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Sample records for leishmania major dihydroorotate

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of Leishmania major dihydroorotate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, Artur T.; Feliciano, Patricia R.; Nonato, M. Cristina

    2006-01-01

    Dihydroorotate dehydrogenases (DHODHs) are flavin-containing enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of l-dihydroorotate to orotate, the fourth step in the de novo pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis pathway. In this study, DHODH from Leishmania major has been crystallized by the vapour-diffusion technique using lithium sulfate as the precipitating agent. The crystals belong to space group P61, with unit-cell parameters a = 143.7, c = 69.8 Å. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.0 Å resolution using an in-house rotating-anode generator. Analysis of the solvent content and the self-rotation function indicate the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure has been solved by the molecular-replacement technique. PMID:17012810

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of Leishmania major dihydroorotate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Artur T; Feliciano, Patricia R; Nonato, M Cristina

    2006-10-01

    Dihydroorotate dehydrogenases (DHODHs) are flavin-containing enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of L-dihydroorotate to orotate, the fourth step in the de novo pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis pathway. In this study, DHODH from Leishmania major has been crystallized by the vapour-diffusion technique using lithium sulfate as the precipitating agent. The crystals belong to space group P6(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 143.7, c = 69.8 A. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.0 A resolution using an in-house rotating-anode generator. Analysis of the solvent content and the self-rotation function indicate the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure has been solved by the molecular-replacement technique. PMID:17012810

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of Leishmania major dihydroorotate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Cordeiro, Artur T.; Feliciano, Patricia R.; Nonato, M. Cristina

    2006-10-01

    Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase from L. major has been crystallized by the vapour-diffusion technique using lithium sulfate as the precipitant agent. A complete data set from a native crystal has been collected to 2.0 Å resolution using an in-house rotating-anode generator. Dihydroorotate dehydrogenases (DHODHs) are flavin-containing enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of l-dihydroorotate to orotate, the fourth step in the de novo pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis pathway. In this study, DHODH from Leishmania major has been crystallized by the vapour-diffusion technique using lithium sulfate as the precipitating agent. The crystals belong to space group P6{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 143.7, c = 69.8 Å. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.0 Å resolution using an in-house rotating-anode generator. Analysis of the solvent content and the self-rotation function indicate the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure has been solved by the molecular-replacement technique.

  4. The mechanistic study of Leishmania major dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase based on steady- and pre-steady-state kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Reis, Renata A G; Ferreira, Patricia; Medina, Milagros; Nonato, M Cristina

    2016-03-01

    Leishmania major dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase (DHODHLm) has been considered as a potential therapeutic target against leishmaniasis. DHODHLm, a member of class 1A DHODH, oxidizes dihydro-orotate (DHO) to orotate (ORO) during pyrimidine biosynthesis using fumarate (FUM) as the oxidizing substrate. In the present study, the chemistry of reduction and reoxidation of the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor in DHODHLm was examined by steady- and pre-steady state kinetics under both aerobic and anaerobic environments. Our results provide for the first time the experimental evidence of co-operative behaviour in class 1A DHODH regulated by DHO binding and reveal that the initial reductive flavin half-reaction follows a mechanism with two steps. The first step is consistent with FMN reduction and shows a hyperbolic dependence on the DHO concentration with a limiting rate (kred) of 110±6 s(-1) and a K(DHO) d of 180±27 μM. Dissociation of the reduced flavin-ORO complex corresponds to the second step, with a limiting rate of 6 s(-1). In the oxidative half-reaction, the oxygen-sensitive reoxidation of the reduced FMN cofactor of DHODHLm by FUM exhibited a hyperbolic saturation profile dependent on FUM concentration allowing estimation of K(FUM) d and the limiting rate (kreox) of 258±53 μM and 35±2 s(-1), respectively. Comparison between steady- and pre-steady-state parameters together with studies of interaction for DHODHLm with both ORO and succinate (SUC), suggests that ORO release is the rate-limiting step in overall catalysis. Our results provide evidence of mechanistic differences between class 1A and class 2 individual half-reactions to be exploited for the development of selective inhibitors. PMID:26656485

  5. Comorbidity of Leishmania Major with Cutaneous Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Moravvej, Hamideh; Vesal, Parvaneh; Abolhasani, Ehsan; Nahidi, Shizar; Mahboudi, Fereidoun

    2014-01-01

    Background: leishmaniasis infection might manifest as sarcoidosis; on the other hand, some evidences propose an association between sarcoidosis and leishmaniasis. Most of the times, it is impossible to discriminate idiopathic sarcoidosis from leishmaniasis by conventional histopathologic exam. Aim: We performed a cross-sectional study to examine the association of sarcoidosis with leishmaniasis in histopathologically diagnosed sarcoidal granuloma biopsy samples by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Materials and Methods: We examined paraffin-embedded skin biopsy samples obtained from patients with clinical and histopathological diagnosis as naked sarcoidal granuloma, referred to Skin Research Center of Shaheed Beheshti Medical University from January 2001 to March 2010, in order to isolate Leishmania parasite. The samples were reassessed by an independent dermatopathologist. DNA extracted from all specimens was analyzed by the commercially available PCR kits (DNPTM Kit, CinnaGen, Tehran, Iran) to detect endemic Leishmania species, namely leishmania major (L. major). Results: L. major was positive in PCR of Eight out of twenty-five examined samples. Conclusion: Cutaneous leishmaniasis may be misinterpreted as sarcoidosis; in endemic areas, when conventional methods fail to detect Leishmania parasite, PCR should be utilized in any granulomatous skin disease compatible with sarcoidosis, regardless of the clinical presentation or histopathological interpretation. PMID:24891680

  6. Leishmania major, the predominant Leishmania species responsible for cutaneous leishmaniasis in Mali.

    PubMed

    Paz, Carlos; Samake, Sibiry; Anderson, Jennifer M; Faye, Ousmane; Traore, Pierre; Tall, Koureishi; Cisse, Moumine; Keita, Somita; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Doumbia, Seydou

    2013-03-01

    Leishmania major is the only species of Leishmania known to cause cutaneous leishmanisis (CL) in Mali. We amplified Leishmania DNA stored on archived Giemsa-stained dermal scraping slides obtained from self-referral patients with clinically suspected CL seen in the Center National d'Appui A La Lutte Contre La Maladie (CNAM) in Bamako, Mali, to determine if any other Leishmania species were responsible for CL in Mali and evaluate its geographic distribution. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification was performed using a Leishmania species-specific primer pair that can amplify DNA from L. major, L. tropica, L. infantum, and L. donovani parasites, possible causative agents of CL in Mali. L. major was the only species detected in 41 microscopically confirmed cases of CL from five regions of Mali (Kayes, Koulikoro, Ségou, Mopti, and Tombouctou). These results implicate L. major as the predominant, possibly exclusive species responsible for CL in Mali.

  7. In vitro evaluation of photodynamic therapy using curcumin on Leishmania major and Leishmania braziliensis.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Juliana Guerra; Fontana, Letícia Correa; de Oliveira, Marco Antonio; Kurachi, Cristina; Raniero, Leandro José; Ferreira-Strixino, Juliana

    2016-07-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is an infectious disease caused by the Leishmania protozoan. The conventional treatment is long-lasting and aggressive, in addition to causing harmful effect. Photodynamic therapy has emerged as a promising alternative treatment, which allows local administration with fewer side effects. This study investigated the photodynamic activity of curcumin on Leishmania major and Leishmania braziliensis promastigote. Both species were submitted to incubation with curcumin in serial dilutions from 500 μg/ml up to 7.8 μg/ml. Control groups were kept in the dark while PDT groups received a fluency of 10 J/cm(2) at 450 nm. Mitochondrial activity was assessed by MTT assay 18 h after light treatment, and viability was measured by Trypan blue dye exclusion test. Morphological alterations were observed by Giemsa staining. Confocal microscopy showed the uptake of curcumin by both tested Leishmania species. Mitochondrial activity was inconclusive to determine viability; however, Trypan blue test was able to show that curcumin photodynamic treatment had a significant effect on viability of parasites. The morphology of promastigotes was highly affected by the photodynamic therapy. These results indicated that curcumin may be a promising alternative photosensitizer, because it presents no toxicity in the dark; however, further tests in co-culture with macrophages and other species of Leishmania should be conducted to determine better conditions before in vivo tests are performed.

  8. [Importance of amastigote forms morphology to differentiate Leishmania infantum and Leishmania major species].

    PubMed

    Aoun, K; Chahed, M K; Mokni, M; Harrat, Z; Bouratbine, A

    2003-01-01

    The microscopic study of the dermal smears of 62 cases of cutaneous leishmaniose, 27 infected by Leishmania (L.) infantum and 35 by L. major, showed that the amastigotes of L. infantum are meaningfully smaller (p < 0.001). This criteria is a simple pary alternative to distinguish these 2 species which have completely different epidemiology, recovery delay and prophylactic dispositions.

  9. Detection of Leishmania major and Leishmania tropica in domestic cats in the Ege Region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Paşa, Serdar; Tetik Vardarlı, Aslı; Erol, Nural; Karakuş, Mehmet; Töz, Seray; Atasoy, Abidin; Balcıoğlu, İ Cüneyt; Emek Tuna, Gülten; Ermiş, Özge V; Ertabaklar, Hatice; Özbel, Yusuf

    2015-09-15

    Leishmaniosis is a group of diseases caused by different species of Leishmania parasites in mammalian species. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of Leishmania spp. DNA in cats using real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays targeting internal transcribed spacer (ITS1) and heat-shock protein 70 gene (Hsp70) regions with Leishmania species-specific primers and probes. Blood samples were collected from 147 cats (73 female; 74 male) in the endemic regions for zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis in the western provinces of Turkey and analyzed using two RT-PCR assays. Additionally, Hsp70 RT-PCR products were sequenced. ELISA assays for feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) were also carried out for 145 of the 147 samples. Overall, 13/147 (8.84%) cats were positive for Leishmania by RT-PCR (4 L. major and 9 L. tropica). FIV and FeLV antibody and/or antigen was detected in 4 and 5 cats among Leishmania DNA positives, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate and report the presence of L. major and L. tropica infections in a large group of domestic cats in Turkey. The results obtained indicate that species identification of Leishmania is essential for epidemiological understanding and that clinical signs alone are not indicative for leishmaniosis in cats, as it is in dogs. This study suggests that extensive research should be carried out in cat populations in order to fully understand the role of cats in the epidemiology of the disease.

  10. Cutaneous infection with Leishmania major mediates heterologous protection against visceral infection with Leishmania infantum

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Audrey; Doria, Nicole A.; Mendez, Jonatan; Sacks, David L.; Peters, Nathan C.

    2015-01-01

    Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) is a fatal disease of the internal organs caused by the eukaryotic parasite Leishmania. Control of VL would best be achieved through vaccination. However, this has proven to be difficult partly because the correlates of protective immunity are not fully understood. In contrast, protective immunity against non-fatal cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL) is well defined and mediated by rapidly recruited, IFN-γ-producing, Ly6C+CD4+ T cells at the dermal challenge site. Protection against CL is best achieved by prior infection or live vaccination with Leishmania major, termed leishmanization. A long-standing question is whether prior CL or leishmanization can protect against VL. Employing an intra-dermal challenge model in mice, we report that cutaneous infection with Leishmania major provides heterologous protection against visceral infection with Leishmania infantum. Protection was associated with a robust CD4+ T cell response at the dermal challenge site and in the viscera. In-vivo labeling of circulating cells revealed that increased frequencies of IFN-γ+CD4+ T cells at sites of infection is due to recruitment or retention of cells in the tissue, rather than increased numbers of cells trapped in the vasculature. Shortly after challenge IFN-γ producing cells were highly enriched for Ly6C+T-bet+ cells in the viscera. Surprisingly, this heterologous immunity was superior to homologous immunity mediated by prior infection with Leishmania infantum. Our observations demonstrate a common mechanism of protection against different clinical forms of leishmaniasis. The efficacy of leishmanization against VL may warrant the introduction of the practice in VL endemic areas or during outbreaks of disease. PMID:26371247

  11. The LPG1 gene family of Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Barron, Tamara; Turco, Salvatore J.; Beverley, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    In Leishmania major, the core of the abundant surface lipophosphoglycan (LPG) is structurally related to that of the smaller glycosylinositolphospholipids (GIPLs) in containing galactosylfuranose (Galf ) residues in a Galf (β1, 3)Man motif. However, deletion of the putative Galf-transferase (Galf T) LPG1 affected Galf incorporation in LPG but not GIPLs. We hypothesized that the presumptive GIPL Galf-transferases could be homologous to LPG1, and identified three related genes in the L. major genome. These were termed LPG1L, LPG1R, and LPG1G, the latter of which was found in three identical copies located at the telomeres of chromosomes 5, 19, and 32 based on Leishmania genome project data. Neither LPG1 nor its homologues LPG1L and LPG1R were involved in the biosynthesis of GIPLs, as an lpg1−/lpg1l−/lpg1r− triple knockout (the first such in Leishmania) grew normally and made wild-type levels of Galf-containing GIPLs. In contrast, overexpression of these three led to elevated galactose incorporation in glycoproteins. Galf-containing glycoproteins had not been described in Leishmania but occur at high levels in other closely related trypanosomatids including Trypanosoma cruzi, Crithidia, Leptomonas, and Endotrypanum, and LPG1L and LPG1R homologs were detected in these species. These data suggest that the glyco-synthetic capabilities of Leishmania and perhaps other trypanosomatids may be larger than previously thought, with some activities being ‘cryptic’ in different lineages and potentially serving as reservoirs for glycoconjugate variation during evolution. Future tests will address whether the LPG1G family encodes the hypothesized GIPL-specific Galf T. PMID:15138063

  12. Lipophosphoglycan blocks attachment of Leishmania major amastigotes to macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Kelleher, M; Moody, S F; Mirabile, P; Osborn, A H; Bacic, A; Handman, E

    1995-01-01

    Promastigotes of the intracellular protozoan parasite Leishmania major invade mononuclear phagocytes by a direct interaction between the cell surface lipophosphoglycan found on all Leishmania species and macrophage receptors. This interaction is mediated by phosphoglycan repeats containing oligomers of beta (1-3)Gal residues specific to L. major. We show here that although amastigotes also use lipophosphoglycan to bind to both primary macrophages and a cell line, this interaction is independent of the beta (1-3)Gal residues employed by promastigotes. Binding of amastigotes to macrophages could be blocked by intact lipophosphoglycan from L. major amastigotes as well as by lipophosphoglycan from promastigotes of several other Leishmania species, suggesting involvement of a conserved domain. Binding of amastigotes to macrophages could be blocked significantly by the monoclonal antibody WIC 108.3, directed to the lipophosphoglycan backbone. The glycan core of lipophosphoglycan could also inhibit attachment of amastigotes, but to a considerably lesser extent. The glycan core structure is also present in the type 2 glycoinositolphospholipids which are expressed on the surface of amastigotes at 100-fold-higher levels than lipophosphoglycan. However, their inhibitory effect could not be increased even when they were used at a 300-fold-higher concentration than lipophosphoglycan, indicating that lipophosphoglycan is the major macrophage-binding molecule on amastigotes of L. major. In the presence of complement, the attachment of amastigotes to macrophages was not altered, suggesting that lipophosphoglycan interacts directly with macrophage receptors. PMID:7806383

  13. An agent-based model for Leishmania major infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dancik, Garrett M.; Jones, Douglas E.; Dorman, Karin S.

    Leishmania are protozoan parasites transmitted by bites of infected sandflies. Over 20 species of Leishmania, endemic in 88 countries, are capable of causing human disease. Disease is either cutaneous, where skin ulcers occur on exposed surfaces of the body, or visceral, with near certain mortality if left untreated. C3HeB/FeJ mice are resistant to L. major, but develop chronic cutaneous lesions when infected with another species L. amazonensis. The well-characterized mechanism of resistance to L. major depends on a CD4+ Thl immune response, macrophage activation, and elimination of the parasite [Sacks 2002]. The factors that account for host susceptibility to L. Amazonensis, however, are not completely understood, despite being generally attributed to a weakened Th1 response [Vanloubbeck 2004].

  14. An agent-based model for Leishmania major infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dancik, Garrett M.; Jones, Douglas E.; Dorman, Karin S.

    Leishmania are protozoan parasites transmitted by bites of infected sandflies. Over 20 species of Leishmania, endemic in 88 countries, are capable of causing human disease. Disease is either cutaneous, where skin ulcers occur on exposed surfaces of the body, or visceral, with near certain mortality if untreated. C3HeB/FeJ mice are resistant to L. major, but develop chronic cutaneous lesions when infected with another species L. amazonensis. The well-characterized mechanism of resistance to L. major depends on a CD4+ Thl immune response, macrophage activation, and elimination of the parasite [Sacks 2002]. The factors that account for host susceptibility to L. Amazonensis, however, are not completely understood, despite being generally attributed to a weakened Th1 response [Vanloubbeck 2004].

  15. Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) from the lower eukaryote Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Lye, Lon-Fye; Kang, Song Ok; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Casadevall, Arturo; Beverley, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    Aromatic amino acid hydroxylases (AAAH) typically use tetrahydrobiopterin (H4B) as the cofactor. The protozoan parasite Leishmania major requires biopterin for growth and expresses strong salvage and regeneration systems to maintain H4B levels. Here we explored the consequences of genetic manipulation of the sole L. major phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) to explore whether it could account for the Leishmania H4B requirement. L. major PAH resembles AAAHs of other organisms, bearing eukaryotic-type domain organization, and conservation of key catalytic residues including those implicated in pteridine binding. A pah− null mutant and an episomal complemented overexpressing derivative (pah−/+PAH) were readily obtained, and metabolic labeling studies established that PAH was required to hydroxylate Phe to Tyr. Neither WT nor overexpressing lines were able to hydroxylate radiolabeled tyrosine or tryptophan, nor to synthesize catecholamines. WT but not pah− parasites showed reactivity with an antibody to melanin when grown with L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), although the reactive product is unlikely to be melanin sensu strictu. WT was auxotrophic for Phe, Trp and Tyr, suggesting that PAH activity was insufficient to meet normal Tyr requirements. However, pah− showed an increased sensitivity to Tyr deprivation, while the pah−/+PAH overexpressor showed increased survival and could be adapted to grow well without added Tyr. pah− showed no alterations in H4B-dependent differentiation, as established by in vitro metacyclogenesis, or survival in mouse or macrophage infections. Thus Leishmania PAH may mitigate but not alleviate Tyr auxotrophy, but plays no essential role in the steps of the parasite infectious cycle. These findings suggest PAH is unlikely to explain the Leishmania requirement for biopterin. PMID:20887755

  16. Glycosome turnover in Leishmania major is mediated by autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Cull, Benjamin; Prado Godinho, Joseane Lima; Fernandes Rodrigues, Juliany Cola; Frank, Benjamin; Schurigt, Uta; Williams, Roderick AM; Coombs, Graham H; Mottram, Jeremy C

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a central process behind the cellular remodeling that occurs during differentiation of Leishmania, yet the cargo of the protozoan parasite's autophagosome is unknown. We have identified glycosomes, peroxisome-like organelles that uniquely compartmentalize glycolytic and other metabolic enzymes in Leishmania and other kinetoplastid parasitic protozoa, as autophagosome cargo. It has been proposed that the number of glycosomes and their content change during the Leishmania life cycle as a key adaptation to the different environments encountered. Quantification of RFP-SQL-labeled glycosomes showed that promastigotes of L. major possess ∼20 glycosomes per cell, whereas amastigotes contain ∼10. Glycosome numbers were significantly greater in promastigotes and amastigotes of autophagy-defective L. major Δatg5 mutants, implicating autophagy in glycosome homeostasis and providing a partial explanation for the previously observed growth and virulence defects of these mutants. Use of GFP-ATG8 to label autophagosomes showed glycosomes to be cargo in ∼15% of them; glycosome-containing autophagosomes were trafficked to the lysosome for degradation. The number of autophagosomes increased 10-fold during differentiation, yet the percentage of glycosome-containing autophagosomes remained constant. This indicates that increased turnover of glycosomes was due to an overall increase in autophagy, rather than an upregulation of autophagosomes containing this cargo. Mitophagy of the single mitochondrion was not observed in L. major during normal growth or differentiation; however, mitochondrial remnants resulting from stress-induced fragmentation colocalized with autophagosomes and lysosomes, indicating that autophagy is used to recycle these damaged organelles. These data show that autophagy in Leishmania has a central role not only in maintaining cellular homeostasis and recycling damaged organelles but crucially in the adaptation to environmental change through the

  17. Identification of geographically distributed sub-populations of Leishmania (Leishmania) major by microsatellite analysis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Leishmania (Leishmania) major, one of the agents causing cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in humans, is widely distributed in the Old World where different species of wild rodent and phlebotomine sand fly serve as animal reservoir hosts and vectors, respectively. Despite this, strains of L. (L.) major isolated from many different sources over many years have proved to be relatively uniform. To investigate the population structure of the species highly polymorphic microsatellite markers were employed for greater discrimination among it's otherwise closely related strains, an approach applied successfully to other species of Leishmania. Results Multilocus Microsatellite Typing (MLMT) based on 10 different microsatellite markers was applied to 106 strains of L. (L.) major from different regions where it is endemic. On applying a Bayesian model-based approach, three main populations were identified, corresponding to three separate geographical regions: Central Asia (CA); the Middle East (ME); and Africa (AF). This was congruent with phylogenetic reconstructions based on genetic distances. Re-analysis separated each of the populations into two sub-populations. The two African sub-populations did not correlate well with strains' geographical origin. Strains falling into the sub-populations CA and ME did mostly group according to their place of isolation although some anomalies were seen, probably, owing to human migration. Conclusion The model- and distance-based analyses of the microsatellite data exposed three main populations of L. (L.) major, Central Asia, the Middle East and Africa, each of which separated into two sub-populations. This probably correlates with the different species of rodent host. PMID:18577226

  18. In Vitro and In Vivo Antileishmanial Effects of Pistacia khinjuk against Leishmania tropica and Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Saedi Dezaki, Ebrahim; Mahmoudvand, Hossein; Azadpour, Mojgan; Ezzatkhah, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo antileishmanial activities of Pistacia khinjuk Stocks (Anacardiaceae) alcoholic extract and to compare its efficacy with a reference drug, meglumine antimoniate (MA, Glucantime), against Leishmania tropica and Leishmania major. This extract (0–100 µg/mL) was evaluated in vitro against promastigote and intracellular amastigote forms of L. tropica (MRHO/IR/75/ER) and then tested on cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in male BALB/c mice with L. major to reproduce the antileishmanial activity topically. In vitro, P. khinjuk extract significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited the growth rate of promastigote (IC50 58.6 ± 3.2 µg/mL) and intramacrophage amastigotes (37.3 ± 2.5 µg/mL) of L. tropica as a dose-dependent response. In the in vivo assay, after 30 days of treatment, 75% recovery was observed in the infected mice treated with 30% extract. After treatment of the subgroups with the concentration of 20 and 30% of P. khinjuk extract, mean diameter of lesions was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced. To conclude, the present investigation demonstrated that P. vera extract had in vitro and in vivo effectiveness against L. major. Obtained findings also provide the scientific evidences that natural plants could be used in the traditional medicine for the prevention and treatment of CL. PMID:25815025

  19. Immunoregulatory pathways in murine leishmaniasis: different regulatory control during Leishmania mexicana mexicana and Leishmania major infections.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, J; Kaye, P M

    1985-01-01

    The effect of whole body sublethal gamma irradiation on the subsequent growth of Leishmania mexicana mexicana and Leishmania major was studied in CBA/Ca and BALB/c mice. Whereas BALB/c mice are highly susceptible to both parasites developing non healing progressively growing lesions at the site of cutaneous infection, CBA/Ca mice develop small healing cutaneous ulcers following subcutaneous infection with L. major but non healing lesions following subcutaneous infection with L.m. mexicana. Prior whole body sublethal irradiation of CBA/Ca mice, but not BALB/c mice, resulted in strong resistance against infection with L.m. mexicana: no lesions developed at the site of cutaneous infection. Irradiated BALB/c mice did, however, develop small lesions which healed when infected with L. major. The protective effects of irradiation coincided with the development of delayed type hypersensitivity. Both naive and sensitized nylon wool purified lymphocytes could restore susceptibility to L. major in irradiated BALB/c mice but only lymphocytes from long term infected donor mice adoptively transferred a non healing response to irradiated CBA/Ca mice infected with L.m. mexicana. Non-irradiated, L. major infected, CBA/Ca mice, but not similarly treated BALB/c mice, were found to be resistant to subsequent infection with L.m. mexicana. On the other hand, irradiated BALB/c mice infected with L. major were resistant to subsequent infectious challenge with L.m. mexicana. We suggest that the susceptibility of CBA/Ca mice to L.m. mexicana is under the control of an as yet unidentified gene which is not dependent on the generation of T suppressor cells and is bypassed by previous infection with L. major. Therefore, BALB/c mice immunized against L. major by prior sublethal irradiation are also resistant to L.m. mexicana. PMID:3907906

  20. Structure of the SAS-6 cartwheel hub from Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    van Breugel, Mark; Wilcken, Rainer; McLaughlin, Stephen H; Rutherford, Trevor J; Johnson, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    Centrioles are cylindrical cell organelles with a ninefold symmetric peripheral microtubule array that is essential to template cilia and flagella. They are built around a central cartwheel assembly that is organized through homo-oligomerization of the centriolar protein SAS-6, but whether SAS-6 self-assembly can dictate cartwheel and thereby centriole symmetry is unclear. Here we show that Leishmania major SAS-6 crystallizes as a 9-fold symmetric cartwheel and provide the X-ray structure of this assembly at a resolution of 3.5 Å. We furthermore demonstrate that oligomerization of Leishmania SAS-6 can be inhibited by a small molecule in vitro and provide indications for its binding site. Our results firmly establish that SAS-6 can impose cartwheel symmetry on its own and indicate how this process might occur mechanistically in vivo. Importantly, our data also provide a proof-of-principle that inhibition of SAS-6 oligomerization by small molecules is feasible. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01812.001.

  1. Tamoxifen Induces Apoptosis of Leishmania major Promastigotes in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Doroodgar, Masoud; Delavari, Mahdi; Doroodgar, Moein; Abbasi, Ali; Taherian, Ali Akbar; Doroodgar, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Tamoxifen is an antagonist of the estrogen receptor and currently used for the treatment of breast cancer. The current treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis with pentavalent antimony compounds is not satisfactory. Therefore, in this study, due to its antileishmanial activity, effects of tamoxifen on the growth of promastigotes and amastigotes of Leishmania major Iranian strain were evaluated in vitro. Promastigotes and amastigotes were treated with different concentrations (1, 5, 10, 20, and 50 μg/ml) and time periods (24, 48, and 72 hr) of tamoxifen. After tamoxifen treatment, MTT assay (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 biphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay) was used to determine the percentage of live parasites and Graph Pad Prism software to calculate IC50. Flow cytometry was applied to investigate the induction of tamoxifen-induced apoptosis in promastigotes. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of tamoxifen on promastigotes was 2.6 μg/ml after 24 hr treatment. Flow cytometry analysis showed that tamoxifen induced early and late apoptosis in Leishmania promastigotes. While after 48 hr in control group the apoptosis was 2.0%, the 50 µg/L concentration of tamoxifen increased it to 59.7%. Based on the in vitro antileishmanial effect, tamoxifen might be used for leishmaniasis treatment; however, further researches on in vivo effects of tamoxifen in animal models are needed. PMID:26951973

  2. Mitochondrial haplotypes and phylogeography of Phlebotomus vectors of Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Esseghir, S; Ready, P D; Killick-Kendrick, R; Ben-Ismail, R

    1997-08-01

    Haplotypes of eight phlebotomine species were characterized by cycle sequencing a mitochondrial (mt) DNA fragment (cytochrome b to NADH1) amplified from single sandflies by PCR. Phlebotomus (Phlebotomus) papatasi displayed little variation throughout its large geographical range. We conclude that this vector of Leishmania major suffered a population bottleneck late in the Pleistocene and then radiated out from the eastern Mediterranean subregion. There was no support for a recent domestic lineage of P. papatasi. The mtDNA molecular clock in phlebotomines (subgenera Phlebotomus and Larroussius) was calibrated by reference to palaeogeographical events in Africa and the Mediterranean subregion. It fitted a pairwise nucleotide sequence divergence rate of 1.0-2.5% per million years. Co-evolution of L. major, its Phlebotomus vectors and mammalian reservoirs is discussed. PMID:9272439

  3. Expression and subcellular localization of ORC1 in Leishmania major

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Diwakar; Mukherji, Agnideep; Saha, Swati

    2008-10-10

    The mechanism of DNA replication is highly conserved in eukaryotes, with the process being preceded by the ordered assembly of pre-replication complexes (pre-RCs). Pre-RC formation is triggered by the association of the origin replication complex (ORC) with chromatin. Leishmania major appears to have only one ORC ortholog, ORC1. ORC1 in other eukaryotes is the largest of the ORC subunits and is believed to play a significant role in modulating replication initiation. Here we report for the first time, the cloning of ORC1 from L. major, and the analysis of its expression in L. major promastigotes. In human cells ORC1 levels have been found to be upregulated in G1 and subsequently degraded, thus playing a role in controlling replication initiation. We examine the subcellular localization of L. major ORC1 in relation to the different stages of the cell cycle. Our results show that, unlike what is widely believed to be the case with ORC1 in human cells, ORC1 in L. major is nuclear at all stages of the cell cycle.

  4. Systems analysis of metabolism in the pathogenic trypanosomatid Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Chavali, Arvind K; Whittemore, Jeffrey D; Eddy, James A; Williams, Kyle T; Papin, Jason A

    2008-01-01

    Systems analyses have facilitated the characterization of metabolic networks of several organisms. We have reconstructed the metabolic network of Leishmania major, a poorly characterized organism that causes cutaneous leishmaniasis in mammalian hosts. This network reconstruction accounts for 560 genes, 1112 reactions, 1101 metabolites and 8 unique subcellular localizations. Using a systems-based approach, we hypothesized a comprehensive set of lethal single and double gene deletions, some of which were validated using published data with approximately 70% accuracy. Additionally, we generated hypothetical annotations to dozens of previously uncharacterized genes in the L. major genome and proposed a minimal medium for growth. We further demonstrated the utility of a network reconstruction with two proof-of-concept examples that yielded insight into robustness of the network in the presence of enzymatic inhibitors and delineation of promastigote/amastigote stage-specific metabolism. This reconstruction and the associated network analyses of L. major is the first of its kind for a protozoan. It can serve as a tool for clarifying discrepancies between data sources, generating hypotheses that can be experimentally validated and identifying ideal therapeutic targets. PMID:18364711

  5. Systems analysis of metabolism in the pathogenic trypanosomatid Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Chavali, Arvind K; Whittemore, Jeffrey D; Eddy, James A; Williams, Kyle T; Papin, Jason A

    2008-01-01

    Systems analyses have facilitated the characterization of metabolic networks of several organisms. We have reconstructed the metabolic network of Leishmania major, a poorly characterized organism that causes cutaneous leishmaniasis in mammalian hosts. This network reconstruction accounts for 560 genes, 1112 reactions, 1101 metabolites and 8 unique subcellular localizations. Using a systems-based approach, we hypothesized a comprehensive set of lethal single and double gene deletions, some of which were validated using published data with approximately 70% accuracy. Additionally, we generated hypothetical annotations to dozens of previously uncharacterized genes in the L. major genome and proposed a minimal medium for growth. We further demonstrated the utility of a network reconstruction with two proof-of-concept examples that yielded insight into robustness of the network in the presence of enzymatic inhibitors and delineation of promastigote/amastigote stage-specific metabolism. This reconstruction and the associated network analyses of L. major is the first of its kind for a protozoan. It can serve as a tool for clarifying discrepancies between data sources, generating hypotheses that can be experimentally validated and identifying ideal therapeutic targets. PMID:18364711

  6. The activity of ozonated olive oil against Leishmania major promastigotes

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi, Omid; Sazgarnia, Ameneh; Abbasi, Fatemeh; Layegh, Pouran

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Cutaneous Leishmaniasis is a common and endemic disease in Khorasan province in North-East of Iran. The pentavalant antimony (Sb V) is the mainstay of treatment that has many side effects and resistance to the drug has been reported. The microbicidal effect of ozone was proven in different microorganisms. Since there is no study in this respect and to achieve a low cost and effective treatment, we decided to evaluate the efficacy of ozone against promastigotes of Leishmania major, in vitro. Materials and Methods: Ozonated olive oil was prepared after production of ozone by bubbling ozone-oxygen gas produced by ozone generator through olive oil until it solidified. Promastigotes of L. major were cultivated in two phasic media. After calculation of the number of promastigotes, they were incubated with ozonated olive oil (0, 0.626, 0.938, 1.25, 2.5, 5, 10 mcg/ml) at 28 °c for 24 hr. Parasites survival percentage was evaluated using MTS and microscopic assay, and then compared with Glucantime and non-ozonated olive oil. Results: According to the results, there were significant differences in parasites survival percentage between ozonated olive oil and non-ozonated olive oil, at similar concentrations (P<0.001). Ozonated olive oil was more effective than Glucantime. According to MTS results, Glucantime and ozonated olive oil gel concentrations that are required to inhibit the growth of L. major promastigotes by 50% (IC50), were 165 and 0.002 mg/ml, respectively. Conclusion: Ozonated olive oil has in vitro activity against the promastigotes of L. major and this effect is dose dependent. PMID:26523224

  7. Structural and Kinetic Characterization of Thymidine Kinase from Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Recio, Eliseo; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Rada, Heather; González-Pacanowska, Dolores; Wilson, Keith S.

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania spp. is a protozoan parasite and the causative agent of leishmaniasis. Thymidine kinase (TK) catalyses the transfer of the γ-phosphate of ATP to 2’-deoxythymidine (dThd) forming thymidine monophosphate (dTMP). L. major Type II TK (LmTK) has been previously shown to be important for infectivity of the parasite and therefore has potential as a drug target for anti-leishmanial therapy. In this study, we determined the enzymatic properties and the 3D structures of holo forms of the enzyme. LmTK efficiently phosphorylates dThd and dUrd and has high structural homology to TKs from other species. However, it significantly differs in its kinetic properties from Trypanosoma brucei TK since purines are not substrates of the enzyme and dNTPs such as dUTP inhibit LmTK. The enzyme had Km and kcat values for dThd of 1.1 μM and 2.62 s-1 and exhibits cooperative binding for ATP. Additionally, we show that the anti-retroviral prodrug zidovudine (3-azido-3-deoxythymidine, AZT) and 5’-modified dUrd can be readily phosphorylated by LmTK. The production of recombinant enzyme at a level suitable for structural studies was achieved by the construction of C-terminal truncated versions of the enzyme and the use of a baculoviral expression system. The structures of the catalytic core of LmTK in complex with dThd, the negative feedback regulator dTTP and the bi-substrate analogue AP5dT, were determined to 2.74, 3.00 and 2.40 Å, respectively, and provide the structural basis for exclusion of purines and dNTP inhibition. The results will aid the process of rational drug design with LmTK as a potential target for anti-leishmanial drugs. PMID:25978379

  8. Intracellular Survival of Leishmania major Depends on Uptake and Degradation of Extracellular Matrix Glycosaminoglycans by Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Naderer, Thomas; Heng, Joanne; Saunders, Eleanor C; Kloehn, Joachim; Rupasinghe, Thusitha W; Brown, Tracey J; McConville, Malcolm J

    2015-09-01

    Leishmania parasites replicate within the phagolysosome compartment of mammalian macrophages. Although Leishmania depend on sugars as a major carbon source during infections, the nutrient composition of the phagolysosome remains poorly described. To determine the origin of the sugar carbon source in macrophage phagolysosomes, we have generated a N-acetylglucosamine acetyltransferase (GNAT) deficient Leishmania major mutant (∆gnat) that is auxotrophic for the amino sugar, N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc). This mutant was unable to grow or survive in ex vivo infected macrophages even when macrophages were cultivated in presence of exogenous GlcNAc. In contrast, the L. major ∆gnat mutant induced normal skin lesions in mice, suggesting that these parasites have access to GlcNAc in tissue macrophages. Intracellular growth of the mutant in ex vivo infected macrophages was restored by supplementation of the macrophage medium with hyaluronan, a GlcNAc-rich extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycan. Hyaluronan is present and constitutively turned-over in Leishmania-induced skin lesions and is efficiently internalized into Leishmania containing phagolysosomes. These findings suggest that the constitutive internalization and degradation of host glycosaminoglycans by macrophages provides Leishmania with essential carbon sources, creating a uniquely favorable niche for these parasites.

  9. Intracellular Survival of Leishmania major Depends on Uptake and Degradation of Extracellular Matrix Glycosaminoglycans by Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Eleanor C.; Kloehn, Joachim; Rupasinghe, Thusitha W.; Brown, Tracey J.; McConville, Malcolm J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Leishmania parasites replicate within the phagolysosome compartment of mammalian macrophages. Although Leishmania depend on sugars as a major carbon source during infections, the nutrient composition of the phagolysosome remains poorly described. To determine the origin of the sugar carbon source in macrophage phagolysosomes, we have generated a N-acetylglucosamine acetyltransferase (GNAT) deficient Leishmania major mutant (∆gnat) that is auxotrophic for the amino sugar, N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc). This mutant was unable to grow or survive in ex vivo infected macrophages even when macrophages were cultivated in presence of exogenous GlcNAc. In contrast, the L. major ∆gnat mutant induced normal skin lesions in mice, suggesting that these parasites have access to GlcNAc in tissue macrophages. Intracellular growth of the mutant in ex vivo infected macrophages was restored by supplementation of the macrophage medium with hyaluronan, a GlcNAc-rich extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycan. Hyaluronan is present and constitutively turned-over in Leishmania-induced skin lesions and is efficiently internalized into Leishmania containing phagolysosomes. These findings suggest that the constitutive internalization and degradation of host glycosaminoglycans by macrophages provides Leishmania with essential carbon sources, creating a uniquely favorable niche for these parasites. PMID:26334531

  10. Mycobacterium hsp65 DNA entrapped into TDM-loaded PLGA microspheres induces protection in mice against Leishmania (Leishmania) major infection.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Eduardo Antonio Ferraz; Tavares, Carlos Alberto Pereira; Lima, Karla de Melo; Silva, Célio Lopes; Rodrigues, José Maciel; Fernandes, Ana Paula

    2006-05-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are highly conserved among different organisms. A mycobacterial HSP65 DNA vaccine was previously shown to have prophylactic and immunotherapeutic effects against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in mice. Here, BALB/c mice were immunized with mycobacterial DNA-hsp65 or with DNA-hsp65 and trehalose dymicolate (TDM), both carried by biodegradable microspheres (MHSP/TDM), and challenged with Leishmania (Leishmania) major. MHSP/TDM conferred protection against L. major infection, as indicated by a significant reduction of edema and parasite loads in infected tissues. Although high levels of interferon-gamma and low levels of interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-10 were detected in mice immunized with DNA-hsp65 or MHSP/TDM, only animals immunized with MHSP/TDM displayed a consistent Th1 immune response, i.e., significantly higher levels of anti-soluble Leishmania antigen (SLA) immunoglobulin G (IgG)2a and low anti-SLA IgG1 antibodies. These findings indicate that encapsulated MHSP/TDM is more immunogenic than naked hsp65 DNA, and has great potential to improve vaccine effectiveness against leishmaniasis and tuberculosis. PMID:16432754

  11. Evidence That Intracellular Stages of Leishmania major Utilize Amino Sugars as a Major Carbon Source

    PubMed Central

    McConville, Malcolm J.

    2010-01-01

    Intracellular parasites, such as Leishmania spp, must acquire suitable carbon sources from the host cell in order to replicate. Here we present evidence that intracellular amastigote stages of Leishmania exploit amino sugars in the phagolysosome of mammalian macrophages as a source of carbon and energy. L. major parasites are capable of using N-acetylglucosamine and glucosamine as primarily carbon sources and contain key enzymes required for conversion of these sugars to fructose-6-phosphate. The last step in this pathway is catalyzed by glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase (GND), which was targeted to glycosomes via a canonical C-terminal targeting signal when expressed as a GFP fusion protein. Mutant parasites lacking GND were unable to grow in medium containing amino sugars as sole carbohydrate source and rapidly lost viability, concomitant with the hyper-accumulation of hexosamine-phosphates. Expression of native GND, but not a cytosolic form of GND, in Δgnd parasites restored hexosamine-dependent growth, indicating that toxicity is due to depletion of glycosomal pools of ATP. Non-lethal increases in hexosamine phosphate levels in both Δgnd and wild type parasites was associated with a defect in promastigote metacyclogenesis, suggesting that hexosamine phosphate levels may influence parasite differentiation. Promastigote and amastigote stages of the Δgnd mutant were unable to replicate within macrophages and were either completely cleared or exhibited reduced lesion development in highly susceptible Balb/c mice. Our results suggest that hexosamines are a major class of sugars in the macrophage phagolysosome and that catabolism of scavenged amino sugars is required to sustain essential metabolic pathways and prevent hexosamine toxicity. PMID:21203480

  12. Acute cysticercosis favours rapid and more severe lesions caused by Leishmania major and Leishmania mexicana infection, a role for alternatively activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sosa, Miriam; Rivera-Montoya, Irma; Espinoza, Arlett; Romero-Grijalva, Miriam; López-Flores, Roberto; González, Jorge; Terrazas, Luis I

    2006-08-01

    Parasitic helminths have developed complex mechanisms to modulate host immunity. In the present study we found that previous infection of mice with the cestode Taenia crassiceps favours parasitemia and induces larger cutaneous lesions during both Leishmania major and Leishmania mexicana co-infections. Analysis of cytokine responses into draining lymph nodes indicated that co-infection of T. crassiceps-Leishmania did not inhibit IFN-gamma production in response to Leishmania antigens, but significantly increased IL-4 production. Additionally, anti-Leishmania-specific IgG1 antibodies and total IgE increased in co-infected mice, whereas, IgG2a titers remained similar. Macrophages from Taenia-infected mice displayed increased mRNA transcripts of arginase-1, Ym1, and Mannose Receptor, as well as greater production of urea (all markers for an alternate activation state) compared to macrophages from Leishmania-infected mice. In contrast, lower mRNA transcripts for IL-12p35, IL-12p40, IL-23p19, and iNOS were detected in macrophages obtained from cestode-infected mice compared to uninfected and Leishmania-infected mice after LPS stimulation. The presence of cestode also generated impaired macrophage anti-leishmanicidal activity in vitro, as evidenced by the inability of these macrophages to prevent Leishmania growth compared to macrophages from uninfected mice. This was observed despite the fact that both groups of cells were exposed to IFN-gamma. Flow cytometry showed high IFN-gammaR expression on Taenia-induced macrophages. Thus, lack of response to IFN-gamma is not associated with the absence of its receptor. Our data suggest that cestode infection may favour Leishmania installation by inducing alternatively activated macrophages rather than inhibiting Th1-type responses.

  13. [Demonstration of the Leishmanicidal activity of Stachys guyoniana against Leishmania major in eastern Algeria].

    PubMed

    Mihoubi, I; Ramli, I; Frahtia, K; Kabouche, Z; Harrat, Z

    2013-05-01

    The authors report the results of the assessment of the Leishmanicidal activity of a plant species of the Lamiaceae family, Stachys guyoniana. This in vitro study used the species endemic in Algeria, Leishmania major. Both the butanolic and ethyl acetate extracts showed strong activity against this strain.

  14. Antileishmanial activity of licochalcone A in mice infected with Leishmania major and in hamsters infected with Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, M; Christensen, S B; Theander, T G; Kharazmi, A

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the antileishmanial activity of the oxygenated chalcone licochalcone A in mice and hamsters infected with Leishmania parasites. Intraperitoneal administration of licochalcone A at doses of 2.5 and 5 mg/kg of body weight per day completely prevented lesion development in BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania major. Treatment of hamsters infected with L. donovani with intraperitoneal administration of licochalcone A at a dose of 20 mg/kg of body weight per day for 6 consecutive days resulted in a > 96% reduction of parasite load in the liver and the spleen compared with values for untreated control animals. The [3H]thymidine uptake by the parasites isolated from the treated hamsters was only about 1% of that observed in parasites isolated from the controls. Oral administration of licochalcone A at concentrations of 5 to 150 mg/kg of body weight per day for 6 consecutive days resulted in > 65 and 85% reductions of L. donovani parasite loads in the liver and the spleen, respectively, compared with those of untreated control hamsters. These data clearly demonstrate that licochalcone A is a promising lead for the development of a new drug against leishmaniases. PMID:8092835

  15. Immune responses in DNA vaccine formulated with PMMA following immunization and after challenge with Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Zarrati, Somayeh; Mahdavi, Mehdi; Tabatabaie, Fatemeh

    2016-06-01

    Leishmaniasis is a major infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania. Despite of many efforts toward vaccine against Leishmania no effective vaccine has been approved yet. DNA vaccines can generate more powerful and broad immune responses than conventional vaccines. In order to increase immunity, the DNA vaccine has been supplemented with adjuvant. In this study a new nano-vaccine containing TSA recombinant plasmid and poly(methylmethacrylate) nanoparticles (act as adjuvant) was designed and its immunogenicity tested on BALB/c mouse. After three intramuscular injection of nano-vaccine (100 μg), the recombinant TSA protein (20 μg) was injected subcutaneously. Finally as a challenge animals were infected by Leishmania major. After the last injection of nano-vaccine, after protein booster injection, and also after challenge, cellular immune and antibody responses were evaluated by ELISA method. The findings of this study showed the new nano-vaccine was capable of induction both cytokines secretion and specific antibody responses, but predominant Th1 immune response characterized by IFN-γ production compared to control groups. Moreover, results revealed that nano-vaccine was effective in reducing parasite burden in the spleen of Leishmania major-infected BALB/c mice. Base on results, current candidate vaccine has potency for further studies. PMID:27413316

  16. Approaches for the identification of potential excreted/secreted proteins of Leishmania major parasites.

    PubMed

    Chenik, M; Lakhal, S; Ben Khalef, N; Zribi, L; Louzir, H; Dellagi, K

    2006-04-01

    Leishmania parasites are able to survive in host macrophages despite the harsh phagolysosomal vacuoles conditions. This could reflect, in part, their capacity to secrete proteins that may play an essential role in the establishment of infection and serve as targets for cellular immune responses. To characterize Leishmania major proteins excreted/secreted early after promastigote entry into the host macrophage, we have generated antibodies against culture supernatants of stationary-phase promastigotes collected 6 h after incubation in conditions that partially reproduce those prevailing in the parasitophorous vacuole. The screening of an L. major cDNA library with these antibodies led us to isolate 33 different cDNA clones that we report here. Sequence analysis revealed that the corresponding proteins could be classified in 3 groups: 9 proteins have been previously described as excreted/secreted in Leishmania and/or other species; 11 correspond to known proteins already characterized in Leishmania and/or other species although it is unknown whether they are excreted/secreted and 13 code for unknown proteins. Interestingly, the latter are transcribed as shown by RT-PCR and some of them are stage regulated. The L. major excreted/secreted proteins may constitute putative virulence factors, vaccine candidates and/or new drug targets.

  17. Neglected tropical diseases and omics science: proteogenomics analysis of the promastigote stage of Leishmania major parasite.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Harsh; Renuse, Santosh; Khobragade, Sweta N; Chavan, Sandip; Sathe, Gajanan; Kumar, Praveen; Mahale, Kiran N; Gore, Kalpita; Kulkarni, Aditi; Dixit, Tanwi; Raju, Rajesh; Prasad, T S Keshava; Harsha, H C; Patole, Milind S; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2014-08-01

    Among the neglected tropical diseases, leishmaniasis is one of the most devastating, resulting in significant mortality and contributing to nearly 2 million disability-adjusted life years. Cutaneous leishmaniasis is a debilitating disorder caused by the kinetoplastid protozoan parasite Leishmania major, which results in disfiguration and scars. L. major genome was the first to be sequenced within the genus Leishmania. Use of proteomic data for annotating genomes is a complementary approach to conventional genome annotation approaches and is referred to as proteogenomics. We have used a proteogenomics-based approach to map the proteome of L. major and also annotate its genome. In this study, we searched L. major promastigote proteomic data against the annotated L. major protein database. Additionally, we searched the proteomic data against six-frame translated L. major genome. In all, we identified 3613 proteins in L. major promastigotes, which covered 43% of its proteome. We also identified 26 genome search-specific peptides, which led to the identification of three novel genes previously not identified in L. major. We also corrected the annotation of N-termini of 15 genes, which resulted in extension of their protein products. We have validated our proteogenomics findings by RT-PCR and sequencing. In addition, our study resulted in identification of 266 N-terminally acetylated peptides in L. major, one of the largest acetylated peptide datasets thus far in Leishmania. This dataset should be a valuable resource to researchers focusing on neglected tropical diseases. PMID:24937402

  18. Leishmania in the Old World: 1. The geographical and hostal distribution of L. major zymodemes.

    PubMed

    Le Blancq, S M; Schnur, L F; Peters, W

    1986-01-01

    135 stocks of Leishmania major from man, reservoir hosts and sandflies were characterized using thin-layer starch-gel electrophoresis of 13 enzymes: MDH, 6PGD, GD, SOD, ASAT, ALAT, PK, PGM, ES, NH, PEPD, MPI, GPI. Homogeneity in this species was demonstrated by identical electrophoretic mobilities in nine enzymes. Polymorphism in four enzymes: 6PGD, GPI, PEPD, ES, gave six zymodemes among the collection. Stocks from sandflies and several species of burrowing rodents were indistinguishable from those from man in the same areas. Stocks of Leishmania from North-West India were identified as L. major. In some foci the distribution of zymodemes has some correlation with the presence of particular rodent reservoir hosts. The enzymic homogeneity of L. major throughout its geographical and host range appears to be correlated with the close association between L. major and sandflies of the subgenus Phlebotomus. The status of L. major as a distinct species is supported.

  19. Lipid Droplet Formation, Their Localization and Dynamics during Leishmania major Macrophage Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rabhi, Sameh; Rabhi, Imen; Trentin, Bernadette; Piquemal, David; Regnault, Béatrice; Goyard, Sophie; Lang, Thierry; Descoteaux, Albert; Enninga, Jost; Guizani-Tabbane, Lamia

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania, the causative agent of vector-borne diseases, known as leishmaniases, is an obligate intracellular parasite within mammalian hosts. The outcome of infection depends largely on the activation status of macrophages, the first line of mammalian defense and the major target cells for parasite replication. Understanding the strategies developed by the parasite to circumvent macrophage defense mechanisms and to survive within those cells help defining novel therapeutic approaches for leishmaniasis. We previously showed the formation of lipid droplets (LDs) in L. major infected macrophages. Here, we provide novel insights on the origin of the formed LDs by determining their cellular distribution and to what extent these high-energy sources are directed to the proximity of Leishmania parasites. We show that the ability of L. major to trigger macrophage LD accumulation is independent of parasite viability and uptake and can also be observed in non-infected cells through paracrine stimuli suggesting that LD formation is from cellular origin. The accumulation of LDs is demonstrated using confocal microscopy and live-cell imagin in parasite-free cytoplasmic region of the host cell, but also promptly recruited to the proximity of Leishmania parasites. Indeed LDs are observed inside parasitophorous vacuole and in parasite cytoplasm suggesting that Leishmania parasites besides producing their own LDs, may take advantage of these high energy sources. Otherwise, these LDs may help cells defending against parasitic infection. These metabolic changes, rising as common features during the last years, occur in host cells infected by a large number of pathogens and seem to play an important role in pathogenesis. Understanding how Leishmania parasites and different pathogens exploit this LD accumulation will help us define the common mechanism used by these different pathogens to manipulate and/or take advantage of this high-energy source. PMID:26871576

  20. A heat-activated and thermoresistant telomerase activity in Leishmania major Friedlin.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Maria Mercedes; Rodriguez, Evelyn; Rojas, Maria Gabriela; Figarella, Katherine; Campelo, Riward; Ramírez, Jose Luis

    2009-07-01

    Here we studied the telomerase activity of the human parasite Leishmania major. In this organism we have detected a high activity of this enzyme once several parameters such as heat activation, sequence of extension primer, and protein concentration are adjusted. The activity was not only heat activated, but also very resistant to heat denaturation. We believe L. major telomerase is an important activity and it may provide an adequate drug therapy target. PMID:19426669

  1. Platelet activation attracts a subpopulation of effector monocytes to sites of Leishmania major infection.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Ricardo; Zhang, Xia; Cohen, Heather; Debrabant, Alain; Mosser, David M

    2011-06-01

    Leishmania species trigger a brisk inflammatory response and efficiently induce cell-mediated immunity. We examined the mechanisms whereby leukocytes were recruited into lesions after Leishmania major infection of mice. We found that a subpopulation of effector monocytes expressing the granulocyte marker GR1 (Ly6C) is rapidly recruited into lesions, and these monocytes efficiently kill L. major parasites. The recruitment of this subpopulation of monocytes depends on the chemokine receptor CCR2 and the activation of platelets. Activated platelets secrete platelet-derived growth factor, which induces the rapid release of CCL2 from leukocytes and mesenchymal cells. This work points to a new role for platelets in host defense involving the selective recruitment of a subpopulation of effector monocytes from the blood to efficiently kill this intracellular parasite.

  2. Structures of prostaglandin F synthase from the protozoa Leishmania major and Trypanosoma cruzi with NADP.

    PubMed

    Moen, Spencer O; Fairman, James W; Barnes, Steve R; Sullivan, Amy; Nakazawa-Hewitt, Stephen; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Staker, Bart L; Lorimer, Donald D; Myler, Peter J; Edwards, Thomas E

    2015-05-01

    The crystal structures of prostaglandin F synthase (PGF) from both Leishmania major and Trypanosoma cruzi with and without their cofactor NADP have been determined to resolutions of 2.6 Å for T. cruzi PGF, 1.25 Å for T. cruzi PGF with NADP, 1.6 Å for L. major PGF and 1.8 Å for L. major PGF with NADP. These structures were determined by molecular replacement to a final R factor of less than 18.6% (Rfree of less than 22.9%). PGF in the infectious protozoa L. major and T. cruzi is a potential therapeutic target.

  3. Fumarate hydratase isoforms of Leishmania major: subcellular localization, structural and kinetic properties.

    PubMed

    Feliciano, Patrícia R; Gupta, Shreedhara; Dyszy, Fabio; Dias-Baruffi, Marcelo; Costa-Filho, Antonio J; Michels, Paul A M; Nonato, M Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Fumarate hydratases (FHs; EC 4.2.1.2) are enzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration of fumarate to S-malate. Parasitic protists that belong to the genus Leishmania and are responsible for a complex of vector-borne diseases named leishmaniases possess two genes that encode distinct putative FH enzymes. Genome sequence analysis of Leishmania major Friedlin reveals the existence of genes LmjF24.0320 and LmjF29.1960 encoding the putative enzymes LmFH-1 and LmFH-2, respectively. In the present work, the FH activity of both L. major enzymes has been confirmed. Circular dichroism studies suggest important differences in terms of secondary structure content when comparing LmFH isoforms and even larger differences when comparing them to the homologous human enzyme. CD melting experiments revealed that both LmFH isoforms are thermolabile enzymes. The catalytic efficiency under aerobic and anaerobic environments suggests that they are both highly sensitive to oxidation and damaged by oxygen. Intracellular localization studies located LmFH-1 in the mitochondrion, whereas LmFH-2 was found predominantly in the cytosol with possibly also some in glycosomes. The high degree of sequence conservation in different Leishmania species, together with the relevance of FH activity for the energy metabolism in these parasites suggest that FHs might be exploited as targets for broad-spectrum antileishmanial drugs.

  4. Coadministration of the Three Antigenic Leishmania infantum Poly (A) Binding Proteins as a DNA Vaccine Induces Protection against Leishmania major Infection in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Corvo, Laura; Garde, Esther; Ramírez, Laura; Iniesta, Virginia; Bonay, Pedro; Gómez-Nieto, Carlos; González, Víctor M.; Martín, M. Elena; Alonso, Carlos; Coelho, Eduardo A. F.; Barral, Aldina; Barral-Netto, Manoel

    2015-01-01

    Background Highly conserved intracellular proteins from Leishmania have been described as antigens in natural and experimental infected mammals. The present study aimed to evaluate the antigenicity and prophylactic properties of the Leishmania infantum Poly (A) binding proteins (LiPABPs). Methodology/Principal Findings Three different members of the LiPABP family have been described. Recombinant tools based on these proteins were constructed: recombinant proteins and DNA vaccines. The three recombinant proteins were employed for coating ELISA plates. Sera from human and canine patients of visceral leishmaniasis and human patients of mucosal leishmaniasis recognized the three LiPABPs. In addition, the protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine based on the combination of the three Leishmania PABPs has been tested in a model of progressive murine leishmaniasis: BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania major. The induction of a Th1-like response against the LiPABP family by genetic vaccination was able to down-regulate the IL-10 predominant responses elicited by parasite LiPABPs after infection in this murine model. This modulation resulted in a partial protection against L. major infection. LiPABP vaccinated mice showed a reduction on the pathology that was accompanied by a decrease in parasite burdens, in antibody titers against Leishmania antigens and in the IL-4 and IL-10 parasite-specific mediated responses in comparison to control mice groups immunized with saline or with the non-recombinant plasmid. Conclusion/Significance The results presented here demonstrate for the first time the prophylactic properties of a new family of Leishmania antigenic intracellular proteins, the LiPABPs. The redirection of the immune response elicited against the LiPABP family (from IL-10 towards IFN-γ mediated responses) by genetic vaccination was able to induce a partial protection against the development of the disease in a highly susceptible murine model of leishmaniasis. PMID:25955652

  5. Primary structure of the gene encoding the bifunctional dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase of Leishmania major.

    PubMed Central

    Beverley, S M; Ellenberger, T E; Cordingley, J S

    1986-01-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthetase (DHFR-TS) gene of the protozoan parasite Leishmania major (dihydrofolate reductase, EC 1.5.1.3 and thymidylate synthase, EC 2.1.1.45). The DHFR-TS protein is encoded by a single 1560-base-pair open reading frame within genomic DNA, in contrast to vertebrate DHFRs or mouse and phage T4 TSs, which contain intervening sequences. Comparisons of the DHFR-TS sequence with DHFR and TS sequences of other organisms indicate that the order of enzymatic activities within the bifunctional polypeptide chain is DHFR followed by TS, the Leishmania bifunctional DHFR-TS evolved independently and not through a phage T4-related intermediate, and the rate of evolution of both the DHFR and TS domains has not detectably changed despite the acquisition of new functional properties by the bifunctional enzyme. The Leishmania gene is 86% G+C in the third codon position, in contrast to genes of the parasite Plasmodium falciparum, which exhibit an opposite bias toward A+T. The DHFR-TS locus is encoded within a region of DNA amplified in methotrexate-resistant lines, as previously proposed. PMID:3458220

  6. Efficacy of Permethrin Treated Bed Nets Against Leishmania major Infected Sand Flies.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Tobin; Davidson, Silas A; Kobylinski, Kevin; Menses, Claudio; Rowton, Edgar

    2015-01-01

    Insecticide treated nets (ITNs) are a potential tool to help control sand flies and prevent Leishmaniasis. However, little is currently known about the response of Leishmania infected sand flies to ITNs. In this study, Phlebotomus duboscqi sand flies were infected with the parasite Leishmania major. Infected and noninfected sand flies were then evaluated against permethrin treated and untreated bed nets in a laboratory assay that required sand flies to pass through suspended netting material to feed on a mouse serving as an attractive host. The number of sand flies passing through the nets and blood feeding was recorded. There was not a significant difference in the ability of infected or noninfected sand flies to move through treated or untreated nets. Fewer sand flies entered the permethrin treated nets compared to the untreated nets, indicating that permethrin creates an effective barrier. The results show that in addition to reducing the nuisance bites of noninfected sand flies, ITNs also protect against Leishmania infected sand flies and therefore can play in key role in reducing the rates of Leishmaniasis. This study is important to the Department of Defense as it continues to develop and field new bed nets to protect service members.

  7. Antigen-presenting cells in human cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania major.

    PubMed Central

    ElHassan, A M; Gaafar, A; Theander, T G

    1995-01-01

    In this study biopsies from skin lesions and draining lymph nodes of patients suffering from cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania major were examined by immunohistochemistry, and by light and electron microscopy to identify the types of antigen-presenting cells (APC) and their location. APC, identified morphologically and by their expression of specific cell markers, included Langerhans cells, macrophages, follicular dendritic cells, and interdigitating reticulum cells of the paracortex of lymph nodes. These cells expressed MHC class II antigens and contained Leishmania antigen. Since some keratinocytes and endothelial cells also showed these characteristics, they may also act as APC. By examining tissue samples from skin lesions and draining lymph nodes it was possible to follow the probable route of trafficking of various inflammatory cells between the skin lesion and lymph nodes. Leishmania antigen containing Langerhans cells were found in the epidermis, dermis and the regional lymph nodes. We believe these cells translocate from the epidermis to the dermis, where they take up antigen and migrate to the paracortex of the regional lymph nodes. There they are intimately associated with cells of the paracortex, and could be involved in the generation of Leishmania-specific T memory cells. LFA-1-positive T cells of the CD45RO phenotype were found in the skin lesion. Venular endothelium in the skin lesions expressed intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), which is the ligand for LFA-1. The migration of lymphocytes from the vascular lumen to the site of inflammation is possibly a result of the interaction of these two adhesion molecules. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7882568

  8. First report of natural infection in hedgehogs with Leishmania major, a possible reservoir of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Tomás-Pérez, Míriam; Khaldi, Mourad; Riera, Cristina; Mozo-León, Denis; Ribas, Alexis; Hide, Mallorie; Barech, Ghania; Benyettou, Meryam; Seghiri, Kamel; Doudou, Souad; Fisa, Roser

    2014-07-01

    We report here the first known cases of natural infection of hedgehogs with Leishmania major. Cutaneous leishmaniasis is an important public health problem in the area of M'sila, a semi-arid province in Algeria's northern Sahara, where two species of hedgehog live, Atelerix algirus and Paraechinus aethiopicus. The aim of this research was to survey Leishmania infection in these hedgehogs and evaluate whether they were reservoir hosts of Leishmania in an endemic zoonotic focus of leishmaniasis. Serological and molecular methods were used to determine the presence of Leishmania in 24 hedgehogs caught directly by hand and identified at species level as 19 A. algirus and 5 P. aethiopicus. Specific anti-Leishmania antibodies were detected in 29.2% of individuals by Western blot and in 26.3% by ELISA. The real-time PCR performed in spleen, ear and blood samples detected Leishmania spp. DNA in 12.5% of the individuals, one A. algirus and two P. aethiopicus. Three skin and two spleen samples of these animals were found to be parasitized and were identified by molecular test as L. major. Considering our results, it is suggested that hedgehogs have a potential epidemiological role as reservoir hosts of L. major.

  9. First report of natural infection in hedgehogs with Leishmania major, a possible reservoir of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Tomás-Pérez, Míriam; Khaldi, Mourad; Riera, Cristina; Mozo-León, Denis; Ribas, Alexis; Hide, Mallorie; Barech, Ghania; Benyettou, Meryam; Seghiri, Kamel; Doudou, Souad; Fisa, Roser

    2014-07-01

    We report here the first known cases of natural infection of hedgehogs with Leishmania major. Cutaneous leishmaniasis is an important public health problem in the area of M'sila, a semi-arid province in Algeria's northern Sahara, where two species of hedgehog live, Atelerix algirus and Paraechinus aethiopicus. The aim of this research was to survey Leishmania infection in these hedgehogs and evaluate whether they were reservoir hosts of Leishmania in an endemic zoonotic focus of leishmaniasis. Serological and molecular methods were used to determine the presence of Leishmania in 24 hedgehogs caught directly by hand and identified at species level as 19 A. algirus and 5 P. aethiopicus. Specific anti-Leishmania antibodies were detected in 29.2% of individuals by Western blot and in 26.3% by ELISA. The real-time PCR performed in spleen, ear and blood samples detected Leishmania spp. DNA in 12.5% of the individuals, one A. algirus and two P. aethiopicus. Three skin and two spleen samples of these animals were found to be parasitized and were identified by molecular test as L. major. Considering our results, it is suggested that hedgehogs have a potential epidemiological role as reservoir hosts of L. major. PMID:24699087

  10. Leishmania major lipophosphoglycan modulates the phenotype and inhibits migration of murine Langerhans cells

    PubMed Central

    Ponte-Sucre, Alicia; Heise, Dirk; Moll, Heidrun

    2001-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LC), members of the dendritic cell family, play a central role in the initiation and regulation of the immune response against the protozoan parasite Leishmania major. LC take up antigens in the skin and transport them to the regional lymph nodes for presentation to T cells. However, it is not known whether LC functions are modulated by parasite antigens. In the present study, we examined the effect of a major parasite surface molecule, L. major lipophosphoglycan (LPG), on the maturation of LC and their migratory properties. The results show that exposure to LPG did not affect the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and B7, but induced an up-regulation of CD25, CD31 and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin expression and a down-regulation of Mac-1 expression, by LC. Importantly, LPG treatment inhibited the migratory activity of LC, as it reduced their efflux from skin explants and their migration in transwell cultures. These results suggest that Leishmania LPG impairs LC migration out of the skin and thus may modulate their immunostimulatory functions, which require LC translocation from skin to lymph nodes. PMID:11899433

  11. Spatio-temporal Genetic Structuring of Leishmania major in Tunisia by Microsatellite Analysis.

    PubMed

    Harrabi, Myriam; Bettaieb, Jihène; Ghawar, Wissem; Toumi, Amine; Zaâtour, Amor; Yazidi, Rihab; Chaâbane, Sana; Chalghaf, Bilel; Hide, Mallorie; Bañuls, Anne-Laure; Ben Salah, Afif

    2015-01-01

    In Tunisia, cases of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania major are increasing and spreading from the south-west to new areas in the center. To improve the current knowledge on L. major evolution and population dynamics, we performed multi-locus microsatellite typing of human isolates from Tunisian governorates where the disease is endemic (Gafsa, Kairouan and Sidi Bouzid governorates) and collected during two periods: 1991-1992 and 2008-2012. Analysis (F-statistics and Bayesian model-based approach) of the genotyping results of isolates collected in Sidi Bouzid in 1991-1992 and 2008-2012 shows that, over two decades, in the same area, Leishmania parasites evolved by generating genetically differentiated populations. The genetic patterns of 2008-2012 isolates from the three governorates indicate that L. major populations did not spread gradually from the south to the center of Tunisia, according to a geographical gradient, suggesting that human activities might be the source of the disease expansion. The genotype analysis also suggests previous (Bayesian model-based approach) and current (F-statistics) flows of genotypes between governorates and districts. Human activities as well as reservoir dynamics and the effects of environmental changes could explain how the disease progresses. This study provides new insights into the evolution and spread of L. major in Tunisia that might improve our understanding of the parasite flow between geographically and temporally distinct populations. PMID:26302440

  12. In vitro activity of sulfonamides and sulfones against Leishmania major promastigotes.

    PubMed Central

    Peixoto, M P; Beverley, S M

    1987-01-01

    We examined the susceptibility of promastigotes of Leishmania major to sulfonamides and sulfones in vitro. In a completely defined medium only sulfamoxole, sulfaquinoxaline, and dapsone were inhibitory; the concentrations required for 50% inhibition of the rate of growth were 150, 600, and 600 microM, respectively. Eleven other sulfa drugs were ineffective at concentrations up to 2 mM. The growth inhibition was similar to that observed in procaryotes: the cells continued logarithmic growth for several cell doublings before inhibition was observed. Surprisingly, the addition of p-aminobenzoate or folate did not reverse the effects of the active sulfa drugs, the effects of sulfamoxole and methotrexate were additive rather than synergistic, and the addition of thymidine reversed methotrexate but not sulfa-drug inhibition. These results suggest that the mode of action of sulfa drugs on L. major is not by the classical route of inhibition of de novo folate synthesis. Promastigotes could be propagated for more than 40 passages in a completely defined medium in which the only added pterin was biopterin. The folate concentration in this medium was less than 10(-10) to 10(-11) M, as determined by a Leishmania bioassay. Although these data suggest that L. major may be capable of de novo synthesis of folate, the nonclassical mode of action of sulfa drugs, as well as other studies, favors the view that L. major is auxotrophic for folate. PMID:3435106

  13. Spatio-temporal Genetic Structuring of Leishmania major in Tunisia by Microsatellite Analysis.

    PubMed

    Harrabi, Myriam; Bettaieb, Jihène; Ghawar, Wissem; Toumi, Amine; Zaâtour, Amor; Yazidi, Rihab; Chaâbane, Sana; Chalghaf, Bilel; Hide, Mallorie; Bañuls, Anne-Laure; Ben Salah, Afif

    2015-01-01

    In Tunisia, cases of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania major are increasing and spreading from the south-west to new areas in the center. To improve the current knowledge on L. major evolution and population dynamics, we performed multi-locus microsatellite typing of human isolates from Tunisian governorates where the disease is endemic (Gafsa, Kairouan and Sidi Bouzid governorates) and collected during two periods: 1991-1992 and 2008-2012. Analysis (F-statistics and Bayesian model-based approach) of the genotyping results of isolates collected in Sidi Bouzid in 1991-1992 and 2008-2012 shows that, over two decades, in the same area, Leishmania parasites evolved by generating genetically differentiated populations. The genetic patterns of 2008-2012 isolates from the three governorates indicate that L. major populations did not spread gradually from the south to the center of Tunisia, according to a geographical gradient, suggesting that human activities might be the source of the disease expansion. The genotype analysis also suggests previous (Bayesian model-based approach) and current (F-statistics) flows of genotypes between governorates and districts. Human activities as well as reservoir dynamics and the effects of environmental changes could explain how the disease progresses. This study provides new insights into the evolution and spread of L. major in Tunisia that might improve our understanding of the parasite flow between geographically and temporally distinct populations.

  14. Spatio-temporal Genetic Structuring of Leishmania major in Tunisia by Microsatellite Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Harrabi, Myriam; Bettaieb, Jihène; Ghawar, Wissem; Toumi, Amine; Zaâtour, Amor; Yazidi, Rihab; Chaâbane, Sana; Chalghaf, Bilel; Hide, Mallorie; Bañuls, Anne-Laure; Ben Salah, Afif

    2015-01-01

    In Tunisia, cases of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania major are increasing and spreading from the south-west to new areas in the center. To improve the current knowledge on L. major evolution and population dynamics, we performed multi-locus microsatellite typing of human isolates from Tunisian governorates where the disease is endemic (Gafsa, Kairouan and Sidi Bouzid governorates) and collected during two periods: 1991–1992 and 2008–2012. Analysis (F-statistics and Bayesian model-based approach) of the genotyping results of isolates collected in Sidi Bouzid in 1991–1992 and 2008–2012 shows that, over two decades, in the same area, Leishmania parasites evolved by generating genetically differentiated populations. The genetic patterns of 2008–2012 isolates from the three governorates indicate that L. major populations did not spread gradually from the south to the center of Tunisia, according to a geographical gradient, suggesting that human activities might be the source of the disease expansion. The genotype analysis also suggests previous (Bayesian model-based approach) and current (F-statistics) flows of genotypes between governorates and districts. Human activities as well as reservoir dynamics and the effects of environmental changes could explain how the disease progresses. This study provides new insights into the evolution and spread of L. major in Tunisia that might improve our understanding of the parasite flow between geographically and temporally distinct populations. PMID:26302440

  15. Comparative evaluation of two vaccine candidates against experimental leishmaniasis due to Leishmania major infection in four inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Benhnini, Fouad; Chenik, Mehdi; Laouini, Dhafer; Louzir, Hechmi; Cazenave, Pierre André; Dellagi, Koussay

    2009-11-01

    Experimental leishmaniasis in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice are the most investigated murine models that were used for the preclinical evaluation of Leishmania vaccine candidates. We have previously described two new inbred mouse strains named PWK and MAI issued from feral founders that also support the development of experimental leishmaniasis due to L. major. In this study, we sought to determine whether different mouse inbred strains generate concordant or discordant results when used to evaluate the potential of Leishmania proteins to protect against experimental leishmaniasis. To this end, two Leishmania proteins, namely, LACK (for Leishmania homolog of receptor for activated C kinase) and LmPDI (for L. major protein disulfide isomerase) were compared for their capacity to protect against experimental leishmaniasis in PWK, MAI, BALB/c, and C57BL/6 inbred mouse strains. Our data show that the capacity of Leishmania proteins to confer protection depends on the mouse strain used, stressing the important role played by the genetic background in shaping the immune response against the pathogen. These results may have important implications for the preclinical evaluation of candidate Leishmania vaccines: rather than using a single mouse strain, a panel of different inbred strains of various genetic backgrounds should be tested in parallel. The antigen that confers protection in the larger range of inbred strains may have better chances to be also protective in outbred human populations and should be selected for clinical trials.

  16. Imported cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania major in a Chinese laborer who worked in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Liu, Fang; Liu, Haibo; Hu, Wenxing; Sang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    We report an imported case of cutaneous leishmaniasis in a 37-year-old man from Saudi Arabia caused by Leishmania major. He presented with non-healing nodulo-ulcerative lesions with a "volcanic crater" on the lower limbs. It was clearly cutaneous leishmaniasis - a rare disease in China - as reflected by the patient's clinical history, the lesions' morphology, histopathological examination, culture and PCR analysis of the lesions. The patient was completely cured after two cycles of sodium stibogluconate treatment. This case report demonstrates that dermatologists should be aware of sporadic cutaneous leishmaniasis cases in non-endemic areas. PMID:27438208

  17. Imported cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania major in a Chinese laborer who worked in Saudi Arabia*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Min; Liu, Fang; Liu, Haibo; Hu, Wenxing; Sang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    We report an imported case of cutaneous leishmaniasis in a 37-year-old man from Saudi Arabia caused by Leishmania major. He presented with non-healing nodulo-ulcerative lesions with a "volcanic crater" on the lower limbs. It was clearly cutaneous leishmaniasis - a rare disease in China - as reflected by the patient's clinical history, the lesions' morphology, histopathological examination, culture and PCR analysis of the lesions. The patient was completely cured after two cycles of sodium stibogluconate treatment. This case report demonstrates that dermatologists should be aware of sporadic cutaneous leishmaniasis cases in non-endemic areas. PMID:27438208

  18. Establishment of Stable, Cell-Mediated Immunity that Makes "Susceptible" Mice Resistant to Leishmania major

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretscher, Peter A.; Wei, Guojian; Menon, Juthika N.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle

    1992-07-01

    Cell-mediated, but not antibody-mediated, immune responses protect humans against certain pathogens that produce chronic diseases such as leishmaniasis. Effective vaccination against such pathogens must therefore produce an immunological "imprint" so that stable, cell-mediated immunity is induced in all individuals after natural infection. BALB/c mice "innately susceptible" to Leishmania major produce antibodies after substantial infection. In the present study, "susceptible" mice injected with a small number of parasites mounted a cell-mediated response and acquired resistance to a larger, normally pathogenic, challenge. This vaccination strategy may be applicable in diseases in which protection is dependent on cell-mediated immunity.

