Science.gov

Sample records for leg ulcer etiology

  1. Multisystemic Sarcoidosis Presenting as Pretibial Leg Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Baunacke, Anja; Hansel, Gesina

    2016-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic disease of unknown etiology. Up to 30% of patients develop cutaneous manifestations, either specific or nonspecific. Ulcerating sarcoidosis leading to leg ulcers is a rare observation that may lead to confusions with other, more common types of chronic leg ulcers. We report the case of a 45-year-old female patient with chronic multisystemic sarcoidosis presenting with pretibial leg ulcers. Other etiology could be excluded. Histology revealed nonspecific findings. Therefore, the diagnosis of nonspecific leg ulcers in sarcoidosis was confirmed. Treatment consisted of oral prednisolone and good ulcer care. Complete healing was achieved within 6 months. Sarcoidosis is a rare cause of leg ulcers and usually sarcoid granulomas can be found. Our patient illustrates that even in the absence of sarcoid granulomas, leg ulcers can be due to sarcoidosis. PMID:27272316

  2. Etiology of venous ulceration.

    PubMed

    Gourdin, F W; Smith, J G

    1993-10-01

    The etiology of venous ulceration is far more complex than Homans' theory of stagnation and hypo-oxygenation. Indeed, studies have shown that flow in lipodermatosclerotic limbs is actually faster than normal. We suggest, therefore, that the terms "stasis dermatitis" and "stasis ulcer" be dropped from medical parlance. The term "lipodermatosclerosis with ulceration" as used by the British, or simply "venous ulcer," would seem more appropriate. Venous hypertension, produced by incompetence of deep and communicating vein valves and thrombosis of segments of the deep system, is closely correlated with the development of venous ulcers. Precisely how this venous hypertension translates into ulceration is unclear. Burnand et al showed that fibrin cuffs are deposited around the capillaries in lipodermatosclerotic limbs. These cuffs may serve as barriers to the diffusion of oxygen, leading to local ischemia and epidermal necrosis. Others suggest that trapped leukocytes in the microcirculation alter capillary permeability by releasing various inflammatory mediators that hasten the flow of fibrinogen across the capillary membrane and promote the formation of fibrin cuffs. Proof of this hypothesis is still lacking, but may eventually come from using radioactive WBC tagging procedures. A synthesis of these two theories may in fact explain the etiology of venous ulceration. PMID:8211332

  3. [Leg ulcer: conservative treatment].

    PubMed

    Fradique, Caldeira; Pupo, Alexandra; Quaresma, Luísa; Palma-Rosa, Ana; Fernandes, Mário; Silva, Gualdino; Almeida, Heitor; Diogo, Cláudia; Pinho, Ana Catarina

    2011-01-01

    During 16 years 202 patients with leg ulcer have been studied prospectively. Whenever possible, cure has been obtained in ambulatory, which was the main objective. Surgery was preferentially made after the cure of the ulcer. From the 202 patients, 166 have made a prolonged follow-up. Cure in ambulatory has been obtained in 91% of the patients. We stress the importance of the direct control of all the treatment by the responsible doctor.

  4. Bacteriology of chronic leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Lookingbill, D P; Miller, S H; Knowles, R C

    1978-12-01

    The quantitative bacteriology of 13 chronic leg ulcers was sequentially assessed by both swab and biopsy culture techniques, and the effect of either a 10% benzoyl peroxide lotion or placebo lotion was evaluated. There was good correlation between the swab and biopsy culture techniques in 12 of the 17 instances where simultaneous swabs and biopsies were done. Though the benzoyl peroxide did not favorably affect the bacterial flora, ulcer healing did appear to correlate with quantitative bacterial counts. THREE of five ulcers containing fewer than 10(5) organisms per gram of tissue or per centimeter of ulcer surface area healed, while none of eight ulcers containing more than 10(5) organisms healed. Quantitative bacteriological measurements can serve as useful tools in evaluating healing of leg ulcers.

  5. [Martorell Hypertensive Ischaemic Leg Ulcer].

    PubMed

    Nobbe, S; Hafner, J

    2015-10-01

    Martorell hypertensive ischaemic leg ulcer (HYTILU) represents an important differential diagnosis of painful leg ulcerations. Stenotic subcutaneous arteriolosclerosis in patients with long-standing arterial hypertension finally leads to skin infarction. The typical histological changes are very similar in Martorell HYTILU and calciphylaxis. This raises the hypothesis that the two entities may have a common pathogenesis. Martorell HYTILU presents as an extremely painful ulcer that is regularly located at the laterodorsal lower leg or at the Achilles tendon. Because of its inflammatory and violaceous wound edges and its tendency to progression, clinicians unaware of the diagnosis Martorell HYTILU might misdiagnose pyoderma gangrenosum or necrotising cutaneous vasculitis start an immunosuppressive treatment and avoid surgical diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Instead, necrosectomy and split skin grafting are the treatment of choice for Martorell HYTILU.

  6. FAQs on leg ulcer care.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Irene; King, Brenda; Knight, Susan; Keynes, Milton

    In a webchat on leg ulcer management issues, hosted by Nursing Times, participants raised three key areas of care: the role of healthcare assistants in compression bandaging; reporting and investigating damage caused by compression therapy; and recommendations for dressings to be used under compression. This article discusses each of these in turn.

  7. [List of diagnostic tests and procedures in leg ulcer].

    PubMed

    Spoljar, Sanja

    2013-10-01

    Many factors contribute to the pathogenesis of leg ulcer. Most patients have venous leg ulcer due to chronic venous insufficiency. Less often, patients have arterial leg ulcer resulting from peripheral arterial occlusive disease, the most common cause of which is arteriosclerosis. Leg ulcer may be of a mixed arteriovenous origin. In diabetic patients, distal symmetric neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease are probably the most important etiologic factors in the development of diabetic leg ulcer. Other causes of chronic leg ulcers are hematologic diseases, autoimmune diseases, genetic defects, infectious diseases, primary skin diseases, cutaneous malignant diseases, use of some medications and therapeutic procedures, and numerous exogenous factors. Diagnosis of leg ulcer is based on medical history, inspection, palpation of skin temperature, palpation of arteries, fascia holes, presence and degree of edema, firm painful cords, and functional testing to assess peripheral occlusive arterial disease or identify superficial and deep venous reflux of the legs. Knowledge of differential diagnosis is essential for ensuring treatment success in patients with leg ulcer. There are many possible etiologic factors of leg ulcers and sometimes, clinical findings are similar. Additional testing should be performed, e.g., serologic testing such as blood count, C-reactive protein, HBA1c, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, differential blood count, total proteins, electrolytes, coagulation parameters, circulating immune complex, cryoglobulins, homocysteins, AT, PAI-1, APC resistance, proteins C and S, paraproteins, ANA, ENA, ANCA, dsDNA, antiphospholipid antibodies, urea, creatinine, blood lipids, vitamins and trace elements. Also, biopsy of the lesion for histopathology, direct immunofluorescence, bacteriology and mycology should be included. Other tests are Raynaud (cold stimulation) test and pathergy test. Device-based diagnostic testing should be performed for future

  8. [Contact eczema in patients with leg ulcers].

    PubMed

    Degreef, H; Dooms-Goossens, A; Gladys, K

    1986-01-01

    Patients with leg ulcers or varicose eczema suffer much more often from contact eczema due to the local application of pharmaceutical preparations than patients suffering from other dermatological problems (even those of eczematous origin). This contact allergy may concern not only the active ingredient but also the excipient, the preservative, or even the perfume. In all cases of leg ulcers, of varicose eczema, but also of badly healed ulcers, epicutaneous tests should be carried out with all the components of the pharmaceutical preparations concerned. Moreover, the pharmaceutical industry really must perfect non-allergenic preparations.

  9. Chronic leg ulcers in Werner's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yeong, E K; Yang, C C

    2004-01-01

    We report two siblings suffered from Werner's syndrome, which is a rare premature aging disorder caused by genetic mutations. They developed premature aging during adolescence with loss and graying of hair, short stature, baldness, atrophic skin, thin extremities, flat feet, 'bird' face and cataracts. Multiple chronic ulcers were noted over the feet in both patients. Healing was prolonged because of atrophic subcutaneous tissue, poor perfusion, impaired fibroblast activity and the loss of normal foot architecture. Treatment of the ulcers was challenging, as flap options were limited over the lower third of the leg and skin grafting was not easy as there was a lack of healthy granulations. However, we have successfully closed the ulcers with Integra artificial skin and ultra-thin split thickness skin grafting with the scalp as donor site. The main purpose of this paper is to alert physicians to this syndrome when treatments are being planned for patients with chronic leg ulcers.

  10. What's new: Management of venous leg ulcers: Approach to venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Afsaneh; Sibbald, R Gary; Phillips, Tania J; Miller, O Fred; Margolis, David J; Marston, William; Woo, Kevin; Romanelli, Marco; Kirsner, Robert S

    2016-04-01

    Leg ulcerations are a common problem, with an estimated prevalence of 1% to 2% in the adult population. Venous leg ulcers are primarily treated in outpatient settings and often are managed by dermatologists. Recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of leg ulcers combined with available evidence-based data will provide an update on this topic. A systematized approach and the judicious use of expensive advanced therapeutics are critical. Specialized arterial and venous studies are most commonly noninvasive. The ankle brachial pressure index can be performed with a handheld Doppler unit at the bedside by most clinicians. The vascular laboratory results and duplex Doppler findings are used to identify segmental defects and potential operative candidates. Studies of the venous system can also predict a subset of patients who may benefit from surgery. Successful leg ulcer management requires an interdisciplinary team to make the correct diagnosis, assess the vascular supply, and identify other modifiable factors to optimize healing. The aim of this continuing medical education article is to provide an update on the management of venous leg ulcers. Part I is focused on the approach to venous ulcer diagnostic testing.

  11. Leg ulcer in lepromatous leprosy - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Tania Rita Moreno de Oliveira; dos Santos, Talita Suzany Siqueira; Lopes, Ramon Rodrigues de Macedo

    2016-01-01

    In Brazil, leprosy is a widespread infectious and contagious disease. Clinicians and specialists view leprosy broadly as a systemic infection, since, in its manifestations, it mimics many conditions, such as rheumatic, vascular, ENT, neurological and dermatological diseases. There are few studies that characterize the factors associated with ulcers in leprosy. These injuries should be prevented and treated promptly to avoid serious problems like secondary infections, sepsis, carcinomatous degeneration and amputations. We describe a patient with ulcers on his legs, involving late diagnosis of lepromatous leprosy.

  12. Leg ulcers: a new symptom of Blau syndrome?

    PubMed

    Dhondt, Veerle; Hofman, Sarah; Dahan, Karin; Beele, Hilde

    2008-01-01

    Blau syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant condition, typically defined by granulomatous polyarthritis, uveitis and skin eruption. Biopsy specimens demonstrate non-caseating granulomas in all lesions. We present a case of Blau syndrome associated with large recalcitrant leg ulcers. Biopsies taken in the leg ulcers of our patient systematically showed granulomas. Although leg ulcers have not previously been described as a part of Blau syndrome, we assume that the ulcerations in this case form part of Blau syndrome.

  13. A case of bacillary angiomatosis presenting as leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Karakaş, M; Baba, M; Homan, S; Akman, A; Acar, M A; Memişoğlu, H R; Gümürdülü, D

    2003-01-01

    We report a 32-year-old immunocompetent man who had multiple leg ulcers caused by bacillary angiomatosis without a history of direct contact with cats. Bacillary angiomatosis should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of leg ulcers in cases of unknown aetiology.

  14. Allergic contact dermatitis in venous leg ulcer patients.

    PubMed

    Tavadia, S; Bianchi, J; Dawe, R S; McEvoy, M; Wiggins, E; Hamill, E; Urcelay, M; Strong, A M M; Douglas, W S

    2003-05-01

    Our aim was to determine the frequency and nature of contact sensitivity in venous leg ulcer patients in Lanarkshire. We performed patch testing with the European standard series, antimicrobials and medicaments on 200 patients referred to our leg ulcer clinics. Positive patch tests were found in 136 (68%) patients. Multiple allergies occurred in 102 (51%). The most frequent allergen groups were fragrances (30.5%), antimicrobials (19.5%), topical excipients (19.5%), rubber accelerators (13.5%) and topical corticosteroids (8%). We also found a high prevalence of positive patch tests to Intrasite gel (9.5%) and Hioxyl cream (8.5%), medicaments which are commonly used to treat leg ulcers in our area. Contact sensitivity is common in venous leg ulcer patients and has important implications for patient management. The allergens involved vary depending on local nursing practice. We suggest that all venous leg ulcer patients be patch tested with a locally relevant patch test series.

  15. [Benzoyl peroxide for the treatment of leg ulcers (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Ramelet, A A; van Melle, G

    1980-01-01

    40 leg ulcers were treated for 6 weeks by application twice a day of a 20% benzoyl peroxide lotion. Each ulcer was regularly measured and its bacterial flora was determined. Therapeutic results were very satisfactory: the average healing rate of the ulcers was 62.8% of the initial wound area after 4 weeks of treatment and 76.5% after 6 weeks of treatment. The bacterial flora of the ulcers changed during treatments, streptococci and staphylococci disappeared. Pseudomonas aeruginosa became abundant.

  16. Large leg ulcers due to autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rozin, Alexander P.; Egozi, Dana; Ramon, Yehuda; Toledano, Kohava; Braun-Moscovici, Yolanda; Markovits, Doron; Schapira, Daniel; Bergman, Reuven; Melamed, Yehuda; Ullman, Yehuda; Balbir-Gurman, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Large leg ulcers (LLU) may complicate autoimmune diseases. They pose a therapeutic challenge and are often resistant to treatment. To report three cases of autoimmune diseases complicated with LLU. Case Report Case 1. A 55-year old woman presented with long-standing painful LLU due to mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). Biopsy from the ulcer edge showed small vessel vasculitis. IV methylprednisolone (MethP) 1 G/day, prednisolone (PR) 1mg/kg, monthly IV cyclophosphamide (CYC), cyclosporine (CyA) 100mg/day, IVIG 125G, ciprofloxacin+IV Iloprost+enoxaparin+aspirin (AAVAA), hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HO), maggot debridement and autologous skin transplantation were performed and the LLU healed. Case 2. A 45-year old women with MCTD developed multiple LLU’s with non-specific inflammation by biopsy. MethP, PR, hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), azathioprine (AZA), CYC, IVIG, AAVAA failed. Treatment for underlying the LLU tibial osteomyelitis and addition of CyA was followed by the LLU healing. Case 3. A 20-year-old man with history of polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) developed painful LLU’s due to small vessel vasculitis (biopsy). MethP, PR 1 mg/kg, CYC, CyA 100 mg/d, AAVAA failed. MRSA sepsis and relapse of systemic PAN developed. IV vancomycin, followed by ciprofloxacin, monthly IVIG (150 g/for 5 days) and infliximab (5 mg/kg) were instituted and the LLU’s healed. Conclusions LLU are extremely resistant to therapy. Combined use of multiple medications and services are needed for healing of LLU due to autoimmune diseases. PMID:21169912

  17. Introducing and auditing a nurse-led leg ulcer service.

    PubMed

    Rotchell, L

    1999-05-01

    Leg ulcers have a significant impact on quality of life, and represent a major treatment cost for health services. Improved healing rates benefit patients and health service provision. Nurse-led clinics provide an appropriate setting for treatment.

  18. Compression therapy of leg ulcers with PAOD.

    PubMed

    Ladwig, Andrea; Haase, Hermann; Bichel, Jens; Schuren, Jan; Jünger, Michael

    2014-05-19

    Objectives: To assess the clinical safety of a new short-stretch 2-layer compression system (3M(tm) Coban(tm) 2 Lite) in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). This system combines a low resting pressure with a high working pressure. Methods: A pilot study was performed in 15 subjects with moderate PAOD, i.e. an ABPI of 0.5-0.8. Co-existing chronic venous insufficiency or leg ulcer was not mandatory. All subjects received the compression system which was reapplied at each study visit (days 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 10, 14). The safety parameters were: sub-bandage pressure immediately after application, pressure-related skin damage, hypoxia-related pain, and adverse events. A product comfort questionnaire was completed at the last visit. Results: The average sub-bandage pressure of 30 mmHg defined by the protocol was achieved. No pressure-related skin damage or hypoxia-related pain was found. The reported adverse device effects were as expected for compression therapies, including dry skin and pruritus. The product comfort questionnaire completed by the subjects showed a good tolerability profile. Conclusion: The short-stretch 2-layer compression system (3M(tm) Coban(tm) 2 Lite) was safe and well tolerated in subjects with moderate PAOD. PMID:24843079

  19. [Innovative therapy for leg ulcers: Electrostimulation].

    PubMed

    Maillard, H

    2015-01-01

    Chronic wounds can take a long time to heal despite appropriate therapy based upon aetiology and use of suitable dressings. The success of electrostimulation is based upon the existence within the skin of the endogenous currents involved in the wound healing process. Where skin continuity is broken by a wound, these electrical potentials are short-circuited, resulting in leakage of electrical current. Woundel(®) therapy is the only such treatment currently available in France and is based on the use of continuous pulsed current that generates an electrical field near the endogenous electrical fields. It utilises a console to deliver the electrical impulses, a dressing electrode and a dispersion electrode. The electrode dressing is left on the wound for 3 days, and venous compression bandaging may be applied to the leg, taking care to leave the connector free. Negative polarity stimulates migration of fibroblasts, resulting in elimination of fibrin. Positive polarity causes keratinocyte migration, which in turn leads to epidermisation. Electrostimulation is of recognised utility in the healing of chronic wounds: it has been assigned a high-level recommendation in the European and American guidelines for the treatment of venous ulcers and bedsores with proof level of A. Further, the analgesic effect of electrostimulation has been demonstrated in several studies. Electrostimulation is already well developed in France among wound specialists, but prospective studies are planned so that it may be used at patients' homes.

  20. Quality of life in patients with leg ulcers or skin lesions – a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Mościcka, Paulina; Jawień, Arkadiusz; Cwajda-Białasik, Justyna; Cierzniakowska, Katarzyna; Ślusarz, Robert; Hancke, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Attempts to determine the quality of life are advisable in patients with ulcers as the group affected with this problem is relatively large. According to one Polish randomized trial, approximately 0.3–2% of the adult population suffers from active or healed venous ulcers. Aim To compare the quality of life of patients with leg ulcers of venous and arterial etiology and those with lower limb skin lesions due to chronic venous insufficiency. Material and methods This study included 90 consecutive patients with ulcers of venous (n = 30) or arterial etiology (n = 30), or patients with trophic disorders of the skin associated with chronic venous insufficiency (n = 30) treated at the Venous Ulceration Outpatient Clinic and at the Department and Clinic of General Surgery, Dr. J. Biziel Memorial University Hospital No. 2, in Bydgoszcz. This study was designed as a questionnaire survey and included the Skindex-29 instrument for the assessment of quality of life in patients with dermatological conditions. Results Overall, the global Skinndex-29 scores of all studied participants ranged between 37 and 136 points, 23.93 points on average. The analyzed groups of patients differed significantly with respect to the average level of the global quality of life determined using the Skindex-29 questionnaire. Conclusions Significant differences were observed in the global quality of life of patients who suffered from venous or arterial leg ulcers or skin lesions resulting from chronic venous insufficiency. PMID:26755912

  1. Squamous cell carcinoma developed on chronic venous leg ulcer.

    PubMed

    Sîrbi, Adelina Gabriela; Florea, Marius; Pătraşcu, Virgil; Rotaru, Maria; Mogoş, Dan Gabriel; Georgescu, Claudia Valentina; Mărgăritescu, Nicolae Dragoş

    2015-01-01

    Chronic venous leg ulcers (VLU), especially long-lasting non-healing ulcers, are among the risk factors for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Malignant transformation of a VLU is a rare finding and the relative risk of carcinomatous transformation is quite low (about 5.8). SCC arising in the context of a VLU has a particularly aggressive behavior. A 76-year-old male patient with no relevant medical familial history, with chronic venous insufficiency CEAP C6 for 10 years [recurrent leg ulcers with favorable outcome (healing) after specific local and systemic treatment], showing for about three years one ulcerated lesion located on the anterior upper third of the right calf non-responsive to specific treatment, which subsequently increased their size and merged. Biopsy sample was taken. Histopathology showed epidermal acanthosis, papillomatosis, intense parakeratosis, pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia, dysplasia and moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma with areas of acantholysis. Immunohistochemistry (Ki67, EMA, cytokeratin 34βE12 and p63) was performed and all types of immunostaining were moderately to intense positive. Above-knee leg amputation and specific oncologic treatment were proposed as possible curative solutions but the patient refused. Ten months after diagnosis and discharge form the Department of Dermatology, the patient died. Patients with chronic venous leg ulcers and clinically suspicious lesions should be evaluated for malignant transformation of the venous lesion. When diagnosed, malignancy complicating a chronic venous leg ulcer requires a resolute treatment as it may be fatal.

  2. [When to worry about before a vascular chronic leg ulcer?].

    PubMed

    Lazareth, I

    2016-09-01

    Leg ulcers are a chronic condition. Healing can be long for venous ulcers and the risk of complications is significant. Infection is the most severe complication and can occur in the form of easily diagnosed acute bacterial dermohypodermitis that generally responds well to antibiotic treatment if given at an appropriate dose or in the form of localized infection that is more difficult to diagnosis. Indeed, no consensus has been reached in the literature on the clinical criteria to retain for the diagnosis of localized infection. Similarly, the most appropriate treatment remains to be established. Local care would be a logical starting point, followed by systemic antibiotics if this approach is unsuccessful. Individual conditions also should be taken into consideration (immunodepression, severe arteriopathy warranting more rapid use of systemic antibiotics). The second most frequent complication is an allergic reaction to a topical agent used for wound care. The rate of sensitivization in patients with leg ulcers is high (60 %), although the rate is declining with modern dressings. No product can be considered perfectly safe for these polysensitized patients. Dermocorticoid therapy can be very effective. Allergology tests are needed. Certain leg ulcers require special care from diagnosis. An arterial origin must be suspected for deep, or necrotic ulcers. Arterial supply must be explored rapidly, followed by a revascularization procedure when necessary. Highly painful superficial extensive necrotic ulcers due to necrotic angiodermitis require hospital care for skin grafts that will control the antiodermitis and provide pain. Carcinoma should be suspected in cases of leg ulcers with an atypical localization exhibiting excessive budding. A biopsy is mandatory for leg ulcers with an unusual course (absence of healing despite well-conducted care). PMID:27622980

  3. Evaluation of clinical and laboratory correlates of sickle leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Madu, Anazoeze Jude; Ubesie, Agozie; Madu, Kenechi Anthony; Okwor, Bismarck; Anigbo, Chukwudi

    2013-01-01

    The exact mechanism for the occurrence of sickle leg ulcers (SLUs) has not been fully explained, although, popular opinion supports a multifactorial etio-pathogenetic process. Leg ulceration in sickle cell is a chronic and debilitating condition which is difficult to treat and may worsen the psychosocial impact of this illness. This study aims to evaluate the laboratory and clinical correlates of SLUs. One hundred sixty-seven patients who had been diagnosed with sickle cell anemia (homozygous S) had their steady-state hemoglobin concentration (Hb), hematocrit, white cell count, platelet count, serum bilirubin, and aspartate transaminase (AST) as well as frequency of crisis per annum evaluated with respect to their relationship to the occurrence of leg ulcers. They were aged 6-53 years (mean age 24.3 years), and prevalence of leg ulcer was found to be 2.75 per 1000 (2.54 per 1000 in females and 2.83 per 1000 in males). The independent sample t-test showed a significant difference in the serum AST levels in those with SLU (p = 0.029), though a positive correlation did not exist. Other predictors of disease severity found to have positive relationship with each other were the AST and total serum bilirubin 0.207 (p = 0.012); Hb and age 0.130 (p = 0.035); Hb and white cell count -0.159 (p = 0.010), white cell count and age -0.113 (p = 0.018). SLUs do not occur in patients with severe disease in sickle cell. The clinical and laboratory indicators of severe sickle cell disease do not correlate positively with the occurrence of SLU. Serum AST may have a relationship with leg ulceration in these patients. Environmental factors most likely play a major part in the etiopathogenesis of leg ulcer and this may require further studies in different sociocultural settings.

  4. LEG ULCERS IN SICKLE CELL DISEASE: CURRENT PATTERNS AND PRACTICES

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Kara-Marie H.; Axelrod, Karen C.; Buscetta, Ashley; Hassell, Kathryn L.; Adams-Graves, Patricia E.; Seamon, Catherine; Kato, Gregory J.; Minniti, Caterina P.

    2013-01-01

    Leg ulcers are a debilitating complication of patients with sickle cell disease, and their frequency in North America was reported to be 2.5% by the Cooperative Study of Sickle Cell Disease more than 20 years ago. We sought to determine if the frequency of leg ulcers in sickle cell patients in the United States had declined and to assess which treatments providers use most commonly. We sent an e-mail survey to health professionals belonging to the national Sickle Cell Adult Provider Network. Responses were obtained from 31 of them (26.0%). Most of them (96.0%) reported having some patients with leg ulcers. Providers reported a total of 185 patients with active leg ulcers and 224 in the previous 5 years, for a total of 409 patients. Hb SS (homozygous sickle cell anemia) was the most common genotype of affected individuals, followed by Hb SC (double heterozygote for Hb S [β6(A3)Glu→Val, GAG>GTG; HBB: c.20A>T] and Hb C [β6(A3)Glu→Lys, GAG>AAG; HBB: c.19G>A]). Males showed a 2:1 predominance. Two-thirds of patients were treated with either hydroxyurea (HU) or transfusion therapy and most used compression stockings and topical therapies as directed by wound care services. We conclude that leg ulcers continue to be a debilitating complication of young adults with sickle cell disease, despite improved supportive care and the widespread use of disease modifying agents such HU and transfusion. While some providers offer office-based ulcer care, the majority prefer specialty consultation including podiatry, plastic surgery and dermatology. Despite their frequency, there is no clear consensus among providers as to the best treatment. PMID:23600469

  5. Managing venous leg ulcers and oedema using compression hosiery.

    PubMed

    Tickle, Joy

    2015-10-21

    Increasing demand for services and rising costs in the NHS have resulted in reduced consultation times and resources for clinicians when treating patients with compression therapy. This article emphasises the importance of considering alternative treatment approaches, while encouraging patient choice, independence and self-care. One alternative treatment is the use of compression hosiery kits for the management of venous leg ulceration and oedema.

  6. The impact of leg ulcers on patients' quality of life.

    PubMed

    Charles, H

    1995-06-01

    The pain of leg ulceration can dominate patients' lives and can have serious psychological and social effects on patients' quality of life. A phenomenological approach was used in this study to obtain rich data on patients' experiences. A feeling of loss of control and lack of faith in the professionals treating the condition was found. PMID:7604055

  7. Topical Treatment of Nonhealing Venous Leg Ulcer with Propolis Ointment

    PubMed Central

    Kucharzewski, M.; Kózka, M.; Urbanek, T.

    2013-01-01

    An investigation of effectiveness of topical treatment of nonhealing chronic venous leg ulcers with propolis ointment was conducted. 56 patients were included in the study and randomized into two groups. In group 1, there were 28 patients (ulceration area: 6.9–9.78 cm2) treated by means of topical propolis ointment application and short stretch bandage compression. In group 2, there were 29 patients (ulceration area: 7.2–9.4 cm2) treated by means of Unna boot leg compression without topical propolis treatment. In the study, the efficacy of both treatment methods in patients with resistive venous leg ulcers was compared. The ulceration of patients from group 1 healed completely after 6 weeks of therapy in all cases. In all patients from group 2, the process of healing was longer but successfully completed after 16 weeks of the therapy. We found that an adjunctive propolis ointment treatment increases the efficacy of the short stretch bandage compression stocking, and this combined treatment is more effective than Unna's boot compression alone. PMID:23662121

  8. Spatial distribution of mast cells in chronic venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Abd-El-Aleem, S A; Morgan, C; Ferguson, M W J; McCollum, C N; Ireland, G W

    2005-01-01

    Chronic venous leg ulcers (CVUs) show chronic inflammation but different pathological changes occur in different parts of the ulcer. There is a lack of re-epithelialisation and defective matrix deposition in the ulcer base but epidermal hyperproliferation and increased matrix deposition in the surrounding skin. The role of mast cells in wound healing, inflammation, fibrosis and epidermal hyperproliferation has been extensively studied but less is known about their role in CVUs. In the present study, we investigated the distribution of mast cells in CVUs with specific consideration of the differences between the ulcer base and the skin surrounding the ulcer. Both histochemical and immunohistological methods were used to detect the mast cell marker tryptase in frozen sections of CVU biopsies. Mast cells were counted in the dermis of normal skin, in the ulcer base and in the skin surrounding the ulcer. Double immunofluorescence staining was used to study the location of mast cells in relation to blood vessels. In normal skin few mast cells were seen in the dermis but none in the epidermis. However in CVUs there was a significant increase in intact and degranulated mast cells in the surrounding skin and ulcer edge (184 per field, p<0.003) of CVUs and a significant reduction in the ulcer base (20.5 per field p<0.05) in comparison to normal skin (61 per field). In CVUs mast cells showed a characteristic location near the epithelial basement membrane whilst mast cell granules and phantom cells (mast cells devoid of granules) were predominantly seen in the epidermis. In the dermis, mast cells were seen associated with blood vessels. The marked increase in mast cells in the surrounding skin of CVUs and depletion of mast cells in the ulcer base could implicate mast cell mediators in the pathological changes in CVUs particularly in the epidermal and vascular changes occurring in the surrounding skin.

  9. Telemedicine: an innovative way of managing patients with leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Samad, Ajai; Hayes, Sue; Dodds, Simon

    2002-03-01

    The optimal management of patients with leg ulcers requires a multidisciplinary approach, with contributions from both community and hospital specialists to identify, investigate and treat the underlying causes, provide patient education, assess healing and dress the wounds, monitor outcome and prevent recurrence. However, current practice is impaired by the limited communication between community and hospital specialists. There are inconsistencies in methods of transferring and updating patient records between the hospital and the community, and this can lead to confusion over the diagnosis and appropriate management. Telemedicine, the electronic exchange of medical information at a distance, would appear to offer a way to establish an efficient and effective communication link between hospital and community specialists involved in the care of patients with leg ulcers. The authors of this article believe that modern information technology and the existing NHSnet information infrastructure could be employed to create such a link via electronic patient records.

  10. Changes in patient's quality of life comparing conservative and surgical treatment of venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Jankūnas, Vytautas; Rimdeika, Rytis; Jasenas, Marius; Samsanavicius, Donatas

    2004-01-01

    Leg ulcers of different etiology disable up to 1% of total population, and up to 15% individuals over 70 years old. It is an old disease, which troubles the patients and medical personnel and is hard to cure. It might take several years to cure the ulcer fully. Most of the patients with leg ulcers are being treated at home, not in the outpatient departments or hospitals; therefore there is not much information on how the ulcer affects the patient's everyday life and its quality. The researchers often analyze only the financial part of this disorder forgetting its human part: pain, social isolation, and decreased mobility. There are many questionnaires and methods to analyze the quality of life of the patients with leg ulceration. It is often unclear if we should treat the ulcer conservatively for a long time or if part of resources should be used for operation (skin grafting) and the time of treatment should be shortened. To see the advantage of both methods and the influence of the ulcer treatment to the quality of life we decided to estimate the functionality of surgical and conservative treatment. We have analyzed the case histories and the data of special questionnaires of 44 patients, which were treated in Department of Plastic Surgery and Burns of Kaunas University of Medicine Hospital in the period of 2001 January-2004 February and had large trophic leg ulcers (m=254 cm2) for 6 months or more. Ten patients were treated conservatively and 34 patients were treated by skin grafting. All of them were interviewed after 3-6 months. We found that the pain in the place of the ulcers has decreased for the patients, who were treated surgically. By making the differences of the pain more exact we found out, that the patients have been feeling pain before the operation and when interviewing them the second time they told that they felt discomfort, not pain. The intensity of pain remained the same for the patients treated conservatively. The regression of pain also

  11. Cost effectiveness analysis of larval therapy for leg ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, Cynthia P; Bland, J Martin; Cullum, Nicky; Dumville, Jo C; Nelson, E Andrea; Torgerson, David J; Worthy, Gill

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the cost effectiveness of larval therapy compared with hydrogel in the management of leg ulcers. Design Cost effectiveness and cost utility analyses carried out alongside a pragmatic multicentre, randomised, open trial with equal randomisation. Population Intention to treat population comprising 267 patients with a venous or mixed venous and arterial ulcers with at least 25% coverage of slough or necrotic tissue. Interventions Patients were randomly allocated to debridement with bagged larvae, loose larvae, or hydrogel. Main outcome measure The time horizon was 12 months and costs were estimated from the UK National Health Service perspective. Cost effectiveness outcomes are expressed in terms of incremental costs per ulcer-free day (cost effectiveness analysis) and incremental costs per quality adjusted life years (cost utility analysis). Results The larvae arms were pooled for the main analysis. Treatment with larval therapy cost, on average, £96.70 (€109.61; $140.57) more per participant per year (95% confidence interval −£491.9 to £685.8) than treatment with hydrogel. Participants treated with larval therapy healed, on average, 2.42 days before those in the hydrogel arm (95% confidence interval −0.95 to 31.91 days) and had a slightly better health related quality of life, as the annual difference in QALYs was 0.011 (95% confidence interval −0.067 to 0.071). However, none of these differences was statistically significant. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio for the base case analysis was estimated at £8826 per QALY gained and £40 per ulcer-free day. Considerable uncertainty surrounds the outcome estimates. Conclusions Debridement of sloughy or necrotic leg ulcers with larval therapy is likely to produce similar health benefits and have similar costs to treatment with hydrogel. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN55114812 and National Research Register N0484123692. PMID:19304578

  12. Treatment with benzoyl peroxide of ulcers on legs within lesions of necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum.

    PubMed

    Hanke, C W; Bergfeld, W F

    1978-09-01

    A lotion of 20% benzoyl peroxide was applied to ulcers on legs from necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum. The ulcers healed rapidly and uneventfully, leaving firm, yellow scars. The efficacy and simplicity of use of topical benzoyl peroxide therapy is discussed.

  13. Leg ulcer in Werner syndrome (adult progeria): a case report.

    PubMed

    Fumo, Giuseppe; Pau, Monica; Patta, Federico; Aste, Nicola; Atzori, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS; MIM#277700) or adult progeria, is a rare disease, associated with mutations of a single gene (RECQL2 or WRN), located on chromosome 8 (8p12). It codes a DNA-helicase, whose defects cause genomic instability. The highest incidences are reported in Japan and Sardinia (Italy). On this major island of the Mediterranean Basin, the WS cases have been observed in the northern areas. The authors describe the apparently first case reported in southern Sardinia, a 51-year-old woman, who was born in and resides in the province of Cagliari. She presented with a 9-year history of an intractable leg ulcer and other characteristic symptoms, including "bird-like" face, high-pitched voice, premature greying, short stature, abdominal obesity in contrast with thin body type, scleroderma-like legs, decreased muscle mass, diabetes, atherosclerosis, and premature menopause. A specialized genetic Institute of Research (IRCCS-IDI, Rome) confirmed the clinical diagnosis. There is no cure or specific treatment and patients must be periodically screened for an increased risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease and malignancies. Among the many findings, leg ulcers significantly affect the patient's quality of life. This problem may send the patient to the dermatologist, who finally suspects the diagnosis. Poor response to medical treatment may require aggressive repeated surgery, with poor or temporary results.

  14. Allergic contact dermatitis to Plectranthus amboinicus masquerading as chronic leg ulcer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shyue-Luen; Chang, Ya-Ching; Yang, Chin-Hsun; Hong, Hong-Shang

    2005-12-01

    This report discusses a case of a 69-year-old woman who developed chronic non-healing leg ulcers after long-term topical use of Plectranthus amboinicus. The ulcer was proven to be allergic contact dermatitis to P. amboinicus by a patch test. The ulcer healed after discontinuation of P. amboinicus. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of allergic contact dermatitis to P. amboinicus masquerading as chronic leg ulcer. PMID:16364130

  15. Chronic leg ulcer: does a patient always get a correct diagnosis and adequate treatment?

    PubMed

    Mooij, Michael C; Huisman, Laurens C

    2016-03-01

    Patients with chronic leg ulcers have severely impaired quality of life and account for a high percentage of annual healthcare costs. To establish the cause of a chronic leg ulcer, referral to a center with a multidisciplinary team of professionals is often necessary. Treating the underlying cause diminishes healing time and reduces costs. In venous leg ulcers adequate compression therapy is still a problem. It can be improved by training the professionals with pressure measuring devices. A perfect fitting of elastic stockings is important to prevent venous leg ulcer recurrence. In most cases, custom-made stockings are the best choice for this purpose. PMID:26916772

  16. Leg ulcers and abscesses caused by Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Langrock, Marie-Luise; Linde, Hans-Jörg; Landthaler, Michael; Karrer, Sigrid

    2008-01-01

    Cutaneous infections caused by S. marcescens, a gram-negative bacillus belonging to the family of Enterobacteriaceae, are uncommon but may be predisposed by immunocompromised conditions or pre-damaged skin. A 73-year-old man presented with multiple ulcers and painful nodules on the lower right leg as well as abscesses on the right malleolus lateralis. He had been treated with oral penicillin without success. Due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, he was receiving a systemic therapy with corticosteroids. In addition, he had a post-thrombotic syndrome of the lower right leg. Serratia marcescens was the only microorganism isolated from all cultures performed. After a microbial sensitivity test, ertapenem 1 g/day was given intravenously for 10 days, followed by oral administration of ciprofloxacin 500 mg 1-0-1 for a further 7 days. This therapy resulted in the resolution of all lesions. This rare skin infection with S. marcescens needs specific microbiological diagnosis and adapted antibiosis.

  17. An evaluation of Debrisan in chronic leg ulcers and pressure sores.

    PubMed

    Allen, P C; Turmer, A D

    1979-01-01

    Debrisan (Dextranomer) was subjected to a simple open assessment in the treatment of fifty-three chronic leg ulcers and thirty pressure sores in eight hospitals. It was found that 70% of leg ulcers and 76% of pressure sores improved, with a noticeable cleansing effect being evident in 79% and 83% respectively. No side-effects were recorded.

  18. [Personalized holistic approach to a patient with mixed leg ulcer].

    PubMed

    Kovacević, Jadranka; Sinozić, Tamara

    2014-10-01

    Holistic approach as the philosophical orientation to care underpins the fundamental wholeness of human being and emphasizes the importance of balance within the person and between the person and his/her environment. It includes elements of the physiological, sociological, economic, psychological and spiritual dimensions, and thus providesan opportunity to assess the patient as a whole and in relation to his/ her living context. Such an integrated approach is part of the basic knowledge and skills of general practitioners/family doctors and makes them equal members of a multidisciplinary team in chronic wound patient care. In this case report on a patient with mixed leg ulcer, we will try to bring closer holistic approach in care for this kind of patients in daily practice of general practitioners/family doctors.

  19. The analgesic effect of electrostimulation (WoundEL®) in the treatment of leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Leloup, Pauline; Toussaint, Pascal; Lembelembe, Jean-Paul; Célérier, Philippe; Maillard, Hervé

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to demonstrate the analgesic efficacy of electrostimulation (ES), a recognised treatment for leg ulcers. Patients treated by ES for leg ulcers between 2011 and 2013 were included in the study. The pain score obtained with the numerical rating scale (NRS) was reported before the start of the ES (D0), after 3 days (D3) and 1 week following treatment initialisation. The analgesic treatments (AT) were reported at each assessment. Seventy-three patients were included (mean age 75·19 years): 31 venous leg ulcers, 21 mixed venous leg ulcers, 2 arterial ulcers, 17 hypertensive ischaemic ulcers, 1 Hydrea(®)-induced ulcer and an amputation stump ulcer. The NRS at D0 was on average 5·3 (median = 6) while it was 2·2 at D7 (median = 2), that is P < 0·001. The results were also significant between D0 and D3 (P < 0·001). A decrease in the number of AT used was observed between D0 (2·0 AT per patient on average) and D7 (1·7 AT on average) (P < 0·001). We also observed a decrease in the consumption of grade 3 analgesics on D0 and D7 (P = 0·03). This study demonstrates the rapid analgesic efficacy of ES in leg ulcers, with a clear impact on the NRS score and especially on the decrease in analgesic consumption.

  20. Clinical Examination and Treatment of a Leg Ulcer Caused by a Stingray Puncture.

    PubMed

    Fino, Pasquale; Onesti, Maria Giuseppina; Felli, Antonina; Scuderi, Nicolò

    2015-06-01

    The most frequent causes of leg ulcers include venous incompetency (superficial and deep), arterial insufficiency, trauma, vasculitis, and neoplasm. Leg ulcers from injury by stingrays are quite rare. In this case report, we describe a leg ulcer caused by a stingray sting complicated by infection, which healed completely without surgery. In addition, since there few cases in the literature describing such traumas, we performed a comprehensive review of the literature. Important is the fact that the wound healing was complete without resorting to surgery, but only with a correct targeted antibiotic therapy and the use of a collagenase, which has the particularity of having hyaluronic acid as a component. PMID:24879461

  1. Topical therapy of leg ulcers with 20 percent benzoyl peroxide lotion.

    PubMed

    Colman, G J; Roenigk, H H

    1978-04-01

    Preliminary clinical observations suggest that benzoyl peroxide lotion (20%) may be a useful topical treatment for various types of leg ulcers. Further studies utilizing patients as their own controls (treating half of the ulcer surface with 20% benzoyl peroxide) are now underway.

  2. Managing chronic oedema in a patient with arterial disease and leg ulceration.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Robin

    2016-04-01

    Treating lymphoedema in patients with critical arterial disease can be contraindicated. This case study describes current methods of managing lymphoedema in a patient with arterial disease and leg ulcers. The patient, a 65-year-old male, had paraplegia and lower-limb lymphoedema with leg ulceration for 18 years, as well as arterial disease. The patient was referred to the lymphoedema/vascular service in 2013. Duplex ultrasound indicated superficial femoral occlusion. The arterial disease was treated with an angiogram and angioplasty, and when the blood supply was improved, the lymphoedema was treated. Emphasis was placed on self-care and reducing the need for community nurse involvement. Selfcare included compression bandaging, use of FarrowWrap, low-level light therapy, and ulcer dressings. Outcomes were measured using a telemedicine software programme. The patient's lymphoedema was reduced, leg ulcers healed, and quality of life transformed.

  3. Trends in perforated peptic ulcer: incidence, etiology, treatment, and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Svanes, C

    2000-03-01

    After increasing steeply at the beginning of the twentieth century, ulcer perforation incidence during the last decades has declined in the young and in men, and it has risen among the elderly and in women. These changes can be attributed to a cohort phenomenon: Ulcer perforation risk is particularly common in the cohorts born after the turn of the twentieth century and is less common in previous and succeeding birth cohorts. A decline in total incidence is expected with the death of the high risk cohorts. Most ulcer perforations among subjects < 75 years of age can be attributed to smoking. Subjects with a history of ulcer perforation therefore have poorer long-term survival than the general population, most pronounced for younger generations. About one of four ulcer perforations can be attributed to the use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, a risk factor of particular importance in the elderly. Ulcer perforation was frequently treated by gastric resection in former days, whereas suture, being the first method introduced in 1887, is the method of choice today. The introduction of antibiotics improved the prognosis of ulcer perforation surgery greatly. Postoperative lethality decreased until 1950 but has remained stable since then. Lethality is higher in the elderly and is higher after gastric than after duodenal perforation. The delay before surgical treatment is a strong determinant for lethality, complication rates, and hospital costs. Treatment delay seems to have increased during the last

  4. Comparative study of quality of life and psychosocial characteristics in patients with psoriasis and leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Kouris, Anargyros; Christodoulou, Christos; Efstathiou, Vasiliki; Tsatovidou, Revekka; Torlidi-Kordera, Evangelia; Zouridaki, Eftychia; Kontochristopoulos, George

    2016-03-01

    Psoriasis and leg ulcers have a marked impact on the patient's quality of life and represent a life-long burden for affected patients. The aim of this study is to compare the quality of life, anxiety and depression, self-esteem, and loneliness in patients with psoriasis and leg-ulcer patients. Eighty patients with leg ulcers, eighty patients with psoriasis, and eighty healthy controls were included in this study. The quality of life, depression and anxiety, loneliness of the patient, and self-esteem were assessed using the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the UCLA loneliness Scale (UCLA-Version 3), and the Rosenberg's Self-esteem Scale (RSES), respectively. The DLQI score among patients with psoriasis was 12.74 ± 4.89 and leg ulcer patients was 13.28 ± 2.57. The patients with psoriasis presented statistically significant higher anxiety (9.87 ± 4.56) than both leg ulcer patients (8.26 ± 2.82) and controls (6.45 ± 1.89), while leg ulcer patients also presented higher anxiety than controls. Regarding self-esteem, although there were no significant differences between the patients with psoriasis (15.25 ± 3.20) and the ones with leg ulcers (15.89 ± 2.93), they both presented statistically significant lower self-esteem scores than control group (18.53 ± 3.04). The patients with psoriasis presented statistically significant higher levels of loneliness and social isolation (46.18 ± 6.63) compared to leg ulcer patients (43.73 ± 5.68) than controls (42.49 ± 3.41). Psoriasis and leg ulcers are long-term skin diseases associated with significant impairment of the patient's quality of life, anxiety, and self-esteem, which are frequently under-recognized.

  5. Quality of life in chronic leg ulcer patients. An assessment according to the Nottingham Health Profile.

    PubMed

    Lindholm, C; Bjellerup, M; Christensen, O B; Zederfeldt, B

    1993-12-01

    Chronic leg ulcer is a disease of long duration, occurring predominantly in elderly people. Traditionally, little interest has been devoted to the study of the impact of this disease on life quality. In the present study the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) was used to assess disease influence on six areas of daily life, namely: pain, physical mobility, sleep, energy, emotional reactions and social isolation. Standard questionnaires were distributed to patients with chronic leg ulcers of venous, arterial or mixed venous-arterial origin, treated at the Department of Dermatology. Complete data were obtained from 125 patients. The disease had a marked impact on the patient's subjectively perceived health. Males exhibited remarkably elevated scores, compared to the normative scores for men, especially in the areas of pain, emotional reactions, social isolation and physical restrictions. For women the impact of leg ulcer disease, although obvious, seems much less marked than for males. An exceptionally long median duration of leg ulcer disease was found among shop-assistants. It is possible that preventive measures should be undertaken in this group. The duration of leg ulcer disease did not seem to influence the quality of life. Patients with long disease duration in fact reported fewer problems than those with shorter duration, suggesting adaptive mechanisms. This study indicates that male leg ulcer patients should be more closely observed for symptoms of emotional stress, pain, social isolation and impaired physical mobility. More efforts should be made to alleviate pain. Above all this study underlines the importance of considering not only the ulcer but the whole patient. PMID:7906458

  6. [QUALITY OF LIFE AND PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC LEG ULCER].

    PubMed

    Situm, Mirna; Kolić, Maja; Spoljar, Sanja

    2016-03-01

    Wound represents a disruption of anathomic and physiologic continuity of the skin. Regarding to the healing process, wounds can be classified as acute or chronic wounds. Quality of life is primarily concerned with the impact of chronic wounds. A wound is considered chronic if healing does not occur within expected period of time regarding to its etiology and localization. Chronic wounds can be classified as typical and atypical. The majority of wounds (95 percent) are typical ones which include ischaemic, neurotrophic and hypostatic ulcer and two separate entities: diabetic foot and decubital ulcers. An 80 percent of chronic wounds localized on lower leg are result of chronic venous insufficiency, in 5-10 percent cause is of arterial etiology, whereas the remainder is mostly neuropathic ulcer. Chronic wounds represent a significant burden to patients, health care professionals and the entire health care system. Chronic wounds affect the elderly population and it is estimated that 1-2 percent of western population suffer from it. This estimate is expected to rise due to an increasing population of the elderly and the diabetic and obesity epidemic. The WHO definition of health is "A state of complite physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity". Based on this definition, quality of life in relation to health may be defined as "the functional effect of an illness and it's consequent therapy upon a patient, as perceived by the patient". The domains that contribute to this effect are physical, psychological and social functioning. The patient's own perceptions of an illness were found to play an important role in explainig quality of life. Chronic wounds significantly decrease the quality of life in a number of ways such as reduced mobility, pain, unpleasant odor, sleep disturbances, social isolation and frustration, and inability to perform everyday duties. Among the most common psychological reactions to chronic diseases

  7. [Neurosis and genetic theory of etiology and pathogenesis of ulcer disease].

    PubMed

    Kolotilova, M L; Ivanov, L N

    2014-01-01

    Based on the analysis of literature data and our own research, we have developed the original concept of etiology and pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease. An analysis of the literature shows that none of the theories of pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease does not cover the full diversity of the involved functions and their shifts, which lead to the development of ulcers in the stomach and the duodenum. Our neurogenic-genetic theory of etiology and pathogenesis of gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer very best explains the cause-and-effect relationships in the patient peptic ulcer, allowing options for predominance in one or the other case factors of neurosis or genetic factors. However, it is clear that the only other: combination of neurogenic factor with genetically modified reactivity of gastroduodenal system (the presence of the target organ) cause the chronicity of the sores. The theory of peptic ulcer disease related to psychosomatic pathologies allows us to develop effective schema therapy, including drugs with psychocorrective action. On the basis of our theory of the role of Helicobacter pylori infection is treated as a pathogenetic factor in the development of peptic ulcer disease.

  8. [Neurosis and genetic theory of etiology and pathogenesis of ulcer disease].

    PubMed

    Kolotilova, M L; Ivanov, L N

    2014-01-01

    Based on the analysis of literature data and our own research, we have developed the original concept of etiology and pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease. An analysis of the literature shows that none of the theories of pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease does not cover the full diversity of the involved functions and their shifts, which lead to the development of ulcers in the stomach and the duodenum. Our neurogenic-genetic theory of etiology and pathogenesis of gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer very best explains the cause-and-effect relationships in the patient peptic ulcer, allowing options for predominance in one or the other case factors of neurosis or genetic factors. However, it is clear that the only other: combination of neurogenic factor with genetically modified reactivity of gastroduodenal system (the presence of the target organ) cause the chronicity of the sores. The theory of peptic ulcer disease related to psychosomatic pathologies allows us to develop effective schema therapy, including drugs with psychocorrective action. On the basis of our theory of the role of Helicobacter pylori infection is treated as a pathogenetic factor in the development of peptic ulcer disease. PMID:25562999

  9. Novel Wound Healing Powder Formulation for the Treatment of Venous Leg Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Ghatnekar, Angela V.; Elstrom, Tuan; Ghatnekar, Gautam S.; Kelechi, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Chronic venous disorders are common in the Western world. The current treatment of venous leg ulcers is unsatisfactory despite the availability of well-documented standards of care. Patients today are interested in alternative approaches to modern medicine. We have developed a wound-healing powder containing natural ingredients with absorptive, aromatic, antiseptic, and anti-inflammatory synergistic properties. This report describes 3 cases that were successfully treated with the powder, demonstrating the potential of herbal remedies in the clinical treatment of venous leg ulcers. PMID:24527167

  10. The difficulty and the solution of compression therapy in a healed venous leg ulcer.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Sylvie

    2016-09-01

    Continuing preventative treatment once a venous ulcer is healed is fraught with dangers, with the most common problem being the inability of the wearer or their carer to apply compression therapy. A new novel compression modality has been introduced to solve the dilemma of applying compression once an injury has healed. This compression is also time-saving for practitioners who wish to heal leg ulcers. This will have an impact on the time restrictions of practice and district nurses-who have a 10-15 minute slot to dress and bandage their patients' venous ulcers. PMID:27594312

  11. Quality of life psychosocial characteristics in Greek patients with leg ulcers: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Kouris, Anargyros; Armyra, Kalliopi; Christodoulou, Christos; Sgontzou, Themis; Karypidis, Dimitrios; Kontochristopoulos, George; Liordou, Fotini; Zakopoulou, Nikoletta; Zouridaki, Eftychia

    2016-10-01

    Chronic leg ulcers are a public health problem that can have a significant impact on the patient's physical, socioeconomic and psychological status. The aim of this study is to evaluate the quality of life, anxiety and depression, self-esteem and loneliness in patients suffering from leg ulcers. A total of 102 patients were enrolled in the study. The quality of life, anxiety and depression, self-esteem and loneliness of the patient were assessed using the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Rosenberg's Self-esteem Scale (RSES) and the UCLA Loneliness Scale (UCLA-Version 3), respectively. The mean DLQI score was 13·38 ± 2·59, suggesting a serious effect on the quality of life of patients. Those with leg ulcers had statistically significant higher scores according to the HADS-total scale (P = 0·031) and HADS-anxiety subscale (P = 0·015) compared with healthy volunteers. Moreover, a statistically significant difference was found between the two groups concerning the UCLA-scale (P = 0·029). Female patients presented with a higher score of anxiety (P = 0·027) and social isolation (P = 0·048), and worse quality of life (P = 0·018) than male patients. A severe quality of life impairment was documented, reflecting a significant psychosocial impact on patients with leg ulcers.

  12. Management of stasis leg ulcers with Unna's boots versus elastic support stockings.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, W M; Swallow, R T

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-one patients with stasis leg ulcers were randomly assigned to two groups. The first group was treated with Unna's boots, while the second was treated with elastic support stockings with graded compression from 24 mm/Hg pressure at the ankle to 16 mm/Hg pressure at the calf. The ulcers on seven of ten legs (70%) treated with Unna's boots and on 10 of 14 legs (71%) treated with elastic support stocking healed. Although the two groups were small, there was no statistically significant difference between their success rate in healing stasis leg ulcers (p = 0.9394). Both treatment groups showed significant changes in lower limb volume, calf circumference, and ankle circumference, although there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. If healing times are calculated, however, the average healing time in the Unna boot-treated group was 7.3 weeks, while patients treated with support stockings took an average of 18.4 weeks. If one patient whose ulcerations almost encircled her calves and took 78 weeks to heal is excluded, patients treated with support stockings had an average healing time of 11.8 weeks.

  13. Quality of life profile and correlated factors in chronic leg ulcer patients in the mid-west of São Paulo State, Brazil*

    PubMed Central

    Wachholz, Patrick Alexander; Masuda, Paula Yoshiko; Nascimento, Dejair Caitano; Taira, Cecilia Midori Higashi; Cleto, Norma Gondim

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Chronic leg ulcer may have an impact on patients' quality of life. OBJECTIVES This study aimed to identify the impact of leg ulcers on patient's quality of life using the Dermatology Life Quality Index and to define the main factors correlated with this perception. METHOD Cross-sectional, non-probabilistic sampling study. We included patients with chronic leg ulcers being treated for at least 3 months. A sociodemographic and clinical survey was conducted to assess the profile of the ulcers. We administered a screening for depressive symptoms and the Dermatology Life Quality Index. We performed a descriptive statistical analysis, chi-square test and Mann-Whitney test for categorical data, Pearson for numeric variables, and multiple regression for categorical data. RESULTS Forty-one patients were assessed. Their mean age was 61.78 years. Venous ulcers (48.8%) were the most prevalent. Seventy-three percent of the sample perceived no impact/low impact on quality of life in the past week, and 26.8% perceived moderate/high impact. A multiple regression analysis identified the causes of lesion, pain related to the ulcers, time of onset, and severity of the depressive symptoms as the variables that had an influence on quality of life. CONCLUSIONS The majority of the sample perceived low or no impact of the condition on the quality of the life. The variables etiology of the lesion (p<0.001), pain related to the ulcers (p=0.001), time of onset (p=0.006), and severity of the depressive symptoms (p<0.001) had an influence on the quality of life, suggesting the need for further studies with more robust designs to confirm the causal relationship between these characteristics and quality of life. PMID:24626651

  14. Case 11: large, infected, necrotic mixed-aetiology leg ulcer.

    PubMed

    Price, Juliet; Boulton, Zoe

    2016-03-01

    This painful and malodorous ulcer was covered with 40% necrotic tissue. Combined use of octenilin Wound gel and Wound Irrigation Solution gently debrided the necrotic tissue, and helped reduce the pain and malodour. Within 6 weeks, the wound was covered with granulation tissue. PMID:26949855

  15. Etiology of genital ulcers and prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus coinfection in 10 US cities. The Genital Ulcer Disease Surveillance Group.

    PubMed

    Mertz, K J; Trees, D; Levine, W C; Lewis, J S; Litchfield, B; Pettus, K S; Morse, S A; St Louis, M E; Weiss, J B; Schwebke, J; Dickes, J; Kee, R; Reynolds, J; Hutcheson, D; Green, D; Dyer, I; Richwald, G A; Novotny, J; Weisfuse, I; Goldberg, M; O'Donnell, J A; Knaup, R

    1998-12-01

    To determine the etiology of genital ulcers and to assess the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in ulcer patients in 10 US cities, ulcer and serum specimens were collected from approximately 50 ulcer patients at a sexually transmitted disease clinic in each city. Ulcer specimens were tested using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay to detect Haemophilus ducreyi, Treponema pallidum, and herpes simplex virus (HSV); sera were tested for antibody to HIV. H. ducreyi was detected in ulcer specimens from patients in Memphis (20% of specimens) and Chicago (12%). T. pallidum was detected in ulcer specimens from every city except Los Angeles (median, 9% of specimens; range, 0%-46%). HSV was detected in >/=50% of specimens from all cities except Memphis (42%). HIV seroprevalence in ulcer patients was 6% (range by city, 0%-18%). These data suggest that chancroid is prevalent in some US cities and that persons with genital ulcers should be a focus of HIV prevention activities.

  16. A comparative clinical study on five types of compression therapy in patients with venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Dolibog, Pawel; Franek, Andrzej; Taradaj, Jakub; Dolibog, Patrycja; Blaszczak, Edward; Polak, Anna; Brzezinska-Wcislo, Ligia; Hrycek, Antoni; Urbanek, Tomasz; Ziaja, Jacek; Kolanko, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare five types of compression therapy in venous leg ulcers (intermittent pneumatic vs. stockings vs. multi layer vs. two layer short stretch bandages vs. Unna boots). Primary study endpoints were analysis of changes of the total ulcer surface area, volume and linear dimensions inside observed groups. The secondary end points were comparisons between all groups the number of completely healed wounds (ulcer healing rates), Gilman index and percentage change of ulcer surface area. In total, 147 patients with unilateral venous leg ulcers were included to this study. Participants were randomly allocated to the groups: A, B, C, D and E. After two months the healing rate was the highest in group A (intermittent pneumatic compression) - 57.14%, 16/28 patients, B (ulcer stocking system) - 56.66%, 17/30 patients and C (multi layer short stretch bandage) - 58.62%, 17/29 patients. Significantly much worse rate found in group D (two layer short stretch bandages) - only 16.66%, 5/30 patients and E (Unna boots) - 20%, 6/30 patients. The analysis of changes of the percentage of Gilman index and wound total surface area confirmed that intermittent pneumatic compression, stockings and multi layer bandages are the most efficient. The two layer short - stretch bandages and Unna boots appeared again much less effective.

  17. A Comparative Clinical Study on Five Types of Compression Therapy in Patients with Venous Leg Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Dolibog, Pawel; Franek, Andrzej; Taradaj, Jakub; Dolibog, Patrycja; Blaszczak, Edward; Polak, Anna; Brzezinska-Wcislo, Ligia; Hrycek, Antoni; Urbanek, Tomasz; Ziaja, Jacek; Kolanko, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare five types of compression therapy in venous leg ulcers (intermittent pneumatic vs. stockings vs. multi layer vs. two layer short stretch bandages vs. Unna boots). Primary study endpoints were analysis of changes of the total ulcer surface area, volume and linear dimensions inside observed groups. The secondary end points were comparisons between all groups the number of completely healed wounds (ulcer healing rates), Gilman index and percentage change of ulcer surface area. In total, 147 patients with unilateral venous leg ulcers were included to this study. Participants were randomly allocated to the groups: A, B, C, D and E. After two months the healing rate was the highest in group A (intermittent pneumatic compression) - 57.14%, 16/28 patients, B (ulcer stocking system) - 56.66%, 17/30 patients and C (multi layer short stretch bandage) - 58.62%, 17/29 patients. Significantly much worse rate found in group D (two layer short stretch bandages) - only 16.66%, 5/30 patients and E (Unna boots) - 20%, 6/30 patients. The analysis of changes of the percentage of Gilman index and wound total surface area confirmed that intermittent pneumatic compression, stockings and multi layer bandages are the most efficient. The two layer short - stretch bandages and Unna boots appeared again much less effective. PMID:24396284

  18. An evaluation of short-stretch compression systems for chronic lower-limb leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Carr, Caryn; Shadwell, Janice; Regan, Pip; Hammett, Susan

    2015-03-01

    An evaluation of a new short-stretch compression system (CoFlex UBZ, TLC and TLC Lite, Aspen Medical Europe Ltd) was undertaken in four leg ulcer clinics. A total of 19 patients aged 42-93 years were treated for up to 4 weeks, or until healed. Collated data included age, underlying diseases, leg ulcer type, ulcer duration and current treatment. The evaluation included quality of life measurements, wear time, slippage, exudate strikethrough and pain using a numerical pain score. Patients were asked to document sleep patterns. Compression was applied according to clinical need. Inclusion criteria were non-healing wounds on the lower limb existing for more than 6 weeks that were suitable for compression. Exclusion criteria included patients with untreated peripheral disease, ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI)<0.5 or those unable to consent. Staff were asked to rate performance, wear time, fluid handling and conformability. Wound tissue types improved significantly for n=16 (84%) patients. Pain scores reduced significantly by week 2, n=11 (58%) patient leg ulcers had improved, n=2 (11%) patients in standard compression noted a marked reduction in malodour and sloughy tissue. n=16 (84%) rated the overall performance as 'very good' or 'good'. A detailed cost analysis was undertaken on one patient, suggesting a potential cost saving of £186.92 per month and a cost efficiency saving of 43.4%. PMID:25757382

  19. The wound/burn guidelines - 5: Guidelines for the management of lower leg ulcers/varicose veins.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takaaki; Kukino, Ryuichi; Takahara, Masakazu; Tanioka, Miki; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Asano, Yoshihide; Abe, Masatoshi; Ishii, Takayuki; Isei, Taiki; Inoue, Yuji; Imafuku, Shinichi; Irisawa, Ryokichi; Ohtsuka, Masaki; Ohtsuka, Mikio; Ogawa, Fumihide; Kadono, Takafumi; Kawakami, Tamihiro; Kawaguchi, Masakazu; Kono, Takeshi; Kodera, Masanari; Sakai, Keisuke; Nakanishi, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Akira; Hasegawa, Minoru; Hayashi, Masahiro; Fujimoto, Manabu; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Maekawa, Takeo; Matsuo, Koma; Madokoro, Naoki; Yamasaki, Osamu; Yoshino, Yuichiro; Le Pavoux, Andres; Tachibana, Takao; Ihn, Hironobu

    2016-08-01

    Varicose veins are treated at multiple clinical departments, but as patients often visit the dermatology clinic first due to leg ulcers, the present Guidelines for the Management of Lower Leg Ulcers/Varicose Veins were prepared in consideration of the importance of the dermatologist's role. Also, the disease concept of chronic venous insufficiency or chronic venous disorders and the CEAP classification of these disorders are presented. The objective of the present guidelines is to properly guide the diagnosis and treatment of lower leg ulcers/varicose veins by systematically presenting evidence-based recommendations that support clinical decisions.

