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Sample records for leis jim crow

  1. EPITAPH FOR JIM CROW.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PETTIGREW, THOMAS F.

    BASED ON A SERIES OF FILMS PRODUCED BY WGBH-TV, BOSTON UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL RELATIONS, HARVARD UNIVERSITY, "EPTITAPH FOR JIM CROW" PRESENTED DIFFERENT ASPECTS OF THE NEGRO PROBLEM IN AMERICA. THE FIRST CHAPTER, "A TALE OF TWO LADIES," EMPHASIZED A KNOWLEDGE OF THE NEGRO ROLE IN AMERICA'S SOCIAL AND…

  2. EPITAPH FOR JIM CROW.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PETTIGREW, THOMAS F.

    BASED ON A SERIES OF FILMS PRODUCED BY WGBH-TV, BOSTON UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL RELATIONS, HARVARD UNIVERSITY, "EPTITAPH FOR JIM CROW" PRESENTED DIFFERENT ASPECTS OF THE NEGRO PROBLEM IN AMERICA. THE FIRST CHAPTER, "A TALE OF TWO LADIES," EMPHASIZED A KNOWLEDGE OF THE NEGRO ROLE IN AMERICA'S SOCIAL AND…

  3. Jim Crow and Premature Mortality Among the US Black and White Population, 1960–2009

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Nancy; Chen, Jarvis T.; Coull, Brent A.; Beckfield, Jason; Kiang, Mathew V.; Waterman, Pamela D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Scant research has analyzed the health impact of abolition of Jim Crow (ie, legal racial discrimination overturned by the US 1964 Civil Rights Act). Methods We used hierarchical age–period–cohort models to analyze US national black and white premature mortality rates (death before 65 years of age) in 1960–2009. Results Within a context of declining US black and white premature mortality rates and a persistent 2-fold excess black risk of premature mortality in both the Jim Crow and non-Jim Crow states, analyses including random period, cohort, state, and county effects and fixed county income effects found that, within the black population, the largest Jim Crow-by-period interaction occurred in 1960–1964 (mortality rate ratio [MRR] = 1.15 [95% confidence interval = 1.09–1.22), yielding the largest overall period-specific Jim Crow effect MRR of 1.27, with no such interactions subsequently observed. Furthermore, the most elevated Jim Crow-by-cohort effects occurred for birth cohorts from 1901 through 1945 (MRR range = 1.05–1.11), translating to the largest overall cohort-specific Jim Crow effect MRRs for the 1921–1945 birth cohorts (MRR ~ 1.2), with no such interactions subsequently observed. No such interactions between Jim Crow and either period or cohort occurred among the white population. Conclusion Together, the study results offer compelling evidence of the enduring impact of both Jim Crow and its abolition on premature mortality among the US black population, although insufficient to eliminate the persistent 2-fold black excess risk evident in both the Jim Crow and non-Jim Crow states from 1960 to 2009. PMID:24825344

  4. Reporting on the Holocaust: the view from Jim Crow Alabama.

    PubMed

    Puckett, Dan J

    2011-01-01

    The press in Alabama covered major events taking place in Germany from the rise of Adolf Hitler and the Nazis in 1933 through the Nuremberg Trials in 1946. Journalists in the state provided extensive coverage, and editors did not hesitate to opine on the persecution of the Jews in Europe. Yet, Alabama’s white-run press failed in the end to explain the events as a singularly Jewish tragedy. The state’s black-run press, for its part, used the news of the mass killings of the Jews to warn against the dangers of conceptions of racial superiority—a primary concern for black southerners living in the Jim Crow South.

  5. A Bus Ride across the Mason-Dixon Line during Jim Crow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes, John A.

    2010-01-01

    In this classroom simulation, students travel back in time to 1945, when racism was institutionalized in many states through segregation. Though students cannot literally travel back to the Jim Crow era, teachers can create a situation that brings home the point of injustice and the choices individuals are faced with in such situations. Suddenly,…

  6. A Bus Ride across the Mason-Dixon Line during Jim Crow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes, John A.

    2010-01-01

    In this classroom simulation, students travel back in time to 1945, when racism was institutionalized in many states through segregation. Though students cannot literally travel back to the Jim Crow era, teachers can create a situation that brings home the point of injustice and the choices individuals are faced with in such situations. Suddenly,…

  7. What Jim Crow's Teachers Could Do: Educational Capital and Teachers' Work in Under-Resourced Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Hilton

    2010-01-01

    This article explains how Jim Crow's teachers--former teachers of legally segregated schools for blacks--prepared and motivated disadvantaged students in spite of funding and resource deprivation. According to the author, black teachers fashioned situated pedagogies for the acquisition of educational capital that could be used in exchange for…

  8. Segregation as Splitting, Segregation as Joining: Schools, Housing, and the Many Modes of Jim Crow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Highsmith, Andrew R.; Erickson, Ansley T.

    2015-01-01

    Popular understandings of segregation often emphasize the Jim Crow South before the 1954 "Brown" decision and, in many instances, explain continued segregation in schooling as the result of segregated housing patterns. The case of Flint, Michigan, complicates these views, at once illustrating the depth of governmental commitment to…

  9. Segregation as Splitting, Segregation as Joining: Schools, Housing, and the Many Modes of Jim Crow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Highsmith, Andrew R.; Erickson, Ansley T.

    2015-01-01

    Popular understandings of segregation often emphasize the Jim Crow South before the 1954 "Brown" decision and, in many instances, explain continued segregation in schooling as the result of segregated housing patterns. The case of Flint, Michigan, complicates these views, at once illustrating the depth of governmental commitment to…

  10. Tourism and the Hispanicization of race in Jim Crow Miami, 1945-1965.

    PubMed

    Rose, Chanelle N

    2012-01-01

    This article examines how Miami's significant presence of Anglo Caribbean blacks and Spanish-speaking tourists critically influenced the evolution of race relations before and after the watershed 1959 Cuban Revolution. The convergence of people from the American South and North, the Caribbean, and Latin America created a border culture in a city where the influx of Bahamian blacks and Spanish-speakers, especially tourists, had begun to alter the racial landscape. To be sure, Miami had many parallels with other parts of the South in regard to how blackness was understood and enforced by whites during the first half of the twentieth century. However, I argue that the city's post-WWII meteoric tourist growth, along with its emergence as a burgeoning Pan-American metropolis, complicated the traditional southern black-white dichotomy. The purchasing power of Spanish-speaking visitors during the postwar era transformed a tourist economy that had traditionally catered to primarily wealthy white transplanted Northerners. This significant change to the city's tourist industry significantly influenced white civic leaders' decision to occasionally modify Jim Crow practices for Latin American vacationers. In effect, Miami's early Latinization had a profound impact on the established racial order as speaking Spanish became a form of currency that benefited Spanish-speaking tourists—even those of African descent. Paradoxically, this ostensibly peculiar racial climate aided the local struggle by highlighting the idiosyncrasies of Jim Crow while perpetuating the second-class status of native-born blacks.

  11. "There Were Rapes!": Sexual Assaults of African American Women and Children in Jim Crow.

    PubMed

    Thompson-Miller, Ruth; Picca, Leslie H

    2016-07-03

    Using data from 92 interviews, this article examines the narratives of African Americans' experiences as children and young adults during Jim Crow in the Southeast and Southwest. It gives voice to the realities of sexual assaults committed by ordinary White men who systematically terrorized African American families with impunity after the post-Reconstruction south until the 1960s. The interviewees discuss the short- and long-term impact of physical, mental, emotional, and sexual assaults in their communities. We discuss the top four prevalent themes that emerged related to sexual assault, specifically (a) the normalization of sexual assaults, (b) protective measures to avoid White violence, (c) the morality of African American women, and (d) the long-term consequences of assaults on children. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. The Unique Impact of Abolition of Jim Crow Laws on Reducing Inequities in Infant Death Rates and Implications for Choice of Comparison Groups in Analyzing Societal Determinants of Health

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jarvis T.; Coull, Brent; Waterman, Pamela D.; Beckfield, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We explored associations between the abolition of Jim Crow laws (i.e., state laws legalizing racial discrimination overturned by the 1964 US Civil Rights Act) and birth cohort trends in infant death rates. Methods. We analyzed 1959 to 2006 US Black and White infant death rates within and across sets of states (polities) with and without Jim Crow laws. Results. Between 1965 and 1969, a unique convergence of Black infant death rates occurred across polities; in 1960 to 1964, the Black infant death rate was 1.19 times higher (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.18, 1.20) in the Jim Crow polity than in the non–Jim Crow polity, whereas in 1970 to 1974 the rate ratio shrank to and remained at approximately 1 (with the 95% CI including 1) until 2000, when it rose to 1.10 (95% CI = 1.08, 1.12). No such convergence occurred for Black–White differences in infant death rates or for White infants. Conclusions. Our results suggest that abolition of Jim Crow laws affected US Black infant death rates and that valid analysis of societal determinants of health requires appropriate comparison groups. PMID:24134378

  13. Jim Crow, Indian Style.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svingen, Orlan J.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews history of voting rights for Indians and discusses a 1986 decision calling for election reform in Big Horn County, Montana, to eliminate violations of the voting rights of the county's Indian citizens. Notes that positive effects--such as election of the county's first Indian commissioner--co-exist with enduring anti-Indian sentiment. (JHZ)

  14. Gentrifying Water and Selling Jim Crow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Brett

    2002-01-01

    Explores the gentrification of Washington, D.C.'s Anacostia watershed, tracing the projects of federal and local government to devitalize and demolish living black relationships and institutions while reifying lost, invented, or imagined communities. Explores connections among capital, community, culture, and state power. Examines problems in the…

  15. General view of Crow Farm, view looking east of Crow ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of Crow Farm, view looking east of Crow Farm, showing farm house, hog house, and coal house - Jacob Crow Farm, Crow Creek Road, 1 mile south of intersection of Routes 15 & 28, Cameron, Marshall County, WV

  16. Eleanor Roosevelt and the Wartime Campaign against Jim Crow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Allida M.

    1996-01-01

    Describes Eleanor Roosevelt's efforts to correct institutional racism. Mrs. Roosevelt worked continually in support of civil rights for African Americans in employment, housing, and the armed services. Her efforts often were met with vehement and venomous opposition. (MJP)

  17. Jim Dalinghaus d/b/a Jim Dalinghaus Feedlot

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA is providing notice of a proposed Administrative Penalty Assessment against Jim Dalinghaus, doing business as Jim Dalinghaus Feedlot, for alleged violations at the facility located at: 424 144th Road, Baileyville, Kansas 66404.

  18. In Conversation with Jim Blair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holman, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Jim Blair is the only consultant nurse working with people with learning disabilities in the country. His job helps make people better and saves money. This article shares a conversation with Jim Blair. In the conversation, Blair says he is unhappy Valuing People programme did not do as much as it could have done. Jim is worried all the changes,…

  19. In Conversation with Jim Blair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holman, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Jim Blair is the only consultant nurse working with people with learning disabilities in the country. His job helps make people better and saves money. This article shares a conversation with Jim Blair. In the conversation, Blair says he is unhappy Valuing People programme did not do as much as it could have done. Jim is worried all the changes,…

  20. Joseph Conrad's "Lord Jim": Reconsiderations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Haj, Ali Albashir Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims at reconsidering critically Joseph Conrad's "Lord Jim." Joseph Conrad is a great master of English prose who writes normally of the sea, of the Eastern islands, of the English character as seen against a background of the exotic or faced with difficulties. The power of Conrad's feelings for Jim, as well as the…

  1. Giving Voice to Crow Country: The Crow Place Name Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCleary, Carrie Moran

    2000-01-01

    Little Big Horn College (Montana) General Studies instructor, Timothy McCleary, has worked with Crow tribal elders to document Crow place names across Montana and to chronicle the many stories behind the names. A database (available at www.lbhc.cc.mt.us/crownames) contains interview material and GIS maps of over 500 locations. (PGS)

  2. Jim Milledge: Hypoxia Honoree 2007.

    PubMed

    Nickol, Annabel

    2007-01-01

    Jim Milledge is well known to the international "Hypoxia" community for his many contributions to many high altitude medical and scientific expeditions, including the recent Extreme Everest Expedition in the aspring of 2007! His role as a physician, scientist, teacher, mentor and fried is cherished by those who have had the pleasure of working with him, either at home in the U.K., or abroad during his many forays into thin air. In 2007 the International Hypoxia Symposium honored Jim for his outstanding service and role in leading the entire field of high altitude medicine and physiology.

  3. Jim Dine-Inspired Valentines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlett, April

    2011-01-01

    Jim Dine was born in 1935 in Cincinnati. He earned a BFA from Ohio University in 1957 and then moved to New York in 1959, where he fell in with a group of artists that included Claes Oldenburg. Dine is best known as a Pop innovator, whose paintings, sculptures, and prints were layered with everyday objects, including ties, tools, and even a…

  4. An Interview with Jim Black

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burch, Brad

    2006-01-01

    Jim Black is president of SEM WORKS, one of the leading higher education consulting firms in the area of enrollment management. Dr. Black has delivered keynote addresses and conducted training workshops for business leaders and educators worldwide. His areas of expertise include leadership, organizational change, customer service, strategic…

  5. An Interview with Jim Black

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burch, Brad

    2006-01-01

    Jim Black is president of SEM WORKS, one of the leading higher education consulting firms in the area of enrollment management. Dr. Black has delivered keynote addresses and conducted training workshops for business leaders and educators worldwide. His areas of expertise include leadership, organizational change, customer service, strategic…

  6. Jim and Dave: A Dialogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doud, Robert E.

    This is a fictional dialogue intended to honor Jim Kingman and David Leary, both professors of history who retired after long careers at Pasadena City College in California (PCC). The dialogue hypothesizes the observations of both men as they look on the honorary gold plates of previous retirees that decorate the wall of a PCC public dining hall.…

  7. Jim Dine-Inspired Valentines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlett, April

    2011-01-01

    Jim Dine was born in 1935 in Cincinnati. He earned a BFA from Ohio University in 1957 and then moved to New York in 1959, where he fell in with a group of artists that included Claes Oldenburg. Dine is best known as a Pop innovator, whose paintings, sculptures, and prints were layered with everyday objects, including ties, tools, and even a…

  8. Mission Dolores and Jim Corbin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaton, Moss, Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Written by history students at Gary High School, Gary, Texas, this issue includes two articles relevant to East Texas history. "Mission Dolores and Jim Corbin," (Moss Heaton and others) is a summary of material presented by Professor James Corbin about the early Spanish presence in East Texas. The first attempt at setting up a mission…

  9. Jim Thomas, 1946-2010

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Maureen; Kasik, David; Bailey, Mike; van Dam, Andy; Dill, John; Rhyne, Theresa-Marie; Foley, Jim; Encarnacao, L. M.; Rosenblum, Larry; Earnshaw, Rae; Ma, Kwan-Liu; Wong, Pak C.; Encarnacao, Jose; Fellner, Dieter; Urban, Bodo

    2010-11-01

    Jim Thomas, a visionary scientist and inspirational leader, died on 6 August 2010 in Richland, Washington. His impact on the fields of computer graphics, user interface software, and visualization was extraordinary, his ability to personally change people’s lives even more so. He is remembered for his enthusiasm, his mentorship, his generosity, and, most of all, his laughter. This collection of remembrances images him through the eyes of his many friends.

  10. 25 CFR 162.500 - Crow Reservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Crow Reservation. 162.500 Section 162.500 Indians BUREAU... for Certain Reservations § 162.500 Crow Reservation. (a) Notwithstanding the regulations in other sections of this part 162, Crow Indians classified as competent under the Act of June 4, 1920 (41 Stat....

  11. Blood parasites of American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) and fish crows (Corvus ossifragus) in Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dusek, R.J.; Forrester, Donald J.

    2002-01-01

    Blood films from 46 fish crows (Corvus ossifragus Wilson) and 42 American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos Brehm) from Florida, U.S.A., were examined for blood parasites. Haemoproteus picae Coatney and Roudabush, Haemoproteus danilewskii Kruse, Trypanosoma avium (Danilewsky), and microfilariae of an unidentified filarioid were identified from both species of crows. An unidentified species of Haemoproteus and Trypanosoma ontarioensis Woo and Bartlett were observed in American crow blood films. Fish crow blood films contained Plasmodium relictum Celli and Sanfelice. Prior to this study, T. avium and P. relictum had not been reported from fish crows.

  12. Jim Dalinghaus d/b/a Jim Dalinghaus Feedlot - Clean Water Act Public Notice

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA is providing notice of a proposed Administrative Penalty Assessment against Jim Dalinghaus, doing business as Jim Dalinghaus Feedlot, for alleged violations at the facility located at: 424 144th Road, Baileyville, Kansas 66404.

  13. Crows Rival Monkeys in Cognitive Capacity.

    PubMed

    Balakhonov, Dmitry; Rose, Jonas

    2017-08-18

    The present study compares the 'bandwidth of cognition' between crows and primates. Working memory is the ability to maintain and manipulate information over short periods of time - a core component of cognition. The capacity of working memory is tightly limited, in humans correlated with individual intelligence and commonly used synonymously with cognitive capacity. Crows have remarkable cognitive skills and while birds and mammals share neural principles of working memory, its capacity has not been tested in crows. Here we report the performance of two carrion crows on a working memory paradigm adapted from a recent experiment in rhesus monkeys. Capacity of crows is remarkably similar to monkeys and estimated at about four items. In both species, the visual hemifields show largely independent capacity. These results show that crows, like primates evolved a high-capacity working memory that reflects the result of convergent evolution of higher cognitive abilities in both species.

  14. Jim. L'historie de Jim Caron jeune homme racontee par lui-meme (Jim. The Story of Jim Caron as a Young Man Told by Himself).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Julien

    This illustrated account of an interview with Jim Caron, a 101 year-old Franco-American resident of New Hampshire, is intended for use in a bilingual education setting. The narrative is divided into ten chapters and is written in the style of the spoken French dialect of Quebec and New England. In addition to details on the long life of Jim it…

  15. Jim. L'historie de Jim Caron jeune homme racontee par lui-meme (Jim. The Story of Jim Caron as a Young Man Told by Himself).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Julien

    This illustrated account of an interview with Jim Caron, a 101 year-old Franco-American resident of New Hampshire, is intended for use in a bilingual education setting. The narrative is divided into ten chapters and is written in the style of the spoken French dialect of Quebec and New England. In addition to details on the long life of Jim it…

  16. Fulfilling the Promise: African American Educators Teach for Democracy in Jim Crow's South

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston-Grimes, Patrice

    2010-01-01

    America's civic community from the end of the Great Depression through the post World War II years was hardly rational or racially neutral in its uneven and unequal treatment of African Americans and other underrepresented groups. Conventional civic scholarship of the era has ignored the complexities of a racially segregated society that in theory…

  17. Fair and Tender Ladies versus Jim Crow: The Politics of Co-Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Karen L.

    2010-01-01

    In the current vernacular, co-education means the education of the sexes together within an institutional setting. Once a phenomenon, today, women enjoy nearly equal status on campuses that were at one time bastions of "maleness." Moreover, the counter-culture revolution of the late 1960s and throughout the 1970s, ushered in a new…

  18. Foul Lines: Teaching Race in Jim Crow America through Baseball History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laliberte, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Far more than just recreation, baseball offers social, cultural, and political insights into history. For teachers, the goals of this article are threefold. First, this narrative is designed to provide the introductory content knowledge needed to develop a colorful lecture, structure a spirited discussion, or create a student project on the topic.…

  19. People and Place: Croatan Indians in Jim Crow Georgia, 1890-1920

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynor, Malinda

    2005-01-01

    Croatans did not take their community's identity for granted, nor did they blend in with one or another dominant ethnic identity. They continually reinforced their distinctiveness as a community by employing strategies as diverse as maintaining long-distance kin ties and accommodating racial segregation.

  20. Jim Crow, Uncle Sam, and the Formation of the Tuskegee Flying Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Percy, William

    1999-01-01

    Delivers background information on the political origins and confrontations surrounding the "Tuskegee Experiment." States that the success of the Tuskegee pilots, in their role as strategic escort for the Fifteenth Air Force, paved the way for the overall desegregation of U.S. armed forces. Provides teaching ideas along with two…

  1. Race, Remembering, and Jim Crow's Teachers. Studies in African American History and Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Hilton

    2012-01-01

    This book explores a profoundly negative narrative about legally segregated schools in the United States being "inherently inferior" compared to their white counterparts. However, there are overwhelmingly positive counter-memories of these schools as "good and valued" among former students, teachers, and community members.…

  2. Jim Crow, Uncle Sam, and the Formation of the Tuskegee Flying Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Percy, William

    1999-01-01

    Delivers background information on the political origins and confrontations surrounding the "Tuskegee Experiment." States that the success of the Tuskegee pilots, in their role as strategic escort for the Fifteenth Air Force, paved the way for the overall desegregation of U.S. armed forces. Provides teaching ideas along with two…

  3. People and Place: Croatan Indians in Jim Crow Georgia, 1890-1920

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynor, Malinda

    2005-01-01

    Croatans did not take their community's identity for granted, nor did they blend in with one or another dominant ethnic identity. They continually reinforced their distinctiveness as a community by employing strategies as diverse as maintaining long-distance kin ties and accommodating racial segregation.

  4. The discovery of southern childhoods: psychology and the transformation of schooling in the Jim Crow South.

    PubMed

    Rose, Anne C

    2007-08-01

    Although the psychology of race in America has been the subject of significant research, psychological science in the principal region of racial interaction before Brown v. Board of Education-the South--has received little attention. This article argues that the introduction of psychological ideas about children by means of school reform in the South during the half-century before the Brown decision established a cultural foundation for both Black resistance to segregated schools and White determination to preserve them. In 1900, southern children and their schools were an afterthought in a culture more committed to tradition and racial stability than innovation and individual achievement. The advent of northern philanthropy, however, brought with it a new psychology of childhood. Although the reformers did not intend to subvert segregation, their premises downplayed natural endowment, including racial inheritance, and favored concepts highlighting nurture: that personality is developmental, childhood foundational, and adversity detrimental. Decades of discussion of children in their learning environment gave southern Blacks a rationale for protest and Whites a logical defense for conservative reaction.

  5. Foul Lines: Teaching Race in Jim Crow America through Baseball History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laliberte, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Far more than just recreation, baseball offers social, cultural, and political insights into history. For teachers, the goals of this article are threefold. First, this narrative is designed to provide the introductory content knowledge needed to develop a colorful lecture, structure a spirited discussion, or create a student project on the topic.…

  6. Fair and Tender Ladies versus Jim Crow: The Politics of Co-Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Karen L.

    2010-01-01

    In the current vernacular, co-education means the education of the sexes together within an institutional setting. Once a phenomenon, today, women enjoy nearly equal status on campuses that were at one time bastions of "maleness." Moreover, the counter-culture revolution of the late 1960s and throughout the 1970s, ushered in a new…

  7. 50 CFR 20.133 - Hunting regulations for crows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hunting regulations for crows. 20.133... Hunting regulations for crows. (a) Crows may be taken, possessed, transported, exported, or imported, only.... (b) Except in the State of Hawaii, where no crows shall be taken, States may by statute or...

  8. Jim Lovell Recalls Apollo 8 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Astronaut Jim Lovell, veteran of two Gemini flights as well as the legendary missions of Apollo 8 and Apollo 13, recalls his thoughts on launch day of Apollo 8 in 1968, when humans first left the E...

  9. West Nile virus antibody prevalence in American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) and fish crows (Corvus ossifragus) in Georgia, USA.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Benjamin R; Yabsley, Michael J; Ellis, Angela E; Stallknecht, David E; Gibbs, Samantha E J

    2007-03-01

    Crows have been the centerpiece of avian West Nile virus (WNV) surveillance and research in North America. This work has demonstrated variation in susceptibility to WNV infection between American (Cor vus brachyrhynchos) andFish Crows (Corvus ossifragus). The higher WNV-associated mortality rate in American Crows compared with Fish Crows suggests that WNV antibody prevalence would be greater in the Fish Crow population. The objectives of this study were to 1) determine whether Fish Crows had higher WNV antibody prevalencethan American Crows, 2 ) determine th e persistence o f antibodies to WNV in naturally infected Fish Crows, and 3) develop a technique to distinguish Fish Crows from American Crows on the basis of sequence analysis and restriction enzyme digestion of a mitochondrial DNA fragment. West Nile virus antibody prevalence was 16.5% (n = 97) in Fish Crows and 5.7% in American Crows (n = 53) collected from Georgia between 2004 and 2006. Antibodies persisted at high titers for 12 mo in Fish Crows. This is the first report of WNV antibody persistence in a crow species. A polymerase chain reaction technique paired with restriction enzyme digestion easily distinguished American Crows from Fish Crows on the basis of a mitochondrial DNA fragment.

  10. Comparative phylogeography of two crow species: jungle crow Corvus macrorhynchos and carrion crow Corvus corone.

    PubMed

    Kryukov, Alexey; Spiridonova, Liudmila; Nakamura, Sumio; Haring, Elisabeth; Suzuki, Hitoshi

    2012-08-01

    The jungle crow Corvus macrorhynchos Wagler, 1827, and the carrion crow Corvus corone L., 1758, are two closely related species with similar ecological requirements that occupy wide distribution ranges in the Palearctic. We studied patterns of their genetic variation by using sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. Corvus macrorhynchos demonstrates a low level of variation and differentiation throughout its range, except for a highly diverged population of Cheju Island (Korea). The haplotype network shows two haplogroups. The island group comprises populations of Sakhalin, Hokkaido, Honshu, and Kyushu, while the haplotypes of Taiwan and Ryukyu Islands proved to be closer to the mainland group, which also includes populations from the Primorye, Khabarovsk, Amur, and Magadan regions in the Russian Far East. This pattern allowed us to develop a phylogeographic hypothesis regarding the two modes of settling of the island populations. Concerning C. corone, the presence of two distinct haplogroups was confirmed within the range of C. c. orientalis. Both haplogroups are found within the same populations in Kamchatka and North Sakhalin, which implies secondary contacts there. Populations of C. corone are found to be rather stable in the western parts of its range, while in the Far East populations experienced recent growth, as was observed for C. macrorhynchos in general. The two species appear to have passed through different evolutionary scenarios.

  11. Crow Nation Water Treatment Plant NPDES Permit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under NPDES permit MT-0030538, the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs is authorized to discharge from the Crow Agency water treatment plants via the wastewater treatment facility located in Bighorn County, Montana to the Little Bighorn River.

  12. Automating the Purple Crow Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Shannon; Sica, R. J.; Argall, P. S.

    2016-06-01

    The Purple Crow LiDAR (PCL) was built to measure short and long term coupling between the lower, middle, and upper atmosphere. The initial component of my MSc. project is to automate two key elements of the PCL: the rotating liquid mercury mirror and the Zaber alignment mirror. In addition to the automation of the Zaber alignment mirror, it is also necessary to describe the mirror's movement and positioning errors. Its properties will then be added into the alignment software. Once the alignment software has been completed, we will compare the new alignment method with the previous manual procedure. This is the first among several projects that will culminate in a fully-automated lidar. Eventually, we will be able to work remotely, thereby increasing the amount of data we collect. This paper will describe the motivation for automation, the methods we propose, preliminary results for the Zaber alignment error analysis, and future work.

  13. Crows spontaneously exhibit analogical reasoning.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Anna; Zorina, Zoya; Obozova, Tanya; Wasserman, Edward

    2015-01-19

    Analogical reasoning is vital to advanced cognition and behavioral adaptation. Many theorists deem analogical thinking to be uniquely human and to be foundational to categorization, creative problem solving, and scientific discovery. Comparative psychologists have long been interested in the species generality of analogical reasoning, but they initially found it difficult to obtain empirical support for such thinking in nonhuman animals (for pioneering efforts, see [2, 3]). Researchers have since mustered considerable evidence and argument that relational matching-to-sample (RMTS) effectively captures the essence of analogy, in which the relevant logical arguments are presented visually. In RMTS, choice of test pair BB would be correct if the sample pair were AA, whereas choice of test pair EF would be correct if the sample pair were CD. Critically, no items in the correct test pair physically match items in the sample pair, thus demanding that only relational sameness or differentness is available to support accurate choice responding. Initial evidence suggested that only humans and apes can successfully learn RMTS with pairs of sample and test items; however, monkeys have subsequently done so. Here, we report that crows too exhibit relational matching behavior. Even more importantly, crows spontaneously display relational responding without ever having been trained on RMTS; they had only been trained on identity matching-to-sample (IMTS). Such robust and uninstructed relational matching behavior represents the most convincing evidence yet of analogical reasoning in a nonprimate species, as apes alone have spontaneously exhibited RMTS behavior after only IMTS training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. CROW for large scale macromolecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Hodoscek, Milan; Borstnik, Urban; Janezic, Dusanka

    2002-01-01

    CROW (Columns and Rows Of Workstations - http://www.sicmm.org/crow/) is a parallel computer cluster based on the Beowulf (http://www.beowulf.org/) idea, modified to support a larger number of processors. Its architecture is based on point-to-point network architecture, which does not require the use of any network switching equipment in the system. Thus, the cost is lower, and there is no degradation in network performance even for a larger number of processors.

  15. CROW{trademark} process modeling. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    The Western Research Institute (WRI) has patented a technology (CROW{trademark}) for the recovery of oily contaminants from water-saturated formations. The CROW process uses either hot water or low-pressure steam to flush contaminants to the surface by means of production wells. CROW is typically applied to highly permeable aquifers that have been invaded by organics such as coal tars or chemical solvents. In conceptualizing a model of the CROW process, we draw an analogy between flushing organics from an organic-contaminated aquifer and producing oil from a petroleum reservoir. The organic-contaminated aquifer can be represented as a petroleum reservoir. The injection of water or steam and production of water/organic admixtures can be described by standard reservoir well equations. Finally, the movement of organic and water within the aquifer can be represented by Darcy flow of the individual phases. Thus, in modeling the CROW process, it is reasonable to assume that a petroleum reservoir simulator would accurately portray the recovery of organics from a contaminated aquifer. Of course, the reservoir simulator would need to incorporate thermal aspects of Darcy flow to accurately represent recovery during CROW processing.

  16. Neospora caninum in crows from Israel.

    PubMed

    Salant, H; Mazuz, M L; Savitsky, I; Nasereddin, A; Blinder, E; Baneth, G

    2015-09-15

    A cross-sectional Neospora caninum seroprevalence study was performed on free ranging crows (Corvus cornix, Corvus monedula and Corvus splendens) from Israel in order to assess their exposure to this pathogen and evaluate their role as potential hosts or as sentinels of infection. Using the modified agglutination test (MAT) with a cutoff titer of 1:100, 30 out of 183 crows (16.4%) were found to be N. caninum seropositive. Positive results were validated and confirmed by the indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT). There was 100% agreement between tests when cut-off titers of 1:50 and 1:100 were applied for the IFAT and MAT, respectively. PCR analysis of brain extracts from all crows resulted in the detection of N. caninum DNA for the first time in crows belonging to two species, C. cornix and C. monedula. The high N. caninum seroprevalence in crows suggests that widespread exposure to infection with N. caninum exists especially in central and northern Israel and that crows may act as suitable markers for disease prevalence in the areas in which they are found.

  17. [Differences in vocalization and morphology of the syrinx between Carrion crows (Corvus corone) and Jungle crows (C. macrorhynchos)].

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, Naoki; Aoyama, Masato; Sugita, Shoei

    2007-12-01

    The vocal characteristics and the morph of the syrinx in Carrion crows (Corvus corone) and those in Jungle crows (C. macrorhynchos) were compared. The vocalizations of both species of crow were recorded into sonograms and analyzed. The appearance and inner configuration of the syrinx were observed using stereoscopic microscope. In addition, the inside diameter of the syrinx, the sizes of the labia and the attached position of the syringeal muscles were measured. The attached figures of syringeal muscles were different between the two species. The vocalizations of Carrion crows were noisier than possibly because their labias were noticeably smaller than those of Jungle crows. The attachment patterns of the syringeal muscles in Jungle crows suggested that they allow for more flexibility on the inside structure of the syrinx. The inner space of the syrinx in Jungle crows was also wider than those of Carrion crows. These results suggested that Jungle crows may be able to make various vocalizations because of these morphological characteristics.

  18. [Research on Zhang's collated edition of Lei gong pao zhi lun (Master Lei's Discourse on Processing of Chinese Materia Medica)].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Li

    2010-05-01

    Lei gong pao zhi lun (Master Lei's Discourse on Processing of Chinese Materia Medica) collated by Zhang Ji, and printed by Zhang's Yisheng Tang in Chengdu in 1932 was the first collated edition. Its original edition was not Jing shi zheng lei bei ji ben cao (Classified Materia Medica from Historical Classics for Emergency) of the Song Dynasty, but was Xiu shi zhi nan (Instruction for Drug Processing) and Lei gong pao zhi yao xing jie (Explanation on Master Lei's Properties of Drugs Processing) of the Qing Dynasty. The contents of this collated edition was far from Lei gong pao zhi lun with many mistakes, and was not the best edition to study Lei gong pao zhi lun.

  19. Jim Marshall: Foucault and Disciplining the Self

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besley, A. C.

    2005-01-01

    This paper notes how Jim influenced my own use of Foucault and also focuses on two of James Marshall's New Zealand oriented texts. In the first, "Discipline and Punishment in New Zealand Education" (Marshall & Marshall, 1997) he provides a Foucauldian genealogy of New Zealand approaches to both punishment and discipline, in…

  20. Crow Municipal Rural & Industrial Pilot Water Treatment Plant NPDES Permit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under NPDES permit MT-0031827, the Crow Indian Tribe is authorized to discharge from the Crow Municipal Rural & Industrial (MR&I) Pilot Water Treatment Plant in Bighorn County, Montana to the Bighorn River.

  1. Social learning in New Caledonian crows.

    PubMed

    Holzhaider, Jennifer C; Hunt, Gavin R; Gray, Russell D

    2010-08-01

    New Caledonian (NC) crows are the most sophisticated tool manufacturers other than humans. The diversification and geographical distribution of their three Pandanus tool designs that differ in complexity, as well as the lack of ecological correlates, suggest that cumulative technological change has taken place. To investigate the possibility that high-fidelity social transmission mediated this putative ratchet-like process, we studied the ontogeny of Pandanus tool manufacture and social organization in free-living NC crows. We found that juvenile crows took more than 1 year to reach adult proficiency in their Pandanus tool skills. Although trial-and-error learning is clearly important, juveniles have ample opportunity to learn about Pandanus tool manufacture by both observing their parents and interacting with artifactual material. The crows' social system seems likely to promote the faithful social transmission of local tool designs by both favoring the vertical transmission of tool information and minimizing horizontal transmission. We suggest that NC crows develop their Pandanus tool skills in a highly scaffolded learning environment that facilitates the cumulative technological evolution of tool designs.

  2. 50 CFR 20.133 - Hunting regulations for crows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hunting regulations for crows. 20.133... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Administrative and Miscellaneous Provisions § 20.133 Hunting regulations for crows. (a) Crows may be taken, possessed, transported, exported, or imported, only...

  3. 50 CFR 20.133 - Hunting regulations for crows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hunting regulations for crows. 20.133... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Administrative and Miscellaneous Provisions § 20.133 Hunting regulations for crows. (a) Crows may be taken, possessed, transported, exported, or imported, only...

  4. 50 CFR 20.133 - Hunting regulations for crows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hunting regulations for crows. 20.133... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Administrative and Miscellaneous Provisions § 20.133 Hunting regulations for crows. (a) Crows may be taken, possessed, transported, exported, or imported, only...

  5. 50 CFR 20.133 - Hunting regulations for crows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hunting regulations for crows. 20.133... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Administrative and Miscellaneous Provisions § 20.133 Hunting regulations for crows. (a) Crows may be taken, possessed, transported, exported, or imported, only...

  6. Jim Pollack's Contributions to Planetary Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberle, Robert M.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Jim Pollack was an extraordinary scientist. Since receiving his Ph.D. from Harvard in 1965, he published hundreds of papers in scientific journals, encyclopedias, popular magazines, and books. The sheer volume of this kind of productivity is impressive enough, but when considering the diversity and detail of his work, these accomplishments seem almost superhuman. Jim studied and wrote about every planet in the solar system. For, this he was perhaps the most distinguished planetary scientist of his generation. He successfully identified the composition of Saturn's rings and Venus's clouds. With his collaborators, he created the first detailed models for the formation of the outer planets, and the general circulation of the Martian atmosphere. His interest in Mars dust storms provided a foundation for the "nuclear winter" theory that ultimately helped shape foreign policy in the cold war era. Jim's creative talents brought him many awards including the Kuiper Award of the Division of Planetary Sciences, the Leo Szilard Award of the American Physical Society, H. Julian Allen award of the Ames Research Center, and several NASA medals for exceptional scientific achievement.

  7. Jim Pollack's Contributions to Planetary Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberle, Robert M.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Jim Pollack was an extraordinary scientist. Since receiving his Ph.D. from Harvard in 1965, he published hundreds of papers in scientific journals, encyclopedias, popular magazines, and books. The sheer volume of this kind of productivity is impressive enough, but when considering the diversity and detail of his work, these accomplishments seem almost superhuman. Jim studied and wrote about every planet in the solar system. For, this he was perhaps the most distinguished planetary scientist of his generation. He successfully identified the composition of Saturn's rings and Venus's clouds. With his collaborators, he created the first detailed models for the formation of the outer planets, and the general circulation of the Martian atmosphere. His interest in Mars dust storms provided a foundation for the "nuclear winter" theory that ultimately helped shape foreign policy in the cold war era. Jim's creative talents brought him many awards including the Kuiper Award of the Division of Planetary Sciences, the Leo Szilard Award of the American Physical Society, H. Julian Allen award of the Ames Research Center, and several NASA medals for exceptional scientific achievement.

  8. The human biology of Jim Tanner.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Noël

    2012-09-01

    In 1940, during his second year of medical training, Jim Tanner expressed the desire to work, 'where physiology, psychology and sociology meet'. His subsequent exposure to the breadth of an American medical education and to the social and economic environment of post-war Europe distilled his belief in the importance of viewing the human in a broad context. Following his visits to the American longitudinal growth studies in 1948. Jim's dreams of a broad scientific discipline that incorporated both the biology and ecology of the human were strengthened by an inspirational group of embryonic human biologists with whom he developed '… the new Human Biology …' from the '… Physical Anthropology of old…'. With Jo Weiner, Derek Roberts, Geoffrey Harrison, Arthur Mourant, Nigel Barnicot and Kenneth Oakley, Jim was to form the Society for the Study of Human Biology in 1958. The development of human biology over the next 50 years was shaped by the expertise and diversity of that group of visionary scientists who conceived the scientific discipline of 'human biology' in which biology, behaviour and social context define the human species.

  9. Corvid cognition: something to crow about?

    PubMed

    Vonk, Jennifer

    2015-01-19

    New research indicates that crows are capable of matching stimuli on the basis of analogical relations: that is, similarity of size, color and shape. This may be the first evidence for spontaneous analogical reasoning outside of the primate order. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Crow Butte uranium deposit, northwest Nebraska

    SciTech Connect

    Collings, S.P.; Gjelsteen, T.

    1987-05-01

    The Crow Butte uranium deposit is in northwest Nebraska near the town of Crawford and represents the first mineral deposit discovered in Nebraska. The deposit was discovered during the fall of 1980 by the Crow Butte Joint Venture, presently operated by Ferret Exploration Company of Nebraska, Inc. The discovery was made by drilling across oxidation-reduction fronts following regional drilling based on anomalous gamma readings in oil and gas holes. Delineation drilling during 1981 and 1982 indicated over 30 million lb U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ with an average grade of over 0.25% U/sub 3/O/sub 8/. Additional drilling has extended the Crow Butte mineral trend to the southeast a distance of about 25 mi, and to date over 50 million lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ have been indicated along this trend. The Crow Butte deposit is a roll-front deposit within the fluvial Chadron sandstone of Oligocene age. The deposit is contained in the very permeable Chadron sandstone confined between the underlying Cretaceous Pierre Shale and the siltstones and claystones of the overlying upper Chadron and Brule formations. Following several years of permitting, hearings, and environmental lawsuits, a pilot plant solution mine began operation during July 1986 using a sodium bicarbonate lixiviant with an oxidant of dissolved oxygen. The pilot plant assesses the feasibility of solution mining and evaluates restoration performance. Initial results of the pilot plant are very favorable and indicate the Crow Butte deposit can be developed into a significant commercial operation.

  11. JIM GREEN ADDRESSES THE MARSHALL ASSOCIATION

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-28

    JIM GREEN, DIRECTOR OF PLANETARY SCIENCE AT NASA HEADQUARTERS, ADDRESSES MARSHALL TEAM MEMBERS DURING A JUNE 28 LUNCHEON HOSTED BY THE MARSHALL ASSOCIATION. OVER THE COURSE OF HIS 35-YEAR CAREER AT NASA, HE HAS SUPPORTED A DIVERSE ARRAY OF PLANETARY SCIENCE MISSIONS, AND RECENTLY SERVED AS SCIENCE ADVISOR FOR THE FILM ADAPTATION OF "THE MARTIAN." GREEN'S PRESENTATION WAS TITLED "THE MARTIAN: SCIENCE FICTION VS. SCIENCE FACT," IN WHICH HE DISCUSSED THE MOVIE AND THE NATION'S JOURNEY TO MARS. THE MARSHALL ASSOCIATION IS THE CENTER'S PROFESSIONAL, EMPLOYEE SERVICE ORGANIZATION.

  12. STS-104 Crew Interview: Jim Reilly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-104 Mission Specialist Jim Reilly is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, its payload (the Joint Airlock and the external gas tanks), and the usefulness of the newly installed Canadian Robotic Arm (installed by STS-100 crew). Reilly describes his role in the rendezvous, docking, undocking, and flyaround of the Atlantis Orbiter and the International Space Station (ISS) and discusses the mission's planned spacewalks.

  13. Career Profile- Jim Ross, Aerial Photographer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-21

    Check out what it takes to “capture the moment” at Mach speeds. The stunning aerial imagery of NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center comes from well-skilled photographers like Jim Ross, Photo Lead. This career profile video highlights Jim’s job responsibilities in documenting aircraft hardware installations, aerial research, and mission work that happens both on center and around the world. During Jim’s 27-year career, he has logged over 800 flight hours in twelve different types of aircraft.

  14. Jim Walter Resources installs new overland conveyor

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2008-12-15

    Embarking on a major expansion plan, the company is constructing a new additional overland conveyor coal to a recently refurbished prep plant. Jim Walter Resources recently invested $20 million in a new 5-mile overland conveyor system to haul coal from the No.7 deep coal mine in Alabama to the No.5 coal preparation plant. The size of the No.7 mine was effectively doubled. The article describes how this expansion move was decided upon and describes the design and installation of the new conveyor which spans approximately 5 miles. 4 photos.

  15. Differential Virulence of West Nile Strains for American Crows

    PubMed Central

    Langevin, Stanley A.; Bowen, Richard A.; Panella, Nicholas A.; Biggerstaff, Brad J.; Miller, Barry R.; Komar, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    Crow deaths were observed after West Nile virus (WNV) was introduced into North America, and this phenomenon has subsequently been used to monitor the spread of the virus. To investigate potential differences in the crow virulence of different WNV strains, American Crows were inoculated with Old World strains of WNV from Kenya and Australia (Kunjin) and a North American (NY99) WNV genotype. Infection of crows with NY99 genotype resulted in high serum viremia levels and death; the Kenyan and Kunjin genotypes elicited low viremia levels and minimal deaths but resulted in the generation of neutralizing antibodies capable of providing 100% protection from infection with the NY99 strain. These results suggest that genetic alterations in NY99 WNV are responsible for the crow-virulent phenotype and that increased replication of this strain in crows could spread WNV in North America. PMID:15663854

  16. Comparing the face inversion effect in crows and humans.

    PubMed

    Brecht, Katharina F; Wagener, Lysann; Ostojić, Ljerka; Clayton, Nicola S; Nieder, Andreas

    2017-09-13

    Humans show impaired recognition of faces that are presented upside down, a phenomenon termed face inversion effect, which is thought to reflect the special relevance of faces for humans. Here, we investigated whether a phylogenetically distantly related avian species, the carrion crow, with similar socio-cognitive abilities to human and non-human primates, exhibits a face inversion effect. In a delayed matching-to-sample task, two crows had to differentiate profiles of crow faces as well as matched controls, presented both upright and inverted. Because crows can discriminate humans based on their faces, we also assessed the face inversion effect using human faces. Both crows performed better with crow faces than with human faces and performed worse when responding to inverted pictures in general compared to upright pictures. However, neither of the crows showed a face inversion effect. For comparative reasons, the tests were repeated with human subjects. As expected, humans showed a face-specific inversion effect. Therefore, we did not find any evidence that crows-like humans-process faces as a special visual stimulus. Instead, individual recognition in crows may be based on cues other than a conspecific's facial profile, such as their body, or on processing of local features rather than holistic processing.

  17. Tool bending in New Caledonian crows

    PubMed Central

    Sugasawa, Shoko; van der Wal, Jessica E. M.; Klump, Barbara C.; St Clair, James J. H.

    2016-01-01

    ‘Betty’ the New Caledonian crow astonished the world when she ‘spontaneously’ bent straight pieces of garden wire into hooked foraging tools. Recent field experiments have revealed that tool bending is part of the species' natural behavioural repertoire, providing important context for interpreting Betty's iconic wire-bending feat. More generally, this discovery provides a compelling illustration of how natural history observations can inform laboratory-based research into the cognitive capacities of non-human animals. PMID:27853622

  18. Development of the CROW{trademark} process

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.A. Jr.

    1994-05-01

    The Contained Recovery of Oily Waste (CROW{trademark}) technology has been successfully tested in the laboratory and presently is being implemented at field sites contaminated with wood treating wastes and byproducts of town gas production. These field demonstrations will utilize only hot-water displacement without any chemical additives because the use of chemicals to enhance the hot-water flushing process has only been tested on a preliminary basis. Preliminary testing has shown that low concentrations of chemicals could reduce the contaminant content by an additional 10 to 20 wt %. Western Research Institute (WRI) research, plus research at Carnegie Mellon University, on surfactant enhancement of solubility of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in water and water-soil systems indicate the potential of chemical enhancement of the CROW process. Chemicals that have been tested and that were used in these tests are totally biodegradable. The objective of this task was to obtain sufficient baseline data to show the effectiveness and environmentally safe use of chemicals, primarily surfactants, to enhance the CROW process. To meet this objective, 14 one-dimensional displacement tests were conducted. Eleven tests were conducted on a material from a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) site and four tests were conducted with a contaminated soil from a former wood treatment facility. The tests investigated the effect of three chemical concentrations (0, 0.5, and 1.0 vol %) at three temperatures (ambient, the projected optimum temperature, and one 40{degree}F [22{degree}C] below the optimum temperature).

  19. STS-113 Crew Interviews: Jim Wetherbee, Commander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-113 Commander Jim Wetherbee is seen during this preflight interview where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. Wetherbee outlines his role in the mission, what his responsibilities will be, what the crew exchange will be like (transferring the Expedition 6 crew in place of the Expedition 5 crew on the International Space Station (ISS)) and what the importance of the primary payload (the P1 truss) will be. He also provides a detailed account of the three planned extravehicular activities (EVAs) and additional transfer duties. He ends by offering his thoughts on the success of the ISS as the second anniversary of continuous human occupation of the ISS approaches.

  20. From Radical Reconstruction to Jim Crow: Education, Nation-Building, and the Making of a New Racial Order

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Christi Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on recent theories of boundary processes, status and ethnicity, I investigate processes of group-making in the post-Civil War era (1865-1905) when Americans were faced with two daunting political projects: rebuilding the nation, and creating a new racial order to replace the abolished system of bond slavery. Although scholars have…

  1. A "mulatto escape hatch" in the United States? Examining evidence of racial and social mobility during the Jim Crow era.

    PubMed

    Saperstein, Aliya; Gullickson, Aaron

    2013-10-01

    Racial distinctions in the United States have long been characterized as uniquely rigid and governed by strict rules of descent, particularly along the black-white boundary. This is often contrasted with countries, such as Brazil, that recognize "mixed" or intermediate racial categories and allow for more fluidity or ambiguity in racial classification. Recently released longitudinal data from the IPUMS Linked Representative Samples, and the brief inclusion of a "mulatto" category in the U.S. Census, allow us to subject this generally accepted wisdom to empirical test for the 1870-1920 period. We find substantial fluidity in black-mulatto classification between censuses-including notable "downward" racial mobility. Using person fixed-effects models, we also find evidence that among Southern men, the likelihood of being classified as mulatto was related to intercensal changes in occupational status. These findings have implications for studies of race and inequality in the United States, cross-national research on racial classification schemes in the Americas, and for how demographers collect and interpret racial data.

  2. The Life and Work of Dr. Beadie Eugene Conner: An African American Physician in Jim Crow Texas.

    PubMed

    Volanto, Keith

    2012-01-01

    [[On a bright, sunny day in late May 1980, commencement exercises were underway at Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee. More than 250 physicians, dentists, nurses, candidates in health administration, dental hygienists, and medical technicians prepared to receive their certifications from the second-oldest historically black medical school in the country. Wearing a brown gabardine suit, Dr. Beadie Eugene Conner prepared to be called up to the podium along with some former classmates of Meharry’s class of 1930 to receive a plaque commemorating fifty years of public service. As he made his way up to the podium, tears began to well up in his eyes as he thought about his mother who would be so proud of him, his deceased wife, Willie Ruel, their daughter, Georgia, and the many years that had passed since he received his medical degree. The event contributed to the retired doctor’s desire to write an autobiography. Though never completed, rough drafts of the manuscript’s early chapters (along with other existing personal documents) provide an invaluable window into the interesting life of an important African American physician in twentieth-century Texas.1 The Conner family’s emphasis on education started long before Beadie was born. The earliest relatives of Dr. Conner so far identified are William Conner and Rachel Sterling Conner of Blount County, in eastern Tennessee. Family records indicate that William was born a slave in Knox County, Tennessee, sometime in 1814. He had already purchased his freedom by 1843 when he married Rachel Sterling, a woman born in 1829 into a free black family. William and Rachel lived on a Blount County farm through the Civil War years, raising six boys and one girl. Beadie Conner’s father, David Alexander Conner, was the fourth oldest son, born in 1859. After William died in 1866, Rachel moved the family to Louisville (a community in Blount County not to be confused with the city in Kentucky), where she kept house while David and his two youngest brothers attended school. By the late 1870s, the family had relocated to Knoxville before breaking up and going their separate ways. Among David’s siblings, his sister became a schoolteacher, two brothers served as ministers, one brother became a successful mortician, and his youngest brother, George Sherman Conner (destined to become a role model for young Beadie), started out as a teacher in Paris, Texas, before becoming a physician and important community leader in Waco.2 Much had transpired in David Alexander Conner’s life by the time his twin children Beadie and Beatrice were born on July 8, 1902, in Miller County, Arkansas, on a farm along the banks of the Red River. A widower living with six children from his previous marriage, he had met Queen Fowler Newlin, a short, beautiful woman of French and Choctaw extraction while attending a Baptist convention in Hope, Arkansas, in 1900. After a brief correspondence and courtship, the two married in 1901. Queen had five children from her previous marriage, thus Beadie and Beatrice became the youngest additions to a family already containing eleven brothers and sisters...

  3. From Radical Reconstruction to Jim Crow: Education, Nation-Building, and the Making of a New Racial Order

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Christi Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on recent theories of boundary processes, status and ethnicity, I investigate processes of group-making in the post-Civil War era (1865-1905) when Americans were faced with two daunting political projects: rebuilding the nation, and creating a new racial order to replace the abolished system of bond slavery. Although scholars have…

  4. Clinical and pathologic responses of American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) and fish crows (C ossifragus) to experimental West Nile virus infection.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, N M; Thomsen, B V; Spraker, T R; Benson, J M; Bosco-Lauth, A M; Oesterle, P T; Bright, J M; Muth, J P; Campbell, T W; Gidlewski, T L; Bowen, R A

    2011-11-01

    West Nile virus (WNV)-associated disease has a range of clinical manifestations among avian taxa, the reasons for which are not known. Species susceptibility varies within the avian family Corvidae, with estimated mortality rates ranging from 50 to 100%. We examined and compared virologic, immunologic, pathologic, and clinical responses in 2 corvid species, the American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) and the fish crow (C ossifragus), following experimental WNV inoculation. Unlike fish crows, which remained clinically normal throughout the study, American crows succumbed to WNV infection subsequent to dehydration, electrolyte and pH imbalances, and delayed or depressed humoral immune responses concurrent with marked, widespread virus replication. Viral titers were approximately 3,000 times greater in blood and 30,000 to 50,000 times greater in other tissues (eg, pancreas and small intestine) in American crows versus fish crows. Histologic lesion patterns and antigen deposition supported the differing clinical outcomes, with greater severity and distribution of lesions and WNV antigen in American crows. Both crow species had multiorgan necrosis and inflammation, although lesions were more frequent, severe, and widespread in American crows, in which the most commonly affected tissues were small intestine, spleen, and liver. American crows also had inflammation of vessels and nerves in multiple tissues, including heart, kidney, and the gastrointestinal tract. WNV antigen was most commonly observed within monocytes, macrophages, and other cells of the reticuloendothelial system of affected tissues. Collectively, the data support that WNV-infected American crows experience uncontrolled systemic infection leading to multiorgan failure and rapid death.

  5. 34. THE CROW'S NEST. IN THE EARLY YEARS OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. THE CROW'S NEST. IN THE EARLY YEARS OF THE INN MUSICIANS SAT AND PLAYED FOR THE GUESTS IN THE LOBBY BELOW. THE EARTHQUAKE IN 1959 CAUSED SOME STRUCTURAL DAMAGE AND NOW THE CROW'S NEST IS NOT ACCESSIBLE TO THE PUBLIC. - Old Faithful Inn, 900' northeast of Snowlodge & 1050' west of Old Faithful Lodge, Lake, Teton County, WY

  6. Beak deformities in Northwestern Crows: Evidence of a multispecies epizootic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Hemert, Caroline; Handel, Colleen M.

    2010-01-01

    Beak abnormalities are rare among adult birds and, typically, are not widespread in a given population, within a region, or across multiple species. A high concentration of beak deformities was recently documented in Black-capped Chickadees (Poecile atricapillus) and other resident avian species in Alaska. We describe a parallel condition in Northwestern Crows (Corvus caurinus) that signals the emergence of a multispecies epizootic. On the basis of 186 Northwestern Crows captured at six sites in Alaska during 2007 and 2008, we estimated the prevalence of beak deformities in adults to be 16.9 ± 5.3%, the highest rate of gross deformities ever recorded in a wild bird population. Prevalence varied among sites and was as high as 36% on the Kenai Peninsula, which suggests possible epizootic clusters. We also documented beak abnormalities in an additional 148 Northwestern Crows in south-central and southeastern Alaska and in 64 crows near Vancouver, British Columbia, and Puget Sound, Washington, a region where both Northwestern Crows and American Crows (C. brachyrhynchos) occur. The increase in frequency and distribution of crows observed with abnormal beaks throughout the Pacific Northwest since the late 1990s indicates a geographic expansion of this problem. Affected crows exhibited elongated and often crossed beaks that were morphologically similar to deformities documented in Black-capped Chickadees and other species in Alaska over approximately the same period. Additional research is needed to determine the etiology and potential adverse effects on bird populations affected by this disorder.

  7. Spectrographic Analysis of Carrion Crow Calls and Their Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibuya, Hisashi; Yokota, Yasunari

    In recent years, damage to agricultural products, livestock, and power transmission systems by crows is regarded as a serious problem; countermeasures against crow damage are urgently necessary. This paper proposed a method for detecting crow calls in various environmental sounds. If detection and discernment of crow calls were possible, various actions could be undertaken to prevent the damage. Wildlife call detection, not only that for crows, should be executed in extremely noisy environments. We then introduced both a spectrograph estimation technique with AR modeling in which AR coefficients are temporally smoothed and interpolated and a background noise elimination technique to obtain higher-quality crow call templates. The input sounds are compared with these templates by DP matching in the metric vector space of a logarithmic cepstrum. Every input sound whose minimal distance to the template database is less than the specified threshold value is detected as a crow call. The maximal detection performance can be obtained when five call templates in the template database are utilized; the implication is that carrion crows have five distinguishable call patterns. It is shown that the proposed method achieves 95% detection rate when 1.66% misdetection rate is allowed.

  8. Social learning spreads knowledge about dangerous humans among American crows

    PubMed Central

    Cornell, Heather N.; Marzluff, John M.; Pecoraro, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    Individuals face evolutionary trade-offs between the acquisition of costly but accurate information gained firsthand and the use of inexpensive but possibly less reliable social information. American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) use both sources of information to learn the facial features of a dangerous person. We exposed wild crows to a novel ‘dangerous face’ by wearing a unique mask as we trapped, banded and released 7–15 birds at five study sites near Seattle, WA, USA. An immediate scolding response to the dangerous mask after trapping by previously captured crows demonstrates individual learning, while an immediate response by crows that were not captured probably represents conditioning to the trapping scene by the mob of birds that assembled during the capture. Later recognition of dangerous masks by lone crows that were never captured is consistent with horizontal social learning. Independent scolding by young crows, whose parents had conditioned them to scold the dangerous mask, demonstrates vertical social learning. Crows that directly experienced trapping later discriminated among dangerous and neutral masks more precisely than did crows that learned through social means. Learning enabled scolding to double in frequency and spread at least 1.2 km from the place of origin over a 5 year period at one site. PMID:21715408

  9. Social learning spreads knowledge about dangerous humans among American crows.

    PubMed

    Cornell, Heather N; Marzluff, John M; Pecoraro, Shannon

    2012-02-07

    Individuals face evolutionary trade-offs between the acquisition of costly but accurate information gained firsthand and the use of inexpensive but possibly less reliable social information. American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) use both sources of information to learn the facial features of a dangerous person. We exposed wild crows to a novel 'dangerous face' by wearing a unique mask as we trapped, banded and released 7-15 birds at five study sites near Seattle, WA, USA. An immediate scolding response to the dangerous mask after trapping by previously captured crows demonstrates individual learning, while an immediate response by crows that were not captured probably represents conditioning to the trapping scene by the mob of birds that assembled during the capture. Later recognition of dangerous masks by lone crows that were never captured is consistent with horizontal social learning. Independent scolding by young crows, whose parents had conditioned them to scold the dangerous mask, demonstrates vertical social learning. Crows that directly experienced trapping later discriminated among dangerous and neutral masks more precisely than did crows that learned through social means. Learning enabled scolding to double in frequency and spread at least 1.2 km from the place of origin over a 5 year period at one site.

  10. Cell scientist to watch - Lei Stanley Qi.

    PubMed

    Bobrowska, Anna

    2016-01-15

    Originally from China, Lei (Stanley) Qi obtained his first degree in physics and mathematics at the Tsinghua University. He then moved to University of California, Berkeley, where he graduated with an MA in physics and worked in the laboratory of Steven Chu, Noble Laureate in Physics (1997), before switching fields to pursue a PhD in bioengineering in the laboratories of Adam Arkin and Jennifer Doudna. Stanley's work earned him the National Institutes of Health Director's Early Independence Award, which allowed him to start his own laboratory at the University of California, San Francisco, as a Systems Biology Fellow without a postdoctoral training period. In 2014, he moved to Stanford, where he is now Assistant Professor at the Department of Bioengineering and of Chemical and Systems Biology, and is affiliated with Stanford Chemistry, Engineering and Medicine for Human Health (ChEM-H). He invented the use of the CRISPR-dCas9 system for transcriptional modulation and genome imaging. His current research is focused on developing new tools and technologies for genome editing and transcriptional modulation, manipulating molecular networks to understand fundamental principles of biology and engineering cells to exhibit desired behaviors, such as teaching immune cells to recognise and eliminate cancers.