  19. Kinetoplastid-specific histone variant functions are conserved in Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Britta A; Wong, Iris L K; Baugh, Loren; Ramasamy, Gowthaman; Myler, Peter J; Beverley, Stephen M

    2013-10-01

    Regions of transcription initiation and termination in kinetoplastid protists lack known eukaryotic promoter and terminator elements, although epigenetic marks such as histone variants and the modified DNA base J have been localized to these regions in Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, and/or Leishmania major. Phenotypes of base J mutants vary significantly across trypanosomatids, implying divergence in the epigenetic networks governing transcription during evolution. Here, we demonstrate that the histone variants H2A.Z and H2B.V are essential in L. major using a powerful quantitative plasmid segregation-based test. In contrast, H3.V is not essential for viability or normal growth in Leishmania. Steady-state transcript levels and the efficiency of transcription termination at convergent strand switch regions (SSRs) in H3V-null parasites were comparable to WT parasites. Our genetic tests show a conservation of histone variant phenotypes between L. major and T. brucei, unlike the diversity of phenotypes associated with genetic manipulation of the DNA base J modification.

  20. Transcriptomic profiling of gene expression and RNA processing during Leishmania major differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Laura A. L.; Okrah, Kwame; Hughitt, V. Keith; Suresh, Rahul; Li, Yuan; Fernandes, Maria Cecilia; Belew, A. Trey; Corrada Bravo, Hector; Mosser, David M.; El-Sayed, Najib M.

    2015-01-01

    Protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania are the etiological agents of leishmaniasis, a group of diseases with a worldwide incidence of 0.9–1.6 million cases per year. We used RNA-seq to conduct a high-resolution transcriptomic analysis of the global changes in gene expression and RNA processing events that occur as L. major transforms from non-infective procyclic promastigotes to infective metacyclic promastigotes. Careful statistical analysis across multiple biological replicates and the removal of batch effects provided a high quality framework for comprehensively analyzing differential gene expression and transcriptome remodeling in this pathogen as it acquires its infectivity. We also identified precise 5′ and 3′ UTR boundaries for a majority of Leishmania genes and detected widespread alternative trans-splicing and polyadenylation. An investigation of possible correlations between stage-specific preferential trans-splicing or polyadenylation sites and differentially expressed genes revealed a lack of systematic association, establishing that differences in expression levels cannot be attributed to stage-regulated alternative RNA processing. Our findings build on and improve existing expression datasets and provide a substantially more detailed view of L. major biology that will inform the field and potentially provide a stronger basis for drug discovery and vaccine development efforts. PMID:26150419

  1. Structures of prostaglandin F synthase from the protozoa Leishmania major and Trypanosoma cruzi with NADP

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Spencer O.; Fairman, James W.; Barnes, Steve R.; Sullivan, Amy; Nakazawa-Hewitt, Stephen; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Staker, Bart L.; Lorimer, Donald D.; Myler, Peter J.; Edwards, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structures of prostaglandin F synthase (PGF) from both Leishmania major and Trypanosoma cruzi with and without their cofactor NADP have been determined to resolutions of 2.6 Å for T. cruzi PGF, 1.25 Å for T. cruzi PGF with NADP, 1.6 Å for L. major PGF and 1.8 Å for L. major PGF with NADP. These structures were determined by molecular replacement to a final R factor of less than 18.6% (R free of less than 22.9%). PGF in the infectious protozoa L. major and T. cruzi is a potential therapeutic target. PMID:25945716

  2. Targeting Leishmania major parasite with peptides derived from a combinatorial phage display library.

    PubMed

    Rhaiem, Rafik Ben; Houimel, Mehdi

    2016-07-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a global problem caused by intracellular protozoan pathogens of the genus Leishmania for which there are no suitable vaccine or chemotherapy options. Thus, de novo identification of small molecules binding to the Leishmania parasites by direct screening is a promising and appropriate alternative strategy for the development of new drugs. In this study, we used a random linear hexapeptide library fused to the gene III protein of M13 filamentous bacteriophage to select binding peptides to metacyclic promastigotes from a highly virulent strain of Leishmania major (Zymodeme MON-25; MHOM/TN/94/GLC94). After four rounds of stringent selection and amplification, polyclonal and monoclonal phage-peptides directed against L. major metacyclic promastigotes were assessed by ELISA, and the optimal phage-peptides were grown individually and characterized for binding to L. major by monoclonal phage ELISA. The DNA of 42 phage-peptides clones was amplified by PCR, sequenced, and their amino acid sequences deduced. Six different peptide sequences were obtained with frequencies of occurrence ranging from 2.3% to 85.7%. The biological effect of the peptides was assessed in vitro on human monocytes infected with L. major metacyclic promastigotes, and in vivo on susceptible parasite-infected BALB/c mice. The development of cutaneous lesions in the right hind footpads of infected mice after 13 weeks post-infection showed a protection rate of 81.94% with the injected peptide P2. Moreover, Western blots revealed that the P2 peptide interacted with the major surface protease gp63, a protein of 63kDa molecular weight. Moreover, bioinformatics were used to predict the interaction between peptides and the major surface molecule of the L. major. The molecular docking showed that the P2 peptide has the minimum interaction energy and maximum shape complimentarity with the L. major gp63 active site. Our study demonstrated that the P2 peptide occurs at high frequency

  3. Immunization Against Cutaneous Leishmaniasis by Alginate Microspheres Loaded With Autoclaved Leishmania Major (ALM) and Quillaja Saponins.

    PubMed

    Tafaghodi, Mohsen; Eskandari, Maryam; Khamesipour, Ali; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania antigens are weak immunogens and need to be potentiated by various adjuvants and delivery systems. Alginate microspheres as antigen delivery system and Quillaja saponins (QS) as immunoadjuvant have been used to enhance the immune response against Autoclaved Leishmania major (ALM). Microspheres were prepared by an emulsification technique and characterized for size, encapsulation efficiency and release profile of encapsulates. BALB/c mice were immunized three times in 3-weeks intervals using ALM plus QS loaded microspheres [(ALM+QS)ALG], ALM encapsulated with alginate microspheres [(ALM)ALG], (ALM)ALG + QS, ALM + QS, ALM alone or PBS. The intensity of infection induced by L. major challenge was assessed by measuring size of footpad swelling. The strongest protection, showed by significantly (P < 0.05) smaller footpad, were observed in mice immunized with (ALM)ALG+QS. The (ALM+QS)ALG, ALM and PBS groups showed the least protection and highest swelling, while the (ALM)ALG and ALM+QS showed an intermediate protection with no significant difference. The mice immunized with (ALM+QS)ALG showed the highest IgG2a/IgG1 ratio (P<0.05). The highest IFN-γ and IL-4 production was seen in ALM+QS (P<0.01). It is concluded that QS adjuvant has a mixed Th1/Th2 effect and has increased both humoral and cellular immune responses. PMID:27642328

  4. Cathepsin L is crucial for a Th1-type immune response during Leishmania major infection.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Kotaro; Li, Yang; Ishii, Kazunari; Hisaeda, Hajime; Tang, Lijun; Duan, Xuefeng; Dainichi, Teruki; Maekawa, Yoichi; Katunuma, Nobuhiko; Himeno, Kunisuke

    2004-04-01

    Prior to the activation of CD4+ T cells, exogenous proteins are digested by endo/lysosomal enzymes in antigen-presenting cells (APCs) to produce antigenic peptides that are presented on MHC class II molecules. In the studies described here, the functional significance of cathepsin L for antigen processing and Th1/Th2 differentiation in experimental leishmaniasis was investigated. We first demonstrated that cathepsin L is one of the candidates for endo/lysosomal enzymes in the processing of soluble Leishmania antigen (SLA) by using CLIK148, a specific inhibitor of cathepsin L. Treatment of BALB/c or DBA/2 mice with CLIK148 exacerbated the disease by enhancing an SLA-specific Th2-type response such as IL-4 production. CLIK148 did not exert any direct influence on Leishmania major promastigotes themselves or on the course of L. major infection in SCID mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that treatment of host mice with CLIK148 affects the processing of SLA in APCs, resulting in the potentiation of Th2-type immune responses and thus leading to exacerbation of the disease. Furthermore, endo/lysosomal cathepsin L was found to be functionally distinct from previously described cathepsins B and D.

  5. Immunization Against Cutaneous Leishmaniasis by Alginate Microspheres Loaded With Autoclaved Leishmania Major (ALM) and Quillaja Saponins

    PubMed Central

    Tafaghodi, Mohsen; Eskandari, Maryam; Khamesipour, Ali; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania antigens are weak immunogens and need to be potentiated by various adjuvants and delivery systems. Alginate microspheres as antigen delivery system and Quillaja saponins (QS) as immunoadjuvant have been used to enhance the immune response against Autoclaved Leishmania major (ALM). Microspheres were prepared by an emulsification technique and characterized for size, encapsulation efficiency and release profile of encapsulates. BALB/c mice were immunized three times in 3-weeks intervals using ALM plus QS loaded microspheres [(ALM+QS)ALG], ALM encapsulated with alginate microspheres [(ALM)ALG], (ALM)ALG + QS, ALM + QS, ALM alone or PBS. The intensity of infection induced by L. major challenge was assessed by measuring size of footpad swelling. The strongest protection, showed by significantly (P < 0.05) smaller footpad, were observed in mice immunized with (ALM)ALG+QS. The (ALM+QS)ALG, ALM and PBS groups showed the least protection and highest swelling, while the (ALM)ALG and ALM+QS showed an intermediate protection with no significant difference. The mice immunized with (ALM+QS)ALG showed the highest IgG2a/IgG1 ratio (P<0.05). The highest IFN-γ and IL-4 production was seen in ALM+QS (P<0.01). It is concluded that QS adjuvant has a mixed Th1/Th2 effect and has increased both humoral and cellular immune responses. PMID:27642328

  6. Immunomodulatory properties of borage (Echium amoenum) on BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Nahid; Abolhassani, Mohsen

    2011-06-01

    Leishmaniasis is caused by parasitic protozoa transmitted by the bite of a female sand fly and is currently endemic in 88 countries. BALB/c mice are highly susceptible to the infection with the parasite Leishmania major, and this susceptibility has been attributed, in part, to the expansion of Th2 cells, production of their cytokines, and downregulation of Th1 cytokine, interferon gamma (IFN-γ). In this report, we used both aqueous and alcoholic extracts of Iranian borage (Echium amoenum Fisch & C.A. Mey) for treatment of L. major infection in BALB/c mice. We found that both extracts had immunomodulatory properties and increased the level of IFN-γ and lowered the parasite burden in the proximal lymph nodes and prevented the necrosis of the footpad as compared with the untreated infected mice. These results may provide a basis for further studies directed toward the use of the Iranian borage against L. major infection. PMID:21225450

  7. The Role of Vitamin D and Vitamin D Receptor in Immunity to Leishmania major Infection

    PubMed Central

    Whitcomb, James P.; DeAgostino, Mary; Ballentine, Mark; Fu, Jun; Tenniswood, Martin; Welsh, JoEllen; Cantorna, Margherita; McDowell, Mary Ann

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D signaling modulates a variety of immune responses. Here, we assessed the role of vitamin D in immunity to experimental leishmaniasis infection in vitamin D receptor-deficient mice (VDRKO). We observed that VDRKO mice on a genetically resistant background have decreased Leishmania major-induced lesion development compared to wild-type (WT) mice; additionally, parasite loads in infected dermis were significantly lower at the height of infection. Enzymatic depletion of the active form of vitamin D mimics the ablation of VDR resulting in an increased resistance to L. major. Conversely, VDRKO or vitamin D-deficient mice on the susceptible Th2-biased background had no change in susceptibility. These studies indicate vitamin D deficiency, either through the ablation of VDR or elimination of its ligand, 1,25D3, leads to an increase resistance to L. major infection but only in a host that is predisposed for Th-1 immune responses. PMID:22007288

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Leishmania major glyoxalase I

    SciTech Connect

    Ariza, Antonio; Vickers, Tim J.; Greig, Neil; Fairlamb, Alan H.; Bond, Charles S.

    2005-08-01

    The detoxification enzyme glyoxalase I from L. major has been crystallized. Preliminary molecular-replacement calculations indicate the presence of three glyoxalase I dimers in the asymmetric unit. Glyoxalase I (GLO1) is a putative drug target for trypanosomatids, which are pathogenic protozoa that include the causative agents of leishmaniasis. Significant sequence and functional differences between Leishmania major and human GLO1 suggest that it may make a suitable template for rational inhibitor design. L. major GLO1 was crystallized in two forms: the first is extremely disordered and does not diffract, while the second, an orthorhombic form, produces diffraction to 2.0 Å. Molecular-replacement calculations indicate that there are three GLO1 dimers in the asymmetric unit, which take up a helical arrangement with their molecular dyads arranged approximately perpendicular to the c axis. Further analysis of these data are under way.

  9. Immunomodulatory properties of borage (Echium amoenum) on BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Nahid; Abolhassani, Mohsen

    2011-06-01

    Leishmaniasis is caused by parasitic protozoa transmitted by the bite of a female sand fly and is currently endemic in 88 countries. BALB/c mice are highly susceptible to the infection with the parasite Leishmania major, and this susceptibility has been attributed, in part, to the expansion of Th2 cells, production of their cytokines, and downregulation of Th1 cytokine, interferon gamma (IFN-γ). In this report, we used both aqueous and alcoholic extracts of Iranian borage (Echium amoenum Fisch & C.A. Mey) for treatment of L. major infection in BALB/c mice. We found that both extracts had immunomodulatory properties and increased the level of IFN-γ and lowered the parasite burden in the proximal lymph nodes and prevented the necrosis of the footpad as compared with the untreated infected mice. These results may provide a basis for further studies directed toward the use of the Iranian borage against L. major infection.

  10. Mycobacterium bovis BCG-induced protection against cutaneous and systemic Leishmania major infections of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fortier, A H; Mock, B A; Meltzer, M S; Nacy, C A

    1987-01-01

    We examined the protective effects of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) administration on Leishmania major infections of BALB/c and P/J mice. There were two treatment protocols. In the first, the footpads of naive animals were inoculated with mixtures of L. major and BCG (viable or heat killed) or the soluble mycobacterial antigen, purified protein derivative. Viable BCG, but not heat-killed BCG or purified protein derivative, inoculated with L. major amastigotes into the footpads of naive BALB/c or P/J mice protected these animals from the metastatic spread of parasites to the viscera and from ensuing lethal systemic infection. This treatment also induced cures of the cutaneous lesions of P/J mice but not of BALB/c mice. In the second protocol, we induced an immune response to BCG before inoculation of L. major. BCG given intraperitoneally 10 days before infection of footpads with leishmania offered protection against the metastatic spread of amastigotes in both P/J and BALB/c mice, regardless of intralesional treatment, and modulated the severity of cutaneous infection by 30 to 50%. Inoculation of a mixture of viable BCG and L. major amastigotes into BCG-immune mice completely protected both BALB/c and P/J strains from cutaneous disease; we recovered no parasites from the inoculated footpads of these animals. Furthermore, each of the nonspecifically protected mice of both the BALB/c and P/J strains developed immunity to rechallenge with viable L. major. Injection of amastigotes at a site remote from the original lesion, the contralateral footpad, resulted in the complete clearance of parasites in the inoculum with no evidence of either cutaneous or systemic disease over an extended observation period. PMID:3298065

  11. T Helper 1 (Th1), Th2, and Th17 Responses to Leishmania major Lipophosphoglycan 3.

    PubMed

    Miahipour, Abolfazl; Haji-Fatahaliha, Mostafa; Keshavarz, Hossein; Gharavi, Mohammad Javad; Mohamadi, Hamed; Babaloo, Zohre; Rafati, Sima; Younesi, Vahid; Hosseini, Maryam; Yousefi, Mehdi

    2016-10-01

    Leishmania major is the main causal agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) that remains a serious public health concern in many tropical and subtropical countries. A long-lasting protective vaccine against leishmaniasis remains as a medical unmet need. Lipophosphoglycan 3 (LPG3) is one of the class II LPG genes from HSP90 family involved in the host immune responses. The aim of the present study is to investigate the capability of recombinant LPG3 (rLPG3) to induce Th1, Th2, Th17 responses. The results showed that rLPG3 in moderate and high concentrations significantly induced expression of Th1 lineage-specific transcription factor (T-bet) and cytokine (IFN-γ)(P < 0.05). Moreover, the Th1-stimulating effect of rLPG3 was confirmed by significant induction of IFN-γ secretion from treated T cells (P < 0.01). However, no significant effect of rLPG3 on Th2 and Th17 lineage cells was observed even in high concentration. Our findings demonstrate that rLPG3 induces Th1, but not Th2 and Th17, lineage responses. Further studies are needed to investigate adjuvant properties of rLPG3 for leishmania therapy. PMID:27611455

  12. Leishmania major Infection-Induced VEGF-A/VEGFR-2 Signaling Promotes Lymphangiogenesis That Controls Disease.

    PubMed

    Weinkopff, Tiffany; Konradt, Christoph; Christian, David A; Discher, Dennis E; Hunter, Christopher A; Scott, Phillip

    2016-09-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis causes a spectrum of diseases from self-healing to severe nonhealing lesions. Defining the factors contributing to lesion resolution may help in developing new therapies for those patients with chronic disease. We found that infection with Leishmania major increases the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-A and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-2 and is associated with significant changes in the blood and lymphatic vasculature at the site of infection. Ab blockade of VEGFR-2 during infection led to a reduction in lymphatic endothelial cell proliferation and simultaneously increased lesion size without altering the parasite burden. These data show that L. major infection initiates enhanced vascular endothelial growth factor-A/VEGFR-2 signaling and suggest that VEGFR-2-dependent lymphangiogenesis is a mechanism that restricts tissue inflammation in leishmaniasis. PMID:27474074

  13. Transcriptionally Driven DNA Replication Program of the Human Parasite Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Lombraña, Rodrigo; Álvarez, Alba; Fernández-Justel, José Miguel; Almeida, Ricardo; Poza-Carrión, César; Gomes, Fábia; Calzada, Arturo; Requena, José María; Gómez, María

    2016-08-01

    Faithful inheritance of eukaryotic genomes requires the orchestrated activation of multiple DNA replication origins (ORIs). Although origin firing is mechanistically conserved, how origins are specified and selected for activation varies across different model systems. Here, we provide a complete analysis of the nucleosomal landscape and replication program of the human parasite Leishmania major, building on a better evolutionary understanding of replication organization in Eukarya. We found that active transcription is a driving force for the nucleosomal organization of the L. major genome and that both the spatial and the temporal program of DNA replication can be explained as associated to RNA polymerase kinetics. This simple scenario likely provides flexibility and robustness to deal with the environmental changes that impose alterations in the genetic programs during parasitic life cycle stages. Our findings also suggest that coupling replication initiation to transcription elongation could be an ancient solution used by eukaryotic cells for origin maintenance. PMID:27477279

  14. Leishmania major Telomerase TERT Protein Has a Nuclear/Mitochondrial Eclipsed Distribution That Is Affected by Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Campelo, Riward; Díaz Lozano, Isabel; Figarella, Katherine; Osuna, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    In its canonical role the reverse transcriptase telomerase recovers the telomeric repeats that are lost during DNA replication. Other locations and activities have been recently described for the telomerase protein subunit TERT in mammalian cells. In the present work, using biochemistry, molecular biology, and electron microscopy techniques, we found that in the human parasite Leishmania major, TERT (and telomerase activity) shared locations between the nuclear, mitochondrial, and cytoplasmic compartments. Also, some telomerase activity and TERT protein could be found in ∼100-nm nanovesicles. In the mitochondrial compartment, TERT appears to be mainly associated with the kinetoplast DNA. When Leishmania cells were exposed to H2O2, TERT changed its relative abundance and activity between the nuclear and mitochondrial compartments, with the majority of activity residing in the mitochondrion. Finally, overexpression of TERT in Leishmania transfected cells not only increased the parasitic cell growth rate but also increased their resistance to oxidative stress. PMID:25312950

  15. Differences in Lsh gene control over systemic Leishmania major and Leishmania donovani or Leishmania mexicana mexicana infections are caused by differential targeting to infiltrating and resident liver macrophage populations.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, E V; Singleton, A M; Blackwell, J M

    1988-01-01

    Earlier studies had shown that the viscerotropic NIH 173 strain of cutaneous Leishmania major fails to come under Lsh gene control. Visceral Leishmania donovani LV9 and another viscerotropic cutaneous strain, Leishmania mexicana mexicana LV4, are controlled by Lsh. The results of double-infection experiments presented here show that expression of Lsh resistance against L. mexicana mexicana was enhanced in the presence of L. donovani, whereas L. major still failed to come under Lsh gene control, even in the presence of L. donovani. Prior irradiation (850 rads) of mice showed that in the absence of infiltrating monocytes, Lsh did exert some influence over L. major. The presence of a higher infiltrate of fresh monocytes after L. major infection was confirmed in liver macrophage populations isolated from mice after infection in vivo and in liver cryosections immunostained with monoclonal antibody M1/70 directed against the type 3 complement receptor CR3. The results support the hypothesis that Lsh is expressed maximally in the resident tissue macrophages and poorly in the immature macrophages preferentially infected by L. major amastigotes. Images PMID:3356462

  16. Antigenic specificity of the 72-kilodalton major surface glycoprotein of Leishmania braziliensis braziliensis.

    PubMed Central

    Kutner, S; Pellerin, P; Breniere, S F; Desjeux, P; Dedet, J P

    1991-01-01

    We examined the expression and the antigenicity of the major surface polypeptides of Leishmania braziliensis braziliensis and Leishmania donovani chagasi, parasites which commonly coexist in the same endemic areas of Bolivia. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis protein profiles from surface-iodinated promastigotes showed the presence of a unique iodinatable polypeptide of 72 kDa on the L. b. braziliensis surface and of two major components of 65 and 50 kDa exposed at the surface of L. d. chagasi. Comparison of the peptide digestion profiles of the major iodinated polypeptides of both strains showed no similarity between the maps of the 72- and the 65-kDa polypeptides of L. b. braziliensis and L. d. chagasi, respectively. Immunoprecipitation of surface-labeled L. b. braziliensis Nonidet P-40 extracts with 35 serum specimens obtained from Bolivian patients with cutaneous and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis showed that all serum specimens recognized predominantly the 72-kDa antigen and high-molecular-mass proteins in some cases. The recognition patterns were independent of the geographical origin of the patient, the type of lesion, and the serum antibody titer. Serum specimens from children with visceral leishmaniasis did not precipitate the L. b. braziliensis 72-kDa antigen. Hamster hyperimmune serum against L. b. braziliensis also recognized the 72-kDa surface antigen. However, this recognition was inhibited in the presence of the homologous nonlabeled antigen but not in the presence of heterologous (L. d. chagasi and Trypanosoma cruzi) antigens. The specific recognition of 72-kDa surface antigen in both natural and experimental L. b. braziliensis infections suggests that this antigen could be a good candidate for use in the differential immunodiagnosis and prognosis of the disease. Images PMID:2037677

  17. Phototoxic effects of silicon bis (dimetilaminoetanoxi)-phthalocyanine (SiPc) on the viability of Leishmania major and Leishmania braziliensis promastigotes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra Pinto, Juliana; Ferreira-Strixino, Juliana; Mittmann, Josane

    2016-06-01

    American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL) is an infectious disease caused by protozoans of the genus Leishmania. The treatment may consist of pentavalent antimonials or pentamidine and amphotericin. However, these treatments are extremely aggressive. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) involves the same mechanism of photodynamic therapy which associates a photosensitizer with oxygen and a light source generating a photochemical reaction leading to cell death. The aim of this study was to verify the potential use of silicon bis (dimetilaminoetanoxi)-phthalocyanine (SiPc) compound in photodynamic treatment through evaluation of its phototoxic effect in promastigotes of the genus Leishmania braziliensis and Leishmania major. Treatment with SiPc was able to drastically affect the viability of the parasites as well as affect their growth and morphology, after PACT treatment. The data shown in this study allows us to conclude that SiPc is a promising photosensitizer (PS) since it does not affect parasite growth and viability in the dark. After PACT with this phthalocyanine, over 99% of parasites were killed with the higher concentration and a light dose used. These results suggest that SiPc can be used in future to treat CL, however, further studies are necessary to determine whether the PS are toxic to mononuclear phagocytic cells and epithelial cells which will also be affected by therapy when applied topically.

  18. Ferroportin-encapsulated nanoparticles reduce infection and improve immunity in mice infected with Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Rafiee, Aras; Riazi-Rad, Farhad; Darabi, Haiedeh; Khaze, Vahid; Javadian, Seifoddin; Ajdary, Soheila; Bahrami, Fariborz; Alimohammadian, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-05-15

    Inoculation of inbred mice by Leishmania major results in two different patterns. C57BL/6 mice display resistance against L. major but BALB/c mice show susceptibility to L. major with visceral infection, anemia and death. In this study, the effects of treatment of L. major-infected BALB/c mice with a ferroportin (Fpn)-encoding construct via nanoparticles were evaluated. A fragment encoding Fpn, a major regulator of iron homeostasis, was amplified and sub-cloned to a GFP expression vector to express Fpn-EGFP protein. This construct was incorporated in nanoparticles of alginate/chitosan polymers and orally administered to L. major-infected BALB/c mice. Blood hematocrit and iron, footpad size, parasite load and concentration of IFNG, IL4 and IL10 by ELISA were measured in the treated and untreated mice. The results indicated that the treated mice had significantly higher hematocrit and iron levels while exhibited significantly lower footpad size and parasite load measurements. Moreover, lower levels of IL4 and IL10 and higher ratios of IFNG/IL4 or IFNG/IL10 were shown in the treated, compared to the untreated mice. In conclusion, treating BALB/c mice infected with L. major with encapsulated Fpn-encoding construct in alginate/chitosan nanoparticles were shown to reduce the infection and improve anemia and immunity in the animal model of leishmaniasis.

  19. Leishmania major possesses a unique HemG-type protoporphyrinogen IX oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Zwerschke, Dagmar; Karrie, Simone; Jahn, Dieter; Jahn, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania major was proposed to either utilize haem from its host or partially synthesize the tetrapyrrole from host provided precursors. However, only indirect evidence was available for this partial late haem biosynthetic pathway. Here, we demonstrate that the LMJF_06_1280 gene of L. major encodes a HemG-type PPO (protoporphyrinogen IX oxidase) catalysing the oxidation of protoporphyrinogen IX to protoporphyrin IX. Interestingly, trypanosomatids are currently the only known eukaryotes possessing HemG-type enzymes. The LMJF_06_1280 gene forms a potential transcriptional unit with LMJF_06_1270 encoding CPO (coproporphyrinogen III oxidase) and with LMJF_06_1290 for a cytochrome b5. In vivo function of the L. major hemG gene was shown by the functional complementation of the Escherichia coli ΔhemG strain LG285. Restored haem formation in E. coli was observed using HPLC analyses. Purified recombinant L. major HemG revealed PPO activity in vitro using different ubiquinones and triphenyltetrazolium as electron acceptors. FMN was identified as the L. major HemG cofactor. Active site residues were found to be essential for HemG catalysis. These data in combination with the solved crystal structures of L. major CPO and the physiological proof of a ferrochelatase activity provide clear-cut evidence for a partial haem biosynthetic pathway in L. major. PMID:24962471

  20. Amplified DNAs in laboratory stocks of Leishmania tarentolae: extrachromosomal circles structurally and functionally similar to the inverted-H-region amplification of methotrexate-resistant Leishmania major

    SciTech Connect

    Petrillo-Peixoto, M.L.; Beverley, S.M. )

    1988-12-01

    We describe the structure of amplified DNA that was discovered in two laboratory stocks of the protozoan parasite Leishmania tarentolae. Restriction mapping and molecular cloning revealed that a region of 42 kilobases was amplified 8- to 30-fold in these lines. Southern blot analyses of digested DNAs or chromosomes separated by pulsed-field electrophoresis showed that the amplified DNA corresponded to the H region, a locus defined originally by its amplification in methotrexate-resistant Leishmania major. Similarities between the amplified DNA of the two species included (i) extensive cross-hybridization; (ii) approximate conservation of sequence order; (iii) extrachromosomal localization; (iv) an overall inverted, head-to-head configuration as a circular 140-kilobase tetrameric molecule; (v) two regions of DNA sequence rearrangement, each of which was closely associated with the two centers of the inverted repeats; (vi) association with methotrexate resistance; and (vii) phenotypically conservative amplification, in which the wild-type chromosomal arrangement was retained without apparent modification. Our data showed that amplified DNA mediating drug resistance arose in unselected L. tarentolae, although the pressures leading to apparently spontaneous amplification and maintenance of the H region are not known. The simple structure and limited extent of DNA amplified in these and other Leishmania lines suggests that the study of gene amplification in Leishmania spp. offers an attractive model system for the study of amplification in cultured mammalian cells and tumors. We also introduced a method for measuring the size of large circular DNAs, using gamma-irradiation to introduce limited double-strand breaks followed by sizing of the linear DNAs by pulsed-field electrophoresis.

  1. Biochemical characterization of Leishmania major aquaglyceroporin LmAQP1: possible role in volume regulation and osmotaxis.

    PubMed

    Figarella, Katherine; Uzcategui, Nestor L; Zhou, Yao; LeFurgey, Ann; Ouellette, Marc; Bhattacharjee, Hiranmoy; Mukhopadhyay, Rita

    2007-08-01

    The Leishmania major aquaglyceroporin, LmAQP1, is responsible for the transport of trivalent metalloids, arsenite and antimonite. We have earlier shown that downregulation of LmAQP1 provides resistance to trivalent antimony compounds whereas increased expression of LmAQP1 in drug-resistant parasites can reverse the resistance. In this paper we describe the biochemical characterization of LmAQP1. Expression of LmAQP1 in Xenopus oocytes rendered them permeable to water, glycerol, methylglyoxal, dihydroxyacetone and sugar alcohols. The transport property of LmAQP1 was severely affected when a critical Arg230, located inside the pore of the channel, was altered to either alanine or lysine. Immunofluorescence and immuno-electron microscopy revealed LmAQP1 to be localized to the flagellum of Leishmania promastigotes and in the flagellar pocket membrane and contractile vacuole/spongiome complex of amastigotes. This is the first report of an aquaglyceroporin being localized to the flagellum of any microbe. Leishmania promastigotes and amastigotes expressing LmAQP1 could regulate their volume in response to hypoosmotic stress. Additionally, Leishmania promastigotes overexpressing LmAQP1 were found to migrate faster towards an osmotic gradient. These results taken together suggest that Leishmania LmAQP1 has multiple physiological roles, being involved in solute transport, volume regulation and osmotaxis. PMID:17640270

  2. PCR-based detection of Leishmania major kDNA within naturally infected Phlebotomus papatasi in southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Kourosh; Rassi, Yavar; Moemenbellah-Fard, Mohammad Djaefar

    2010-06-01

    The annual incidence of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in Iran rose by 43% over a five year period, from 2002 to 2006; most of these cases were caused by Leishmania major. Two complementary standard and nested polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) were used to detect parasites within their natural vector, Phlebotomus papatasi. Twelve different sand fly species were morphologically identified. The most abundant species (31.3%) was P. papatasi. Leptomonads were found in nine (2.4%) phlebotomines. Twenty (5.3%) sand fly species were found positive for Leishmania-genus DNA using standard PCR. The infection rate of this species was 5% and 7% by microscopic and molecular methods, respectively. PMID:20129635

  3. The squash blot technique and the detection of Leishmania major in Phlebotomus papatasi in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Esseghir, S; Ftaïti, A; Ready, P D; Khadraoui, B; Zaafouri, B; Dellagi, K; Ben Ismaïl, R

    1993-01-01

    This study describes the preliminary applications of the squash blot technique in Tunisia, to detect Leishmania major in naturally infected Phlebotomus papatasi. 309 P. papatasi among 364 female sandflies squashed on to nylon Gene Screen DNA transfer membranes, were identified using the 3.2 kb ribosomal P. papatasi specific DNA probe described by Ready et al. A second hybridization using the Taq1 DNA probe described by Smith et al. (1989) allowed the detection and identification of the parasite in 15 (4.9%) of these P. papatasi specimens. The dissection of P. papatasi females during the same period and from the same biotopes showed an infection rate of 7.9% (9 positives among 113 dissected). The t proportion comparison test indicated that there is no significant statistical difference between the dissection and the squash blot technique for the estimation of infection rates of P. papatasi.

  4. Development of topical treatment for cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania major in experimental animals.

    PubMed Central

    El-On, J; Jacobs, G P; Witztum, E; Greenblatt, C L

    1984-01-01

    Topical treatment, with drug-containing ointments, of cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania major in BALB/c mice was studied. Twenty chemotherapeutic agents having potential or established antileishmanial activity were formulated in different ointment and cream bases. Only 15% paromomycin sulfate with 12% methylbenzethonium chloride, 12% benzethonium chloride, 12% cetalkonium chloride, or 12% dimethyl sulfoxide, all incorporated in white soft paraffin (United Kingdom patent application no. 2117237A), were completely effective. Topical treatment twice daily for 6 or more days caused total elimination of the parasites and healing of the lesion in all treated mice. All the other antileishmanial compounds, including sodium stibogluconate, pentamidine, amphotericin B, emetine hydrochloride, metronidazole, co-trimoxazole, allopurinol, and rifampin, either showed a slight effect on the parasites or were highly toxic to the animal host at the concentrations tested. Images PMID:6517557

  5. Selective amplification of maxicircle classes during the life cycle of Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Flegontov, Pavel N; Zhirenkina, Ekaterina N; Gerasimov, Evgeny S; Ponirovsky, Evgeny N; Strelkova, Margarita V; Kolesnikov, Alexander A

    2009-06-01

    The kinetoplast genome contains several thousands of minicircles of various sequence classes and several scores of maxicircles. We demonstrated that maxicircles are heterogeneous in clonal cultures of Leishmania major, and, therefore, probably heterogeneous (heteroplasmic) within the kinetoplast. Sequence heterogeneity was observed in a non-coding fragment upstream of the 12S rRNA gene. We identified about 20 stable variants of this fragment, which were composed of one to five non-identical repeats 200-300bp in length. Promastigote-to-amastigote and amastigote-to-promastigote differentiation was often accompanied by shifts in abundance of some maxicircle classes. Reversion to promastigote-specific maxicircle patterns was usually observed in the life cycle (promastigote-amastigote-promastigote), however there were many exceptions.

  6. Molecular Detection of Leishmania major and L. turanica in Phlebotomus papatasi and First Natural Infection of P. salehi to L. major in North-East of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rafizadeh, Sayena; Saraei, Mehrzad; Abaei, Mohammad Reza; Oshaghi, Mohammad Ali; Mohebali, Mehdi; Peymani, Amir; Naserpour-Farivar, Taghi; Bakhshi, Hassan; Rassi, Yavar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Leishmaniasis is an important public health disease in many developing countries as well in Iran. The main objective of this study was to investigate on leishmania infection of wild caught sand flies in an endemic focus of disease in Esfarayen district, north east of Iran. Methods: Sand flies were collected by sticky papers and mounted in a drop of Puri’s medium for species identification. Polymerase chain reaction techniques of kDNA, ITS1-rDNA, followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism were used for identification of DNA of Leishmania parasites within infected sand flies. Results: Among the collected female sand flies, two species of Phlebotomus papatasi and Phlebotomus salehi were found naturally infected with Leishmania major. Furthermore, mixed infection of Leishmania turanica and L. major was observed in one specimen of P. papatasi. Sequence analysis revealed two parasite ITS1 haplotypes including three L. major with accession numbers: KJ425408, KJ425407, KM056403 and one L. turanica. (KJ425406). The haplotype of L. major was identical (100%) to several L. major sequences deposited in GenBank, including isolates from Iran, (Gen Bank accession nos.AY573187, KC505421, KJ194178) and Uzbekistan (Accession no.FN677357). Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first detection of L. major within wild caught P. salehi in northeast of Iran. PMID:27308272

  7. The yeast oligosaccharyltransferase complex can be replaced by STT3 from Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Hese, Katrin; Otto, Claudia; Routier, Françoise H; Lehle, Ludwig

    2009-02-01

    The key step of protein N-glycosylation is catalyzed by the multimeric oligosaccharyltransferase complex (OST). Biochemical and genetic studies have revealed that OST from Saccharomyces cerevisiae consists of nine subunits: Wbp1, Swp1, Stt3, Ost1, Ost2, Ost3, Ost4, Ost5, and Ost6. With the exception of Stt3, assumed to contain the catalytic site, little is known about the function of other OST subunits. The existence of the OST complex is suggested to allow substrate specificity and efficient transfer, a close interaction with the translocon and the prevention of protein folding to ensure the efficient co-translational modification of proteins. However, in the recently completed genome of the trypanosomatid parasite Leishmania major STT3 (of which four paralogs exist, STT3-1, STT3-2, STT3-3, and STT3-4) is the only OST subunit that can be identified. Here we report that L.m.STT3 proteins, except STT3-3, are able to complement stt3 deficiency in yeast during vegetative growth, but only poorly during sporulation. By blue native electrophoresis we demonstrate that the L.mSTT3 is active mainly as a free, monomeric enzyme. In cell-free assays and also in vivo we find that L.mSTT3, expressed in yeast, has a broad specificity for nonglucosylated lipid-linked mannose-oligosaccharides, typical for several protists. But when incorporated into the OST complex, L.mSTT3 transfers also the common eukaryotic Glc(3)Man(9)GlcNAc(2)-PP-Dol donor. Finally, three L.m.STT3 paralogs were shown to complement not only stt3 but also ost1, ost2, wbp1, or swp1 mutants. Thus, STT3 from Leishmania can substitute for the whole OST complex.

  8. Influence of parasite encoded inhibitors of serine peptidases in early infection of macrophages with Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Eschenlauer, Sylvain C P; Faria, Marilia S; Morrison, Lesley S; Bland, Nicolas; Ribeiro-Gomes, Flavia L; DosReis, George A; Coombs, Graham H; Lima, Ana Paula C A; Mottram, Jeremy C

    2009-01-01

    Ecotin is a potent inhibitor of family S1A serine peptidases, enzymes lacking in the protozoan parasite Leishmania major. Nevertheless, L. major has three ecotin-like genes, termed inhibitor of serine peptidase (ISP). ISP1 is expressed in vector-borne procyclic and metacyclic promastigotes, whereas ISP2 is also expressed in the mammalian amastigote stage. Recombinant ISP2 inhibited neutrophil elastase, trypsin and chymotrypsin with Kis between 7.7 and 83 nM. L. major ISP2–ISP3 double null mutants (Δisp2/3) were created. These grew normally as promastigotes, but were internalized by macrophages more efficiently than wild-type parasites due to the upregulation of phagocytosis by a mechanism dependent on serine peptidase activity. Δisp2/3 promastigotes transformed to amastigotes, but failed to divide for 48 h. Intracellular multiplication of Δisp2/3 was similar to wild-type parasites when serine peptidase inhibitors were present, suggesting that defective intracellular growth results from the lack of serine peptidase inhibition during promastigote uptake. Δisp2/3 mutants were more infective than wild-type parasites to BALB/c mice at the early stages of infection, but became equivalent as the infection progressed. These data support the hypothesis that ISPs of L. major target host serine peptidases and influence the early stages of infection of the mammalian host. PMID:19016791

  9. Heterogeneity of Wild Leishmania major Isolates in Experimental Murine Pathogenicity and Specific Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Kébaïer, C.; Louzir, H.; Chenik, M.; Salah, A. Ben; Dellagi, K.

    2001-01-01

    Virulence variability was investigated by analyzing the experimental pathogenicity of 19 Leishmania major strains in susceptible BALB/c mice. Twelve strains were isolated from Tunisian patients with zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis; seven strains were isolated in Syria (n = 1), Saudi Arabia (n = 2), Jordan (n = 2), or Israel (n = 2). BALB/c mice were injected in the hind footpad with 2 × 106 amastigotes of the various isolates, and lesion progression was recorded weekly for 9 weeks. Interleukin-4 (IL-4) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production of lymph node mononuclear cells activated in vitro with parasite antigens were evaluated 5 weeks after infection. We show that disease progression induced by different L. major isolates was largely heterogeneous although reproducible results were obtained when using the same isolate. Interestingly, isolates from the Middle East induced a more severe disease than did the majority of Tunisian isolates. Strains with the highest virulence tend to generate more IL-4 and less IFN-γ in vitro at week 5 postinfection as well as higher levels of early IL-4 mRNA in the lymph node draining the inoculation site at 16 h postinfection. These results suggest that L. major isolates from the field may differ in virulence, which influences the course of the disease induced in mice and the type of immune response elicited by the infected host. PMID:11447167

  10. Leishmania major Promastigotes Evade LC3-Associated Phagocytosis through the Action of GP63.

    PubMed

    Matte, Christine; Casgrain, Pierre-André; Séguin, Olivier; Moradin, Neda; Hong, Wan Jin; Descoteaux, Albert

    2016-06-01

    The protozoan Leishmania parasitizes macrophages and evades the microbicidal consequences of phagocytosis through the inhibition of phagolysosome biogenesis. In this study, we investigated the impact of this parasite on LC3-associated phagocytosis, a non-canonical autophagic process that enhances phagosome maturation and functions. We show that whereas internalization of L. major promastigotes by macrophages promoted LC3 lipidation, recruitment of LC3 to phagosomes was inhibited through the action of the parasite surface metalloprotease GP63. Reactive oxygen species generated by the NOX2 NADPH oxidase are necessary for LC3-associated phagocytosis. We found that L. major promastigotes prevented, in a GP63-dependent manner, the recruitment of NOX2 to phagosomes through a mechanism that does not involve NOX2 cleavage. Moreover, we found that the SNARE protein VAMP8, which regulates phagosomal assembly of the NADPH oxidase NOX2, was down-modulated by GP63. In the absence of VAMP8, recruitment of LC3 to phagosomes containing GP63-deficient parasites was inhibited, indicating that VAMP8 is involved in the phagosomal recruitment of LC3. These findings reveal a role for VAMP8 in LC3-associated phagocytosis and highlight a novel mechanism exploited by L. major promastigotes to interfere with the host antimicrobial machinery.

  11. Leishmania major Promastigotes Evade LC3-Associated Phagocytosis through the Action of GP63

    PubMed Central

    Matte, Christine; Casgrain, Pierre-André; Séguin, Olivier; Moradin, Neda; Hong, Wan Jin; Descoteaux, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The protozoan Leishmania parasitizes macrophages and evades the microbicidal consequences of phagocytosis through the inhibition of phagolysosome biogenesis. In this study, we investigated the impact of this parasite on LC3-associated phagocytosis, a non-canonical autophagic process that enhances phagosome maturation and functions. We show that whereas internalization of L. major promastigotes by macrophages promoted LC3 lipidation, recruitment of LC3 to phagosomes was inhibited through the action of the parasite surface metalloprotease GP63. Reactive oxygen species generated by the NOX2 NADPH oxidase are necessary for LC3-associated phagocytosis. We found that L. major promastigotes prevented, in a GP63-dependent manner, the recruitment of NOX2 to phagosomes through a mechanism that does not involve NOX2 cleavage. Moreover, we found that the SNARE protein VAMP8, which regulates phagosomal assembly of the NADPH oxidase NOX2, was down-modulated by GP63. In the absence of VAMP8, recruitment of LC3 to phagosomes containing GP63-deficient parasites was inhibited, indicating that VAMP8 is involved in the phagosomal recruitment of LC3. These findings reveal a role for VAMP8 in LC3-associated phagocytosis and highlight a novel mechanism exploited by L. major promastigotes to interfere with the host antimicrobial machinery. PMID:27280768

  12. Differential Regulation of the Interleukin-12 Receptor during the Innate Immune Response to Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Douglas; Elloso, M. Merle; Showe, Louise; Williams, Donna; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Scott, Phillip

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies have shown the central role of interleukin 12 (IL-12) in the development of resistance to Leishmania major infection in C3H mice. We now show that during the innate immune response the lymph node cells of L. major-infected C3H mice upregulate the IL-12 receptor on CD4+, CD8+, and B220+ cells. An increase in the ability of the lymph node cells to bind IL-12 correlates with 9.3- and 4.6-fold increases in the mRNA expression levels of the IL-12Rβ1 and -β2 subunits, respectively. In contrast, BALB/c mice, which are susceptible to L. major infection, have no increase in the ability of the lymph node cells to bind IL-12 and correspondingly smaller increases in the mRNA expression levels of the IL-12Rβ1 and -β2 subunits of 2- and 1.5-fold, respectively. Neutralizing IL-4 and the administration of exogenous IL-12 upregulate IL-12R expression in BALB/c mice, while the neutralization of IL-12 in C3H mice blocks increased IL-12 receptor expression. These experiments reveal an important role for the regulation of the IL-12 receptor during the innate immune response after infection of mice with a pathogen. PMID:9673267

  13. Immunotherapeutic effects of chitin in comparison with chitosan against Leishmania major infection.

    PubMed

    Hoseini, Mostafa Haji Molla; Moradi, Maryam; Alimohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Shahgoli, Vahid Khaze; Darabi, Hayedeh; Rostami, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Chitin and chitosan microparticles (MPs) are important immune system stimulators. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effects of these compounds in comparison with each other against Leishmania infection in BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania major (L. major). Female BALB/c mice were injected subcutaneously with 2×10(5) promastigotes. Chitin and/or chitosan MPs (<40 μm) were subcutaneously injected in the BALB/c mice with two-day intervals until two weeks. Mice in all groups were sacrificed at 12 weeks post-infection. Enumeration of viable parasites was performed using limiting dilution assay. Furthermore, the animals (5 mice/group) were sacrificed two weeks post-infection. The lymph node cells were isolated and the effects of the chitinous MPs on the proliferation and production of cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) were determined. The mean sizes of lesions were significantly smaller in chitin (0.6±0.12 mm) and chitosan treated groups (1.2±0.8 mm) than in the control group (6.2±1.7 mm) (P<0.05). The parasite load in the lymph nodes of the treated mice was significantly lower than that in the lymph nodes of controls (1.31×10(6) vs 8.24×10(7) parasite/lymph node [P=0.032] and 7.49×10(6) vs 8.24×10(7) parasite/lymph node [P=0.05] for chitin and chitosan MPs treatment, respectively). We found that chitinous MPs induced cell proliferation and that chitin but not chitosan increased TNF-α and IL-10 production. Chitin appears that it has more effect than chitosan against leishmaniasis. The current study revealed that chitinous MPs had significant activity against L. major and could be considered as new therapeutic modality in leishmaniasis.

  14. Novel arylalkylamine compounds exhibits potent selective antiparasitic activity against Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Iniguez, Eva A.; Perez, Andrea; Maldonado, Rosa A.; Skouta, Rachid

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania major (L. major) is a protozoan parasite causal agent of Leishmaniasis. It is estimated that 12 million people are currently infected and around 2 million infections occur each year. Current treatments suffer of high toxicity for the patient, low efficacy toward the parasite, high cost, and are losing effectiveness due to parasite resistance. Discovering novel small molecule with high specificity/selectivity and drug-like properties for anti-leishmanial activity remains a significant challenge. The purpose of this study is to communicate the design and synthesis strategies of novel chemical compounds based of the arylalkylamine scaffold with selective toxicity towards L. major and less toxicity to human cells in vitro. Here, we have developed a structure activity relationship (SAR) study of arylalkylamine AA1 in order to study their anti-parasitic effect in L. major. Overall, 27 arylalkylamine compounds derived from AA1 were synthesized and purified by silica gel column chromatography. The purity of each analog was confirmed by spectroscopic methods (1H, 13C NMR and LC/MS). Among these analogs, the compound AA9 showed the best toxic activity on L. major (LD50 = 3.34 μM), which represents a 9 fold higher lethality as compared with its parental AA1 (Fer-1) compound (LD50 = 28.75 μM). In addition, AA9 showed no significant toxicity at 80 μM on U20S Human Osteoblasts, Raw 264.7 Macrophages or intraperitoneal macrophages. In summary, our combined SAR study and biological evaluation data of AA1-AA27 compounds allow the identification of novel arylalkylamine compound AA9 that exhibits potent cytotoxicity against L. major promastigote with minimum toxic effect on human cells. PMID:26410073

  15. Novel arylalkylamine compounds exhibits potent selective antiparasitic activity against Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Iniguez, Eva A; Perez, Andrea; Maldonado, Rosa A; Skouta, Rachid

    2015-11-15

    Leishmania major (L. major) is a protozoan parasite causal agent of Leishmaniasis. It is estimated that 12 million people are currently infected and around 2 million infections occur each year. Current treatments suffer of high toxicity for the patient, low efficacy toward the parasite, high cost, and are losing effectiveness due to parasite resistance. Discovering novel small molecule with high specificity/selectivity and drug-like properties for anti-leishmanial activity remains a significant challenge. The purpose of this study is to communicate the design and synthesis strategies of novel chemical compounds based of the arylalkylamine scaffold with selective toxicity towards L. major and less toxicity to human cells in vitro. Here, we have developed a structure activity relationship (SAR) study of arylalkylamine AA1 in order to study their anti-parasitic effect in L. major. Overall, 27 arylalkylamine compounds derived from AA1 were synthesized and purified by silica gel column chromatography. The purity of each analog was confirmed by spectroscopic methods ((1)H, (13)C NMR and LC/MS). Among these analogs, the compound AA9 showed the best toxic activity on L. major (LD50=3.34 μM), which represents a 9 fold higher lethality as compared with its parental AA1 (Fer-1) compound (LD50=28.75 μM). In addition, AA9 showed no significant toxicity at 80 μM on U20S Human Osteoblasts, Raw 264.7 Macrophages or intraperitoneal macrophages. In summary, our combined SAR study and biological evaluation data of AA1-AA27 compounds allow the identification of novel arylalkylamine compound AA9 that exhibits potent cytotoxicity against L. major promastigote with minimum toxic effect on human cells. PMID:26410073

  16. Structure of Lmaj006129AAA, a hypothetical protein from Leishmania major

    SciTech Connect

    Arakaki, Tracy; Le Trong, Isolde; Phizicky, Eric; Quartley, Erin; DeTitta, George; Luft, Joseph; Lauricella, Angela; Anderson, Lori; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Worthey, Elizabeth; Myler, Peter J.; Kim, David; Baker, David; Hol, Wim G. J.; Merritt, Ethan A.

    2006-03-01

    The crystal structure of a conserved hypothetical protein from L. major, Pfam sequence family PF04543, structural genomics target ID Lmaj006129AAA, has been determined at a resolution of 1.6 Å. The gene product of structural genomics target Lmaj006129 from Leishmania major codes for a 164-residue protein of unknown function. When SeMet expression of the full-length gene product failed, several truncation variants were created with the aid of Ginzu, a domain-prediction method. 11 truncations were selected for expression, purification and crystallization based upon secondary-structure elements and disorder. The structure of one of these variants, Lmaj006129AAH, was solved by multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) using ELVES, an automatic protein crystal structure-determination system. This model was then successfully used as a molecular-replacement probe for the parent full-length target, Lmaj006129AAA. The final structure of Lmaj006129AAA was refined to an R value of 0.185 (R{sub free} = 0.229) at 1.60 Å resolution. Structure and sequence comparisons based on Lmaj006129AAA suggest that proteins belonging to Pfam sequence families PF04543 and PF01878 may share a common ligand-binding motif.

  17. Implication of different domains of the Leishmania major metacaspase in cell death and autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Casanova, M; Gonzalez, I J; Sprissler, C; Zalila, H; Dacher, M; Basmaciyan, L; Späth, G F; Azas, N; Fasel, N

    2015-01-01

    Metacaspases (MCAs) are cysteine peptidases expressed in plants, fungi and protozoa, with a caspase-like histidine–cysteine catalytic dyad, but differing from caspases, for example, in their substrate specificity. The role of MCAs is subject to debate: roles in cell cycle control, in cell death or even in cell survival have been suggested. In this study, using a Leishmania major MCA-deficient strain, we showed that L. major MCA (LmjMCA) not only had a role similar to caspases in cell death but also in autophagy and this through different domains. Upon cell death induction by miltefosine or H2O2, LmjMCA is processed, releasing the catalytic domain, which activated substrates via its catalytic dyad His/Cys and a proline-rich C-terminal domain. The C-terminal domain interacted with proteins, notably proteins involved in stress regulation, such as the MAP kinase LmaMPK7 or programmed cell death like the calpain-like cysteine peptidase. We also showed a new role of LmjMCA in autophagy, acting on or upstream of ATG8, involving Lmjmca gene overexpression and interaction of the C-terminal domain of LmjMCA with itself and other proteins. These results allowed us to propose two models, showing the role of LmjMCA in the cell death and also in the autophagy pathway, implicating different protein domains. PMID:26492367

  18. In vitro antileishmanial activity of methanolic and aqueous extracts of Eucalyptus camaldulensis against Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Nosratabadi, Seyyed Jafar; Sharifi, Iraj; Sharififar, Fariba; Bamorovat, Mehdi; Daneshvar, Hamid; Mirzaie, Mohammad

    2015-03-01

    Pentavalent antimony compounds are expensive, toxic and drug resistance is prevalent, whereas the plant extract derivatives are safe. In the present study, the effect of methanolic and aqueous extracts of Eucalyptus camaldulensis on the promastigotes of Leishmania major was evaluated. The methanolic and aqueous extracts of E. camaldulensis leaves were prepared. The compounds were dried and powdered. Serial dilutions of the extracts and control drugs in phosphate buffer solution were prepared. The stationary phase promastigotes of L. major were incubated to the methanolic and aqueous extractions in vitro. Tartar emetic was used as the positive control drug. After 72 h of incubation the activity of the extracts was measured, using MTT method. The IC50 values (50 % inhibitory concentration) were 586.2 ± 47.6 and 1,108.6 ± 51.9 μg/ml for methanolic and aqueous extracts, respectively, whereas it was 32.5 ± 6.8 μg/ml for tartar emetic. The results indicated that the methanolic extract was more effective than aqueous extract, although there was no significant difference. The extracts were less effective as compared to the control drug. Further investigation is required to evaluate these extracts on clinical stage in macrophage-amastigote model. PMID:25698853

  19. Characterization of a Novel Endoplasmic Reticulum Protein Involved in Tubercidin Resistance in Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Juliana Ide; Coelho, Adriano Cappellazzo; Muxel, Sandra Marcia; Zampieri, Ricardo Andrade; Sanchez, Eduardo Milton Ramos; Nerland, Audun Helge; Floeter-Winter, Lucile Maria; Cotrim, Paulo Cesar

    2016-01-01

    Background Tubercidin (TUB) is a toxic adenosine analog with potential antiparasitic activity against Leishmania, with mechanism of action and resistance that are not completely understood. For understanding the mechanisms of action and identifying the potential metabolic pathways affected by this drug, we employed in this study an overexpression/selection approach using TUB for the identification of potential targets, as well as, drug resistance genes in L. major. Although, TUB is toxic to the mammalian host, these findings can provide evidences for a rational drug design based on purine pathway against leishmaniasis. Methodology/Principal findings After transfection of a cosmid genomic library into L. major Friedlin (LmjF) parasites and application of the overexpression/selection method, we identified two cosmids (cosTUB1 and cosTU2) containing two different loci capable of conferring significant levels of TUB resistance. In the cosTUB1 contained a gene encoding NUPM1-like protein, which has been previously described as associated with TUB resistance in L. amazonensis. In the cosTUB2 we identified and characterized a gene encoding a 63 kDa protein that we denoted as tubercidin-resistance protein (TRP). Functional analysis revealed that the transfectants were less susceptible to TUB than LmjF parasites or those transfected with the control vector. In addition, the trp mRNA and protein levels in cosTUB2 transfectants were higher than LmjF. TRP immunolocalization revealed that it was co-localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), a cellular compartment with many functions. In silico predictions indicated that TRP contains only a hypothetical transmembrane domain. Thus, it is likely that TRP is a lumen protein involved in multidrug efflux transport that may be involved in the purine metabolic pathway. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrated for the first time that TRP is associated with TUB resistance in Leishmania. The next challenge is to determine how

  20. Genome-Wide Prediction of Vaccine Candidates for Leishmania major: An Integrated Approach

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Satarudra Prakash; Roopendra, Kriti; Mishra, Bhartendu Nath

    2015-01-01

    Despite the wealth of information regarding genetics of the causative parasite and experimental immunology of the cutaneous leishmaniasis, there is currently no licensed vaccine against it. In the current study, a two-level data mining strategy was employed, to screen the Leishmania major genome for promising vaccine candidates. First, we screened a set of 25 potential antigens from 8312 protein coding sequences, based on presence of signal peptides, GPI anchors, and consensus antigenicity predictions. Second, we conducted a comprehensive immunogenic analysis of the 25 antigens based on epitopes predicted by NetCTL tool. Interestingly, results revealed that candidate antigen number 1 (LmjF.03.0550) had greater number of potential T cell epitopes, as compared to five well-characterized control antigens (CSP-Plasmodium falciparum, M1 and NP-Influenza A virus, core protein-Hepatitis B virus, and PSTA1-Mycobacterium tuberculosis). In order to determine an optimal set of epitopes among the highest scoring predicted epitopes, the OptiTope tool was employed for populations susceptible to cutaneous leishmaniasis. The epitope (127SLWSLLAGV) from antigen number 1, found to bind with the most prevalent allele HLA-A⁎0201 (25% frequency in Southwest Asia), was predicted as most immunogenic for all the target populations. Thus, our study reasserts the potential of genome-wide screening of pathogen antigens and epitopes, for identification of promising vaccine candidates. PMID:26681959

  1. Arginase I Induction during Leishmania major Infection Mediates the Development of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Iniesta, Virginia; Carcelén, Jesualdo; Molano, Isabel; Peixoto, Pablo M. V.; Redondo, Eloy; Parra, Pilar; Mangas, Marina; Monroy, Isabel; Campo, Maria Luisa; Nieto, Carlos Gómez; Corraliza, Inés

    2005-01-01

    In a previous work, we demonstrated that the induction of arginase I favored the replication of Leishmania inside macrophages. Now we have analyzed the differential expression of this enzyme in the mouse model of L. major infection. Ours results show that arginase I is induced in both susceptible and resistant mice during the development of the disease. However, in BALB/c-infected tissues, the induction of this protein parallels the time of infection, while in C57BL/6 mice, the enzyme is upregulated only during footpad swelling. The induction of the host arginase in both strains is mediated by the balance between interleukin-4 (IL-4) and IL-12 and opposite to nitric oxide synthase II expression. Moreover, inhibition of arginase reduces the number of parasites and delays disease outcome in BALB/c mice, while treatment with l-ornithine increases the susceptibility of C57BL/6 mice. Therefore, arginase I induction could be considered a marker of disease in leishmaniasis. PMID:16113329

  2. Crystal structure of phosphoglucomutase from Leishmania major at 3.5 Å resolution.

    PubMed

    Waugh, Barnali; Sen, Udayaditya; Banerjee, Rahul

    2016-02-01

    The crystal structure of phosphoglucomutase (LmPGM) from the parasite Leishmania major has been solved at 3.5 Å resolution. Although the active form of the enzyme is monomeric in solution, four molecules (A, B, C, D) were found in the asymmetric unit, of which the pairs (A,D) and (B,C) were of identical inter-subunit geometry. The parasitic enzyme constituted of four domains exhibited the canonical 'heart' shape of the protein, with domains I to III having a conserved α|β core, while the fourth (IV) domain being structurally distinct from the rest. Conformational variability of the IVth domain, postulated to be responsible for the catalytic function of the enzyme has been studied by normal mode analysis (NMA) and the conformational features responsible for domain movement in the 'hinge region' analyzed in detail. Although the active site of phosphoglucomutase is highly conserved from parasite to human, initial calculations show that a ligand binding pocket could exist near the hinge region, which is unique to the parasite. The enzymatic parameters of LmPGM have been determined and compared with other PGMs from orthologous species in addition to elucidating its mechanism of action by docking the substrate, intermediate onto the active site.

  3. Neutrophils Contribute to the Protection Conferred by ArtinM against Intracellular Pathogens: A Study on Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Ricci-Azevedo, Rafael; Oliveira, Aline Ferreira; Conrado, Marina C. A. V.; Carvalho, Fernanda Caroline; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    ArtinM, a D-mannose binding lectin from Artocarpus heterophyllus, has immunomodulatory activities through its interaction with N-glycans of immune cells, culminating with the establishment of T helper type 1 (Th1) immunity. This interaction protects mice against intracellular pathogens, including Leishmania major and Leishmania amazonensis. ArtinM induces neutrophils activation, which is known to account for both resistance to pathogens and host tissue injury. Although exacerbated inflammation was not observed in ArtinM-treated animals, assessment of neutrophil responses to ArtinM is required to envisage its possible application to design a novel immunomodulatory agent based on carbohydrate recognition. Herein, we focus on the mechanisms through which neutrophils contribute to ArtinM-induced protection against Leishmania, without exacerbating inflammation. For this purpose, human neutrophils treated with ArtinM and infected with Leishmania major were analyzed together with untreated and uninfected controls, based on their ability to eliminate the parasite, release cytokines, degranulate, produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and change life span. We demonstrate that ArtinM-stimulated neutrophils enhanced L. major clearance and at least duplicated tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) release; otherwise, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) production was reduced by half. Furthermore, ROS production and cell degranulation were augmented. The life span of ArtinM-stimulated neutrophils decreased and they did not form NETs when infected with L. major. We postulate that the enhanced leishmanicidal ability of ArtinM-stimulated neutrophils is due to augmented release of inflammatory cytokines, ROS production, and cell degranulation, whereas host tissue integrity is favored by their shortened life span and the absence of NET formation. Our results reinforce the idea that ArtinM may be considered an

  4. Neutrophils Contribute to the Protection Conferred by ArtinM against Intracellular Pathogens: A Study on Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Ricci-Azevedo, Rafael; Oliveira, Aline Ferreira; Conrado, Marina C A V; Carvalho, Fernanda Caroline; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2016-04-01

    ArtinM, a D-mannose binding lectin from Artocarpus heterophyllus, has immunomodulatory activities through its interaction with N-glycans of immune cells, culminating with the establishment of T helper type 1 (Th1) immunity. This interaction protects mice against intracellular pathogens, including Leishmania major and Leishmania amazonensis. ArtinM induces neutrophils activation, which is known to account for both resistance to pathogens and host tissue injury. Although exacerbated inflammation was not observed in ArtinM-treated animals, assessment of neutrophil responses to ArtinM is required to envisage its possible application to design a novel immunomodulatory agent based on carbohydrate recognition. Herein, we focus on the mechanisms through which neutrophils contribute to ArtinM-induced protection against Leishmania, without exacerbating inflammation. For this purpose, human neutrophils treated with ArtinM and infected with Leishmania major were analyzed together with untreated and uninfected controls, based on their ability to eliminate the parasite, release cytokines, degranulate, produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and change life span. We demonstrate that ArtinM-stimulated neutrophils enhanced L. major clearance and at least duplicated tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) release; otherwise, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) production was reduced by half. Furthermore, ROS production and cell degranulation were augmented. The life span of ArtinM-stimulated neutrophils decreased and they did not form NETs when infected with L. major. We postulate that the enhanced leishmanicidal ability of ArtinM-stimulated neutrophils is due to augmented release of inflammatory cytokines, ROS production, and cell degranulation, whereas host tissue integrity is favored by their shortened life span and the absence of NET formation. Our results reinforce the idea that ArtinM may be considered an

  5. Neutrophils Contribute to the Protection Conferred by ArtinM against Intracellular Pathogens: A Study on Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Ricci-Azevedo, Rafael; Oliveira, Aline Ferreira; Conrado, Marina C A V; Carvalho, Fernanda Caroline; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2016-04-01

    ArtinM, a D-mannose binding lectin from Artocarpus heterophyllus, has immunomodulatory activities through its interaction with N-glycans of immune cells, culminating with the establishment of T helper type 1 (Th1) immunity. This interaction protects mice against intracellular pathogens, including Leishmania major and Leishmania amazonensis. ArtinM induces neutrophils activation, which is known to account for both resistance to pathogens and host tissue injury. Although exacerbated inflammation was not observed in ArtinM-treated animals, assessment of neutrophil responses to ArtinM is required to envisage its possible application to design a novel immunomodulatory agent based on carbohydrate recognition. Herein, we focus on the mechanisms through which neutrophils contribute to ArtinM-induced protection against Leishmania, without exacerbating inflammation. For this purpose, human neutrophils treated with ArtinM and infected with Leishmania major were analyzed together with untreated and uninfected controls, based on their ability to eliminate the parasite, release cytokines, degranulate, produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and change life span. We demonstrate that ArtinM-stimulated neutrophils enhanced L. major clearance and at least duplicated tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) release; otherwise, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) production was reduced by half. Furthermore, ROS production and cell degranulation were augmented. The life span of ArtinM-stimulated neutrophils decreased and they did not form NETs when infected with L. major. We postulate that the enhanced leishmanicidal ability of ArtinM-stimulated neutrophils is due to augmented release of inflammatory cytokines, ROS production, and cell degranulation, whereas host tissue integrity is favored by their shortened life span and the absence of NET formation. Our results reinforce the idea that ArtinM may be considered an

  6. Leishmania tropica major in mice: vaccination against cutaneous leishmaniasis in mice of high genetic susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, G F; Handman, E

    1983-02-01

    BALB/c and BALB/c.H-2b mice are genetically susceptible to development of persistent and severe disease following cutaneous injection of promastigotes of the protozoan parasite, Leishmania tropica major, whereas C57BL/6 are relatively resistant. Resistance in C57BL/6 can be further increased by intraperitoneal injection of living, but not killed, promastigotes prior to cutaneous challenge. Severely diseased BALB/c mice can show resistance to development of a second cutaneous lesion but apparently only in the advanced stages of systemic life-threatening disease. A striking level of resistance to persistent disease has been demonstrated in BALB/c.H-2b mice pre-injected with frozen and thawed L. t. major-infected macrophages of the continuous macrophage cell line IC-21 (H-2b) together with Corynebacterium parvum. No resistance is seen in recipients of either C. parvum or the crude antigen mixture alone. Protection is afforded by intraperitoneal and not subcutaneous injection of crude antigen plus adjuvant. In these vaccination studies all evidence points to the infected macrophage as most appropriate source of 'host-protective' antigens as well as being the most likely target of host-protective immunity. Resistance is expressed in vaccinated mice as minimal signs of cutaneous disease and rapid resolution of any small lesions which do develop. Frozen and thawed promastigotes plus C. parvum will not induce resistance to persistent disease in BALB/c.H-2b mice and preincubation of promastigotes with sera from resistant vaccinated mice does not influence their capacity to cause cutaneous disease. The results provide baseline data for vaccination attempts in genetically susceptible hosts using isolated L. t. major antigens (and, in particular, infected macrophage antigens) and highlight the utility of the intraperitoneal route of injection and the use of the therapeutic biological, C. parvum, as an adjuvant in such studies. PMID:6870673

  7. Stable transfection of the human parasite Leishmania major delineates a 30-kilobase region sufficient for extrachromosomal replication and expression.

    PubMed Central

    Kapler, G M; Coburn, C M; Beverley, S M

    1990-01-01

    To delineate segments of the genome of the human protozoan parasite Leishmania major necessary for replication and expression, we developed a vector (pR-NEO) which can be reproducibly introduced into L. major. This DNA was derived from a 30-kilobase extrachromosomal amplified DNA bearing the dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase gene, with the coding region for neomycin phosphotransferase substituted for that of dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase and a bacterial origin of replication and selectable marker added. G418-resistant lines were obtained at high efficiency by electroporation of pR-NEO (approaching 10(-4) per cell), while constructs bearing an inverted neo gene or lacking Leishmania sequences did not confer resistance. pR-NEO replicated in L. major and gave rise to correctly processed transcripts bearing the trans-spliced miniexon. Molecular karyotype analysis showed that in some lines pR-NEO DNA exists exclusively as an extrachromosomal circle, a finding supported by the rescue of intact pR-NEO after transformation of Escherichia coli. These data genetically localize all elements required in cis for DNA replication, transcription, and trans splicing to the Leishmania DNA contained within pR-NEO DNA and signal the advent of stable transfection methodology for addressing molecular phenomena in trypanosomatid parasites. Images PMID:2304458

  8. Experimental therapeutic studies of Solanum aculeastrum Dunal. on Leishmania major infection in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Laban, Linet T; Anjili, Christopher O; Mutiso, Joshua M; Ingonga, Johnstone; Kiige, Samuel G; Ngedzo, Mgala M; Gicheru, Michael M

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Solanum acueastrum Dunal. has been shown to have some chemotherapeutic value. Leaf and berry water and methanol compounds of S. acueastrum were evaluated for possible antileishmanial activity In vivo on BALB/c mice and in vitro against Leishmania major promastigotes, amastigotes and vero cells. Materials and Methods: Dry S. aculeastrum berry and leaf material were extracted in methanol and water. L. major parasites were exposed to different concentrations of S. aculeastrum fruit and leaf compounds and the IC50 on the promastigotes, percentage of infection rate of macrophages by amastigotes and the toxicological effect on vero cells were determined. BALB/c mice were infected subcutaneously with 1×106 promastigotes and kept for four weeks to allow for disease establishment. Infected mice were treated with fruit and leaf methanolic and water compounds, amphotericin B (AmB), and sterile phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Results: Fruit methanol compound was most effective in inhibiting the growth of promastigotes with IC5078.62 μg/ml. Fruit water compound showed the best activity in inhibiting infection of macrophages by amastigotes. Fruit methanol compound was more toxic at Ld50=8.06 mg/ml to vero cells than amphotericin B. Analysis of variance computation indicated statistically significant difference in lesion sizes between experimental and control mice groups (P=0.0001). Splenic impression smears ANOVA indicated a highly significant difference in parasitic numbers between the experimental and the control groups (P=0.0001). Conclusion: The results demonstrate that compounds from S. aculeastrum have potential anti-leishmanial activities and the medicinal use of the plant poses considerable toxicity against dividing vero cells. PMID:25810878

  9. Carbon dioxide abolishes the reverse Pasteur effect in Leishmania major promastigotes.

    PubMed

    Darling, T N; Davis, D G; London, R E; Blum, J J

    1989-03-01

    The products released by Leishmania major promastigotes incubated with [1-13C]glucose as sole exogenous carbon source were identified using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Under aerobic (95% O2/5% CO2) conditions, acetate, succinate, and small amounts of pyruvate, D-lactate, and glycerol were released in addition to CO2. Under anaerobic (95% N2/5% CO2) conditions, the relative amounts of products formed changed and alanine was also released. The changes in the rates of glucose consumption and product formation during the aerobic to anaerobic transition were measured. Under hypoxic conditions (O2 less than 0.2%), glucose consumption was decreased by about 50%. Under completely anaerobic conditions (100% N2), glucose consumption almost ceased (a total reverse Pasteur effect). The inclusion of 5% CO2 in the gas phase restored hypoxic and anaerobic glucose consumption to the aerobic rate, and increased production of succinate, pyruvate, and D-lactate. Thus, CO2 and very low concentrations of O2 have strong regulatory effects on L. major glucose metabolism. A quantitative carbon balance showed that the NMR-identified products accounted for only about 25% of the glucose carbons consumed under aerobic conditions. CO2, measured as the release of 14CO2 from [U-14C]glucose, accounted for an additional 25% of the glucose consumed. About 11% of the glucose carbon was incorporated into trichloroacetic acid-insoluble products, mostly lipid. Large amounts of label from [U-14C]glucose were incorporated into the intracellular pools of alanine, glutamate, glutamine, and aspartate, indicating that CO2 from unlabeled amino acids contributed to the carbon balance. Under anaerobic conditions, all the glucose carbons consumed could be accounted for solely by the NMR-identified products.

  10. Sheep blood-LB agar base medium (SLM) as a simple and suitable medium for the cultivation of Leishmania major promastigotes.

    PubMed

    Nasiri, Vahid

    2013-11-01

    Several methods of cultivation of Leishmania parasites are available, and among them, biphasic media like Nicolle-Novy-MacNeal medium are considered to be superior for the initial isolation of the parasites and their in vivo infectivity. In the present work, the efficacy of sheep blood-LB agar base medium (SLM) was evaluated for the cultivation of Leishmania major promastigotes. The SLM supports the proliferation of the parasites and can be used for routine isolation and cultivation of Leishmania parasites with acceptable in vivo infectivity for research purposes.

  11. Cinnamic Acid Bornyl Ester Derivatives from Valeriana wallichii Exhibit Antileishmanial In Vivo Activity in Leishmania major-Infected BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Sudipta; Glaser, Jan; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Hazra, Banasri; Schurigt, Uta

    2015-01-01

    Human leishmaniasis covers a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations ranging from self-healing cutaneous leishmaniasis to severe and lethal visceral leishmaniasis caused among other species by Leishmania major or Leishmania donovani, respectively. Some drug candidates are in clinical trials to substitute current therapies, which are facing emerging drug-resistance accompanied with serious side effects. Here, two cinnamic acid bornyl ester derivatives (1 and 2) were assessed for their antileishmanial activity. Good selectivity and antileishmanial activity of bornyl 3-phenylpropanoate (2) in vitro prompted the antileishmanial assessment in vivo. For this purpose, BALB/c mice were infected with Leishmania major promastigotes and treated with three doses of 50 mg/kg/day of compound 2. The treatment prevented the characteristic swelling at the site of infection and correlated with reduced parasite burden. Transmitted light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy of Leishmania major promastigotes revealed that compounds 1 and 2 induce mitochondrial swelling. Subsequent studies on Leishmania major promastigotes showed the loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) as a putative mode of action. As the cinnamic acid bornyl ester derivatives 1 and 2 had exhibited antileishmanial activity in vitro, and compound 2 in Leishmania major-infected BALB/c mice in vivo, they can be regarded as possible lead structures for the development of new antileishmanial therapeutic approaches. PMID:26554591

  12. Cinnamic Acid Bornyl Ester Derivatives from Valeriana wallichii Exhibit Antileishmanial In Vivo Activity in Leishmania major-Infected BALB/c Mice.

    PubMed

    Masic, Anita; Valencia Hernandez, Ana Maria; Hazra, Sudipta; Glaser, Jan; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Hazra, Banasri; Schurigt, Uta

    2015-01-01

    Human leishmaniasis covers a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations ranging from self-healing cutaneous leishmaniasis to severe and lethal visceral leishmaniasis caused among other species by Leishmania major or Leishmania donovani, respectively. Some drug candidates are in clinical trials to substitute current therapies, which are facing emerging drug-resistance accompanied with serious side effects. Here, two cinnamic acid bornyl ester derivatives (1 and 2) were assessed for their antileishmanial activity. Good selectivity and antileishmanial activity of bornyl 3-phenylpropanoate (2) in vitro prompted the antileishmanial assessment in vivo. For this purpose, BALB/c mice were infected with Leishmania major promastigotes and treated with three doses of 50 mg/kg/day of compound 2. The treatment prevented the characteristic swelling at the site of infection and correlated with reduced parasite burden. Transmitted light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy of Leishmania major promastigotes revealed that compounds 1 and 2 induce mitochondrial swelling. Subsequent studies on Leishmania major promastigotes showed the loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) as a putative mode of action. As the cinnamic acid bornyl ester derivatives 1 and 2 had exhibited antileishmanial activity in vitro, and compound 2 in Leishmania major-infected BALB/c mice in vivo, they can be regarded as possible lead structures for the development of new antileishmanial therapeutic approaches. PMID:26554591

  13. Cinnamic Acid Bornyl Ester Derivatives from Valeriana wallichii Exhibit Antileishmanial In Vivo Activity in Leishmania major-Infected BALB/c Mice.