  20. Helicobacter pylori is not the predominant etiology for peptic ulcers requiring operation.

    PubMed

    Zelickson, Marc S; Bronder, Cathy M; Johnson, Brent L; Camunas, Joseph A; Smith, Dane E; Rawlinson, Dustin; Von, Stephen; Stone, H Harlan; Taylor, Spence M

    2011-08-01

    As the number of patients requiring operation for peptic ulcer disease (PUD) declines, presumed contemporary ulcer etiology has largely been derived from medically treated patients not subjected to surgery. The purpose of this study was to examine the specific causes of PUD in patients requiring surgery. Our Acute Care Surgical Service registry was reviewed for patients operated on for complications of PUD from 2004 to 2009. Emphasis was placed on individual etiologic factors for PUD. There were 128 patients (52% male, 81% white) who underwent emergency operation including: simple patch closure (n = 61, 48%); gastric resection (n = 22, 17%); gastric resection with vagotomy (n = 21, 16%); vagotomy and pyloroplasty (n = 18, 14%); or other procedures (n = 6, 5%). Complications necessitating operation were perforation (n = 79, 62%); bleeding (n = 29, 23%); obstruction (n = 12, 9%); and intractability (n = 8, 6%). Perioperative mortality was 12.5 per cent. Risk factors for PUD included tobacco use (50%), alcohol abuse (34%), and steroids (21%). Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory use was confirmed in 68 (53%) patients. Of the 128 patients, 82 (64%) were tested for Helicobacter pylori, 33 (40%) of which were positive and 49 (60%) negative. Helicobacter pylori, thus, was the confirmed ulcer etiology in only 26 per cent of cases. Unlike contemporary series of medically treated PUD, Helicobacter pylori may not be the predominant etiologic factor in patients who experience complications requiring surgery. A "traditional" surgical approach with liberal use of vagotomy, not antibiotic triple therapy, may well be the preferred treatment consideration in such cases. PMID:21944523

  1. Transcutaneous measurements of oxygen tension at edges of leg ulcers: preliminary communication.

    PubMed Central

    Mani, R; Gorman, F W; White, J E

    1986-01-01

    Using skin-surface sensors, transcutaneous oxygen tension (TcPo2) has been measured at the edges of ulcers and at control sites proximal to wounds on the same legs. TcPo2 at 43 degrees C at the edges of venous ulcers was found to be significantly different (P less than 0.003) from that of arterial and mixed arteriovenous ulcers (P less than 0.05) respectively. TcPo2 on healed skin was higher than at any wound edge. At this temperature TcPo2 was also found to be significantly different (P less than 0.001) on the intact skin of patients with venous disease when compared with measurements at identical sites on healthy controls. In the same group, these TcPo2 values increased with dependency. By contrast, at 37 degrees C TcPo2 was no different between groups (P less than 0.10), nor did it alter with position. This protocol adopted for investigating ulcers enables a quantitative distinction to be made between ulcers of different aetiologies. The differences in TcPo2 between different ulcers and healed skin support the fibrin cuff mechanism which has been suggested as the cause of venous ulceration. PMID:3795208

  2. Infection in Venous Leg Ulcers: Considerations for Optimal Management in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, Douglas J

    2016-02-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most common cause of chronic leg wounds, accounting for up to 70 % of all chronic leg ulcers and carrying with them a significant morbidity, especially for elderly patients. Among people aged 65 years and older, the annual prevalence is 1.7 %. Billions of dollars per year are spent caring for patients with these often difficult-to-heal and sometimes recurrent chronic wounds. Chronic non-healing wounds of the lower extremities are susceptible to microbial invasion and can lead to serious complications, such as delayed healing, cellulitis, enlargement of wound size, debilitating pain, and deeper wound infections causing systemic illness. Recognition and treatment of the infected venous leg ulcer is an essential skill set for any physician caring for geriatric patients. Most physicians rely on subjective clinical signs and patient-reported symptoms in the evaluation of infected chronic wounds. The conventional bacterial culture is a widely available tool for the diagnosis of bacterial infection but can have limitations. Systemic antibiotics, as well as topical antiseptics and antibiotics, can be employed to treat and control infection and critical colonization. Better understanding of microbial biofilms in the wound environment have caused them to emerge as an important reason for non-healing and infection due to their increased resistance to antimicrobial, immunological, and chemical attack. A sound understanding of the microbial-host environment and its complexities, as well as the pathophysiology of venous hypertension, must be appreciated to understand the need for a multimodality approach to treating an infected venous leg ulcer. Other treatment measures are often required, in addition to systemic and topical antibiotics, such as the application of wound bandages, compression therapy, and wound debridement, which can hasten clearance of the infection and help to promote healing.

  3. Infection in Venous Leg Ulcers: Considerations for Optimal Management in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, Douglas J

    2016-02-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most common cause of chronic leg wounds, accounting for up to 70 % of all chronic leg ulcers and carrying with them a significant morbidity, especially for elderly patients. Among people aged 65 years and older, the annual prevalence is 1.7 %. Billions of dollars per year are spent caring for patients with these often difficult-to-heal and sometimes recurrent chronic wounds. Chronic non-healing wounds of the lower extremities are susceptible to microbial invasion and can lead to serious complications, such as delayed healing, cellulitis, enlargement of wound size, debilitating pain, and deeper wound infections causing systemic illness. Recognition and treatment of the infected venous leg ulcer is an essential skill set for any physician caring for geriatric patients. Most physicians rely on subjective clinical signs and patient-reported symptoms in the evaluation of infected chronic wounds. The conventional bacterial culture is a widely available tool for the diagnosis of bacterial infection but can have limitations. Systemic antibiotics, as well as topical antiseptics and antibiotics, can be employed to treat and control infection and critical colonization. Better understanding of microbial biofilms in the wound environment have caused them to emerge as an important reason for non-healing and infection due to their increased resistance to antimicrobial, immunological, and chemical attack. A sound understanding of the microbial-host environment and its complexities, as well as the pathophysiology of venous hypertension, must be appreciated to understand the need for a multimodality approach to treating an infected venous leg ulcer. Other treatment measures are often required, in addition to systemic and topical antibiotics, such as the application of wound bandages, compression therapy, and wound debridement, which can hasten clearance of the infection and help to promote healing. PMID:26833351

  4. Prevalence of skin problems and leg ulceration in a sample of young injecting drug users

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug users suffer harm from the injecting process, and clinical services are reporting increasing numbers presenting with skin-related problems such as abscesses and leg ulcers. Skin breakdown can lead to long-term health problems and increased service costs and is often the first indication of serious systemic ill health. The extent of skin problems in injecting drug users has not previously been quantified empirically, and there is a dearth of robust topical literature. Where skin problems have been reported, this is often without clear definition and generic terms such as ‘soft tissue infection’ are used which lack specificity. The aim of this study was to identify the range and extent of skin problems including leg ulceration in a sample of injecting drug users. Definitions of skin problems were developed and applied to descriptions from drug users to improve rigour. Methods Data were collected in needle exchanges and methadone clinics across Glasgow, Scotland, from both current and former drug injectors using face-to-face interviews. Results Two hundred participants were recruited, of which 74% (n = 148) were males and 26% (n = 52) were females. The age range was 21–44 years (mean 35 years). Just under two thirds (64%, n = 127) were currently injecting or had injected within the last 6 months, and 36% (n = 73) had previously injected and had not injected for more than 6 months. Sixty per cent (n = 120) of the sample had experienced a skin problem, and the majority reported more than one problem. Most common were abscesses, lumps, track marks and leg ulcers. Fifteen per cent (n = 30) of all participants reported having had a leg ulcer. Conclusions This is an original empirical study which demonstrated unique findings of a high prevalence of skin disease (60%) and surprisingly high rates of leg ulceration (15%). Skin disease in injecting drug users is clearly widespread. Leg ulceration in particular is a chronic recurring

  5. Involving patients with leg ulcers in developing innovations in treatment and management strategies.

    PubMed

    McNichol, Elaine

    2014-09-01

    Securing greater patient and public involvement is a central theme of health policy in many countries ( Coulter, 2011 ) and is a growing health-care phenomenon ( Staniszewska et al, 2011 ; World Health Organization, 2011 ). The challenge is how to ensure these voices are heard among the plethora of 'professional' voices representing different stakeholders of provider organisations, higher education, health-care industries and governments. Historically, in the management of leg ulcers, the professional 'user' voice has had a stronger input than that of the patient. This article outlines an approach that addresses this by moving beyond the concept of 'involving' the patient to putting the patient voice first, so that it sets the direction and leads the process in identifying innovation priorities in the management and treatment of chronic leg ulcers.

  6. Treatment of a venous leg ulcer with a honey alginate dressing.

    PubMed

    van der Weyden, Elizabeth A

    2005-06-01

    The management of chronic wounds such as venous ulcers is a common and long-term issue with the aging population. Non-standard treatment that is both medically and financially effective needs to be identified. Honey has been used for its healing properties for centuries and has been used to successfully heal wounds including pressure-ulcers in our care facility. However, there is not much evidence for its use in treating venous ulcers. To this end, I trialed the use of a honey-impregnated alginate dressing on a man who had a long-standing history of venous ulcers on his leg with the aim of evaluating the effectiveness of honey as an alternative treatment to the current wound management therapies. The honey seemed to act as an effective antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and deodorizing dressing, with total healing of the ulcer achieved. This result, together with past successes with the use of honey alginate on ulcerated wounds, has led to this product becoming mainstream in the treatment of chronic wounds within our care facility.

  7. Compression for Primary Prevention, Treatment, and Prevention of Recurrence of Venous Leg Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Stephanie; McNichol, Laurie; Gray, Mikel

    2016-01-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency is a prevalent disease that frequently leads to development of venous leg ulcers. While a number of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines have been developed that provide guidance for clinicians when caring for patients with chronic venous insufficiency, they lack adequate detail concerning selection and application of compression for prevention and management of venous leg ulcers. In order to address this need, the WOCN Society appointed a task force to develop an algorithm for compression for primary prevention, treatment, and prevention of recurrent venous leg ulcers in persons with chronic venous insufficiency. The task force used findings from a scoping literature review to identify current best evidence needed to support decision points and pathways within the algorithm. In addition, the task force convened a panel of 20 clinicians and researchers with expertise in lower extremity venous disorders in order to establish consensus around pathways and decision points within the algorithm lacking robust evidence. Following initial construction of the algorithm, a second interdisciplinary group of expert clinicians established content validity and provided additional qualitative feedback used to complete final revisions of the algorithm. This article reviews the process used to create this landmark algorithm, including generation of the evidence- and consensus-based statements used in its construction, the various pathways, and rich supplemental materials embedded within the algorithm, and the process used to establish content validity. PMID:27163774

  8. Larval therapy for leg ulcers (VenUS II): randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Worthy, Gill; Bland, J Martin; Cullum, Nicky; Dowson, Christopher; Iglesias, Cynthia; Mitchell, Joanne L; Nelson, E Andrea; Soares, Marta O; Torgerson, David J

    2009-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical effectiveness of larval therapy with a standard debridement technique (hydrogel) for sloughy or necrotic leg ulcers. Design Pragmatic, three armed randomised controlled trial. Setting Community nurse led services, hospital wards, and hospital outpatient leg ulcer clinics in urban and rural settings, United Kingdom. Participants 267 patients with at least one venous or mixed venous and arterial ulcer with at least 25% coverage of slough or necrotic tissue, and an ankle brachial pressure index of 0.6 or more. Interventions Loose larvae, bagged larvae, and hydrogel. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was time to healing of the largest eligible ulcer. Secondary outcomes were time to debridement, health related quality of life (SF-12), bacterial load, presence of meticillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, adverse events, and ulcer related pain (visual analogue scale, from 0 mm for no pain to 150 mm for worst pain imaginable). Results Time to healing was not significantly different between the loose or bagged larvae group and the hydrogel group (hazard ratio for healing using larvae v hydrogel 1.13, 95% confidence interval 0.76 to 1.68; P=0.54). Larval therapy significantly reduced the time to debridement (2.31, 1.65 to 3.2; P<0.001). Health related quality of life and change in bacterial load over time were not significantly different between the groups. 6.7% of participants had MRSA at baseline. No difference was found between larval therapy and hydrogel in their ability to eradicate MRSA by the end of the debridement phase (75% (9/12) v 50% (3/6); P=0.34), although this comparison was underpowered. Mean ulcer related pain scores were higher in either larvae group compared with hydrogel (mean difference in pain score: loose larvae v hydrogel 46.74 (95% confidence interval 32.44 to 61.04), P<0.001; bagged larvae v hydrogel 38.58 (23.46 to 53.70), P<0.001). Conclusions Larval therapy did not improve the rate of healing of sloughy

  9. Laser irradiation effect on Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms isolated from venous leg ulcer.

    PubMed

    Baffoni, Marina; Bessa, Lucinda J; Grande, Rossella; Di Giulio, Mara; Mongelli, Matteo; Ciarelli, Antonio; Cellini, Luigina

    2012-10-01

    Chronic wounds, including diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers and venous leg ulcers, represent a significant cause of morbidity in developed countries, predominantly in older patients. The aetiology of these wounds is probably multifactorial, but the role of bacteria in their pathogenesis is still unclear. Moreover, the presence of bacterial biofilms has been considered an important factor responsible for wounds chronicity. We aimed to investigate the laser action as a possible biofilm eradicating strategy, in order to attempt an additional treatment to antibiotic therapy to improve wound healing. In this work, the effect of near-infrared (NIR) laser was evaluated on mono and polymicrobial biofilms produced by two pathogenic bacterial strains, Staphylococcus aureus PECHA10 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PECHA9, both isolated from a chronic venous leg ulcer. Laser effect was assessed by biomass measurement, colony forming unit count and cell viability assay. It was shown that the laser treatment has not affected the biofilms biomass neither the cell viability, although a small disruptive action was observed in the structure of all biofilms tested. A reduction on cell growth was observed in S. aureus and in polymicrobial biofilms. This work represents an initial in vitro approach to study the influence of NIR laser treatment on bacterial biofilms in order to explain its potentially advantageous effects in the healing process of chronic infected wounds.

  10. Effects of Hypochlorous Acid Solutions on Venous Leg Ulcers (VLU): Experience With 1249 VLUs in 897 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bongiovanni, Cheryl M.

    2016-01-01

    In order to assess the impact of comorbidities and identify factors that accelerate the healing rate of venous leg ulcers we performed an extensive, retrospective analysis of our experience in a diverse population. From June, 2006 to June, 2014, 897 patients with 1249 venous leg ulcers were treated at Lake Wound Clinics. Treatment protocols utilized the standard regimen of wound cleaning, debridement and compression bandaging. Wound cleaning, autolytic debridement, packing and dressing of venous leg ulcers utilized aqueous solutions of hypochlorous acid (HCA) rather than the standard normal saline. This protocol caused all ulcers to close completely. Comorbidities that delayed healing included uncontrolled or poorly controlled diabetes mellitus, advanced peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAD), active smoking, use of steroid medications and/or street drugs, large initial ulcer size and significant depth. Other factors, including advanced age, recurrent venous ulceration, stasis dermatitis, lipodermatosclerosis, morbid obesity and infection with one or more multidrug resistant organisms did not delay closure. From this experience we conclude that venous leg ulcer care protocols that clean, debride, pack and dress with hypochlorous acid solutions can reduce the effects of some comorbidities while accelerating healing times. Additional benefits are described. PMID:27104143

  11. Management of Patients With Venous Leg Ulcers: Challenges and Current Best Practice.

    PubMed

    Franks, Peter J; Barker, Judith; Collier, Mark; Gethin, Georgina; Haesler, Emily; Jawien, Arkadiusz; Laeuchli, Severin; Mosti, Giovanni; Probst, Sebastian; Weller, Carolina

    2016-06-01

    Introduction It is well documented that the prevalence of venous leg ulcers (VLUs) is increasing, coinciding with an ageing population. Accurate global prevalence of VLUs is difficult to estimate due to the range of methodologies used in studies and accuracy of reporting. (1) Venous ulceration is the most common type of leg ulceration and a significant clinical problem, affecting approximately 1% of the population and 3% of people over 80 years of age (2) in westernised countries. Moreover, the global prevalence of VLUs is predicted to escalate dramatically, as people are living longer, often with multiple comorbidities. Recent figures on the prevalence of VLUs are based on a small number of studies, conducted in Western countries, and the evidence is weak. However, it is estimated that 93% of VLUs will heal in 12 months, and 7% remain unhealed after five years. (3) Furthermore, the recurrence rate within 3 months after wound closure is as high as 70%. (4) (-6) Thus, cost-effective adjunct evidence-based treatment strategies and services are needed to help prevent these ulcers, facilitate healing when they occur and prevent recurrence. The impact of a VLU represents social, personal, financial and psychological costs on the individual and further economic drain on the health-care system. This brings the challenge of providing a standardised leg ulcer service which delivers evidence-based treatment for the patient and their ulcer. It is recognised there are variations in practice and barriers preventing the implementation of best practice. There are patients not receiving appropriate and timely treatment in the initial development of VLUs, effective management of their VLU and preventing recurrence once the VLU has healed. Health-care professionals (HCPs) and organisations must have confidence in the development process of clinical practice guidelines and have ownership of these guidelines to ensure those of the highest quality guide their practice. These systematic

  12. Using a topical anaesthetic cream to reduce pain during sharp debridement of chronic leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, D; Murphy, F; Gottschalk, R; Baxter, M; Lycka, B; Nevin, K

    2001-01-01

    This multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study assessed the efficacy and safety of using Emla (lignocaine/prilocaine) anaesthetic cream to achieve pain control during sharp debridement of chronic leg ulcers of arterial, venous or arteriovenous aetiology. A total of 101 patients (51 Emla, 50 placebo), aged 29-99 years, who had experienced pain associated with previous debridement were included. Patients with an amide anaesthetic allergy, anaesthetic diabetic ulcers, or ulcers > 50 cm2 were excluded. Debridement was initiated approximately 30 minutes after the application of a thick layer of Emla or placebo cream to an ulcer occluded with a plastic wrap. The patient and investigator assessed the pain associated with debridement on a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS). The median patient VAS scores were 18 mm and 53.5 mm in the Emla and placebo groups, respectively (p < 0.0001). The corresponding investigator values in the two groups were 20 mm and 49.5 mm, respectively (p = 0.004). Local reactions were mainly transient and mild, and were observed in roughly the same percentage of placebo and Emla-treated patients. After a 30-minute application Emla cream significantly reduced the pain of debridement compared with the placebo. PMID:12964231

  13. Etiology and pathogenesis of skin ulcers in menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannis: does Pfiesteria piscicida play a role?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blazer, V.; Vogelbein, W.K.; Densmore, C.; Kator, H.; Zwerner, D.; Lilley, J.

    2000-01-01

    The toxic dinoflagellate, Pfiesteria piscicida, is widely blamed for adverse human health effects, acute fish kills and skin lesion events in fishes, particularly menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannis, inhabiting coastal waters from Delaware to North Carolina, USA. In response, we initiated studies to clarify the etiology and pathogenesis of presumed 'Pfiesteria-specific' menhaden skin lesions. Histopathologically, all lesions (>150 fish examined) were associated with a highly invasive and pathogenic fungus eliciting severe tissue necrosis and intense granulomatous inflammation. Severity and extent of the host response indicates that ulcers were at least 1 week old or older. Maryland and Virginia currently use menhaden ulcers as one of several indicators of local Pfiesteria activity. However, their chronic nature, advanced age, and consistent fungal involvement suggest that their use for this purpose may not be valid. We recently isolated an Aphanomyces sp. from the menhaden lesions which by appearance in culture, temperature growth curves, pathogenicity studies in snakehead and positive immunohistochemical staining with polyclonal antibodies suggest the infectious agent is A. invadans (cause of epizootic ulcerative syndrome in Asia, Japan and Australia) or a very closely related species. Ongoing research will address pathogenicity of the fungus in menhaden, genetic comparisons of isolates, and the role of environmental stressors, including P. piscicida, in initiation of the infection. Copyright (C) 2000.

  14. A new option for endovascular treatment of leg ulcers caused by venous insufficiency with fluoroscopically guided sclerotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Garcarek, Jerzy; Falkowski, Aleksander; Rybak, Zbigniew; Jargiello, Tomasz; Łokaj, Marek; Czapla, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ulcers of lower legs are the most bothersome complication of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). Aim To assess the effectiveness of endovascular fluoroscopically guided sclerotherapy for the treatment of venous ulcers. Material and methods Thirty-eight limbs in 35 patients with crural venous ulcers were treated with guided sclerotherapy under the control of fluoroscopy. Patients with non-healing ulcers in the course of chronic venous insufficiency, with and without features of past deep vein thrombosis, were qualified for the study. Doppler ultrasound and dynamic venography with mapping of venous flow were performed. Ambulatory venous pressure measurements, leg circumference and varicography were performed just before and following the procedure. Results In 84% of cases, ulcers were treated successfully and healed. Patients with post-thrombotic syndrome (n = 17) healed in 13 (76.5%) cases, whereas patients without post-thrombotic syndrome (n = 21) healed in 19 (90.5%) cases. The mean time of healing of an ulcer for all patients was 83 days (in the first group it was 121 days and in the second group 67 days). Recurrence of an ulcer was observed in 10 limbs: 6 cases in the first group and 4 cases in the second group. Occurrence of deep vein thrombosis associated with the procedure was not observed. Temporary complications were reported but none giving a serious clinical outcome. Conclusions Endovascular fluoroscopically guided sclerotherapy can be an alternative method of treatment of venous ulcers, especially in situations when surgical procedures or other options of treatment are impossible. PMID:26649090

  15. EMLA and Lidocaine Spray: A Comparison for Surgical Debridement in Venous Leg Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Cuomo, Roberto; D'Aniello, Carlo; Grimaldi, Luca; Nisi, Giuseppe; Botteri, Gaia; Zerini, Irene; Brandi, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In this study the author proposes to compare eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA) and an odontoiatric spray solution of 10% Lidocaine (Ecocain) for surgical debridement in venous leg ulcers. Approach: Fifty patients were recruited and randomly assigned into two groups (A, B). All of them have venous leg ulcer in the medial and/or lateral malleolar region. Group A: topical anesthetic EMLA with film occlusion. Group B: topical anesthesia with Ecocain. The author proceeded to surgical debridement after local anesthesia. A questionnaire and a visual analog scale (VAS) were administered to assess the amount of pain felt during the debridement and during the following 6 h. Results: The analysis of the VAS revealed no major significant differences statistically. The analysis of the questionnaires showed patients treated with Ecocain took more analgesic drugs. Analysis of the timing and quality of procedure showed that Ecocain reduced the timing of debridement and dressing change, improving the outpatient management and patient compliance. Innovations: For rapid debridement, the most appropriate is to use Ecocain. Conclusion: Methods of local anesthesia are multiple and must be identified according to the needs of the patient and the surgeon trying to get the best anesthesia with minimal use of time and resources. PMID:26029486

  16. A topical haemoglobin spray for oxygenating chronic venous leg ulcers: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Norris, Ray

    2014-11-01

    Acute wounds will generally heal independently of any interventions, whereas chronic wounds are chronic for a reason and are unlikely to successfully heal without intervention. In the treatment of venous leg ulcers, the gold standard will always be compression therapy. However, many wounds still do not heal despite best practice. Therefore, the use of adjunct therapies alongside standard care become the priority for healing. This article describes a small evaluation, involving 17 patients with chronic venous leg ulcers, that set out to determine the effect of a topical oxygen therapy on wound size. The therapy comprises a canister that sprays pure haemoglobin in a water solution into the wound. The haemoglobin spray needs to be used at least once every 3 days, and no training is required on its use. Results showed the device helped promote wound healing in 14 out of 17 wounds treated for more than 2 weeks. These patients had previously been shown to be non-healing during a 4-week run-in period where they received standard care, including compression therapy.

  17. [Valid and reliable methods for describing pressure sores and leg ulcer--a systematic literature review].

    PubMed

    Panfil, Eva-Maria; Linde, Eva

    2007-08-01

    In the wound documentation of pressure sore and leg ulcer the most important tasks and objectives are the presentation of the outcomes of the diagnostic inspection, planning of therapy and evaluation of wound healing. The aim of the systematic literature review covering the period of time between 2001 and 2006 was to look for valid, reliable and feasible methods to the size, appearance, edge, grade, and healing of wounds. Due to their heterogeneity the studies that were found can hardly be compared; some of them show methodological weaknesses. Measurements of an elliptical area based on the perpendicular method using a ruler are the most reliable within the linear methods; however, they only allow an estimation of the size. Together with mechanical or digital planimetry tracings can measure the wound's size reliably. Photographs do not assess large or circular wounds reliably, nor do they adequately document the wound's colour. There are no valid and reliable standardized procedures for the documentation of the wound's colour, exudate, odour; margins and maceration. To describe the pressure sore's degree of severity there are twenty different systems of classification. The data, however, confirm the difficulty to classify pressure ulcers reliably. Wound healing can also be assessed by a number of standardized tools: PSST, PUSH, SWHT, SS, PUHP, CODED and DESIGN (pressure sore) and LUMT (leg ulcer). These tools have not been translated into German and have not been adequately researched. No data exists to allow generalization concerning the practicability of these methods. For all methods of measurement, it can be concluded that training and experience in the use of the method is required and that the validity and reliability are higher when measurements are conducted by an experienced person. PMID:18019553

  18. Investigating the humoral immune response in chronic venous leg ulcer patients colonised with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Jasper N; Andersen, Anders S; Sonnested, Michael K; Laursen, Inga; Jorgensen, Bo; Krogfelt, Karen A

    2011-02-01

    The ability to manage the bioburden in chronic wounds is most likely coupled to the humoral immune response of the patient. We analysed markers of systemic immune response in patients with chronic venous leg ulcers (CVLUs) colonised (no-systemic infection) with the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Sera from 44 clinically non infected patients with CVLUs were analysed for total IgM and IgG isotype 1-4, complement C3, mannose-binding lectin (MBL), interleukin (IL)-6, C-reactive protein (CRP) and specific anti-P. aeruginosa antibodies against exotoxin A, elastase and alkaline phosphatase. Concentrations of IL-6 versus CRP intercorrelated (β = 2.43 95% CI (1.34-4.34)), but were independent of P. aeruginosa colonisation. MBL deficiency (MBL < 500 ng/ml) correlated to high serum levels of IgG(1) (P = 0.038) consistent with a compensatory mechanism, but not related to presence of P. aeruginosa in the ulcers. Twenty-four patients (54.5%) were culture positive for P. aeruginosa, also conferring significantly high serum levels of complement C3 (P = 0.014), but only two of these had positive titres for antibodies against exotoxin A. All patient sera were negative for antibodies against elastase and alkaline phosphatase. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis on randomly selected culture-positive patients could not establish unambiguous presence of P. aeruginosa biofilms in the ulcers. A multiple regression model showed P. aeruginosa and systemic CRP as significant factors in deterioration of ulcer healing rate.

  19. Safety and performance evaluation of a next-generation antimicrobial dressing in patients with chronic venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Harding, Keith G; Szczepkowski, Marek; Mikosiński, Jacek; Twardowska-Saucha, Krystyna; Blair, Stephen; Ivins, Nicola M; Saucha, Wojciech; Cains, Jane; Peters, Kim; Parsons, David; Bowler, Philip

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the safety and performance of AQUACEL™ Ag+ dressing, a wound dressing containing a combination of anti-biofilm and antimicrobial agents, in the management of chronic wounds. Patients (n = 42) with venous leg ulcers exhibiting signs of clinical infection were treated for 4 weeks with AQUACEL™ Ag+ dressing, followed by management with AQUACEL™ wound dressings for 4 weeks. Wound progression, wound size, ulcer pain and clinical evolution of the wound were assessed for up to 8 weeks. Adverse events were recorded throughout the study. AQUACEL™ Ag+ dressing had an acceptable safety profile, with only one patient discontinuing from the study, because of a non-treatment-related adverse event. After 8 weeks, substantial wound improvements were observed: 5 patients (11·9%) had healed ulcers and 32 patients (76·2%) showed improvement in ulcer condition. The mean ulcer size had reduced by 54·5%. Patients reported less pain as the study progressed. Notable improvements were observed in patients with ulcers that were considered to require treatment with systemic antibiotics or topical antimicrobials at baseline (n = 10), with a mean 70·2% reduction in wound area. These data indicate that AQUACEL™ Ag+ dressing has an acceptable safety profile in the management of venous leg ulcers that may be impeded by biofilm.

  20. Influence of psychosocial factors on coping and living with a venous leg ulcer.

    PubMed

    Peart, Joanna

    2015-06-01

    This clinical focus and literature review describe the effect of psychosocial factors on coping and living with a venous leg ulcer (VLU). The associated stressors of living with a VLU include: pain, loss of self-esteem, and social isolation, with subsequent negative emotions that could potentially lead to anxiety and depression. The ability to cope with a VLU depends upon the individual, with some patients employing negative coping strategies such as denial, depending on the stage of the illness and level of acceptance reached (Husband, 2001; Brown, 2014). Psychosocial interventions by health professionals have been shown to reduce the stress of living with a VLU, to improve a patient's coping ability, and subsequently enhance wound healing. This article highlights the importance of holistic assessment and joint treatment planning, to incorporate patients' psychosocial needs and individual coping methods in order to reduce the associated stress of living with a VLU. PMID:26052991

  1. Non-medical prescribing in nurse-led community leg ulcer clinics.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Julia

    Over the past decade, nurse prescribing in the community has improved clinical care, providing timely access to many products required for patients to receive appropriate treatment. Until recently, nurses who have qualified as nurse prescribers have only been able to prescribe from a limited list of products. Within the leg ulcer clinic environment, the majority of prescriptions written have been related to wound care. This article describes the introduction of extended independent prescribing (now known as non-medical prescribing) and how this type of prescribing has scope for revolutionizing clinical practice in all healthcare settings. There are, however, many contentious issues for clinicians prescribing in this new role, including systems for communication, clinical governance, and attitudes of other professionals. PMID:16835510

  2. Diagnosing and managing venous leg ulcers in patients in the community.

    PubMed

    Day, Julie

    2015-12-01

    Venous leg ulcers (VLUs) are a chronic condition affecting between 0.1% and 0.3% of the population in the UK. Healing rates are variable and recurrence rates are high. The diagnosis, assessment, and management of this patient group is primarily carried out in the community. Assessment of this patient group requires skill and competence to ensure a correct diagnosis is made. When carrying out the assessment, it is important to consider the patient's past medical history, medication, and allergies, as well as to record the ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI), pain level, palpation of pulses, and ankle joint movement, among other aspects of the assessment. VLUs heal with compression therapy, and practitioners should be knowledgeable about the various compression systems available in order to offer patients the most suitable and informed choices. PMID:26639070

  3. Reducing infection in chronic leg ulcers with an activated carbon cloth dressing.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Nina

    2016-06-23

    Zorflex is a new type of antimicrobial dressing composed of 100% activated carbon cloth. It attracts and binds bacteria to its surface, enabling them to be safely removed at dressing change. It has no reported toxic effects and can be used on either a short-or long-term basis. This article describes 4 case studies in which patients with recalcitrant chronic venous leg ulcers that were prone to recurrent infection were treated with the activated carbon cloth dressing. All of the wounds had failed to respond to antimicrobial dressings containing silver, iodine or polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB), and were heavily exuding and painful. In all cases, the signs of infection reduced significantly within 4 weeks, resulting in good patient outcomes. PMID:27345081

  4. [Compression therapy: Choosing the right option for leg ulcers in 2016].

    PubMed

    Senet, P; Monfort, J-B; Debure, C

    2016-09-01

    Compression therapy is a mandatory treatment of leg ulcers whether the goal is cure (stage C6 in the international classification for chronic venous disease) or prevention of recurrence (stage C5). Different indications for compression therapy were proposed by the French Superior Health Authority (HAS) in 2010, but new studies have modified attitudes since that time. Considering the very large number of options available, the many co-morbid conditions observed in these patients, as well as patient age and available assistance, it is important to adapt to the variable clinical and social situations encountered. One must keep in mind that a well-controlled treatment should improve trophic disorders and patient comfort. A poorly-adapted treatment with little or even deleterious effect will be abandoned by the patient.

  5. QUALITY OF LIFE AND PERCEPTION OF DISEASE IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC LEG ULCER.

    PubMed

    Brtan Romić, Renata; Brtan, Anđelka; Romić, Ivan; Cvitanović, Hrvoje; Duvančić, Tomislavć; Lugović-Mihić, Liborija

    2015-09-01

    Chronic wounds on lower extremities most commonly result from chronic venous insufficiency. Chronic leg ulcer impacts the quality of life in a number of ways such as reduced mobility, pain, unpleasant odor, sleep disturbances, social isolation, etc. This study included 100 patients with chronic wounds/lower leg ulcer (59% of women and 41% of men, aged 31 to 89) treated locally with special wound dressings for moist wound healing. Study results showed no age and sex correlation with the quality of life, and all participants evaluated their quality of life and health satisfaction as neither good nor bad, but it was found that the disease mostly affected social relationships and to a lesser extent patient satisfaction with their physical and mental health, and the environment. Results on the disease perception showed that the participants considered their disease to have a significant effect on their life and would last for a relatively long time, but they also believed they had good control of their disease. Also, they considered the disease to have many symptoms affecting them; they were worried about their disease which they understood relatively well; they were aware that treatment could be very helpful; and that the disease had moderate effect on their emotional health. According to sex, the disease was found to have greater effect on women (especially on their emotional condition) and women had more faith in successful treatment, while correlation with age was nonsignificant. This study confirmed the importance of the patient psychological condition and the need of due care of their psychological reactions to and facing with the disease. PMID:26666100

  6. Prevalence rate for inherited thrombophilia in patients with chronic and recurrent venous leg ulceration.

    PubMed

    Wiszniewski, Adam; Bykowska, Ksenia; Bilski, Radoslaw; Jaśkowiak, Wojciech; Proniewski, Jacek

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence rate for inherited thrombophilia (IT) in patients with chronic (CVU) and recurrent venous leg ulceration. We also investigated and evaluated the severity of the clinical pattern of CVU in patients with and without IT. We examined 110 patients with CVU (the study group) and 110 healthy subjects (the control group). We prepared a questionnaire to be completed by each study participant. Ultrasound Doppler color imaging or/and duplex ultrasonography was performed to evaluate the efficiency of the venous system. The ankle-brachial index was calculated to determine the efficiency of the arterial system. We examined both groups for the presence of IT. IT was diagnosed in 30% of study group and in 1.8% of control group. Our diagnoses of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) were based on medical interviews, physical examinations, and an ultrasonography of the venous system and concerned 64 study group patients (58.2%), 35 of whom (31.8%) experienced recurrent DVT. Proximal and/or distal DVT was determined in an interview and/or by an ultrasonography performed for all patients with CVU and IT. In 94% of these patients, DVT was recurrent, and in 88% of patients with CVU and IT, we observed recurrent DVT and CVU. It recurred more often and persisted longer when compared to patients with CVU and no IT, despite similar management. No differences were observed in ulcer size, localization, or pain level related to ulceration between patients with CVU and IT and those with CVU and no IT.

  7. The journey to chronic pain: a grounded theory of older adults' experiences of pain associated with leg ulceration.

    PubMed

    Taverner, Tarnia; Closs, S José; Briggs, Michelle

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to develop a grounded theory to describe and explain the experience of pain and its impact, as reported by the individuals who had pain associated with chronic leg ulceration. The Strauss and Corbin grounded theory approach was used. In-depth interviews were undertaken with 11 people aged ≥ 65 years from Leeds in the north of England. All participants were cared for by home care nurses and had painful leg ulceration. The emergent grounded theory centered on a core category of "The journey to chronic pain." The theory suggested a trajectory consisting of three phases that the patient experiences, where the end result is a chronic pain syndrome. In phase 1, leg ulcer pain has predominantly acute nociceptive properties, and if this is not managed effectively, or ulcers do not heal, persistent pain may develop with both nociceptive and neuropathic properties (i.e., phase 2). If phase 2 pain is not managed effectively, patients may then develop refractory long-term pain (phase 3). Those who progress to phase 3 tend to experience negative consequences such as insomnia, depression, and suicidal ideation. Only when health care professionals understand and acknowledge the persistent and long-term nature of the pain in this patient group can the pain be managed effectively.

  8. A Comparison of the Efficacy and Cost of Different Venous Leg Ulcer Dressings: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Syed M. Asim

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of simple nonadherent dressings with other more expensive dressing types in the treatment of venous leg ulcers. Study Design. Retrospective cohort study. Location. The leg ulcer clinic at the University Hospital of South Manchester. Subjects and Methods. The healing rates of twelve leg ulcer patients treated with simple nonadherent dressings (e.g., NA Ultra) were compared with an equal number of patients treated with modern dressings to determine differences in healing rates and cost. Main Outcome Measures. Rate of healing as determined by reduction in ulcer area over a specified period of time and total cost of dressing per patient. Results. Simple nonadherent dressings had a mean healing rate of 0.353 cm2/week (standard deviation ± 0.319) compared with a mean of 0.415 cm2/week (standard deviation ± 0.383) for more expensive dressings. This resulted in a one-tailed p value of 0.251 and a two-tailed p value of 0.508. Multiple regression analysis gave a significance F of 0.8134. Conclusion. The results indicate that the difference in healing rate between simple and modern dressings is not statistically significant. Therefore, the cost of dressing type should be an important factor influencing dressing selection. PMID:25954532

  9. The Effect of a Connexin43-Based Peptide on the Healing of Chronic Venous Leg Ulcers: A Multicenter, Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ghatnekar, Gautam S; Grek, Christina L; Armstrong, David G; Desai, Sanjay C; Gourdie, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    The gap junction protein, connexin43 (Cx43), has critical roles in the inflammatory, edematous, and fibrotic processes following dermal injury and during wound healing, and is abnormally upregulated at the epidermal wound margins of venous leg ulcers (VLUs). Targeting Cx43 with ACT1, a peptide mimetic of the carboxyl-terminus of Cx43, accelerates fibroblast migration and proliferation, and wound reepithelialization. In a prospective, multicenter clinical trial conducted in India, adults with chronic VLUs were randomized to treatment with an ACT1 gel formulation plus conventional standard-of-care (SOC) protocols, involving maintaining wound moisture and four-layer compression bandage therapy, or SOC protocols alone. The primary end point was mean percent ulcer reepithelialization from baseline to 12 weeks. A significantly greater reduction in mean percent ulcer area from baseline to 12 weeks was associated with the incorporation of ACT1 therapy (79% (SD 50.4)) as compared with compression bandage therapy alone (36% (SD 179.8); P=0.02). Evaluation of secondary efficacy end points indicated a reduced median time to 50 and 100% ulcer reepithelialization for ACT1-treated ulcers. Incorporation of ACT1 in SOC protocols may represent a well-tolerated, highly effective therapeutic strategy that expedites chronic venous ulcer healing by treating the underlying ulcer pathophysiology through Cx43-mediated pathways. PMID:25072595

  10. Treatment of venous leg ulcers with ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy: Healing, long-term recurrence and quality of life evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lloret, Pedro; Redondo, Pedro; Cabrera, Juan; Sierra, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers (VLU) generally have slow healing rates (HR) and frequent recurrence rates (RR). The underlying etiology is venous hypertension. The present observational cohort study was to determine healing and RR in VLU treated with ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy (UGFS). One hundred and eighty VLU were treated with polidocanol microfoam monthly under ultrasound control. Median follow-up was 30 months (range: 17-40). One hundred seventy-two (95.6%) ulcers healed during the study. The overall twenty-four week HR was 79.4% and was significantly higher (95.1%) in patients with isolated great saphenous vein incompetence than in those with great saphenous vein plus perforator (91.7%) or exclusive perforator incompetence (78.9%) (p < 0.01). Patients without deep vein incompetence had a significantly higher 6-month HR (89.8%) than those with (67.4%) (p < 0.01). Multivariate analysis identified the following independent risk factors: chronicity > 12 months (OR 7.69), area > 6 cm(2) (OR 4.24), lipodermatoesclerosis (OR 12.22), history of > 3 previous ulcers (OR 5.57) and history of deep vein thrombosis (OR 6.18). One, two and three year ulcer RR were 8.1%, 14.9%, and 20.8%, respectively. Isolated perforator incompetence and previous history of venous surgery were significantly (p = 0.03) associated with a higher RR. VLU treated with microfoam sclerotherapy are associated with high HR and low mid-term RR.

  11. Comparing the efficacies of alginate, foam, hydrocolloid, hydrofiber, and hydrogel dressings in the management of diabetic foot ulcers and venous leg ulcers: a systematic review and meta-analysis examining how to dress for success.

    PubMed

    Saco, Michael; Howe, Nicole; Nathoo, Rajiv; Cherpelis, Basil

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers and venous leg ulcers are chronic wounds frequently encountered by dermatologists. Choosing appropriate wound dressings can effectively promote wound healing and potentially reduce morbidity and financial burden experienced by patients. The objective of our systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate wound healing efficacies of synthetic active dressings in diabetic foot ulcer and venous leg ulcer management. For data collection, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and clinicaltrials.gov online databases were searched from database inception to 10 May 2015. Fixed and random effects modeling were used to calculate pooled risk ratios for complete ulcer healing from pairwise dressing comparisons. The results of our review showed moderate-quality level evidence that hydrogels were more effective in healing diabetic foot ulcers than basic wound contact dressings (RR 1.80 [95% CI, 1.27-2.56]). The other dressing comparisons showed no statistically significant differences between the interventions examined in terms of achieving complete diabetic foot ulcer healing. Non-adherent dressings were more cost-effective than hydrofiber dressings for diabetic foot ulcers in terms of mean total cost per patient of the dressings themselves. All venous leg ulcer pairwise dressing comparisons showed equivalent dressing efficacies in terms of promoting complete ulcer healing. Overall, most synthetic active dressings and traditional wound dressings are equally efficacious in treating diabetic foot ulcers and venous leg ulcers. For treating diabetic foot ulcers, hydrogels are more efficacious than basic wound contact dressings, and non-adherent dressings are more cost-effective than hydrofiber dressings. Ultimately, dressing choice should be tailored to the wound and the patient. PMID:27617934

  12. Medical grade honey in the management of chronic venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Holland, Luke C; Norris, Joseph M

    2015-08-01

    A best evidence topic in vascular surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: In patients with chronic venous leg ulcers (CVLU), does the use of medical grade honey as compared to standard wound therapy improve clinical outcomes? A total of 299 papers were identified using the search protocol described, of which five represented the best evidence available to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Two randomised controlled trials arrived at contradictory conclusions: one showing better outcomes for CVLU healing with use of honey over standard wound therapy and the other showing equivalent outcomes but more adverse effects. A third randomised controlled trial showed a non-significant reduction in bacterial colonisation of CVLU with honey compared to standard therapy. Two further studies--a prospective cohort study and a case series--supported the use of honey, but these were of lower grade evidence and had numerous methodological faults. Therefore, the clinical bottom line is that there is no conclusive evidence that honey improves outcome in patients with CVLU, and until more robust trials are conducted, its benefit should be considered unproven.

  13. Decreased Hematocrit-To-Viscosity Ratio and Increased Lactate Dehydrogenase Level in Patients with Sickle Cell Anemia and Recurrent Leg Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Connes, Philippe; Lamarre, Yann; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Lemonne, Nathalie; Waltz, Xavier; Mougenel, Danièle; Mukisi-Mukaza, Martin; Lalanne-Mistrih, Marie-Laure; Tarer, Vanessa; Tressières, Benoit; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Romana, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Leg ulcer is a disabling complication in patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) but the exact pathophysiological mechanisms are unknown. The aim of this study was to identify the hematological and hemorheological alterations associated with recurrent leg ulcers. Sixty-two SCA patients who never experienced leg ulcers (ULC-) and 13 SCA patients with a positive history of recurrent leg ulcers (ULC+) - but with no leg ulcers at the time of the study – were recruited. All patients were in steady state condition. Blood was sampled to perform hematological, biochemical (hemolytic markers) and hemorheological analyses (blood viscosity, red blood cell deformability and aggregation properties). The hematocrit-to-viscosity ratio (HVR), which reflects the red blood cell oxygen transport efficiency, was calculated for each subject. Patients from the ULC+ group were older than patients from the ULC- group. Anemia (red blood cell count, hematocrit and hemoglobin levels) was more pronounced in the ULC+ group. Lactate dehydrogenase level was higher in the ULC+ group than in the ULC- group. Neither blood viscosity, nor RBC aggregation properties differed between the two groups. HVR was lower and RBC deformability tended to be reduced in the ULC+ group. Our study confirmed increased hemolytic rate and anemia in SCA patients with leg ulcers recurrence. Furthermore, our data suggest that although systemic blood viscosity is not a major factor involved in the pathophysiology of this complication, decreased red blood cell oxygen transport efficiency (i.e., low hematocrit/viscosity ratio) may play a role. PMID:24223994

  14. Etiology of ulcerative lesions of Atlantic menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus) from James River, Virginia.

    PubMed

    Webb, Stanley R; Garman, Gregory C; McIninch, Stephen P; Nerad, Thomas A; Peglar, Michael T; Gillevet, Patrick M; Brown, Bonnie L

    2005-11-01

    We observed ulcerative lesions on live Atlantic menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus, during ichthyofaunal sampling in the tidal James River in October 1999 (near Jamestown, VA, USA). Other synoptically collected fishes exhibited no signs of lesions or pre-ulcerative tissues. Live fish were classified as unremarkable (no dermal anomalies), pre-ulcerative (integument intact with boil-like swelling), and ulcerative (severe focal lesions). Specimens were analyzed for bacteria, fungi, and pathogenic protozoans including amphizoic amoebae, Pfiesteria piscicida, and Kudoa sp. No Pfiesteria were detected in any tissue specimen. All B. tyrannus examined, including tissues from unremarkable fish, tested positive for presence of the known fish parasite Kudoa. Only ulcerative lesions were also colonized by bacteria, fungi, and amphizoic amoebae. The absence of bacteria, fungi, and protozoans from unremarkable and pre-ulcerative fish suggests that association of other potential pathogens with B. tyrannus ulcers was due to secondary colonization following lesion formation as a result of Kudoa infection. PMID:16133297

  15. Cost-effectiveness of compression technologies for evidence-informed leg ulcer care: results from the Canadian Bandaging Trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Venous leg ulcers, affecting approximately 1% of the population, are costly to manage due to poor healing and high recurrence rates. We evaluated an evidence-informed leg ulcer care protocol with two frequently used high compression systems: ‘four-layer bandage’ (4LB) and ‘short-stretch bandage’ (SSB). Methods We conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis using individual patient data from the Canadian Bandaging Trial, a publicly funded, pragmatic, randomized trial evaluating high compression therapy with 4LB (n = 215) and SSB (n = 209) for community care of venous leg ulcers. We estimated costs (in 2009–2010 Canadian dollars) from the societal perspective and used a time horizon corresponding to each trial participant’s first year. Results Relative to SSB, 4LB was associated with an average 15 ulcer-free days gained, although the 95% confidence interval [−32, 21 days] crossed zero, indicating no treatment difference; an average health benefit of 0.009 QALYs gained [−0.019, 0.037] and overall, an average cost increase of $420 [$235, $739] (due to twice as many 4LB bandages used); or equivalently, a cost of $46,667 per QALY gained. If decision makers are willing to pay from $50,000 to $100,000 per QALY, the probability of 4LB being more cost effective increased from 51% to 63%. Conclusions Our findings differ from the emerging clinical and economic evidence that supports high compression therapy with 4LB, and therefore suggest another perspective on high compression practice, namely when delivered by trained registered nurses using an evidence-informed protocol, both 4LB and SSB systems offer comparable effectiveness and value for money. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00202267 PMID:23031428

  16. Association Between Microbial Bioburden and Healing Outcomes in Venous Leg Ulcers: A Review of the Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Tuttle, Marie S.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Venous leg ulcers (VLUs) are susceptible to microbial invasion, and serious complications can result without the timely control of infection. Diagnosis of wound infection is primarily based on subjective clinical characteristics and patient-reported symptoms, and the treatment with antimicrobials has not consistently shown improvement in healing outcomes. This is a review of studies using bacterial cultures and/or new molecular-based methods associating microbial bioburden with healing outcomes in VLU patients, with the goal of guiding future studies to better determine significant patterns of microbial involvement in chronic wounds. Recent Advances: Studies reviewed here use cultivation-based identification of bacteria and next-generation sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene to gain insight into microbial bioburden in VLUs. Further application of sophisticated DNA sequencing and bioinformatic analyses has the potential to revolutionize our ability to further discern, with high resolution, complex microbial communities in chronic wounds. Critical Issues: Few previous studies of microbial bioburden in VLUs have incorporated the knowledge of clinical treatments, which includes close monitoring of patients' symptoms and responses to therapy. Thus, wound care practitioners are currently without evidence-based guidance for the diagnosis and treatment of wound infections. Future Directions: Clinically relevant breakthroughs are possible by combining advanced microbial detection techniques with improved study designs that reflect clinical practices. Well-designed longitudinal studies have great potential to lead to better evidence-based diagnosis of chronic wounds. A greater understanding of microbial bioburden in chronic wounds is likely to lead to better therapies that speed healing and prevent wound infection without risking the development of antimicrobial resistance. PMID:25566410

  17. Aetiology, comorbidities and cofactors of chronic leg ulcers: retrospective evaluation of 1 000 patients from 10 specialised dermatological wound care centers in Germany.

    PubMed

    Jockenhöfer, Finja; Gollnick, Harald; Herberger, Katharina; Isbary, Georg; Renner, Regina; Stücker, Markus; Valesky, Eva; Wollina, Uwe; Weichenthal, Michael; Karrer, Sigrid; Kuepper, Bernhard; Roesch, Alexander; Dissemond, Joachim

    2016-10-01

    Numerous comorbidities and cofactors have been known to influence wound healing processes. In this multicentre study, clinical data of 1 000 patients with chronic leg ulcers from ten specialised dermatological wound care centers were analysed. The patient cohort comprised 567 females and 433 males with an average age of 69·9 years. The wounds persisted on average for 40·8 months and had a mean size of 43·7 cm(2) . Venous leg ulcers represented the most common entity accounting for 51·3% of all chronic wounds, followed by mixed-type ulcers in 12·9% and arterial ulcerations in 11·0% of the patients. Vasculitis was diagnosed in 4·5%, trauma in 3·2%, pyoderma gangrenosum in 2·8%, lymphoedema in 1·7%, neoplasia in 1·0% and delayed post-surgical wound healing in 0·6% of the included patients. In total, 70·5% of patients suffered from arterial hypertension, 45·2% were obese, 27·2% had non-insulin dependent diabetes, and 24·4% dyslipidaemia. Altogether 18·4% suffered from metabolic syndrome. Cofactors and comorbidities of patients with chronic leg ulcers have previously been studied but not in detail. Here, we were able to demonstrate the existence of several potentially relevant cofactors, comorbidities of their associations and geographical distributions, which should be routinely examined in patients with chronic leg ulcers and - if possible - treated.

  18. [Nutrition and chronic wound healing. A clinical case of a patient with a hard to heal venous leg ulcers].

    PubMed

    Lozano, Sandra Alexandre; Bonet, Carme Marquilles; Bou, Joan-Enric Torra I; Llobet Burgués, Marta

    2014-05-01

    The cronicity of a wound can be produced by the alteration of several factors. One of the agents that can produce a delay in the wound healing process is malnutrition. According with the evidence, nutrition is an important factor in chronic wound prevention and treatment. The prevalence of low extremity wounds increases in population aged 65 or more. As we became older, malnutrition risk is more relevant due to physiological changes related to ageing. We describe a clinical case of a torpid venous leg ulcer in an elder patient centering on nutrition assessment and management.

  19. Continuity through best practice: design and implementation of a nurse-led community leg-ulcer service.

    PubMed

    Lorimer, Karen

    2004-06-01

    The design of the new service was intended to facilitate continuity. The results after the first year of the new service revealed that care was both more effective and more efficient for all types of leg ulcers (Harrison, Graham, Friedberg, & Lorimer, 2003). Healing rates had dramatically improved, the frequency of nursing visits decreased, and supply costs declined. With the new service, comprehensive standardized assessments are made at baseline on all new admissions for home leg-ulcer care, and reassessments are regularly scheduled if the condition does not improve. With the evidence-based protocol, all providers and sectors of care are "working from the same script." Specific information is obtained on the client's health history, leg-ulcer history, preferences, and social context. Continuity is further facilitated through implementation of the primary nurse model, whereby one provider is responsible for developing the care plan and for subsequent evaluation and revision. Management continuity is advanced through health-care reorganization, with the development of an expert, dedicated nursing team, a consistent approach to training and skill development, improved coordination, an interdisciplinary approach for referral and consultation, and continuous quality improvement measures for education and practice audit. A number of strategies tailored to the new service have been highly effective. Strategic alliances among the researchers, home-care authority, nursing agency, nurses, and physicians are essential to the success of both design and implementation. Ongoing interdisciplinary and intersectoral communication expedites the referral process and helps to resolve issues as they develop. The majority of physicians have been very supportive of the use of the protocol and the evidence-based service. Surveys of care recipients have been mostly positive. Nurses who have been surveyed concerning the supports to implementation of the evidence-based service have

  20. Factors that influence healing of chronic venous leg ulcers: a retrospective cohort*

    PubMed Central

    Scotton, Marilia Formentini; Miot, Hélio Amante; Abbade, Luciana Patricia Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Venous ulcers have a significant impact on patient quality of life, and constitute a worldwide public health problem. Treatment is complex, with high failure rates. OBJECTIVES To identify clinical and therapeutic factors that influence healing of venous ulcers. METHODS Retrospective cohort study of patients with venous ulcers. Ulcer area was measured at the first visit (T0) and after 6 months (T6) and 1 year (T12). A reduction in ulcer area of 50% or more at T6 and T12 was the outcome of interest, weighted by clinical, demographic and treatment aspects. RESULTS Ninety-four patients were included (137 ulcers). A reduction in ulcer area of 50% or more was seen in 40.1% of patients (95%CI 31.9 to 48.4%) at T6 and 49.6% (95%CI 41.2 to 58.1%) at T12. Complete healing occurred in 16.8% (95%CI 10.5 to 23.1%) at T6 and 27% (95%CI 19.5 to 39.5%) at T12. The lowest ulcer area reductions at T6 were associated with longstanding ulcer (RR=0.95; 95%CI 0.91 to 0.98), poor adherence to compression therapy (RR=4.04; 95%CI 1.31 to 12.41), and infection episodes (RR= 0.42; 95%CI 0.23 to 0.76). At T12, lower reductions were associated with longstanding ulcer (RR=0.95; 95%CI 0.92 to 0.98), longer topical antibiotic use (RR=0.93; 95%CI 0.87 to 0.99), and systemic antibiotic use (RR=0.63; 95%CI 0.40 to 0.99). CONCLUSIONS Longstanding ulcer, infection, poor adherence to compression therapy, and longer topical and systemic antibiotic use were independently correlated with worse healing rates. PMID:24937814

  1. Genital ulcers: etiology, clinical diagnosis, and associated human immunodeficiency virus infection in Kingston, Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Behets, F M; Brathwaite, A R; Hylton-Kong, T; Chen, C Y; Hoffman, I; Weiss, J B; Morse, S A; Dallabetta, G; Cohen, M S; Figueroa, J P

    1999-05-01

    Individuals presenting consecutively with genital ulcers in Kingston, Jamaica, underwent serological testing for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, chlamydial infection, and syphilis. Ulcer material was analyzed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (M-PCR) analysis. DNA from herpes simplex virus (HSV), Haemophilus ducreyi, and Treponema pallidum was detected in 158 (52.0%), 72 (23.7%), and 31 (10.2%) of 304 ulcer specimens. Of the 304 subjects, 67 (22%) were HIV-seropositive and 64 (21%) were T. pallidum-seroreactive. Granuloma inguinale was clinically diagnosed in nine (13.4%) of 67 ulcers negative by M-PCR analysis and in 12 (5.1%) of 237 ulcers positive by M-PCR analysis (P = .03). Lymphogranuloma venereum was clinically diagnosed in eight patients. Compared with M-PCR analysis, the sensitivity and specificity of a clinical diagnosis of syphilis, herpes, and chancroid were 67.7%, 53.8%, and 75% and 91.2%, 83.6%, and 75.4%, respectively. Reactive syphilis serology was 74% sensitive and 85% specific compared with M-PCR analysis. Reported contact with a prostitute in the preceding 3 months was associated with chancroid (P = .009), reactive syphilis serology (P = .011), and HIV infection (P = .007). The relatively poor accuracy of clinical and locally available laboratory diagnoses pleads for syndromic management of genital ulcers in Jamaica. Prevention efforts should be intensified.

  2. A case of hydroxyurea-induced leg ulcer after definitive treatment suspension in a patient affected by thrombocythemia: effectiveness of a new collagenase.

    PubMed

    Fioramonti, Paolo; Fino, Pasquale; Parisi, Paola; Scuderi, Nicolo; Onesti, Maria G

    2012-01-01

    Hydroxyurea (HU) is an antitumor agent effective in the treatment of myeloproliferative disorders. It is usually well-tolerated and has low toxicity but its use is associated with several adverse cutaneous effects. Among them, leg ulcers have been noted in association with long-term administration. Poor response to traditional local and systemic therapy is a typical feature of HU-induced leg ulcers, and discontinuation of the drug is often required to achieve complete wound healing. We present a case of circumferential HU-induced leg ulcer in a patient affected by essential thrombocythemia, in which the lesion occured after the definitive suspension of the treatment. We propose a conservative management with a new collagenase (Bionect Start®) for skin lesions in this type of patient, for whom a surgical treatment could be more complicated, due to the underlying disease.

  3. Diabetic foot ulcer--A review on pathophysiology, classification and microbial etiology.

    PubMed

    Noor, Saba; Zubair, Mohammad; Ahmad, Jamal

    2015-01-01

    As the prevalence of diabetes is increasing globally, secondary complications associated to this endocrinal disorder are also ascending. Diabetic foot ulcers are potentially modifying complications. Disruption of harmony in glucose homeostasis causes hyperglycemic status, results in activation of certain metabolic pathways which in their abnormal state subsequently leads to development of vascular insufficiency, nerve damages headed by ulceration in lower extremity due to plantar pressures and foot deformity. Insult to foot caused by trauma at the affected site goes unnoticeable to patient due to loss of sensation. Among the above mention causes, resistance to infection is also considered as chief modulator of pathophysiological image of diabetic foot lesions. Healing as well as non-healing nature of ulcer relies upon the wound microbial communities and the extent of their pathogenicity. A validated classification system of foot ulcer is primarily necessary for clinicians in management of diabetic foot problems. Another aspect which needs management is proper identification of causative pathogen causing infection. The way of approaches presently employed in the diagnosis for treatment of foot ulcer colonized by different microbes is conventional techniques. Conventional diagnostic methods are widely acceptable since decades. But in recent years newly invented molecular techniques are exploring the use of 16S ribosomal regions specific to prokaryotes in bacterial identification and quantification. Molecular techniques would be a better choice if engaged, in finding the specific species harboring the wound.

  4. A retrospective, quality improvement review of maggot debridement therapy outcomes in a foot and leg ulcer clinic.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Noreen; Campbell, Donna

    2014-07-01

    Maggot debridement is the deliberate use of larvae known to consume only necrotic tissue. A retrospective quality improvement analysis of maggot debridement therapy (MDT) was conducted among patients with devitalized tissue or gangrene attending a Canadian foot and leg ulcer clinic who received MDT between January 2001 and June 2006. MDT was applied every 48 hours until >90% of necrotic tissue was debrided. The authors identified MDT patients in the clinic database and reviewed their medical records for age, gender, presence of diabetes or peripheral arterial disease (PAD), type of wound, number of maggot applications required, wound outcomes, and nursing visit costs (week before, during, and after MDT) and noted patient experiences. Records of 68 patients (average age 71, range 22 to 95, years) were identified and abstracted. Of those, 44% had leg ulcers and 67% had both diabetes and PAD. The majority (39, 58%) of wounds required three debridement sessions. All but one patient achieved debridement of >90% of necrotic tissue in 2 to 10 days. Most wounds (56) healed with follow-up moist wound care. Only one patient withdrew from MDT. No other patient or safety concerns were documented. Total nursing visits for all patients the week before and then after MDT were 307 and 102, respectively. These findings confirm results of previous reports about the effectiveness of MDT for wound debridement. Randomized, controlled clinical studies are needed to confirm the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of MDT compared to other debridement modalities.

  5. Chronic venous ulceration of leg associated with peripheral arterial disease: an underappreciated entity in developing country.

    PubMed

    Nag, Falguni; De, Abhishek; Hazra, Avijit; Chatterjee, Gobinda; Ghosh, Arghyaprasun; Surana, Trupti V

    2014-10-01

    Chronic venous ulcer can often be associated with asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease (PAD), which usually remains undiagnosed adding significantly to the morbidity of these patients. The Ankle-Brachial Pressure Index (ABPI) is suggested for PAD evaluation. Many PAD studies were conducted in western countries, but there is a scarcity of data on the prevalence of PAD in clinical venous ulcer patient in developing countries. We conducted a study in a tertiary care hospital of eastern part of India to find out the prevalence of PAD in venous ulcer patients, and also to find the sensitivity of ABPI as a diagnostic tool in these patients. We evaluated clinically diagnosed patients with venous ulcer using ABPI and Colour Doppler study for the presence of PAD. Possible associations such as age, sex, body mass index (BMI), smoking, hypertension and atherosclerosis were studied. All results were analysed using the software Statistica version 6. PAD was present in 23 (27·71%) patients. Older age, longer duration, smoking, high BMI and hypertension were found to be significantly associated with PAD. A very strong level of agreement was found between venous Doppler and ABPI. Assessment for the presence of PAD is important in all clinically diagnosed venous ulcer patients. ABPI being a simple, non-invasive outpatient department (OPD)-based procedure, can be routinely used in cases of venous ulcer to find out the hidden cases of PAD even in developing countries. PMID:23170845

  6. Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... have one. Ulcers can also be caused by anti-inflammatory medicines. Although most people take these medicines without ... may damage the stomach lining and cause ulcers. Anti-inflammatory drugs include aspirin, ibuprofen (one brand name: Motrin), ...

