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Sample records for left ventricle finite-element

  1. Finite element stress analysis of the human left ventricle whose irregular shape is developed from single plane cineangiocardiogram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghista, D. N.; Hamid, M. S.

    1977-01-01

    The three-dimensional left ventricular chamber geometrical model is developed from single plane cineangiocardiogram. This left ventricular model is loaded by an internal pressure monitored by cardiac catheterization. The resulting stresses in the left ventricular model chamber's wall are determined by computerized finite element procedure. For the discretization of this left ventricular model structure, a 20-node, isoparametric finite element is employed. The analysis and formulation of the computerised procedure is presented in the paper, along with the detailed algorithms and computer programs. The procedure is applied to determine the stresses in a left ventricle at an instant, during systole. Next, a portion (represented by a finite element) of this left ventricular chamber is simulated as being infarcted by making its active-state modulus value equal to its passive-state value; the neighbouring elements are shown to relieve the 'infarcted' element of stress by themselves taking on more stress.

  2. Incorporation of a Left Ventricle Finite Element Model Defining Infarction Into the XCAT Imaging Phantom

    PubMed Central

    Veress, Alexander I.; Segars, W. Paul; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2011-01-01

    The 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom was developed to provide a realistic and flexible model of the human anatomy and cardiac and respiratory motions for use in medical imaging research. A prior limitation to the phantom was that it did not accurately simulate altered functions of the heart that result from cardiac pathologies such as coronary artery disease (CAD). We overcame this limitation in a previous study by combining the phantom with a finite-element (FE) mechanical model of the left ventricle (LV) capable of more realistically simulating regional defects caused by ischemia. In the present work, we extend this model giving it the ability to accurately simulate motion abnormalities caused by myocardial infarction (MI), a far more complex situation in terms of altered mechanics compared with the modeling of acute ischemia. The FE model geometry is based on high resolution CT images of a normal male subject. An anterior region was defined as infarcted and the material properties and fiber distribution were altered, according to the bio-physiological properties of two types of infarction, i.e., fibrous and remodeled infarction (30% thinner wall than fibrous case). Compared with the original, surface-based 4D beating heart model of the XCAT, where regional abnormalities are modeled by simply scaling down the motion in those regions, the FE model was found to provide a more accurate representation of the abnormal motion of the LV due to the effects of fibrous infarction as well as depicting the motion of remodeled infarction. In particular, the FE models allow for the accurate depiction of dyskinetic motion. The average circumferential strain results were found to be consistent with measured dyskinetic experimental results. Combined with the 4D XCAT phantom, the FE model can be used to produce realistic multimodality sets of imaging data from a variety of patients in which the normal or abnormal cardiac function is accurately represented. PMID:21041157

  3. Finite element analysis of left ventricle during cardiac cycles in viscoelasticity.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jing Jin; Xu, Feng Yu; Yang, Wen An

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the effect of myocardial viscoeslasticity on heart function, this paper presents a finite element model based on a hyper-viscoelastic model for the passive myocardium and Hill's three-element model for the active contraction. The hyper-viscoelastic model considers the myocardium microstructure, while the active model is phenomenologically based on the combination of Hill's equation for the steady tetanized contraction and the specific time-length-force property of the myocardial muscle. To validate the finite element model, the end-diastole strains and the end-systole strain predicted by the model are compared with the experimental values in the literature. It is found that the proposed model not only can estimate well the pumping function of the heart, but also predicts the transverse shear strains. The finite element model is also applied to analyze the influence of viscoelasticity on the residual stresses in the myocardium. PMID:27253618

  4. Quasi-static image-based immersed boundary-finite element model of left ventricle under diastolic loading

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hao; Wang, Huiming; Berry, Colin; Luo, Xiaoyu; Griffith, Boyce E

    2014-01-01

    Finite stress and strain analyses of the heart provide insight into the biomechanics of myocardial function and dysfunction. Herein, we describe progress toward dynamic patient-specific models of the left ventricle using an immersed boundary (IB) method with a finite element (FE) structural mechanics model. We use a structure-based hyperelastic strain-energy function to describe the passive mechanics of the ventricular myocardium, a realistic anatomical geometry reconstructed from clinical magnetic resonance images of a healthy human heart, and a rule-based fiber architecture. Numerical predictions of this IB/FE model are compared with results obtained by a commercial FE solver. We demonstrate that the IB/FE model yields results that are in good agreement with those of the conventional FE model under diastolic loading conditions, and the predictions of the LV model using either numerical method are shown to be consistent with previous computational and experimental data. These results are among the first to analyze the stress and strain predictions of IB models of ventricular mechanics, and they serve both to verify the IB/FE simulation framework and to validate the IB/FE model. Moreover, this work represents an important step toward using such models for fully dynamic fluid–structure interaction simulations of the heart. © 2014 The Authors. International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24799090

  5. Normal and Pathological NCAT Image and PhantomData Based onPhysiologically Realistic Left Ventricle Finite-Element Models

    SciTech Connect

    Veress, Alexander I.; Segars, W. Paul; Weiss, Jeffrey A.; Tsui,Benjamin M.W.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2006-08-02

    The 4D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) phantom, whichprovides a realistic model of the normal human anatomy and cardiac andrespiratory motions, is used in medical imaging research to evaluate andimprove imaging devices and techniques, especially dynamic cardiacapplications. One limitation of the phantom is that it lacks the abilityto accurately simulate altered functions of the heart that result fromcardiac pathologies such as coronary artery disease (CAD). The goal ofthis work was to enhance the 4D NCAT phantom by incorporating aphysiologically based, finite-element (FE) mechanical model of the leftventricle (LV) to simulate both normal and abnormal cardiac motions. Thegeometry of the FE mechanical model was based on gated high-resolutionx-ray multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) data of a healthy malesubject. The myocardial wall was represented as transversely isotropichyperelastic material, with the fiber angle varying from -90 degrees atthe epicardial surface, through 0 degreesat the mid-wall, to 90 degreesat the endocardial surface. A time varying elastance model was used tosimulate fiber contraction, and physiological intraventricular systolicpressure-time curves were applied to simulate the cardiac motion over theentire cardiac cycle. To demonstrate the ability of the FE mechanicalmodel to accurately simulate the normal cardiac motion as well abnormalmotions indicative of CAD, a normal case and two pathologic cases weresimulated and analyzed. In the first pathologic model, a subendocardialanterior ischemic region was defined. A second model was created with atransmural ischemic region defined in the same location. The FE baseddeformations were incorporated into the 4D NCAT cardiac model through thecontrol points that define the cardiac structures in the phantom whichwere set to move according to the predictions of the mechanical model. Asimulation study was performed using the FE-NCAT combination toinvestigate how the differences in contractile function

  6. Dynamic finite-strain modelling of the human left ventricle in health and disease using an immersed boundary-finite element method

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hao; Carrick, David; Berry, Colin; Griffith, Boyce E.; Luo, Xiaoyu

    2016-01-01

    Detailed models of the biomechanics of the heart are important both for developing improved interventions for patients with heart disease and also for patient risk stratification and treatment planning. For instance, stress distributions in the heart affect cardiac remodelling, but such distributions are not presently accessible in patients. Biomechanical models of the heart offer detailed three-dimensional deformation, stress and strain fields that can supplement conventional clinical data. In this work, we introduce dynamic computational models of the human left ventricle (LV) that are derived from clinical imaging data obtained from a healthy subject and from a patient with a myocardial infarction (MI). Both models incorporate a detailed invariant-based orthotropic description of the passive elasticity of the ventricular myocardium along with a detailed biophysical model of active tension generation in the ventricular muscle. These constitutive models are employed within a dynamic simulation framework that accounts for the inertia of the ventricular muscle and the blood that is based on an immersed boundary (IB) method with a finite element description of the structural mechanics. The geometry of the models is based on data obtained non-invasively by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). CMR imaging data are also used to estimate the parameters of the passive and active constitutive models, which are determined so that the simulated end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes agree with the corresponding volumes determined from the CMR imaging studies. Using these models, we simulate LV dynamics from enddiastole to end-systole. The results of our simulations are shown to be in good agreement with subject-specific CMR-derived strain measurements and also with earlier clinical studies on human LV strain distributions. PMID:27041786

  7. The direct incorporation of perfusion defect information to define ischemia and infarction in a finite element model of the left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Veress, Alexander I; Fung, George S K; Lee, Taek-Soo; Tsui, Benjamin M W; Kicska, Gregory A; Paul Segars, W; Gullberg, Grant T

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes the process in which complex lesion geometries (specified by computer generated perfusion defects) are incorporated in the description of nonlinear finite element (FE) mechanical models used for specifying the motion of the left ventricle (LV) in the 4D extended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom to simulate gated cardiac image data. An image interrogation process was developed to define the elements in the LV mesh as ischemic or infarcted based upon the values of sampled intensity levels of the perfusion maps. The intensity values were determined for each of the interior integration points of every element of the FE mesh. The average element intensity levels were then determined. The elements with average intensity values below a user-controlled threshold were defined as ischemic or infarcted depending upon the model being defined. For the infarction model cases, the thresholding and interrogation process were repeated in order to define a border zone (BZ) surrounding the infarction. This methodology was evaluated using perfusion maps created by the perfusion cardiac-torso (PCAT) phantom an extension of the 4D XCAT phantom. The PCAT was used to create 3D perfusion maps representing 90% occlusions at four locations (left anterior descending (LAD) segments 6 and 9, left circumflex (LCX) segment 11, right coronary artery (RCA) segment 1) in the coronary tree. The volumes and shapes of the defects defined in the FE mechanical models were compared with perfusion maps produced by the PCAT. The models were incorporated into the XCAT phantom. The ischemia models had reduced stroke volume (SV) by 18-59 ml. and ejection fraction (EF) values by 14-50% points compared to the normal models. The infarction models, had less reductions in SV and EF, 17-54 ml. and 14-45% points, respectively. The volumes of the ischemic/infarcted regions of the models were nearly identical to those volumes obtained from the perfusion images and were highly correlated (R

  8. A finite element study relating to the rapid filling phase of the human ventricles.

    PubMed

    Bettendorff-Bakman, D-E; Schmid, P; Lunkenheimer, P P; Niederer, P

    2006-01-21

    During the rapid diastolic filling phase at rest, the ventricles of the human heart double approximately in volume. In order to investigate whether the ventricular filling pressures measured under physiological conditions can give rise to such an extensive augmentation in ventricular volumes, a finite element model of the human right and left ventricles has been developed, taking into account the nonlinear mechanical behavior and effective compressibility of the myocardial tissue. The results were compared with the filling phase of the human left ventricle as extrapolated from measurements documented in the literature. We arrived at the conclusion that the ventricular pressures measured during the rapid filling phase cannot be the sole cause of the rise of the observed ventricular volumes. We rather advocate the assumption that further dilating mechanisms might be part of ventricular activity thus heralding a multiple function of the ventricular muscle body. A further result indicates that under normal conditions the influence of the viscoelasticity of the tissue should not be disregarded in ventricular mechanics.

  9. Left ventricular finite element model bounded by a systemic circulation model.

    PubMed

    Veress, A I; Raymond, G M; Gullberg, G T; Bassingthwaighte, J B

    2013-05-01

    A series of models were developed in which a circulatory system model was coupled to an existing series of finite element (FE) models of the left ventricle (LV). The circulatory models were used to provide realistic boundary conditions for the LV models. This was developed for the JSim analysis package and was composed of a systemic arterial, capillary, and venous system in a closed loop with a varying elastance LV and left atria to provide the driving pressures and flows matching those of the FE model. Three coupled models were developed, a normal LV under normotensive aortic loading (116/80 mm Hg), a mild hypertension (137/89 mm Hg) model, and a moderate hypertension model (165/100 mm Hg). The initial step in the modeling analysis was that the circulation was optimized to the end-diastolic pressure and volume values of the LV model. The cardiac FE models were then optimized to the systolic pressure/volume characteristics of the steady-state JSim circulatory model solution. Comparison of the stress predictions for the three models indicated that the mild hypertensive case produced a 21% increase in the average fiber stress levels, and the moderate hypertension case had a 36% increase in average stress. The circulatory work increased by 18% and 43% over that of the control for the mild and moderate hypertensive cases, respectively.

  10. Time Components of the Left Ventricle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franks, B. Don

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of the time components of the left ventricle. Since one of the ways to investigate cardiac function is to analyze the time intervals between particular events of the cardiac cycle, various time intervals of systole and diastole of the left ventricle were measured from simultaneous…

  11. Finite element modeling of the left atrium to facilitate the design of an endoscopic atrial retractor.

    PubMed

    Jernigan, S R; Buckner, G D; Eischen, J W; Cormier, D R

    2007-12-01

    With the worldwide prevalence of cardiovascular diseases, much attention has been focused on simulating the characteristics of the human heart to better understand and treat cardiac disorders. The purpose of this study is to build a finite element model of the left atrium (LA) that incorporates detailed anatomical features and realistic material characteristics to investigate the interaction of heart tissue and surgical instruments. This model is used to facilitate the design of an endoscopically deployable atrial retractor for use in minimally invasive, robotically assisted mitral valve repair. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of a pressurized explanted porcine heart were taken to provide a 3D solid model of the heart geometry, while uniaxial tensile tests of porcine left atrial tissue were conducted to obtain realistic material properties for noncontractile cardiac tissue. A finite element model of the LA was constructed using ANSYS Release 9.0 software and the MRI data. The Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic material model was chosen to characterize the passive left atrial tissue; material constants were derived from tensile test data. Finite element analysis (FEA) models of a CardioVations Port Access retractor and a prototype endoscopic retractor were constructed to simulate interaction between each instrument and the LA. These contact simulations were used to compare the quality of retraction between the two instruments and to optimize the design of the prototype retractor. Model accuracy was verified by comparing simulated cardiac wall deflections to those measured by MRI. FEA simulations revealed that peak forces of approximately 2.85 N and 2.46 N were required to retract the LA using the Port Access and prototype retractors, respectively. These forces varied nonlinearly with retractor blade displacement. Dilation of the atrial walls and rigid body motion of the chamber were approximately the same for both retractors. Finite element analysis is shown to be an

  12. Regional left ventricular myocardial contractility and stress in a finite element model of posterobasal myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Wenk, Jonathan F; Sun, Kay; Zhang, Zhihong; Soleimani, Mehrdad; Ge, Liang; Saloner, David; Wallace, Arthur W; Ratcliffe, Mark B; Guccione, Julius M

    2011-04-01

    Recently, a noninvasive method for determining regional myocardial contractility, using an animal-specific finite element (FE) model-based optimization, was developed to study a sheep with anteroapical infarction (Sun et al., 2009, "A Computationally Efficient Formal Optimization of Regional Myocardial Contractility in a Sheep With Left Ventricular Aneurysm," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 131(11), p. 111001). Using the methodology developed in the previous study (Sun et al., 2009, "A Computationally Efficient Formal Optimization of Regional Myocardial Contractility in a Sheep With Left Ventricular Aneurysm," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 131(11), p. 111001), which incorporates tagged magnetic resonance images, three-dimensional myocardial strains, left ventricular (LV) volumes, and LV cardiac catheterization pressures, the regional myocardial contractility and stress distribution of a sheep with posterobasal infarction were investigated. Active material parameters in the noninfarcted border zone (BZ) myocardium adjacent to the infarct (T(max_B)), in the myocardium remote from the infarct (T(max_R)), and in the infarct (T(max_I)) were estimated by minimizing the errors between FE model-predicted and experimentally measured systolic strains and LV volumes using the previously developed optimization scheme. The optimized T(max_B) was found to be significantly depressed relative to T(max_R), while T(max_I) was found to be zero. The myofiber stress in the BZ was found to be elevated, relative to the remote region. This could cause further damage to the contracting myocytes, leading to heart failure.

  13. Finite element analysis of stresses developed in the blood sac of a left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Haut Donahue, T L; Dehlin, W; Gillespie, J; Weiss, W J; Rosenberg, G

    2009-05-01

    The goal of this research is to develop a 3D finite element (FE) model of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) to predict stresses in the blood sac. The hyperelastic stress-strain curves for the segmented poly(ether polyurethane urea) (SPEUU) blood sac were determined in both tension and compression using a servo-hydraulic testing system at various strain rates. Over the range of strain rates studied, the sac was not strain rate sensitive, however the material response was different for tension versus compression. The experimental tension and compression properties were used in a FE model that consisted of the pusher plate, blood sac and pump case. A quasi-static analysis was used to allow for nonlinearities due to contact and material deformation. The 3D FE model showed that blood sac stresses are not adversely affected by the location of the inlet and outlet ports of the device and that over the systolic ejection phase of the simulation the prediction of blood sac stresses from the full 3D model and an axisymmetric model are the same. Minimizing stresses in the blood sac will increase the longevity of the blood sac in vivo. PMID:19131267

  14. Comparative response of right and left ventricles to volume overload.

    PubMed

    Mathew, R; Thilenius, O G; Arcilla, R A

    1976-08-01

    The cardiac volume data of 49 normal children were compared with those of 23 with secundum atrial septal defect and 24 with patent ductus arteriosus. Significantly smaller ventricular end-diastolic volumes were observed in the normal infants than in older children (right ventricle 53.9 versus 75.5 cm3/m2; left ventricle 46.7 versus 63.6 cm3/m2). "Distensibility" of the right ventricle (DRV), left ventricle (DLV) and left atrium increased normally with age. DRV and DLV were similar shortly after birth; thereafter, DRV increased more rapidly than DLV (mean DRV 12.7; mean DLV 7.8 cm3/m2 per mm Hg, P less than 0.001). In both atrial septal defect and patent ductus arteriosus, the ipsilateral (involved) ventricles had increased volume, increased output, normal ejection fraction and increased distensibility. The contralateral (left) ventricle in atrial septal defect was smaller than normal (39.6 versus 49.7 cm3, P less than 0.001), and had a smaller ejection fraction (0.63 versus 0.71, P less than 0.01) and output (3.70 versus 4.57 liters/min per m2, P less than 0.005). In contrast, the contralateral (right) ventricle in patent ductus arteriosus remained normal. Left atrial maximal volume was larger than normal in atrial septal defect (46.6 versus 35.9 cm3/m2, P less than 0.001). The left atrial and left ventricular volumes in patent ductus arteriosus were, respectively, 152 and 142 percent of normal, indicating comparable response to the volume load. The left head changes in atrial septal defect may be related both to a functionally restrictive defect and to the difference in distensibility of the ventricles.

  15. The hypertrabeculated (noncompacted) left ventricle is different from the ventricle of embryos and ectothermic vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Bjarke; Agger, Peter; de Boer, Bouke A; Oostra, Roelof-Jan; Pedersen, Michael; van der Wal, Allard C; Nils Planken, R; Moorman, Antoon F M

    2016-07-01

    Ventricular hypertrabeculation (noncompaction) is a poorly characterized condition associated with heart failure. The condition is widely assumed to be the retention of the trabeculated ventricular design of the embryo and ectothermic (cold-blooded) vertebrates. This assumption appears simplistic and counterfactual. Here, we measured a set of anatomical parameters in hypertrabeculation in man and in the ventricles of embryos and animals. We compared humans with left ventricular hypertrabeculation (N=21) with humans with structurally normal left ventricles (N=54). We measured ejection fraction and ventricular trabeculation using cardiovascular MRI. Ventricular trabeculation was further measured in series of embryonic human and 9 animal species, and in hearts of 15 adult animal species using MRI, CT, or histology. In human, hypertrabeculated left ventricles were significantly different from structurally normal left ventricles by all structural measures and ejection fraction. They were far less trabeculated than human embryonic hearts (15-40% trabeculated volume versus 55-80%). Early in development all vertebrate embryos acquired a ventricle with approximately 80% trabeculations, but only ectotherms retained the 80% trabeculation throughout development. Endothermic (warm-blooded) animals including human slowly matured in fetal and postnatal stages towards ventricles with little trabeculations, generally less than 30%. Further, the trabeculations of all embryos and adult ectotherms were very thin, less than 50 μm wide, whereas the trabeculations in adult endotherms and in the setting of hypertrabeculation were wider by orders of magnitude. It is concluded in contrast to a prevailing assumption, the hypertrabeculated left ventricle is not like the ventricle of the embryo or of adult ectotherms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes

  16. The hypertrabeculated (noncompacted) left ventricle is different from the ventricle of embryos and ectothermic vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Bjarke; Agger, Peter; de Boer, Bouke A; Oostra, Roelof-Jan; Pedersen, Michael; van der Wal, Allard C; Nils Planken, R; Moorman, Antoon F M

    2016-07-01

    Ventricular hypertrabeculation (noncompaction) is a poorly characterized condition associated with heart failure. The condition is widely assumed to be the retention of the trabeculated ventricular design of the embryo and ectothermic (cold-blooded) vertebrates. This assumption appears simplistic and counterfactual. Here, we measured a set of anatomical parameters in hypertrabeculation in man and in the ventricles of embryos and animals. We compared humans with left ventricular hypertrabeculation (N=21) with humans with structurally normal left ventricles (N=54). We measured ejection fraction and ventricular trabeculation using cardiovascular MRI. Ventricular trabeculation was further measured in series of embryonic human and 9 animal species, and in hearts of 15 adult animal species using MRI, CT, or histology. In human, hypertrabeculated left ventricles were significantly different from structurally normal left ventricles by all structural measures and ejection fraction. They were far less trabeculated than human embryonic hearts (15-40% trabeculated volume versus 55-80%). Early in development all vertebrate embryos acquired a ventricle with approximately 80% trabeculations, but only ectotherms retained the 80% trabeculation throughout development. Endothermic (warm-blooded) animals including human slowly matured in fetal and postnatal stages towards ventricles with little trabeculations, generally less than 30%. Further, the trabeculations of all embryos and adult ectotherms were very thin, less than 50 μm wide, whereas the trabeculations in adult endotherms and in the setting of hypertrabeculation were wider by orders of magnitude. It is concluded in contrast to a prevailing assumption, the hypertrabeculated left ventricle is not like the ventricle of the embryo or of adult ectotherms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes

  17. Abnormal myocardial strain rate in noncompaction of the left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Williams, R Ian; Masani, Navroz D; Buchalter, Maurice B; Fraser, Alan G

    2003-03-01

    A 28-year-old woman presented in the second trimester of pregnancy with palpitations and left heart failure. Transthoracic echocardiography showed features consistent with isolated noncompaction of the left ventricle. Doppler tissue echocardiography with strain-rate imaging revealed unique appearances of paradoxical alternating bands of compression and expansion throughout systole and diastole. These features may be pathognomonic for this disease.

  18. An Inverse Finite Element Method for Determining the Tissue Compressibility of Human Left Ventricular Wall during the Cardiac Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Hassaballah, Abdallah I.; Hassan, Mohsen A.; Mardi, Azizi N.; Hamdi, Mohd

    2013-01-01

    The determination of the myocardium’s tissue properties is important in constructing functional finite element (FE) models of the human heart. To obtain accurate properties especially for functional modeling of a heart, tissue properties have to be determined in vivo. At present, there are only few in vivo methods that can be applied to characterize the internal myocardium tissue mechanics. This work introduced and evaluated an FE inverse method to determine the myocardial tissue compressibility. Specifically, it combined an inverse FE method with the experimentally-measured left ventricular (LV) internal cavity pressure and volume versus time curves. Results indicated that the FE inverse method showed good correlation between LV repolarization and the variations in the myocardium tissue bulk modulus K (K = 1/compressibility), as well as provided an ability to describe in vivo human myocardium material behavior. The myocardium bulk modulus can be effectively used as a diagnostic tool of the heart ejection fraction. The model developed is proved to be robust and efficient. It offers a new perspective and means to the study of living-myocardium tissue properties, as it shows the variation of the bulk modulus throughout the cardiac cycle. PMID:24367544

  19. [Endomyocardial fibrosis with massive calcification of the left ventricle].

    PubMed

    Trigo, Joana; Camacho, Ana; Gago, Paula; Candeias, Rui; Santos, Walter; Marques, Nuno; Matos, Pedro; Brandão, Victor; Gomes, Veloso

    2010-03-01

    Endomyocardial fibrosis is a rare disease, endemic in tropical countries. It is characterized by fibrosis of the endocardium that can extend to myocardium. Important calcification of the endocardium is rare with only a few cases reported in the literature. We report a case of endomyocardial fibrosis in a european caucasian patient, associated with massive calcification of left ventricle.

  20. Patient-specific simulation of a trileaflet aortic heart valve in a realistic left ventricle and aorta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmanov, Anvar; Le, Trung; Stolarski, Henryk; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2013-11-01

    We develop a patient-specific model of the left ventricle consisting of: (1) magnetic-resonance images (MRI) data for wall geometry and kinematics reconstruction of the left ventricle during one cardiac cycle and (2) an elastic trileaflet aortic heart valve implanted in (3) a realistic aorta interacting with blood flow driven by the pulsating left ventricle. Blood flow is simulated via a new fluid-structure interaction (FSI) method, which couples the sharp-interface CURVIB [L. Ge, F. Sotiropoulos, JCP, (2007)] for handling complex moving boundaries with a new, rotation-free finite-element (FE) formulation for simulating large tissue deformations [H. Stolarski, A. Gilmanov, F. Sotiropoulos, IJNME, (2013)] The new FE shell formulation has been extensively tested and validated for a range of relevant problems showing good agreements. Validation of the coupled FSI-FE-CURVIB model is carried out for a thin plate undergoing flow-induced vibrations in the wake of a square cylinder and the computed results are in good agreement with published data. The new approach has been applied to simulate dynamic interaction of a trileaflet aortic heart valve with pulsating blood flow at physiological conditions and realistic artery and left ventricle geometry.

  1. An Ultrasound-Driven Kinematic Model for Deformation of the Infarcted Mouse Left Ventricle Incorporating A Near-Incompressibility Constraint

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Dan; French, Brent A.; Xu, Yaqin; Hossack, John A.; Holmes, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical models of varying complexity have proved useful in fitting and interpreting regional cardiac displacements obtained from imaging methods such as ultrasound speckle tracking or MRI tagging. Simpler models, such as the classic thick-walled cylinder model of the left ventricle (LV), solve quickly and are easy to implement, but they ignore regional geometric variations and are difficult to adapt to the study of regional pathologies such as myocardial infarction. Complex, anatomically accurate finite-element models work well but are computationally intensive and require specialized expertise to implement. We developed a kinematic model that offers a compromise between these two traditional approaches, assuming only that displacements in the left ventricle are polynomial functions of initial position and that the myocardium is nearly incompressible, while allowing myocardial motion to vary spatially as would be expected in an ischemic or dyssynchronous left ventricle. Model parameters were determined using an objective function with adjustable weights to account for confidence in individual displacement components and desired strength of the incompressibility constraint. The model accurately represented the motion of both normal and infarcted mouse left ventricles during the cardiac cycle, with normalized root mean square errors in predicted deformed positions of 8.2 ± 2.3% and 7.4 ± 2.1% for normal and infarcted hearts, respectively. PMID:25542490

  2. Is the human left ventricle partially a fractal pump?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Brandon; Dasi, Lakshmi

    2011-11-01

    Ventricular systolic and diastolic dysfunctions represent a large portion of healthcare problems in the United States. Many of these problems are caused and/or characterized by their altered fluid-structure mechanics. The structure of the left ventricle in particular is complex with time dependent multi-scale geometric complexity. At relatively small scales, one facet that is still not well understood is the role of trabeculae in the pumping function of the left ventricle. We utilize fractal geometry tools to help characterize the complexity of the inner surface of the left ventricle at different times during the cardiac cycle. A high-resolution three dimensional model of the time dependent ventricular geometry was constructed from computed tomography (CT) images in a human. The scale dependent fractal dimension of the ventricle was determined using the box-counting algorithm over the cardiac cycle. It is shown that the trabeculae may indeed play an integral role in the biomechanics of pumping by regulating the mechanical leverage available to the cardiac muscle fibers.

  3. A strategic approach for cardiac MR left ventricle segmentation.

    PubMed

    Dakua, Sarada Prasad; Sahambi, J S

    2010-09-01

    Quantitative evaluation of cardiac function from cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) images requires the identification of the myocardial walls. This generally requires the clinician to view the image and interactively trace the contours. Especially, detection of myocardial walls of left ventricle is a difficult task in CMR images that are obtained from subjects having serious diseases. An approach to automated outlining the left ventricular contour is proposed. In order to segment the left ventricle, in this paper, a combination of two approaches is suggested. Difference of Gaussian weighting function (DoG) is newly introduced in random walk approach for blood pool (inner contour) extraction. The myocardial wall (outer contour) is segmented out by a modified active contour method that takes blood pool boundary as the initial contour. Promising experimental results in CMR images demonstrate the potentials of our approach.

  4. Chest tube injury to left ventricle: complication or negligence?

    PubMed

    Haron, Hairufaizi; Rashid, Norfaezan Abdul; Dimon, Mohd Zamrin; Azmi, Muhd Helmi; Sumin, Joanna Ooi; Zabir, Azmil Farid; Abdul Rahman, Mohd Ramzisham

    2010-07-01

    An injury to the left ventricle after a chest tube insertion is a rare but lethal phenomenon that is likely to occur if precautions are not seriously addressed. We present a 15-year-old girl who was diagnosed a left empyema thoracis. An attempt to place a chest drain in this young girl was almost fatal. A left ventricular repair together with thoracotomy and decortication were successful. This case emphasizes the rarity of this lethal complication and the importance of the correct technique for chest tube insertion.

  5. Concealed Left Ventricle to Right Atrium Fistula Complicating Infective Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Onzuka, Tatsushi; Morishige, Shoji; Yamashita, Yoshiyuki; Ueno, Yasutaka

    2016-09-01

    We report a case of aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis presenting with subaortic stenosis without perivalvular leakage and vegetations in the left ventricular outflow and right atrium, the latter being attached to the atrioventricular septum. Intraoperatively, an abscess that had formed on the aortic annulus and perforated to the right atrium was unexpectedly found, the fistula being occluded by vegetations. Even when no left-to-right shunts are detected by imaging, vegetations adjacent to the atrioventricular septum may conceal a left ventricle-right atrium fistula, resulting in prosthetic valve endocarditis presenting clinically as subaortic stenosis without perivalvular leakage. PMID:27549556

  6. Application of NASTRAN for stress analysis of left ventricle of the heart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, Y. C.; Ritman, E. L.; Wang, H. C.

    1975-01-01

    Knowing the stress and strain distributions in the left ventricular wall of the heart is a prerequisite for the determination of the muscle elasticity and contractility in the process of assessing the functional status of the heart. NASTRAN was applied for the calculation of these stresses and strains and to help in verifying the results obtained by the computer program FEAMPS which was specifically designed for the plane-strain finite-element analysis of the left ventricular cross sections. Adopted for the analysis are the true shape and dimensions of the cross sections reconstructed from multiplanar X-ray views of a left ventricle which was surgically isolated from a dog's heart but metabolically supported to sustain its beating. A preprocessor was prepared to accommodate both FEAMPS and NASTRAN, and it has also facilitated the application of both the triangular element and isoparameteric quadrilateral element versions of NASTRAN. The stresses in several crucial regions of the left ventricular wall calculated by these two independently developed computer programs are found to be in good agreement. Such confirmation of the results is essential in the development of a method which assesses the heart performance.

  7. Vortex formation and instability in the left ventricle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Trung Bao; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Coffey, Dane; Keefe, Daniel

    2012-09-01

    We study the formation of the mitral vortex ring during early diastolic filling in a patient-specific left ventricle (LV) using direct numerical simulation. The geometry of the left ventricle is reconstructed from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data of a healthy human subject. The left ventricular kinematics is modeled via a cell-based activation methodology, which is inspired by cardiac electro-physiology and yields physiologic LV wall motion. In the fluid dynamics videos, we describe in detail the three-dimensional structure of the mitral vortex ring, which is formed during early diastolic filling. The ring starts to deform as it propagates toward the apex of the heart and becomes inclined. The trailing secondary vortex tubes are formed as the result of interaction between the vortex ring and the LV wall. These vortex tubes wrap around the circumference and begin to interact with and destabilize the mitral vortex ring. At the end of diastole, the vortex ring impinges on the LV wall and the large-scale intraventricular flow rotates in clockwise direction. We show for the first time that the mitral vortex ring evolution is dominated by a number of vortex-vortex and vortex-wall interactions, including lateral straining and deformation of vortex ring, the interaction of two vortex tubes with unequal strengths, helicity polarization of vortex tubes and twisting instabilities of the vortex cores.

  8. Endovascular Treatment of Two Pseudoaneurysms Originating From the Left Ventricle

    SciTech Connect

    Cwikiel, Wojciech Keussen, Inger; Gustafsson, Ronny; Mokhtari, Arash

    2013-12-15

    A 67-year-old woman resented with an acute type A aortic dissection, which was treated surgically with aortic valve replacement as a composite graft with reimplantation of the coronary arteries. At the end of surgery, a left-ventricular venting catheter was placed through the apex and closed with a buffered suture. Consecutive computed tomography (CT) examinations verified a growing apex pseudoaneurysm. Communication between the ventricle and the pseudoaneurysm was successfully closed with an Amplatz septal plug by the transfemoral route. Follow-up CT showed an additional pseudoaneurysm, which also was successfully closed using the same method.

  9. Left Ventricle Volume Measurements in Cardiac Micro-CT

    PubMed Central

    Badea, Cristian T.; Wetzel, Arthur W.; Mistry, Nilesh; Pomerantz, Stuart; Nave, Demian; Johnson, G. Allan

    2008-01-01

    Micro-CT based cardiac function estimation in small animals requires measurement of left ventricle (LV) volume at multiple time points during the cardiac cycle. Measurement accuracy depends on the image resolution, its signal and noise properties, and the analysis procedure. This work compares the accuracy of the Otsu thresholding and a region sampled binary mixture approach, for live mouse LV volume measurement using 100 micron resolution datasets. We evaluate both analysis methods after varying the volume of injected contrast agent and the number of projections used for CT reconstruction with a goal of permitting reduced levels of both x-ray and contrast agent doses. PMID:18243656

  10. Measurement of Strain in the Left Ventricle during Diastole withcine-MRI and Deformable Image Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Veress, Alexander I.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2005-07-20

    The assessment of regional heart wall motion (local strain) can localize ischemic myocardial disease, evaluate myocardial viability and identify impaired cardiac function due to hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathies. The objectives of this research were to develop and validate a technique known as Hyperelastic Warping for the measurement of local strains in the left ventricle from clinical cine-MRI image datasets. The technique uses differences in image intensities between template (reference) and target (loaded) image datasets to generate a body force that deforms a finite element (FE) representation of the template so that it registers with the target image. To validate the technique, MRI image datasets representing two deformation states of a left ventricle were created such that the deformation map between the states represented in the images was known. A beginning diastoliccine-MRI image dataset from a normal human subject was defined as the template. A second image dataset (target) was created by mapping the template image using the deformation results obtained from a forward FE model of diastolic filling. Fiber stretch and strain predictions from Hyperelastic Warping showed good agreement with those of the forward solution. The technique had low sensitivity to changes in material parameters, with the exception of changes in bulk modulus of the material. The use of an isotropic hyperelastic constitutive model in the Warping analyses degraded the predictions of fiber stretch. Results were unaffected by simulated noise down to an SNR of 4.0. This study demonstrates that Warping in conjunction with cine-MRI imaging can be used to determine local ventricular strains during diastole.

  11. Infarcted Left Ventricles Have Stiffer Material Properties and Lower Stiffness Variation: Three-Dimensional Echo-Based Modeling to Quantify In Vivo Ventricle Material Properties.

    PubMed

    Fan, Longling; Yao, Jing; Yang, Chun; Tang, Dalin; Xu, Di

    2015-08-01

    Methods to quantify ventricle material properties noninvasively using in vivo data are of great important in clinical applications. An ultrasound echo-based computational modeling approach was proposed to quantify left ventricle (LV) material properties, curvature, and stress/strain conditions and find differences between normal LV and LV with infarct. Echo image data were acquired from five patients with myocardial infarction (I-Group) and five healthy volunteers as control (H-Group). Finite element models were constructed to obtain ventricle stress and strain conditions. Material stiffening and softening were used to model ventricle active contraction and relaxation. Systolic and diastolic material parameter values were obtained by adjusting the models to match echo volume data. Young's modulus (YM) value was obtained for each material stress-strain curve for easy comparison. LV wall thickness, circumferential and longitudinal curvatures (C- and L-curvature), material parameter values, and stress/strain values were recorded for analysis. Using the mean value of H-Group as the base value, at end-diastole, I-Group mean YM value for the fiber direction stress-strain curve was 54% stiffer than that of H-Group (136.24 kPa versus 88.68 kPa). At end-systole, the mean YM values from the two groups were similar (175.84 kPa versus 200.2 kPa). More interestingly, H-Group end-systole mean YM was 126% higher that its end-diastole value, while I-Group end-systole mean YM was only 29% higher that its end-diastole value. This indicated that H-Group had much greater systole-diastole material stiffness variations. At beginning-of-ejection (BE), LV ejection fraction (LVEF) showed positive correlation with C-curvature, stress, and strain, and negative correlation with LV volume, respectively. At beginning-of-filling (BF), LVEF showed positive correlation with C-curvature and strain, but negative correlation with stress and LV volume, respectively. Using averaged values of two groups

  12. Transmural distribution of myocardial infarction: difference between the right and left ventricles in a canine model

    SciTech Connect

    Ohzono, K.; Koyanagi, S.; Urabe, Y.; Harasawa, Y.; Tomoike, H.; Nakamura, M.

    1986-07-01

    The evolution of myocardial infarction 24 hours after ligating both the right coronary artery and the obtuse marginal branch of the left circumflex coronary artery was examined in 33 anesthetized dogs. Postmortem coronary angiography and a tracer microsphere technique were used to determine risk areas and their collateral blood flows, respectively. The mean weight of the risk areas was 11.3 +/- 0.5 g (mean +/- SEM) in the right ventricle and 10.5 +/- 0.9 g in the left ventricle (NS). The weight of infarcted tissue was 5.7 +/- 0.7 g in the right ventricle and 5.2 +/- 0.9 g in the left ventricle (NS). In both ventricles, infarct weight was linearly related to risk area size, and the percent of risk area necrosis was inversely correlated with the extent of collateral flow at 24 hours of coronary ligation, defined as the mean myocardial blood flow inside the central risk area. Ratios of infarct to risk area between the subendocardial and subepicardial layers were 0.76 +/- 0.06 and 0.28 +/- 0.05 in the right and left ventricles, respectively (p less than 0.01, between ventricles, n = 31), which coincided well with subendocardial-to-subepicardial-flow ratios at 24 hours, ie, 0.86 +/- 0.04 in the right ventricle and 0.32 +/- 0.06 in the left ventricle (p less than 0.01). The regional distribution of myocardial infarction correlated well with flow distribution inside the risk area; the slope of these relations was similar between the subendocardium and subepicardium in the right ventricle, whereas in the left ventricle it was larger in the subendocardium than in the subepicardium. Thus, in the dog, the inherent change in the regional distribution of coronary collateral blood flow is an important modifier in the evolution of myocardial infarction, especially in the left ventricle.

  13. Characterising adequacy or inadequacy of the borderline left ventricle: what tools can we use?

    PubMed

    Kaplinski, Michelle; Cohen, Meryl S

    2015-12-01

    Borderline left ventricle refers to a spectrum of left ventricular underdevelopment, typically associated with other cardiac anomalies. The left ventricle may be mildly hypoplastic, as is sometimes seen accompanying aortic coarctation, or it can be severely hypoplastic, as is seen in hypoplastic left heart syndrome. For patients with a borderline left ventricle that is at either extreme, the treatment decision is relatively straightforward. Those with the most severe form of left ventricle hypoplasia will require single ventricle palliation or cardiac transplantation, whereas those with the mildest form may not need any intervention. It is the management strategy of children that fall within the grey zone of the spectrum, which continues to be controversial and remains variable within and among different institutions. Cardiac diseases with associated left ventricle hypoplasia include critical aortic stenosis, mitral stenosis, coarctation of the aorta, arch hypoplasia, cor triatriatum, unbalanced common atrioventricular canal, Shone's complex, total anomalous pulmonary venous return, and complex conotruncal abnormalities. In this review, we will discuss the assessment and management of infants with borderline left ventricle with critical aortic stenosis or arch obstruction and associated mitral anomalies.

  14. Measurements, modeling, control and simulation - as applied to the human left ventricle for purposeful physiological monitoring.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghista, D. N.; Rasmussen, D. N.; Linebarger, R. N.; Sandler, H.

    1971-01-01

    Interdisciplinary engineering research effort in studying the intact human left ventricle has been employed to physiologically monitor the heart and to obtain its 'state-of-health' characteristics. The left ventricle was selected for this purpose because it plays a key role in supplying energy to the body cells. The techniques for measurement of the left ventricular geometry are described; the geometry is effectively displayed to bring out the abnormalities in cardiac function. Methods of mathematical modeling, which make it possible to determine the performance of the intact left ventricular muscle, are also described. Finally, features of a control system for the left ventricle for predicting the effect of certain physiological stress situations on the ventricle performance are discussed.

  15. Quantification of Protein Expression Changes in the Aging Left Ventricle of Rattus norvegicus

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Jennifer E.; Bradshaw, Amy D.; Schwacke, John H.; Baicu, Catalin F.; Zile, Michael R.; Schey, Kevin L.

    2009-01-01

    As the heart ages, electrophysiological and biochemical changes can occur, and the ventricle in many cases loses distensibility, impairing diastolic function. How the proteomic signature of the aged ventricle is unique in comparison to young hearts is still under active investigation. We have undertaken a quantitative proteomics study of aging left ventricles (LVs) utilizing the isobaric Tagging for Relative and Absolute Quantification (iTRAQ) methodology. Differential protein expression was observed for 117 proteins including proteins involved in cell signaling, the immune response, structural proteins, and proteins mediating responses to oxidative stress. For many of these proteins, this is the first report of an association with the aged myocardium. Additionally, two proteins of unknown function were identified. This work serves as the basis for making future comparisons of the aged left ventricle proteome to that of left ventricles obtained from other models of disease and heart failure. PMID:19603826

  16. Patient-specific finite element modeling of the Cardiokinetix Parachute(®) device: effects on left ventricular wall stress and function.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lik Chuan; Ge, Liang; Zhang, Zhihong; Pease, Matthew; Nikolic, Serjan D; Mishra, Rakesh; Ratcliffe, Mark B; Guccione, Julius M

    2014-06-01

    The Parachute(®) (Cardiokinetix, Inc., Menlo Park, California) is a catheter-based device intended to reverse left ventricular (LV) remodeling after antero-apical myocardial infarction. When deployed, the device partitions the LV into upper and lower chambers. To simulate its mechanical effects, we created a finite element LV model based on computed tomography (CT) images from a patient before and 6 months after Parachute(®) implantation. Acute mechanical effects were determined by in silico device implantation (VIRTUAL-Parachute). Chronic effects of the device were determined by adjusting the diastolic and systolic material parameters to better match the 6-month post-implantation CT data and LV pressure data at end-diastole (ED) (POST-OP). Regional myofiber stress and pump function were calculated in each case. The principal finding is that VIRTUAL-Parachute was associated with a 61.2 % reduction in the lower chamber myofiber stress at ED. The POST-OP model was associated with a decrease in LV diastolic stiffness and a larger reduction in myofiber stress at the upper (27.1%) and lower chamber (78.4%) at ED. Myofiber stress at end-systole and stroke volume was little changed in the POST-OP case. These results suggest that the primary mechanism of Parachute(®) is a reduction in ED myofiber stress, which may reverse eccentric post-infarct LV hypertrophy.

  17. Regional myocardial shape and dimensions of the working isolated canine left ventricle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritman, E.; Tsuiki, K.; Donald, D.; Wood, E. H.

    1975-01-01

    Angiographic experiments were performed on isolated canine left ventricle preparations using donor dog to supply blood to the coronary circulation via a rotary pump to control coronary flow. The angiographic record was transferred from video tape to video disk for detailed uninterrupted sequential analysis at a frequency of 60 fields/sec. It is shown that the use of a biplane X-ray technique and a metabolically supported isolated canine left ventricle preparation provides an angiographically ideal means of measuring the mechanical dynamics of the myocardium while the intact left ventricular myocardial structure and electrical activation pattern retain most of the in situ ventricular characteristics. In particular, biplane X-ray angiography of the left ventricle can provide estimates of total ventricular function such as ejection fraction, stroke volume, and myocardial mass correct to within 15% under the angiographically ideal conditions of the preparation.

  18. Acute ileofemoral artery thromboembolism due to left ventricle thrombi with spontaneous coronary artery dissection

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Heungman; Jung, Cheol-Woong

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is a very rare cause of peripheral artery thromboembolism. It is especially rare to show symptoms of acute limb ischemia without chest symptoms during a hospital visit. In this case, a rare case of SCAD led to left heart failure and caused left ventricle thrombi, which in turn caused peripheral thromboembolism. PMID:25553326

  19. Automatic finite element generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, P. S.

    1984-01-01

    The design and implementation of a software system for generating finite elements and related computations are described. Exact symbolic computational techniques are employed to derive strain-displacement matrices and element stiffness matrices. Methods for dealing with the excessive growth of symbolic expressions are discussed. Automatic FORTRAN code generation is described with emphasis on improving the efficiency of the resultant code.

  20. Doppler echocardiographic description of double-inlet left ventricle in an Arabian horse.

    PubMed

    Sedacca, Cassidy D; Bright, Janice M; Boon, June

    2010-08-01

    Univentricular atrioventricular (AV) connections are rare and complex congenital cardiac anomalies in which both AV valves communicate into a large, common (single) receiving chamber. The common chamber can be of left, right, or mixed ventricular morphology. Although well documented in people, reports of the double-inlet ventricle malformation are rare in the veterinary literature. This report provides description of an Arabian horse with a double-inlet univentricular connection of left ventricular type, a hypoplastic subpulmonary right ventricle, two muscular ventricular septal defects, and a stenotic mitral valve. Transthoracic Doppler echocardiography enabled antemortem diagnosis, and provided an assessment of intracardiac hemodynamics. The findings indicate that Doppler echocardiography is a useful, noninvasive tool for evaluating equine patients with congenital univentricular AV connections, such as a double-inlet left ventricle.

  1. Regional myocardial shape and dimensions of the working isolated canine left ventricle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritman, E. L.; Tsuiki, K.; Donald, D.; Wood, E. H.

    1975-01-01

    The extent to which the dynamic shape and dimensions of the isolated left ventricular myocardial wall differ throughout the myocardium and how these differences are characteristic of the anatomic location was demonstrated. The use of a biplane X-ray technique and a metabolically-supported isolated canine left ventricle preparation provided an angiographically ideal means of measuring mechanical dynamics of the myocardium while the intact left ventricular myocardial structure and electrical activation pattern retains most of the in situ ventricular characteristics.

  2. Finite Element Analysis Code

    2006-03-08

    MAPVAR-KD is designed to transfer solution results from one finite element mesh to another. MAPVAR-KD draws heavily from the structure and coding of MERLIN II, but it employs a new finite element data base, EXODUS II, and offers enhanced speed and new capabilities not available in MERLIN II. In keeping with the MERLIN II documentation, the computational algorithms used in MAPVAR-KD are described. User instructions are presented. Example problems are included to demonstrate the operationmore » of the code and the effects of various input options. MAPVAR-KD is a modification of MAPVAR in which the search algorithm was replaced by a kd-tree-based search for better performance on large problems.« less

  3. Finite Element Analysis Code

    SciTech Connect

    Sjaardema, G.; Wellman, G.; Gartling, D.

    2006-03-08

    MAPVAR-KD is designed to transfer solution results from one finite element mesh to another. MAPVAR-KD draws heavily from the structure and coding of MERLIN II, but it employs a new finite element data base, EXODUS II, and offers enhanced speed and new capabilities not available in MERLIN II. In keeping with the MERLIN II documentation, the computational algorithms used in MAPVAR-KD are described. User instructions are presented. Example problems are included to demonstrate the operation of the code and the effects of various input options. MAPVAR-KD is a modification of MAPVAR in which the search algorithm was replaced by a kd-tree-based search for better performance on large problems.

  4. Finite Element Analysis Code

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, C.; Smith, M.; Sjaardema, G.

    2005-06-26

    Exotxt is an analysis code that reads finite element results data stored in an exodusII file and generates a file in a structured text format. The text file can be edited or modified via a number of text formatting tools. Exotxt is used by analysis to translate data from the binary exodusII format into a structured text format which can then be edited or modified and then either translated back to exodusII format or to another format.

  5. Automatic short axis orientation of the left ventricle in 3D ultrasound recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrosa, João.; Heyde, Brecht; Heeren, Laurens; Engvall, Jan; Zamorano, Jose; Papachristidis, Alexandros; Edvardsen, Thor; Claus, Piet; D'hooge, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The recent advent of three-dimensional echocardiography has led to an increased interest from the scientific community in left ventricle segmentation frameworks for cardiac volume and function assessment. An automatic orientation of the segmented left ventricular mesh is an important step to obtain a point-to-point correspondence between the mesh and the cardiac anatomy. Furthermore, this would allow for an automatic division of the left ventricle into the standard 17 segments and, thus, fully automatic per-segment analysis, e.g. regional strain assessment. In this work, a method for fully automatic short axis orientation of the segmented left ventricle is presented. The proposed framework aims at detecting the inferior right ventricular insertion point. 211 three-dimensional echocardiographic images were used to validate this framework by comparison to manual annotation of the inferior right ventricular insertion point. A mean unsigned error of 8, 05° +/- 18, 50° was found, whereas the mean signed error was 1, 09°. Large deviations between the manual and automatic annotations (> 30°) only occurred in 3, 79% of cases. The average computation time was 666ms in a non-optimized MATLAB environment, which potentiates real-time application. In conclusion, a successful automatic real-time method for orientation of the segmented left ventricle is proposed.

  6. Effect of diastolic flow patterns on the function of the left ventricle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jung Hee; Mittal, Rajat

    2013-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations are used to study the effect of intraventricular flow patterns on the pumping efficiency and the blood mixing and transport characteristics of the left ventricle. The simulations employ a geometric model of the left ventricle which is derived from contrast computed tomography. A variety of diastolic flow conditions are generated for a fixed ejection fraction in order to delineate the effect of flow patterns on ventricular performance. The simulations indicate that the effect of intraventricular blood flow pattern on the pumping power is physiologically insignificant. However, diastolic flow patterns have a noticeable effect on the blood mixing as well as the residence time of blood cells in the ventricle. The implications of these findings on ventricular function are discussed.

  7. Coenurus cerebralis Cysts in the Left Lateral Cerebral Ventricle of a Ewe

    PubMed Central

    HARIDY, Mohie; SAKAI, Hiroki; EL-NAHASS, El-Shayma; EL-MORSEY, Ahmed; ANWAR, Shehata; YANAI, Tokuma

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT A three-and-a-half year-old female Rahmani ewe was presented suffering from nervous symptoms. Grossly, a large cyst measuring 7 × 4 cm and weighing 145 g occupied the dilated left lateral ventricle. The overlying cerebral tissue was thin, atrophied and congested. It tore easily, and the cyst was evacuated spontaneously. Microscopically, liquefactive necrosis surrounded by aggregations of macrophages, eosinophils, lymphocytes, fibroblasts and giant cells was predominantly observed. Hyperplasia and severe necrosis of the ependymal cell lining of the lateral ventricle were observed. Extensive subependymal inflammatory cell infiltrations, accompanied by neovascularization and fibroblastic proliferation, were seen. Based on the gross and histopathological lesions and cyst morphology and location, the cyst was diagnosed as Coenurus cerebralis. This report describes a rare case of coenurus cyst in the left lateral cerebral ventricle of a ewe and the associated lesion. PMID:23884082

  8. A numerical study of the left ventricle using structure-based bio-mechanical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yunfei; Luo, Xiaoyu; Feng, Yaoqi

    A numerical study of the left ventricle using structure-based bio-mechanical model In space environment, microgravity and radiation can have deleterious effects on the cardiovascular system of the astronauts. The work in this paper is part of an ongoing effort to use mathematical models to provide a better understanding of the impact of long-duration spaceflight on the heart and blood vessels. In this study, we develop a computational left ventricle model before and after myocardium infarction based on cardiovascular mechanical theory. The anatomically realistic model has a rule-based fibre structure and a orthotropic structure-based constitutive model. The differences of deformations in the left ventricle before and after infarction are compared in details. In particular, the effects of fiber direction and fiber dispersion are examined. The disarray of both the fiber and sheet orientation is characterized by a dispersion parameter. The left ventricle volume is calculated from the MRI images and used for the optimization of the parameters of the myocardium. We provide the numerical framework for further study on effects of spaceflight on the cardiovascular system.

  9. Finite Element Analysis Code

    2005-06-26

    Exotxt is an analysis code that reads finite element results data stored in an exodusII file and generates a file in a structured text format. The text file can be edited or modified via a number of text formatting tools. Exotxt is used by analysis to translate data from the binary exodusII format into a structured text format which can then be edited or modified and then either translated back to exodusII format or tomore » another format.« less

  10. Finite Element Analysis Code

    SciTech Connect

    Sjaardema, G.; Forsythe, C.

    2005-05-07

    CONEX is a code for joining sequentially in time multiple exodusll database files which all represent the same base mesh topology and geometry. It is used to create a single results or restart file from multiple results or restart files which typically arise as the result of multiple restarted analyses. CONEX is used to postprocess the results from a series of finite element analyses. It can join sequentially the data from multiple results databases into a single database which makes it easier to postprocess the results data.

  11. Finite Element Analysis Code

    2005-05-07

    CONEX is a code for joining sequentially in time multiple exodusll database files which all represent the same base mesh topology and geometry. It is used to create a single results or restart file from multiple results or restart files which typically arise as the result of multiple restarted analyses. CONEX is used to postprocess the results from a series of finite element analyses. It can join sequentially the data from multiple results databases intomore » a single database which makes it easier to postprocess the results data.« less

  12. Quantitative 3D analysis of shape dynamics of the left ventricle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scowen, Barry C.; Smith, Stephen L.; Vannan, Mani A.; Arsenault, Marie

    1998-07-01

    There is an established link between Left Ventricular (LV) geometry and its performance. As a consequence of ischemic heart disease and the attempt to relieve myocardial tissue stress, ventricle shape begins to distort from a conical to spherical geometry with a reduction in pumping efficiency of the chamber. If untreated, premature heart failure will result. To increase the changes of successful treatment it is obviously important for the benefit of the patient to detect these abnormalities as soon as possible. It is the development of a technique to characterize and quantify the shape of the left ventricle that is described here. The system described in this paper uses a novel helix model which combines the advantages of current two dimensional (2D) quantitative measures which provide limited information, with 3D qualitative methods which provide accurate reconstructions of the LV using computationally expensive rendering schemes. A phantom object and dog ventricle (normal/abnormal) were imaged and helical models constructed. The result are encouraging with differences between normal and abnormal ventricles in both diastole and systole able to be determined. Further work entails building a library of subjects in order to determine the relationship between ventricle geometry and quantitative measurements.

  13. A Computational Chemo-Fluidic Modeling for the Investigation of Patient-Specific Left Ventricle Thrombogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Rajat; Seo, Jung Hee; Abd, Thura; George, Richard T.

    2015-11-01

    Patients recovering from myocardial infarction (MI) are considered at high-risk for cardioembolic stroke due to the formation of left ventricle thrombus (LVT). The formation of LVT is the result of a complex interplay between the fluid dynamics inside the ventricle and the chemistry of coagulation, and the role of LV flow pattern on the thrombogenesis was not well understood. The previous computational study performed with the model ventricles suggested that the local flow residence time is the key variable governing the accumulation of coagulation factors. In the present study, a coupled, chemo-fluidic computational modeling is applied to the patient-specific cases of infracted ventricles to investigate the interaction between the LV hemodynamics and thrombogensis. In collaboration with the Johns Hopkins hospital, patient-specific LV models are constructed using the multi-modality medical imaging data. Blood flow in the left ventricle is simulated by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and the biochemical reactions for the thrombus formation are modeled with convection-diffusion-reaction equations. The formation and deposition of key coagulation chemical factors are then correlated with the hemodynamic flow metrics to explore the biophysics underlying LVT risk. Supported by the Johns Hopkins Medicine Discovery Fund and NSF Grant: CBET-1511200, Computational resource by XSEDE NSF grant TG-CTS100002.

  14. [Recent echocardiographic examination of the left ventricle – from M-mode to 3D speckle-tracking imaging].

    PubMed

    Nemes, Attila; Forster, Tamás

    2015-10-25

    The left ventricle has a vital role in maintaining circulation of the body, therefore, its non-invasive assessment is essential. The aim of the present review is to demonstrate clinical relevance of different echocardiographic methods in the evaluation of left ventricle emphasizing the importance of the most recent three-dimensional (and) speckle-tracking methodologies.

  15. Multiple Small Coronary Artery Fistulas Emptying into the Left Ventricle: A Rare but Challenging Problem

    PubMed Central

    Kahaly, Omar

    2016-01-01

    A coronary artery fistula (CAF) is an abnormal communication between a coronary artery and a cardiac chamber or a great vessel. CAFs are rare based on coronary arteriography and when found they most often empty into the right ventricle and atrium and less often into the high pressure, low compliance left ventricle (LV). A patient who presented with atypical chest pain and was found to have multiple small CAFs originating from the ramus intermedius coronary artery and emptying into the LV is presented. This case highlights the challenges in providing an appropriate therapy for multiple small CAFs emptying into the LV. PMID:27525009

  16. Automated Axial Right Ventricle to Left Ventricle Diameter Ratio Computation in Computed Tomography Pulmonary Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-López, Sara; Kumamaru, Kanako K.; George, Elizabeth; San José Estépar, Raúl; Rybicki, Frank J.; Ledesma-Carbayo, Maria J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Right Ventricular to Left Ventricular (RV/LV) diameter ratio has been shown to be a prognostic biomarker for patients suffering from acute Pulmonary Embolism (PE). While Computed Tomography Pulmonary Angiography (CTPA) images used to confirm a clinical suspicion of PE do include information of the heart, a numerical RV/LV diameter ratio is not universally reported, likely because of lack in training, inter-reader variability in the measurements, and additional effort by the radiologist. This study designs and validates a completely automated Computer Aided Detection (CAD) system to compute the axial RV/LV diameter ratio from CTPA images so that the RV/LV diameter ratio can be a more objective metric that is consistently reported in patients for whom CTPA diagnoses PE. Materials and Methods The CAD system was designed specifically for RV/LV measurements. The system was tested in 198 consecutive CTPA patients with acute PE. Its accuracy was evaluated using reference standard RV/LV radiologist measurements and its prognostic value was established for 30-day PE-specific mortality and a composite outcome of 30-day PE-specific mortality or the need for intensive therapies. The study was Institutional Review Board (IRB) approved and HIPAA compliant. Results The CAD system analyzed correctly 92.4% (183/198) of CTPA studies. The mean difference between automated and manually computed axial RV/LV ratios was 0.03±0.22. The correlation between the RV/LV diameter ratio obtained by the CAD system and that obtained by the radiologist was high (r=0.81). Compared to the radiologist, the CAD system equally achieved high accuracy for the composite outcome, with areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves of 0.75 vs. 0.78. Similar results were found for 30-days PE-specific mortality, with areas under the curve of 0.72 vs. 0.75. Conclusions An automated CAD system for determining the CT derived RV/LV diameter ratio in patients with acute PE has high

  17. [Effect of wall thickness of left ventricle on 201Tl myocardial SPECT images: myocardial phantom study].

    PubMed

    Koto, M; Namura, H; Kawase, O; Yamasaki, K; Kono, M

    1996-07-01

    201Tl myocardial SPECT is known for better sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy than planar images in detecting coronary artery disease and diagnosing myocardial viability. SPECT images are also superior to planar images in diagnostic sensitivity and anatomical orientation. However, as limitation of the spatial resolution of the machine, we often encounter poor SPECT plower image quality in patients with decreased wall thickness. To test the accuracy of SPECT images in patients with marked thinning of the left ventricular wall, as occurs in dilated cardiomyopathy, we performed a experimental study using myocardial phantom with 7 mm wall thickness. Tomographic image of the phantom images were rather heterogeneous, though no artificial defect was located. Dilated cardiomyopathy is thought to be characterized by patchy defects in the left ventricle. Careful attention should be given to elucidating myocardial perfusion in patients with a thin left ventricle wall, as there are technical limitations in addition to clinical features.

  18. Computational modelling of left-ventricular diastolic mechanics: effect of fibre orientation and right-ventricle topology.

    PubMed

    Palit, Arnab; Bhudia, Sunil K; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Turley, Glen A; Williams, Mark A

    2015-02-26

    Majority of heart failure patients who suffer from diastolic dysfunction retain normal systolic pump action. The dysfunction remodels the myocardial fibre structure of left-ventricle (LV), changing its regular diastolic behaviour. Existing LV diastolic models ignored the effects of right-ventricular (RV) deformation, resulting in inaccurate strain analysis of LV wall during diastole. This paper, for the first time, proposes a numerical approach to investigate the effect of fibre-angle distribution and RV deformation on LV diastolic mechanics. A finite element modelling of LV passive inflation was carried out, using structure-based orthotropic constitutive law. Rule-based fibre architecture was assigned on a bi-ventricular (BV) geometry constructed from non-invasive imaging of human heart. The effect of RV deformation on LV diastolic mechanics was investigated by comparing the results predicted by BV and single LV model constructed from the same image data. Results indicated an important influence of RV deformation which led to additional LV passive inflation and increase of average fibre and sheet stress-strain in LV wall during diastole. Sensitivity of LV passive mechanics to the changes in the fibre distribution was also examined. The study revealed that LV diastolic volume increased when fibres were aligned more towards LV longitudinal axis. Changes in fibre angle distribution significantly altered fibre stress-strain distribution of LV wall. The simulation results strongly suggest that patient-specific fibre structure and RV deformation play very important roles in LV diastolic mechanics and should be accounted for in computational modelling for improved understanding of the LV mechanics under normal and pathological conditions.