    PubMed

    Masic, Anita; Valencia Hernandez, Ana Maria; Hazra, Sudipta; Glaser, Jan; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Hazra, Banasri; Schurigt, Uta

    2015-01-01

    Human leishmaniasis covers a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations ranging from self-healing cutaneous leishmaniasis to severe and lethal visceral leishmaniasis caused among other species by Leishmania major or Leishmania donovani, respectively. Some drug candidates are in clinical trials to substitute current therapies, which are facing emerging drug-resistance accompanied with serious side effects. Here, two cinnamic acid bornyl ester derivatives (1 and 2) were assessed for their antileishmanial activity. Good selectivity and antileishmanial activity of bornyl 3-phenylpropanoate (2) in vitro prompted the antileishmanial assessment in vivo. For this purpose, BALB/c mice were infected with Leishmania major promastigotes and treated with three doses of 50 mg/kg/day of compound 2. The treatment prevented the characteristic swelling at the site of infection and correlated with reduced parasite burden. Transmitted light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy of Leishmania major promastigotes revealed that compounds 1 and 2 induce mitochondrial swelling. Subsequent studies on Leishmania major promastigotes showed the loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) as a putative mode of action. As the cinnamic acid bornyl ester derivatives 1 and 2 had exhibited antileishmanial activity in vitro, and compound 2 in Leishmania major-infected BALB/c mice in vivo, they can be regarded as possible lead structures for the development of new antileishmanial therapeutic approaches.

  14. Concomitant Infection with Leishmania donovani and L. major in Single Ulcers of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Patients from Sudan.

    PubMed

    Babiker, A M; Ravagnan, S; Fusaro, A; Hassan, M M; Bakheit, S M; Mukhtar, M M; Cattoli, G; Capelli, G

    2014-01-01

    In Sudan human leishmaniasis occurs in different clinical forms, that is, visceral (VL), cutaneous (CL), mucocutaneous (ML), and post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL). Clinical samples from 69 Sudanese patients with different clinical manifestations were subjected to a PCR targeting the cytochrome oxidase II (COII) gene for Leishmania species identification. Mixed infections were suspected due to multiple overlapping peaks presented in some sequences of the COII amplicons. Cloning these amplicons and alignment of sequences from randomly selected clones confirmed the presence of two different Leishmania species, L. donovani and L. major, in three out of five CL patients. Findings were further confirmed by cloning the ITS gene. Regarding other samples no significant genetic variations were found in patients with VL (62 patients), PKDL (one patient), or ML (one patient). The sequences clustered in a single homogeneous group within L. donovani genetic group, with the exception of one sequence clustering with L. infantum genetic group. Findings of this study open discussion on the synergetic/antagonistic interaction between divergent Leishmania species both in mammalian and vector hosts, their clinical implications with respect to parasite fitness and response to treatment, and the route of transmission with respect to vector distribution and or adaptation. PMID:24744788

  15. The Crystal Structure of the Leishmania major Deoxyuridine Triphosphate Nucleotidohydrolase in Complex with Nucleotide Analogues, dUMP, and Deoxyuridine*

    PubMed Central

    Hemsworth, Glyn R.; Moroz, Olga V.; Fogg, Mark J.; Scott, Benjamin; Bosch-Navarrete, Cristina; González-Pacanowska, Dolores; Wilson, Keith S.

    2011-01-01

    Members of the Leishmania genus are the causative agents of the life-threatening disease leishmaniasis. New drugs are being sought due to increasing resistance and adverse side effects with current treatments. The knowledge that dUTPase is an essential enzyme and that the all α-helical dimeric kinetoplastid dUTPases have completely different structures compared with the trimeric β-sheet type dUTPase possessed by most organisms, including humans, make the dimeric enzymes attractive drug targets. Here, we present crystal structures of the Leishmania major dUTPase in complex with substrate analogues, the product dUMP and a substrate fragment, and of the homologous Campylobacter jejuni dUTPase in complex with a triphosphate substrate analogue. The metal-binding properties of both enzymes are shown to be dependent upon the ligand identity, a previously unseen characteristic of this family. Furthermore, structures of the Leishmania enzyme in the presence of dUMP and deoxyuridine coupled with tryptophan fluorescence quenching indicate that occupation of the phosphate binding region is essential for induction of the closed conformation and hence for substrate binding. These findings will aid in the development of dUTPase inhibitors as potential new lead anti-trypanosomal compounds. PMID:21454646

  16. Skin-resident memory CD4+ T cells enhance protection against Leishmania major infection

    PubMed Central

    Glennie, Nelson D.; Yeramilli, Venkata A.; Beiting, Daniel P.; Volk, Susan W.; Weaver, Casey T.

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis causes a significant disease burden worldwide. Although Leishmania-infected patients become refractory to reinfection after disease resolution, effective immune protection has not yet been achieved by human vaccines. Although circulating Leishmania-specific T cells are known to play a critical role in immunity, the role of memory T cells present in peripheral tissues has not been explored. Here, we identify a population of skin-resident Leishmania-specific memory CD4+ T cells. These cells produce IFN-γ and remain resident in the skin when transplanted by skin graft onto naive mice. They function to recruit circulating T cells to the skin in a CXCR3-dependent manner, resulting in better control of the parasites. Our findings are the first to demonstrate that CD4+ TRM cells form in response to a parasitic infection, and indicate that optimal protective immunity to Leishmania, and thus the success of a vaccine, may depend on generating both circulating and skin-resident memory T cells. PMID:26216123

  17. A Newly Emerged Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Focus in Northern Israel and Two New Reservoir Hosts of Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Faiman, Roy; Abbasi, Ibrahim; Jaffe, Charles; Motro, Yoav; Nasereddin, Abdelmagid; Schnur, Lionel F.; Torem, Moshe; Pratlong, Francine; Dedet, Jean-Pierre; Warburg, Alon

    2013-01-01

    In 2006/7, 18 cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) were reported for the first time from Sde Eliyahu (pop. 650), a village in the Beit She'an valley of Israel. Between 2007–2011, a further 88 CL cases were diagnosed bringing the total to 106 (16.3% of the population of Sde Eliyahu). The majority of cases resided in the south-western part of the village along the perimeter fence. The causative parasite was identified as Leishmania major Yakimoff & Schokhor, 1914 (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae). Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli), 1786 (Diptera: Psychodidae) was found to be the most abundant phlebotomine species comprising 97% of the sand flies trapped inside the village, and an average of 7.9% of the females were positive for Leishmania ITS1 DNA. Parasite isolates from CL cases and a sand fly were characterized using several methods and shown to be L. major. During a comprehensive survey of rodents 164 Levant voles Microtus guentheri Danford & Alston, 1880 (Rodentia: Cricetidae) were captured in alfalfa fields bordering the village. Of these 27 (16.5%) tested positive for Leishmania ITS1 DNA and shown to be L. major by reverse line blotting. A very high percentage (58.3% - 21/36) of Tristram's jirds Meriones tristrami Thomas, 1892 (Rodentia: Muridae), found further away from the village also tested positive for ITS1 by PCR. Isolates of L. major were successfully cultured from the ear of a wild jird found positive by ITS1 PCR. Although none of the wild PCR-positive voles exhibited external pathology, laboratory-reared voles that were infected by intradermal L. major inoculation, developed patent lesions and sand flies became infected by feeding on the ears of these laboratory-infected voles. This is the first report implicating M. guentheri and M. tristrami as reservoirs of Leishmania. The widespread co-distribution of M. guentheri and P. papatasi, suggests a significant threat from the spread of CL caused by L. major in the Middle East, central Asia and southern

  18. Targeted gene deletion of Leishmania major genes encoding developmental stage-specific leishmanolysin (GP63).

    PubMed

    Joshi, P B; Sacks, D L; Modi, G; McMaster, W R

    1998-02-01

    The major surface glycoprotein of Leishmania major is a zinc metalloproteinase of 63 kDa referred to as leishmanolysin or GP63, which is encoded by a family of seven genes. Targeted gene replacement was used to delete gp63 genes 1-6 encoding the highly expressed promastigote and constitutively expressed GP63. In the L. major homozygous mutants deficient in gp63 genes 1-6, there was no expression of GP63 as detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) or fluorescent staining in promastigotes from the procyclic stage (logarithmic growth phase). The remaining L. major gP63 gene 7 was shown to be developmentally regulated, as it was expressed exclusively in infectious metacyclic stage (late stationary growth phase) promastigotes and in lesion amastigotes. The gp63 genes 1-6-deficient mutants showed increased sensitivity to complement-mediated lysis. The sensitivity to lysis was greater in procyclics than in metacyclics when compared with the equivalent wild-type stages. Increased resistance of the mutant metacyclic promastigotes correlated with the expression of gp63 gene 7 and was restored to the same levels as wild-type promastigotes by transfection with gp63 gene 1. Thus, expression of GP63 is clearly involved in conferring resistance to complement-mediated lysis. The L. major GP63 1-6 mutants were capable of infecting mouse macrophages and differentiating into amastigotes. Similar levels of infection and subsequent intracellular survival were observed when mouse macrophages were infected in vitro with wild type, GP63 1-6 mutants and mutants transfected with gp63 gene 1. The GP63 1-6 mutants were capable of lesion formation in BALB/c mice and, thus, gp63 genes 1-6 do not play a role in the survival of the parasite within mouse macrophages. The role of gp63 genes 1-6 in parasite development within the sandfly vector was studied. GP63 1-6 mutants grew normally in the blood-engorged midgut of both Phlebotomus argentipes and P. papatasi However

  19. Characterization of the RNA polymerase II and III complexes in Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Calvillo, Santiago; Saxena, Alka; Green, Amanda; Leland, Aaron; Myler, Peter J

    2007-04-01

    Transcription of protein-coding genes in Leishmania major and other trypanosomatids differs from that in most eukaryotes and bioinformatic analyses have failed to identify several components of the RNA polymerase (RNAP) complexes. To increase our knowledge about this basic cellular process, we used tandem affinity purification (TAP) to identify subunits of RNAP II and III. Mass spectrometric analysis of the complexes co-purified with TAP-tagged LmRPB2 (encoded by LmjF31.0160) identified seven RNAP II subunits: RPB1, RPB2, RPB3, RPB5, RPB7, RPB10 and RPB11. With the exception of RPB10 and RPB11, and the addition of RPB8, these were also identified using TAP-tagged constructs of one (encoded by LmjF34.0890) of the two LmRPB6 orthologues. The latter experiments also identified the RNAP III subunits RPC1 (C160), RPC2 (C128), RPC3 (C82), RPC4 (C53), RPC5 (C37), RPC6 (C34), RPC9 (C17), RPAC1 (AC40) and RPAC2 (AC19). Significantly, the complexes precipitated by TAP-tagged LmRPB6 did not contain any RNAP I-specific subunits, suggesting that, unlike in other eukaryotes, LmRPB6 is not shared by all three polymerases but is restricted to RNAP II and III, while the LmRPB6z (encoded by LmjF25.0140) isoform is limited to RNAP I. Similarly, we identified peptides from only one (encoded by LmjF18.0780) of the two RPB5 orthologues and one (LmjF13.1120) of the two RPB10 orthologues, suggesting that LmRPB5z (LmjF18.0790) and LmRPB10z (LmjF13.1120) are also restricted to RNAP I. In addition to these RNAP subunits, we also identified a number of other proteins that co-purified with the RNAP II and III complexes, including a potential transcription factor, several histones, an ATPase involved in chromosome segregation, an endonuclease, four helicases, RNA splicing factor PTSR-1, at least two RNA binding proteins and several proteins of unknown function. PMID:17275824

  20. Enzymatic Mechanism of Leishmania major Peroxidase and the Critical Role of Specific Ionic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chreifi, Georges; Hollingsworth, Scott A.; Li, Huiying; Tripathi, Sarvind; Arce, Anton P.; Magaña-Garcia, Hugo I.; Poulos, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania major peroxidase (LmP) is very similar to the well-known yeast cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP). Both enzymes catalyze the peroxidation of cytochrome c. Like CcP, LmP reacts with H2O2 to form Compound I, which consists of a ferryl heme and a Trp radical, FeIV= O;Trp•+. Cytochrome c (Cytc) reduces the Trp radical to give Compound II, FeIV= O;Trp, which is followed by an intramolecular electron transfer to give FeIII–OH;Trp•+, and in the last step, Cytc reduces the Trp radical. In this study, we have used steady-state and single-turnover kinetics to improve our understanding of the overall mechanism of LmP catalysis. While the activity of CcP greatly increases with ionic strength, the kcat for LmP remains relatively constant at all ionic strengths tested. Therefore, unlike CcP, where dissociation of oxidized Cytc is limiting at low ionic strengths, association/dissociation reactions are not limiting at any ionic strength in LmP. We conclude that in LmP, the intramolecular electron transfer reaction, FeIV= O;Trp to FeIII–OH;Trp•+, is limiting at all ionic strengths. Unlike CcP, LmP depends on key intermolecular ion pairs to form the electron transfer competent complex. Mutating these sites causes the initial rate of association to decrease by 2 orders of magnitude and a substantial decrease in kcat. The drop in kcat is due to a switch in the rate-limiting step of the mutants from intramolecular electron transfer to the rate of association in forming the LmP–LmCytc complex. These studies show that while LmP and CcP form very similar complexes and exhibit similar activities, they substantially differ in how their activity changes as a function of ionic strength. This difference is primarily due to the heavy reliance of LmP on highly specific intermolecular ion pairs, while CcP relies mainly on nonpolar interactions. PMID:25941976

  1. Characterization of integral membrane proteins of Leishmania major by Triton X-114 fractionation and analysis of vaccination effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Murray, P J; Spithill, T W; Handman, E

    1989-07-01

    The total integral membrane proteins of promastigotes of Leishmania major were extracted by using the Triton X-114 phase separation technique and were characterized by immunoprecipitation, Western blotting (immunoblotting), and lectin chromatography. Of the 40 or more proteins which partitioned into the detergent phase, only about 10 proteins could be surface radioiodinated on live promastigotes, suggesting their surface orientation. The abundance of the gp58-63 antigen varied markedly between two strains of L. major. Sera from patients with visceral leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania donovani chagasi recognized the gp58-63 complex and an additional Mr-42,000 polypeptide shared between L. major and L. donovani chagasi. A subpopulation of six surface proteins, including the abundant gp58-63 antigen and a group of proteins of Mr 81,000 to 105,000, were glycoproteins recognized by antiserum to wheat germ agglutinin- or concanavalin A-binding proteins. The membrane proteins of the LRC-L119 isolate of L. major could successfully vaccinate genetically susceptible mice, thus opening the way for a molecularly defined subunit vaccine composed of glycolipid and membrane protein antigens.

  2. Characterization of integral membrane proteins of Leishmania major by Triton X-114 fractionation and analysis of vaccination effects in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, P J; Spithill, T W; Handman, E

    1989-01-01

    The total integral membrane proteins of promastigotes of Leishmania major were extracted by using the Triton X-114 phase separation technique and were characterized by immunoprecipitation, Western blotting (immunoblotting), and lectin chromatography. Of the 40 or more proteins which partitioned into the detergent phase, only about 10 proteins could be surface radioiodinated on live promastigotes, suggesting their surface orientation. The abundance of the gp58-63 antigen varied markedly between two strains of L. major. Sera from patients with visceral leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania donovani chagasi recognized the gp58-63 complex and an additional Mr-42,000 polypeptide shared between L. major and L. donovani chagasi. A subpopulation of six surface proteins, including the abundant gp58-63 antigen and a group of proteins of Mr 81,000 to 105,000, were glycoproteins recognized by antiserum to wheat germ agglutinin- or concanavalin A-binding proteins. The membrane proteins of the LRC-L119 isolate of L. major could successfully vaccinate genetically susceptible mice, thus opening the way for a molecularly defined subunit vaccine composed of glycolipid and membrane protein antigens. Images PMID:2731987

  3. Identification of Potent Chemotypes Targeting Leishmania major Using a High-Throughput, Low-Stringency, Computationally Enhanced, Small Molecule Screen

    PubMed Central

    Sharlow, Elizabeth R.; Close, David; Shun, Tongying; Leimgruber, Stephanie; Reed, Robyn; Mustata, Gabriela; Wipf, Peter; Johnson, Jacob; O'Neil, Michael; Grögl, Max; Magill, Alan J.; Lazo, John S.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with clinical manifestations of leishmaniasis, including cutaneous leishmaniasis, have limited treatment options, and existing therapies frequently have significant untoward liabilities. Rapid expansion in the diversity of available cutaneous leishmanicidal chemotypes is the initial step in finding alternative efficacious treatments. To this end, we combined a low-stringency Leishmania major promastigote growth inhibition assay with a structural computational filtering algorithm. After a rigorous assay validation process, we interrogated ∼200,000 unique compounds for L. major promastigote growth inhibition. Using iterative computational filtering of the compounds exhibiting >50% inhibition, we identified 553 structural clusters and 640 compound singletons. Secondary confirmation assays yielded 93 compounds with EC50s ≤ 1 µM, with none of the identified chemotypes being structurally similar to known leishmanicidals and most having favorable in silico predicted bioavailability characteristics. The leishmanicidal activity of a representative subset of 15 chemotypes was confirmed in two independent assay formats, and L. major parasite specificity was demonstrated by assaying against a panel of human cell lines. Thirteen chemotypes inhibited the growth of a L. major axenic amastigote-like population. Murine in vivo efficacy studies using one of the new chemotypes document inhibition of footpad lesion development. These results authenticate that low stringency, large-scale compound screening combined with computational structure filtering can rapidly expand the chemotypes targeting in vitro and in vivo Leishmania growth and viability. PMID:19888337

  4. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells help protective immunity to Leishmania major infection despite suppressed T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Wânia F; Ribeiro-Gomes, Flávia L; Guillermo, Landi V Costilla; Vellozo, Natália S; Montalvão, Fabrício; Dosreis, George A; Lopes, Marcela F

    2011-12-01

    Th1/Th2 cytokines play a key role in immune responses to Leishmania major by controlling macrophage activation for NO production and parasite killing. MDSCs, including myeloid precursors and immature monocytes, produce NO and suppress T cell responses in tumor immunity. We hypothesized that NO-producing MDSCs could help immunity to L. major infection. Gr1(hi)(Ly6C(hi)) CD11b(hi) MDSCs elicited by L. major infection suppressed polyclonal and antigen-specific T cell proliferation. Moreover, L. major-induced MDSCs killed intracellular parasites in a NO-dependent manner and reduced parasite burden in vivo. By contrast, treatment with ATRA, which induces MDSCs to differentiate into macrophages, increased development of lesions, parasite load, and T cell proliferation in draining LNs. Altogether, these results indicate that NO-producing MDSCs help protective immunity to L. major infection, despite suppressed T cell proliferation.

  5. Study of Genetic Variation of Leishmania major Based on Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 (ITS1) in Chabahar, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Dabirzadeh, Mansour; Hashemi, Mohammad; Maroufi, Yahya

    2016-01-01

    Background Zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) is polymorphic disease that may show various clinical manifestations. Objectives This study investigates the determination of genetic variation within the species of Leishmania major isolates from new cases in Chabahar, a port city in Southeast Iran (situated at the Iran-Pakistan border). Migration in this region indicates that leishmaniasis is spreading gradually, and a new micro-habitat focus appears each year. Materials and Methods A variety of nucleic acid detection methods that target both DNA and RNA have been developed. The restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of amplified internal transcribed spacer 1 with polymerase chain reaction (ITS1-RFLP PCR) assay is a multipurpose tool for the diagnosis of Leishmania from clinical samples and for enabling the determination of the infecting Leishmania species. The goal of this study was the identification of species based on ITS1-RFLP in the ribosomal operon of L. major from clinically different forms of ZCL amplified by PCR, followed by the digestion of the PCR product with restriction enzymes. The profiles were observed and visualized in agarose gel under UV light. We used direct smears to identify the parasites. While taking the smear, samples were collected for culture or direct PCR. We used the PCR-RFLP assay of the ITS1 genes for direct identification of Leishmania species in 24 out of 33 suspected patients. PCR-ITS1 amplification was done on the 24 samples confirmed by culture via growth and parasitological methods. Results Of the 24 isolates, 21 had 350 bp bands (87.5%) and three had 450 bp bands (12.5%). After using the restriction enzyme, banding patterns including fragments of 210 and 140 bp for L. major were detected in 19 cases. Conclusions The L. major species causing ZCL in Chabahar have limited genetic variation. There seems to be little manifestation of diversity between these lesions as a new focus of disease, and new micro-habitats for

  6. Study of Genetic Variation of Leishmania major Based on Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 (ITS1) in Chabahar, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Dabirzadeh, Mansour; Hashemi, Mohammad; Maroufi, Yahya

    2016-01-01

    Background Zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) is polymorphic disease that may show various clinical manifestations. Objectives This study investigates the determination of genetic variation within the species of Leishmania major isolates from new cases in Chabahar, a port city in Southeast Iran (situated at the Iran-Pakistan border). Migration in this region indicates that leishmaniasis is spreading gradually, and a new micro-habitat focus appears each year. Materials and Methods A variety of nucleic acid detection methods that target both DNA and RNA have been developed. The restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of amplified internal transcribed spacer 1 with polymerase chain reaction (ITS1-RFLP PCR) assay is a multipurpose tool for the diagnosis of Leishmania from clinical samples and for enabling the determination of the infecting Leishmania species. The goal of this study was the identification of species based on ITS1-RFLP in the ribosomal operon of L. major from clinically different forms of ZCL amplified by PCR, followed by the digestion of the PCR product with restriction enzymes. The profiles were observed and visualized in agarose gel under UV light. We used direct smears to identify the parasites. While taking the smear, samples were collected for culture or direct PCR. We used the PCR-RFLP assay of the ITS1 genes for direct identification of Leishmania species in 24 out of 33 suspected patients. PCR-ITS1 amplification was done on the 24 samples confirmed by culture via growth and parasitological methods. Results Of the 24 isolates, 21 had 350 bp bands (87.5%) and three had 450 bp bands (12.5%). After using the restriction enzyme, banding patterns including fragments of 210 and 140 bp for L. major were detected in 19 cases. Conclusions The L. major species causing ZCL in Chabahar have limited genetic variation. There seems to be little manifestation of diversity between these lesions as a new focus of disease, and new micro-habitats for

  7. Immunization against leishmaniasis by PLGA nanospheres loaded with an experimental autoclaved Leishmania major (ALM) and Quillaja saponins.

    PubMed

    Tafaghodi, M; Eskandari, M; Kharazizadeh, M; Khamesipour, A; Jaafari, M R

    2010-12-01

    Immune responses against the Leishmania antigens are not sufficient to protect against a leishmania challenge. Therefore these antigens need to be potentiated by various adjuvants and delivery systems. In this study, Poly (d,l-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) nanospheres as antigen delivery system and Quillaja saponins (QS) as immunoadjuvant have been used to enhance the immune response against autoclaved Leishmania major (ALM). PLGA nanospheres were prepared by a double-emulsion (W/O/W) technique. Particulate characteristics were studied by scanning electron microscopy and particle size analysis. Mean diameter for nanospheres loaded with ALM+QS was 294 ± 106 nm. BALB/c mice were immunized three times in 3-weeks intervals using ALM plus QS loaded nanospheres [(ALM+QS)PLGA], ALM encapsulated with PLGA nanospheres [(ALM)PLGA], (ALM)PLGA + QS, ALM + QS, ALM alone or PBS. The intensity of infection induced by L. major challenge was assessed by measuring size of footpad swelling. The strongest protection, showed by significantly (P < 0.05) smaller footpad, were observed in mice immunized with (ALM)PLGA. The (ALM+QS)PLGA group showed the least protection and highest swelling, while the (ALM)PLGA+QS, ALM+QS and ALM showed an intermediate protection with no significant difference. The mice immunized with ALM and ALM+QS showed the highest IgG2a/IgG1 ratio (P < 0.01), followed by (ALM)PLGA+QS. The highest IFN-γ and lowest IL-4 production was seen in (ALM)PLGA+QS, ALM+QS groups. The highest parasite burden was observed in (ALM)PLGA+QS and (ALM+QS)PLGA groups. It is concluded that PLGA nanospheres as a vaccine delivery system could increase the protective immune responses, but QS adjuvant has a reverse effect on protective immune responses and the least protective responses were seen in the presence of this adjuvant.

  8. The Effect of Garlic Extract on Expression of INFγ And Inos Genes in Macrophages Infected with Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Gharavi, MJ; Nobakht, M; Khademvatan, SH; Bandani, E; Bakhshayesh, M; Roozbehani, M

    2011-01-01

    Background The study was aimed to show the effect of molecular mechanism of Aqueous Garlic Extract (AGE) on expression of IFNγ and iNOS genes in Leishmania major. Methods Leishmania major promastigotes (MRHO/IR/75/ER) were added to the in-vitro cultured J774 cell line, the cells were incubated for 72 hours. Various concentrations of garlic extract (9.25, 18.5, 37, 74, 148 mg/ml) were added to the infected cells. MTT assay was applied for cellular proliferation. After 72 hours of incubation, supernatants were collected and total RNA was extracted from the infected cells. The express of IFNγ and iNOS genes were studied by RT-PCR method. Results The colorimetric MTT assay after 3 days of incubation showed cytotoxic effect of garlic extract with an IC50 of 37 mg/ml. In addition, IFNγ and iNOS genes expression by RT-PCR indicated that garlic extract lead to over expression of these genes in J774 cell line infected with L. major. Conclusion Garlic extract exerts cytotoxic effect on infected J774 cell line. In addition, the hypothesis that garlic can improve cellular immunity with raising the expression of IFNγ and of iNOS genes confirmed. PMID:22347300

  9. Cell homeostasis in a Leishmania major mutant overexpressing the spliced leader RNA is maintained by an increased proteolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Juliano S; Ferreira, Tiago R; Defina, Tânia P A; Dossin, Fernando de M; Beattie, Kenneth A; Lamont, Douglas J; Cloutier, Serge; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Schenkman, Sergio; Cruz, Angela K

    2010-10-01

    Although several stage-specific genes have been identified in Leishmania, the molecular mechanisms governing developmental gene regulation in this organism are still not well understood. We have previously reported an attenuation of virulence in Leishmania major and L. braziliensis carrying extra-copies of the spliced leader RNA gene. Here, we surveyed the major differences in proteome and transcript expression profiles between the spliced leader RNA overexpressor and control lines using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and differential display reverse transcription PCR, respectively. Thirty-nine genes related to stress response, cytoskeleton, proteolysis, cell cycle control and proliferation, energy generation, gene transcription, RNA processing and post-transcriptional regulation have abnormal patterns of expression in the spliced leader RNA overexpressor line. The evaluation of proteolytic pathways in the mutant revealed a selective increase of cysteine protease activity and an exacerbated ubiquitin-labeled protein population. Polysome profile analysis and measurement of cellular protein aggregates showed that protein translation in the spliced leader RNA overexpressor line is increased when compared to the control line. We found that L. major promastigotes maintain homeostasis in culture when challenged with a metabolic imbalance generated by spliced leader RNA surplus through modulation of intracellular proteolysis. However, this might interfere with a fine-tuned gene expression control necessary for the amastigote multiplication in the mammalian host.

  10. Cathepsin B-Deficient Mice Resolve Leishmania major Inflammation Faster in a T Cell-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Mériaux, Véronique; Khan, Erin M.; Borde, Chloé; Ciulean, Ioana S.; Fitting, Catherine; Manoury, Bénédicte; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc; Doyen, Noëlle

    2016-01-01

    A critical role for intracellular TLR9 has been described in recognition and host resistance to Leishmania parasites. As TLR9 requires endolysosomal proteolytic cleavage to achieve signaling functionality, we investigated the contribution of different proteases like asparagine endopeptidase (AEP) or cysteine protease cathepsins B (CatB), L (CatL) and S (CatS) to host resistance during Leishmania major (L. major) infection in C57BL/6 (WT) mice and whether they would impact on TLR9 signaling. Unlike TLR9-/-, which are more susceptible to infection, AEP-/-, CatL-/- and CatS-/- mice are as resistant to L. major infection as WT mice, suggesting that these proteases are not individually involved in TLR9 processing. Interestingly, we observed that CatB-/- mice resolve L. major lesions significantly faster than WT mice, however we did not find evidence for an involvement of CatB on either TLR9-dependent or independent cytokine responses of dendritic cells and macrophages or in the innate immune response to L. major infection. We also found no difference in antigen presenting capacity. We observed a more precocious development of T helper 1 responses accompanied by a faster decline of inflammation, resulting in resolution of footpad inflammation, reduced IFNγ levels and decreased parasite burden. Adoptive transfer experiments into alymphoid RAG2-/-γc-/- mice allowed us to identify CD3+ T cells as responsible for the immune advantage of CatB-/- mice towards L. major. In vitro data confirmed the T cell intrinsic differences between CatB-/- mice and WT. Our study brings forth a yet unappreciated role for CatB in regulating T cell responses during L. major infection. PMID:27182703

  11. T cell and non-T cell compartments can independently determine resistance to Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    In experimental murine cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania major (Lm), the cellular determinants governing development of protective or exacerbative T cells are not well understood. We, therefore, attempted to determine the influence of T cell and non-T cell compartments on disease outcome. To this end, T cell chimeric mice were constructed using adult thymectomized lethally irradiated, bone marrow-reconstituted (ATXBM) animals of genetically resistant, C57BL/6, or susceptible, BALB/c, backgrounds. These hosts were engrafted with naive T cell populations from H-2-congenic susceptible, BALB.B6-H-2b, or resistant, C57BL/6.C-H-2d, animals, respectively. Chimeric mice were then infected with Lm, and disease outcome was monitored. BALB/c T cell chimeric mice, BALB/c ATXBM hosts given naive C57BL/6.C-H-2d T cells, resolved their infections as indicated by reductions in both lesion size and parasite numbers. Furthermore, the mice developed typical Th1 (interferon[IFN]-gamma hiinterleukin[IL]-4lo) cytokine patterns. In contrast, both sham chimeric, BALB/c ATXBM hosts given naive BALB/c T cells, and control irradiated euthymic mice succumbed to infection, producing Th2 profiles (IFN-gamma loIL-4hiIL-10hi). C57BL/6 T cell chimeras, C57BL/6 ATXBM hosts given naive BALB.B6-H-2b T cells, resolved their infections as did C57BL/6 sham chimeras and euthymic controls. Interestingly, whereas C57BL/6 control animals produced Th1 cytokines, chimeric animals progressed from Th0 (IFN-gamma hiIL-4hiIL- 10hi) to Th2 (IFN-gamma loIL-4hiIL-10hi) cytokine profiles as cure ensued. Both reconstitution and chimeric status of all mice were confirmed by flow cytometry. In addition, T cell receptor V beta usage of Lm-specific blasts was determined. In all cases, V beta use was multiclonal, involving primarily V beta 2, 4, 6, 8.1, 8.2, 8.3, 10, and 14, with relative V beta frequencies differing between H-2b and H-2d animals. Most importantly, however, these differences did not segregate

  12. The Leishmania infantum Acidic Ribosomal Protein P0 Administered as a DNA Vaccine Confers Protective Immunity to Leishmania major Infection in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Iborra, Salvador; Soto, Manuel; Carrión, Javier; Nieto, Ana; Fernández, Edgar; Alonso, Carlos; Requena, Jose M.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we examined the immunogenic properties of the Leishmania infantum acidic ribosomal protein P0 (LiP0) in the BALB/c mouse model. The humoral and cellular responses induced by the administration of the LiP0 antigen, either as soluble recombinant LiP0 (rLiP0) or as a plasmid DNA formulation (pcDNA3-LiP0), were determined. Also, the immunological response associated with a prime-boost strategy, consisting of immunization with pcDNA3-LiP0 followed by a boost with rLiP0, was assayed. Immunization with rLiP0 induced a predominant Th2-like humoral response, but no anti-LiP0 antibodies were induced after immunization with pcDNA3-LiP0, whereas a strong humoral response consisting of a mixed immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a)-IgG1 isotype profile was induced in mice immunized with the prime-boost regime. For all three immunization protocols, rLiP0-stimulated production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in both splenocytes and lymph node cells from immunized mice was observed. However, it was only when mice were immunized with pcDNA3-LiP0 that noticeable protection against L. major infection was achieved, as determined by both lesion development and parasite burden. Immunization of mice with LiP0-DNA primes both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, which, with the L. major challenge, were boosted to produce significant levels of IL-12-dependent, antigen-specific IFN-γ. Taken together, these data indicate that genetic vaccination with LiP0 induces protective immunological effector mechanisms, yet the immunological response elicited by LiP0 is not sufficient to keep the infection from progressing. PMID:14573678

  13. Structure-based discovery of the first non-covalent inhibitors of Leishmania major tryparedoxin peroxidase by high throughput docking

    PubMed Central

    Brindisi, Margherita; Brogi, Simone; Relitti, Nicola; Vallone, Alessandra; Butini, Stefania; Gemma, Sandra; Novellino, Ettore; Colotti, Gianni; Angiulli, Gabriella; Di Chiaro, Francesco; Fiorillo, Annarita; Ilari, Andrea; Campiani, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a neglected vector-born disease caused by a protozoan of the genus Leishmania and affecting more than 1.300.000 people worldwide. The couple tryparedoxin/tryparedoxin peroxidase is essential for parasite survival in the host since it neutralizes the hydrogen peroxide produced by macrophages during the infection. Herein we report a study aimed at discovering the first class of compounds able to non-covalently inhibit tryparedoxin peroxidase. We have solved the high-resolution structure of Tryparedoxin peroxidase I from Leishmania major (LmTXNPx) in the reduced state and in fully folded conformation. A first series of compounds able to inhibit LmTXNPx was identified by means of the high throughput docking technique. The inhibitory activity of these compounds was validated by a Horseradish peroxidase-based enzymatic assay and their affinity for LmTXNPx calculated by surface plasmon resonance experiments. On the basis of these results, the analysis of the enzyme-inhibitor docked models allowed us to rationally design and synthesize a series of N,N-disubstituted 3-aminomethyl quinolones. These compounds showed an inhibitory potency against LmTXNPx in the micromolar range. Among them, compound 12 represents the first non-covalent LmTXNPx inhibitor reported to date and could pave the way to the discovery of a new class of drugs against leishmaniasis. PMID:25951439

  14. Prediction of T Cell Epitopes from Leishmania major Potentially Excreted/Secreted Proteins Inducing Granzyme B Production.

    PubMed

    Naouar, Ikbel; Boussoffara, Thouraya; Chenik, Mehdi; Gritli, Sami; Ben Ahmed, Melika; Belhadj Hmida, Nabil; Bahi-Jaber, Narges; Bardi, Rafika; Gorgi, Yousr; Ben Salah, Afif; Louzir, Hechmi

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania-specific cytotoxic T cell response is part of the acquired immune response developed against the parasite and contributes to resistance to reinfection. Herein, we have used an immune-informatic approach for the identification, among Leishmania major potentially excreted/secreted proteins previously described, those generating peptides that could be targeted by the cytotoxic immune response. Seventy-eight nonameric peptides that are predicted to be loaded by HLA-A*0201 molecule were generated and their binding capacity to HLA-A2 was evaluated. These peptides were grouped into 20 pools and their immunogenicity was evaluated by in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HLA-A2+-immune individuals with a history of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis. Six peptides were identified according to their ability to elicit production of granzyme B. Furthermore, among these peptides 3 showed highest affinity to HLA-A*0201, one derived from an elongation factor 1-alpha and two from an unknown protein. These proteins could constitute potential vaccine candidates against leishmaniasis. PMID:26771180

  15. Base J represses genes at the end of polycistronic gene clusters in Leishmania major by promoting RNAP II termination.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, David L; Hofmeister, Brigitte T; Cliffe, Laura; Siegel, T Nicolai; Anderson, Britta A; Beverley, Stephen M; Schmitz, Robert J; Sabatini, Robert

    2016-08-01

    The genomes of kinetoplastids are organized into polycistronic gene clusters that are flanked by the modified DNA base J. Previous work has established a role of base J in promoting RNA polymerase II termination in Leishmania spp. where the loss of J leads to termination defects and transcription into adjacent gene clusters. It remains unclear whether these termination defects affect gene expression and whether read through transcription is detrimental to cell growth, thus explaining the essential nature of J. We now demonstrate that reduction of base J at specific sites within polycistronic gene clusters in L. major leads to read through transcription and increased expression of downstream genes in the cluster. Interestingly, subsequent transcription into the opposing polycistronic gene cluster does not lead to downregulation of sense mRNAs. These findings indicate a conserved role for J regulating transcription termination and expression of genes within polycistronic gene clusters in trypanosomatids. In contrast to the expectations often attributed to opposing transcription, the essential nature of J in Leishmania spp. is related to its role in gene repression rather than preventing transcriptional interference resulting from read through and dual strand transcription.

  16. Base J represses genes at the end of polycistronic gene clusters in Leishmania major by promoting RNAP II termination

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, David L.; Hofmeister, Brigitte T.; Cliffe, Laura; Siegel, T. Nicolai; Anderson, Britta A.; Beverley, Stephen M.; Schmitz, Robert J.; Sabatini, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Summary The genomes of kinetoplastids are organized into polycistronic gene clusters that are flanked by the modified DNA base J. Previous work has established a role of base J in promoting RNA polymerase II termination in Leishmania spp. where the loss of J leads to termination defects and transcription into adjacent gene clusters. It remains unclear whether these termination defects affect gene expression and whether read through transcription is detrimental to cell growth, thus explaining the essential nature of J. We now demonstrate that reduction of base J at specific sites within polycistronic gene clusters in L. major leads to read through transcription and increased expression of downstream genes in the cluster. Interestingly, subsequent transcription into the opposing polycistronic gene cluster does not lead to downregulation of sense mRNAs. These findings indicate a conserved role for J regulating transcription termination and expression of genes within polycistronic gene clusters in trypanosomatids. In contrast to the expectations often attributed to opposing transcription, the essential nature of J in Leishmania spp. is related to its role in gene repression rather than preventing transcriptional interference resulting from read through and dual strand transcription. PMID:27125778

  17. Prediction of T Cell Epitopes from Leishmania major Potentially Excreted/Secreted Proteins Inducing Granzyme B Production

    PubMed Central

    Naouar, Ikbel; Boussoffara, Thouraya; Chenik, Mehdi; Gritli, Sami; Ben Ahmed, Melika; Belhadj Hmida, Nabil; Bahi-Jaber, Narges; Bardi, Rafika; Gorgi, Yousr; Ben Salah, Afif; Louzir, Hechmi

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania-specific cytotoxic T cell response is part of the acquired immune response developed against the parasite and contributes to resistance to reinfection. Herein, we have used an immune-informatic approach for the identification, among Leishmania major potentially excreted/secreted proteins previously described, those generating peptides that could be targeted by the cytotoxic immune response. Seventy-eight nonameric peptides that are predicted to be loaded by HLA-A*0201 molecule were generated and their binding capacity to HLA-A2 was evaluated. These peptides were grouped into 20 pools and their immunogenicity was evaluated by in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HLA-A2+-immune individuals with a history of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis. Six peptides were identified according to their ability to elicit production of granzyme B. Furthermore, among these peptides 3 showed highest affinity to HLA-A*0201, one derived from an elongation factor 1-alpha and two from an unknown protein. These proteins could constitute potential vaccine candidates against leishmaniasis. PMID:26771180

  18. Antileishmanial Activity of Compounds Derived from the Medicines for Malaria Venture Open Access Box against Intracellular Leishmania major Amastigotes

    PubMed Central

    Khraiwesh, Mozna; Leed, Susan; Roncal, Norma; Johnson, Jacob; Sciotti, Richard; Smith, Philip; Read, Lisa; Paris, Robert; Hudson, Thomas; Hickman, Mark; Grogl, Max

    2016-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a complex tropical disease caused by kinetoplastid parasitic protozoa of the genus Leishmania and is transmitted by the sand fly insect vector. Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is the most common form of this disease, and CL infections often result in serious skin lesions and scars. CL remains a public health problem in many endemic countries worldwide because of the absence of effective, safe, and cost-effective drugs for treatment. One of the strategies we chose to use to find novel chemical entities worthy of further development as antileishmanials involved screening synthetic and natural products libraries. In our study, we developed a Leishmania major intracellular amastigote assay that uses the activity of luciferase as a measure of parasite proliferation and used this assay to screen a collection of 400 compounds obtained from Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV) for their antileishmanial activity. Our results showed that 14 compounds identified by MMV as antimalarial drugs have antileishmanial activity and can potentially be optimized for CL drug development. PMID:26503273

  19. Cathepsin B in Antigen-Presenting Cells Controls Mediators of the Th1 Immune Response during Leishmania major Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Leal, Iris J.; Röger, Bianca; Schwarz, Angela; Schirmeister, Tanja; Reinheckel, Thomas; Lutz, Manfred B.; Moll, Heidrun

    2014-01-01

    Resistance and susceptibility to Leishmania major infection in the murine model is determined by the capacity of the host to mount either a protective Th1 response or a Th2 response associated with disease progression. Previous reports involving the use of cysteine cathepsin inhibitors indicated that cathepsins B (Ctsb) and L (Ctsl) play important roles in Th1/Th2 polarization during L. major infection in both susceptible and resistant mouse strains. Although it was hypothesized that these effects are a consequence of differential patterns of antigen processing, the mechanisms underlying these differences were not further investigated. Given the pivotal roles that dendritic cells and macrophages play during Leishmania infection, we generated bone-marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC) and macrophages (BMM) from Ctsb−/− and Ctsl−/− mice, and studied the effects of Ctsb and Ctsl deficiency on the survival of L. major in infected cells. Furthermore, the signals used by dendritic cells to instruct Th cell polarization were addressed: the expression of MHC class II and co-stimulatory molecules, and cytokine production. We found that Ctsb−/− BMDC express higher levels of MHC class II molecules than wild-type (WT) and Ctsl−/− BMDC, while there were no significant differences in the expression of co-stimulatory molecules between cathepsin-deficient and WT cells. Moreover, both BMDC and BMM from Ctsb−/− mice significantly up-regulated the levels of interleukin 12 (IL-12) expression, a key Th1-inducing cytokine. These findings indicate that Ctsb−/− BMDC display more pro-Th1 properties than their WT and Ctsl−/− counterparts, and therefore suggest that Ctsb down-regulates the Th1 response to L. major. Moreover, they propose a novel role for Ctsb as a regulator of cytokine expression. PMID:25255101

  20. The Selenocysteine tRNA Gene in Leishmania major Is Transcribed by both RNA Polymerase II and RNA Polymerase III

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Mejía, Norma E.; Florencio-Martínez, Luis E.; Moreno-Campos, Rodrigo; Vizuet-de-Rueda, Juan C.; Cevallos, Ana M.; Hernández-Rivas, Rosaura; Manning-Cela, Rebeca

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic tRNAs, transcribed by RNA polymerase III (Pol III), contain boxes A and B as internal promoter elements. One exception is the selenocysteine (Sec) tRNA (tRNA-Sec), whose transcription is directed by an internal box B and three extragenic sequences in vertebrates. Here we report on the transcriptional analysis of the tRNA-Sec gene in the protozoan parasite Leishmania major. This organism has unusual mechanisms of gene expression, including Pol II polycistronic transcription and maturation of mRNAs by trans splicing, a process that attaches a 39-nucleotide miniexon to the 5′ end of all the mRNAs. In L. major, tRNA-Sec is encoded by a single gene inserted into a Pol II polycistronic unit, in contrast to most tRNAs, which are clustered at the boundaries of polycistronic units. 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends and reverse transcription-PCR experiments showed that some tRNA-Sec transcripts contain the miniexon at the 5′ end and a poly(A) tail at the 3′ end, indicating that the tRNA-Sec gene is polycistronically transcribed by Pol II and processed by trans splicing and polyadenylation, as was recently reported for the tRNA-Sec genes in the related parasite Trypanosoma brucei. However, nuclear run-on assays with RNA polymerase inhibitors and with cells that were previously UV irradiated showed that the tRNA-Sec gene in L. major is also transcribed by Pol III. Thus, our results indicate that RNA polymerase specificity in Leishmania is not absolute in vivo, as has recently been found in other eukaryotes. PMID:25548151

  1. Structure of Leishmania major Methionyl-tRNA Synthetase in Complex with Intermediate Products Methionyladenylate and Pyrophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Eric T.; Kim, Jessica E.; Zucker, Frank H.; Kelley, Angela; Mueller, Natascha; Napuli, Alberto J.; Verlinde, Christophe L.M.J.; Fan, Erkang; Buckner, Frederick S.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Merritt, Ethan A.; Hol, Wim G.J.

    2011-01-01

    Leishmania parasites cause two million new cases of leishmaniasis each year with several hundreds of millions people at risk. Due to the paucity and shortcomings of available drugs, we have undertaken the crystal structure determination of a key enzyme from Leishmania major in hopes of creating a platform for the rational design of new therapeutics. Crystals of the catalytic core of methionyl-tRNA synthetase from L. major (LmMetRS) were obtained with the substrates MgATP and methionine present in the crystallization medium. These crystals yielded the 2.0 Å resolution structure of LmMetRS in complex with two products, methionyladenylate and pyrophosphate, along with a Mg2+ ion that bridges them. This is the first class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS) structure with pyrophosphate bound. The residues of the class I aaRS signature sequence motifs, KISKS and HIGH, make numerous contacts with the pyrophosphate. Substantial differences between the LmMetRS structure and previously reported complexes of E. coli MetRS (EcMetRS) with analogs of the methionyladenylate intermediate product are observed, even though one of these analogs only differs by one atom from the intermediate. The source of these structural differences is attributed to the presence of the product pyrophosphate in LmMetRS. Analysis of the LmMetRS structure in light of the Aquifex aeolicus MetRS-tRNAMet complex shows that major rearrangements of multiple structural elements of enzyme and/or tRNA are required to allow the CCA acceptor triplet to reach the methionyladenylate intermediate in the active site. Comparison with sequences of human cytosolic and mitochondrial MetRS reveals interesting differences near the ATP- and methionine-binding regions of LmMetRS, suggesting that it should be possible to obtain compounds that selectively inhibit the parasite enzyme. PMID:21144880

  2. Protective vaccination with promastigote surface antigen 2 from Leishmania major is mediated by a TH1 type of immune response.

    PubMed

    Handman, E; Symons, F M; Baldwin, T M; Curtis, J M; Scheerlinck, J P

    1995-11-01

    Leishmania major promastigote surface antigen-2 complex (PSA-2) comprises a family of three similar but distinct polypeptides. The three PSA-2 polypeptides were purified from cultured promastigotes by a combination of detergent phase separation and monoclonal antibody affinity chromatography. Intraperitoneal vaccination of C3H/He mice with PSA-2 with Corynebacterium parvum as an adjuvant resulted in complete protection from lesion development after challenge infection with virulent L. major. Significant protection was also obtained in the genetically susceptible BALB/cH-2k and BALB/c mice. One of the PSA-2 genes was cloned and expressed in both Escherichia coli and Leishmania mexicana promastigotes. Vaccination with the recombinant PSA-2 purified from E. coli did not confer protection, in contrast to the L. mexicana-derived recombinant PSA-2, which provided excellent protection. CD4+ T cells isolated from the spleens of vaccinated mice produced large amounts of gamma interferon but no detectable interleukin 4 upon stimulation with PSA-2 in vitro. Limiting dilution analysis showed a marked increase in the precursor frequency of PSA-2-specific gamma interferon-secreting CD4+ T cells. No substantial change in precursor frequency was observed for interleukin 4-secreting T cells in the vaccinated mice. A CD4+ PSA-2 specific T-cell line generated from splenocytes of a vaccinated mouse produces a cytokine pattern consistent with a TH1 phenotype. Intravenous injection of this line into naive mice reduced significantly the parasite burden upon challenge infection. Taken together, the data suggest that vaccination with PSA-2 induces a TH1 type of immune response which protects mice from L. major infection. Moreover, a single recombinant PSA-2 polypeptide derived from a genomic clone can also vaccinate, provided that the structural form of the antigen is near native. PMID:7591056

  3. The Effect of Aqueous Garlic Extract on Interleukin-12 and 10 Levels in Leishmania major (MRHO/IR/75/ER) Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gharavi, MJ; Nobakht, M; Khademvatan, S; Fani, F; Bakhshayesh, M; Roozbehani, M

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to investigate the immunomodulation effects of aqueous garlic extract (AGE) in the cultured macrophages infected by Leishmania major. Methods: After J774 macrophages proliferation in RPMI1640 and incubation with Leishmania for 72 hours, AGE was added in doses of 9.25, 18.5, 37, 74 and 148 mg/ml for 18, 24 and 48 hours and cell culture supernatants were harvested. The Leishmania infected J774 cells to assess the cell viability was examined using trypan blue and methylthiazol tetrazolium assay (MTT). An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed on cell culture supernatants for measurement of interleukin IL-10 and IL-12. Results: Dose of 37 mg/ml for 48 hours of garlic extract was the most potent dose for activation of amastigotes infected macrophages. In addition, AGE increased the level of IL-12 in Leishmania infected cell lines significantly. Conclusions: AGE treated cell is effective against parasitic pathogens, and AGE induced IL-12 differentially affected the immune response to invading Leishmania parasites. PMID:23113109

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of selenophosphate synthetases from Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Faim, Lívia Maria; Rosa e Silva, Ivan; Bertacine Dias, Marcio Vinicius; D'Muniz Pereira, Humberto; Brandao-Neto, José; Alves da Silva, Marco Túlio; Thiemann, Otavio Henrique

    2013-08-01

    Selenophosphate synthetase (SPS) plays an indispensable role in selenium metabolism, being responsible for catalyzing the activation of selenide with adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) to generate selenophosphate, the essential selenium donor for selenocysteine synthesis. Recombinant full-length Leishmania major SPS (LmSPS2) was recalcitrant to crystallization. Therefore, a limited proteolysis technique was used and a stable N-terminal truncated construct (ΔN-LmSPS2) yielded suitable crystals. The Trypanosoma brucei SPS orthologue (TbSPS2) was crystallized by the microbatch method using paraffin oil. X-ray diffraction data were collected to resolutions of 1.9 Å for ΔN-LmSPS2 and 3.4 Å for TbSPS2.

  5. Development of an Ex Vivo Lymph Node Explant Model for Identification of Novel Molecules Active against Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Peniche, Alex G.; Osorio, Yaneth; Renslo, Adam R.; Frantz, Doug E.; Melby, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne zoonotic infection affecting people in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Current treatments for cutaneous leishmaniasis are difficult to administer, toxic, expensive, and limited in effectiveness and availability. Here we describe the development and application of a medium-throughput screening approach to identify new drug candidates for cutaneous leishmaniasis using an ex vivo lymph node explant culture (ELEC) derived from the draining lymph nodes of Leishmania major-infected mice. The ELEC supported intracellular amastigote proliferation and contained lymph node cell populations (and their secreted products) that enabled the testing of compounds within a system that mimicked the immunopathological environment of the infected host, which is known to profoundly influence parasite replication, killing, and drug efficacy. The activity of known antileishmanial drugs in the ELEC system was similar to the activity measured in peritoneal macrophages infected in vitro with L. major. Using the ELEC system, we screened a collection of 334 compounds, some of which we had demonstrated previously to be active against L. donovani, and identified 119 hits, 85% of which were confirmed to be active by determination of the 50% effective concentration (EC50). We found 24 compounds (7%) that had an in vitro therapeutic index (IVTI; 50% cytotoxic/effective concentration [CC50]/EC50) > 100; 19 of the compounds had an EC50 below 1 μM. According to PubChem searchs, 17 of those compounds had not previously been reported to be active against Leishmania. We expect that this novel method will help to accelerate discovery of new drug candidates for treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:24126577

  6. Immunization against leishmaniasis by PLGA nanospheres encapsulated with autoclaved Leishmania major (ALM) and CpG-ODN.

    PubMed

    Tafaghodi, Mohsen; Khamesipour, Ali; Jaafari, Mahmoud R

    2011-05-01

    Various adjuvants and delivery systems have been evaluated for increasing the protective immune responses against leishmaniasis and mostly have been shown not to be effective enough. In this study, poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanospheres as an antigen delivery system and CpG-ODN as an immunoadjuvant have been used for the first time to enhance the immune response against autoclaved Leishmania major (ALM). PLGA nanospheres were prepared by a double-emulsion (W/O/W) technique. Particulate characteristics were studied by scanning electron microscopy and particle size analysis. Mean diameter of ALM + CpG-ODN-loaded nanospheres was 300 ± 128 nm. BALB/c mice were immunized three times in 3-week intervals using ALM plus CpG-ODN-loaded nanospheres [(ALM + CpG-ODN)(PLGA)], ALM encapsulated PLGA nanospheres [(ALM)(PLGA)], (ALM)(PLGA) + CpG, ALM + CpG, ALM alone, or phosphate buffer solution (PBS). The intensity of infection induced by L. major challenge was assessed by measuring size of footpad swelling. The strongest protection, showed by significantly (P<0.05) smaller footpad, was observed in mice immunized with (ALM + CpG-ODN)(PLGA). The (ALM)(PLGA), (ALM)(PLGA) + CpG, and ALM + CpG were also showed a significantly (P<0.05) smaller footpad swelling compared to the groups received either PBS or ALM alone. The mice immunized with (ALM + CpG-ODN)(PLGA), (ALM)(PLGA) + CpG, and ALM + CpG showed the highest IgG2a/IgG1 ratio, interferon-γ production, and lowest interleukin-4 production compared to the other groups. It is concluded that when both PLGA nanospheres and CpG-ODN adjuvants were used simultaneously, it induce stronger immune response and enhance protection rate against Leishmania infection.

  7. Inhibition of caspase-8 activity promotes protective Th1- and Th2-mediated immunity to Leishmania major infection.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Manfro, Wânia F; Ribeiro-Gomes, Flávia L; Filardy, Alessandra Almeida; Vellozo, Natália S; Guillermo, Landi V C; Silva, Elisabeth M; Siegel, Richard M; Dosreis, George A; Lopes, Marcela F

    2014-02-01

    We investigated how apoptosis pathways mediated by death receptors and caspase-8 affect cytokine responses and immunity to Leishmania major parasites. Splenic CD4 T cells undergo activation-induced apoptosis, and blockade of FasL-Fas interaction increased IFN-γ and IL-4 cytokine responses to L. major antigens. To block death receptor-induced death, we used mice expressing a T cell-restricted transgene for vFLIP. Inhibition of caspase-8 activation in vFLIP mice enhanced Th1 and Th2 cytokine responses to L. major infection, even in the Th1-prone B6 background. We also observed increased NO production by splenocytes from vFLIP mice upon T cell activation. Despite an exacerbated Th2 response, vFLIP mice controlled better L. major infection, with reduced lesions and lower parasite loads compared with WT mice. Moreover, injection of anti-IL-4 mAb in infected vFLIP mice disrupted control of parasite infection. Therefore, blockade of caspase-8 activity in T cells improves immunity to L. major infection by promoting increased Th1 and Th2 responses.

  8. Inhibition of caspase-8 activity promotes protective Th1- and Th2-mediated immunity to Leishmania major infection

    PubMed Central

    Pereira-Manfro, Wânia F.; Ribeiro-Gomes, Flávia L.; Filardy, Alessandra Almeida; Vellozo, Natália S.; Guillermo, Landi V. C.; Silva, Elisabeth M.; Siegel, Richard M.; DosReis, George A.; Lopes, Marcela F.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated how apoptosis pathways mediated by death receptors and caspase-8 affect cytokine responses and immunity to Leishmania major parasites. Splenic CD4 T cells undergo activation-induced apoptosis, and blockade of FasL-Fas interaction increased IFN-γ and IL-4 cytokine responses to L. major antigens. To block death receptor-induced death, we used mice expressing a T cell-restricted transgene for vFLIP. Inhibition of caspase-8 activation in vFLIP mice enhanced Th1 and Th2 cytokine responses to L. major infection, even in the Th1-prone B6 background. We also observed increased NO production by splenocytes from vFLIP mice upon T cell activation. Despite an exacerbated Th2 response, vFLIP mice controlled better L. major infection, with reduced lesions and lower parasite loads compared with WT mice. Moreover, injection of anti-IL-4 mAb in infected vFLIP mice disrupted control of parasite infection. Therefore, blockade of caspase-8 activity in T cells improves immunity to L. major infection by promoting increased Th1 and Th2 responses. PMID:24072877

  9. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic characterization of LmACR2, an arsenate/antimonate reductase from Leishmania major

    SciTech Connect

    Bisacchi, Davide; Zhou, Yao; Rosen, Barry P.; Mukhopadhyay, Rita; Bordo, Domenico

    2006-10-01

    LmACR2 from L. major is the first rhodanese-like enzyme directly involved in the reduction of arsenate and antimonate to be crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 1.99 Å resolution using synchrotron X-rays. Arsenic is present in the biosphere owing either to the presence of pesticides and herbicides used in agricultural and industrial activities or to leaching from geological formations. The health effects of prolonged exposure to arsenic can be devastating and may lead to various forms of cancer. Antimony(V), which is chemically very similar to arsenic, is used instead in the treatment of leishmaniasis, an infection caused by the protozoan parasite Leishmania sp.; the reduction of pentavalent antimony contained in the drug Pentostam to the active trivalent form arises from the presence in the Leishmania genome of a gene, LmACR2, coding for the protein LmACR2 (14.5 kDa, 127 amino acids) that displays weak but significant sequence similarity to the catalytic domain of Cdc25 phosphatase and to rhodanese enzymes. For structural characterization, LmACR2 was overexpressed, purified to homogeneity and crystallized in a trigonal space group (P321 or P3{sub 1}21/P3{sub 2}21). The protein crystallized in two distinct trigonal crystal forms, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 111.0, c = 86.1 Å and a = b = 111.0, c = 175.6 Å, respectively. At a synchrotron beamline, the diffraction pattern extended to a resolution limit of 1.99 Å.

  10. Leishmanin skin test lymphoproliferative responses and cytokine production after symptomatic or asymptomatic Leishmania major infection in Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    SASSI, A; LOUZIR, H; BEN SALAH, A; MOKNI, M; BEN OSMAN, A; DELLAGI, K

    1999-01-01

    Resistance to Leishmania parasite infection requires the development of a cellular immune response that activates macrophage leishmanicidal activity. In this study we have investigated the lymphoproliferative responses and in vitro cytokine production of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from individuals living in an endemic area for L. major infection in Tunisia. The results were compared with the DTH reaction of the leishmanin skin test (LST). Sixty-seven individuals were included in the study: 22 persons (age range 9–60 years) who developed, 2 years before the present study, a parasitologically confirmed localized cutaneous leishmaniasis (LCL) that healed spontaneously, and 45 individuals (age range 18–20 years) born and living in the same area, with no previous history of LCL. LST was positive (skin induration ≥ 5 mm) in 20/22 cured cases of LCL and in 75% of healthy individuals without history of LCL. LST+ individuals expressed vigorous Leishmania-specific lymphoproliferative responses associated with in vitro production of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) but not IL-4. Interestingly, IL-10 was detected in parallel with the highest levels of IFN-γ in PBMC supernatants from 3/20 cured LCL and 8/25 individuals without history of LCL. Our results showed a 98% concordance between the DTH reaction assessed by LST and the in vitro proliferative assay induced by soluble leishmanial antigens. Moreover, proliferative assays as well as cytokine analysis did not show any significant difference of the immune memory to parasite antigens developed by patients who had overt cutaneous leishmaniasis and those who had apparently asymptomatic infection. PMID:10209516

  11. Treatment with cathepsin L inhibitor potentiates Th2-type immune response in Leishmania major-infected BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, T; Maekawa, Y; Sakai, T; Nakano, Y; Ishii, K; Hisaeda, H; Dainichi, T; Asao, T; Katunuma, N; Himeno, K

    2001-08-01

    Prior to the activation of CD4 (+) T cells, exogenous proteins must be digested by endo/lysosomal enzymes in antigen-presenting cells (APC) to produce antigenic peptides that are able to be presented on class II molecules of the MHC. Studies described here inspect the functional significance of cathepsin L inhibition for antigen processing and T (h) 1/T (h) 2 differentiation in experimental leishmaniasis. We first demonstrated using in vitro systems that cathepsin L is one of the candidate endo/lysosomal enzymes in processing of soluble Leishmania antigen (SLA) and that its specific inhibitor, CLIK148, modulated the processing of SLA. BALB/c mice are known to be susceptible to infection with Leishmania major. Interestingly, treatment of BALB/c mice with CLIK148 exacerbated the infection by enhancing the development of SLA-specific T (h) 2-type response such as production of IL-4 and generation of T (h) 2-dependent specific IgE/IgG1 antibodies. Moreover, addition of CLIK148 in incubation of a SLA-specific CD4 (+) T cell line with APC up-regulated the production of IL-4. However, CLIK148 did not exert any direct influence on the function of T cells themselves. Taken together, these findings suggest that treatment of host mice with CLIK148 affects the processing of SLA in APC, resulting in the potentiation of T (h) 2-type immune responses and thus leading to exacerbation of the infection. Furthermore, endo/lysosomal cathepsin L was found to be functionally distinct from previously described cathepsins B and D.

  12. Qualitative differences in the early immune response to live and killed Leishmania major: Implications for vaccination strategies against Leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Okwor, Ifeoma; Liu, Dong; Uzonna, Jude

    2009-04-28

    Recovery from natural or deliberate infection with Leishmania major leads to the development of lifelong immunity against rechallenge infections. In contrast, vaccination with killed parasites or defined leishmanial antigens generally induces only short-term protection. The reasons for this difference are currently not known but may be related to differences in the quality of the early immune responses to live and killed parasites. Here, we report that live and killed L. major parasites elicit comparable early inflammatory response as evidenced by influx and/or proliferation of cells in the draining lymph nodes (dLNs). In contrast, the early cytokine responses were qualitatively different. Cells from mice inoculated with killed parasites produced significantly more antigen-specific IL-4 and less IFN-gamma than those from mice injected with live parasites. Inclusion of CpG ODN into killed parasite preparations changed the early response to killed parasites from IL-4 to a predominantly IFN-gamma response, resulting in better protection following secondary high dose virulent L. major challenge. Interestingly, CpG-mediated enhancement of killed parasites-induced protection was short-lived and waned after 12 weeks. Taken together, these results suggest that the nature of primary immunity induced by killed and live parasites are qualitatively different and that these differences may account for the differential protection seen in mice following vaccination with live and killed parasites. They further suggest that modulating the early response with an appropriate adjuvant could enhance efficacy of killed parasite vaccines.

  13. Inhibition of caspase-8 activity reduces IFN-gamma expression by T cells from Leishmania major infection.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Wânia F; Guillermo, Landi V C; Ribeiro-Gomes, Flávia L; Lopes, Marcela F

    2008-03-01

    Following infection with Leishmania major, T cell activation and apoptosis can be detected in draining lymph nodes of C57BL/6-infected mice. We investigated the mechanisms involved in apoptosis and cytokine expression following T cell activation. After two weeks of infection, apoptotic T cells were not detected in draining lymph nodes but activation with anti-CD3 induced apoptosis in both CD4 and CD8 T cells. Treatment with anti-Fas Ligand, caspase-8 or caspase- 9 inhibitors did not block activation-induced T-cell death. We also investigated whether the blockade of caspase-8 activity would affect the expression of type-1 or type-2 cytokines. At early stages of infection, both CD4 and CD8 T cells expressed IFN-gamma upon activation. Treatment with the caspase-8 inhibitor zIETD-fmk (benzyl-oxycarbonyl-Ile- Glu(OMe)-Thr-Asp(OMe)-fluoromethyl ketone) reduced the proportion of CD8 T cells and IFN-gamma expression in both CD4 and CD8 T cells. We conclude that a non apoptotic role of caspase-8 activity may be required for T cell-mediated type-1 responses during L. major infection.

  14. Effect of topical liposomes containing paromomycin sulfate in the course of Leishmania major infection in susceptible BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Jaafari, Mahmoud R; Bavarsad, Neda; Bazzaz, Bibi Sedigheh Fazly; Samiei, Afshin; Soroush, Dina; Ghorbani, Serajodin; Heravi, Mohammad M Lotfi; Khamesipour, Ali

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antileishmanial effects of topical liposomal paromomycin sulfate (PM) in Leishmania major-infected BALB/c mice. Liposomes containing 10 or 15% PM (Lip-PM-10 and Lip-PM-15, respectively) were prepared by the fusion method and were characterized for their size and encapsulation efficiency. The penetration of PM from the liposomal PM formulations (LPMFs) through and into skin was evaluated in vitro with Franz diffusion cells fitted with mouse skin at 37 degrees C for 8 h. The in vitro permeation data showed that almost 15% of the LPMFs applied penetrated the mouse skin, and the amount retained in the skin was about 60% for both formulations. The 50% effective doses of Lip-PM-10 and Lip-PM-15 against L. major promastigotes in culture were 65.32 and 59.73 microg/ml, respectively, and those against L. major amastigotes in macrophages were 24.64 and 26.44 microg/ml, respectively. Lip-PM-10 or Lip-PM-15 was used topically twice a day for 4 weeks to treat L. major lesions on BALB/c mice, and the results showed a significantly (P < 0.001) smaller lesion size in the mice in the treated groups than in the mice in the control group, which received either empty liposomes or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Eight weeks after the beginning of the treatment, every mouse treated with LPMFs was completely cured. The spleen parasite burden was significantly (P < 0.001) lower in mice treated with Lip-PM-10 or Lip-PM-15 than in mice treated with PBS or control liposomes, but no significant difference was seen between the two groups treated with either Lip-PM-10 or Lip-PM-15. The results suggest that topical liposomal PM may be useful for the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:19223613

  15. Effect of root bark extract of Berberis vulgaris L. on Leishmania major on BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Salehabadi, Alireza; Karamian, Mahdi; Farzad, Motevalli Haghi; Namaei, Mohammad Hasan

    2014-03-01

    Leishmaniasis is one of the most important diseases transmitted by arthropod. This disease is present in 88 countries. Approximately 400 million people are at risk, and 12 million are involved. We aimed to examine the application of ethanolic extract of the root bark of Berberis vulgaris L. for treatment of mice infected with cutaneous leishmaniasis. At first, 40 BALB/c mice were infected to Leishmania major promastigotes and were divided in two groups A and B. Then, each of A and B groups were divided to two subgroups. Mice from subgroup A1 were treated with 10% root bark alcoholic extract, and mice from subgroup A2 were treated with only alcohol (control). Mice from subgroup B1 were treated with 20% root bark alcoholic extract, and mice from subgroup B2 were treated with only alcohol (control). The 90% recovery was found in the mice treated with 20% root bark extract, and 55% recovery was found with 10% root bark extract, but in the control group, 0% recovery was found. The results of our study showed that the lotion of root bark extract has good suppression effects on parasites. Therefore, it might be a pro for developing new antileishmanial drugs.

  16. Structural and thermodynamic basis of the inhibition of Leishmania major farnesyl diphosphate synthase by nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates

    SciTech Connect

    Aripirala, Srinivas; Gonzalez-Pacanowska, Dolores; Oldfield, Eric; Kaiser, Marcel; Amzel, L. Mario; Gabelli, Sandra B.

    2014-03-01

    Structural insights into L. major farnesyl diphosphate synthase, a key enzyme in the mevalonate pathway, are described. Farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS) is an essential enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of sterols (cholesterol in humans and ergosterol in yeasts, fungi and trypanosomatid parasites) as well as in protein prenylation. It is inhibited by bisphosphonates, a class of drugs used in humans to treat diverse bone-related diseases. The development of bisphosphonates as antiparasitic compounds targeting ergosterol biosynthesis has become an important route for therapeutic intervention. Here, the X-ray crystallographic structures of complexes of FPPS from Leishmania major (the causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis) with three bisphosphonates determined at resolutions of 1.8, 1.9 and 2.3 Å are reported. Two of the inhibitors, 1-(2-hydroxy-2,2-diphosphonoethyl)-3-phenylpyridinium (300B) and 3-butyl-1-(2,2-diphosphonoethyl)pyridinium (476A), co-crystallize with the homoallylic substrate isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and three Ca{sup 2+} ions. A third inhibitor, 3-fluoro-1-(2-hydroxy-2,2-diphosphonoethyl)pyridinium (46I), was found to bind two Mg{sup 2+} ions but not IPP. Calorimetric studies showed that binding of the inhibitors is entropically driven. Comparison of the structures of L. major FPPS (LmFPPS) and human FPPS provides new information for the design of bisphosphonates that will be more specific for inhibition of LmFPPS. The asymmetric structure of the LmFPPS–46I homodimer indicates that binding of the allylic substrate to both monomers of the dimer results in an asymmetric dimer with one open and one closed homoallylic site. It is proposed that IPP first binds to the open site, which then closes, opening the site on the other monomer, which closes after binding the second IPP, leading to the symmetric fully occupied FPPS dimer observed in other structures.

  17. Detection of Leishmania major DNA within wild caught Phlebotomus papatasi and species composition of sand flies in endemic focus of cutaneous leishmaniasis, in western Iran.

    PubMed

    Vahabi, A; Rassi, Y; Oshaghi, M A; Sayyadi, M; Rafizadeh, S

    2016-03-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is one of the most important public health problem in many developing countries. The present study was conducted to determine the vector(s), the parasite and the species composition of sand flies in the Dehloran County during May-November 2012. Sand flies were collected by sticky traps and mounted in Puri's medium for species identification. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques of kDNA, ITS1-rDNA, followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) were used for identification of DNA of Leishmania parasites in infected sand flies. A total of 82443 specimens comprising 15 species of sand flies (5 Phlebotomus and 10 Sergentomyia) were collected and identified. The species of Phlebotomus papatasi was dominant in outdoor and indoor resting places. Among the 280 specimens of female P. papatasi tested by PCR of kDNA, ITS1-rDNA genes of the parasite followed by RFLP, only 5 of them (1.8 %) were positive to Leishmania major parasites. This is the first molecular detection of leishmania infection of P. papatasi to L. major in this region. The results indicated that, P. papatasi was only species found infected by L. major and the principal vector of disease agent to human. PMID:27065601

  18. Anti-Leishmanial Activity (In Vitro and In Vivo) of Allicin and Allicin Cream Using Leishmania major (Sub-strain Zymowme LON4) and Balb/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Metwally, Dina M.; Al-Olayan, Ebtesam M.; El-Khadragy, Manal F.; Alkathiri, Badriah

    2016-01-01

    Background Leishmania is a unicellular protozoan parasite that produces several human diseases, ranging from localized self-healing cutaneous lesions to deadly visceral infections. Objective The effect of allicin on the growth of Leishmania major (L. major) promastigotes was evaluated under in vitro conditions. Moreover, the efficacy of a topical allicin cream was examined in BALB/c (Bagg albino, laboratory-bred strain of the House Mouse) mice with cutaneous leishmanial lesions compared to the currently used drug, sodiumstibogluconate (pentostam). Methods Cytotoxiciy and promastigote proliferation were measured. Different concentrations (50, 100, 150, and 200 μM) of liquid allicin were tested on L. major promastigotes twice: after 24 and 48 hours using an MTT colorimetric assay. In the in vivo condition, the efficacies of allicin cream and liquid allicin at two concentrations (0.15 μM/mouse and 0.30 μM/mouse) were evaluated. Serum factors of the control and treated groups were tested to evaluate the toxic effects of allicin on the liver and kidney. Results Allicin at a concentration of 50 μM inhibited the growth of Leishmania promastigotes. Topical application of allicin cream reduced lesion sizes in mice. No significant differences in biochemical analysis were observed between the control and treated groups. Conclusions Allicin has antileishmanial effects under in vitro and in vivo conditions and may be used in clinical applications. PMID:27537199

  19. First microscopical and molecular-based characterization of Leishmania major within naturally infected Phlebotomus salehi (Diptera; Psychodidae) in Fars province, southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    DAVAMI, M H; MOTAZEDIAN, M H; KALANTARI, M; ASGARI, Q; BADZOHRE, A; MOHAMMADPOUR, I

    2011-01-01

    Zoonotoc cutaneous leishmaniasis is endemic in several parts of Iran. Jahrom district is one of the most important endemic foci of leishmaniasis located in Fars province, southern Iran. To identify the vectors of leishmaniasis in this area, a total of 349 sandflies were collected during May to August 2009. They were caught from outdoors in five regions of Jahrom district including villages of Mousavieh, Ghotb-Abad, Heydar-Abad, Fath-Abad and Jahrom County. Eleven species of Phlebotomine (three Phlebotomus spp. and eight Sergentomyia spp.) were detected. To determine the sandflies naturally infected by Leishmania spp., 122 female sandflies were dissected and evaluated microscopically using Giemsa-stained slides. Natural infection of 2 out of 38 (5.26%) P. papatasi and 1 out of 8 (12.5%) P. salehi to Leishmania major was confirmed in the region. Sequencing and nested polymerase chain reaction-based detection of Leishmania were carried out to confirm the microscopic findings. Five (13.16%) P. papatasi and two (25%) P. salehi were positive in nested polymerase chain reaction assay. All positive samples were shown 72–76% similarity with L. major Friedlin. On the basis of our knowledge, this is the first molecular detection of L. major within naturally infected P. salehi in this region in southern Iran. PMID:22185942

  20. Structural and thermodynamic basis of the inhibition of Leishmania major farnesyl diphosphate synthase by nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates.

    PubMed

    Aripirala, Srinivas; Gonzalez-Pacanowska, Dolores; Oldfield, Eric; Kaiser, Marcel; Amzel, L Mario; Gabelli, Sandra B

    2014-03-01

    Farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS) is an essential enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of sterols (cholesterol in humans and ergosterol in yeasts, fungi and trypanosomatid parasites) as well as in protein prenylation. It is inhibited by bisphosphonates, a class of drugs used in humans to treat diverse bone-related diseases. The development of bisphosphonates as antiparasitic compounds targeting ergosterol biosynthesis has become an important route for therapeutic intervention. Here, the X-ray crystallographic structures of complexes of FPPS from Leishmania major (the causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis) with three bisphosphonates determined at resolutions of 1.8, 1.9 and 2.3 Å are reported. Two of the inhibitors, 1-(2-hydroxy-2,2-diphosphonoethyl)-3-phenylpyridinium (300B) and 3-butyl-1-(2,2-diphosphonoethyl)pyridinium (476A), co-crystallize with the homoallylic substrate isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and three Ca(2+) ions. A third inhibitor, 3-fluoro-1-(2-hydroxy-2,2-diphosphonoethyl)pyridinium (46I), was found to bind two Mg(2+) ions but not IPP. Calorimetric studies showed that binding of the inhibitors is entropically driven. Comparison of the structures of L. major FPPS (LmFPPS) and human FPPS provides new information for the design of bisphosphonates that will be more specific for inhibition of LmFPPS. The asymmetric structure of the LmFPPS-46I homodimer indicates that binding of the allylic substrate to both monomers of the dimer results in an asymmetric dimer with one open and one closed homoallylic site. It is proposed that IPP first binds to the open site, which then closes, opening the site on the other monomer, which closes after binding the second IPP, leading to the symmetric fully occupied FPPS dimer observed in other structures.

