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Sample records for legume nodule development

  1. Hormonal Control of Lateral Root and Nodule Development in Legumes

    PubMed Central

    Bensmihen, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Many plants can establish symbioses with nitrogen-fixing bacteria, some of which lead to nodulation, including legumes. Indeed, in the rhizobium/legume symbiosis, new root organs, called nodules, are formed by the plant in order to host the rhizobia in protective conditions, optimized for nitrogen fixation. In this way, these plants can benefit from the reduction of atmospheric dinitrogen into ammonia by the hosted bacteria, and in exchange the plant provides the rhizobia with a carbon source. Since this symbiosis is costly for the plant it is highly regulated. Both legume nodule and lateral root organogenesis involve divisions of the root inner tissues, and both developmental programs are tightly controlled by plant hormones. In fact, most of the major plant hormones, such as auxin, cytokinins, abscisic acid, and strigolactones, control both lateral root formation and nodule organogenesis, but often in an opposite manner. This suggests that the sensitivity of legume plants to some phytohormones could be linked to the antagonism that exists between the processes of nodulation and lateral root formation. Here, we will review the implication of some major phytohormones in lateral root formation in legumes, compare them with their roles in nodulation, and discuss specificities and divergences from non-legume eudicot plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:27135340

  2. Hormonal Control of Lateral Root and Nodule Development in Legumes.

    PubMed

    Bensmihen, Sandra

    2015-08-07

    Many plants can establish symbioses with nitrogen-fixing bacteria, some of which lead to nodulation, including legumes. Indeed, in the rhizobium/legume symbiosis, new root organs, called nodules, are formed by the plant in order to host the rhizobia in protective conditions, optimized for nitrogen fixation. In this way, these plants can benefit from the reduction of atmospheric dinitrogen into ammonia by the hosted bacteria, and in exchange the plant provides the rhizobia with a carbon source. Since this symbiosis is costly for the plant it is highly regulated. Both legume nodule and lateral root organogenesis involve divisions of the root inner tissues, and both developmental programs are tightly controlled by plant hormones. In fact, most of the major plant hormones, such as auxin, cytokinins, abscisic acid, and strigolactones, control both lateral root formation and nodule organogenesis, but often in an opposite manner. This suggests that the sensitivity of legume plants to some phytohormones could be linked to the antagonism that exists between the processes of nodulation and lateral root formation. Here, we will review the implication of some major phytohormones in lateral root formation in legumes, compare them with their roles in nodulation, and discuss specificities and divergences from non-legume eudicot plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana.

  3. Effects of Boron on Rhizobium-Legume Cell-Surface Interactions and Nodule Development.

    PubMed Central

    Bolanos, L.; Brewin, N. J.; Bonilla, I.

    1996-01-01

    Boron (B) is an essential micronutrient for the development of nitrogen-fixing root nodules in pea (Pisum sativum). By using monoclonal antibodies that recognize specific glycoconjugate components implicated in legume root-nodule development, we investigated the effects of low B on the formation of infection threads and the colonization of pea nodules by Rhizobium leguminosarum bv viciae. In B-deficient nodules the proportion of infected host cells was much lower than in nodules from plants supplied with normal quantities of B. Moreover, the host cells often developed enlarged and abnormally shaped infection threads that frequently burst, releasing bacteria into damaged host cells. There was also an over-production of plant matrix material in which the rhizobial cells were embedded during their progression through the infection thread. Furthermore, in a series of in vitro binding studies, we demonstrated that the presence of B can change the affinity with which the bacterial cell surface interacts with the peribacteroid membrane glycocalyx relative to its interaction with intercellular plant matrix glycoprotein. From these observations we suggest that B plays an important role in mediating cell-surface interactions that lead to endocytosis of rhizobia by host cells and hence to the correct establishment of the symbiosis between pea and Rhizobium. PMID:12226256

  4. NODULE ROOT and COCHLEATA Maintain Nodule Development and Are Legume Orthologs of Arabidopsis BLADE-ON-PETIOLE Genes[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Couzigou, Jean-Malo; Zhukov, Vladimir; Mondy, Samuel; Abu el Heba, Ghada; Cosson, Viviane; Ellis, T.H. Noel; Ambrose, Mike; Wen, Jiangqi; Tadege, Million; Tikhonovich, Igor; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Putterill, Joanna; Hofer, Julie; Borisov, Alexei Y.; Ratet, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    During their symbiotic interaction with rhizobia, legume plants develop symbiosis-specific organs on their roots, called nodules, that house nitrogen-fixing bacteria. The molecular mechanisms governing the identity and maintenance of these organs are unknown. Using Medicago truncatula nodule root (noot) mutants and pea (Pisum sativum) cochleata (coch) mutants, which are characterized by the abnormal development of roots from the nodule, we identified the NOOT and COCH genes as being necessary for the robust maintenance of nodule identity throughout the nodule developmental program. NOOT and COCH are Arabidopsis thaliana BLADE-ON-PETIOLE orthologs, and we have shown that their functions in leaf and flower development are conserved in M. truncatula and pea. The identification of these two genes defines a clade in the BTB/POZ-ankyrin domain proteins that shares conserved functions in eudicot organ development and suggests that NOOT and COCH were recruited to repress root identity in the legume symbiotic organ. PMID:23136374

  5. Lipopolysaccharide Profiles from Nodules as Markers of Bradyrhizobium Strains Nodulating Wild Legumes

    PubMed Central

    Santamaría, Mónica; Gutiérrez-Navarro, Ángel M.; Corzo, Javier

    1998-01-01

    To develop the use of electrophoretic lipopolysaccharide profiles for Bradyrhizobium strain identification, we studied the feasibility of using electrophoresis of whole legume nodule homogenates to obtain distinctive lipopolysaccharide profiles. The electrophoretic patterns were the same whether we used nodule extracts, bacteroids, or cultured bacteria as samples, and there was no evidence of changes in the ladder-like pattern during the nodulation process. To assess the reliability of using lipopolysaccharide profiling performed with individual nodules for studying the diversity and microdistribution of the rhizobia nodulating wild shrub legumes, we used a population of Adenocarpus foliolosus seedlings. We obtained 75 different profiles from the 147 nodules studied. There was no dominant profile in the sample, and a plant with different nodules generally produced different profiles. Electrophoresis of legume root nodules proved to be a fast and discriminating technique for determining the diversity of a bradyrhizobial population, although it did not allow the genetic relationships among the nodulating strains to be studied. PMID:16349529

  6. Regulation of legume nodulation by acidic growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Brett J; Lin, Meng-Han; Gresshoff, Peter M

    2013-03-01

    Legumes represent some of the most important crop species worldwide. They are able to form novel root organs known as nodules, within which biological nitrogen fixation is facilitated through a symbiotic interaction with soil-dwelling bacteria called rhizobia. This provides legumes with a distinct advantage over other plant species, as nitrogen is a key factor for growth and development. Nodule formation is tightly regulated by the plant and can be inhibited by a number of external factors, such as soil pH. This is of significant agricultural and economic importance as much of global legume crops are grown on low pH soils. Despite this, the precise mechanism by which low pH conditions inhibits nodule development remains poorly characterized.

  7. Comprehensive Comparative Genomic and Transcriptomic Analyses of the Legume Genes Controlling the Nodulation Process.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Zhenzhen; Pingault, Lise; Nourbakhsh-Rey, Mehrnoush; Libault, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen is one of the most essential plant nutrients and one of the major factors limiting crop productivity. Having the goal to perform a more sustainable agriculture, there is a need to maximize biological nitrogen fixation, a feature of legumes. To enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling the interaction between legumes and rhizobia, the symbiotic partner fixing and assimilating the atmospheric nitrogen for the plant, researchers took advantage of genetic and genomic resources developed across different legume models (e.g., Medicago truncatula, Lotus japonicus, Glycine max, and Phaseolus vulgaris) to identify key regulatory protein coding genes of the nodulation process. In this study, we are presenting the results of a comprehensive comparative genomic analysis to highlight orthologous and paralogous relationships between the legume genes controlling nodulation. Mining large transcriptomic datasets, we also identified several orthologous and paralogous genes characterized by the induction of their expression during nodulation across legume plant species. This comprehensive study prompts new insights into the evolution of the nodulation process in legume plant and will benefit the scientific community interested in the transfer of functional genomic information between species.

  8. Comprehensive Comparative Genomic and Transcriptomic Analyses of the Legume Genes Controlling the Nodulation Process.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Zhenzhen; Pingault, Lise; Nourbakhsh-Rey, Mehrnoush; Libault, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen is one of the most essential plant nutrients and one of the major factors limiting crop productivity. Having the goal to perform a more sustainable agriculture, there is a need to maximize biological nitrogen fixation, a feature of legumes. To enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling the interaction between legumes and rhizobia, the symbiotic partner fixing and assimilating the atmospheric nitrogen for the plant, researchers took advantage of genetic and genomic resources developed across different legume models (e.g., Medicago truncatula, Lotus japonicus, Glycine max, and Phaseolus vulgaris) to identify key regulatory protein coding genes of the nodulation process. In this study, we are presenting the results of a comprehensive comparative genomic analysis to highlight orthologous and paralogous relationships between the legume genes controlling nodulation. Mining large transcriptomic datasets, we also identified several orthologous and paralogous genes characterized by the induction of their expression during nodulation across legume plant species. This comprehensive study prompts new insights into the evolution of the nodulation process in legume plant and will benefit the scientific community interested in the transfer of functional genomic information between species. PMID:26858743

  9. Biosynthesis of Ascorbic Acid in Legume Root Nodules1

    PubMed Central

    Matamoros, Manuel A.; Loscos, Jorge; Coronado, Maria J.; Ramos, Javier; Sato, Shusei; Testillano, Pilar S.; Tabata, Satoshi; Becana, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is a major antioxidant and redox buffer, but is also involved in other critical processes of plants. Recently, the hypothesis has been proposed that legume nodules are unable to synthesize ascorbate and have to import it from the shoot or root, thus providing a means by which the plant regulates nodule senescence. The last step of ascorbate biosynthesis in plants is catalyzed by l-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (GalLDH). The mRNAs encoding GalLDH and three other enzymes involved in ascorbate biosynthesis are clearly detectable in nodules. Furthermore, an active membrane-bound GalLDH enzyme is present in nodule mitochondria. Biochemical assays on dissected nodules reveal that GalLDH activity and ascorbate are correlated in nodule tissues and predominantly localized in the infected zone, with lower levels of both parameters (relative to the infected tissues) in the apex (87%) and senescent region (43%) of indeterminate nodules and in the peripheral tissues (65%) of determinate nodules. In situ RNA hybridization showed that the GalLDH mRNA is particularly abundant in the infected zone of indeterminate and determinate nodules. Thus, our results refute the hypothesis that ascorbate is not synthesized in nodules and lend support to a previous conclusion that ascorbate in the infected zone is primarily involved in the protection of host cells against peroxide damage. Likewise, the high ascorbate and GalLDH activity levels found in the apex of indeterminate nodules strongly suggest a participation of ascorbate in additional functions during symbiosis, possibly related to cell growth and division and to molecular signaling. PMID:16766673

  10. A Legume Genetic Framework Controls Infection of Nodules by Symbiotic and Endophytic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Zgadzaj, Rafal; James, Euan K.; Kelly, Simon; Kawaharada, Yasuyuki; de Jonge, Nadieh; Jensen, Dorthe B.; Madsen, Lene H.; Radutoiu, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Legumes have an intrinsic capacity to accommodate both symbiotic and endophytic bacteria within root nodules. For the symbionts, a complex genetic mechanism that allows mutual recognition and plant infection has emerged from genetic studies under axenic conditions. In contrast, little is known about the mechanisms controlling the endophytic infection. Here we investigate the contribution of both the host and the symbiotic microbe to endophyte infection and development of mixed colonised nodules in Lotus japonicus. We found that infection threads initiated by Mesorhizobium loti, the natural symbiont of Lotus, can selectively guide endophytic bacteria towards nodule primordia, where competent strains multiply and colonise the nodule together with the nitrogen-fixing symbiotic partner. Further co-inoculation studies with the competent coloniser, Rhizobium mesosinicum strain KAW12, show that endophytic nodule infection depends on functional and efficient M. loti-driven Nod factor signalling. KAW12 exopolysaccharide (EPS) enabled endophyte nodule infection whilst compatible M. loti EPS restricted it. Analysis of plant mutants that control different stages of the symbiotic infection showed that both symbiont and endophyte accommodation within nodules is under host genetic control. This demonstrates that when legume plants are exposed to complex communities they selectively regulate access and accommodation of bacteria occupying this specialized environmental niche, the root nodule. PMID:26042417

  11. Legume NADPH Oxidases Have Crucial Roles at Different Stages of Nodulation

    PubMed Central

    Montiel, Jesús; Arthikala, Manoj-Kumar; Cárdenas, Luis; Quinto, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Plant NADPH oxidases, formerly known as respiratory burst oxidase homologues (RBOHs), are plasma membrane enzymes dedicated to reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. These oxidases are implicated in a wide variety of processes, ranging from tissue and organ growth and development to signaling pathways in response to abiotic and biotic stimuli. Research on the roles of RBOHs in the plant’s response to biotic stresses has mainly focused on plant-pathogen interactions; nonetheless, recent findings have shown that these oxidases are also involved in the legume-rhizobia symbiosis. The legume-rhizobia symbiosis leads to the formation of the root nodule, where rhizobia reduce atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia. A complex signaling and developmental pathway in the legume root hair and root facilitate rhizobial entrance and nodule organogenesis, respectively. Interestingly, several reports demonstrate that RBOH-mediated ROS production displays versatile roles at different stages of nodulation. The evidence collected to date indicates that ROS act as signaling molecules that regulate rhizobial invasion and also function in nodule senescence. This review summarizes discoveries that support the key and versatile roles of various RBOH members in the legume-rhizobia symbiosis. PMID:27213330

  12. Legume NADPH Oxidases Have Crucial Roles at Different Stages of Nodulation.

    PubMed

    Montiel, Jesús; Arthikala, Manoj-Kumar; Cárdenas, Luis; Quinto, Carmen

    2016-05-18

    Plant NADPH oxidases, formerly known as respiratory burst oxidase homologues (RBOHs), are plasma membrane enzymes dedicated to reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. These oxidases are implicated in a wide variety of processes, ranging from tissue and organ growth and development to signaling pathways in response to abiotic and biotic stimuli. Research on the roles of RBOHs in the plant's response to biotic stresses has mainly focused on plant-pathogen interactions; nonetheless, recent findings have shown that these oxidases are also involved in the legume-rhizobia symbiosis. The legume-rhizobia symbiosis leads to the formation of the root nodule, where rhizobia reduce atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia. A complex signaling and developmental pathway in the legume root hair and root facilitate rhizobial entrance and nodule organogenesis, respectively. Interestingly, several reports demonstrate that RBOH-mediated ROS production displays versatile roles at different stages of nodulation. The evidence collected to date indicates that ROS act as signaling molecules that regulate rhizobial invasion and also function in nodule senescence. This review summarizes discoveries that support the key and versatile roles of various RBOH members in the legume-rhizobia symbiosis.

  13. Legume NADPH Oxidases Have Crucial Roles at Different Stages of Nodulation.

    PubMed

    Montiel, Jesús; Arthikala, Manoj-Kumar; Cárdenas, Luis; Quinto, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Plant NADPH oxidases, formerly known as respiratory burst oxidase homologues (RBOHs), are plasma membrane enzymes dedicated to reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. These oxidases are implicated in a wide variety of processes, ranging from tissue and organ growth and development to signaling pathways in response to abiotic and biotic stimuli. Research on the roles of RBOHs in the plant's response to biotic stresses has mainly focused on plant-pathogen interactions; nonetheless, recent findings have shown that these oxidases are also involved in the legume-rhizobia symbiosis. The legume-rhizobia symbiosis leads to the formation of the root nodule, where rhizobia reduce atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia. A complex signaling and developmental pathway in the legume root hair and root facilitate rhizobial entrance and nodule organogenesis, respectively. Interestingly, several reports demonstrate that RBOH-mediated ROS production displays versatile roles at different stages of nodulation. The evidence collected to date indicates that ROS act as signaling molecules that regulate rhizobial invasion and also function in nodule senescence. This review summarizes discoveries that support the key and versatile roles of various RBOH members in the legume-rhizobia symbiosis. PMID:27213330

  14. Function of glutathione peroxidases in legume root nodules

    PubMed Central

    Matamoros, Manuel A.; Saiz, Ana; Peñuelas, Maria; Bustos-Sanmamed, Pilar; Mulet, Jose M.; Barja, Maria V.; Rouhier, Nicolas; Moore, Marten; James, Euan K.; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Becana, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione peroxidases (Gpxs) are antioxidant enzymes not studied so far in legume nodules, despite the fact that reactive oxygen species are produced at different steps of the symbiosis. The function of two Gpxs that are highly expressed in nodules of the model legume Lotus japonicus was examined. Gene expression analysis, enzymatic and nitrosylation assays, yeast cell complementation, in situ mRNA hybridization, immunoelectron microscopy, and LjGpx-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions were used to characterize the enzymes and to localize each transcript and isoform in nodules. The LjGpx1 and LjGpx3 genes encode thioredoxin-dependent phospholipid hydroperoxidases and are differentially regulated in response to nitric oxide (NO) and hormones. LjGpx1 and LjGpx3 are nitrosylated in vitro or in plants treated with S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). Consistent with the modification of the peroxidatic cysteine of LjGpx3, in vitro assays demonstrated that this modification results in enzyme inhibition. The enzymes are highly expressed in the infected zone, but the LjGpx3 mRNA is also detected in the cortex and vascular bundles. LjGpx1 is localized to the plastids and nuclei, and LjGpx3 to the cytosol and endoplasmic reticulum. Based on yeast complementation experiments, both enzymes protect against oxidative stress, salt stress, and membrane damage. It is concluded that both LjGpxs perform major antioxidative functions in nodules, preventing lipid peroxidation and other oxidative processes at different subcellular sites of vascular and infected cells. The enzymes are probably involved in hormone and NO signalling, and may be regulated through nitrosylation of the peroxidatic cysteine essential for catalytic function. PMID:25740929

  15. Transient Susceptibility of Root Cells in Four Common Legumes to Nodulation by Rhizobia 1

    PubMed Central

    Bhuvaneswari, T. V.; Bhagwat, Arvind A.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    1981-01-01

    Root cells of four common legumes were found to remain susceptible to nodulation by rhizobia for only a short period of time. Delayed inoculation experiments conducted with these legume hosts indicated that the initially susceptible region of the root became progressively less susceptible if inoculations were delayed by a few hours. Profiles of the frequency of nodule formation relative to marks indicating the regions of root and root hair development at the time of inoculation indicated that nodulation of Vigna sinensis (L.) Endl. cv California Black Eye and Medicago sativa L. cvs Moapa and Vernal roots was inhibited just below the region that was most susceptible at the time of inoculation. This result suggests the existence of a fast-acting regulatory mechanism in these hosts that prevents overnodulation. Nodulation in white clover may occur in two distinct phases. In addition to the transient susceptibility of preemergent and developing root hair cells, there appeared to be an induced susceptibility of mature clover root hair cells. A cell-free bacterial exudate preparation from Rhizobium trifolii cells was found to render mature root hair cells of white clover more rapidly susceptible to nodulation. PMID:16662065

  16. Carbon metabolism in legume nodules. Progress report, July 1982-July 1983

    SciTech Connect

    LaRue, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    The goal is to understand how the legume nodule metabolizes carbohydrate to provide energy and reductant for symbiotic fixation. The working hypothesis has been that the plant cytosol is microacrobic and that some carbon metabolism may be via anaerobic pathways similar to those in roots of flood tolerant plants. A method of analyzing redox changes in intact mitochondria, bacteroids or bacteria was adapted; a method of manipulating nitrogenase activity by oxygen inhibition was developed; the production of alcohol by soybean nodules was studied; and enzymes metabolizing alcohol/aldehyde were found in other nitrogen fixing systems. (ACR)

  17. The value of biodiversity in legume symbiotic nitrogen fixation and nodulation for biofuel and food production.

    PubMed

    Gresshoff, Peter M; Hayashi, Satomi; Biswas, Bandana; Mirzaei, Saeid; Indrasumunar, Arief; Reid, Dugald; Samuel, Sharon; Tollenaere, Alina; van Hameren, Bethany; Hastwell, April; Scott, Paul; Ferguson, Brett J

    2015-01-01

    Much of modern agriculture is based on immense populations of genetically identical or near-identical varieties, called cultivars. However, advancement of knowledge, and thus experimental utility, is found through biodiversity, whether naturally-found or induced by the experimenter. Globally we are confronted by ever-growing food and energy challenges. Here we demonstrate how such biodiversity from the food legume crop soybean (Glycine max L. Merr) and the bioenergy legume tree Pongamia (Millettia) pinnata is a great value. Legume plants are diverse and are represented by over 18,000 species on this planet. Some, such as soybean, pea and medics are used as food and animal feed crops. Others serve as ornamental (e.g., wisteria), timber (e.g., acacia/wattle) or biofuel (e.g., Pongamia pinnata) resources. Most legumes develop root organs (nodules) after microsymbiont induction that serve as their habitat for biological nitrogen fixation. Through this, nitrogen fertiliser demand is reduced by the efficient symbiosis between soil Rhizobium-type bacteria and the appropriate legume partner. Mechanistic research into the genetics, biochemistry and physiology of legumes is thus strategically essential for future global agriculture. Here we demonstrate how molecular plant science analysis of the genetics of an established food crop (soybean) and an emerging biofuel P. pinnata feedstock contributes to their utility by sustainable production aided by symbiotic nitrogen fixation. PMID:25240795

  18. Accumulation of ENOD2-Like Transcripts in Non-Nodulating Woody Papilionoid Legumes1

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Carol M.; Horner, Harry T.; Graves, William R.

    2000-01-01

    Japanese pagodatree (Styphnolobium japonicum [L.] Schott) and American yellowwood (Cladrastis kentukea Dum.-Cours.) Rudd are the first woody, non-nodulating papilionoid legumes shown to possess putative early nodulin 2 (ENOD2) genes. ENOD2 cDNAs from Japanese pagodatree (807 bp) and American yellowwood (735 bp) have 75% to 79% sequence identity to ENOD2 sequences and encode deduced proteins that possess conserved ENOD2 pentapeptides (PPHEK and PPEYQ). Lower percentages of glucose and higher percentages of histidine and valine suggest that SjENOD2 and CkENOD2 are different from other ENOD2s. Hybridization analyses indicate the clones represent ENOD2 gene families of two to four genes in Japanese pagodatree and American yellowwood genomes, and ENOD2-like transcripts were detected in stems and flowers, as well as roots. Only roots of control species that nodulate, Maackia amurensis Rupr. & Maxim. and alfalfa (Medicago sativa), produced pseudonodules after treatment with zeatin or 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid, an auxin transport inhibitor. Accumulation of MaENOD2 transcripts was enhanced during the first 10 d of treatment, but 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid and zeatin enhanced transcript accumulation after 30 d in roots of Japanese pagodatree and American yellowwood. Characteristics that distinguish ENOD2 gene families in basal, non-nodulating woody legumes from other ENOD2 genes may provide new information about the function of these genes during symbiotic and non-symbiotic organ development. PMID:11027723

  19. Accumulation of ENOD2-like transcripts in non-nodulating woody papilionoid legumes.

    PubMed

    Foster, C M; Horner, H T; Graves, W R

    2000-10-01

    Japanese pagodatree (Styphnolobium japonicum [L.] Schott) and American yellowwood (Cladrastis kentukea Dum.-Cours.) Rudd are the first woody, non-nodulating papilionoid legumes shown to possess putative early nodulin 2 (ENOD2) genes. ENOD2 cDNAs from Japanese pagodatree (807 bp) and American yellowwood (735 bp) have 75% to 79% sequence identity to ENOD2 sequences and encode deduced proteins that possess conserved ENOD2 pentapeptides (PPHEK and PPEYQ). Lower percentages of glucose and higher percentages of histidine and valine suggest that SjENOD2 and CkENOD2 are different from other ENOD2s. Hybridization analyses indicate the clones represent ENOD2 gene families of two to four genes in Japanese pagodatree and American yellowwood genomes, and ENOD2-like transcripts were detected in stems and flowers, as well as roots. Only roots of control species that nodulate, Maackia amurensis Rupr. & Maxim. and alfalfa (Medicago sativa), produced pseudonodules after treatment with zeatin or 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid, an auxin transport inhibitor. Accumulation of MaENOD2 transcripts was enhanced during the first 10 d of treatment, but 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid and zeatin enhanced transcript accumulation after 30 d in roots of Japanese pagodatree and American yellowwood. Characteristics that distinguish ENOD2 gene families in basal, non-nodulating woody legumes from other ENOD2 genes may provide new information about the function of these genes during symbiotic and non-symbiotic organ development. PMID:11027723

  20. South African Papilionoid Legumes Are Nodulated by Diverse Burkholderia with Unique Nodulation and Nitrogen-Fixation Loci

    PubMed Central

    Beukes, Chrizelle W.; Venter, Stephanus N.; Law, Ian J.; Phalane, Francina L.; Steenkamp, Emma T.

    2013-01-01

    The root-nodule bacteria of legumes endemic to the Cape Floristic Region are largely understudied, even though recent reports suggest the occurrence of nodulating Burkholderia species unique to the region. In this study, we considered the diversity and evolution of nodulating Burkholderia associated with the endemic papilionoid tribes Hypocalypteae and Podalyrieae. We identified distinct groups from verified rhizobial isolates by phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA and recA housekeeping gene regions. In order to gain insight into the evolution of the nodulation and diazotrophy of these rhizobia we analysed the genes encoding NifH and NodA. The majority of these 69 isolates appeared to be unique, potentially representing novel species. Evidence of horizontal gene transfer determining the symbiotic ability of these Cape Floristic Region isolates indicate evolutionary origins distinct from those of nodulating Burkholderia from elsewhere in the world. Overall, our findings suggest that Burkholderia species associated with fynbos legumes are highly diverse and their symbiotic abilities have unique ancestries. It is therefore possible that the evolution of these bacteria is closely linked to the diversification and establishment of legumes characteristic of the Cape Floristic Region. PMID:23874611

  1. South african papilionoid legumes are nodulated by diverse burkholderia with unique nodulation and nitrogen-fixation Loci.

    PubMed

    Beukes, Chrizelle W; Venter, Stephanus N; Law, Ian J; Phalane, Francina L; Steenkamp, Emma T

    2013-01-01

    The root-nodule bacteria of legumes endemic to the Cape Floristic Region are largely understudied, even though recent reports suggest the occurrence of nodulating Burkholderia species unique to the region. In this study, we considered the diversity and evolution of nodulating Burkholderia associated with the endemic papilionoid tribes Hypocalypteae and Podalyrieae. We identified distinct groups from verified rhizobial isolates by phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA and recA housekeeping gene regions. In order to gain insight into the evolution of the nodulation and diazotrophy of these rhizobia we analysed the genes encoding NifH and NodA. The majority of these 69 isolates appeared to be unique, potentially representing novel species. Evidence of horizontal gene transfer determining the symbiotic ability of these Cape Floristic Region isolates indicate evolutionary origins distinct from those of nodulating Burkholderia from elsewhere in the world. Overall, our findings suggest that Burkholderia species associated with fynbos legumes are highly diverse and their symbiotic abilities have unique ancestries. It is therefore possible that the evolution of these bacteria is closely linked to the diversification and establishment of legumes characteristic of the Cape Floristic Region. PMID:23874611

  2. Computational Complementation: A Modelling Approach to Study Signalling Mechanisms during Legume Autoregulation of Nodulation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Liqi

    2010-01-01

    Autoregulation of nodulation (AON) is a long-distance signalling regulatory system maintaining the balance of symbiotic nodulation in legume plants. However, the intricacy of internal signalling and absence of flux and biochemical data, are a bottleneck for investigation of AON. To address this, a new computational modelling approach called “Computational Complementation” has been developed. The main idea is to use functional-structural modelling to complement the deficiency of an empirical model of a loss-of-function (non-AON) mutant with hypothetical AON mechanisms. If computational complementation demonstrates a phenotype similar to the wild-type plant, the signalling hypothesis would be suggested as “reasonable”. Our initial case for application of this approach was to test whether or not wild-type soybean cotyledons provide the shoot-derived inhibitor (SDI) to regulate nodule progression. We predicted by computational complementation that the cotyledon is part of the shoot in terms of AON and that it produces the SDI signal, a result that was confirmed by reciprocal epicotyl-and-hypocotyl grafting in a real-plant experiment. This application demonstrates the feasibility of computational complementation and shows its usefulness for applications where real-plant experimentation is either difficult or impossible. PMID:20195551

  3. Rhizobial Diversity and Nodulation Characteristics of the Extremely Promiscuous Legume Sophora flavescens.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yin Shan; Liu, Yuan Hui; Yan, Hui; Wang, En Tao; Tian, Chang Fu; Chen, Wen Xin; Guo, Bao Lin; Chen, Wen Feng

    2015-12-01

    In present study, we report our extensive survey on the diversity and biogeography of rhizobia associated with Sophora flavescens, a sophocarpidine (matrine)-containing medicinal legume. We additionally investigated the cross nodulation, infection pattern, light and electron microscopies of root nodule sections of S. flavescens infected by various rhizobia. Seventeen genospecies of rhizobia belonging to five genera with seven types of symbiotic nodC genes were found to nodulate S. flavescens in natural soils. In the cross-nodulation tests, most representative rhizobia in class α-Proteobacteria, whose host plants belong to different cross-nodulation groups, form effective indeterminate nodules, while representative rhizobia in class β-Proteobacteria form ineffective nodules on S. flavescens. Highly host-specific biovars of Rhizobium leguminosarum (bv. trifolii and bv. viciae) and Rhizobium etli bv. phaseoli could establish symbioses with S. flavescens, providing further evidence that S. flavescens is an extremely promiscuous legume and it does not have strict selectivity on either the symbiotic genes or the species-determining housekeeping genes of rhizobia. Root-hair infection is found as the pattern that rhizobia have gained entry into the curled root hairs. Electron microscopies of ultra-thin sections of S. flavescens root nodules formed by different rhizobia show that the bacteroids are regular or irregular rod shape and nonswollen types. Some bacteroids contain poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB), while others do not, indicating the synthesis of PHB in bacteroids is rhizobia-dependent. The extremely promiscuous symbiosis between S. flavescens and different rhizobia provide us a basis for future studies aimed at understanding the molecular interactions of rhizobia and legumes. PMID:26389798

  4. Nodulation gene factors and plant response in the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis. [Nodulation

    SciTech Connect

    Long, S.R.

    1990-01-01

    Our original application aimed to identify genes outside the common nod region involved in nodulation and host range of alfalfa. This has been revised by adding other studies on nodulation gene action and removing molecular studies of gene action. Our restated goals and progress are as follows. An early goal was identification and characterization of additional nodulation genes. By means of transposon mutagenesis, mapping and marker exchange we have established 87 independent mutations in a 20kb area represented by plasmid pRmJT5. We discovered four new genes: nodP, nodD3, syrA and syrM. The sequence, start site and protein product for nodFe, nodG, and nodH were also identified. Regulation of nod FEGH was studied. nod FEGH can be induced by luteolin in the presence of noodle; nodD1; noD3 and syrM, a symbiotic regulator gene also increase transcription of nod FEGH. syrA will interact with syrM; syrM also regulates exopolysaccharide genes and is believed to be a master regulator. As part of these studies, an in vitro transcription/translation system for Rhizobium was developed. Adjacent to nodP we discussed nodQ, nodPQ occurrs in two highly consumed copies. nodQ appears by sequence analysis to be similar to initiation and elongation factors, with the highest homology in the GDP binding domain. We have also investigated the nod strain, WL131. WL131 has an insertion, ISRm3, interrupting nodG, and a nonsase mutation in nodH, nodH is responsible for the lack of nodulation. We are currently investigating supernatant factors, host range effects C by spot inoculation, glucaronidase fusion proteins, and are developing, a single root hair inoculation protocol. 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. The diversity of Rhizobia, Sinorhizobia and novel non-Rhizobial Paenibacillus nodulating wild herbaceous legumes.

    PubMed

    Latif, Sadia; Khan, Samiullah; Naveed, Muhammad; Mustafa, Ghulam; Bashir, Tasmia; Mumtaz, Abdul Samad

    2013-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to isolate and characterize nodulating bacteria associated with wild legumes. For this purpose, we recovered twenty isolates from root nodules of five wild legume species: Melilotus alles, Melilotus officinalis, Trifolium pratense, Trifolium repens and Medicago sp. Most of the isolates were morphologically analogous with only few exceptions in colony shape, appearance and incubation time. All isolates were Gram negative except T.P2-4. Random amplification of polymorphic DNA showed genetic variation among isolates. The 16S rRNA sequence analysis revealed these isolates as Rhizobium, Sinorhizobium and Paenibacillus. Each of these was also screened for nod D and nod F genes with marked variation at these loci; however, the nucleotide sequence analysis confirmed the presence of nod genes. The assignment of strains to their hosts revealed a unique symbiotic association of Paenibacillus sp. nodulating T .pratense which is being reported here for the first time.

  6. Economy of Photosynthate Use in Nitrogen-fixing Legume Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Layzell, David B.; Rainbird, Ross M.; Atkins, Craig A.; Pate, John S.

    1979-01-01

    The economy of C use by root nodules was examined in two symbioses, Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. (cv. Caloona):Rhizobium CB756 and Lupinus albus L. (cv. Ultra):Rhizobium WU425 over a 2-week period in early vegetative growth. Plants were grown in minus N water culture with cuvettes attached to the nodulated zone of their primary roots for collection of evolved CO2 and H2. Increments in total plant N and in C and N of nodules, and C:N weight ratios of xylem and phloem exudates were studied by periodic sampling from the plant populations. Itemized budgets were constructed for the partitioning and utilization of C in the two species. For each milligram N fixed and assimilated by the cowpea association, 1.54 ± 0.26 (standard error) milligrams C as CO2 and negligible H2 were evolved and 3.11 milligrams of translocated C utilized by the nodules. Comparable values for nodules of the lupin association were 3.64 ± 0.28 milligrams C as CO2, 0.22 ± 0.05 milligrams H2, and 6.58 milligrams C. More efficient use of C by cowpea nodules was due to a lesser requirement of C for synthesis of exported N compounds, a smaller allocation of C to nodule dry matter, and a lower evolution of CO2. The activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in nodule extracts and the rate of 14CO2 fixation by detached nodules were greater for the cowpea symbiosis (0.56 ± 0.06 and 0.22 milligrams C as CO2 fixed per gram fresh weight per hour, respectively) than for the lupin 0.06 ± 0.02 and 0.01 milligrams C as CO2 fixed per gram fresh weight per hour. The significance of the data was discussed in relation to current information on theoretical costs of nitrogenase functioning and associated nodule processes. PMID:16661076

  7. A New Species of Devosia That Forms a Unique Nitrogen-Fixing Root-Nodule Symbiosis with the Aquatic Legume Neptunia natans (L.f.) Druce

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Raul; Velázquez, Encarna; Willems, Anne; Vizcaíno, Nieves; Subba-Rao, Nanjappa S.; Mateos, Pedro F.; Gillis, Monique; Dazzo, Frank B.; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio

    2002-01-01

    Rhizobia are the common bacterial symbionts that form nitrogen-fixing root nodules in legumes. However, recently other bacteria have been shown to nodulate and fix nitrogen symbiotically with these plants. Neptunia natans is an aquatic legume indigenous to tropical and subtropical regions and in African soils is nodulated by Allorhizobium undicola. This legume develops an unusual root-nodule symbiosis on floating stems in aquatic environments through a unique infection process. Here, we analyzed the low-molecular-weight RNA and 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequence of the same fast-growing isolates from India that were previously used to define the developmental morphology of the unique infection process in this symbiosis with N. natans and found that they are phylogenetically located in the genus Devosia, not Allorhizobium or Rhizobium. The 16S rDNA sequences of these two Neptunia-nodulating Devosia strains differ from the only species currently described in that genus, Devosia riboflavina. From the same isolated colonies, we also located their nodD and nifH genes involved in nodulation and nitrogen fixation on a plasmid of approximately 170 kb. Sequence analysis showed that their nodD and nifH genes are most closely related to nodD and nifH of Rhizobium tropici, suggesting that this newly described Neptunia-nodulating Devosia species may have acquired these symbiotic genes by horizontal transfer. PMID:12406707

  8. SCARN a Novel Class of SCAR Protein That Is Required for Root-Hair Infection during Legume Nodulation.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Liping; Lin, Jie-Shun; Xu, Ji; Sato, Shusei; Parniske, Martin; Wang, Trevor L; Downie, J Allan; Xie, Fang

    2015-10-01

    Rhizobial infection of legume root hairs requires a rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton to enable the establishment of plant-made infection structures called infection threads. In the SCAR/WAVE (Suppressor of cAMP receptor defect/WASP family verpolin homologous protein) actin regulatory complex, the conserved N-terminal domains of SCAR proteins interact with other components of the SCAR/WAVE complex. The conserved C-terminal domains of SCAR proteins bind to and activate the actin-related protein 2/3 (ARP2/3) complex, which can bind to actin filaments catalyzing new actin filament formation by nucleating actin branching. We have identified, SCARN (SCAR-Nodulation), a gene required for root hair infection of Lotus japonicus by Mesorhizobium loti. Although the SCARN protein is related to Arabidopsis thaliana SCAR2 and SCAR4, it belongs to a distinct legume-sub clade. We identified other SCARN-like proteins in legumes and phylogeny analyses suggested that SCARN may have arisen from a gene duplication and acquired specialized functions in root nodule symbiosis. Mutation of SCARN reduced formation of infection-threads and their extension into the root cortex and slightly reduced root-hair length. Surprisingly two of the scarn mutants showed constitutive branching of root hairs in uninoculated plants. However we observed no effect of scarn mutations on trichome development or on the early actin cytoskeletal accumulation that is normally seen in root hair tips shortly after M. loti inoculation, distinguishing them from other symbiosis mutations affecting actin nucleation. The C-terminal domain of SCARN binds to ARPC3 and ectopic expression of the N-terminal SCAR-homology domain (but not the full length protein) inhibited nodulation. In addition, we found that SCARN expression is enhanced by M. loti in epidermal cells and that this is directly regulated by the NODULE INCEPTION (NIN) transcription factor.

  9. SCARN a Novel Class of SCAR Protein That Is Required for Root-Hair Infection during Legume Nodulation

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Liping; Lin, Jie-shun; Xu, Ji; Sato, Shusei; Parniske, Martin; Wang, Trevor L.; Downie, J. Allan; Xie, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Rhizobial infection of legume root hairs requires a rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton to enable the establishment of plant-made infection structures called infection threads. In the SCAR/WAVE (Suppressor of cAMP receptor defect/WASP family verpolin homologous protein) actin regulatory complex, the conserved N-terminal domains of SCAR proteins interact with other components of the SCAR/WAVE complex. The conserved C-terminal domains of SCAR proteins bind to and activate the actin-related protein 2/3 (ARP2/3) complex, which can bind to actin filaments catalyzing new actin filament formation by nucleating actin branching. We have identified, SCARN (SCAR-Nodulation), a gene required for root hair infection of Lotus japonicus by Mesorhizobium loti. Although the SCARN protein is related to Arabidopsis thaliana SCAR2 and SCAR4, it belongs to a distinct legume-sub clade. We identified other SCARN-like proteins in legumes and phylogeny analyses suggested that SCARN may have arisen from a gene duplication and acquired specialized functions in root nodule symbiosis. Mutation of SCARN reduced formation of infection-threads and their extension into the root cortex and slightly reduced root-hair length. Surprisingly two of the scarn mutants showed constitutive branching of root hairs in uninoculated plants. However we observed no effect of scarn mutations on trichome development or on the early actin cytoskeletal accumulation that is normally seen in root hair tips shortly after M. loti inoculation, distinguishing them from other symbiosis mutations affecting actin nucleation. The C-terminal domain of SCARN binds to ARPC3 and ectopic expression of the N-terminal SCAR-homology domain (but not the full length protein) inhibited nodulation. In addition, we found that SCARN expression is enhanced by M. loti in epidermal cells and that this is directly regulated by the NODULE INCEPTION (NIN) transcription factor. PMID:26517270

  10. SCARN a Novel Class of SCAR Protein That Is Required for Root-Hair Infection during Legume Nodulation.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Liping; Lin, Jie-Shun; Xu, Ji; Sato, Shusei; Parniske, Martin; Wang, Trevor L; Downie, J Allan; Xie, Fang

    2015-10-01

    Rhizobial infection of legume root hairs requires a rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton to enable the establishment of plant-made infection structures called infection threads. In the SCAR/WAVE (Suppressor of cAMP receptor defect/WASP family verpolin homologous protein) actin regulatory complex, the conserved N-terminal domains of SCAR proteins interact with other components of the SCAR/WAVE complex. The conserved C-terminal domains of SCAR proteins bind to and activate the actin-related protein 2/3 (ARP2/3) complex, which can bind to actin filaments catalyzing new actin filament formation by nucleating actin branching. We have identified, SCARN (SCAR-Nodulation), a gene required for root hair infection of Lotus japonicus by Mesorhizobium loti. Although the SCARN protein is related to Arabidopsis thaliana SCAR2 and SCAR4, it belongs to a distinct legume-sub clade. We identified other SCARN-like proteins in legumes and phylogeny analyses suggested that SCARN may have arisen from a gene duplication and acquired specialized functions in root nodule symbiosis. Mutation of SCARN reduced formation of infection-threads and their extension into the root cortex and slightly reduced root-hair length. Surprisingly two of the scarn mutants showed constitutive branching of root hairs in uninoculated plants. However we observed no effect of scarn mutations on trichome development or on the early actin cytoskeletal accumulation that is normally seen in root hair tips shortly after M. loti inoculation, distinguishing them from other symbiosis mutations affecting actin nucleation. The C-terminal domain of SCARN binds to ARPC3 and ectopic expression of the N-terminal SCAR-homology domain (but not the full length protein) inhibited nodulation. In addition, we found that SCARN expression is enhanced by M. loti in epidermal cells and that this is directly regulated by the NODULE INCEPTION (NIN) transcription factor. PMID:26517270

  11. The genetic and biochemical basis for nodulation of legumes by rhizobia

    SciTech Connect

    Pueppke, S.G.

    1996-05-01

    Soil bacteria of the genera Azorhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, and Rhizobium are collectively termed rhizobia. They share the ability to penetrate legume roots and elicit morphological responses that lead to the appearance of nodules. Bacteria within these symbiotic structures fix atmosphere nitrogen and thus are of immense ecological and agricultural significance. Although modern genetic analysis of rhizobia began less than 20 years ago, dozens of nodulation genes have now been identified, some in multiple species of rhizobia. These genetic advances have led to the discovery of a host surveillance system encoded by nodD and to the identification of Nod factor signals. These derivatives of oligochitin are synthesized by the protein products of nodABC, nodFE, NodPQ, and other nodulation genes: they provoke symbiotic responses on the part of the host and have generated immense interest in recent years. The symbiotic functions of other nodulation genes are nonetheless uncertain, and there remain significant gaps in the knowledge of several large groups of rhizobia with interesting biological properties. This review focuses on the nodulation genes of rhizobia, with particular emphasis on the concept of biological specificity of symbiosis with legume host plants. 419 refs.

  12. Multiple polyploidy events in the early radiation of nodulating and nonnodulating legumes.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Steven B; McKain, Michael R; Harkess, Alex; Nelson, Matthew N; Dash, Sudhansu; Deyholos, Michael K; Peng, Yanhui; Joyce, Blake; Stewart, Charles N; Rolf, Megan; Kutchan, Toni; Tan, Xuemei; Chen, Cui; Zhang, Yong; Carpenter, Eric; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Doyle, Jeff J; Leebens-Mack, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Unresolved questions about evolution of the large and diverse legume family include the timing of polyploidy (whole-genome duplication; WGDs) relative to the origin of the major lineages within the Fabaceae and to the origin of symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Previous work has established that a WGD affects most lineages in the Papilionoideae and occurred sometime after the divergence of the papilionoid and mimosoid clades, but the exact timing has been unknown. The history of WGD has also not been established for legume lineages outside the Papilionoideae. We investigated the presence and timing of WGDs in the legumes by querying thousands of phylogenetic trees constructed from transcriptome and genome data from 20 diverse legumes and 17 outgroup species. The timing of duplications in the gene trees indicates that the papilionoid WGD occurred in the common ancestor of all papilionoids. The earliest diverging lineages of the Papilionoideae include both nodulating taxa, such as the genistoids (e.g., lupin), dalbergioids (e.g., peanut), phaseoloids (e.g., beans), and galegoids (=Hologalegina, e.g., clovers), and clades with nonnodulating taxa including Xanthocercis and Cladrastis (evaluated in this study). We also found evidence for several independent WGDs near the base of other major legume lineages, including the Mimosoideae-Cassiinae-Caesalpinieae (MCC), Detarieae, and Cercideae clades. Nodulation is found in the MCC and papilionoid clades, both of which experienced ancestral WGDs. However, there are numerous nonnodulating lineages in both clades, making it unclear whether the phylogenetic distribution of nodulation is due to independent gains or a single origin followed by multiple losses. PMID:25349287

  13. Multiple polyploidy events in the early radiation of nodulating and nonnodulating legumes.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Steven B; McKain, Michael R; Harkess, Alex; Nelson, Matthew N; Dash, Sudhansu; Deyholos, Michael K; Peng, Yanhui; Joyce, Blake; Stewart, Charles N; Rolf, Megan; Kutchan, Toni; Tan, Xuemei; Chen, Cui; Zhang, Yong; Carpenter, Eric; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Doyle, Jeff J; Leebens-Mack, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Unresolved questions about evolution of the large and diverse legume family include the timing of polyploidy (whole-genome duplication; WGDs) relative to the origin of the major lineages within the Fabaceae and to the origin of symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Previous work has established that a WGD affects most lineages in the Papilionoideae and occurred sometime after the divergence of the papilionoid and mimosoid clades, but the exact timing has been unknown. The history of WGD has also not been established for legume lineages outside the Papilionoideae. We investigated the presence and timing of WGDs in the legumes by querying thousands of phylogenetic trees constructed from transcriptome and genome data from 20 diverse legumes and 17 outgroup species. The timing of duplications in the gene trees indicates that the papilionoid WGD occurred in the common ancestor of all papilionoids. The earliest diverging lineages of the Papilionoideae include both nodulating taxa, such as the genistoids (e.g., lupin), dalbergioids (e.g., peanut), phaseoloids (e.g., beans), and galegoids (=Hologalegina, e.g., clovers), and clades with nonnodulating taxa including Xanthocercis and Cladrastis (evaluated in this study). We also found evidence for several independent WGDs near the base of other major legume lineages, including the Mimosoideae-Cassiinae-Caesalpinieae (MCC), Detarieae, and Cercideae clades. Nodulation is found in the MCC and papilionoid clades, both of which experienced ancestral WGDs. However, there are numerous nonnodulating lineages in both clades, making it unclear whether the phylogenetic distribution of nodulation is due to independent gains or a single origin followed by multiple losses.

  14. Multiple Polyploidy Events in the Early Radiation of Nodulating and Nonnodulating Legumes

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Steven B.; McKain, Michael R.; Harkess, Alex; Nelson, Matthew N.; Dash, Sudhansu; Deyholos, Michael K.; Peng, Yanhui; Joyce, Blake; Stewart, Charles N.; Rolf, Megan; Kutchan, Toni; Tan, Xuemei; Chen, Cui; Zhang, Yong; Carpenter, Eric; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Doyle, Jeff J.; Leebens-Mack, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Unresolved questions about evolution of the large and diverse legume family include the timing of polyploidy (whole-genome duplication; WGDs) relative to the origin of the major lineages within the Fabaceae and to the origin of symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Previous work has established that a WGD affects most lineages in the Papilionoideae and occurred sometime after the divergence of the papilionoid and mimosoid clades, but the exact timing has been unknown. The history of WGD has also not been established for legume lineages outside the Papilionoideae. We investigated the presence and timing of WGDs in the legumes by querying thousands of phylogenetic trees constructed from transcriptome and genome data from 20 diverse legumes and 17 outgroup species. The timing of duplications in the gene trees indicates that the papilionoid WGD occurred in the common ancestor of all papilionoids. The earliest diverging lineages of the Papilionoideae include both nodulating taxa, such as the genistoids (e.g., lupin), dalbergioids (e.g., peanut), phaseoloids (e.g., beans), and galegoids (=Hologalegina, e.g., clovers), and clades with nonnodulating taxa including Xanthocercis and Cladrastis (evaluated in this study). We also found evidence for several independent WGDs near the base of other major legume lineages, including the Mimosoideae–Cassiinae–Caesalpinieae (MCC), Detarieae, and Cercideae clades. Nodulation is found in the MCC and papilionoid clades, both of which experienced ancestral WGDs. However, there are numerous nonnodulating lineages in both clades, making it unclear whether the phylogenetic distribution of nodulation is due to independent gains or a single origin followed by multiple losses. PMID:25349287

  15. Carbon metabolism in legume nodules. Progress report, June 1, 1982-January 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    LaRue, T.A.

    1983-02-01

    The oxidation and reduction of flavins and pyridine nucleotides in intact bacteria can be monitored by their changes in fluorescence. This technique permits study in nitrogen fixing bacteria of the effect of inhibitors of electron transport, and of the effect of substrates which may provide reductant for nitrogenase or oxidative phosphorylation. The nitrogen fixing ability of intact legume plants or bacteroids isolated from nodules can be manipulated downward by appropriate brief treatment of supra-optimal oxygen concentrations.

  16. Legume genomics: promise versus reality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Legume root nodules, the specialized organs in which symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) occurs, are structurally and metabolically complex organs. Their development and function depends upon coordinated gene expression between the host plant and rhizobial partner. Depending upon the symbiosis, nodule...

  17. Multiple polyploidy events in the early radiation of nodulating and non-nodulating legumes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unresolved questions about evolution of the large and diverse legume family include the timing of polyploidy (whole-genome duplication; WGDs) relative to the origin of the major lineages within the Fabaceae and to the origin of symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Previous work has established that a WGD af...

  18. Carbon metabolism in legume nodules. Progress report, January 1, 1984-March 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    LaRue, T.A.

    1985-04-01

    Mitochondria were extracted from nodules and separated from the bacteroids using completely anaerobic procedures. When the mitochondria were incubated aerobically (50 to 240 ..mu..M dissolved O/sub 2/) with malate and ADP there was an immediate uptake of O/sub 2/ (120 to 140 nmol O/sub 2/ min/sup -1/ mg protein/sup -1/). Respiratory control ratios varied between 5 and 8, and ATP/O ratios were between 2.3 and 2.5. When mitochondria were incubated anaerobically (10 to 60 nM dissolved O/sub 2/), oxygen uptake was determined by measuring the deoxygenation of leghemoglobin solutions in sealed optical cuvettes. Oxygen uptake was from 8 to 33% of the aerobic rate. ATP/O ratios declined with decreasing oxygen concentration and ATP production was slight at the low pO/sub 2/ level found in legume nodules. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Burkholderia kirstenboschensis sp. nov. nodulates papilionoid legumes indigenous to South Africa.

    PubMed

    Steenkamp, Emma T; van Zyl, Elritha; Beukes, Chrizelle W; Avontuur, Juanita R; Chan, Wai Yin; Palmer, Marike; Mthombeni, Lunghile S; Phalane, Francina L; Sereme, T Karabo; Venter, Stephanus N

    2015-12-01

    Despite the diversity of Burkholderia species known to nodulate legumes in introduced and native regions, relatively few taxa have been formally described. For example, the Cape Floristic Region of South Africa is thought to represent one of the major centres of diversity for the rhizobial members of Burkholderia, yet only five species have been described from legumes occurring in this region and numerous are still awaiting taxonomic treatment. Here, we investigated the taxonomic status of 12 South African root-nodulating Burkholderia isolates from native papilionoid legumes (Hypocalyptus coluteoides, H. oxalidifolius, H. sophoroides and Virgilia oroboides). Analysis of four gene regions (16S rRNA, recA, atpD and rpoB) revealed that the isolates represent a genealogically unique and exclusive assemblage within the genus. Its distinctness was supported by all other aspects of the polyphasic approach utilized, including the genome-based criteria DNA-DNA hybridization (≥70.9%) and average nucleotide identities (≥96%). We accordingly propose the name B. kirstenboschensis sp. nov. for this taxon with isolate Kb15(T) (=LMG 28727(T); =SARC 695(T)) as its type strain. Our data showed that intraspecific genome size differences (≥0.81 Mb) and the occurrence of large DNA regions that are apparently unique to single individuals (16-23% of an isolate's genome) can significantly limit the value of data obtained from DNA-DNA hybridization experiments. Substitution of DNA-DNA hybridization with whole genome sequencing as a prerequisite for the description of Burkholderia species will undoubtedly speed up the pace at which their diversity are documented, especially in hyperdiverse regions such as the Cape Floristic Region.

  20. Relevance of fucose-rich extracellular polysaccharides produced by Rhizobium sullae strains nodulating Hedysarum coronarium l. legumes.

    PubMed

    Gharzouli, Razika; Carpéné, Marie-Anne; Couderc, François; Benguedouar, Ammar; Poinsot, Véréna

    2013-03-01

    Specific and complex interactions between soil bacteria, known as rhizobia, and their leguminous host plants result in the development of root nodules. This process implies a complex dialogue between the partners. Rhizobia synthesize different classes of polysaccharides: exopolysaccharides (EPS), Kdo-rich capsular polysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, and cyclic β-(1,2)-glucans. These polymers are actors of a successful symbiosis with legumes. We focus here on studying the EPS produced by Rhizobium sullae bacteria that nodulate Hedysarum coronarium L., largely distributed in Algeria. We describe the influence of the carbon source on the production and on the composition of EPS produced by R. sullae A6 and RHF strains. High-molecular-weight EPS preserve the bacteria from desiccation. The structural characterization of the EPS produced by R. sullae strains has been performed through sugar analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The low-molecular-weight EPS of one strain (RHF) has been totally elucidated using nuclear magnetic resonance and quantitative time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry analyses. An unusual fucose-rich EPS has been characterized. The presence of this deoxy sugar seems to be related to nodulation capacity.

  1. Purification, properties, and distribution of ascorbate peroxidase in legume root nodules

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, D.A.; Hanus, F.J.; Russell, S.A.; Evans, H.J. )

    1987-01-01

    All aerobic biological system, including N{sub 2}-fixing root nodules, are subject to O{sub 2} toxicity that results from the formation of reactive intermediates such as H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and free radicals of O{sub 2}. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} may be removed from root nodules in a series of enzymic reactions involving ascorbate peroxidase, dehydroascorbate reductase, and glutathione reductase. The authors confirm here the presence of these enzymes in root nodules from nine species of legumes and from Alnus rubra. Ascorbate peroxidase from soybean nodules was purified to near homogeneity. This enzyme was found to be a hemeprotein with a molecular weight of 30,000 as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. KCN, NaN{sub 3}, CO, and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} were potent inhibitors of activity. Nonphysiological reductants such as guaiacol, o-dianisidine, and pyrogallol functioned as substrates for the enzyme. No activity was detected with NAD(P)H, reduced glutathione, or urate. Ascorbate peroxidation did not follow Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The substrate concentration which resulted in a reaction rate of 1/2 V{sub max} was 70 micromolar for ascorbate and 3 micromolar for H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The high affinity of ascorbate peroxidase for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} indicates that this enzyme, rather than catalase, is responsible for most H{sub 2}O{sub 2} removal outside of peroxisomes in root nodules.

  2. Diversity of nodule-endophytic agrobacteria-like strains associated with different grain legumes in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Saïdi, Sabrine; Mnasri, Bacem; Mhamdi, Ridha

    2011-11-01

    This study represents the first report describing the genetic diversity of nodule-endophytic agrobacteria isolated from diverse legumes and their phylogenetic relationships with the valid species of agrobacteria, as well as the non-recognized genomospecies of the former Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Rhizobium radiobacter). The genetic diversity of a collection of 18 non-nodulating agrobacteria-like strains, previously isolated from root nodules of Vicia faba, Cicer arietinum and Phaseolus vulgaris from different geographical regions of Tunisia, was studied by REP-PCR and PCR-RFLP of the 16S-23S rDNA IGS, as well as by sequence analysis of the 16S rDNA and the housekeeping genes recA and atpD. The aim of the work was to study the genetic diversity of the different isolates and to check for any host-specificity. The results from the different techniques were congruent and suggested a specific interaction for P. vulgaris, whereas no specific endophytic interaction was observed for V. faba and C. arietinum. The phylogenetic analysis clearly indicated that some isolates were affiliated to R. radiobacter or to its non-recognized genomic species (genomovars G2, G4 and G9). However, the other isolates probably constitute new species within Rhizobium (Agrobacterium) and Shinella.

  3. Long-term non-invasive and continuous measurements of legume nodule activity.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Ricardo A; Liese, Rebecca; Fischinger, Stephanie A; Sulieman, Saad; Avenhaus, Ulrike; Lingner, Annika; Hein, Hans; Koester, Beke; Baumgarten, Vanessa; Dittert, Klaus; Schulze, Joachim

    2015-02-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation is a process of considerable economic, ecological and scientific interest. The central enzyme nitrogenase reduces H(+) alongside N2 , and the evolving H2 allows a continuous and non-invasive in vivo measurement of nitrogenase activity. The objective of this study was to show that an elaborated set-up providing such measurements for periods as long as several weeks will produce specific insight into the nodule activity's dependence on environmental conditions and genotype features. A system was developed that allows the air-proof separation of a root/nodule and a shoot compartment. H2 evolution in the root/nodule compartment can be monitored continuously. Nutrient solution composition, temperature, CO2 concentration and humidity around the shoots can concomitantly be maintained and manipulated. Medicago truncatula plants showed vigorous growth in the system when relying on nitrogen fixation. The set-up was able to provide specific insights into nitrogen fixation. For example, nodule activity depended on the temperature in their surroundings, but not on temperature or light around shoots. Increased temperature around the nodules was able to induce higher nodule activity in darkness versus light around shoots for a period of as long as 8 h. Conditions that affected the N demand of the shoots (ammonium application, Mg or P depletion, super numeric nodules) induced consistent and complex daily rhythms in nodule activity. It was shown that long-term continuous measurements of nodule activity could be useful for revealing special features in mutants and could be of importance when synchronizing nodule harvests for complex analysis of their metabolic status. PMID:25640854

  4. Long-term non-invasive and continuous measurements of legume nodule activity.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Ricardo A; Liese, Rebecca; Fischinger, Stephanie A; Sulieman, Saad; Avenhaus, Ulrike; Lingner, Annika; Hein, Hans; Koester, Beke; Baumgarten, Vanessa; Dittert, Klaus; Schulze, Joachim

    2015-02-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation is a process of considerable economic, ecological and scientific interest. The central enzyme nitrogenase reduces H(+) alongside N2 , and the evolving H2 allows a continuous and non-invasive in vivo measurement of nitrogenase activity. The objective of this study was to show that an elaborated set-up providing such measurements for periods as long as several weeks will produce specific insight into the nodule activity's dependence on environmental conditions and genotype features. A system was developed that allows the air-proof separation of a root/nodule and a shoot compartment. H2 evolution in the root/nodule compartment can be monitored continuously. Nutrient solution composition, temperature, CO2 concentration and humidity around the shoots can concomitantly be maintained and manipulated. Medicago truncatula plants showed vigorous growth in the system when relying on nitrogen fixation. The set-up was able to provide specific insights into nitrogen fixation. For example, nodule activity depended on the temperature in their surroundings, but not on temperature or light around shoots. Increased temperature around the nodules was able to induce higher nodule activity in darkness versus light around shoots for a period of as long as 8 h. Conditions that affected the N demand of the shoots (ammonium application, Mg or P depletion, super numeric nodules) induced consistent and complex daily rhythms in nodule activity. It was shown that long-term continuous measurements of nodule activity could be useful for revealing special features in mutants and could be of importance when synchronizing nodule harvests for complex analysis of their metabolic status.

  5. The potential of oil-utilizing bacterial consortia associated with legume root nodules for cleaning oily soils.

    PubMed

    Dashti, N; Khanafer, M; El-Nemr, I; Sorkhoh, N; Ali, N; Radwan, S

    2009-03-01

    The surfaces of root nodules of Vicia faba and Lupinus albus (legume crops), were colonized with bacterial consortia which utilized oil and fixed nitrogen. Such combined activities apparently make those periphytic consortia efficient contributors to bioremediation of oily nitrogen-poor desert soils. This was confirmed experimentally in this study. Thus, cultivating V. faba, L. albus and, for comparison, Solanum melongena, a nonlegume crop, separately in oily sand samples resulted in more oil attenuation than in an uncultivated sample. This effect was more pronounced with the legume crops than with the nonlegume crop. Furthermore, in flask cultures, V. faba plants with nodulated roots exhibited a higher potential for oil attenuation in the surrounding water than plants with nodule-free roots. Denaturation gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of polymerase chain reaction amplified 16S rRNA coding genes revealed that periphytic bacteria had DGGE bands not matching those of the oil-utilizing rhizospheric bacteria. Legume nodules also contained endophytic bacteria whose 16S rDNA bands did not match those of Rhizobium nor those of all other individual periphytic and rhizospheric strains. It was concluded that legume crops host on their roots bacterial consortia with a satisfactory potential for oil phytoremediation.

  6. NODULE INCEPTION Directly Targets NF-Y Subunit Genes to Regulate Essential Processes of Root Nodule Development in Lotus japonicus

    PubMed Central

    Soyano, Takashi; Kouchi, Hiroshi; Hirota, Atsuko; Hayashi, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    The interactions of legumes with symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria cause the formation of specialized lateral root organs called root nodules. It has been postulated that this root nodule symbiosis system has recruited factors that act in early signaling pathways (common SYM genes) partly from the ancestral mycorrhizal symbiosis. However, the origins of factors needed for root nodule organogenesis are largely unknown. NODULE INCEPTION (NIN) is a nodulation-specific gene that encodes a putative transcription factor and acts downstream of the common SYM genes. Here, we identified two Nuclear Factor-Y (NF-Y) subunit genes, LjNF-YA1 and LjNF-YB1, as transcriptional targets of NIN in Lotus japonicus. These genes are expressed in root nodule primordia and their translational products interact in plant cells, indicating that they form an NF-Y complex in root nodule primordia. The knockdown of LjNF-YA1 inhibited root nodule organogenesis, as did the loss of function of NIN. Furthermore, we found that NIN overexpression induced root nodule primordium-like structures that originated from cortical cells in the absence of bacterial symbionts. Thus, NIN is a crucial factor responsible for initiating nodulation-specific symbiotic processes. In addition, ectopic expression of either NIN or the NF-Y subunit genes caused abnormal cell division during lateral root development. This indicated that the Lotus NF-Y subunits can function to stimulate cell division. Thus, transcriptional regulation by NIN, including the activation of the NF-Y subunit genes, induces cortical cell division, which is an initial step in root nodule organogenesis. Unlike the legume-specific NIN protein, NF-Y is a major CCAAT box binding protein complex that is widespread among eukaryotes. We propose that the evolution of root nodules in legume plants was associated with changes in the function of NIN. NIN has acquired functions that allow it to divert pathways involved in the regulation of cell division to

  7. Boron dependent membrane glycoproteins in symbiosome development and nodule organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Redondo-Nieto, Miguel; Reguera, María; Bonilla, Ildefonso

    2008-01-01

    During the last two decades, we have analyzed the roles of boron (B) in the development of the legume-rhizobia symbiosis and nodule organogenesis. As in other plant tissues, B is needed for the maintenance of nodule cell wall structure. Moreover, several symbiotic events including rhizobial infection, nodule cell invasion and symbiosome development that involve membrane related functions (i.e., vesicle targeting, secretion, or cell surface interactions) are affected by B deficiency. Using anti-rhamnogalacturonan II (anti-RGII) antiserum and immunological techniques, we recently described membrane glycoproteins (RGII-glycoproteins) developmentally regulated in Pisum sativum nodules, which are not detected by the antibody in B-deficient nodules. RGII-glycoproteins appeared related with development processes involving extensive membrane synthesis, like symbiosome maturation or cell growth, both of them negatively affected by B deficiency. Here, we suggest that, besides maintaining cell wall structure, B is both stabilizing components of the membrane glycocalyx and promoting interactions between cell surfaces glycoconjugates that are important during the establishment of the symbiosis and during nodule development. Moreover, we hypothesize that B is playing a similar role during plant or animal embryogenesis and development. PMID:19841651

  8. Bacterial-induced calcium oscillations are common to nitrogen-fixing associations of nodulating legumes and nonlegumes.

    PubMed

    Granqvist, Emma; Sun, Jongho; Op den Camp, Rik; Pujic, Petar; Hill, Lionel; Normand, Philippe; Morris, Richard J; Downie, J Allan; Geurts, Rene; Oldroyd, Giles E D

    2015-08-01

    Plants that form root-nodule symbioses are within a monophyletic 'nitrogen-fixing' clade and associated signalling processes are shared with the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. Central to symbiotic signalling are nuclear-associated oscillations in calcium ions (Ca(2+) ), occurring in the root hairs of several legume species in response to the rhizobial Nod factor signal. In this study we expanded the species analysed for activation of Ca(2+) oscillations, including nonleguminous species within the nitrogen-fixing clade. We showed that Ca(2+) oscillations are a common feature of legumes in their association with rhizobia, while Cercis, a non-nodulating legume, does not show Ca(2+) oscillations in response to Nod factors from Sinorhizobium fredii NGR234. Parasponia andersonii, a nonlegume that can associate with rhizobia, showed Nod factor-induced calcium oscillations to S. fredii NGR234 Nod factors, but its non-nodulating sister species, Trema tomentosa, did not. Also within the nitrogen-fixing clade are actinorhizal species that associate with Frankia bacteria and we showed that Alnus glutinosa induces Ca(2+) oscillations in root hairs in response to exudates from Frankia alni, but not to S. fredii NGR234 Nod factors. We conclude that the ability to mount Ca(2+) oscillations in response to symbiotic bacteria is a common feature of nodulating species within the nitrogen-fixing clade. PMID:26010117

  9. Applying reversible mutations of nodulation and nitrogen-fixation genes to study social cheating in Rhizobium etli-legume interaction.

    PubMed

    Ling, Jun; Zheng, Huiming; Katzianer, David S; Wang, Hui; Zhong, Zengtao; Zhu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Mutualisms are common in nature, though these symbioses can be quite permeable to cheaters in situations where one individual parasitizes the other by discontinuing cooperation yet still exploits the benefits of the partnership. In the Rhizobium-legume system, there are two separate contexts, namely nodulation and nitrogen fixation processes, by which resident Rhizobium individuals can benefit by cheating. Here, we constructed reversible and irreversible mutations in key nodulation and nitrogen-fixation pathways of Rhizobium etli and compared their interaction with plant hosts Phaseolus vulgaris to that of wild type. We show that R. etli reversible mutants deficient in nodulation factor production are capable of intra-specific cheating, wherein mutants exploit other Rhizobium individuals capable of producing these factors. Similarly, we show that R. etli mutants are also capable of cheating inter-specifically, colonizing the host legume yet contributing nothing to the partnership in terms of nitrogen fixation. Our findings indicate that cheating is possible in both of these frameworks, seemingly without damaging the stability of the mutualism itself. These results may potentially help explain observations suggesting that legume plants are commonly infected by multiple bacterial lineages during the nodulation process.

  10. Applying Reversible Mutations of Nodulation and Nitrogen-Fixation Genes to Study Social Cheating in Rhizobium etli-Legume Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Zhong, Zengtao; Zhu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Mutualisms are common in nature, though these symbioses can be quite permeable to cheaters in situations where one individual parasitizes the other by discontinuing cooperation yet still exploits the benefits of the partnership. In the Rhizobium-legume system, there are two separate contexts, namely nodulation and nitrogen fixation processes, by which resident Rhizobium individuals can benefit by cheating. Here, we constructed reversible and irreversible mutations in key nodulation and nitrogen-fixation pathways of Rhizobium etli and compared their interaction with plant hosts Phaseolus vulgaris to that of wild type. We show that R. etli reversible mutants deficient in nodulation factor production are capable of intra-specific cheating, wherein mutants exploit other Rhizobium individuals capable of producing these factors. Similarly, we show that R. etli mutants are also capable of cheating inter-specifically, colonizing the host legume yet contributing nothing to the partnership in terms of nitrogen fixation. Our findings indicate that cheating is possible in both of these frameworks, seemingly without damaging the stability of the mutualism itself. These results may potentially help explain observations suggesting that legume plants are commonly infected by multiple bacterial lineages during the nodulation process. PMID:23922937

  11. Nitrate inhibition of legume nodule growth and activity. I. Long term studies with a continuous supply of nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, J.G.

    1985-02-01

    The synthesis and accumulation of nitrite has been suggested as a causative factor in the inhibition of legume nodules supplied with nitrate. Plants were grown in sand culture with a moderate level of nitrate (2.1 to 6.4 millimolar) supplied continuously from seed germination to 30 to 50 days after planting. In a comparison of nitrate treatments, a highly significant negative correlation between nitrite concentration in soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) nodules and nodule fresh weight per shoot dry weight was found even when bacteroids lacked nitrate reductase (NR). However, in a comparison of two Rhizobium japonicum strains, there was only 12% as much nitrite in nodules formed by NR/sup -/ R. japonicum as in nodules formed by NR/sup +/ R. japonicum, and growth and acetylene reduction activity of both types of nodules was about equally inhibited. The very small concentration of nitrite found in P. vulgaris nodules was probably below that required for the inhibition of nitrogenase based on published in vitro experiments, and yet the specific acetylene reduction activity was inhibited 83% by nitrate. The overall results do not support the idea that nitrite plays a role in the inhibition of nodule growth and nitrogenase activity by nitrate.

  12. Compatibility of rhizobial genotypes within natural populations of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae for nodulation of host legumes.

    PubMed

    Laguerre, Gisèle; Louvrier, Philippe; Allard, Marie-Reine; Amarger, Noëlle

    2003-04-01

    Populations of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae were sampled from two bulk soils, rhizosphere, and nodules of host legumes, fava bean (Vicia faba) and pea (Pisum sativum) grown in the same soils. Additional populations nodulating peas, fava beans, and vetches (Vicia sativa) grown in other soils and fava bean-nodulating strains from various geographic sites were also analyzed. The rhizobia were characterized by repetitive extragenomic palindromic-PCR fingerprinting and/or PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of 16S-23S ribosomal DNA intergenic spacers as markers of the genomic background and PCR-RFLP of a nodulation gene region, nodD, as a marker of the symbiotic component of the genome. Pairwise comparisons showed differences among the genetic structures of the bulk soil, rhizosphere, and nodule populations and in the degree of host specificity within the Vicieae cross-inoculation group. With fava bean, the symbiotic genotype appeared to be the preponderant determinant of the success in nodule occupancy of rhizobial genotypes independently of the associated genomic background, the plant genotype, and the soil sampled. The interaction between one particular rhizobial symbiotic genotype and fava bean seems to be highly specific for nodulation and linked to the efficiency of nitrogen fixation. By contrast with bulk soil and fava bean-nodulating populations, the analysis of pea-nodulating populations showed preferential associations between genomic backgrounds and symbiotic genotypes. Both components of the rhizobial genome may influence competitiveness for nodulation of pea, and rhizosphere colonization may be a decisive step in competition for nodule occupancy.

  13. Compatibility of rhizobial genotypes within natural populations of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae for nodulation of host legumes.

    PubMed

    Laguerre, Gisèle; Louvrier, Philippe; Allard, Marie-Reine; Amarger, Noëlle

    2003-04-01

    Populations of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae were sampled from two bulk soils, rhizosphere, and nodules of host legumes, fava bean (Vicia faba) and pea (Pisum sativum) grown in the same soils. Additional populations nodulating peas, fava beans, and vetches (Vicia sativa) grown in other soils and fava bean-nodulating strains from various geographic sites were also analyzed. The rhizobia were characterized by repetitive extragenomic palindromic-PCR fingerprinting and/or PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of 16S-23S ribosomal DNA intergenic spacers as markers of the genomic background and PCR-RFLP of a nodulation gene region, nodD, as a marker of the symbiotic component of the genome. Pairwise comparisons showed differences among the genetic structures of the bulk soil, rhizosphere, and nodule populations and in the degree of host specificity within the Vicieae cross-inoculation group. With fava bean, the symbiotic genotype appeared to be the preponderant determinant of the success in nodule occupancy of rhizobial genotypes independently of the associated genomic background, the plant genotype, and the soil sampled. The interaction between one particular rhizobial symbiotic genotype and fava bean seems to be highly specific for nodulation and linked to the efficiency of nitrogen fixation. By contrast with bulk soil and fava bean-nodulating populations, the analysis of pea-nodulating populations showed preferential associations between genomic backgrounds and symbiotic genotypes. Both components of the rhizobial genome may influence competitiveness for nodulation of pea, and rhizosphere colonization may be a decisive step in competition for nodule occupancy. PMID:12676710

  14. Phylogenetic diversity of Rhizobium strains nodulating diverse legume species growing in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Degefu, Tulu; Wolde-meskel, Endalkachew; Frostegård, Åsa

    2013-06-01

    The taxonomic diversity of thirty-seven Rhizobium strains, isolated from nodules of leguminous trees and herbs growing in Ethiopia, was studied using multilocus sequence analyses (MLSA) of six core and two symbiosis-related genes. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene grouped them into five clusters related to nine Rhizobium reference species (99-100% sequence similarity). In addition, two test strains occupied their own independent branches on the phylogenetic tree (AC86a2 along with R. tibeticum; 99.1% similarity and AC100b along with R. multihospitium; 99.5% similarity). One strain from Milletia ferruginea was closely related (>99%) to the genus Shinella, further corroborating earlier findings that nitrogen-fixing bacteria are distributed among phylogenetically unrelated taxa. Sequence analyses of five housekeeping genes also separated the strains into five well-supported clusters, three of which grouped with previously studied Ethiopian common bean rhizobia. Three of the five clusters could potentially be described into new species. Based on the nifH genes, most of the test strains from crop legumes were closely related to several strains of Ethiopian common bean rhizobia and other symbionts of bean plants (R. etli and R. gallicum sv. phaseoli). The grouping of the test strains based on the symbiosis-related genes was not in agreement with the housekeeping genes, signifying differences in their evolutionary history. Our earlier studies revealing a large diversity of Mesorhizobium and Ensifer microsymbionts isolated from Ethiopian legumes, together with the results from the present analysis of Rhizobium strains, suggest that this region might be a potential hotspot for rhizobial biodiversity. PMID:23643092

  15. Terminal bacteroid differentiation in the legume-rhizobium symbiosis: nodule-specific cysteine-rich peptides and beyond.

    PubMed

    Alunni, Benoît; Gourion, Benjamin

    2016-07-01

    Contents 411 I. 411 II. 412 III. 412 IV. 413 V. 414 VI. 414 VII. 415 VIII. 415 416 References 416 SUMMARY: Terminal bacteroid differentiation (TBD) is a remarkable case of bacterial cell differentiation that occurs after rhizobia are released intracellularly within plant cells of symbiotic legume organs called nodules. The hallmarks of TBD are cell enlargement, genome amplification and membrane permeabilization. This plant-driven process is governed by a large family of bacteroid-targeted nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides that were until recently thought to be restricted to a specific lineage of the legume family, including the model plant Medicago truncatula. Recently, new plant and bacterial factors involved in TBD have been identified, challenging our view of this phenomenon at mechanistic and evolutionary levels. Here, we review the recent literature and discuss emerging questions about the mechanisms and the role(s) of TBD. PMID:27241115

  16. Unexpectedly Diverse Mesorhizobium Strains and Rhizobium leguminosarum Nodulate Native Legume Genera of New Zealand, while Introduced Legume Weeds Are Nodulated by Bradyrhizobium Species

    PubMed Central

    Weir, Bevan S.; Turner, Susan J.; Silvester, Warwick B.; Park, Duck-Chul; Young, John M.