  11. 30 CFR 756.19 - Approval of the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine... PROGRAMS § 756.19 Approval of the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Crow Tribe's.... Copies of the approved Plan are available at the following locations: (a) Crow Tribal Council,...

  12. Plasmonic CROWs for Tunable Dispersion and High Quality Cavity Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, John J.; Lafone, Lucas; Hamm, Joachim M.; Hess, Ortwin; Oulton, Rupert F.

    2015-12-01

    Coupled resonator optical waveguides (CROWs) have the potential to revolutionise integrated optics, to slow-light and enhance linear and non-linear optical phenomena. Here we exploit the broad resonances and subwavelength nature of localized surface plasmons in a compact CROW design where plasmonic nanoparticles are side coupled to a dielectric waveguide. The plasmonic CROW features a low loss central mode with a highly tunable dispersion, that avoids coupling to the plasmonic nanoparticles close to the band-edge. We show that this low loss character is preserved in finite plasmonic CROWs giving rise to Fabry-Perot type resonances that have high quality factors of many thousands, limited only by the CROW length. Furthermore we demonstrate that the proposed CROW design is surprisingly robust to disorder. By varying the geometric parameters one can not only reduce the losses into dissipative or radiative channels but also control the outcoupling of energy to the waveguide. The ability to minimise loss in plasmonic CROWs while maintaining dispersion provides an effective cavity design for chip-integrated laser devices and applications in linear and non-linear nano-photonics.

  13. Plasmonic CROWs for Tunable Dispersion and High Quality Cavity Modes

    PubMed Central

    Wood, John J.; Lafone, Lucas; Hamm, Joachim M.; Hess, Ortwin; Oulton, Rupert F.

    2015-01-01

    Coupled resonator optical waveguides (CROWs) have the potential to revolutionise integrated optics, to slow-light and enhance linear and non-linear optical phenomena. Here we exploit the broad resonances and subwavelength nature of localized surface plasmons in a compact CROW design where plasmonic nanoparticles are side coupled to a dielectric waveguide. The plasmonic CROW features a low loss central mode with a highly tunable dispersion, that avoids coupling to the plasmonic nanoparticles close to the band-edge. We show that this low loss character is preserved in finite plasmonic CROWs giving rise to Fabry-Perot type resonances that have high quality factors of many thousands, limited only by the CROW length. Furthermore we demonstrate that the proposed CROW design is surprisingly robust to disorder. By varying the geometric parameters one can not only reduce the losses into dissipative or radiative channels but also control the outcoupling of energy to the waveguide. The ability to minimise loss in plasmonic CROWs while maintaining dispersion provides an effective cavity design for chip-integrated laser devices and applications in linear and non-linear nano-photonics. PMID:26631579

  14. VIEW NORTH OF AUSTRALIAN PINES THAT LINE SUNNY JIM LANE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW NORTH OF AUSTRALIAN PINES THAT LINE SUNNY JIM LANE FROM SOUTHERN MOST BARN TO THE STABLE GATE. BARNS LINE LEFT SIDE OF LANE: CD-N. - Hialeah Park Race Track, East Fourth Avenue, Hialeah, Miami-Dade County, FL

  15. Interview of Jim Kerby about the First Beam

    SciTech Connect

    2008-08-06

    Jim Kerby : Head of the US LHC Construction Project - FERMILAB employee Questions asked : 1. What does it take to start up the LHC machine? 2. What's the plan for 1st injection day? 3. How do you feel about this?

  16. 43. 253255 AUBURN AVENUE (Jim's Place; Unisex Beauty Shop) NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. 253-255 AUBURN AVENUE (Jim's Place; Unisex Beauty Shop) NORTH ELEVATION 44. --- PIEDMONT AVENUE (Pucker House) EAST ELEVATION - 126-255 Auburn Avenue (Commercial Buildings), Auburn Avenue, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  17. Interview of Jim Kerby about the First Beam

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Jim Kerby : Head of the US LHC Construction Project - FERMILAB employee Questions asked : 1. What does it take to start up the LHC machine? 2. What's the plan for 1st injection day? 3. How do you feel about this?

  18. Jim Thorpe, The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reising, Robert

    Fifty years after the death of Black Hawk, the greatest warrior of the Sac and Fox tribe, his great-great-grandson was born: Jim Thorpe, one of the greatest athletes of all time. This biography opens with Black Hawk and a brief history of the Sac and Fox Indians. Then Jim's story begins, in a simple log cabin in Oklahoma, in 1888. Even in his…

  19. Jim Thorpe, The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reising, Robert

    Fifty years after the death of Black Hawk, the greatest warrior of the Sac and Fox tribe, his great-great-grandson was born: Jim Thorpe, one of the greatest athletes of all time. This biography opens with Black Hawk and a brief history of the Sac and Fox Indians. Then Jim's story begins, in a simple log cabin in Oklahoma, in 1888. Even in his…

  20. Differential cerebral speech lateralization in Crow Indian and Anglo children.

    PubMed

    Vocate, D R

    1984-01-01

    Sixty pairs of dichotically presented CV syllables were administered to matched samples of bilingual Native American Crow and monolingual Anglo subjects. While sex and grade were not significant factors, a significant variance was found between the performance of the bilingual Native American Crow and the monolingual Anglo subjects. As predicted (1) the bilingual children demonstrated a more symmetrical cerebral representation for language processing than the monolingual children; and (2) the bilingual primary Crow speakers had a greater right hemisphere involvement in receptive language processing than the monolingual English speakers. Possible factors influencing these results are discussed.

  1. The scientific bases for preservation of the Mariana crow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    National Research Council, Committee on the Scientific Bases for the Preservation of the Mariana Crow; Duckworth, W.D.; Beissinger, S.R.; Derrickson, S.R.; Fritts, T.H.; Haig, S.M.; James, F.C.; Marsluff, J.M.; Rideout, B.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Panel recently released the report and recommendations resulting from its work over the last six months. Although primarily focused on the Mariana Crow, the report highlights that this is a matter potentially far more serious than the preservation of the crow on Guam and Rota. The report includes major sections dealing with the need to intensify research and control activities on the Brown Tree Snake both on Guam and in all appropriate areas to which the snake could spread if uncontained and on the population biology and behavior of the Mariana Crow on Guam and Rota.

  2. Context-dependent tool use in New Caledonian crows.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Alex H; Hunt, Gavin R; Gray, Russell D

    2012-04-23

    Humans and chimpanzees both exhibit context-dependent tool use. That is, both species choose to use tools when food is within reach, but the context is potentially hazardous. Here, we show that New Caledonian crows used tools more frequently when food was positioned next to a novel model snake than when food was positioned next to a novel teddy bear or a familiar food bowl. However, the crows showed no significant difference in their neophobic reactions towards the teddy bear and the model snake. Therefore, the crows used tools more in response to a risky object resembling a natural predator than to a less-threatening object that provoked a comparable level of neophobia. These results show that New Caledonian crows, like humans and chimpanzees, are capable of context-dependent tool use.

  3. Context-dependent tool use in New Caledonian crows

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Alex H.; Hunt, Gavin R.; Gray, Russell D.

    2012-01-01

    Humans and chimpanzees both exhibit context-dependent tool use. That is, both species choose to use tools when food is within reach, but the context is potentially hazardous. Here, we show that New Caledonian crows used tools more frequently when food was positioned next to a novel model snake than when food was positioned next to a novel teddy bear or a familiar food bowl. However, the crows showed no significant difference in their neophobic reactions towards the teddy bear and the model snake. Therefore, the crows used tools more in response to a risky object resembling a natural predator than to a less-threatening object that provoked a comparable level of neophobia. These results show that New Caledonian crows, like humans and chimpanzees, are capable of context-dependent tool use. PMID:21900316

  4. Dead Crow Density and West Nile Virus Monitoring, New York

    PubMed Central

    Schmit, Kate; Hagiwara, Yoichiro; Anand, Madhu; Backenson, P. Bryon; Gotham, Ivan; Kramer, Laura

    2005-01-01

    New York State used the health commerce system to monitor the number of West Nile virus (WNV) human disease cases and the density of dead crows. In each year from 2001 to 2003 and for the 3 years combined, persons living in New York counties (excluding New York City) with elevated weekly dead crow densities (above a threshold value of 0.1 dead crows per square mile) had higher risk (2.0–8.6 times) for disease caused by WNV within the next 2 weeks than residents of counties reporting fewer dead crows per square mile. This type of index can offer a real-time, relatively inexpensive window into viral activity in time for prevention and control. Changes in reporting, bird populations, and immunity may require that thresholds other than 0.1 be used in later years or in other areas. PMID:16229764

  5. James F. Crow and the art of teaching and mentoring.

    PubMed

    Hartl, Daniel L

    2011-12-01

    To honor James F. Crow on the occasion of his 95th birthday, GENETICS has commissioned a series of Perspectives and Reviews. For GENETICS to publish the honorifics is fitting, as from their birth Crow and GENETICS have been paired. Crow was scheduled to be born in January 1916, the same month that the first issue of GENETICS was scheduled to appear, and in the many years that Crow has made major contributions to the conceptual foundations of modern genetics, GENETICS has chronicled his and other major advances in the field. The commissioned Perspectives and Reviews summarize and celebrate Professor Crow's contributions as a research scientist, administrator, colleague, community supporter, international leader, teacher, and mentor. In science, Professor Crow was the international leader of his generation in the application of genetics to populations of organisms and in uncovering the role of genetics in health and disease. In education, he was a superb undergraduate teacher whose inspiration changed the career paths of many students. His teaching skills are legendary, his lectures urbane and witty, rigorous and clear. He was also an extraordinary mentor to numerous graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, many of whom went on to establish successful careers of their own. In public service, Professor Crow served in key administrative positions at the University of Wisconsin, participated as a member of numerous national and international committees, and served as president of both the Genetics Society of America and the American Society for Human Genetics. This Perspective examines Professor Crow as teacher and mentor through the eyes and experiences of one student who was enrolled in his genetics course as an undergraduate and who later studied with him as a graduate student.

  6. Status of the Mariana Crow population on Rota, Mariana Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fancy, Steven G.; Lusk, Michael R.; Grout, Daniel J.

    1999-01-01

    We conducted a survey of the endangered Mariana Crow (Corvus kubaryi) population on Rota, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, in October-November 1995 to provide current information on numbers and distribution of this species. To allow direct comparisons with a previous survey, we resurveyed transects established in 1982 using the same field methods and used identical analysis methods for both surveys. Several areas on Rota that lack suitable habitat and have few if any resident crows were excluded from our 6,315-ha study area. Our reanalysis of 1982 survey data for our study area gave an estimated population size of 1,348 crows (95% CI = 1,136–1,564), compared to a 1995 estimate of 592 crows (95% CI = 474–720). Mean number of crows detected per sampling station decreased 57% from 1.06 ± 0.09 SE in 1982 to 0.46 ± 0.05 in 1995. The apparent 56% decrease in population size may be a result of habitat loss from development and typhoons, as well as persecution, but other factors contributing to the decline cannot be identified until more is known about the ecology and demography of the Mariana Crow population.

  7. Mycoplasmosis in captive crows and robins from Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Wellehan, J F; Calsamiglia, M; Ley, D H; Zens, M S; Amonsin, A; Kapur, V

    2001-07-01

    Mycoplasma sturni is a recently described organism previously associated with conjunctivitis in European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris), northern mockingbirds (Mimus polyglottos) and blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata). Herein we describe the isolation of M. sturni from an American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) presenting with conjunctivitis. A nested-PCR was designed for identification of M. sturni in clinical specimens and the sensitivity of the reaction was found to be 10 colony-changing units. The organism was found in asymptomatic American crows caged with a nestmate of the crow with conjunctivitis. Mycoplasma sturni also was found in asymptomatic American robins (Turdus migratorius) and in a European starling (Sturnus vulgaris) housed at the same facility as the crows. Heterogenity of M. sturni isolates from different host species was found by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analyses. Heterogeneity also was found among M. sturni isolates recovered from American crows. We suggest that M. sturni can successfully infect American crows and American robins with or without the presence of clinical disease. Furthermore, we demonstrate that nested-PCR is an effective method for the detection of M. sturni and that substantial genetic heterogeneity exists among natural isolates of this bacterial pathogen.

  8. James F. Crow and the Art of Teaching and Mentoring

    PubMed Central

    Hartl, Daniel L.

    2011-01-01

    To honor James F. Crow on the occasion of his 95th birthday, GENETICS has commissioned a series of Perspectives and Reviews. For GENETICS to publish the honorifics is fitting, as from their birth Crow and GENETICS have been paired. Crow was scheduled to be born in January 1916, the same month that the first issue of GENETICS was scheduled to appear, and in the many years that Crow has made major contributions to the conceptual foundations of modern genetics, GENETICS has chronicled his and other major advances in the field. The commissioned Perspectives and Reviews summarize and celebrate Professor Crow’s contributions as a research scientist, administrator, colleague, community supporter, international leader, teacher, and mentor. In science, Professor Crow was the international leader of his generation in the application of genetics to populations of organisms and in uncovering the role of genetics in health and disease. In education, he was a superb undergraduate teacher whose inspiration changed the career paths of many students. His teaching skills are legendary, his lectures urbane and witty, rigorous and clear. He was also an extraordinary mentor to numerous graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, many of whom went on to establish successful careers of their own. In public service, Professor Crow served in key administrative positions at the University of Wisconsin, participated as a member of numerous national and international committees, and served as president of both the Genetics Society of America and the American Society for Human Genetics. This Perspective examines Professor Crow as teacher and mentor through the eyes and experiences of one student who was enrolled in his genetics course as an undergraduate and who later studied with him as a graduate student. PMID:22174181

  9. Toxoplasma gondii prevalence in Israeli crows and Griffon vultures.

    PubMed

    Salant, H; Hamburger, J; King, R; Baneth, G

    2013-01-16

    A cross-sectional Toxoplasma gondii seroprevalence study was performed on free ranging crows (Corvus cornis, Corvus monedula, Corvus splendens) and Griffon vultures (Gyps fulvus) from Israel in order to assess exposure to this pathogen in scavenger birds that feed on animal carcasses and their possible role in the epidemiology of toxoplasmosis. Using the modified agglutination test (MAT) with a cutoff titer of 1:25, 52 of 122 crows (42.6%) and 40 of 101 Griffon vultures (39.6%) were found to be T. gondii seropositive. Crow T. gondii seroprevalence was significantly higher in northern areas of Israel (p=0.007) where annual precipitation is higher and annual summer maximum temperatures are lower than in the drier and warmer south. Seroprevalence in crows was positively associated with higher human population densities possibly related to the increased cat population in these areas. PCR analysis of brain extracts from crows resulted in the detection of T. gondii DNA in 1 seropositive crow from northern Israel. Genetic analysis of DNA from the positive crow brain confirmed infection with T. gondii type 2 using a multiplex multilocus nested PCR-RFLP (Mn-PCR-RFLP) of the SAG1, 5-3' SAG2, alt.SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, C22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1 and Apico loci. The high T. gondii seroprevalence in these bird species suggests that infected carrion may be responsible for widespread infection of carcass scavenger birds which may further transmit infection to other carnivorous intermediate hosts or feline definitive hosts when consumed post-mortally. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. New Caledonian crows reason about hidden causal agents

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Alex H.; Miller, Rachael; Gray, Russell D.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to make inferences about hidden causal mechanisms underpins scientific and religious thought. It also facilitates the understanding of social interactions and the production of sophisticated tool-using behaviors. However, although animals can reason about the outcomes of accidental interventions, only humans have been shown to make inferences about hidden causal mechanisms. Here, we show that tool-making New Caledonian crows react differently to an observable event when it is caused by a hidden causal agent. Eight crows watched two series of events in which a stick moved. In the first set of events, the crows observed a human enter a hide, a stick move, and the human then leave the hide. In the second, the stick moved without a human entering or exiting the hide. The crows inspected the hide and abandoned probing with a tool for food more often after the second, unexplained series of events. This difference shows that the crows can reason about a hidden causal agent. Comparative studies with the methodology outlined here could aid in elucidating the selective pressures that led to the evolution of this cognitive ability. PMID:22988112

  11. New Caledonian crows reason about hidden causal agents.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Alex H; Miller, Rachael; Gray, Russell D

    2012-10-02

    The ability to make inferences about hidden causal mechanisms underpins scientific and religious thought. It also facilitates the understanding of social interactions and the production of sophisticated tool-using behaviors. However, although animals can reason about the outcomes of accidental interventions, only humans have been shown to make inferences about hidden causal mechanisms. Here, we show that tool-making New Caledonian crows react differently to an observable event when it is caused by a hidden causal agent. Eight crows watched two series of events in which a stick moved. In the first set of events, the crows observed a human enter a hide, a stick move, and the human then leave the hide. In the second, the stick moved without a human entering or exiting the hide. The crows inspected the hide and abandoned probing with a tool for food more often after the second, unexplained series of events. This difference shows that the crows can reason about a hidden causal agent. Comparative studies with the methodology outlined here could aid in elucidating the selective pressures that led to the evolution of this cognitive ability.

  12. 30 CFR 756.19 - Approval of the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Approval of the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine... ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INDIAN LANDS PROGRAM INDIAN TRIBE ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION PROGRAMS § 756.19 Approval of the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Crow Tribe's...

  13. 30 CFR 756.19 - Approval of the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Approval of the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine... ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INDIAN LANDS PROGRAM INDIAN TRIBE ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION PROGRAMS § 756.19 Approval of the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Crow Tribe's...

  14. 30 CFR 756.19 - Approval of the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Approval of the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine... ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INDIAN LANDS PROGRAM INDIAN TRIBE ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION PROGRAMS § 756.19 Approval of the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Crow Tribe's...

  15. 30 CFR 756.19 - Approval of the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Approval of the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine... ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INDIAN LANDS PROGRAM INDIAN TRIBE ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION PROGRAMS § 756.19 Approval of the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Crow Tribe's...

  16. 78 FR 9945 - Crow Butte Resources, Inc.; Establishment of Atomic Safety and Licensing Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... COMMISSION Crow Butte Resources, Inc.; Establishment of Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Pursuant to... Licensing Board (Board) is being established to preside over the following proceeding: Crow Butte Resources, Inc. (Marsland Expansion Area) This proceeding involves a request from Crow Butte Resources, Inc....

  17. 30 CFR 756.21 - Required amendments to the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Required amendments to the Crow Tribe's... RECLAMATION PROGRAMS § 756.21 Required amendments to the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan. Pursuant to 30 CFR 884.15, the Crow Tribe is required to submit to OSM by the date specified either...

  18. Jim, Antonia, and the Wolves: Displacement in Cather's "My Antonia"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Robin

    2009-01-01

    In one of the most frequently noted incidents in Willa Cather's "My Antonia", Russian immigrant Pavel reveals on his deathbed that, when driving his friend's wedding party sledge, he saved his own life and companion Peter's by throwing the bride and groom to the attacking wolves. Antonia and Jim are fascinated by this story, and readers…

  19. Jim Driver, Panola County Oil and Gas Boom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Bobbie, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Written by history students at Gary High School, Gary, Texas, this volume presents several diverse pictures of life in East Texas. The first article, "Jim Driver, Panola County Oil and Gas Boom," (Bobby Kelly and Billy Anderson) talks about drilling for oil and gas and the concerns of an employee of the drilling company. "When I Was…

  20. Jim Driver, Panola County Oil and Gas Boom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Bobbie, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Written by history students at Gary High School, Gary, Texas, this volume presents several diverse pictures of life in East Texas. The first article, "Jim Driver, Panola County Oil and Gas Boom," (Bobby Kelly and Billy Anderson) talks about drilling for oil and gas and the concerns of an employee of the drilling company. "When I Was…

  1. Jim, Antonia, and the Wolves: Displacement in Cather's "My Antonia"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Robin

    2009-01-01

    In one of the most frequently noted incidents in Willa Cather's "My Antonia", Russian immigrant Pavel reveals on his deathbed that, when driving his friend's wedding party sledge, he saved his own life and companion Peter's by throwing the bride and groom to the attacking wolves. Antonia and Jim are fascinated by this story, and readers…

  2. Running, Heart Disease, and the Ironic Death of Jim Fixx.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plymire, Darcy C.

    2002-01-01

    Runner Jim Fixx wrote a book about running and died young of a heart attack while running. Fixx and other authors believed heart disease resulted from overcivilization and recommended running as a way of life and cure, advising readers to listen to their bodies instead of their doctors. Fixx's adherence to that philosophy explains his behavior…

  3. Takin' It to the Hill: A Conversation with Jim Shanley

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shreve, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Jim Shanley (Assiniboine) served as president of Standing Rock Community College (now Sitting Bull College) and later Fort Peck Community College, where he remained for 28 years. He was also one of the American Indian Higher Education Consortium's (AIHEC) early leaders. At the age of 29, he was appointed as AIHEC's executive committee president…

  4. The Theoretical Framework of Jim Cummins: A Review and Critique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baral, David P.

    In recent years, the theoretical framework of Jim Cummins has been widely discussed by bilingual educators. This paper traces the evolution of Cummins' theory and examines the criticisms which have been raised against it. The first part of the paper discusses the major elements of his theory of bilingual proficiency: the threshhold hypothesis, the…

  5. Running, Heart Disease, and the Ironic Death of Jim Fixx.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plymire, Darcy C.

    2002-01-01

    Runner Jim Fixx wrote a book about running and died young of a heart attack while running. Fixx and other authors believed heart disease resulted from overcivilization and recommended running as a way of life and cure, advising readers to listen to their bodies instead of their doctors. Fixx's adherence to that philosophy explains his behavior…

  6. 23. Road view at Jim Camp Wash. Note Rainbow Museum ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Road view at Jim Camp Wash. Note Rainbow Museum at rear. Road is on east-west axis here as original design of Rainbow Museum area. Long Logs Road to left foreground. Park Road to right foreground. Looking W. - Petrified Forest National Park Roads & Bridges, Holbrook, Navajo County, AZ

  7. Takin' It to the Hill: A Conversation with Jim Shanley

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shreve, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Jim Shanley (Assiniboine) served as president of Standing Rock Community College (now Sitting Bull College) and later Fort Peck Community College, where he remained for 28 years. He was also one of the American Indian Higher Education Consortium's (AIHEC) early leaders. At the age of 29, he was appointed as AIHEC's executive committee president…

  8. Excavating Voices, Illuminating History: A Conversation with Jim Murphy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerper, Richard M.

    2000-01-01

    Interviews author Jim Murphy, two-time winner of the Orbis Pictus award for children's nonfiction. Discusses his writing processes, finding subjects, his fascination with first-hand accounts of history, his use of visual displays that extend text, and ensuring accuracy. (SR)

  9. Creativity, alcohol and drug abuse: the pop icon Jim Morrison.

    PubMed

    Holm-Hadulla, Rainer M; Bertolino, Alina

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol and drug abuse is frequent among performers and pop musicians. Many of them hope that alcohol and drugs will enhance their creativity. Scientific studies are scarce and conclusions limited for methodological reasons. Furthermore, extraordinary creativity can hardly be grasped by empirical-statistical methods. Thus, ideographic studies are necessary to learn from extraordinarily creative persons about the relationship of creativity with alcohol and drugs. The pop icon Jim Morrison can serve as an exemplary case to investigate the interrelation between alcohol and drug abuse and creativity. Morrison's self-assessments in his works and letters as well as the descriptions by others are analyzed under the perspective of creativity research. In the lyrics of Jim Morrison and in biographical descriptions, we can see how Jim Morrison tried to cope with traumatic events, depressive moods and uncontrolled impulses through creative activities. His talent, skill and motivation to write creatively were independent from taking alcohol and drugs. He used alcohol and drugs to transgress restrictive social norms, to broaden his perceptions and to reinforce his struggle for self-actualization. In short, his motivation to create something new and authentic was reinforced by alcohol and drugs. More important was the influence of a supportive group that enabled Morrison's talents to flourish. However, soon the frequent use of high doses of alcohol and drugs weakened his capacity to realize creative motivation. Jim Morrison is an exemplary case showing that heavy drinking and the abuse of LSD, mescaline and amphetamines damages the capacity to realize creative motivation. Jim Morrison is typical of creative personalities like Amy Winehouse, Janis Joplin, Brian Jones and Jimmy Hendrix who burn their creativity in early adulthood through alcohol and drugs. We suppose that the sacrificial ritual of their decay offers some benefits for the excited spectators. One of these is the

  10. Lateralization of tool use in New Caledonian crows (Corvus moneduloides).

    PubMed Central

    Weir, Alex A S; Kenward, Ben; Chappell, Jackie; Kacelnik, Alex

    2004-01-01

    We studied laterality of tool use in 10 captive New Caledonian (NC) crows (Corvus moneduloides). All subjects showed near-exclusive individual laterality, but there was no overall bias in either direction (five were left-lateralized and five were right-lateralized). This is consistent with results in non-human primates, which show strong individual lateralization for tool use (but not for other activities), and also with observations of four wild NC crows by Rutledge & Hunt. Jointly, these results contrast with observations that the crows have a population-level bias for manufacturing tools from the left edges of Pandanus sp. leaves, and suggest that the manufacture and use of tools in this species may have different neural underpinnings. PMID:15504013

  11. Epizootology of Newcastle disease in Indian house crows.

    PubMed

    Sulochana, S; Pillai, R M; Nair, G K; Sudharma, D; Abdulla, P K

    1981-09-19

    During an investigation into the role of Indian house crows (Corvus splendens splendens) in the epizootology of Newcastle disease, a total of 164 samples from 82 crows were examined. Fifteen isolations of Newcastle diseases virus were made from 10 birds and one of these was highly pathogenic to chicken. Haemagglutination inhibition (HI) tests showed that 38 per cent of these crows possessed antibody to Newcastle disease virus. Initiation and duration of virus excretion and development of HI antibodies were also studied by experimental infection. Virus excretion began on day 3, continued till day 5 and complete elimination occurred by day 6. HI antibody titre began to rise from the seventh day to peak by the twenty-first day and declined thereafter.

  12. Cross-Modal Associative Mnemonic Signals in Crow Endbrain Neurons.

    PubMed

    Moll, Felix W; Nieder, Andreas

    2015-08-17

    The ability to associate stimuli across time and sensory modalities endows animals and humans with many of the complex, learned behaviors. For successful performance, associations need to be retrieved from long-term memory and maintained active in working memory. We investigated how this is accomplished in the avian brain. We trained carrion crows (Corvus corone) to perform a bimodal delayed paired associate task in which the crows had to match auditory stimuli to delayed visual items. Single-unit recordings from the association area nidopallium caudolaterale (NCL) revealed sustained memory signals that selectively correlated with the learned audio-visual associations across time and modality, and sustained activity prospectively encoded the crows' choices. NCL neurons carried an internal, stimulus-independent signal that was predictive of error and type of error. These results underscore the role of corvid NCL in synthesizing external multisensory information and internal mnemonic data needed for executive control of behavior. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The ecological significance of tool use in New Caledonian crows.

    PubMed

    Rutz, Christian; Bluff, Lucas A; Reed, Nicola; Troscianko, Jolyon; Newton, Jason; Inger, Richard; Kacelnik, Alex; Bearhop, Stuart

    2010-09-17

    Tool use is so rare in the animal kingdom that its evolutionary origins cannot be traced with comparative analyses. Valuable insights can be gained from investigating the ecological context and adaptive significance of tool use under contemporary conditions, but obtaining robust observational data is challenging. We assayed individual-level tool-use dependence in wild New Caledonian crows by analyzing stable isotope profiles of the birds' feathers, blood, and putative food sources. Bayesian diet-mixing models revealed that a substantial amount of the crows' protein and lipid intake comes from prey obtained with stick tools--wood-boring beetle larvae. Our calculations provide estimates of larva-intake rates and show that just a few larvae can satisfy a crow's daily energy requirements, highlighting the substantial rewards available to competent tool users.

  14. [Traditional immunosuppression--Lei Gong Teng in modern medicine].

    PubMed

    Caspi, Opher; Polak, Arik

    2013-07-01

    Although the origin of many common modern medicines that are routinely being used nowadays in healthcare is in medicinal plants and fungi, herbal medicine as a standalone profession is no longer included in the curricula of most Western medical schools. The medicinal plant Lei Gong Teng [also known as Thunder God Vine, Tripterygium Wilfordii Hook f., that is core to traditional Chinese herbal medicine, was praised for its possible anti-inflammatory properties in ancient traditional scripts that date back thousands of years. Yet, modern interest in its proven immune-modulatory properties serves as a vivid example to the bridge that is being built, gradually but constantly, between the tradition of healing arts and the world of modern therapeutics. In this review we summarize the main findings from an increasing number of clinical and laboratory studies published in top peer-reviewed medical journals that verify the traditional indications for which Lei Gong Teng was used medicinally. Based on these findings, and the risk-benefit profile of the plant's debarked root, we conclude that Lei Gong Teng and its active metabolites should be included in the Israeli herbal pharmacopeia.

  15. WWJD--What Would Jim Do? A Comparison of James Dobson's and Jim Fay's Philosophies of Parenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buttner, Carolyn; Fridley, William L.

    2007-01-01

    Jim Fay and James Dobson are two of America's most visible, popular, and influential "experts" on the topics of parenting and discipline for children. Dobson is widely known for the "pro-family" political activism of Focus on The Family, the organization he founded and currently directs. He first made a name for himself as a…

  16. Brains, tools, innovation and biogeography in crows and ravens.

    PubMed

    Jønsson, Knud A; Fabre, Pierre-Henri; Irestedt, Martin

    2012-05-29

    Crows and ravens (Passeriformes: Corvus) are large-brained birds with enhanced cognitive abilities relative to other birds. They are among the few non-hominid organisms on Earth to be considered intelligent and well-known examples exist of several crow species having evolved innovative strategies and even use of tools in their search for food. The 40 Corvus species have also been successful dispersers and are distributed on most continents and in remote archipelagos. This study presents the first molecular phylogeny including all species and a number of subspecies within the genus Corvus. We date the phylogeny and determine ancestral areas to investigate historical biogeographical patterns of the crows. Additionally, we use data on brain size and a large database on innovative behaviour and tool use to test whether brain size (i) explains innovative behaviour and success in applying tools when foraging and (ii) has some correlative role in the success of colonization of islands. Our results demonstrate that crows originated in the Palaearctic in the Miocene from where they dispersed to North America and the Caribbean, Africa and Australasia. We find that relative brain size alone does not explain tool use, innovative feeding strategies and dispersal success within crows. Our study supports monophyly of the genus Corvus and further demonstrates the direction and timing of colonization from the area of origin in the Palaearctic to other continents and archipelagos. The Caribbean was probably colonized from North America, although some North American ancestor may have gone extinct, and the Pacific was colonized multiple times from Asia and Australia. We did not find a correlation between relative brain size, tool use, innovative feeding strategies and dispersal success. Hence, we propose that all crows and ravens have relatively large brains compared to other birds and thus the potential to be innovative if conditions and circumstances are right.

  17. Brains, tools, innovation and biogeography in crows and ravens

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Crows and ravens (Passeriformes: Corvus) are large-brained birds with enhanced cognitive abilities relative to other birds. They are among the few non-hominid organisms on Earth to be considered intelligent and well-known examples exist of several crow species having evolved innovative strategies and even use of tools in their search for food. The 40 Corvus species have also been successful dispersers and are distributed on most continents and in remote archipelagos. Results This study presents the first molecular phylogeny including all species and a number of subspecies within the genus Corvus. We date the phylogeny and determine ancestral areas to investigate historical biogeographical patterns of the crows. Additionally, we use data on brain size and a large database on innovative behaviour and tool use to test whether brain size (i) explains innovative behaviour and success in applying tools when foraging and (ii) has some correlative role in the success of colonization of islands. Our results demonstrate that crows originated in the Palaearctic in the Miocene from where they dispersed to North America and the Caribbean, Africa and Australasia. We find that relative brain size alone does not explain tool use, innovative feeding strategies and dispersal success within crows. Conclusions Our study supports monophyly of the genus Corvus and further demonstrates the direction and timing of colonization from the area of origin in the Palaearctic to other continents and archipelagos. The Caribbean was probably colonized from North America, although some North American ancestor may have gone extinct, and the Pacific was colonized multiple times from Asia and Australia. We did not find a correlation between relative brain size, tool use, innovative feeding strategies and dispersal success. Hence, we propose that all crows and ravens have relatively large brains compared to other birds and thus the potential to be innovative if conditions and circumstances

  18. Erysipelas in a free-ranging Hawaiian crow (Corvus hawaiiensis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, Thierry M.; Ball, Donna; Wolcott, Mark

    1999-01-01

    We describe a case of erysipelas in a free-ranging endangered Hawaiian crow. The partially scavenged carcass exhibited gross emaciation and petechial hemorrhages in both lungs. Microscopy revealed multiple necrotic foci associated with gram-positive rods in the liver and adrenal, diffuse acute proximal tubular necrosis of kidney, diffuse necrosis and inflammation of proventricular mucosa associated with gram-positive rods, and multiple intravascular aggregates of gram-positive rods associated with thrombi. Culture of the kidney revealed the bacterium to be Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae. The implications of this finding to free-ranging crows remain unclear.

  19. James F. Crow: His Life in Public Service

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamson, Seymour

    2012-01-01

    The readers of this journal may well be aware of Professor Crow’s scientific achievements and his role as the editor of Perspectives. In addition, for many thousands of students at the University of Wisconsin over many generations, James F. Crow was one of the most memorable teachers at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. What is less known is his major role in public service where he served as chair of many important committees for the National Academy of Sciences, the National Institutes of Health, the National Institutes of Justice as well as various international programs. In all of these efforts, Professor Crow has left a lasting impact. PMID:22219505

  20. N-S Simulations of Crow-Type Instabilities in Vortex Wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Z. C.; Baek, K.

    1999-01-01

    Three-dimensional Navier-Stokes simulations of the Crow instability of wake vortices are conducted using large-eddy simulations without background turbulence. Sinusoidal displacement has been specified as the initial perturbation for the vortex system. The results have shown that the minimum Crow instability wavelength is about one vortex spacing shorter than predicted by Crow's linear stability theory. The planar- standing-wave-angle value and the amplitude indifference behavior agree with Crow's analysis. Simulations with periodicity in the axial direction have indicated minor influence of axial flow on the Crow instability.

  1. N-S Simulations of Crow-Type Instabilities in Vortex Wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Z. C.; Baek, K.

    1999-01-01

    Three-dimensional Navier-Stokes simulations of the Crow instability of wake vortices are conducted using large-eddy simulations without background turbulence. Sinusoidal displacement has been specified as the initial perturbation for the vortex system. The results have shown that the minimum Crow instability wavelength is about one vortex spacing shorter than predicted by Crow's linear stability theory. The planar- standing-wave-angle value and the amplitude indifference behavior agree with Crow's analysis. Simulations with periodicity in the axial direction have indicated minor influence of axial flow on the Crow instability.

  2. Physical characteristics of stream subbasins in the North Fork Crow-Crow River basin, south-central Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanocki, C.A.

    1998-01-01

    Data that describe the physical characteristics of stream subbasins upstream from selected sites on streams in the North Fork Crow-Crow River Basin, located in south-central Minnesota are presented in this report. The physical characteristics are the drainage area of the subbasin, the percentage area of the subbasin covered only by lakes, the percentage area of the subbasin covered by both lakes and wetlands, the main-channel length, and the main-channel slope. Stream sites include outlets of subbasins of at least 5 square miles, and locations of U.S. Geological Survey low-flow, high-flow, and continuous-record gaging stations.

  3. In Conversation with Jim Schuck: Nano-optics

    ScienceCinema

    Jim Schuck and Alice Egan

    2016-07-12

    Sponsored by Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division (MSD), "In Conversation with" is a next generation science seminar series. Host Alice Egan is the assistant to MSD Director Miquel Salmeron. Alice conducts a fun and informative interview, touching on the lives and work of the guest. The first In Conversation With took place July 9 with Jim Schuck, a staff scientist in the Molecular Foundry's Imaging and Manipulation Facility as our first guest. He discussed the world of Nano-optics.

  4. In Conversation with Jim Schuck: Nano-optics

    SciTech Connect

    Jim Schuck and Alice Egan

    2009-08-07

    Sponsored by Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division (MSD), "In Conversation with" is a next generation science seminar series. Host Alice Egan is the assistant to MSD Director Miquel Salmeron. Alice conducts a fun and informative interview, touching on the lives and work of the guest. The first In Conversation With took place July 9 with Jim Schuck, a staff scientist in the Molecular Foundry's Imaging and Manipulation Facility as our first guest. He discussed the world of Nano-optics.

  5. 18. CROWS NEST ATOP SUPERSTRUCTURE. Looking up from northeast corner ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. CROWS NEST ATOP SUPERSTRUCTURE. Looking up from northeast corner of run line deck. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  6. The Raven and the Crow: A Makah Story Coloring Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makah Cultural and Research Center, Neah Bay, WA.

    The Makah coloring book tells the story of how the raven twice tricked the crow and her hungry children out of a meal. The captions tell the story in English with some Makah words inserted in the text. The book contains a Makah-English glossary of 11 words. (SB)

  7. Culture for Sale? An Exploratory Study of the Crow Fair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bordelon, Thomas D.; Opatrny, Marie; Turner, Wendy G.; Williams, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an ethnographically-oriented participant-observation study conducted during the annual Crow Fair, held in south central Montana. Data collected included audio-recorded interviews with participants, participant observations, photographic and video recordings. Narrative interviews were transcribed and analyzed using the constant…

  8. Plains Speaking: Crow Students Go Online to Meet the World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, Vicki

    1995-01-01

    Describes a two-year Technology for Teaching Project linking high school students on Montana's Crow Indian Reservation with other students in the United States and abroad through AT&T Learning Network's Learning Circles. Topics include project organization, materials exchanged with other schools, issues covered in online student discussions,…

  9. "No More Excuses": Michael M. Crow on Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Michael M. Crow became the 16th president of Arizona State University in July 2002, with the goal of transforming ASU into what he calls a "New American University"--an institution combining the highest levels of academic excellence, inclusiveness to a broad demographic, and maximum societal impact. His view included increasing graduate…

  10. Transitive Responding in Hooded Crows Requires Linearly Ordered Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazareva, Olga F.; Smirnova, Anna A.; Bagozkaja, Maria S.; Zorina, Zoya A.; Rayevsky, Vladimir V.; Wasserman, Edward A.

    2004-01-01

    Eight crows were taught to discriminate overlapping pairs of visual stimuli (A+ B-, B+ C-, C+ D-, and D+ E-). For 4 birds, the stimuli were colored cards with a circle of the same color on the reverse side whose diameter decreased from A to E (ordered feedback group). These circles were made available for comparison to potentially help the crows…

  11. Part Long Section with Middle Wall at Crow of Reinforcing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Part Long Section with Middle Wall at Crow of Reinforcing Arch-Center of Bridge; Part Section Across Bridge at Center; Part Long Section with Middle Wall and Foot of Reinforcing Arch; South Side and East Entrance; View of Bridge and Schoharie River Looking South; One Aisle of Bridge - Blenheim Covered Bridge, Spanning Schoharie River, North Blenheim, Schoharie County, NY

  12. The Raven and the Crow: A Makah Story Coloring Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makah Cultural and Research Center, Neah Bay, WA.

    The Makah coloring book tells the story of how the raven twice tricked the crow and her hungry children out of a meal. The captions tell the story in English with some Makah words inserted in the text. The book contains a Makah-English glossary of 11 words. (SB)

  13. Crow Education Partnership: Science in a Cultural Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, S. B.; NASA Astrobiology Institute Icy Worlds Science Team; Whillans Ice Stream Subglacial Access Research Drilling (Wissard) Science Team

    2011-12-01

    Join us to learn more about a developing science education partnership on the Crow Indian Reservation, in South Central Montana. Through this partnership we are designing culturally-relevant STEM science enrichment activites that focus on extreme environments for the Upper Elementary grades in the Hardin School District. The district encompasses three intermediate schools in a rural setting, with a largely Native American student body. Intermediate School teachers from Hardin, scientists and graduate students at Montana State University, and Crow tribal members are working together to develop inquiry-based science activities for students and teachers. Through the use of hands-on interactions, online technologies and field experiences, we are providing monthly science interaction for the classroom, and modeling inquiry-based activities for the teachers and community members. In addition to developing activities, we are working with Crow tribal members and teachers to tie science activities to the national standards and school district curriculum, while at the same time connecting science activities to Crow history and culture. Our blended education model which utilizes face to face interactions and video-conferencing, engages MSU graduate students in the teaching process. Graduate students are developing science communication skills and learning the importance of cross-cultural communication, while the teachers and intermediate students are gaining science content knowledge and direct interactions with authentic science experiences. We are developing a true partnership and community of learning through our efforts.

  14. Transitive Responding in Hooded Crows Requires Linearly Ordered Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazareva, Olga F.; Smirnova, Anna A.; Bagozkaja, Maria S.; Zorina, Zoya A.; Rayevsky, Vladimir V.; Wasserman, Edward A.

    2004-01-01

    Eight crows were taught to discriminate overlapping pairs of visual stimuli (A+ B-, B+ C-, C+ D-, and D+ E-). For 4 birds, the stimuli were colored cards with a circle of the same color on the reverse side whose diameter decreased from A to E (ordered feedback group). These circles were made available for comparison to potentially help the crows…

  15. AN EPIZOOTIC OF EMERGING NOVEL AVIAN POX IN CARRION CROWS (CORVUS CORONE) AND LARGE-BILLED CROWS (CORVUS MACRORHYNCHOS) IN JAPAN.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Daisuke; Nakamura, Makiko; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Takenaka, Makiko; Murakami, Mami; Yanai, Tokuma; Fukushi, Hideto; Yanagida, Kazumi; Bando, Gen; Matsuno, Keita; Nagano, Masashi; Tsubota, Toshio

    2016-04-28

    In 2006-10, an epizootic of emerging avian pox occurred in Carrion Crows ( Corvus corone ) and Large-billed Crows ( Corvus macrorhynchos ), leading to mortality of juvenile crows in Hokkaido, the northernmost island of Japan. We diagnosed 27 crows with proliferative skin lesions (19 carcasses and eight biopsied cases [one in zoo captivity]) as avian pox clinically, histopathologically by detection of Avipoxvirus-specific 4b core protein (P4b) gene, and epidemiologically. The fatal cases demonstrated intensively severe infection and aggressive lesions with secondary bacterial infection. Since the first identification of avian pox in Sapporo, Japan, in 2006, the frequency of mortality events has increased, peaking in 2007-08. Mortalities have subsequently occurred in other areas, suggesting disease expansion. In Sapporo, prevalence of avian pox evaluated by field censuses during 2007-12 was 17.6% (6.6-27.2%), peaked during 2007-08 and 2008-09, and then decreased. All diseased crows were juveniles, except for one adult. The number of crows assembling in the winter roosts had been stable for >10 yr; however, it declined in 2007-08, decreased by about 50% in 2008-09, and recovered to the previous level in 2009-10, correlated with the avian pox outbreak. Thus, avian pox probably contributed to the unusual crow population decline. All P4b sequences detected in six specimens in Sapporo were identical and different from any previously reported sequences. The sequence detected in the zoo-kept crow was distinct from any reported clades, and interspecies transmission was suspected. This report demonstrates an emerging novel avian pox in the Japanese avifauna and in global populations of Carrion Crows and Large-billed Crows. Longitudinal monitoring is needed to evaluate its impact on the crow population.

  16. Involvement of circadian clock in crowing of red jungle fowls (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Ito, Shuichi; Hori, Shuho; Hirose, Makiko; Iwahara, Mari; Yatsushiro, Azusa; Matsumoto, Atsushi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Okamoto, Chinobu; Yayou, Ken-Ichi; Shimmura, Tsuyoshi

    2017-04-01

    The rhythmic locomotor behavior of flies and mice provides a phenotype for the identification of clock genes, and the underlying molecular mechanism is well studied. However, interestingly, when examining locomotor rhythm in the wild, several key laboratory-based assumptions on circadian behavior are not supported in natural conditions. The rooster crowing 'cock-a-doodle-doo' is a symbol of the break of dawn in many countries. Previously, we used domestic inbred roosters and showed that the timing of roosters' crowing is regulated by the circadian clock under laboratory conditions. However, it is still unknown whether the regulation of crowing by circadian clock is observed under natural conditions. Therefore, here we used red jungle fowls and first confirmed that similar crowing rhythms with domesticated chickens are observed in red jungle fowls under the laboratory conditions. Red jungle fowls show predawn crowing before light onset under 12:12 light : dim light conditions and the free-running rhythm of crowing under total dim light conditions. We next examined the crowing rhythms under semi-wild conditions. Although the crowing of red jungle fowls changed seasonally under semi-wild conditions, predawn crowing was observed before sunrise in all seasons. This evidence suggests that seasonally changed crowing of red jungle fowls is under the control of a circadian clock. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  17. Patterns of evolution of MHC class II genes of crows (Corvus) suggest trans-species polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Eimes, John A; Townsend, Andrea K; Sepil, Irem; Nishiumi, Isao; Satta, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    A distinguishing characteristic of genes that code for the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is that alleles often share more similarity between, rather than within species. There are two likely mechanisms that can explain this pattern: convergent evolution and trans-species polymorphism (TSP), in which ancient allelic lineages are maintained by balancing selection and retained by descendant species. Distinguishing between these two mechanisms has major implications in how we view adaptation of immune genes. In this study we analyzed exon 2 of the MHC class IIB in three passerine bird species in the genus Corvus: jungle crows (Corvus macrorhynchos japonensis) American crows (C. brachyrhynchos) and carrion crows (C. corone orientalis). Carrion crows and American crows are recently diverged, but allopatric, sister species, whereas carrion crows and jungle crows are more distantly related but sympatric species, and possibly share pathogens linked to MHC IIB polymorphisms. These patterns of evolutionary divergence and current geographic ranges enabled us to test for trans-species polymorphism and convergent evolution of the MHC IIB in crows. Phylogenetic reconstructions of MHC IIB sequences revealed several well supported interspecific clusters containing all three species, and there was no biased clustering of variants among the sympatric carrion crows and jungle crows. The topologies of phylogenetic trees constructed from putatively selected sites were remarkably different than those constructed from putatively neutral sites. In addition, trees constructed using non-synonymous substitutions from a continuous fragment of exon 2 had more, and generally more inclusive, supported interspecific MHC IIB variant clusters than those constructed from the same fragment using synonymous substitutions. These phylogenetic patterns suggest that recombination, especially gene conversion, has partially erased the signal of allelic ancestry in these species. While clustering of

  18. Patterns of evolution of MHC class II genes of crows (Corvus) suggest trans-species polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Andrea K.; Sepil, Irem; Nishiumi, Isao; Satta, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    A distinguishing characteristic of genes that code for the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is that alleles often share more similarity between, rather than within species. There are two likely mechanisms that can explain this pattern: convergent evolution and trans-species polymorphism (TSP), in which ancient allelic lineages are maintained by balancing selection and retained by descendant species. Distinguishing between these two mechanisms has major implications in how we view adaptation of immune genes. In this study we analyzed exon 2 of the MHC class IIB in three passerine bird species in the genus Corvus: jungle crows (Corvus macrorhynchos japonensis) American crows (C. brachyrhynchos) and carrion crows (C. corone orientalis). Carrion crows and American crows are recently diverged, but allopatric, sister species, whereas carrion crows and jungle crows are more distantly related but sympatric species, and possibly share pathogens linked to MHC IIB polymorphisms. These patterns of evolutionary divergence and current geographic ranges enabled us to test for trans-species polymorphism and convergent evolution of the MHC IIB in crows. Phylogenetic reconstructions of MHC IIB sequences revealed several well supported interspecific clusters containing all three species, and there was no biased clustering of variants among the sympatric carrion crows and jungle crows. The topologies of phylogenetic trees constructed from putatively selected sites were remarkably different than those constructed from putatively neutral sites. In addition, trees constructed using non-synonymous substitutions from a continuous fragment of exon 2 had more, and generally more inclusive, supported interspecific MHC IIB variant clusters than those constructed from the same fragment using synonymous substitutions. These phylogenetic patterns suggest that recombination, especially gene conversion, has partially erased the signal of allelic ancestry in these species. While clustering of

  19. Isolation of sindbis virus from a hooded crow in Germany.

    PubMed

    Eiden, Martin; Ziegler, Ute; Keller, Markus; Müller, Kerstin; Granzow, Harald; Jöst, Hanna; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Groschup, Martin H

    2014-03-01

    Sindbis virus (SINV) is an arbovirus that causes clinical symptoms, including arthritis, rash, and fever during acute human infections. In Europe, SINV outbreaks are largely restricted to northern Europe. Intrigued by the isolation of SINV from mosquitoes in southwestern Germany in 2009, we initiated a passive arbovirus-monitoring program in birds and analyzed a total of 685 samples. By this approach, we were able to detect a SINV in a Hooded Crow in Germany for the first time. It was possible to isolate SINV virus in cell cultures and even to visualize virus particles by electron microscopy. After the determination of the complete SINV genome sequence, the phylogenetic analysis revealed its close relationship to SINV genotype I sequences previously obtained from mosquitoes in Germany and Scandinavia. This first report on the isolation of viable SINV indicates the potential involvement of crows in an enzootic circulation of SINV in Germany and Central Europe.

  20. Behavioural responses to olfactory cues in carrion crows.

    PubMed

    Wascher, Claudia A F; Heiss, Rebecca S; Baglione, Vittorio; Canestrari, Daniela

    2015-02-01

    Until recently, the use of olfactory signals in birds has been largely ignored, despite the fact that birds do possess a fully functioning olfactory system and have been shown to use odours in social and foraging tasks, predator detection and orientation. The present study investigates whether carrion crows (Corvus corone corone), a bird species living in complex social societies, respond behaviourally to olfactory cues of conspecifics. During our experiment, carrion crows were observed less often close to the conspecific scent compared to a control side. Because conspecific scent was extracted during handling, a stressful procedure for birds, we interpreted the general avoidance of the 'scent' side as disfavour against a stressed conspecific. However, males, unlike females, showed less avoidance towards the scent of a familiar individual compared to an unfamiliar one, which might reflect a stronger interest in the information conveyed and/or willingness to provide social support. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A Description of the "Crow's Foot" Tunnel Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Russell V.; Williams, Steven P.; Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Kramer, Lynda J.; Bailey, Randall E.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Norman, R. Michael

    2006-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has actively pursued the development and the use of pictorial or three-dimensional perspective displays of tunnel-, pathway- or highway-in-the-sky concepts for presenting flight path information to pilots in all aircraft categories (e.g., transports, General Aviation, rotorcraft) since the late 1970s. Prominent among these efforts has been the development of the crow s foot tunnel concept. The crow's foot tunnel concept emerged as the consensus pathway concept from a series of interactive workshops that brought together government and industry display designers, test pilots, and airline pilots to iteratively design, debate, and fly various pathway concepts. Over years of use in many simulation and flight test activities at NASA and elsewhere, modifications have refined and adapted the tunnel concept for different applications and aircraft categories (i.e., conventional transports, High Speed Civil Transport, General Aviation). A description of those refinements follows the definition of the original tunnel concept.

  2. Sexual aggression by intruders in hooded crow Corvus cornix.

    PubMed

    Zduniak, Piotr; Kosicki, Jakub Z; Yosef, Reuven

    The hooded crow Corvus cornix is a west Palaearctic, solitary nesting, monogamous corvid. In the breeding season, populations are characterized by a social organization wherein breeding pairs are territorial and non-breeding individuals, called floaters, live in flocks. During a study of the breeding ecology of the hooded crow, conducted in a protected flooded area, we monitored nests with video cameras. We recorded two separate incidents when intruders attacked a female at the nest. We believe that she remained in the nest in order to prevent the strangers cannibalizing the nestlings by mantling over the brood. The spatio-temporal occurrence of these attacks suggests that the observed behaviour is intraspecific sexual aggression wherein non-breeding males mounted an immobilized female.

  3. Tight-binding calculation of radiation loss in photonic crystal CROW.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Martínez, Luis Javier; Fan, Shanhui; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2013-01-28

    The tight binding approximation (TBA) is used to relate the intrinsic, radiation loss of a coupled resonator optical waveguide (CROW) to that of a single constituent resonator within a light cone picture. We verify the validity of the TBA via direct, full-field simulation of CROWs based on the L2 photonic crystal cavity. The TBA predicts that the quality factor of the CROW increases with that of the isolated cavity. Moreover, our results provide a method to design CROWs with low intrinsic loss across the entire waveguide band.

  4. Transcriptomics of colour patterning and coloration shifts in crows.

    PubMed

    Poelstra, J W; Vijay, N; Hoeppner, M P; Wolf, J B W

    2015-09-01

    Animal coloration is one of the most conspicuous phenotypic traits in natural populations and has important implications for adaptation and speciation. Changes in coloration can occur over surprisingly short evolutionary timescales, while recurrence of similar colour patterns across large phylogenetic distances is also common. Even though the genetic basis of pigment production is well understood, little is known about the mechanisms regulating colour patterning. In this study, we shed light on the molecular elements regulating regional pigment production in two genetically near-identical crow taxa with striking differences in a eumelanin-based phenotype: black carrion and grey-coated hooded crows. We produced a high-quality genome annotation and analysed transcriptome data from a 2 × 2 design of active melanogenic feather follicles from head (black in both taxa) and torso (black in carrion and grey in hooded crow). Extensive, parallel expression differences between body regions in both taxa, enriched for melanogenesis genes (e.g. ASIP, CORIN, and ALDH6), indicated the presence of cryptic prepatterning also in all-black carrion crows. Meanwhile, colour-specific expression (grey vs. black) was limited to a small number of melanogenesis genes in close association with the central transcription factor MITF (most notably HPGDS, NDP and RASGRF1). We conclude that colour pattern differences between the taxa likely result from an interaction between divergence in upstream elements of the melanogenesis pathway and genes that provide an underlying prepattern across the body through positional information. A model of evolutionary stable prepatterns that can be exposed and masked through simple regulatory changes may explain the phylogenetically independent recurrence of colour patterns that is observed across corvids and many other vertebrate groups.

  5. Estimated and measured traveltime for the Crow River watershed, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arntson, Allan D.

    2007-01-01

    A time-of-travel study involving a luminescent dye was done on the Crow River in Minnesota from Rockford to the confluence with the Mississippi River at Dayton on July 11, 2006, at a streamflow of 293 cubic feet per second at Rockford. Dye was injected in the Crow River at Rockford, and traveltime and concentrations were measured at three sampling locations downstream: at the Hanover historic bridge in Hanover, at County Road 116 near St. Michael, and at County Road 12 in Dayton. The results of the measured traveltimes were compared to estimated traveltimes from a previous study of the Crow River and six other rivers in the Upper Mississippi River basin in 2003. Regression equations based on watershed characteristics of drainage area, river slope, mean-annual streamflow, and instantaneous streamflow at the time of measurement from more than 900 stream segments across the Nation were used to estimate traveltimes. Traveltimes were estimated and measured for the leading edge, peak concentration, and trailing edge of tracer-response curves. Estimated traveltimes for the leading edge, peak concentration, and trailing edge at Dayton were 25.3, 28.4, and 35.6 hours, respectively. Measured traveltimes for the leading edge, peak concentration, and trailing edge at Dayton were 33.2, 38.2, and 49.2 hours, respectively, for the 22.4-mile reach. Although traveltimes for the Crow and the Sauk Rivers were underestimated by use of the regression equations, the regression estimates were close enough to measured values to be considered satisfactory; hence, this estimating technique should be applicable in other source-water planning efforts in and near the study area.

  6. A repellent for protecting corn seed from blackbirds and crows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stickley, A.R.; Guarineo, J.L.

    1972-01-01

    Methiocarb [4-(methylthio)-3,-5-xylyl N-methylcarbamate] was tested as a seed treatment for repelling blackbirds and crows (Corvus sp.) from sprouting corn in South Carolina. The test was conducted on eight fields within a 0.25-square-mile area. Marked repellency occurred; sprout damage averaged 44 percent in the control fields and 0.3 percent in the fields treated with methiocarb.

  7. Phenotypic similarity in sympatric crow species: Evidence of social convergence?

    PubMed

    Laiolo, Paola

    2017-04-01

    Crows, rooks, and ravens (Corvus spp.) display marked morphological and voice similarities that have been hypothesized to stem from competitive interactions, as a case of nonaposematic mimicry. Here, I test predictions of the mimicry hypothesis at the macrovolutionary scale, examining whether species morphological and acoustic traits covary with those of coexisting congeners, and whether phenotypic similarity has facilitated the coexistence of related species after secondary contact. Body size and the temporal patterns of the commonest call display high levels of similarity among sympatric species, even after controlling for the effect of shared climate and habitat, and phylogenetic constraints in the production of variation. When sister species differed in these acoustic and morphological traits, their transition to secondary sympatry was delayed relative to those with more similar traits. No similarity was found in the sexual call of crows, suggesting that convergence occurs only when function does not favour maintenance of species-specific traits. Crow similarities in morphological and acoustic features may therefore be associated with coevolving interactions with congeners, in line with a broad array of studies documenting convergence among species that interact aggressively or forage communally.

  8. Complex cognition and behavioural innovation in New Caledonian crows

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Alex H.; Elliffe, Douglas; Hunt, Gavin R.; Gray, Russell D.

    2010-01-01

    Apes, corvids and parrots all show high rates of behavioural innovation in the wild. However, it is unclear whether this innovative behaviour is underpinned by cognition more complex than simple learning mechanisms. To investigate this question we presented New Caledonian crows with a novel three-stage metatool problem. The task involved three distinct stages: (i) obtaining a short stick by pulling up a string, (ii) using the short stick as a metatool to extract a long stick from a toolbox, and finally (iii) using the long stick to extract food from a hole. Crows with previous experience of the behaviours in stages 1–3 linked them into a novel sequence to solve the problem on the first trial. Crows with experience of only using string and tools to access food also successfully solved the problem. This innovative use of established behaviours in novel contexts was not based on resurgence, chaining and conditional reinforcement. Instead, the performance was consistent with the transfer of an abstract, causal rule: ‘out-of-reach objects can be accessed using a tool’. This suggests that high innovation rates in the wild may reflect complex cognitive abilities that supplement basic learning mechanisms. PMID:20410040

  9. Condition, innate immunity and disease mortality of inbred crows.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Andrea K; Clark, Anne B; McGowan, Kevin J; Miller, Andrew D; Buckles, Elizabeth L

    2010-09-22

    Cooperatively breeding American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) suffer a severe disease-mediated survival cost from inbreeding, but the proximate mechanisms linking inbreeding to disease are unknown. Here, we examine indices of nestling body condition and innate immunocompetence in relationship to inbreeding and disease mortality. Using an estimate of microsatellite heterozygosity that predicts inbreeding in this population, we show that inbred crows were in relatively poor condition as nestlings, and that body condition index measured in the first 2-33 days after hatching, in addition to inbreeding index, predicted disease probability in the first 34 months of life. Inbred nestlings also mounted a weaker response along one axis of innate immunity: the proportion of bacteria killed in a microbiocidal assay increased as heterozygosity index increased. Relatively poor body condition and low innate immunocompetence are two mechanisms that might predispose inbred crows to ultimate disease mortality. A better understanding of condition-mediated inbreeding depression can guide efforts to minimize disease costs of inbreeding in small populations.