  1. Immunostimulatory responses to crude extracts of Warburgia ugandensis (sprague) subsp ugandensis (canellaceae) by Balb/c mice infected with Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Ngure, Peter; Ng'ang'a, Zipporah; Kimutai, Albert; Kepha, Stella; Mong'are, Samuel; Ingonga, Johnnie; Tonui, Willy

    2014-01-01

    Introduction To determine the immunostimulatory potential of crude extracts of Warburgia ugandensis subsp. ugandensis with a soluble leishmanial antigen in vaccinating BALB/c mice. Methods Seventy two female BALB/c mice were randomly assigned into six groups. The mice were vaccinated with soluble leishmania antigens (SLA) alone, hexane, ethyl acetate, and dichloromethane extract co-administered with SLA. Unvaccinated mice formed the control group. The induction of cell-mediated immunity following vaccination was determined by measuring in vitro lymphocyte proliferation and the production of interleukin (IL)-4 and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) determined by flow cytometry. Protection against L. major was determined by quantifying parasite burdens in L. major infected footpads using a limiting dilution assay and by measuring lesion sizes of the infected footpad compared to the contralateral uninfected footpad. Results On vaccination with extracts of W. ugandensis subsp. ugandensis alone or as adjuvants when used in combination with Leishmania antigens, the hexane extract and the dichloromethane extract plus SLA stimulated moderate production of IFN-γ and low levels of IL-4.These mice were partially protected from cutaneous leishmaniasis as shown by the slow development of lesions and comparatively less parasite burdens. Conclusion These data suggest that extracts of W. ugandensis subsp. ugandensis are suitable adjuvants for Leishmania vaccines. However, since W. ugandensis subsp. ugandensis has been shown to be effective against Leishmania parasites in vitro and in vivo, further studies ought to be conducted to determine its immunochemotherapeutic potential when co-administered with a soluble leishmanial antigen in vaccinating BALB/c mice. PMID:24624248

  2. Golgi-located NTPDase1 of Leishmania major is required for lipophosphoglycan elongation and normal lesion development whereas secreted NTPDase2 is dispensable for virulence.

    PubMed

    Sansom, Fiona M; Ralton, Julie E; Sernee, M Fleur; Cohen, Alice M; Hooker, David J; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Naderer, Thomas; McConville, Malcolm J

    2014-12-01

    Parasitic protozoa, such as Leishmania species, are thought to express a number of surface and secreted nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (NTPDases) which hydrolyze a broad range of nucleoside tri- and diphosphates. However, the functional significance of NTPDases in parasite virulence is poorly defined. The Leishmania major genome was found to contain two putative NTPDases, termed LmNTPDase1 and 2, with predicted NTPDase catalytic domains and either an N-terminal signal sequence and/or transmembrane domain, respectively. Expression of both proteins as C-terminal GFP fusion proteins revealed that LmNTPDase1 was exclusively targeted to the Golgi apparatus, while LmNTPDase2 was predominantly secreted. An L. major LmNTPDase1 null mutant displayed increased sensitivity to serum complement lysis and exhibited a lag in lesion development when infections in susceptible BALB/c mice were initiated with promastigotes, but not with the obligate intracellular amastigote stage. This phenotype is characteristic of L. major strains lacking lipophosphoglycan (LPG), the major surface glycoconjugate of promastigote stages. Biochemical studies showed that the L. major NTPDase1 null mutant synthesized normal levels of LPG that was structurally identical to wild type LPG, with the exception of having shorter phosphoglycan chains. These data suggest that the Golgi-localized NTPase1 is involved in regulating the normal sugar-nucleotide dependent elongation of LPG and assembly of protective surface glycocalyx. In contrast, deletion of the gene encoding LmNTPDase2 had no measurable impact on parasite virulence in BALB/c mice. These data suggest that the Leishmania major NTPDase enzymes have potentially important roles in the insect stage, but only play a transient or non-major role in pathogenesis in the mammalian host.

  3. Golgi-Located NTPDase1 of Leishmania major Is Required for Lipophosphoglycan Elongation and Normal Lesion Development whereas Secreted NTPDase2 Is Dispensable for Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Sansom, Fiona M.; Ralton, Julie E.; Sernee, M. Fleur; Cohen, Alice M.; Hooker, David J.; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; Naderer, Thomas; McConville, Malcolm J.

    2014-01-01

    Parasitic protozoa, such as Leishmania species, are thought to express a number of surface and secreted nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (NTPDases) which hydrolyze a broad range of nucleoside tri- and diphosphates. However, the functional significance of NTPDases in parasite virulence is poorly defined. The Leishmania major genome was found to contain two putative NTPDases, termed LmNTPDase1 and 2, with predicted NTPDase catalytic domains and either an N-terminal signal sequence and/or transmembrane domain, respectively. Expression of both proteins as C-terminal GFP fusion proteins revealed that LmNTPDase1 was exclusively targeted to the Golgi apparatus, while LmNTPDase2 was predominantly secreted. An L. major LmNTPDase1 null mutant displayed increased sensitivity to serum complement lysis and exhibited a lag in lesion development when infections in susceptible BALB/c mice were initiated with promastigotes, but not with the obligate intracellular amastigote stage. This phenotype is characteristic of L. major strains lacking lipophosphoglycan (LPG), the major surface glycoconjugate of promastigote stages. Biochemical studies showed that the L. major NTPDase1 null mutant synthesized normal levels of LPG that was structurally identical to wild type LPG, with the exception of having shorter phosphoglycan chains. These data suggest that the Golgi-localized NTPase1 is involved in regulating the normal sugar-nucleotide dependent elongation of LPG and assembly of protective surface glycocalyx. In contrast, deletion of the gene encoding LmNTPDase2 had no measurable impact on parasite virulence in BALB/c mice. These data suggest that the Leishmania major NTPDase enzymes have potentially important roles in the insect stage, but only play a transient or non-major role in pathogenesis in the mammalian host. PMID:25521752

  4. Inhibition of Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Overcomes Differentiation Blockade in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sykes, David B; Kfoury, Youmna S; Mercier, François E; Wawer, Mathias J; Law, Jason M; Haynes, Mark K; Lewis, Timothy A; Schajnovitz, Amir; Jain, Esha; Lee, Dongjun; Meyer, Hanna; Pierce, Kerry A; Tolliday, Nicola J; Waller, Anna; Ferrara, Steven J; Eheim, Ashley L; Stoeckigt, Detlef; Maxcy, Katrina L; Cobert, Julien M; Bachand, Jacqueline; Szekely, Brian A; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Sklar, Larry A; Kotz, Joanne D; Clish, Clary B; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Clemons, Paul A; Janzer, Andreas; Schreiber, Stuart L; Scadden, David T

    2016-09-22

    While acute myeloid leukemia (AML) comprises many disparate genetic subtypes, one shared hallmark is the arrest of leukemic myeloblasts at an immature and self-renewing stage of development. Therapies that overcome differentiation arrest represent a powerful treatment strategy. We leveraged the observation that the majority of AML, despite their genetically heterogeneity, share in the expression of HoxA9, a gene normally downregulated during myeloid differentiation. Using a conditional HoxA9 model system, we performed a high-throughput phenotypic screen and defined compounds that overcame differentiation blockade. Target identification led to the unanticipated discovery that inhibition of the enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) enables myeloid differentiation in human and mouse AML models. In vivo, DHODH inhibitors reduced leukemic cell burden, decreased levels of leukemia-initiating cells, and improved survival. These data demonstrate the role of DHODH as a metabolic regulator of differentiation and point to its inhibition as a strategy for overcoming differentiation blockade in AML.

  5. Antileishmanial activity of Ferula assa-foetida oleo gum resin against Leishmania major: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Bafghi, Ali Fatahi; Bagheri, Seyyed Majid; Hejazian, Seyed Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Background: In Ayurveda, asafetida is introduced as a valuable remedy for flatulence, hysteria, nervous disorders, whooping cough, pneumonia and bronchitis in children and also considered as an aphrodisiac agent. Presently, Leishmaniasis is common in most countries of the world and is a serious health problem in the world. Some plant medicines and natural products have a new candidate for treatment of leishmaniasis. Objective: This study was designed to evaluate Ferula assa-foetida oleo gum resin (asafetida) on mortality and morbidity Leishmania major in vitro. Materials and Methods: Mostigotes were isolated from mice spleens and then transformed to promastigotes in Novy-Nicolle-Mac Neal (NNN medium supplemented with penicillin (100 U/ml), streptomycin (100 μg/ml) and 20% heat-inactivated fetal calf serum (FCS) at 25°C. A fixed initial density of the parasites was transferred to screw-capped vials containing 5 ml of RPMI1640 media to which different concentrations of 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 μg asafetida were added and each concentration was done in triplicates. Each run also included control. The mortality of parasitoids was measured by the slide and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods. Results: After 72 h, asafetida inhibited growth of parasites in all doses in stationary and logarithmic phases. The ELISA measurement suggested that the viability of parasites significantly decreased after 48h (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The results show that asafetida could prevent from growth and viability of parasites and this oleo gum resin can be useful for treatment of leishmaniasis. PMID:25624696

  6. NF-kappa B1 is required for optimal CD4+ Th1 cell development and resistance to Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Artis, David; Speirs, Kendra; Joyce, Karen; Goldschmidt, Michael; Caamaño, Jorge; Hunter, Christopher A; Scott, Phillip

    2003-02-15

    The NF-kappaB family of transcription factors regulates the expression of a wide range of immune response genes involved in immunity to pathogens. However, the need for individual family members in regulating innate and adaptive immune responses in vivo has yet to be clearly defined. We investigated the role of NF-kappaB1 in the induction of protective IL-12-dependent Th1 cell responses following infection with the intracellular protozoan parasite Leishmania major. Whereas wild-type C57BL/6 mice controlled parasite replication, NF-kappaB1 knockout (KO) mice were susceptible to infection, developing chronic unresolving lesions associated with persistent parasites. There was a profound defect in Ag-specific CD4(+) T cell proliferation and IFN-gamma production in infected KO mice, although innate responses-including IL-12 production and control of intracellular parasite replication by macrophages-were intact. In vitro polyclonal stimulation of purified naive KO T cells revealed an intrinsic defect in CD4(+) T cell proliferation associated with reduced IL-2 receptor expression, but operating independently of APC function and IL-2 production. Critically, the frequency of proliferating KO CD4(+) T cells secreting IFN-gamma matched that of wild-type cells, suggesting that NF-kappaB1 was not required for efficient transcription of the IFN-gamma gene. Taken together, these results identify a novel role for NF-kappaB1 in CD4(+) T cell proliferation and the development of Th1 cell responses required for protective immunity against intracellular pathogens. PMID:12574369

  7. H-11-linked gene has a parallel effect on Leishmania major and L. donovani infections in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, J.M.; Hale, C.; Roberts, M.B.; Ulczak, O.M.; Liew, F.Y.; Howard, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    The courses of visceral infection following intravenous injection of Leishmania donovani amastigotes, or lesion growth following subcutaneous injection of L. major promastigotes, were examined in B10.129(10M) (H-2b, H-11b) mice and compared with disease profiles observed in congenic C57BL/10ScSn(= B10) (H-2b, H-11a) and B10.D2/n (H-2d, H-11a) mice, and in BALB/mice. Possession of alternative alleles at H-11 and closely linked loci transformed the normal curing/healing phenotype of B10 mice into a characteristically different noncuring/nonhealing phenotype affecting both visceral and subcutaneous infections in B10.129(10M) mice. In reciprocal radiation bone marrow chimeras made between the congenic B10 and B10.129(10M) strains, both cure and noncure phenotypes were transferable with the donor hematopoietic system. Although it was possible to demonstrate transfer of suppression with T-enriched spleen cells from day 61 L. donovani-infected B10.129(10M) donor mice into 550 rad syngeneic recipients, the pretreatment of mice with sublethal irradiation did not, as in the earlier studies of Scl-controlled L. major nonhealing or H-2-controlled L. donovani noncure phenotypes, have a clear or consistent prophylactic effect. Together with the progressive disease profile observed even for L. donovani at low parasite doses this suggests that, despite their ability to develop initial delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions to parasite antigen early in L. major infection, B10.129(10M) mice possess some inherent defect in ability to mount a cell-mediated response effective at the level of macrophage neishmanial activity in vivo even when suppressor T cells are not generated. Elucidation of this characteristically different noncuring/nonhealing phenotye may provide important insight into common events involved in the development of the cell-mediated immune response to both visceral and subcutaneous forms of leishmaniasis.

  8. Role of protein kinase R in the killing of Leishmania major by macrophages in response to neutrophil elastase and TLR4 via TNFα and IFNβ.

    PubMed

    Faria, Marilia S; Calegari-Silva, Tereza C; de Carvalho Vivarini, Aislan; Mottram, Jeremy C; Lopes, Ulisses Gazos; Lima, Ana Paula C A

    2014-07-01

    In cutaneous leishmaniasis, Leishmania amazonensis activates macrophage double-stranded, RNA-activated protein kinase R (PKR) to promote parasite growth. In our study, Leishmania major grew normally in RAW cells, RAW-expressing dominant-negative PKR (PKR-DN) cells, and macrophages of PKR-knockout mice, revealing that PKR is dispensable for L. major growth in macrophages. PKR activation in infected macrophages with poly I:C resulted in parasite death. Fifty percent of L. major-knockout lines for the ecotin-like serine peptidase inhibitor (ISP2; Δisp2/isp3), an inhibitor of neutrophil elastase (NE), died in RAW cells or macrophages from 129Sv mice, as a result of PKR activation. Inhibition of PKR or NE or neutralization of Toll-like receptor 4 or 2(TLR4 or TLR2) prevented the death of Δisp2/isp3. Δisp2/isp3 grew normally in RAW-PKR-DN cells or macrophages from 129Sv pkr(-/-), tlr2(-/-), trif(-/-), and myd88(-/-) mice, associating NE activity, PKR, and TLR responses with parasite death. Δisp2/isp3 increased the expression of mRNA for TNF-α by 2-fold and of interferon β (IFNβ) in a PKR-dependent manner. Antibodies to TNF-α reversed the 95% killing by Δisp2/isp3, whereas they grew normally in macrophages from IFN receptor-knockout mice. We propose that ISP2 prevents the activation of PKR via an NE-TLR4-TLR2 axis to control innate responses that contribute to the killing of L. major.-Faria, M. S., Calegari-Silva, T. C., de Carvalho Vivarini, A., Mottram, J. C., Lopes, U. G., Lima, A. P. C. A. Role of protein kinase R in the killing of Leishmania major by macrophages in response to neutrophil elastase and TLR4 via TNFα and IFNβ. PMID:24732131

  9. First Report on Isolation and Characterization of Leishmania major from Meriones hurrianae (Rodentia: Gerbillidae) of A Rural Cutaneous leishmaniasis Focus in South-Eastern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Kassiri, Hamid; Naddaf, Saied Reza; Javadian, Ezat–Aldin; Mohebali, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Background Zoonotic Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (ZCL) is an endemic health problem in many rural areas of Iran, with doubled number of incidences over the last decade. Different species of rodents serve as natural reservoir host for ZCL. The disease is considered as a major health problem in rural areas of Mirjaveh, Chabahar, and Konarak Counties of Sistan va Baluchistan Province. Objectives This study describes the identity of Leishmania species, isolated from Meriones hurrianae from Chabahar County using RAPD-PCR methodology. Materials and Methods Rodents were entrapped by live traps baited with roasted walnut, tomato, and cucumber during spring and summer. All rodents were identified based on external features including fur color, ears characteristics, tail length, hind feet, body measurements, and internal features of teeth and cranium. Giemsa-stained impressions from rodents’ ears were examined for amastigotes microscopically. The samples from infected rodents were cultured in NNN+LIT medium and then the harvested parasites at the stationary phase were subjected to DNA extraction followed by amplification with RAPD-PCR. Results All the 28 entrapped animals were identified as M. hurrianae. Five animals showed to harbor Leishmania parasite by microscopy. Leishmania DNA isolated from five M. hurrianae produced distinctive bands of L. major with four primers. However, the products that were amplified with primers AB1-07, 327, and 329 were stable and reproducible. This is the first report on the isolation and identification of L. major from M. hurrianae from Iran. Conclusions Regarding infection rate of 17.8%, M. hurrianae seems to play the major role in the maintenance and transmission of disease to humans in this area. PMID:24616787

  10. Synthesis of brequinar analogue inhibitors of malaria parasite dihydroorotate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Boa, Andrew N; Canavan, Shane P; Hirst, Paul R; Ramsey, Christopher; Stead, Andrew M W; McConkey, Glenn A

    2005-03-15

    A series of 2-phenyl quinoline-4-carboxylic acid derivatives related to brequinar, an inhibitor of human dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH), has been prepared and evaluated as inhibitors of DHODH from the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Brequinar was essentially inactive against PfDHODH (IC(50) 880 microM) whereas several members of the series inhibited PfDHODH. Unexpectedly, replacement of the carboxylic acid required for brequinar to inhibit hDHODH was not essential in the diisopropylamides that inhibited PfDHODH.

  11. Leishmania major Glycosylation Mutants Require Phosphoglycans (lpg2−) but Not Lipophosphoglycan (lpg1−) for Survival in Permissive Sand Fly Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Svárovská, Anna; Ant, Thomas H.; Seblová, Veronika; Jecná, Lucie; Beverley, Stephen M.; Volf, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Background Sand fly species able to support the survival of the protozoan parasite Leishmania have been classified as permissive or specific, based upon their ability to support a wide or limited range of strains and/or species. Studies of a limited number of fly/parasite species combinations have implicated parasite surface molecules in this process and here we provide further evidence in support of this proposal. We investigated the role of lipophosphoglycan (LPG) and other phosphoglycans (PGs) in sand fly survival, using Leishmania major mutants deficient in LPG (lpg1−), and the phosphoglycan (PG)-deficient mutant lpg2−. The sand fly species used were the permissive species Phlebotomus perniciosus and P. argentipes, and the specific vector P. duboscqi, a species resistant to L. infantum development. Principal Findings The lpg2− mutants did not survive well in any of the three sand fly species, suggesting that phosphoglycans and/or other LPG2-dependent molecules are required for parasite development. In vitro, all three L. major lines were equally resistant to proteolytic activity of bovine trypsin, suggesting that sand fly-specific hydrolytic proteases or other factors are the reason for the early lpg2− parasite killing. The lpg1− mutants developed late-stage infections in two permissive species, P. perniciosus and P. argentipes, where their infection rates and intensities of infections were comparable to the wild type (WT) parasites. In contrast, in P. duboscqi the lpg1− mutants developed significantly worse than the WT parasites. Conclusions In combination with previous studies, the data establish clearly that LPG is not required for Leishmania survival in permissive species P. perniciosus and P. argentipes but plays an important role in the specific vector P. duboscqi. With regard to PGs other than LPG, the data prove the importance of LPG2-related molecules for survival of L. major in the three sand fly species tested. PMID:20084096

  12. The structure of tubulin-binding cofactor A from Leishmania major infers a mode of association during the early stages of microtubule assembly.

    PubMed

    Barrack, Keri L; Fyfe, Paul K; Hunter, William N

    2015-05-01

    Tubulin-binding cofactor A (TBCA) participates in microtubule formation, a key process in eukaryotic biology to create the cytoskeleton. There is little information on how TBCA might interact with β-tubulin en route to microtubule biogenesis. To address this, the protozoan Leishmania major was targeted as a model system. The crystal structure of TBCA and comparisons with three orthologous proteins are presented. The presence of conserved features infers that electrostatic interactions that are likely to involve the C-terminal tail of β-tubulin are key to association. This study provides a reagent and template to support further work in this area.

  13. Colonization of Phlebotomus papatasi changes the effect of pre-immunization with saliva from lack of protection towards protection against experimental challenge with Leishmania major and saliva

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Sand fly saliva has been postulated as a potential vaccine or as a vaccine component within multi component vaccine against leishmaniasis. It is important to note that these studies were performed using long-term colonized Phlebotomus papatasi. The effect of sand flies colonization on the outcome of Leishmania infection is reported. Results While pre-immunization of mice with salivary gland homogenate (SGH) of long-term colonized (F5 and beyond) female Phlebotomus papatasi induced protection against Leishmania major co-inoculated with the same type of SGH, pre-immunization of mice with SGH of recently colonized (F2 and F3) female P. papatasi did not confer protection against L. major co-inoculated with the same type of SGH. Our data showed for the first time that a shift from lack of protection to protection occurs at the fourth generation (F4) during the colonization process of P. papatasi. Conclusion For the development of a sand fly saliva-based vaccine, inferences based on long-term colonized populations of sand flies should be treated with caution as colonization of P. papatasi appears to modulate the outcome of L. major infection from lack of protection to protection. PMID:21726438

  14. Design and synthesis of potent inhibitors of the malaria parasite dihydroorotate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, Timo; Ramsey, Christopher; Davies, Matthew; Galtier, Christophe; Stead, Andrew M W; Johnson, A Peter; Fishwick, Colin W G; Boa, Andrew N; McConkey, Glenn A

    2007-01-25

    Pyrimidine biosynthesis presents an attractive drug target in malaria parasites due to the absence of a pyrimidine salvage pathway. A set of compounds designed to inhibit the Plasmodium falciparum pyrimidine biosynthetic enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (PfDHODH) was synthesized. PfDHODH-specific inhibitors with low nanomolar binding affinities were identified that bind in the N-terminal hydrophobic channel of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, the presumed site of ubiquinone binding during oxidation of dihydroorotate to orotate. These compounds also prevented growth of cultured parasites at low micromolar concentrations. Models that suggest the mode of inhibitor binding is based on shape complementarity, matching hydrophobic regions of inhibitor and enzyme, and interaction of inhibitors with amino acid residues F188, H185, and R265 are supported by mutagenesis data. These results further highlight PfDHODH as a promising new target for chemotherapeutic intervention in prevention of malaria and provide better understanding of the factors that determine specificity over human dihydroorotate dehydrogenase.

  15. Immune response and protection assay of recombinant major surface glycoprotein of Leishmania (rgp63) reconstituted with liposomes in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Jaafari, Mahmoud R; Ghafarian, Attieh; Farrokh-Gisour, Ahsan; Samiei, Afshin; Kheiri, Masoumeh Tavassoti; Mahboudi, Fereidoun; Barkhordari, Farzaneh; Khamesipour, Ali; McMaster, W Robert

    2006-07-17

    In this study the ability of recombinant gp63 entrapped in liposomes to induce immune response and protection against L. major infection in susceptible BALB/c mice was studied. Liposomes containing rgp63 (Lip-rgp63) were prepared from egg lecithin and cholesterol using detergent solubilization method. Immunization of BALB/c mice with rgp63 alone conferred a partial protection while entrapment of rgp63 in liposomes significantly increased the rate of protection (P<0.05). The parasite burden of spleen in mice challenged with L. major was significantly (p<0.001) lower in group of mice immunized with rgp63 alone or Lip-rgp63, however, the least parasite burden was seen in Lip-rgp63 group. Both rgp63 alone and Lip-rgp63 elicited significant delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response compared to controls (p<0.01), however, the DTH response of PBS-rgp63 was less than the Lip-rgp63. Titration of anti-Leishmania IgG isotypes (IgG2a/IgG1) showed a preferential Th1 type of immune response only in mice immunized with Lip-rgp63. The results indicate that liposomes might be used as a suitable immunoadjuvant for development of Leishmania vaccine. PMID:16740346

  16. Identification, biochemical characterization, and in-vivo expression of the intracellular invertase BfrA from the pathogenic parasite Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Belaz, Sorya; Rattier, Thibault; Lafite, Pierre; Moreau, Philippe; Routier, Françoise H; Robert-Gangneux, Florence; Gangneux, Jean-Pierre; Daniellou, Richard

    2015-10-13

    The parasitic life cycle of Leishmania includes an extracellular promastigote stage that occurs in the gut of the insect vector. During that period, the sucrose metabolism and more specifically the first glycosidase of this pathway are essential for growth and survival of the parasite. We investigated the expression of the invertase BfrA in the promastigote and amastigote stages of three parasite species representative of the three various clinical forms and of various geographical areas, namely Leishmania major, L. donovani and L. braziliensis. Thereafter, we cloned, overexpressed and biochemically characterized this invertase BfrA from L. major, heterologously expressed in both Escherichia coli and L. tarentolae. For all species, expression levels of BfrA mRNA were correlated to the time of the culture and the parasitic stage (promastigotes > amastigotes). BfrA exhibited no activity when expressed as a glycoprotein in L. tarentolae but proved to be an invertase when not glycosylated, yet owing low sequence homology with other invertases from the same family. Our data suggest that BfrA is an original invertase that is located inside the parasite. It is expressed in both parasitic stages, though to a higher extent in promastigotes. This work provides new insight into the parasite sucrose metabolism. PMID:26279524

  17. Concomitant Immunity Induced by Persistent Leishmania major Does Not Preclude Secondary Re-Infection: Implications for Genetic Exchange, Diversity and Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Mandell, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Many microbes have evolved the ability to co-exist for long periods of time within other species in the absence of overt pathology. Evolutionary biologists have proposed benefits to the microbe from ‘asymptomatic persistent infections’, most commonly invoking increased likelihood of transmission by longer-lived hosts. Typically asymptomatic persistent infections arise from strong containment by the immune system, accompanied by protective immunity; such ‘vaccination’ from overt disease in the presence of a non-sterilizing immune response is termed premunition or concomitant immunity. Here we consider another potential benefit of persistence and concomitant immunity to the parasite: the ‘exclusion’ of competing super-infecting strains, which would favor transmission of the original infecting organism. Methodology / Principle Findings To investigate this in the protozoan parasite Leishmania major, a superb model for the study of asymptomatic persistence, we used isogenic lines of comparable virulence bearing independent selectable markers. One was then used to infect genetically resistant mice, yielding infections which healed and progressed to asymptomatic persistent infection; these mice were then super-infected with the second marked line. As anticipated, super-infection yielded minimal pathology, showing that protective immunity against disease pathology had been established. The relative abundance of the primary and super-infecting secondary parasites was then assessed by plating on selective media. The data show clearly that super-infecting parasites were able to colonize the immune host effectively, achieving numbers comparable to and sometimes greater than that of the primary parasite. Conclusions / Significance We conclude that induction of protective immunity does not guarantee the Leishmania parasite exclusive occupation of the infected host. This finding has important consequences to the maintenance and generation of parasite

  18. Naturally Occurring Culturable Aerobic Gut Flora of Adult Phlebotomus papatasi, Vector of Leishmania major in the Old World

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Jaba; Braig, Henk R.; Rowton, Edgar D.; Ghosh, Kashinath

    2012-01-01

    Background Cutaneous leishmaniasis is a neglected, vector-borne parasitic disease and is responsible for persistent, often disfiguring lesions and other associated complications. Leishmania, causing zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) in the Old World are mainly transmitted by the predominant sand fly vector, Phlebotomus papatasi. To date, there is no efficient control measure or vaccine available for this widespread insect-borne infectious disease. Methodology/Principal Findings A survey was carried out to study the abundance of different natural gut flora in P. papatasi, with the long-term goal of generating a paratransgenic sand fly that can potentially block the development of Leishmania in the sand fly gut, thereby preventing transmission of leishmania in endemic disease foci. Sand flies, in particular, P. papatasi were captured from different habitats of various parts of the world. Gut microbes were cultured and identified using 16S ribosomal DNA analysis and a phylogenetic tree was constructed. We found variation in the species and abundance of gut flora in flies collected from different habitats. However, a few Gram-positive, nonpathogenic bacteria including Bacillus flexus and B. pumilus were common in most of the sites examined. Conclusion/Significance Our results indicate that there is a wide range of variation of aerobic gut flora inhabiting sand fly guts, which possibly reflect the ecological condition of the habitat where the fly breeds. Also, some species of bacteria (B. pumilus, and B. flexus) were found from most of the habitats. Important from an applied perspective of dissemination, our results support a link between oviposition induction and adult gut flora. PMID:22629302

  19. Les leishmanioses cutanées à Leishmania major et à Leishmania tropica au Maroc: aspects épidémio-cliniques comparatifs de 268 cas

    PubMed Central

    Chiheb, Soumia; Slaoui, Widad; Mouttaqui, Tarik; Riyad, Meriem; Benchikhi, Hakima

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Depuis 1995, le Maroc a connu une réactivation des foyers de leishmanioses cutanées (LC) à L. major et une nouvelle répartition géographique des foyers à L. tropica. Le but de cette étude est de comparer les aspects épidémio-cliniques associés aux LC potentiellement dûes à L. major et à L. tropica. Méthodes Une étude rétrospective a colligé 268 cas de LC au service de dermatologie du CHU Ibn Rochd de Casablanca entre Janvier 1995 et Septembre 2010. Les données étaient analysées par Epi info version 3.5.1. Le test X2 était appliqué (Différence significative = p< 0,05). Résultats Deux cent soixante-huit cas de LC ont été colligés, dont 160 femmes et 108 hommes. Ils ont été répartis en 123 patients originaires des foyers à L.major et 145 patients originaires des foyers à L. tropica. L'aspect ulcéronodulaire, ulcérovégétant ou végétant était retrouvé dans 58 cas (47,2%) des cas de LC à L. major versus 24 cas (16,7%) dans la L.C à L. tropica. L'aspect papulonodulaire était retrouvé dans 84 cas (58%) de LC à L. tropica contre 41 cas (33,3%) de LC à L. major. Conclusion Dans la LC à L. major, l'atteinte des membres et les aspects cliniques végétant ou ulcéro-végétant restent toujours prédominants. Dans la L.C à L. tropica, l'atteinte papulonodulaire unique du visage reste prédominante mais des formes ulcéronodulaires, végétantes ou ulcérovégétantes existent également dans les foyers récents à L. tropica, prêtant à confusion cliniquement avec des LC à L. major. PMID:25810796

  20. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic characterization of LmACR2, an arsenate/antimonate reductase from Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Bisacchi, Davide; Zhou, Yao; Rosen, Barry P; Mukhopadhyay, Rita; Bordo, Domenico

    2006-10-01

    Arsenic is present in the biosphere owing either to the presence of pesticides and herbicides used in agricultural and industrial activities or to leaching from geological formations. The health effects of prolonged exposure to arsenic can be devastating and may lead to various forms of cancer. Antimony(V), which is chemically very similar to arsenic, is used instead in the treatment of leishmaniasis, an infection caused by the protozoan parasite Leishmania sp.; the reduction of pentavalent antimony contained in the drug Pentostam to the active trivalent form arises from the presence in the Leishmania genome of a gene, LmACR2, coding for the protein LmACR2 (14.5 kDa, 127 amino acids) that displays weak but significant sequence similarity to the catalytic domain of Cdc25 phosphatase and to rhodanese enzymes. For structural characterization, LmACR2 was overexpressed, purified to homogeneity and crystallized in a trigonal space group (P321 or P3(1)21/P3(2)21). The protein crystallized in two distinct trigonal crystal forms, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 111.0, c = 86.1 A and a = b = 111.0, c = 175.6 A, respectively. At a synchrotron beamline, the diffraction pattern extended to a resolution limit of 1.99 A. PMID:17012788

  1. The role of Montanide ISA 70 as an adjuvant in immune responses against Leishmania major induced by thiol-specific antioxidant-based protein vaccine.

    PubMed

    Khabazzadeh Tehrani, Narges; Mahdavi, Mehdi; Maleki, Fatemeh; Zarrati, Somayeh; Tabatabaie, Fatemeh

    2016-09-01

    Leishmaniasis is a parasitic disease caused by several species of the genus Leishmania. Montanide ISA 70 is an adjuvant composed of a natural metabolizable oil and a very refined emulsifier from the manide monooleate family. The TSA (thiol-specific antioxidant) is a important antigen of Leishmania major. The purpose of this work was protein-vaccine efficacy as an protection and excellent candidate in the presence Montanide. The expression of recombinant protein was confirmed with SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate) page and Western bloting. 48 BALB/c mice were divided into four groups (TSA/Freund,TSA/Alum + BCG, TSA/Montanide and PBS groups) and immunized with 20 μg of vaccine subcutaneously three times intervals on days 0, 14 and 28. The mice were challenged with parasite 21 days after final immunization. The lymphocyte proliferation was evaluated with Brdu method. Cytokines and also total antibody and subclasses were evaluated with ELISA method. The vaccine formulated with the recombinant TSA protein with Montanide induced lymphocytes proliferation cytokines and total antibody and subclasses as compared with the control group. PMID:27605780

  2. Apoptotic cell clearance of Leishmania major-infected neutrophils by dendritic cells inhibits CD8+ T-cell priming in vitro by Mer tyrosine kinase-dependent signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro-Gomes, F L; Romano, A; Lee, S; Roffê, E; Peters, N C; Debrabant, A; Sacks, D

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are the predominant recruited and infected cells during the early stages of Leishmania major infection in the skin, and depletion of neutrophils promotes immunity to infection transmitted by sand fly bite. In order to better understand how the acute neutrophilic response suppresses immunity, we assessed the consequences of the interaction between neutrophils recovered from the skin-inoculation site and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro. The capture of infected, apoptotic neutrophils by the DCs completely inhibited their cross-presentation function that was dependent on engagement of the receptor tyrosine kinase Mer on the DCs. The capture of uninfected neutrophils, or neutrophils infected with Toxoplasma gondii, had only slight immunomodulatory effects. These studies define the clearance of infected, apoptotic neutrophils by DCs and Mer receptor signaling as central to the early immune evasion strategies of L. major, with relevance to other vector-borne pathogens delivered by bite to the skin. PMID:26658192

  3. The structure of tubulin-binding cofactor A from Leishmania major infers a mode of association during the early stages of microtubule assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Barrack, Keri L.; Fyfe, Paul K.; Hunter, William N.

    2015-04-21

    The structure of a tubulin-binding cofactor from L. major is reported and compared with yeast, plant and human orthologues. Tubulin-binding cofactor A (TBCA) participates in microtubule formation, a key process in eukaryotic biology to create the cytoskeleton. There is little information on how TBCA might interact with β-tubulin en route to microtubule biogenesis. To address this, the protozoan Leishmania major was targeted as a model system. The crystal structure of TBCA and comparisons with three orthologous proteins are presented. The presence of conserved features infers that electrostatic interactions that are likely to involve the C-terminal tail of β-tubulin are key to association. This study provides a reagent and template to support further work in this area.

  4. Vaccination with recombinant Parasite Surface Antigen 2 from Leishmania major induces a Th1 type of immune response but does not protect against infection.

    PubMed

    Sjölander, A; Baldwin, T M; Curtis, J M; Bengtsson, K L; Handman, E

    1998-12-01

    Vaccination with the native Parasite Surface Antigen 2 of Leishmania major with Corynebacterium parvum as adjuvant protects mice from leishmaniasis through a Th1 mediated response. Here we show that vaccination with a recombinant form of this protein, purified from Escherichia coli and administered in iscoms or with C. parvum as adjuvant, does not induce protective immunity despite the induction of Th1 responses. The results suggest that protective immunity depends on the ability of the vaccinating antigen to induce Th1-like T cells with ability to be recalled by infection. Therefore, the conformation of antigens may play a more major role for the induction of T cell mediated immunity than originally considered. PMID:9796067

  5. On dihydroorotate dehydrogenases and their inhibitors and uses.

    PubMed

    Munier-Lehmann, Hélène; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Tangy, Frédéric; Janin, Yves L

    2013-04-25

    Proper nucleosides availability is crucial for the proliferation of living entities (eukaryotic cells, parasites, bacteria, and virus). Accordingly, the uses of inhibitors of the de novo nucleosides biosynthetic pathways have been investigated in the past. In the following we have focused on dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH), the fourth enzyme in the de novo pyrimidine nucleosides biosynthetic pathway. We first described the different types of enzyme in terms of sequence, structure, and biochemistry, including the reported bioassays. In a second part, the series of inhibitors of this enzyme along with a description of their potential or actual uses were reviewed. These inhibitors are indeed used in medicine to treat autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis or multiple sclerosis (leflunomide and teriflunomide) and have been investigated in treatments of cancer, virus, and parasite infections (i.e., malaria) as well as in crop science. PMID:23452331

  6. The Jordanian Mid Jordan Valley is a classic focus of Leishmania major as revealed by RFLP of 56 isolates and 173 ITS-1-PCR-positive clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Mosleh, Ibrahim M; Shönian, Gabriele; Geith, Eid; Al-Jawabreh, Amer; Natsheh, Lina

    2015-01-01

    The identity of the causative species of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in the endemic Jordanian Mid Jordan Valley (JMidJV) was investigated using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplifying the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS-1) followed by the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). The geographical distribution of CL and the usefulness of ITS1 PCR in diagnosis of suspected CL in the study area were also addressed. Over the period from 2004 to 2009, 56 clinical isolates of Leishmania promastigotes and 185 lesion scrapings spotted on filter papers were obtained from suspected CL patients living in the JMidJV, which is divided into northern and southern districts. The majority (67.1%) of patients occurred in the populated eastern part of the southern district. Of the 185 suspected CL patients, 173 (93.5%) were confirmed positive using PCR. Leishmanial DNA was detected in 27 (90%) of 30 patients having clinically atypical lesions of CL and in 60 (92%) of 65 smear- and culture-negative cases having typical lesions of CL. The parasites in all of the 56 isolates and the 173 PCR-positive scrapings were classified as Leishmania major. In conclusion, PCR is useful in diagnosis of CL especially when smear and culture are negative. It is also recommended as a differential diagnostic tool of atypical lesions when CL is endemic. The identification of L. major as the causative species in such a considerable number of CL cases, representative of all mini foci of CL in the study area, shows that the JMidJV is a classic focus of L. major.

  7. Crystal structure of an Fe-S cluster-containing fumarate hydratase enzyme from Leishmania major reveals a unique protein fold.

    PubMed

    Feliciano, Patricia R; Drennan, Catherine L; Nonato, M Cristina

    2016-08-30

    Fumarate hydratases (FHs) are essential metabolic enzymes grouped into two classes. Here, we present the crystal structure of a class I FH, the cytosolic FH from Leishmania major, which reveals a previously undiscovered protein fold that coordinates a catalytically essential [4Fe-4S] cluster. Our 2.05 Å resolution data further reveal a dimeric architecture for this FH that resembles a heart, with each lobe comprised of two domains that are arranged around the active site. Besides the active site, where the substrate S-malate is bound bidentate to the unique iron of the [4Fe-4S] cluster, other binding pockets are found near the dimeric enzyme interface, some of which are occupied by malonate, shown here to be a weak inhibitor of this enzyme. Taken together, these data provide a framework both for investigations of the class I FH catalytic mechanism and for drug design aimed at fighting neglected tropical diseases.

  8. Crystal structure of an Fe-S cluster-containing fumarate hydratase enzyme from Leishmania major reveals a unique protein fold.

    PubMed

    Feliciano, Patricia R; Drennan, Catherine L; Nonato, M Cristina

    2016-08-30

    Fumarate hydratases (FHs) are essential metabolic enzymes grouped into two classes. Here, we present the crystal structure of a class I FH, the cytosolic FH from Leishmania major, which reveals a previously undiscovered protein fold that coordinates a catalytically essential [4Fe-4S] cluster. Our 2.05 Å resolution data further reveal a dimeric architecture for this FH that resembles a heart, with each lobe comprised of two domains that are arranged around the active site. Besides the active site, where the substrate S-malate is bound bidentate to the unique iron of the [4Fe-4S] cluster, other binding pockets are found near the dimeric enzyme interface, some of which are occupied by malonate, shown here to be a weak inhibitor of this enzyme. Taken together, these data provide a framework both for investigations of the class I FH catalytic mechanism and for drug design aimed at fighting neglected tropical diseases. PMID:27528683

  9. Inhibition of Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Overcomes Differentiation Blockade in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sykes, David B; Kfoury, Youmna S; Mercier, François E; Wawer, Mathias J; Law, Jason M; Haynes, Mark K; Lewis, Timothy A; Schajnovitz, Amir; Jain, Esha; Lee, Dongjun; Meyer, Hanna; Pierce, Kerry A; Tolliday, Nicola J; Waller, Anna; Ferrara, Steven J; Eheim, Ashley L; Stoeckigt, Detlef; Maxcy, Katrina L; Cobert, Julien M; Bachand, Jacqueline; Szekely, Brian A; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Sklar, Larry A; Kotz, Joanne D; Clish, Clary B; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Clemons, Paul A; Janzer, Andreas; Schreiber, Stuart L; Scadden, David T

    2016-09-22

    While acute myeloid leukemia (AML) comprises many disparate genetic subtypes, one shared hallmark is the arrest of leukemic myeloblasts at an immature and self-renewing stage of development. Therapies that overcome differentiation arrest represent a powerful treatment strategy. We leveraged the observation that the majority of AML, despite their genetically heterogeneity, share in the expression of HoxA9, a gene normally downregulated during myeloid differentiation. Using a conditional HoxA9 model system, we performed a high-throughput phenotypic screen and defined compounds that overcame differentiation blockade. Target identification led to the unanticipated discovery that inhibition of the enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) enables myeloid differentiation in human and mouse AML models. In vivo, DHODH inhibitors reduced leukemic cell burden, decreased levels of leukemia-initiating cells, and improved survival. These data demonstrate the role of DHODH as a metabolic regulator of differentiation and point to its inhibition as a strategy for overcoming differentiation blockade in AML. PMID:27641501

  10. Structural Plasticity of Malaria Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Allows Selective Binding of Diverse Chemical Scaffolds

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xiaoyi; Gujjar, Ramesh; El Mazouni, Farah; Kaminsky, Werner; Malmquist, Nicholas A.; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.; Phillips, Margaret A.

    2010-01-20

    Malaria remains a major global health burden and current drug therapies are compromised by resistance. Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (PfDHODH) was validated as a new drug target through the identification of potent and selective triazolopyrimidine-based DHODH inhibitors with anti-malarial activity in vivo. Here we report x-ray structure determination of PfDHODH bound to three inhibitors from this series, representing the first of the enzyme bound to malaria specific inhibitors. We demonstrate that conformational flexibility results in an unexpected binding mode identifying a new hydrophobic pocket on the enzyme. Importantly this plasticity allows PfDHODH to bind inhibitors from different chemical classes and to accommodate inhibitor modifications during lead optimization, increasing the value of PfDHODH as a drug target. A second discovery, based on small molecule crystallography, is that the triazolopyrimidines populate a resonance form that promotes charge separation. These intrinsic dipoles allow formation of energetically favorable H-bond interactions with the enzyme. The importance of delocalization to binding affinity was supported by site-directed mutagenesis and the demonstration that triazolopyrimidine analogs that lack this intrinsic dipole are inactive. Finally, the PfDHODH-triazolopyrimidine bound structures provide considerable new insight into species-selective inhibitor binding in this enzyme family. Together, these studies will directly impact efforts to exploit PfDHODH for the development of anti-malarial chemotherapy.

  11. Validity and Reliability of Enzyme Immunoassays Using Leishmania major or L. infantum Antigens for the Diagnosis of Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Arruda, Mauro Maciel; Figueiredo, Fabiano Borges; Cardoso, Fernanda Alvarenga; Hiamamoto, Roberto Mitsuyoshi; Brazuna, Júlia Cristina Macksoud; de Oliveira, Maria Regina Fernandes; Noronha, Elza Ferreira; Romero, Gustavo Adolfo Sierra

    2013-01-01

    Background American visceral leishmaniasis is caused by the protozoan Leishmania infantum. Dogs are the main reservoirs in the domestic transmission cycle. The limited accuracy of diagnostic tests for canine leishmaniasis may contribute to the lack of impact of control measures recommended by the Brazilian Ministry of Health. The objective of this study was to estimate the accuracy of two enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays employing L. major or L. infantum antigens and their reliability between three laboratories of different levels of complexity. Methods A validation study of ELISA techniques using L. major or L. infantum antigens was conducted. Direct visualization of the parasite in hematoxylin/eosin-stained histopathological sections, immunohistochemistry, and isolation of the parasite in culture.were used as gold standard. An animal that was positive in at least one of the tests was defined as infected with L. infantum. Serum samples collected from 1,425 dogs were analyzed. Samples were separated in three aliquots and tested in three different laboratories. Sensitivity, specificity and the area under de ROC curve were calculated and the reliability was evaluated between the participant laboratories. Results The sensitivity was 91.8% and 89.8% for the L. major and L. infantum assays, respectively. The specificity was 83.75% and 82.7% for the L. major and L. infantum assays, respectively. The area under de ROC curve was 0.920 and 0.898 for L. major and L. infantum, respectively. The mean intraclass correlation coefficients between laboratories ranged from 0.890 to 0.948 when L. major was used as antigen, and from 0.818 to 0.879 when L. infantum was used. Interpretation ELISA tests using L. major or L. infantum antigens have similar accuracy and reliability. Our results do not support the substitution of the L. major antigen of the ELISA test currently used for the diagnosis of canine visceral leishmaniasis in Brazil. PMID:23922884

  12. Structure-guided discovery of thiazolidine-2,4-dione derivatives as a novel class of Leishmania major pteridine reductase 1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Leite, Franco Henrique A; Santiago, Priscila Brandão Gomes da Silva; Froes, Thamires Quadros; da Silva Filho, João; da Silva, Suellen Gonçalves; Ximenes, Rafael M; de Faria, Antônio Rodolfo; Brondani, Dalci José; de Albuquerque, Julianna F C; Castilho, Marcelo Santos

    2016-11-10

    Leishmania major, as other protozoan parasites, plague human kind since pre-historic times but it remains a worldwide ailment for which the therapeutic arsenal remains scarce. Although L. major is pteridine- and purine-auxotroph, well-established folate biosynthesis inhibitors, such as methotrexate, have poor effect over the parasite survival. The lack of efficiency is related to an alternative biochemical pathway in which pteridine reductase 1 (PTR1) plays a major role. For this reason, this enzyme has been considered a promising target for anti-leishmanial drug development and several inhibitors that share the substrate scaffold have been reported. In order to design a novel class of PTR1 inhibitors, we employed the thiazolidinone ring as a bioisosteric replacement for pteridine/purine ring. Among seven novel thiazolidine-2,4-dione derivatives reported herein, 2d was identified as the most promising lead by thermal shift assays (ΔTm = 11 °C, p = 0,01). Kinetic assays reveal that 2d has IC50 = 44.67 ± 1.74 μM and shows a noncompetitive behavior. This information guided docking studies and molecular dynamics simulations (50 000 ps) that supports 2d putative binding profile (H-bonding to Ser-111 and Leu-66) and shall be useful to design more potent inhibitors. PMID:27517809

  13. Neutrophil-Derived CCL3 Is Essential for the Rapid Recruitment of Dendritic Cells to the Site of Leishmania major Inoculation in Resistant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Charmoy, Mélanie; Brunner-Agten, Saskia; Aebischer, David; Auderset, Floriane; Launois, Pascal; Milon, Geneviève; Proudfoot, Amanda E. I.; Tacchini-Cottier, Fabienne

    2010-01-01

    Neutrophils are rapidly and massively recruited to sites of microbial infection, where they can influence the recruitment of dendritic cells. Here, we have analyzed the role of neutrophil released chemokines in the early recruitment of dendritic cells (DCs) in an experimental model of Leishmania major infection. We show in vitro, as well as during infection, that the parasite induced the expression of CCL3 selectively in neutrophils from L. major resistant mice. Neutrophil-secreted CCL3 was critical in chemotaxis of immature DCs, an effect lost upon CCL3 neutralisation. Depletion of neutrophils prior to infection, as well as pharmacological or genetic inhibition of CCL3, resulted in a significant decrease in DC recruitment at the site of parasite inoculation. Decreased DC recruitment in CCL3−/− mice was corrected by the transfer of wild type neutrophils at the time of infection. The early release of CCL3 by neutrophils was further shown to have a transient impact on the development of a protective immune response. Altogether, we identified a novel role for neutrophil-secreted CCL3 in the first wave of DC recruitment to the site of infection with L. major, suggesting that the selective release of neutrophil-secreted chemokines may regulate the development of immune response to pathogens. PMID:20140197

  14. Structure-guided discovery of thiazolidine-2,4-dione derivatives as a novel class of Leishmania major pteridine reductase 1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Leite, Franco Henrique A; Santiago, Priscila Brandão Gomes da Silva; Froes, Thamires Quadros; da Silva Filho, João; da Silva, Suellen Gonçalves; Ximenes, Rafael M; de Faria, Antônio Rodolfo; Brondani, Dalci José; de Albuquerque, Julianna F C; Castilho, Marcelo Santos

    2016-11-10

    Leishmania major, as other protozoan parasites, plague human kind since pre-historic times but it remains a worldwide ailment for which the therapeutic arsenal remains scarce. Although L. major is pteridine- and purine-auxotroph, well-established folate biosynthesis inhibitors, such as methotrexate, have poor effect over the parasite survival. The lack of efficiency is related to an alternative biochemical pathway in which pteridine reductase 1 (PTR1) plays a major role. For this reason, this enzyme has been considered a promising target for anti-leishmanial drug development and several inhibitors that share the substrate scaffold have been reported. In order to design a novel class of PTR1 inhibitors, we employed the thiazolidinone ring as a bioisosteric replacement for pteridine/purine ring. Among seven novel thiazolidine-2,4-dione derivatives reported herein, 2d was identified as the most promising lead by thermal shift assays (ΔTm = 11 °C, p = 0,01). Kinetic assays reveal that 2d has IC50 = 44.67 ± 1.74 μM and shows a noncompetitive behavior. This information guided docking studies and molecular dynamics simulations (50 000 ps) that supports 2d putative binding profile (H-bonding to Ser-111 and Leu-66) and shall be useful to design more potent inhibitors.

  15. Loss of TNF signaling facilitates the development of a novel Ly-6C(low) macrophage population permissive for Leishmania major infection.

    PubMed

    Fromm, Phillip D; Kling, Jessica; Mack, Matthias; Sedgwick, Jonathon D; Körner, Heinrich

    2012-06-15

    In the absence of TNF, the normally resistant C57BL/6 (B6.WT) strain develops a fatal, progressive form of leishmaniasis after infection with Leishmania major. It is not yet understood which TNF activity or the lack thereof is responsible for the dramatic progression of leishmaniasis in TNF-negative (B6.TNF(-/-)) mice. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms resulting in the fatal outcome of L. major infection in this gene-deficient mouse strain, we analyzed the monocytic component of the inflammatory infiltrate in the draining popliteal lymph node and the site of the infection using multicolor flow cytometry. The leukocytic infiltrate within the draining lymph node and footpad of B6.TNF(-/-) mice resembled that of B6.WT mice over the first 2 wk of cutaneous L. major infection. Thereafter, the B6.TNF(-/-) mice showed an increase of CD11c(+)Ly-6C(+)CCR2(+) monocytic dendritic cells within the popliteal lymph node in comparison with B6.WT mice. This increase of inflammatory dendritic cells was paired with the accumulation of a novel CD11b(+)Ly-6C(low)CCR2(low) population that was not present in B6.WT mice. This B6.TNF(-/-)- and B6.TNFR1(-/-)-specific cell population was CD115(+)Ly-6G(-)iNOS(-), not apoptotic, and harbored large numbers of parasites.

  16. Structural modeling and docking studies of ribose 5-phosphate isomerase from Leishmania major and Homo sapiens: a comparative analysis for Leishmaniasis treatment.

    PubMed

    Capriles, Priscila V S Z; Baptista, Luiz Phillippe R; Guedes, Isabella A; Guimarães, Ana Carolina R; Custódio, Fabio L; Alves-Ferreira, Marcelo; Dardenne, Laurent E

    2015-02-01

    Leishmaniases are caused by protozoa of the genus Leishmania and are considered the second-highest cause of death worldwide by parasitic infection. The drugs available for treatment in humans are becoming ineffective mainly due to parasite resistance; therefore, it is extremely important to develop a new chemotherapy against these parasites. A crucial aspect of drug design development is the identification and characterization of novel molecular targets. In this work, through an in silico comparative analysis between the genomes of Leishmania major and Homo sapiens, the enzyme ribose 5-phosphate isomerase (R5PI) was indicated as a promising molecular target. R5PI is an important enzyme that acts in the pentose phosphate pathway and catalyzes the interconversion of d-ribose-5-phosphate (R5P) and d-ribulose-5-phosphate (5RP). R5PI activity is found in two analogous groups of enzymes called RpiA (found in H. sapiens) and RpiB (found in L. major). Here, we present the first report of the three-dimensional (3D) structures and active sites of RpiB from L. major (LmRpiB) and RpiA from H. sapiens (HsRpiA). Three-dimensional models were constructed by applying a hybrid methodology that combines comparative and ab initio modeling techniques, and the active site was characterized based on docking studies of the substrates R5P (furanose and ring-opened forms) and 5RP. Our comparative analyses show that these proteins are structural analogs and that distinct residues participate in the interconversion of R5P and 5RP. We propose two distinct reaction mechanisms for the reversible isomerization of R5P to 5RP, which is catalyzed by LmRpiB and HsRpiA. We expect that the present results will be important in guiding future molecular modeling studies to develop new drugs that are specially designed to inhibit the parasitic form of the enzyme without significant effects on the human analog.

  17. Vaccination with Plasmid DNA Encoding TSA/LmSTI1 Leishmanial Fusion Proteins Confers Protection against Leishmania major Infection in Susceptible BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Neto, A.; Webb, J. R.; Greeson, K.; Coler, R. N.; Skeiky, Y. A. W.; Reed, S. G.

    2002-01-01

    We have recently shown that a cocktail containing two leishmanial recombinant antigens (LmSTI1 and TSA) and interleukin-12 (IL-12) as an adjuvant induces solid protection in both a murine and a nonhuman primate model of cutaneous leishmaniasis. However, because IL-12 is difficult to prepare, is expensive, and does not have the stability required for a vaccine product, we have investigated the possibility of using DNA as an alternative means of inducing protective immunity. Here, we present evidence that the antigens TSA and LmSTI1 delivered in a plasmid DNA format either as single genes or in a tandem digene construct induce equally solid protection against Leishmania major infection in susceptible BALB/c mice. Immunization of mice with either TSA DNA or LmSTI1 DNA induced specific CD4+-T-cell responses of the Th1 phenotype without a requirement for specific adjuvant. CD8 responses, as measured by cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte activity, were generated after immunization with TSA DNA but not LmSTI1 DNA. Interestingly, vaccination of mice with TSA DNA consistently induced protection to a much greater extent than LmSTI1 DNA, thus supporting the notion that CD8 responses might be an important accessory arm of the immune response for acquired resistance against leishmaniasis. Moreover, the protection induced by DNA immunization was specific for infection with Leishmania, i.e., the immunization had no effect on the course of infection of the mice challenged with an unrelated intracellular pathogen such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Conversely, immunization of BALB/c mice with a plasmid DNA that is protective against challenge with M. tuberculosis had no effect on the course of infection of these mice with L. major. Together, these results indicate that the protection observed with the leishmanial DNA is mediated by acquired specific immune response rather than by the activation of nonspecific innate immune mechanisms. In addition, a plasmid DNA containing a fusion construct of

  18. Zoonotic Disease in a Peripheral Population: Persistence and Transmission of Leishmania major in a Putative Sink-Source System in the Negev Highlands, Israel

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Ruti; Warburg, Alon; Orshan, Laor; Kotler, Burt P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Populations at the edge of their geographic distributions are referred to as peripheral populations. Very little attention has been given to this topic in the context of persistence of infectious disease in natural populations. In this study, we examined this question using zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) caused by Leishmania major in the Negev Desert of Israel as a model system. Here, we suggest that the regional persistence of Phlebotomus papatasi populations and L. major transmission in the Sede Boqer region could be explained through processes akin to sink-source and/or mainland-island metapopulation dynamics. Given its potentially enzootically superior ecological conditions, we hypothesize that the Zin Valley ecotope constitutes the “mainland” or the “source” patch for the Sede Boqer area where L. major transmission is persistent and resistant to local extinctions (die-outs) whereas the local sand fly populations on the Zin Plateau (“island patch” or “sink patch”) are more prone to local extinctions. Between 2007 and 2008, we trapped sand flies and sand rats in the two areas and compared sand fly abundance and L. major infection prevalence in both. In both 2007 and 2008, sand fly abundance was high and continuous in the Zin Wadi but low and discontinuous in the Zin Plateau. Infection prevalence of sand rats was significantly higher in the Wadi (13%) compared with the Zin Plateau (3%). Minimum infection rate in sand flies did not differ significantly between the two areas. Overall, our results are consistent with the premise that the Zin Valley population is relatively robust in terms of L. major transmission, whereas transmission is potentially more tenuous in the plateau. Understanding the biotic and abiotic processes enabling the persistence of L. major and other vector-borne diseases in peripheral disease foci is important for predicting the effect of anthropogenic land use and climate change. PMID:25072990

  19. Zoonotic disease in a peripheral population: persistence and transmission of Leishmania major in a putative sink-source system in the Negev Highlands, Israel.

    PubMed

    Berger, Ruti; Wasserberg, Gideon; Warburg, Alon; Orshan, Laor; Kotler, Burt P

    2014-08-01

    Populations at the edge of their geographic distributions are referred to as peripheral populations. Very little attention has been given to this topic in the context of persistence of infectious disease in natural populations. In this study, we examined this question using zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) caused by Leishmania major in the Negev Desert of Israel as a model system. Here, we suggest that the regional persistence of Phlebotomus papatasi populations and L. major transmission in the Sede Boqer region could be explained through processes akin to sink-source and/or mainland-island metapopulation dynamics. Given its potentially enzootically superior ecological conditions, we hypothesize that the Zin Valley ecotope constitutes the "mainland" or the "source" patch for the Sede Boqer area where L. major transmission is persistent and resistant to local extinctions (die-outs) whereas the local sand fly populations on the Zin Plateau ("island patch" or "sink patch") are more prone to local extinctions. Between 2007 and 2008, we trapped sand flies and sand rats in the two areas and compared sand fly abundance and L. major infection prevalence in both. In both 2007 and 2008, sand fly abundance was high and continuous in the Zin Wadi but low and discontinuous in the Zin Plateau. Infection prevalence of sand rats was significantly higher in the Wadi (13%) compared with the Zin Plateau (3%). Minimum infection rate in sand flies did not differ significantly between the two areas. Overall, our results are consistent with the premise that the Zin Valley population is relatively robust in terms of L. major transmission, whereas transmission is potentially more tenuous in the plateau. Understanding the biotic and abiotic processes enabling the persistence of L. major and other vector-borne diseases in peripheral disease foci is important for predicting the effect of anthropogenic land use and climate change. PMID:25072990

  20. Stability and toxicity of tris-tolyl bismuth(V) dicarboxylates and their biological activity towards Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Ong, Yih Ching; Blair, Victoria L; Kedzierski, Lukasz; Tuck, Kellie L; Andrews, Philip C

    2015-11-01

    A series of 29 tris-tolyl bismuth(v) di-carboxylato complexes of composition [Bi(Tol)3(O2CR)2] involving either ortho, meta or para substituted tolyl ligands have been synthesized and characterised. Of these 15 were assessed for their toxicity towards Leishmania promastigotes and human fibroblast cells, with ten then being subsequently assessed against parasite amastigotes. The carboxylate ligands are drawn from a series of substituted and biologically relevant benzoic acids which allow a comparison with earlier studies on [BiPh3(O2CR)2] and analogous Sb(v) [SbAr3(O2CR)2] (Ar = Ph and Tol) complexes. Twelve complexes have been structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction and shown to adopt a typical trigonal bipyramidal geometry in which the three tolyl ligands occupy the equatorial plane. NMR studies on two illustrative examples indicate that the complexes are stable in D2O and DMSO but only have a half-life of 1.2 hours in culture medium, with glucose being a contributing factor in decomposition and reduction to Bi(Tol)3. Despite their short lifetime many complexes show significant toxicity towards promastigotes at low concentration (<6 μM) and at that concentration provide for good selectivity indices (parasite vs. mammalian cells), for example 114 for [Bi(o-Tol)3(O2CC6H3(2-OH,5-C6H3(2,4-F2)))2] and 838 for [Bi(m-Tol)3(O2CC6H4(2-OAc))2]. Best activity and selectivity is observed with complexes containing o- and m-tolyl ligands, and it appears the primary influence on fibroblast toxicity is the Ar ligand while the carboxylate influences promastigote toxicity. The complexes are less effective in vitro against the parasite amastigotes, where longer incubation times and harsher chemical and biological environments are encountered in the assay. Nevertheless, there were some statistically relevant differences at 1 μM against the positive controls with the best performing complexes being [Bi(o-Tol)3(O2CC6H4(2-EtO))2] and [Bi(m-Tol)3(O2CC6H4(2-OAc))2

  1. The Nlrp3 inflammasome, IL-1β, and neutrophil recruitment are required for susceptibility to a nonhealing strain of Leishmania major in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Charmoy, Melanie; Hurrell, Benjamin P; Romano, Audrey; Lee, Sang Hun; Ribeiro-Gomes, Flavia; Riteau, Nicolas; Mayer-Barber, Katrin; Tacchini-Cottier, Fabienne; Sacks, David L

    2016-04-01

    Infection of C57BL/6 mice with most Leishmania major strains results in a healing lesion and clearance of parasites from the skin. Infection of C57BL/6 mice with the L. major Seidman strain (LmSd), isolated from a patient with chronic lesions, despite eliciting a strong Th1 response, results in a nonhealing lesion, poor parasite clearance, and complete destruction of the ear dermis. We show here that in comparison to a healing strain, LmSd elicited early upregulation of IL-1β mRNA and IL-1β-producing dermal cells and prominent neutrophil recruitment to the infected skin. Mice deficient in Nlrp3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain, or caspase-1/11, or lacking IL-1β or IL-1 receptor signaling, developed healing lesions and cleared LmSd from the infection site. Mice resistant to LmSd had a stronger antigen-specific Th1 response. The possibility that IL-1β might act through neutrophil recruitment to locally suppress immunity was supported by the healing observed in neutropenic Genista mice. Secretion of mature IL-1β by LmSd-infected macrophages in vitro was dependent on activation of the Nlrp3 inflammasome and caspase-1. These data reveal that Nlrp3 inflammasome-dependent IL-1β, associated with localized neutrophil recruitment, plays a crucial role in the development of a nonhealing form of cutaneous leishmaniasis in conventionally resistant mice.

  2. Crystal Structure of the Leishmania Major Phosphodiesterase LmjPDEB1 and Insight into the Design of hte Parasite-Selective Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang,H.; Yan, Z.; Geng, J.; Kunz, S.; Seebeck, T.; Ke, H.

    2007-01-01

    Human leishmaniasis is a major public health problem in many countries, but chemotherapy is in an unsatisfactory state. Leishmania major phosphodiesterases (LmjPDEs) have been shown to play important roles in cell proliferation and apoptosis of the parasite. Thus LmjPDE inhibitors may potentially represent a novel class of drugs for the treatment of leishmaniasis. Reported here are the kinetic characterization of the LmjPDEB1 catalytic domain and its crystal structure as a complex with 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) at 1.55 Angstroms resolution. The structure of LmjPDEB1 is similar to that of human PDEs. IBMX stacks against the conserved phenylalanine and forms a hydrogen bond with the invariant glutamine, in a pattern common to most inhibitors bound to human PDEs. However, an extensive structural comparison reveals subtle, but significant differences between the active sites of LmjPDEB1 and human PDEs. In addition, a pocket next to the inhibitor binding site is found to be unique to LmjPDEB1. This pocket is isolated by two gating residues in human PDE families, but constitutes a natural expansion of the inhibitor binding pocket in LmjPDEB1. The structure particularity might be useful for the development of parasite-selective inhibitors for the treatment of leishmaniasis.

  3. Different Morphologies of Leishmania major Amastigotes with No Molecular Diversity in a Neglected Endemic Area of Zoonotic Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Spotin, Adel; Rouhani, Soheila; Ghaemmaghami, Parnazsadat; Haghighi, Ali; Zolfaghari, Mohammad Reza; Amirkhani, Aref; Farahmand, Mahin; Bordbar, Ali; Parvizi, Parviz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Molecular diversity of Leishmania major and its morphological changes have become a controversial issue among researchers. Some aspects of polymorphic shapes of amastigotes in clinical manifestations along with molecular variation were evaluated among suspected patients of some exceptional zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis locations in Northern Khuzestan, Southwestern Iran. Methods: Suspected patients (n = 165) were sampled in zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis foci over two consecutive years during 2012-2014. Prepared smears were stained, scaled and measured by ocular micrometer. DNA was extracted from smears; ITS-rDNA and Cytochrome b (Cyt b) markers were amplified, and PCR products were digested by BsuR1 restriction enzyme. Then the RFLP and sequencing were employed. Results: Only L. major was identified in patients containing regular amastigotes' shapes (oval or round) with a size of 2-4 µm in each of classical wet, dry, mixed lesions. Meanwhile, irregular shapes (spindle, pear, or cigarette) were observed separately in non-classical wet lesions with more than 4 µm. Interestingly, a few amastigotes with an external flagellum were observed in some lesions. All sequenced ITS-rDNA and Cyt b genes of L. major did not show any molecular variation (χ 2 P > 0.05), including only one common haplotype (GenBank access no. EF413075). Conclusion: Findings proved that unlike other endemic foci, there is not a meaningful correlation between phenotypic and genotypic features of L. major isolates. This study is considered as the first comprehensive report to incriminate morphometric shapes of L. major amastigotes, which enhances our knowledge concerning their relevance with various clinical appearances and genotypic traits. PMID:26081070

  4. Protection against Leishmania major infection in genetically susceptible BALB/c mice by gp63 delivered orally in attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (AroA- AroD-).

    PubMed Central

    Xu, D; McSorley, S J; Chatfield, S N; Dougan, G; Liew, F Y

    1995-01-01

    The gene encoding the Leishmania major (L. major) promastigote surface glycoprotein, gp63, was introduced into the Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium) aroA- aroD- live oral vaccine strain BRD509 and expressed under the control of a constitutive tac promoter in plasmid pKK233-2. This construct (GID101) expressed gp63 in vitro and was used to immunize highly susceptible BALB/c mice by the oral route. The plasmid was relatively stably inherited by bacteria growing or persisting in the mesenteric lymph nodes of immunized mice. Mice immunized with GID101 developed significant resistance against a challenge infection with L. major compared to controls immunized with BRD509 alone. Spleen and lymph node cells from immunized mice developed a strong in vitro proliferative T-cell response to killed or live L. major. The activated T cells secreted interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) which was abrogated by treatment with anti-CD4 but not with anti-CD8 antibody. The cells did not produce detectable levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4). The immunized mice also produced significant amounts of leishmanial specific IgG2a antibody but did not develop delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) to live parasites. No IgG1 antibody was detected. These data therefore demonstrate that gp63 gene delivered orally by a vaccine strain of S. typhimurium can preferentially induce the development of Th-1 subset of CD4+ T cells and protective immunity in the highly susceptible BALB/c mice. Images Figure 1 PMID:7635511

  5. Polymerase chain reaction detection and inducible nitric-oxide synthase expression of Leishmania major in mice inoculated by two different routes

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Abeer E; Attia, Rasha AH; Eldeek, Hanan EM; Farrag, Haiam Mohammed Mahmoud; Makboul, Rania

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Leishmania major needs a sensitive and specific method for proper diagnosis. This study aims to study the course and histopathology of L. major in certain tissues of experimentally infected BALB/c mice after subcutaneous (sc) and intraperitoneal (ip) inoculation. Materials and Methods: After infecting BALB/c mice using sc and ip inoculation, the histopathology was studied. The kinetoplastic DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for its molecular detection and detect the inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) pattern during the first 3 months of infection. Result: PCR could detect the presence of L. major in all spleens, lymph nodes, and skin ulcers by both inoculation routes while (33%) and (42%) of livers were positive after sc and ip routes, respectively. Chronic inflammatory cell infiltrates with capsulitis was found in the spleen, lymph nodes, and liver. Granulomas were found in the spleen and liver. There was a statistically significant difference in iNOS expression along the experiment in the spleen and lymph nodes by both routes and in the liver by ip only. Apart from the liver, iNOS could not be detected on the 2nd week postinfection and was high after 1 month for both routes in all samples; a moderate decrease at 2 months and the highest decrease were detected after 3 months. Conclusions: L. major inoculation by both routes produce visceral disease in mice, and kinetoplastic DNA PCR can detect its presence from the 2nd week up to the 3rd month postinfection. The iNOS expression was high at 1 and 2 months and remained throughout the 3 months of the experiment; which plays an important role in the disease course and control. PMID:26998433

  6. Hybridization of different antisense oligonucleotides on the surface of gold nanoparticles to silence zinc metalloproteinase gene after uptake by Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Jebali, Ali; Anvari-Tafti, Mohammad Hosssein

    2015-05-01

    The use of antisense oligonucleotides is a novel strategy to treat infectious diseases. In this approach, vital mRNAs are targeted by antisense oligonucleotides. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of gold nanoparticles hybridized with different antisense oligonucleotides on Leishmania (L) major. In this project, gold nanoparticles were first synthesized, and then conjugated with primary oligonucleotides, 3'-AAA-5'. Next, conjugated gold nanoparticles (NP1) were separately hybridized with three types of antisense oligonucleotide from coding reign of GP63 gene (NP2), non-coding reign of GP63 gene (NP3), and both coding and non-coding reigns of GP63 (NP4). Then, 1mL of L. major suspension was separately added to 1mL of different hybridized gold nanoparticles at serial concentrations (1-200μg/mL), and incubated for 24, 48, and 72h at 37°C. Next, the uptake of each nanoparticle was separately measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy. After incubation, the cell viability was separately evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay. Also, the expression of GP63 gene was read out by quantitative-real-time PCR. This study showed that NP2 and NP3 had higher (5-fold) uptake than NP1 and NP4. Moreover, NP2 and NP3 led to less cell viability and gene expression, compared with NP1 and NP4. It could be concluded that both sequence and size of antisense oligonucleotide were important for transfection of L. major. Importantly, these antisense oligonucleotides can be obtained from both coding and non-coding reign of GP63 gene. Moreover, hybridized gold nanoparticles not only could silence GP63 gene, but also could kill L. major.

  7. A Listeria monocytogenes-Based Vaccine That Secretes Sand Fly Salivary Protein LJM11 Confers Long-Term Protection against Vector-Transmitted Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Abi Abdallah, Delbert S.; Pavinski Bitar, Alan; Oliveira, Fabiano; Meneses, Claudio; Park, Justin J.; Mendez, Susana; Kamhawi, Shaden; Valenzuela, Jesus G.

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is a sand fly-transmitted disease characterized by skin ulcers that carry significant scarring and social stigmatization. Over the past years, there has been cumulative evidence that immunity to specific sand fly salivary proteins confers a significant level of protection against leishmaniasis. In this study, we used an attenuated strain of Listeria monocytogenes as a vaccine expression system for LJM11, a sand fly salivary protein identified as a good vaccine candidate. We observed that mice were best protected against an intradermal needle challenge with Leishmania major and sand fly saliva when vaccinated intravenously. However, this protection was short-lived. Importantly, groups of vaccinated mice were protected long term when challenged with infected sand flies. Protection correlated with smaller lesion size, fewer scars, and better parasite control between 2 and 6 weeks postchallenge compared to the control group of mice vaccinated with the parent L. monocytogenes strain not expressing LJM11. Moreover, protection correlated with high numbers of CD4+, gamma interferon-positive (IFN-γ+), tumor necrosis factor alpha-positive/negative (TNF-α+/−), interleukin-10-negative (IL-10−) cells and low numbers of CD4+ IFN-γ+/− TNF-α− IL-10+ T cells at 2 weeks postchallenge. Overall, our data indicate that delivery of LJM11 by Listeria is a promising vaccination strategy against cutaneous leishmaniasis inducing long-term protection against ulcer formation following a natural challenge with infected sand flies. PMID:24733091

  8. Leishmania major: anti-leishmanial activity of Nuphar lutea extract mediated by the activation of transcription factor NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Lital; El-On, Joseph; Golan-Goldhirsh, Avi; Gopas, Jacob

    2010-12-01

    Here we report the effect of a partially purified alkaloid fraction (NUP) of Nuphar lutea on nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) expression and studied its mechanism of toxicity against Leishmania major in C3H mice peritoneal macrophages. NUP was found to be a mixture of thermo-stable dimeric sesquiterpene thioalkaloids containing mainly thionupharidines. The anti-leishmanial activity was shown to be mediated through the activation of NF-κB and increased iNOS production. Additionally, the nitric oxide inhibitor, N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (0.5mM) totally reverted the anti-leishmanial effect of NUP (0.25 and 0.5μg/ml). NUP was also shown to act as an anti-oxidant, almost completely inhibiting the macrophage respiratory burst activity. However, no elevated lysozyme (EC3.2.1.17) or β-galactosidase (EC3.2.1.23) activities were demonstrated in macrophages treated with NUP. This study suggests, that the activity of NUP is mediated by NF-κB activation and the production of nitric oxide which is dependent on the L-arginine:NO pathway. PMID:20515684

  9. Characterization of a compensatory mutant of Leishmania major that lacks ether lipids but exhibits normal growth, and G418 and hygromycin resistance.