  19. Testosterone affects hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) activity and lipid metabolism in the left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Langfort, Jozef; Jagsz, Slawomir; Dobrzyn, Pawel; Brzezinska, Zofia; Klapcinska, Barbara; Galbo, Henrik; Gorski, Jan

    2010-09-01

    Fatty acids, which are the major cardiac fuel, are derived from lipid droplets stored in cardiomyocytes, among other sources. The heart expresses hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), which regulates triglycerides (TG) breakdown, and the enzyme is under hormonal control. Evidence obtained from adipose tissue suggests that testosterone regulates HSL activity. To test whether this is also true in the heart, we measured HSL activity in the left ventricle of sedentary male rats that had been treated with testosterone supplementation or orchidectomy with or without testosterone substitution. Left ventricle HSL activity against TG was significantly elevated in intact rats supplemented with testosterone. HSL activity against both TG and diacylglyceride was reduced by orchidectomy, whereas testosterone replacement fully reversed this effect. Moreover, testosterone increased left ventricle free fatty acid levels, caused an inhibitory effect on carbohydrate metabolism in the heart, and elevated left ventricular phosphocreatine and ATP levels as compared to control rats. These data indicate that testosterone is involved in cardiac HSL activity regulation which, in turn, may affect cardiac lipid and carbohydrate metabolism.

  20. Management of the congenital aneurysm of the left ventricle associated with mitral insufficiency in a child: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mitsomoy, Michel Francklyn; Ajaja, Mohomed Reda; Fkiri, Btisam; Haddour, L; Cheikhaoui, Younes

    2013-01-01

    The combination of congenital left ventricular aneurysm associated with mitral insufficiency is rare. We describe the case of a girl aged 11 years, bearing these two entities simultaneously. Aneurysmal resection of the left ventricle was performed with Dor technic to allow remodelation of the anatomy of the left ventricle. Mitral annuloplasty was performed through a transseptal approach. Three months after surgery, the child presents a good myocardial contractility without mitral regurgitation and normal ejection fraction. PMID:24251007

  1. Management of the Congenital Aneurysm of the Left Ventricle Associated with Mitral Insufficiency in a Child: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mitsomoy, Michel Francklyn; Ajaja, Mohomed Reda; Fkiri, Btisam; Haddour, L; Cheikhaoui, Younes

    2013-01-01

    The combination of congenital left ventricular aneurysm associated with mitral insufficiency is rare. We describe the case of a girl aged 11 years, bearing these two entities simultaneously. Aneurysmal resection of the left ventricle was performed with Dor technic to allow remodelation of the anatomy of the left ventricle. Mitral annuloplasty was performed through a transseptal approach. Three months after surgery, the child presents a good myocardial contractility without mitral regurgitation and normal ejection fraction. PMID:24251007

  2. Traumatic Left Anterior Descending Coronary Artery-Right Ventricle Fistula: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhi, Mohammad Ali; Asgari, Mehdi; Firouzabadi, Mehdi Dehghani; Zeraati, Mohammad Reza; Rezaee, Alireza

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic coronary artery-cameral fistulas (TCAF) are rare and may present secondary to penetrating injuries (80%) or iatrogenic traumas. Early operative intervention remains the recommended treatment modality for accidental traumatic coronary artery fistulas. We report the case of a 17-year-old man who presented with left anterior descending coronary artery-right ventricle fistula following penetrating cardiac trauma, which was successfully repaired surgically. PMID:23074613

  3. Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy: computerized anatomic study of relashionship between septal and free left ventricle wall

    PubMed Central

    Juliani, Paulo Sérgio; da Costa, Éder França; Correia, Aristides Tadeu; Monteiro, Rosangela; Jatene, Fabio Biscegli

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A feature of dilated cardiomyopathy is the deformation of ventricular cavity, which contributes to systolic dysfunction. Few studies have evaluated this deformation bearing in mind ventricular regions and segments of the ventricle, which could reveal important details of the remodeling process, supporting a better understanding of its role in functional impairment and the development of new therapeutic strategies. Objective To evaluate if, in basal, equatorial and apical regions, increased internal transverse perimeter of left ventricle in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy occurs proportionally between the septal and non-septal segment. Methods We performed an anatomical study with 28 adult hearts from human cadavers. One group consisted of 18 hearts with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and another group with 10 normal hearts. After lamination and left ventricle digital image capture, in three different regions (base, equator and apex), the transversal internal perimeter of left ventricle was divided into two segments: septal and not septal. These segments were measured by proper software. It was established an index of proportionality between these segments, called septal and non-septal segment index. Then we determined whether this index was the same in both groups. Results Among patients with normal hearts and idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, the index of proportionality between the two segments (septal and non-septal) showed no significant difference in the three regions analyzed. The comparison results of the indices NSS/SS among normal and enlarged hearts were respectively: in base 1.99 versus 1.86 (P=0.46), in equator 2.22 versus 2.18 (P=0.79) and in apex 2.96 versus 3.56 (P=0.11). Conclusion In the idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, the transversal dilatation of left ventricular internal perimeter occurs proportionally between the segments corresponding to the septum and free wall at the basal, equatorial and apical regions of this chamber

  4. Modeling of time-variant coupling between left ventricle and aorta in cardiac cycle.

    PubMed

    Tözeren, A; Chien, S

    1985-09-01

    An analytical model is developed to study the interaction between the left ventricle and vascular system. Ventricular pressure is expressed as a function of the chamber volume, volumetric strain rate, and the degree of activation. A three-element Wind-kessel model is employed to represent the hydraulic properties of the vascular system. Conditions of interaction between the left ventricle and the vascular system are formulated in mathematical terms. Numerical solutions are obtained for the mechanical events occurring during a cardiac cycle as a function of time. The time variations of aortic pressure and ventricular volume predicted by the model compare well with the experimental results of Sunagawa and co-workers [Am. J. Physiol. 243 (Heart Circ. Physiol. 12): H346-H350, 1982, and Am. J. Physiol. 245 (Heart Circ. Physiol. 14): H773-H780, 1983]. Furthermore, the application of the present model to the experimental data has allowed the derivation of the intrinsic contractility parameters in these experiments. The unique features of this analytical model are that 1) it provides the time-variant pressure and volume curves of the left ventricle in relation to the aorta, 2) it generates information on the effects of heart rate on these hemodynamic parameters, and 3) it allows the derivation of intrinsic contractility parameters from experimental data.

  5. Effect of trabeculae and papillary muscles on the hemodynamics of the left ventricle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedula, Vijay; Seo, Jung-Hee; Lardo, Albert C.; Mittal, Rajat

    2016-04-01

    The impact of surface trabeculae and papillary muscles on the hemodynamics of the left ventricle (LV) is investigated using numerical simulations. Simulations of ventricular flow are conducted for two different models of the LV derived from high-resolution cardiac computed tomography (CT) scans using an immersed boundary method-based flow solver. One model comprises a trabeculated left ventricle (TLV) that includes both trabeculae and papillary muscles, while the second model has a smooth left ventricle that is devoid of any of these surface features. Results indicate that the trabeculae and papillary muscles significantly disrupt the vortices that develop during early filling in the TLV model. Large recirculation zones are found to form in the wake of the papillary muscles; these zones enhance the blockage provided by the papillary muscles and create a path for the mitral jet to penetrate deeper into the ventricular apex during diastole. During systole, the trabeculae enhance the apical washout by `squeezing' the flow from the apical region. Finally, the trabeculae enhance viscous dissipation rate of the ventricular flow, but this effect is not significant in the overall power budget.

  6. Fluid Structure Interaction simulation of heart prosthesis in patient-specific left-ventricle/aorta anatomies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Trung; Borazjani, Iman; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2009-11-01

    In order to test and optimize heart valve prosthesis and enable virtual implantation of other biomedical devices it is essential to develop and validate high-resolution FSI-CFD codes for carrying out simulations in patient-specific geometries. We have developed a powerful numerical methodology for carrying out FSI simulations of cardiovascular flows based on the CURVIB approach (Borazjani, L. Ge, and F. Sotiropoulos, Journal of Computational physics, vol. 227, pp. 7587-7620 2008). We have extended our FSI method to overset grids to handle efficiently more complicated geometries e.g. simulating an MHV implanted in an anatomically realistic aorta and left-ventricle. A compliant, anatomic left-ventricle is modeled using prescribed motion in one domain. The mechanical heart valve is placed inside the second domain i.e. the body-fitted curvilinear mesh of the anatomic aorta. The simulations of an MHV with a left-ventricle model underscore the importance of inflow conditions and ventricular compliance for such simulations and demonstrate the potential of our method as a powerful tool for patient-specific simulations.

  7. Computational modeling and analysis for left ventricle motion using CT/Echo image fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji-Yeon; Kang, Nahyup; Lee, Hyoung-Euk; Kim, James D. K.

    2014-03-01

    In order to diagnose heart disease such as myocardial infarction, 2D strain through the speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) or the tagged MRI is often used. However out-of-plane strain measurement using STE or tagged MRI is inaccurate. Therefore, strain for whole organ which are analyzed by simulation of 3D cardiac model can be applied in clinical diagnosis. To simulate cardiac contraction in a cycle, cardiac physical properties should be reflected in cardiac model. The myocardial wall in left ventricle is represented as a transversely orthotropic hyperelastic material, with the fiber orientation varying sequentially from the epicardial surface, through about 0° at the midwall, to the endocardial surface. A time-varying elastance model is simulated to contract myocardial fiber, and physiological intraventricular systolic pressure curves are employed for the cardiac dynamics simulation in a cycle. And an exact description of the cardiac motion should be acquired in order that essential boundary conditions for cardiac simulation are obtained effectively. Real time cardiac motion can be acquired by using echocardiography and exact cardiac geometrical 3D model can be reconstructed using 3D CT data. In this research, image fusion technology from CT and echocardiography is employed in order to consider patient-specific left ventricle movement. Finally, longitudinal strain from speckle tracking echocardiography which is known to fit actual left ventricle deformation relatively well is used to verify these results.

  8. [Air Bubble in the Left Ventricle due to Computed Tomography Guided Lung Needle Biopsy].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Eisuke; Yoshida, Kumiko; Yoshiyama, Koichi; Hayashi, Tatsuro; Tanaka, Toshiki; Tao, Hiroyuki; Okabe, Kazunori

    2015-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) guided lung biopsy is a useful examination in diagnosing pulmonary diseases, but the complications such as pneumothorax or pulmonary hemorrhage can not be ignored. Among them, air embolization is a severe complication, although it is infrequently encountered. Forty two-year-old man admitted to our department for the examination of left lung tumor. CT guided lung biopsy was performed. After examination, the patient showed disturbance in cardiac function, which recovered in several minutes. Chest CT revealed air bubble in the left ventricle. After 2-hours head down position followed by bed rest, air bubble is confirmed to be dissappeared by CT.

  9. A robust automated left ventricle region of interest localization technique using a cardiac cine MRI atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zikri, Yehuda Kfir; Linte, Cristian A.

    2016-03-01

    Region of interest detection is a precursor to many medical image processing and analysis applications, including segmentation, registration and other image manipulation techniques. The optimal region of interest is often selected manually, based on empirical knowledge and features of the image dataset. However, if inconsistently identified, the selected region of interest may greatly affect the subsequent image analysis or interpretation steps, in turn leading to incomplete assessment during computer-aided diagnosis or incomplete visualization or identification of the surgical targets, if employed in the context of pre-procedural planning or image-guided interventions. Therefore, the need for robust, accurate and computationally efficient region of interest localization techniques is prevalent in many modern computer-assisted diagnosis and therapy applications. Here we propose a fully automated, robust, a priori learning-based approach that provides reliable estimates of the left and right ventricle features from cine cardiac MR images. The proposed approach leverages the temporal frame-to-frame motion extracted across a range of short axis left ventricle slice images with small training set generated from les than 10% of the population. This approach is based on histogram of oriented gradients features weighted by local intensities to first identify an initial region of interest depicting the left and right ventricles that exhibits the greatest extent of cardiac motion. This region is correlated with the homologous region that belongs to the training dataset that best matches the test image using feature vector correlation techniques. Lastly, the optimal left ventricle region of interest of the test image is identified based on the correlation of known ground truth segmentations associated with the training dataset deemed closest to the test image. The proposed approach was tested on a population of 100 patient datasets and was validated against the ground truth

  10. How to mend a broken heart: a major stab wound of the left ventricle

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A 28-year-old male admitted with a stab wound under his left nipple, underwent emergency surgery because of confusion, a decreasing blood pressure and increasing tachycardia. A median sternotomy incision was made and after establishing cardiopulmonary bypass, a 7 cm wound in the left ventricle and a smaller wound in the left atrium were repaired. An injured segment of lung was resected and the left anterior descending and circumflex arteries were grafted after weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass was initially unsuccessful. Although the patient suffered a stroke, probably due to prehospital hypoperfusion, he eventually recovered without major sequelae. In addition to the case report we present a literature review of the last 15 years pertaining the management of penetrating cardiac injury. PMID:22640705

  11. [Postero'inferior aneurysm of the left ventricle following myocardial infarction. Diagnosis and surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Flores Covarrubias, S E; Acoltzin Vidal, C; Nava Lopez, G; Palacios Macedo, X

    1979-01-01

    This is a report of the first four cases of left ventricle aneurysm of the posterior and inferior segments successfully treated surgically in the Hospital de Cardiología y Neumología del Centro Médico Nacional, México D. F., and represent the twelve per cent of all realized aneurysmectomies. The patients were all men with 57 years mean age, and a previous history of posteroinferior myocardial infarction, complicated in three of them with angor and severe ventricle arrythmias; chest X ray in lateral view showed a bump of the posteroinferior border of the cardiac silhouette; the echocardiography increase in the ventricular diameter below the mitral valve; the ventriculography made evident a diastolic bulging with systolic expansion of posterior and inferior segments of the left ventricle and no mitral regurgitation; selective coronary arteriography showed a dominant right pattern with 100 per cent proximal occlusion. Aneurysmectomy was done in all four cases and aortocoronary by-pass in two. The posteromedial papilar muscle was found respected in all cases and in two cases a mural thrombus was detected.

  12. A Reconstruction Method of Blood Flow Velocity in Left Ventricle Using Color Flow Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jaeseong; Ahn, Chi Young; Jeon, Kiwan; Heo, Jung; Lee, DongHak; Joo, Chulmin; Choi, Jung-il; Seo, Jin Keun

    2015-01-01

    Vortex flow imaging is a relatively new medical imaging method for the dynamic visualization of intracardiac blood flow, a potentially useful index of cardiac dysfunction. A reconstruction method is proposed here to quantify the distribution of blood flow velocity fields inside the left ventricle from color flow images compiled from ultrasound measurements. In this paper, a 2D incompressible Navier-Stokes equation with a mass source term is proposed to utilize the measurable color flow ultrasound data in a plane along with the moving boundary condition. The proposed model reflects out-of-plane blood flows on the imaging plane through the mass source term. The boundary conditions to solve the system of equations are derived from the dimensions of the ventricle extracted from 2D echocardiography data. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated numerically using synthetic flow data acquired from simulating left ventricle flows. The numerical simulations show the feasibility and potential usefulness of the proposed method of reconstructing the intracardiac flow fields. Of particular note is the finding that the mass source term in the proposed model improves the reconstruction performance. PMID:26078773

  13. The echo-transponder electrode catheter: a new method for mapping the left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Langberg, J J; Franklin, J O; Landzberg, J S; Herre, J M; Kee, L; Chin, M C; Bharati, S; Lev, M; Himelman, R B; Schiller, N B

    1988-07-01

    The ability to locate catheter position in the left ventricle with respect to endocardial landmarks might enhance the accuracy of ventricular tachycardia mapping. An echo-transponder system (Telectronics, Inc.) was compared with biplane fluoroscopy for left ventricular endocardial mapping. A 6F electrode catheter was modified with the addition of a piezoelectric crystal 5 mm from the tip. This crystal was connected to a transponder that received and transmitted ultrasound, resulting in a discrete artifact on the two-dimensional echocardiographic image corresponding to the position of the catheter tip. Catheters were introduced percutaneously into the left ventricle of nine anesthetized dogs. Two-dimensional echo-transponder and biplane fluoroscopic images were recorded on videotape with the catheter at multiple endocardial sites. Catheter location was marked by delivering radiofrequency current to the distal electrode, creating a small endocardial lesion. Catheter location by echo-transponder and by fluoroscopy were compared with lesion location without knowledge of other data. Location by echo-transponder was 8.7 +/- 5.1 mm from the center of the radiofrequency lesion versus 14 + 7.8 mm by fluoroscopy (n = 15, p = 0.023). Echo-transponder localization is more precise than is biplane fluoroscopy and may enhance the accuracy of left ventricular electrophysiologic mapping.

  14. Transcatheter desiccation of the canine left ventricle using radiofrequency energy: a pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.K.; Graham, A.R.; Hoyt, R.H.; Odell, R.C.

    1987-07-01

    Catheter ablation of cardiac tissue by means of direct-current electrical energy is associated with several complications. We assessed the efficacy and safety of closed-chest catheter desiccation of the left ventricular myocardium with microbipolar radiofrequency (RF) energy (750 kHz) in five dogs. The unipolar configuration was used with RF energy delivered between the tip electrode of a standard No. 7F tripolar catheter in the left ventricle and an external patch electrode on the left lateral chest wall. A single application with different RF energy settings (100 J, 200 J, and 300 J) was delivered to three individual endocardial sites of the left ventricle. Ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation was not observed during energy application and 24 hours after ablation, as assessed by a Holter recording. There was no damage to the electrode catheter. Dogs were killed on the fifth day. Pathology showed well-delineated ovoid or round-shaped coagulation necrosis at the ablation sites. Microscopic findings consisted of circumscribed areas of necrosis surrounded by a zone of fibroblastic and mononuclear proliferation. In conclusion, catheter ablation of the ventricular myocardium with RF energy is an apparently safe procedure and can effectively produce discrete areas of injury without destruction of surrounding uninvolved myocardium. This method offers potential clinical utility for catheter ablation of refractory sustained ventricular tachycardia.

  15. Kinematic, Dynamic, and Energy Characteristics of Diastolic Flow in the Left Ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Khalafvand, Seyed Saeid; Hung, Tin-Kan; Ng, Eddie Yin-Kwee; Zhong, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Blood flow characteristics in the normal left ventricle are studied by using the magnetic resonance imaging, the Navier-Stokes equations, and the work-energy equation. Vortices produced during the mitral valve opening and closing are modeled in a two-dimensional analysis and correlated with temporal variations of the Reynolds number and pressure drop. Low shear stress and net pressures on the mitral valve are obtained for flow acceleration and deceleration. Bernoulli energy flux delivered to blood from ventricular dilation is practically balanced by the energy influx and the rate change of kinetic energy in the ventricle. The rates of work done by shear and energy dissipation are small. The dynamic and energy characteristics of the 2D results are comparable to those of a 3D model. PMID:26417381

  16. Mathematical model of the anatomy and fibre orientation field of the left ventricle of the heart

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background One of the main factors affecting propagation of electrical waves and contraction in ventricles of the heart is anisotropy of cardiac tissue. Anisotropy is determined by orientation of myocardial fibres. Determining fibre orientation field and shape of the heart is important for anatomically accurate modelling of electrical and mechanical function of the heart. The aim of this paper is to introduce a theoretical rule-based model for anatomy and fibre orientation of the left ventricle (LV) of the heart and to compare it with experimental data. We suggest explicit analytical formulae that allow us to obtain the left ventricle form and its fibre direction field. The ventricle band concept of cardiac architecture given by Torrent-Guasp is chosen as the model postulate. Methods In our approach, anisotropy of the heart is derived from some general principles. The LV is considered as a set of identical spiral surfaces, each of which can be produced from the other by rotation around one vertical axis. Each spiral surface is filled with non-intersecting curves which represent myocardial fibres. For model verification, we use experimental data on fibre orientation in human and canine hearts. Results LV shape and anisotropy are represented by explicit analytical expressions in a curvilinear 3-D coordinate system. The derived fibre orientation field shows good qualitative agreement with experimental data. The model reveals the most thorough quantitative simulation of fibre angles at the LV middle zone. Conclusions Our analysis shows that the band concept can generate realistic anisotropy of the LV. Our model shows good qualitative agreement between the simulated fibre orientation field and the experimental data on LV anisotropy, and the model can be used for various numerical simulations to study the effects of anisotropy on cardiac excitation and mechanical function. PMID:23773421

  17. Finite element computational fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Finite element analysis as applied to the broad spectrum of computational fluid mechanics is analyzed. The finite element solution methodology is derived, developed, and applied directly to the differential equation systems governing classes of problems in fluid mechanics. The heat conduction equation is used to reveal the essence and elegance of finite element theory, including higher order accuracy and convergence. The algorithm is extended to the pervasive nonlinearity of the Navier-Stokes equations. A specific fluid mechanics problem class is analyzed with an even mix of theory and applications, including turbulence closure and the solution of turbulent flows.

  18. Pressure-volume relation around zero transmural pressure in excised cross-circulated dog left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Suga, H; Yasumura, Y; Nozawa, T; Futaki, S; Tanaka, N

    1988-08-01

    Left ventricular (LV) pressure-volume (PV) relations of quasi-isobaric contractions around zero transmural pressure were studied with a new volumetric method. Left ventricles of isolated cross-circulated dog hearts were connected to a large air tank through the mitral annulus. The volume of the air space was changed with a volume servo pump to oscillate the transmural pressure (P) around zero. Instantaneous LV volume (V) was computed from P by Boyle's law (P.V = constant) to draw the PV trajectories of the isobaric contractions. The end-systolic PV relation (ESPVR) and end-diastolic PV relation (EDPVR) curves intercepted the volume axis at two different volumes (Vo and Vu, respectively). The slopes of both ESPVR and EDPVR curves as well as Vo and Vu were variably influenced by positive and negative inotropic states, heart rate changes, arrhythmias, ischemia, and rigor. In control before any interventions, LV stroke and suction volume (delta V = Vu - Vo) at zero P was 7.5 +/- 2.5 (SD) ml/100 g left ventricle, which changed with the changes in Vo and Vu. delta V decreased with decreases in P from zero and virtually vanished at a pressure (Pn) of -9.5 +/- 2.0 mm Hg. Directly measured LV dead volume (Vd) at Pn was 4.1 +/- 1.3 ml/100 g. The results seem essential for evaluation of LV filling and suction during diastole. PMID:3396157

  19. Scaling of left ventricle cardiomyocyte ultrastructure across development in the kangaroo Macropus fuliginosus.

    PubMed

    Snelling, Edward P; Taggart, David A; Maloney, Shane K; Farrell, Anthony P; Leigh, Christopher M; Waterhouse, Lyn; Williams, Ruth; Seymour, Roger S

    2015-06-01

    The heart and left ventricle of the marsupial western grey kangaroo Macropus fuliginosus exhibit biphasic allometric growth, whereby a negative shift in the trajectory of cardiac growth occurs at pouch exit. In this study, we used transmission electron microscopy to examine the scaling of left ventricle cardiomyocyte ultrastructure across development in the western grey kangaroo over a 190-fold body mass range (0.355-67.5 kg). The volume-density (%) of myofibrils, mitochondria, sarcoplasmic reticuli and T-tubules increase significantly during in-pouch growth, such that the absolute volume (ml) of these organelles scales with body mass (Mb; kg) with steep hyperallometry: 1.41Mb (1.38), 0.64Mb (1.29), 0.066Mb (1.45) and 0.035Mb (1.87), respectively. Maturation of the left ventricle ultrastructure coincides with pouch vacation, as organelle volume-densities scale independent of body mass across post-pouch development, such that absolute organelle volumes scale in parallel and with relatively shallow hypoallometry: 4.65Mb (0.79), 1.75Mb (0.77), 0.21Mb (0.79) and 0.35Mb (0.79), respectively. The steep hyperallometry of organelle volumes and volume-densities across in-pouch growth is consistent with the improved contractile performance of isolated cardiac muscle during fetal development in placental mammals, and is probably critical in augmenting cardiac output to levels necessary for endothermy and independent locomotion in the young kangaroo as it prepares for pouch exit. The shallow hypoallometry of organelle volumes during post-pouch growth suggests a decrease in relative cardiac requirements as body mass increases in free-roaming kangaroos, which is possibly because the energy required for hopping is independent of speed, and the capacity for energy storage during hopping could increase as the kangaroo grows.

  20. Scaling of left ventricle cardiomyocyte ultrastructure across development in the kangaroo Macropus fuliginosus.

    PubMed

    Snelling, Edward P; Taggart, David A; Maloney, Shane K; Farrell, Anthony P; Leigh, Christopher M; Waterhouse, Lyn; Williams, Ruth; Seymour, Roger S

    2015-06-01

    The heart and left ventricle of the marsupial western grey kangaroo Macropus fuliginosus exhibit biphasic allometric growth, whereby a negative shift in the trajectory of cardiac growth occurs at pouch exit. In this study, we used transmission electron microscopy to examine the scaling of left ventricle cardiomyocyte ultrastructure across development in the western grey kangaroo over a 190-fold body mass range (0.355-67.5 kg). The volume-density (%) of myofibrils, mitochondria, sarcoplasmic reticuli and T-tubules increase significantly during in-pouch growth, such that the absolute volume (ml) of these organelles scales with body mass (Mb; kg) with steep hyperallometry: 1.41Mb (1.38), 0.64Mb (1.29), 0.066Mb (1.45) and 0.035Mb (1.87), respectively. Maturation of the left ventricle ultrastructure coincides with pouch vacation, as organelle volume-densities scale independent of body mass across post-pouch development, such that absolute organelle volumes scale in parallel and with relatively shallow hypoallometry: 4.65Mb (0.79), 1.75Mb (0.77), 0.21Mb (0.79) and 0.35Mb (0.79), respectively. The steep hyperallometry of organelle volumes and volume-densities across in-pouch growth is consistent with the improved contractile performance of isolated cardiac muscle during fetal development in placental mammals, and is probably critical in augmenting cardiac output to levels necessary for endothermy and independent locomotion in the young kangaroo as it prepares for pouch exit. The shallow hypoallometry of organelle volumes during post-pouch growth suggests a decrease in relative cardiac requirements as body mass increases in free-roaming kangaroos, which is possibly because the energy required for hopping is independent of speed, and the capacity for energy storage during hopping could increase as the kangaroo grows. PMID:25908057

  1. A tissue-level model of the left ventricle for the analysis of regional myocardial function

    PubMed Central

    Le Rolle, Virginie; Hernandez, Alfredo I.; Richard, Pierre-Yves; Donal, Erwan; Carrault, Guy

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a model-based method for the analysis of regional myocardial strain, based on echocardiography and Tissue Doppler Imaging (TDI). A multi-formalism, tissue-level electromechanical model of the left ventricle is proposed. The parameters of the model are identified in order to reproduce regional strain signal morphologies obtained from a healthy subject and a patient presenting a dilated cardiomyopathy. The parameters identified for the DCM patient allow the localization of the failing myocardial segments and may be useful for a better design of cardiac resynchronization therapy on heart failure patients. PMID:18002171

  2. Level set algorithms comparison for multi-slice CT left ventricle segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Ruben; La Cruz, Alexandra; Ordoñes, Andrés.; Pesántez, Daniel; Morocho, Villie; Vanegas, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    The comparison of several Level Set algorithms is performed with respect to 2D left ventricle segmentation in Multi-Slice CT images. Five algorithms are compared by calculating the Dice coefficient between the resulting segmentation contour and a reference contour traced by a cardiologist. The algorithms are also tested on images contaminated with Gaussian noise for several values of PSNR. Additionally an algorithm for providing the initialization shape is proposed. This algorithm is based on a combination of mathematical morphology tools with watershed and region growing algorithms. Results on the set of test images are promising and suggest the extension to 3{D MSCT database segmentation.

  3. Oxygen utilization of the human left ventricle - An indirect method for its evaluation and clinical considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghista, D. N.; Sandler, H.

    1974-01-01

    An analytical method is presented for determining the oxygen consumption rate of the intact heart working (as opposed to empty but beating) human left ventricle. Use is made of experimental recordings obtained for the chamber pressure and the associated dimensions of the LV. LV dimensions are determined by cineangiocardiography, and the chamber pressure is obtained by means of fluid-filled catheters during retrograde or transeptal catheterization. An analytical method incorporating these data is then employed for the evaluation of the LV coronary oxygen consumption in five subjects. Oxygen consumption for these subjects was also obtained by the conventional clinical method in order to evaluate the reliability of the proposed method.

  4. Toward automatic finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kela, Ajay; Perucchio, Renato; Voelcker, Herbert

    1987-01-01

    Two problems must be solved if the finite element method is to become a reliable and affordable blackbox engineering tool. Finite element meshes must be generated automatically from computer aided design databases and mesh analysis must be made self-adaptive. The experimental system described solves both problems in 2-D through spatial and analytical substructuring techniques that are now being extended into 3-D.

  5. Three-dimensional structure of the flow inside the left ventricle of the human heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortini, S.; Querzoli, G.; Espa, S.; Cenedese, A.

    2013-11-01

    The laboratory models of the human heart left ventricle developed in the last decades gave a valuable contribution to the comprehension of the role of the fluid dynamics in the cardiac function and to support the interpretation of the data obtained in vivo. Nevertheless, some questions are still opened and new ones stem from the continuous improvements in the diagnostic imaging techniques. Many of these unresolved issues are related to the three-dimensional structure of the left ventricular flow during the cardiac cycle. In this paper, we investigated in detail this aspect using a laboratory model. The ventricle was simulated by a flexible sack varying its volume in time according to a physiologically shaped law. Velocities measured during several cycles on series of parallel planes, taken from two orthogonal points of view, were combined together in order to reconstruct the phase-averaged, three-dimensional velocity field. During the diastole, three main steps are recognized in the evolution of the vortical structures: (1) straight propagation in the direction of the long axis of a vortex ring originated from the mitral orifice; (2) asymmetric development of the vortex ring on an inclined plane; and (3) single vortex formation. The analysis of three-dimensional data gives the experimental evidence of the reorganization of the flow in a single vortex persisting until the end of the diastole. This flow pattern seems to optimize the cardiac function since it directs velocity towards the aortic valve just before the systole and minimizes the fraction of blood residing within the ventricle for more cycles.

  6. Characterization of human left ventricle flow patterns using ultrasound and Lagrangian coherent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendabadi, Sahar; Del Alamo, Juan Carlos; Benito, Yolanda; Yotti, Raquel; Bermejo, Javier; Shadden, Shawn

    2012-11-01

    We discuss work towards understanding human left ventricle (LV) transport and mixing characteristics in normal subjects and patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Prior studies have shown that the fluid dynamics in the left ventricle (LV) play a major role in dictating overall cardiac health. This study utilizes a noninvasive method to obtain planar velocity data over the apical long-axis view of the LV from color Doppler and B-mode ultrasound measurements. We use a Lagrangian measure to study unsteady behavior of blood transport inside the LV. We compute finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields to extract Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) from the empirical data. This application presents a particular challenge to Lagrangian computations due to the presence of moving flux, and no-flux, boundaries. We describe a method for unstructured grid generation from the LV motion, and LCS computation on the deforming unstructured grid. Results demonstrate that LCS reveal the moving boundaries confining the blood volume injected to the LV in diastole and ejected into the aorta in systole. We discuss findings related to the quantification of the LV vortex, whose geometry and motion is thought to be an important indicator of cardiac health.

  7. Effect of Trabeculations on the Hemodynamics of Left Ventricle: A Computational Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedula, Vijay; Seo, Jung-Hee; George, Richard; Lardo, Albert; Mittal, Rajat

    2013-11-01

    The endocardium of the human left ventricle is not smooth. There are surface trabeculations as well as papillary muscles that protrude deep into the ventricular cavity. However, most models of ventricular hemodynamics ignore the presence of these surface structures and assume a smooth endocardial surface. Several key questions arise regarding the impact of these structures on ventricular hemodynamics. These surface ``roughness elements'' could enhance mixing and dissipation. Moreover, the interstitial regions within the trabeculae might be prone to flow stasis, and this has implications for ventricular thrombogenesis. In the present study, we use flow simulation to study this issue for CT derived models of normal human left ventricle. We focus on the near-wall dynamics of the flow and employ a number of different diagnostics to examine the flow dynamics and ``washout'' in this region. This research is supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation through (NSF) CDI-Type II grant IOS-1124804. Computational resources for some of the simulations were also provided in part through the NSF grant NSF-OCI-108849.

  8. Measuring Regional Changes in the Diastolic Deformation of the Left Ventricle of SHR Rats Using microPET Technology and Hyperelastic Warping

    SciTech Connect

    Gullberg, Grant T; VERESS , ALEXANDER I.; WEISS, JEFFREY A.; HUESMAN, RONALD H.; REUTTER, BRYAN W.; TAYLOR , SCOTT E.; SITEK , AREK; FENG, BING; YANG , YONGFENG; GULLBERG, GRANT T.

    2008-04-04

    The objective of this research was to assess applicability of a technique known as hyperelastic warping for the measurement of local strains in the left ventricle (LV) directly from microPET image data sets. The technique uses differences in image intensities between template (reference) and target (loaded) image data sets to generate a body force that deforms a finite element (FE) representation of the template so that it registers with the target images. For validation, the template image was defined as the end-systolic microPET image data set from a Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat. The target image was created by mapping the template image using the deformation results obtained from a FE model of diastolic filling. Regression analysis revealed highly significant correlations between the simulated forward FE solution and image derived warping predictions for fiber stretch (R2 = 0.96), circumferential strain (R2 = 0.96), radial strain (R2 = 0.93), and longitudinal strain (R2 = 0.76) (p<0.001for all cases). The technology was applied to microPET image data of two spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and a WKY control. Regional analysis revealed that, the lateral freewall in the SHR subjects showed the greatest deformation compared with the other wall segments. This work indicates that warping can accurately predict the strain distributions during diastole from the analysis of microPET data sets.

  9. Relationship of functional recovery to scar contraction after myocardial infarction in the canine left ventricle

    SciTech Connect

    Choong, C.Y.; Gibbons, E.F.; Hogan, R.D.; Franklin, T.D.; Nolting, M.; Mann, D.L.; Weyman, A.E.

    1989-04-01

    We have previously reported that regional wall motion abnormalities in a canine model of acute myocardial infarction may show substantial improvement in the first 6 weeks after infarction. To determine whether the mechanism of this improvement in function is the result of scar contraction within the infarct, we studied the relationship between changes in regional wall motion defined by cross-sectional echocardiography and the regional concentration of radioactive microspheres injected immediately before coronary occlusion and sampled 6 weeks after occlusion. Eight dogs underwent serial echocardiographic and microsphere blood flow measurements immediately before and 30 minutes, 48 hours, 1 week, 3 weeks, and 6 weeks after ligation of the left anterior descending or the left circumflex coronary artery. Wall motion and blood flow were measured in the short-axis section of the left ventricle at the level of the midpapillary muscle in each 10-degree radial segment around the circumference of the ventricle. Infarct histology was assessed at 6 weeks by means of the same radial coordinate system. Control data were collected in a similar manner from four dogs that underwent sham operations and had no histologic evidence of infarction. In all of the animals with infarcts, but not in the sham animals, the calculated preocclusion endocardial and epicardial blood flow values in the histologic infarct zone (252 +/- 44 and 168 +/- 17 ml/min/100 gm, respectively, mean +/- SEM) were significantly higher than those in the normal opposite wall (endocardial: 106 +/- 3 ml/min/100 gm, p less than 0.01); epicardial: 108 +/- 3 ml/min/100 gm, p less than 0.01. The location and circumferential extent of myocardium showing this elevation of preocclusion blood flow correlated well (r = 0.93, p less than 0.001) with the location and circumferential extent of the histologic infarct.

  10. Second order tensor finite element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. Tinsley; Fly, J.; Berry, C.; Tworzydlo, W.; Vadaketh, S.; Bass, J.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a research and software development effort are presented for the finite element modeling of the static and dynamic behavior of anisotropic materials, with emphasis on single crystal alloys. Various versions of two dimensional and three dimensional hybrid finite elements were implemented and compared with displacement-based elements. Both static and dynamic cases are considered. The hybrid elements developed in the project were incorporated into the SPAR finite element code. In an extension of the first phase of the project, optimization of experimental tests for anisotropic materials was addressed. In particular, the problem of calculating material properties from tensile tests and of calculating stresses from strain measurements were considered. For both cases, numerical procedures and software for the optimization of strain gauge and material axes orientation were developed.

  11. Element-topology-independent preconditioners for parallel finite element computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Alexander, Scott

    1992-01-01

    A family of preconditioners for the solution of finite element equations are presented, which are element-topology independent and thus can be applicable to element order-free parallel computations. A key feature of the present preconditioners is the repeated use of element connectivity matrices and their left and right inverses. The properties and performance of the present preconditioners are demonstrated via beam and two-dimensional finite element matrices for implicit time integration computations.

  12. A coupled chemo-fluidic computational model for thrombogenesis in infarcted left ventricles.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jung Hee; Abd, Thura; George, Richard T; Mittal, Rajat

    2016-06-01

    A coupled chemo-fluidic computational model for investigating flow-mediated thrombogenesis in infarcted left ventricles (LVs) is proposed. LV thrombus (LVT) formation after the acute myocardial infarction (AMI) may lead to thromboembolic events that are associated with high mortality and morbidity, and reliable stratification of LVT risk is the key to managing the treatment of AMI patients. There have been several studies emphasizing the importance of LV blood flow patterns on thrombus formation; however, given the complex interplay between ventricular flow dynamics and biochemistry of thrombogenesis, current understanding is mostly empirical. In the present model, blood flow in the LV is obtained by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, and this is coupled to the biochemical modeling of the coagulation cascade, platelet activation, and fibrinogen polymerization. The coupled model is used to examine the effect of ventricular flow patterns on thrombogenesis in modeled ventricles. It is expected that the method developed here will enable in-depth studies of thrombogenesis in patient-derived infarcted LV models. PMID:27016582

  13. 3D Finite Time Lyapunov Exponents in a left ventricle laboratory model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grazia Badas, Maria; Espa, Stefania; Fortini, Stefania; Querzoli, Giorgio

    2015-05-01

    Finite Time Lyapunov Exponents (FTLEs) are a powerful means to infer characteristic features of the flow that cannot be revealed by other Eulerian criteria. Recently FTLEs are becoming popular also in the medical context, for instance in the analysis of vascular flow measured by means of Magnetic Resonance Imaging. However, many of the FTLE experimental works are based only on two-dimensional velocity fields, moreover those computed on in-vivo data cannot be obtained under controlled and repeatable conditions. Here we present the 3D FTLE evolution inside a Left Ventricle (LV) laboratory model mimicking physiological human conditions. The investigation of FTLE fields highlights distinctive features of the cardiac flow and gives an insight on the physiological development of the Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) that optimize the LV refill.

  14. Topology of blood transport in the human left ventricle by novel processing of Doppler echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Hendabadi, Sahar; Bermejo, Javier; Benito, Yolanda; Yotti, Raquel; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco; del Álamo, Juan C.; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2013-01-01

    Novel processing of Doppler-echocardiography data was used to study blood transport in the left ventricle (LV) of 6 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and 6 healthy volunteers. Bi-directional velocity field maps in the apical long axis of the LV were reconstructed from color-Doppler echocardiography. Resulting velocity field data were used to perform trajectory-based computation of Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS). LCS were shown to reveal the boundaries of blood injected and ejected from the heart over multiple beats. This enabled qualitative and quantitive assessments of blood transport patterns and residence times in the LV. Quantitative assessments of stasis in the LV are reported, as well as characterization of LV vortex formations from E-wave and A-wave filling. PMID:23817765

  15. Pattern recognition of abnormal left ventricle wall motion in cardiac MR.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yingli; Radau, Perry; Connelly, Kim; Dick, Alexander; Wright, Graham

    2009-01-01

    There are four main problems that limit application of pattern recognition techniques for recognition of abnormal cardiac left ventricle (LV) wall motion: (1) Normalization of the LV's size, shape, intensity level and position; (2) defining a spatial correspondence between phases and subjects; (3) extracting features; (4) and discriminating abnormal from normal wall motion. Solving these four problems is required for application of pattern recognition techniques to classify the normal and abnormal LV wall motion. In this work, we introduce a normalization scheme to solve the first and second problems. With this scheme, LVs are normalized to the same position, size, and intensity level. Using the normalized images, we proposed an intra-segment classification criterion based on a correlation measure to solve the third and fourth problems. Application of the method to recognition of abnormal cardiac MR LV wall motion showed promising results.

  16. Blood flow and pressure measurements of right coronary artery to left ventricle fistula.

    PubMed Central

    Kiso, I; Itoh, T; Morishita, M; Kato, K; Ishikura, Y

    1978-01-01

    A case of a dilated and tortuous right coronary artery to left ventricle fistula was surgically repaired. Preoperative intracoronary pressure measurements showed a sudden depression of diastolic pressure in the terminal part of the right coronary artery. Intraoperative mean right coronary flow was recorded as 315 ml/min. After repair of the fistula, blood flow measurements showed only 35 ml/min, which suggested that a large amount of blood was stolen by the fistula. Although systolic and diastolic murmurs only were heard in our patient, continuous murmurs have been noticed by some observers. From a study of the preoperative physical findings, intraoperative coronary flow measurements, and other operative findings, the genesis of heart murmurs relating to this type of anomaly is discussed. Images PMID:663886

  17. Automatic localization of the left ventricle in cardiac MRI images using deep learning.

    PubMed

    Emad, Omar; Yassine, Inas A; Fahmy, Ahmed S

    2015-08-01

    Automatic localization of the left ventricle (LV) in cardiac MRI images is an essential step for automatic segmentation, functional analysis, and content based retrieval of cardiac images. In this paper, we introduce a new approach based on deep Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) to localize the LV in cardiac MRI in short axis views. A six-layer CNN with different kernel sizes was employed for feature extraction, followed by Softmax fully connected layer for classification. The pyramids of scales analysis was introduced in order to take account of the different sizes of the heart. A publically-available database of 33 patients was used for learning and testing. The proposed method was able it localize the LV with 98.66%, 83.91% and 99.07% for accuracy, sensitivity and specificity respectively. PMID:26736354

  18. Coupled Hemodynamic-Biochemical Modeling of Thrombus Formation in Infarcted Left Ventricles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jung Hee; Vedula, Vijay; George, Richard; Mittal, Rajat

    2013-11-01

    Patients with heart failure (HF) and left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction have higher rates of thromboembolic events including embolic stroke and peripheral arterial thrombi. A common cause of arterial emboli in HF patients is myocardial infarction (MI) and subsequent left ventricular thrombus (LVT) formation. Stagnation of blood and endocardial injury are hypothesized to promote the development of LVT. The identification of high risk patients and the pharmacologic prevention of LVT formation are the keys to preventing embolic events. Stratification of patients at risk for LVT formation is currently limited, and primarily based on global assessment of ventricular function and image based assessment of ventricular wall motion. In this study, we explore a method to predict LVT risk using a multi-physics computational model. The blood flow in the left ventricle is simulated by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation using an immersed boundary method and this is coupled to a convection-diffusion-reaction equation based model of platelet activation and coagulation. The results are then correlated with the other hemodynamic metrics such as wall shear stress and residence time to develop quantitative metrics for the LVT risk prediction. Supported by NSF CDI-Type II grant IOS-1124804, Computational resource by XSEDE NSF grant TG-CTS100002.

  19. Hemodynamic responses to continuous versus pulsatile mechanical unloading of the failing left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, Carlo R; Giridharan, Guruprasad A; Litwak, Kenneth N; Sobieski, Michael; Prabhu, Sumanth D; Slaughter, Mark S; Koenig, Steven C

    2010-01-01

    Debate exists regarding the merits and limitations of continuous versus pulsatile flow mechanical circulatory support. To characterize the hemodynamic differences between each mode of support, we investigated the acute effects of continuous versus pulsatile unloading of the failing left ventricle in a bovine model. Heart failure was induced in male calves (n = 14). During an acute study, animals were instrumented through thoracotomy for hemodynamic measurement. A continuous flow (n = 8) and/or pulsatile flow (n = 8) left ventricular assist device (LVAD) was implanted and studied during maximum support ( approximately 5 L/min) and moderate support ( approximately 2-3 L/min) modes. Pulse pressure (PP), surplus hemodynamic energy (SHE), and (energy equivalent pressure [EEP]/mean aortic pressure (MAP) - 1) x 100% were derived to characterize hemodynamic energy profiles during the different support modes. Standard hemodynamic parameters of cardiac performance were also derived. Data were analyzed by repeated measures one-way analysis of variance within groups and unpaired Student's t-tests across groups. During maximum and moderate continuous unloading, PP, SHE, and (EEP/MAP - 1) x 100% were significantly decreased compared with baseline and compared with pulsatile unloading. As a result, continuous unloading significantly altered left ventricular peak systolic pressure, aortic systolic and diastolic pressure, +/-dP/dt, and rate x pressure product, whereas pulsatile unloading preserved a normal profile of physiologic values. As continuous unloading increased, the pressure-volume relationship collapsed, and the aortic valve remained closed. In contrast, as pulsatile unloading increased, a comparable decrease in left ventricular volumes was noted. However, a normal range of left ventricular pressures was preserved. Continuous unloading deranged the physiologic profile of myocardial and vascular hemodynamic energy utilization, whereas pulsatile unloading preserved more

  20. Finite element shell instability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Formulation procedures and the associated computer program for finite element thin shell instability analysis are discussed. Data cover: (1) formulation of basic element relationships, (2) construction of solution algorithms on both the conceptual and algorithmic levels, and (3) conduction of numerical analyses to verify the accuracy and efficiency of the theory and related programs therein are described.

  1. Double-outlet right ventricle with absent left ventricle and mitral atresia in a fetus with a deletion 22q12.

    PubMed

    L'herminé-Coulomb, Aurore; Houyel, Lucille; Aboura, Azzedine; Audibert, François; Dal Soglio, Dorothée; Tachdjian, Gérard

    2004-09-01

    Interstitial deletions of chromosomal region 22q12 are rare. We report the prenatal diagnosis of a de novo interstitial deletion 22q12. The fetus was karyotyped because of a complex cardiac anomaly. Conventional and molecular cytogenetics showed a female karyotype with a de novo pericentric inversion of one chromosome 22 associated with a deletion of the chromosomal region 22q12 leading to a partial monosomy 22q12. At autopsy, the fetus showed double-outlet right ventricle (DORV) with absent left ventricle and mitral atresia. This observation suggests that one or several genes for the early looping step of heart development may reside in chromosomal region 22q12. Further studies are needed to identify these genes, and to search microdeletions of 22q12 region in patients with DORV.

  2. Oxidative status and chymotrypsin-like activity in right and left ventricle hypertrophy in an experimental model of emphysema.

    PubMed

    Tonon, Jair; Guarnier, Flávia Alessandra; Brunnquell, Cláudia Roberta; Bernardes, Sara Santos; Cecchini, Alessandra Lourenço; Cecchini, Rubens

    2013-09-01

    Although cardiac muscle hypertrophy has been studied in association with several diseases, its mechanism in patients with emphysema, in particular in relation to oxidative stress and proteolysis, remains unknown. The role of oxidative stress and proteolysis in right and left ventricle hypertrophy was investigated in hamsters with emphysema induced by 2 different doses of papain (20mg/mL, E20 and 40mg/mL, E40). The thickness of the ventricles, total and cardiac weight, lipid peroxidation, carbonyl proteins, total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and proteasomal proteolytic activity were evaluated in the right ventricle (RV) and the left ventricle (LV) of control and emphysema hamsters. RV thickness was increased by 12% in the E20 group and by 29% in the E40 group. Lipid peroxidation measured by chemiluminescence was increased in the E40 group (from 3350.68±392.44URL/g tissue to 4696.63±1076.70URL/g tissue, p<0.05). TAC also increased only in the E40 group. In the LV, chemiluminescence values increased from 4044.77±503.39 to 5517.10±388.27 in the E20 group and to 8169.14±1748.77URL/g tissue in the E40 group (p<0.05, both). TAC significantly increased in the E20 and E40 groups. No differences were detected in substances reactive to thiobarbituric acid or carbonyl proteins when comparing ventricles or doses. Chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity significantly decreased in both groups and ventricles. Emphysema can induce right and left ventricle lipid peroxidation and result in antioxidant mobilization. These data together support the idea that cardiac hypertrophy in response to emphysema is mediated in part by proteolytic pathways with involvement of reactive species. PMID:24149056

  3. Cancer Induces Cardiomyocyte Remodeling and Hypoinnervation in the Left Ventricle of the Mouse Heart

    PubMed Central

    Heinzel, Frank R.; Schmidt, Albrecht; Post, Heiner; Schauer, Silvia; Papadakis, Tamara; Kummer, Wolfgang; Hoefler, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is often associated with cachexia, cardiovascular symptoms and autonomic dysregulation. We tested whether extracardiac cancer directly affects the innervation of left ventricular myocardium. Mice injected with Lewis lung carcinoma cells (tumor group, TG) or PBS (control group, CG) were analyzed after 21 days. Cardiac function (echocardiography), serum levels of TNF-α and Il-6 (ELISA), structural alterations of cardiomyocytes and their innervation (design-based stereology) and levels of innervation-related mRNA (quantitative RT-PCR) were analysed. The groups did not differ in various functional parameters. Serum levels of TNF-α and Il-6 were elevated in TG. The total length of axons in the left ventricle was reduced. The number of dense core vesicles per axon profile was reduced. Decreased myofibrillar volume, increased sarcoplasmic volume and increased volume of lipid droplets were indicative of metabolic alterations of TG cardiomyocytes. In the heart, the mRNA level of nerve growth factor was reduced whereas that of β1-adrenergic receptor was unchanged in TG. In the stellate ganglion of TG, mRNA levels of nerve growth factor and neuropeptide Y were decreased and that of tyrosine hydroxylase was increased. In summary, cancer induces a systemic pro-inflammatory state, a significant reduction in myocardial innervation and a catabolic phenotype of cardiomyocytes in the mouse. Reduced expression of nerve growth factor may account for the reduced myocardial innervation. PMID:21637823

  4. Segmentation of the left ventricle using distance regularized two-layer level set approach.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chaolu; Li, Chunming; Zhao, Dazhe; Davatzikos, Christos; Litt, Harold

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel two-layer level set approach for segmentation of the left ventricle (LV) from cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) short-axis images. In our method, endocardium and epicardium are represented by two specified level contours of a level set function. Segmentation of the LV is formulated as a problem of optimizing the level set function such that these two level contours best fit the epicardium and endocardium. More importantly, a distance regularization (DR) constraint on the level contours is introduced to preserve smoothly varying distance between them. This DR constraint leads to a desirable interaction between the level contours that contributes to maintain the anatomical geometry of the endocardium and epicardium. The negative influence of intensity inhomogeneities on image segmentation are overcome by using a data term derived from a local intensity clustering property. Our method is quantitatively validated by experiments on the datasets for the MICCAI grand challenge on left ventricular segmentation, which demonstrates the advantages of our method in terms of segmentation accuracy and consistency with anatomical geometry.

  5. Analysis of the Influence of the Electrical Asynchrony on Regional Mechanics of the Infarcted Left Ventricle Using Electromechanical Heart Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Xia, Ling; Zhang, Xin

    Asynchronous electrical activation, as induced by myocardial infarction, causes various abnormalities in left ventricle function. The influence of the electrical asynchrony on regional mechanics of the left ventricle is simulated using a mechanical heart model and an electrical heart model. The mechanical model accounts for the ventricular geometry, the fiber nature of the myocardial tissue, and the dependency of the activation sequence of the ventricular wall. The electrical model is based on a heart-torso model with realistic geometry, and different action potential waveforms with variables in duration are used to simulate the abnormal electrical activation after myocardial infarction. Regional deformation, strain and stress are calculated during systole phase. The preliminary results show that asynchronous electrical activation, as an important factor, significantly affects regional mechanical performance of the infarcted left ventricle, it indicates heterogeneous contraction pattern and elevated systolic stresses near the injured region. The simulated results are compared with solutions obtained in the literature. This simulation suggests that such coupled heart models can be used to assess the mechanical function of the left ventricle with diseases such as myocardial infarction, and more realistic models of cardiac function are essential for clinical evaluation of heart disease.

  6. The Effects of Training on the Time Components of the Left Ventricle, and Cardiac Time Components: Sedentary versus Active Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plowman, Sharon Ann

    A review of previous research was completed to determine (a) the response of the cardiac time components of the left ventricle to varying types and intensities of training programs, (b) the probable physiological explanations for these responses, and (c) the significance of the changes which did or did not occur. It was found that, at rest,…

  7. Contraction wave in axial direction in free wall of guinea pig left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Kirn, Borut; Starc, Vito

    2004-08-01

    Mechanical activation of the normal left ventricle (LV) is not simultaneous; however, the potential consequences of the ejection function of the ventricle are not entirely known. We studied contraction of the LV free wall to determine whether it reveals a contraction wave in the axial direction during ejection. Seven guinea pig hearts in situ were studied via thoracotomy. In each heart, the ventricular and aortic pressures were measured by two microtipped manometers (2-Fr, Millar). Contraction of the LV free wall was assessed with a video system (Dalsa D6-0256 camera and EPIX PIXCI D32 frame grabber; acquisition rate, 500 frames/s), and 15-18 epicardial markers were used to divide the region into 20-25 triangular areas. The area sizes were studied during contraction to locate the position of the contraction wave. For each triangular area, two variables were determined as follows: the time (t(c)) from the end of diastole until the size of the area reached 80% of maximum size reduction (normalized with the duration of systole) and the normalized latitude (L(ax)) of the area (determined at the end of diastole). A relationship between these two variables was determined by regression analysis. We found that the t(c) at which the contraction wave reached a triangular area was in positive correlation with the L(ax) value for that triangular area with a slope of 0.25 +/- 0.09 and a linear correlation coefficient of 0.41 +/- 0.08. Thus contraction in the guinea pig LV free wall occurs progressively from apex to base with successive areas reaching 80% contraction.

  8. Simulated Microgravity and Recovery-Induced Remodeling of the Left and Right Ventricle.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Guohui; Li, Yuheng; Li, Hongxing; Sun, Weijia; Cao, Dengchao; Li, Jianwei; Zhao, Dingsheng; Song, Jinping; Jin, Xiaoyan; Song, Hailin; Yuan, Xinxin; Wu, Xiaorui; Li, Qi; Xu, Qing; Kan, Guanghan; Cao, Hongqing; Ling, Shukuan; Li, Yingxian

    2016-01-01

    Physiological adaptations to microgravity involve alterations in cardiovascular systems. These adaptations result in cardiac remodeling and orthostatic hypotension. However, the response of the left ventricle (LV) and right ventricle (RV) following hindlimb unloading (HU) and hindlimb reloading (HR) is not clear and the underlying mechanism remains to be understood. In this study, three groups of mice were subjected to HU by tail suspension for 28 days. Following this, two groups were allowed to recover for 7 or 14 days. The control group was treated equally, with the exception of tail suspension. Echocardiography was performed to detect the structure and function changes of heart. Compared with the control, the HU group of mice showed reduced LV-EF (ejection fraction), and LV-FS (fractional shortening). However, mice that were allowed to recover for 7 days after HU (HR-7d) showed increased LVIDs (systolic LV internal diameter) and LV Vols (systolic LV volume). Mice that recovered for 14 days (HR-14d) returned to the normal state. In comparison, RV-EF and RV-FS didn't recover to the normal conditions till being reloaded for 14 days. Compared with the control, RVIDd (diastolic RV internal diameter), and RV Vold (diastolic RV volume) were reduced in HU group and recovered to the normal conditions in HR-7d and HR-14d groups, in which groups RVIDs (systolic RV internal diameter) and RV Vols (systolic RV volume) were increased. Histological analysis and cardiac remodeling gene expression results indicated that HU induces left and right ventricular remodeling. Western blot demonstrated that the phosphorylation of HDAC4 and ERK1/2 and the ratio of LC3-II / LC3-I, were increased following HU and recovered following HR in both LV and RV, and the phosphorylation of AMPK was inhibited in both LV and RV following HU, but only restored in LV following HR for 14 days. These results indicate that simulated microgravity leads to cardiac remodeling, and the remodeling changes can

  9. Simulated Microgravity and Recovery-Induced Remodeling of the Left and Right Ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Guohui; Li, Yuheng; Li, Hongxing; Sun, Weijia; Cao, Dengchao; Li, Jianwei; Zhao, Dingsheng; Song, Jinping; Jin, Xiaoyan; Song, Hailin; Yuan, Xinxin; Wu, Xiaorui; Li, Qi; Xu, Qing; Kan, Guanghan; Cao, Hongqing; Ling, Shukuan; Li, Yingxian

    2016-01-01

    Physiological adaptations to microgravity involve alterations in cardiovascular systems. These adaptations result in cardiac remodeling and orthostatic hypotension. However, the response of the left ventricle (LV) and right ventricle (RV) following hindlimb unloading (HU) and hindlimb reloading (HR) is not clear and the underlying mechanism remains to be understood. In this study, three groups of mice were subjected to HU by tail suspension for 28 days. Following this, two groups were allowed to recover for 7 or 14 days. The control group was treated equally, with the exception of tail suspension. Echocardiography was performed to detect the structure and function changes of heart. Compared with the control, the HU group of mice showed reduced LV-EF (ejection fraction), and LV-FS (fractional shortening). However, mice that were allowed to recover for 7 days after HU (HR-7d) showed increased LVIDs (systolic LV internal diameter) and LV Vols (systolic LV volume). Mice that recovered for 14 days (HR-14d) returned to the normal state. In comparison, RV-EF and RV-FS didn't recover to the normal conditions till being reloaded for 14 days. Compared with the control, RVIDd (diastolic RV internal diameter), and RV Vold (diastolic RV volume) were reduced in HU group and recovered to the normal conditions in HR-7d and HR-14d groups, in which groups RVIDs (systolic RV internal diameter) and RV Vols (systolic RV volume) were increased. Histological analysis and cardiac remodeling gene expression results indicated that HU induces left and right ventricular remodeling. Western blot demonstrated that the phosphorylation of HDAC4 and ERK1/2 and the ratio of LC3-II / LC3-I, were increased following HU and recovered following HR in both LV and RV, and the phosphorylation of AMPK was inhibited in both LV and RV following HU, but only restored in LV following HR for 14 days. These results indicate that simulated microgravity leads to cardiac remodeling, and the remodeling changes can

  10. Intra-isthmus reentry associated with uncorrected double inlet left ventricle and transposition of the great arteries.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Paramdeep S; Li, Anthony; Gonna, Hanney; Ward, David E

    2013-01-01

    A 62-year-old man with uncorrected cyanotic congenital heart disease involving double inlet left ventricle with visceral and atrial situs solitus, L-looped ventricles, L-transposed great vessels, and pulmonary stenosis, presented with recurrent atrial tachycardia. Entrainment mapping revealed the arrhythmia mechanism to be an uncommon micro-reentrant cavotricuspid isthmus-dependent circuit (intra-isthmus reentry), which was amenable to radiofrequency ablation. This uncommon right atrial arrhythmia is yet to be reported in patients with complex congenital heart disease and was amenable to radiofrequency ablation.

  11. [Mathematical Modelling of the Dependence of the Performance of the Left Ventricle of the Heart on Preload and Afterload].

    PubMed

    Syomin, F A; Zberia, M V; Koubassova, N A; Tsaturyan, A K

    2015-01-01

    The results of the numerical simulation of the end-diastolic, end-systolic and stroke volumes of the left ventricle of the heart are presented. The simulation was based on a published simple kinetic model of cardiac muscle and approximation of the ventricle geometry with thick-wall cylinder where the fibre orientation varied linearly from sub-epicardium towards sub-endocardium. Blood flow was modelled with a liner compartment model. This simplified approach provides correct dependencies of the stroke volume on the pre- and afterload, namely end-diastolic pressure and peripheral resistance. The calculations show that the stroke volume is independent of arterial compliance and blood inertia. PMID:26841514

  12. [THE EFFECT OF SEROTONIN ON THE INOTROPIC FUNCTION OF MYOCARDIUM OF THE LEFT VENTRICLE OF IMMATURE SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS].

    PubMed

    Aflyatumova, G N; Nedorezova, R S; Nigmatullina, R R; Sadykova, D I; Mateeva, V L; Chibireva, M D

    2015-08-01

    The mechanisms of the serotonin effect on the inotropic function of the myocardium of the left ventricle of immature spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) are unexplored. It was found that systolic arterial blood pressure of 5-6 weeks SHR rats is 147.5 mm Hg, which is statistically significantly higher (more than 25 mm Hg) than in the same age of normotensive control Wistar- Kyoto rats. The weight of the heart, of the left ventricle myocardium, of the ventricular septum, of the aorta and the force of contraction of the left ventricle of 5-6-week-old SHR rats are increased significantly compared with the control. 0.1 pM serotonin increases and 1.0 pM and 10.0 AM serotonin reduce the force of contraction of the left ventricular myocardium in hypertensive rats, but there is a dose-dependent increase of the force of contraction in the control. Serotonin reduces the time of contraction of the myocardium of the left ventricular of SHR rats, these reactions are less pronounced as compared to the control.