  10. Numerosity representations in crows obey the Weber–Fechner law

    PubMed Central

    Ditz, Helen M.; Nieder, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The ability to estimate number is widespread throughout the animal kingdom. Based on the relative close phylogenetic relationship (and thus equivalent brain structures), non-verbal numerical representations in human and non-human primates show almost identical behavioural signatures that obey the Weber–Fechner law. However, whether numerosity discriminations of vertebrates with a very different endbrain organization show the same behavioural signatures remains unknown. Therefore, we tested the numerical discrimination performance of two carrion crows (Corvus corone) to a broad range of numerosities from 1 to 30 in a delayed match-to-sample task similar to the one used previously with primates. The crows' discrimination was based on an analogue number system and showed the Weber-fraction signature (i.e. the ‘just noticeable difference’ between numerosity pairs increased in proportion to the numerical magnitudes). The detailed analysis of the performance indicates that numerosity representations in crows are scaled on a logarithmically compressed ‘number line’. Because the same psychophysical characteristics are found in primates, these findings suggest fundamentally similar number representations between primates and birds. This study helps to resolve a classical debate in psychophysics: the mental number line seems to be logarithmic rather than linear, and not just in primates, but across vertebrates. PMID:27009227

  11. Numerosity representations in crows obey the Weber-Fechner law.

    PubMed

    Ditz, Helen M; Nieder, Andreas

    2016-03-30

    The ability to estimate number is widespread throughout the animal kingdom. Based on the relative close phylogenetic relationship (and thus equivalent brain structures), non-verbal numerical representations in human and non-human primates show almost identical behavioural signatures that obey the Weber-Fechner law. However, whether numerosity discriminations of vertebrates with a very different endbrain organization show the same behavioural signatures remains unknown. Therefore, we tested the numerical discrimination performance of two carrion crows (Corvus corone) to a broad range of numerosities from 1 to 30 in a delayed match-to-sample task similar to the one used previously with primates. The crows' discrimination was based on an analogue number system and showed the Weber-fraction signature (i.e. the 'just noticeable difference' between numerosity pairs increased in proportion to the numerical magnitudes). The detailed analysis of the performance indicates that numerosity representations in crows are scaled on a logarithmically compressed 'number line'. Because the same psychophysical characteristics are found in primates, these findings suggest fundamentally similar number representations between primates and birds. This study helps to resolve a classical debate in psychophysics: the mental number line seems to be logarithmic rather than linear, and not just in primates, but across vertebrates. © 2016 The Author(s).

  12. Condition, innate immunity and disease mortality of inbred crows

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Andrea K.; Clark, Anne B.; McGowan, Kevin J.; Miller, Andrew D.; Buckles, Elizabeth L.

    2010-01-01

    Cooperatively breeding American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) suffer a severe disease-mediated survival cost from inbreeding, but the proximate mechanisms linking inbreeding to disease are unknown. Here, we examine indices of nestling body condition and innate immunocompetence in relationship to inbreeding and disease mortality. Using an estimate of microsatellite heterozygosity that predicts inbreeding in this population, we show that inbred crows were in relatively poor condition as nestlings, and that body condition index measured in the first 2–33 days after hatching, in addition to inbreeding index, predicted disease probability in the first 34 months of life. Inbred nestlings also mounted a weaker response along one axis of innate immunity: the proportion of bacteria killed in a microbiocidal assay increased as heterozygosity index increased. Relatively poor body condition and low innate immunocompetence are two mechanisms that might predispose inbred crows to ultimate disease mortality. A better understanding of condition-mediated inbreeding depression can guide efforts to minimize disease costs of inbreeding in small populations. PMID:20444716

  13. New Caledonian crows use tools for non-foraging activities.

    PubMed

    Wimpenny, Joanna H; Weir, Alexander A S; Kacelnik, Alex

    2011-05-01

    Tool use is of great interest for cognitive research, largely because it can be particularly revealing about the underlying information processing mechanisms. Tool use that is inflexible or requires extensive experience to change, and that is only addressed towards specific targets such as food, is not likely to reflect unusual or particularly complex cognition. On the contrary, if tools are employed flexibly and for a variety of innovative purposes, then conventional combinations of inherited predispositions and associative learning are challenged and interesting questions emerge. Since New Caledonian crows (Corvus moneduloides) are especially adept at using and making tools for food extraction, we decided to examine their ability to generalise this to other contexts. We recorded how five pairs of New Caledonian crows interacted with novel objects that were not associated with food. We observed eight occasions in which the first contact with the novel object was mediated by a tool, suggesting that the function of the tool was for exploration. This is the first report of non-foraging tool use in New Caledonian crows, and it implies that the cognitive operations controlling tool-oriented behaviour in this species are more general than previously thought.

  14. Preliminary discussion on the origin of Lei-gong-mo (tektites)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baoyin, Y.

    1983-01-01

    The specimens of lei-gong-mo (tektites) were collected from Hainan Island and Leizhow Peninsula during the period from 1963 to 1975. The distribution, forms, sculpture, abration surface (bald spot), internal structure and chemical composition of lei-gong-mo are discussed. Studies of these materials lead to the following conclusions: (1) the specimens of lei-gong-mo can be morphologically divided into eight types; (2) the sculptures on the surface of lei-gong-mo are probably due to the corrosion effect of volcanic gas, and the abration surface due to the aerodynamic corrosion; (3) the folded structures in the layered lei-gong-mo (Muong Nong-type tektite) seem hardly to be formed by an impact of meteorites, but they might be produced in the magma flow process when the lei-gong-mo was melting within the crater vent; and (4) the comparison of its chemical composition with that of basalt from Hainan Island does not show that lei-gong-mo came from the local volcano. The hypothesis of the lunar volcanic origin of tektites is examined.

  15. STS-113 Commander Jim Wetherbee in White Room before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, STS-113 Commander Jim Wetherbee is helped with his launch and entry suit before entering Space Shuttle Endeavour. Closeout Crew members helping are (left) Rick Welty, United Space Alliance Vehicle Closeout chief, and (right) Danny Wyatt, NASA Quality Assurance specialist. The launch will carry the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return the Expedition 5 crew to Earth. The major objective of the mission is delivery of the Port 1 (P1) Integrated Truss Assembly, which will be attached to the port side of the S0 truss. Three spacewalks are planned to install and activate the truss and its associated equipment. Launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-113 is scheduled for Nov. 23 at 7:50 p.m. EST.

  16. Running, heart disease, and the ironic death of Jim Fixx.

    PubMed

    Plymire, Darcy C

    2002-03-01

    Jim Fixx was one of millions ofAmericans who started running in the 1 960s, 1970s, and 1980s. Unlike other runners, however, Fixx wrote a best-selling book about running and, ironically, died of a heart attack at the age of 52 years while running. Fixx and the authors of other running books believed heart disease resulted from overcivilization and recommended running as a cure. Running was not merely a physical exercise, according to those authors, but also a way of life. Moreover, those running authors, who were often doctors themselves, advised their readers to listen to their bodies, instead of their doctors. Fixx's adherence to that philosophy offers an explanationfor his seemingly irrational behavior--running through chest pain and discomfort.

  17. Personal Background Interview of Jim McBarron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McBarron, Jim; Wright, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Jim McBarron exhibits a wealth of knowledge gathered from more than 40 years of experience with NASA, EVA, and spacesuits. His biography, progression of work at NASA, impact on EVA and the U.S. spacesuit, and career accomplishments are of interest to many. Wright, from the JSC History Office, conducted a personal background interview with McBarron. This interview highlighted the influences and decision-making methods that impacted McBarron's technical and management contributions to the space program. Attendees gained insight on the external and internal NASA influences on career progression within the EVA and spacesuit, and the type of accomplishments and technical advances that committed individuals can make. He concluded the presentation with a question and answer period that included a brief discussion about close calls and Russian spacesuits.

  18. Nearly 50 Years Post-Jim Crow: Persisting and Expansive School Segregation for African American, Latina/o, and ELL Students in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasquez Heilig, Julian; Holme, Jennifer Jellison

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses the segregation of English language learner (ELL) students in schools across Texas. We descriptively analyze levels of racial, economic, and linguistic isolation experienced by ELL students across the state of Texas. We also examine the association between segregation by race/ethnicity, economic disadvantage, and language…

  19. Nearly 50 Years Post-Jim Crow: Persisting and Expansive School Segregation for African American, Latina/o, and ELL Students in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasquez Heilig, Julian; Holme, Jennifer Jellison

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses the segregation of English language learner (ELL) students in schools across Texas. We descriptively analyze levels of racial, economic, and linguistic isolation experienced by ELL students across the state of Texas. We also examine the association between segregation by race/ethnicity, economic disadvantage, and language…

  20. 30 CFR 756.20 - Approval of amendments to the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of amendments to the Crow Tribe's... RECLAMATION PROGRAMS § 756.20 Approval of amendments to the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan. Revisions to the following provisions of the Crow Tribe's Abandoned Mine Land Reclamation Plan, as...

  1. Restricted gene flow and fine-scale population structuring in tool using New Caledonian crows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutz, C.; Ryder, T. B.; Fleischer, R. C.

    2012-04-01

    New Caledonian crows Corvus moneduloides are the most prolific avian tool users. It has been suggested that some aspects of their complex tool use behaviour are under the influence of cultural processes, involving the social transmission—and perhaps even progressive refinement—of tool designs. Using microsatellite and mt-haplotype profiling of crows from three distinct habitats (dry forest, farmland and beachside habitat), we show that New Caledonian crow populations can exhibit significant fine-scale genetic structuring. Our finding that some sites of <10 km apart were highly differentiated demonstrates considerable potential for genetic and/or cultural isolation of crow groups. Restricted movement of birds between local populations at such small spatial scales, especially across habitat boundaries, illustrates how specific tool designs could be preserved over time, and how tool technologies of different crow groups could diverge due to drift and local selection pressures. Young New Caledonian crows have an unusually long juvenile dependency period, during which they acquire complex tool-related foraging skills. We suggest that the resulting delayed natal dispersal drives population-divergence patterns in this species. Our work provides essential context for future studies that examine the genetic makeup of crow populations across larger geographic areas, including localities with suspected cultural differences in crow tool technologies.

  2. Of Horses and Men: Superintendent Asbury's Deadly Assault on the Crow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCleary, Carrie Moran

    2003-01-01

    Discusses Superintendent Calvin Asbury's campaign to convert members of the Crow Tribe to Christianity. Presents Joe Medicine Crow, who was a child during the campaign that began in 1919, as he describes the historical and continuing effects on the Tribe. Explains that federal policy included selling tribal lands to non-Indians, prohibiting…

  3. 50 CFR 21.43 - Depredation order for blackbirds, cowbirds, grackles, crows and magpies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Depredation order for blackbirds, cowbirds... and Otherwise Injurious Birds § 21.43 Depredation order for blackbirds, cowbirds, grackles, crows and... blackbirds, cowbirds, all grackles, crows, and magpies, when found committing or about to commit depredations...

  4. 50 CFR 21.43 - Depredation order for blackbirds, cowbirds, grackles, crows, and magpies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Depredation order for blackbirds, cowbirds... and Otherwise Injurious Birds § 21.43 Depredation order for blackbirds, cowbirds, grackles, crows, and...: Blackbirds Cowbirds Grackles Crows Magpies Brewer's (Euphagus cyanocephalus) Bronzed (Molothrus aeneus) Boat...

  5. A Social, Economic, and Cultural Study of the Crow Reservation: Implications for Energy Development. Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow Impact Study Office, MT.

    Crow people want their resource decisions to benefit and strengthen the tribe socially and economically and to minimize damage to the tribal way of life, culture, and reservation environment. Based on a survey of 1016 reservation and non-reservation Crow families, conducted as part of a study of the impact of resource development on the…

  6. A Social, Economic, and Cultural Study of the Crow Reservation: Implications for Energy Development. Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow Impact Study Office, MT.

    Crow people want their resource decisions to benefit and strengthen the tribe socially and economically and to minimize damage to the tribal way of life, culture, and reservation environment. Based on a survey of 1016 reservation and non-reservation Crow families, conducted as part of a study of the impact of resource development on the…

  7. They Call Me Agnes: A Crow Narrative Based on the Life of Agnes Yellowtail Deernose.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voget, Fred W.; Mee, Mary K.

    This book is about life on the Crow Indian Reservation from around 1910 to the present and is based on the personal experiences of Donnie and Agnes Deernose. Following Donnie's death, Agnes became the principal narrator of the book. The Crow Indian Reservation is situated between Billings, Montana, and Sheridan, Wyoming. More so than any other…

  8. Underlying Nasals in Crow, Hidatsa and Proto-Missouri River (Siouan).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Jack

    1989-01-01

    The allophonic variation in the quality of the resonant consonants of two Missouri River (Siouan) languages, Crow and Hidatsa, has not previously been studied adequately. Evidence is provided in this paper that /m/ and /n/ are the best representations for the underlying resonants in Hidatsa as well as Crow and Proto-Missouri River. Establishing…

  9. Carrion crows learn to discriminate between calls of reliable and unreliable conspecifics.

    PubMed

    Wascher, Claudia A F; Hillemann, Friederike; Canestrari, Daniela; Baglione, Vittorio

    2015-09-01

    Partner choice on the basis of an individual's reliability is expected to stabilize social interactions. In this experiment, we tested whether carrion crows (Corvus corone corone) learn to differentiate between calls of reliable or unreliable individuals. Crows were kept in an aviary that comprised four visually but not acoustically isolated compartments, separated by a central room. In an association phase, a dead crow placed in the central compartment was visible only to one of the four crow groups, whilst alert calls of a conspecific were played back. Therefore, these calls were reliable for that group, but unreliable for the three other groups. The procedure was repeated, using a different reliable caller for each group. In two test sessions, 1 month apart, reliable and unreliable model individuals were played back, but no dead crow was presented. We quantified birds' attention behaviour and the number of vocalisations emitted. In the association phase, crows were more attentive towards the reliable compared with the unreliable stimuli and called more in response to reliable compared to unreliable individuals. In the test and repeat phase, attention behaviour did not differ between reliability conditions, but the pattern of vocal behaviour reversed, with crows calling less frequent when listening to reliable compared with unreliable calls. Vocal responses of crows suggest that they can discriminate between reliable and unreliable callers.

  10. Declining mortality in American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) following natural West Nile virus infection.

    PubMed

    Reed, Lisa M; Johansson, Michael A; Panella, Nicholas; McLean, Robert; Creekmore, Terry; Puelle, Rose; Komar, Nicholas

    2009-09-01

    The American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) is known to suffer 100% mortality from infection with the New York 1999 strain of West Nile virus (WNV). Following the initial detection of WNV in North America in 1999, we measured prevalence of WNV-reactive antibodies ("seroprevalence") in free-ranging American and fish crows (Corvus ossifragus) of central New Jersey after each transmission season through 2005. In 2002, seroprevalence in American crow juveniles increased to 14% from the 5% of the previous year, potentially indicating increased survival in this species. Using the annual seroprevalence measurements and the number of human West Nile neuroinvasive disease cases as a surrogate for WNV transmission intensity, we developed a model to estimate the annual WNV-associated mortality rates among both of these crow species. Our model supports the hypothesis that mortality is changing over time; the WNV-associated mortality rate declined over time by 1.5% for American crow and by 1.1% for fish crow. The probability that the trend in mortality was negative was 90% for the American crow and 60% for the fish crow.

  11. Restricted gene flow and fine-scale population structuring in tool using New Caledonian crows.

    PubMed

    Rutz, C; Ryder, T B; Fleischer, R C

    2012-04-01

    New Caledonian crows Corvus moneduloides are the most prolific avian tool users. It has been suggested that some aspects of their complex tool use behaviour are under the influence of cultural processes, involving the social transmission-and perhaps even progressive refinement-of tool designs. Using microsatellite and mt-haplotype profiling of crows from three distinct habitats (dry forest, farmland and beachside habitat), we show that New Caledonian crow populations can exhibit significant fine-scale genetic structuring. Our finding that some sites of <10 km apart were highly differentiated demonstrates considerable potential for genetic and/or cultural isolation of crow groups. Restricted movement of birds between local populations at such small spatial scales, especially across habitat boundaries, illustrates how specific tool designs could be preserved over time, and how tool technologies of different crow groups could diverge due to drift and local selection pressures. Young New Caledonian crows have an unusually long juvenile dependency period, during which they acquire complex tool-related foraging skills. We suggest that the resulting delayed natal dispersal drives population-divergence patterns in this species. Our work provides essential context for future studies that examine the genetic makeup of crow populations across larger geographic areas, including localities with suspected cultural differences in crow tool technologies.

  12. Extraordinary large brains in tool-using New Caledonian crows (Corvus moneduloides).

    PubMed

    Cnotka, Julia; Güntürkün, Onur; Rehkämper, Gerd; Gray, Russell D; Hunt, Gavin R

    2008-03-15

    A general correlation exists between brain weight and higher cognitive ability in birds and mammals. In birds this relationship is especially evident in corvids. These animals are well-known for their flexible behavior and problem-solving abilities, and have relatively large brains associated with a pallial enlargement. At the behavioral level, New Caledonian crows stand out amongst corvids because of their impressive object manipulation skills both in the wild and in the laboratory. However, nothing is known about the relative size of their brains. Here we show that NC crows have highly encephalised brains relative to most other birds that have been studied. We compared the relative brain size of five NC crows with combined data for four passerine species (7 European carrion crows, 2 European magpies, 3 European jays and 4 domestic sparrows) and found that NC crows had significantly larger brains. A comparison only with the seven carrion crows also revealed significantly larger brains for NC crows. When compared with brain data for 140 avian species from the literature, the NC crow had one of the highest degrees of encephalisation, exceeding that of the 7 other Corvidae in the data set.

  13. Of Horses and Men: Superintendent Asbury's Deadly Assault on the Crow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCleary, Carrie Moran

    2003-01-01

    Discusses Superintendent Calvin Asbury's campaign to convert members of the Crow Tribe to Christianity. Presents Joe Medicine Crow, who was a child during the campaign that began in 1919, as he describes the historical and continuing effects on the Tribe. Explains that federal policy included selling tribal lands to non-Indians, prohibiting…

  14. A possible role of crows in the spread of diarrhoeal diseases in Aden.

    PubMed

    al-Sallami, S

    1991-01-01

    The Indian House Crow (Corvus splendens) has increased dramatically in number in Aden. These birds pollute the environment by dropping their faecal material all over the city. They may accordingly be related to important public health problems. The present work aimed at investigating the possibility that they play a role in the spread of diarrheal diseases. One hundred and fifty crows were collected and their liver, intestine and cloaca examined bacteriologically for Enterobacteriaceae and Vibrionaceas as well as for parasites. Different members of Enterobacteriaceae including Salmonella, and Shigella serotypes and Proteus strains as well as members of Vibrionaceae and Pseudomonads were isolated from a great proportion of crows. Some of them were found identical to the strains previously isolated from patients suffering from diarrhea in Aden. Giardia lamblia cysts and Hymenolepis nana ova were also recovered from crows. It was concluded that crows may participate in the spread of diarrheal diseases in Aden.

  15. Distinct neural circuits underlie assessment of a diversity of natural dangers by American crows.

    PubMed

    Cross, Donna J; Marzluff, John M; Palmquist, Ila; Minoshima, Satoshi; Shimizu, Toru; Miyaoka, Robert

    2013-08-22

    Social animals encountering natural dangers face decisions such as whether to freeze, flee or harass the threat. The American crow, Corvus brachyrhynchos, conspicuously mobs dangers. We used positron emission tomography to test the hypothesis that distinct neuronal substrates underlie the crow's consistent behavioural response to different dangers. We found that crows activated brain regions associated with attention and arousal (nucleus isthmo-opticus/locus coeruleus), and with motor response (arcopallium), as they fixed their gaze on a threat. However, despite this consistent behavioural and neural response, the sight of a person who previously captured the crow, a person holding a dead crow and a taxidermy-mounted hawk activated distinct forebrain regions (amygdala, hippocampus and portion of the caudal nidopallium, respectively). We suggest that aspects of mobbing behaviour are guided by unique neural circuits that respond to differences in mental processing-learning, memory formation and multisensory discrimination-required to appropriately nuance a risky behaviour to specific dangers.

  16. High Prevalence and Genetic Diversity of Campylobacter jejuni in Wild Crows and Pigeons.

    PubMed

    Ramonaitė, Sigita; Novoslavskij, Aleksandr; Zakarienė, Gintarė; Aksomaitienė, Jurgita; Malakauskas, Mindaugas

    2015-11-01

    The occurrence, seasonal variation and genetic diversity of Campylobacter spp. in pigeons and crows over a 1-year period were evaluated. Campylobacter spp. were isolated from 166 (34.6 %) out of 480 wild bird faecal samples. The occurrence of Campylobacter spp. in faecal samples was higher among crows (39.2 %) than pigeons (30.0 %), (P < 0.05). Campylobacter jejuni was the most common species detected among wild bird faecal samples (98.2 %). Meanwhile, Campylobacter coli prevalence in wild bird faecal samples was low-6 %. The Simpson's diversity index of C. jejuni flaA RFLP types was lower in pigeons (D = 0.88) compared with C. jejuni isolates detected in crows (D = 0.97). Obtained results revealed that C. jejuni are widely prevalent among crows and pigeons, indicating these wild birds as potential infection sources to humans. Further studies are required to determine crows and pigeons role in zoonotic transmission of Campylobacter.

  17. Distinct neural circuits underlie assessment of a diversity of natural dangers by American crows

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Donna J.; Marzluff, John M.; Palmquist, Ila; Minoshima, Satoshi; Shimizu, Toru; Miyaoka, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Social animals encountering natural dangers face decisions such as whether to freeze, flee or harass the threat. The American crow, Corvus brachyrhynchos, conspicuously mobs dangers. We used positron emission tomography to test the hypothesis that distinct neuronal substrates underlie the crow's consistent behavioural response to different dangers. We found that crows activated brain regions associated with attention and arousal (nucleus isthmo-opticus/locus coeruleus), and with motor response (arcopallium), as they fixed their gaze on a threat. However, despite this consistent behavioural and neural response, the sight of a person who previously captured the crow, a person holding a dead crow and a taxidermy-mounted hawk activated distinct forebrain regions (amygdala, hippocampus and portion of the caudal nidopallium, respectively). We suggest that aspects of mobbing behaviour are guided by unique neural circuits that respond to differences in mental processing—learning, memory formation and multisensory discrimination—required to appropriately nuance a risky behaviour to specific dangers. PMID:23825209

  18. Vancomycin resistant Enterococcus spp. from crows and their environment in metropolitan Washington State, USA: Is there a correlation between VRE positive crows and the environment?

    PubMed

    Roberts, Marilyn C; No, David B; Marzluff, John M; Delap, Jack H; Turner, Robert

    2016-10-15

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci [VRE] have been isolated from municipal, hospital and agricultural wastewater, recreational beaches, wild animals, birds and food animals around the world. In this study, American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) from sewage treatment plants (WWTP), dairy farms, and a large roost in a restored wetland with corresponding environmental samples were cultured for VRE. A total of 245 samples [156 crows, 89 environmental] were collected and screened for acquired vanA, vanB and/or intrinsic vanC1 genes. Samples were enriched overnight in BHI supplemented with 20μg/mL aztreonam, 4μg/mL vancomycin and plated on m-Enterococcus agar media supplemented with 6μg/mL vancomycin. Selected colonies were grown on BHI media supplemented with 18μg/mL vancomycin. Of these, 24.5% of the crow and 55% the environmental/cow samples were VRE positive as defined by Enterococcus spp. able to grow on media supplemented with 18μg/mL vancomycin. A total of 122 VRE isolates, 43 crow and 79 environmental isolates were screened, identified to species level using 16S sequencing and further characterized. Four vanA E. faecium and multiple vanC1 E. gallinarum were identified from crows isolated from three sites. E. faecium vanA and E. gallinarum vanC1 along with other Enterococcus spp. carrying vanA, vanB, vanC1 were isolated from three environments. All enterococci were multidrug resistant. Crows were more likely to carry vanA E. faecium than either the cow feces or wetland waters/soils. Comparing E. gallinarum vanC1 from crows and their environment would be useful in determining whether crows share VRE strains with their environment.

  19. Risk factors associated with West Nile virus mortality in American Crow populations in Southern Quebec.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Antoinette; Bigras-Poulin, Michel; Michel, Pascal; Bélanger, Denise

    2010-01-01

    Soon after the appearance of West Nile virus (WNV) in North America, a number of public health authorities designated the American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) a sentinel for WNV detection. Although preliminary studies have suggested a positive association between American Crow mortality and increased risk of WNV infection in humans, we still know little about dynamic variation in American Crow mortality, both baseline levels and mortality associated with WNV. We hypothesized that the complex social behavior of American Crows, which is shaped by age and seasonal factors, influences both baseline mortality and WNV mortality in American Crow populations. We examined American Crow mortality data from Quebec for the 2005 WNV surveillance year, which lasted from 5 June to 17 September 2005. The variables of interest were age, gender, body condition index, time of year, and land cover. We used a log-linear model to examine baseline mortality. Logistic regression and general linear regression models were constructed to examine variables associated with mortality due to WNV. We found that both age and time of year were key variables in explaining baseline mortality. These two variables were also risk factors for WNV mortality. The probability that a carcass tested positive for WNV increased with the age of the dead bird and as summer progressed. WNV-positive carcasses also had a lower body condition index than WNV-negative carcasses. We believe that the first major wave of American Crow mortality observed in the early summer of 2005 was the result of natural mortality among young American Crows. Because this mortality was not linked to WNV, it appears that American Crow may not be a good species for early detection of WNV activity. Our data also suggest that second-year American Crows play a major role in propagating WNV during their movements to urban land covers during midsummer.

  20. Involvement of vision in tool use in crow.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Masaki; Matsui, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Shigeru; Izawa, Ei-Ichi

    2014-09-10

    Birds are capable of dexterous sensory-motor activities such as tool use. Reaching is a crucial component of tool use and is a vision-guided behavior in primates, in which arm movement is monitored online in a stable visual frame. However, vision-guided reaching in primates is enabled by anatomical separation of the head and arm; neck reaching in birds accompanies head movement, which produces unstable vision because the eye necessarily moves with the bill. This anatomical difference raises the question whether tool use in birds involves visuomotor mechanisms that are distinct from those in primates. As the role of vision in avian tool use has been poorly understood, we investigated the role of vision in tool use in the large-billed crow (Corvus macrorhynchos), a nontool user in the wild. Crows were trained to manipulate an L-shaped hook to retrieve food that was otherwise out of reach. After training, an opaque panel was placed on the front window of the platform to block their vision, and the effects on tool use were tested with respect to performance and movement trajectory. Vision blocking caused similar deviation of tool movement trajectories for both near and far targets, as well as far target-specific deviation. This suggests the involvement of vision in tool use by crows, specifically in the premanipulation process for conversion of vision-body coordinates for motor planning and in the process of tool manipulation. This is the first behavioral evidence for the involvement of vision in avian tool use.

  1. Health studies on the Indian house crow (Corvus splendens).

    PubMed

    Cooper, J E

    1996-06-01

    Fifteen Indian house crows (Corvus splendens) were obtained from a live-trap in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Two died soon after arrival. The remainder were examined clinically prior to euthanasia. All birds were examined post-mortem and a limited number of laboratory investigations was performed. None of the birds showed significant clinical signs or pathological lesions. Lice were found on one. Only Escherichia coli and Proteus spp. were isolated from the rectum. Coccidia were detected in three birds and cestodes in one. Haematological values were low. No blood parasites were seen. More extensive studies are warranted on the possible role of this species in the dissemination of pathogens.

  2. CROW{trademark} FIELD DEMONSTRATION WITH BELL LUMBER AND POLE

    SciTech Connect

    L. John Fahy; Lyle A. Johnson, Jr.

    1997-04-01

    Beginning in 1990, efforts were initiated for Western Research Institute (WRI) to implement an in situ remediation project for the contaminated aquifer at the Bell Lumber and Pole Company (Bell Pole) Site in New Brighton, Minnesota. The remediation project involves the application of the Contained Recovery of Oily Waste (CROW{trademark}) process, which consists of hot-water injection to displace and recover the non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL) (Johnson and Sudduth 1989). Wood treating activities began at the Bell Pole Site in 1923 and have included the use of creosote and pentachlorophenol (PCP) in a fuel oil carrier. Creosote was used as a wood preservative from 1923 to 1958. Provalene 4-A, a non-sludging fuel-oil-type carrier for PCP, was used from 1952 until it was no longer commercially available in 1968. A 5-6% mixture of PCP in fuel oil has been used as a wood preservative since 1952, and a fuel-oil-type carrier, P-9, has been used since 1968. While reviewing the site evaluation information, it became apparent that better site characterization would enhance the outcome of the project. Additional coring indicated that the area's extent of the contaminated soils was approximately eight times greater than initially believed. Because of these uncertainties, a pilot test was conducted, which provided containment and organic recovery information that assisted in the design of the full-scale CROW process demonstration.

  3. De novo assembly and analysis of crow lungs transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, Periyasamy; Raut, Ashwin Ashok; Kumar, Pushpendra; Sharma, Deepak; Mishra, Anamika

    2014-09-01

    The jungle crow (Corvus macrorhynchos) belongs to the order Passeriformes of bird species and is important for avian ecological and evolutionary genetics studies. However, there is limited information on the transcriptome data of this species. In the present study, we report the characterization of the lung transcriptome of the jungle crow using GS FLX Titanium XLR70. Altogether, 1,510,303 high-quality sequence reads with 581,198,230 bases was de novo assembled into 22,169 isotigs (isotig represents an individual transcript) and 784,009 singletons. Using these isotigs and 581,681 length-filtered (greater than 300 bp) singletons, 20,010 unique protein-coding genes were identified by BLASTx comparison against a nonredundant (nr) protein sequence database. Comparative analysis revealed that 46,604 (70.29%) and 51,642 (72.48%) of the assembled transcripts have significant similarity to zebra finch and chicken RefSeq proteins, respectively. As determined by GO annotation and KEGG pathway mapping, functional annotation of the unigenes recovered diverse biological functions and processes. Transcripts putatively involved in the immune response were identified. Furthermore, 20,599 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 7525 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were retrieved from the assembled transcript database. This resource should lay an important base for future ecological, evolutionary, and conservation genetic studies on this species and in other related species.

  4. Bell Pole CROW pilot test results and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Fahy, L.J.; Johnson, L.A. Jr.; Sola, D.V.; Horn, S.G.; Christofferson, J.L.

    1992-11-01

    Beginning in 1990, efforts were initiated to implement an in situ remediation project to address the creosote and pentachlorophenol (PCP) contaminated surficial aquifer at the Bell Lumber and Pole Company (Bell Pole) Site. The remediation project involves the application of the Contained Recovery of Oily Wastes (CROW{trademark}) process which consists of hot-water injection to displace and recover the non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL). Based on the results from the pilot test the following conclusions can be made: (1) The pilot test provided sufficient hydraulic information to design the full-scale CROW remediation system. The pumping test portion of the pilot test indicated uniform aquifer properties. The entire thickness of the aquifer reached the target temperature range and containment of the injected hot water was achieved. (2) Pretest injection and production rate predictions were achieved. (3) The post test soil boring data indicated hot-water injection displaced greater than 80% of the NAPL near the injection well. The data indicates that a NAPL saturation of approximately 19% (pore volume basis) and a 500 fold decrease in PCP concentration can be achieved with 20 pore volumes of flushing. (4) The treatment system used during the pilot test was effective in reducing PCP and PAH compounds to concentrations acceptable for sanitary sewer discharge. (5) The microbial assay of the post test samples found an encouraging increase in microbial population compared to earlier data collected before the pilot test.

  5. Bell Pole CROW pilot test results and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Fahy, L.J.; Johnson, L.A. Jr. ); Sola, D.V.; Horn, S.G.; Christofferson, J.L. )

    1992-01-01

    Beginning in 1990, efforts were initiated to implement an in situ remediation project to address the creosote and pentachlorophenol (PCP) contaminated surficial aquifer at the Bell Lumber and Pole Company (Bell Pole) Site. The remediation project involves the application of the Contained Recovery of Oily Wastes (CROW[trademark]) process which consists of hot-water injection to displace and recover the non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL). Based on the results from the pilot test the following conclusions can be made: (1) The pilot test provided sufficient hydraulic information to design the full-scale CROW remediation system. The pumping test portion of the pilot test indicated uniform aquifer properties. The entire thickness of the aquifer reached the target temperature range and containment of the injected hot water was achieved. (2) Pretest injection and production rate predictions were achieved. (3) The post test soil boring data indicated hot-water injection displaced greater than 80% of the NAPL near the injection well. The data indicates that a NAPL saturation of approximately 19% (pore volume basis) and a 500 fold decrease in PCP concentration can be achieved with 20 pore volumes of flushing. (4) The treatment system used during the pilot test was effective in reducing PCP and PAH compounds to concentrations acceptable for sanitary sewer discharge. (5) The microbial assay of the post test samples found an encouraging increase in microbial population compared to earlier data collected before the pilot test.

  6. Plastic and the nest entanglement of urban and agricultural crows.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Andrea K; Barker, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    Much attention has been paid to the impacts of plastics and other debris on marine organisms, but the effects of plastic on terrestrial organisms have been largely ignored. Detrimental effects of terrestrial plastic could be most pronounced in intensively human-modified landscapes (e.g., urban and agricultural areas), which are a source of much anthropogenic debris. Here, we examine the occurrence, types, landscape associations, and consequences of anthropogenic nest material in the American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos), a North American species that breeds in both urban and agricultural landscapes. We monitored 195 nestlings in 106 nests across an urban and agricultural gradient in the Sacramento Valley, California, USA. We found that 85.2% of crow nests contained anthropogenic material, and 11 of 195 nestlings (5.6%) were entangled in their nests. The length of the material was greater in nests in agricultural territories than in urban territories, and the odds of entanglement increased 7.55 times for each meter of anthropogenic material in the nest. Fledging success was significantly lower for entangled than for unentangled nestlings. In all environments, particularly urban, agricultural, and marine, careful disposal of potential hazards (string, packing and hay bale twine, balloon ribbon, wire, fishing line) could reduce the occurrence of entanglement of nestling birds.

  7. Ventilation and respiratory evaporation in the flying crow, Corvus ossifragus.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, M H

    1976-05-01

    Tidal volume (VT), respiration frequency (f) and respiratory evaporation (mre) were measured in the passeriform fish crow, Corvus ossifragus (mass 0.28 kg), during steady state, horizontal, wind-tunnel flight, at air speeds of 7.4-11.0 m-sec-1 and air temperatures (TA) of 12-28 degrees C. Ventilation (V1) of the respiratory system was calculated as f-VT. All parameters were independent of speed. Respiration frequency was independent of TA. VT and V1 were independent of TA below 23 degrees C, but above 23 degrees C increased linearly, as did mre. Oxygen extraction (E), the fraction of available oxygen removed from respiratory system air, was calculated using oxygen consumption data (VO2) reported previously, and VI. E was independent of TA below 23 degrees C, where mean E, similar to that in crows resting at 20 degrees C, was substantially higher than in resting mammals of the same mass. E decreased at higher TA, reflecting hyperventilation accompanying elevated mre. mre accounted for the loss of only 17% of total metabolic heat production (Hp), as calculated from VO2, with a partial efficiency of 25%. Thus most heat loss must follow cutaneous evaporative, or nonevaporative routes.

  8. Plastic and the Nest Entanglement of Urban and Agricultural Crows

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Andrea K.; Barker, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Much attention has been paid to the impacts of plastics and other debris on marine organisms, but the effects of plastic on terrestrial organisms have been largely ignored. Detrimental effects of terrestrial plastic could be most pronounced in intensively human-modified landscapes (e.g., urban and agricultural areas), which are a source of much anthropogenic debris. Here, we examine the occurrence, types, landscape associations, and consequences of anthropogenic nest material in the American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos), a North American species that breeds in both urban and agricultural landscapes. We monitored 195 nestlings in 106 nests across an urban and agricultural gradient in the Sacramento Valley, California, USA. We found that 85.2% of crow nests contained anthropogenic material, and 11 of 195 nestlings (5.6%) were entangled in their nests. The length of the material was greater in nests in agricultural territories than in urban territories, and the odds of entanglement increased 7.55 times for each meter of anthropogenic material in the nest. Fledging success was significantly lower for entangled than for unentangled nestlings. In all environments, particularly urban, agricultural, and marine, careful disposal of potential hazards (string, packing and hay bale twine, balloon ribbon, wire, fishing line) could reduce the occurrence of entanglement of nestling birds. PMID:24498238

  9. Tool use by wild New Caledonian crows Corvus moneduloides at natural foraging sites.

    PubMed

    Bluff, Lucas A; Troscianko, Jolyon; Weir, Alex A S; Kacelnik, Alex; Rutz, Christian

    2010-05-07

    New Caledonian crows Corvus moneduloides use tools made from sticks or leaf stems to 'fish' woodboring beetle larvae from their burrows in decaying wood. Previous research on this behaviour has been confined to baited sites, leaving its ecological context and significance virtually unexplored. To obtain detailed observations of natural, undisturbed tool use, we deployed motion-triggered video cameras at seven larva-fishing sites. From 1797 camera hours of surveillance over 111 days, we recorded 317 site visits by at least 14 individual crows. Tool use was observed during 150 site visits. Our video footage revealed notable variation in foraging success among identifiable crows. Two nutritionally independent, immature crows spent considerable time using tools, but were much less successful than local adults, highlighting the potential role of individual and social learning in the acquisition of tool-use proficiency. During systematic surveys of larva-fishing sites, we collected 193 tools that crows had left inserted in larva burrows. Comparing these tools with the holes in which they were found, and with raw materials available around logs, provides evidence for tool selectivity by New Caledonian crows under natural conditions. Taken together, these two complementary lines of investigation provide, to our knowledge, the first quantitative description of larva fishing by wild crows in its full ecological context.

  10. Long-term memory of color stimuli in the jungle crow (Corvus macrorhynchos).

    PubMed

    Bogale, Bezawork Afework; Sugawara, Satoshi; Sakano, Katsuhisa; Tsuda, Sonoko; Sugita, Shoei

    2012-03-01

    Wild-caught jungle crows (n = 20) were trained to discriminate between color stimuli in a two-alternative discrimination task. Next, crows were tested for long-term memory after 1-, 2-, 3-, 6-, and 10-month retention intervals. This preliminary study showed that jungle crows learn the task and reach a discrimination criterion (80% or more correct choices in two consecutive sessions of ten trials) in a few trials, and some even in a single session. Most, if not all, crows successfully remembered the constantly reinforced visual stimulus during training after all retention intervals. These results suggest that jungle crows have a high retention capacity for learned information, at least after a 10-month retention interval and make no or very few errors. This study is the first to show long-term memory capacity of color stimuli in corvids following a brief training that memory rather than rehearsal was apparent. Memory of visual color information is vital for exploitation of biological resources in crows. We suspect that jungle crows could remember the learned color discrimination task even after a much longer retention interval.

  11. Shape discrimination and concept formation in the jungle crow (Corvus macrorhynchos).

    PubMed

    Bogale, Bezawork Afework; Sugita, Shoei

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether jungle crows can learn concepts by using printouts of shapes in a simultaneous two-alternative task. Jungle crows were first trained with a red triangle and red square until they reached the discrimination criterion (80% of correct choices in two blocks of 10 trials each). Then, we tested crows with successive transfer tests to investigate both the discrimination cues being used and concept formation ability, by using novel triangular and non-triangular stimuli. All of the jungle crows learnt to discriminate between the triangle and square during training. The discrimination performance was generally not affected either by changes in the colour of the stimuli or when both shape and colour cues conflicted, with the previously non-rewarded shape but matching colour (red square) versus rewarded shape but non-matching colour (green triangle). The use of only outlines of the familiar stimuli also did not affect discrimination behaviour of crows. In addition, crows significantly discriminated novel triangular shapes during the limited trials given, suggesting their ability to form the concept of triangularity. However, failure to discriminate when the novel stimuli size deviated from the original suggests that there is a limit to shape concept formation in a familiar-novel context in the jungle crow.

  12. Population genetic structure and colonisation history of the tool-using New Caledonian crow.

    PubMed

    Abdelkrim, Jawad; Hunt, Gavin R; Gray, Russell D; Gemmell, Neil J

    2012-01-01

    New Caledonian crows exhibit considerable variation in tool making between populations. Here, we present the first study of the species' genetic structure over its geographical distribution. We collected feathers from crows on mainland Grande Terre, the inshore island of Toupéti, and the nearby island of Maré where it is believed birds were introduced after European colonisation. We used nine microsatellite markers to establish the genotypes of 136 crows from these islands and classical population genetic tools as well as Approximate Bayesian Computations to explore the distribution of genetic diversity. We found that New Caledonian crows most likely separate into three main distinct clusters: Grande Terre, Toupéti and Maré. Furthermore, Toupéti and Maré crows represent a subset of the genetic diversity observed on Grande Terre, confirming their mainland origin. The genetic data are compatible with a colonisation of Maré taking place after European colonisation around 1900. Importantly, we observed (1) moderate, but significant, genetic differentiation across Grande Terre, and (2) that the degree of differentiation between populations on the mainland increases with geographic distance. These data indicate that despite individual crows' potential ability to disperse over large distances, most gene flow occurs over short distances. The temporal and spatial patterns described provide a basis for further hypothesis testing and investigation of the geographical variation observed in the tool skills of these crows.

  13. Categorical learning between 'male' and 'female' photographic human faces in jungle crows (Corvus macrorhynchos).

    PubMed

    Bogale, Bezawork Afework; Aoyama, Masato; Sugita, Shoei

    2011-01-01

    We trained jungle crows to discriminate among photographs of human face according to their sex in a simultaneous two-alternative task to study their categorical learning ability. Once the crows reached a discrimination criterion (greater than or equal to 80% correct choices in two consecutive sessions; binomial probability test, p<.05), they next received generalization and transfer tests (i.e., greyscale, contour, and 'full' occlusion) in Experiment 1 followed by a 'partial' occlusion test in Experiment 2 and random stimuli pair test in Experiment 3. Jungle crows learned the discrimination task in a few trials and successfully generalized to novel stimuli sets. However, all crows failed the greyscale test and half of them the contour test. Neither occlusion of internal features of the face, nor randomly pairing of exemplars affected discrimination performance of most, if not all crows. We suggest that jungle crows categorize human face photographs based on perceptual similarities as other non-human animals do, and colour appears to be the most salient feature controlling discriminative behaviour. However, the variability in the use of facial contours among individuals suggests an exploitation of multiple features and individual differences in visual information processing among jungle crows. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Tool use by wild New Caledonian crows Corvus moneduloides at natural foraging sites

    PubMed Central

    Bluff, Lucas A.; Troscianko, Jolyon; Weir, Alex A. S.; Kacelnik, Alex; Rutz, Christian

    2010-01-01

    New Caledonian crows Corvus moneduloides use tools made from sticks or leaf stems to ‘fish’ woodboring beetle larvae from their burrows in decaying wood. Previous research on this behaviour has been confined to baited sites, leaving its ecological context and significance virtually unexplored. To obtain detailed observations of natural, undisturbed tool use, we deployed motion-triggered video cameras at seven larva-fishing sites. From 1797 camera hours of surveillance over 111 days, we recorded 317 site visits by at least 14 individual crows. Tool use was observed during 150 site visits. Our video footage revealed notable variation in foraging success among identifiable crows. Two nutritionally independent, immature crows spent considerable time using tools, but were much less successful than local adults, highlighting the potential role of individual and social learning in the acquisition of tool-use proficiency. During systematic surveys of larva-fishing sites, we collected 193 tools that crows had left inserted in larva burrows. Comparing these tools with the holes in which they were found, and with raw materials available around logs, provides evidence for tool selectivity by New Caledonian crows under natural conditions. Taken together, these two complementary lines of investigation provide, to our knowledge, the first quantitative description of larva fishing by wild crows in its full ecological context. PMID:20053646

  15. Measurements and predictions of hooded crow (Corvus corone cornix) call propagation over open field habitats.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kenneth Kragh; Larsen, Ole Naesbye; Attenborough, Keith

    2008-01-01

    In a study of hooded crow communication over open fields an excellent correspondence is found between the attenuation spectra predicted by a "turbulence-modified ground effect plus atmospheric absorption" model, and crow call attenuation data. Sound propagation predictions and background noise measurements are used to predict an optimal frequency range for communication ("sound communication window") from an average of crow call spectra predicted for every possible combination of the sender/receiver separations 300, 600, 900, and 1200 m and heights 3,6,9 m thereby creating a matrix assumed relevant to crow interterritorial communication. These predictions indicate an optimal frequency range for sound communication between 500 Hz and 2 kHz. Since this corresponds to the frequency range in which crow calls have their main energy and crow hearing in noise is particularly sensitive, it suggests a specific adaptation to the ground effect. Sound propagation predictions, together with background noise measurements and hearing data, are used to estimate the radius of the hooded crow active space. This is found to be roughly 1 km in moderately windy conditions. It is concluded that the propagation modeling of the sort introduced here could be used for assessing the impact of human noise on animal communication.

  16. Nucleotide divergence vs. gene expression differentiation: comparative transcriptome sequencing in natural isolates from the carrion crow and its hybrid zone with the hooded crow.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Jochen B W; Bayer, Till; Haubold, Bernhard; Schilhabel, Markus; Rosenstiel, Philip; Tautz, Diethard

    2010-03-01

    Recent advances in sequencing technology promise to provide new strategies for studying population differentiation and speciation phenomena in their earliest phases. We focus here on the black carrion crow (Corvus [corone] corone), which forms a zone of hybridization and overlap with the grey coated hooded crow (Corvus [corone] cornix). However, although these semispecies are taxonomically distinct, previous analyses based on several types of genetic markers did not reveal significant molecular differentiation between them. We here corroborate this result with sequence data obtained from a set of 25 nuclear intronic loci. Thus, the system represents a case of a very early phase of species divergence that requires new molecular approaches for its description. We have therefore generated RNAseq expression profiles using barcoded massively parallel pyrosequencing of brain mRNA from six individuals of the carrion crow and five individuals from a hybrid zone with the hooded crow. We obtained 856 675 reads from two runs, with average read length of 270 nt and coverage of 8.44. Reads were assembled de novo into 19 552 contigs, 70% of which could be assigned to annotated genes in chicken and zebra finch. This resulted in a total of 7637 orthologous genes and a core set of 1301 genes that could be compared across all individuals. We find a clear clustering of expression profiles for the pure carrion crow animals and disperse profiles for the animals from the hybrid zone. These results suggest that gene expression differences may indeed be a sensitive indicator of initial species divergence.

  17. Comparing simulated carbon budget of a Lei bamboo forest with flux tower data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, Xuehe; Jiang, Hong; Liu, Jinxun; Sun, Cheng; Wang, Ying; Jin, Jiaxin

    2014-01-01

    Bamboo forest ecosystem is the part of the forest ecosystem. The distribution area of bamboo forest is limited, but in somewhere, like south China, it has been cultivate for a long time with human management. As the climate change has been take great effect on forest carbon budget, many researchers pay attention to the carbon budget in bamboo forest. Moreover cultivative management had a significant impact on the bamboo forest carbon budget. In this study, we modified a terrestrial ecosystem model named Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS) according the management of Lei bamboo forest. Some management, like fertilization, shoots harvesting and organic mulching in winter, had been incorporated into model. Then we had compared model results with the observation data from a Lei bamboo flux tower. The simulated and observed results had achieved good consistency. Our simulated Lei bamboo forest yearly net ecosystem productivity (NEP) was 0.41 kgC a-1 of carbon, which is very close to the observation data 0.45 kgC a-1 of carbon. And the monthly simulated results can take the change of carbon budget in each month, similar to the data we got from flux tower. It reflects that the modified IBIS model can characterize the growth of bamboo forest and perform the simulation well. And then two groups of simulations were set to evaluate effects of cultivative managements on Lei bamboo forests carbon budget. And results showed that both fertilization and organic mulching had taken positive effects on Lei bamboo forests carbon sequestration.

  18. Strong between-site variation in New Caledonian crows' use of hook-tool-making materials.

    PubMed

    St Clair, James J H; Klump, Barbara C; van der Wal, Jessica E M; Sugasawa, Shoko; Rutz, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Functional tool use requires the selection of appropriate raw materials. New Caledonian crows Corvus moneduloides are known for their extraordinary tool-making behaviour, including the crafting of hooked stick tools from branched vegetation. We describe a surprisingly strong between-site difference in the plant materials used by wild crows to manufacture these tools: crows at one study site use branches of the non-native shrub Desmanthus virgatus, whereas only approximately 7 km away, birds apparently ignore this material in favour of the terminal twigs of an as-yet-unidentified tree species. Although it is likely that differences in local plant communities drive this striking pattern, it remains to be determined how and why crows develop such strong site-specific preferences for certain raw materials.

  19. Large-billed crows (Corvus macrorhynchos) have retrospective but not prospective metamemory.

    PubMed

    Goto, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Shigeru

    2012-01-01

    Evidence of metamemory, the ability to monitor one's own memory, has been obtained in some primates, but it appears to be weaker in other species. In this study, we examined whether crows flexibly modulate their behavior by monitoring the strength of memory trace in a delayed matching-to-sample task using two paradigms. First, crows performing a memory test were given an escape option to decline taking the test (prospective metamemory). Second, crows were given the escape option as a "not confident" report after completing the test (retrospective metamemory). Accurate memory performance yielded a reward with a higher probability, whereas inaccurate memory performance resulted in no such recompense. The escape option yielded a reward with a lower probability. In the prospective metamemory test, crows escaped the memory test more frequently with longer delay intervals than they did with shorter delay intervals but no more frequently in the sample-omission than the sample-present trials, indicating that the crows decided to take the test or decline it by using the delay interval as a cue. In contrast, in the retrospective metamemory test, the crows escaped the memory test more frequently when their memory-test response was incorrect than correct and more frequently in the sample-omission than the sample-present trials, indicating that the crows recognized confidence regarding their choice in the memory test and utilized the escape option to maximize reward probability. Although these results suggest that crows retrospectively monitor the strength of memory trace, their prospective metamemory ability has not yet been confirmed in the present paradigm.

  20. DNA Vaccine for West Nile Virus Infection in Fish Crows (Corvus ossifragus)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    SUBJECT TERMS west Nile virus, vaccine, efficacy , crows 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 5 19a...crows, Emerging Infectious Diseases • Vol. 9, No. 9, September 2003 1079 RESEARCH Table 1. Effect of route of administration of a DNA West Nile virus...zoologic parks indicate the need to develop an effective avian vaccine for WNV. To break the transmis- sion cycle, the vaccine must be able to

  1. Population Genetic Structure and Colonisation History of the Tool-Using New Caledonian Crow

    PubMed Central

    Abdelkrim, Jawad; Hunt, Gavin R.; Gray, Russell D.; Gemmell, Neil J.

    2012-01-01

    New Caledonian crows exhibit considerable variation in tool making between populations. Here, we present the first study of the species’ genetic structure over its geographical distribution. We collected feathers from crows on mainland Grande Terre, the inshore island of Toupéti, and the nearby island of Maré where it is believed birds were introduced after European colonisation. We used nine microsatellite markers to establish the genotypes of 136 crows from these islands and classical population genetic tools as well as Approximate Bayesian Computations to explore the distribution of genetic diversity. We found that New Caledonian crows most likely separate into three main distinct clusters: Grande Terre, Toupéti and Maré. Furthermore, Toupéti and Maré crows represent a subset of the genetic diversity observed on Grande Terre, confirming their mainland origin. The genetic data are compatible with a colonisation of Maré taking place after European colonisation around 1900. Importantly, we observed (1) moderate, but significant, genetic differentiation across Grande Terre, and (2) that the degree of differentiation between populations on the mainland increases with geographic distance. These data indicate that despite individual crows’ potential ability to disperse over large distances, most gene flow occurs over short distances. The temporal and spatial patterns described provide a basis for further hypothesis testing and investigation of the geographical variation observed in the tool skills of these crows. PMID:22590576

  2. New Caledonian Crows Learn the Functional Properties of Novel Tool Types

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Alex H.; Elliffe, Douglas M.; Hunt, Gavin R.; Emery, Nathan J.; Clayton, Nicola S.; Gray, Russell D.

    2011-01-01

    New Caledonian crows were presented with Bird and Emery's (2009a) Aesop's fable paradigm, which requires stones to be dropped into a water-filled tube to bring floating food within reach. The crows did not spontaneously use stones as tools, but quickly learned to do so, and to choose objects and materials with functional properties. Some crows discarded both inefficient and non-functional objects before observing their effects on the water level. Interestingly, the crows did not learn to discriminate between functional and non-functional objects and materials when there was an arbitrary, rather than causal, link between object and reward. This finding suggests that the crows' performances were not based on associative learning alone. That is, learning was not guided solely by the covariation rate between stimuli and outcomes or the conditioned reinforcement properties acquired by functional objects. Our results, therefore, show that New Caledonian crows can process causal information not only when it is linked to sticks and stick-like tools but also when it concerns the functional properties of novel types of tool. PMID:22194779

  3. New Caledonian crows learn the functional properties of novel tool types.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Alex H; Elliffe, Douglas M; Hunt, Gavin R; Emery, Nathan J; Clayton, Nicola S; Gray, Russell D

    2011-01-01

    New Caledonian crows were presented with Bird and Emery's (2009a) Aesop's fable paradigm, which requires stones to be dropped into a water-filled tube to bring floating food within reach. The crows did not spontaneously use stones as tools, but quickly learned to do so, and to choose objects and materials with functional properties. Some crows discarded both inefficient and non-functional objects before observing their effects on the water level. Interestingly, the crows did not learn to discriminate between functional and non-functional objects and materials when there was an arbitrary, rather than causal, link between object and reward. This finding suggests that the crows' performances were not based on associative learning alone. That is, learning was not guided solely by the covariation rate between stimuli and outcomes or the conditioned reinforcement properties acquired by functional objects. Our results, therefore, show that New Caledonian crows can process causal information not only when it is linked to sticks and stick-like tools but also when it concerns the functional properties of novel types of tool.

  4. Blood parasites in hooded crows (Corvus corone cornix) in Northwest Italy.

    PubMed

    Scaglione, Frine Eleonora; Cannizzo, Francesca Tiziana; Pregel, Paola; Perez Rodriguez, Anton David; Bollo, Enrico

    2016-09-30

    Haemoparasites and their effects on hooded crows (Corvus corone cornix) are poorly studied. The aims are to evaluate the prevalence of Haemoproteus spp./Plasmodium spp. or Leucocytozoon spp., to correlate this with gross and histopathological findings, and to investigate the association among infection and geographical origin, age, gender, parasite distribution and prevalence among organs. Hooded crows (n = 47) were collected within a regional culling programme from 3 districts in the province of Turin (Italy) and subjected to necropsy. Histological and molecular analyses were carried out on some tissues. Leucocytozoon spp. was detected in 46 crows (97.9%) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), whereas 28 birds (59.6%) were found to be positive for Haemoproteus spp./Plasmodium spp. The distribution of parasites in several organs varied significantly, showing that Leucocytozoon spp. is ubiquitous in organs in contrast with Haemoproteus spp./Plasmodium spp., which have a specific predilection for spleen and lungs. The prevalence of Haemoproteus spp./Plasmodium spp. also differed significantly among the crows captured in the areas of the study. The high prevalence of haemoparasites emphasizes the success of ornithophilic vectors and the susceptibility of this species to infection. Differences in prevalence among the sites are probably due to orographic features of the areas, variations in vector species and density, or to crow population size or structure. In spite of the high infection rate, no gross and histological lesions were found. This finding further suggests an evolutionary adaptation between crows and avian blood parasites.

  5. Ultrastructural and histochemical properties of the olfactory system in the japanese jungle crow, Corvus macrorhynchos.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Daisuke; Nashimoto, Mai; Kanayama, Shunsaku; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki

    2011-08-01

    Although it has been commonly believed that birds are more dependent on the vision and audition than the olfaction, recent studies indicate that the olfaction of birds is related to the reproductive, homing, and predatory behaviors. In an attempt to reveal the dependence on the olfactory system in crows, we examined the olfactory system of the Japanese jungle crow (Corvus macrorhynchos) by histological, ultrastructural, and lectin histochemical methods. The olfactory epithelium (OE) of the crow occupied remarkably a small area of the nasal cavity (NC) and had the histological and ultrastructural features like other birds. The olfactory bulb (OB) of the crow was remarkably small and did not possess the olfactory ventricle. The left and right halves of the OB were fused in many cases. In the lectin histochemistry, soybean agglutinin (SBA) and Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA) stained a small number of the receptor cells (RCs) in the OE and the olfactory nerve layer (ONL) and glomerular layer (GL) on the dorsocaudal region of the OB. Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-E (PHA-E) stained several RCs in the OE and the ONL and GL on the ventral region of the OB. These results suggest that 1) the crow has less-developed olfactory system than other birds, and 2) the dedicated olfactory receptor cells project their axons to the specific regions of the OB in the crow.

  6. Calculation of Auger-neutralization probabilities for He +-ions in LEIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebl, D.; Monreal, R. C.; Valdés, D.; Primetzhofer, D.; Bauer, P.

    2011-06-01

    In Low Energy Ion Scattering (LEIS), Auger-neutralization is an omnipresent charge exchange mechanism, especially when noble gas ions are used as projectiles, with a primary energy below the threshold energy, Eth, for collision induced charge exchange processes (neutralization and reionization). Recent experiments revealed a significant dependence of the ion survival probability, P+, on the crystal plane, when He + ions are scattered from a metal surface. This is in contrast to the fact, that the neutralization probability in LEIS is usually assumed to be independent of the chemical environment of the collision partner (absence of matrix effects). In order to investigate this crystal effect, an existent theory on Auger-neutralization (based on a Linear Combination of Atomic Orbitals) is adapted to the LEIS geometry. With this model, Auger-neutralization rates are calculated for a Ag(1 1 0) surface. Trajectories for He particles scattered from this surface into different azimuth directions are obtained by means of Molecular Dynamics simulations. Subsequently, the ion survival probability is calculated and compared to measurements. Good agreement is obtained which gives confidence in the applicability of this model in the LEIS regime. Moreover, it was possible to obtain detailed information on the properties of the neutralization process.

  7. 76 FR 60815 - Final Legislative Environmental Impact Statement (LEIS) for the Limestone Hills Training Area...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... environmental analysis is resource dependent. It includes Lewis and Clark County and Broadwater County for... resources. The LEIS analyzes potential environmental effects of three action alternatives and a No Action... Graymont Western's Indian Creek Limestone Mine to extract and process ore within the LHTA; (2)...

  8. Dielectric interpretation of Lei-Ting nonlinear force-momentum-balance transport equation for isothermal resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horing, N. J. M.; Lei, X. L.; Cui, H. L.