    2004-01-01

    The New Zealand native legume flora are represented by four genera, Sophora, Carmichaelia, Clianthus, and Montigena. The adventive flora of New Zealand contains several legume species introduced in the 19th century and now established as serious invasive weeds. Until now, nothing has been reported on the identification of the associated rhizobia of native or introduced legumes in New Zealand. The success of the introduced species may be due, at least in part, to the nature of their rhizobial symbioses. This study set out to address this issue by identifying rhizobial strains isolated from species of the four native legume genera and from the introduced weeds: Acacia spp. (wattles), Cytisus scoparius (broom), and Ulex europaeus (gorse). The identities of the isolates and their relationship to known rhizobia were established by comparative analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA, atpD, glnII, and recA gene sequences. Maximum-likelihood analysis of the resultant data partitioned the bacteria into three genera. Most isolates from native legumes aligned with the genus Mesorhizobium, either as members of named species or as putative novel species. The widespread distribution of strains from individual native legume genera across Mesorhizobium spp. contrasts with previous reports implying that bacterial species are specific to limited numbers of legume genera. In addition, four isolates were identified as Rhizobium leguminosarum. In contrast, all sequences from isolates from introduced weeds aligned with Bradyrhizobium species but formed clusters distinct from existing named species. These results show that native legume genera and these introduced legume genera do not have the same rhizobial populations. PMID:15466541

  17. Small-peptide signals that control root nodule number, development, and symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, Michael A; Mohd-Radzman, Nadiatul A; Imin, Nijat

    2015-08-01

    Many legumes have the capacity to enter into a symbiotic association with soil bacteria generically called 'rhizobia' that results in the formation of new lateral organs on roots called nodules within which the rhizobia fix atmospheric nitrogen (N). Up to 200 million tonnes of N per annum is fixed by this association. Therefore, this symbiosis plays an integral role in the N cycle and is exploited in agriculture to support the sustainable fixation of N for cropping and animal production in developing and developed nations. Root nodulation is an expendable developmental process and competency for nodulation is coupled to low-N conditions. Both nodule initiation and development is suppressed under high-N conditions. Although root nodule formation enables sufficient N to be fixed for legumes to grow under N-deficient conditions, the carbon cost is high and nodule number is tightly regulated by local and systemic mechanisms. How legumes co-ordinate nodule formation with the other main organs of nutrient acquisition, lateral roots, is not fully understood. Independent mechanisms appear to regulate lateral roots and nodules under low- and high-N regimes. Recently, several signalling peptides have been implicated in the local and systemic regulation of nodule and lateral root formation. Other peptide classes control the symbiotic interaction of rhizobia with the host. This review focuses on the roles played by signalling peptides during the early stages of root nodule formation, in the control of nodule number, and in the establishment of symbiosis. Here, we highlight the latest findings and the gaps in our understanding of these processes.

  18. Burkholderia sp. induces functional nodules on the South African invasive legume Dipogon lignosus (Phaseoleae) in New Zealand soils.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wendy Y Y; Ridgway, Hayley J; James, Trevor K; James, Euan K; Chen, Wen-Ming; Sprent, Janet I; Young, J Peter W; Andrews, Mitchell

    2014-10-01

    The South African invasive legume Dipogon lignosus (Phaseoleae) produces nodules with both determinate and indeterminate characteristics in New Zealand (NZ) soils. Ten bacterial isolates produced functional nodules on D. lignosus. The 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences identified one isolate as Bradyrhizobium sp., one isolate as Rhizobium sp. and eight isolates as Burkholderia sp. The Bradyrhizobium sp. and Rhizobium sp. 16S rRNA sequences were identical to those of strains previously isolated from crop plants and may have originated from inocula used on crops. Both 16S rRNA and DNA recombinase A (recA) gene sequences placed the eight Burkholderia isolates separate from previously described Burkholderia rhizobial species. However, the isolates showed a very close relationship to Burkholderia rhizobial strains isolated from South African plants with respect to their nitrogenase iron protein (nifH), N-acyltransferase nodulation protein A (nodA) and N-acetylglucosaminyl transferase nodulation protein C (nodC) gene sequences. Gene sequences and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) PCR and repetitive element palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) banding patterns indicated that the eight Burkholderia isolates separated into five clones of one strain and three of another. One strain was tested and shown to produce functional nodules on a range of South African plants previously reported to be nodulated by Burkholderia tuberum STM678(T) which was isolated from the Cape Region. Thus, evidence is strong that the Burkholderia strains isolated here originated in South Africa and were somehow transported with the plants from their native habitat to NZ. It is possible that the strains are of a new species capable of nodulating legumes.

  19. Five Nodulation Mutants of White Sweetclover (Melilotus alba Desr.) Exhibit Distinct Phenotypes Blocked at Root Hair Curling, Infection Thread Development, and Nodule Organogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Utrup, L. J.; Cary, A. J.; Norris, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    In an effort to obtain a developmental sequence of mutations in the Rhizobium-legume interaction within a single legume species, we have characterized the early events of nodule development in 10 nodulation mutants of sweetclover, Melilotus alba Desr. cv U389, representing five genetic loci. Both seed and root exudates from all of the sweetclover mutants induced expression of the nod genes of Rhizobium meliloti. Mutants in three loci were blocked in the early stages of root hair curling. Of these, a mutant in the sym-3 locus exhibited root hair deformations in response to inoculation with R. meliloti but produced no nodules or emerging nodule primordia, suggesting a blockage in the signal transduction events leading to nodule organogenesis. In contrast, mutants in both the sym-1 and sym-5 loci formed ineffective nodules in response to inoculation but differed slightly in the type of root hair response observed. None of these three early mutants formed infection threads. Infection threads were observed in mutant sym-2 as well as in ineffective nodules. Mutant sym-4 also formed infection threads but lacked nodules. The phenotypes observed for mutants from these five loci suggest that a secondary receptor or signal produced by the plant is required for nodule development. PMID:12231990

  20. Soybean ureide transporters play a critical role in nodule development, function and nitrogen export.

    PubMed

    Collier, Ray; Tegeder, Mechthild

    2012-11-01

    Legumes can access atmospheric nitrogen through a symbiotic relationship with nitrogen-fixing bacteroids that reside in root nodules. In soybean, the products of fixation are the ureides allantoin and allantoic acid, which are also the dominant long-distance transport forms of nitrogen from nodules to the shoot. Movement of nitrogen assimilates out of the nodules occurs via the nodule vasculature; however, the molecular mechanisms for ureide export and the importance of nitrogen transport processes for nodule physiology have not been resolved. Here, we demonstrate the function of two soybean proteins - GmUPS1-1 (XP_003516366) and GmUPS1-2 (XP_003518768) - in allantoin and allantoic acid transport out of the nodule. Localization studies revealed the presence of both transporters in the plasma membrane, and expression in nodule cortex cells and vascular endodermis. Functional analysis in soybean showed that repression of GmUPS1-1 and GmUPS1-2 in nodules leads to an accumulation of ureides and decreased nitrogen partitioning to roots and shoot. It was further demonstrated that nodule development, nitrogen fixation and nodule metabolism were negatively affected in RNAi UPS1 plants. Together, we conclude that export of ureides from nodules is mediated by UPS1 proteins, and that activity of the transporters is not only essential for shoot nitrogen supply but also for nodule development and function.

  1. Burkholderia aspalathi sp. nov., isolated from root nodules of the South African legume Aspalathus abietina Thunb.

    PubMed

    Mavengere, Natasha R; Ellis, Allan G; Le Roux, Johannes J

    2014-06-01

    During a study to investigate the diversity of rhizobia associated with native legumes in South Africa's Cape Floristic Region, a Gram-negative bacterium designated VG1C(T) was isolated from the root nodules of Aspalathus abietina Thunb. Based on phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA and recA genes, VG1C(T) belongs to the genus Burkholderia, with the highest degree of sequence similarity to the type strain of Burkholderia sediminicola (98.5% and 98%, respectively). The DNA G+C content of strain VG1C(T) was 60.1 mol%, and DNA-DNA relatedness values to the type strain of closely related species were found to be substantially lower than 70%. As evidenced by results of genotypic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic tests provided here, we conclude that isolate VG1C(T) represents a novel rhizosphere-associated species in the genus Burkholderia, for which the name Burkholderia aspalathi sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain VG1C(T) ( = DSM 27239(T) = LMG 27731(T)).

  2. Increasing Nitrogen Fixation and Seed Development in Soybean Requires Complex Adjustments of Nodule Nitrogen Metabolism and Partitioning Processes.

    PubMed

    Carter, Amanda M; Tegeder, Mechthild

    2016-08-01

    Legumes are able to access atmospheric di-nitrogen (N2) through a symbiotic relationship with rhizobia that reside within root nodules. In soybean, following N2 fixation by the bacteroids, ammonia is finally reduced in uninfected cells to allantoin and allantoic acid [1]. These ureides present the primary long-distance transport forms of nitrogen (N), and are exported from nodules via the xylem for shoot N supply. Transport of allantoin and allantoic acid out of nodules requires the function of ureide permeases (UPS1) located in cells adjacent to the vasculature [2, 3]. We expressed a common bean UPS1 transporter in cortex and endodermis cells of soybean nodules and found that delivery of N from nodules to shoot, as well as seed set, was significantly increased. In addition, the number of transgenic nodules was increased and symbiotic N2 fixation per nodule was elevated, indicating that transporter function in nodule N export is a limiting step in bacterial N acquisition. Further, the transgenic nodules showed considerable increases in nodule N assimilation, ureide synthesis, and metabolite levels. This suggests complex adjustments of nodule N metabolism and partitioning processes in support of symbiotic N2 fixation. We propose that the transgenic UPS1 plants display metabolic and allocation plasticity to overcome N2 fixation and seed yield limitations. Overall, it is demonstrated that transporter function in N export from nodules is a key step for enhancing atmospheric N2 fixation and nodule function and for improving shoot N nutrition and seed development in legumes.

  3. Legume nodules from nutrient-poor soils exhibit high plasticity of cellular phosphorus recycling and conservation during variable phosphorus supply.

    PubMed

    Vardien, Waafeka; Steenkamp, Emma T; Valentine, Alexander J

    2016-02-01

    Nitrogen fixing legumes rely on phosphorus for nodule formation, nodule function and the energy costs of fixation. Phosphorus is however very limited in soils, especially in ancient sandstone-derived soils such as those in the Cape Floristic Region of South Africa. Plants growing in such areas have evolved the ability to tolerate phosphorus stress by eliciting an array of physiological and biochemical responses. In this study we investigated the effects of phosphorus limitation on N2 fixation and phosphorus recycling in the nodules of Virgilia divaricata (Adamson), a legume native to the Cape Floristic Region. In particular, we focused on nutrient acquisition efficiencies, phosphorus fractions and the exudation and accumulation of phosphatases. Our finding indicate that during low phosphorus supply, V. divaricata internally recycles phosphorus and has a lower uptake rate of phosphorus, as well as lower levels adenylates but greater levels of phosphohydrolase exudation suggesting it engages in recycling internal nodule phosphorus pools and making use of alternate bypass routes in order to conserve phosphorus.

  4. Single-plant, Sterile Microcosms for Nodulation and Growth of the Legume Plant Medicago truncatula with the Rhizobial Symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kathryn M.

    2013-01-01

    Rhizobial bacteria form symbiotic, nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots of compatible host legume plants. One of the most well-developed model systems for studying these interactions is the plant Medicago truncatula cv. Jemalong A17 and the rhizobial bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021. Repeated imaging of plant roots and scoring of symbiotic phenotypes requires methods that are non-destructive to either plants or bacteria. The symbiotic phenotypes of some plant and bacterial mutants become apparent after relatively short periods of growth, and do not require long-term observation of the host/symbiont interaction. However, subtle differences in symbiotic efficiency and nodule senescence phenotypes that are not apparent in the early stages of the nodulation process require relatively long growth periods before they can be scored. Several methods have been developed for long-term growth and observation of this host/symbiont pair. However, many of these methods require repeated watering, which increases the possibility of contamination by other microbes. Other methods require a relatively large space for growth of large numbers of plants. The method described here, symbiotic growth of M. truncatula/S. meliloti in sterile, single-plant microcosms, has several advantages. Plants in these microcosms have sufficient moisture and nutrients to ensure that watering is not required for up to 9 weeks, preventing cross-contamination during watering. This allows phenotypes to be quantified that might be missed in short-term growth systems, such as subtle delays in nodule development and early nodule senescence. Also, the roots and nodules in the microcosm are easily viewed through the plate lid, so up-rooting of the plants for observation is not required. PMID:24121837

  5. KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEOBOX 3: a new regulator of symbiotic nodule development

    PubMed Central

    Azarakhsh, M.; Kirienko, A. N.; Zhukov, V. A.; Lebedeva, M. A.; Dolgikh, E. A.; Lutova, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    KNOX transcription factors (TFs) regulate different aspects of plant development essentially through their effects on phytohormone metabolism. In particular, KNOX TF SHOOTMERISTEMLESS activates the cytokinin biosynthesis ISOPENTENYL TRANSFERASE (IPT) genes in the shoot apical meristem. However, the role of KNOX TFs in symbiotic nodule development and their possible effects on phytohormone metabolism during nodulation have not been studied to date. Cytokinin is a well-known regulator of nodule development, playing the key role in the regulation of cell division during nodule primordium formation. Recently, the activation of IPT genes was shown to take place during nodulation. Therefore, it was hypothesized that KNOX TFs may regulate nodule development and activate cytokinin biosynthesis upon nodulation. This study analysed the expression of different KNOX genes in Medicago truncatula Gaertn. and Pisum sativum L. Among them, the KNOX3 gene was upregulated in response to rhizobial inoculation in both species. pKNOX3::GUS activity was observed in developing nodule primordium. KNOX3 ectopic expression caused the formation of nodule-like structures on transgenic root without bacterial inoculation, a phenotype similar to one described previously for legumes with constitutive activation of the cytokinin receptor. Furthermore, in transgenic roots with MtKNOX3 knockdown, downregulation of A-type cytokinin response genes was found, as well as the MtIPT3 and LONELYGUY2 (MtLOG2) gene being involved in cytokinin activation. Taken together, these findings suggest that KNOX3 gene is involved in symbiotic nodule development and may regulate cytokinin biosynthesis/activation upon nodule development in legume plants. PMID:26351356

  6. CYTOKININ OXIDASE/DEHYDROGENASE3 Maintains Cytokinin Homeostasis during Root and Nodule Development in Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Reid, Dugald E; Heckmann, Anne B; Novák, Ondřej; Kelly, Simon; Stougaard, Jens

    2016-02-01

    Cytokinins are required for symbiotic nodule development in legumes, and cytokinin signaling responses occur locally in nodule primordia and in developing nodules. Here, we show that the Lotus japonicus Ckx3 cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase gene is induced by Nod factor during the early phase of nodule initiation. At the cellular level, pCkx3::YFP reporter-gene studies revealed that the Ckx3 promoter is active during the first cortical cell divisions of the nodule primordium and in growing nodules. Cytokinin measurements in ckx3 mutants confirmed that CKX3 activity negatively regulates root cytokinin levels. Particularly, tZ and DHZ type cytokinins in both inoculated and uninoculated roots were elevated in ckx3 mutants, suggesting that these are targets for degradation by the CKX3 cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase. The effect of CKX3 on the positive and negative roles of cytokinin in nodule development, infection and regulation was further clarified using ckx3 insertion mutants. Phenotypic analysis indicated that ckx3 mutants have reduced nodulation, infection thread formation and root growth. We also identify a role for cytokinin in regulating nodulation and nitrogen fixation in response to nitrate as ckx3 phenotypes are exaggerated at increased nitrate levels. Together, these findings show that cytokinin accumulation is tightly regulated during nodulation in order to balance the requirement for cell divisions with negative regulatory effects of cytokinin on infection events and root development. PMID:26644503

  7. GmEXPB2, a Cell Wall β-Expansin, Affects Soybean Nodulation through Modifying Root Architecture and Promoting Nodule Formation and Development.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinxin; Zhao, Jing; Tan, Zhiyuan; Zeng, Rensen; Liao, Hong

    2015-12-01

    Nodulation is an essential process for biological nitrogen (N2) fixation in legumes, but its regulation remains poorly understood. Here, a β-expansin gene, GmEXPB2, was found to be critical for soybean (Glycine max) nodulation. GmEXPB2 was preferentially expressed at the early stage of nodule development. β-Glucuronidase staining further showed that GmEXPB2 was mainly localized to the nodule vascular trace and nodule vascular bundles, as well as nodule cortical and parenchyma cells, suggesting that GmEXPB2 might be involved in cell wall modification and extension during nodule formation and development. Overexpression of GmEXPB2 dramatically modified soybean root architecture, increasing the size and number of cortical cells in the root meristematic and elongation zones and expanding root hair density and size of the root hair zone. Confocal microscopy with green fluorescent protein-labeled rhizobium USDA110 cells showed that the infection events were significantly enhanced in the GmEXPB2-overexpressing lines. Moreover, nodule primordium development was earlier in overexpressing lines compared with wild-type plants. Thereby, overexpression of GmEXPB2 in either transgenic soybean hairy roots or whole plants resulted in increased nodule number, nodule mass, and nitrogenase activity and thus elevated plant N and phosphorus content as well as biomass. In contrast, suppression of GmEXPB2 in soybean transgenic composite plants led to smaller infected cells and thus reduced number of big nodules, nodule mass, and nitrogenase activity, thereby inhibiting soybean growth. Taken together, we conclude that GmEXPB2 critically affects soybean nodulation through modifying root architecture and promoting nodule formation and development and subsequently impacts biological N2 fixation and growth of soybean.

  8. GmEXPB2, a Cell Wall β-Expansin, Affects Soybean Nodulation through Modifying Root Architecture and Promoting Nodule Formation and Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinxin; Zhao, Jing; Tan, Zhiyuan; Liao, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Nodulation is an essential process for biological nitrogen (N2) fixation in legumes, but its regulation remains poorly understood. Here, a β-expansin gene, GmEXPB2, was found to be critical for soybean (Glycine max) nodulation. GmEXPB2 was preferentially expressed at the early stage of nodule development. β-Glucuronidase staining further showed that GmEXPB2 was mainly localized to the nodule vascular trace and nodule vascular bundles, as well as nodule cortical and parenchyma cells, suggesting that GmEXPB2 might be involved in cell wall modification and extension during nodule formation and development. Overexpression of GmEXPB2 dramatically modified soybean root architecture, increasing the size and number of cortical cells in the root meristematic and elongation zones and expanding root hair density and size of the root hair zone. Confocal microscopy with green fluorescent protein-labeled rhizobium USDA110 cells showed that the infection events were significantly enhanced in the GmEXPB2-overexpressing lines. Moreover, nodule primordium development was earlier in overexpressing lines compared with wild-type plants. Thereby, overexpression of GmEXPB2 in either transgenic soybean hairy roots or whole plants resulted in increased nodule number, nodule mass, and nitrogenase activity and thus elevated plant N and phosphorus content as well as biomass. In contrast, suppression of GmEXPB2 in soybean transgenic composite plants led to smaller infected cells and thus reduced number of big nodules, nodule mass, and nitrogenase activity, thereby inhibiting soybean growth. Taken together, we conclude that GmEXPB2 critically affects soybean nodulation through modifying root architecture and promoting nodule formation and development and subsequently impacts biological N2 fixation and growth of soybean. PMID:26432877

  9. Proof that Burkholderia Strains Form Effective Symbioses with Legumes: a Study of Novel Mimosa-Nodulating Strains from South America

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Ming; de Faria, Sergio M.; Straliotto, Rosângela; Pitard, Rosa M.; Simões-Araùjo, Jean L.; Chou, Jui-Hsing; Chou, Yi-Ju; Barrios, Edmundo; Prescott, Alan R.; Elliott, Geoffrey N.; Sprent, Janet I.; Young, J. Peter W.; James, Euan K.

    2005-01-01

    Twenty Mimosa-nodulating bacterial strains from Brazil and Venezuela, together with eight reference Mimosa-nodulating rhizobial strains and two other β-rhizobial strains, were examined by amplified rRNA gene restriction analysis. They fell into 16 patterns and formed a single cluster together with the known β-rhizobia, Burkholderia caribensis, Burkholderia phymatum, and Burkholderia tuberum. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of 15 of the 20 strains were determined, and all were shown to belong to the genus Burkholderia; four distinct clusters could be discerned, with strains isolated from the same host species usually clustering very closely. Five of the strains (MAP3-5, Br3407, Br3454, Br3461, and Br3469) were selected for further studies of the symbiosis-related genes nodA, the NodD-dependent regulatory consensus sequences (nod box), and nifH. The nodA and nifH sequences were very close to each other and to those of B. phymatum STM815, B. caribensis TJ182, and Cupriavidus taiwanensis LMG19424 but were relatively distant from those of B. tuberum STM678. In addition to nodulating their original hosts, all five strains could also nodulate other Mimosa spp., and all produced nodules on Mimosa pudica that had nitrogenase (acetylene reduction) activities and structures typical of effective N2-fixing symbioses. Finally, both wild-type and green fluorescent protein-expressing transconjugant strains of Br3461 and MAP3-5 produced N2-fixing nodules on their original hosts, Mimosa bimucronata (Br3461) and Mimosa pigra (MAP3-5), and hence this confirms strongly that Burkholderia strains can form effective symbioses with legumes. PMID:16269788

  10. Proof that Burkholderia strains form effective symbioses with legumes: a study of novel Mimosa-nodulating strains from South America.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ming; de Faria, Sergio M; Straliotto, Rosângela; Pitard, Rosa M; Simões-Araùjo, Jean L; Chou, Jui-Hsing; Chou, Yi-Ju; Barrios, Edmundo; Prescott, Alan R; Elliott, Geoffrey N; Sprent, Janet I; Young, J Peter W; James, Euan K

    2005-11-01

    Twenty Mimosa-nodulating bacterial strains from Brazil and Venezuela, together with eight reference Mimosa-nodulating rhizobial strains and two other beta-rhizobial strains, were examined by amplified rRNA gene restriction analysis. They fell into 16 patterns and formed a single cluster together with the known beta-rhizobia, Burkholderia caribensis, Burkholderia phymatum, and Burkholderia tuberum. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of 15 of the 20 strains were determined, and all were shown to belong to the genus Burkholderia; four distinct clusters could be discerned, with strains isolated from the same host species usually clustering very closely. Five of the strains (MAP3-5, Br3407, Br3454, Br3461, and Br3469) were selected for further studies of the symbiosis-related genes nodA, the NodD-dependent regulatory consensus sequences (nod box), and nifH. The nodA and nifH sequences were very close to each other and to those of B. phymatum STM815, B. caribensis TJ182, and Cupriavidus taiwanensis LMG19424 but were relatively distant from those of B. tuberum STM678. In addition to nodulating their original hosts, all five strains could also nodulate other Mimosa spp., and all produced nodules on Mimosa pudica that had nitrogenase (acetylene reduction) activities and structures typical of effective N2-fixing symbioses. Finally, both wild-type and green fluorescent protein-expressing transconjugant strains of Br3461 and MAP3-5 produced N2-fixing nodules on their original hosts, Mimosa bimucronata (Br3461) and Mimosa pigra (MAP3-5), and hence this confirms strongly that Burkholderia strains can form effective symbioses with legumes.

  11. RRNA and dnaK relationships of Bradyrhizobium sp. nodule bacteria from four papilionoid legume trees in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Parker, Matthew A

    2004-05-01

    Enzyme electrophoresis and sequencing of rRNA and dnaK genes revealed high genetic diversity among root nodule bacteria from the Costa Rican trees Andira inermis, Dalbergia retusa, Platymiscium pinnatum (Papilionoideae tribe Dalbergieae) and Lonchocarpus atropurpureus (Papilionoideae tribe Millettieae). A total of 21 distinct multilocus genotypes [ETs (electrophoretic types)] was found among the 36 isolates analyzed, and no ETs were shared in common by isolates from different legume hosts. However, three of the ETs from D. retusa were identical to Bradyrhizobium sp. isolates detected in prior studies of several other legume genera in both Costa Rica and Panama. Nearly full-length 16S rRNA sequences and partial 23S rRNA sequences confirmed that two isolates from D. retusa were highly similar or identical to Bradyrhizobium strains isolated from the legumes Erythrina and Clitoria (Papilionoideae tribe Phaseoleae) in Panama. rRNA sequences for five isolates from L. atropurpureus, P. pinnatum and A. inermis were not closely related to any currently known strains from Central America or elsewhere, but had affinities to the reference strains Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110 (three isolates) or to B. elkanii USDA 76 (two isolates). A phylogenetic tree for 21 Bradyrhizobium strains based on 603 bp of the dnaK gene showed several significant conflicts with the rRNA tree, suggesting that genealogical relationships may have been altered by lateral gene transfer events. PMID:15214639

  12. Vigna unguiculata is nodulated in Spain by endosymbionts of Genisteae legumes and by a new symbiovar (vignae) of the genus Bradyrhizobium.

    PubMed

    Bejarano, Ana; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha-Helena; Velázquez, Encarna; Peix, Alvaro

    2014-10-01

    Vigna unguiculata was introduced into Europe from its distribution centre in Africa, and it is currently being cultivated in Mediterranean regions with adequate edapho-climatic conditions where the slow growing rhizobia nodulating this legume have not yet been studied. Previous studies based on rrs gene and ITS region analyses have shown that Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense and B. elkanii nodulated V. unguiculata in Africa, but these two species were not found in this study. Using the same phylogenetic markers it was shown that V. unguiculata, a legume from the tribe Phaseolae, was nodulated in Spain by two species of group I, B. cytisi and B. canariense, which are common endosymbionts of Genisteae in both Europe and Africa. These species have not been found to date in V. unguiculata nodules in its African distribution centres. All strains from Bradyrhizobium group I isolated in Spain belonged to the symbiovar genistearum, which is found at present only in Genisteae legumes in both Africa and Europe. V. unguiculata was also nodulated in Spain by a strain from Bradyrhizobium group II that belonged to a novel symbiovar (vignae). Some African V. unguiculata-nodulating strains also belonged to this proposed new symbiovar.

  13. Vigna unguiculata is nodulated in Spain by endosymbionts of Genisteae legumes and by a new symbiovar (vignae) of the genus Bradyrhizobium.

    PubMed

    Bejarano, Ana; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha-Helena; Velázquez, Encarna; Peix, Alvaro

    2014-10-01

    Vigna unguiculata was introduced into Europe from its distribution centre in Africa, and it is currently being cultivated in Mediterranean regions with adequate edapho-climatic conditions where the slow growing rhizobia nodulating this legume have not yet been studied. Previous studies based on rrs gene and ITS region analyses have shown that Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense and B. elkanii nodulated V. unguiculata in Africa, but these two species were not found in this study. Using the same phylogenetic markers it was shown that V. unguiculata, a legume from the tribe Phaseolae, was nodulated in Spain by two species of group I, B. cytisi and B. canariense, which are common endosymbionts of Genisteae in both Europe and Africa. These species have not been found to date in V. unguiculata nodules in its African distribution centres. All strains from Bradyrhizobium group I isolated in Spain belonged to the symbiovar genistearum, which is found at present only in Genisteae legumes in both Africa and Europe. V. unguiculata was also nodulated in Spain by a strain from Bradyrhizobium group II that belonged to a novel symbiovar (vignae). Some African V. unguiculata-nodulating strains also belonged to this proposed new symbiovar. PMID:24867807

  14. Short-Term Molecular Acclimation Processes of Legume Nodules to Increased External Oxygen Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Avenhaus, Ulrike; Cabeza, Ricardo A.; Liese, Rebecca; Lingner, Annika; Dittert, Klaus; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Pommerenke, Claudia; Schulze, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogenase is an oxygen labile enzyme. Microaerobic conditions within the infected zone of nodules are maintained primarily by an oxygen diffusion barrier (ODB) located in the nodule cortex. Flexibility of the ODB is important for the acclimation processes of nodules in response to changes in external oxygen concentration. The hypothesis of the present study was that there are additional molecular mechanisms involved. Nodule activity of Medicago truncatula plants were continuously monitored during a change from 21 to 25 or 30% oxygen around root nodules by measuring nodule H2 evolution. Within about 2 min of the increase in oxygen concentration, a steep decline in nitrogenase activity occurred. A quick recovery commenced about 8 min later. A qPCR-based analysis of the expression of genes for nitrogenase components showed a tendency toward upregulation during the recovery. The recovery resulted in a new constant activity after about 30 min, corresponding to approximately 90% of the pre-treatment level. An RNAseq-based comparative transcriptome profiling of nodules at that point in time revealed that genes for nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides, defensins, leghaemoglobin and chalcone and stilbene synthase were significantly upregulated when considered as a gene family. A gene for a nicotianamine synthase-like protein (Medtr1g084050) showed a strong increase in count number. The gene appears to be of importance for nodule functioning, as evidenced by its consistently high expression in nodules and a strong reaction to various environmental cues that influence nodule activity. A Tnt1-mutant that carries an insert in the coding sequence (cds) of that gene showed reduced nitrogen fixation and less efficient acclimation to an increased external oxygen concentration. It was concluded that sudden increases in oxygen concentration around nodules destroy nitrogenase, which is quickly counteracted by an increased neoformation of the enzyme. This reaction might be

  15. Short-Term Molecular Acclimation Processes of Legume Nodules to Increased External Oxygen Concentration.

    PubMed

    Avenhaus, Ulrike; Cabeza, Ricardo A; Liese, Rebecca; Lingner, Annika; Dittert, Klaus; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Pommerenke, Claudia; Schulze, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogenase is an oxygen labile enzyme. Microaerobic conditions within the infected zone of nodules are maintained primarily by an oxygen diffusion barrier (ODB) located in the nodule cortex. Flexibility of the ODB is important for the acclimation processes of nodules in response to changes in external oxygen concentration. The hypothesis of the present study was that there are additional molecular mechanisms involved. Nodule activity of Medicago truncatula plants were continuously monitored during a change from 21 to 25 or 30% oxygen around root nodules by measuring nodule H2 evolution. Within about 2 min of the increase in oxygen concentration, a steep decline in nitrogenase activity occurred. A quick recovery commenced about 8 min later. A qPCR-based analysis of the expression of genes for nitrogenase components showed a tendency toward upregulation during the recovery. The recovery resulted in a new constant activity after about 30 min, corresponding to approximately 90% of the pre-treatment level. An RNAseq-based comparative transcriptome profiling of nodules at that point in time revealed that genes for nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides, defensins, leghaemoglobin and chalcone and stilbene synthase were significantly upregulated when considered as a gene family. A gene for a nicotianamine synthase-like protein (Medtr1g084050) showed a strong increase in count number. The gene appears to be of importance for nodule functioning, as evidenced by its consistently high expression in nodules and a strong reaction to various environmental cues that influence nodule activity. A Tnt1-mutant that carries an insert in the coding sequence (cds) of that gene showed reduced nitrogen fixation and less efficient acclimation to an increased external oxygen concentration. It was concluded that sudden increases in oxygen concentration around nodules destroy nitrogenase, which is quickly counteracted by an increased neoformation of the enzyme. This reaction might be

  16. Short-Term Molecular Acclimation Processes of Legume Nodules to Increased External Oxygen Concentration.

    PubMed

    Avenhaus, Ulrike; Cabeza, Ricardo A; Liese, Rebecca; Lingner, Annika; Dittert, Klaus; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Pommerenke, Claudia; Schulze, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogenase is an oxygen labile enzyme. Microaerobic conditions within the infected zone of nodules are maintained primarily by an oxygen diffusion barrier (ODB) located in the nodule cortex. Flexibility of the ODB is important for the acclimation processes of nodules in response to changes in external oxygen concentration. The hypothesis of the present study was that there are additional molecular mechanisms involved. Nodule activity of Medicago truncatula plants were continuously monitored during a change from 21 to 25 or 30% oxygen around root nodules by measuring nodule H2 evolution. Within about 2 min of the increase in oxygen concentration, a steep decline in nitrogenase activity occurred. A quick recovery commenced about 8 min later. A qPCR-based analysis of the expression of genes for nitrogenase components showed a tendency toward upregulation during the recovery. The recovery resulted in a new constant activity after about 30 min, corresponding to approximately 90% of the pre-treatment level. An RNAseq-based comparative transcriptome profiling of nodules at that point in time revealed that genes for nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides, defensins, leghaemoglobin and chalcone and stilbene synthase were significantly upregulated when considered as a gene family. A gene for a nicotianamine synthase-like protein (Medtr1g084050) showed a strong increase in count number. The gene appears to be of importance for nodule functioning, as evidenced by its consistently high expression in nodules and a strong reaction to various environmental cues that influence nodule activity. A Tnt1-mutant that carries an insert in the coding sequence (cds) of that gene showed reduced nitrogen fixation and less efficient acclimation to an increased external oxygen concentration. It was concluded that sudden increases in oxygen concentration around nodules destroy nitrogenase, which is quickly counteracted by an increased neoformation of the enzyme. This reaction might be

  17. NrcR, a New Transcriptional Regulator of Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899 Involved in the Legume Root-Nodule Symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Del Cerro, Pablo; Rolla-Santos, Amanda A P; Valderrama-Fernández, Rocío; Gil-Serrano, Antonio; Bellogín, Ramón A; Gomes, Douglas Fabiano; Pérez-Montaño, Francisco; Megías, Manuel; Hungría, Mariangela; Ollero, Francisco Javier

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of nitrogen-fixing rhizobium-legume symbioses requires a highly complex cascade of events. In this molecular dialogue the bacterial NodD transcriptional regulators in conjunction with plant inducers, mostly flavonoids, are responsible for the biosynthesis and secretion of Nod factors which are key molecules for successful nodulation. Other transcriptional regulators related to the symbiotic process have been identified in rhizobial genomes, including negative regulators such as NolR. Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899 is an important symbiont of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), and its genome encompasses intriguing features such as five copies of nodD genes, as well as other possible transcriptional regulators including the NolR protein. Here we describe and characterize a new regulatory gene located in the non-symbiotic plasmid pRtrCIAT899c, that shows homology (46% identity) with the nolR gene located in the chromosome of CIAT 899. The mutation of this gene, named nrcR (nolR-like plasmid c Regulator), enhanced motility and exopolysaccharide production in comparison to the wild-type strain. Interestingly, the number and decoration of Nod Factors produced by this mutant were higher than those detected in the wild-type strain, especially under salinity stress. The nrcR mutant showed delayed nodulation and reduced competitiveness with P. vulgaris, and reduction in nodule number and shoot dry weight in both P. vulgaris and Leucaena leucocephala. Moreover, the mutant exhibited reduced capacity to induce the nodC gene in comparison to the wild-type CIAT 899. The finding of a new nod-gene regulator located in a non-symbiotic plasmid may reveal the existence of even more complex mechanisms of regulation of nodulation genes in R. tropici CIAT 899 that may be applicable to other rhizobial species. PMID:27096734

  18. NrcR, a New Transcriptional Regulator of Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899 Involved in the Legume Root-Nodule Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    del Cerro, Pablo; Rolla-Santos, Amanda A. P.; Valderrama-Fernández, Rocío; Gil-Serrano, Antonio; Bellogín, Ramón A.; Gomes, Douglas Fabiano; Pérez-Montaño, Francisco; Megías, Manuel; Hungría, Mariangela; Ollero, Francisco Javier

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of nitrogen-fixing rhizobium-legume symbioses requires a highly complex cascade of events. In this molecular dialogue the bacterial NodD transcriptional regulators in conjunction with plant inducers, mostly flavonoids, are responsible for the biosynthesis and secretion of Nod factors which are key molecules for successful nodulation. Other transcriptional regulators related to the symbiotic process have been identified in rhizobial genomes, including negative regulators such as NolR. Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899 is an important symbiont of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), and its genome encompasses intriguing features such as five copies of nodD genes, as well as other possible transcriptional regulators including the NolR protein. Here we describe and characterize a new regulatory gene located in the non-symbiotic plasmid pRtrCIAT899c, that shows homology (46% identity) with the nolR gene located in the chromosome of CIAT 899. The mutation of this gene, named nrcR (nolR-like plasmid c Regulator), enhanced motility and exopolysaccharide production in comparison to the wild-type strain. Interestingly, the number and decoration of Nod Factors produced by this mutant were higher than those detected in the wild-type strain, especially under salinity stress. The nrcR mutant showed delayed nodulation and reduced competitiveness with P. vulgaris, and reduction in nodule number and shoot dry weight in both P. vulgaris and Leucaena leucocephala. Moreover, the mutant exhibited reduced capacity to induce the nodC gene in comparison to the wild-type CIAT 899. The finding of a new nod-gene regulator located in a non-symbiotic plasmid may reveal the existence of even more complex mechanisms of regulation of nodulation genes in R. tropici CIAT 899 that may be applicable to other rhizobial species. PMID:27096734

  19. A Phylogenetically Conserved Group of Nuclear Factor-Y Transcription Factors Interact to Control Nodulation in Legumes1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Laloum, Tom; Lepage, Agnès; Ariel, Federico; Frances, Lisa; Gamas, Pascal; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    The endosymbiotic association between legumes and soil bacteria called rhizobia leads to the formation of a new root-derived organ called the nodule in which differentiated bacteria convert atmospheric nitrogen into a form that can be assimilated by the host plant. Successful root infection by rhizobia and nodule organogenesis require the activation of symbiotic genes that are controlled by a set of transcription factors (TFs). We recently identified Medicago truncatula nuclear factor-YA1 (MtNF-YA1) and MtNF-YA2 as two M. truncatula TFs playing a central role during key steps of the Sinorhizobium meliloti-M. truncatula symbiotic interaction. NF-YA TFs interact with NF-YB and NF-YC subunits to regulate target genes containing the CCAAT box consensus sequence. In this study, using a yeast two-hybrid screen approach, we identified the NF-YB and NF-YC subunits able to interact with MtNF-YA1 and MtNF-YA2. In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and in planta, we further demonstrated by both coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation that these NF-YA, -B, and -C subunits interact and form a stable NF-Y heterotrimeric complex. Reverse genetic and chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR approaches revealed the importance of these newly identified NF-YB and NF-YC subunits for rhizobial symbiosis and binding to the promoter of MtERN1 (for Ethylene Responsive factor required for Nodulation), a direct target gene of MtNF-YA1 and MtNF-YA2. Finally, we verified that a similar trimer is formed in planta by the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) NF-Y subunits, revealing the existence of evolutionary conserved NF-Y protein complexes to control nodulation in leguminous plants. This sheds light on the process whereby an ancient heterotrimeric TF mainly controlling cell division in animals has acquired specialized functions in plants. PMID:26432878

  20. A Phylogenetically Conserved Group of Nuclear Factor-Y Transcription Factors Interact to Control Nodulation in Legumes.

    PubMed

    Baudin, Maël; Laloum, Tom; Lepage, Agnès; Rípodas, Carolina; Ariel, Federico; Frances, Lisa; Crespi, Martin; Gamas, Pascal; Blanco, Flavio Antonio; Zanetti, Maria Eugenia; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda; Niebel, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    The endosymbiotic association between legumes and soil bacteria called rhizobia leads to the formation of a new root-derived organ called the nodule in which differentiated bacteria convert atmospheric nitrogen into a form that can be assimilated by the host plant. Successful root infection by rhizobia and nodule organogenesis require the activation of symbiotic genes that are controlled by a set of transcription factors (TFs). We recently identified Medicago truncatula nuclear factor-YA1 (MtNF-YA1) and MtNF-YA2 as two M. truncatula TFs playing a central role during key steps of the Sinorhizobium meliloti-M. truncatula symbiotic interaction. NF-YA TFs interact with NF-YB and NF-YC subunits to regulate target genes containing the CCAAT box consensus sequence. In this study, using a yeast two-hybrid screen approach, we identified the NF-YB and NF-YC subunits able to interact with MtNF-YA1 and MtNF-YA2. In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and in planta, we further demonstrated by both coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation that these NF-YA, -B, and -C subunits interact and form a stable NF-Y heterotrimeric complex. Reverse genetic and chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR approaches revealed the importance of these newly identified NF-YB and NF-YC subunits for rhizobial symbiosis and binding to the promoter of MtERN1 (for Ethylene Responsive factor required for Nodulation), a direct target gene of MtNF-YA1 and MtNF-YA2. Finally, we verified that a similar trimer is formed in planta by the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) NF-Y subunits, revealing the existence of evolutionary conserved NF-Y protein complexes to control nodulation in leguminous plants. This sheds light on the process whereby an ancient heterotrimeric TF mainly controlling cell division in animals has acquired specialized functions in plants.

  1. NrcR, a New Transcriptional Regulator of Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899 Involved in the Legume Root-Nodule Symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Del Cerro, Pablo; Rolla-Santos, Amanda A P; Valderrama-Fernández, Rocío; Gil-Serrano, Antonio; Bellogín, Ramón A; Gomes, Douglas Fabiano; Pérez-Montaño, Francisco; Megías, Manuel; Hungría, Mariangela; Ollero, Francisco Javier

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of nitrogen-fixing rhizobium-legume symbioses requires a highly complex cascade of events. In this molecular dialogue the bacterial NodD transcriptional regulators in conjunction with plant inducers, mostly flavonoids, are responsible for the biosynthesis and secretion of Nod factors which are key molecules for successful nodulation. Other transcriptional regulators related to the symbiotic process have been identified in rhizobial genomes, including negative regulators such as NolR. Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899 is an important symbiont of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), and its genome encompasses intriguing features such as five copies of nodD genes, as well as other possible transcriptional regulators including the NolR protein. Here we describe and characterize a new regulatory gene located in the non-symbiotic plasmid pRtrCIAT899c, that shows homology (46% identity) with the nolR gene located in the chromosome of CIAT 899. The mutation of this gene, named nrcR (nolR-like plasmid c Regulator), enhanced motility and exopolysaccharide production in comparison to the wild-type strain. Interestingly, the number and decoration of Nod Factors produced by this mutant were higher than those detected in the wild-type strain, especially under salinity stress. The nrcR mutant showed delayed nodulation and reduced competitiveness with P. vulgaris, and reduction in nodule number and shoot dry weight in both P. vulgaris and Leucaena leucocephala. Moreover, the mutant exhibited reduced capacity to induce the nodC gene in comparison to the wild-type CIAT 899. The finding of a new nod-gene regulator located in a non-symbiotic plasmid may reveal the existence of even more complex mechanisms of regulation of nodulation genes in R. tropici CIAT 899 that may be applicable to other rhizobial species.

  2. Nitrate inhibition of legume nodule growth and activity. II. Short term studies with high nitrate supply

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, J.G.

    1985-02-01

    Soybean plants (Glycine max (L.) Merr) were grown in sand culture with 2 millimolar nitrate for 37 days and then supplied with 15 millimolar nitrate for 7 days. Control plants received 2 millimolar nitrate and 13 millimolar chloride and, after the 7-day treatment period, all plants were supplied with nil nitrate. The temporary treatment with high nitrate inhibited nitrogenase (acetylene reduction) activity by 80% whether or not Rhizobium japonicum bacteroids had nitrate reductase (NR) activity. The pattern of nitrite accumulation in nodules formed by NR/sup +/ rhizobia was inversely related to the decrease and recovery of nitrogenase activity. However, nitrite concentration in nodules formed by NR/sup -/ rhizobia appeared to be too low to explain the inhibition of nitrogenase. Nodules on plants treated with 15 millimolar nitrate contained higher concentrations of amino N and, especially, ureide N than control nodules and, after withdrawal of nitrate, reduced N content of treated and control nodules returned to similar levels. The accumulation of N/sub 2/ fixation products in nodules in response to high nitrate treatment was observed with three R. japonicum strains, two NR/sup +/ and one NR/sup -/.

  3. Increasing Nitrogen Fixation and Seed Development in Soybean Requires Complex Adjustments of Nodule Nitrogen Metabolism and Partitioning Processes.

    PubMed

    Carter, Amanda M; Tegeder, Mechthild

    2016-08-01

    Legumes are able to access atmospheric di-nitrogen (N2) through a symbiotic relationship with rhizobia that reside within root nodules. In soybean, following N2 fixation by the bacteroids, ammonia is finally reduced in uninfected cells to allantoin and allantoic acid [1]. These ureides present the primary long-distance transport forms of nitrogen (N), and are exported from nodules via the xylem for shoot N supply. Transport of allantoin and allantoic acid out of nodules requires the function of ureide permeases (UPS1) located in cells adjacent to the vasculature [2, 3]. We expressed a common bean UPS1 transporter in cortex and endodermis cells of soybean nodules and found that delivery of N from nodules to shoot, as well as seed set, was significantly increased. In addition, the number of transgenic nodules was increased and symbiotic N2 fixation per nodule was elevated, indicating that transporter function in nodule N export is a limiting step in bacterial N acquisition. Further, the transgenic nodules showed considerable increases in nodule N assimilation, ureide synthesis, and metabolite levels. This suggests complex adjustments of nodule N metabolism and partitioning processes in support of symbiotic N2 fixation. We propose that the transgenic UPS1 plants display metabolic and allocation plasticity to overcome N2 fixation and seed yield limitations. Overall, it is demonstrated that transporter function in N export from nodules is a key step for enhancing atmospheric N2 fixation and nodule function and for improving shoot N nutrition and seed development in legumes. PMID:27451897

  4. microRNA160 dictates stage-specific auxin and cytokinin sensitivities and directs soybean nodule development.

    PubMed

    Nizampatnam, Narasimha Rao; Schreier, Spencer John; Damodaran, Suresh; Adhikari, Sajag; Subramanian, Senthil

    2015-10-01

    Legume nodules result from coordinated interactions between the plant and nitrogen-fixing rhizobia. The phytohormone cytokinin promotes nodule formation, and recent findings suggest that the phytohormone auxin inhibits nodule formation. Here we show that microRNA160 (miR160) is a key signaling element that determines the auxin/cytokinin balance during nodule development in soybean (Glycine max). miR160 appears to promote auxin activity by suppressing the levels of the ARF10/16/17 family of repressor ARF transcription factors. Using quantitative PCR assays and a fluorescence miRNA sensor, we show that miR160 levels are relatively low early during nodule formation and high in mature nodules. We had previously shown that ectopic expression of miR160 in soybean roots led to a severe reduction in nodule formation, coupled with enhanced sensitivity to auxin and reduced sensitivity to cytokinin. Here we show that exogenous cytokinin restores nodule formation in miR160 over-expressing roots. Therefore, low miR160 levels early during nodule development favor cytokinin activity required for nodule formation. Suppression of miR160 levels using a short tandem target mimic (STTM160) resulted in reduced sensitivity to auxin and enhanced sensitivity to cytokinin. In contrast to miR160 over-expressing roots, STTM160 roots had increased nodule formation, but nodule maturation was significantly delayed. Exogenous auxin partially restored proper nodule formation and maturation in STTM160 roots, suggesting that high miR160 activity later during nodule development favors auxin activity and promotes nodule maturation. Therefore, miR160 dictates developmental stage-specific sensitivities to auxin and cytokinin to direct proper nodule formation and maturation in soybean.

  5. Stress-induced legume root nodule senescence. Physiological, biochemical, and structural alterations.

    PubMed

    Matamoros, M A; Baird, L M; Escuredo, P R; Dalton, D A; Minchin, F R; Iturbe-Ormaetxe, I; Rubio, M C; Moran, J F; Gordon, A J; Becana, M

    1999-09-01

    Nitrate-fed and dark-stressed bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and pea (Pisum sativum) plants were used to study nodule senescence. In bean, 1 d of nitrate treatment caused a partially reversible decline in nitrogenase activity and an increase in O(2) diffusion resistance, but minimal changes in carbon metabolites, antioxidants, and other biochemical parameters, indicating that the initial decrease in nitrogenase activity was due to O(2) limitation. In pea, 1 d of dark treatment led to a 96% decline in nitrogenase activity and sucrose, indicating sugar deprivation as the primary cause of activity loss. In later stages of senescence (4 d of nitrate or 2-4 d of dark treatment), nodules showed accumulation of oxidized proteins and general ultrastructural deterioration. The major thiol tripeptides of untreated nodules were homoglutathione (72%) in bean and glutathione (89%) in pea. These predominant thiols declined by approximately 93% after 4 d of nitrate or dark treatment, but the loss of thiol content can be only ascribed in part to limited synthesis by gamma-glutamylcysteinyl, homoglutathione, and glutathione synthetases. Ascorbate peroxidase was immunolocalized primarily in the infected and parenchyma (inner cortex) nodule cells, with large decreases in senescent tissue. Ferritin was almost undetectable in untreated bean nodules, but accumulated in the plastids and amyloplasts of uninfected interstitial and parenchyma cells following 2 or 4 d of nitrate treatment, probably as a response to oxidative stress.

  6. The presence of nodules on legume root systems can alter phenotypic plasticity in response to internal nitrogen independent of nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Goh, Chooi-Hua; Nicotra, Adrienne B; Mathesius, Ulrike

    2016-04-01

    All higher plants show developmental plasticity in response to the availability of nitrogen (N) in the soil. In legumes, N starvation causes the formation of root nodules, where symbiotic rhizobacteria fix atmospheric N2 for the host in exchange for fixed carbon (C) from the shoot. Here, we tested whether plastic responses to internal [N] of legumes are altered by their symbionts. Glasshouse experiments compared root phenotypes of three legumes, Medicago truncatula, Medicago sativa and Trifolium subterraneum, inoculated with their compatible symbiont partners and grown under four nitrate levels. In addition, six strains of rhizobia, differing in their ability to fix N2 in M. truncatula, were compared to test if plastic responses to internal [N] were dependent on the rhizobia or N2 -fixing capability of the nodules. We found that the presence of rhizobia affected phenotypic plasticity of the legumes to internal [N], particularly in root length and root mass ratio (RMR), in a plant species-dependent way. While root length responses of M. truncatula to internal [N] were dependent on the ability of rhizobial symbionts to fix N2 , RMR response to internal [N] was dependent only on initiation of nodules, irrespective of N2 -fixing ability of the rhizobia strains.

  7. Transport and partitioning of CO/sub 2/ fixed by root nodules of ureide and amide producing legumes. [Vigna angularis; Glycine max; Medicago sativa

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, C.P.; Boylan, K.L.M.; Maxwell, C.A.; Heichel, G.H.; Hardman, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    Nodulated and denodulated roots of adzuki bean (Vigna angularis), soybean (Glycine max), and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) were exposed to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ to investigate the contribution of nodule CO/sub 2/ fixation to assimilation and transport of fixed nitrogen. The distribution of radioactivity in xylem sap and partitioning of carbon fixed by nodules to the whole plant were measured. Radioactivity in the xylem sap of nodulated soybean and adzuki bean was located primarily (70 to 87%) in the acid fraction while the basic (amino acid) fraction contained 10 to 22%. In contrast radioactivity in the xylem sap of nodulated alfalfa was primarily in amino acids with about 20% in organic acids. Total ureide concentration was 8.1, 4.7, and 0.0 micromoles per milliliter xylem sap for soybean, adzuki bean, and alfalfa, respectively. While the major nitrogen transport products in soybeans and adzuki beans are ureides, this class of metabolites contained less than 20% of the the total radioactivity. When nodules of plants were removed, radioactivity in xylem sap decreased by 90% or more. Pulse-chase experiments indicated that CO/sub 2/ fixed by nodules was rapidly transported to shoots and incorporated into acid stable constituents. The data are consistent with a role for nodule CO/sub 2/ fixation providing carbon for the assimilation and transport of fixed nitrogen in amide-based legumes. In contrast, CO/sub 2/ fixation by nodules of ureide transporting legumes appears to contribute little to assimilation and transport of fixed nitrogen. 19 references, 2 figures, 5 tables.

  8. Phloem Glutamine and the Regulation of O2 Diffusion in Legume Nodules.

    PubMed Central

    Neo, H. H.; Layzell, D. B.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the N content or the composition of the phloem sap that supplies nodulated roots may play a role in the feedback regulation of nitrogenase activity by increasing nodule resistance to O2 diffusion. Treating shoots of lupin (Lupinus albus cv Manitoba) or soybean (Glycine max L. Merr. cv Maple Arrow) with 100 [mu]L L-1 NH3 caused a 1.3-fold (lupin) and 2.6-fold (soybean) increase in the total N content of phloem sap without altering its C content. The increase in phloem N was due primarily to a 4.8-fold (lupin) and 10.5-fold (soybean) increase in the concentration of glutamine N. In addition, there was a decline in both the apparent nitrogenase activity and total nitrogenase activity that began within 4 h and reached about 54% of its initial activity within 6 h of the start of the NH3 treatment. However, the potential nitrogenase activity values in the treated plants were not significantly different from those of the control plants. These results provide evidence that changes in the N composition of the phloem sap, particularly the glutamine content, may increase nodule resistance to O2 diffusion and, thereby, down-regulate nodule metabolism and nitrogenase activity by controlling the supply of O2 to the bacteria-infected cells. PMID:12223605

  9. Cicer canariense, an endemic legume to the Canary Islands, is nodulated in mainland Spain by fast-growing strains from symbiovar trifolii phylogenetically related to Rhizobium leguminosarum.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Hidalgo, Pilar; Flores-Félix, José-David; Menéndez, Esther; Rivas, Raúl; Carro, Lorena; Mateos, Pedro F; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio; León-Barrios, Milagros; Velázquez, Encarna

    2015-07-01

    Cicer canariense is a threatened endemic legume from the Canary Islands where it can be nodulated by mesorhizobial strains from the symbiovar ciceri, which is the common worldwide endosymbiont of Cicer arietinum linked to the genus Mesorhizobium. However, when C. canariense was cultivated in a soil from mainland Spain, where the symbiovar ciceri is present, only fast-growing rhizobial strains were unexpectedly isolated from its nodules. These strains were classified into the genus Rhizobium by analysis of the recA and atpD genes, and they were phylogenetically related to Rhizobium leguminosarum. The analysis of the nodC gene showed that the isolated strains belonged to the symbiovar trifolii that harbored a nodC allele (β allele) different to that harbored by other strains from this symbiovar. Nodulation experiments carried out with the lacZ-labeled strain RCCHU01, representative of the β nodC allele, showed that it induced curling of root hairs, infected them through infection threads, and formed typical indeterminate nodules where nitrogen fixation took place. This represents a case of exceptional performance between the symbiovar trifolii and a legume from the tribe Cicereae that opens up new possibilities and provides new insights into the study of rhizobia-legume symbiosis.

  10. [The defense and regulatory mechanisms during development of legume-Rhizobium symbiosis].

    PubMed

    Glian'ko, A K; Akimova, G P; Sokolova, M G; Makarova, L E; Vasil'eva, G G

    2007-01-01

    The roles of indolylacetic acid, the peroxidase system, catalase, active oxygen species, and phenolic compounds in the physiological and biochemical mechanisms involved in the autoregulation of nodulation in the developing legume-Rhizobium symbiosis were studied. It was inferred that the concentration of indolylacetic acid in the roots of inoculated plants, controlled by the enzymes of the peroxidase complex, is the signal permitting or limiting nodulation at the initial stages of symbiotic interaction. Presumably, the change in the level of active oxygen species is determined by an antioxidant activity of phenolic compounds. During the development of symbiosis, phytohormones, antioxidant enzymes, and active oxygen species may be involved in the regulation of infection via both a direct antibacterial action and regulation of functional activity of the host plant defense systems. PMID:17619575

  11. CYTOKININ OXIDASE/DEHYDROGENASE3 Maintains Cytokinin Homeostasis during Root and Nodule Development in Lotus japonicus1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Heckmann, Anne B.; Kelly, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinins are required for symbiotic nodule development in legumes, and cytokinin signaling responses occur locally in nodule primordia and in developing nodules. Here, we show that the Lotus japonicus Ckx3 cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase gene is induced by Nod factor during the early phase of nodule initiation. At the cellular level, pCkx3::YFP reporter-gene studies revealed that the Ckx3 promoter is active during the first cortical cell divisions of the nodule primordium and in growing nodules. Cytokinin measurements in ckx3 mutants confirmed that CKX3 activity negatively regulates root cytokinin levels. Particularly, tZ and DHZ type cytokinins in both inoculated and uninoculated roots were elevated in ckx3 mutants, suggesting that these are targets for degradation by the CKX3 cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase. The effect of CKX3 on the positive and negative roles of cytokinin in nodule development, infection and regulation was further clarified using ckx3 insertion mutants. Phenotypic analysis indicated that ckx3 mutants have reduced nodulation, infection thread formation and root growth. We also identify a role for cytokinin in regulating nodulation and nitrogen fixation in response to nitrate as ckx3 phenotypes are exaggerated at increased nitrate levels. Together, these findings show that cytokinin accumulation is tightly regulated during nodulation in order to balance the requirement for cell divisions with negative regulatory effects of cytokinin on infection events and root development. PMID:26644503

  12. Recombination and horizontal transfer of nodulation and ACC deaminase (acdS) genes within Alpha- and Betaproteobacteria nodulating legumes of the Cape Fynbos biome.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Benny; Van Cauwenberghe, Jannick; Chimphango, Samson; Stirton, Charles; Honnay, Olivier; Smets, Erik; Muasya, A Muthama

    2015-11-01

    The goal of this work is to study the evolution and the degree of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) within rhizobial genera of both Alphaproteobacteria (Mesorhizobium, Rhizobium) and Betaproteobacteria (Burkholderia), originating from South African Fynbos legumes. By using a phylogenetic approach and comparing multiple chromosomal and symbiosis genes, we revealed conclusive evidence of high degrees of horizontal transfer of nodulation genes among closely related species of both groups of rhizobia, but also among species with distant genetic backgrounds (Rhizobium and Mesorhizobium), underscoring the importance of lateral transfer of symbiosis traits as an important evolutionary force among rhizobia of the Cape Fynbos biome. The extensive exchange of symbiosis genes in the Fynbos is in contrast with a lack of significant events of HGT among Burkholderia symbionts from the South American Cerrado and Caatinga biome. Furthermore, homologous recombination among selected housekeeping genes had a substantial impact on sequence evolution within Burkholderia and Mesorhizobium. Finally, phylogenetic analyses of the non-symbiosis acdS gene in Mesorhizobium, a gene often located on symbiosis islands, revealed distinct relationships compared to the chromosomal and symbiosis genes, suggesting a different evolutionary history and independent events of gene transfer. The observed events of HGT and incongruence between different genes necessitate caution in interpreting topologies from individual data types.

  13. The genus Micromonospora is widespread in legume root nodules: the example of Lupinus angustifolius.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Martha E; Alonso-Vega, Pablo; Rodríguez, Raúl; Carro, Lorena; Cerda, Eugenia; Alonso, Pilar; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio

    2010-10-01

    Our current knowledge of plant-microbe interactions indicate that populations inhabiting a host plant are not restricted to a single microbial species but comprise several genera and species. No one knows if communities inside plants interact, and it has been speculated that beneficial effects are the result of their combined activities. During an ecological study of nitrogen-fixing bacterial communities from Lupinus angustifolius collected in Spain, significant numbers of orange-pigmented actinomycete colonies were isolated from surface-sterilized root nodules. The isolates were analysed by BOX-PCR fingerprinting revealing an unexpectedly high genetic variation. Selected strains were chosen for 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analyses confirmed that all strains isolated belonged to the genus Micromonospora and that some of them may represent new species. To determine the possibility that the isolates fixed atmospheric nitrogen, chosen strains were grown in nitrogen-free media, obtaining in some cases, significant growth when compared with the controls. These strains were further screened for the presence of the nifH gene encoding dinitrogenase reductase, a key enzyme in nitrogen fixation. The partial nifH-like gene sequences obtained showed a 99% similarity with the sequence of the nifH gene from Frankia alni ACN14a, an actinobacterium that induces nodulation and fixes nitrogen in symbiosis with Alnus. In addition, in situ hybridization was performed to determine if these microorganisms inhabit the inside of the nodules. This study strongly suggests that Micromonospora populations are natural inhabitants of nitrogen-fixing root nodules. PMID:20445637

  14. [Development and technological transfer of functional pastas extended with legumes].

    PubMed

    Granito, Marisela; Ascanio, Vanesa

    2009-03-01

    Development and technological transfer of functional pastas extended with legumes. Semolina pasta is a highly consumed foodstuff, the biological value of which is low because its protein is deficient in lysine. However, if the semolina is extended with legumes rich in this essential aminoacid, not only and aminoacid supplementation is produced, but also the dietary fibre and minerals are increased. In this work, pastas extended in 10% with a white variety of Phaseolus vulgaris and with Cajanus cajan were produced on a pilot plant scale, and this technology was transferred to a cooperative producing artisanal pastas. The cooking qualities and the physical, chemical, and nutritional characteristics of the pastas were evaluated, as well as the sensorial acceptability in institutionalized elderly people. The extension of the pastas with legume flours increased the optimum cooking time (15 to 20%), the weight (20% and 25%), and the loss of solids by cooking. Similarly, the functional value of the pastas increased by increasing the contents of minerals and dietary fibre. The protein content, as well as the protein digestibility in vitro also increased; however, the parameters of colour L, a and b, and the total starch content of the pastas decreased. At consumer level, the pastas extended with legumes had a good acceptability, for what it was concluded that the extension of the semolina with legume flours in the manufacture of pastas is technologically feasible. PMID:19480347

  15. Ectopic expression of miR160 results in auxin hypersensitivity, cytokinin hyposensitivity, and inhibition of symbiotic nodule development in soybean.

    PubMed

    Turner, Marie; Nizampatnam, Narasimha Rao; Baron, Mathieu; Coppin, Stéphanie; Damodaran, Suresh; Adhikari, Sajag; Arunachalam, Shivaram Poigai; Yu, Oliver; Subramanian, Senthil

    2013-08-01

    Symbiotic root nodules in leguminous plants result from interaction between the plant and nitrogen-fixing rhizobia bacteria. There are two major types of legume nodules, determinate and indeterminate. Determinate nodules do not have a persistent meristem, while indeterminate nodules have a persistent meristem. Auxin is thought to play a role in the development of both these types of nodules. However, inhibition of rootward auxin transport at the site of nodule initiation is crucial for the development of indeterminate nodules but not determinate nodules. Using the synthetic auxin-responsive DR5 promoter in soybean (Glycine max), we show that there is relatively low auxin activity during determinate nodule initiation and that it is restricted to the nodule periphery subsequently during development. To examine if and what role auxin plays in determinate nodule development, we generated soybean composite plants with altered sensitivity to auxin. We overexpressed microRNA393 to silence the auxin receptor gene family, and these roots were hyposensitive to auxin. These roots nodulated normally, suggesting that only minimal/reduced auxin signaling is required for determinate nodule development. We overexpressed microRNA160 to silence a set of repressor auxin response factor transcription factors, and these roots were hypersensitive to auxin. These roots were not impaired in epidermal responses to rhizobia but had significantly reduced nodule primordium formation, suggesting that auxin hypersensitivity inhibits nodule development. These roots were also hyposensitive to cytokinin and had attenuated expression of key nodulation-associated transcription factors known to be regulated by cytokinin. We propose a regulatory feedback loop involving auxin and cytokinin during nodulation.

  16. Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 bacteroids are not terminally differentiated and show altered O-antigen in nodules of the Inverted Repeat-Lacking Clade legume Glycyrrhiza uralensis.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Rivas, Juan C; Guefrachi, Ibtissem; Mok, Kenny C; Villaécija-Aguilar, José A; Acosta-Jurado, Sebastián; Pierre, Olivier; Ruiz-Sainz, José E; Taga, Michiko E; Mergaert, Peter; Vinardell, José M

    2016-09-01

    In rhizobial species that nodulate inverted repeat-lacking clade (IRLC) legumes, such as the interaction between Sinorhizobium meliloti and Medicago, bacteroid differentiation is driven by an endoreduplication event that is induced by host nodule-specific cysteine rich (NCR) antimicrobial peptides and requires the participation of the bacterial protein BacA. We have studied bacteroid differentiation of Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 in three host plants: Glycine max, Cajanus cajan and the IRLC legume Glycyrrhiza uralensis. Flow cytometry, microscopy analyses and viability studies of bacteroids as well as confocal microscopy studies carried out in nodules showed that S. fredii HH103 bacteroids, regardless of the host plant, had deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) contents, cellular sizes and survival rates similar to those of free-living bacteria. Contrary to S. meliloti, S. fredii HH103 showed little or no sensitivity to Medicago NCR247 and NCR335 peptides. Inactivation of S. fredii HH103 bacA neither affected symbiosis with Glycyrrhiza nor increased bacterial sensitivity to Medicago NCRs. Finally, HH103 bacteroids isolated from Glycyrrhiza, but not those isolated from Cajanus or Glycine, showed an altered lipopolysaccharide. Our studies indicate that, in contrast to the S. meliloti-Medicago model symbiosis, bacteroids in the S. fredii HH103-Glycyrrhiza symbiosis do not undergo NCR-induced and bacA-dependent terminal differentiation. PMID:26521863

  17. Sulphadimethoxine inhibits Phaseolus vulgaris root growth and development of N-fixing nodules.

    PubMed

    Sartorius, Marilena; Riccio, Anna; Cermola, Michele; Casoria, Paolo; Patriarca, Eduardo J; Taté, Rosarita

    2009-07-01

    Sulphonamides contamination of cultivated lands occurs through the recurrent spreading of animal wastes from intensive farming. The aim of this study was to test the effect(s) of sulphadimethoxine on the beneficial N-fixing Rhizobium etli-Phaseolus vulgaris symbiosis under laboratory conditions. The consequence of increasing concentrations of sulphadimethoxine on the growth ability of free-living R. etli bacteria, as well as on seed germination, seedling development and growth of common bean plants was examined. We have established that sulphadimethoxine inhibited the growth of both symbiotic partners in a dose-dependent manner. Bacterial invasion occurring in developing root nodules was visualized by fluorescence microscopy generating EGFP-marked R. etli bacteria. Our results proved that the development of symbiotic N-fixing root nodules is hampered by sulphadimethoxine thus identifying sulphonamides as toxic compounds for the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis: a low-input sustainable agricultural practice.

  18. Phytohormone regulation of legume-rhizobia interactions.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Brett J; Mathesius, Ulrike

    2014-07-01

    The symbiosis between legumes and nitrogen fixing bacteria called rhizobia leads to the formation of root nodules. Nodules are highly organized root organs that form in response to Nod factors produced by rhizobia, and they provide rhizobia with a specialized niche to optimize nutrient exchange and nitrogen fixation. Nodule development and invasion by rhizobia is locally controlled by feedback between rhizobia and the plant host. In addition, the total number of nodules on a root system is controlled by a systemic mechanism termed 'autoregulation of nodulation'. Both the local and the systemic control of nodulation are regulated by phytohormones. There are two mechanisms by which phytohormone signalling is altered during nodulation: through direct synthesis by rhizobia and through indirect manipulation of the phytohormone balance in the plant, triggered by bacterial Nod factors. Recent genetic and physiological evidence points to a crucial role of Nod factor-induced changes in the host phytohormone balance as a prerequisite for successful nodule formation. Phytohormones synthesized by rhizobia enhance symbiosis effectiveness but do not appear to be necessary for nodule formation. This review provides an overview of recent advances in our understanding of the roles and interactions of phytohormones and signalling peptides in the regulation of nodule infection, initiation, positioning, development, and autoregulation. Future challenges remain to unify hormone-related findings across different legumes and to test whether hormone perception, response, or transport differences among different legumes could explain the variety of nodules types and the predisposition for nodule formation in this plant family. In addition, the molecular studies carried out under controlled conditions will need to be extended into the field to test whether and how phytohormone contributions by host and rhizobial partners affect the long term fitness of the host and the survival and

  19. A Model of the Regulation of Nitrogenase Electron Allocation in Legume Nodules (II. Comparison of Empirical and Theoretical Studies in Soybean).

    PubMed Central

    Moloney, A. H.; Guy, R. D.; Layzell, D. B.

    1994-01-01

    In N2-fixing legumes, the proportion of total electron flow through nitrogenase (total nitrogenase activity, TNA) that is used for N2 fixation is called the electron allocation coefficient (EAC). Previous studies have proposed that EAC is regulated by the competitive inhibition of H2 on N2 fixation and that the degree of H2 inhibition can be affected by a nodule's permeability to gas diffusion. To test this hypothesis, EAC was measured in soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) nodules exposed to various partial pressures of H2 and N2, with or without changes in TNA or nodule permeability to gas diffusion, and the results were compared with the predictions of a mathematical model that combined equations for gas diffusion and competitive inhibition of N2 fixation (A. Moloney and D.B. Layzell [1993] Plant Physiol 103: 421-428). The empirical data clearly showed that decreases in EAC were associated with increases in external pH2, decreases in external pN2, and decreases in nodule permeability to O2 diffusion. The model predicted similar trends in EAC, and the small deviations that occurred between measured and predicted values could be readily accounted for by altering one or more of the following model assumptions: K1(H2) of nitrogenase (range from 2-4% H2), Km(N2) of nitrogenase (range from 4-5% N2), the allocation of less than 100% of whole-nodule respiration to tissues within the diffusion barrier, and the presence of a diffusion pathway that is open pore versus closed pore. The differences in the open-pore and closed-pore versions of the model suggest that it may be possible to use EAC measurements as a tool for the study of legume nodule diffusion barrier structure and function. The ability of the model to predict EAC provided strong support for the hypothesis that H2 inhibition of N2 fixation plays a major role in the in vivo control of EAC and that the presence of a variable barrier to gas diffusion affects the H2 and N2 concentration in the infected cell and

  20. Diversity patterns of Rhizobiaceae communities inhabiting soils, root surfaces and nodules reveal a strong selection of rhizobial partners by legumes.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Sánchez, Fabiola; Rivera, Javier; Vinuesa, Pablo

    2016-09-01

    Current knowledge about rhizobial diversity patterns in non-nodule habitats is scarce, limiting our understanding of basic aspects of rhizobial ecology like competitiveness for nodule occupancy and host effects on community structure. We used a combination of cultivation-dependent and independent approaches to analyse alpha and beta diversity patterns of Rhizobiaceae communities from a conserved seasonally dry tropical forest site in central Mexico and two nearby agricultural fields. Lineage-specific recA amplicon libraries were generated from soil DNA and their sequences compared with those from root surface and nodule isolates recovered in trapping experiments from two native Acacia species and two Phaseolus vulgaris cultivars. Rarefaction analyses revealed that Rhizobiaceae diversity in soils is larger than on root surfaces, and smallest in nodules. A 'rare biosphere'-like distribution of species was found in the three habitats. Multivariate statistical analyses demonstrated that the plant genus exerted a stronger influence than the land-usage regime on the diversity of rhizobia associated with hosts. Rhizobium etli was the dominant Rhizobiaceae found in the soil libraries. It dominated nodulation of Acacia spp. and predominately harboured symbiovar mimosae-like nodC genes. A novel Rhizobium lineage (Rsp1) dominated bean nodulation. Specialist and generalist genotypes for host nodulation were detected in both species. PMID:26395550

  1. Root nodulation of Sesbania rostrata.

    PubMed Central

    Ndoye, I; de Billy, F; Vasse, J; Dreyfus, B; Truchet, G

    1994-01-01

    The tropical legume Sesbania rostrata can be nodulated by Azorhizobium caulinodans on both its stem and its root system. Here we investigate in detail the process of root nodulation and show that nodules develop exclusively at the base of secondary roots. Intercellular infection leads to the formation of infection pockets, which then give rise to infection threads. Concomitantly with infection, cortical cells of the secondary roots dedifferentiate, forming a meristem which has an "open-basket" configuration and which surrounds the initial infection site. Bacteria are released from the tips of infection threads into plant cells via "infection droplets," each containing several bacteria. Initially, nodule differentiation is comparable to that of indeterminate nodules, with the youngest meristematic cells being located at the periphery and the nitrogen-fixing cells being located at the nodule center. Because of the peculiar form of the meristem, Sesbania root nodules develop uniformly around a central axis. Nitrogen fixation is detected as early as 3 days following inoculation, while the nodule meristem is still active. Two weeks after inoculation, meristematic activity ceases, and nodules then show the typical histology of determinate nodules. Thus, root nodule organogenesis in S. rostrata appears to be intermediate between indeterminate and determinate types. Images PMID:8106317

  2. [The Effect of Cadmium on the Efficiency of Development of Legume-Rhizobium Symbiosis].

    PubMed

    Chuhukova, O V; Postrigan, B N; Baimiev, A Kh; Chemeris, A V

    2015-01-01

    Screening of nodule bacteria (rhizobia) forming symbiotic relationships with legumes has been performed in order to isolate strains resistant to cadmium ions in a wide range of concentrations (6-132 mg/kg). The effect ofcadmium salts (6, 12, 24 mg/kg) on the legume-rhizobium symbiosis ofthe pea Pisum sativum L. with Rhizobium leguminosarum and of the fodder galega Galega orientalis Lam. with Rhizobium galegae has been studied under experimental laboratory conditions. No statistically significant differences have been revealed in the growth and biomass of plants with regard to the control in the range of concentrations given above. However, it was found that cadmium inhibited nodulation in P. sativum and stimulated it in G. orientalis. PMID:26638242

  3. [The Effect of Cadmium on the Efficiency of Development of Legume-Rhizobium Symbiosis].

    PubMed

    Chuhukova, O V; Postrigan, B N; Baimiev, A Kh; Chemeris, A V

    2015-01-01

    Screening of nodule bacteria (rhizobia) forming symbiotic relationships with legumes has been performed in order to isolate strains resistant to cadmium ions in a wide range of concentrations (6-132 mg/kg). The effect ofcadmium salts (6, 12, 24 mg/kg) on the legume-rhizobium symbiosis ofthe pea Pisum sativum L. with Rhizobium leguminosarum and of the fodder galega Galega orientalis Lam. with Rhizobium galegae has been studied under experimental laboratory conditions. No statistically significant differences have been revealed in the growth and biomass of plants with regard to the control in the range of concentrations given above. However, it was found that cadmium inhibited nodulation in P. sativum and stimulated it in G. orientalis.

  4. Diversity pattern of nitrogen fixing microbes in nodules of Trifolium arvense (L.) at different initial stages of ecosystem development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, S.; Engel, M.; Fischer, D.; Buegger, F.; Elmer, M.; Welzl, G.; Schloter, M.

    2013-02-01

    Legumes can be considered as pioneer plants during ecosystem development, as they form a symbiosis with different nitrogen fixing rhizobia species, which enable the plants to grow on soils with low available nitrogen content. In this study we compared the abundance and diversity of nitrogen fixing microbes based on the functional marker gene nifH, which codes for a subunit of the Fe-protein of the dinitrogenase reductase, in nodules of different size classes of Trifolium arvense (L.). Additionally, carbon and nitrogen contents of the bulk soil and plant material were measured. Plants were harvested from different sites, reflecting 2 (2a) and 5 (5a) yr of ecosystem development, of an opencast lignite mining area in the south of Cottbus, Lower Lusatia (Germany) where the artificial catchment "Chicken Creek" was constructed to study the development of terrestrial ecosystems. Plants from the 5a site revealed higher amounts of carbon and nitrogen, although nifH gene abundances in the nodules and carbon and nitrogen contents between the two soils did not differ significantly. Analysis of the nifH clone libraries showed a significant effect of the nodule size on the community composition of nitrogen fixing microbes. Medium sized nodules (2-5 mm) contained a uniform community composed of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii, whereas the small nodules (<2 mm) consisted of a diverse community including clones with non-Rhizobium nifH gene sequences. Regarding the impact of the soil age on the community composition a clear distinction between the small and the medium nodules can be made. While clone libraries from the medium nodules were pretty similar at both soil ages, soil age had a significant effect on the community compositions of the small nodules, where the proportion of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii increased with soil age.

  5. Diversity pattern of nitrogen fixing microbes in nodules of Trifolium arvense (L.) at different initial stages of ecosystem development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, S.; Engel, M.; Fischer, D.; Buegger, F.; Elmer, M.; Welzl, G.; Schloter, M.

    2012-09-01

    Legumes can be considered as pioneer plants during ecosystem development, as they form a symbiosis with different nitrogen fixing rhizobia species, which enable the plants to grow on soils with low available nitrogen content. In this study we compared the abundance and diversity of nitrogen fixing microbes based on the functional marker gene nifH, which codes for a subunit of the Fe-protein of the dinitrogenase reductase, in nodules of different size classes of Trifolium arvense (L.). Additionally, carbon and nitrogen contents of the bulk soil and plant material were measured. Plants were harvested from different sites, reflecting 2 (2a) and 5 (5a) yr of ecosystem development, of an opencast lignite mining area in the south of Cottbus, Lower Lusatia (Germany) where the artificial catchment "Chicken Creek" was constructed to study the development of terrestrial ecosystems. Plants from the 5a site revealed higher amounts of carbon and nitrogen, although nifH gene abundances in the nodules and carbon and nitrogen contents between the two soils did not differ significantly. Analysis of the nifH clone libraries showed a significant effect of the nodule size on the community composition of nitrogen fixing microbes. Medium sized nodules (2-5 mm) contained a uniform community composed of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii, whereas the small nodules (< 2 mm) consisted of a diverse community including clones with non-Rhizobium nifH gene sequences. Regarding the impact of the soil age on the community composition a clear distinction between the small and the medium nodules can be made. While clone libraries from the medium nodules were pretty similar at both soil ages, soil age had a significant effect on the community compositions of the small nodules, where the proportion of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii increased with soil age.