  13. Infinite Possibilities for the Finite Element.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finlayson, Bruce A.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the uses of finite element methods in solving problems of heat transfer, fluid flow, etc. Suggests that engineers should know the general concepts and be able to apply the principles of finite element methods. (Author/WB)

  14. SUPG Finite Element Simulations of Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Brnjamin, S.

    2006-01-01

    The Streamline-Upwind Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) finite element simulations of compressible flows is presented. The topics include: 1) Introduction; 2) SUPG Galerkin Finite Element Methods; 3) Applications; and 4) Bibliography.

  15. Early diastolic clicks after the Fontan procedure for double inlet left ventricle: anatomical and physiological correlates.

    PubMed Central

    Redington, A N; Chan, K Y; Carvalho, J S; Shinebourne, E A

    1990-01-01

    M mode echocardiograms and simultaneous phonocardiograms were recorded in four patients with early diastolic clicks on auscultation. All had double inlet left ventricle and had undergone the Fontan procedure with closure of the right atrioventricular valve orifice by an artificial patch. The phonocardiogram confirmed a high frequency sound occurring 60-90 ms after aortic valve closure and coinciding with the time of maximal excursion of the atrioventricular valve patch towards the ventricular mass. One patient had coexisting congenital complete heart block. The M mode echocardiogram showed "reversed" motion of the patch towards the right atrium during atrial contraction. Doppler flow studies showed that coincident with this motion there was forward flow in the pulmonary artery with augmentation when atrial contraction coincided with ventricular systole. The early diastolic click in these patients was explained by abrupt cessation of the motion of the atrioventricular valve patch towards the ventricular mass in early diastole. In one patient atrial contraction led to a reversal of this motion and was associated with forward flow in the pulmonary artery. Images PMID:2278802

  16. [HEMODYNAMIC CHILDREN WITH ISOLATED ANOMALOUS CHORDS OF THE LEFT VENTRICLE DEPENDING ON LOCATION AND QUANTITY].

    PubMed

    Kondrashova, V G

    2015-01-01

    A total of 156 children group (children born to parents exposed to the Chernobyl disaster), in which, according to Doppler echocardiography, revealed isolated abnormal chords of the left ventricle (AHLV). Analysis of morphometric parameters and central hemodynamics conducted according to the localization AHLV. Found that concomitant localization AHLV at the threshold of the number of the most influencing change morphoinetric indicators and central hemodynamics. Condition of systemic circulation indicates a decline in their adaptive capacity of the cardiovascular system due to changes in the dynamics and power of the heartbeat. The decrease in stroke volume, stroke and cardiac index suggests hypokinetic type of organization of central hemodynamics, which can be considered an early sign of stress features of the heart and blood vessels. In this subgroup of children revealed significant changes in transmitral flow, indicating the initiation they have diastolic dysfunc tion. When the number of prethreshold AHLV most pronounced changes were found in the middle of their localization. Almost a third of children in this subgroup with individual assessment also revealed signs of initiation of diastolic dysfunction. PMID:27089709

  17. Fully automated segmentation of left ventricle using dual dynamic programming in cardiac cine MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Luan; Ling, Shan; Li, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are becoming a leading cause of death all over the world. The cardiac function could be evaluated by global and regional parameters of left ventricle (LV) of the heart. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a fully automated scheme for segmentation of LV in short axis cardiac cine MR images. Our fully automated method consists of three major steps, i.e., LV localization, LV segmentation at end-diastolic phase, and LV segmentation propagation to the other phases. First, the maximum intensity projection image along the time phases of the midventricular slice, located at the center of the image, was calculated to locate the region of interest of LV. Based on the mean intensity of the roughly segmented blood pool in the midventricular slice at each phase, end-diastolic (ED) and end-systolic (ES) phases were determined. Second, the endocardial and epicardial boundaries of LV of each slice at ED phase were synchronously delineated by use of a dual dynamic programming technique. The external costs of the endocardial and epicardial boundaries were defined with the gradient values obtained from the original and enhanced images, respectively. Finally, with the advantages of the continuity of the boundaries of LV across adjacent phases, we propagated the LV segmentation from the ED phase to the other phases by use of dual dynamic programming technique. The preliminary results on 9 clinical cardiac cine MR cases show that the proposed method can obtain accurate segmentation of LV based on subjective evaluation.

  18. Chloroquine improves left ventricle diastolic function in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xun; Xiao, Yi-Chuan; Zhang, Gui-Ping; Hou, Ning; Wu, Xiao-Qian; Chen, Wen-Liang; Luo, Jian-Dong; Zhang, Gen-Shui

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a potent risk factor for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Autophagy can be activated under pathological conditions, including diabetic cardiomyopathy. The therapeutic effects of chloroquine (CQ), an autophagy inhibitor, on left ventricle function in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice were investigated. The cardiac function, light chain 3 (LC3)-II/LC3-I ratio, p62, beclin 1, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and fibrosis were measured 14 days after CQ (ip 60 mg/kg/d) administration. In STZ-induced mice, cardiac diastolic function was decreased significantly with normal ejection fraction. CQ significantly ameliorated cardiac diastolic function in diabetic mice with HFpEF. In addition, CQ decreased the autophagolysosomes, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and cardiac fibrosis but increased LC3-II and p62 expressions. These results suggested that CQ improved the cardiac diastolic function by inhibiting autophagy in STZ-induced HFpEF mice. Autophagic inhibitor CQ might be a potential therapeutic agent for HFpEF. PMID:27621594

  19. Flow Behavior in the Left Heart Ventricle Following Apico-Aortic Bypass Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahriari, Shahrokh; Jeyhani, Morteza; Labrosse, Michel; Kadem, Lyes

    2013-11-01

    Apico-aortic bypass (AAB) surgery is an alternative for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) to reduce left ventricle (LV) overload in patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS). It consists in connecting the apex of the LV to the descending thoracic aorta with a valved conduit. Postoperative flow assessments show that two thirds of the outflow is conducted from the LV apex to the conduit, while only one third crosses the native aortic valve. In this study, we performed high speed particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements of flow pattern within an in vitro elastic model of LV in the presence of a very severe AS, before and after AAB. Results indicate that AAB effectively relieves the LV outflow obstruction; however, it also leads to abnormal ventricular flow patterns. Normal LV flow dynamics is characterized by an emerging mitral jet flow followed by the development of a vortical flow with velocities directed towards the aortic valve, while measurements in the presence of AAB show systolic flow bifurcating to the apical conduit and to the aortic valve outflow tract. This study provides the first insight into the LV flow structure after AAB including outflow jets and disturbed stagnation regions.

  20. [HEMODYNAMIC CHILDREN WITH ISOLATED ANOMALOUS CHORDS OF THE LEFT VENTRICLE DEPENDING ON LOCATION AND QUANTITY].

    PubMed

    Kondrashova, V G

    2015-01-01

    A total of 156 children group (children born to parents exposed to the Chernobyl disaster), in which, according to Doppler echocardiography, revealed isolated abnormal chords of the left ventricle (AHLV). Analysis of morphometric parameters and central hemodynamics conducted according to the localization AHLV. Found that concomitant localization AHLV at the threshold of the number of the most influencing change morphoinetric indicators and central hemodynamics. Condition of systemic circulation indicates a decline in their adaptive capacity of the cardiovascular system due to changes in the dynamics and power of the heartbeat. The decrease in stroke volume, stroke and cardiac index suggests hypokinetic type of organization of central hemodynamics, which can be considered an early sign of stress features of the heart and blood vessels. In this subgroup of children revealed significant changes in transmitral flow, indicating the initiation they have diastolic dysfunc tion. When the number of prethreshold AHLV most pronounced changes were found in the middle of their localization. Almost a third of children in this subgroup with individual assessment also revealed signs of initiation of diastolic dysfunction.

  1. In-vivo characterization of left-ventricle pressure-volume telemetry system in swine model.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Kyle; Konecny, Filip; El-Warrak, Alexander; Hodgson, Chad; Cadieux-Pitre, Heather; Hill, Tracy; Sobot, Robert

    2016-10-01

    We present in-vivo study related to the use of our implantable RF telemetry system for pressure-volume (PV) cardiac monitoring in a animal subject. We implant a commercial MEMS PV sensor into the subject's heart left-ventricle (LV), while the telemetry system is implanted outside of the heart and connected to the sensor with a 7-microwires tether. The RF telemetry system is suitable for commercial application in medium sized subjects, its total volume of 2.475cm(3) and a weight of 4.0g. Our designed system is 58 % smaller in volume, 44 % in weight and has a 55 % reduction in sampling power over the last reported research in PV telemetry. In-vivo data was captured in both an acute and a freely moving setting over a 24 hour period. We experimentally demonstrated viability of the methodology that includes the surgical procedure and real-time monitoring of the in-vivo data in a freely moving subject. Further improvements in catheter design will improve the data quality and safety of the subject. This real-time implantable technology allows for researchers to quantify cardiac pathologies by extracting real-time pressure-volume loops, wirelessly from within freely moving subjects. PMID:27492638

  2. Accelerated circumferential strain quantification of the left ventricle using CIRCOME: simulation and factor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, Abbas N.; Finn, J. Paul

    2008-03-01

    Circumferential strain of the left ventricle reflects myocardial contractility and is considered a key index of cardiac function. It is also an important parameter in the quantitative evaluation of heart failure. Circumferential compression encoding, CIRCOME, is a novel method in cardiac MRI to evaluate this strain non-invasively and quickly. This strain encoding technique avoids the explicit measurement of the displacement field and does not require calculation of strain through spatial differentiation. CIRCOME bypasses these two time-consuming and noise sensitive steps by directly using the frequency domain (k-space) information from radially tagged myocardium, before and after deformation. It uses the ring-shaped crown region of the k-space, generated by the taglines, to reconstruct circumferentially compression-weighted images of the heart before and after deformation. CIRCOME then calculates the circumferential strain through relative changes in the compression level of corresponding regions before and after deformation. This technique can be implemented in 3D as well as 2D and may be employed to estimate the overall global or regional circumferential strain. The main parameters that affect the accuracy of this method are spatial resolution, signal to noise ratio, eccentricity of the center of radial taglines their fading and their density. Also, a variety of possible image reconstruction and filtering options may influence the accuracy of the method. This study describes the pulse sequence, algorithm, influencing factors and limiting criteria for CIRCOME and provides the simulated results.

  3. Chloroquine improves left ventricle diastolic function in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xun; Xiao, Yi-Chuan; Zhang, Gui-Ping; Hou, Ning; Wu, Xiao-Qian; Chen, Wen-Liang; Luo, Jian-Dong; Zhang, Gen-Shui

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a potent risk factor for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Autophagy can be activated under pathological conditions, including diabetic cardiomyopathy. The therapeutic effects of chloroquine (CQ), an autophagy inhibitor, on left ventricle function in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice were investigated. The cardiac function, light chain 3 (LC3)-II/LC3-I ratio, p62, beclin 1, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and fibrosis were measured 14 days after CQ (ip 60 mg/kg/d) administration. In STZ-induced mice, cardiac diastolic function was decreased significantly with normal ejection fraction. CQ significantly ameliorated cardiac diastolic function in diabetic mice with HFpEF. In addition, CQ decreased the autophagolysosomes, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and cardiac fibrosis but increased LC3-II and p62 expressions. These results suggested that CQ improved the cardiac diastolic function by inhibiting autophagy in STZ-induced HFpEF mice. Autophagic inhibitor CQ might be a potential therapeutic agent for HFpEF. PMID:27621594

  4. Variational level-set segmentation and tracking of left ventricle using field prior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshin, Mariam; Ben Ayed, Ismail; Islam, Ali; Ross, Ian; Peters, Terry; Li, Shuo

    2011-03-01

    This study investigates a novel method of tracking Left Ventricle (LV) curve in Magnetic Resonance (MR) sequences. The method focuses on energy minimization by level-set curve boundary evolution. The level-set framework allows introducing knowledge of the field prior on the solution. The segmentation in each particular time relies not only on the current image but also the segmented image from previous phase. Field prior is defined based on the experimental fact that the mean logarithm of intensity inside endo and epi-cardium is approximately constant during a cardiac cycle. The solution is obtained by evolving two curves following the Euler-Lagrange minimization of a functional containing a field constraint. The functional measures the consistency of the field prior over a cardiac sequence. Our preliminary results show that the obtained segmentations are very well correlated with those manually obtained by experts. Furthermore, we observed that the proposed field prior speeds up curve evolution significantly and reduces the computation load.

  5. Accurate segmentation framework for the left ventricle wall from cardiac cine MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliman, H.; Khalifa, F.; Elnakib, A.; Soliman, A.; Beache, G. M.; Gimel'farb, G.; Emam, A.; Elmaghraby, A.; El-Baz, A.

    2013-10-01

    We propose a novel, fast, robust, bi-directional coupled parametric deformable model to segment the left ventricle (LV) wall borders using first- and second-order visual appearance features. These features are embedded in a new stochastic external force that preserves the topology of LV wall to track the evolution of the parametric deformable models control points. To accurately estimate the marginal density of each deformable model control point, the empirical marginal grey level distributions (first-order appearance) inside and outside the boundary of the deformable model are modeled with adaptive linear combinations of discrete Gaussians (LCDG). The second order visual appearance of the LV wall is accurately modeled with a new rotationally invariant second-order Markov-Gibbs random field (MGRF). We tested the proposed segmentation approach on 15 data sets in 6 infarction patients using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and the average distance (AD) between the ground truth and automated segmentation contours. Our approach achieves a mean DSC value of 0.926±0.022 and AD value of 2.16±0.60 compared to two other level set methods that achieve 0.904±0.033 and 0.885±0.02 for DSC; and 2.86±1.35 and 5.72±4.70 for AD, respectively.

  6. Clinical characterization of 2D pressure field in human left ventricles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borja, Maria; Rossini, Lorenzo; Martinez-Legazpi, Pablo; Benito, Yolanda; Alhama, Marta; Yotti, Raquel; Perez Del Villar, Candelas; Gonzalez-Mansilla, Ana; Barrio, Alicia; Fernandez-Aviles, Francisco; Bermejo, Javier; Khan, Andrew; Del Alamo, Juan Carlos

    2014-11-01

    The evaluation of left ventricle (LV) function in the clinical setting remains a challenge. Pressure gradient is a reliable and reproducible indicator of the LV function. We obtain 2D relative pressure field in the LV using in-vivo measurements obtained by processing Doppler-echocardiography images of healthy and dilated hearts. Exploiting mass conservation, we solve the Poisson pressure equation (PPE) dropping the time derivatives and viscous terms. The flow acceleration appears only in the boundary conditions, making our method weakly sensible to the time resolution of in-vivo acquisitions. To ensure continuity with respect to the discrete operator and grid used, a potential flow correction is applied beforehand, which gives another Poisson equation. The new incompressible velocity field ensures that the compatibility equation for the PPE is satisfied. Both Poisson equations are efficiently solved on a Cartesian grid using a multi-grid method and immersed boundary for the LV wall. The whole process is computationally inexpensive and could play a diagnostic role in the clinical assessment of LV function.

  7. Chloroquine improves left ventricle diastolic function in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xun; Xiao, Yi-Chuan; Zhang, Gui-Ping; Hou, Ning; Wu, Xiao-Qian; Chen, Wen-Liang; Luo, Jian-Dong; Zhang, Gen-Shui

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a potent risk factor for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Autophagy can be activated under pathological conditions, including diabetic cardiomyopathy. The therapeutic effects of chloroquine (CQ), an autophagy inhibitor, on left ventricle function in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice were investigated. The cardiac function, light chain 3 (LC3)-II/LC3-I ratio, p62, beclin 1, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and fibrosis were measured 14 days after CQ (ip 60 mg/kg/d) administration. In STZ-induced mice, cardiac diastolic function was decreased significantly with normal ejection fraction. CQ significantly ameliorated cardiac diastolic function in diabetic mice with HFpEF. In addition, CQ decreased the autophagolysosomes, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and cardiac fibrosis but increased LC3-II and p62 expressions. These results suggested that CQ improved the cardiac diastolic function by inhibiting autophagy in STZ-induced HFpEF mice. Autophagic inhibitor CQ might be a potential therapeutic agent for HFpEF.

  8. In-vivo characterization of 2D residence time maps in the left ventricle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossini, Lorenzo; Martinez-Legazpi, Pablo; Bermejo, Javier; Benito, Yolanda; Alhama, Marta; Yotti, Raquel; Perez Del Villar, Candelas; Gonzalez-Mansilla, Ana; Barrio, Alicia; Fernandez-Aviles, Francisco; Shadden, Shawn; Del Alamo, Juan Carlos

    2014-11-01

    Thrombus formation is a multifactorial process involving biology and hemodynamics. Blood stagnation and wall shear stress are linked to thrombus formation. The quantification of residence time of blood in the left ventricle (LV) is relevant for patients affected by ventricular contractility dysfunction. We use a continuum formulation to compute 2D blood residence time (TR) maps in the LV using in-vivo 2D velocity fields in the apical long axis plane obtained from Doppler-echocardiography images of healthy and dilated hearts. The TR maps are generated integrating in time an advection-diffusion equation of a passive scalar with a time-source term. This equation represents the Eulerian translation of DTR / D t = 1 and is solved numerically with a finite volume method on a Cartesian grid using an immersed boundary for the LV wall. Changing the source term and the boundary conditions allows us to track blood transport (direct and retained flow) in the LV and the topology of early (E) and atrial (A) filling waves. This method has been validated against a Lagrangian Coherent Structures analysis, is computationally inexpensive and observer independent, making it a potential diagnostic tool in clinical settings.

  9. A clinical method for mapping and quantifying blood stasis in the left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Lorenzo; Martinez-Legazpi, Pablo; Vu, Vi; Fernández-Friera, Leticia; Pérez Del Villar, Candelas; Rodríguez-López, Sara; Benito, Yolanda; Borja, María-Guadalupe; Pastor-Escuredo, David; Yotti, Raquel; Ledesma-Carbayo, María J; Kahn, Andrew M; Ibáñez, Borja; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco; May-Newman, Karen; Bermejo, Javier; Del Álamo, Juan C

    2016-07-26

    In patients at risk of intraventrcular thrombosis, the benefits of chronic anticoagulation therapy need to be balanced with the pro-hemorrhagic effects of therapy. Blood stasis in the cardiac chambers is a recognized risk factor for intracardiac thrombosis and potential cardiogenic embolic events. In this work, we present a novel flow image-based method to assess the location and extent of intraventricular stasis regions inside the left ventricle (LV) by digital processing flow-velocity images obtained either by phase-contrast magnetic resonance (PCMR) or 2D color-Doppler velocimetry (echo-CDV). This approach is based on quantifying the distribution of the blood Residence Time (TR) from time-resolved blood velocity fields in the LV. We tested the new method in illustrative examples of normal hearts, patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and one patient before and after the implantation of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). The method allowed us to assess in-vivo the location and extent of the stasis regions in the LV. Original metrics were developed to integrate flow properties into simple scalars suitable for a robust and personalized assessment of the risk of thrombosis. From a clinical perspective, this work introduces the new paradigm that quantitative flow dynamics can provide the basis to obtain subclinical markers of intraventricular thrombosis risk. The early prediction of LV blood stasis may result in decrease strokes by appropriate use of anticoagulant therapy for the purpose of primary and secondary prevention. It may also have a significant impact on LVAD device design and operation set-up. PMID:26680013

  10. A clinical method for mapping and quantifying blood stasis in the left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Lorenzo; Martinez-Legazpi, Pablo; Vu, Vi; Fernández-Friera, Leticia; Pérez Del Villar, Candelas; Rodríguez-López, Sara; Benito, Yolanda; Borja, María-Guadalupe; Pastor-Escuredo, David; Yotti, Raquel; Ledesma-Carbayo, María J; Kahn, Andrew M; Ibáñez, Borja; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco; May-Newman, Karen; Bermejo, Javier; Del Álamo, Juan C

    2016-07-26

    In patients at risk of intraventrcular thrombosis, the benefits of chronic anticoagulation therapy need to be balanced with the pro-hemorrhagic effects of therapy. Blood stasis in the cardiac chambers is a recognized risk factor for intracardiac thrombosis and potential cardiogenic embolic events. In this work, we present a novel flow image-based method to assess the location and extent of intraventricular stasis regions inside the left ventricle (LV) by digital processing flow-velocity images obtained either by phase-contrast magnetic resonance (PCMR) or 2D color-Doppler velocimetry (echo-CDV). This approach is based on quantifying the distribution of the blood Residence Time (TR) from time-resolved blood velocity fields in the LV. We tested the new method in illustrative examples of normal hearts, patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and one patient before and after the implantation of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). The method allowed us to assess in-vivo the location and extent of the stasis regions in the LV. Original metrics were developed to integrate flow properties into simple scalars suitable for a robust and personalized assessment of the risk of thrombosis. From a clinical perspective, this work introduces the new paradigm that quantitative flow dynamics can provide the basis to obtain subclinical markers of intraventricular thrombosis risk. The early prediction of LV blood stasis may result in decrease strokes by appropriate use of anticoagulant therapy for the purpose of primary and secondary prevention. It may also have a significant impact on LVAD device design and operation set-up.

  11. Peridynamic Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Timothy; Bond, Stephen D.; Littlewood, David John; Moore, Stan Gerald

    2015-12-01

    The problem of computing quantum-accurate design-scale solutions to mechanics problems is rich with applications and serves as the background to modern multiscale science research. The prob- lem can be broken into component problems comprised of communicating across adjacent scales, which when strung together create a pipeline for information to travel from quantum scales to design scales. Traditionally, this involves connections between a) quantum electronic structure calculations and molecular dynamics and between b) molecular dynamics and local partial differ- ential equation models at the design scale. The second step, b), is particularly challenging since the appropriate scales of molecular dynamic and local partial differential equation models do not overlap. The peridynamic model for continuum mechanics provides an advantage in this endeavor, as the basic equations of peridynamics are valid at a wide range of scales limiting from the classical partial differential equation models valid at the design scale to the scale of molecular dynamics. In this work we focus on the development of multiscale finite element methods for the peridynamic model, in an effort to create a mathematically consistent channel for microscale information to travel from the upper limits of the molecular dynamics scale to the design scale. In particular, we first develop a Nonlocal Multiscale Finite Element Method which solves the peridynamic model at multiple scales to include microscale information at the coarse-scale. We then consider a method that solves a fine-scale peridynamic model to build element-support basis functions for a coarse- scale local partial differential equation model, called the Mixed Locality Multiscale Finite Element Method. Given decades of research and development into finite element codes for the local partial differential equation models of continuum mechanics there is a strong desire to couple local and nonlocal models to leverage the speed and state of the

  12. Totally implantable artificial hearts and left ventricular assist devices: selecting impermeable polycarbonate urethane to manufacture ventricles.

    PubMed

    Yang, M; Zhang, Z; Hahn, C; Laroche, G; King, M W; Guidoin, R

    1999-01-01

    In the development of a new generation of totally implantable artificial hearts and left ventricular assist devices (VADs) for long-term use, the selection of an acceptable material for the fabrication of the ventricles probably represents one of the greatest challenges. Segmented polyether urethanes used to be the material of choice due to their superior flexural performance, acceptable blood compatibility, and ease of processing. However, because they are known to degrade and to be readily permeable to water, they cannot meet the rigorous requirements needed for a new generation of implantable artificial hearts and VADs. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to identify alternative polymeric materials that would be satisfactory for fabricating the ventricles, and in particular, to determine the water permeability through membranes made from four commercial polycarbonate urethanes (Carbothane PC3570A, Chronoflex AR, Corethane 80A, and Corethane 55D) in comparison to those made from two traditional polyether urethanes (Tecoflex EG80A and Tecothane TT-1074A). In addition to determining the rate of water transmission through the six membranes by exposing them to deionized water, saline, and albumin-Krebs solution under pressure and measuring the displacement of liquid by means of a recently developed capillary method, the inherent surface and chemical properties of the six membranes were characterized by SEM, contact angle measurements, FTIR, DSC, and GPC techniques. The results of the study demonstrated that the rate of water transmission through the four polycarbonate urethane membranes was significantly lower than through the two polyether urethanes. In fact the lowest values were recorded with the two Corethane membranes, and the harder type 55D polymer had a lower value (2.7 x 10(-7) g/s cm2) than the softer 80A version (3.3 x 10(-7) g/s cm2). This level of water vapor permeability, which appears to be controlled primarily by a Fickian diffusion

  13. Totally implantable artificial hearts and left ventricular assist devices: selecting impermeable polycarbonate urethane to manufacture ventricles.

    PubMed

    Yang, M; Zhang, Z; Hahn, C; Laroche, G; King, M W; Guidoin, R

    1999-01-01

    In the development of a new generation of totally implantable artificial hearts and left ventricular assist devices (VADs) for long-term use, the selection of an acceptable material for the fabrication of the ventricles probably represents one of the greatest challenges. Segmented polyether urethanes used to be the material of choice due to their superior flexural performance, acceptable blood compatibility, and ease of processing. However, because they are known to degrade and to be readily permeable to water, they cannot meet the rigorous requirements needed for a new generation of implantable artificial hearts and VADs. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to identify alternative polymeric materials that would be satisfactory for fabricating the ventricles, and in particular, to determine the water permeability through membranes made from four commercial polycarbonate urethanes (Carbothane PC3570A, Chronoflex AR, Corethane 80A, and Corethane 55D) in comparison to those made from two traditional polyether urethanes (Tecoflex EG80A and Tecothane TT-1074A). In addition to determining the rate of water transmission through the six membranes by exposing them to deionized water, saline, and albumin-Krebs solution under pressure and measuring the displacement of liquid by means of a recently developed capillary method, the inherent surface and chemical properties of the six membranes were characterized by SEM, contact angle measurements, FTIR, DSC, and GPC techniques. The results of the study demonstrated that the rate of water transmission through the four polycarbonate urethane membranes was significantly lower than through the two polyether urethanes. In fact the lowest values were recorded with the two Corethane membranes, and the harder type 55D polymer had a lower value (2.7 x 10(-7) g/s cm2) than the softer 80A version (3.3 x 10(-7) g/s cm2). This level of water vapor permeability, which appears to be controlled primarily by a Fickian diffusion

  14. Attenuated sarcomere lengthening of the aged murine left ventricle observed using two-photon fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nance, Michael E; Whitfield, Justin T; Zhu, Yi; Gibson, Anne K; Hanft, Laurin M; Campbell, Kenneth S; Meininger, Gerald A; McDonald, Kerry S; Segal, Steven S; Domeier, Timothy L

    2015-09-01

    The Frank-Starling mechanism, whereby increased diastolic filling leads to increased cardiac output, depends on increasing the sarcomere length (Ls) of cardiomyocytes. Ventricular stiffness increases with advancing age, yet it remains unclear how such changes in compliance impact sarcomere dynamics in the intact heart. We developed an isolated murine heart preparation to monitor Ls as a function of left ventricular pressure and tested the hypothesis that sarcomere lengthening in response to ventricular filling is impaired with advanced age. Mouse hearts isolated from young (3-6 mo) and aged (24-28 mo) C57BL/6 mice were perfused via the aorta under Ca(2+)-free conditions with the left ventricle cannulated to control filling pressure. Two-photon imaging of 4-{2-[6-(dioctylamino)-2-naphthalenyl]ethenyl}1-(3-sulfopropyl)-pyridinium fluorescence was used to monitor t-tubule striations and obtain passive Ls between pressures of 0 and 40 mmHg. Ls values (in μm, aged vs. young, respectively) were 2.02 ± 0.04 versus 2.01 ± 0.02 at 0 mmHg, 2.13 ± 0.04 versus 2.23 ± 0.02 at 5 mmHg, 2.21 ± 0.03 versus 2.27 ± 0.03 at 10 mmHg, and 2.28 ± 0.02 versus 2.36 ± 0.01 at 40 mmHg, indicative of impaired sarcomere lengthening in aged hearts. Atomic force microscopy nanoindentation revealed that intact cardiomyocytes enzymatically isolated from aged hearts had increased stiffness compared with those of young hearts (elastic modulus: aged, 41.9 ± 5.8 kPa vs. young, 18.6 ± 3.3 kPa; P = 0.006). Impaired sarcomere lengthening during left ventricular filling may contribute to cardiac dysfunction with advancing age by attenuating the Frank-Starling mechanism and reducing stroke volume.

  15. On the three-dimensional vortical structure of early diastolic flow in a patient-specific left ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Le, Trung Bao; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2012-01-01

    We study the formation of the mitral vortex ring during early diastolic filling in a patient-specific left ventricle using direct numerical simulation. The geometry of the left ventricle is reconstructed from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The heart wall motion is modeled by a cell-based activation methodology, which yields physiologic kinematics with heart rate equal to 52 beats per minute. We show that the structure of the mitral vortex ring consists of the main vortex ring and trailing vortex tubes, which originate at the heart wall. The trailing vortex tubes play an important role in exciting twisting circumferential instability modes of the mitral vortex ring. At the end of diastole, the vortex ring impinges on the wall and the intraventricular flow transitions to a weak turbulent state. Our results can be used to help interprete and analyze three-dimensional in–vivo flow measurements obtained with MRI. PMID:22773898

  16. Visualization and simulated surgery of the left ventricle in the virtual pathological heart of the Virtual Physiological Human.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, N J B; Lin, X; Zhao, Y; Clapworthy, G J; Dong, F; Redaelli, A; Parodi, O; Testi, D

    2011-06-01

    Ischaemic heart failure remains a significant health and economic problem worldwide. This paper presents a user-friendly software system that will form a part of the virtual pathological heart of the Virtual Physiological Human (VPH2) project, currently being developed under the European Commission Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) programme. VPH2 is an integrated medicine project, which will create a suite of modelling, simulation and visualization tools for patient-specific prediction and planning in cases of post-ischaemic left ventricular dysfunction. The work presented here describes a three-dimensional interactive visualization for simulating left ventricle restoration surgery, comprising the operations of cutting, stitching and patching, and for simulating the elastic deformation of the ventricle to its post-operative shape. This will supply the quantitative measurements required for the post-operative prediction tools being developed in parallel in the same project. PMID:22670207

  17. A Patient-Specific Computational Fluid Dynamic Model for Hemodynamic Analysis of Left Ventricle Diastolic Dysfunctions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vinh-Tan; Wibowo, Stella Nathania; Leow, Yue An; Nguyen, Hoang-Huy; Liang, Zhong; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2015-12-01

    This work presents a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model to simulate blood flows through the human heart's left ventricles (LV), providing patient-specific time-dependent hemodynamic characteristics from reconstructed MRI scans of LV. These types of blood flow visualization can be of great asset to the medical field helping medical practitioners better predict the existence of any abnormalities in the patient, hence offer an appropriate treatment. The methodology employed in this work processed geometries obtained from MRI scans of patient-specific LV throughout a cardiac cycle using computer-aided design tool. It then used unstructured mesh generation techniques to generate surface and volume meshes for flow simulations; thus provided flow visualization and characteristics in patient-specific LV. The resulting CFD model provides three dimensional velocity streamlines on the geometries at specific times in a cardiac cycle, and they are compared with existing literature findings, such as data from echocardiography particle image velocimetry. As an important flow characteristic, vortex formation of the blood flow of healthy as well as diseased subjects having a LV dysfunction condition are also obtained from simulations and further investigated for potential diagnosis. The current work established a pipeline for a non-invasive diagnostic tool for diastolic dysfunction by generating patient-specific LV models and CFD models in the spatiotemporal dimensions. The proposed framework was applied for analysis of a group of normal subjects and patients with cardiac diseases. Results obtained using the numerical tool showed distinct differences in flow characteristics in the LV between patient with diastolic dysfunction and healthy subjects. In particular, vortex structures do not develop during cardiac cycles for patients while it was clearly seen in the normal subjects. The current LV CFD model has proven to be a promising technology to aid in the diagnosis of LV

  18. Quantitative Tagged Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Normal Human Left Ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Christopher C.; McVeigh, Elliot R.; Zerhouni, Elias A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Magnetic resonance imaging with tissue tagging is a noninvasive technique for measuring three-dimensional motion and deformation in the human heart. Tags are regions of tissue whose longitudinal magnetization has been altered before imaging so that they appear dark in subsequent magnetic resonance images. They then move with the underlying tissue and serve as easily identifiable landmarks within the heart for the detailed detection of motion. Many different motion and strain parameters can be determined from tagged magnetic resonance imaging. Strain components that are based on a high density of tag data, such as circumferential and longitudinal shortening, or parameters that are combinations of multiple strain components, have highest measurement precision and tightest normal ranges. The pattern of three-dimensional motion and strain in the heart is important clinically, because it reflects the basic mechanical function of the myocardium at both local and global levels. Localized abnormalities can be detected and quantified if the pattern of deformation in a given heart is compared to the normal range for that region, because normal motion and strain in the left ventricle is spatially heterogeneous. Contraction strains typically are greatest in the anterior and lateral walls and increase toward the apex. The direction of greatest contraction lies along a counter clockwise helix from base to apex (viewed from the base) and approximates the epicardial muscle fiber direction. This fiber geometry also results in long-axis torsion during systole. Ejection is accomplished primarily by radially inward motion of the endocardium and by descent of the base toward the apex during systole. PMID:11153703

  19. The numerical analysis of non-Newtonian blood flow in human patient-specific left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Doost, Siamak N; Zhong, Liang; Su, Boyang; Morsi, Yosry S

    2016-04-01

    Recently, various non-invasive tools such as the magnetic resonance image (MRI), ultrasound imaging (USI), computed tomography (CT), and the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have been widely utilized to enhance our current understanding of the physiological parameters that affect the initiation and the progression of the cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) associated with heart failure (HF). In particular, the hemodynamics of left ventricle (LV) has attracted the attention of the researchers due to its significant role in the heart functionality. In this study, CFD owing its capability of predicting detailed flow field was adopted to model the blood flow in images-based patient-specific LV over cardiac cycle. In most published studies, the blood is modeled as Newtonian that is not entirely accurate as the blood viscosity varies with the shear rate in non-linear manner. In this paper, we studied the effect of Newtonian assumption on the degree of accuracy of intraventricular hemodynamics. In doing so, various non-Newtonian models and Newtonian model are used in the analysis of the intraventricular flow and the viscosity of the blood. Initially, we used the cardiac MRI images to reconstruct the time-resolved geometry of the patient-specific LV. After the unstructured mesh generation, the simulations were conducted in the CFD commercial solver FLUENT to analyze the intraventricular hemodynamic parameters. The findings indicate that the Newtonian assumption cannot adequately simulate the flow dynamic within the LV over the cardiac cycle, which can be attributed to the pulsatile and recirculation nature of the flow and the low blood shear rate. PMID:26849955

  20. Aberrant Glycosylation in the Left Ventricle and Plasma of Rats with Cardiac Hypertrophy and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Nagai-Okatani, Chiaki; Minamino, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    Targeted proteomics focusing on post-translational modifications, including glycosylation, is a useful strategy for discovering novel biomarkers. To apply this strategy effectively to cardiac hypertrophy and resultant heart failure, we aimed to characterize glycosylation profiles in the left ventricle and plasma of rats with cardiac hypertrophy. Dahl salt-sensitive hypertensive rats, a model of hypertension-induced cardiac hypertrophy, were fed a high-salt (8% NaCl) diet starting at 6 weeks. As a result, they exhibited cardiac hypertrophy at 12 weeks and partially impaired cardiac function at 16 weeks compared with control rats fed a low-salt (0.3% NaCl) diet. Gene expression analysis revealed significant changes in the expression of genes encoding glycosyltransferases and glycosidases. Glycoproteome profiling using lectin microarrays indicated upregulation of mucin-type O-glycosylation, especially disialyl-T, and downregulation of core fucosylation on N-glycans, detected by specific interactions with Amaranthus caudatus and Aspergillus oryzae lectins, respectively. Upregulation of plasma α-l-fucosidase activity was identified as a biomarker candidate for cardiac hypertrophy, which is expected to support the existing marker, atrial natriuretic peptide and its related peptides. Proteomic analysis identified cysteine and glycine-rich protein 3, a master regulator of cardiac muscle function, as an O-glycosylated protein with altered glycosylation in the rats with cardiac hypertrophy, suggesting that alternations in O-glycosylation affect its oligomerization and function. In conclusion, our data provide evidence of significant changes in glycosylation pattern, specifically mucin-type O-glycosylation and core defucosylation, in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, suggesting that they are potential biomarkers for these diseases. PMID:27281159

  1. Aberrant Glycosylation in the Left Ventricle and Plasma of Rats with Cardiac Hypertrophy and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Nagai-Okatani, Chiaki; Minamino, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    Targeted proteomics focusing on post-translational modifications, including glycosylation, is a useful strategy for discovering novel biomarkers. To apply this strategy effectively to cardiac hypertrophy and resultant heart failure, we aimed to characterize glycosylation profiles in the left ventricle and plasma of rats with cardiac hypertrophy. Dahl salt-sensitive hypertensive rats, a model of hypertension-induced cardiac hypertrophy, were fed a high-salt (8% NaCl) diet starting at 6 weeks. As a result, they exhibited cardiac hypertrophy at 12 weeks and partially impaired cardiac function at 16 weeks compared with control rats fed a low-salt (0.3% NaCl) diet. Gene expression analysis revealed significant changes in the expression of genes encoding glycosyltransferases and glycosidases. Glycoproteome profiling using lectin microarrays indicated upregulation of mucin-type O-glycosylation, especially disialyl-T, and downregulation of core fucosylation on N-glycans, detected by specific interactions with Amaranthus caudatus and Aspergillus oryzae lectins, respectively. Upregulation of plasma α-l-fucosidase activity was identified as a biomarker candidate for cardiac hypertrophy, which is expected to support the existing marker, atrial natriuretic peptide and its related peptides. Proteomic analysis identified cysteine and glycine-rich protein 3, a master regulator of cardiac muscle function, as an O-glycosylated protein with altered glycosylation in the rats with cardiac hypertrophy, suggesting that alternations in O-glycosylation affect its oligomerization and function. In conclusion, our data provide evidence of significant changes in glycosylation pattern, specifically mucin-type O-glycosylation and core defucosylation, in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, suggesting that they are potential biomarkers for these diseases. PMID:27281159

  2. Integration of electro-anatomical and imaging data of the left ventricle: An evaluation framework.

    PubMed

    Soto-Iglesias, David; Butakoff, Constantine; Andreu, David; Fernández-Armenta, Juan; Berruezo, Antonio; Camara, Oscar

    2016-08-01

    Integration of electrical and structural information for scar characterization in the left ventricle (LV) is a crucial step to better guide radio-frequency ablation therapies, which are usually performed in complex ventricular tachycardia (VT) cases. This integration requires finding a common representation where to map the electrical information from the electro-anatomical map (EAM) surfaces and tissue viability information from delay-enhancement magnetic resonance images (DE-MRI). However, the development of a consistent integration method is still an open problem due to the lack of a proper evaluation framework to assess its accuracy. In this paper we present both: (i) an evaluation framework to assess the accuracy of EAM and imaging integration strategies with simulated EAM data and a set of global and local measures; and (ii) a new integration methodology based on a planar disk representation where the LV surface meshes are quasi-conformally mapped (QCM) by flattening, allowing for simultaneous visualization and joint analysis of the multi-modal data. The developed evaluation framework was applied to estimate the accuracy of the QCM-based integration strategy on a benchmark dataset of 128 synthetically generated ground-truth cases presenting different scar configurations and EAM characteristics. The obtained results demonstrate a significant reduction in global overlap errors (50-100%) with respect to state-of-the-art integration techniques, also better preserving the local topology of small structures such as conduction channels in scars. Data from seventeen VT patients were also used to study the feasibility of the QCM technique in a clinical setting, consistently outperforming the alternative integration techniques in the presence of sparse and noisy clinical data. The proposed evaluation framework has allowed a rigorous comparison of different EAM and imaging data integration strategies, providing useful information to better guide clinical practice in

  3. Relationships between left heart chamber dilatation on echocardiography and left-to-right ventricle shunting quantified by cardiac catheterization in children with ventricular septal defects.

    PubMed

    Gokalp, Selman; Guler Eroglu, Ayse; Saltik, Levent; Koca, Bulent

    2014-04-01

    Left atrium and/or left ventricle dilatation on echocardiography is considered to be an indication for closure of ventricular septal defects (VSD). No study has addressed the accuracy of using dilated left heart chambers when defining significant left-to-right shunting quantified by cardiac catheterization in isolated small or moderate VSDs. In this study, the relation between dilated left heart chambers, measured by echocardiography, and left-to-right ventricle shunting, quantified by cardiac catheterization, was evaluated in patients with isolated VSD. The medical records of all patients with isolated VSD who had undergone catheterization from 1996 to 2010 were examined retrospectively. Normative data for left heart chambers adjusted for body weight (BW) and body surface area (BSA) were used. The pulmonary-to-systemic flow ratio (Qp:Qs) was calculated by an oximetry technique. A total of 115 patients (mean age 7.3 ± 5 years) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. There was a statistically significant difference in terms of Qp:Qs between the patient groups with normal and dilated left heart chambers, when adjusted for BW and BSA (p = 0.001 and p = 0.002, respectively). But the relationships between Qp:Qs and left heart chamber sizes on echocardiography were not strong enough to be useful for making surgical decisions, as left heart chamber dilatation was not significantly associated with Qp:Qs ≥ 2 (p = 0.349 when adjusted for BW, p = 0.107 when adjusted for BSA). Left heart chamber dilatation was significantly associated with Qp:Qs ≥ 1.5 only when it was adjusted for BSA (for BW p = 0.022, for BSA p = 0.006). As a result, left heart chamber dilatation measured by echocardiography does not show significant left-to-right ventricle shunting, as quantified by catheterization. We still advocate that catheter angiography should be undertaken when left heart chambers are dilated in echocardiography in order to make decisions about closing small- to moderate-sized VSD.

  4. Combining multiple dynamic models and deep learning architectures for tracking the left ventricle endocardium in ultrasound data.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Gustavo; Nascimento, Jacinto C

    2013-11-01

    We present a new statistical pattern recognition approach for the problem of left ventricle endocardium tracking in ultrasound data. The problem is formulated as a sequential importance resampling algorithm such that the expected segmentation of the current time step is estimated based on the appearance, shape, and motion models that take into account all previous and current images and previous segmentation contours produced by the method. The new appearance and shape models decouple the affine and nonrigid segmentations of the left ventricle to reduce the running time complexity. The proposed motion model combines the systole and diastole motion patterns and an observation distribution built by a deep neural network. The functionality of our approach is evaluated using a dataset of diseased cases containing 16 sequences and another dataset of normal cases comprised of four sequences, where both sets present long axis views of the left ventricle. Using a training set comprised of diseased and healthy cases, we show that our approach produces more accurate results than current state-of-the-art endocardium tracking methods in two test sequences from healthy subjects. Using three test sequences containing different types of cardiopathies, we show that our method correlates well with interuser statistics produced by four cardiologists.

  5. Automatic segmentation of the left ventricle in cardiac MRI using local binary fitting model and dynamic programming techniques.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huaifei; Gao, Zhiyong; Liu, Liman; Liu, Haihua; Gao, Junfeng; Xu, Shengzhou; Li, Wei; Huang, Lu

    2014-01-01

    Segmentation of the left ventricle is very important to quantitatively analyze global and regional cardiac function from magnetic resonance. The aim of this study is to develop a novel algorithm for segmenting left ventricle on short-axis cardiac magnetic resonance images (MRI) to improve the performance of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems. In this research, an automatic segmentation method for left ventricle is proposed on the basis of local binary fitting (LBF) model and dynamic programming techniques. The validation experiments are performed on a pool of data sets of 45 cases. For both endo- and epi-cardial contours of our results, percentage of good contours is about 93.5%, the average perpendicular distance are about 2 mm. The overlapping dice metric is about 0.91. The regression and determination coefficient between the experts and our proposed method on the LV mass is 1.038 and 0.9033, respectively; they are 1.076 and 0.9386 for ejection fraction (EF). The proposed segmentation method shows the better performance and has great potential in improving the accuracy of computer-aided diagnosis systems in cardiovascular diseases.

  6. Longitudinally and circumferentially directed movements of the left ventricle studied by cardiovascular magnetic resonance phase contrast velocity mapping

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective Using high resolution cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR), we aimed to detect new details of left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic function, to explain the twisting and longitudinal movements of the left ventricle. Methods Using CMR phase contrast velocity mapping (also called Tissue Phase Mapping) regional wall motion patterns and longitudinally and circumferentially directed movements of the left ventricle were studied using a high temporal resolution technique in healthy male subjects (n = 14, age 23 ± 3 years). Results Previously undescribed systolic and diastolic motion patterns were obtained for left ventricular segments (based on the AHA segmental) and for basal, mid and apical segments. The summation of segmental motion results in a complex pattern of ventricular twisting and longitudinal motion in the normal human heart which underlies systolic and diastolic function. As viewed from the apex, the entire LV initially rotates in a counter-clockwise direction at the beginning of ventricular systole, followed by opposing clockwise rotation of the base and counter-clockwise rotation at the apex, resulting in ventricular torsion. Simultaneously, as the entire LV moves in an apical direction during systole, the base and apex move towards each other, with little net apical displacement. The reverse of these motion patterns occur in diastole. Conclusion Left ventricular function may be a consequence of the relative orientations and moments of torque of the sub-epicardial relative to the sub-endocardial myocyte layers, with influence from tethering of the heart to adjacent structures and the directional forces associated with blood flow. Understanding the complex mechanics of the left ventricle is vital to enable these techniques to be used for the evaluation of cardiac pathology. PMID:20716369

  7. Single primitive ventricle with normally related great arteries and atresia of the left A-V valve.

    PubMed Central

    Coto, E O; Raggio, J M; Malo, P; Sainz, C; Aparisi, R; Gomez-Ullate, J M

    1978-01-01

    A child aged 2 years and 9 months was angiocardiographically diagnosed to have a single ventricle with normally related great arteries and atresia of the left A-V valve. A Blalock-Hanlon procedure and division of a large patent ductus arteriosus were followed by reduction in pulmonary artery pressure, but after operation the patient showed signs of left ventricular failure unresponsive to medical treatment, necessitating pulmonary artery banding. We have found only three similar published cases, and this is the only one with full angiographic documentation. Images PMID:725830

  8. The left ventricle as a mechanical engine: from Leonardo da Vinci to the echocardiographic assessment of peak power output-to-left ventricular mass.

    PubMed

    Dini, Frank L; Guarini, Giacinta; Ballo, Piercarlo; Carluccio, Erberto; Maiello, Maria; Capozza, Paola; Innelli, Pasquale; Rosa, Gian M; Palmiero, Pasquale; Galderisi, Maurizio; Razzolini, Renato; Nodari, Savina

    2013-03-01

    The interpretation of the heart as a mechanical engine dates back to the teachings of Leonardo da Vinci, who was the first to apply the laws of mechanics to the function of the heart. Similar to any mechanical engine, whose performance is proportional to the power generated with respect to weight, the left ventricle can be viewed as a power generator whose performance can be related to left ventricular mass. Stress echocardiography may provide valuable information on the relationship between cardiac performance and recruited left ventricular mass that may be used in distinguishing between adaptive and maladaptive left ventricular remodeling. Peak power output-to-mass, obtained during exercise or pharmacological stress echocardiography, is a measure that reflects the number of watts that are developed by 100 g of left ventricular mass under maximal stimulation. Power output-to-mass may be calculated as left ventricular power output per 100 g of left ventricular mass: 100× left ventricular power output divided by left ventricular mass (W/100 g). A simplified formula to calculate power output-to-mass is as follows: 0.222 × cardiac output (l/min) × mean blood pressure (mmHg)/left ventricular mass (g). When the integrity of myocardial structure is compromised, a mismatch becomes apparent between maximal cardiac power output and left ventricular mass; when this occurs, a reduction of the peak power output-to-mass index is observed.

  9. Lactate clearance for initiating and weaning off extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in a child with regressed left ventricle after arterial switch operation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarvesh Pal; Chauhan, Sandeep; Bisoi, A K; Sahoo, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    We hereby report a child with transposition of great arteries and regressed ventricle who underwent arterial switch operation (ASO) with the aid of cardiopulmonary bypass and "integrated" extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) circuit. The significance of lactate clearance as a guide to initiate and terminate veno-arterial ECMO in a post ASO child with regressed left ventricle is discussed.

  10. Lactate clearance for initiating and weaning off extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in a child with regressed left ventricle after arterial switch operation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarvesh Pal; Chauhan, Sandeep; Bisoi, A. K.; Sahoo, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    We hereby report a child with transposition of great arteries and regressed ventricle who underwent arterial switch operation (ASO) with the aid of cardiopulmonary bypass and “integrated” extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) circuit. The significance of lactate clearance as a guide to initiate and terminate veno-arterial ECMO in a post ASO child with regressed left ventricle is discussed. PMID:26750700

  11. Weighted Least-Squares Finite Element Method for Cardiac Blood Flow Simulation with Echocardiographic Data

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Fei; Westerdale, John; McMahon, Eileen M.; Belohlavek, Marek; Heys, Jeffrey J.

    2012-01-01

    As both fluid flow measurement techniques and computer simulation methods continue to improve, there is a growing need for numerical simulation approaches that can assimilate experimental data into the simulation in a flexible and mathematically consistent manner. The problem of interest here is the simulation of blood flow in the left ventricle with the assimilation of experimental data provided by ultrasound imaging of microbubbles in the blood. The weighted least-squares finite element method is used because it allows data to be assimilated in a very flexible manner so that accurate measurements are more closely matched with the numerical solution than less accurate data. This approach is applied to two different test problems: a flexible flap that is displaced by a jet of fluid and blood flow in the porcine left ventricle. By adjusting how closely the simulation matches the experimental data, one can observe potential inaccuracies in the model because the simulation without experimental data differs significantly from the simulation with the data. Additionally, the assimilation of experimental data can help the simulation capture certain small effects that are present in the experiment, but not modeled directly in the simulation. PMID:22312412

  12. Methylome analysis reveals alterations in DNA methylation in the regulatory regions of left ventricle development genes in human dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Jo, Bong-Seok; Koh, In-Uk; Bae, Jae-Bum; Yu, Ho-Yeong; Jeon, Eun-Seok; Lee, Hae-Young; Kim, Jae-Joong; Choi, Murim; Choi, Sun Shim

    2016-08-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is one of the main causes of heart failure (called cardiomyopathies) in adults. Alterations in epigenetic regulation (i.e., DNA methylation) have been implicated in the development of DCM. Here, we identified a total of 1828 differentially methylated probes (DMPs) using the Infinium 450K HumanMethylation Bead chip by comparing the methylomes between 18 left ventricles and 9 right ventricles. Alterations in DNA methylation levels were observed mainly in lowly methylated regions corresponding to promoter-proximal regions, which become hypermethylated in severely affected left ventricles. Subsequent mRNA microarray analysis showed that the effect of DNA methylation on gene expression regulation is not unidirectional but is controlled by the functional sub-network context. DMPs were significantly enriched in the transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) we tested. Alterations in DNA methylation were specifically enriched in the cis-regulatory regions of cardiac development genes, the majority of which are involved in ventricular development (e.g., TBX5 and HAND1).

  13. Detection of left ventricle function from a magnetically levitated impeller behavior.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Hideo; Asama, Junichi; Hara, Chikara; Hijikata, Wataru; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Shimokohbe, Akira; Takatani, Setsuo

    2006-05-01

    The magnetically levitated (Mag-Lev) centrifugal rotary blood pump (CRBP) with two-degrees-of-freedom active control is promising for safe and long-term support of circulation. In this study, Mag-Lev CRBP controllability and impeller behavior were studied in the simulated heart failure circulatory model. A pneumatically driven pulsatile blood pump (Medos VAD [ventricular assist device]-54 mL) was used to simulate the left ventricle (LV). The Mag-Lev CRBP was placed between the LV apex and aortic compliance tank simulating LV assistance. The impeller behavior in five axes (x, y, z, theta, and phi) was continuously monitored using five eddy current sensors. The signals of the x- and y-axes were used for feedback active control, while the behaviors of the other three axes were passively controlled by the permanent magnets. In the static mock circuit, the impeller movement was controlled to within +/-10-+/-20 microm in the x- and y-axes, while in the pulsatile circuit, LV pulsation was modulated in the impeller movement with the amplitude being 2-22 microm. The amplitude of impeller movement measured at 1800 rpm with the simulated failing heart (peak LV pressure [LVP] = 70 mm Hg, mean aortic pressure [AoP(mean)] = 55 +/- 20 mm Hg, aortic flow = 2.7 L/min) was 12.6 microm, while it increased to 19.2 microm with the recovered heart (peak LVP = 122 mm Hg, AoP(mean) = 100 +/- 20 mm Hg, aortic flow = 3.9 L/min). The impeller repeated the reciprocating movement from the center of the pump toward the outlet port with LV pulsation. Angular rotation (theta, phi) was around +/-0.002 rad without z-axis displacement. Power requirements ranged from 0.6 to 0.9 W. Five-axis impeller behavior and Mag-Lev controller stability were demonstrated in the pulsatile mock circuit. Noncontact drive and low power requirements were shown despite the effects of LV pulsation. The impeller position signals in the x- and y-axes reflected LV function. The Mag-Lev CRBP is effective not only for

  14. Domain decomposition methods for mortar finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Widlund, O.

    1996-12-31

    In the last few years, domain decomposition methods, previously developed and tested for standard finite element methods and elliptic problems, have been extended and modified to work for mortar and other nonconforming finite element methods. A survey will be given of work carried out jointly with Yves Achdou, Mario Casarin, Maksymilian Dryja and Yvon Maday. Results on the p- and h-p-version finite elements will also be discussed.

  15. A level set approach for left ventricle detection in CT images using shape segmentation and optical flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brieva, Jorge; Moya-Albor, Ernesto; Escalante-Ramírez, Boris

    2015-01-01

    The left ventricle (LV) segmentation plays an important role in a subsequent process for the functional analysis of the LV. Typical segmentation of the endocardium wall in the ventricle excludes papillary muscles which leads to an incorrect measure of the ejected volume in the LV. In this paper we present a new variational strategy using a 2D level set framework that includes a local term for enhancing the low contrast structures and a 2D shape model. The shape model in the level set method is propagated to all image sequences corresponding to the cardiac cycles through the optical flow approach using the Hermite transform. To evaluate our strategy we use the Dice index and the Hausdorff distance to compare the segmentation results with the manual segmentation carried out by the physician.

  16. Left ventricle afterload impedance control by an axial flow ventricular assist device: a potential tool for ventricular recovery.

    PubMed

    Moscato, Francesco; Arabia, Maurizio; Colacino, Francesco M; Naiyanetr, Phornphop; Danieli, Guido A; Schima, Heinrich

    2010-09-01

    Ventricular assist devices (VADs) are increasingly used for supporting blood circulation in heart failure patients. To protect or even to restore the myocardial function, a defined loading of the ventricle for training would be important. Therefore, a VAD control strategy was developed that provides an explicitly definable loading condition for the failing ventricle. A mathematical model of the cardiovascular system with an axial flow VAD was used to test the control strategy in the presence of a failing left ventricle, slight physical activity, and a recovering scenario. Furthermore, the proposed control strategy was compared to a conventional constant speed mode during hemodynamic changes (reduced venous return and arterial vasoconstriction). The physiological benefit of the control strategy was manifested by a large increase in the ventricular Frank-Starling reserve and by restoration of normal hemodynamics (5.1 L/min cardiac output at a left atrial pressure of 10 mmHg vs. 4.2 L/min at 21 mmHg in the unassisted case). The control strategy automatically reduced the pump speed in response to reduced venous return and kept the pump flow independent of the vasoconstriction condition. Most importantly, the ventricular load was kept stable within 1%, compared to a change of 75% for the constant speed. As a key feature, the proposed control strategy provides a defined and adjustable load to the failing ventricle by an automatic regulation of the VAD speed and allows a controlled training of the myocardium. This, in turn, may represent a potential additional tool to increase the number of patients showing recovery.

  17. Probabilistic finite element analysis of a craniofacial finite element model.

    PubMed

    Berthaume, Michael A; Dechow, Paul C; Iriarte-Diaz, Jose; Ross, Callum F; Strait, David S; Wang, Qian; Grosse, Ian R

    2012-05-01

    We employed a probabilistic finite element analysis (FEA) method to determine how variability in material property values affects stress and strain values in a finite model of a Macaca fascicularis cranium. The material behavior of cortical bone varied in three ways: isotropic homogeneous, isotropic non-homogeneous, and orthotropic non-homogeneous. The material behavior of the trabecular bone and teeth was always treated as isotropic and homogeneous. All material property values for the cranium were randomized with a Gaussian distribution with either coefficients of variation (CVs) of 0.2 or with CVs calculated from empirical data. Latin hypercube sampling was used to determine the values of the material properties used in the finite element models. In total, four hundred and twenty six separate deterministic FE simulations were executed. We tested four hypotheses in this study: (1) uncertainty in material property values will have an insignificant effect on high stresses and a significant effect on high strains for homogeneous isotropic models; (2) the effect of variability in material property values on the stress state will increase as non-homogeneity and anisotropy increase; (3) variation in the in vivo shear strain values reported by Strait et al. (2005) and Ross et al. (2011) is not only due to variations in muscle forces and cranial morphology, but also due to variation in material property values; (4) the assumption of a uniform coefficient of variation for the material property values will result in the same trend in how moderate-to-high stresses and moderate-to-high strains vary with respect to the degree of non-homogeneity and anisotropy as the trend found when the coefficients of variation for material property values are calculated from empirical data. Our results supported the first three hypotheses and falsified the fourth. When material properties were varied with a constant CV, as non-homogeneity and anisotropy increased the level of variability in

  18. Intrinsic Myoarchitectural Differences Between the Left and Right Ventricles of Fetal Human Hearts: An Ultrasonic Backscatter Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Mark R.; Gibson, Allyson A.; Kirschner, Carol A.; Hicks, Deborah; Ludomirsky, Achiau; Singh, Gautam K.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Embryologically, cardiac chambers differ in their morphological and contractile properties from the beginning. We hypothesized that a non-invasive ultrasonic backscatter investigation might illustrate the fundamental differences in myocardial morphologic properties of the two ventricles during heart development. Objectives The goals of this investigation were: 1) to explore the feasibility of measuring the magnitude of cyclic variation of ultrasonic backscatter from the left and right ventricular free walls of fetal hearts; 2) to compare measurements of the magnitude of cyclic variation from the left and right sides of the heart; and 3) to determine if the observed results are consistent with predictions relating the overall backscatter level and the magnitude of cyclic variation. Methods Cyclic variation data from the left and right ventricular free walls were generated from analyses of the backscatter from echocardiographic images of 16 structurally normal fetal hearts at mid-gestation. Results The magnitude of cyclic variation was found to be greater for the left ventricular free wall than for the right ventricular free wall (4.5 ± 1.1 dB vs. 2.3 ± 0.9 dB, respectively; mean ± SD; p < 0.0001, paired t-test). Conclusion Measurements of the cyclic variation of backscatter can be obtained from both the left and right sides of fetal hearts demonstrating a significant difference between the measured magnitude of cyclic variation in the left and right ventricular myocardium. This observation is consistent with predictions relating the overall backscatter level and the magnitude of cyclic variation. Results of this study suggest cyclic variation measurements may offer a useful approach for characterizing intrinsic differences in myocardial properties of the two ventricles in assessing fetal heart development. PMID:19131208

  19. Assessment of left ventricle function in patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic aortic stenosis by 2-dimensional speckle-tracking imaging

    PubMed Central

    Luszczak, Joanna; Olszowska, Maria; Drapisz, Sylwia; Plazak, Wojciech; Karch, Izabela; Komar, Monika; Goralczyk, Tadeusz; Podolec, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Global longitudinal peak strain (GLPS) quantifies left ventricle (LV) long-axis contractility. Early detection of LV systolic dysfunction is pivotal in diagnosis and treatment of patients with aortic stenosis (AS). This study was performed to assess LV longitudinal systolic function by GLPS derived from 2-dimensional speckle tracking imaging (2D-STI) in AS patients in comparison to standard echocardiographic parameters. Material/Methods Laboratory tests, standard echocardiography, tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) and 2D-STI examinations with GLPS calculation were performed in 49 consecutive patients with moderate to severe AS with LV ejection fraction ≥50% and 18 controls. Results While LVEF do not differentiate AS patients from controls, GLPS was significantly decreased in the AS group (−15.30±3.25% vs. −19.60±2.46% in controls, p<0.001). GLPS was significantly reduced in symptomatic AS patients as compared to the asymptomatic AS group [−15.5 (11.8–16.8) vs. −17.5 (14.7–18.9)%, p=0.02]. Conclusions In aortic stenosis patients, despite normal left ventricle ejection fraction, long-axis left ventricular function is impaired, which manifests in global longitudinal peak strain reduction. GLPS reveals that LV function impairment is more pronounced in symptomatic as compared to asymptomatic AS patients. Further studies are needed to determine the prognostic significance of early LV function impairment in aortic stenosis patients showed by GLPS. PMID:23197243

  20. Catheter-based high-intensity ultrasound for epicardial ablation of the left ventricle: device design and in vivo feasiblity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Nazer, Babak; Jones, Peter D.; Tanaka, Yasuaki; Martin, Alastair; Ng, Bennett; Duggirala, Srikant; Diederich, Chris J.; Gerstenfeld, Edward P.