    1986-05-01

    A dielectric interpretation of the nonlinear Lei-Ting force-momentum-balance transport equation for steady-state dc current flow is developed here in correspondence with standard techniques for calculating fast-particle energy loss to a plasmalike medium. In conjunction with this we interpret the result to be an isothermal resistivity calculated to lowest order in the impurity scattering potentials, isothermal in the sense that all energy dissipated is removed from the system, essentially instantaneously as it is generated, by a heat bath in contact with the system which maintains it at constant temperature throughout the nonlinear dc conduction process. On the basis of its isothermal character, we argue that the Lei-Ting dc resistivity calculated to lowest order in the impurity scattering potentials-whose linear limit is significantly different from the corresponding linear resistivity of an adiabatic character (for a system admitting no drainoff of dissipated energy, developing under a purely mechanical Hamiltonian)-is immune to serious critical objections of the type brought by Argyres and Sigel against similar lowest-order adiabatic linear resistivity calculations some time ago. Moreover, we also show that a dielectric Lei-Ting type formulation of linearized ac resistivity leads to the standard high-frequency linear resistivity formula, and that its zero-frequency limit naturally yields the isothermal dc linear Lei-Ting resistivity.

  9. Lazy group members are substitute helpers in carrion crows

    PubMed Central

    Baglione, Vittorio; Canestrari, Daniela; Chiarati, Elisa; Vera, Ruben; Marcos, Jose M.

    2010-01-01

    In many cooperatively breeding societies, helping effort varies greatly among group members, raising the question of why dominant individuals tolerate lazy subordinates. In groups of carrion crows Corvus corone corone, helpers at the nest increase breeders' reproductive success, but chick provisioning is unevenly distributed among non-breeders, with a gradient that ranges from individuals that work as much as the breeders to others that completely refrain from visiting the nest. Here we show that lazy non-breeders represent an insurance workforce that fully compensates for a reduction in the provisioning effort of another group member, avoiding a decrease in reproductive success. When we temporarily impaired a carer, decreasing its nest attendance, the laziest non-breeders increased their provisioning rate and individuals that initially refrained from visiting the nest started helping. Breeders, in contrast, did not increase chick provisioning. This shows that lazy non-breeders can buffer a sudden unfavourable circumstance and suggests that group stability relies on the potential contribution of group members in addition to their current effort. PMID:20519217

  10. Lazy group members are substitute helpers in carrion crows.

    PubMed

    Baglione, Vittorio; Canestrari, Daniela; Chiarati, Elisa; Vera, Ruben; Marcos, Jose M

    2010-11-07

    In many cooperatively breeding societies, helping effort varies greatly among group members, raising the question of why dominant individuals tolerate lazy subordinates. In groups of carrion crows Corvus corone corone, helpers at the nest increase breeders' reproductive success, but chick provisioning is unevenly distributed among non-breeders, with a gradient that ranges from individuals that work as much as the breeders to others that completely refrain from visiting the nest. Here we show that lazy non-breeders represent an insurance workforce that fully compensates for a reduction in the provisioning effort of another group member, avoiding a decrease in reproductive success. When we temporarily impaired a carer, decreasing its nest attendance, the laziest non-breeders increased their provisioning rate and individuals that initially refrained from visiting the nest started helping. Breeders, in contrast, did not increase chick provisioning. This shows that lazy non-breeders can buffer a sudden unfavourable circumstance and suggests that group stability relies on the potential contribution of group members in addition to their current effort.

  11. Diversification and cumulative evolution in New Caledonian crow tool manufacture.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Gavin R; Gray, Russell D

    2003-04-22

    Many animals use tools but only humans are generally considered to have the cognitive sophistication required for cumulative technological evolution. Three important characteristics of cumulative technological evolution are: (i) the diversification of tool design; (ii) cumulative change; and (iii) high-fidelity social transmission. We present evidence that crows have diversified and cumulatively changed the design of their pandanus tools. In 2000 we carried out an intensive survey in New Caledonia to establish the geographical variation in the manufacture of these tools. We documented the shapes of 5550 tools from 21 sites throughout the range of pandanus tool manufacture. We found three distinct pandanus tool designs: wide tools, narrow tools and stepped tools. The lack of ecological correlates of the three tool designs and their different, continuous and overlapping geographical distributions make it unlikely that they evolved independently. The similarities in the manufacture method of each design further suggest that pandanus tools have gone through a process of cumulative change from a common historical origin. We propose a plausible scenario for this rudimentary cumulative evolution.

  12. Habitat selection and management of the Hawaiian crow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Giffen, J.G.; Scott, J.M.; Mountainspring, S.

    1987-01-01

    The abundance and range of the Hawaiian crow, or alala, (Corvus hawaiiensis) have decreased drastically since the 1890's. Fewer than 10 breeding pairs remained in the wild in 1985. A sample of 82 nests during 1970-82 were used to determine habitat associations. Two hundred firty-nine alala observations were used to estimate densities occurring in different vegetation types in 1978. Compared to available habitat, more nests and higher bird densities during the breeding season occurred in areas where: (1) canopy cover was > 60%; (2) koa (Acacia koa) and ohia (Metrosideros polymorpha) were dominant species in the crown layer; (3) native plants constituted > 75% of the understory cover; and (4) the elevation was 1,100-1,500 m. Compared to breeding habitat, nonbreeding habitat tended to lie at lower elevations and in wetter forests having the crown layer dominated by ohia but lacking koa. Habitat loss is a major factor underlying the decline of this species although predation on fledgings, avian disease, and shooting also have reduced the population. Remaining key habitat areas have little or no legal protection through zoning and land ownership. Preserves should be established to encompass the location of existing pairs and to assure the provision of optimum breeding habitat and suitable nonbreeding habitat.

  13. Susceptibility of Carrion Crows to Experimental Infection with Lineage 1 and 2 West Nile Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Stephanie M.; Brault, Aaron C.; van Amerongen, Geert; Bosco-Lauth, Angela M.; Romo, Hannah; Sewbalaksing, Varsha D.; Bowen, Richard A.; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E.; Koraka, Penelope

    2015-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) outbreaks in North America have been characterized by substantial die-offs of American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos). In contrast, a low incidence of bird deaths has been observed during WNV epidemic activity in Europe. To examine the susceptibility of the western European counterpart of American crows, we inoculated carrion crows (Corvus corone) with WNV strains isolated in Greece (Gr-10), Italy (FIN and Ita09), and Hungary (578/10) and with the highly virulent North American genotype strain (NY99). We also inoculated American crows with a selection of these strains to examine the strains’ virulence in a highly susceptible bird species. Infection with all strains, except WNV FIN, resulted in high rates of death and high-level viremia in both bird species and virus dissemination to several organs. These results suggest that carrion crows are highly susceptible to WNV and may potentially be useful as part of dead bird surveillance for early warning of WNV activity in Europe. PMID:26197093

  14. An Investigation into the Cognition Behind Spontaneous String Pulling in New Caledonian Crows

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Alex H.; Medina, Felipe S.; Holzhaider, Jennifer C.; Hearne, Lindsay J.; Hunt, Gavin R.; Gray, Russell D.

    2010-01-01

    The ability of some bird species to pull up meat hung on a string is a famous example of spontaneous animal problem solving. The “insight” hypothesis claims that this complex behaviour is based on cognitive abilities such as mental scenario building and imagination. An operant conditioning account, in contrast, would claim that this spontaneity is due to each action in string pulling being reinforced by the meat moving closer and remaining closer to the bird on the perch. We presented experienced and naïve New Caledonian crows with a novel, visually restricted string-pulling problem that reduced the quality of visual feedback during string pulling. Experienced crows solved this problem with reduced efficiency and increased errors compared to their performance in standard string pulling. Naïve crows either failed or solved the problem by trial and error learning. However, when visual feedback was available via a mirror mounted next to the apparatus, two naïve crows were able to perform at the same level as the experienced group. Our results raise the possibility that spontaneous string pulling in New Caledonian crows may not be based on insight but on operant conditioning mediated by a perceptual-motor feedback cycle. PMID:20179759

  15. DNA Vaccine for West Nile Virus Infection in Fish Crows (Corvus ossifragus)

    PubMed Central

    Bunning, Michel; Ludwig, George V.; Ortman, Brian; Chang, Jeff; Speaker, Tully; Spielman, Andrew; McLean, Robert; Komar, Nicholas; Gates, Robert; McNamara, Tracey; Creekmore, Terry; Farley, Linda; Mitchell, Carl J.

    2003-01-01

    A DNA vaccine for West Nile virus (WNV) was evaluated to determine whether its use could protect fish crows (Corvus ossifragus) from fatal WNV infection. Captured adult crows were given 0.5 mg of the DNA vaccine either orally or by intramuscular (IM) inoculation; control crows were inoculated or orally exposed to a placebo. After 6 weeks, crows were challenged subcutaneously with 105 plaque-forming units of WNV (New York 1999 strain). None of the placebo inoculated–placebo challenged birds died. While none of the 9 IM vaccine–inoculated birds died, 5 of 10 placebo-inoculated and 4 of 8 orally vaccinated birds died within 15 days after challenge. Peak viremia titers in birds with fatal WNV infection were substantially higher than those in birds that survived infection. Although oral administration of a single DNA vaccine dose failed to elicit an immune response or protect crows from WNV infection, IM administration of a single dose prevented death and was associated with reduced viremia. PMID:14519243

  16. Susceptibility of Carrion Crows to Experimental Infection with Lineage 1 and 2 West Nile Viruses.

    PubMed

    Lim, Stephanie M; Brault, Aaron C; van Amerongen, Geert; Bosco-Lauth, Angela M; Romo, Hannah; Sewbalaksing, Varsha D; Bowen, Richard A; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Koraka, Penelope; Martina, Byron E E

    2015-08-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) outbreaks in North America have been characterized by substantial die-offs of American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos). In contrast, a low incidence of bird deaths has been observed during WNV epidemic activity in Europe. To examine the susceptibility of the western European counterpart of American crows, we inoculated carrion crows (Corvus corone) with WNV strains isolated in Greece (Gr-10), Italy (FIN and Ita09), and Hungary (578/10) and with the highly virulent North American genotype strain (NY99). We also inoculated American crows with a selection of these strains to examine the strains' virulence in a highly susceptible bird species. Infection with all strains, except WNV FIN, resulted in high rates of death and high-level viremia in both bird species and virus dissemination to several organs. These results suggest that carrion crows are highly susceptible to WNV and may potentially be useful as part of dead bird surveillance for early warning of WNV activity in Europe.

  17. [Solution of trap tube test by hooded crows (Corvus cornix L.)].

    PubMed

    Bagotskaia, M S; Smirnova, A A; Zorina, Z A

    2013-01-01

    Eight hooded crows (Corvus cornix L.) were tested for their ability to use a piston (a stick with two attached clear plates between which the food is enclosed such that moving the stick would move the food) to get the reward out of a transparent tube avoiding a trap. Six out of eight crows learned to use a piston to extract a food reward from a transparent non-trap tube. One out of these six birds successfully performed the task in which it had to avoid a trap to retrieve a reward, in the first trial showing spontaneous comprehending of the task structure. Four crows learned to perform this task using the trial-and-error method. To find out a mechanism these crows used to perform the task, birds were presented with two transfer tasks (tests) in which we changed the relative positions of components in the apparatus. We found out that crows performed transfer tasks using rather concrete rules than immediate estimation of the relative positions of the components in the apparatus.

  18. Associative learning rapidly establishes neuronal representations of upcoming behavioral choices in crows.

    PubMed

    Veit, Lena; Pidpruzhnykova, Galyna; Nieder, Andreas

    2015-12-08

    The ability to form associations between behaviorally relevant sensory stimuli is fundamental for goal-directed behaviors. We investigated neuronal activity in the telencephalic area nidopallium caudolaterale (NCL) while two crows (Corvus corone) performed a delayed association task. Whereas some paired associates were familiar to the crows, novel associations had to be learned and mapped to the same target stimuli within a single session. We found neurons that prospectively encoded the chosen test item during the delay for both familiar and newly learned associations. These neurons increased their selectivity during learning in parallel with the crows' increased behavioral performance. Thus, sustained activity in the NCL actively processes information for the upcoming behavioral choice. These data provide new insights into memory representations of behaviorally meaningful stimuli in birds, and how such representations are formed during learning. The findings suggest that the NCL plays a role in learning arbitrary associations, a cornerstone of corvids' remarkable behavioral flexibility and adaptability.

  19. An end to insight? New Caledonian crows can spontaneously solve problems without planning their actions.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Alex H; Knaebe, Brenna; Gray, Russell D

    2012-12-22

    Animals rarely solve problems spontaneously. Some bird species, however, can immediately find a solution to the string-pulling problem. They are able to rapidly gain access to food hung on the end of a long string by repeatedly pulling and then stepping on the string. It is currently unclear whether these spontaneous solutions are produced by insight or by a perceptual-motor feedback loop. Here, we presented New Caledonian crows and humans with a novel horizontal string-pulling task. While the humans succeeded, no individual crow showed a significant preference for the connected string, and all but one failed to gain the food even once. These results clearly show that string pulling in New Caledonian crows is generated not by insight, but by perceptual feedback. Animals can spontaneously solve problems without planning their actions.

  20. Associative learning rapidly establishes neuronal representations of upcoming behavioral choices in crows

    PubMed Central

    Veit, Lena; Pidpruzhnykova, Galyna; Nieder, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The ability to form associations between behaviorally relevant sensory stimuli is fundamental for goal-directed behaviors. We investigated neuronal activity in the telencephalic area nidopallium caudolaterale (NCL) while two crows (Corvus corone) performed a delayed association task. Whereas some paired associates were familiar to the crows, novel associations had to be learned and mapped to the same target stimuli within a single session. We found neurons that prospectively encoded the chosen test item during the delay for both familiar and newly learned associations. These neurons increased their selectivity during learning in parallel with the crows' increased behavioral performance. Thus, sustained activity in the NCL actively processes information for the upcoming behavioral choice. These data provide new insights into memory representations of behaviorally meaningful stimuli in birds, and how such representations are formed during learning. The findings suggest that the NCL plays a role in learning arbitrary associations, a cornerstone of corvids’ remarkable behavioral flexibility and adaptability. PMID:26598669

  1. Prion Remains Infectious after Passage through Digestive System of American Crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos)

    PubMed Central

    VerCauteren, Kurt C.; Pilon, John L.; Nash, Paul B.; Phillips, Gregory E.; Fischer, Justin W.

    2012-01-01

    Avian scavengers, such as American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos), have potential to translocate infectious agents (prions) of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) diseases including chronic wasting disease, scrapie, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy. We inoculated mice with fecal extracts obtained from 20 American crows that were force-fed material infected with RML-strain scrapie prions. These mice all evinced severe neurological dysfunction 196–231 d postinoculation ( = 198; 95% CI: 210–216) and tested positive for prion disease. Our results suggest a large proportion of crows that consume prion-positive tissue are capable of passing infectious prions in their feces ( = 1.0; 95% CI: 0.8–1.0). Therefore, this common, migratory North American scavenger could play a role in the geographic spread of TSE diseases. PMID:23082115

  2. An end to insight? New Caledonian crows can spontaneously solve problems without planning their actions

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Alex H.; Knaebe, Brenna; Gray, Russell D.

    2012-01-01

    Animals rarely solve problems spontaneously. Some bird species, however, can immediately find a solution to the string-pulling problem. They are able to rapidly gain access to food hung on the end of a long string by repeatedly pulling and then stepping on the string. It is currently unclear whether these spontaneous solutions are produced by insight or by a perceptual-motor feedback loop. Here, we presented New Caledonian crows and humans with a novel horizontal string-pulling task. While the humans succeeded, no individual crow showed a significant preference for the connected string, and all but one failed to gain the food even once. These results clearly show that string pulling in New Caledonian crows is generated not by insight, but by perceptual feedback. Animals can spontaneously solve problems without planning their actions. PMID:23097511

  3. Prevalence and pathogenic potential of campylobacter isolates from free-living, human-commensal american crows.

    PubMed

    Weis, Allison M; Miller, Woutrina A; Byrne, Barbara A; Chouicha, Nadira; Boyce, Walter M; Townsend, Andrea K

    2014-03-01

    Recent studies have suggested a potential role for wild birds in zoonotic transmission of Campylobacter jejuni, the leading cause of gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. In this study, we detected Campylobacter spp. in 66.9% (85/127) of free-ranging American crows (Corvus brachyrhyncos) sampled in the Sacramento Valley of California in 2012 and 2013. Biochemical testing and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA revealed that 93% of isolates (n = 70) were C. jejuni, with cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and flagellin A genes detected by PCR in 20% and 46% of the C. jejuni isolates (n = 59), respectively. The high prevalence of C. jejuni, coupled with the occurrence of known virulence markers CDT and flagellin A, demonstrates that crows shed Campylobacter spp. in their feces that are potentially pathogenic to humans. Crows are abundant in urban, suburban, and agricultural settings, and thus further study to determine their role in zoonotic transmission of Campylobacter will inform public health.

  4. Prevalence and Pathogenic Potential of Campylobacter Isolates from Free-Living, Human-Commensal American Crows

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Allison M.; Miller, Woutrina A.; Byrne, Barbara A.; Chouicha, Nadira; Boyce, Walter M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested a potential role for wild birds in zoonotic transmission of Campylobacter jejuni, the leading cause of gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. In this study, we detected Campylobacter spp. in 66.9% (85/127) of free-ranging American crows (Corvus brachyrhyncos) sampled in the Sacramento Valley of California in 2012 and 2013. Biochemical testing and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA revealed that 93% of isolates (n = 70) were C. jejuni, with cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and flagellin A genes detected by PCR in 20% and 46% of the C. jejuni isolates (n = 59), respectively. The high prevalence of C. jejuni, coupled with the occurrence of known virulence markers CDT and flagellin A, demonstrates that crows shed Campylobacter spp. in their feces that are potentially pathogenic to humans. Crows are abundant in urban, suburban, and agricultural settings, and thus further study to determine their role in zoonotic transmission of Campylobacter will inform public health. PMID:24375131

  5. Bilateral innervation of syringeal muscles by the hypoglossal nucleus in the jungle crow (Corvus macrorhynchos)

    PubMed Central

    Tsukahara, Naoki; Kamata, Naoki; Nagasawa, Miyuki; Sugita, Shoei

    2009-01-01

    Bird vocalizations are produced by contractions of syringeal muscles, which are controlled by the hypoglossal nucleus. In oscines, syringeal muscles are controlled by the hypoglossal nucleus ipsilaterally, whereas syringeal innervation is bilateral in non-oscines. We have determined the course of hypoglossal nerves in the jungle crow Corvus macrorhynchos. Our results indicate a cross-over of the hypoglossal nerve from the left side to the right side on the trachea 7 mm rostral to theMusculus sternotrachealis. We also investigated the innervation of the syringeal muscles of jungle crows from the hypoglossal nucleus using the horseradish peroxidase (HRP) method. After HRP was injected into the syringeal muscles on each side, HRP-labeled cells were found bilaterally in the hypoglossal nerve. These results suggest that the syringeal muscles of jungle crows are innervated bilaterally from the hypoglossal nucleus, although these birds are categorized as oscines. PMID:19490396

  6. Prion remains infectious after passage through digestive system of American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos).

    PubMed

    VerCauteren, Kurt C; Pilon, John L; Nash, Paul B; Phillips, Gregory E; Fischer, Justin W

    2012-01-01

    Avian scavengers, such as American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos), have potential to translocate infectious agents (prions) of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) diseases including chronic wasting disease, scrapie, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy. We inoculated mice with fecal extracts obtained from 20 American crows that were force-fed material infected with RML-strain scrapie prions. These mice all evinced severe neurological dysfunction 196-231 d postinoculation (x =198; 95% CI: 210-216) and tested positive for prion disease. Our results suggest a large proportion of crows that consume prion-positive tissue are capable of passing infectious prions in their feces (ˆp=1.0; 95% CI: 0.8-1.0). Therefore, this common, migratory North American scavenger could play a role in the geographic spread of TSE diseases.

  7. Factors associated with the risk of West Nile Virus among crows in New York State

    PubMed Central

    DeCarlo, C. H.; Clark, A. B.; McGowan, K. J.; Ziegler, P. E.; Glaser, A. L.; Szonyi, B.; Mohammed, H. O.

    2010-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is transmitted between avian hosts in enzootic cycles by a mosquito vector. The virus has significant disease effects on humans and equines when it bridges into an epizootic cycle. Since the initial epidemic of WNV in 1999, perennial outbreaks in New York State suggest the local establishment of natural foci with perpetuation of the virus among susceptible hosts rather than reintroduction of the virus. The factors that play a role in the perpetuation of the virus are not fully understood. American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) are known to be highly susceptible to infection with the virus. We investigate the factors that put crows at risk of infection in Tompkins County, New York during the period of 2000 through 2008 in a case-control study. Cases were crow carcasses that were found dead and tested positive for WNV using real time reverse transcription (RT-PCR) or VecTestR. Data on putative risk factors were collected and assessed for significance of association with the presence of WNV using logistic regression analysis to evaluate the significance of each factor while simultaneously controlling for the effect of others. The risk of a crow carcass testing WNV positive varied with age, season of the year, and ecological area where the carcass was found. Crows that were more than one year old were 4 times more likely to be WNV positive in comparison to birds that were less than one year of age. It was three times more likely to find WNV positive carcasses in residential areas in comparison to rural areas. The risk of testing WNV positive did not vary by sex of the crow carcasses. PMID:20707862

  8. Factors associated with the risk of West Nile virus among crows in New York State.

    PubMed

    DeCarlo, C H; Clark, A B; McGowan, K J; Ziegler, P E; Glaser, A L; Szonyi, B; Mohammed, H O

    2011-06-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is transmitted between avian hosts in enzootic cycles by a mosquito vector. The virus has significant disease effects on humans and equines when it bridges into an epizootic cycle. As the initial epidemic of WNV in 1999, perennial outbreaks in New York State suggest the local establishment of natural foci with perpetuation of the virus among susceptible hosts rather than reintroduction of the virus. The factors that play a role in the perpetuation of the virus are not fully understood. American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) are known to be highly susceptible to infection with the virus. We investigate the factors that put crows at risk of infection in Tompkins County, New York during the period of 2000-2008 in a case-control study. Cases were crow carcasses that were found dead and tested positive for WNV using real time reverse transcription or VecTest. Data on putative risk factors were collected and assessed for significance of association with the presence of WNV using logistic regression analysis to evaluate the significance of each factor while simultaneously controlling for the effect of others. The risk of a crow carcass testing WNV positive varied with age, season of the year and ecological area where the carcass was found. Crows that were more than 1-year-old were four times more likely to be WNV positive in comparison to birds that were less than 1 year of age. It was three times more likely to find WNV positive carcasses in residential areas in comparison to rural areas. The risk of testing WNV positive did not vary by sex of the crow carcasses. © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. Hook tool manufacture in New Caledonian crows: behavioural variation and the influence of raw materials.

    PubMed

    Klump, Barbara C; Sugasawa, Shoko; St Clair, James J H; Rutz, Christian

    2015-11-18

    New Caledonian crows use a range of foraging tools, and are the only non-human species known to craft hooks. Based on a small number of observations, their manufacture of hooked stick tools has previously been described as a complex, multi-stage process. Tool behaviour is shaped by genetic predispositions, individual and social learning, and/or ecological influences, but disentangling the relative contributions of these factors remains a major research challenge. The properties of raw materials are an obvious, but largely overlooked, source of variation in tool-manufacture behaviour. We conducted experiments with wild-caught New Caledonian crows, to assess variation in their hooked stick tool making, and to investigate how raw-material properties affect the manufacture process. In Experiment 1, we showed that New Caledonian crows' manufacture of hooked stick tools can be much more variable than previously thought (85 tools by 18 subjects), and can involve two newly-discovered behaviours: 'pulling' for detaching stems and bending of the tool shaft. Crows' tool manufactures varied significantly: in the number of different action types employed; in the time spent processing the hook and bending the tool shaft; and in the structure of processing sequences. In Experiment 2, we examined the interaction of crows with raw materials of different properties, using a novel paradigm that enabled us to determine subjects' rank-ordered preferences (42 tools by 7 subjects). Plant properties influenced: the order in which crows selected stems; whether a hooked tool was manufactured; the time required to release a basic tool; and, possibly, the release technique, the number of behavioural actions, and aspects of processing behaviour. Results from Experiment 2 suggested that at least part of the natural behavioural variation observed in Experiment 1 is due to the effect of raw-material properties. Our discovery of novel manufacture behaviours indicates a plausible scenario for the

  10. The evolutionary origins and ecological context of tool use in New Caledonian crows.

    PubMed

    Rutz, Christian; St Clair, James J H

    2012-02-01

    New Caledonian (NC) crows Corvus moneduloides are the most prolific avian tool users. In the wild, they use at least three distinct tool types to extract invertebrate prey from deadwood and vegetation, with some of their tools requiring complex manufacture, modification and/or deployment. Experiments with captive-bred, hand-raised NC crows have demonstrated that the species has a strong genetic predisposition for basic tool use and manufacture, suggesting that this behaviour is an evolved adaptation. This view is supported by recent stable-isotope analyses of the diets of wild crows, which revealed that tool use provides access to highly profitable hidden prey, with preliminary data indicating that parents preferentially feed their offspring with tool-derived food. Building on this work, our review examines the possible evolutionary origins of these birds' remarkable tool-use behaviour. Whilst robust comparative analyses are impossible, given the phylogenetic rarity of animal tool use, our examination of a wide range of circumstantial evidence enables a first attempt at reconstructing a plausible evolutionary scenario. We suggest that a common ancestor of NC crows, originating from a (probably) non-tool-using South-East Asian or Australasian crow population, colonised New Caledonia after its last emersion several million years ago. The presence of profitable but out-of-reach food, in combination with a lack of direct competition for these resources, resulted in a vacant woodpecker-like niche. Crows may have possessed certain behavioural and/or morphological features upon their arrival that predisposed them to express tool-use rather than specialised prey-excavation behaviour, although it is possible that woodpecker-like foraging preceded tool use. Low levels of predation risk may have further facilitated tool-use behaviour, by allowing greater expenditure of time and energy on object interaction and exploration, as well as the evolution of a 'slow' life-history, in

  11. The hooded crow (Corvus cornix) as an environmental bioindicator species of heavy metal contamination.

    PubMed

    Giammarino, Mauro; Quatto, Piero; Squadrone, Stefania; Abete, Maria Cesarina

    2014-10-01

    This study aims to examine the possible presence of lead and cadmium in the liver and kidneys of hooded crows (Corvus cornix). Liver and kidneys of hooded crow carcasses were collected in Province of Cuneo (Piedmont, Italy) in order to detect lead and cadmium content. Significant differences were found in lead and cadmium levels between areas of intensive cultivation versus areas where meadows are prevalent. Moreover, age greatly influenced the burden of heavy metals, while sex did not seem to affect the level of contamination. The source of contamination may be phosphate fertilizers used for intensive cultivation in the study area.

  12. The Freudian subject and the Maoist mind: the diaries of Hermine Hug-Hellmuth and Lei Feng.

    PubMed

    Larson, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    Although written in vastly different cultural contexts and periods, Hermine Hug-Hellmuth's "Diary of a Young Girl" (1919) and Lei Feng's "The Diary of Lei Feng" (1963) both to a large extent were written as concept pieces, with the goal of illustrating specific theories of the self. In the case of Hug-Hellmuth, the underlying theory is the Freudian sexualized unconscious mind, whereas for Lei Feng, it is Maoist revolutionary optimism. Additionally, both diaries have unusually strong inauthentic or 'fake' aspects. Although Hug-Hellmuth never admitted to writing the diary, most critics believed it came from her pen. Lei Feng's diary was revised through his own attempts to present himself as politically progressive, by editors, and through successive political movements that focused on the person behind the diary and made him one of the most widely-recognized figures in China. As such, the diaries are excellent windows into powerful and long-lasting ideological constructs.

  13. Complete genome sequence of the commensal Streptococcus salivarius strain JIM8777.

    PubMed

    Guédon, Eric; Delorme, Christine; Pons, Nicolas; Cruaud, Corinne; Loux, Valentin; Couloux, Arnaud; Gautier, Céline; Sanchez, Nicolas; Layec, Séverine; Galleron, Nathalie; Almeida, Mathieu; van de Guchte, Maarten; Kennedy, Sean P; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Gibrat, Jean-François; Wincker, Patrick; Renault, Pierre

    2011-09-01

    The commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius is a prevalent species of the human oropharyngeal tract with an important role in oral ecology. Here, we report the complete 2.2-Mb genome sequence and annotation of strain JIM8777, which was recently isolated from the oral cavity of a healthy, dentate infant. Copyright © 2011, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Can Inclusion Work? A Conversation with Jim Kauffman and Mara Sapon-Shevin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, John

    1995-01-01

    Mara Sapon-Shevin and Jim Kauffman debate the potential and pitfalls of the inclusion movement. Sapon-Shevin enumerates the benefits of inclusion accompanied by adequate resources, support and commitment, teacher preparation time, restructuring, and staff development. Kauffman insists that alternative settings are necessary for some students and…

  15. Jim Starnes' Contributions to Residual Strength Analysis Methods for Metallic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Richard D.; Rose, Cheryl A.; Harris, Charles E.

    2005-01-01

    A summary of advances in residual strength analyses methods for metallic structures that were realized under the leadership of Dr. James H. Starnes, Jr., is presented. The majority of research led by Dr. Starnes in this area was conducted in the 1990's under the NASA Airframe Structural Integrity Program (NASIP). Dr. Starnes, respectfully referred to herein as Jim, had a passion for studying complex response phenomena and dedicated a significant amount of research effort toward advancing damage tolerance and residual strength analysis methods for metallic structures. Jim's efforts were focused on understanding damage propagation in built-up fuselage structure with widespread fatigue damage, with the goal of ensuring safety in the aging international commercial transport fleet. Jim's major contributions in this research area were in identifying the effects of combined internal pressure and mechanical loads, and geometric nonlinearity, on the response of built-up structures with damage. Analytical and experimental technical results are presented to demonstrate the breadth and rigor of the research conducted in this technical area. Technical results presented herein are drawn exclusively from papers where Jim was a co-author.

  16. Humility, Will, and Level 5 Leadership: An Interview with Jim Collins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosnan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Organizational expert, Jim Collins, is the author of "Good to Great" (2001) and "How the Mighty Fall" (2009) and coauthor of "Great by Choice" (2011). Collins also authored a monograph entitled, "Good to Great and the Social Sectors," and presented his findings at the 2007 NAIS Conference. Recently, Collins…

  17. An Introductory Reader to the Writings of Jim Cummins. Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Colin, Ed.; Hornberger, Nancy H., Ed.

    This book contains 19 readings covering three decades of the work of academic Jim Cummins. Section 1, "The 1970s," includes: "A Theoretical Perspective on the Relationship between Bilingualism and Thought"; "The Influence of Bilingualism on Cognitive Growth: An Synthesis of Research Findings and Explanatory…

  18. Multiple Perspectivism in James Welch's "Winter in the Blood" and "The Death of Jim Loney"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Sidner

    2007-01-01

    James Welch's "Winter in the Blood" (1974) and "The Death of Jim Loney" (1979) are excellent examples of work that remains essentially misunderstood throughout some three decades of interpretation. Attempts to define these two books in terms of mainstream modernism notwithstanding, they represent a phenomenon not unlike aspects of American folk…

  19. Humility, Will, and Level 5 Leadership: An Interview with Jim Collins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosnan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Organizational expert, Jim Collins, is the author of "Good to Great" (2001) and "How the Mighty Fall" (2009) and coauthor of "Great by Choice" (2011). Collins also authored a monograph entitled, "Good to Great and the Social Sectors," and presented his findings at the 2007 NAIS Conference. Recently, Collins…

  20. Selected Essays of Jim W. Corder: Pursuing the Personal in Scholarship, Teaching, and Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumlin, James S.; Miller, Keith D.

    2004-01-01

    Recent, renewed interest in the personal in writing and teaching suggests that the late Jim Corder still has much to tell us. Editors James Baumlin and Keith Miller argue that Corder's yet-to-be-absorbed theory and scholarly praxis can contribute significantly to current debates in composition studies, especially because Corder struggles to move…

  1. Can Inclusion Work? A Conversation with Jim Kauffman and Mara Sapon-Shevin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, John

    1995-01-01

    Mara Sapon-Shevin and Jim Kauffman debate the potential and pitfalls of the inclusion movement. Sapon-Shevin enumerates the benefits of inclusion accompanied by adequate resources, support and commitment, teacher preparation time, restructuring, and staff development. Kauffman insists that alternative settings are necessary for some students and…

  2. Multiple Perspectivism in James Welch's "Winter in the Blood" and "The Death of Jim Loney"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Sidner

    2007-01-01

    James Welch's "Winter in the Blood" (1974) and "The Death of Jim Loney" (1979) are excellent examples of work that remains essentially misunderstood throughout some three decades of interpretation. Attempts to define these two books in terms of mainstream modernism notwithstanding, they represent a phenomenon not unlike aspects of American folk…

  3. An Introductory Reader to the Writings of Jim Cummins. Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Colin, Ed.; Hornberger, Nancy H., Ed.

    This book contains 19 readings covering three decades of the work of academic Jim Cummins. Section 1, "The 1970s," includes: "A Theoretical Perspective on the Relationship between Bilingualism and Thought"; "The Influence of Bilingualism on Cognitive Growth: An Synthesis of Research Findings and Explanatory…

  4. Complete genome sequence of the pigmented Streptococcus thermophilus strain JIM8232.

    PubMed

    Delorme, Christine; Bartholini, Claire; Luraschi, Mélanie; Pons, Nicolas; Loux, Valentin; Almeida, Mathieu; Guédon, Eric; Gibrat, Jean-François; Renault, Pierre

    2011-10-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus is a dairy species commonly used in the manufacture of cheese and yogurt. Here, we report the complete sequence of S. thermophilus strain JIM8232, isolated from milk and which produces a yellow pigment, an atypical trait for this bacterium.

  5. Selected Essays of Jim W. Corder: Pursuing the Personal in Scholarship, Teaching, and Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumlin, James S.; Miller, Keith D.

    2004-01-01

    Recent, renewed interest in the personal in writing and teaching suggests that the late Jim Corder still has much to tell us. Editors James Baumlin and Keith Miller argue that Corder's yet-to-be-absorbed theory and scholarly praxis can contribute significantly to current debates in composition studies, especially because Corder struggles to move…

  6. Translating African-American Vernacular English into German: The Problem of "Jim" in Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berthele, Raphael

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the most important problem translators are faced with when translating Mark Twain's "Huckleberry Finn" into German: how can the speech of The African-American Jim be rendered? Examines both orthographic and other linguistic strategies that have been used to differentiate Jim's voice over the last hundred years. (Author/VWL)

  7. Translating African-American Vernacular English into German: The Problem of "Jim" in Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berthele, Raphael

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the most important problem translators are faced with when translating Mark Twain's "Huckleberry Finn" into German: how can the speech of The African-American Jim be rendered? Examines both orthographic and other linguistic strategies that have been used to differentiate Jim's voice over the last hundred years. (Author/VWL)

  8. Preserving Old Ways the Modern Way: Red Crow Uses GIS, GPS to Document Traditional Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fat, Mary Weasel

    2004-01-01

    The article report that Red Crow Community College has created a unique, one-year certificate program that will train students to compile and document Kainai traditional knowledge. The program called the First Nations' Land Use Certificate Program accepted its first 16 students in January 2004 at the college, which is located on the Blood Reserve…

  9. WESTERN RESEARCH INSTITUTE CONTAINED RECOVERY OF OILY WASTES (CROW) PROCESS - ITER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the findings of an evaluation of the Contained Recovery of Oily Wastes (CROW) technology developed by the Western Research Institute. The process involves the injection of heated water into the subsurface to mobilize oily wastes, which are removed from the ...

  10. Hydraulic modeling of stream channels and structures in Harbor and Crow Hollow Brooks, Meriden, Connecticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weiss, Lawrence A.; Sears, Michael P.; Cervione, Michael A.

    1994-01-01

    Effects of urbanization have increased the frequency and size of floods along certain reaches of Harbor Brook and Crow Hollow Brook in Meriden, Conn. A floodprofile-modeling study was conducted to model the effects of selected channel and structural modifications on flood elevations and inundated areas. The study covered the reach of Harbor Brook downstream from Interstate 691 and the reach of Crow Hollow Brook downstream from Johnson Avenue. Proposed modifications, which include changes to bank heights, channel geometry, structural geometry, and streambed armoring on Harbor Brook and changes to bank heights on Crow Hollow Brook, significantly lower flood elevations. Results of the modeling indicate a significant reduction of flood elevations for the 10-year, 25-year, 35-year, 50-year, and 100-year flood frequencies using proposed modifications to (1 ) bank heights between Harbor Brook Towers and Interstate 691 on Harbor Brook, and between Centennial Avenue and Johnson Avenue on Crow Hollow Brook; (2) channel geometry between Coe Avenue and Interstate 69 1 on Harbor Brook; (3) bridge and culvert opening geometry between Harbor Brook Towers and Interstate 691 on Harbor Brook; and (4) channel streambed armoring between Harbor Brook Towers and Interstate 691 on Harbor Brook. The proposed modifications were developed without consideration of cost-benefit ratios.

  11. Reconciling traditional knowledge, food security, and climate change: experience from Old Crow, YT, Canada.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Vasiliki; Chan, Hing Man; Wesche, Sonia; Dickson, Cindy; Kassi, Norma; Netro, Lorraine; Williams, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Because of a lack of transportation infrastructure, Old Crow has the highest food costs and greatest reliance on traditional food species for sustenance of any community in Canada's Yukon Territory. Environmental, cultural, and economic change are driving increased perception of food insecurity in Old Crow. To address community concerns regarding food security and supply in Old Crow and develop adaptation strategies to ameliorate their impact on the community. A community adaptation workshop was held on October 13, 2009, in which representatives of different stakeholders in the community discussed a variety of food security issues facing Old Crow and how they could be dealt with. Workshop data were analyzed using keyword, subject, and narrative analysis techniques to determine community priorities in food security and adaptation. Community concern is high and favored adaptation options include agriculture, improved food storage, and conservation through increased traditional education. These results were presented to the community for review and revision, after which the Vuntut Gwitchin Government will integrate them into its ongoing adaptation planning measures.

  12. Brain imaging reveals neuronal circuitry underlying the crow's perception of human faces.

    PubMed

    Marzluff, John M; Miyaoka, Robert; Minoshima, Satoshi; Cross, Donna J

    2012-09-25

    Crows pay close attention to people and can remember specific faces for several years after a single encounter. In mammals, including humans, faces are evaluated by an integrated neural system involving the sensory cortex, limbic system, and striatum. Here we test the hypothesis that birds use a similar system by providing an imaging analysis of an awake, wild animal's brain as it performs an adaptive, complex cognitive task. We show that in vivo imaging of crow brain activity during exposure to familiar human faces previously associated with either capture (threatening) or caretaking (caring) activated several brain regions that allow birds to discriminate, associate, and remember visual stimuli, including the rostral hyperpallium, nidopallium, mesopallium, and lateral striatum. Perception of threatening faces activated circuitry including amygdalar, thalamic, and brainstem regions, known in humans and other vertebrates to be related to emotion, motivation, and conditioned fear learning. In contrast, perception of caring faces activated motivation and striatal regions. In our experiments and in nature, when perceiving a threatening face, crows froze and fixed their gaze (decreased blink rate), which was associated with activation of brain regions known in birds to regulate perception, attention, fear, and escape behavior. These findings indicate that, similar to humans, crows use sophisticated visual sensory systems to recognize faces and modulate behavioral responses by integrating visual information with expectation and emotion. Our approach has wide applicability and potential to improve our understanding of the neural basis for animal behavior.

  13. Stratigraphic Context of Old Crow Tephra, Holitna Lowland, Interior Southwest Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, C.F.; Lea, P.D.; Walter, R.C.

    1993-01-01

    A thick deposit of Old Crow tephra was discovered in a bluff exposure along the middle Holitna River near the Kulukbuk Hills (61??20???N latitude, 157??10???W longitude) in interior southwest Alaska. This locality is the southwesternmost-known deposit of Old Crow tephra in Alaska. Thickness and grain-size data from this site support a source volcano in the eastern Aleutian arc. Pleistocene stratigraphic sequences in the lowland are dominated by upward-fining eolian sand-sheet deposits and loess separated by organic silt. These deposits record at least two episodes of regional glaciation and an intervening nonglacial period (marine oxygen isotope stage 3, stage 5, or both). Old Crow tephra crops out near the top of the lower upward-fining eolian unit, indicating that the ash erupted near the end of an interval of periglacial eolian sedimentation. The sequence of eolian deposits that contain Old Crow tephra probably accumulated during the latter part of marine oxygen isotope stage 6, whereas the overlying eolian sequence formed during the last glaciation (stage 2). This stratigraphic position is consistent with other stratigraphic contexts for the tephra and with fission-track and thermoluminescence ages of ca. 140,000 ?? 10,000 yr B.P.

  14. WESTERN RESEARCH INSTITUTE CONTAINED RECOVERY OF OILY WASTES (CROW) PROCESS - ITER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the findings of an evaluation of the Contained Recovery of Oily Wastes (CROW) technology developed by the Western Research Institute. The process involves the injection of heated water into the subsurface to mobilize oily wastes, which are removed from the ...

  15. The variety and nutritional value of foods consumed by Hawaiian crow nestlings, an endangered species

    Treesearch

    H.F. Sakai; J.R. Carpenter

    1990-01-01

    Research was conducted to determine the food habits of Hawaiian Crow (Corvus hawaiiensis) nestlings, variety of food items ingested relative to their age, and the nutritional composition of ingested fruits. Knowledge of the fruits’ nutritive value and the nestlings’ diet allowed us to determine what plants best meet nutritional...

  16. Lateralization of Auditory Language: An EEG Study of Bilingual Crow Indian Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vocate, Donna R.

    A study was undertaken to learn whether involvement of the brain's right hemisphere in auditory language processing, a phenomenon found in a previous study of Crow-English bilinguals, was language-specific. Alpha blocking response as measured by electroencephalography (EEG) was used as an indicator of brain activity. It was predicted that (1)…

  17. Self-Rehabilitation of a Captive American Crow at Binghamton Zoo.

    PubMed

    Davie, Clara; Clark, Anne B

    2017-01-01

    The behavioral transition from an entirely unflighted-to-flighted, female yearling American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) in captivity in a specially designed exhibit was documented at the Binghamton Zoo at Ross Park in Binghamton, NY. Upon arrival, the focal crow had no complete primary feathers or retrices and had been in captivity since fledging. She apparently had never flown successfully and was using her legs and an abnormal body orientation to cushion her landing on the ground. In a social and physical environment with 3 flying companion crows and staggered perches, she developed and appeared to "practice" routines that ultimately resulted in her recovering normal body posture and flight ability. The crow's practice routine was recorded during daily observations using an ethogram of social and locomotor behaviors. Both enclosure design and the social environment may have provided an ideal setting for the self-motivation of practice and this recovery. Attention to the potential for such practice could facilitate rehabilitation in individuals for whom rehabilitation was not thought possible.

  18. 30 CFR 756.21 - Required amendments to the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... abandoned mine land reclamation plan. 756.21 Section 756.21 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INDIAN LANDS PROGRAM INDIAN TRIBE ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION PROGRAMS § 756.21 Required amendments to the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan...

  19. 30 CFR 756.21 - Required amendments to the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... abandoned mine land reclamation plan. 756.21 Section 756.21 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INDIAN LANDS PROGRAM INDIAN TRIBE ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION PROGRAMS § 756.21 Required amendments to the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan...

  20. 30 CFR 756.21 - Required amendments to the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... abandoned mine land reclamation plan. 756.21 Section 756.21 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INDIAN LANDS PROGRAM INDIAN TRIBE ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION PROGRAMS § 756.21 Required amendments to the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan...

  1. 30 CFR 756.21 - Required amendments to the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... abandoned mine land reclamation plan. 756.21 Section 756.21 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INDIAN LANDS PROGRAM INDIAN TRIBE ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION PROGRAMS § 756.21 Required amendments to the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan...

  2. The experience of repeated and traumatic loss among Crow Indian children: response patterns and intervention strategies.

    PubMed

    Long, K A

    1983-01-01

    Crow Indian children residing on the Montana Reservation appear to experience traumatic losses of family members and friends with much greater frequency than children in the population at large. Responses to these losses include interpersonal distancing, and sadness without apparent anger. Assessment and clinical intervention are considered within the sociocultural context of Indian child client and white, middle-class clinician.

  3. Education through Communication: Alu'utaashe Crow Develop Model in Bilingual Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merritt, Judy

    1994-01-01

    A bilingual education program developed in Pryor (Montana) for Crow students in grades K-8 emphasizes teaching English within the context of the students' culture and language, promoting an understanding of language usage, and incorporating Native knowledge of science and math in the classroom. (LP)

  4. The Crow Indian Reservation of Montana. Indian Affairs (No. 4). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeHoyos, Genevieve; DeHoyos, Auturo

    As a final report of a survey about manpower potential of the Crow Indian Reservation of Montana, this report gives a description of population characteristics, educational achievement, potential labor force, available skills of the labor force, and present employment conditions of the worker population on the reservation. The report also includes…

  5. School Readiness and Achievement of Crow Indian Children, First Through Fourth Grades, at Pryor, Montana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Joyce Martin

    The study was based on a year's work with Crow Indian children, grades 1-4, at Pryor, Montana. Five tests were given and evaluated: the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale, the Metropolitan Achievement Tests, the Gesell Developmental Examination, the Lowenfeld Mosaic, and 3 selected tasks from Piaget. The 21 pupils used for this study were broken…

  6. Lateralization of Auditory Language: An EEG Study of Bilingual Crow Indian Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vocate, Donna R.

    A study was undertaken to learn whether involvement of the brain's right hemisphere in auditory language processing, a phenomenon found in a previous study of Crow-English bilinguals, was language-specific. Alpha blocking response as measured by electroencephalography (EEG) was used as an indicator of brain activity. It was predicted that (1)…

  7. An Evaluation of the Crow 4-H Program. A Summary Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Robert A.

    In the spring of 1971, pertinent literature was reviewed and a small survey conducted on the Crow Indian Reservation to find more effective ways to develop Indian youth through 4-H programs. Twenty-five people, mostly Indian, were surveyed using a semi-structured interview form. Comments were solicited following each of the structured questions.…

  8. Searching for Structure: Reconstructing Crow Family Life during the Reservation Era.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoxie, Frederick E.

    1991-01-01

    Outlines a method of using census information on residence and marriage among the Crow during the early reservation era (1880-1910) to investigate the persistence of traditional family patterns and the emergence of twentieth-century tribal culture. Contains 19 data tables and figures. (SV)

  9. "A Happiness that Sleeps with Sadness." An Examination of "White Scabs" in Fools Crow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernon, Irene S.

    2005-01-01

    A prolific and popular writer, James Welch has captured the attention of both Native and non-Native readers since his first publication of poems, "Riding the Earthboy," in 1971. One of Welch's stories, "Fools Crow," was of particular interest to this author as an academic researching Native Americans and health. "Fools…

  10. Crows cross-modally recognize group members but not non-group members

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Noriko; Izawa, Ei-Ichi; Watanabe, Shigeru

    2012-01-01

    Recognizing other individuals by integrating different sensory modalities is a crucial ability of social animals, including humans. Although cross-modal individual recognition has been demonstrated in mammals, the extent of its use by birds remains unknown. Herein, we report the first evidence of cross-modal recognition of group members by a highly social bird, the large-billed crow (Corvus macrorhynchos). A cross-modal expectancy violation paradigm was used to test whether crows were sensitive to identity congruence between visual presentation of a group member and the subsequent playback of a contact call. Crows looked more rapidly and for a longer duration when the visual and auditory stimuli were incongruent than when congruent. Moreover, these responses were not observed with non-group member stimuli. These results indicate that crows spontaneously associate visual and auditory information of group members but not of non-group members, which is a demonstration of cross-modal audiovisual recognition of group members in birds. PMID:22217722

  11. Crows cross-modally recognize group members but not non-group members.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Noriko; Izawa, Ei-Ichi; Watanabe, Shigeru

    2012-05-22

    Recognizing other individuals by integrating different sensory modalities is a crucial ability of social animals, including humans. Although cross-modal individual recognition has been demonstrated in mammals, the extent of its use by birds remains unknown. Herein, we report the first evidence of cross-modal recognition of group members by a highly social bird, the large-billed crow (Corvus macrorhynchos). A cross-modal expectancy violation paradigm was used to test whether crows were sensitive to identity congruence between visual presentation of a group member and the subsequent playback of a contact call. Crows looked more rapidly and for a longer duration when the visual and auditory stimuli were incongruent than when congruent. Moreover, these responses were not observed with non-group member stimuli. These results indicate that crows spontaneously associate visual and auditory information of group members but not of non-group members, which is a demonstration of cross-modal audiovisual recognition of group members in birds.

  12. 50 CFR 21.43 - Depredation order for blackbirds, cowbirds, grackles, crows, and magpies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD PERMITS Control of Depredating and Otherwise Injurious Birds § 21.43 Depredation order for blackbirds, cowbirds, grackles, crows, and... migratory birds under the provisions of this section, you must use nontoxic shot or nontoxic bullets to do...

  13. Growth and nutritional state of American Crow nestlings vary between urban and rural habitats.

    PubMed

    Heiss, Rebecca S; Clark, Anne B; McGowan, Kevin J

    2009-06-01

    In urbanized areas, many adult birds find sufficient foods to survive, but the anthropogenic foods that are abundant there may be detrimental to nestling growth. In fact, American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) nestlings are smaller in suburban than rural areas, possibly because of nutrient limitation. Here, we seek to identify possible causes of size differences by comparing both size and blood chemistry measures in rural and suburban crow nestlings. We quantified land use in known crow territories and distinguished three distinct environments: suburban-residential, suburban-managed (e.g., golf courses), and rural. We measured nestlings near fledging age in each environment and bled them for determination of unbound plasma calcium, total protein, and corticosterone. We supplemented a subset of broods in suburban-residential and rural areas with a food high in protein and calcium. Rural nestlings were significantly larger than suburban-residential crows and had higher total serum protein. Nestlings in suburban-managed areas were intermediate in size and serum protein but had the lowest plasma calcium levels. Nestling corticosterone levels did not differ significantly among habitats, indicating that, although suburban nestlings may be food-limited, they were not starving. Supplemented nestlings in suburban-residential areas were significantly larger in some growth measures than their unsupplemented counterparts. Unexpectedly, supplemented rural nestlings were significantly smaller than unsupplemented rural ones, suggesting that parents use easily accessible food even when it is nutritionally suboptimal. Our results indicate that nestlings in suburban areas are nutrient restricted, rather than calorie restricted.

  14. School Readiness and Achievement of Crow Indian Children, First Through Fourth Grades, at Pryor, Montana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Joyce Martin

    The study was based on a year's work with Crow Indian children, grades 1-4, at Pryor, Montana. Five tests were given and evaluated: the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale, the Metropolitan Achievement Tests, the Gesell Developmental Examination, the Lowenfeld Mosaic, and 3 selected tasks from Piaget. The 21 pupils used for this study were broken…

  15. Is caching the key to exclusion in corvids? The case of carrion crows (Corvus corone corone).

    PubMed

    Mikolasch, Sandra; Kotrschal, Kurt; Schloegl, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Recently, two corvid species, food-caching ravens and non-caching jackdaws, have been tested in an exclusion performance (EP) task. While the ravens chose by exclusion, the jackdaws did not. Thus, foraging behaviour may affect EP abilities. To investigate this possibility, another food-caching corvid species, the carrion crow (Corvus corone corone), was tested in the same exclusion task. We hid food under one of two cups and subsequently lifted either both cups, or the baited or the un-baited cup. The crows were significantly above chance when both cups were lifted or when only the baited cup was lifted. When the empty cup was lifted, we found considerable inter-individual variation, with some birds having a significant preference for the un-baited but manipulated cup. In a follow-up task, we always provided the birds with the full information about the food location, but manipulated in which order they saw the hiding or the removal of food. Interestingly, they strongly preferred the cup which was manipulated last, even if it did not contain any food. Therefore, we repeated the first experiment but controlled for the movement of the cups. In this case, more crows found the food reliably in the un-baited condition. We conclude that carrion crows are able to choose by exclusion, but local enhancement has a strong influence on their performance and may overshadow potential inferential abilities. However, these findings support the hypothesis that caching might be a key to exclusion in corvids.

  16. "A Happiness that Sleeps with Sadness." An Examination of "White Scabs" in Fools Crow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernon, Irene S.

    2005-01-01

    A prolific and popular writer, James Welch has captured the attention of both Native and non-Native readers since his first publication of poems, "Riding the Earthboy," in 1971. One of Welch's stories, "Fools Crow," was of particular interest to this author as an academic researching Native Americans and health. "Fools…

  17. Dead Crow Reports and Location of Human West Nile Virus Cases, Chicago, 2002

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Roderick C.; Gibbs, Kevin; Paul, William

    2004-01-01

    During the summer and fall of 2002, an epidemic (223 cases) and epizootic of West Nile virus infections occurred in Chicago. Retrospective spatial analysis demonstrated that age-adjusted human case rates were three times higher inside geographic areas with high early-season crow deaths than outside these areas. PMID:15200837

  18. Preserving Old Ways the Modern Way: Red Crow Uses GIS, GPS to Document Traditional Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fat, Mary Weasel

    2004-01-01

    The article report that Red Crow Community College has created a unique, one-year certificate program that will train students to compile and document Kainai traditional knowledge. The program called the First Nations' Land Use Certificate Program accepted its first 16 students in January 2004 at the college, which is located on the Blood Reserve…

  19. First Results from the Relocated and Enhanced Purple Crow Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, R.; Argall, P. S.; Bandoro, J.; Khanna, J.; McCullough, E. M.; Sica, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    The University of Western Ontario's Purple Crow Lidar (PCL) has been in near continuous operation since 1993 and routinely measures temperature from 10 km to above 100 km, water vapor mixing ratio in the troposphere and stratosphere, as well as aerosol products. The PCL was recently relocated to a new custom-built, environmentally friendly facility at Western's Environmental Research Station located 9 km north of the campus. The PCL move allowed the opportunity for many new and exciting instrumentation upgrades and improvements. Our new transmitter, a Litron Nd:YAG laser, produces 1000 mJ/pulse at 532 nm with a 30 Hz repetition rate (i.e. 30 W). This new laser increases our transmitter power by 2.5 times compared to our previous laser and boosts the PCL's power-aperture product to 160 W/m2. We have also upgraded the counting electronics to improve the vertical height resolution of our Rayleigh temperature from 24 m to 7.5 m and our water vapour, vibrational Raman temperature, and aerosol measurements from 250 m to 24 m. As well, the system is now capable of automatic alignment during operations. The water vapor measurements have been further improved by the addition of a white light calibration source. We are in the process of upgrading the system for more direct aerosol measurements by including a low altitude aerosol channel using a small co-aligned telescope. The enhanced system will have two major impacts on upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere science. First, our new laser will allow our temperature measurements to gain another 10 km in altitude, pushing them at times above 110 km. Second, due to the new inversion method developed by Khanna (2011), an assumption of a seed pressure at the top of the atmosphere will no longer be required, so any systematic retrieval uncertainties will be less than the measurement statistical uncertainty in the lower thermosphere. With the seeding of the temperature profiles now done at the lowest heights (i.e. stratosphere), the

  20. How New Caledonian crows solve novel foraging problems and what it means for cumulative culture.

    PubMed

    Logan, Corina J; Breen, Alexis J; Taylor, Alex H; Gray, Russell D; Hoppitt, William J E

    2016-03-01

    New Caledonian crows make and use tools, and tool types vary over geographic landscapes. Social learning may explain the variation in tool design, but it is unknown to what degree social learning accounts for the maintenance of these designs. Indeed, little is known about the mechanisms these crows use to obtain information from others, despite the question's importance in understanding whether tool behavior is transmitted via social, genetic, or environmental means. For social transmission to account for tool-type variation, copying must utilize a mechanism that is action specific (e.g., pushing left vs. right) as well as context specific (e.g., pushing a particular object vs. any object). To determine whether crows can copy a demonstrator's actions as well as the contexts in which they occur, we conducted a diffusion experiment using a novel foraging task. We used a nontool task to eliminate any confounds introduced by individual differences in their prior tool experience. Two groups had demonstrators (trained in isolation on different options of a four-option task, including a two-action option) and one group did not. We found that crows socially learn about context: After observers see a demonstrator interact with the task, they are more likely to interact with the same parts of the task. In contrast, observers did not copy the demonstrator's specific actions. Our results suggest it is unlikely that observing tool-making behavior transmits tool types. We suggest it is possible that tool types are transmitted when crows copy the physical form of the tools they encounter.

  1. Carrion crows cannot overcome impulsive choice in a quantitative exchange task.

    PubMed

    Wascher, Claudia A F; Dufour, Valerie; Bugnyar, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The ability to control an immediate impulse in return for a more desirable - though delayed - outcome has long been thought to be a uniquely human feature. However, studies on non-human primates revealed that some species are capable of enduring delays in order to get food of higher quality or quantity. Recently two corvid species, common raven (Corvus corax) and carrion crow (Corvus corone corone), exchanged food for a higher quality reward though seemed less capable of enduring delays when exchanging for the same food type in a higher quantity. In the present study, we specifically investigated the ability of carrion crows to overcome an impulsive choice in a quantitative exchange task. After a short delay, individuals were asked to give back an initial reward (cheese) to the human experimenter in order to receive a higher amount of the same reward (two, four, or eight pieces). We tested six captive crows - three individuals never exchanged the initial reward for a higher quantity; the other three birds did exchange though at very low rates. We performed a preference test between one or more pieces of cheese in order to address whether crow poor performance could be due to an inability to discriminate between different quantities or not attributing a higher value to the higher quantities. All birds chose the higher quantities significantly more often, indicating that they can discriminate between quantities and that higher quantities are more desirable. Taken together, these results suggest that, although crows may possess the cognitive abilities to judge quantities and to overcome an impulsive choice, they do so only in order to optimize the qualitative but not quantitative output in the exchange paradigm.

  2. Crow-Fukase (POEMS) syndrome: a study of peripheral nerve biopsy in five new cases.

    PubMed

    Vital, Claude; Vital, Anne; Ferrer, Xavier; Viallard, Jean-François; Pellegrin, Jean-Luc; Bouillot, Sandrine; Larrieu, Jean-Marc; Lequen, Laurence; Larrieu, Jean-Louis; Brechenmacher, Christiane; Petry, Klaus G; Lagueny, Alain

    2003-09-01

    The pathogenesis of Crow-Fukase (POEMS) syndrome is not well known, and in some cases, a definite diagnosis is difficult to establish. Nerve fibers have been studied in about 120 peripheral nerve biopsies (PNBs), and a mixture of axonal and demyelinating lesions were found in most of them. We report five new cases of Crow-Fukase (POEMS) syndrome with ultrastructural examination of their PNBs. In every case, there were features of axonal degeneration and primary demyelination. Interestingly, uncompacted myelin lamellae (UMLs) were present in every case at a percentage of 1-7. The association of UML and Crow-Fukase (POEMS) syndrome was described 20 years ago but was only reported in a few studies and found in 31 of 41 cases. In fact, this association is very significant because apart from Crow-Fukase (POEMS) syndrome, UMLs can only be found with such a frequency in rare cases of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B. UML was also reported in acute and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies but at a much lower percentage. Moreover, in our five cases, UML was frequently associated with a decrease in the number of intra-axonal filaments, and this finding raises the problem of relationships between myelin formation and neurofilaments. So far, glomeruloid hemangiomas present in the dermis of some patients are considered as the only specific criteria of Crow-Fukase (POEMS) syndrome, but we think UML can also be regarded as highly suggestive of this entity on condition that a thorough ultrastructural examination of a PNB is performed.