  7. Self-monitoring of lower leg skin temperature: accuracy of self-reported data and adherence to a cooling protocol for the prevention of venous leg ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Kelechi, Teresa J; Madisetti, Mohan; Mueller, Martina; Dooley, Mary; Prentice, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Background For intervention studies that require the use of participant self-reports, the quality and accuracy of recorded data and variability in participant adherence rates to the treatment can cause significant outcome bias. Purpose To assess the quality and accuracy of participant documentation of daily self-monitoring of leg skin temperature, adherence to a graduated cooling treatment protocol to prevent venous leg ulcers, and the potential for bias in treatment effect in a randomized controlled trial that included a population with chronic venous disease. Methods Individuals were randomized to a leg cooling intervention or placebo treatment group to daily self-monitor and record lower leg skin temperature over a 9-month period on monthly paper study logs. Returned study logs for the first 100 completed participants (n=54 cooling intervention, n=46 control) were reviewed for quality and accuracy. Adherence was determined from evaluating the accuracy of participant documentation. To examine potential outcome bias in treatment effect, mean between group and within group comparisons of the before and after treatment differences were conducted using an intention-to-treat (ITT) versus a modified intention-to-treat (mITT) analysis approach with an 85% accuracy cut-off rate. Data were collected in 2011–2014. Results Of the expected 900 study logs, 91.8% (826/900) were returned and 8.2% (74/900) were not. Non-mutually exclusive main error types in returned documentation included: 59.2% (489/826) white-outs, cross-off and/or overwrites, 34.9% (288/826) entries omitted, 29.4% (243/826) no performance of daily self-monitoring, 28.7% (237/826) no performance of the treatment intervention per the prescribed protocol regime, 26.8% (221/826) extraneous data, 8.6% (71/826) suspected fabrication, and 7.6% (63/826) questionable validity. Under ITT analysis, 38.4% (346/900) of all returned logs were <85% accurate, 25.0% (225/900) were 85%–99% accurate, and 36.6% (329

  8. Extracellular matrix assessment of infected chronic venous leg ulcers: role of metalloproteinases and inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Serra, Raffaele; Grande, Raffaele; Buffone, Gianluca; Molinari, Vincenzo; Perri, Paolo; Perri, Aldina; Amato, Bruno; Colosimo, Manuela; de Franciscis, Stefano

    2016-02-01

    Chronic venous ulcer (CVU) represents a dreaded complication of chronic venous disease (CVD). The onset of infection may further delay the already precarious healing process in such lesions. Some evidences have shown that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are involved and play a central role in both CVUs and infectious diseases. Two groups of patients were enrolled to evaluate the expression of MMPs in infected ulcers and the levels of inflammatory cytokines as well as their prevalence. Group I comprised 63 patients (36 females and 27 males with a median age of 68·7 years) with infected CVUs, and group II (control group) comprised 66 patients (38 females and 28 males with a median age of 61·2 years) with non-infected venous ulcers. MMP evaluation and dosage of inflammatory cytokines in plasma and wound fluid was performed by means of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test; protein extraction and immunoblot analysis were performed on biopsied wounds. The first three most common agents involved in CVUs were Staphylococcus aureus (38·09%), Corynebacterium striatum (19·05%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (12·7%). In this study, we documented overall higher levels of MMP-1 and MMP-8 in patients with infected ulcers compared to those with uninfected ulcers that showed higher levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9. We also documented higher levels of interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, IL-8, vascular endothelial growth factor and tumour necrosis factor-alpha in patients with infected ulcers with respect to those with uninfected ulcers, documenting a possible association between infection, MMP activation, cytokine secretions and symptoms. The present results could represent the basis for further studies on drug use that mimic the action of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases in order to make infected CVU more manageable.

  9. [Information needs of people suffering from venous leg ulcer. Expertise of people concerned as a basis of patient-centered information].

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Astrid

    2011-06-01

    Patient-centred information is orientated on the needs. The main objective of such information is coping with every-day life and learning to live with the chronic disease. Regarding the current knowledge, such information does not exist in German speaking countries for people suffering from venous leg ulceration. In order to generate the subject matter of such information, a literature search and a secondary analysis of 27 transcripts of interviews, given by people living with chronic leg ulceration, were conducted. Both analyses show the complex impact of leg ulceration on every-day live. The dimensions competences in every-day live, knowledge, techniques and skills and the meaning of family were generated. The secondary analysis points out that family members are an important part of the supporting system and are concerned by effects of chronic disease as well. After long-lasting disease-experience people consider themselves as experts. They obtain special competences in dealing with their disease and judge their experience-based knowledge higher than the knowledge of healthcare professionals. The participants describe individual concepts about their disease. Medical knowledge constitutes just one source of knowledge among others. People know about alternative medicine and use it. They feel that the healthcare professionals do not take them seriously in most cases. Patient-centred information can be a guide to people suffering from venous leg ulceration and their family members, but also a support for healthcare professionals to reflect their professional behaviour and understanding. PMID:21638256

  10. Analysis of antibiotic susceptibility and resistance of leg ulcer bacterial flora in patients hospitalized at Dermatology Department, Poznań University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Zmudzińska, Maria; Czarnecka-Operacz, Magdalena; Silny, Wojciech

    2005-01-01

    Effective treatment of frequently infected, poorly healing wounds such as leg ulcers due to chronic venous insufficiency poses a major clinical problem. Antibiotic resistance in dermatology patients, especially those with non-healing leg ulcers, is a widespread phenomenon. Various antibiotics, mainly broad-spectrum agents, are frequently and sometimes inappropriately prescribed, which often leads to the selection of antibiotic-resistant bacteria strains. The aim of this study was to analyze antibiotic susceptibility and resistance of bacterial isolates cultured from leg ulcers. Wound swabs were obtained from patients admitted to Dermatology Department, Poznań University of Medical Sciences, during the 1998-2002 period. Bacteriologic diagnosis of 175 wound swabs was performed in compliance with compulsory laboratory methods. The analysis yielded 173 positive results, predominated by Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, Proteus mirabilis and Escherichia coli. Bacterial isolates were evaluated for resistance to commonly used antibiotics, taking into consideration the presence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains. Antibiotic resistance profiles were compared between the years 1998 and 2002, with detailed account of clinical characteristics and history of leg ulcers disease. The study pointed to an increasing tendency of antibiotic resistance in the study group of patients. PMID:16146620

  11. Testing the effectiveness of a self-efficacy based exercise intervention for adults with venous leg ulcers: protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise and adequate self-management capacity may be important strategies in the management of venous leg ulcers. However, it remains unclear if exercise improves the healing rates of venous leg ulcers and if a self-management exercise program based on self-efficacy theory is well adhered to. Method/design This is a randomised controlled in adults with venous leg ulcers to determine the effectiveness of a self-efficacy based exercise intervention. Participants with venous leg ulcers are recruited from 3 clinical sites in Australia. After collection of baseline data, participants are randomised to either an intervention group or control group. The control group receive usual care, as recommended by evidence based guidelines. The intervention group receive an individualised program of calf muscle exercises and walking. The twelve week exercise program integrates multiple elements, including up to six telephone delivered behavioural coaching and goal setting sessions, supported by written materials, a pedometer and two follow-up booster calls if required. Participants are encouraged to seek social support among their friends, self-monitor their weekly steps and lower limb exercises. The control group are supported by a generic information sheet that the intervention group also receive encouraging lower limb exercises, a pedometer for self-management and phone calls at the same time points as the intervention group. The primary outcome is the healing rates of venous leg ulcers which are assessed at fortnightly clinic appointments. Secondary outcomes, assessed at baseline and 12 weeks: functional ability (range of ankle motion and Tinetti gait and balance score), quality of life and self-management scores. Discussion This study seeks to address a significant gap in current wound management practice by providing evidence for the effectiveness of a home-based exercise program for adults with venous leg ulcers. Theory-driven, evidence-based strategies that can

  12. Case 10: venous leg ulcer that was significantly impairing quality of life.

    PubMed

    Simon, Deborah

    2016-03-01

    This heavily exuding, sloughy ulcer was so painful that the patient had difficulty tolerating any physical contact with it. After treatment, pain levels subsided, so that she was better able to tolerate dressing changes, could sleep in her own bed instead of a chair, and started compression therapy. PMID:26949854

  13. Low-grade elastic compression regimen for venous leg ulcers--an effective compromise for patients requiring daily dressing changes.

    PubMed

    Dabiri, Ganary; Hammerman, Scott; Carson, Polly; Falanga, Vincent

    2015-12-01

    Venous leg ulcers (VLUs) affect millions of patients worldwide and are a tremendous financial burden on our health care system. The hallmark of venous disease of the lower extremities is venous hypertension, and compression is the current mainstay of treatment. However, many patients are non-compliant, partly because of the complexity of the dressings and the difficulties with application and removal. The aim of our study was to test an effective compression dressing regimen for patients with VLUs who require changing the ulcer primary dressing twice daily. We used two layers of a latex-free tubular elastic bandage for compression. The primary endpoint of our study was increased wound-healing rate and our secondary endpoint was complete wound closure. All active study subjects had positive healing rates at week 4 and week 8. Two subjects achieved complete wound closure by week 8. We conclude that compression with a latex-free tubular elastic bandage can be safely used in patients with VLUs requiring frequent dressing changes. This type of compression allows for daily inspection of wounds, dressing changes at home, flexibility in the context of clinical trials, and is a compromise for patients who are intolerant to compression dressings.

  14. "Toothbrush" the Feet: A Periodic Mechanical Stimulus for Healing of a Severe Chronic Leg Ulcer.

    PubMed

    Vounotrypidis, Periklis; Pappas, Periklis; Vrangalas, Vasilios; Pehlivanidis, Anthimos

    2015-09-01

    Chronic wounds develop when the sequence of healing events are disrupted, usually in patients with underlying diseases such as diabetes mellitus, venous insufficiency, peripheral artery disease, and neuropathies and they affect most often the lower extremities. We present a 68-year-old woman with plantar ulceration, lasting for approximately 18 months, resistant to healing with conventional therapy and various modalities we used. The patient had a long history of seronegative enteropathic arthritis, Crohn's disease, secondary fibrillar amyloidosis, multiplex neuropathy, and small vessel vasculitis, the latter being the trigger event for the ulceration of her right foot. Before the decision for a final surgical intervention, we implemented a mechanical periodic stimulus using a soft toothbrush, which resulted in the gradual and complete healing of the ulcer within a period of 6 weeks. Patient's history and previous treatments are presented along with the procedures that led to the healing of the chronic wound. This report supports the idea that periodic mechanical stimulus is of great importance for the healing process and this could be the mechanism of action of some other methods that have been described in the medical literature.

  15. Vascular pythiosis in a thalassemic patient presenting as bilateral leg ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Keoprasom, Nicha; Chularojanamontri, Leena; Chayakulkeeree, Methee; Chaiprasert, Angkana; Wanachiwanawin, Wanchai; Ruangsetakit, Chanean

    2012-01-01

    Human pythiosis is an emerging disease caused by Pythium insidiosum, a fungus-like aquatic organism. Clinical presentations can be classified into four types: (i) cutaneous/subcutaneous, (ii) ocular, (iii) vascular, and (iv) disseminated pythiosis. Serological tests such as immunodiffusion and immunochromotographic test are useful to make rapid diagnosis in cutaneous and vascular pythiosis. We report a case of 35 year-old male with vascular pythiosis of both legs, diagnosed by serology and molecular techniques. PMID:24432209

  16. Vascular pythiosis in a thalassemic patient presenting as bilateral leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Keoprasom, Nicha; Chularojanamontri, Leena; Chayakulkeeree, Methee; Chaiprasert, Angkana; Wanachiwanawin, Wanchai; Ruangsetakit, Chanean

    2012-12-01

    Human pythiosis is an emerging disease caused by Pythium insidiosum, a fungus-like aquatic organism. Clinical presentations can be classified into four types: (i) cutaneous/subcutaneous, (ii) ocular, (iii) vascular, and (iv) disseminated pythiosis. Serological tests such as immunodiffusion and immunochromotographic test are useful to make rapid diagnosis in cutaneous and vascular pythiosis. We report a case of 35 year-old male with vascular pythiosis of both legs, diagnosed by serology and molecular techniques. PMID:24432209

  17. [Care for ulcers having diverse etiology prospective study on PermaFoam].

    PubMed

    Cuervo, Fernando Martínez; Soriano, José Verdú; López, Justo Rueda; Gómez, Teresa Segovia

    2009-09-01

    PermaFoam, the dressing under study, is characterized as a polyurethane foam having gradient pores which, besides all the aforementioned characteristics, makes it possible to: rapidly absorb large quantity of seepage or exudation, cell remains and viscous seepage thanks to a layer of large size pores that are in contact with the wound; distribute and retain seepage in an intermediate layer of this dressing which is composed of pores having a smaller diameter; and, through a final layer characterized by an even smaller pore which permits a high degree of semi-permeability and adaptability to the distinct locales where this dressing needs be applied. With the objective to evaluate the usefulness of this dressing under study for the cicatrization of wounds having diverse etiology this research project was carried out. Secondary objectives included: reducing the surface of a wound, respecting the perilesional skin, estimating the ease of handling and applying this dressing, and identifying the most outstanding qualities this dressing provides. PMID:19839235

  18. Compression for Primary Prevention, Treatment, and Prevention of Recurrence of Venous Leg Ulcers: An Evidence-and Consensus-Based Algorithm for Care Across the Continuum.

    PubMed

    Ratliff, Catherine R; Yates, Stephanie; McNichol, Laurie; Gray, Mikel

    2016-01-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency is a prevalent disease that frequently leads to development of venous leg ulcers. While a number of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines have been developed that provide guidance for clinicians when caring for patients with chronic venous insufficiency, they lack adequate detail concerning selection and application of compression for prevention and management of venous leg ulcers. In order to address this need, the WOCN Society appointed a task force to develop an algorithm for compression for primary prevention, treatment, and prevention of recurrent venous leg ulcers in persons with chronic venous insufficiency. The task force used findings from a scoping literature review to identify current best evidence needed to support decision points and pathways within the algorithm. In addition, the task force convened a panel of 20 clinicians and researchers with expertise in lower extremity venous disorders in order to establish consensus around pathways and decision points within the algorithm lacking robust evidence. Following initial construction of the algorithm, a second interdisciplinary group of expert clinicians established content validity and provided additional qualitative feedback used to complete final revisions of the algorithm. This article reviews the process used to create this landmark algorithm, including generation of the evidence- and consensus-based statements used in its construction, the various pathways, and rich supplemental materials embedded within the algorithm, and the process used to establish content validity.

  19. Compression for Primary Prevention, Treatment, and Prevention of Recurrence of Venous Leg Ulcers: An Evidence-and Consensus-Based Algorithm for Care Across the Continuum.

    PubMed

    Ratliff, Catherine R; Yates, Stephanie; McNichol, Laurie; Gray, Mikel

    2016-01-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency is a prevalent disease that frequently leads to development of venous leg ulcers. While a number of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines have been developed that provide guidance for clinicians when caring for patients with chronic venous insufficiency, they lack adequate detail concerning selection and application of compression for prevention and management of venous leg ulcers. In order to address this need, the WOCN Society appointed a task force to develop an algorithm for compression for primary prevention, treatment, and prevention of recurrent venous leg ulcers in persons with chronic venous insufficiency. The task force used findings from a scoping literature review to identify current best evidence needed to support decision points and pathways within the algorithm. In addition, the task force convened a panel of 20 clinicians and researchers with expertise in lower extremity venous disorders in order to establish consensus around pathways and decision points within the algorithm lacking robust evidence. Following initial construction of the algorithm, a second interdisciplinary group of expert clinicians established content validity and provided additional qualitative feedback used to complete final revisions of the algorithm. This article reviews the process used to create this landmark algorithm, including generation of the evidence- and consensus-based statements used in its construction, the various pathways, and rich supplemental materials embedded within the algorithm, and the process used to establish content validity. PMID:27163774

  20. Factor XIII V34L polymorphism modulates the risk of chronic venous leg ulcer progression and extension.

    PubMed

    Gemmati, Donato; Tognazzo, Silvia; Serino, Maria L; Fogato, Luisella; Carandina, Sergio; De Palma, Massimiliano; Izzo, Marcello; De Mattei, Monica; Ongaro, Alessia; Scapoli, Gian L; Caruso, Angelo; Liboni, Alberto; Zamboni, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    Low Factor XIII (FXIII) activity has been reported in the blood of patients with chronic venous leg ulcer (CVU). In vivo studies have described increased wound healing in CVU patients treated with FXIII concentrate, and in vitro studies have shown increased regenerative capacity in FXIII-treated fibroblasts. In addition, a common G-to-T polymorphism in the FXIIIA-subunit gene (V34L) significantly increases the activity and modifies the cross-linking properties of the FXIII molecule and this variant has been investigated as a protective factor against thrombosis, a recognized risk factor for CVU establishment. Therefore, the role of FXIII levels, FXIII V34L, FVR506Q, and FIIG20210A, common gene polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of CVU was investigated. Ninety-one patients with CVU and 195 healthy controls (91 of them sex- and age-matched) were PCR-genotyped for the FXIIIV34L, FVR506Q, and FIIG20210A substitutions and FXIIIA-subunit levels were determined by immuno-electrophoresis. The extent of the venous ulcer surface in patients was measured by computer software. The allele frequency and the genotype distribution of the FXIII polymorphism did not show significant differences between the whole group of cases and controls as well as prothrombin variants did. On the contrary, the FVR506Q variant (FV Leiden) allele was more frequent in patients, yielding a significant OR value of 5.93 (95 percent CI, 1.83-19.17; p= 0.003). Considering only CVU cases secondary to a post-thrombotic syndrome (n= 24), FV Leiden yielded a greater OR value of 16.08 (95 percent CI, 4.33-59.6; p < 0.0001). When the CVU cases were stratified by the three possible FXIII genotypes, a significant trend toward a lower mean value of the ulcerated area was clearly evident as the number of the polymorphic alleles (L34) increased in the genotype of patients (VV = 11.9 cm(2,)+/- 23.6; VL = 6.1 cm(2,)+/- 6.9; LL = 4.1 cm(2,)+/- 2.8; p= 0.01). On the other hand, FXIIIA antigen levels were similar between

  1. Effectiveness and tissue compatibility of a 12-week treatment of chronic venous leg ulcers with an octenidine based antiseptic--a randomized, double-blind controlled study.

    PubMed

    Vanscheidt, Wolfgang; Harding, Keith; Téot, Luc; Siebert, Jörg

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of octenidine dihydrochloride/phenoxyethanol (OHP) found in vitro by conducting a randomized, double-blind controlled clinical study focusing on its safe and effective use in chronic venous leg ulcers. In total, 126 male and female patients were treated with either OHP (n = 60) or Ringer solution (n = 66). The treatment lasted over a period of maximum 12 weeks. For the assessment of the wound-healing process, clinical outcome parameters were employed, that is, time span until 100% epithelization, wound status and the wound surface area were analysed. Side effects were recorded during the study period. The median time to complete ulcer healing was comparable between the OHP and Ringer solution groups (92 versus 87 days; P = 0·952), without being influenced by wound size or duration of the target ulcer (P-values: 0·947/0·978). In patients treated with OHP, fewer adverse events (AEs) were observed compared with the Ringer group (17% versus 29% of patients reported 20 versus 38 AEs). OHP is well suitable for the treatment of chronic wounds without cytotoxic effects. Furthermore, OHP does not impair the wound healing in chronic venous ulcers.

  2. Medical management of venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Pascarella, Luigi; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2015-03-01

    Venous disease is the most common cause of chronic leg ulceration and represents an advanced clinical manifestation of venous insufficiency. Due to their frequency and chronicity, venous ulcers have a high socioeconomic impact, with treatment costs accounting for 1% of the health care budget in Western countries. The evaluation of patients with venous ulcers should include a thorough medical history for prior deep venous thrombosis, assessment for an hypercoagulable state, and a physical examination. Use of the CEAP (clinical, etiology, anatomy, pathophysiology) Classification System and the revised Venous Clinical Severity Scoring System is strongly recommended to characterize disease severity and assess response to treatment. This venous condition requires lifestyle modification, with affected individuals performing daily intervals of leg elevation to control edema; use of elastic compression garments; and moderate physical activity, such as walking wearing below-knee elastic stockings. Meticulous skin care, treatment of dermatitis, and prompt treatment of cellulitis are important aspects of medical management. The pharmacology of chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulcers include essentially two medications: pentoxifylline and phlebotropic agents. The micronized purified flavonoid fraction is an effective adjunct to compression therapy in patients with large, chronic ulceration.

  3. Efficacy and cost-effectiveness of octenidine wound gel in the treatment of chronic venous leg ulcers in comparison to modern wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Hämmerle, Gilbert; Strohal, Robert

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness of an octenidine-based wound gel in the treatment of chronic venous leg ulcers. For this purpose, 49 wounds were treated with either modern wound-phase-adapted dressings alone (treatment arm 1; n = 17), octenidine wound gel plus modern wound-phase-adapted dressings (treatment arm 2; n = 17) or octenidine wound gel alone (treatment arm 3; n = 15). During the study period of 42 days with dressing changes every 3-5 days, wound healing characteristics and treatment costs of different dressings were analysed. Wound size reduction was significantly better (P = 0·028) in both octenidine wound gel treatment arms compared to modern dressings alone with total reductions of 14·6%, 64·1% and 96·2% in treatment arms 1-3. Early wound healing was merely observed under octenidine wound gel treatment (n = 9), whereby lowest treatment costs were generated by octenidine wound gel alone (€20·34/dressing change). As a result, the octenidine wound gel is cost-effective and well suitable for the treatment of chronic venous leg ulcers, considering both safety and promotion of wound healing.

  4. Combined use of fenestrated-type artificial dermis and topical negative pressure wound therapy for the venous leg ulcer of a rheumatoid arthritis patient.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Naoki; Kuro, Atsuyuki; Yamauchi, Takashi; Horiuchi, Ai; Kakudo, Natsuko; Sakamoto, Michiharu; Suzuki, Kenji; Kusumoto, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of circumferential venous leg ulcer in a rheumatoid arthritis patient. Mesh skin grafting was performed in another hospital, but the graft failed and the patient was referred to our hospital. This ulcer was treated by the combination therapy of a fenestrated-type artificial dermis with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) and secondary mesh grafting using our 'grip tape technique'. NPWT was started at -100 mmHg and continued until the formation of dermis-like tissue. A section stained using haematoxylin and eosin and an anti-αSMA (α smooth muscle actin) immunohistological section of the biopsy from dermis-like tissue showed an abundant infiltration of fibroblasts and capillary formation beneath the fenestration of the silicone sheet. Threefold mesh skin grafting was subsequently performed and it was taken up completely. The fenestrated-type artificial dermis in combination with NPWT produced good results without infection in the treatment of complex wounds. In addition, our 'grip tape technique' was useful to apply polyurethane foam to the entire surface of the lower leg. PMID:25650053

  5. Interleukin-8 production by polymorphonuclear leukocytes from patients with chronic infected leg ulcers treated with Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Peral, M C; Rachid, M M; Gobbato, N M; Huaman Martinez, M A; Valdez, J C

    2010-03-01

    Bacterial infection impairs the healing process, promoting the chronicity of inflammation and wounds. Because antibiotics fail to eradicate bacteria, especially in biofilm form, new therapeutic modalities may be required. In the present study, the effectiveness of bacteriotherapy with Lactobacillus plantarum on infected chronic venous ulcers was investigated and its effects on interleukin (IL)-8 production by cells from the ulcer bed and neutrophils isolated from peripheral blood that were previously challenged in vitro with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and L. plantarum were studied. Topical application of L. plantarum culture to lesions (25-60 cm(2)) of 14 diabetic and 20 non-diabetic patients induced debridement, granulation tissue formation and total healing after 30 days in 43% diabetics and in 50% non-diabetics. No significant differences between the groups were observed. The cells from ulcer beds collected after treatment with L. plantarum for 10 days showed a decrease in the percentage of polymorphonuclear, apoptotic and necrotic cells and an enhancement of IL-8 production. IL-8 production by isolated neutrophils from these patients was compared with that in diabetics without ulcers, as well as normal subjects under basal conditions, and after infection of polymorphonuclear cells with P. aeruginosa preincubated either with or without L. plantarum. The basal values in diabetic and ulcer patients were higher than normal (p <0.001) and were increased by P. aeruginosa infection in normal, diabetics (p <0.001) and non-diabetics with ulcers (p <0.01). Preincubation with L. plantarum decreased IL-8 production in patients with ulcers non-diabetic and diabetic (p <0.001). Lactobacillus plantarum treatment reduced wound bacterial load, neutrophils, apoptotic and necrotic cells, modified IL-8 production and induced wound healing.

  6. A budget impact analysis comparing a Hydrofiber® ; dressing to an alginate dressing in managing exuding venous leg ulcers in France.

    PubMed

    Yan, Songkai; Colin, Xavier; Coudray-Omnès, Carole; Guido-Morin, Pascale; Kommala, Dheerendra R

    2014-06-01

    An Excel model was developed to compare total costs (including primary and secondary dressings only) of Hydrofiber(®) ; dressing (2010 branded price) versus an alginate dressing (generic or branded price) in managing exuding venous leg ulcers considering mean wear time and mean duration of exudate management phase, from the French Social Security perspective over 5 years (2011-2015). Budget impact (based on prevalence of venous leg ulcers in France) was estimated as the difference between scenario 1 (Hydrofiber(®) ; versus alginate dressing usage proportion increasing slightly per year) and Scenario2 (proportion remaining at 2010 levels). Annual costs and net savings per patient for the dressings were calculated in analyses 1 and 2. Analysis 1 (28-day mean exudate management phase for both Hydrofiber(®) ; and alginate dressing groups): total costs 66·82€ Hydrofiber(®) ;, 70·08€ generic alginate, 77·0€ branded alginate; net savings 3·26€ and 10·18€ for Hydrofiber(®) ; versus generic and branded alginate. Analysis 2 (mean exudate management phase of 22·2 versus 28 days for Hydrofiber(®) ; versus alginate): total costs 52·92€, 70·08€ and 77·0€, and net savings 17·10€ and 24·02€, accordingly. Total cost savings (budget impact scenario 1 minus scenario 2): Analysis 1 - 223 107€ and 696 304€ for Hydrofiber(®) ; versus generic and branded alginate dressings, respectively; Analysis 2 - 1 169 845€ and 1 643 042€ accordingly. Sensitivity analyses indicated that results are reliable. This conservative analysis shows that effective exudate management using Hydrofiber(®) ; dressing can produce sizeable cost savings.

  7. A randomized controlled trial of larval therapy for the debridement of leg ulcers: results of a multicenter, randomized, controlled, open, observer blind, parallel group study.

    PubMed

    Mudge, Elizabeth; Price, Patricia; Walkley, Neal; Neal, Walkley; Harding, Keith G

    2014-01-01

    It has been known for centuries that the application of larvae is useful to heal certain wounds by facilitating debridement of necrotic tissue,(1) yet the efficacy of larval therapy continues to be debatable. This study compared the clinical effectiveness of a larval therapy dressing (BioFOAM) with a standard debridement technique (Purilon gel; hydrogel) in terms of time to debridement of venous (VLU) or mixed arterial/venous (MLU) leg ulcers. Data analyses were conducted on 88 subjects. Sixty-four subjects completed the full study. Of these, 31 of the 32 (96.9%) patients who completed treatment in the larvae arm debrided fully, compared with 11 of the 32 (34.4%) patients who completed the hydrogel arm. In addition, 42 (48%) ulcers fully debrided within the 21-day intervention phase, 31 (67.4%) from the larvae arm (n = 46), and 11 (26.2%) from the hydrogel arm (n = 42), which was statistically significant (p = 0.001) in support of larvae. A statistically significant difference was also observed between treatment arms with regard to numbers of dressing changes during the intervention phase of the study (p < 0.001) in that subjects in the larvae arm required significantly fewer dressing changes(mean = 2.83) than those in the hydrogel arm (mean = 5.40). There were no statistically significant differences in the clinical condition of the wound bed and surrounding skin by intervention. Subjects in the larvae arm experienced more ulcer-related pain or discomfort than subjects in the hydrogel arm (p < 0.001). This study provided good evidence to show that larval therapy, in the form of a BioFOAM dressing, debrided VLU and MLU considerably more quickly than a hydrogel, although the possibility of resloughing should be closely monitored. PMID:24299513

  8. Clinical evaluation of the efficacy and safety of a medical device in various forms containing Triticum vulgare for the treatment of venous leg ulcers - a randomized pilot study.

    PubMed

    Romanelli, Marco; Macchia, Michela; Panduri, Salvatore; Paggi, Battistino; Saponati, Giorgio; Dini, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to assess the efficacy and tolerability of the topical application of an aqueous extract of Triticum vulgare (TV) in different vehicles (cream, impregnated gauzes, foam, hydrogel, and dressing gel) for the treatment of venous lower leg ulcers. Fifty patients were randomized to receive one of the five investigational vehicles. Treatment was performed up to complete healing or to a maximum of 29 days. The wound size reduction from baseline was the primary efficacy variable, which was measured by means of a noninvasive laser scanner instrument for wound assessment. In all groups, apart from the foam group, a similar trend toward the reduction of the surface area was observed. The cream showed the greatest effect on the mean reduction of the lesion size. At last visit, six ulcers were healed: two in the cream group, three in the gauze group, and one in the dressing gel group. In the patients treated with the cream, the gauzes, the hydrogel, and the dressing gel, the reduction of lesion size was 40%-50%; the reduction was smaller in the foam group. No impact in terms of age on the healing process was found. The Total Symptoms Score decreased in all groups during the study; a greater efficacy in terms of signs/symptoms was observed in the patients treated with the gauzes. In the dressing gel group, one patient had an infection of the wound after 3 weeks of treatment and 2 of colonization, leading to a systemic antibiotic treatment. The events were judged as nonrelated to the device used. On the basis of the results, it could be argued that the medical device may be useful in the treatment of chronic venous ulcers.

  9. Split thickness skin grafts for the treatment of non-healing foot and leg ulcers in patients with diabetes: a retrospective review

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, John J.; Wallin, Kelly J.; Spencer, Loren

    2012-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed 107 diabetic patients who received a split thickness skin graft (STSG) for treatment of a non-healing diabetic foot or leg ulcer to describe healing times based on patient characteristics, comorbidities or complications. The minimum follow-up was 6 months from the time of STSG application. The mean time to healing among all patients was 5.1 weeks (3 to 16 weeks). The mean healing time for patients with complications was 12.0 weeks (10 to 16 weeks) while the mean healing time for those without complications was 4.9 weeks (3 to 10 weeks). Overall complication rate was 2.8%. Patients with a STSG take of less than 95% had a mean healing time of 7.9 weeks compared to 4.8 weeks for those with a STSG take of 100% (p<0.001). The use of autologous STSG for treatment of non-healing diabetic foot and leg wounds is a viable method for soft tissue closure and may present a low complication rate and a satisfactory rate of healing. PMID:22403742

  10. Split thickness skin grafts for the treatment of non-healing foot and leg ulcers in patients with diabetes: a retrospective review.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John J; Wallin, Kelly J; Spencer, Loren

    2012-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed 107 diabetic patients who received a split thickness skin graft (STSG) for treatment of a non-healing diabetic foot or leg ulcer to describe healing times based on patient characteristics, comorbidities or complications. The minimum follow-up was 6 months from the time of STSG application. The mean time to healing among all patients was 5.1 weeks (3 to 16 weeks). The mean healing time for patients with complications was 12.0 weeks (10 to 16 weeks) while the mean healing time for those without complications was 4.9 weeks (3 to 10 weeks). Overall complication rate was 2.8%. Patients with a STSG take of less than 95% had a mean healing time of 7.9 weeks compared to 4.8 weeks for those with a STSG take of 100% (p<0.001). The use of autologous STSG for treatment of non-healing diabetic foot and leg wounds is a viable method for soft tissue closure and may present a low complication rate and a satisfactory rate of healing. PMID:22403742

  11. A Real World, Observational Registry of Chronic Wounds and Ulcers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Diabetic Foot; Varicose Ulcer; Pressure Ulcer; Surgical Wound Dehiscence; Vasculitis; Skin Ulcer; Leg Ulcer; Wounds and Injuries; Pyoderma; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Diabetic Neuropathies; Lymphedema; Venous Insufficiency; Diabetes Complications; Amputation Stump

  12. A prospective, randomized, controlled trial comparing the effects of noncontact, low-frequency ultrasound to standard care in healing venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Gary W; Orgill, Dennis P; Serena, Thomas E; Novoung, Aksone; O'Connell, Jessica B; Li, William W; Driver, Vickie R

    2015-01-01

    Current scientific evidence suggests venous leg ulcers (VLUs) that do not respond to guideline-defined care may have a wound microenvironment that is out of physiological balance. A prospective, randomized, controlled, multicenter trial was conducted to compare percent wound size reduction, proportions healed, pain, and quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes in patients randomized to standard care (SC) alone or SC and 40 kHz noncontact, low-frequency ultrasound (NLFU) treatments 3 times per week for 4 weeks. One hundred, twelve (112) eligible participants with documented venous stasis, a VLU >30 days' duration, measuring 4 cm2 to 50 cm2, and demonstrated arterial flow were enrolled. Of these, 81 reduced <30% in size during the 2-week run-in study phase and were randomized (SC, n = 40; NLFU+SC, n = 41). Median age of participants was 59 years; 83% had multiple complex comorbidities. Index ulcers were 56% recurrent, with a median duration of 10.3 months (range 1 month to 204.5 months) and median ulcer area of 11.0 cm2 (range 3.7 cm2-41.3 cm2). All participants received protocol-defined SC compression (30-40 mm Hg), dressings to promote a moist wound environment, and sharp debridement at the bedside for a minimum of 1 time per week. Ulcer measurements were obtained weekly using digital planimetry. Pain and QOL scores were assessed at baseline and after 4 weeks of treatment using the Visual Analog Scale and the Short Form-36 Health Survey. After 4 weeks of treatment, average wound size reduction was 61.6% ± 28.9 in the NLFU+SC compared to 45% ± 32.5 in the SC group (P = 0.02). Reductions in median (65.7% versus 44.4%, P = 0.02) and absolute wound area (9.0 cm2 versus 4.1 cm2, P = 0.003) as well as pain scores (from 3.0 to 0.6 versus 3.0 to 2.4, P = 0.01) were also significant. NLFU therapy with guideline-defined standard VLU care should be considered for healing VLUs not responding to SC alone. The results of this study warrant further research on barriers to healing and the

  13. Factors influencing the sporulation and cyst formation of Aphanomyces invadans, etiological agent of ulcerative mycosis in Atlantic menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kiryu, Y.; Blazer, V.S.; Vogelbein, W.K.; Kator, H.; Shields, J.D.

    2005-01-01

    Oomycete infections caused by Aphanomyces invadans occur in freshwater and estuarine fishes around the world. Along the east coast of the USA, skin ulcers caused by A. invadans are prevalent in Atlantic menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus. From laboratory observations low salinities appear crucial to transmission of the pathogen. To better understand aspects of transmission, we characterized sporulation and cyst formation of secondary zoospores of two isolates of A. invadans at different salinities and temperatures. Sporulation occurred only at low salinities. At room temperature (ca. 20-22 C), using "pond water" augmented with artificial sea salts, the endemic strain WIC and the Thailand strain PA7 of A. invadans produced free-swimming secondary zoospores at salinities of 0, 1 and 2 psu (practical salinity unit = ???), but not at 4 psu or higher. Secondary zoospores of another species, ATCC-62427 (Aphanomyces sp.), were observed at 1, 2, 4 and 8 psu but not at 0 and 12 psu. Secondary zoospores of all three isolates, especially WIC, were abundant and motile 1-2 d post-sporulation. Sporulation was temperature dependent and occurred over a relatively narrow range. No sporulation occurred at 4, 30 or 35 C for either WIC or PA7. For both strains zoospore production within 1-3 d after the initiation of sporulation was more prolific at 25 C than at 20 and 15 C. At 15 C production of zoospores was sustained over 11 d for WIC and 5 d for PA7. At room temperature single WIC secondary zoospores remained motile 12-18 h. Salinities exceeding 4 psu or vigorous shaking caused immediate cyst formation of WIC secondary zoospores. Exposure to menhaden tissue, but not tissues of other fishes to secondary zoospores (WIC), caused rapid (2 h) cyst formation. Cysts were capable of excysting when transferred to 1 psu water within 2-3 h of cyst formation. Cysts that had remained encysted in 6.5 psu for 24 h did not excyst when transferred to 1 psu water. Salinity and temperature requirements

  14. Factors influencing the sporulation and cyst formation of Aphanomyces invadans, etiological agent of ulcerative mycosis in Atlantic menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus.

    PubMed

    Kiryu, Yasunari; Blazer, Vicki S; Vogelbein, Wolfgang K; Kator, Howard; Shields, Jeffrey D

    2005-01-01

    Oomycete infections caused by Aphanomyces invadans occur in freshwater and estuarine fishes around the world. Along the east coast of the USA, skin ulcers caused by A. invadans are prevalent in Atlantic menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus. From laboratory observations low salinities appear crucial to transmission of the pathogen. To better understand aspects of transmission, we characterized sporulation and cyst formation of secondary zoospores of two isolates of A. invadans at different salinities and temperatures. Sporulation occurred only at low salinities. At room temperature (ca. 20-22 C), using "pond water" augmented with artificial sea salts, the endemic strain WIC and the Thailand strain PA7 of A. invadans produced free-swimming secondary zoospores at salinities of 0, 1 and 2 psu (practical salinity unit = per thousand), but not at 4 psu or higher. Secondary zoospores of another species, ATCC-62427 (Aphanomyces sp.), were observed at 1, 2, 4 and 8 psu but not at 0 and 12 psu. Secondary zoospores of all three isolates, especially WIC, were abundant and motile 1-2 d postsporulation. Sporulation was temperature dependent and occurred over a relatively narrow range. No sporulation occurred at 4, 30 or 35 C for either WIC or PA7. For both strains zoospore production within 1-3 d after the initiation of sporulation was more prolific at 25 C than at 20 and 15 C. At 15 C production of zoospores was sustained over 11 d for WIC and 5 d for PA7. At room temperature single WIC secondary zoospores remained motile 12-18 h. Salinities exceeding 4 psu or vigorous shaking caused immediate cyst formation of WIC secondary zoospores. Exposure to menhaden tissue, but not tissues of other fishes to secondary zoospores (WIC), caused rapid (2 h) cyst formation. Cysts were capable of excysting when transferred to 1 psu water within 2-3 h of cyst formation. Cysts that had remained encysted in 6.5 psu for 24 h did not excyst when transferred to 1 psu water. Salinity and temperature

  15. Use of 16S rRNA sequencing and quantitative PCR to correlate venous leg ulcer bacterial bioburden dynamics with wound expansion, antibiotic therapy, and healing

    PubMed Central

    Sprockett, Daniel D.; Ammons, Christine G.; Tuttle, Marie S.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis of infection in chronic wounds is currently limited to subjective clinical signs and culture-based methods that underestimate the complexity of wound microbial bioburden as revealed by DNA-based microbial identification methods. Here, we use 16S rRNA next generation sequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reaction to characterize weekly changes in bacterial load, community structure, and diversity associated with a chronic venous leg ulcer over the 15-week course of treatment and healing. Our DNA-based methods and detailed sampling scheme reveal that the bacterial bioburden of the wound is unexpectedly dynamic, including changes in the bacterial load and community structure that correlate with wound expansion, antibiotic therapy, and healing. We demonstrate that these multidimensional changes in bacterial bioburden can be summarized using swabs taken prior to debridement, and therefore, can be more easily collected serially than debridement or biopsy samples. Overall, this case illustrates the importance of detailed clinical indicators and longitudinal sampling to determine the pathogenic significance of chronic wound microbial dynamics and guide best use of antimicrobials for improvement of healing outcomes. PMID:25902876

  16. Adalimumab treatment leads to reduction of tissue tumor necrosis factor-alpha correlated with venous leg ulcer improvement: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Fox, Joshua D; Baquerizo-Nole, Katherine L; Keegan, Brian R; Macquhae, Flor; Escandon, Julia; Espinosa, Aliette; Perez, Carmen; Romanelli, Paolo; Kirsner, Robert S

    2016-10-01

    Venous leg ulcers (VLUs) have higher tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels compared with normal skin. Refractory VLUs of long duration have higher TNF-α levels compared with VLUs of shorter duration. As up to 75% of VLUs fail to heal with standard care, we sought to evaluate the role of anti-TNF-α therapy for patients with refractory VLUs. Evaluable data were obtained in four of five subjects with recalcitrant VLUs treated with 80 mg of subcutaneous adalimumab at week 0 and with 40 mg at week 2 along with compression therapy and were followed-up for 6 weeks. Wound biopsies taken at weeks 0 and 4 were stained with anti-TNF-α antibodies. Average 4-week percent wound size reduction was 20.5% ± 6.4%. Two patients had wound size reduction more than 25%, and their percent wound size reduction correlated to percent TNF-α staining score reductions (P = 0.02, R(2) = 0.999). VLU TNF-α level decrease 4 weeks post-adalimumab treatment correlated with wound healing.

  17. Leg pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - leg; Aches - leg; Cramps - leg ... Leg pain can be due to a muscle cramp (also called a charley horse ). Common causes of ... a long time An injury can also cause leg pain from: A torn or overstretched muscle ( strain ) ...

  18. Venogram - leg

    MedlinePlus

    Phlebogram - leg; Venography - leg ... into a vein in the foot of the leg being looked at, so that an intravenous (IV) ... vein. A tourniquet may be placed on your leg so the dye flows into the deeper veins. ...

  19. Restless Legs

    MedlinePlus

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) causes a powerful urge to move your legs. Your legs become uncomfortable when you are lying down or ... crawling, tingling, or burning sensation. Moving makes your legs feel better, but not for long. RLS can ...

  20. Venous Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Caprini, J.A.; Partsch, H.; Simman, R.

    2013-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most frequent form of wounds seen in patients. This article presents an overview on some practical aspects concerning diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment. Duplex ultrasound investigations are essential to ascertain the diagnosis of the underlying venous pathology and to treat venous refluxes. Differential diagnosis includes mainly other vascular lesions (arterial, microcirculatory causes), hematologic and metabolic diseases, trauma, infection, malignancies. Patients with superficial venous incompetence may benefit from endovenous or surgical reflux abolition diagnosed by Duplex ultrasound. The most important basic component of the management is compression therapy, for which we prefer materials with low elasticity applied with high initial pressure (short-stretch bandages and Velcro-strap devices). Local treatment should be simple, absorbing and not sticky dressings keeping adequate moisture balance after debridement of necrotic tissue and biofilms are preferred. After the ulcer is healed compression therapy should be continued in order to prevent recurrence. PMID:26236636

  1. Venous Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Caprini, J A; Partsch, H; Simman, R

    2012-09-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most frequent form of wounds seen in patients. This article presents an overview on some practical aspects concerning diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment. Duplex ultrasound investigations are essential to ascertain the diagnosis of the underlying venous pathology and to treat venous refluxes. Differential diagnosis includes mainly other vascular lesions (arterial, microcirculatory causes), hematologic and metabolic diseases, trauma, infection, malignancies. Patients with superficial venous incompetence may benefit from endovenous or surgical reflux abolition diagnosed by Duplex ultrasound. The most important basic component of the management is compression therapy, for which we prefer materials with low elasticity applied with high initial pressure (short-stretch bandages and Velcro-strap devices). Local treatment should be simple, absorbing and not sticky dressings keeping adequate moisture balance after debridement of necrotic tissue and biofilms are preferred. After the ulcer is healed compression therapy should be continued in order to prevent recurrence.

  2. [SURGICAL EXPERIENCES IN THE TREATMENT OF ULCER COMPLICATIONS].

    PubMed

    Rado, Zic; Bozo, Gorjanc; Zdenko, Stanec; Srećko, Budi; Rudolf, Milanović; Zlatko, Vlajcić; Franjo, Rudman; Kresimir, Martić; Zeljka, Roje; Rebeka, Held

    2016-03-01

    Lower leg ulcers have a high in incidence in general population and are associated with a significant morbidity rate. Wide differential diagnosis considering their etiology poses considerable problem, as the causes are diverse including metabolic, immune, oncologic, vascular and mixed ones. Approach to treatment should be multidisciplinary, and among various medical specialties surgery plays an important role. There are numerous efficient procedures that require proper indication to be successful. Along with reconstructive methods, there are complementary methods, mainly from the field of vascular surgery; when combined, they produce good results.

  3. [Peptic ulcer disease and stress].

    PubMed

    Herszényi, László; Juhász, Márk; Mihály, Emese; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2015-08-30

    The discovery that Helicobacter pylori infection is the major cause of peptic ulcer disease revolutionised our views on the etiology and treatment of the disease. This discovery has tempted many experts to conclude that psychological factors and, specifically, stress are unimportant. However, Helicobacter pylori infection alone does not explain fully the incidence and prevalence of peptic ulcer disease. It has been demonstrated that stress can cause peptic ulcer disease even in the absence of Helicobacter pylori infection, supporting a multicausal model of peptic ulcer etiology. Psychological stress among other risk factors can function as a cofactor with Helicobacter pylori infection.

  4. Quality of life in patients with venous stasis ulcers and others with advanced venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Tracz, Edyta; Zamojska, Ewa; Modrzejewski, Andrzej; Zaborski, Daniel; Grzesiak, Wilhelm

    2015-01-01

    The quality of life (QoL) in patients with advanced venous insufficiency (including venous stasis ulcers, skin discoloration, stasis eczema, and lipodermatosclerosis) assessed using the Clinical Etiological Anatomical Pathophysiological (CEAP) and Venous Clinical Severity Score (VCSS) classifications is presented. Also, disease features such as: intensity of pain, edema and inflammatory response that exerted the most profound effect on different domains of QoL are reported. The global QoL in patients with lower leg venous ulcerations was relatively similar to that observed in other patients with chronic venous insufficiency. The presence of venous ulcerations was associated with lower QoL in a Physical domain. Significant correlations were found between pain intensity and the values of Physical, Physiological, Level of Independence and Environmental domains, between edema intensity and Social domain as well as between the intensity of inflammatory response and Physical and Spiritual domains.

  5. Peptic ulcer

    MedlinePlus

    ... I. bleed - peptic ulcer; H. pylori - peptic ulcer; Helicobacter pylori - peptic ulcer ... is infection of the stomach by bacteria called Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori ). Most people with peptic ulcers have ...

  6. Echo-Guided Differential Popliteal Block in an Obese Patient With Intractable Painful Leg Ulcer for Early Discharge in Day Surgery.

    PubMed

    Zampi, Maddalena; Iacovazzo, Carmine; Pagano, Tommaso; Buonanno, Pasquale; Carlomagno, Mariella; Cianciulli, Flavia; Servillo, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    Pain management is extremely important in day surgery, and it is one of the limiting factors for this type of procedures. Locoregional anesthesia is strongly recommended for day surgery; nevertheless, it could be very difficult to localize nerve position especially in obese patients. Furthermore, a complete nerve blockade could result in a delayed discharge. We present a case of analgesic ultrasound-guided block of tibial and common peroneal nerves in the popliteal fossa without any motor function involvement in an obese patient undergoing debridement of an infected lower limb ulcer; all previous attempts of surgical debridement in day surgery with topical anesthetics had failed because of discomfort due to pain. Our aim was to ensure an optimal degree of analgesia and, at the same time, to save motor function in order to make early discharge possible. We used 15 mL ropivacaine 0.375% to obtain a differential block, taking advantage of sensitive fibers selectivity of ropivacaine. Surgical debridement was performed successfully. Our peripheral blockade was able to provide significantly prolonged analgesia without motor block that guaranteed a safe and early discharge according to the Post Anesthetic Discharge Scoring System. The satisfaction expressed by the patient and her comfort during the procedure support the choice of this approach for intractable painful ulcers of lower limb.

  7. A novel, non-invasive diagnostic clinical procedure for the determination of an oxygenation status of chronic lower leg ulcers using peri-ulceral transcutaneous oxygen partial pressure measurements: results of its application in chronic venous insufficiency (CVI).

    PubMed

    Barnikol, Wolfgang K R; Pötzschke, Harald

    2012-01-01

    The basis for the new procedure is the simultaneous transcutaneous measurement of the peri-ulceral oxygen partial pressure (tcPO(2)), using a minimum of 4 electrodes which are placed as close to the wound margin as possible, additionally, as a challenge the patient inhales pure oxygen for approximately 15 minutes. In order to evaluate the measurement data and to characterise the wounds, two new oxygen parameters were defined: (1) the oxygen characteristic (K-PO(2)), and (2) the oxygen inhomogeneity (I-PO(2)) of a chronic wound. The first of these is the arithmetic mean of the two lowest tcPO(2) measurement values, and the second is the variation coefficient of the four measurement values. Using the K-PO(2) parameter, a grading of wound hypoxia can be obtained. To begin with, the physiologically regulated (and still compensated) hypoxia with K-PO(2) values of between 35 and 40 mmHg is distinguished from the pathological decompensated hypoxia with K-PO(2) values of between 0 and 35 mmHg; the first of these still stimulates self-healing (within the limits of the oxygen balance). The decompensated hypoxia can be (arbitrarily) divided into "simple" hypoxia (Grade I), intense hypoxia (Grade II) and extreme hypoxia (Grade III), with the possibility of intermediate grades (I/II and II/III).Measurements were carried out using the new procedure on the skin of the right inner ankle of 21 healthy volunteers of various ages, and in 17 CVI (chronic venous insufficiency) wounds. Sixteen of the 17 CVI wounds (i.e., 94%) were found to be pathologically hypoxic, a state which was not found in any of the healthy volunteers. The oxygen inhomogeneity (I-PO(2)) of the individual chronic wounds increased exponentially as a function of the hypoxia grading (K-PO(2)), with a 10-fold increase with extreme hypoxia in contrast to a constant value of approximately 14% in the healthy volunteers. This pronounced oxygen inhomogeneity explains inhomogeneous wound healing, resulting in the so

  8. [Oral ulcers].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Figuero-Ruiz, Elena; Esparza-Gómez, Germán Carlos

    2005-10-29

    Ulcers commonly occur in the oral cavity, their main symptom being pain. There are different ways to classify oral ulcers. The most widely accepted form divides them into acute ulcers--sudden onset and short lasting--and chronic ulcers--insidious onset and long lasting. Commonest acute oral ulcers include traumatic ulcer, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, viral and bacterial infections and necrotizing sialometaplasia. On the other hand, oral lichen planus, oral cancer, benign mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigus and drug-induced ulcers belong to the group of chronic oral ulcers. It is very important to make a proper differential diagnosis in order to establish the appropriate treatment for each pathology. PMID:16277953

  9. [Oral ulcers].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Figuero-Ruiz, Elena; Esparza-Gómez, Germán Carlos

    2005-10-29

    Ulcers commonly occur in the oral cavity, their main symptom being pain. There are different ways to classify oral ulcers. The most widely accepted form divides them into acute ulcers--sudden onset and short lasting--and chronic ulcers--insidious onset and long lasting. Commonest acute oral ulcers include traumatic ulcer, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, viral and bacterial infections and necrotizing sialometaplasia. On the other hand, oral lichen planus, oral cancer, benign mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigus and drug-induced ulcers belong to the group of chronic oral ulcers. It is very important to make a proper differential diagnosis in order to establish the appropriate treatment for each pathology.

  10. [Aphthous ulcers and oral ulcerations].

    PubMed

    Vaillant, Loïc; Samimi, Mahtab

    2016-02-01

    Aphthous ulcers are painful ulcerations located on the mucous membrane, generally in the mouth, less often in the genital area. Three clinical forms of aphthous ulcers have been described: minor aphthous ulcers, herpetiform aphthous ulcers and major aphthous ulcers. Many other conditions presenting with oral bullous or vesiculous lesions orulcerations and erosions can be mistaken for aphthous ulcers. Currently, treatment of aphthous ulcers is palliative and symptomatic. Topical treatments (topical anesthetics, topical steroids and sucralfate) are the first line therapy. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is defined by the recurrence of oral aphthous ulcers at least 4 times per year. RAS is often idiopathic but can be associated with gastro-intestinal diseases (i.e. celiac disease, inflammatory bowel diseases), nutritional deficiencies (iron, folates...), immune disorders (HIV infection, neutropenia) and rare syndromes. Behçet's disease is a chronic, inflammatory, disease whose main clinical feature is recurrent bipolar aphthosis. Colchicine associated with topical treatments constitutes a suitable treatment of most RAS. Thalidomide is the most effective treatment of RAS but its use is limited by frequent adverse effects. Oral ulcers can be related to a wide range of conditions that constitute the differential diagnoses of aphthous ulcers. Oral ulcers are classified into three main groups: acute ulcers with abrupt onset and short duration, recurrent ulcers (mainly due to postherpetic erythema multiforme) and chronic ulcers (with slow onset and insidious progression). Acute oral ulcers are due to trauma, bacterial infections (including acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis), deep fungal infection, gastro-intestinal (namely inflammatory bowel disease) or systemic diseases. Chronic oral ulcers may be drug-induced, or due to benign or malignant tumors. Every oral solitary chronic ulcer should be biopsied to rule out squamous cell carcinoma. A solitary palatal ulcer

  11. Leg CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - leg; Computed axial tomography scan - leg; Computed tomography scan - leg; CT scan - leg ... on film. Three-dimensional (3D) models of the leg can be created by adding the slices together. ...

  12. Ulcerative Colitis

    MedlinePlus

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a disease that causes inflammation and sores, called ulcers, in the lining of the rectum and colon. ... a group of diseases called inflammatory bowel disease. UC can happen at any age, but it usually ...

  13. Peptic Ulcer

    MedlinePlus

    A peptic ulcer is a sore in the lining of your stomach or your duodenum, the first part of your ... Comes and goes for several days or weeks Peptic ulcers happen when the acids that help you digest ...

  14. Hyperhomocysteinaemia and chronic venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    de Franciscis, Stefano; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Longo, Paola; Buffone, Gianluca; Molinari, Vincenzo; Stillitano, Domenico M; Gallelli, Luca; Serra, Raffaele

    2015-02-01

    Chronic venous ulceration (CVU) is the major cause of chronic wounds of lower extremities, and is a part of the complex of chronic venous disease. Previous studies have hypothesised that several thrombophilic factors, such as hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHcy), may be associated with chronic venous ulcers. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of HHcy in patients with venous leg ulcers and the effect of folic acid therapy on wound healing. Eighty-seven patients with venous leg ulcers were enrolled in this study to calculate the prevalence of HHcy in this population. All patients underwent basic treatment for venous ulcer (compression therapy ± surgical procedures). Patients with HHcy (group A) received basic treatment and administered folic acid (1·2 mg/day for 12 months) and patients without HHcy (group B) received only basic treatment. Healing was assessed by means of computerised planimetry analysis. The prevalence of HHcy among patients with chronic venous ulcer enrolled in this study was 62·06%. Healing rate was significantly higher (P < 0·05) in group A patients (78·75%) compared with group B patients (63·33%). This study suggests a close association, statistically significant, between HHcy and CVU. Homocysteine-lowering therapy with folic acid seems to expedite wound healing. Despite these aspects, the exact molecular mechanisms between homocysteine and CVU have not been clearly defined and further studies are needed.

  15. Lipschütz [corrected] ulcers--four cases.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Núñez, Almudena; Córdoba, Susana; Romero-Maté, Alberto; Miñano, Román; Sanz, Tatiana; Borbujo, Jesús

    2008-01-01

    A distinctive clinical entity of acute genital ulcers occurring in adolescents, with nonvenereal infectious etiology was described by Lipschütz in 1913. We describe four puberal virgin girls who developed fever and painful genital ulcers. The main causes infectious and noninfectious of ulceration were rejected. Although the etiology is unknown, recent cases related with Epstein-Barr virus acute infection have been reported.

  16. [Venous ulcer].

    PubMed

    Böhler, Kornelia

    2016-06-01

    Venous disorders causing a permanent increase in venous pressure are by far the most frequent reason for ulcers of the lower extremity. With a prevalence of 1 % in the general population rising to 4 % in the elderly over 80 and its chronic character, 1 % of healthcare budgets of the western world are spent on treatment of venous ulcers. A thorough investigation of the underlying venous disorder is the prerequisite for a differenciated therapy. This should comprise elimination of venous reflux as well as local wound management. Chronic ulcers can successfully be treated by shave therapy and split skin grafting. Compression therapy is a basic measure not only in venous ulcer treatment but also in prevention of ulcer recurrence. Differential diagnosis which have to be considered are arterial ulcers, vasculitis and neoplasms. PMID:27405863

  17. Pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Woodard, Charles R; Buschbacher, Ralph M; Long, William B; Gebhart, Jocelynn H; Ma, Eva K

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this collective review is to outline the predisposing factors in the development of pressure ulcers and to identify a pressure ulcer prevention program. The most frequent sites for pressure ulcers are areas of skin overlying bony prominences. There are four critical factors contributing to the development of pressure ulcers: pressure, shearing forces, friction, and moisture. Pressure is now viewed as the single most important etiologic factor in pressure ulcer formation. Prolonged immobilization, sensory deficit, circulatory disturbances, and poor nutrition have been identified as important risk factors in the development of pressure ulcer formation. Among the clinical assessment scales available, only two, the Braden Scale and Norton Scale, have been tested extensively for reliability and/or validity. The most commonly used risk assessment tools for pressure ulcer formation are computerized pressure monitoring and measurement of laser Doppler skin blood flow. Pressure ulcers can predispose the patient to a variety of complications that include bacteremia, osteomyelitis, squamous cell carcinoma, and sinus tracts. The three components of pressure ulcer prevention that must be considered in any patient include management of incontinence, nutritional support, and pressure relief. The pressure relief program must be individualized for non-weight-bearing individuals as well as those that can bear weight. For those that can not bear weight and passively stand, the RENAISSANCE Mattress Replacement System is recommended for the immobile patient who lies supine on the bed, the stretcher, or operating room table. This alternating pressure system is unique because it has three separate cells that are not interconnected. It is specifically designed so that deflation of each individual cell will reach a ZERO PRESSURE during each alternating pressure cycle. The superiority of this system has been documented by comprehensive clinical studies in which this system

  18. Complications of peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Milosavljevic, Tomica; Kostić-Milosavljević, Mirjana; Jovanović, Ivan; Krstić, Miodrag

    2011-01-01

    There are four major complications of peptic ulcer disease (PUD): bleeding, perforation, penetration, and obstruction. Complications can occur in patients with peptic ulcer of any etiology. Despite improvements in the medical management and the lower overall incidence of PUD, there are conflicting data about the incidence of potentially life-threatening ulcer complications. There are important time trends embedded within this stable overall rate of complications: the dramatic decline in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (comparing the cohort born from 1900 to 1920 to cohorts born after 1940); an increased use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and an increased rate of ulcer complications related to such drug use, especially in the elderly. As a result of these trends, ulcer complications are on the rise in older patients but on the decline in younger individuals. Hemorrhage is the most frequent PUD complication and its incidence is increasing in comparison to perforation and stenosis. Therapeutic endoscopy is considered the treatment of choice for bleeding ulcers, reducing the need for emergent surgical procedures to 10-20% of the cases. In recent years, besides the success of angiographic embolization, the containment of massive hemorrhage must also be taken into account. Transcatheter arterial embolization is also an effective and safe treatment in patients with duodenal ulcers re-bleeding after therapeutic endoscopy or surgery.

  19. Managing and promoting change: implementing the Leg Club model.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Ellen

    2005-09-01

    Patient knowledge of their disease may increase concordance to compression therapy. The Lindsay Leg Club model (Lindsay, 2004) empowers the community nursing team to truly get to know their communities and deliver local, high-quality, evidence-based care for patients with leg ulcers and leg related problems. The author's experience of opening a Leg Club has lead to changes in clinical practice: re-evaluation of the use of long stretch bandages in favour of short stretch; replacing conventional compression bandage systems with two piece graduated compression hosiery; increased patient concordance post healing with increased use of compression hosiery; the introduction of toe bandaging and appropriate long-term management for those patients with lymphoedema; and developing the role of the nursing auxiliary in leg ulcer care.

  20. Inflammation in chronic venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Raffetto, J D

    2013-03-01

    Chronic venous ulcers (CVUs) occur in approximately 1% of the general population. Risk factors for chronic venous disease (CVD) include heredity, age, female sex and obesity. Although not restricted to the elderly, the prevalence of CVD, especially leg ulcers, increases with age. CVD has a considerable impact on health-care resources. It has been estimated that venous ulcers cause the loss of approximately two million working days and incur treatment costs of approximately $3 billion per year in the USA. Overall, CVD has been estimated to account for 1-3% of the total health-care budgets in countries with developed health-care systems. The pathophysiology of dermal abnormalities in CVU is reflective of a complex interplay that involves sustained venous hypertension, inflammation, changes in microcirculation, cytokine and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activation, resulting in altered cellular function and delayed wound healing.

  1. Diagnosis and management of genital ulcers.

    PubMed

    Roett, Michelle A; Mayor, Mejebi T; Uduhiri, Kelechi A

    2012-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus infection and syphilis are the most common causes of genital ulcers in the United States. Other infectious causes include chancroid, lymphogranuloma venereum, granuloma inguinale (donovanosis), secondary bacterial infections, and fungi. Noninfectious etiologies, including sexual trauma, psoriasis, Behçet syndrome, and fixed drug eruptions, can also lead to genital ulcers. Although initial treatment of genital ulcers is generally based on clinical presentation, the following tests should be considered in all patients: serologic tests for syphilis and darkfield microscopy or direct fluorescent antibody testing for Treponema pallidum, culture or polymerase chain reaction test for herpes simplex virus, and culture for Haemophilus ducreyi in settings with a high prevalence of chancroid. No pathogen is identified in up to 25 percent of patients with genital ulcers. The first episode of herpes simplex virus infection is usually treated with seven to 10 days of oral acyclovir (five days for recurrent episodes). Famciclovir and valacyclovir are alternative therapies. One dose of intramuscular penicillin G benzathine is recommended to treat genital ulcers caused by primary syphilis. Treatment options for chancroid include a single dose of intramuscular ceftriaxone or oral azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, or erythromycin. Lymphogranuloma venereum and donovanosis are treated with 21 days of oral doxycycline. Treatment of noninfectious causes of genital ulcers varies by etiology, and ranges from topical wound care for ulcers caused by sexual trauma to consideration of subcutaneous pegylated interferon alfa-2a for ulcers caused by Behçet syndrome.

  2. Ulcerative colitis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Inflammatory bowel disease - ulcerative colitis - discharge; Ulcerative proctitis - discharge; Colitis - discharge ... were in the hospital because you have ulcerative colitis. This is a swelling of the inner lining ...

  3. Peripheral artery disease - legs

    MedlinePlus

    ... legs; Arterial insufficiency of the legs; Recurrent leg pain and cramping; Calf pain with exercise ... The main symptoms of PAD are pain, achiness, fatigue, burning, or ... or thighs. These symptoms most often appear during walking or ...

  4. Leg Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your legs are made up of bones, blood vessels, muscles, and other connective tissue. They are important for motion ... falling, or having an accident can damage your legs. Common leg injuries include sprains and strains, joint ...