    2015-03-01

    The development and in vivo testing of a high-intensity ultrasound thermal ablation catheter for epicardial ablation of the left ventricle (LV) is presented. Scar tissue can occur in the mid-myocardial and epicardial space in patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy and lead to ventricular tachycardia. Current ablation technology uses radiofrequency energy, which is limited epicardially by the presence of coronary vessels, phrenic nerves, and fat. Ultrasound energy can be precisely directed to deliver targeted deep epicardial ablation while sparing intervening epicardial nerve and vessels. The proof-of-concept ultrasound applicators were designed for sub-xyphoid access to the pericardial space through a steerable 14-Fr sheath. The catheter consists of two rectangular planar transducers, for therapy (6.4 MHz) and imaging (5 MHz), mounted at the tip of a 3.5-mm flexible nylon catheter coupled and encapsulated within a custom-shaped balloon for cooling. Thermal lesions were created in the LV in a swine (n = 10) model in vivo. The ultrasound applicator was positioned fluoroscopically. Its orientation and contact with the LV were verified using A-mode imaging and a radio-opaque marker. Ablations employed 60-s exposures at 15 - 30 W (electrical power). Histology indicated thermal coagulation and ablative lesions penetrating 8 - 12 mm into the left ventricle on lateral and anterior walls and along the left anterior descending artery. The transducer design enabled successful sparing from the epicardial surface to 2 - 4 mm of intervening ventricle tissue and epicardial fat. The feasibility of targeted epicardial ablation with catheter-based ultrasound was demonstrated.

  1. Finite-Element Composite-Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, David E.

    1990-01-01

    Finite Element Composite Analysis Program, FECAP, special-purpose finite-element program for analyzing behavior of composite material with microcomputer. Procedure leads to set of linear simultaneous equations relating unknown nodal displacement to applied loads. Written in HP BASIC 3.0.

  2. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    1996-07-15

    TAURUS is an interactive post-processing application supporting visualization of finite element analysis results on unstructured grids. TAURUS provides the ability to display deformed geometries and contours or fringes of a large number of derived results on meshes consisting of beam, plate, shell, and solid type finite elements. Time history plotting is also available.

  3. [Electron microscope analysis of cardiomyocytes in the rat left ventricle under simulation of weightlessness effects and artificial gravitation].

    PubMed

    Varenik, E N; Lipina, T V; Shornikova, M V; Krasnov, I B; Chentsov, Iu S

    2012-01-01

    Electron microscopic study of left ventricle cardiomyocytes and quantitative analysis of their mitochondriom was performed in rats exposed to tail-suspension, as a model of weightlessness effects, to artificial gravity produced by intermittent 2G centrifugation and a combination of these effects. It was found that the cardiomyocytes ultrastructure changed slightly after tail-suspension and after intermittent 2G influence, as well as under a combination of these effects. However, the number of intermitochondrial junctions increased significantly in the interfibrillar zone of cardiomyocytes under a combination of tail-suspension and intermittent 2G influence, which agrees with the cell hypertrophy described earlier.

  4. Computational modeling of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: effect of spatially varying β-adrenergic stimulation in the rat left ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Land, Sander; Niederer, Steven A.; Louch, William E.; Røe, Åsmund T.; Aronsen, Jan Magnus; Stuckey, Daniel J.; Sikkel, Markus B.; Tranter, Matthew H.; Lyon, Alexander R.; Harding, Sian E.

    2014-01-01

    In Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, the left ventricle shows apical ballooning combined with basal hypercontractility. Both clinical observations in humans and recent experimental work on isolated rat ventricular myocytes suggest the dominant mechanisms of this syndrome are related to acute catecholamine overload. However, relating observed differences in single cells to the capacity of such alterations to result in the extreme changes in ventricular shape seen in Takotsubo syndrome is difficult. By using a computational model of the rat left ventricle, we investigate which mechanisms can give rise to the typical shape of the ventricle observed in this syndrome. Three potential dominant mechanisms related to effects of β-adrenergic stimulation were considered: apical-basal variation of calcium transients due to differences in L-type and sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase activation, apical-basal variation of calcium sensitivity due to differences in troponin I phosphorylation, and apical-basal variation in maximal active tension due to, e.g., the negative inotropic effects of p38 MAPK. Furthermore, we investigated the interaction of these spatial variations in the presence of a failing Frank-Starling mechanism. We conclude that a large portion of the apex needs to be affected by severe changes in calcium regulation or contractile function to result in apical ballooning, and smooth linear variation from apex to base is unlikely to result in the typical ventricular shape observed in this syndrome. A failing Frank-Starling mechanism significantly increases apical ballooning at end systole and may be an important additional factor underpinning Takotsubo syndrome. PMID:25239804

  5. T3 enhances Ang2 in rat aorta in myocardial I/R: comparison with left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Sabatino, Laura; Kusmic, Claudia; Nicolini, Giuseppina; Amato, Rosario; Casini, Giovanni; Iervasi, Giorgio; Balzan, Silvana

    2016-10-01

    Angiogenesis is important for recovery after tissue damage in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion, and tri-iodothyronine (T3) has documented effects on angiogenesis. The angiopoietins 1/2 and tyrosine kinase receptor represent an essential system in angiogenesis controlling endothelial cell survival and vascular maturation. Recently, in a 3-day ischemia/reperfusion rat model, the infusion of a low dose of T3 improved the post-ischemic recovery of cardiac function.Adopting this model, our study aimed to investigate the effects of T3 on the capillary index and the expression of angiogenic genes as the angiopoietins 1/2 and tyrosine kinase receptor system, in the thoracic aorta and in the left ventricle. In the thoracic aorta, T3 infusion significantly improved the angiogenic sprouting and angiopoietin 2 expression. Instead, Sham-T3 group did not show any significant increment of capillary density and angiopoietin 2 expression. In the area at risk (AAR) of the left ventricle, T3 infusion did not increase capillary density but restored levels of angiopoietin 1, which were reduced in I/R group. Angiopoietin 2 levels were similar to Sham group and unchanged by T3 administration. In the remote zone, T3 induced a significant increment of both angiopoietin 1/2. In conclusion, T3 infusion induced a different response of angiopoietin 1/2 between the ventricle (the AAR and the remote zone) and the thoracic aorta, probably reflecting the different action of angiopoietin 1/2 in cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells. Overall, these data suggest a new aspect of T3-mediated cardioprotection through angiogenesis. PMID:27444191

  6. Effect of the architecture of the left ventricle on the speed of the excitation wave in muscle fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezlobinsky, T. V.; Pravdin, S. F.; Katsnelson, L. B.; Solovyova, O. E.

    2016-07-01

    It is known that preferential paths for the propagation of an electrical excitation wave in the human ventricular myocardium are associated with muscle fibers in tissue. The speed of the excitation wave along a fiber is several times higher than that across the direction of the fiber. To estimate the effect of the architecture and anisotropy of the myocardium of the left ventricle on the process of its electrical activation, we have studied the relation between the speed of the electrical excitation wave in a one-dimensional isolated myocardial fiber consisting of sequentially coupled cardiomyocytes and in an identical fiber located in the wall of a threedimensional anatomical model of the left ventricle. It has been shown that the speed of a wavefront along the fiber in the three-dimensional myocardial tissue is much higher than that in the one-dimensional fiber. The acceleration of the signal is due to the rotation of directions of fibers in the wall and to the position of the excitation wavefront with respect to the direction of this fiber. The observed phenomenon is caused by the approach of the excitable tissue with rotational anisotropy in its properties to a pseudoisotropic tissue.

  7. Shape regression machine and efficient segmentation of left ventricle endocardium from 2D B-mode echocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shaohua Kevin

    2010-08-01

    We present a machine learning approach called shape regression machine (SRM) for efficient segmentation of an anatomic structure that exhibits a deformable shape in a medical image, e.g., left ventricle endocardial wall in an echocardiogram. The SRM achieves efficient segmentation via statistical learning of the interrelations among shape, appearance, and anatomy, which are exemplified by an annotated database. The SRM is a two-stage approach. In the first stage that estimates a rigid shape to solve an automatic initialization problem, it derives a regression solution to object detection that needs just one scan in principle and a sparse set of scans in practice, avoiding the exhaustive scanning required by the state-of-the-art classification-based detection approach while yielding comparable detection accuracy. In the second stage that estimates the nonrigid shape, it again learns a nonlinear regressor to directly associate nonrigid shape with image appearance. The underpinning of both stages is a novel image-based boosting ridge regression (IBRR) method that enables multivariate, nonlinear modeling and accommodates fast evaluation. We demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness of the SRM using experiments on segmenting the left ventricle endocardium from a B-mode echocardiogram of apical four chamber view. The proposed algorithm is able to automatically detect and accurately segment the LV endocardial border in about 120ms.

  8. Double Outlet Right Ventricle

    MedlinePlus

    ... the right ventricle into the lungs, and the aorta sends oxygen-rich blood from the left ventricle ... the body. Together, the pulmonary artery and the aorta are known as the great arteries. But with ...

  9. Early genes induction in spontaneously hypertensive rats left ventricle with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors but not hydralazine

    SciTech Connect

    Susic, D.; Aristizabal, D.J.; Prakash, O.; Nunez, E.; Frohlich, E.D.

    1995-12-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats were given an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor (benazepril or quinapril) or hydralazine and were left for up to 6 hr. To examine whether administration of antihypertensive agents affects expression of immediate early genes in left ventricular myocardium, groups of rats were sacrificed at 1, 3, and 6 hr after dosing; total RNA was extracted from left ventricular tissue and analyzed by blot hybridization technique using labeled probes for c-myc, c-fos, and GAPDH mRNA. All three antihypertensive agents reduced pressure similarly, and treatment with the two ACE inhibitors increased c-fos and c-myc mRNA expression in left ventriculum. By contrast, hydralazine did not increase steady-state mRNA expression of either proto-oncogene. Thus, in parallel with the pressure fall, acute administration of the ACE inhibitors induced expression of c-fos and c-myc mRNAs in the left ventricle. Since the equidepressor dose of hyralazine did not affect expression of these proto-oncogenes, this effect of ACE inhibitors is independent of their hemodynamic action. 27 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  10. Books and monographs on finite element technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.

    1985-01-01

    The present paper proviees a listing of all of the English books and some of the foreign books on finite element technology, taking into account also a list of the conference proceedings devoted solely to finite elements. The references are divided into categories. Attention is given to fundamentals, mathematical foundations, structural and solid mechanics applications, fluid mechanics applications, other applied science and engineering applications, computer implementation and software systems, computational and modeling aspects, special topics, boundary element methods, proceedings of symmposia and conferences on finite element technology, bibliographies, handbooks, and historical accounts.

  11. Will Finite Elements Replace Structural Mechanics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojalvo, I. U.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents a personal view regarding the need for a continued interest and activity in structural methods in general, while viewing finite elements and the computer as simply two specific tools for assisting in this endeavor. An attempt is made to provide some insight as to why finite element methods seem to have "won the war," and to give examples of their more (and less) intelligent use. Items addressed include a highlight of unnecessary limitations of many existing standard finite element codes and where it is felt that further development work is needed.

  12. Impact of Continuous Erythropoietin Receptor Activator on Selected Biomarkers of Cardiovascular Disease and Left Ventricle Structure and Function in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rysz, Jacek; Franczyk, Beata; Baj, Zbigniew; Majewska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality are very high in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of continuous erythropoietin receptor activator (CERA) on selected biomarkers of cardiovascular disease, left ventricle structure, and function in CKD. Material and Methods. Peripheral blood was collected from 25 CKD patients before and after CERA treatment and 20 healthy subjects. In serum samples, we assessed inflammatory markers (IL-1β, TNF-RI, TNF-RII, sFas, sFasL, MMP-9, TIMP-1, and TGF-β1), endothelial dysfunction markers (sE-selectin, sICAM-1, and sVCAM-1), and volume-related marker (NT-proBNP). All subjects underwent echocardiography and were evaluated for selected biochemical parameters (Hb, creatinine, and CRP). Results. Evaluated biomarkers and echocardiographic parameters of left ventricle structure were significantly increased but left ventricle EF was significantly decreased in CKD patients compared to controls. After CERA treatment, we observed a significant increase of Hb and left ventricle EF and a significant decrease of NT-proBNP and MMP-9. There was a significant negative correlation between Hb and TNF-RI, sICAM-1, and IL-1β. Conclusions. Our results indicate that selected biomarkers related to cardiovascular risk are significantly increased in CKD patients compared to controls. CERA treatment has anti-inflammatory action, diminishes endothelial dysfunction, and improves left ventricle function in these patients. PMID:27034745

  13. A survey of mixed finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brezzi, F.

    1987-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to and an overview of mixed finite element methods. It discusses the mixed formulation of certain basic problems in elasticity and hydrodynamics. It also discusses special techniques for solving the discrete problem.

  14. Finite element modeling of the human pelvis

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, B.

    1995-11-01

    A finite element model of the human pelvis was created using a commercial wire frame image as a template. To test the final mesh, the model`s mechanical behavior was analyzed through finite element analysis and the results were displayed graphically as stress concentrations. In the future, this grid of the pelvis will be integrated with a full leg model and used in side-impact car collision simulations.

  15. [Determination of the ejection fraction of the left ventricle by videodensitometric analysis of digital angiography. Preliminary results].

    PubMed

    Angel, C Y; Vuthien, H; Letienne, G; Pernes, J M; Brenot, P; Parola, J L; Raynaud, A; Gaux, J C

    1985-08-01

    Digitalisation enables angiocardiography to be performed by a peripheral intravenous injection. Computer-assisted analysis of the date widens the possibilities of quantification. The authors have developed a videodensitometric method of studying the left ventricular ejection fraction. The research was performed on an experimental model and the technique validated in a series of 10 patients. The experimental model consisted of a series of balloons which, when inflated with contrast medium assumed an allipsoid shape resembling a left ventricle. The balloons were blown up in two stages with an automatic injector to simulate systole and diastole. The images were recorded in the same way as during ventriculography. Videodensitometric measurements showed 3 to 5% variations from the true values. The method was then applied to the calculation of the left ventricular ejection fraction in 10 patients: left ventricular function was also quantified by geometrical methods (Dodge) from the same angiogrammes and the 2 sets of results were then compared. The correlation coefficient between the two methods was 0.97, so validating the new technique. Videodensitometry opens up new perspectives in the study of left ventricular function. On the other hand it can be used to monitor the ejection fraction in severely ill or recently operated patients, and, on the other hand the principle of videodensitometry eliminates the geometrical approximations inherent in the classical methods of angiographic analysis and would therefore seem to be more suitable for the study of pathological left ventricules (aneurysm...). Finally, the technique of videodensitometry represents a new step towards the measurement of true volumes and flow rates. PMID:3935074

  16. Influence of the heart rate and atrioventricular delays on vortex evolution and blood transport inside the left ventricle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendabadi, Sahar; Martinez-Legazpi, Pablo; Benito, Yolanda; Bermejo, Javier; Del Alamo, Juan Carlos; Shadden, Shawn

    2013-11-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is used to help restore coordinated pumping of the ventricles by overcoming delays in electrical conduction due to cardiac disease. This is accomplished by a specialized cardiac pacemaker that is able to adjust the atrioventricular (AV) delay.A major clinical challenge is to adjust the pacing strategy to best coordinate the blood flow mechanics of ventricular filling and ejection. To this end, we have studied the difference in the vortex formation and its evolution inside the left ventricle (LV) for 4 different AV delays in a cohort of patients with implanted pacemakers. A reconstruction algorithm was used to obtain 2D velocity over the apical long-axis view of the LV from color Doppler and B-mode ultrasound data. To study blood transport, we have identified Lagrangian coherent structures to determine moving boundaries of the blood volumes injected to the LV in diastole and ejected to the aorta in systole. In all cases, we have analyzed the differences in filling and ejection patterns and the blood transport during the E-wave and A-wave formation.Finally we have assessed the influence of the AV delay on 2 indices of stasis, direct flow and residence time.The findings shed insight to the optimization of AV delays in patients undergoing CRT. NIH award 5R21HL108268 and grants PIS09/02603 and RD06/0010 from the Plan Nacional de Investigacion Cientifica, Spain.

  17. Automated Classification of Disease Patterns from Echo-cardiography Images Based on Shape Features of the Left Ventricle

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Shaoli; Parekh, Ranjan

    2010-10-26

    Computer assisted diagnosis using analysis of medical images is an area of active research in health informatics. This paper proposes a technique for indication of heart diseases by using information related to shapes of the left ventricle (LV). LV boundaries are tracked from echo-cardiography images taken from LV short axis view, corresponding to two disease conditions viz. dilated cardiomyopathy and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and discriminated from the normal condition. The LV shapes are modeled using shape histograms generated by plotting the frequency of normalized radii lengths drawn from the centroid to the periphery, against a specific number of bins. A 3-layer neural network activated by a log-sigmoid function is used to classify the shape histograms into one of the three classes. Experimentations on a dataset of 240 images show recognition accuracies of the order of 80%.

  18. The M2 muscarinic receptors are essential for signaling in the heart left ventricle during restraint stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Tomankova, Hana; Valuskova, Paulina; Varejkova, Eva; Rotkova, Jana; Benes, Jan; Myslivecek, Jaromir

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that muscarinic receptors (MRs) in the heart have a role in stress responses and thus investigated changes in MR signaling (gene expression, number of receptors, adenylyl cyclase (AC), phospholipase C (PLC), protein kinase A and C (PKA and PKC) and nitric oxide synthase [NOS]) in the left ventricle, together with telemetric measurement of heart rate (HR) in mice (wild type [WT] and M2 knockout [KO]) during and after one (1R) or seven sessions (7R) of restraint stress (seven mice per group). Stress decreased M2 MR mRNA and cell surface MR in the left ventricle in WT mice. In KO mice, 1R, but not 7R, decreased surface MR. Similarly, AC activity was decreased in WT mice after 1R and 7R, whereas in KO mice, there was no change. PLC activity was also decreased after 1R in WT and KO mice. This is in accord with the concept that cAMP is a key player in HR regulation. No change was found with stress in NOS activity. Amount of AC and PKA protein was not changed, but was altered for PKC isoenzymes (PKCα, β, γ, η and ϵ (increased) in KO mice, and PKCι (increased) in WT mice). KO mice were more susceptible to stress as shown by inability to compensate HR during 120 min following repeated stress. The results imply that not only M2 but also M3 are involved in stress signaling and in allostasis. We conclude that for a normal stress response, the expression of M2 MR to mediate vagal responses is essential.

  19. Muscarinic receptor modulation of basal and beta-adrenergic stimulated function of the failing human left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Newton, G E; Parker, A B; Landzberg, J S; Colucci, W S; Parker, J D

    1996-12-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of muscarinic receptor modulation on basal and beta-adrenergic stimulated left ventricular function in patients with heart failure. 21 heart failure patients and 14 subjects with normal ventricular function were studied. In Protocol 1 intracoronary acetylcholine resulted in a 60+/-8% inhibition of the left ventricular +dP/dt response to intracoronary dobutamine in the normal group, and a similar 70+/-13% inhibition in the heart failure group. Acetylcholine also attenuated the dobutamine-mediated acceleration of isovolumic relaxation (Tau) in both groups. Acetylcholine alone had no effect on Tau in the normal group, while it prolonged Tau in the heart failure group. In Protocol 2 intracoronary atropine resulted in a 35+/-10% augmentation of the inotropic response to dobutamine in the normal group, versus a non-significant 12+/-15% augmentation of the dobutamine response in the heart failure group. In Protocol 3, in 6 heart failure patients, both effects of acetylcholine, the slowing of ventricular relaxation and the inhibition of beta-adrenergic responses, were reversed by the addition of atropine. Therefore, in the failing human left ventricle muscarinic stimulation has an independent negative lusitropic effect and antagonizes the effects of beta-adrenergic stimulation.

  20. [Myxoma of the left ventricle: a cause of syncope in an adolescent].

    PubMed

    Delgado, L J; Montiel, J; Guindo, J; Margarit, L; Casas, I; Ramírez, I; Sánchez, J M; Bayes de Luna, A; Caralps, J M

    1998-08-01

    Clinical diagnosis of cardiac tumours is often difficult. We present the case of a 17 year-old boy in whom a left ventricular tumour was discovered during on diagnostic work-up for a syncope. The tumour was removed and histology confirmed the diagnosis of myxoma.

  1. TRPM7 is down‐regulated in both left atria and left ventricle of ischaemic cardiomyopathy patients and highly related to changes in ventricular function

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Ana; Roselló‐Lletí, Esther; Tarazón, Estefanía; Gil‐Cayuela, Carolina; Lago, Francisca; González‐Juanatey, Jose‐Ramón; Martinez‐Dolz, Luis; Portolés, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims The kinase ion channel transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7) is considered a modulator of cardiac fibrosis progression; nevertheless, we lack of studies analysing its role in human ischaemic cardiomyopathy (ICM). Our objective was to analyse the expression of genes encoding cardiac ion channels in human ICM, focusing on the alterations in mRNA levels of TRPM7 and its relationship with changes in the ventricular function. Methods and results RNA‐sequencing was carried out in 13 left ventricular (LV) samples of patients with ICM compared with a control group (n = 10). The analysis revealed a total of 25 ion channel genes differentially expressed. We performed an RTqPCR analysis of the TRPM7 mRNA in LV and left atrial samples and found that it was down‐regulated in both cavities (−1.43‐fold and −1.52‐fold, respectively). Atrial TRPM7 mRNA levels showed an excellent and inverse relationships with the depressed ejection fraction (r = −0.724, P = 0.042) and with the mitral A wave (r = −0.938, P = 0.006). Conclusions We report the down‐regulation of TRPM7 in tissue samples from both left atria and left ventricle in patients with ICM. We found an inverse relationship between both cardiac chambers mRNA levels with LV dysfunction, suggesting an important role of TRPM7 in the left atrial and LV functional depression found in this cardiomyopathy.

  2. Reverse cardiac remodeling enabled by mechanical unloading of the left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Malliaras, Konstantinos G; Terrovitis, John V; Drakos, Stavros G; Nanas, John N

    2009-03-01

    Cardiac remodeling is a characteristic and basic component of heart failure progression and is associated with a poor prognosis. Attenuating or reversing remodeling is an accepted goal of heart failure therapy. Cardiac mechanical support with left ventricular assist devices, in addition to its established role as "bridge to transplantation" or "destination therapy" in patients not eligible for cardiac transplantation, offers the potential for significant and sustained myocardial recovery through reverse remodeling. This review discusses the emerging role of left ventricular assist devices as a "bridge to recovery". Clinical and basic aspects of cardiac remodeling and cardiac reverse remodeling enabled by mechanical unloading, potential candidates for this modality of treatment as well as unresolved issues regarding the use of mechanical circulatory support as a bridge to recovery are discussed. PMID:20559975

  3. Noncomplicated Excision of a Mobile Pedunculated Septal Hemangioma of the Left Ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Mazen, Mahmoud; Abdelgawad, Ahmed; El-Shemy, Ahmed; Ramadan, Mona; Al-Batrek, Hani; Mahdi, Ousama; Ramadan, Mahmoud M.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 27 Final Diagnosis: LV hemangioma Symptoms: Palpitation • dyspnea • fatigue Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Posterior atriotomy Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Rare disease Background: Cardiac tumors are quite rare, and differential diagnosis of them is challenging. Case Report: A young lady with a history of palpitations, dyspnea, and fatigue was proven by transthoracic echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to have a mobile left ventricular mass with rounded contour attached to the mid-part of the interventricular septum. The mass was approached via a posterior inter-atrial approach to avoid left ventriculotomy and provide adequate exposure to completely excise the tumor and control its pedicle with minimal cardiac trauma. Histological examination of the mass was diagnostic of capillary and sinusoidal hemangioma. Conclusions: Complete excision of cardiac hemangioma is recommended once it is diagnosed, for histopathologic diagnosis and because of the possibility of serious complications. PMID:27384944

  4. Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Alan

    2005-03-18

    Sparse systems of linear equations arise in many engineering applications, including finite elements, finite volumes, and others. The solution of linear systems is often the most computationally intensive portion of the application. Depending on the complexity of problems addressed by the application, there may be no single solver capable of solving all of the linear systems that arise. This motivates the desire to switch an application from one solver librwy to another, depending on the problem being solved. The interfaces provided by solver libraries differ greatly, making it difficult to switch an application code from one library to another. The amount of library-specific code in an application Can be greatly reduced by having an abstraction layer between solver libraries and the application, putting a common "face" on various solver libraries. One such abstraction layer is the Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers (EEl), which has seen significant use by finite element applications at Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  5. Solving finite element equations on concurrent computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nour-Omid, B.; Raefsky, A.; Lyzenga, G.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a concurrent algorithm for the solution of systems of equations arising in finite element applications. The approach is based on a hybrid of direct elimination method and preconditioned conjugate iteration. Two different preconditioners are used; diagonal scaling and a concurrent implementation of incomplete LU factorization. First, an automatic procedure is used to partition the finite element mesh into sub-structures. The particular mesh partition is chosen to minimize an estimate of the cost for evaluating the solution using this algorithm on a concurrent computer. These procedures are implemented in a finite element program on the JPL/CalTech MARK III hypercube computer. An overview of the structure of this program is presented. The performance of the solution method is demonstrated with the aid of a number of numerical test runs, and its advantages for concurrent implementations are discussed. Efficiency and speed-up factors over sequential machines for the numerical examples are highlighted.

  6. Parallel processing in finite element structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.

    1987-01-01

    A brief review is made of the fundamental concepts and basic issues of parallel processing. Discussion focuses on parallel numerical algorithms, performance evaluation of machines and algorithms, and parallelism in finite element computations. A computational strategy is proposed for maximizing the degree of parallelism at different levels of the finite element analysis process including: 1) formulation level (through the use of mixed finite element models); 2) analysis level (through additive decomposition of the different arrays in the governing equations into the contributions to a symmetrized response plus correction terms); 3) numerical algorithm level (through the use of operator splitting techniques and application of iterative processes); and 4) implementation level (through the effective combination of vectorization, multitasking and microtasking, whenever available).

  7. Rate of uptake of endogenous cortisol by the left ventricle of the anaesthetized dog during ventilation with ambient air and during hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Kolanowski, J.; Lammerant, J.

    1973-01-01

    1. The rate of uptake of endogenous cortisol by the left ventricle was determined in eight dogs as the product of the left ventricular myocardial plasma flow and the coronary arteriovenous difference in plasma cortisol concentration. The arteriovenous difference in hormone concentration in resting skeletal muscle (M. gracilis) was also measured. The values given are means ± S.E. 2. During ventilation with ambient air (arterial PO2: 85 ± 2 mm Hg), the rate of cortisol uptake by the left ventricle averaged 382 ± 92 ng/100 g.min. The arteriovenous difference in hormone concentration in the vessels of the M. gracilis was more than twice that in the coronary vessels. Assuming a value of 3-4 ml./100 g.min for the blood flow in this muscle, the corresponding rate of cortisol uptake would be in the range of 25-33 ng/100 g.min. 3. During hypoxia (arterial PO2: 35 ± 1 mm Hg), the rate of cortisol uptake by the left ventricle was not significant, averaging 26 ± 113 ng/100 g.min. By contrast, the skeletal muscle still extracted significant amounts of cortisol from the plasma. It is inferred that the suppression of a significant uptake of the hormone by the left ventricle was related, at least in part, to the changes in the mechanical and associated metabolic activity of the heart muscle elicited by the lowering of the arterial PO2. 4. Hypoxia depressed the net uptake of cortisol by the left ventricle rather than the uptake mechanism itself. Indeed, bi-directional movements of cortisol between the plasma and the heart muscle, with rates of release up to 1150 ng/100 g.min, were observed. PMID:4754871

  8. Finite element radiation transport in one dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Painter, J.F.

    1997-05-09

    A new physics package solves radiation transport equations in one space dimension, multiple energy groups and directions. A discontinuous finite element method discretizes radiation intensity with respect to space and angle, and a continuous finite element method discretizes electron temperature `in space. A splitting method solves the resulting linear equations. This is a one-dimensional analog of Kershaw and Harte`s two-dimensional package. This package has been installed in a two-dimensional inertial confinement fusion code, and has given excellent results for both thermal waves and highly directional radiation. In contrast, the traditional discrete ordinate and spherical harmonic methods show less accurate results in both cases.

  9. Finite-element models of continental extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, H. David; Morgan, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Numerical models of the initial deformation of extending continental lithosphere, computed to investigate the control of preexisting thermal and mechanical heterogeneities on the style of deformation, are presented. The finite element method is used to calculate deformation with a viscoelastic-plastic model for the lithosphere. Comparisons of the results of analytic models and finite-element models using this method show that good results may be obtained by the numerical technique, even with elements containing both brittle and viscoelastic sampling points. It is shown that the gross style of initial extensional deformation is controlled by the depth and width of the initial heterogeneity which localizes deformation.

  10. Correlation-based discrimination between cardiac tissue and blood for segmentation of the left ventricle in 3-D echocardiographic images.

    PubMed

    Saris, Anne E C M; Nillesen, Maartje M; Lopata, Richard G P; de Korte, Chris L

    2014-03-01

    For automated segmentation of 3-D echocardiographic images, incorporation of temporal information may be helpful. In this study, optimal settings for calculation of temporal cross-correlations between subsequent time frames were determined, to obtain the maximum cross-correlation (MCC) values that provided the best contrast between blood and cardiac tissue over the entire cardiac cycle. Both contrast and boundary gradient quality measures were assessed to optimize MCC values with respect to signal choice (radiofrequency or envelope data) and axial window size. Optimal MCC values were incorporated into a deformable model to automatically segment the left ventricular cavity. MCC values were tested against, and combined with, filtered, demodulated radiofrequency data. Results reveal that using envelope data in combination with a relatively small axial window (0.7-1.25 mm) at fine scale results in optimal contrast and boundary gradient between the two tissues over the entire cardiac cycle. Preliminary segmentation results indicate that incorporation of MCC values has additional value for automated segmentation of the left ventricle. PMID:24412178

  11. Animation of finite element models and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipman, Robert R.

    1992-01-01

    This is not intended as a complete review of computer hardware and software that can be used for animation of finite element models and results, but is instead a demonstration of the benefits of visualization using selected hardware and software. The role of raw computational power, graphics speed, and the use of videotape are discussed.

  12. Finite element displacement analysis of a lung.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, F. L.; West, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    A method is given based on the technique of finite elements which determines theoretically the mechanical behavior of a lung-shaped body loaded by its own weight. The results of this theoretical analysis have been compared with actual measurements of alveolar size and pleural pressures in animal lungs.

  13. Finite element analysis of a meniscus mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Y.

    1989-10-01

    Finite element analyses were carried out for a 7.5 m meniscus mirror of 20 cm thickness. Calculations were made for deformations of the mirror surface due to the gravity and the effect of a hole through which a lateral supporting mechanism would be installed. Vibrational eigenmodes were also calculated when the mirror is fixed by three axial and three lateral hard points.

  14. Direct finite element equation solving algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, R. J.; Utku, S.; Salama, M.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents and examines direct solution algorithms for the linear simultaneous equations that arise when finite element models represent an engineering system. It identifies the mathematical processing of four solution methods and assesses their data processing implications using concurrent processing.

  15. Assignment Of Finite Elements To Parallel Processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Moktar A.; Flower, Jon W.; Otto, Steve W.

    1990-01-01

    Elements assigned approximately optimally to subdomains. Mapping algorithm based on simulated-annealing concept used to minimize approximate time required to perform finite-element computation on hypercube computer or other network of parallel data processors. Mapping algorithm needed when shape of domain complicated or otherwise not obvious what allocation of elements to subdomains minimizes cost of computation.

  16. Particle tracking velocimetry using echocardiographic data resolves flow in the left ventricle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampath, Kaushik; Abd, Thura T.; George, Richard T.; Katz, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Two dimensional contrast echocardiography was performed on patients with a history of left ventricular (LV) thrombus. The 636 x 434 pixels electrocardiograms were recorded using a GE Vivid 9E system with (M5S-D and 4V-D) probes in a 2-D mode at a magnification of 0.3 mm/pix. The concentration of 2-4.5 micron seed bubbles was adjusted to obtain individually discernable traces, and a data acquisition rate of 60-90 fps kept the inter-frame displacements suitable for matching traces, and calculating vectors, but yet low enough to allow a scanning depth and width of upto 13 cm and 60 degrees respectively. Particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) guided by initial particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to obtain the velocity distributions inside the LV with vector spacing of 3-5 mm. The data quality was greatly enhanced by implementing an iterative particle specific enhancement and tracking algorithm. Data covering 20 heart beats facilitated phase averaging. The results elucidated blood flow in the intra-ventricular septal region, lateral wall region, the apex of the LV and the mitral valve region.

  17. [Contraction disorders of the left ventricle in ischemic heart disease. Studies using atrial stimulation].

    PubMed

    Schwarz, F; Thormann, J; Zimmermann, H; Winkler, B

    1975-01-25

    Sixty-one patients with suspected ischemic heart disease (IHD) have been investigated by atrial stimulation (AST). Group A patients had normal coronarograms and served as controls. Group B patients had pathological conronarograms (at least 50% stenosis in one of the 3 vessels) and normal ventriculograms. Group C patients had pathological coronarograms and ventricular aneurysms. During AST, group C patients exhibited lower dp/dt max and dp/dt min as well as higher left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) and/or mean pulmonary artery pressure (MPAP) than groups A and B. Group B differed from group A only by increased MPAP during AST. When compared to controls, contractility in group C was reduced even at rest. AST offers an excellent means of diagnosing IHD if heart rates of 140/min and above are used. An abnormal increase in MPAP serves as the simplest parameter for IHD. Elevated MPAP at rest prompts suspicion of ventricular aneurysm. It is possible to deduce a quanitative estimate of contracitility by correlating dp/dt max to LVEDP. A hyperbolic relation results. PMID:1124378

  18. Left ventricle motion estimation based on signal-dependent time-frequency representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Marco A.; Weiderpass, Heinar A.; Furuie, Sergio S.

    2003-05-01

    In current clinical practice, the noninvasive assessment of left ventricular deformation can be determined using all the principal imaging modalities, including contrast angiography, echocardiography, cine computed tomography, single photon emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. However, since the heart undergoes complex motion, proper characterization of its motion still remains an open and challenging research problem. A number of approaches for nonrigid motion analysis have been studied in the literature. Much of the effort has confined to estimate the displacement vector for each image point or optical flow. This is a challenging problem in image analysis because of a wide range of possible motions and the presence of noise in the image sets. In this work, we present an algorithm for computation of optical flow based on a signal-dependent radially Gaussian kernel that adapts over time. The adaptive kernel obtained from the proposed algorithm is used to estimate a 3D-frequency spectrum for a given pixel in a series of images. The orientation of the spectrum in the frequency domain is totally governed by the pixel velocity. In a recent contribution, a linear regression model is used over the spectrum to obtain the velocity components that are proportional to the pixel movement.

  19. Three Dimensional Energetics of Left Ventricle Flows Using Time-Resolved DPIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierrakos, Olga; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2006-11-01

    Left ventricular (LV) flows in the human heart are very complex and in the presence of unhealthy or prosthetic heart valves (HV), the complexity of the flow is further increased. Yet to date, no study has documented the complex 3D hemodynamic characteristics and energetics of LV flows. We present high sampling frequency Time Resolved DPIV results obtained in a flexible, transparent LV documenting the evolution of eddies and turbulence. The purpose is to characterize the energetics of the LV flow field in the presence of four orientations of the most commonly implanted mechanical bileaflet HV and a porcine valve. By decomposing the energy scales of the flow field, the ultimate goal is to quantify the total energy losses associated with vortex ring formation and turbulence dissipation. The energies associated to vortex ring formation give a measure of the energy trapped within the structure while estimations of the turbulence dissipation rate (TDR) give a measure of the energy dissipated at the smaller scales. For the first time in cardiovascular applications, an LES-based PIV method, which overcomes the limitations of conventional TDR estimation methods that assume homogeneous isotropic turbulence, was employed. We observed that energy lost at the larger scales (vortex ring) is much higher than the energy lost at the smaller scales due to turbulence dissipation.

  20. Effect of Trabeculae on the Hemodynamics of an Embryonic Left Ventricle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedula, Vijay; Lee, Juhyun; Hsiai, Tzung; Marsden, Alison

    2015-11-01

    The left ventricular (LV) endocardium is not smooth, but has ``trabeculae'' protruding into the LV cavity. Recent studies have indicated that trabeculae significantly influence LV hemodynamics by enhancing the diastolic penetration depth of inflow and facilitating a better apical systolic washout. However, it remains unclear how the role of hemodynamics modulates the initiation of trabeculae during cardiac morphogenesis. While such an assessment of mammalian heart models is hampered by the prolonged duration of cardiac development and complexity of surrounding internal organs, embryonic zebrafish is a genetically tractable model for investigating cardiac morphogenesis. We employ a novel light-sheet fluorescent microscopy to extract 4D LV models of zebrafish and develop an ALE-based moving domain CFD solver to perform flow simulations and extract quantitative data related to flow velocities and pressure gradients. We will compare near-wall flow dynamics between the wild type zebrafish (with trabeculae) and the cloche mutant lines that fail to develop trabeculae, to provide new insights into the flow-induced mechano-transduction relevant to the initiation of trabeculae during cardiac morphogenesis. This research is supported by NIH 1R01HL121754-01 grant and Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award. Computational resources are provided through the NSF XSEDE grant TG-CTS130034. The light-sheet imaging and zebrafish model are supported by NIH 1R01HL129727.

  1. The Clinical Benefits of Adding a Third Dimension to Assess the Left Ventricle with Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Badano, Luigi P.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional echocardiography is a novel imaging technique based on acquisition and display of volumetric data sets in the beating heart. This permits a comprehensive evaluation of left ventricular (LV) anatomy and function from a single acquisition and expands the diagnostic possibilities of noninvasive cardiology. It provides the possibility of quantitating geometry and function of LV without preestablished assumptions regarding cardiac chamber shape and allows an echocardiographic assessment of the LV that is less operator-dependent and therefore more reproducible. Further developments and improvements for widespread routine applications include higher spatial and temporal resolution to improve image quality, faster acquisition, processing and reconstruction, and fully automated quantitative analysis. At present, three-dimensional echocardiography complements routine 2DE in clinical practice, overcoming some of its limitations and offering additional valuable information that has led to recommending its use for routine assessment of the LV of patients in whom information about LV size and function is critical for their clinical management. PMID:24959374

  2. A practical approach to using strain echocardiography to evaluate the left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Feigenbaum, Harvey; Mastouri, Ronald; Sawada, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) evaluation is the most important use of echocardiography. Speckle tracking strain echocardiography (SE) provides a quantitative regional and global LV assessment, is an independent supplement to wall motion analysis and has been validated over the past 10 years. Despite these facts, SE is not being used routinely, especially in the United States. SE can generate longitudinal, radial, and circumferential strain measurements and LV twist. Although intriguing and potentially useful, these measurements also are confusing, complicated, time consuming, and frequently displayed as difficult-to-interpret wave forms. A pragmatic approach to SE simplifies the suggested method for strain calculation to reduce the time required and enhance reproducibility. With this modification the strain calculations take only 2-4 min. The yield is >80% in all patients. Reproducibility is at least as good as ejection fraction. Longitudinal strain is the most sensitive and reproducible of the various strain measurements, so it is the only strain we record. For simplicity, systolic strain is displayed as a positive number. Lastly, we primarily use a bullseye presentation for peak systolic strain. Many clinical examples are illustrated. However, as with all tests, SE is not perfect; there are limitations and potential false positives, but a practical approach to SE eventually should help make it a part of all echocardiographic examinations. PMID:22789972

  3. Fast left ventricle tracking in CMR images using localized anatomical affine optical flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queirós, Sandro; Vilaça, João. L.; Morais, Pedro; Fonseca, Jaime C.; D'hooge, Jan; Barbosa, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    In daily cardiology practice, assessment of left ventricular (LV) global function using non-invasive imaging remains central for the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with cardiovascular diseases. Despite the different methodologies currently accessible for LV segmentation in cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) images, a fast and complete LV delineation is still limitedly available for routine use. In this study, a localized anatomically constrained affine optical flow method is proposed for fast and automatic LV tracking throughout the full cardiac cycle in short-axis CMR images. Starting from an automatically delineated LV in the end-diastolic frame, the endocardial and epicardial boundaries are propagated by estimating the motion between adjacent cardiac phases using optical flow. In order to reduce the computational burden, the motion is only estimated in an anatomical region of interest around the tracked boundaries and subsequently integrated into a local affine motion model. Such localized estimation enables to capture complex motion patterns, while still being spatially consistent. The method was validated on 45 CMR datasets taken from the 2009 MICCAI LV segmentation challenge. The proposed approach proved to be robust and efficient, with an average distance error of 2.1 mm and a correlation with reference ejection fraction of 0.98 (1.9 +/- 4.5%). Moreover, it showed to be fast, taking 5 seconds for the tracking of a full 4D dataset (30 ms per image). Overall, a novel fast, robust and accurate LV tracking methodology was proposed, enabling accurate assessment of relevant global function cardiac indices, such as volumes and ejection fraction

  4. Hyperglycemia has a greater impact on left ventricle function in South Asians than in Europeans

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chloe M; Tillin, Therese; March, Katherine; Ghosh, Arjun K; Jones, Siana; Wright, Andrew; Heasman, John; Francis, Darrel; Sattar, Naveed; Mayet, Jamil; Chaturvedi, Nish; Hughes, Alun D

    2016-01-01

    Objective Diabetes is associated with left ventricular diastolic and systolic dysfunction. South Asians may be at particular risk of developing LV dysfunction due to a high prevalence of diabetes. We investigated the role of diabetes and hyperglycaemia in LV dysfunction in a community-based cohort of older South Asians and White Europeans. Research Design and Methods Conventional and Doppler echocardiography was performed in 999 participants (542 Europeans, 457 South Asians aged 58-86 years) in a population-based study. Anthropometry, fasting bloods, coronary artery calcification scoring, blood pressure and renal function were measured. Results Diabetes, and hyperglycaemia across the spectrum of HbA1c had a greater adverse effect on LV function in South Asians than Europeans (NT-proBNP beta±SE 0.09±0.04, p=0.01 versus -0.04±0.05, p=0.4, p for HbA1c/ethnicity interaction 0.02), diastolic function (E/e’ 0.69±0.12, p<0.0001 versus 0.09±0.2, p=0.6, p interaction 0.005, and systolic function (s’ -0.11±0.06, p=0.04 versus 0.14±0.09, p=0.1, p interaction 0.2). Multivariable adjustment for hypertension, microvascular disease, LV mass, coronary disease and dyslipidaemia only partially accounted for the ethnic differences. Adverse LV function in diabetic South Asians could not be accounted for by poorer glycaemic control or longer diabetes duration. Conclusions Diabetes and hyperglycaemia have a greater adverse effect on LV function in South Asians than Europeans incompletely explained by adverse risk factors. South Asians may require earlier, and more aggressive treatment of their cardiometabolic risk factors to reduce risks of LV dysfunction. PMID:24241789

  5. Three-dimensional Systolic Strain Patterns in the Normal Human Left Ventricle: Characterization with Tagged MR Imaging1

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Christopher C.; Lugo-Olivieri, Carlos H.; McVeigh, Elliot R.; Zerhouni, Elias A.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE To present a database of systolic three-dimensional (3D) strain evolution throughout the normal left ventricle (LV) in humans. MATERIALS AND METHODS In 31 healthy volunteers, magnetic resonance (MR) tissue tagging and breath-hold MR imaging were used to generate and then detect the motion of transient fiducial markers (ie, tags) in the heart every 32 msec. Strain and motion were calculated from a 3D displacement field that was fit to the tag data. Special indexes of contraction and thickening that were based on multiple strain components also were evaluated. RESULTS The temporal evolution of local strains was linear during the first half of systole. The peak shortening and thickening strain components were typically greatest in the anterolateral wall, increased toward the apex, and increased toward the endocardium. Shears and displacements were more spatially variable. The two specialized indexes of contraction and thickening had higher measurement precision and tighter normal ranges than did the traditional strain components. CONCLUSION In this study, the authors noninvasively characterized the normal systolic ranges of 3D displacement and strain evolution throughout the human LV. Comparison against this multidimensional database may permit sensitive detection of systolic LV dysfunction. PMID:10671594

  6. Fluid mechanics of blood flow in human fetal left ventricles based on patient-specific 4D ultrasound scans.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chang Quan; Lim, Guat Ling; Jamil, Muhammad; Mattar, Citra Nurfarah Zaini; Biswas, Arijit; Yap, Choon Hwai

    2016-10-01

    The mechanics of intracardiac blood flow and the epigenetic influence it exerts over the heart function have been the subjects of intense research lately. Fetal intracardiac flows are especially useful for gaining insights into the development of congenital heart diseases, but have not received due attention thus far, most likely because of technical difficulties in collecting sufficient intracardiac flow data in a safe manner. Here, we circumvent such obstacles by employing 4D STIC ultrasound scans to quantify the fetal heart motion in three normal 20-week fetuses, subsequently performing 3D computational fluid dynamics simulations on the left ventricles based on these patient-specific heart movements. Analysis of the simulation results shows that there are significant differences between fetal and adult ventricular blood flows which arise because of dissimilar heart morphology, E/A ratio, diastolic-systolic duration ratio, and heart rate. The formations of ventricular vortex rings were observed for both E- and A-wave in the flow simulations. These vortices had sufficient momentum to last until the end of diastole and were responsible for generating significant wall shear stresses on the myocardial endothelium, as well as helicity in systolic outflow. Based on findings from previous studies, we hypothesized that these vortex-induced flow properties play an important role in sustaining the efficiency of diastolic filling, systolic pumping, and cardiovascular flow in normal fetal hearts. PMID:26676944

  7. Relationship between changes of chamber mechanical parameters and mean pressure-mean flow diagrams of the left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Negroni, J A; Lascano, E C; Pichel, R H

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical relationship between mean ventricular pressure (P) and mean ventricular outflow (Q) was developed based on a model of the left ventricle with elastic-resistive properties. Using a polynomial interpolation method, a fifth-order polynomial equation for the P-Q relationship was obtained. Its coefficients are functions of end-diastolic volume (VD), heart rate (HR), contractile state (CS), diastolic elastance (ED), asymmetry (S) of the elastance function E(t), and ventricular internal resistance factor (K). Effect of changes of these parameters indicated that normal and enhanced CS relations diverge toward the P axis but have a common intercept toward the Q axis. A similar effect was obtained with increased asymmetry of E(t). Changes in VD, HR and ED produced a parallel shift of the P-Q relation. The effect of K was negligible, however, which would reduce the description of the P-Q relationship to a third-order polynomial equation. A flow-dependent deactivation component was introduced, altering the asymmetry factor S, which decreases in a linear proportion to Q. This factor shifted the pump function graph downwards. We conclude that the theoretical description of the P-Q relation we present reproduces the experimental behavior of pump function diagrams reported in the literature (changes in VD, HR, and CS) and predicts the possible behavior due to other parameter changes. PMID:3400909

  8. Fluid-structure interaction of an aortic heart valve prosthesis driven by an animated anatomic left ventricle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Trung Bao; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2013-07-01

    We develop a novel large-scale kinematic model for animating the left ventricle (LV) wall and use this model to drive the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) between the ensuing blood flow and a mechanical heart valve prosthesis implanted in the aortic position of an anatomic LV/aorta configuration. The kinematic model is of lumped type and employs a cell-based, FitzHugh-Nagumo framework to simulate the motion of the LV wall in response to an excitation wavefront propagating along the heart wall. The emerging large-scale LV wall motion exhibits complex contractile mechanisms that include contraction (twist) and expansion (untwist). The kinematic model is shown to yield global LV motion parameters that are well within the physiologic range throughout the cardiac cycle. The FSI between the leaflets of the mechanical heart valve and the blood flow driven by the dynamic LV wall motion and mitral inflow is simulated using the curvilinear immersed boundary (CURVIB) method (Ge and Sotiropoulos, 2007; Borazjani et al., 2008) [1,2] implemented in conjunction with a domain decomposition approach. The computed results show that the simulated flow patterns are in good qualitative agreement with in vivo observations. The simulations also reveal complex kinematics of the valve leaflets, thus, underscoring the need for patient-specific simulations of heart valve prosthesis and other cardiac devices.

  9. Electrical Wave Propagation in an Anisotropic Model of the Left Ventricle Based on Analytical Description of Cardiac Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Pravdin, Sergey F.; Dierckx, Hans; Katsnelson, Leonid B.; Solovyova, Olga; Markhasin, Vladimir S.; Panfilov, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a numerical approach based on our recent analytical model of fiber structure in the left ventricle of the human heart. A special curvilinear coordinate system is proposed to analytically include realistic ventricular shape and myofiber directions. With this anatomical model, electrophysiological simulations can be performed on a rectangular coordinate grid. We apply our method to study the effect of fiber rotation and electrical anisotropy of cardiac tissue (i.e., the ratio of the conductivity coefficients along and across the myocardial fibers) on wave propagation using the ten Tusscher–Panfilov (2006) ionic model for human ventricular cells. We show that fiber rotation increases the speed of cardiac activation and attenuates the effects of anisotropy. Our results show that the fiber rotation in the heart is an important factor underlying cardiac excitation. We also study scroll wave dynamics in our model and show the drift of a scroll wave filament whose velocity depends non-monotonically on the fiber rotation angle; the period of scroll wave rotation decreases with an increase of the fiber rotation angle; an increase in anisotropy may cause the breakup of a scroll wave, similar to the mother rotor mechanism of ventricular fibrillation. PMID:24817308

  10. Fluid-structure interaction of an aortic heart valve prosthesis driven by an animated anatomic left ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Le, Trung Bao; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2012-01-01

    We develop a novel large-scale kinematic model for animating the left ventricle (LV) wall and use this model to drive the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) between the ensuing blood flow and a mechanical heart valve prosthesis implanted in the aortic position of an anatomic LV/aorta configuration. The kinematic model is of lumped type and employs a cell-based, FitzHugh-Nagumo framework to simulate the motion of the LV wall in response to an excitation wavefront propagating along the heart wall. The emerging large-scale LV wall motion exhibits complex contractile mechanisms that include contraction (twist) and expansion (untwist). The kinematic model is shown to yield global LV motion parameters that are well within the physiologic range throughout the cardiac cycle. The FSI between the leaflets of the mechanical heart valve and the blood flow driven by the dynamic LV wall motion and mitral inflow is simulated using the curvilinear immersed boundary (CURVIB) method [1, 2] implemented in conjunction with a domain decomposition approach. The computed results show that the simulated flow patterns are in good qualitative agreement with in vivo observations. The simulations also reveal complex kinematics of the valve leaflets, thus, underscoring the need for patient-specific simulations of heart valve prosthesis and other cardiac devices. PMID:23729841

  11. Drift of Scroll Wave Filaments in an Anisotropic Model of the Left Ventricle of the Human Heart

    PubMed Central

    Pravdin, Sergei; Dierckx, Hans; Markhasin, Vladimir S.; Panfilov, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    Scroll waves are three-dimensional vortices which occur in excitable media. Their formation in the heart results in the onset of cardiac arrhythmias, and the dynamics of their filaments determine the arrhythmia type. Most studies of filament dynamics were performed in domains with simple geometries and generic description of the anisotropy of cardiac tissue. Recently, we developed an analytical model of fibre structure and anatomy of the left ventricle (LV) of the human heart. Here, we perform a systematic study of the dynamics of scroll wave filaments for the cases of positive and negative tension in this anatomical model. We study the various possible shapes of LV and different degree of anisotropy of cardiac tissue. We show that, for positive filament tension, the final position of scroll wave filament is mainly determined by the thickness of the myocardial wall but, however, anisotropy attracts the filament to the LV apex. For negative filament tension, the filament buckles, and for most cases, tends to the apex of the heart with no or slight dependency on the thickness of the LV. We discuss the mechanisms of the observed phenomena and their implications for cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:26539486

  12. Fluid mechanics of blood flow in human fetal left ventricles based on patient-specific 4D ultrasound scans.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chang Quan; Lim, Guat Ling; Jamil, Muhammad; Mattar, Citra Nurfarah Zaini; Biswas, Arijit; Yap, Choon Hwai

    2016-10-01

    The mechanics of intracardiac blood flow and the epigenetic influence it exerts over the heart function have been the subjects of intense research lately. Fetal intracardiac flows are especially useful for gaining insights into the development of congenital heart diseases, but have not received due attention thus far, most likely because of technical difficulties in collecting sufficient intracardiac flow data in a safe manner. Here, we circumvent such obstacles by employing 4D STIC ultrasound scans to quantify the fetal heart motion in three normal 20-week fetuses, subsequently performing 3D computational fluid dynamics simulations on the left ventricles based on these patient-specific heart movements. Analysis of the simulation results shows that there are significant differences between fetal and adult ventricular blood flows which arise because of dissimilar heart morphology, E/A ratio, diastolic-systolic duration ratio, and heart rate. The formations of ventricular vortex rings were observed for both E- and A-wave in the flow simulations. These vortices had sufficient momentum to last until the end of diastole and were responsible for generating significant wall shear stresses on the myocardial endothelium, as well as helicity in systolic outflow. Based on findings from previous studies, we hypothesized that these vortex-induced flow properties play an important role in sustaining the efficiency of diastolic filling, systolic pumping, and cardiovascular flow in normal fetal hearts.

  13. Relationship between changes of chamber mechanical parameters and mean pressure-mean flow diagrams of the left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Negroni, J A; Lascano, E C; Pichel, R H

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical relationship between mean ventricular pressure (P) and mean ventricular outflow (Q) was developed based on a model of the left ventricle with elastic-resistive properties. Using a polynomial interpolation method, a fifth-order polynomial equation for the P-Q relationship was obtained. Its coefficients are functions of end-diastolic volume (VD), heart rate (HR), contractile state (CS), diastolic elastance (ED), asymmetry (S) of the elastance function E(t), and ventricular internal resistance factor (K). Effect of changes of these parameters indicated that normal and enhanced CS relations diverge toward the P axis but have a common intercept toward the Q axis. A similar effect was obtained with increased asymmetry of E(t). Changes in VD, HR and ED produced a parallel shift of the P-Q relation. The effect of K was negligible, however, which would reduce the description of the P-Q relationship to a third-order polynomial equation. A flow-dependent deactivation component was introduced, altering the asymmetry factor S, which decreases in a linear proportion to Q. This factor shifted the pump function graph downwards. We conclude that the theoretical description of the P-Q relation we present reproduces the experimental behavior of pump function diagrams reported in the literature (changes in VD, HR, and CS) and predicts the possible behavior due to other parameter changes.

  14. Diastolic Dyssynchrony in Acute ST Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction and Relationship with Functional Recovery of Left Ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Daşli, Tolga; Erkol, Ayhan; Erden, İsmail; Başaran, Yelda

    2016-01-01

    Background Incidence of diastolic dyssynchrony (DD) and its impact on functional recovery of left ventricle (LV) after ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is not known. Methods Consecutive patients with STEMI who underwent successful revascularization were prospectively enrolled. Echocardiography with tissue Doppler imaging was performed within 48 hours of admission and at 6 months. LV end-diastolic volume index (EDVI), end-systolic volume index (ESVI), ejection fraction (EF), and left atrial volume index (LAVI) were calculated. Diastolic delay was calculated from onset of QRS complex to peak of E wave in tissue Doppler image and presented as maximal temporal difference between peak early diastolic velocity of 6 basal segments of LV (TeDiff). Study patients were compared with demographically matched control group. Results Forty eight consecutive patients (55 ± 10 years, 88% male) and 24 controls (56 ± 6 years, 88% male) were included. TeDiff was higher in STEMI than in controls (35.9 ± 19.9 ms vs. 26.3 ± 6.8 ms, p = 0.025). Presence of DD was higher in STEMI than controls (58% vs. 33%, p = 0.046) according to calculated cut-off value (≥ 29 ms). There was no correlation between TeDiff and change in EDVI, ESVI, and LAVI at 6 months, however TeDiff and change in EF at 6 months was positively correlated (r = 0.328, p = 0.023). Patients with baseline DD experienced remodeling less frequently compared to patients without baseline DD (11% vs. 38%, p = 0.040) during follow-up. Conclusion STEMI disrupts diastolic synchronicity of LV. However, DD during acute phase of STEMI is associated with better recovery of LV thereafter. This suggests that DD is associated with peri-infarct stunned myocardium that is salvaged with primary intervention as well as infarct size. PMID:27721951

  15. Transcatheter embolization of a large aneurysm in a congenital coronary cameral fistula from the left coronary artery to the right ventricle.

    PubMed

    Freund, Jan Erik; Yuko-Jowi, Christine; Freund, Matthias W

    2015-02-15

    A congenital coronary cameral fistula (CCCF) is characterized by left ventricular dysfunction, electrocardiographic changes due to a reduced left coronary blood flow and impaired physical activity. CCCF's with a giant aneurysm are very rarely seen. The presence of a giant aneurysm imposes even greater health risks. We report a case of a CCCF from the left coronary artery to the right ventricle with a large distal aneurysm in a 20-year-old woman that we closed percutaneously with coils for the closure of ventricular septal defects (VSD) and persistent ductus arteriosus (PDA).

  16. Finite element analysis of human joints

    SciTech Connect

    Bossart, P.L.; Hollerbach, K.

    1996-09-01

    Our work focuses on the development of finite element models (FEMs) that describe the biomechanics of human joints. Finite element modeling is becoming a standard tool in industrial applications. In highly complex problems such as those found in biomechanics research, however, the full potential of FEMs is just beginning to be explored, due to the absence of precise, high resolution medical data and the difficulties encountered in converting these enormous datasets into a form that is usable in FEMs. With increasing computing speed and memory available, it is now feasible to address these challenges. We address the first by acquiring data with a high resolution C-ray CT scanner and the latter by developing semi-automated method for generating the volumetric meshes used in the FEM. Issues related to tomographic reconstruction, volume segmentation, the use of extracted surfaces to generate volumetric hexahedral meshes, and applications of the FEM are described.

  17. Visualization of higher order finite elements.

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David C.; Pebay, Philippe Pierre; Crawford, Richard H.; Khardekar, Rahul Vinay

    2004-04-01

    Finite element meshes are used to approximate the solution to some differential equation when no exact solution exists. A finite element mesh consists of many small (but finite, not infinitesimal or differential) regions of space that partition the problem domain, {Omega}. Each region, or element, or cell has an associated polynomial map, {Phi}, that converts the coordinates of any point, x = ( x y z ), in the element into another value, f(x), that is an approximate solution to the differential equation, as in Figure 1(a). This representation works quite well for axis-aligned regions of space, but when there are curved boundaries on the problem domain, {Omega}, it becomes algorithmically much more difficult to define {Phi} in terms of x. Rather, we define an archetypal element in a new coordinate space, r = ( r s t ), which has a simple, axis-aligned boundary (see Figure 1(b)) and place two maps onto our archetypal element:

  18. Finite element computation with parallel VLSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgregor, J.; Salama, M.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a parallel processing computer consisting of a 16-bit microcomputer as a master processor which controls and coordinates the activities of 8086/8087 VLSI chip set slave processors working in parallel. The hardware is inexpensive and can be flexibly configured and programmed to perform various functions. This makes it a useful research tool for the development of, and experimentation with parallel mathematical algorithms. Application of the hardware to computational tasks involved in the finite element analysis method is demonstrated by the generation and assembly of beam finite element stiffness matrices. A number of possible schemes for the implementation of N-elements on N- or n-processors (N is greater than n) are described, and the speedup factors of their time consumption are determined as a function of the number of available parallel processors.

  19. Revolution in Orthodontics: Finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Johar Rajvinder; Kambalyal, Prabhuraj; Jain, Megha; Khandelwal, Piyush

    2016-01-01

    Engineering has not only developed in the field of medicine but has also become quite established in the field of dentistry, especially Orthodontics. Finite element analysis (FEA) is a computational procedure to calculate the stress in an element, which performs a model solution. This structural analysis allows the determination of stress resulting from external force, pressure, thermal change, and other factors. This method is extremely useful for indicating mechanical aspects of biomaterials and human tissues that can hardly be measured in vivo. The results obtained can then be studied using visualization software within the finite element method (FEM) to view a variety of parameters, and to fully identify implications of the analysis. This is a review to show the applications of FEM in Orthodontics. It is extremely important to verify what the purpose of the study is in order to correctly apply FEM. PMID:27114948

  20. Finite Element Analysis of Honeycomb Impact Attenuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Seung-Yong; Choi, Seung-Kyu; Kim, Nohyu

    To participate in Student Formula Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) competitions, it is necessary to build an impact attenuator that would give an average deceleration not to exceed 20g when it runs into a rigid wall. Students can use numerical simulations or experimental test data to show that their car satisfies this safety requirement. A student group to study formula cars at the Korea University of Technology and Education has designed a vehicle to take part in a SAE competition, and a honeycomb structure was adopted as the impact attenuator. In this paper, finite element calculations were carried out to investigate the dynamic behavior of the honeycomb attenuator. Deceleration and deformation behaviors were studied. Effect of the yield strength was checked by comparing the numerical results. ABAQUS/Explicit finite element code was used.