  6. Leghemoglobin green derivatives with nitrated hemes evidence production of highly reactive nitrogen species during aging of legume nodules

    PubMed Central

    Navascués, Joaquín; Pérez-Rontomé, Carmen; Gay, Marina; Marcos, Manuel; Yang, Fei; Walker, F. Ann; Desbois, Alain; Abián, Joaquín; Becana, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Globins constitute a superfamily of proteins widespread in all kingdoms of life, where they fulfill multiple functions, such as efficient O2 transport and modulation of nitric oxide bioactivity. In plants, the most abundant Hbs are the symbiotic leghemoglobins (Lbs) that scavenge O2 and facilitate its diffusion to the N2-fixing bacteroids in nodules. The biosynthesis of Lbs during nodule formation has been studied in detail, whereas little is known about the green derivatives of Lbs generated during nodule senescence. Here we characterize modified forms of Lbs, termed Lbam, Lbcm, and Lbdm, of soybean nodules. These green Lbs have identical globins to the parent red Lbs but their hemes are nitrated. By combining UV-visible, MS, NMR, and resonance Raman spectroscopies with reconstitution experiments of the apoprotein with protoheme or mesoheme, we show that the nitro group is on the 4-vinyl. In vitro nitration of Lba with excess nitrite produced several isomers of nitrated heme, one of which is identical to those found in vivo. The use of antioxidants, metal chelators, and heme ligands reveals that nitration is contingent upon the binding of nitrite to heme Fe, and that the reactive nitrogen species involved derives from nitrous acid and is most probably the nitronium cation. The identification of these green Lbs provides conclusive evidence that highly oxidizing and nitrating species are produced in nodules leading to nitrosative stress. These findings are consistent with a previous report showing that the modified Lbs are more abundant in senescing nodules and have aberrant O2 binding. PMID:22308405

  7. A Re-Evaluation of the Role of the Infected Cell in the Control of O2 Diffusion in Legume Nodules.

    PubMed Central

    Thumfort, P. P.; Atkins, C. A.; Layzell, D. B.

    1994-01-01

    Two different simulation models were constructed to describe O2 diffusion into the bacteria-infected cells of legume nodules: one based on a central zone of uniform spherical cells and the other on a central zone of packed, uniform cubical cells with air spaces along the edges. The cubical model more closely approximated the geometry and gas diffusion characteristics of infected cells than did the spherical model. The models relied on set values for the innermost O2 concentration in the infected cell (1-20 nM) and predicted values for the free O2 and oxygenated leghemoglobin gradients toward the cell:space interface. The cubical model but not the spherical model predicted saturation of leghemoglobin (Lb) oxygenation at or within a few micrometers of the gas-filled intercellular space and predicted that the space concentration could be as high as 1.3% O2 when the fractional oxygenation of Lb and respiration rate within the infected cell were typical of that which has been measured in vivo. In the model, the higher the space O2 concentration, the greater the saturation of Lb by O2 and the greater the collapse of Lb-facilitated diffusion near the cell:space interface. This was predicted to result in a greater resistance to O2 diffusion from the space to the bacteroids, thereby providing an intrinsic, homeostatic mechanism for controlling the rate of O2 influx into infected cells. Changes in the physiological features of the simulated cubical infected cell, such as the proportion of the cell as cytosol, the surface area of the cell exposed to a space, the maximum rate of cellular respiration, or the concentration of Lb in the cytoplasm, significantly altered the extent to which the infected cell would be able to regulate its diffusive resistance. These results demonstrate the possibility of a Lb-based mechanism for controlling the O2 concentration within the infected cells. If such a mechanism exists in legume nodules, it would give the infected cell an ability to

  8. Leghemoglobin is nitrated in functional legume nodules in a tyrosine residue within the heme cavity by a nitrite/peroxide-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Sainz, Martha; Calvo-Begueria, Laura; Pérez-Rontomé, Carmen; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Abián, Joaquín; Staudinger, Christiana; Bartesaghi, Silvina; Radi, Rafael; Becana, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Protein Tyr nitration is a post-translational modification yielding 3-nitrotyrosine (NO2-Tyr). Formation of NO2-Tyr is generally considered as a marker of nitroxidative stress and is involved in some human pathophysiological disorders, but it has been poorly studied in plants. Leghemoglobin (Lb) is an abundant hemeprotein of legume nodules that plays an essential role as O2 transporter. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry was used for a targeted search and quantification of NO2-Tyr in Lbs. For all Lbs examined, Tyr30, located in the distal heme pocket, is the major target of nitration. Lower amounts were found for NO2-Tyr25 and NO2-Tyr133. Nitrated Lb and other as yet unidentified nitrated proteins were also detected in nodules of plants not receiving NO3− and were found to decrease during senescence. This demonstrates formation of nitric oxide (•NO) and NO2− by alternative means to nitrate reductase, probably via a NO synthase-like enzyme, and strongly suggests that nitrated proteins perform biological functions and are not merely metabolic byproducts. In vitro assays with purified Lbs revealed that Tyr nitration requires NO2− + H2O2 and that peroxynitrite is not an efficient inducer of nitration, possibly by isomerizing it to NO3−. Nitrated Lb is formed via oxoferryl Lb, which generates nitrogen dioxide and tyrosyl radicals. This mechanism is distinctly different from that involved in heme nitration. Formation of NO2-Tyr in Lbs is a consequence of active metabolism in functional nodules, where Lbs may act as a sink of toxic peroxynitrite and may play a protective role in the symbiosis. PMID:25603991

  9. Legume genomes: more than peas in a pod.

    PubMed

    Young, Nevin Dale; Mudge, Joann; Ellis, T H Noel

    2003-04-01

    A growing array of sequence-based tools is helping to reveal the organization, evolution and syntenic relationships of legume genomes. The results indicate that legumes form a coherent taxonomic group with frequent and widespread macro- and microsynteny. This is good news for two model legume systems, Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus. Indeed, both models have recently been used to clone and characterize genes for nodulation-related receptors that were originally described in legumes with more complex genomes. Studies of legume genomes have also provided insight into genome size, gene clustering, genome duplications and repetitive elements. To understand legume genomes better, it will be necessary to develop tools for studying under-represented taxa beyond the relatively small group of economically important species that have been examined so far.

  10. Srchi24, A Chitinase Homolog Lacking an Essential Glutamic Acid Residue for Hydrolytic Activity, Is Induced during Nodule Development on Sesbania rostrata1

    PubMed Central

    Goormachtig, Sofie; Van de Velde, Willem; Lievens, Sam; Verplancke, Christa; Herman, Sylvia; De Keyser, Annick; Holsters, Marcelle

    2001-01-01

    The interaction between the tropical legume Sesbania rostrata and the bacterium Azorhizobium caulinodans results in the formation of nodules on both stem and roots. Stem nodulation was used as a model system to isolate early markers by differential display. One of them, Srchi24 is a novel early nodulin whose transcript level increased already 4 h after inoculation. This enhancement depended on Nod factor-producing bacteria. Srchi24 transcript levels were induced also by exogenous cytokinins. In situ hybridization and immunolocalization experiments showed that Srchi24 transcripts and proteins were present in the outermost cortical cell layers of the developing nodules. Sequence analyses revealed that Srchi24 is similar to class III chitinases, but lacks an important catalytic glutamate residue. A fusion between a maltose-binding protein and Srchi24 had no detectable hydrolytic activity. A function in nodulation is proposed for the Srchi24 protein. PMID:11553736

  11. A gene-based map of the Nod factor-independent Aeschynomene evenia sheds new light on the evolution of nodulation and legume genomes

    PubMed Central

    Chaintreuil, Clémence; Rivallan, Ronan; Bertioli, David J.; Klopp, Christophe; Gouzy, Jérôme; Courtois, Brigitte; Leleux, Philippe; Martin, Guillaume; Rami, Jean-François; Gully, Djamel; Parrinello, Hugues; Séverac, Dany; Patrel, Delphine; Fardoux, Joël; Ribière, William; Boursot, Marc; Cartieaux, Fabienne; Czernic, Pierre; Ratet, Pascal; Mournet, Pierre; Giraud, Eric; Arrighi, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Aeschynomene evenia has emerged as a new model legume for the deciphering of the molecular mechanisms of an alternative symbiotic process that is independent of the Nod factors. Whereas most of the research on nitrogen-fixing symbiosis, legume genetics and genomics has so far focused on Galegoid and Phaseolid legumes, A. evenia falls in the more basal and understudied Dalbergioid clade along with peanut (Arachis hypogaea). To provide insights into the symbiotic genes content and the structure of the A. evenia genome, we established a gene-based genetic map for this species. Firstly, an RNAseq analysis was performed on the two parental lines selected to generate a F2 mapping population. The transcriptomic data were used to develop molecular markers and they allowed the identification of most symbiotic genes. The resulting map comprised 364 markers arranged in 10 linkage groups (2n = 20). A comparative analysis with the sequenced genomes of Arachis duranensis and A. ipaensis, the diploid ancestors of peanut, indicated blocks of conserved macrosynteny. Altogether, these results provided important clues regarding the evolution of symbiotic genes in a Nod factor-independent context. They provide a basis for a genome sequencing project and pave the way for forward genetic analysis of symbiosis in A. evenia. PMID:27298380

  12. Different cytokinin histidine kinase receptors regulate nodule initiation as well as later nodule developmental stages in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Boivin, Stéphane; Kazmierczak, Théophile; Brault, Mathias; Wen, Jiangqi; Gamas, Pascal; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Frugier, Florian

    2016-10-01

    Legume plants adapt to low nitrogen by developing an endosymbiosis with nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria to form a new specific organ: the nitrogen-fixing nodule. In the Medicago truncatula model legume, the MtCRE1 cytokinin receptor is essential for this symbiotic interaction. As three other putative CHASE-domain containing histidine kinase (CHK) cytokinin receptors exist in M. truncatula, we determined their potential contribution to this symbiotic interaction. The four CHKs have extensive redundant expression patterns at early nodulation stages but diverge in differentiated nodules, even though MtCHK1/MtCRE1 has the strongest expression at all stages. Mutant and knock-down analyses revealed that other CHKs than MtCHK1/CRE1 are positively involved in nodule initiation, which explains the delayed nodulation phenotype of the chk1/cre1 mutant. In addition, cre1 nodules exhibit an increased growth, whereas other chk mutants have no detectable phenotype, and the maintained nitrogen fixation capacity in cre1 requires other CHK genes. Interestingly, an AHK4/CRE1 genomic locus from the aposymbiotic Arabidopsis plant rescues nodule initiation but not the nitrogen fixation capacity. This indicates that different CHK cytokinin signalling pathways regulate not only nodule initiation but also later developmental stages, and that legume-specific determinants encoded by the MtCRE1 gene are required for later nodulation stages than initiation. PMID:27341695

  13. Discovery of a rhizobial RNA that is essential for symbiotic root nodule development.

    PubMed Central

    Ebeling, S; Kündig, C; Hennecke, H

    1991-01-01

    All of the Azorhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, and Rhizobium genes known to be involved in the development of nitrogen-fixing legume root nodules are genes that code for proteins. Here we report the first exception to this rule: the sra gene; it was discovered during the genetic analysis of a Bradyrhizobium japonicum Tn5 mutant (strain 259) which had a severe deficiency in colonizing soybean nodules. A DNA region as small as 0.56 kb cloned from the parental wild type restored a wild-type phenotype in strain 259 by genetic complementation. The sra gene was located on this fragment, sequenced, and shown to be transcribed into a 213-nucleotide RNA. Results obtained with critical point mutations in the sra gene proved that the transcript was not translated into protein; rather, it appeared to function as an RNA molecule with a certain stem-and-loop secondary structure. We also detected an sra homolog in Rhizobium meliloti which, when cloned and transferred to B. japonicum mutant 259, fully restored symbiotic effectiveness in that strain. We propose several alternative functions for the sra gene product, of which that as a regulatory RNA for gene expression may be the most probable one. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 PMID:1717438

  14. Transcriptome sequencing and marker development for four underutilized legumes1

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Combating threats to food and nutrition security in the context of climate change and global population increase is one of the highest priorities of major international organizations. Hundreds of species are grown on a small scale in some of the most drought/flood-prone regions of the world and as such may harbor some of the most environmentally tolerant crops (and alleles). • Methods and Results: In this study, transcriptomes were sequenced, assembled, and annotated for four underutilized legume crops. Microsatellite markers were identified in each species, as well as a conserved orthologous set of markers for cross-family phylogenetics and comparative mapping, which were ground-truthed on a panel of diverse legume germplasm. • Conclusions: An understanding of these underutilized legumes will inform crop selection and breeding by allowing the investigation of genetic variation and the genetic basis of adaptive traits to be established. PMID:25699221

  15. Phenotypic and biochemical characterization of root nodule bacteria naturally associated with woody tree legumes in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alshaharani, Thobayet Safar; Shetta, Nader Desouky

    2015-03-01

    Thirty root-nodulating bacteria isolates were obtained from the roots of Acacia ampliceps (Maslin), A. ehrenbergiana (Hayne.), A. saligna (Labill.), A. seyal (Del.), A. tortilis (Forssk.), A. tortilis subsp. raddiana (Savi.), Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) and Vicia faba (L.) trees growing in the Riyadh region. The isolates' phenotypic and biochemical properties were characterized by assessing colony appearance, growth rate, resistance to antibiotics and heavy metals, and tolerance to salinity, elevated temperature and pH. All isolates had same colony morphology and grew on yeast extract mannitol and tryptone yeast agar, but not MGS media. The results also revealed considerable diversity among the isolates, which exhibited different patterns of resistance to abiotic stresses. Most isolates tolerated temperatures up to 37 degrees C and could grow from pH 5.5-8.5 and at a high NaCl concentration (2% w/v). The majority of isolates could utilize a variety of carbohydrates. Most of the isolates displayed resistance to antibiotics in the 75 microg ml(-1) range, with approximately 100 pg ml(-1) the maximum concentration at which growth was observed. All isolates were sensitive to aluminum and resistant to other heavy metals tested, and they were able to reduce nitrate and hydrolyze urea. PMID:25895257

  16. Genetic considerations in developing germplasm sources of native legumes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a great need for biological diversity in reseeding efforts on western rangelands. Legumes provide a crucial component of reseedings, by allowing for higher forage quality, soil nitrogen fixation, pollinator sustenance, and wildlife and wild-fowl feed. In efforts to collect and produce see...

  17. Leguminous plants: inventors of root nodules to accommodate symbiotic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Suzaki, Takuya; Yoro, Emiko; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Legumes and a few other plant species can establish a symbiotic relationship with nitrogen-fixing rhizobia, which enables them to survive in a nitrogen-deficient environment. During the course of nodulation, infection with rhizobia induces the dedifferentiation of host cells to form primordia of a symbiotic organ, the nodule, which prepares plants to accommodate rhizobia in host cells. While these nodulation processes are known to be genetically controlled by both plants and rhizobia, recent advances in studies on two model legumes, Lotus japonicus and Medicago truncatula, have provided great insight into the underlying plant-side molecular mechanism. In this chapter, we review such knowledge, with particular emphasis on two key processes of nodulation, nodule development and rhizobial invasion.

  18. Mesorhizobium shonense sp. nov., Mesorhizobium hawassense sp. nov. and Mesorhizobium abyssinicae sp. nov., isolated from root nodules of different agroforestry legume trees.

    PubMed

    Degefu, Tulu; Wolde-Meskel, Endalkachew; Liu, Binbin; Cleenwerck, Ilse; Willems, Anne; Frostegård, Åsa

    2013-05-01

    A total of 18 strains, representing members of the genus Mesorhizobium, obtained from root nodules of woody legumes growing in Ethiopia, have been previously shown, by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) of five housekeeping genes, to form three novel genospecies. In the present study, the phylogenetic relationship between representative strains of these three genospecies and the type strains of their closest phylogenetic neighbours Mesorhizobium plurifarium, Mesorhizobium amorphae, Mesorhizobium septentrionale and Mesorhizobium huakuii was further evaluated using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. In line with our earlier MLSA of other housekeeping genes, the phylogenetic trees derived from the atpD and glnII genes grouped the test strains into three well-supported, distinct lineages that exclude all defined species of the genus Mesorhizobium. The DNA-DNA relatedness between the representative strains of genospecies I-III and the type strains of their closest phylogenetic neighbours was low (≤59 %). They differed from each other and from their closest phylogenetic neighbours by the presence/absence of several fatty acids, or by large differences in the relative amounts of particular fatty acids. While showing distinctive features, they were generally able to utilize a wide range of substrates as sole carbon and nitrogen sources. The strains belonging to genospecies I, II and III therefore represent novel species for which we propose the names Mesorhizobium shonense sp. nov., Mesorhizobium hawassense sp. nov. and Mesorhizobium abyssinicae sp. nov. The isolates AC39a(T) ( = LMG 26966(T) = HAMBI 3295(T)), AC99b(T) ( = LMG 26968(T) = HAMBI 3301(T)) and AC98c(T) ( = LMG 26967(T) = HAMBI 3306(T)) are proposed as type strains for the respective novel species.

  19. Down-regulation of SymRK correlates with a deficiency in vascular bundle development in Phaseolus vulgaris nodules.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-López, Rosana; Jáuregui, David; Nava, Noreide; Alvarado-Affantranger, Xóchitl; Montiel, Jesús; Santana, Olivia; Sanchez, Federico; Quinto, Carmen

    2011-12-01

    The symbiotic interaction of legumes and rhizobia results in the formation of nitrogen-fixing nodules. Nodulation depends on the finely coordinated expression of a battery of genes involved in the infection and the organogenesis processes. After Nod factor perception, symbiosis receptor kinase (SymRK) receptor triggers a signal transduction cascade essential for nodulation leading to cortical cell divisions, infection thread (IT) formation and final release of rhizobia to the intracellular space, forming the symbiosome. Herein, the participation of SymRK receptor during the nodule organogenesis in Phaseolus vulgaris is addressed. Our findings indicate that besides its expression in the nodule epidermis, in IT, and in uninfected cells of the infection zone, PvSymRK immunolocalizes in the root and nodule vascular system. On the other hand, knockdown expression of PvSymRK led to the formation of scarce and defective nodules, which presented alterations in both IT/symbiosome formation and vascular system.

  20. Proteolytic Activity in Soybean Root Nodules 1

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Nancy E.; Torres, Cecilia M.; Wagner, Fred W.

    1983-01-01

    Root nodules were harvested from chamber-grown soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill cv Woodworth) plants throughout development. Apparent nitrogenase activity (acetylene reduction) peaked before seeds began to develop, but a significant amount of activity remained as the seeds matured. Nodule senescence was defined as the period in which residual nitrogenase activity was lost. During this time, soluble protein and leghemoglobin levels in the host cell cytosol decreased, and proteolytic activity against azocasein increased. Degradative changes were not detected in bacteroids during nodule senescence. Total soluble bacteroid protein per gram of nodule remained constant, and an increase in proteolytic activity in bacteroid extracts was not observed. These results are consistent with the view that soybean nodule bacteroids are capable of redifferentiation into free-living bacteria upon deterioration of the legume-rhizobia symbiosis. PMID:16662910

  1. Proteome reference maps of the Lotus japonicus nodule and root.

    PubMed

    Dam, Svend; Dyrlund, Thomas F; Ussatjuk, Anna; Jochimsen, Bjarne; Nielsen, Kasper; Goffard, Nicolas; Ventosa, Miguel; Lorentzen, Andrea; Gupta, Vikas; Andersen, Stig U; Enghild, Jan J; Ronson, Clive W; Roepstorff, Peter; Stougaard, Jens

    2014-02-01

    Legume symbiosis with rhizobia results in the formation of a specialized organ, the root nodule, where atmospheric dinitrogen is reduced to ammonia. In Lotus japonicus (Lotus), several genes involved in nodule development or nodule function have been defined using biochemistry, genetic approaches, and high-throughput transcriptomics. We have employed proteomics to further understand nodule development. Two developmental stages representing nodules prior to nitrogen fixation (white) and mature nitrogen fixing nodules (red) were compared with roots. In addition, the proteome of a spontaneous nodule formation mutant (snf1) was determined. From nodules and roots, 780 and 790 protein spots from 2D gels were identified and approximately 45% of the corresponding unique gene accessions were common. Including a previous proteomics set from Lotus pod and seed, the common gene accessions were decreased to 7%. Interestingly, an indication of more pronounced PTMs in nodules than in roots was determined. Between the two nodule developmental stages, higher levels of pathogen-related 10 proteins, HSPs, and proteins involved in redox processes were found in white nodules, suggesting a higher stress level at this developmental stage. In contrast, protein spots corresponding to nodulins such as leghemoglobin, asparagine synthetase, sucrose synthase, and glutamine synthetase were prevalent in red nodules. The distinct biochemical state of nodules was further highlighted by the conspicuous presence of several nitrilases, ascorbate metabolic enzymes, and putative rhizobial effectors.

  2. A JAZ Protein in Astragalus sinicus Interacts with a Leghemoglobin through the TIFY Domain and Is Involved in Nodule Development and Nitrogen Fixation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yixing; Xu, Meng; Wang, Ning; Li, Youguo

    2015-01-01

    Leghemoglobins (Lbs) play an important role in legumes-rhizobia symbiosis. Lbs bind O2 and protect nitrogenase activity from damage by O2 in nodules, therefore, they are regarded as a marker of active nitrogen fixation in nodules. Additionally, Lbs are involved in the nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway, acting as a NO scavenger during nodule development and nitrogen fixation. However, regulators responsible for Lb expression and modulation of Lb activity have not been characterized. In our previous work, a Jasmonate-Zim-domain (JAZ) protein interacting with a Lb (AsB2510) in Astragalus sinicus was identified and designated AsJAZ1. In this study, the interaction between AsJAZ1 and AsB2510 was verified using a yeast two-hybrid system and in vitro Glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down assays, resulting in identification of the interaction domain as a TIFY (previously known as zinc-finger protein expressed in inflorescence meristem, ZIM) domain. TIFY domain is named after the most conserved amino acids within the domain. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) was used to confirm the interaction between AsJAZ1 and AsB2510 in tobacco cells, demonstrating that AsJAZ1-AsB2510 interaction was localized to the cell membrane and cytoplasm. Furthermore, the expression patterns and the symbiotic phenotypes of AsJAZ1 were investigated. Knockdown of AsJAZ1 expression via RNA interference led to decreased number of nodules, abnormal development of bacteroids, accumulation of poly-x-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) and loss of nitrogenase activity. Taken together, our results suggest that AsJAZ1 interacts with AsB2510 and participates in nodule development and nitrogen fixation. Our results provide novel insights into the functions of Lbs or JAZ proteins during legume-rhizobia symbiosis.

  3. A JAZ Protein in Astragalus sinicus Interacts with a Leghemoglobin through the TIFY Domain and Is Involved in Nodule Development and Nitrogen Fixation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yixing; Xu, Meng; Wang, Ning; Li, Youguo

    2015-01-01

    Leghemoglobins (Lbs) play an important role in legumes-rhizobia symbiosis. Lbs bind O2 and protect nitrogenase activity from damage by O2 in nodules, therefore, they are regarded as a marker of active nitrogen fixation in nodules. Additionally, Lbs are involved in the nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway, acting as a NO scavenger during nodule development and nitrogen fixation. However, regulators responsible for Lb expression and modulation of Lb activity have not been characterized. In our previous work, a Jasmonate-Zim-domain (JAZ) protein interacting with a Lb (AsB2510) in Astragalus sinicus was identified and designated AsJAZ1. In this study, the interaction between AsJAZ1 and AsB2510 was verified using a yeast two-hybrid system and in vitro Glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down assays, resulting in identification of the interaction domain as a TIFY (previously known as zinc-finger protein expressed in inflorescence meristem, ZIM) domain. TIFY domain is named after the most conserved amino acids within the domain. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) was used to confirm the interaction between AsJAZ1 and AsB2510 in tobacco cells, demonstrating that AsJAZ1-AsB2510 interaction was localized to the cell membrane and cytoplasm. Furthermore, the expression patterns and the symbiotic phenotypes of AsJAZ1 were investigated. Knockdown of AsJAZ1 expression via RNA interference led to decreased number of nodules, abnormal development of bacteroids, accumulation of poly-x-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) and loss of nitrogenase activity. Taken together, our results suggest that AsJAZ1 interacts with AsB2510 and participates in nodule development and nitrogen fixation. Our results provide novel insights into the functions of Lbs or JAZ proteins during legume-rhizobia symbiosis. PMID:26460857

  4. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of Ensifer sp. PC2, isolated from a nitrogen-fixing root nodule of the legume tree (Khejri) native to the Thar Desert of India.

    PubMed

    Gehlot, Hukam Singh; Ardley, Julie; Tak, Nisha; Tian, Rui; Poonar, Neetu; Meghwal, Raju R; Rathi, Sonam; Tiwari, Ravi; Adnawani, Wan; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, T B K; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Pillay, Manoj; Markowitz, Victor; Baeshen, Mohammed N; Al-Hejin, Ahmed M; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Reeve, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    Ensifer sp. PC2 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from a nitrogen-fixing nodule of the tree legume P. cineraria (L.) Druce (Khejri), which is a keystone species that grows in arid and semi-arid regions of the Indian Thar desert. Strain PC2 exists as a dominant saprophyte in alkaline soils of Western Rajasthan. It is fast growing, well-adapted to arid conditions and is able to form an effective symbiosis with several annual crop legumes as well as species of mimosoid trees and shrubs. Here we describe the features of Ensifer sp. PC2, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 8,458,965 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged into 171 scaffolds of 171 contigs containing 8,344 protein-coding genes and 139 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of the rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project proposal. PMID:27340511

  5. How legumes recognize rhizobia.

    PubMed

    Via, Virginia Dalla; Zanetti, María Eugenia; Blanco, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    Legume plants have developed the capacity to establish symbiotic interactions with soil bacteria (known as rhizobia) that can convert N2 to molecular forms that are incorporated into the plant metabolism. The first step of this relationship is the recognition of bacteria by the plant, which allows to distinguish potentially harmful species from symbiotic partners. The main molecular determinant of this symbiotic interaction is the Nod Factor, a diffusible lipochitooligosaccharide molecule produced by rhizobia and perceived by LysM receptor kinases; however, other important molecules involved in the specific recognition have emerged over the years. Secreted exopolysaccharides and the lipopolysaccharides present in the bacterial cell wall have been proposed to act as signaling molecules, triggering the expression of specific genes related to the symbiotic process. In this review we will briefly discuss how transcriptomic analysis are helping to understand how multiple signaling pathways, triggered by the perception of different molecules produced by rhizobia, control the genetic programs of root nodule organogenesis and bacterial infection. This knowledge can help to understand how legumes have evolved to recognize and establish complex ecological relationships with particular species and strains of rhizobia, adjusting gene expression in response to identity determinants of bacteria. PMID:26636731

  6. MicroRNA167-Directed Regulation of the Auxin Response Factors GmARF8a and GmARF8b Is Required for Soybean Nodulation and Lateral Root Development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Youning; Li, Kexue; Chen, Liang; Zou, Yanmin; Liu, Haipei; Tian, Yinping; Li, Dongxiao; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Fang; Ferguson, Brett J; Gresshoff, Peter M; Li, Xia

    2015-07-01

    Legume root nodules convert atmospheric nitrogen gas into ammonium through symbiosis with a prokaryotic microsymbiont broadly called rhizobia. Auxin signaling is required for determinant nodule development; however, the molecular mechanism of auxin-mediated nodule formation remains largely unknown. Here, we show in soybean (Glycine max) that the microRNA miR167 acts as a positive regulator of lateral root organs, namely nodules and lateral roots. miR167c expression was up-regulated in the vasculature, pericycle, and cortex of soybean roots following inoculation with Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain USDA110 (the microsymbiont). It was found to positively regulate nodule numbers directly by repressing the target genes GmARF8a and GmARF8b (homologous genes of Arabidopsis [Arabidopsis thaliana] AtARF8 that encode auxin response factors). Moreover, the expression of miR167 and its targets was up- and down-regulated by auxin, respectively. The miR167-GmARF8 module also positively regulated nodulation efficiency under low microsymbiont density, a condition often associated with environmental stress. The regulatory role of miR167 on nodule initiation was dependent on the Nod factor receptor GmNFR1α, and it acts upstream of the nodulation-associated genes nodule inception, nodulation signaling pathway1, early nodulin40-1, NF-YA1 (previously known as HAEM activator protein2-1), and NF-YA2. miR167 also promoted lateral root numbers. Collectively, our findings establish a key role for the miR167-GmARF8 module in auxin-mediated nodule and lateral root formation in soybean. PMID:25941314

  7. MicroRNA167-Directed Regulation of the Auxin Response Factors GmARF8a and GmARF8b Is Required for Soybean Nodulation and Lateral Root Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Youning; Li, Kexue; Chen, Liang; Zou, Yanmin; Tian, Yinping; Li, Dongxiao; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Fang; Ferguson, Brett J.; Gresshoff, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Legume root nodules convert atmospheric nitrogen gas into ammonium through symbiosis with a prokaryotic microsymbiont broadly called rhizobia. Auxin signaling is required for determinant nodule development; however, the molecular mechanism of auxin-mediated nodule formation remains largely unknown. Here, we show in soybean (Glycine max) that the microRNA miR167 acts as a positive regulator of lateral root organs, namely nodules and lateral roots. miR167c expression was up-regulated in the vasculature, pericycle, and cortex of soybean roots following inoculation with Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain USDA110 (the microsymbiont). It was found to positively regulate nodule numbers directly by repressing the target genes GmARF8a and GmARF8b (homologous genes of Arabidopsis [Arabidopsis thaliana] AtARF8 that encode auxin response factors). Moreover, the expression of miR167 and its targets was up- and down-regulated by auxin, respectively. The miR167-GmARF8 module also positively regulated nodulation efficiency under low microsymbiont density, a condition often associated with environmental stress. The regulatory role of miR167 on nodule initiation was dependent on the Nod factor receptor GmNFR1α, and it acts upstream of the nodulation-associated genes NODULE INCEPTION, NODULATION SIGNALING PATHWAY1, EARLY NODULIN40-1, NF-YA1 (previously known as HAEM ACTIVATOR PROTEIN2-1), and NF-YA2. miR167 also promoted lateral root numbers. Collectively, our findings establish a key role for the miR167-GmARF8 module in auxin-mediated nodule and lateral root formation in soybean. PMID:25941314

  8. MicroRNA167-Directed Regulation of the Auxin Response Factors GmARF8a and GmARF8b Is Required for Soybean Nodulation and Lateral Root Development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Youning; Li, Kexue; Chen, Liang; Zou, Yanmin; Liu, Haipei; Tian, Yinping; Li, Dongxiao; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Fang; Ferguson, Brett J; Gresshoff, Peter M; Li, Xia

    2015-07-01

    Legume root nodules convert atmospheric nitrogen gas into ammonium through symbiosis with a prokaryotic microsymbiont broadly called rhizobia. Auxin signaling is required for determinant nodule development; however, the molecular mechanism of auxin-mediated nodule formation remains largely unknown. Here, we show in soybean (Glycine max) that the microRNA miR167 acts as a positive regulator of lateral root organs, namely nodules and lateral roots. miR167c expression was up-regulated in the vasculature, pericycle, and cortex of soybean roots following inoculation with Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain USDA110 (the microsymbiont). It was found to positively regulate nodule numbers directly by repressing the target genes GmARF8a and GmARF8b (homologous genes of Arabidopsis [Arabidopsis thaliana] AtARF8 that encode auxin response factors). Moreover, the expression of miR167 and its targets was up- and down-regulated by auxin, respectively. The miR167-GmARF8 module also positively regulated nodulation efficiency under low microsymbiont density, a condition often associated with environmental stress. The regulatory role of miR167 on nodule initiation was dependent on the Nod factor receptor GmNFR1α, and it acts upstream of the nodulation-associated genes nodule inception, nodulation signaling pathway1, early nodulin40-1, NF-YA1 (previously known as HAEM activator protein2-1), and NF-YA2. miR167 also promoted lateral root numbers. Collectively, our findings establish a key role for the miR167-GmARF8 module in auxin-mediated nodule and lateral root formation in soybean.

  9. Development and comparison of projection and image space 3D nodule insertion techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robins, Marthony; Solomon, Justin; Sahbaee, Pooyan; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to develop and compare two methods of inserting computerized virtual lesions into CT datasets. 24 physical (synthetic) nodules of three sizes and four morphologies were inserted into an anthropomorphic chest phantom (LUNGMAN, KYOTO KAGAKU). The phantom was scanned (Somatom Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare) with and without nodules present, and images were reconstructed with filtered back projection and iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) at 0.6 mm slice thickness using a standard thoracic CT protocol at multiple dose settings. Virtual 3D CAD models based on the physical nodules were virtually inserted (accounting for the system MTF) into the nodule-free CT data using two techniques. These techniques include projection-based and image-based insertion. Nodule volumes were estimated using a commercial segmentation tool (iNtuition, TeraRecon, Inc.). Differences were tested using paired t-tests and R2 goodness of fit between the virtually and physically inserted nodules. Both insertion techniques resulted in nodule volumes very similar to the real nodules (<3% difference) and in most cases the differences were not statistically significant. Also, R2 values were all <0.97 for both insertion techniques. These data imply that these techniques can confidently be used as a means of inserting virtual nodules in CT datasets. These techniques can be instrumental in building hybrid CT datasets composed of patient images with virtually inserted nodules.

  10. Nitrogen modulation of legume root architecture signaling pathways involves phytohormones and small regulatory molecules.

    PubMed

    Mohd-Radzman, Nadiatul A; Djordjevic, Michael A; Imin, Nijat

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen, particularly nitrate is an important yield determinant for crops. However, current agricultural practice with excessive fertilizer usage has detrimental effects on the environment. Therefore, legumes have been suggested as a sustainable alternative for replenishing soil nitrogen. Legumes can uniquely form nitrogen-fixing nodules through symbiotic interaction with specialized soil bacteria. Legumes possess a highly plastic root system which modulates its architecture according to the nitrogen availability in the soil. Understanding how legumes regulate root development in response to nitrogen availability is an important step to improving root architecture. The nitrogen-mediated root development pathway starts with sensing soil nitrogen level followed by subsequent signal transduction pathways involving phytohormones, microRNAs and regulatory peptides that collectively modulate the growth and shape of the root system. This review focuses on the current understanding of nitrogen-mediated legume root architecture including local and systemic regulations by different N-sources and the modulations by phytohormones and small regulatory molecules.

  11. Growth and Survival of Mesorhizobium loti Inside Acanthamoeba Enhanced Its Ability to Develop More Nodules on Lotus corniculatus.

    PubMed

    Karaś, Magdalena A; Turska-Szewczuk, Anna; Trapska, Dominika; Urbanik-Sypniewska, Teresa

    2015-08-01

    The importance of protozoa as environmental reservoirs of pathogens is well recognized, while their impact on survival and symbiotic properties of rhizobia has not been explored. The possible survival of free-living rhizobia inside amoebae could influence bacterial abundance in the rhizosphere of legume plants and the nodulation competitiveness of microsymbionts. Two well-characterized strains of Mesorhizobium: Mesorhizobium loti NZP2213 and Mesorhizobium huakuii symbiovar loti MAFF303099 were assayed for their growth ability within the Neff strain of Acanthamoeba castellanii. Although the association ability and the initial uptake rate of both strains were similar, recovery of viable M. huakuii MAFF303099 after 4 h postinfection decreased markedly and that of M. loti NZP2213 increased. The latter strain was also able to survive prolonged co-incubation within amoebae and to self-release from the amoeba cell. The temperature 28 °C and PBS were established as optimal for the uptake of Mesorhizobium by amoebae. The internalization of mesorhizobia was mediated by the mannose-dependent receptor. M. loti NZP2213 bacteria released from amoebae developed 1.5 times more nodules on Lotus corniculatus than bacteria cultivated in an amoebae-free medium.

  12. Proteome analysis of pod and seed development in the model legume Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Nautrup-Pedersen, Gitte; Dam, Svend; Laursen, Brian S; Siegumfeldt, Astrid L; Nielsen, Kasper; Goffard, Nicolas; Stærfeldt, Hans Henrik; Friis, Carsten; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Lorentzen, Andrea; Roepstorff, Peter; Stougaard, Jens

    2010-11-01

    Legume pods serve important functions during seed development and are themselves sources of food and feed. Compared to seeds, the metabolism and development of pods are not well-defined. The present characterization of pods from the model legume Lotus japonicus, together with the detailed analyses of the pod and seed proteomes in five developmental stages, paves the way for comparative pathway analysis and provides new metabolic information. Proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and tandem-mass spectrometry. These analyses lead to the identification of 604 pod proteins and 965 seed proteins, including 263 proteins distinguishing the pod. The complete data set is publicly available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/cgi-bin/lotus/db.cgi , where spots in a reference map are linked to experimental data, such as matched peptides, quantification values, and gene accessions. Identified pod proteins represented enzymes from 85 different metabolic pathways, including storage globulins and a late embryogenesis abundant protein. In contrast to seed maturation, pod maturation was associated with decreasing total protein content, especially proteins involved in protein biosynthesis and photosynthesis. Proteins detected only in pods included three enzymes participating in the urea cycle and four in nitrogen and amino group metabolism, highlighting the importance of nitrogen metabolism during pod development. Additionally, five legume seed proteins previously unassigned in the glutamate metabolism pathway were identified.

  13. The proteome of seed development in the model legume Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Dam, Svend; Laursen, Brian S; Ornfelt, Jane H; Jochimsen, Bjarne; Staerfeldt, Hans Henrik; Friis, Carsten; Nielsen, Kasper; Goffard, Nicolas; Besenbacher, Søren; Krusell, Lene; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Thøgersen, Ida B; Enghild, Jan J; Stougaard, Jens

    2009-03-01

    We have characterized the development of seeds in the model legume Lotus japonicus. Like soybean (Glycine max) and pea (Pisum sativum), Lotus develops straight seed pods and each pod contains approximately 20 seeds that reach maturity within 40 days. Histological sections show the characteristic three developmental phases of legume seeds and the presence of embryo, endosperm, and seed coat in desiccated seeds. Furthermore, protein, oil, starch, phytic acid, and ash contents were determined, and this indicates that the composition of mature Lotus seed is more similar to soybean than to pea. In a first attempt to determine the seed proteome, both a two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis approach and a gel-based liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry approach were used. Globulins were analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and five legumins, LLP1 to LLP5, and two convicilins, LCP1 and LCP2, were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometry. For two distinct developmental phases, seed filling and desiccation, a gel-based liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry approach was used, and 665 and 181 unique proteins corresponding to gene accession numbers were identified for the two phases, respectively. All of the proteome data, including the experimental data and mass spectrometry spectra peaks, were collected in a database that is available to the scientific community via a Web interface (http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/cgi-bin/lotus/db.cgi). This database establishes the basis for relating physiology, biochemistry, and regulation of seed development in Lotus. Together with a new Web interface (http://bioinfoserver.rsbs.anu.edu.au/utils/PathExpress4legumes/) collecting all protein identifications for Lotus, Medicago, and soybean seed proteomes, this database is a valuable resource for comparative seed proteomics and pathway analysis within and beyond the legume family.

  14. Characterisation of the legume SERK-NIK gene superfamily including splice variants: Implications for development and defence

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background SOMATIC EMBRYOGENESIS RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE (SERK) genes are part of the regulation of diverse signalling events in plants. Current evidence shows SERK proteins function both in developmental and defence signalling pathways, which occur in response to both peptide and steroid ligands. SERKs are generally present as small gene families in plants, with five SERK genes in Arabidopsis. Knowledge gained primarily through work on Arabidopsis SERKs indicates that these proteins probably interact with a wide range of other receptor kinases and form a fundamental part of many essential signalling pathways. The SERK1 gene of the model legume, Medicago truncatula functions in somatic and zygotic embryogenesis, and during many phases of plant development, including nodule and lateral root formation. However, other SERK genes in M. truncatula and other legumes are largely unidentified and their functions unknown. Results To aid the understanding of signalling pathways in M. truncatula, we have identified and annotated the SERK genes in this species. Using degenerate PCR and database mining, eight more SERK-like genes have been identified and these have been shown to be expressed. The amplification and sequencing of several different PCR products from one of these genes is consistent with the presence of splice variants. Four of the eight additional genes identified are upregulated in cultured leaf tissue grown on embryogenic medium. The sequence information obtained from M. truncatula was used to identify SERK family genes in the recently sequenced soybean (Glycine max) genome. Conclusions A total of nine SERK or SERK-like genes have been identified in M. truncatula and potentially 17 in soybean. Five M. truncatula SERK genes arose from duplication events not evident in soybean and Lotus. The presence of splice variants has not been previously reported in a SERK gene. Upregulation of four newly identified SERK genes (in addition to the previously described MtSERK1) in

  15. Polyphenol oxidase affects normal nodule development in red clover (Trifolium pratense L.)

    PubMed Central

    Webb, K. Judith; Cookson, Alan; Allison, Gordon; Sullivan, Michael L.; Winters, Ana L.

    2014-01-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) may have multiple functions in tissues depending on its cellular or tissue localization. Here we use PPO RNAi transformants of red clover (Trifolium pratense) to determine the role PPO plays in normal development of plants, and especially in N2-fixing nodules. In red clover, PPO was not essential for either growth or nodule production, or for nodule function in plants grown under optimal, N-free conditions. However, absence of PPO resulted in a more reduced environment in all tissues, as measured by redox potential, and caused subtle developmental changes in nodules. Leaves and, to a lesser extent nodules, lacking PPO tended to accumulate phenolic compounds. A comparison of nodules of two representative contrasting clones by microscopy revealed that nodules lacking PPO were morphologically and anatomically subtly altered, and that phenolics accumulated in different cells and tissues. Developing nodules lacking PPO were longer, and there were more cell layers within the squashed cell layer (SCL), but the walls of these cells were less thickened and the cells were less squashed. Within the N2-fixing zone, bacteroids appeared more granular and were less tightly packed together, and were similar to developmentally compromised bacteroids elicited by catalase mutant rhizobia reported elsewhere. PMID:25566275

  16. The role of the testa during development and in establishment of dormancy of the legume seed

    PubMed Central

    Smýkal, Petr; Vernoud, Vanessa; Blair, Matthew W.; Soukup, Aleš; Thompson, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Timing of seed germination is one of the key steps in plant life cycles. It determines the beginning of plant growth in natural or agricultural ecosystems. In the wild, many seeds exhibit dormancy and will only germinate after exposure to certain environmental conditions. In contrast, crop seeds germinate as soon as they are imbibed usually at planting time. These domestication-triggered changes represent adaptations to cultivation and human harvesting. Germination is one of the common sets of traits recorded in different crops and termed the “domestication syndrome.” Moreover, legume seed imbibition has a crucial role in cooking properties. Different seed dormancy classes exist among plant species. Physical dormancy (often called hardseededness), as found in legumes, involves the development of a water-impermeable seed coat, caused by the presence of phenolics- and suberin-impregnated layers of palisade cells. The dormancy release mechanism primarily involves seed responses to temperature changes in the habitat, resulting in testa permeability to water. The underlying genetic controls in legumes have not been identified yet. However, positive correlation was shown between phenolics content (e.g., pigmentation), the requirement for oxidation and the activity of catechol oxidase in relation to pea seed dormancy, while epicatechin levels showed a significant positive correlation with soybean hardseededness. myeloblastosis family of transcription factors, WD40 proteins and enzymes of the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway were involved in seed testa color in soybean, pea and Medicago, but were not tested directly in relation to seed dormancy. These phenolic compounds play important roles in defense against pathogens, as well as affecting the nutritional quality of products, and because of their health benefits, they are of industrial and medicinal interest. In this review, we discuss the role of the testa in mediating legume seed germination, with a focus on

  17. The abundance and diversity of legume-nodulating rhizobia in 28-year-old plantations of tropical, subtropical, and exotic tree species: a case study from the Forest Reserve of Bandia, Senegal.

    PubMed

    Sene, Godar; Thiao, Mansour; Samba-Mbaye, Ramatoulaye; Khasa, Damase; Kane, Aboubacry; Mbaye, Mame Samba; Beaulieu, Marie-Ève; Manga, Anicet; Sylla, Samba Ndao

    2013-01-01

    Several fast-growing and multipurpose tree species have been widely used in West Africa to both reverse the tendency of land degradation and restore soil productivity. Although beneficial effects have been reported on soil stabilization, there still remains a lack of information about their impact on soil microorganisms. Our investigation has been carried out in exotic and native tree plantations of 28 years and aimed to survey and compare the abundance and genetic diversity of natural legume-nodulating rhizobia (LNR). The study of LNR is supported by the phylogenetic analysis which clustered the isolates into three genera: Bradyrhizobium, Mesorhizobium, and Sinorhizobium. The results showed close positive correlations between the sizes of LNR populations estimated both in the dry and rainy seasons and the presence of legume tree hosts. There were significant increases in Rhizobium spp. population densities in response to planting with Acacia spp., and high genetic diversities and richness of genotypes were fittest in these tree plantations. This suggests that enrichment of soil Rhizobium spp. populations is host specific. The results indicated also that species of genera Mesorhizobium and Sinorhizobium were lacking in plantations of non-host species. By contrast, there was a widespread distribution of Bradyrhizobium spp. strains across the tree plantations, with no evident specialization in regard to plantation type. Finally, the study provides information about the LNR communities associated with a range of old tree plantations and some aspects of their relationships to soil factors, which may facilitate the management of man-made forest systems that target ecosystem rehabilitation and preservation of soil biota. PMID:22864803

  18. Alfalfa Enod12 genes are differentially regulated during nodule development by Nod factors and Rhizobium invasion.

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, P; Crespi, M D; Szécsi, J; Allison, L A; Schultze, M; Ratet, P; Kondorosi, E; Kondorosi, A

    1994-01-01

    MsEnod12A and MsEnod12B are two early nodulin genes from alfalfa (Medicago sativa). Differential expression of these genes was demonstrated using a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction approach. MsEnod12A RNA was detected only in nodules and not in other plant tissues. In contrast, MsEnod12B transcripts were found in nodules and also at low levels in roots, flowers, stems, and leaves. MsEnod12B expression was enhanced in the root early after inoculation with the microsymbiont Rhizobium meliloti and after treatment with purified Nod factors, whereas MsEnod12A induction was detected only when developing nodules were visible. In situ hybridization showed that in nodules, MsEnod12 expression occurred in the infection zone. In empty Fix- nodules the MsEnod12A transcript level was much reduced, and in spontaneous nodules it was not detectable. These data indicate that MsEnod12B expression in roots is related to the action of Nod factors, whereas MsEnod12A expression is associated with the invasion process in nodules. Therefore, alfalfa possesses different mechanisms regulating MsEnod12A and MsEnod12B expression. PMID:8066132

  19. [Baked product development based fermented legumes and cereals for schoolchildren snack].

    PubMed

    Granito, Marisela; Valero, Yolmar; Zambrano, Rosaura

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this work was to develop three foodstuffs based on mixes of wheat and fermented and non-fermented legumes, for the purpose of contributing with a healthy alternative for school snacks. To this aim, refined wheat flour was partially substituted with whole legume flours for the preparation of cakes, brownies and cookies, foodstuffs traditionally consumed by school age children. Cakes were formulated substituting 20% of wheat flour with Phaseolus vulgaris flour, brownies with 30% of Cajanus cajan flour and cookies with 30% of Vigna sinensis flour, using fermented and non-fermented legumes in the three products. When these products were subjected to sensorial evaluation through a test of degree of acceptability and using a hedonic scale of 7 points, values higher than 5 in the attributes taste, color and overall appraisal were found for all the products. In addition, the preference was measured with a group of 90 school children, corroborating the results obtained at laboratory level. Chemical characterization showed protein contents between 12 and 13% for the cake, 10 and 11% for the brownies and 10% for the cookies and protein digestibilities in vitro of 91%, 87% and 93%, respectively. The calorie supply, calculated per portion was of 199 kcal, 246 kcal and 237 kcal, for cakes, brownies and cookies, respectively. It was concluded that it is technically possible to incorporate fermented and non-fermented Phaseolus vulgaris, Vigna sinensis and Cajanus cajan, to highly consumed products such as cakes, brownies and cookies with a higher nutritional content and well-accepted by school-age children.

  20. Alteration of enod40 expression modifies medicago truncatula root nodule development induced by sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Charon, C; Sousa, C; Crespi, M; Kondorosi, A

    1999-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms involved in the control of root nodule organogenesis in the plant host are poorly understood. One of the nodulin genes associated with the earliest phases of this developmental program is enod40. We show here that transgenic Medicago truncatula plants overexpressing enod40 exhibit accelerated nodulation induced by Sinorhizobium meliloti. This resulted from increased initiation of primordia, which was accompanied by a proliferation response of the region close to the root tip and enhanced root length. The root cortex of the enod40-transformed plants showed increased sensitivity to nodulation signals. T(1) and T(2) descendants of two transgenic lines with reduced amounts of enod40 transcripts (probably from cosuppression) formed only a few and modified nodulelike structures. Our results suggest that induction of enod40 is a limiting step in primordium formation, and its function is required for appropriate nodule development. PMID:10521525

  1. A Nodule-Specific Lipid Transfer Protein AsE246 Participates in Transport of Plant-Synthesized Lipids to Symbiosome Membrane and Is Essential for Nodule Organogenesis in Chinese Milk Vetch1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Lei; Chen, Ling; Shi, Xiaofeng; Li, Yixing; Wang, Jianyun; Chen, Dasong; Xie, Fuli; Li, Youguo

    2014-01-01

    Rhizobia in legume root nodules fix nitrogen in symbiosomes, organelle-like structures in which a membrane from the host plant surrounds the symbiotic bacteria. However, the components that transport plant-synthesized lipids to the symbiosome membrane remain unknown. This study identified and functionally characterized the Chinese milk vetch (Astragalus sinicus) lipid transfer protein AsE246, which is specifically expressed in nodules. It was found that AsE246 can bind lipids in vitro. More importantly, AsE246 can bind the plant-synthesized membrane lipid digalactosyldiacylglycerol in vivo. Immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy showed that AsE246 and digalactosyldiacylglycerol localize in the symbiosome membrane and are present in infection threads. Overexpression of AsE246 resulted in increased nodule numbers; knockdown of AsE246 resulted in reduced nodule numbers, decreased lipids contents in nodules, diminished nitrogen fixation activity, and abnormal development of symbiosomes. AsE246 knockdown also resulted in fewer infection threads, nodule primordia, and nodules, while AsE246 overexpression resulted in more infection threads and nodule primordia, suggesting that AsE246 affects nodule organogenesis associated with infection thread formation. Taken together, these results indicate that AsE246 contributes to lipids transport to the symbiosome membrane, and this transport is required for effective legume-rhizobium symbiosis. PMID:24367021

  2. Genotypic Characterization of Bradyrhizobium Strains Nodulating Small Senegalese Legumes by 16S-23S rRNA Intergenic Gene Spacers and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Fingerprint Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Doignon-Bourcier, Florence; Willems, Anne; Coopman, Renata; Laguerre, Gisele; Gillis, Monique; de Lajudie, Philippe

    2000-01-01

    We examined the genotypic diversity of 64 Bradyrhizobium strains isolated from nodules from 27 native leguminous plant species in Senegal (West Africa) belonging to the genera Abrus, Alysicarpus, Bryaspis, Chamaecrista, Cassia, Crotalaria, Desmodium, Eriosema, Indigofera, Moghania, Rhynchosia, Sesbania, Tephrosia, and Zornia, which play an ecological role and have agronomic potential in arid regions. The strains were characterized by intergenic spacer (between 16S and 23S rRNA genes) PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (IGS PCR-RFLP) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting analyses. Fifty-three reference strains of the different Bradyrhizobium species and described groups were included for comparison. The strains were diverse and formed 27 groups by AFLP and 16 groups by IGS PCR-RFLP. The sizes of the IGS PCR products from the Bradyrhizobium strains that were studied varied from 780 to 1,038 bp and were correlated with the IGS PCR-RFLP results. The grouping of strains was consistent by the three methods AFLP, IGS PCR-RFLP, and previously reported 16S amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis. For investigating the whole genome, AFLP was the most discriminative technique, thus being of particular interest for future taxonomic studies in Bradyrhizobium, for which DNA is difficult to obtain in quantity and quality to perform extensive DNA:DNA hybridizations. PMID:10966419

  3. Genotypic characterization of Bradyrhizobium strains nodulating small Senegalese legumes by 16S-23S rRNA intergenic gene spacers and amplified fragment length polymorphism fingerprint analyses.

    PubMed

    Doignon-Bourcier, F; Willems, A; Coopman, R; Laguerre, G; Gillis, M; de Lajudie, P

    2000-09-01

    We examined the genotypic diversity of 64 Bradyrhizobium strains isolated from nodules from 27 native leguminous plant species in Senegal (West Africa) belonging to the genera Abrus, Alysicarpus, Bryaspis, Chamaecrista, Cassia, Crotalaria, Desmodium, Eriosema, Indigofera, Moghania, Rhynchosia, Sesbania, Tephrosia, and Zornia, which play an ecological role and have agronomic potential in arid regions. The strains were characterized by intergenic spacer (between 16S and 23S rRNA genes) PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (IGS PCR-RFLP) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting analyses. Fifty-three reference strains of the different Bradyrhizobium species and described groups were included for comparison. The strains were diverse and formed 27 groups by AFLP and 16 groups by IGS PCR-RFLP. The sizes of the IGS PCR products from the Bradyrhizobium strains that were studied varied from 780 to 1,038 bp and were correlated with the IGS PCR-RFLP results. The grouping of strains was consistent by the three methods AFLP, IGS PCR-RFLP, and previously reported 16S amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis. For investigating the whole genome, AFLP was the most discriminative technique, thus being of particular interest for future taxonomic studies in Bradyrhizobium, for which DNA is difficult to obtain in quantity and quality to perform extensive DNA:DNA hybridizations.

  4. PII Overexpression in Lotus japonicus Affects Nodule Activity in Permissive Low-Nitrogen Conditions and Increases Nodule Numbers in High Nitrogen Treated Plants.

    PubMed

    D'Apuzzo, Enrica; Valkov, Vladimir Totev; Parlati, Aurora; Omrane, Selim; Barbulova, Ani; Sainz, Maria Martha; Lentini, Marco; Esposito, Sergio; Rogato, Alessandra; Chiurazzi, Maurizio

    2015-04-01

    We report here the first characterization of a GLNB1 gene coding for the PII protein in leguminous plants. The main purpose of this work was the investigation of the possible roles played by this multifunctional protein in nodulation pathways. The Lotus japonicus LjGLB1 gene shows a significant transcriptional regulation during the light-dark cycle and different nitrogen availability, conditions that strongly affect nodule formation, development, and functioning. We also report analysis of the spatial profile of expression of LjGLB1 in root and nodule tissues and of the protein's subcellular localization. Transgenic L. japonicus lines overexpressing the PII protein were obtained and tested for the analysis of the symbiotic responses in different conditions. The uncoupling of PII from its native regulation affects nitrogenase activity and nodule polyamine content. Furthermore, our results suggest the involvement of PII in the signaling of the nitrogen nutritional status affecting the legumes' predisposition for nodule formation.

  5. The carbon-nitrogen balance of the nodule and its regulation under elevated carbon dioxide concentration.

    PubMed

    Libault, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Legumes have developed a unique way to interact with bacteria: in addition to preventing infection from pathogenic bacteria like any other plant, legumes also developed a mutualistic symbiotic relationship with one gender of soil bacteria: rhizobium. This interaction leads to the development of a new root organ, the nodule, where the differentiated bacteria fix for the plant the atmospheric dinitrogen (atmN2). In exchange, the symbiont will benefit from a permanent source of carbon compounds, products of the photosynthesis. The substantial amounts of fixed carbon dioxide dedicated to the symbiont imposed to the plant a tight regulation of the nodulation process to balance carbon and nitrogen incomes and outcomes. Climate change including the increase of the concentration of the atmospheric carbon dioxide is going to modify the rates of plant photosynthesis, the balance between nitrogen and carbon, and, as a consequence, the regulatory mechanisms of the nodulation process. This review focuses on the regulatory mechanisms controlling carbon/nitrogen balances in the context of legume nodulation and discusses how the change in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration could affect nodulation efficiency.

  6. [Production of inhibiting plant growth and development hormones by pathogenic for legumes Pseudomonas genus bacteria].

    PubMed

    Dankevich, L A

    2013-01-01

    It has been studied the ability of pathogenic for legumes pathovars of Pseudomonas genus to produce ethylene and abscisic acid in vitro. A direct correlation between the level of ethylene production by agent of bacterial pea burn--Pseudomonas syringae pv. pisi and level of its aggressiveness for plants has been found. It is shown that the amount of abscisic acid synthesized by pathogenic for legumes Pseudomonas genus bacteria correlates with their aggressiveness for plants.

  7. Dissecting the Root Nodule Transcriptome of Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Kant, Chandra; Pradhan, Seema; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark trait of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.), like other legumes, is the capability to convert atmospheric nitrogen (N2) into ammonia (NH3) in symbiotic association with Mesorhizobium ciceri. However, the complexity of molecular networks associated with the dynamics of nodule development in chickpea need to be analyzed in depth. Hence, in order to gain insights into the chickpea nodule development, the transcriptomes of nodules at early, middle and late stages of development were sequenced using the Roche 454 platform. This generated 490.84 Mb sequence data comprising 1,360,251 reads which were assembled into 83,405 unigenes. Transcripts were annotated using Gene Ontology (GO), Cluster of Orthologous Groups (COG) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) metabolic pathways analysis. Differential expression analysis revealed that a total of 3760 transcripts were differentially expressed in at least one of three stages, whereas 935, 117 and 2707 transcripts were found to be differentially expressed in the early, middle and late stages of nodule development respectively. MapMan analysis revealed enrichment of metabolic pathways such as transport, protein synthesis, signaling and carbohydrate metabolism during root nodulation. Transcription factors were predicted and analyzed for their differential expression during nodule development. Putative nodule specific transcripts were identified and enriched for GO categories using BiNGO which revealed many categories to be enriched during nodule development, including transcription regulators and transporters. Further, the assembled transcriptome was also used to mine for genic SSR markers. In conclusion, this study will help in enriching the transcriptomic resources implicated in understanding of root nodulation events in chickpea. PMID:27348121

  8. Dissecting the Root Nodule Transcriptome of Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    PubMed

    Kant, Chandra; Pradhan, Seema; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark trait of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.), like other legumes, is the capability to convert atmospheric nitrogen (N2) into ammonia (NH3) in symbiotic association with Mesorhizobium ciceri. However, the complexity of molecular networks associated with the dynamics of nodule development in chickpea need to be analyzed in depth. Hence, in order to gain insights into the chickpea nodule development, the transcriptomes of nodules at early, middle and late stages of development were sequenced using the Roche 454 platform. This generated 490.84 Mb sequence data comprising 1,360,251 reads which were assembled into 83,405 unigenes. Transcripts were annotated using Gene Ontology (GO), Cluster of Orthologous Groups (COG) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) metabolic pathways analysis. Differential expression analysis revealed that a total of 3760 transcripts were differentially expressed in at least one of three stages, whereas 935, 117 and 2707 transcripts were found to be differentially expressed in the early, middle and late stages of nodule development respectively. MapMan analysis revealed enrichment of metabolic pathways such as transport, protein synthesis, signaling and carbohydrate metabolism during root nodulation. Transcription factors were predicted and analyzed for their differential expression during nodule development. Putative nodule specific transcripts were identified and enriched for GO categories using BiNGO which revealed many categories to be enriched during nodule development, including transcription regulators and transporters. Further, the assembled transcriptome was also used to mine for genic SSR markers. In conclusion, this study will help in enriching the transcriptomic resources implicated in understanding of root nodulation events in chickpea. PMID:27348121

  9. Dissecting the Root Nodule Transcriptome of Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    PubMed

    Kant, Chandra; Pradhan, Seema; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark trait of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.), like other legumes, is the capability to convert atmospheric nitrogen (N2) into ammonia (NH3) in symbiotic association with Mesorhizobium ciceri. However, the complexity of molecular networks associated with the dynamics of nodule development in chickpea need to be analyzed in depth. Hence, in order to gain insights into the chickpea nodule development, the transcriptomes of nodules at early, middle and late stages of development were sequenced using the Roche 454 platform. This generated 490.84 Mb sequence data comprising 1,360,251 reads which were assembled into 83,405 unigenes. Transcripts were annotated using Gene Ontology (GO), Cluster of Orthologous Groups (COG) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) metabolic pathways analysis. Differential expression analysis revealed that a total of 3760 transcripts were differentially expressed in at least one of three stages, whereas 935, 117 and 2707 transcripts were found to be differentially expressed in the early, middle and late stages of nodule development respectively. MapMan analysis revealed enrichment of metabolic pathways such as transport, protein synthesis, signaling and carbohydrate metabolism during root nodulation. Transcription factors were predicted and analyzed for their differential expression during nodule development. Putative nodule specific transcripts were identified and enriched for GO categories using BiNGO which revealed many categories to be enriched during nodule development, including transcription regulators and transporters. Further, the assembled transcriptome was also used to mine for genic SSR markers. In conclusion, this study will help in enriching the transcriptomic resources implicated in understanding of root nodulation events in chickpea.

  10. Polyphenol oxidase affects normal nodule development in red clover (Trifolium pratense L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) may have multiple functions in tissues, depending on its cellular or tissue localization. We used PPO RNAi transformants of red clover (Trifolium pratense) to determine the role PPO plays in normal development of plants, and especially in nitrogen-fixing nodules. In red clov...

  11. Different Pathways Act Downstream of the CEP Peptide Receptor CRA2 to Regulate Lateral Root and Nodule Development.

    PubMed

    Mohd-Radzman, Nadiatul A; Laffont, Carole; Ivanovici, Ariel; Patel, Neha; Reid, Dugald; Stougaard, Jens; Frugier, Florian; Imin, Nijat; Djordjevic, Michael A

    2016-08-01

    C-TERMINALLY ENCODED PEPTIDEs (CEPs) control root system architecture in a non-cell-autonomous manner. In Medicago truncatula, MtCEP1 affects root development by increasing nodule formation and inhibiting lateral root emergence by unknown pathways. Here, we show that the MtCEP1 peptide-dependent increase in nodulation requires the symbiotic signaling pathway and ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE2 (EIN2)/SICKLE (SKL), but acts independently of SUPER NUMERIC NODULES. MtCEP1-dependent inhibition of lateral root development acts through an EIN2-independent mechanism. MtCEP1 increases nodulation by promoting rhizobial infections, the developmental competency of roots for nodulation, the formation of fused nodules, and an increase in frequency of nodule development that initiates at proto-phloem poles. These phenotypes are similar to those of the ein2/skl mutant and support that MtCEP1 modulates EIN2-dependent symbiotic responses. Accordingly, MtCEP1 counteracts the reduction in nodulation induced by increasing ethylene precursor concentrations, and an ethylene synthesis inhibitor treatment antagonizes MtCEP1 root phenotypes. MtCEP1 also inhibits the development of EIN2-dependent pseudonodule formation. Finally, mutants affecting the COMPACT ROOT ARCHITECTURE2 (CRA2) receptor, which is closely related to the Arabidopsis CEP Receptor1, are unresponsive to MtCEP1 effects on lateral root and nodule formation, suggesting that CRA2 is a CEP peptide receptor mediating both organogenesis programs. In addition, an ethylene inhibitor treatment counteracts the cra2 nodulation phenotype. These results indicate that MtCEP1 and its likely receptor, CRA2, mediate nodulation and lateral root development through different pathways. PMID:27342310

  12. Different Pathways Act Downstream of the CEP Peptide Receptor CRA2 to Regulate Lateral Root and Nodule Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Mohd-Radzman, Nadiatul A.; Ivanovici, Ariel; Frugier, Florian; Djordjevic, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    C-TERMINALLY ENCODED PEPTIDEs (CEPs) control root system architecture in a non-cell-autonomous manner. In Medicago truncatula, MtCEP1 affects root development by increasing nodule formation and inhibiting lateral root emergence by unknown pathways. Here, we show that the MtCEP1 peptide-dependent increase in nodulation requires the symbiotic signaling pathway and ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE2 (EIN2)/SICKLE (SKL), but acts independently of SUPER NUMERIC NODULES. MtCEP1-dependent inhibition of lateral root development acts through an EIN2-independent mechanism. MtCEP1 increases nodulation by promoting rhizobial infections, the developmental competency of roots for nodulation, the formation of fused nodules, and an increase in frequency of nodule development that initiates at proto-phloem poles. These phenotypes are similar to those of the ein2/skl mutant and support that MtCEP1 modulates EIN2-dependent symbiotic responses. Accordingly, MtCEP1 counteracts the reduction in nodulation induced by increasing ethylene precursor concentrations, and an ethylene synthesis inhibitor treatment antagonizes MtCEP1 root phenotypes. MtCEP1 also inhibits the development of EIN2-dependent pseudonodule formation. Finally, mutants affecting the COMPACT ROOT ARCHITECTURE2 (CRA2) receptor, which is closely related to the Arabidopsis CEP Receptor1, are unresponsive to MtCEP1 effects on lateral root and nodule formation, suggesting that CRA2 is a CEP peptide receptor mediating both organogenesis programs. In addition, an ethylene inhibitor treatment counteracts the cra2 nodulation phenotype. These results indicate that MtCEP1 and its likely receptor, CRA2, mediate nodulation and lateral root development through different pathways. PMID:27342310

  13. Nodulation outer proteins: double-edged swords of symbiotic rhizobia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizobia are nitrogen-fixing bacteria that establish a nodule symbiosis with legumes. Nodule formation is the result of a complex bacterial infection process, which depends on signals and surface determinants produced by both symbiotic partners. Among them, rhizobial nodulation outer proteins (Nops)...

  14. Transcriptome Profiling of Lotus japonicus Roots During Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Development and Comparison with that of Nodulation

    PubMed Central

    Deguchi, Yuichi; Banba, Mari; Shimoda, Yoshikazu; Chechetka, Svetlana A.; Suzuri, Ryota; Okusako, Yasuhiro; Ooki, Yasuhiro; Toyokura, Koichi; Suzuki, Akihiro; Uchiumi, Toshiki; Higashi, Shiro; Abe, Mikiko; Kouchi, Hiroshi; Izui, Katsura; Hata, Shingo

    2007-01-01

    Abstract To better understand the molecular responses of plants to arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, we analyzed the differential gene expression patterns of Lotus japonicus, a model legume, with the aid of a large-scale cDNA macroarray. Experiments were carried out considering the effects of contaminating microorganisms in the soil inoculants. When the colonization by AM fungi, i.e. Glomus mosseae and Gigaspora margarita, was well established, four cysteine protease genes were induced. In situ hybridization revealed that these cysteine protease genes were specifically expressed in arbuscule-containing inner cortical cells of AM roots. On the other hand, phenylpropanoid biosynthesis-related genes for phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), chalcone synthase, etc. were repressed in the later stage, although they were moderately up-regulated on the initial association with the AM fungus. Real-time RT–PCR experiments supported the array experiments. To further confirm the characteristic expression, a PAL promoter was fused with a reporter gene and introduced into L. japonicus, and then the transformants were grown with a commercial inoculum of G. mosseae. The reporter activity was augmented throughout the roots due to the presence of contaminating microorganisms in the inoculum. Interestingly, G. mosseae only colonized where the reporter activity was low. Comparison of the transcriptome profiles of AM roots and nitrogen-fixing root nodules formed with Mesorhizobium loti indicated that the PAL genes and other phenylpropanoid biosynthesis-related genes were similarly repressed in the two organs. PMID:17634281

  15. Recent developments in video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for pulmonary nodule management.

    PubMed

    Chow, Simon C Y; Ng, Calvin S H

    2016-07-01

    In the modern era when screening and early surveillance of pulmonary nodules is increasing in importance, the management of the pulmonary nodule represents a different challenge to thoracic surgeons. The difficulty lies in the merging of sound surgical and oncological principles with more minimally invasive and appropriate lung sparing surgery. Furthermore, the intra-operative identification and surgical management of small and sometimes multi-focal pulmonary lesions remain challenging. There have been many developments and innovations in the field of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) to cater for the demands from increasing incidence of pulmonary nodules with associated paradigm shift in their surgical management. Recently, uniportal VATS and non-intubated VATS represent an even less invasive alternative to the conventional multiport VATS. The emergence of image guided VATS, hybrid operating theatre and fluorescence thoracoscopy have all contributed to improved precision of VATS lung resection, and are becoming important adjuncts to lung sparing surgery. In this chapter, some of these recent developments in VATS with emphasize on their importance in surgical management of the pulmonary nodule will be discussed. PMID:27606081

  16. Recent developments in video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for pulmonary nodule management

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Simon C. Y.

    2016-01-01

    In the modern era when screening and early surveillance of pulmonary nodules is increasing in importance, the management of the pulmonary nodule represents a different challenge to thoracic surgeons. The difficulty lies in the merging of sound surgical and oncological principles with more minimally invasive and appropriate lung sparing surgery. Furthermore, the intra-operative identification and surgical management of small and sometimes multi-focal pulmonary lesions remain challenging. There have been many developments and innovations in the field of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) to cater for the demands from increasing incidence of pulmonary nodules with associated paradigm shift in their surgical management. Recently, uniportal VATS and non-intubated VATS represent an even less invasive alternative to the conventional multiport VATS. The emergence of image guided VATS, hybrid operating theatre and fluorescence thoracoscopy have all contributed to improved precision of VATS lung resection, and are becoming important adjuncts to lung sparing surgery. In this chapter, some of these recent developments in VATS with emphasize on their importance in surgical management of the pulmonary nodule will be discussed.

  17. Recent developments in video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for pulmonary nodule management

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Simon C. Y.

    2016-01-01

    In the modern era when screening and early surveillance of pulmonary nodules is increasing in importance, the management of the pulmonary nodule represents a different challenge to thoracic surgeons. The difficulty lies in the merging of sound surgical and oncological principles with more minimally invasive and appropriate lung sparing surgery. Furthermore, the intra-operative identification and surgical management of small and sometimes multi-focal pulmonary lesions remain challenging. There have been many developments and innovations in the field of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) to cater for the demands from increasing incidence of pulmonary nodules with associated paradigm shift in their surgical management. Recently, uniportal VATS and non-intubated VATS represent an even less invasive alternative to the conventional multiport VATS. The emergence of image guided VATS, hybrid operating theatre and fluorescence thoracoscopy have all contributed to improved precision of VATS lung resection, and are becoming important adjuncts to lung sparing surgery. In this chapter, some of these recent developments in VATS with emphasize on their importance in surgical management of the pulmonary nodule will be discussed. PMID:27606081

  18. Proteomics and Metabolomics: Two Emerging Areas for Legume Improvement.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Abirami; Kudapa, Himabindu; Pazhamala, Lekha T; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2015-01-01

    The crop legumes such as chickpea, common bean, cowpea, peanut, pigeonpea, soybean, etc. are important sources of nutrition and contribute to a significant amount of biological nitrogen fixation (>20 million tons of fixed nitrogen) in agriculture. However, the production of legumes is constrained due to abiotic and biotic stresses. It is therefore imperative to understand the molecular mechanisms of plant response to different stresses and identify key candidate genes regulating tolerance which can be deployed in breeding programs. The information obtained from transcriptomics has facilitated the identification of candidate genes for the given trait of interest and utilizing them in crop breeding programs to improve stress tolerance. However, the mechanisms of stress tolerance are complex due to the influence of multi-genes and post-transcriptional regulations. Furthermore, stress conditions greatly affect gene expression which in turn causes modifications in the composition of plant proteomes and metabolomes. Therefore, functional genomics involving various proteomics and metabolomics approaches have been obligatory for understanding plant stress tolerance. These approaches have also been found useful to unravel different pathways related to plant and seed development as well as symbiosis. Proteome and metabolome profiling using high-throughput based systems have been extensively applied in the model legume species, Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus, as well as in the model crop legume, soybean, to examine stress signaling pathways, cellular and developmental processes and nodule symbiosis. Moreover, the availability of protein reference maps as well as proteomics and metabolomics databases greatly support research and understanding of various biological processes in legumes. Protein-protein interaction techniques, particularly the yeast two-hybrid system have been advantageous for studying symbiosis and stress signaling in legumes. In this review, several

  19. Proteomics and Metabolomics: Two Emerging Areas for Legume Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Ramalingam, Abirami; Kudapa, Himabindu; Pazhamala, Lekha T.; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2015-01-01

    The crop legumes such as chickpea, common bean, cowpea, peanut, pigeonpea, soybean, etc. are important sources of nutrition and contribute to a significant amount of biological nitrogen fixation (>20 million tons of fixed nitrogen) in agriculture. However, the production of legumes is constrained due to abiotic and biotic stresses. It is therefore imperative to understand the molecular mechanisms of plant response to different stresses and identify key candidate genes regulating tolerance which can be deployed in breeding programs. The information obtained from transcriptomics has facilitated the identification of candidate genes for the given trait of interest and utilizing them in crop breeding programs to improve stress tolerance. However, the mechanisms of stress tolerance are complex due to the influence of multi-genes and post-transcriptional regulations. Furthermore, stress conditions greatly affect gene expression which in turn causes modifications in the composition of plant proteomes and metabolomes. Therefore, functional genomics involving various proteomics and metabolomics approaches have been obligatory for understanding plant stress tolerance. These approaches have also been found useful to unravel different pathways related to plant and seed development as well as symbiosis. Proteome and metabolome profiling using high-throughput based systems have been extensively applied in the model legume species, Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus, as well as in the model crop legume, soybean, to examine stress signaling pathways, cellular and developmental processes and nodule symbiosis. Moreover, the availability of protein reference maps as well as proteomics and metabolomics databases greatly support research and understanding of various biological processes in legumes. Protein-protein interaction techniques, particularly the yeast two-hybrid system have been advantageous for studying symbiosis and stress signaling in legumes. In this review, several

  20. Introduction of a novel pathway for IAA biosynthesis to rhizobia alters vetch root nodule development.

    PubMed

    Camerini, Serena; Senatore, Beatrice; Lonardo, Enza; Imperlini, Esther; Bianco, Carmen; Moschetti, Giancarlo; Rotino, Giuseppe L; Campion, Bruno; Defez, Roberto

    2008-07-01

    We introduced into Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae LPR1105 a new pathway for the biosynthesis of the auxin, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), under the control of a stationary phase-activated promoter active both in free-living bacteria and bacteroids. The newly introduced genes are the iaaM gene from Pseudomonas savastanoi and the tms2 gene from Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Free-living bacteria harbouring the promoter-iaaMtms2 construct release into the growth medium 14-fold more IAA than the wild-type parental strain. This IAA overproducing R. l. viciae, the RD20 strain, elicits the development of vetch root nodules containing up to 60-fold more IAA than nodules infected by the wild-type strain LPR1105. Vetch root nodules derived from RD20 are fewer in number per plant, heavier in terms of dry weight and show an enlarged and more active meristem. A significant increase in acetylene reduction activity was measured in nodules elicited in vetch by RD20.

  1. Metabolomic Profiling of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens-Induced Root Nodules Reveals Both Host Plant-Specific and Developmental Signatures.