  5. Cancer complicating chronic ulcerative and scarifying mucocutaneous disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, R.P. )

    1987-01-01

    Skin affected by a burn cancer is scarred, ulcerated, and often appears as erythema ab igne clinically in adjacent skin. The latent period in burn scar malignancy is much longer for SCC than BCC. Malignant melanoma and various sarcomas are reported to arise in burn scars, too. The other extreme on the temperature scale can less often result in enough permanent acral damage that poor wound healing may eventually result in cancer, usually SCC. About 1% of patients with chronic osteomyelitis develop cancer, usually SCC in sinus tracts. As with tumors arising in burn scars and chronic leg ulcers of varied etiology, black patients are disproportionately overrepresented in osteomyelitic malignancy. In nearly all of the patients with radiation-induced skin cancer, concomitant radiodermatitis is present. As with burn scar and osteomyelitic cancer, x-ray related cancer has a long latent period. Similar to burn scar cancer, SCC predominates in osteomyelitis and occurs on the extremities. BCC, when it arises, is more common on the face and neck in burn- and radiation-induced tumors. Multiple tumors are frequent as is recurrence in x-ray malignancy. Mortality is high: one out of three to four patients with burn scar, osteomyelitic, and radiation cancer die of dermatosis-related malignancy. Recently, radioactivity-contaminated gold rings have been implicated in causing SCC. Carcinoma tends to occur in irradiated benign dermatoses whereas sarcomas tend to complicate irradiated malignancies. Stasis ulceration and anogenital fistulae may rarely lead to cancer, SCC in the former and adenocarcinoma in the latter. SCC can rarely develop in four related conditions (acne conglobata, dissecting perifolliculitis of the scalp, hidradenitis suppurativa, and pilonidal sinus) after a lengthy latent period; prognosis is poor with a high metastatic rate. 147 references.

  6. Leg lengthening.

    PubMed

    Bridgman, S A; Bennet, G C; Evans, G A; Stirling, J

    1993-04-01

    The combined experience of the Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Glasgow and the Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry in lengthening 52 lower limb segments with the Orthofix device is reviewed. Forty-eight segments were lengthened by callotasis, 24 in patients with achondroplasia. Attempted lengthening with chondrodiatasis was performed in 4 patients with leg length discrepancy. With callotasis, planned lengthening was achieved in 43/48 (90%) of segments. There was a small number of significant complications. Angulation or buckling of the new bone was the commonest major complication, and was seen in 10% of segments. Pin tract infection was the predominant minor complication. Premature union was noted commonly in the femurs of achondroplastics, but could usually be overcome with manipulation under anaesthesia. We confirm that callotasis achieves its objectives with fewer complications and operations than the commonly used Wagner method which it should supersede. By contrast, we had major complications in all cases with chondrodiatasis and have abandoned this method. PMID:8478826

  7. Leg lengthening.

    PubMed

    Bridgman, S A; Bennet, G C; Evans, G A; Stirling, J

    1993-04-01

    The combined experience of the Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Glasgow and the Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry in lengthening 52 lower limb segments with the Orthofix device is reviewed. Forty-eight segments were lengthened by callotasis, 24 in patients with achondroplasia. Attempted lengthening with chondrodiatasis was performed in 4 patients with leg length discrepancy. With callotasis, planned lengthening was achieved in 43/48 (90%) of segments. There was a small number of significant complications. Angulation or buckling of the new bone was the commonest major complication, and was seen in 10% of segments. Pin tract infection was the predominant minor complication. Premature union was noted commonly in the femurs of achondroplastics, but could usually be overcome with manipulation under anaesthesia. We confirm that callotasis achieves its objectives with fewer complications and operations than the commonly used Wagner method which it should supersede. By contrast, we had major complications in all cases with chondrodiatasis and have abandoned this method.

  8. Probiotics and prebiotics in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Derikx, Lauranne A A P; Dieleman, Levinus A; Hoentjen, Frank

    2016-02-01

    The intestinal microbiota is one of the key players in the etiology of ulcerative colitis. Manipulation of this microflora with probiotics and prebiotics is an attractive strategy in the management of ulcerative colitis. Several intervention studies for both the induction and maintenance of remission in ulcerative colitis patients have been performed. Most of these studies evaluated VSL#3 or E. Coli Nissle 1917 and in general there is evidence for efficacy of these agents for induction and maintenance of remission. However, studies are frequently underpowered, lack a control group, and are very heterogeneous investigating different probiotic strains in different study populations. The absence of well-powered robust randomized placebo-controlled trials impedes the widespread use of probiotics and prebiotics in ulcerative colitis. However, given the promising results that are currently available, probiotics and prebiotics may find their way to the treatment algorithm for ulcerative colitis in the near future. PMID:27048897

  9. Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn's Disease: Implications for College Health Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelphi, A. P.

    1977-01-01

    The author reviews clinical patterns of inflammatory bowel disorders, establishes a perspective for recognizing ulcerative colitis, ulcerative proctitis, and Crohn's disease in relation to other bowel inflammations, and suggests some epidemiologic strategies for studying etiology, pathogenesis, and natural history of the diseases. (MJB)

  10. Clinical and microbiologic studies of genital ulcers in Kenyan women.

    PubMed

    Plummer, F A; D'Costa, L J; Nsanze, H; Karasira, P; MacLean, I W; Piot, P; Ronald, A R

    1985-01-01

    The etiology of genital ulcers in women in tropical regions is poorly understood. Eighty-nine women, presenting to a sexually transmitted disease clinic in Nairobi (Kenya) with a primary complaint of genital ulcers, were evaluated prospectively in a clinical and laboratory study. A final etiologic diagnosis was possible for 60 (67%) of the women. Culture for Haemophilus ducreyi was positive for 43 women, eight had secondary syphilis with ulcerated condyloma latum, three had primary syphilis, one had both chancroid and syphilis, two had moniliasis, two had herpetic ulceration, and one had a traumatic ulcer. The clinical characteristics that best distinguished chancroid from secondary syphilis were ulcer excavation and a rough ulcer base. No etiologic diagnosis was established for 29 patients. However, the clinical and epidemiologic features of these patients suggested that they were similar if not identical to the patients with H. ducreyi culture-positive chancroid. Further studies are necessary to determine the etiology of ulcers in females in whom no pathogen was identified.

  11. Nutritional care in peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    VOMERO, Nathália Dalcin; COLPO, Elisângela

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Peptic ulcer is a lesion of the mucosal lining of the upper gastrointestinal tract characterized by an imbalance between aggressive and protective factors of the mucosa, having H. pylori as the main etiologic factor. Dietotherapy is important in the prevention and treatment of this disease. Aim To update nutritional therapy in adults' peptic ulcer. Methods Exploratory review without restrictions with primary sources indexed in Scielo, PubMed, Medline, ISI, and Scopus databases. Results Dietotherapy, as well as caloric distribution, should be adjusted to the patient's needs aiming to normalize the nutritional status and promote healing. Recommended nutrients can be different in the acute phase and in the recovery phase, and there is a greater need of protein and some micronutrients, such as vitamin A, zinc, selenium, and vitamin C in the recovery phase. In addition, some studies have shown that vitamin C has a beneficial effect in eradication of H. pylori. Fibers and probiotics also play a important role in the treatment of peptic ulcer, because they reduce the side effects of antibiotics and help reduce treatment time. Conclusion A balanced diet is vital in the treatment of peptic ulcer, once food can prevent, treat or even alleviate the symptoms involving this pathology. However, there are few papers that innovate dietotherapy; so additional studies addressing more specifically the dietotherapy for treatment of peptic ulcer are necessary. PMID:25626944

  12. Peptic Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a good alternative to NSAIDs for most childhood conditions. Signs and Symptoms Although peptic ulcers are rare in kids, if your child has any of these signs and symptoms, call your doctor: burning pain in the abdomen between the breastbone and the belly button (the ...

  13. [Ulcerative colitis].

    PubMed

    Lopetuso, Loris; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), such as Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), are chronic, relapsing inflammatory disorders of the digestive tract resulting from dysregulated immune responses toward environmental factors in genetically predisposed individuals. This review focus on what is the state of the art of UC pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment and how any future findings could drive our clinical practice. PMID:27362722

  14. Getting Your Sea Legs

    PubMed Central

    Stoffregen, Thomas A.; Chen, Fu-Chen; Varlet, Manuel; Alcantara, Cristina; Bardy, Benoît G.

    2013-01-01

    Sea travel mandates changes in the control of the body. The process by which we adapt bodily control to life at sea is known as getting one's sea legs. We conducted the first experimental study of bodily control as maritime novices adapted to motion of a ship at sea. We evaluated postural activity (stance width, stance angle, and the kinematics of body sway) before and during a sea voyage. In addition, we evaluated the role of the visible horizon in the control of body sway. Finally, we related data on postural activity to two subjective experiences that are associated with sea travel; seasickness, and mal de debarquement. Our results revealed rapid changes in postural activity among novices at sea. Before the beginning of the voyage, the temporal dynamics of body sway differed among participants as a function of their (subsequent) severity of seasickness. Body sway measured at sea differed among participants as a function of their (subsequent) experience of mal de debarquement. We discuss implications of these results for general theories of the perception and control of bodily orientation, for the etiology of motion sickness, and for general phenomena of perceptual-motor adaptation and learning. PMID:23840560

  15. Excessive bleeding from genital ulcers of Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Bostankolu, A; Aksungur, V L; Aksungur, E H; Ozpoyraz, M; Yücel, A; Memisoglu, H R

    1997-09-01

    Although genital ulcers are a common manifestation of Behçet's disease, bleeding from these lesions is unusual. In this report, a patient with excessive bleeding from genital ulcers is presented. A 22-year-old man with recurrent oral and genital ulcers, erythema nodosum, folliculitis, positive pathergic reaction, uveitis, superior vena cava syndrome, and generalized lymphadenopathy fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of Behçet's disease. Three years after presenting he was admitted to our clinic with excessive bleeding from large ulcers on the scrotum and upper thighs and with a leg ulcer. Bleeding was controlled with compresses. Examination of a biopsy specimen obtained from the leg ulcer showed findings consistent with Kaposi-like acroangiodermatitis. Results of various radiologic investigations showed thrombosis of the inferior vena cava, peritesticular varicosities, and venous insufficiency of the lower extremities. We suggest that the bleeding was secondary to the extension of genital ulcers to the varicose veins.

  16. Leg MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... resonance imaging) scan of the leg uses strong magnets to create pictures of the leg. This may ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  17. Oral ulcer by Sphingomonas paucimobilis: first report.

    PubMed

    Santarelli, A; Mascitti, M; Galeazzi, R; Marziali, A; Busco, F; Procaccini, M

    2016-10-01

    The first case of an oral infection caused by Sphingomonas paucimobilis is reported. A 73-year-old man presented with a gingival ulcer with bone exposure affecting the attached gingiva in the anterior maxillary region. He reported pain during chewing and the presence of fever. Since the first case of S. paucimobilis infection was reported in 1977, involving a leg ulcer, the number of reports related to this organism has been increasing, indicating that the bacterium should be considered an emerging pathogen. It is possible that other non-classical pathogens of the oral cavity may be responsible for infectious lesions, which represents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge.

  18. Evidence-based chronic ulcer care and lower limb outcomes among Pacific Northwest veterans.

    PubMed

    Karavan, Mahsa; Olerud, John; Bouldin, Erin; Taylor, Leslie; Reiber, Gayle E

    2015-09-01

    Evidence-based ulcer care guidelines detail optimal components of care for treatment of ulcers of different etiologies. We investigated the impact of providing specific evidence-based ulcer treatment components on healing outcomes for lower limb ulcers (LLU) among veterans in the Pacific Northwest. Components of evidence-based ulcer care for venous, arterial, diabetic foot ulcers/neuropathic ulcers were abstracted from medical records. The outcome was ulcer healing. Our analysis assessed the relationship between evidence-based ulcer care by etiology, components of care provided, and healing, while accounting for veteran characteristics. A minority of veterans in all three ulcer-etiology groups received the recommended components of evidence-based care in at least 80% of visits. The likelihood of healing improved when assessment for edema and infection were performed on at least 80% of visits (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.20, p = 0.009 and HR = 3.54, p = 0.006, respectively) in patients with venous ulcers. There was no significant association between frequency of care components provided and healing among patients with arterial ulcers. Among patients with diabetic/neuropathic ulcers, the chance of healing increased 2.5-fold when debridement was performed at 80% of visits (p = 0.03), and doubled when ischemia was assessed at the first visit (p = 0.045). Veterans in the Pacific Northwest did not uniformly receive evidence-based ulcer care. Not all evidence-based ulcer care components were significantly associated with healing. At a minimum, clinicians need to address components of ulcer care associated with improved ulcer healing.

  19. Intestinal microbiota and ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-11-01

    There is a close relationship between the human host and the intestinal microbiota, which is an assortment of microorganisms, protecting the intestine against colonization by exogenous pathogens. Moreover, the intestinal microbiota play a critical role in providing nutrition and the modulation of host immune homeostasis. Recent reports indicate that some strains of intestinal bacteria are responsible for intestinal ulceration and chronic inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Understanding the interaction of the intestinal microbiota with pathogens and the human host might provide new strategies treating patients with IBD. This review focuses on the important role that the intestinal microbiota plays in maintaining innate immunity in the pathogenesis and etiology of UC and discusses new antibiotic therapies targeting the intestinal microbiota.

  20. Anti-ulcer Activity.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    This chapter explains the procedure of ethanol-induced ulcer to check the protective effect of drugs over induced ulcer in rats. Ulcer is defined as the erosion in the lining of the stomach or duodenum and is caused by the disruptions of the gastric mucosal defence and repair systems. Ulceration of stomach is called gastric ulcer and that of duodenum is called duodenal ulcer and together peptic ulcer. In clinical practice, peptic ulcer is one of the most prevalent gastrointestinal disorders, which commonly occurs in developed countries.

  1. The role of psychosocial factors in peptic ulcer disease: beyond Helicobacter pylori and NSAIDs.

    PubMed

    Jones, Michael P

    2006-04-01

    A variety of organic etiologies are associated with peptic ulcer disease, and the most relevant of these are infection with Helicobacter pylori and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Between 5% and 20% of patients with gastric or duodenal ulcer, however, lack an identifiable organic etiology. In these patients particularly and in all ulcer patients in general, psychosocial factors may play a significant role. At present, there is no definitive study proving a causal relationship between psychological stress and the development of ulcer disease. Studies to date suffer from significant methodological limitations and have not effectively addressed the poor correlation between ulcer craters and ulcer symptoms. A conservative application of available data would suggest that psychosocial factors play a significant role in symptom perception and reporting in patients with dyspeptic symptoms and may play a role in ulcer formation. PMID:16581366

  2. Spontaneous dermal abscesses and ulcers as a result of Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Friedman, N Deborah; Peterson, Neeraja B; Sumner, William T; Alexander, Barbara D

    2003-08-01

    Serratia sp have only rarely been reported as isolates from leg ulcers. We describe the case of a middle-aged man with a medical history significant for alcohol-induced cirrhosis who presented with rapidly progressive skin ulcers initially starting as purple nodules. These skin ulcers and underlying dermal abscesses were found to be a result of S marcescens, with the presumed portal of entry being a toe-web infection.

  3. [Ulcer surgery - what remains?].

    PubMed

    Hölscher, A H; Bollschweiler, E; Mönig, S P

    2006-06-01

    Ulcer surgery today concentrates on the complications of chronic ulcer disease, especially ulcer perforation and endoscopically uncontrollable ulcer bleeding. In this case the laparoscopic or open closure of the gastroduodenal defect or local hemostasis of the bleeding ulcer by laparotomy are the main aims of surgery. Elective operations due to recurrent gastric or duodenal ulcers have become rare. An indication for gastric ulcer resistant to conservative therapy could be persisting suspicion of malignancy whereas in duodenal ulcer gastric outlet obstruction represents a reason for surgery. If these indications are confirmed the classic procedures of gastric resection like Billroth I and Billroth II are performed whereas vagotomy is no longer used. Altogether ulcer surgery has become very safe although it is practiced quite rarely.

  4. The swollen leg.

    PubMed

    Young, J R

    1977-01-01

    Systemic causes of leg edema include idiopathic cyclic edema, heart failure, cirrhosis, nephrosis and other hypoproteinemic states. Lymphedema may be primary, or secondary to neoplasm, lymphangitis, retroperitoneal fibrosis and, rarely (in the U.S.), filariasis. Thrombophlebitis and chronic venous insufficiency are not uncommon causes. Finally, infection, ischemia, lipedema, vascular anomalies, tumors and trauma can be responsible for the swollen leg.

  5. Recurrent oral ulcers--an overview.

    PubMed

    Gaffar, A

    2001-01-01

    Recurrent oral ulcers (ROUs) are the most common oral mucosal disease. The etiology of ROUs is complex. The factors include mechanical trauma, genetics, stress, smoking, and viral and bacterial infections. Treatment modalities depend on the differential diagnosis of ROUs and could consist of antimicrobial agents, anti-inflammatory agents, immunomodulators, or over-the-counter medications. New therapy available in the form of a coating polymer, Colgate ORABASE Soothe.N.Seal, is clinically proven to provide rapid relief and healing of ROUs.

  6. Emergency ulcer surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Constance W; Sarosi, George A

    2011-10-01

    The rate of elective surgery for peptic ulcer disease has been declining steadily over the past 3 decades. During this same period, the rate of emergency ulcer surgery rose by 44%. This means that the gastrointestinal surgeon is likely to be called on to manage the emergent complications of peptic ulcer disease without substantial experience in elective peptic ulcer disease surgery. The goal of this review is to familiarize surgeons with our evolving understanding of the pathogenesis, epidemiology, presentation, and management of peptic ulcer disease in the emergency setting, with a focus on peptic ulcer disease-associated bleeding and perforation.

  7. Noninfectious genital ulcers.

    PubMed

    Kirshen, Carly; Edwards, Libby

    2015-12-01

    Noninfectious genital ulcers are much more common than ulcers arising from infections. Still, it is important to take a thorough history of sexual activity and a sexual abuse screen. A physical exam should include skin, oral mucosa, nails, hair, vulva, and vaginal mucosa if needed. The differential diagnosis of noninfectious genital ulcers includes: lipschütz ulcers, complex aphthosis, Behçet's syndrome, vulvar metastatic Crohn's disease, hidradenitis suppurativa, pyoderma gangrenosum, pressure ulcers, and malignancies. It is important to come to the correct diagnosis to avoid undue testing, stress, and anxiety in patients experiencing genital ulcerations.

  8. Foot, leg, and ankle swelling

    MedlinePlus

    Swelling of the ankles - feet - legs; Ankle swelling; Foot swelling; Leg swelling; Edema - peripheral; Peripheral edema ... Painless swelling may affect both legs and may include the calves or ... of gravity makes the swelling most noticeable in the lower ...

  9. Lipschütz ulcer (ulcus vulvae acutum): a rare cause of genital lesion.

    PubMed

    Brinca, Ana; Canelas, Maria Miguel; Carvalho, Maria João; Vieira, Ricardo; Figueiredo, Américo

    2012-01-01

    Lipschütz Ulcer, or ulcus vulvae acutum, is a rare and probably underdiagnosed entity that usually presents as an acute painful vulvar ulcer in young women. The etiology is unknown, although recent reports have associated it with the Epstein-Barr virus. The diagnosis is made by exclusion after ruling out sexually transmitted diseases, autoimmune causes, trauma, and other etiologies of genital ulcerations. We report a case of a young woman who developed flu-like symptoms and painful vulvar ulcers. Complementary examinations ruled out sexually transmitted diseases and the other usual causes of genital ulcers; lesions healed with no sequelae or recurrences. This case represents a rare important differential diagnosis of genital ulceration.

  10. Ulcerative diseases of animals with an infectious etiology.

    PubMed

    Mebus, C A

    1978-01-01

    The oral lesions of five viral diseases of cattle are compared. Two of the diseases, foot-and-mouth disease and vesicular stomatitis, cause vesicles, and rinderpest, bovine virus diarrhea and malignant catarrhal fever produce sharply demarcated erosive lesions. Gross lesions of different diseases appear similar: however, histologically, there are subtle differences in the development of the lesions. PMID:216786

  11. Etiology of zygomatic fractures.

    PubMed

    Cotter, C J; Ogunbowale, A; Beirne, C

    2005-01-01

    We report on the etiology of zygomatic fractures in an Irish population. More than half of these injuries are related to interpersonal assault. Treatment of these injuries places a considerable burden on the health service. PMID:16445148

  12. Acute genital ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers. PMID:24473429

  13. Peptic Ulcer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... stomach and duodenum to diagnose or treat disease. Erosion – a very shallow sore, similar to an abrasion ... Ulcer – an open sore. Ulcers are deeper than erosions. Author(s) and Publication Date(s) Sean P. Caufield, MD, ...

  14. Ulcer emergencies (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Peptic ulcers may lead to emergency situations. Severe abdominal pain with or without evidence of bleeding may indicate a perforation of the ulcer through the stomach or duodenum. Vomiting of a substance that resembles coffee grounds, ...

  15. Acute genital ulcers.

    PubMed

    Delgado-García, Silvia; Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos; Martín-Bayón, Tina-Aurora

    2014-01-28

    Acute genital ulcers, also known as acute vulvar ulcers, ulcus vulvae acutum or Lipschütz ulcers, refer to an ulceration of the vulva or lower vagina of non-venereal origin that usually presents in young women, predominantly virgins. Although its incidence is unknown, it seems a rare entity, with few cases reported in the literature. Their aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease is characterised by an acute onset of flu-like symptoms with single or multiple painful ulcers on the vulva. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, after exclusion of other causes of vulvar ulcers. The treatment is mainly symptomatic, with spontaneous resolution in 2 weeks and without recurrences in most cases. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl with two episodes of acute ulcers that fit the clinical criteria for Lipschütz ulcers.

  16. Living with diabetic foot ulcers: a life of fear, restrictions, and pain.

    PubMed

    Ribu, Lis; Wahl, Astrid

    2004-02-01

    Lower extremity ulcers are a common and challenging problem for people with diabetes and clinicians who provide their care. A qualitative study of seven patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes who had leg and/or foot ulcers was conducted to enhance understanding of the patient's perspective of living with lower extremity ulcers and diabetes. Data were collected through in-depth interviews guided by the patients' descriptive priorities. Results indicated that patients experienced changes in their feet, pain and insomnia, fatigue and limited mobility, social isolation and loneliness, a restricted life, loss of control, and fear for the future. When treating a patient's leg or foot ulcer, clinicians need to consider patients' subjective feelings toward the various aspects of their life situations and the impact of their situation on their quality of life. Understanding the ramifications of lower extremity ulcers and diabetes on patients is important to the health professional's ability to provide support during the illness process. PMID:15129612

  17. Retrograde mechanochemical ablation of the small saphenous vein for the treatment of a venous ulcer.

    PubMed

    Moore, Hayley M; Lane, Tristan R A; Franklin, Ian J; Davies, Alun H

    2014-10-01

    We present the first case of retrograde ablation of the small saphenous vein to treat active venous ulceration. A 73-year-old gentleman with complicated varicose veins of the left leg and a non-healing venous ulcer despite previous successful endovenous treatment to his left great saphenous vein underwent mechanochemical ablation of his small saphenous vein with the ClariVein® system, under local anaesthetic, using a retrograde cannulation technique. Post-operatively the patient had improved symptomatically and the ulcer size had reduced. This report highlights that patients with small saphenous vein incompetence and active ulceration can be treated successfully with retrograde mechanochemical ablation.

  18. Restless legs syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... they sleep. This condition is called periodic limb movement disorder. All of these symptoms make it hard to ... treatment of restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movement disorder in adults-an update for 2012: practice parameters ...

  19. Restless Legs Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Restless Legs Syndrome ... News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | Privacy ...

  20. Juxta CURES: compression for healing venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Lisa

    2013-09-01

    Clinicians are expected to show improved healing rates, reduction in recurrence rates and to demonstrate greater patient satisfaction. All patients should rightly expect a high standard of holistic care that supports both their physical and emotional needs. Keeping the patient engaged in the "healing process" has many beneficial outcomes, not least to their emotional wellbeing. Managing to heal the wounds within a realistic timeframe is the required outcome for all parties. This article demonstrates how a new compression device, Juxta CURES, has a positive impact on patients' quality of life, also benefiting the clinician while maintaining cost-saving efficiencies.

  1. Diabetic foot ulcers: Part I. Pathophysiology and prevention.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Afsaneh; Sibbald, R Gary; Mayer, Dieter; Goodman, Laurie; Botros, Mariam; Armstrong, David G; Woo, Kevin; Boeni, Thomas; Ayello, Elizabeth A; Kirsner, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a serious, life-long condition that is the sixth leading cause of death in North America. Dermatologists frequently encounter patients with diabetes mellitus. Up to 25% of patients with diabetes mellitus will develop diabetic foot ulcers. Foot ulcer patients have an increased risk of amputation and increased mortality rate. The high-risk diabetic foot can be identified with a simplified screening, and subsequent foot ulcers can be prevented. Early recognition of the high-risk foot and timely treatment will save legs and improve patients' quality of life. Peripheral arterial disease, neuropathy, deformity, previous amputation, and infection are the main factors contributing to the development of diabetic foot ulcers. Early recognition of the high-risk foot is imperative to decrease the rates of mortality and morbidity. An interprofessional approach (ie, physicians, nurses, and foot care specialists) is often needed to support patients' needs.

  2. Candida-associated gastric ulcer relapsing in a different position with a different appearance.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kenji

    2012-08-28

    An 87-year-old, Japanese woman was shown to have a submucosal tumor-like lesion with a deep, central ulceration covered with thick, whitish exudate in the stomach. Biopsy showed Candida tropicalis but not Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). She had no predisposing factors or history of peptic ulcers nor had taken non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), diagnosed with Candida-associated gastric ulcer. Though cured of the lesion, she developed another ulcer in a different position, in which Candida was demonstrated but H. pylori was undetectable. This is the first case of recurrent Candida-associated gastric ulcer in the world. Detected in both the original and recurrent lesions in an H. pylori-negative patient with no antecedent ulcers who had not taken NSAIDs, Candida is considered, contrary to the prevailing opinion, to play an etiologic role in ulcer formation.

  3. Actuator device for artificial leg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An actuator device is described for moving an artificial leg of a person having a prosthesis replacing an entire leg and hip joint. The device includes a first articulated hip joint assembly carried by the natural leg and a second articulated hip joint assembly carried by the prosthesis whereby energy from the movement of the natural leg is transferred by a compressible fluid from the first hip joint assembly to the second hip joint assembly for moving the artificial leg.

  4. Intussusception of the rectum and the solitary ulcer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ihre, T

    1990-12-01

    A general review is given of the intussusception of the rectum, the paradoxical contraction of the pelvic floor syndrome and of the solitary ulcer syndrome. The latter is in most cases a symptom of the other two as is the descending perineum syndrome. The conditions are diagnosed by defecography, proctosigmoidoscopy and EMG. The etiologies are unknown. The treatment is either conservative or operative.

  5. Athletes' leg pains.

    PubMed Central

    Orava, S.; Puranen, J.

    1979-01-01

    The frequency and nature of exertion pains of the leg in athletes were studied in 2,750 cases of overuse injuries treated at the Sports Clinic of the Deaconess Institute of Oulu, Finland, during the years 1972-1977. 465 cases of exertion pain (18%) were located in the shin. The medial tibial syndrome was the most common overuse injury among these athletes, comprising 9.5% of all exertion injuries and 60% of the leg exertion pains. Together with stress fracture of the tibia, the second most common exertion pain of the leg, it accounted for 75% of the total leg pains. There are certain difficulties in differentiating between the medial tibial syndrome and stress fracture of the tibia. They both occur at the same site with similar symptoms. Radiological examination and isotope scanning are needed. The medial tibial syndrome is an overuse injury at the medial tibial border caused by running exercises. The pain is elicited by exertional ischaemia. The pathogenesis is explained by increased pressure in the fascial compartment of the deep flexor muscles due to prolonged exercise. Similar chronic ischaemic pains from exercise are also found in other fascial compartments of the leg, especially in the anterior compartment. The only treatment needed for stress fractures is rest from training. Fascial compartment pains also usually subside. If chronic fascial syndromes prevent training, fasciotomy is recommended as a reliable method to restore the athlete to normal training without pains. PMID:486888

  6. The Etiology of Giftedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Lee Anne; Oehlert, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Many theories of giftedness either explicitly or implicitly acknowledge the role of genetic influences; yet, empirical work has not been able to establish the impact that genes have specifically on gifted behavior. In contrast, a great deal of research has been targeted at understanding the etiology of individual differences in general and…

  7. Evaluation of treatment with carboxymethylcellulose on chronic venous ulcers*

    PubMed Central

    Januário, Virginia; de Ávila, Dione Augusto; Penetra, Maria Alice; Sampaio, Ana Luisa Bittencourt; Noronha Neta, Maria Isabel; Cassia, Flavia de Freire; Carneiro, Sueli

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Among the chronic leg ulcers, venous ulcers are the most common and constitute a major burden to public health. Despite all technology available, some patients do not respond to established treatments. In our study, carboxymethylcellulose was tested in the treatment of refractory chronic venous ulcers. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of carboxymethylcellulose 20% on the healing of chronic venous ulcers refractory to conventional treatments. METHODS: This is an analytical, pre-experimental study. Thirty patients were included with refractory venous ulcers, and applied dressings with carboxymethylcellulose 20% for 20 weeks. The analysis was based on measurement of the area of ulcers, performed at the first visit and after the end of the treatment. RESULTS: There was a reduction of 3.9 cm2 of lesion area (p=0.0001), corresponding to 38.8% (p=0.0001). There was no interruption of treatment and no increase in lesion area in any patient. CONCLUSIONS: Carboxymethylcellulose 20% represents a low cost and effective therapeutic alternative for the treatment of refractory chronic venous ulcers. However, controlled studies are necessary to prove its efficacy. PMID:26982773

  8. [Solitary ulcer of the rectum: a report of a clinical case associated with rectal prolapse].

    PubMed

    Stolfi, V M; Bacaro, D; Rossi, P; Forlini, A; Quintigliano, D; Prisco, L; Gentileschi, E; Gentileschi, P

    1991-01-01

    Solitary ulcer of the rectum is an unusual condition occurring more often in young adults. Unfortunately the term is rather confusing, since the lesion may not necessarily be solitary, nor be confined to the rectum; moreover, it may be polypoid rather than ulcerating. The etiology is uncertain, but chronic constipation and fecal impaction could play a role. Today most authors believe solitary ulcer syndrome is a distinct clinical inflammatory manifestation associated with rectal prolapse. Surgical treatment of the prolapse is usually followed by a recovery of the solitary rectal ulcer. PMID:1836345

  9. Genital ulcers in women: clinical, microbiologic and histopathologic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Christiane Maria Moreira; Giraldo, Paulo César; Gomes, Francis de Assis Moraes; Amaral, Rose; Passos, Mauro Romero Leal; Gonçalves, Ana Katherine da Silveira

    2007-04-01

    Female genital ulcer is a disease that affects a large number of women, and its etiologic diagnosis can be difficult. The disease may increase the risk of acquiring HIV. Genital ulcer may be present in sexually transmitted diseases (STD)--syphilis, chancroid, genital herpes, donovanosis, lymphogranuloma venereum; and other non-STD disorders (NSTD)--Behçet's syndrome, pemphigus, Crohn's disease, erosive lichen planus and others. This study evaluated the clinical-histopathologic-microbiologic characteristics of female genital ulcers. A cross-sectional descriptive prospective study was conducted during a six-month period to investigate the first 53 women without a definitive diagnosis, seeking medical care for genital ulcers at a genital infections outpatient facility in a university hospital. A detailed and specific history was taken, followed by a dermatologic and gynecologic examination. In addition to collecting material from the lesions for microbiologic study, a biopsy of the ulcer was performed for histopathologic investigation. The average age of the patients was 32.7 years, 56.6% had junior high school education and higher education. The most frequent etiology was herpetic lesion, followed by auto-immune ulcers. At the time of their first consultation, around 60% of the women were using inadequate medication that was inconsistent with the final diagnosis. Histologic diagnosis was conclusive in only 26.4% of the patients (14/53). Cure was obtained in 99% of the cases after proper therapy. The female genital ulcers studied were equally distributed between sexually transmitted and non-sexually transmitted causes. Herpes was the most frequent type of genital ulcer, affecting women indiscriminately, mostly between the ages of 20 and 40 years. The etiologic diagnosis of herpetic ulcers is difficult to make even when various diagnostic methods are applied. It is imperative that NSTD should be included in the differential diagnoses of female genital ulcers. The

  10. Management of patients with ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Laine, Loren; Jensen, Dennis M

    2012-03-01

    This guideline presents recommendations for the step-wise management of patients with overt upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Hemodynamic status is first assessed, and resuscitation initiated as needed. Patients are risk-stratified based on features such as hemodynamic status, comorbidities, age, and laboratory tests. Pre-endoscopic erythromycin is considered to increase diagnostic yield at first endoscopy. Pre-endoscopic proton pump inhibitor (PPI) may be considered to decrease the need for endoscopic therapy but does not improve clinical outcomes. Upper endoscopy is generally performed within 24h. The endoscopic features of ulcers direct further management. Patients with active bleeding or non-bleeding visible vessels receive endoscopic therapy (e.g., bipolar electrocoagulation, heater probe, sclerosant, clips) and those with an adherent clot may receive endoscopic therapy; these patients then receive intravenous PPI with a bolus followed by continuous infusion. Patients with flat spots or clean-based ulcers do not require endoscopic therapy or intensive PPI therapy. Recurrent bleeding after endoscopic therapy is treated with a second endoscopic treatment; if bleeding persists or recurs, treatment with surgery or interventional radiology is undertaken. Prevention of recurrent bleeding is based on the etiology of the bleeding ulcer. H. pylori is eradicated and after cure is documented anti-ulcer therapy is generally not given. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are stopped; if they must be resumed low-dose COX-2-selective NSAID plus PPI is used. Patients with established cardiovascular disease who require aspirin should start PPI and generally re-institute aspirin soon after bleeding ceases (within 7 days and ideally 1-3 days). Patients with idiopathic ulcers receive long-term anti-ulcer therapy. PMID:22310222

  11. Management of patients with ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Laine, Loren; Jensen, Dennis M

    2012-03-01

    This guideline presents recommendations for the step-wise management of patients with overt upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Hemodynamic status is first assessed, and resuscitation initiated as needed. Patients are risk-stratified based on features such as hemodynamic status, comorbidities, age, and laboratory tests. Pre-endoscopic erythromycin is considered to increase diagnostic yield at first endoscopy. Pre-endoscopic proton pump inhibitor (PPI) may be considered to decrease the need for endoscopic therapy but does not improve clinical outcomes. Upper endoscopy is generally performed within 24h. The endoscopic features of ulcers direct further management. Patients with active bleeding or non-bleeding visible vessels receive endoscopic therapy (e.g., bipolar electrocoagulation, heater probe, sclerosant, clips) and those with an adherent clot may receive endoscopic therapy; these patients then receive intravenous PPI with a bolus followed by continuous infusion. Patients with flat spots or clean-based ulcers do not require endoscopic therapy or intensive PPI therapy. Recurrent bleeding after endoscopic therapy is treated with a second endoscopic treatment; if bleeding persists or recurs, treatment with surgery or interventional radiology is undertaken. Prevention of recurrent bleeding is based on the etiology of the bleeding ulcer. H. pylori is eradicated and after cure is documented anti-ulcer therapy is generally not given. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are stopped; if they must be resumed low-dose COX-2-selective NSAID plus PPI is used. Patients with established cardiovascular disease who require aspirin should start PPI and generally re-institute aspirin soon after bleeding ceases (within 7 days and ideally 1-3 days). Patients with idiopathic ulcers receive long-term anti-ulcer therapy.

  12. 20. DETAIL, TYPICAL LEG CONNECTION, CROSS BRACING AT LEG, WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. DETAIL, TYPICAL LEG CONNECTION, CROSS BRACING AT LEG, WITH CROSSED BRACE BLOCK, GROUND WIRES AND GUIDE WIRE. - Hat Point Fire Lookout Tower, Forest Service Road #4340, 24 miles from Imnaha, Imnaha, Wallowa County, OR

  13. Ileocolonic ulcer treated by endoscopic application of collagen-polyvinylpyrrolidone

    PubMed Central

    de Hoyos Garza, Andrés; Aguilar, Edgar A Esparza; Checa Richards, Griselda

    2007-01-01

    Ulceration is a complication that may occur after an ileocolonic anastomosis. Most of the etiologies remain speculative. The case of a 33-year-old woman with eosinophilic colitis is reported, in whom a colectomy with an ileocolonic anastomosis was performed. After four months, the patient presented with a stenosis in the ileocolonic anastomosis, necessitating surgical restoration. Four weeks later, the patient presented with rectal bleeding, and a colonoscopy showed an ulcer in the anastomosis. Collagen-polyvinylpyrrolidone was applied into and on the surface of the ulcer, and five days later the procedure was repeated. Follow-up endoscopies at seven days and three months showed complete healing of the ulcer and the patient remained without bleeding throughout a further four weeks of follow-up tests. It was concluded that this biological product could be an excellent treatment for these lesions. PMID:17703251

  14. Ulcerative lupus vulgaris over nose, leading to cosmetic deformity.

    PubMed

    Nair, Pragya A; Mehta, Malay J; Patel, Bhumi B

    2015-01-01

    Lupus vulgaris (LV), is a chronic and progressive form of secondary cutaneous tuberculosis. In India, it is commonly seen over buttocks, thighs, and legs whereas involvement of nose is quite rare. Ulcerative variant particularly over nose causes destruction of cartilage, leading to irreversible deformities and contracture. High-index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis and prevention of cosmetic deformity. A case of LV over nose in a young male with ulceration is reported who responded well to anti-tubercular therapy, but left with scarring of nose, which could have been prevented if adequate awareness regarding extra-pulmonary cases would have been practiced.

  15. Toe Necrosis, Etiologies and Management, a Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Abdelfatah Abou; Newman, Mackenzie; Simman, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Toe necrosis may have vast different etiologies. These include ischemia, embolus, and others. (1) The most common etiology is ischemia. It is a reduction in blood supply to a viable tissue that can lead to susceptibility to infection and tissue death. Peripheral ischemia, which is rooted in the lower limbs, is a major risk factor for toe necrosis because the basal metabolic requirements of tissue are not being sufficiently met. As a result, pain, ulcers, and gangrene commonly occur. (2) Other causes of direct and indirect toe necrosis and related lower limb gangrene include mechanical trauma, infectious, pharmacological sensitivity, cancer, blue toe syndrome, and other granulomatous diseases, such as Churg-Strauss syndrome. We present a case series of toes necrosis which resulted from different etiologies and their management. PMID:26199887

  16. On the etiology of Crohn disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mishina, D; Katsel, P; Brown, S T; Gilberts, E C; Greenstein, R J

    1996-01-01

    Crohn disease (CD) is a chronic, panenteric intestinal inflammatory disease. Its etiology is unknown. Analogous to the tuberculoid and lepromatous forms of leprosy, CD may have two clinical manifestations. One is aggressive and fistulizing (perforating), and the other is contained, indolent, and obstructive (nonperforating) [Gi]-berts, E. C. A. M., Greenstein, A. J., Katsel, P., Harpaz, N. & Greenstein, R. J. (1994) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 91, 12721-127241. The etiology, if infections, may be due to Mycobacterium paratuberculosis. We employed reverse transcription PCR using M. paratuberculosis subspecies-specific primers (IS 900) on total RNA from 12 ileal mucosal specimens (CD, n = 8; controls, n = 4, 2 with ulcerative colitis and 2 with colonic cancer). As a negative control, we used Myobacterium avium DNA, originally cultured from the drinking water of a major city in the United States. cDNA sequence analysis shows that all eight cases of Crohn's disease and both samples from the patients with ulcerative colitis contained M. paratuberculosis RNA. Additionally, the M. avium control has the DNA sequence of M. paratuberculosis. We demonstrate the DNA sequence of M. paratuberculosis from mucosal specimens from humans with CD. The potable water supply may be a reservoir of infection. Although M. paratuberculosis signal in CD has been previously reported, a cause and effect relationship has not been established. In part, this is due to conflicting data from studies with empirical antimycobacterial therapy. We conclude that clinical trials with anti-M. paratuberculosis therapy are indicated in patients with CD who have been stratified into the aggressive (perforating) and contained (nonperforating) forms. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8790414

  17. [Biological etiologies of transsexualism].

    PubMed

    Butty, Anne-Virginie; Bianchi-Demicheli, Francesco

    2016-03-16

    Transsexualism or gender dysphoria is a disorder of sexual identity of unknown etiology. At the biological level, one assumes atypical brain development during certain periods of its formation (genesis) notably during embryogenesis, as a result of altered hormonal influence and a particular genetic polymorphism. This article summarizes the research conducted to date in these three areas only, excluding psycho-social and environmental factors. PMID:27149713

  18. Massively bleeding gastric pouch ulcer after silastic ring vertical gastroplasty successfully treated endoscopically: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Kyzer, S; Gelber, E; Rabinovich, Y; Lurie, B; Binder, Y; Chaimoff, C

    1997-04-01

    Two patients who developed massive bleeding from a gastric pouch ulcer are described. This rare complication occurred during the early postoperative course after silicone ring vertical gastroplasty (SRVG). In both cases the bleeding stopped after the ulcers were injected with epinephrine and alcohol. Both ulcers healed after 1 month of treatment with omeprazole (Losec). The probable etiology of this rare complication is discussed. PMID:9730544

  19. PEPTIC ULCER DISEASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) is an ulcerative condition of the stomach or duodenum that may be accompanied by mucosal inflammation. PUD is classified as primary when it occurs in healthy children and as secondary when underlying disorders associated with injury, illness, or drug therapy co-exists. Pri...

  20. Recurrent oral ulcers--an overview.

    PubMed

    Gaffar, A

    2001-01-01

    Recurrent oral ulcers (ROUs) are the most common oral mucosal disease. The etiology of ROUs is complex. The factors include mechanical trauma, genetics, stress, smoking, and viral and bacterial infections. Treatment modalities depend on the differential diagnosis of ROUs and could consist of antimicrobial agents, anti-inflammatory agents, immunomodulators, or over-the-counter medications. New therapy available in the form of a coating polymer, Colgate ORABASE Soothe.N.Seal, is clinically proven to provide rapid relief and healing of ROUs. PMID:11915640

  1. ORTHOPEDIC LEG BRACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, William Neil (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Knee braces generally have been rigid in both the knee bending direction and in the knee straightening direction unless a manually operated release is incorporated in them to allow the knee to bend. Desirably a braced knee joint should effectively duplicate the compound, complex, actions of a normal knee. The key to knee braces is the knee joint housing. The housing herein carries a number of cam action pawls. with teeth adapted to engage the internal teeth of a ratchet ring mounted in the housing. Cam action return springs and the shape of the cam action pawl teeth allow rotation of the ratchet ring in a leg straightening direction while still supporting a load. The leg can then be extended during walking while at the same time being prevented by the cam action pawls from buckling in the knee bending direction.

  2. [LCT (lipocolloid technology) in lesions of venous etiology].

    PubMed

    López, Justo Rueda; Bueno, Ana Maria Muñoz; Perejamo, Montserrat Arboix; Fornells, Manuel Gago; González, R Fernando García; Gómez, Teresa Segovia; Palmero, Albert Guerrero; Sauvadet, Anne

    2005-02-01

    This article reports on a spanish study to evaluate the effectiveness of dressings using a Technology Lipido-Colloid to treat skin lesions with "Urgotul". Has been included 18 of this 60 lesions were leg ulcers. We have decided to focus our analysis in these difficult to treat chronic wounds. This study noted better results in relation to the evolution of these lesions and in the quality of life for these patients who suffered these lesions in terms of pain control, skin deterioration or lesions in the same spot related to changing dressings, and an improvement in the skin nearby the lesion.

  3. Stable walking with asymmetric legs.

    PubMed

    Merker, Andreas; Rummel, Juergen; Seyfarth, Andre

    2011-12-01

    Asymmetric leg function is often an undesired side-effect in artificial legged systems and may reflect functional deficits or variations in the mechanical construction. It can also be found in legged locomotion in humans and animals such as after an accident or in specific gait patterns. So far, it is not clear to what extent differences in the leg function of contralateral limbs can be tolerated during walking or running. Here, we address this issue using a bipedal spring-mass model for simulating walking with compliant legs. With the help of the model, we show that considerable differences between contralateral legs can be tolerated and may even provide advantages to the robustness of the system dynamics. A better understanding of the mechanisms and potential benefits of asymmetric leg operation may help to guide the development of artificial limbs or the design novel therapeutic concepts and rehabilitation strategies.

  4. Etiologies of Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Edward S; Moller, David R

    2015-08-01

    Since sarcoidosis was first described more than a century ago, the etiologic determinants causing this disease remain uncertain. Studies suggest that genetic, host immunologic, and environmental factors interact together to cause sarcoidosis. Immunologic characteristics of sarcoidosis include non-caseating granulomas, enhanced local expression of T helper-1 (and often Th17) cytokines and chemokines, dysfunctional regulatory T-cell responses, dysregulated Toll-like receptor signaling, and oligoclonal expansion of CD4+ T cells consistent with chronic antigenic stimulation. Multiple environmental agents have been suggested to cause sarcoidosis. Studies from several groups implicate mycobacterial or propionibacterial organisms in the etiology of sarcoidosis based on tissue analyses and immunologic responses in sarcoidosis patients. Despite these studies, there is no consensus on the nature of a microbial pathogenesis of sarcoidosis. Some groups postulate sarcoidosis is caused by an active viable replicating infection while other groups contend there is no clinical, pathologic, or microbiologic evidence for such a pathogenic mechanism. The authors posit a novel hypothesis that proposes that sarcoidosis is triggered by a hyperimmune Th1 response to pathogenic microbial and tissue antigens associated with the aberrant aggregation of serum amyloid A within granulomas, which promotes progressive chronic granulomatous inflammation in the absence of ongoing infection. PMID:25771769

  5. Etiologies of Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Edward S; Moller, David R

    2015-08-01

    Since sarcoidosis was first described more than a century ago, the etiologic determinants causing this disease remain uncertain. Studies suggest that genetic, host immunologic, and environmental factors interact together to cause sarcoidosis. Immunologic characteristics of sarcoidosis include non-caseating granulomas, enhanced local expression of T helper-1 (and often Th17) cytokines and chemokines, dysfunctional regulatory T-cell responses, dysregulated Toll-like receptor signaling, and oligoclonal expansion of CD4+ T cells consistent with chronic antigenic stimulation. Multiple environmental agents have been suggested to cause sarcoidosis. Studies from several groups implicate mycobacterial or propionibacterial organisms in the etiology of sarcoidosis based on tissue analyses and immunologic responses in sarcoidosis patients. Despite these studies, there is no consensus on the nature of a microbial pathogenesis of sarcoidosis. Some groups postulate sarcoidosis is caused by an active viable replicating infection while other groups contend there is no clinical, pathologic, or microbiologic evidence for such a pathogenic mechanism. The authors posit a novel hypothesis that proposes that sarcoidosis is triggered by a hyperimmune Th1 response to pathogenic microbial and tissue antigens associated with the aberrant aggregation of serum amyloid A within granulomas, which promotes progressive chronic granulomatous inflammation in the absence of ongoing infection.

  6. Connective Tissue Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Dabiri, Ganary; Falanga, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Connective tissue disorders (CTD), which are often also termed collagen vascular diseases, include a number of related inflammatory conditions. Some of these diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), localized scleroderma (morphea variants localized to the skin), Sjogren’s syndrome, dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and mixed connective tissue disease. In addition to the systemic manifestations of these diseases, there are a number of cutaneous features that make these conditions recognizable on physical exam. Lower extremity ulcers and digital ulcers are an infrequent but disabling complication of long-standing connective tissue disease. The exact frequency with which these ulcers occur is not known, and the cause of the ulcerations is often multifactorial. Moreover, a challenging component of CTD ulcerations is that there are still no established guidelines for their diagnosis and treatment. The morbidity associated with these ulcerations and their underlying conditions is very substantial. Indeed, these less common but intractable ulcers represent a major medical and economic problem for patients, physicians and nurses, and even well organized multidisciplinary wound healing centers. PMID:23756459

  7. [Perforated gastroduodenal stress ulcer].

    PubMed

    Melinte, C; Dragomir, Cr

    2006-01-01

    Experimental and clinical data support the role of oxidative stress in the development of gastro-duodenal inflammatory lesions and peptic ulcer. Although quite common, stress ulcer remains a minor concern in the The authors review the literature data and perform a retrospective study on 205 personal cases of gastroduodenal ulcers, diagnosed and operated in the period 1986-2005. Of these, 58 (28.29%) were perforated ulcers, including 4 cases (6.8%) caused by various psychic traumas. All the patients presented symptoms and signs characteristic for perforated ulcer and were undoubtedly of psychogenic cause. The surgical treatment consisted in the closure of the perforation and peritoneal drainage. Besides medical treatment of peptic ulcer disease consisting of antisecretory drugs, antioxidants and sedatives were used. Postoperative follow-up showed a rapid and uneventful recovery in all cases. In conclusion, surgery is the mainstay of treatment in perforated ulcer, but additional stress therapy promotes healing and may reduce postoperative morbidity in cases with certain involvement of psychic trauma.

  8. Nonspecific genital ulcers.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Pandhi, Deepika; Khurana, Ananta

    2014-01-01

    Recent intervention of nonspecific genital ulcers has added refreshing dimensions to genital ulcer disease. It was considered pertinent to dwell on diverse clinical presentation and diagnostic strategies. It seems to possess spectrum. It includes infective causes, Epstein Bar Virus, tuberculosis, Leishmaniasis, HIV/AIDS related ulcers and amoebiasis. Noninfective causes are immunobullous disorders, aphthosis, Behcet's disease (BD), inflammatory bowel disease, lichen planus and lichen sclerosis et atrophicus, drug reactions, premalignant and malignant conditions, pyoderma gangrenosum, and hidradenitis suppurativa. The diagnostic features and treatment option of each disorder are succinctly outlined for ready reference.

  9. Peptic ulcer at the end of the 20th century: biological and psychological risk factors.

    PubMed

    Levenstein, S

    1999-11-01

    The prevailing concept of peptic ulcer etiology has swung over entirely in just a few years from the psychological to the infectious, yet the rich literature documenting an association between psychosocial factors and ulcer is not invalidated by the discovery of Helicobacter pylori. Physical and psychological stressors interact to induce ulcers in animal models, concrete life difficulties and subjective distress predict the development of ulcers in prospective cohorts, shared catastrophes such as war and earthquakes lead to surges in hospitalizations for complicated ulcers, and stress or anxiety can worsen ulcer course. Many known ulcer risk factors, including smoking, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, heavy drinking, loss of sleep and skipping breakfast, can increase under stress; the association of low socioeconomic status with ulcer is also accounted for in part by psychosocial factors. Among possible physiological mechanisms, stress may induce gastric hypersecretion, reduce acid buffering in the stomach and the duodenum, impair gastroduodenal blood flow, and affect healing or inflammation through psychoneuroimmunological mechanisms. Psychosocial factors seem to be particularly prominent among idiopathic or complicated ulcers, but they are probably operative in run of the mill H pylori disease as well, either through additive effects or by facilitating the spread of the organism across the pylorus, while gastrointestinal damage by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can also be potentiated by stress. Although the clinical importance of peptic ulcer is fading along with the millennium, due to secular trends and new therapies, it remains worthy of study as a splendid example of the biopsychosocial model.

  10. Leg size and muscle functions associated with leg compliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.; Doerr, Donald F.; Flores, Jose F.; Hoffler, G. Wyckliffe; Buchanan, Paul

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between the leg compliance and factors related to the size of leg muscle and to physical fitness was investigated in ten healthy subjects. Vascular compliance of the leg, as determined by a mercury strain gauge, was found to be not significantly correlated with any variables associated with physical fitness per se (e.g., peak O2 uptake, calf strength, age, body weight, or body composition. On the other hand, leg compliance correlated with the calf cross-sectional area (CSA) and the calculated calf volume, with the CSA of calf muscle being the most dominant contributing factor (while fat and bone were poor predicators). It is suggested that leg compliance can be lowered by increasing calf muscle mass, thus providing structural support to limit the expansion of leg veins.

  11. Venous ulceration, fibrinogen and fibrinolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Leach, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of long and short-term venous hypertension upon lymph fibrinogen concentrations was studied in an attempt to explain the peri-capillary deposition of fibrin reported in patients with post-phlebitic syndromes. The clearance of radioactive fibrinogen/thrombin clots from the subcutaneous tissues of rats and human volunteers was also studied. Both long- and short-term venous hypertension were found to increase fibrinogen transport across the interstitial space by more than 600%. Not only was there evidence of fibrinolytic activity in the lymph but after long-term venous hypertension alpha 2 antiplasmin activity was also detectable. Skin biopsies from the venous hypertensive ankles showed deposition of interstitial fibrin. The clearance of radioactive fibrinogen/thrombin clots from the subcutaneous tissues of the rat was found to be delayed if the rats were given epsilon amino caproic acid but it could not be increased with stanozolol. In human subjects it was found that patients with lipodermatosclerosis had delayed clot clearance and retarded blood fibrinolytic activity when compared with normal volunteers and patients with uncomplicated varicose veins. The principle cause why tall men are more subject to ulcers than short men, Dr Young conceived to be then length of the column of blood in their veins; which by its pressure, renders the legs less able to recover when hurt by any violence. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 5 PMID:6742738

  12. Lithium Battery Diaper Ulceration.

    PubMed

    Maridet, Claire; Taïeb, Alain

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of lithium battery diaper ulceration in a 16-month-old girl. Gastrointestinal and ear, nose, and throat lesions after lithium battery ingestion have been reported, but skin involvement has not been reported to our knowledge.

  13. Ulcer and gastritis.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, H

    2007-02-01

    Five papers, discussing important topics related to ulcer and gastritis, have been selected for review here. The papers, which include some excellent systematic reviews and meta-analyses, were published between July 2005 and August 2006.

  14. Tension leg platform system

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, R.B.

    1983-12-20

    A tension leg platform system for use in drilling wellbores into the floor of an offshore body of water. Includes in the system is a buoyancy control vessel having a plurality of pull down cables attached thereto which extend to the ocean floor. A plurality of spaced apart anchors disposed at the ocean floor are positioned to receive the lower ends of the respective pull down cables. A submergible hull slidably engages the respective hold down cables such that the hull can be controllably lowered to the ocean floor whereby a canopy carried on the hull will cover an uncontrollably flowing well to conduct the effluent to the water's surface.

  15. Exertional Leg Pain.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Sathish; Finnoff, Jonathan T

    2016-02-01

    Exertional leg pain is a common condition seen in runners and the general population. Given the broad differential diagnosis of this complaint, this article focuses on the incidence, anatomy, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and management of common causes that include medial tibial stress syndrome, tibial bone stress injury, chronic exertional compartment syndrome, arterial endofibrosis, popliteal artery entrapment syndrome, and entrapment of the common peroneal, superficial peroneal, and saphenous nerves. Successful diagnosis of these conditions hinges on performing a thorough history and physical examination followed by proper diagnostic testing and appropriate management. PMID:26616179

  16. Cushing's ulcer: Further reflections

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, William J.; Bashir, Asif; Dababneh, Haitham; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Brain tumors, traumatic head injury, and other intracranial processes including infections, can cause increased intracranial pressure and lead to overstimulation of the vagus nerve. As a result, increased secretion of gastric acid may occur which leads to gastro-duodenal ulcer formation known as Cushing's ulcer. Methods: A review of original records of Dr. Harvey Cushing's patients suffering from gastro-duodenal ulcers was performed followed by a discussion of the available literature. We also reviewed the clinical records of the patients never reported by Cushing to gain his perspective in describing this phenomenon. Dr. Cushing was intrigued to investigate gastro-duodenal ulcers as he lost patients to acute gastrointestinal perforations following successful brain tumor operations. It is indeed ironic that Harvey Cushing developed a gastro-duodenal ulcer in his later years with failing health. Results: Clinically shown by Cushing's Yale Registry, a tumor or lesion can disrupt this circuitry, leading to gastroduodenal ulceration. Cushing said that it was “reasonable to believe that the perforations following posterior fossa cerebellar operations were produced in like fashion by an irritative disturbance either of fiber tracts or vagal centers in the brain stem.” Conclusion: Harvey Cushing's pioneering work depicted in his Yale registry serves as a milestone for continuing research that can further discern this pathway. PMID:25972936

  17. Late failure of a split-thickness skin graft in the setting of homozygous factor V Leiden mutation: a case report and correlative animal model from the Wound Etiology and Healing (WE-HEAL) study.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Victoria K; McNish, Sean; Duncan, Joanna; Root, Brandy; Tassi, Elena; Wellstein, Anton; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Attinger, Christopher E

    2015-10-01

    We present the case of a 53-year-old Caucasian male smoker with remote history of left lower extremity deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and a strong family history of thrombosis, who presented to the Center for Wound Healing at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital with spontaneous left leg ulceration. Prothrombotic evaluation showed homozygosity for the factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation. Therapeutic anticoagulation was commenced with warfarin (Coumadin®) and the patient underwent successful debridement and Apligraf® followed by split-thickness skin graft (STSG) of two wounds. He had an uneventful postoperative course and on the 27th postoperative day the grafts were 95% intact. However, by postoperative day 41 there was 10% graft loss, and over the subsequent 2 weeks both grafts necrosed. On further questioning, it transpired that the patient had discontinued his warfarin on postoperative day 37 because he thought that it was no longer necessary. The patient is enrolled in the Wound Etiology and Healing (WE-HEAL) study, and at the time of the original graft, residual skin fragments from the STSG were transplanted onto a nude mouse for development of an animal model of wound healing. The mouse graft was successful and was harvested at postoperative day 87 for pathological examination. We review the mechanisms by which prothrombotic states, particularly FVL mutation, can contribute to skin graft failure and delayed wound healing. This case highlights the importance of considering prothrombotic conditions in patients with spontaneous leg ulcerations and the impact of therapeutic anticoagulation on healing. It further allows us to demonstrate the efficacy of the animal model in which residual fragments of STSG tissue are utilised for transplant onto nude mice for manipulation in the laboratory. PMID:24028566

  18. Ulcerative Colitis: A Challenge to Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Parray, Fazl Q; Wani, Mohd L; Malik, Ajaz A; Wani, Shadab N; Bijli, Akram H; Irshad, Ifat; Nayeem-Ul-Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic disease that specifically affects the mucosa of the rectum and colon. Although the etiology of this recurring inflammatory disorder remains essentially unknown, there have been significant advances in identifying the likely genetic and environmental factors that contribute to its pathogenesis. The clinical course of the disease typically manifests with remissions and exacerbations characterized by rectal bleeding and diarrhea. Since ulcerative colitis most commonly affects patients in their youth or early middle age, the disease can have serious long-term local and systemic consequences. There is no specific medical therapy that is curative. Although medical therapy can ameliorate the inflammatory process and control most symptomatic flares, it provides no definitive treatment for the disease. Proctocolectomy or total removal of the colon and rectum provides the only complete cure; however, innovative surgical alternatives have eliminated the need for a permanent ileostomy. The aim of this review is to provide a detailed account of the surgical management of ulcerative colitis. PMID:23189226

  19. Streptococcus agalactie involved in the etiology of sexually transmitted diseases.

    PubMed

    Frey, Marcos Noronha; Ioppi, Ana Elisa Empinotti; Bonamigo, Renan Rangel; Prado, Guilherme Pinheiro

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is an important microorganism involved in a number of conditions in pregnant women, newborns, elderly people (over 65 years of age) and individuals with chronic disabling illnesses. This pathogen is infrequently found among patients outside this age range or clinical profile(1-5) and is rarely reported in the etiology of sexually transmitted diseases. Here we describe a case of an otherwise healthy 19 year-old male, who presented with ulcerative genital and oral lesions in association with urethral and ocular discharge, suggestive of Streptococcus agalactiae infection acquired through sexual contact.

  20. Venous ulcers of the lower limb: Where do we stand?

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Sasanka S.

    2012-01-01

    Venous ulcers are the most common ulcers of the lower limb. It has a high morbidity and results in economic strain both at a personal and at a state level. Chronic venous hypertension either due to primary or secondary venous disease with perforator paucity, destruction or incompetence resulting in reflux is the underlying pathology, but inflammatory reactions mediated through leucocytes, platelet adhesion, formation of pericapillary fibrin cuff, growth factors and macromolecules trapped in tissue result in tissue hypoxia, cell death and ulceration. Duplex scan with colour flow is the most useful investigation for venous disease supplying information about patency, reflux, effects of proximal and distal compression, Valsalva maneuver and effects of muscle contraction. Most venous disease can be managed conservatively by leg elevation and compression bandaging. Drugs of proven benefit in venous disease are pentoxifylline and aspirin, but they work best in conjunction with compression therapy. Once ulceration is chronic or the patient does not respond to or cannot maintain conservative regime, surgical intervention treating the underlying venous hypertension and cover for the ulcer is necessary. The different modalities like sclerotherapy, ligation and stripping of superficial varicose veins, endoscopic subfascial perforator ligation, endovenous laser or radiofrequency ablation have similar long-term results, although short-term recovery is best with radiofrequency and foam sclerotherapy. For deep venous reflux, surgical modalities include repair of incompetent venous valves or transplant or transposition of a competent vein segment with normal valves to replace a post-thrombotic destroyed portion of the deep vein. PMID:23162226

  1. [Etiology of deafness in children].

    PubMed

    Delvaux de Fenffe, J; Deggouj, N; Dutilleux, D; Gersdorff, M

    1992-01-01

    A retrospective etiological study of 112 files of deaf children is presented. A prenatal etiology is found in 42.8%, a perinatal in 19.6% and a postnatal in 13.4% of the cases. No cause was suspected in 30.3% of the cases. These results emphasise existing literature.

  2. [Restless-legs syndrome].

    PubMed

    Karroum, E; Konofal, E; Arnulf, I

    2008-01-01

    Restless-legs syndrome (RLS) is a sensorimotor disorder, characterized by an irresistible urge to move the legs usually accompanied or caused by uncomfortable and unpleasant sensations. It begins or worsens during periods of rest or inactivity, is partially or totally relieved by movements and is exacerbated or occurs at night and in the evening. RLS sufferers represent 2 to 3% of the general population in Western countries. Supportive criteria include a family history, the presence of periodic-leg movements (PLM) when awake or asleep and a positive response to dopaminergic treatment. The RLS phenotypes include an early onset form, usually idiopathic with a familial history and a late onset form, usually secondary to peripheral neuropathy. Recently, an atypical RLS phenotype without PLM and l-DOPA resistant has been characterized. RLS can occur in childhood and should be distinguished from attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, growing pains and sleep complaints in childhood. RLS should be included in the diagnosis of all patients consulting for sleep complaints or discomfort in the lower limbs. It should be differentiated from akathisia, that is, an urge to move the whole body without uncomfortable sensations. Polysomnographic studies and the suggested immobilization test can detect PLM. Furthermore, an l-DOPA challenge has recently been validated to support the diagnosis of RLS. RLS may cause severe-sleep disturbances, poor quality of life, depressive and anxious symptoms and may be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. In most cases, RLS is idiopathic. It may also be secondary to iron deficiency, end-stage renal disease, pregnancy, peripheral neuropathy and drugs, such as antipsychotics and antidepressants. The small-fiber neuropathy can mimic RLS or even trigger it. RLS is associated with many neurological and sleep disorders including Parkinson's disease, but does not predispose to these diseases. The pathophysiology of RLS includes an altered brain

  3. Ulcerative colitis and rheumatoid arthritis: a rare association--case report.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Vitor Alves; Yamaguchi, Lúcio; Ribeiro, Carolina Nazeozeno; Magalhães, Vanessa de Oliveira; Rego, Jozelia; Silva, Nilzio Antonio da

    2012-08-01

    Ulcerative colitis is an autoimmune disorder of unknown etiology. Although the large intestine is the major focus of autoimmunity, resulting in chronic diarrhea, that is actually a systemic disease, with numerous extraintestinal manifestations, such as articular involvement. The frequent association of a number of autoimmune diseases in the same patient has been described. However, the coexistence of ulcerative colitis and rheumatoid arthritis is rare. The authors report a case of ulcerative colitis associated with rheumatoid arthritis, in which colitis occurred 12 years before the onset of inflammatory arthropathy.