    PubMed

    Zufferey, Rachel; Bibis, Stergios S; Zhu, Tongtong; Dhalladoo, Subbhalakshmi

    2012-03-01

    Ether glycerolipid biosynthesis in Leishmania major initiates with the acylation of dihydroxyacetonephosphate by the glycosomal dihydroxyacetonephosphate acyltransferase LmDAT. We previously reported that a null mutant of LmDAT is severely affected in logarithmic growth, survival during stationary phase, and in virulence in mice. In addition, it lacks all ether glycerolipids, produces altered forms of the ether-lipid based virulence factors lipophosphoglycan and increased levels of GPI-anchored protein gp63. Here, we describe the characterization of a compensatory mutant of a null strain of LmDAT, Δlmdat/Δlmdat(rev). Similarly to the null mutant, the Δlmdat/Δlmdat(rev) strain formed altered forms of lipophosphoglycan and increased levels of gp63, and was avirulent in mice infection. Further, dihydroxyacetonephosphate acyltransferase activity was absent in the revertant clone, indicating that a mutation in another acyltransferase gene did not confer dihydroxyacetonephosphate specificity. In contrast, the revertant grew normally but still exhibited poor survival during stationary phase. In addition, agarose gel analysis of its genomic DNA failed to detect any amplified DNA. Surprisingly, its sensitivity to aminoglycoside based antibiotics G418 and hygromycin was lower than that of the null mutant, wild type and complemented line. PMID:22306069

  10. Peganum harmala Aqueous and Ethanol Extracts Effects on Lesions Caused by Leishmania major (MRHO/IR/75/ER) in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Khoshzaban, Fariba; Ghaffarifar, Fatemeh; Jamshidi Koohsari, Hamid Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Leishmaniasis is one of the six most common parasitic infections in the tropical regions. There are different therapeutic modalities, however therapeutic resistance is developed and resulted in numerous problems. Therefore, evaluation of other therapeutic modalities is performed extensively. Objectives: The current study aimed to compare the therapeutic response of cutaneous leishmaniasis with Glucantime and Peganum harmala extracts (aqueous and ethanol) in the animal model. Materials and Methods: The therapeutic response of Leishmania major to Glucantime and P. harmala extracts (aqueous and ethanol) in animal model was studied in BALB/c mice. These mice were divided into four groups according to receiving either one of these three agents, and the control group. The therapeutic response was evaluated according to the parasitic load before and after treatment and also with measuring the size of the lesions. Results: The results showed that ethanol extract of P. harmala had good therapeutic efficacy in treatment of lesions in mice (P < 0.05), and the efficacy was significant in the eighth week after the treatment. There was also a statistically significant difference between the groups regarding the parasitic load (P < 0.05). Conclusions: According to the current study results, it may be concluded that ethanol extract of P. harmala is efficient in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis, and the efficiency is comparable with that of Glucantime. PMID:25368792

  11. Genome-wide analysis of small nucleolar RNAs of Leishmania major reveals a rich repertoire of RNAs involved in modification and processing of rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Eliaz, Dror; Doniger, Tirza; Tkacz, Itai Dov; Biswas, Viplov Kumar; Gupta, Sachin Kumar; Kolev, Nikolay G; Unger, Ron; Ullu, Elisabetta; Tschudi, Christian; Michaeli, Shulamit

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosomatids are protozoan parasites and the causative agent of infamous infectious diseases. These organisms regulate their gene expression mainly at the post-transcriptional level and possess characteristic RNA processing mechanisms. In this study, we analyzed the complete repertoire of Leishmania major small nucleolar (snoRNA) RNAs by performing RNA-seq analysis on RNAs that were affinity-purified using the C/D snoRNA core protein, SNU13, and the H/ACA core protein, NHP2. This study revealed a large collection of C/D and H/ACA snoRNAs, organized in gene clusters generally containing both snoRNA types. Abundant snoRNAs were identified and predicted to guide trypanosome-specific rRNA cleavages. The repertoire of snoRNAs was compared to that of the closely related Trypanosoma brucei, and 80% of both C/D and H/ACA molecules were found to have functional homologues. The comparative analyses elucidated how snoRNAs evolved to generate molecules with analogous functions in both species. Interestingly, H/ACA RNAs have great flexibility in their ability to guide modifications, and several of the RNA species can guide more than one modification, compensating for the presence of single hairpin H/ACA snoRNA in these organisms. Placing the predicted modifications on the rRNA secondary structure revealed hypermodification regions mostly in domains which are modified in other eukaryotes, in addition to trypanosome-specific modifications. PMID:25970223

  12. Characterization of a compensatory mutant of Leishmania major that lacks ether lipids but exhibits normal growth, and G418 and hygromycin resistance.

    PubMed

    Zufferey, Rachel; Bibis, Stergios S; Zhu, Tongtong; Dhalladoo, Subbhalakshmi

    2012-03-01

    Ether glycerolipid biosynthesis in Leishmania major initiates with the acylation of dihydroxyacetonephosphate by the glycosomal dihydroxyacetonephosphate acyltransferase LmDAT. We previously reported that a null mutant of LmDAT is severely affected in logarithmic growth, survival during stationary phase, and in virulence in mice. In addition, it lacks all ether glycerolipids, produces altered forms of the ether-lipid based virulence factors lipophosphoglycan and increased levels of GPI-anchored protein gp63. Here, we describe the characterization of a compensatory mutant of a null strain of LmDAT, Δlmdat/Δlmdat(rev). Similarly to the null mutant, the Δlmdat/Δlmdat(rev) strain formed altered forms of lipophosphoglycan and increased levels of gp63, and was avirulent in mice infection. Further, dihydroxyacetonephosphate acyltransferase activity was absent in the revertant clone, indicating that a mutation in another acyltransferase gene did not confer dihydroxyacetonephosphate specificity. In contrast, the revertant grew normally but still exhibited poor survival during stationary phase. In addition, agarose gel analysis of its genomic DNA failed to detect any amplified DNA. Surprisingly, its sensitivity to aminoglycoside based antibiotics G418 and hygromycin was lower than that of the null mutant, wild type and complemented line.

  13. In vitro efficacy of ethanolic extract of Artemisia absinthium (Asteraceae) against Leishmania major L. using cell sensitivity and flow cytometry assays.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Kourosh; Shahidi-Hakak, Fatemeh; Asgari, Qasem; Hatam, Gholam Reza; Fakoorziba, Mohammad Reza; Miri, Ramin; Moemenbellah-Fard, Mohammad Djaefar

    2016-09-01

    Leishmaniasis is one of the most neglected human diseases with an estimated global burden ranking second in mortality and fourth in morbidity among the tropical infections. Chemotherapy involving the use of drugs like glucantime is the mainstay treatment in endemic areas of Iran. Drug resistance is increasingly prevalent, so search for alternative therapy is gathering pace. Medicinal herbs, like wormwood Artemisia, have chemical compounds effective against a number of pathogens. In this study, the efficacy of ethanol extract from Artemisia absinthium (Asteraceae) against Leishmania major L. was investigated in vitro. The outcome of different effective doses (1-40 mg/ml) of ethanol extracts from this medicinal herb, A. absinthium, on a standard Iranian parasite strain of L. major was examined. The L. major promastigote cell sensitivity and mortality or viability effects due to the addition of herbal extract were measured using the MTT assay and the flow cytometry technique, respectively. There was complete agreement between the two assays. The lethal concentration (LC50) was measured as 101 mg/ml. Some contrasting relationships between the medicinal herb concentrations and the viability of parasites were observed; so that there was an increased multiplication of the parasite at low concentrations of the drug, but an anti-parasitic apoptotic effect was seen at high concentrations of A. absinthium. It was concluded that there might be one or more chemical constituents within the herbal extract of wormwood which at high concentration controlled cell division and affected the relevant activity within the only one giant mitochondrion in this flagellate parasite. At low doses, however, it showed the opposite effect of leading to mitotic cell divisions. PMID:27605775

  14. In vitro efficacy of ethanolic extract of Artemisia absinthium (Asteraceae) against Leishmania major L. using cell sensitivity and flow cytometry assays.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Kourosh; Shahidi-Hakak, Fatemeh; Asgari, Qasem; Hatam, Gholam Reza; Fakoorziba, Mohammad Reza; Miri, Ramin; Moemenbellah-Fard, Mohammad Djaefar

    2016-09-01

    Leishmaniasis is one of the most neglected human diseases with an estimated global burden ranking second in mortality and fourth in morbidity among the tropical infections. Chemotherapy involving the use of drugs like glucantime is the mainstay treatment in endemic areas of Iran. Drug resistance is increasingly prevalent, so search for alternative therapy is gathering pace. Medicinal herbs, like wormwood Artemisia, have chemical compounds effective against a number of pathogens. In this study, the efficacy of ethanol extract from Artemisia absinthium (Asteraceae) against Leishmania major L. was investigated in vitro. The outcome of different effective doses (1-40 mg/ml) of ethanol extracts from this medicinal herb, A. absinthium, on a standard Iranian parasite strain of L. major was examined. The L. major promastigote cell sensitivity and mortality or viability effects due to the addition of herbal extract were measured using the MTT assay and the flow cytometry technique, respectively. There was complete agreement between the two assays. The lethal concentration (LC50) was measured as 101 mg/ml. Some contrasting relationships between the medicinal herb concentrations and the viability of parasites were observed; so that there was an increased multiplication of the parasite at low concentrations of the drug, but an anti-parasitic apoptotic effect was seen at high concentrations of A. absinthium. It was concluded that there might be one or more chemical constituents within the herbal extract of wormwood which at high concentration controlled cell division and affected the relevant activity within the only one giant mitochondrion in this flagellate parasite. At low doses, however, it showed the opposite effect of leading to mitotic cell divisions.

  15. Comparative assessment of a DNA and protein Leishmania donovani gamma glutamyl cysteine synthetase vaccine to cross-protect against murine cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by L. major or L. mexicana infection.

    PubMed

    Campbell, S A; Alawa, J; Doro, B; Henriquez, F L; Roberts, C W; Nok, A; Alawa, C B I; Alsaadi, M; Mullen, A B; Carter, K C

    2012-02-01

    Leishmaniasis is a major health problem and it is estimated that 12 million people are currently infected. A vaccine which could cross-protect people against different Leishmania spp. would facilitate control of this disease as more than one species of Leishmania may be present. In this study the ability of a DNA vaccine, using the full gene sequence for L. donovani gamma glutamyl cysteine synthetase (γGCS) incorporated in the pVAX vector (pVAXγGCS), and a protein vaccine, using the corresponding recombinant L. donovani γGCS protein (LdγGCS), to protect against L. major or L. mexicana infection was evaluated. DNA vaccination gave transient protection against L. major and no protection against L. mexicana despite significantly enhancing specific antibody titres in vaccinated infected mice compared to infected controls. Vaccination with the LdγGCS protected against both species but only if the protein was incorporated into non-ionic surfactant vesicles for L. mexicana. The results of this study indicate that a L. donovani γGCS vaccine could be used to vaccinate against more than one Leishmania species but only if the recombinant protein is used.

  16. Expression of the E3L Gene of Vaccinia Virus in Transgenic Mice Decreases Host Resistance to Vaccinia Virus and Leishmania major Infections▿

    PubMed Central

    Domingo-Gil, Elena; Pérez-Jiménez, Eva; Ventoso, Iván; Nájera, José L.; Esteban, Mariano

    2008-01-01

    The E3L gene of vaccinia virus (VACV) encodes the E3 protein that in cultured cells inhibits the activation of interferon (IFN)-induced proteins, double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR), 2′-5′-oligoadenylate synthetase/RNase L (2-5A system) and adenosine deaminase (ADAR-1), thus helping the virus to evade host responses. Here, we have characterized the in vivo E3 functions in a murine inducible cell culture system (E3L-TetOFF) and in transgenic mice (TgE3L). Inducible E3 expression in cultured cells conferred on cells resistance to the antiviral action of IFN against different viruses, while expression of the E3L gene in TgE3L mice triggered enhanced sensitivity of the animals to pathogens. Virus infection monitored in TgE3L mice by different inoculation routes (intraperitoneal and tail scarification) showed that transgenic mice became more susceptible to VACV infection than control mice. TgE3L mice were also more susceptible to Leishmania major infection, leading to an increase in parasitemia compared to control mice. The enhanced sensitivity of TgE3L mice to VACV and L. major infections occurred together with alterations in the host immune system, as revealed by decreased T-cell responses to viral antigens in the spleen and lymph nodes and by differences in the levels of specific innate cell populations. These results demonstrate that expression of the E3L gene in transgenic mice partly reverses the resistance of the host to viral and parasitic infections and that these effects are associated with immune alterations. PMID:17959665

  17. Structure determination of glycogen synthase kinase-3 from Leishmania major and comparative inhibitor structure-activity relationships with Trypanosoma brucei GSK-3

    SciTech Connect

    Ojo, Kayode K; Arakaki, Tracy L; Napuli, Alberto J; Inampudi, Krishna K; Keyloun, Katelyn R; Zhang, Li; Hol, Wim G.J.; Verlind, Christophe L.M.J.; Merritt, Ethan A; Van Voorhis, Wesley C

    2012-04-24

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is a drug target under intense investigation in pharmaceutical companies and constitutes an attractive piggyback target for eukaryotic pathogens. Two different GSKs are found in trypanosomatids, one about 150 residues shorter than the other. GSK-3 short (GeneDB: Tb927.10.13780) has previously been validated genetically as a drug target in Trypanosoma brucei by RNAi induced growth retardation; and chemically by correlation between enzyme and in vitro growth inhibition. Here, we report investigation of the equivalent GSK-3 short enzymes of L. major (LmjF18.0270) and L. infantum (LinJ18_V3.0270, identical in amino acid sequences to LdonGSK-3 short) and a crystal structure of LmajGSK-3 short at 2 Å resolution. The inhibitor structure-activity relationships (SARs) of L. major and L. infantum are virtually identical, suggesting that inhibitors could be useful for both cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis. Leishmania spp. GSK-3 short has different inhibitor SARs than TbruGSK-3 short, which can be explained mostly by two variant residues in the ATP-binding pocket. Indeed, mutating these residues in the ATP-binding site of LmajGSK-3 short to the TbruGSK-3 short equivalents results in a mutant LmajGSK-3 short enzyme with SAR more similar to that of TbruGSK-3 short. The differences between human GSK-3β (HsGSK-3β) and LmajGSK-3 short SAR suggest that compounds which selectively inhibit LmajGSK-3 short may be found.

  18. Different cytokines are required for induction and maintenance of the Th2 type response in DBA/2 mice resistant to infection with Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Nashed, B F; Maekawa, Y; Takashima, M; Zhang, T; Ishii, K; Dainichi, T; Ishikawa, H; Sakai, T; Hisaeda, H; Himeno, K

    2000-10-01

    Experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis is a useful model in studying the mechanism regulating immune responses between T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th2. Mice susceptible to Leishmania major infection such as BALB/c (H-2(d)) are associated with the induction of the disease-promoting Th2 response, while the resistant mice such as DBA/2 (H-2(d)) develop the protective Th1 response. To understand the induction mechanism of Th1 and Th2 responses, it is necessary to establish an immunization scheme by which the induction of each Th response can be easily and experimentally controlled. Adjuvants are known to enhance the immune responses through the combined effect of several factors: prolonged release of antigen, migration of cells, mitogenic effect and so forth. When the genetically resistant DBA/2 mice were immunized twice with soluble leishmanial antigen (SLA), emulsified in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) before L. major inoculation, these mice mounted a Th2 cell response and suffered from progressive infection. While IL-4 and IL-13 were upregulated early after the infection in both healer and non-healer groups of mice, IL-5 and IL-10 were upregulated only in non-healer mice. From these results, IL-5 and IL-10 appear to have an important role, at least in the early phases of the infection, rather than IL-4 and IL-13 in establishing the disease-promoting Th2 response in leishmaniasis. Further, IL-9 was found to be expressed in both BALB/c and DBA/2 mice immunized with IFA/SLA. This cytokine may support the establishment of a Th2 response in these mice. Therefore it is suggested that Th2 cytokines play different roles between priming and maintaining the Th2 immune response after the infection.

  19. Reversible inhibition of contractions of mammalian cardiomyocytes and of smooth muscle by the protistan parasite Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, R

    2005-11-25

    Myotropic neuropeptides have been isolated from vertebrates and invertebrates. Recently, a myoinhibitory peptide from the protist Leishmaniamajor was isolated, and its function in the sand fly vector was described. Similar lysates of cultured L. major were tested for their ability to inhibit contractions in mammalian cell and tissue preparations. L. major proteins (LMP) (34 microg/ml) completely stopped spontaneous contractions of cultured rat cardiomyocytes; cells resumed contracting after a saline wash. An application of 880 microg/ml LMP significantly decreased force of contractions (36%) in strips of guinea pig ileum precontracted with nicotine (p<0.01) but not with acetylcholine (p>0.01). Ileal strips rinsed with Tyrode's solution and again stimulated with nicotine contracted normally. Contractile force of ileal strips electrically stimulated with 40 V was reduced in a dose-dependent manner (30, 76, and 100%) (p<0.01) by increasing concentrations of LMP (220, 440, and 880 microg/ml). This ileal preparation resumed contracting after rinsing with Tyrode's solution. Oxytocin-induced contractions of guinea pig uterine strips were reduced significantly in a dose-dependent manner (21 and 55%) (p<0.01) by increasing concentrations (170 and 310 microg/ml) of LMP and resumed contracting normally after rinsing with Tyrode's solution. Modes of action for L. major myoinhibitory factors may include either decreasing Ca(2+) influx or increasing Ca(2+) efflux in susceptible muscle. Protistan-induced inotropism is discussed in light of exacerbating pathology of disease.

  20. Dendritic cell-mediated vaccination relies on interleukin-4 receptor signaling to avoid tissue damage after Leishmania major infection of BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Masic, Anita; Hurdayal, Ramona; Nieuwenhuizen, Natalie E; Brombacher, Frank; Moll, Heidrun

    2012-01-01

    Prevention of tissue damages at the site of Leishmania major inoculation can be achieved if the BALB/c mice are systemically given L. major antigen (LmAg)-loaded bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DC) that had been exposed to CpG-containing oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODN). As previous studies allowed establishing that interleukin-4 (IL-4) is involved in the redirection of the immune response towards a type 1 profile, we were interested in further exploring the role of IL-4. Thus, wild-type (wt) BALB/c mice or DC-specific IL-4 receptor alpha (IL-4Rα)-deficient (CD11c(cre)IL-4Rα(-/lox)) BALB/c mice were given either wt or IL-4Rα-deficient LmAg-loaded bone marrow-derived DC exposed or not to CpG ODN prior to inoculation of 2×10⁵ stationary-phase L. major promastigotes into the BALB/c footpad. The results provide evidence that IL4/IL-4Rα-mediated signaling in the vaccinating DC is required to prevent tissue damage at the site of L. major inoculation, as properly conditioned wt DC but not IL-4Rα-deficient DC were able to confer resistance. Furthermore, uncontrolled L. major population size expansion was observed in the footpad and the footpad draining lymph nodes of CD11c(cre)IL-4Rα(-/lox) mice immunized with CpG ODN-exposed LmAg-loaded IL-4Rα-deficient DC, indicating the influence of IL-4Rα-mediated signaling in host DC to control parasite replication. In addition, no footpad damage occurred in BALB/c mice that were systemically immunized with LmAg-loaded wt DC doubly exposed to CpG ODN and recombinant IL-4. We discuss these findings and suggest that the IL4/IL4Rα signaling pathway could be a key pathway to trigger when designing vaccines aimed to prevent damaging processes in tissues hosting intracellular microorganisms.

  1. Electroacupuncture at the ST36 acupoint increases interleukin-4 responsiveness in macrophages, generation of alternatively activated macrophages and susceptibility to Leishmania major infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Electroacupuncture (EA) has been used to treat inflammatory diseases. Alternatively activated macrophages (AAMo) stimulated by cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-13 are anti-inflammatory and mildly microbicidal. This study aimed to evaluate whether EA at the Zusanli acupoint (ST36) would change the profile of healthy murine macrophages, particularly the generation of AAMo and susceptibility to Leishmania major infection. Methods BALB/c mice were treated with EA (15/30 Hz) at the ST36 acupoint for 20 min/d for 5 d. After the final EA session, the mice were euthanized and their peritoneal cells were harvested and counted for determination of arginase activity, nitric oxide (NO) production and microbicidal activity after culture in the presence or absence of IL-4, interferon-γ (IFNγ) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or both IFNγ and LPS. Twelve mice were infected with L. major promastigotes into the footpads after the final EA session and the infection course was monitored. Results Peritoneal cells freshly obtained from EA-treated mice had similar arginase and microbicidal activities to cells from sham-treated mice. After culture with IL-4, cells from EA-treated mice exhibited significant increases in the arginase activity (sham: 58 ± 11.3 vs. EA: 80.7 ± 4.6%, P = 0.025) and number of parasites/infected cell (sham: 2.5 ± 0.4 vs. EA: 4.3 ± 0.8 cells, P = 0.007). The NO production was lower in cells from EA-treated mice cultured in the presence of a combination of IFNγ and LPS (sham: 31.6 ± 6.5 vs. EA: 22.3 ± 2.1 μM, P = 0.025). The lesion size in mice infected with L. major promastigotes was larger in EA-treated mice (sham: 3.26 ± 0.29 vs. EA: 2.23 ± 0.4 mm, P = 0.039). Conclusion EA at the ST36 acupoint increases IL-4 responsiveness in macrophages, Generation of AAMo and susceptibility to L. major infection PMID:22838729

  2. In Silico Analysis of Six Known Leishmania major Antigens and In Vitro Evaluation of Specific Epitopes Eliciting HLA-A2 Restricted CD8 T Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Seyed, Negar; Zahedifard, Farnaz; Safaiyan, Shima; Gholami, Elham; Doustdari, Fatemeh; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Mirzaei, Maryam; Saeedi Eslami, Nasir; Khadem Sadegh, Akbar; Eslami far, Ali; Sharifi, Iraj; Rafati, Sima

    2011-01-01

    Background As a potent CD8+ T cell activator, peptide vaccine has found its way in vaccine development against intracellular infections and cancer, but not against leishmaniasis. The first step toward a peptide vaccine is epitope mapping of different proteins according to the most frequent HLA types in a population. Methods and Findings Six Leishmania (L.) major-related candidate antigens (CPB,CPC,LmsTI-1,TSA,LeIF and LPG-3) were screened for potential CD8+ T cell activating 9-mer epitopes presented by HLA-A*0201 (the most frequent HLA-A allele). Online software including SYFPEITHI, BIMAS, EpiJen, Rankpep, nHLApred, NetCTL and Multipred were used. Peptides were selected only if predicted by almost all programs, according to their predictive scores. Pan-A2 presentation of selected peptides was confirmed by NetMHCPan1.1. Selected peptides were pooled in four peptide groups and the immunogenicity was evaluated by in vitro stimulation and intracellular cytokine assay of PBMCs from HLA-A2+ individuals recovered from L. major. HLA-A2− individuals recovered from L. major and HLA-A2+ healthy donors were included as control groups. Individual response of HLA-A2+ recovered volunteers as percent of CD8+/IFN-γ+ T cells after in vitro stimulation against peptide pools II and IV was notably higher than that of HLA-A2− recovered individuals. Based on cutoff scores calculated from the response of HLA-A2− recovered individuals, 31.6% and 13.3% of HLA-A2+ recovered persons responded above cutoff in pools II and IV, respectively. ELISpot and ELISA results confirmed flow cytometry analysis. The response of HLA-A2− recovered individuals against peptide pools I and III was detected similar and even higher than HLA-A2+ recovered individuals. Conclusion Using in silico prediction we demonstrated specific response to LmsTI-1 (pool II) and LPG-3- (pool IV) related peptides specifically presented in HLA-A*0201 context. This is among the very few reports mapping L. major epitopes for

  3. A single intradermal administration of soluble leishmanial antigen and plasmid expressing interleukin-12 protects BALB/c mice from Leishmania major infection.

    PubMed

    Yamakami, K; Akao, S; Sato, M; Nitta, Y; Miyazaki, J; Tadakuma, T

    2001-07-01

    In murine leishmaniasis, the induction of the T-helper type 1 (Th1) response contributes to infection resistance, whereas the establishment of the Th2 response makes the mice susceptible to infection. Interleukin-12 (IL-12) plays a pivotal role in the diversification of immune responses to the Th1 type. In this study, we tested whether the co-administration of IL-12 expression plasmid which compose p35 and p40 subunits and soluble leishmanial antigen (SLA) will skew the susceptible BALB/c mice to Th1 response and protect from leishmaniasis. When the mice were intradermally injected with the combination of IL-12 plasmid and SLA 7 days prior to the challenge with 1x10(6) promastigotes of Leishmania major, the local lesions completely healed and the parasite burden in the local lymph nodes significantly decreased. The cured mice attained long-term immunity, and were resistant to any subsequent rechallenge of the lethal dose of the parasite. The protective effect was associated with the development of a Th1 response, as demonstrated by the enhanced level of antigen-specific interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and dominant production of IgG2a in the serum. In contrast, the administration of empty plasmid plus SLA or IL-12 plasmid alone failed to protect the disease and shape the Th1 response. Furthermore, the protective efficiency induced by the vaccination was clearly prevented by the injection of either neutralizing anti-IL-12 mAb or anti-IFN-gamma mAb. The IL-12 expression plasmid is thus an effective adjuvant for the elicitation of a protective Th1 response against leishmaniasis and is therefore, considered to be appropriate for vaccinations that require the induction of Th1 type immunity.

  4. LmSmdB: an integrated database for metabolic and gene regulatory network in Leishmania major and Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Patel, Priyanka; Mandlik, Vineetha; Singh, Shailza

    2016-03-01

    A database that integrates all the information required for biological processing is essential to be stored in one platform. We have attempted to create one such integrated database that can be a one stop shop for the essential features required to fetch valuable result. LmSmdB (L. major and S. mansoni database) is an integrated database that accounts for the biological networks and regulatory pathways computationally determined by integrating the knowledge of the genome sequences of the mentioned organisms. It is the first database of its kind that has together with the network designing showed the simulation pattern of the product. This database intends to create a comprehensive canopy for the regulation of lipid metabolism reaction in the parasite by integrating the transcription factors, regulatory genes and the protein products controlled by the transcription factors and hence operating the metabolism at genetic level.

  5. Deficiency of prolactin-inducible protein leads to impaired Th1 immune response and susceptibility to Leishmania major in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Jintao; Liu, Dong; Mou, Zhirong; Ihedioha, Olivia C; Blanchard, Anne; Jia, Ping; Myal, Yvonne; Uzonna, Jude E

    2015-04-01

    Although the strategic production of prolactin-inducible protein (PIP) at several ports of pathogen entry into the body suggests it might play a role in host defense, no study has directly implicated it in immunity against any infectious agent. Here, we show for the first time that PIP deficiency is associated with reduced numbers of CD4(+) T cells in peripheral lymphoid tissues and impaired CD4(+) Th1-cell differentiation in vitro. In vivo, CD4(+) T cells from OVA-immunized, PIP-deficient mice showed significantly impaired proliferation and IFN-γ production following in vitro restimulation. Furthermore, PIP-deficient mice were highly susceptible to Leishmani major infection and failed to control lesion progression and parasite proliferation. This susceptibility was associated with impaired NO production and leishmanicidal activity of PIP KO macrophages following IFN-γ and LPS stimulation. Collectively, our findings implicate PIP as an important regulator of CD4(+) Th1-cell-mediated immunity.

  6. Novel Diketopiperazine Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Inhibitors Purified from Traditional Tibetan Animal Medicine Osteon Myospalacem Baileyi.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; Wen, Huaixiu; Shao, Yun; Yu, Ruitao; Liu, Zenggen; Wang, Shuo; Wang, Qilan; Zhao, Xiaohui; Zhang, Peng; Tao, Yanduo; Mei, Lijuan

    2015-10-01

    Traditional Tibetan medicine provides an abundant source of knowledge on human ailments and their treatment. As such, it is necessary to explore their active single compounds used to treat these ailments to discover lead compounds with good pharmacologic properties. In this present work, animal medicine, Osteon Myospalacem Baileyi extracts have been separated using a two-dimensional preparative chromatographic method to obtain single compounds with high purity as part of the following pharmacological research. Five high-purity cyclic dipeptides from chromatography work were studied for their dihydroorotate dehydrogenase inhibitory activity on recombinant human dihydroorotate dehydrogenase enzyme and compound Fr. 1-4 was found to contain satisfying inhibition activity. The molecular modeling study suggests that the active compound Fr. 1-4 may have a teriflunomide-like binding mode. Then, the energy decomposition study suggests that the hydrogen bond between Fr. 1-4 and Arg136 can improve the binding mode to indirectly increase the van der Waals binding energy. All the results above together come to the conclusion that the 2, 5-diketopiperazine structure group can interact with the polar residues well in the active pocket using electrostatic power. If some proper hydrophobic groups can be added to the sides of the 2, 5-diketopiperazine group, it is believed that better 2, 5-diketopiperazine dihydroorotate dehydrogenase inhibitors will be found in the future. PMID:25626527

  7. Novel Diketopiperazine Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Inhibitors Purified from Traditional Tibetan Animal Medicine Osteon Myospalacem Baileyi.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; Wen, Huaixiu; Shao, Yun; Yu, Ruitao; Liu, Zenggen; Wang, Shuo; Wang, Qilan; Zhao, Xiaohui; Zhang, Peng; Tao, Yanduo; Mei, Lijuan

    2015-10-01

    Traditional Tibetan medicine provides an abundant source of knowledge on human ailments and their treatment. As such, it is necessary to explore their active single compounds used to treat these ailments to discover lead compounds with good pharmacologic properties. In this present work, animal medicine, Osteon Myospalacem Baileyi extracts have been separated using a two-dimensional preparative chromatographic method to obtain single compounds with high purity as part of the following pharmacological research. Five high-purity cyclic dipeptides from chromatography work were studied for their dihydroorotate dehydrogenase inhibitory activity on recombinant human dihydroorotate dehydrogenase enzyme and compound Fr. 1-4 was found to contain satisfying inhibition activity. The molecular modeling study suggests that the active compound Fr. 1-4 may have a teriflunomide-like binding mode. Then, the energy decomposition study suggests that the hydrogen bond between Fr. 1-4 and Arg136 can improve the binding mode to indirectly increase the van der Waals binding energy. All the results above together come to the conclusion that the 2, 5-diketopiperazine structure group can interact with the polar residues well in the active pocket using electrostatic power. If some proper hydrophobic groups can be added to the sides of the 2, 5-diketopiperazine group, it is believed that better 2, 5-diketopiperazine dihydroorotate dehydrogenase inhibitors will be found in the future.

  8. Evaluation of immune responses and analysis of the effect of vaccination of the Leishmania major recombinant ribosomal proteins L3 or L5 in two different murine models of cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Laura; Santos, Diego M; Souza, Ana P; Coelho, Eduardo A F; Barral, Aldina; Alonso, Carlos; Escutia, Marta R; Bonay, Pedro; de Oliveira, Camila I; Soto, Manuel

    2013-02-18

    Four new antigenic proteins located in Leishmania ribosomes have been characterized: S4, S6, L3 and L5. Recombinant versions of the four ribosomal proteins from Leishmania major were recognized by sera from human and canine patients suffering different clinical forms of leishmaniasis. The prophylactic properties of these proteins were first studied in the experimental model of cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by L. major inoculation into BALB/c mice. The administration of two of them, LmL3 or LmL5 combined with CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN) was able to protect BALB/c mice against L. major infection. Vaccinated mice showed smaller lesions and parasite burden compared to mice inoculated with vaccine diluent or vaccine adjuvant. Protection was correlated with an antigen-specific increased production of IFN-γ paralleled by a decrease of the antigen-specific IL-10 mediated response in protected mice relative to non-protected controls. Further, it was demonstrated that BALB/c mice vaccinated with recombinant LmL3 or LmL5 plus CpG-ODN were also protected against the development of cutaneous lesions following inoculation of L. braziliensis. Together, data presented here indicate that LmL3 or LmL5 ribosomal proteins combined with Th1 inducing adjuvants, may be relevant components of a vaccine against cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by distinct species.

  9. Lack of Protection of Pre-Immunization with Saliva of Long-Term Colonized Phlebotomus papatasi against Experimental Challenge with Leishmania major and Saliva of Wild-Caught P. papatasi

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Sami Ben Hadj; Kaabi, Belhassen; Chelbi, Ifhem; Derbali, Mohamed; Cherni, Saifedine; Laouini, Dhafer; Zhioua, Elyes

    2010-01-01

    Immunity to saliva of Phlebotomus papatasi protects against Leishmania major infection as determined by co-inoculation of parasites with salivary gland homogenates (SGHs) of this vector. These results were obtained with long-term colonized female P. papatasi. We investigated the effect of pre-immunization with SGH of long-term colonized P. papatasi against L. major infection co-inoculated with SGH of wild-caught P. papatasi. Our results showed that pre-exposure to SGH of long-term, colonized P. papatasi do not confer protection against infection with L. major co-inoculated with SGH of wild-caught P. papatasi. These preliminary results strongly suggest that the effectiveness of a vector saliva-based vaccine derived from colonized sand fly populations may be affected by inconsistent immune response after natural exposure. PMID:20810812

  10. Lack of protection of pre-immunization with saliva of long-term colonized Phlebotomus papatasi against experimental challenge with Leishmania major and saliva of wild-caught P. papatasi.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sami Ben Hadj; Kaabi, Belhassen; Chelbi, Ifhem; Derbali, Mohamed; Cherni, Saifedine; Laouini, Dhafer; Zhioua, Elyes

    2010-09-01

    Immunity to saliva of Phlebotomus papatasi protects against Leishmania major infection as determined by co-inoculation of parasites with salivary gland homogenates (SGHs) of this vector. These results were obtained with long-term colonized female P. papatasi. We investigated the effect of pre-immunization with SGH of long-term colonized P. papatasi against L. major infection co-inoculated with SGH of wild-caught P. papatasi. Our results showed that pre-exposure to SGH of long-term, colonized P. papatasi do not confer protection against infection with L. major co-inoculated with SGH of wild-caught P. papatasi. These preliminary results strongly suggest that the effectiveness of a vector saliva-based vaccine derived from colonized sand fly populations may be affected by inconsistent immune response after natural exposure. PMID:20810812

  11. Natural infection of bats with Leishmania in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Kassahun, Aysheshm; Sadlova, Jovana; Benda, Petr; Kostalova, Tatiana; Warburg, Alon; Hailu, Asrat; Baneth, Gad; Volf, Petr; Votypka, Jan

    2015-10-01

    The leishmaniases, a group of diseases with a worldwide-distribution, are caused by different species of Leishmania parasites. Both cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis remain important public health problems in Ethiopia. Epidemiological cycles of these protozoans involve various sand fly (Diptera: Psychodidae) vectors and mammalian hosts, including humans. In recent years, Leishmania infections in bats have been reported in the New World countries endemic to leishmaniasis. The aim of this study was to survey natural Leishmania infection in bats collected from various regions of Ethiopia. Total DNA was isolated from spleens of 163 bats belonging to 23 species and 18 genera. Leishmania infection was detected by real-time (RT) PCR targeting a kinetoplast (k) DNA and internal transcribed spacer one (ITS1) gene of the parasite. Detection was confirmed by sequencing of the PCR products. Leishmania kDNA was detected in eight (4.9%) bats; four of them had been captured in the Aba-Roba and Awash-Methara regions that are endemic for leishmaniasis, while the other four specimens originated from non-endemic localities of Metu, Bedele and Masha. Leishmania isolates from two bats were confirmed by ITS1 PCR to be Leishmania tropica and Leishmania major, isolated from two individual bats, Cardioderma cor and Nycteris hispida, respectively. These results represent the first confirmed observation of natural infection of bats with the Old World Leishmania. Hence, bats should be considered putative hosts of Leishmania spp. affecting humans with a significant role in the transmission.

  12. Characterization of Leishmania major phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferases LmjPEM1 and LmjPEM2 and their inhibition by choline analogs.

    PubMed

    Bibis, Stergios S; Dahlstrom, Kelly; Zhu, Tongtong; Zufferey, Rachel

    2014-09-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is the most abundant phospholipid in the membranes of the human parasite Leishmania. It is synthesized via two metabolic routes, the de novo pathway that starts with the uptake of choline, and the threefold methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine. Choline was shown to be dispensable for Leishmania; thus, the methylation pathway likely represents the primary route for PC production. Here, we have identified and characterized two phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferases, LmjPEM1 and LmjPEM2. Both enzymes are expressed in promastigotes as well as in the vertebrate form amastigotes, suggesting that these methyltransferases are important for the development of the parasite throughout its life cycle. These enzymes are maximally expressed during the log phase of growth which correlates with the demand of PC synthesis during cell multiplication. Immunofluorescence studies combined with cell fractionation have shown that both methyltransferases are localized at the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Heterologous expression in yeast has demonstrated that LmjPEM1 and LmjPEM2 complement the choline auxotrophy phenotype of a yeast double null mutant lacking phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase activity. LmjPEM1 catalyzes the first, and to a lesser extent, the second methylation reaction. In contrast, LmjPEM2 has the capacity to add the second and third methyl group onto phosphatidylethanolamine to yield (lyso)PC; it can also add the first methyl group, albeit with very low efficiency. Finally, we have demonstrated using inhibition studies with choline analogs that miltefosine and octadecyltrimethylammonium bromide are potent inhibitors of this metabolic pathway. PMID:25176160

  13. Characterization of Leishmania major phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferases LmjPEM1 and LmjPEM2 and their inhibition by choline analogs.

    PubMed

    Bibis, Stergios S; Dahlstrom, Kelly; Zhu, Tongtong; Zufferey, Rachel

    2014-09-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is the most abundant phospholipid in the membranes of the human parasite Leishmania. It is synthesized via two metabolic routes, the de novo pathway that starts with the uptake of choline, and the threefold methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine. Choline was shown to be dispensable for Leishmania; thus, the methylation pathway likely represents the primary route for PC production. Here, we have identified and characterized two phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferases, LmjPEM1 and LmjPEM2. Both enzymes are expressed in promastigotes as well as in the vertebrate form amastigotes, suggesting that these methyltransferases are important for the development of the parasite throughout its life cycle. These enzymes are maximally expressed during the log phase of growth which correlates with the demand of PC synthesis during cell multiplication. Immunofluorescence studies combined with cell fractionation have shown that both methyltransferases are localized at the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Heterologous expression in yeast has demonstrated that LmjPEM1 and LmjPEM2 complement the choline auxotrophy phenotype of a yeast double null mutant lacking phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase activity. LmjPEM1 catalyzes the first, and to a lesser extent, the second methylation reaction. In contrast, LmjPEM2 has the capacity to add the second and third methyl group onto phosphatidylethanolamine to yield (lyso)PC; it can also add the first methyl group, albeit with very low efficiency. Finally, we have demonstrated using inhibition studies with choline analogs that miltefosine and octadecyltrimethylammonium bromide are potent inhibitors of this metabolic pathway.

  14. Role of lys100 in human dihydroorotate dehydrogenase: mutagenesis studies and chemical rescue by external amines.

    PubMed

    Jiang, W; Locke, G; Harpel, M R; Copeland, R A; Marcinkeviciene, J

    2000-07-11

    Chemical modification, mutagenesis, chemical rescue, and isotope effect studies are used to identify and probe the roles of several conserved amino acid groups in catalysis by human dihydroorotate dehydrogenase. Time- and pH-dependent inactivation of human dihydroorotate dehydrogenase by trinitrobenzenesulfonate implicates at least one critical lysyl residue in catalysis. Of four highly conserved lysines, only the cognate of Lys255 was previously suggested to have catalytic functionality. We now show that replacement of either Lys184 or Lys186 by mutagenesis does not impact, whereas substitution of Lys100 abolishes, enzymatic activity. However, activity is partially restored to K100C (or K100A) by inclusion of exogenous primary amines in reaction mixtures. This rescued activity saturates with respect to numerous amines and exhibits a steric discrimination reflected in K(d,(amine)) values. For all amines, rescued k(cat) values were only approximately 10% of wild type and independent of amine basicity. K(M) values for dihydroorotate and coenzyme Q(0) were similar to wild type. Thus, exogenous amines (as surrogates for Lys100) apparently complement a chemical, not binding, step(s) of catalysis, which does not entail proton transfer. In support of this postulate, solvent kinetic isotope effect analysis indicates that Lys100 stabilizes developing negative charge on the isoalloxazine ring of flavin mononucleotide during hydride transfer, as has been observed for a number of flavoprotein oxidoreductases. Ser215 of human dihydroarotate dehydrogenase (DHODase) was also studied because of its alignment with the putative active-site base Cys130 of Lactococcus lactisDHODase. Substantial retention of activity by S215C, yet complete loss of activity for S215A, is consistent with Ser215 serving as the active-site base in the human enzyme. PMID:10891080

  15. Insights into the mechanism of oxidation of dihydroorotate to orotate catalysed by human class 2 dihydroorotate dehydrogenase: a QM/MM free energy study.

    PubMed

    Alves, Cláudio Nahum; Silva, José Rogério A; Roitberg, Adrian E

    2015-07-21

    The dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHOD) enzyme catalyzes the unique redox reaction in the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway. In this reaction, the oxidation of dihydroorotate (DHO) to orotate (OA) and reduction of the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor is catalysed by DHOD. The class 2 DHOD, to which the human enzyme belongs, was experimentally shown to follow a stepwise mechanism but the data did not allow the determination of the order of bond-breaking in a stepwise oxidation of DHO. The goal of this study is to understand the reaction mechanism at the molecular level of class 2 DHOD, which may aid in the design of inhibitors that selectively impact the activity of only certain members of the enzyme family. In this paper, the catalytic mechanism of oxidation of DHO to OA in human DHOD was studied using a hybrid Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical (QM/MM) approach and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. The free energy barriers calculated reveal that the mechanism in human DHOD occurs via a stepwise reaction pathway. In the first step, a proton is abstracted from the C5 of DHO to the deprotonated Ser215 side chain. Whereas, in the second step, the transfer of the hydride or hydride equivalent from the C6 of DHO to the N5 of FMN, where free energy barrier calculated by the DFT/MM level is 10.84 kcal mol(-1). Finally, a residual decomposition analysis was carried out in order to elucidate the influence of the catalytic region residues during DHO oxidation.

  16. Pepstatin A-sensitive aspartic proteases in lysosome are involved in degradation of the invariant chain and antigen-processing in antigen presenting cells of mice infected with Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Zhang, T; Maekawa, Y; Yasutomo, K; Ishikawa, H; Fawzy Nashed, B; Dainichi, T; Hisaeda, H; Sakai, T; Kasai, M; Mizuochi, T; Asao, T; Katunuma, N; Himeno, K

    2000-09-24

    We previously reported that CA074, a specific inhibitor of cathepsin B, significantly deviated immune responses from the disease-promoting Th2 type to the protective Th1 type in BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania major. Herein, we found that pepstatin A-sensitive aspartic proteases (PSAP) in lysosomes seem to play a different role from that of cathepsin B in antigen-processing and Ii-degradation. That is, cathepsin B appears to digest 16-, 28-, and 31-kDa peptides of soluble leishmania antigen (SLA), whereas PSAP seems to process mainly 28-kDa peptides. Furthermore, the latter protease contributed to the degradation of Ii but cathepsin B did not. Following treatment with pepstatin A, both Th1 and Th2 responses were profoundly suppressed in resistant DBA/2 mice (H-2(d)) and in susceptible BALB/c mice (H-2(d)), and both strains of mice became markedly susceptible compared with the untreated groups, probably owing to failure in degradation of Ii and partly to failure in digestion of 28-kDa peptide.

  17. In vitro cytocidal effects of the essential oil from Croton cajucara (red sacaca) and its major constituent 7- hydroxycalamenene against Leishmania chagasi

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis is the most serious form of leishmaniasis and can be lethal if left untreated. Currently available treatments for these parasitic diseases are frequently associated to severe side effects. The leaves of Croton cajucara are used as an infusion in popular medicine to combat several diseases. Previous studies have demonstrated that the linalool-rich essential oil from C. cajucara (white sacaca) is extremely efficient against the tegumentary specie Leishmania amazonensis. In this study, we investigated the effects of the 7-hydroxycalamenene-rich essential oil from the leaves of C. cajucara (red sacaca) against Leishmania chagasi, as well as on the interaction of these parasites with host cells. Methods Promastigotes were treated with different concentrations of the essential oil for determination of its minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). In addition, the effects of the essential oil on parasite ultrastructure were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. To evaluate its efficacy against infected cells, mouse peritoneal macrophages infected with L. chagasi promastigotes were treated with the inhibitory and sub-inhibitory concentrations of the essential oil. Results The minimum inhibitory concentrations of the essential oil and its purified component 7-hydroxycalamenene against L. chagasi were 250 and 15.6 μg/mL, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed important nuclear and kinetoplastic alterations in L. chagasi promastigotes. Pre-treatment of macrophages and parasites with the essential oil reduced parasite/macrophage interaction by 52.8%, while it increased the production of nitric oxide by L. chagasi-infected macrophages by 80%. Conclusion These results indicate that the 7-hydroxycalamenene-rich essential oil from C. cajucara is a promising source of leishmanicidal compounds. PMID:24088644

  18. A high-throughput fluorescence-based assay for Plasmodium dihydroorotate dehydrogenase inhibitor screening.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Iván; Lafuente, María José; Gamo, Francisco-Javier; Cid, Concepción

    2016-08-01

    Plasmodium dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) is a mitochondrial membrane-associated flavoenzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis. DHODH is a validated target for malaria, and DSM265, a potent inhibitor, is currently in clinical trials. The enzyme catalyzes the oxidation of dihydroorotate to orotate using flavin mononucleotide (FMN) as cofactor in the first half of the reaction. Reoxidation of FMN to regenerate the active enzyme is mediated by ubiquinone (CoQD), which is the physiological final electron acceptor and second substrate of the reaction. We have developed a fluorescence-based high-throughput enzymatic assay to find DHODH inhibitors. In this assay, the CoQD has been replaced by a redox-sensitive fluorogenic dye, resazurin, which changes to a fluorescent state on reduction to resorufin. Remarkably, the assay sensitivity to find competitive inhibitors of the second substrate is higher than that reported for the standard colorimetric assay. It is amenable to 1536-well plates with Z' values close to 0.8. The fact that the human enzyme can also be assayed in the same format opens additional applications of this assay to the discovery of inhibitors to treat cancer, transplant rejection, autoimmune diseases, and other diseases mediated by rapid cellular growth. PMID:27133204

  19. The genus Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Garnham, P. C. C.

    1971-01-01

    The systematic position of the so-called ”species” of Leishmania is examined and an attempt made to determine their phylogenetic relationships. The morphology of the organisms as seen by light- and electron-microscopy is described; neither method provides useful criteria for the determination of species. The behaviour of the parasites in insect and in vertebrate hosts offers a better method of classification. In this way, the species may be divided into 4 main groups, comprising the mammalian species involving man, the distinctive species L. enriettii in the guinea-pig, those infecting lizards, and species apparently in various stages of evolution in phlebotomines. The so-called ”human” group is divided into visceral forms (originating chiefly in wild canidae) and cutaneous forms (probably of rodent origin). The named species of the former group include L. donovani and L. infantum. The cutaneous species include L. tropica tropica (=minor), L. tropica major, L. brasiliensis, L. peruana, L. guyanensis, and L. mexicana. L. pifanoi is probably not a distinct species but represents various forms as modified by the failure of cell-mediated immunity in the host. Leishmanial infections can be identified first by ascertaining the geographical area where the infection was acquired, and then by more or less complicated laboratory investigations including characteristics in culture, serological tests, the response of special hosts in terms of symptomatology, and the behaviour of the parasite in the phlebotomine host. No test is infallible, and an effective simple test is urgently needed. The preservation of Leishmania strains is an important research procedure and a method for conserving parasites by lyophilization is described briefly. PMID:5316250

  20. Genetic Dissection of Pyrimidine Biosynthesis and Salvage in Leishmania donovani*

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Zachary N.; Gilroy, Caslin A.; Boitz, Jan M.; Ullman, Buddy; Yates, Phillip A.

    2012-01-01

    Protozoan parasites of the Leishmania genus express the metabolic machinery to synthesize pyrimidine nucleotides via both de novo and salvage pathways. To evaluate the relative contributions of pyrimidine biosynthesis and salvage to pyrimidine homeostasis in both life cycle stages of Leishmania donovani, individual mutant lines deficient in either carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS), the first enzyme in pyrimidine biosynthesis, uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT), a salvage enzyme, or both CPS and UPRT were constructed. The Δcps lesion conferred pyrimidine auxotrophy and a growth requirement for medium supplementation with one of a plethora of pyrimidine nucleosides or nucleobases, although only dihydroorotate or orotate could circumvent the pyrimidine auxotrophy of the Δcps/Δuprt double knockout. The Δuprt null mutant was prototrophic for pyrimidines but could not salvage uracil or any pyrimidine nucleoside. The capability of the Δcps parasites to infect mice was somewhat diminished but still robust, indicating active pyrimidine salvage by the amastigote form of the parasite, but the Δcps/Δuprt mutant was completely attenuated with no persistent parasites detected after a 4-week infection. Complementation of the Δcps/Δuprt clone with either CPS or UPRT restored infectivity. These data establish that an intact pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway is essential for the growth of the promastigote form of L. donovani in culture, that all uracil and pyrimidine nucleoside salvage in the parasite is mediated by UPRT, and that both the biosynthetic and salvage pathways contribute to a robust infection of the mammalian host by the amastigote. These findings impact potential therapeutic design and vaccine strategies for visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:22367196

  1. An overview on Leishmania vaccines: A narrative review article.

    PubMed

    Rezvan, Hossein; Moafi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is one of the major health problems and categorized as a class I disease (emerging and uncontrolled) by World Health Organization (WHO), causing highly significant morbidity and mortality. Indeed, more than 350 million individuals are at risk of Leishmania infection, and about 1.6 million new cases occur causing more than 50 thousands death annually. Because of the severe toxicity and drug resistance, present chemotherapy regimen against diverse forms of Leishmania infections is not totally worthwhile. However, sound immunity due to natural infection, implies that vigor cellular immunity against Leishmania parasites, via their live, attenuated or killed forms, can be developed in dogs and humans. Moreover, genetically conserved antigens (in most of Leishmania species), and components of sand fly saliva confer potential immunogenic molecules for Leishmania vaccination. Vaccines successes in animal studies and some clinical trials clearly justify more researches and investments illuminating opportunities in suitable vaccine designation.

  2. An overview on Leishmania vaccines: A narrative review article.

    PubMed

    Rezvan, Hossein; Moafi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is one of the major health problems and categorized as a class I disease (emerging and uncontrolled) by World Health Organization (WHO), causing highly significant morbidity and mortality. Indeed, more than 350 million individuals are at risk of Leishmania infection, and about 1.6 million new cases occur causing more than 50 thousands death annually. Because of the severe toxicity and drug resistance, present chemotherapy regimen against diverse forms of Leishmania infections is not totally worthwhile. However, sound immunity due to natural infection, implies that vigor cellular immunity against Leishmania parasites, via their live, attenuated or killed forms, can be developed in dogs and humans. Moreover, genetically conserved antigens (in most of Leishmania species), and components of sand fly saliva confer potential immunogenic molecules for Leishmania vaccination. Vaccines successes in animal studies and some clinical trials clearly justify more researches and investments illuminating opportunities in suitable vaccine designation. PMID:25992245

  3. Functional expression of a fragment of human dihydroorotate dehydrogenase by means of the baculovirus expression vector system, and kinetic investigation of the purified recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed

    Knecht, W; Bergjohann, U; Gonski, S; Kirschbaum, B; Löffler, M

    1996-08-15

    Human mitochondrial dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (the fourth enzyme of pyrimidine de novo synthesis) has been overproduced by means of a recombinant baculovirus that contained the human cDNA fragment for this protein. After virus infection and protein expression in Trichoplusia ni cells (BTI-Tn-5B1-4), the subcellular distribution of the recombinant dihydroorotate dehydrogenase was determined by two distinct enzyme-activity assays and by Western blot analysis with anti-(dihydroorotate dehydrogenase) Ig. The targeting of the recombinant protein to the mitochondria of the insect cells was verified. The activity of the recombinant enzyme in the mitochondria of infected cells was about 740-fold above the level of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase in human liver mitochondria. In a three-step procedure, dihydroorotate dehydrogenase was purified to a specific activity of greater than 50 U/mg. Size-exclusion chromatography showed a molecular mass of 42 kDa and confirmed the existence of the fully active enzyme as a monomeric species. Fluorimetric cofactor analysis revealed the presence of FMN in recombinant dihydroorotate dehydrogenase. By kinetics analysis, Km values for dihydroorotate and ubiquinone-50 were found to be 4 microM and 9.9 microM, respectively, while Km values for dihydroorotate and decylubiquinone were 9.4 microM and 13.7 microM, respectively. The applied expression system will allow preparation of large quantities of the enzyme for structure and function studies. Purified recombinant human dihytdroorotate dehydrogenase was tested for its sensitivity to a reported inhibitor A77 1726 (2-hydroxyethyliden-cyanoacetic acid 4-trifluoromethyl anilide), which is the active metabolite of the isoxazole derivative leflunomide [5-methyl-N-(4-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-4-isoxazole carboximide]. An IC50 value of 1 microM was determined for A77 1726. Detailed kinetics experiments revealed uncompetitive inhibition with respect to dihydroorotate (Kiu = 0.94 microM) and non

  4. Site directed spin labeling studies of Escherichia coli dihydroorotate dehydrogenase N-terminal extension

    SciTech Connect

    Couto, Sheila G.; Cristina Nonato, M.

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EcDHODH is a membrane-associated enzyme and a promising target for drug design. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enzyme's N-terminal extension is responsible for membrane association. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-terminal works as a molecular lid regulating access to the protein interior. -- Abstract: Dihydroorotate dehydrogenases (DHODHs) are enzymes that catalyze the fourth step of the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. In this reaction, DHODH converts dihydroorotate to orotate, using a flavine mononucleotide as a cofactor. Since the synthesis of nucleotides has different pathways in mammals as compared to parasites, DHODH has gained much attention as a promising target for drug design. Escherichia coli DHODH (EcDHODH) is a family 2 DHODH that interacts with cell membranes in order to promote catalysis. The membrane association is supposedly made via an extension found in the enzyme's N-terminal. In the present work, we used site directed spin labeling (SDSL) to specifically place a magnetic probe at positions 2, 5, 19, and 21 within the N-terminal and thus monitor, by using Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), dynamics and structural changes in this region in the presence of a membrane model system. Overall, our ESR spectra show that the N-terminal indeed binds to membranes and that it experiences a somewhat high flexibility that could be related to the role of this region as a molecular lid controlling the entrance of the enzyme's active site and thus allowing the enzyme to give access to quinones that are dispersed in the membrane and that are necessary for the catalysis.

  5. Protein turnover and differentiation in Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Besteiro, Sébastien; Williams, Roderick A.M.; Coombs, Graham H.; Mottram, Jeremy C.

    2007-01-01

    Leishmania occurs in several developmental forms and thus undergoes complex cell differentiation events during its life-cycle. Those are required to allow the parasite to adapt to the different environmental conditions. The sequencing of the genome of L. major has facilitated the identification of the parasite’s vast arsenal of proteolytic enzymes, a few of which have already been carefully studied and found to be important for the development and virulence of the parasite. This review focuses on these peptidases and their role in the cellular differentiation of Leishmania through their key involvement in a variety of degradative pathways in the lysosomal and autophagy networks. PMID:17493624

  6. Computational study of the mechanism of half-reactions in class 1A dihydroorotate dehydrogenase from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Silva, Natália de Farias; Lameira, Jerônimo; Alves, Cláudio Nahum; Martí, Sergio

    2013-11-21

    Chagas' disease is considered to be a health problem affecting millions of people in Latin America. This disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Recently dihydroorotate dehydrogenase class 1A from Trypanosoma cruzi (TcDHODA) was shown to be essential for the survival and growth of T. cruzi and proposed as a drug target against Chagas' disease. This enzyme catalyzes the oxidation of (S)-dihydroorotate to orotate, with a proposed catalytic cycle consisting of two half-reactions. In the first half-reaction dihydroorotate is oxidized to orotate, with the consequent reduction of the flavin mononucleotide cofactor. In the second half-reaction fumarate is reduced to succinate. The first oxidation half-reaction may occur via a concerted or a stepwise mechanism. Herein, the catalytic mechanism of TcDHODA has been studied using hybrid Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical (QM/MM) Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. The free energy profiles derived from the bidimensional potential of mean force reveal more details for two half-reaction processes. PMID:24084894

  7. Activity of Cuban Plants Extracts against Leishmania amazonensis

    PubMed Central

    García, Marley; Monzote, Lianet; Scull, Ramón; Herrera, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Natural products have long been providing important drug leads for infectious diseases. Leishmaniasis is a major health problem worldwide that affects millions of people especially in the developing nations. There is no immunoprophylaxis (vaccination) available for Leishmania infections, and conventional treatments are unsatisfactory; therefore, antileishmanial drugs are urgently needed. In this work, 48 alcoholic extracts from 46 Cuban plants were evaluated by an in vitro bioassay against Leishmania amazonensis. Furthermore, their toxicity was assayed against murine macrophage. The three most potent extracts against the amastigote stage of Leishmania amazonensis were from Hura crepitans, Bambusa vulgaris, and Simarouba glauca. PMID:22530133

  8. Anti-infective activities of Pelargonium sidoides (EPS® 7630): effects of induced NO production on Leishmania major in infected macrophages and antiviral effects as assessed in a fibroblast-virus protection assay.

    PubMed

    Thäle, Carsten; Kiderlen, Albrecht Ferdinand; Kolodziej, Herbert

    2011-05-01

    EPs® 7630 is an aqueous-ethanolic extract of the roots of Pelargonium sidoides, employed in the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections. Its anti-infective activity is supposed to be associated with the activation of the nonspecific immune system. Using Leishmania major GFP-infected murine BMMΦ, the NO production of EPs® 7630-activated macrophages was correlated with the reduction of the GFP signal measured at single cell levels using flow cytometry. The anti-infectious effect of EPs® 7630 (3-10 µg/mL) on its own (NO production: 4-13 µM; signal reduction: 25-73 %) was less prominent than that in combination with IFN- γ (100 U/mL) (NO production: 20-27 µM; signal reduction: 35-78 %). Furthermore, supernatants of EPs® 7630-stimulated BMMΦ (10 µg/mL) significantly reduced the cytopathic effect of EMCV on L929 fibroblasts (antiviral activity 80 U/mL) when compared with an IFN- γ standard (100 U/mL). Direct addition of EPs® 7630 to L929 did not mediate cytoprotective effects. The antiviral components induced in BMMΦ by EPs® 7630 remain to be identified. Detection of any IFNs by ELISA was unsuccessful, which may be due to their very low concentrations in cell supernatants. The current data provide convincing support for the induction of anti-infectious responses by EPs® 7630.

  9. High quality long-term CD4+ and CD8+ effector memory populations stimulated by DNA-LACK/MVA-LACK regimen in Leishmania major BALB/c model of infection.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sampedro, Lucas; Gómez, Carmen Elena; Mejías-Pérez, Ernesto; Sorzano, Carlos Oscar S; Esteban, Mariano

    2012-01-01

    Heterologous vaccination based on priming with a plasmid DNA vector and boosting with an attenuated vaccinia virus MVA recombinant, with both vectors expressing the Leishmania infantum LACK antigen (DNA-LACK and MVA-LACK), has shown efficacy conferring protection in murine and canine models against cutaneus and visceral leishmaniasis, but the immune parameters of protection remain ill defined. Here we performed by flow cytometry an in depth analysis of the T cell populations induced in BALB/c mice during the vaccination protocol DNA-LACK/MVA-LACK, as well as after challenge with L. major parasites. In the adaptive response, there is a polyfunctional CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell activation against LACK antigen. At the memory phase the heterologous vaccination induces high quality LACK-specific long-term CD4(+) and CD8(+) effector memory cells. After parasite challenge, there is a moderate boosting of LACK-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Anti-vector responses were largely CD8(+)-mediated. The immune parameters induced against LACK and triggered by the combined vaccination DNA/MVA protocol, like polyfunctionality of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells with an effector phenotype, could be relevant in protection against leishmaniasis. PMID:22715418

  10. KM(+), a lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia, induces IL-12 p40 production by macrophages and switches from type 2 to type 1 cell-mediated immunity against Leishmania major antigens, resulting in BALB/c mice resistance to infection.

    PubMed

    Panunto-Castelo, A; Souza, M A; Roque-Barreira, M C; Silva, J S

    2001-12-01

    The outcome and severity of some diseases correlate with the dominance of either the T helper 1 (Th1) or Th2 immune response, which is stimulated by IL-12 or IL-4, respectively. In the present study we demonstrate that gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) secretion by murine spleen cells stimulated with KM(+), a mannose-binding lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia, is due to IL-12 induction, because (1) macrophages from several sources (including cell lines) produced IL-12 p40 in response to KM(+), and (2) lectin-free supernatants from J774 cell line cultures stimulated with KM(+) induced the secretion of IFN-gamma by spleen cell cultures, an effect blocked by the supernatant pretreatment with anti-IL-12 antibody. The known pattern of susceptibility of BALB/c mice to infection with Leishmania major, attributed to high levels of IL-4 production leading to a Th2 nonprotective immune response, was modified by administration of KM(+). Draining lymph node cells from these immunized BALB/c mice (in contrast to cells from animals immunized only with soluble leishmanial antigen [SLA]) secreted high levels of IFN-gamma and low levels of IL-4, which characterized a Th1 rather than a Th2 response pattern. The footpad thickness of BALB/c mice immunized with SLA plus KM(+) and challenged with L. major was similar to that of uninfected mice. This beneficial effect against leishmanial infection was blocked by pretreatment of these mice with anti-IL-12 antibody. These observations indicate that KM(+) induces IL-12 p40 in vivo and has a protective effect against L. major infection.

  11. Pyrimidine Pathway-Dependent and -Independent Functions of the Toxoplasma gondii Mitochondrial Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Hortua Triana, Miryam Andrea; Cajiao Herrera, Daniela; Zimmermann, Barbara H; Fox, Barbara A; Bzik, David J

    2016-10-01

    Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) mediates the fourth step of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis and is a proven drug target for inducing immunosuppression in therapy of human disease as well as a rapidly emerging drug target for treatment of malaria. In Toxoplasma gondii, disruption of the first, fifth, or sixth step of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis induced uracil auxotrophy. However, previous attempts to generate uracil auxotrophy by genetically deleting the mitochondrion-associated DHODH of T. gondii (TgDHODH) failed. To further address the essentiality of TgDHODH, mutant gene alleles deficient in TgDHODH activity were designed to ablate the enzyme activity. Replacement of the endogenous DHODH gene with catalytically deficient DHODH gene alleles induced uracil auxotrophy. Catalytically deficient TgDHODH localized to the mitochondria, and parasites retained mitochondrial membrane potential. These results show that TgDHODH is essential for the synthesis of pyrimidines and suggest that TgDHODH is required for a second essential function independent of its role in pyrimidine biosynthesis. PMID:27481247

  12. A long-duration dihydroorotate dehydrogenase inhibitor (DSM265) for prevention and treatment of malaria

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Margaret A.; Lotharius, Julie; Marsh, Kennan; White, John; Dayan, Anthony; White, Karen L.; Njoroge, Jacqueline W.; El Mazouni, Farah; Lao, Yanbin; Kokkonda, Sreekanth; Tomchick, Diana R.; Deng, Xiaoyi; Laird, Trevor; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.; March, Sandra; Ng, Caroline L.; Fidock, David A.; Wittlin, Sergio; Lafuente-Monasterio, Maria; Benito, Francisco Javier Gamo; Alonso, Laura Maria Sanz; Martinez, Maria Santos; Jimenez-Diaz, Maria Belen; Bazaga, Santiago Ferrer; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Haselden, John N.; Louttit, James; Cui, Yi; Sridhar, Arun; Zeeman, Anna-Marie; Kocken, Clemens; Sauerwein, Robert; Dechering, Koen; Avery, Vicky M.; Duffy, Sandra; Delves, Michael; Sinden, Robert; Ruecker, Andrea; Wickham, Kristina S.; Rochford, Rosemary; Gahagen, Janet; Iyer, Lalitha; Riccio, Ed; Mirsalis, Jon; Bathhurst, Ian; Rueckle, Thomas; Ding, Xavier; Campo, Brice; Leroy, Didier; Rogers, M. John; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.; Burrows, Jeremy N.; Charman, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most significant causes of childhood mortality but disease control efforts are threatened by resistance of the Plasmodium parasite to current therapies. Continued progress in combating malaria requires development of new, easy to administer drug combinations with broad ranging activity against all manifestations of the disease. DSM265, a triazolopyrimidine-based inhibitor of the pyrimidine biosynthetic enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH), is the first DHODH inhibitor to reach clinical development for treatment of malaria. We describe studies profiling the biological activity, pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties, and safety of DSM265, which supported its advancement to human trials. DSM265 is highly selective towards DHODH of the malaria parasite Plasmodium, efficacious against both blood and liver stages of P. falciparum, and active against drug-resistant parasite isolates. Favorable pharmacokinetic properties of DSM265 are predicted to provide therapeutic concentrations for more than 8 days after a single oral dose in the range of 200–400 mg. DSM265 was well tolerated in repeat dose and cardiovascular safety studies in mice and dogs, was not mutagenic, and was inactive against panels of human enzymes/receptors. The excellent safety profile, blood and liver-stage activity, and predicted long human half-life position DSM265 as a new potential drug combination partner for either single-dose treatment or once weekly chemoprevention. DSM265 has advantages over current treatment options that are dosed daily or are inactive on the parasite liver-stage PMID:26180101

  13. Fluorine Modulates Species Selectivity in the Triazolopyrimidine Class of Plasmodium falciparum Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most serious global infectious diseases. The pyrimidine biosynthetic enzyme Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (PfDHODH) is an important target for antimalarial chemotherapy. We describe a detailed analysis of protein–ligand interactions between DHODH and a triazolopyrimidine-based inhibitor series to explore the effects of fluorine on affinity and species selectivity. We show that increasing fluorination dramatically increases binding to mammalian DHODHs, leading to a loss of species selectivity. Triazolopyrimidines bind Plasmodium and mammalian DHODHs in overlapping but distinct binding sites. Key hydrogen-bond and stacking interactions underlying strong binding to PfDHODH are absent in the mammalian enzymes. Increasing fluorine substitution leads to an increase in the entropic contribution to binding, suggesting that strong binding to mammalian DHODH is a consequence of an enhanced hydrophobic effect upon binding to an apolar pocket. We conclude that hydrophobic interactions between fluorine and hydrocarbons provide significant binding energy to protein–ligand interactions. Our studies define the requirements for species-selective binding to PfDHODH and show that the triazolopyrimidine scaffold can alternatively be tuned to inhibit human DHODH, an important target for autoimmune diseases. PMID:24801997

  14. Novel Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase with Anti-malarial Activity in the Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, Michael L.; Bastos, Cecilia M.; Kramer, Martin L.; Barker, Jr., Robert H.; Skerlj, Renato; Sidhu, Amar Bir; Deng, Xiaoyi; Celatka, Cassandra; Cortese, Joseph F.; Guerrero Bravo, Jose E.; Crespo Llado, Keila N.; Serrano, Adelfa E.; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Viera, Sara; Garuti, Helen; Wittlin, Sergio; Papastogiannidis, Petros; Lin, Jing-wen; Janse, Chris J.; Khan, Shahid M.; Duraisingh, Manoj; Coleman, Bradley; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.; Phillips, Margaret A.; Munoz, Benito; Wirth, Dyann F.; Klinger, Jeffrey D.; Wiegand, Roger; Sybertz, Edmund

    2010-11-22

    Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most deadly form of human malaria, is unable to salvage pyrimidines and must rely on de novo biosynthesis for survival. Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway and represents a potential target for anti-malarial therapy. A high throughput screen and subsequent medicinal chemistry program identified a series of N-alkyl-5-(1H-benzimidazol-1-yl)thiophene-2-carboxamides with low nanomolar in vitro potency against DHODH from P. falciparum, P. vivax, and P. berghei. The compounds were selective for the parasite enzymes over human DHODH, and x-ray structural data on the analog Genz-667348, demonstrated that species selectivity could be attributed to amino acid differences in the inhibitor-binding site. Compounds from this series demonstrated in vitro potency against the 3D7 and Dd2 strains of P. falciparum, good tolerability and oral exposure in the mouse, and ED{sub 50} values in the 4-day murine P. berghei efficacy model of 13-21 mg/kg/day with oral twice-daily dosing. In particular, treatment with Genz-667348 at 100 mg/kg/day resulted in sterile cure. Two recent analogs of Genz-667348 are currently undergoing pilot toxicity testing to determine suitability as clinical development candidates.

  15. Mice from a genetically resistant background lacking the interferon gamma receptor are susceptible to infection with Leishmania major but mount a polarized T helper cell 1-type CD4+ T cell response

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Mice with homologous disruption of the gene coding for the ligand- binding chain of the interferon (IFN) gamma receptor and derived from a strain genetically resistant to infection with Leishmania major have been used to study further the role of this cytokine in the differentiation of functional CD4+ T cell subsets in vivo and resistance to infection. Wild-type 129/Sv/Ev mice are resistant to infection with this parasite, developing only small lesions, which resolve spontaneously within 6 wk. In contrast, mice lacking the IFN- gamma receptor develop large, progressing lesions. After infection, lymph nodes (LN) and spleens from both wild-type and knockout mice showed an expansion of CD4+ cells producing IFN-gamma as revealed by measuring IFN-gamma in supernatants of specifically stimulated CD4+ T cells, by enumerating IFN-gamma-producing T cells, and by Northern blot analysis of IFN-gamma transcripts. No biologically active interleukin (IL) 4 was detected in supernatants of in vitro-stimulated LN or spleen cells from infected wild-type or deficient mice. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis with primers specific for IL-4 showed similar IL-4 message levels in LN from both types of mice. The IL-4 message levels observed were comparable to those found in similarly infected C57BL/6 mice and significantly lower than the levels found in BALB/c mice. Anti-IFN-gamma treatment of both types of mice failed to alter the pattern of cytokines produced after infection. These data show that even in the absence of IFN-gamma receptors, T helper cell (Th) 1-type responses still develop in genetically resistant mice with no evidence for the expansion of Th2 cells. PMID:7869054

  16. Leishmania spp. identification by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and its applications in French Guiana.

    PubMed

    Simon, Stéphane; Veron, Vincent; Carme, Bernard

    2010-02-01

    Leishmania (Viannia) guyanensis was for many years the only species commonly identified in French Guiana, but precise species identifications were quite rare. We describe a new restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction technique using a 615-bp fragment of the RNA polymerase II gene and 2 restriction enzymes, TspRI and HgaI. Seven reference strains (Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis, Leishmania (Viannia) lainsoni, Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, L. (V.) guyanensis, Leishmania (Viannia) naiffi, Leishmania (Leishmania) major, Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum) and 112 clinical samples from positive lesions were used for the development of the technique. The rates of positive species identification were 85.7% for punch skin biopsy specimens, 93.1% for positive Giemsa-stained smears, and 100% for positive culture supernatants. In the framework of cutaneous leishmaniasis species surveillance for the 2006 to 2008 period, parasite identification was carried out for 199 samples from different patients. The prevalence of the various Leishmania spp. was 84.4% for L. (V.) guyanensis, 8.0% for L. (V.) braziliensis, 5.0% for L. (L.) amazonensis, and 2.6% for L. (V.) lainsoni. L. (V.) braziliensis seems to be locally an emerging pathogen.

  17. Laboratory diagnosis of Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Palma, G; Gutierrez, Y

    1991-12-01

    Leishmaniasis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of individuals living in or with a history of having traveled to known endemic areas and who present with signs and symptoms of visceral infection or with cutaneous or mucosal lesions. Because leishmaniae are capable of producing a wide spectrum of disease in humans, the clinical manifestations overlap with many other diseases. Definitive diagnosis of Leishmania infection in the laboratory requires demonstration of the parasite in smears, in biopsies, or by isolation of the organism in culture media or in experimental animals. Many other methods for demonstration of parasites (histochemical and immunohistochemical) or for detecting the presence of antibodies against leishmaniae (serologic) have been described. Many advances have been made in these areas, but the methodology and the technology involved in immunohistochemistry and serology remain outside the reach of the standard clinical diagnostic laboratory, which both in developed and less developed countries still relies on demonstration of the parasites in smears stained with Giemsa stain and on biopsy specimens processed and stained with hematoxylin and eosin stain. The newer serologic techniques, such as ELISA with several variations, IFAT, and others, are largely research tools with the greatest use in seroepidemiologic surveys.

  18. Prevalence and Distribution of Leishmania RNA Virus 1 in Leishmania Parasites from French Guiana.

    PubMed

    Ginouvès, Marine; Simon, Stéphane; Bourreau, Eliane; Lacoste, Vincent; Ronet, Catherine; Couppié, Pierre; Nacher, Mathieu; Demar, Magalie; Prévot, Ghislaine

    2016-01-01

    In South America, the presence of the Leishmania RNA virus type 1 (LRV1) was described in Leishmania guyanensis and Leishmania braziliensis strains. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence distribution of LRV1 in Leishmania isolates in French Guiana given that, in this French overseas department, most Leishmania infections are due to these parasite species. The presence of the virus was observed in 74% of Leishmania spp. isolates, with a highest presence in the internal areas of the country.

  19. Biochemical effects of riluzole on Leishmania parasites.

    PubMed

    Guerrieri, Davide; Ferrari, Stefania; Costi, M Paola; Michels, Paul A M

    2013-03-01

    We have previously shown that riluzole (6-(trifluoromethoxy)benzothiazol-2-amine), an agent used to treat CNS disorders, possesses inhibitory activity against pteridine reductase (PTR1) in pathogenic protists at low micromolar concentrations. Therefore, the potential use of this drug in anti-parasitic chemotherapy deserves evaluation. In this study, we report the effect of this compound on cell cultures of Leishmania mexicana and L. major. The anti-parasitic activity of riluzole was confirmed, with the largest effect observed when the drug was administered to cells during their exponential growth phase. Moreover, a remarkable decrease in PTR1 activity was observed in the lysates of cells pretreated with the compound, which is due to impairment of the enzyme's preferential reaction with biopterin as a cofactor. In addition, the treatment increased the parasites' susceptibility to oxidative stress, affecting the ability of Leishmania to survive under severe oxidative conditions. These results suggest that the inhibitory effect of riluzole on PTR1 is not the only mechanism through which it induces the death of Leishmania parasites.

  20. Thermodynamic basis of electron transfer in dihydroorotate dehydrogenase B from Lactococcus lactis: analysis by potentiometry, EPR spectroscopy, and ENDOR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mohsen, Al-Walid A; Rigby, Stephen E J; Jensen, Kaj Frank; Munro, Andrew W; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2004-06-01

    Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase B (DHODB) is a complex iron-sulfur flavoprotein that catalyzes the conversion of dihydroorotate to orotate and the reduction of NAD(+). The enzyme is a dimer of heterodimers containing an FMN, an FAD, and a 2Fe-2S center. UV-visible, EPR, and ENDOR spectroscopies have been used to determine the reduction potentials of the flavins and the 2Fe-2S center and to characterize radicals and their interactions. Reductive titration using dithionite indicates a five-electron capacity for DHODB. The midpoint reduction potential of the 2Fe-2S center (-212 +/- 3 mV) was determined from analysis of absorption data at 540 nm, where absorption contributions from the two flavins are small. The midpoint reduction potentials of the oxidized/semiquinone (E(1)) and semiquinone/hydroquinone (E(2)) couples for the FMN (E(1) = -301 +/- 6 mV; E(2) = -252 +/- 8 mV) and FAD (E(1) = -312 +/- 6 mV; E(2) = -297 +/- 5 mV) were determined from analysis of spectral changes at 630 nm. Corresponding values for the midpoint reduction potentials for FMN (E(1) = -298 +/- 4 mV; E(2) = -259 +/- 5 mV) in the isolated catalytic subunit (subunit D, which lacks the 2Fe-2S center and FAD) are consistent with the values determined for the FMN couples in DHODB. During reductive titration of DHODB, small amounts of the neutral blue semiquinone are observed at approximately 630 nm, consistent with the measured midpoint reduction potentials of the flavins. An ENDOR spectrum of substrate-reduced DHODB identifies hyperfine couplings to proton nuclei similar to those recorded for the blue semiquinone of free flavins in aqueous solution, thus confirming the presence of this species in DHODB. Spectral features observed during EPR spectroscopy of dithionite-reduced DHODB are consistent with the midpoint reduction potentials determined using UV-visible spectroscopy and further identify an unusual EPR signal with very small rhombic anisotropy and g values of 2.02, 1.99, and 1.96. This unusual

  1. Leishmania(Leishmania) chagasi in captive wild felids in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dahroug, Magyda A A; Almeida, Arleana B P F; Sousa, Valéria R F; Dutra, Valéria; Turbino, Nívea C M R; Nakazato, Luciano; de Souza, Roberto L

    2010-01-01

    This study used a PCR-RFLP test to determine the presence of Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi in 16 captive wild felids [seven Puma concolor (Linnaeus, 1771); five Panthera onca (Linnaeus, 1758) and four Leopardus pardalis (Linnaeus, 1758)] at the zoological park of the Federal University of Mato Grosso, Brazil. Amplification of Leishmania spp. DNA was seen in samples from five pumas and one jaguar, and the species was characterized as L. chagasi using restriction enzymes. It is already known that domestic felids can act as a reservoir of L. chagasi in endemic areas, and further studies are necessary to investigate their participation in the epidemiological chain of leishmaniasis.