  3. Magnetic polarity stratigraphy in the Mississippian Mauch Chunk Formation at Jim Thorpe and Lavelle, PA

    SciTech Connect

    Opdyke, N.D. ); Divenere, V.J. . Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory)

    1992-01-01

    In a previous study of the mid to upper Mississippian Mauch Chunk Formation, a well defined magnetic polarity stratigraphy was obtained in the upper 350 m of the formation just below the Chesterian-Morrowan boundary at Pottsville, Pa. As a result of this successful study, samples were collected throughout the exposed portion of the Mauch Chunk Formation at Jim Thorpe, Pa. and in new exposures in the Frackville Anticline south of Lavelle, Pa. 183 oriented cores were collected in red mudstones, siltstones and fine sandstones from the lower 450 m of the Mauch Chunk from its contact with the underlying Pocono Formation at the type section of the Mauch Chunk Formation at Jim Thorpe, Pa. 115 oriented cores were collected from the lower 440 m of the Mauch Chunk Formation near Lavelle, Pa., and 62 oriented cores were collected from the upper 215 m. Unfortunately, the middle member is poorly exposed and a complete section is yet to be sampled. All samples were subjected to progressive thermal demagnetization to temperatures as high as 690 C. Normal and reversed polarity zones were identified in the stable high temperature components after removal of a uniform reversed polarity Permo-Carboniferous overprint. The last Mauch Chunk type redbeds at the intertonguing contact with the Pottsville Formation at both the Lavelle and Pottsville sections are in normal polarity zones. The first Mauch Chunk type redbeds at the intertonguing contact with the Pocono Formation at both the Lavelle and Jim Thorpe sections are in reversed polarity zones. However, a one-to-one correlation is not seen in the magnetozones from the lower Mauch Chunk at Lavelle and Jim Thorpe. It seems likely that the lithologic boundary separating the Pocono Formation sandstones from the first appearance of Mauch Chunk redbeds is not a time boundary.

  4. Tolerance and Social Facilitation in the Foraging Behaviour of Free-Ranging Crows (Corvus corone corone; C. c. cornix)

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Rachael; Schiestl, Martina; Whiten, Andrew; Schwab, Christine; Bugnyar, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Social foraging provides animals with opportunities to gain knowledge about available food. Studies indicate that animals are influenced by social context during exploration and are able to learn socially. Carrion and hooded crows, which are opportunistic generalists with flexible social systems, have so far received little focus in this area. We combined observational and experimental approaches to investigate social interactions during foraging and social influences on crow behaviour within a free-ranging population at Vienna Zoo, which included 115 individually marked crows. We expected the crows to be tolerant of conspecifics during foraging due to high food abundance. We predicted that social context would enhance familiar object exploration, as well as a specific foraging strategy: predation by crows on other species. We found that crows were highly tolerant of one another, as reflected by their high rates of cofeeding – where they fed directly beside conspecific(s) – relative to affiliative or agonistic interactions. Evidence for social facilitation – when the observer’s behaviour is affected by the mere presence of a model – was found in both object exploration and predation behaviour. Specifically, crows touched the objects more frequently when others were present (whilst only approaching the objects when alone), and conspecifics were present more frequently during predation events involving the high-risk target species. Evidence for enhancement during object exploration – where the observer’s attention is drawn to a place or object by a model’s actions – was not confirmed in this context. Our results highlight the role played by the presence of conspecifics across different contexts: natural foraging behaviour, familiar object exploration and a specific foraging strategy. To our knowledge, this is one of the first corvid studies aimed at teasing apart specific social influence and learning mechanisms in the field. These crows therefore

  5. Tolerance and Social Facilitation in the Foraging Behaviour of Free-Ranging Crows (Corvus corone corone; C. c. cornix).

    PubMed

    Miller, Rachael; Schiestl, Martina; Whiten, Andrew; Schwab, Christine; Bugnyar, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    Social foraging provides animals with opportunities to gain knowledge about available food. Studies indicate that animals are influenced by social context during exploration and are able to learn socially. Carrion and hooded crows, which are opportunistic generalists with flexible social systems, have so far received little focus in this area. We combined observational and experimental approaches to investigate social interactions during foraging and social influences on crow behaviour within a free-ranging population at Vienna Zoo, which included 115 individually marked crows. We expected the crows to be tolerant of conspecifics during foraging due to high food abundance. We predicted that social context would enhance familiar object exploration, as well as a specific foraging strategy: predation by crows on other species. We found that crows were highly tolerant of one another, as reflected by their high rates of cofeeding - where they fed directly beside conspecific(s) - relative to affiliative or agonistic interactions. Evidence for social facilitation - when the observer's behaviour is affected by the mere presence of a model - was found in both object exploration and predation behaviour. Specifically, crows touched the objects more frequently when others were present (whilst only approaching the objects when alone), and conspecifics were present more frequently during predation events involving the high-risk target species. Evidence for enhancement during object exploration - where the observer's attention is drawn to a place or object by a model's actions - was not confirmed in this context. Our results highlight the role played by the presence of conspecifics across different contexts: natural foraging behaviour, familiar object exploration and a specific foraging strategy. To our knowledge, this is one of the first corvid studies aimed at teasing apart specific social influence and learning mechanisms in the field. These crows therefore make promising

  6. Analysis of the crow lung transcriptome in response to infection with highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, Periyasamy; Mishra, Anamika; Ranaware, Pradip B; Kolte, Atul P; Kulkarni, Diwakar D; Burt, David W; Raut, Ashwin Ashok

    2015-03-15

    The highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus, currently circulating in Asia, causes severe disease in domestic poultry as well as wild birds like crow. However, the molecular pathogenesis of HPAIV infection in crows and other wild birds is not well known. Thus, as a step to explore it, a comprehensive global gene expression analysis was performed on crow lungs, infected with HPAI H5N1 crow isolate (A/Crow/India/11TI11/2011) using high throughput next generation sequencing (NGS) (GS FLX Titanium XLR70). The reference genome of crow is not available, so RNA seq analysis was performed on the basis of a de novo assembled transcriptome. The RNA seq result shows, 4052 genes were expressed uniquely in noninfected, 6277 genes were expressed uniquely in HPAIV infected sample and of the 6814 genes expressed in both samples, 2279 genes were significantly differentially expressed. Our transcriptome profile data allows for the ability to understand the molecular mechanism behind the recent lethal HPAIV outbreak in crows which was, until recently, thought to cause lethal infections only in gallinaceous birds such as chickens, but not in wild birds. The pattern of differentially expressed genes suggest that this isolate of H5N1 virus evades the host innate immune response by attenuating interferon (IFN)-inducible signalling possibly by down regulating the signalling from type I IFN (IFNAR1 and IFNAR2) and type II IFN receptors, upregulation of the signalling inhibitors suppressor of cytokine signalling 1 (SOCS1) and SOCS3 and altering the expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs). This may be the reason for disease and mortality in crows. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Responses of urban crows to con- and hetero-specific alarm calls in predator and non-predator zoo enclosures.

    PubMed

    Bílá, Kateřina; Beránková, Jana; Veselý, Petr; Bugnyar, Thomas; Schwab, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Urban animals and birds in particular are able to cope with diverse novel threats in a city environment such as avoiding novel, unfamiliar predators. Predator avoidance often includes alarm signals that can be used also by hetero-specifics, which is mainly the case in mixed-species flocks. It can also occur when species do not form flocks but co-occur together. In this study we tested whether urban crows use alarm calls of conspecifics and hetero-specifics (jackdaws, Corvus monedula) differently in a predator and a non-predator context with partly novel and unfamiliar zoo animal species. Birds were tested at the Tiergarten Schönbrunn in the city of Vienna by playing back con- and hetero-specific alarm calls and control stimuli (great tit song and no stimuli) at predator (wolf, polar bear) and non-predator (eland antelope and cranes, peccaries) enclosures. We recorded responses of crows as the percentage of birds flying away after hearing the playback (out of those present before the playback) and as the number of vocalizations given by the present birds. A significantly higher percentage of crows flew away after hearing either con- or hetero-specific alarm calls, but it did not significantly differ between the predator and the non-predator context. Crows treated jackdaw calls just as crow calls, indicating that they make proper use of hetero-specific alarm calls. Responding similarly in both contexts may suggest that the crows were uncertain about the threat a particular zoo animal represents and were generally cautious. In the predator context, however, a high percentage of crows also flew away upon hearing the great tit control song which suggests that they may still evaluate those species which occasionally killed crows as more dangerous and respond to any conspicuous sound.

  8. GREYBULL SANDSTONE PETROLEUM POTENTIAL ON THE CROW INDIAN RESERVATION, SOUTH-CENTRAL MONTANA

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Lopez

    2000-12-14

    Evaluation of the Lower Cretaceous Greybull Sandstone on the Crow Indian Reservation for potential stratigraphic traps in the valley-fill sandstone was the focus of this project. The Crow Reservation area, located in south-central Montana, is part of the Rocky Mountain Foreland structural province, which is characterized by Laramide uplifts and intervening structural basins. The Pryor and Bighorn mountains, like other foreland uplifts, are characterized by asymmetrical folds associated with basement-involved reverse faults. The reservation area east of the mountains is on the northwestern flank of the Powder River Basin. Therefore, regional dips are eastward and southeastward; however, several prominent structural features interrupt these regional dips. The nearly 4,000 mi{sup 2} reservation is under explored but has strong potential for increased oil and gas development. Oil and gas production is well established in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming to the south as well as in the areas north and west of the reservation. However, only limited petroleum production has been established within the reservation. Geologic relations and trends indicate strong potential for oil and gas accumulations, but drilling has been insufficient for their discovery. The Greybull Sandstone, which is part of the transgressive systems tract that includes the overlying Fall River Sandstone, was deposited on a major regional unconformity. The erosional surface at the base of the Greybull Sandstone is the +100 Ma, late Aptian-Early Albian regional unconformity of Weimer (1984). This lowstand erosional surface was controlled by a basin-wide drop in sea level. In areas where incised Greybull channels are absent, the lowstand erosional unconformity is at the base of the Fall River Sandstone and equivalent formations. During the pre-Greybull lowstand, sediment bypassed this region. In the subsequent marine transgression, streams began to aggrade and deposit sand of the lower Greybull Sandstone

  9. West Nile virus and non-West Nile virus mortality and coinfection of American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) in California.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Sarah S; Woods, Leslie W; Boyce, Walter M; Eckstrand, Christina D; Langevin, Stanley A; Reisen, William K; Townsend, Andrea K

    2014-06-01

    American crows are acutely sensitive to West Nile virus (WNV) infection, and crow mortality has been used in WNV surveillance to monitor enzootic transmission. However, non-WNV sources of mortality could reduce the reliability of crow death as a surveillance tool. Here, using a combination of histopathologic, toxicologic, virologic, and molecular techniques we describe causes of mortality in 67 American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) that were collected from a population in the Sacramento Valley of California in 2012 and 2013. Evidence of infectious disease was detected in 70% (47/67) of carcasses. The majority of deaths were linked to a suite of non-WNV viral, bacterial, and fungal infections (39%; 23/59 cases), WNV (36%; 24/67 cases), and an acute toxic event (25%; 15/59 cases). Coinfections were detected in 20% (12/59) of birds and frequently were associated with WNV and poxviral dermatitis. Inferences about WNV activity based on crow mortality should be supported by laboratory confirmation because crow mortality frequently can be caused by other infectious diseases or toxic events.

  10. The long and the short of it: rule-based relative length discrimination in carrion crows, Corvus corone.

    PubMed

    Moll, Felix W; Nieder, Andreas

    2014-09-01

    Birds and other nonhuman animals can choose the larger of two discrete or continuous quantities. However, whether birds possess the conceptual grasp and cognitive control to flexibly switch between relative more-or-less-than judgments remains elusive. We therefore tested carrion crows in a rule-based line-length discrimination task to flexibly select lines presented on a touchscreen according to their relative length. In the first experiment, the crows needed to discriminate a shorter from a longer line, and vice versa. In the second experiment, the crows were required to choose a medium long line among three lines of different length (intermediate-size task). The crows switched effortlessly between "longer than/shorter than" rules, showing no signs of trial history affecting switching performance. They reliably chose the relatively longer and shorter line length, thus demonstrating a concept of greater than/less than with a continuous magnitude. However, both crows failed to discriminate a line of 'medium' length embedded in longer and shorter lines. These results indicate that relational discrimination exhibits different cognitive demands. While a greater than/less than concept requires only one relational comparison (with the respectively greater or smaller magnitude), the discrimination of a 'medium' magnitude demands to relate two or more comparisons, which might overburden crows and maybe animals in general.

  11. Mesopredators constrain a top predator: competitive release of ravens after culling crows.

    PubMed

    Bodey, Thomas W; McDonald, Robbie A; Bearhop, Stuart

    2009-10-23

    Although predator control programmes rarely consider complex competitive interactions among predators, it is becoming clear that removal of larger 'superior' competitors often releases the 'inferior' ones and can precipitate trophic cascades. In contrast, our study indicates that culling hooded crows Corvus cornix appears to release a larger competitor, the common raven Corvus corax. Ravens ranged more widely, and the predation of artificial nests was significantly faster (although total predation was similar), after the removal of crows. Our study provides evidence of a novel reversal of competitive release where a larger species was freed from constraints imposed on its distribution and behaviour by a smaller species, and emphasizes the importance of considering community and ecosystem effects of predator manipulations when undertaken for conservation or game management.

  12. Traditional Crow Indian health beliefs and practices. Toward a grounded theory.

    PubMed

    Buehler, J A

    1992-03-01

    An important element in American Indian cultures is a holistic view of wellness. Nurses attempting to provide holistic, culturally sensitive health services to American Indian clients must assess the cultural orientation of their clients and have culture-specific knowledge. A pilot qualitative study was conducted at the Crow Indian Reservation in south central Montana. Qualitative analysis of data identified categories of traditional contemporary health practices of Crow Indians. These categories are use of rituals/ceremonies, indigenous healers, and sacred objects. Five patterns of use of traditional health practices were also discovered. These are (a) initial use of traditional practices followed by modern health services, (b) initial use of modern health services followed by traditional practices, (c) simultaneous bicultural use, (d) traditional use only, and (e) modern use only.

  13. The complete mitochondrial genome of the invasive house crow Corvus splendens (Passeriformes: Corvidae).

    PubMed

    Krzeminska, Urszula; Wilson, Robyn; Rahman, Sadequr; Song, Beng Kah; Gan, Han Ming; Tan, Mun Hua; Austin, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the invasive house crow (Corvus splendens) was sequenced (GenBank accession number: KJ766304) using the MiSeq Personal Sequencer (Illumina, San Diego, CA). The mitochondrial genome is 16,962 bp in length, comprising 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal subunit genes and a non-coding control region. The mitogenome structural organization is identical to that of the other Corvus species and related genera. The overall base composition of C. splendens is 30.65% for A, 29.71% for C, 14.84% for G and 24.80% for T, with an AT content of 55.45%. We propose to use full mitochondrial genome to address taxonomic issues and to study the population genetics of crows.

  14. Chemotherapeutic reactions of Chandlerella hawkingi, the filarial parasite of the Indian jungle crow, Corvus macrorhynchos (Agler).

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, R J; Sen, A B

    1969-02-01

    1. A high percentage of Indian jungle crows (Corvus macrorhynchos Wagler), found in and around Lucknow, harbour a natural filarial infection Chandlerella hawkingi. The microfilariae of this species are sheathed and show nocturnal periodicity.2. Fourteen compounds active against other kinds of filariae, especially against Litomosoides carinii, were tested against Ch. hawkingi in jungle crows to find whether this infection would be suitable for routine filarial chemotherapy. This is apparently the first report of systematic screening of antifilarial compounds against an avian filariasis.3. Tartar emetic (10 mg/kg intravenously, daily for 6 days) and arsenamide (5 mg/kg intraperitoneally, daily for 6 days) proved to be effective in killing adult worms. Trivalent tryparsamide, though effective, was toxic in the doses tried. Diethylcarbamazine and other compounds tested were ineffective.4. The chemotherapeutic susceptibilities of Ch. hawkingi differ considerably from those of L. carinii and Wuchereria bancrofti.

  15. Chemotherapeutic reactions of Chandlerella hawkingi, the filarial parasite of the Indian jungle crow, Corvus macrorhynchos (Wagler)

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, R. K.; Sen, A. B.

    1969-01-01

    1. A high percentage of Indian jungle crows (Corvus macrorhynchos Wagler), found in and around Lucknow, harbour a natural filarial infection Chandlerella hawkingi. The microfilariae of this species are sheathed and show nocturnal periodicity. 2. Fourteen compounds active against other kinds of filariae, especially against Litomosoides carinii, were tested against Ch. hawkingi in jungle crows to find whether this infection would be suitable for routine filarial chemotherapy. This is apparently the first report of systematic screening of antifilarial compounds against an avian filariasis. 3. Tartar emetic (10 mg/kg intravenously, daily for 6 days) and arsenamide (5 mg/kg intraperitoneally, daily for 6 days) proved to be effective in killing adult worms. Trivalent tryparsamide, though effective, was toxic in the doses tried. Diethylcarbamazine and other compounds tested were ineffective. 4. The chemotherapeutic susceptibilities of Ch. hawkingi differ considerably from those of L. carinii and Wuchereria bancrofti. PMID:5774047

  16. The genomic landscape underlying phenotypic integrity in the face of gene flow in crows.

    PubMed

    Poelstra, J W; Vijay, N; Bossu, C M; Lantz, H; Ryll, B; Müller, I; Baglione, V; Unneberg, P; Wikelski, M; Grabherr, M G; Wolf, J B W

    2014-06-20

    The importance, extent, and mode of interspecific gene flow for the evolution of species has long been debated. Characterization of genomic differentiation in a classic example of hybridization between all-black carrion crows and gray-coated hooded crows identified genome-wide introgression extending far beyond the morphological hybrid zone. Gene expression divergence was concentrated in pigmentation genes expressed in gray versus black feather follicles. Only a small number of narrow genomic islands exhibited resistance to gene flow. One prominent genomic region (<2 megabases) harbored 81 of all 82 fixed differences (of 8.4 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms in total) linking genes involved in pigmentation and in visual perception-a genomic signal reflecting color-mediated prezygotic isolation. Thus, localized genomic selection can cause marked heterogeneity in introgression landscapes while maintaining phenotypic divergence. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. Is primate tool use special? Chimpanzee and New Caledonian crow compared.

    PubMed

    McGrew, W C

    2013-11-19

    The chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) is well-known in both nature and captivity as an impressive maker and user of tools, but recently the New Caledonian crow (Corvus moneduloides) has been championed as being equivalent or superior to the ape in elementary technology. I systematically compare the two taxa, going beyond simple presence/absence scoring of tool-using and -making types, on four more precise aspects of material culture: (i) types of associative technology (tools used in combination); (ii) modes of tool making; (iii) modes of tool use; and (iv) functions of tool use. I emphasize tool use in nature, when performance is habitual or customary, rather than in anecdotal or idiosyncratic. On all four measures, the ape shows more variety than does the corvid, especially in modes and functions that go beyond extractive foraging. However, more sustained field research is required on the crows before this contrast is conclusive.

  18. A novel tool-use mode in animals: New Caledonian crows insert tools to transport objects.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Ivo F; von Bayern, Auguste; Osvath, Mathias

    2016-11-01

    New Caledonian crows (Corvus moneduloides) rely heavily on a range of tools to extract prey. They manufacture novel tools, save tools for later use, and have morphological features that facilitate tool use. We report six observations, in two individuals, of a novel tool-use mode not previously reported in non-human animals. Insert-and-transport tool use involves inserting a stick into an object and then moving away, thereby transporting both object and tool. All transported objects were non-food objects. One subject used a stick to transport an object that was too large to be handled by beak, which suggests the tool facilitated object control. The function in the other cases is unclear but seems to be an expression of play or exploration. Further studies should investigate whether it is adaptive in the wild and to what extent crows can flexibly apply the behaviour in experimental settings when purposive transportation of objects is advantageous.

  19. Is primate tool use special? Chimpanzee and New Caledonian crow compared

    PubMed Central

    McGrew, W. C.

    2013-01-01

    The chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) is well-known in both nature and captivity as an impressive maker and user of tools, but recently the New Caledonian crow (Corvus moneduloides) has been championed as being equivalent or superior to the ape in elementary technology. I systematically compare the two taxa, going beyond simple presence/absence scoring of tool-using and -making types, on four more precise aspects of material culture: (i) types of associative technology (tools used in combination); (ii) modes of tool making; (iii) modes of tool use; and (iv) functions of tool use. I emphasize tool use in nature, when performance is habitual or customary, rather than in anecdotal or idiosyncratic. On all four measures, the ape shows more variety than does the corvid, especially in modes and functions that go beyond extractive foraging. However, more sustained field research is required on the crows before this contrast is conclusive. PMID:24101630

  20. Schwinger Boson Formulation and Solution of the Crow-Kimura and Eigen Models of Quasispecies Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeong-Man; Deem, Michael W.

    2006-11-01

    We express the Crow-Kimura and Eigen models of quasispecies theory in a functional integral representation. We formulate the spin coherent state functional integrals using the Schwinger Boson method. In this formulation, we are able to deduce the long-time behavior of these models for arbitrary replication and degradation functions. We discuss the phase transitions that occur in these models as a function of mutation rate. We derive for these models the leading order corrections to the infinite genome length limit.

  1. New Caledonian crows attend to multiple functional properties of complex tools

    PubMed Central

    St Clair, James J. H.; Rutz, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The ability to attend to the functional properties of foraging tools should affect energy-intake rates, fitness components and ultimately the evolutionary dynamics of tool-related behaviour. New Caledonian crows Corvus moneduloides use three distinct tool types for extractive foraging: non-hooked stick tools, hooked stick tools and tools cut from the barbed edges of Pandanus spp. leaves. The latter two types exhibit clear functional polarity, because of (respectively) a single terminal, crow-manufactured hook and natural barbs running along one edge of the leaf strip; in each case, the ‘hooks’ can only aid prey capture if the tool is oriented correctly by the crow during deployment. A previous experimental study of New Caledonian crows found that subjects paid little attention to the barbs of supplied (wide) pandanus tools, resulting in non-functional tool orientation during foraging. This result is puzzling, given the presumed fitness benefits of consistently orienting tools functionally in the wild. We investigated whether the lack of discrimination with respect to (wide) pandanus tool orientation also applies to hooked stick tools. We experimentally provided subjects with naturalistic replica tools in a range of orientations and found that all subjects used these tools correctly, regardless of how they had been presented. In a companion experiment, we explored the extent to which normally co-occurring tool features (terminal hook, curvature of the tool shaft and stripped bark at the hooked end) inform tool-orientation decisions, by forcing birds to deploy ‘unnatural’ tools, which exhibited these traits at opposite ends. Our subjects attended to at least two of the three tool features, although, as expected, the location of the hook was of paramount importance. We discuss these results in the context of earlier research and propose avenues for future work. PMID:24101625

  2. American crows as carriers of vancomycin-resistant enterococci with vanA gene.

    PubMed

    Oravcova, Veronika; Zurek, Ludek; Townsend, Andrea; Clark, Anne B; Ellis, Julie C; Cizek, Alois; Literak, Ivan

    2014-04-01

    We studied the vanA-carrying vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) isolated from American crows in the United States during the winter 2011/2012. Faecal samples from crows were cultured selectively for VRE and characterized. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were used to examine epidemiological relationships of vanA-containing VRE. Isolates were tested in vitro for their ability to horizontally transfer the vancomycin resistance trait. VRE with the vanA gene were found in 15 (2.5%) of 590 crows samples, from which we obtained 22 different isolates. Enterococcal species were Enterococcus faecium (14) and E. faecalis (8). One, two and 19 isolates originated from Kansas, New York State and Massachusetts, respectively. Based on MLST analysis, E. faecium isolates were grouped as ST18 (6 isolates), ST555 (2), and novel types ST749 (1), ST750 (3), ST751 (1), ST752 (1). Enterococcus faecalis isolates belonged to ST6 (1), ST16 (3) and ST179 (4). All isolates were able to transfer the vancomycin resistance trait via filter mating with very high transfer range. Clinically important enterococci with the vanA gene occur in faeces of wild American crows throughout the United States. These migrating birds may contribute to the dissemination of VRE in environment over large distances. [Correction added after first online publication on 06 August 2013: The number of E. faecium ST752 isolate is now amended to '1', consistent with that shown in the 'Results' section and Figure 2.]. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. New Caledonian crows attend to multiple functional properties of complex tools.

    PubMed

    St Clair, James J H; Rutz, Christian

    2013-11-19

    The ability to attend to the functional properties of foraging tools should affect energy-intake rates, fitness components and ultimately the evolutionary dynamics of tool-related behaviour. New Caledonian crows Corvus moneduloides use three distinct tool types for extractive foraging: non-hooked stick tools, hooked stick tools and tools cut from the barbed edges of Pandanus spp. leaves. The latter two types exhibit clear functional polarity, because of (respectively) a single terminal, crow-manufactured hook and natural barbs running along one edge of the leaf strip; in each case, the 'hooks' can only aid prey capture if the tool is oriented correctly by the crow during deployment. A previous experimental study of New Caledonian crows found that subjects paid little attention to the barbs of supplied (wide) pandanus tools, resulting in non-functional tool orientation during foraging. This result is puzzling, given the presumed fitness benefits of consistently orienting tools functionally in the wild. We investigated whether the lack of discrimination with respect to (wide) pandanus tool orientation also applies to hooked stick tools. We experimentally provided subjects with naturalistic replica tools in a range of orientations and found that all subjects used these tools correctly, regardless of how they had been presented. In a companion experiment, we explored the extent to which normally co-occurring tool features (terminal hook, curvature of the tool shaft and stripped bark at the hooked end) inform tool-orientation decisions, by forcing birds to deploy 'unnatural' tools, which exhibited these traits at opposite ends. Our subjects attended to at least two of the three tool features, although, as expected, the location of the hook was of paramount importance. We discuss these results in the context of earlier research and propose avenues for future work.

  4. Greater trochanter osteotomy with cementless THA for Crowe type IV DDH.

    PubMed

    Lei, Pengfei; Hu, Yihe; Cai, PengDe; Xie, Jie; Yang, XuCheng; Wang, Long

    2013-05-01

    This study explored the surgical method and short-term clinical effect of a greater trochanter osteotomy along with cementless artificial total hip arthroplasty in the treatment of Crowe type IV developmental dysplasia of the hip. The authors conducted a retrospective analysis of 18 patients (22 hips) with Crowe type IV dysplasia who were seen between June 2008 and August 2010. After undergoing cementless artificial total hip arthroplasty using a posterolateral approach, a greater trochanter osteotomy was used to adjust the tension of the gluteal muscle, and an acetabular cup was placed. Average preoperative length shortening of the affected limb was 4.5 cm (range, 3.4-6 cm), and average postoperative length increase was 4.0 cm (range, 3.2-4.8 cm). Average postoperative Harris Hip Score was 87 (range, 79-91), which was higher than the average preoperative score of 38 (range, 32-51). Intraoperatively, 3 hips (3 patients) sustained a proximal femur fracture. Due to the stability of the femoral prosthesis, either no treatment or wire fixation only was given; by 2 months postoperatively, radiographs indicated that all fractures had healed. One patient had symptoms of sciatic nerve paralysis that resolved 3 months postoperatively. Performing a greater trochanter osteotomy after cementless artificial total hip arthroplasty is effective for the treatment of Crowe type IV dysplasia and can rebuild the complex biology and biomechanics of hip dysplasia without increasing the complication risk. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Distribution of retinal cone photoreceptor oil droplets, and identification of associated carotenoids in crow (Corvus macrorhynchos).

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohammad Lutfur; Yoshida, Kazuyuki; Maeda, Isamu; Tanaka, Hideuki; Sugita, Shoei

    2010-06-01

    The topography of cone oil droplets and their carotenoids were investigated in the retina of jungle crow (Corvus macrorhynchos). Fresh retina was sampled for the study of retinal cone oil droplets, and extracted retinal carotenoids were saponified using methods adapted from a recent study, then identified with reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). To assess the effects of saponification conditions on carotenoid recovery from crow retina, we varied base concentration and total time of saponification across a wide range of conditions, and again used HPLC to compare carotenoid concentrations. Based on colors, at least four types of oil droplets were recognized, i.e., red, orange, green, and translucent, across the retina. With an average of 91,202 /mm(2), density gradually declines in an eccentric manner from optic disc. In retina, the density and size of droplets are inversely related. In the peripheral zone, oil droplets were significantly larger than those of the central area. The proportion of orange oil droplets (33%) was higher in the central area, whereas green was predominant in other areas. Three types of carotenoid (astaxanthin, galloxanthin and lutein), together with one unknown carotenoid, were recovered from the crow retina; astaxanthin was the dominant carotenoid among them. The recovery of carotenoids was affected by saponification conditions. Astaxanthin was well recovered in weak alkali (0.06 M KOH), in contrast, xanthophyllic carotenoids were best recovered in strong alkali (0.6 M KOH) after 12 h of saponification at freeze temperature.

  6. Using the Aesop's fable paradigm to investigate causal understanding of water displacement by New Caledonian crows.

    PubMed

    Jelbert, Sarah A; Taylor, Alex H; Cheke, Lucy G; Clayton, Nicola S; Gray, Russell D

    2014-01-01

    Understanding causal regularities in the world is a key feature of human cognition. However, the extent to which non-human animals are capable of causal understanding is not well understood. Here, we used the Aesop's fable paradigm--in which subjects drop stones into water to raise the water level and obtain an out of reach reward--to assess New Caledonian crows' causal understanding of water displacement. We found that crows preferentially dropped stones into a water-filled tube instead of a sand-filled tube; they dropped sinking objects rather than floating objects; solid objects rather than hollow objects, and they dropped objects into a tube with a high water level rather than a low one. However, they failed two more challenging tasks which required them to attend to the width of the tube, and to counter-intuitive causal cues in a U-shaped apparatus. Our results indicate that New Caledonian crows possess a sophisticated, but incomplete, understanding of the causal properties of displacement, rivalling that of 5-7 year old children.

  7. Flexible motor adjustment of pecking with an artificially extended bill in crows but not in pigeons

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    The dextrous foraging skills of primates, including humans, are underpinned by flexible vision-guided control of the arms/hands and even tools as body-part extensions. This capacity involves a visuomotor conversion process that transfers the locations of the hands/arms and a target in retinal coordinates into body coordinates to generate a reaching/grasping movement and to correct online. Similar capacities have evolved in birds, such as tool use in corvids and finches, which represents the flexible motor control of extended body parts. However, the flexibility of avian head-reaching and bill-grasping with body-part extensions remains poorly understood. This study comparatively investigated the flexibility of pecking with an artificially extended bill in crows and pigeons. Pecking performance and kinematics were examined when the bill extension was attached, and after its removal. The bill extension deteriorated pecking in pigeons in both performance and kinematics over 10 days. After the bill removal, pigeons started bill-grasping earlier, indicating motor adaptation to the bill extension. Contrastingly, pecking in crows was deteriorated transiently with the bill extension, but was recovered by adjusting pecking at closer distances, suggesting a quick adjustment to the bill extension. These results indicate flexible visuomotor control to extended body parts in crows but not in pigeons. PMID:28386435

  8. Behavioural Type Affects Space Use in a Wild Population of Crows (Corvus corone).

    PubMed

    Deventer, Sarah A; Uhl, Florian; Bugnyar, Thomas; Miller, Rachael; Fitch, W Tecumseh; Schiestl, Martina; Ringler, Max; Schwab, Christine

    2016-11-01

    While personality-dependent dispersal is well studied, local space use has received surprisingly little attention in this context, despite the multiple consequences on survival and fitness. Regarding the coping style of individuals, recent studies on personality-dependent space use within a habitat indicate that 'proactive' individuals are wider ranging than 'reactive' ones. However, such studies are still scarce and cover limited taxonomic diversity, and thus, more research is needed to explore whether this pattern generalises across species. We examined the link between coping style and space use in a population of crows (Corvus corone) freely inhabiting the urban zoo of Vienna, Austria. We used a binary docility rating (struggle during handling vs. no struggle) and a tonic immobility test to quantify individual coping style. Individual space use was quantified as the number of different sites at which each crow was observed, and we controlled for different number of sightings per individual by creating a space use index. Only the binary docility rating showed repeatability over time, and significantly predicted space use. In contrast to previous studies, we found that reactive crows (no struggle during handling) showed wider ranging space use within the study site than proactive individuals (who struggled during handling). The discrepancy from previous results suggests that the relationship between behavioural type and space use may vary between species, potentially reflecting differences in socioecology.

  9. Using the Aesop's Fable Paradigm to Investigate Causal Understanding of Water Displacement by New Caledonian Crows

    PubMed Central

    Jelbert, Sarah A.; Taylor, Alex H.; Cheke, Lucy G.; Clayton, Nicola S.; Gray, Russell D.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding causal regularities in the world is a key feature of human cognition. However, the extent to which non-human animals are capable of causal understanding is not well understood. Here, we used the Aesop's fable paradigm – in which subjects drop stones into water to raise the water level and obtain an out of reach reward – to assess New Caledonian crows' causal understanding of water displacement. We found that crows preferentially dropped stones into a water-filled tube instead of a sand-filled tube; they dropped sinking objects rather than floating objects; solid objects rather than hollow objects, and they dropped objects into a tube with a high water level rather than a low one. However, they failed two more challenging tasks which required them to attend to the width of the tube, and to counter-intuitive causal cues in a U-shaped apparatus. Our results indicate that New Caledonian crows possess a sophisticated, but incomplete, understanding of the causal properties of displacement, rivalling that of 5–7 year old children. PMID:24671252

  10. Song control nuclei in male and female large-billed crows (Corvus macrorhynchos).

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Sun, YingYu; Zhang, XueBo; Zeng, ShaoJu; Xie, WenQing; Yu, YueQiang; Zhang, XinWen; Zuo, MingXue

    2009-11-01

    We show that the learned vocalizations of male and female large-billed crows (Corvus macrorhynchos) are similar and that their functions and physical features show significant differences from those of other oscine species. We investigate whether the song control nuclei of crows show any sexual differences in size, reflecting differences in their singing behavior, and whether these nuclei are different from those of other songbirds in terms of neural connectivity size and relative to the forebrain. Our Nissl staining results reveal that 1) of the four song nuclei examined (HVC; the robust nucleus of the arcopallium [RA]; Area X; and the dorsolateral medial nucleus [DLM]), HVC, RA, and Area X volumes are significantly larger in males than in females, but DLM volume and body and brain weights show no significant gender differences; and 2) the sizes of song nuclei relative to the forebrain are within the range of other oscines. By injecting a neural tract tracer (DiI) into various song nuclei in brain slices, we found that, as in other songbirds, HVC projects to RA and Area X, while Area X projects to the lateral magnocellular nucleus of the anterior nidopallium (IMAN) and DLM, DLM to IMAN, and IMAN to RA. Our results Indicate that, although the crow has songs very different from those of other oscine species, Its song nuclei and the connections between them are not obviously different.

  11. High sensitivity electro-optic modulation of slow light in ellipse rods PC-CROW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changhong; Wan, Yong; Zong, Weihua

    2017-07-01

    A tunable slow light with low group velocity, high buffer performance and high sensitivity is realized in photonic crystal coupled resonator optical waveguide (PC-CROW) with elliptical rod around cavity. By adjusting the long axis and short axis of the elliptical rods, the slow light and buffer performance of PC-CROW are optimized. As ae=0.42a, be=0.20a, the group velocity is below 2.3053×10-4c, simultaneously, the buffer capacity C and delay time Ts reach the optimum value of 9.8214 bit and 354.8 ps. Then the dynamic modulation of the slow light and buffer performance based on this optimized structure has been discussed systematically. Thanks to the electro-optic effect of the polystyrene substrate, the guided mode shifts linearly to short wavelength in sensitivity of 3.0 nm/mV around 1550 nm, as the applied voltage increases. The modulation sensitivities of delay time and buffer capacity are 0.445 ns/mV and 0.051 bit/mV, respectively. These results show a considerable potential for this structure that can be dynamically controlled according to the practical requirements by electro-optic effect in PC-CROW.

  12. Adaptive bill morphology for enhanced tool manipulation in New Caledonian crows.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Hiroshi; Hunt, Gavin R; Oberhofer, Katja; Ogihara, Naomichi; McGowan, Kevin J; Mithraratne, Kumar; Yamasaki, Takeshi; Gray, Russell D; Izawa, Ei-Ichi

    2016-03-09

    Early increased sophistication of human tools is thought to be underpinned by adaptive morphology for efficient tool manipulation. Such adaptive specialisation is unknown in nonhuman primates but may have evolved in the New Caledonian crow, which has sophisticated tool manufacture. The straightness of its bill, for example, may be adaptive for enhanced visually-directed use of tools. Here, we examine in detail the shape and internal structure of the New Caledonian crow's bill using Principal Components Analysis and Computed Tomography within a comparative framework. We found that the bill has a combination of interrelated shape and structural features unique within Corvus, and possibly birds generally. The upper mandible is relatively deep and short with a straight cutting edge, and the lower mandible is strengthened and upturned. These novel combined attributes would be functional for (i) counteracting the unique loading patterns acting on the bill when manipulating tools, (ii) a strong precision grip to hold tools securely, and (iii) enhanced visually-guided tool use. Our findings indicate that the New Caledonian crow's innovative bill has been adapted for tool manipulation to at least some degree. Early increased sophistication of tools may require the co-evolution of morphology that provides improved manipulatory skills.

  13. Modifications to the Aesop's Fable paradigm change New Caledonian crow performances.

    PubMed

    Logan, Corina J; Jelbert, Sarah A; Breen, Alexis J; Gray, Russell D; Taylor, Alex H

    2014-01-01

    While humans are able to understand much about causality, it is unclear to what extent non-human animals can do the same. The Aesop's Fable paradigm requires an animal to drop stones into a water-filled tube to bring a floating food reward within reach. Rook, Eurasian jay, and New Caledonian crow performances are similar to those of children under seven years of age when solving this task. However, we know very little about the cognition underpinning these birds' performances. Here, we address several limitations of previous Aesop's Fable studies to gain insight into the causal cognition of New Caledonian crows. Our results provide the first evidence that any non-human animal can solve the U-tube task and can discriminate between water-filled tubes of different volumes. However, our results do not provide support for the hypothesis that these crows can infer the presence of a hidden causal mechanism. They also call into question previous object-discrimination performances. The methodologies outlined here should allow for more powerful comparisons between humans and other animal species and thus help us to determine which aspects of causal cognition are distinct to humans.

  14. Evolution of Vortex Pairs Subject to the Crow Instability in Wall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asselin, Daniel; Williamson, C. H. K.

    2014-11-01

    In this research, we examine the effect of a solid boundary on the dynamics and instabilities of a pair of counter-rotating vortices. An isolated vortex pair is subject to both a short-wave elliptic instability and a long-wave Crow (1970) instability. Near a wall, the boundary layer that forms between the primary vortices and the wall can separate, leading to the generation of secondary vorticity. In the present study, we are examining the long-wave Crow instability as it is modified by interaction with a wall. Several key features of the flow are observed. Strong axial flows cause fluid containing vorticity to move from the ``troughs'' of the initially wavy vortex tube to the ``peaks.'' This process is associated with distinct differences in vortex concentration at the peak and the trough, which lead to the establishment of an axial pressure gradient. Furthermore, the primary and secondary vortices interact to form additional small-scale vortex rings. The exact number and orientation of these small-scale rings is highly dependent on the extent to which the Crow instability has developed prior to interaction with the ground. Finally, significant changes to the vortex dynamics, including circulation, core size, and topology, are also observed during and after interaction with the boundary. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research under ONR Award No. N00014-12-1-0712.

  15. Evolution of Vortex Pairs Subject to the Crow Instability in Wall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asselin, Daniel; Williamson, C. H. K.

    2015-11-01

    In this research, we examine the effect of a solid boundary on the dynamics and instabilities of a pair of counter-rotating vortices. An isolated vortex pair is subject to both a short-wave elliptic instability and a long-wave Crow (1970) instability. Near a wall, the boundary layer that forms between the primary vortices and the wall can separate, leading to the generation of secondary vorticity. In the present study, we are examining the long-wave Crow instability as it is modified by interaction with a wall. The regions of the perturbed vortex pair which first interact with the wall experience accelerated circulation decay, which leads to the formation of an axial pressure gradient. This pressure difference produces strong axial flows, which ultimately give rise to interactions between the primary and secondary vortices and the generation of small-scale vortex rings. These rings vary in number and orientation depending on the extent to which the Crow instability has developed prior to interaction with the wall. In addition to the topological modifications, significant changes to the vortex dynamics, including circulation and core size, are also observed during and after interaction with the boundary. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research under ONR Award No. N00014-12-1-0712.

  16. Dynamics of crowing development in the domestic Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica)

    PubMed Central

    Derégnaucourt, Sébastien; Saar, Sigal; Gahr, Manfred

    2009-01-01

    Species-specific behaviours gradually emerge, via incomplete patterns, to the final complete adult form. A classical example is birdsong, a learned behaviour ideally suited for studying the neural and molecular substrates of vocal learning. Young songbirds gradually transform primitive unstructured vocalizations (subsong, akin to human babbling) into complex, stereotyped sequences of syllables that constitute adult song. In comparison with birdsong, territorial and mating calls of vocal non-learner species are thought to exhibit little change during development. We revisited this issue using the crowing behaviour of domestic Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica). Crowing activity was continuously recorded in young males maintained in social isolation from the age of three weeks to four months. We observed developmental changes in crow structure, both the temporal and the spectral levels. Speed and trajectories of these developmental changes exhibited an unexpected high inter-individual variability. Mechanisms used by quails to transform sounds during ontogeny resemble those described in oscines during the sensorimotor phase of song learning. Studies on vocal non-learners could shed light on the specificity and evolution of vocal learning. PMID:19324760

  17. Flexible motor adjustment of pecking with an artificially extended bill in crows but not in pigeons.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Hiroshi; Izawa, Ei-Ichi

    2017-02-01

    The dextrous foraging skills of primates, including humans, are underpinned by flexible vision-guided control of the arms/hands and even tools as body-part extensions. This capacity involves a visuomotor conversion process that transfers the locations of the hands/arms and a target in retinal coordinates into body coordinates to generate a reaching/grasping movement and to correct online. Similar capacities have evolved in birds, such as tool use in corvids and finches, which represents the flexible motor control of extended body parts. However, the flexibility of avian head-reaching and bill-grasping with body-part extensions remains poorly understood. This study comparatively investigated the flexibility of pecking with an artificially extended bill in crows and pigeons. Pecking performance and kinematics were examined when the bill extension was attached, and after its removal. The bill extension deteriorated pecking in pigeons in both performance and kinematics over 10 days. After the bill removal, pigeons started bill-grasping earlier, indicating motor adaptation to the bill extension. Contrastingly, pecking in crows was deteriorated transiently with the bill extension, but was recovered by adjusting pecking at closer distances, suggesting a quick adjustment to the bill extension. These results indicate flexible visuomotor control to extended body parts in crows but not in pigeons.

  18. Carrion crows (Corvus corone) of southwest Germany: important hosts for haemosporidian parasites.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Sandrine; Fachet, Katrin; Dinkel, Anke; Mackenstedt, Ute; Woog, Friederike

    2017-09-12

    Avian malaria parasites (Plasmodium spp.) and other Haemosporida (Haemoproteus and Leucocytozoon spp.) form a diverse group of vector-transmitted blood parasites that are abundant in many bird families. Recent studies have suggested that corvids may be an important host for Plasmodium spp. and Leucocytozoon spp. To investigate the diversity of Haemosporida of resident carrion crows (Corvus corone) and Eurasian Magpies (Pica pica) in southwest Germany, 100 liver samples of corvids were examined using a nested PCR method to amplify a 1063 bp fragment of the haemosporidian mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. The phylogenetic relationship of parasite lineages obtained from these birds was inferred. Haemosporidian DNA was detected in 85 carrion crows (89.5%) and in all five Eurasian Magpies. The most abundant parasite genus was Leucocytozoon with a prevalence of 85.3% (n = 95). 65.3% of the samples (n = 62) contained multiple infections. Thirteen haemosporidian lineages were isolated from the corvid samples. Female carrion crows were more likely infected with haemosporidian parasites than males. This study provides the first insight into the diversity of haemosporidian parasites of corvids in Germany. Very high prevalences were found and based on the applied diagnostic method also a high amount of multiple infections could be detected. Due to the high diversity of haemosporidian parasites found in corvids, they seem to be excellent model organisms to test species deliminations in haemosporidian parasites.

  19. Modifications to the Aesop's Fable Paradigm Change New Caledonian Crow Performances

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Corina J.; Jelbert, Sarah A.; Breen, Alexis J.; Gray, Russell D.; Taylor, Alex H.

    2014-01-01

    While humans are able to understand much about causality, it is unclear to what extent non-human animals can do the same. The Aesop's Fable paradigm requires an animal to drop stones into a water-filled tube to bring a floating food reward within reach. Rook, Eurasian jay, and New Caledonian crow performances are similar to those of children under seven years of age when solving this task. However, we know very little about the cognition underpinning these birds' performances. Here, we address several limitations of previous Aesop's Fable studies to gain insight into the causal cognition of New Caledonian crows. Our results provide the first evidence that any non-human animal can solve the U-tube task and can discriminate between water-filled tubes of different volumes. However, our results do not provide support for the hypothesis that these crows can infer the presence of a hidden causal mechanism. They also call into question previous object-discrimination performances. The methodologies outlined here should allow for more powerful comparisons between humans and other animal species and thus help us to determine which aspects of causal cognition are distinct to humans. PMID:25055009

  20. Discovery of species-wide tool use in the Hawaiian crow.

    PubMed

    Rutz, Christian; Klump, Barbara C; Komarczyk, Lisa; Leighton, Rosanna; Kramer, Joshua; Wischnewski, Saskia; Sugasawa, Shoko; Morrissey, Michael B; James, Richard; St Clair, James J H; Switzer, Richard A; Masuda, Bryce M

    2016-09-15

    Only a handful of bird species are known to use foraging tools in the wild. Amongst them, the New Caledonian crow (Corvus moneduloides) stands out with its sophisticated tool-making skills. Despite considerable speculation, the evolutionary origins of this species' remarkable tool behaviour remain largely unknown, not least because no naturally tool-using congeners have yet been identified that would enable informative comparisons. Here we show that another tropical corvid, the 'Alalā (C. hawaiiensis; Hawaiian crow), is a highly dexterous tool user. Although the 'Alalā became extinct in the wild in the early 2000s, and currently survives only in captivity, at least two lines of evidence suggest that tool use is part of the species' natural behavioural repertoire: juveniles develop functional tool use without training, or social input from adults; and proficient tool use is a species-wide capacity. 'Alalā and New Caledonian crows evolved in similar environments on remote tropical islands, yet are only distantly related, suggesting that their technical abilities arose convergently. This supports the idea that avian foraging tool use is facilitated by ecological conditions typical of islands, such as reduced competition for embedded prey and low predation risk. Our discovery creates exciting opportunities for comparative research on multiple tool-using and non-tool-using corvid species. Such work will in turn pave the way for replicated cross-taxonomic comparisons with the primate lineage, enabling valuable insights into the evolutionary origins of tool-using behaviour.

  1. Social and Foraging Behavior in Northwestern Crows (Corvus caurinus): Incorporating New Analyses and Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Carol K.

    Both foraging and social decisions impact animals in important ways. We investigate the effects of age on foraging efficiency and sociality on Northwestern Crows (Corvus caurinus) at the beach, and use the growing field of social network analysis (SNA) to further examine social behavior in these birds. Specifically, we predict that 1) adults are more efficient foragers than juveniles, 2) juveniles interact with larger numbers of social partners than adults, 3) juveniles and adults prefer to associate with each other rather than within their own age classes, 4) crows are not associating randomly while on the beach (aka they have preferred social partners), and 5) pairs of individuals engaging in more affiliative behaviors with each other are less likely to also behave agonistically to one another, and vice versa. We also explore the uses of a remote radio detection system Encounternet by testing the validity of pilot data collected through this system against live observations conducted simultaneously. There is no effect of age on foraging efficiency; however, juveniles were found to interact with more total partners than adults, and most social associations occur between juveniles and adults. Our results also suggest crows are engaging in preferential social associations, though there is no evidence that affiliative pairs and agonistic pairs are mutually exclusive. Finally, it appears Encounternet can be useful for data collection when paired with live observations, as long as certain limitations are kept in mind. Our pilot study could be beneficial to anyone considering the use of remote detection tools in data collection on animals.

  2. Dynamics of crowing development in the domestic Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica).

    PubMed

    Derégnaucourt, Sébastien; Saar, Sigal; Gahr, Manfred

    2009-06-22

    Species-specific behaviours gradually emerge, via incomplete patterns, to the final complete adult form. A classical example is birdsong, a learned behaviour ideally suited for studying the neural and molecular substrates of vocal learning. Young songbirds gradually transform primitive unstructured vocalizations (subsong, akin to human babbling) into complex, stereotyped sequences of syllables that constitute adult song. In comparison with birdsong, territorial and mating calls of vocal non-learner species are thought to exhibit little change during development. We revisited this issue using the crowing behaviour of domestic Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica). Crowing activity was continuously recorded in young males maintained in social isolation from the age of three weeks to four months. We observed developmental changes in crow structure, both the temporal and the spectral levels. Speed and trajectories of these developmental changes exhibited an unexpected high inter-individual variability. Mechanisms used by quails to transform sounds during ontogeny resemble those described in oscines during the sensorimotor phase of song learning. Studies on vocal non-learners could shed light on the specificity and evolution of vocal learning.

  3. Comprehensive health care reform in Vermont: a conversation with Governor Jim Douglas. Interview by James Maxwell.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Jim

    2007-01-01

    In this conversation, Vermont's Republican governor, Jim Douglas, discusses his role in and views on the state's comprehensive health reforms adopted in 2006. The reforms are designed to provide universal access to coverage, improve the quality and performance of the health care system, and promote health and wellness across the lifespan. He describes the specific features of the reforms, the plan for their financing, and the difficult compromises that had to be reached with the Democratically controlled legislature. He talks about his need, as governor, to balance the goals of health reform against other state priorities such as education and economic development.

  4. Cognitive processes associated with sequential tool use in New Caledonian crows.

    PubMed

    Wimpenny, Joanna H; Weir, Alex A S; Clayton, Lisa; Rutz, Christian; Kacelnik, Alex

    2009-08-05

    Using tools to act on non-food objects--for example, to make other tools--is considered to be a hallmark of human intelligence, and may have been a crucial step in our evolution. One form of this behaviour, 'sequential tool use', has been observed in a number of non-human primates and even in one bird, the New Caledonian crow (Corvus moneduloides). While sequential tool use has often been interpreted as evidence for advanced cognitive abilities, such as planning and analogical reasoning, the behaviour itself can be underpinned by a range of different cognitive mechanisms, which have never been explicitly examined. Here, we present experiments that not only demonstrate new tool-using capabilities in New Caledonian crows, but allow examination of the extent to which crows understand the physical interactions involved. In two experiments, we tested seven captive New Caledonian crows in six tasks requiring the use of up to three different tools in a sequence to retrieve food. Our study incorporated several novel features: (i) we tested crows on a three-tool problem (subjects were required to use a tool to retrieve a second tool, then use the second tool to retrieve a third one, and finally use the third one to reach for food); (ii) we presented tasks of different complexity in random rather than progressive order; (iii) we included a number of control conditions to test whether tool retrieval was goal-directed; and (iv) we manipulated the subjects' pre-testing experience. Five subjects successfully used tools in a sequence (four from their first trial), and four subjects repeatedly solved the three-tool condition. Sequential tool use did not require, but was enhanced by, pre-training on each element in the sequence ('chaining'), an explanation that could not be ruled out in earlier studies. By analyzing tool choice, tool swapping and improvement over time, we show that successful subjects did not use a random probing strategy. However, we find no firm evidence to

  5. Cognitive Processes Associated with Sequential Tool Use in New Caledonian Crows

    PubMed Central

    Wimpenny, Joanna H.; Weir, Alex A. S.; Clayton, Lisa; Rutz, Christian; Kacelnik, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Background Using tools to act on non-food objects—for example, to make other tools—is considered to be a hallmark of human intelligence, and may have been a crucial step in our evolution. One form of this behaviour, ‘sequential tool use’, has been observed in a number of non-human primates and even in one bird, the New Caledonian crow (Corvus moneduloides). While sequential tool use has often been interpreted as evidence for advanced cognitive abilities, such as planning and analogical reasoning, the behaviour itself can be underpinned by a range of different cognitive mechanisms, which have never been explicitly examined. Here, we present experiments that not only demonstrate new tool-using capabilities in New Caledonian crows, but allow examination of the extent to which crows understand the physical interactions involved. Methodology/Principal Findings In two experiments, we tested seven captive New Caledonian crows in six tasks requiring the use of up to three different tools in a sequence to retrieve food. Our study incorporated several novel features: (i) we tested crows on a three-tool problem (subjects were required to use a tool to retrieve a second tool, then use the second tool to retrieve a third one, and finally use the third one to reach for food); (ii) we presented tasks of different complexity in random rather than progressive order; (iii) we included a number of control conditions to test whether tool retrieval was goal-directed; and (iv) we manipulated the subjects' pre-testing experience. Five subjects successfully used tools in a sequence (four from their first trial), and four subjects repeatedly solved the three-tool condition. Sequential tool use did not require, but was enhanced by, pre-training on each element in the sequence (‘chaining’), an explanation that could not be ruled out in earlier studies. By analyzing tool choice, tool swapping and improvement over time, we show that successful subjects did not use a random probing

  6. Study of three-dimensional morphology of the proximal femur in developmental adult dysplasia of the hip suggests that the on-shelf modular prosthesis may not be an ideal choice for patients with Crowe type IV hips.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuanglu; Zuo, Jianlin; Li, Zhizhou; Yang, Yuhui; Liu, Tong; Xiao, Jianlin; Gao, Zhongli

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the three-dimensional morphological features of the proximal femur of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). From January 2012 to December 2014, 38 patients (47 hips) of DDH were admitted and 30 normal hips were selected as controls. All hips from both groups were examined by CT scan. CT data were imported into Mimics 17.0. Three-dimensional models of the proximal femur were then reconstructed, and the following parameters were measured: neck-shaft angle, neck length, offset, height of the centre of femoral head, level of isthmus, height of the tip of greater trochanter, the medullary canal diameter of isthmus(Di), the medullary canal diameter 10 mm above the apex of the lesser trochanter(DT + 10), the medullary canal diameter 20 mm below the apex of the lesser trochanter(DT-20), and then DT + 10/Di, DT-20/Di and DT + 10/DT-20 were calculated. There was no significant difference in neck-shaft angle between Crowe I, Crowe II-III DDH and the control group, while the neck-shaft angle was much smaller in Crowe IV DDH. The neck length of Crowe IV DDH was also much smaller than those of Crowe I and Crowe II-III DDH. Height of the tip greater trochanter in Crowe IV was greater than that in Crowe I, Crowe II-III DDH and the control group. The centre of femoral head in Crowe IV DDH was lower than those in Crowe I, Crowe II-III DDH and the control group. The level of isthmus in Crowe IV was much higher than those in Crowe I, Crowe II-III DDH and the control group. DT + 10, DT-20, DT + 10/Di and DT-20/Di were much smaller in Crowe IV DDH than those in Crowe I, Crowe II-III and the control group. Neck-shaft angle in the DDH groups was not larger than that in the control group. Comparing to Crowe I, Crowe II-III DDH and the control group, Crowe IV DDH had a dramatic change in the intramedullary and extramedullary parameters, especially the dramatic narrowing of medullary canal around the level of the lesser

  7. Activity profiles and hook-tool use of New Caledonian crows recorded by bird-borne video cameras.

    PubMed

    Troscianko, Jolyon; Rutz, Christian

    2015-12-01

    New Caledonian crows are renowned for their unusually sophisticated tool behaviour. Despite decades of fieldwork, however, very little is known about how they make and use their foraging tools in the wild, which is largely owing to the difficulties in observing these shy forest birds. To obtain first estimates of activity budgets, as well as close-up observations of tool-assisted foraging, we equipped 19 wild crows with self-developed miniature video cameras, yielding more than 10 h of analysable video footage for 10 subjects. While only four crows used tools during recording sessions, they did so extensively: across all 10 birds, we conservatively estimate that tool-related behaviour occurred in 3% of total observation time, and accounted for 19% of all foraging behaviour. Our video-loggers provided first footage of crows manufacturing, and using, one of their most complex tool types--hooked stick tools--under completely natural foraging conditions. We recorded manufacture from live branches of paperbark (Melaleuca sp.) and another tree species (thought to be Acacia spirorbis), and deployment of tools in a range of contexts, including on the forest floor. Taken together, our video recordings reveal an 'expanded' foraging niche for hooked stick tools, and highlight more generally how crows routinely switch between tool- and bill-assisted foraging.

  8. [Phylogeographic carrion, hooded and jungle crows (Aves, Corvidae) from data on partial sequencing of the mitochondrial DNA cytochrome B gene].

    PubMed

    Kriukov, A P; Suzuki, H

    2000-08-01

    Distribution of mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b gene haplotypes in two crow species was examined by means of sequencing of the 336-bp gene fragment. The topology of the NJ and UPGMA trees showed that the carrion crow range was split into two parts due to the presence of significantly diverged ancestral lineage localized in the southeastern part of the range. The carrion crow populations, inhabiting a territory ranging from France to northern Sakhalin, along with interspersed hooded crow populations and hybrid Siberian populations, shared a common haplotype. The border between two carrion crow lineages revealed is located in central Sakhalin. The subdivision of two weakly differentiated lineages within the jungle crown range, also observed within this territory, coincided with the subspecies division of this species. The estimated genetic distances indicate the isolation of the subgenus Coloeus. These data also suggest the convergent similarity between the chough Pyrrhocorax pyrrhocorax and the Corvus genus, as well as the conspecificity of Corvus corone corone and C. c. cornix.

  9. CROW{trademark} field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole. Topical report, March 1, 1995--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Fahy, L.J.; Johnson, L.A. Jr

    1997-10-01

    Beginning in 1990, efforts were initiated to implement an in situ remediation project for the contaminated aquifer at the Bell Lumber and Pole Company (Bell Pole) Site in New Brighton, Minnesota. The remediation project involves the application of the Contained Recovery of Oily Waste (CROW) process, which consists of hot-water injection to displace and recover the non- aqueous phase liquids (NAPL). While reviewing the site evaluation information, it became apparent that better site characterization would enhance the outcome of the project. Additional coring indicated that the areal extent of the contaminated soils was approximately eight times greater than initially believed. Because of uncertainties, it was determined that a pilot test would assist in the design of the full-scale CROW process demonstration. Based on the results from the pilot test, conditions and procedures were developed for implementing a full-scale CROW process demonstration to remediate the remaining contaminated soil at the Bell Pole site. After considering several options, WRI recommended implementing a three-phase approach to remediating the contaminated area. Phase 1 will involve a 30-gpm CROW process demonstration to remediate the upgradient, one-third of the contaminated area, which is believed to contain the largest amount of free organic material. As of late March 1996, the Phase 1 CROW process system is operating. However, hot-water response has not yet been observed at the extraction well. Phase 1 is expected to continue for at least 18 months or until 20 pore volumes have been injected.