    PubMed

    Lardi, Martina; Murset, Valérie; Fischer, Hans-Martin; Mesa, Socorro; Ahrens, Christian H; Zamboni, Nicola; Pessi, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens is a nitrogen-fixing endosymbiont, which can grow inside root-nodule cells of the agriculturally important soybean and other host plants. Our previous studies described B. diazoefficiens host-specific global expression changes occurring during legume infection at the transcript and protein level. In order to further characterize nodule metabolism, we here determine by flow injection-time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis the metabolome of (i) nodules and roots from four different B. diazoefficiens host plants; (ii) soybean nodules harvested at different time points during nodule development; and (iii) soybean nodules infected by two strains mutated in key genes for nitrogen fixation, respectively. Ribose (soybean), tartaric acid (mungbean), hydroxybutanoyloxybutanoate (siratro) and catechol (cowpea) were among the metabolites found to be specifically elevated in one of the respective host plants. While the level of C4-dicarboxylic acids decreased during soybean nodule development, we observed an accumulation of trehalose-phosphate at 21 days post infection (dpi). Moreover, nodules from non-nitrogen-fixing bacteroids (nifA and nifH mutants) showed specific metabolic alterations; these were also supported by independent transcriptomics data. The alterations included signs of nitrogen limitation in both mutants, and an increased level of a phytoalexin in nodules induced by the nifA mutant, suggesting that the tissue of these nodules exhibits defense and stress reactions. PMID:27240350

  2. Metabolomic Profiling of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens-Induced Root Nodules Reveals Both Host Plant-Specific and Developmental Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Lardi, Martina; Murset, Valérie; Fischer, Hans-Martin; Mesa, Socorro; Ahrens, Christian H.; Zamboni, Nicola; Pessi, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens is a nitrogen-fixing endosymbiont, which can grow inside root-nodule cells of the agriculturally important soybean and other host plants. Our previous studies described B. diazoefficiens host-specific global expression changes occurring during legume infection at the transcript and protein level. In order to further characterize nodule metabolism, we here determine by flow injection–time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis the metabolome of (i) nodules and roots from four different B. diazoefficiens host plants; (ii) soybean nodules harvested at different time points during nodule development; and (iii) soybean nodules infected by two strains mutated in key genes for nitrogen fixation, respectively. Ribose (soybean), tartaric acid (mungbean), hydroxybutanoyloxybutanoate (siratro) and catechol (cowpea) were among the metabolites found to be specifically elevated in one of the respective host plants. While the level of C4-dicarboxylic acids decreased during soybean nodule development, we observed an accumulation of trehalose-phosphate at 21 days post infection (dpi). Moreover, nodules from non-nitrogen-fixing bacteroids (nifA and nifH mutants) showed specific metabolic alterations; these were also supported by independent transcriptomics data. The alterations included signs of nitrogen limitation in both mutants, and an increased level of a phytoalexin in nodules induced by the nifA mutant, suggesting that the tissue of these nodules exhibits defense and stress reactions. PMID:27240350

  3. [Characterization of rhizobia causing nodules on leguminous trees native to Uruguay using the rep-PCR technique].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, A; Frioni, L

    2003-01-01

    Methods for identifying and following microorganisms in the environment such as soils, water and plant association have been highly developed in recent years. In this study, we used rep-PCR for the characterization of Rhizobium bacteria isolated from legume trees native of Uruguay which permitted to follow them in plant inoculation assays. Among the primers used, ERIC and BOX1AR, the latter allowed the differentiation of isolates from different legumes and the finding of a high level of homology among rhizobia that nodulate the same legume species. Besides, it demonstrated that the profiles of the isolates recovered from nodules of Acacia caven, were identical to the ones used as inoculants; this confirmed the efficiency of these methods to follow these diazotrophs in the environment.

  4. Aspartate Aminotransferase in Alfalfa Root Nodules 1

    PubMed Central

    Farnham, Mark W.; Griffith, Stephen M.; Miller, Susan S.; Vance, Carroll P.

    1990-01-01

    Aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) plays an important role in nitrogen metabolism in all plants and is particularly important in the assimilation of fixed N derived from the legume-Rhizoblum symbiosis. Two isozymes of AAT (AAT-1 and AAT-2) occur in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). Antibodies against alfalfa nodule AAT-2 do not recognize AAT-1, and these antibodies were used to study AAT-2 expression in different tissues and genotypes of alfalfa and also in other legume and nonlegume species. Rocket immunoelectrophoresis indicated that nodules of 38-day-old alfalfa plants contained about eight times more AAT-2 than did nodules of 7-day-old plants, confirming the nodule-enhanced nature of this isozyme. AAT-2 was estimated to make up 16, 15, 5, and 8 milligrams per gram of total soluble protein in mature nodules, roots, stems, and leaves, respectively, of effective N2-fixing alfalfa. The concentration of AAT-2 in nodules of ineffective non-N2-fixing alafalfa genotypes was about 70% less than that of effective nodules. Western blots of soluble protein from nodules of nine legume species indicated that a 40-kilodalton polypeptide that reacts strongly with AAT-2 antibodies is conserved in legumes. Nodule AAT-2 immunoprecipitation data suggested that amide- and ureide-type legumes may differ in expression and regulation of the enzyme. In addition, Western blotting and immunoprecipitations of AAT activity demonstrated that antibodies against alfalfa AAT-2 are highly cross-reactive with AAT enzyme protein in leaves of soybean (Glycine max L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and maize (Zea mays L.) and in roots of maize, but not with AAT in soybean and wheat roots. Results from this study indicate that AAT-2 is structurally conserved and localized in similar tissues among diverse species. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:16667896

  5. Functional Implication of β-Carotene Hydroxylases in Soybean Nodulation1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yun-Kyoung; Kim, Sunghan; Um, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Kyunga; Choi, Sun-Kang; Um, Byung-Hun; Kang, Suk-Woo; Kim, Jee-Woong; Takaichi, Shinichi; Song, Seok-Bo; Lee, Choon-Hwan; Kim, Ho-Seung; Kim, Ki Woo; Nam, Kyoung Hee; Lee, Suk-Ha; Kim, Yul-Ho; Park, Hyang-Mi; Ha, Sun-Hwa; Verma, Desh Pal S.; Cheon, Choong-Ill

    2013-01-01

    Legume-Rhizobium spp. symbiosis requires signaling between the symbiotic partners and differential expression of plant genes during nodule development. Previously, we cloned a gene encoding a putative β-carotene hydroxylase (GmBCH1) from soybean (Glycine max) whose expression increased during nodulation with Bradyrhizobium japonicum. In this work, we extended our study to three GmBCHs to examine their possible role(s) in nodule development, as they were additionally identified as nodule specific, along with the completion of the soybean genome. In situ hybridization revealed the expression of three GmBCHs (GmBCH1, GmBCH2, and GmBCH3) in the infected cells of root nodules, and their enzymatic activities were confirmed by functional assays in Escherichia coli. Localization of GmBCHs by transfecting Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) protoplasts with green fluorescent protein fusions and by electron microscopic immunogold detection in soybean nodules indicated that GmBCH2 and GmBCH3 were present in plastids, while GmBCH1 appeared to be cytosolic. RNA interference of the GmBCHs severely impaired nitrogen fixation as well as nodule development. Surprisingly, we failed to detect zeaxanthin, a product of GmBCH, or any other carotenoids in nodules. Therefore, we examined the possibility that most of the carotenoids in nodules are converted or cleaved to other compounds. We detected the expression of some carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (GmCCDs) in wild-type nodules and also a reduced amount of zeaxanthin in GmCCD8-expressing E. coli, suggesting cleavage of the carotenoid. In view of these findings, we propose that carotenoids such as zeaxanthin synthesized in root nodules are cleaved by GmCCDs, and we discuss the possible roles of the carotenoid cleavage products in nodulation. PMID:23700351

  6. Identifying abnormalities in symbiotic development between Trifolium spp. and Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii leading to sub-optimal and ineffective nodule phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Melino, V. J.; Drew, E. A.; Ballard, R. A.; Reeve, W. G.; Thomson, G.; White, R. G.; O'Hara, G. W.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Legumes overcome nitrogen limitations by entering into a mutualistic symbiosis with N2-fixing bacteria (rhizobia). Fully compatible associations (effective) between Trifolium spp. and Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii result from successful recognition of symbiotic partners in the rhizosphere, root hair infection and the formation of nodules where N2-fixing bacteroids reside. Poorly compatible associations can result in root nodule formation with minimal (sub-optimal) or no (ineffective) N2-fixation. Despite the abundance and persistence of strains in agricultural soils which are poorly compatible with the commercially grown clover species, little is known of how and why they fail symbiotically. The aims of this research were to determine the morphological aberrations occurring in sub-optimal and ineffective clover nodules and to determine whether reduced bacteroid numbers or reduced N2-fixing activity is the main cause for the Sub-optimal phenotype. Methods Symbiotic effectiveness of four Trifolium hosts with each of four R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii strains was assessed by analysis of plant yields and nitrogen content; nodule yields, abundance, morphology and internal structure; and bacteroid cytology, quantity and activity. Key Results Effective nodules (Nodule Function 83–100 %) contained four developmental zones and N2-fixing bacteroids. In contrast, Sub-optimal nodules of the same age (Nodule Function 24–57 %) carried prematurely senescing bacteroids and a small bacteroid pool resulting in reduced shoot N. Ineffective-differentiated nodules carried bacteroids aborted at stage 2 or 3 in differentiation. In contrast, bacteroids were not observed in Ineffective-vegetative nodules despite the presence of bacteria within infection threads. Conclusions Three major responses to N2-fixation incompatibility between Trifolium spp. and R. l. trifolii strains were found: failed bacterial endocytosis from infection threads into plant cortical

  7. Strigolactones promote nodulation in pea.

    PubMed

    Foo, Eloise; Davies, Noel W

    2011-11-01

    Strigolactones are recently defined plant hormones with roles in mycorrhizal symbiosis and shoot and root architecture. Their potential role in controlling nodulation, the related symbiosis between legumes and Rhizobium bacteria, was explored using the strigolactone-deficient rms1 mutant in pea (Pisum sativum L.). This work indicates that endogenous strigolactones are positive regulators of nodulation in pea, required for optimal nodule number but not for nodule formation per se. rms1 mutant root exudates and root tissue are almost completely deficient in strigolactones, and rms1 mutant plants have approximately 40% fewer nodules than wild-type plants. Treatment with the synthetic strigolactone GR24 elevated nodule number in wild-type pea plants and also elevated nodule number in rms1 mutant plants to a level similar to that seen in untreated wild-type plants. Grafting studies revealed that nodule number and strigolactone levels in root tissue of rms1 roots were unaffected by grafting to wild-type scions indicating that strigolactones in the root, but not shoot-derived factors, regulate nodule number and provide the first direct evidence that the shoot does not make a major contribution to root strigolactone levels.

  8. High intensity, short duration rotational grazing on reclaimed cool season fescue/legume pastures: I. System development

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, W.R.; Carlson, K.E.

    1995-09-01

    The Pittsburg & Midway Coal Mining Co.`s ({open_quotes}P&M{close_quotes}) Midway Mine lies 50 miles south of Kansas City, Kansas, straddling the border of Kansas and Missouri. P&M actively mined the area until 1989, when the mine was closed and reclaimed. Approximately 3,750 acres of surface mined land were topsoiled and revegetated to cool season fescue/legume pasture. Various pasture management methods are being utilized to meet reclamation success standards and achieve final bond release. The effectiveness and costs of various cool season fescue/legume pasture management methods are evaluated and contrasted. These methods include sharecropping, bush hogging, burning and livestock grazing. It presents guidelines used to develop a site specific rotational livestock grazing programs with land owners or contractors, and local, state and federal agencies. Rotational grazing uses both cow/calf or feeder livestock operations. Key managerial elements used to control grazing activities, either by the landowner or a contractor, are reviewed. Methods used to determine stocking levels for successful rotational grazing on this type of pasture are presented. Rotational grazing of livestock has proven to be the most effective method for managing established cool season fescue/legume pastures at this site. Initial stocking rates of 1 A.U.M. per 5 acres have been modified to a current stocking rate of 1 A.U.M. per 2.5 acres. Supporting physical and chemical data are presented and discussed.

  9. The evolution of specificity in the legume-rhizobium symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Young, J P; Johnston, A W

    1989-11-01

    We know more about the partnership between legumes and their root-nodule bacteria than about any other symbiosis or any other plant-microbe interaction. In the light of recent research we are beginning to see details of an elaborate tapestry. The rhizobia are not a self-contained branch on the bacterial tree; their ancestry is intertwined with that of photosynthetic and pathogenic bacteria. Their host ranges, which vary enormously in breadth, overlap to form a tangled web of interconnections between plants and bacteria, and mechanisms of infection and nodule development are more diverse than we once thought. From genetic analysis of the bacteria we learn that specificity is not the province of special 'host-range determinants', but is affected by a wide range of genes with diverse modes of action. The symbiosis is a rich resource for evolutionary fact and speculation, but its complexity and diversity should warn us not to expect easy answers.

  10. Effect of Co-Inoculation with Mycorrhiza and Rhizobia on the Nodule Trehalose Content of Different Bean Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Ballesteros-Almanza, L; Altamirano-Hernandez, J; Peña-Cabriales, J.J; Santoyo, G; Sanchez-Yañez, J.M; Valencia-Cantero, E; Macias-Rodriguez, L; Lopez-Bucio, J; Cardenas-Navarro, R; Farias-Rodriguez, R

    2010-01-01

    Studies on Rhizobium-legume symbiosis show that trehalose content in nodules under drought stress correlates positively with an increase in plant tolerance to this stress. Fewer reports describe trehalose accumulation in mycorrhiza where, in contrast with rhizobia, there is no flux of carbohydrates from the microsymbiont to the plant. However, the trehalose dynamics in the Mycorrhiza-Rhizobium-Legume tripartite symbiosis is unknown. The present study explores the role of this tripartite symbiosis in the trehalose content of nodules grown under contrasting moisture conditions. Three wild genotypes (P. filiformis, P. acutifolis and P. vulgaris) and two commercial genotypes of Phaseolus vulgaris (Pinto villa and Flor de Mayo) were used. Co-inoculation treatments were conducted with Glomus intraradices and a mixture of seven native rhizobial strains, and trehalose content was determined by GC/MS. The results showed a negative effect of mycorrhizal inoculation on nodule development, as mycorrhized plants showed fewer nodules and lower nodule dry weight compared to plants inoculated only with Rhizobium. Mycorrhizal colonization was also higher in plants inoculated only with Glomus as compared to plants co-inoculated with both microsymbionts. In regard to trehalose, co-inoculation negatively affects its accumulation in the nodules of each genotype tested. However, the correlation analysis showed a significantly positive correlation between mycorrhizal colonization and nodule trehalose content. PMID:21253462

  11. Determinants of nodulation competitiveness in Rhizobium etli. Final report for period September 30, 1996--September 29, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Handelsman, Jo

    2000-01-04

    Nitrogen is a major limiting nutrient in crop production. Chemical fertilizers, which are used extensively to meet crop nitrogen requirements, contribute to the high energy inputs of modern agriculture and cause human health and environmental problems. Legumes and their bacterial associates have long been used in crop rotations to replenish soil nitrogen, but effective and reliable biological nitrogen fixation for beans is prevented by the lack of nodulation competitiveness of many Rhizobium strains used as inoculants. The result is that the inoculant strains will not occupy the host's nodules and no benefit will be derived from inoculation. Many indigenous soil strains of Rhizobium etli bv. phaseoli, the symbiont of bean, nodulate but fix little or no nitrogen, and therefore the nodulation competitiveness problem is significant for achieving maximum nitrogen benefit from bean crops. This project was directed toward developing an understanding of the basis of nodulation competitiveness.

  12. Rhizobium Infection and Nodule Development in Soybean Are Affected by Exposure of the Cotyledons to Light 1

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Nasir S. A.; Pence, Mark K.; Calvert, Harry E.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    1984-01-01

    The initiation of Rhizobium infections and the development of nodules on the primary root of soybean Glycine max L. Merr cv Williams seedlings are strongly affected by exposure of the cotyledons/hypocotyls to light. Seedlings in plastic growth pouches were inoculated with R. japonicum in dim light and the position of the root tip of each seedling was marked on the face of the pouch. The pouches were covered and kept in the dark for various times before exposing the upper portions of the plants (cotyledons and hypocotyls) to light. Maximum nodulation occurred if the plants were kept in the dark until 1 day after inoculation. The exposure of plants to light 2 days before inoculation reduced the number of nodules by 50% while the number of nodules was reduced by 70% if the plants were kept in the dark until 7 days after inoculation. Anatomical studies revealed that exposure to light prior to inoculation reduced both the number of infection centers with visible infection threads and the number of infections which developed nodule meristems. Plants kept in the dark for 7 days after inoculation formed a normal number of infection threads above the root tip mark, but very few of these infections developed a nodule meristem. It appears that light stimulates soybean to produce substances which can both inhibit the formation of infection threads and enhance the development of nodules from established infection threads. The effects of light on nodulation appear to be expressed independently of the Rhizobium-induced suppression of nodule formation in younger regions of the root. PMID:16663609

  13. A comprehensive review of legume allergy.

    PubMed

    Verma, Alok Kumar; Kumar, Sandeep; Das, Mukul; Dwivedi, Premendra D

    2013-08-01

    Legumes belonging to Fabaceae family of the order Fabales are a rich and important source of proteins and many essential elements. Due to its nutritious elements, these are preferably included in human diet in most part of the world. But, unfortunately, IgE binding proteins have been identified in majority of legumes, and allergenic response to these legumes may range from mild skin reactions to life-threatening anaphylactic reaction. Overall, allergenicity due to consumption of legumes in decreasing order may be peanut, soybean, lentil, chickpea, pea, mung bean, and red gram. So far, several allergens from different legumes have been identified and characterized. Most of identified allergens belong to storage proteins family, profilins, or the pathogenesis-related proteins. Legumes also have property of immunological cross-reactivity among themselves and from other sources that also increases the severity of allergenic response to a particular legume. This review summarizes the currently available knowledge on legume allergy and describes the allergenic problems associated with different legumes. It also tries to explore about the legume allergens identified so far by different scientific groups. The culmination of knowledge about identification and characterization of allergens from different legumes will be helpful in diagnosis and treatment of allergy, for development of novel therapeutic strategies, for strict avoidance of particular legume in diet by susceptible individual and also to produce hypoallergenic cultivars of leguminous crop through conventional breeding or genetic modification.

  14. Assessing genotypic diversity and symbiotic efficiency of five rhizobial legume interactions under cadmium stress for soil phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Guefrachi, I; Rejili, M; Mahdhi, M; Mars, M

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of soil phytoremediation using local legume plants coupled with their native root-nodulating bacteria to increase forage yields and preserve contaminated soils in arid regions of Tunisia, we investigated the diversity of bacteria from root nodules of Lathyrus sativus, Lens culinaris, Medicago marina, M. truncatula, and M. minima and the symbiotic efficiency of these five legume symbiosis under Cadmium stress. Fifty bacterial strains were characterized using physiological and biochemical features such heavy metals resistant, and PCR-RFLP of 16S rDNA. Taxonomically, the isolates nodulating L. sativus, and L. culinaris are species within the genera Rhizobium and the ones associated to Medicago sp, within the genera Sinorhizobium. The results revealed also that the cadmium tolerance of the different legumes-rhizobia interaction was as follows: M. minima < M. truncatula < M. marina < L. sativus < L. culinaris indicating that the effect of Cadmium on root nodulation and biomass production is more deleterious on M. minima-S. meliloti and M. truncatula-S. meliloti than in other symbiosis. Knowledge on genetic and functional diversity of M. marina, L. sativus and L. culinaris microsymbiotes is very useful for inoculant strain selection and can be selected to develop inoculants for soil phytoremediation. PMID:23819287

  15. Morphogenetic Rescue of Rhizobium meliloti Nodulation Mutants by trans-Zeatin Secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, J. B.; Long, S. R.

    1994-01-01

    The development of nitrogen-fixing nodules is induced on the roots of legume host plants by Rhizobium bacteria. We employed a novel strategy to probe the underlying mechanism of nodule morphogenesis in alfalfa roots using pTZS, a broad host range plasmid carrying a constitutive trans-zeatin secretion (tzs) gene from Agrobacterium tumefaciens T37. This plasmid suppressed the Nod- phenotype of Rhizobium nodulation mutants such that mutants harboring pTZS stimulated the formation of nodulelike structures. Alfalfa roots formed more or fewer of these nodules according to both the nitrogen content of the environment and the position along the root at which the pTZS+ bacteria were applied, which parallels the physiological and developmental regulation of true Rhizobium nodule formation. This plasmid also conferred on Escherichia coli cells the ability to induce root cortical cell mitoses. Both the pattern of induced cell divisions and the spatially restricted expression of an alfalfa nodule-specific marker gene (MsENOD2) in pTZS-induced nodules support the conclusion that localized cytokinin production produces a phenocopy of nodule morphogenesis. PMID:12244237

  16. Wuschel-related homeobox5 gene expression and interaction of CLE peptides with components of the systemic control add two pieces to the puzzle of autoregulation of nodulation.

    PubMed

    Osipova, Maria A; Mortier, Virginie; Demchenko, Kirill N; Tsyganov, Victor E; Tikhonovich, Igor A; Lutova, Ludmila A; Dolgikh, Elena A; Goormachtig, Sofie

    2012-03-01

    In legumes, the symbiotic nodules are formed as a result of dedifferentiation and reactivation of cortical root cells. A shoot-acting receptor complex, similar to the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CLAVATA1 (CLV1)/CLV2 receptor, regulating development of the shoot apical meristem, is involved in autoregulation of nodulation (AON), a mechanism that systemically controls nodule number. The targets of CLV1/CLV2 in the shoot apical meristem, the WUSCHEL (WUS)-RELATED HOMEOBOX (WOX) family transcription factors, have been proposed to be important regulators of apical meristem maintenance and to be expressed in apical meristem "organizers." Here, we focus on the role of the WOX5 transcription factor upon nodulation in Medicago truncatula and pea (Pisum sativum) that form indeterminate nodules. Analysis of temporal WOX5 expression during nodulation with quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and promoter-reporter fusion revealed that the WOX5 gene was expressed during nodule organogenesis, suggesting that WOX genes are common regulators of cell proliferation in different systems. Furthermore, in nodules of supernodulating mutants, defective in AON, WOX5 expression was higher than that in wild-type nodules. Hence, a conserved WUS/WOX-CLV regulatory system might control cell proliferation and differentiation not only in the root and shoot apical meristems but also in nodule meristems. In addition, the link between nodule-derived CLE peptides activating AON in different legumes and components of the AON system was investigated. We demonstrate that the identified AON component, NODULATION3 of pea, might act downstream from or beside the CLE peptides during AON. PMID:22232385

  17. Too much love, a novel Kelch repeat-containing F-box protein, functions in the long-distance regulation of the legume-Rhizobium symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Masahiro; Magori, Shimpei; Soyano, Takashi; Okamoto, Satoru; Yoshida, Chie; Yano, Koji; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Katsushi; Shigenobu, Shuji; Takeda, Naoya; Suzaki, Takuya; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2013-04-01

    The interaction of legumes with N2-fixing bacteria collectively called rhizobia results in root nodule development. The number of nodules formed is tightly restricted through the systemic negative feedback control by the host called autoregulation of nodulation (AON). Here, we report the characterization and gene identification of TOO MUCH LOVE (TML), a root factor that acts during AON in a model legume Lotus japonicus. In our genetic analyses using another root-regulated hypernodulation mutant, plenty, the tml-1 plenty double mutant showed additive effects on the nodule number, whereas the tml-1 har1-7 double mutant did not, suggesting that TML and PLENTY act in different genetic pathways and that TML and HAR1 act in the same genetic pathway. The systemic suppression of nodule formation by CLE-RS1/RS2 overexpression was not observed in the tml mutant background, indicating that TML acts downstream of CLE-RS1/RS2. The tml-1 Snf2 double mutant developed an excessive number of spontaneous nodules, indicating that TML inhibits nodule organogenesis. Together with the determination of the deleted regions in tml-1/-2/-3, the fine mapping of tml-4 and the next-generation sequencing analysis, we identified a nonsense mutation in the Kelch repeat-containing F-box protein. As the gene knockdown of the candidate drastically increased the number of nodules, we concluded that it should be the causative gene. An expression analysis revealed that TML is a root-specific gene. In addition, the activity of ProTML-GUS was constitutively detected in the root tip and in the nodules/nodule primordia upon rhizobial infection. In conclusion, TML is a root factor acting at the final stage of AON.

  18. Secretion systems and signal exchange between nitrogen-fixing rhizobia and legumes

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Matthew S.; Sadowsky, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots and/or stem of leguminous plants involves a complex signal exchange between both partners. Since many microorganisms are present in the soil, legumes and rhizobia must recognize and initiate communication with each other to establish symbioses. This results in the formation of nodules. Rhizobia within nodules exchange fixed nitrogen for carbon from the legume. Symbiotic relationships can become non-beneficial if one partner ceases to provide support to the other. As a result, complex signal exchange mechanisms have evolved to ensure continued, beneficial symbioses. Proper recognition and signal exchange is also the basis for host specificity. Nodule formation always provides a fitness benefit to rhizobia, but does not always provide a fitness benefit to legumes. Therefore, legumes have evolved a mechanism to regulate the number of nodules that are formed, this is called autoregulation of nodulation. Sequencing of many different rhizobia have revealed the presence of several secretion systems - and the Type III, Type IV, and Type VI secretion systems are known to be used by pathogens to transport effector proteins. These secretion systems are also known to have an effect on host specificity and are a determinant of overall nodule number on legumes. This review focuses on signal exchange between rhizobia and legumes, particularly focusing on the role of secretion systems involved in nodule formation and host specificity. PMID:26191069

  19. Secretion systems and signal exchange between nitrogen-fixing rhizobia and legumes.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Matthew S; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    The formation of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots and/or stem of leguminous plants involves a complex signal exchange between both partners. Since many microorganisms are present in the soil, legumes and rhizobia must recognize and initiate communication with each other to establish symbioses. This results in the formation of nodules. Rhizobia within nodules exchange fixed nitrogen for carbon from the legume. Symbiotic relationships can become non-beneficial if one partner ceases to provide support to the other. As a result, complex signal exchange mechanisms have evolved to ensure continued, beneficial symbioses. Proper recognition and signal exchange is also the basis for host specificity. Nodule formation always provides a fitness benefit to rhizobia, but does not always provide a fitness benefit to legumes. Therefore, legumes have evolved a mechanism to regulate the number of nodules that are formed, this is called autoregulation of nodulation. Sequencing of many different rhizobia have revealed the presence of several secretion systems - and the Type III, Type IV, and Type VI secretion systems are known to be used by pathogens to transport effector proteins. These secretion systems are also known to have an effect on host specificity and are a determinant of overall nodule number on legumes. This review focuses on signal exchange between rhizobia and legumes, particularly focusing on the role of secretion systems involved in nodule formation and host specificity.

  20. Secretion systems and signal exchange between nitrogen-fixing rhizobia and legumes.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Matthew S; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    The formation of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots and/or stem of leguminous plants involves a complex signal exchange between both partners. Since many microorganisms are present in the soil, legumes and rhizobia must recognize and initiate communication with each other to establish symbioses. This results in the formation of nodules. Rhizobia within nodules exchange fixed nitrogen for carbon from the legume. Symbiotic relationships can become non-beneficial if one partner ceases to provide support to the other. As a result, complex signal exchange mechanisms have evolved to ensure continued, beneficial symbioses. Proper recognition and signal exchange is also the basis for host specificity. Nodule formation always provides a fitness benefit to rhizobia, but does not always provide a fitness benefit to legumes. Therefore, legumes have evolved a mechanism to regulate the number of nodules that are formed, this is called autoregulation of nodulation. Sequencing of many different rhizobia have revealed the presence of several secretion systems - and the Type III, Type IV, and Type VI secretion systems are known to be used by pathogens to transport effector proteins. These secretion systems are also known to have an effect on host specificity and are a determinant of overall nodule number on legumes. This review focuses on signal exchange between rhizobia and legumes, particularly focusing on the role of secretion systems involved in nodule formation and host specificity. PMID:26191069

  1. Nodule-Specific Polypeptides from Effective Alfalfa Root Nodules and from Ineffective Nodules Lacking Nitrogenase 1

    PubMed Central

    Lang-Unnasch, Naomi; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    1985-01-01

    In addition to leghemoglobin, at least nine nodule-specific polypeptides from the alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.)-Rhizobium meliloti symbiosis were identified by immune assay. Some of these polypeptides may be subunits of larger proteins but none appeared to be subunits of the same multimeric protein. All nine of the nodule-specific polypeptides were localized to within the plant cytosol; they were not found in extracts of bacteroids or in the peribacteroid space. At least one of these nodule-specific polypeptides was found to be antigenically related to nodule-specific polypeptides in pea and/or soybean. Ineffective nodules elicited by R. meliloti strains containing mutations in four different genes required for nitrogenase synthesis contained reduced concentrations of leghemoglobin and of several of the nodule-specific polypeptides. Other nodule-specific polypeptides were unaltered or actually enriched in the ineffective nodules. Many of the differences between the ineffective and effective nodules were apparent in nodules harvested shortly after the nodules became visible. These differences were greatly amplified in older nodules. When the four ineffective nodule types were compared to one another, there were clear quantitative differences in the concentrations of several of the nodule-specific polypeptides. These differences suggest that lack of a functional nitrogenase does not have a single direct effect on nodule development. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:16664146

  2. The Role of Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 in the Development of Benign and Malignant Thyroid Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Baştürk, Engin; Kement, Metin; Yavuzer, Dilek; Vural, Selahattin; Gezen, Cem; Gözü, Hülya Ilıksu; Karadayı, Ayşe; Öncel, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to investigate the role of IGF-1 in the development of nodular thyroid disease. Material and Methods: A total number of 100 consecutive patients operated for nodular thyroid disease in our institution were included in this prospective study. In addition to classical pathological examinations, nodules and extranodular healthy tissues were sampled and immunochemically stained for IGF-1. The materials were independently evaluated using an Allred Scoring System ranging from 0 to 8. If the score was ≥1, the tissue was accepted as IGF-1 positive. Results: IGF-1 positivity was observed in 88% and 58% of the samples obtained from nodules and extranodular healthy tissues, respectively. Allred 8-unit scores were higher in benign nodules (n=89; 4.1±2.3) and papillary carcinomas (n=7; 6.7±1.3), than in extranodular healthy tissues in the same patients (2.3±2.3 and 3.3±1.9, respectively); and higher in papillary carcinomas than in benign nodules, when the scores were compared to each other (p<0.01 for all comparisons). Conclusions: Allred 8-unit scores for IGF-1 increase in the presence of benign thyroid nodules, papillary cancer. The results of our study support the findings of previous studies demonstrating the role of IGF-1 in the development of thyroidal nodules. PMID:25206982

  3. Genotypic Characterization of Bradyrhizobium Strains Nodulating Endemic Woody Legumes of the Canary Islands by PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis of Genes Encoding 16S rRNA (16S rDNA) and 16S-23S rDNA Intergenic Spacers, Repetitive Extragenic Palindromic PCR Genomic Fingerprinting, and Partial 16S rDNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Vinuesa, Pablo; Rademaker, Jan L. W.; de Bruijn, Frans J.; Werner, Dietrich

    1998-01-01

    We present a phylogenetic analysis of nine strains of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria isolated from nodules of tagasaste (Chamaecytisus proliferus) and other endemic woody legumes of the Canary Islands, Spain. These and several reference strains were characterized genotypically at different levels of taxonomic resolution by computer-assisted analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (PCR-RFLPs), 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS) RFLPs, and repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) genomic fingerprints with BOX, ERIC, and REP primers. Cluster analysis of 16S rDNA restriction patterns with four tetrameric endonucleases grouped the Canarian isolates with the two reference strains, Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110spc4 and Bradyrhizobium sp. strain (Centrosema) CIAT 3101, resolving three genotypes within these bradyrhizobia. In the analysis of IGS RFLPs with three enzymes, six groups were found, whereas rep-PCR fingerprinting revealed an even greater genotypic diversity, with only two of the Canarian strains having similar fingerprints. Furthermore, we show that IGS RFLPs and even very dissimilar rep-PCR fingerprints can be clustered into phylogenetically sound groupings by combining them with 16S rDNA RFLPs in computer-assisted cluster analysis of electrophoretic patterns. The DNA sequence analysis of a highly variable 264-bp segment of the 16S rRNA genes of these strains was found to be consistent with the fingerprint-based classification. Three different DNA sequences were obtained, one of which was not previously described, and all belonged to the B. japonicum/Rhodopseudomonas rDNA cluster. Nodulation assays revealed that none of the Canarian isolates nodulated Glycine max or Leucaena leucocephala, but all nodulated Acacia pendula, C. proliferus, Macroptilium atropurpureum, and Vigna unguiculata. PMID:9603820

  4. Exploring genetic variability within lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) and across related legumes using a newly developed set of microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Verma, Priyanka; Sharma, Tilak R; Srivastava, Prem S; Abdin, M Z; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2014-09-01

    Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is an economically important grain legume, yet the genetic and genomic resources remain largely uncharacterized and unexploited in this crop. Microsatellites have become markers of choice for crop improvement applications. Hence, simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were developed for lentil through the construction of genomic library enriched for GA/CT motifs. As a result 122 functional SSR primer pairs were developed from 151 microsatellite loci and validated in L. culinaris cv. Precoz. Thirty three SSR markers were utilized for the analysis of genetic relationships between cultivated and wild species of Lens and related legumes. A total of 123 alleles were amplified at 33 loci ranging from 2-5 alleles with an average of 3.73 alleles per locus. Polymorphic information content (PIC) for all the loci ranged from 0.13 to 0.99 with an average of 0.66 per locus. Varied levels of cross genera transferability were obtained ranging from 69.70 % across Pisum sativum to 12.12 % across Vigna radiata. The UPGMA based dendrogram was able to establish the uniqueness of each genotype and grouped them into two major clusters clearly resolving the genetic relationships within lentil and related species. The new set of SSR markers reported here were efficient and highly polymorphic and would add to the existing repertoire of lentil SSR markers to be utilized in molecular breeding. Moreover, the improved knowledge about intra- and inter-specific genetic relationships would facilitate germplasm utilization for lentil improvement.

  5. Symbiotic performance of herbaceous legumes in tropical cover cropping systems.

    PubMed

    Ibewiro, B; Onuh, M; Sanginga, N; Bernard, V; Merckx, R

    2001-11-10

    Increasing use of herbaceous legumes such as mucuna ( Mucuna pruriens var. utilis [Wright] Bruck) and lablab ( Lablab purpureus [L.] Sweet) in the derived savannas of West Africa can be attributed to their potential to fix atmospheric nitrogen (N2). The effects of management practices on N2 fixation in mucuna and lablab were examined using 15N isotope dilution technique. Dry matter yield of both legumes at 12 weeks was two to five times more in in situ mulch (IM) than live mulch (LM) systems. Land Equivalent Ratios, however, showed 8 to 30% more efficient utilization of resources required for biomass production under LM than IM systems. Live mulching reduced nodule numbers in the legumes by one third compared to values in the IM systems. Similarly, nodule mass was reduced by 34 to 58% under LM compared to the IM systems. The proportion of fixed N2 in the legumes was 18% higher in LM than IM systems. Except for inoculated mucuna, the amounts of N fixed by both legumes were greater in IM than LM systems. Rhizobia inoculation of the legumes did not significantly increase N2 fixation compared to uninoculated plots. Application of N fertilizer reduced N2 fixed in the legumes by 36 to 51% compared to inoculated or uninoculated systems. The implications of cover cropping, N fertilization, and rhizobia inoculation on N contributions of legumes into tropical low-input systems were discussed. PMID:12805778

  6. Iron: an essential micronutrient for the legume-rhizobium symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Brear, Ella M.; Day, David A.; Smith, Penelope M. C.

    2013-01-01

    Legumes, which develop a symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria, have an increased demand for iron. Iron is required for the synthesis of iron-containing proteins in the host, including the highly abundant leghemoglobin, and in bacteroids for nitrogenase and cytochromes of the electron transport chain. Deficiencies in iron can affect initiation and development of the nodule. Within root cells, iron is chelated with organic acids such as citrate and nicotianamine and distributed to other parts of the plant. Transport to the nitrogen-fixing bacteroids in infected cells of nodules is more complicated. Formation of the symbiosis results in bacteroids internalized within root cortical cells of the legume where they are surrounded by a plant-derived membrane termed the symbiosome membrane (SM). This membrane forms an interface that regulates nutrient supply to the bacteroid. Consequently, iron must cross this membrane before being supplied to the bacteroid. Iron is transported across the SM as both ferric and ferrous iron. However, uptake of Fe(II) by both the symbiosome and bacteroid is faster than Fe(III) uptake. Members of more than one protein family may be responsible for Fe(II) transport across the SM. The only Fe(II) transporter in nodules characterized to date is GmDMT1 (Glycine max divalent metal transporter 1), which is located on the SM in soybean. Like the root plasma membrane, the SM has ferric iron reductase activity. The protein responsible has not been identified but is predicted to reduce ferric iron accumulated in the symbiosome space prior to uptake by the bacteroid. With the recent publication of a number of legume genomes including Medicago truncatula and G. max, a large number of additional candidate transport proteins have been identified. Members of the NRAMP (natural resistance-associated macrophage protein), YSL (yellow stripe-like), VIT (vacuolar iron transporter), and ZIP (Zrt-, Irt-like protein) transport families show enhanced expression in

  7. Small RNA pathways and diversity in model legumes: lessons from genomics

    PubMed Central

    Bustos-Sanmamed, Pilar; Bazin, Jérémie; Hartmann, Caroline; Crespi, Martin; Lelandais-Brière, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (smRNA) participate in the regulation of development, cell differentiation, adaptation to environmental constraints and defense responses in plants. They negatively regulate gene expression by degrading specific mRNA targets, repressing their translation or modifying chromatin conformation through homologous interaction with target loci. MicroRNAs (miRNA) and short-interfering RNAs (siRNA) are generated from long double stranded RNA (dsRNA) that are cleaved into 20–24-nucleotide dsRNAs by RNase III proteins called DICERs (DCL). One strand of the duplex is then loaded onto effective complexes containing different ARGONAUTE (AGO) proteins. In this review, we explored smRNA diversity in model legumes and compiled available data from miRBAse, the miRNA database, and from 22 reports of smRNA deep sequencing or miRNA identification genome-wide in three legumes: Medicago truncatula, soybean (Glycine max) and Lotus japonicus. In addition to conserved miRNAs present in other plant species, 229, 179, and 35 novel miRNA families were identified respectively in these 3 legumes, among which several seems legume-specific. New potential functions of several miRNAs in the legume-specific nodulation process are discussed. Furthermore, a new category of siRNA, the phased siRNAs, which seems to mainly regulate disease-resistance genes, was recently discovered in legumes. Despite that the genome sequence of model legumes are not yet fully completed, further analysis was performed by database mining of gene families and protein characteristics of DCLs and AGOs in these genomes. Although most components of the smRNA pathways are conserved, identifiable homologs of key smRNA players from non-legumes, like AGO10 or DCL4, could not yet be detected in M. truncatula available genomic and expressed sequence (EST) databases. In contrast to Arabidopsis, an important gene diversification was observed in the three legume models (for DCL2, AGO4, AGO2, and AGO10) or

  8. Small RNA pathways and diversity in model legumes: lessons from genomics.

    PubMed

    Bustos-Sanmamed, Pilar; Bazin, Jérémie; Hartmann, Caroline; Crespi, Martin; Lelandais-Brière, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (smRNA) participate in the regulation of development, cell differentiation, adaptation to environmental constraints and defense responses in plants. They negatively regulate gene expression by degrading specific mRNA targets, repressing their translation or modifying chromatin conformation through homologous interaction with target loci. MicroRNAs (miRNA) and short-interfering RNAs (siRNA) are generated from long double stranded RNA (dsRNA) that are cleaved into 20-24-nucleotide dsRNAs by RNase III proteins called DICERs (DCL). One strand of the duplex is then loaded onto effective complexes containing different ARGONAUTE (AGO) proteins. In this review, we explored smRNA diversity in model legumes and compiled available data from miRBAse, the miRNA database, and from 22 reports of smRNA deep sequencing or miRNA identification genome-wide in three legumes: Medicago truncatula, soybean (Glycine max) and Lotus japonicus. In addition to conserved miRNAs present in other plant species, 229, 179, and 35 novel miRNA families were identified respectively in these 3 legumes, among which several seems legume-specific. New potential functions of several miRNAs in the legume-specific nodulation process are discussed. Furthermore, a new category of siRNA, the phased siRNAs, which seems to mainly regulate disease-resistance genes, was recently discovered in legumes. Despite that the genome sequence of model legumes are not yet fully completed, further analysis was performed by database mining of gene families and protein characteristics of DCLs and AGOs in these genomes. Although most components of the smRNA pathways are conserved, identifiable homologs of key smRNA players from non-legumes, like AGO10 or DCL4, could not yet be detected in M. truncatula available genomic and expressed sequence (EST) databases. In contrast to Arabidopsis, an important gene diversification was observed in the three legume models (for DCL2, AGO4, AGO2, and AGO10) or

  9. Minor components in the sex pheromone of legume podborer: Maruca vitrata development of an attractive blend.

    PubMed

    Downham, M C A; Hall, D R; Chamberlain, D J; Cork, A; Farman, D I; Tamò, M; Dahounto, D; Datinon, B; Adetonah, S

    2003-04-01

    The legume podborer, Maruca vitrata (syn. M. testulalis) (F.) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) is a pantropical pest of legume crops. Sex pheromone was collected by gland extraction or trapping of volatiles from virgin female moths originating in India, West Africa, or Taiwan. Analysis by GC-EAG and GC-MS confirmed previously published findings that (E,E)-10,12-hexadecadienal is the most abundant EAG-active component with 2-5% of (E,E)-10,12-hexadecadienol also present. At least one other EAG response was detected at retention times typical of monounsaturated hexadecenals or tetradecenyl acetates, but neither could be detected by GC-MS. Laboratory wind-tunnel bioassays and a field bioassay of blends of (E,E)-10,12-hexadecadienal with (E,E )-10,12-hexadecadienol and a range of monounsaturated hexadecenal and tetradecenyl acetate isomers indicated greatest attraction of males was to those including (E,E)-10,12-hexadecadienol and (E)-10-hexadecenal as minor components. In subsequent trapping experiments in cowpea fields in Benin, traps baited with a three-component blend of (E,E)-10,12-hexadecadienal and these two minor components in a 100:5:5 ratio caught significantly more males than traps baited with the major component alone, either two-component blend, or virgin female moths. Further blend optimization experiments did not produce a more attractive blend. No significant differences in catches were found between traps baited with polyethylene vials or rubber septa, or between lures containing 0.01 and 0.1 mg of synthetic pheromone. Significant numbers of female M. vitrata moths, up to 50% of total catches, were trapped with synthetic blends but not with virgin females. At present there is no clear explanation for this almost unprecedented finding, but the phenomenon may improve the predictive power of traps for population monitoring.

  10. How many peas in a pod? Legume genes responsible for mutualistic symbioses underground.

    PubMed

    Kouchi, Hiroshi; Imaizumi-Anraku, Haruko; Hayashi, Makoto; Hakoyama, Tsuneo; Nakagawa, Tomomi; Umehara, Yosuke; Suganuma, Norio; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2010-09-01

    The nitrogen-fixing symbiosis between legume plants and Rhizobium bacteria is the most prominent plant-microbe endosymbiotic system and, together with mycorrhizal fungi, has critical importance in agriculture. The introduction of two model legume species, Lotus japonicus and Medicago truncatula, has enabled us to identify a number of host legume genes required for symbiosis. A total of 26 genes have so far been cloned from various symbiotic mutants of these model legumes, which are involved in recognition of rhizobial nodulation signals, early symbiotic signaling cascades, infection and nodulation processes, and regulation of nitrogen fixation. These accomplishments during the past decade provide important clues to understanding not only the molecular mechanisms underlying plant-microbe endosymbiotic associations but also the evolutionary aspects of nitrogen-fixing symbiosis between legume plants and Rhizobium bacteria. In this review we survey recent progress in molecular genetic studies using these model legumes.

  11. Manganese nodules

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, James R.; Harff, Jan; Petersen, Sven; Thiede, Jorn

    2014-01-01

    The existence of manganese (Mn) nodules (Fig. 1) has been known since the late 1800s when they were collected during the Challenger expedition of 1873–1876. However, it was not until after WWII that nodules were further studied in detail for their ability to adsorb metals from seawater. Many of the early studies did not distinguish Mn nodules from Mn crusts. Economic interest in Mn nodules began in the late 1950s and early 1960s when John Mero finished his Ph.D. thesis on this subject, which was published...

  12. Nodule morphology, symbiotic specificity and association with unusual rhizobia are distinguishing features of the genus Listia within the southern African crotalarioid clade Lotononis s.l.

    PubMed Central

    Ardley, Julie K.; Reeve, Wayne G.; O'Hara, Graham W.; Yates, Ron J.; Dilworth, Michael J.; Howieson, John G.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims The legume clade Lotononis sensu lato (s.l.; tribe Crotalarieae) comprises three genera: Listia, Leobordea and Lotononis sensu stricto (s.s.). Listia species are symbiotically specific and form lupinoid nodules with rhizobial species of Methylobacterium and Microvirga. This work investigated whether these symbiotic traits were confined to Listia by determining the ability of rhizobial strains isolated from species of Lotononis s.l. to nodulate Listia, Leobordea and Lotononis s.s. hosts and by examining the morphology and structure of the resulting nodules. Methods Rhizobia were characterized by sequencing their 16S rRNA and nodA genes. Nodulation and N2 fixation on eight taxonomically diverse Lotononis s.l. species were determined in glasshouse trials. Nodules of all hosts, and the process of infection and nodule initiation in Listia angolensis and Listia bainesii, were examined by light microscopy. Key Results Rhizobia associated with Lotononis s.l. were phylogenetically diverse. Leobordea and Lotononis s.s. isolates were most closely related to Bradyrhizobium spp., Ensifer meliloti, Mesorhizobium tianshanense and Methylobacterium nodulans. Listia angolensis formed effective nodules only with species of Microvirga. Listia bainesii nodulated only with pigmented Methylobacterium. Five lineages of nodA were found. Listia angolensis and L. bainesii formed lupinoid nodules, whereas nodules of Leobordea and Lotononis s.s. species were indeterminate. All effective nodules contained uniformly infected central tissue. Listia angolensis and L. bainesii nodule initials occurred on the border of the hypocotyl and along the tap root, and nodule primordia developed in the outer cortical layer. Neither root hair curling nor infection threads were seen. Conclusions Two specificity groups occur within Lotononis s.l.: Listia species are symbiotically specific, while species of Leobordea and Lotononis s.s. are generally promiscuous and interact with rhizobia of

  13. Actinorhizal root nodule symbioses: what is signalling telling on the origins of nodulation?

    PubMed

    Svistoonoff, Sergio; Hocher, Valérie; Gherbi, Hassen

    2014-08-01

    Two groups of bacteria are able to induce the formation of nitrogen-fixing nodules: proteobacteria called rhizobia, which associate with Legumes or Parasponia and actinobateria from the genus Frankia which are able to interact with ∼220 species belonging to eight families called actinorhizal plants. Legumes and different lineages of actinorhizal plants differ in bacterial partners, nodule organogenesis and infection patterns and have independent evolutionary origins. However, recent technical achievements are revealing a variety of conserved signalling molecules and gene networks. Actinorhizal interactions display several primitive features and thus provide the ideal opportunity to determine the minimal molecular toolkit needed to build a nodule and to understand the evolution of root nodule symbioses. PMID:24691197

  14. Inoculation of Woody Legumes with Selected Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Rhizobia To Recover Desertified Mediterranean Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, M. A.; Salamanca, C. P.; Barea, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    Revegetation strategies, either for reclamation or for rehabilitation, are being used to recover desertified ecosystems. Woody legumes are recognized as species that are useful for revegetation of water-deficient, low-nutrient environments because of their ability to form symbiotic associations with rhizobial bacteria and mycorrhizal fungi, which improve nutrient acquisition and help plants to become established and cope with stress situations. A range of woody legumes used in revegetation programs, particularly in Mediterranean regions, were assayed. These legumes included both exotic and native species and were used in a test of a desertified semiarid ecosystem in southeast Spain. Screening for the appropriate plant species-microsymbiont combinations was performed previously, and a simple procedure to produce plantlets with optimized mycorrhizal and nodulated status was developed. The results of a 4-year trial showed that (i) only the native shrub legumes were able to become established under the local environmental conditions (hence, a reclamation strategy is recommended) and (ii) biotechnological manipulation of the seedlings to be used for revegetation (by inoculation with selected rhizobia and mycorrhizal fungi) improved outplanting performance, plant survival, and biomass development. PMID:16348838

  15. Landmark Research in Legumes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Legumes are members of family Fabaceae or Leguminosae and include economically important grain legumes, oilseed crops, forage crops, shrubs and tropical or subtropical trees. Many legumes are rich source of quality protein for humans and animals and enrich the soil by producing their own nitrogen i...

  16. N-fixation in legumes--An assessment of the potential threat posed by ozone pollution.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, D K L; Mills, G; Hayes, F; Norris, D; Coyle, M; Wilkinson, S; Davies, W

    2016-01-01

    The growth, development and functioning of legumes are often significantly affected by exposure to tropospheric ozone (O3) pollution. However, surprisingly little is known about how leguminous Nitrogen (N) fixation responds to ozone, with a scarcity of studies addressing this question in detail. In the last decade, ozone impacts on N-fixation in soybean, cowpea, mung bean, peanut and clover have been shown for concentrations which are now commonly recorded in ambient air or are likely to occur in the near future. We provide a synthesis of the existing literature addressing this issue, and also explore the effects that may occur on an agroecosystem scale by predicting reductions in Trifolium (clovers) root nodule biomass in United Kingdom (UK) pasture based on ozone concentration data for a "high" (2006) and "average" ozone year (2008). Median 8% and 5% reductions in clover root nodule biomass in pasture across the UK were predicted for 2006 and 2008 respectively. Seasonal exposure to elevated ozone, or short-term acute concentrations >100 ppb, are sufficient to reduce N-fixation and/or impact nodulation, in a range of globally-important legumes. However, an increasing global burden of CO2, the use of artificial fertiliser, and reactive N-pollution may partially mitigate impacts of ozone on N-fixation. PMID:26385644

  17. N-fixation in legumes--An assessment of the potential threat posed by ozone pollution.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, D K L; Mills, G; Hayes, F; Norris, D; Coyle, M; Wilkinson, S; Davies, W

    2016-01-01

    The growth, development and functioning of legumes are often significantly affected by exposure to tropospheric ozone (O3) pollution. However, surprisingly little is known about how leguminous Nitrogen (N) fixation responds to ozone, with a scarcity of studies addressing this question in detail. In the last decade, ozone impacts on N-fixation in soybean, cowpea, mung bean, peanut and clover have been shown for concentrations which are now commonly recorded in ambient air or are likely to occur in the near future. We provide a synthesis of the existing literature addressing this issue, and also explore the effects that may occur on an agroecosystem scale by predicting reductions in Trifolium (clovers) root nodule biomass in United Kingdom (UK) pasture based on ozone concentration data for a "high" (2006) and "average" ozone year (2008). Median 8% and 5% reductions in clover root nodule biomass in pasture across the UK were predicted for 2006 and 2008 respectively. Seasonal exposure to elevated ozone, or short-term acute concentrations >100 ppb, are sufficient to reduce N-fixation and/or impact nodulation, in a range of globally-important legumes. However, an increasing global burden of CO2, the use of artificial fertiliser, and reactive N-pollution may partially mitigate impacts of ozone on N-fixation.

  18. An experimental and modelling exploration of the host-sanction hypothesis in legume-rhizobia mutualism.

    PubMed

    Marco, Diana E; Carbajal, Juan P; Cannas, Sergio; Pérez-Arnedo, Rebeca; Hidalgo-Perea, Angeles; Olivares, José; Ruiz-Sainz, José E; Sanjuán, Juan

    2009-08-01

    Despite the importance of mutualism as a key ecological process, its persistence in nature is difficult to explain since the existence of exploitative, "cheating" partners that could erode the interaction is common. By analogy with the proposed policing strategy stabilizing intraspecific cooperation, host sanctions against non-N(2) fixing, cheating symbionts have been proposed as a force stabilizing mutualism in legume-Rhizobium symbiosis. Following this proposal, penalizations would include decreased nodular rhizobial viability and/or early nodule senescence in nodules occupied by cheating rhizobia. In this work, we analyse the stability of Rhizobium-legume symbiosis when non-fixing, cheating strains are present, using an experimental and modelling approach. We used split-root experiments with soybean plants inoculated with two rhizobial strains, a cooperative, normal N(2) fixing strain and an isogenic non-fixing, "perfect" cheating mutant derivative that lacks nitrogenase activity but has the same nodulation abilities inoculated to split-root plants. We found no experimental evidence of functioning plant host sanctions to cheater rhizobia based on nodular rhizobia viability and nodule senescence and maturity molecular markers. Based on these experiments, we developed a population dynamic model with and without the inclusion of plant host sanctions. We show that plant populations persist in spite of the presence of cheating rhizobia without the need of incorporating any sanction against the cheater populations in the model, under the realistic assumption that plants can at least get some amount of fixed N(2) from the effectively mutualistic rhizobia occupying some nodules. Inclusion of plant sanctions leads to the unrealistic effect of ultimate extinction of cheater strains in soil. Our simulation results are in agreement with increasing experimental evidence and theoretical work showing that mutualisms can persist in presence of cheating partners.

  19. The evolutionary dynamics of ancient and recent polyploidy in the African semiaquatic species of the legume genus Aeschynomene.

    PubMed

    Chaintreuil, Clémence; Gully, Djamel; Hervouet, Catherine; Tittabutr, Panlada; Randriambanona, Herizo; Brown, Spencer C; Lewis, Gwilym P; Bourge, Mickaël; Cartieaux, Fabienne; Boursot, Marc; Ramanankierana, Heriniaina; D'Hont, Angélique; Teaumroong, Neung; Giraud, Eric; Arrighi, Jean-François

    2016-08-01

    The legume genus Aeschynomene is notable in the ability of certain semiaquatic species to develop nitrogen-fixing stem nodules. These species are distributed in two clades. In the first clade, all the species are characterized by the use of a unique Nod-independent symbiotic process. In the second clade, the species use a Nod-dependent symbiotic process and some of them display a profuse stem nodulation as exemplified in the African Aeschynomene afraspera. To facilitate the molecular analysis of the symbiotic characteristics of such legumes, we took an integrated molecular and cytogenetic approach to track occurrences of polyploidy events and to analyze their impact on the evolution of the African species of Aeschynomene. Our results revealed two rounds of polyploidy: a paleopolyploid event predating the African group and two neopolyploid speciations, along with significant chromosomal variations. Hence, we found that A. afraspera (8x) has inherited the contrasted genomic properties and the stem-nodulation habit of its parental lineages (4x). This study reveals a comprehensive picture of African Aeschynomene diversification. It notably evidences a history that is distinct from the diploid Nod-independent clade, providing clues for the identification of the specific determinants of the Nod-dependent and Nod-independent symbiotic processes, and for comparative analysis of stem nodulation. PMID:27061605

  20. The evolutionary dynamics of ancient and recent polyploidy in the African semiaquatic species of the legume genus Aeschynomene.

    PubMed

    Chaintreuil, Clémence; Gully, Djamel; Hervouet, Catherine; Tittabutr, Panlada; Randriambanona, Herizo; Brown, Spencer C; Lewis, Gwilym P; Bourge, Mickaël; Cartieaux, Fabienne; Boursot, Marc; Ramanankierana, Heriniaina; D'Hont, Angélique; Teaumroong, Neung; Giraud, Eric; Arrighi, Jean-François

    2016-08-01

    The legume genus Aeschynomene is notable in the ability of certain semiaquatic species to develop nitrogen-fixing stem nodules. These species are distributed in two clades. In the first clade, all the species are characterized by the use of a unique Nod-independent symbiotic process. In the second clade, the species use a Nod-dependent symbiotic process and some of them display a profuse stem nodulation as exemplified in the African Aeschynomene afraspera. To facilitate the molecular analysis of the symbiotic characteristics of such legumes, we took an integrated molecular and cytogenetic approach to track occurrences of polyploidy events and to analyze their impact on the evolution of the African species of Aeschynomene. Our results revealed two rounds of polyploidy: a paleopolyploid event predating the African group and two neopolyploid speciations, along with significant chromosomal variations. Hence, we found that A. afraspera (8x) has inherited the contrasted genomic properties and the stem-nodulation habit of its parental lineages (4x). This study reveals a comprehensive picture of African Aeschynomene diversification. It notably evidences a history that is distinct from the diploid Nod-independent clade, providing clues for the identification of the specific determinants of the Nod-dependent and Nod-independent symbiotic processes, and for comparative analysis of stem nodulation.

  1. Nodulation of Cyclopia spp. (Leguminosae, Papilionoideae) by Burkholderia tuberum

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Geoffrey N.; Chen, Wen-Ming; Bontemps, Cyril; Chou, Jui-Hsing; Young, J. Peter W.; Sprent, Janet I.; James, Euan K.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Species of the genus Burkholderia, from the Betaproteobacteria, have been isolated from legume nodules, but so far they have only been shown to form symbioses with species of Mimosa, sub-family Mimosoideae. This work investigates whether Burkholderia tuberum strains STM678 (isolated from Aspalathus carnosa) and DUS833 (from Aspalathus callosa) can nodulate species of the South African endemic papilionoid genera Cyclopia (tribe Podalyrieae) and Aspalathus (Crotalarieae) as well as the promiscuous legume Macroptilium atropurpureum (Phaseoleae). Method Bacterial strains and the phylogeny of their symbiosis-related (nod) genes were examined via 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Seedlings were grown in liquid culture and inoculated with one of the two strains of B. tuberum or with Sinorhizobium strain NGR 234 (from Lablab purpureus), Mesorhizobium strain DUS835 (from Aspalathus linearis) or Methylobacterium nodulans (from Crotalaria podocarpa). Some nodules, inoculated with green fluorescence protein (GFP)-tagged strains, were examined by light and electron microscopy coupled with immunogold labelling with a Burkholderia-specific antibody. The presence of active nitrogenase was checked by immunolabelling of nitrogenase and by the acetylene reduction assay. B. tuberum STM678 was also tested on a wide range of legumes from all three sub-families. Key Results Nodules were not formed on any of the Aspalathus spp. Only B. tuberum nodulated Cyclopia falcata, C. galioides, C. genistoides, C. intermedia and C. pubescens. It also effectively nodulated M. atropurpureum but no other species tested. GFP-expressing inoculant strains were located inside infected cells of C. genistoides, and bacteroids in both Cyclopia spp. and M. atropurpureum were immunogold-labelled with antibodies against Burkholderia and nitrogenase. Nitrogenase activity was also shown using the acetylene reduction assay. This is the first demonstration that a β-rhizobial strain can effectively

  2. NPR1 Protein Regulates Pathogenic and Symbiotic Interactions between Rhizobium and Legumes and Non-Legumes

    PubMed Central

    Peleg-Grossman, Smadar; Golani, Yael; Kaye, Yuval; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Levine, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Background Legumes are unique in their ability to establish symbiotic interaction with rhizobacteria from Rhizobium genus, which provide them with available nitrogen. Nodulation factors (NFs) produced by Rhizobium initiate legume root hair deformation and curling that entrap the bacteria, and allow it to grow inside the plant. In contrast, legumes and non-legumes activate defense responses when inoculated with pathogenic bacteria. One major defense pathway is mediated by salicylic acid (SA). SA is sensed and transduced to downstream defense components by a redox-regulated protein called NPR1. Methodology/Principal Findings We used Arabidopsis mutants in SA defense pathway to test the role of NPR1 in symbiotic interactions. Inoculation of Sinorhizobium meliloti or purified NF on Medicago truncatula or nim1/npr1 A. thaliana mutants induced root hair deformation and transcription of early and late nodulins. Application of S. meliloti or NF on M. truncatula or A. thaliana roots also induced a strong oxidative burst that lasted much longer than in plants inoculated with pathogenic or mutualistic bacteria. Transient overexpression of NPR1 in M. truncatula suppressed root hair curling, while inhibition of NPR1 expression by RNAi accelerated curling. Conclusions/Significance We show that, while NPR1 has a positive effect on pathogen resistance, it has a negative effect on symbiotic interactions, by inhibiting root hair deformation and nodulin expression. Our results also show that basic plant responses to Rhizobium inoculation are conserved in legumes and non-legumes. PMID:20027302

  3. Tree legumes as feedstock for sustainable biofuel production: Opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Bandana; Scott, Paul T; Gresshoff, Peter M

    2011-11-01

    Concerns about future fossil fuel supplies and the environmental effects of their consumption have prompted the search for alternative sources of liquid fuels, specifically biofuels. However, it is important that the sources of such biofuel have minimal impact on global food supplies, land use, and commodity prices. Many legume trees can be grown on so-called marginal land with beneficial effects to the environment through their symbiotic interaction with "Rhizobia" and the associated process of root nodule development and biological nitrogen fixation. Once established legume trees can live for many years and some produce an annual yield of oil-rich seeds. For example, the tropical and sub-tropical legume tree Pongamia pinnata produces large seeds (∼1.5-2g) that contain about 40% oil, the quality and composition of which is regarded as highly desirable for sustainable biofuel production. Here we consider the benefits of legume trees as future energy crops, particularly in relation to their impact on nitrogen inputs and the net energy balance for biofuel production, and also ways in which these as yet fully domesticated species may be further improved for optimal use as biofuel feedstock. PMID:21715045

  4. Micromonospora from nitrogen fixing nodules of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). A new promising Plant Probiotic Bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Hidalgo, Pilar; Galindo-Villardón, Purificación; Igual, José M.; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio

    2014-01-01

    Biotic interactions can improve agricultural productivity without costly and environmentally challenging inputs. Micromonospora strains have recently been reported as natural endophytes of legume nodules but their significance for plant development and productivity has not yet been established. The aim of this study was to determine the diversity and function of Micromonospora isolated from Medicago sativa root nodules. Micromonospora-like strains from field alfalfa nodules were characterized by BOX-PCR fingerprinting and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The ecological role of the interaction of the 15 selected representative Micromonospora strains was tested in M. sativa. Nodulation, plant growth and nutrition parameters were analyzed. Alfalfa nodules naturally contain abundant and highly diverse populations of Micromonospora, both at the intra- and at interspecific level. Selected Micromonospora isolates significantly increase the nodulation of alfalfa by Ensifer meliloti 1021 and also the efficiency of the plant for nitrogen nutrition. Moreover, they promote aerial growth, the shoot-to-root ratio, and raise the level of essential nutrients. Our results indicate that Micromonospora acts as a Rhizobia Helper Bacteria (RHB) agent and has probiotic effects, promoting plant growth and increasing nutrition efficiency. Its ecological role, biotechnological potential and advantages as a plant probiotic bacterium (PPB) are also discussed. PMID:25227415

  5. The Ribosomal RNA is a Useful Marker to Visualize Rhizobia Interacting with Legume Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinaudi, Luciana; Isola, Maria C.; Giordano, Walter

    2004-01-01

    Symbiosis between rhizobia and leguminous plants leads to the formation of nitrogen-fixing root nodules. In the present article, we recommend the use of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) isolated from legume nodules in an experimental class with the purpose of introducing students to the structure of eukaryotic and prokaryotic ribosomes and of…

  6. Rhizobia are attracted to localized sites on legume roots.

    PubMed

    Gulash, M; Ames, P; Larosiliere, R C; Bergman, K

    1984-07-01

    Clouds of Rhizobium meliloti were attracted to localized sites on the surface of the infectible region of alfalfa roots. This behavior, which required active motility and chemotaxis, was not species specific. Correlation between the behavior of various mutants and their competitiveness for nodulation suggests that cloud formation has a role in the infection of host legume roots by rhizobia.

  7. Legume proteomics: Progress, prospects, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Rathi, Divya; Gayen, Dipak; Gayali, Saurabh; Chakraborty, Subhra; Chakraborty, Niranjan

    2016-01-01

    Legumes are the major sources of food and fodder with strong commercial relevance, and are essential components of agricultural ecosystems owing to their ability to carry out endosymbiotic nitrogen fixation. In recent years, legumes have become one of the major choices of plant research. The legume proteomics is currently represented by more than 100 reference maps and an equal number of stress-responsive proteomes. Among the 48 legumes in the protein databases, most proteomic studies have been accomplished in two model legumes, soybean, and barrel medic. This review highlights recent contributions in the field of legume proteomics to comprehend the defence and regulatory mechanisms during development and adaptation to climatic changes. Here, we attempted to provide a concise overview of the progress in legume proteomics and discuss future developments in three broad perspectives: (i) proteome of organs/tissues; (ii) subcellular compartments; and (iii) spatiotemporal changes in response to stress. Such data mining may aid in discovering potential biomarkers for plant growth, in general, apart from essential components involved in stress tolerance. The prospect of integrating proteome data with genome information from legumes will provide exciting opportunities for plant biologists to achieve long-term goals of crop improvement and sustainable agriculture.

  8. Impact of the energy crop Jatropha curcas L. on the composition of rhizobial populations nodulating cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.) and acacia (Acacia seyal L.).

    PubMed

    Dieng, Amadou; Duponnois, Robin; Floury, Antoine; Laguerre, Gisèle; Ndoye, Ibrahima; Baudoin, Ezékiel

    2015-03-01

    Jatropha curcas, a Euphorbiaceae species that produces many toxicants, is increasingly planted as an agrofuel plant in Senegal. The purpose of this study was to determine whether soil priming induced by J. curcas monoculture could alter the rhizobial populations that nodulate cowpea and acacia, two locally widespread legumes. Soil samples were transferred into a greenhouse from three fields previously cultivated with Jatropha for 1, 2, and 15 years, and the two trap legumes were grown in them. Control soil samples were also taken from adjacent Jatropha-fallow plots. Both legumes tended to develop fewer but larger nodules when grown in Jatropha soils. Nearly all the nifH sequences amplified from nodule DNA were affiliated to the Bradyrhizobium genus. Only sequences from Acacia seyal nodules grown in the most recent Jatropha plantation were related to the Mesorhizobium genus, which was much a more conventional finding on A. seyal than the unexpected Bradyrhizobium genus. Apart from this particular case, only minor differences were found in the respective compositions of Jatropha soil versus control soil rhizobial populations. Lastly, the structure of these rhizobial populations was systematically imbalanced owing to the overwhelming dominance of a very small number of nifH genotypes, some of which were identical across soil types or even sites. Despite these weak and sparse effects on rhizobial diversity, future investigations should focus on the characterization of the nitrogen-fixing abilities of the predominant rhizobial strains.

  9. Impact of the energy crop Jatropha curcas L. on the composition of rhizobial populations nodulating cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.) and acacia (Acacia seyal L.).

    PubMed

    Dieng, Amadou; Duponnois, Robin; Floury, Antoine; Laguerre, Gisèle; Ndoye, Ibrahima; Baudoin, Ezékiel

    2015-03-01

    Jatropha curcas, a Euphorbiaceae species that produces many toxicants, is increasingly planted as an agrofuel plant in Senegal. The purpose of this study was to determine whether soil priming induced by J. curcas monoculture could alter the rhizobial populations that nodulate cowpea and acacia, two locally widespread legumes. Soil samples were transferred into a greenhouse from three fields previously cultivated with Jatropha for 1, 2, and 15 years, and the two trap legumes were grown in them. Control soil samples were also taken from adjacent Jatropha-fallow plots. Both legumes tended to develop fewer but larger nodules when grown in Jatropha soils. Nearly all the nifH sequences amplified from nodule DNA were affiliated to the Bradyrhizobium genus. Only sequences from Acacia seyal nodules grown in the most recent Jatropha plantation were related to the Mesorhizobium genus, which was much a more conventional finding on A. seyal than the unexpected Bradyrhizobium genus. Apart from this particular case, only minor differences were found in the respective compositions of Jatropha soil versus control soil rhizobial populations. Lastly, the structure of these rhizobial populations was systematically imbalanced owing to the overwhelming dominance of a very small number of nifH genotypes, some of which were identical across soil types or even sites. Despite these weak and sparse effects on rhizobial diversity, future investigations should focus on the characterization of the nitrogen-fixing abilities of the predominant rhizobial strains. PMID:25466917

  10. Thyroid nodule

    MedlinePlus

    ... food Nodules that produce thyroid hormones will likely cause symptoms of overactive thyroid gland , including: Warm, sweaty skin Fast pulse Increased appetite Nervousness Restlessness Skin blushing or flushing Weight loss Irregular menstrual periods Older ...

  11. [Genetic diversity of rhizobia isolated from common legumes in the Karst area. Northwest Guangxi].

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; He, Xun-yang; Xie, Qiang; Wang, Ke-lin

    2015-12-01

    Legumes, with a strong resistance to the adverse environmental conditions, are pioneer plants in degraded habitats, and play an important role in ecosystem restoration. In this study, the nodulation characteristics of 24 legumes were surveyed in the Karst area of Northwest Guangxi. A total of 39 nodule samples were collected from 15 legumes, the DNA was extracted and the 16S rDNA and nifH gene were amplified. A phylogenetic tree was then constructed to analyze the genetic diversity of rhizobia. The results showed that 15 legumes were nodulated, of which 14 belonged to the Papilionoideae, one to the Mimosaceae, and none to the Caesalpinoideae. No nodules were found on some legumes that were reported as nodulated, which might result from soil water stress in Karst. BLAST result and phylogenetic analyse indicated that most of the legumes were associated with rhizobia that belonged to the genus Bradyrhizobium, with the exception of two samples from Callerya nitida that were associated with the genus Mesorhizobium. In the phylogenetic tree, the sequences obtained from the same plot or the sequences from the same host species clustered together in most cases. This finding suggested that host selection and the ecological environment are the major factors that influence the genotype of rhizobia. PMID:27112003

  12. [Genetic diversity of rhizobia isolated from common legumes in the Karst area. Northwest Guangxi].

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; He, Xun-yang; Xie, Qiang; Wang, Ke-lin

    2015-12-01

    Legumes, with a strong resistance to the adverse environmental conditions, are pioneer plants in degraded habitats, and play an important role in ecosystem restoration. In this study, the nodulation characteristics of 24 legumes were surveyed in the Karst area of Northwest Guangxi. A total of 39 nodule samples were collected from 15 legumes, the DNA was extracted and the 16S rDNA and nifH gene were amplified. A phylogenetic tree was then constructed to analyze the genetic diversity of rhizobia. The results showed that 15 legumes were nodulated, of which 14 belonged to the Papilionoideae, one to the Mimosaceae, and none to the Caesalpinoideae. No nodules were found on some legumes that were reported as nodulated, which might result from soil water stress in Karst. BLAST result and phylogenetic analyse indicated that most of the legumes were associated with rhizobia that belonged to the genus Bradyrhizobium, with the exception of two samples from Callerya nitida that were associated with the genus Mesorhizobium. In the phylogenetic tree, the sequences obtained from the same plot or the sequences from the same host species clustered together in most cases. This finding suggested that host selection and the ecological environment are the major factors that influence the genotype of rhizobia.

  13. Genetic Dissection of the Initiation of the Infection Process and Nodule Tissue Development in the Rhizobium–Pea (Pisum sativum L.) Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    TSYGANOV, V. E.; VOROSHILOVA, V. A.; PRIEFER, U. B.; BORISOV, A. Y.; TIKHONOVICH, I. A.

    2002-01-01

    Twelve non‐nodulating pea (Pisum sativum L.) mutants were studied to identify the blocks in nodule tissue development. In nine, the reason for the lack of infection thread (IT) development was studied; this had been characterized previously in the other three mutants. With respect to IT development, mutants in gene sym7 are interrupted at the stage of colonization of the pocket in the curled root hair (Crh– phenotype), mutants in genes sym37 and sym38 are blocked at the stage of IT growth in the root hair cell (Ith– phenotype) and mutants in gene sym34 at the stage of IT growth inside root cortex cells (Itr– phenotype). With respect to nodule tissue development, mutants in genes sym7, sym14 and sym35 were shown to be blocked at the stage of cortical cell divisions (Ccd– phenotype), mutants in gene sym34 are halted at the stage of nodule primordium (NP) development (Npd– phenotype) and mutants in genes sym37 and sym38 are arrested at the stage of nodule meristem development (Nmd– phenotype). Thus, the sequential functioning of the genes Sym37, Sym38 and the gene Sym34 apparently differs in the infection process and during nodule tissue development. Based on these data, a scheme is suggested for the sequential functioning of early pea symbiotic genes in the two developmental processes: infection and nodule tissue formation. PMID:12096795

  14. Final Report Grant No. DE-FG02-98ER20307 Lipopolysaccharide Structures and Genes Required for Root Nodule Development August 1, 2004 to July 31, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, K. Dale

    2008-12-07

    This project dealt with the plant-bacterial symbiosis that gives rise to root nodules on leguminous plants in which the bacteria carry out nitrogen fixation. Nitrogen fixation, like carbon dioxide fixation, is essential for life on planet earth, and this symbiosis is estimated to account for half of all nitrogen fixed on land. Aside from being important for the sustenance of global life, this ability allows legumes to grow without nitrogen fertilizers. Basic studies such as this project are aimed at understanding the symbiosis well enough that eventually it can be engineered into important crop species so that they no longer depend on nitrogen fertilizer for growth. The production and distribution of excessive fertilizer needed for optimal crop yields is responsible for a significant portion of the energy costs in agriculture. The specific aims of this work were to further the understanding of a bacterial factor that is essential for the symbiotic infection process. This factor is a bacterial surface molecule, lipopolysaccharide O antigen. In this project we showed that, not only the presence, but the specific structure of this molecule is crucial for infection. Although the success of bacterial infections in many pathogenic and mutualistic interactions have been shown to depend on intact O antigen, it has been very rare to establish that specific features of the structure are important. One of the features in this case is the presence of one additional methyl group on one sugar in the O antigen. It is very surprising that such a minor change should have an observable effect. This work sets the stage for biochemical studies of possible plant receptors that may be involved. During the course of this grant period, we developed a method of testing the importance of this bacterial component at stages of nodule development beyond the step that is blocked by null mutation. The method works adequately for this purpose and is being improved. It has implications for testing

  15. Correlation of endogenous free polyamine levels with root nodule senescence in different genotypes in Vigna mungo L.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Kajari; Chattopadhyay, Soumen; Ghosh, Bharati

    2004-05-01

    Endogenous free polyamines, nitrogenase (EC 1.1.8.6.1, acetylene reduction), and leghaemoglobin (pyridine-hemochrome assay) levels were compared among five genotypes of developing Vigna root nodules grown under field conditions. Nitrogenase activity and leghaemoglobin level attained a peak at the flowering stage and gradually declined thereafter. Individual and total polyamine also followed the same pattern. Ranking on the basis of legume yield and other morphometric attributes was PDU-2 > UH-28 > UH-82 > T-9 > Sardhomash. Except spermine, the levels of putrescine, spermidine, and total polyamine showed significant differences (p<0.05) amongst the genotypes, particularly from flowering to mid-pod development stage. Genotype, development stage, and their interaction between the two had significant (p<0.01) effects on individual as well as total polyamines. Moreover, significant high linear correlations were found between total free polyamine and putrescine with conventional nodule senescence marker like nitrogenase (R2 = 0.94 and R2 = 0.92, respectively). Putrescine had an overall positive correlation with high legume yield. The results strongly suggest a relationship between polyamine and nodule senescence. Endogenous free polyamine and putrescine may be considered as genotypic markers for nodule senescence in field grown V. mungo. It is suggested that the flowering stage is more suitable for selection.