  4. Epstein-Barr virus-associated genital ulcers: an under-recognized disorder.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Cheryl J; Alió, Alessandra B; Cunningham, Bari B; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon

    2007-01-01

    Infectious mononucleosis is the best-known syndrome associated with primary Epstein-Barr virus infection. Although a variety of cutaneous and mucosal manifestations are recognized in infectious mononucleosis, genital ulcers have only rarely been described. We describe an otherwise healthy 14-year-old girl in whom painful genital ulcers developed during an episode of serologically-confirmed primary Epstein-Barr virus infection. Clinical, serologic, and histopathologic evaluation failed to disclose evidence of any other etiologic explanation for her lesions. The patient remains well, without recurrence. To date, only 13 instances of genital ulceration in females attributable to Epstein-Barr virus infection have been reported.

  5. Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis (anticipated pubicstion date - mid-2009) Purpose A pressure ulcer, also known as a pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, or bedsore, is defined as a localized injury to the skin/and or underlying tissue occurring most often over a bony prominence and caused by pressure, shear, or friction, alone or in combination. (1) Those at risk for developing pressure ulcers include the elderly and critically ill as well as persons with neurological impairments and those who suffer conditions associated with immobility. Pressure ulcers are graded or staged with a 4-point classification system denoting severity. Stage I represents the beginnings of a pressure ulcer and stage IV, the severest grade, consists of full thickness tissue loss with exposed bone, tendon, and or muscle. (1) In a 2004 survey of Canadian health care settings, Woodbury and Houghton (2) estimated that the prevalence of pressure ulcers at a stage 1 or greater in Ontario ranged between 13.1% and 53% with nonacute health care settings having the highest prevalence rate (Table 1). Executive Summary Table 1: Prevalence of Pressure Ulcers* Setting Canadian Prevalence,% (95% CI) Ontario Prevalence,Range % (n) Acute care 25 (23.8–26.3) 23.9–29.7 (3418) Nonacute care† 30 (29.3–31.4) 30.0–53.3 (1165) Community care 15 (13.4–16.8) 13.2 (91) Mixed health care‡ 22 (20.9

  6. Ulcer bleeding and perforation: non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Svanes, C; Ovrebø, K; Søreide, O

    1996-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-exposure increases the risk for ulcer perforation by a factor of 5-8. Recent data from Norway indicate that NSAID exposure is more common in gastric than in prepyloric, pyloric and duodenal perforation. Twenty to 40% of patients with gastric perforation have used NSAIDs; attributable risks are not published. The risk for ulcer bleeding is increased by a factor of 3-5 in NSAID users, with similar effects for stomach and duodenum. NSAID exposure accounts for 20-35% of ulcer bleedings. There is little knowledge about the role of Helicobacter pylori in ulcer complications, a limited importance of the bacteria is indicated in the etiology of both perforation and bleeding. Ulcer complications have a multifactorial origin. NSAIDs account for a limited part of the events. H. pylori infection may play a still undocumented role. Smoking, alcohol and aspirin are other important causal factors.

  7. Limits and possibilities experienced by nurses in the treatment of women with chronic venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Silva, Marcelo Henrique da; Jesus, Maria Cristina Pinto de; Merighi, Miriam Aparecida Barbosa; Oliveira, Deíse Moura de

    2014-08-01

    Objective To understand the experiences and expectations of nurses in the treatment of women with chronic venous ulcers. Method Phenomenological research was based on Alfred Schütz, whose statements were obtained in January, 2012, through semi-structured interviews with seven nurses. Results The nurse reveals the difficulties presented by the woman in performing self-care, the perceived limitations in the treatment anchored in motivation, and the values and beliefs of women. It showed professional frustration because venous leg ulcer recurrence, lack of inputs, interdisciplinary work and training of nursing staff. There was an expected adherence to the treatment of women, and it emphasized the need for ongoing care, supported self-care and standard practices in treatment. Conclusion That treatment of chronic venous leg ulcers constitutes a challenge that requires collective investment, involving women, professionals, managers and health institutions. PMID:25517835

  8. Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis (anticipated pubicstion date - mid-2009) Purpose A pressure ulcer, also known as a pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, or bedsore, is defined as a localized injury to the skin/and or underlying tissue occurring most often over a bony prominence and caused by pressure, shear, or friction, alone or in combination. (1) Those at risk for developing pressure ulcers include the elderly and critically ill as well as persons with neurological impairments and those who suffer conditions associated with immobility. Pressure ulcers are graded or staged with a 4-point classification system denoting severity. Stage I represents the beginnings of a pressure ulcer and stage IV, the severest grade, consists of full thickness tissue loss with exposed bone, tendon, and or muscle. (1) In a 2004 survey of Canadian health care settings, Woodbury and Houghton (2) estimated that the prevalence of pressure ulcers at a stage 1 or greater in Ontario ranged between 13.1% and 53% with nonacute health care settings having the highest prevalence rate (Table 1). Executive Summary Table 1: Prevalence of Pressure Ulcers* Setting Canadian Prevalence,% (95% CI) Ontario Prevalence,Range % (n) Acute care 25 (23.8–26.3) 23.9–29.7 (3418) Nonacute care† 30 (29.3–31.4) 30.0–53.3 (1165) Community care 15 (13.4–16.8) 13.2 (91) Mixed health care‡ 22 (20.9

  9. The Buruli Ulcer.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Satendra; Basu, Somprakas; Bhartiya, Satyanam Kumar; Shukla, Vijay Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans and can manifest as a simple nodule or as aggressive skin ulcers leading to debilitating osteoarthritis or limb deformity. The disease is more prevalent in those living in remote rural areas, especially in children younger than 15 years. The exact mode of transmission is possibly through traumatic skin lesions contaminated by M ulcerans. IS2404 polymerase chain reaction from ulcer swabs or biopsies is a rapid method for confirmation of BU. In coendemic countries, HIV infection complicates the progression of BU, leading to rapidly spreading osteomyelitis. Treatment is principally medical, with antitubercular drugs, and surgery is utilized for complicated disease. Because of ineffective vaccination, primary prevention is the best option for control of the disease. PMID:26286931

  10. Ulcerated tophaceous gout.

    PubMed

    Filanovsky, Michelle Gita; Sukhdeo, Kumar; McNamara, Megan Cunnane

    2015-01-01

    Gout is an inflammatory arthritis characterised by hyperuricemia, which, if poorly controlled, can lead to the development of tophi. We report the case of a 60-year-old Caucasian man with poorly controlled polyarticular tophaceous gout with multiple comorbidities (including renal failure) who presented with tophaceous ulcers of the upper extremity. These ulcers caused extreme pain, requiring chronic opiate medications, and were associated with decreased sensation and reduced ability to move the extremity. His hospital course was complicated by acute kidney injury, haemolytic anaemia and Clostridium difficile infection. He required 1 month of antibiotics and intensive wound care for his ulcers. This case highlights the diagnosis, natural history and management of an unusual complication of hyperuricemia. PMID:26240104

  11. [Peripheral ulcerative keratitis].

    PubMed

    Stamate, Alina-cristina; Avram, Corina Ioana; Malciolu, R; Oprea, S; Zemba, M

    2014-01-01

    Ulcerative keratitis is frequently associated with collagen vascular diseases and presents a predilection for peripheral corneal localization, due to the distinct morphologic and immunologic features of the limbal conjunctiva, which provides access for the circulating immune complexes to the peripheral cornea via the capillary network. Deposition of immune complexes in the terminal ends of limbal vessels initiates an immune-mediated vasculitis process, with inflammatory cells and mediators involvement by alteration of the vascular permeability. Peripheral ulcerative keratitis generally correlates with exacerbations of the background autoimmune systemic disease. Associated sceritis, specially the necrotizing form, is usually observed in severe cases, which may evolve in corneal perforation and loss of vision. Although the first-line of treatment in acute phases is represented by systemic administration of corticosteroids, immunosuppressive and cytotoxic agents are necessary for the treatment of peripheral ulcerative keratitis associated with systemic diseases.

  12. [The acute bleeding rectal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Hansen, H

    1985-06-14

    An acute bleeding rectal ulcer was the solitary condition in four patients. The cause of such an ulcer, which always results in heavy arterial bleeding, remains unknown. The source of bleeding is demonstrated by rectoscopy which may at times be difficult because of the large amount of blood in the rectum and the hidden position of the small ulcer. Sclerosing or circumferential suturing of the ulcer provides immediate cessation of bleeding and cure.

  13. [Helicobacter pylori and gastric ulcer].

    PubMed

    Maaroos, H I

    1994-01-01

    In connection with longitudinal ulcer studies and the demonstration of Helicobacter pylori as the main cause of chronic gastritis, new aspects of gastric ulcer recurrences and healing become evident. This extends the possibilities to prognosticate the course of gastric ulcer and to use more effective treatment. PMID:7937016

  14. Leg discomfort: beyond the joints.

    PubMed

    Berger, Douglas

    2014-05-01

    Although simple characterization of discomfort as cramps, heaviness, shooting pains, and so forth can be misleading, history and examination are key to accurate diagnosis. Absence of both dorsalis pedis and posterior tibial pulses strongly suggests peripheral arterial disease (PAD), and the presence of either pulse makes PAD less likely. Hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) are a common cause of lower extremity myalgias. Restless legs syndrome causes nocturnal discomfort but must be distinguished from confounding“mimics." Neurologic causes of leg symptoms include lumbar spinal stenosis, radiculopathy, distal symmetric polyneuropathy, and entrapment neuropathy. Many common causes of leg discomfort can be managed conservatively.

  15. Microsurgical Reconstruction of Plantar Ulcers of the Insensate Foot.

    PubMed

    Kadam, Dinesh

    2016-06-01

    Background Plantar, neuropathic, or trophic ulcers are often found in patients with decreased sensation in the foot. These ulcers can be complicated by infection, deformity, and increased patient morbidity. Excision results in wider defects and local tissues are often insufficient for reconstruction Methods Total 26 free flaps were used in 25 patients to reconstruct plantar ulcers between years 2007 and 2013. The etiology included diabetic neuropathy (n = 13), leprosy (n = 3), spinal/peripheral nerve injury (n = 7), spina bifida (n = 1), and peripheral neuropathy (n = 1). The duration of the ulcer ranged from 1 to 18 years. Fifteen patients had associated systemic comorbidities and six had previous attempts. Free flaps used in reconstruction were the anterolateral thigh flap (n = 18), radial artery forearm flap (n = 4), and the gracilis muscle flap (n = 4). Recipient vessels were the posterior tibial artery (end to side) in 19 and the dorsalis pedis artery in 7. Results The average age at presentation was 44.6 years with mean duration of ulcer of 5.8 years predominantly located over weight-bearing areas. Mean size of ulcer was 59.45 cm(2) and mean follow-up period was 48 months. All flaps survived except a partial loss. Average time to resume ambulation was 6 weeks. Three patients had recurrence with mean follow-up of 48 months. Secondary flap reduction and bony resection was done in four. Conclusion Microvascular reconstruction of the sole has advantages of vascularity, adequate tissue, and leaving rest of the foot undisturbed for offloading. Three significant local conditions influencing selection and transfer of the flap include (1) distally located forefoot ulcers, (2) extensive subcutaneous fibrosis secondary to frequent inflammation, and (3) Charcot arthropathy. In our series, the anterolateral thigh flap is our first choice for reconstruction of these defects.

  16. Remote wound monitoring of chronic ulcers.

    PubMed

    Weber, Sonja A; Watermann, Niall; Jossinet, Jacques; Byrne, J Anthony; Chantrey, Jonquille; Alam, Shabana; So, Karen; Bush, Jim; O'Kane, Sharon; McAdams, Eric T

    2010-03-01

    Chronic wounds or ulcers are wounds that do not heal in the usual manner. This type of wound is most common in the elderly and in paraplegic patients with an estimated 1% of the population suffering from leg ulcers and the costs adding up to 4% of the annual National Health Service budget in the U.K. There is an identified need to develop a device capable of remote wound monitoring that enables patients to take charge of their wound management under clinical guidance. A new ¿wound mapping¿ device has been developed, which is based on electrical impedance spectroscopy and involves the multifrequency characterization of the electrical properties of wound tissue under an electrode array. A key feature of the prototype device is the anticipated incorporation of the measuring array into standard commercial occlusive dressings, thereby protecting the wound from interference and contamination, and thus, promoting wound healing, while monitoring the protected wound. Further development is planned including wireless transmission, thus enabling telewound monitoring as described earlier. PMID:20659833

  17. Athermal laser treatment of the diabetic leg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignat, P.; Suteanu, S.; Brojbeanu, Gabriela; Vasiliu, Virgil V.

    1995-03-01

    This work shows the result obtained in the medical clinic of the `Dr. I. Cantacuzino Hospital' on a lot of 43 diabetic patients using the `LASSIS' devices composed of a He-Ne laser and 4 semiconductor lasers. The 43 patients showed various clinic pictures of a diabetic leg (diabetic arteriopathy and neuropathy) 16 of the lot showed an arteriopathy with claudication and a decrease of pulses oscillometrically measurements, 15 had ulceration and a beginning of gangrene and the other 12 showed a plantary boring ill. There has been achieved an amelioration of the oscillometric index of the claudication while walking the amelioration of local circulation, together with the limitation of the necrosis. For the boring ill, there has been achieved the acceleration of the granulating and epithelization process avoiding surgeries, suppuration and cutaneous plasties. The response to the laser treatment was compared to the response to the classic treatment (vasodilatation surgery unstrapping, antibiotherapy) on a proving lot. We appreciated that the cicatrization and local vasodilatation with athermal laser treatment should be a hope for the treatment of patients suffering of diabetic arteriopathy and neuropathy.

  18. Peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Kalyanakrishnan; Salinas, Robert C

    2007-10-01

    Peptic ulcer disease usually occurs in the stomach and proximal duodenum. The predominant causes in the United States are infection with Helicobacter pylori and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Symptoms of peptic ulcer disease include epigastric discomfort (specifically, pain relieved by food intake or antacids and pain that causes awakening at night or that occurs between meals), loss of appetite, and weight loss. Older patients and patients with alarm symptoms indicating a complication or malignancy should have prompt endoscopy. Patients taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs should discontinue their use. For younger patients with no alarm symptoms, a test-and-treat strategy based on the results of H. pylori testing is recommended. If H. pylori infection is diagnosed, the infection should be eradicated and antisecretory therapy (preferably with a proton pump inhibitor) given for four weeks. Patients with persistent symptoms should be referred for endoscopy. Surgery is indicated if complications develop or if the ulcer is unresponsive to medications. Bleeding is the most common indication for surgery. Administration of proton pump inhibitors and endoscopic therapy control most bleeds. Perforation and gastric outlet obstruction are rare but serious complications. Peritonitis is a surgical emergency requiring patient resuscitation; laparotomy and peritoneal toilet; omental patch placement; and, in selected patients, surgery for ulcer control.

  19. Peptic ulcer in hospital

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, H. Daintree

    1962-01-01

    This study corresponds to an estimated 142,250 admissions for peptic ulcer to the wards of National Health Service hospitals in England and Wales during the two years 1956 and 1957. It presents a picture of the incidence and mortality of complications and surgical treatment throughout England and Wales. PMID:14036965

  20. New molecules as drug candidates for the treatment of upper and lower GI tract ulcers.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Sandor; Tolstanova, Ganna

    2015-01-01

    Ulcers in the stomach, duodenum, ileum/jejunum and colon may look alike grossly and microscopically, but they have very different etiologies and pathogenesis. Unfortunately, there is virtually no etiologic treatment for any of these lesions which are also accompanied by limited or extensive inflammation. This article reviews four groups of new antiulcer drugs discovered and patented in our lab in Boston and Long Beach/Irvine (Table 1). Actually, the first group, pyrazole and its derivatives can be used for prevention, i.e., long lasting protection of gastric mucosa against alcohol- or NSAID-induced erosions. Dopamine seems to be a new etiologic treatment for both upper and lower GI tract ulcers. Angiogenic growth factors like bFGF or PDGF (daily administration as peptides orally or by rectal enemas, or as single or double-dose of gene therapy) accelerated the healing of gastroduodenal ulcers and UC, while VEGF seems to be effective only for upper GI tract ulcers. Last but not least, a novel group of angiogenic steroids which not only stimulate new blood vessel formation and granulation tissue production (essential elements of healing of ulcer types) but may also exert mild or prominent antiinflammatory action and seem to be ideal drugs for the treatment of IBD.

  1. Restless leg syndrome in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Grover, Aarti; Clark-Bilodeau, Courtney; D'Ambrosio, Carolyn M

    2015-09-01

    Restless leg syndrome, more recently renamed Willis-Ekbom disease, is a condition that disrupts sleep and occurs more frequently in the pregnant population. We present a 39-year-old woman with restless legs syndrome in the third trimester and discuss the epidemiology, pathophysiology and therapeutic options in the pregnant population while highlighting the challenges posed by the lack of safety data of approved drugs. PMID:27512466

  2. Is Helicobacter pylori Infection the Primary Cause of Duodenal Ulceration or a Secondary Factor? A Review of the Evidence.

    PubMed

    Kate, Vikram; Ananthakrishnan, N; Tovey, Frank I

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has a role in the multifactorial etiology of peptic ulcer disease. A link between H. pylori infection and duodenal ulcer disease is now established. Other contributing factors and their interaction with the organism may initiate the ulcerative process. The fact that eradication of H. pylori infection leads to a long-term cure in the majority of duodenal ulcer patients and the fact that the prevalence of infection is higher in ulcer patients than in the normal population are cogent arguments in favor of it being the primary cause of the ulceration. Against this concept there are issues that need explanation such as the reason why only a minority of infected persons develop duodenal ulceration when infection with H. pylori is widespread. There is evidence that H. pylori infection has been prevalent for several centuries, yet duodenal ulceration became common at the beginning of the twentieth century. The prevalence of duodenal ulceration is not higher in countries with a high prevalence of H. pylori infection. This paper debate puts forth the point of view of two groups of workers in this field whether H. pylori infection is the primary cause of duodenal ulcer disease or a secondary factor. PMID:23606834

  3. Restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Miletić, Vladimir; Relja, Maja

    2011-12-01

    Being of the most frequent causes of insomnia, which in the end leads to chronic fatigue, inadequate performance of daily activities, and serious disruption of quality of living, restless legs syndrome (RLS) is nowadays not only a serious medical problem but a socio-economical one as well. Prevalence of the disorder in general population is estimated at 5 to 15%. Family history is positive in over 50% of idiopathic RLS patients which points to genetic basis of the disorder. The characteristics of the secondary or acquired form of RLS are symptoms that start later in life as well as a rapid progression of the disease. On the other hand, idiopathic RLS more often starts at a younger age and the prognoses are better. Over twenty disorders and conditions are brought in connection with secondary RLS. Although the cause of primary RLS is still unknown, there is a strong connection between central metabolism of iron as well as dopamine levels and RLS manifestation. A differential diagnosis of RLS includes a wide specter of motor and sensory disorders. Diagnosis is based on clinical features and the history of disease. To correctly diagnose idiopathic RLS one must first eliminate secondary causes of RLS and then also exclude any disorders with clinical features that mimic those of RLS. It has been estimated that some 20 to 25% of patients need pharmacological therapy. Best initial therapy is the application of nonergot dopamine agonists. Anticonvulsants, benzodiazepines and opioides can be given to patients who are refractory to dopaminergic therapy, those suffering from RLS with emphasized painful sensory component and those with RLS connected with insomnia.

  4. Diabetes - foot ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... 33. Kim PJ, Steinberg JS. Complications of the diabetic foot. Endocrinol Metab Clin N Am. 2013;42:833-847. PMID: 24286952 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24286952 . Read More Diabetes Diabetes and nerve damage Leg or foot amputation Type 1 diabetes Type 2 diabetes Patient Instructions Diabetes and ...

  5. Differentiation of etiologic agents of bacterial keratitis from presentation characteristics.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Jeena; Srinivasan, Muthiah; Chen, Michael; Rajaraman, Revathi; Ravindran, Meenakshi; Lalitha, Prajna; Oldenburg, Catherine E; Ray, Kathryn J; Glidden, David V; Costanza, Stephanie; Lietman, Thomas M; Acharya, Nisha R

    2012-12-01

    Presenting characteristics of bacterial corneal ulcers may suggest particular causative organisms, helping to guide treatment decisions before cultures become available. In this study, we analyze the association between presentation demographic and clinical characteristics, using data collected as part of a randomized, controlled clinical trial. Data for this study were collected as part of the Steroids for Corneal Ulcers Trial, a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-masked trial. All patients had a culture-proven bacterial corneal ulcer. Patient history, clinical examination, and photography were performed in a standardized fashion at enrollment. Analysis of variance or Fisher's exact test was used to compare characteristics by organism. Univariate logistic regression was used to analyze predictors of the most common organisms. Five hundred patients were enrolled in the trial, of whom 488 were included in this analysis. The most common organism was Streptococcus pneumoniae (N = 248, 51 %) followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (N = 110, 23 %). Compared to other organisms, P. aeruginosa was significantly associated with a larger baseline infiltrate/scar size [odds ratio (OR) 1.6, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.4-1.8] and deeper infiltrate (OR 2.4, 95 % CI 1.5-3.8). S. pneumoniae was significantly associated with a smaller baseline infiltrate/scar size (OR 0.8, 95 % CI 0.7-0.9) and dacryocystitis (OR 7.3, 95 % CI 4.1-13.3). Nocardia spp. were significantly associated with longer duration of symptoms prior to presentation (OR 1.4, 95 % CI 1.2-1.6), more shallow infiltrate (OR 0.3, 95 % CI 0.2-0.5), and better baseline visual acuity (OR 0.4, 95 % CI 0.2-0.65). Staphylococcus spp. were less likely to be central in location (OR 0.16, 95 % CI 0.08-0.3). Baseline characteristics of bacterial ulcers may suggest the likely etiology and guide early management.

  6. An Etiological Model of Perfectionism

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, Gayle K.; Egan, Sarah J.; Kane, Robert T.; Rees, Clare S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Perfectionism has been recognized as a transdiagnostic factor that is relevant to anxiety disorders, eating disorders and depression. Despite the importance of perfectionism in psychopathology to date there has been no empirical test of an etiological model of perfectionism. Method The present study aimed to address the paucity of research on the etiology of perfectionism by developing and testing an etiological model using a sample of 311 clients seeking treatment. Results Structural equation modeling showed a direct relationship between high Parental Expectations and Criticism, and Perfectionism. There was also an indirect relationship between Parental Bonding and Perfectionism that was mediated by core schemas of disconnection and rejection. Finally, it was found that Neuroticism had both an indirect relationship, which was mediated by core schemas, and a direct relationship with perfectionism. Conclusions The study provided the first direct test of an etiological model of perfectionism to date. Clinical implications include investigating whether the inclusion of etiological factors in the understanding and treatment of perfectionism is effective. PMID:24787357

  7. Restless Legs Syndrome and Leg Motor Restlessness in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Hirata, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are important nonmotor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) that are associated with a negative impact on quality of life. Restless legs syndrome (RLS), which is characterized by an urge to move the legs accompanied by abnormal leg sensations, can coexist with PD, although the pathophysiology of these disorders appears to be different. RLS and PD both respond favorably to dopaminergic treatment, and several investigators have reported a significant relationship between RLS and PD. Sensory symptoms, pain, motor restlessness, akathisia, and the wearing-off phenomenon observed in PD should be differentiated from RLS. RLS in PD may be confounded by chronic dopaminergic treatment; thus, more studies are needed to investigate RLS in drug-naïve patients with PD. Recently, leg motor restlessness (LMR), which is characterized by an urge to move the legs that does not fulfill the diagnostic criteria for RLS, has been reported to be observed more frequently in de novo patients with PD than in age-matched healthy controls, suggesting that LMR may be a part of sensorimotor symptoms intrinsic to PD. In this paper, we provide an overview of RLS, LMR, and PD and of the relationships among these disorders. PMID:26504610

  8. Prolonged ulcerative laryngitis: a new disease entity.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Tzu-Yu

    2011-03-01

    Over the last decade, a new disease entity, prolonged ulcerative laryngitis (PUL), with unique clinical presentation and prolonged disease course, has been recognized. Until now, very few studies dealing with this disease have been reported in the literature. From 1999 to 2008, we analyzed clinical data from a series of 39 PUL patients who were treated with an observational approach without implementing specific treatments. This disease affects adults, predominantly females. The age of patients in our series ranged from 26 to 76 years with a median of 49.5 years. This disease is characterized by ulcers and signs of acute inflammation on the membranous portion of the vocal folds with a prolonged clinical course. The recovery times of patients ranged from 4 to 20 weeks with an average of 9.4 weeks. The data in this study may reflect a natural history of this disease. PUL seems to be a self-limited disease, but the etiology of this disease is unknown. Specific infections or systemic inflammatory processes involving the larynx must be ruled out before diagnosis, and conservative treatments are suggested.

  9. Management of Chronic Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) conducted a systematic review on interventions used to treat pressure ulcers in order to answer the following questions: Do currently available interventions for the treatment of pressure ulcers increase the healing rate of pressure ulcers compared with standard care, a placebo, or other similar interventions? Within each category of intervention, which one is most effective in promoting the healing of existing pressure ulcers? Background A pressure ulcer is a localized injury to the skin and/or underlying tissue usually over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in conjunction with shear and/or friction. Many areas of the body, especially the sacrum and the heel, are prone to the development of pressure ulcers. People with impaired mobility (e.g., stroke or spinal cord injury patients) are most vulnerable to pressure ulcers. Other factors that predispose people to pressure ulcer formation are poor nutrition, poor sensation, urinary and fecal incontinence, and poor overall physical and mental health. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in Ontario has been estimated to range from a median of 22.1% in community settings to a median of 29.9% in nonacute care facilities. Pressure ulcers have been shown to increase the risk of mortality among geriatric patients by

  10. A patient with foot ulcer and severe metabolic alkalosis.

    PubMed

    John, Ruby Samuel; Simoes, Sonia; Reddi, Alluru S

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of triple acid-base disorder with metabolic alkalosis as the primary disorder in a 65-year-old man due to ingestion and application to leg ulcers of baking soda (calcium bicarbonate). The blood pH was 7.65 with hypochloremia, hypokalemia, and prerenal azotemia. He was treated with isotonic saline with K replacement, and the patient improved without any adverse clinical consequences. We discuss the causes, mechanisms, and management of Cl-responsive (depletion) metabolic alkalosis. PMID:21185672

  11. A patient with foot ulcer and severe metabolic alkalosis.

    PubMed

    John, Ruby Samuel; Simoes, Sonia; Reddi, Alluru S

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of triple acid-base disorder with metabolic alkalosis as the primary disorder in a 65-year-old man due to ingestion and application to leg ulcers of baking soda (calcium bicarbonate). The blood pH was 7.65 with hypochloremia, hypokalemia, and prerenal azotemia. He was treated with isotonic saline with K replacement, and the patient improved without any adverse clinical consequences. We discuss the causes, mechanisms, and management of Cl-responsive (depletion) metabolic alkalosis.

  12. Contact vitiligo: etiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Singh, P; Singh, J; Agarwal, U S; Bhargava, R K

    2003-01-01

    Fifty patients of contact vitiligo were studied. Etiological agents of contact vitiligo were identified by clinical history, distribution of lesions and patch testing with suspected material. All patients were advised to avoid the suspected agent and treated with PUVASOL and topical steroid. Out of 50 patients (Male 8%, Female 92% age 14-60 years)., etiological agent of contact vitiligo was found to be sticking bindi alone in 24 (48%), while bindi along with other etiological agents were found to be purse, foot wear, plastic watch strap, lipstick and tooth paste in 14 (28%) cases. 14 (28%) patients also had disseminated lesions of vitiligo along with contact vitiligo. Positive reaction with patch testing was observed in 18 (36%) while depigmentation was seen in 4 (8%) cases. We observed that response of treatment was better in patients with shorter duration of disease while poor response was seen in patients with longer duration of disease. PMID:17642819

  13. Genetic parameters for claw health and feet and leg conformation traits in Finnish Ayrshire cows.

    PubMed

    Häggman, J; Juga, J; Sillanpää, M J; Thompson, R

    2013-04-01

    Genetic parameters for different claw disorders, overall claw health and feet and leg conformation traits were estimated for Finnish Ayrshire cows. The merged data set with records of claw health and feet and leg conformation traits consisted of 105,000 observations from 52,598 Finnish Ayrshire cows between 2000 and 2010. The binary claw health data and the linearly scored conformation data were analysed using an animal model and restricted maximum likelihood method by applying the statistical package ASReml. Binomial logistic models with mixed effects were used to estimate genetic parameters for sole haemorrhages, chronic laminitis, white-line separation, sole ulcer, interdigital dermatitis, heel horn erosion, digital dermatitis, corkscrew claw and overall claw health. Estimated heritabilities for different claw disorders using a binomial logistic model ranged from 0.01 to 0.20. Estimated heritability for overall claw health using a binomial logistic model was 0.08. Estimated heritabilities for feet and leg conformation traits ranged from 0.07 to 0.39. The genetic correlations between claw health and feet and leg conformation traits ranged from -0.40 to 0.42. All phenotypic correlations were close to zero. The moderate genetic correlation, together with higher heritability of feet and leg conformation traits, showed that RLSV (rear leg side view) is a useful indicator trait to be used together with claw trimming information to increase the accuracy of breeding values for claw health in genetic evaluation.

  14. Systematic Review and Operative Technique of Recalcitrant Pressure Ulcers Using a Fillet Flap Technique

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Venkat K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this article is to describe the indications, operative technique, outcomes, and systematic review of the literature on the reconstruction of patients with end-stage pressure ulcers using a fillet flap technique. In this technique, the femur, tibia, and fibula are removed from the thigh and leg, and the soft tissue is used as a pedicled, or free, myocutaneous flap for reconstruction. Long-term outcomes, salient surgical technique of flap elevation, and design are detailed for patients who had a fillet of leg flap for reconstruction of extensive pressure ulcers. Methods: The indications, surgical technique, and postoperative outcomes of 5 patients who had pedicled fillet flaps are reviewed including patient age, sex, underlying comorbidities, duration of paraplegia, operative technique, and complications. A systematic review of the literature was performed searching PubMed, Cochrane Database, and Medline with the following MeSH terms: pressure ulcer, pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, fillet flap, and fillet flap. Inclusion criteria were use of a fillet technique, article data on the number of reconstructions before fillet flap, complications, and English language. Results: Most of our patients were male 75% (n = 3) with an average age of 47.5 years, had been paralyzed for an average of 16 years, and had few medical comorbidities. Two patients (3 flaps) required hip disarticulation, 1 patient had a bilateral fillet flaps, and 3 patients had resection of tibia/fibula. After following patients for an average of 1.4 years (4 mo to 2 yr), complications were limited to 1 patient who had partial-thickness flap loss at the distal skin flap that healed by secondary intention and 1 patient who had ulcer recurrence because of noncompliance. Four articles met inclusion criteria for systematic review and 3 were excluded. Conclusions: The fillet of leg flap remains a useful and reliable method of reconstructing end-stage pressure ulcers. PMID:27622082

  15. Systematic Review and Operative Technique of Recalcitrant Pressure Ulcers Using a Fillet Flap Technique

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Venkat K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this article is to describe the indications, operative technique, outcomes, and systematic review of the literature on the reconstruction of patients with end-stage pressure ulcers using a fillet flap technique. In this technique, the femur, tibia, and fibula are removed from the thigh and leg, and the soft tissue is used as a pedicled, or free, myocutaneous flap for reconstruction. Long-term outcomes, salient surgical technique of flap elevation, and design are detailed for patients who had a fillet of leg flap for reconstruction of extensive pressure ulcers. Methods: The indications, surgical technique, and postoperative outcomes of 5 patients who had pedicled fillet flaps are reviewed including patient age, sex, underlying comorbidities, duration of paraplegia, operative technique, and complications. A systematic review of the literature was performed searching PubMed, Cochrane Database, and Medline with the following MeSH terms: pressure ulcer, pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, fillet flap, and fillet flap. Inclusion criteria were use of a fillet technique, article data on the number of reconstructions before fillet flap, complications, and English language. Results: Most of our patients were male 75% (n = 3) with an average age of 47.5 years, had been paralyzed for an average of 16 years, and had few medical comorbidities. Two patients (3 flaps) required hip disarticulation, 1 patient had a bilateral fillet flaps, and 3 patients had resection of tibia/fibula. After following patients for an average of 1.4 years (4 mo to 2 yr), complications were limited to 1 patient who had partial-thickness flap loss at the distal skin flap that healed by secondary intention and 1 patient who had ulcer recurrence because of noncompliance. Four articles met inclusion criteria for systematic review and 3 were excluded. Conclusions: The fillet of leg flap remains a useful and reliable method of reconstructing end-stage pressure ulcers.

  16. Infiltrating basal cell carcinoma in the setting of a venous ulcer.

    PubMed

    Lutz, M E; Davis, M D; Otley, C C

    2000-07-01

    A 77-year-old man was referred with a 5-year history of an intermittently painful, nonhealing right medial ankle ulcer. The ulcer had not responded to multiple treatment modalities, including Unna boots, compression therapy, sclerotherapy, and split-thickness skin grafting. The past medical history was significant for a deep venous thrombosis in the right leg 30 years earlier (treated with warfarin for 3 months) and a history of greater saphenous vein harvesting for coronary bypass grafting 28 years previously. After the vein stripping, the patient had suffered from increasing right leg edema and stasis changes in the right leg. His history was also remarkable for coronary artery disease, dyslipidemia, and lymphoma treated with chemotherapy 8 years before presentation, with no evidence of recurrence. He had stopped smoking approximately 20 years earlier. Medications included atenolol, simvastatin, nicardipine, nitroglycerin, and aspirin. Skin examination revealed a 3.0 x 3.5-cm ulcer adjacent to the medial malleolus. The edges of the ulcer appeared raised and rolled (Fig. 1). Centrally, there was granulation tissue, which appeared healthy. There were surrounding dermatitic changes. Dorsalis pedis and the posterior tibial pulses were normal. Noninvasive vascular studies revealed severe venous incompetence of the right popliteal and superficial veins. Arterial studies and transcutaneous oximetry were normal. Computed tomographic scan of the pelvis did not reveal any adenopathy, and radiographic imaging did not reveal any bony changes suggestive of osteomyelitis. Biopsy of the ulcer edge and base showed infiltrating basal cell carcinoma (Fig. 2). Mohs' micrographic surgery required three layers; the final extent of the ulcer was 7.8 x 6.9 cm. A split-thickness skin graft was placed.

  17. Management of ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Fell, John M; Muhammed, Rafeeq; Spray, Chris; Crook, Kay; Russell, Richard K

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) in children is increasing. The range of treatments available has also increased too but around 1 in 4 children still require surgery to control their disease. An up-to-date understanding of treatments is essential for all clinicians involved in the care of UC patients to ensure appropriate and timely treatment while minimising the risk of complications and side effects. PMID:26553909

  18. Chest neoplasms with infectious etiologies.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Carlos S; Chen, Melissa M; Martinez-Jimenez, Santiago; Carrillo, Jorge; Restrepo, Catalina

    2011-12-28

    A wide spectrum of thoracic tumors have known or suspected viral etiologies. Oncogenic viruses can be classified by the type of genomic material they contain. Neoplastic conditions found to have viral etiologies include post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease, lymphoid granulomatosis, Kaposi's sarcoma, Castleman's disease, recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, lung cancer, malignant mesothelioma, leukemia and lymphomas. Viruses involved in these conditions include Epstein-Barr virus, human herpes virus 8, human papillomavirus, Simian virus 40, human immunodeficiency virus, and Human T-lymphotropic virus. Imaging findings, epidemiology and mechanism of transmission for these diseases are reviewed in detail to gain a more thorough appreciation of disease pathophysiology for the chest radiologist.

  19. [Ulcerative colitis? Guidelines 2004].

    PubMed

    Siegmund, B; Zeitz, M

    2005-10-12

    Ulcerative colitis was first described in 1859 from Samuel Wilks, a physician at Guy's hospital in London. The prevalence in the high incidence areas ranges from 80 to 120/100.000/year. Ulcerative colitis is a chronic relapsing or chronic active disease which starts at the rectum and presents with a continuous inflammation. Primarily young adults are affected (20 to 40 years of age) but the disease may present at all ages, from younger than 1 year of life to the 80s. Many series show a secondary peak in incidence in the elderly. In the present review we will focus on the basic principles of the therapy with regard to the variety of disease manifestations. The therapeutic algorithms will be described separately for the induction of remission and the maintenance of remission. The localization of inflammation and disease activity represent crucial factors which have to be considered. With regard to these factors, the therapeutic regimens range from simple local therapy with aminosalicylates to systemic immunosuppressive therapy, which will in extreme cases require the administration of ciclosporin. Since ulcerative colitis is associated with an increased risk in developing colon carcinoma, medical therapy as well as endoscopic surveillance are fundamental in the prevention of carcinoma. In the end an outlook to future therapeutic targets and strategies will be provided. PMID:16245638

  20. Pipe crawler with extendable legs

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.

    1992-06-16

    A pipe crawler for moving through a pipe in inchworm fashion having front and rear leg assemblies separated by air cylinders to increase and decrease the spacing between assemblies. Each leg of the four legs of an assembly is moved between a wall-engaging, extended position and a retracted position by a separate air cylinder. The air cylinders of the leg assemblies are preferably arranged in pairs of oppositely directed cylinders with no pair lying in the same axial plane as another pair. Therefore, the cylinders can be as long as a leg assembly is wide and the crawler can crawl through sections of pipes where the diameter is twice that of other sections. The crawler carries a valving system, a manifold to distribute air supplied by a single umbilical air hose to the various air cylinders in a sequence controlled electrically by a controller. The crawler also utilizes a rolling mechanism, casters in this case, to reduce friction between the crawler and pipe wall thereby further extending the range of the pipe crawler. 8 figs.

  1. Pipe crawler with extendable legs

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, William T.

    1992-01-01

    A pipe crawler for moving through a pipe in inchworm fashion having front and rear leg assemblies separated by air cylinders to increase and decrease the spacing between assemblies. Each leg of the four legs of an assembly is moved between a wall-engaging, extended position and a retracted position by a separate air cylinder. The air cylinders of the leg assemblies are preferably arranged in pairs of oppositely directed cylinders with no pair lying in the same axial plane as another pair. Therefore, the cylinders can be as long a leg assembly is wide and the crawler can crawl through sections of pipes where the diameter is twice that of other sections. The crawler carries a valving system, a manifold to distribute air supplied by a single umbilical air hose to the various air cylinders in a sequence controlled electrically by a controller. The crawler also utilizes a rolling mechanism, casters in this case, to reduce friction between the crawler and pipe wall thereby further extending the range of the pipe crawler.

  2. Diagnosis, treatment, and outcome in patients with bleeding peptic ulcers and Helicobacter pylori infections.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ting-Chun; Lee, Chia-Long

    2014-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding is the most frequently encountered complication of peptic ulcer disease. Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) administration are two independent risk factors for UGI bleeding. Therefore, testing for and diagnosing Hp infection are essential for every patient with UGI hemorrhage. The presence of the infection is usually underestimated in cases of bleeding peptic ulcers. A rapid urease test (RUT), with or without histology, is usually the first test performed during endoscopy. If the initial diagnostic test is negative, a delayed (13)C-urea breath test (UBT) or serology should be performed. Once an infection is diagnosed, antibiotic treatment is advocated. Sufficient evidence supports the concept that Hp infection eradication can heal the ulcer and reduce the likelihood of rebleeding. With increased awareness of the effects of Hp infection, the etiologies of bleeding peptic ulcers have shifted to NSAID use, old age, and disease comorbidity.

  3. Perforation of the Peptic Ulcer Localized in the Proximal Jejunum - Case Report.

    PubMed

    Żyluk, Andrzej Ż; Szlosser, Zbigniew

    2016-09-01

    Non-traumatic perforation of the digestive tract occurs most often in the duodenum and stomach (peptic ulcer), as well as the colon (diverticulitis, cancer or ischemic lesions). Perforation of the small bowel is very rare. The Authors of the study presented a case of proximal jejunum perforation, which occurred in a patient with a history of duodenal peptic ulcer disease. Diagnosis posed no difficulties, and treatment included the excision of the ulceration and suturing of the bowel. The patient recovered without complications and the histological examination failed to reveal the nature of the ulcer. However, based on the medical history, one may suppose that it might be of peptic etiology, which makes this case exceptional. PMID:27648623

  4. Perforation of the Peptic Ulcer Localized in the Proximal Jejunum - Case Report.

    PubMed

    Żyluk, Andrzej Ż; Szlosser, Zbigniew

    2016-09-01

    Non-traumatic perforation of the digestive tract occurs most often in the duodenum and stomach (peptic ulcer), as well as the colon (diverticulitis, cancer or ischemic lesions). Perforation of the small bowel is very rare. The Authors of the study presented a case of proximal jejunum perforation, which occurred in a patient with a history of duodenal peptic ulcer disease. Diagnosis posed no difficulties, and treatment included the excision of the ulceration and suturing of the bowel. The patient recovered without complications and the histological examination failed to reveal the nature of the ulcer. However, based on the medical history, one may suppose that it might be of peptic etiology, which makes this case exceptional.

  5. [Hyperkeratotic Kaposi sarcoma with leg lymphoedema after prolonged corticosteroid therapy for SLE. Case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Fagone, S; Cavaleri, A; Camuto, M; Iannello, S; Belfiore, F

    2001-06-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a malignant vascular neoplasia with a viral etiology, characterized by development of multiple hyperpigmentate lesions, primarily at cutaneous level with associated edema and ulcerations, but frequently involving also the mucous membranes and/or visceral organs. In this study, we describe (in the light of the relevant literature) the clinical case of an elderly (78 yrs-old) woman, who developed red-blues multiple hyperkeratotic nodules in the right leg and foot with marked lymphoedema, blushing and pain, after a long period of a low-dose corticosteroid therapy for LES (at least 10 years of continuous treatment). The diagnosis of KS was made on the basis of histologic findings. The patient HLA-typing showed the haplotypes HLA-A2-10, -B21-35, -Bw4-6, -Cw4 and HLA-DR11-13 (some of which are known to predispose to LES, but not to KS). The KS, first described by Moritz Kaposi in 1872, has been a very rare pathology until the 80s, afterwards its frequency has steadly increased, favored by immunosuppressive therapy for autoimmune diseases or tranplants and by immunodepression of AIDS. Concerning the pathogenesis, it is crucial the role of HHV-8 of the herpesvirus family (found in the lesions and in the circulating cells of all KS patients), for which a prevailing sexual transmission is postulated. General physicians and specialists of internal medicine and angiology should know this disease, which can be undiagnosed because of the low incidence in the general population and the consequent poor knowledge of this vascular neoplastic disease, which is now reported with increasing frequency. PMID:11404728

  6. Radiation of anginal pain to the legs.

    PubMed

    Kolettis, M T; Kalogeropoulos, C K; Tzannetis, G C; Vitakis, S K; Xaplanteris, P P; Novas, I A

    1986-02-01

    Pain radiated from the chest to one or both legs (17 cases), or from the legs to the chest (two cases) in 19 patients with angina or acute myocardial infarction. The leg pain was assumed to be related to the angina pectoris when both were of a similar character and occurred together, when the leg pain occurred at rest, and when there were normal peripheral pulses in the leg. Pain was felt in the left leg by 10 patients, the right leg by two patients, and in both legs by seven. Three patients experienced pain in the thigh(s), six in the shin(s), and 10 had pain in both. In six patients the pain extended down to the inner two to four toes. The pain was always felt in front of the legs. This distribution accords with the suggestion that some sensory cardiac nerve fibres occur in the lumbar sympathetic ganglia and that pain is projected into the corresponding dermatomes.

  7. Pressure ulcer management: the importance of nutrition.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, M; Cook, A; Rimmasch, H; Bender, S; Voss, A

    2000-08-01

    Nutrition plays an important role in pressure ulcer prevention and treatment. Nutrition assessment techniques and nutritional interventions for patients at risk for developing a pressure ulcer or who currently have pressure ulcers are essential components of quality patient care.

  8. Prometheus Hot Leg Piping Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Gribik, Anastasia M.; DiLorenzo, Peter A.

    2007-01-30

    The Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommended the development of a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton energy conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for NASA's Project Prometheus. The section of piping between the reactor outlet and turbine inlet, designated as the hot leg piping, required unique design features to allow the use of a nickel superalloy rather than a refractory metal as the pressure boundary. The NRPCT evaluated a variety of hot leg piping concepts for performance relative to SNPP system parameters, manufacturability, material considerations, and comparison to past high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) practice. Manufacturability challenges and the impact of pressure drop and turbine entrance temperature reduction on cycle efficiency were discriminators between the piping concepts. This paper summarizes the NRPCT hot leg piping evaluation, presents the concept recommended, and summarizes developmental issues for the recommended concept.

  9. Promethus Hot Leg Piping Concept

    SciTech Connect

    AM Girbik; PA Dilorenzo

    2006-01-24

    The Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommended the development of a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton energy conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for NASA's Project Prometheus. The section of piping between the reactor outlet and turbine inlet, designated as the hot leg piping, required unique design features to allow the use of a nickel superalloy rather than a refractory metal as the pressure boundary. The NRPCT evaluated a variety of hot leg piping concepts for performance relative to SNPP system parameters, manufacturability, material considerations, and comparison to past high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) practice. Manufacturability challenges and the impact of pressure drop and turbine entrance temperature reduction on cycle efficiency were discriminators between the piping concepts. This paper summarizes the NRPCT hot leg piping evaluation, presents the concept recommended, and summarizes developmental issues for the recommended concept.

  10. Intramuscular pressures beneath elastic and inelastic leggings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Ballard, R. E.; Breit, G. A.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Leg compression devices have been used extensively by patients to combat chronic venous insufficiency and by astronauts to counteract orthostatic intolerance following spaceflight. However, the effects of elastic and inelastic leggings on the calf muscle pump have not been compared. The purpose of this study was to compare in normal subjects the effects of elastic and inelastic compression on leg intramuscular pressure (IMP), an objective index of calf muscle pump function. IMP in soleus and tibialis anterior muscles was measured with transducer-tipped catheters. Surface compression between each legging and the skin was recorded with an air bladder. Subjects were studied under three conditions: (1) control (no legging), (2) elastic legging, and (3) inelastic legging. Pressure data were recorded for each condition during recumbency, sitting, standing, walking, and running. Elastic leggings applied significantly greater surface compression during recumbency (20 +/- 1 mm Hg, mean +/- SE) than inelastic leggings (13 +/- 2 mm Hg). During recumbency, elastic leggings produced significantly higher soleus IMP of 25 +/- 1 mm Hg and tibialis anterior IMP of 28 +/- 1 mm Hg compared to 17 +/- 1 mm Hg and 20 +/- 2 mm Hg, respectively, generated by inelastic leggings and 8 +/- 1 mm Hg and 11 +/- 1 mm Hg, respectively, without leggings. During sitting, walking, and running, however, peak IMPs generated in the muscular compartments by elastic and inelastic leggings were similar. Our results suggest that elastic leg compression applied over a long period in the recumbent posture may impede microcirculation and jeopardize tissue viability.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  11. Etiology of Depression in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Shirley J.; Markham, Ramona A.

    2005-01-01

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is experienced by a significant proportion of youth today, occurring at an earlier age than found in previous generations. Major Depressive Disorder can produce long-lasting detrimental effects on a child's life, which raises the question of etiology. Three areas were examined for evidence identifying specific…

  12. Etiological aspects of double monsters.

    PubMed

    Jaschevatzky, O E; Goldman, B; Kampf, D; Wexler, H; Grünstein, S

    1980-06-01

    Four cases of double monsters are reported, including a rare case of craniofacial duplication (diprosopus). Based on the findings observed, etiological factors of these malformations are discussed. We suggest that exogenous (environmental) factors such as habits, way of life or religious practices of certain populations can influence the development of double monsters.

  13. Risk factors of recurrent aphthous ulceration among university students.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liuxia; Wan, Kuan; Tan, Mengmeng; Yin, Guifang; Ge, Mengkai; Rao, Xiaoqian; He, Lianping; Jin, Yuelong; Yao, Yingshui

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous ulceration (RAU) is a common oral mucosal disease. The etiological involves in genetics, vitamin deficiencies, trauma, immune dysfunction and stress. This study was to explore the related risk factors of recurrent aphthous ulceration (RAU) among college students, and provide basis for further research. We conducted a questionnaire survey among students from three colleges in Wuhu by stratified cluster sampling. The information collected includes general demographic characteristics, dietary habits and so on. The overall prevalence of RAU is 23.30% among college students (23.23% in male and 23.39% in female). There are statistical significance in prevalence of RAU between subjects with RAU and without RAU (P<0.05) the prevalence of RAU in different grade, age, adequate brushing time, good brushing habits, wear dentures or braces, other oral disease, eat barbecue, adequate exercise time is statistic difference. According to the result of multinomial logistic regression analysis, the risk of recurrent aphthous ulceration factors including grade, inadequate brushing time. Tempering was a protective factor of RAU. Some measure should be taken to control dental ulcer, which consist of promoting a correct way of living habits, paying attention to the health conscious diet, strengthen physical exercise, self-decompression and keeping good mentality. PMID:26131228

  14. Acute genital ulcers in nonsexually active young girls: case series, review of the literature, and evaluation and management recommendations.

    PubMed

    Rosman, Ilana S; Berk, David R; Bayliss, Susan J; White, Andrew J; Merritt, Diane F

    2012-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers rarely occur in nonsexually active young girls. When present, they can cause significant physical and emotional distress for the patient and her parents, and prompt an evaluation for sexual abuse and sexually transmitted diseases. With this review, we aim to further characterize acute genital ulcers in nonsexually active young girls by reviewing the medical records of patients with this disorder and to offer an approach to the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of acute genital ulcers based on our understanding and knowledge of this condition. We retrospectively review our understanding and knowledge of acute genital ulcers in nonsexually active girls at a pediatric hospital. A review of the recent literature on acute genital ulcers and a multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of acute genital ulcers are also presented. Twelve patients presented with acute genital ulcers, 11 of which were hospitalized for evaluation and pain management. Extensive work-up failed to reveal a specific infectious or autoimmune etiology in all but one patient, who was diagnosed with acute mycoplasma pneumonia. Acute genital ulcers in nonsexually active young girls likely represent a form of idiopathic vulvar aphthosis. Evaluation of a first episode of acute genital ulcers with mild prodromal symptoms should be limited. Treatment consists primarily of supportive care and symptom relief.

  15. Is There an Association between Restless Legs Syndrome and Urticaria?

    PubMed

    Tuna, Serpil; Alan, Sevil; Samancı, Nehir; Karakaş, Ayşe Akman

    2016-05-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a disease characterized by the urge to move the legs and sleep disturbances. Similarly, chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) is a dermatological disease characterized by pruritus and sleep disorders. In this study, we aimed to determine the prevalence and severity of RLS in patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) and to compare the quality of sleep of patients with and without RLS in the CSU group using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. A total of 130 patients with CSU and 100 healthy controls were included in this study. The frequency of RLS, frequency of sleep disturbances, and average score of RLS in patients with CSU were statistically significantly higher than control groups (respectively P = 0.008, P = 0.009, P = 0.004). Subjective sleep quality, sleep latency and habitual sleep efficiency scores in patients with RLS were statistically significantly higher than patients without RLS (respectively P = 0.016, P = 0.007, P = 0.035). We claimed that pruritus of urticaria may decrease the quality of sleep in patients with RLS and it may trigger and worsen the restless legs syndrome. Furthermore, RLS and CSU may share a common etiology. PMID:27134503

  16. Other Causes of Leg Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the same position for a long time Injuries caused by: A torn or overstretched muscle (strain) Hairline crack in the bone (stress fracture) Inflamed tendon (tendinitis) Shin splints—pain in the front of your leg related to overuse or repetitive pounding Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) , which occurs when ...

  17. Etiology, pathophysiology and classifications of the diabetic Charcot foot

    PubMed Central

    Papanas, Nikolaos; Maltezos, Efstratios

    2013-01-01

    In people with diabetes mellitus, the Charcot foot is a specific manifestation of peripheral neuropathy that may involve autonomic neuropathy with high blood flow to the foot, leading to increased bone resorption. It may also involve peripheral somatic polyneuropathy with loss of protective sensation and high risk of unrecognized acute or chronic minor trauma. In both cases, there is excess local inflammatory response to foot injury, resulting in local osteoporosis. In the Charcot foot, the acute and chronic phases have been described. The former is characterized by local erythema, edema, and marked temperature elevation, while pain is not a prominent symptom. In the latter, signs of inflammation gradually recede and deformities may develop, increasing the risk of foot ulceration. The most common anatomical classification describes five patterns, according to the localization of bone and joint pathology. This review article aims to provide a brief overview of the diabetic Charcot foot in terms of etiology, pathophysiology, and classification. PMID:23705058

  18. Perioral dermatitis: etiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Bendl, B J

    1976-05-01

    Ninety-five patients with perioral dermatitis were studied from an epidemiological aspect. Consistent clearing of the eruption was obtained with oral tetracycline in combination with a topical sodium sulfacetamide-sulfur-hydro-cortisone lotion. Comparison of the study group of patients to a group of 50 control patients revealed highly significant quantitative differences in the cosmetic preparations used by the two groups. This latter finding would suggest that lubricating and moisturizing products play some part in the etiology of perioral dermatitis.

  19. Perforated peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Søreide, Kjetil; Thorsen, Kenneth; Harrison, Ewen M; Bingener, Juliane; Møller, Morten H; Ohene-Yeboah, Michael; Søreide, Jon Arne

    2015-09-26

    Perforated peptic ulcer is a common emergency condition worldwide, with associated mortality rates of up to 30%. A scarcity of high-quality studies about the condition limits the knowledge base for clinical decision making, but a few published randomised trials are available. Although Helicobacter pylori and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are common causes, demographic differences in age, sex, perforation location, and underlying causes exist between countries, and mortality rates also vary. Clinical prediction rules are used, but accuracy varies with study population. Early surgery, either by laparoscopic or open repair, and proper sepsis management are essential for good outcome. Selected patients can be managed non-operatively or with novel endoscopic approaches, but validation of such methods in trials is needed. Quality of care, sepsis care bundles, and postoperative monitoring need further assessment. Adequate trials with low risk of bias are urgently needed to provide better evidence. We summarise the evidence for perforated peptic ulcer management and identify directions for future clinical research.

  20. THE ETIOLOGY OF BACTERIAL VAGINOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Turovskiy, Yevgeniy; Noll, Katia Sutyak; Chikindas, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal infection among women of childbearing age. This condition is notorious for causing severe complications related to the reproductive health of women. Five decades of intense research established many risk factors for acquisition of BV, however due to the complexity of BV and due to lack of a reliable animal model for this condition, its exact etiology remains elusive. In this manuscript we use a historical perspective to critically review the development of major theories on the etiology of BV, ultimately implicating BV-related pathogens, healthy vaginal microbiota, bacteriophages and the immune response of the host. None of these theories on their own can reliably explain the epidemiological data. Instead, BV is caused by a complex interaction of multiple factors, which include the numerous components of the vaginal microbial ecosystem and their human host. Many of these factors are yet to be characterized because a clear understanding of their relative contribution to the etiology of BV is pivotal to formulation of an effective treatment for and prophylaxis of this condition. PMID:21332897

  1. The one-leg standing radiograph

    PubMed Central

    Naratrikun, K.; Kanitnate, S.; Sangkomkamhang, T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare the joint space width between one-leg and both-legs standing radiographs in order to diagnose a primary osteoarthritis of the knee. Methods Digital radiographs of 100 medial osteoarthritic knees in 50 patients were performed. The patients had undergone one-leg standing anteroposterior (AP) views by standing on the affected leg while a both-legs standing AP view was undertaken while standing on both legs. The severity of the osteoarthritis was evaluated using the joint space width and Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) radiographic classification. The t-test was used for statistical analysis. Results The mean medial joint space width found in the one-leg and in the both-legs standing view were measured at 1.8 mm and 2.4 mm, respectively (p < 0.001, 95% CI 0.5 to 0.7). 33%, 47.4% and 23.1% of the knees diagnosed with a KL grade of I, II and III in the both-legs standing views were changed to KL grade II, III and IV in the one-leg standing views, respectively. No changes for KL IV osteoarthritis diagnoses have been found between both- and one-leg standing views. Conclusions One-leg standing radiographs better represent joint space width than both-legs standing radiographs. 32% of both-legs standing radiographs have changed the KL grading to a more severe grade than that in the one-leg standing radiographs. Cite this article: P. Pinsornsak, K. Naratrikun, S. Kanitnate, T. Sangkomkamhang. The one-leg standing radiograph: An improved technique to evaluate the severity of knee osteoarthritis. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:436–441. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.59.BJR-2016-0049.R1. PMID:27683299

  2. Effects of weekly LED therapy at 625 nm on the treatment of chronic lower ulcers.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Cláudia Patrícia Cardoso Martins; de Paula Ramos, Solange; Gobbi, Cynthia A A; Shigaki, Leonardo; Kashimoto, Roberto K; Venâncio, Emerson José; de Oliveira Toginho Filho, Dari; Castaldin, André G; Felinto, Alan S; Silva, Francisco Pereira; Silva, Ricardo B; Dias, Ivan Frederico Lupiano

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of LED therapy associated with compression therapy on chronic venous leg ulcers (CVUs). The study included CVU patients (n = 17, eight men) who were eligible for Unna's boot treatment. Ulcers were treated on a weekly basis with either LED therapy (625 nm, 4 J/cm(2)) and an Unna's boot (LED ulcers, n = 14) or a placebo treatment and an Unna's boot (control ulcers, n = 14). The total surface area of the ulcers, the relative ulcer area, and the healing rate were recorded over a period of 30 weeks. Ulcer exudates were collected for determination of local tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) levels. The total area was not significantly different between the LED and control ulcers (P > 0.05, Mann-Whitney U test) throughout the study. However, the relative area indicated that non-healing treatment resistant ulcers (n = 6) persisted in the control group after 19 weeks (P < 0.05, Mann-Whitney U Test). No differences in median healing rate were observed (hazard ratio 0.89, CI 95%: 0.40-1.98) between LED (15 weeks) and control ulcers (19.5 weeks). No differences in TNF-α levels were detected (P > 0.05, Mann-Whitney U test). The results suggest that LED therapy improved the effectiveness of the Unna's boot since no refractory ulcer was observed in the LED group after 19 weeks. However, LED therapy did not alter the local secretion of TNF-α nor accelerate wound healing.

  3. Assessing the effect of chronic oedema with associated ulceration.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Megan

    2015-10-01

    Chronic oedema is a common problem in the UK and, given the country's ageing population, the numbers are predicted to rise. In an epidemiological study carried out in Derby, England, researchers found the prevalence of chronic oedema to be 3.99 in every 1000 people, with the prevalence increasing to 10.31 in those aged 65-74 years. Often, patients with untreated chronic oedema will develop an ulceration that can lead to further costs and hospital admissions. The cost of treating chronic wounds has been estimated at £2.3 billion-£3.1 billion a year. It is therefore surprising that given the number of patients living with these problems, there is still a lack of knowledge and skill among nurses when assessing patients with chronic oedema and associated ulceration. This article offers advice for nurses when assessing leg ulcers in patients with chronic oedema, detailing the visual skin changes most frequently seen in these patients. The article also discusses some of the treatment options available, briefly covering the advantages and disadvantages of each option.

  4. Common Questions About Pressure Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Raetz, Jaqueline G M; Wick, Keren H

    2015-11-15

    Patients with limited mobility due to physical or cognitive impairment are at risk of pressure ulcers. Primary care physicians should examine at-risk patients because pressure ulcers are often missed in inpatient, outpatient, and long-term care settings. High-risk patients should use advanced static support surfaces to prevent pressure ulcers and air-fluidized beds to treat pressure ulcers. Physicians should document the size and clinical features of ulcers. Cleansing should be done with saline or tap water, while avoiding caustic agents, such as hydrogen peroxide. Dressings should promote a moist, but not wet, wound healing environment. The presence of infection is determined through clinical judgment; if uncertain, a tissue biopsy should be performed. New or worsening pain may indicate infection of a pressure ulcer. When treating patients with pressure ulcers, it is important to keep in mind the patient's psychological, behavioral, and cognitive status. The patient's social, financial, and caregiver resources, as well as goals and long-term prognosis, should also be considered in the treatment plan. PMID:26554282

  5. Stromal vascularization prevents corneal ulceration.

    PubMed

    Conn, H; Berman, M; Kenyon, K; Langer, R; Gage, J

    1980-04-01

    Experiments were performed with a model of focal, thermal-induced ulceration to test the clinical impression that vascularization prevents ulceration of the corneal stroma. Slow-release polymers containing a vasoproliferase agent (tumor angiogenesis factor) were placed in corneal pockets 2 mm central to the limbus of albino rabbits. These polymers elicited blood vessel ingrowth up to the implant. Control eyes received empty polymers which caused minimal to no vessel growth. Polymers were removed, and each cornea received a focal, thermal burn placed just central to the polymer site. All control corneas ulcerated: most (79%) developed deep stromal or perforating ulcers. Only 25% of prevascularized corneas developed stromal ulcers, and none was deep or perforating. After thermal burns, vessels in both groups grew at the same linear rate toward the burned area. There was a direct relationship between the distance separating the nearest blood vessel and the burned area at the time of burning and the maximum depth of stromal ulceration. Thus prevention of or less severe stromal ulceration is correlated with the earlier presence of vessels in the burned area.