  1. Outcomes of off-pump versus on-pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery in patients with severely dilated left ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sen; Gong, Wenhui; Qi, Quan; Yuan, Zezhe; Chen, Anqing; Liu, Jun; Cai, Junfeng; Zhou, Mi

    2016-01-01

    Background Currently, off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) grafting has been the standard procedure for surgical revascularization in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). This study aimed to examine the safety and applicability of OPCAB compared with on-pump coronary artery bypass (ONCAB) in patients with severely dilated left ventricle. Methods A retrospective study of giant left ventricle patients [left ventricular end diastolic diameter (LVEDD) ≥ VE mm] undergoing coronary bypass grafting from 2009 through 2015 at a single center was conducted. Preoperative and intraoperative risk factors, and postoperative outcomes were analyzed. Survival analysis was carried to analyze survival rate during follow-up. Results A total of 24 patients underwent ONCAB, and 26 underwent OPCAB. Both groups had similar preoperative profiles. Two cases from each group died during in-hospital time. In comparison to OPCAB, there was longer operation and post-surgery intubation time and more renal dysfunction in ONCAB group (P<0.05). One-year survival between OPCAB and ONCAB were not significantly different (87.5% vs. 92.3%, P>0.05). Conclusions OPCAB is a safe and feasible alternative for CAD patients with giant left ventricle, offering a significant advantage over ONCAB with regards to renal function, operation duration and length of ventilation. PMID:27761444

  2. Finite Element Analysis of Reverberation Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunting, Charles F.; Nguyen, Duc T.

    2000-01-01

    The primary motivating factor behind the initiation of this work was to provide a deterministic means of establishing the validity of the statistical methods that are recommended for the determination of fields that interact in -an avionics system. The application of finite element analysis to reverberation chambers is the initial step required to establish a reasonable course of inquiry in this particularly data-intensive study. The use of computational electromagnetics provides a high degree of control of the "experimental" parameters that can be utilized in a simulation of reverberating structures. As the work evolved there were four primary focus areas they are: 1. The eigenvalue problem for the source free problem. 2. The development of a complex efficient eigensolver. 3. The application of a source for the TE and TM fields for statistical characterization. 4. The examination of shielding effectiveness in a reverberating environment. One early purpose of this work was to establish the utility of finite element techniques in the development of an extended low frequency statistical model for reverberation phenomena. By employing finite element techniques, structures of arbitrary complexity can be analyzed due to the use of triangular shape functions in the spatial discretization. The effects of both frequency stirring and mechanical stirring are presented. It is suggested that for the low frequency operation the typical tuner size is inadequate to provide a sufficiently random field and that frequency stirring should be used. The results of the finite element analysis of the reverberation chamber illustrate io-W the potential utility of a 2D representation for enhancing the basic statistical characteristics of the chamber when operating in a low frequency regime. The basic field statistics are verified for frequency stirring over a wide range of frequencies. Mechanical stirring is shown to provide an effective frequency deviation.

  3. Finite element based electric motor design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C. Warren

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this effort was to develop a finite element code for the analysis and design of permanent magnet electric motors. These motors would drive electromechanical actuators in advanced rocket engines. The actuators would control fuel valves and thrust vector control systems. Refurbishing the hydraulic systems of the Space Shuttle after each flight is costly and time consuming. Electromechanical actuators could replace hydraulics, improve system reliability, and reduce down time.

  4. Finite element methods in fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebowitz, H.; Moyer, E. T., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Finite-element methodology specific to the analysis of fracture mechanics problems is reviewed. Primary emphasis is on the important algorithmic developments which have enhanced the numerical modeling of fracture processes. Methodologies to address elastostatic problems in two and three dimensions, elastodynamic problems, elastoplastic problems, special considerations for three-dimensional nonlinear problems, and the modeling of stable crack growth are reviewed. In addition, the future needs of the fracture community are discussed and open questions are identified.

  5. Finite element formulations for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tezduyar, Tayfun E.

    1989-01-01

    Researchers started their studies on the development and application of computational methods for compressible flows. Particular attention was given to proper numerical treatment of sharp layers occurring in such problems and to general mesh generation capabilities for intricate computational geometries. Mainly finite element methods enhanced with several state-of-the art techniques (such as the streamline-upwind/Petrov-Galerkin, discontinuity capturing, adaptive implicit-explicit, and trouped element-by-element approximate factorization schemes) were employed.

  6. Adaptive finite element strategies for shell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, G.; Levit, I.; Stehlin, B.; Hurlbut, B.

    1992-01-01

    The present paper extends existing finite element adaptive refinement (AR) techniques to shell structures, which have heretofore been neglected in the AR literature. Specific challenges in applying AR to shell structures include: (1) physical discontinuities (e.g., stiffener intersections); (2) boundary layers; (3) sensitivity to geometric imperfections; (4) the sensitivity of most shell elements to mesh distortion, constraint definition and/or thinness; and (5) intrinsic geometric nonlinearity. All of these challenges but (5) are addressed here.

  7. A multidimensional finite element method for CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, Darrell W.; Humphrey, Joseph W.

    1991-01-01

    A finite element method is used to solve the equations of motion for 2- and 3-D fluid flow. The time-dependent equations are solved explicitly using quadrilateral (2-D) and hexahedral (3-D) elements, mass lumping, and reduced integration. A Petrov-Galerkin technique is applied to the advection terms. The method requires a minimum of computational storage, executes quickly, and is scalable for execution on computer systems ranging from PCs to supercomputers.

  8. Finite element based electric motor design optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, C. Warren

    1993-11-01

    The purpose of this effort was to develop a finite element code for the analysis and design of permanent magnet electric motors. These motors would drive electromechanical actuators in advanced rocket engines. The actuators would control fuel valves and thrust vector control systems. Refurbishing the hydraulic systems of the Space Shuttle after each flight is costly and time consuming. Electromechanical actuators could replace hydraulics, improve system reliability, and reduce down time.

  9. Quadrilateral/hexahedral finite element mesh coarsening

    DOEpatents

    Staten, Matthew L; Dewey, Mark W; Scott, Michael A; Benzley, Steven E

    2012-10-16

    A technique for coarsening a finite element mesh ("FEM") is described. This technique includes identifying a coarsening region within the FEM to be coarsened. Perimeter chords running along perimeter boundaries of the coarsening region are identified. The perimeter chords are redirected to create an adaptive chord separating the coarsening region from a remainder of the FEM. The adaptive chord runs through mesh elements residing along the perimeter boundaries of the coarsening region. The adaptive chord is then extracted to coarsen the FEM.

  10. Finite Element Results Visualization for Unstructured Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Speck, Douglas E.; Dovey, Donald J.

    1996-07-15

    GRIZ is a general-purpose post-processing application supporting interactive visualization of finite element analysis results on unstructured grids. In addition to basic pseudocolor renderings of state variables over the mesh surface, GRIZ provides modern visualization techniques such as isocontours and isosurfaces, cutting planes, vector field display, and particle traces. GRIZ accepts both command-line and mouse-driven input, and is portable to virtually any UNIX platform which provides Motif and OpenGl libraries.

  11. ExodusII Finite Element Data Model

    SciTech Connect

    2005-05-14

    EXODUS II is a model developed to store and retrieve data for finite element analyses. It is used for preprocessing (problem definition), postprocessing (results visualization), as well as code to code data transfer. An EXODUS II data file is a random access, machine independent, binary file that is written and read via C, C++, or Fortran library routines which comprise the Application Programming Interface. (exodus II is based on netcdf)

  12. EXODUS II: A finite element data model

    SciTech Connect

    Schoof, L.A.; Yarberry, V.R.

    1994-09-01

    EXODUS II is a model developed to store and retrieve data for finite element analyses. It is used for preprocessing (problem definition), postprocessing (results visualization), as well as code to code data transfer. An EXODUS II data file is a random access, machine independent, binary file that is written and read via C, C++, or Fortran library routines which comprise the Application Programming Interface (API).

  13. Finite element modeling of nonisothermal polymer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roylance, D.

    1981-01-01

    A finite element formulation designed to simulate polymer melt flows in which both conductive and convective heat transfer are important is described, and the numerical model is illustrated by means of computer experiments using extruder drag flow and entry flow as trial problems. Fluid incompressibility is enforced by a penalty treatment of the element pressures, and the thermal convective transport is modeled by conventional Galerkin and optimal upwind treatments.

  14. Finite element analysis of wrinkling membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. K.; Hedgepeth, J. M.; Weingarten, V. I.; Das, P.; Kahyai, S.

    1984-01-01

    The development of a nonlinear numerical algorithm for the analysis of stresses and displacements in partly wrinkled flat membranes, and its implementation on the SAP VII finite-element code are described. A comparison of numerical results with exact solutions of two benchmark problems reveals excellent agreement, with good convergence of the required iterative procedure. An exact solution of a problem involving axisymmetric deformations of a partly wrinkled shallow curved membrane is also reported.

  15. Finite element analysis of flexible, rotating blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, Oliver G.

    1987-01-01

    A reference guide that can be used when using the finite element method to approximate the static and dynamic behavior of flexible, rotating blades is given. Important parameters such as twist, sweep, camber, co-planar shell elements, centrifugal loads, and inertia properties are studied. Comparisons are made between NASTRAN elements through published benchmark tests. The main purpose is to summarize blade modeling strategies and to document capabilities and limitations (for flexible, rotating blades) of various NASTRAN elements.

  16. [Pulmonary artery sling and single ventricle treated with a simultaneous operation of slide tracheoplasty, left pulmonary artery reimplantation, and bidirectional cavo-pulmonary shunt].

    PubMed

    Kawahito, Tomohisa; Takano, Shinji; Egawa, Yoshiyasu; Iwamura, Yoshinobu; Nakahara, Yasuo; Nii, Akira; Ohnishi, Tatsuya; Miyagi, Yuhichi; Terada, Kazuya; Ohta, Akira

    2013-07-01

    Pulmonary artery sling is frequently combined with tracheal stenosis, and occasionally combined with congenital heart defects. However, there are few reports of successfully treated cases that were combined with single ventricle. In this article, we report a successfully treated case of pulmonary artery sling combined with tracheal stenosis, single ventricle, pulmonary atresia, vascular ring, and bilateral superior vena cava. A male infant was referred to our hospital for central cyanosis, and was diagnosed with single ventricle (tricuspid stenosis, multiple ventricular septal defect, and hypoplastic right ventricle)with pulmonary atresia by echocardiogram. Tracheal stenosis was shown at cardiac catheterization. Pulmonary artery sling and tracheal diverticulum were diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)examination. Furthermore, the patient was complicated by vascular ring, which consisted of right aortic arch, an aberrant left subclavian artery, and patent ductus arteriosus, and this ductus arteriosus was connected to the left subclavian artery and pulmonary arterial trunk. After 6 months of medical treatment, including continuous infusion of prostaglandin, re-evaluation was performed by cardiac catheterization. We considered that bidirectional cavo-pulmonary shunt was appropriate for the patient since his pulmonary vasculature had matured well. An operation was performed under the use of cardio-pulmonary bypass. Release of vascular ring by division of the ductus, bilateral bidirectional cavo-pulmonary shunt, and a slide tracheoplasty for tracheal stenosis were performed simultaneously. His recovery was uneventful, and he is currently waiting to receive a Fontan-type operation.

  17. Variational approach to probabilistic finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belytschko, T.; Liu, W. K.; Mani, A.; Besterfield, G.

    1991-01-01

    Probabilistic finite element methods (PFEM), synthesizing the power of finite element methods with second-moment techniques, are formulated for various classes of problems in structural and solid mechanics. Time-invariant random materials, geometric properties and loads are incorporated in terms of their fundamental statistics viz. second-moments. Analogous to the discretization of the displacement field in finite element methods, the random fields are also discretized. Preserving the conceptual simplicity, the response moments are calculated with minimal computations. By incorporating certain computational techniques, these methods are shown to be capable of handling large systems with many sources of uncertainties. By construction, these methods are applicable when the scale of randomness is not very large and when the probabilistic density functions have decaying tails. The accuracy and efficiency of these methods, along with their limitations, are demonstrated by various applications. Results obtained are compared with those of Monte Carlo simulation and it is shown that good accuracy can be obtained for both linear and nonlinear problems. The methods are amenable to implementation in deterministic FEM based computer codes.

  18. FESDIF -- Finite Element Scalar Diffraction theory code

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, H.G.

    1992-09-01

    This document describes the theory and use of a powerful scalar diffraction theory based computer code for calculation of intensity fields due to diffraction of optical waves by two-dimensional planar apertures and lenses. This code is called FESDIF (Finite Element Scalar Diffraction). It is based upon both Fraunhofer and Kirchhoff scalar diffraction theories. Simplified routines for circular apertures are included. However, the real power of the code comes from its basis in finite element methods. These methods allow the diffracting aperture to be virtually any geometric shape, including the various secondary aperture obstructions present in telescope systems. Aperture functions, with virtually any phase and amplitude variations, are allowed in the aperture openings. Step change aperture functions are accommodated. The incident waves are considered to be monochromatic. Plane waves, spherical waves, or Gaussian laser beams may be incident upon the apertures. Both area and line integral transformations were developed for the finite element based diffraction transformations. There is some loss of aperture function generality in the line integral transformations which are typically many times more computationally efficient than the area integral transformations when applicable to a particular problem.

  19. Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers

    2005-03-18

    Sparse systems of linear equations arise in many engineering applications, including finite elements, finite volumes, and others. The solution of linear systems is often the most computationally intensive portion of the application. Depending on the complexity of problems addressed by the application, there may be no single solver capable of solving all of the linear systems that arise. This motivates the desire to switch an application from one solver librwy to another, depending on themore » problem being solved. The interfaces provided by solver libraries differ greatly, making it difficult to switch an application code from one library to another. The amount of library-specific code in an application Can be greatly reduced by having an abstraction layer between solver libraries and the application, putting a common "face" on various solver libraries. One such abstraction layer is the Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers (EEl), which has seen significant use by finite element applications at Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.« less

  20. Total Mechanical Unloading Minimizes Metabolic Demand of Left Ventricle and Dramatically Reduces Infarct Size in Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kakino, Takamori; Arimura, Takahiro; Sakamoto, Takafumi; Nishikawa, Takuya; Sakamoto, Kazuo; Ikeda, Masataka; Kishi, Takuya; Ide, Tomomi; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Background Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) mechanically unloads the left ventricle (LV). Theoretical analysis indicates that partial LVAD support (p-LVAD), where LV remains ejecting, reduces LV preload while increases afterload resulting from the elevation of total cardiac output and mean aortic pressure, and consequently does not markedly decrease myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2). In contrast, total LVAD support (t-LVAD), where LV no longer ejects, markedly decreases LV preload volume and afterload pressure, thereby strikingly reduces MVO2. Since an imbalance in oxygen supply and demand is the fundamental pathophysiology of myocardial infarction (MI), we hypothesized that t-LVAD minimizes MVO2 and reduces infarct size in MI. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the differential impact of the support level of LVAD on MVO2 and infarct size in a canine model of ischemia-reperfusion. Methods In 5 normal mongrel dogs, we examined the impact of LVAD on MVO2 at 3 support levels: Control (no LVAD support), p-LVAD and t-LVAD. In another 16 dogs, ischemia was induced by occluding major branches of the left anterior descending coronary artery (90 min) followed by reperfusion (300 min). We activated LVAD from the beginning of ischemia until 300 min of reperfusion, and compared the infarct size among 3 different levels of LVAD support. Results t-LVAD markedly reduced MVO2 (% reduction against Control: -56 ± 9%, p<0.01) whereas p-LVAD did less (-21 ± 14%, p<0.05). t-LVAD markedly reduced infarct size compared to p-LVAD (infarct area/area at risk: Control; 41.8 ± 6.4, p-LVAD; 29.1 ± 5.6 and t-LVAD; 5.0 ± 3.1%, p<0.01). Changes in creatine kinase-MB paralleled those in infarct size. Conclusions Total LVAD support that minimizes metabolic demand maximizes the benefit of LVAD in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction. PMID:27124411

  1. Precise survival time and physical activity after fatal left ventricle injury from sharp pointed weapon: a case report and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Angélique; Kolopp, Martin; Coudane, Henry; Martrille, Laurent

    2016-09-01

    Survival time and physical activity following fatal injury are especially important during investigation of homicide cases and the estimation of a victim's survival time and physical activity following a fatal injury from a sharp weapon is a commonly raised issue, particularly at trial. According to the literature, survival time and physical activity after cardiac damage are short-term estimates without high accuracy. We report the homicide case of a young man who died as a result of a left ventricle injury caused by a sharp pointed weapon. This case is based on evidence from a video surveillance camera that recorded the whole scene after the fatal injury: The victim showed an adapted physical activity for 38 s, although the left ventricle incision measured 2 cm. Despite several cases in the literature, it is not possible to correlate precisely the size of the wounds and the acting capability.

  2. Precise survival time and physical activity after fatal left ventricle injury from sharp pointed weapon: a case report and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Angélique; Kolopp, Martin; Coudane, Henry; Martrille, Laurent

    2016-09-01

    Survival time and physical activity following fatal injury are especially important during investigation of homicide cases and the estimation of a victim's survival time and physical activity following a fatal injury from a sharp weapon is a commonly raised issue, particularly at trial. According to the literature, survival time and physical activity after cardiac damage are short-term estimates without high accuracy. We report the homicide case of a young man who died as a result of a left ventricle injury caused by a sharp pointed weapon. This case is based on evidence from a video surveillance camera that recorded the whole scene after the fatal injury: The victim showed an adapted physical activity for 38 s, although the left ventricle incision measured 2 cm. Despite several cases in the literature, it is not possible to correlate precisely the size of the wounds and the acting capability. PMID:26914799

  3. Double inlet left ventricle

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart (electrocardiogram, or ECG) Passing a thin, flexible tube into the heart to examine the arteries (cardiac catheterization) Ultrasound exam of the heart (echocardiogram) Using magnets to create images of the heart (MRI)

  4. Transient outward potassium current, ‘Ito’, phenotypes in the mammalian left ventricle: underlying molecular, cellular and biophysical mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sangita P; Campbell, Donald L

    2005-01-01

    At least two functionally distinct transient outward K+ current (Ito) phenotypes can exist across the free wall of the left ventricle (LV). Based upon their voltage-dependent kinetics of recovery from inactivation, these two phenotypes are designated ‘Ito,fast’ (recovery time constants on the order of tens of milliseconds) and ‘Ito,slow’ (recovery time constants on the order of thousands of milliseconds). Depending upon species, either Ito,fast, Ito,slow or both current phenotypes may be expressed in the LV free wall. The expression gradients of these two Ito phenotypes across the LV free wall are typically heterogeneous and, depending upon species, may consist of functional phenotypic gradients of both Ito,fast and Ito,slow and/or density gradients of either phenotype. We review the present evidence (molecular, biophysical, electrophysiological and pharmacological) for Kv4.2/4.3 α subunits underlying LV Ito,fast and Kv1.4 α subunits underlying LV Ito,slow and speculate upon the potential roles of each of these currents in determining frequency-dependent action potential characteristics of LV subepicardial versus subendocardial myocytes in different species. We also review the possible functional implications of (i) ancillary subunits that regulate Kv1.4 and Kv4.2/4.3 (Kvβ subunits, DPPs), (ii) KChIP2 isoforms, (iii) spider toxin-mediated block of Kv4.2/4.3 (Heteropoda toxins, phrixotoxins), and (iv) potential mechanisms of modulation of Ito,fast and Ito,slow by cellular redox state, [Ca2+]i and kinase-mediated phosphorylation. Ito phenotypic activation and state-dependent gating models and molecular structure–function relationships are also discussed. PMID:15831535

  5. Analysis of the stability of housekeeping gene expression in the left cardiac ventricle of rats submitted to chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Julian, Guilherme Silva; Oliveira, Renato Watanabe de; Tufik, Sergio; Chagas, Jair Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been associated with oxidative stress and various cardiovascular consequences, such as increased cardiovascular disease risk. Quantitative real-time PCR is frequently employed to assess changes in gene expression in experimental models. In this study, we analyzed the effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia (an experimental model of OSA) on housekeeping gene expression in the left cardiac ventricle of rats. Analyses via four different approaches-use of the geNorm, BestKeeper, and NormFinder algorithms; and 2-ΔCt (threshold cycle) data analysis-produced similar results: all genes were found to be suitable for use, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and 18S being classified as the most and the least stable, respectively. The use of more than one housekeeping gene is strongly advised. RESUMO A apneia obstrutiva do sono (AOS) tem sido associada ao estresse oxidativo e a várias consequências cardiovasculares, tais como risco aumentado de doença cardiovascular. A PCR quantitativa em tempo real é frequentemente empregada para avaliar alterações na expressão gênica em modelos experimentais. Neste estudo, analisamos os efeitos da hipóxia intermitente crônica (um modelo experimental de AOS) na expressão de genes de referência no ventrículo cardíaco esquerdo de ratos. Análises a partir de quatro abordagens - uso dos algoritmos geNorm, BestKeeper e NormFinder e análise de dados 2-ΔCt (ciclo limiar) - produziram resultados semelhantes: todos os genes mostraram-se adequados para uso, sendo que gliceraldeído-3-fosfato desidrogenase e 18S foram classificados como o mais e o menos estável, respectivamente. A utilização de mais de um gene de referência é altamente recomendada.

  6. Analysis of the stability of housekeeping gene expression in the left cardiac ventricle of rats submitted to chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Julian, Guilherme Silva; Oliveira, Renato Watanabe de; Tufik, Sergio; Chagas, Jair Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been associated with oxidative stress and various cardiovascular consequences, such as increased cardiovascular disease risk. Quantitative real-time PCR is frequently employed to assess changes in gene expression in experimental models. In this study, we analyzed the effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia (an experimental model of OSA) on housekeeping gene expression in the left cardiac ventricle of rats. Analyses via four different approaches-use of the geNorm, BestKeeper, and NormFinder algorithms; and 2-ΔCt (threshold cycle) data analysis-produced similar results: all genes were found to be suitable for use, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and 18S being classified as the most and the least stable, respectively. The use of more than one housekeeping gene is strongly advised. RESUMO A apneia obstrutiva do sono (AOS) tem sido associada ao estresse oxidativo e a várias consequências cardiovasculares, tais como risco aumentado de doença cardiovascular. A PCR quantitativa em tempo real é frequentemente empregada para avaliar alterações na expressão gênica em modelos experimentais. Neste estudo, analisamos os efeitos da hipóxia intermitente crônica (um modelo experimental de AOS) na expressão de genes de referência no ventrículo cardíaco esquerdo de ratos. Análises a partir de quatro abordagens - uso dos algoritmos geNorm, BestKeeper e NormFinder e análise de dados 2-ΔCt (ciclo limiar) - produziram resultados semelhantes: todos os genes mostraram-se adequados para uso, sendo que gliceraldeído-3-fosfato desidrogenase e 18S foram classificados como o mais e o menos estável, respectivamente. A utilização de mais de um gene de referência é altamente recomendada. PMID:27383935

  7. Evaluation of state-of-the-art segmentation algorithms for left ventricle infarct from late Gadolinium enhancement MR images.

    PubMed

    Karim, Rashed; Bhagirath, Pranav; Claus, Piet; Housden, R James; Chen, Zhong; Karimaghaloo, Zahra; Sohn, Hyon-Mok; Lara Rodríguez, Laura; Vera, Sergio; Albà, Xènia; Hennemuth, Anja; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto; Arbel, Tal; Gonzàlez Ballester, Miguel A; Frangi, Alejandro F; Götte, Marco; Razavi, Reza; Schaeffter, Tobias; Rhode, Kawal

    2016-05-01

    Studies have demonstrated the feasibility of late Gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging for guiding the management of patients with sequelae to myocardial infarction, such as ventricular tachycardia and heart failure. Clinical implementation of these developments necessitates a reproducible and reliable segmentation of the infarcted regions. It is challenging to compare new algorithms for infarct segmentation in the left ventricle (LV) with existing algorithms. Benchmarking datasets with evaluation strategies are much needed to facilitate comparison. This manuscript presents a benchmarking evaluation framework for future algorithms that segment infarct from LGE CMR of the LV. The image database consists of 30 LGE CMR images of both humans and pigs that were acquired from two separate imaging centres. A consensus ground truth was obtained for all data using maximum likelihood estimation. Six widely-used fixed-thresholding methods and five recently developed algorithms are tested on the benchmarking framework. Results demonstrate that the algorithms have better overlap with the consensus ground truth than most of the n-SD fixed-thresholding methods, with the exception of the Full-Width-at-Half-Maximum (FWHM) fixed-thresholding method. Some of the pitfalls of fixed thresholding methods are demonstrated in this work. The benchmarking evaluation framework, which is a contribution of this work, can be used to test and benchmark future algorithms that detect and quantify infarct in LGE CMR images of the LV. The datasets, ground truth and evaluation code have been made publicly available through the website: https://www.cardiacatlas.org/web/guest/challenges.

  8. Right aortic arch with isolation of the left innominate artery in a case of double chamber right ventricle and ventricular septal defect

    PubMed Central

    Mangukia, Chirantan; Sethi, Sonali; Agarwal, Saket; Mishra, Smita; Satsangi, Deepak kumar

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we report an unusual case of right aortic arch with isolation of the left innominate artery in a case of double chamber right ventricle with ventricular septal defect. The blood supply to the innominate artery was by a collateral arising from the descending aorta. The embryological development of this anomaly can be explained by the hypothetical double aortic arch model proposed by Edwards with interruption of the arch at two levels. PMID:24987265

  9. A biplane roentgen videometry system for dynamic /60 per second/ studies of the shape and size of circulatory structures, particularly the left ventricle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritman, E. L.; Sturm, E.; Wood, E. H.; Heintzen, P. H.

    1971-01-01

    A roentgen-television digital-computer technique and a display system developed for dynamic circulatory structure studies are described. Details are given for a videoroentgenographic setup which is used for obtaining biplane roentgen silhouettes of a left ventricle. A 60 per sec measurement of the shape and volume of angiographically outlined cardiac chambers can be made by this technique along with simultaneous ECG, pressure, and flow measurements accessible for real-time digital computer processing and analysis.

  10. 2-D Finite Element Heat Conduction

    1989-10-30

    AYER is a finite element program which implicitly solves the general two-dimensional equation of thermal conduction for plane or axisymmetric bodies. AYER takes into account the effects of time (transient problems), in-plane anisotropic thermal conductivity, a three-dimensional velocity distribution, and interface thermal contact resistance. Geometry and material distributions are arbitrary, and input is via subroutines provided by the user. As a result, boundary conditions, material properties, velocity distributions, and internal power generation may be mademore » functions of, e.g., time, temperature, location, and heat flux.« less

  11. Chemorheology of reactive systems: Finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, C.; Roylance, D.

    1982-01-01

    The equations which govern the nonisothermal flow of reactive fluids are outlined, and the means by which finite element analysis is used to solve these equations for the sort of arbitrary boundary conditions encountered in industrial practice are described. The performance of the computer code is illustrated by several trial problems, selected more for their value in providing insight to polymer processing flows than as practical production problems. Although a good deal remains to be learned as to the performance and proper use of this numerical technique, it is undeniably useful in providing better understanding of today's complicated polymer processing problems.

  12. A finite element model of ultrasonic extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, M.; Daud, Y.

    2009-08-01

    Since the 1950's researchers have carried out investigations into the effects of applying ultrasonic excitation to metals undergoing elastic and plastic deformation. Experiments have been conducted where ultrasonic excitation is superimposed in complex metalworking operations such as wire drawing and extrusion, to identify the benefits of ultrasonic vibrations. This study presents a finite element analysis of ultrasonic excitation applied to the extrusion of a cylindrical aluminium bar. The effects of friction on the extrusion load are reported for the two excitation configurations of radially and axially applied ultrasonic vibrations and the results are compared with experimental data reported in the literature.

  13. Modelling bucket excavation by finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecingina, O. M.

    2015-11-01

    Changes in geological components of the layers from lignite pits have an impact on the sustainability of the cup path elements and under the action of excavation force appear efforts leading to deformation of the entire assembly. Application of finite element method in the optimization of components leads to economic growth, to increase the reliability and durability of the studied machine parts thus the machine. It is obvious usefulness of knowledge the state of mechanical tensions that the designed piece or the assembly not to break under the action of tensions that must cope during operation. In the course of excavation work on all bucket cutting force components, the first coming into contact with the material being excavated cutting edge. Therefore in the study with finite element analysis is retained only cutting edge. To study the field of stress and strain on the cutting edge will be created geometric patterns for each type of cup this will be subject to static analysis. The geometric design retains the cutting edge shape and on this on the tooth cassette location will apply an areal force on the abutment tooth. The cutting edge real pattern is subjected to finite element study for the worst case of rock cutting by symmetrical and asymmetrical cups whose profile is different. The purpose of this paper is to determine the displacement and tensions field for both profiles considering the maximum force applied on the cutting edge and the depth of the cutting is equal with the width of the cutting edge of the tooth. It will consider the worst case when on the structure will act both the tangential force and radial force on the bucket profile. For determination of stress and strain field on the form design of cutting edge profile will apply maximum force assuming uniform distribution and on the edge surface force will apply a radial force. After geometric patterns discretization on the cutting knives and determining stress field, can be seen that at the

  14. Algebraic surface design and finite element meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajaj, Chandrajit L.

    1992-01-01

    Some of the techniques are summarized which are used in constructing C sup 0 and C sup 1 continuous meshes of low degree, implicitly defined, algebraic surface patches in three dimensional space. These meshes of low degree algebraic surface patches are used to construct accurate computer models of physical objects. These meshes are also used in the finite element simulation of physical phenomena (e.g., heat dissipation, stress/strain distributions, fluid flow characteristics) required in the computer prototyping of both the manufacturability and functionality of the geometric design.

  15. Finite Element Heat & Mass Transfer Code

    1996-10-10

    FEHM is a numerical simulation code for subsurface transport processes. It models 3-D, time-dependent, multiphase, multicomponent, non-isothermal, reactive flow through porous and fractured media. It can accurately represent complex 3-D geologic media and structures and their effects on subsurface flow and transport. Its capabilities include flow of gas, water, and heat; flow of air, water, and heat; multiple chemically reactive and sorbing tracers; finite element/finite volume formulation; coupled stress module; saturated and unsaturated media; andmore » double porosity and double porosity/double permeability capabilities.« less

  16. On Hybrid and mixed finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.

    1981-01-01

    Three versions of the assumed stress hybrid model in finite element methods and the corresponding variational principles for the formulation are presented. Examples of rank deficiency for stiffness matrices by the hybrid stress model are given and their corresponding kinematic deformation modes are identified. A discussion of the derivation of general semi-Loof elements for plates and shells by the hybrid stress method is given. It is shown that the equilibrium model by Fraeijs de Veubeke can be derived by the approach of the hybrid stress model as a special case of semi-Loof elements.

  17. Finite Element Vibration Analysis of Rectangular Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. H.; Lin, W. J.; Leung, A. Y. T.

    2010-05-01

    Some pre-tensioned 4-node rectangular elements and 8-node triangular elements are constructed for the free vibration analysis of membranes by finite element. The shape functions are given to derive the element stiffness and mass matrices in accordance with the minimum potential energy principle. Two typical examples show that the calculation by the 4-node rectangular element is very close to the theoretical solution, and 8-node rectangular element has higher accuracy than the 4-node rectangular element. For dense grid, the result is almost consistent with the theoretical solution.

  18. Moving finite elements in 2-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelinas, R. J.; Doss, S. K.; Vajk, J. P.; Djomehri, J.; Miller, K.

    1983-01-01

    The mathematical background regarding the moving finite element (MFE) method of Miller and Miller (1981) is discussed, taking into account a general system of partial differential equations (PDE) and the amenability of the MFE method in two dimensions to code modularization and to semiautomatic user-construction of numerous PDE systems for both Dirichlet and zero-Neumann boundary conditions. A description of test problem results is presented, giving attention to aspects of single square wave propagation, and a solution of the heat equation.

  19. Modelling the arterial wall by finite elements.

    PubMed

    Mosora, F; Harmant, A; Bernard, C; Fossion, A; Pochet, T; Juchmes, J; Cescotto, S

    1993-01-01

    The mechanical behaviour of the arterial wall was determined theoretically utilizing some parameters of blood flow measured in vivo. Continuous experimental measurements of pressure and diameter were recorded in anesthetized dogs on the thoracic ascending and midabdominal aorta. The pressure was measured by using a catheter, and the diameter firstly, at the same site, by a plethysmograph with mercury gauge and secondly, by a sonomicrometer with ferroelectric ceramic transducers. The unstressed radius and thickness were measured at the end of each experiment in situ. Considering that the viscous component is not important relatively to the nonlinear component of the elasticity and utilizing several equations for Young modulus calculation (thick and thin wall circular cylindrical tube formulas and Bergel's equation) the following values were obtained for this parameter: 0.6 MPa-2 MPa in midabdominal aorta and 2 MPa-6.5 MPa in thoracic ascending aorta. The behaviour of the aorta wall was modelled considering an elastic law and using the finite element program "Lagamine" working in large deformations. The discretized equilibrium equations are non-linear and a unique axi-symmetric, iso-parametric element of 1 cm in length with 8 knots was used for this bi-dimensional problem. The theoretical estimation of radius vessel, utilizing a constant 5 MPa Young modulus and also a variable one, are in good agreement with the experimental results, showing that this finite element model can be applied to study mechanical properties of the arteries in physiological and pathological conditions.

  20. Impeller deflection and modal finite element analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Nathan A.

    2013-10-01

    Deflections of an impeller due to centripetal forces are calculated using finite element analysis. The lateral, or out of plane, deflections are an important design consideration for this particular impeller because it incorporates an air bearing with critical gap tolerances. The target gap distance is approximately 10 microns at a rotational velocity of 2500 rpm. The centripetal forces acting on the impeller cause it deflect in a concave fashion, decreasing the initial gap distance as a function of radial position. This deflection is characterized for a previous and updated impeller design for comparative purposes. The impact of design options such as material selection, geometry dimensions, and operating rotational velocity are also explored, followed by a sensitivity study with these parameters bounded by specific design values. A modal analysis is also performed to calculate the impeller's natural frequencies which are desired to be avoided during operation. The finite element modeling techniques continue to be exercised by the impeller design team to address specific questions and evaluate conceptual designs, some of which are included in the Appendix.

  1. Finite element analysis of bolted flange connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, D. Y.; Stallings, J. M.

    1994-06-01

    A 2-D axisymmetric finite element model and a 3-D solid finite element model of a high pressure bolted flange joint were generated to investigate the stress behaviors. This investigation includes comparisons for axisymmetric loading of both the 2-D and 3-D models, the effects of non-axisymmetric bolt pretensions in the 3-D models, and the differences between 2-D and 3-D models subjected to non-axisymmetric loading. Comparisons indicated differences in von Mises stress up to 12% at various points due to the non-axisymmetric bolt pretensions. Applied bending moments were converted to equivalent axial forces for use in the 2-D model. It was found that the largest von Mises stresses in 3-D model did not occur on the side of the connection where the bending stresses and applied axial stresses were additive. Hence, in the 2-D model where the equivalent axial force (for bending moment) and applied axial forces were added, the 2-D model under estimated the maximum von Mises stress obtained from the 3-D model by 30%.

  2. Finite element analysis of multilayer coextrusion.

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Schunk, Peter Randall; Baer, Thomas A.; Mrozek, Randy A.; Lenhart, Joseph Ludlow; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Collins, Robert; Mondy, Lisa Ann

    2011-09-01

    Multilayer coextrusion has become a popular commercial process for producing complex polymeric products from soda bottles to reflective coatings. A numerical model of a multilayer coextrusion process is developed based on a finite element discretization and two different free-surface methods, an arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) moving mesh implementation and an Eulerian level set method, to understand the moving boundary problem associated with the polymer-polymer interface. The goal of this work is to have a numerical capability suitable for optimizing and troubleshooting the coextrusion process, circumventing flow instabilities such as ribbing and barring, and reducing variability in layer thickness. Though these instabilities can be both viscous and elastic in nature, for this work a generalized Newtonian description of the fluid is used. Models of varying degrees of complexity are investigated including stability analysis and direct three-dimensional finite element free surface approaches. The results of this work show how critical modeling can be to reduce build test cycles, improve material choices, and guide mold design.

  3. Changes in Global and Regional Mechanics Due to Atrial Fibrillation: Insights From a Coupled Finite-Element and Circulation Model

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Christian B.; Norton, Patrick T.; Ferguson, John D.; Holmes, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a rhythm disorder with rapidly increasing prevalence due to the aging of the population. AF triggers structural remodeling and a gradual loss of function; however, the relative contributions of specific features of AF-induced remodeling to changes in atrial mechanical function are unclear. We constructed and validated a finite-element model (FEM) of the normal human left atrium using anatomic information from cardiac MRI, material properties and fiber orientations from published studies, and an iterative algorithm to estimate unloaded geometry. We coupled the FEM to a circuit model to capture hemodynamic interactions between the atrium, pulmonary circulation, and left ventricle. The normal model reproduced measured volumes within 1 SD, as well as most metrics of regional mechanics. Using this validated human model as a starting point, we explored the impact of individual features of atrial remodeling on atrial mechanics and found that a combination of dilation, increased pressure, and fibrosis can explain most of the observed changes in mechanics in patients with paroxysmal AF. However, only impaired ventricular relaxation could reproduce the increased reliance on active emptying we observed in these patients. The resulting model provides new insight into the mechanics of AF and a platform for exploring future therapies. PMID:25631205

  4. Changes in Global and Regional Mechanics Due to Atrial Fibrillation: Insights from a Coupled Finite-Element and Circulation Model.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Christian B; Norton, Patrick T; Ferguson, John D; Holmes, Jeffrey W

    2015-07-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a rhythm disorder with rapidly increasing prevalence due to the aging of the population. AF triggers structural remodeling and a gradual loss of function; however, the relative contributions of specific features of AF-induced remodeling to changes in atrial mechanical function are unclear. We constructed and validated a finite-element model (FEM) of the normal human left atrium using anatomic information from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, material properties and fiber orientations from published studies, and an iterative algorithm to estimate unloaded geometry. We coupled the FEM to a circuit model to capture hemodynamic interactions between the atrium, pulmonary circulation, and left ventricle. The normal model reproduced measured volumes within 1 SD, as well as most metrics of regional mechanics. Using this validated human model as a starting point, we explored the impact of individual features of atrial remodeling on atrial mechanics and found that a combination of dilation, increased pressure, and fibrosis can explain most of the observed changes in mechanics in patients with paroxysmal AF. However, only impaired ventricular relaxation could reproduce the increased reliance on active emptying we observed in these patients. The resulting model provides new insight into the mechanics of AF and a platform for exploring future therapies.

  5. A multigrid solution method for mixed hybrid finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, W.

    1996-12-31

    We consider the multigrid solution of linear equations arising within the discretization of elliptic second order boundary value problems of the form by mixed hybrid finite elements. Using the equivalence of mixed hybrid finite elements and non-conforming nodal finite elements, we construct a multigrid scheme for the corresponding non-conforming finite elements, and, by this equivalence, for the mixed hybrid finite elements, following guidelines from Arbogast/Chen. For a rectangular triangulation of the computational domain, this non-conforming schemes are the so-called nodal finite elements. We explicitly construct prolongation and restriction operators for this type of non-conforming finite elements. We discuss the use of plain multigrid and the multilevel-preconditioned cg-method and compare their efficiency in numerical tests.

  6. Evolution of the ventricles.

    PubMed

    Victor, S; Nayak, V M; Rajasingh, R

    1999-01-01

    We studied the evolution of ventricles by macroscopic examination of the hearts of marine cartilaginous and bony fish, and by angiocardiography and gross examination of the hearts of air-breathing freshwater fish, frogs, turtles, snakes, and crocodiles. A right-sided, thin-walled ventricular lumen is seen in the fish, frog, turtle, and snake. In fish, there is external symmetry of the ventricle, internal asymmetry, and a thick-walled left ventricle with a small inlet chamber. In animals such as frogs, turtles, and snakes, the left ventricle exists as a small-cavitied contractile sponge. The high pressure generated by this spongy left ventricle, the direction of the jet, the ventriculoarterial orientation, and the bulbar spiral valve in the frog help to separate the systemic and pulmonary circulations. In the crocodile, the right aorta is connected to the left ventricle, and there is a complete interventricular septum and an improved left ventricular lumen when compared with turtles and snakes. The heart is housed in a rigid pericardial cavity in the shark, possibly to protect it from changing underwater pressure. The pericardial cavity in various species permits movements of the heart-which vary depending on the ventriculoarterial orientation and need for the ventricle to generate torque or spin on the ejected blood- that favor run-off into the appropriate arteries and their branches. In the lower species, it is not clear whether the spongy myocardium contributes to myocardial oxygenation. In human beings, spongy myocardium constitutes a rare form of congenital heart disease.

  7. A finite element model with nonviscous damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussos, L. A.; Hyer, M. W.; Thornton, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    A constitutive law by which structural damping is modeled as a relationship between stress, strain, and strain rate in a material is used in conjunction with the finite element method to develop general integral expressions for viscous and nonviscous damping matrices. To solve the set of nonlinear equations resulting from the presence of nonviscous damping, a solution technique is developed by modifying the Newmark method to accommodate an iterative solution and treat the nonviscous damping as a pseudo-force. The technique is then checked for accuracy and convergence in single- and multi-degree-of-freedom problems, and is found to be accurate and efficient for initial-condition problems with small nonviscous damping.

  8. Finite-element solutions for geothermal systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. C.; Conel, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Vector potential and scalar potential are used to formulate the governing equations for a single-component and single-phase geothermal system. By assuming an initial temperature field, the fluid velocity can be determined which, in turn, is used to calculate the convective heat transfer. The energy equation is then solved by considering convected heat as a distributed source. Using the resulting temperature to compute new source terms, the final results are obtained by iterations of the procedure. Finite-element methods are proposed for modeling of realistic geothermal systems; the advantages of such methods are discussed. The developed methodology is then applied to a sample problem. Favorable agreement is obtained by comparisons with a previous study.

  9. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forcesmore » along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.« less

  10. Finite-element modeling of nanoindentation

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, J.A.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Myers, S.M.; Barbour, J.C.; Friedmann, T.A.

    1999-02-01

    Procedures have been developed based on finite-element modeling of nanoindentation data to obtain the mechanical properties of thin films and ion-beam-modified layers independently of the properties of the underlying substrates. These procedures accurately deduce the yield strength, Young{close_quote}s elastic modulus, and layer hardness from indentations as deep as 50{percent} of the layer thickness or more. We have used these procedures to evaluate materials ranging from ion implanted metals to deposited, diamond-like carbon layers. The technique increases the applicability of indentation testing to very thin layers, composite layers, and modulated compositions. This article presents an overview of the procedures involved and illustrates them with selected examples. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Finite element simulation of pipe dynamic response

    SciTech Connect

    Slagis, G.C.; Litton, R.W.

    1996-12-01

    Nonlinear finite element dynamic analyses of the response of a pipe span to controlled-displacement, sinusoidal vibration have been performed. The objective of this preliminary study is to compare strain and acceleration response data to those generated by Beaney in the Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories experiments. Results for an unpressurized, 5 Hz, carbon steel pipe are in good agreement with the experiments. Hence, it appears that analytical simulation will be useful to assess seismic margins. Recommendations for additional studies are provided. The analyses confirm the test results--dynamic response is greatly attenuated by material plasticity. Analytical strains and accelerations are about 30% higher than test data. There are several possible explanations for the differences. To assess the effect of frequency on response, the length of the pipe span was increased. Analysis of the longer, 2 Hz, pipe span shows significantly greater cyclic strains than the 5 Hz span at the same input excitation levels.

  12. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer

    1992-02-01

    TOPAZ3D is a three-dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat transfer analysis. TOPAZ3D can be used to solve for the steady-state or transient temperature field on three-dimensional geometries. Material properties may be temperature-dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. By implementing the user subroutine feature, users can model chemical reaction kinetics and allow for any type of functionalmore » representation of boundary conditions and internal heat generation. TOPAZ3D can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in the material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluids, phase change, and energy balances.« less

  13. Immersed molecular electrokinetic finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopacz, Adrian M.; Liu, Wing K.

    2013-07-01

    A unique simulation technique has been developed capable of modeling electric field induced detection of biomolecules such as viruses, at room temperatures where thermal fluctuations must be considered. The proposed immersed molecular electrokinetic finite element method couples electrokinetics with fluctuating hydrodynamics to study the motion and deformation of flexible objects immersed in a suspending medium under an applied electric field. The force induced on an arbitrary object due to an electric field is calculated based on the continuum electromechanics and the Maxwell stress tensor. The thermal fluctuations are included in the Navier-Stokes fluid equations via the stochastic stress tensor. Dielectrophoretic and fluctuating forces acting on the particle are coupled through the fluid-structure interaction force calculated within the surrounding environment. This method was used to perform concentration and retention efficacy analysis of nanoscale biosensors using gold particles of various sizes. The analysis was also applied to a human papillomavirus.

  14. Finite element analyses of CCAT preliminary design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarawit, Andrew T.; Kan, Frank W.

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes the development of the CCAT telescope finite element model (FEM) and the analyses performed to support the preliminary design work. CCAT will be a 25 m diameter telescope operating in the 0.2 to 2 mm wavelength range. It will be located at an elevation of 5600 m on Cerro Chajnantor in Northern Chile, near ALMA. The telescope will be equipped with wide-field cameras and spectrometers mounted at the two Nasmyth foci. The telescope will be inside an enclosure to protect it from wind buffeting, direct solar heating, and bad weather. The main structures of the telescope include a steel Mount and a carbon-fiber-reinforced-plastic (CFRP) primary truss. The finite element model developed in this study was used to perform modal, frequency response, seismic response spectrum, stress, and deflection analyses of telescope. Modal analyses of telescope were performed to compute the structure natural frequencies and mode shapes and to obtain reduced order modal output at selected locations in the telescope structure to support the design of the Mount control system. Modal frequency response analyses were also performed to compute transfer functions at these selected locations. Seismic response spectrum analyses of the telescope subject to the Maximum Likely Earthquake were performed to compute peak accelerations and seismic demand stresses. Stress analyses were performed for gravity load to obtain gravity demand stresses. Deflection analyses for gravity load, thermal load, and differential elevation drive torque were performed so that the CCAT Observatory can verify that the structures meet the stringent telescope surface and pointing error requirements.

  15. Effects of physical activity on blood pressure monitoring and morphometric parameters of the left ventricle and of the abdominal aorta in healthy elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Macchi, Claudio; Lova, Raffaele Molino; Giannelli, Fabrizio; Papucci, Mario; Conti, Andrea A; Paternostro, Ferdinando; Contini, Massimo; Miniati, Benedetta; Gulisano, Massimo; Catini, Claudio

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the effects of physical activity not only on morphometric left ventricular parameters, but also on the abdominal aorta diameter and on blood pressure, we enrolled 100 healthy subjects, 50 males and 50 females, aged between 63 and 91 years (mean 73.3 +/- s.d. 7.7), each divided into two subgroups, sedentary and non sedentary, come to our observation for a diagnostic screening. For each subject an Echography was performed, by using an Acuson 128XP10 apparatus, equipped with a 2 MHz phased array probe, both for the study of the heart and for the study of the abdominal aorta. Then, all the subjects underwent 24 hours blood pressure monitoring by using a P6 Delmar apparatus in order to get mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Diastolic blood pressure was significantly related to physical activity (sedentary > non sedentary, P < 0.01), while systolic blood pressure was not; left ventricle and abdominal aorta diameters were both significantly related to sex (males > females, P < 0.001), but left ventricle diameter was significantly related to diastolic blood pressure (P < 0.01), while abdominal aorta diameter was significantly related to systolic blood pressure (P < 0.001). Our data suggest that physical activity might be strongly recommended to control blood pressure.

  16. The Flow Field Inside Ventricle Assist Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einav, Shmuel; Rosenfeld, Moshe; Avrahami, Idit

    2000-11-01

    The evaluation of innovative ventricle assist devices (VAD), is of major importance. A New Left Heart Assist Device, with an improved energy converter unit, has been investigated both numerically and experimentally. For this purpose, an experimental Continuous Digital Particle Imagining Velocimetry (CDPIV) is combined with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. These tools complement each other to result into a comprehensive description of the complex 3D, viscous and time-dependent flow field inside the artificial ventricle. A 3D numerical model was constructed to simulate the VAD pump and a time-depended CFD analysis with moving walls was performed to predict the flow behaviour in the VAD during the cardiac cycle. A commercial finite element package was used to solve the Navier-Stokes equations (FIDAP, Fluent Inc., Evanston). In the experimental analysis, an optically clear elastic model of the VAD was placed inside a 2D CDPIV system. The CDPIV system is capable of sampling 15 velocity vector fields per second based on image-pairs intervals lower than 0.5 millisecond. Continuous sequences of experimental images, followed by their calculated velocity transient fields, are given as animated presentation of the distensible VAD. These results are used for validating the CFD simulations. Once validated, the CFD results provide a detailed 3D and time dependent description of the flow field, allowing the identification of stagnation or high shear stress regions.

  17. Improved finite element methodology for integrated thermal structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechaumphai, P.; Thornton, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    An integrated thermal-structural finite element approach for efficient coupling of thermal and structural analyses is presented. New thermal finite elements which yield exact nodal and element temperature for one dimensional linear steady state heat transfer problems are developed. A nodeless variable formulation is used to establish improved thermal finite elements for one dimensional nonlinear transient and two dimensional linear transient heat transfer problems. The thermal finite elements provide detailed temperature distributions without using additional element nodes and permit a common discretization with lower order congruent structural finite elements. The accuracy of the integrated approach is evaluated by comparisons with analytical solutions and conventional finite element thermal-structural analyses for a number of academic and more realistic problems. Results indicate that the approach provides a significant improvement in the accuracy and efficiency of thermal stress analysis for structures with complex temperature distributions.

  18. Improved finite element methodology for integrated thermal structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechaumphai, P.; Thornton, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    An integrated thermal-structural finite element approach for efficient coupling of thermal and structural analysis is presented. New thermal finite elements which yield exact nodal and element temperatures for one dimensional linear steady state heat transfer problems are developed. A nodeless variable formulation is used to establish improved thermal finite elements for one dimensional nonlinear transient and two dimensional linear transient heat transfer problems. The thermal finite elements provide detailed temperature distributions without using additional element nodes and permit a common discretization with lower order congruent structural finite elements. The accuracy of the integrated approach is evaluated by comparisons with analytical solutions and conventional finite element thermal structural analyses for a number of academic and more realistic problems. Results indicate that the approach provides a significant improvement in the accuracy and efficiency of thermal stress analysis for structures with complex temperature distributions.

  19. An atomic finite element model for biodegradable polymers. Part 1. Formulation of the finite elements.

    PubMed

    Gleadall, Andrew; Pan, Jingzhe; Ding, Lifeng; Kruft, Marc-Anton; Curcó, David

    2015-11-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are widely used to analyse materials at the atomic scale. However, MD has high computational demands, which may inhibit its use for simulations of structures involving large numbers of atoms such as amorphous polymer structures. An atomic-scale finite element method (AFEM) is presented in this study with significantly lower computational demands than MD. Due to the reduced computational demands, AFEM is suitable for the analysis of Young's modulus of amorphous polymer structures. This is of particular interest when studying the degradation of bioresorbable polymers, which is the topic of an accompanying paper. AFEM is derived from the inter-atomic potential energy functions of an MD force field. The nonlinear MD functions were adapted to enable static linear analysis. Finite element formulations were derived to represent interatomic potential energy functions between two, three and four atoms. Validation of the AFEM was conducted through its application to atomic structures for crystalline and amorphous poly(lactide).

  20. Integrated transient thermal-structural finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.; Wieting, A. R.; Tamma, K. K.

    1981-01-01

    An integrated thermal structural finite element approach for efficient coupling of transient thermal and structural analysis is presented. Integrated thermal structural rod and one dimensional axisymmetric elements considering conduction and convection are developed and used in transient thermal structural applications. The improved accuracy of the integrated approach is illustrated by comparisons with exact transient heat conduction elasticity solutions and conventional finite element thermal finite element structural analyses.

  1. TACO: a finite element heat transfer code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E. Jr.

    1980-02-01

    TACO is a two-dimensional implicit finite element code for heat transfer analysis. It can perform both linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady state problems. Either plane or axisymmetric geometries can be analyzed. TACO has the capability to handle time or temperature dependent material properties and materials may be either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature dependent loadings and boundary conditions are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additionally, TACO has some specialized features such as internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance), bulk nodes, enclosure radiation with view factor calculations, and chemical reactive kinetics. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A bandwidth and profile minimization option is also available in the code. Graphical representation of data generated by TACO is provided by a companion post-processor named POSTACO. The theory on which TACO is based is outlined, the capabilities of the code are explained, the input data required to perform an analysis with TACO are described. Some simple examples are provided to illustrate the use of the code.

  2. Finite element modeling of retinal prosthesis mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basinger, B. C.; Rowley, A. P.; Chen, K.; Humayun, M. S.; Weiland, J. D.

    2009-10-01

    Epiretinal prostheses used to treat degenerative retina diseases apply stimulus via an electrode array fixed to the ganglion cell side of the retina. Mechanical pressure applied by these arrays to the retina, both during initial insertion and throughout chronic use, could cause sufficient retinal damage to reduce the device's effectiveness. In order to understand and minimize potential mechanical damage, we have used finite element analysis to model mechanical interactions between an electrode array and the retina in both acute and chronic loading configurations. Modeling indicates that an acute tacking force distributes stress primarily underneath the tack site and heel edge of the array, while more moderate chronic stresses are distributed more evenly underneath the array. Retinal damage in a canine model chronically implanted with a similar array occurred in correlating locations, and model predictions correlate well with benchtop eyewall compression tests. This model provides retinal prosthesis researchers with a tool to optimize the mechanical electrode array design, but the techniques used here represent a unique effort to combine a modifiable device and soft biological tissues in the same model and those techniques could be extended to other devices that come into mechanical contact with soft neural tissues.

  3. An iterative algorithm for finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laouafa, F.; Royis, P.

    2004-03-01

    In this paper, we state in a new form the algebraic problem arising from the one-field displacement finite element method (FEM). The displacement approach, in this discrete form, can be considered as the dual approach (force or equilibrium) with subsidiary constraints. This approach dissociates the nonlinear operator to the linear ones and their sizes are linear functions of integration rule which is of interest in the case of reduced integration. This new form of the problem leads to an inexpensive improvement of FEM computations, which acts at local, elementary and global levels. We demonstrate the numerical performances of this approach which is independent of the mesh structure. Using the GMRES algorithm we build, for nonsymmetric problems, a new algorithm based upon the discretized field of strain. The new algorithms proposed are more closer to the mechanical problem than the classical ones because all fields appear during the resolution process. The sizes of the different operators arising in these new forms are linear functions of integration rule, which is of great interest in the case of reduced integration.

  4. Time course of changes in the mechanical properties of the canine right and left ventricles during hypertrophy caused by pressure overload.

    PubMed

    Mirsky, I; Laks, M M

    1980-04-01

    We developed a mathematical model of the right and left ventricles to determine whether there is a change in the mechanical properties of muscle during the hypertrophy process resulting from pulmonary arterial banding. Pressure-volume data were obtained from 10 normal dog hearts and 8 dog hearts in which the pulmonary artery was banded for periods of 2--40 weeks. These data were applied to the model, and the time course of wall stress and muscle stiffness was quantified for both ventricles. The results demonstrate that (1) myocardial stiffness is increased in pressure-overload hypertrophy (2) normal right and left ventricular muscle exhibits similar mechanical properties and (3) the relationships between wall stresses and the volume/mass ratios to the period of banding are biphasic. We concluded that (1) increase in muscle stiffness is due to several factors. In the early stages of hypertrophy, it may be predominantly due to fibrosis and, in the later stages, to substantial increases in muscle mass. (2) The progressive increase in muscle stiffness concomitant with the increase in muscle mass may be due to the presence of myocardial cellular projections and fibrosis. (3) The appropriate timing for surgical/medical intervention should take place before low volume:mass ratios and, hence, low wall stresses are attained. PMID:6444557

  5. [Desmin content and transversal stiffness of the left ventricle mouse cardiomyocytes and skeletal muscle fibers after a 30-day space flight on board "BION-M1" biosatellite].

    PubMed

    Ogneva, I V; Maximova, M V; Larina, I M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the transversal stiffness of the cortical cytoskeleton and the cytoskeletal protein desmin content in the left ventricle cardiomyocytes, fibers of the mouse soleus and tibialis anterior muscle after a 30-day space flight on board the "BION-M1" biosatellite (Russia, 2013). The dissection was made after 13-16.5 h after landing. The transversal stiffness was measured in relaxed and calcium activated state by, atomic force microscopy. The desmin content was estimated by western blotting, and the expression level of desmin-coding gene was detected using real-time PCR. The results indicate that, the transversal stiffness of the left ventricle cardiomyocytes and fibers of the soleus muscle in relaxed and activated states did not differ from the control. The transversal stiffness of the tibialis muscle fibers in relaxed and activated state was increased in the mice group after space flight. At the same time, in all types of studied tissues the desmin content and the expression level of desmin-coding gene did not differ from the control level.

  6. Biomechanical Evaluation of Different Fixation Methods for Mandibular Anterior Segmental Osteotomy Using Finite Element Analysis, Part One: Superior Repositioning Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kilinç, Yeliz; Erkmen, Erkan; Kurt, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to comparatively evaluate the mechanical behavior of 3 different fixation methods following various amounts of superior repositioning of mandibular anterior segment. In this study, 3 different rigid fixation configurations comprising double right L, double left L, or double I miniplates with monocortical screws were compared under vertical, horizontal, and oblique load conditions by means of finite element analysis. A three-dimensional finite element model of a fully dentate mandible was generated. A 3 and 5 mm superior repositioning of mandibular anterior segmental osteotomy were simulated. Three different finite element models corresponding to different fixation configurations were created for each superior repositioning. The von Mises stress values on fixation appliances and principal maximum stresses (Pmax) on bony structures were predicted by finite element analysis. The results have demonstrated that double right L configuration provides better stability with less stress fields in comparison with other fixation configurations used in this study.

  7. Finite Element Simulations to Explore Assumptions in Kolsky Bar Experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Crum, Justin

    2015-08-05

    The chief purpose of this project has been to develop a set of finite element models that attempt to explore some of the assumptions in the experimental set-up and data reduction of the Kolsky bar experiment. In brief, the Kolsky bar, sometimes referred to as the split Hopkinson pressure bar, is an experimental apparatus used to study the mechanical properties of materials at high strain rates. Kolsky bars can be constructed to conduct experiments in tension or compression, both of which are studied in this paper. The basic operation of the tension Kolsky bar is as follows: compressed air is inserted into the barrel that contains the striker; the striker accelerates towards the left and strikes the left end of the barrel producing a tensile stress wave that propogates first through the barrel and then down the incident bar, into the specimen, and finally the transmission bar. In the compression case, the striker instead travels to the right and impacts the incident bar directly. As the stress wave travels through an interface (e.g., the incident bar to specimen connection), a portion of the pulse is transmitted and the rest reflected. The incident pulse, as well as the transmitted and reflected pulses are picked up by two strain gauges installed on the incident and transmitted bars as shown. By interpreting the data acquired by these strain gauges, the stress/strain behavior of the specimen can be determined.

  8. Solution-adaptive finite element method in computational fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1993-01-01

    Some recent results obtained using solution-adaptive finite element method in linear elastic two-dimensional fracture mechanics problems are presented. The focus is on the basic issue of adaptive finite element method for validating the applications of new methodology to fracture mechanics problems by computing demonstration problems and comparing the stress intensity factors to analytical results.

  9. Modular Finite Element Methods Library Version: 1.0

    2010-06-22

    MFEM is a general, modular library for finite element methods. It provides a variety of finite element spaces and bilinear/linear forms in 2D and 3D. MFEM also includes classes for dealing with various types of meshes and their refinement.

  10. Blood flow structure and dynamics, and ejection mechanism in the left ventricle: analysis using echo-dynamography.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Motonao; Sakamoto, Tsuguya; Sugawara, Shigeo; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Katahira, Yoshiaki; Ohtsuki, Shigeo; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2008-10-01

    Using our "echo-dynamography", blood flow structure and flow dynamics during ventricular systole were investigated in 10 normal volunteers. The velocity vector distribution demonstrated blood flow during ejection was laminar along the ventricular septum. The characteristic flow structure was observed in each cardiac phases, early, mid- and late systole and was generated depending on the wall dynamic events such as peristaltic squeezing, hinge-like movement of the mitral ring plane, bellows action of the ventricle and dimensional changes in the funnel shape of the basal part of the ventricle, which were disclosed macroscopically by using the new technology of high speed scanning echo-tomography and microscopically by the strain rate distribution measured by phase tracking method. The pump function was reflected on the changes in the flow structure represented by the flow axis line distribution and the acceleration along the flow axis line. The acceleration of the ejection had three modes, "A", "B" and "C", and generated by the wall dynamic events. "A" appeared from the apical to the outflow area along the main flow axis line, "B" along the anterior mitral leaflet and the branched flow axis line, and "C" generated by the high speed vortex behind the mitral valve. The magnitude of the acceleration was estimated quantitatively from the velocity gradient along the flow axis line. Macroscopic and microscopic asynchrony in the myocardial contraction and extension appeared systematically in the local part of the ventricular wall, which was helpful for making the flow structure and for performing the smooth pump function.