  10. Elements in whole blood of Northwestern Crows (Corvus caurinus) in Alaska: No evidence for an association with beak deformities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Hemert, Caroline R.; Handel, Colleen M.

    2016-01-01

    A recent outbreak of beak deformities among resident birds in Alaska has raised concern about environmental contamination as a possible underlying factor. We measured whole blood concentrations of 30 essential and nonessential elements to determine whether any were associated with beak deformities in Northwestern Crows (Corvus caurinus). We tested for differences between 1) adults with versus those without beak deformities and 2) unaffected adults versus juveniles. Crows with beak deformities had slightly higher levels of barium, molybdenum, and vanadium (all P<0.05), but concentrations were generally low and within the range of values reported from other apparently healthy wild birds. Concentrations of several elements, including selenium, were higher in birds without versus birds with beak deformities (all P<0.05), a difference that may be explained in part by compromised foraging ability associated with the deformities. Adult crows had higher concentrations of cadmium, silicon, and zinc than juveniles (all P<0.05), although differences were relatively small and values were similar to those from other wild birds. Our results suggest that neither selenium nor other tested elements are likely to be causing beak deformities in Alaskan crows. We also provide the first data on elemental concentrations in Northwestern Crows. Levels of selenium far exceeded those typically found in passerine birds and were similar to those in marine-associated waterfowl, suggesting that background levels should be interpreted relative to a species's environment.

  11. Elements in Whole Blood of Northwestern Crows ( Corvus caurinus ) in Alaska, USA: No Evidence for an Association with Beak Deformities.

    PubMed

    Van Hemert, Caroline; Handel, Colleen M

    2016-07-01

    A recent outbreak of beak deformities among resident birds in Alaska, US, has raised concern about environmental contamination as a possible underlying factor. We measured whole blood concentrations of 30 essential and nonessential elements to determine whether any were associated with beak deformities in Northwestern Crows ( Corvus caurinus ). We tested for differences between 1) adults with versus those without beak deformities and 2) unaffected adults versus juveniles. Crows with beak deformities had slightly higher levels of barium, molybdenum, and vanadium (all P<0.05), but concentrations were generally low and within the range of values reported from other apparently healthy wild birds. Concentrations of several elements, including selenium, were higher in birds without versus birds with beak deformities (all P<0.05), a difference that may be explained in part by compromised foraging ability associated with the deformities. Adult crows had higher concentrations of cadmium, silicon, and zinc than juveniles (all P<0.05), although differences were relatively small and values were similar to those from other wild birds. Our results suggest that neither selenium nor other tested elements are likely to be causing beak deformities in Alaskan crows. We also provide the first data on elemental concentrations in Northwestern Crows. Levels of selenium far exceeded those typically found in passerine birds and were similar to those in marine-associated waterfowl, suggesting that background levels should be interpreted relative to a species' environment.

  12. Activity profiles and hook-tool use of New Caledonian crows recorded by bird-borne video cameras

    PubMed Central

    Troscianko, Jolyon; Rutz, Christian

    2015-01-01

    New Caledonian crows are renowned for their unusually sophisticated tool behaviour. Despite decades of fieldwork, however, very little is known about how they make and use their foraging tools in the wild, which is largely owing to the difficulties in observing these shy forest birds. To obtain first estimates of activity budgets, as well as close-up observations of tool-assisted foraging, we equipped 19 wild crows with self-developed miniature video cameras, yielding more than 10 h of analysable video footage for 10 subjects. While only four crows used tools during recording sessions, they did so extensively: across all 10 birds, we conservatively estimate that tool-related behaviour occurred in 3% of total observation time, and accounted for 19% of all foraging behaviour. Our video-loggers provided first footage of crows manufacturing, and using, one of their most complex tool types—hooked stick tools—under completely natural foraging conditions. We recorded manufacture from live branches of paperbark (Melaleuca sp.) and another tree species (thought to be Acacia spirorbis), and deployment of tools in a range of contexts, including on the forest floor. Taken together, our video recordings reveal an ‘expanded’ foraging niche for hooked stick tools, and highlight more generally how crows routinely switch between tool- and bill-assisted foraging. PMID:26701755

  13. Interspecific hybridization as a tool to understand vocal divergence: the example of crowing in quail (Genus Coturnix).

    PubMed

    Derégnaucourt, Sébastien

    2010-02-26

    Understanding the mechanisms that lead organisms to be separated into distinct species remains a challenge in evolutionary biology. Interspecific hybridization, which results from incomplete reproductive isolation, is a useful tool to investigate such mechanisms. In birds, interspecific hybridization is relatively frequent, despite the fact that closed species exhibit morphological and behavioural differences. Evolution of behaviour is difficult to investigate on a large timescale since it does not 'fossilize'. Here I propose that calls of hybrid non-songbirds that develop without the influence of learning may help in understanding the gradual process that leads to vocal divergence during speciation. I recorded crows produced by the European quail (Coturnix c. coturnix), the domestic Japanese quail (Coturnix c. japonica) and their hybrids (F1, F2 and backcrosses). Most crowing patterns were intermediate to those of the parental species; some were similar to one or the other parental species, or not present in either parental species. I also observed vocal changes in hybrid crows during the breeding season and from one year to the other. This vocal variability resembles those observed during the ontogeny of the crow in quails. It is likely that similar mechanisms involved in vocal changes during ontogeny might have driven vocal divergence in the species of Palearctic quails. I suggest that hybrid crows might have resembled those produced by intermediary forms of quails during speciation.

  14. Interspecific Hybridization as a Tool to Understand Vocal Divergence: The Example of Crowing in Quail (Genus Coturnix)

    PubMed Central

    Derégnaucourt, Sébastien

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that lead organisms to be separated into distinct species remains a challenge in evolutionary biology. Interspecific hybridization, which results from incomplete reproductive isolation, is a useful tool to investigate such mechanisms. In birds, interspecific hybridization is relatively frequent, despite the fact that closed species exhibit morphological and behavioural differences. Evolution of behaviour is difficult to investigate on a large timescale since it does not ‘fossilize’. Here I propose that calls of hybrid non-songbirds that develop without the influence of learning may help in understanding the gradual process that leads to vocal divergence during speciation. I recorded crows produced by the European quail (Coturnix c. coturnix), the domestic Japanese quail (Coturnix c. japonica) and their hybrids (F1, F2 and backcrosses). Most crowing patterns were intermediate to those of the parental species; some were similar to one or the other parental species, or not present in either parental species. I also observed vocal changes in hybrid crows during the breeding season and from one year to the other. This vocal variability resembles those observed during the ontogeny of the crow in quails. It is likely that similar mechanisms involved in vocal changes during ontogeny might have driven vocal divergence in the species of Palearctic quails. I suggest that hybrid crows might have resembled those produced by intermediary forms of quails during speciation. PMID:20195481

  15. LEI0258 microsatellite variability and its association with humoral and cell mediated immune responses in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Esmailnejad, Atefeh; Nikbakht Brujeni, Gholamreza; Badavam, Maryam

    2017-10-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) has a profound influence on disease resistance or susceptibility, productivity and important economic traits in chicken. Association of the MHC with a wide range of immune responses makes it a valuable predictive factor for the disease pathogenesis and outcome. The tandem repeat LEI0258 is a genetic marker which is located within the B locus of chicken MHC and strongly associated with serologically defined haplotypes. LEI0258 microsatellite marker was applied to investigate the MHC polymorphism in Ross 308 broiler chicken (N=104). Association of LEI0258 alleles with humoral and cell mediated immune responses to Newcastle disease (ND), Infectious bursal disease (IBD) and Avian influenza (AI) vaccines were also examined. LEI0258 polymorphism was determined by PCR-based fragment analysis, and association of LEI0258 alleles with immune responses were evaluated using multivariate regression analysis and GLM procedures. A total of seven alleles ranging from 195 to 448bp were found, including two novel alleles (263 and 362bp) that were unique in Ross 308 broiler population. Association study revealed a significant influence of MHC alleles on humoral and cellular immune responses in Ross population (P<0.05). Alleles 385 and 448bp were associated with increased peripheral blood lymphocyte proliferation response. Alleles 300, 362 and 448bp had a positive effect on immune responses to Infectious bursal disease vaccine, and allele 263bp was significantly correlated with elevated antibody titer against Newcastle disease vaccine. Results obtained from this study confirmed the important role of MHC as a candidate gene marker for immune responses that could be used in genetic improvement of disease-resistant traits and resource conservation in broiler population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Crow deaths as a sentinel surveillance system for West Nile virus in the northeastern United States, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eidson, M.; Komar, N.; Sorhage, F.; Nelson, R.; Talbot, T.; Mostashari, F.; McLean, R.; ,

    2001-01-01

    In addition to human encephalitis and meningitis cases, the West Nile (WN) virus outbreak in the summer and fall of 1999 in New York State resulted in bird deaths in New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut. From August to December 1999, 295 dead birds were laboratory-confirmed with WN virus infection; 262 (89%) were American Crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos). The New York State Department of Health received reports of 17,339 dead birds, including 5,697 (33%) crows; in Connecticut 1,040 dead crows were reported. Bird deaths were critical in identifying WN virus as the cause of the human outbreak and defining its geographic and temporal limits. If established before a WN virus outbreak, a surveillance system based on bird deaths may provide a sensitive method of detecting WN virus.

  17. How Insightful Is 'Insight'? New Caledonian Crows Do Not Attend to Object Weight during Spontaneous Stone Dropping.

    PubMed

    Neilands, P D; Jelbert, S A; Breen, A J; Schiestl, M; Taylor, A H

    2016-01-01

    It is highly difficult to pinpoint what is going through an animal's mind when it appears to solve a problem by 'insight'. Here, we searched for an information processing error during the emergence of seemingly insightful stone dropping in New Caledonian crows. We presented these birds with the platform apparatus, where a heavy object needs to be dropped down a tube and onto a platform in order to trigger the release of food. Our results show New Caledonian crows exhibit a weight inattention error: they do not attend to the weight of an object when innovating stone dropping. This suggests that these crows do not use an understanding of force when solving the platform task in a seemingly insightful manner. Our findings showcase the power of the signature-testing approach, where experiments search for information processing biases, errors and limits, in order to make strong inferences about the functioning of animal minds.

  18. Crow deaths as a sentinel surveillance system for West Nile virus in the northeastern United States, 1999.

    PubMed Central

    Eidson, M.; Komar, N.; Sorhage, F.; Nelson, R.; Talbot, T.; Mostashari, F.; McLean, R.

    2001-01-01

    In addition to human encephalitis and meningitis cases, the West Nile (WN) virus outbreak in the summer and fall of 1999 in New York State resulted in bird deaths in New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut. From August to December 1999, 295 dead birds were laboratory-confirmed with WN virus infection; 262 (89%) were American Crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos). The New York State Department of Health received reports of 17,339 dead birds, including 5,697 (33%) crows; in Connecticut 1,040 dead crows were reported. Bird deaths were critical in identifying WN virus as the cause of the human outbreak and defining its geographic and temporal limits. If established before a WN virus outbreak, a surveillance system based on bird deaths may provide a sensitive method of detecting WN virus. PMID:11585521

  19. How Insightful Is ‘Insight’? New Caledonian Crows Do Not Attend to Object Weight during Spontaneous Stone Dropping

    PubMed Central

    Jelbert, S. A.; Breen, A. J.; Schiestl, M.; Taylor, A. H.

    2016-01-01

    It is highly difficult to pinpoint what is going through an animal’s mind when it appears to solve a problem by ‘insight’. Here, we searched for an information processing error during the emergence of seemingly insightful stone dropping in New Caledonian crows. We presented these birds with the platform apparatus, where a heavy object needs to be dropped down a tube and onto a platform in order to trigger the release of food. Our results show New Caledonian crows exhibit a weight inattention error: they do not attend to the weight of an object when innovating stone dropping. This suggests that these crows do not use an understanding of force when solving the platform task in a seemingly insightful manner. Our findings showcase the power of the signature-testing approach, where experiments search for information processing biases, errors and limits, in order to make strong inferences about the functioning of animal minds. PMID:27973610

  20. Deposition of Crow Creek Member (Pierre Shale, Campanian), southeast South Dakota, and supposed relations to Iowa's Manson Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Witzke, B.J.; Anderson, R.R.; Ludvigson, G.A. . Geological Survey Bureau); Hammond, R.H. )

    1994-04-01

    Previous dates from the Manson Impact Structure (MIS) indicated an age near the K-T boundary (65 Ma), but a date of 73.8 Ma was recently reported for a single breccia clast at Manson. The discovery of shock metamorphosed grains in roughly coeval Pierre Shale strata in S. Dak. led Izett et al. to propose that the Crow Creek Mbr contains Manson's distal impact ejecta. They indicated that Manson was covered by a seaway at that time, and postulated effects from an impact-triggered tsunami in the Western Interior. A study of Crow Creek strata from four sites in Yankton Co., S. Dak. was undertaken to evaluate the sedimentary context of the contained impact-derived grains. The sub-Crow Creek unconformity truncates lower Pierre strata eastward across S. Dak. and locally overlies the Niobrara Fm on the sioux Ridge. Probable leaf fossils are seen along this surface at one site. Basal Crow Creek strata reveal evidence of condensed sedimentation coincident with the onset of Bearpaw transgression, particularly occurrences of glauconite, abundant phosphate (pellets, phosphatized matrix, fish bone apatite), and foam-rich lithologies. Basal strata contain detrital grains (15--25% volume) derived from eastern source areas, including quartz, feldspar, and heavy minerals and small clasts of siltstone, mudstone, shale, dolomite, limestone, and quartzite. Floating silt and sand-sized detrital grains persist in the overlying Crow Creek marls, indicating continuing detrital influx. Shock metamorphic planar deformation features (PDFs) are seen in many quartz grains (10-30% in basal unit) and some quartzite and siltstone grains; these are definitive for an impact-derived source. Was the MIS the source of these grains, and does the Crow Creek show evidence of a Manson-triggered tsunami Several obstacles remain and are discussed.

  1. Population trends of Mariana Crow Corvus kubaryi on Rota, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plentovich, S.; Morton, J.M.; Bart, J.; Camp, R.J.; Lusk, M.; Johnson, N.; VanderWerf, E.

    2005-01-01

    Endemic to the islands of Guam and Rota in the Mariana Islands, Mariana Crow Corvus kubaryi is the only corvid in Micronesia. Currently, it survives on Guam only because of translocation of individuals from Rota (1999-2003). Island-wide surveys in 1982 and 1995 on Rota yielded population estimates of 1,348 and 592 respectively, indicating a 56% decrease in only 13 years. A sharp decline in the only viable Mariana Crow population has serious implications for conservation efforts on Rota and for efforts to re-establish the Guam population. However, the validity of the apparent decline has been debated among scientists and government management agencies. We augmented the 1982 and 1995 island-wide VCP surveys with (1) an additional island-wide survey conducted in 1998, and (2) roadside surveys conducted during 1991-1993 and again during 1999-2002. We also outline historical changes in Rota's limestone forest based on aerial photographs and historical information. Data from all surveys indicate a significant decline in the Mariana Crow population. Declines occurred especially along the north-central coast and in the area east of the airport known as As Dudo in the 1990s, but the data indicate an island-wide decline over the entire span of the surveys. introduced predators, human persecution, and habitat loss and degradation by anthropogenic and natural causes have all contributed to the decline. Long-term preservation of this species will require effective brown treesnake Boiga irregularis control, habitat protection, continued monitoring and research, and increased public education and awareness of Rota's rare and endangered species. ?? BirdLife International 2005.

  2. Experimental infection of Carrion crows (Corvus corone) with two European West Nile virus (WNV) strains.

    PubMed

    Dridi, Maha; Vangeluwe, Didier; Lecollinet, Sylvie; van den Berg, Thierry; Lambrecht, Bénédicte

    2013-07-26

    West Nile virus (WNV) has become a wide-spread arbovirus in Europe and the Mediterranean Basin countries. This emerging zoonotic disease disseminated 13 years ago in North America where its impact on animal and public health has been considerable. Although American corvids have been the most reliable avian sentinels for WN surveillance in the United States, there is so far no data available about the susceptibility of their Western European counterparts to WNV. Clinical follow-up and serum, oral swabs and feathers viral RNA load monitoring was herein performed on wild-caught Carrion crows (Corvus corone) experimentally inoculated with two WNV strains, Is98 that was isolated from a stork in Israel where it elicited high rates of avian deaths in 1998, and Fr2000 which was only associated to sporadic equine cases in Camargue, France in 2000. Inoculated crows were sensitive to both WNV infections and, as expected from the available epidemiological data, Is98 induced a higher mortality rate (100% vs. 33%) and a quicker fatal outcome, with higher viral RNA loads detected in the serum, oral swabs and feathers than in the Fr2000 group. Therefore, Carrion crows should also be a target species for WNV surveillance in Western Europe, where reporting for abnormal mortalities could be completed by viral detection in the herein described avian matrices. These experimental findings also emphasize the peculiarity of the European situation where a large spectrum of WNV genetic and pathotypic variants have been so far isolated despite limited WN disease reports in wild birds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Apoptosis-mediated seasonal testicular regression in the Japanese Jungle Crow (Corvus macrorhynchos).

    PubMed

    Islam, M Nazrul; Tsukahara, N; Sugita, S

    2012-06-01

    The present study investigated effects of apoptosis observed during seasonal testicular regression in Japanese Jungle Crows. The study was conducted during January to June 2008, 2009. Testes from adults captured during non-breeding (January), prebreeding (February to mid-March), main-breeding (late March to early May), transition (mid-May to late May), and post-breeding (June) seasons were analyzed. Apoptosis was assessed by in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay. Paired-testis volume increased 95-fold from the non-breeding to the main-breeding season (P < 0.05), and subsequently decreased 26-fold from the main breeding to the post-breeding season (P < 0.05). Testicular activity was evaluated from the total germ cell count and sperm index, which increased 42- and 5-fold, respectively, in the main-breeding season, and subsequently decreased 33- and 5-fold in the post-breeding season. In testes, TUNEL-positive germ cells were at low levels in the non-breeding season, absent in the prebreeding and the main-breeding seasons, and highest in mid-May (P < 0.05). In contrast, TUNEL-positive Sertoli cells occurred only in late-April. In addition, TUNEL-positive fibroblast-like cells were observed in the outer zone of the tunica albuginea in the post-breeding season. Collectively, these data suggested that the seasonal rise in the testicular competence occurred slowly in Japanese Jungle Crows; however, testis function was terminated rapidly after the breeding season. Furthermore, we concluded, similar to other avian species, Sertoli cell apoptosis followed by massive germ cell death was responsible for rapid testicular regression in Jungle Crows. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Laudation in honor of Professor Miguel Ángel Jiménez Montaño

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Fernández, Antero

    2013-12-01

    During our academic event, a laudatory ceremony in honor of Professor Miguel Ángel Jiménez Montaño was carried out and a brief account of his achievements was presented. Professor JJiménez Montaño is a founding member of the Faculty of Physics of the University of Veracruz, Campus Xalapa (founded in 1962). Professor Jiménez Montaño is currently the Dean of this Faculty and one of the most respected Mexican Physicist in the research areas of Biophysics and Computational Molecular Biology.

  5. Sensory and Working Memory Representations of Small and Large Numerosities in the Crow Endbrain.

    PubMed

    Ditz, Helen M; Nieder, Andreas

    2016-11-23

    Neurons in the avian nidopallium caudolaterale (NCL), an endbrain structure that originated independently from the mammalian neocortex, process visual numerosities. To clarify the code for number in this anatomically distinct endbrain area in birds, neuronal responses to a broad range of numerosities were analyzed. We recorded single-neuron activity from the NCL of crows performing a delayed match-to-sample task with visual numerosities as discriminanda. The responses of >20% of randomly selected neurons were modulated significantly by numerosities ranging from one to 30 items. Numerosity-selective neurons showed bell-shaped tuning curves with one of the presented numerosities as preferred numerosity regardless of the physical appearance of the items. The resulting labeled-line code exhibited logarithmic compression obeying the Weber-Fechner law for magnitudes. Comparable proportions of selective neurons were found, not only during stimulus presentation, but also in the delay phase, indicating a dominant role of the NCL in numerical working memory. Both during sensory encoding and memorization of numerosities in working memory, NCL activity predicted the crows' number discrimination performance. These neuronal data reveal striking similarities across vertebrate taxa in their code for number despite convergently evolved and anatomically distinct endbrain structures. Birds are known for their capabilities to process numerical quantity. However, birds lack a six-layered neocortex that enables primates with numerical competence. We aimed to decipher the neuronal code for numerical quantity in the independently and distinctly evolved endbrain of birds. We recorded the activity of neurons in an endbrain association area termed nidopallium caudolaterale (NCL) from crows that assessed and briefly memorized numerosities from one to 30 dots. We report a neuronal code for sensory representation and working memory of numerosities in the crow NCL exhibiting several

  6. Physical characteristics of stream subbasins in the South Fork Crow River basin, south-central Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanocki, C.A.

    1998-01-01

    Data that describe the physical characteristics of stream subbasins upstream from selected. sites on streams in the South Fork Crow River Basin, located in south-central Minnesota are presented in this report. The physical characteristics are the drainage area of the subbasin, the percentage area of the subbasin covered only by lakes, the percentage area of the subbasin covered by both lakes and wetlands, the main-channellength, and the main-channel slope. Stream sites include outlets of subbasins of at least 5 square miles, and locations of U.S. Geological Survey low-flow, high-flow, and continuous-record gaging stations.

  7. Engineers Jim Murray and Joe Pahle prepare a deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator exp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Engineers Jim Murray and Joe Pahle prepare a deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment flown by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The inflatable wing project represented a basic flight research effort by Dryden personnel. Three successful flights of the I2000 inflatable wing aircraft occurred. During the flights, the team air-launched the radio-controlled (R/C) I2000 from an R/C utility airplane at an altitude of 800-1000 feet. As the I2000 separated from the carrier aircraft, its inflatable wings 'popped-out,' deploying rapidly via an on-board nitrogen bottle. The aircraft remained stable as it transitioned from wingless to winged flight. The unpowered I2000 glided down to a smooth landing under complete control.

  8. Engineers Jim Murray and Joe Pahle prepare a deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator exp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Engineers Jim Murray and Joe Pahle prepare a deployable, inflatable wing technology demonstrator experiment flown by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The inflatable wing project represented a basic flight research effort by Dryden personnel. Three successful flights of the I2000 inflatable wing aircraft occurred. During the flights, the team air-launched the radio-controlled (R/C) I2000 from an R/C utility airplane at an altitude of 800-1000 feet. As the I2000 separated from the carrier aircraft, its inflatable wings 'popped-out,' deploying rapidly via an on-board nitrogen bottle. The aircraft remained stable as it transitioned from wingless to winged flight. The unpowered I2000 glided down to a smooth landing under complete control.

  9. More to explore in music reading as a cross-modal process: a comment on Lee and Lei (2012).

    PubMed

    Besson, Mireille; Martínez-Montes, Eduardo

    2013-06-01

    Lee and Lei (2012) used a pitch task and a duration task in different blocks of trials and measured event-related potentials in 12 musicians and 24 non-musicians as they read musical scores. The authors claimed to disentangle pitch and duration processing. From the perspectives of cognitive neuropsychology there is great interest in studying the processes involved in reading musical scores. However, we argue that the design used by Lee and Lei (2012) does not allow disentangling pitch and duration processing because both are expressed within the musical score. Moreover, we emphasize the importance of longitudinal studies over cross-sectional studies to pinpoint the specific influence of musical expertise on score reading.

  10. Using MicroLEIS DSS to evaluate climate change impacts on land suitability in Andalusia, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotb Abd-Elmabod, Sameh; Anaya-Romero, María; Jordán, Antonio; Muñoz-Rojas, Miriam; de la Rosa, Diego

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the effects of climate change on land suitability for crop production has become an important issue with respect to food security in areas undergoing increasing population sizes. Land suitability for six common Mediterranean crops was evaluated under current conditions and future climate change scenario. This evaluation was performed using the Agro-ecological Decision Support System Micro LEIS (MicroLEIS DSS) through the application of Terraza and Cervatana models. Terraza model provides an experimental prediction for the bioclimatic deficiency in the 62 natural regions that represent the Andalusia region. This model is dependent on current climate data, future climate change scenario data, and crop response data including coefficient of photosynthetic efficacy (Kc), coefficient of efficiency (Ky), and soil water retention. Alternatively, the Cervatana model is used to estimate agricultural land use capability under different soil types. Soil morphological and analytical data were collected from SEISnet data base representative of the natural region (NUTS 2) of Andalusia by 62 soil profiles. Agro-climatic data, referred to temperature and precipitation were obtained from the CDBm-Andalusia database, which contains monthly average values of climate variables: mean temperature, maximum and minimum rainfall, number of days of rain and humidity, collected during a consecutive period of 30 years (1960-1990), that represent the current climate scenario. Future climate is represented under A1B scenario for theperiods 2040, 2070 and 2100. These scenarios have been calculated using climate change variation values from the State Meteorological Agency (AEMET, 2011). The results of the Cervatana model depends on Terraza output results (e.g. water deficit class and the risk of frost class) and other land properties including soil factors, slope factors, and erosion risk factors. In order to spatialize the evaluation data, both models were incorporated into a

  11. From the Cotton Fields to the Ties That Bind: Jim Pusack's Enduring Impact on Today's CALL Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Linda C.

    2010-01-01

    From 1981 to today, the encouragement Jim Pusack and his colleague Sue Otto gave faculty to develop and/or implement CALL into the curriculum has been vital to our L2 teaching evolution. This article describes how their efforts evolved over the last two and a half decades and the ties that bind their efforts with today's CALL development.

  12. From the Cotton Fields to the Ties That Bind: Jim Pusack's Enduring Impact on Today's CALL Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Linda C.

    2010-01-01

    From 1981 to today, the encouragement Jim Pusack and his colleague Sue Otto gave faculty to develop and/or implement CALL into the curriculum has been vital to our L2 teaching evolution. This article describes how their efforts evolved over the last two and a half decades and the ties that bind their efforts with today's CALL development.

  13. Beyond Open Source: According to Jim Hirsch, Open Technology, Not Open Source, Is the Wave of the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villano, Matt

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Jim Hirsch, an associate superintendent for technology at Piano Independent School District in Piano, Texas. Hirsch serves as a liaison for the open technologies committee of the Consortium for School Networking. In this interview, he shares his opinion on the significance of open source in K-12.

  14. The Use of Crow-AMSAA Plots to Assess Mishap Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Jeffrey W.

    2011-01-01

    Crow-AMSAA (CA) plots are used to model reliability growth. Use of CA plots has expanded into other areas, such as tracking events of interest to management, maintenance problems, and safety mishaps. Safety mishaps can often be successfully modeled using a Poisson probability distribution. CA plots show a Poisson process in log-log space. If the safety mishaps are a stable homogenous Poisson process, a linear fit to the points in a CA plot will have a slope of one. Slopes of greater than one indicate a nonhomogenous Poisson process, with increasing occurrence. Slopes of less than one indicate a nonhomogenous Poisson process, with decreasing occurrence. Changes in slope, known as "cusps," indicate a change in process, which could be an improvement or a degradation. After presenting the CA conceptual framework, examples are given of trending slips, trips and falls, and ergonomic incidents at NASA (from Agency-level data). Crow-AMSAA plotting is a robust tool for trending safety mishaps that can provide insight into safety performance over time.

  15. Survey of campylobacter, salmonella and mycoplasmas in house crows (Corvus splendens) in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ganapathy, K; Saleha, A A; Jaganathan, M; Tan, C G; Chong, C T; Tang, S C; Ideris, A; Dare, C M; Bradbury, J M

    2007-05-05

    House crows (Corvus splendens) in Selangor, Malaysia were examined for the presence of Campylobacter species, Salmonella species, Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Mycoplasma synoviae by serology, culture and pcr. For the detection of Campylobacter and Salmonella species swabs were taken either from the intestine or cloaca. For the detection of mycoplasmas, swabs were taken either from the choanal cleft or trachea for culture and pcr and serum samples were tested by the rapid serum agglutination (rsa) and monoclonal antibody-blocking elisa (mbelisa) for antibodies to M gallisepticum and M synoviae. For campylobacter, 25.3 per cent of the crows were positive by culture, and the species identified were Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. No Salmonella species were isolated. Four of 24 swabs were positive for M gallisepticum dna but none gave positive results for M synoviae dna. No M gallisepticum or M synoviae antibodies were detected by rsa but 60 per cent of the sera gave positive reactions for M gallisepticum and 13 per cent gave positive reactions for M synoviae by mbelisa.

  16. West Nile Virus Activity in a Winter Roost of American Crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos): Is Bird-To-Bird Transmission Important in Persistence and Amplification?

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, M. G.; Reisen, W. K.; Wheeler, S. S.; Townsend, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    Since its emergence in North America, West Nile virus (WNV) has had a large impact on equines, humans, and wild bird communities, yet gaps remain in our understanding of how the virus persists at temperate latitudes when winter temperatures preclude virus replication and host-seeking activity by mosquito vectors. Bird-to-bird transmission at large communal American Crow roosts could provide one mechanism for WNV persistence. Herein, we describe seasonal patterns of crow and Culex mosquito abundance, WNV infection rates, and the prevalence of WNV-positive fecal samples at a winter crow roost to test the hypothesis that bird-to-bird transmission allows WNV to persist at winter crow roosts. Samples were collected from large winter crow roosts in the Sacramento Valley of California from January 2013 until August 2014, encompassing two overwintering roost periods. West Nile virus RNA was detected in local crow carcasses in both summer [13/18 (72% WNV positive)] and winter [18/44 (41% WNV positive)] 2013–2014. Winter infections were unlikely to have arisen by recent bites from infected mosquitoes because Culex host-seeking activity was very low in winter and all Culex mosquitoes collected during winter months tested negative for WNV. Opportunities existed for fecal-oral transfer at the overwintering roost: most carcasses that tested positive for WNV had detectable viral RNA in both kidney and cloacal swabs, suggesting that infected crows were shedding virus in their feces, and >50% of crows at the roost were stained with feces by mid-winter. Moreover, 2.3% of fecal samples collected in late summer, when mosquitoes were active, tested positive for WNV RNA. Nevertheless, none of the 1,119 feces collected from three roosts over two winters contained detectable WNV RNA. This study provided evidence of WNV infection in overwintering American crows without mosquito vector activity, but did not elucidate a mechanism of WNV transmission during winter. PMID:26335475

  17. West Nile Virus Activity in a Winter Roost of American Crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos): Is Bird-To-Bird Transmission Important in Persistence and Amplification?

    PubMed

    Hinton, M G; Reisen, W K; Wheeler, S S; Townsend, A K

    2015-07-01

    Since its emergence in North America, West Nile virus (WNV) has had a large impact on equines, humans, and wild bird communities, yet gaps remain in our understanding of how the virus persists at temperate latitudes when winter temperatures preclude virus replication and host-seeking activity by mosquito vectors. Bird-to-bird transmission at large communal American Crow roosts could provide one mechanism for WNV persistence. Herein, we describe seasonal patterns of crow and Culex mosquito abundance, WNV infection rates, and the prevalence of WNV-positive fecal samples at a winter crow roost to test the hypothesis that bird-to-bird transmission allows WNV to persist at winter crow roosts. Samples were collected from large winter crow roosts in the Sacramento Valley of California from January 2013 until August 2014, encompassing two overwintering roost periods. West Nile virus RNA was detected in local crow carcasses in both summer [13/18 (72% WNV positive)] and winter [18/44 (41% WNV positive)] 2013-2014. Winter infections were unlikely to have arisen by recent bites from infected mosquitoes because Culex host-seeking activity was very low in winter and all Culex mosquitoes collected during winter months tested negative for WNV. Opportunities existed for fecal-oral transfer at the overwintering roost: most carcasses that tested positive for WNV had detectable viral RNA in both kidney and cloacal swabs, suggesting that infected crows were shedding virus in their feces, and >50% of crows at the roost were stained with feces by mid-winter. Moreover, 2.3% of fecal samples collected in late summer, when mosquitoes were active, tested positive for WNV RNA. Nevertheless, none of the 1,119 feces collected from three roosts over two winters contained detectable WNV RNA. This study provided evidence of WNV infection in overwintering American crows without mosquito vector activity, but did not elucidate a mechanism of WNV transmission during winter.

  18. 77 FR 71454 - Crow Butte Resources, Inc. License SUA-1534, License Amendment To Construct and Operate Marsland...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-30

    ... 16, 2012 and June 8, 2012, Crow Butte Resources, Inc. (CBR) submitted a request to amend Source... administrative review, documented in an email to CBR dated October 5, 2012, found the application acceptable to... facility at CBR's Marsland site in Dawes County, Nebraska. Requirements for hearing requests and petitions...

  19. 30 CFR 756.20 - Approval of amendments to the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... abandoned mine land reclamation plan. 756.20 Section 756.20 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INDIAN LANDS PROGRAM INDIAN TRIBE ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION PROGRAMS § 756.20 Approval of amendments to the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan...

  20. 30 CFR 756.20 - Approval of amendments to the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... abandoned mine land reclamation plan. 756.20 Section 756.20 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INDIAN LANDS PROGRAM INDIAN TRIBE ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION PROGRAMS § 756.20 Approval of amendments to the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan...

  1. 30 CFR 756.20 - Approval of amendments to the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... abandoned mine land reclamation plan. 756.20 Section 756.20 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INDIAN LANDS PROGRAM INDIAN TRIBE ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION PROGRAMS § 756.20 Approval of amendments to the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan...

  2. 30 CFR 756.20 - Approval of amendments to the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... abandoned mine land reclamation plan. 756.20 Section 756.20 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INDIAN LANDS PROGRAM INDIAN TRIBE ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION PROGRAMS § 756.20 Approval of amendments to the Crow Tribe's abandoned mine land reclamation plan...

  3. The Extent of Bilingualism Among the Crow and the Northern Cheyenne Indian School Populations, Grades One Through Twelve. A Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dracon, John

    The research was conducted in the schools on or near the Crow and the Northern Cheyenne Indian reservations in Montana during October of 1969. All the students, both Indian and white, grades 1 through 12, were involved in the study. Some 2020 Indian students, out of a combined student enrollment of 3626, were assessed as to their bilingual…

  4. "Crows on the Wire": Intermediality in Applied Drama and Conflict Transformation--"Humanising" the Police in Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Matt

    2016-01-01

    "Crows on the Wire" (COTW) is an intermedial project deploying applied theatre, educational drama and digital performance [Dixon, S. (2007). "Digital Performance: A History of New Media in Theatre, Dance, Performance Art and Installation." Cambridge, MA: MIT Press] to explore the recent history of the peace process in Northern…

  5. "Crows on the Wire": Intermediality in Applied Drama and Conflict Transformation--"Humanising" the Police in Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Matt

    2016-01-01

    "Crows on the Wire" (COTW) is an intermedial project deploying applied theatre, educational drama and digital performance [Dixon, S. (2007). "Digital Performance: A History of New Media in Theatre, Dance, Performance Art and Installation." Cambridge, MA: MIT Press] to explore the recent history of the peace process in Northern…

  6. Population and water are vital to the existence and development of China: Mme. Lei Jiegiang.

    PubMed

    1997-09-01

    The seminar was opened by Mme. Lei Jiegiang, Deputy Speaker of the Standing Committee NPC. She said that "the per capital ownership of the water resources is only one-fourth of the world average, the 110th place in the world. Therefore, population growth control, economical utilization of resources, and environmental protection are fundamental channels to realize the socioeconomic development in our country." China is a country where water resources are not sufficient, causing a shortage of water in many areas. Furthermore, the water in some areas has been severely polluted. With the increase of population and the development of economy, the contradiction between population size and water resources is expected to increase. Mme. Jiegiang suggested that "we should encourage the establishment of a calculation system of water resources in order to save water. In addition, we should begin to treat pollution and strengthen the economic regulation of water resources." She concluded her speech by stating that "Population and Water Resources are two major issues that are closely related and needed to attain the 21st century modernization and they are vital to the existence and development of the Chinese Nation. As the population in China occupies 22% of the world total, a well solved population and water resources in China will be great contribution not only for the sustainable development of China, but also to the peace and development of Asia and the world." full text

  7. [Comparison of academic viewpoints between Yun Tie-qiao and Lu Yuan-lei].

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi-qing; Bi, Li-juan; Yang, Xing-lin

    2010-07-01

    Both Yun Tie-qiao and Lu Yuan-lei are medical professionals coming from the literary field with versatile and in-depth knowledge and extensive experience in medical education and clinical practice, all closely related to modern TCM development. Yun, the elder, insisted on reforming TCM and was early to advocate the academic idea of amalgamating western and traditional Chinese medicine; while Lu, the younger, insisted on the idea of "scientizing TCM" and was the representative of amalgamating western and traditional Chinese medicine in the later stage. They shared many common viewpoints, including venerating Zhang Zhongjing, stressing exogenous cold pathogens, advocating reformation and amalgamation of western medicine and TCM and objecting to the abolishment of TCM. However, there were discrepancies between them, including the relationship between the Inner Canon and the Essay on Exogenous Cold Diseases, warm disease theory, pulse theory, titles of TCM diseases and Japanese Kampo medicine. A comparison of them and noting their valuable contributions will be beneficial for the promotion of the development of TCM.

  8. Influence of screening length modification on the scattering cross section in LEIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primetzhofer, D.; Markin, S. N.; Efrosinin, D. V.; Steinbauer, E.; Andrzejewski, R.; Bauer, P.

    2011-06-01

    Scattering cross sections for He + ions in the energy range of 100 eV to 100 keV and for Al, Cu and Au target atoms were calculated. Employing the Thomas-Fermi-Molière model the potential strength was tuned by variation of the screening length. The resulting change in scattering cross section was analyzed and the absolute value is compared to cross sections obtained from potentials commonly employed in the medium-energy ion scattering (MEIS) regime. A large influence on the scattering cross section is observed for targets with large atomic number in the very low energy range. For instance, the scattering cross section for 100 eV He +-ions scattered from Au by 129° changes by a factor of 2.5 between different potential strengths claimed in the literature to be suitable for low-energy ion scattering (LEIS) energies. An experiment to determine electronic energy loss of very slow ions in metals is presented. It shows how uncertainties in the scattering potential strength can lead to systematically wrong results, although perfect agreement between experimental data and simulations is found. The impact of these results on quantitative surface structure and composition analysis is discussed.

  9. Brassinosteroid stimulation of hypocotyl elongation and wall relaxation in pakchoi (Brassica chinensis cv Lei-Choi)

    SciTech Connect

    Tzannwei Wang; Cosgrove, D.J.; Arteca, R.N. )

    1993-03-01

    Hypocotyl elongation of pakchoi (Brassica chinensis cv Lei-Choi) was stimulated by applying 300 ng of brassinosteroid (2[alpha],3[alpha],22[beta],23[beta]-tetrahydroxy-24[beta]-methyl-B-homo-7-oxa-5[alpha]-cholestan-6-one, BR) in 1 [mu]L of 50% ethanol to the apex of hypocotyls. BR had its greatest effect on elongation of the apical 3-mm region below the cotyledonary node (75% stimulation) between 6 and 18 h after treatment. Stress/strain (Instron) analysis of this 3-mm region revealed that plastic and elastic components of extension were not significantly different between BR-treated and control seedlings. In pressure-block experiments, the initial rate of relaxation was 2-fold faster in BR-treated plants as compared with controls, whereas after 125 min the total amount of relaxation and the relaxation rate were the same for the two treatments. Osmotic pressure of cell sap expressed from this 3-mm region showed a large decrease (28%) in BR-treated seedlings compared to the controls. The authors conclude that BR stimulates growth in pakchoi by accelerating the biochemical processes that cause wall relaxation, without inducing a large change in wall mechanical properties. 19 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Detection of West Nile virus using formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissues in crows and horses: quantification of viral transcripts by real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Deepanker; Kim, Hyun; Feria, Willard; Russo, Brigite; Acland, Helen

    2004-08-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) RNA was quantified in WNV infected crows and horses with the help of a real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR assay. A 5' nuclease assay, based on NS5 gene detection with a fluorescent probe was used for quantifying WNV RNA using formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue specimens. Quantitative detection of WNV RNA showed the presence of a higher amount of the viral RNA in crow tissues compared to equine tissues and these results correlated well with the detection of WNV antigen by immunostaining. In crows, the highest amount of virus was seen in the intestine and in horses in the brain.

  11. Predicting fractional bed load transport rates: Application of the Wilcock-Crowe equations to a regulated gravel bed river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaeuman, D.; Andrews, E.D.; Kraus, A.; Smith, W.

    2009-01-01

    Bed load samples from four locations in the Trinity River of northern California are analyzed to evaluate the performance of the Wilcock-Crowe bed load transport equations for predicting fractional bed load transport rates. Bed surface particles become smaller and the fraction of sand on the bed increases with distance downstream from Lewiston Dam. The dimensionless reference shear stress for the mean bed particle size (t*rm) is largest near the dam, but varies relatively little between the more downstream locations. The relation between t*rm and the reference shear stresses for other size fractions is constant across all locations. Total bed load transport rates predicted with the Wilcock-Crowe equations are within a factor of 2 of sampled transport rates for 68% of all samples. The Wilcock-Crowe equations nonetheless consistently under-predict the transport of particles larger than 128 mm, frequently by more than an order of magnitude. Accurate prediction of the transport rates of the largest particles is important for models in which the evolution of the surface grain size distribution determines subsequent bed load transport rates. Values of term estimated from bed load samples are up to 50% larger than those predicted with the Wilcock-Crowe equations, and sampled bed load transport approximates equal mobility across a wider range of grain sizes than is implied by the equations. Modifications to theWilcock-Crowe equation for determining t*rm and the hiding function used to scale term to other grain size fractions are proposed to achieve the best fit to observed bed load transport in the Trinity River. Copyright 2009 by the American eophysical Union.

  12. Extending the Purple Crow Lidar Temperature Climatology Above 100 km Altitude Using an Inversion Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, A.; Sica, R. J.; Argall, S.; McCullough, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    Temperature retrievals from Rayleigh-scattering lidar measurements have been performed using the algorithm given by Chanin and Hauchecorne (1980; henceforth CH) for the last 3 decades. Recently Khanna et al. have presented an inversion approach to retrieve atmospheric temperature profiles. This method uses a nonlinear inversion method with a Monte Carlo technique to determine the statistical uncertainties for the retrieved nightly average temperature profiles. Using this approach, Purple Crow Lidar temperature profiles can now be extended 10 km higher in altitude compared to those calculated with the CH method, with reduced systematic uncertainty. Argall and Sica (2007) used the CH method to produce a climatology of the Purple Crow Lidar measurements from 1994 to 2004 which was compared with the CIRA-86 model. The CH method integrates temperatures downward, and requires the assumption of a 'seed' pressure at the highest altitude, taken from a model. Geophysical variation here, in the lower thermosphere, is sufficiently large to cause temperature retrievals to be unreliable for the top 10 or more km; uncertainties due to this pressure assumption cause the top two scale heights of temperatures from each profile to be discarded until the retrieval is no longer sensitive to the seed pressure. Khanna et al. (2012) use an inversion approach which allows the corrected lidar photocount profile to be integrated upward, as opposed to downward as required by the CH method. Khanna et al. (2012) showed that seeding the retrieval at the lowest instead of top height allows a much smaller uncertainty in the contribution of the seed pressure to the temperature compared to integrating from the top of the profile. Two other benefits to seeding the retrieval at the lower altitudes (around 30 km) include reduced geophysical variability, and the availability of routine pressure measurements from radiosondes. This presentation will show an extension of the Khanna et al. (2012) comparison

  13. Love stories can be unpredictable: Jules et Jim in the vortex of life.

    PubMed

    Dercole, Fabio; Rinaldi, Sergio

    2014-06-01

    Love stories are dynamic processes that begin, develop, and often stay for a relatively long time in a stationary or fluctuating regime, before possibly fading. Although they are, undoubtedly, the most important dynamic process in our life, they have only recently been cast in the formal frame of dynamical systems theory. In particular, why it is so difficult to predict the evolution of sentimental relationships continues to be largely unexplained. A common reason for this is that love stories reflect the turbulence of the surrounding social environment. But we can also imagine that the interplay of the characters involved contributes to make the story unpredictable-that is, chaotic. In other words, we conjecture that sentimental chaos can have a relevant endogenous origin. To support this intriguing conjecture, we mimic a real and well-documented love story with a mathematical model in which the environment is kept constant, and show that the model is chaotic. The case we analyze is the triangle described in Jules et Jim, an autobiographic novel by Henri-Pierre Roché that became famous worldwide after the success of the homonymous film directed by François Truffaut.

  14. Love stories can be unpredictable: Jules et Jim in the vortex of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dercole, Fabio; Rinaldi, Sergio

    2014-06-01

    Love stories are dynamic processes that begin, develop, and often stay for a relatively long time in a stationary or fluctuating regime, before possibly fading. Although they are, undoubtedly, the most important dynamic process in our life, they have only recently been cast in the formal frame of dynamical systems theory. In particular, why it is so difficult to predict the evolution of sentimental relationships continues to be largely unexplained. A common reason for this is that love stories reflect the turbulence of the surrounding social environment. But we can also imagine that the interplay of the characters involved contributes to make the story unpredictable—that is, chaotic. In other words, we conjecture that sentimental chaos can have a relevant endogenous origin. To support this intriguing conjecture, we mimic a real and well-documented love story with a mathematical model in which the environment is kept constant, and show that the model is chaotic. The case we analyze is the triangle described in Jules et Jim, an autobiographic novel by Henri-Pierre Roché that became famous worldwide after the success of the homonymous film directed by François Truffaut.

  15. JIM: a joint integrated module of glass x-ray optics for astronomical telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proserpio, Laura; Breunig, Elias; Friedrich, Peter; Winter, Anita; Rohé, Christian; Eder, Josef; Burwitz, Vadim; Hartner, Gisela D.; Menz, Benedikt; Civitani, Marta; Basso, Stefano; Buratti, Enrico

    2015-09-01

    For several years, the Max-Planck-Institute for extraterrestrial Physics in Germany (MPE) and the Astronomical Observatory of Brera in Italy (INAF-OAB) have been studying the slumping technology for the manufacturing of segmented glass X-ray optics for astronomy. Despite some differences in their specific approaches, the synergy of the two institutes has always been good, focusing on the common goal of developing a technology able to meet the outstanding requirements for future X-ray telescopes: i.e. large collecting areas, low mass and good angular resolution. This synergy has in the last year resulted in an active collaboration for the production of a Joint Integrated Module (JIM) that puts together the expertise of the two research groups. In particular, the indirect slumping approach of MPE has been employed for the manufacturing of X-ray mirror segments that have been integrated into a kind of X-ray Optical Unit following the approach developed at INAF-OAB. The module has then been tested in X-ray at the MPE PANTER facility, in Neuried. The several steps and the results of this joint activity are reviewed and discussed in this paper.

  16. Presentation from 2016 STAR Tribal Research Meeting: Water, Our Voice to the Future: Climate Change Adaptation and Waterborne Disease Prevention on the Crow Reservation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This presentation, Water, Our Voice to the Future: Climate Change Adaptation and Waterborne Disease Prevention on the Crow Reservation, was given at the 2016 STAR Tribal Research Meeting held on Sept. 20-21, 2016.

  17. Calibration of the Purple Crow Lidar vibrational Raman water-vapour mixing ratio and temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argall, P. S.; Sica, R. J.; Bryant, C. R.; Algara-Siller, M.; Schijns, H.

    2007-02-01

    Purple Crow Lidar (PCL) measurements of the vibrational Raman-shifted backscatter from water vapour and nitrogen molecules allows height profiles of the water-vapour mixing ratio to be measured from 500 m up into the lower stratosphere. In addition, the Raman nitrogen measurements allow the determination of temperature profiles from about 10 to 40 km altitude. However, external calibration of these measurements is necessary to compensate for instrumental effects, uncertainties in our knowledge of the relevant molecular cross sections, and atmospheric transmission. A comparison of the PCL-derived water-vapour concentration and temperature profiles with routine radiosonde measurements from Detroit and Buffalo on 37 and 141 nights, respectively, was undertaken to provide this calibration. The calibration is then applied to the measurements and monthly mean-temperature and water-vapour profiles are determined.

  18. Evolution of heterogeneous genome differentiation across multiple contact zones in a crow species complex

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Nagarjun; Bossu, Christen M.; Poelstra, Jelmer W.; Weissensteiner, Matthias H.; Suh, Alexander; Kryukov, Alexey P.; Wolf, Jochen B. W.

    2016-01-01

    Uncovering the genetic basis of species diversification is a central goal in evolutionary biology. Yet, the link between the accumulation of genomic changes during population divergence and the evolutionary forces promoting reproductive isolation is poorly understood. Here, we analysed 124 genomes of crow populations with various degrees of genome-wide differentiation, with parallelism of a sexually selected plumage phenotype, and ongoing hybridization. Overall, heterogeneity in genetic differentiation along the genome was best explained by linked selection exposed on a shared genome architecture. Superimposed on this common background, we identified genomic regions with signatures of selection specific to independent phenotypic contact zones. Candidate pigmentation genes with evidence for divergent selection were only partly shared, suggesting context-dependent selection on a multigenic trait architecture and parallelism by pathway rather than by repeated single-gene effects. This study provides insight into how various forms of selection shape genome-wide patterns of genomic differentiation as populations diverge. PMID:27796282

  19. Geohydrology of Crow Creek and Lower Brule Indian Reservations, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howells, Lewis W.

    1974-01-01

    Effective improvement of economic and social conditions of Indians living on Crow Creek and Lower Brule Reservations has been hampered by lack of adequate and reliable information about the quantity and quality of water supplies available for development.  Compounding the problem, and making especially pressing the need for discovery and development of new water supplies, is the recent filling of Fort Randall and Big Bend Reservoirs on the Missouri River, and the consequent relocation of may residents.  Much of the best land and known water supplies are inundated beneath the reservoirs.  This report summarized the results of a water-resources study made at the request of the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs.

  20. New Caledonian crows rapidly solve a collaborative problem without cooperative cognition.

    PubMed

    Jelbert, Sarah A; Singh, Puja J; Gray, Russell D; Taylor, Alex H

    2015-01-01

    There is growing comparative evidence that the cognitive bases of cooperation are not unique to humans. However, the selective pressures that lead to the evolution of these mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show that while tool-making New Caledonian crows can produce collaborative behavior, they do not understand the causality of cooperation nor show sensitivity to inequity. Instead, the collaborative behavior produced appears to have been underpinned by the transfer of prior experience. These results suggest that a number of possible selective pressures, including tool manufacture and mobbing behaviours, have not led to the evolution of cooperative cognition in this species. They show that causal cognition can evolve in a domain specific manner-understanding the properties and flexible uses of physical tools does not necessarily enable animals to grasp that a conspecific can be used as a social tool.

  1. New Caledonian Crows Rapidly Solve a Collaborative Problem without Cooperative Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Jelbert, Sarah A.; Singh, Puja J.; Gray, Russell D.; Taylor, Alex H.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing comparative evidence that the cognitive bases of cooperation are not unique to humans. However, the selective pressures that lead to the evolution of these mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show that while tool-making New Caledonian crows can produce collaborative behavior, they do not understand the causality of cooperation nor show sensitivity to inequity. Instead, the collaborative behavior produced appears to have been underpinned by the transfer of prior experience. These results suggest that a number of possible selective pressures, including tool manufacture and mobbing behaviours, have not led to the evolution of cooperative cognition in this species. They show that causal cognition can evolve in a domain specific manner–understanding the properties and flexible uses of physical tools does not necessarily enable animals to grasp that a conspecific can be used as a social tool. PMID:26266937

  2. Pelvic reference selection in patients with unilateral Crowe type IV DDH for measuring leg length inequality.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanbo; Chang, Fei; Wang, Chenyu; Yang, Modi; Wang, Jincheng

    2015-01-01

    We identified the presence of deformities in the affected pelvis of unilateral Crowe type IV DDH patients, and if present, whether the teardrop and ischial lines were parallel with the sacral base line. We also verified whether the sacral base line provided a better pelvic landmark than the teardrop line for determining leg length inequality (LLI). After leveling the pelvis by using a block to lift the short leg, standard anterior-posterior full-length radiography was performed on 10 patients and 10 healthy volunteers as controls. The ratio of pelvic heights on each side of the pelvis, the angles formed by the sacral base line and the other 2 lines between 2 groups were measured. LLI were measured by sacral base line and teardrop line respectively. The ratio between the pelvic heights was lower in the patient group than in the control group (0.95 versus 0.99). The angles between the teardrop and ischial lines and the sacral base line in the patient group were both greater than in the control group (6.08° versus 0.92° and 7.13° versus 0.97°). LLI measured from the sacral base line was larger than from the teardrop line in the patient group (5.55 cm versus 4.36 cm). There was pelvic asymmetry and the sacral base line was not parallel with the other 2 lines in unilateral Crowe type IV DDH. The leveled sacral base line was perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the body, and may be a better choice for accurate LLI measurement in this situation.

  3. Hydrologic response of the Crow Wing Watershed, Minnesota, to mid-Holocene climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Person, M.; Roy, P.; Wright, H.; Gutowski, W.; Ito, E.; Winter, T.; Rosenberry, D.; Cohen, D.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we have integrated a suite of Holocene paleoclimatic proxies with mathematical modeling in an attempt to obtain a comprehensive picture of how watersheds respond to past climate change. A three-dimensional surface-water-groundwater model was developed to assess the effects of mid-Holocene climate change on water resources within the Crow Wing Watershed, Upper Mississippi Basin in north central Minnesota. The model was first calibrated to a 50 yr historical record of average annual surface-water discharge, monthly groundwater levels, and lake-level fluctuations. The model was able to reproduce reasonably well long-term historical records (1949-1999) of water-table and lake-level fluctuations across the watershed as well as stream discharge near the watershed outlet. The calibrated model was then used to reproduce paleogroundwater and lake levels using climate reconstructions based on pollen-transfer functions from Williams Lake just outside the watershed. Computed declines in mid-Holocene lake levels for two lakes at opposite ends of the watershed were between 6 and 18 m. Simulated streamflow near the outlet of the watershed decreased to 70% of modern average annual discharge after ???200 yr. The area covered by wetlands for the entire watershed was reduced by ???16%. The mid-Holocene hydrologic changes indicated by these model results and corroborated by several lake-core records across the Crow Wing Watershed may serve as a useful proxy of the hydrologic response to future warm, dry climatic forecasts (ca. 2050) made by some atmospheric general-circulation models for the glaciated Midwestern United States. ?? 2007 Geological Society of America.

  4. Antiwrinkle effect of topical adhesive pads on crow's feet: How long does the effect last for?

    PubMed

    Mazzarello, Vittorio; Ferrari, Marco; Bulla, Antonio; Piu, Gabriella; Montella, Andrea

    2017-08-28

    Adhesive pads should reduce the action of the local muscle contraction on the skin leading to a decrease in the depth of existing wrinkles and the formation of new dynamic wrinkles. This study aims at assessing the antiwrinkles action of adhesive pads during time, and the temporary improvement of facial skin appearance by reducing the vision of linear wrinkles and improving skin elasticity. Thirty-nine subjects participated to a placebo-controlled study. In the short-term test, the measurements were taken 15, 30, and 60 minutes following 30 minutes application of the product; in the long-term test, the measurements were taken after wearing pads every night for 4 weeks. The roughness parameter of the skin surface was calculated by using a profilometry software 3D MEX(®) . In the short- and long-term tests, analyzing the average of the elastomeric measurements, no significant change was observed in any of the parameters analyzed after 15, 30, and 60 minutes. The adhesive pad decreased significantly all roughness skin parameters 15 minutes after short-term application and until 60 minutes after long-term application. These changes did not occur in the contralateral untreated zone. The use of topical adhesive pads improves wrinkles in the crow's feet area in the first hour after use. However, patient self-evaluation indicated that the use of topical adhesive pads for 3 weeks may offer subjective improvement in crow's feet zone over a 2 hour period. Topical adhesive pads are safe to use and tolerable for most users. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Performance in Object-Choice Aesop's Fable Tasks Are Influenced by Object Biases in New Caledonian Crows but not in Human Children.

    PubMed

    Miller, Rachael; Jelbert, Sarah A; Taylor, Alex H; Cheke, Lucy G; Gray, Russell D; Loissel, Elsa; Clayton, Nicola S

    2016-01-01

    The ability to reason about causality underlies key aspects of human cognition, but the extent to which non-humans understand causality is still largely unknown. The Aesop's Fable paradigm, where objects are inserted into water-filled tubes to obtain out-of-reach rewards, has been used to test casual reasoning in birds and children. However, success on these tasks may be influenced by other factors, specifically, object preferences present prior to testing or arising during pre-test stone-dropping training. Here, we assessed this 'object-bias' hypothesis by giving New Caledonian crows and 5-10 year old children two object-choice Aesop's Fable experiments: sinking vs. floating objects, and solid vs. hollow objects. Before each test, we assessed subjects' object preferences and/or trained them to prefer the alternative object. Both crows and children showed pre-test object preferences, suggesting that birds in previous Aesop's Fable studies may also have had initial preferences for objects that proved to be functional on test. After training to prefer the non-functional object, crows, but not children, performed more poorly on these two object-choice Aesop's Fable tasks than subjects in previous studies. Crows dropped the non-functional objects into the tube on their first trials, indicating that, unlike many children, they do not appear to have an a priori understanding of water displacement. Alternatively, issues with inhibition could explain their performance. The crows did, however, learn to solve the tasks over time. We tested crows further to determine whether their eventual success was based on learning about the functional properties of the objects, or associating dropping the functional object with reward. Crows inserted significantly more rewarded, non-functional objects than non-rewarded, functional objects. These findings suggest that the ability of New Caledonian crows to produce performances rivaling those of young children on object-choice Aesop

  6. Relativity in Transylvania and Patusan: Finding the roots of Einstein's theories of relativity in "Dracula" and "Lord Jim"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatum, Brian Shane

    This thesis investigates the similarities in the study of time and space in literature and science during the modern period. Specifically, it focuses on the portrayal of time and space within Bram Stoker's Dracula (1897) and Joseph Conrad's Lord Jim (1899-1900), and compares the ideas presented with those later scientifically formulated by Albert Einstein in his special and general theories of relativity (1905-1915). Although both novels precede Einstein's theories, they reveal advanced complex ideas of time and space very similar to those later argued by the iconic physicist. These ideas follow a linear progression including a sense of temporal dissonance, the search for a communal sense of the present, the awareness and expansion of the individual's sense of the present, and the effect of mass on surrounding space. This approach enhances readings of Dracula and Lord Jim, illuminating the fascination with highly refined notions of time and space within modern European culture.

  7. Geochemistry and shock petrography of the Crow Creek Member, South Dakota, USA: Ejecta from the 74-Ma Manson impact structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katongo, C.; Koeberl, C.; Witzke, B.J.; Hammond, R.H.; Anderson, R.R.