  16. Legumes, N2 fixation and the H2 cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layzell, D. B.

    2004-12-01

    Legume plants such as soybean or pea can form symbiotic, N2 fixing associations with bacteria that exist in root nodules. For every N2 fixed, 1 to 3 H2 are produced as a by-product of the nitrogenase reaction. Therefore, a typical N2 fixing legume crop produces about 200,000 L H2 gas (at STP) per hectare per crop season. This paper will summarize our current understanding of the processes leading to H2 production in legumes, the magnitude of H2 production associated with global cropping systems, and the implications for its production and oxidation on both the legumes and the soils in which they grow. Specific points may include: ˜ In symbioses lacking uptake hydrogenase (HUP) activity (thought to be the majority of crop legumes), the H2 diffuses into the soil where it is oxidized by soil microbes that grow up around the legume nodules. The kinetic properties of these microbes are very different (higher Km and Vmax) from that of microbes in soils exposed to normal air (ca. 0.5 ppm H2); ˜ Laboratory studies indicate that 60% of the reducing power from H2 is coupled to O2 uptake, whereas 40% is coupled to autotrophic CO2 fixation. The latter process should increase soil carbon stocks by about 25 kg C/ha/yr; ˜ At the site of the nitrogenase enzyme, H2 production is autocatalytic such that the higher the H2 concentration, the more H2 is produced and the less N2 fixed. The variable O2 diffusion barrier in legumes can act to restrict H2 diffusion from the nodule, thereby increasing the relative magnitude of H2 production versus N2 fixation; ˜ Studies to understand why legume symbioses make such an energy investment in H2 production have led to the discovery that H2 treated soils have improved fertility, supporting the growth and yield of legume and non-legume crops. This observation may account for the benefits of legumes when used in rotation with cereal crops, a phenomenon that has been used by farmers for over 2000 years, but which has remained unexplained. An

  17. Development and evaluation of a computer-aided diagnostic scheme for lung nodule detection in chest radiographs by means of two-stage nodule enhancement with support vector classification

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Sheng; Suzuki, Kenji; MacMahon, Heber

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: To develop a computer-aided detection (CADe) scheme for nodules in chest radiographs (CXRs) with a high sensitivity and a low false-positive (FP) rate. Methods: The authors developed a CADe scheme consisting of five major steps, which were developed for improving the overall performance of CADe schemes. First, to segment the lung fields accurately, the authors developed a multisegment active shape model. Then, a two-stage nodule-enhancement technique was developed for improving the conspicuity of nodules. Initial nodule candidates were detected and segmented by using the clustering watershed algorithm. Thirty-one shape-, gray-level-, surface-, and gradient-based features were extracted from each segmented candidate for determining the feature space, including one of the new features based on the Canny edge detector to eliminate a major FP source caused by rib crossings. Finally, a nonlinear support vector machine (SVM) with a Gaussian kernel was employed for classification of the nodule candidates. Results: To evaluate and compare the scheme to other published CADe schemes, the authors used a publicly available database containing 140 nodules in 140 CXRs and 93 normal CXRs. The CADe scheme based on the SVM classifier achieved sensitivities of 78.6% (110/140) and 71.4% (100/140) with averages of 5.0 (1165/233) FPs/image and 2.0 (466/233) FPs/image, respectively, in a leave-one-out cross-validation test, whereas the CADe scheme based on a linear discriminant analysis classifier had a sensitivity of 60.7% (85/140) at an FP rate of 5.0 FPs/image. For nodules classified as ''very subtle'' and ''extremely subtle,'' a sensitivity of 57.1% (24/42) was achieved at an FP rate of 5.0 FPs/image. When the authors used a database developed at the University of Chicago, the sensitivities was 83.3% (40/48) and 77.1% (37/48) at an FP rate of 5.0 (240/48) FPs/image and 2.0 (96/48) FPs /image, respectively. Conclusions: These results compare favorably to those described for

  18. Development of a SIDA-LC-MS/MS Method for the Determination of Phomopsin A in Legumes.

    PubMed

    Schloß, Svenja; Koch, Matthias; Rohn, Sascha; Maul, Ronald

    2015-12-01

    A novel method for the determination of phomopsin A (1) in lupin flour, pea flour, and bean flour as well as whole lupin plants was established based on stable isotope dilution assay (SIDA) LC-MS/MS using (15)N6-1 as an isotopically labeled internal standard. Artificially infected samples were used to develop an optimized extraction procedure and sample pretreatment. The limits of detection were 0.5-1 μg/kg for all matrices. The limits of quantitation were 2-4 μg/kg. The method was used to analyze flour samples generated from selected legume seeds and lupin plant samples that had been inoculated with Diaporthe toxica and two further fungal strains. Finally, growing lupin plants infected with D. toxica were investigated to simulate a naturally in-field mycotoxicosis. Toxin levels of up to 10.1 μg/kg of 1 were found in the pods and 7.2 μg/kg in the stems and leaves.

  19. Cereal grains, legumes and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Venn, B J; Mann, J I

    2004-11-01

    This review examines the evidence for the role of whole grain foods and legumes in the aetiology and management of diabetes. MedLine and SilverPlatter ('Nutrition' and 'Food Science FSTA') databases were searched to identify epidemiological and experimental studies relating to the effects of whole grain foods and legumes on indicators of carbohydrate metabolism. Epidemiological studies strongly support the suggestion that high intakes of whole grain foods protect against the development of type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM). People who consume approximately 3 servings per day of whole grain foods are less likely to develop T2DM than low consumers (<3 servings per week) with a risk reduction in the order of 20-30%. The role of legumes in the prevention of diabetes is less clear, possibly because of the relatively low intake of leguminous foods in the populations studied. However, legumes share several qualities with whole grains of potential benefit to glycaemic control including slow release carbohydrate and a high fibre content. A substantial increase in dietary intake of legumes as replacement food for more rapidly digested carbohydrate might therefore be expected to improve glycaemic control and thus reduce incident diabetes. This is consistent with the results of dietary intervention studies that have found improvements in glycaemic control after increasing the dietary intake of whole grain foods, legumes, vegetables and fruit. The benefit has been attributed to an increase in soluble fibre intake. However, prospective studies have found that soluble fibre intake is not associated with a lower incidence of T2DM. On the contrary, it is cereal fibre that is largely insoluble that is associated with a reduced risk of developing T2DM. Despite this, the addition of wheat bran to the diets of diabetic people has not improved indicators of glycaemic control. These apparently contradictory findings might be explained by metabolic studies that have indicated improvement

  20. The African yam bean seed lectin affects the development of the cowpea weevil but does not affect the development of larvae of the legume pod borer.

    PubMed

    Machuka, J S; Okeola, O G; Chrispeels, M J; Jackai, L E

    2000-03-01

    Artificial feeding assays were used to study the effect of purified galactose-specific lectins from African yam beans (Sphenostylis stenocarpa) on development of larvae of the cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera : Bruchidae) and the legume pod-borer, Maruca vitrata (Lepidoptera : Pyrialidae). Inhibition of development of C. maculatus was observed when larvae were fed on artificial cowpea seeds containing 0.2%, 2.0% and 5.0% (wt/wt) of dietary lectin. Larval mortality was between 30% and 88%, while delays in total developmental time ranged between 7 and 13 days. The lectin had no effect on development of larvae of M. vitrala, when tested through topical artificial diet incorporation assays, except at the extremely high dose of 35% dietary level.

  1. Nod factors stimulate seed germination and promote growth and nodulation of pea and vetch under competitive conditions.

    PubMed

    Kidaj, Dominika; Wielbo, Jerzy; Skorupska, Anna

    2012-03-20

    Nod factors are lipochitooligosaccharide (LCO) produced by soil bacteria commonly known as rhizobia acting as signals for the legume plants to initiate symbiosis. Nod factors trigger early symbiotic responses in plant roots and initiate the development of specialized plant organs called nodules, where biological nitrogen fixation takes place. Here, the effect of specific LCO originating from flavonoid induced Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae GR09 culture was studied on germination, plant growth and nodulation of pea and vetch. A crude preparation of GR09 LCO significantly enhanced symbiotic performance of pea and vetch grown under laboratory conditions and in the soil. Moreover, the effect of GR09 LCOs seed treatments on the genetic diversity of rhizobia recovered from vetch and pea nodules was presented.

  2. Forage legumes - untrapped resource

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, R.F.

    1985-02-01

    Legumes are important in nutrition, nitrogen fixation and in reducing dependence on nitrogen fertilizers. At a meeting between scientists from Australia, New Zealand and the United States the role of legumes was assessed and coordinated research programs set up to deal with problems such as disease, soil, climate and selective breeding.

  3. Transcriptome sequencing, and rapid development and application of SNP markers for the legume pod borer Maruca vitrata (Lepidoptera: Crambidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The legume pod borer, Maruca vitrata (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), is an insect pest species that is destructive to crops grown by subsistence farmers in tropical regions of West Africa. We present the de novo assembly of 3729 contigs from 454- and Sanger-derived sequencing reads for midgut, salivary, ...

  4. Large-scale microsatellite development in grasspea (Lathyrus sativus L.), an orphan legume of the arid areas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grasspea (Lathyrus sativus L., 2n = 14), a member of the family Leguminosae, holds great agronomic potential as grain and forage legume crop in the arid areas for its superb resilience to abiotic stresses such as drought, flood and salinity. The crop could not make much progress through conventional...

  5. Legume receptors perceive the rhizobial lipochitin oligosaccharide signal molecules by direct binding

    PubMed Central

    Broghammer, Angelique; Krusell, Lene; Blaise, Mickaël; Sauer, Jørgen; Sullivan, John T.; Maolanon, Nicolai; Vinther, Maria; Lorentzen, Andrea; Madsen, Esben B.; Jensen, Knud J.; Roepstorff, Peter; Thirup, Søren; Ronson, Clive W.; Thygesen, Mikkel B.; Stougaard, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Lipochitin oligosaccharides called Nod factors function as primary rhizobial signal molecules triggering legumes to develop new plant organs: root nodules that host the bacteria as nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. Here, we show that the Lotus japonicus Nod factor receptor 5 (NFR5) and Nod factor receptor 1 (NFR1) bind Nod factor directly at high-affinity binding sites. Both receptor proteins were posttranslationally processed when expressed as fusion proteins and extracted from purified membrane fractions of Nicotiana benthamiana or Arabidopsis thaliana. The N-terminal signal peptides were cleaved, and NFR1 protein retained its in vitro kinase activity. Processing of NFR5 protein was characterized by determining the N-glycosylation patterns of the ectodomain. Two different glycan structures with identical composition, Man3XylFucGlcNAc4, were identified by mass spectrometry and located at amino acid positions N68 and N198. Receptor–ligand interaction was measured by using ligands that were labeled or immobilized by application of chemoselective chemistry at the anomeric center. High-affinity ligand binding was demonstrated with both solid-phase and free solution techniques. The Kd values obtained for Nod factor binding were in the nanomolar range and comparable to the concentration range sufficient for biological activity. Structure-dependent ligand specificity was shown by using chitin oligosaccharides. Taken together, our results suggest that ligand recognition through direct ligand binding is a key step in the receptor-mediated activation mechanism leading to root nodule development in legumes. PMID:22859506

  6. Negotiation of mutualism: rhizobia and legumes

    PubMed Central

    Akçay, Erol; Roughgarden, Joan

    2006-01-01

    The evolution and persistence of biological cooperation have been an important puzzle in evolutionary theory. Here, we suggest a new approach based on bargaining theory to tackle the question. We present a mechanistic model for negotiation of benefits between a nitrogen-fixing nodule and a legume plant. To that end, we first derive growth rates for the nodule and plant from metabolic models of each as a function of material fluxes between them. We use these growth rates as pay-off functions in the negotiation process, which is analogous to collective bargaining between a firm and a workers' union. Our model predicts that negotiations lead to the Nash bargaining solution, maximizing the product of players' pay-offs. This work introduces elements of cooperative game theory into the field of mutualistic interactions. In the discussion of the paper, we argue for the benefits of such an approach in studying the question of biological cooperation. PMID:17015340

  7. Coordinated changes in storage proteins during development and germination of elite seeds of Pongamia pinnata, a versatile biodiesel legume

    PubMed Central

    Kesari, Vigya; Rangan, Latha

    2011-01-01

    Background and aims The oleaginous legume Pongamia pinnata is a rapidly growing and economically important tree. The seeds are used increasingly as feedstock for biodiesel production, with the protein-rich residue providing valuable supplement to farm animal diets. However, little is known about seed development and the characteristics of germination. We therefore studied morphological, protein and ultrastructural changes during seed maturation and germination using seeds from a tree selected for superior morphological and reproductive characters (candidate plus tree). Methodology Phenology, sodium dodecyl sulphate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS–PAGE), and scanning and transmission electron microscopy were used to investigate seed development from 90 to 350 days after flowering (DAF), and germination and seedling development from 0 to 45 days after the start of imbibition (DAI) (Stages 0–VII). Principal results Seven distinct developmental stages were identified during seed development. Fresh weight, length, breadth and thickness increased from Stage I (90 DAF) to V (270 DAF) and decreased at Stages VI (315 DAF) and VII (350 DAF), when the seeds were fully ripe. Marked changes in total soluble protein content and SDS–PAGE profile were observed in vegetative and reproductive tissues and in the cotyledons of germinating seedlings. Polypeptide fragments of 150–14 kDa were observed during seed maturation and germination. In SDS–PAGE the expression of three main polypeptide bands (50, 18 and 14 kDa) increased from Stage I to Stage V and then almost became the same until Stage VII during seed maturation. During germination the expression of 50 kDa polypeptide decreased and that of 18 and 14 kDa increased from Stage 0 (ungerminated seed) to Stage VI (30 DAI), respectively; however, all three polypeptides (50, 18 and 14 kDa) completely disappeared at Stage VII (45 DAI). Ultrastructural changes during four stages of seed maturation (early immature, 90

  8. Ectopic expression of miR156 represses nodulation and causes morphological and developmental changes in Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Zhishuo; Amyot, Lisa; Tian, Lining; Xu, Ziqin; Gruber, Margaret Y; Hannoufa, Abdelali

    2015-04-01

    The effects of microRNA156 overexpression on general plant architecture, branching, flowering time and nodulation were investigated in the model legume, Lotus japonicus. We cloned an miR156 homolog, LjmiR156a, from L. japonicus, and investigated its SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN LIKE (SPL) genes and its biological function at enhancing vegetative biomass yield, extending flowering time, and its impact on nodulation. Thirteen potential targets for LjmiR156 were identified in vitro and their expression profiles were determined in aerial and underground parts of mature plants, including genes coding for eight SPLs, one WD-40, one RNA-directed DNA polymerase, two transport proteins, and one histidine-phosphotransfer protein. Two SPL and one WD-40 cleavage targets for LjmiR156-TC70253, AU089191, and TC57859-were identified. Transgenic plants with ectopic expression of LjmiR156a showed enhanced branching, dramatically delayed flowering, underdeveloped roots, and reduced nodulation. We also examined the transcript levels of key genes involved in nodule organogenesis and infection thread formation to determine the role of miR156 in regulating symbiosis. Overexpression of LjmiR156a led to repression of several nodulation genes during the early stages of root development such as three ENOD genes, SymPK, POLLUX, CYCLOPS, Cerberus, and Nsp1, and the stimulation of NFR1. Our results show that miR156 regulates vegetative biomass yield, flowering time and nodulation by silencing downstream target SPLs and other genes, suggesting that the miR156 regulatory network could be modified in forage legumes (such as alfalfa and trefoils) and in leafy vegetables (like lettuce and spinach) to positively impact economically valuable crop species. PMID:25293935

  9. Control of mannose/galactose ratio during galactomannan formation in developing legume seeds.

    PubMed

    Edwards, M; Scott, C; Gidley, M J; Reid, J S

    1992-04-01

    Galactomannan deposition was investigated in developing endosperms of three leguminous species representative of taxonomic groups which have galactomannans with high, medium and low galactose content. These were fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum L.; mannose/galactose (Man/Gal) = 1.1), guar (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (L.) Taub.; Man/Gal = 1.6) and Senna occidentalis (L.) Link. (Man/Gal = 3.3), respectively. Endosperms were analysed at different stages of seed development for galactomannan content and the levels, in cell-free extracts, of a mannosyltransferase and a galactosyltransferase which have been shown to catalyse galactomannan biosynthesis in vitro (M. Edwards et al., 1989, Planta 178, 41-51). There was a close correlation in each case between the levels of the biosynthetic mannosyl- and galactosyltransferases and the deposition of galactomannan. The relative in vitro activities of the mannosyl- and galactosyltransferases in fenugreek and guar were similar, and almost constant throughout the period of galactomannan deposition. In Senna the ratio mannosyltransferase/galactosyltransferase was always higher than in the other two species, and it increased substantially throughout the period of galactomannan deposition. In fenugreek and guar the galactomannans present in the endosperms of seeds at different stages of development had the Man/Gal ratios characteristic of the mature seeds. By contrast the galactomannan present in Senna endosperms at the earliest stages of deposition had a Man/Gal ratio of about 2.3. During late deposition this ratio increased rapidly, stabilising at about 3.3, the ratio characteristic of the mature seed. The levels of α-galactosidase in the developing endosperms of fenugreek and guar were low and remained fairly constant throughout the deposition of the galactomannan. In Senna, α-galactosidase activity in the endosperm was low during early galactomannan deposition, but increased subsequently, peaking during late galactomannan

  10. Study of phenanthrene utilizing bacterial consortia associated with cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) root nodules.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ran; Crowley, David E; Wei, Gehong

    2015-02-01

    Many legumes have been selected as model plants to degrade organic contaminants with their special associated rhizosphere microbes in soil. However, the function of root nodules during microbe-assisted phytoremediation is not clear. A pot study was conducted to examine phenanthrene (PHE) utilizing bacteria associated with root nodules and the effects of cowpea root nodules on phytoremediation in two different types of soils (freshly contaminated soil and aged contaminated soil). Cowpea nodules in freshly-contaminated soil showed less damage in comparison to the aged-contaminated soil, both morphologically and ultra-structurally by scanning electron microscopy. The study of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) attenuation conducted by high performance liquid chromatography revealed that more PAH was eliminated from liquid culture around nodulated roots than nodule-free roots. PAH sublimation and denaturation gradient gel electrophoresis were applied to analyze the capability and diversity of PAH degrading bacteria from the following four parts of rhizo-microzone: bulk soil, root surface, nodule surface and nodule inside. The results indicated that the surface and inside of cowpea root nodules were colonized with bacterial consortia that utilized PHE. Our results demonstrated that root nodules not only fixed nitrogen, but also enriched PAH-utilizing microorganisms both inside and outside of the nodules. Legume nodules may have biotechnological values for PAH degradation. PMID:25601371

  11. Study of phenanthrene utilizing bacterial consortia associated with cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) root nodules.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ran; Crowley, David E; Wei, Gehong

    2015-02-01

    Many legumes have been selected as model plants to degrade organic contaminants with their special associated rhizosphere microbes in soil. However, the function of root nodules during microbe-assisted phytoremediation is not clear. A pot study was conducted to examine phenanthrene (PHE) utilizing bacteria associated with root nodules and the effects of cowpea root nodules on phytoremediation in two different types of soils (freshly contaminated soil and aged contaminated soil). Cowpea nodules in freshly-contaminated soil showed less damage in comparison to the aged-contaminated soil, both morphologically and ultra-structurally by scanning electron microscopy. The study of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) attenuation conducted by high performance liquid chromatography revealed that more PAH was eliminated from liquid culture around nodulated roots than nodule-free roots. PAH sublimation and denaturation gradient gel electrophoresis were applied to analyze the capability and diversity of PAH degrading bacteria from the following four parts of rhizo-microzone: bulk soil, root surface, nodule surface and nodule inside. The results indicated that the surface and inside of cowpea root nodules were colonized with bacterial consortia that utilized PHE. Our results demonstrated that root nodules not only fixed nitrogen, but also enriched PAH-utilizing microorganisms both inside and outside of the nodules. Legume nodules may have biotechnological values for PAH degradation.

  12. Potential Maternal Effects of Elevated Atmospheric CO2 on Development and Disease Severity in a Mediterranean Legume

    PubMed Central

    Grünzweig, José M.

    2011-01-01

    Global change can greatly affect plant populations both directly by influencing growing conditions and indirectly by maternal effects on development of offspring. More information is needed on transgenerational effects of global change on plants and their interactions with pathogens. The current study assessed potential maternal effects of atmospheric CO2 enrichment on performance and disease susceptibility of first-generation offspring of the Mediterranean legume Onobrychis crista-galli. Mother plants were grown at three CO2 concentrations, and the study focused on their offspring that were raised under common ambient climate and CO2. In addition, progeny were exposed to natural infection by the fungal pathogen powdery mildew. In one out of 3 years, offspring of high-CO2 treatments (440 and 600 ppm) had lower shoot biomass and reproductive output than offspring of low-CO2 treatment (280 ppm). Disease severity in a heavy-infection year was higher in high-CO2 than in low-CO2 offspring. However, some of the findings on maternal effects changed when the population was divided into two functionally diverging plant types distinguishable by flower color (pink, Type P; white, Type W). Disease severity in a heavy-infection year was higher in high-CO2 than in low-CO2 progeny in the more disease-resistant (Type P), but not in the more susceptible plant type (Type W). In a low-infection year, maternal CO2 treatments did not differ in disease severity. Mother plants of Type P exposed to low CO2 produced larger seeds than all other combinations of CO2 and plant type, which might contribute to higher offspring performance. This study showed that elevated CO2 potentially exerts environmental maternal effects on performance of progeny and, notably, also on their susceptibility to natural infection by a pathogen. Maternal effects of global change might differently affect functionally divergent plant types, which could impact population fitness and alter plant communities

  13. Diversity and symbiotic effectiveness of beta-rhizobia isolated from sub-tropical legumes of a Brazilian Araucaria Forest.

    PubMed

    Lammel, Daniel R; Cruz, Leonardo M; Carrer, Helaine; Cardoso, Elke J B N

    2013-12-01

    While the occurrence of Betaproteobacteria occupying the nodules of tropical legumes has been shown, little is known about subtropical areas. Araucaria Forest is a subtropical endangered ecosystem, and a better understanding of the legume-rhizobial symbionts may allow their use in land reclamation. The 16S rRNA gene of bacteria isolated from nine leguminous species was sequenced and their nodulation tested in Mimosa scabrella and Phaseolus vulgaris. 196 isolates were identified as eight genotypes: Pantoea, Pseudomonas, Bradyrhizobium sp1-2, Rhizobium, and Burkholderia sp1-3. The majority of the isolates from native plants (87 %) were taxonomically related to β-rhizobia, namely Burkholderia, however the legumes Galactia crassifolia and Collea speciosa were nodulated by both α and β-rhizobia, and Acacia dealbata, an exotic plant, only by α-rhizobia. The nifH genes of some isolates were sequenced and N-fixing potential shown by the acetylene reduction test. Most of the isolates nodulated the test plants, some were effective in M. scabrella, but all presented low efficiency in the exotic promiscuous legume P. vulgaris. Pantoea and Pseudomonas did not nodulate and probably are endophytic bacteria. The presented data shows diversity of α, β and γ-Proteobacteria in nodules of subtropical legumes, and suggests host specificity with β-rhizobia. Potential isolates were found for M. scabrella, indicating that a high N-fixing strain may be further inoculated in plants for use in reforestation. PMID:23861038

  14. Genetic Variability in Nodulation and Root Growth Affects Nitrogen Fixation and Accumulation in Pea

    PubMed Central

    Bourion, Virginie; Laguerre, Gisele; Depret, Geraldine; Voisin, Anne-Sophie; Salon, Christophe; Duc, Gerard

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Legume nitrogen is derived from two different sources, symbiotically fixed atmospheric N2 and soil N. The effect of genetic variability of root and nodule establishment on N acquisition and seed protein yield was investigated under field conditions in pea (Pisum sativum). In addition, these parameters were related to the variability in preference for rhizobial genotypes. Methods Five different spring pea lines (two hypernodulating mutants and three cultivars), previously identified in artificial conditions as contrasted for both root and nodule development, were characterized under field conditions. Root and nodule establishment was examined from the four-leaf stage up to the beginning of seed filling and was related to the patterns of shoot dry matter and nitrogen accumulation. The genetic structure of rhizobial populations associated with the pea lines was obtained by analysis of nodule samples. The fraction of nitrogen derived from symbiotic fixation was estimated at the beginning of seed filling and at physiological maturity, when seed protein content and yield were determined. Key Results The hypernodulating mutants established nodules earlier and maintained them longer than was the case for the three cultivars, whereas their root development and nitrogen accumulation were lower. The seed protein yield was higher in ‘Athos’ and ‘Austin’, the two cultivars with increased root development, consistent with their higher N absorption during seed filling. Conclusion The hypernodulating mutants did not accumulate more nitrogen, probably due to the C cost for nodulation being higher than for root development. Enhancing exogenous nitrogen supply at the end of the growth cycle, by increasing the potential for root N uptake from soil, seems a good option for improving pea seed filling. PMID:17670753

  15. Expression and Functional Analysis of a Novel Group of Legume-specific WRKY and Exo70 Protein Variants from Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ze; Li, Panfeng; Yang, Yan; Chi, Yingjun; Fan, Baofang; Chen, Zhixiang

    2016-01-01

    Legumes fix atmospheric nitrogen through symbiosis with microorganisms and contain special traits in nitrogen assimilation and associated processes. Recently, we have reported a novel WRKY-related protein (GmWRP1) and a new clade of Exo70 proteins (GmExo70J) from soybean with homologs found only in legumes. GmWRP1 and some of the GmExo70J proteins are localized to Golgi apparatus through a novel N-terminal transmembrane domain. Here, we report further analysis of expression and functions of the novel GmWRP1 and GmExo70J genes. Promoter-GUS analysis in Arabidopsis revealed distinct tissue-specific expression patterns of the GmExo70J genes not only in vegetative but also in reproductive organs including mature tissues, where expression of previously characterized Exo70 genes is usually absent. Furthermore, expression of some GmExo70J genes including GmExo70J1, GmExo70J6 and GmExo70J7 increases greatly in floral organ-supporting receptacles during the development and maturation of siliques, indicating a possible role in seed development. More importantly, suppression of GmWRP1, GmExo70J7, GmExo70J8 and GmExo70J9 expression in soybean using virus- or artificial microRNA-mediated gene silencing resulted in accelerated leaf senescence and reduced nodule formation. These results strongly suggest that legume-specific GmWRP1 and GmExo70J proteins play important roles not only in legume symbiosis but also in other processes critical for legume growth and development. PMID:27572297

  16. Expression and Functional Analysis of a Novel Group of Legume-specific WRKY and Exo70 Protein Variants from Soybean.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ze; Li, Panfeng; Yang, Yan; Chi, Yingjun; Fan, Baofang; Chen, Zhixiang

    2016-01-01

    Legumes fix atmospheric nitrogen through symbiosis with microorganisms and contain special traits in nitrogen assimilation and associated processes. Recently, we have reported a novel WRKY-related protein (GmWRP1) and a new clade of Exo70 proteins (GmExo70J) from soybean with homologs found only in legumes. GmWRP1 and some of the GmExo70J proteins are localized to Golgi apparatus through a novel N-terminal transmembrane domain. Here, we report further analysis of expression and functions of the novel GmWRP1 and GmExo70J genes. Promoter-GUS analysis in Arabidopsis revealed distinct tissue-specific expression patterns of the GmExo70J genes not only in vegetative but also in reproductive organs including mature tissues, where expression of previously characterized Exo70 genes is usually absent. Furthermore, expression of some GmExo70J genes including GmExo70J1, GmExo70J6 and GmExo70J7 increases greatly in floral organ-supporting receptacles during the development and maturation of siliques, indicating a possible role in seed development. More importantly, suppression of GmWRP1, GmExo70J7, GmExo70J8 and GmExo70J9 expression in soybean using virus- or artificial microRNA-mediated gene silencing resulted in accelerated leaf senescence and reduced nodule formation. These results strongly suggest that legume-specific GmWRP1 and GmExo70J proteins play important roles not only in legume symbiosis but also in other processes critical for legume growth and development. PMID:27572297

  17. Roles of plant homologs of Rab1p and Rab7p in the biogenesis of the peribacteroid membrane, a subcellular compartment formed de novo during root nodule symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Cheon, C I; Lee, N G; Siddique, A B; Bal, A K; Verma, D P

    1993-11-01

    The peribacteroid membrane (PBM) in legume root nodules is derived from plasma membrane following endocytosis of Rhizobium by fusion of newly synthesized vesicles. We studied the roles of plant Rab1p and Rab7p homologs, the small GTP-binding proteins involved in vesicular transport, in the biogenesis of the PBM. Three cDNAs encoding legume homologs of mammalian Rab1p and Rab7p were isolated from soybean (sRab1p, sRab7p) and Vigna aconitifolia (vRab7p). sRab1p was confirmed to be a functional counterpart of yeast Ypt1p (Rab1p) by complementation of a yeast ypt1-1 mutant. Both srab1 and vrab7 genes are induced during nodulation with the level of vrab7 mRNA being 12 times higher than that in root meristem and leaves. This induction directly correlates with membrane proliferation in nodules. Antisense constructs of srab1 and vrab7, under a nodule-specific promoter (leghemoglobin, Lbc3), were made in a binary vector and transgenic nodules were developed on soybean hairy roots obtained through Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformation. Both antisense srab1 and vrab7 nodules were smaller in size and showed lower nitrogenase activity than controls. The antisense srab1 nodules showed lack of expansion of infected cells, fewer bacteroids per cell and their frequent release into vacuoles. In contrast, antisense vrab7 expressing nodules showed accumulation of late endosomal structure and multivesicular bodies in the perinuclear region. These data suggest that both Rab1p and Rab7p are essential for the development of the PBM compartment in effective symbiosis.

  18. Nicotianamine synthase specifically expressed in root nodules of Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Hakoyama, T; Watanabe, H; Tomita, J; Yamamoto, A; Sato, S; Mori, Y; Kouchi, H; Suganuma, N

    2009-07-01

    In dicotyledonous plants, nicotianamine synthase (NAS) is thought to play a role in the intercellular transport of iron (Fe). Fe is an essential metal for nitrogen-fixing root nodules of legumes, prompting us to characterize the role of the NAS gene in detail. We previously compared gene-expression profiles in ineffective nodules formed on a Lotus japonicus Fix(-) mutant, sen1, with those in wild-type-effective nodules, and showed that expression of an expressed sequence tag (EST) clone encoding an NAS (EC 2.5.1.43) homologue was repressed in the ineffective nodules. In the present study, two EST clones encoding NAS homologues were found in the EST database. We named them LjNAS1 and LjNAS2. Both were detected as single-copy genes in the L. japonicus genome, and conferred NAS activities in transformed Saccharomyces cerevisiae. LjNAS2 was expressed only in nodules, but LjNAS1 was expressed mainly in leaves, stems, and cotyledons. The level of LjNAS2 transcripts was highest in the nodules 24 days after inoculation with Mesorhizobium loti, and was localized in vascular bundles within the nodules. Expression of LjNAS2 was suppressed in ineffective nodules formed on Fix(-) mutants other than sen1. By contrast, nitrogenase activities of nodules were not influenced in LjNAS2-suppressed plants. We discuss the role of LjNAS2 from the aspect of Fe translocation in nodules.

  19. Estimating variability in grain legume yields across Europe and the Americas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cernay, Charles; Ben-Ari, Tamara; Pelzer, Elise; Meynard, Jean-Marc; Makowski, David

    2015-06-01

    Grain legume production in Europe has recently come under scrutiny. Although legume crops are often promoted to provide environmental services, European farmers tend to turn to non-legume crops. It is assumed that high variability in legume yields explains this aversion, but so far this hypothesis has not been tested. Here, we estimate the variability of major grain legume and non-legume yields in Europe and the Americas from yield time series over 1961-2013. Results show that grain legume yields are significantly more variable than non-legume yields in Europe. These differences are smaller in the Americas. Our results are robust at the level of the statistical methods. In all regions, crops with high yield variability are allocated to less than 1% of cultivated areas. Although the expansion of grain legumes in Europe may be hindered by high yield variability, some species display risk levels compatible with the development of specialized supply chains.

  20. Estimating variability in grain legume yields across Europe and the Americas.

    PubMed

    Cernay, Charles; Ben-Ari, Tamara; Pelzer, Elise; Meynard, Jean-Marc; Makowski, David

    2015-01-01

    Grain legume production in Europe has recently come under scrutiny. Although legume crops are often promoted to provide environmental services, European farmers tend to turn to non-legume crops. It is assumed that high variability in legume yields explains this aversion, but so far this hypothesis has not been tested. Here, we estimate the variability of major grain legume and non-legume yields in Europe and the Americas from yield time series over 1961-2013. Results show that grain legume yields are significantly more variable than non-legume yields in Europe. These differences are smaller in the Americas. Our results are robust at the level of the statistical methods. In all regions, crops with high yield variability are allocated to less than 1% of cultivated areas. Although the expansion of grain legumes in Europe may be hindered by high yield variability, some species display risk levels compatible with the development of specialized supply chains. PMID:26054055

  1. Genetic control of inflorescence architecture in legumes

    PubMed Central

    Benlloch, Reyes; Berbel, Ana; Ali, Latifeh; Gohari, Gholamreza; Millán, Teresa; Madueño, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The architecture of the inflorescence, the shoot system that bears the flowers, is a main component of the huge diversity of forms found in flowering plants. Inflorescence architecture has also a strong impact on the production of fruits and seeds, and on crop management, two highly relevant agronomical traits. Elucidating the genetic networks that control inflorescence development, and how they vary between different species, is essential to understanding the evolution of plant form and to being able to breed key architectural traits in crop species. Inflorescence architecture depends on the identity and activity of the meristems in the inflorescence apex, which determines when flowers are formed, how many are produced and their relative position in the inflorescence axis. Arabidopsis thaliana, where the genetic control of inflorescence development is best known, has a simple inflorescence, where the primary inflorescence meristem directly produces the flowers, which are thus borne in the main inflorescence axis. In contrast, legumes represent a more complex inflorescence type, the compound inflorescence, where flowers are not directly borne in the main inflorescence axis but, instead, they are formed by secondary or higher order inflorescence meristems. Studies in model legumes such as pea (Pisum sativum) or Medicago truncatula have led to a rather good knowledge of the genetic control of the development of the legume compound inflorescence. In addition, the increasing availability of genetic and genomic tools for legumes is allowing to rapidly extending this knowledge to other grain legume crops. This review aims to describe the current knowledge of the genetic network controlling inflorescence development in legumes. It also discusses how the combination of this knowledge with the use of emerging genomic tools and resources may allow rapid advances in the breeding of grain legume crops. PMID:26257753

  2. Genetic control of inflorescence architecture in legumes.

    PubMed

    Benlloch, Reyes; Berbel, Ana; Ali, Latifeh; Gohari, Gholamreza; Millán, Teresa; Madueño, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The architecture of the inflorescence, the shoot system that bears the flowers, is a main component of the huge diversity of forms found in flowering plants. Inflorescence architecture has also a strong impact on the production of fruits and seeds, and on crop management, two highly relevant agronomical traits. Elucidating the genetic networks that control inflorescence development, and how they vary between different species, is essential to understanding the evolution of plant form and to being able to breed key architectural traits in crop species. Inflorescence architecture depends on the identity and activity of the meristems in the inflorescence apex, which determines when flowers are formed, how many are produced and their relative position in the inflorescence axis. Arabidopsis thaliana, where the genetic control of inflorescence development is best known, has a simple inflorescence, where the primary inflorescence meristem directly produces the flowers, which are thus borne in the main inflorescence axis. In contrast, legumes represent a more complex inflorescence type, the compound inflorescence, where flowers are not directly borne in the main inflorescence axis but, instead, they are formed by secondary or higher order inflorescence meristems. Studies in model legumes such as pea (Pisum sativum) or Medicago truncatula have led to a rather good knowledge of the genetic control of the development of the legume compound inflorescence. In addition, the increasing availability of genetic and genomic tools for legumes is allowing to rapidly extending this knowledge to other grain legume crops. This review aims to describe the current knowledge of the genetic network controlling inflorescence development in legumes. It also discusses how the combination of this knowledge with the use of emerging genomic tools and resources may allow rapid advances in the breeding of grain legume crops.

  3. Nitrate reduction and nitrogen fixation in symbiotic association Rhizobium-legumes.

    PubMed

    Luciński, Robert; Polcyn, Władysław; Ratajczak, Lech

    2002-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of nitrate on nitrogenase activity in root nodules of legume plants has been known for a long time. The major factor inducing changes in nitrogenase activity is the concentration of free oxygen inside nodules. Oxygen availability in the infected zone of nodule is limited, among others, by the gas diffusion resistance in nodule cortex. The presence of nitrate may cause changes in the resistance to O2 diffusion. The aim of this paper is to review literature data concerning the effect of nitrate on the symbiotic association between rhizobia and legume plants, with special emphasis on nitrogenase activity. Recent advances indicate that symbiotic associations of Rhizobium strains characterized by a high nitrate reductase activity are less susceptible to inhibition by nitrate. A thesis may be put forward that dissimilatory nitrate reduction, catalyzed by bacteroid nitrate reductase, significantly facilitates the symbiotic function of bacteroids.

  4. Lotus corniculatus nodulation specificity is changed by the presence of a soybean lectin gene

    PubMed Central

    van Rhijn P; Goldberg, RB; Hirsch, AM

    1998-01-01

    Plant lectins have been implicated as playing an important role in mediating recognition and specificity in the Rhizobium-legume nitrogen-fixing symbiosis. To test this hypothesis, we introduced the soybean lectin gene Le1 either behind its own promoter or behind the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter into Lotus corniculatus, which is nodulated by R. loti. We found that nodulelike outgrowths developed on transgenic L. corniculatus plant roots in response to Bradyrhizobium japonicum, which nodulates soybean and not Lotus spp. Soybean lectin was properly targeted to L. corniculatus root hairs, and although infection threads formed, they aborted in epidermal or hypodermal cells. Mutation of the lectin sugar binding site abolished infection thread formation and nodulation. Incubation of bradyrhizobia in the nodulation (nod) gene-inducing flavonoid genistein increased the number of nodulelike outgrowths on transgenic L. corniculatus roots. Studies of bacterial mutants, however, suggest that a component of the exopolysaccharide surface of B. japonicum, rather than Nod factor, is required for extension of host range to the transgenic L. corniculatus plants. PMID:9707526

  5. Soybean nodule autoregulation receptor kinase phosphorylates two kinase-associated protein phosphatases in vitro.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, Akira; Hirani, Tripty A; Oakes, Marie; Kereszt, Attila; Kobe, Bostjan; Djordjevic, Michael A; Gresshoff, Peter M

    2008-09-12

    The NARK (nodule autoregulation receptor kinase) gene, a negative regulator of cell proliferation in nodule primordia in several legumes, encodes a receptor kinase that consists of an extracellular leucine-rich repeat and an intracellular serine/threonine protein kinase domain. The putative catalytic domain of NARK was expressed and purified as a maltose-binding or a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The recombinant NARK proteins showed autophosphorylation activity in vitro. Several regions of the NARK kinase domain were shown by mass spectrometry to possess phosphoresidues. The kinase-inactive protein K724E failed to autophosphorylate, as did three other proteins corresponding to phenotypically detected mutants defective in whole plant autoregulation of nodulation. A wild-type NARK fusion protein transphosphorylated a kinase-inactive mutant NARK fusion protein, suggesting that it is capable of intermolecular autophosphorylation in vitro. In addition, Ser-861 and Thr-963 in the NARK kinase catalytic domain were identified as phosphorylation sites through site-directed mutagenesis. The genes coding for the kinase-associated protein phosphatases KAPP1 and KAPP2, two putative interacting components of NARK, were isolated. NARK kinase domain phosphorylated recombinant KAPP proteins in vitro. Autophosphorylated NARK kinase domain was, in turn, dephosphorylated by both KAPP1 and KAPP2. Our results suggest a model for signal transduction involving NARK in the control of nodule development.

  6. The independent acquisition of plant root nitrogen-fixing symbiosis in Fabids recruited the same genetic pathway for nodule organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Svistoonoff, Sergio; Benabdoun, Faiza Meriem; Nambiar-Veetil, Mathish; Imanishi, Leandro; Vaissayre, Virginie; Cesari, Stella; Diagne, Nathalie; Hocher, Valérie; de Billy, Françoise; Bonneau, Jocelyne; Wall, Luis; Ykhlef, Nadia; Rosenberg, Charles; Bogusz, Didier; Franche, Claudine; Gherbi, Hassen

    2013-01-01

    Only species belonging to the Fabid clade, limited to four classes and ten families of Angiosperms, are able to form nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbioses (RNS) with soil bacteria. This concerns plants of the legume family (Fabaceae) and Parasponia (Cannabaceae) associated with the Gram-negative proteobacteria collectively called rhizobia and actinorhizal plants associated with the Gram-positive actinomycetes of the genus Frankia. Calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is a key component of the common signaling pathway leading to both rhizobial and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses (AM) and plays a central role in cross-signaling between root nodule organogenesis and infection processes. Here, we show that CCaMK is also needed for successful actinorhiza formation and interaction with AM fungi in the actinorhizal tree Casuarina glauca and is also able to restore both nodulation and AM symbioses in a Medicago truncatula ccamk mutant. Besides, we expressed auto-active CgCCaMK lacking the auto-inhibitory/CaM domain in two actinorhizal species: C. glauca (Casuarinaceae), which develops an intracellular infection pathway, and Discaria trinervis (Rhamnaceae) which is characterized by an ancestral intercellular infection mechanism. In both species, we found induction of nodulation independent of Frankia similar to response to the activation of CCaMK in the rhizobia-legume symbiosis and conclude that the regulation of actinorhiza organogenesis is conserved regardless of the infection mode. It has been suggested that rhizobial and actinorhizal symbioses originated from a common ancestor with several independent evolutionary origins. Our findings are consistent with the recruitment of a similar genetic pathway governing rhizobial and Frankia nodule organogenesis. PMID:23741336

  7. The Independent Acquisition of Plant Root Nitrogen-Fixing Symbiosis in Fabids Recruited the Same Genetic Pathway for Nodule Organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Svistoonoff, Sergio; Benabdoun, Faiza Meriem; Nambiar-Veetil, Mathish; Imanishi, Leandro; Vaissayre, Virginie; Cesari, Stella; Diagne, Nathalie; Hocher, Valérie; de Billy, Françoise; Bonneau, Jocelyne; Wall, Luis; Ykhlef, Nadia; Rosenberg, Charles; Bogusz, Didier; Franche, Claudine; Gherbi, Hassen

    2013-01-01

    Only species belonging to the Fabid clade, limited to four classes and ten families of Angiosperms, are able to form nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbioses (RNS) with soil bacteria. This concerns plants of the legume family (Fabaceae) and Parasponia (Cannabaceae) associated with the Gram-negative proteobacteria collectively called rhizobia and actinorhizal plants associated with the Gram-positive actinomycetes of the genus Frankia. Calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is a key component of the common signaling pathway leading to both rhizobial and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses (AM) and plays a central role in cross-signaling between root nodule organogenesis and infection processes. Here, we show that CCaMK is also needed for successful actinorhiza formation and interaction with AM fungi in the actinorhizal tree Casuarina glauca and is also able to restore both nodulation and AM symbioses in a Medicago truncatula ccamk mutant. Besides, we expressed auto-active CgCCaMK lacking the auto-inhibitory/CaM domain in two actinorhizal species: C. glauca (Casuarinaceae), which develops an intracellular infection pathway, and Discaria trinervis (Rhamnaceae) which is characterized by an ancestral intercellular infection mechanism. In both species, we found induction of nodulation independent of Frankia similar to response to the activation of CCaMK in the rhizobia-legume symbiosis and conclude that the regulation of actinorhiza organogenesis is conserved regardless of the infection mode. It has been suggested that rhizobial and actinorhizal symbioses originated from a common ancestor with several independent evolutionary origins. Our findings are consistent with the recruitment of a similar genetic pathway governing rhizobial and Frankia nodule organogenesis. PMID:23741336

  8. A CDPK isoform participates in the regulation of nodule number in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Gargantini, Pablo R; Gonzalez-Rizzo, Silvina; Chinchilla, Delphine; Raices, Marcela; Giammaria, Verónica; Ulloa, Rita M; Frugier, Florian; Crespi, Martin D

    2006-12-01

    Medicago spp. are able to develop root nodules via symbiotic interaction with Sinorhizobium meliloti. Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are involved in various signalling pathways in plants, and we found that expression of MtCPK3, a CDPK isoform present in roots of the model legume Medicago truncatula, is regulated during the nodulation process. Early inductions were detected 15 min and 3-4 days post-inoculation (dpi). The very early induction of CPK3 messengers was also present in inoculated M. truncatula dmi mutants and in wild-type roots subjected to salt stress, indicating that this rapid response is probably stress-related. In contrast, the later response was concomitant with cortical cell division and the formation of nodule primordia, and was not observed in wild-type roots inoculated with nod (-) strains. This late induction correlated with a change in the subcellular distribution of CDPK activities. Accordingly, an anti-MtCPK3 antibody detected two bands in soluble root extracts and one in the particulate fraction. CPK3::GFP fusions are targeted to the plasma membrane in epidermal onion cells, a localization that depends on myristoylation and palmitoylation sites of the protein, suggesting a dual subcellular localization. MtCPK3 mRNA and protein were also up-regulated by cytokinin treatment, a hormone linked to the regulation of cortical cell division and other nodulation-related responses. An RNAi-CDPK construction was used to silence CPK3 in Agrobacterium rhizogenes-transformed roots. Although no major phenotype was detected in these roots, when infected with rhizobia, the total number of nodules was, on average, twofold higher than in controls. This correlates with the lack of MtCPK3 induction in the inoculated super-nodulator sunn mutant. Our results suggest that CPK3 participates in the regulation of the symbiotic interaction. PMID:17132148

  9. A pancreatobiliary-type carcinoma in situ at the periphery of a mural nodule developed from a gastric adenoma in an intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Takasu, Naoki; Kimura, Wataru; Moriya, Toshiyuki; Takeshita, Akiko; Murayama, Saijiro; Hirai, Ichiro; Ogata, Shinya

    2010-08-01

    We report a rare case of an intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) with a pancreatobiliary-type carcinoma in situ (CIS) that originated around a mural nodule formed in a gastric-type adenoma. A 64-year-old man was admitted to our hospital in December 2001 for dilation of the main pancreatic duct, detected on abdominal ultrasonography. Branch-duct-type IPMN (diameter 25 mm) was diagnosed, and because mural nodules were absent, the patient was annually followed up for 5 years. In 2006, computed tomography scans revealed thickening of the tumor wall and the development of a mural nodule (diameter approximately 6 mm); pancreatoduodenectomy with regional lymph-node dissection was performed. Histopathologic examination showed an intraductal papillary mucinous carcinoma arising from an adenoma. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining revealed that most of the tumor components, including the mural nodule, had adenomatous changes, indicating the tumor to be of the gastric type; however, immunohistochemistry showed positive MUC2 expression. Histologically, the tissues around the nodule, including those showing a cribriform pattern, were diagnosed as CIS. These tissues were classified as the pancreatobiliary-type on the basis of the results of both H&E staining and immunohistochemistry. The patient remained disease-free for 3 years after surgery.

  10. Genetic diversity and distribution of rhizobia associated with the medicinal legumes Astragalus spp. and Hedysarum polybotrys in agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui; Ji, Zhao Jun; Jiao, Yin Shan; Wang, En Tao; Chen, Wen Feng; Guo, Bao Lin; Chen, Wen Xin

    2016-03-01

    With the increasing cultivation of medicinal legumes in agricultural fields, the rhizobia associated with these plants are facing new stresses, mainly from fertilization and irrigation. In this study, investigations on the nodulation of three cultivated medicinal legumes, Astragalus mongholicus, Astragalus membranaceus and Hedysarum polybotrys were performed. Bacterial isolates from root nodules of these legumes were subjected to genetic diversity and multilocus sequence analyses. In addition, the distribution of nodule bacteria related to soil factors and host plants was studied. A total 367 bacterial isolates were obtained and 13 genospecies were identified. The predominant microsymbionts were identified as Mesorhizobium septentrionale, Mesorhizobium temperatum, Mesorhizobium tianshanense, Mesorhizobium ciceri and Mesorhizobium muleiense. M. septentrionale was found in most root nodules especially from legumes grown in the barren soils (with low available nitrogen and low organic carbon contents), while M. temperatum was predominant in nodules where the plants were grown in the nitrogen-rich fields. A. mongholicus tended to be associated with M. septentrionale, M. temperatum and M. ciceri in different soils, while A. membranaceus and H. polybotrys tended to be associated with M. tianshanense and M. septentrionale, respectively. This study showed that soil fertility may be the main determinant for the distribution of rhizobia associated with these cultured legume plants. PMID:26915496

  11. Edible grain legumes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edible grain legumes including dry bean, dry pea, chickpeas, and lentils, have served as important sources of protein for human diets for thousands of years. In the US, these crops are predominately produced for export markets. The objective of this study was to examine yield gains in these crops ov...

  12. Extrusion cooking: Legume pulses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extrusion is used commercially to produce high value breakfast and snack foods based on cereals such as wheat or corn. However, this processing method is not being commercially used for legume pulses seeds due to the perception that they do not expand well in extrusion. Extrusion cooking of pulses (...

  13. Regulatory patterns of a large family of defensin-like genes expressed in nodules of Medicago truncatula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root nodules are the symbiotic organ of legumes that house nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Many genes are specifically induced in nodules during the interactions between the host plant and symbiotic rhizobia. Information regarding the regulation of expression for most of these genes is lacking. One of the...

  14. ndvF, a novel locus located on megaplasmid pRmeSU47b (pEXO) of Rhizobium meliloti, is required for normal nodule development.

    PubMed Central

    Charles, T C; Newcomb, W; Finan, T M

    1991-01-01

    Rhizobium meliloti strains carrying either of two overlapping deletions (delta 5408 and delta F114) of the megaplasmid pRmeSU47b form nodules on alfalfa which fail to fix N2 (Fix-). Strains carrying these deletions also fail to fluoresce on media containing calcofluor, indicating a defect in synthesis of the acidic exopolysaccharide (Exo-) of R. meliloti. We have isolated cosmid clones (pTH21 and pTH22) which complement the Fix- but not the Exo- phenotype of the strains carrying the delta 5408 and delta F114 deletions. In addition, cosmid clones which complement the Exo- phenotype fail to complement the Fix- phenotype of these deletions; thus, the Exo- phenotype is not related to the Fix- phenotype. A 5-kb region within a 7.3-kb BamHI restriction fragment was found to be required for complementation of the Fix- phenotype of the delta 5408 and delta F114 deletion strains. Tn5 insertions in the 5-kb region generated a Fix- phenotype when recombined into the wild-type genome. We have designated this locus ndvF, for nodule development. TnphoA mutagenesis of this region generated active alkaline-phosphatase gene fusions, indicating that ndvF encodes extracytoplasmic protein(s). Induction of nodules by the ndvF mutants was delayed by 2 to 3 days compared with induction by the wild-type strain. Light microscopy of nodules elicited by strains carrying the large 150-kb delta F114 deletion, a 12-kb deletion removing ndvF, or an individual ndvF::Tn5 insertion mutation demonstrated that many nodules contained few infected cortical cells, indicating that nodule development was blocked early in the infection process, before the release of bacteria from the infection threads. Images PMID:1648074

  15. Efficacy Assessment of Newly Developed Open-Window Intervention Needles for the Treatment of Cystic Thyroid Nodules That Cannot Be Aspirated

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaohua; Li, Boyi; Chen, Xiaokang; Li, Shilin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop a novel open-window needle aspiration method and evaluate its efficacy in drainage and sclerotherapy of cystic thyroid nodules that cannot be aspirated with an 18-gauge needle. Methods: Two rectangular windows 5.0 mm in length and 1.0 mm wide were placed at the end of the percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTCA) needle trocar to develop a new open-window intervention needle. The efficiency of the open-window intervention needle was compared either to a porous interventional needle or to an ordinary PTCA needle by assessing the aspiration efficiency. The efficacy of the modified open-window approach was tested by carrying out sclerotherapy and drainage on 21 thyroid cystic nodules that could not be aspirated with an 18-gauge needle and comparing it to aspiration with an 18-gauge PTCA needle of 50 cystic thyroid nodules. Results: The efficacy of aspirating coupling agents of various specifications using the new open-window intervention was superior to aspiration using the PTCA trocar needle or a porous needle (p<0.05). Ethanol ablation efficacy in the treatment of 21 cystic thyroid nodules that could not be aspirated with an 18-gauge needle and the aspiration efficacy of 50 cystic thyroid nodules with an 18-gauge PTCA needle were not significantly different (p>0.05). Conclusion: The new open-window intervention needle approach was highly effective in conducting ethanol ablation of cystic thyroid nodules that could not be aspirated using conventional methodologies. PMID:24547900

  16. Specific Subunits of Heterotrimeric G Proteins Play Important Roles during Nodulation in Soybean1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Swarup Roy; Pandey, Sona

    2013-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins comprising Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits regulate many fundamental growth and development processes in all eukaryotes. Plants possess a relatively limited number of G-protein components compared with mammalian systems, and their detailed functional characterization has been performed mostly in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice (Oryza sativa). However, the presence of single Gα and Gβ proteins in both these species has significantly undermined the complexity and specificity of response regulation in plant G-protein signaling. There is ample pharmacological evidence for the role of G proteins in regulation of legume-specific processes such as nodulation, but the lack of genetic data from a leguminous species has restricted its direct assessment. Our recent identification and characterization of an elaborate G-protein family in soybean (Glycine max) and the availability of appropriate molecular-genetic resources have allowed us to directly evaluate the role of G-protein subunits during nodulation. We demonstrate that all G-protein genes are expressed in nodules and exhibit significant changes in their expression in response to Bradyrhizobium japonicum infection and in representative supernodulating and nonnodulating soybean mutants. RNA interference suppression and overexpression of specific G-protein components results in lower and higher nodule numbers, respectively, validating their roles as positive regulators of nodule formation. Our data further show preferential usage of distinct G-protein subunits in the presence of an additional signal during nodulation. Interestingly, the Gα proteins directly interact with the soybean nodulation factor receptors NFR1α and NFR1β, suggesting that the plant G proteins may couple with receptors other than the canonical heptahelical receptors common in metazoans to modulate signaling. PMID:23569109

  17. Functional analysis of duplicated Symbiosis Receptor Kinase (SymRK) genes during nodulation and mycorrhizal infection in soybean (Glycine max).

    PubMed

    Indrasumunar, Arief; Wilde, Julia; Hayashi, Satomi; Li, Dongxue; Gresshoff, Peter M

    2015-03-15

    Association between legumes and rhizobia results in the formation of root nodules, where symbiotic nitrogen fixation occurs. The early stages of this association involve a complex of signalling events between the host and microsymbiont. Several genes dealing with early signal transduction have been cloned, and one of them encodes the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) receptor kinase (SymRK; also termed NORK). The Symbiosis Receptor Kinase gene is required by legumes to establish a root endosymbiosis with Rhizobium bacteria as well as mycorrhizal fungi. Using degenerate primer and BAC sequencing, we cloned duplicated SymRK homeologues in soybean called GmSymRKα and GmSymRKβ. These duplicated genes have high similarity of nucleotide (96%) and amino acid sequence (95%). Sequence analysis predicted a malectin-like domain within the extracellular domain of both genes. Several putative cis-acting elements were found in promoter regions of GmSymRKα and GmSymRKβ, suggesting a participation in lateral root development, cell division and peribacteroid membrane formation. The mutant of SymRK genes is not available in soybean; therefore, to know the functions of these genes, RNA interference (RNAi) of these duplicated genes was performed. For this purpose, RNAi construct of each gene was generated and introduced into the soybean genome by Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated hairy root transformation. RNAi of GmSymRKβ gene resulted in an increased reduction of nodulation and mycorrhizal infection than RNAi of GmSymRKα, suggesting it has the major activity of the duplicated gene pair. The results from the important crop legume soybean confirm the joint phenotypic action of GmSymRK genes in both mycorrhizal and rhizobial infection seen in model legumes.

  18. Symbiont abundance is more important than pre-infection partner choice in a Rhizobium - legume mutualism.

    PubMed

    Van Cauwenberghe, Jannick; Lemaire, Benny; Stefan, Andrei; Efrose, Rodica; Michiels, Jan; Honnay, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    It is known that the genetic diversity of conspecific rhizobia present in root nodules differs greatly among populations of a legume species, which has led to the suggestion that both dispersal limitation and the local environment affect rhizobial genotypic composition. However, it remains unclear whether rhizobial genotypes residing in root nodules are representative of the entire population of compatible symbiotic rhizobia. Since symbiotic preferences differ among legume populations, the genetic composition of rhizobia found within nodules may reflect the preferences of the local hosts, rather than the full diversity of potential nodulating rhizobia present in the soil. Here, we assessed whether Vicia cracca legume hosts of different provenances select different Rhizobium leguminosarum genotypes than sympatric V. cracca hosts, when presented a natural soil rhizobial population. Through combining V. cracca plants and rhizobia from adjacent and more distant populations, we found that V. cracca hosts are relatively randomly associated with rhizobial genotypes. This indicates that pre-infection partner choice is relatively weak in certain legume hosts when faced with a natural population of rhizobia. PMID:27269381

  19. Crotalarieae and Genisteae of the South African Great Escarpment are nodulated by novel Bradyrhizobium species with unique and diverse symbiotic loci.

    PubMed

    Beukes, Chrizelle W; Stępkowski, Tomasz; Venter, Stephanus N; Cłapa, Tomasz; Phalane, Francina L; le Roux, Marianne M; Steenkamp, Emma T

    2016-07-01

    The genus Bradyrhizobium contains predominantly nitrogen-fixing legume symbionts. Phylogenetic analysis of the genes responsible for their symbiotic abilities (i.e., those encoded on the nodulation [nod] and nitrogen-fixation [nif] loci) has facilitated the development of an extensive phylogeographic framework for the genus. This framework however contains only a few nodulating isolates from Africa. Here we focused on nodulating Bradyrhizobium isolates associated with native southern African legumes in the tribes Genisteae and Crotalarieae found along the Great Escarpment in the Mpumalanga Province of South Africa. The aims of this study were to: (1) obtain rhizobial isolates from legumes in the Genisteae and Crotalarieae; (2) verify their nodulation ability; (3) characterize them to species level based on phylogenetic analyses of several protein coding gene regions (atpD, dnaK, glnII, recA, rpoB and gyrB) and (4) determine their placement in the phylogeographic framework inferred from the sequences of the symbiotic loci nodA and nifD. Twenty of the 21 Bradyrhizobium isolates belonged to six novel species, while one was conspecific with the recently described B. arachidis. Among these isolates, the nodA phylogeny revealed several new clades, with 18 of our isolates found in Clades XIV and XV, and only three forming part of the cosmopolitan Clade III. These strains formed predominantly the same groups in the nifD phylogeny although with slight differences; indicating that both vertical and horizontal inheritance of the symbiotic loci occurred. These findings suggest that the largely unexplored diversity of indigenous African rhizobia are characterized by unique ancestries that might mirror the distribution of their hosts and the environmental factors driving their evolution.

  20. Ethylene, a Hormone at the Center-Stage of Nodulation

    PubMed Central

    Guinel, Frédérique C.

    2015-01-01

    Nodulation is the result of a beneficial interaction between legumes and rhizobia. It is a sophisticated process leading to nutrient exchange between the two types of symbionts. In this association, within a nodule, the rhizobia, using energy provided as photosynthates, fix atmospheric nitrogen and convert it to ammonium which is available to the plant. Nodulation is recognized as an essential process in nitrogen cycling and legume crops are known to enrich agricultural soils in nitrogenous compounds. Furthermore, as they are rich in nitrogen, legumes are considered important as staple foods for humans and fodder for animals. To tightly control this association and keep it mutualistic, the plant uses several means, including hormones. The hormone ethylene has been known as a negative regulator of nodulation for almost four decades. Since then, much progress has been made in the understanding of both the ethylene signaling pathway and the nodulation process. Here I have taken a large view, using recently obtained knowledge, to describe in some detail the major stages of the process. I have not only reviewed the steps most commonly covered (the common signaling transduction pathway, and the epidermal and cortical programs), but I have also looked into steps less understood (the pre-infection step with the plant defense response, the bacterial release and the formation of the symbiosome, and nodule functioning and senescence). After a succinct review of the ethylene signaling pathway, I have used the knowledge obtained from nodulation- and ethylene-related mutants to paint a more complete picture of the role played by the hormone in nodule organogenesis, functioning, and senescence. It transpires that ethylene is at the center of this effective symbiosis. It has not only been involved in most of the steps leading to a mature nodule, but it has also been implicated in host immunity and nodule senescence. It is likely responsible for the activation of other hormonal

  1. Transcriptome sequencing, and rapid development and application of SNP markers for the legume pod borer Maruca vitrata (Lepidoptera: Crambidae).

    PubMed

    Margam, Venu M; Coates, Brad S; Bayles, Darrell O; Hellmich, Richard L; Agunbiade, Tolulope; Seufferheld, Manfredo J; Sun, Weilin; Kroemer, Jeremy A; Ba, Malick N; Binso-Dabire, Clementine L; Baoua, Ibrahim; Ishiyaku, Mohammad F; Covas, Fernando G; Srinivasan, Ramasamy; Armstrong, Joel; Murdock, Larry L; Pittendrigh, Barry R

    2011-01-01

    The legume pod borer, Maruca vitrata (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), is an insect pest species of crops grown by subsistence farmers in tropical regions of Africa. We present the de novo assembly of 3729 contigs from 454- and Sanger-derived sequencing reads for midgut, salivary, and whole adult tissues of this non-model species. Functional annotation predicted that 1320 M. vitrata protein coding genes are present, of which 631 have orthologs within the Bombyx mori gene model. A homology-based analysis assigned M. vitrata genes into a group of paralogs, but these were subsequently partitioned into putative orthologs following phylogenetic analyses. Following sequence quality filtering, a total of 1542 putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were predicted within M. vitrata contig assemblies. Seventy one of 1078 designed molecular genetic markers were used to screen M. vitrata samples from five collection sites in West Africa. Population substructure may be present with significant implications in the insect resistance management recommendations pertaining to the release of biological control agents or transgenic cowpea that express Bacillus thuringiensis crystal toxins. Mutation data derived from transcriptome sequencing is an expeditious and economical source for genetic markers that allow evaluation of ecological differentiation.

  2. Transcriptome Sequencing, and Rapid Development and Application of SNP Markers for the Legume Pod Borer Maruca vitrata (Lepidoptera: Crambidae)

    PubMed Central

    Margam, Venu M.; Coates, Brad S.; Bayles, Darrell O.; Hellmich, Richard L.; Agunbiade, Tolulope; Seufferheld, Manfredo J.; Sun, Weilin; Kroemer, Jeremy A.; Ba, Malick N.; Binso-Dabire, Clementine L.; Baoua, Ibrahim; Ishiyaku, Mohammad F.; Covas, Fernando G.; Srinivasan, Ramasamy; Armstrong, Joel; Murdock, Larry L.; Pittendrigh, Barry R.

    2011-01-01

    The legume pod borer, Maruca vitrata (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), is an insect pest species of crops grown by subsistence farmers in tropical regions of Africa. We present the de novo assembly of 3729 contigs from 454- and Sanger-derived sequencing reads for midgut, salivary, and whole adult tissues of this non-model species. Functional annotation predicted that 1320 M. vitrata protein coding genes are present, of which 631 have orthologs within the Bombyx mori gene model. A homology-based analysis assigned M. vitrata genes into a group of paralogs, but these were subsequently partitioned into putative orthologs following phylogenetic analyses. Following sequence quality filtering, a total of 1542 putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were predicted within M. vitrata contig assemblies. Seventy one of 1078 designed molecular genetic markers were used to screen M. vitrata samples from five collection sites in West Africa. Population substructure may be present with significant implications in the insect resistance management recommendations pertaining to the release of biological control agents or transgenic cowpea that express Bacillus thuringiensis crystal toxins. Mutation data derived from transcriptome sequencing is an expeditious and economical source for genetic markers that allow evaluation of ecological differentiation. PMID:21754987

  3. [Genetic resources of nodule bacteria].

    PubMed

    Rumiantseva, M L

    2009-09-01

    Nodule bacteria (rhizobia) form highly specific symbiosis with leguminous plants. The efficiency of accumulation of biological nitrogen depends on molecular-genetic interaction between the host plant and rhizobia. Genetic characteristics of microsymbiotic strains are crucial in developing highly productive and stress-resistant symbiotic pairs: rhizobium strain-host plant cultivar (species). The present review considers the issue of studying genetic resources of nodule bacteria to identify genes and their blocks, responsible for the ability of rhizobia to form highly effective symbiosis in various agroecological conditions. The main approaches to investigation of intraspecific and interspecific genetic and genomic diversity of nodule bacteria are considered, from MLEE analysis to the recent methods of genomic DNA analysis using biochips. The data are presented showing that gene centers of host plants are centers of genetic diversification of nodule bacteria, because the intraspecific polymorphism of genetic markers of the core and the accessory rhizobial genomes is extremely high in them. Genotypic features of trapped and nodule subpopulations of alfalfa nodule bacteria are discussed. A survey of literature showed that the genomes of natural strains in alfalfa gene centers exhibit significant differences in genes involved in control of metabolism, replication, recombination, and the formation of defense response (hsd genes). Natural populations of rhizobia are regarded as a huge gene pool serving as a source of evolutionary innovations.

  4. Trifolitoxin Production and Nodulation Are Necessary for the Expression of Superior Nodulation Competitiveness by Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii Strain T24 on Clover 1

    PubMed Central

    Triplett, Eric W.; Barta, Terese M.

    1987-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii T24 is ineffective in symbiotic nitrogen fixation, produces a potent antibiotic (referred to here as trifolitoxin) that is bacteriostatic to certain Rhizobium strains, and is very competitive for clover root nodulation (EA Schwinghamer, RP Belkengren 1968 Arch Mikrobiol 64: 130-145). The primary objective of this work was to demonstrate the roles of nodulation and trifolitoxin production in the expression of nodulation competitiveness by T24. Unlike wildtype T24, transposon mutants of T24 lacking trifolitoxin production were unable to decrease clover nodulation by an effective, trifolitoxin-sensitive strain of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii. A non-nodulating transposon mutant of T24 prevented clover nodulation by a trifolitoxin-sensitive R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii when co-inoculated with a T24 mutant lacking trifolitoxin production. Neither mutant alone prevented nodulation by the trifolitoxin-sensitive strain. These results demonstrate that trifolitoxin production and nodulation are required for the expression of nodulation competitiveness by strain T24. A trifolitoxin-sensitive strain of R. meliloti did not nodulate alfalfa when co-inoculated with T24 and a trifolitoxin-resistant strain of R. meliloti. Thus, a trifolitoxin-producing strain was useful in regulating nodule occupancy on a legume host other than clover. Trifolitoxin production was constitutive in both minimal and enriched media. Trifolitoxin was found to inhibit the growth of 95% of all strains of R. leguminosarum bvs. trifolii, viceae, and phaseoli tested. Strains of all 13 biotypes of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii were inhibited by trifolitoxin. Three strains of R. fredii were also inhibited. Strain T24 ineffectively nodulated 46 clover species, did not nodulate Trifolium ambiguum, and induced partially effective nodules on Trifolium micranthum. Since T24 produced partially effective nodules on T. micranthum and since a trifolitoxin-minus mutant of T24 induced

  5. Total Glutamine Synthetase Activity during Soybean Nodule Development Is Controlled at the Level of Transcription and Holoprotein Turnover.

    PubMed Central

    Temple, S. J.; Kunjibettu, S.; Roche, D.; Sengupta-Gopalan, C.

    1996-01-01

    Gln synthetase (GS) catalyzes the ATP-dependent condensation of ammonia with glutamate to yield Gln. In higher plants GS is an octameric enzyme and the subunits are encoded by members of a small multigene family. In soybeans (Glycine max), following the onset of N2 fixation there is a dramatic increase in GS activity in the root nodules. GS activity staining of native polyacrylamide gels containing nodule and root extracts showed a common band of activity (GSrs). The nodules also contained a slower-migrating, broad band of enzyme activity (GSns). The GSns activity band is a complex of many isozymes made up of different proportions of two kinds of GS subunits: GSr and GSn. Root nodules formed following inoculation with an Nif- strain of Bradyrhizobium japonicum showed the presence of GS isoenzymes (GSns1) with low enzyme activity, which migrated more slowly than GSns. Gsns1 is most likely made up predominantly of GSn subunits. Our data suggest that, whereas the class I GS genes encoding the GSr subunits are regulated by the availability of NH3, the class II GS genes coding for the GSn subunits are developmentally regulated. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that the GSns1 isozymes in the Nif- nodules are relatively more labile. Our overall conclusion is that GSns activity in soybean nodules is regulated by N2 fixation both at the level of transcription and at the level of holoprotein stability. PMID:12226474

  6. Global Synthesis of Drought Effects on Food Legume Production.

    PubMed

    Daryanto, Stefani; Wang, Lixin; Jacinthe, Pierre-André

    2015-01-01

    Food legume crops play important roles in conservation farming systems and contribute to food security in the developing world. However, in many regions of the world, their production has been adversely affected by drought. Although water scarcity is a severe abiotic constraint of legume crops productivity, it remains unclear how the effects of drought co-vary with legume species, soil texture, agroclimatic region, and drought timing. To address these uncertainties, we collected literature data between 1980 and 2014 that reported monoculture legume yield responses to drought under field conditions, and analyzed this data set using meta-analysis techniques. Our results showed that the amount of water reduction was positively related with yield reduction, but the extent of the impact varied with legume species and the phenological state during which drought occurred. Overall, lentil (Lens culinaris), groundnut (Arachis hypogaea), and pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan) were found to experience lower drought-induced yield reduction compared to legumes such as cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) and green gram (Vigna radiate). Yield reduction was generally greater when legumes experienced drought during their reproductive stage compared to during their vegetative stage. Legumes grown in soil with medium texture also exhibited greater yield reduction compared to those planted on soil of either coarse or fine texture. In contrast, regions and their associated climatic factors did not significantly affect legume yield reduction. In the face of changing climate, our study provides useful information for agricultural planning and research directions for development of drought-resistant legume species to improve adaptation and resilience of agricultural systems in the drought-prone regions of the world. PMID:26061704

  7. Global Synthesis of Drought Effects on Food Legume Production

    PubMed Central

    Daryanto, Stefani; Wang, Lixin; Jacinthe, Pierre-André

    2015-01-01

    Food legume crops play important roles in conservation farming systems and contribute to food security in the developing world. However, in many regions of the world, their production has been adversely affected by drought. Although water scarcity is a severe abiotic constraint of legume crops productivity, it remains unclear how the effects of drought co-vary with legume species, soil texture, agroclimatic region, and drought timing. To address these uncertainties, we collected literature data between 1980 and 2014 that reported monoculture legume yield responses to drought under field conditions, and analyzed this data set using meta-analysis techniques. Our results showed that the amount of water reduction was positively related with yield reduction, but the extent of the impact varied with legume species and the phenological state during which drought occurred. Overall, lentil (Lens culinaris), groundnut (Arachis hypogaea), and pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan) were found to experience lower drought-induced yield reduction compared to legumes such as cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) and green gram (Vigna radiate). Yield reduction was generally greater when legumes experienced drought during their reproductive stage compared to during their vegetative stage. Legumes grown in soil with medium texture also exhibited greater yield reduction compared to those planted on soil of either coarse or fine texture. In contrast, regions and their associated climatic factors did not significantly affect legume yield reduction. In the face of changing climate, our study provides useful information for agricultural planning and research directions for development of drought-resistant legume species to improve adaptation and resilience of agricultural systems in the drought-prone regions of the world. PMID:26061704

  8. Clover development during spaceflight: A model system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guikema, James A.; Debell, Lynnette; Paulsen, Avelina; Spooner, Brian S.; Wong, Peter P.

    1994-01-01

    The development of legume root nodules was studied as a model system for the examination of gravitational effects on plant root development. In order to examine whether rhizobial association with clover roots can be achieved in microgravity, experiments were performed aboard the KC-135 parabolic aircraft and aboard the sounding rocket mission Consort 3. Binding of rhizobia to roots and the initial stages of root nodule development successfully occurred in microgravity. Seedling germination experiments were performed in the sliding block device, the Materials Dispersion Apparatus, aboard STS-37. When significant hydration of the seeds was achieved, normal rates of germination and seedling development were observed.

  9. Clover development during spaceflight: a model system.

    PubMed

    Guikema, J A; DeBell, L; Paulsen, A; Spooner, B S; Wong, P P

    1994-01-01

    The development of legume root nodules was studied as a model system for the examination of gravitational effects on plant root development. In order to examine whether rhizobial association with clover roots can be achieved in microgravity, experiments were performed aboard the KC-135 parabolic aircraft and aboard the sounding rocket mission Consort 3. Binding of rhizobia to roots and the initial stages of root nodule development successfully occurred in microgravity. Seedling germination experiments were performed in the sliding block device, the Materials Dispersion Apparatus, aboard STS-37. When significant hydration of the seeds was achieved, normal rates of germination and seedling development were observed. PMID:11537915

  10. Organogenic Nodule Formation in Hop: A Tool to Study Morphogenesis in Plants with Biotechnological and Medicinal Applications

    PubMed Central

    Fortes, Ana M.; Santos, Filipa; Pais, Maria S.

    2010-01-01

    The usage of Humulus lupulus for brewing increased the demand for high-quality plant material. Simultaneously, hop has been used in traditional medicine and recently recognized with anticancer and anti-infective properties. Tissue culture techniques have been reported for a wide range of species, and open the prospect for propagation of disease-free, genetically uniform and massive amounts of plants in vitro. Moreover, the development of large-scale culture methods using bioreactors enables the industrial production of secondary metabolites. Reliable and efficient tissue culture protocol for shoot regeneration through organogenic nodule formation was established for hop. The present review describes the histological, and biochemical changes occurring during this morphogenic process, together with an analysis of transcriptional and metabolic profiles. We also discuss the existence of common molecular factors among three different morphogenic processes: organogenic nodules and somatic embryogenesis, which strictly speaking depend exclusively on intrinsic developmental reprogramming, and legume nitrogen-fixing root nodules, which arises in response to symbiosis. The review of the key factors that participate in hop nodule organogenesis and the comparison with other morphogenic processes may have merit as a study presenting recent advances in complex molecular networks occurring during morphogenesis and together, these provide a rich framework for biotechnology applications. PMID:20811599

  11. Development of glass-ceramic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: characterisation, proliferation of human osteoblasts and nodule formation.

    PubMed

    Vitale-Brovarone, C; Verné, E; Robiglio, L; Appendino, P; Bassi, F; Martinasso, G; Muzio, G; Canuto, R

    2007-03-01

    Glass-ceramic macroporous scaffolds for tissue engineering have been developed using a polyurethane sponge template and bioactive glass powders. The starting glass (CEL2) belongs to the system SiO(2)-P(2)O(5)-CaO-MgO-Na(2)O-K(2)O and has been synthesised by a conventional melting-quenching route. A slurry of CEL2 powder, polyvinyl alcohol and water has been prepared in order to coat, by impregnation, the polymeric template. An optimised thermal treatment was then use to remove the sponge and to sinter the glass powders, leading to a glass-ceramic replica of the template. Morphological observations, image analyses, mechanical tests and in vitro tests showed that the obtained devices are good candidates as scaffolds for bone-tissue engineering, in terms of pore-size distribution, pore interconnection, surface roughness, and both bioactivity and biocompatibility. In particular, a human osteoblast cell line (MG-63) seeded onto the scaffold after a standardised preconditioning route in simulated body fluid showed a high degree of cell proliferation and a good ability to produce calcium nodules. The obtained results were enhanced by the addition of bone morphogenetic proteins after cell seeding.