  11. Finite Element analyses of soil bioengineered slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamagnini, Roberto; Switala, Barbara Maria; Sudan Acharya, Madhu; Wu, Wei; Graf, Frank; Auer, Michael; te Kamp, Lothar

    2014-05-01

    Soil Bioengineering methods are not only effective from an economical point of view, but they are also interesting as fully ecological solutions. The presented project is aimed to define a numerical model which includes the impact of vegetation on slope stability, considering both mechanical and hydrological effects. In this project, a constitutive model has been developed that accounts for the multi-phase nature of the soil, namely the partly saturated condition and it also includes the effects of a biological component. The constitutive equation is implemented in the Finite Element (FE) software Comes-Geo with an implicit integration scheme that accounts for the collapse of the soils structure due to wetting. The mathematical formulation of the constitutive equations is introduced by means of thermodynamics and it simulates the growth of the biological system during the time. The numerical code is then applied in the analysis of an ideal rainfall induced landslide. The slope is analyzed for vegetated and non-vegetated conditions. The final results allow to quantitatively assessing the impact of vegetation on slope stability. This allows drawing conclusions and choosing whenever it is worthful to use soil bioengineering methods in slope stabilization instead of traditional approaches. The application of the FE methods show some advantages with respect to the commonly used limit equilibrium analyses, because it can account for the real coupled strain-diffusion nature of the problem. The mechanical strength of roots is in fact influenced by the stress evolution into the slope. Moreover, FE method does not need a pre-definition of any failure surface. FE method can also be used in monitoring the progressive failure of the soil bio-engineered system as it calculates the amount of displacements and strains of the model slope. The preliminary study results show that the formulated equations can be useful for analysis and evaluation of different soil bio

  12. Nondestructive Evaluation Correlated with Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul-Azid, Ali; Baaklini, George Y.

    1999-01-01

    Advanced materials are being developed for use in high-temperature gas turbine applications. For these new materials to be fully utilized, their deformation properties, their nondestructive evaluation (NDE) quality and material durability, and their creep and fatigue fracture characteristics need to be determined by suitable experiments. The experimental findings must be analyzed, characterized, modeled and translated into constitutive equations for stress analysis and life prediction. Only when these ingredients - together with the appropriate computational tools - are available, can durability analysis be performed in the design stage, long before the component is built. One of the many structural components being evaluated by the NDE group at the NASA Lewis Research Center is the flywheel system. It is being considered as an energy storage device for advanced space vehicles. Such devices offer advantages over electrochemical batteries in situations demanding high power delivery and high energy storage per unit weight. In addition, flywheels have potentially higher efficiency and longer lifetimes with proper motor-generator and rotor design. Flywheels made of fiber-reinforced polymer composite material show great promise for energy applications because of the high energy and power densities that they can achieve along with a burst failure mode that is relatively benign in comparison to those of flywheels made of metallic materials Therefore, to help improve durability and reduce structural uncertainties, we are developing a comprehensive analytical approach to predict the reliability and life of these components under these harsh loading conditions. The combination of NDE and two- and three-dimensional finite element analyses (e.g., stress analyses and fracture mechanics) is expected to set a standardized procedure to accurately assess the applicability of using various composite materials to design a suitable rotor/flywheel assembly.

  13. An efficient finite element solution for gear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooley, C. G.; Parker, R. G.; Vijayakar, S. M.

    2010-06-01

    A finite element formulation for the dynamic response of gear pairs is proposed. Following an established approach in lumped parameter gear dynamic models, the static solution is used as the excitation in a frequency domain solution of the finite element vibration model. The nonlinear finite element/contact mechanics formulation provides accurate calculation of the static solution and average mesh stiffness that are used in the dynamic simulation. The frequency domain finite element calculation of dynamic response compares well with numerically integrated (time domain) finite element dynamic results and previously published experimental results. Simulation time with the proposed formulation is two orders of magnitude lower than numerically integrated dynamic results. This formulation admits system level dynamic gearbox response, which may include multiple gear meshes, flexible shafts, rolling element bearings, housing structures, and other deformable components.

  14. The effects of long-term aerobic exercise on cardiac structure, stroke volume of the left ventricle, and cardiac output

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bo-Ae; Oh, Deuk-Ja

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the long-term aerobic exercises on cardiac structure, left ventricular stroke volume, and cardiac output. To achieve the purpose of the study, a total of 22 volunteers—including 10 people who have continued regular exercises and 12 people as the control group—were selected as subjects. With regard to data processing, the IBM SPSS Statistics ver. 21.0 was used to calculate the mean and standard deviation, and the difference of the means between the groups was verified through an independent t-test. As a result, there were significant differences between groups in the left ventricular end-diastolic internal dimension, left ventricular end-systolic internal dimension, left ventricular end-diastolic septum thickness. There were significant differences between groups in left ventricular end-diastolic volume, left ventricular mass, and left ventricular mass index per body surface area. However, in cardiac function, only left ventricular stroke volume showed a significant difference between groups. PMID:26933658

  15. The effects of long-term aerobic exercise on cardiac structure, stroke volume of the left ventricle, and cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bo-Ae; Oh, Deuk-Ja

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the long-term aerobic exercises on cardiac structure, left ventricular stroke volume, and cardiac output. To achieve the purpose of the study, a total of 22 volunteers-including 10 people who have continued regular exercises and 12 people as the control group-were selected as subjects. With regard to data processing, the IBM SPSS Statistics ver. 21.0 was used to calculate the mean and standard deviation, and the difference of the means between the groups was verified through an independent t-test. As a result, there were significant differences between groups in the left ventricular end-diastolic internal dimension, left ventricular end-systolic internal dimension, left ventricular end-diastolic septum thickness. There were significant differences between groups in left ventricular end-diastolic volume, left ventricular mass, and left ventricular mass index per body surface area. However, in cardiac function, only left ventricular stroke volume showed a significant difference between groups.

  16. Evolution of the ventricles.

    PubMed Central

    Victor, S; Nayak, V M; Rajasingh, R

    1999-01-01

    We studied the evolution of ventricles by macroscopic examination of the hearts of marine cartilaginous and bony fish, and by angiocardiography and gross examination of the hearts of air-breathing freshwater fish, frogs, turtles, snakes, and crocodiles. A right-sided, thin-walled ventricular lumen is seen in the fish, frog, turtle, and snake. In fish, there is external symmetry of the ventricle, internal asymmetry, and a thick-walled left ventricle with a small inlet chamber. In animals such as frogs, turtles, and snakes, the left ventricle exists as a small-cavitied contractile sponge. The high pressure generated by this spongy left ventricle, the direction of the jet, the ventriculoarterial orientation, and the bulbar spiral valve in the frog help to separate the systemic and pulmonary circulations. In the crocodile, the right aorta is connected to the left ventricle, and there is a complete interventricular septum and an improved left ventricular lumen when compared with turtles and snakes. The heart is housed in a rigid pericardial cavity in the shark, possibly to protect it from changing underwater pressure. The pericardial cavity in various species permits movements of the heart-which vary depending on the ventriculoarterial orientation and need for the ventricle to generate torque or spin on the ejected blood- that favor run-off into the appropriate arteries and their branches. In the lower species, it is not clear whether the spongy myocardium contributes to myocardial oxygenation. In human beings, spongy myocardium constitutes a rare form of congenital heart disease. Images PMID:10524737

  17. Nonlinear, finite deformation, finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nhung; Waas, Anthony M.

    2016-06-01

    The roles of the consistent Jacobian matrix and the material tangent moduli, which are used in nonlinear incremental finite deformation mechanics problems solved using the finite element method, are emphasized in this paper, and demonstrated using the commercial software ABAQUS standard. In doing so, the necessity for correctly employing user material subroutines to solve nonlinear problems involving large deformation and/or large rotation is clarified. Starting with the rate form of the principle of virtual work, the derivations of the material tangent moduli, the consistent Jacobian matrix, the stress/strain measures, and the objective stress rates are discussed and clarified. The difference between the consistent Jacobian matrix (which, in the ABAQUS UMAT user material subroutine is referred to as DDSDDE) and the material tangent moduli ( C e ) needed for the stress update is pointed out and emphasized in this paper. While the former is derived based on the Jaumann rate of the Kirchhoff stress, the latter is derived using the Jaumann rate of the Cauchy stress. Understanding the difference between these two objective stress rates is crucial for correctly implementing a constitutive model, especially a rate form constitutive relation, and for ensuring fast convergence. Specifically, the implementation requires the stresses to be updated correctly. For this, the strains must be computed directly from the deformation gradient and corresponding strain measure (for a total form model). Alternatively, the material tangent moduli derived from the corresponding Jaumann rate of the Cauchy stress of the constitutive relation (for a rate form model) should be used. Given that this requirement is satisfied, the consistent Jacobian matrix only influences the rate of convergence. Its derivation should be based on the Jaumann rate of the Kirchhoff stress to ensure fast convergence; however, the use of a different objective stress rate may also be possible. The error associated

  18. Finite Element Model of Cardiac Electrical Conduction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, John Zhihao

    1994-01-01

    In this thesis, we develop mathematical models to study electrical conduction of the heart. One important pattern of wave propagation of electrical excitation in the heart is reentry which is believed to be the underlying mechanism of some dangerous cardiac arhythmias such as ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. We present in this thesis a new ionic channel model of the ventricular cardiac cell membrane to study the microscopic electrical properties of myocardium. We base our model on recent single channel experiment data and a simple physical diffusion model of the calcium channel. Our ionic channel model of myocardium has simpler differential equations and fewer parameters than previous models. Further more, our ionic channel model achieves better results in simulating the strength-interval curve when we connect the membrane patch model to form a one dimensional cardiac muscle strand. We go on to study a finite element model which uses multiple states and non-nearest neighbor interactions to include curvature and dispersion effects. We create a generalized lattice randomization to overcome the artifacts generated by the interaction between the local dynamics and the regularities of the square lattice. We show that the homogeneous model does not display spontaneous wavefront breakup in a reentrant wave propagation once the lattice artifacts have been smoothed out by lattice randomization with a randomization scale larger than the characteristic length of the interaction. We further develop a finite 3-D 3-state heart model which employs a probability interaction rule. This model is applied to the simulation of Body Surface Laplacian Mapping (BSLM) using a cylindrical volume conductor as the torso model. We show that BSLM has a higher spatial resolution than conventional mapping methods in revealing the underlying electrical activities of the heart. The results of these studies demonstrate that mathematical modeling and computer simulation are very

  19. A multi-physics and multi-scale lumped parameter model of cardiac contraction of the left ventricle: a conceptual model from the protein to the organ scale.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya-Ghosh, Benjamin; Schievano, Silvia; Díaz-Zuccarini, Vanessa

    2012-10-01

    In cardiovascular computational physiology the importance of understanding cardiac contraction as a multi-scale process is of paramount importance to understand causality across different scales. Within this study, a multi-scale and multi-physics model of the left ventricle that connects the process of cardiac excitation and contraction from the protein to the organ level is presented in a novel way. The model presented here includes the functional description of a cardiomyocyte (cellular scale), which explains the dynamic behaviour of the calcium concentration within the cell whilst an action potential develops. The cell domain is coupled to a domain that determines the kinetics of the sliding filament mechanism (protein level), which is at the basis of cardiac contraction. These processes are then linked to the generation of muscular force and from there to the generation of pressure inside the ventricle. This multi-scale model presents a coherent and unified way to describe cardiac contraction from the protein to the organ level.

  20. Elective decompression of the left ventricle in pediatric patients may reduce the duration of venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Hacking, Douglas F; Best, Derek; d'Udekem, Yves; Brizard, Christian P; Konstantinov, Igor E; Millar, Johnny; Butt, Warwick

    2015-04-01

    We aimed to determine the effect of elective left heart decompression at the time of initiation of central venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA ECMO) on VA ECMO duration and clinical outcomes in children in a single tertiary ECMO referral center with a large pediatric population from a national referral center for pediatric cardiac surgery. We studied 51 episodes of VA ECMO in a historical cohort of 49 pediatric patients treated between the years 1990 and 2013 in the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) of the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne. The cases had a variety of diagnoses including congenital cardiac abnormalities, sepsis, myocarditis, and cardiomyopathy. Left heart decompression as an elective treatment or an emergency intervention for left heart distension was effectively achieved by a number of methods, including left atrial venting, blade atrial septostomy, and left ventricular cannulation. Elective left heart decompression was associated with a reduction in time on ECMO (128 h) when compared with emergency decompression (236 h) (P = 0.013). Subgroup analysis showed that ECMO duration was greatest in noncardiac patients (elective 138 h, emergency 295 h; P = 0.02) and in patients who died despite both emergency decompression and ECMO (elective 133 h, emergency 354 h; P = 0.002). As the emergency cases had a lower pH, a higher PaCO2 , and a lower oxygenation index and were treated with a higher mean airway pressure, positive end-expiratory pressure, and respiratory rate prior to receiving VA ECMO, we undertook multivariate linear regression modeling to show that only PaCO2 and the timing of left heart decompression were associated with ECMO duration. However, elective left heart decompression was not associated with a reduction in length of PICU stay, duration of mechanical ventilation, or duration of oxygen therapy. Elective left heart decompression was not associated with improved ECMO survival or survival to PICU discharge

  1. Elective decompression of the left ventricle in pediatric patients may reduce the duration of venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Hacking, Douglas F; Best, Derek; d'Udekem, Yves; Brizard, Christian P; Konstantinov, Igor E; Millar, Johnny; Butt, Warwick

    2015-04-01

    We aimed to determine the effect of elective left heart decompression at the time of initiation of central venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA ECMO) on VA ECMO duration and clinical outcomes in children in a single tertiary ECMO referral center with a large pediatric population from a national referral center for pediatric cardiac surgery. We studied 51 episodes of VA ECMO in a historical cohort of 49 pediatric patients treated between the years 1990 and 2013 in the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) of the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne. The cases had a variety of diagnoses including congenital cardiac abnormalities, sepsis, myocarditis, and cardiomyopathy. Left heart decompression as an elective treatment or an emergency intervention for left heart distension was effectively achieved by a number of methods, including left atrial venting, blade atrial septostomy, and left ventricular cannulation. Elective left heart decompression was associated with a reduction in time on ECMO (128 h) when compared with emergency decompression (236 h) (P = 0.013). Subgroup analysis showed that ECMO duration was greatest in noncardiac patients (elective 138 h, emergency 295 h; P = 0.02) and in patients who died despite both emergency decompression and ECMO (elective 133 h, emergency 354 h; P = 0.002). As the emergency cases had a lower pH, a higher PaCO2 , and a lower oxygenation index and were treated with a higher mean airway pressure, positive end-expiratory pressure, and respiratory rate prior to receiving VA ECMO, we undertook multivariate linear regression modeling to show that only PaCO2 and the timing of left heart decompression were associated with ECMO duration. However, elective left heart decompression was not associated with a reduction in length of PICU stay, duration of mechanical ventilation, or duration of oxygen therapy. Elective left heart decompression was not associated with improved ECMO survival or survival to PICU discharge

  2. Finite element modeling of blast lung injury in sheep.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Melissa M; Dang, Xinglai; Adkins, Mark; Powell, Brian; Chan, Philemon

    2015-04-01

    A detailed 3D finite element model (FEM) of the sheep thorax was developed to predict heterogeneous and volumetric lung injury due to blast. A shared node mesh of the sheep thorax was constructed from a computed tomography (CT) scan of a sheep cadaver, and while most material properties were taken from literature, an elastic-plastic material model was used for the ribs based on three-point bending experiments performed on sheep rib specimens. Anesthetized sheep were blasted in an enclosure, and blast overpressure data were collected using the blast test device (BTD), while surface lung injury was quantified during necropsy. Matching blasts were simulated using the sheep thorax FEM. Surface lung injury in the FEM was matched to pathology reports by setting a threshold value of the scalar output termed the strain product (maximum value of the dot product of strain and strain-rate vectors over all simulation time) in the surface elements. Volumetric lung injury was quantified by applying the threshold value to all elements in the model lungs, and a correlation was found between predicted volumetric injury and measured postblast lung weights. All predictions are made for the left and right lungs separately. This work represents a significant step toward the prediction of localized and heterogeneous blast lung injury, as well as volumetric injury, which was not recorded during field testing for sheep.

  3. Integrated transient thermal-structural finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Decahaumphai, P.; Tamma, K. K.; Wieting, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    An integrated thermal-structural finite element approach for efficient coupling of transient thermal and structural analysis is presented. New integrated thermal-structural rod and one dimensional axisymmetric elements considering conduction and convection are developed and used in transient thermal-structural applications. The improved accuracy of the integrated approach is illustrated by comparisons with exact transient heat conduction-elasticity solutions and conventional finite element thermal-finite element structural analyses. Results indicate that the approach offers significant potential for further development with other elements.

  4. A finite element conjugate gradient FFT method for scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Jeffery D.; Ross, Dan; Jin, J.-M.; Chatterjee, A.; Volakis, John L.

    1991-01-01

    Validated results are presented for the new 3D body of revolution finite element boundary integral code. A Fourier series expansion of the vector electric and mangnetic fields is employed to reduce the dimensionality of the system, and the exact boundary condition is employed to terminate the finite element mesh. The mesh termination boundary is chosen such that is leads to convolutional boundary operatores of low O(n) memory demand. Improvements of this code are discussed along with the proposed formulation for a full 3D implementation of the finite element boundary integral method in conjunction with a conjugate gradiant fast Fourier transformation (CGFFT) solution.

  5. Thermal Analysis of Thin Plates Using the Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Er, G. K.; Iu, V. P.; Liu, X. L.

    2010-05-01

    The isotropic thermal plate is analyzed with finite element method. The solution procedure is presented. The elementary stiffness matrix and loading vector are derived rigorously with variation principle and the principle of minimum potential energy. Numerical results are obtained based on the derived equations and tested with available exact solutions. The problems in the finite element analysis are figured out. It is found that the finite element solutions can not converge as the number of elements increases around the corners of the plate. The derived equations presented in this paper are fundamental for our further study on more complicated thermal plate analysis.

  6. Nonlinear finite element modeling of THUNDER piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taleghani, Barmac K.; Campbell, Joel F.

    1999-06-01

    A NASTRAN non-linear finite element model has been developed for predicting the dome heights of THUNDER (Thin Layer Unimorph Ferroelectric Driver) piezoelectric actuators. To analytically validate the finite element model, a comparison was made with a non-linear plate solution using Von Karmen's approximation. A 500 volt input was used to examine the actuator deformation. The NASTRAN finite element model was also compared with experimental results. Four groups of specimens were fabricated and tested. Four different input voltages, which included 120, 160, 200, and 240 Vp-p with a 0 volts offset, were used for this comparison.

  7. Non-Linear Finite Element Modeling of THUNDER Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taleghani, Barmac K.; Campbell, Joel F.

    1999-01-01

    A NASTRAN non-linear finite element model has been developed for predicting the dome heights of THUNDER (THin Layer UNimorph Ferroelectric DrivER) piezoelectric actuators. To analytically validate the finite element model, a comparison was made with a non-linear plate solution using Von Karmen's approximation. A 500 volt input was used to examine the actuator deformation. The NASTRAN finite element model was also compared with experimental results. Four groups of specimens were fabricated and tested. Four different input voltages, which included 120, 160, 200, and 240 Vp-p with a 0 volts offset, were used for this comparison.

  8. Wavelet and Multiresolution Analysis for Finite Element Networking Paradigms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurdila, Andrew J.; Sharpley, Robert C.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a final report on Wavelet and Multiresolution Analysis for Finite Element Networking Paradigms. The focus of this research is to derive and implement: 1) Wavelet based methodologies for the compression, transmission, decoding, and visualization of three dimensional finite element geometry and simulation data in a network environment; 2) methodologies for interactive algorithm monitoring and tracking in computational mechanics; and 3) Methodologies for interactive algorithm steering for the acceleration of large scale finite element simulations. Also included in this report are appendices describing the derivation of wavelet based Particle Image Velocity algorithms and reduced order input-output models for nonlinear systems by utilizing wavelet approximations.

  9. Ablative Thermal Response Analysis Using the Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec John A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    A review of the classic techniques used to solve ablative thermal response problems is presented. The advantages and disadvantages of both the finite element and finite difference methods are described. As a first step in developing a three dimensional finite element based ablative thermal response capability, a one dimensional computer tool has been developed. The finite element method is used to discretize the governing differential equations and Galerkin's method of weighted residuals is used to derive the element equations. A code to code comparison between the current 1-D tool and the 1-D Fully Implicit Ablation and Thermal Response Program (FIAT) has been performed.

  10. [Calculation of the peak systolic wall stress at the equator of the left ventricle by coupled M mode echo and pressure recordings].

    PubMed

    Drobinski, G; Fechner, J; Eugène, M; Evans, J I; Béjean-Lebuisson, A; Leighton, R F; Grosgogeat, Y

    1983-11-01

    The peak systolic wall stress at the equator of the left ventricle (sigma max) is the maximum load that the myocardial fibres bear during contraction. It is an index of the adaptation of the left ventricle to cardiac disease, and, when elevated, it indicates cardiac decompensation. sigma max was calculated by coupled M mode echo-LV pressure recordings in 51 cases: 11 patients without LV disease, 14 patients with aortic stenosis (AS), 14 patients with aortic incompetence (AI), 7 patients with severe mitral incompetence (MI) and 5 patients with cardiomyopathy with dilatation (CMP). sigma max was calculated from Mirsky's formula, the length of the long axis being deduced from the short axis and the diastolic:systolic ratio of these two axes from ventriculography. The normal value of sigma max by this method is 220 dynes 10(3)/cm2 +/- 30 with an upper limit of normal of 280 dynes 10(3)/cm2. sigma max was normal in patients with AS and AI, and increased in the cases of MI and CMP, in positive correlation with LV volume (r = 0,47) and the shape of the LV (long:short axis ratio). No correlations were found between sigma max and maximum LV pressure. The relatively low values of sigma max compared to the results obtained from coupled echo-angio recordings are partly due to the thick walled LV model and, to a large extent, to the lower values of short axis when measured by echo compared to angiography.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. The number of cardiac myocytes in the hypertrophic and hypotrophic left ventricle of the obese and calorie-restricted mouse heart

    PubMed Central

    Schipke, Julia; Banmann, Ewgenija; Nikam, Sandeep; Voswinckel, Robert; Kohlstedt, Karin; Loot, Annemarieke E; Fleming, Ingrid; Mühlfeld, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Changes in body mass due to varying amounts of calorie intake occur frequently with obesity and anorexia/cachexia being at opposite sides of the scale. Here, we tested whether a high-fat diet or calorie restriction (CR) decreases the number of cardiac myocytes and affects their volume. Ten 6–8-week-old mice were randomly assigned to a normal (control group, n = 5) or high-fat diet (obesity group, n = 5) for 28 weeks. Ten 8-week-old mice were randomly assigned to a normal (control group, n = 5) or CR diet (CR group, n = 5) for 7 days. The left ventricles of the hearts were prepared for light and electron microscopy, and analysed by design-based stereology. In CR, neither the number of cardiac myocytes, the relationship between one- and multinucleate myocytes nor their mean volume were significantly different between the groups. In contrast, in the obese mice we observed a significant increase in cell size combined with a lower number of cardiomyocytes (P < 0.05 in the one-sided U-test) and an increase in the mean number of nuclei per myocyte. The mean volume of myofibrils and mitochondria per cardiac myocyte reflected the hypertrophic and hypotrophic remodelling in obesity and CR, respectively, but were only significant in the obese mice, indicating a more profound effect of the obesity protocol than in the CR experiments. Taken together, our data indicate that long-lasting obesity is associated with a loss of cardiomyocytes of the left ventricle, but that short-term CR does not alter the number of cardiomyocytes. PMID:25322944

  12. pSnakes: a new radial active contour model and its application in the segmentation of the left ventricle from echocardiographic images.

    PubMed

    de Alexandria, Auzuir Ripardo; Cortez, Paulo César; Bessa, Jessyca Almeida; da Silva Félix, John Hebert; de Abreu, José Sebastião; de Albuquerque, Victor Hugo C

    2014-10-01

    Active contours are image segmentation methods that minimize the total energy of the contour to be segmented. Among the active contour methods, the radial methods have lower computational complexity and can be applied in real time. This work aims to present a new radial active contour technique, called pSnakes, using the 1D Hilbert transform as external energy. The pSnakes method is based on the fact that the beams in ultrasound equipment diverge from a single point of the probe, thus enabling the use of polar coordinates in the segmentation. The control points or nodes of the active contour are obtained in pairs and are called twin nodes. The internal energies as well as the external one, Hilbertian energy, are redefined. The results showed that pSnakes can be used in image segmentation of short-axis echocardiogram images and that they were effective in image segmentation of the left ventricle. The echo-cardiologist's golden standard showed that the pSnakes was the best method when compared with other methods. The main contributions of this work are the use of pSnakes and Hilbertian energy, as the external energy, in image segmentation. The Hilbertian energy is calculated by the 1D Hilbert transform. Compared with traditional methods, the pSnakes method is more suitable for ultrasound images because it is not affected by variations in image contrast, such as noise. The experimental results obtained by the left ventricle segmentation of echocardiographic images demonstrated the advantages of the proposed model. The results presented in this paper are justified due to an improved performance of the Hilbert energy in the presence of speckle noise.

  13. A Comparison Between the Hemodynamic Effects of Cisatracurium and Atracurium in Patient with Low Function of Left Ventricle who are Candidate for Open Heart Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbanlo, Masoud; Mohaghegh, Mahmoud Reza; Yazdanian, Forozan; Mesbah, Mehrdad; Totonchi, Ziya

    2016-01-01

    Background: The need for muscle relaxants in general anesthesia in different surgeries including cardiac surgeries, and the type of relaxant to be used considering its different hemodynamic effects on patients with heart disease can be of considerable importance. In this study, the hemodynamic effects of two muscle relaxants, Cisatracurium and Atracurium in patients whit low function of left ventricle who are candidate for open heart surgery have been considered. Method: This study has been designed as a randomized prospective double-blind clinical trial. The target population included all adult patients with heart disease whose ejection fraction reported by echocardiography or cardiac catheterization was 35% or less before the surgery, and were candidate for open heart surgery in Shahid Rajaei Heart Center. Taking into account the inclusion and exclusion criteria, the patients were randomly placed in two groups of 30 people each. In the induction stage, all the patients received midazolam, etomidate, and one of the considered muscle relaxant, either 0.2 mg/kg of cisatracurium or 0.5mg/kg of Atracurium within one minute. In the maintenance stage of anesthesia, the patients were administered by infusion of midazolam, sufentanil and the same muscle relaxant used in the induction stage. The hemodynamic indexes were recorded and evaluated in different stages of anesthesia and surgery as well as prior to transfer to ICU. Results: In regard with descriptive indexes (age and sex distributions, premedication with cardiac drugs, ejection fraction before surgery, basic disease) there was no statistically significant difference between the groups. Conclusions: The significant difference of hemodynamic indexes between the two groups of this study, and the need for hemodynamic stability in all stages of surgery for patients with low function of left ventricle who are candidate for open heart surgery, proves that administering Cisatracurium as the muscle relaxant is advantageous

  14. Left-ventricle segmentation in real-time 3D echocardiography using a hybrid active shape model and optimal graph search approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Honghai; Abiose, Ademola K.; Campbell, Dwayne N.; Sonka, Milan; Martins, James B.; Wahle, Andreas

    2010-03-01

    Quantitative analysis of the left ventricular shape and motion patterns associated with left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony (LVMD) is essential for diagnosis and treatment planning in congestive heart failure. Real-time 3D echocardiography (RT3DE) used for LVMD analysis is frequently limited by heavy speckle noise or partially incomplete data, thus a segmentation method utilizing learned global shape knowledge is beneficial. In this study, the endocardial surface of the left ventricle (LV) is segmented using a hybrid approach combining active shape model (ASM) with optimal graph search. The latter is used to achieve landmark refinement in the ASM framework. Optimal graph search translates the 3D segmentation into the detection of a minimum-cost closed set in a graph and can produce a globally optimal result. Various information-gradient, intensity distributions, and regional-property terms-are used to define the costs for the graph search. The developed method was tested on 44 RT3DE datasets acquired from 26 LVMD patients. The segmentation accuracy was assessed by surface positioning error and volume overlap measured for the whole LV as well as 16 standard LV regions. The segmentation produced very good results that were not achievable using ASM or graph search alone.

  15. BOOK REVIEW: Nonlinear Continuum Mechanics for Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialek, James M.

    1998-05-01

    Nonlinear continuum mechanics of solids is a fascinating subject. All the assumptions inherited from an overexposure to linear behaviour and analysis must be re-examined. The standard definitions of strain designed for small deformation linear problems may be totally misleading when finite motion or large deformations are considered. Nonlinear behaviour includes phenomena like `snap-through', where bifurcation theory is applied to engineering design. Capabilities in this field are growing at a fantastic speed; for example, modern automobiles are presently being designed to crumple in the most energy absorbing manner in order to protect the occupants. The combination of nonlinear mechanics and the finite element method is a very important field. Most engineering designs encountered in the fusion effort are strictly limited to small deformation linear theory. In fact, fusion devices are usually kept in the low stress, long life regime that avoids large deformations, nonlinearity and any plastic behaviour. The only aspect of nonlinear continuum solid mechanics about which the fusion community now worries is that rare case where details of the metal forming process must be considered. This text is divided into nine sections: introduction, mathematical preliminaries, kinematics, stress and equilibrium, hyperelasticity, linearized equilibrium equations, discretization and solution, computer implementation and an appendix covering an introduction to large inelastic deformations. The authors have decided to use vector and tensor notation almost exclusively. This means that the usual maze of indicial equations is avoided, but most readers will therefore be stretched considerably to follow the presentation, which quickly proceeds to the heart of nonlinear behaviour in solids. With great speed the reader is led through the material (Lagrangian) and spatial (Eulerian) co-ordinates, the deformation gradient tensor (an example of a two point tensor), the right and left Cauchy

  16. Optimal least-squares finite element method for elliptic problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1991-01-01

    An optimal least squares finite element method is proposed for two dimensional and three dimensional elliptic problems and its advantages are discussed over the mixed Galerkin method and the usual least squares finite element method. In the usual least squares finite element method, the second order equation (-Delta x (Delta u) + u = f) is recast as a first order system (-Delta x p + u = f, Delta u - p = 0). The error analysis and numerical experiment show that, in this usual least squares finite element method, the rate of convergence for flux p is one order lower than optimal. In order to get an optimal least squares method, the irrotationality Delta x p = 0 should be included in the first order system.

  17. Application of the Finite Element Method to Rotary Wing Aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straub, F. K.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1982-01-01

    A finite element method for the spatial discretization of the dynamic equations of equilibrium governing rotary-wing aeroelastic problems is presented. Formulation of the finite element equations is based on weighted Galerkin residuals. This Galerkin finite element method reduces algebraic manipulative labor significantly, when compared to the application of the global Galerkin method in similar problems. The coupled flap-lag aeroelastic stability boundaries of hingeless helicopter rotor blades in hover are calculated. The linearized dynamic equations are reduced to the standard eigenvalue problem from which the aeroelastic stability boundaries are obtained. The convergence properties of the Galerkin finite element method are studied numerically by refining the discretization process. Results indicate that four or five elements suffice to capture the dynamics of the blade with the same accuracy as the global Galerkin method.

  18. Validation of high displacement piezoelectric actuator finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taleghani, Barmac K.

    2000-08-01

    The paper presents the results obtained by using NASTRAN and ANSYS finite element codes to predict doming of the THUNDER piezoelectric actuators during the manufacturing process and subsequent straining due to an applied input voltage. To effectively use such devices in engineering applications, modeling and characterization are essential. Length, width, dome height, and thickness and important parameters for users of such devices. Therefore, finite element models were used to assess the effects of these parameters. NASTRAN and ANSYS used different methods for modeling piezoelectric effects. In NASTRAN, a thermal analogy was used to represent voltage at nodes as equivalent temperatures, while ANSYS processed the voltage directly using piezoelectric finite elements. The results of finite element models were validated by using the experimental results.

  19. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) in Design and Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waggoner, Todd C.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) enables industrial designers to analyze complex components by dividing them into smaller elements, then assessing stress and strain characteristics. Traditionally mainframe based, FEA is being increasingly used in microcomputers. (SK)

  20. Validation of High Displacement Piezoelectric Actuator Finite Element Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taleghani, B. K.

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the results obtained by using NASTRAN(Registered Trademark) and ANSYS(Regitered Trademark) finite element codes to predict doming of the THUNDER piezoelectric actuators during the manufacturing process and subsequent straining due to an applied input voltage. To effectively use such devices in engineering applications, modeling and characterization are essential. Length, width, dome height, and thickness are important parameters for users of such devices. Therefore, finite element models were used to assess the effects of these parameters. NASTRAN(Registered Trademark) and ANSYS(Registered Trademark) used different methods for modeling piezoelectric effects. In NASTRAN(Registered Trademark), a thermal analogy was used to represent voltage at nodes as equivalent temperatures, while ANSYS(Registered Trademark) processed the voltage directly using piezoelectric finite elements. The results of finite element models were validated by using the experimental results.

  1. Scalable, Finite Element Analysis of Electromagnetic Scattering and Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, T.; Lou, J.; Katz, D.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper a method for simulating electromagnetic fields scattered from complex objects is reviewed; namely, an unstructured finite element code that does not use traditional mesh partitioning algorithms.

  2. Examples of finite element mesh generation using SDRC IDEAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapp, John; Volakis, John L.

    1990-01-01

    IDEAS (Integrated Design Engineering Analysis Software) offers a comprehensive package for mechanical design engineers. Due to its multifaceted capabilities, however, it can be manipulated to serve the needs of electrical engineers, also. IDEAS can be used to perform the following tasks: system modeling, system assembly, kinematics, finite element pre/post processing, finite element solution, system dynamics, drafting, test data analysis, and project relational database.

  3. Finite Element Analysis for Pseudo Hyperbolic Integral-Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xia

    The finite element method and its analysis for pseudo-hyperbolic integral-differential equations with nonlinear boundary conditions is considered. A new projection is introduced to obtain optimal L2 convergence estimates. The present techniques can be applied to treat elastic wave problems with absorbing boundary conditions in porous media. Keywords: pseudo-hyperbolic integral-differential equation, finite element, Sobolev-Volterra projection, convergence analysis

  4. Simulation of two-dimensional waterflooding using mixed finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Chavent, G.; Jaffre, J.; Cohen, G.; Dupuy, M.; Dieste, I.

    1982-01-01

    A new method for the simulation of incompressible diphasic flows in two dimensions is presented, the distinctive features of which are: (1) reformation of the basic equation and specific choices of the finite element approximation of the same; (11) use of a mixed finite elements method, approximating both scalar and vector functions. Several test examples are shown, including gravity and capillary effects. The use of discontinuous basis functions proved successful for an accurate representation of sharp fronts. 16 refs.

  5. Integration of geometric modeling and advanced finite element preprocessing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephard, Mark S.; Finnigan, Peter M.

    1987-01-01

    The structure to a geometry based finite element preprocessing system is presented. The key features of the system are the use of geometric operators to support all geometric calculations required for analysis model generation, and the use of a hierarchic boundary based data structure for the major data sets within the system. The approach presented can support the finite element modeling procedures used today as well as the fully automated procedures under development.

  6. Finite element analysis of vibration and damping of laminated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rikards, Rolands

    Simple finite elements are used to form a special laminated beam and plate superelements excluding all degrees of freedom in the nodes of the middle layer, and the finite element analysis of this structure is performed. To estimate damping of structures, modal loss factors are calculated, using two methods: the 'exact' method of complex eigenvalues and the approximate energy method. It was found that both methods give satisfactory results. However, the energy method needs less computer time than the exact method.

  7. Finite element analysis of a composite wheelchair wheel design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, Rene

    1994-01-01

    The finite element analysis of a composite wheelchair wheel design is presented. The design is the result of a technology utilization request. The designer's intent is to soften the riding feeling by incorporating a mechanism attaching the wheel rim to the spokes that would allow considerable deflection upon compressive loads. A finite element analysis was conducted to verify proper structural function. Displacement and stress results are presented and conclusions are provided.

  8. Mathematical aspects of finite element methods for incompressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunzburger, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    Mathematical aspects of finite element methods are surveyed for incompressible viscous flows, concentrating on the steady primitive variable formulation. The discretization of a weak formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations are addressed, then the stability condition is considered, the satisfaction of which insures the stability of the approximation. Specific choices of finite element spaces for the velocity and pressure are then discussed. Finally, the connection between different weak formulations and a variety of boundary conditions is explored.

  9. Comparison of the effectiveness of one- and two-suture prosthesis used to correct left laryngeal hemiplegia in the equine: followed by Nd:YAG laser ventricle ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Cindy; Tate, Lloyd P.; Correa, Maria T.

    1992-06-01

    The effectiveness of one or two suture prothesis in performing laryngoplasty was compared. Forty-six horses treated for left laryngeal hemiplegia at North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine (NCSU-CVM) between January 1987 and April 1991 were included in the study. Thirty-seven of the horses were treated with two sutures, while nine were treated with one suture. All horses, after recovering from general anesthesia, were sedated the following day and were subjected to a transendoscopic neodymium: yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser ablation of the left laryngeal ventricle. Ability to perform after treatment relative to before treatment, reduction or elimination of respiratory noise, owner or trainer satisfaction, were compared for the two suture prosthetic procedures using chi-squared test or Fisher's exact test. No statistical significant differences were found for performance, reduction of noise, and owner or trainer satisfaction. The use of one or two sutures seemed to have no effect on the effectiveness of prosthetic laryngoplasty procedure followed by Nd:YAG ventricular ablation.

  10. Stroke volume generation of the left ventricle and its relation to chamber shape in normal subjects and patients with mitral or aortic regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Hiro, T; Katayama, K; Miura, T; Kohno, M; Fujii, T; Hiro, J; Matsuzaki, M

    1996-04-01

    The total stroke volume of the left ventricle (LV) is equal to the sum of the regional cavity shrinkage. Since nonuniformity of regional wall motion in LV has been well documented even in normal subjects, the extent of the contribution of each region to total stroke volume cannot be easily determined. To assess the left ventricular regional contributions to total stroke volume under normal conditions and in compensated chronic mitral or aortic regurgitation, LV cineangiograms were analyzed in 14 normal subjects (N), 8 patients with mitral regurgitation (MR) and 10 patients with aortic regurgitation (AR). We assumed that the LV cavity could be viewed as a stack of 30 half-cylindrical discs, 15 in the anterior and 15 in the inferior wall regions. LV chamber shape was more spherical in MR than in N, but was more conical in AR. Percent regional hemichordal shortening was significantly decreased in the anterobasal and anteroapical walls in AR, but was similar between N and MR. The regional contribution to total stroke volume showed a significant quadratic correlation with the end-diastolic regional shape index (N, r = 0.87; MR, r = 0.79; AR, r = 0.90), which was defined as the regional hemiaxial length divided by the LV long-axis length, but was not correlated with percent regional hemichordal shortening. Therefore, stroke volume is generated mainly in the mid-ventricular portion in N and MR, but in the basal portion in AR due to the characteristic change in cavity shape.

  11. A large pseudoaneurysm of the left cardiac ventricle in a 57-year-old patient after urgent coronary artery bypass grafting and surgical mitral valve replacement due to acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Joanna; Mizia-Stec, Katarzyna; Rybicka-Musialik, Anna; Janusiewicz, Piotr; Malinowski, Marcin; Deja, Marek A

    2014-12-01

    We present a rare case of a left ventricular pseudoaneurysm in a patient after inferior wall myocardial infarction. The infarction was complicated with acute mitral insufficiency, pulmonary edema, and cardiogenic shock. Urgent surgical mitral valve replacement and coronary artery bypass grafting were performed. After several months, the patient was hospitalized again because of deterioration of exercise tolerance and symptoms of acute congestive heart failure. A large pseudoaneurysm of the left ventricle was recognized and successfully treated surgically. PMID:26336464

  12. A large pseudoaneurysm of the left cardiac ventricle in a 57-year-old patient after urgent coronary artery bypass grafting and surgical mitral valve replacement due to acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Mizia-Stec, Katarzyna; Rybicka-Musialik, Anna; Janusiewicz, Piotr; Malinowski, Marcin; Deja, Marek A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a rare case of a left ventricular pseudoaneurysm in a patient after inferior wall myocardial infarction. The infarction was complicated with acute mitral insufficiency, pulmonary edema, and cardiogenic shock. Urgent surgical mitral valve replacement and coronary artery bypass grafting were performed. After several months, the patient was hospitalized again because of deterioration of exercise tolerance and symptoms of acute congestive heart failure. A large pseudoaneurysm of the left ventricle was recognized and successfully treated surgically. PMID:26336464

  13. [Influence of propafenon on hemodynamics of the left ventricle and atrioventricular conduction with special reference to the WPW syndrome].

    PubMed

    Probst, P; Pachinger, O

    1976-03-01

    15 patients were injected 2 mg/kg Propafenon intravenously in 3 minutes. In 10 patients the changes of the atrio-ventricular conduction and the sinus-node recovery time were measured. In 5 out of these 10 patients the influence on the left ventricular systolic pressure, the left ventricular enddiastolic pressure and the dp/dtmax was also measured. 4 patients had a WPW-syndrom and one patient an AV nodal tachycardia. There was a significant increase of the PQ-time (16,7%), the AH interval (9%), HV interval (33%) and the width of the QRS complex (13.8%). The intratrial conduction (PA-time), the heart rate and the sinus-node recovery time were not influenced. In 6 out of 7 patients the effective refractory period of the AV node was prolonged and in one it remained unchanged. There was a statistically significant decrease of the dp/dt, the heart rate staying the same. The systolic pressure decreased slightly and the enddiastolic pressure increased insignificantly. In 3 out of 4 patients with WPW syndrome the accessory pathway was blocked and in the 4th the effective refractory period of the pathway prolonged. In 3 out of these 4 patients a tachycardia could be initiated by the extra-stimulus method which was not possible after administration of the drug.

  14. The hemodynamic effects of acute aortic regurgitation into a stiffened left ventricle resulting from chronic aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Ikechukwu; Raghav, Vrishank; Midha, Prem; Kumar, Gautam; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2016-06-01

    Acute aortic regurgitation (AR) post-chronic aortic stenosis is a prevalent phenomenon occurring in patients who undergo transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) surgery. The objective of this work was to characterize the effects of left ventricular diastolic stiffness (LVDS) and AR severity on LV performance. Three LVDS models were inserted into a physiological left heart simulator. AR severity was parametrically varied through four levels (ranging from trace to moderate) and compared with a competent aortic valve. Hemodynamic metrics such as average diastolic pressures (DP) and reduction in transmitral flow were measured. AR index was calculated as a function of AR severity and LVDS, and the work required to make up for lost volume due to AR was estimated. In the presence of trace AR, higher LVDS had up to a threefold reduction in transmitral flow (13% compared with 3.5%) and a significant increase in DP (2-fold). The AR index ranged from ∼42 to 16 (no AR to moderate AR), with stiffer LVs having lower values. To compensate for lost volume due to AR, the low, medium, and high LVDS models were found to require 5.1, 5.5, and 6.6 times more work, respectively. This work shows that the LVDS has a significant effect on the LV performance in the presence of AR. Therefore, the LVDS of potential TAVR patients should be assessed to gain an initial indication of their ability to tolerate post-procedural AR. PMID:27106040

  15. Survey and development of finite elements for nonlinear structural analysis. Volume 2: Nonlinear shell finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The development of two new shell finite elements for applications to large deflection problems is considered. The elements in question are doubly curved and of triangular and quadrilateral planform. They are restricted to small strains of elastic materials, and can accommodate large rotations. The elements described, which are based on relatively simple linear elements, make use of a new displacement function approach specifically designed for strongly nonlinear problems. The displacement function development for nonlinear applications is based on certain beam element formulations, and the strain-displacement equations are of a shallow shell type. Additional terms were included in these equations in an attempt to avoid the large errors characteristic of shallow shell elements in certain types of problems. An incremental nonlinear solution procedure specifically adopted to the element formulation was developed. The solution procedure is of combined incremental and total Lagrangian type, and uses a new updating scheme. A computer program was written to evaluate the developed formulations. This program can accommodate small element groups in arbitrary arrangements. Two simple programs were successfully solved. The results indicate that this new type of element has definite promise and should be a fruitful area for further research.

  16. Normal and shear strains of the left ventricle in healthy human subjects measured by two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Animal studies have shown that shear deformation of myocardial sheets in transmural planes of left ventricular (LV) wall is an important mechanism for systolic wall thickening, and normal and shear strains of the LV free wall differ from those of the interventricular septum (IVS). We sought to test whether these also hold for human hearts. Methods Thirty healthy volunteers (male 23 and female 7, aged 34 ± 6 years) from Outpatient Department of the University of Tokyo Hospital were included. Echocardiographic images were obtained in the left decubitus position using a commercially available system (Aloka SSD-6500, Japan) equipped with a 3.5-MHz transducer. The ECG was recorded simultaneously. The peak systolic radial normal strain (length change), shear strain (angle change) and time to peak systolic radial normal strain were obtained non-invasively by two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography. Results The peak systolic radial normal strain in both IVS and LV posterior wall (LVPW) showed a trend to increase progressively from the apical level to the basal level, especially at short axis views, and the peak systolic radial normal strain of LVPW was significantly greater than that of IVS at all three levels. The time to peak systolic radial normal strain was the shortest at the basal IVS, and increased progressively from the base to the apical IVS. It gradually increased from the apical to the basal LVPW in sequence, especially at short axis views. The peak of radial normal strain of LVPW occurred much later than the peak of IVS at all three levels. For IVS, the shear deformation was clockwise at basal level, and counterclockwise at mid and apical levels in LV long-axis view. For LVPW, the shear deformations were all counterclockwise in LV long-axis view and increased slightly from base to the apex. LVPW showed larger shear strains than IVS at all three levels. Bland-Altman analysis shows very good agreement between measurements taken by the

  17. Joint multi-object registration and segmentation of left and right cardiac ventricles in 4D cine MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, Jan; Kepp, Timo; Schmidt-Richberg, Alexander; Handels, Heinz

    2014-03-01

    The diagnosis of cardiac function based on cine MRI requires the segmentation of cardiac structures in the images, but the problem of automatic cardiac segmentation is still open, due to the imaging characteristics of cardiac MR images and the anatomical variability of the heart. In this paper, we present a variational framework for joint segmentation and registration of multiple structures of the heart. To enable the simultaneous segmentation and registration of multiple objects, a shape prior term is introduced into a region competition approach for multi-object level set segmentation. The proposed algorithm is applied for simultaneous segmentation of the myocardium as well as the left and right ventricular blood pool in short axis cine MRI images. Two experiments are performed: first, intra-patient 4D segmentation with a given initial segmentation for one time-point in a 4D sequence, and second, a multi-atlas segmentation strategy is applied to unseen patient data. Evaluation of segmentation accuracy is done by overlap coefficients and surface distances. An evaluation based on clinical 4D cine MRI images of 25 patients shows the benefit of the combined approach compared to sole registration and sole segmentation.

  18. Failing left ventricle to ascending aorta conduit-Hybrid implantation of a melody valve and NuMed covered stent.

    PubMed

    Gössl, Mario; Johnson, Jonathan N; Hagler, Donald J

    2014-04-01

    We present the case of a 36-year-old woman with increasing shortness of breath, a new 3/4 diastolic murmur, and a complex history of LV outflow tract obstruction. She has undergone multiple surgeries including the replacement of her old LV apex to ascending aorta conduit with a 20-mm Gore-Tex tube graft, addition of a 24-mm homograft sutured between the conduit and the LV apex, and insertion of a 21-mm Freestyle porcine valve conduit between the Gore-Tex tube graft and allograft at age 23. The current assessment showed a failing Freestyle conduit prosthesis leading to left heart decompensation. Due to substantial surgical risk, the patient underwent successful implantation of a Melody valve into the Gore-Tex tube and exclusion of the failing Freestyle bioprosthesis with a NuMed CP stent in a hybrid procedure. The case nicely illustrates the collaborative potential of cardiovascular surgeons and interventional cardiologists in the new arena of a hybrid operating room. Complex hybrid procedures like the current one, especially those including percutaneous placements of valves, offer therapeutic options for patients that are otherwise too high risk for conventional open heart surgery. PMID:23784974

  19. Quantitative Study of the Effect of Tissue Microstructure on Contraction in a Computational Model of Rat Left Ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Carapella, Valentina; Bordas, Rafel; Pathmanathan, Pras; Lohezic, Maelene; Schneider, Jurgen E.; Kohl, Peter; Burrage, Kevin; Grau, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Tissue microstructure, in particular the alignment of myocytes (fibre direction) and their lateral organisation into sheets, is fundamental to cardiac function. We studied the effect of microstructure on contraction in a computational model of rat left ventricular electromechanics. Different fibre models, globally rule-based or locally optimised to DT-MRI data, were compared, in order to understand whether a subject-specific fibre model would enhance the predictive power of our model with respect to the global ones. We also studied the impact of sheets on ventricular deformation by comparing: (a) a transversely isotropic versus an orthotropic material law and (b) a linear model with a bimodal model of sheet transmural variation. We estimated ejection fraction, wall thickening and base-to-apex shortening and compared them with measures from cine-MRI. We also evaluated Lagrangian strains as local metrics of cardiac deformation. Our results show that the subject-specific fibre model provides little improvement in the metric predictions with respect to global fibre models while material orthotropy allows closer agreement with measures than transverse isotropy. Nonetheless, the impact of sheets in our model is smaller than that of fibres. We conclude that further investigation of the modelling of sheet dynamics is necessary to fully understand the impact of tissue structure on cardiac deformation. PMID:24695115

  20. Biventricular Finite Element Modeling of the Acorn CorCap Cardiac Support Device on a Failing Heart

    PubMed Central

    Wenk, Jonathan F.; Ge, Liang; Zhang, Zhihong; Mojsejenko, Dimitri; Potter, D. Dean; Tseng, Elaine E.; Guccione, Julius M.; Ratcliffe, Mark B.

    2013-01-01

    Background The Acorn CorCap Cardiac Support Device (CSD; Acorn Cardiovascular Inc, St. Paul, MN) is a woven polyester jacket that is placed around the heart and designed to reverse the progressive remodeling associated with dilated cardiomyopathy. However, the effects of the Acorn CSD on myofiber stress and ventricular function remain unknown. We tested the hypothesis that the Acorn CSD reduces end-diastolic (ED) myofiber stress. Methods A previously described weakly coupled biventricular finite element (FE) model and circulatory model based on magnetic resonance images of a dog with dilated cardiomyopathy was used. Virtual applications of the CSD alone (Acorn), CSD with rotated fabric fiber orientation (rotated), CSD with 5% prestretch (tight), and CSD wrapped only around the left ventricle (LV; LV-only) were performed, and the effect on myofiber stress at ED and pump function was calculated. Results The Acorn CSD has a large effect on ED myofiber stress in the LV free wall, with reductions of 55%, 79%, 92%, and 40% in the Acorn, rotated, tight, and LV-only cases, respectively. However, there is a tradeoff in which the Acorn CSD reduces stroke volume at LV end-diastolic pressure of 8 mm Hg by 23%, 25%, 30%, and 7%, respectively, in the Acorn, rotated, tight, and LV-only cases. Conclusions The Acorn CSD significantly reduces ED myofiber stress. However, CSD wrapped only around the LV was the only case with minimal negative effect on pump function. Findings suggest that LV-only CSD and Acorn fabric orientation should be optimized to allow maximal myofiber stress reduction with minimal reduction in pump function. PMID:23643546

  1. Systolic Longitudinal Function of the Left Ventricle Assessed by Speckle Tracking in Heart Failure Patients with Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Toufan, Mehrnoush; Mohammadzadeh Gharebaghi, Saeed; Pourafkari, Leili; Delir Abdolahinia, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Background: Echocardiographic evaluations of the longitudinal axis of the left ventricular (LV) function have been used in the diagnosis and assessment of heart failure with normal ejection fraction (HFNEF). The evaluation of the global and segmental peak systolic longitudinal strains (PSLSs) by two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) may correlate with conventional echocardiography findings. We aimed to use STE to evaluate the longitudinal function of the LV in patients with HFNEF. Methods: In this study, 126 patients with HFNEF and diastolic dysfunction and 60 normal subjects on conventional echocardiography underwent STE evaluations, including LV end-diastolic and end-systolic dimensions; interventricular septal thickness; posterior wall thickness; LV volume; LV ejection fraction; left atrial volume index; early diastolic peak flow velocity (𝐸); late diastolic peak flow velocity (𝐴); 𝐸/𝐴 ratio; deceleration time of 𝐸; early diastolic myocardial velocity (e′); late diastolic myocardial velocity (A′); systolic myocardial velocity (S); and global, basal, mid, and apical PSLSs. The correlations between these methods were assessed. Results: The mean age was 57.50 ± 10.07 years in the HFNEF patients and 54.90 ± 7.17 years in the control group. The HFNEF group comprised 69.8% males and 30.2% females, and the normal group consisted of 70% males and 30% females. The global, basal, mid, and apical PSLSs were significantly lower in the HFNEF group (p value < 0.001 for all). There was a significant positive correlation between the global PSLS and the septal e' (p value < 0.001). There was a negative correlation between the global PSLS and the E/e' ratio (p value = 0.001). There was a significant negative correlation between the E/e' ratio and the mid PSLS (p value = 0.002) and the basal PSLS (p value = 0.001). There was a weak positive correlation between the septal e' and the mid PSLS (p value = 0.001) and the

  2. Evaluation of vortex flow in left ventricle by echo-dynamography and phase contrast magnetic resonance angiography.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Takanori; Kameyama, Takeyoshi; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Khmyrova, Elena; Kurokawa, Takafumi; Saijo, Yoshifumi

    2012-01-01

    Echo-dynamography (EDG) is a method for visualizing left ventricular (LV) blood flow based on cardiac Doppler measurement in which blood flow component perpendicular to the ultrasonic beam is deduced by applying fluid dynamics theories to two-dimensional (2D) distribution of blood flow component along the ultrasonic beam. EDG has been validated by numerical simulation and particle image velocimetry of model circulation. However, these validations were too simple to reproduce unstable and asymmetrical flow in a beating heart. In the present study, EDG is compared with three-directional (3D) blood flow distribution on the same plane obtained with phase contrast magnetic resonance angiography (PCMRA) for clinical validation. Moreover, the location and vorticity of the vortex flow in LV are measured quantitatively and the relation to echocardiographic parameters of systolic and diastolic functions is discussed. 3D components of blood flow on a plane were obtained with triple scans of the same plane with ECG trigger and breath holding; 1) phase encode (x-axis), 2) read out (y-axis) and 3) slice selection (z-axis). After the acquisition of MRA dataset, color Doppler dataset of the same plane was acquired and 2D velocity distribution was obtained with EDG in MATLAB programs. EDG and PCMRA showed similar velocity vector distribution and formation of LV vortex flow. The vortex at mid diastolic phase was strongly affected by early diastolic filling while the vortex at isometric contraction was affected by atrial filling. EDG gained a new insight on systolic-diastolic coupling from the view point of LV blood flow such as LV vortex formation. PMID:23366476

  3. Development, Validation and Parametric study of a 3-Year-Old Child Head Finite Element Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Shihai; Chen, Yue; Li, Haiyan; Ruan, ShiJie

    2015-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury caused by drop and traffic accidents is an important reason for children's death and disability. Recently, the computer finite element (FE) head model has been developed to investigate brain injury mechanism and biomechanical responses. Based on CT data of a healthy 3-year-old child head, the FE head model with detailed anatomical structure was developed. The deep brain structures such as white matter, gray matter, cerebral ventricle, hippocampus, were firstly created in this FE model. The FE model was validated by comparing the simulation results with that of cadaver experiments based on reconstructing the child and adult cadaver experiments. In addition, the effects of skull stiffness on the child head dynamic responses were further investigated. All the simulation results confirmed the good biofidelity of the FE model.

  4. Investigation of mouse conductance catheter position deviation effects on volume measurements by finite element models.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chia-Ling; Wu, Po-Yi

    2008-01-01

    The conductance catheter system is used to measure the instantaneous ventricular conductance, and real-time ventricular volumes is then determined by converting the measured conductance to volume. In fact, two different conductance-to-volume conversion equations for conductance catheters have been proposed, the Baan's classic equation and Wei's nonlinear equation. The accuracy of this volume estimation method is limited by several factors, such as the deviation of the catheter position inside the ventricle. The effects of the mouse catheter radial and longitudinal position deviations on the measured conductance are investigated with finite element models. Moreover, the capacities of the two conversion equations to calibrate the error induced by the catheter position variation are evaluated and compared. According to the simulation results, the error-calibrated capacity of the nonlinear conversion equation is better.

  5. Exponential convergence through linear finite element discretization of stratified subdomains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guddati, Murthy N.; Druskin, Vladimir; Vaziri Astaneh, Ali

    2016-10-01

    Motivated by problems where the response is needed at select localized regions in a large computational domain, we devise a novel finite element discretization that results in exponential convergence at pre-selected points. The key features of the discretization are (a) use of midpoint integration to evaluate the contribution matrices, and (b) an unconventional mapping of the mesh into complex space. Named complex-length finite element method (CFEM), the technique is linked to Padé approximants that provide exponential convergence of the Dirichlet-to-Neumann maps and thus the solution at specified points in the domain. Exponential convergence facilitates drastic reduction in the number of elements. This, combined with sparse computation associated with linear finite elements, results in significant reduction in the computational cost. The paper presents the basic ideas of the method as well as illustration of its effectiveness for a variety of problems involving Laplace, Helmholtz and elastodynamics equations.

  6. Dynamical observer for a flexible beam via finite element approximations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manitius, Andre; Xia, Hong-Xing

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this view-graph presentation is a computational investigation of the closed-loop output feedback control of a Euler-Bernoulli beam based on finite element approximation. The observer is part of the classical observer plus state feedback control, but it is finite-dimensional. In the theoretical work on the subject it is assumed (and sometimes proved) that increasing the number of finite elements will improve accuracy of the control. In applications, this may be difficult to achieve because of numerical problems. The main difficulty in computing the observer and simulating its work is the presence of high frequency eigenvalues in the finite-element model and poor numerical conditioning of some of the system matrices (e.g. poor observability properties) when the dimension of the approximating system increases. This work dealt with some of these difficulties.

  7. Finite element method for eigenvalue problems in electromagnetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. J.; Deshpande, Manohar D.; Cockrell, C. R.; Beck, Fred B.

    1994-01-01

    Finite element method (FEM) has been a very powerful tool to solve many complex problems in electromagnetics. The goal of the current research at the Langley Research Center is to develop a combined FEM/method of moments approach to three-dimensional scattering/radiation problem for objects with arbitrary shape and filled with complex materials. As a first step toward that goal, an exercise is taken to establish the power of FEM, through closed boundary problems. This paper demonstrates the developed of FEM tools for two- and three-dimensional eigenvalue problems in electromagnetics. In section 2, both the scalar and vector finite elements have been used for various waveguide problems to demonstrate the flexibility of FEM. In section 3, vector finite element method has been extended to three-dimensional eigenvalue problems.

  8. An Object Oriented, Finite Element Framework for Linear Wave Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Koning, Joseph M.

    2004-03-01

    This dissertation documents an object oriented framework which can be used to solve any linear wave equation. The linear wave equations are expressed in the differential forms language. This differential forms expression allows a strict discrete interpretation of the system. The framework is implemented using the Galerkin Finite Element Method to define the discrete differential forms and operators. Finite element basis functions including standard scalar Nodal and vector Nedelec basis functions are used to implement the discrete differential forms resulting in a mixed finite element system. Discretizations of scalar and vector wave equations in the time and frequency domains will be demonstrated in both differential forms and vector calculi. This framework conserves energy, maintains physical continuity, is valid on unstructured grids, conditionally stable and second order accurate. Examples including linear electrodynamics, acoustics, elasticity and magnetohydrodynamics are demonstrated.

  9. Finite elements and finite differences for transonic flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M. M.; Murman, E. M.; Wellford, L. C.

    1978-01-01

    The paper reviews the chief finite difference and finite element techniques used for numerical solution of nonlinear mixed elliptic-hyperbolic equations governing transonic flow. The forms of the governing equations for unsteady two-dimensional transonic flow considered are the Euler equation, the full potential equation in both conservative and nonconservative form, the transonic small-disturbance equation in both conservative and nonconservative form, and the hodograph equations for the small-disturbance case and the full-potential case. Finite difference methods considered include time-dependent methods, relaxation methods, semidirect methods, and hybrid methods. Finite element methods include finite element Lax-Wendroff schemes, implicit Galerkin method, mixed variational principles, dual iterative procedures, optimal control methods and least squares.

  10. Finite element methods for enhanced oil recovery Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.F.

    1985-02-01

    A general, finite element procedure for reservoir simulation is presented. This effort is directed toward improving the numerical behavior of standard upstream, or upwind, finite difference techniques, without significantly increasing the computational costs. Two methods from previous authors' work are modified and developed: upwind finite elements and the Petrov-Galerkin method. These techniques are applied in a one- and two-dimensional, surfactant/ polymer simulator. The paper sets forth the mathematical formulation and several details concerning the implementation. The results indicate that the PetrovGalerkin method does significantly reduce numericaldiffusion errors, while it retains the stability of the first-order, upwind methods. It is also relatively simple to implement. Both the upwind, and PetrovGalerkin, finite element methods demonstrate little sensitivity to grid orientation.

  11. User's Guide for ENSAERO_FE Parallel Finite Element Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldred, Lloyd B.; Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1999-01-01

    A high fidelity parallel static structural analysis capability is created and interfaced to the multidisciplinary analysis package ENSAERO-MPI of Ames Research Center. This new module replaces ENSAERO's lower fidelity simple finite element and modal modules. Full aircraft structures may be more accurately modeled using the new finite element capability. Parallel computation is performed by breaking the full structure into multiple substructures. This approach is conceptually similar to ENSAERO's multizonal fluid analysis capability. The new substructure code is used to solve the structural finite element equations for each substructure in parallel. NASTRANKOSMIC is utilized as a front end for this code. Its full library of elements can be used to create an accurate and realistic aircraft model. It is used to create the stiffness matrices for each substructure. The new parallel code then uses an iterative preconditioned conjugate gradient method to solve the global structural equations for the substructure boundary nodes.