    2004-01-01

    The Crow Creek Member is one of several marl units recognized within the Upper Cretaceous Pierre Shale Formation of eastern South Dakota and northeastern Nebraska, but it is the only unit that contains shock-metamorphosed minerals. The shocked minerals represent impact ejecta from the 74-Ma Manson impact structure (MIS). This study was aimed at determining the bulk chemical compositions and analysis of planar deformation features (PDFs) of shocked quartz; for the basal and marly units of the Crow Creek Member. We studied samples from the Gregory 84-21 core, Iroquois core and Wakonda lime quarry. Contents of siderophile elements are generally high, but due to uncertainties in the determination of Ir and uncertainties in compositional sources for Cr, Co, and Ni, we could not confirm an extraterrestrial component in the Crow Creek Member. We recovered several shocked quartz grains from basal-unit samples, mainly from the Gregory 84-21 core, and results of PDF measurements indicate shock pressures of at least 15 GPa. All the samples are composed chiefly of SiO2, (29-58 wt%), Al2O3 (6-14 wt%), and CaO (7-30 wt%). When compared to the composition of North American Shale Composite, the samples are significantly enriched in CaO, P2O5, Mn, Sr, Y, U, Cr, and Ni. The contents of rare earth elements (REE), high field strength elements (HFSE), Cr, Co, Sc, and their ratios and chemical weathering trends, reflect both felsic and basic sources for the Crow Creek Member, an inference, which is consistent with the lithological compositions in the environs of the MIS. The high chemical indices of alteration and weathering (CIA' and CIW': 75-99), coupled with the Al2O3-(CaO*,+Na2O -K2O (A-CN'-K) ratios, indicate that the Crow Creek Member and source rocks had undergone high degrees of chemical weathering. The expected ejecta thicknesses at the sampled locations (409 to 219 km from Manson) were calculated to range from about 1.9 to 12.2 cm (for the present-day crater radius of Manson

  8. The Drosophila BTB Domain Protein Jim Lovell Has Roles in Multiple Larval and Adult Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Bjorum, Sonia M.; Simonette, Rebecca A.; Alanis, Raul; Wang, Jennifer E.; Lewis, Benjamin M.; Trejo, Michael H.; Hanson, Keith A.; Beckingham, Kathleen M.

    2013-01-01

    Innate behaviors have their origins in the specification of neural fates during development. Within Drosophila, BTB (Bric-a-brac,Tramtrack, Broad) domain proteins such as Fruitless are known to play key roles in the neural differentiation underlying such responses. We previously identified a gene, which we have termed jim lovell (lov), encoding a BTB protein with a role in gravity responses. To understand more fully the behavioral roles of this gene we have investigated its function through several approaches. Transcript and protein expression patterns have been examined and behavioral phenotypes of new lov mutations have been characterized. Lov is a nuclear protein, suggesting a role as a transcriptional regulator, as for other BTB proteins. In late embryogenesis, Lov is expressed in many CNS and PNS neurons. An examination of the PNS expression indicates that lov functions in the late specification of several classes of sensory neurons. In particular, only two of the five abdominal lateral chordotonal neurons express Lov, predicting functional variation within this highly similar group. Surprisingly, Lov is also expressed very early in embryogenesis in ways that suggests roles in morphogenetic movements, amnioserosa function and head neurogenesis. The phenotypes of two new lov mutations that delete adjacent non-coding DNA regions are strikingly different suggesting removal of different regulatory elements. In lov47, Lov expression is lost in many embryonic neurons including the two lateral chordotonal neurons. lov47 mutant larvae show feeding and locomotor defects including spontaneous backward movement. Adult lov47 males perform aberrant courtship behavior distinguished by courtship displays that are not directed at the female. lov47 adults also show more defective negative gravitaxis than the previously isolated lov91Y mutant. In contrast, lov66 produces largely normal behavior but severe female sterility associated with ectopic lov expression in the ovary. We

  9. [Study on processing adjuvant medicines in Lei Gong's treatise on preparation and broiling of materia medica (Leigong Paozhi Lun)].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Ruixian

    2010-09-01

    There were 268 kinds of medicines recorded in the book of Lei Gong's Treatise on preparation and broiling of materia medica (Leigong Paozhi Lun). Among these medicines, 178 medicines were prepared with adjuvant medicines, including general and special compatible adjuvant medicines. These adjuvant medicines used in this book can be explained by the theory of "seven-relation compatibility". The author tried to explain the usage and their compatibility of these adjuvant medicines and put forward that attention should be paid to the changes in functions of medicines and the influences of society should be paid attention.

  10. The Impact of Historical and Current Loss on Chronic Illness: Perceptions of Crow (Apsáalooke) People

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Sloane Real; Held, Suzanne; McCormick, Alma; Hallett, John; Martin, Christine; Trottier, Coleen

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to gain a better understanding of perceptions about the impact of historical and current loss on Apsáalooke (Crow) people acquiring and coping with chronic illness. This study took a qualitative phenomenological approach by interviewing community members with chronic illness in order to gain insight into their perceptions and experiences. Participants emphasized 10 areas of impact of historical and current loss: the link between mental health and physical health/health behaviors; resiliency and strengths; connection and isolation; importance of language and language loss; changes in cultural knowledge and practices; diet; grieving; racism and discrimination; changes in land use and ownership; and boarding schools. The findings from this research are being used to develop a chronic illness self-care management program for Crow people.

  11. Acoustic profiling in a complexly social species, the American crow: caws encode information on caller sex, identity, and behavioural context

    PubMed Central

    Mates, Exu Anton; Tarter, Robin R.; Ha, James C.; Clark, Anne B.; McGowan, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research on inter-individual variation in the calls of corvids has largely been restricted to single call types, such as alarm or contact calls, and has rarely considered the effects of age on call structure. This study explores structural variation in a contextually diverse set of “caw” calls of the American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos), including alarm, foraging recruitment and territorial calls, and searches for structural features that may be associated with behavioural context and caller sex, age, and identity. Automated pitch detection algorithms are used to generate 23 pitch-related and spectral parameters for a collection of caws from 18 wild, marked crows. Using principal component analysis and mixed models, we identify independent axes of acoustic variation associated with behavioural context and with caller sex, respectively. We also have moderate success predicting caller sex and identity from call structure. However, we do not find significant acoustic variation with respect to caller age. PMID:25419053

  12. Frequent development of inflammatory lesions and lymphoid foci in the kidneys of Japanese wild crows (Corvus macrorhynchos and Corvus corone) as a result of the entry of causal agents via the renal portal blood.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Akihiro; Yonemaru, Kayoko; Kubo, Masahito; Murakami, Mami; Sakai, Hiroki; Yanai, Tokuma; Masegi, Toshiaki

    2010-03-01

    Although the increase in the number of wild crows is causing social problems in urban areas, crows play an increasingly important role in monitoring serious infectious diseases, such as highly pathogenic avian influenza and West Nile fever. To gain a better understanding of normal conditions and common disorders in crows, we conducted a retrospective study of wild crows captured in central Japan in the 1990s and examined the necropsy findings from 166 jungle crows (Corvus macrorhynchos) and 74 carrion crows (Corvus corone). We found frequent development of lymphoid foci and inflammatory lesions in the kidneys of both species of crows. These findings were unrelated to place or date of capture, indicating the universality of renal lesion developments in the Corvus species. In the kidneys, suppurative granulomas were concentrated in the renal cortex and the vein wall, indicating the haematoegenous spread of causal agents. However, the glomeruli remained intact, unlike the spreading of causal agents via arterial blood, which strongly suggested the renal portal blood as a possible entry route of causal agents. The renal lymphoid foci showed the same distribution as the granulomas, supporting the possibility of external agents entering through renal portal blood. We also identified types of parasites in Japanese wild crows by means of histopathological analysis. We hope that our data will contribute to the appropriate evaluation and a better understanding of pathological conditions in Japanese wild crows.

  13. DNA Vaccination of the American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) Provides Partial Protection Against Lethal Challenge with West Nile Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    North America, West Nile virus (WNV; genus Flavivirus, family Flaviviridae) has caused a series of outbreaks since its discovery in 1999, resulting in...encephalitis virus (SLEV). For challenge studies , the crows were moved to an animal biosafety level–3 (ABSL-3) facility, where they were placed in... studies . Birds were provided fresh water and a mixture of dog food, cat food, and cracked corn ad libitum, with supplementation including fresh fruits and

  14. Assessment of efficacy of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on infraorbital dark circles and crow's feet wrinkles.

    PubMed

    Mehryan, Pedram; Zartab, Hamed; Rajabi, Ali; Pazhoohi, Neda; Firooz, Alireza

    2014-03-01

    Infraorbital skin hyperpigmentation, commonly called dark circles, and crow's feet wrinkles are common cosmetic concerns. Various methods of treatment have been evaluated with variable outcomes. This study was performed to assess the efficacy of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection for treating periorbital dark circles and crow's feet. Ten participants with a mean age of 41.2 years were treated in a single session with intradermal injections of 1.5 mL PRP into tear trough area and crow's feet wrinkles on each side. The effects on melanin content, color homogeneity of the treated area, epidermal stratum corneum hydration, and wrinkle volume and visibility index were compared 3 months after treatment with baseline. Physician's global assessment and participants' satisfaction and any potential side effects were also assessed. The improvement in infraorbital color homogeneity was statistically significant (P = 0.010), but no statistically significant changes were observed in melanin content, stratum corneum hydration, wrinkle volume, and visibility index. Participant's satisfaction score and physician's global assessment score were 2.2 and 1.7, respectively, on a 0-3 scale. Platelet-rich plasma may have the potential to improve infraorbital dark circle in terms of color homogeneity of the region, though this remains to be proven using larger, controlled studies using multiple injections. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Human-like, population-level specialization in the manufacture of pandanus tools by New Caledonian crows Corvus moneduloides.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, G R

    2000-01-01

    The main way of gaining insight into the behaviour and neurological faculties of our early ancestors is to study artefactual evidence for the making and use of tools, but this places severe constraints on what knowledge can be obtained. New Caledonian crows, however, offer a potential analogous model system for learning about these difficult-to-establish aspects of prehistoric humans. I found new evidence of human-like specialization in crows' manufacture of hook tools from pandanus leaves: functional lateralization or 'handedness' and the shaping of these tools to a rule system. These population-level features are unprecedented in the tool behaviour of free-living non-humans and provide the first demonstration that a population bias for handedness in tool-making and the shaping of tools to rule systems are not concomitant with symbolic thought and language. It is unknown how crows obtain their tool behaviour. Nevertheless, at the least they can be studied in order to learn about the neuropsychology associated with early specialized and/or advanced population features in tool-making such as hook use, handedness and the shaping of tools to rule systems. PMID:10722223

  16. Absence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci among highly ESBL-positive crows (Corvus splendens) foraging on hospital waste in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Badrul; Järhult, Josef D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) have emerged as a growing problem in hospitals; however, domesticated animals, poultry, and wild birds are acting as potential reservoirs. There is a knowledge gap in the Epidemiology of VRE from Bangladesh. Methods To study the prevalence of VRE and the mechanisms of resistance implicated among wild birds, 238 fecal samples were collected in 2010 from house crows (Corvus splendens) foraging on hospital waste in Bangladesh. Fecal samples were screened by analyzing color change in broth and screening for vanA and vanB resistant genes by PCR. Results Neither vanA nor vanB genes were detected from the fecal samples. The house crow does not seem to constitute a reservoir for VRE. Conclusion The zero prevalence is an indication that foraging on hospital waste does not constitute a major risk of VRE carriage in house crows and this is the first study to focus on the prevalence of VRE from wild birds in Bangladesh. PMID:26679560

  17. Reasoning by exclusion in New Caledonian crows (Corvus moneduloides) cannot be explained by avoidance of empty containers.

    PubMed

    Jelbert, Sarah A; Taylor, Alex H; Gray, Russell D

    2015-08-01

    Whether animals can reason or merely learn associatively is a long-standing debate. Researchers have approached this question by investigating whether dogs, birds, and primates can reason by exclusion (choosing by logically excluding all other alternatives). However, these studies have not resolved whether animals are capable of inferring which option is rewarded or are merely avoiding options known to be incorrect. Here, we used a forced-choice tubes task, where strategies of "reasoning by exclusion" and "avoidance of empty containers" predicted different responses. Two tubes (1 straight, 1 bent) were presented in 5 types of orientation, varying whether the rewarded location could be inferred. We compared predictions from both strategies with the observed performance of 8 wild-caught New Caledonian crows. Two of the 8 birds' choices were entirely consistent with reasoning by exclusion only. A further 4 birds followed a mixed strategy, where both reasoning and avoidance could have influenced their decisions. Thus, although avoidance plays a role, it cannot fully explain the crows' choices. Confirming how animals naturally solve problems is increasingly important in animal cognition; we demonstrate that NC crows can inferentially reason without explicit training, but, like humans, most do not rely solely on reasoning to make decisions. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Multiplexed microsatellite loci in American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos): a severely affected natural host of West Nile virus.

    PubMed

    Verdugo, Claudio; Clark, Ann Marie; Prakoso, Dhani; Kramer, Laura D; Long, Maureen T

    2012-12-01

    Recent advances in high throughput molecular techniques have allowed the development of cost- and time-effective libraries of molecular markers, such as microsatellites, for population genetic studies in non-model species. The American crow, Corvus brachyrhynchos, is recognized to be one of the species that has been most negatively affected by the emergence of West Nile virus (WNV) in North America in 1999. Genetic monitoring of the process of a declining population after the introduction of an infectious disease can provide insights into the demographic and evolutionary impact of a pathogen in a natural host population over time. In this study, shotgun pyrosequencing and validation of previously published cross-species markers were the approaches used to identify and develop a set of 32 polymorphic loci for the C. brachyrhynchos. Since the American crow is morphologically similar to the sympatric species Fish crow (Corvus ossifragus), we also designed a real-time PCR protocol to rapidly differentiate these two species using a set of primers and probes that can discriminate a section of the COI gene at the mitochondrial DNA. These new markers together with a faster method for species verification will allow further detailed studies to characterize and compare genetic diversity of historic and contemporary C. brachyrhynchos populations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Experimental resource pulses influence social-network dynamics and the potential for information flow in tool-using crows.

    PubMed

    St Clair, James J H; Burns, Zackory T; Bettaney, Elaine M; Morrissey, Michael B; Otis, Brian; Ryder, Thomas B; Fleischer, Robert C; James, Richard; Rutz, Christian

    2015-11-03

    Social-network dynamics have profound consequences for biological processes such as information flow, but are notoriously difficult to measure in the wild. We used novel transceiver technology to chart association patterns across 19 days in a wild population of the New Caledonian crow--a tool-using species that may socially learn, and culturally accumulate, tool-related information. To examine the causes and consequences of changing network topology, we manipulated the environmental availability of the crows' preferred tool-extracted prey, and simulated, in silico, the diffusion of information across field-recorded time-ordered networks. Here we show that network structure responds quickly to environmental change and that novel information can potentially spread rapidly within multi-family communities, especially when tool-use opportunities are plentiful. At the same time, we report surprisingly limited social contact between neighbouring crow communities. Such scale dependence in information-flow dynamics is likely to influence the evolution and maintenance of material cultures.

  20. Detection of protozoan and bacterial pathogens of public health importance in faeces of Corvus spp. (large-billed crow).

    PubMed

    Lee, H Y; Stephen, A; Sushela, D; Mala, M

    2008-08-01

    Parasites and bacteria are reported in the faeces of birds in the current study. Fresh faecal samples of the large-billed crow (Corvus spp.) were collected from the study site at Bangsar, an urban setting in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. These samples were transported to laboratory and analysed for parasites and bacteria. Pre-prepared XLD agar plates were used for culturing the bacteria in the laboratory. Using the API 20ETM Test Strips, 9 different species of bacteria were identified belonging to the family Enterobacteriacea. They were Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter cloacae, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Kluyvera ascorbata, Salmonella arizonae, Salmonella typhi, Shigella flexneri and Shigella sonnei. The protozoan parasites detected include Cryptosporidium spp., Cyclospora spp., Blastocystis spp., and Capillaria hepatica and Ascaris lumbricoidus ova. Environmental air samples collected on agar plates using an air sampler in the area only produced fungal colonies. Some of these pathogens found in the crows are of zoonotic importance, especially Cryptosporidium, Blastocystis, Cyclopsora, Salmonella, Shigella and Kluyvera. The finding of Kluyvera spp. in crows in our current study highlights its zoonotic potential in an urban setting.

  1. Midterm Outcome of Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty in Crowe IV-Hartofilakidis Type III Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip.

    PubMed

    Mu, Wenbo; Yang, Desheng; Xu, Boyong; Mamtimin, Askar; Guo, Wentao; Cao, Li

    2016-03-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is widespread in developing countries, and treating Crowe IV-Hartofilakidis Type III DDH in adults requires the use of a highly demanding technique. We sought to determine the outcome of cementless total hip arthroplasty using Zweymüller components to treat Crowe IV-Hartofilakidis Type III DDH. Fifty-eight patients (71 hips) with a mean age of 35.8 years at time of index operation were included in our study. The average duration of follow-up was 70.5 months. The acetabular component was placed in the true acetabulum in all cases, and subtrochanteric shortening osteotomy was performed in 61 hips. With any component revision for any reason as the end point, Kaplan-Meier survivorship analysis at 98 months revealed a cumulative survival rate for implanted components of 91.40%. The mean Harris Hip Score improved from 35.6 preoperatively to 82.9 postoperatively. There were 20 cases of intraoperative fracture, 1 case of complete nerve palsy, and 7 cases of transient nerve palsy. Revision surgery was performed in 7 patients because of cup loosening in 1, severe polyethylene wear in 4, cup breakage in 1, and dislocation in 1. Midterm results for cementless total hip arthroplasty in patients with Crowe IV-Hartofilakidis Type III DDH was satisfactory; however, intraoperative fracture and polyethylene wear were major complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Middle school science classroom practices in Crow and Northern Cheyenne schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolbaugh, Walter Harold

    This study first identifies the teaching and learning practices that have shown to be effective in producing achievement gains with K--12 Native American students. In order to identify effective practices, policy guidelines and research studies focusing on achievement gains among Native American students were reviewed. This information was then mapped to the National Science Education Standards and aligned with a widely used mathematics and science observation instrument. The instrument was used by the author to gather data from 13 teachers by observing 68 lessons in 11 middle schools on the Crow and Northern Cheyenne Reservations in Southeast Montana. Interviewing and surveying the observed teachers generated further data. To complete the study, administrators and community members, including tribal elders, were involvement from tribal elders. The literature reveals that Native American students achieve more when student centered teaching methods are used. These methods include the use of visual teaching aids, cooperative learning, and practical applications all interwoven in culturally relevant lessons. The literature supports building community support, including involvement from tribal elders. Data gathered by the researcher revealed that the teachers on and near the two reservations have more teaching experience, more science credits, and attain higher ratings for observed lessons than a national sample of teachers. A factor analysis indicated that Crow and Northern Cheyenne region teachers scored especially high in student/teacher relationships, classroom management, and content knowledge. Even through 43 percent of class time was spent in hands-on paired activities, teachers scored lower on indicators pertaining to creating classroom environments that engaged students in rigorous, meaningful learning experiences. Teachers reported on not feeling prepared to include cultural applications and meaning during instruction. Teachers attaining lower scores during

  3. Tibial lengthening for unilateral Crowe type-IV developmental dysplasia of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Jun; Zhang, Xiang-Sheng; Ling, Lin; Fan, Jing; Li, Zhi-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Background: Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is associated with chronic pain and limping which especially has a negative impact on the patients’ daily activities, body image, and self-esteem. Although total hip arthroplasty remains the first choice for treatment of DDH in adults, minimally invasive alternative approaches are being increasingly favored both by the surgeon and the patients with severe DDH. This study aimed to evaluate the outcome of these patients treated with a mono-lateral external fixator-based tibial lengthening procedure. Materials and Methods: During the period of month between June 1999 and January 2006, 13 (mean ages 20.8 years) adult patients with unilateral Crowe type-IV DDH were treated by tibial lengthening using a mono-lateral external fixator over an intramedullary nail. Bone healing, infection, gait correction and improvement in body image were assessed during postoperative followup. Patients’ overall health status at the end of followup was assessed using the short form-36 (SF-36) health survey. Results: Patients were followed up for an average of 7.3 years. Successful bone healing was observed in all 13 patients and no further surgeries were indicated. A mean external fixation index of 12.4 days/cm was achieved. Bone formation fell in good to excellent categories with a mean consolidation index of 50.1 days/cm. Pin-tract infections were observed in two patients. The degree of limping was reduced from severe or moderate preoperatively to mild postoperatively. Neither equinus deformity nor painful degenerative osteoarthritis and hip dysfunction were observed in any of the patients studied. The SF-36 questionnaire survey showed that all patients were satisfied with their outcomes. Conclusions: Tibial lengthening may effectively correct gait and satisfactorily improve body image in young patients with unilateral Crowe type-IV DDH. Mono-lateral external fixator allows for accelerated postoperative rehabilitation and optimal

  4. Lost Jim Lava Flow, Seward Peninsula, Alaska as an analog for lava-ice interactions on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcucci, E.; Hamilton, C.; Herrick, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    On Mars, volcanism within Elysium Planitia may have occurred as recently as ~10 million years ago, which associated lava flows being emplaced with ice-bearing permafrost. On Earth, there are few active volcanic regions that are cold enough to support permafrost, but the Seward Peninsula in Alaska is a prime location to study recent volcano-ice interactions. In the early 2000s, J.E. Beget and J.S. Kargel explored two areas in Alaska that exhibit features characteristic of explosive volcanism that may be the result of lava-ice interaction. These locations include the Lost Jim Lava Flow (65°29'N, 163°17'W) and several large maars (66°23'N, 164°29'W). The work presented here focuses on the Lost Jim Lava Flow, emanating from Lost Jim Cone and flowing West and North. The flow was erupted 1000-2000 years ago, covers ~225 km2, and ranges 3-30 m in thickness. Previous fieldwork identified pits along the margins of the flow that were interpreted to be collapse features (i.e., thermokarst) that formed as ground-ice beneath the lava melted due to heat transfer from the overlaying lava flow. This investigation utilizes stereo photogrammetry to generate high-resolution digital terrain models (DTMs) of these flow features to assess if these pits are indeed the products of thermokarstification, or if they are lava-rise pits formed by lava flow inflation. The DTMs were generated from ALOS PRISM data and DigitalGlobe Worldview 1 and 2 panchromatic satellite images taken as stereo-pairs or -triplets. With these new models the extent and morphology of the flow and pits will be categorized across the entire flow. These results are also compared to young lava flows on Mars, which may have experienced lava-ice interactions. Understanding the expression of such interactions on Earth may aid in the identification and interpretation of analogous eruptions on Mars.

  5. Disease-mediated inbreeding depression in a large, open population of cooperative crows

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Andrea K.; Clark, Anne B.; McGowan, Kevin J.; Buckles, Elizabeth L.; Miller, Andrew D.; Lovette, Irby J.

    2009-01-01

    Disease-mediated inbreeding depression is a potential cost of living in groups with kin, but its general magnitude in wild populations is unclear. We examined the relationships between inbreeding, survival and disease for 312 offspring, produced by 35 parental pairs, in a large, open population of cooperatively breeding American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos). Genetic analyses of parentage, parental relatedness coefficients and pedigree information suggested that 23 per cent of parental dyads were first- or second-order kin. Heterozygosity–heterozygosity correlations suggested that a microsatellite-based index of individual heterozygosity predicted individual genome-wide heterozygosity in this population. After excluding birds that died traumatically, survival probability was lower for relatively inbred birds during the 2–50 months after banding: the hazard rate for the most inbred birds was 170 per cent higher than that for the least inbred birds across the range of inbreeding index values. Birds that died with disease symptoms had higher inbreeding indices than birds with other fates. Our results suggest that avoidance of close inbreeding and the absence of inbreeding depression in large, open populations should not be assumed in taxa with kin-based social systems, and that microsatellite-based indices of individual heterozygosity can be an appropriate tool for examining the inbreeding depression in populations where incest and close inbreeding occur. PMID:19324784

  6. Socially Driven Consistent Behavioural Differences during Development in Common Ravens and Carrion Crows.

    PubMed

    Miller, Rachael; Laskowski, Kate L; Schiestl, Martina; Bugnyar, Thomas; Schwab, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Consistent individual differences in behaviour, or 'personality', are likely to be influenced by development, social context, and species ecology, though few comparative, longitudinal studies exist. Here, we investigated the role of development and social context on personality variation in two identically reared, social corvids: common ravens and carrion crows. We repeatedly presented subjects with a variety of novel food and objects, while alone and in a primarily sibling subgroup, from fledging to sub-adulthood. We predicted that consistent individual differences would emerge later in development, and that conspecific presence would facilitate behavioural similarities. In contrast to our predictions, we found that individuals of both species were highly inconsistent in their behavioural responses throughout the development period. In line with our predictions, though in the ravens only, conspecific presence promoted behavioural similarities as individuals were strongly shaped by their subgroup, and it is likely that these effects were driven by social context rather than relatedness. We discuss these findings in relation to developmental steps and the role of social relations in these species. Overall, our findings highlight that these two species are highly adaptable in their behaviour, and the ravens in particular are strongly influenced by their social environment, which may facilitate cooperation and social learning.

  7. Spin Coherent State Representation of the Crow-Kimura and Eigen Models of Quasispecies Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancliff, Mark; Park, Jeong-Man

    2011-05-01

    We present a spin coherent state representation of the Crow-Kimura and Eigen models of biological evolution. We deal with quasispecies models where the fitness is a function of Hamming distances from one or more reference sequences. In the limit of large sequence length N, we find exact expressions for the mean fitness and magnetization of the asymptotic quasispecies distribution in symmetric fitness landscapes. The results are obtained by constructing a path integral for the propagator on the coset SU(2)/ U(1) and taking the classical limit. The classical limit gives a Hamiltonian function on a circle for one reference sequence, and on the product of 2 m -1 circles for m reference sequences. We apply our representation to study the Schuster-Swetina phenomena, where a wide lower peak is selected over a narrow higher peak. The quadratic landscape with two reference sequences is also analyzed specifically and we present the phase diagram on the mutation-fitness parameter phase space. Furthermore, we use our method to investigate more biologically relevant system, a model of escape from adaptive conflict through gene duplication, and find three different phases for the asymptotic population distribution.

  8. Adaptive bill morphology for enhanced tool manipulation in New Caledonian crows

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Hiroshi; Hunt, Gavin R.; Oberhofer, Katja; Ogihara, Naomichi; McGowan, Kevin J.; Mithraratne, Kumar; Yamasaki, Takeshi; Gray, Russell D.; Izawa, Ei-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Early increased sophistication of human tools is thought to be underpinned by adaptive morphology for efficient tool manipulation. Such adaptive specialisation is unknown in nonhuman primates but may have evolved in the New Caledonian crow, which has sophisticated tool manufacture. The straightness of its bill, for example, may be adaptive for enhanced visually-directed use of tools. Here, we examine in detail the shape and internal structure of the New Caledonian crow’s bill using Principal Components Analysis and Computed Tomography within a comparative framework. We found that the bill has a combination of interrelated shape and structural features unique within Corvus, and possibly birds generally. The upper mandible is relatively deep and short with a straight cutting edge, and the lower mandible is strengthened and upturned. These novel combined attributes would be functional for (i) counteracting the unique loading patterns acting on the bill when manipulating tools, (ii) a strong precision grip to hold tools securely, and (iii) enhanced visually-guided tool use. Our findings indicate that the New Caledonian crow’s innovative bill has been adapted for tool manipulation to at least some degree. Early increased sophistication of tools may require the co-evolution of morphology that provides improved manipulatory skills. PMID:26955788

  9. Linear algebra of the permutation invariant Crow-Kimura model of prebiotic evolution.

    PubMed

    Bratus, Alexander S; Novozhilov, Artem S; Semenov, Yuri S

    2014-10-01

    A particular case of the famous quasispecies model - the Crow-Kimura model with a permutation invariant fitness landscape - is investigated. Using the fact that the mutation matrix in the case of a permutation invariant fitness landscape has a special tridiagonal form, a change of the basis is suggested such that in the new coordinates a number of analytical results can be obtained. In particular, using the eigenvectors of the mutation matrix as the new basis, we show that the quasispecies distribution approaches a binomial one and give simple estimates for the speed of convergence. Another consequence of the suggested approach is a parametric solution to the system of equations determining the quasispecies. Using this parametric solution we show that our approach leads to exact asymptotic results in some cases, which are not covered by the existing methods. In particular, we are able to present not only the limit behavior of the leading eigenvalue (mean population fitness), but also the exact formulas for the limit quasispecies eigenvector for special cases. For instance, this eigenvector has a geometric distribution in the case of the classical single peaked fitness landscape. On the biological side, we propose a mathematical definition, based on the closeness of the quasispecies to the binomial distribution, which can be used as an operational definition of the notorious error threshold. Using this definition, we suggest two approximate formulas to estimate the critical mutation rate after which the quasispecies delocalization occurs.

  10. Point counts from clustered populations: Lessons from an experiment with Hawaiian crows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayward, G.D.; Kepler, C.B.; Scott, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    We designed an experiment to identify factors contributing most to error in counts of Hawaiian Crow or Alala (Corvus hawaiiensis) groups that are detected aurally. Seven observers failed to detect calling Alala on 197 of 361 3-min point counts on four transects extending from cages with captive Alala. A detection curve describing the relation between frequency of flock detection and distance typified the distribution expected in transect or point counts. Failure to detect calling Alala was affected most by distance, observer, and Alala calling frequency. The number of individual Alala calling was not important in detection rate. Estimates of the number of Alala calling (flock size) were biased and imprecise: average difference between number of Alala calling and number heard was 3.24 (.+-. 0.277). Distance, observer, number of Alala calling, and Alala calling frequency all contributed to errors in estimates of group size (P < 0.0001). Multiple regression suggested that number of Alala calling contributed most to errors. These results suggest that well-designed point counts may be used to estimate the number of Alala flocks but cast doubt on attempts to estimate flock size when individuals are counted aurally.

  11. Monocular tool control, eye dominance, and laterality in New Caledonian crows.

    PubMed

    Martinho, Antone; Burns, Zackory T; von Bayern, Auguste M P; Kacelnik, Alex

    2014-12-15

    Tool use, though rare, is taxonomically widespread, but morphological adaptations for tool use are virtually unknown. We focus on the New Caledonian crow (NCC, Corvus moneduloides), which displays some of the most innovative tool-related behavior among nonhumans. One of their major food sources is larvae extracted from burrows with sticks held diagonally in the bill, oriented with individual, but not species-wide, laterality. Among possible behavioral and anatomical adaptations for tool use, NCCs possess unusually wide binocular visual fields (up to 60°), suggesting that extreme binocular vision may facilitate tool use. Here, we establish that during natural extractions, tool tips can only be viewed by the contralateral eye. Thus, maintaining binocular view of tool tips is unlikely to have selected for wide binocular fields; the selective factor is more likely to have been to allow each eye to see far enough across the midsagittal line to view the tool's tip monocularly. Consequently, we tested the hypothesis that tool side preference follows eye preference and found that eye dominance does predict tool laterality across individuals. This contrasts with humans' species-wide motor laterality and uncorrelated motor-visual laterality, possibly because bill-held tools are viewed monocularly and move in concert with eyes, whereas hand-held tools are visible to both eyes and allow independent combinations of eye preference and handedness. This difference may affect other models of coordination between vision and mechanical control, not necessarily involving tools. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Context-dependent 'safekeeping' of foraging tools in New Caledonian crows.

    PubMed

    Klump, Barbara C; van der Wal, Jessica E M; St Clair, James J H; Rutz, Christian

    2015-06-07

    Several animal species use tools for foraging, such as sticks to extract embedded arthropods and honey, or stones to crack open nuts and eggs. While providing access to nutritious foods, these behaviours may incur significant costs, such as the time and energy spent searching for, manufacturing and transporting tools. These costs can be reduced by re-using tools, keeping them safe when not needed. We experimentally investigated what New Caledonian crows do with their tools between successive prey extractions, and whether they express tool 'safekeeping' behaviours more often when the costs (foraging at height), or likelihood (handling of demanding prey), of tool loss are high. Birds generally took care of their tools (84% of 176 prey extractions, nine subjects), either trapping them underfoot (74%) or storing them in holes (26%)--behaviours we also observed in the wild (19 cases, four subjects). Moreover, tool-handling behaviour was context-dependent, with subjects: keeping their tools safe significantly more often when foraging at height; and storing tools significantly more often in holes when extracting more demanding prey (under these conditions, foot-trapping proved challenging). In arboreal environments, safekeeping can prevent costly tool losses, removing a potentially important constraint on the evolution of habitual and complex tool behaviour.

  13. Changes in lake area in response to thermokarst processes and climate in Old Crow Flats, Yukon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantz, T. C.; Turner, K. W.

    2015-03-01

    Growing evidence indicates that lake-dominated ecosystems at high latitudes are undergoing significant hydrological changes. Research examining these changes is complicated because both thermokarst and climatic processes likely influence lake dynamics. To examine the relative impacts of these processes in permafrost landscapes, we investigated the dynamics of lake area and number in Old Crow Flats (OCF), Yukon using historical air photos and satellite imagery. Between 1951 and 2007, OCF experienced a decline of ~6000 ha in total lake area but gained 232 lakes. Close to half (49%) of the difference in lake area was driven by the rapid and persistent drainage of 38 large lakes. These catastrophic drainages were associated with new or enlarged outlet channels, resulted in the formation of numerous residual ponds, and were likely driven by thermokarst processes. Our analysis shows that catastrophic lake drainages have become more than 5 times more frequent in recent decades. These changes are likely related to the impacts of increased temperature and precipitation on thermokarst processes. Fifty-nine of the 170 intensively studied lakes showed either large bidirectional fluctuations or gradual cumulative declines. These changes affected a much smaller portion of OCF and were likely driven by interactions between increased precipitation and temperature and individual catchment characteristics. To anticipate landscape-scale changes in these systems, and assess their impact on hydrology, wildlife habitat, and carbon storage, field research is required to better characterize the mechanisms responsible for changes.

  14. Reproductive partitioning and the assumptions of reproductive skew models in the cooperatively breeding American crow

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Andrea K.; Clark, Anne B.; McGowan, Kevin J.; Lovette, Irby J.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the benefits of cooperative breeding for group members of different social and demographic classes requires knowledge of their reproductive partitioning and genetic relatedness. From 2004-2007, we examined parentage as a function of relatedness and social interactions among members of 21 American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) family groups. Paired female breeders monopolized maternity of all offspring in their broods, whereas paired male breeders sired 82.7% of offspring, within-group auxiliary males sired 6.9% of offspring, and extragroup males sired 10.4% of offspring. Although adult females had fewer opportunities for direct reproduction as auxiliaries than males, they appeared to have earlier opportunities for independent breeding. These different opportunities for direct reproduction probably contributed to the male biased adult auxiliary sex ratio. Patterns of reproductive partitioning and conflict among males were most consistent with a synthetic reproductive skew model, in which auxiliaries struggled with breeders for a limited reproductive share, beyond which breeders could evict them. Counter to a frequent assumption of reproductive skew models, female breeders appeared to influence paternity, although their interests might have agreed with the interests of their paired males. Unusual among cooperative breeders, close inbreeding and incest occurred in this population. Incest avoidance between potential breeders did not significantly affect reproductive skew. PMID:20126287

  15. Context-dependent ‘safekeeping’ of foraging tools in New Caledonian crows

    PubMed Central

    Klump, Barbara C.; van der Wal, Jessica E. M.; St Clair, James J. H.; Rutz, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Several animal species use tools for foraging, such as sticks to extract embedded arthropods and honey, or stones to crack open nuts and eggs. While providing access to nutritious foods, these behaviours may incur significant costs, such as the time and energy spent searching for, manufacturing and transporting tools. These costs can be reduced by re-using tools, keeping them safe when not needed. We experimentally investigated what New Caledonian crows do with their tools between successive prey extractions, and whether they express tool ‘safekeeping’ behaviours more often when the costs (foraging at height), or likelihood (handling of demanding prey), of tool loss are high. Birds generally took care of their tools (84% of 176 prey extractions, nine subjects), either trapping them underfoot (74%) or storing them in holes (26%)—behaviours we also observed in the wild (19 cases, four subjects). Moreover, tool-handling behaviour was context-dependent, with subjects: keeping their tools safe significantly more often when foraging at height; and storing tools significantly more often in holes when extracting more demanding prey (under these conditions, foot-trapping proved challenging). In arboreal environments, safekeeping can prevent costly tool losses, removing a potentially important constraint on the evolution of habitual and complex tool behaviour. PMID:25994674

  16. Behavioral responses to inequity in reward distribution and working effort in crows and ravens.

    PubMed

    Wascher, Claudia A F; Bugnyar, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Sensitivity to inequity is considered to be a crucial cognitive tool in the evolution of human cooperation. The ability has recently been shown also in primates and dogs, raising the question of an evolutionary basis of inequity aversion. We present first evidence that two bird species are sensitive to other individuals' efforts and payoffs. In a token exchange task we tested both behavioral responses to inequity in the quality of reward (preferred versus non-preferred food) and to the absence of reward in the presence of a rewarded partner, in 5 pairs of corvids (6 crows, 4 ravens). Birds decreased their exchange performance when the experimental partner received the reward as a gift, which indicates that they are sensitive to other individuals' working effort. They also decreased their exchange performance in the inequity compared with the equity condition. Notably, corvids refused to take the reward after a successful exchange more often in the inequity compared with the other conditions. Our findings indicate that awareness to other individuals' efforts and payoffs may evolve independently of phylogeny in systems with a given degree of social complexity.

  17. Extreme binocular vision and a straight bill facilitate tool use in New Caledonian crows.

    PubMed

    Troscianko, Jolyon; von Bayern, Auguste M P; Chappell, Jackie; Rutz, Christian; Martin, Graham R

    2012-01-01

    Humans are expert tool users, who manipulate objects with dextrous hands and precise visual control. Surprisingly, morphological predispositions, or adaptations, for tool use have rarely been examined in non-human animals. New Caledonian crows Corvus moneduloides use their bills to craft complex tools from sticks, leaves and other materials, before inserting them into deadwood or vegetation to extract prey. Here we show that tool use in these birds is facilitated by an unusual visual-field topography and bill shape. Their visual field has substantially greater binocular overlap than that of any other bird species investigated to date, including six non-tool-using corvids. Furthermore, their unusually straight bill enables a stable grip on tools, and raises the tool tip into their visual field's binocular sector. These features enable a degree of tool control that would be impossible in other corvids, despite their comparable cognitive abilities. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence for tool-use-related morphological features outside the hominin lineage.

  18. Behavioral Responses to Inequity in Reward Distribution and Working Effort in Crows and Ravens

    PubMed Central

    Wascher, Claudia A. F.; Bugnyar, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Sensitivity to inequity is considered to be a crucial cognitive tool in the evolution of human cooperation. The ability has recently been shown also in primates and dogs, raising the question of an evolutionary basis of inequity aversion. We present first evidence that two bird species are sensitive to other individuals' efforts and payoffs. In a token exchange task we tested both behavioral responses to inequity in the quality of reward (preferred versus non-preferred food) and to the absence of reward in the presence of a rewarded partner, in 5 pairs of corvids (6 crows, 4 ravens). Birds decreased their exchange performance when the experimental partner received the reward as a gift, which indicates that they are sensitive to other individuals' working effort. They also decreased their exchange performance in the inequity compared with the equity condition. Notably, corvids refused to take the reward after a successful exchange more often in the inequity compared with the other conditions. Our findings indicate that awareness to other individuals' efforts and payoffs may evolve independently of phylogeny in systems with a given degree of social complexity. PMID:23437262

  19. The underlying structure of skin wrinkles: a hyperspectral approach to crows feet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puccetti, G.

    2017-02-01

    Skin wrinkles are visually perceived by consumers but they are also known to possess an underlying structure not apparent at the surface of the skin. This underlying structure can be brought out by polarized hyperspectral imaging. Wrinkle patterns of eye crow's feet are used as example to show a deeper existing pattern and their characterization versus age on a group of volunteers. The skin inhomogeneity changes within each layer of the skin and can be observed in the shorter wavelength region of the spectrum, about 450nm to 500nm which are well suited to image skin surface inhomogeneities within the central and deep epidermis. Imaging in the 550nm range can serve as a larger scale topology reference because of its deeper penetration into the upper dermis. This serves to bring out the underlying wrinkle pattern as imprinted by collagen anisotropies around deep folds but unapparent to the eye yet. The approach has potential applications in evaluating the internal skin patterns non visible to the eye by mapping their spectral dispersion. This method has thus potentials to evaluate the extent of subsurface structures such as acne and other scars and thereby the efficacy of treatments.

  20. Socially Driven Consistent Behavioural Differences during Development in Common Ravens and Carrion Crows

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Rachael; Laskowski, Kate L.; Schiestl, Martina; Bugnyar, Thomas; Schwab, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Consistent individual differences in behaviour, or ‘personality’, are likely to be influenced by development, social context, and species ecology, though few comparative, longitudinal studies exist. Here, we investigated the role of development and social context on personality variation in two identically reared, social corvids: common ravens and carrion crows. We repeatedly presented subjects with a variety of novel food and objects, while alone and in a primarily sibling subgroup, from fledging to sub-adulthood. We predicted that consistent individual differences would emerge later in development, and that conspecific presence would facilitate behavioural similarities. In contrast to our predictions, we found that individuals of both species were highly inconsistent in their behavioural responses throughout the development period. In line with our predictions, though in the ravens only, conspecific presence promoted behavioural similarities as individuals were strongly shaped by their subgroup, and it is likely that these effects were driven by social context rather than relatedness. We discuss these findings in relation to developmental steps and the role of social relations in these species. Overall, our findings highlight that these two species are highly adaptable in their behaviour, and the ravens in particular are strongly influenced by their social environment, which may facilitate cooperation and social learning. PMID:26848954

  1. The Corvids Literature Database--500 years of ornithological research from a crow's perspective.

    PubMed

    Droege, Gabriele; Töpfer, Till

    2016-01-01

    Corvids (Corvidae) play a major role in ornithological research. Because of their worldwide distribution, diversity and adaptiveness, they have been studied extensively. The aim of the Corvids Literature Database (CLD, http://www.corvids.de/cld) is to record all publications (citation format) on all extant and extinct Crows, Ravens, Jays and Magpies worldwide and tag them with specific keywords making them available for researchers worldwide. The self-maintained project started in 2006 and today comprises 8000 articles, spanning almost 500 years. The CLD covers publications from 164 countries, written in 36 languages and published by 8026 authors in 1503 journals (plus books, theses and other publications). Forty-nine percent of all records are available online as full-text documents or deposited in the physical CLD archive. The CLD contains 442 original corvid descriptions. Here, we present a metadata assessment of articles recorded in the CLD including a gap analysis and prospects for future research. Database URL: http://www.corvids.de/cld. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  2. Population abundance of potentially pathogenic organisms in intestinal microbiome of jungle crow (Corvus macrorhynchos) shown with 16S rRNA gene-based microbial community analysis.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Isamu; Siddiki, Mohammad Shohel Rana; Nozawa-Takeda, Tsutomu; Tsukahara, Naoki; Tani, Yuri; Naito, Taki; Sugita, Shoei

    2013-01-01

    Jungle Crows (Corvus macrorhynchos) prefer human habitats because of their versatility in feeding accompanied with human food consumption. Therefore, it is important from a public health viewpoint to characterize their intestinal microbiota. However, no studies have been involved in molecular characterization of the microbiota based on huge and reliable number of data acquisition. In this study, 16S rRNA gene-based microbial community analysis coupled with the next-generation DNA sequencing techniques was applied to the taxonomic classification of intestinal microbiome for three jungle crows. Clustering of the reads into 130 operational taxonomic units showed that at least 70% of analyzed sequences for each crow were highly homologous to Eimeria sp., which belongs to the protozoan phylum Apicomplexa. The microbiotas of three crows also contained potentially pathogenic bacteria with significant percentages, such as the genera Campylobacter and Brachyspira. Thus, the profiling of a large number of 16S rRNA gene sequences in crow intestinal microbiomes revealed the high-frequency existence or vestige of potentially pathogenic microorganisms.

  3. Population Abundance of Potentially Pathogenic Organisms in Intestinal Microbiome of Jungle Crow (Corvus macrorhynchos) Shown with 16S rRNA Gene-Based Microbial Community Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Isamu; Siddiki, Mohammad Shohel Rana; Nozawa-Takeda, Tsutomu; Tsukahara, Naoki; Tani, Yuri; Naito, Taki; Sugita, Shoei

    2013-01-01

    Jungle Crows (Corvus macrorhynchos) prefer human habitats because of their versatility in feeding accompanied with human food consumption. Therefore, it is important from a public health viewpoint to characterize their intestinal microbiota. However, no studies have been involved in molecular characterization of the microbiota based on huge and reliable number of data acquisition. In this study, 16S rRNA gene-based microbial community analysis coupled with the next-generation DNA sequencing techniques was applied to the taxonomic classification of intestinal microbiome for three jungle crows. Clustering of the reads into 130 operational taxonomic units showed that at least 70% of analyzed sequences for each crow were highly homologous to Eimeria sp., which belongs to the protozoan phylum Apicomplexa. The microbiotas of three crows also contained potentially pathogenic bacteria with significant percentages, such as the genera Campylobacter and Brachyspira. Thus, the profiling of a large number of 16S rRNA gene sequences in crow intestinal microbiomes revealed the high-frequency existence or vestige of potentially pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:24058905

  4. A late-Middle Pleistocene (Marine Isotope Stage 6) vegetated surface buried by Old Crow tephra at the Palisades, interior Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reyes, A.V.; Jensen, B.J.L.; Zazula, G.D.; Ager, T.A.; Kuzmina, S.; La, Farge C.; Froese, D.G.

    2010-01-01

    A 40??cm thick primary bed of Old Crow tephra (131??????11??ka), an important stratigraphic marker in eastern Beringia, directly overlies a vegetated surface at Palisades West, on the Yukon River in central Alaska. Analyses of insect, bryophyte, and vascular plant macrofossils from the buried surface and underlying organic-rich silt suggest the local presence of an aquatic environment and mesic shrub-tundra at the time of tephra deposition. Autochthonous plant and insect macrofossils from peat directly overlying Old Crow tephra suggest similar aquatic habitats and hydric to mesic tundra environments, though pollen counts indicate a substantial herbaceous component to the regional tundra vegetation. Trace amounts of arboreal pollen in sediments associated with the tephra probably reflect reworking from older deposits, rather than the local presence of trees. The revised glass fission-track age for Old Crow tephra places its deposition closer to the time of the last interglaciation than earlier age determinations, but stratigraphy and paleoecology of sites with Old Crow tephra indicate a late Marine Isotope Stage 6 age. Regional permafrost degradation and associated thaw slumping are responsible for the close stratigraphic and paleoecological relations between Old Crow tephra and last interglacial deposits at some sites in eastern Beringia. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Regulation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 functions by leukocyte elastase inhibitor/LEI-derived DNase II during caspase-independent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Leprêtre, C; Scovassi, A I; Shah, G M; Torriglia, A

    2009-05-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is an important regulator of apoptosis. Its over-activation at the onset of apoptosis can inhibit the action of apoptotic endonucleases like caspase-activated DNase and DNAS1L3. Therefore, controlled PARP-1 proteolysis during caspase-dependent apoptosis is considered essential to promote DNA degradation. Yet, little is known about the interplay of PARP-1 and endonucleases that operate during caspase-independent cell death. Here we show that in the long-term cultured HeLa cells which undergo caspase-independent death, PARP-1 co-immunoprecipitates with leukocyte elastase inhibitor-derived DNase II (L-DNase II), an acid DNase implicated in this death pathway and activated by serine proteases. Our results indicate that, despite having putative poly(ADP-ribose)-acceptor sites, LEI/L-DNase II is neither significantly poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated nor inhibited by PARP-1 during caspase-independent apoptosis. Unexpectedly, caspase-independent apoptosis induced by hexa-methylene amiloride, LEI/L-DNase II can activate PARP-1 and promote its auto-poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, thus inhibiting PARP-1 activity. Moreover, overexpression of LEI blocks the pro-survival effect of PARP-1 in this model of cell death. Our results provide the original evidence for a new mechanism of PARP-1 activity regulation in the caspase-independent death pathway involving LEI/L-DNase II.

  6. Mitochondrial genomes of the jungle crow Corvus macrorhynchos (Passeriformes: Corvidae) from shed feathers and a phylogenetic analysis of genus Corvus using mitochondrial protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Krzeminska, Urszula; Wilson, Robyn; Rahman, Sadequr; Song, Beng Kah; Seneviratne, Sampath; Gan, Han Ming; Austin, Christopher M

    2016-07-01

    The complete mitochondrial genomes of two jungle crows (Corvus macrorhynchos) were sequenced. DNA was extracted from tissue samples obtained from shed feathers collected in the field in Sri Lanka and sequenced using the Illumina MiSeq Personal Sequencer. Jungle crow mitogenomes have a structural organization typical of the genus Corvus and are 16,927 bp and 17,066 bp in length, both comprising 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal subunit genes, and a non-coding control region. In addition, we complement already available house crow (Corvus spelendens) mitogenome resources by sequencing an individual from Singapore. A phylogenetic tree constructed from Corvidae family mitogenome sequences available on GenBank is presented. We confirm the monophyly of the genus Corvus and propose to use complete mitogenome resources for further intra- and interspecies genetic studies.

  7. Bioaccumulation of organochlorines in crows from an indian open waste dumping site: evidence for direct transfer of dioxin-like congeners from the contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Michio X; Iwata, Hisato; Watanabe, Mafumi; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Subramanian, Annamalai; Yoneda, Kumiko; Hashimoto, Takuma

    2005-06-15

    To assess the significance of waste dumping sites as a source of chemical contamination to ecosystems, we analyzed the residue levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other organochlorines in the breast muscle of crows from a dumping site in the south of Chennai city, South India. Crows from the dumping site contained significantly higher total TEQs (60 +/- 27 pg/g lipid wt) than those from the reference sites (26 +/- 18 pg/g lipid wt). Especially, certain dioxin-like coplanar PCB congeners (Co-PCBs), such as CB-77 and CB-105, whose source is commercial PCBs,were significantly higher in crows from the dumping site than those from the reference sites. Profiles of PCDDs/DFs and Co-PCBs in crows from the dumping site were similar to those of soil at the same site, which was confirmed by principal component analysis. Furthermore, significant positive correlations were obtained between the congener-specific bioconcentration factors (BCFs) of PCDDs/DFs estimated from concentrations in crows and soil from the dumping site and the theoretical BCFs calculated from water-particle and lipid-water partitioning coefficients. On the other hand, the estimated BCFs had significant negative correlations with the molecular weight of PCDDs/DFs, indicating that molecular size limits their bioaccumulation. These results suggest that dioxin-like congeners in the soil of the dumping site were transferred directly to the crows through the ingestion of on-site garbage contaminated with soil, rather than through trophic transfer in the ecosystem. The present study provides insight into the ecological impacts of dumping sites.

  8. The use of feather as an indicator for heavy metal contamination in house crow (Corvus splendens) in the Klang area, Selangor, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Janaydeh, Mohammed; Ismail, Ahmad; Zulkifli, Syaizwan Zahmir; Bejo, Mohd Hair; Aziz, Nor Azwady Abd; Taneenah, Ayat

    2016-11-01

    The Klang area of Peninsular Malaysia has experienced rapid industrial growth with intense activities, which can increase the concentration of pollutants in the environment that significantly impact on habitats and the human health. The purpose of this study was to determine the levels of selected heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Ni, Fe, and Pb) in the heart, lung, brain, liver, kidney, muscle tissues, and feathers of house crow, Corvus splendens, in Klang, Peninsular Malaysia. House crow samples were collected from the Klang area through the Department of Public Health at Majlis Perbandaran Klang. Quantitative determination of heavy metals was carried out using atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). The result shows the presence of heavy metals in all biological samples of house crows. For heavy metals in all the house crow tissues analyzed, Fe concentrations were the highest, followed by those of Zn, Cu, Pb, and Ni. The feathers and kidney accumulated high concentrations of Pb, whereas the liver accumulated high concentrations of essential heavy metals (Fe > Zn > Cu > Ni). Significant variations were also detected in the concentrations of Pb among adult and juvenile and male and female bird samples. The results also revealed significant positive correlations between Pb metal concentration in the breast feathers and all internal organs. Accumulation of toxic heavy metals in feathers reflected storing and elimination processes, while the accumulation of toxic heavy metals in the kidney can be consequential to chronic exposure. The present study clearly shows the usefulness of house crow breast feather as a suitable indicator for heavy metal accumulation in the internal organs of house crows in the Klang area.

  9. Great spotted cuckoo nestlings have no antipredatory effect on magpie or carrion crow host nests in southern Spain

    PubMed Central

    Soler, Manuel; de Neve, Liesbeth; Roldán, María; Pérez-Contreras, Tomás; Soler, Juan José

    2017-01-01

    Host defences against cuckoo parasitism and cuckoo trickeries to overcome them are a classic example of antagonistic coevolution. Recently it has been reported that this relationship may turn to be mutualistic in the case of the carrion crow (Corvus corone) and its brood parasite, the great spotted cuckoo (Clamator glandarius), given that experimentally and naturally parasitized nests were depredated at a lower rate than non-parasitized nests. This result was interpreted as a consequence of the antipredatory properties of a fetid cloacal secretion produced by cuckoo nestlings, which presumably deters predators from parasitized host nests. This potential defensive mechanism would therefore explain the detected higher fledgling success of parasitized nests during breeding seasons with high predation risk. Here, in a different study population, we explored the expected benefits in terms of reduced nest predation in naturally and experimentally parasitized nests of two different host species, carrion crows and magpies (Pica pica). During the incubation phase non-parasitized nests were depredated more frequently than parasitized nests. However, during the nestling phase, parasitized nests were not depredated at a lower rate than non-parasitized nests, neither in magpie nor in carrion crow nests, and experimental translocation of great spotted cuckoo hatchlings did not reveal causal effects between parasitism state and predation rate of host nests. Therefore, our results do not fit expectations and, thus, do not support the fascinating possibility that great spotted cuckoo nestlings could have an antipredatory effect for host nestlings, at least in our study area. We also discuss different possibilities that may conciliate these with previous results, but also several alternative explanations, including the lack of generalizability of the previously documented mutualistic association. PMID:28422953

  10. Great spotted cuckoo nestlings have no antipredatory effect on magpie or carrion crow host nests in southern Spain.

    PubMed

    Soler, Manuel; de Neve, Liesbeth; Roldán, María; Pérez-Contreras, Tomás; Soler, Juan José

    2017-01-01

    Host defences against cuckoo parasitism and cuckoo trickeries to overcome them are a classic example of antagonistic coevolution. Recently it has been reported that this relationship may turn to be mutualistic in the case of the carrion crow (Corvus corone) and its brood parasite, the great spotted cuckoo (Clamator glandarius), given that experimentally and naturally parasitized nests were depredated at a lower rate than non-parasitized nests. This result was interpreted as a consequence of the antipredatory properties of a fetid cloacal secretion produced by cuckoo nestlings, which presumably deters predators from parasitized host nests. This potential defensive mechanism would therefore explain the detected higher fledgling success of parasitized nests during breeding seasons with high predation risk. Here, in a different study population, we explored the expected benefits in terms of reduced nest predation in naturally and experimentally parasitized nests of two different host species, carrion crows and magpies (Pica pica). During the incubation phase non-parasitized nests were depredated more frequently than parasitized nests. However, during the nestling phase, parasitized nests were not depredated at a lower rate than non-parasitized nests, neither in magpie nor in carrion crow nests, and experimental translocation of great spotted cuckoo hatchlings did not reveal causal effects between parasitism state and predation rate of host nests. Therefore, our results do not fit expectations and, thus, do not support the fascinating possibility that great spotted cuckoo nestlings could have an antipredatory effect for host nestlings, at least in our study area. We also discuss different possibilities that may conciliate these with previous results, but also several alternative explanations, including the lack of generalizability of the previously documented mutualistic association.

  11. Counting with Colours? Effect of Colours on the Numerical Abilities of House Crows (Corvus splendens) and Common Myna (Acridotheres tristis)

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Nor Amira Abdul; Ali, Zalila; Zuharah, Wan Fatma; Fadzly, Nik

    2016-01-01

    We conducted several aviary experiments to investigate the influence of colours in quantity judgments of two species of birds; house crow (Corvus splendens) and common myna (Acridotheres tristis). Different quantity (in seven different food proportions) of mealworms were presented nonsequentially to all birds using artificially coloured red mealworms, for experiment 1, and using artificially coloured green mealworms, for experiment 2. Both red and green coloured mealworms have no significant effect on house crow’s quantity judgments (red: ANOVA: F6,30 = 1.748, p = 0.144; and green: ANOVA: F6,30= 1.085, p = 0.394). Common myna, however, showed a strong influence of red colour in their quantity judgment (ANOVA: F6,30 = 2.922, p = 0.023) as they succeeded in choosing the largest amount of food between two cups, but not when offered food using green coloured mealworms (ANOVA: F6,30 = 1.183, p = 0.342). In the next experiment, we hypothesised that both house crow and common myna will prefer red coloured food items over green coloured food items, when factors such as the amount of food is equal. We chose to test red and green colours because both colours play an important role in most avian food selections. Results showed that there were no significant differences in the selection of red or green coloured mealworms for both house crows (ANOVA: F6,30 = 2.310, p = 0.06) and common myna (ANOVA: F6,30 = 0.823, p = 0.561). PMID:27688847

  12. Valley-Fill Standstones in the Kootenai Formation on the Crow Indian Reservation, South-Central Montana

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Lopez

    1998-01-07

    Subsurface data is being collected, organized, and a digital database is being prepared. An ACCESS database and PC-Arcview if being used to manage and interpret the data. Well data and base map have been successfully imported to Arcview and customized. All of the four 30 feet by 60 feet geologic surface geologic quadrangles have been scanned to produce a digital surface data base for the Crow Reservation. Field investigations inventoried for the presence of valley-fill deposits. These appear to represent at least a four major westward-trending valley systems.