  12. Novel Expression Pattern of Cytosolic Gln Synthetase in Nitrogen-Fixing Root Nodules of the Actinorhizal Host, Datisca glomerata1[w

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Alison M.; Murphy, Terence M.; Okubara, Patricia A.; Jacobsen, Karin R.; Swensen, Susan M.; Pawlowski, Katharina

    2004-01-01

    Gln synthetase (GS) is the key enzyme of primary ammonia assimilation in nitrogen-fixing root nodules of legumes and actinorhizal (Frankia-nodulated) plants. In root nodules of Datisca glomerata (Datiscaceae), transcripts hybridizing to a conserved coding region of the abundant nodule isoform, DgGS1-1, are abundant in uninfected nodule cortical tissue, but expression was not detectable in the infected zone or in the nodule meristem. Similarly, the GS holoprotein is immunolocalized exclusively to the uninfected nodule tissue. Phylogenetic analysis of the full-length cDNA of DgGS1-1 indicates affinities with cytosolic GS genes from legumes, the actinorhizal species Alnus glutinosa, and nonnodulating species, Vitis vinifera and Hevea brasilensis. The D. glomerata nodule GS expression pattern is a new variant among reported root nodule symbioses and may reflect an unusual nitrogen transfer pathway from the Frankia nodule microsymbiont to the plant infected tissue, coupled to a distinctive nitrogen cycle in the uninfected cortical tissue. Arg, Gln, and Glu are the major amino acids present in D. glomerata nodules, but Arg was not detected at high levels in leaves or roots. Arg as a major nodule nitrogen storage form is not found in other root nodule types except in the phylogenetically related Coriaria. Catabolism of Arg through the urea cycle could generate free ammonium in the uninfected tissue where GS is expressed. PMID:15247391

  13. High-Resolution Transcriptomic Analyses of Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 Bacteroids in Determinate Nodules of Vigna unguiculata and Indeterminate Nodules of Leucaena leucocephala

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Tian, Chang Fu; Chen, Wen Feng; Wang, Lei; Sui, Xin Hua; Chen, Wen Xin

    2013-01-01

    The rhizobium-legume symbiosis is a model system for studying mutualistic interactions between bacteria and eukaryotes. Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 is distinguished by its ability to form either indeterminate nodules or determinate nodules with diverse legumes. Here, we presented a high-resolution RNA-seq transcriptomic analysis of NGR234 bacteroids in indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala and determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata. In contrast to exponentially growing free-living bacteria, non-growing bacteroids from both legumes recruited several common cellular functions such as cbb3 oxidase, thiamine biosynthesis, nitrate reduction pathway (NO-producing), succinate metabolism, PHB (poly-3-hydroxybutyrate) biosynthesis and phosphate/phosphonate transporters. However, different transcription profiles between bacteroids from two legumes were also uncovered for genes involved in the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, T3SS (type three secretion system) and effector proteins, cytochrome bd ubiquinol oxidase, PQQ (pyrroloquinoline quinone), cytochrome c550, pseudoazurin, biotin, phasins and glycolate oxidase, and in the metabolism of glutamate and phenylalanine. Noteworthy were the distinct expression patterns of genes encoding phasins, which are thought to be involved in regulating the surface/volume ratio of PHB granules. These patterns are in good agreement with the observed granule size difference between bacteroids from L. leucocephala and V. unguiculata. PMID:23936444

  14. High-resolution transcriptomic analyses of Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 bacteroids in determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata and indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Tian, Chang Fu; Chen, Wen Feng; Wang, Lei; Sui, Xin Hua; Chen, Wen Xin

    2013-01-01

    The rhizobium-legume symbiosis is a model system for studying mutualistic interactions between bacteria and eukaryotes. Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 is distinguished by its ability to form either indeterminate nodules or determinate nodules with diverse legumes. Here, we presented a high-resolution RNA-seq transcriptomic analysis of NGR234 bacteroids in indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala and determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata. In contrast to exponentially growing free-living bacteria, non-growing bacteroids from both legumes recruited several common cellular functions such as cbb3 oxidase, thiamine biosynthesis, nitrate reduction pathway (NO-producing), succinate metabolism, PHB (poly-3-hydroxybutyrate) biosynthesis and phosphate/phosphonate transporters. However, different transcription profiles between bacteroids from two legumes were also uncovered for genes involved in the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, T3SS (type three secretion system) and effector proteins, cytochrome bd ubiquinol oxidase, PQQ (pyrroloquinoline quinone), cytochrome c550, pseudoazurin, biotin, phasins and glycolate oxidase, and in the metabolism of glutamate and phenylalanine. Noteworthy were the distinct expression patterns of genes encoding phasins, which are thought to be involved in regulating the surface/volume ratio of PHB granules. These patterns are in good agreement with the observed granule size difference between bacteroids from L. leucocephala and V. unguiculata.

  15. High-resolution transcriptomic analyses of Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 bacteroids in determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata and indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Tian, Chang Fu; Chen, Wen Feng; Wang, Lei; Sui, Xin Hua; Chen, Wen Xin

    2013-01-01

    The rhizobium-legume symbiosis is a model system for studying mutualistic interactions between bacteria and eukaryotes. Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 is distinguished by its ability to form either indeterminate nodules or determinate nodules with diverse legumes. Here, we presented a high-resolution RNA-seq transcriptomic analysis of NGR234 bacteroids in indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala and determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata. In contrast to exponentially growing free-living bacteria, non-growing bacteroids from both legumes recruited several common cellular functions such as cbb3 oxidase, thiamine biosynthesis, nitrate reduction pathway (NO-producing), succinate metabolism, PHB (poly-3-hydroxybutyrate) biosynthesis and phosphate/phosphonate transporters. However, different transcription profiles between bacteroids from two legumes were also uncovered for genes involved in the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, T3SS (type three secretion system) and effector proteins, cytochrome bd ubiquinol oxidase, PQQ (pyrroloquinoline quinone), cytochrome c550, pseudoazurin, biotin, phasins and glycolate oxidase, and in the metabolism of glutamate and phenylalanine. Noteworthy were the distinct expression patterns of genes encoding phasins, which are thought to be involved in regulating the surface/volume ratio of PHB granules. These patterns are in good agreement with the observed granule size difference between bacteroids from L. leucocephala and V. unguiculata. PMID:23936444

  16. Narrow- and Broad-Host-Range Symbiotic Plasmids of Rhizobium spp. Strains That Nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Brom, Susana; Martinez, Esperanza; Dávila, Guillermo; Palacios, Rafael

    1988-01-01

    Agrobacterium transconjugants containing symbiotic plasmids from different Rhizobium spp. strains that nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris were obtained. All transconjugants conserved the parental nodulation host range. Symbiotic (Sym) plasmids of Rhizobium strains isolated originally from P. vulgaris nodules, which had a broad nodulation host range, and single-copy nitrogenase genes conferred a Fix+ phenotype to the Agrobacterium transconjugants. A Fix− phenotype was obtained with Sym plasmids of strains isolated from P. vulgaris nodules that had a narrow host range and reiterated nif genes, as well as with Sym plasmids of strains isolated from other legumes that presented single nif genes and a broad nodulation host range. This indicates that different types of Sym plasmids can confer the ability to establish an effective symbiosis with P. vulgaris. Images PMID:16347637

  17. Biosynthesis and degradation of nodule-specific Rhizobium loti compounds in Lotus nodules.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, D B; Wilson, R; Shaw, G J; Petit, A; Tempe, J

    1987-01-01

    Two nodule-specific Rhizobium loti compounds were identified in Lotus tenuis and Lotus pedunculatus nodules induced by strain NZP2037. One, a silver nitrate-positive cation called rhizolotine, has been characterized as the riboside of a novel alpha-hydroxyimino acid containing a 1,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidine ring (G. J. Shaw, R. D. Wilson, G. A. Lane, L. D. Kennedy, D. B. Scott, and G. J. Gainsford, J. Chem. Soc. Chem. Commun., p. 180-181, 1986), and the other, yellow-1, stains yellow with ninhydrin. Both compounds were degraded by R. loti NZP2037 but not by strains of Rhizobium meliloti, Rhizobium trifolii, or Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Under the conditions tested neither compound was able to serve as a sole source of C or N for growth of R. loti NZP2037. Rhizolotine and yellow-1 were found in nodules from a range of different legumes inoculated with NZP2037, suggesting that the Rhizobium and not the host plant determines their synthesis. Neither compound was found in nodulelike structures of L. pedunculatus induced by transposon Tn5-induced noninfectious (Inf-) mutants of NZP2037 or in similar structures induced by a transconjugant of NZP2037 containing the symbiotic (Sym) cointegrate plasmid pPN1 of R. trifolii. Both compounds were also absent in the ineffective nodules induced by the bacterial-release-negative (Bar-) mutant, strain PN239. However, both compounds were present in nodules induced by the fixation-negative (Fix-) mutant PN235 and in Fix+ nodules formed by a plasmid-cured derivative of NZP2037. These results would suggest that infection and bacterial release from the infection thread are necessary for nodule (symbiotic) synthesis of these compounds. Images PMID:3025173

  18. A Novel Sucrose-Regulatory MADS-Box Transcription Factor GmNMHC5 Promotes Root Development and Nodulation in Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Han, Xiangdong; Zhan, Ge; Zhao, Zhenfang; Feng, Yongjun; Wu, Cunxiang

    2015-08-31

    The MADS-box protein family includes many transcription factors that have a conserved DNA-binding MADS-box domain. The proteins in this family were originally recognized to play prominent roles in floral development. Recent findings, especially with regard to the regulatory roles of the AGL17 subfamily in root development, have greatly broadened their known functions. In this study, a gene from soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.), GmNMHC5, was cloned from the Zigongdongdou cultivar and identified as a member of the AGL17 subfamily. Real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR analysis showed that GmNMHC5 was expressed at much higher levels in roots and nodules than in other organs. The activation of expression was first examined in leaves and roots, followed by shoot apexes. GmNMHC5 expression levels rose sharply when the plants were treated under short-day conditions (SD) and started to pod, whereas low levels were maintained in non-podding plants under long-day conditions (LD). Furthermore, overexpression of GmNMHC5 in transgenic soybean significantly promoted lateral root development and nodule building. Moreover, GmNMHC5 is upregulated by exogenous sucrose. These results indicate that GmNMHC5 can sense the sucrose signal and plays significant roles in lateral root development and nodule building.

  19. A Novel Sucrose-Regulatory MADS-Box Transcription Factor GmNMHC5 Promotes Root Development and Nodulation in Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Han, Xiangdong; Zhan, Ge; Zhao, Zhenfang; Feng, Yongjun; Wu, Cunxiang

    2015-01-01

    The MADS-box protein family includes many transcription factors that have a conserved DNA-binding MADS-box domain. The proteins in this family were originally recognized to play prominent roles in floral development. Recent findings, especially with regard to the regulatory roles of the AGL17 subfamily in root development, have greatly broadened their known functions. In this study, a gene from soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.), GmNMHC5, was cloned from the Zigongdongdou cultivar and identified as a member of the AGL17 subfamily. Real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR analysis showed that GmNMHC5 was expressed at much higher levels in roots and nodules than in other organs. The activation of expression was first examined in leaves and roots, followed by shoot apexes. GmNMHC5 expression levels rose sharply when the plants were treated under short-day conditions (SD) and started to pod, whereas low levels were maintained in non-podding plants under long-day conditions (LD). Furthermore, overexpression of GmNMHC5 in transgenic soybean significantly promoted lateral root development and nodule building. Moreover, GmNMHC5 is upregulated by exogenous sucrose. These results indicate that GmNMHC5 can sense the sucrose signal and plays significant roles in lateral root development and nodule building. PMID:26404246

  20. A Novel Sucrose-Regulatory MADS-Box Transcription Factor GmNMHC5 Promotes Root Development and Nodulation in Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Han, Xiangdong; Zhan, Ge; Zhao, Zhenfang; Feng, Yongjun; Wu, Cunxiang

    2015-01-01

    The MADS-box protein family includes many transcription factors that have a conserved DNA-binding MADS-box domain. The proteins in this family were originally recognized to play prominent roles in floral development. Recent findings, especially with regard to the regulatory roles of the AGL17 subfamily in root development, have greatly broadened their known functions. In this study, a gene from soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.), GmNMHC5, was cloned from the Zigongdongdou cultivar and identified as a member of the AGL17 subfamily. Real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR analysis showed that GmNMHC5 was expressed at much higher levels in roots and nodules than in other organs. The activation of expression was first examined in leaves and roots, followed by shoot apexes. GmNMHC5 expression levels rose sharply when the plants were treated under short-day conditions (SD) and started to pod, whereas low levels were maintained in non-podding plants under long-day conditions (LD). Furthermore, overexpression of GmNMHC5 in transgenic soybean significantly promoted lateral root development and nodule building. Moreover, GmNMHC5 is upregulated by exogenous sucrose. These results indicate that GmNMHC5 can sense the sucrose signal and plays significant roles in lateral root development and nodule building. PMID:26404246

  1. New Nodule-Newer Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Atul C; Wang, Juan; Abuqayyas, Sami; Garcha, Puneet; Lane, Charles Randy; Tsuang, Wayne; Budev, Marie; Akindipe, Olufemi

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate frequency and temporal relationship between pulmonary nodules (PNs) and transbronchial biopsy (TBBx) among lung transplant recipients (LTR). METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 100 records of LTR who underwent flexible bronchoscopy (FB) with TBBx, looking for the appearance of peripheral pulmonary nodule (PPN). If these patients had chest radiographs within 50 d of FB, they were included in the study. Data was compared with 30 procedures performed among non-transplant patients. Information on patient’s demographics, antirejection medications, anticoagulation, indication and type of lung transplantation, timing of the FB and the appearance and disappearance of the nodules and its characteristics were gathered. RESULTS: Nineteen new PN were found in 13 procedures performed on LTR and none among non-transplant patients. Nodules were detected between 4-47 d from the procedure and disappeared within 84 d after appearance without intervention. CONCLUSION: FB in LTR is associated with development of new, transient PPN at the site of TBBx in 13% of procedures. We hypothesize that these nodules are related to local hematoma and impaired lymphatic drainage. Close observation is a reasonable management approach. PMID:27011920

  2. crinkle, a novel symbiotic mutant that affects the infection thread growth and alters the root hair, trichome, and seed development in Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Tansengco, Myra L; Hayashi, Makoto; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Imaizumi-Anraku, Haruko; Murooka, Yoshikatsu

    2003-03-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms involved in Rhizobium-legume symbiosis, we examined a novel symbiotic mutant, crinkle (Ljsym79), from the model legume Lotus japonicus. On nitrogen-starved medium, crinkle mutants inoculated with the symbiont bacterium Mesorhizobium loti MAFF 303099 showed severe nitrogen deficiency symptoms. This mutant was characterized by the production of many bumps and small, white, uninfected nodule-like structures. Few nodules were pale-pink and irregularly shaped with nitrogen-fixing bacteroids and expressing leghemoglobin mRNA. Morphological analysis of infected roots showed that nodulation in crinkle mutants is blocked at the stage of the infection process. Confocal microscopy and histological examination of crinkle nodules revealed that infection threads were arrested upon penetrating the epidermal cells. Starch accumulation in uninfected cells and undeveloped vascular bundles were also noted in crinkle nodules. Results suggest that the Crinkle gene controls the infection process that is crucial during the early stage of nodule organogenesis. Aside from the symbiotic phenotypes, crinkle mutants also developed morphological alterations, such as crinkly or wavy trichomes, short seedpods with aborted embryos, and swollen root hairs. crinkle is therefore required for symbiotic nodule development and for other aspects of plant development.

  3. Responses of Legume Versus Nonlegume Tropical Tree Seedlings to Elevated CO2 Concentration1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Cernusak, Lucas A.; Winter, Klaus; Martínez, Carlos; Correa, Edwin; Aranda, Jorge; Garcia, Milton; Jaramillo, Carlos; Turner, Benjamin L.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated responses of growth, leaf gas exchange, carbon-isotope discrimination, and whole-plant water-use efficiency (WP) to elevated CO2 concentration ([CO2]) in seedlings of five leguminous and five nonleguminous tropical tree species. Plants were grown at CO2 partial pressures of 40 and 70 Pa. As a group, legumes did not differ from nonlegumes in growth response to elevated [CO2]. The mean ratio of final plant dry mass at elevated to ambient [CO2] (ME/MA) was 1.32 and 1.24 for legumes and nonlegumes, respectively. However, there was large variation in ME/MA among legume species (0.92–2.35), whereas nonlegumes varied much less (1.21–1.29). Variation among legume species in ME/MA was closely correlated with their capacity for nodule formation, as expressed by nodule mass ratio, the dry mass of nodules for a given plant dry mass. WP increased markedly in response to elevated [CO2] in all species. The ratio of intercellular to ambient CO2 partial pressures during photosynthesis remained approximately constant at ambient and elevated [CO2], as did carbon isotope discrimination, suggesting that WP should increase proportionally for a given increase in atmospheric [CO2]. These results suggest that tree legumes with a strong capacity for nodule formation could have a competitive advantage in tropical forests as atmospheric [CO2] rises and that the water-use efficiency of tropical tree species will increase under elevated [CO2]. PMID:21788363

  4. Beneficial consequences of a selective glutamine synthetase inhibitor in oats and legumes

    SciTech Connect

    Langston-Unkefer, P.J.; Knight, T.J.; Sengupta-Gopalan, C.

    1988-01-01

    We report on the effects of administering a unique glutamine synthetase inhibitor to cereals and N/sub 2/-fixing legumes. A bacterium (Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci) delivers this inhibitor to provide extended treatment periods; we inoculated the root systems of oat and legume plants with pv. tabaci to provide for delivery of this inhibitor to their root or root/nodule systems. Inoculation of legumes is accompanied by increased plant growth, total plant nitrogen, nodulation, and nitrogen fixation activity. Inoculation of the oats is accompanied by either of two results depending upon the genotype of the oat plant. One result is inhibition of plant growth followed by plant death as consequences of the loss of all of the glutamine synthetase activities in the plant and the subsequent accumulation of ammonia and cessation of nitrate uptake. The second and opposite result is observed in a small population of oats screened from a commercial cultivar and includes increased plant growth and leaf protein. The effects of this inhibitor can be beneficial when applied to appropriate plant material. In an attempt to effectively communicate these findings to the reader, we first introduce the inhibitor (a novel amino acid) and its bacterial delivery systems, the target of the inhibitor (glutamine synthetase-catalyzed ammonia assimilation), and the two different nitrogen economics in the legume and cereal plants used experimentally. The physiological, biochemical, and molecular genetic consequences of the inhibitor action in cereals and legumes, as we presently understand them, are then presented. 18 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.,

  5. Effects of legume species introduction on vegetation and soil nutrient development on abandoned croplands in a semi-arid environment on the Loess Plateau, China.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zi-Qiang; Yu, Kai-Liang; Epstein, Howard; Fang, Chao; Li, Jun-Ting; Liu, Qian-Qian; Liu, Xue-Wei; Gao, Wen-Juan; Li, Feng-Min

    2016-01-15

    Revegetation facilitated by legume species introduction has been used for soil erosion control on the Loess Plateau, China. However, it is still unclear how vegetation and soil resources develop during this restoration process, especially over the longer term. In this study, we investigated the changes of plant aboveground biomass, vegetation cover, species richness and density of all individuals, and soil total nitrogen, mineral nitrogen, total phosphorus and available phosphorus over 11 years from 2003 to 2013 in three treatments (natural revegetation, Medicago sativa L. introduction and Melilotus suaveolens L. introduction) on the semi-arid Loess Plateau. Medicago significantly increased aboveground biomass and vegetation cover, and soil total nitrogen and mineral nitrogen contents. The Medicago treatment had lower species richness and density of all individuals, lower soil moisture in the deep soil (i.e., 1.4-5m), and lower soil available phosphorus. Melilotus introduction significantly increased aboveground biomass in only the first two years, and it was not an effective approach to improve vegetation biomass and cover, and soil nutrients, especially in later stages of revegetation. Overall, our study suggests that M. sativa can be the preferred plant species for revegetation of degraded ecosystems on the Loess Plateau, although phosphorus fertilizer should be applied for the sustainability of the revegetation.

  6. Development of a computer tool to detect and classify nodules in ultrasound breast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcomini, Karem D.; Carneiro, Antonio O.; Schiabel, Homero

    2014-03-01

    Due to the high incidence rate of breast cancer in women, many procedures have been developed to assist the diagnosis and early detection. Currently, ultrasonography has proved as a useful tool in distinguishing benign and malignant masses. In this context, the computer-aided diagnosis schemes have provided to the specialist a second opinion more accurately and reliably, minimizing the visual subjectivity between observers. Thus, we propose the application of an automatic detection method based on the use of the technique of active contour in order to show precisely the contour of the lesion and provide a better understanding of their morphology. For this, a total of 144 images of phantoms were segmented and submitted to morphological operations of opening and closing for smoothing the edges. Then morphological features were extracted and selected to work as input parameters for the neural classifier Multilayer Perceptron which obtained 95.34% correct classification of data and Az of 0.96.

  7. Phosphoserine aminotransferase in soybean root nodules : demonstration and localization.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, P H; Blevins, D G

    1986-05-01

    Phosphoserine aminotransferase activity was detected in the plant and bacteroid fractions from soybean (Glycine max) root nodules. Both total and specific activities increased in the plant fraction during nodule development. Serine-pyruvate aminotransferase activity was not detectable in the plant or bacteroid fractions of these nodules. Sucrose density gradient fractionation indicated a proplastid localization for phosphoserine aminotransferase. The data presented support a role for this enzyme in carbon supply to purine biosynthesis in the pathway of ureide biogenesis in soybean nodules.

  8. Reactive Oxygen Species and Nitric Oxide Control Early Steps of the Legume - Rhizobium Symbiotic Interaction.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Isabelle; Pauly, Nicolas; Puppo, Alain; Brouquisse, Renaud; Boscari, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    The symbiotic interaction between legumes and nitrogen-fixing rhizobium bacteria leads to the formation of a new organ, the nodule. Early steps of the interaction are characterized by the production of bacterial Nod factors, the reorientation of root-hair tip growth, the formation of an infection thread (IT) in the root hair, and the induction of cell division in inner cortical cells of the root, leading to a nodule primordium formation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) have been detected in early steps of the interaction. ROS/NO are determinant signals to arbitrate the specificity of this mutualistic association and modifications in their content impair the development of the symbiotic association. The decrease of ROS level prevents root hair curling and ITs formation, and that of NO conducts to delayed nodule formation. In root hairs, NADPH oxidases were shown to produce ROS which could be involved in the hair tip growth process. The use of enzyme inhibitors suggests that nitrate reductase and NO synthase-like enzymes are the main route for NO production during the early steps of the interaction. Transcriptomic analyses point to the involvement of ROS and NO in the success of the infection process, the induction of early nodulin gene expression, and the repression of plant defense, thereby favoring the establishment of the symbiosis. The occurrence of an interplay between ROS and NO was further supported by the finding of both S-sulfenylated and S-nitrosylated proteins during early symbiotic interaction, linking ROS/NO production to a redox-based regulation of the symbiotic process. PMID:27092165

  9. Reactive Oxygen Species and Nitric Oxide Control Early Steps of the Legume – Rhizobium Symbiotic Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Damiani, Isabelle; Pauly, Nicolas; Puppo, Alain; Brouquisse, Renaud; Boscari, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    The symbiotic interaction between legumes and nitrogen-fixing rhizobium bacteria leads to the formation of a new organ, the nodule. Early steps of the interaction are characterized by the production of bacterial Nod factors, the reorientation of root-hair tip growth, the formation of an infection thread (IT) in the root hair, and the induction of cell division in inner cortical cells of the root, leading to a nodule primordium formation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) have been detected in early steps of the interaction. ROS/NO are determinant signals to arbitrate the specificity of this mutualistic association and modifications in their content impair the development of the symbiotic association. The decrease of ROS level prevents root hair curling and ITs formation, and that of NO conducts to delayed nodule formation. In root hairs, NADPH oxidases were shown to produce ROS which could be involved in the hair tip growth process. The use of enzyme inhibitors suggests that nitrate reductase and NO synthase-like enzymes are the main route for NO production during the early steps of the interaction. Transcriptomic analyses point to the involvement of ROS and NO in the success of the infection process, the induction of early nodulin gene expression, and the repression of plant defense, thereby favoring the establishment of the symbiosis. The occurrence of an interplay between ROS and NO was further supported by the finding of both S-sulfenylated and S-nitrosylated proteins during early symbiotic interaction, linking ROS/NO production to a redox-based regulation of the symbiotic process. PMID:27092165

  10. Identifying genes involved in nodulation and symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) in Phaseolus vulgaris using RNAseq technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean) is one of the most important grain legumes for direct human consumption. It comprises 50% of the grain legumes consumed worldwide and is important as a primary source of dietary protein in developing countries. Legumes form a unique symbiotic relationship with rhizob...

  11. Bradyrhizobium BclA Is a Peptide Transporter Required for Bacterial Differentiation in Symbiosis with Aeschynomene Legumes.

    PubMed

    Guefrachi, Ibtissem; Pierre, Olivier; Timchenko, Tatiana; Alunni, Benoît; Barrière, Quentin; Czernic, Pierre; Villaécija-Aguilar, José-Antonio; Verly, Camille; Bourge, Mickaël; Fardoux, Joël; Mars, Mohamed; Kondorosi, Eva; Giraud, Eric; Mergaert, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Nodules of legume plants are highly integrated symbiotic systems shaped by millions of years of evolution. They harbor nitrogen-fixing rhizobium bacteria called bacteroids. Several legume species produce peptides called nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides in the symbiotic nodule cells which house the bacteroids. NCR peptides are related to antimicrobial peptides of innate immunity. They induce the endosymbionts into a differentiated, enlarged, and polyploid state. The bacterial symbionts, on their side, evolved functions for the response to the NCR peptides. Here, we identified the bclA gene of Bradyrhizobium sp. strains ORS278 and ORS285, which is required for the formation of differentiated and functional bacteroids in the nodules of the NCR peptide-producing Aeschynomene legumes. The BclA ABC transporter promotes the import of NCR peptides and provides protection against the antimicrobial activity of these peptides. Moreover, BclA can complement the role of the related BacA transporter of Sinorhizobium meliloti, which has a similar symbiotic function in the interaction with Medicago legumes.

  12. Bradyrhizobium BclA Is a Peptide Transporter Required for Bacterial Differentiation in Symbiosis with Aeschynomene Legumes.

    PubMed

    Guefrachi, Ibtissem; Pierre, Olivier; Timchenko, Tatiana; Alunni, Benoît; Barrière, Quentin; Czernic, Pierre; Villaécija-Aguilar, José-Antonio; Verly, Camille; Bourge, Mickaël; Fardoux, Joël; Mars, Mohamed; Kondorosi, Eva; Giraud, Eric; Mergaert, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Nodules of legume plants are highly integrated symbiotic systems shaped by millions of years of evolution. They harbor nitrogen-fixing rhizobium bacteria called bacteroids. Several legume species produce peptides called nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides in the symbiotic nodule cells which house the bacteroids. NCR peptides are related to antimicrobial peptides of innate immunity. They induce the endosymbionts into a differentiated, enlarged, and polyploid state. The bacterial symbionts, on their side, evolved functions for the response to the NCR peptides. Here, we identified the bclA gene of Bradyrhizobium sp. strains ORS278 and ORS285, which is required for the formation of differentiated and functional bacteroids in the nodules of the NCR peptide-producing Aeschynomene legumes. The BclA ABC transporter promotes the import of NCR peptides and provides protection against the antimicrobial activity of these peptides. Moreover, BclA can complement the role of the related BacA transporter of Sinorhizobium meliloti, which has a similar symbiotic function in the interaction with Medicago legumes. PMID:26106901

  13. Mutualism and Adaptive Divergence: Co-Invasion of a Heterogeneous Grassland by an Exotic Legume-Rhizobium Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Stephanie S.; Stanton, Maureen L.; Rice, Kevin J.

    2011-01-01

    Species interactions play a critical role in biological invasions. For example, exotic plant and microbe mutualists can facilitate each other's spread as they co-invade novel ranges. Environmental context may influence the effect of mutualisms on invasions in heterogeneous environments, however these effects are poorly understood. We examined the mutualism between the legume, Medicago polymorpha, and the rhizobium, Ensifer medicae, which have both invaded California grasslands. Many of these invaded grasslands are composed of a patchwork of harsh serpentine and relatively benign non-serpentine soils. We grew legume genotypes collected from serpentine or non-serpentine soil in both types of soil in combination with rhizobium genotypes from serpentine or non-serpentine soils and in the absence of rhizobia. Legumes invested more strongly in the mutualism in the home soil type and trends in fitness suggested that this ecotypic divergence was adaptive. Serpentine legumes had greater allocation to symbiotic root nodules in serpentine soil than did non-serpentine legumes and non-serpentine legumes had greater allocation to nodules in non-serpentine soil than did serpentine legumes. Therefore, this invasive legume has undergone the rapid evolution of divergence for soil-specific investment in the mutualism. Contrary to theoretical expectations, the mutualism was less beneficial for legumes grown on the stressful serpentine soil than on the non-serpentine soil, possibly due to the inhibitory effects of serpentine on the benefits derived from the interaction. The soil-specific ability to allocate to a robust microbial mutualism may be a critical, and previously overlooked, adaptation for plants adapting to heterogeneous environments during invasion. PMID:22174755

  14. Large-scale development of cost-effective SNP marker assays for diversity assessment and genetic mapping in chickpea and comparative mapping in legumes

    PubMed Central

    Hiremath, Pavana J; Kumar, Ashish; Penmetsa, Ramachandra Varma; Farmer, Andrew; Schlueter, Jessica A; Chamarthi, Siva K; Whaley, Adam M; Carrasquilla-Garcia, Noelia; Gaur, Pooran M; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Kavi Kishor, Polavarapu B; Shah, Trushar M; Cook, Douglas R; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2012-01-01

    A set of 2486 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were compiled in chickpea using four approaches, namely (i) Solexa/Illumina sequencing (1409), (ii) amplicon sequencing of tentative orthologous genes (TOGs) (604), (iii) mining of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) (286) and (iv) sequencing of candidate genes (187). Conversion of these SNPs to the cost-effective and flexible throughput Competitive Allele Specific PCR (KASPar) assays generated successful assays for 2005 SNPs. These marker assays have been designated as Chickpea KASPar Assay Markers (CKAMs). Screening of 70 genotypes including 58 diverse chickpea accessions and 12 BC3F2 lines showed 1341 CKAMs as being polymorphic. Genetic analysis of these data clustered chickpea accessions based on geographical origin. Genotyping data generated for 671 CKAMs on the reference mapping population (Cicer arietinum ICC 4958 × Cicer reticulatum PI 489777) were compiled with 317 unpublished TOG-SNPs and 396 published markers for developing the genetic map. As a result, a second-generation genetic map comprising 1328 marker loci including novel 625 CKAMs, 314 TOG-SNPs and 389 published marker loci with an average inter-marker distance of 0.59 cM was constructed. Detailed analyses of 1064 mapped loci of this second-generation chickpea genetic map showed a higher degree of synteny with genome of Medicago truncatula, followed by Glycine max, Lotus japonicus and least with Vigna unguiculata. Development of these cost-effective CKAMs for SNP genotyping will be useful not only for genetics research and breeding applications in chickpea, but also for utilizing genome information from other sequenced or model legumes. PMID:22703242

  15. Trade-Offs between Economic and Environmental Impacts of Introducing Legumes into Cropping Systems.

    PubMed

    Reckling, Moritz; Bergkvist, Göran; Watson, Christine A; Stoddard, Frederick L; Zander, Peter M; Walker, Robin L; Pristeri, Aurelio; Toncea, Ion; Bachinger, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Europe's agriculture is highly specialized, dependent on external inputs and responsible for negative environmental impacts. Legume crops are grown on less than 2% of the arable land and more than 70% of the demand for protein feed supplement is imported from overseas. The integration of legumes into cropping systems has the potential to contribute to the transition to a more resource-efficient agriculture and reduce the current protein deficit. Legume crops influence the production of other crops in the rotation making it difficult to evaluate the overall agronomic effects of legumes in cropping systems. A novel assessment framework was developed and applied in five case study regions across Europe with the objective of evaluating trade-offs between economic and environmental effects of integrating legumes into cropping systems. Legumes resulted in positive and negative impacts when integrated into various cropping systems across the case studies. On average, cropping systems with legumes reduced nitrous oxide emissions by 18 and 33% and N fertilizer use by 24 and 38% in arable and forage systems, respectively, compared to systems without legumes. Nitrate leaching was similar with and without legumes in arable systems and reduced by 22% in forage systems. However, grain legumes reduced gross margins in 3 of 5 regions. Forage legumes increased gross margins in 3 of 3 regions. Among the cropping systems with legumes, systems could be identified that had both relatively high economic returns and positive environmental impacts. Thus, increasing the cultivation of legumes could lead to economic competitive cropping systems and positive environmental impacts, but achieving this aim requires the development of novel management strategies informed by the involvement of advisors and farmers. PMID:27242870

  16. Trade-Offs between Economic and Environmental Impacts of Introducing Legumes into Cropping Systems

    PubMed Central

    Reckling, Moritz; Bergkvist, Göran; Watson, Christine A.; Stoddard, Frederick L.; Zander, Peter M.; Walker, Robin L.; Pristeri, Aurelio; Toncea, Ion; Bachinger, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Europe's agriculture is highly specialized, dependent on external inputs and responsible for negative environmental impacts. Legume crops are grown on less than 2% of the arable land and more than 70% of the demand for protein feed supplement is imported from overseas. The integration of legumes into cropping systems has the potential to contribute to the transition to a more resource-efficient agriculture and reduce the current protein deficit. Legume crops influence the production of other crops in the rotation making it difficult to evaluate the overall agronomic effects of legumes in cropping systems. A novel assessment framework was developed and applied in five case study regions across Europe with the objective of evaluating trade-offs between economic and environmental effects of integrating legumes into cropping systems. Legumes resulted in positive and negative impacts when integrated into various cropping systems across the case studies. On average, cropping systems with legumes reduced nitrous oxide emissions by 18 and 33% and N fertilizer use by 24 and 38% in arable and forage systems, respectively, compared to systems without legumes. Nitrate leaching was similar with and without legumes in arable systems and reduced by 22% in forage systems. However, grain legumes reduced gross margins in 3 of 5 regions. Forage legumes increased gross margins in 3 of 3 regions. Among the cropping systems with legumes, systems could be identified that had both relatively high economic returns and positive environmental impacts. Thus, increasing the cultivation of legumes could lead to economic competitive cropping systems and positive environmental impacts, but achieving this aim requires the development of novel management strategies informed by the involvement of advisors and farmers. PMID:27242870

  17. Interactions between ethylene, gibberellins, and brassinosteroids in the development of rhizobial and mycorrhizal symbioses of pea

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Eloise; McAdam, Erin L.; Weller, James L.; Reid, James B.

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of arbuscular mycorrhizal development and nodulation involves complex interactions between the plant and its microbial symbionts. In this study, we use the recently identified ethylene-insensitive ein2 mutant in pea (Pisum sativum L.) to explore the role of ethylene in the development of these symbioses. We show that ethylene acts as a strong negative regulator of nodulation, confirming reports in other legumes. Minor changes in gibberellin1 and indole-3-acetic acid levels in ein2 roots appear insufficient to explain the differences in nodulation. Double mutants produced by crosses between ein2 and the severely gibberellin-deficient na and brassinosteroid-deficient lk mutants showed increased nodule numbers and reduced nodule spacing compared with the na and lk single mutants, but nodule numbers and spacing were typical of ein2 plants, suggesting that the reduced number of nodules in na and lk plants is largely due to the elevated ethylene levels previously reported in these mutants. We show that ethylene can also negatively regulate mycorrhizae development when ethylene levels are elevated above basal levels, consistent with a role for ethylene in reducing symbiotic development under stressful conditions. In contrast to the hormone interactions in nodulation, ein2 does not override the effect of lk or na on the development of arbuscular mycorrhizae, suggesting that brassinosteroids and gibberellins influence this process largely independently of ethylene. PMID:26889005

  18. Interactions between ethylene, gibberellins, and brassinosteroids in the development of rhizobial and mycorrhizal symbioses of pea.

    PubMed

    Foo, Eloise; McAdam, Erin L; Weller, James L; Reid, James B

    2016-04-01

    The regulation of arbuscular mycorrhizal development and nodulation involves complex interactions between the plant and its microbial symbionts. In this study, we use the recently identified ethylene-insensitive ein2 mutant in pea (Pisum sativum L.) to explore the role of ethylene in the development of these symbioses. We show that ethylene acts as a strong negative regulator of nodulation, confirming reports in other legumes. Minor changes in gibberellin1 and indole-3-acetic acid levels in ein2 roots appear insufficient to explain the differences in nodulation. Double mutants produced by crosses between ein2 and the severely gibberellin-deficient na and brassinosteroid-deficient lk mutants showed increased nodule numbers and reduced nodule spacing compared with the na and lk single mutants, but nodule numbers and spacing were typical of ein2 plants, suggesting that the reduced number of nodules innaandlkplants is largely due to the elevated ethylene levels previously reported in these mutants. We show that ethylene can also negatively regulate mycorrhizae development when ethylene levels are elevated above basal levels, consistent with a role for ethylene in reducing symbiotic development under stressful conditions. In contrast to the hormone interactions in nodulation, ein2 does not override the effect of lk or na on the development of arbuscular mycorrhizae, suggesting that brassinosteroids and gibberellins influence this process largely independently of ethylene.

  19. Root nodule bacteria from Clitoria ternatea L. are putative invasive nonrhizobial endophytes.

    PubMed

    Aeron, Abhinav; Chauhan, Puneet Singh; Dubey, Ramesh Chand; Maheshwari, Dinesh Kumar; Bajpai, Vivek K

    2015-02-01

    In this study, bacteria (8 species and 5 genera) belonging to the classes Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Sphingobacteria were isolated from root nodules of the multipurpose legume Clitoria ternatea L. and identified on the basis of partial 16S rRNA sequencing. The root nodule bacteria were subjected to phenotypic clustering and diversity studies using biochemical kits, including Hi-Media Carbokit™, Enterobacteriaceae™ identification kit, ERIC-PCR, and 16S ARDRA. All the strains showed growth on Ashby's N-free media over 7 generations, indicative of presumptive nitrogen fixation and further confirmed by amplification of the nifH gene. None of the strains showed the capability to renodulate the host plant, neither alone nor in combination with standard rhizobial strains, which was further confirmed by the absence of nodC bands in PCR assay. The results clearly indicate the common existence of nonrhizobial microflora inside the root nodules of legumes, which were thought to be colonized only by rhizobia and were responsible for N2 fixation in leguminous crops. However, with the recent discovery of nodule endophytes from a variety of legumes, as also observed here, it can be assumed that symbiotic rhizobia are not all alone and that these invasive endophytes belonging to various bacterial genera are more than just opportunistic colonizers of specialized nodule niche. PMID:25619106

  20. Pleiotropic effect of fluoranthene on anthocyanin synthesis and nodulation of Medicago sativa is reversed by the plant flavone luteolin

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, A.; Parniske, M.; Werner, D.

    1995-05-01

    The symbiosis between leguminous plants and soil bacteria of the genus Rhizobium is of considerable agronominal importance. Recently it has been found, that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs; e.g. anthracene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene), occurring as ubiquitous environmental contaminants can inhibit nodulation of Medicago sativa. Fluoranthene is one of the dominant PAHs found in urban particulate matter, sewage sludge or beside motorways. Several organisms have been shown to be able to metabolize and mineralize fluoranthene but the uptake of fluoranthene is limited due to low solubility of fluoranthene in water and strong adsorption to humic substances in soil. Rhizobium meliloti cannot degrade fluoranthene. Toxic effects of fluoranthene on bacterial growth have never been observed. In contrast to their rhizobial symbiotic partners, alfalfa plants grown on a solidified fluoranthene-containing medium, exhibited symptoms of toxicity. They showed a dose-responsive decrease in shoot length and, if inoculated with R. meliloti, inhibition of nodule formation. Growth retardation is accompanied by a decrease in anthocyanin pigmentation of shoots, and an atypical accumulation of anthocyanins in roots. Plant flavonoids are known to play a central role in the signal exchange of the Legume-Rhizobium symbiosis. Phenylpropane derived compounds and flavonoids have been implicated in nodule development. Since fluoranthene impairs nodulation and induces the production of anthocyanins, it is possible that these events are causally linked via phenylpropanoid metabolism. These experiments attempt to overcome the inhibitory effects of fluoranthene by exogeneous application of the flavonoid luteolin. This paper demonstrates that luteolin antagonizes the fluoranthene mediated inhibition of nodule formation and prevents the accumulation of anthocyanins in roots. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. A Rapid Regulatory Response Governing Nodulation in Soybean 1

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Margaret; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    1983-01-01

    The number of nodules which develop on the primary root of soybean seedlings (Glycine max L. Merr) after inoculation with Rhizobium japonicum is substantially diminished in the region of the root developmentally 10 to 15 hours younger than the region maximally susceptible to nodulation at the time of inoculation. This rapid inhibition of nodulation has been investigated by inoculating soybean seedlings with rhizobia at two different times, 15 hours apart. Living R. japonicum cells, but not heterologous rhizobia or UV-killed cells of the homologous bacterium, were capable of eliciting the rapid inhibitory response. Nodulation responses to varying inoculum concentrations showed that bacterial dosages could be superoptimal, resulting in reduced nodulation and reduced inhibition of nodulation. When suspensions of R. japonicum were dripped uniformly onto the root surfaces, the degree of inhibition of nodulation in developmentally younger regions of the root was correlated with the number of nodules formed in the older and initially most susceptible region of the root. Nodulation in the developmentally younger region of the root, however, was affected very little if the first inoculum was restricted to contact with root cells in the region initially most susceptible to nodulation. The rapid regulatory response may be an important factor contributing to the clustering of nodules in the crown region of soybean roots in field-grown plants and the sparse nodulation commonly observed in younger regions of the root. PMID:16663209

  2. Medicago truncatula and Glycine max: Different Drought Tolerance and Similar Local Response of the Root Nodule Proteome.

    PubMed

    Gil-Quintana, Erena; Lyon, David; Staudinger, Christiana; Wienkoop, Stefanie; González, Esther M

    2015-12-01

    Legume crops present important agronomical and environmental advantages mainly due to their capacity to reduce atmospheric N2 to ammonium via symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF). This process is very sensitive to abiotic stresses such as drought, but the mechanism underlying this response is not fully understood. The goal of the current work is to compare the drought response of two legumes with high economic impact and research importance, Medicago truncatula and Glycine max, by characterizing their root nodule proteomes. Our results show that, although M. truncatula exhibits lower water potential values under drought conditions compared to G. max, SNF declined analogously in the two legumes. Both of their nodule proteomes are very similar, and comparable down-regulation responses in the diverse protein functional groups were identified (mainly proteins related to the metabolism of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur). We suggest lipoxygenases and protein turnover as newly recognized players in SNF regulation. Partial drought conditions applied to a split-root system resulted in the local down-regulation of the entire proteome of drought-stressed nodules in both legumes. The high degree of similarity between both legume proteomes suggests that the vast amount of research conducted on M. truncatula could be applied to economically important legume crops, such as soybean.

  3. Medicago truncatula and Glycine max: Different Drought Tolerance and Similar Local Response of the Root Nodule Proteome

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Legume crops present important agronomical and environmental advantages mainly due to their capacity to reduce atmospheric N2 to ammonium via symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF). This process is very sensitive to abiotic stresses such as drought, but the mechanism underlying this response is not fully understood. The goal of the current work is to compare the drought response of two legumes with high economic impact and research importance, Medicago truncatula and Glycine max, by characterizing their root nodule proteomes. Our results show that, although M. truncatula exhibits lower water potential values under drought conditions compared to G. max, SNF declined analogously in the two legumes. Both of their nodule proteomes are very similar, and comparable down-regulation responses in the diverse protein functional groups were identified (mainly proteins related to the metabolism of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur). We suggest lipoxygenases and protein turnover as newly recognized players in SNF regulation. Partial drought conditions applied to a split-root system resulted in the local down-regulation of the entire proteome of drought-stressed nodules in both legumes. The high degree of similarity between both legume proteomes suggests that the vast amount of research conducted on M. truncatula could be applied to economically important legume crops, such as soybean. PMID:26503705

  4. Penile Epithelioid Angiomatoid Nodule.

    PubMed

    Pirpiris, Athina; Gilbourd, Daniel; Ranasinghe, Anudini; Dill, Tony; Lynnhtun, Kyaw; Rindani, Rahul

    2015-10-01

    Cutaneous epithelioid angiomatoid nodule is a rare clinical entity that is common on the trunk and limbs. This is the first report of penile cutaneous epithelioid angiomatoid nodule. Although it is a benign entity, it must be differentiated from vascular neoplasms, as it can bear similar clinical and pathologic features. PMID:26171823

  5. Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins in legumes.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Marina; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2013-01-01

    Plants are exposed to different external conditions that affect growth, development, and productivity. Water deficit is one of these adverse conditions caused by drought, salinity, and extreme temperatures. Plants have developed different responses to prevent, ameliorate or repair the damage inflicted by these stressful environments. One of these responses is the activation of a set of genes encoding a group of hydrophilic proteins that typically accumulate to high levels during seed dehydration, at the last stage of embryogenesis, hence named Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins. LEA proteins also accumulate in response to water limitation in vegetative tissues, and have been classified in seven groups based on their amino acid sequence similarity and on the presence of distinctive conserved motifs. These proteins are widely distributed in the plant kingdom, from ferns to angiosperms, suggesting a relevant role in the plant response to this unfavorable environmental condition. In this review, we analyzed the LEA proteins from those legumes whose complete genomes have been sequenced such as Phaseolus vulgaris, Glycine max, Medicago truncatula, Lotus japonicus, Cajanus cajan, and Cicer arietinum. Considering their distinctive motifs, LEA proteins from the different groups were identified, and their sequence analysis allowed the recognition of novel legume specific motifs. Moreover, we compile their transcript accumulation patterns based on publicly available data. In spite of the limited information on these proteins in legumes, the analysis and data compiled here confirm the high correlation between their accumulation and water deficit, reinforcing their functional relevance under this detrimental conditions. PMID:23805145

  6. Grain and legume allergy.

    PubMed

    Ito, Komei

    2015-01-01

    Among grains and legumes, wheat and soybean are the most frequent and well-characterized allergenic foods. Wheat proteins are divided into water/salt-soluble and water/salt-insoluble (gluten) fractions. The most dominant allergen in the former is α-amylase/trypsin inhibitor, which acts as an inhaled allergen causing baker's asthma. Gluten allergens, including ω-5 gliadin and high- and low-molecular-weight glutenins, contribute to wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis in adults and immediate-type wheat allergies, including anaphylaxis, in children. Recently, wheat allergies exclusively caused by hydrolyzed wheat proteins or deamidated glutens have been reported, and the presence of unique IgE-binding epitopes has been suggested. Soybean allergens contributing to immediate-type allergic reactions in children are present in seed storage proteins, namely Gly m 5, Gly m 6 and Gly m 8. However, pollen-related soybean allergy in adults is caused by the Bet v 1 homolog of soybeans, Gly m 4. Taken together, the varying clinical manifestations of wheat and soybean allergies are predominantly caused by their different allergen components.

  7. Loss of the nodule-specific cysteine rich peptide, NCR169, abolishes symbiotic nitrogen fixation in the Medicago truncatula dnf7 mutant

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Beatrix; Domonkos, Ágota; Szűcs, Attila; Ábrahám, Edit; Ayaydin, Ferhan; Bóka, Károly; Chen, Yuhui; Chen, Rujin; Murray, Jeremy D.; Udvardi, Michael K.; Kondorosi, Éva; Kaló, Péter

    2015-01-01

    Host compatible rhizobia induce the formation of legume root nodules, symbiotic organs within which intracellular bacteria are present in plant-derived membrane compartments termed symbiosomes. In Medicago truncatula nodules, the Sinorhizobium microsymbionts undergo an irreversible differentiation process leading to the development of elongated polyploid noncultivable nitrogen fixing bacteroids that convert atmospheric dinitrogen into ammonia. This terminal differentiation is directed by the host plant and involves hundreds of nodule specific cysteine-rich peptides (NCRs). Except for certain in vitro activities of cationic peptides, the functional roles of individual NCR peptides in planta are not known. In this study, we demonstrate that the inability of M. truncatula dnf7 mutants to fix nitrogen is due to inactivation of a single NCR peptide, NCR169. In the absence of NCR169, bacterial differentiation was impaired and was associated with early senescence of the symbiotic cells. Introduction of the NCR169 gene into the dnf7-2/NCR169 deletion mutant restored symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Replacement of any of the cysteine residues in the NCR169 peptide with serine rendered it incapable of complementation, demonstrating an absolute requirement for all cysteines in planta. NCR169 was induced in the cell layers in which bacteroid elongation was most pronounced, and high expression persisted throughout the nitrogen-fixing nodule zone. Our results provide evidence for an essential role of NCR169 in the differentiation and persistence of nitrogen fixing bacteroids in M. truncatula. PMID:26401023

  8. Loss of the nodule-specific cysteine rich peptide, NCR169, abolishes symbiotic nitrogen fixation in the Medicago truncatula dnf7 mutant.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Beatrix; Domonkos, Ágota; Kereszt, Attila; Szűcs, Attila; Ábrahám, Edit; Ayaydin, Ferhan; Bóka, Károly; Chen, Yuhui; Chen, Rujin; Murray, Jeremy D; Udvardi, Michael K; Kondorosi, Éva; Kaló, Péter

    2015-12-01

    Host compatible rhizobia induce the formation of legume root nodules, symbiotic organs within which intracellular bacteria are present in plant-derived membrane compartments termed symbiosomes. In Medicago truncatula nodules, the Sinorhizobium microsymbionts undergo an irreversible differentiation process leading to the development of elongated polyploid noncultivable nitrogen fixing bacteroids that convert atmospheric dinitrogen into ammonia. This terminal differentiation is directed by the host plant and involves hundreds of nodule specific cysteine-rich peptides (NCRs). Except for certain in vitro activities of cationic peptides, the functional roles of individual NCR peptides in planta are not known. In this study, we demonstrate that the inability of M. truncatula dnf7 mutants to fix nitrogen is due to inactivation of a single NCR peptide, NCR169. In the absence of NCR169, bacterial differentiation was impaired and was associated with early senescence of the symbiotic cells. Introduction of the NCR169 gene into the dnf7-2/NCR169 deletion mutant restored symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Replacement of any of the cysteine residues in the NCR169 peptide with serine rendered it incapable of complementation, demonstrating an absolute requirement for all cysteines in planta. NCR169 was induced in the cell layers in which bacteroid elongation was most pronounced, and high expression persisted throughout the nitrogen-fixing nodule zone. Our results provide evidence for an essential role of NCR169 in the differentiation and persistence of nitrogen fixing bacteroids in M. truncatula.

  9. [An ovarian mucinous borderline tumour with mixed mural nodules].

    PubMed

    Dhouibi, A; Denoux, Y; Touil, N; Devouassoux Shisheboran, M; Carbonnel, M; Baglin, A C

    2011-09-01

    The occurrence of mural nodules in serous or mucinous ovarian tumours is not frequent. Mural nodule can be developed in benign, borderline or malignant tumours. They can be benign, malignant or mixed type. Thus the prognosis of the ovarian tumour can be dramatically modified by the presence if these nodules. Eighty-two cases of mural nodules were reported in the literature, among which we account four cases of mixed nodules type. We report an additional case of mixed type mural nodules of anaplastic carcinoma and sarcoma-like developed in an ovarian mucinous borderline tumour at a 60-year-old woman.We give details about the classification, the differential diagnosis and prognosis of theses nodules.

  10. Disulfide cross-linking influences symbiotic activities of nodule peptide NCR247.

    PubMed

    Shabab, Mohammed; Arnold, Markus F F; Penterman, Jon; Wommack, Andrew J; Bocker, Hartmut T; Price, Paul A; Griffitts, Joel S; Nolan, Elizabeth M; Walker, Graham C

    2016-09-01

    Interactions of rhizobia with legumes establish the chronic intracellular infection that underlies symbiosis. Within nodules of inverted repeat-lacking clade (IRLC) legumes, rhizobia differentiate into nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. This terminal differentiation is driven by host nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides that orchestrate the adaptation of free-living bacteria into intracellular residents. Medicago truncatula encodes a family of >700 NCR peptides that have conserved cysteine motifs. NCR247 is a cationic peptide with four cysteines that can form two intramolecular disulfide bonds in the oxidized forms. This peptide affects Sinorhizobium meliloti transcription, translation, and cell division at low concentrations and is antimicrobial at higher concentrations. By preparing the three possible disulfide-cross-linked NCR247 regioisomers, the reduced peptide, and a variant lacking cysteines, we performed a systematic study of the effects of intramolecular disulfide cross-linking and cysteines on the activities of an NCR peptide. The relative activities of the five NCR247 variants differed strikingly among the various bioassays, suggesting that the NCR peptide-based language used by plants to control the development of their bacterial partners during symbiosis is even greater than previously recognized. These patterns indicate that certain NCR bioactivities require cysteines whereas others do not. The results also suggest that NCR247 may exert some of its effects within the cell envelope whereas other activities occur in the cytoplasm. BacA, a membrane protein that is critical for symbiosis, provides protection against all bactericidal forms of NCR247. Oxidative folding protects NCR247 from degradation by the symbiotically relevant metalloprotease HrrP (host range restriction peptidase), suggesting that disulfide bond formation may additionally stabilize NCR peptides during symbiosis. PMID:27551097

  11. Development of a global, gridded, and time-series crop yield dataset for four major cereal and legume crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizumi, T.; Yokozawa, M.; Sakurai, G.

    2012-12-01

    Global, gridded crop yield data are essential to study impacts of climate variability and change on food production, atmosphere-soil-managed ecosystem carbon and nitrogen cycle at a global scale. However so far available data are limited to country, time-series data from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and global, gridded data in the circa 2000 from Monfreda et al. (2008). This necessitates an effort to develop a global, gridded, and time-series dataset. To that end we developed a 25-yr long (1982-2006) dataset with 1.125 x 1.125 grid size for maize, soybean, rice, and wheat by merging county statistics, FAO country statistics, and yield proxy from satellite products. Yield statistics were collected from agricultural agencies in 19 countries: those correspond to 58-95% of the global production in the 2000. The proportion for rice and wheat (58%) is less than those for maize (72%) and soybean (95%). Also net primary production (NPP) for that period was estimated crop by crop from the normalized differential vegetation index bi-monthly time series at 8-km resolution from the Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies group, using the method of Los et al. (2000). When estimating yield from NPP, for each crop, we used the following six procedures: (1) for a given grid where an intended crop grows (evaluated from harvested area from Monfreda et al. (2008)), accumulate NPP time series for the whole growth period from Sacks et al. (2010), considering the temporal distribution of planting/harvesting date through an ensemble calculation of 100 different planting/harvesting date; (2) average over accumulated NPPs that locate within a given country and compute the ratio of a grid NPP against a country mean (this represents the spatial variation of yield); (3) multiply this ratio and country FAO yield year by year; (4) calculate correction coefficient that is a ratio between estimated grid yield in the 2000 and that from Monfreda et al. (2000); (5) repeat (1

  12. Bradyrhizobium sp. Strains That Nodulate the Leguminous Tree Acacia albida Produce Fucosylated and Partially Sulfated Nod Factors

    PubMed Central

    Ferro, Myriam; Lorquin, Jean; Ba, Salif; Sanon, Kadidia; Promé, Jean-Claude; Boivin, Catherine

    2000-01-01

    We determined the structures of Nod factors produced by six different Bradyrhizobium sp. strains nodulating the legume tree Acacia albida (syn. Faidherbia albida). Compounds from all strains were found to be similar, i.e., O-carbamoylated and substituted by an often sulfated methyl fucose and different from compounds produced by Rhizobium-Mesorhizobium-Sinorhizobium strains nodulating other species of the Acaciae tribe. PMID:11055966

  13. Soybean nodulation and symbiotic nitrogen fixation in response to soil compaction and mulching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siczek, A.; Lipiec, J.

    2009-04-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation by legume crops such as soybean plays a key role in supplying nitrogen for agricultural systems. In symbiotic associations with Bradyrhizobium japonicum soybean can fix up to 200 kg N ha-1 yr-1. This reduces the need for expensive and often environmentally harmful because of leaching nitrogen fertilization. However both soybean nodulation and nitrogen fixation are sensitive to soil conditions. One of the critical soil constraints is soil compaction. Increasing use of heavy equipment and intensive cropping in modern agriculture leads to excessive soil compaction. Compaction often is found as a result of field operations that have to be performed in a very short period of time and when soils are wet and more susceptible to compaction. This results in unfavourable water content, temperature, aeration, pore size distribution, strength for plant growth and microbial activity. The surface mulching can alleviate the adverse effect of the environmental factors on soil by decreasing fluctuation of soil temperature, increasing moisture by controlling evaporation from the soil surface, decreasing bulk density, preventing soil crusting. The effect of mulch on soil conditions largely depends on soil compaction and weather conditions during growing season. The positive effect of the straw mulch on soil moisture has been seen under seasons with insufficient rainfalls. However thicker layers of mulch can act as diffusion barrier, especially when the mulch is wet. Additionally, low soil temperature prevalent during early spring under mulch can impede development of nodule, nodule size and delay onset of nodulation. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the straw mulch on nodulation and nitrogen fixation of soybean in variously compacted soil. The experimental field was 192 m2and was divided into three parts composed of 6 micro-plots with area 7 m2. Three degrees of soil compaction obtained in each field part through tractor passes were

  14. Quantitative trait locus analysis of symbiotic nitrogen fixation activity in the model legume Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Akiyoshi; Gondo, Takahiro; Akashi, Ryo; Zheng, Shao-Hui; Arima, Susumu; Suzuki, Akihiro

    2012-05-01

    Many legumes form nitrogen-fixing root nodules. An elevation of nitrogen fixation in such legumes would have significant implications for plant growth and biomass production in agriculture. To identify the genetic basis for the regulation of nitrogen fixation, quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis was conducted with recombinant inbred lines derived from the cross Miyakojima MG-20 × Gifu B-129 in the model legume Lotus japonicus. This population was inoculated with Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099 and grown for 14 days in pods containing vermiculite. Phenotypic data were collected for acetylene reduction activity (ARA) per plant (ARA/P), ARA per nodule weight (ARA/NW), ARA per nodule number (ARA/NN), NN per plant, NW per plant, stem length (SL), SL without inoculation (SLbac-), shoot dry weight without inoculation (SWbac-), root length without inoculation (RLbac-), and root dry weight (RWbac-), and finally 34 QTLs were identified. ARA/P, ARA/NN, NW, and SL showed strong correlations and QTL co-localization, suggesting that several plant characteristics important for symbiotic nitrogen fixation are controlled by the same locus. QTLs for ARA/P, ARA/NN, NW, and SL, co-localized around marker TM0832 on chromosome 4, were also co-localized with previously reported QTLs for seed mass. This is the first report of QTL analysis for symbiotic nitrogen fixation activity traits.

  15. A purple acid phosphatase plays a role in nodule formation and nitrogen fixation in Astragalus sinicus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianyun; Si, Zaiyong; Li, Fang; Xiong, Xiaobo; Lei, Lei; Xie, Fuli; Chen, Dasong; Li, Yixing; Li, Youguo

    2015-08-01

    The AsPPD1 gene from Astragalus sinicus encodes a purple acid phosphatase. To address the functions of AsPPD1 in legume-rhizobium symbiosis, its expression patterns, enzyme activity, subcellular localization, and phenotypes associated with its over-expression and RNA interference (RNAi) were investigated. The expression of AsPPD1 was up-regulated in roots and nodules after inoculation with rhizobia. Phosphate starvation reduced the levels of AsPPD1 transcripts in roots while increased those levels in nodules. We confirmed the acid phosphatase and phosphodiesterase activities of recombinant AsPPD1 purified from Pichia pastoris, and demonstrated its ability to hydrolyze ADP and ATP in vitro. Subcellular localization showed that AsPPD1 located on the plasma membranes in hairy roots and on the symbiosomes membranes in root nodules. Over-expression of AsPPD1 in hairy roots inhibited nodulation, while its silencing resulted in nodules early senescence and significantly decreased nitrogenase activity. Furthermore, HPLC measurement showed that AsPPD1 overexpression affects the ADP levels in the infected roots and nodules, AsPPD1 silencing affects the ratio of ATP/ADP and the energy charge in nodules, and quantitative observation demonstrated the changes of AsPPD1 transcripts level affected nodule primordia formation. Taken together, it is speculated that AsPPD1 contributes to symbiotic ADP levels and energy charge control, and this is required for effective nodule organogenesis and nitrogen fixation.

  16. Genetic diversity of root nodule bacteria nodulating Lotus corniculatus and Anthyllis vulneraria in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Ampomah, Osei Yaw; Huss-Danell, Kerstin

    2011-06-01

    Very little is known about the genetic diversity and phylogeny of rhizobia nodulating Lotus species in northern temperate regions. We have therefore studied the genetic diversity among a total of 61 root nodule bacteria isolated from Lotus corniculatus and Anthyllis vulneraria from different geographic sites and habitats in Sweden by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the internal transcribed spacer between their 16S rRNA and 23S rRNA (IGS) region. A high diversity consisting of 26 IGS types from 54 L. corniculatus isolates and five IGS types from seven A. vulneraria isolates was found. The 16S rRNA sequences and phylogeny of representatives of the different IGS types showed four interesting exceptions from the majority of the isolates belonging to the genus Mesorhizobium: Two isolates were both found to be closely related to Rhodococcus spp., and two other isolates showed close relationship with Geobacillus spp. and Paenibacillus spp., respectively. The nodA sequences and phylogeny showed that all the isolates, including those not belonging to the traditional rhizobia genera, harbored nodA sequences which were typical of Mesorhizobium loti. Generally, the 16S rRNA and nodA phylogenetic trees were not congruent in that isolates with similar 16S rRNA sequences were associated with isolates harboring different nodA sequences. All the isolates were confirmed to nodulate L. corniculatus in an inoculation test. This is the first report of members of these non-rhizobia genera being able to nodulate legumes, and we suggest that they may have acquired their nodulating properties through lateral gene transfer.

  17. Development of an efficient in vitro plant regeneration system amenable to Agrobacterium- mediated transformation of a recalcitrant grain legume blackgram (Vigna mungo L. Hepper).

    PubMed

    Sainger, Manish; Chaudhary, Darshna; Dahiya, Savita; Jaiwal, Ranjana; Jaiwal, Pawan K

    2015-10-01

    An efficient, rapid and direct multiple shoot regeneration system amenable to Agrobacterium-mediated transformation from primary leaf with intact petiole of blackgram (Vigna mungo) is established for the first time. The effect of the explant type and its age, type and concentration of cytokinin and auxin either alone or in combination and genotype on multiple shoot regeneration efficiency and frequency was optimized. The primary leaf explants with petiole excised from 4-day-old seedlings directly developed multiple shoots (an average of 10 shoots/ explant) from the cut ends of the petiole in 95 % of the cultures on MSB (MS salts and B5 vitamins) medium containing 1.0 μM 6-benzylaminopurine. Elongated (2-3 cm) shoots were rooted on MSB medium with 2.5 μM indole-butyric acid and resulted plantlets were hardened and established in soil, where they resumed growth and reached maturity with normal seed set. The regenerated plants were morphologically similar to seed-raised plants and required 8 weeks time from initiation of culture to establish them in soil. The regeneration competent cells present at the cut ends of petiole are fully exposed and are, thus, easily accessible to Agrobacterium, making this plant regeneration protocol amenable for the production of transgenic plants. The protocol was further successfully used to develop fertile transgenic plants of blackgram using Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA 105 carrying a binary vector pCAMBIA2301 that contains a neomycin phosphotransferase gene (nptII) and a β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene (uidA) interrupted with an intron. The presence and integration of transgenes in putative T0 plants were confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot hybridization, respectively. The transgenes were inherited in Mendelian fashion in T1 progeny and a transformation frequency of 1.3 % was obtained. This protocol can be effectively used for transferring new traits in blackgram and other legumes for their

  18. Development of an efficient in vitro plant regeneration system amenable to Agrobacterium- mediated transformation of a recalcitrant grain legume blackgram (Vigna mungo L. Hepper).

    PubMed

    Sainger, Manish; Chaudhary, Darshna; Dahiya, Savita; Jaiwal, Ranjana; Jaiwal, Pawan K

    2015-10-01

    An efficient, rapid and direct multiple shoot regeneration system amenable to Agrobacterium-mediated transformation from primary leaf with intact petiole of blackgram (Vigna mungo) is established for the first time. The effect of the explant type and its age, type and concentration of cytokinin and auxin either alone or in combination and genotype on multiple shoot regeneration efficiency and frequency was optimized. The primary leaf explants with petiole excised from 4-day-old seedlings directly developed multiple shoots (an average of 10 shoots/ explant) from the cut ends of the petiole in 95 % of the cultures on MSB (MS salts and B5 vitamins) medium containing 1.0 μM 6-benzylaminopurine. Elongated (2-3 cm) shoots were rooted on MSB medium with 2.5 μM indole-butyric acid and resulted plantlets were hardened and established in soil, where they resumed growth and reached maturity with normal seed set. The regenerated plants were morphologically similar to seed-raised plants and required 8 weeks time from initiation of culture to establish them in soil. The regeneration competent cells present at the cut ends of petiole are fully exposed and are, thus, easily accessible to Agrobacterium, making this plant regeneration protocol amenable for the production of transgenic plants. The protocol was further successfully used to develop fertile transgenic plants of blackgram using Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA 105 carrying a binary vector pCAMBIA2301 that contains a neomycin phosphotransferase gene (nptII) and a β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene (uidA) interrupted with an intron. The presence and integration of transgenes in putative T0 plants were confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot hybridization, respectively. The transgenes were inherited in Mendelian fashion in T1 progeny and a transformation frequency of 1.3 % was obtained. This protocol can be effectively used for transferring new traits in blackgram and other legumes for their

  19. Priority regions for research on dryland cereals and legumes.

    PubMed

    Hyman, Glenn; Barona, Elizabeth; Biradar, Chandrashekhar; Guevara, Edward; Dixon, John; Beebe, Steve; Castano, Silvia Elena; Alabi, Tunrayo; Gumma, Murali Krishna; Sivasankar, Shoba; Rivera, Ovidio; Espinosa, Herlin; Cardona, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Dryland cereals and legumes  are important crops in farming systems across the world.  Yet they are frequently neglected among the priorities for international agricultural research and development, often due to lack of information on their magnitude and extent. Given what we know about the global distribution of dryland cereals and legumes, what regions should be high priority for research and development to improve livelihoods and food security? This research evaluated the geographic dimensions of these crops and the farming systems where they are found worldwide. The study employed geographic information science and data to assess the key farming systems and regions for these crops. Dryland cereal and legume crops should be given high priority in 18 farming systems worldwide, where their cultivated area comprises more than 160 million ha. These regions include the dryer areas of South Asia, West and East Africa, the Middle East and North Africa, Central America and other parts of Asia. These regions are prone to drought and heat stress, have limiting soil constraints, make up half of the global population and account for 60 percent of the global poor and malnourished. The dryland cereal and legume crops and farming systems merit more research and development attention to improve productivity and address development problems. This project developed an open access dataset and information resource that provides the basis for future analysis of the geographic dimensions of dryland cereals and legumes. PMID:27303632

  20. Priority regions for research on dryland cereals and legumes

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, Glenn; Barona, Elizabeth; Biradar, Chandrashekhar; Guevara, Edward; Dixon, John; Beebe, Steve; Castano, Silvia Elena; Alabi, Tunrayo; Gumma, Murali Krishna; Sivasankar, Shoba; Rivera, Ovidio; Espinosa, Herlin; Cardona, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Dryland cereals and legumes  are important crops in farming systems across the world.  Yet they are frequently neglected among the priorities for international agricultural research and development, often due to lack of information on their magnitude and extent. Given what we know about the global distribution of dryland cereals and legumes, what regions should be high priority for research and development to improve livelihoods and food security? This research evaluated the geographic dimensions of these crops and the farming systems where they are found worldwide. The study employed geographic information science and data to assess the key farming systems and regions for these crops. Dryland cereal and legume crops should be given high priority in 18 farming systems worldwide, where their cultivated area comprises more than 160 million ha. These regions include the dryer areas of South Asia, West and East Africa, the Middle East and North Africa, Central America and other parts of Asia. These regions are prone to drought and heat stress, have limiting soil constraints, make up half of the global population and account for 60 percent of the global poor and malnourished. The dryland cereal and legume crops and farming systems merit more research and development attention to improve productivity and address development problems. This project developed an open access dataset and information resource that provides the basis for future analysis of the geographic dimensions of dryland cereals and legumes. PMID:27303632

  1. Diffusion Limitation of Oxygen Uptake and Nitrogenase Activity in the Root Nodules of Parasponia rigida Merr. and Perry 1

    PubMed Central

    Tjepkema, John D.; Cartica, Robert J.

    1982-01-01

    Parasponia is the first non-legume genus proven to form nitrogen-fixing root nodules induced by rhizobia. Infiltration with India ink demonstrated that intercellular air spaces are lacking in the inner layers of the nodule cortex. Oxygen must diffuse through these layers to reach the cells containing the rhizobia, and it was calculated that most of the gradient in O2 partial pressure between the atmosphere and rhizobia occurs at the inner cortex. This was confirmed by O2 microelectrode measurements which showed that the O2 partial pressure was much lower in the zone of infected cells than in the cortex. Measurements of nitrogenase activity and O2 uptake as a function of temperature and partial pressure of O2 were consistent with diffusion limitation of O2 uptake by the inner cortex. In spite of the presumed absence of leghemoglobin in nodules of Parasponia rigida Merr. and Perry, energy usage for nitrogen fixation was similar to that in legume nodules. The results demonstrate that O2 regulation in legume and Parasponia nodules is very similar and differs from O2 regulation in actionorhizal nodules. Images PMID:16662284

  2. Detection of S-Nitrosothiol and Nitrosylated Proteins in Arachis hypogaea Functional Nodule: Response of the Nitrogen Fixing Symbiont

    PubMed Central

    Maiti, Debasis; Sarkar, Tuhin Subhra; Ghosh, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    To detect the presence of NO, ROS and RNS in nodules of crack entry legumes, we used Arachis hypogaea functional nodule. The response of two cognate partner rhizobia was compared towards NO and GSNO using S. meliloti and Bradyrhizobium sp NC921001. ROS, NO, nitrosothiol and bacteroids were detected by fluorescence microscopy. Redox enzymes and thiol pools were detected biochemically. Nitrosothiols were found to be present but ROS and NO were absent in A. hypogaea nodule. A number of S-nitrosylated proteins were also detected. The total thiol pool and most of the redox enzymes were low in nodule cytosolic extract but these were found to be high in the partner microorganisms indicating partner rhizobia could protect the nodule environment against the nitrosothiols. Both S. meliloti and Bradyrhizobium sp NC921001 were found to contain GSNO reductase. Interestingly, there was a marked difference in growth pattern between S. meliloti and Bradyrhizobium sp in presence of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). Bradyrhizobium sp was found to be much more tolerant to NO donor compounds than the S. meliloti. In contrast, S. meliloti showed resistance to GSNO but was sensitive to SNP. Together our data indicate that nodule environment of crack entry legumes is different than the nodules of infection mode entry in terms of NO, ROS and RNS. Based on our biochemical characterization, we propose that exchange of redox molecules and reactive chemical species is possible between the bacteroid and nodule compartment. PMID:23029073

  3. Diagnosis of liver nodules within and outside screening programs.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of a liver nodule detected with ultrasound includes the recovery of a detailed medical history, a physical exam, appropriate contrast imaging examinations and, in selected cases, histopathology. In this setting, identification of liver disease accompanying a liver nodule helps distinction between benign nodules and metastatic malignant nodules from primary liver cancer, as recommended by scientific liver societies. Diagnostic algorithms for a liver nodule in patients with liver disease involve contrast CT scan, magnetic resonance imaging or contrast enhanced ultrasounds to show the typical neoplastic pattern of early arterial hyperenhancement wash-in followed by hypoenhancement in the late portal phase wash out. The flow charts developed by western societies utilize the discriminant criterion of tumor size i.e. the radiological diagnosis being endorsed in a nodule equal or greater than 1 cm whereas eastern societies rely on the recognition of a typical vascular pattern of the node, independently of size. Differential diagnosis should be obtained to differentiate liver related nodules like regenerative macronodules (more than 20% of the cases) and the less frequent intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (~2% of the cases) from liver disease unrelated nodules like hemangioma (~4%), neuroendocrine metastatic nodules (~1%) and focal nodular hyperplasia. In patients without liver disease, the most common liver nodules in the liver are hemangioma (~1.5%), focal nodular hyperplasia (0.03%) and hepatocellular adenoma (up to 0.004% in long term users of oral contraceptives). Optimization of management of patients with a liver nodule requires establishment of a multidisciplinary clinic.

  4. Rhizobia from Lanzarote, the Canary Islands, that nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris have characteristics in common with LMW RNA group II Sinorhizobium meliloti of Medicago, Melilotus and Trigonella from soils of mainland Spain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several isolates from nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris grown in soil of Lanzarote, an island of the Canaries, had electrophoretic LMW RNA patterns identical with a less common pattern within S. meliloti (assigned as group II) obtained from nodules of alfalfa and alfalfa-related legumes grown in northe...

  5. A Dicarboxylate Transporter, LjALMT4, Mainly Expressed in Nodules of Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Takanashi, Kojiro; Sasaki, Takayuki; Kan, Tomohiro; Saida, Yuka; Sugiyama, Akifumi; Yamamoto, Yoko; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2016-07-01

    Legume plants can establish symbiosis with soil bacteria called rhizobia to obtain nitrogen as a nutrient directly from atmospheric N2 via symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Legumes and rhizobia form nodules, symbiotic organs in which fixed-nitrogen and photosynthetic products are exchanged between rhizobia and plant cells. The photosynthetic products supplied to rhizobia are thought to be dicarboxylates but little is known about the movement of dicarboxylates in the nodules. In terms of dicarboxylate transporters, an aluminum-activated malate transporter (ALMT) family is a strong candidate responsible for the membrane transport of carboxylates in nodules. Among the seven ALMT genes in the Lotus japonicus genome, only one, LjALMT4, shows a high expression in the nodules. LjALMT4 showed transport activity in a Xenopus oocyte system, with LjALMT4 mediating the efflux of dicarboxylates including malate, succinate, and fumarate, but not tricarboxylates such as citrate. LjALMT4 also mediated the influx of several inorganic anions. Organ-specific gene expression analysis showed LjALMT4 mRNA mainly in the parenchyma cells of nodule vascular bundles. These results suggest that LjALMT4 may not be involved in the direct supply of dicarboxylates to rhizobia in infected cells but is responsible for supplying malate as well as several anions necessary for symbiotic nitrogen fixation, via nodule vasculatures. PMID:27183039

  6. Nodules are induced on alfalfa roots by Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhizobium trifolii containing small segments of the Rhizobium meliloti nodulation region

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, A.M.; Drake, D.; Jacobs, T.W.; Long, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    Regions of the Rhizobium meliloti nodulation genes from the symbiotic plasmid were transferred to Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhizobium trifolii by conjugation. The A. tumefaciens and R. trifolii trans-conjugants were unable to elicit curling of alfalfa root hairs, but were able to induce nodule development at a low frequency. These were judged to be genuine nodules on the basis of cytological and developmental criteria. Like genuine alfalfa nodules, the nodules were initiated from divisions of the inner root cortical cells. They developed a distally positioned meristem and several peripheral vascular bundles. An endodermis separated the inner tissues of the nodule from the surrounding cortex. No infection threads were found to penetrate either root hairs or the nodule cells. Bacteria were found only in intercellular spaces. Thus, alfalfa nodules induced by A. tumefaciens and R. trifolii transconjugants carrying small nodulation clones of R. meliloti were completely devoid of intracellular bacteria. When these strains were inoculated onto white clover roots, small nodule-like protrusions developed that, when examined cytologically, were found to more closely resemble roots than nodules. Although the meristem was broadened and lacked a root cap, the protrusions had a central vascular bundle and other rootlike features. The results suggest that morphogenesis of alfalfa root nodules can be uncoupled from infection thread formation. The genes encoded in the 8.7-kilobase nodulation fragment are sufficient in A. tumefaciens or R. trifolii backgrounds for nodule morphogenesis.

  7. [Therapy of thyroid nodules].

    PubMed

    Schott, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Thyroid nodules are frequent in Germany. In about every fourth person thyroid nodules can be detected. Most of them are benign. Signs for malignancy are hypoechogenicity, microcalcifications, an unregular margin and increased blood perfusion. There is no strict indication for the treatment of benign nodules. In most cases iodine supplementation is sufficient. A combination therapy with levothyroxine and iodine is more efficient for the treatment of larger nodules. Subclinical hyperthyroidism caused by an adenoma does not necessarily need to be treated, whereas manifest hyperthyroidism needs to treated in most cases with antithyroid drug therapy. Radioiodine therapy is the classical indication for the treatment of unifocal autonomous adenomas. A largely increased thyroid gland with and without uni- / multifocal adenomas are often operated. PMID:25831118

  8. Potential of legume-based grassland–livestock systems in Europe: a review

    PubMed Central

    Lüscher, A; Mueller-Harvey, I; Soussana, J F; Rees, R M; Peyraud, J L

    2014-01-01

    European grassland-based livestock production systems face the challenge of producing more meat and milk to meet increasing world demands and to achieve this using fewer resources. Legumes offer great potential for achieving these objectives. They have numerous features that can act together at different stages in the soil–plant–animal–atmosphere system, and these are most effective in mixed swards with a legume proportion of 30–50%. The resulting benefits include reduced dependence on fossil energy and industrial N-fertilizer, lower quantities of harmful emissions to the environment (greenhouse gases and nitrate), lower production costs, higher productivity and increased protein self-sufficiency. Some legume species offer opportunities for improving animal health with less medication, due to the presence of bioactive secondary metabolites. In addition, legumes may offer an adaptation option to rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations and climate change. Legumes generate these benefits at the level of the managed land-area unit and also at the level of the final product unit. However, legumes suffer from some limitations, and suggestions are made for future research to exploit more fully the opportunities that legumes can offer. In conclusion, the development of legume-based grassland–livestock systems undoubtedly constitutes one of the pillars for more sustainable and competitive ruminant production systems, and it can be expected that forage legumes will become more important in the future. PMID:26300574

  9. Legumes as a Model Plant Family

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The human population derives the majority of its nutrition either directly or indirectly (via animal protein) from two plant families: the grasses and the legumes. Grain legumes alone supply approximately 33% of human protein nutrition. Thus, it is critical for genetic improvement of legume crop spe...