  12. Adaptive finite-element ballooning analysis of bipolar ionized fields

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Hamouz, Z.M.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents an adaptive finite-element iterative method for the analysis of the ionized field around high-voltage bipolar direct-current (HVDC) transmission line conductors without resort to Deutsch`s assumption. A new iterative finite-element ballooning technique is proposed to solve Poisson`s equation wherein the commonly used artificial boundary around the transmission line conductors is simulated at infinity. Unlike all attempts reported in the literature for the solution of ionized field, the constancy of the conductors` surface field at the corona onset value is directly implemented in the finite-element formulation. In order to investigate the effectiveness of the proposed method, a laboratory model was built. It has been found that the calculated V-I characteristics and the ground-plane current density agreed well with those measured experimentally. The simplicity in computer programming in addition to the low number of iterations required to achieve convergence characterize this method of analysis.

  13. Electrical and Joule heating relationship investigation using Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thangaraju, S. K.; Munisamy, K. M.

    2015-09-01

    The finite element method is vastly used in material strength analysis. The nature of the finite element solver, which solves the Fourier equation of stress and strain analysis, made it possible to apply for conduction heat transfer Fourier Equation. Similarly the Current and voltage equation is also liner Fourier equation. The nature of the governing equation makes it possible to numerical investigate the electrical joule heating phenomena in electronic component. This paper highlights the Finite Element Method (FEM) application onto semiconductor interconnects to determine the specific contact resistance (SCR). Metal and semiconductor interconnects is used as model. The result confirms the possibility and validity of FEM utilization to investigate the Joule heating due electrical resistance.

  14. Design and finite element analysis of oval man way

    SciTech Connect

    Hari, Y.; Gryder, B.

    1996-12-01

    This paper presents the design of an oval man way in the side wall of a cylindrical pressure vessel. ASME Code Section 8 is used to obtain the design parameters of the oval man way, man way cover and bolts. The code calculations require some assumptions which may not be valid. A typical design example is taken. STAAD III finite element code with plate elements is used to model the oval man way, man way cover and bolts. The stresses calculated using ASME Code Section 8 and other analytical formulas for plate and shells are compared with the stresses obtained by Finite Element Modeling. This paper gives the designer of oval man way the ability to perform a finite element analysis and compare it with the analytical calculations and assumptions made. This gives added confidence to the designer as to the validity of his calculations and assumptions.

  15. Optimal mapping of irregular finite element domains to parallel processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, J.; Otto, S.; Salama, M.

    1987-01-01

    Mapping the solution domain of n-finite elements into N-subdomains that may be processed in parallel by N-processors is an optimal one if the subdomain decomposition results in a well-balanced workload distribution among the processors. The problem is discussed in the context of irregular finite element domains as an important aspect of the efficient utilization of the capabilities of emerging multiprocessor computers. Finding the optimal mapping is an intractable combinatorial optimization problem, for which a satisfactory approximate solution is obtained here by analogy to a method used in statistical mechanics for simulating the annealing process in solids. The simulated annealing analogy and algorithm are described, and numerical results are given for mapping an irregular two-dimensional finite element domain containing a singularity onto the Hypercube computer.

  16. A combined deep-learning and deformable-model approach to fully automatic segmentation of the left ventricle in cardiac MRI.

    PubMed

    Avendi, M R; Kheradvar, Arash; Jafarkhani, Hamid

    2016-05-01

    Segmentation of the left ventricle (LV) from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets is an essential step for calculation of clinical indices such as ventricular volume and ejection fraction. In this work, we employ deep learning algorithms combined with deformable models to develop and evaluate a fully automatic LV segmentation tool from short-axis cardiac MRI datasets. The method employs deep learning algorithms to learn the segmentation task from the ground true data. Convolutional networks are employed to automatically detect the LV chamber in MRI dataset. Stacked autoencoders are used to infer the LV shape. The inferred shape is incorporated into deformable models to improve the accuracy and robustness of the segmentation. We validated our method using 45 cardiac MR datasets from the MICCAI 2009 LV segmentation challenge and showed that it outperforms the state-of-the art methods. Excellent agreement with the ground truth was achieved. Validation metrics, percentage of good contours, Dice metric, average perpendicular distance and conformity, were computed as 96.69%, 0.94, 1.81 mm and 0.86, versus those of 79.2-95.62%, 0.87-0.9, 1.76-2.97 mm and 0.67-0.78, obtained by other methods, respectively. PMID:26917105

  17. A combined deep-learning and deformable-model approach to fully automatic segmentation of the left ventricle in cardiac MRI.

    PubMed

    Avendi, M R; Kheradvar, Arash; Jafarkhani, Hamid

    2016-05-01

    Segmentation of the left ventricle (LV) from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets is an essential step for calculation of clinical indices such as ventricular volume and ejection fraction. In this work, we employ deep learning algorithms combined with deformable models to develop and evaluate a fully automatic LV segmentation tool from short-axis cardiac MRI datasets. The method employs deep learning algorithms to learn the segmentation task from the ground true data. Convolutional networks are employed to automatically detect the LV chamber in MRI dataset. Stacked autoencoders are used to infer the LV shape. The inferred shape is incorporated into deformable models to improve the accuracy and robustness of the segmentation. We validated our method using 45 cardiac MR datasets from the MICCAI 2009 LV segmentation challenge and showed that it outperforms the state-of-the art methods. Excellent agreement with the ground truth was achieved. Validation metrics, percentage of good contours, Dice metric, average perpendicular distance and conformity, were computed as 96.69%, 0.94, 1.81 mm and 0.86, versus those of 79.2-95.62%, 0.87-0.9, 1.76-2.97 mm and 0.67-0.78, obtained by other methods, respectively.

  18. Deformation modes in the finite element absolute nodal coordinate formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Hiroyuki; Gerstmayr, Johannes; Shabana, Ahmed A.

    2006-12-01

    The objective of this study is to provide interpretation of the deformation modes in the finite element absolute nodal coordinate formulation using several strain definitions. In this finite element formulation, the nodal coordinates consist of absolute position coordinates and gradients that can be used to define a unique rotation and deformation fields within the element as well as at the nodal points. The results obtained in this study clearly show cross-section deformation modes eliminated when the number of the finite element nodal coordinates is systematically and consistently reduced. Using the procedure discussed in this paper one can obtain a reduced order dynamic model, eliminate position vector gradients that introduce high frequencies to the solution of some problems, achieve the continuity of the remaining gradients at the nodal points, and obtain a formulation that automatically satisfies the principle of work and energy. Furthermore, the resulting dynamic model, unlike large rotation finite element formulations, leads to a unique rotation field, and as a consequence, the obtained formulation does not suffer from the problem of coordinate redundancy that characterizes existing large deformation finite element formulations. In order to accurately define strain components that can have easy physical interpretation, a material coordinate system is introduced to define the material element rotation and deformation. Using the material coordinate system, the Timoshenko-Reissner and Euler -Bernoulli beam models can be systematically obtained as special cases of the absolute nodal coordinate formulation beam models. While a constraint approach is used in this study to eliminate the cross-section deformation modes, it is important to point out as mentioned in this paper that lower-order finite elements, some of which already presented in previous investigations, can be efficiently used in thin and stiff structure applications.

  19. Correlation of Scar in Cardiac MRI and High‐Resolution Contact Mapping of Left Ventricle in a Chronic Infarct Model

    PubMed Central

    THAJUDEEN, ANEES; STEWART, BRIAN; COKIC, IVAN; NAKAGAWA, HIROSHI; SHEHATA, MICHAEL; AMORN, ALLEN M.; KALI, AVINASH; LIU, EZH; HARLEV, DORON; BENNETT, NATHAN; DHARMAKUMAR, ROHAN; CHUGH, SUMEET S.; WANG, XUNZHANG

    2015-01-01

    Background Endocardial mapping for scars and abnormal electrograms forms the most essential component of ventricular tachycardia ablation. The utility of ultra‐high resolution mapping of ventricular scar was assessed using a multielectrode contact mapping system in a chronic canine infarct model. Methods Chronic infarcts were created in five anesthetized dogs by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery. Late gadolinium‐enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (LGE MRI) was obtained 4.9 ± 0.9 months after infarction, with three‐dimensional (3D) gadolinium enhancement signal intensity maps at 1‐mm and 5‐mm depths from the endocardium. Ultra‐high resolution electroanatomical maps were created using a novel mapping system (Rhythmia Mapping System, Rhythmia Medical/Boston Scientific, Marlborough, MA, USA) Rhythmia Medical, Boston Scientific, Marlborough, MA, USA with an 8.5F catheter with mini‐basket electrode array (64 tiny electrodes, 2.5‐mm spacing, center‐to‐center). Results The maps contained 7,754 ± 1,960 electrograms per animal with a mean resolution of 2.8 ± 0.6 mm. Low bipolar voltage (<2 mV) correlated closely with scar on the LGE MRI and the 3D signal intensity map (1‐mm depth). The scar areas between the MRI signal intensity map and electroanatomic map matched at 87.7% of sites. Bipolar and unipolar voltages, compared in 592 electrograms from four MRI‐defined scar types (endocardial scar, epicardial scar, mottled transmural scar, and dense transmural scar) as well as normal tissue, were significantly different. A unipolar voltage of <13 mV correlated with transmural extension of scar in MRI. Electrograms exhibiting isolated late potentials (ILPs) were manually annotated and ILP maps were created showing ILP location and timing. ILPs were identified in 203 ± 159 electrograms per dog (within low‐voltage areas) and ILP maps showed gradation in timing of ILPs at different locations in the scar. Conclusions Ultra

  20. Characterization and Quantification of Vortex Flow in the Human Left Ventricle by Contrast Echocardiography Using Vector Particle Image Velocimetry

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Geu-Ru; Pedrizzetti, Gianni; Tonti, Giovanni; Li, Peng; Wei, Zhao; Kim, Jin Kyung; Baweja, Abinav; Liu, Shizhen; Chung, Namsik; Houle, Helene; Narula, Jagat; Vannan, Mani A.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aims of this study were to: 1) assess the feasibility of left ventricular (LV) vortex flow analysis using contrast echocardiography (CE); and 2) characterize and quantify LV vortex flow in normal subjects and patients with LV systolic dysfunction. BACKGROUND Vortices that form during LV filling have specific geometry and anatomical locations that are critical determinants of directed blood flow during ejection. Therefore, it is clinically relevant to assess the vortex flow patterns to better understand the LV function. METHODS Twenty-five patients (10 normal and 15 patients with abnormal LV systolic function) underwent CE with intravenous contrast agent, Definity (Bristol-Myers Squibb Medical Imaging, Inc., North Billerica, Massachusetts). The velocity vector and vorticity were estimated by particle image velocimetry. Average vortex parameters including vortex depth, transverse position, length, width, and sphericity index were measured. Vortex pulsatility parameters including relative strength, vortex relative strength, and vortex pulsation correlation were also estimated. RESULTS Vortex depth and vortex length were significantly lower in the abnormal LV function group (0.443 ± 0.04 vs. 0.482 ± 0.06, p < 0.05; 0.366 ± 0.06 vs. 0.467 ± 0.05, p < 0.01, respectively). Vortex width was greater (0.209 ± 0.05 vs. 0.128 ± 0.06, p < 0.01) and sphericity index was lower (1.86 ± 0.5 vs. 3.66 ± 0.6, p < 0.001) in the abnormal LV function group. Relative strength (1.13 ± 0.4 vs. 2.10 ± 0.8, p < 0.001), vortex relative strength (0.57 ± 0.2 vs. 1.19 ± 0.5, p < 0.001), and vortex pulsation correlation (0.63 ± 0.2 vs. 1.31 ± 0.5, p < 0.001) were significantly lower in the abnormal LV function group. CONCLUSIONS It was feasible to quantify LV vorticity arrangement by CE using particle image velocimetry in normal subjects and those with LV systolic dysfunction, and the vorticity imaging by CE may serve as a novel approach to depict vortex, the principal

  1. Immediate regional endocardial surface expansion following coronary occlusion in the canine left ventricle: disproportionate effects of anterior versus inferior ischemia.

    PubMed

    Picard, M H; Wilkins, G T; Gillam, L D; Thomas, J D; Weyman, A E

    1991-03-01

    The exact time of onset of functional expansion after acute myocardial infarction/ischemia remains unclear in spite of its potential link to chronic pathologic infarct expansion and its potential implications for therapy. To examine this early change in ventricular morphology, 14 open-chest dogs were studied with two-dimensional echocardiography before and after occlusion (10 minutes) of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD, n = 7) or circumflex artery (CIRC, n = 7). The endocardial surface area (ESA) and the area of abnormal wall motion (AWM) were reconstructed from the echocardiographic data using a previously reported technique for quantitatively mapping the ESA and extent of AWM. For the total group (N = 14), the mean ESA before occlusion was 48.9 +/- 9.8 cm2, increasing to 65.7 +/- 18.9 cm2 at 10 minutes occlusion (p less than 0.001). For the LAD subgroup, the mean ESA before occlusion was 50.7 +/- 9.3 cm2, increasing to 79.1 +/- 14.1 cm2 at 10 minutes following occlusion (p less than 0.001). For the CIRC subgroup, the mean ESA before occlusion was 47.1 +/- 10.8 cm2, increasing to 52.3 +/- 12.6 cm2 at 10 minutes after occlusion (p less than 0.001). The ESA increase for the LAD subgroup was significantly larger than that of the CIRC subgroup (LAD range 14.5 to 49.9 cm2 versus CIRC range 1.5 to 9 cm2, p less than 0.0001). Coronary occlusion resulted in similarly sized regions of AWM for both subgroups (LAD, 31.3 +/- 12.2 cm2 versus CIRC, 25.9 +/- 10.3 cm2, p = n.s.). For the LAD group, the largest increase in endocardial circumference occurred within the zone of AWM at the apex (39.9 +/- 12%). The endocardial surface area therefore expands immediately after coronary occlusion and the magnitude of this process is primarily related to the site (anteroapical) rather than to the extent of AWM. PMID:2000741

  2. Bone marrow mononuclear cells induce beneficial remodeling and reduce diastolic dysfunction in the left ventricle of hypertensive SS/MCWi rats.

    PubMed

    Parker, Sarah J; Didier, Daniela N; Karcher, Jamie R; Stodola, Timothy J; Endres, Bradley; Greene, Andrew S

    2012-10-01

    Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) increase capillary density and reduce fibrosis in rodents after myocardial infarction, resulting in an overall improvement in left ventricular function. Little is known about the effectiveness of BMMNC therapy in hypertensive heart disease. In the current study, we show that delivery of BMMNCs from hypertension protected SS-13(BN)/MCWi donor rats, but not BMMNC from hypertension susceptible SS/MCWi donor rats, resulted in 57.2 and 83.4% reductions in perivascular and interstitial fibrosis, respectively, as well as a 60% increase in capillary-to-myocyte count in the left ventricles (LV) of hypertensive SS/MCWi recipients. These histological changes were associated with improvements in LV compliance and relaxation (103 and 46.4% improvements, respectively). Furthermore, improved diastolic function in hypertensive SS/MCWi rats receiving SS-13(BN)/MCWi derived BMMNCs was associated with lower clinical indicators of heart failure, including reductions in end diastolic pressure (65%) and serum brain natriuretic peptide levels (49.9%) with no improvements observed in rats receiving SS/MCWi BMMNCs. SS/MCWi rats had a lower percentage of endothelial progenitor cells in their bone marrow relative to SS-13(BN)/MCWi rats. These results suggest that administration of BMMNCs can prevent or reverse pathological remodeling in hypertensive heart disease, which contributes to ameliorating diastolic dysfunction and associated symptomology. Furthermore, the health and hypertension susceptibility of the BMMNC donor are important factors influencing therapeutic efficacy, possibly via differences in the cellular composition of bone marrow.

  3. Finite element methods for nonlinear elastostatic problems in rubber elasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.; Becker, E. B.; Miller, T. H.; Endo, T.; Pires, E. B.

    1983-01-01

    A number of finite element methods for the analysis of nonlinear problems in rubber elasticity are outlined. Several different finite element schemes are discussed. These include the augmented Lagrangian method, continuation or incremental loading methods, and associated Riks-type methods which have the capability of incorporating limit point behavior and bifurcations. Algorithms for the analysis of limit point behavior and bifurcations are described and the results of several numerical experiments are presented. In addition, a brief survey of some recent work on modelling contact and friction in elasticity problems is given. These results pertain to the use of new nonlocal and nonlinear friction laws.

  4. Substructure System Identification for Finite Element Model Updating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roy R., Jr.; Blades, Eric L.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted under a NASA grant on the topic 'Substructure System Identification for Finite Element Model Updating.' The research concerns ongoing development of the Substructure System Identification Algorithm (SSID Algorithm), a system identification algorithm that can be used to obtain mathematical models of substructures, like Space Shuttle payloads. In the present study, particular attention was given to the following topics: making the algorithm robust to noisy test data, extending the algorithm to accept experimental FRF data that covers a broad frequency bandwidth, and developing a test analytical model (TAM) for use in relating test data to reduced-order finite element models.

  5. Adaptive multiscale model reduction with Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Eric; Efendiev, Yalchin; Hou, Thomas Y.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we discuss a general multiscale model reduction framework based on multiscale finite element methods. We give a brief overview of related multiscale methods. Due to page limitations, the overview focuses on a few related methods and is not intended to be comprehensive. We present a general adaptive multiscale model reduction framework, the Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Method. Besides the method's basic outline, we discuss some important ingredients needed for the method's success. We also discuss several applications. The proposed method allows performing local model reduction in the presence of high contrast and no scale separation.

  6. Adaptive grid finite element model of the tokamak scrapeoff layer

    SciTech Connect

    Kuprat, A.P.; Glasser, A.H.

    1995-07-01

    The authors discuss unstructured grids for application to transport in the tokamak edge SOL. They have developed a new metric with which to judge element elongation and resolution requirements. Using this method, the authors apply a standard moving finite element technique to advance the SOL equations while inserting/deleting dynamically nodes that violate an elongation criterion. In a tokamak plasma, this method achieves a more uniform accuracy, and results in highly stretched triangular finite elements, except near separatrix X-point where transport is more isotropic.

  7. Correlation of composite material test results with finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guƫu, M.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper are presented some aspects regarding the method of simulation of composite materials testing with finite element analysis software. There were simulated tensile and shear tests of specimens manufactured from glass fiber reinforced polyester. For specimens manufacturing two types of fabrics were used: unidirectional and bidirectional. Experimentally determined elastic properties of composite material were used as input data. Modeling of composite architecture of the specimens was performed with ANSYS Composite PrepPost software. Finite element analysis stresses and strains on strain gauges bonding area were considered and compared with the real values in a diagram. After results comparison, potential causes of deviations were identified.

  8. A weak Galerkin generalized multiscale finite element method

    DOE PAGES

    Mu, Lin; Wang, Junping; Ye, Xiu

    2016-03-31

    In this study, we propose a general framework for weak Galerkin generalized multiscale (WG-GMS) finite element method for the elliptic problems with rapidly oscillating or high contrast coefficients. This general WG-GMS method features in high order accuracy on general meshes and can work with multiscale basis derived by different numerical schemes. A special case is studied under this WG-GMS framework in which the multiscale basis functions are obtained by solving local problem with the weak Galerkin finite element method. Convergence analysis and numerical experiments are obtained for the special case.

  9. Fourier analysis of finite element preconditioned collocation schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deville, Michel O.; Mund, Ernest H.

    1990-01-01

    The spectrum of the iteration operator of some finite element preconditioned Fourier collocation schemes is investigated. The first part of the paper analyses one-dimensional elliptic and hyperbolic model problems and the advection-diffusion equation. Analytical expressions of the eigenvalues are obtained with use of symbolic computation. The second part of the paper considers the set of one-dimensional differential equations resulting from Fourier analysis (in the tranverse direction) of the 2-D Stokes problem. All results agree with previous conclusions on the numerical efficiency of finite element preconditioning schemes.

  10. Experimentally validated finite element model of electrocaloric multilayer ceramic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, N. A. S. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk Correia, T. M. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk; Rokosz, M. K. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk

    2014-07-28

    A novel finite element model to simulate the electrocaloric response of a multilayer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) under real environment and operational conditions has been developed. The two-dimensional transient conductive heat transfer model presented includes the electrocaloric effect as a source term, as well as accounting for radiative and convective effects. The model has been validated with experimental data obtained from the direct imaging of MLCC transient temperature variation under application of an electric field. The good agreement between simulated and experimental data, suggests that the novel experimental direct measurement methodology and the finite element model could be used to support the design of optimised electrocaloric units and operating conditions.

  11. Development of non-linear finite element computer code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, E. B.; Miller, T.

    1985-01-01

    Recent work has shown that the use of separable symmetric functions of the principal stretches can adequately describe the response of certain propellant materials and, further, that a data reduction scheme gives a convenient way of obtaining the values of the functions from experimental data. Based on representation of the energy, a computational scheme was developed that allows finite element analysis of boundary value problems of arbitrary shape and loading. The computational procedure was implemental in a three-dimensional finite element code, TEXLESP-S, which is documented herein.

  12. Finite element models of the space shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    Finite element models were developed as input to dynamic simulations of the high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP), the high pressure oxidizer turbopump (HPOTP), and the space shuttle main engine (SSME). Descriptions are provided for the five basic finite element models: HPFTP rotor, HPFTP case, HPOTP rotor, HPOTP case, and SSME (excluding turbopumps). Modal results are presented for the HPFTP rotor, HPFTP case, HPOTP rotor, coupled HPFTP rotor and case, HPOTP case, coupled HPOTP rotor and case, SSME (excluding turbopumps), and SSME (including turbopumps). Results for the SSME (including turbopumps) model are compared to data from a SSME HPOTP modal survey.

  13. Diffusive mesh relaxation in ALE finite element numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dube, E.I.

    1996-06-01

    The theory for a diffusive mesh relaxation algorithm is developed for use in three-dimensional Arbitary Lagrange/Eulerian (ALE) finite element simulation techniques. This mesh relaxer is derived by a variational principle for an unstructured 3D grid using finite elements, and incorporates hourglass controls in the numerical implementation. The diffusive coefficients are based on the geometric properties of the existing mesh, and are chosen so as to allow for a smooth grid that retains the general shape of the original mesh. The diffusive mesh relaxation algorithm is then applied to an ALE code system, and results from several test cases are discussed.

  14. Discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods for gradient plasticity.

    SciTech Connect

    Garikipati, Krishna.; Ostien, Jakob T.

    2010-10-01

    In this report we apply discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods to the equations of an incompatibility based formulation of gradient plasticity. The presentation is motivated with a brief overview of the description of dislocations within a crystal lattice. A tensor representing a measure of the incompatibility with the lattice is used in the formulation of a gradient plasticity model. This model is cast in a variational formulation, and discontinuous Galerkin machinery is employed to implement the formulation into a finite element code. Finally numerical examples of the model are shown.

  15. Finite element analysis of two disk rotor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Harsh Kumar

    2016-05-01

    A finite element model of simple horizontal rotor system is developed for evaluating its dynamic behaviour. The model is based on Timoshenko beam element and accounts for the effect of gyroscopic couple and other rotational forces. Present rotor system consists of single shaft which is supported by bearings at both ends and two disks are mounted at different locations. The natural frequencies, mode shapes and orbits of rotating system for a specific range of rotation speed are obtained by developing a MATLAB code for solving the finite element equations of rotary system. Consequently, Campbell diagram is plotted for finding a relationship between natural whirl frequencies and rotation of the rotor.

  16. Robust Hybrid Finite Element Methods for Antennas and Microwave Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, J.; Volakis, John L.

    1996-01-01

    One of the primary goals in this dissertation is concerned with the development of robust hybrid finite element-boundary integral (FE-BI) techniques for modeling and design of conformal antennas of arbitrary shape. Both the finite element and integral equation methods will be first overviewed in this chapter with an emphasis on recently developed hybrid FE-BI methodologies for antennas, microwave and millimeter wave applications. The structure of the dissertation is then outlined. We conclude the chapter with discussions of certain fundamental concepts and methods in electromagnetics, which are important to this study.

  17. Finite element microscopic stress analysis of cracked composite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    This paper considers the stress concentration problems of two types of cracked composite systems: (1) a composite system with a broken fiber (a penny-shaped crack problem), and (2) a composite system with a cracked matrix (an annular crack problem). The cracked composite systems are modeled with triangular and trapezoidal ring finite elements. Using NASTRAN (NASA Structural Analysis) finite element computer program, the stress and deformation fields in the cracked composite systems are calculated. The effect of fiber-matrix material combination on the stress concentrations and on the crack opening displacements is studied.

  18. Preconditioned CG-solvers and finite element grids

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, R.; Selberherr, S.

    1994-12-31

    To extract parasitic capacitances in wiring structures of integrated circuits the authors developed the two- and three-dimensional finite element program SCAP (Smart Capacitance Analysis Program). The program computes the task of the electrostatic field from a solution of Poisson`s equation via finite elements and calculates the energies from which the capacitance matrix is extracted. The unknown potential vector, which has for three-dimensional applications 5000-50000 unknowns, is computed by a ICCG solver. Currently three- and six-node triangular, four- and ten-node tetrahedronal elements are supported.

  19. An alternative Laplacian electrostatic field finite element formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, P.F.; Lauber, T.S.

    1987-01-01

    An alternative finite element method for calculating three-dimensional electrostatic fields is described. The matrix equation is assembled using linear tetrahedral elements and an electrical network solution techniques known as impedance matrix building with axis discarding. The solutions of sample problems are described.

  20. Implicit extrapolation methods for multilevel finite element computations

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, M.; Ruede, U.

    1994-12-31

    The finite element package FEMGP has been developed to solve elliptic and parabolic problems arising in the computation of magnetic and thermomechanical fields. FEMGP implements various methods for the construction of hierarchical finite element meshes, a variety of efficient multilevel solvers, including multigrid and preconditioned conjugate gradient iterations, as well as pre- and post-processing software. Within FEMGP, multigrid {tau}-extrapolation can be employed to improve the finite element solution iteratively to higher order. This algorithm is based on an implicit extrapolation, so that the algorithm differs from a regular multigrid algorithm only by a slightly modified computation of the residuals on the finest mesh. Another advantage of this technique is, that in contrast to explicit extrapolation methods, it does not rely on the existence of global error expansions, and therefore neither requires uniform meshes nor global regularity assumptions. In the paper the authors will analyse the {tau}-extrapolation algorithm and present experimental results in the context of the FEMGP package. Furthermore, the {tau}-extrapolation results will be compared to higher order finite element solutions.

  1. Finite element forced vibration analysis of rotating cyclic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elchuri, V.; Smith, G. C. C.

    1981-01-01

    A capability was added to the general purpose finite element program NASTRAN Level 17.7 to conduct forced vibration analysis of tuned cyclic structures rotating about their axes of symmetry. The effects of Coriolis and centripetal accelerations together with those due to linear acceleration of the axis of rotation were included. The theoretical development of this capability is presented.

  2. Modal Substructuring of Geometrically Nonlinear Finite-Element Models

    DOE PAGES

    Kuether, Robert J.; Allen, Matthew S.; Hollkamp, Joseph J.

    2016-02-01

    The efficiency of a modal substructuring method depends on the component modes used to reduce each subcomponent model. Methods such as Craig–Bampton have been used extensively to reduce linear finite-element models with thousands or even millions of degrees of freedom down orders of magnitude while maintaining acceptable accuracy. A novel reduction method is proposed here for geometrically nonlinear finite-element models using the fixed-interface and constraint modes of the linearized system to reduce each subcomponent model. The geometric nonlinearity requires an additional cubic and quadratic polynomial function in the modal equations, and the nonlinear stiffness coefficients are determined by applying amore » series of static loads and using the finite-element code to compute the response. The geometrically nonlinear, reduced modal equations for each subcomponent are then coupled by satisfying compatibility and force equilibrium. This modal substructuring approach is an extension of the Craig–Bampton method and is readily applied to geometrically nonlinear models built directly within commercial finite-element packages. The efficiency of this new approach is demonstrated on two example problems: one that couples two geometrically nonlinear beams at a shared rotational degree of freedom, and another that couples an axial spring element to the axial degree of freedom of a geometrically nonlinear beam. The nonlinear normal modes of the assembled models are compared with those of a truth model to assess the accuracy of the novel modal substructuring approach.« less

  3. Grid generation for two-dimensional finite element flowfield computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatum, K. E.

    1980-01-01

    The finite element method for fluid dynamics was used to develop a two dimensional mesh generation scheme. The method consists of shearing and conformal maps with upper and lower surfaces handled independently to allow sharp leading edges. The method also generates meshes of triangular or quadrilateral elements.

  4. Finite Element Model Development and Validation for Aircraft Fuselage Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, Ralph D.; Fleming, Gary A.; Pappa, Richard S.; Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    2000-01-01

    The ability to extend the valid frequency range for finite element based structural dynamic predictions using detailed models of the structural components and attachment interfaces is examined for several stiffened aircraft fuselage structures. This extended dynamic prediction capability is needed for the integration of mid-frequency noise control technology. Beam, plate and solid element models of the stiffener components are evaluated. Attachment models between the stiffener and panel skin range from a line along the rivets of the physical structure to a constraint over the entire contact surface. The finite element models are validated using experimental modal analysis results. The increased frequency range results in a corresponding increase in the number of modes, modal density and spatial resolution requirements. In this study, conventional modal tests using accelerometers are complemented with Scanning Laser Doppler Velocimetry and Electro-Optic Holography measurements to further resolve the spatial response characteristics. Whenever possible, component and subassembly modal tests are used to validate the finite element models at lower levels of assembly. Normal mode predictions for different finite element representations of components and assemblies are compared with experimental results to assess the most accurate techniques for modeling aircraft fuselage type structures.

  5. Spanwise variation of potential form drag. [finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clever, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    The finite element method is used to calculate the spanwise variation of potential form drag of a wing at subsonic and supersonic speeds using linearly varying panels. The wing may be of arbitrary planform and nonplanar provided the wing panels are parallel to the aircraft axis.

  6. Experiences in interfacing NASTRAN with another finite element program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwerzler, D. D.; Leverenz, R. K.

    1972-01-01

    The coupling of NASTRAN to another finite element program developed for the static analysis of automotive structures is discussed. The two programs were coupled together to use the substructuring capability of the in-house program and the normal mode analysis capability of NASTRAN. Modifications were made to the NASTRAN program in order to make the coupling feasible.

  7. Finite-element analysis of end-notch flexure specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Kochhar, N. K.

    1986-01-01

    A finite-element analysis of the end-notch flexure specimen for Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness measurement was conducted. The effects of friction between the crack faces and large deflection on the evaluation of G(IIc) from this specimen were investigated. Results of this study are presented in this paper.

  8. Finite element analysis of end notch flexure specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Kochhar, N. K.

    1986-01-01

    A finite element analysis of the end notch flexure specimen for mode II interlaminar fracture toughness measurement was conducted. The effect of friction between the crack faces and large deflection on the evaluation of G sub IIc from this specimen were investigated. Results of this study are presented in this paper.

  9. SUPG Finite Element Simulations of Compressible Flows for Aerothermodynamic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Benjamin S.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Streamline-Upwind Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) Finite Element Simulation. It covers the background, governing equations, weak formulation, shock capturing, inviscid flux discretization, time discretization, linearization, and implicit solution strategies. It also reviews some applications such as Type IV Shock Interaction, Forward-Facing Cavity and AEDC Sharp Double Cone.

  10. Boundary control of parabolic systems - Finite-element approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasiecka, I.

    1980-01-01

    The finite element approximation of a Dirichlet type boundary control problem for parabolic systems is considered. An approach based on the direct approximation of an input-output semigroup formula is applied. Error estimates are derived for optimal state and optimal control, and it is noted that these estimates are actually optimal with respect to the approximation theoretic properties.

  11. Finite Element Studies Of Tangent Mounted Conical Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoneking, J.; Casstevens, J.; Stillman, D.

    1982-12-01

    This paper presents experimental and analytical results from a study investigating the effect of centrifugal force and gravity on two candidate mirror fixture designs to be used on a diamond-turning ma-chine. The authors illustrate and discuss the use of the finite element method as an aid in the design and fabrication of high precision metallic optical components.

  12. A finite element approach for prediction of aerothermal loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.; Vemaganti, G.

    1986-01-01

    A Taylor-Galerkin finite element approach is presented for analysis of high speed viscous flows with an emphasis on predicting heating rates. Five computational issues relevant to the computation of steady flows are examined. Numerical results for supersonic and hypersonic problems address the computational issues and demonstrate the validity for the approach for analysis of high speed flows.

  13. Finite-Element Analysis of Multiphase Immiscible Flow Through Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuppusamy, T.; Sheng, J.; Parker, J. C.; Lenhard, R. J.

    1987-04-01

    A finite-element model is developed for multiphase flow through soil involving three immiscible fluids: namely, air, water, and a nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL). A variational method is employed for the finite-element formulation corresponding to the coupled differential equations governing flow in a three-fluid phase porous medium system with constant air phase pressure. Constitutive relationships for fluid conductivities and saturations as functions of fluid pressures, which are derived in a companion paper by J. C. Parker et al. (this issue) and which may be calibrated from two-phase laboratory measurements, are employed in the finite-element program. The solution procedure uses backward time integration with iteration by a modified Picard method to handle the nonlinear properties. Laboratory experiments involving water displacement from soil columns by p cymene (a benzene-derivative hydrocarbon) under constant pressure were simulated by the finite-element program to validate the numerical model and formulation for constitutive properties. Transient water outflow predicted using independently measured saturation-capillary head data agreed with observed outflow data within the limits of precision of the predictions as estimated by a first-order Taylor series approximation considering parameter uncertainty due to experimental reproducability and constitutive model accuracy. Two-dimensional simulations are presented for a hypothetical field case involving introduction of NAPL near the soil surface due to leakage from an underground storage tank. Subsequent transport of NAPL in the variably saturated vadose and groundwater zones is analyzed.

  14. [Quantitative Evaluation of Intracardiac Blood Flow by Left Ventricle Dynamic Anatovy Based On Exact Solutions of Non-Stationary Navier-Stocks Equations for Selforganized tornado-Like Flows of Viscous Incompresssible Fluid].

    PubMed

    Talygin, E A; Zazybo, N A; Zhorzholiany, S T; Krestinich, I M; Mironov, A A; Kiknadze, G I; Bokerya, L A; Gorodkov, A Y; Makarenko, V N; Alexandrova, S A

    2016-01-01

    New approach to intracardiac blood flow condition analysis based on geometric parameters of left ventricle flow channel has been suggested. Parameters, that used in this method, follow from exact solutions of nonstationary Navier-Stocks equations for selforganized tornado-like flows of viscous incompressible fluid. The main advantage of this method is considering dynamic anatomy of intracardiac cavity and trabeculae relief of left ventricle streamlined surface, both registered in a common mri-process, as flow condition indicator. Calculated quantity options that characterizes blood flow condition can be use as diagnostic criterias for estimation of violation in blood circulation function which entails heart ejection reduction. Developed approach allows to clarify heart jet organization mechanism and estimate the share of the tornado-like flow self-organization in heart ejection structure. PMID:27149823

  15. [Quantitative Evaluation of Intracardiac Blood Flow by Left Ventricle Dynamic Anatovy Based On Exact Solutions of Non-Stationary Navier-Stocks Equations for Selforganized tornado-Like Flows of Viscous Incompresssible Fluid].

    PubMed

    Talygin, E A; Zazybo, N A; Zhorzholiany, S T; Krestinich, I M; Mironov, A A; Kiknadze, G I; Bokerya, L A; Gorodkov, A Y; Makarenko, V N; Alexandrova, S A

    2016-01-01

    New approach to intracardiac blood flow condition analysis based on geometric parameters of left ventricle flow channel has been suggested. Parameters, that used in this method, follow from exact solutions of nonstationary Navier-Stocks equations for selforganized tornado-like flows of viscous incompressible fluid. The main advantage of this method is considering dynamic anatomy of intracardiac cavity and trabeculae relief of left ventricle streamlined surface, both registered in a common mri-process, as flow condition indicator. Calculated quantity options that characterizes blood flow condition can be use as diagnostic criterias for estimation of violation in blood circulation function which entails heart ejection reduction. Developed approach allows to clarify heart jet organization mechanism and estimate the share of the tornado-like flow self-organization in heart ejection structure.

  16. Swimming training attenuates the morphological reorganization of the myocardium and local inflammation in the left ventricle of growing rats with untreated experimental diabetes.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Edson; Natali, Antônio José; da Silva, Márcia Ferreira; Gomes, Gilton de Jesus; da Cunha, Daise Nunes Queiroz; Toledo, Marileila Marques; Drummond, Filipe Rios; Ramos, Regiane Maria Soares; Dos Santos, Eliziária Cardoso; Novaes, Rômulo Dias; de Oliveira, Leandro Licursi; Maldonado, Izabel Regina dos Santos Costa

    2016-04-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is associated with cardiac remodeling, myocardial dysfunction, low-grade inflammation, and reduced cardiac adiponectin in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Alternatively, physical exercise is an important strategy for the management of diabetes. This study aimed to investigate the influence of low-intensity swimming training in cardiac cytokines, structural remodeling, and cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction in growing rats with untreated experimental DM. Thirty-day-old male Wistar rats were divided into four groups (n=14, per group): sedentary control (SC), exercised control (EC), sedentary diabetic (SD), and exercised diabetic (ED). Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (60 mg kg(-1), i.p.). Animals from exercised groups swam (5 days/week, 90 min/day, loading up to 5% body weight around the animal's chest) for 8 weeks. The left ventricle (LV) was removed for molecular, morphological, and cardiomyocyte mechanical analysis. Diabetic animals presented cardiac remodeling with myocardial histoarchitectural disorganization, fibrosis, and necrosis. The capillary density was lower in diabetic animals. LV cardiomyocytes from diabetic animals exhibited more prolonged time to the peak of contraction and time to half relaxation than those from control animals. The cardiac levels of interleukin 10, nitric oxide, and total and high molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin were significantly decreased in diabetic animals. Exercise training reduced the level of TNF-α, increased capillary density, and attenuated the histopathological parameters assessed in diabetic rats. In conclusion, the cardiac structural remodeling coexists with reduced levels of total and HMW adiponectin, inflammation, and cardiomyocyte contractility dysfunction in experimental DM. More important, low-intensity swimming training attenuates part of these pathological changes, indicating the beneficial role for exercise in untreated T1DM. PMID:26896925

  17. Automatic 3D motion estimation of left ventricle from C-arm rotational angiocardiography using a prior motion model and learning based boundary detector.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingqing; Zheng, Yefeng; Wang, Yang; Mueller, Kerstin; Lauritsch, Guenter

    2013-01-01

    Compared to pre-operative imaging modalities, it is more convenient to estimate the current cardiac physiological status from C-arm angiocardiography since C-arm is a widely used intra-operative imaging modality to guide many cardiac interventions. The 3D shape and motion of the left ventricle (LV) estimated from rotational angiocardiography provide important cardiac function measurements, e.g., ejection fraction and myocardium motion dyssynchrony. However, automatic estimation of the 3D LV motion is difficult since all anatomical structures overlap on the 2D X-ray projections and the nearby confounding strong image boundaries (e.g., pericardium) often cause ambiguities to LV endocardium boundary detection. In this paper, a new framework is proposed to overcome the aforementioned difficulties: (1) A new learning-based boundary detector is developed by training a boosting boundary classifier combined with the principal component analysis of a local image patch; (2) The prior LV motion model is learned from a set of dynamic cardiac computed tomography (CT) sequences to provide a good initial estimate of the 3D LV shape of different cardiac phases; (3) The 3D motion trajectory is learned for each mesh point; (4) All these components are integrated into a multi-surface graph optimization method to extract the globally coherent motion. The method is tested on seven patient scans, showing significant improvement on the ambiguous boundary cases with a detection accuracy of 2.87 +/- 1.00 mm on LV endocardium boundary delineation in the 2D projections.

  18. Ablation of the CLP-1 gene leads to down-regulation of the HAND1 gene and abnormality of the left ventricle of the heart and fetal death.

    PubMed

    Huang, Facan; Wagner, Michael; Siddiqui, M A Q

    2004-06-01

    We have recently reported that cardiac lineage protein-1 (CLP-1), a nuclear protein with an acidic region that constitutes a potential protein-protein interaction domain, regulates transcription of the cardiac myosin light chain-2v (MLC-2v) gene promoter in a manner consistent with its being a transcriptional co-activator or regulator. To test the postulate that CLP-1 is a regulator of cardiac genes we ablated the CLP-1 gene in mice. Past embryonic day (E)16.5, CLP-1 null alleles did not show Mendelian inheritance suggesting that absence of CLP-1 was lethal in late fetal stages. CLP-1 (-/-) fetal hearts exhibited a reduced left ventricular chamber with thickened myocardial walls, features suggestive of cardiac hypertrophy. Electron microscopic analysis of E16.5 CLP-1 (-/-) ventricular myocardium showed a marked decline in cell density and altered nuclear and myofibril morphologies similar to that seen in animal models of hypertrophic heart. Analysis of contractile and non-contractile protein genes known to be re-expressed during cardiac hypertrophy showed them to have higher expression levels in CLP-1 (-/-) hearts thereby confirming the hypertrophic phenotype at the molecular level. Analysis of cardiac development genes showed that expression of the HAND1 transcription factor, a gene involved in patterning of the heart tube and down-regulated in hypertrophic hearts, was also significantly reduced in CLP-1 (-/-) fetal hearts. CLP-1 and HAND1 have similar expression patterns in the developing heart ventricles. These data suggest that CLP-1 and the HAND transcription factors may be part of a genetic program critical to proper heart development, perturbation of which can lead to cardiomyopathy.

  19. Automatic 3D motion estimation of left ventricle from C-arm rotational angiocardiography using a prior motion model and learning based boundary detector.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingqing; Zheng, Yefeng; Wang, Yang; Mueller, Kerstin; Lauritsch, Guenter

    2013-01-01

    Compared to pre-operative imaging modalities, it is more convenient to estimate the current cardiac physiological status from C-arm angiocardiography since C-arm is a widely used intra-operative imaging modality to guide many cardiac interventions. The 3D shape and motion of the left ventricle (LV) estimated from rotational angiocardiography provide important cardiac function measurements, e.g., ejection fraction and myocardium motion dyssynchrony. However, automatic estimation of the 3D LV motion is difficult since all anatomical structures overlap on the 2D X-ray projections and the nearby confounding strong image boundaries (e.g., pericardium) often cause ambiguities to LV endocardium boundary detection. In this paper, a new framework is proposed to overcome the aforementioned difficulties: (1) A new learning-based boundary detector is developed by training a boosting boundary classifier combined with the principal component analysis of a local image patch; (2) The prior LV motion model is learned from a set of dynamic cardiac computed tomography (CT) sequences to provide a good initial estimate of the 3D LV shape of different cardiac phases; (3) The 3D motion trajectory is learned for each mesh point; (4) All these components are integrated into a multi-surface graph optimization method to extract the globally coherent motion. The method is tested on seven patient scans, showing significant improvement on the ambiguous boundary cases with a detection accuracy of 2.87 +/- 1.00 mm on LV endocardium boundary delineation in the 2D projections. PMID:24505748

  20. Exercise training in athletes with bicuspid aortic valve does not result in increased dimensions and impaired performance of the left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Stefani, Laura; Galanti, Giorgio; Innocenti, Gabriele; Mercuri, Roberto; Maffulli, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Background. Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is one of the most common congenital heart disease (0.9%-2%) and is frequently found in the athletes and in the general population. BAV can lead to aortic valve dysfunction and to a progressive aortic dilatation. Trained BAV athletes exhibit a progressive enlargement of the left ventricle (LV) compared to athletes with normal aortic valve morphology. The present study investigates the possible relationship between different aortic valve morphology and LV dimensions. Methods. In the period from 2000 to 2011, we investigated a total of 292 BAV subjects, divided into three different groups (210 athletes, 59 sedentaries, and 23 ex-athletes). A 2D echocardiogram exam to classify BAV morphology and measure the standard LV systo-diastolic parameters was performed. The study was conducted as a 5-year follow-up echocardiographic longitudinal and as cross-sectional study. Results. Typical BAV was more frequent in all three groups (68% athletes, 67% sedentaries, and 63% ex-athletes) than atypical. In BAV athletes, the typical form was found in 51% (107/210) of soccer players, 10% (21/210) of basketball players, 10% track and field athletics (20/210), 8% (17/210) of cyclists, 6% (13/210) swimmers, and 15% (32/210) of rugby players and others sport. Despite a progressive enlargement of the LV (P < 0.001) observed during the follow-up study, no statistical differences of the LV morphology and function were evident among the diverse BAV patterns either in sedentary subjects or in athletes. Conclusion. In a large population of trained BAV athletes, with different prevalence of typical and atypical BAV type, there is a progressive nonstatistically significant enlargement of the LV. In any case, the dimensions of the LV remained within normal range. The metabolic requirements of the diverse sport examined in the present investigations do not seem to produce any negative impact in BAV athletes.

  1. Motion analysis study on sensitivity of finite element model of the cervical spine to geometry.

    PubMed

    Zafarparandeh, Iman; Erbulut, Deniz U; Ozer, Ali F

    2016-07-01

    Numerous finite element models of the cervical spine have been proposed, with exact geometry or with symmetric approximation in the geometry. However, few researches have investigated the sensitivity of predicted motion responses to the geometry of the cervical spine. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of symmetric assumption on the predicted motion by finite element model of the cervical spine. We developed two finite element models of the cervical spine C2-C7. One model was based on the exact geometry of the cervical spine (asymmetric model), whereas the other was symmetric (symmetric model) about the mid-sagittal plane. The predicted range of motion of both models-main and coupled motions-was compared with published experimental data for all motion planes under a full range of loads. The maximum differences between the asymmetric model and symmetric model predictions for the principal motion were 31%, 78%, and 126% for flexion-extension, right-left lateral bending, and right-left axial rotation, respectively. For flexion-extension and lateral bending, the minimum difference was 0%, whereas it was 2% for axial rotation. The maximum coupled motions predicted by the symmetric model were 1.5° axial rotation and 3.6° lateral bending, under applied lateral bending and axial rotation, respectively. Those coupled motions predicted by the asymmetric model were 1.6° axial rotation and 4° lateral bending, under applied lateral bending and axial rotation, respectively. In general, the predicted motion response of the cervical spine by the symmetric model was in the acceptable range and nonlinearity of the moment-rotation curve for the cervical spine was properly predicted.

  2. In vivo porcine left atrial wall stress: Computational model.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Elena S; Bellini, Chiara; Schwartzman, David S

    2011-10-13

    Most computational models of the heart have so far concentrated on the study of the left ventricle, mainly using simplified geometries. The same approach cannot be adopted to model the left atrium, whose irregular shape does not allow morphological simplifications. In addition, the deformation of the left atrium during the cardiac cycle strongly depends on the interaction with its surrounding structures. We present a procedure to generate a comprehensive computational model of the left atrium, including physiological loads (blood pressure), boundary conditions (pericardium, pulmonary veins and mitral valve annulus movement) and mechanical properties based on planar biaxial experiments. The model was able to accurately reproduce the in vivo dynamics of the left atrium during the passive portion of the cardiac cycle. A shift in time between the peak pressure and the maximum displacement of the mitral valve annulus allows the appendage to inflate and bend towards the ventricle before the pulling effect associated with the ventricle contraction takes place. The ventricular systole creates room for further expansion of the appendage, which gets in close contact with the pericardium. The temporal evolution of the volume in the atrial cavity as predicted by the finite element simulation matches the volume changes obtained from CT scans. The stress field computed at each time point shows remarkable spatial heterogeneity. In particular, high stress concentration occurs along the appendage rim and in the region surrounding the pulmonary veins. PMID:21907340

  3. Dosimetric Comparison of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Plans, With or Without Anterior Myocardial Territory and Left Ventricle as Organs at Risk, in Early-Stage Left-Sided Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Wenyong; Wang Xiaohong; Qiu Dasheng; Liu Dong; Jia Shaohui; Zeng Fanyu; Chen Zhengwang; Li Beihui; Xu Jiaozhen; Wei Lai; Hu Desheng

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: We evaluated heart sparing using an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan with the left ventricle (LV) and/or the anterior myocardial territory (AMT) as additional organs at risk (OARs). Methods and Materials: A total of 10 patients with left-sided breast cancer were selected for dosimetric planning. Both lungs, the right breast, heart, LV, and AMT were defined as OARs. We generated one tangential field plan and four IMRT plans for each patient. We examined the dose-volume histogram parameters of the planning target volume and OARs. Results: Compared with the tangential field plan, the mean dose to the heart in the IMRT plans did not show significant differences; however, the dose to the AMT and LV decreased by 18.7-45.4% and 10.8-37.4%, respectively. The maximal dose to the heart decreased by 18.6-35.3%, to the AMT by 22.0-45.1%, and to the LV by 23.5-45.0%, And the relative volumes of the heart (V{sub {>=}12}), AMT (V{sub >11}) and LV (V{sub >10}) decreased significantly with different levels, respectively. The volume of the heart, AMT, LV, both lungs, and right breast receiving {>=}5 Gy showed a significant increase. Compared with the IMRT (H) plan, the mean dose to the heart, AMT, and LV decreased by 17.5-21.5%, 25.2-29.8%, and 22.8-29.8% and the maximal dose by 13.6-20.6%, 23.1-29.6%, and 17.3-29.1%, respectively. The IMRT plans for both lungs and the right breast showed no significant differences. Conclusions: The IMRT plans with the addition of the AMT and/or LV as OARs considerably increased heart sparing. We recommend including the LV as an additional OAR in such plans.

  4. Finite element dynamic analysis on CDC STAR-100 computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Lambiotte, J. J., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Computational algorithms are presented for the finite element dynamic analysis of structures on the CDC STAR-100 computer. The spatial behavior is described using higher-order finite elements. The temporal behavior is approximated by using either the central difference explicit scheme or Newmark's implicit scheme. In each case the analysis is broken up into a number of basic macro-operations. Discussion is focused on the organization of the computation and the mode of storage of different arrays to take advantage of the STAR pipeline capability. The potential of the proposed algorithms is discussed and CPU times are given for performing the different macro-operations for a shell modeled by higher order composite shallow shell elements having 80 degrees of freedom.

  5. Structural health monitoring system design using finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stinemates, D. W.; Bennett, J. G.

    2002-01-01

    The project described in this report was performed to couple experimental and analytical techniques in the field of structural health monitoring and damage identification. To do this, a finite element model was constructed of a simulated three-story building used for damage identification experiments. The model was used in conjunction with data from the physical structure to research damage identification algorithms. Of particular interest was modeling slip in joints as a function of bolt torque and predicting the smallest change of torque that could be detected experimentally. After being validated with results from the physical structure, the model was used to produce data to test the capabilities of damage identification algorithms. This report describes the finite element model constructed, the results obtained, and proposed future use of the model.

  6. A fast hidden line algorithm for plotting finite element models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G. K.

    1982-01-01

    Effective plotting of finite element models requires the use of fast hidden line plot techniques that provide interactive response. A high speed hidden line technique was developed to facilitate the plotting of NASTRAN finite element models. Based on testing using 14 different models, the new hidden line algorithm (JONES-D) appears to be very fast: its speed equals that for normal (all lines visible) plotting and when compared to other existing methods it appears to be substantially faster. It also appears to be very reliable: no plot errors were observed using the new method to plot NASTRAN models. The new algorithm was made part of the NPLOT NASTRAN plot package and was used by structural analysts for normal production tasks.

  7. Finite element thermo-viscoplastic analysis of aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, Ajay K.; Dechaumphai, Pramote; Thornton, Earl A.

    1990-01-01

    The time-dependent thermo-viscoplastic response of aerospace structures subjected to intense aerothermal loads is predicted using the finite-element method. The finite-element analysis uses the Bodner-Partom unified viscoplastic constitutive relations to determine rate-dependent nonlinear material behavior. The methodology is verified by comparison with experimental data and other numerical results for a uniaxially-loaded bar. The method is then used (1) to predict the structural response of a rectangular plate subjected to line heating along a centerline, and (2) to predict the thermal-structural response of a convectively-cooled engine cowl leading edge subjected to aerodynamic shock-shock interference heating. Compared to linear elastic analysis, the viscoplastic analysis results in lower peak stresses and regions of plastic deformations.

  8. PWSCC Assessment by Using Extended Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung-Jun; Lee, Sang-Hwan; Chang, Yoon-Suk

    2015-12-01

    The head penetration nozzle of control rod driving mechanism (CRDM) is known to be susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) due to the welding-induced residual stress. Especially, the J-groove dissimilar metal weld regions have received many attentions in the previous studies. However, even though several advanced techniques such as weight function and finite element alternating methods have been introduced to predict the occurrence of PWSCC, there are still difficulties in respect of applicability and efficiency. In this study, the extended finite element method (XFEM), which allows convenient crack element modeling by enriching degree of freedom (DOF) with special displacement function, was employed to evaluate structural integrity of the CRDM head penetration nozzle. The resulting stress intensity factors of surface cracks were verified for the reliability of proposed method through the comparison with those suggested in the American Society of Mechanical Engineering (ASME) code. The detailed results from the FE analyses are fully discussed in the manuscript.

  9. Least-squares finite element methods for compressible Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Carey, G. F.

    1990-01-01

    A method based on backward finite differencing in time and a least-squares finite element scheme for first-order systems of partial differential equations in space is applied to the Euler equations for gas dynamics. The scheme minimizes the L-sq-norm of the residual within each time step. The method naturally generates numerical dissipation proportional to the time step size. An implicit method employing linear elements has been implemented and proves robust. For high-order elements, computed solutions based on the L-sq method may have oscillations for calculations at similar time step sizes. To overcome this difficulty, a scheme which minimizes the weighted H1-norm of the residual is proposed and leads to a successful scheme with high-degree elements. Finally, a conservative least-squares finite element method is also developed. Numerical results for two-dimensional problems are given to demonstrate the shock resolution of the methods and compare different approaches.

  10. Finite element model of magnetoconvection of a ferrofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Suzanne M.; Cader, Tahir; Finlayson, Bruce A.

    2003-06-01

    Combined natural and magnetic convective heat transfer through a ferrofluid in a cubic enclosure is simulated numerically. The momentum equation includes a magnetic term that arises when a magnetic fluid is in the presence of a magnetic field gradient and a temperature gradient. In order to validate the theory, the wall temperature isotherms and Nusselt numbers are compared to experimental work of Sawada et al. (Int. J. Appl. Electromagn. Mater. 4 (1994) 329). Results are obtained using standard computational fluid dynamics codes, with modifications to account for the Langevin factor when needed. The CFD code FIDAP uses the finite element method, sometimes with a user-defined subroutine. The CFD code FEMLAB uses the finite element method with a user-supplied body force.

  11. Parallel, adaptive finite element methods for conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Devine, Karen D.; Flaherty, Joseph E.

    1994-01-01

    We construct parallel finite element methods for the solution of hyperbolic conservation laws in one and two dimensions. Spatial discretization is performed by a discontinuous Galerkin finite element method using a basis of piecewise Legendre polynomials. Temporal discretization utilizes a Runge-Kutta method. Dissipative fluxes and projection limiting prevent oscillations near solution discontinuities. A posteriori estimates of spatial errors are obtained by a p-refinement technique using superconvergence at Radau points. The resulting method is of high order and may be parallelized efficiently on MIMD computers. We compare results using different limiting schemes and demonstrate parallel efficiency through computations on an NCUBE/2 hypercube. We also present results using adaptive h- and p-refinement to reduce the computational cost of the method.

  12. Weak Hamiltonian finite element method for optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Bless, Robert R.

    1991-01-01

    A temporal finite element method based on a mixed form of the Hamiltonian weak principle is developed for dynamics and optimal control problems. The mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle contains both displacements and momenta as primary variables that are expanded in terms of nodal values and simple polynomial shape functions. Unlike other forms of Hamilton's principle, however, time derivatives of the momenta and displacements do not appear therein; instead, only the virtual momenta and virtual displacements are differentiated with respect to time. Based on the duality that is observed to exist between the mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle and variational principles governing classical optimal control problems, a temporal finite element formulation of the latter can be developed in a rather straightforward manner. Several well-known problems in dynamics and optimal control are illustrated. The example dynamics problem involves a time-marching problem. As optimal control examples, elementary trajectory optimization problems are treated.

  13. A weak Hamiltonian finite element method for optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Bless, Robert R.

    1990-01-01

    A temporal finite element method based on a mixed form of the Hamiltonian weak principle is developed for dynamics and optimal control problems. The mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle contains both displacements and momenta as primary variables that are expanded in terms of nodal values and simple polynomial shape functions. Unlike other forms of Hamilton's principle, however, time derivatives of the momenta and displacements do not appear therein; instead, only the virtual momenta and virtual displacements are differentiated with respect to time. Based on the duality that is observed to exist between the mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle and variational principles governing classical optimal control problems, a temporal finite element formulation of the latter can be developed in a rather straightforward manner. Several well-known problems in dynamics and optimal control are illustrated. The example dynamics problem involves a time-marching problem. As optimal control examples, elementary trajectory optimization problems are treated.

  14. A weak Hamiltonian finite element method for optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Bless, Robert R.

    1989-01-01

    A temporal finite element method based on a mixed form of the Hamiltonian weak principle is developed for dynamics and optimal control problems. The mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle contains both displacements and momenta as primary variables that are expanded in terms of nodal values and simple polynomial shape functions. Unlike other forms of Hamilton's principle, however, time derivatives of the momenta and displacements do not appear therein; instead, only the virtual momenta and virtual displacements are differentiated with respect to time. Based on the duality that is observed to exist between the mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle and variational principles governing classical optimal control problems, a temporal finite element formulation of the latter can be developed in a rather straightforward manner. Several well-known problems in dynamics and optimal control are illustrated. The example dynamics problem involves a time-marching problem. As optimal control examples, elementary trajectory optimization problems are treated.

  15. Application of Mass Lumped Higher Order Finite Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Strauss, H. R.; Jardin, S. C.; Park, W.; Sugiyama, L. E.; G. Fu; Breslau, J.

    2005-11-01

    There are many interesting phenomena in extended-MHD such as anisotropic transport, mhd, 2-fluid effects stellarator and hot particles. Any one of them challenges numerical analysts, and researchers are seeking for higher order methods, such as higher order finite difference, higher order finite elements and hp/spectral elements. It is true that these methods give more accurate solution than their linear counterparts. However, numerically they are prohibitively expensive. Here we give a successful solution of this conflict by applying mass lumped higher order finite elements. This type of elements not only keep second/third order accuracy but also scale closely to linear elements by doing mass lumping. This is especially true for second order lump elements. Full M3D and anisotropic transport models are studied.

  16. Finite element solution of transient fluid-structure interaction problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everstine, Gordon C.; Cheng, Raymond S.; Hambric, Stephen A.

    1991-01-01

    A finite element approach using NASTRAN is developed for solving time-dependent fluid-structure interaction problems, with emphasis on the transient scattering of acoustic waves from submerged elastic structures. Finite elements are used for modeling both structure and fluid domains to facilitate the graphical display of the wave motion through both media. For the liquid, the use of velocity potential as the fundamental unknown results in a symmetric matrix equation. The approach is illustrated for the problem of transient scattering from a submerged elastic spherical shell subjected to an incident tone burst. The use of an analogy between the equations of elasticity and the wave equation of acoustics, a necessary ingredient to the procedure, is summarized.

  17. The strain-based beam finite elements in multibody dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gams, M.; Planinc, I.; Saje, M.

    2007-08-01

    We present a strain-based finite-element formulation for the dynamic analysis of flexible elastic planar multibody systems, composed of planar beams. We consider finite displacements, rotations and strains. The discrete dynamic equations of motion are obtained by the collocation method. The strains are the basic interpolated variables, which makes the formulation different from other formulations. The further speciality of the formulation is the strong satisfaction of the cross-sectional constitutive conditions at collocation points. In order to avoid the nested integrations, a special algorithm for the numerical integration over the length of the finite element is proposed. The midpoint scheme is used for the time integration. The performance of the formulation is illustrated via numerical examples, including a stiff multibody system.

  18. Sensitive analysis of a finite element model of orthogonal cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocail, J.; Watremez, M.; Dubar, L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional finite element model of orthogonal cutting. The proposed model has been developed with Abaqus/explicit software. An Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) formulation is used to predict chip formation, temperature, chip-tool contact length, chip thickness, and cutting forces. This numerical model of orthogonal cutting will be validated by comparing these process variables to experimental and numerical results obtained by Filice et al. [1]. This model can be considered to be reliable enough to make qualitative analysis of entry parameters related to cutting process and frictional models. A sensitivity analysis is conducted on the main entry parameters (coefficients of the Johnson-Cook law, and contact parameters) with the finite element model. This analysis is performed with two levels for each factor. The sensitivity analysis realised with the numerical model on the entry parameters has allowed the identification of significant parameters and the margin identification of parameters.