  2. A Historical Overview of the Classification, Evolution, and Dispersion of Leishmania Parasites and Sandflies

    PubMed Central

    Akhoundi, Mohammad; Kuhls, Katrin; Cannet, Arnaud; Votýpka, Jan; Marty, Pierre; Delaunay, Pascal; Sereno, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to describe the major evolutionary historical events among Leishmania, sandflies, and the associated animal reservoirs in detail, in accordance with the geographical evolution of the Earth, which has not been previously discussed on a large scale. Methodology and Principal Findings Leishmania and sandfly classification has always been a controversial matter, and the increasing number of species currently described further complicates this issue. Despite several hypotheses on the origin, evolution, and distribution of Leishmania and sandflies in the Old and New World, no consistent agreement exists regarding dissemination of the actors that play roles in leishmaniasis. For this purpose, we present here three centuries of research on sandflies and Leishmania descriptions, as well as a complete description of Leishmania and sandfly fossils and the emergence date of each Leishmania and sandfly group during different geographical periods, from 550 million years ago until now. We discuss critically the different approaches that were used for Leishmana and sandfly classification and their synonymies, proposing an updated classification for each species of Leishmania and sandfly. We update information on the current distribution and dispersion of different species of Leishmania (53), sandflies (more than 800 at genus or subgenus level), and animal reservoirs in each of the following geographical ecozones: Palearctic, Nearctic, Neotropic, Afrotropical, Oriental, Malagasy, and Australian. We propose an updated list of the potential and proven sandfly vectors for each Leishmania species in the Old and New World. Finally, we address a classical question about digenetic Leishmania evolution: which was the first host, a vertebrate or an invertebrate? Conclusions and Significance We propose an updated view of events that have played important roles in the geographical dispersion of sandflies, in relation to both the Leishmania species they

  3. The Dynamics of Lateral Gene Transfer in Genus Leishmania - A Route for Adaptation and Species Diversification

    PubMed Central

    Vikeved, Elisabet; Backlund, Anders; Alsmark, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Background The genome of Leishmania major harbours a comparably high proportion of genes of prokaryote origin, acquired by lateral gene transfer (LGT). Some of these are present in closely related trypanosomatids, while some are detected in Leishmania only. We have evaluated the impact and destiny of LGT in genus Leishmania. Methodology/Principal Findings To study the dynamics and fate of LGTs we have performed phylogenetic, as well as nucleotide and amino acid composition analyses within orthologous groups of LGTs detected in Leishmania. A set of universal trypanosomatid LGTs was added as a reference group. Both groups of LGTs have, to some extent, ameliorated to resemble the recipient genomes. However, while virtually all of the universal trypanosomatid LGTs are distributed and conserved in the entire genus Leishmania, the LGTs uniquely present in genus Leishmania are more prone to gene loss and display faster rates of evolution. Furthermore, a PCR based approach has been employed to ascertain the presence of a set of twenty LGTs uniquely present in genus Leishmania, and three universal trypanosomatid LGTs, in ten additional strains of Leishmania. Evolutionary rates and predicted expression levels of these LGTs have also been estimated. Ten of the twenty LGTs are distributed and conserved in all species investigated, while the remainder have been subjected to modifications, or undergone pseudogenization, degradation or loss in one or more species. Conclusions/Significance LGTs unique to the genus Leishmania have been acquired after the divergence of Leishmania from the other trypanosomatids, and are evolving faster than their recipient genomes. This implies that LGT in genus Leishmania is a continuous and dynamic process contributing to species differentiation and speciation. This study also highlights the importance of carefully evaluating these dynamic genes, e.g. as LGTs have been suggested as potential drug targets. PMID:26730948

  4. Identification of Tunisian Leishmania spp. by PCR amplification of cysteine proteinase B (cpb) genes and phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Chaouch, Melek; Fathallah-Mili, Akila; Driss, Mehdi; Lahmadi, Ramzi; Ayari, Chiraz; Guizani, Ikram; Ben Said, Moncef; Benabderrazak, Souha

    2013-03-01

    Discrimination of the Old World Leishmania parasites is important for diagnosis and epidemiological studies of leishmaniasis. We have developed PCR assays that allow the discrimination between Leishmania major, Leishmania tropica and Leishmania infantum Tunisian species. The identification was performed by a simple PCR targeting cysteine protease B (cpb) gene copies. These PCR can be a routine molecular biology tools for discrimination of Leishmania spp. from different geographical origins and different clinical forms. Our assays can be an informative source for cpb gene studying concerning drug, diagnostics and vaccine research. The PCR products of the cpb gene and the N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate transferase (nagt) Leishmania gene were sequenced and aligned. Phylogenetic trees of Leishmania based cpb and nagt sequences are close in topology and present the classic distribution of Leishmania in the Old World. The phylogenetic analysis has enabled the characterization and identification of different strains, using both multicopy (cpb) and single copy (nagt) genes. Indeed, the cpb phylogenetic analysis allowed us to identify the Tunisian Leishmania killicki species, and a group which gathers the least evolved isolates of the Leishmania donovani complex, that was originated from East Africa. This clustering confirms the African origin for the visceralizing species of the L. donovani complex. PMID:23228525

  5. Efficacy of Recombinant Canine Distemper Virus Expressing Leishmania Antigen against Leishmania Challenge in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Misako; Takenaka, Akiko; Doki, Miho; Goto, Yasuyuki; Sanjoba, Chizu; Endo, Yasuyuki; Fujiyuki, Tomoko; Sugai, Akihiro; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Matsumoto, Yoshitsugu; Sato, Hiroki; Kai, Chieko

    2015-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccination confers long-term protection against CDV reinfection. To investigate the utility of CDV as a polyvalent vaccine vector for Leishmania, we generated recombinant CDVs, based on an avirulent Yanaka strain, that expressed Leishmania antigens: LACK, TSA, or LmSTI1 (rCDV–LACK, rCDV–TSA, and rCDV–LmSTI1, respectively). Dogs immunized with rCDV-LACK were protected against challenge with lethal doses of virulent CDV, in the same way as the parental Yanaka strain. To evaluate the protective effects of the recombinant CDVs against cutaneous leishmaniasis in dogs, dogs were immunized with one recombinant CDV or a cocktail of three recombinant CDVs, before intradermal challenge (in the ears) with infective-stage promastigotes of Leishmania major. Unvaccinated dogs showed increased nodules with ulcer formation after 3 weeks, whereas dogs immunized with rCDV–LACK showed markedly smaller nodules without ulceration. Although the rCDV–TSA- and rCDV–LmSTI1-immunized dogs showed little protection against L. major, the cocktail of three recombinant CDVs more effectively suppressed the progression of nodule formation than immunization with rCDV–LACK alone. These results indicate that recombinant CDV is suitable for use as a polyvalent live attenuated vaccine for protection against both CDV and L. major infections in dogs. PMID:26162094

  6. Efficacy of Recombinant Canine Distemper Virus Expressing Leishmania Antigen against Leishmania Challenge in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Miura, Ryuichi; Kooriyama, Takanori; Yoneda, Misako; Takenaka, Akiko; Doki, Miho; Goto, Yasuyuki; Sanjoba, Chizu; Endo, Yasuyuki; Fujiyuki, Tomoko; Sugai, Akihiro; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Matsumoto, Yoshitsugu; Sato, Hiroki; Kai, Chieko

    2015-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccination confers long-term protection against CDV reinfection. To investigate the utility of CDV as a polyvalent vaccine vector for Leishmania, we generated recombinant CDVs, based on an avirulent Yanaka strain, that expressed Leishmania antigens: LACK, TSA, or LmSTI1 (rCDV-LACK, rCDV-TSA, and rCDV-LmSTI1, respectively). Dogs immunized with rCDV-LACK were protected against challenge with lethal doses of virulent CDV, in the same way as the parental Yanaka strain. To evaluate the protective effects of the recombinant CDVs against cutaneous leishmaniasis in dogs, dogs were immunized with one recombinant CDV or a cocktail of three recombinant CDVs, before intradermal challenge (in the ears) with infective-stage promastigotes of Leishmania major. Unvaccinated dogs showed increased nodules with ulcer formation after 3 weeks, whereas dogs immunized with rCDV-LACK showed markedly smaller nodules without ulceration. Although the rCDV-TSA- and rCDV-LmSTI1-immunized dogs showed little protection against L. major, the cocktail of three recombinant CDVs more effectively suppressed the progression of nodule formation than immunization with rCDV-LACK alone. These results indicate that recombinant CDV is suitable for use as a polyvalent live attenuated vaccine for protection against both CDV and L. major infections in dogs. PMID:26162094

  7. 3D-QSAR Studies on a Series of Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Inhibitors: Analogues of the Active Metabolite of Leflunomide

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shun-Lai; He, Mao-Yu; Du, Hong-Guang

    2011-01-01

    The active metabolite of the novel immunosuppressive agent leflunomide has been shown to inhibit the enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH). This enzyme catalyzes the fourth step in de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis. Self-organizing molecular field analysis (SOMFA), a simple three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) method is used to study the correlation between the molecular properties and the biological activities of a series of analogues of the active metabolite. The statistical results, cross-validated rCV2 (0.664) and non cross-validated r2 (0.687), show a good predictive ability. The final SOMFA model provides a better understanding of DHODH inhibitor-enzyme interactions, and may be useful for further modification and improvement of inhibitors of this important enzyme. PMID:21686163

  8. Cross-protective efficacy from a immunogen firstly identified in Leishmania infantum against tegumentary leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Martins, V T; Lage, D P; Duarte, M C; Costa, L E; Chávez-Fumagalli, M A; Roatt, B M; Menezes-Souza, D; Tavares, C A P; Coelho, E A F

    2016-02-01

    Experimental vaccine candidates have been evaluated to prevent leishmaniasis, but no commercial vaccine has been proved to be effective against more than one parasite species. LiHyT is a Leishmania-specific protein that was firstly identified as protective against Leishmania infantum. In this study, LiHyT was evaluated as a vaccine to against two Leishmania species causing tegumentary leishmaniasis (TL): Leishmania major and Leishmania braziliensis. BALB/c mice were immunized with rLiHyT plus saponin and lately challenged with promastigotes of the two parasite species. The immune response generated was evaluated before and 10 weeks after infection, as well as the parasite burden at this time after infection. The vaccination induced a Th1 response, which was characterized by the production of IFN-γ, IL-12 and GM-CSF, as well as by high levels of IgG2a antibodies, after in vitro stimulation using both the protein and parasite extracts. After challenge, vaccinated mice showed significant reductions in their infected footpads, as well as in the parasite burden in the tissue and organs evaluated, when compared to the control groups. The anti-Leishmania Th1 response was maintained after infection, being the IFN-γ production based mainly on CD4(+) T cells. We described one conserved Leishmania-specific protein that could compose a pan-Leishmania vaccine.

  9. Leishmania carbon metabolism in the macrophage phagolysosome- feast or famine?

    PubMed Central

    McConville, Malcolm J.; Saunders, Eleanor C.; Kloehn, Joachim; Dagley, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    A number of medically important microbial pathogens target and proliferate within macrophages and other phagocytic cells in their mammalian hosts. While the majority of these pathogens replicate within the host cell cytosol or non-hydrolytic vacuolar compartments, a few, including protists belonging to the genus Leishmania, proliferate long-term within mature lysosome compartments.  How these parasites achieve this feat remains poorly defined. In this review, we highlight recent studies that suggest that Leishmania virulence is intimately linked to programmed changes in the growth rate and carbon metabolism of the obligate intra-macrophage stages. We propose that activation of a slow growth and a stringent metabolic response confers resistance to multiple stresses (oxidative, temperature, pH), as well as both nutrient limitation and nutrient excess within this niche. These studies highlight the importance of metabolic processes as key virulence determinants in Leishmania. PMID:26594352

  10. Leishmania carbon metabolism in the macrophage phagolysosome- feast or famine?

    PubMed

    McConville, Malcolm J; Saunders, Eleanor C; Kloehn, Joachim; Dagley, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    A number of medically important microbial pathogens target and proliferate within macrophages and other phagocytic cells in their mammalian hosts. While the majority of these pathogens replicate within the host cell cytosol or non-hydrolytic vacuolar compartments, a few, including protists belonging to the genus Leishmania, proliferate long-term within mature lysosome compartments.  How these parasites achieve this feat remains poorly defined. In this review, we highlight recent studies that suggest that Leishmania virulence is intimately linked to programmed changes in the growth rate and carbon metabolism of the obligate intra-macrophage stages. We propose that activation of a slow growth and a stringent metabolic response confers resistance to multiple stresses (oxidative, temperature, pH), as well as both nutrient limitation and nutrient excess within this niche. These studies highlight the importance of metabolic processes as key virulence determinants in Leishmania.

  11. Immunogenicity Evaluation of a Rationally Designed Polytope Construct Encoding HLA-A*0201 Restricted Epitopes Derived from Leishmania major Related Proteins in HLA-A2/DR1 Transgenic Mice: Steps toward Polytope Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Seyed, Negar; Taheri, Tahereh; Vauchy, Charline; Dosset, Magalie; Godet, Yann; Eslamifar, Ali; Sharifi, Iraj; Adotevi, Olivier; Borg, Christophe; Rohrlich, Pierre Simon; Rafati, Sima

    2014-01-01

    Background There are several reports demonstrating the role of CD8 T cells against Leishmania species. Therefore peptide vaccine might represent an effective approach to control the infection. We developed a rational polytope-DNA construct encoding immunogenic HLA-A2 restricted peptides and validated the processing and presentation of encoded epitopes in a preclinical mouse model humanized for the MHC-class-I and II. Methods and Findings HLA-A*0201 restricted epitopes from LPG-3, LmSTI-1, CPB and CPC along with H-2Kd restricted peptides, were lined-up together as a polytope string in a DNA construct. Polytope string was rationally designed by harnessing advantages of ubiquitin, spacers and HLA-DR restricted Th1 epitope. Endotoxin free pcDNA plasmid expressing the polytope was inoculated into humanized HLA-DRB1*0101/HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice intramuscularly 4 days after Cardiotoxin priming followed by 2 boosters at one week interval. Mice were sacrificed 10 days after the last booster, and splenocytes were subjected to ex-vivo and in-vitro evaluation of specific IFN-γ production and in-vitro cytotoxicity against individual peptides by ELISpot and standard chromium-51(51Cr) release assay respectively. 4 H-2Kd and 5 HLA-A*0201 restricted peptides were able to induce specific CD8 T cell responses in BALB/C and HLA-A2/DR1 mice respectively. IFN-γ and cytolytic activity together discriminated LPG-3-P1 as dominant, LmSTI-1-P3 and LmSTI-1-P6 as subdominant with both cytolytic activity and IFN-γ production, LmSTI-1-P4 and LPG-3-P5 as subdominant with only IFN-γ production potential. Conclusions Here we described a new DNA-polytope construct for Leishmania vaccination encompassing immunogenic HLA-A2 restricted peptides. Immunogenicity evaluation in HLA-transgenic model confirmed CD8 T cell induction with expected affinities and avidities showing almost efficient processing and presentation of the peptides in relevant preclinical model. Further evaluation will determine

  12. Mucosal Leishmaniasis Caused by Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis and Leishmania (Viannia) guyanensis in the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Guerra, Jorge Augusto; Prestes, Suzane Ribeiro; Silveira, Henrique; Coelho, Leila Inês de Aguiar Raposo Câmara; Gama, Pricila; Moura, Aristoteles; Amato, Valdir; Barbosa, Maria das Graças Vale; de Lima Ferreira, Luiz Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Background Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis is a parasite recognized as the most important etiologic agent of mucosal leishmaniasis (ML) in the New World. In Amazonia, seven different species of Leishmania, etiologic agents of human Cutaneous Leishmaniasis, have been described. Isolated cases of ML have been described for several different species of Leishmania: L. (V.) panamensis, L. (V.) guyanensis and L. (L.) amazonensis. Methodology Leishmania species were characterized by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of tissues taken from mucosal biopsies of Amazonian patients who were diagnosed with ML and treated at the Tropical Medicine Foundation of Amazonas (FMTAM) in Manaus, Amazonas state, Brazil. Samples were obtained retrospectively from the pathology laboratory and prospectively from patients attending the aforementioned tertiary care unit. Results This study reports 46 cases of ML along with their geographical origin, 30 cases caused by L. (V.) braziliensis and 16 cases by L. (V.) guyanensis. This is the first record of ML cases in 16 different municipalities in the state of Amazonas and of simultaneous detection of both species in 4 municipalities of this state. It is also the first record of ML caused by L. (V.) guyanensis in the states of Pará, Acre, and Rondônia and cases of ML caused by L. (V.) braziliensis in the state of Rondônia. Conclusions/Significance L. (V.) braziliensis is the predominant species that causes ML in the Amazon region. However, contrary to previous studies, L. (V.) guyanensis is also a significant causative agent of ML within the region. The clinical and epidemiological expression of ML in the Manaus region is similar to the rest of the country, although the majority of ML cases are found south of the Amazon River. PMID:21408116

  13. Extreme inbreeding in Leishmania braziliensis

    PubMed Central

    Rougeron, Virginie; De Meeûs, Thierry; Hide, Mallorie; Waleckx, Etienne; Bermudez, Herman; Arevalo, Jorge; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; De Doncker, Simone; Le Ray, Dominique; Ayala, Francisco J.; Bañuls, Anne-Laure

    2009-01-01

    Leishmania species of the subgenus Viannia and especially Leishmania braziliensis are responsible for a large proportion of New World leishmaniasis cases. The reproductive mode of Leishmania species has often been assumed to be predominantly clonal, but remains unsettled. We have investigated the genetic polymorphism at 12 microsatellite loci on 124 human strains of Leishmania braziliensis from 2 countries, Peru and Bolivia. There is substantial genetic diversity, with an average of 12.4 ± 4.4 alleles per locus. There is linkage disequilibrium at a genome-wide scale, as well as a substantial heterozygote deficit (more than 50% the expected value from Hardy−Weinberg equilibrium), which indicates high levels of inbreeding. These observations are inconsistent with a strictly clonal model of reproduction, which implies excess heterozygosity. Moreover, there is large genetic heterogeneity between populations within countries (Wahlund effect), which evinces a strong population structure at a microgeographic scale. Our findings are compatible with the existence of population foci at a microgeographic scale, where clonality alternates with sexuality of an endogamic nature, with possible occasional recombination events between individuals of different genotypes. These findings provide key clues on the ecology and transmission patterns of Leishmania parasites. PMID:19497885

  14. The early interaction of Leishmania with macrophages and dendritic cells and its influence on the host immune response

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong; Uzonna, Jude E.

    2012-01-01

    The complicated interactions between Leishmania and the host antigen-presenting cells (APCs) have fundamental effects on the final outcome of the disease. Two major APCs, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), play critical roles in mediating resistance and susceptibility during Leishmania infection. Macrophages are the primary resident cell for Leishmania: they phagocytose and permit parasite proliferation. However, these cells are also the major effector cells to eliminate infection. The effective clearance of parasites by macrophages depends on activation of appropriate immune response, which is usually initiated by DCs. Here, we review the early interaction of APCs with Leishmania parasites and how these interactions profoundly impact on the ensuing adaptive immune response. We also discuss how the current knowledge will allow further refinement of our understanding of the interplay between Leishmania and its hosts that leads to resistance or susceptibility. PMID:22919674

  15. Anti-Leishmania Activity of Osthole

    PubMed Central

    Kermani, Elaheh Kordzadeh; Sajjadi, Seyed Ebrahim; Hejazi, Seyed Hossein; Arjmand, Reza; Saberi, Sedigheh; Eskandarian, Abbas Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is occasionally highly resistant to pentavalent antimonials, the gold standard in pharmacotherapy of CL. Since there is no effective vaccine, the discovery of natural antileishmanial products as complementary therapeutic agents could be used to improve the current regimens. Objective: In this study in vitro and in vivo antileishmanial activities of osthole, a natural coumarin known to possess antibacterial and parasiticidal activities are evaluated. Materials and Methods: Leishmania major infected J774.A1 macrophages were treated with increasing concentrations of osthole. CL lesions of BALB/c mice were treated topically with 0.2% osthole. Results: Osthole exhibited dose-dependent leishmanicidal activity against intracellular amastigotes with IC50 value of 14.95 μg/ml. Treatment of CL lesions in BALB/c mice with osthole significantly declined lesion progression compared to untreated mice (P < 0.05), however did not result in recovery. Conclusion: Osthole demonstrated remarkable leishmanicidal activity in vitro. Higher concentrations of osthole may demonstrate the therapeutic property in vivo. SUMMARY In vitro and in vivo antileishmanial activities of osthole, a pernylated coumarin extracted from Prangos asperula Boiss., are studied against Leishmania major. PMID:27114685

  16. [Differentiation among cutaneous Leishmania species upon amplification of a sequence of dipeptidyl peptidase III encoding gene].

    PubMed

    Kbaier-Hachemi, H; Barhoumi, M; Chakroun, A S; Ben Fadhel, M; Guizani, I

    2008-01-01

    Leishmaniasis are a group of vector-born, parasitic diseases caused by protozoan of the Leishmania genus, that includes visceral or cutaneous forms. Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) refers to a group of diseases because of the variability of clinical manifestations, caused by a large number of Leishmania species. In Tunisia, three different forms of CL are encountered, having different causal agents L. infantum, L. major and L. tropica. For the purpose of this study, we assessed the potential of polymorphic sites in dipeptidyl peptidase III (DPP III) encoding gene to differentiate among Leishmania species encountered in Tunisia. A pair of forward and reverse primers amplifying a 664 bp DPP III sequence were designed in regions including 2 mutations in the forward primer and 1 in the reverse, and were used to amplify DNA from diverse species of Leishmania parasites including L. infantum, L. major, L. tropica, L. donovani, L. chagasi, L. arabica, L. aethiopica and L. tarentolae. Amplification was positive for all tested Leishmania species except for L. infantum, L. chagasi, L. archibaldi, L. donovani and L. tarentolae. In case of cutaneous Leishmania species encountered in Tunisia, amplification was positive for both L. tropica and L. major and negative in case of L. infantum. This ability to differentiate L. infantum from L. tropica/L. major constitutes a first step in the taxonomy of cutaneous species prevalent in Tunisia.

  17. Passive transfer of leishmania lipopolysaccharide confers parasite survival in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Handman, E.; Schnur, L.F.; Spithill, T.W.; Mitchell, G.F.

    1986-12-01

    Infection of macrophages by the intracellular protozoan parasite Leishmania involves specific attachment to the host membrane, followed by phagocytosis and intracellular survival and growth. Two parasite molecules have been implicated in the attachment event: Leishmania lipopolysaccharide (L-LPS) and a glycoprotein (gp63). This study was designed to clarify the role of L-LPS in infection and the stage in the process of infection at which it operates. The authors have recently identified a Leishmania major strain (LRC-L119) which lacks the L-LPS molecule and is not infective for hamsters or mice. This parasite was isolated from a gerbil in Kenya and was identified phenotypically as L. major by isoenzyme and fatty acid analysis. In this study they have confirmed at the genotype level that LRC-L119 is L. major by analyzing and comparing the organization of cloned DNA sequences in the genome of different strains of L. major. Here they show that LRC-L119 promastigotes are phagocytosed rapidly by macrophages in vitro, but in contrast to virulent strains of L. major, they are then killed over a period of 18 hr. In addition, they show that transfer of purified L-LPS from a virulent clone of L. major (V121) into LRC-L119 promastigotes confers on them the ability to survive in macrophages in vitro.

  18. Attenuation of Leishmania infantum chagasi Metacyclic Promastigotes by Sterol Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Gaur Dixit, Upasna; Barker, Jason H.; Teesch, Lynn M.; Love-Homan, Laurie; Donelson, John E.; Wilson, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    The infectious metacyclic promastigotes of Leishmania protozoa establish infection in a mammalian host after they are deposited into the dermis by a sand fly vector. Several Leishmania virulence factors promote infection, including the glycosylphosphatidylinositol membrane-anchored major surface protease (MSP). Metacyclic Leishmania infantum chagasi promastigotes were treated with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MβCD), a sterol-chelating reagent, causing a 3-fold reduction in total cellular sterols as well as enhancing MSP release without affecting parasite viability in vitro. MβCD-treated promastigotes were more susceptible to complement-mediated lysis than untreated controls and reduced the parasite load 3-fold when inoculated into BALB/c mice. Paradoxically, MβCD-treated promastigotes caused a higher initial in vitro infection rate in human or murine macrophages than untreated controls, although their intracellular multiplication was hindered upon infection establishment. There was a corresponding larger amount of covalently bound C3b than iC3b on the parasite surfaces of MβCD-treated promastigotes exposed to healthy human serum in vitro, as well as loss of MSP, a protease that enhances C3b cleavage to iC3b. Mass spectrometry showed that MβCD promotes the release of proteins into the extracellular medium, including both MSP and MSP-like protein (MLP), from virulent metacyclic promastigotes. These data support the hypothesis that plasma membrane sterols are important for the virulence of Leishmania protozoa at least in part through retention of membrane virulence proteins. PMID:23630964

  19. Original 2-(3-Alkoxy-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)azines Inhibitors of Human Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase (DHODH)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Following our discovery of human dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) inhibition by 2-(3-alkoxy-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)pyrimidine derivatives as well as 2-(4-benzyl-3-ethoxy-5-methyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-5-methylpyridine, we describe here the syntheses and evaluation of an array of azine-bearing analogues. As in our previous report, the structure–activity study of this series of human DHODH inhibitors was based on a phenotypic assay measuring measles virus replication. Among other inhibitors, this round of syntheses and biological evaluation iteration led to the highly active 5-cyclopropyl-2-(4-(2,6-difluorophenoxy)-3-isopropoxy-5-methyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-3-fluoropyridine. Inhibition of DHODH by this compound was confirmed in an array of in vitro assays, including enzymatic tests and cell-based assays for viral replication and cellular growth. This molecule was found to be more active than the known inhibitors of DHODH, brequinar and teriflunomide, thus opening perspectives for its use as a tool or for the design of an original series of immunosuppressive agent. Moreover, because other series of inhibitors of human DHODH have been found to also affect Plasmodium falciparum DHODH, all the compounds were assayed for their effect on P. falciparum growth. However, the modest in vitro inhibition solely observed for two compounds did not correlate with their inhibition of P. falciparum DHODH. PMID:26079043

  20. 4SC-101, a novel small molecule dihydroorotate dehydrogenase inhibitor, suppresses systemic lupus erythematosus in MRL-(Fas)lpr mice.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Onkar P; Sayyed, Sufyan G; Kantner, Claudia; Ryu, Mi; Schnurr, Max; Sárdy, Miklós; Leban, Johann; Jankowsky, Ruediger; Ammendola, Aldo; Doblhofer, Robert; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2010-06-01

    Immunosuppressive treatments of systemic lupus (SLE) remain associated with significant toxicities; hence, compounds with better toxicity profiles are needed. Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) inhibition with leflunomide has proven to be effective in autoimmune diseases including SLE, but leflunomide can cause a variety of side effects. We hypothesized that 4SC-101, a novel DHODH inhibitor with a more favorable toxicity profile, would be as effective as high-dose cyclophosphamide (CYC) in controlling experimental SLE of female MRL(Fas)lpr mice. Daily oral gavage of 30, 100, and 300 mg/kg 4SC-101 from 12 to 22 weeks of age was compared with either vehicle or CYC treatment (30 mg/kg/week, i.p.) in terms of efficacy and toxicity. Three hundred milligrams per kilogram 4SC-101 was as effective as CYC in depleting spleen autoreactive T cells, B cells, and plasma cells as well as the respective DNA and RNA serum autoantibodies. This was associated with a comparable amelioration of the renal, dermal, and pulmonary SLE manifestations of MRL(Fas)lpr mice. However, even the highest dose of 4SC-101 had no effect on bone marrow neutrophil counts, which were significantly reduced in CYC-treated mice. Together, the novel DHODH inhibitor 4SC-101 is as effective as high dose CYC in controlling SLE without causing myelosuppression. Hence, DHODH inhibition with 4SC-101 might be suitable to treat active SLE with fewer side effects than CYC.

  1. Original 2-(3-Alkoxy-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)azines Inhibitors of Human Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase (DHODH).

    PubMed

    Lucas-Hourani, Marianne; Munier-Lehmann, Hélène; El Mazouni, Farah; Malmquist, Nicholas A; Harpon, Jane; Coutant, Eloi P; Guillou, Sandrine; Helynck, Olivier; Noel, Anne; Scherf, Artur; Phillips, Margaret A; Tangy, Frédéric; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Janin, Yves L

    2015-07-23

    Following our discovery of human dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) inhibition by 2-(3-alkoxy-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)pyrimidine derivatives as well as 2-(4-benzyl-3-ethoxy-5-methyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-5-methylpyridine, we describe here the syntheses and evaluation of an array of azine-bearing analogues. As in our previous report, the structure-activity study of this series of human DHODH inhibitors was based on a phenotypic assay measuring measles virus replication. Among other inhibitors, this round of syntheses and biological evaluation iteration led to the highly active 5-cyclopropyl-2-(4-(2,6-difluorophenoxy)-3-isopropoxy-5-methyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-3-fluoropyridine. Inhibition of DHODH by this compound was confirmed in an array of in vitro assays, including enzymatic tests and cell-based assays for viral replication and cellular growth. This molecule was found to be more active than the known inhibitors of DHODH, brequinar and teriflunomide, thus opening perspectives for its use as a tool or for the design of an original series of immunosuppressive agent. Moreover, because other series of inhibitors of human DHODH have been found to also affect Plasmodium falciparum DHODH, all the compounds were assayed for their effect on P. falciparum growth. However, the modest in vitro inhibition solely observed for two compounds did not correlate with their inhibition of P. falciparum DHODH.

  2. Tetrahydro-2-naphthyl and 2-Indanyl Triazolopyrimidines Targeting Plasmodium falciparum Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Display Potent and Selective Antimalarial Activity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Malaria persists as one of the most devastating global infectious diseases. The pyrimidine biosynthetic enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) has been identified as a new malaria drug target, and a triazolopyrimidine-based DHODH inhibitor 1 (DSM265) is in clinical development. We sought to identify compounds with higher potency against Plasmodium DHODH while showing greater selectivity toward animal DHODHs. Herein we describe a series of novel triazolopyrimidines wherein the p-SF5-aniline was replaced with substituted 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2-naphthyl or 2-indanyl amines. These compounds showed strong species selectivity, and several highly potent tetrahydro-2-naphthyl derivatives were identified. Compounds with halogen substitutions displayed sustained plasma levels after oral dosing in rodents leading to efficacy in the P. falciparum SCID mouse malaria model. These data suggest that tetrahydro-2-naphthyl derivatives have the potential to be efficacious for the treatment of malaria, but due to higher metabolic clearance than 1, they most likely would need to be part of a multidose regimen. PMID:27127993

  3. Original 2-(3-Alkoxy-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)azines Inhibitors of Human Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase (DHODH).

    PubMed

    Lucas-Hourani, Marianne; Munier-Lehmann, Hélène; El Mazouni, Farah; Malmquist, Nicholas A; Harpon, Jane; Coutant, Eloi P; Guillou, Sandrine; Helynck, Olivier; Noel, Anne; Scherf, Artur; Phillips, Margaret A; Tangy, Frédéric; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Janin, Yves L

    2015-07-23

    Following our discovery of human dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) inhibition by 2-(3-alkoxy-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)pyrimidine derivatives as well as 2-(4-benzyl-3-ethoxy-5-methyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-5-methylpyridine, we describe here the syntheses and evaluation of an array of azine-bearing analogues. As in our previous report, the structure-activity study of this series of human DHODH inhibitors was based on a phenotypic assay measuring measles virus replication. Among other inhibitors, this round of syntheses and biological evaluation iteration led to the highly active 5-cyclopropyl-2-(4-(2,6-difluorophenoxy)-3-isopropoxy-5-methyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-3-fluoropyridine. Inhibition of DHODH by this compound was confirmed in an array of in vitro assays, including enzymatic tests and cell-based assays for viral replication and cellular growth. This molecule was found to be more active than the known inhibitors of DHODH, brequinar and teriflunomide, thus opening perspectives for its use as a tool or for the design of an original series of immunosuppressive agent. Moreover, because other series of inhibitors of human DHODH have been found to also affect Plasmodium falciparum DHODH, all the compounds were assayed for their effect on P. falciparum growth. However, the modest in vitro inhibition solely observed for two compounds did not correlate with their inhibition of P. falciparum DHODH. PMID:26079043

  4. Tetrahydro-2-naphthyl and 2-Indanyl Triazolopyrimidines Targeting Plasmodium falciparum Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Display Potent and Selective Antimalarial Activity.

    PubMed

    Kokkonda, Sreekanth; Deng, Xiaoyi; White, Karen L; Coteron, Jose M; Marco, Maria; de Las Heras, Laura; White, John; El Mazouni, Farah; Tomchick, Diana R; Manjalanagara, Krishne; Rudra, Kakali Rani; Chen, Gong; Morizzi, Julia; Ryan, Eileen; Kaminsky, Werner; Leroy, Didier; Martínez-Martínez, María Santos; Jimenez-Diaz, Maria Belen; Bazaga, Santiago Ferrer; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Waterson, David; Burrows, Jeremy N; Matthews, Dave; Charman, Susan A; Phillips, Margaret A; Rathod, Pradipsinh K

    2016-06-01

    Malaria persists as one of the most devastating global infectious diseases. The pyrimidine biosynthetic enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) has been identified as a new malaria drug target, and a triazolopyrimidine-based DHODH inhibitor 1 (DSM265) is in clinical development. We sought to identify compounds with higher potency against Plasmodium DHODH while showing greater selectivity toward animal DHODHs. Herein we describe a series of novel triazolopyrimidines wherein the p-SF5-aniline was replaced with substituted 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2-naphthyl or 2-indanyl amines. These compounds showed strong species selectivity, and several highly potent tetrahydro-2-naphthyl derivatives were identified. Compounds with halogen substitutions displayed sustained plasma levels after oral dosing in rodents leading to efficacy in the P. falciparum SCID mouse malaria model. These data suggest that tetrahydro-2-naphthyl derivatives have the potential to be efficacious for the treatment of malaria, but due to higher metabolic clearance than 1, they most likely would need to be part of a multidose regimen. PMID:27127993

  5. Leishmania amazonensis: Anionic currents expressed in oocytes upon microinjection of mRNA from the parasite.

    PubMed

    Lagos M, Luisa F; Moran, Oscar; Camacho, Marcela

    2007-06-01

    Transport mechanisms involved in pH homeostasis are relevant for the survival of Leishmania parasites. The presence of chloride conductive pathways in Leishmania has been anticipated since anion channel inhibitors limit the proton extrusion mediated by the H+ATPase, which is the major regulator of intracellular pH in amastigotes. In this study, we used Xenopus laevis oocytes as a heterologous expression system in which to study the expression of ion channels upon microinjection of polyA mRNA from Leishmania amazonensis. After injection of polyA mRNA into the oocytes, we measured three different types of currents. We discuss the possible origin of each, and propose that Type 3 currents could be the result of the heterologous expression of proteins from Leishmania since they show different pharmacological and biophysical properties as compared to endogenous oocyte currents. PMID:17328895

  6. First Isolation of Leishmania from Northern Thailand: Case Report, Identification as Leishmania martiniquensis and Phylogenetic Position within the Leishmania enriettii Complex

    PubMed Central

    Pothirat, Thatawan; Tantiworawit, Adisak; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Jariyapan, Narissara; Wannasan, Anchalee; Siriyasatien, Padet; Supparatpinyo, Khuanchai; Bates, Michelle D.; Kwakye-Nuako, Godwin; Bates, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Since 1996, there have been several case reports of autochthonous visceral leishmaniasis in Thailand. Here we report a case in a 52-year-old Thai male from northern Thailand, who presented with subacute fever, huge splenomegaly and pancytopenia. Bone marrow aspiration revealed numerous amastigotes within macrophages. Isolation of Leishmania LSCM1 into culture and DNA sequence analysis (ribosomal RNA ITS-1 and large subunit of RNA polymerase II) revealed the parasites to be members of the Leishmania enriettii complex, and apparently identical to L. martiniquensis previously reported from the Caribbean island of Martinique. This is the first report of visceral leishmaniasis caused by L. martiniquensis from the region. Moreover, the majority of parasites previously identified as “L. siamensis” also appear to be L. martiniquensis. PMID:25474647

  7. Leishmania and human immunodeficiency virus coinfection: the first 10 years.

    PubMed Central

    Alvar, J; Cañavate, C; Gutiérrez-Solar, B; Jiménez, M; Laguna, F; López-Vélez, R; Molina, R; Moreno, J

    1997-01-01

    Over 850 Leishmania-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection cases have been recorded, the majority in Europe, where 7 to 17% of HIV-positive individuals with fever have amastigotes, suggesting that Leishmania-infected individuals without symptoms will express symptoms of leishmaniasis if they become immunosuppressed. However, there are indirect reasons and statistical data demonstrating that intravenous drug addiction plays a specific role in Leishmania infantum transmission: an anthroponotic cycle complementary to the zoonotic one has been suggested. Due to anergy in patients with coinfection, L. infantum dermotropic zymodemes are isolated from patient viscera and a higher L. infantum phenotypic variability is seen. Moreover, insect trypanosomatids that are currently considered nonpathogenic have been isolated from coinfected patients. HIV infection and Leishmania infection each induce important analogous immunological changes whose effects are multiplied if they occur concomitantly, such as a Th1-to-Th2 response switch; however, the consequences of the viral infection predominate. In fact, a large proportion of coinfected patients have no detectable anti-Leishmania antibodies. The microorganisms share target cells, and it has been demonstrated in vitro how L. infantum induces the expression of latent HIV-1. Bone marrow culture is the most useful diagnostic technique, but it is invasive. Blood smears and culture are good alternatives. PCR, xenodiagnosis, and circulating-antigen detection are available only in specialized laboratories. The relationship with low levels of CD4+ cells conditions the clinical presentation and evolution of disease. Most patients have visceral leishmaniasis, but asymptomatic, cutaneous, mucocutaneous, diffuse cutaneous, and post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis can be produced by L. infantum. The digestive and respiratory tracts are frequently parasitized. The course of coinfection is marked by a high relapse rate. There is a lack

  8. Natural infection of Algerian hedgehog, Atelerix algirus (Lereboullet 1842) with Leishmania parasites in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Chemkhi, Jomaa; Souguir, Hejer; Ali, Insaf Bel Hadj; Driss, Mehdi; Guizani, Ikram; Guerbouj, Souheila

    2015-10-01

    In Tunisia, Leishmania parasites are responsible of visceral leishmaniasis, caused by Leishmania infantum species while three cutaneous disease forms are documented: chronic cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania killicki, sporadic cutaneous form (SCL) caused by L. infantum and the predominant zoonotic cutaneous leishmanaisis (ZCL) due to Leishmania major. ZCL reservoirs are rodents of the Psammomys and Meriones genera, while for SCL the dog is supposed to be a reservoir. Ctenodactylus gundii is involved in the transmission of L. killicki. However, other mammals could constitute potential reservoir hosts in Tunisia and other North African countries. In order to explore the role of hedgehogs as potential reservoirs of leishmaniasis, specimens (N=6) were captured during July-November period in 2011-2013 in an SCL endemic area in El Kef region, North-Western Tunisia. Using morphological characteristics, all specimens were described and measured. Biopsies from liver, heart, kidney and spleen of each animal were used to extract genomic DNA, which was further used in PCR assays to assess the presence of Leishmania parasites. Different PCRs targeting kinetoplast minicircles, ITS1, mini-exon genes and a repetitive Leishmania- specific sequence, were applied. To further identify Leishmania species involved, RFLP analysis of amplified fragments was performed with appropriate restriction enzymes. Using morphological characters, animals were identified as North African hedgehogs, also called Algerian hedgehogs, that belong to the Erinaceidae family, genus Atelerix Pomel 1848, and species algirus (Lereboullet, 1842). PCR results showed in total that all specimens were Leishmania infected, with different organs incriminated, mainly liver and spleen. Results were confirmed by direct sequencing of amplified fragments. Species identification showed that all specimens were infected with L. major, three of which were additionally co-infected with L. infantum. The present study

  9. Natural infection of Algerian hedgehog, Atelerix algirus (Lereboullet 1842) with Leishmania parasites in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Chemkhi, Jomaa; Souguir, Hejer; Ali, Insaf Bel Hadj; Driss, Mehdi; Guizani, Ikram; Guerbouj, Souheila

    2015-10-01

    In Tunisia, Leishmania parasites are responsible of visceral leishmaniasis, caused by Leishmania infantum species while three cutaneous disease forms are documented: chronic cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania killicki, sporadic cutaneous form (SCL) caused by L. infantum and the predominant zoonotic cutaneous leishmanaisis (ZCL) due to Leishmania major. ZCL reservoirs are rodents of the Psammomys and Meriones genera, while for SCL the dog is supposed to be a reservoir. Ctenodactylus gundii is involved in the transmission of L. killicki. However, other mammals could constitute potential reservoir hosts in Tunisia and other North African countries. In order to explore the role of hedgehogs as potential reservoirs of leishmaniasis, specimens (N=6) were captured during July-November period in 2011-2013 in an SCL endemic area in El Kef region, North-Western Tunisia. Using morphological characteristics, all specimens were described and measured. Biopsies from liver, heart, kidney and spleen of each animal were used to extract genomic DNA, which was further used in PCR assays to assess the presence of Leishmania parasites. Different PCRs targeting kinetoplast minicircles, ITS1, mini-exon genes and a repetitive Leishmania- specific sequence, were applied. To further identify Leishmania species involved, RFLP analysis of amplified fragments was performed with appropriate restriction enzymes. Using morphological characters, animals were identified as North African hedgehogs, also called Algerian hedgehogs, that belong to the Erinaceidae family, genus Atelerix Pomel 1848, and species algirus (Lereboullet, 1842). PCR results showed in total that all specimens were Leishmania infected, with different organs incriminated, mainly liver and spleen. Results were confirmed by direct sequencing of amplified fragments. Species identification showed that all specimens were infected with L. major, three of which were additionally co-infected with L. infantum. The present study

  10. Profiling of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, p38 and JAK inhibitors in the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis model: a translational study

    PubMed Central

    Balagué, C; Pont, M; Prats, N; Godessart, N

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Translational animal models are essential in the prediction of the efficacy and side effects of new chemical entities. We have carried out a thorough study of three distinct disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in an adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model in the rat and critically appraised the results in the context of the reported clinical experience in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Teriflunomide – a dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) inhibitor; AL8697 – a selective p38 MAPK inhibitor; and tofacitinib – a Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor; were selected as representatives of their class and dose-response studies carried out using a therapeutic 10-day administration scheme in arthritic rats. Paw swelling and body weight were periodically monitored, and joint radiology and histology, lymph organ weight and haematological and biochemical parameters evaluated at study completion. KEY RESULTS All three drugs demonstrated beneficial effects on paw swelling, bone lesions and splenomegalia, with p38 inhibition providing the best anti-inflammatory effect and JAK inhibition the best DMARD effect. Leukopenia, body weight loss and gastrointestinal toxicity were dose-dependently observed with teriflunomide treatment. p38 MAPK inhibition induced leukocytosis and increased total plasma cholesterol. JAK inhibition, normalized platelet, reticulocyte and neutrophil counts, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels while inducing lymphopenia and cholesterolemia. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS This multiparametric approach can reveal specific drug properties and provide translational information. Whereas the complex profile for p38 inhibition in AIA is not observed in human RA, immunosuppressants such as DHODH and JAK inhibitors show DMARD properties and side effects seen in both AIA and RA. PMID:22229697

  11. Flagellar pocket restructuring through the Leishmania life cycle involves a discrete flagellum attachment zone.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Richard J; Sunter, Jack D; Gull, Keith

    2016-02-15

    Leishmania promastigote parasites have a flagellum, which protrudes from the flagellar pocket at the cell anterior, yet, surprisingly, have homologs of many flagellum attachment zone (FAZ) proteins--proteins used in the related Trypanosoma species to laterally attach the flagellum to the cell body from the flagellar pocket to the cell posterior. Here, we use seven Leishmania mexicana cell lines that expressed eYFP fusions of FAZ protein homologs to show that the Leishmania flagellar pocket includes a FAZ structure. Electron tomography revealed a precisely defined 3D organisation for both the flagellar pocket and FAZ, with striking similarities to those of Trypanosoma brucei. Expression of two T. brucei FAZ proteins in L. mexicana showed that T. brucei FAZ proteins can assemble into the Leishmania FAZ structure. Leishmania therefore have a previously unrecognised FAZ structure, which we show undergoes major structural reorganisation in the transition from the promastigote (sandfly vector) to amastigote (in mammalian macrophages). Morphogenesis of the Leishmania flagellar pocket, a structure important for pathogenicity, is therefore intimately associated with a FAZ; a finding with implications for understanding shape changes involving component modules during evolution.

  12. Flagellar pocket restructuring through the Leishmania life cycle involves a discrete flagellum attachment zone.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Richard J; Sunter, Jack D; Gull, Keith

    2016-02-15

    Leishmania promastigote parasites have a flagellum, which protrudes from the flagellar pocket at the cell anterior, yet, surprisingly, have homologs of many flagellum attachment zone (FAZ) proteins--proteins used in the related Trypanosoma species to laterally attach the flagellum to the cell body from the flagellar pocket to the cell posterior. Here, we use seven Leishmania mexicana cell lines that expressed eYFP fusions of FAZ protein homologs to show that the Leishmania flagellar pocket includes a FAZ structure. Electron tomography revealed a precisely defined 3D organisation for both the flagellar pocket and FAZ, with striking similarities to those of Trypanosoma brucei. Expression of two T. brucei FAZ proteins in L. mexicana showed that T. brucei FAZ proteins can assemble into the Leishmania FAZ structure. Leishmania therefore have a previously unrecognised FAZ structure, which we show undergoes major structural reorganisation in the transition from the promastigote (sandfly vector) to amastigote (in mammalian macrophages). Morphogenesis of the Leishmania flagellar pocket, a structure important for pathogenicity, is therefore intimately associated with a FAZ; a finding with implications for understanding shape changes involving component modules during evolution. PMID:26746239

  13. Leishmania-based expression systems.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Tahereh; Seyed, Negar; Mizbani, Amir; Rafati, Sima

    2016-09-01

    Production of therapeutic or medical recombinant proteins, such as monoclonal antibodies, proteins, or active enzymes, requires a highly efficient system allowing natural folding and perfect post-translation modifications of the expressed protein. These requirements lead to the generation of a variety of gene expression systems from bacteria to eukaryotes. To achieve the best form of eukaryotic proteins, two factors need to be taken into consideration: choosing a suitable organism to express the protein of interest, and selecting an efficient delivery system. For this reason, the expression of recombinant proteins in eukaryotic nonpathogenic Leishmania parasites is an interesting approach which meets both criteria. Here, new Leishmania-based expression systems are compared with current systems that have long histories in research and industry. PMID:27435294

  14. Folate metabolic pathways in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Tim J; Beverley, Stephen M

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosomatid parasitic protozoans of the genus Leishmania are autotrophic for both folate and unconjugated pteridines. Leishmania salvage these metabolites from their mammalian hosts and insect vectors through multiple transporters. Within the parasite, folates are reduced by a bifunctional DHFR (dihydrofolate reductase)-TS (thymidylate synthase) and by a novel PTR1 (pteridine reductase 1), which reduces both folates and unconjugated pteridines. PTR1 can act as a metabolic bypass of DHFR inhibition, reducing the effectiveness of existing antifolate drugs. Leishmania possess a reduced set of folate-dependent metabolic reactions and can salvage many of the key products of folate metabolism from their hosts. For example, they lack purine synthesis, which normally requires 10-formyltetrahydrofolate, and instead rely on a network of purine salvage enzymes. Leishmania elaborate at least three pathways for the synthesis of the key metabolite 5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate, required for the synthesis of thymidylate, and for 10-formyltetrahydrofolate, whose presumptive function is for methionyl-tRNAMet formylation required for mitochondrial protein synthesis. Genetic studies have shown that the synthesis of methionine using 5-methyltetrahydrofolate is dispensable, as is the activity of the glycine cleavage complex, probably due to redundancy with serine hydroxymethyltransferase. Although not always essential, the loss of several folate metabolic enzymes results in attenuation or loss of virulence in animal models, and a null DHFR-TS mutant has been used to induce protective immunity. The folate metabolic pathway provides numerous opportunities for targeted chemotherapy, with strong potential for 'repurposing' of compounds developed originally for treatment of human cancers or other infectious agents.

  15. Leishmania molecules that mediate intracellular pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kima, Peter E

    2014-09-01

    Parasites of the Leishmania genus are the causative agents of a complex disease called leishmaniasis. Many activities of infected cells including their responses to a range of stimuli are modulated by Leishmania parasites. This review will profile some of the parasite molecules that target host cell processes for which there has been recent progress.

  16. Comprehensive proteomics analysis of glycosomes from Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Jamdhade, Mahendra D; Pawar, Harsh; Chavan, Sandip; Sathe, Gajanan; Umasankar, P K; Mahale, Kiran N; Dixit, Tanwi; Madugundu, Anil K; Prasad, T S Keshava; Gowda, Harsha; Pandey, Akhilesh; Patole, Milind S

    2015-03-01

    Leishmania donovani is a kinetoplastid protozoan that causes a severe and fatal disease kala-azar, or visceral leishmaniasis. L. donovani infects human host after the phlebotomine sandfly takes a blood meal and resides within the phagolysosome of infected macrophages. Previous studies on host-parasite interactions have not focused on Leishmania organelles and the role that they play in the survival of this parasite within macrophages. Leishmania possess glycosomes that are unique and specialized subcellular microbody organelles. Glycosomes are known to harbor most peroxisomal enzymes and, in addition, they also possess nine glycolytic enzymes. In the present study, we have carried out proteomic profiling using high resolution mass spectrometry of a sucrose density gradient-enriched glycosomal fraction isolated from L. donovani promastigotes. This study resulted in the identification of 4022 unique peptides, leading to the identification of 1355 unique proteins from a preparation enriched in L. donovani glycosomes. Based on protein annotation, 566 (41.8%) were identified as hypothetical proteins with no known function. A majority of the identified proteins are involved in metabolic processes such as carbohydrate, lipid, and nucleic acid metabolism. Our present proteomic analysis is the most comprehensive study to date to map the proteome of L. donovani glycosomes. PMID:25748437

  17. Comprehensive Proteomics Analysis of Glycosomes from Leishmania donovani

    PubMed Central

    Jamdhade, Mahendra D.; Pawar, Harsh; Chavan, Sandip; Sathe, Gajanan; Umasankar, P.K.; Mahale, Kiran N.; Dixit, Tanwi; Madugundu, Anil K.; Prasad, T.S. Keshava; Gowda, Harsha

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Leishmania donovani is a kinetoplastid protozoan that causes a severe and fatal disease kala-azar, or visceral leishmaniasis. L. donovani infects human host after the phlebotomine sandfly takes a blood meal and resides within the phagolysosome of infected macrophages. Previous studies on host–parasite interactions have not focused on Leishmania organelles and the role that they play in the survival of this parasite within macrophages. Leishmania possess glycosomes that are unique and specialized subcellular microbody organelles. Glycosomes are known to harbor most peroxisomal enzymes and, in addition, they also possess nine glycolytic enzymes. In the present study, we have carried out proteomic profiling using high resolution mass spectrometry of a sucrose density gradient-enriched glycosomal fraction isolated from L. donovani promastigotes. This study resulted in the identification of 4022 unique peptides, leading to the identification of 1355 unique proteins from a preparation enriched in L. donovani glycosomes. Based on protein annotation, 566 (41.8%) were identified as hypothetical proteins with no known function. A majority of the identified proteins are involved in metabolic processes such as carbohydrate, lipid, and nucleic acid metabolism. Our present proteomic analysis is the most comprehensive study to date to map the proteome of L. donovani glycosomes. PMID:25748437

  18. The LABCG2 Transporter from the Protozoan Parasite Leishmania Is Involved in Antimony Resistance.

    PubMed

    Perea, Ana; Manzano, José Ignacio; Castanys, Santiago; Gamarro, Francisco

    2016-06-01

    Treatment for leishmaniasis, which is caused by Leishmania protozoan parasites, currently relies on a reduced arsenal of drugs. However, the significant increase in the incidence of drug therapeutic failure and the growing resistance to first-line drugs like antimonials in some areas of Northern India and Nepal limit the control of this parasitic disease. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of resistance in Leishmania is now a matter of urgency to optimize drugs used and to identify novel drug targets to block or reverse resistant mechanisms. Some members of the family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in Leishmania have been associated with drug resistance. In this study, we have focused our interest to characterize LABCG2's involvement in drug resistance in Leishmania. Leishmania major parasites overexpressing the ABC protein transporter LABCG2 were generated in order to assess how LABCG2 is involved in drug resistance. Assays of susceptibility to different leishmanicidal agents were carried out. Analysis of the drug resistance profile revealed that Leishmania parasites overexpressing LABCG2 were resistant to antimony, as they demonstrated a reduced accumulation of Sb(III) due to an increase in drug efflux. Additionally, LABCG2 was able to transport thiols in the presence of Sb(III) Biotinylation assays using parasites expressing LABCG2 fused with an N-terminal green fluorescent protein tag revealed that LABCG2 is partially localized in the plasma membrane; this supports data from previous studies which suggested that LABCG2 is localized in intracellular vesicles that fuse with the plasma membrane during exocytosis. In conclusion, Leishmania LABCG2 probably confers antimony resistance by sequestering metal-thiol conjugates within vesicles and through further exocytosis by means of the parasite's flagellar pocket.

  19. Biodistribution of meglumine antimoniate in healthy and Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum chagasi-infected BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Borborema, Samanta Etel Treiger; Osso Jr, João Alberto; Andrade Jr, Heitor Franco de; Nascimento, Nanci do

    2013-08-01

    Pentavalent antimonials such as meglumine antimoniate (MA) are the primary treatments for leishmaniasis, a complex disease caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania . Despite over 70 years of clinical use, their mechanisms of action, toxicity and pharmacokinetics have not been fully elucidated. Radiotracer studies performed on animals have the potential to play a major role in pharmaceutical development. The aims of this study were to prepare an antimony radiotracer by neutron irradiation of MA and to determine the biodistribution of MA in healthy and Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum chagasi-infected mice. MA (Glucantime®) was neutron irradiated inside the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor, producing two radioisotopes, ¹²²Sb and ¹²⁴Sb, with high radionuclidic purity and good specific activity. This irradiated compound presented anti-leishmanial activity similar to that of non-irradiated MA in both in vitro and in vivo evaluations. In the biodistribution studies, healthy mice showed higher uptake of antimony in the liver than infected mice and elimination occurred primarily through biliary excretion, with a small proportion of the drug excreted by the kidneys. The serum kinetic curve was bi-exponential, with two compartments: the central compartment and another compartment associated with drug excretion. Radiotracers, which can be easily produced by neutron irradiation, were demonstrated to be an interesting tool for answering several questions regarding antimonial pharmacokinetics and chemotherapy.

  20. Leishmanial Excreted Factor: Protein-Bound and Free Forms from Promastigote Cultures of Leishmania tropica and Leishmania donovani

    PubMed Central

    Slutzky, Gerald M.; El-On, Joseph; Greenblatt, Charles L.

    1979-01-01

    Leishmania spp. growing in culture produce an immunologically active substance called excreted factor (EF), which precipitates antibodies raised against intact cells and has been implicated as the conditioning agent for parasite infection of host macrophages. An improved method for isolation of the material is described, based on Sephadex column chromatography of growth medium which had been boiled at pH 5.0. This procedure allows the detection of differences among the EF molecules of different species, and it overcomes previous shortcomings through the monitoring of immunological activity throughout. Analysis of the products of this procedure revealed that EFs from Leishmania tropica and Leishmania donovani share a common carrier protein, identified as rabbit serum albumin, and are chemically quite similar. Growth medium from L. tropica boiled at acidic pH contains primarily an EF-albumin complex of 75,000 molecular weight. Treated growth medium from L. donovani, on the other hand, contains both the albumin complex and a smaller molecule (less than 27,000 molecular weight) that is not associated with rabbit protein. This material accounts for nearly 20% of the EF of one L. donovani strain, but constitutes only a minute fraction of L. tropica EF. Treatment of the EF-albumin complex with trichloroacetic acid separates the molecule into two major subunits, one having a molecular weight of about 61,000 (without anti-Leishmania activity) and the other having a molecular weight of about 18,000 (with no anti-rabbit activity). The protein-free EF of L. tropica differs from that released by trichloroacetic acid extraction in that it is capable of precipitating antisera of nonhomologous serotypes, whereas the albumin complex and the trichloroacetic acid-treated EF fragment are not. EFs from both species display pH-dependent affinity for certain lectins. Images PMID:118936

  1. Natural infection of North African gundi (Ctenodactylus gundi) by Leishmania tropica in the focus of cutaneous leishmaniasis, Southeast Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Bousslimi, Nadia; Ben-Ayed, Soumaya; Ben-Abda, Imène; Aoun, Karim; Bouratbine, Aïda

    2012-06-01

    North African gundis (Ctenodactylus gundi) were trapped in the Leishmania (L.) tropica focus of cutaneous leishmaniasis, situated in southeast Tunisia and evaluated for Leishmania infection by real-time kinetoplast DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Species identification was performed by internal transcribed spacer one (ITS1)-PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis of the 7SL RNA gene. Real-time PCR on blood was positive in 6 of 13 (46.2%) tested gundis. Leishmania tropica was identified in five infected gundis and Leishmania major in one specimen. Alignments of the ITS-1 DNA sequences and 7S-HRM curves analysis indicated that similar genotypes were present in humans, a sandfly, and gundis from the same region suggesting a potential role of this rodent as reservoir host of L. tropica in southeast Tunisia.

  2. Leishmania amazonensis fails to induce the release of reactive oxygen intermediates by CBA macrophages.

    PubMed

    Almeida, T F; Palma, L C; Mendez, L C; Noronha-Dutra, A A; Veras, P S T

    2012-10-01

    CBA mouse macrophages effectively control Leishmania major infection, yet are permissive to Leishmania amazonensis. It has been established that some Leishmania species are destroyed by reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, other species of Leishmania exhibit resistance to ROS or even down-modulate ROS production. We hypothesized that L. amazonensis-infected macrophages reduce ROS production soon after parasite-cell interaction. Employing a highly sensitive analysis technique based on chemiluminescence, the production of superoxide (O(·-)(2)) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) by L. major- or L. amazonensis-infected CBA macrophages were measured. L. major induces macrophages to release levels of (O(·-)(2)) 3·5 times higher than in uninfected cells. This (O(·-)(2)) production is partially dependent on NADPH oxidase (NOX) type 2. The level of accumulated H(2)O(2) is 20 times higher in L. major-than in L. amazonensis-infected cells. Furthermore, macrophages stimulated with L. amazonensis release amounts of ROS similar to uninfected cells. These findings support previous studies showing that CBA macrophages are effective in controlling L. major infection by a mechanism dependent on both (O(·-)(2)) production and H(2)O(2) generation. Furthermore, these data reinforce the notion that L. amazonensis survive inside CBA macrophages by reducing ROS production during the phagocytic process. PMID:22817661

  3. Development of a human dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (hDHODH) pharma-similarity index approach with scaffold-hopping strategy for the design of novel potential inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shih, Kuei-Chung; Lee, Chi-Ching; Tsai, Chi-Neu; Lin, Yu-Shan; Tang, Chuan-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Human dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (hDHODH) is a class-2 dihydroorotate dehydrogenase. Because it is extensively used by proliferating cells, its inhibition in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, cancers, and multiple sclerosis is of substantial clinical importance. In this study, we had two aims. The first was to develop an hDHODH pharma-similarity index approach (PhSIA) using integrated molecular dynamics calculations, pharmacophore hypothesis, and comparative molecular similarity index analysis (CoMSIA) contour information techniques. The approach, for the discovery and design of novel inhibitors, was based on 25 diverse known hDHODH inhibitors. Three statistical methods were used to verify the performance of hDHODH PhSIA. Fischer's cross-validation test provided a 98% confidence level and the goodness of hit (GH) test score was 0.61. The q(2), r(2), and predictive r(2) values were 0.55, 0.97, and 0.92, respectively, for a partial least squares validation method. In our approach, each diverse inhibitor structure could easily be aligned with contour information, and common substructures were unnecessary. For our second aim, we used the proposed approach to design 13 novel hDHODH inhibitors using a scaffold-hopping strategy. Chemical features of the approach were divided into two groups, and the Vitas-M Laboratory fragment was used to create de novo inhibitors. This approach provides a useful tool for the discovery and design of potential inhibitors of hDHODH, and does not require docking analysis; thus, our method can assist medicinal chemists in their efforts to identify novel inhibitors.

  4. Phlebotomus sergenti (Parrot, 1917) identified as Leishmania killicki host in Ghardaïa, south Algeria.

    PubMed

    Boubidi, S C; Benallal, K; Boudrissa, A; Bouiba, L; Bouchareb, B; Garni, R; Bouratbine, A; Ravel, C; Dvorak, V; Votypka, J; Volf, P; Harrat, Z

    2011-07-01

    Since 2005, an outbreak of human cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in Ghardaïa, south Algeria, was studied and one output of these investigations was the identification of two Leishmania species, Leishmania major and Leishmania killicki, as the CL causative agents. In the present study, we were curious to focus on sand fly fauna present in this area and detection of Leishmania-positive sand fly females. Sand flies (3717) were collected during two seasons using sticky papers and CDC light traps in urban, rural and sylvatic sites. Twelve Phlebotomus species were identified. Phlebotomus papatasi was dominant in the urban site while Phlebotomus sergenti and Phlebotomus riouxi/chabaudi were dominant in the sylvatic site. Out of 74 P. sergenti females captured by CDC light traps in the sylvatic site populated by Ghardaïas' Gundi (Massoutiera mzabi), three ones were hosting Leishmania promastigotes. PCR-RFLP and sequencing of seven single-copy coding DNA sequences identified the promastigotes as L. killicki. Furthermore, laboratory experiments revealed that L. killicki isolate sampled from a CL patient inhabiting the studied region develop well in P. sergenti females. Our findings strongly suggest that the human cutaneous leishmaniases caused by L. killicki is a zoonotic disease with P. sergenti sand flies acting as hosts and vectors and gundi rodents as reservoirs.

  5. Using Proteomics to Understand How Leishmania Parasites Survive inside the Host and Establish Infection.

    PubMed

    Veras, Patrícia Sampaio Tavares; Bezerra de Menezes, Juliana Perrone

    2016-08-19

    Leishmania is a protozoan parasite that causes a wide range of different clinical manifestations in mammalian hosts. It is a major public health risk on different continents and represents one of the most important neglected diseases. Due to the high toxicity of the drugs currently used, and in the light of increasing drug resistance, there is a critical need to develop new drugs and vaccines to control Leishmania infection. Over the past few years, proteomics has become an important tool to understand the underlying biology of Leishmania parasites and host interaction. The large-scale study of proteins, both in parasites and within the host in response to infection, can accelerate the discovery of new therapeutic targets. By studying the proteomes of host cells and tissues infected with Leishmania, as well as changes in protein profiles among promastigotes and amastigotes, scientists hope to better understand the biology involved in the parasite survival and the host-parasite interaction. This review demonstrates the feasibility of proteomics as an approach to identify new proteins involved in Leishmania differentiation and intracellular survival.

  6. Using Proteomics to Understand How Leishmania Parasites Survive inside the Host and Establish Infection.

    PubMed

    Veras, Patrícia Sampaio Tavares; Bezerra de Menezes, Juliana Perrone

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania is a protozoan parasite that causes a wide range of different clinical manifestations in mammalian hosts. It is a major public health risk on different continents and represents one of the most important neglected diseases. Due to the high toxicity of the drugs currently used, and in the light of increasing drug resistance, there is a critical need to develop new drugs and vaccines to control Leishmania infection. Over the past few years, proteomics has become an important tool to understand the underlying biology of Leishmania parasites and host interaction. The large-scale study of proteins, both in parasites and within the host in response to infection, can accelerate the discovery of new therapeutic targets. By studying the proteomes of host cells and tissues infected with Leishmania, as well as changes in protein profiles among promastigotes and amastigotes, scientists hope to better understand the biology involved in the parasite survival and the host-parasite interaction. This review demonstrates the feasibility of proteomics as an approach to identify new proteins involved in Leishmania differentiation and intracellular survival. PMID:27548150

  7. Using Proteomics to Understand How Leishmania Parasites Survive inside the Host and Establish Infection

    PubMed Central

    Veras, Patrícia Sampaio Tavares; Bezerra de Menezes, Juliana Perrone

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania is a protozoan parasite that causes a wide range of different clinical manifestations in mammalian hosts. It is a major public health risk on different continents and represents one of the most important neglected diseases. Due to the high toxicity of the drugs currently used, and in the light of increasing drug resistance, there is a critical need to develop new drugs and vaccines to control Leishmania infection. Over the past few years, proteomics has become an important tool to understand the underlying biology of Leishmania parasites and host interaction. The large-scale study of proteins, both in parasites and within the host in response to infection, can accelerate the discovery of new therapeutic targets. By studying the proteomes of host cells and tissues infected with Leishmania, as well as changes in protein profiles among promastigotes and amastigotes, scientists hope to better understand the biology involved in the parasite survival and the host-parasite interaction. This review demonstrates the feasibility of proteomics as an approach to identify new proteins involved in Leishmania differentiation and intracellular survival. PMID:27548150

  8. A lipophosphoglycan-independent development of Leishmania in permissive sand flies

    PubMed Central

    Myskova, Jitka; Svobodova, Milena; Beverley, Stephen M.; Volf, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Leishmaniases are serious parasitic diseases the etiological organisms of which are transmitted by insect vectors, phlebotominae sand flies. Two sand fly species, Phlebotomus papatasi and P. sergenti, display remarkable specificity for Leishmania parasites they transmit in nature, but many others are broadly permissive to the development of different Leishmania species. Previous studies have suggested that in ‘specific’ vectors the successful parasite development is mediated by parasite surface glycoconjugates and sand fly lectins, however we show here that interactions involving ‘permissive’ sand flies utilize another molecules. We did find that the abundant surface glycoconjugate lipophosphoglycan, essential for attachment of Leishmania major in the specific vector P. papatasi, was not required for parasite adherence or survival in the permissive vectors P. arabicus and Lutzomyia longipalpis. Attachment in several permissive sand fly species instead correlated with the presence of midgut glycoproteins bearing terminal N-Acetyl-galactosamine and with the occurrence of a lectin-like activity on Leishmania surface. This new binding modality has important implications to parasite transmission and evolution. It may contribute to the successful spreading of Leishmania due to their adaptation into new vectors, namely transmission of L. infantum by Lutzomyia longipalpis; this event led to the establishment of L.infantum/chagasi in Latin America. PMID:17307009

  9. Serological survey of dogs from Egypt for antibodies to Leishmania spp.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leishmaniasis is an insect-transmitted parasitic disease with worldwide distribution. Leishmania spp. infections cause a broad spectrum of clinical signs ranging from skin lesions to fatal visceral disease. Dogs are a major reservoir host for visceral leishmaniasis in humans. Leishmaniasis is endemi...

  10. Comparison of tetrazolium salt assays for evaluation of drug activity against Leishmania spp.

    PubMed

    Ginouves, Marine; Carme, Bernard; Couppie, Pierre; Prevot, Ghislaine

    2014-06-01

    In French Guiana, leishmaniasis is an essentially cutaneous infection. It constitutes a major public health problem, with a real incidence of 0.2 to 0.3%. Leishmania guyanensis is the causal species most frequently encountered in French Guiana. The treatment of leishmaniasis is essentially drug based, but the therapeutic compounds available have major side effects (e.g., liver damage and diabetes) and must be administered parenterally or are costly. The efficacy of some of these agents has declined due to the emergence of resistance in certain strains of Leishmania. There is currently no vaccine against leishmaniasis, and it is therefore both necessary and urgent to identify new compounds effective against Leishmania. The search for new drugs requires effective tests for evaluations of the leishmanicidal activity of a particular molecule or extract. Microculture tetrazolium assays (MTAs) are colorimetric tests based on the use of tetrazolium salts. We compared the efficacies of three tetrazolium salts-3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), 2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT), and 2-(2-methoxy-4-nitrophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-(2,4-disulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (WST-8)-for quantification of the promastigotes of various species of Leishmania. We found that the capacity of Leishmania to metabolize a tetrazolium salt depended on the salt used and the species of Leishmania. WST-8 was the tetrazolium salt best metabolized by L. guyanensis and gave the best sensitivity. PMID:24719447

  11. Comparison of Tetrazolium Salt Assays for Evaluation of Drug Activity against Leishmania spp.

    PubMed Central

    Ginouves, Marine; Carme, Bernard; Couppie, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    In French Guiana, leishmaniasis is an essentially cutaneous infection. It constitutes a major public health problem, with a real incidence of 0.2 to 0.3%. Leishmania guyanensis is the causal species most frequently encountered in French Guiana. The treatment of leishmaniasis is essentially drug based, but the therapeutic compounds available have major side effects (e.g., liver damage and diabetes) and must be administered parenterally or are costly. The efficacy of some of these agents has declined due to the emergence of resistance in certain strains of Leishmania. There is currently no vaccine against leishmaniasis, and it is therefore both necessary and urgent to identify new compounds effective against Leishmania. The search for new drugs requires effective tests for evaluations of the leishmanicidal activity of a particular molecule or extract. Microculture tetrazolium assays (MTAs) are colorimetric tests based on the use of tetrazolium salts. We compared the efficacies of three tetrazolium salts—3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), 2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT), and 2-(2-methoxy-4-nitrophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-(2,4-disulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (WST-8)—for quantification of the promastigotes of various species of Leishmania. We found that the capacity of Leishmania to metabolize a tetrazolium salt depended on the salt used and the species of Leishmania. WST-8 was the tetrazolium salt best metabolized by L. guyanensis and gave the best sensitivity. PMID:24719447

  12. Phylogenomic reconstruction supports supercontinent origins for Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Harkins, Kelly M; Schwartz, Rachel S; Cartwright, Reed A; Stone, Anne C

    2016-03-01

    Leishmania, a genus of parasites transmitted to human hosts and mammalian/reptilian reservoirs by an insect vector, is the causative agent of the human disease complex leishmaniasis. The evolutionary relationships within the genus Leishmania and its origins are the source of ongoing debate, reflected in conflicting phylogenetic and biogeographic reconstructions. This study employs a recently described bioinformatics method, SISRS, to identify over 200,000 informative sites across the genome from newly sequenced and publicly available Leishmania data. This dataset is used to reconstruct the evolutionary relationships of this genus. Additionally, we constructed a large multi-gene dataset, using it to reconstruct the phylogeny and estimate divergence dates for species. We conclude that the genus Leishmania evolved at least 90-100 million years ago, supporting a modified version of the Multiple Origins hypothesis that we call the Supercontinent hypothesis. According to this scenario, separate Leishmania clades emerged prior to, and during, the breakup of Gondwana. Additionally, we confirm that reptile-infecting Leishmania are derived from mammalian forms and that the species that infect porcupines and sloths form a clade long separated from other species. Finally, we firmly place the guinea-pig infecting species, Leishmaniaenriettii, the globally dispersed Leishmaniasiamensis, and the newly identified Australian species from a kangaroo, as sibling species whose distribution arises from the ancient connection between Australia, Antarctica, and South America. PMID:26708057

  13. Vaccine Development Against Leishmania donovani

    PubMed Central

    Das, Amrita; Ali, Nahid

    2012-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by Leishmania donovani and Leishmania infantum/chagasi represents the second most challenging infectious disease worldwide, leading to nearly 500,000 new cases and 60,000 deaths annually. Zoonotic VL caused by L. infantum is a re-emergent canid zoonoses which represents a complex epidemiological cycle in the New world where domestic dogs serve as a reservoir host responsible for potentially fatal human infection and where dog culling is the only measure for reservoir control. Life-long immunity to VL has motivated development of prophylactic vaccines against the disease but very few have progressed beyond the experimental stage. No licensed vaccine is available till date against any form of leishmaniasis. High toxicity and increasing resistance to the current chemotherapeutic regimens have further complicated the situation in VL endemic regions of the world. Advances in vaccinology, including recombinant proteins, novel antigen-delivery systems/adjuvants, heterologous prime-boost regimens and strategies for intracellular antigen presentation, have contributed to recent advances in vaccine development against VL. Attempts to develop an effective vaccine for use in domestic dogs in areas of canine VL should be pursued for preventing human infection. Studies in animal models and human patients have revealed the pathogenic mechanisms of disease progression and features of protective immunity. This review will summarize the accumulated knowledge of pathogenesis, immune response, and prerequisites for protective immunity against human VL. Authors will discuss promising vaccine candidates, their developmental status and future prospects in a quest for rational vaccine development against the disease. In addition, several challenges such as safety issues, renewed and coordinated commitment to basic research, preclinical studies and trial design will be addressed to overcome the problems faced in developing prophylactic strategies for

  14. Identification of Leishmania spp. promastigotes in the intestines, ovaries, and salivary glands of Rhipicephalus sanguineus actively infesting dogs.

    PubMed

    Viol, Milena Araúz; Guerrero, Felix D; de Oliveira, Bruno César Miranda; de Aquino, Monally Conceição Costa; Loiola, Saulo Hudson; de Melo, Guilherme Dias; de Souza Gomes, Aparecida Helena; Kanamura, Cristina Takami; Garcia, Marcos Valério; Andreotti, Renato; de Lima, Valéria Marçal Félix; Bresciani, Katia Denise Saraiva

    2016-09-01

    Sand flies are recognized as the major vector of canine visceral leishmaniasis. However, in some areas of Brazil where sand flies do not occur, this disease is found in humans and dogs. There has been speculation that ticks might play a role in transmission of canine visceral leishmaniasis and the DNA of Leishmania spp. has been reported in whole ticks. We investigated the presence of Leishmania spp. promastigotes in the intestines, ovaries, and salivary glands of Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks collected from tick-infested dogs in two cities of Brazil. We used 66 dogs that tested positive and 33 that tested negative for Leishmania spp. according to direct cytological examination assays. Ten ticks were collected from each dog and dissected to collect the intestines, ovaries, and salivary glands for immunohistochemistry (IHC) and diagnostic real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). IHC results showed Leishmania spp. in 98, 14, and 8 % of the intestines, ovaries, and salivary glands, respectively. Real-time PCR showed that 89, 41, and 33 % of the tick intestine, ovary, and salivary glands, respectively, were positive for Leishmania spp. The verification of promastigotes of Leishmania spp. by two independent techniques in ticks collected from these urban region dogs showed that there is need for clarification of the role of ticks in the transmission of canine visceral leishmaniasis in Brazil. PMID:27169724

  15. Heme oxygenase-1 promotes the persistence of Leishmania chagasi infection

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Nívea F.; Andrade, Bruno B.; Feijó, Daniel F.; Araújo-Santos, Théo; Quintela, Graziele C.; Andrade, Daniela; Abánades, Daniel R.; Melo, Enaldo V.; Silva, Angela M.; Brodyskn, Cláudia I.; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Barral, Aldina; Soares, Rodrigo P.; Almeida, Roque P.; Bozza, Marcelo T.; Borges, Valéria M.