  6. Characterization of mucosa-associated bacterial communities in abomasal ulcers by pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Hund, Alexandra; Dzieciol, Monika; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Wittek, Thomas

    2015-05-15

    Abomasal ulcers are important pathological alterations of the gastrointestinal tract in cattle and are exceptionally hard to diagnose in vivo. The microbiome of the abomasum in cattle with or without ulcers has hardly been studied to date, and if so, the studies used culture-dependent methods. In the present study, the bacterial communities associated with abomasal ulcers of slaughter cows, bulls, and calves in Austria were described using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Sequences were clustered into 10,459 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), affiliating to 28 phyla with Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Tenericutes dominating (96.4% of all reads). The most abundant genera belonged to Helicobacter, Acetobacter, Lactobacillus, and novel Mycoplasma-like phylotypes. Significant differences between the microbial communities of healthy and ulcerated calves compared to cows and bulls could be observed. However, only few statistically significant differences in the abundances of certain OTUs between healthy and ulcerated abomasal mucosa were found. Additionally, near full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences of the most abundant phylotypes were obtained by cloning and Sanger sequencing (n=88). In conclusion, our results allow the first deep insights into the composition of abomasal mucosal bacterial communities in cattle and describe a hitherto unknown high diversity and species richness of abomasal bacteria in cattle. Our results suggest that bacteria may have only limited involvement in the etiology of abomasal ulcers. However, future research will be needed to verify the contribution of bacteria to abomasal ulcer formation as presence or absence of bacteria does not necessarily correlate with etiology of disease. PMID:25770891

  7. [THERAPEUTIC GUIDE IN VENOUS ULCERS].

    PubMed

    López Herranz, Marta; Bas Caro, Pedro; García Jábega, Rosa Ma; García Carmona, Francisco Javier; Villalta García, Pedro; Postigo Mota, Salvador

    2014-11-01

    The treatment of venous ulcers and wounds in general, is a complex and important public health problem, with personal effects, family and health, without addressing the economic impact includes assistance, care of patients with ulcerative lesions. The increase in life expectancy, driven by improved socio-sanitary conditions that this aging population, facilitates the emergence of chronic diseases may be complicated by the presence of skin ulcers. There is no doubt that the best way to treat a skin ulcer is avoiding to occur, hence the importance of early diagnosis and risk factors act alone them. In relation to venous ulcers is crucial, provide local treatment, act on the cause, because if not, relapse is the norm in this type of injury. Currently, the moist wound healing, is an important step in solving earlier of these chronic wounds. This has meant that the pharmaceutical industry has been involved in researching and creating different types of dressings, having specific activity at different stages of venous ulcer healing, ie inflammatory phase, proliferative and remodeling. The proliferation of these products has been increasing over the years, not surprisingly, are described therapeutic 12 families that are applied in the management, care of these injuries. The fact of existing therapeutic options highlights the ineffectiveness of these products individually. Therefore, the nurse will not forget that the optimal treatment of venous ulcers, necessarily involves choosing the right product for every type and stage of the lesion. In this decision process, strongly influenced by the specific characteristics of each patient and injury, the nurse will take into account a lot of factors when choosing the product, not forgetting that an ulcer is not cured with a single therapeutic element, several products being used throughout the process to evolutionary venous ulcer until complete resolution.

  8. Treatment of restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ferini-Strambi, Luigi; Manconi, Mauro

    2009-12-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common condition characterized by an urge to move the legs, accompanied by uncomfortable or unpleasant sensations. Symptoms predominantly occur at rest in the evening or at night, and they are alleviated by moving the affected extremity or by walking. Recent European epidemiological studies reported an overall prevalence of RLS up to 10%, with a female preponderance. The prevalence rates reported in south-eastern Europe are lower, as are those in Asiatic populations. Although the aetiopathogenesis of RLS is still unknown, the rapid and dramatic improvement of RLS with dopaminergic compounds suggests a dopaminergic system dysfunction as the basic mechanism. Extensive data are available for l-dopa and dopamine receptor agonists, especially for pramipexole and ropinirole. Pharmacological treatment should be limited to those patients who suffer from clinically relevant RLS with impaired sleep quality or quality of life. Treatment on demand is a clinical need in RLS cases that present intermittent symptoms. PMID:20123560

  9. Targinact for restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    Idiopathic restless legs syndrome (RLS)--also known as Willis-Ekbom disease--is a neurological condition characterised by an overwhelming urge to move the legs, occurring during rest or inactivity, especially at night. Symptoms are highly variable in frequency and severity, and can affect sleep and quality of life. First-line management includes addressing precipitating or aggravating factors and providing explanation, reassurance and advice on self-help strategies. Drug therapy (e.g. a dopamine agonist) is used for patients with more severe symptoms. In December 2014, the marketing authorisation for a modified-release preparation containing oxycodone and naloxone (Targinact-Napp Pharmaceuticals) was expanded to include use in the treatment of severe to very severe RLS after failure of dopaminergic therapy.(10)Here we review the management of adults with RLS, including the place of oxycodone/naloxone. PMID:27079737

  10. [Golimumab Therapy in Ulcerative Colitis].

    PubMed

    Moon, Won

    2016-02-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory condition of the colon, characterized by diffuse mucosal inflammation and blood-mixed diarrhea. The main treatment has been 5-aminosalicylic acid, steroid, thiopurine, and anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) antibodies including infliximab, adalimumab, and golimumab. Golimumab, a new anti-TNF-α agent has been recently approved for patients with moderate to severe ulcerative colitis. Its efficacy and safety has been demonstrated in line with infliximab and adalimumab in preclinical and clinical studies. This review will focus on golimumab therapy in ulcerative colitis.

  11. Leg ischemia post-varicocelectomy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Wahbi, Abdullah M; Elmoukaied, Shaza

    2016-01-01

    Varicocelectomy is the most commonly performed operation for the treatment of male infertility. Many surgical approaches are used as each of them has advantages over the other and is preferred by surgeons. Vascular injury has never been reported as a complication of varicocelectomy apart from testicular artery injury. We present a 36-year-old male who developed leg ischemia post-varicocelectomy due to common femoral artery injury. He was successfully treated by using a vein graft. PMID:27022305

  12. [Psychological differences between ulcer and non-ulcer dyspeptic patients].

    PubMed

    Slepoy, V; Pezzotto, S; Pedrana, R; Gatto, A; Poletto, L

    1994-01-01

    The existence of differences in the psychological profile of 39 endoscopically evaluated patients with ulcer (U) and non ulcer (NU) dyspepsia were examined. There were 21 U and 18 NU subjects. Cigarette smoking, intake of alcohol, coffee, mate, aspirin and NSAID were recorded, but there were no significant differences between the two groups. Personality traits were determined by the Rorschach Test, considering psychological profile (introversive, extroversive, self-restrained), impulse and emotion control (do not allow their expression, impulsive, adequately conveyed) and level of social adaptation (low, normal, high). U and NU subjects experienced a similar number of potentially stressful life events. However, U patients perceived their events more negatively. Although no one type of "ulcer personality" was found consistently, ulcer patients tended to be more introversive and they had a better social adaptation than NU.

  13. Ulcerative Colitis in Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Rukunuzzaman, Md; Karim, A. S. M. Bazlul

    2011-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic idiopathic inflammatory disorder of colon. Frequency of UC is gradually increasing over few years worldwide. Prevalence is 35 to 100/100 000 people in USA, 1% of them are infants. UC develops in a genetically predisposed individual with altered intestinal immune response. An eight-month-old girl presented with loose bloody stool, growth failure, and moderate pallor. The girl was diagnosed as a case of UC by colonoscopy and biopsy. Treatment was thereafter started with immunosuppressive drugs. After initial induction therapy with parenteral steroid and infliximab, the patient is now on remission with azathioprine and mesalamine. UC is rare in Bangladesh, especially in children, and it is rarer during infancy. Several conditions like infective colitis, allergic colitis, Meckel's diverticulitis, Crohn's disease, etc. may mimic the features of UC. So, if a child presents with recurrent bloody diarrhea, UC should be considered as differential diagnosis. PMID:22064342

  14. Population-Level Evidence for an Autoimmune Etiology of Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Mei-Sing; Kohane, Isaac; Cai, Tianxi; Gorman, Mark P.; Mandl, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Importance Epilepsy is a debilitating condition, often with neither a known etiology nor an effective treatment. Autoimmune mechanisms have been increasingly identified. Objective To conduct a population-level study investigating the relationship between epilepsy and several common autoimmune diseases. Design, Setting, and Participant A retrospective population-based study using claims from a nation-wide employer-provided health insurance plan in the United States. Subjects were beneficiaries enrolled between 1999 and 2006 (n= 2,518,034). Main Outcomes and Measures We examined the relationship between epilepsy and 12 autoimmune diseases: type 1 diabetes, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, Graves’ disease, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid syndrome, Sjögren’s syndrome, myasthenia gravis and celiac disease. Results The risk of epilepsy is significantly heightened among patients with autoimmune diseases (OR 3.8, 95% CI 3.6–4.0, P<0.001), and is especially pronounced in children (OR 5.2, 95% CI 4.1–6.5; P<0.001). Elevated risk is consistently observed across all 12 autoimmune diseases. Conclusions and Relevance Epilepsy and AD frequently co-occur and patients with either condition should undergo surveillance for the other. The potential role of autoimmunity must be given due consideration in epilepsy, so we are not overlooking a treatable etiology. PMID:24687183

  15. Urine-drainage leg bags: an overview.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mary

    This article looks at leg bags from the perspective of the clinical guidance available, published research, review papers, the diverse nature of products available, and their use with catheters, sheaths or urinals. The part that leg bags play in catheter-associated urinary tract infection control is addressed. Other aspects of catheter safety are discussed, including the avoidance of catheter traction. Variations in leg-bag structure including bag size, inlet tubing, tap, connector and backing, along with the reasons for selecting a particular leg bag are considered, along with the choice of either leg-bag straps or sleeves. The article concludes that, as a result of the variation of leg bags available, patients may require assistance and support from health professionals in finding the right leg bag for them.

  16. Pressure ulcer prevention in the community setting.

    PubMed

    Jones, Donna

    Pressure ulcers are associated with reduced quality of life, affecting individuals physically, socially and emotionally. The financial cost to the NHS of preventing and treating such ulcers is substantial. Although largely preventable, pressure ulcers are still common. The Department of Health is committed to eliminating all avoidable pressure ulcers in NHS-provided care. This article explores methods of preventing pressure ulcers, with particular focus on risk assessment, skin inspection, pressure-relieving measures, nutrition and hydration, and patient and carer education.

  17. Intrathoracic neoplasia: Epidemiology and etiology

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1992-05-01

    Neoplasms of the thorax encompass those derived from the thoracic wall, trachea, mediastinum, lungs and pleura. They represent a wide variety of lesions including benign and malignant tumors arising from many tissues. The large surface area, 60 to 90 m{sup 2} in man, represented by the respiratory epithelium and associated thoracic structures are ideal targets for carcinogens carried by inspired air. The topic of discussion in this report is the epidemiology, etiology, and mechanisms of spontaneous intrathoracic neoplasia in animals and man. Much of what we know or suspect about thoracic neoplasia in animals has been extrapolated from experimentally-induced neoplasms.

  18. Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease: is Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis the common villain?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium, subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) causes a chronic disease of the intestines in dairy cows and a wide range of other animals, including nonhuman primates, called Johne's ("Yo-knee's") disease. MAP has been consistently identified by a variety of techniques in humans with Crohn's disease. The research investigating the presence of MAP in patients with Crohn's disease has often identified MAP in the "negative" ulcerative colitis controls as well, suggesting that ulcerative colitis is also caused by MAP. Like other infectious diseases, dose, route of infection, age, sex and genes influence whether an individual infected with MAP develops ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. The apparently opposite role of smoking, increasing the risk of Crohn's disease while decreasing the risk of ulcerative colitis, is explained by a more careful review of the literature that reveals smoking causes an increase in both diseases but switches the phenotype from ulcerative colitis to Crohn's disease. MAP as the sole etiologic agent of both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease explains their common epidemiology, geographic distribution and familial and sporadic clusters, providing a unified hypothesis for the prevention and cure of the no longer "idiopathic" inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:21167058

  19. Nutritional prediction of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Breslow, R A; Bergstrom, N

    1994-11-01

    This article focuses on nutritional risk factors that predict the development of pressure ulcers in hospital and nursing home patients. Cross-sectional studies associate inadequate energy and protein intake; underweight; low triceps skinfold measurement; and low serum albumin, low serum cholesterol, and low hemoglobin levels with pressure ulcers. Prospective studies identify inadequate energy and protein intake, a poor score on the Braden scale (a risk assessment instrument that includes a nutrition component), and possibly low serum albumin level as risk factors for developing a pressure ulcer. Nutritionists should provide a high-energy, high-protein diet for patients at risk of development of pressure ulcers to improve their dietary intake and nutritional status.

  20. [Surgical treatment of peptic ulcer].

    PubMed

    Hurtado-Andrade, Humberto

    2003-01-01

    Despite a decreasing number of operations for ulcer, there are many patients who require definitive treatment. If an operation is required for duodenal ulcer, vagotomy of some type is part of the treatment, and in gastric ulcer resection with or without vagotomy is required. Extended proximal gastric vagotomy can be performed in the majority of patients, excluding those who are unstable or have severe concomitant diseases. In cases of urgent surgery for hemorrhage or perforation, the surgical procedure must be selected individually. Although the role of traditional operations is well established, there is increasing interest in laparoscopic approaches. However, because there is a diminishing of elective surgery for ulcer, it is unlikely that these new procedures may be evaluated as operations were evaluated in the past.

  1. [Pedophilia: etiology, diagnostics and therapy].

    PubMed

    Fromberger, P; Jordan, K; Müller, J L

    2013-09-01

    Child sexual abuse is one of the most destructive events for healthy child development. Following psychiatric classification systems, pedophilia must be distinguished from child sexual abuse. Approximately only one half of all child abusers fulfill the diagnostic criteria for pedophilia which is defined as a persistent or dominating sexual preference for prepubescent children characterized by persistent thoughts, fantasies, urges, sexual arousal or behavior. This article describes the diagnostic criteria and potential differential diagnoses as well as epidemiological and etiological findings. From an etiological point of view multifactorial mechanisms are currently considered to be responsible especially genetic factors, learning theoretical and neurobiological factors. Psychotherapeutic and pharmaceutical treatment options will be discussed. According to the current state of knowledge cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy is the method of choice in the treatment of pedophilia and has demonstrated positive treatment effects in meta-analyses regarding relapse prevention. Medicinal treatment of pedophilia is only indicated for severe forms of pedophilia. Important aspects of risk management in the treatment of pedophilia and aspects which must be considered in the forensic psychiatric assessment are presented.

  2. Translational control in cancer etiology.

    PubMed

    Ruggero, Davide

    2013-02-01

    The link between perturbations in translational control and cancer etiology is becoming a primary focus in cancer research. It has now been established that genetic alterations in several components of the translational apparatus underlie spontaneous cancers as well as an entire class of inherited syndromes known as "ribosomopathies" associated with increased cancer susceptibility. These discoveries have illuminated the importance of deregulations in translational control to very specific cellular processes that contribute to cancer etiology. In addition, a growing body of evidence supports the view that deregulation of translational control is a common mechanism by which diverse oncogenic pathways promote cellular transformation and tumor development. Indeed, activation of these key oncogenic pathways induces rapid and dramatic translational reprogramming both by increasing overall protein synthesis and by modulating specific mRNA networks. These translational changes promote cellular transformation, impacting almost every phase of tumor development. This paradigm represents a new frontier in the multihit model of cancer formation and offers significant promise for innovative cancer therapies. Current research, in conjunction with cutting edge technologies, will further enable us to explore novel mechanisms of translational control, functionally identify translationally controlled mRNA groups, and unravel their impact on cellular transformation and tumorigenesis.

  3. Translational control in cancer etiology.

    PubMed

    Ruggero, Davide

    2013-02-01

    The link between perturbations in translational control and cancer etiology is becoming a primary focus in cancer research. It has now been established that genetic alterations in several components of the translational apparatus underlie spontaneous cancers as well as an entire class of inherited syndromes known as "ribosomopathies" associated with increased cancer susceptibility. These discoveries have illuminated the importance of deregulations in translational control to very specific cellular processes that contribute to cancer etiology. In addition, a growing body of evidence supports the view that deregulation of translational control is a common mechanism by which diverse oncogenic pathways promote cellular transformation and tumor development. Indeed, activation of these key oncogenic pathways induces rapid and dramatic translational reprogramming both by increasing overall protein synthesis and by modulating specific mRNA networks. These translational changes promote cellular transformation, impacting almost every phase of tumor development. This paradigm represents a new frontier in the multihit model of cancer formation and offers significant promise for innovative cancer therapies. Current research, in conjunction with cutting edge technologies, will further enable us to explore novel mechanisms of translational control, functionally identify translationally controlled mRNA groups, and unravel their impact on cellular transformation and tumorigenesis. PMID:22767671

  4. Static one-legged balance in soccer players during use of a lifted leg.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Shigeki; Demura, Shinichi; Nagasawa, Yoshinori

    2010-08-01

    The goal was to describe static one-legged balance during use of a lifted leg and to compare balance between the dominant and nondominant legs of soccer players. Participants were 17 male soccer players and 17 untrained male students (control). Balance ability was evaluated with four sway measures: sway velocity, anterior-posterior sway, medial-lateral sway, and high-frequency sway. Soccer players had smaller magnitude mean anterior-posterior and medial-lateral sway than untrained students. Although mean sway velocity and anterior-posterior sway were higher with the dominant leg than in the nondominant leg of the control group, there was no significant difference on any sway factor between the two legs of the soccer group. In conclusion, the soccer players were observed to have superior static one-legged balance during use of a lifted leg, and there is no difference in balance for the two legs in the soccer group.

  5. Characterization of running with compliant curved legs.

    PubMed

    Jun, Jae-Yun; Clark, Jonathan E

    2015-07-07

    Running with compliant curved legs involves the progression of the center of pressure, the changes of both the leg's stiffness and effective rest length, and the shift of the location of the maximum stress point along the leg. These phenomena are product of the geometric and material properties of these legs, and the rolling motion produced during stance. We examine these aspects with several reduced-order dynamical models to relate the leg's design parameters (such as normalized foot radius, leg's effective stiffness, location of the maximum stress point and leg shape) to running performance (such as robustness and efficiency). By using these models, we show that running with compliant curved legs can be more efficient, robust with fast recovery behavior from perturbations than running with compliant straight legs. Moreover, the running performance can be further improved by tuning these design parameters in the context of running with rolling. The results shown in this work may serve as potential guidance for future compliant curved leg designs that may further improve the running performance.

  6. Disabling pansclerotic morphea of childhood poses a high risk of chronic ulceration of the skin and squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Buslau, Michael; Heinig, Birgit; Petrov, Ivailo; Unger, Eleonore; Kyriopoulou, Eugenia; Koch, André; Köstler, Erich; Schönlebe, Jaqueline; Haroske, Gunther; Doede, Thorsten; Pramatarov, Kyrill

    2007-12-01

    Disabling pansclerotic morphea of childhood (DPMC) is a rare and severe variant of scleroderma. This report presents 3 cases that presented to the authors and studies 25 patients from the literature (English language only) for the presence of chronic nonhealing ulcers of skin and skin cancer. The authors identified a total of 30 patients (9 male and 21 female) aged between 1 and 37 years at time of presentation. All cases were less than 14 years old when the disease started. The majority of patients had an aggressive course with deep sclerotic lesions leading to joint contractures and immobility. Five patients suffered from chronic nonhealing leg ulcers (17%), but ulcers were present on other parts of the body (upper limbs, trunk, head) as well (n = 6). Four patients died because of complications of the disease such as sepsis or gangrene. Two patients developed a squamous cell carcinoma at the age of 16 years and 19 years, respectively (6.7%). The available treatment of DMPC-associated ulcers is unsatisfying. Only temporary improvements have been seen in a minority of patients. We report on marked improvement of chronic leg ulcers by a combination of sildenafil 3 x 20 mg/day and repeated application of a porcine small intestinal submucosal acellular matrix. PMID:18048875

  7. Endoscopic Obliteration for Bleeding Peptic Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Zawadzki, J.J. J.; Gajda, A.G. G.; Kamiński, P. Ł.; Lembas, L.; Bielecki, K.

    1997-01-01

    A group of 133 patients treated for bleeding peptic ulcer in our Department, is reviewed. Within several hours of admission, all patients underwent upper gastrointestinal tract gastroscopy and obliteration of the bleeding ulcer. Bleeding gastric ulcers were found in 41 patients, and duodenal ulcers in 92 patients. Patients were classified according to the Forrest scale: IA – 11 patients, IB – 49 patients, IIA – 35 patients, lIB – 40 patients. In 126 (94.7%) patients the bleeding was stopped, and 7 required urgent surgery: 3 patients with gastric ulcer underwent gastrectomy, and 4 with duodenal ulcer – truncal vagotomy with pyloroplasty and had the bleeding site underpinned. Fifty-five patients underwent elective surgery: gastrectomy and vagotomy (18 patients with gastric ulcer), highly selective vagotomy (25 patients with duodenal ulcer) and truncal vagotomy and pyloroplasty (12 patients with duodenal ulcer). None of the patients was observed to have recurrent bleeding. PMID:18493453

  8. Management of Chronic Pressure Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary In April 2008, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began an evidence-based review of the literature concerning pressure ulcers. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/tech/tech_mn.html to review these titles that are currently available within the Pressure Ulcers series. Pressure ulcer prevention: an evidence based analysis The cost-effectiveness of prevention strategies for pressure ulcers in long-term care homes in Ontario: projections of the Ontario Pressure Ulcer Model (field evaluation) Management of chronic pressure ulcers: an evidence-based analysis Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) conducted a systematic review on interventions used to treat pressure ulcers in order to answer the following questions: Do currently available interventions for the treatment of pressure ulcers increase the healing rate of pressure ulcers compared with standard care, a placebo, or other similar interventions? Within each category of intervention, which one is most effective in promoting the healing of existing pressure ulcers? Background A pressure ulcer is a localized injury to the skin and/or underlying tissue usually over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in conjunction with shear and/or friction. Many areas of the body, especially the sacrum and the heel, are prone to the development of pressure ulcers. People with impaired mobility (e.g., stroke or spinal cord injury patients) are most vulnerable to pressure ulcers. Other factors that predispose people to pressure ulcer formation are poor nutrition, poor sensation, urinary and fecal incontinence, and poor overall physical and mental health. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in Ontario has been estimated to range from a median of 22.1% in community settings to a median of 29.9% in nonacute care facilities. Pressure ulcers have been shown to increase the risk of mortality among geriatric patients by

  9. [Etiological factors of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Spicák, J

    2002-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis develops immediately after the causative impulse, while chronic pancreatitis develops after the long-term action of the noxious agent. A typical representative of acute pancreatitis is biliary pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis develops in alcoholism and has a long latency. As alcoholic pancreatitis is manifested at first as a rule by a potent attack, it is classified in this stage as acute pancreatitis. The most frequent etiological factors in our civilization are thus cholelithiasis and alcoholism (both account for 20-50% in different studies). The assumed pathogenetic principles in acute biliary pancreatitis are the common canal of both efferent ducts above the obturated papilla, duodenopancreatic reflux and intrapancreatic hypertension. A detailed interpretation is however lacking. The pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis is more complicated. Among others some part is played by changes in the calcium concentration and fusion of cellular membranes. Idiopathic pancreatitis occurs in up to 10%, part of the are due to undiagnosed alcoholism and cholelithiasis. Other etiologies are exceptional. Similarly as in cholelithiasis pancreatitis develops also during other pathological processes in the area of the papilla of Vater such as dysfunction of the sphincter of Oddi, ampulloma and juxtapapillary diverticulum, it is however usually mild. The incidence of postoperative pancreatitis is declining. Its lethality is 30% and the diagnosis is difficult. In the pathogenesis changes of the ion concentration are involved, hypoxia and mechanical disorders of the integrity of the gland. Pancreatitis develops in association with other infections--frequently in mumps, rarely in hepatitis, tuberculosis, typhoid and mycoses. Viral pancreatitis is usually mild. In parasitoses pancreatitis develops due to a block of the papilla Vateri. In hyperparathyroidism chronic pancreatitis is more likely to develop, recent data are lacking. As to dyslipoproteinaemias

  10. Chronic leg pain in athletes.

    PubMed

    Burrus, M Tyrrell; Werner, Brian C; Starman, Jim S; Gwathmey, F Winston; Carson, Eric W; Wilder, Robert P; Diduch, David R

    2015-06-01

    Chronic leg pain is commonly treated by orthopaedic surgeons who take care of athletes. The sources are varied and include the more commonly encountered medial tibial stress syndrome, chronic exertional compartment syndrome, stress fracture, popliteal artery entrapment syndrome, nerve entrapment, Achilles tightness, deep vein thrombosis, and complex regional pain syndrome. Owing to overlapping physical examination findings, an assortment of imaging and other diagnostic modalities are employed to distinguish among the diagnoses to guide the appropriate management. Although most of these chronic problems are treated nonsurgically, some patients require operative intervention. For each condition listed above, the pathophysiology, diagnosis, management option, and outcomes are discussed in turn. PMID:25157051

  11. Nonoxynol-9 use, genital ulcers, and HIV infection in a cohort of sex workers.

    PubMed

    Weir, S S; Roddy, R E; Zekeng, L; Feldblum, P J

    1995-04-01

    To determine whether nonoxynol-9 produces disruption of the genital epithelium and, in turn, places users of this spermicide at increased risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), 273 seronegative female commercial sex workers in Cameroon were enrolled in a 12-month cohort study. Subjects were instructed to use condoms and 100 mg nonoxynol-9 suppositories at each act of intercourse and to maintain coital logs. The presence or absence of vaginal and cervical ulcers was recorded at monthly gynecologic examinations; HIV testing was performed every three months. Included in the final analysis were the 191 women with no cervical ulcers at baseline. Of these, 77 (40%) were classified as frequent (15 times/month) nonoxynol-9 users, 84 (44%) as intermediate (11-15 times/month) users, and 30 (16%) as infrequent (10 or fewer times/month) users. 40 women had evidence of cervical ulceration during the observation period and 18 developed vaginal ulcerations. Unexpectedly, nonoxynol-9 use was not associated with an increased risk of ulceration. The incidence rates for cervical and vaginal ulcers, respectively, were 2.7% and 0.6% among frequent users, 2.2% and 0.8% among intermediate users, and 9.0% and 3.0% among infrequent users. Of the 17 women who became infected with HIV during the study, 29% had experienced ulceration compared to a rate of 28% for matched controls (odds ratio, 1.1; 95% confidence interval, 0.3-3.5). It is speculated that nonoxynol-9 provides sufficient lubrication during intercourse to prevent epithelial trauma. It is further plausible that any ulcers caused by nonoxynol-9--as opposed to those of infectious etiology--lack the immunologic cell responses required to increase susceptibility to HIV.

  12. [Acute vulvar ulcer of Lipschütz: a misdiagnosis entity].

    PubMed

    Levy Bencheton, A; Agostini, A; Mortier, I; Sadoun, C; Gamerre, M

    2011-03-01

    Acute vulvar ulcer or Lipschütz ulcer has been described in 1917 [1]. Clinical pattern is characterized by a prodromic period, with hyperthermia, malaise, headache, odynophagia, myalgia and cough before the apparition of vulvar localization. Vulvar ulcer is classically deep, painful, necrotic, with edema and adenopathy in an adolescent or young woman without any previous sexual contact. Epstein-Barr Virus is the first etiology, but some authors have suggested other infections. Differential diagnosis has to be made with other sexually transmitted pathology, Behçet disease and Crohn disease. Gynecologist and dermatologist should be aware of this diagnosis to avoid unconscionable treatment and reassure patient and family about sexual transmission.

  13. Microvascular injury in persistent gastric ulcers after yttrium-90 microsphere radioembolization for liver malignancies.

    PubMed

    Sun, Belinda; Lapetino, Shawn R; Diffalha, Sameer A L; Yong, Sherri; Gaba, Ron C; Bui, James T; Koppe, Sean; Garzon, Steven; Guzman, Grace

    2016-04-01

    Yttrium-90 microsphere radioembolization ((90)Y MRE) is a therapy for liver malignancies by permanently implanting (90)Y-containing microspheres into tumors via hepatic artery. The etiology of persistent gastric ulcerations in patients presenting months after treatment remains unclear. Three patients who presented with gastric ulceration 4 to 13 months after (90)Y MRE were examined by esophagogastroduodenoscopy and biopsies. Pathological examinations showed multiple (90)Y microspheres scattered within the lamina propria and submucosa. Most of the microspheres were distributed in a linear fashion, consistent with an intravascular location; however, the vascular lumen and endothelial cells were not present. The microspheres were surrounded by fibrotic tissue infiltrated by chronic inflammatory cells and rare neutrophils. Epithelial granulation without pititis and miniaturized glands with intervening fibrosis were noted, compatible with chronic ischemic changes. These findings suggest that the persistent gastric ulceration is a result of localized ischemic injury in response to (90)Y MRE-induced vascular damage.

  14. Etiological diagnosis of pericardial effusion.

    PubMed

    Levy, Pierre-Yves; Habib, Gilbert; Collart, Fréderic; Lepidi, Hubert; Raoult, Didier

    2006-08-01

    Detection and treatment of pericarditis remains a challenging problem and the etiology is unknown in 40-85% of cases. As a result, a large proportion of cases are labeled idiopathic pericarditis. The advent of echocardiography, an accurate noninvasive method for the detection of effusion, has clarified the definition from pericarditis to pericardial effusion, which is a standardized and clear entity. A systematic approach to diagnostic testing based on standardized practice guidelines has been proposed. This strategy has led to a decrease in the number of cases classified as idiopathic and to the identification of treatable conditions. Percutaneous pericardiocentesis, guided by fluoroscopy or echocardiography, can now be carried out safely and rapidly and has also allowed the intrapericardial instillation of drugs, representing a new treatment strategy. The inclusion of flexible pericardioscopy, immunohistochemistry and contemporary molecular biology tools has improved the diagnostic value of the biopsy.

  15. Pseudomelanosis Duodeni of Undetermined Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Samit S.; Shah, Dharmesh K.; Khot, Amol A.; T, Narendran R.; Gharat, Amit R.; Rathi, Pravin M.

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomelanosis duodeni is a rare, benign condition of unknown etiology. It is characterized by collection of pigment-laden macrophages in the tips of duodenal villi. The pigment, originally interpreted as melanin, pseudomelanin, lipomelanin or hemosiderin, has now been demonstrated to be mostly ferrous sulfide. There is a strong association with chronic renal failure, arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus and the use of medications such as ferrous sulfate, hydralazine, propranolol, hydrochlorothiazide and furosemide. We reported a case of a 48 years old female who only had dyspeptic symptoms and no history of hypertension or drug history. Laboratory tests showed normal serum electrolytes and renal function. On endoscopy we found multiple tiny brownish-black pigmentation throughout proximal duodenum. Histopathological examination showed mild inflammation in lamina propria with haemosiderin-laden macrophages. Stain for iron was positive and that for melanin was negative.

  16. Penile ulcer as a specific clinical manifestation of Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia*

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Cláudia Cardoso de Macedo; Bressa, José Antônio Nascimento; Mendes, Fernanda; Roncada, Eduardo Vinicius Mendes; Monteiro, Rodrigo; Abreu, Marilda Aparecida Milanez Morgado

    2016-01-01

    Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia is considered a lymphoma by the World Health Organization. Cutaneous lesions, particularly of a specific type, are rare occurring in 5% of patients. What draws attention in this case is the unusual cutaneous clinical manifestation and its location on the genitals, which has not been described in researched literature, therefore imposing differential diagnosis with other etiologies of genital ulcers. PMID:27192528

  17. Muscle hernias of the leg: A case report and comprehensive review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jesse T; Nguyen, Jenny L; Wheatley, Michael J; Nguyen, Tuan A

    2013-01-01

    A case involving a retired, elderly male war veteran with a symptomatic peroneus brevis muscle hernia causing superficial peroneal nerve compression with chosen surgical management is presented. Symptomatic muscle hernias of the extremities occur most commonly in the leg and are a rare cause of chronic leg pain. Historically, treating military surgeons pioneered the early documentation of leg hernias observed in active military recruits. A focal fascial defect can cause a muscle to herniate, forming a variable palpable subcutaneous mass, and causing pain and potentially neuropathic symptoms with nerve involvement. While the true incidence is not known, the etiology has been classified as secondary to a congenital (or constitutional) fascial weakness, or acquired fascial defect, usually secondary to direct or indirect trauma. The highest occurrence is believed to be in young, physically active males. Involvement of the tibialis anterior is most common, although other muscles have been reported. Dynamic ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging is often used to confirm diagnosis and guide treatment. Most symptomatic cases respond successfully to conservative treatment, with surgery reserved for refractory cases. A variety of surgical techniques have been described, ranging from fasciotomy to anatomical repair of the fascial defect, with no consensus on optimal treatment. Clinicians must remember to consider muscle hernias in their repertoire of differential diagnoses for chronic leg pain or neuropathy. A comprehensive review of muscle hernias of the leg is presented to highlight their history, occurrence, presentation, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24497767

  18. Perforated peptic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Søreide, Kjetil; Thorsen, Kenneth; Harrison, Ewen M.; Bingener, Juliane; Møller, Morten H.; Ohene-Yeboah, Michael; Søreide, Jon Arne

    2015-01-01

    Summary Perforated peptic ulcer (PPU) is a frequent emergency condition worldwide with associated mortality up to 30%. A paucity of studies on PPU limits the knowledge base for clinical decision-making, but a few randomised trials are available. While Helicobacter pylori and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are frequent causes of PPU, demographic differences in age, gender, perforation location and aetiology exist between countries, as do mortality rates. Clinical prediction rules are used, but accuracy varies with study population. Early surgery, either by laparoscopic or open repair, and proper sepsis management are essential for good outcome. Selected patients can perhaps be managed non-operatively or with novel endoscopic approaches, but validation in trials is needed. Quality of care, sepsis care-bundles and postoperative monitoring need further evaluation. Adequate trials with low risk of bias are urgently needed for better evidence. Here we summarize the evidence for PPU management and identify directions for future clinical research. PMID:26460663

  19. The Legs Problem--For All Ages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Way, Jenni

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an example of a versatile multi-solution problem that can be used right across the primary years. The basic problem is: "Noah saw 16 legs go past him into the Ark. How many creatures did he see?" Any even number can be used, although, 2 legs allows only one answer and with 16 legs there are already 14 different solutions, so…

  20. [Controversies over heel pressure ulcers].

    PubMed

    Rueda López, J

    2013-02-01

    Article whose content was exposed in the workshops of the GNEAUPP Congress, held in Seville in November2012, and which refers to ulcers by pressure on the heels as a location exposed to the analysis. A pressure ulcer is a lesion located in skin I underlying tissue usually over a bone prominence, as a result of the pressure, or pressure in combination with the shears. A number of contributing factors or confounding factors are also associated with ulcers by pressure; the importance of these factors still not been elucidated. The heels are next to the sacred area, parts of the body that most frequently presents ulcers by pressure, The importance of the predisposing factors for ulcers in the sacral area as humidity has been studied in recent years, but in heels, remains one of the most important locations in the extremities, which entails adverse outcomes such as amputation in persons with comorbid diseases like Diabetes Mellitus (DM). The incidence of ulcers on heels in patients with DM and without it, is approximately 19-32%. Everything and be a problem associated with elderly people and chronic pathologies, in acute patients are a problem that this underrated, but not devoid of controversy. In hospitals of treble in 2006, the NPUAP encrypted the incidence of UPPin heels in a 43%; in one systematic review conducted by Reddy et al. (2006) puts revealed that 60% of pressure ulcers is produced. The problem of the UPP in heels is present in all the areas of intervention and particularly in paediatric units intensive care, where the first localization it is the occipital area followed by the heels.

  1. Peptic ulcer as a risk factor for postherpetic neuralgia in adult patients with herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jen-Yin; Lan, Kuo-Mao; Sheu, Ming-Jen; Tseng, Su-Feng; Weng, Shih-Feng; Hu, Miao-Lin

    2015-02-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia is the most common complication of herpes zoster. Identifying predictors for postherpetic neuralgia may help physicians screen herpes zoster patients at risk of postherpetic neuralgia and undertake preventive strategies. Peptic ulcer has been linked to immunological dysfunctions and malnutrition, both of which are predictors of postherpetic neuralgia. The aim of this retrospective case-control study was to determine whether adult herpes zoster patients with peptic ulcer were at greater risk of postherpetic neuralgia. Adult zoster patients without postherpetic neuralgia and postherpetic neuralgia patients were automatically selected from a medical center's electronic database using herpes zoster/postherpetic neuralgia ICD-9 codes supported with inclusion and exclusion criteria. Consequently, medical record review was performed to validate the diagnostic codes and all pertaining data including peptic ulcer, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and ulcerogenic medications. Because no standard pain intensity measurement exists, opioid usage was used as a proxy measurement for moderate to severe pain. In total, 410 zoster patients without postherpetic neuralgia and 115 postherpetic neuralgia patients were included. Multivariate logistic regressions identified 60 years of age and older, peptic ulcer and greater acute herpetic pain as independent predictors for postherpetic neuralgia. Among etiologies of peptic ulcer, H. pylori infection and usage of non-selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were significantly associated with the increased risk of postherpetic neuralgia; conversely, other etiologies were not significantly associated with the postherpetic neuralgia risk. In conclusion, 60 years of age and older, peptic ulcer and greater acute herpetic pain are independent predictors for postherpetic neuralgia in adult herpes zoster patients.

  2. Space Elevator Base Leg Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swan, C.; Swan, P. A.

    While the Space Elevator stretches for 104,000 kilometers, the region of most concern, from the survival perspective, is 2,500 kms and below. The threats inside this dangerous arena include debris, spacecraft, meteorites, lightening, winds, rogue waves, aircraft, and intentional human acts. Two major questions will be addressed that will influence the overall systems architecture of a Space Elevator. While the deployment phase of the development of the Space Elevator will only have a single ribbon from the surface of the Earth to well beyond the Geosynchronous altitude, a mature Space Elevator must never allow a complete sever of the system. Design approaches, materials selections, international policy development and assembly must ensure that the integrity of the Space Elevator be maintained. The trade space analysis will address the probability of an individual ribbon being severed, the length of time to repair, and the potential for a catastrophic Space Elevator cut. The architecture proposed for the base leg portion will address two questions: Shall there be multiple base legs to 2,500 kms altitude? And Should the anchor be based on land or at sea?

  3. Leg automaticity is stronger than arm automaticity during simultaneous arm and leg cycling.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Masanori; Tazoe, Toshiki; Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Endoh, Takashi; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi

    2014-04-01

    Recent studies indicate that human locomotion is quadrupedal in nature. An automatic rhythm-generating system is thought to play a crucial role in controlling arm and leg movements. In the present study, we attempted to elucidate differences between intrinsic arm and leg automaticity by investigating cadence variability during simultaneous arm and leg (AL) cycling. Participants performed AL cycling with visual feedback of arm or leg cadence. Participants were asked to focus their attention to match the predetermined cadence; this affects the automaticity of the rhythm-generating system. Leg cadence variability was only mildly affected when the participants intended to precisely adjust either their arm or leg cycling cadence to a predetermined value. In contrast, arm cadence variability significantly increased when the participants adjusted their leg cycling cadence to a predetermined value. These findings suggest that different neural mechanisms underlie the automaticities of arm and leg cycling and that the latter is stronger than the former during AL cycling.

  4. Intra-arterial intervention chemotherapy for sarcoma and cancerous ulcer via an implanted pump.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng; Cui, Qiu; Guo, Jun; Li, Dingfeng; Zeng, Yanjun

    2014-04-01

    To observe the efficacy of intra-arterial chemotherapy with subcutaneously implanted pump for soft tissue sarcoma in extremities and cancerous ulcer. 31 patients with ulcerative skin squamous cell carcinoma or sarcoma in extremities who received treatment during the period from July 2003 to November 2011 at our hospital were recruited, including 15 male and 16 female patients, aging between 14 and 83 with average age of 49 years old. 10 patients had tumor in upper extremities and 21 patients in lower extremities. The pathological types of studied cases include 9 cases with skin squamous cell carcinoma, 6 cases with synovial sarcoma, 5 cases with malignant fibrous histiocytoma, 3 cases with liposarcoma, 3 cases with osteosarcoma, 2 cases with malignant melanoma, 2 cases with epidermoid sarcoma, and 1 case with protuberans. The main symptoms of cancerous ulcer were pain, infection and hemorrhage; All the studied patients were administrated with cisplatin and doxorubicin by intra-arterial chemotherapy pump, and the patients with squamous cell carcinoma were additionally applied with bleomycin and patients with malignant melanoma were additionally applied with dacarbazine. The chemotherapy efficiency was observed after at 3 cycles of intra-arterial chemotherapy. The total remission rate of pain (RR) was 87 %, and total remission rate of ulcer cicatrization (RR) was 71 %, with ulcer cicatrizing spontaneously in 9 cases and obvious homeostasis in 5 cases with bleeding ulcers. 19 patients underwent surgery after chemotherapy, in which 16 cases had limb-salvage surgery and 3 cases underwent lower leg amputation after chemotherapy, and 3 patients out of 16 cases had local recurrence (19 %). The subcutaneous intra-arterial targeting chemotherapy could be applied to treat refractory sarcoma and cancerous ulcer in extremities to significantly increase the chemotherapeutic concentration at tumor area so as to effectively constrain the tumor rupture induced main symptoms

  5. Potassium Channelopathies and Gastrointestinal Ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jaeyong; Lee, Seung Hun; Giebisch, Gerhard; Wang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Potassium channels and transporters maintain potassium homeostasis and play significant roles in several different biological actions via potassium ion regulation. In previous decades, the key revelations that potassium channels and transporters are involved in the production of gastric acid and the regulation of secretion in the stomach have been recognized. Drugs used to treat peptic ulceration are often potassium transporter inhibitors. It has also been reported that potassium channels are involved in ulcerative colitis. Direct toxicity to the intestines from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been associated with altered potassium channel activities. Several reports have indicated that the long-term use of the antianginal drug Nicorandil, an adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel opener, increases the chances of ulceration and perforation from the oral to anal regions throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Several of these drug features provide further insights into the role of potassium channels in the occurrence of ulceration in the GI tract. The purpose of this review is to investigate whether potassium channelopathies are involved in the mechanisms responsible for ulceration that occurs throughout the GI tract. PMID:27784845

  6. The Relationship among Leg Strength, Leg Power and Alpine Skiing Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gettman, Larry R.; Huckel, Jack R.

    The purpose of this study was to relate leg strength and power to alpine skiing success as measured by FIS points. Isometric leg strength was represented by the knee extension test described by Clarke. Leg power was measured by the vertical jump test and the Margaria-Kalamen stair run. Results in the strength and power tests were correlated with…

  7. Geographic Disparities in the Etiology of Bacterial and Fungal Keratitis in the United States of America.

    PubMed

    Estopinal, Christopher B; Ewald, Mark D

    2016-01-01

    Infectious keratitis is a serious cause of vision loss. Proper treatment of infectious keratitis requires antimicrobials that target the organism responsible for a patient's ulcer. The frequency of infection by a given organism varies by location. We examined the literature to determine geographic disparities in the etiology of bacterial and fungal keratitis in the United States of America. Bacterial keratitis makes up a greater proportion of cases in northern locations, and fungal keratitis increases in prevalence in southern locations. Gram-negative organisms make up a greater proportion of bacterial keratitis in southern locations when compared to northern locations.

  8. Running with a load increases leg stiffness.

    PubMed

    Silder, Amy; Besier, Thor; Delp, Scott L

    2015-04-13

    Spring-mass models have been used to characterize running mechanics and leg stiffness in a variety of conditions, yet it remains unknown how running while carrying a load affects running mechanics and leg stiffness. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that running with a load increases leg stiffness. Twenty-seven subjects ran at a constant speed on a force-measuring treadmill while carrying no load, and while wearing weight vests loaded with 10%, 20%, and 30% of body weight. We measured lower extremity motion and created a scaled musculoskeletal model of each subject, which we used to estimate lower extremity joint angles and leg length. We estimated dimensionless leg stiffness as the ratio of the peak vertical ground reaction force (normalized to body weight) and the change in stance phase leg length (normalized to leg length at initial foot contact). Leg length was calculated as the distance from the center of the pelvis to the center-of-pressure under the foot. We found that dimensionless leg stiffness increased when running with load (p=0.001); this resulted from an increase in the peak vertical ground reaction force (p<0.001) and a smaller change in stance phase leg length (p=0.025). When running with load, subjects had longer ground contact times (p<0.020), greater hip (p<0.001) and knee flexion (p=0.048) at the time of initial foot contact, and greater peak stance phase hip, knee, and ankle flexion (p<0.05). Our results reveal that subjects run in a more crouched posture and with higher leg stiffness to accommodate an added load.

  9. Running with a load increases leg stiffness.

    PubMed

    Silder, Amy; Besier, Thor; Delp, Scott L

    2015-04-13

    Spring-mass models have been used to characterize running mechanics and leg stiffness in a variety of conditions, yet it remains unknown how running while carrying a load affects running mechanics and leg stiffness. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that running with a load increases leg stiffness. Twenty-seven subjects ran at a constant speed on a force-measuring treadmill while carrying no load, and while wearing weight vests loaded with 10%, 20%, and 30% of body weight. We measured lower extremity motion and created a scaled musculoskeletal model of each subject, which we used to estimate lower extremity joint angles and leg length. We estimated dimensionless leg stiffness as the ratio of the peak vertical ground reaction force (normalized to body weight) and the change in stance phase leg length (normalized to leg length at initial foot contact). Leg length was calculated as the distance from the center of the pelvis to the center-of-pressure under the foot. We found that dimensionless leg stiffness increased when running with load (p=0.001); this resulted from an increase in the peak vertical ground reaction force (p<0.001) and a smaller change in stance phase leg length (p=0.025). When running with load, subjects had longer ground contact times (p<0.020), greater hip (p<0.001) and knee flexion (p=0.048) at the time of initial foot contact, and greater peak stance phase hip, knee, and ankle flexion (p<0.05). Our results reveal that subjects run in a more crouched posture and with higher leg stiffness to accommodate an added load. PMID:25728581

  10. Peptic Ulcer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Peptic Ulcer URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Peptic Ulcer - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  11. [Combined therapy for a vascular ulcer. 2008 Biatain First Prize. A clinical case of a patient with an infected vascular ulcer].

    PubMed

    Romo Sanz, María Isabel; Juárez Vela, Raul

    2009-03-01

    The use of a combined therapy which includes hydropolymeric dressings with ionic silver and dressings which release of ibuprofen together with a constant reevaluation made it possible to heal an ulcer which had afflicted a patient for 10 years. In order to succeed in doing so, medical professionals started off with the evidence that, in the complicated process which the cicatrization of long-lasting wounds difficult to cure constitutes, a series of factors involved in tissue regeneration appear which, at the same time, are not expected and which delay and slow down this process (critical colonization and infection, nutritional and metabolic state, repetitive infections, vascular state or hormonal alterations). This case story won the 2008 Biatain First Prize in the category "Clinical Case Study of a patient with an infected leg ulcer".

  12. [Genital ulcers--what's new?].

    PubMed

    Abu Raya, Bahaa; Bamberger, Ellen; Srugo, Isaac

    2013-08-01

    The most common infectious causes of genital ulcers are herpes simplex virus and syphilis. However, mixed infections can occur and genital ulcer may increase the risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus. Although the history and physical examination can narrow the differential diagnosis, there is a need for initial routine laboratory testing for the most common pathogens that includes: for syphilis: serologic screening and dark field examination of the lesion; for herpes simplex virus: serology, vial culture and/or polymerase chain reaction. Human immunodeficiency testing is mandatory. Recently, some clinical laboratories adapted the reverse screening algorithm for syphilis (initial treponemal test, and, if positive, followed by non-treponemal test) that may potentially lead to overtreatment. Early and prompt therapy may decrease the risk of transmission of the infectious agent to others. This article reviews the infectious pathogens causing genital ulcers, their unique clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment.

  13. Pradaxa-induced esophageal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Wood, Michele; Shaw, Paul

    2015-10-09

    Pradaxa (dabigatran) is a direct thrombin inhibitor approved for prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. We describe a case of esophageal ulceration associated with Pradaxa administration in a 75-year-old man. The patient reported difficulty swallowing and a burning sensation after taking his first dose of Pradaxa. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed linear ulcerations in the mid-esophagus. Pradaxa was held beginning the day before the EGD. The patient reported that his pain and difficulty swallowing resolved on stopping Pradaxa. Pradaxa is formulated with a tartaric acid excipient to reduce variability in absorption. We hypothesise that the capsule lodged in the patient's esophagus and the tartaric acid may have caused local damage resulting in an esophageal ulcer. It is important to educate patients on proper administration of Pradaxa, to decrease the risk of this rare, but potentially serious adverse event.

  14. Raynaud, digital ulcers and calcinosis in scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Raynaud, digital ulcers and calcinosis are frequent manifestations of patients with systemic sclerosis. Digital ulcers are seen in more than half of the patients with scleroderma. Hospitalizations, ischemic complications and impairment of hand function are frequently observed in patients with digital ulcers, especially if treatment is delayed. Rapid and intensive treatment escalation in patients with scleroderma and refractory Raynaud's phenomenon is one of the most effective preventive action available in order to avoid the development of digital ulcers and tissue loss.

  15. Etiology of primary spontaneous pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Lyra, Roberto de Menezes

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of HRCT, primary spontaneous pneumothorax has come to be better understood and managed, because its etiology can now be identified in most cases. Primary spontaneous pneumothorax is mainly caused by the rupture of a small subpleural emphysematous vesicle (designated a bleb) or of a subpleural paraseptal emphysematous lesion (designated a bulla). The aim of this pictorial essay was to improve the understanding of primary spontaneous pneumothorax and to propose a description of the major anatomical lesions found during surgery. RESUMO Com o advento da TCAR, o pneumotórax espontâneo primário passou a ser mais bem entendido e conduzido, pois sua etiologia pode ser atualmente identificada na maioria dos casos. O pneumotórax espontâneo primário tem como principal causa a rotura de uma pequena vesícula enfisematosa subpleural, denominada bleb ou de uma lesão enfisematosa parasseptal subpleural, denominada bulla. O objetivo deste ensaio pictórico foi melhorar o entendimento do pneumotórax espontâneo primário e propor uma descrição das principais lesões anatômicas encontradas durante a cirurgia. PMID:27383937

  16. Why do flamingos stand on one leg?

    PubMed

    Anderson, Matthew J; Williams, Sarah A

    2010-01-01

    A series of observational studies of captive Caribbean flamingos Phoenicopterus ruber were conducted to determine why flamingos rest on one leg. While frequently asked by the general public, this basic question has remained unanswered by the scientific community. Here we suggest that the latency of flamingos to initiate forward locomotion following resting on one leg is significantly longer than following resting on two, discounting the possibility that unipedal resting reduces muscle fatigue or enhances predatory escape. Additionally, we demonstrate that flamingos do not display lateral preferences at the individual or group levels when resting on one leg, with each bird dividing its resting time across both legs. We show that while flamingos prefer resting on one leg to two regardless of location, the percentage of birds resting on one leg is significantly higher among birds standing in the water than among those on land. Finally, we demonstrate a negative relationship between temperature and the percentage of observed birds resting on one leg, such that resting on one leg decreases as temperature rises. Results strongly suggest that unipedal resting aids flamingos in thermoregulation.

  17. Preventing Decubitus Ulcers with Cotton Sheeting Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Decubitus pressure ulcers are a worldwide health crisis and their prevention and treatment has become a national priority. The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Board estimates that as many as three million people in the United States have pressure ulcers. The causes of the ailment include both extr...

  18. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term “peptic ulcer” is not sufficiently specific for rating purposes. Manifest differences in ulcers of the stomach... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section...

  19. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term “peptic ulcer” is not sufficiently specific for rating purposes. Manifest differences in ulcers of the stomach... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section...

  20. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term “peptic ulcer” is not sufficiently specific for rating purposes. Manifest differences in ulcers of the stomach... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section...

  1. Computed tomographic findings in penetrating peptic ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Madrazo, B.L.; Halpert, R.D.; Sandler, M.A.; Pearlberg, J.L.

    1984-12-01

    Four cases of peptic ulcer penetrating the head of the pancreas were diagnosed by computed tomography (CT). Findings common to 3 cases included (a) an ulcer crater, (b) a sinus tract, and (c) enlargement of the head of the pancreas. Unlike other modalities, the inherent spatial resolution of CT allows a convenient diagnosis of this important complication of peptic ulcer disease.

  2. Stress as an etiologic co-factor in recurrent aphthous ulcers and oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Priyadarshini; Aswath, Nalini

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the role of stress in the occurrence of recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) and oral lichen planus (OLP), as well as to analyze the efficacy of saliva, urine, and serum cortisol levels as markers of stress. This study included 30 subjects with RAS (Group A), 30 with OLP (Group B), and 30 controls (Group C). The serum, salivary, and urinary cortisol levels were measured using electro-chemiluminescence immunoassay. The results were analyzed using the independent t-test, and a statistically significant difference (P = 0.000) was observed between the study and control groups. Further analysis was done using ANOVA and post-hoc tests. The results of this study suggest that RAS and OLP patients had higher cortisol levels than controls, indicating that stress acts as a co-factor in the pathogenesis of RAS and OLP. Although urinary cortisol level was found to be the best indicator of stress, saliva can also be used as a reliable marker. (J Oral Sci 58, 237-240, 2016). PMID:27349545

  3. Identification and phenotypic characterization of the most frequent bacterial etiologies in chronic skin ulcers.

    PubMed

    Mihai, Mara Mădălina; Holban, Alina Maria; Giurcăneanu, Călin; Popa, Liliana Gabriela; Buzea, Mariana; Filipov, Marilena; Lazăr, Veronica; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Popa, Mircea Ioan

    2014-01-01

    Chronic wounds represent an important burden on the healthcare system, requiring frequent hospitalizations and expensive treatments. It is now recognized that a primary factor contributing to a non-healing trajectory and a low therapeutic response is the biofilm infection. The purpose of this study was to identify the bacterial isolates collected from chronic skin wounds of hospitalized patients and to evaluate their antimicrobial susceptibility profiles, virulence factors, as well as the ability to develop biofilms in vitro. A number of 44 wound samples were collected from 39 patients. The isolated strains belonged to seven different microbial species, i.e.: Staphylococcus aureus (32 strains), followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (4), Escherichia coli (3), Klebsiella pneumoniae (2), Proteus mirabilis (1), Citrobacter freundii (1), group G β-hemolytic streptococci (1). In comparison to the other isolates, P. aeruginosa strains exhibited the highest capacity to develop complex biofilm structures in vitro, followed by S. aureus, with insignificant differences between MRSA and non-methicillin resistant isolates. The Enterobacteriaceae strains expressed less virulent phenotypes, lower adherence to epithelial cells and biofilm forming capacity, but also significant resistance phenotypes with a potential of unfavorable epidemiological outcome. The isolation of MRSA, ESBL-producing microorganisms and multiple antibiotic resistant P. aeruginosa suggests the potential risk of nosocomial spread and the potential severe outcome in case of bacteremia and sepsis. This study represents an important step in elucidating the host-wound microbiome interaction, by describing various resistance and virulence threats of microorganisms colonizing and/or infecting the chronic wounds. However, in order to establish a statistical relevant correlation, larger studies are needed.

  4. Molecular assays for detecting Aphanomyces invadans in ulcerative mycotic fish lesions.

    PubMed

    Vandersea, Mark W; Litaker, R Wayne; Yonnish, Bryan; Sosa, Emilio; Landsberg, Jan H; Pullinger, Chris; Moon-Butzin, Paula; Green, Jason; Morris, James A; Kator, Howard; Noga, Edward J; Tester, Patricia A

    2006-02-01

    The pathogenic oomycete Aphanomyces invadans is the primary etiological agent in ulcerative mycosis, an ulcerative skin disease caused by a fungus-like agent of wild and cultured fish. We developed sensitive PCR and fluorescent peptide nucleic acid in situ hybridization (FISH) assays to detect A. invadans. Laboratory-challenged killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) were first tested to optimize and validate the assays. Skin ulcers of Atlantic menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus) from populations found in the Pamlico and Neuse River estuaries in North Carolina were then surveyed. Results from both assays indicated that all of the lesioned menhaden (n = 50) collected in September 2004 were positive for A. invadans. Neither the FISH assay nor the PCR assay cross-reacted with other closely related oomycetes. These results provided strong evidence that A. invadans is the primary oomycete pathogen in ulcerative mycosis and demonstrated the utility of the assays. The FISH assay is the first molecular assay to provide unambiguous visual confirmation that hyphae in the ulcerated lesions were exclusively A. invadans. PMID:16461710

  5. Molecular Assays for Detecting Aphanomyces invadans in Ulcerative Mycotic Fish Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vandersea, Mark W.; Litaker, R. Wayne; Yonnish, Bryan; Sosa, Emilio; Landsberg, Jan H.; Pullinger, Chris; Moon-Butzin, Paula; Green, Jason; Morris, James A.; Kator, Howard; Noga, Edward J.; Tester, Patricia A.

    2006-01-01

    The pathogenic oomycete Aphanomyces invadans is the primary etiological agent in ulcerative mycosis, an ulcerative skin disease caused by a fungus-like agent of wild and cultured fish. We developed sensitive PCR and fluorescent peptide nucleic acid in situ hybridization (FISH) assays to detect A. invadans. Laboratory-challenged killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) were first tested to optimize and validate the assays. Skin ulcers of Atlantic menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus) from populations found in the Pamlico and Neuse River estuaries in North Carolina were then surveyed. Results from both assays indicated that all of the lesioned menhaden (n = 50) collected in September 2004 were positive for A. invadans. Neither the FISH assay nor the PCR assay cross-reacted with other closely related oomycetes. These results provided strong evidence that A. invadans is the primary oomycete pathogen in ulcerative mycosis and demonstrated the utility of the assays. The FISH assay is the first molecular assay to provide unambiguous visual confirmation that hyphae in the ulcerated lesions were exclusively A. invadans. PMID:16461710

  6. [Esophageal pathology in patients with the AIDS virus. Etiology and diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Varsky, C G; Yahni, V D; Freire, M C; Patrizio, E; Balbo, V; Benetucci, J; Boffi, A; Mattoni, R A; Luis; Alicia, M

    1991-01-01

    From 180 patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and followed-up for one year, 17 cases (9.44%) were referred to detect oesophageal pathology. They were prospectively analyzed through fibroscopy, radiology, biopsies for histopathology, virology and mycology and brush cytology. Most frequent symptoms were dysphagia. Odynophagia and retrosternal pain, usually associated, and not providing an accurate diagnostic clue. The most common causes of symptoms were oesophageal candidiasis (47.70%), and herpetic ulcers (23.52%) caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 2. Reflux pathology was also found (11.76%). Cytomegalovirus, other opportunistic infections and tumors were not detected. Seven (64%) of the eleven patients with oesophageal candidiasis also had oral involvement. Four (66%) of six oesophageal ulcers were herpetic; two of them (50%) showed oral ulcers too, and one (25%) had perioral herpetic blisters. Almost in every case endoscopic features allowed diagnosis. Endoscopy in candidiasis showed isolated or confluent white plaques of variable grade. Herpetic ulcers, alone or multiple, were deep with slightly elevated borders. Radiology yielded a poor diagnostic profit (50%), specially in case of multiple lesions. Cytology was highly specific and sensitive (both 90.9%) and suggested viral etiology in 100% of HSV patients. Histopathology was less sensitive than endoscopy and cytology (73% in candida and one HSV non-ulcer case). Both, cytology and histopathology showed koilocytosis in herpetic virus infected patients. The studies performed allowed to change the HIV disease stage in ten patients (62.5%) and to diagnose AIDS in seven (43.75%). In every case medical behavior was oriented or changed by these studies.

  7. Recording pressure ulcer risk assessment and incidence.

    PubMed

    Plaskitt, Anne; Heywood, Nicola; Arrowsmith, Michaela

    2015-07-15

    This article reports on the introduction of an innovative computer-based system developed to record and report pressure ulcer risk and incidence at an acute NHS trust. The system was introduced to ensure that all patients have an early pressure ulcer risk assessment, which prompts staff to initiate appropriate management if a pressure ulcer is detected, thereby preventing further patient harm. Initial findings suggest that this electronic process has helped to improve the timeliness and accuracy of data on pressure ulcer risk and incidence. In addition, it has resulted in a reduced number of reported hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.

  8. Endoscopic Management of Peptic Ulcer Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min

    2015-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency around the world and the major cause is peptic ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic treatment is fundamental for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Despite recent advances in endoscopic treatment, mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding has still remained high. This is because the disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities and are taking ulcerogenic medications. Therefore, the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is still a challenge for clinicians. This article reviews the various endoscopic methods available for management of peptic ulcer bleeding and the techniques in using these methods. PMID:25844337

  9. Endoscopic management of peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min; Kim, Byung-Wook

    2015-03-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency around the world and the major cause is peptic ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic treatment is fundamental for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Despite recent advances in endoscopic treatment, mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding has still remained high. This is because the disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities and are taking ulcerogenic medications. Therefore, the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is still a challenge for clinicians. This article reviews the various endoscopic methods available for management of peptic ulcer bleeding and the techniques in using these methods.

  10. Experimental ulcerative disease of the colon.

    PubMed

    Watt, J; Marcus, R

    1975-01-01

    The oral administration to guinea-pigs of an aqueous solution of carrageenan derived from the red seaweed, Eucheuma spinosum, provides a useful, readily available experimental model for the study of ulcerative disease of the colon. Two types of ulcerative disease can be produced within a 4-6 week period, viz., ulceration localised mainly to the caecum by using 1% undegraded carrageenan in the drinking fluid, and extensive ulceration involving caecum, colon, and rectum by using 5% degraded carrageenan. Ulceration is probably due to the local action of carrageenan in the bowel. PMID:1202321

  11. Steerable Hopping Six-Legged Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Younse, Paulo; Aghazarian, Hrand

    2010-01-01

    The figure depicts selected aspects of a six-legged robot that moves by hopping and that can be steered in the sense that it can be launched into a hop in a controllable direction. This is a prototype of hopping robots being developed for use in scientific exploration of rough terrain on remote planets that have surface gravitation less than that of Earth. Hopping robots could also be used on Earth, albeit at diminished hopping distances associated with the greater Earth gravitation. The upper end of each leg is connected through two universal joints to an upper and a lower hexagonal frame, such that the tilt of the leg depends on the relative position of the two frames. Two non-back-driveable worm-gear motor drives are used to control the relative position of the two frames along two axes 120 apart, thereby controlling the common tilt of all six legs and thereby, further, controlling the direction of hopping. Each leg includes an upper and a lower aluminum frame segment with a joint between them. A fiberglass spring, connected via hinges to both segments, is used to store hopping energy prior to launch into a hop and to cushion the landing at the end of the hop. A cable for loading the spring is run into each leg through the center of the universal joints and then down along the center lines of the segments to the lower end of the leg. A central spool actuated by a motor with a harmonic drive and an electromagnetic clutch winds in all six cables to compress all six springs (thereby also flexing all six legs) simultaneously. To ensure that all the legs push off and land in the same direction, timing- belt pulley drives are attached to the leg segments, restricting the flexing and extension of all six legs to a common linear motion. In preparation for a hop, the spool can be driven to load the spring legs by an amount corresponding to a desired hop distance within range. The amount of compression can be computed from the reading of a shaft-angle encoder that

  12. Pathogenicity studies with the fungi Aphanomyces invadans, Achlya bisexualis, and Phialemonium dimorphosporum: induction of skin ulcers in striped mullet.