  19. Derivation of a Tappered p-Version Beam Finite Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinnant, Howard E.

    1989-01-01

    A tapered p-version beam finite element suitable for dynamic applications is derived. The taper in the element is represented by allowing the area moments of inertia to vary as quartic polynomials along the length of the beam, and the cross-sectional area to vary as a quadratic polynomial. The p-version finite-element characteristics are implemented through a set of polynomial shape functions. The lower-order shape functions are identical to the classical cubic and linear shape functions normally associated with a beam element. The higher-order shape functions are a hierarchical set of polynomials that are integrals of orthogonal polynomials. Explicit expressions for the mass and stiffness matrices are presented for an arbitrary value of p. The element has been verified to be numerically stable using shape functions through 22nd order.

  20. Finite Element Modelling of Fluid Coupling in the Coiled Cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Guangjian; Elliott, S. J.; Lineton, B.; Saba, R.

    2011-11-01

    A finite element model is first used to calculate the modal pressure difference for a box model of the cochlea, which shows that the number of fluid elements across the width of the cochlea determines the accuracy with which the near field, or short wavenumber, component of the fluid coupling is reproduced. Then results are compared with the analytic results to validate the accuracy of the FE model. It is, however, the far field, or long wavelength, component of the fluid coupling that is most affected by the geometry. A finite element model of the coiled cochlea is then used to calculate fluid coupling in this case, which has similar characteristics to the uncoiled model.

  1. A finite element model of ferroelectric/ferroelastic polycrystals

    SciTech Connect

    HWANG,STEPHEN C.; MCMEEKING,ROBERT M.

    2000-02-17

    A finite element model of polarization switching in a polycrystalline ferroelectric/ferroelastic ceramic is developed. It is assumed that a crystallite switches if the reduction in potential energy of the polycrystal exceeds a critical energy barrier per unit volume of switching material. Each crystallite is represented by a finite element with the possible dipole directions assigned randomly subject to crystallographic constraints. The model accounts for both electric field induced (i.e. ferroelectric) switching and stress induced (i.e. ferroelastic) switching with piezoelectric interactions. Experimentally measured elastic, dielectric, and piezoelectric constants are used consistently, but different effective critical energy barriers are selected phenomenologically. Electric displacement versus electric field, strain versus electric field, stress versus strain, and stress versus electric displacement loops of a ceramic lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) are modeled well below the Curie temperature.

  2. Finite element modelling of the 1969 Portuguese tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guesmia, M.; Heinrich, Ph.; Mariotti, C.

    1996-03-01

    On the 28 th February 1969, the coasts of Portugal, Spain and Morocco were affected by water waves generated by a submarine earthquake (Ms=7.3) with epicenter located off Portugal. The propagation of this tsunami has been simulated by a finite element numerical model solving the Boussinesq equations. These equations have been discretized using the finite element Galerkin method and a Crank-Nicholson scheme in time. The 2-D simulation of the 1969 tsunami is carried out using the hydraulic source calculated from the geophysical model of Okada and seismic parameters of Fukao. The modeled waves are compared with the recorded waves with respect to the travel times, the maximum amplitudes, the periods of the signal. Good agreement is found for most of the studied gauges. The comparison between Boussinesq and shallow-water models shows that the effects of frequency dispersion are minor using Fukao's seismic parameters.

  3. Finite element calculation of residual stress in dental restorative material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto

    2012-07-01

    A finite element methodology for residual stresses calculation in dental restorative materials is proposed. The material under concern is a multifunctional methacrylate-based composite for dental restorations, activated by visible light. Reaction kinetics, curing shrinkage, and viscoelastic relaxation functions were required as input data on a structural finite element solver. Post cure effects were considered in order to quantify the residual stresses coming out from natural contraction with respect to those debited to the chemical shrinkage. The analysis showed for a given test case that residual stresses frozen in the dental restoration at uniform temperature of 37°C are of the same order of magnitude of the strength of the dental composite material per se.

  4. Exemplifying Quantum Systems in a Finite Element Basis

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Toby D.

    2009-08-13

    This paper presents a description of the abstractions required for the expression and solution of the linear single-particle Schroedinger equation in a finite element basis. This paper consists of two disparate themes: First, to layout and establish the foundations of finite element analysis as an approximate numerical solution to extendable quantum mechanical systems; and second, to promote a high-performance open-source computational model for the approximate numerical solution to quantum mechanical systems. The structural foundation of the one-and two-dimensional time-independent Schroedinger equation describing an infinite potential well is explored and a brief overview of the hierarchal design of the computational library written in C++ is given.

  5. An emulator for minimizing computer resources for finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, R.; Utku, S.; Islam, M.; Salama, M.

    1984-01-01

    A computer code, SCOPE, has been developed for predicting the computer resources required for a given analysis code, computer hardware, and structural problem. The cost of running the code is a small fraction (about 3 percent) of the cost of performing the actual analysis. However, its accuracy in predicting the CPU and I/O resources depends intrinsically on the accuracy of calibration data that must be developed once for the computer hardware and the finite element analysis code of interest. Testing of the SCOPE code on the AMDAHL 470 V/8 computer and the ELAS finite element analysis program indicated small I/O errors (3.2 percent), larger CPU errors (17.8 percent), and negligible total errors (1.5 percent).

  6. An emulator for minimizing finite element analysis implementation resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, R. J.; Utku, S.; Salama, M.; Islam, M.

    1982-01-01

    A finite element analysis emulator providing a basis for efficiently establishing an optimum computer implementation strategy when many calculations are involved is described. The SCOPE emulator determines computer resources required as a function of the structural model, structural load-deflection equation characteristics, the storage allocation plan, and computer hardware capabilities. Thereby, it provides data for trading analysis implementation options to arrive at a best strategy. The models contained in SCOPE lead to micro-operation computer counts of each finite element operation as well as overall computer resource cost estimates. Application of SCOPE to the Memphis-Arkansas bridge analysis provides measures of the accuracy of resource assessments. Data indicate that predictions are within 17.3 percent for calculation times and within 3.2 percent for peripheral storage resources for the ELAS code.

  7. A finite element analysis of fatigue crack closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Experiments have shown that fatigue cracks close at positive loads during constant-amplitude load cycling. The crack-closure phenomenon is caused by residual plastic deformations remaining in the wake of an advancing crack tip. The present paper is concerned with the application of a two-dimensional, nonlinear, finite-element analysis for predicting crack-closure and crack-opening stresses during cyclic loading. A two-dimensional finite-element computer program, which accounts for both elastic-plastic material behavior and changing boundary conditions associated with crack extension and intermittent contact of the crack surfaces under cyclic loading, has been developed. An efficient technique to account for changing boundary conditions was also incorporated into the nonlinear analysis program. This program was subsequently used to study crack extension and crack closure under constant-amplitude and two-level block loading. The calculated crack-closure and crack-opening stresses were qualitatively consistent with experimental observations.

  8. Finite element analyses of two antirotational designs of implant fixtures.

    PubMed

    Akour, Salih N; Fayyad, Mohammed A; Nayfeh, Jamal F

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of cyclic compressive forces on loosening of the abutment retaining screw of dental implant fixtures with two different antirotational designs using the finite element analysis. A three-dimensional model of externally hexed and trichannel dental implant fixtures with their corresponding abutments and retaining screws was developed. Comparison between the two designs was carried out using finite element analysis. The results revealed that the externally hexed design has significantly higher overall stress, contact stress, and deflection compared with the trichannel design. The trichannel antirotational design has the least potential for fracture of the implant/abutment assembly in addition to its capability for preventing rotation of the prosthesis and loosening of the screw.

  9. Spectral finite-element methods for parametric constrained optimization problems.

    SciTech Connect

    Anitescu, M.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2009-01-01

    We present a method to approximate the solution mapping of parametric constrained optimization problems. The approximation, which is of the spectral finite element type, is represented as a linear combination of orthogonal polynomials. Its coefficients are determined by solving an appropriate finite-dimensional constrained optimization problem. We show that, under certain conditions, the latter problem is solvable because it is feasible for a sufficiently large degree of the polynomial approximation and has an objective function with bounded level sets. In addition, the solutions of the finite-dimensional problems converge for an increasing degree of the polynomials considered, provided that the solutions exhibit a sufficiently large and uniform degree of smoothness. Our approach solves, in the case of optimization problems with uncertain parameters, the most computationally intensive part of stochastic finite-element approaches. We demonstrate that our framework is applicable to parametric eigenvalue problems.

  10. Finite Element Analysis Applied to Dentoalveolar Trauma: Methodology Description

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, B. R.; Moreira Neto, J. J. S.; da Silva, F. I.; de Aguiar, A. S. W.

    2011-01-01

    Dentoalveolar traumatic injuries are among the clinical conditions most frequently treated in dental practice. However, few studies so far have addressed the biomechanical aspects of these events, probably as a result of difficulties in carrying out satisfactory experimental and clinical studies as well as the unavailability of truly scientific methodologies. The aim of this paper was to describe the use of finite element analysis applied to the biomechanical evaluation of dentoalveolar trauma. For didactic purposes, the methodological process was divided into steps that go from the creation of a geometric model to the evaluation of final results, always with a focus on methodological characteristics, advantages, and disadvantages, so as to allow the reader to customize the methodology according to specific needs. Our description shows that the finite element method can faithfully reproduce dentoalveolar trauma, provided the methodology is closely followed and thoroughly evaluated. PMID:21991463

  11. A finite element model for residual stress in repair welds

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Z.; Wang, X.L.; Spooner, S.; Goodwin, G.M.; Maziasz, P.J.; Hubbard, C.R.; Zacharia, T.

    1996-03-28

    This paper describes a three-dimensional finite element model for calculation of the residual stress distribution caused by repair welding. Special user subroutines were developed to simulate the continuous deposition of filler metal during welding. The model was then tested by simulating the residual stress/strain field of a FeAl weld overlay clad on a 2{1/4}Cr-1 Mo steel plate, for which neutron diffraction measurement data of the residual strain field were available. It is shown that the calculated residual stress distribution was consistent with that determined with neutron diffraction. High tensile residual stresses in both the longitudinal and transverse directions were observed around the weld toe at the end of the weld. The strong spatial dependency of the residual stresses in the region around the weld demonstrates that the common two-dimensional cross-section finite element models should not be used for repair welding analysis.

  12. Tube Bulge Process : Theoretical Analysis And Finite Element Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Velasco, Raphaeel; Boudeau, Nathalie

    2007-04-07

    This paper is focused on the determination of mechanics characteristics for tubular materials, using tube bulge process. A comparative study is made between two different models: theoretical model and finite element analysis. The theoretical model is completely developed, based first on a geometrical analysis of the tube profile during bulging, which is assumed to strain in arc of circles. Strain and stress analysis complete the theoretical model, which allows to evaluate tube thickness and state of stress, at any point of the free bulge region. Free bulging of a 304L stainless steel is simulated using Ls-Dyna 970. To validate FE simulations approach, a comparison between theoretical and finite elements models is led on several parameters such as: thickness variation at the free bulge region pole with bulge height, tube thickness variation with z axial coordinate, and von Mises stress variation with plastic strain.

  13. EXODUS: A finite element file format for pre- and postprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Mills-Curran, W.C.; Gilkey, A.P.; Flanagan, D.P.

    1988-09-01

    The EXODUS format defines a binary file which is used for finite element analysis pre- and postprocessing. It includes data to define the finite element mesh and label both boundary condition and load application points. EXODUS accommodates multiple element types and is sufficiently general format for analysis results. A benefit of combining the mesh definition data and the results data in the same file is that the user is assured that the results data are consistent with the model. EXODUS is currently in use by the entire range of Department 1520 codes (including preprocessors, translators, linear and nonlinear analyses, and postprocessors) and is finding applications in codes outside Department 1520. 2 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Finite element modeling of an electrically variable inductor

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, Y.; Jiles, D.C.

    1999-09-01

    A new type of electrically variable inductor has been investigated. This uses an ac excitation field with an orthogonal dc bias field to control the properties of the device. Measurements showed that the effective inductance can be decreased by increasing the orthogonal dc bias field. With an appropriate current in the orthogonal bias coils, an inductance plateau can be reached in which the inductance remains stable over a range of excitation currents. The inductance value can be adjusted by controlling the orthogonal current. Based on an existing anhysteretic magnetization model, nonlinear 3D finite element modeling was successfully used to model the distribution of flux density and to identify the region of saturation which is believed to result in the decrease in effective inductance of the inductor. The effective inductance of the device was also modeled using numerical finite element calculations. The modeled inductance showed broad agreement with experimental results and predicted the observed trend in inductance.

  15. Finite Element Modeling of Micromachined MEMS Photon Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Datskos, P.G.; Evans, B.M.; Schonberger, D.

    1999-09-20

    The technology of microelectronics that has evolved over the past half century is one of great power and sophistication and can now be extended to many applications (MEMS and MOEMS) other than electronics. An interesting application of MEMS quantum devices is the detection of electromagnetic radiation. The operation principle of MEMS quantum devices is based on the photoinduced stress in semiconductors, and the photon detection results from the measurement of the photoinduced bending. These devices can be described as micromechanical photon detectors. In this work, we have developed a technique for simulating electronic stresses using finite element analysis. We have used our technique to model the response of micromechanical photon devices to external stimuli and compared these results with experimental data. Material properties, geometry, and bimaterial design play an important role in the performance of micromechanical photon detectors. We have modeled these effects using finite element analysis and included the effects of bimaterial thickness coating, effective length of the device, width, and thickness.

  16. Transient finite element method using edge elements for moving conductor

    SciTech Connect

    Tani, Koji; Nishio, Takayuki; Yamada, Takashi ); Kawase, Yoshihiro . Dept. of Information Science)

    1999-05-01

    For the next generation of high speed railway systems and automobiles new braking systems are currently under development. These braking systems take into account the eddy currents, which are produced by the movement of the conductor in the magnetic field. For their optimum design, it is necessary to know the distribution of eddy currents in the moving conductor. The finite element method (FEM) is often used to simulate them. Here, transient finite element method using edge elements for moving conductor is presented. Here the magnetic vector potential is interpolated at the upwind position and the time derivative term is discretized by the backward difference method. As a result, the system matrix becomes symmetric and the ICCG method is applicable to solve the matrix. This method is used to solve an eddy current rail brake system. The results demonstrate that this approach is suitable to solve transient problems involving movement.

  17. A finite-element analysis of bipolar ionized field

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Salam, M.; Al-Hamouz, Z.

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes a new iterative method for the analysis of the bipolar ionized field in HVDC transmission lines without resorting to Deutsch`s assumption. The finite-element technique (FET) is used to solve Poisson`s equation where the constancy of the conductors` surface field at the corona inception value is directly implemented in the finite-element formulation. The proposed method has been tested on laboratory and full-scale models. The calculated V-I characteristics agreed well with those calculated and measured previously. The dependence of the corona current as well as its monopolar and bipolar components on the conductor height is discussed. The simplicity in computer programming in addition to the low number of iterations required to achieve convergence characterize the proposed method of analysis.

  18. Design Optimization of Coronary Stent Based on Finite Element Models

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Tianshuang; Zhu, Bao; Wu, Jinying

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an effective optimization method using the Kriging surrogate model combing with modified rectangular grid sampling to reduce the stent dogboning effect in the expansion process. An infilling sampling criterion named expected improvement (EI) is used to balance local and global searches in the optimization iteration. Four commonly used finite element models of stent dilation were used to investigate stent dogboning rate. Thrombosis models of three typical shapes are built to test the effectiveness of optimization results. Numerical results show that two finite element models dilated by pressure applied inside the balloon are available, one of which with the artery and plaque can give an optimal stent with better expansion behavior, while the artery and plaque unincluded model is more efficient and takes a smaller amount of computation. PMID:24222743

  19. Finite element analysis of fiber-reinforced fixed partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Ohyama, Tatsuo; Waki, Tomonori; Kinuta, Soichiro; Wakabayashi, Kazumichi; Takano, Naoki; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2005-06-01

    Two-dimensional finite element models were created for a three-unit posterior fixed partial denture. An experimental resin-impregnated glass fiber was used as the fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) for the framework. The FRC was evaluated using varying combinations of position and thickness, alongside with two types of veneering composite. A load of 50 N simulating bite force was applied at the pontic in a vertical direction. Tensile stress was examined using a finite element analysis program. Model without FRC showed tensile stress concentrations within the veneering composite on the cervical side of the pontic--from the connector area to the bottom of the pontic. Model with FRC at the top of the pontic had almost the same stress distribution as the model without FRC. Models with 0.4-0.8 mm thick FRC positioned at the bottom of the pontic showed maximum tensile stresses reduced by 4-19% within the veneering composite. PMID:16022451

  20. Surface subsidence prediction by nonlinear finite-element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Najjar, Y. . Dept. of Civil Engineering); Zaman, M. . School of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science)

    1993-11-01

    An improved two-dimensional plane-strain numerical procedure based on the incremental-iterative nonlinear finite-element is developed to predict ground subsidence caused by underground mining. The procedure emphasizes the use of the following features: (1) an appropriate constitutive model that can accurately describe the nonlinear behavior of geological strata; and (2) an accurate algorithm for simulation of excavation sequences consistent with the actual underground mining process. The computer code is used to analyze a collapse that occurred in the Blue Goose Lease [number sign]1 Mine in northeastern Oklahoma. A parametric study is conducted to investigate the effects of some selected factors on the shape and extent of subsidence profiles. Analyses of the numerical results indicate that the nonlinear finite-element technique can be employed to meaningfully predict and characterize the potential for ground subsidence due to underground mining.

  1. Finite element analysis of electrically excited quartz tuning fork devices.

    PubMed

    Oria, Roger; Otero, Jorge; González, Laura; Botaya, Luis; Carmona, Manuel; Puig-Vidal, Manel

    2013-05-30

    Quartz Tuning Fork (QTF)-based Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) is an important field of research. A suitable model for the QTF is important to obtain quantitative measurements with these devices. Analytical models have the limitation of being based on the double cantilever configuration. In this paper, we present an electromechanical finite element model of the QTF electrically excited with two free prongs. The model goes beyond the state-of-the-art of numerical simulations currently found in the literature for this QTF configuration. We present the first numerical analysis of both the electrical and mechanical behavior of QTF devices. Experimental measurements obtained with 10 units of the same model of QTF validate the finite element model with a good agreement.

  2. Finite-element thermo-viscoplastic analysis of aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, Ajay; Dechaumphai, Pramote; Thornton, Earl A.

    1990-01-01

    The time-dependent thermo-viscoplastic response of aerospace structures subjected to intense aerothermal loads is predicted using the finite-element method. The finite-element analysis uses the Bodner-Partom unified viscoplastic constitutive relations to determine rate-dependent nonlinear material behavior. The methodology is verified by comparison with experimental data and other numerical results for a uniaxially-loaded bar. The method is then used (1) to predict the structural response of a rectangular plate subjected to line heating along a centerline, and (2) to predict the thermal-structural response of a convectively-cooled engine cowl leading edge subjected to aerodynamic shock-shock interference heating. Compared to linear elastic analysis, the viscoplastic analysis results in lower peak stresses and regions of plastic deformations.

  3. Study of the available finite element software packages at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Chu-Ho

    1990-01-01

    The interaction among the three finite element software packages, SDRCI/I-DEAS, MSC/NASTRAN, and I/FEM, used at NASA, Kennedy Space Center is addressed. The procedures for using more than one of these application software packages to model and analyze a structure design are discussed. Design and stress analysis of a solid rocket booster fixture is illustrated by using four different combinations of the three software packages. Their results are compared and show small yet acceptable differences.

  4. Finite Element Composite Analysis Program (FECAP) for a microcomputer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, David E.

    1988-01-01

    A special purpose finite element composite analysis program for analyzing composite material behavior with a microcomputer is described. The formulation assumes a state of generalized plane strain in a material consisting of two or more orthotropic phases. Loading can be mechanical and/or thermal. The theoretical background, computer implementation, and program users guide are described in detail. A sample program is solved showing the required user input and computer generated output.

  5. [Whiplash injury analysis of cervical vertebra by finite element method].

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Li, Zheng-Dong; Shao, Yu; Chen, Yi-Jiu

    2015-02-01

    Finite element method (FEM) is an effective mathematical method for stress analysis, and has been gradually applied in the study of biomechanics of human body structures. This paper reviews the construction, development, materials assignment and verification of FEM model of cervical vertebra, and it also states the research results of injury mechanism of whiplash injury and biomechanical response analysis of the cervical vertebra using FEM by researchers at home and abroad. PMID:26058135

  6. New triangular and quadrilateral plate-bending finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanaswami, R.

    1974-01-01

    A nonconforming plate-bending finite element of triangular shape and associated quadrilateral elements are developed. The transverse displacement is approximated within the element by a quintic polynomial. The formulation takes into account the effects of transverse shear deformation. Results of the static and dynamic analysis of a square plate, with edges simply supported or clamped, are compared with exact solutions. Good accuracy is obtained in all calculations.

  7. Parallel finite element simulation of large ram-air parachutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalro, V.; Aliabadi, S.; Garrard, W.; Tezduyar, T.; Mittal, S.; Stein, K.

    1997-06-01

    In the near future, large ram-air parachutes are expected to provide the capability of delivering 21 ton payloads from altitudes as high as 25,000 ft. In development and test and evaluation of these parachutes the size of the parachute needed and the deployment stages involved make high-performance computing (HPC) simulations a desirable alternative to costly airdrop tests. Although computational simulations based on realistic, 3D, time-dependent models will continue to be a major computational challenge, advanced finite element simulation techniques recently developed for this purpose and the execution of these techniques on HPC platforms are significant steps in the direction to meet this challenge. In this paper, two approaches for analysis of the inflation and gliding of ram-air parachutes are presented. In one of the approaches the point mass flight mechanics equations are solved with the time-varying drag and lift areas obtained from empirical data. This approach is limited to parachutes with similar configurations to those for which data are available. The other approach is 3D finite element computations based on the Navier-Stokes equations governing the airflow around the parachute canopy and Newtons law of motion governing the 3D dynamics of the canopy, with the forces acting on the canopy calculated from the simulated flow field. At the earlier stages of canopy inflation the parachute is modelled as an expanding box, whereas at the later stages, as it expands, the box transforms to a parafoil and glides. These finite element computations are carried out on the massively parallel supercomputers CRAY T3D and Thinking Machines CM-5, typically with millions of coupled, non-linear finite element equations solved simultaneously at every time step or pseudo-time step of the simulation.

  8. A General-Purpose Mesh Generator for Finite Element Codes.

    1984-02-28

    Version 00 INGEN is a general-purpose mesh generator for use in conjunction with two and three dimensional finite element programs. The basic components of INGEN are surface and three-dimensional region generators that use linear-blending interpolation formulae. These generators are based on an i, j, k index scheme, which is used to number nodal points, construct elements, and develop displacement and traction boundary conditions.

  9. An interactive virtual environment for finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, S.; Canfield, T.; Kokinis, J.; Disz, T.

    1995-06-01

    Virtual environments (VE) provide a powerful human-computer interface that opens the door to exciting new methods of interaction with high-performance computing applications in several areas of research. The authors are interested in the use of virtual environments as a user interface to real-time simulations used in rapid prototyping procedures. Consequently, the authors are developing methods for coupling finite element models of complex mechanical systems with a VE interface for real-time interaction.

  10. Application of Finite Element Method to Analyze Inflatable Waveguide Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    A Finite Element Method (FEM) is presented to determine propagation characteristics of deformed inflatable rectangular waveguide. Various deformations that might be present in an inflatable waveguide are analyzed using the FEM. The FEM procedure and the code developed here are so general that they can be used for any other deformations that are not considered in this report. The code is validated by applying the present code to rectangular waveguide without any deformations and comparing the numerical results with earlier published results.

  11. A Decoupled Finite Element Heterogeneous Coarse Mesh Transport Method.

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, S. W.; Rahnema, Farzad

    2005-01-01

    In a recent paper, an original finite element (FE) method was presented for solving eigenvalue transport problems on a coarse spatial mesh. The method employed a surface Green's function expansion of the angular flux trial functions, so that heterogeneous coarse-meshes could be treated with relative ease. Numerical problems were solved using the multigroup discrete ordinates approximation in one-dimensional (1-D) slab geometry. Unfortunately, difficulties were encountered in finding solutions to the algebraic finite element equations, which led to sizeable angular flux discontinuities at coarse-mesh interfaces and significant errors. For this reason, a nonvariational iterative technique was ultimately favored for converging the angular flux distribution, and was used in conjunction with a Rayleigh quotient for converging the eigenvalue. In this paper, a new derivation of finite element equations is presented, which seems to offer a remedy for at least some of the numerical ills that plagued the previous work. First, the equations are derived in terms of a generalized response function expansion. This allows a more efficient response basis to be employed and vastly reduces the overall computational effort without a substantial loss of accuracy. Second, the tight coupling between coarse-meshes in the original equations is effectively broken by assuming that an accurate estimate of the flux distribution entering a given coarse-mesh is known. With an additional assumption that an accurate eigenvalue estimate is known, an iterative approach to solving these decoupled finite element (DFE) equations is developed. The DFE method has been applied to both 1- and 2-D heterogeneous coarse-mesh problems with a far greater degree of success than the original FE method. However, some numerical difficulties remain to be overcome before the new approach can be considered robust.

  12. Piezoelectric theory for finite element analysis of ultrasonic motors

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, J.D.; Mentesana, C.P.

    1997-06-01

    The authors present the fundamental equations of piezoelectricity and references. They show how a second form of the equations and a second set of coefficients can be found, through inversions involving the elasticity tensor. They show how to compute the clamped permittivity matrix from the unclamped matrix. The authors list the program pzansys.ftn and present examples of its use. This program does the conversions and calculations needed by the finite element program ANSYS.

  13. Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element Method for Parabolic Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaneko, Hideaki; Bey, Kim S.; Hou, Gene J. W.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a time and its corresponding spatial discretization scheme, based upon the assumption of a certain weak singularity of parallel ut(t) parallel Lz(omega) = parallel ut parallel2, for the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for one-dimensional parabolic problems. Optimal convergence rates in both time and spatial variables are obtained. A discussion of automatic time-step control method is also included.

  14. Three-dimensional finite element modeling of liquid crystal devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanbrabant, Pieter J. M.; James, Richard; Beeckman, Jeroen; Neyts, Kristiaan; Willman, Eero; Fernandez, F. Anibal

    2011-03-01

    A finite element framework is presented to combine advanced three-dimensional liquid crystal director calculations with a full-vector beam propagation analysis. This approach becomes especially valuable to analyze and design structures in which disclinations or diffraction effects play an important role. The wide applicability of the approach is illustrated in our overview from several examples including small pixel LCOS microdisplays with homeotropic alignment.

  15. Stability and Convergence of Underintegrated Finite Element Approximations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of underintegration on the numerical stability and convergence characteristics of certain classes of finite element approximations were analyzed. Particular attention is given to hourglassing instabilities that arise from underintegrating the stiffness matrix entries and checkerboard instabilities that arise from underintegrating constrain terms such as those arising from incompressibility conditions. A fundamental result reported here is the proof that the fully integrated stiffness is restored in some cases through a post-processing operation.

  16. A finite element code for electric motor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C. Warren

    1994-01-01

    FEMOT is a finite element program for solving the nonlinear magnetostatic problem. This version uses nonlinear, Newton first order elements. The code can be used for electric motor design and analysis. FEMOT can be embedded within an optimization code that will vary nodal coordinates to optimize the motor design. The output from FEMOT can be used to determine motor back EMF, torque, cogging, and magnet saturation. It will run on a PC and will be available to anyone who wants to use it.

  17. An Efficient Vector Finite Element Method for Nonlinear Electromagnetic Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A C; White, D A; Rodrigue, G H

    2006-06-27

    We have developed a mixed Vector Finite Element Method (VFEM) for Maxwell's equations with a nonlinear polarization term. The method allows for discretization of complicated geometries with arbitrary order representations of the B and E fields. In this paper we will describe the method and a series of optimizations that significantly reduce the computational cost. Additionally, a series of test simulations will be presented to validate the method. Finally, a nonlinear waveguide mode mixing example is presented and discussed.

  18. Finite element methods for non-Newtonian flows

    SciTech Connect

    Gartling, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    The application of the finite element method to problems in non-Newtonian fluid mechanics is described. The formulation of the basic equations is presented for both inelastic and viscoelastic constitutive models. Solution algorithms for treating the material nonlinearities associated with inealstic fluids are described; typical solution procedures for the implicit stress-rate equations of viscoelastic fluids are also presented. Simple example analyses are included for both types of fluid models. 65 refs., 21 figs.

  19. Variational formulation of high performance finite elements: Parametrized variational principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felippa, Carlos A.; Militello, Carmello

    1991-01-01

    High performance elements are simple finite elements constructed to deliver engineering accuracy with coarse arbitrary grids. This is part of a series on the variational basis of high-performance elements, with emphasis on those constructed with the free formulation (FF) and assumed natural strain (ANS) methods. Parametrized variational principles that provide a foundation for the FF and ANS methods, as well as for a combination of both are presented.

  20. A verification procedure for MSC/NASTRAN Finite Element Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockwell, Alan E.

    1995-01-01

    Finite Element Models (FEM's) are used in the design and analysis of aircraft to mathematically describe the airframe structure for such diverse tasks as flutter analysis and actively controlled landing gear design. FEM's are used to model the entire airplane as well as airframe components. The purpose of this document is to describe recommended methods for verifying the quality of the FEM's and to specify a step-by-step procedure for implementing the methods.

  1. Finite Element Method Applied to Fuse Protection Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sen; Song, Zhiquan; Zhang, Ming; Xu, Liuwei; Li, Jinchao; Fu, Peng; Wang, Min; Dong, Lin

    2014-03-01

    In a poloidal field (PF) converter module, fuse protection is of great importance to ensure the safety of the thyristors. The fuse is pre-selected in a traditional way and then verified by finite element analysis. A 3D physical model is built by ANSYS software to solve the thermal-electric coupled problem of transient process in case of external fault. The result shows that this method is feasible.

  2. Enhanced finite element scheme for vibrational and flow induced sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltenbacher, M.; Triebenbacher, S.; Wohlmuth, B.; Zörnre, S.

    2010-06-01

    The paper presents Finite Element (FE) methods for classical vibroacoustics as well as computational aeroacoustics. Therewith, we can handle different grid sizes in different regions and ensure a correct coupling at the interfaces by applying the Mortar FE method. Furthermore, we can fully take into account free radiation by a new Perfectly Matched Layer (PML) technique, which is stable even for long term computations. The applicability of our developed numerical methods will be demonstrated by simulation results of the human phonation.

  3. Transient Finite Element Computations on a Variable Transputer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolinski, Patrick J.; Lapczyk, Ireneusz

    1993-01-01

    A parallel program to analyze transient finite element problems was written and implemented on a system of transputer processors. The program uses the explicit time integration algorithm which eliminates the need for equation solving, making it more suitable for parallel computations. An interprocessor communication scheme was developed for arbitrary two dimensional grid processor configurations. Several 3-D problems were analyzed on a system with a small number of processors.

  4. Least-squares finite element method for fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1989-01-01

    An overview is given of new developments of the least squares finite element method (LSFEM) in fluid dynamics. Special emphasis is placed on the universality of LSFEM; the symmetry and positiveness of the algebraic systems obtained from LSFEM; the accommodation of LSFEM to equal order interpolations for incompressible viscous flows; and the natural numerical dissipation of LSFEM for convective transport problems and high speed compressible flows. The performance of LSFEM is illustrated by numerical examples.

  5. Slave finite elements: The temporal element approach to nonlinear analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gellin, S.

    1984-01-01

    A formulation method for finite elements in space and time incorporating nonlinear geometric and material behavior is presented. The method uses interpolation polynomials for approximating the behavior of various quantities over the element domain, and only explicit integration over space and time. While applications are general, the plate and shell elements that are currently being programmed are appropriate to model turbine blades, vanes, and combustor liners.

  6. HEAT2. Two-Dimensional Heat Transfer Finite Element Code

    SciTech Connect

    Charman, C.

    1993-08-01

    HEAT2 is a finite element program for the transient and steady-state, thermal analysis of two-dimensional solids. Calculates detailed temperature distributions in MHTGR prismatic fuel elements side reflector and core support blocks. Non-linear effects of time and temperature dependent boundary conditions, and heat source generation and material properties are included with user supplied subroutines NPBC, QAREA, SOURCE, and MPROP.

  7. High speed inviscid compressible flow by the finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zienkiewicz, O. C.; Loehner, R.; Morgan, K.

    1984-01-01

    The finite element method and an explicit time stepping algorithm which is based on Taylor-Galerkin schemes with an appropriate artificial viscosity is combined with an automatic mesh refinement process which is designed to produce accurate steady state solutions to problems of inviscid compressible flow in two dimensions. The results of two test problems are included which demonstrate the excellent performance characteristics of the proposed procedures.

  8. Finite Element Method for Capturing Ultra-relativistic Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, G. A.; Chung, T. J.

    2003-01-01

    While finite element methods are used extensively by researchers solving computational fluid dynamics in fields other than astrophysics, their use in astrophysical fluid simulations has been predominantly overlooked. Current simulations using other methods such as finite difference and finite volume (based on finite difference) have shown remarkable results, but these methods are limited by their fundamental properties in aspects that are important for simulations with complex geometries and widely varying spatial and temporal scale differences. We have explored the use of finite element methods for astrophysical fluids in order to establish the validity of using such methods in astrophysical environments. We present our numerical technique applied to solving ultra-relativistic (Lorentz Factor Gamma >> 1) shocks which are prevalent in astrophysical studies including relativistic jets and gamma-ray burst studies. We show our finite element formulation applied to simulations where the Lorentz factor ranges up to 2236 and demonstrate its stability in solving ultra-relativistic flows. Our numerical method is based on the Flowfield Dependent Variation (FDV) Method, unique in that numerical diffusion is derived from physical parameters rather than traditional artificial viscosity methods. Numerical instabilities account for most of the difficulties when capturing shocks in this regime. Our method results in stable solutions and accurate results as compared with other methods.

  9. Discontinuous dual-primal mixed finite elements for elliptic problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bottasso, Carlo L.; Micheletti, Stefano; Sacco, Riccardo

    2000-01-01

    We propose a novel discontinuous mixed finite element formulation for the solution of second-order elliptic problems. Fully discontinuous piecewise polynomial finite element spaces are used for the trial and test functions. The discontinuous nature of the test functions at the element interfaces allows to introduce new boundary unknowns that, on the one hand enforce the weak continuity of the trial functions, and on the other avoid the need to define a priori algorithmic fluxes as in standard discontinuous Galerkin methods. Static condensation is performed at the element level, leading to a solution procedure based on the sole interface unknowns. The resulting family of discontinuous dual-primal mixed finite element methods is presented in the one and two-dimensional cases. In the one-dimensional case, we show the equivalence of the method with implicit Runge-Kutta schemes of the collocation type exhibiting optimal behavior. Numerical experiments in one and two dimensions demonstrate the order accuracy of the new method, confirming the results of the analysis.

  10. Nonlinear probabilistic finite element models of laminated composite shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelstad, S. P.; Reddy, J. N.

    1993-01-01

    A probabilistic finite element analysis procedure for laminated composite shells has been developed. A total Lagrangian finite element formulation, employing a degenerated 3-D laminated composite shell with the full Green-Lagrange strains and first-order shear deformable kinematics, forms the modeling foundation. The first-order second-moment technique for probabilistic finite element analysis of random fields is employed and results are presented in the form of mean and variance of the structural response. The effects of material nonlinearity are included through the use of a rate-independent anisotropic plasticity formulation with the macroscopic point of view. Both ply-level and micromechanics-level random variables can be selected, the latter by means of the Aboudi micromechanics model. A number of sample problems are solved to verify the accuracy of the procedures developed and to quantify the variability of certain material type/structure combinations. Experimental data is compared in many cases, and the Monte Carlo simulation method is used to check the probabilistic results. In general, the procedure is quite effective in modeling the mean and variance response of the linear and nonlinear behavior of laminated composite shells.

  11. Finite element analysis of the cyclic indentation of bilayer enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yunfei; Xuan, Fu-zhen; Chen, Xiaoping; Yang, Fuqian

    2014-04-01

    Tooth enamel is often subjected to repeated contact and often experiences contact deformation in daily life. The mechanical strength of the enamel determines the biofunctionality of the tooth. Considering the variation of the rod arrangement in outer and inner enamel, we approximate enamel as a bilayer structure and perform finite element analysis of the cyclic indentation of the bilayer structure, to mimic the repeated contact of enamel during mastication. The dynamic deformation behaviour of both the inner enamel and the bilayer enamel is examined. The material parameters of the inner and outer enamel used in the analysis are obtained by fitting the finite element results with the experimental nanoindentation results. The penetration depth per cycle at the quasi-steady state is used to describe the depth propagation speed, which exhibits a two-stage power-law dependence on the maximum indentation load and the amplitude of the cyclic load, respectively. The continuous penetration of the indenter reflects the propagation of the plastic zone during cyclic indentation, which is related to the energy dissipation. The outer enamel serves as a protective layer due to its great resistance to contact deformation in comparison to the inner enamel. The larger equivalent plastic strain and lower stresses in the inner enamel during cyclic indentation, as calculated from the finite element analysis, indicate better crack/fracture resistance of the inner enamel.

  12. Finite element solver for 3-D compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, K. C.; Reddy, J. N.

    1986-01-01

    The space shuttle main engine (SSME) has extremely complex internal flow structure. The geometry of the flow domain is three-dimensional with complicated topology. The flow is compressible, viscous, and turbulent with large gradients in flow quantities and regions of recirculations. The analysis of the flow field in SSME involves several tedious steps. One is the geometrical modeling of the particular zone of the SSME being studied. Accessing the geometry definition, digitalizing it, and developing surface interpolations suitable for an interior grid generator require considerable amount of manual labor. There are several types of grid generators available with some general-purpose finite element programs. An efficient and robust computational scheme for solving 3D Navier-Stokes equations has to be implemented. Post processing software has to be adapted to visualize and analyze the computed 3D flow field. The progress made in a project to develop software for the analysis of the flow is discussed. The technical approach to the development of the finite element scheme and the relaxation procedure are discussed. The three dimensional finite element code for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations is listed.

  13. Finite Element Modeling of the NASA Langley Aluminum Testbed Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Pritchard, Joselyn I.; Buehrle, Ralph D.; Pappa, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Langley Aluminum Testbed Cylinder (ATC) was designed to serve as a universal structure for evaluating structural acoustic codes, modeling techniques and optimization methods used in the prediction of aircraft interior noise. Finite element models were developed for the components of the ATC based on the geometric, structural and material properties of the physical test structure. Numerically predicted modal frequencies for the longitudinal stringer, ring frame and dome component models, and six assembled ATC configurations were compared with experimental modal survey data. The finite element models were updated and refined, using physical parameters, to increase correlation with the measured modal data. Excellent agreement, within an average 1.5% to 2.9%, was obtained between the predicted and measured modal frequencies of the stringer, frame and dome components. The predictions for the modal frequencies of the assembled component Configurations I through V were within an average 2.9% and 9.1%. Finite element modal analyses were performed for comparison with 3 psi and 6 psi internal pressurization conditions in Configuration VI. The modal frequencies were predicted by applying differential stiffness to the elements with pressure loading and creating reduced matrices for beam elements with offsets inside external superelements. The average disagreement between the measured and predicted differences for the 0 psi and 6 psi internal pressure conditions was less than 0.5%. Comparably good agreement was obtained for the differences between the 0 psi and 3 psi measured and predicted internal pressure conditions.

  14. Interpreting finite element results for brittle materials in endodontic restorations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Finite element simulation has been used in last years for analysing the biomechanical performance of post-core restorations in endodontics, but results of these simulations have been interpreted in most of the works using von Mises stress criterion. However, the validity of this failure criterion for brittle materials, which are present in these restorations, is questionable. The objective of the paper is to analyse how finite element results for brittle materials of endodontic restorations should be interpreted to obtain correct conclusions about the possible failure in the restoration. Methods Different failure criteria (Von Mises, Rankine, Coulomb-Mohr, Modified Mohr and Christensen) and material strength data (diametral tensile strength and flexural strength) were considered in the study. Three finite element models (FEM) were developed to simulate an endodontic restoration and two typical material tests: diametral tensile test and flexural test. Results Results showed that the Christensen criterion predicts similar results as the Von Mises criterion for ductile components, while it predicts similar results to all other criteria for brittle components. The different criteria predict different failure points for the diametral tensile test, all of them under multi-axial stress states. All criteria except Von Mises predict failure for flexural test at the same point of the specimen, with this point under uniaxial tensile stress. Conclusions From the results it is concluded that the Christensen criterion is recommended for FEM result interpretation in endodontic restorations and that the flexural test is recommended to estimate tensile strength instead of the diametral tensile test. PMID:21635759

  15. Nonlinear explicit transient finite element analysis on the Intel Delta

    SciTech Connect

    Plaskacz, E.J. ); Ramirez, M.R.; Gupta, S. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1993-01-01

    Many large scale finite element problems are intractable on current generation production supercomputers. High-performance computer architectures offer effective avenues to bridge the gap between computational needs and the power of computational hardware. The biggest challenge lies in the substitution of the key algorithms in an application program with redesigned algorithms which exploit the new architectures and use better or more appropriate numerical techniques. A methodology for implementing nonlinear finite element analysis on a homogeneous distributed processing network is discussed. The method can also be extended to heterogeneous networks comprised of different machine architectures provided that they have a mutual communication interface. This unique feature has greatly facilitated the port of the code to the 8-node Intel Touchstone Gamma and then the 512-node Intel Touchstone Delta. The domain is decomposed serially in a preprocessor. Separate input files are written for each subdomain. These files are read in by local copies of the program executable operating in parallel. Communication between processors is addressed utilizing asynchronous and synchronous message passing. The basic kernel of message passing is the internal force exchange which is analogous to the computed interactions between sections of physical bodies in static stress analysis. Benchmarks for the Intel Delta are presented. Performance exceeding 1 gigaflop was attained. Results for two large-scale finite element meshes are presented.

  16. Nonlinear explicit transient finite element analysis on the Intel Delta

    SciTech Connect

    Plaskacz, E.J.; Ramirez, M.R.; Gupta, S.

    1993-03-01

    Many large scale finite element problems are intractable on current generation production supercomputers. High-performance computer architectures offer effective avenues to bridge the gap between computational needs and the power of computational hardware. The biggest challenge lies in the substitution of the key algorithms in an application program with redesigned algorithms which exploit the new architectures and use better or more appropriate numerical techniques. A methodology for implementing nonlinear finite element analysis on a homogeneous distributed processing network is discussed. The method can also be extended to heterogeneous networks comprised of different machine architectures provided that they have a mutual communication interface. This unique feature has greatly facilitated the port of the code to the 8-node Intel Touchstone Gamma and then the 512-node Intel Touchstone Delta. The domain is decomposed serially in a preprocessor. Separate input files are written for each subdomain. These files are read in by local copies of the program executable operating in parallel. Communication between processors is addressed utilizing asynchronous and synchronous message passing. The basic kernel of message passing is the internal force exchange which is analogous to the computed interactions between sections of physical bodies in static stress analysis. Benchmarks for the Intel Delta are presented. Performance exceeding 1 gigaflop was attained. Results for two large-scale finite element meshes are presented.

  17. A phenomenological finite element model of stereolithography processing

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, R.S.; Guess, T.R.; Hinnerichs, T.D.

    1996-03-01

    In the stereolithography process, three dimensional parts are built layer by layer using a laser to selectively cure slices of a photocurable resin, one on top of another. As the laser spot passes over the surface of the resin, the ensuing chemical reaction causes the resin to shrink and stiffen during solidification. When laser paths cross or when new layers are cured on top of existing layers, residual stresses are generated as the cure shrinkage of the freshly gelled resin is constrained by the adjoining previously-cured material. These internal stresses can cause curling in the compliant material. A capability for performing finite element analyses of the stereolithography process has been developed. Although no attempt has been made to incorporate all the physics of the process, a numerical platform suitable for such development has been established. A methodology and code architecture have been structured to allow finite elements to be birthed (activated) according to a prescribed order mimicking the procedure by which a laser is used to cure and build-up surface layers of resin to construct a three dimensional geometry. In its present form, the finite element code incorporates a simple phenomenological viscoelastic material model of solidification that is based on the shrinkage and relaxation observed following isolated, uncoupled laser exposures. The phenomenological material model has been used to analyze the curl in a simple cantilever beam and to make qualitative distinctions between two contrived build styles.

  18. Crystal level simulations using Eulerian finite element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, R; Barton, N R; Benson, D J

    2004-02-06

    Over the last several years, significant progress has been made in the use of crystal level material models in simulations of forming operations. However, in Lagrangian finite element approaches simulation capabilities are limited in many cases by mesh distortion associated with deformation heterogeneity. Contexts in which such large distortions arise include: bulk deformation to strains approaching or exceeding unity, especially in highly anisotropic or multiphase materials; shear band formation and intersection of shear bands; and indentation with sharp indenters. Investigators have in the past used Eulerian finite element methods with material response determined from crystal aggregates to study steady state forming processes. However, Eulerian and Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) finite element methods have not been widely utilized for simulation of transient deformation processes at the crystal level. The advection schemes used in Eulerian and ALE codes control mesh distortion and allow for simulation of much larger total deformations. We will discuss material state representation issues related to advection and will present results from ALE simulations.

  19. Automated Finite Element Modeling of Wing Structures for Shape Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Michael Stephen

    1993-01-01

    The displacement formulation of the finite element method is the most general and most widely used technique for structural analysis of airplane configurations. Modem structural synthesis techniques based on the finite element method have reached a certain maturity in recent years, and large airplane structures can now be optimized with respect to sizing type design variables for many load cases subject to a rich variety of constraints including stress, buckling, frequency, stiffness and aeroelastic constraints (Refs. 1-3). These structural synthesis capabilities use gradient based nonlinear programming techniques to search for improved designs. For these techniques to be practical a major improvement was required in computational cost of finite element analyses (needed repeatedly in the optimization process). Thus, associated with the progress in structural optimization, a new perspective of structural analysis has emerged, namely, structural analysis specialized for design optimization application, or.what is known as "design oriented structural analysis" (Ref. 4). This discipline includes approximation concepts and methods for obtaining behavior sensitivity information (Ref. 1), all needed to make the optimization of large structural systems (modeled by thousands of degrees of freedom and thousands of design variables) practical and cost effective.

  20. Finite element evaluation of erosion/corrosion affected reducing elbow

    SciTech Connect

    Basavaraju, C.

    1996-12-01

    Erosion/corrosion is a primary source for wall thinning or degradation of carbon steel piping systems in service. A number of piping failures in the power industry have been attributed to erosion/corrosion. Piping elbow is one of such susceptible components for erosion/corrosion because of increased flow turbulence due to its geometry. In this paper, the acceptability of a 12 in. x 8 in. reducing elbow in RHR service water pump discharge piping, which experienced significant degradation due to wall thinning in localized areas, was evaluated using finite element analysis methodology. Since the simplified methods showed very small margin and recommended replacement of the elbow, a detailed 3-D finite element model was built using shell elements and analyzed for internal pressure and moment loadings. The finite element analysis incorporated the U.T. measured wall thickness data at various spots that experienced wall thinning. The results showed that the elbow is acceptable as-is until the next fuel cycle. FEA, though cumbersome, and time consuming is a valuable analytical tool in making critical decisions with regard to component replacement of border line situation cases, eliminating some conservatism while not compromising the safety.

  1. HYDRA, A finite element computational fluid dynamics code: User manual

    SciTech Connect

    Christon, M.A.

    1995-06-01

    HYDRA is a finite element code which has been developed specifically to attack the class of transient, incompressible, viscous, computational fluid dynamics problems which are predominant in the world which surrounds us. The goal for HYDRA has been to achieve high performance across a spectrum of supercomputer architectures without sacrificing any of the aspects of the finite element method which make it so flexible and permit application to a broad class of problems. As supercomputer algorithms evolve, the continuing development of HYDRA will strive to achieve optimal mappings of the most advanced flow solution algorithms onto supercomputer architectures. HYDRA has drawn upon the many years of finite element expertise constituted by DYNA3D and NIKE3D Certain key architectural ideas from both DYNA3D and NIKE3D have been adopted and further improved to fit the advanced dynamic memory management and data structures implemented in HYDRA. The philosophy for HYDRA is to focus on mapping flow algorithms to computer architectures to try and achieve a high level of performance, rather than just performing a port.

  2. A convenient scheme for coupling a finite element curvilinear mesh to a finite element voxel mesh: application to the heart

    PubMed Central

    Hopenfeld, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    Background In some cases, it may be necessary to combine distinct finite element meshes into a single system. The present work describes a scheme for coupling a finite element mesh, which may have curvilinear elements, to a voxel based finite element mesh. Methods The method is described with reference to a sample problem that involves combining a heart, which is defined by a curvilinear mesh, with a voxel based torso mesh. The method involves the creation of a temporary (scaffolding) mesh that couples the outer surface of the heart mesh to a voxel based torso mesh. The inner surface of the scaffolding mesh is the outer heart surface, and the outer surface of the scaffolding mesh is defined by the nodes in the torso mesh that are nearest (but outside of) the heart. The finite element stiffness matrix for the scaffolding mesh is then computed. This stiffness matrix includes extraneous nodes that are then removed, leaving a coupling matrix that couples the original outer heart surface nodes to adjacent nodes in the torso voxel mesh. Finally, a complete system matrix is assembled from the pre-existing heart stiffness matrix, the heart/torso coupling matrix, and the torso stiffness matrix. Results Realistic body surface electrocardiograms were generated. In a test involving a dipole embedded in a spherical shell, relative error of the scheme rapidly converged to slightly over 4%, although convergence thereafter was relatively slow. Conclusion The described method produces reasonably accurate results and may be best suited for problems where computational speed and convenience have a higher priority than very high levels of accuracy. PMID:17112373

  3. IFEMS, an Interactive Finite Element Modeling System Using a CAD/CAM System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckellip, S.; Schuman, T.; Lauer, S.

    1980-01-01

    A method of coupling a CAD/CAM system with a general purpose finite element mesh generator is described. The three computer programs which make up the interactive finite element graphics system are discussed.

  4. Progress on hybrid finite element methods for scattering by bodies of revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Jeffery D.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Progress on the development and implementation of hybrid finite element methods for scattering by bodies of revolution are described. It was found that earlier finite element-boundary integral formulations suffered from convergence difficulties when applied to large and thin bodies of revolution. An alternative implementation is described where the finite element method is terminated with an absorbing termination boundary. In addition, an alternative finite element-boundary integral implementation is discussed for improving the convergence of the original code.

  5. Numerical computation of transonic flows by finite-element and finite-difference methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M. M.; Wellford, L. C.; Merkle, C. L.; Murman, E. M.

    1978-01-01

    Studies on applications of the finite element approach to transonic flow calculations are reported. Different discretization techniques of the differential equations and boundary conditions are compared. Finite element analogs of Murman's mixed type finite difference operators for small disturbance formulations were constructed and the time dependent approach (using finite differences in time and finite elements in space) was examined.

  6. Hierarchicalp-version finite elements for radiation heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Dana Craig

    Methods to compute surface-to-surface radiation heat transfer between diffuse-gray surfaces using hierarchical p-version finite elements have been developed and applied to the analysis of a high-speed aircraft wing. A review of traditional methods for surface-to-surface radiation exchange is given. Traditional methods rely on the assumption of isothermal surfaces with incoming and outgoing radiation heat flux assumed constant over the surface. These assumptions are not appropriate for p-version finite elements, so new methods for evaluating the incoming and outgoing radiation flux over a finite element surface were required. Two methods for computing the surface-to-surface radiation heat transfer that do not rely on the above assumptions are developed and validated. The first approach uses traditional methods to compute the radiation exchange on an element sub-mesh, then transfers this data back to the parent element for the computation of the radiation heat flux. The second method requires the numerical integration of the net radiation exchange equation for each element. The methods are validated and evaluated using simple problems with analytical solutions. The radiation sub-element method is less costly than the direct integration method, but it is also less accurate. Both methods are computationally more expensive than traditional methods for a given number of degrees of freedom; however, for a given accuracy, they are less expensive. The new methods are used to analyze the wing of a High Speed Civil Transport vehicle. The p-elements were effective in capturing significant temperature variations over large sections of the wing and reduced the mesh complexity and associated modeling time while maintaining accuracy.

  7. FECAP - FINITE ELEMENT COMPOSITE ANALYSIS PROGRAM FOR A MICROCOMPUTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    Advanced composite materials have gained use in the aerospace industry over the last 20 years because of their high specific strength and stiffness, and low coefficient of thermal expansion. Design of composite structures requires the analysis of composite material behavior. The Finite Element Composite Analysis Program, FECAP, is a special purpose finite element analysis program for analyzing composite material behavior with a microcomputer. Composite materials, in regard to this program, are defined as the combination of at least two distinct materials to form one nonhomogeneous anisotropic material. FECAP assumes a state of generalized plane strain exists in a material consisting of two or more orthotropic phases, subjected to mechanical and/or thermal loading. The finite element formulation used in FECAP is displacement based and requires the minimization of the total potential energy for each element with respect to the unknown variables. This procedure leads to a set of linear simultaneous equations relating the unknown nodal displacements to the applied loads. The equations for each element are assembled into a global system, the boundary conditions are applied, and the system is solved for the nodal displacements. The analysis may be performed using either 4-mode linear or 8-mode quadratic isoparametric elements. Output includes the nodal displacements, and the element stresses and strains. FECAP was written for a Hewlett Packard HP9000 Series 200 Microcomputer with the HP Basic operating system. It was written in HP BASIC 3.0 and requires approximately 0.5 Mbytes of RAM in addition to what is required for the operating system. A math coprocessor card is highly recommended. FECAP was developed in 1988.

  8. New hybrid quadrilateral finite element for Mindlin plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Yi; Zhang, Jingyu

    1994-02-01

    A new quadrilateral plate element concerning the effect of transverse shear strain was presented. It was derived from the hybrid finite element model based on the principles of virtual work. The outstanding advantage of this element was to use more rational trial functions of the displacements. For this reason, every variety of plate deformation can be simulated really while the least degrees of freedom was employed. A wide range of numerical tests was conducted and the results illustrate that this element has a very wide application scope to the thickness of plates and satisfactory accuracy can be obtained by coarse mesh for all kinds of examples.

  9. Finite element analysis of thumb carpometacarpal joint implants

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, C.

    1995-11-01

    The thumb carpometacarpal joint is frequently replaced in women who have developed severe osteoarthritis of the hand. A new, privately developed implant design consists of two components, trapezial and metacarpal, each with a saddle-shaped articulating surface. A three dimensional finite element model of this implant has been developed to analyze stresses on the device. The first simulations using the model involve loading the implant with forces normal to the trapezial component. Preliminary results show contact stress distributions at the particulating surfaces of the implant.

  10. Finite element analysis of inviscid subsonic boattail flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, R. V.; Gerhart, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    A finite element code for analysis of inviscid subsonic flows over arbitrary nonlifting planar or axisymmetric bodies is described. The code solves a novel primitive variable formulation of the coupled irrotationality and compressible continuity equations. Results for flow over a cylinder, a sphere, and a NACA 0012 airfoil verify the code. Computed subcritical flows over an axisymmetric boattailed afterbody compare well with finite difference results and experimental data. Interative coupling with an integral turbulent boundary layer code shows strong viscous effects on the inviscid flow. Improvements in code efficiency and extensions to transonic flows are discussed.

  11. Finite Element Modeling of Transient Thermography Inspection of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Tsuchin Philip

    1998-01-01

    Several finite element models of defects such as debond and void have been developed for composite panels subjected to transient thermography inspection. Since the exact nature of the heat generated from the flash lamps is unknown, direct comparison between FEA and experimental results is not possible. However, some similarity of the results has been observed. The shape of the time curve that simulates the heat flux from the flash lamps has minimal effect on the temperature profiles. Double the number of flash lamps could increase the contrast of thermal image and define the shape of defect better.

  12. Assessing performance and validating finite element simulations using probabilistic knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Dolin, Ronald M.; Rodriguez, E. A.

    2002-01-01

    Two probabilistic approaches for assessing performance are presented. The first approach assesses probability of failure by simultaneously modeling all likely events. The probability each event causes failure along with the event's likelihood of occurrence contribute to the overall probability of failure. The second assessment method is based on stochastic sampling using an influence diagram. Latin-hypercube sampling is used to stochastically assess events. The overall probability of failure is taken as the maximum probability of failure of all the events. The Likelihood of Occurrence simulation suggests failure does not occur while the Stochastic Sampling approach predicts failure. The Likelihood of Occurrence results are used to validate finite element predictions.

  13. Seakeeping with the semi-Lagrangian particle finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadukandi, Prashanth; Servan-Camas, Borja; Becker, Pablo Agustín; Garcia-Espinosa, Julio

    2016-07-01

    The application of the semi-Lagrangian particle finite element method (SL-PFEM) for the seakeeping simulation of the wave adaptive modular vehicle under spray generating conditions is presented. The time integration of the Lagrangian advection is done using the explicit integration of the velocity and acceleration along the streamlines (X-IVAS). Despite the suitability of the SL-PFEM for the considered seakeeping application, small time steps were needed in the X-IVAS scheme to control the solution accuracy. A preliminary proposal to overcome this limitation of the X-IVAS scheme for seakeeping simulations is presented.

  14. Analysis of Waveguide Junction Discontinuities Using Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Manohar D.

    1997-01-01

    A Finite Element Method (FEM) is presented to determine reflection and transmission coefficients of rectangular waveguide junction discontinuities. An H-plane discontinuity, an E-plane ridge discontinuity, and a step discontinuity in a concentric rectangular waveguide junction are analyzed using the FEM procedure. Also, reflection and transmission coefficients due to presence of a gap between two sections of a rectangular waveguide are determined using the FEM. The numerical results obtained by the present method are in excellent agreement with the earlier published results. The numerical results obtained by the FEM are compared with the numerical results obtained using the Mode Matching Method (MMM) and also with the measured data.

  15. Finite element analysis of laminated plates and shells, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seide, P.; Chang, P. N. H.

    1978-01-01

    The finite element method is used to investigate the static behavior of laminated composite flat plates and cylindrical shells. The analysis incorporates the effects of transverse shear deformation in each layer through the assumption that the normals to the undeformed layer midsurface remain straight but need not be normal to the mid-surface after deformation. A digital computer program was developed to perform the required computations. The program includes a very efficient equation solution code which permits the analysis of large size problems. The method is applied to the problem of stretching and bending of a perforated curved plate.

  16. Modelling the viscoelasticity of ceramic tiles by finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovic, Ana; Fragassa, Cristiano

    2016-05-01

    This research details a numerical method aiming at investigating the viscoelastic behaviour of a specific family of ceramic material, the Grès Porcelain, during an uncommon transformation, known as pyroplasticity, which occurs when a ceramic tile bends under a combination of thermal stress and own weight. In general, the theory of viscoelasticity can be considered extremely large and precise, but its application on real cases is particularly delicate. A time-depending problem, as viscoelasticity naturally is, has to be merged with a temperature-depending situation. This paper investigates how the viscoelastic response of bending ceramic materials can be modelled by commercial Finite Elements codes.

  17. Finite element model for brittle fracture and fragmentation

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Wei; Delaney, Tristan J.; Jiao, Xiangmin; Samulyak, Roman; Lu, Cao

    2016-06-01

    A new computational model for brittle fracture and fragmentation has been developed based on finite element analysis of non-linear elasticity equations. The proposed model propagates the cracks by splitting the mesh nodes alongside the most over-strained edges based on the principal direction of strain tensor. To prevent elements from overlapping and folding under large deformations, robust geometrical constraints using the method of Lagrange multipliers have been incorporated. In conclusion, the model has been applied to 2D simulations of the formation and propagation of cracks in brittle materials, and the fracture and fragmentation of stretched and compressed materials.

  18. Vector algorithms for geometrically nonlinear 3D finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, John D.

    1989-01-01

    Algorithms for geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis are presented which exploit the vector processing capability of the VPS-32, which is closely related to the CYBER 205. By manipulating vectors (which are long lists of numbers) rather than individual numbers, very high processing speeds are obtained. Long vector lengths are obtained without extensive replication or reordering by storage of intermediate results in strategic patterns at all stages of the computations. Comparisons of execution times with those from programs using either scalar or other vector programming techniques indicate that the algorithms presented are quite efficient.

  19. Finite-element simulation of myocardial electrical excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasserman, I. N.; Matveenko, V. P.; Shardakov, I. N.; Shestakov, A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Based on a single-domain model of myocardial conduction, isotropic and anisotropic finite element models of the myocardium are developed allowing excitation wave propagation to be studied. The Aliev-Panfilov phenomenological equations were used as the relations between the transmembrane current and the transmembrane potential. Interaction of an additional source of initial excitation with an excitation wave that passed and the spread of the excitation wave are studied using heart tomograms. A numerical solution is obtained using a splitting algorithm that allows the nonlinear boundary-value problem to be reduced to a sequence of simpler problems: ordinary differential equations and linear boundary-value problems in partial derivatives.

  20. Finite element model of thermal processes in retinal photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sramek, Christopher; Paulus, Yannis M.; Nomoto, Hiroyuki; Huie, Phil; Palanker, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Short duration (< 20 ms) pulses are desirable in patterned scanning laser photocoagulation to confine thermal damage to the photoreceptor layer, decrease overall treatment time and reduce pain. However, short exposures have a smaller therapeutic window (defined as the ratio of rupture threshold power to that of light coagulation). We have constructed a finite-element computational model of retinal photocoagulation to predict spatial damage and improve the therapeutic window. Model parameters were inferred from experimentally measured absorption characteristics of ocular tissues, as well as the thresholds of vaporization, coagulation, and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) damage. Calculated lesion diameters showed good agreement with histological measurements over a wide range of pulse durations and powers.