    2012-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) remains a major public health problem worldwide. This disease is highly associated with chronic inflammation and a lack of the cellular immune responses against Leishmania. It is important to identify major factors driving the successful establishment of the Leishmania infection in order to develop better tools for the disease control. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a key enzyme triggered by cellular stress, and its role in VL has not been investigated. Herein, we evaluated the role of HO-1 in the infection by Leishmania infantum chagasi, the causative agent of VL cases in Brazil. We found that L. chagasi infection or lipophosphoglycan (LPG) isolated from promastigotes triggered HO-1 production by murine macrophages. Interestingly, cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPP), a HO-1 inductor, increased the parasite burden in both mouse and human derived macrophages. Upon L. chagasi infection, macrophages from Hmox1 knockout mice presented significantly lower parasite loads when compared to those from wild type mice. Furthermore, upregulation of HO-1 by CoPP diminished the production of TNF-α and reactive oxygen species by infected murine macrophages and increased Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase expression in human monocytes. Finally, patients with VL presented higher systemic concentrations of HO-1 than healthy individuals and this increase of HO-1 was reduced after antileishmanial treatment, suggesting that HO-1 is associated with disease susceptibility. Our data argue that HO-1 has a critical role in the L. chagasi infection and is strongly associated with the inflammatory imbalance during VL. Manipulation of HO-1 pathways during VL could serve as an adjunctive therapeutic approach. PMID:22461696

  16. Leishmania promastigotes activate PI3K/Akt signalling to confer host cell resistance to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ruhland, Aaron; Leal, Nicole; Kima, Peter E

    2007-01-01

    Previous reports have shown that cells infected with promastigotes of some Leishmania species are resistant to the induction of apoptosis. This would suggest that either parasites elaborate factors that block signalling from apoptosis inducers or that parasites engage endogenous host signalling pathways that block apoptosis. To investigate the latter scenario, we determined whether Leishmania infection results in the activation of signalling pathways that have been shown to mediate resistance to apoptosis in other infection models. First, we showed that infection with the promastigote form of Leishmania major, Leishmania pifanoi and Leishmania amazonensis activates signalling through p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), NFkappaB and PI3K/Akt. Then we found that inhibition of signalling through the PI3K/Akt pathway with LY294002 and Akt IV inhibitor reversed resistance of infected bone marrow-derived macrophages and RAW 264.7 macrophages to potent inducers of apoptosis. Moreover, reduction of Akt levels with small interfering RNAs to Akt resulted in the inability of infected macrophages to resist apoptosis. Further evidence of the role of PI3K/Akt signalling in the promotion of cell survival by infected cells was obtained with the finding that Bad, which is a substrate of Akt, becomes phosphorylated during the course of infection. In contrast to the observations with PI3K/Akt signalling, inhibition of p38 MAPK signalling with SB202190 or NFkappaB signalling with wedelolactone had limited effect on parasite-induced resistance to apoptosis. We conclude that Leishmania promastigotes engage PI3K/Akt signalling, which confers to the infected cell, the capacity to resist death from activators of apoptosis.

  17. Genetic Manipulation of Leishmania donovani to Explore the Involvement of Argininosuccinate Synthase in Oxidative Stress Management.

    PubMed

    Sardar, Abul Hasan; Jardim, Armando; Ghosh, Ayan Kumar; Mandal, Abhishek; Das, Sushmita; Saini, Savita; Abhishek, Kumar; Singh, Ruby; Verma, Sudha; Kumar, Ajay; Das, Pradeep

    2016-03-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) produced by the phagocytic cells are the most common arsenals used to kill the intracellular pathogens. However, Leishmania, an intracellular pathogen, has evolved mechanisms to survive by counterbalancing the toxic oxygen metabolites produced during infection. Polyamines, the major contributor in this anti-oxidant machinery, are largely dependent on the availability of L-arginine in the intracellular milieu. Argininosuccinate synthase (ASS) plays an important role as the rate-limiting step required for converting L-citrulline to argininosuccinate to provide arginine for an assortment of metabolic processes. Leishmania produce an active ASS enzyme, yet it has an incomplete urea cycle as it lacks an argininosuccinate lyase (ASL). There is no evidence for endogenous synthesis of L-arginine in Leishmania, which suggests that these parasites salvage L-arginine from extracellular milieu and makes the biological function of ASS and the production of argininosuccinate in Leishmania unclear. Our previous quantitative proteomic analysis of Leishmania promastigotes treated with sub-lethal doses of ROS, RNS, or a combination of both, led to the identification of several differentially expressed proteins which included ASS. To assess the involvement of ASS in stress management, a mutant cell line with greatly reduced ASS activity was created by a double-targeted gene replacement strategy in L. donovani promastigote. Interestingly, LdASS is encoded by three copies of allele, but Western blot analysis showed the third allele did not appear to express ASS. The free thiol levels in the mutant LdASS-/-/+ cell line were decreased. Furthermore, the cell viability in L-arginine depleted medium was greatly attenuated on exposure to different stress environments and was adversely impacted in its ability to infect mice. These findings suggest that ASS is important for Leishmania donovani to counterbalance the stressed environments

  18. Genetic Manipulation of Leishmania donovani to Explore the Involvement of Argininosuccinate Synthase in Oxidative Stress Management.

    PubMed

    Sardar, Abul Hasan; Jardim, Armando; Ghosh, Ayan Kumar; Mandal, Abhishek; Das, Sushmita; Saini, Savita; Abhishek, Kumar; Singh, Ruby; Verma, Sudha; Kumar, Ajay; Das, Pradeep

    2016-03-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) produced by the phagocytic cells are the most common arsenals used to kill the intracellular pathogens. However, Leishmania, an intracellular pathogen, has evolved mechanisms to survive by counterbalancing the toxic oxygen metabolites produced during infection. Polyamines, the major contributor in this anti-oxidant machinery, are largely dependent on the availability of L-arginine in the intracellular milieu. Argininosuccinate synthase (ASS) plays an important role as the rate-limiting step required for converting L-citrulline to argininosuccinate to provide arginine for an assortment of metabolic processes. Leishmania produce an active ASS enzyme, yet it has an incomplete urea cycle as it lacks an argininosuccinate lyase (ASL). There is no evidence for endogenous synthesis of L-arginine in Leishmania, which suggests that these parasites salvage L-arginine from extracellular milieu and makes the biological function of ASS and the production of argininosuccinate in Leishmania unclear. Our previous quantitative proteomic analysis of Leishmania promastigotes treated with sub-lethal doses of ROS, RNS, or a combination of both, led to the identification of several differentially expressed proteins which included ASS. To assess the involvement of ASS in stress management, a mutant cell line with greatly reduced ASS activity was created by a double-targeted gene replacement strategy in L. donovani promastigote. Interestingly, LdASS is encoded by three copies of allele, but Western blot analysis showed the third allele did not appear to express ASS. The free thiol levels in the mutant LdASS-/-/+ cell line were decreased. Furthermore, the cell viability in L-arginine depleted medium was greatly attenuated on exposure to different stress environments and was adversely impacted in its ability to infect mice. These findings suggest that ASS is important for Leishmania donovani to counterbalance the stressed environments

  19. Genetic Manipulation of Leishmania donovani to Explore the Involvement of Argininosuccinate Synthase in Oxidative Stress Management

    PubMed Central

    Sardar, Abul Hasan; Jardim, Armando; Ghosh, Ayan Kumar; Mandal, Abhishek; Das, Sushmita; Saini, Savita; Abhishek, Kumar; Singh, Ruby; Verma, Sudha; Kumar, Ajay; Das, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) produced by the phagocytic cells are the most common arsenals used to kill the intracellular pathogens. However, Leishmania, an intracellular pathogen, has evolved mechanisms to survive by counterbalancing the toxic oxygen metabolites produced during infection. Polyamines, the major contributor in this anti-oxidant machinery, are largely dependent on the availability of L-arginine in the intracellular milieu. Argininosuccinate synthase (ASS) plays an important role as the rate-limiting step required for converting L-citrulline to argininosuccinate to provide arginine for an assortment of metabolic processes. Leishmania produce an active ASS enzyme, yet it has an incomplete urea cycle as it lacks an argininosuccinate lyase (ASL). There is no evidence for endogenous synthesis of L-arginine in Leishmania, which suggests that these parasites salvage L-arginine from extracellular milieu and makes the biological function of ASS and the production of argininosuccinate in Leishmania unclear. Our previous quantitative proteomic analysis of Leishmania promastigotes treated with sub-lethal doses of ROS, RNS, or a combination of both, led to the identification of several differentially expressed proteins which included ASS. To assess the involvement of ASS in stress management, a mutant cell line with greatly reduced ASS activity was created by a double-targeted gene replacement strategy in L. donovani promastigote. Interestingly, LdASS is encoded by three copies of allele, but Western blot analysis showed the third allele did not appear to express ASS. The free thiol levels in the mutant LdASS-/-/+ cell line were decreased. Furthermore, the cell viability in L-arginine depleted medium was greatly attenuated on exposure to different stress environments and was adversely impacted in its ability to infect mice. These findings suggest that ASS is important for Leishmania donovani to counterbalance the stressed environments

  20. Molecular Diagnosis and Identification of Leishmania Species in Jordan from Saved Dry Samples.

    PubMed

    Hijjawi, Nawal; Kanani, Kalil A; Rasheed, Malak; Atoum, Manar; Abdel-Dayem, Mona; Irhimeh, Mohammad R

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of the endemic cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in Jordan relies on patient clinical presentation and microscopic identification. Studies toward improved identification of the causative Leishmania species, especially in regions where multiple species exist, and the introduction of these techniques into medical diagnosis is paramount. This study looked at the current epidemiology of CL in Jordan. Clinically diagnosed 41 patients with CL were tested for the presence of Leishmania parasite using both Giemsa staining from skin scraps on glass slides and ITS1-PCR from samples blotted onto storage cards (NucleoCards®). Microscopically, 28 out of the 41 (68.3%) collected samples were positive for amastigotes, whereas the molecular ITS1-PCR amplification successfully identified 30 of the 41 samples (73.2%). Furthermore, PCR-RFLP analysis allowed species identification which is impossible microscopically. Of the 30 PCR positive samples, 28 were Leishmania major positive and the other two samples were Leishmania tropica. This indicates that L. major is the most prevalent species in Jordan and the two L. tropica cases originated from Syria indicating possible future L. tropica outbreaks. Diagnosis of CL based on clinical presentation only may falsely increase its prevalence. Although PCR is more sensitive, it is still not available in our medical laboratories in Jordan. PMID:27403435

  1. Molecular Diagnosis and Identification of Leishmania Species in Jordan from Saved Dry Samples

    PubMed Central

    Hijjawi, Nawal; Kanani, Kalil A.; Rasheed, Malak; Atoum, Manar; Abdel-Dayem, Mona; Irhimeh, Mohammad R.

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of the endemic cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in Jordan relies on patient clinical presentation and microscopic identification. Studies toward improved identification of the causative Leishmania species, especially in regions where multiple species exist, and the introduction of these techniques into medical diagnosis is paramount. This study looked at the current epidemiology of CL in Jordan. Clinically diagnosed 41 patients with CL were tested for the presence of Leishmania parasite using both Giemsa staining from skin scraps on glass slides and ITS1-PCR from samples blotted onto storage cards (NucleoCards®). Microscopically, 28 out of the 41 (68.3%) collected samples were positive for amastigotes, whereas the molecular ITS1-PCR amplification successfully identified 30 of the 41 samples (73.2%). Furthermore, PCR-RFLP analysis allowed species identification which is impossible microscopically. Of the 30 PCR positive samples, 28 were Leishmania major positive and the other two samples were Leishmania tropica. This indicates that L. major is the most prevalent species in Jordan and the two L. tropica cases originated from Syria indicating possible future L. tropica outbreaks. Diagnosis of CL based on clinical presentation only may falsely increase its prevalence. Although PCR is more sensitive, it is still not available in our medical laboratories in Jordan. PMID:27403435

  2. Characterization of microRNA expression profiles in Leishmania-infected human phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Geraci, N S; Tan, J C; McDowell, M A

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania are intracellular protozoa that influence host immune responses eliciting parasite species-specific pathologies. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short single-stranded ribonucleic acids that complement gene transcripts to block protein translation and have been shown to regulate immune system molecular mechanisms. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages (MP) were infected in vitro with Leishmania major or Leishmania donovani parasites. Small RNAs were isolated from total RNA and sequenced to identify mature miRNAs associated with leishmanial infections. Normalized sequence read count profiles revealed a global downregulation in miRNA expression among host cells following infection. Most identified miRNAs were expressed at higher levels in L. donovani-infected cells relative to L. major-infected cells. Pathway enrichments using in silico-predicted gene targets of differentially expressed miRNAs showed evidence of potentially universal MAP kinase signalling pathway effects. Whereas JAK-STAT and TGF-β signalling pathways were more highly enriched using targets of miRNAs upregulated in L. donovani-infected cells, these data provide evidence in support of a selective influence on host cell miRNA expression and regulation in response to differential Leishmania infections.

  3. Polymorphisms of cytochrome b gene in Leishmania parasites and their relation to types of cutaneous leishmaniasis lesions in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Myint, Chomar Kaung; Asato, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Yu-ichi; Kato, Hirotomo; Bhutto, Abdul M; Soomro, Farooq R; Memon, Muhamad Z; Matsumoto, Jun; Marco, Jorge D; Oshiro, Minoru; Katakura, Ken; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa; Uezato, Hiroshi

    2008-02-01

    The exact species and/or strains of Leishmania parasites involved strongly influence the clinical and epidemiological features of leishmaniasis, and current knowledge of those influences and relationships is inadequate. We report that cytochrome b (cyt b) gene sequencing identified causal Leishmania parasites of 69 cutaneous leishmaniasis cases in Pakistan over a 3-year period. Of 21 cases in highland areas (Quetta city, Balochistan province), 16 (76.2%) were identified as Leishmania (L.) tropica and five (23.8%) as Leishmania (L.) major. Of 48 cases from lowland areas, cities/villages in Indus valley in Sindh and Balochistan provinces, 47 (97.9%) were identified as L. (L.) major and one (2.1%) as L. (L.) tropica. Statistical analysis (Fisher's exact test) revealed a significant difference (P < 0.0001) in the distribution of the two species by altitude; L. (L.) major is predominant in lowland and L. (L.) tropica at highland areas. The present result enriched our earlier finding, based on the first year's cultured parasite data, that only L. (L.) tropica was found in highland areas and only L. (L.) major in lowland areas. Among Leishmania samples analyzed, three types of cyt b polymorphism of L. (L.) major were found, including 45 (86.5%) cases of type I, six (11.5%) of type II and one (2%) of type III. We report for the first time on the presence of polymorphisms in L. (L.) major (types I, II and III) based on species identification using cyt b gene sequencing from clinical samples. Moreover, we found no correlation between clinical presentation (wet-, dry- and/or mixed-types of cutaneous lesions) and causal Leishmania parasites.

  4. Proteomic analysis of antigens from Leishmania infantum promastigotes.

    PubMed

    Dea-Ayuela, María Auxiliadora; Rama-Iñiguez, Sara; Bolás-Fernández, Francisco

    2006-07-01

    Leishmaniasis is a zoonotic disease caused by the species of the genus Leishmania, flagellated protozoa that multiply inside mammalian macrophages and are transmitted by the bite of the sandfly. The disease is widespread and due to the lack of fully effective treatment and vaccination the search for new drugs and immune targets is needed. Proteomics seems to be a suitable strategy because the annotated sequenced genome of L. major is available. Here, we present a high-resolution proteome for L. infantum promastigotes comprising of around 700 spots. Western blot with rabbit hyperimmune serum raised against L. infantum promastiogote extracts and further analysis by MALDI-TOF and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS allowed the identification of various relevant functional antigenic proteins. Major antigenic proteins were identified as propionil carboxilasa, ATPase beta subunit, transketolase, proteasome subunit, succinyl-diaminopimelate desuccinylase, a probable tubulin alpha chain, the full-size heat shock protein 70, and several proteins of unknown function. In addition, one enzyme from the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway (adrenodoxin reductase) and the structural paraflagellar rod protein 3 (PAR3) were found among non-antigenic proteins. This study corroborates the usefulness of proteomics in identifying new proteins with crucial biological functions in Leishmania parasites. PMID:16791830

  5. Silver nanoparticles and electroporation: Their combinational effect on Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Dolat, Elham; Rajabi, Omid; Salarabadi, Samaneh Soudmand; Yadegari-Dehkordi, Sajedeh; Sazgarnia, Ameneh

    2015-12-01

    Leishmaniasis is an emerging and uncontrolled disease. The use of routine drugs has been limited due to proven side effects and drug resistance. Interestingly, novel approaches such as nanotechnology have been applied as a therapeutic modality. Silver nanoparticles have shown antileishmanial effects but because of their nonspecific and toxic effects on normal cells, their use has been limited. On the other hand, it has been demonstrated that electric pulses induce electropores on cell membranes resulting in higher entrance of certain molecules into cells. There is a hypothesis proposing that use of electroporation and silver nanoparticles simultaneously can induce greater accumulation of particles in infected cells, besides higher toxicity. In this study, after applying electric pulses with different concentrations of silver nanoparticles (SNPs), cell survival rate was determined by standard viability assays. On the basis of these data, 2 μg/ml of SNPs and 700 V/cm with 100 μs duration of electroporation were selected as the non-lethal condition. Promastigotes and infected macrophage cells received both treatments and the survival percentage and Infection Index were calculated. In parasites and cells receiving both treatments, higher toxicity was observed in comparison to each treatment given individually, showing a synergic effect on promastigotes. Therefore, application of electric pulses could overcome limitations in using the antileishmanial properties of silver nanoparticles.

  6. Differentiation of Leishmania species by FT-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, Josafá C.; Mittmann, Josane; Ferreira, Isabelle; Ferreira-Strixino, Juliana; Raniero, Leandro

    2015-05-01

    Leishmaniasis is a parasitic infectious disease caused by protozoa that belong to the genus Leishmania. It is transmitted by the bite of an infected female Sand fly. The disease is endemic in 88 countries Desjeux (2001) [1] (16 developed countries and 72 developing countries) on four continents. In Brazil, epidemiological data show the disease is present in all Brazilian regions, with the highest incidences in the North and Northeast. There are several methods used to diagnose leishmaniasis, but these procedures have many limitations, are time consuming, have low sensitivity, and are expensive. In this context, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis has the potential to provide rapid results and may be adapted for a clinical test with high sensitivity and specificity. In this work, FT-IR was used as a tool to investigate the promastigotes of Leishmaniaamazonensis, Leishmaniachagasi, and Leishmaniamajor species. The spectra were analyzed by cluster analysis and deconvolution procedure base on spectra second derivatives. Results: cluster analysis found four specific regions that are able to identify the Leishmania species. The dendrogram representation clearly indicates the heterogeneity among Leishmania species. The band deconvolution done by the curve fitting in these regions quantitatively differentiated the polysaccharides, amide III, phospholipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. L. chagasi and L. major showed a greater biochemistry similarity and have three bands that were not registered in L. amazonensis. The L. amazonensis presented three specific bands that were not recorded in the other two species. It is evident that the FT-IR method is an indispensable tool to discriminate these parasites. The high sensitivity and specificity of this technique opens up the possibilities for further studies about characterization of other microorganisms.

  7. Protein kinase A signaling during bidirectional axenic differentiation in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Bachmaier, Sabine; Witztum, Ronit; Tsigankov, Polina; Koren, Roni; Boshart, Michael; Zilberstein, Dan

    2016-02-01

    Parasitic protozoa of the genus Leishmania are obligatory intracellular parasites that cycle between the phagolysosome of mammalian macrophages, where they proliferate as intracellular amastigotes, and the midgut of female sand flies, where they proliferate as extracellular promastigotes. Shifting between the two environments induces signaling pathway-mediated developmental processes that enable adaptation to both host and vector. Developmentally regulated expression and phosphorylation of protein kinase A subunits in Leishmania and in Trypanosoma brucei point to an involvement of protein kinase A in parasite development. To assess this hypothesis in Leishmania donovani, we determined proteome-wide changes in phosphorylation of the conserved protein kinase A phosphorylation motifs RXXS and RXXT, using a phospho-specific antibody. Rapid dephosphorylation of these motifs was observed upon initiation of promastigote to amastigote differentiation in culture. No phosphorylated sites were detected in axenic amastigotes. To analyse the kinetics of (re)phosphorylation during axenic reverse differentiation from L. donovani amastigotes to promastigotes, we first established a map of this process with morphological and molecular markers. Upon initiation, the parasites rested for 6-12 h before proliferation of an asynchronous population resumed. After early changes in cell shape, the major changes in molecular marker expression and flagella biogenesis occurred between 24 and 33 h after initiation. RXXS/T re-phosphorylation and expression of the regulatory subunit PKAR1 correlated with promastigote maturation, indicating a promastigote-specific function of protein kinase A signaling. This is supported by the localization of PKAR1 to the flagellum, an organelle reduced to a remnant in amastigote forms. We conclude that a significant increase in protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation is part of the ordered changes that characterise the amastigote to promastigote

  8. Activity of Thymus capitellatus volatile extract, 1,8-cineole and borneol against Leishmania species.

    PubMed

    Machado, M; Dinis, A M; Santos-Rosa, M; Alves, V; Salgueiro, L; Cavaleiro, C; Sousa, M C

    2014-02-24

    In the search for new leishmanicidal agents, Thymus capitellatus Hoffmanns. & Link (family Lamiaceae) volatile extract and its major compounds, 1,8-cineole and borneol, were tested against Leishmania infantum, Leishmania tropica and Leishmania major. Plant volatile extract (essential oil) was analysed by GC and GC-MS and the activity of essential oil on Leishmania promastigotes viability was assessed using tetrazolium-dye colorimetric method (MTT). The MTT test was also used to assess the cytotoxicity of essential oil on macrophages and bovine aortic endothelial cells. Effects on parasites were also analyzed by flow cytometry in order to assess mitochondrial transmembrane electrochemical gradient (JC-1), analyze phosphatidylserine externalization (annexin V-FITC, propidium iodide) and evaluate cell cycle (DNase-free, RNase, PI). Morphological and ultrastructural studies were performed by light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. T. capitellatus volatile extract exhibited anti-parasite activity on Leishmania species, with IC50 values ranging from 35 to 62 μg/ml. However, major compounds 1,8-cineole and borneol did not showed biological activity suggesting that these monoterpenes are not responsible for the antileishmanial activity of T. capitellatus essential oil. Appearance of aberrant-shaped cells, mitochondrial swelling and autophagosomal structures were some of the ultrastructural alterations exhibited among treated promastigote cells. T. capitellatus promoted leishmanicidal effect by triggering a programmed cell death as evidenced by externalization of phosphatidylserine, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and cell-cycle arrest at the G(0)/G(1) phase. The volatile extract did not induced cytotoxic effects on mammalian cells. Taken together, these results suggest that T. capitellatus may represent a valuable source for therapeutic control of leishmaniasis in humans and animals. PMID:24365244

  9. Testing of Four Leishmania Vaccine Candidates in a Mouse Model of Infection with Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, the Main Causative Agent of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in the New World▿

    PubMed Central

    Salay, G.; Dorta, M. L.; Santos, N. M.; Mortara, R. A.; Brodskyn, C.; Oliveira, C. I.; Barbiéri, C. L.; Rodrigues, M. M.

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated whether four recombinant antigens previously used for vaccination against experimental infection with Leishmania (Leishmania) major could also induce protective immunity against a challenge with Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, the species responsible for 90% of the 28,712 annual cases of cutaneous and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis recorded in Brazil during the year of 2004. Initially, we isolated the homolog genes encoding four L. (V.) braziliensis antigens: (i) homologue of receptor for activated C kinase, (ii) thiol-specific antioxidant, (iii) Leishmania elongation and initiation factor, and (iv) L. (L.) major stress-inducible protein 1. At the deduced amino acid level, all four open reading frames had a high degree of identity with the previously described genes of L. (L.) major being expressed on promastigotes and amastigotes of L. (V.) braziliensis. These genes were inserted into the vector pcDNA3 or expressed as bacterial recombinant proteins. After immunization with recombinant plasmids or proteins, BALB/c mice generated specific antibody or cell-mediated immune responses (gamma interferon production). After an intradermal challenge with L. (V.) braziliensis infective promastigotes, no significant reduction on the lesions was detected. We conclude that the protective immunity afforded by these four vaccine candidates against experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by L. (L.) major could not be reproduced against a challenge with L. (V.) braziliensis. Although negative, we consider our results important since they suggest that studies aimed at the development of an effective vaccine against L. (V.) braziliensis, the main causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis in the New World, should be redirected toward distinct antigens or different vaccination strategies. PMID:17626159

  10. The Comparative Genomics and Phylogenomics of Leishmania amazonensis Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Tschoeke, Diogo A; Nunes, Gisele L; Jardim, Rodrigo; Lima, Joana; Dumaresq, Aline SR; Gomes, Monete R; de Mattos Pereira, Leandro; Loureiro, Daniel R; Stoco, Patricia H; de Matos Guedes, Herbert Leonel; de Miranda, Antonio Basilio; Ruiz, Jeronimo; Pitaluga, André; Silva, Floriano P; Probst, Christian M; Dickens, Nicholas J; Mottram, Jeremy C; Grisard, Edmundo C; Dávila, Alberto MR

    2014-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is an infectious disease caused by Leishmania species. Leishmania amazonensis is a New World Leishmania species belonging to the Mexicana complex, which is able to cause all types of leishmaniasis infections. The L. amazonensis reference strain MHOM/BR/1973/M2269 was sequenced identifying 8,802 codifying sequences (CDS), most of them of hypothetical function. Comparative analysis using six Leishmania species showed a core set of 7,016 orthologs. L. amazonensis and Leishmania mexicana share the largest number of distinct orthologs, while Leishmania braziliensis presented the largest number of inparalogs. Additionally, phylogenomic analysis confirmed the taxonomic position for L. amazonensis within the “Mexicana complex”, reinforcing understanding of the split of New and Old World Leishmania. Potential non-homologous isofunctional enzymes (NISE) were identified between L. amazonensis and Homo sapiens that could provide new drug targets for development. PMID:25336895

  11. The Comparative Genomics and Phylogenomics of Leishmania amazonensis Parasite.

    PubMed

    Tschoeke, Diogo A; Nunes, Gisele L; Jardim, Rodrigo; Lima, Joana; Dumaresq, Aline Sr; Gomes, Monete R; de Mattos Pereira, Leandro; Loureiro, Daniel R; Stoco, Patricia H; de Matos Guedes, Herbert Leonel; de Miranda, Antonio Basilio; Ruiz, Jeronimo; Pitaluga, André; Silva, Floriano P; Probst, Christian M; Dickens, Nicholas J; Mottram, Jeremy C; Grisard, Edmundo C; Dávila, Alberto Mr

    2014-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is an infectious disease caused by Leishmania species. Leishmania amazonensis is a New World Leishmania species belonging to the Mexicana complex, which is able to cause all types of leishmaniasis infections. The L. amazonensis reference strain MHOM/BR/1973/M2269 was sequenced identifying 8,802 codifying sequences (CDS), most of them of hypothetical function. Comparative analysis using six Leishmania species showed a core set of 7,016 orthologs. L. amazonensis and Leishmania mexicana share the largest number of distinct orthologs, while Leishmania braziliensis presented the largest number of inparalogs. Additionally, phylogenomic analysis confirmed the taxonomic position for L. amazonensis within the "Mexicana complex", reinforcing understanding of the split of New and Old World Leishmania. Potential non-homologous isofunctional enzymes (NISE) were identified between L. amazonensis and Homo sapiens that could provide new drug targets for development. PMID:25336895

  12. Different susceptibilities of Leishmania spp. promastigotes to the Annona muricata acetogenins annonacinone and corossolone, and the Platymiscium floribundum coumarin scoparone.

    PubMed

    Vila-Nova, Nadja Soares; de Morais, Selene Maia; Falcão, Maria José Cajazeiras; Alcantara, Terezinha Thaize Negreiros; Ferreira, Pablito Augusto Travassos; Cavalcanti, Eveline Solon Barreira; Vieira, Icaro Gusmão Pinto; Campello, Cláudio Cabral; Wilson, Mary

    2013-03-01

    Leishmaniasis is a zoonotic disease that can manifest itself in visceral and cutaneous form. The aim of this study was to search for new leishmanicidal compounds. Preliminarily, Artemia salina assay was applied to compounds from two plants found in Northeastern Brazil, Platymiscium floribundum and Annona muricata. Then these compounds were tested against three Leishmania species (Leishmania donovani, Leishmania mexicana and Leishmania major). A screening assay using luciferase-expressing promastigote form were used to measure the viability of promastigote One coumarin, scoparone, isolated from P. floribundum and two acetogenins, annonacinone and corossolone isolated from A. muricata showed leishmanicidal activity in all species tested. Nevertheless, Leishmania species indicated different susceptibilities in relation to the tested compounds: L. mexicana was more sensitive to scoparone followed by L. major and L. donovani. The three species presented similar inhibition to corossolone and annonacinone. Acetogenin annonacinone (EC(50)=6.72-8.00 μg/mL) indicated high leishmanicidal activity; corossolone (EC(50)=16.14-18.73 μg/mL) and scoparone (EC(50)=9.11-27.51 μg/mL) moderate activity. A. saline larvae were less sensitive to the coumarin scoparone and acetogenin corossolone was the most toxic. In conclusion, the leishmanicidal activity demonstrated by the coumarin and acetogenins indicate these compounds for further studies aiming the development of new leishmanicidal agents.

  13. Differences in immune responses against Leishmania induced by infection and by immunization with killed parasite antigen: implications for vaccine discovery.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Sergio C F

    2016-01-01

    The leishmaniases are a group of diseases caused by different species of the protozoan genus Leishmania and transmitted by sand fly vectors. They are a major public health problem in almost all continents. There is no effective control of leishmaniasis and its geographical distribution is expanding in many countries. Great effort has been made by many scientists to develop a vaccine against leishmaniasis, but, so far, there is still no effective vaccine against the disease. The only way to generate protective immunity against leishmaniasis in humans is leishmanization, consisting of the inoculation of live virulent Leishmania as a means to acquire long-lasting immunity against subsequent infections. At present, all that we know about human immune responses to Leishmania induced by immunization with killed parasite antigens came from studies with first generation candidate vaccines (killed promastigote extracts). In the few occasions that the T cell-mediated immune responses to Leishmania induced by infection and immunization with killed parasite antigens were compared, important differences were found both in humans and in animals. This review discusses these differences and their relevance to the development of a vaccine against leishmaniasis, the major problems involved in this task, the recent prospects for the selection of candidate antigens and the use of attenuated Leishmania as live vaccines. PMID:27600664

  14. T Helper1/T Helper2 Cells and Resistance/Susceptibility to Leishmania Infection: Is This Paradigm Still Relevant?

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, James; Brombacher, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Work in large part on Leishmania major in the 1980s identified two distinct apparently counter-regulatory CD4+ T cell populations, T helper (h)1 and Th2, that controlled resistance/susceptibility to infection respectively. However, the generation of IL-4−/− mice in the 1990s questioned the paramount role of this Th2 archetypal cytokine in the non-healing response to Leishmania infection. The more recent characterization of CD4+ T cell regulatory populations and further effector CD4+ T helper populations, Th17, Th9, and T follicular (f)h cells as well as the acknowledged plasticity in T helper cell function has further added to the complexity of host pathogen interactions. These interactions are complicated by the multiplicity of cells that respond to CD4+ T cell subset signatory cytokines, as well as the diversity of Leishmania species that are often subject to significantly different immune-regulatory controls. In this article we review current knowledge with regard to the role of CD4+ T cells and their products during Leishmania infection. In particular we update on our studies using conditional IL-4Rα gene-deficient mice that have allowed dissection of the cell interplay dictating the disease outcomes of the major Leishmania species infecting humans. PMID:22566961

  15. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) induced by Leishmania infection of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Donovan, M J; Tripathi, V; Favila, M A; Geraci, N S; Lange, M C; Ballhorn, W; McDowell, M A

    2012-10-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a pivotal role in regulating immunity, establishing immunologically privileged tissue microenvironments and maintaining homoeostasis. It is becoming increasingly clear that one key mechanism that mediates many DC functions is production of the immunomodulatory enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). For pathogens that cause chronic infection, exploitation of host DCs is a solution to establish and persist within a host. Leishmania parasites cause a range of clinical manifestations, all involving chronic infection, and are proficient at avoiding immune responses. We demonstrate here that infection of human myeloid-derived DC with L. major and L. donovani induces IDO expression using a mechanism that involves autocrine or paracrine stimulation with a DC-secreted factor. Leishmania-induced IDO suppresses allogeneic and tetanus toxoid-specific lymphocyte proliferation, an inhibition that is reversed with the IDO inhibitor, 1-methyl tryptophan (1-MT). Furthermore, IDO expression by human DC does not require live Leishmania infection, as parasite lysates also up-regulate IDO mRNA production. Our data suggest that one mechanism Leishmania parasites utilize to circumvent immune clearance may be to promote the induction of IDO among host DC within the infection microenvironment.

  16. Attenuation and Production of the Amphotericin B-Resistant Leishmania tropica Strain

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Imran; Khan, Momin; Umar, Muhammad Naveed; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Background Infections caused by Leishmania are becoming major public health problems on a global scale. Many species of Leishmania around the world are obtaining resistance levels of up to 15 folds, as estimated by the World Health Organization. Leishmania showing resistance is relatively difficult to observe and maintain in laboratory settings. Objectives The current study deals with the generation of Leishmania tropica strains that are resistant to amphotericin B (amp B). Materials and Methods The L. tropica strain was attenuated using continuous passaging 20 times. The infectivity of L. tropica was confirmed in BALB/c mice. The L. tropica resistant strain was produced in vitro using a continuous increase in drug pressure. The cross resistance of L. tropica to other drugs was also investigated. Results After 20 continuous passages, the BALB/c mice tested negative in the development of leishmaniasis. At a concentration of 0.1 µg/mL, L. tropica showed resistance to amp B. The newly developed promastigotes were 16 times more resistant compared to the resistance of the wild type promastigotes. The resistant L. tropica strain showed cross resistance to itraconazole and had a resistance index that was greater than five. The resistant strain displayed maximum stability for more than three months in the drug-free medium. Conclusions The resistant strain of L. tropica can be produced in laboratories using continuous drug pressure. The attenuated resistant strain has significant implications (both medically and academically) in the ability to overcome resistance.

  17. Attenuation and Production of the Amphotericin B-Resistant Leishmania tropica Strain

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Imran; Khan, Momin; Umar, Muhammad Naveed; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Background Infections caused by Leishmania are becoming major public health problems on a global scale. Many species of Leishmania around the world are obtaining resistance levels of up to 15 folds, as estimated by the World Health Organization. Leishmania showing resistance is relatively difficult to observe and maintain in laboratory settings. Objectives The current study deals with the generation of Leishmania tropica strains that are resistant to amphotericin B (amp B). Materials and Methods The L. tropica strain was attenuated using continuous passaging 20 times. The infectivity of L. tropica was confirmed in BALB/c mice. The L. tropica resistant strain was produced in vitro using a continuous increase in drug pressure. The cross resistance of L. tropica to other drugs was also investigated. Results After 20 continuous passages, the BALB/c mice tested negative in the development of leishmaniasis. At a concentration of 0.1 µg/mL, L. tropica showed resistance to amp B. The newly developed promastigotes were 16 times more resistant compared to the resistance of the wild type promastigotes. The resistant L. tropica strain showed cross resistance to itraconazole and had a resistance index that was greater than five. The resistant strain displayed maximum stability for more than three months in the drug-free medium. Conclusions The resistant strain of L. tropica can be produced in laboratories using continuous drug pressure. The attenuated resistant strain has significant implications (both medically and academically) in the ability to overcome resistance. PMID:27630762

  18. Phosphoproteomic analysis of differentiating Leishmania parasites reveals a unique stage-specific phosphorylation motif.

    PubMed

    Tsigankov, Polina; Gherardini, Pier Federico; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Späth, Gerald F; Zilberstein, Dan

    2013-07-01

    Protists of the genus Leishmania are obligatory intracellular parasites that cause a wide range of cutaneous, mucocutaneous, and visceral diseases in humans. They cycle between phagolysosomes of mammalian macrophages and the sand fly midgut, proliferating as intracellular amastigotes and extracellular promastigotes, respectively. Exposure to a lysosomal environment, i.e. acidic pH and body temperature, signals promastigotes to differentiate into amastigotes. Time course analyses indicated that Leishmania differentiation is a highly regulated and coordinated process. However, the role of posttranslational events such as protein phosphorylation in this process is still unknown. Herein, we analyzed and compared the phosphoproteomes of L. donovani amastigotes and promastigotes using an axenic host-free system that simulates parasite differentiation. Shotgun phosphopeptide analysis revealed 1614 phosphorylation residues (p-sites) corresponding to 627 proteins. The analysis indicated that the majority of the p-sites are stage-specific. Serine phosphorylation in a previously identified trypanosomatid-specific "SF" motif was significantly enriched in amastigotes. We identified a few phosophotyrosines (pY), mostly in proteins known to participate in signal transduction pathways. The analysis indicated that Leishmania contains proteins with multiple p-sites that are phosphorylated at distinct stages of the life cycle. For over half of the phosphorylation events, changes in phosphoprotein abundance did not positively correlate with changes in protein abundance, suggesting functional regulation. This study compares, for the first time, the phosphoproteins of L. donovani axenic promastigotes and amastigotes and provides the largest data set of the Leishmania phosphoproteome to date.

  19. Iron uptake controls the generation of Leishmania infective forms through regulation of ROS levels

    PubMed Central

    Mittra, Bidyottam; Cortez, Mauro; Haydock, Andrew; Ramasamy, Gowthaman; Myler, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    During its life cycle, Leishmania undergoes extreme environmental changes, alternating between insect vectors and vertebrate hosts. Elevated temperature and decreased pH, conditions encountered after macrophage invasion, can induce axenic differentiation of avirulent promastigotes into virulent amastigotes. Here we show that iron uptake is a major trigger for the differentiation of Leishmania amazonensis amastigotes, independently of temperature and pH changes. We found that iron depletion from the culture medium triggered expression of the ferrous iron transporter LIT1 (Leishmania iron transporter 1), an increase in iron content of the parasites, growth arrest, and differentiation of wild-type (WT) promastigotes into infective amastigotes. In contrast, LIT1-null promastigotes showed reduced intracellular iron content and sustained growth in iron-poor media, followed by cell death. LIT1 up-regulation also increased iron superoxide dismutase (FeSOD) activity in WT but not in LIT1-null parasites. Notably, the superoxide-generating drug menadione or H2O2 was sufficient to trigger differentiation of WT promastigotes into fully infective amastigotes. LIT1-null promastigotes accumulated superoxide radicals and initiated amastigote differentiation after exposure to H2O2 but not to menadione. Our results reveal a novel role for FeSOD activity and reactive oxygen species in orchestrating the differentiation of virulent Leishmania amastigotes in a process regulated by iron availability. PMID:23382545

  20. The Role of Leishmania Proteophosphoglycans in Sand Fly Transmission and Infection of the Mammalian Host

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Matthew E.

    2012-01-01

    Leishmania are transmitted by the bite of their sand fly vector and this has a significant influence on the virulence of the resulting infection. From our studies into the interaction between parasite, vector, and host we have uncovered an important missing ingredient during Leishmania transmission. Leishmania actively adapt their sand fly hosts into efficient vectors by secreting Promastigote Secretory Gel (PSG), a proteophosphoglycan (PPG)-rich, mucin-like gel which accumulates in sand fly gut and mouthparts. This has the effect of blocking the fly, such that during bloodfeeding both parasites and gel are co-transmitted in an act of regurgitation. We are discovering that this has further implications for the mammalian infection, again, in favor of the parasite. Experimentally, PSG exacerbates cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis and can promote the chronicity of Leishmania infection, even in mouse strains normally capable of controlling leishmaniasis. The underlying mechanism of PSG’s action is a major focus of our ongoing work. This review aims to synthesize what is known about the role and action of PSG and its constituent proteophosphoglycans, for parasite colonization of the sand fly, transmission, and mammalian infection. Lastly, we discuss potential exploitation of this important vector-transmitted product and future avenues of research. PMID:22754550

  1. Development of a Murine Infection Model with Leishmania killicki, Responsible for Cutaneous Leishmaniosis in Algeria: Application in Pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Eddaikra, Naouel; Kherachi Djenad, Ihcene; Benbetka, Sihem; Benikhlef, Razika; Aït-Oudhia, Khatima; Moulti-Mati, Farida; Oury, Bruno; Sereno, Denis; Harrat, Zoubir

    2016-01-01

    In Algeria, Leishmania infantum, Leishmania major, and Leishmania killicki (Leishmania tropica) are responsible for cutaneous leishmaniosis. We established a murine model of L. killicki infection to investigate its infective capacity, some immunophysiopathological aspects, and its suitability for pharmacological purposes. Following the injection of L. major or L. killicki metacyclic promastigotes in the ear dermis of BALB/c mice, the course of infection was followed. The infection with L. killicki caused slower lesion formation than with L. major. The presence of L. killicki or L. major DNA and parasites was detected in the ear dermis and in lymph nodes, spleen, and liver. Lesions induced by L. killicki were nonulcerative in their aspect, whereas those caused by L. major were highly ulcerative and necrotic, which matches well with the lesion phenotype reported in humans for L. killicki and L. major, respectively. The treatment of L. killicki lesions by injection of Glucantime® significantly reduced the lesion thickness and parasite burden. Ear dermal injection of BALB/c mice constitutes a model to study lesions physiopathology caused by L. killicki and presents interest for in vivo screening of new compounds against this pathogen, emerging in Algeria. PMID:26949705

  2. Development of a Murine Infection Model with Leishmania killicki, Responsible for Cutaneous Leishmaniosis in Algeria: Application in Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Eddaikra, Naouel; Kherachi Djenad, Ihcene; Benbetka, Sihem; Benikhlef, Razika; Aït-Oudhia, Khatima; Moulti-Mati, Farida; Oury, Bruno; Sereno, Denis; Harrat, Zoubir

    2016-01-01

    In Algeria, Leishmania infantum, Leishmania major, and Leishmania killicki (Leishmania tropica) are responsible for cutaneous leishmaniosis. We established a murine model of L. killicki infection to investigate its infective capacity, some immunophysiopathological aspects, and its suitability for pharmacological purposes. Following the injection of L. major or L. killicki metacyclic promastigotes in the ear dermis of BALB/c mice, the course of infection was followed. The infection with L. killicki caused slower lesion formation than with L. major. The presence of L. killicki or L. major DNA and parasites was detected in the ear dermis and in lymph nodes, spleen, and liver. Lesions induced by L. killicki were nonulcerative in their aspect, whereas those caused by L. major were highly ulcerative and necrotic, which matches well with the lesion phenotype reported in humans for L. killicki and L. major, respectively. The treatment of L. killicki lesions by injection of Glucantime® significantly reduced the lesion thickness and parasite burden. Ear dermal injection of BALB/c mice constitutes a model to study lesions physiopathology caused by L. killicki and presents interest for in vivo screening of new compounds against this pathogen, emerging in Algeria. PMID:26949705

  3. Structure-Guided Lead Optimization of Triazolopyrimidine-Ring Substituents Identifies Potent Plasmodium falciparum Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Inhibitors with Clinical Candidate Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Coteron, Jose M.; Marco, Maria; Esquivias, Jorge; Deng, Xiaoyi; White, Karen L.; White, John; Koltun, Maria; El Mazouni, Farah; Kokkonda, Sreekanth; Katneni, Kasiram; Bhamidipati, Ravi; Shackleford, David M.; Angulo-Barturen, Inigo; Ferrer, Santiago B.; Jimenez-Diaz, Maria Belen; Gamo, Francisco-Javier; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.; Charman, William N.; Bathurst, Ian; Floyd, David; Matthews, David; Burrows, Jeremy N.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.; Charman, Susan A.; Phillips, Margaret A.

    2012-02-27

    Drug therapy is the mainstay of antimalarial therapy, yet current drugs are threatened by the development of resistance. In an effort to identify new potential antimalarials, we have undertaken a lead optimization program around our previously identified triazolopyrimidine-based series of Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (PfDHODH) inhibitors. The X-ray structure of PfDHODH was used to inform the medicinal chemistry program allowing the identification of a potent and selective inhibitor (DSM265) that acts through DHODH inhibition to kill both sensitive and drug resistant strains of the parasite. This compound has similar potency to chloroquine in the humanized SCID mouse P. falciparum model, can be synthesized by a simple route, and rodent pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated it has excellent oral bioavailability, a long half-life and low clearance. These studies have identified the first candidate in the triazolopyrimidine series to meet previously established progression criteria for efficacy and ADME properties, justifying further development of this compound toward clinical candidate status.

  4. Rational Design of Benzylidenehydrazinyl-Substituted Thiazole Derivatives as Potent Inhibitors of Human Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase with in Vivo Anti-arthritic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shiliang; Luan, Guoqin; Ren, Xiaoli; Song, Wenlin; Xu, Liuxin; Xu, Minghao; Zhu, Junsheng; Dong, Dong; Diao, Yanyan; Liu, Xiaofeng; Zhu, Lili; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Zhenjiang; Xu, Yufang; Li, Honglin

    2015-01-01

    Human dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (hDHODH) is an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, transplant rejection and other autoimmune diseases. Based on the X-ray structure of hDHODH in complex with lead compound 7, a series of benzylidenehydrazinyl-substituted thiazole derivatives as potent inhibitors of hDHODH were designed and synthesized, of which 19 and 30 were the most potent with IC50 values in the double-digit nanomolar range. Moreover, compound 19 displayed significant anti-arthritic effects and favorable pharmacokinetic profiles in vivo. Further X-ray structure and SAR analyses revealed that the potencies of the designed inhibitors were partly attributable to additional water-mediated hydrogen bond networks formed by an unexpected buried water between hDHODH and the 2-(2-methylenehydrazinyl)thiazole scaffold. This work not only elucidates promising scaffolds targeting hDHODH for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, but also demonstrates that the water-mediated hydrogen bond interaction is an important factor in molecular design and optimization. PMID:26443076

  5. Lead-optimization of aryl and aralkyl amine based triazolopyrimidine inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase with antimalarial activity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gujjar, Ramesh; Mazouni, Farah El; White, Karen L.; White, John; Creason, Sharon; Shackleford, David M.; Deng, Xiaoyi; Charman, William N.; Bathurst, Ian; Burrows, Jeremy; Floyd, David M.; Matthews, David; Buckner, Frederick S.; Charman, Susan A.; Phillips, Margaret A.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.

    2011-01-01

    Malaria is one of the leading causes of severe infectious disease worldwide, yet our ability to maintain effective therapy to combat the illness is continually challenged by the emergence of drug resistance. We previously reported identification of a new class of triazolopyrimidine based P. falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (PfDHODH) inhibitors with antimalarial activity, leading to the discovery of a new lead series and novel target for drug development. Active compounds from the series contained a triazolopyrimidine ring attached to an aromatic group through a bridging nitrogen atom. Herein we describe systematic efforts to optimize the aromatic functionality with the goal of improving potency and in vivo properties of compounds from the series. These studies led to the identification of two new substituted aniline moieties (4-SF5-Ph and 3,5-Di-F-4-CF3-Ph) which, when coupled to the triazolopyrimidine ring showed good plasma exposure and better efficacy in the P. berghei mouse model of the disease, than previously reported compounds from the series. PMID:21517059

  6. Bioisosteric transformations and permutations in the triazolopyrimidine scaffold to identify the minimum pharmacophore required for inhibitory activity against Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Marwaha, Alka; White, John; El_Mazouni, Farah; Creason, Sharon A; Kokkonda, Sreekanth; Buckner, Frederick S.; Charman, Susan A.; Phillips, Margaret A.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.

    2012-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum causes approximately 1 million deaths annually. However increasing resistance imposes a continuous threat to existing drug therapies. We previously reported a number of potent and selective triazolopyrimidine-based inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase that inhibit parasite in vitro growth with similar activity. Lead optimization of this series led to the recent identification of a preclinical candidate, showing good activity against P. falciparum in mice. As part of a backup program around this scaffold, we explored heteroatom rearrangement and substitution in the triazolopyrimidine ring and have identified several other ring configurations that are active as PfDHODH inhibitors. The imidazo[1,2-α]pyrimidines were shown to bind somewhat more potently than the triazolopyrimidines depending on the nature of the amino aniline substitution. DSM151, the best candidate in this series, binds with 4-fold better affinity (PfDHODH IC50 = 0.077 μM) than the equivalent triazolopyrimidine and suppresses parasites in vivo in the P. berghei model. PMID:22877245

  7. Trypanothione overproduction and resistance to antimonials and arsenicals in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, R; Dey, S; Xu, N; Gage, D; Lightbody, J; Ouellette, M; Rosen, B P

    1996-09-17

    Leishmania resistant to arsenicals and antimonials extrude arsenite. Previous results of arsenite uptake into plasma membrane-enriched vesicles suggested that the transported species is a thiol adduct of arsenite. In this paper, we demonstrate that promastigotes of arsenite-resistant Leishmania tarentolae have increased levels of intracellular thiols. High-pressure liquid chromatography of the total thiols showed that a single peak of material was elevated almost 40-fold. The major species in this peak was identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry as N1,N8-bis-(glutathionyl)spermidine (trypanothione). The trypanothione adduct of arsenite was effectively transported by the As-thiol pump. No difference in pump activity was observed in wild type and mutants. A model for drug resistance is proposed in which Sb(V)/As(V)-containing compounds, including the antileishmanial drug Pentostam, are reduced intracellularly to Sb(III)/As(III), conjugated to trypanothione, and extruded by the As-thiol pump. The rate-limiting step in resistance is proposed to be formation of the metalloid-thiol pump substrates, so that increased synthesis of trypanothione produces resistance. Increased synthesis of the substrate rather than an increase in the number of pump molecules is a novel mechanism for drug resistance.

  8. Leishmania is not prone to develop resistance to tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Adriano C; Trinconi, Cristiana T; Senra, Luisa; Yokoyama-Yasunaka, Jenicer K U; Uliana, Silvia R B

    2015-12-01

    Tamoxifen, an antineoplastic agent, is active in vitro and in vivo against the parasitic protozoa Leishmania. As part of our efforts to unravel this drug's mechanisms of action against the parasite and understand how resistance could arise, we tried to select tamoxifen-resistant Leishmania amazonensis. Three different strategies to generate tamoxifen resistant mutants were used: stepwise increase in drug concentration applied to promastigote cultures, chemical mutagenesis followed by drug selection and treatment of infected mice followed by selection of amastigotes. For amastigote selection, we employed a method with direct plating of parasites recovered from lesions into semi-solid media. Tamoxifen resistant parasites were not rescued by any of these methods. Miltefosine was used as a control in selection experiments and both stepwise selection and chemical mutagenesis allowed successful isolation of miltefosine resistant mutants. These findings are consistent with a multi-target mode of action to explain tamoxifen's leishmanicidal properties. Considering that drug resistance is a major concern in anti-parasitic chemotherapy, these findings support the proposition of using tamoxifen as a partner in drug combination schemes for the treatment of leishmaniasis.

  9. Exposure to Leishmania braziliensis Triggers Neutrophil Activation and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Hurrell, Benjamin P.; Celes, Fabiana S.; Curvelo, Rebecca P.; Prates, Deboraci B.; Barral, Aldina; Borges, Valeria M.; Tacchini-Cottier, Fabienne; de Oliveira, Camila I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Neutrophils are the first line of defense against invading pathogens and are rapidly recruited to the sites of Leishmania inoculation. During Leishmania braziliensis infection, depletion of inflammatory cells significantly increases the parasite load whereas co-inoculation of neutrophils plus L. braziliensis had an opposite effect. Moreover, the co-culture of infected macrophages and neutrophils also induced parasite killing leading us to ask how neutrophils alone respond to an L. braziliensis exposure. Herein we focused on understanding the interaction between neutrophils and L. braziliensis, exploring cell activation and apoptotic fate. Methods and Findings Inoculation of serum-opsonized L. braziliensis promastigotes in mice induced neutrophil accumulation in vivo, peaking at 24 h. In vitro, exposure of thyoglycollate-elicited inflammatory or bone marrow neutrophils to L. braziliensis modulated the expression of surface molecules such as CD18 and CD62L, and induced the oxidative burst. Using mCherry-expressing L. braziliensis, we determined that such effects were mainly observed in infected and not in bystander cells. Neutrophil activation following contact with L. braziliensis was also confirmed by the release of TNF-α and neutrophil elastase. Lastly, neutrophils infected with L. braziliensis but not with L. major displayed markers of early apoptosis. Conclusions We show that L. braziliensis induces neutrophil recruitment in vivo and that neutrophils exposed to the parasite in vitro respond through activation and release of inflammatory mediators. This outcome may impact on parasite elimination, particularly at the early stages of infection. PMID:25756874

  10. Spatial Distribution and Molecular Identification of Leishmania Species from Endemic Foci of South-Eastern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi, F; Sharifi, I; Zarean, M; Parizi, M Hakimi; Aflatoonian, MR; Harandi, M Fasihi; Zahmatkesh, R; Mashayekhi, M; Kermanizadeh, AR

    2012-01-01

    Background Cutaneous leishmaniasis constitutes a major public health problem in many parts of the world including Iran. The primary objective of this study was to identify Leishmania species in endemic districts of Kerman Province, south-eastern Iran. Methods This study was conducted by random sampling as cross- sectional descriptive between 2008 and 2010. Overall, 203 skin scraping smears were taken from the patients. Nested –PCR was performed to amplify variable minicircle fragments of Leishmania kDNA. Results Bam was the most infected district (71.1%), followed by Kerman (14.7%), Jiroft (5.4%), Baft (2.7%), Sirjan (1.6%), Shahr-e Babak (1.5%) and others (3.0%). L. tropica was the most common species identified (194 cases, 95.6%), while L. major was found in only 9 cases (4.4%). Of 203 identified patients, all species in Bam (l07 cases), Kerman (32 cases), Jiroft (l6 cases) and Shahr-e- Babak (l1 cases) were detected as L. tropica, whereas infected subjects in Baft and Sirjan showed L. tropica or L. major. Characterization of Leishmania species resulted in generation of 750 bp and 560 bp fragments, corresponding to those of L. tropica and L. major, respectively. Conclusion L. tropica is the main species (95.6%) caused ACL in endemic areas of Kerman Province; however L. major is present in low level (4.4%). PMID:23133471

  11. Characterization of the pattern of ribosomal protein L19 production during the lifecycle of Leishmania spp.

    PubMed

    de Almeida-Bizzo, Janayna Hammes; Alves, Lysangela Ronalte; Castro, Felipe F; Garcia, Juliana Bório Ferreira; Goldenberg, Samuel; Cruz, Angela Kaysel

    2014-12-01

    Leishmania is a genus of protozoan parasites causing a wide clinical spectrum of diseases in humans. Analysis of a region of chromosome 6 from Leishmania major (Iribar et al.) showed that the transcript of a putative L19 ribosomal protein (RPL19) was most abundant at the amastigote stage. We therefore decided to characterize L19 protein abundance throughout the lifecycle of Leishmania. Differential expression of the L19 gene during development has been observed for all Leishmania species studied to date (L. major, L. braziliensis, L. donovani, and L. amazonensis). Immunoblotting with polyclonal antibodies against L. major RPL19 revealed that changes to L19 protein abundance follow a similar pattern in various species. The amount of L19 protein was higher in exponentially growing promastigotes than in stationary phase promastigotes. The L19 protein was barely detectable in amastigotes, despite the abundance of L19 transcripts observed in L. major at this stage. Immunofluorescence assays showed a granular, dispersed distribution of RPL19 throughout the cytoplasm. Subcellular fractionation confirmed the presence of the protein in the ribosomal fraction, but not in the cytosol of L. major. We generated a L. major transfectant bearing a plasmid-borne L19 gene. Overproduction of the L19 transcript and protein resulted in impaired growth of the transfectants in association with high polysome peaks. We also showed by metabolic labeling that L19 overexpressing clones display low rates of translation. These data suggest that L19 overexpression affects negatively translation elongation or termination. The lack of correlation between L19 transcript and protein abundances suggest that the translation of L19 is differentially controlled during development in the various species investigated.

  12. Characterization of the pattern of ribosomal protein L19 production during the lifecycle of Leishmania spp.

    PubMed

    de Almeida-Bizzo, Janayna Hammes; Alves, Lysangela Ronalte; Castro, Felipe F; Garcia, Juliana Bório Ferreira; Goldenberg, Samuel; Cruz, Angela Kaysel

    2014-12-01

    Leishmania is a genus of protozoan parasites causing a wide clinical spectrum of diseases in humans. Analysis of a region of chromosome 6 from Leishmania major (Iribar et al.) showed that the transcript of a putative L19 ribosomal protein (RPL19) was most abundant at the amastigote stage. We therefore decided to characterize L19 protein abundance throughout the lifecycle of Leishmania. Differential expression of the L19 gene during development has been observed for all Leishmania species studied to date (L. major, L. braziliensis, L. donovani, and L. amazonensis). Immunoblotting with polyclonal antibodies against L. major RPL19 revealed that changes to L19 protein abundance follow a similar pattern in various species. The amount of L19 protein was higher in exponentially growing promastigotes than in stationary phase promastigotes. The L19 protein was barely detectable in amastigotes, despite the abundance of L19 transcripts observed in L. major at this stage. Immunofluorescence assays showed a granular, dispersed distribution of RPL19 throughout the cytoplasm. Subcellular fractionation confirmed the presence of the protein in the ribosomal fraction, but not in the cytosol of L. major. We generated a L. major transfectant bearing a plasmid-borne L19 gene. Overproduction of the L19 transcript and protein resulted in impaired growth of the transfectants in association with high polysome peaks. We also showed by metabolic labeling that L19 overexpressing clones display low rates of translation. These data suggest that L19 overexpression affects negatively translation elongation or termination. The lack of correlation between L19 transcript and protein abundances suggest that the translation of L19 is differentially controlled during development in the various species investigated. PMID:25290356

  13. Influence of Clinical Status and Parasite Load on Erythropoiesis and Leucopoiesis in Dogs Naturally Infected with Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi

    PubMed Central

    Trópia de Abreu, Raquel; Carvalho, Maria das Graças; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins; Giunchetti, Rodolfo Cordeiro; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Coura-Vital, Wendel; Corrêa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Reis, Alexandre Barbosa

    2011-01-01

    Background The bone marrow is considered to be an important storage of parasites in Leishmania-infected dogs, although little is known about cellular genesis in this organ during canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL). Methodology/Principal Findings The aim of the present study was to evaluate changes in erythropoiesis and leucopoiesis in bone marrow aspirates from dogs naturally infected with Leishmania chagasi and presenting different clinical statuses and bone marrow parasite densities. The evolution of CVL from asymptomatic to symptomatic status was accompanied by increasing parasite density in the bone marrow. The impact of bone marrow parasite density on cellularity was similar in dogs at different clinical stages, with animals in the high parasite density group. Erythroid and eosinophilic hypoplasia, proliferation of neutrophilic precursor cells and significant increases in lymphocytes and plasma cell numbers were the major alterations observed. Differential bone marrow cell counts revealed increases in the myeloid:erythroid ratio associated to increased numbers of granulopoietic cells in the different clinical groups compared with non-infected dogs. Conclusions Analysis of the data obtained indicated that the assessment of bone marrow constitutes an additional and useful tool by which to elaborate a prognosis for CVL. PMID:21572995

  14. High Resolution Melting Analysis Targeting hsp70 as a Fast and Efficient Method for the Discrimination of Leishmania Species

    PubMed Central

    Zampieri, Ricardo Andrade; Laranjeira-Silva, Maria Fernanda; Muxel, Sandra Marcia; Stocco de Lima, Ana Carolina; Shaw, Jeffrey Jon; Floeter-Winter, Lucile Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background Protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania cause a large spectrum of clinical manifestations known as Leishmaniases. These diseases are increasingly important public health problems in many countries both within and outside endemic regions. Thus, an accurate differential diagnosis is extremely relevant for understanding epidemiological profiles and for the administration of the best therapeutic protocol. Methods/Principal Findings Exploring the High Resolution Melting (HRM) dissociation profiles of two amplicons using real time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) targeting heat-shock protein 70 coding gene (hsp70) revealed differences that allowed the discrimination of genomic DNA samples of eight Leishmania species found in the Americas, including Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum chagasi, L. (L.) amazonensis, L. (L.) mexicana, L. (Viannia) lainsoni, L. (V.) braziliensis, L. (V.) guyanensis, L. (V.) naiffi and L. (V.) shawi, and three species found in Eurasia and Africa, including L. (L.) tropica, L. (L.) donovani and L. (L.) major. In addition, we tested DNA samples obtained from standard promastigote culture, naturally infected phlebotomines, experimentally infected mice and clinical human samples to validate the proposed protocol. Conclusions/Significance HRM analysis of hsp70 amplicons is a fast and robust strategy that allowed for the detection and discrimination of all Leishmania species responsible for the Leishmaniases in Brazil and Eurasia/Africa with high sensitivity and accuracy. This method could detect less than one parasite per reaction, even in the presence of host DNA. PMID:26928050

  15. Licochalcone A, a novel antiparasitic agent with potent activity against human pathogenic protozoan species of Leishmania.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, M; Christensen, S B; Blom, J; Lemmich, E; Nadelmann, L; Fich, K; Theander, T G; Kharazmi, A

    1993-01-01

    Licochalcone A, an oxygenated chalcone isolated from the roots of Chinese licorice plant, inhibited the growth of both Leishmania major and Leishmania donovani promastigotes and amastigotes. The structure of the licochalcone A was established by mass and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies and by synthesis, and its purity was verified by high-pressure liquid chromatography. The 50% inhibition of growth of logarithmic- and stationary-phase promastigotes of L. major, as measured by [3H]thymidine uptake, were 4 and 2.5 micrograms/ml, respectively. The growth of L. major promastigotes was totally inhibited after a 20-h incubation period with licochalcone A at 5 micrograms/ml. At a concentration of 0.5 microgram/ml, licochalcone A markedly reduced the infection rate of human peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages and U937 cells with L. major promastigotes and exhibited a strong intracellular killing of the parasite. These data show that intracellular Leishmania amastigotes are more susceptible than promastigotes to licochalcone A. Results of studies on the site of action of licochalcone A indicate that the target organelle appears to be the parasite mitochondria. These findings demonstrate that licochalcone A in concentrations that are nontoxic to host cells exhibits a strong antileishmanial activity and that appropriate substituted chalcones might be a new class of antileishmanial drugs. Images PMID:8109916

  16. Plants used in the treatment of leishmanial ulcers due to Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis in an endemic area of Bahia, Brazil.

    PubMed

    França, F; Lago, E L; Marsden, P D

    1996-01-01

    This paper records the plants used in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis (L(V)b) among the rural population of a cocoa-producing coastal area of Bahia state, Brazil. An enquiry conducted among a hundred patients identified 49 plants species used to treat skin ulceration caused by this Leishmania species. The principal plants used are caju-branco (Anacardium occidentale, Anacardiaceae), used by 65% of the population, folha-fogo (Clidemia hirta,Melastomataceae) 39%, alfavaca-grossa (Plectranthus amboinicus, Lamiaceae) 33%, mastruz (Chenopodium ambrosioides, Chenopodiaceae) 31%, erva-de-santa-maria (Solanum americanum, Solanaceae) (25%) and transagem (Plantago major, Plantaginaceae) 2%. PMID:8701041

  17. Plants used in the treatment of leishmanial ulcers due to Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis in an endemic area of Bahia, Brazil.

    PubMed

    França, F; Lago, E L; Marsden, P D

    1996-01-01

    This paper records the plants used in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis (L(V)b) among the rural population of a cocoa-producing coastal area of Bahia state, Brazil. An enquiry conducted among a hundred patients identified 49 plants species used to treat skin ulceration caused by this Leishmania species. The principal plants used are caju-branco (Anacardium occidentale, Anacardiaceae), used by 65% of the population, folha-fogo (Clidemia hirta,Melastomataceae) 39%, alfavaca-grossa (Plectranthus amboinicus, Lamiaceae) 33%, mastruz (Chenopodium ambrosioides, Chenopodiaceae) 31%, erva-de-santa-maria (Solanum americanum, Solanaceae) (25%) and transagem (Plantago major, Plantaginaceae) 2%.

  18. Leishmania genome analysis and high-throughput immunological screening identifies tuzin as a novel vaccine candidate against visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Bhavana Sethu; Wang, Ruobing; Madhubala, Rentala

    2014-06-24

    Leishmaniasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by Leishmania species. It is a major health concern affecting 88 countries and threatening 350 million people globally. Unfortunately, there are no vaccines and there are limitations associated with the current therapeutic regimens for leishmaniasis. The emerging cases of drug-resistance further aggravate the situation, demanding rapid drug and vaccine development. The genome sequence of Leishmania, provides access to novel genes that hold potential as chemotherapeutic targets or vaccine candidates. In this study, we selected 19 antigenic genes from about 8000 common Leishmania genes based on the Leishmania major and Leishmania infantum genome information available in the pathogen databases. Potential vaccine candidates thus identified were screened using an in vitro high throughput immunological platform developed in the laboratory. Four candidate genes coding for tuzin, flagellar glycoprotein-like protein (FGP), phospholipase A1-like protein (PLA1) and potassium voltage-gated channel protein (K VOLT) showed a predominant protective Th1 response over disease exacerbating Th2. We report the immunogenic properties and protective efficacy of one of the four antigens, tuzin, as a DNA vaccine against Leishmania donovani challenge. Our results show that administration of tuzin DNA protected BALB/c mice against L. donovani challenge and that protective immunity was associated with higher levels of IFN-γ and IL-12 production in comparison to IL-4 and IL-10. Our study presents a simple approach to rapidly identify potential vaccine candidates using the exhaustive information stored in the genome and an in vitro high-throughput immunological platform.

  19. Drought, Smallpox, and Emergence of Leishmania braziliensis in Northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (Vianna) braziliensis is a major health problem in the state of Ceará in northeastern Brazil. We propose that the disease emerged as a consequence of the displacement of persons from Ceará to the Amazon region following the Great Drought and smallpox epidemic of 1877–1879. As the economic and social situation in Ceará deteriorated, ≈55,000 residents migrated to the Amazon region to find work, many on rubber plantations. Those that returned likely introduced L. (V.) brazilensis into Ceará, where the first cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis were reported early in the 20th century. The absence of an animal reservoir in Ceará, apart from dogs, supports the hypothesis. The spread of HIV/AIDS into the region and the possibility of concurrent cutaneous leishmaniasis raise the possibility of future problems. PMID:19523291

  20. Members of a large retroposon family are determinants of post-transcriptional gene expression in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Bringaud, Frédéric; Müller, Michaela; Cerqueira, Gustavo Coutinho; Smith, Martin; Rochette, Annie; El-Sayed, Najib M A; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Ghedin, Elodie

    2007-09-01

    Trypanosomatids are unicellular protists that include the human pathogens Leishmania spp. (leishmaniasis), Trypanosoma brucei (sleeping sickness), and Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas disease). Analysis of their recently completed genomes confirmed the presence of non-long-terminal repeat retrotransposons, also called retroposons. Using the 79-bp signature sequence common to all trypanosomatid retroposons as bait, we identified in the Leishmania major genome two new large families of small elements--LmSIDER1 (785 copies) and LmSIDER2 (1,073 copies)--that fulfill all the characteristics of extinct trypanosomatid retroposons. LmSIDERs are approximately 70 times more abundant in L. major compared to T. brucei and are found almost exclusively within the 3'-untranslated regions (3'UTRs) of L. major mRNAs. We provide experimental evidence that LmSIDER2 act as mRNA instability elements and that LmSIDER2-containing mRNAs are generally expressed at lower levels compared to the non-LmSIDER2 mRNAs. The considerable expansion of LmSIDERs within 3'UTRs in an organism lacking transcriptional control and their role in regulating mRNA stability indicate that Leishmania have probably recycled these short retroposons to globally modulate the expression of a number of genes. To our knowledge, this is the first example in eukaryotes of the domestication and expansion of a family of mobile elements that have evolved to fulfill a critical cellular function.

  1. Calmodulin Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism for Leishmania Identification and Typing.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Aracelis; Samudio, Franklyn; González, Kadir; Saldaña, Azael; Brandão, Adeilton; Calzada, Jose E

    2016-08-01

    A precise identification of Leishmania species involved in human infections has epidemiological and clinical importance. Herein, we describe a preliminary validation of a restriction fragment length polymorphism assay, based on the calmodulin intergenic spacer region, as a tool for detecting and typing Leishmania species. After calmodulin amplification, the enzyme HaeIII yielded a clear distinction between reference strains of Leishmania mexicana, Leishmania amazonensis, Leishmania infantum, Leishmania lainsoni, and the rest of the Viannia reference species analyzed. The closely related Viannia species: Leishmania braziliensis, Leishmania panamensis, and Leishmania guyanensis, are separated in a subsequent digestion step with different restriction enzymes. We have developed a more accessible molecular protocol for Leishmania identification/typing based on the exploitation of part of the calmodulin gene. This methodology has the potential to become an additional tool for Leishmania species characterization and taxonomy.

  2. In vitro resistance selections for Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase inhibitors give mutants with multiple point mutations in the drug-binding site and altered growth.

    PubMed

    Ross, Leila S; Gamo, Francisco Javier; Lafuente-Monasterio, Maria José; Singh, Onkar M P; Rowland, Paul; Wiegand, Roger C; Wirth, Dyann F

    2014-06-27

    Malaria is a preventable and treatable disease; yet half of the world's population lives at risk of infection, and an estimated 660,000 people die of malaria-related causes every year. Rising drug resistance threatens to make malaria untreatable, necessitating both the discovery of new antimalarial agents and the development of strategies to identify and suppress the emergence and spread of drug resistance. We focused on in-development dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) inhibitors. Characterizing resistance pathways for antimalarial agents not yet in clinical use will increase our understanding of the potential for resistance. We identified resistance mechanisms of Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) DHODH inhibitors via in vitro resistance selections. We found 11 point mutations in the PfDHODH target. Target gene amplification and unknown mechanisms also contributed to resistance, albeit to a lesser extent. These mutant parasites were often hypersensitive to other PfDHODH inhibitors, which immediately suggested a novel combination therapy approach to preventing resistance. Indeed, a combination of wild-type and mutant-type selective inhibitors led to resistance far less often than either drug alone. The effects of point mutations in PfDHODH were corroborated with purified recombinant wild-type and mutant-type PfDHODH proteins, which showed the same trends in drug response as the cognate cell lines. Comparative growth assays demonstrated that two mutant parasites grew less robustly than their wild-type parent, and the purified protein of those mutants showed a decrease in catalytic efficiency, thereby suggesting a reason for the diminished growth rate. Co-crystallography of PfDHODH with three inhibitors suggested that hydrophobic interactions are important for drug binding and selectivity.

  3. Prevalence of Leishmania infantum Infection in Dogs Living in an Area of Canine Leishmaniasis Endemicity Using PCR on Several Tissues and Serology

    PubMed Central

    Solano-Gallego, Laia; Morell, Pere; Arboix, Margarita; Alberola, Jordi; Ferrer, Lluis

    2001-01-01

    We studied and compared the prevalence of Leishmania infection and the seroprevalence and the prevalence of canine leishmaniasis in an area where canine leishmaniasis is endemic. One hundred dogs living on the island of Mallorca (Spain) were studied. In this study, we clinically examined each dog for the presence of symptoms compatible with leishmaniasis, determined the titer of anti-Leishmania antibodies, and investigated the presence of Leishmania DNA by PCR in skin, conjunctiva, and bone marrow samples of each dog. The prevalence of the disease and the seroprevalence were 13 and 26%, respectively. In 63% of the dogs, Leishmania DNA could be detected by PCR in at least one of the tissues studied. The results of positive PCR in the bone marrow, the conjunctiva, and the skin were 17.8, 32, and 51%, respectively. The prevalence of the infection, 67%, was calculated using all animals that were seropositive and/or positive by PCR with any tissue. The results showed that the majority of dogs living in an area where canine leishmaniasis is endemic are infected by Leishmania and that the prevalence of infection is much greater than the prevalence of overt Leishmania-related disease. PMID:11158106

  4. First detection of Leishmania killicki (Kinetoplastida, Trypanosomatidae) in Ctenodactylus gundi (Rodentia, Ctenodactylidae), a possible reservoir of human cutaneous leishmaniasis in Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Leishmania killicki was originally described in 1980 in southeast Tunisia. It was also recently reported in Lybia and Algeria. Nevertheless, neither vector nor reservoirs of this parasite are known. The identification of the vector and the animal reservoir host of L. killicki is critical for the establishment of an efficient control strategy. Findings blood, popliteal lymph node, spleen, bone marrow, liver and skin were collected from 50 rodents in 2009 in south western Tunisia. Samples were smeared onto glass slides, cultured on NNN medium and tested by polymerase chain reaction for Leishmania detection. Parasites were detected by PCR from 10 Psammomys obesus and from two Ctenodactylus gundi. Parasite identification was performed simultaneously by internal transcribed spacer 1 PCR-RFLP and by PCR sequencing. Both Leishmania major and Leishmania killicki were identified from infected Psammomys and Ctenodactylus gundi respectively. Conclusion This is the first report of Leishmania killicki identified from Ctenodactylus gundi in Tunisia. This result supports the assumption that C. gundi is a potential reservoir for Leishmania killicki. PMID:21834996

  5. Eugenia uniflora L. Essential Oil as a Potential Anti-Leishmania Agent: Effects on Leishmania amazonensis and Possible Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Layane Valéria; de Oliveira, Jamylla Mirck Guerra; Dias, Clarice Noleto; Moraes, Denise Fernandes Coutinho; Andrade, Eloisa Helena de Aguiar; Maia, Jose Guilherme Soares; Carneiro, Sabrina Maria Portela; Carvalho, Fernando Aécio de Amorim

    2013-01-01

    Eugenia uniflora L. is a member of the Myrtaceae family and is commonly known as Brazilian cherry tree. In this study, we evaluated the chemical composition of Eugenia uniflora L. essential oil (EuEO) by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and assessed its anti-Leishmania activity. We also explored the potential mechanisms of action and cytotoxicity of EuEO. Thirty-two compounds were identified, which constituted 92.65% of the total oil composition. The most abundant components were sesquiterpenes (91.92%), with curzerene (47.3%), γ-elemene (14.25%), and trans-β-elemenone (10.4%) being the major constituents. The bioactivity shown by EuEO against promastigotes (IC50, 3.04 μg·mL−1) and amastigotes (IC50, 1.92 μg·mL−1) suggested significant anti-Leishmania activity. In the cytotoxicity determination, EuEO was 20 times more toxic to amastigotes than to macrophages. Hemolytic activity was 63.22% at the highest concentration tested (400 μg·mL−1); however, there appeared to be no toxicity at 50 μg·mL−1. While the data show that EuEO activity is not mediated by nitric oxide production, they do suggest that macrophage activation may be involved in EuEO anti-Leishmania activity, as evidenced by increases in both the phagocytic capacity and the lysosomal activity. More studies are needed to determine in vivo activity as well as additional mechanisms of the anti-Leishmania activity. PMID:23533469

  6. Leishmania infantum and Leishmania braziliensis: Differences and Similarities to Evade the Innate Immune System.

    PubMed

    Falcão, Sarah de Athayde Couto; Jaramillo, Tatiana M G; Ferreira, Luciana G; Bernardes, Daniela M; Santana, Jaime M; Favali, Cecília B F

    2016-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is a severe form of the disease, caused by Leishmania infantum in the New World. Patients present an anergic immune response that favors parasite establishment and spreading through tissues like bone marrow and liver. On the other hand, Leishmania braziliensis causes localized cutaneous lesions, which can be self-healing in some individuals. Interactions between host and parasite are essential to understand disease pathogenesis and progression. In this context, dendritic cells (DCs) act as essential bridges that connect innate and adaptive immune responses. In this way, the aim of this study was to compare the effects of these two Leishmania species, in some aspects of human DCs' biology for better understanding of the evasion mechanisms of Leishmania from host innate immune response. To do so, DCs were obtained from monocytes from whole peripheral blood of healthy volunteer donors and from those infected with L. infantum or L. braziliensis for 24 h. We observed similar rates of infection (around 40%) as well as parasite burden for both Leishmania species. Concerning surface molecules, we observed that both parasites induced CD86 expression when DCs were infected for 24 h. On the other hand, we detected a lower surface expression of CD209 in the presence of both L. braziliensis and L. infantum, but only the last one promoted the survival of DCs after 24 h. Therefore, DCs infected by both Leishmania species showed a higher expression of CD86 and a decrease of CD209 expression, suggesting that both enter DCs through CD209 molecule. However, only L. infantum had the ability to inhibit DC apoptotic death, as an evasion mechanism that enables its spreading to organs like bone marrow and liver. Lastly, L. braziliensis was more silent parasite, once it did not inhibit DC apoptosis in our in vitro model. PMID:27536300

  7. Leishmania infantum and Leishmania braziliensis: Differences and Similarities to Evade the Innate Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Falcão, Sarah de Athayde Couto; Jaramillo, Tatiana M. G.; Ferreira, Luciana G.; Bernardes, Daniela M.; Santana, Jaime M.; Favali, Cecília B. F.