  10. Nitrogen-fixing Rhizobium-legume symbiosis: are polyploidy and host peptide-governed symbiont differentiation general principles of endosymbiosis?

    PubMed Central

    Maróti, Gergely; Kondorosi, Éva

    2014-01-01

    The symbiosis between rhizobia soil bacteria and legumes is facultative and initiated by nitrogen starvation of the host plant. Exchange of signal molecules between the partners leads to the formation of root nodules where bacteria are converted to nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. In this mutualistic symbiosis, the bacteria provide nitrogen sources for plant growth in return for photosynthates from the host. Depending on the host plant the symbiotic fate of bacteria can either be reversible or irreversible. In Medicago plants the bacteria undergo a host-directed multistep differentiation process culminating in the formation of elongated and branched polyploid bacteria with definitive loss of cell division ability. The plant factors are nodule-specific symbiotic peptides. About 500 of them are cysteine-rich NCR peptides produced in the infected plant cells. NCRs are targeted to the endosymbionts and the concerted action of different sets of peptides governs different stages of endosymbiont maturation. This review focuses on symbiotic plant cell development and terminal bacteroid differentiation and demonstrates the crucial roles of symbiotic peptides by showing an example of multi-target mechanism exerted by one of these symbiotic peptides. PMID:25071739

  11. Effect of nano-zinc oxide on nitrogenase activity in legumes: an interplay of concentration and exposure time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Praveen; Burman, Uday; Santra, P.

    2015-07-01

    Experiments were carried out to study the effect of zinc oxide nanoparticles (nano-ZnO) on nitrogenase activity in legumes. In the first experiment, nodulated roots of cluster bean, moth bean, green gram and cowpea were dipped in Hoagland solution containing 1.5 and 10 μg mL-1 of nano-ZnO for 24 h. Nitrogenase activity in cluster bean, green gram and cowpea roots increased after dipping in solution containing 1.5 μg mL-1 nano-ZnO, but decreased in roots dipped in solution containing 10 μg mL-1 nano-ZnO. However, in moth bean roots, nitrogenase activity decreased after dipping in solution containing either concentration of nano-ZnO. In the second experiment, nodulated roots of green gram were dipped in Hoagland solution containing 1, 4, 6, 8 and 10 μg mL-1 nano-ZnO for 6-30 h before estimating nitrogenase activity. Results showed that an interactive effect of nano-ZnO concentration and exposure time influenced nitrogenase activity. The possible reasons behind this effect have been discussed. A model [ A = 3.44 + 0.46 t - 0.01 t 2 - 0.002 tc 2 ( R 2 = 0.81)] involving linear and power components was developed to simulate the response of nitrogenase activity in green gram roots to the concentration and exposure time of nano-ZnO.

  12. Nodules Initiated by Rhizobium meliloti Exopolysaccharide Mutants Lack a Discrete, Persistent Nodule Meristem 1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Cheng; Signer, Ethan R.; Hirsch, Ann M.

    1992-01-01

    Infection of alfalfa with Rhizobium meliloti exo mutants deficient in exopolysaccharide results in abnormal root nodules that are devoid of bacteria and fail to fix nitrogen. Here we report further characterization of these abnormal nodules. Tightly curled root hairs or shepherd's crooks were found after inoculation with Rm 1021-derived exo mutants, but curling was delayed compared with wild-type Rm 1021. Infection threads were initiated in curled root hairs by mutants as well as by wild-type R. meliloti, but the exo mutant-induced threads aborted within the peripheral cells of the developing nodule. Also, nodules elicited by Rm 1021-derived exo mutants were more likely to develop on secondary roots than on the primary root. In contrast with wild-type R. meliloti-induced nodules, the exo mutant-induced nodules lacked a well defined apical meristem, presumably due to the abortion of the infection threads. The relationship of these findings to the physiology of nodule development is discussed. ImagesFigure 3Figure 1Figure 2Figure 4 PMID:16668605

  13. NODULES WITH ACTIVATED DEFENSE 1 is required for maintenance of rhizobial endosymbiosis in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Yu, Haixiang; Luo, Li; Duan, Liujian; Cai, Liuyang; He, Xinxing; Wen, Jiangqi; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Li, Guoliang; Xiao, Aifang; Duanmu, Deqiang; Cao, Yangrong; Hong, Zonglie; Zhang, Zhongming

    2016-10-01

    The symbiotic interaction between legume plants and rhizobia results in the formation of root nodules, in which symbiotic plant cells host and harbor thousands of nitrogen-fixing rhizobia. Here, a Medicago truncatula nodules with activated defense 1 (nad1) mutant was identified using reverse genetics methods. The mutant phenotype was characterized using cell and molecular biology approaches. An RNA-sequencing technique was used to analyze the transcriptomic reprogramming of nad1 mutant nodules. In the nad1 mutant plants, rhizobial infection and propagation in infection threads are normal, whereas rhizobia and their symbiotic plant cells become necrotic immediately after rhizobia are released from infection threads into symbiotic cells of nodules. Defense-associated responses were detected in nad1 nodules. NAD1 is specifically present in root nodule symbiosis plants with the exception of Morus notabilis, and the transcript is highly induced in nodules. NAD1 encodes a small uncharacterized protein with two predicted transmembrane helices and is localized at the endoplasmic reticulum. Our data demonstrate a positive role for NAD1 in the maintenance of rhizobial endosymbiosis during nodulation. PMID:27245091

  14. Metabolic responses in root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris and Vicia sativa exposed to the imazamox herbicide.

    PubMed

    García-Garijo, A; Tejera, N A; Lluch, C; Palma, F

    2014-05-01

    Alterations on growth, amino acids metabolism and some antioxidant enzyme activities as result of imazamox treatment were examined in determinate and indeterminate nodules, formed by Phaseolus vulgaris and Vicia sativa, respectively. Young seedlings of both legumes were inoculated with their respective microsymbionts and grown under controlled conditions. At vegetative growth, plants were treated with imazamox (250μM) in the nutrient solution and harvested 7days after. Imazamox was mainly accumulated in V. sativa where concentrations were more than six fold higher than those detected in P. vulgaris. Nodule dry weight and total nitrogen content were reduced by the herbicide treatment: the highest decrease of nodule biomass (50%) and nitrogen content (40%) were registered in V. sativa and P. vulgaris, respectively. The concentration of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) did not change in neither determinate nor indeterminate nodules even though the acetohydroxyacid synthase activity decreased in root and nodules of both symbioses with the herbicide application. Based on this last result and taking into account that total free amino acids increased in roots but not in nodules of common vetch, a possible BCAA translocation from root to nodule could occur. Our results suggest that the maintenance of BCAA balance in nodule become a priority for the plant in such conditions. The involvement of activities glutathione-S-transferase, guaiacol peroxidase and superoxide dismutase in the response of the symbioses to imazamox are also discussed.

  15. Nodulation and nitrogen fixation by Mimosa spp. in the Cerrado and Caatinga biomes of Brazil.

    PubMed

    dos Reis, Fábio Bueno; Simon, Marcelo F; Gross, Eduardo; Boddey, Robert M; Elliott, Geoffrey N; Neto, Nicolau E; Loureiro, M de Fatima; de Queiroz, Luciano P; Scotti, Maria Rita; Chen, Wen-Ming; Norén, Agneta; Rubio, Maria C; de Faria, Sergio M; Bontemps, Cyril; Goi, Silvia R; Young, J Peter W; Sprent, Janet I; James, Euan K

    2010-06-01

    *An extensive survey of nodulation in the legume genus Mimosa was undertaken in two major biomes in Brazil, the Cerrado and the Caatinga, in both of which there are high degrees of endemicity of the genus. *Nodules were collected from 67 of the 70 Mimosa spp. found. Thirteen of the species were newly reported as nodulating. Nodules were examined by light and electron microscopy, and all except for M. gatesiae had a structure typical of effective Mimosa nodules. The endosymbiotic bacteria in nodules from all of the Mimosa spp. were identified as Burkholderia via immunolabelling with an antibody against Burkholderia phymatum STM815. *Twenty of the 23 Mimosa nodules tested were shown to contain nitrogenase by immunolabelling with an antibody to the nitrogenase Fe- (nifH) protein, and using the delta(15)N ((15)N natural abundance) technique, contributions by biological N(2) fixation of up to 60% of total plant N were calculated for Caatinga Mimosa spp. *It is concluded that nodulation in Mimosa is a generic character, and that the preferred symbionts of Brazilian species are Burkholderia. This is the first study to demonstrate N(2) fixation by beta-rhizobial symbioses in the field.

  16. Determination by capillary electrophoresis of total and available niacin in different development stage of raw and processed legumes: comparison with high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Valverde, C; Sierra, I; Díaz-Pollán, C; Blázquez, I

    2001-05-01

    The available and total niacin evolution during maturation of yellow pea lupine (Lupinus luteus L., cv. Juno), pea (Pisum sativum L., cv. Ergo), faba bean (Vicia faba sp. minor Harz, cv. Tibo) and in germinated and high-pressure heated peas (Pisum sativum L., cv. Esla) have been determined by capillary electrophoresis (CE). The results have been compared with those obtained by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The values obtained by CE were similar to those obtained by HPLC. Maturation of seeds significantly reduced the available and total niacin content in legumes. The available/total niacin ratio during seed maturation depends on the type of legume. In faba beans and peas, a reduction was observed which was more pronounced in the case of peas. For lupine seeds, the ripening produced an increase (34%) in the available/total niacin ratio 50 days after flowering (DAF). Pea germination produced an overall increase in available and total niacin content although the available/total niacin ratio decreased. High pressure heating of pea yielded an increase in the available niacin content and available/total niacin ratio but the total niacin content did not change.

  17. RAPD-inferred genetic variability of some indigenous Rhizobium leguminosarum isolates from red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) nodules.

    PubMed

    Stefan, Andrei; Rosu, Craita M; Stedel, Catalina; Gorgan, Lucian D; Efrose, Rodica C

    2015-09-01

    The application of commercial rhizobial inoculants to legume crops is proving to be an alternative to synthetic fertilizer use. The challenge for sustainable agriculture resides in the compatibility between crop, inoculants and environmental conditions. The evaluation of symbiotic efficiency and genetic diversity of indigenous rhizobial strains could lead to the development of better inoculants and increased crop production. The genetic variability of 32 wild indigenous rhizobial isolates was assessed by RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA). The strains were isolated from red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) nodules from two distinct geographical regions of Northern and Eastern Romania. Three decamer primers were used to resolve the phylogenetic relationships between the investigated isolates. Cluster analysis revealed a high diversity; most strains clustered together based on their geographical location. PMID:26344027

  18. RNA-seq transcriptome profiling reveals that Medicago truncatula nodules acclimate N2 fixation before emerging P deficiency reaches the nodules

    PubMed Central

    Cabeza, Ricardo A.; Liese, Rebecca; Lingner, Annika; von Stieglitz, Ilsabe; Neumann, Janice; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Pommerenke, Claudia; Dittert, Klaus; Schulze, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Legume nodules are plant tissues with an exceptionally high concentration of phosphorus (P), which, when there is scarcity of P, is preferentially maintained there rather than being allocated to other plant organs. The hypothesis of this study was that nodules are affected before the P concentration in the organ declines during whole-plant P depletion. Nitrogen (N2) fixation and P concentration in various organs were monitored during a whole-plant P-depletion process in Medicago truncatula. Nodule gene expression was profiled through RNA-seq at day 5 of P depletion. Until that point in time P concentration in leaves reached a lower threshold but was maintained in nodules. N2-fixation activity per plant diverged from that of fully nourished plants beginning at day 5 of the P-depletion process, primarily because fewer nodules were being formed, while the activity of the existing nodules was maintained for as long as two weeks into P depletion. RNA-seq revealed nodule acclimation on a molecular level with a total of 1140 differentially expressed genes. Numerous genes for P remobilization from organic structures were increasingly expressed. Various genes involved in nodule malate formation were upregulated, while genes involved in fermentation were downregulated. The fact that nodule formation was strongly repressed with the onset of P deficiency is reflected in the differential expression of various genes involved in nodulation. It is concluded that plants follow a strategy to maintain N2 fixation and viable leaf tissue as long as possible during whole-plant P depletion to maintain their ability to react to emerging new P sources (e.g. through active P acquisition by roots). PMID:25151618

  19. Comparative sequence analysis of nitrogen fixation-related genes in six legumes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Parupalli, Swathi; Azam, Sarwar; Lee, Suk-Ha; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2013-01-01

    Legumes play an important role as food and forage crops in international agriculture especially in developing countries. Legumes have a unique biological process called nitrogen fixation (NF) by which they convert atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia. Although legume genomes have undergone polyploidization, duplication and divergence, NF-related genes, because of their essential functional role for legumes, might have remained conserved. To understand the relationship of divergence and evolutionary processes in legumes, this study analyzes orthologs and paralogs for selected 20 NF-related genes by using comparative genomic approaches in six legumes i.e., Medicago truncatula (Mt), Cicer arietinum, Lotus japonicus, Cajanus cajan (Cc), Phaseolus vulgaris (Pv), and Glycine max (Gm). Subsequently, sequence distances, numbers of synonymous substitutions per synonymous site (Ks) and non-synonymous substitutions per non-synonymous site (Ka) between orthologs and paralogs were calculated and compared across legumes. These analyses suggest the closest relationship between Gm and Cc and the highest distance between Mt and Pv in six legumes. Ks proportional plots clearly showed ancient genome duplication in all legumes, whole genome duplication event in Gm and also speciation pattern in different legumes. This study also reports some interesting observations e.g., no peak at Ks 0.4 in Gm-Gm, location of two independent genes next to each other in Mt and low Ks values for outparalogs for three genes as compared to other 12 genes. In summary, this study underlines the importance of NF-related genes and provides important insights in genome organization and evolutionary aspects of six legume species analyzed. PMID:23986765

  20. Growth, photosynthetic acclimation and yield quality in legumes under climate change simulations: an updated survey.

    PubMed

    Irigoyen, J J; Goicoechea, N; Antolín, M C; Pascual, I; Sánchez-Díaz, M; Aguirreolea, J; Morales, F

    2014-09-01

    Continued emissions of CO2, derived from human activities, increase atmospheric CO2 concentration. The CO2 rise stimulates plant growth and affects yield quality. Effects of elevated CO2 on legume quality depend on interactions with N2-fixing bacteria and mycorrhizal fungi. Growth at elevated CO2 increases photosynthesis under short-term exposures in C3 species. Under long-term exposures, however, plants generally acclimate to elevated CO2 decreasing their photosynthetic capacity. An updated survey of the literature indicates that a key factor, perhaps the most important, that characteristically influences this phenomenon, its occurrence and extent, is the plant source-sink balance. In legumes, the ability of exchanging C for N at nodule level with the N2-fixing symbionts creates an extra C sink that avoids the occurrence of photosynthetic acclimation. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi colonizing roots may also result in increased C sink, preventing photosynthetic acclimation. Defoliation (Anthyllis vulneraria, simulated grazing) or shoot cutting (alfalfa, usual management as forage) largely increases root/shoot ratio. During re-growth at elevated CO2, new shoots growth and nodule respiration function as strong C sinks that counteracts photosynthetic acclimation. In the presence of some limiting factor, the legumes response to elevated CO2 is weakened showing photosynthetic acclimation. This survey has identified limiting factors that include an insufficient N supply from bacterial strains, nutrient-poor soils, low P supply, excess temperature affecting photosynthesis and/or nodule activity, a genetically determined low nodulation capacity, an inability of species or varieties to increase growth (and therefore C sink) at elevated CO2 and a plant phenological state or season when plant growth is stopped. PMID:25113447

  1. Transport processes of the legume symbiosome membrane

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Victoria C.; Loughlin, Patrick C.; Day, David A.; Smith, Penelope M. C.

    2014-01-01

    The symbiosome membrane (SM) is a physical barrier between the host plant and nitrogen-fixing bacteria in the legume:rhizobia symbiosis, and represents a regulated interface for the movement of solutes between the symbionts that is under plant control. The primary nutrient exchange across the SM is the transport of a carbon energy source from plant to bacteroid in exchange for fixed nitrogen. At a biochemical level two channels have been implicated in movement of fixed nitrogen across the SM and a uniporter that transports monovalent dicarboxylate ions has been characterized that would transport fixed carbon. The aquaporin NOD26 may provide a channel for ammonia, but the genes encoding the other transporters have not been identified. Transport of several other solutes, including calcium and potassium, have been demonstrated in isolated symbiosomes, and genes encoding transport systems for the movement of iron, nitrate, sulfate, and zinc in nodules have been identified. However, definitively matching transport activities with these genes has proved difficult and many further transport processes are expected on the SM to facilitate the movement of nutrients between the symbionts. Recently, work detailing the SM proteome in soybean has been completed, contributing significantly to the database of known SM proteins. This represents a valuable resource for the identification of transporter protein candidates, some of which may correspond to transport processes previously described, or to novel transport systems in the symbiosis. Putative transporters identified from the proteome include homologs of transporters of sulfate, calcium, peptides, and various metal ions. Here we review current knowledge of transport processes of the SM and discuss the requirements for additional transport routes of other nutrients exchanged in the symbiosis, with a focus on transport systems identified through the soybean SM proteome. PMID:25566274

  2. [Evolution of Root Nodule Bacteria: Reconstruction of the Speciation Processes Resulting from Genomic Rearrangements in a Symbiotic System].

    PubMed

    Provorov, N A; Andronov, E E

    2016-01-01

    The processes of speciation and macroevolution of root nodule bacteria (rhizobia), based on deep rearrangements of their genomes and occurring in the N₂-fixing symbiotic system, are reconstructed. At the first stage of rhizobial evolution, transformation of free-living diazotrophs (related to Rhodopseudomonas) to symbiotic N₂-fixers (Bradyrhizobium) occurred due to the acquisition of the fix gene system, which is responsible for providing nitrogenase with electrons and reducing equivalents, as well as for oxygen-dependent regulation of nitrogenase synthesis in planta, and then of the nod genes responsible for the synthesis of the lipo- chito-oligosaccharide Nod factors, which induce root nodule development. The subsequent rearrangements of bacterial genomes included: (1) increased volume of hereditary information supported by species, genera (pan-genome), and individual strains; (2) transition from the unitary genome to a multicomponent one; and (3) enhanced levels of bacterial genetic plasticity and horizontal gene transfer, resulting in formation of new genera, of which Mesorhizobium, Rhizobium, and Sinorhizobium are the largest, and of over 100 species. Rhizobial evolution caused by development and diversification of the Nod factor synthesizing systems may result in both increased host specificity range (transition of Bradyrhizobium from autotrophic to symbiotrophic carbon metabolism in interaction with a broad spectrum of legumes) and to its contraction (transition of Rhizobium and Sinorhizobium to "altruistic" interaction with legumes of the galegoid clade). Reconstruction of the evolutionary pathway from symbiotic N₂-fixers to their free-living ancestors makes it possible to initiate the studies based on up-to-date genome screening technologies and aimed at the issues of genetic integration of organisms into supracpecies complexes, ratios of the macro- and microevolutionary mechanisms, and developmetn of cooperative adaptations based on altruistic

  3. Computer-aided diagnosis in lung nodule assessment.

    PubMed

    Goldin, Jonathan G; Brown, Matthew S; Petkovska, Iva

    2008-05-01

    Computed tomography (CT) imaging is playing an increasingly important role in cancer detection, diagnosis, and lesion characterization, and it is the most sensitive test for lung nodule detection. Interpretation of lung nodules involves characterization and integration of clinical and other imaging information. Advances in lung nodule management using CT require optimization of CT data acquisition, postprocessing tools, and computer-aided diagnosis (CAD). The goal of CAD systems being developed is to both assist radiologists in the more sensitive detection of nodules and noninvasively differentiate benign from malignant lesions; the latter is important given that malignant lesions account for between 1% and 11% of pulmonary nodules. The aim of this review is to summarize the current state of the art regarding CAD techniques for the detection and characterization of solitary pulmonary nodules and their potential applications in the clinical workup of these lesions.

  4. Taxonomic and symbiotic diversity of bacteria isolated from nodules of Acacia tortilis subsp. raddiana in arid soils of Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Fterich, A; Mahdhi, M; Lafuente, A; Pajuelo, E; Caviedes, M A; Rodriguez-Llorente, I D; Mars, M

    2012-06-01

    A collection of rhizobia isolated from Acacia tortilis subsp. raddiana nodules from various arid soils in Tunisia was analyzed for their diversity at both taxonomic and symbiotic levels. The isolates were found to be phenotypically diverse. The majority of the isolates tolerated 3% NaCl and grew at 40 °C. Genetic characterization emphasized that most of the strains (42/50) belong to the genus Ensifer, particularly the species Ensifer meliloti, Ensifer garamanticus, and Ensifer numidicus. Symbiotic properties of isolates showed diversity in their capacity to nodulate their host plant and to fix atmospheric nitrogen. The most effective isolates were closely related to E. garamanticus. Nodulation tests showed that 3 strains belonging to Mesorhizobium genus failed to renodulate their host plant, which is surprising for symbiotic rhizobia. Furthermore, our results support the presence of non-nodulating endophytic bacteria belonging to the Acinetobacter genus in legume nodules. PMID:22616625

  5. Arbuscular mycorrhiza maintains nodule function during external NH4+ supply in Phaseolus vulgaris (L.).

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Peter E; Pérez-Fernández, Maria A; Valentine, Alex J

    2012-04-01

    The synergistic benefits of the dual inoculation of legumes with nodule bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) are well established, but the effect of an external NH(4)(+) supply on this tripartite relationship is less clear. This effect of NH(4)(+) supply was investigated with regards to the growth and function of the legume host and both symbionts. Nodulated Phaseolus vulgaris seedlings with and without AM, were grown in a sand medium with either 0 N, 1 mM or 3 mM NH(4)(+). Plants were harvested at 30 days after emergence and measurements were taken for biomass, N(2) fixation, photosynthesis, asparagine concentration, construction costs and N nutrition. The addition of NH(4)(+) led to a decline in the percentage AM colonization and nodule dry weights, although AM colonization was affected to a lesser extent. NH(4)(+) supply also resulted in a decrease in the reliance on biological nitrogen fixation (BNF); however, the AM roots maintained higher levels of NH(4)(+) uptake than their non-AM counterparts. Furthermore, the non-AM plants had a higher production of asparagine than the AM plants. The inhibitory effects of NH(4)(+) on nodule function can be reduced by the presence of AM at moderate levels of NH(4)(+) (1 mM), via improving nodule growth or relieving the asparagine-induced inhibition of BNF.

  6. Impact of whole-genome and tandem duplications in the expansion and functional diversification of the F-box family in legumes (Fabaceae).

    PubMed

    Bellieny-Rabelo, Daniel; Oliveira, Antônia Elenir Amâncio; Venancio, Thiago Motta

    2013-01-01

    F-box proteins constitute a large gene family that regulates processes from hormone signaling to stress response. F-box proteins are the substrate recognition modules of SCF E3 ubiquitin ligases. Here we report very distinct trends in family size, duplication, synteny and transcription of F-box genes in two nitrogen-fixing legumes, Glycine max (soybean) and Medicago truncatula (alfafa). While the soybean FBX genes emerged mainly through segmental duplications (including whole-genome duplications), M. truncatula genome is dominated by locally-duplicated (tandem) F-box genes. Many of these young FBX genes evolved complex transcriptional patterns, including preferential transcription in different tissues, suggesting that they have probably been recruited to important biochemical pathways (e.g. nodulation and seed development).

  7. Effector-Triggered Immunity Determines Host Genotype-Specific Incompatibility in Legume-Rhizobium Symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Michiko; Miwa, Hiroki; Masuda, Sachiko; Takebayashi, Yumiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Okazaki, Shin

    2016-08-01

    Symbiosis between legumes and rhizobia leads to the formation of N2-fixing root nodules. In soybean, several host genes, referred to as Rj genes, control nodulation. Soybean cultivars carrying the Rj4 gene restrict nodulation by specific rhizobia such as Bradyrhizobium elkanii We previously reported that the restriction of nodulation was caused by B. elkanii possessing a functional type III secretion system (T3SS), which is known for its delivery of virulence factors by pathogenic bacteria. In the present study, we investigated the molecular basis for the T3SS-dependent nodulation restriction in Rj4 soybean. Inoculation tests revealed that soybean cultivar BARC-2 (Rj4/Rj4) restricted nodulation by B. elkanii USDA61, whereas its nearly isogenic line BARC-3 (rj4/rj4) formed nitrogen-fixing nodules with the same strain. Root-hair curling and infection threads were not observed in the roots of BARC-2 inoculated with USDA61, indicating that Rj4 blocked B. elkanii infection in the early stages. Accumulation of H2O2 and salicylic acid (SA) was observed in the roots of BARC-2 inoculated with USDA61. Transcriptome analyses revealed that inoculation of USDA61, but not its T3SS mutant in BARC-2, induced defense-related genes, including those coding for hypersensitive-induced responsive protein, which act in effector-triggered immunity (ETI) in Arabidopsis. These findings suggest that B. elkanii T3SS triggers the SA-mediated ETI-type response in Rj4 soybean, which consequently blocks symbiotic interactions. This study revealed a common molecular mechanism underlying both plant-pathogen and plant-symbiont interactions, and suggests that establishment of a root nodule symbiosis requires the evasion or suppression of plant immune responses triggered by rhizobial effectors. PMID:27373538

  8. Asparagine: an amide of particular distinction in the regulation of symbiotic nitrogen fixation of legumes.

    PubMed

    Sulieman, Saad; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2013-09-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation is tightly regulated by a range of fine processes at the nodule level, over which the host plant has overall control through the whole life of the plant. The operation of this control at the nodule level is not yet fully understood, but greater knowledge will ultimately lead to a better improvement of N2 fixation through the use of crop legumes and genetic engineering of crop plants for higher performance. It has been suggested that, nodule responses to the nutritional complexity of the rhizosphere environment involve a great deal of coordination of sensing and signal transduction. This regulation can be achieved through several mechanisms, including changes in carbon metabolism, oxygen supply and/or overproduction of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Recently, the cycling of amino acids observed between the plant and bacteroid fractions suggests a new and important regulatory mechanism involved in nodule responses. Most of the recent transcriptional findings are consistent with the earlier biochemical and physiological reports. Current research revealed unique advances for nodule metabolism, especially on the regulation of asparagine synthetase gene expression and the control of asparagine (ASN) to N2 fixing activity. A large amount of ASN is found accumulating in the root nodules of the symbiotic plants under restricted environments, such as drought, salinity and nutrient deficiency. Exceptionally, ASN phloem feeding has resulted in an increased concentration of the ASN amide in nodules followed by a remarkable decrease in nodule activity. In this review, recent progress concerning the possible role of ASN in whole-plant-based down-regulation of symbiotic N2 fixation will be reviewed.

  9. The importance of nodule CO2 fixation for the efficiency of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in pea at vegetative growth and during pod formation.

    PubMed

    Fischinger, Stephanie Anastasia; Schulze, Joachim

    2010-05-01

    Nodule CO2 fixation is of pivotal importance for N2 fixation. The process provides malate for bacteroids and oxaloacetate for nitrogen assimilation. The hypothesis of the present paper was that grain legume nodules would adapt to higher plant N demand and more restricted carbon availability at pod formation through increased nodule CO2 fixation and a more efficient N2 fixation. Growth, N2 fixation, and nodule composition during vegetative growth and at pod formation were studied in pea plants (Pisum sativum L.). In parallel experiments, 15N2 and 13CO2 uptake, as well as nodule hydrogen and CO2 release, was measured. Plants at pod formation showed higher growth rates and N2 fixation per plant when compared with vegetative growth. The specific activity of active nodules was about 25% higher at pod formation. The higher nodule activity was accompanied by higher amino acid concentration in nodules and xylem sap with a higher share of asparagine. Nodule 13CO2 fixation was increased at pod formation, both per plant and per 15N2 fixed unit. However, malate concentration in nodules was only 40% of that during vegetative growth and succinate was no longer detectable. The data indicate that increased N2 fixation at pod formation is connected with strongly increased nodule CO2 fixation. While the sugar concentration in nodules at pod formation was not altered, the concentration of organic acids, namely malate and succinate, was significantly lower. It is concluded that strategies to improve the capability of nodules to fix CO2 and form organic acids might prolong intensive N2 fixation into the later stages of pod formation and pod filling in grain legumes.

  10. A Sinorhizobium meliloti-specific N-acyl homoserine lactone quorum-sensing signal increases nodule numbers in Medicago truncatula independent of autoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Veliz-Vallejos, Debora F.; van Noorden, Giel E.; Yuan, Mengqi; Mathesius, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) act as quorum sensing signals that regulate cell-density dependent behaviors in many gram-negative bacteria, in particular those important for plant-microbe interactions. AHLs can also be recognized by plants, and this may influence their interactions with bacteria. Here we tested whether the exposure to AHLs affects the nodule-forming symbiosis between legume hosts and rhizobia. We treated roots of the model legume, Medicago truncatula, with a range of AHLs either from its specific symbiont, Sinorhizobium meliloti, or from the potential pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Agrobacterium vitis. We found increased numbers of nodules formed on root systems treated with the S. meliloti-specific AHL, 3-oxo-C14-homoserine lactone, at a concentration of 1 μM, while the other AHLs did not result in significant changes to nodule numbers. We did not find any evidence for altered nodule invasion by the rhizobia. Quantification of flavonoids that could act as nod gene inducers in S. meliloti did not show any correlation with increased nodule numbers. The effects of AHLs were specific for an increase in nodule numbers, but not lateral root numbers or root length. Increased nodule numbers following 3-oxo-C14-homoserine lactone treatment were under control of autoregulation of nodulation and were still observed in the autoregulation mutant, sunn4 (super numeric nodules4). However, increases in nodule numbers by 3-oxo-C14-homoserine lactone were not found in the ethylene-insensitive sickle mutant. A comparison between M. truncatula with M. sativa (alfalfa) and Trifolium repens (white clover) showed that the observed effects of AHLs on nodule numbers were specific to M. truncatula, despite M. sativa nodulating with the same symbiont. We conclude that plant perception of the S. meliloti-specific 3-oxo-C14-homoserine lactone influences nodule numbers in M. truncatula via an ethylene-dependent, but autoregulation-independent mechanism. PMID

  11. Inoculation Response of Legumes in Relation to the Number and Effectiveness of Indigenous Rhizobium Populations

    PubMed Central

    Singleton, P. W.; Tavares, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    The response of legumes to inoculation with rhizobia can be affected by many factors. Little work has been undertaken to examine how indigenous populations or rhizobia affect this response. We conducted a series of inoculation trials in four Hawaiian soils with six legume species (Glycine max, Vigna unguiculata, Phaseolus lunatus, Leucaena leucocephala, Arachis hypogaea, and Phaseolus vulgaris) and characterized the native rhizobial populations for each species in terms of the number and effectiveness of the population for a particular host. Inoculated plants had, on average, 76% of the nodules formed by the inoculum strain, which effectively eliminated competition from native strains as a variable between soils. Rhizobia populations ranged from less than 6 × 100/g of soil to 1 × 104/g of soil. The concentration of nitrogen in shoots of inoculated plants was not higher than that in uninoculated controls when the most probable number MPN counts of rhizobia were at or above 2 × 101/g of soil unless the native population was completely ineffective. Tests of random isolates from nodules of uninoculated plants revealed that within most soil populations there was a wide range of effectiveness for N2 fixation. All populations had isolates that were ineffective in fixing N2. The inoculum strains generally did not fix more N2 than the average isolate from the soil population in single-isolate tests. Even when the inoculum strain proved to be a better symbiont than the soil rhizobia, there was no response to inoculation. Enhanced N2 fixation after inoculation was related to increased nodule dry weights. Although inoculation generally increased nodule number when there were less than 1 × 102 rhizobia per g of soil, there was no corresponding increase in nodule dry weight when native populations were effective. Most species compensated for reduced nodulation in soils with few rhizobia by increasing the size of nodules and therefore maintaining a nodule dry weight similar

  12. Establishment of the Lotus japonicus Gene Expression Atlas (LjGEA) and its use to explore legume seed maturation.

    PubMed

    Verdier, Jerome; Torres-Jerez, Ivone; Wang, Mingyi; Andriankaja, Andry; Allen, Stacy N; He, Ji; Tang, Yuhong; Murray, Jeremy D; Udvardi, Michael K

    2013-04-01

    Lotus japonicus is a model species for legume genomics. To accelerate legume functional genomics, we developed a Lotus japonicus Gene Expression Atlas (LjGEA), which provides a global view of gene expression in all organ systems of this species, including roots, nodules, stems, petioles, leaves, flowers, pods and seeds. Time-series data covering multiple stages of developing pod and seed are included in the LjGEA. In addition, previously published L. japonicus Affymetrix data are included in the database, making it a 'one-stop shop' for transcriptome analysis of this species. The LjGEA web server (http://ljgea.noble.org/) enables flexible, multi-faceted analyses of the transcriptome. Transcript data may be accessed using the Affymetrix probe identification number, DNA sequence, gene name, functional description in natural language, and GO and KEGG annotation terms. Genes may be discovered through co-expression or differential expression analysis. Users may select a subset of experiments and visualize and compare expression profiles of multiple genes simultaneously. Data may be downloaded in a tabular form compatible with common analytical and visualization software. To illustrate the power of LjGEA, we explored the transcriptome of developing seeds. Genes represented by 36 474 probe sets were expressed at some stage during seed development, and almost half of these genes displayed differential expression during development. Among the latter were 624 transcription factor genes, some of which are orthologs of transcription factor genes that are known to regulate seed development in other species, while most are novel and represent attractive targets for reverse genetics approaches to determine their roles in this important organ.

  13. The endemic Genista versicolor from Sierra Nevada National Park in Spain is nodulated by putative new Bradyrhizobium species and a novel symbiovar (sierranevadense).

    PubMed

    Cobo-Díaz, José F; Martínez-Hidalgo, Pilar; Fernández-González, Antonio J; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio; Toro, Nicolás; Velázquez, Encarna; Fernández-López, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Genista versicolor is an endemic legume from Sierra Nevada National Park which constitutes one of the UNESCO-recognized Biosphere Reserves. In the present study, a collection of strains nodulating this legume was analysed in characteristic soils of this ecosystem. Most strains nodulating G. versicolor belonged to rrs group I within the genus Bradyrhizobium and only one strain, named GV137, belonged to rrs group II from which only a single species, B. retamae, has been described in Europe to date. Strain GV137, and some strains from rrs group I, belonged to putative new species of Bradyrhizobium, although most strains from group I belonged to B. canariense, according to the ITS fragment and atpD gene analysis. This result contrasted with those obtained in Genista tinctoria in Northeast Europe whose endosymbionts were identified as B. japonicum. The analysis of the symbiotic nodC and nifH genes carried by G. versicolor-nodulating strains showed that most of them belonged to symbiovar genistearum, as did those isolated from G. tinctoria. Nevertheless, strain GV137, belonging to rrs group II, formed a divergent lineage that constituted a novel symbiovar within the genus Bradyrhizobium for which the name sierranevadense is proposed. This finding showed that the Genisteae are not restrictive legumes only nodulated by symbiovar genistearum, since Genista is a promiscuous legume nodulated by at least two symbiovars of Bradyrhizobium, as occurs in Retama species. PMID:24268094

  14. Diversifying selection by Desmodiinae legume species on Bradyrhizobium symbionts.

    PubMed

    Parker, Matthew A; Jankowiak, Jennifer G; Landrigan, Grace K

    2015-07-01

    Desmodium and Hylodesmum (Papilionoideae Subtribe Desmodiinae) are among the most common herbaceous perennial legumes native to eastern North America. To analyze the population structure of their Bradyrhizobium sp. root-nodule bacteria, 159 isolates were sampled from ten host species across a 1000 km region. Phylogenetic analysis of four housekeeping loci (2164 bp) and two loci in the symbiosis island (SI) chromosomal region (1374 bp) indicated extensive overlap in symbiont utilization, with each common bacterial clade found on 2-7 species of these legume genera. However, host species differed considerably in the relative proportion of symbionts belonging to different Bradyrhizobium clades. High phylogenetic incongruence between trees for housekeeping loci and SI loci suggested that diversification of these Bradyrhizobium lineages involved substantial horizontal gene transfer. Plant inoculation with strains from six Bradyrhizobium clades revealed marked disparity in relative bacterial reproductive success across four Desmodium species. Estimated yield of Bradyrhizobium progeny cells per plant ranged from zero to >10(9), and strains with high fitness on one host sometimes reproduced poorly on other host species. Diversifying selection on bacteria, arising from differential success in habitats with different Desmodium and Hylodesmum taxa, is therefore likely to affect Bradyrhizobium diversity patterns at the landscape level. PMID:26130822

  15. Phylogenetic relationships and host range of Rhizobium spp. that nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Lucas, I; Segovia, L; Martinez-Romero, E; Pueppke, S G

    1995-01-01

    We determined the nucleotide sequences of 16S rRNA gene segments from five Rhizobium strains that have been isolated from tropical legume species. All share the capacity to nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris L., the common bean. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that these strains are of two different chromosomal lineages. We defined the host ranges of two strains of Rhizobium etli and three strains of R. tropici, comparing them with those of the two most divergently related new strains. Twenty-two of the 43 tested legume species were nodulated by three or more of these strains. All seven strains have broad host ranges that include woody species such as Albizia lebbeck, Gliricidia maculata, and Leucaena leucocephala. PMID:7618891

  16. Solitary pulmonary nodule

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest x-ray Pulmonary nodule, solitary - CT scan Respiratory system References Gotway MB, Panse PM, Gruden JF, Elicker BM. Thoracic radiology. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  17. CAD System for Pulmonary Nodule Detection Using Gabor Filtering and Template Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastawrous, Hany Ayad; Nitta, Norihisa; Tsudagawa, Masaru

    This paper aims at developing a Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) system used for the detection of pulmonary nodules in chest Computed Tomography (CT) images. These lung nodules include both solid nodules and Ground Glass Opacity (GGO) nodules. In our scheme, we apply Gabor filter on the CT image in order to enhance the detection process. After this we perform some morphological operations including threshold process and labeling to extract all the objects inside the lung area. Then, some feature analysis is used to examine these objects to decide which of them are likely to be potential cancer candidates. Following the feature examination, a template matching between the potential cancer candidates and some Gaussian reference models is performed to determine the similarity between them. The algorithm was applied on 715 slices containing 25 GGO nodules and 82 solid nodules and achieved detection sensitivity of 92% for GGO nodules and 95% for solid nodules with False Positive (FP) rate of 0.75 FP/slice for GGO nodules and 2.32 FP/slice for solid nodules. Finally, we used an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to reduce the number of FP findings. After using ANN, we were able to reduce the FP rate to 0.25 FP/slice for GGO nodules and 1.62 FP/slice for solid nodules but at the expense of detection sensitivity, which became 84 % for GGO nodules and 91% for solid nodules.

  18. Converting perennial legumes to organic cropland without tillage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic producers are interested in developing a no-till system for crop production. In this study, we examined management tactics to convert perennial legumes to annual crops without tillage. Our hypothesis was that reducing carbohydrate production in the fall by mowing would favor winterkill. M...

  19. New aspect of plant–rhizobia interaction: Alkaloid biosynthesis in Crotalaria depends on nodulation

    PubMed Central

    Irmer, Simon; Podzun, Nora; Langel, Dorothee; Heidemann, Franziska; Kaltenegger, Elisabeth; Schemmerling, Brigitte; Geilfus, Christoph-Martin; Zörb, Christian; Ober, Dietrich

    2015-01-01

    Infection of legume hosts by rhizobial bacteria results in the formation of a specialized organ, the nodule, in which atmospheric nitrogen is reduced to ammonia. Nodulation requires the reprogramming of the plant cell, allowing the microsymbiont to enter the plant tissue in a highly controlled manner. We have found that, in Crotalaria (Fabaceae), this reprogramming is associated with the biosynthesis of pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs). These compounds are part of the plant’s chemical defense against herbivores and cannot be regarded as being functionally involved in the symbiosis. PAs in Crotalaria are detectable only when the plants form nodules after infection with their rhizobial partner. The identification of a plant-derived sequence encoding homospermidine synthase (HSS), the first pathway-specific enzyme of PA biosynthesis, suggests that the plant and not the microbiont is the producer of PAs. Transcripts of HSS are detectable exclusively in the nodules, the tissue with the highest concentration of PAs, indicating that PA biosynthesis is restricted to the nodules and that the nodules are the source from which the alkaloids are transported to the above ground parts of the plant. The link between nodulation and the biosynthesis of nitrogen-containing alkaloids in Crotalaria highlights a further facet of the effect of symbiosis with rhizobia on the ecologically important trait of the plant’s chemical defense. PMID:25775562

  20. [Symbiosis between the nodule bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) under salinization conditions].

    PubMed

    Ibragimova, M V; Rumiantseva, M L; Onishchuk, O P; Belova, V S; Kurchak, O N; Andronov, E E; Dziubenko, N I; Simarov, B V

    2006-01-01

    Two hundred forty-three isolates of alfalfa nodule bacteria (Sinorhizobium meliloti) were obtained from legume nodules and soils sampled in the northern Aral region, experiencing secondary salinization. Isolates obtained from nodules (N isolates) were significantly more salt-tolerant than those from soils (S isolates) when grown in a liquid medium with 3.5% NaCl. It was found that wild species of alfalfa, melilot, and trigonella preferably formed symbioses with salt-tolerant nodule bacteria in both salinized and nonsalinized soils. Only two alfalfa species, Medicago falcata and M. trautvetteri, formed efficient symbioses in soils contrasting in salinity. The formation of efficient symbiosis with alfalfa in the presence of 0.6% NaCl was studied in 36 isolates (N and S) differing in salt tolerance and symbiotic efficiency. Fifteen isolates formed efficient symbioses in the presence of salt. The increase in the dry weight of the plants was 25-68% higher than in the control group. The efficiency of symbiotic interaction under salinization conditions depended on the efficiency of the isolates under standard conditions but did not correlate with the source of nodule bacteria (soil or nodule) or their salt tolerance. The results indicate that nodule bacterium strains forming efficient symbioses under salinization conditions can be found.

  1. Mixed Nodule Infection in Sinorhizobium meliloti–Medicago sativa Symbiosis Suggest the Presence of Cheating Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Checcucci, Alice; Azzarello, Elisa; Bazzicalupo, Marco; Galardini, Marco; Lagomarsino, Alessandra; Mancuso, Stefano; Marti, Lucia; Marzano, Maria C.; Mocali, Stefano; Squartini, Andrea; Zanardo, Marina; Mengoni, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    In the symbiosis between rhizobia and legumes, host plants can form symbiotic root nodules with multiple rhizobial strains, potentially showing different symbiotic performances in nitrogen fixation. Here, we investigated the presence of mixed nodules, containing rhizobia with different degrees of mutualisms, and evaluate their relative fitness in the Sinorhizobium meliloti–Medicago sativa model symbiosis. We used three S. meliloti strains, the mutualist strains Rm1021 and BL225C and the non-mutualist AK83. We performed competition experiments involving both in vitro and in vivo symbiotic assays with M. sativa host plants. We show the occurrence of a high number (from 27 to 100%) of mixed nodules with no negative effect on both nitrogen fixation and plant growth. The estimation of the relative fitness as non-mutualist/mutualist ratios in single nodules shows that in some nodules the non-mutualist strain efficiently colonized root nodules along with the mutualist ones. In conclusion, we can support the hypothesis that in S. meliloti–M. sativa symbiosis mixed nodules are formed and allow non-mutualist or less-mutualist bacterial partners to be less or not sanctioned by the host plant, hence allowing a potential form of cheating behavior to be present in the nitrogen fixing symbiosis. PMID:27379128

  2. Mixed Nodule Infection in Sinorhizobium meliloti-Medicago sativa Symbiosis Suggest the Presence of Cheating Behavior.

    PubMed

    Checcucci, Alice; Azzarello, Elisa; Bazzicalupo, Marco; Galardini, Marco; Lagomarsino, Alessandra; Mancuso, Stefano; Marti, Lucia; Marzano, Maria C; Mocali, Stefano; Squartini, Andrea; Zanardo, Marina; Mengoni, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    In the symbiosis between rhizobia and legumes, host plants can form symbiotic root nodules with multiple rhizobial strains, potentially showing different symbiotic performances in nitrogen fixation. Here, we investigated the presence of mixed nodules, containing rhizobia with different degrees of mutualisms, and evaluate their relative fitness in the Sinorhizobium meliloti-Medicago sativa model symbiosis. We used three S. meliloti strains, the mutualist strains Rm1021 and BL225C and the non-mutualist AK83. We performed competition experiments involving both in vitro and in vivo symbiotic assays with M. sativa host plants. We show the occurrence of a high number (from 27 to 100%) of mixed nodules with no negative effect on both nitrogen fixation and plant growth. The estimation of the relative fitness as non-mutualist/mutualist ratios in single nodules shows that in some nodules the non-mutualist strain efficiently colonized root nodules along with the mutualist ones. In conclusion, we can support the hypothesis that in S. meliloti-M. sativa symbiosis mixed nodules are formed and allow non-mutualist or less-mutualist bacterial partners to be less or not sanctioned by the host plant, hence allowing a potential form of cheating behavior to be present in the nitrogen fixing symbiosis. PMID:27379128

  3. New aspect of plant-rhizobia interaction: alkaloid biosynthesis in Crotalaria depends on nodulation.

    PubMed

    Irmer, Simon; Podzun, Nora; Langel, Dorothee; Heidemann, Franziska; Kaltenegger, Elisabeth; Schemmerling, Brigitte; Geilfus, Christoph-Martin; Zörb, Christian; Ober, Dietrich

    2015-03-31

    Infection of legume hosts by rhizobial bacteria results in the formation of a specialized organ, the nodule, in which atmospheric nitrogen is reduced to ammonia. Nodulation requires the reprogramming of the plant cell, allowing the microsymbiont to enter the plant tissue in a highly controlled manner. We have found that, in Crotalaria (Fabaceae), this reprogramming is associated with the biosynthesis of pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs). These compounds are part of the plant's chemical defense against herbivores and cannot be regarded as being functionally involved in the symbiosis. PAs in Crotalaria are detectable only when the plants form nodules after infection with their rhizobial partner. The identification of a plant-derived sequence encoding homospermidine synthase (HSS), the first pathway-specific enzyme of PA biosynthesis, suggests that the plant and not the microbiont is the producer of PAs. Transcripts of HSS are detectable exclusively in the nodules, the tissue with the highest concentration of PAs, indicating that PA biosynthesis is restricted to the nodules and that the nodules are the source from which the alkaloids are transported to the above ground parts of the plant. The link between nodulation and the biosynthesis of nitrogen-containing alkaloids in Crotalaria highlights a further facet of the effect of symbiosis with rhizobia on the ecologically important trait of the plant's chemical defense. PMID:25775562

  4. Mixed Nodule Infection in Sinorhizobium meliloti-Medicago sativa Symbiosis Suggest the Presence of Cheating Behavior.

    PubMed

    Checcucci, Alice; Azzarello, Elisa; Bazzicalupo, Marco; Galardini, Marco; Lagomarsino, Alessandra; Mancuso, Stefano; Marti, Lucia; Marzano, Maria C; Mocali, Stefano; Squartini, Andrea; Zanardo, Marina; Mengoni, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    In the symbiosis between rhizobia and legumes, host plants can form symbiotic root nodules with multiple rhizobial strains, potentially showing different symbiotic performances in nitrogen fixation. Here, we investigated the presence of mixed nodules, containing rhizobia with different degrees of mutualisms, and evaluate their relative fitness in the Sinorhizobium meliloti-Medicago sativa model symbiosis. We used three S. meliloti strains, the mutualist strains Rm1021 and BL225C and the non-mutualist AK83. We performed competition experiments involving both in vitro and in vivo symbiotic assays with M. sativa host plants. We show the occurrence of a high number (from 27 to 100%) of mixed nodules with no negative effect on both nitrogen fixation and plant growth. The estimation of the relative fitness as non-mutualist/mutualist ratios in single nodules shows that in some nodules the non-mutualist strain efficiently colonized root nodules along with the mutualist ones. In conclusion, we can support the hypothesis that in S. meliloti-M. sativa symbiosis mixed nodules are formed and allow non-mutualist or less-mutualist bacterial partners to be less or not sanctioned by the host plant, hence allowing a potential form of cheating behavior to be present in the nitrogen fixing symbiosis.

  5. Shoot versus Root Signal Involvement in Nodulation and Vegetative Growth in Wild-Type and Hypernodulating Soybean Genotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, C.; Harper, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    Grafting studies involving Williams 82 (normally nodulating) and NOD1-3 (hypernodulating) soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) lines and Lablab purpureus were used to evaluate the effect of shoot and root on nodulation control and plant growth. A single- or double-wedge graft technique, with superimposed partial defoliation, was used to separate signal control from a photosynthate supply effect. Grafting of hypernodulated soybean shoots to roots of Williams 82 or L. purpureus resulted in increased nodule numbers. Grafting of two shoots to one root enhanced root growth in both soybean genotypes, whereas the nodule number was a function of shoot genotype but not of the photosynthetic area. In double-shoot, single-root-grafted plants, removing trifoliolate leaves from either Williams 82 or NOD1-3 shoots decreased root and shoot dry matter, attributable to decreased photosynthetic source. Concurrently, Williams 82 shoot defoliation increased the nodule number, whereas NOD1-3 shoot defoliation decreased the nodule number on both soybean and L. purpureus roots. It was concluded that (a) soybean leaves are the dominant site of autoregulatory signal production, which controls the nodule number; (b) soybean and L. purpureus have a common, translocatable, autoregulatory control signal; (c) seedling vegetative growth and nodule number are independently controlled; and (d) two signals, inhibitor and promoter, may be involved in controlling legume nodule numbers. PMID:12223646

  6. A Peptidoglycan-Remodeling Enzyme Is Critical for Bacteroid Differentiation in Bradyrhizobium spp. During Legume Symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Gully, Djamel; Gargani, Daniel; Bonaldi, Katia; Grangeteau, Cédric; Chaintreuil, Clémence; Fardoux, Joël; Nguyen, Phuong; Marchetti, Roberta; Nouwen, Nico; Molinaro, Antonio; Mergaert, Peter; Giraud, Eric

    2016-06-01

    In response to the presence of compatible rhizobium bacteria, legumes form symbiotic organs called nodules on their roots. These nodules house nitrogen-fixing bacteroids that are a differentiated form of the rhizobium bacteria. In some legumes, the bacteroid differentiation comprises a dramatic cell enlargement, polyploidization, and other morphological changes. Here, we demonstrate that a peptidoglycan-modifying enzyme in Bradyrhizobium strains, a DD-carboxypeptidase that contains a peptidoglycan-binding SPOR domain, is essential for normal bacteroid differentiation in Aeschynomene species. The corresponding mutants formed bacteroids that are malformed and hypertrophied. However, in soybean, a plant that does not induce morphological differentiation of its symbiont, the mutation does not affect the bacteroids. Remarkably, the mutation also leads to necrosis in a large fraction of the Aeschynomene nodules, indicating that a normally formed peptidoglycan layer is essential for avoiding the induction of plant immune responses by the invading bacteria. In addition to exopolysaccharides, capsular polysaccharides, and lipopolysaccharides, whose role during symbiosis is well defined, our work demonstrates an essential role in symbiosis for yet another rhizobial envelope component, the peptidoglycan layer.

  7. Evaluation of a thyroid nodule

    PubMed Central

    Bomeli, Steven R.; LeBeau, Shane O.; Ferris, Robert L

    2010-01-01

    The thyroid specialist frequently evaluates thyroid nodules because they may represent malignancy. Nodules are typically found on physical exam or incidentally when other imaging studies are performed. Malignant or symptomatic nodules that compress nearby structures warrant surgical excision. Yet, the majority of thyroid nodules are asymptomatic and benign, so the thyroid surgeon must rely on diagnostic studies to determine when surgery is indicated. Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for thyroid nodules, and the ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) is the preferred method of tissue sampling. Nodules one centimeter or larger, or nodules with suspicious sonographic appearance warrant cytologic analysis to better quantify the risk of malignancy. Molecular biomarkers are a powerful adjunct to cytology, as detecting malignancy pre-operatively allows total thyroidectomy in a single operation without the need for frozen section or a second operation for completion thyroidectomy if malignancy is found during the initial thyroid lobectomy. PMID:20510711

  8. Importance of rhizobia in Agriculture: potential of the commercial inoculants and native strains for improving legume yields in different land-use systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesueur, D.; Atieno, M.; Mathu, S.; Herrmann, L.

    2012-04-01

    Legumes play an important role in the traditional diets of many regions throughout the world because they provide a multitude of benefits to both the soil and other crops grown in combination with them or following them in several cropping systems. The ability of legumes to fix atmospheric nitrogen in association with rhizobia gives them the capacity to grow in very degraded soils. But do we have to systematically inoculate legumes? For example our results suggested that the systematic inoculation of both cowpea and green gram in Kenya with commercial inoculants to improve yields is not really justified, native strains performing better than inoculated strains. But when native rhizobia nodulating legumes are not naturally present, application of rhizobial inoculants is very commonly used. Our results showed that the utilization of effective good-quality rhizobial inoculants by farmers have a real potential to improve legume yields in unfertile soils requesting high applications of mineral fertilizers. For example an effective soybean commercial inoculants was tested in different locations in Kenya (in about 150 farms in 3 mandate areas presenting different soil characteristics and environmental conditions). Application of the rhizobial inoculant significantly increased the soybean yields in all mandate areas (about 75% of the farms). Nodule occupancy analysis showed that a high number of nodules occupied by the inoculated strain did not obviously lead to an increase of soybean production. Soil factors (pH, P, C, N…) seemed to affect the inoculant efficiency whether the strain is occupying the nodules or not. Our statistic analysis showed that soil pH significantly affected nodulation and yield, though the effect was variable depending on the region. We concluded that the competitiveness of rhizobial strains might not be the main factor explaining the effect (or lack of) of legumes inoculation in the field. Another study was aiming to assess if several factors

  9. A Genomic Encyclopedia of the Root Nodule Bacteria: assessing genetic diversity through a systematic biogeographic survey

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Root nodule bacteria are free-living soil bacteria, belonging to diverse genera within the Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria, that have the capacity to form nitrogen-fixing symbioses with legumes. The symbiosis is specific and is governed by signaling molecules produced from both host and bacteria. Sequencing of several model RNB genomes has provided valuable insights into the genetic basis of symbiosis. However, the small number of sequenced RNB genomes available does not currently reflect the phylogenetic diversity of RNB, or the variety of mechanisms that lead to symbiosis in different legume hosts. This prevents a broad understanding of symbiotic interactions and the factors that govern the biogeography of host-microbe symbioses. Here, we outline a proposal to expand the number of sequenced RNB strains, which aims to capture this phylogenetic and biogeographic diversity. Through the Vavilov centers of diversity (Proposal ID: 231) and GEBA-RNB (Proposal ID: 882) projects we will sequence 107 RNB strains, isolated from diverse legume hosts in various geographic locations around the world. The nominated strains belong to nine of the 16 currently validly described RNB genera. They include 13 type strains, as well as elite inoculant strains of high commercial importance. These projects will strongly support systematic sequence-based studies of RNB and contribute to our understanding of the effects of biogeography on the evolution of different species of RNB, as well as the mechanisms that determine the specificity and effectiveness of nodulation and symbiotic nitrogen fixation by RNB with diverse legume hosts. PMID:25685260

  10. A Genomic Encyclopedia of the Root Nodule Bacteria: assessing genetic diversity through a systematic biogeographic survey.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Wayne; Ardley, Julie; Tian, Rui; Eshragi, Leila; Yoon, Je Won; Ngamwisetkun, Pinyaruk; Seshadri, Rekha; Ivanova, Natalia N; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2015-01-01

    Root nodule bacteria are free-living soil bacteria, belonging to diverse genera within the Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria, that have the capacity to form nitrogen-fixing symbioses with legumes. The symbiosis is specific and is governed by signaling molecules produced from both host and bacteria. Sequencing of several model RNB genomes has provided valuable insights into the genetic basis of symbiosis. However, the small number of sequenced RNB genomes available does not currently reflect the phylogenetic diversity of RNB, or the variety of mechanisms that lead to symbiosis in different legume hosts. This prevents a broad understanding of symbiotic interactions and the factors that govern the biogeography of host-microbe symbioses. Here, we outline a proposal to expand the number of sequenced RNB strains, which aims to capture this phylogenetic and biogeographic diversity. Through the Vavilov centers of diversity (Proposal ID: 231) and GEBA-RNB (Proposal ID: 882) projects we will sequence 107 RNB strains, isolated from diverse legume hosts in various geographic locations around the world. The nominated strains belong to nine of the 16 currently validly described RNB genera. They include 13 type strains, as well as elite inoculant strains of high commercial importance. These projects will strongly support systematic sequence-based studies of RNB and contribute to our understanding of the effects of biogeography on the evolution of different species of RNB, as well as the mechanisms that determine the specificity and effectiveness of nodulation and symbiotic nitrogen fixation by RNB with diverse legume hosts.

  11. High diversity of Bradyrhizobium strains isolated from several legume species and land uses in Brazilian tropical ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Azarias Guimarães, Amanda; Florentino, Ligiane Aparecida; Alves Almeida, Kize; Lebbe, Liesbeth; Barroso Silva, Karina; Willems, Anne; de Souza Moreira, Fatima Maria

    2015-09-01

    The genus Bradyrhizobium stands out among nitrogen-fixing legume-nodulating bacteria because it predominates among the efficient microsymbionts of forest, forage, and green manure legume species, as well as important species of grain legumes, such as soybean, cowpea, and peanut. Therefore, the diversity of Bradyrhizobium strains is a relevant resource from environmental and economic perspectives, and strains isolated from diverse legume species and land uses in Brazilian tropical ecosystems were assessed in this study. To accomplish this, sequences of four housekeeping genes (atpD, dnaK, gyrB, and recA) were individually analysed, with the first three also being considered using multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA). The sensitivity of the strains to different antibiotics, their tolerance to different levels of salinity, and their ability to nodulate soybean plants were also measured. The phylogenetic trees based on each individual gene, and on the concatenated housekeeping genes, revealed several strain clusters separated from any currently described species. The Bradyrhizobium strains studied were generally resistant to antibiotics. All strains were able to grow at salinity levels of up to 0.5% NaCl, whereas only strains UFLA03-142, UFLA03-143, UFLA03-145, and UFLA03-146 grew in the presence of 1% NaCl. Together, the results indicated that some of the strains studied were potential novel species, indicating that the various soils and ecosystems in Brazil may harbour an as yet unknown diversity of rhizobia.

  12. Quorum-sensing regulation in rhizobia and its role in symbiotic interactions with legumes.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Contreras, Maria; Bauer, Wolfgang D; Gao, Mengsheng; Robinson, Jayne B; Allan Downie, J

    2007-07-29

    Legume-nodulating bacteria (rhizobia) usually produce N-acyl homoserine lactones, which regulate the induction of gene expression in a quorum-sensing (or population-density)-dependent manner. There is significant diversity in the types of quorum-sensing regulatory systems that are present in different rhizobia and no two independent isolates worked on in detail have the same complement of quorum-sensing genes. The genes regulated by quorum sensing appear to be rather diverse and many are associated with adaptive aspects of physiology that are probably important in the rhizosphere. It is evident that some aspects of rhizobial physiology related to the interaction between rhizobia and legumes are influenced by quorum sensing. However, it also appears that the legumes play an active role, both in terms of interfering with the rhizobial quorum-sensing systems and responding to the signalling molecules made by the bacteria. In this article, we review the diversity of quorum-sensing regulation in rhizobia and the potential role of legumes in influencing and responding to this signalling system.

  13. GRAS Proteins Form a DNA Binding Complex to Induce Gene Expression during Nodulation Signaling in Medicago truncatula[W

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Sibylle; Kim, Jiyoung; Muñoz, Alfonso; Heckmann, Anne B.; Downie, J. Allan; Oldroyd, Giles E.D.

    2009-01-01

    The symbiotic association of legumes with rhizobia involves bacterially derived Nod factor, which is sufficient to activate the formation of nodules on the roots of the host plant. Perception of Nod factor by root hair cells induces calcium oscillations that are a component of the Nod factor signal transduction pathway. Perception of the calcium oscillations is a function of a calcium- and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, and this activates nodulation gene expression via two GRAS domain transcriptional regulators, Nodulation Signaling Pathway1 (NSP1) and NSP2, and an ERF transcription factor required for nodulation. Here, we show that NSP1 and NSP2 form a complex that is associated with the promoters of early nodulin genes. We show that NSP1 binds directly to ENOD promoters through the novel cis-element AATTT. While NSP1 shows direct binding to the ENOD11 promoter in vitro, this association in vivo requires NSP2. The NSP1-NSP2 association with the ENOD11 promoter is enhanced following Nod factor elicitation. Mutations in the domain of NSP2 responsible for its interaction with NSP1 highlight the significance of the NSP1-NSP2 heteropolymer for nodulation signaling. Our work reveals direct binding of a GRAS protein complex to DNA and highlights the importance of the NSP1-NSP2 complex for efficient nodulation in the model legume Medicago truncatula. PMID:19252081

  14. Legume Information System (LegumeInfo.org): a key component of a set of federated data resources for the legume family

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Legume Information System (LIS), at http://legumeinfo.org, is a genomic data portal (GDP) for the legume family. LIS provides access to genetic and genomic information for major crop and model legumes. With more than two-dozen domesticated legume species, there are numerous specialists working o...

  15. Comparison of the Nodule vs. Root Transcriptome of the Actinorhizal Plant Datisca glomerata: Actinorhizal Nodules Contain a Specific Class of Defensins

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Patricia; Plaszczyca, Marian; Pawlowski, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    Actinorhizal root nodule symbioses are very diverse, and the symbiosis of Datisca glomerata has previously been shown to have many unusual aspects. In order to gain molecular information on the infection mechanism, nodule development and nodule metabolism, we compared the transcriptomes of D. glomerata roots and nodules. Root and nodule libraries representing the 3′-ends of cDNAs were subjected to high-throughput parallel 454 sequencing. To identify the corresponding genes and to improve the assembly, Illumina sequencing of the nodule transcriptome was performed as well. The evaluation revealed 406 differentially regulated genes, 295 of which (72.7%) could be assigned a function based on homology. Analysis of the nodule transcriptome showed that genes encoding components of the common symbiosis signaling pathway were present in nodules of D. glomerata, which in combination with the previously established function of SymRK in D. glomerata nodulation suggests that this pathway is also active in actinorhizal Cucurbitales. Furthermore, comparison of the D. glomerata nodule transcriptome with nodule transcriptomes from actinorhizal Fagales revealed a new subgroup of nodule-specific defensins that might play a role specific to actinorhizal symbioses. The D. glomerata members of this defensin subgroup contain an acidic C-terminal domain that was never found in plant defensins before. PMID:24009681

  16. Utilization of summer legumes as bioenergy feedstocks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunn hemp (Crotolaria juncea), is a fast growing, high biomass yielding tropical legume that may be a possible southeastern bioenergy crop. When comparing this legume to a commonly grown summer legume—cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata), sunn hemp was superior in biomass yield and subsequent energy yield. S...

  17. A sustainable legume biomass energy farming system

    SciTech Connect

    Neathery, J.; Rubel, A.; Stencel, J.; Collins, M.

    1996-12-31

    Before environmentally sensitive areas are converted to biomass energy production, the production, the potential for sustainability of such systems must be assessed. The focus has been on woody or grass crops because of their high potential yields; however, yield sustainability is dependent on the application of fertilizer and lining materials, which in turn contribute to large costs. Growing legumes or mixtures of legumes with grasses could lower or alleviate the need for nitrate fertilizers. The incorporation of legumes into energy cropping systems could: (1) add soil organic matter; (2) introduce biologically fixed N; (3) improve soil structure and texture; (4) reduce soil erosion; (5) reduce production costs; and (6) decrease nitrate run-off in surface waters. Through the {open_quotes}rotation effect{close_quotes}, legumes cause increases in yield of subsequent non-legume crops beyond that accounted for by biologically-fixed N alone. In this paper, we describe a biomass energy system combining legume and grass biomass energy with fertilizer production from these same materials. Preliminary agronomic and engineering assessments for this type of biomass system are presented. The technologies needed to integrate nitrate production with legume energy farming and energy production through legume energy conversion are identified.

  18. Scent glands in legume flowers.

    PubMed

    Marinho, C R; Souza, C D; Barros, T C; Teixeira, S P

    2014-01-01

    Scent glands, or osmophores, are predominantly floral secretory structures that secrete volatile substances during anthesis, and therefore act in interactions with pollinators. The Leguminosae family, despite being the third largest angiosperm family, with a wide geographical distribution and diversity of habits, morphology and pollinators, has been ignored with respect to these glands. Thus, we localised and characterised the sites of fragrance production and release in flowers of legumes, in which scent plays an important role in pollination, and also tested whether there are relationships between the structure of the scent gland and the pollinator habit: diurnal or nocturnal. Flowers in pre-anthesis and anthesis of 12 legume species were collected and analysed using immersion in neutral red, olfactory tests and anatomical studies (light and scanning electron microscopy). The main production site of floral scent is the perianth, especially the petals. The scent glands are distributed in a restricted way in Caesalpinia pulcherrima, Anadenanthera peregrina, Inga edulis and Parkia pendula, constituting mesophilic osmophores, and in a diffuse way in Bauhinia rufa, Hymenaea courbaril, Erythrostemon gilliesii, Poincianella pluviosa, Pterodon pubescens, Platycyamus regnellii, Mucuna urens and Tipuana tipu. The glands are comprised of cells of the epidermis and mesophyll that secrete mainly terpenes, nitrogen compounds and phenols. Relationships between the presence of osmophores and type of anthesis (diurnal and nocturnal) and the pollinator were not found. Our data on scent glands in Leguminosae are original and detail the type of diffuse release, which has been very poorly studied. PMID:23574349

  19. Genetic characterization of fast-growing rhizobia able to nodulate Prosopis alba in North Spain.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Olga; Rivas, Raúl; García-Fraile, Paula; Abril, Adriana; Mateos, Pedro F; Martinez-Molina, Eustoquio; Velázquez, Encarna

    2007-12-01

    Prosopis is a Mimosaceae legume tree indigenous to South America and not naturalized in Europe. In this work 18 rhizobial strains nodulating Prosopis alba roots were isolated from a soil in North Spain that belong to eight different randomly amplified polymorphic DNA groups phylogenetically related to Sinorhizobium medicae, Sinorhizobium meliloti and Rhizobium giardinii according to their intergenic spacer and 16S rRNA gene sequences. The nodC genes of isolates close to S. medicae and S. meliloti were identical to those of S. medicae USDA 1,037(T) and S. meliloti LMG 6,133(T) and accordingly all these strains were able to nodulate both alfalfa and Prosopis. These nodC genes were phylogenetically divergent from those of the isolates close to R. giardinii that were identical to that of R. giardinii H152(T) and therefore all these strains formed nodules in common beans and Prosopis. The nodC genes of the strains isolated in Spain were phylogenetically divergent from that carried by Mesorhizobium chacoense Pr-5(T) and Sinorhizobium arboris LMG 1,4919(T) nodulating Prosopis in America and Africa, respectively. Therefore, Prosopis is a promiscuous host which can establish symbiosis with strains carrying very divergent nodC genes and this promiscuity may be an important advantage for this legume tree to be used in reforestation.

  20. New Betaproteobacterial Rhizobium Strains Able To Efficiently Nodulate Parapiptadenia rigida (Benth.) Brenan

    PubMed Central

    Taulé, Cecilia; Zabaleta, María; Mareque, Cintia; Platero, Raúl; Sanjurjo, Lucía; Sicardi, Margarita; Frioni, Lillian; Battistoni, Federico

    2012-01-01

    Among the leguminous trees native to Uruguay, Parapiptadenia rigida (Angico), a Mimosoideae legume, is one of the most promising species for agroforestry. Like many other legumes, it is able to establish symbiotic associations with rhizobia and belongs to the group known as nitrogen-fixing trees, which are major components of agroforestry systems. Information about rhizobial symbionts for this genus is scarce, and thus, the aim of this work was to identify and characterize rhizobia associated with P. rigida. A collection of Angico-nodulating isolates was obtained, and 47 isolates were selected for genetic studies. According to enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR patterns and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of their nifH and 16S rRNA genes, the isolates could be grouped into seven genotypes, including the genera Burkholderia, Cupriavidus, and Rhizobium, among which the Burkholderia genotypes were the predominant group. Phylogenetic studies of nifH, nodA, and nodC sequences from the Burkholderia and the Cupriavidus isolates indicated a close relationship of these genes with those from betaproteobacterial rhizobia (beta-rhizobia) rather than from alphaproteobacterial rhizobia (alpha-rhizobia). In addition, nodulation assays with representative isolates showed that while the Cupriavidus isolates were able to effectively nodulate Mimosa pudica, the Burkholderia isolates produced white and ineffective nodules on this host. PMID:22226956

  1. Nodule performance within a changing environmental context.

    PubMed

    Aranjuelo, Iker; Arrese-Igor, Cesar; Molero, Gemma

    2014-07-15

    Global climate models predict that future environmental conditions will see alterations in temperature, water availability and CO2 concentration ([CO2]) in the atmosphere. Climate change will reinforce the need to develop highly productive crops. For this purpose it is essential to identify target traits conditioning plant performance in changing environments. N2 fixing plants represent the second major crop of agricultural importance worldwide. The current review provides a compilation of results from existing literature on the effects of several abiotic stress conditions on nodule performance and N2 fixation. The environmental factors analysed include water stress, salinity, temperature, and elevated [CO2]. Despite the large number of studies analysing [CO2] effects in plants, frequently they have been conducted under optimal growth conditions that are difficult to find in natural conditions where different stresses often occur simultaneously. This is why we have also included a section describing the current state of knowledge of interacting environmental conditions in nodule functioning. Regardless of the environmental factor considered, it is evident that some general patterns of nodule response are observed. Nodule carbohydrate and N compound availability, together with the presence of oxygen reactive species (ROS) have proven to be the key factors modulating N2 fixation at the physiological/biochemical levels. However, with the exception of water availability and [CO2], it should also be considered that nodule performance has not been characterised in detail under other limiting growth conditions. This highlights the necessity to conduct further studies considering these factors. Finally, we also observe that a better understanding of these metabolic effects of changing environment in nodule functioning would require an integrated and synergistic investigation based on widely used and novel protocols such as transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and

  2. Legume promotion in counselling: an e-mail survey of dietitians.

    PubMed

    Desrochers, N; Brauer, P M

    2001-01-01

    Little is known about dietitians current practice in counselling clients about the use of legumes in a low fat, high fibre diet. An exploratory e-mail questionnaire was sent to members of Dietitians of Canada to assess: dietitian use and preferences for legumes, dietitian practice, opinions about clients attitudes and preferences, and resource needs. Counsellors (n=256) had high personal use of legumes (64% > or = 1 serving/week) and frequently recommended legumes in counselling. The legumes most preferred by respondents and their clients were: peanuts, kidney beans, split peas, chickpeas, and lentils. Respondents often recommended canned bean products (76%) and tofu (61%), but other legume grocery products were less often recommended. The most common client issues identified were: flatulence (87% agreed), lack of familiarity (85%), and knowledge of preparation (82%). Dietitians were not satisfied with current resources to support practice, especially those respondents providing primarily clinical counselling services. The most requested resources were: recipes (90%), pamphlets (82%), food demonstrations (75%) and Internet sites (63%). Client level research is now needed to confirm the importance of the issues identified and to develop and test strategies for legume promotion in counselling. PMID:11742561

  3. GS52 Ecto-Apyrase Plays a Critical Role during Soybean Nodulation1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Govindarajulu, Manjula; Kim, Sung-Yong; Libault, Marc; Berg, R. Howard; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Stacey, Gary; Taylor, Christopher G.

    2009-01-01

    Apyrases are non-energy-coupled nucleotide phosphohydrolases that hydrolyze nucleoside triphosphates and nucleoside diphosphates to nucleoside monophosphates and orthophosphates. GS52, a soybean (Glycine soja) ecto-apyrase, was previously shown to be induced very early in response to inoculation with the symbiotic bacterium Bradyrhizobium japonicum. Overexpression of the GS52 ecto-apyrase in Lotus japonicus increased the level of rhizobial infection and enhanced nodulation. These data suggest a critical role for the GS52 ecto-apyrase during nodulation. To further investigate the role of GS52 during nodulation, we used RNA interference to silence GS52 expression in soybean (Glycine max) roots using Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated root transformation. Transcript levels of GS52 were significantly reduced in GS52 silenced roots and these roots exhibited reduced numbers of mature nodules. Development of the nodule primordium and subsequent nodule maturation was significantly suppressed in GS52 silenced roots. Transmission electron micrographs of GS52 silenced root nodules showed that early senescence and infected cortical cells were devoid of symbiosome-containing bacteroids. Application of exogenous adenosine diphosphate to silenced GS52 roots restored nodule development. Restored nodules contained bacteroids, thus indicating that extracellular adenosine diphosphate is important during nodulation. These results clearly suggest that GS52 ecto-apyrase catalytic activity is critical for the early B. japonicum infection process, initiation of nodule primordium development, and subsequent nodule organogenesis in soybean. PMID:19036836

  4. Multiple chronic benign pulmonary nodules.

    PubMed

    Kalifa, L G; Schimmel, D H; Gamsu, G

    1976-11-01

    Four cases are discussed in which were found unusual multiple chronic pulmonary nodules: leiomyomatous hamartomas, rheumatoid nodules, multiple histoplasmomas, and possible multiple plasma cell granulomas (hyalinizing pulmonary nodules). In each case the initial impression of metastic malignancy was countered by more than 2 years' observation, during which time the lesions appeared to be benign. Histologic examination is necessary to exclude malignancy, although a definitive diagnosis may be difficult to establish. PMID:981596

  5. Competition among rhizobium species for nodulation of Leucaena leucocephala in two tropical soils

    SciTech Connect

    Moawad, H.; Bohlool, B.B.

    1984-07-01

    The successful nodulation of legumes by a Rhizobium strain is determined by the competitve ability of that strain against the mixture of other native and inoculant rhizobia. Competition among six Leucaena rhizobial strains in single and multistrain inoculants were studied. Field inoculation trials were conducted in an oxisol and a mollisol soil, both of which contained indigenous Leucaena-nodulating rhizobia. Strain-specific fluorescent antibodies were used for the identification of the strains in Leucaena nodules. Mixtures of three recommended inoculum strains for Leucaena species (TAL82, TAL582, and TAL1145) were used in peat-based inocula either alone or with one of the three other strains isolated from the sites, B213, B214, and B215. Each of these latter three strains was also used as single-strain inocula to study their competition with the native rhizobia in the two soil systems. In the oxisol soil, strains B213 and B215, when used as single-strain inocula, outcompeted the native rhizobia and formed 92 and 62% of the nodules, respectively. Strain B214 was the least competitive in oxisol soil, where it formed 30% of the nodules, and the best in mollisol soil, where it formed 70% of the nodules. The most successful competitor for nodulation in multistrain inocula was strain TAL1145, which outcompeted native and other inoculum Leucaena rhizobia is both soils. None of the strains in single or multistrain inoculants was capable of completely overcoming the resident rhizobia, which formed 4 to 70% of the total nodules in oxisol soil and 12 to 72% in mollisol soil. No strong relationship was detected between the size of the rhizosphere population of a strain and its successful occupation of nodules. 24 references.

  6. BRISC-an open source pulmonary nodule image retrieval framework.

    PubMed

    Lam, Michael O; Disney, Tim; Raicu, Daniela S; Furst, Jacob; Channin, David S

    2007-11-01

    We have created a content-based image retrieval framework for computed tomography images of pulmonary nodules. When presented with a nodule image, the system retrieves images of similar nodules from a collection prepared by the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC). The system (1) extracts images of individual nodules from the LIDC collection based on LIDC expert annotations, (2) stores the extracted data in a flat XML database, (3) calculates a set of quantitative descriptors for each nodule that provide a high-level characterization of its texture, and (4) uses various measures to determine the similarity of two nodules and perform queries on a selected query nodule. Using our framework, we compared three feature extraction methods: Haralick co-occurrence, Gabor filters, and Markov random fields. Gabor and Markov descriptors perform better at retrieving similar nodules than do Haralick co-occurrence techniques, with best retrieval precisions in excess of 88%. Because the software we have developed and the reference images are both open source and publicly available they may be incorporated into both commercial and academic imaging workstations and extended by others in their research.