    PubMed

    Sosa, Emilio R; Landsberg, Jan H; Kiryu, Yasunari; Stephenson, Christy M; Cody, Theresa T; Dukeman, Angela K; Wolfe, Heather P; Vandersea, Mark W; Litaker, R Wayne

    2007-03-01

    Based on isolations from naturally infected fish in Florida, we investigated the role of the fungi Aphanomyces invadans, Achlya bisexualis, and Phialemonium dimorphosporum in the etiology of ulcerative mycosis (UM) in striped mullet Mugil cephalus. We injected healthy striped mullet subcutaneously with secondary zoospores of four oomycete isolates: two concentrations (50 and 115 zoospores/mL) of SJR (an endemic isolate of Aphanomyces invadans in American shad Alosa sapidissima from the St. Johns River); two concentrations each of CAL (25 and 65 zoospores/mL) and ACH (1,400 and 2,000 zoospores/mL; endemic isolates of Aphanomyces invadans and Achlyva bisexualis, respectively, in striped mullet from the Caloosahatchee River); and two concentrations of the ascomycete culture MTZ (2,500 and 3,500 zoospores/mL; endemic isolate of P. dimorphosporum from whirligig mullet M. gyrans in the Matanzas Inlet). All fish injected with either concentration of SJR developed granulomatous ulcers after 8 d and died within 21 d. Eighty percent (8/10) of fish injected with the high dose of CAL developed ulcers after 13 d and died within 28 d, but only 30% (3/10) of fish injected with the low dose of CAL developed ulcers. Four of the ulcerated fish died within 28 d, and the remaining fish were terminated after 32 d. Fish injected with zoospores of Aphanomyces invadans developed ulcers that were grossly and histologically similar to those observed in naturally infected striped mullet with UM from several estuaries or rivers in Florida. These hemorrhagic skin ulcers were characterized by myonecrosis and the presence of mycotic granulomas. None of the fish injected with ACH, MTZ, or sterile water developed ulcers. This study fulfilled Koch's postulates and demonstrated that ulcers could be experimentally induced in striped mullet after exposure via injection to secondary zoospores of an endemic Florida strain of Aphanomyces invadans. PMID:18236631

  13. Iron for restless legs syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Trotti, Lynn M; Bhadriraju, Srinivas; Becker, Lorne A

    2014-01-01

    Background Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurologic syndrome and is associated with iron deficiency in many patients. It is unclear whether iron therapy is effective treatment for RLS. Objectives The objective of this review was to assess the effects of iron supplementation (oral or intravenous) for patients with RLS. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (Jan 1995 to April 2011); EMBASE (Jan 1995 to April 2011); PsycINFO (Jan 1995 to April 2011); and CINAHL (Jan 1995 to April 2011). Corresponding authors of included trials and additional members of the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group were contacted to locate additional published or unpublished trials. Selection criteria Controlled trials comparing any formulation of iron with placebo, other medications, or no treatment in adults diagnosed with RLS according to expert clinical interview or explicit diagnostic criteria. Data collection and analysis Two review authors extracted data and at least two authors assessed trial quality. We contacted trial authors for missing data. Main results Six studies (192 total subjects) were identified and included in this analysis. The quality of trials was variable. Our primary outcome was restlessness or uncomfortable leg sensations, which was quantified using the IRLS severity scale in four trials and another RLS symptom scale in a fifth trial. Combining data from the four trials using the IRLS severity scale, there was no clear benefit from iron therapy (mean difference in IRLS severity scores of -3.79, 95% CI: -7.68 to 0.10, p = 0.06). However, the fifth trial did find iron therapy to be beneficial (median decrease of 3 points in the iron group and no change in the placebo group on a 10 point scale of RLS symptoms, p = 0.01). Quality of life was improved in the iron group relative to placebo in some studies but not others. Changes in periodic limb movements were not different between groups

  14. Influence of Soft or Hard Floors before and after First Calving on Dairy Heifer Locomotion, Claw and Leg Health.

    PubMed

    Bergsten, Christer; Telezhenko, Evgenij; Ventorp, Michael

    2015-08-06

    Claw health, an important dairy cow welfare parameter, may be affected by early-life foot/leg stresses. To investigate this, groups of pregnant heifers were allocated to deep straw bedding (Soft) or cubicles (Hard), both with scraped concrete feeding alleys. After the grazing season, they were re-housed in cubicle systems, half on slatted concrete (Hard) and half on slatted rubber (Soft) alleys. Claw measurements, contact area and pressure distribution claw/flooring, claw disorders and leg lesions were recorded at the start and end of each housing season. Locomotion and leg lesions were also scored monthly after calving. Prevalence of sole haemorrhages was higher among pregnant heifers in cubicles than in deep straw. After calving, first-calvers on Hard floors had higher odds for lameness (OR = 3.6; P < 0.01), sole haemorrhages/ulcers (OR = 2.2; P < 0.05), white-line haemorrhages (OR = 2.8; P < 0.01) and leg lesions (OR = 2.6; P < 0.02) than those on Soft floors. Lowest prevalence and severity of sole and white-line haemorrhages (non-significant) in first-calvers was found in those on Soft floors and reared on Hard floors and the highest prevalence and severity on those on Hard floors reared on Soft floors. Soft flooring after calving is of most importance for healthy feet and legs.

  15. Influence of Soft or Hard Floors before and after First Calving on Dairy Heifer Locomotion, Claw and Leg Health.

    PubMed

    Bergsten, Christer; Telezhenko, Evgenij; Ventorp, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Claw health, an important dairy cow welfare parameter, may be affected by early-life foot/leg stresses. To investigate this, groups of pregnant heifers were allocated to deep straw bedding (Soft) or cubicles (Hard), both with scraped concrete feeding alleys. After the grazing season, they were re-housed in cubicle systems, half on slatted concrete (Hard) and half on slatted rubber (Soft) alleys. Claw measurements, contact area and pressure distribution claw/flooring, claw disorders and leg lesions were recorded at the start and end of each housing season. Locomotion and leg lesions were also scored monthly after calving. Prevalence of sole haemorrhages was higher among pregnant heifers in cubicles than in deep straw. After calving, first-calvers on Hard floors had higher odds for lameness (OR = 3.6; P < 0.01), sole haemorrhages/ulcers (OR = 2.2; P < 0.05), white-line haemorrhages (OR = 2.8; P < 0.01) and leg lesions (OR = 2.6; P < 0.02) than those on Soft floors. Lowest prevalence and severity of sole and white-line haemorrhages (non-significant) in first-calvers was found in those on Soft floors and reared on Hard floors and the highest prevalence and severity on those on Hard floors reared on Soft floors. Soft flooring after calving is of most importance for healthy feet and legs. PMID:26479380

  16. [Diagnosis of gastric ulcer in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Ashida, Kiyoshi; Fukuchi, Takumi; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    2010-11-01

    It is well known that gastric ulcers are most often found at anglus and upper corpus in the elderly. The number of gastric ulcer found at upper corpus hold half of all cases in the elderly patients with bleeding ulcer. Sixty percent of the elderly patients with bleeding ulcer took NSAIDs including low-dose aspirin in authors' hospital. Now it is easy to treat and cure bleeding ulcers due to development of endoscopic hemostasis and antiulcer drugs such as proton pump inhibitor(PPI). However, the elderly patients sometimes result in fatal outcome on bleeding from gastric ulcer. Therefore, it is important to prevent ulcer complications by PPI for the high-risk group such as elderly patients taking NSAIDs.

  17. Peptic ulcers: mortality and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Riley, R

    1991-01-01

    This study analyzes data on peptic ulcer disease based on deaths for 1951-1988 and hospital separations for 1969-1988. The source of the data are mortality and morbidity statistics provided to Statistics Canada by the provinces. The age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for peptic ulcer disease decreased from 1951 to 1988 by 69.4% for men (8.5 to 2.6 per 100,000 population), and 31.8% for women (2.2 to 1.5). Separation rates from hospitals during 1969-1988 for peptic ulcer disease also decreased by 59.8% for men (242.7 to 97.6 per 100,000 population) and 35.6% for women (103.2 to 66.5). Age-specific rates for both mortality and hospital separations increased with age. Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence of peptic ulcer disease is declining in the general population. The downward trends in mortality and hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease reflect this change in incidence, but additional factors probably contribute as well to this decline. Male rates for both mortality and hospital separations were much higher than female rates at the beginning of the study period; but toward the end, the gap between the sexes narrowed considerably, mainly because the male rates declined substantially while the female rates decline moderately. The slower decline in the rates for women may be related to such factors as the increasing labour force participation among women and the slower decline in the population of female smokers. PMID:1801957

  18. Peptic ulcers: mortality and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Riley, R

    1991-01-01

    This study analyzes data on peptic ulcer disease based on deaths for 1951-1988 and hospital separations for 1969-1988. The source of the data are mortality and morbidity statistics provided to Statistics Canada by the provinces. The age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for peptic ulcer disease decreased from 1951 to 1988 by 69.4% for men (8.5 to 2.6 per 100,000 population), and 31.8% for women (2.2 to 1.5). Separation rates from hospitals during 1969-1988 for peptic ulcer disease also decreased by 59.8% for men (242.7 to 97.6 per 100,000 population) and 35.6% for women (103.2 to 66.5). Age-specific rates for both mortality and hospital separations increased with age. Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence of peptic ulcer disease is declining in the general population. The downward trends in mortality and hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease reflect this change in incidence, but additional factors probably contribute as well to this decline. Male rates for both mortality and hospital separations were much higher than female rates at the beginning of the study period; but toward the end, the gap between the sexes narrowed considerably, mainly because the male rates declined substantially while the female rates decline moderately. The slower decline in the rates for women may be related to such factors as the increasing labour force participation among women and the slower decline in the population of female smokers.

  19. Expansion Compression Contacts for Thermoelectric Legs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    In a proposed alternative to previous approaches to making hot-shoe contacts to the legs of thermoelectric devices, one relies on differential thermal expansion to increase contact pressures for the purpose of reducing the electrical resistances of contacts as temperatures increase. The proposed approach is particularly applicable to thermoelectric devices containing p-type (positive-charge-carrier) legs made of a Zintl compound (specifically, Yb14MnSb11) and n-type (negative charge-carrier) legs made of SiGe. This combination of thermoelectric materials has been selected for further development, primarily on the basis of projected thermoelectric performance. However, it is problematic to integrate, into a practical thermoelectric device, legs made of these materials along with a metal or semiconductor hot shoe that is required to be in thermal and electrical contact with the legs. This is partly because of the thermal-expansion mismatch of these materials: The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of SiGe is 4.5 x 10(exp -6) C (exp -1), while the CTE of Yb14MnSb11 is 20 x 10(exp -6) C(exp -1). Simply joining a Yb14MnSb11 and a SiGe leg to a common hot shoe could be expected to result in significant thermal stresses in either or both legs during operation. Heretofore, such thermal stresses have been regarded as disadvantageous. In the proposed approach, stresses resulting from the CTE mismatch would be turned to advantage.

  20. Delayed Healing of Sickle Cell Ulcers Is due to Impaired Angiogenesis and CXCL12 Secretion in Skin Wounds.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van Tuan; Nassar, Dany; Batteux, Fréderic; Raymond, Karine; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis; Aractingi, Sélim

    2016-02-01

    Leg ulcers are a major complication of sickle cell disease that occur in 2.5-40% of patients. Leg ulcers are responsible for frequent complications because they are often long-lasting and are highly resistant to therapy. Although their occurrence is associated with hyperhemolysis, the mechanisms underlying sickle cell ulcers remain poorly understood. In this study, we show that skin wound healing is severely altered in old SAD sickle cell mice but is normal in young animals, consistent with reports in humans. Alterations of wound healing were associated with impaired blood and lymphatic angiogenesis in the wound beds and poor endothelial progenitor cell mobilization from the bone marrow. CXCL12 secretion by keratinocytes and inflammatory cells was low in the wounds of SAD mice. Local therapy with endothelial progenitor cells or recombinant CXCL12 injections restored wound angiogenesis and rescued the healing defect together with mobilization of circulating endothelial progenitor cells. To our knowledge, this is a previously unreported study of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of sickle cell ulcers in a murine model that provides promising therapeutic perspectives for clinical trials. PMID:26967481

  1. Delayed Healing of Sickle Cell Ulcers Is due to Impaired Angiogenesis and CXCL12 Secretion in Skin Wounds.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van Tuan; Nassar, Dany; Batteux, Fréderic; Raymond, Karine; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis; Aractingi, Sélim

    2016-02-01

    Leg ulcers are a major complication of sickle cell disease that occur in 2.5-40% of patients. Leg ulcers are responsible for frequent complications because they are often long-lasting and are highly resistant to therapy. Although their occurrence is associated with hyperhemolysis, the mechanisms underlying sickle cell ulcers remain poorly understood. In this study, we show that skin wound healing is severely altered in old SAD sickle cell mice but is normal in young animals, consistent with reports in humans. Alterations of wound healing were associated with impaired blood and lymphatic angiogenesis in the wound beds and poor endothelial progenitor cell mobilization from the bone marrow. CXCL12 secretion by keratinocytes and inflammatory cells was low in the wounds of SAD mice. Local therapy with endothelial progenitor cells or recombinant CXCL12 injections restored wound angiogenesis and rescued the healing defect together with mobilization of circulating endothelial progenitor cells. To our knowledge, this is a previously unreported study of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of sickle cell ulcers in a murine model that provides promising therapeutic perspectives for clinical trials.

  2. The effects of sulodexide on both clinical and molecular parameters in patients with mixed arterial and venous ulcers of lower limbs

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Raffaele; Gallelli, Luca; Conti, Angela; De Caridi, Giovanni; Massara, Mafalda; Spinelli, Francesco; Buffone, Gianluca; Caliò, Francesco Giuseppe; Amato, Bruno; Ceglia, Simona; Spaziano, Giuseppe; Scaramuzzino, Luca; Ferrarese, Alessia Giovanna; Grande, Raffaele; de Franciscis, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Background Mixed venous and arterial ulcers account for approximately 15%–30% of all venous leg ulcerations. Several studies have shown that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) play a central role in the pathophysiology of venous and arterial diseases. Some studies have shown the efficacy of glycosaminoglycans, such as sulodexide (SDX), in treating patients with leg ulcers. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical effects of SDX and its correlation with MMPs and NGAL expression in patients with mixed arterial and venous leg ulcers. Methods Patients eligible for this study were of both sexes, older than 20 years, and with a clinical and instrumental diagnosis of mixed ulcer. Results Fifty-three patients of both sexes were enrolled and divided into two groups by means of randomization tables. Group A (treated group) comprised 18 females and ten males (median age: 68.7 years) treated with standard treatment (compression therapy and surgery) + SDX (600 lipoprotein lipase-releasing units/day intramuscularly) for 15 days followed by SDX 250 lipase-releasing units every 12 hours day orally for 6 months as adjunctive treatment. Group B (control group) comprised 17 females and eight males (median age: 64.2 years) treated with standard treatment only (compression therapy and surgery). The type of surgery was chosen according to anatomical level of vein incompetence: superficial venous open surgery and/or subfascial endoscopic perforating surgery. In all enrolled patients, blood samples were collected in order to evaluate the plasma levels of MMPs and NGAL through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. These results were compared to another control group (Group C) of healthy individuals. Moreover, biopsies of ulcers were taken to evaluate the tissue expression of MMPs and NGAL through Western blot analysis. Our results revealed that SDX treatment is able to reduce both plasma levels and tissue expression of MMPs improving

  3. Hot Leg Piping Materials Issues

    SciTech Connect

    V. Munne

    2006-07-19

    With Naval Reactors (NR) approval of the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommendation to develop a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton power conversion system as the space nuclear power plant (SNPP) for Project Prometheus (References a and b) the reactor outlet piping was recognized to require a design that utilizes internal insulation (Reference c). The initial pipe design suggested ceramic fiber blanket as the insulation material based on requirements associated with service temperature capability within the expected range, very low thermal conductivity, and low density. Nevertheless, it was not considered to be well suited for internal insulation use because its very high surface area and proclivity for holding adsorbed gases, especially water, would make outgassing a source of contaminant gases in the He-Xe working fluid. Additionally, ceramic fiber blanket insulating materials become very friable after relatively short service periods at working temperatures and small pieces of fiber could be dislodged and contaminate the system. Consequently, alternative insulation materials were sought that would have comparable thermal properties and density but superior structural integrity and greatly reduced outgassing. This letter provides technical information regarding insulation and materials issues for the Hot Leg Piping preconceptual design developed for the Project Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP).

  4. Fast and Standardized Skin Grafting of Leg Wounds With a New Technique: Report of 2 Cases and Review of Previous Methods

    PubMed Central

    Hamnerius, Nils; Wallin, Ewa; Svensson, Åke; Stenström, Pernilla

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic leg ulcers remain a challenge to the treating physician. Such wounds often need skin grafts to heal. This necessitates a readily available, fast, simple, and standardized procedure for grafting. Objectives: The aim of this work was to test a novel method developed for outpatient transplant procedures. Methods: The procedure employs a handheld disposable dermatome and a roller mincer that cut the skin into standardized micrografts that can be spread out onto a suitable graft bed. Wounds were followed until healed and photographed. Results: The device was successfully used to treat and close a traumatic lower limb wound and a persistent chronic venous leg ulcer. The donor site itself healed by secondary intent with minimal cosmetic impairment. Conclusion: The method was successfully used to graft 2 lower extremity wounds. PMID:27004083

  5. Nutritional care to prevent and heal pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Singer, Pierre

    2002-09-01

    Pressure sores are a well-recognized problem, with an etiology that is multifactorial and not solely a consequence of pressure itself. Malnutrition is one of the factors involved, namely low calorie and protein intake. Mainly elderly patients, patients after hip fracture, but also patients after trauma, burns or extended surgery require additional nutritional support to reduce the possibility of pressure ulcers developing. Evidence has shown the efficacy of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in elderly patients with malnutrition and dementia. Nutritional support should include sufficient calories, protein, fat, carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals. Arginine is the main amino acid required and is essential for collagen deposition and wound healing. Vitamin A and zinc should be added to nutritional support.

  6. [Hepatobiliary diseases in Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis].

    PubMed

    Kruis, W

    1987-02-01

    Hepatobiliary diseases are certainly not very frequent extraintestinal complications of chronic intestinal inflammatory diseases, however, they are an important prognostic factor. 2% of patients with ulcerative colitis develop liver cirrhosis but 10% of those die as a direct result of liver failure. Other associated severe hepatobiliary diseases include primary sclerosing cholangitis, carcinoma of the bile duct and amyloidosis. The present review attempts to divide the associated hepatobiliary diseases into three groups. 1. those that are the result of therapy. 2. those that are the result of the pathophysiological mechanisms of the underlying disease and 3. those of unknown etiological origin. This division might serve not only for a better understanding of the various mechanisms but should have some impact on therapeutic regimens.

  7. [The newly occurred and recurrent gastric ulcers after organ-preserving operations for the ulcer disease].

    PubMed

    Todurov, I M; Dibrova, Iu A

    2008-10-01

    The literature data and the results of own investigations on gastric recurrent ulcers occurrence after organpreserving operations performance for the ulcer disease are summarized. The data on gastric recurrent ulcers occurrence rate are adduced. Modern views on possible causes of occurrence, necessary volume and informativity of investigation methods and tactics of treatment are presented. Gastroduodenal motor-evacuation function disorders, duodenogastric reflux and gastric hypersecretion are suggested as a most frequent causes of gastric recurrent ulcers occurrence. The method of operative intervention choice for recurrent gastric ulcer is determined by the cause of its occurrence, as well as the character of ulcer complication and the kind of previous surgical procedure performed.

  8. Leg stiffness: comparison between unilateral and bilateral hopping tasks.

    PubMed

    Brauner, Torsten; Sterzing, Thorsten; Wulf, Mathias; Horstmann, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Leg stiffness is a predictor of athletic performance and injury and typically evaluated during bilateral hopping. The contribution of each limb to bilateral leg stiffness, however, is not well understood. This study investigated leg stiffness during unilateral and bilateral hopping to address the following research questions: (1) does the magnitude and variability of leg stiffness differ between dominant and non-dominant legs? (2) Does unilateral leg stiffness differ from bilateral leg stiffness? and (3) Is bilateral leg stiffness determined by unilateral leg stiffness? Thirty-two physically active males performed repeated hopping tests on a force platform for each of the three conditions: bilateral hopping, unilateral hopping on the dominant leg, and unilateral hopping on the non-dominant leg. Leg stiffness was estimated as the ratio of the peak vertical force and the maximum displacement using a simple 1-D mass-spring model. Neither the magnitude nor variability of leg stiffness differed between dominant and non-dominant limbs. Unilateral leg stiffness was 24% lower than bilateral stiffness and showed less variability between consecutive hops and subjects. Unilateral leg stiffness explained 76% of the variance in bilateral leg stiffness. We conclude that leg stiffness estimates during unilateral hopping are preferable for intervention studies because of their low variability. PMID:24290613

  9. EBV+ cutaneous B-cell lymphoproliferation of the leg in an elderly patient with mycosis fungoides and methotrexate treatment.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Thierry; Cairoli, Anne; Benhattar, Jean; Spring, Philipp; Hohl, Daniel; de Leval, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    A 77-year-old man with a 5-year history of mycosis fungoides (MF) who had received several lines of therapy, including intravenous courses of Methotrexate (MTX) for the past 2 years, went on to develop several ulcerated cutaneous nodules on the left leg. Biopsy revealed diffuse sheets of EBV-positive large B cells (CD20+ CD30 ± IgM Lambda), with an angiocentric distribution and a monoclonal IGH gene rearrangement. Although the pathological features were diagnostic for an EBV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), several possibilities could be considered for assignment to a specific entity: EBV-positive DLBCL of the elderly, methotrexate-induced lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD), lymphomatoid granulomatosis, or the more recently described EBV-positive mucocutaneous ulcer. The development of EBV+ lymphoproliferations has been reported in two other patients with MF under MTX, and occurred as skin lesions of the leg in one of these and in the current case, which may question the relatedness to primary cutaneous DLCBL, leg-type. PMID:23031074

  10. Diabetes mellitus and the elderly: special considerations for foot ulcer prevention and care.

    PubMed

    Van Gils, Carl C; Stark, Lee Ann

    2006-09-01

    The risk of lower extremity amputation in persons with diabetes mellitus increases with advanced age, necessitating clinical vigilance. Individualized and comprehensive prevention efforts are required to address the complicated and diverse nature of the diabetic foot in the elderly patient, including promotion of lifestyle changes to offset diabetes, attention to cognitive deficits and economic limitations, and provision of foot care education and management (eg, emphasizing the need for appropriate foot wear). If an ulcer develops, physiologic and socioeconomic factors may influence its clinical presentation, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment. To help ulcer-related complications and prevent lower leg amputations, clinicians must address diabetes management; the cost of supplies; the importance of offloading, nutrition, and exercise; and challenges inherent to impaired eyesight, dexterity, and ability to self-care. A multidisciplinary approach is recommended. Additional research to enhance understanding of practice parameters in this population is needed to help clinicians manage the increasing numbers of older adults with diabetes mellitus.

  11. The use of honey for the treatment of two patients with pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Van der Weyden, Elizabeth A

    2003-12-01

    Chronic wounds such as pressure ulcers, leg ulcers and diabetic wounds are a common problem among older people and alternative methods to the current time-consuming and costly practices of wound management in the nursing home need to be identified. To this end, we trialled the use of a honey alginate on two elderly males in our nursing home who were suffering from pressure ulcers (one on the ankle and one on the sacral region), to evaluate its effectiveness as a viable alternative to the current wound management practices in nursing homes. The use of honey resulted in a rapid and complete healing of both wounds. In addition, the antibacterial activity of honey had a deodorizing effect on the wounds and its anti-inflammatory actions helped reduce the level of pain. Similar healing results are also being observed in other patients with pressure-induced ulcers and as a result honey alginates are now being used as the 'standard' treatment for chronic wounds in our nursing home.

  12. Less Common Etiologies of Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Bleck, Thomas P

    2010-01-01

    Status epilepticus is treated as a neurologic emergency and only later are the potential etiologies assessed. While sometimes the cause for status epilepticus is apparent (e.g., antiepileptic drug withdrawal), all too often it is not identified, even after extensive diagnostic testing has been performed. With emphasis on the less-common etiologies, this review will cover various probable and known causes of status epilepticus among adults, children, and those patients with refractory epilepsy. PMID:20231917

  13. Restless Legs Syndrome -- Causes and Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... health issues or medication. This may include: Low iron levels This can cause problems with brain cell ... you have restless legs syndrome caused by low iron, talk with your physician and do not attempt ...

  14. Support Leg Loading in Punt Kicking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kermond, John; Konz, Stephen

    1978-01-01

    Maximum distance in football punt kicking is associated with a maximum force transfer to the ball rather than a maximum force transfer through the ground via the support leg. For maximum distance, tred lightly. (Author)

  15. Passive zero-gravity leg restraint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A passive zero or microgravity leg restraint is described which includes a central support post with a top and a bottom. Extending from the central support post are a calf pad tab, to which calf pad is attached, and a foot pad tab, to which foot tab is attached. Also extending from central support post are knee pads. When the restraint is in use the user's legs are forced between pads by a user imposed scissors action of the legs. The user's body is then supported in a zero or microgravity neutral body posture by the leg restraint. The calf pad has semi-ridig elastic padding material covering structural stiffener. The foot pad has padding material and a structural stiffener. Knee pads have s structural tube stiffener at their core.

  16. Endoscopic management of peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Laws, H L; McKernan, J B

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article reviews the authors' experience with endoscopic management of duodenal ulcer and ulcers occurring after a previous drainage procedure. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Patients with complications of duodenal ulcer and ulcers occurring after a previous drainage procedure still require surgical management. Virtually all operations for duodenal ulcer include some form of vagotomy. American surgeons in academic centers prefer highly selective vagotomy in suitable candidates. Video-directed laparoscopic and thoracoscopic operations have been done for all complications of duodenal ulcer except for acute hemorrhage. METHODS: The authors have performed laparoscopic operation on eight patients with intractable chronic duodenal ulcer, seven patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease combined with duodenal ulcer, one patient with chronic duodenal ulcer and gastric outlet obstruction, and one patient with acute perforation. Operations performed included omentopexy, anterior seromyotomy plus post truncal vagotomy, and highly selective vagotomy. Seven patients had a simultaneous Nissen fundoplication; and the patient with obstruction underwent concomitant pyloroplasty and vagotomy. Six patients with intestinal ulcers occurring after a previous drainage procedure were treated with thoracoscopic vagotomy. Techniques used are shown. RESULTS: There has been one recurrent ulcer in the laparoscopic group after anterior seromyotomy plus posterior truncal vagotomy. The patient treated by omentopexy for duodenal perforation recovered gastrointestinal function promptly with no further difficulty, but eventually died of primary medical disease. Patients undergoing thoracoscopic vagotomy have all become asymptomatic. Postoperative hospital stay after highly selective vagotomy, anterior seromyotomy plus posterior truncal vagotomy, or thoracoscopic vagotomy was 1-5 days. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopic management of duodenal ulcers is feasible. Larger numbers of patients with

  17. Microgravity, Mesh-Crawling Legged Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto; Marzwell, Neville; Matthews, Jaret; Richardson, Krandalyn; Wall, Jonathan; Poole, Michael; Foor, David; Rodgers, Damian

    2008-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and microgravity flight-testing are part of a continuing development of palm-sized mobile robots that resemble spiders (except that they have six legs apiece, whereas a spider has eight legs). Denoted SpiderBots (see figure), they are prototypes of proposed product line of relatively inexpensive walking robots that could be deployed in large numbers to function cooperatively in construction, repair, exploration, search, and rescue activities in connection with exploration of outer space and remote planets.

  18. Rotational joint assembly for the prosthetic leg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, L. J.; Jones, W. C. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A rotational joint assembly for a prosthetic leg has been devised, which enables an artificial foot to rotate slightly when a person is walking, running or turning. The prosthetic leg includes upper and lower tubular members with the rotational joint assembly interposed between them. The assembly includes a restrainer mechanism which consists of a pivotably mounted paddle element. This device applies limiting force to control the rotation of the foot and also restores torque to return the foot back to its initial position.

  19. Laser leg vein treatment: a brief overview.

    PubMed

    Ross, Victor; Domankevitz, Yacov

    2003-12-01

    Laser treatment of leg veins has been associated with a number of disadvantages, but the introduction of new devices has increased the role of lasers in the treatment of leg veins. This paper reviews the role of laser devices applied from the surface in the treatment of reticular and spider veins. Success is determined by the proper selection of wavelength, fluence, pulse duration, spot size, and number and frequency of treatments. PMID:14741827

  20. Dehydrated Human Amnion/Chorion Grafts May Accelerate the Healing of Ulcers on Free Flaps in Patients With Venous Insufficiency and/or Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Ulceration of free flaps in patients with venous insufficiency and/or lymphedema is an uncommon but challenging problem. We hypothesized that dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane (Epifix) grafts would accelerate healing of these challenging ulcers. Methods: Retrospective analysis of prospectively acquired data identified 8 lower extremity free flaps with ulcerations in the context of venous insufficiency and/or lymphedema. The first 4 were flaps that had been treated with conservative wound care to healing. The second group was treated conservatively initially but then converted to treatment with dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane grafts. The primary endpoint was time to healing. Results: Comparison of Kaplan-Meier survival curves revealed a significant difference between the conservatively and dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane–treated flap ulcers, favoring graft treatment (P = .0361). In those ulcers that healed, the average time to healing was 87 days for the conservative treatment group and 33 days for the dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane treatment group (with an average of 1.7 grafts per ulcer). Conclusions: Dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane may accelerate healing of ulcers on lower extremity free flaps in patient with lymphedema and/or venous disease in the treated leg.

  1. Dehydrated Human Amnion/Chorion Grafts May Accelerate the Healing of Ulcers on Free Flaps in Patients With Venous Insufficiency and/or Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Ulceration of free flaps in patients with venous insufficiency and/or lymphedema is an uncommon but challenging problem. We hypothesized that dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane (Epifix) grafts would accelerate healing of these challenging ulcers. Methods: Retrospective analysis of prospectively acquired data identified 8 lower extremity free flaps with ulcerations in the context of venous insufficiency and/or lymphedema. The first 4 were flaps that had been treated with conservative wound care to healing. The second group was treated conservatively initially but then converted to treatment with dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane grafts. The primary endpoint was time to healing. Results: Comparison of Kaplan-Meier survival curves revealed a significant difference between the conservatively and dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane–treated flap ulcers, favoring graft treatment (P = .0361). In those ulcers that healed, the average time to healing was 87 days for the conservative treatment group and 33 days for the dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane treatment group (with an average of 1.7 grafts per ulcer). Conclusions: Dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane may accelerate healing of ulcers on lower extremity free flaps in patient with lymphedema and/or venous disease in the treated leg. PMID:27648116

  2. Three cross leg flaps for lower leg reconstruction of Gustilo type III C open fracture

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Kazufumi; Ozeki, Satoru; Sugimoto, Ichiro; Ogawa, Masato

    2016-01-01

    A 60 year old male had Gustilo type III C open fracture of the right lower leg. After radical debridement, the large open defect including certain loss of the bone tissue was successfully augmented and covered, by consecutive three cross-leg flaps, which consisted of the free rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap, the fibula osteocutaneous flap and the conventional sural flap. Although indication for amputation or preservation is decided with multiple factors in each case, a strategic combination of cross-leg flap, free flap, external fixation and vascular delay could increase the potential of preservation of the lower leg with even disastrous Gustilo type III C. PMID:27293297

  3. Passive legged, multi-segmented, robotic vehicle.

    SciTech Connect

    Hayward, David R.

    2003-11-01

    The Passive-legged, Multi-segmented, Robotic Vehicle concept is a simple legged vehicle that is modular and scaleable, and can be sized to fit through confined areas that are slightly larger than the size of the vehicle. A specific goal of this project was to be able to fit through the opening in the fabric of a chain link fence. This terrain agile robotic platform will be composed of multiple segments that are each equipped with appendages (legs) that resemble oars extending from a boat. Motion is achieved by pushing with these legs that can also flex to fold next to the body when passing through a constricted area. Each segment is attached to another segment using an actuated joint. This joint represents the only actuation required for mobility. The major feature of this type of mobility is that the terrain agility advantage of legs can be attained without the complexity of the multiple-actuation normally required for the many joints of an active leg. The minimum number of segments is two, but some concepts require three or more segments. This report discusses several concepts for achieving this type of mobility, their design, and the results obtained for each.

  4. Bilateral leg edema in an older woman.

    PubMed

    Thaler, H W; Pienaar, S; Wirnsberger, G; Roller-Wirnsberger, R E

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral leg edema is a frequent symptom in older people and an important concern in geriatric medicine. Further evaluation is frequently not performed and simple therapy with diuretics is prescribed. Particularly in older patients, long-term use of diuretics can lead to severe electrolyte imbalances, volume depletion, and falls. In this case report we want to focus the physicians' attention on the necessity to determine the cause and show a correspondingly effective treatment for bilateral leg edema in older people. A thorough approach is required to recognize diseases and to avoid adverse drug events as geriatric patients often show an atypical presentation or minor symptoms. The cause of swollen legs is often multifactorial; therefore, the patient's individual history and an appropriate physical examination are important. Depending on the clinical symptoms, evaluation including basic laboratory tests, urinalysis, chest radiography, and echocardiogram may be indicated. The most probable cause of bilateral edema in older patients is chronic venous insufficiency. Heart failure is also a common cause. Other systemic causes such as renal disease or liver disease are much rarer. Antihypertensive and anti-inflammatory drugs can frequently cause leg edema, but the incidence of drug-induced leg swelling is unknown. With the help of this special case we tried to develop an approach to the diagnosis of symmetric leg edema in older patients, a problem frequently neglected in geriatric medicine.

  5. Intractable ulcerating enterocolitis of infancy.

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, I R; Risdon, R A; Walker-Smith, J A

    1991-01-01

    Five children (three boys, two girls) presenting in the first year of life with intractable diarrhoea had a number of features in common. All had ulcerating stomatitis, four had partial villous atrophy on small intestinal biopsy, all had colitis characterised by large ulcers with overhanging edges, and four had severe perianal disease; no stool pathogens were detected. Treatment with steroids, sulphasalazine, and azathioprine was unsuccessful. All five required subtotal colectomy. Four were children of consanguinous marriages, two were siblings of Pakistani origin, two were cousins of Arab origin, and the fifth was Portuguese. Although the diagnoses of Behçet's disease and Crohn's disease were considered, it appears that these children represent a distinct inherited condition affecting the whole gastrointestinal tract, particularly the colon. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:2025003

  6. [Digital ulcers in systemic scleroderma].

    PubMed

    Belz, D; Hunzelmann, N; Moinzadeh, P

    2014-11-01

    Digital ulcers (DU's) are one of the main symptoms of systemic scleroderma and occur in approximately 60% of all scleroderma patients. Due to possible complications such as infections, gangrene or amputation, they require regular medical attention and a good wound treatment by doctors and nursing staff. A definition of DU's has not yet been established. In 2009 the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) published guidelines for the treatment of DU's. An improvement of the healing of active ulcers has been described with Iloprost. Bosentan significantly reduced the frequency of occurrence of new DU's. In some small studies PDE-5 inhibitors appear helpful. Further studies with other therapeutic approaches will follow in the next few years. PMID:25336296

  7. [Therapeutic options for pressure ulcers].

    PubMed

    Damert, H-G; Meyer, F; Altmann, S

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this overview is based on remarks on the pathogenesis of and therapy for pressure ulcers and selected but representative cases to demonstrate current options of plastic coverage. As a consequence of the demographic developments, in particular, with regard to the increasing proportion of older patients as well as the advances in modern medicine, the number of multimorbid, geriatric and bedridden patients and of those with prolonged sickbed periods has been steadily growing. Therefore, partly severe manifestations of pressure ulcers at various exposed body regions can be observed in spite of the best preventive intention of care. While in the early stages rather conservative treatment is adequate, surgical intervention might become important and indispensable for a sufficient treatment in advanced stages. To facilitate basic care and to appropriately treat the infectious focus, the methods and procedures of plastic surgery can become relevant. Although there are several options and approaches existing to sanitise and cover defects of pressure ulcers, which are described within the article based on representative cases, preventive measures can still be considered the best approach.

  8. Approach to skin ulcers in older patients.

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide family physicians with an approach to managing skin ulcers in older patients. SOURCES OF INFORMATION: Clinical practice guidelines and best practice guidelines were summarized to describe an evidence-based approach. MAIN MESSAGE; Preventing ulcers is important in frail older patients. Using guidelines can help prevent ulcers in institutions. Clarifying the cause and contributing factors is the first step in management. Pressure and venous ulcers are common in elderly people. Poor nutrition, edema, arterial insufficiency, and anemia often impair wound healing. Adequate debridement is important to decrease risk of infection and to promote healing. There are guidelines for cleaning ulcers. Choice of dressings depends on the circumstances of each wound, but dressings should provide a moist environment. Options for dressings are summarized. CONCLUSION: Family physicians can manage skin ulcers effectively by applying basic principles and using readily available guidelines. PMID:15648380

  9. Engaging patients in pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Hudgell, Lynne; Dalphinis, Julie; Blunt, Chris; Zonouzi, Maryam; Procter, Susan

    2015-05-01

    As patients increasingly care for themselves at home, they require accessible information to enable informed self-care. This article describes the development of an educational electronic application (app) designed for use by patients at risk of pressure ulcers, and their carers. The app can be downloaded to Windows, Android or Apple smartphones or tablets. The app is based on the current pressure ulcer prevention and management guidelines from the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, and is designed to educate patients and carers about how to prevent a pressure ulcer, how to recognise a pressure ulcer, and what to do if they suspect they are developing a pressure ulcer. We hope the app will be used to help with educational conversations among patients, carers and healthcare professionals.

  10. [Orthopaedic footwear against foot ulcers in diabetes].

    PubMed

    Bus, Sicco A

    2014-01-01

    In people with diabetes mellitus, foot ulcers are a major problem because they increase the risk of a foot infection and amputation and reduce quality of life. After a foot ulcer has healed, the risk of recurrence is high. Orthopaedic shoes and orthotics are often prescribed to high risk patients and aim to reduce the mechanical pressure on the plantar surface of the foot. Orthopaedic footwear that is modified to reduce pressure is not much more effective in preventing foot ulcer recurrence than orthopaedic footwear that did not undergo such modification, unless the shoes are worn as recommended. In that case, the risk of ulcer recurrence is reduced by 46%. In patients with a history of ulceration, compliance in wearing orthopaedic shoes at home is low, while these patients walk more inside the house than outside the house. Foot pressure measurements should be part of the prescription and evaluation of orthopaedic footwear for patients at high risk for foot ulceration.

  11. Three cases of Lipschutz vulval ulceration.

    PubMed

    Alés-Fernández, M; Rodríguez-Pichardo, A; García-Bravo, B; Ferrándiz-Pulido, L; Camacho-Martínez, F M

    2010-05-01

    A Lipschütz ulcer or 'ulcus vulvae acutum' is an acute simple ulceration of the vulva or vagina of non-venereal origin which can be associated with lymphadenopathy. Three cases are described with accompanying clinical photographs. Two cases refer to adolescents, one an infant, all without any history of sexual contact. The cases serve to illustrate a little known but potentially important differential diagnosis of vulval ulceration.

  12. [SURGICAL TREATMENT OF COMPLICATED GASTRODUODENAL ULCER].

    PubMed

    Lupahltsov, V I

    2016-03-01

    Results of operative treatment of 437 patients with complicated gastroduodenal ulcer were summarized. The modern views on the problem of conservative therapy for gas- troduodenal ulcer were presented. A rational individual approach with a certain terms is necessary for conservative treatment of gastroduodenal ulcer. A real way for improve- ment of the patients treatment results--it is a combination of effective conservative treatment with a timely established indications for a planned operative treatment before dangerous complications occur.

  13. Recurrence of Mooren's ulcer after lamellar keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, P J

    1989-09-01

    A 45-year-old man with unilateral Mooren's ulcer in a quiescent state underwent annular lamellar keratoplasty after corneal rupture due to minor trauma. Postoperatively, he did well until 8 months later when a recurrence of the Mooren's ulceration occurred, involving the central island of the patient's original corneal stroma. The stroma of the lamellar graft was uninvolved. This unusual occurrence lends support to the concept that there is a specific immunologic reaction to the cornea in patients with Mooren's ulcer.

  14. [SURGICAL TREATMENT OF COMPLICATED GASTRODUODENAL ULCER].

    PubMed

    Lupahltsov, V I

    2016-03-01

    Results of operative treatment of 437 patients with complicated gastroduodenal ulcer were summarized. The modern views on the problem of conservative therapy for gas- troduodenal ulcer were presented. A rational individual approach with a certain terms is necessary for conservative treatment of gastroduodenal ulcer. A real way for improve- ment of the patients treatment results--it is a combination of effective conservative treatment with a timely established indications for a planned operative treatment before dangerous complications occur. PMID:27514084

  15. Correlation analysis of cytokine gene expression changes and antiulcer effects of Pro-Gly-Pro and N-Acetyl-Pro-Gly-Pro in experimental models of ulceration.

    PubMed

    Bakaeva, Z V; Kozlov, I G; Sangadzhieva, A D; Samonina, G E; Mezentseva, M V; Andreeva, L A; Myasoedov, N F

    2015-01-01

    Direct correlation of the cytokine gene expression level in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (BMNCs) and gastric mucosa (GM) cells with the development of gastric ulcers of various etiologies was shown for the first time. Ethanol-induced ulceration causes an increased transcription of IFNa, IL-8, and IL-12 mRNA in BMNCs. GM damages caused by water immersion stress were accompanied by an increased transcription of TNFa. The sizes of acetate-induced damages were positively correlated with the expression of IL-10 and IL-8 genes in BMNCs and with the expression of IFNa, IL-2, IL-12, and TNF genes in GM cells. Intranasal administration of Pro-Gly-Pro (PGP) reduced ethanol-induced ulceration, activating the transcription of IFNγ, IL-2, and IL-4 mRNA in BMNCs and prevents the formation of stress- and acetateinduced ulcers by inhibiting the expression of IL-8 and IL-10 genes, respectively.

  16. Cryptogenic multifocal ulcerous stenosing enteritis (CMUSE), and neuromuscular and vascular hamartoma (NMVH): two sides of the same coin?

    PubMed

    Setaffy, Lisa; Osuna, María José Martín; Plieschnegger, Wolfgang; del Pino Florez Rial, María; Geboes, Karel; Langner, Cord

    2015-04-01

    Multifocal stenosing enteritis, not related to Crohn's disease or drug intake, has been described under two different terms: "cryptogenic multifocal ulcerous stenosing enteritis" (CMUSE) and "neuromuscular and vascular hamartoma" (NMVH). We present three new cases of this condition and argue that the two terms reflect the same disease entity. Although etiology and pathogenesis of the disease remain largely unclear, obliterative vascular changes may play an important role.

  17. A revised risk analysis of stress ulcers in burn patients receiving ulcer prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Hwan; Lee, Jong Ho; Shin, Jae Jun; Cho, Young Soon

    2015-01-01

    Objective Most of the literature about Curling’s ulcer was published from 1960 through 1980. Therefore, an updated study of Curling’s ulcer is needed. We analyzed the risk factors affecting ulcer incidence in burn patients. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of burn patients who were admitted to two burn centers. We collected information about the general characteristics of patients, burn area size, abbreviated burn severity index, whether surgery was performed, endoscopy results, and the total body surface area (TBSA). We performed a multivariate regression analysis predicting development of Curling’s ulcer. Results In total, 135 patients (mean age, 49.5±13.5 years) underwent endoscopy. Endoscopy revealed ulcer in 51 patients: 36 (70.6%) with gastric ulcers, 9 (17.6%) with duodenal ulcers, and 6 (11.8%) with both ulcer types. Burn area, burn depth, epigastric pain, melena, intensive care unit admission, burn area >20% of TBSA, and undergoing surgery for the burn were significantly different between the ulcer and non-ulcer groups. Multivariate analysis showed two independent factors significantly associated with ulcer: epigastric pain (odds ratio [OR]: 4.55, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.74 to 11.90), major burn (TBSA > 20%)(OR: 4.31 ,95% CI: 1.34 to 13.85). Conclusion For burn patients, presence of epigastric pain and major burn with TBSA > 20% showed significant association with ulcer development. PMID:27752605

  18. Pressure ulcer prevention in frail older people.

    PubMed

    Barry, Maree; Nugent, Linda

    2015-12-16

    Pressure ulcers are painful and cause discomfort, have a negative effect on quality of life, and are costly to treat. The incidence and severity of preventable pressure ulcers is an important indicator of quality of care; it is essential that healthcare providers monitor prevalence and incidence rates to ensure that care strategies implemented are effective. Frail older people are at increased risk of developing pressure ulcers. This article discusses the complexities of preventing pressure ulcers in frail older people and emphasises the importance of structured educational programmes that incorporate effective clinical leadership and multidisciplinary teamwork.

  19. Ischemic Gastropathic Ulcer Mimics Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Saleh; Lahav, Ziv; Rmeileh, Ayman Abu; Mizrahi, Meir

    2016-01-01

    Gastric ulcer due to mesenteric ischemia is a rare clinical finding. As a result, few reports of ischemic gastric ulcers have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis of ischemic gastropathy is seldom considered in patients presenting with abdominal pain and gastric ulcers. In this case report, we describe a patient with increasing abdominal pain, weight loss, and gastric ulcers, who underwent extensive medical evaluation and whose symptoms were resistant to medical interventions. Finally he was diagnosed with chronic mesenteric ischemia, and his clinical and endoscopic abnormalities resolved after surgical revascularization of both the superior mesenteric artery and the celiac trunk. PMID:27579191

  20. Cushing's ulcer: the eponym and his own.

    PubMed

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2011-06-01

    One of the least remembered eponyms associated with Harvey Cushing is "Cushing's ulcer." The basis of this credit is a paper published in 1932 in which Cushing describes patients who postoperatively and unexpectedly died of perforated peptic ulcers. It is one of the first descriptions of a stress ulcer and a treatise on the brain-stomach connection. Harvey Cushing was puzzled by the pathogenesis of these peptic ulcerations and perforations and advanced several theories. The least plausible included the bile-vomiting theory suggesting that hemorrhagic ulceration could be produced by a combination of bile and acid in a patient recovering from the anesthetic. Other theories were stimulation of a parasympathetic center in the diencephalon or a disturbance of vagal centers in the brainstem. Quite surprisingly to Cushing, the Boston Herald implicitly insinuated that Cushing found the cause of ulcers and this claim upset him greatly. It is ironic that Harvey Cushing, in his later years with failing health, developed an ulcer himself. Cushing noted in his correspondence that he felt the agitation over this newspaper clipping caused his later ulcer. The first description of a neurogenic ulcer remains an important medical observation and is a testament to Cushing's broad accomplishments. PMID:21346647

  1. Gastric emptying abnormal in duodenal ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, S.; Heading, R.C.; Taylor, T.V.; Forrest, J.A.; Tothill, P.

    1986-07-01

    To investigate the possibility that an abnormality of gastric emptying exists in duodenal ulcer and to determine if such an abnormality persists after ulcer healing, scintigraphic gastric emptying measurements were undertaken in 16 duodenal ulcer patients before, during, and after therapy with cimetidine; in 12 patients with pernicious anemia, and in 12 control subjects. No difference was detected in the rate or pattern of gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer patients before and after ulcer healing with cimetidine compared with controls, but emptying of the solid component of the test meal was more rapid during treatment with the drug. Comparison of emptying patterns obtained in duodenal ulcer subjects during and after cimetidine treatment with those obtained in pernicious anemia patients and controls revealed a similar relationship that was characterized by a tendency for reduction in the normal differentiation between the emptying of solid and liquid from the stomach. The similarity in emptying patterns in these groups of subjects suggests that gastric emptying of solids may be influenced by changes in the volume of gastric secretion. The failure to detect an abnormality of gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer subjects before and after ulcer healing calls into question the widespread belief that abnormally rapid gastric emptying is a feature with pathogenetic significance in duodenal ulcer disease.

  2. Gastric cancer detection in gastric ulcer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mountford, R A; Brown, P; Salmon, P R; Alvarenga, C; Neumann, C S; Read, A E

    1980-01-01

    A retrospective study has been performed of all cases of gastric ulcer diagnosed or investigated within the Endoscopy Unit of the Department of Medicine, Bristol, over a three year period (1974-76). The average length of follow-up was two years. Two hundred and sixty five cases of gastric ulcer were studied of which 37 proved to be malignant (14%). Presenting complaints of anorexia, weight loss, nausea and/or vomiting, and multiple (greater than 3) symptoms, were commoner in the malignant ulcer group. Ulcer site and the presence of coexisting duodenal ulceration were largely unhelpful in deciding the status of an ulcer. Malignant ulcers tended to be large (greater than 1 cm diameter). Radiology was highly unreliable in distinguishing benign from malignant ulcers. Visual inspection at endoscopy was more reliable, but associated with a tendency to over-diagnose malignancy. False positive biopsies were uncommon (two cases). Three cases of clinically unsuspected superficial gastric carcinoma were revealed. Repeated endoscopy and biopsy of all gastric ulcers until they are completely healed is advised. Images Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7364322

  3. [Peptic ulcer surgery in the aged].

    PubMed

    Michel, D

    1981-04-01

    Particular problems are discussed in 257 patients over 75 years of age, who were treated for peptic ulcer disease between 1960 and 1979. In elderly patients the peptic ulcer is complicated, often requiring emergency surgery. A special problem in the aged is simultaneous appearance of various sicknesses, which produces further complications. The chosen method of surgery is described and the post-operative period and its general and surgical problems are discussed. The result is a concept of indication for surgery, particularly for the elective operation of chronic ulcers not responding to therapy, before the ulcer becomes complicated. PMID:7227008

  4. Characterization of the porcine CDKN3 gene as a potential candidate for congenital splay leg in piglets

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Congenital splay leg is a hereditary disease observed in newborn piglets. The etiology and pathogenetic mechanism of the disorder are still unknown. The gene for cyclin-dependent protein kinase inhibitor 3 (CDKN3) was identified as a potential candidate gene in a differential display experiment. We analyzed the gene on sequence variations and compared its expression in M. biceps femoris between healthy and affected piglets. Comparative sequencing of the coding region of three healthy and four splay leg piglets revealed twelve single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) resulting in six amino acid exchanges in the deduced sequences. However, all polymorphisms were observed in healthy as well as in splay leg piglets thus excluding structural differences of the gene as a cause of the disease. Besides full length transcripts, we found a variety of aberrantly transcribed cDNA in clones derived from M. biceps femoris of healthy as well as of splay leg piglets. All alternative transcripts coexist with normal cDNA. Expression analysis revealed a trend towards higher values in M. biceps femoris of splay leg piglets supporting the results obtained from a differential display. PMID:12927088

  5. The Most Common Detected Risk and Etiologic Factors of Pulmonary Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna; Baljic, Rusmir

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) is the most serious manifestation of thromboembolic disease. Objective: To determine the most common risk and etiologic factors of pulmonary tromboembolism in patients treated in Intensive care unit of Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” in three-year- period from 2008. to 2010. Material and methods: We retrospectively analysed patients with PTE treated in Intensive care unit of Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” in three-year period from 2008. to 2010. PTE was diagnosed by high resolute computed tomography, in most of them ventilatory /perfusion scintigraphy (V/P SPECT) was made, with proper laboratory analyses (D-dimmer, platelets , fibrinogen, and if it was needed protein C, S and AT III factor were examined). In all of them echosonography of abdomen and pelvis was done, also the examination by angiologist, and in patients with indications echosonography of the heart and Color Doppler of leg veins was made. We analysed risk and etiologic factors for PTE in each patient. Results: In 222 treated patients with PTE risk factors were found in 124 or 55.86% patients, etiologic factors were found in 31 or 13.96%, and both risk and etiologic factors in one patient were found in 18 or 8.11% patients. Conclusion: PTE is very serious disease that very often has fatal prognosis, and can develop with previously entirely healthy people, and as soon as we become suspicious of its presence we have to made appropriate diagnostic procedures and include appropriate therapy. We can after look for risk and etiologic factors and try to influence them. PMID:23922531

  6. Micropenis. I. Criteria, etiologies and classification.

    PubMed

    Lee, P A; Mazur, T; Danish, R; Amrhein, J; Blizzard, R M; Money, J; Migeon, C J

    1980-04-01

    A micropenis is an abnormally small penis with a normal configuration. This finding constitues a sign not a diagnosis. The etiologies may be classified as hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, primary hypogonadism, androgen insensitivity, or idiopathic; among 45 patients, the respective percentages in these categories were 31, 24, 2 and 7% with 36% as yet undiagnosed. Various clinical syndromes may include a micropenis and can be classified in one of the etiologic categories. This paper provides the criteria for determining the presence of a micropenis. A phallic length which is 2.5 or more standard deviations below the mean should be considered as abnormal; for an infant of 0 to 5 months of age, the lower limit is 1.9 cm. The technique of penile measurement, determination of etiology, guidelines for sex of rearing and psychologic, surgical and medical management are discussed.

  7. Antioxidant properties of natural compounds used in popular medicine for gastric ulcers.

    PubMed

    Repetto, M G; Llesuy, S F

    2002-05-01

    There is evidence concerning the participation of reactive oxygen species in the etiology and physiopathology of human diseases, such as neurodegenerative disorders, inflammation, viral infections, autoimmune pathologies, and digestive system disorders such as gastrointestinal inflammation and gastric ulcer. The role of these reactive oxygen species in several diseases and the potential antioxidant protective effect of natural compounds on affected tissues are topics of high current interest. To consider a natural compound or a drug as an antioxidant substance it is necessary to investigate its antioxidant properties in vitro and then to evaluate its antioxidant functions in biological systems. In this review article, we shall consider the role of natural antioxidants derived from popular plants to reduce or prevent the oxidative stress in gastric ulcer induced by ethanol. PMID:12011936

  8. How diet and lifestyle affect duodenal ulcers. Review of the evidence.

    PubMed Central

    Ryan-Harshman, Milly; Aldoori, Walid

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the role of diet in reducing or aggravating risk of duodenal ulcer (DU). QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: MEDLINE was searched from January 1966 to December 2001 for articles on the relationship between diet and lifestyle and DU using the key words duodenal ulcer and diet, fibre, or lifestyle. Evidence that these factors are associated with DU arose mainly from three case-control and three prospective studies (level II evidence) and from expert opinion (level III evidence). MAIN MESSAGE: A high-fibre diet appears to reduce risk of DU; soluble fibre might be associated with reduced risk also. Vitamin A intake is associated with lower risk of DU. Little evidence indicates that fat, type of fat, protein intake, or consumption of alcohol or caffeine affect the etiology of DU. CONCLUSION: A high-fibre diet, particularly if the fibre comes from fruit and vegetables, could reduce risk of DU; vitamin A might also be beneficial. PMID:15171675

  9. Laser Therapy of Recurrent Aphthous Ulcer in Patient with HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Bruno Vieira; Noro Filho, Gilberto Araujo; Dos Santos, Camila Correia; Okida, Yugo; Giovani, Elcio Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    The recurrent aphthous ulcer (RAU) is a pathological change found in the oral mucosa, characterized by painful single or multiple ulcers. The etiologic aspect of RAU is not well understood; however it is known that due to lower CD4 cell counts patients had higher prevalence of these oral lesions, and immunosuppressed patients with HIV are predisposed. Patient FC is African descent, 26 years old, male, HIV + CD4 67 cells/mm(3), with minor RAU in the upper and lower right side lip, measuring about 4 mm, and major RAU in tongue and the tonsillar pillar measuring 2 cm. The patient was treated with laser therapy with the objective to help reverse the damage and decrease the symptoms. After one week there was remission of the lesions. The laser showed to be an important alternative therapy that promoted analgesic, healing effects and improving the quality of life of patients. PMID:23346114

  10. Leg extension is an important predictor of paretic leg propulsion in hemiparetic walking.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Carrie L; Cheng, Jing; Kautz, Steven A; Neptune, Richard R

    2010-10-01

    Forward propulsion is a central task of walking that depends on the generation of appropriate anterior-posterior ground reaction forces (AP GRFs). The AP impulse (i.e., time integral of the AP GRF) generated by the paretic leg relative to the non-paretic leg is a quantitative measure of the paretic leg's contribution to forward propulsion and is variable across hemiparetic subjects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the underlying mechanisms of propulsion generation in hemiparetic walking by identifying the biomechanical predictors of AP impulses. Three-dimensional kinematics and GRFs were recorded from 51 hemiparetic and 21 age-matched control subjects walking at similar speeds on an instrumented treadmill. Hierarchical regression models were generated for each leg to predict the AP impulse from independent biomechanical variables. Leg extension was a significant predictor and positively related to the propulsive impulse in the paretic, non-paretic and control legs. Secondarily, the hip flexor moment impulse was negatively related to the propulsive impulse. Also, the relationship of paretic and non-paretic ankle moments with the propulsive impulse depended on the paretic step ratio, suggesting the plantar flexor contribution to the propulsive impulse depends on leg angle. These results suggest that increasing paretic leg extension will increase propulsion. Increasing paretic plantar flexor output and decreasing paretic hip flexor output could also increase paretic leg propulsion. While increased pre-swing hip flexor output has been suggested to compensate for decreased plantar flexor output, such output may further impair propulsion by the paretic leg if it occurs too soon in the gait cycle.

  11. Clopidogrel delays gastric ulcer healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiing-Chyuan; Huo, Teh-Ia; Hou, Ming-Chih; Lin, Hsiao-Yi; Li, Chung-Pin; Lin, Han-Chieh; Chang, Full-Young; Lee, Fa-Yauh

    2012-11-15

    Clopidogrel is not safe enough for the gastric mucosa in patients with high risk of peptic ulcer. This study aimed to explore if clopidogrel delays gastric ulcer healing and elucidate the involved mechanisms. Gastric ulcer was induced in rats and the ulcer size, mucosal epithelial cell proliferation of the ulcer margin, expression of growth factors [epidermal growth factor (EGF), basic fibroblast growth factor] and their receptors, and signal transduction pathways for cell proliferation were measured and compared between the clopidogrel-treated group and untreated controls. For the in vitro part, rat gastric mucosal epithelial cell line (RGM-1 cells) was used to establish EGF receptor over-expressed cells. Cell proliferation and molecular change under EGF treatment (10ng/ml) with and without clopidogrel (10(-6)M) were demonstrated. Ulcer size was significantly larger in the clopidogrel-treated group compared to the control and mucosal epithelial cell proliferation of the ulcer margin was significantly decreased in the clopidogrel-treated group (P<0.05). Clopidogrel (2mg and 10mg/kg/day) significantly decreased ulcer-induced gastric epithelial cell proliferation and ulcer-stimulated expressions of EGF receptor and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (PERK) at the ulcer margin (P<0.05). Clopidogrel (10(-6)M) also inhibited EGF-stimulated EGF receptor, PERK expression, and cell proliferation in RGM-1 cells (P<0.05), and caused much less inhibition of EGF-stimulated cell proliferation in EGF receptor over-expressed RGM-1 cells than in RGM-1 cells (22% vs. 32% reduction). In conclusion, clopidogrel delays gastric ulcer healing in rats via inhibiting gastric epithelial cell proliferation, at least by inhibition of the EGF receptor-ERK signal transduction pathway.

  12. Micropenis: etiology, diagnosis and treatment approaches.

    PubMed

    Hatipoğlu, Nihal; Kurtoğlu, Selim

    2013-01-01

    Micropenis is a medical diagnosis based on correct measurement of length. If stretched penile length is below the value corresponding to - 2.5 standard deviation of the mean in a patient with normal internal and external male genitalia, a diagnosis of micropenis is considered. Micropenis can be caused by a variety of factors including structural or hormonal defects of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. It can also be a component of a number of congenital syndromes. For the etiological evaluation, endocrinologic tests are important. This article reviews the etiology, diagnosis, treatment and management of micropenis.

  13. Conductivity of Doped Two-Leg Ladders

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eugene H.

    2001-02-12

    Recently, conductivity measurements were performed on the hole-doped two-leg ladder material Sr{sub 14-x} Ca{sub x}Cu {sub 24}O{sub 41} . In this work, we calculate the conductivity for doped two-leg ladders using a model of hole pairs forming a strongly correlated liquid. Quantum interference effects are handled using renormalization group methods. We find that our model can account for the low-energy features of the experiments. However, at higher energies there are deviations from the predictions of this model. Using the results of our calculations as well as results on the ground state of doped two-leg ladders, we suggest a scenario to explain the experimental results.

  14. Probabilistic Mechanical Reliability Prediction of Thermoelectric Legs

    SciTech Connect

    Jadaan, Osama M.; Wereszczak, Andrew A

    2009-05-01

    The probability of failure, Pf, for various square-arrayed thermoelectric device designs using bismuth telluride, lead telluride, or skutterudite thermoelectric materials were estimated. Only volume- or bulk-based Pf analysis was considered in this study. The effects of the choice of the thermoelectric material, the size of the leg array, the height of the thermoelectric legs, and the boundary conditions on the Pf of thermoelectric devices were investigated. Yielding of the solder contacts and mounting layer was taken into account. The modeling results showed that the use of longer legs, using skutterudites, allowing the thermoelectric device to freely deform while under a thermal gradient, and using smaller arrays promoted higher probabilities of survival.

  15. Dimensional synthesis of a leg mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, F.; Lovasz, E.-Ch; Pop, C.; Dolga, V.

    2016-08-01

    An eight bar leg mechanism dimensional synthesis is presented. The mathematical model regarding the synthesis is described and the results obtained after computation are verified with help of 2D mechanism simulation in Matlab. This mechanism, inspired from proposed solution of Theo Jansen, is integrated into the structure of a 2 DOF quadruped robot. With help of the kinematic synthesis method described, it is tried to determine new dimensions for the mechanism, based on a set of initial conditions. These are established by taking into account the movement of the end point of the leg mechanism, which enters in contact with the ground, during walking. An optimization process based on the results obtained can be conducted further in order to find a better solution for the leg mechanism.

  16. Thrombophilia and chronic venous ulceration.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, A W; MacKenzie, R K; Burns, P; Fegan, C

    2002-08-01

    It is known that thrombophilia (TP) is a risk factor for deep venous thrombosis (DVT), and that DVT predisposes to chronic venous ulceration (CVU). However, the relationship between TP and CVU has not been well studied. Review of the literature reveals that the prevalence of TP in CVU patients is high--similar to the prevalence found in patients with a history of DVT. This is despite many patients with CVU having no clear history, or duplex evidence of previous DVT. TP may predispose to CVU by leading to macro- or micro-vascular thrombosis. This association raises several issues regarding the investigation, prevention and management of patients with venous disease.