  13. Performance in Object-Choice Aesop’s Fable Tasks Are Influenced by Object Biases in New Caledonian Crows but not in Human Children

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Alex H.; Cheke, Lucy G.; Gray, Russell D.; Loissel, Elsa; Clayton, Nicola S.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to reason about causality underlies key aspects of human cognition, but the extent to which non-humans understand causality is still largely unknown. The Aesop’s Fable paradigm, where objects are inserted into water-filled tubes to obtain out-of-reach rewards, has been used to test casual reasoning in birds and children. However, success on these tasks may be influenced by other factors, specifically, object preferences present prior to testing or arising during pre-test stone-dropping training. Here, we assessed this ‘object-bias’ hypothesis by giving New Caledonian crows and 5–10 year old children two object-choice Aesop’s Fable experiments: sinking vs. floating objects, and solid vs. hollow objects. Before each test, we assessed subjects’ object preferences and/or trained them to prefer the alternative object. Both crows and children showed pre-test object preferences, suggesting that birds in previous Aesop’s Fable studies may also have had initial preferences for objects that proved to be functional on test. After training to prefer the non-functional object, crows, but not children, performed more poorly on these two object-choice Aesop’s Fable tasks than subjects in previous studies. Crows dropped the non-functional objects into the tube on their first trials, indicating that, unlike many children, they do not appear to have an a priori understanding of water displacement. Alternatively, issues with inhibition could explain their performance. The crows did, however, learn to solve the tasks over time. We tested crows further to determine whether their eventual success was based on learning about the functional properties of the objects, or associating dropping the functional object with reward. Crows inserted significantly more rewarded, non-functional objects than non-rewarded, functional objects. These findings suggest that the ability of New Caledonian crows to produce performances rivaling those of young children on object

  14. Sensitivity and specificity of monoclonal and polyclonal immunohistochemical staining for West Nile virus in various organs from American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos)

    PubMed Central

    Smedley, Rebecca C; Patterson, Jon S; Miller, RoseAnn; Massey, Jeffrey P; Wise, Annabel G; Maes, Roger K; Wu, Ping; Kaneene, John B; Kiupel, Matti

    2007-01-01

    Background Based on results of earlier studies, brain, heart and kidney are most commonly used for West Nile virus (WNV) detection in avian species. Both monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies have been used for the immunohistochemical diagnosis of WNV in these species. Thus far, no studies have been performed to compare the sensitivity and specificity of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies in detecting WNV in American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos). Our objectives were to determine 1) the comparative sensitivities of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies for immunohistochemical (IHC) diagnosis of WNV infection in free-ranging American crows, 2) which organ(s) is/are most suitable for IHC-based diagnosis of WNV, and 3) how real-time RT-PCR on RNA extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues compared to IHC for the diagnosis of WNV infection. Methods Various combinations, depending on tissue availability, of sections of heart, kidney, brain, liver, lung, spleen, and small intestine from 85 free-ranging American crows were stained using a rabbit-polyclonal anti-WNV antibody as well as a monoclonal antibody directed against an epitope on Domain III of the E protein of WNV. The staining intensity and the extent of staining were determined for each organ using both antibodies. Real-time RT-PCR on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues from all 85 crows was performed. Results Forty-three crows were IHC-positive in at least one of the examined organs with the polyclonal antibody, and of these, only 31 were positive when IHC was performed with the monoclonal antibody. Real-time RT-PCR amplified WNV-specific sequences from tissue extracts of the same 43 crows that were IHC-positive using the polyclonal antibody. All other 42 crows tested negative for WNV with real-time PCR and IHC staining. Both antibodies had a test specificity of 100% when compared to PCR results. The test sensitivity of monoclonal antibody-based IHC staining was only 72%, compared to 100% when

  15. OnabotulinumtoxinA for Treatment of Moderate to Severe Crow's Feet Lines: A Review.

    PubMed

    Carruthers, Alastair; Bruce, Suzanne; Cox, Sue Ellen; Kane, Michael A C; Lee, Elisabeth; Gallagher, Conor J

    2016-05-01

    Lateral canthal lines or crow's feet lines (CFL) may be treated with onabotulinumtoxinA. We identified several key concepts important to understanding the use of onabotulinumtoxinA for treatment of moderate-to-severe CFL. To contextualize and integrate data on the recommended dose and injection patterns of onabotulinumtoxinA for treatment of CFL, we summarized data from pivotal clinical studies in the development of onabotulinumtoxinA for treatment of CFL. Data from key studies of onabotulinumtoxinA for CFL are presented. The efficacy and safety of onabotulinumtoxinA treatment of moderate-to-severe CFL were evaluated in 2 randomized, controlled phase 3 studies comprising 1362 patients. The 24U total dose of onabotulinumtoxinA used in these studies was based on a phase 2 dose-ranging trial. Two injection patterns were available to investigators; each involved 3 injection sites per side in the lateral orbicularis oculi muscle. A cross-sectional analysis of photographs from the phase 3 trials provided detailed information on the frequency of 4 distinct CFL patterns. In the primary efficacy analysis for each phase 3 trial, CFL responder rates were significantly greater with onabotulinumtoxinA vs placebo at day 30 (P< .001). Eyelid edema (1%) was the only adverse event reported in ≥ 1% of patients receiving onabotulinumtoxinA, occurring more frequently with onabotulinumtoxinA than with placebo. The studies showed that onabotulinumtoxinA is effective and generally well-tolerated for CFL treatment. Additionally, 2 different injection patterns allow physicians to tailor treatment based on a patient's CFL pattern. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Investigation of Detector Behaviour At High Count Rates for the Purple Crow Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sica, R. J.; McCullough, E. M.; Jalali, A.; Hartery, S.; Farhani, G.; Argall, P.; Argall, S.

    2013-12-01

    Temperature measurements in the middle and upper atmosphere are an important complement to similar measurements in the lower atmosphere. Even modest size Rayleigh-scatter lidars are capable of high quality measurements of temperature in the stratosphere (above 25 km) and lower mesosphere. The most commonly reported uncertainty, that due to counting statistics, is well understood and affects temperatures at the greatest heights (i.e. lowest signal rates). Counting statistics have a lesser effect on temperatures at the lower range of measurements, where the photocount rate is larger. However, if a lidar's dynamic range is increased by combining analog and digital counting profiles into a 'glued' profile, the gluing introduces a systematic uncertainty. In this presentation we will show the effect of the uncertainty due to gluing on our temperature measurements. The Purple Crow Lidar (PCL), located at the The University of Western Ontario's Echo Base Field Station near London, Canada, has undergone considerable modifications to its transmitter (now a Litron Nd:YAG laser outputting 1 J/pulse at 532 nm with a repetition rate of 30 Hz) as well as to its data acquisition system. The PCL has retained its 2.6 m diameter liquid mercury mirror, giving the system a large power-aperture product. Such a large throughput requires simultaneous analog-digital detection to obtain Rayleigh-scatter temperatures from 25 to above 100 km. The analog and digital profiles must be combined into a single continuous profile, a process called gluing. Several excellent methods for gluing profiles have been presented, but prior to now systematic uncertainties due to the procedure have not been quantified. We will present a detailed characterization of the analog and digital counting channels, using a variety of tests which will show the effect of the gluing procedure on the retrieved temperature.

  17. Near-shore talik development beneath shallow water in expanding thermokarst lakes, Old Crow Flats, Yukon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy-Leveillee, Pascale; Burn, Christopher R.

    2017-05-01

    It is generally assumed that permafrost is preserved beneath shallow lakes and ponds in the Western North American Arctic where water depth is less than about two thirds of the late-winter lake ice thickness. Here we present field observations of talik development beneath water as shallow as 0.2 m despite a lake ice thickness of 1.5 m, in Old Crow Flats (OCF), YT. Conditions leading to the initiation and development of taliks beneath shallow water were investigated with field measurements of shore erosion rates, bathymetry, ice thickness, snow accumulation, and lake bottom temperature near the shores of two expanding lakes in OCF. The sensitivity of talik development to variations in lake bottom thermal regime was then investigated numerically. Where ice reached the lake bottom, talik development was controlled by the ratio of freezing degree days to thawing degree days at the lake bottom (FDDlb/TDDlb). In some cases, spatial variations in on-ice snow depth had a minimal effect on annual mean lake bottom temperature (Tlb) but caused sufficient variations in FDDlb/TDDlb to influence talik development. Where Tlb was close to but greater than 0°C simulations indicated that the thermal offset allowed permafrost aggradation to occur under certain conditions, resulting in irregular near-shore talik geometries. The results highlight the sensitivity of permafrost to small changes in lake bottom thermal conditions where the water column freezes through in early winter and indicate the occurrence of permafrost degradation beneath very shallow water in the near-shore zone of Arctic ponds and lakes.

  18. Gastrointestinal Helminths of Magpies (Pica pica), Rooks (Corvus frugilegus) and Carrion Crows (Corvus corone) in Mazandaran Province, North of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Halajian, A; Eslami, A; Mobedi, I; Amin, O; Mariaux, J; Mansoori, J; Tavakol, S

    2011-01-01

    Background Corvidae is a cosmopolitan family of oscine birds including crows, rooks, magpies, jays, chough, and ravens. These birds are migratory species, especially in the shortage of foods, so they can act like vectors for a wide range of microorganisms. They live generally in temperate climates and in a very close contact with human residential areas as well as poultry farms. There is no available information in the literature concerning the parasitic infections of these three species of corvidae in Mazandaran Province, northern Iran, so this study was conducted to clarify this. Methods As there are three species of corvid birds in Mazandaran Province, 106 birds including 79 magpies, 11 rooks, and 16 carrion crows were examined between winter 2007 and spring 2008 at post mortem for gastrointestinal helminths. The helminths were drawn and identified morphologically in the Laboratory of Parasitology, Islamic Azad University, Science and Research Branch, Tehran and also partly in the School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, based on the reference books and identification keys like Soulsby, Khalil et al. and Anderson et al. Results Four species of nematodes, 2 species of cestodes, 1 species of trematodes and 1 species of acanthocephalans were identified in these three corvid species. Conclusion Five species of the helminths are identified for the first time in Iran, and the acanthocephalan species is new host record for rooks. It is clear that these corvid birds have diverse range of helminths and can act as carriers for infecting the domestic fowls. PMID:22347286

  19. Experimental resource pulses influence social-network dynamics and the potential for information flow in tool-using crows

    PubMed Central

    St Clair, James J. H.; Burns, Zackory T.; Bettaney, Elaine M.; Morrissey, Michael B.; Otis, Brian; Ryder, Thomas B.; Fleischer, Robert C.; James, Richard; Rutz, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Social-network dynamics have profound consequences for biological processes such as information flow, but are notoriously difficult to measure in the wild. We used novel transceiver technology to chart association patterns across 19 days in a wild population of the New Caledonian crow—a tool-using species that may socially learn, and culturally accumulate, tool-related information. To examine the causes and consequences of changing network topology, we manipulated the environmental availability of the crows' preferred tool-extracted prey, and simulated, in silico, the diffusion of information across field-recorded time-ordered networks. Here we show that network structure responds quickly to environmental change and that novel information can potentially spread rapidly within multi-family communities, especially when tool-use opportunities are plentiful. At the same time, we report surprisingly limited social contact between neighbouring crow communities. Such scale dependence in information-flow dynamics is likely to influence the evolution and maintenance of material cultures. PMID:26529116

  20. Isolation and molecular characterization of a H5N1 virus isolated from a Jungle crow (Corvus macrohynchos) in India.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, S; Tosh, C; Murugkar, H V; Venkatesh, G; Katare, M; Jain, R; Behera, P; Khandia, R; Tripathi, S; Kulkarni, D D; Dubey, S C

    2010-08-01

    In 2008, India experienced widespread outbreaks of H5N1 virus in West Bengal, Tripura, and Assam. The virus was detected in Kamrup district of Assam in November 2008 and subsequently spread to eight more districts. Two Jungle or Large billed crows (Corvus macrohynchos) were found dead in a hospital campus at about 8 km from the foci of initial detection of the virus in the same district. One of the crows was positive for H5N1 avian influenza virus by virus isolation, real time RT-PCR, and RT-PCR tests. Full length sequencing of all the eight segments of the virus was carried out. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that all the eight genes grouped with clade 2.2 viruses and were closely related to the human isolate of Bangladesh and avian isolates from India, Bangladesh, Kuwait, Germany, and Saudi Arabia. The molecular analysis indicated avian receptor (alpha 2,3 sialic acid) specificity, susceptibility to oseltamivir and amantadine group of antivirals and lower pathogenicity to mice.

  1. Old Crow tephra across eastern Beringia: a single cataclysmic eruption at the close of Marine Isotope Stage 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preece, S. J.; Pearce, N. J. G.; Westgate, J. A.; Froese, D. G.; Jensen, B. J. L.; Perkins, W. T.

    2011-08-01

    Old Crow tephra is the largest and most widespread Quaternary eruption presently known in eastern Beringia. Its major- and trace-element geochemistry, Fe-Ti oxides, and stratigraphic and paleoecological context indicate that it is the result of a single cataclysmic eruption. The proximal region may well have experienced tephra fallout from small eruptions just prior to or after the Old Crow event, but there is no evidence to indicate that the distal area was affected. We recalculate the glass fission-track age at 124 ± 10 ka, which, coupled with stratigraphic and paleoenvironmental reconstructions, indicates that deposition occurred prior to development of the last interglacial boreal forest, which suggests a latest Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 6 age. The bulk tephra volume erupted is estimated by three different approaches, that are in broad agreement at ˜200 km 3, but this result must be considered as tentative given the poor controls on definition of isopachs over such a large area. The source caldera, although presently unrecognized, is located in the eastern Aleutian arc, possibly at or near the Emmons Lake volcanic center.

  2. Extending and Merging the Purple Crow Lidar Temperature Climatologies Using the Inversion Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, Ali; Sica, R. J.; Argall, P. S.

    2016-06-01

    Rayleigh and Raman scatter measurements from The University of Western Ontario Purple Crow Lidar (PCL) have been used to develop temperature climatologies for the stratosphere, mesosphere, and thermosphere using data from 1994 to 2013 (Rayleigh system) and from 1999 to 2013 (vibrational Raman system). Temperature retrievals from Rayleigh-scattering lidar measurements have been performed using the methods by Hauchecorne and Chanin (1980; henceforth HC) and Khanna et al. (2012). Argall and Sica (2007) used the HC method to compute a climatology of the PCL measurements from 1994 to 2004 for 35 to 110 km, while Iserhienrhien et al. (2013) applied the same technique from 1999 to 2007 for 10 to 35 km. Khanna et al. (2012) used the inversion technique to retrieve atmospheric temperature profiles and found that it had advantages over the HC method. This paper presents an extension of the PCL climatologies created by Argall and Sica (2007) and Iserhienrhien et al. (2013). Both the inversion and HC methods were used to form the Rayleigh climatology, while only the latter was adopted for the Raman climatology. Then, two different approaches were used to merge the climatologies from 10 to 110 km. Among four different functional identities, a trigonometric hyperbolic relation results in the best choice for merging temperature profiles between the Raman and Low level Rayleigh channels, with an estimated uncertainty of 0.9 K for merging temperatures. Also, error function produces best result with uncertainty of 0.7 K between the Low Level Rayleigh and High Level Rayleigh channels. The results show that the temperature climatologies produced by the HC method when using a seed pressure are comparable to the climatologies produced by the inversion method. The Rayleigh extended climatology is slightly warmer below 80 km and slightly colder above 80 km. There are no significant differences in temperature between the extended and the previous Raman channel climatologies. Through out

  3. OnabotulinumtoxinA (Botox) in the Treatment of Crow's Feet Lines in Japanese Subjects.

    PubMed

    Harii, Kiyonori; Kawashima, Makoto; Furuyama, Nobutaka; Lei, Xiaofang; Hopfinger, René; Lee, Elisabeth

    2017-07-21

    This study evaluated the safety and efficacy of onabotulinumtoxinA in Japanese subjects with crow's feet lines (CFL). This phase 3, multicenter, double-blind, randomized study included 2 treatment periods: 6-month placebo-controlled period followed by a 7-month open-label period. In period 1, subjects with moderate to severe CFL received onabotulinumtoxinA 24 U (n = 104) or 12 U (n = 99), or placebo (n = 97). In period 2, placebo subjects switched to onabotulinumtoxinA 24 U or 12 U (double-blind dose). Up to 5 total treatments were permitted for subjects meeting re-treatment criteria. The primary efficacy measure was the proportion of investigator-assessed responders (achieving CFL severity of none or mild at maximum smile using the Facial Wrinkle Scale with Asian Photonumeric Guide [FWS-A] at day 30 of treatment 1). Additional endpoints included other responders (achieving at least 1-grade improvement at maximum smile and at rest using the FWS-A at day 30), responders at other time points, duration of effect, subject-reported outcomes, and safety. All efficacy endpoints were met. At day 30, the proportion of subjects achieving none or mild severity at maximum smile was significantly greater (P < 0.001) in the onabotulinumtoxinA 24 and 12 U groups (68.3 and 56.6%, respectively) compared with the placebo group (8.2%). Efficacy results were consistent over repeated treatments, and subjects' self-assessed outcomes were similar to investigator-assessed results. Treatment with onabotulinumtoxinA 24 and 12 U improved the appearance of CFL in Japanese subjects and was well tolerated, with no new safety findings. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  4. [Discussion on Tang edition (TE) and notes of the Tang edition (NT) under the "ink cap" in Zheng lei ben cao (Classified materia medica)].

    PubMed

    Shang, Zhijun

    2002-04-01

    The TE and NT cited under ink cap in Zheng lei ben cao (Classified Materia Medica) cannot be found in the contents and fragmentary volumes of Xin xiu ben cao (Newly Revised Materia Medica), yet can be seen in the "annotations of Shu ben cao (Materia Medica of Sichuan)", cited by Zhang Yuxi. This showed that the TE and NT were, in fact, coming from Shu ben cao, whose old name was Chong guang ying gong ben cao (Augmented Yinggong's Materia Medica). The so - called Yinggong was Li Ji, who compiled Tang ben cao (Materia Medica of the Tang Dynasty) by the imperial order, and gained the title Master Yingguogong, hence the title. Chong guang ying gong ben cao was meant revised Tang ben cao. This was the reason why Tang Shenwei called Shu ben cao as Tang ben cao right away in his Zheng lei ben cao.

  5. Instructional Coaching and the Effective Teacher. Q&A with Jim Knight, Ph.D. REL Mid-Atlantic Teacher Effectiveness Webinar Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Educational Laboratory Mid-Atlantic, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Instructional coaching can help teachers adopt new practices. In this webinar, participants explored how instructional coaching can encourage teachers to adopt new practices and whether coaching has lasting effects. This webinar featured Jim Knight, Ph.D., a Research Associate at the University of Kansas, who has been studying and writing about…

  6. Jim Smolka (left) details a flight experiment to Jerry McKee, Kevin Petersen and NASA Administrator Mike Griffin (right) during Griffin's initial visit to DFRC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-05-24

    NASA Dryden research pilot Jim Smolka (left) details a recent flight experiment on a modified F-15B research aircraft to test range program manager Jerry McKee, center director Kevin Petersen and NASA Administrator Michael Griffin (right) during Griffin's initial visit to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center on Tuesday, May 24.

  7. An analysis of population genetic differentiation and genotype-phenotype association across the hybrid zone of carrion and hooded crows using microsatellites and MC1R.

    PubMed

    Haas, Fredrik; Pointer, Marie A; Saino, Nicola; Brodin, Anders; Mundy, Nicholas I; Hansson, Bengt

    2009-01-01

    The all black carrion crow (Corvus corone corone) and the grey and black hooded crow (Corvus corone cornix) meet in a narrow hybrid zone across Europe. To evaluate the degree of genetic differentiation over the hybrid zone, we genotyped crows from the centre and edges of the zone, and from allopatric populations in northern (Scotland-Denmark-Sweden) and southern Europe (western-central northern Italy), at 18 microsatellites and at a plumage candidate gene, the MC1R gene. Allopatric and edge populations were significantly differentiated on microsatellites, and populations were isolated by distance over the hybrid zone in Italy. Single-locus analyses showed that one locus, CmeH9, differentiated populations on different sides of the zone at the same time as showing only weak separation of populations on the same side of the zone. Within the hybrid zone there was no differentiation of phenotypes at CmeH9 or at the set of microsatellites, no excess of heterozygotes among hybrids and low levels of linkage disequilibrium between markers. We did not detect any association between phenotypes and nucleotide variation at MC1R, and the two most common haplotypes occurred in very similar frequencies in carrion and hooded crows. That we found a similar degree of genetic differentiation between allopatric and edge populations irrespectively of their location in relation to the hybrid zone, no differentiation between phenotypes within the hybrid zone, and neither heterozygote excess nor consistent linkage disequilibrium in the hybrid zone, is striking considering that carrion and hooded crows are phenotypically distinct and sometimes recognised as separate species.

  8. Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards Interlaboratory Study on Measuring the Thickness and Chemistry of Nanoparticle Coatings Using XPS and LEIS.

    PubMed

    Belsey, Natalie A; Cant, David J H; Minelli, Caterina; Araujo, Joyce R; Bock, Bernd; Brüner, Philipp; Castner, David G; Ceccone, Giacomo; Counsell, Jonathan D P; Dietrich, Paul M; Engelhard, Mark H; Fearn, Sarah; Galhardo, Carlos E; Kalbe, Henryk; Won Kim, Jeong; Lartundo-Rojas, Luis; Luftman, Henry S; Nunney, Tim S; Pseiner, Johannes; Smith, Emily F; Spampinato, Valentina; Sturm, Jacobus M; Thomas, Andrew G; Treacy, Jon P W; Veith, Lothar; Wagstaffe, Michael; Wang, Hai; Wang, Meiling; Wang, Yung-Chen; Werner, Wolfgang; Yang, Li; Shard, Alexander G

    2016-10-27

    We report the results of a VAMAS (Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards) inter-laboratory study on the measurement of the shell thickness and chemistry of nanoparticle coatings. Peptide-coated gold particles were supplied to laboratories in two forms: a colloidal suspension in pure water and; particles dried onto a silicon wafer. Participants prepared and analyzed these samples using either X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) or low energy ion scattering (LEIS). Careful data analysis revealed some significant sources of discrepancy, particularly for XPS. Degradation during transportation, storage or sample preparation resulted in a variability in thickness of 53 %. The calculation method chosen by XPS participants contributed a variability of 67 %. However, variability of 12 % was achieved for the samples deposited using a single method and by choosing photoelectron peaks that were not adversely affected by instrumental transmission effects. The study identified a need for more consistency in instrumental transmission functions and relative sensitivity factors, since this contributed a variability of 33 %. The results from the LEIS participants were more consistent, with variability of less than 10 % in thickness and this is mostly due to a common method of data analysis. The calculation was performed using a model developed for uniform, flat films and some participants employed a correction factor to account for the sample geometry, which appears warranted based upon a simulation of LEIS data from one of the participants and comparison to the XPS results.

  9. Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards Interlaboratory Study on Measuring the Thickness and Chemistry of Nanoparticle Coatings Using XPS and LEIS

    SciTech Connect

    Belsey, Natalie A.; Cant, David J. H.; Minelli, Caterina; Araujo, Joyce R.; Bock, Bernd; Brüner, Philipp; Castner, David G.; Ceccone, Giacomo; Counsell, Jonathan D. P.; Dietrich, Paul M.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Fearn, Sarah; Galhardo, Carlos E.; Kalbe, Henryk; Kim, Jeong Won; Lartundo-Rojas, Luis; Luftman, Henry S.; Nunney, Tim S.; Pseiner, Johannes; Smith, Emily F.; Spampinato, Valentina; Sturm, Jacobus M.; Thomas, Andrew G.; Treacy, Jon P. W.; Veith, Lothar; Wagstaffe, Michael; Wang, Hai; Wang, Meiling; Wang, Yung-Chen; Werner, Wolfgang; Yang, Li; Shard, Alexander G.

    2016-10-27

    We report the results of a VAMAS (Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards) inter-laboratory study on the measurement of the shell thickness and chemistry of nanoparticle coatings. Peptide-coated gold particles were supplied to laboratories in two forms: a colloidal suspension in pure water and; particles dried onto a silicon wafer. Participants prepared and analyzed these samples using either X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) or low energy ion scattering (LEIS). Careful data analysis revealed some significant sources of discrepancy, particularly for XPS. Degradation during transportation, storage or sample preparation resulted in a variability in thickness of 53 %. The calculation method chosen by XPS participants contributed a variability of 67 %. However, variability of 12 % was achieved for the samples deposited using a single method and by choosing photoelectron peaks that were not adversely affected by instrumental transmission effects. The study identified a need for more consistency in instrumental transmission functions and relative sensitivity factors, since this contributed a variability of 33 %. The results from the LEIS participants were more consistent, with variability of less than 10 % in thickness and this is mostly due to a common method of data analysis. The calculation was performed using a model developed for uniform, flat films and some participants employed a correction factor to account for the sample geometry, which appears warranted based upon a simulation of LEIS data from one of the participants and comparison to the XPS results.

  10. Oxygen accumulation on metal surfaces investigated by XPS, AES and LEIS, an issue for sputter depth profiling under UHV conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberger, R.; Celedón, C. E.; Bruckner, B.; Roth, D.; Duchoslav, J.; Arndt, M.; Kürnsteiner, P.; Steck, T.; Faderl, J.; Riener, C. K.; Angeli, G.; Bauer, P.; Stifter, D.

    2017-07-01

    Depth profiling using surface sensitive analysis methods in combination with sputter ion etching is a common procedure for thorough material investigations, where clean surfaces free of any contamination are essential. Hence, surface analytic studies are mostly performed under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions, but the cleanness of such UHV environments is usually overrated. Consequently, the current study highlights the in principle known impact of the residual gas on metal surfaces (Fe, Mg, Al, Cr and Zn) for various surface analytics methods, like X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and low-energy ion scattering (LEIS). The investigations with modern, state-of-the-art equipment showed different behaviors for the metal surfaces in UHV during acquisition: (i) no impact for Zn, even after long time, (ii) solely adsorption of oxygen for Fe, slight and slow changes for Cr and (iii) adsorption accompanied by oxide formation for Al and Mg. The efficiency of different counter measures was tested and the acquired knowledge was finally used for ZnMgAl coated steel to obtain accurate depth profiles, which exhibited before serious artifacts when data acquisition was performed in an inconsiderate way.

  11. [Total hip arthroplasty for treatment of Crowe type IV congenital dysplasia of hip with dislocation in adults].

    PubMed

    Li, Wenbo; Zhang, Wenming; Bai, Guochang; Huang, Zida; Shen, Rongkai

    2013-10-01

    To study the effectiveness and acetabular prosthesis selection of the total hip arthroplasty (THA) for Crowe type IV congenital dysplasia of the hip with dislocation in adults. Between June 2008 and May 2012, 8 adult patients (8 hips) with Crowe type IV congenital dysplasia of the hip with dislocation underwent THA. They were all female, aged 20-35 years with a mean age of 25 years. The left hip was involved in 5 cases and the right hip in 3 cases. The Harris score of involved hip was 53.9 +/- 6.6. The shortened length of involved extremity was 4-6 cm (mean, 4.8 cm). The X-ray films showed complete dislocation in all cases. The acetabular prosthesis with diameter of 42-44 mm and S-ROM femoral prosthesis were used in THA. The incisions healed by first intention. There was no hip dislocation events and sciatic nerve injury during the follow-up. Femoral nerve injury occurred in 1 case and asymptomatic venous thrombosis of the leg muscle occurred in 2 cases. All the patients were followed up 1-5 years (mean, 3 years). All cases showed obvious improvement of claudication and could restore to work. At 6 months after operation, the mean length difference between affected and contralateral extremities was 0.4 cm (range, 1.0-0.6 cm); the Harris score was significantly increased to 87.6 +/- 0.3 (t = 1.77, P = 0.00). The X-ray films showed that all cases got bony union at 3-6 months after operation and stable interface between acetabular prosthesis and bone. No revision was involved during the follow-up. THA with small acetabular cup and subtrochanteric osteotomy is an effective method in the treatment of Crowe type IV congenital dysplasia of the hip with dislocation in adults. The early effectiveness is satisfactory. The long-term survival rate of prosthesis needs to be followed up.

  12. Sex-reversed correlation between stress levels and dominance rank in a captive non-breeder flock of crows.

    PubMed

    Ode, Minami; Asaba, Akari; Miyazawa, Eri; Mogi, Kazutaka; Kikusui, Takefumi; Izawa, Ei-Ichi

    2015-07-01

    Group living has both benefits and costs to individuals; benefits include efficient acquisition of resources, and costs include stress from social conflicts among group members. Such social challenges result in hierarchical dominance ranking among group members as a solution to avoid escalating conflict that causes different levels of basal stress between individuals at different ranks. Stress-associated glucocorticoid (corticosterone in rodents and birds; CORT) levels are known to correlate with dominance rank in diverse taxa and to covary with various social factors, such as sex and dominance maintenance styles. Although there is much evidence for sex differences in the basal levels of CORT in various species, the correlation of sex differences in basal CORT with dominance rank is poorly understood. We investigated the correlation between CORT metabolites (CM) in the droppings and social factors, including rank and sex, in a captive non-breeder group of crows. In this group, all the single males dominated all the single females, and dominance ranks were stable among single males but relatively unstable among single females. CM levels and rank were significantly correlated in a sex-reversed fashion: males at higher rank (i.e., more dominant) had higher CM, whereas females at higher rank exhibited lower CM. This is the first evidence of sex-reversed patterns of CM-rank correlation in birds. The results suggest that different mechanisms of stress-dominance relationships operate on the sexes in non-breeder crow aggregations; in males, stress is associated with the cost of aggressive displays, whereas females experience subordination stress due to males' overt aggression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Valey-Fill Sandstones in the Kootenai Formation on the Crow Indian Reservation, South-Central Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, David A

    1998-04-07

    Subsurface data is being collected, organized, and a digital database is being prepared for the project. An ACCESS database and PC-Arcview is being used to manage and interpret the data. Well data and base map data have been successfully imported into Arcview and customized to meet the needs of this project. Log tops and other data from about ½ of the exploration wells in the area have been incorporated into the data base. All of the four 30" X 60" geologic quadrangles have been scanned to produce a digital surface geologic data base for the Crow Reservation and all are nearing completion. Formal technical review prior to publication has been completed for the Billings and Bridger Quadrangles; and are underway for the Hardin and Lodge Grass Quadrangles. Field investigations were completed during the last quarter. With the help of a student field assistant from the Crow Tribe, the entire project area was inventoried for the presence of valley-fill deposits in the Kootenai Formation. Field inventory has resulted in the identification of nine exposures of thick valley-fill deposits. These appear to represent at least four major westward-trending valley systems. All the channel localities have been measured and described in detail and paleocurrent data has been collected from all but one locality. In addition, two stratigraphic sections were measured in areas where channels are absent. One channel has bee traced over a distance of about 60 miles and exhibits definite paleostructural control. An abstract describing this channel has been submitted and accepted for presentation at the Williston Basin Symposium in October, 1998.

  14. Valley-Fill Sandstones in the Kootenai Formation on the Crow Indian Reservation, South-Central Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, David A

    1998-07-03

    Subsurface data continues to be collected, organized, and a digital database is being prepared for the project. An ACCESS database and PC-Arcview is being used to manage and interpret the data. Well data and base map data have been successfully imported into Arcview and customized to meet the needs of this project. Log tops and other data from about ¾ of the exploration wells in the area have been incorporated into the data base. All of the four 30" X 60" geologic quadrangles have been scanned to produce a digital surface geologic data base for the Crow Reservation and all are nearing completion. Formal technical review prior to publication has been completed for all the quadrangles; Billings, Bridger; Hardin, and Lodge Grass. Final GIS edits are being made before being forwarded to the Bureau's Publications Department. Field investigations were completed during the third quarter, 1997. With the help of a student field assistant from the Crow Tribe, the entire project area was inventoried for the presence of valley-fill deposits in the Kootenai Formation. Field inventory has resulted in the identification of nine exposures of thick valley-fill deposits. These appear to represent at least four major westward-trending valley systems. All the channel localities have been measured and described in detail and paleocurrent data has been collected from all but one locality. In addition, two stratigraphic sections were measured in areas where channels are absent. One channel has bee traced over a distance of about 60 miles and exhibits definite paleostructural control. An abstract describing this channel has been submitted and accepted for presentation at the Williston Basin Symposium in October, 1998.

  15. Population size and relative abundance of adult Alabama shad reaching jim woodruff lock and dam, Apalachicola River, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ely, Patrick C.; Young, S.P.; Isely, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    We estimated the population size of migrating Alabama shad Alosa alabamae below Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam in the Apalachicola River (located in the central panhandle of northwestern Florida) using mark-recapture and relative abundance techniques. After adjustment for tag loss, emigration, and mortality, the population size was estimated as 25,935 (95% confidence interval, 17,715-39,535) in 2005, 2,767 (838-5,031) in 2006, and 8,511 (5,211-14,674) in 2007. The cumulative catch rate from boat electrofishing averaged 20.47 Alabama shad per hour in 2005, 6.10 per hour in 2006, and 13.17 per hour in 2007. The relationship between population size (N) and electrofishing catch per unit effort (CPUE) was modeled by the equation N = -9008.2 + (electrofishing CPUE X 1616.4). Additionally, in 2007 the hook-and-line catch rate averaged 1.94 Alabama shad per rod hour. A predictive model relating the population size and hook-and-line CPUE of spawning American shad A. sapidissima was applied to Alabama shad hook-and-line CPUE and produced satisfactory results. Recent spawning populations of Alabama shad in the Apalachicola River are low relative to American shad populations in other southeastern U.S. rivers. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  16. Failure to Burrow and Tunnel Reveals Roles for jim lovell in the Growth and Endoreplication of the Drosophila Larval Tracheae

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Karen M.; Beckingham, Kathleen M.

    2016-01-01

    The Drosophila protein Jim Lovell (Lov) is a putative transcription factor of the BTB/POZ (Bric- a-Brac/Tramtrack/Broad/ Pox virus and Zinc finger) domain class that is expressed in many elements of the developing larval nervous system. It has roles in innate behaviors such as larval locomotion and adult courtship. In performing tissue-specific knockdown with the Gal4-UAS system we identified a new behavioral phenotype for lov: larvae failed to burrow into their food during their growth phase and then failed to tunnel into an agarose substratum during their wandering phase. We determined that these phenotypes originate in a previously unrecognized role for lov in the tracheae. By using tracheal-specific Gal4 lines, Lov immunolocalization and a lov enhancer trap line, we established that lov is normally expressed in the tracheae from late in embryogenesis through larval life. Using an assay that monitors food burrowing, substrate tunneling and death we showed that lov tracheal knockdown results in tracheal fluid-filling, producing hypoxia that activates the aberrant behaviors and inhibits development. We investigated the role of lov in the tracheae that initiates this sequence of events. We discovered that when lov levels are reduced, the tracheal cells are smaller, more numerous and show lower levels of endopolyploidization. Together our findings indicate that Lov is necessary for tracheal endoreplicative growth and that its loss in this tissue causes loss of tracheal integrity resulting in chronic hypoxia and abnormal burrowing and tunneling behavior. PMID:27494251

  17. Jim Newman and Bob McDonald attach an M2-F2 lifting body model to the "Mothership"

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-06-26

    A photo of model airplane builders James B. Newman and Robert L. McDonald preparing for a flight with models of the M2-F2 and a “Mothership”. In 1968 a test flight was made on the Rosamond dry lakebed, Rosamond, California. The original idea of lifting bodies was conceived about 1957 by Dr. Alfred J. Eggers, Jr., then the assistant director for Research and Development Analysis and Planning at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics' Ames Aeronautical Laboratory, Moffett Field, California. Nose cone studies led to the design known as the M-2, a modified half-cone, rounded on the bottom and flat on top, with a blunt, rounded nose and twin tail fins. To gather flight data on this configuration, models were found to be an effective method. A special twin-engined, 14-foot model “mothership” was used for carrying the M2-F2 model to altitude and a launch, much as was being done with the B-52 for the full-scale lifting bodies. Jim (on the left) will fly the “mothership” and Bob will take control of the M2-F2 at launch and fly it to a landing on the lakebed.

  18. Comparison of the effects of using the Crowe Critical Appraisal Tool versus informal appraisal in assessing health research: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Michael; Sheppard, Lorraine; Campbell, Alistair

    2011-12-01

    In systematic reviews, evidence-based practice and journal clubs critical appraisal tools are used to rate research papers. However, little evidence exists on whether the critical appraisal tool, subject matter knowledge or research design knowledge affect the appraisal of research papers. A match paired randomised trial was conducted in August/September 2010 in the Faculty of Medicine, Health and Molecular Science, James Cook University, Australia. Ten participants in total were randomly assigned to two groups using either an informal appraisal of research (IA group) or the Crowe Critical Appraisal Tool (CCAT group), a general critical appraisal tool. Participant independently appraised five research papers, where each paper had a different research design. The scores allocated to the papers by each group were analysed. The intraclass correlation coefficient for absolute agreement was 0.76 for the informal appraisal group and 0.88 for the Crowe Critical Appraisal Tool group. The G study showed that in the informal appraisal group 24% of variance in scores was attributable to either the rater or paper × rater interactions, whereas this was 12% in the Crowe Critical Appraisal Tool group. Analysis of covariance showed that there were statistically significant results in the informal appraisal group for subject matter knowledge (F(1,18) = 7.03, P < 0.05 1 tailed, partial η² = 0.28) and rater (F(4,18) = 4.57, P < 0.05 1 tailed, partial η² = 0.50). Kendall's tau correlation coefficient also showed a significant weak positive relationship (τ = 0.38, P = 0.03) between total score and subject matter knowledge for the informal appraisal group. The Crowe Critical Appraisal Tool was more reliable than an informal appraisal of the research papers. In the informal appraisal group, there were significant effects for rater and subject matter knowledge, whereas the Crowe Critical Appraisal Tool almost eliminated the rater effect, and no subject matter knowledge effect was

  19. Investigating a crow die-off in January-February 2011 during the introduction of a new clade of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 into Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Khan, Salah Uddin; Berman, Lashondra; Haider, Najmul; Gerloff, Nancy; Rahman, Md Z; Shu, Bo; Rahman, Mustafizur; Dey, Tapan Kumar; Davis, Todd C; Das, Bidhan Chandra; Balish, Amanda; Islam, Ausraful; Teifke, Jens P; Zeidner, Nord; Lindstrom, Steven; Klimov, Alexander; Donis, Ruben O; Luby, Stephen P; Shivaprasad, H L; Mikolon, Andrea B

    2014-03-01

    We investigated unusual crow mortality in Bangladesh during January-February 2011 at two sites. Crows of two species, Corvus splendens and C. macrorhynchos, were found sick and dead during the outbreaks. In selected crow roosts, morbidity was ~1 % and mortality was ~4 % during the investigation. Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 clade 2.3.2.1 was isolated from dead crows. All isolates were closely related to A/duck/India/02CA10/2011 (H5N1) with 99.8 % and A/crow/Bangladesh/11rs1984-15/2011 (H5N1) virus with 99 % nucleotide sequence identity in their HA genes. The phylogenetic cluster of Bangladesh viruses suggested a common ancestor with viruses found in poultry from India, Myanmar and Nepal. Histopathological changes and immunohistochemistry staining in brain, pancreas, liver, heart, kidney, bursa of Fabricius, rectum, and cloaca were consistent with influenza virus infection. Through our limited investigation in domesticated birds near the crow roosts, we did not identify any samples that tested positive for influenza virus A/H5N1. However, environmental samples collected from live-bird markets near an outbreak site during the month of the outbreaks tested very weakly positive for influenza virus A/H5N1 in clade 2.3.2.1-specific rRT-PCR. Continuation of surveillance in wild and domestic birds may identify evolution of new avian influenza virus and associated public-health risks.

  20. Dissemination of the multidrug-resistant extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli O25b-ST131 clone and the role of house crow (Corvus splendens) foraging on hospital waste in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Hasan, B; Olsen, B; Alam, A; Akter, L; Melhus, Å

    2015-11-01

    Two hundred and thirty-eight faecal samples from crows foraging on hospital wastes were analysed for extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae. ESBL-producing crow isolates were characterized and compared with 31 patient isolates. Among the crows, 59% carried ESBL producers. These included Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Raoultella terrigena and Enterobacter cloacae harbouring the genes for CTX-M-1, CTX-M-15, CTX-M-55, CTX-M-79, and CTX-M-14. Human isolates carried only the CTX-M-15 gene. Two-thirds of crow E. coli isolates and all human E. coli isolates were multidrug resistant. Crows and patients shared E. coli sequence types, including the epidemic E. coli O25b-ST131 clone. The scavenging behaviour of crows at poorly managed hospital waste dumps made them potential reservoirs of antibiotic resistance, including ESBLs. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. An extensive candidate gene approach to speciation: diversity, divergence and linkage disequilibrium in candidate pigmentation genes across the European crow hybrid zone.

    PubMed

    Poelstra, J W; Ellegren, H; Wolf, J B W

    2013-12-01

    Colouration patterns have an important role in adaptation and speciation. The European crow system, in which all-black carrion crows and grey-coated hooded crows meet in a narrow hybrid zone, is a prominent example. The marked phenotypic difference is maintained by assortative mating in the absence of neutral genetic divergence, suggesting the presence of few pigmentation genes of major effect. We made use of the rich phenotypic and genetic resources in mammals and identified a comprehensive panel of 95 candidate pigmentation genes for birds. Based on functional annotation, we chose a subset of the most promising 37 candidates, for which we developed a marker system that demonstrably works across the avian phylogeny. In total, we sequenced 107 amplicons (∼3 loci per gene, totalling 60 kb) in population samples of crows (n=23 for each taxon). Tajima's D, Fu's FS, DHEW and HKA (Hudson-Kreitman-Aguade) statistics revealed several amplicons that deviated from neutrality; however, none of these showed significantly elevated differentiation between the two taxa. Hence, colour divergence in this system may be mediated by uncharacterized pigmentation genes or regulatory regions outside genes. Alternatively, the observed high population recombination rate (4Ner∼0.03), with overall linkage disequilibrium dropping rapidly within the order of few 100 bp, may compromise the power to detect causal loci with nearby markers. Our results add to the debate as to the utility of candidate gene approaches in relation to genomic features and the genetic architecture of the phenotypic trait in question.

  2. An extensive candidate gene approach to speciation: diversity, divergence and linkage disequilibrium in candidate pigmentation genes across the European crow hybrid zone

    PubMed Central

    Poelstra, J W; Ellegren, H; Wolf, J B W

    2013-01-01

    Colouration patterns have an important role in adaptation and speciation. The European crow system, in which all-black carrion crows and grey-coated hooded crows meet in a narrow hybrid zone, is a prominent example. The marked phenotypic difference is maintained by assortative mating in the absence of neutral genetic divergence, suggesting the presence of few pigmentation genes of major effect. We made use of the rich phenotypic and genetic resources in mammals and identified a comprehensive panel of 95 candidate pigmentation genes for birds. Based on functional annotation, we chose a subset of the most promising 37 candidates, for which we developed a marker system that demonstrably works across the avian phylogeny. In total, we sequenced 107 amplicons (∼3 loci per gene, totalling 60 kb) in population samples of crows (n=23 for each taxon). Tajima's D, Fu's FS, DHEW and HKA (Hudson–Kreitman–Aguade) statistics revealed several amplicons that deviated from neutrality; however, none of these showed significantly elevated differentiation between the two taxa. Hence, colour divergence in this system may be mediated by uncharacterized pigmentation genes or regulatory regions outside genes. Alternatively, the observed high population recombination rate (4Ner∼0.03), with overall linkage disequilibrium dropping rapidly within the order of few 100 bp, may compromise the power to detect causal loci with nearby markers. Our results add to the debate as to the utility of candidate gene approaches in relation to genomic features and the genetic architecture of the phenotypic trait in question. PMID:23881172

  3. Neural-activity mapping of memory-based dominance in the crow: neural networks integrating individual discrimination and social behaviour control.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, K; Izawa, E-I; Watanabe, S

    2011-12-01

    Large-billed crows (Corvus macrorhynchos), highly social birds, form stable dominance relationships based on the memory of win/loss outcomes of first encounters and on individual discrimination. This socio-cognitive behaviour predicts the existence of neural mechanisms for integration of social behaviour control and individual discrimination. This study aimed to elucidate the neural substrates of memory-based dominance in crows. First, the formation of dominance relationships was confirmed between males in a dyadic encounter paradigm. Next, we examined whether neural activities in 22 focal nuclei of pallium and subpallium were correlated with social behaviour and stimulus familiarity after exposure to dominant/subordinate familiar individuals and unfamiliar conspecifics. Neural activity was determined by measuring expression level of the immediate-early-gene (IEG) protein Zenk. Crows displayed aggressive and/or submissive behaviour to opponents less frequently but more discriminatively in subsequent encounters, suggesting stable dominance based on memory, including win/loss outcomes of the first encounters and individual discrimination. Neural correlates of aggressive and submissive behaviour were found in limbic subpallium including septum, bed nucleus of the striae terminalis (BST), and nucleus taeniae of amygdala (TnA), but also those to familiarity factor in BST and TnA. Contrastingly, correlates of social behaviour were little in pallium and those of familiarity with exposed individuals were identified in hippocampus, medial meso-/nidopallium, and ventro-caudal nidopallium. Given the anatomical connection and neural response patterns of the focal nuclei, neural networks connecting pallium and limbic subpallium via hippocampus could be involved in the integration of individual discrimination and social behaviour control in memory-based dominance in the crow. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Jim River and Hodzana plutons, Alaska: the role of assimilation in the petrogenesis of syenite and granite

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, J.D.; Blum, A.E.; Dillon, J.T.

    1985-01-01

    Early Cretaceous plutonic rocks in central Alaska intrude both Devonian to Jurassic oceanic rocks of the Angayuchum terrane (AT) and early Paleozoic to Precambrian continental metasediments of the Ruby terrane (RT). Most plutons intrude only the RT and are biotite and two-mice granite. The Hodzana pluton intrudes both fault-bounded terranes, constraining movement between them to the emplacement age of about 110 million years, and is mainly biotite-amphibole granite with some monzodiorite. Modal and chemical data from the Jim River and Hodzana plutons define two distinct compositional trends. One trend is monzonitic to syenitic while the other is mostly granitic. The two suites are the same age, yet cannot be related by simple differentiation due to a pronounced chemical discontinuity. Rb-Sr whole-rock isochrons yield an age of 112 million years and (87Sr/86Sr)o of .7078 for the syenitic suite, and an age of 108 million years and (87Sr/86Sr)o of .7079 for the granitic suite. The authors suggest that the monzonite represents a primary magma that formed in the lower crust or mantle and initiated upper crustal melting as it intruded the AT and RT. Assimilation of continental crust could have allowed the portion of the magma that intruded the RT to evolve from a monzonite to a granite. Fractionation of these two parent magmas may have resulted in the contemporaneous syenitic and granitic suites. The two suites may reflect the contrasting composition of assimilated wallrock across the AT-RT boundary. Isotopic studies of the wallrocks are in progress and may help to constrain the amount and composition of crust that was assimilated where the magma intruded the AT versus the RT.

  5. Jim Powell: Maglev Pioneer

    ScienceCinema

    Powell, Jim

    2016-10-19

    2016 marks the 50th anniversary of the first published paper on Maglev by retired Brookhaven Lab scientists Gordon Danby and James Powell. The two researchers invented and patented maglev technology — the suspension, guidance, and propulsion of vehicles by magnetic forces.

  6. Career perspective: Jim Milledge

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This paper is an overview of my career as a hospital physician with special interest in respiratory diseases. Alongside this career, I have been fortunate to be able to pursue my professional hobby of high altitude medicine and physiology, partly in the laboratory but mainly in the field in the great ranges of the world. PMID:23849480

  7. Jim Powell: Maglev Pioneer

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Jim

    2016-03-17

    2016 marks the 50th anniversary of the first published paper on Maglev by retired Brookhaven Lab scientists Gordon Danby and James Powell. The two researchers invented and patented maglev technology — the suspension, guidance, and propulsion of vehicles by magnetic forces.

  8. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Astronaut Barry E. Wilmore (left) and Center Director Jim Kennedy pose for a photo after Wilmore presented Kennedy with a special award for Spaceport Super Safety and Health Day.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-15

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Astronaut Barry E. Wilmore (left) and Center Director Jim Kennedy pose for a photo after Wilmore presented Kennedy with a special award for Spaceport Super Safety and Health Day.

  9. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Vehicle Assembly Building, Jim Landy, NDE specialist, examines flight crew lockers using flash thermography. He is screening the lockers for hidden damage underneath dings and dents that might occur during handling.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-04

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Vehicle Assembly Building, Jim Landy, NDE specialist, examines flight crew lockers using flash thermography. He is screening the lockers for hidden damage underneath dings and dents that might occur during handling.

  10. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Vehicle Assembly Building, Jim Landy, NDE specialist, sets up a flight crew lockers for flash thermography. He is screening the lockers for hidden damage underneath dings and dents that might occur during handling.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-04

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Vehicle Assembly Building, Jim Landy, NDE specialist, sets up a flight crew lockers for flash thermography. He is screening the lockers for hidden damage underneath dings and dents that might occur during handling.

  11. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Vehicle Assembly Building, Jim Landy, NDE specialist, performs flash thermography on flight crew lockers. He is screening the lockers for hidden damage underneath dings and dents that might occur during handling.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-04

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Vehicle Assembly Building, Jim Landy, NDE specialist, performs flash thermography on flight crew lockers. He is screening the lockers for hidden damage underneath dings and dents that might occur during handling.

  12. CONHECIMENTO DA LEI GERAL DE SAÚDE – RESPEITO ÀS TRANSFUSÕES SANGUÍNEAS EM MÉDICOS E PACIENTES TESTEMUNHAS DE JEOVÁ DO HOSPITAL DR. DARÍO CONTRERAS DA REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

    PubMed Central

    SANTANA, ELSA DÍAZ

    2010-01-01

    Este estudo avalia quanto o corpo médico do Hospital Dr. Darío Contreras de República Dominicana conhece, respeita, informa e aplica a Lei Geral de Saúde em relação aos direitos do paciente Testemunha de Jeová de negar-se a ser transfundido (respeito a sua autonomia); também se os Testemunhas de Jeová conhecem a Lei Geral de Saúde e até que ponto têm se beneficiado diante dessa proposição. O estudo revelou que nem médicos, nem Testemunhas de Jeová conhecem de fato essa lei. PMID:20689657

  13. Modeling the 1913 eruption of Colima volcano, Mexico, based on data collected by Jim Luhr and colleagues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, L. J.; Connor, C.

    2007-12-01

    Jim Luhr and colleagues spent more than a decade characterizing the explosive eruptions of Colima volcano, particularly the January 20, 1913 Plinian eruption that sent a tephra cloud to the NNE of the volcano, by some reports depositing tephra up to 725 km from the volcano. Their data are modeled using TEPHRA2, a computer model that calculates the expected accumulation of tephra at specific geographical locations as a result of a volcanic eruption with specific input parameters using the advection diffusion equation. TEPHRA2 has numerous input parameters so it is literally impossible to find a best-fit solution using brute force iteration. Instead, we use nonlinear inversion techniques to explore best-fit solutions. Here we use a downhill simplex inversion algorithm. No parameter correlations (for example between eruption column height and eruption mass) are assumed a priori in the inversion. Overall, it appears from inversion results that acceptable solutions for total eruption mass lie between 0.8 x 1011 kg and 1.3 x 1011 kg and acceptable solutions for eruption column height lie between about 20 and 38 km above mean sea-level. In order to better understand the solution space, we ran the inversion numerous times, each time limiting the ranges of eruption column height and erupted mass. All other eruption parameters are allowed to vary over wide ranges to identify best-fit solutions. These results show that best-fit solutions for total erupted mass are constrained between approximately 0.6 x 1011 kg and 1.6 x 1011 kg. Best-fit solutions of essentially equal quality are identified for a wide range of eruption column heights (20-40 km). The plot of best-fit solutions suggests that slightly better results are obtained by the model in the region of 30-38 km and 1.4 x 1010 to 1.8 x 1011 kg, with all other parameters allowed to vary over their entire ranges. We note that eruption physics places some additional constraints on the maximum column height. For an

  14. Acetabular configuration and its impact on cup coverage of a subtype of Crowe type 4 DDH with bi-pseudoacetabulum.

    PubMed

    Yi, Chengqing; Ma, Chunhui; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Guoqiao; Cao, Yun

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the acetabular configuration of a special subtype of Crowe type 4 DDH and its impact on cup coverage, which was identified with a particular bi-pseudoacetabulum and an inter-pseudoacetabulum spine structure. The altered bone stock and anatomic structures were believed to be a result of lesser trochanter impingement on the pelvis as observed in all hips of this series, which was supported by the radiographic and intraoperative findings. Acetabular characteristics were depicted by means of radiographic assessment and direct observation during surgery. Preoperatively, the horizontal distance to the hip centre was 80.5 mm on average and 52.9 mm for femoral head height with a significant difference compared to the general series of DDH cases. Anterosuperior bony coverage was found 
to be more adequate with a thicker anterior wall. The postoperative hip centre was restored to the true acetabulum to within 23.4 mm vertically and 25.2 mm horizontally, and sufficient cup containment was achieved when the acetabular inclination angle was below 45°. A larger diameter cup (range 46-50 mm) was employed. No structural bone graft was required, and the medial protrusion technique was infrequently required. This subtype of DDH facilitated cup coverage during THA.

  15. Purple Crow Lidar Vibrational Raman water vapor mixing ratio and temperature measurements in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sica, R. J.; Argall, P. S.

    2006-12-01

    Purple Crow Lidar (PCL) measurements of the vibrational Raman-shifted backscatter from water vapor and nitrogen molecules allows height profiles of water vapor mixing ratio to be measured from 500 m to up into the lower stratosphere from the Delaware Observatory near London, Canada. In addition, the Raman nitrogen measurements allow the determination of temperature profiles from about 10 km to 40 km altitude. External calibration of these measurements is necessary to compensate for instrumental effects, uncertainties in our knowledge of the relevant molecular cross sections, and atmospheric transmission. A comparison of the PCL derived water vapor concentration and temperature profiles with routine radiosonde measurements from Detroit and Buffalo on 37 and 141 nights respectively, was undertaken to provide this calibration, which showed mean temperature differences over all flights for altitudes above 9 km of about 0.5 K, with agreement for water vapor below 7 km to within ±12%. Comparisons of the cold point temperature with the coincident water vapor measurements will be presented to investigate the transport of air from the tropics to midlatitudes.

  16. Duration of Clinical Efficacy of OnabotulinumtoxinA in Crow's Feet Lines: Results from Two Multicenter, Randomized, Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Steven; Connolly, Simon; Silverberg, Nancy; Lei, Xiaofang; Drinkwater, Adrienne; Gallagher, Conor J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Duration of esthetic treatments may contribute to subject satisfaction. OBJECTIVE Describe response duration with onabotulinumtoxinA in crow's feet lines (CFL) and the association of duration with perception of improvement. METHODS Subjects from 2 double-blind, placebo-controlled trials received onabotulinumtoxinA 24 U in CFL; Study 2 subjects could also receive 20 U in glabella. At Day 30, responders achieved ≥1-grade improvement in Facial Wrinkle Scale (FWS) scores. Median duration of effect for responders and for responders stratified by Subject's Global Assessment of Change in CFL (SGA-CFL) was determined. RESULTS Of 1,362 subjects, 833 received onabotulinumtoxinA. In Study 2, 305 subjects also received 20 U in glabella. In Study 1 (150-day follow-up), per investigator and subject assessments, respectively, median response duration was 125 and 144 days for dynamic lines and 137 and 148 days for static lines. Median response duration for dynamic and static lines in Study 2 (120-day follow-up) was 119 to 121 days per investigator and subject assessments. Subjects reporting greater improvement on the SGA-CFL tended to have a longer duration of response on investigator FWS scores at maximum smile. CONCLUSION Response duration with onabotulinumtoxinA in CFL was ≥4 months. Subject perception of CFL improvement may be associated with response duration. PMID:27110893

  17. Explorative innovators and flexible use of social information in common ravens (Corvus corax) and carrion crows (Corvus corone).

    PubMed

    Miller, Rachael; Schwab, Christine; Bugnyar, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Innovation and social information use are influenced by individual characteristics, and are important for the creation and transmission of novel behavioral patterns. Here, we investigated which individual factors predict innovation rates and social transmission of information in a comparative study with identically reared common ravens (Corvus corax) and carrion crows (Corvus corone corone; Corvus corone cornix). In the innovation experiment (1), we presented the birds with a novel problem-solving task while alone, to determine which individuals would quickly solve ("innovators") or not solve ("noninnovators") this task. We then related these findings to sex, object exploration (frequency of novel item manipulation), object neophobia (latency to novel item interaction), and social rank position. We found that innovators were more explorative than noninnovators, although they did not differ significantly in social rank, object neophobia or sex. In the social information use experiments (2 & 3), subjects first observed a model (Exp. 2: conspecific, heterospecific; Exp. 3: conspecific innovator & noninnovator) demonstrate a specific color selection in a 2-choice cup task, before being allowed to make their own cup selection. Innovator and noninnovator observers did not significantly differ in their tendency to use social information, that is, to select the demonstrated cup first, from a conspecific or heterospecific model. Furthermore, observers did not preferentially use social information from an innovator over a noninnovator model. We discuss our findings in relation to the likely benefits of flexible information use, and the role of other model characteristics, such as relationships, on the use of social information. (PsycINFO Database Record

  18. Fundamental considerations on the mechanisms of silver cementation onto zinc particles in the Merril-Crowe process.

    PubMed

    Viramontes Gamboa, G; Medina Noyola, M; López Valdivieso, A

    2005-02-15

    Studies on the Merrill-Crowe process as applied to silver recovery have shown that one half of the used zinc powder is wasted in water reduction at high cyanide concentrations, while the other half reduces silver ions from the cyanide solution. However, the cementation mechanisms as an electrochemical process taking place on the zinc surface do not explain the split of the electric current resulting from the anodic dissolution of zinc into two equal values. This study demonstrates that the mechanism for silver precipitation at high and low cyanide concentrations differs considerably. At low cyanide concentrations cementation is essentially an electrochemically-controlled process following a shrinking-core behavior. At high cyanide concentrations, the process seems not to be electrochemically controlled. The areas for zinc dissolution and silver deposition are not connected by an electrical-conducting medium and reduction of silver-cyano complex ions takes place by hydrogen adsorbed onto silver growing outward from the cementing zinc particles. The results are based on scanning electron microscopy of solids recovered from cementations in stirred reactors and in situ observations by optical microscopy of the cementation process on the edge of thin zinc disks in cyanide solutions.

  19. Ravens, New Caledonian crows and jackdaws parallel great apes in motor self-regulation despite smaller brains.

    PubMed

    Kabadayi, Can; Taylor, Lucy A; von Bayern, Auguste M P; Osvath, Mathias

    2016-04-01

    Overriding motor impulses instigated by salient perceptual stimuli represent a fundamental inhibitory skill. Such motor self-regulation facilitates more rational behaviour, as it brings economy into the bodily interaction with the physical and social world. It also underlies certain complex cognitive processes including decision making. Recently, MacLean et al. (MacLean et al. 2014 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 111, 2140-2148. (doi:10.1073/pnas.1323533111)) conducted a large-scale study involving 36 species, comparing motor self-regulation across taxa. They concluded that absolute brain size predicts level of performance. The great apes were most successful. Only a few of the species tested were birds. Given birds' small brain size-in absolute terms-yet flexible behaviour, their motor self-regulation calls for closer study. Corvids exhibit some of the largest relative avian brain sizes-although small in absolute measure-as well as the most flexible cognition in the animal kingdom. We therefore tested ravens, New Caledonian crows and jackdaws in the so-called cylinder task. We found performance indistinguishable from that of great apes despite the much smaller brains. We found both absolute and relative brain volume to be a reliable predictor of performance within Aves. The complex cognition of corvids is often likened to that of great apes; our results show further that they share similar fundamental cognitive mechanisms.

  20. Experimentally increased food resources in the natal territory promote offspring philopatry and helping in cooperatively breeding carrion crows

    PubMed Central

    Baglione, Vittorio; Canestrari, Daniela; Marcos, José M; Ekman, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Kin-based societies, where families represent the basic social unit, occur in a relatively small number of vertebrate species. In the majority of avian kin societies, families form when offspring prolong their association with the parents on the natal territory. Therefore, the key to understanding the evolution of families in birds is to understand natal philopatry (i.e. the tendency to remain on the natal territory). It has been shown that, within populations, the strength of the association between parents and offspring (i.e. family stability) increases when offspring dispersal is constrained by external environmental factors, but it is unclear whether and how family wealth influences juvenile dispersal decisions. Here, we show that young carrion crows (Corvus corone corone) from territories that were food-supplemented year-round were more philopatric and more likely to help at their family's nest than the unfed ones. The results suggest that offspring philopatry and helping behaviour are influenced by the quality of ‘home’ and that the availability of food resources positively affects the cohesion of the family. PMID:16777748