  7. Synergism of VAM and Rhizobium on production and metabolism of IAA in roots and root nodules of Vigna mungo.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Jayanta; Chatterjee, Sabyasachi; Ghosh, Sisir; Chatterjee, Narayan Chandra; Dutta, Sikha

    2010-09-01

    Mature and healthy root nodules of Vigna mungo appeared to contain higher amount of indole-acetic acid (IAA) than non-nodulated roots. Dual effect of VAM fungus, Glomus fasciculatum and the nitrogen-fixing bacteria, Rhizobium sp. on the nodulation of roots of V. mungo was studied. It was recorded that the roots which were inoculated simultaneously with both the symbionts i.e., G. fasciculatum and Rhizobium exhibited greater amount of IAA production than the non-inoculated roots. A tryptophan pool present in the mature nodules and young leaves might serve as a precursor for IAA production in the roots and in the nodules. Activity of IAA-metabolizing enzymes, such as IAA oxidase, peroxidase, and polyphenol oxidase was investigated which indicates the active metabolism of IAA in roots and nodules. The Rhizobium symbiont isolated from fresh nodules of V. mungo produced significant amount of IAA under in vitro condition when tryptophan was added to the medium as precursor. Present study represents some beneficial effects of Rhizobium and G. fasciculatum on the production and metabolism of IAA in roots and nodules of V. mungo. The important physiological implication of the study on IAA production and its metabolism in Rhizobium-Legume-VAM tripartite symbiosis is certainly representing a new approach to satisfy the hormonal balance in the host plant.

  8. Terminal Bacteroid Differentiation Is Associated With Variable Morphological Changes in Legume Species Belonging to the Inverted Repeat-Lacking Clade.

    PubMed

    Montiel, Jesús; Szűcs, Attila; Boboescu, Iulian Z; Gherman, Vasile D; Kondorosi, Éva; Kereszt, Attila

    2016-03-01

    Medicago and closely related legume species from the inverted repeat-lacking clade (IRLC) impose terminal differentiation onto their bacterial endosymbionts, manifested in genome endoreduplication, cell enlargement, and loss of cell-division capacity. Nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) secreted host peptides are plant effectors of this process. As bacteroids in other IRLC legumes, such as Cicer arietinum and Glycyrrhiza lepidota, were reported not to display features of terminal differentiation, we investigated the fate of bacteroids in species from these genera as well as in four other species representing distinct genera of the phylogenetic tree for this clade. Bacteroids in all tested legumes proved to be larger in size and DNA content than cultured cells; however, the degree of cell elongation was rather variable in the different species. In addition, the reproductive ability of the bacteroids isolated from these legumes was remarkably reduced. In all IRLC species with available sequence data, the existence of NCR genes was found. These results indicate that IRLC legumes provoke terminal differentiation of their endosymbionts with different morphotypes, probably with the help of NCR peptides.

  9. Legume genomics: understanding biology through DNA and RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    O'Rourke, Jamie A.; Bolon, Yung-Tsi; Bucciarelli, Bruna; Vance, Carroll P.

    2014-01-01

    Background The legume family (Leguminosae) consists of approx. 17 000 species. A few of these species, including, but not limited to, Phaseolus vulgaris, Cicer arietinum and Cajanus cajan, are important dietary components, providing protein for approx. 300 million people worldwide. Additional species, including soybean (Glycine max) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa), are important crops utilized mainly in animal feed. In addition, legumes are important contributors to biological nitrogen, forming symbiotic relationships with rhizobia to fix atmospheric N2 and providing up to 30 % of available nitrogen for the next season of crops. The application of high-throughput genomic technologies including genome sequencing projects, genome re-sequencing (DNA-seq) and transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) by the legume research community has provided major insights into genome evolution, genomic architecture and domestication. Scope and Conclusions This review presents an overview of the current state of legume genomics and explores the role that next-generation sequencing technologies play in advancing legume genomics. The adoption of next-generation sequencing and implementation of associated bioinformatic tools has allowed researchers to turn each species of interest into their own model organism. To illustrate the power of next-generation sequencing, an in-depth overview of the transcriptomes of both soybean and white lupin (Lupinus albus) is provided. The soybean transcriptome focuses on analysing seed development in two near-isogenic lines, examining the role of transporters, oil biosynthesis and nitrogen utilization. The white lupin transcriptome analysis examines how phosphate deficiency alters gene expression patterns, inducing the formation of cluster roots. Such studies illustrate the power of next-generation sequencing and bioinformatic analyses in elucidating the gene networks underlying biological processes. PMID:24769535

  10. A mechanistic molecular test of the plant-sanction hypothesis in legume-rhizobia mutualism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marco, Diana E.; Pérez-Arnedo, Rebeca; Hidalgo-Perea, Ángeles; Olivares, José; Ruiz-Sainz, José E.; Sanjuán, Juan

    2009-09-01

    The origin and persistence of mutualism is difficult to explain because of the widespread occurrence of exploitative, 'cheating' partners. As a policing strategy stabilising intraspecific cooperation, host sanctions against non-N 2 fixing, cheating symbionts have been proposed to stabilise mutualism in legume-rhizobium symbiosis. Mechanism of penalisations would include decreased nodular rhizobial viability and/or early nodule senescence. We tested these potential mechanisms of penalisations in split-root experiments using two soybean varieties and two rhizobial strains, a cooperative, normal N 2-fixing strain and an isogenic non-fixing derivative. We found no differences in the number of viable rhizobia recovered from nodules and no differential expression of a nodular senescence molecular marker. Thus, our results do not support the hypothesis of plant sanctions acting against cheating rhizobia in our experimental conditions.

  11. Cessation of photosynthesis in Lotus japonicus leaves leads to reprogramming of nodule metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Flemetakis, Emmanouil

    2013-01-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) involves global changes in gene expression and metabolite accumulation in both rhizobia and the host plant. In order to study the metabolic changes mediated by leaf–root interaction, photosynthesis was limited in leaves by exposure of plants to darkness, and subsequently gene expression was profiled by real-time reverse transcription–PCR (RT–PCR) and metabolite levels by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry in the nodules of the model legume Lotus japonicus. Photosynthetic carbon deficiency caused by prolonged darkness affected many metabolic processes in L. japonicus nodules. Most of the metabolic genes analysed were down-regulated during the extended dark period. In addition to that, the levels of most metabolites decreased or remained unaltered, although accumulation of amino acids was observed. Reduced glycolysis and carbon fixation resulted in lower organic acid levels, especially of malate, the primary source of carbon for bacteroid metabolism and SNF. The high amino acid concentrations together with a reduction in total protein concentration indicate possible protein degradation in nodules under these conditions. Interestingly, comparisons between amino acid and protein content in various organs indicated systemic changes in response to prolonged darkness between nodulated and non-nodulated plants, rendering the nodule a source organ for both C and N under these conditions. PMID:23404899

  12. An Azorhizobium caulinodans ORS571 locus involved in lipopolysaccharide production and nodule formation on Sesbania rostrata stems and roots.

    PubMed Central

    Goethals, K; Leyman, B; Van Den Eede, G; Van Montagu, M; Holsters, M

    1994-01-01

    Azorhizobium caulinodans ORS571 is able to nodulate roots and stems of the tropical legume Sesbania rostrata. An ORS571 Tn5 insertion mutant, strain ORS571-X15, had a rough colony morphology, was nonmotile, and showed clumping behavior on various media. When this pleiotropic mutant was inoculated on roots or stems of the host, no nodules developed (Nod-). Compared with the wild type, strain ORS571-X15 produced lipopolysaccharides (LPS) with an altered ladder pattern on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels, suggestive of a different O-antigen structure with a lower degree of polymerization. A cosmid clone, pRG20, that fully complemented all phenotypes of ORS571-X15 was isolated. With a 6-kb EcoRI subfragment of pRG20, clumping was relieved and nodulation was almost completely restored, but the strain was still nonmotile. LPS preparations from these complemented strains resembled the wild-type LPS, although minor quantitative and qualitative differences were evident. The sequence of the locus hit by the Tn5 in ORS571-X15 (the oac locus) revealed a striking homology with the rfb locus of Salmonella typhimurium, which is involved in O-antigen biosynthesis. The Tn5 insertion position was mapped to the oac3 gene, homologous to rfbA, encoding dTDP-D-glucose synthase. Biochemical assaying showed that ORS571-X15 is indeed defective in dTDP-D-glucose synthase activity, essential for the production of particular deoxyhexoses. Therefore, it was proposed that the O antigen of the mutant strain is devoid of such sugars. Images PMID:7506708

  13. Mutation of praR in Rhizobium leguminosarum enhances root biofilms, improving nodulation competitiveness by increased expression of attachment proteins

    PubMed Central

    Frederix, Marijke; Edwards, Anne; Swiderska, Anna; Stanger, Andrew; Karunakaran, Ramakrishnan; Williams, Alan; Abbruscato, Pamela; Sanchez-Contreras, Maria; Poole, Philip S; Downie, J Allan

    2014-01-01

    In Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae, quorum-sensing is regulated by CinR, which induces the cinIS operon. CinI synthesizes an AHL, whereas CinS inactivates PraR, a repressor. Mutation of praR enhanced biofilms in vitro. We developed a light (lux)-dependent assay of rhizobial attachment to roots and demonstrated that mutation of praR increased biofilms on pea roots. The praR mutant out-competed wild-type for infection of pea nodules in mixed inoculations. Analysis of gene expression by microarrays and promoter fusions revealed that PraR represses its own transcription and mutation of praR increased expression of several genes including those encoding secreted proteins (the adhesins RapA2, RapB and RapC, two cadherins and the glycanase PlyB), the polysaccharide regulator RosR, and another protein similar to PraR. PraR bound to the promoters of several of these genes indicating direct repression. Mutations in rapA2, rapB, rapC, plyB, the cadherins or rosR did not affect the enhanced root attachment or nodule competitiveness of the praR mutant. However combinations of mutations in rapA, rapB and rapC abolished the enhanced attachment and nodule competitiveness. We conclude that relief of PraR-mediated repression determines a lifestyle switch allowing the expression of genes that are important for biofilm formation on roots and the subsequent initiation of infection of legume roots. PMID:24942546

  14. Split-root systems applied to the study of the legume-rhizobial symbiosis: what have we learned?

    PubMed

    Larrainzar, Estíbaliz; Gil-Quintana, Erena; Arrese-Igor, Cesar; González, Esther M; Marino, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    Split-root system (SRS) approaches allow the differential treatment of separate and independent root systems, while sharing a common aerial part. As such, SRS is a useful tool for the discrimination of systemic (shoot origin) versus local (root/nodule origin) regulation mechanisms. This type of approach is particularly useful when studying the complex regulatory mechanisms governing the symbiosis established between legumes and Rhizobium bacteria. The current work provides an overview of the main insights gained from the application of SRS approaches to understand how nodule number (nodulation autoregulation) and nitrogen fixation are controlled both under non-stressful conditions and in response to a variety of stresses. Nodule number appears to be mainly controlled at the systemic level through a signal which is produced by nodule/root tissue, translocated to the shoot, and transmitted back to the root system, involving shoot Leu-rich repeat receptor-like kinases. In contrast, both local and systemic mechanisms have been shown to operate for the regulation of nitrogenase activity in nodules. Under drought and heavy metal stress, the regulation is mostly local, whereas the application of exogenous nitrogen seems to exert a regulation of nitrogen fixation both at the local and systemic levels.

  15. Nodulation in Dimorphandra wilsonii Rizz. (Caesalpinioideae), a Threatened Species Native to the Brazilian Cerrado

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Márcia Bacelar; Peix, Alvaro; de Faria, Sergio Miana; Mateos, Pedro F.; Rivera, Lina P.; Simões-Araujo, Jean L.; França, Marcel Giovanni Costa; dos Santos Isaias, Rosy Mary; Cruz, Cristina; Velázquez, Encarna; Scotti, Maria Rita; Sprent, Janet I.; James, Euan K.

    2012-01-01

    The threatened caesalpinioid legume Dimorphandra wilsonii, which is native to the Cerrado biome in Brazil, was examined for its nodulation and N2-fixing ability, and was compared with another, less-threatened species, D. jorgei. Nodulation and potential N2 fixation was shown on seedlings that had been inoculated singly with five bradyrhizobial isolates from mature D. wilsonii nodules. The infection of D. wilsonii by two of these strains (Dw10.1, Dw12.5) was followed in detail using light and transmission electron microscopy, and was compared with that of D. jorgei by Bradyrhizobium strain SEMIA6099. The roots of D. wilsonii were infected via small transient root hairs at 42 d after inoculation (dai), and nodules were sufficiently mature at 63 dai to express nitrogenase protein. Similar infection and nodule developmental processes were observed in D. jorgei. The bacteroids in mature Dimorphandra nodules were enclosed in plant cell wall material containing a homogalacturonan (pectic) epitope that was recognized by the monoclonal antibody JIM5. Analysis of sequences of their rrs (16S rRNA) genes and their ITS regions showed that the five D. wilsonii strains, although related to SEMIA6099, may constitute five undescribed species of genus Bradyrhizobium, whilst their nodD and nifH gene sequences showed that they formed clearly separated branches from other rhizobial strains. This is the first study to describe in full the N2-fixing symbiotic interaction between defined rhizobial strains and legumes in the sub-family Caesalpinioideae. This information will hopefully assist in the conservation of the threatened species D. wilsonii. PMID:23185349

  16. Lignification of cell walls of infected cells in Casuarina glauca nodules that depend on symplastic sugar supply is accompanied by reduction of plasmodesmata number and narrowing of plasmodesmata.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Maria; Koteyeva, Nouria K; Zdyb, Anna; Santos, Patricia; Voitsekhovskaja, Olga V; Demchenko, Kirill N; Pawlowski, Katharina

    2013-04-01

    The oxygen protection system for the bacterial nitrogen-fixing enzyme complex nitrogenase in actinorhizal nodules of Casuarina glauca resembles that of legume nodules: infected cells contain large amounts of the oxygen-binding protein hemoglobin and are surrounded by an oxygen diffusion barrier. However, while in legume nodules infected cells are located in the central tissue, actinorhizal nodules are composed of modified lateral roots with infected cells in the expanded cortex. Since an oxygen diffusion barrier around the entire cortex would also block oxygen access to the central vascular system where it is required to provide energy for transport processes, here each individual infected cell is surrounded with an oxygen diffusion barrier. In order to assess the effect of these oxygen diffusion barriers on oxygen supply for energy production for transport processes, apoplastic and symplastic sugar transport pathways in C. glauca nodules were examined. The results support the idea that sugar transport to and within the nodule cortex relies to a large extent on the less energy-demanding symplastic mechanism. This is in line with the assumption that oxygen access to the nodule vascular system is substantially restricted. In spite of this dependence on symplastic transport processes to supply sugars to infected cells, plasmodesmal connections between infected cells, and to a lesser degree with uninfected cells, were reduced during the differentiation of infected cells. PMID:22924772

  17. Impact of thermal processing on legume allergens.

    PubMed

    Verma, Alok Kumar; Kumar, Sandeep; Das, Mukul; Dwivedi, Premendra D

    2012-12-01

    Food induced allergic manifestations are reported from several parts of the world. Food proteins exert their allergenic potential by absorption through the gastrointestinal tract and can even induce life threatening anaphylaxis reactions. Among all food allergens, legume allergens play an important role in induction of allergy because legumes are a major source of protein for vegetarians. Most of the legumes are cooked either by boiling, roasting or frying before consumption, which can be considered a form of thermal treatment. Thermal processing may also include autoclaving, microwave heating, blanching, pasteurization, canning, or steaming. Thermal processing of legumes may reduce, eliminate or enhance the allergenic potential of a respective legume. In most of the cases, minimization of allergenic potential on thermal treatment has generally been reported. Thus, thermal processing can be considered an important tool by indirectly prevent allergenicity in susceptible individuals, thereby reducing treatment costs and reducing industry/office/school absence in case of working population/school going children. The present review attempts to explore various possibilities of reducing or eliminating allergenicity of leguminous food using different methods of thermal processing. Further, this review summarizes different methods of food processing, major legumes and their predominant allergenic proteins, thermal treatment and its relation with antigenicity, effect of thermal processing on legume allergens; also suggests a path that may be taken for future research to reduce the allergenicity using conventional/nonconventional methods.

  18. Rhizobium-legume symbiosis in the absence of Nod factors: two possible scenarios with or without the T3SS.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Shin; Tittabutr, Panlada; Teulet, Albin; Thouin, Julien; Fardoux, Joël; Chaintreuil, Clémence; Gully, Djamel; Arrighi, Jean-François; Furuta, Noriyuki; Miwa, Hiroki; Yasuda, Michiko; Nouwen, Nico; Teaumroong, Neung; Giraud, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of alternative Nod factor (NF)-independent symbiosis between legumes and rhizobia was first demonstrated in some Aeschynomene species that are nodulated by photosynthetic bradyrhizobia lacking the canonical nodABC genes. In this study, we revealed that a large diversity of non-photosynthetic bradyrhizobia, including B. elkanii, was also able to induce nodules on the NF-independent Aeschynomene species, A. indica. Using cytological analysis of the nodules and the nitrogenase enzyme activity as markers, a gradient in the symbiotic interaction between bradyrhizobial strains and A. indica could be distinguished. This ranged from strains that induced nodules that were only infected intercellularly to rhizobial strains that formed nodules in which the host cells were invaded intracellularly and that displayed a weak nitrogenase activity. In all non-photosynthetic bradyrhizobia, the type III secretion system (T3SS) appears required to trigger nodule organogenesis. In contrast, genome sequence analysis revealed that apart from a few exceptions, like the Bradyrhizobium ORS285 strain, photosynthetic bradyrhizobia strains lack a T3SS. Furthermore, analysis of the symbiotic properties of an ORS285 T3SS mutant revealed that the T3SS could have a positive or negative role for the interaction with NF-dependent Aeschynomene species, but that it is dispensable for the interaction with all NF-independent Aeschynomene species tested. Taken together, these data indicate that two NF-independent symbiotic processes are possible between legumes and rhizobia: one dependent on a T3SS and one using a so far unknown mechanism.

  19. Management of solitary pulmonary nodules.

    PubMed

    Lillington, G A

    1991-05-01

    The solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN), a single intrapulmonary spherical lesion that is fairly well circumscribed, is a common clinical problem. About half of SPNs seen in clinical practice are malignant, usually bronchogenic carcinomas. Some nodules are primary tumors of other kinds or metastatic. Virtually all benign SPNs are tuberculous or fungal granulomas. The standard management of the SPN of unknown cause is prompt surgical removal unless benignity is established by prior chest roentgenograms showing that the nodule has been stable (i.e., showing no growth) for 2 years or by the presence of a "benign" pattern of calcification. Less universally accepted criteria for benignity include (1) transthoracic needle aspiration biopsy (TNAB) showing a specific benign process, and (2) patient's age under 30 to 35 years. Bronchoscopy has a low diagnostic yield, particularly for benign nodules. SPNs usually grow at constant rates, expressed as the "doubling time" (DT). A nodule with a DT between 20 and 400 days is usually malignant. Benign nodules usually have a DT greater than 400 days. The prospective determination of DT by serial chest roentgenograms (the "wait and watch" strategy) is widely criticized but has clinical utility in special circumstances, particularly if the likelihood of malignancy is low and/or the anticipated surgical mortality is high. The presence and pattern of calcification are best shown by high-resolution thin-section computed tomography (CT). Diffuse, laminated, central or "popcorn" patterns of calcification indicate benignity. An eccentric calcium deposit or a stippled pattern does not rule out malignancy. CT densitometry will often show "occult" calcification in nodules that show no direct visual evidence of calcium deposition. The characteristics of the edge of the nodule correlate with the likelihood of malignancy. Nodules with irregular or spiculated margins are almost always malignant. The probability that the nodule is malignant (pCA) is

  20. A phytase gene is overexpressed in root nodules cortex of Phaseolus vulgaris-rhizobia symbiosis under phosphorus deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lazali, Mohamed; Zaman-Allah, Mainassara; Amenc, Laurie; Ounane, Ghania; Abadie, Josiane; Drevon, Jean-Jacques

    2013-08-01

    Phosphorus is an essential nutrient for rhizobial symbioses to convert N2 into NH4 usable for N nutrition in legumes and N cycle in ecosystems. This N2 fixation process occurs in nodules with a high energy cost. Phytate is the major storage form of P and accounts for more than 50 % of the total P in seeds of cereals and legumes. The phytases, a group of enzymes widely distributed in plant and microorganisms, are able to hydrolyze a variety of inositol phosphates. Recently, phytase activity was discovered in nodules. However, the gene expression localization and its role in N2-fixing nodules are still unknown. In this work, two recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), selected as contrasting for N2 fixation under P deficiency, namely RILs 115 (P-efficient) and 147 (P-inefficient) were inoculated with Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899, and grown under hydroaeroponic conditions with sufficient versus deficient P supply. With in situ RT-PCR methodology, we found that phytase transcripts were particularly abundant in the nodule cortex and infected zone of both RILs. Under P deficiency, phytase transcripts were significantly more abundant for RIL115 than for RIL147, and more in the outer cortex than in the infected zone. Additionally, the high expression of phytase among nodule tissues for the P-deficient RIL115 was associated with an increase in phytase (33 %) and phosphatase (49 %) activities and efficiency in use of the rhizobial symbiosis (34 %). It is argued that phytase activity in nodules would contribute to the adaptation of the rhizobia-legume symbiosis to low-P environments.

  1. Genetics and biochemistry of the Rhizobium meliloti acidic extracellular heteropolysaccharide and its role in nodulation: Annual report for the period 1 June 1987-31 May 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    The symbiotic association of Rhizobium with legumes results in a vital supply of inexpensive nitrogen for the growth of crops such as soybean and alfalfa. In a complex series of events, the bacterial symbiont, Rhizobium, induces the formation of a specialilzed root structure, the nodule. Rhizobium then enters the cells of the nodule and fixes nitrogen. We are interested in an extracellular polysaccharide, produced by Rhizobium, which is required for nodule entry. We have found that R. meliloti mutants which produce the polysaccharide but fail to enter nodules, actually produce an abnormal form of the polysacchardie which lacks succinate. Recently we have discovered a second polysaccharide which can be produced in place of the first polysacchaaride and also satisfy the requirement for nodule entry. We are studying the gentic regulation of the production of the two polysaccharides.

  2. Characterization and symbiotic importance of acidic extracellular polysaccharides of Rhizobium sp. strain GRH2 isolated from acacia nodules.

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Lara, I M; Orgambide, G; Dazzo, F B; Olivares, J; Toro, N

    1993-01-01

    Rhizobium sp. wild-type strain GRH2 was originally isolated from root nodules of the leguminous tree Acacia cyanophylla and has a broad host range which includes herbaceous legumes, e.g., Trifolium spp. We examined the extracellular exopolysaccharides (EPSs) produced by strain GRH2 and found three independent glycosidic structures: a high-molecular-weight acidic heteropolysaccharide which is very similar to the acidic EPS produced by Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar trifolii ANU843, a low-molecular-weight native heterooligosaccharide resembling a dimer of the repeat unit of the high-molecular-weight EPS, and low-molecular-weight neutral beta (1,2)-glucans. A Tn5 insertion mutant derivative of GRH2 (exo-57) that fails to form acidic heteropolysaccharides was obtained. This Exo- mutant formed nitrogen-fixing nodules on Acacia plants but infected a smaller proportion of cells in the central zone of the nodules than did wild-type GRH2. In addition, the exo-57 mutant failed to nodulate several herbaceous legume hosts that are nodulated by wild-type strain GRH2. Images PMID:8491702

  3. Differential expression of trehalose 6-P phosphatase and ascorbate peroxidase transcripts in nodule cortex of Phaseolus vulgaris and regulation of nodule O2 permeability.

    PubMed

    Bargaz, Adnane; Lazali, Mohamed; Amenc, Laurie; Abadie, Josiane; Ghoulam, Cherki; Farissi, Mohamed; Faghire, Mustapha; Drevon, Jean-Jacques

    2013-07-01

    Although the role of phosphatases and antioxidant enzymes have been documented in phosphorus (P) deficiency tolerance, gene expression differences in the nodules of nitrogen fixing legumes should also affect tolerance to this soil constraint. In this study, root nodules were induced by Rhizobium tropici CIAT899 in two Phaseolus vulgaris recombinant inbred lines (RIL); RIL115 (low P-tolerant) and RIL147 (low P-sensitive) under hydroaeroponic culture with sufficient versus deficient P supply. Trehalose 6-P phosphatase and ascorbate peroxidase transcripts were localized within nodules in which O2 permeability was measured. Results indicate that differential tissues-specific expression of trehalose 6-P phosphatase and ascorbate peroxidase transcripts within nodules was detected particularly in infected zone and cortical cells. Under P-deficiency, trehalose 6-P phosphatase transcript was increased and mainly localized in infected zone and outer cortex of RIL115 as compared to RIL147. Ascorbate peroxidase transcript was highly expressed under P-sufficiency in the infected zone, inner cortex and vascular traces of RIL115 rather than RIL147. In addition, significant correlations were found between nodule O2 permeability and both peroxidase (r = 0.66*) and trehalose 6-P phosphatase enzyme activities (r = 0.79*) under sufficient and deficient P conditions, respectively. The present findings suggest that the tissue-specific localized trehalose 6-P phosphatase and ascorbate peroxidase transcripts of infected cells and nodule cortex are involved in nitrogen fixation efficiency and are likely to play a role in nodule respiration and adaptation to P-deficiency.

  4. Legume information system (LegumeInfo.org): a key component of a set of federated data resources for the legume family

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Sudhansu; Campbell, Jacqueline D.; Cannon, Ethalinda K.S.; Cleary, Alan M.; Huang, Wei; Kalberer, Scott R.; Karingula, Vijay; Rice, Alex G.; Singh, Jugpreet; Umale, Pooja E.; Weeks, Nathan T.; Wilkey, Andrew P.; Farmer, Andrew D.; Cannon, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    Legume Information System (LIS), at http://legumeinfo.org, is a genomic data portal (GDP) for the legume family. LIS provides access to genetic and genomic information for major crop and model legumes. With more than two-dozen domesticated legume species, there are numerous specialists working on particular species, and also numerous GDPs for these species. LIS has been redesigned in the last three years both to better integrate data sets across the crop and model legumes, and to better accommodate specialized GDPs that serve particular legume species. To integrate data sets, LIS provides genome and map viewers, holds synteny mappings among all sequenced legume species and provides a set of gene families to allow traversal among orthologous and paralogous sequences across the legumes. To better accommodate other specialized GDPs, LIS uses open-source GMOD components where possible, and advocates use of common data templates, formats, schemas and interfaces so that data collected by one legume research community are accessible across all legume GDPs, through similar interfaces and using common APIs. This federated model for the legumes is managed as part of the ‘Legume Federation’ project (accessible via http://legumefederation.org), which can be thought of as an umbrella project encompassing LIS and other legume GDPs. PMID:26546515

  5. Legume information system (LegumeInfo.org): a key component of a set of federated data resources for the legume family.

    PubMed

    Dash, Sudhansu; Campbell, Jacqueline D; Cannon, Ethalinda K S; Cleary, Alan M; Huang, Wei; Kalberer, Scott R; Karingula, Vijay; Rice, Alex G; Singh, Jugpreet; Umale, Pooja E; Weeks, Nathan T; Wilkey, Andrew P; Farmer, Andrew D; Cannon, Steven B

    2016-01-01

    Legume Information System (LIS), at http://legumeinfo.org, is a genomic data portal (GDP) for the legume family. LIS provides access to genetic and genomic information for major crop and model legumes. With more than two-dozen domesticated legume species, there are numerous specialists working on particular species, and also numerous GDPs for these species. LIS has been redesigned in the last three years both to better integrate data sets across the crop and model legumes, and to better accommodate specialized GDPs that serve particular legume species. To integrate data sets, LIS provides genome and map viewers, holds synteny mappings among all sequenced legume species and provides a set of gene families to allow traversal among orthologous and paralogous sequences across the legumes. To better accommodate other specialized GDPs, LIS uses open-source GMOD components where possible, and advocates use of common data templates, formats, schemas and interfaces so that data collected by one legume research community are accessible across all legume GDPs, through similar interfaces and using common APIs. This federated model for the legumes is managed as part of the 'Legume Federation' project (accessible via http://legumefederation.org), which can be thought of as an umbrella project encompassing LIS and other legume GDPs.

  6. Alfalfa nodules elicited by a flavodoxin-overexpressing Ensifer meliloti strain display nitrogen-fixing activity with enhanced tolerance to salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Redondo, Francisco J; Coba de la Peña, Teodoro; Lucas, M Mercedes; Pueyo, José J

    2012-12-01

    Nitrogen fixation by legumes is very sensitive to salinity stress, which can severely reduce the productivity of legume crops and their soil-enriching capacity. Salinity is known to cause oxidative stress in the nodule by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). Flavodoxins are involved in the response to oxidative stress in bacteria and cyanobacteria. Prevention of ROS production by flavodoxin overexpression in bacteroids might lead to a protective effect on nodule functioning under salinity stress. Tolerance to salinity stress was evaluated in alfalfa nodules elicited by an Ensifer meliloti strain that overexpressed a cyanobacterial flavodoxin compared with nodules produced by the wild-type bacteria. Nitrogen fixation, antioxidant and carbon metabolism enzyme activities were determined. The decline in nitrogenase activity associated to salinity stress was significantly less in flavodoxin-expressing than in wild-type nodules. We detected small but significant changes in nodule antioxidant metabolism involving the ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes and metabolites, as well as differences in activity of the carbon metabolism enzyme sucrose synthase, and an atypical starch accumulation pattern in flavodoxin-containing nodules. Salt-induced structural and ultrastructural alterations were examined in detail in alfalfa wild-type nodules by light and electron microscopy and compared to flavodoxin-containing nodules. Flavodoxin reduced salt-induced structural damage, which primarily affected young infected tissues and not fully differentiated bacteroids. The results indicate that overexpression of flavodoxin in bacteroids has a protective effect on the function and structure of alfalfa nodules subjected to salinity stress conditions. Putative protection mechanisms are discussed.

  7. The Sesbania Root Symbionts Sinorhizobium saheli and S. teranga bv. sesbaniae Can Form Stem Nodules on Sesbania rostrata, although They Are Less Adapted to Stem Nodulation than Azorhizobium caulinodans

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, C.; Ndoye, I.; Lortet, G.; Ndiaye, A.; De Lajudie, P.; Dreyfus, B.

    1997-01-01

    Sesbania species can establish symbiotic interactions with rhizobia from two taxonomically distant genera, including the Sesbania rostrata stem-nodulating Azorhizobium sp. and Azorhizobium caulinodans and the newly described Sinorhizobium saheli and Sinorhizobium teranga bv. sesbaniae, isolated from the roots of various Sesbania species. A collection of strains from both groups were analyzed for their symbiotic properties with different Sesbania species. S. saheli and S. teranga bv. sesbaniae strains were found to effectively stem nodulate Sesbania rostrata, showing that stem nodulation is not restricted to Azorhizobium. Sinorhizobia and azorhizobia, however, exhibited clear differences in other aspects of symbiosis. Unlike Azorhizobium, S. teranga bv. sesbaniae and S. saheli did not induce effective stem nodules on plants previously inoculated on the roots, although stem nodulation was arrested at different stages. For Sesbania rostrata root nodulation, Sinorhizobium appeared more sensitive than Azorhizobium to the presence of combined nitrogen. S. saheli and S. teranga bv. sesbaniae were effective symbionts with all Sesbania species tested, while Azorhizobium strains fixed nitrogen only in symbiosis with Sesbania rostrata. In a simple screening test, S. saheli and S. teranga bv. sesbaniae were incapable of asymbiotic nitrogenase activity. Thus, Azorhizobium can easily be distinguished from Sinorhizobium among Sesbania symbionts on the basis of symbiotic and free-living nitrogen fixation. The ability of Azorhizobium to overcome the systemic plant control appears to be a stem adaptation function. This last property, together with its host-specific symbiotic nitrogen fixation, makes Azorhizobium highly specialized for stem nodulation of the aquatic legume Sesbania rostrata. PMID:16535538

  8. Hydrogenase in actinorhizal root nodules and root nodule homogenates.

    PubMed Central

    Benson, D R; Arp, D J; Burris, R H

    1980-01-01

    Hydrogenases were measured in intact actinorhizal root nodules and from disrupted nodules of Alnus glutinosa, Alnus rhombifolia, Alnus rubra, and Myrica pensylvanica. Whole nodules took up H2 in an O2-dependent reaction. Endophyte preparations oxidized H2 through the oxyhydrogen reaction, but rates were enhanced when hydrogen uptake was coupled to artificial electron acceptors. Oxygen inhibited artifical acceptor-dependent H2 uptake. The hydrogenase system from M. pensylvanica had a different pattern of coupling to various electron acceptors than the hydrogenase systems from the alders; only the bayberry system evolved H2 from reduced viologen dyes. PMID:6989799

  9. The First Attested Extraction of Ancient DNA in Legumes (Fabaceae).

    PubMed

    Mikić, Aleksandar M

    2015-01-01

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) is any DNA extracted from ancient specimens, important for diverse evolutionary researches. The major obstacles in aDNA studies are mutations, contamination and fragmentation. Its studies may be crucial for crop history if integrated with human aDNA research and historical linguistics, both general and relating to agriculture. Legumes (Fabaceae) are one of the richest end economically most important plant families, not only from Neolithic onwards, since they were used as food by Neanderthals and Paleolithic modern man. The idea of extracting and analyzing legume aDNA was considered beneficial for both basic science and applied research, with an emphasis on genetic resources and plant breeding. The first reported successful and attested extraction of the legume aDNA was done from the sample of charred seeds of pea (Pisum sativum) and bitter vetch (Vicia ervilia) from Hissar, southeast Serbia, dated to 1,350-1,000 Before Christ. A modified version of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) method and the commercial kit for DNA extraction QIAGEN DNAesy yielded several ng μl(-1) of aDNA of both species and, after the whole genome amplification and with a fragment of nuclear ribosomal DNA gene 26S rDNA, resulted in the detection of the aDNA among the PCR products. A comparative analysis of four informative chloroplast DNA regions (trnSG, trnK, matK, and rbcL) among the modern wild and cultivated pea taxa demonstrated not only that the extracted aDNA was genuine, on the basis of mutation rate, but also that the ancient Hissar pea was most likely an early domesticated crop, related to the modern wild pea of a neighboring region. It is anticipated that this premier extraction of legume aDNA may provide taxonomists with the answers to diverse questions, such as leaf development in legumes, as well as with novel data on the single steps in domesticating legume crops worldwide. PMID:26635833

  10. The First Attested Extraction of Ancient DNA in Legumes (Fabaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Mikić, Aleksandar M.

    2015-01-01

    Ancient DNA (aDNA) is any DNA extracted from ancient specimens, important for diverse evolutionary researches. The major obstacles in aDNA studies are mutations, contamination and fragmentation. Its studies may be crucial for crop history if integrated with human aDNA research and historical linguistics, both general and relating to agriculture. Legumes (Fabaceae) are one of the richest end economically most important plant families, not only from Neolithic onwards, since they were used as food by Neanderthals and Paleolithic modern man. The idea of extracting and analyzing legume aDNA was considered beneficial for both basic science and applied research, with an emphasis on genetic resources and plant breeding. The first reported successful and attested extraction of the legume aDNA was done from the sample of charred seeds of pea (Pisum sativum) and bitter vetch (Vicia ervilia) from Hissar, southeast Serbia, dated to 1,350–1,000 Before Christ. A modified version of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) method and the commercial kit for DNA extraction QIAGEN DNAesy yielded several ng μl-1 of aDNA of both species and, after the whole genome amplification and with a fragment of nuclear ribosomal DNA gene 26S rDNA, resulted in the detection of the aDNA among the PCR products. A comparative analysis of four informative chloroplast DNA regions (trnSG, trnK, matK, and rbcL) among the modern wild and cultivated pea taxa demonstrated not only that the extracted aDNA was genuine, on the basis of mutation rate, but also that the ancient Hissar pea was most likely an early domesticated crop, related to the modern wild pea of a neighboring region. It is anticipated that this premier extraction of legume aDNA may provide taxonomists with the answers to diverse questions, such as leaf development in legumes, as well as with novel data on the single steps in domesticating legume crops worldwide. PMID:26635833

  11. Direct and interactive effects of light and nutrients on the legume-rhizobia mutualism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Jennifer A.; Bowling, Evan James; Gentry, Lowell E.; Glasser, Paul A.; Monarch, Elizabeth A.; Olesen, Whitney M.; Waxmonsky, Jillian; Young, Ryan Thomas

    2012-02-01

    The relative abundance of traded resources can alter the outcomes of symbioses, potentially shifting mutually-beneficial interactions into interactions that are detrimental to one or both partners. We manipulated the legume-rhizobia symbiosis and light and nutrient levels to investigate how the net growth benefits to both partners shift across environments differing in the availability of both traded resources. In low nutrient, high light environments, rhizobia increased mean plant biomass by 62%. In contrast, when plants were light-limited, rhizobia did not increase above-ground biomass and reduced mean below-ground biomass by 46%. Similarly, rhizobia only increased plant biomass under low nutrient conditions. Resource availability also affected nodule traits correlated with rhizobia fitness, with light-limited plants producing fewer and smaller nodules. Our results suggest that the growth benefits to both partners in the legume-rhizobia symbiosis depend on the availability of both traded resources. We also detected evidence, however, that plants may reduce investment in symbionts as the net benefits of association decrease, potentially limiting how far this interaction shifts toward parasitism in low-light, high nutrient environments.

  12. Genetic control of flowering time in legumes

    PubMed Central

    Weller, James L.; Ortega, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    The timing of flowering, and in particular the degree to which it is responsive to the environment, is a key factor in the adaptation of a given species to various eco-geographic locations and agricultural practices. Flowering time variation has been documented in many crop legumes, and selection for specific variants has permitted significant expansion and improvement in cultivation, from prehistoric times to the present day. Recent advances in legume genomics have accelerated the process of gene identification and functional analysis, and opened up new prospects for a molecular understanding of flowering time adaptation in this important crop group. Within the legumes, two species have been prominent in flowering time studies; the vernalization-responsive long-day species pea (Pisum sativum) and the warm-season short-day plant soybean (Glycine max). Analysis of flowering in these species is now being complemented by reverse genetics capabilities in the model legumes Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus, and the emergence of genome-scale resources in a range of other legumes. This review will outline the insights gained from detailed forward genetic analysis of flowering time in pea and soybean, highlighting the importance of light perception, the circadian clock and the FT family of flowering integrators. It discusses the current state of knowledge on genetic mechanisms for photoperiod and vernalization response, and concludes with a broader discussion of flowering time adaptation across legumes generally. PMID:25914700

  13. Seamless Insertion of Pulmonary Nodules in Chest CT Images.

    PubMed

    Pezeshk, Aria; Sahiner, Berkman; Zeng, Rongping; Wunderlich, Adam; Chen, Weijie; Petrick, Nicholas

    2015-12-01

    The availability of large medical image datasets is critical in many applications, such as training and testing of computer-aided diagnosis systems, evaluation of segmentation algorithms, and conducting perceptual studies. However, collection of data and establishment of ground truth for medical images are both costly and difficult. To address this problem, we are developing an image blending tool that allows users to modify or supplement existing datasets by seamlessly inserting a lesion extracted from a source image into a target image. In this study, we focus on the application of this tool to pulmonary nodules in chest CT exams. We minimize the impact of user skill on the perceived quality of the composite image by limiting user involvement to two simple steps: the user first draws a casual boundary around a nodule in the source, and, then, selects the center of desired insertion area in the target. We demonstrate the performance of our system on clinical samples, and report the results of a reader study evaluating the realism of inserted nodules compared to clinical nodules. We further evaluate our image blending techniques using phantoms simulated under different noise levels and reconstruction filters. Specifically, we compute the area under the ROC curve of the Hotelling observer (HO) and noise power spectrum of regions of interest enclosing native and inserted nodules, and compare the detectability, noise texture, and noise magnitude of inserted and native nodules. Our results indicate the viability of our approach for insertion of pulmonary nodules in clinical CT images. PMID:26080378

  14. Silencing of the chalcone synthase gene in Casuarina glauca highlights the important role of flavonoids during nodulation.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Lateif, Khalid; Vaissayre, Virginie; Gherbi, Hassen; Verries, Clotilde; Meudec, Emmanuelle; Perrine-Walker, Francine; Cheynier, Véronique; Svistoonoff, Sergio; Franche, Claudine; Bogusz, Didier; Hocher, Valérie

    2013-09-01

    Nitrogen-fixing root nodulation is confined to four plant orders, including > 14,000 Leguminosae, one nonlegume genus Parasponia and c. 200 actinorhizal species that form symbioses with rhizobia and Frankia bacterial species, respectively. Flavonoids have been identified as plant signals and developmental regulators for nodulation in legumes and have long been hypothesized to play a critical role during actinorhizal nodulation. However, direct evidence of their involvement in actinorhizal symbiosis is lacking. Here, we used RNA interference to silence chalcone synthase, which is involved in the first committed step of the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway, in the actinorhizal tropical tree Casuarina glauca. Transformed flavonoid-deficient hairy roots were generated and used to study flavonoid accumulation and further nodulation. Knockdown of chalcone synthase expression reduced the level of specific flavonoids and resulted in severely impaired nodulation. Nodule formation was rescued by supplementing the plants with naringenin, which is an upstream intermediate in flavonoid biosynthesis. Our results provide, for the first time, direct evidence of an important role for flavonoids during the early stages of actinorhizal nodulation. PMID:23692063

  15. Nutritional quality of legumes, and their role in cardiometabolic risk prevention: a review.

    PubMed

    Bouchenak, Malika; Lamri-Senhadji, Myriem

    2013-03-01

    Legumes (including alfalfa, clover, lupins, green beans and peas, peanuts, soybeans, dry beans, broad beans, dry peas, chickpeas, and lentils) represent an important component of the human diet in several areas of the world, especially in the developing countries, where they complement the lack of proteins from cereals, roots, and tubers. In some regions of the world, legume seeds are the only protein supply in the diet. The health benefits of legume consumption have received rising interest from researchers, and their consumption and production extends worldwide. Among European countries, higher legume consumption is observed around the Mediterranean, with per capita daily consumption between 8 and 23 g, while in Northern Europe, the daily consumption is less than 5 g per capita. The physiological effects of different legumes vary significantly. These differences may result from the polysaccharides composition, in particular, the quantity and variety of dietary fibers and starch, protein make-up, and variability in phytochemical content. The majority of legumes contain phytochemicals: bioactive compounds, including enzyme inhibitors, phytohemagglutinins (lectins), phytoestrogens, oligosaccharides, saponins, and phenolic compounds, which play metabolic roles in humans who frequently consume these foods. Dietary intake of phytochemicals may provide health benefits, protecting against numerous diseases or disorders, such as coronary heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure and inflammation. The synergistic or antagonistic effects of these phytochemical mixtures from food legumes, their interaction with other components of the diet, and the mechanism of their action have remained a challenge with regard to understanding the role of phytochemicals in health and diseases. Their mitigating effects and the mechanism of their action need to be further addressed if we are to understand the role of phytochemicals in health and diseases. This review provides an overview

  16. A proteomic approach reveals new actors of nodule response to drought in split-root grown pea plants.

    PubMed

    Irar, Sami; González, Esther M; Arrese-Igor, Cesar; Marino, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    Drought is considered the more harmful abiotic stress resulting in crops yield loss. Legumes in symbiosis with rhizobia are able to fix atmospheric nitrogen. Biological nitrogen fixation (SNF) is a very sensitive process to drought and limits legumes agricultural productivity. Several factors are known to regulate SNF including oxygen availability to bacteroids, carbon and nitrogen metabolisms; but the signaling pathways leading to SNF inhibition are largely unknown. In this work, we have performed a proteomic approach of pea plants grown in split-root system where one half of the root was well-irrigated and the other was subjected to drought. Water stress locally provoked nodule water potential decrease that led to SNF local inhibition. The proteomic approach revealed 11 and 7 nodule proteins regulated by drought encoded by Pisum sativum and Rhizobium leguminosarum genomes respectively. Among these 18 proteins, 3 proteins related to flavonoid metabolism, 2 to sulfur metabolism and 3 RNA-binding proteins were identified. These proteins could be molecular targets for future studies focused on the improvement of legumes tolerance to drought. Moreover, this work also provides new hints for the deciphering of SNF regulation machinery in nodules.

  17. MtSWEET11, a Nodule-Specific Sucrose Transporter of Medicago truncatula1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Jerez, Ivone; Sosso, Davide; Guan, Dian; Frommer, Wolf B.

    2016-01-01

    Optimization of nitrogen fixation by rhizobia in legumes is a key area of research for sustainable agriculture. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) occurs in specialized organs called nodules and depends on a steady supply of carbon to both plant and bacterial cells. Here we report the functional characterization of a nodule-specific Suc transporter, MtSWEET11 from Medicago truncatula. MtSWEET11 belongs to a clade of plant SWEET proteins that are capable of transporting Suc and play critical roles in pathogen susceptibility. When expressed in mammalian cells, MtSWEET11 transported sucrose (Suc) but not glucose (Glc). The MtSWEET11 gene was found to be expressed in infected root hair cells, and in the meristem, invasion zone, and vasculature of nodules. Expression of an MtSWEET11-GFP fusion protein in nodules resulted in green fluorescence associated with the plasma membrane of uninfected cells and infection thread and symbiosome membranes of infected cells. Two independent Tnt1-insertion sweet11 mutants were uncompromised in SNF. Therefore, although MtSWEET11 appears to be involved in Suc distribution within nodules, it is not crucial for SNF, probably because other Suc transporters can fulfill its role(s). PMID:27021190

  18. [Analysis of Symbiotic Genes of Leguminous Plants Nodule Bacteria Grown in the Southern Urals].

    PubMed

    Baymiev, An Kh; Ivanova, E S; Gumenko, R S; Chubukova, O V; Baymiev, Al Kh

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial strains isolated from the nodules, tissues, and root surface of wild legumes growing in the Southern Urals related to the tribes Galegeae, Hedysareae, Genisteae, Trifolieae, and Loteae were examined for the presence in their genomes of symbiotic (sym) genes. It was found that the sym-genes are present in microorganisms isolated only from the nodules of the analyzed plants (sym+ -strains). Phylogenetic analysis of sym+ -strains on the basis of a comparative analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that sym+ -strains belong to five families of nodule bacteria: Mesorhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, Sinorhizobium, Rhizobium, and Phyllobacterium. A study the phylogeny of the sym-genes showed that the nodule bacteria of leguminous plants of the Southern Urals at the genus level are mainly characterized by a parallel evolution of symbiotic genes and the 16S rRNA gene. Thus, cases of horizontal transfer of sym genes, which sometimes leads to the formation of certain types of atypical rhizobial strains ofleguminous plants, are detected in nodule bacteria populations. PMID:27055295

  19. Molecular Signals Controlling the Inhibition of Nodulation by Nitrate in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    van Noorden, Giel E.; Verbeek, Rob; Dinh, Quy Dung; Jin, Jian; Green, Alexandra; Ng, Jason Liang Pin; Mathesius, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    The presence of nitrogen inhibits legume nodule formation, but the mechanism of this inhibition is poorly understood. We found that 2.5 mM nitrate and above significantly inhibited nodule initiation but not root hair curling in Medicago trunatula. We analyzed protein abundance in M. truncatula roots after treatment with either 0 or 2.5 mM nitrate in the presence or absence of its symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti after 1, 2 and 5 days following inoculation. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry was used to identify 106 differentially accumulated proteins responding to nitrate addition, inoculation or time point. While flavonoid-related proteins were less abundant in the presence of nitrate, addition of Nod gene-inducing flavonoids to the Sinorhizobium culture did not rescue nodulation. Accumulation of auxin in response to rhizobia, which is also controlled by flavonoids, still occurred in the presence of nitrate, but did not localize to a nodule initiation site. Several of the changes included defense- and redox-related proteins, and visualization of reactive oxygen species indicated that their induction in root hairs following Sinorhizobium inoculation was inhibited by nitrate. In summary, the presence of nitrate appears to inhibit nodulation via multiple pathways, including changes to flavonoid metabolism, defense responses and redox changes. PMID:27384556

  20. MtSWEET11, a Nodule-Specific Sucrose Transporter of Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Kryvoruchko, Igor S; Sinharoy, Senjuti; Torres-Jerez, Ivone; Sosso, Davide; Pislariu, Catalina I; Guan, Dian; Murray, Jeremy; Benedito, Vagner A; Frommer, Wolf B; Udvardi, Michael K

    2016-05-01

    Optimization of nitrogen fixation by rhizobia in legumes is a key area of research for sustainable agriculture. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) occurs in specialized organs called nodules and depends on a steady supply of carbon to both plant and bacterial cells. Here we report the functional characterization of a nodule-specific Suc transporter, MtSWEET11 from Medicago truncatula MtSWEET11 belongs to a clade of plant SWEET proteins that are capable of transporting Suc and play critical roles in pathogen susceptibility. When expressed in mammalian cells, MtSWEET11 transported sucrose (Suc) but not glucose (Glc). The MtSWEET11 gene was found to be expressed in infected root hair cells, and in the meristem, invasion zone, and vasculature of nodules. Expression of an MtSWEET11-GFP fusion protein in nodules resulted in green fluorescence associated with the plasma membrane of uninfected cells and infection thread and symbiosome membranes of infected cells. Two independent Tnt1-insertion sweet11 mutants were uncompromised in SNF Therefore, although MtSWEET11 appears to be involved in Suc distribution within nodules, it is not crucial for SNF, probably because other Suc transporters can fulfill its role(s). PMID:27021190

  1. Induced systemic resistance against Botrytis cinerea by Micromonospora strains isolated from root nodules

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Hidalgo, Pilar; García, Juan M.; Pozo, María J.

    2015-01-01

    Micromonospora is a Gram positive bacterium that can be isolated from nitrogen fixing nodules from healthy leguminous plants, where they could be beneficial to the plant. Their plant growth promoting activity in legume and non-legume plants has been previously demonstrated. The present study explores the ability of Micromonospora strains to control fungal pathogens and to stimulate plant immunity. Micromonospora strains isolated from surface sterilized nodules of alfalfa showed in vitro antifungal activity against several pathogenic fungi. Moreover, root inoculation of tomato plants with these Micromonospora strains effectively reduced leaf infection by the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea, despite spatial separation between both microorganisms. This induced systemic resistance, confirmed in different tomato cultivars, is long lasting. Gene expression analyses evidenced that Micromonospora stimulates the plant capacity to activate defense mechanisms upon pathogen attack. The defensive response of tomato plants inoculated with Micromonospora spp. differs from that of non-inoculated plants, showing a stronger induction of jasmonate-regulated defenses when the plant is challenged with a pathogen. The hypothesis of jasmonates playing a key role in this defense priming effect was confirmed using defense-impaired tomato mutants, since the JA-deficient line def1 was unable to display a long term induced resistance upon Micromonospora spp. inoculation. In conclusion, nodule isolated Micromonospora strains should be considered excellent candidates as biocontrol agents as they combine both direct antifungal activity against plant pathogens and the ability to prime plant immunity. PMID:26388861

  2. Nodulation of Lupinus albus by Strains of Ochrobactrum lupini sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo, Martha E.; Willems, Anne; Abril, Adriana; Planchuelo, Ana-María; Rivas, Raúl; Ludeña, Dolores; Mateos, Pedro F.; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio; Velázquez, Encarna

    2005-01-01

    The nodulation of legumes has for more than a century been considered an exclusive capacity of a group of microorganisms commonly known as rhizobia and belonging to the α-Proteobacteria. However, in the last 3 years four nonrhizobial species, belonging to α and β subclasses of the Proteobacteria, have been described as legume-nodulating bacteria. In the present study, two fast-growing strains, LUP21 and LUP23, were isolated from nodules of Lupinus honoratus. The phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S and 23S rRNA gene sequences showed that the isolates belong to the genus Ochrobactrum. The strains were able to reinfect Lupinus plants. A plasmid profile analysis showed the presence of three plasmids. The nodD and nifH genes were located on these plasmids, and their sequences were obtained. These sequences showed a close resemblance to the nodD and nifH genes of rhizobial species, suggesting that the nodD and nifH genes carried by strain LUP21T were acquired by horizontal gene transfer. A polyphasic study including phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, and molecular features of the strains isolated in this study showed that they belong to a new species of the genus Ochrobactrum for which we propose the name Ochrobactrum lupini sp. nov. Strain LUP21T (LMG 20667T) is the type strain. PMID:15746334

  3. Genome sequence of Ensifer arboris strain LMG 14919(T); a microsymbiont of the legume Prosopis chilensis growing in Kosti, Sudan.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Wayne; Tian, Rui; Bräu, Lambert; Goodwin, Lynne; Munk, Christine; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Liolios, Konstantinos; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Willems, Anne

    2014-06-15

    Ensifer arboris LMG 14919(T) is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that can exist as a soil saprophyte or as a legume microsymbiont of several species of legume trees. LMG 14919(T) was isolated in 1987 from a nodule recovered from the roots of the tree Prosopis chilensis growing in Kosti, Sudan. LMG 14919(T) is highly effective at fixing nitrogen with P. chilensis (Chilean mesquite) and Acacia senegal (gum Arabic tree or gum acacia). LMG 14919(T) does not nodulate the tree Leucena leucocephala, nor the herbaceous species Macroptilium atropurpureum, Trifolium pratense, Medicago sativa, Lotus corniculatus and Galega orientalis. Here we describe the features of E. arboris LMG 14919(T), together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 6,850,303 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged into 7 scaffolds of 12 contigs containing 6,461 protein-coding genes and 84 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 100 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project.

  4. Genome sequence of Ensifer arboris strain LMG 14919T; a microsymbiont of the legume Prosopis chilensis growing in Kosti, Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Wayne; Tian, Rui; Bräu, Lambert; Goodwin, Lynne; Munk, Christine; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Liolios, Konstantinos; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Willems, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Ensifer arboris LMG 14919T is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that can exist as a soil saprophyte or as a legume microsymbiont of several species of legume trees. LMG 14919T was isolated in 1987 from a nodule recovered from the roots of the tree Prosopis chilensis growing in Kosti, Sudan. LMG 14919T is highly effective at fixing nitrogen with P. chilensis (Chilean mesquite) and Acacia senegal (gum Arabic tree or gum acacia). LMG 14919T does not nodulate the tree Leucena leucocephala, nor the herbaceous species Macroptilium atropurpureum, Trifolium pratense, Medicago sativa, Lotus corniculatus and Galega orientalis. Here we describe the features of E. arboris LMG 14919T, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 6,850,303 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged into 7 scaffolds of 12 contigs containing 6,461 protein-coding genes and 84 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 100 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project. PMID:25197433

  5. The Medicago Genome Initiative: a model legume database

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Callum J.; Dixon, Richard A.; Farmer, Andrew D.; Flores, Raul; Inman, Jeff; Gonzales, Robert A.; Harrison, Maria J.; Paiva, Nancy L.; Scott, Angela D.; Weller, Jennifer W.; May, Gregory D.

    2001-01-01

    The Medicago Genome Initiative (MGI) is a database of EST sequences of the model legume Medicago truncatula. The database is available to the public and has resulted from a collaborative research effort between the Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation and the National Center for Genome Resources to investigate the genome of M.truncatula. MGI is part of the greater integrated Medicago functional genomics program at the Noble Foundation (http://www.noble .org), which is taking a global approach in studying the genetic and biochemical events associated with the growth, development and environmental interactions of this model legume. Our approach will include: large-scale EST sequencing, gene expression profiling, the generation of M.truncatula activation-tagged and promoter trap insertion mutants, high-throughput metabolic profiling, and proteome studies. These multidisciplinary information pools will be interfaced with one another to provide scientists with an integrated, holistic set of tools to address fundamental questions pertaining to legume biology. The public interface to the MGI database can be accessed at http://www.ncgr.org/research/mgi. PMID:11125064

  6. Peroxiredoxins and NADPH-dependent thioredoxin systems in the model legume Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Tovar-Méndez, Alejandro; Matamoros, Manuel A; Bustos-Sanmamed, Pilar; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Cejudo, Francisco Javier; Rouhier, Nicolas; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Becana, Manuel

    2011-07-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs), thioredoxins (Trxs), and NADPH-thioredoxin reductases (NTRs) constitute central elements of the thiol-disulfide redox regulatory network of plant cells. This study provides a comprehensive survey of this network in the model legume Lotus japonicus. The aims were to identify and characterize these gene families and to assess whether the NTR-Trx systems are operative in nodules. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunological and proteomic approaches were used for expression profiling. We identified seven Prx, 14 Trx, and three NTR functional genes. The PrxQ1 gene was found to be transcribed in two alternative spliced variants and to be expressed at high levels in leaves, stems, petals, pods, and seeds and at low levels in roots and nodules. The 1CPrx gene showed very high expression in the seed embryos and low expression in vegetative tissues and was induced by nitric oxide and cytokinins. In sharp contrast, cytokinins down-regulated all other Prx genes, except PrxQ1, in roots and nodules, but only 2CPrxA and PrxQ1 in leaves. Gene-specific changes in Prx expression were also observed in response to ethylene, abscisic acid, and auxins. Nodules contain significant mRNA and protein amounts of cytosolic PrxIIB, Trxh1, and NTRA and of plastidic NTRC. Likewise, they express cytosolic Trxh3, Trxh4, Trxh8, and Trxh9, mitochondrial PrxIIF and Trxo, and plastidic Trxm2, Trxm4, and ferredoxin-Trx reductase. These findings reveal a complex regulation of Prxs that is dependent on the isoform, tissue, and signaling molecule and support that redox NTR-Trx systems are functional in the cytosol, mitochondria, and plastids of nodules.

  7. Rhizobial Nodulation Factors Stimulate Mycorrhizal Colonization of Nodulating and Nonnodulating Soybeans.

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Z. P.; Staehelin, C.; Vierheilig, H.; Wiemken, A.; Jabbouri, S.; Broughton, W. J.; Vogeli-Lange, R.; Boller, T.

    1995-01-01

    Legumes form tripartite symbiotic associations with noduleinducing rhizobia and vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Co-inoculation of soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) roots with Bradyrhizobium japonicum 61-A-101 considerably enhanced colonization by the mycorrhizal fungus Glomus mosseae. A similar stimulatory effect on mycorrhizal colonization was also observed in nonnodulating soybean mutants when inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum and in wild-type soybean plants when inoculated with ineffective rhizobial strains, indicating that a functional rhizobial symbiosis is not necessary for enhanced mycorrhiza formation. Inoculation with the mutant Rhizobium sp. NGR[delta]nodABC, unable to produce nodulation (Nod) factors, did not show any effect on mycorrhiza. Highly purified Nod factors also increased the degree of mycorrhizal colonization. Nod factors from Rhizobium sp. NGR234 differed in their potential to promote fungal colonization. The acetylated factor NodNGR-V (MeFuc, Ac), added at concentrations as low as 10-9 M, was active, whereas the sulfated factor, NodNGR-V (MeFuc, S), was inactive. Several soybean flavonoids known to accumulate in response to the acetylated Nod factor showed a similar promoting effect on mycorrhiza. These results suggest that plant flavonoids mediate the Nod factor-induced stimulation of mycorrhizal colonization in soybean roots. PMID:12228558

  8. Predicting Malignancy in Thyroid Nodules: Molecular Advances

    PubMed Central

    Melck, Adrienne L.; Yip, Linwah

    2016-01-01

    Over the last several years, a clearer understanding of the genetic alterations underlying thyroid carcinogenesis has developed. This knowledge can be utilized to tackle one of the greatest challenges facing thyroidologists: management of the indeterminate thyroid nodule. Despite the accuracy of fine needle aspiration cytology, many patients undergo invasive surgery in order to determine if a follicular or Hurthle cell neoplasm is malignant, and better diagnostic tools are required. A number of biomarkers have recently been studied and show promise in this setting. In particular, BRAF, RAS, PAX8-PPARγ, microRNAs and loss of heterozygosity have each been demonstrated as useful molecular tools for predicting malignancy and can thereby guide decisions regarding surgical management of nodular thyroid disease. This review summarizes the current literature surrounding each of these markers and highlights our institution’s prospective analysis of these markers and their subsequent incorporation into our management algorithms for thyroid nodules. PMID:21818817

  9. Possible Role of 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate (ACC) Deaminase Activity of Sinorhizobium sp. BL3 on Symbiosis with Mung Bean and Determinate Nodule Senescence.

    PubMed

    Tittabutr, Panlada; Sripakdi, Sudarat; Boonkerd, Nantakorn; Tanthanuch, Waraporn; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Teaumroong, Neung

    2015-01-01

    Sinorhizobium sp. BL3 forms symbiotic interactions with mung bean (Vigna radiata) and contains lrpL-acdS genes, which encode the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase enzyme that cleaves ACC, a precursor of plant ethylene synthesis. Since ethylene interferes with nodule formation in some legumes and plays a role in senescence in plant cells, BL3-enhancing ACC deaminase activity (BL3(+)) and defective mutant (BL3(-)) strains were constructed in order to investigate the effects of this enzyme on symbiosis and nodule senescence. Nodulation competitiveness was weaker in BL3(-) than in the wild-type, but was stronger in BL3(+). The inoculation of BL3(-) into mung bean resulted in less plant growth, a lower nodule dry weight, and smaller nodule number than those in the wild-type, whereas the inoculation of BL3(+) had no marked effects. However, similar nitrogenase activity was observed with all treatments; it was strongly detected 3 weeks after the inoculation and gradually declined with time, indicating senescence. The rate of plant nodulation by BL3(+) increased in a time-dependent manner. Nodules occupied by BL3(-) formed smaller symbiosomes, and bacteroid degradation was more prominent than that in the wild-type 7 weeks after the inoculation. Changes in biochemical molecules during nodulation were tracked by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy, and the results obtained confirmed that aging processes differed in nodules occupied by BL3 and BL3(-). This is the first study to show the possible role of ACC deaminase activity in senescence in determinate nodules. Our results suggest that an increase in ACC deaminase activity in this strain does not extend the lifespan of nodules, whereas the lack of this activity may accelerate nodule senescence.

  10. Possible Role of 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate (ACC) Deaminase Activity of Sinorhizobium sp. BL3 on Symbiosis with Mung Bean and Determinate Nodule Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Tittabutr, Panlada; Sripakdi, Sudarat; Boonkerd, Nantakorn; Tanthanuch, Waraporn; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Teaumroong, Neung

    2015-01-01

    Sinorhizobium sp. BL3 forms symbiotic interactions with mung bean (Vigna radiata) and contains lrpL-acdS genes, which encode the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase enzyme that cleaves ACC, a precursor of plant ethylene synthesis. Since ethylene interferes with nodule formation in some legumes and plays a role in senescence in plant cells, BL3-enhancing ACC deaminase activity (BL3+) and defective mutant (BL3−) strains were constructed in order to investigate the effects of this enzyme on symbiosis and nodule senescence. Nodulation competitiveness was weaker in BL3− than in the wild-type, but was stronger in BL3+. The inoculation of BL3− into mung bean resulted in less plant growth, a lower nodule dry weight, and smaller nodule number than those in the wild-type, whereas the inoculation of BL3+ had no marked effects. However, similar nitrogenase activity was observed with all treatments; it was strongly detected 3 weeks after the inoculation and gradually declined with time, indicating senescence. The rate of plant nodulation by BL3+ increased in a time-dependent manner. Nodules occupied by BL3− formed smaller symbiosomes, and bacteroid degradation was more prominent than that in the wild-type 7 weeks after the inoculation. Changes in biochemical molecules during nodulation were tracked by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy, and the results obtained confirmed that aging processes differed in nodules occupied by BL3 and BL3−. This is the first study to show the possible role of ACC deaminase activity in senescence in determinate nodules. Our results suggest that an increase in ACC deaminase activity in this strain does not extend the lifespan of nodules, whereas the lack of this activity may accelerate nodule senescence. PMID:26657304

  11. Identification of a new pea gene, PsNlec1, encoding a lectin-like glycoprotein isolated from the symbiosomes of root nodules.

    PubMed Central

    Kardailsky, I V; Sherrier, D J; Brewin, N J

    1996-01-01

    A 27-kD glycoprotein antigen recognized by monoclonal antibody MAC266 was purified from isolated symbiosomes derived from pea (Pisum sativum) root nodules containing Rhizobium. The N-terminal amino acid sequence was obtained, and the corresponding cDNA clone was isolated by a polymerase chain reaction-based strategy. The clone contained a single open reading frame, and the gene was termed PsNlec1. Phylogenetic analysis of 31 legume sequences showed that the PsNlec1 protein is related to the legume lectin family but belongs to a subgroup that is very different from pea seed lectin. Expression of the PsNlec1 transcript was much stronger in nodules than in other parts of the plant. It was found in both infected and uninfected cells in the central tissue of the nodule and in the stele of the root near the attachment point of the nodule. When uninfected pea seedlings were grown on medium containing nitrate, weak transcription of PsNlec1 was observed in the root system. The identification of PsNlec1 inside the symbiosome is consistent with the observation that legume lectins are generally vacuolar proteins that may serve as transient storage components. PMID:8685275

  12. Benign and malignant thyroid nodules after neck irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fjaelling, M.T.; Tisell, L.E.; Carlsson, S.; Hansson, G.; Lundberg, L.M.; Oden, A.

    1986-09-15

    A total of 444 persons were examined for the presence of thyroid nodules on average of 43 years after having been treated with x-rays for cervical tuberculous adenitis. Of this total, 101 subjects had undergone surgery for thyroid nodules: 25 for carcinoma (6%) and 76 for benign nodules (17%). Carcinoma occurred with the same frequency in multinodular and uninodular glands. Because of the uneven age distribution in the current series, it could not be decided whether there was a higher susceptibility of the young thyroid to the induction of thyroid carcinoma or benign nodules. The dosage range for the whole series was 0.40 to 50.90 Gy (40-5090 rad). There was a positive correlation between the absorbed radiation dose and the probability of developing benign and malignant thyroid nodules, even after doses of 20 Gy or more. The risk of developing thyroid carcinoma was equal for men and women, while the female-to-male ratio for benign nodules was 2.9:1, indicating that risk factors associated with females are of less importance in irradiated than in nonirradiated populations. The median latency for carcinoma was 40 years, suggesting that the increased risk of thyroid carcinoma after irradiation remains for the rest of the patient's life.

  13. Emerging Genomic Tools for Legume Breeding: Current Status and Future Prospects.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manish K; Roorkiwal, Manish; Singh, Vikas K; Ramalingam, Abirami; Kudapa, Himabindu; Thudi, Mahendar; Chitikineni, Anu; Rathore, Abhishek; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2016-01-01

    Legumes play a vital role in ensuring global nutritional food security and improving soil quality through nitrogen fixation. Accelerated higher genetic gains is required to meet the demand of ever increasing global population. In recent years, speedy developments have been witnessed in legume genomics due to advancements in next-generation sequencing (NGS) and high-throughput genotyping technologies. Reference genome sequences for many legume crops have been reported in the last 5 years. The availability of the draft genome sequences and re-sequencing of elite genotypes for several important legume crops have made it possible to identify structural variations at large scale. Availability of large-scale genomic resources and low-cost and high-throughput genotyping technologies are enhancing the efficiency and resolution of genetic mapping and marker-trait association studies. Most importantly, deployment of molecular breeding approaches has resulted in development of improved lines in some legume crops such as chickpea and groundnut. In order to support genomics-driven crop improvement at a fast pace, the deployment of breeder-friendly genomics and decision support tools seems appear to be critical in breeding programs in developing countries. This review provides an overview of emerging genomics and informatics tools/approaches that will be the key driving force for accelerating genomics-assisted breeding and ultimately ensuring nutritional and food security in developing countries. PMID:27199998

  14. Emerging Genomic Tools for Legume Breeding: Current Status and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Manish K.; Roorkiwal, Manish; Singh, Vikas K.; Ramalingam, Abirami; Kudapa, Himabindu; Thudi, Mahendar; Chitikineni, Anu; Rathore, Abhishek; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2016-01-01

    Legumes play a vital role in ensuring global nutritional food security and improving soil quality through nitrogen fixation. Accelerated higher genetic gains is required to meet the demand of ever increasing global population. In recent years, speedy developments have been witnessed in legume genomics due to advancements in next-generation sequencing (NGS) and high-throughput genotyping technologies. Reference genome sequences for many legume crops have been reported in the last 5 years. The availability of the draft genome sequences and re-sequencing of elite genotypes for several important legume crops have made it possible to identify structural variations at large scale. Availability of large-scale genomic resources and low-cost and high-throughput genotyping technologies are enhancing the efficiency and resolution of genetic mapping and marker-trait association studies. Most importantly, deployment of molecular breeding approaches has resulted in development of improved lines in some legume crops such as chickpea and groundnut. In order to support genomics-driven crop improvement at a fast pace, the deployment of breeder-friendly genomics and decision support tools seems appear to be critical in breeding programs in developing countries. This review provides an overview of emerging genomics and informatics tools/approaches that will be the key driving force for accelerating genomics-assisted breeding and ultimately ensuring nutritional and food security in developing countries. PMID:27199998

  15. Nodule-enhanced expression of a sucrose phosphate synthase gene member (MsSPSA) has a role in carbon and nitrogen metabolism in the nodules of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Aleman, Lorenzo; Ortega, Jose Luis; Martinez-Grimes, Martha; Seger, Mark; Holguin, Francisco Omar; Uribe, Diana J; Garcia-Ibilcieta, David; Sengupta-Gopalan, Champa

    2010-01-01

    Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) catalyzes the first step in the synthesis of sucrose in photosynthetic tissues. We characterized the expression of three different isoforms of SPS belonging to two different SPS gene families in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), a previously identified SPS (MsSPSA) and two novel isoforms belonging to class B (MsSPSB and MsSPSB3). While MsSPSA showed nodule-enhanced expression, both MsSPSB genes exhibited leaf-enhanced expression. Alfalfa leaf and nodule SPS enzymes showed differences in chromatographic and electrophoretic migration and differences in V (max) and allosteric regulation. The root nodules in legume plants are a strong sink for photosynthates with its need for ATP, reducing power and carbon skeletons for dinitrogen fixation and ammonia assimilation. The expression of genes encoding SPS and other key enzymes in sucrose metabolism, sucrose phosphate phosphatase and sucrose synthase, was analyzed in the leaves and nodules of plants inoculated with Sinorhizobium meliloti. Based on the expression pattern of these genes, the properties of the SPS isoforms and the concentration of starch and soluble sugars in nodules induced by a wild type and a nitrogen fixation deficient strain, we propose that SPS has an important role in the control of carbon flux into different metabolic pathways in the symbiotic nodules.

  16. Rhizobia with different symbiotic efficiencies nodulate Acaciella angustissima in Mexico, including Sinorhizobium chiapanecum sp. nov. which has common symbiotic genes with Sinorhizobium mexicanum

    PubMed Central

    Rincón-Rosales, Reiner; Lloret, Lourdes; Ponce, Edith; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria from nodules of the legume Acaciella angustissima native to the south of Mexico were characterized genetically and their nodulation and competitiveness were evaluated. Phylogenetic studies derived from rpoB gene sequences indicated that A. angustissima is nodulated by Sinorhizobium mexicanum, Rhizobium tropici, Mesorhizobium plurifarium and Agrobacterium tumefaciens and by bacteria related to Sinorhizobium americanum, Sinorhizobium terangae, Rhizobium etli and Rhizobium gallicum. A new lineage related to S. terangae is recognized based on the sequences of gyrA, nolR, recA, rpoB and rrs genes, DNA–DNA hybridization and phenotypic characteristics. The name for this new species is Sinorhizobium chiapanecum and its type strain is ITTG S70T. The symbiotic genes nodA and nifH were similar to those from S. mexicanum strains, which are Acaciella symbionts as well, with nodA gene sequences grouped within a cluster of nod genes from strains that nodulate plants from the Mimosoideae subfamily of the Leguminosae. Sinorhizobium isolates were the most frequently obtained from A. angustissima nodules and were among the best strains to promote plant growth in A. angustissima and to compete in interstrain nodule competition assays. Lateral transfer of symbiotic genes is not evident among the genera that nodulate A. angustissima (Rhizobium, Sinorhizobium and Mesorhizobium) but may occur among the sympatric and closely related sinorhizobia that nodulate Acaciella. PMID:19120461

  17. How should pulmonary nodules be optimally investigated and managed?

    PubMed

    Callister, Matthew E J; Baldwin, David R

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary nodules are a common incidental finding on CT and the inexorable rise in the use of CT (10% increase per year in the UK over the last decade) means that the frequency of their detection is likely to increase over coming years. This may be augmented further if CT screening is implemented. Management has previously been influenced by North American guidelines, with the most widely used resource to date being the Fleischner Society guidelines published in 2005. These predominantly focus on the timing of CT scans arranged to survey small pulmonary nodules (≤ 8 mm), and the guideline authors chose not to offer specific recommendations regarding larger nodules. More recently, the society published specific guidelines for sub-solid nodules, reflecting the different prognosis that this subtype of nodules confers. The American College of Chest Physicians have published two guidelines on pulmonary nodules-the latest was completed in 2012 and published in Chest the following year. However, the investigation and management of pulmonary nodules is a rapidly evolving subject largely driven by evidence from the large CT screening studies. In 2012, The British Thoracic Society (BTS) convened a guideline development group to address the topic of pulmonary nodule investigation and management, with publication of the guideline in July 2015. One third of the 359 references included in the guideline date from 2012 onwards, and many of the differences between the recommendations made and previous guideline recommendations reflect this recent evidence. This article reviews specific evidence considered in formulating the BTS guidelines, and summarises the main guideline recommendations. PMID:26711934

  18. Developmental specialisations in the legume family.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Julie M I; Noel Ellis, T H

    2014-02-01

    The legume family is astonishingly diverse; inventiveness in the form of novel organs, modified organs and additional meristems, is rife. Evolutionary changes can be inferred from the phylogenetic pattern of this diversity, but a full understanding of the origin of these 'hopeful monsters' of meristematic potential requires clear phylogenetic reconstructions and extensive, species-rich, sequence data. The task is large, but rapid progress is being made in both these areas. Here we review specialisations that have been characterised in a subset of intensively studied papilionoid legume taxa at the vanguard of developmental genetic studies.

  19. Glutamine synthetase isoforms in nitrogen-fixing soybean nodules: distinct oligomeric structures and thiol-based regulation.

    PubMed

    Masalkar, Pintu D; Roberts, Daniel M

    2015-01-16

    Legume root nodule glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the assimilation of ammonia produced by nitrogen fixation. Two GS isoform subtypes (GS1β and GS1γ) are present in soybean nodules. GS1γ isoforms differ from GS1β isoforms in terms of their susceptibility to reversible inhibition by intersubunit disulfide bond formation between C159 and C92 at the shared active site at subunit interfaces. Although nodule GS enzymes share 86% amino acid sequence identity, analytical ultracentrifugation experiments showed that GS1γ is a dodecamer, whereas the GS1β is a decamer. It is proposed that this difference contributes to the differential thiol sensitivity of each isoform, and that GS1γ1 may be a target of thiol-based regulation.

  20. Nitrogen Fixation in Peanut Nodules during Dark Periods and Detopped Conditions with Special Reference to Lipid Bodies 1

    PubMed Central

    Siddique, Abu-baker M.; Bal, Arya K.

    1991-01-01

    The peanut plant (Arachis hypogaea L.), unlike other known legumes, can sustain nitrogen fixation when prolonged periods of darkness or detopping curtail the supply of photosynthate to the nodule. This ability to withstand photosynthate stress is attributed to the presence of lipid bodies in infected nodule cells. In both dark-treated and detopped plants, the lipid bodies show a gradual decrease in numbers, suggesting their utilization as a source of energy and carbon for nitrogen fixation. Lipolytic activity can be localized in the lipid bodies, and the existence of β-oxidation pathway and, glyoxylate cycle is shown by the release of 14CO2 from 14C lineoleoyl coenzyme A by the nodule homogenate. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:16668069