  17. Triple gastric peptic ulcer perforation.

    PubMed

    Radojkovic, Milan; Mihajlovic, Suncica; Stojanovic, Miroslav; Stanojevic, Goran; Damnjanovic, Zoran

    2016-03-01

    Patients with advanced or metastatic cancer have compromised nutritional, metabolic, and immune conditions. Nevertheless, little is known about gastroduodenal perforation in cancer patients. Described in the present report is the case of a 41-year old woman with stage IV recurrent laryngeal cancer, who used homeopathic anticancer therapy and who had triple peptic ulcer perforation (PUP) that required surgical repair. Triple gastric PUP is a rare complication. Self-administration of homeopathic anticancer medication should be strongly discouraged when evidence-based data regarding efficacy and toxicity is lacking.

  18. Scleritis and Peripheral Ulcerative Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Galor, Anat; Thorne, Jennifer E.

    2008-01-01

    Scleritis and peripheral ulcerative keratitis (PUK) can present as isolated conditions or as part of a systemic inflammatory or infectious disorder. Both are serious ocular conditions that can result in vision loss and therefore require early diagnosis and treatment. Nearly two-thirds of patients with non-infectious scleritis require systemic glucocorticoid therapy, and one fourth need a glucocorticoid-sparing agent, as well. Essentially all patients with non-infectious PUK require systemic glucocorticoids. Detailed clinical history, thorough physical examination, and thoughtful laboratory evaluations are all important in the exclusion of underlying disorders and extraocular involvement. PMID:18037120

  19. A rapidly fatal palatal ulcer: rhinocerebral mucormycosis.

    PubMed

    Van der Westhuijzen, A J; Grotepass, F W; Wyma, G; Padayachee, A

    1989-07-01

    A case of a patient with a palatal ulcer who was in a diabetic ketoacidotic coma is described. This ulcer proved to be the presenting sign of rhinocerebral mucormycosis. The patient had hemifacial swelling, ocular signs, and gross tissue destruction and died less than 4 weeks after she was first seen.

  20. Symptoms and Causes of Peptic Ulcer Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ulcer Disease Next: Diagnosis of Peptic Ulcer Disease Digestive Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients and medical professionals. View the full list of Digestive Disease Organizations​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ NIH...Turning Discovery ...

  1. Ulcerative colitis flare with splenic ven thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Huseyin Sancar; Kara, Banu; Citil, Serdal

    2015-01-01

    Patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) have an increased risk of thromboembolic events. Here, we present a 28-year-old man with active ulcerative pancolitis presenting via splenic vein thrombosis and left renal superior infarct that was not associated with a surgical procedure.

  2. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section 4.110 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term...

  3. 38 CFR 4.110 - Ulcers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ulcers. 4.110 Section 4.110 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.110 Ulcers. Experience has shown that the term...

  4. Vesicular, ulcerative, and necrotic dermatitis of reptiles.

    PubMed

    Maas, Adolf K

    2013-09-01

    Vesicular, ulcerative, and necrotic dermatologic conditions are common in captive reptiles. Although these conditions have distinct differences histologically, they are commonly sequelae to each other. This article examines the anatomy and physiology of reptile skin; discusses reported causes of vesicular, ulcerative, and necrotic dermatologic conditions; and reviews various management options.

  5. [Multiple and prepyloric ulcers of the stomach].

    PubMed

    Dibrova, Iu A

    2010-01-01

    The literature data and own experience results concerning treatment of relatively rare multiple and prepyloric ulcers were summarized. The peculiarities of functional diagnosis methods of these ulcers are adduced. The tactics of surgical treatment, depending on localization, the complication character and gastric functional state was substantiated.

  6. Sympathetic adaptations to one-legged training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of leg exercise training on sympathetic nerve responses at rest and during dynamic exercise. Six men were trained by using high-intensity interval and prolonged continuous one-legged cycling 4 day/wk, 40 min/day, for 6 wk. Heart rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA; peroneal nerve) were measured during 3 min of upright dynamic one-legged knee extensions at 40 W before and after training. After training, peak oxygen uptake in the trained leg increased 19 +/- 2% (P < 0.01). At rest, heart rate decreased from 77 +/- 3 to 71 +/- 6 beats/min (P < 0.01) with no significant changes in MAP (91 +/- 7 to 91 +/- 11 mmHg) and MSNA (29 +/- 3 to 28 +/- 1 bursts/min). During exercise, both heart rate and MAP were lower after training (108 +/- 5 to 96 +/- 5 beats/min and 132 +/- 8 to 119 +/- 4 mmHg, respectively, during the third minute of exercise; P < 0.01). MSNA decreased similarly from rest during the first 2 min of exercise both before and after training. However, MSNA was significantly less during the third minute of exercise after training (32 +/- 2 to 22 +/- 3 bursts/min; P < 0.01). This training effect on MSNA remained when MSNA was expressed as bursts per 100 heartbeats. Responses to exercise in five untrained control subjects were not different at 0 and 6 wk. These results demonstrate that exercise training prolongs the decrease in MSNA during upright leg exercise and indicates that attenuation of MSNA to exercise reported with forearm training also occurs with leg training.

  7. Sympathetic adaptations to one-legged training.

    PubMed

    Ray, C A

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of leg exercise training on sympathetic nerve responses at rest and during dynamic exercise. Six men were trained by using high-intensity interval and prolonged continuous one-legged cycling 4 day/wk, 40 min/day, for 6 wk. Heart rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA; peroneal nerve) were measured during 3 min of upright dynamic one-legged knee extensions at 40 W before and after training. After training, peak oxygen uptake in the trained leg increased 19 +/- 2% (P < 0.01). At rest, heart rate decreased from 77 +/- 3 to 71 +/- 6 beats/min (P < 0.01) with no significant changes in MAP (91 +/- 7 to 91 +/- 11 mmHg) and MSNA (29 +/- 3 to 28 +/- 1 bursts/min). During exercise, both heart rate and MAP were lower after training (108 +/- 5 to 96 +/- 5 beats/min and 132 +/- 8 to 119 +/- 4 mmHg, respectively, during the third minute of exercise; P < 0.01). MSNA decreased similarly from rest during the first 2 min of exercise both before and after training. However, MSNA was significantly less during the third minute of exercise after training (32 +/- 2 to 22 +/- 3 bursts/min; P < 0.01). This training effect on MSNA remained when MSNA was expressed as bursts per 100 heartbeats. Responses to exercise in five untrained control subjects were not different at 0 and 6 wk. These results demonstrate that exercise training prolongs the decrease in MSNA during upright leg exercise and indicates that attenuation of MSNA to exercise reported with forearm training also occurs with leg training. PMID:10233121

  8. The Molecular Genetics of Restless Legs Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rye, David B

    2015-09-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common sensorimotor trait defined by symptoms that interfere with sleep onset and maintenance in a clinically meaningful way. Nonvolitional myoclonus while awake and asleep is a sign of the disorder and an informative endophenotype. The genetic contributions to RLS/periodic leg movements are substantial, are among the most robust defined to date for a common disease, and account for much of the variance in disease expressivity. The disorder is polygenic, as revealed by recent genome-wide association studies. Experimental studies are revealing mechanistic details of how these common variants might influence RLS expressivity.

  9. Etiology of inflammatory bowel disease: A unified hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xiaofa

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including both ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD), emerged and dramatically increased for about a century. Despite extensive research, its cause remains regarded as unknown. About a decade ago, a series of findings made me suspect that saccharin may be a key causative factor for IBD, through its inhibition on gut bacteria and the resultant impaired inactivation of digestive proteases and over digestion of the mucus layer and gut barrier (the Bacteria-Protease-Mucus-Barrier hypothesis). It explained many puzzles in IBD such as its emergence and temporal changes in last century. Recently I further found evidence suggesting sucralose may be also linked to IBD through a similar mechanism as saccharin and have contributed to the recent worldwide increase of IBD. This new hypothesis suggests that UC and CD are just two symptoms of the same morbidity, rather than two different diseases. They are both caused by a weakening in gut barrier and only differ in that UC is mainly due to increased infiltration of gut bacteria and the resultant recruitment of neutrophils and formation of crypt abscess, while CD is mainly due to increased infiltration of antigens and particles from gut lumen and the resultant recruitment of macrophages and formation of granulomas. It explained the delayed appearance but accelerated increase of CD over UC and many other phenomena. This paper aims to provide a detailed description of a unified hypothesis regarding the etiology of IBD, including the cause and mechanism of IBD, as well as the relationship between UC and CD. PMID:22553395

  10. Future Directions in ADHD Etiology Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigg, Joel T.

    2012-01-01

    Reviews salient emerging themes in the scientific literature related to identifying etiology and pathophysiology of ADHD. While bypassing the need for new treatment research, the review highlights three themes. First, recognition of the epigenetic effects is expected to revitalize the search for and mapping of early environmental influences on the…

  11. [Hyperemesis gravidarum--etiology and treatment].

    PubMed

    Imperato, F; Canova, I; Basili, R; Iuele, T; Mossa, B

    2003-01-01

    Hyperemesis gravidarum is a common pathology encountered by the obstetrician in 0.1-2% of all pregnancies. The purpose of our review, along with other literature, is to report general outline of the syndrome, with etiology, complications and some guidelines about conventional and newer therapy.

  12. Recent Research on the Etiologies of Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Eileen; Van Dyke, Don C.; Sears, Lonnie; Matzen, Jane; Lin-Dyken, Deborah; McBrien, Dianne M.

    1999-01-01

    Reviews recent research on the etiologies of autism, including genetic research, anatomic and neuroimaging studies, topics in neurophysiology research (including serotonin, dopamine, and opiods), immunologic research, studies of autism phenotype, and electroencephalographic studies. It concludes that, as of yet, research has found no clear…

  13. Towards a Balanced Account of Autism Etiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Genae A.

    2004-01-01

    Drash and Tudor describe six sets of reinforcement contingencies which may be present in the environments of some children eventually diagnosed with autism and suggest that these contingencies account for the etiology of "autistic" behaviors. Nevertheless, merely observing such contingencies in the environments of these children is insufficient to…

  14. [Etiology of acute infantile gastroenteritis in Gabon].

    PubMed

    Gendrel, D; Sitbon, M; Richard-Lenoble, D; Galliot, A; Kombila, M; Ivanoff, B; Nardou, M; Gendrel, C; Kani, F

    1985-01-01

    Rotaviruses are the main etiology of acute diarrhoeas in gabonese children (11 to 30% according to age). Salmonellae (11.4%), Shigellae (7.1%) and E. histolytica (7.1%), isolated or associated with enterobacteria, E. coli (3%), Giardia and Strongyloides stercoralis (1.4%), Yersinia enterocolitica (1%) and Balantidium coli (0.5%) were also found, without cholera. PMID:2863005

  15. Necrotizing sialometaplasia of the palate. Ulcerative or necrotizing stage of leukokeratosis nicotina palati?

    PubMed

    Philipsen, H P; Petersen, J K; Simonsen, B H

    1976-12-01

    A typical case of the recently described tumor-suspect lesion, necrotizing sialometaplasia (NS) of the palate, in a 54-year old Caucasian male is presented. Results of complete blood- and urinanalysis including serum electrophoresis and labial salivary gland biopsy strongly pointed at a local etiologic factor. Previous statements that the disease represents a new entity are questioned. The present authors favor the idea that NS is the necrotizing (ulcerative) or terminal stage of leukokeratosis nicotina palati (nicotinic stomatitis). It is of particular importance that this lesion is not diagnosed as a malignancy, as it heals spontaneously and uneventfully.

  16. Respiratory-Related Leg Movements and Their Relationship with Periodic Leg Movements During Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Manconi, Mauro; Zavalko, Irina; Bassetti, Claudio L.; Colamartino, Elisabetta; Pons, Marco; Ferri, Raffaele

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To describe the time structure of leg movements (LM) in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome, in order to advance understanding of their clinical significance. Location: Sleep Research Centre, Oasi Institute (IRCCS), Troina, Italy. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Patients: Eighty-four patients (16 females, 68 males, mean age 55.1 y, range 29-74 y). Methods: Respiratory-related leg movements (RRLM) and those unrelated to respiratory events (NRLM) were examined within diagnostic polysomnograms alone and together for their distributions within the sleep period and for their periodicity. Measurements and Results: Patients with OSA and RRLM exhibited more periodic leg movements in sleep (PLMS), particularly in NREM sleep. A gradual decrease in number of NRLM across the sleep period was observed in patients with RRLM. This pattern was less clear for RRLM. Frequency histograms of intermovement intervals of all LMs in patients with RRLM showed a prominent first peak at 4 sec, and a second peak at approximately 24 sec coincident with that of PLMS occurring in the absence of OSA. A third peak of lowest amplitude was the broadest with a maximum at approximately 42 sec. In patients lacking RRLM, NRLM were evident with a single peak at 2-4 sec. A stepwise linear regression analysis showed that, after controlling for a diagnosis of restless legs syndrome and apnea-hypopnea index, PLMS remained significantly associated with RRLM. Conclusion: The time structure of leg movements occurring in conjunction with respiratory events exhibit features of periodic leg movements in sleep occurring alone, only with a different and longer period. This brings into question the validity, both biologic and clinical, of scoring conventions with their a priori exclusion from consideration as periodic leg movements in sleep. Citation: Manconi M; Zavalko I; Bassetti CL; Colamartino E; Pons M; Ferri R. Respiratory-related leg movements and their relationship with periodic leg movements

  17. Ulcerative paraneoplastic dermatomyositis secondary to metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Scheinfeld, Noah S

    2006-01-01

    A 40-year-old Chinese-American woman with breast carcinoma metastatic to her lungs presented with a 3-month history of erosions on her inner thighs (Figure 1) and medial left shoulder. Faint livedo reticularis was evident on her legs as well. She had difficulty in walking and raising her shoulders. Her cutaneous examination was also notable for cuticular erythema (Figure 2) and mild periorbital erythema and edema. She had no systemic or rheumatologic complaints other than some difficulty in swallowing. Her blood chemistry values were notable for a creatinine kinase of 564 IU/L (5-200 IU/L), alanine aminotransferase 161 U/L (0-40 U/L) and aspartate aminotransferase 93 U/L (0-40 U/L), and an antinuclear antibody titer of 1:2560. Other blood chemistries and antibody serologies (anti-Jo-1, anti-Mi-2 and other anti-tRNA synthetase, anti-Ro/SSA, anti-U1RNP, anti-PM/Scl, and anti-Ku) were within normal limits. A biopsy specimen was obtained from an area of intact skin close to a right thigh ulceration that showed subtle vacuolar alteration at the dermo-epidermal junction with occasional necrotic keratinocyte (Figure 3). Melanophages and telangiectases were present. Within the subcutis there was fibrin deposition and neutrophils. A diagnosis of dermatomyositis was made. The patient received oral prednisone 20 mg three times a day, and her ulcerations resolved. Her creatinine kinase, alanine aminotransferase, and aspartate aminotransferase values returned to normal over the course of 3 weeks, but her antinuclear antibody was unchanged. Radiographic studies concurrently noted that her breast cancer had recurred in her lungs; plans were made to treat her with chemotherapy. The patient was lost to close follow-up, but it was learned that her erosions had reoccurred while her prednisone was tapered and resolved when her dosage of prednisone was increased.

  18. Factors precipitating acute ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Puri, A S; Chaubal, C C; Midha, Vandana

    2014-08-01

    Ulcerative colitis is characterized by mucosal inflammation of a variable length of the colon starting from the rectum. The precise etiopathogenesis is unknown but it occurs in genetically susceptible individuals who manifest an abnormal immunological response against gut commensal bacteria. The disease course is-characterized by multiple spontaneous relapses and remissions. Two pathogens namely CMV and C. difficile have been associated with disease exacerbation in specific clinical situations. Whereas C. difficile may produce worsening of the disease in those exposed to broad spectrum antibiotics, CMV reactivation is seen only in patients with moderate to severe steroid refractory disease. The importance of these two super-infections can be gauged by the fact that both the ACG and the ECCO recommend testing for these two pathogens in appropriate clinical situations. The applicability of these guidelines in the Indian scenario has yet to be determined in view of the bacterial and parasitic infections endemic in tropical countries. The guidelines for diagnosis and management of these two super-infections in the presence of ulcerative colitis are discussed in this review. PMID:25735121

  19. Etiology and Prevention of Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chung S.; Chen, Xiaoxin; Tu, Shuiping

    2016-01-01

    Background Esophageal cancer (EC) occurs commonly, especially in Asia, and is the sixth leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Recently, great progress has been made in research on the etiology and prevention of EC. Summary The major risk factors for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) are tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking, which act synergistically. Dietary parameters, including dietary carcinogens and insufficiency of micronutrients, could also be important risk factors in certain areas. A common etiological factor for both EC and some other cancers are low levels of intake of fruits and vegetables. With improvements in diet and drinking water in developing countries, the incidence of ESCC decreased. However, in economically well-developed countries, the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has markedly increased in the past 40 years. The major etiological factor for EAC is gastroesophageal reflux, which is also an etiological factor for gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (GCA). In certain areas of China, the occurrence of GCA is closely related to ESCC. Susceptibility genes for EC are starting to be discovered, and this may help to identify high-risk groups that have more need for preventive measures. Mitigation of the risk factors, early detection and treatment of precancerous lesions are effective approaches for prevention. Smoking cessation, avoidance of excessive alcohol, meat and caloric consumption, increasing physical activity and frequent consumption of vegetables and fruits are prudent lifestyle modifications for the prevention of EC as well as other diseases. Key Message The etiology of EC includes tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, low levels of intake of fruits and vegetables as well as gastroesophageal reflux and susceptibility genes. Practical Implications A healthy lifestyle including smoking cessation, increasing physical activity, consumption of vegetables as well as reduction of alcohol intake and caloric consumption are major

  20. [The influence of the leg load and the support mobility under leg on the anticipatory postural adjustment].

    PubMed

    Kazennikov, O V; Kireeva, T B; Shlykov, V Iu

    2015-01-01

    Anticipatory postural adjustment is an essential part of equilibrium maintainance during standing in human. So changes in stance condition could affect both control of equilibrium and anticipatory adjustment. Anticipatory changes in the stabilogram of each leg were studied in standing subject during the early stage of quick right arm lifting while legs were on two separated supports. The center of pressure (CP) movement was analyzed in three variants of experiment: both legs on immovable support, with only right leg on the movable support and with only left leg on the moveable support. In each standing condition subject stood with symmetrical load on two legs or with the load voluntary transferred to one leg. The anticipatory CP shift depended on the mobility of the support under the leg and on loading of the leg. While standing on unmovable supports with symmetrical load on the legs before lifting of the right arm CP of right leg shifted backward and CP of left leg--forward. While standing with one leg on movable support the anticipatory CP shift of this leg was small and did not depend on the load on the leg. However the shift of CP of the leg that was placed on the unmovable support depended on the load in the same way as in the case when both legs were on unmovable supports. Results suggested that since on movable support the support and proprioceptive afferent flow from distal part of the leg that was did not supply unambiguous information about body position, the role of distal joints in posture control is reduced. PMID:25857178

  1. [The influence of the leg load and the support mobility under leg on the anticipatory postural adjustment].

    PubMed

    Kazennikov, O V; Kireeva, T B; Shlykov, V Iu

    2015-01-01

    Anticipatory postural adjustment is an essential part of equilibrium maintainance during standing in human. So changes in stance condition could affect both control of equilibrium and anticipatory adjustment. Anticipatory changes in the stabilogram of each leg were studied in standing subject during the early stage of quick right arm lifting while legs were on two separated supports. The center of pressure (CP) movement was analyzed in three variants of experiment: both legs on immovable support, with only right leg on the movable support and with only left leg on the moveable support. In each standing condition subject stood with symmetrical load on two legs or with the load voluntary transferred to one leg. The anticipatory CP shift depended on the mobility of the support under the leg and on loading of the leg. While standing on unmovable supports with symmetrical load on the legs before lifting of the right arm CP of right leg shifted backward and CP of left leg--forward. While standing with one leg on movable support the anticipatory CP shift of this leg was small and did not depend on the load on the leg. However the shift of CP of the leg that was placed on the unmovable support depended on the load in the same way as in the case when both legs were on unmovable supports. Results suggested that since on movable support the support and proprioceptive afferent flow from distal part of the leg that was did not supply unambiguous information about body position, the role of distal joints in posture control is reduced.

  2. Skin ulcers in estuarine fishes: a comparative pathological evaluation of wild and laboratory-exposed fish.

    PubMed

    Vogelbein, W K; Shields, J D; Haas, L W; Reece, K S; Zwerner, D E

    2001-10-01

    The toxic dinoflagellate Pfiesteria piscicida Steidinger & Burkholder has recently been implicated as the etiologic agent of acute mass mortalities and skin ulcers in menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus, and other fishes from mid-Atlantic U.S. estuaries. However, evidence for this association is largely circumstantial and controversial. We exposed tilapia (Oreochromis spp.) to Pfiesteria shumwayae Glasgow & Burkholder (identification based on scanning electron microscopy and molecular analyses) and compared the resulting pathology to the so-called Pfiesteria-specific lesions occurring in wild menhaden. The tilapia challenged by high concentrations (2,000-12,000 cells/mL) of P. shumwayaeexhibited loss of mucus coat and scales plus mild petecchial hemorrhage, but no deeply penetrating chronic ulcers like those in wild menhaden. Histologically, fish exhibited epidermal erosion with bacterial colonization but minimal associated inflammation. In moribund fish, loss of epidermis was widespread over large portions of the body. Similar erosion occurred in the mucosa lining the oral and branchial cavities. Gills exhibited epithelial lifting, loss of secondary lamellar structure, and infiltration by lymphoid cells. Epithelial lining of the lateral line canal (LLC) and olfactory organs exhibited severe necrosis. Visceral organs, kidney, and neural tissues (brain, spinal cord, ganglia, peripheral nerves) were histologically normal. An unexpected finding was the numerous P. shumwayae cells adhering to damaged skin, skin folds, scale pockets, LLC, and olfactory tissues. In contrast, histologic evaluation of skin ulcers in over 200 wild menhaden from Virginia and Maryland portions of the Chesapeake Bay and the Pamlico Estuary, North Carolina, revealed that all ulcers harbored a deeply invasive, highly pathogenic fungus now known to be Aphanomyces invadans. In menhaden the infection always elicited severe myonecrosis and intense granulomatous myositis. The consistent occurrence of this

  3. Muscle dynamics differences between legs in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Eamonn P; Harrison, Andrew J

    2007-02-01

    Differences in muscle dynamics between the preferred and nonpreferred jumping legs of subjects in maximal, explosive exercise were examined. Eight subjects performed nonfatiguing bouts of single-legged drop jumps and rebound jumps on a force sledge apparatus. Measures of flight time, reactive strength index, peak vertical force, and vertical leg-spring stiffness were obtained for 3 drop jumps and 3 rebound jumps on both legs. Subjects utilized a stiffer leg spring and a more explosive jumping action in the nonpreferred leg when performing a cyclical rebound jumping task in comparison to a single drop jump task (observed through differences in vertical leg-spring stiffness, peak vertical force, and reactive strength index, p < 0.05). The preferred leg performed equally well in both tasks. Between-leg analysis showed no differences in dependent variables between the preferred and the nonpreferred leg in the rebound jumping protocol. However, the drop jump protocol showed significant performance differences, with flight time and reactive strength index greater in the preferred leg than the nonpreferred leg (p < 0.05). We hypothesize that, throughout the lifespan, both legs are equally trained in cyclical rebound jumping tasks through running. However, because a preferred leg must be selected when performing any one-off, single-legged jump, imbalances in this specific task develop over time with consistent selection of a preferred jumping leg. The data demonstrate that the rebound jump protocol is representative of the symmetrical mechanics of forward running and that leg-spring stiffness is modulated depending on the demands of the specific task involved. Strength and conditioning practitioners should give careful consideration to appropriate jump protocol selection and should exercise caution when comparing laboratory results to data gathered in field testing. PMID:17313262

  4. Chronic Lower Leg Pain in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Rachel Biber; Gregory, Andrew J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Chronic lower leg pain in athletes can be a frustrating problem for patients and a difficult diagnosis for clinicians. Myriad approaches have been suggested to evaluate these conditions. With the continued evolution of diagnostic studies, evidence-based guidance for a standard approach is unfortunately sparse. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed was searched from January 1980 to May 2011 to identify publications regarding chronic lower leg pain in athletes (excluding conditions related to the foot), including differential diagnosis, clinical presentation, physical examination, history, diagnostic workup, and treatment. Results: Leg pain in athletes can be caused by many conditions, with the most frequent being medial tibial stress syndrome; chronic exertional compartment syndrome, stress fracture, nerve entrapment, and popliteal artery entrapment syndrome are also considerations. Conservative management is the mainstay of care for the majority of causes of chronic lower leg pain; however, surgical intervention may be necessary. Conclusion: Chronic lower extremity pain in athletes includes a wide differential and can pose diagnostic dilemmas for clinicians. PMID:23016078

  5. Mechanics of six-legged runners.

    PubMed

    Full, R J; Tu, M S

    1990-01-01

    Six-legged pedestrians, cockroaches, use a running gait during locomotion. The gait was defined by measuring ground reaction forces and mechanical energy fluctuations of the center of mass in Blaberus discoidalis (Serville) as they travelled over a miniature force platform. These six-legged animals produce horizontal and vertical ground-reaction patterns of force similar to those found in two-, four- and eight-legged runners. Lateral forces were less than half the vertical force fluctuations. At speeds between 0.08 and 0.66 ms-1, horizontal kinetic and gravitational potential energy changes were in phase. This pattern of energy fluctuation characterizes the bouncing gaits used by other animals that run. Blaberus discoidalis attained a maximum sustainable stride frequency of 13 Hz at 0.35 ms-1, the same speed and frequency predicted for a mammal of the same mass. Despite differences in body form, the mass-specific energy used to move the center of mass a given distance (0.9 J kg-1m-1) was the same for cockroaches, ghost crabs, mammals, and birds. Similarities in force production, stride frequency and mechanical energy production during locomotion suggest that there may be common design constraints in terrestrial locomotion which scale with body mass and are relatively independent of body form, leg number and skeletal type.

  6. A large vascular leiomyoma of the leg.

    PubMed

    Cigna, E; Maruccia, M; Malzone, G; Malpassini, F; Soda, G; Drudi, F M

    2012-06-01

    A 69-year-old woman with a subcutaneous, large vascular leiomyoma of the leg is presented. The patient had a painful, slow-growing, right medial malleolus mass. Clinical symptoms, US images and histopathologic features are reported. Vascular leiomyoma should be included in the differential diagnosis of painful, lower extremity subcutaneous masses also in lesions of larger dimensions.

  7. Stress fractures of the foot and leg.

    PubMed

    Meyer, S A; Saltzman, C L; Albright, J P

    1993-04-01

    Stress fractures are overuse injuries of bone. Basketball players are particularly prone to develop the notoriously "troublesome" stress fractures of the foot and leg. This article reviews the pathogenesis, epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of stress fractures, with specific emphasis on the care of the basketball athlete.

  8. Functional scoliosis caused by leg length discrepancy

    PubMed Central

    Daniszewska, Barbara; Zolynski, Krystian

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Leg length discrepancy (LLD) causes pelvic obliquity in the frontal plane and lumbar scoliosis with convexity towards the shorter extremity. Leg length discrepancy is observed in 3-15% of the population. Unequalized lower limb length discrepancy leads to posture deformation, gait asymmetry, low back pain and discopathy. Material and methods In the years 1998-2006, 369 children, aged 5 to 17 years (209 girls, 160 boys) with LLD-related functional scoliosis were treated. An external or internal shoe lift was applied. Results Among 369 children the discrepancy of 0.5 cm was observed in 27, 1 cm in 329, 1.5 cm in 9 and 2 cm in 4 children. During the first follow-up examination, within 2 weeks, the adjustment of the spine to new static conditions was noted and correction of the curve in 316 examined children (83.7%). In 53 children (14.7%) the correction was observed later and was accompanied by slight low back pain. The time needed for real equalization of limbs was 3 to 24 months. The time needed for real equalization of the discrepancy was 11.3 months. Conclusions Leg length discrepancy equalization results in elimination of scoliosis. Leg length discrepancy < 2 cm is a static disorder; that is why measurements should be performed in a standing position using blocks of adequate thickness and the position of the posterior superior iliac spine should be estimated. PMID:22371777

  9. Ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... stomach is empty. Eating something or taking an antacid medication sometimes makes the pain go away for ... are taken every day for about 2 weeks. Antacids — acid blockers or proton pump inhibitors — are given ...

  10. Epidemiological Aspect and common Bacterial and Fungal isolates from Suppurative Corneal Ulcer in Mymensingh Region.

    PubMed

    Moid, M A; Akhanda, A H; Islam, S; Halder, S K; Islam, R

    2015-04-01

    This prospective study was done to find out the epidemiological factors of suppurative corneal ulcer and the common causative bacterial and fungal isolates from the, patients with suppurative corneal ulcer in secondary and tertiary level hospital at Mymensingh region. A total 100 samples of corneal scrapings were collected purposively from clinically diagnosed suppurative corneal ulcer patients from March 18, 2012 to March 17, 2013. Out of the total 100 samples, bacterial species were 29(29%) cases and the fungal spacies were 71(71%) identified by the culture in blood agar, chocolate agar and sabouraud's agar media and also by microscopic examination. The bacterial species were streptococcus pneumonae 12 cases (12%), Staphylococcus aureus 9 cases (9%), pseudomonas in 6 cases (6%), and Streptococcus pyoganes 2 cases (2%). Fungal species were aspergillus fumigatus 61 cases (61%), aspergillus niger 10 cases (10%). Out of the study populations, most of the populations were from the age group of 41 to 60 years (39 %), followed 21 to 40 years (34%) age group. Considering the sex, male were 67%, female were 33%. The majority of patients came from the rural area of Mymensingh region; occupationally they were farmers (44%). Ocular trauma due to agricultural materials was the most common associated factor (71%). The etiological and epidemiological pattern of suppurative corneal ulcer varies significantly with geographical region, patient population and health of the cornea. The present study was carried out to explore the epidemiological pattern, causative bacterial and fungal specie by laboratory procedure from corneal scraping and to invent a prospective guide line for the management of corneal ulcer in the community.

  11. Management of Infective Corneal Ulcer: Epidemiology Needs To Be Evaluated As Priority Basis.

    PubMed

    Talukder, A K; Sultana, Z; Jahan, I; Khanam, M; Bhuiyan, S I; Rahman, M B

    2016-07-01

    Because of known and unknown etiology, management of ocular devastating situation like corneal ulcer is still a challenge for the Ophthalmologists. The cross sectional study was designed for detection of predisposing factor and identification of causal agent. To serve the above purpose, a cross sectional study was performed among 140 patients of the corneal ulcer at Dr K Zaman BNSB Eye Hospital, Mymensingh and Department of Microbiology and Hygiene, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh, Bangladesh. Detail history of patient was taken and recorded in a pretest questionnaire sheet. Two pieces of sample were collected from each corneal ulcer patient. One sample was examined in KOH wet mount for fungus. Other sample was nourished into nutrient broth and for further culture and identification. Bacterial corneal ulcer was higher among the patient of age group ≥46 years (61.9%) followed by 31-45 years (21.5%). P value is 0.261. Males were found predominant (58.5%). P value is 0.13. Agricultural related work was identified as most risky occupation in 83.1% of the total bacteria positive samples. P value is 0.01. Trauma was noted as most predominant influencing factor (56.9%). P value is <0.05. Bacteria were identified in 65(46.4%) and fungus in 40(28.6%) samples. Pseudomonas species were predominant (52.3%) followed by Staphylococcus species (26, 2%) and Streptococcus species (21.5%). No mixed infection was identified. For easier and earlier diagnosis of corneal ulcer, information about epidemiology is very essential. History should be taken meticulously followed by the laboratory procedures. PMID:27612884

  12. Leg stiffness measures depend on computational method.

    PubMed

    Hébert-Losier, Kim; Eriksson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Leg stiffness is often computed from ground reaction force (GRF) registrations of vertical hops to estimate the force-resisting capacity of the lower-extremity during ground contact, with leg stiffness values incorporated in a spring-mass model to describe human motion. Individual biomechanical characteristics, including leg stiffness, were investigated in 40 healthy males. Our aim is to report and discuss the use of 13 different computational methods for evaluating leg stiffness from a double-legged repetitive hopping task, using only GRF registrations. Four approximations for the velocity integration constant were combined with three mathematical expressions, giving 12 methods for computing stiffness using double integrations. One frequency-based method that considered ground contact times was also trialled. The 13 methods thus defined were used to compute stiffness in four extreme cases, which were the stiffest, and most compliant, consistent and variable subjects. All methods provided different stiffness measures for a given individual, but the between-method variations in stiffness were consistent across the four atypical subjects. The frequency-based method apparently overestimated the actual stiffness values, whereas double integrations' measures were more consistent. In double integrations, the choice of the integration constant and mathematical expression considerably affected stiffness values, as variations during hopping were more or less emphasized. Stating a zero centre of mass position at take-off gave more consistent results, and taking a weighted-average of the force or displacement curve was more forgiving to variations in performance. In any case, stiffness values should always be accompanied by a detailed description of their evaluation methods, as our results demonstrated that computational methods affect calculated stiffness. PMID:24188972

  13. A colored leg banding technique for Amazona parrots

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyers, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    A technique for individual identification of Amazona was developed using plastic leg bands. Bands were made from 5- and 7-mm-wide strips of laminated PVC coiled 2.5 times with an inside diameter 4-5 mm gt the maximum diameter of the parrot's leg. Seventeen parrots were captured in Puerto Rico, marked with individual plastic leg bands, and observed for 204-658 d with only one lost or damaged plastic band. Plastic leg bands did not cause injury to or calluses on parrots' legs. The plastic material used for making leg bands was available in 18 colors in 1994, which would allow unique marking of 306 individuals using one plastic leg band on each leg.

  14. 11. NORTH VIEW OF INNER FACING OF SOUTHEASTERN LEG OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. NORTH VIEW OF INNER FACING OF SOUTHEASTERN LEG OF SEA WALL. SOUTHERN END OF NORTHEASTERN LEG OF SEA WALL IN BACKGROUND. - Fort Delaware, Sea Wall, Pea Patch Island, Delaware City, New Castle County, DE

  15. Diabetic foot ulcers. Pathophysiology, assessment, and therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Bowering, C. K.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review underlying causes of diabetic foot ulceration, provide a practical assessment of patients at risk, and outline an evidence-based approach to therapy for diabetic patients with foot ulcers. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search was conducted for the period from 1979 to 1999 for articles relating to diabetic foot ulcers. Most studies found were case series or small controlled trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Foot ulcers in diabetic patients are common and frequently lead to lower limb amputation unless a prompt, rational, multidisciplinary approach to therapy is taken. Factors that affect development and healing of diabetic patients' foot ulcers include the degree of metabolic control, the presence of ischemia or infection, and continuing trauma to feet from excessive plantar pressure or poorly fitting shoes. Appropriate wound care for diabetic patients addresses these issues and provides optimal local ulcer therapy with débridement of necrotic tissue and provision of a moist wound-healing environment. Therapies that have no known therapeutic value, such as foot soaking and topical antiseptics, can actually be harmful and should be avoided. CONCLUSION: Family physicians are often primary medical contacts for patients with diabetes. Patients should be screened regularly for diabetic foot complications, and preventive measures should be initiated for those at risk of ulceration. PMID:11398715

  16. Corneal ulceration following measles in Nigerian children.

    PubMed Central

    Sandford-Smith, J H; Whittle, H C

    1979-01-01

    Acute corneal ulceration in malnourished children is the commonest cause of childhood blindness in Northern Nigeria and usually develops after measles. Other severe diseases in malnourished children rarely precipitate corneal ulceration. A survey in a school for blind children showed that 69% of the children were blind from corneal disease, and a survey of children with corneal scars showed that at least 42% were caused by ulceration after measles. The clinical appearance of the active ulcers was very varied. The serum retinol-binding protein and prealbumin levels in children with corneal ulcers following measles were below normal, but a group of malnourished children without eye complaints following measles were found to have even lower levels. Thus a specific deficiency of vitamin A does not appear to be the primary cause of these ulcers, though it may be a contributory one. A specific measles keratitis and secondary herpes simplex infectious may be local factors contributing to this ulceration, and there is nearly always a background of protein calorie malnutrition. Racial factors may also be of some significance. PMID:508686

  17. Management of finger ulcers in scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Ward, W A; Van Moore, A

    1995-09-01

    Twelve patients (15 hands) with documented scleroderma and chronic nonhealing digital ulcers were followed for their response to nonoperative and operative treatment. The patients were initially managed with nifedipine, biofeedback, digital xylocaine blockade, and silver sulfadiazine topical ointment and cessation of all vasoconstrictive agents. Ulcerations healed in 6 of 15 hands and remained healed at a 2-year follow-up examination. The remaining nine hands in seven patients failed nonoperative treatment and underwent a palmar digital sympathectomy. These chronic digital ulcerations healed within 6 weeks after surgery. After a 26- to 64-month follow-up period, six of the nine hands remained free of all digital ulcerations. Two patients (three hands) had partial recurrence of the ulceration. Digital sympathectomy can be an effective procedure for treating nonhealing digital ulcers in scleroderma patients after nonoperative treatment has failed. Significant vaso-occlusive disease is likely to be present in these patients, as demonstrated by arteriography. Our initial approach is cessation of all vasoconstricting agents, nifedipine biofeedback, and local antibiotic ointment. Wrist blocks with xylocaine and marcaine are offered if these modalities fail. If these methods do not result in healing of the ulcer within 12 weeks, then digital sympathectomy is considered.

  18. Clinical picture of peptic ulceration diagnosed endoscopically.

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, M C; Holmes, G K; Cockel, R

    1977-01-01

    Clinical features and laboratory data are presented for 100 patients with benign gastric ulceration and 150 patients with duodenal ulceration confirmed endoscopically in a district general hospital unit. Abdominal pain was the commonest indication for endoscopy, but one third of examinations were performed for acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Although the patients were selected by referral for endoscopy their clinical presentation, age, and sex distribution were similar to those reported in previous general surveys. There were no clinical features which clearly distinguished gastric from duodenal ulceration. However, of those with gastric ulceration younger patients more often had distal ulcers and presented with pain, while elderly subjects tended to have high lesser curve involvement and presented with haemorrhage. Moreover, all females presenting with haemorrhage were aged over 50 years, while 6% of males bleeding from gastric ulceration and 40% of males bleeding from duodenal ulceration were under this age. Anaemia when present, except in two premenopausal females, indicated either a recent acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage or a coexistent second diagnosis. PMID:873333

  19. Seasonal behaviour of healed duodenal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A K; Pal, L S

    1998-04-01

    Incidence of peptic ulcer is more in people living at higher altitude and similarly relapse of healed duodenal ulcer is more in winter season. Seasonal behaviour of healed duodenal ulcer with or without maintenance therapy with H2 blockers was studied among subjects residing around Shimla (approximate altitude 7000 feet above mean sea level). Sixty-four subjects of endoscopically healed duodenal ulcer were alternatively advised placebo (32 subjects) and ranitidine 150 mg (32 subjects) at bed time as maintenance therapy for period of one year. Subjects were reviewed endoscopically and evaluated for H pylori by rapid urease test, every months or earlier if symptomatic. Relapse rate was analysed among 60 subjects at the end of one year. Cumulative relapse rate was found 60% in ranitidine group and 100% in placebo group. In ranitidine group percentage of relapse to number of endoscopic examinations was 21.4% throughout the year, but in placebo group during winter and spring season relapse was 87.5% of endoscopic examination whereas 57.2% during summer and fall season. Incidence of duodenal ulcer relapse without maintenance therapy was more in winter and spring season (October to March) as compared to summer and fall (April to September), whereas intermittent seasonal treatment is efficacious in prevention of duodenal ulcer relapse and also improves cost benefit ratio of ulcer treatment.

  20. Liposomes as drug carriers for oral ulcers.

    PubMed

    Harsanyi, B B; Hilchie, J C; Mezei, M

    1986-09-01

    The aim of this study was to test the potential of liposomes as drug carriers to the ulcerated oral mucosa. Radioactive triamcinolone acetonide palmitate (3H-TRMAp) was encapsulated in large multilamellar lipid vesicles and served as the test lotion. 3H-TRMAp in solution served as control. Forty-six hamsters were divided into three groups. In group I, multiple confluent ulcers in both cheek pouches were treated by topical application. In group II, single ulcers on the cheeks were treated by intramucosal injection. In group III, multiple confluent ulcers were produced in the cheek pouch on one side, with a single ulcer in the contralateral cheek pouch; no drug was applied, and the tissues were prepared for histology. Hamsters were killed at three and 24 hours, respectively, after treatment. Pouches were divided into ulcerated and intact adjacent mucosa. Cheeks were divided into ulcerated mucosa and distant mucosa. Drug levels in the four mucosal portions as well as in the blood, liver, spleen, brain, and thalamic region were determined by radioactive tracer technique. At three hours, liposomal drug concentrations were lower than in control animals in the brain and the thalamic region. At 24 hours, liposomal drug values were higher than in control animals in the ulcerated mucosa and lower than in control animals in the thalamic region. Mean drug concentrations in the ulcerated mucosa were higher in group II than group I. The results parallel those of Mezei and Gulasekharam (1980, 1982); liposomes increase local and decrease systemic drug concentration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Lateral lower leg perforator flaps: an anatomical study to localize and classify lateral lower leg perforators.

    PubMed

    Hupkens, Pieter; Schijns, Wendy; Van Abeelen, Marjolijn; Kooloos, Jan G M; Slater, Nicholas J; Ulrich, Dietmar J O

    2015-02-01

    Despite increasing use of lateral lower leg perforator flaps, comprehensive anatomical data are still lacking. The aim of this article was to comprehensively document the pattern of usable lateral lower leg perforators. Systematic mapping of 16 cadaver leg perforators in a well-defined area was performed to elucidate location, course, length, diameter, and origin. Overall, 197 perforators were found in 16 lateral lower legs. The mean number of perforators per leg with a diameter ≥ 0.3 mm was 13.4 ± 3.6. Most perforators were found in the distal third (39.0%), followed by the middle third (32.0%), and proximal third (29.0%). A musculocutaneous course was found in 26.9% of the perforators, whereas 73.1% revealed a septocutaneous course. Most septocutaneous perforators (50.0%) were found in the distal third and most musculocutaneous perforators (58.5%) in the proximal third (P < 0.001). The majority of perforators originated from the anterior tibial artery (53.0%), followed by the peroneal artery (41.6%), and the popliteal artery (5.1%). Popliteal artery perforators (1.64 mm) were significantly larger than anterior tibial artery (0.91 mm) and peroneal artery perforators (1.02 mm; P < 0.001). These results may facilitate tissue transfer around the lateral lower leg.

  2. Lipschutz ulcers: evaluation and management of acute genital ulcers in women.

    PubMed

    Huppert, Jill S

    2010-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers are painful and distressing to women and perplexing to the providers who care for them. The differential diagnosis includes sexually and nonsexually transmitted infections, autoimmune conditions, drug reactions, and local manifestations of systemic illness. However, in many cases, no causative agent is identified, and lesions are classified as idiopathic aphthosis. In the setting of fever and acute onset of genital ulcers in girls and women, the term Lipschutz ulcers has been used to describe ulcers associated with an immunologic reaction to a distant source of infection or inflammation. The aims of this article are to review the differential diagnosis and pathogenesis of acute genital ulcers, to offer an evaluation and classification scheme, and to discuss treatment options for the dermatologist who cares for women and girls with vulvar ulcers.

  3. [Lipschütz acute genital ulcer].

    PubMed

    Kluger, N; Garcia, C; Guillot, B

    2009-10-01

    Lipschütz acute genital ulcer is a rare distinctive cause of nonvenereal acute genital ulcers that occurs particularly in adolescents described in 1913. We report here a typical case that occurred in a 24-year-old virgin woman who developed flu-like symptoms and painful genital ulcers that healed spontaneously within a week and without any infection (Epstein Barr Virus, toxoplasmosis, salmonella). The physiopathogeny remains unknown. However, there are body of evidences pointing out a possible link to several nonvenereal infections, including mainly Epstein-Barr virus acute infection. This rare benign but disabling entity should be known by gynecologists.

  4. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy in diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Jen; Cheng, Jai-Hong; Kuo, Yur-Ren; Schaden, Wolfgang; Mittermayr, Rainer

    2015-12-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are among the most common foot disorders with ulceration, infection, and gangrene that may ultimately lead to lower extremity amputation. The goals of treatment include the control of diabetes and proper shoe wear. An effective therapy and appropriate foot care are important in wound healing in DFUs. Recently, extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) was reported to significantly promote and accelerate the healing of complex soft tissue wounds as compared to the standard methods of treatment in DFUs. ESWT showed positive results in short-term and long-term outcomes in diabetic patients suffering from foot ulcers. In this article, we review the clinical results of ESWT in DFUs.

  5. [Study of genetic markers of duodenal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Tsimmerman, Ia S; Onosova, E A; Tsimmerman, I Ia

    1989-05-01

    The results of determination of various hereditary predisposition markers in peptic ulcer are given: in the population, in patients with duodenal ulcer and in their siblings (risk group). Of importance for revealing subjects with hereditary predisposition to duodenal ulcer are the clinico-genealogical analysis, determination of the blood group, especially in simultaneous determination of a "secretory status" ("status of non-secretion" of the ABH blood system agglutinogen in the saliva), increase in the mass of parietal cells and, to some extent, of the distinguishing features of dermatoglyphics (in combination with the above markers). Determination of taste sensitivity to phenylthiocarbamide is non-informative. PMID:2770215

  6. Diabetic foot ulcers: practical treatment recommendations.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Michael

    2006-01-01

    When treating diabetic foot ulcers it is important to be aware of the natural history of the diabetic foot, which can be divided into five stages: stage 1, a normal foot; stage 2, a high risk foot; stage 3, an ulcerated foot; stage 4, an infected foot; and stage 5, a necrotic foot. This covers the entire spectrum of foot disease but emphasises the development of the foot ulcer as a pivotal event in stage 3, which demands urgent and aggressive management. Diabetic foot care in all stages needs multidisciplinary management to control mechanical, wound, microbiological, vascular, metabolic and educational aspects. Achieving good metabolic control of blood glucose, lipids and blood pressure is important in each stage, as is education to teach proper foot care appropriate for each stage. Ideally, it is important to prevent the development of ulcers in stages 1 and 2. In stage 1, the normal foot, it is important to encourage the use of suitable footwear, and to educate the patient to promote healthy foot care and footwear habits. In stage 2, the foot has developed one or more of the following risk factors for ulceration: neuropathy, ischaemia, deformity, swelling and callus. The majority of deformities can be accommodated in special footwear and as callus is an important precursor of ulceration it should be treated aggressively, especially in the neuropathic foot. In stage 3, ulcers can be divided into two distinct entities: those in the neuropathic foot and those in the neuroischaemic foot. In the neuropathic foot, ulcers commonly develop on the plantar surface of the foot and the toes, and are associated with neglected callus and high plantar pressures. In the neuroischaemic foot, ulcers are commonly seen around the edges of the foot, including the apices of the toes and back of the heel, and are associated with trauma or wearing unsuitable shoes. Ulcers in stage 3 need relief of pressure (mechanical control), sharp debridement and dressings (wound control), and

  7. Propeller Flap for Complex Distal Leg Reconstruction: A Versatile Alternative when Reverse Sural Artery Flap is Not Feasible.

    PubMed

    Ademola, Samuel A; Michael, Afieharo I; Oladeji, Femi J; Mbaya, Kefas M; Oyewole, O

    2015-01-01

    Reverse sural artery fasciocutaneous flap has become a workhorse for the reconstruction of distal leg soft tissue defects. When its use is not feasible, perforator-based propeller flap offers a better, easier, faster, and cheaper alternative to free flap. We present our experience with two men both aged 34 years who sustained Gustilo 3B injuries from gunshot. The donor area for reversed sural artery flap was involved in the injuries. They had early debridement, external fixation, and wound coverage with perforator-based propeller flaps. The donor sites were covered with skin graft. All flaps survived. There were minor wound edge ulcers due to the pressure of positioning that did not affect flap survival and the ulcers healed with conservative management. Perforator-based propeller flap is a versatile armamentarium for reconstruction of soft tissue defects of the distal leg in resource-constrained settings, especially when the donor area for a reverse flow sural flap artery is involved in the injury.

  8. Etiology of maxillary canine impaction: a review.

    PubMed

    Becker, Adrian; Chaushu, Stella

    2015-10-01

    This article is a review that enumerates the causes of impaction of the maxillary permanent canines, including hard tissue obstructions, soft tissue lesions, and anomalies of neighboring teeth, and discusses the much-argued relationship between environmental and genetic factors. These phenomena have been shown in many investigations to accompany the diagnosis of canine impaction and have been presented as unrelated anomalous features, each of which is etiologically construed as genetic, including the aberrant canine itself. While in general the influence of genetics pervades the wider picture, a guidance theory proposes an alternative etiologic line of reasoning and interpretation of these studies, in which the same genetically determined anomalous features provide an abnormal milieu in which the canine is reared and from which it is guided in its misdirected and often abortive path of eruption. PMID:26432311

  9. Future directions in ADHD etiology research.

    PubMed

    Nigg, Joel T

    2012-01-01

    Reviews salient emerging themes in the scientific literature related to identifying etiology and pathophysiology of ADHD. While bypassing the need for new treatment research, the review highlights three themes. First, recognition of the epigenetic effects is expected to revitalize the search for and mapping of early environmental influences on the development of ADHD. Second, neurobiological findings will have limited impact if not examined in the context of significant race and cultural variation in ADHD-related developmental processes, and in the context of rapidly changing social and technological contexts of children's development worldwide. Third, further examination of the phenotype and characterization of its dimensional and categorical structure remains a major need. Overall, the coming decades of etiology research on ADHD will be expected to capitalize on new scientific tools. The hope in the field is that new insights into fundamental prevention can emerge.

  10. Spider diffraction: a comparison of curved and straight legs

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, J.L.

    1984-06-15

    It has been known for some time that, if curved legs rather than the usual straight ones are used in the spider that supports the secondary optics in certain telescopes, the visible diffraction effect is reduced. Fraunhofer theory is used to calculate the diffraction effects due to the curved leg spider. Calculated and photographic diffraction patterns are compared for straight and curved leg spiders.

  11. Drug therapy for ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chang-Tai; Meng, Shu-Yong; Pan, Bo-Rong

    2004-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an inflammatory destructive disease of the large intestine occurred usually in the rectum and lower part of the colon as well as the entire colon. Drug therapy is not the only choice for UC treatment and medical management should be as a comprehensive whole. Azulfidine, Asacol, Pentasa, Dipentum, and Rowasa all contain 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), which is the topical anti-inflammatory ingredient. Pentasa is more commonly used in treating Crohn’s ileitis because Pentasa capsules release more 5-ASA into the small intestine than Asacol tablets. Pentasa can also be used for treating mild to moderate UC. Rowasa enemas are safe and effective in treating ulcerative proctitis and proctosigmoiditis. The sulfa-free 5-ASA agents (Asacol, Pentasa, Dipentum and Rowasa) have fewer side effects than sulfa-containing Azulfidine. In UC patients with moderate to severe disease and in patients who failed to respond to 5-ASA compounds, systemic (oral) corticosteroids should be used. Systemic corticosteroids (prednisone, prednisolone, cortisone, etc.) are potent and fast-acting drugs for treating UC, Crohn’s ileitis and ileocolitis. Systemic corticosteroids are not effective in maintaining remission in patients with UC. Serious side effects can result from prolonged corticosteroid treatment. To minimize side effects, corticosteroids should be gradually reduced as soon as the disease remission is achieved. In patients with corticosteroid-dependent or unresponsive to corticosteroid treatment, surgery or immunomodulator is considered. Immunomodulators used for treating severe UC include azathioprine/6-MP, methotrexate, and cyclosporine. Integrated traditional Chinese and Western medicine is safe and effective in maintaining remission in patients with UC. PMID:15285010

  12. Ovarian cancer: etiology, risk factors, and epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Hunn, Jessica; Rodriguez, Gustavo C

    2012-03-01

    Little is known regarding the early aspects of ovarian carcinogenesis. As a consequence, the identification of women at risk for the disease is based primarily on clinical grounds, with family history being the most important risk factor. In this review, we will discuss the various hypotheses regarding ovarian etiology and pathogenesis. In addition, we will discuss the epidemiology of ovarian cancer, including hereditary, reproductive, hormonal, inflammatory, dietary, surgical, and geographic factors that influence ovarian cancer risk.

  13. [Denture stomatitis - definition, etiology, classification and treatment].

    PubMed

    Cubera, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Denture stomatitis pertains to a number of pathological symptoms in the oral cavity caused by wearing acrylic dentures. Etiological factors include: mucosal trauma, fungal infection and accumulation of denture plaque. All of these factors appear to increase the ability of Candida albicans to colonize both the denture and oral mucosal surfaces. Antifungal treatment can eradicate C. albicans contamination and relieve stomatitis symptoms. Early diagnosis of the lesion is essential to assure rational therapy.

  14. Young onset peptic ulcer disease and non-ulcer dyspepsia are separate entities.

    PubMed

    Cederberg, A; Varis, K; Salmi, H A; Sipponen, P; Härkönen, M; Sarna, S

    1991-01-01

    The characteristics of peptic ulcer and non-ulcer dyspepsia in young men were studied in 202 consecutive conscripts who attended Central Military Hospital in Helsinki because of long-standing upper abdominal complaints. Active peptic ulceration (APU) was found in 48 patients, inactive peptic ulcer disease (IPU) was diagnosed in 77 patients, non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD) was diagnosed in 52 patients. In 25 cases the reason for symptoms was another disease, and these patients were excluded from the study. A control series (CON) consisted of 30 symptomless healthy young male volunteers. The likelihood of discriminating between peptic ulcer disease and non-ulcer dyspepsia in a young male patient with dyspepsia are indicated by odds ratios (OR) and its 95% confidence limits (CL 95). Active peptic ulcer disease differs from NUD, e.g., by 1) presence of antrum gastritis, OR 41.5 (CL 95: 10.1-171), 2) Helicobacter pylori in the gastric mucosa, OR 31.0 (7.4-130), 3) Lewisa+ phenotype, OR 8.9 (1.7-45.4), 4) serum pepsinogen I (S-PGI) greater than 100 micrograms/l, OR 4.6 (1.7-12.4), 5) non-secretor status, OR 4.3 (1.6-11.6), and 6) O-blood group, OR 3.0 (1.2-7.7). In conclusion, the status of gastroduodenal mucosa, gastric secretion pattern and distribution of some genetic markers in patient series indicate that young onset peptic ulcer and non-ulcer dyspepsia are two separate entities. Helicobacter-positive antrum gastritis is the best determinant of ulcer risk, but also high S-PGI, Lewisa+ phenotype, non-secretor status and O-blood group are signs of increased risk of peptic ulcer.

  15. Risk factors for healing of duodenal ulcer under antacid treatment: do ulcer patients need individual treatment?

    PubMed

    Massarrat, S; Müller, H G; Schmitz-Moormann, P

    1988-03-01

    In order to identify the risk factors affecting the healing of duodenal ulcer, a clinical trial with effective dose of antacid was carried out in 53 patients. Duration of ulcer history, number of relapses, duration of the last and present relapse, number, duration and severity of pain attacks in the present ulcer relapse, pain radiation to back, vomiting, appetite, smoking habit, intake of analgesics and previous haemorrhage were registered. Number of ulcers, ulcer depth, bublar narrowing, erosions, duodenitis at initial endoscopy and healing of ulcer were assessed by one endoscopist. Basic and peak acid output were measured. The extent of duodenitis on the site opposite the ulcer was determined by histological examination. Sixty per cent of the duodenal ulcers were healed after three weeks. By univariate analysis, the following factors affect the healing; pain radiation to back and pain duration during treatment (p less than 0.001), multiple or deep ulcers, narrowing of duodenal bulb (p less than 0.01), number of pain attacks and poor appetite (p less than 0.05). By the stepwise logistic regression model, the following factors were selected as predictors for healing of duodenal ulcer with 76% correct classification: pain radiation to back (p = 0.002), deep ulcer (p = 0.013), multiple ulcers (p = 0.028). Number of cigarettes/day (p less than 0.007) and male sex (p = 0.036). By this model, the prediction of healing could be accurately assessed in 78% in a new sample. Individual treatment should be carried out on the basis of these factors. PMID:3356359

  16. An overview of the etiology of otosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Markou, Konstantinos; Goudakos, John

    2009-01-01

    Otosclerosis is the primary disease affecting the homeostasis of otic capsule and is among the most common causes of acquired hearing loss. Otosclerosis is considered as a multifactor disease, caused by both genetic and environmental factors. The aim of the present review is to summarize and analyze the bibliographic data, associated with the etiology of the disease. In some cases, the otosclerosis has an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Genetic studies reveal the occurrence of at least nine chromosomal loci as candidate genes of the disease. The localized measles virus infection of the otic capsule has been postulated as a possible etiological theory. The role of hormonal factors, immune and bone-remodeling system in the etiopathogenesis of otosclerosis and the association of the disease with the disorders of the connective tissue are the issues of the present study. Despite the extensive research, many etiological factors and theories have been suggested and the process of development of the otosclerosis remains unclear.

  17. Pressure ulcer pain: a systematic literature review and national pressure ulcer advisory panel white paper.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Barbara; Langemo, Diane; Cuddigan, Janet

    2009-02-01

    Pain is an ever-present problem in patients with pressure ulcers. As an advocate for persons with pressure ulcers, the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) is concerned about pain. To synthesize available pressure ulcer pain literature, a systematic review was performed of English language literature, specific to human research, 1992 to April 2008, using PubMed and the Cumulative Index in Nursing and Allied Health Literature. Fifteen relevant papers were found; they examined pain assessment tools, topical analgesia for pain management, and/or descriptions of persons with pressure ulcer pain. Studies had small sample sizes and included only adults. The literature established that 1) pressure ulcers cause pain; 2) pain assessment was typically found to be self-reported using different versions of the McGill Pain Questionnaire, Faces Rating Scale, or Visual Analog Scale; 3) pain assessment instruments should be appropriate to patient cognitive level and medical challenges; 4) in some cases, topical medications can ease pain and although information on systemic medication is limited, pain medications have been found to negatively affect appetite; and 5) wound treatment is painful, particularly dressing changes. Research gaps include the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcer pain, the impact of pain on nutrition, and pressure ulcer pain considerations for special groups (eg, children, end-of-life patients, and bariatric patients). The NPUAP presents this white paper as the current scientific know-ledge base on the topic. Research regarding the multidimensional aspects of pressure ulcer pain is strongly recommended.

  18. Small bowel ulcerative lesions are common in elderly NSAIDs users with peptic ulcer bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Tsibouris, Panagiotis; Kalantzis, Chissostomos; Apostolopoulos, Periklis; Zalonis, Antonios; Isaacs, Peter Edward Thomas; Hendrickse, Mark; Alexandrakis, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the frequency of small bowel ulcerative lesions in patients with peptic ulcer and define the significance of those lesions. METHODS: In our prospective study, 60 consecutive elderly patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding from a peptic ulceration (cases) and 60 matched patients with a non-bleeding peptic ulcer (controls) underwent small bowel capsule endoscopy, after a negative colonoscopy (compulsory in our institution). Controls were evaluated for non-bleeding indications. Known or suspected chronic inflammatory conditions and medication that could harm the gut were excluded. During capsule endoscopy, small bowel ulcerative lesions were counted thoroughly and classified according to Graham classification. Other small bowel lesions were also recorded. Peptic ulcer bleeding was controlled endoscopically, when adequate, proton pump inhibitors were started in both cases and controls, and Helicobacter pylori eradicated whenever present. Both cases and controls were followed up for a year. In case of bleeding recurrence upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was repeated and whenever it remained unexplained it was followed by repeat colonoscopy and capsule endoscopy. RESULTS: Forty (67%) cases and 18 (30%) controls presented small bowel erosions (P = 0.0001), while 22 (37%) cases and 4 (8%) controls presented small bowel ulcers (P < 0.0001). Among non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) consumers, 39 (95%) cases and 17 (33%) controls presented small bowel erosions (P < 0.0001), while 22 (55%) cases and 4 (10%) controls presented small bowel ulcers (P < 0.0001). Small bowel ulcerative lesions were infrequent among patients not consuming NSAIDs. Mean entry hemoglobin was 9.3 (SD = 1.4) g/dL in cases with small bowel ulcerative lesions and 10.5 (SD = 1.3) g/dL in those without (P = 0.002). Cases with small bowel ulcers necessitate more units of packed red blood cells. During their hospitalization, 6 (27%) cases with small bowel ulcers presented

  19. Cure of peptic gastric ulcer associated with eradication of Helicobacter pylori. Finnish Gastric Ulcer Study Group.

    PubMed

    Seppälä, K; Pikkarainen, P; Sipponen, P; Kivilaakso, E; Gormsen, M H

    1995-06-01

    The effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on ulcer healing and the relapse rate were investigated in a multicentre trial of 239 gastric ulcer patients. Patients with H pylori positive gastric ulcer were randomly assigned to one of three groups: (A) 10 days' treatment with metronidazole and eight weeks' treatment with colloidal bismuth subcitrate (CBS) (84 patients); (B) 10 days' treatment with metronidazole placebo and eight weeks with CBS (73 patients); or (C) ranitidine (82 patients). At 12 weeks in 210 patients, gastric ulcer was present in three (9%) of 35 H pylori negative patients, and in 45 (26%) of 175 H pylori positive patients (p < 0.05). Results after one year of follow up were available for 205 patients. Between 12 and 52 weeks, two (7%) ulcer relapses occurred in 29 H pylori negative patients and in 60 (47%) of 128 H pylori positive patients (p < 0.001). After two weeks of open triple therapy (CBS 120 mg four times daily, amoxicillin 500 mg four times daily, and metronidazole 400 mg three times daily), given to the patients with ulcer relapse, only one (an NSAID user) of 55 successfully treated patients had an ulcer relapse during the one year follow up. Healing of gastric ulcer is rapid and recurrence is infrequent after successful H pylori eradication. H pylori eradication changes the natural history of the gastric ulcer disease.

  20. Successful treatment of two refractory venous stasis ulcers treated with a novel poly-N-acetyl glucosamine-derived membrane

    PubMed Central

    Maus, Erik Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Standard of care for venous leg ulcers (VLUs) consists of the application of compression bandages or stockings and of local moist wound care. While the majority of patients heal with the above mentioned treatments some ulcers become refractory to treatment causing significant disability and costs. The authors present the observation made on two patients with VLUs who had failed to respond to a comprehensive state of the art wound care approach for 11 and 3 years respectively. Both patients were treated with a poly-N-acetyl glucosamine-derived membrane (pGlcNAc) (Talymed, Marine Polymer Technologies, Danvers, Massachusetts, USA) in addition to compression bandaging. Both patients healed within 6 weeks of the first application of pG1cNAc. The authors present two cases of VLUs that had been considered non-healable that were successfully treated in a very short period of time with the application of a novel technology. PMID:22778460