    2016-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is a severe form of the disease, caused by Leishmania infantum in the New World. Patients present an anergic immune response that favors parasite establishment and spreading through tissues like bone marrow and liver. On the other hand, Leishmania braziliensis causes localized cutaneous lesions, which can be self-healing in some individuals. Interactions between host and parasite are essential to understand disease pathogenesis and progression. In this context, dendritic cells (DCs) act as essential bridges that connect innate and adaptive immune responses. In this way, the aim of this study was to compare the effects of these two Leishmania species, in some aspects of human DCs’ biology for better understanding of the evasion mechanisms of Leishmania from host innate immune response. To do so, DCs were obtained from monocytes from whole peripheral blood of healthy volunteer donors and from those infected with L. infantum or L. braziliensis for 24 h. We observed similar rates of infection (around 40%) as well as parasite burden for both Leishmania species. Concerning surface molecules, we observed that both parasites induced CD86 expression when DCs were infected for 24 h. On the other hand, we detected a lower surface expression of CD209 in the presence of both L. braziliensis and L. infantum, but only the last one promoted the survival of DCs after 24 h. Therefore, DCs infected by both Leishmania species showed a higher expression of CD86 and a decrease of CD209 expression, suggesting that both enter DCs through CD209 molecule. However, only L. infantum had the ability to inhibit DC apoptotic death, as an evasion mechanism that enables its spreading to organs like bone marrow and liver. Lastly, L. braziliensis was more silent parasite, once it did not inhibit DC apoptosis in our in vitro model. PMID:27536300

  8. Genetic and clinical characterization of canine leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum in northeastern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Paola A; Nevot, M Cecilia; Hoyos, Carlos L; Locatelli, Fabricio M; Lauthier, Juan J; Ruybal, Paula; Cardozo, Rubén M; Russo, Pablo D; Vassiliades, Carola N; Mora, María C; Estévez, J Octavio; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa; Korenaga, Masataka; Basombrío, Miguel A; Marco, Jorge D

    2015-10-01

    Leishmaniases comprise zoonotic diseases caused by protozoan flagellates of the Leishmania genus. They are endemic to South America, and the visceral form has been recently reported in Argentina. Dogs can play different roles in the Leishmania transmission cycles, depending mainly on the species of parasite involved. Here we focused on the clinical characterization of canine leishmaniasis (CanL) in Northeast Argentina and on the molecular typing of its etiological agent. The nested polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis of the Leishmania cytochrome b (cyt b) gene was performed on DNA templates purified from lymph nodes, bone marrow or spleen aspirates obtained from 48 dogs previously diagnosed by the observation of Leishmania amastigotes on smears from these aspirates. Their clinical and epidemiological data were also recorded. Systemic abnormalities were observed in 46 subjects (95.8%), most frequently lymphadenopathy, and emaciation (89.6 and 75%). Furthermore, 87% also presented tegumentary abnormalities, such as alopecia (54.2%) or secondary skin lesions (47.9%), among others. Twenty three dogs were positive for cyt b amplification. The sequence analysis showed the presence of two genotypes, LiA1 and LiA2, assigned to Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum, with 99.9 and 100% homology with the reference strain MHOM/TN/80/IPT1 respectively. LiA1 was identified in 18 cases (78.3%) and LiA2 in five (21.7%). Two cyt b variants of L. (L.) infantum were incriminated as the causative agents of CanL cases from three cities: Posadas, Garupá, and Ituzaingó. All three cities are located in the northeastern area of the country, where these parasites seem to be spreading in urban areas.

  9. Detection and separation of overlapping cells based on contour concavity for Leishmania images.

    PubMed

    Neves, João C; Castro, Helena; Tomás, Ana; Coimbra, Miguel; Proença, Hugo

    2014-06-01

    Life scientists often must count cells in microscopy images, which is a tedious and time-consuming task. Automatic approaches present a solution to this problem. Several procedures have been devised for this task, but the majority suffer from performance degradation in the case of cell overlap. In this article, we propose a method to determine the positions of macrophages and parasites in fluorescence images of Leishmania-infected macrophages. The proposed strategy is primarily based on blob detection, clustering, and separation using concave regions of the cells' contours. In comparison with the approaches of Nogueira (Master's thesis, Department of University of Porto Computer Science, 2011) and Leal et al. (Proceedings of the 9th international conference on Image Analysis and Recognition, Vol. II, ICIAR'12. Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag; 2012. pp. 432-439), which also addressed this type of image, we conclude that the proposed methodology achieves better performance in the automatic annotation of Leishmania infections. PMID:24719205

  10. Fluorogenic assay for molecular typing of the Leishmania donovani complex: taxonomic and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Quispe-Tintaya, Kelly Wilber; Laurent, Thierry; Decuypere, Saskia; Hide, Mallorie; Bañuls, Anne-Laure; De Doncker, Simonne; Rijal, Suman; Cañavate, Carmen; Campino, Lenea; Dujardin, Jean-Claude

    2005-08-15

    We describe a new fluorogenic assay for the identification of species and intraspecies groups within the Leishmania donovani complex. The assay combined (1) 2 polymerase chain reactions targeting the 2 cysteine proteinase b isogenes and (2) a fluorescence-resonance energy transfer/melting curve analysis of the polymorphisms within a 31-nt region. All strains within the L. donovani complex were distinguished from L. tropica, L. major, and L. aethiopica, and 5 distinct groups were identified within the L. donovani complex. Discrepancies were observed with the present taxonomy on the basis of isoenzyme analysis and concerned East African strains, which suggests the need for a systematic reevaluation of the taxonomy. The capacity to type parasites directly from clinical samples was demonstrated with blood and bone marrow samples. This rapid and high-throughput alternative for molecular diagnosis and epidemiological studies of visceral leishmaniasis could be adapted for use with other Leishmania species. PMID:16028139

  11. The Brown Alga Stypopodium zonale (Dictyotaceae): A Potential Source of Anti-Leishmania Drugs.

    PubMed

    Soares, Deivid Costa; Szlachta, Marcella Macedo; Teixeira, Valéria Laneuville; Soares, Angelica Ribeiro; Saraiva, Elvira Maria

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the anti-Leishmania amazonensis activity of a lipophilic extract from the brown alga Stypopodium zonale and atomaric acid, its major compound. Our initial results revealed high inhibitory activity for intracellular amastigotes in a dose-dependent manner and an IC50 of 0.27 μg/mL. Due to its high anti-Leishmania activity and low toxicity toward host cells, we fractionated the lipophilic extract. A major meroditerpene in this extract, atomaric acid, and its methyl ester derivative, which was obtained by a methylation procedure, were identified by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Both compounds inhibited intracellular amastigotes, with IC50 values of 20.2 μM (9 μg/mL) and 22.9 μM (10 μg/mL), and selectivity indexes of 8.4 μM and 11.5 μM. The leishmanicidal activity of both meroditerpenes was independent of nitric oxide (NO) production, but the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may be at least partially responsible for the amastigote killing. Our results suggest that the lipophilic extract of S. zonale may represent an important source of compounds for the development of anti-Leishmania drugs. PMID:27618071

  12. The Brown Alga Stypopodium zonale (Dictyotaceae): A Potential Source of Anti-Leishmania Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Deivid Costa; Szlachta, Marcella Macedo; Teixeira, Valéria Laneuville; Soares, Angelica Ribeiro; Saraiva, Elvira Maria

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the anti-Leishmania amazonensis activity of a lipophilic extract from the brown alga Stypopodium zonale and atomaric acid, its major compound. Our initial results revealed high inhibitory activity for intracellular amastigotes in a dose-dependent manner and an IC50 of 0.27 μg/mL. Due to its high anti-Leishmania activity and low toxicity toward host cells, we fractionated the lipophilic extract. A major meroditerpene in this extract, atomaric acid, and its methyl ester derivative, which was obtained by a methylation procedure, were identified by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Both compounds inhibited intracellular amastigotes, with IC50 values of 20.2 μM (9 μg/mL) and 22.9 μM (10 μg/mL), and selectivity indexes of 8.4 μM and 11.5 μM. The leishmanicidal activity of both meroditerpenes was independent of nitric oxide (NO) production, but the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may be at least partially responsible for the amastigote killing. Our results suggest that the lipophilic extract of S. zonale may represent an important source of compounds for the development of anti-Leishmania drugs. PMID:27618071

  13. The Brown Alga Stypopodium zonale (Dictyotaceae): A Potential Source of Anti-Leishmania Drugs.

    PubMed

    Soares, Deivid Costa; Szlachta, Marcella Macedo; Teixeira, Valéria Laneuville; Soares, Angelica Ribeiro; Saraiva, Elvira Maria

    2016-09-08

    This study evaluated the anti-Leishmania amazonensis activity of a lipophilic extract from the brown alga Stypopodium zonale and atomaric acid, its major compound. Our initial results revealed high inhibitory activity for intracellular amastigotes in a dose-dependent manner and an IC50 of 0.27 μg/mL. Due to its high anti-Leishmania activity and low toxicity toward host cells, we fractionated the lipophilic extract. A major meroditerpene in this extract, atomaric acid, and its methyl ester derivative, which was obtained by a methylation procedure, were identified by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Both compounds inhibited intracellular amastigotes, with IC50 values of 20.2 μM (9 μg/mL) and 22.9 μM (10 μg/mL), and selectivity indexes of 8.4 μM and 11.5 μM. The leishmanicidal activity of both meroditerpenes was independent of nitric oxide (NO) production, but the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may be at least partially responsible for the amastigote killing. Our results suggest that the lipophilic extract of S. zonale may represent an important source of compounds for the development of anti-Leishmania drugs.

  14. Leishmania-infected macrophages sequester endogenously synthesized parasite antigens from presentation to CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Kima, P E; Soong, L; Chicharro, C; Ruddle, N H; McMahon-Pratt, D

    1996-12-01

    CD4+ T cell lines raised against the protective leishmanial antigens GP46 and P8 were used to study the presentation of endogenously synthesized Leishmania antigens by infected cells. Using two different sources of macrophages, the I4.07 macrophage cell line (H-2k) which constitutively expresses major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules, and elicited peritoneal exudate cells, we found that cells infected with Leishmania amastigotes presented little, if any endogenously synthesized parasite antigens to CD4+ T cells. In contrast, promastigote-infected macrophages did present endogenous parasite molecules to CD4+ T cells, although only for a limited time, with maximal presentation occurring within 24 h of infection and decreasing to minimal antigen presentation at 72 h post-infection. These observations suggest that once within the macrophage, Leishmania amastigote antigens are sequestered from the MHC class II pathway of antigen presentation. This allows live parasites to persist in infected hosts by evading the activation of CD4+ T cells, a major and critical anti-leishmanial component of the host immune system. Studies with drugs that modify fusion patterns of phagosomes suggest that the mechanism of this antigen sequestration includes targeted fusion of the parasitophorous vacuole with certain endocytic compartments.

  15. Clinical manifestations and genetic variation of Leishmania infantum and Leishmania tropica in Southern Turkey.

    PubMed

    Eroglu, Fadime; Koltas, Ismail S; Alabaz, Derya; Uzun, Soner; Karakas, Mehmet

    2015-07-01

    L. infantum was isolated from cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) skin lesions in patients having no signs and symptoms of visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Similarly, L. tropica had previously been isolated from patients with VL in the absence of cutaneous lesions. It was not certain how visceralization occurred. Smears (207) and bone marrow samples (135) were taken from CL and VL-suspected patients, respectively. Microscopic examination, ITS1-PCR, RFLP and DNA sequencing for all samples were analyzed. The microscopic examination of smears was found to be 61.3% (127/207) in CL-suspected cases and bone marrow samples were found to be positive 8.8% (12/135) in VL-suspected cases. L. tropica 48.6% (72/148), L. infantum 35.8% (53/148), L. major 15.6% (23/148) in CL, and L. infantum 56.3% (18/32), L. donovani 31.2% (10/32), L. tropica 12.5% (4/32) in VL were found with PCR-RFLP. In addition, the DNA sequencing revealed a genetic variation in L. infantum (variants 1-3) and L. tropica (variants 1-5). We assume that the increased disease occurrence may have resulted from geographical expansion of disease, changing patterns of international travel, population migrations, non-immune people into endemic regions of infected people into non-endemic regions. In this study, L. infantum (variant 3) only in CL-patients and L. tropica (variant 2) only in VL-patients were identified. We hypothesize that genetic variation might play a role in the causation of CL and VL in southern Turkey and the genetic variants may differ according to the geographical location among Leishmania strains.

  16. First evidence of Leishmania infection in European brown hare (Lepus europaeus) in Greece: GIS analysis and phylogenetic position within the Leishmania spp.

    PubMed

    Tsokana, C N; Sokos, C; Giannakopoulos, A; Mamuris, Z; Birtsas, P; Papaspyropoulos, K; Valiakos, G; Spyrou, V; Lefkaditis, M; Chatzopoulos, D C; Kantere, M; Manolakou, K; Touloudi, A; Burriel, A Rodi; Ferroglio, E; Hadjichristodoulou, C; Billinis, C

    2016-01-01

    Although the existence of a sylvatic transmission cycle of Leishmania spp., independent from the domestic cycle, has been proposed, data are scarce on Leishmania infection in wild mammals in Greece. In this study, we aimed to investigate the presence of Leishmania infection in the European brown hare in Greece, to infer the phylogenetic position of the Leishmania parasites detected in hares in Greece, and to identify any possible correlation between Leishmania infection in hares with environmental parameters, using the geographical information system (GIS). Spleen samples from 166 hares were tested by internal transcribed spacer-1 (ITS-1)-nested PCR for the detection of Leishmania DNA. Phylogenetic analysis was performed on Leishmania sequences from hares in Greece in conjunction with Leishmania sequences from dogs in Greece and 46 Leishmania sequences retrieved from GenBank. The Leishmania DNA prevalence in hares was found to be 23.49 % (95 % confidence interval (CI) 17.27-30.69). The phylogenetic analysis confirmed that the Leishmania sequences from hares in Greece belong in the Leishmania donovani complex. The widespread Leishmania infection in hares should be taken into consideration because under specific circumstances, this species can act as a reservoir host. This study suggests that the role of wild animals, including hares, in the epidemiology of Leishmania spp. in Greece deserves further elucidation. PMID:26386969

  17. First evidence of Leishmania infection in European brown hare (Lepus europaeus) in Greece: GIS analysis and phylogenetic position within the Leishmania spp.

    PubMed

    Tsokana, C N; Sokos, C; Giannakopoulos, A; Mamuris, Z; Birtsas, P; Papaspyropoulos, K; Valiakos, G; Spyrou, V; Lefkaditis, M; Chatzopoulos, D C; Kantere, M; Manolakou, K; Touloudi, A; Burriel, A Rodi; Ferroglio, E; Hadjichristodoulou, C; Billinis, C

    2016-01-01

    Although the existence of a sylvatic transmission cycle of Leishmania spp., independent from the domestic cycle, has been proposed, data are scarce on Leishmania infection in wild mammals in Greece. In this study, we aimed to investigate the presence of Leishmania infection in the European brown hare in Greece, to infer the phylogenetic position of the Leishmania parasites detected in hares in Greece, and to identify any possible correlation between Leishmania infection in hares with environmental parameters, using the geographical information system (GIS). Spleen samples from 166 hares were tested by internal transcribed spacer-1 (ITS-1)-nested PCR for the detection of Leishmania DNA. Phylogenetic analysis was performed on Leishmania sequences from hares in Greece in conjunction with Leishmania sequences from dogs in Greece and 46 Leishmania sequences retrieved from GenBank. The Leishmania DNA prevalence in hares was found to be 23.49 % (95 % confidence interval (CI) 17.27-30.69). The phylogenetic analysis confirmed that the Leishmania sequences from hares in Greece belong in the Leishmania donovani complex. The widespread Leishmania infection in hares should be taken into consideration because under specific circumstances, this species can act as a reservoir host. This study suggests that the role of wild animals, including hares, in the epidemiology of Leishmania spp. in Greece deserves further elucidation.

  18. An improved purification procedure for Leishmania RNA virus (LRV)

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Marcos Michel; Manzine, Livia Regina; da Silva, Marcos Vinicius G.; Bettini, Jefferson; Portugal, Rodrigo Vilares; Cruz, Angela Kaysel; Arruda, Eurico; Thiemann, Otavio Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania RNA Virus (LRV, Totiviridae) infect Leishmania cells and subvert mice immune response, probably promoting parasite persistence, suggesting significant roles for LRV in host-parasite interaction. Here we describe a new LRV1-4 purification protocol, enabling capsid visualization by negatively stained electron microscopy representing a significant contribution to future LRV investigations. PMID:25242960

  19. Spread of Leishmania infantum in Europe with dog travelling.

    PubMed

    Maia, Carla; Cardoso, Luís

    2015-09-30

    Leishmania infantum is the etiological agent of canine leishmaniosis (CanL) in Europe, where it is endemic in the Mediterranean region, with dogs being considered the major reservoir of the parasite for humans and other mammalian hosts. The main transmission mode of Leishmania is by the bite of infected phlebotomine sand fly insects (genus Phlebotomus), which are the only proven vectors of this zoonotic protozoan. Less common, non-vectorial transmission between dogs include infection through transfused blood products from infected donors, transplacental and venereal transmission. CanL has exhibited an expansion to new locations in Europe, mainly northwards, either by territorial contiguity, often in association with global warming that favours vectorial transmission, or by the long-distance importation of infected dogs. The increasing incidence of CanL in countries where the disease is not endemic is challenging owners, veterinarians and government authorities. Most infected dogs in these new areas have been relocated from or travelled with their owners to endemic regions, but in some cases transmission might have also been autochthonous. In the absence of prophylactic measures, the introduction of infected dogs in areas previously free of endemic CanL but which have competent sand fly vectors can result in a potential persistence of L. infantum. The spread of L. infantum in Europe is reviewed with a focus on transmission, epidemiology and geographic distribution of endemic and non-endemic CanL, infection and disease in humans and animal hosts other than dogs, together with prevention and additional control strategies.

  20. Cystathionine γ-lyase, an enzyme related to the reverse transsulfuration pathway, is functional in Leishmania spp.

    PubMed

    Giordana, Lucila; Mantilla, Brian Suárez; Santana, Marianela; Silber, Ariel M; Nowicki, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania parasites seem capable of producing cysteine by de novo biosynthesis, similarly to bacteria, some pathogenic protists, and plants. In Leishmania spp., cysteine synthase (CS) and cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) are expected to participate in this metabolic process. Moreover, the reverse transsulfuration pathway (RTP) is also predicted to be operative in this trypanosomatid because CBS also catalyzes the condensation of serine with homocysteine, and a gene encoding a putative cystathionine γ-lyase (CGL) is present in all the sequenced genomes. Our results show that indeed, Leishmania major CGL is able to rescue the wild-type phenotype of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae CGL-null mutant and is susceptible to inhibition by an irreversible CGL inhibitor, DL-propargylglycine (PAG). In Leishmania promastigotes, CGL and CS are cytosolic enzymes. The coexistence of de novo synthesis with the RTP is extremely rare in most living organisms; however, despite this potentially high redundancy in cysteine production, PAG arrests the proliferation of L. major promastigotes with an IC50 of approximately 65 μM. These findings raise new questions regarding the biological role of CGL in these pathogens and indicate the need for understanding the molecular mechanism of PAG action in vivo to identify the potential targets affected by this drug.

  1. Differential Subcellular Localization of Leishmania Alba-Domain Proteins throughout the Parasite Development

    PubMed Central

    Dupé, Aurélien; Dumas, Carole; Papadopoulou, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Alba-domain proteins are RNA-binding proteins found in archaea and eukaryotes and recently studied in protozoan parasites where they play a role in the regulation of virulence factors and stage-specific proteins. This work describes in silico structural characterization, cellular localization and biochemical analyses of Alba-domain proteins in Leishmania infantum. We show that in contrast to other protozoa, Leishmania have two Alba-domain proteins, LiAlba1 and LiAlba3, representative of the Rpp20- and the Rpp25-like eukaryotic subfamilies, respectively, which share several sequence and structural similarities but also important differences with orthologs in other protozoa, especially in sequences targeted for post-translational modifications. LiAlba1 and LiAlba3 proteins form a complex interacting with other RNA-binding proteins, ribosomal subunits, and translation factors as supported by co-immunoprecipitation and sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis. A higher co-sedimentation of Alba proteins with ribosomal subunits was seen upon conditions of decreased translation, suggesting a role of these proteins in translational repression. The Leishmania Alba-domain proteins display differential cellular localization throughout the parasite development. In the insect promastigote stage, Alba proteins co-localize predominantly to the cytoplasm but they translocate to the nucleolus and the flagellum upon amastigote differentiation in the mammalian host and are found back to the cytoplasm once amastigote differentiation is completed. Heat-shock, a major signal of amastigote differentiation, triggers Alba translocation to the nucleolus and the flagellum. Purification of the Leishmania flagellum confirmed LiAlba3 enrichment in this organelle during amastigote differentiation. Moreover, partial characterization of the Leishmania flagellum proteome of promastigotes and differentiating amastigotes revealed the presence of other RNA-binding proteins, as well as differences in

  2. Differential Subcellular Localization of Leishmania Alba-Domain Proteins throughout the Parasite Development.

    PubMed

    Dupé, Aurélien; Dumas, Carole; Papadopoulou, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Alba-domain proteins are RNA-binding proteins found in archaea and eukaryotes and recently studied in protozoan parasites where they play a role in the regulation of virulence factors and stage-specific proteins. This work describes in silico structural characterization, cellular localization and biochemical analyses of Alba-domain proteins in Leishmania infantum. We show that in contrast to other protozoa, Leishmania have two Alba-domain proteins, LiAlba1 and LiAlba3, representative of the Rpp20- and the Rpp25-like eukaryotic subfamilies, respectively, which share several sequence and structural similarities but also important differences with orthologs in other protozoa, especially in sequences targeted for post-translational modifications. LiAlba1 and LiAlba3 proteins form a complex interacting with other RNA-binding proteins, ribosomal subunits, and translation factors as supported by co-immunoprecipitation and sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis. A higher co-sedimentation of Alba proteins with ribosomal subunits was seen upon conditions of decreased translation, suggesting a role of these proteins in translational repression. The Leishmania Alba-domain proteins display differential cellular localization throughout the parasite development. In the insect promastigote stage, Alba proteins co-localize predominantly to the cytoplasm but they translocate to the nucleolus and the flagellum upon amastigote differentiation in the mammalian host and are found back to the cytoplasm once amastigote differentiation is completed. Heat-shock, a major signal of amastigote differentiation, triggers Alba translocation to the nucleolus and the flagellum. Purification of the Leishmania flagellum confirmed LiAlba3 enrichment in this organelle during amastigote differentiation. Moreover, partial characterization of the Leishmania flagellum proteome of promastigotes and differentiating amastigotes revealed the presence of other RNA-binding proteins, as well as differences in

  3. Molecular characterization of Leishmania spp. in reservoir hosts in endemic foci of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis in Iran.

    PubMed

    Akhoundi, Mohammad; Mohebali, Mehdi; Asadi, Mina; Mahmodi, Mohamad Reza; Amraei, Kamyar; Mirzaei, Asad

    2013-07-01

    Zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) is an expanding disease and a public health issue in Iran. In the present study, rate of natural infection of rodent populations with Leishmania was investigated in six endemic foci including 28 villages in Golestan, Esfahan, Yazd, Fars, Khuzestan and Ilam provinces. A total of 593 rodents were captured and identified as Rhombomys opimus (n = 325), Meriones libycus (n = 171), Meriones persicus (n = 27), Tatera indica (n = 37), Nesokia indica (n = 12), Rattus rattus (n = 13) and Mus musculus (n = 8). Microscopic examinations of Giemsa-stained smears showed that 108 out of 593 (18.2%) rodents were infected with Leishmania spp., whereas infection of 186 out of 593 (31.4%) rodents with Leishmania was then confirmed by ITS1-PCR. The highest rate of infection was found in R. opimus (prevalence of 35%) and M. libycus (31%). Based on Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP), 145 (78%) of 186 samples detected as Leishmania DNA were identified as L. major, 8 (4%) samples as L. turanica and 33 (18%) as mixed infection (L. major and L. turanica). Samples from infected rodents were inoculated subcutaneously at tail base of BALB/c mice. In 35 of them, nodules and ulcers containing amastigotes appeared at the inoculation site. The samples prepared from infected rodents were cultured in NNN medium and only two samples werepositive. Rhombomys opimus, M. libycus, M. persicus, T. indica and N. indica were confirmed as reservoir hosts of ZCL in the studied regions. Leishmania major infection was usually accompanied L. turanica in naturally infected gerbils (R. opimus and M. libycus) in Golestan, Esfahan and Fars provinces. PMID:23951928

  4. The genome sequence of Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis: functional annotation and extended analysis of gene models.

    PubMed

    Real, Fernando; Vidal, Ramon Oliveira; Carazzolle, Marcelo Falsarella; Mondego, Jorge Maurício Costa; Costa, Gustavo Gilson Lacerda; Herai, Roberto Hirochi; Würtele, Martin; de Carvalho, Lucas Miguel; Carmona e Ferreira, Renata; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Barbiéri, Clara Lucia; Mieczkowski, Piotr; da Silveira, José Franco; Briones, Marcelo Ribeiro da Silva; Pereira, Gonçalo Amarante Guimarães; Bahia, Diana

    2013-12-01

    We present the sequencing and annotation of the Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis genome, an etiological agent of human cutaneous leishmaniasis in the Amazon region of Brazil. L. (L.) amazonensis shares features with Leishmania (L.) mexicana but also exhibits unique characteristics regarding geographical distribution and clinical manifestations of cutaneous lesions (e.g. borderline disseminated cutaneous leishmaniasis). Predicted genes were scored for orthologous gene families and conserved domains in comparison with other human pathogenic Leishmania spp. Carboxypeptidase, aminotransferase, and 3'-nucleotidase genes and ATPase, thioredoxin, and chaperone-related domains were represented more abundantly in L. (L.) amazonensis and L. (L.) mexicana species. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these two species share groups of amastin surface proteins unique to the genus that could be related to specific features of disease outcomes and host cell interactions. Additionally, we describe a hypothetical hybrid interactome of potentially secreted L. (L.) amazonensis proteins and host proteins under the assumption that parasite factors mimic their mammalian counterparts. The model predicts an interaction between an L. (L.) amazonensis heat-shock protein and mammalian Toll-like receptor 9, which is implicated in important immune responses such as cytokine and nitric oxide production. The analysis presented here represents valuable information for future studies of leishmaniasis pathogenicity and treatment. PMID:23857904

  5. The Genome Sequence of Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis: Functional Annotation and Extended Analysis of Gene Models

    PubMed Central

    Real, Fernando; Vidal, Ramon Oliveira; Carazzolle, Marcelo Falsarella; Mondego, Jorge Maurício Costa; Costa, Gustavo Gilson Lacerda; Herai, Roberto Hirochi; Würtele, Martin; de Carvalho, Lucas Miguel; e Ferreira, Renata Carmona; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Barbiéri, Clara Lucia; Mieczkowski, Piotr; da Silveira, José Franco; Briones, Marcelo Ribeiro da Silva; Pereira, Gonçalo Amarante Guimarães; Bahia, Diana

    2013-01-01

    We present the sequencing and annotation of the Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis genome, an etiological agent of human cutaneous leishmaniasis in the Amazon region of Brazil. L. (L.) amazonensis shares features with Leishmania (L.) mexicana but also exhibits unique characteristics regarding geographical distribution and clinical manifestations of cutaneous lesions (e.g. borderline disseminated cutaneous leishmaniasis). Predicted genes were scored for orthologous gene families and conserved domains in comparison with other human pathogenic Leishmania spp. Carboxypeptidase, aminotransferase, and 3′-nucleotidase genes and ATPase, thioredoxin, and chaperone-related domains were represented more abundantly in L. (L.) amazonensis and L. (L.) mexicana species. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these two species share groups of amastin surface proteins unique to the genus that could be related to specific features of disease outcomes and host cell interactions. Additionally, we describe a hypothetical hybrid interactome of potentially secreted L. (L.) amazonensis proteins and host proteins under the assumption that parasite factors mimic their mammalian counterparts. The model predicts an interaction between an L. (L.) amazonensis heat-shock protein and mammalian Toll-like receptor 9, which is implicated in important immune responses such as cytokine and nitric oxide production. The analysis presented here represents valuable information for future studies of leishmaniasis pathogenicity and treatment. PMID:23857904

  6. Nitric oxide production by Peromyscus yucatanicus (Rodentia) infected with Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana

    PubMed Central

    Loría-Cervera, Elsy Nalleli; Sosa-Bibiano, Erika Ivett; Villanueva-Lizama, Liliana Estefanía; Van Wynsberghe, Nicole Raymonde; Canto-Lara, Silvia Beatriz; Batún-Cutz, José Luis; Andrade-Narváez, Fernando José

    2013-01-01

    Peromyscus yucatanicus (Rodentia: Cricetidae) is a primary reservoir of Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae). Nitric oxide (NO) generally plays a crucial role in the containment and elimination of Leishmania. The aim of this study was to determine the amount of NO produced by P. yucatanicus infected with L. (L.) mexicana. Subclinical and clinical infections were established in P. yucatanicus through inoculation with 1 x 102 and 2.5 x 106 promastigotes, respectively. Peritoneal macrophages were cultured alone or co-cultured with lymphocytes with or without soluble Leishmania antigen. The level of NO production was determined using the Griess reaction. The amount of NO produced was significantly higher (p ≤ 0.0001) in co-cultured macrophages and lymphocytes than in macrophages cultured alone. No differences in NO production were found between P. yucatanicus with subclinical L. (L.) mexicana infections and animals with clinical infections. These results support the hypothesis that the immunological mechanisms of NO production in P. yucatanicus are similar to those described in mouse models of leishmaniasis and, despite NO production, P. yucatanicus is unable to clear the parasite infection. PMID:23579796

  7. Detection of Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum RNA in fleas and ticks collected from naturally infected dogs.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Fabio A; Odorizzi, Rosa M F N; Laurenti, Marcia D; Galati, Eunice A B; Canavez, Flavio; Pereira-Chioccola, Vera L

    2011-08-01

    The occurrence of the insect vector (sand flies) with low rates of Leishmania infection, as well as autochthonous transmission in the absence of the natural vector in dogs, have been reported. These unexpected data suggest a hypothesis of other arthropods as a possible way of Leishmania transmission. The prevalence of Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum in fleas and ticks collected from dogs with canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL), as well as parasite viability, were evaluated herein. The presence of L. (L.) infantum was assayed by PCR and ELISA in ectoparasites and biological samples from 73 dogs living in a Brazilian endemic area. As the occurrence of Leishmania DNA in ticks and fleas is expected given their blood-feeding habits, we next investigated whether parasites can remain viable inside ticks. PCR and ELISA confirmed that 83% of the dogs had CVL. Fleas and ticks (nymphs, male and female adults) were collected in 55% and 63% of the 73 dogs, respectively. Out of the 60 dogs with CVL, 80% harbored ectoparasites infected with L. (L.) infantum. The infection rates of the ectoparasites were 23% and 50% for fleas and ticks, respectively. The RNA analysis of the extract from ticks left in laboratory conditions during 7 to 10 days after removal from CVL dogs showed that parasites were alive. In addition, live parasites were also detected inside adult ticks recently molted in laboratory conditions. These findings indicate a higher infection rate of L. (L.) infantum in ticks and fleas, but they do not conclusively demonstrate whether these ticks can act as vectors of CVL, despite the fact that their rates were higher than those previously described in Lutzomyia longipalpis. The presence of viable L. (L.) infantum in ticks suggests the possible importance of dog ectoparasites in CVL dissemination. PMID:21221638

  8. Leishmania species: mechanisms of complement activation by five strains of promastigotes.

    PubMed

    Mosser, D M; Burke, S K; Coutavas, E E; Wedgwood, J F; Edelson, P J

    1986-12-01

    The interaction of fresh serum with promastigotes of Leishmania major, L. donovani, L. mexicana mexicana, L. mexicana amazonensis, and L. braziliensis guyanensis results in lysis of all strains tested with either fresh human or guinea pig serum at 37 C for 30 min. Lysis does not occur in the cold and requires divalent cations and complement that is active hemolytically. Serum deficient in the eighth component of complement is not lytic. Lysis of L. major, L. mexicana, and L. braziliensis proceeds fully in human serum containing EGTA/Mg2+ or in guinea pig serum deficient in the fourth complement component. These species consume only small amounts of C4 from human serum and do not require calcium to optimally bind C3. The data indicate that all are activators of the alternative complement pathway and that the classical pathway is not required for the lysis of these organisms. Promastigotes of L. donovani, in contrast, activate the classical pathway. The presence of calcium is required for both optimal C3 binding and parasite lysis, and L. donovani promastigotes consume C4 when incubated in human serum. In high concentrations, human serum agglutinates all tested Leishmania spp. The agglutinating factor does not require divalent cations, is heat stable, and works at 4 C, suggesting that it is an antibody. This "naturally occurring" antibody cross reacts with all Leishmania spp. and agglutinates them. The adsorption of serum with any Leishmania species or with beads that are Protein A coated, removes the agglutinogen. This factor causes a slight enhancement in alternative pathway activation by L. major and mediates the classical activation by L. donovani. In adsorbed serum, L. donovani promastigotes only weakly activate the alternative complement pathway. Increased concentrations of adsorbed serum are therefore necessary for lysis to proceed. The titer can be partially restored by the addition of heat inactivated serum. Using purified components of the classical cascade

  9. Development of Leishmania vaccines: predicting the future from past and present experience

    PubMed Central

    Mutiso, Joshua Muli; Macharia, John Chege; Kiio, Maria Ndunge; Ichagichu, James Maina; Rikoi, Hitler; Gicheru, Michael Muita

    2013-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a disease that ranges in severity from skin lesions to serious disfigurement and fatal systemic infection. Resistance to infection is associated with a T-helper-1 immune response that activates macrophages to kill the intracellular parasite in a nitric oxide-dependent manner. Conversely, disease progression is generally associated with a T-helper-2 response that activates humoral immunity. Current control is based on chemotherapeutic treatments which are expensive, toxic and associated with high relapse and resistance rates. Vaccination remains the best hope for control of all forms of the disease, and the development of a safe, effective and affordable antileishmanial vaccine is a critical global public-health priority. Extensive evidence from studies in animal models indicates that solid protection can be achieved by immunization with defined subunit vaccines or live-attenuated strains of Leishmania. However, to date, no vaccine is available despite substantial efforts by many laboratories. Major impediments in Leishmania vaccine development include: lack of adequate funding from national and international agencies, problems related to the translation of data from animal models to human disease, and the transition from the laboratory to the field. Furthermore, a thorough understanding of protective immune responses and generation and maintenance of the immunological memory, an important but least-studied aspect of antiparasitic vaccine development, during Leishmania infection is needed. This review focuses on the progress of the search for an effective vaccine against human and canine leishmaniasis. PMID:23554800

  10. A Leishmania Ortholog of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Modulates Host Macrophage Responses

    SciTech Connect

    Kamir,D.; Zierow, S.; Leng, L.; Cho, Y.; Diaz, Y.; Griffith, J.; McDonald, C.; Merk, M.; Mitchell, R.; et al

    2008-01-01

    Parasitic organisms have evolved specialized strategies to evade immune defense mechanisms. We describe herein an ortholog of the cytokine, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), which is produced by the obligate intracellular parasite, Leishmania major. The Leishmania MIF protein, Lm1740MIF, shows significant structural homology with human MIF as revealed by a high-resolution x-ray crystal structure (1.03 A). Differences between the two proteins in the N-terminal tautomerization site are evident, and we provide evidence for the selective, species-specific inhibition of MIF by small-molecule antagonists that target this site. Lm1740MIF shows significant binding interaction with the MIF receptor, CD74 (K(d) = 2.9 x 10(-8) M). Like its mammalian counterpart, Lm1740MIF induces ERK1/2 MAP kinase activation in a CD74-dependent manner and inhibits the activation-induced apoptosis of macrophages. The ability of Lm1740MIF to inhibit apoptosis may facilitate the persistence of Leishmania within the macrophage and contribute to its evasion from immune destruction.

  11. Immunogenicity and functional characterization of Leishmania-derived hepatitis C virus envelope glycoprotein complex

    PubMed Central

    Grzyb, Katarzyna; Czarnota, Anna; Brzozowska, Agnieszka; Cieślik, Anna; Rąbalski, Łukasz; Tyborowska, Jolanta; Bieńkowska-Szewczyk, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 are the main inducers of a cross-neutralizing antibody response which plays an important role in the early phase of viral infection. Correctly folded and immunologically active E1E2 complex can be expressed in mammalian cells, though the production process might still prove restrictive, even if the immunological response of a vaccine candidate is positive. Here, we report a characterization and immunogenicity study of a full-length (fE1E2) and soluble version of the E1E2 complex (tE1E2) from genotype 1a, successfully expressed in the cells of Leishmania tarentolae. In a functional study, we confirmed the binding of both Leishmania-derived E1E2 complexes to the CD-81 receptor and the presence of the major epitopes participating in a neutralizing antibody response. Both complexes were proved to be highly immunogenic in mice and elicited neutralizing antibody response. Moreover, cross-reactivity of the mouse sera was detected for all tested HCV genotypes with the highest signal intensity observed for genotypes 1a, 1b, 5 and 6. Since the development of a prophylactic vaccine against HCV is still needed to control the global infection, our Leishmania-derived E1E2 glycoproteins could be considered a potential cost-effective vaccine candidate. PMID:27481352

  12. A Leishmania Ortholog of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Modulates Host Macrophage Responses1

    PubMed Central

    Kamir, Daniela; Zierow, Swen; Leng, Lin; Cho, Yoonsang; Diaz, Yira; Griffith, Jason; McDonald, Courtney; Merk, Melanie; Mitchell, Robert A.; Trent, John; Chen, Yibang; Kwong, Yuen-Kwan Amy; Xiong, Huabao; Vermeire, Jon; Cappello, Michael; McMahon-Pratt, Diane; Walker, John; Bernhagen, Jurgen; Lolis, Elias; Bucala, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Parasitic organisms have evolved specialized strategies to evade immune defense mechanisms. We describe herein an ortholog of the cytokine, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), which is produced by the obligate intracellular parasite, Leishmania major. The Leishmania MIF protein, Lm1740MIF, shows significant structural homology with human MIF as revealed by a high-resolution x-ray crystal structure (1.03 Å). Differences between the two proteins in the N-terminal tautomerization site are evident, and we provide evidence for the selective, species-specific inhibition of MIF by small-molecule antagonists that target this site. Lm1740MIF shows significant binding interaction with the MIF receptor, CD74 (Kd = 2.9 × 10−8 M). Like its mammalian counterpart, Lm1740MIF induces ERK1/2 MAP kinase activation in a CD74-dependent manner and inhibits the activation-induced apoptosis of macrophages. The ability of Lm1740MIF to inhibit apoptosis may facilitate the persistence of Leishmania within the macrophage and contribute to its evasion from immune destruction. PMID:18523291

  13. Flagellar localization of a novel isoform of myosin, myosin XXI, in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Katta, Santharam S; Sahasrabuddhe, Amogh A; Gupta, Chhitar M

    2009-04-01

    Leishmania major genome analysis revealed the presence of putative genes corresponding to two myosins, which have been designated to class IB and a novel class, class XXI, specifically present in kinetoplastids. To characterize these myosin homologs in Leishmania, we have cloned and over-expressed the full-length myosin XXI gene and variable region of myosin IB gene in bacteria, purified the corresponding proteins, and then used the affinity purified anti-sera to analyze the expression and intracellular distribution of these proteins. Whereas myosin XXI was expressed in both the promastigote and amastigote stages, no expression of myosin IB could be detected in any of the two stages of these parasites. Further, myosin XXI expression was more predominant in the promastigote stage where it was preferentially localized in the proximal region of the flagellum. The observed flagellar localization was not dependent on the myosin head region or actin but was exclusively determined by the myosin tail region, as judged by over-expressing GFP conjugates of full-length myosin XXI, its head domain and its tail domain separately in Leishmania. Furthermore, immunofluorescence and immuno-gold electron microscopy analyses revealed that this protein was partly associated with paraflagellar rod proteins but not with tubulins in the flagellar axoneme. Our results, for the first time, report the expression and detailed analysis of cellular localization of a novel class of myosin, myosin XXI in trypanosomatids. PMID:19121339

  14. Immunogenicity and functional characterization of Leishmania-derived hepatitis C virus envelope glycoprotein complex.

    PubMed

    Grzyb, Katarzyna; Czarnota, Anna; Brzozowska, Agnieszka; Cieślik, Anna; Rąbalski, Łukasz; Tyborowska, Jolanta; Bieńkowska-Szewczyk, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 are the main inducers of a cross-neutralizing antibody response which plays an important role in the early phase of viral infection. Correctly folded and immunologically active E1E2 complex can be expressed in mammalian cells, though the production process might still prove restrictive, even if the immunological response of a vaccine candidate is positive. Here, we report a characterization and immunogenicity study of a full-length (fE1E2) and soluble version of the E1E2 complex (tE1E2) from genotype 1a, successfully expressed in the cells of Leishmania tarentolae. In a functional study, we confirmed the binding of both Leishmania-derived E1E2 complexes to the CD-81 receptor and the presence of the major epitopes participating in a neutralizing antibody response. Both complexes were proved to be highly immunogenic in mice and elicited neutralizing antibody response. Moreover, cross-reactivity of the mouse sera was detected for all tested HCV genotypes with the highest signal intensity observed for genotypes 1a, 1b, 5 and 6. Since the development of a prophylactic vaccine against HCV is still needed to control the global infection, our Leishmania-derived E1E2 glycoproteins could be considered a potential cost-effective vaccine candidate. PMID:27481352

  15. Leishmania infantum HSP70-II null mutant as candidate vaccine against leishmaniasis: a preliminary evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis is the most severe form of leishmaniasis and no effective vaccine exists. The use of live attenuated vaccines is emerging as a promising vaccination strategy. Results In this study, we tested the ability of a Leishmania infantum deletion mutant, lacking both HSP70-II alleles (ΔHSP70-II), to provide protection against Leishmania infection in the L. major-BALB/c infection model. Administration of the mutant line by either intraperitoneal, intravenous or subcutaneous route invariably leads to the production of high levels of NO and the development in mice of type 1 immune responses, as determined by analysis of anti-Leishmania IgG subclasses. In addition, we have shown that ΔHSP70-II would be a safe live vaccine as immunodeficient SCID mice, and hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus), infected with mutant parasites did not develop any sign of pathology. Conclusions The results suggest that the ΔHSP70-II mutant is a promising and safe vaccine, but further studies in more appropriate animal models (hamsters and dogs) are needed to appraise whether this attenuate mutant would be useful as vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:21794145

  16. Adaptation of Leishmania donovani to cutaneous and visceral environments: in vivo selection and proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    McCall, Laura-Isobel; Zhang, Wen-Wei; Dejgaard, Kurt; Atayde, Vanessa Diniz; Mazur, Alexander; Ranasinghe, Shalindra; Liu, Jing; Olivier, Martin; Nilsson, Tommy; Matlashewski, Greg

    2015-02-01

    Leishmaniasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by Leishmania protozoa. Two main forms are found in the Old World, self-limited cutaneous leishmaniasis and potentially fatal visceral leishmaniasis, with parasite dissemination to liver, bone marrow, and spleen. The Leishmania donovani species complex is the causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis worldwide, but atypical L. donovani strains can cause cutaneous leishmaniasis. We hypothesized that L. donovani can adapt to survive in response to restrictions imposed by the host environment. To assess this, we performed in vivo selection in BALB/c mice with a cutaneous L. donovani clinical isolate to select for parasites with increased capacity to survive in visceral organs. We then performed whole cell proteomic analysis and compared this visceral-selected strain to the original cutaneous clinical isolate and to a visceral leishmaniasis clinical isolate. Overall, there were no major shifts in proteomic profiles; however, translation, biosynthetic processes, antioxidant protection, and signaling were elevated in visceral strains. Conversely, transport and trafficking were elevated in the cutaneous strain. Overall, these results provide new insight into the adaptability of Leishmania parasites to the host environment and on the factors that mediate their ability to survive in different organs.

  17. Expression of Recombinant Human Amelogenin in Iranian Lizard Leishmania and Its Biological Function Assay

    PubMed Central

    YADEGARI, Zahra; BANDEHPOUR, Mojgan; KAZEMI, Bahram; SHARIFI-SARASIABI, Khojasteh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Amelogenins are the major components of enamel matrix proteins. Enamel matrix derivatives (EMD) can be used in periodontal diseases to regenerate periodontal tissues. The main aim of this study was to evaluate expression of full-length functional recombinant human amelogenin (rhAm) in Iranian lizard Leishmania (I.L.L.) as an alternative eukaryotic expression system. Methods: Human cDNA encoding a 175-amino acid amelogenin expression cassette was sub cloned into a pLEXSY vector. The construct was transferred into Leishmania cells by electroporation. The protein production was surveyed in the transcription and the translation levels. The expressed protein was purified and some of its biological properties were investigated in comparison to EMD and negative control. Results: Expression of rhAm was confirmed by RT-PCR and western blot test in Leishmania cells. Purified rhAm significantly inhibited the formation of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase positive (TRAP+) multinuclear cells in calcitriol stimulated mouse marrow cultures. Moreover, it significantly promoted proliferation and DNA synthesis in L929 mouse fibroblast cells. Conclusion: Functional rhAm was successfully expressed in I.L.L. Easy handling and post translation modification were the main advantages of this expression system. It is suggested to investigate molecular properties of this rhAm in the future. PMID:26576377

  18. The Leishmania mexicana A600 genes are functionally required for amastigote replication.

    PubMed

    Murray, Angus S; Lynn, Miriam A; McMaster, W Robert

    2010-08-01

    Leishmania parasites, the causative agent of leishmaniasis, have a digenetic lifecycle consisting of the morphologically distinct insect vector stage (promastigote) and the mammalian infective amastigote stage. Differentiation of promastigotes to the amastigote stage involves significant morphological and biochemical changes, however, very few genes have been characterised as being differentially expressed in the two stages. The Leishmania A600 genes are one of the few gene families that exhibit stage-specific expression and, as such, they are of interest as potential virulent factors. In this study, we characterize the A600 family in several Leishmania species and investigate their role in amastigote differentiation and proliferation. Four open reading frames, A600-1, A600-2, A600-3, and A600-4, were identified at the multi-gene L. mexicana A600 locus via cloning and restriction mapping. Homology searching identified A600 homologues in other Leishmania species, L. major, L. braziliensis and L. infantum but not in the closely related Trypanosoma family. A targeted gene deletion approach was utilized to determine the cellular function of the L. mexicanaA600 genes. A600(-/-) promastigotes differentiated to axenic amastigotes in response to temperature shift and acidification of culture media, but showed significant growth arrest. Similarly, during in vitro macrophage infection studies, A600(-/-) promastigotes established an early infection, but were deficient in their ability to proliferate as intracellular amastigotes. The ability of A600(-/-) amastigotes to proliferate in mouse peritoneal macrophages was restored by re-introduction of the A600-1 gene, but not the A600-4 gene. The results from these experiments show that the A600-1 gene is essential for continued proliferation of amastigotes, and potentially for development of chronic leishmaniasis. Furthermore, these results suggest a potential role for the L. mexicana A600-deficient mutant as a vaccine candidate

  19. Isolation, purification, characterization and antigenic evaluation of GPI-anchored membrane proteins from Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Agustina; García-Lugo, Pablo; Crisante, Gladys; Añez-Rojas, Néstor; Añez, Néstor

    2008-02-01

    GPI-anchored proteins from the plasma membrane of Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis promastigotes were isolated, characterized and their migration pattern compared with those from other Leishmania species. In all cases the SDS-PAGE migration patterns were obtained under reducing and non-reducing conditions, using DL-dithiothreitol (DTT) as a reducer agent. Our results reveal that under reducing conditions the SDS-PAGE migration pattern is modified as a consequence of the disruption of disulphur-bonds and protein transformation. This is demonstrated when in non-reducing conditions the L. (V.) braziliensis-GPI-anchored proteins pattern showed a group of bands over the 100kDa, and two more bands of 52kDa and 50kDa in four different isolates, whereas under reducing conditions the major GPI-anchored protein fractions were detected as bands of 63kDa, 50kDa and an increase of peptides between 34kDa and 22kDa. Similar modifications were detected in the SDS-PAGE migration patterns of GPI-anchored protein fractions from L. (Leishmania) donovani, L. (L.) mexicana and L. (L.) amazonensis run under the same reducing conditions. Antigenic evaluation carried out by Western blot revealed the presence of two very specific L. (V.) braziliensis-GPI-anchored protein bands of 50kDa and 28kDa. These bands were specifically recognized by anti-L. (V.) braziliensis-GPI-anchored protein serum from experimentally immunized animals. These two peptides were not detected when GPI-anchored protein fractions from L. (L.) donovani, L. (L.) mexicana and L. (L.) amazonensis, were challenged with the same anti-serum. The present results lead us to suggest the use of these two peptides as biochemical markers to identify and differentiate leishmaniasis caused by L. (V.) braziliensis. The lack of immunogenicity observed here with the peptide gp63, a very common protein detected in Leishmania species, is considered.

  20. Leishmania infantum Genetic Diversity and Lutzomyia longipalpis Mitochondrial Haplotypes in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ribolla, Paulo Eduardo Martins; Gushi, Letícia Tsieme; Pires E Cruz, Maria do Socorro; Costa, Carlos Henrique Nery; Costa, Dorcas Lamounier; Lima Júnior, Manoel Sebastião da Costa; Dorval, Maria Elizabeth Moraes Cavalheiros; Gutierrez de Oliveira, Alessandra; da Cunha Santos, Mirella Ferreira; Fonseca Camargo-Neves, Vera Lúcia; Fortaleza, Carlos Magno Castello Branco; Alonso, Diego Peres

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania infantum is the etiological agent of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in the Americas with domestic dogs being its major reservoir hosts. The main VL vector is the sandfly Lutzomyia longipalpis, while other Lutzomyia species may play a role in disease transmission. Although the genetic structure of L. infantum populations has been widely evaluated, only a few studies have addressed this subject coupled to the genetic structure of the respective sandfly vectors. In this study, we analyzed the population structure of L. infantum in three major VL endemic areas in Brazil and associated it with Lutzomyia longipalpis geographic structure.

  1. Leishmania infantum Genetic Diversity and Lutzomyia longipalpis Mitochondrial Haplotypes in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ribolla, Paulo Eduardo Martins; Gushi, Letícia Tsieme; Pires e Cruz, Maria do Socorro; Costa, Carlos Henrique Nery; Costa, Dorcas Lamounier; Lima Júnior, Manoel Sebastião da Costa; Dorval, Maria Elizabeth Moraes Cavalheiros; Gutierrez de Oliveira, Alessandra; da Cunha Santos, Mirella Ferreira; Fonseca Camargo-Neves, Vera Lúcia; Fortaleza, Carlos Magno Castello Branco; Alonso, Diego Peres

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania infantum is the etiological agent of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in the Americas with domestic dogs being its major reservoir hosts. The main VL vector is the sandfly Lutzomyia longipalpis, while other Lutzomyia species may play a role in disease transmission. Although the genetic structure of L. infantum populations has been widely evaluated, only a few studies have addressed this subject coupled to the genetic structure of the respective sandfly vectors. In this study, we analyzed the population structure of L. infantum in three major VL endemic areas in Brazil and associated it with Lutzomyia longipalpis geographic structure. PMID:27119085

  2. Distinct Macrophage Fates after in vitro Infection with Different Species of Leishmania: Induction of Apoptosis by Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis, but Not by Leishmania (Viannia) guyanensis

    PubMed Central

    DaMata, Jarina Pena; Mendes, Bárbara Pinheiro; Maciel-Lima, Kátia; Menezes, Cristiane Alves Silva; Dutra, Walderez Ornelas; Sousa, Lirlândia Pires; Horta, Maria Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania is an intracellular parasite in vertebrate hosts, including man. During infection, amastigotes replicate inside macrophages and are transmitted to healthy cells, leading to amplification of the infection. Although transfer of amastigotes from infected to healthy cells is a crucial step that may shape the outcome of the infection, it is not fully understood. Here we compare L. amazonensis and L. guyanensis infection in C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice and investigate the fate of macrophages when infected with these species of Leishmania in vitro. As previously shown, infection of mice results in distinct outcomes: L. amazonensis causes a chronic infection in both strains of mice (although milder in C57BL/6), whereas L. guyanensis does not cause them disease. In vitro, infection is persistent in L. amazonensis-infected macrophages whereas L. guyanensis growth is controlled by host cells from both strains of mice. We demonstrate that, in vitro, L. amazonensis induces apoptosis of both C57BL/6 and BALB/c macrophages, characterized by PS exposure, DNA cleavage into nucleosomal size fragments, and consequent hypodiploidy. None of these signs were seen in macrophages infected with L. guyanensis, which seem to die through necrosis, as indicated by increased PI-, but not Annexin V-, positive cells. L. amazonensis-induced macrophage apoptosis was associated to activation of caspases-3, -8 and -9 in both strains of mice. Considering these two species of Leishmania and strains of mice, macrophage apoptosis, induced at the initial moments of infection, correlates with chronic infection, regardless of its severity. We present evidence suggestive that macrophages phagocytize L. amazonensis-infected cells, which has not been verified so far. The ingestion of apoptotic infected macrophages by healthy macrophages could be a way of amastigote spreading, leading to the establishment of infection. PMID:26513474

  3. Distinct Macrophage Fates after in vitro Infection with Different Species of Leishmania: Induction of Apoptosis by Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis, but Not by Leishmania (Viannia) guyanensis.

    PubMed

    DaMata, Jarina Pena; Mendes, Bárbara Pinheiro; Maciel-Lima, Kátia; Menezes, Cristiane Alves Silva; Dutra, Walderez Ornelas; Sousa, Lirlândia Pires; Horta, Maria Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania is an intracellular parasite in vertebrate hosts, including man. During infection, amastigotes replicate inside macrophages and are transmitted to healthy cells, leading to amplification of the infection. Although transfer of amastigotes from infected to healthy cells is a crucial step that may shape the outcome of the infection, it is not fully understood. Here we compare L. amazonensis and L. guyanensis infection in C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice and investigate the fate of macrophages when infected with these species of Leishmania in vitro. As previously shown, infection of mice results in distinct outcomes: L. amazonensis causes a chronic infection in both strains of mice (although milder in C57BL/6), whereas L. guyanensis does not cause them disease. In vitro, infection is persistent in L. amazonensis-infected macrophages whereas L. guyanensis growth is controlled by host cells from both strains of mice. We demonstrate that, in vitro, L. amazonensis induces apoptosis of both C57BL/6 and BALB/c macrophages, characterized by PS exposure, DNA cleavage into nucleosomal size fragments, and consequent hypodiploidy. None of these signs were seen in macrophages infected with L. guyanensis, which seem to die through necrosis, as indicated by increased PI-, but not Annexin V-, positive cells. L. amazonensis-induced macrophage apoptosis was associated to activation of caspases-3, -8 and -9 in both strains of mice. Considering these two species of Leishmania and strains of mice, macrophage apoptosis, induced at the initial moments of infection, correlates with chronic infection, regardless of its severity. We present evidence suggestive that macrophages phagocytize L. amazonensis-infected cells, which has not been verified so far. The ingestion of apoptotic infected macrophages by healthy macrophages could be a way of amastigote spreading, leading to the establishment of infection. PMID:26513474

  4. Differential Midgut Attachment of Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis in the Sand Flies Lutzomyia (Nyssomyia) whitmani and Lutzomyia (Nyssomyia) intermedia

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Rodrigo P.; Margonari, Carina; Secundino, Nágila C.; Macêdo, Maria E.; da Costa, Simone M.; Rangel, Elizabeth F.; Pimenta, Paulo F.; Turco, Salvatore J.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between Leishmania and sand flies has been demonstrated in many Old and New World species. Besides the morphological differentiation from procyclic to infective metacyclic promastigotes, the parasite undergoes biochemical transformations in its major surface lipophosphoglycan (LPG). An upregulation of β-glucose residues was previously shown in the LPG repeat units from procyclic to metacyclic phase in Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, which has not been reported in any Leishmania species. LPG has been implicated as an adhesion molecule that mediates the interaction with the midgut epithelium of the sand fly in the Subgenus Leishmania. These adaptations were explored for the first time in a species from the Subgenus Viannia, L. (V.) braziliensis with its natural vectors Lutzomyia (Nyssomyia) intermedia and Lutzomyia (Nyssomyia) whitmani. Using two in vitro binding techniques, phosphoglycans (PGs) derived from procyclic and metacyclic parasites were able to bind to the insect midgut and inhibit L. braziliensis attachment. Interestingly, L. braziliensis procyclic parasite attachment was ∼11-fold greater in the midgut of L. whitmani than in L. intermedia. The epidemiological relevance of L. whitmani as a vector of American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (ACL) in Brazil is discussed. PMID:20011070

  5. Genome of Leptomonas pyrrhocoris: a high-quality reference for monoxenous trypanosomatids and new insights into evolution of Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Flegontov, Pavel; Butenko, Anzhelika; Firsov, Sergei; Kraeva, Natalya; Eliáš, Marek; Field, Mark C.; Filatov, Dmitry; Flegontova, Olga; Gerasimov, Evgeny S.; Hlaváčová, Jana; Ishemgulova, Aygul; Jackson, Andrew P.; Kelly, Steve; Kostygov, Alexei Y.; Logacheva, Maria D.; Maslov, Dmitri A.; Opperdoes, Fred R.; O’Reilly, Amanda; Sádlová, Jovana; Ševčíková, Tereza; Venkatesh, Divya; Vlček, Čestmír; Volf, Petr; Jan Votýpka; Záhonová, Kristína; Yurchenko, Vyacheslav; Lukeš, Julius

    2016-01-01

    Many high-quality genomes are available for dixenous (two hosts) trypanosomatid species of the genera Trypanosoma, Leishmania, and Phytomonas, but only fragmentary information is available for monoxenous (single-host) trypanosomatids. In trypanosomatids, monoxeny is ancestral to dixeny, thus it is anticipated that the genome sequences of the key monoxenous parasites will be instrumental for both understanding the origin of parasitism and the evolution of dixeny. Here, we present a high-quality genome for Leptomonas pyrrhocoris, which is closely related to the dixenous genus Leishmania. The L. pyrrhocoris genome (30.4 Mbp in 60 scaffolds) encodes 10,148 genes. Using the L. pyrrhocoris genome, we pinpointed genes gained in Leishmania. Among those genes, 20 genes with unknown function had expression patterns in the Leishmania mexicana life cycle suggesting their involvement in virulence. By combining differential expression data for L. mexicana, L. major and Leptomonas seymouri, we have identified several additional proteins potentially involved in virulence, including SpoU methylase and U3 small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein IMP3. The population genetics of L. pyrrhocoris was also addressed by sequencing thirteen strains of different geographic origin, allowing the identification of 1,318 genes under positive selection. This set of genes was significantly enriched in components of the cytoskeleton and the flagellum. PMID:27021793

  6. Leishmania Induces Survival, Proliferation and Elevated Cellular dNTP Levels in Human Monocytes Promoting Acceleration of HIV Co-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Daddacha, Waaqo; Overstreet, Michael G.; Lazarski, Chris A.; Fowell, Deborah J.; Kim, Baek

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a parasitic disease that is widely prevalent in many tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. Infection with Leishmania has been recognized to induce a striking acceleration of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) infection in coinfected individuals through as yet incompletely understood mechanisms. Cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage are the predominant cell types coinfected by both pathogens. Monocytes and macrophages contain extremely low levels of deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) due to their lack of cell cycling and S phase, where dNTP biosynthesis is specifically activated. Lentiviruses, such as HIV-1, are unique among retroviruses in their ability to replicate in these non-dividing cells due, at least in part, to their highly efficient reverse transcriptase (RT). Nonetheless, viral replication progresses more efficiently in the setting of higher intracellular dNTP concentrations related to enhanced enzyme kinetics of the viral RT. In the present study, in vitro infection of CD14+ peripheral blood-derived human monocytes with Leishmania major was found to induce differentiation, marked elevation of cellular p53R2 ribonucleotide reductase subunit and R2 subunit expression. The R2 subunit is restricted to the S phase of the cell cycle. Our dNTP assay demonstrated significant elevation of intracellular monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) dNTP concentrations in Leishmania-infected cell populations as compared to control cells. Infection of Leishmania-maturated MDMs with a pseudotyped GFP expressing HIV-1 resulted in increased numbers of GFP+ cells in the Leishmania-maturated MDMs as compared to control cells. Interestingly, a sub-population of Leishmania-maturated MDMs was found to have re-entered the cell cycle, as demonstrated by BrdU labeling. In conclusion, Leishmania infection of primary human monocytes promotes the induction of an S phase environment and elevated dNTP levels with notable elevation of HIV-1 expression

  7. Screening Leishmania donovani complex-specific genes required for visceral disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Wei; Matlashewski, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania protozoan parasites are the causing agent of leishmaniasis. Depending on the infecting species, Leishmania infection can causes a wide variety of diseases such as self-healing cutaneous lesions by L. major and fatal visceral leishmaniasis by L. donovani and L. infantum. Comparison of the visceral disease causing L. infantum genome with cutaneous disease causing L. major and L. braziliensis genomes has identified 25 L. infantum (L. donovani complex) species-specific genes that are absent or pseudogenes in L. major and L. braziliensis. To investigate whether these L. donovani complex species-specific genes are involved in visceral infection, we cloned these genes from L. donovani and introduced them into L. major and then determined whether the transgenic L. major had an increased ability to survive in liver and spleen of BALB/c mice. Several of these L. donovani complex specific genes were found to significantly increase L. major survival in visceral organs in BALB/c mice including the A2 and Ld2834 genes, while down regulation of these genes in L. donovani by either antisense RNA or gene knockout dramatically reduced L. donovani virulence in BALB/c mice. This demonstrated that L. donovani complex species-specific genes play important roles in visceral infection. In this chapter, we describe procedures to screen L. donovani complex specific genes required for visceral infection by cross species transgenic expression, gene deletion targeting and measuring infection levels in mice. PMID:25388124

  8. Rapid fluorescent assay for screening drugs on Leishmania amastigotes.

    PubMed

    Shimony, Orly; Jaffe, Charles L

    2008-10-01

    A rapid fluorescent viability assay employing alamarBlue was optimized for use with Leishmania axenic amastigotes, the stage of the parasite responsible for disease pathology. The activity of two protein kinase inhibitors, Staurosporine and H-89, as well as Amphotericin B, on promastigotes and amastigotes of Leishmania donovani and Leishmania tropica was compared. Both protein kinase inhibitors inhibited promastigote growth at lower concentrations than amastigotes, while the GI(50) for Amphotericin B on both stages was similar. This assay only requires a limited number of axenic amastigotes (50,000 cells/well) and can be used to rapidly screen large chemical or natural product libraries for activity against amastigotes.

  9. Detection of Leishmania in Unaffected Mucosal Tissues of Patients with Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Caused by Leishmania (Viannia) Species

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Roger Adrian; Lozano, Leyder Elena; Romero, Ibeth Cristina; Cardona, Maria Teresa; Prager, Martin; Pacheco, Robinson; Diaz, Yira Rosalba; Tellez, Jair Alexander; Saravia, Nancy Gore

    2016-01-01

    Background Leishmania (Viannia) species are the principal cause of mucosal leishmaniasis. The natural history and pathogenesis of mucosal disease are enigmatic. Parasitological evaluation of mucosal tissues has been constrained by the invasiveness of conventional sampling methods. Methods We evaluated the presence ofLeishmania in the mucosa of 26 patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis and 2 patients with mucocutaneous leishmaniasis. Swab samples of the nasal mucosa, tonsils, and conjunctiva were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction with LV-B1 primers and Southern blot hybridization. Results Two patients with mucocutaneous leishmaniasis and 21 (81%) of 26 patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis had Leishmania kinetoplast minicircle DNA (kDNA) in mucosal tissues. kDNA was amplified from swab samples of nasal mucosa from 14 (58%) of 24 patients, tonsils from 13 (46%) of 28 patients, and conjunctiva from 6 (25%) of 24 patients. kDNA was detected in the mucosa of patients with cutaneous disease caused by Leishmania panamensis, Leishmania guyanensis, and Leishmania braziliensis. Conclusion The asymptomatic presence of parasites in mucosal tissues may be common in patients with Leishmania (Viannia) infection. PMID:19569974

  10. The Leishmania ARL-1 and Golgi Traffic

    PubMed Central

    Tetaud, Emmanuel; Cuvillier, Armelle; Lartigue, Lydia; Ambit, Audrey; Robinson, Derrick R.; Merlin, Gilles

    2008-01-01

    We present here the characterisation of the Leishmania small G protein ADP-Ribosylation Factor-Like protein 1 (ARL-1). The ARL-1 gene is present in one copy per haploid genome and conserved among trypanosomatids. It encodes a protein of 20 kDa, which is equally expressed in the insect promastigote and mammalian amastigote forms of the parasite. ARL-1 localises to the Trans-Golgi Network (TGN); N-terminal myristoylation is essential for TGN localisation. In vivo expression of the LdARL-1/Q74L and LdARL-1/T51N mutants (GTP- and GDP-bound blocked forms respectively) shows that GDP/GTP cycling occurs entirely within the TGN. This is contrary to previous reports in yeast and mammals, where the mutant empty form devoid of nucleotide has been considered as the GDP-blocked form. The dominant-negative empty form mutant LdARL-1/T34N inhibits endocytosis and intracellular trafficking from the TGN to the Lysosome/Multivesicular Tubule and to the acidocalcisomes; these defects are probably related to a mislocalisation of the GRIP domain-containing vesicle tethering factors which cannot be recruited to the TGN by the cytoplasmic LdARL-1/T34N. Thus, besides the functional characterization of a new mutant and a better understanding of ARL-1 GDP/GTP cycling, this work shows that Leishmania ARL-1 is a key component of an essential pathway worth future study. PMID:18286177

  11. Proteome profiling of Leishmania infantum promastigotes.

    PubMed

    Alcolea, Pedro J; Alonso, Ana; Larraga, Vicente

    2011-01-01

    A proteome analysis of the promastigote stage of the trypanosomatid parasite Leishmania infantum (MON-1 zymodeme) is described here for the first time. Total protein extracts were prepared at early logarithmic and stationary phases of replicate axenic cultures and processed by 2D electrophoresis (pH 3-10). A total of 28 differentially regulated proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-tandem time of flight mass spectrometry. This approach has revealed that the electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) and the eukaryotic elongation factor 1α (eEF1α) subunit have the same differential expression pattern at the protein and mRNA levels, up-regulation in the stationary phase. A low-molecular-weight isoform and an alternatively processed form of the eEF1α subunit have been detected. A 51 kDa subunit of replication factor A is up-regulated in dividing logarithmic promastigotes. None of the proteins described here shows opposite differential regulation values with the corresponding mRNA levels. Taken together with previous approaches to the proteome and the transcriptome, this report contributes to the elucidation of the differential regulation patterns of the ETF, the eEF1α subunit, the 40S ribosomal protein S12, α-tubulin and the T-complex protein 1 subunit γ throughout the life cycle of the parasites from the genus Leishmania. PMID:21569158

  12. Evolution of Tubulin Gene Arrays in Trypanosomatid parasites: genomic restructuring in Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Andrew P; Vaughan, Sue; Gull, Keith

    2006-01-01

    Background α- and β-tubulin are fundamental components of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton and cell division machinery. While overall tubulin expression is carefully controlled, most eukaryotes express multiple tubulin genes in specific regulatory or developmental contexts. The genomes of the human parasites Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania major reveal that these unicellular kinetoplastids possess arrays of tandem-duplicated tubulin genes, but with differences in organisation. While L. major possesses monotypic α and β arrays in trans, an array of alternating α- and β tubulin genes occurs in T. brucei. Polycistronic transcription in these organisms makes the chromosomal arrangement of tubulin genes important with respect to gene expression. Results We investigated the genomic architecture of tubulin tandem arrays among these parasites, establishing which character state is derived, and the timing of character transition. Tubulin loci in T. brucei and L. major were compared to examine the relationship between the two character states. Intergenic regions between tubulin genes were sequenced from several trypanosomatids and related, non-parasitic bodonids to identify the ancestral state. Evidence of alternating arrays was found among non-parasitic kinetoplastids and all Trypanosoma spp.; monotypic arrays were confirmed in all Leishmania spp. and close relatives. Conclusion Alternating and monotypic tubulin arrays were found to be mutually exclusive through comparison of genome sequences. The presence of alternating gene arrays in non-parasitic kinetoplastids confirmed that separate, monotypic arrays are the derived state and evolved through genomic restructuring in the lineage leading to Leishmania. This fundamental reorganisation accounted for the dissimilar genomic architectures of T. brucei and L. major tubulin repertoires. PMID:17044946

  13. Cell surface origin of antigens shed by Leishmania donovani during growth in axenic culture.

    PubMed Central

    Kaneshiro, E S; Gottlieb, M; Dwyer, D M

    1982-01-01

    Antisera against isolated cell surface preparations (PCSP-As) of Leishmania donovani promastigotes were used to detect extracellular antigens produced during the growth of these organisms in four different growth media. The PCSP-As precipitated two major antigenically identical but electrophoretically distinct components, in addition to several minor antigens. Immunoelectrophoretic studies employing PCSP-As, PCSP-As absorbed with intact, live promastigotes, and PCSP-As absorbed with a major extracellular antigen demonstrated the antigenic identity between the major extracellular antigens and two major components externally disposed at the surface of promastigotes. Growth curve kinetic investigations suggested that the major extracellular antigens did not appear in the growth media primarily as a result of cell lysis or damage. The carbohydrate nature of the major extracellular antigens was indicated by physicochemical characterization. Images PMID:7118250

  14. Functional complementation of Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis AP endonuclease gene (lamap) in Escherichia coli mutant strains challenged with DNA damage agents

    PubMed Central

    Verissimo-Villela, Erika; Kitahara-Oliveira, Milene Yoko; dos Reis, Ana Beatriz de Bragança; Albano, Rodolpho Mattos; Da-Cruz, Alda Maria; Bello, Alexandre Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    During its life cycle Leishmania spp. face several stress conditions that can cause DNA damages. Base Excision Repair plays an important role in DNA maintenance and it is one of the most conserved mechanisms in all living organisms. DNA repair in trypanosomatids has been reported only for Old World Leishmania species. Here the AP endonuclease from Leishmania (L.) amazonensis was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli mutants defective on the DNA repair machinery, that were submitted to different stress conditions, showing ability to survive in comparison to the triple null mutant parental strain BW535. Phylogenetic and multiple sequence analyses also confirmed that LAMAP belongs to the AP endonuclease class of proteins. PMID:27223868

  15. Successful vaccination against Leishmania chagasi infection in BALB/c mice with freeze-thawed Leishmania antigen and Corynebacterium parvum.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Márcia de Carvalho; Gomes, Daniel Cláudio de Oliveira; Marques-da-Silva, Eduardo de Almeida; Serafim, Tiago Donatelli; Afonso, Luis Carlos Crocco; Rezende, Simone Aparecida

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the potential of a Leishmania antigen vaccine in protecting BALB/c mice against Leishmania chagasi. Mice received two subcutaneous doses of L. amazonensis vaccine with Corynebacterium parvum and subsequent boost was done without adjuvant. One week later, mice were challenged with L. chagasi. We observed that this vaccine caused a significant reduction in parasite load in liver and spleen and induced a high production of IFN-gamma and IL-4 by spleen cells from vaccinated mice in response to Leishmania antigen. Together, our data show that this vaccine is capable of inducing a Th1/Th2 response that is important to control parasite replication. PMID:17919443

  16. The first case report of Leishmania (leishmania) chagasi in Panthera leo in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dahroug, Magyda A A; Almeida, Arleana B P F; Sousa, Valéria R F; Dutra, Valéria; Guimarães, Luciana D; Soares, César E; Nakazato, Luciano; de Souza, Roberto L

    2011-06-01

    We reported here the first known case of natural infection of a lion (Panthera leo-Linnaeus, 1758) with Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi (L. chagasi) in Brazil. The specimen was created by a circus handler in the state of Mato Grosso and was donated to the zoological park of the Federal University of Mato Grosso. Infection by L. chagasi was detected using a PCR-RFLP test. It was known that the domestic felids can act as reservoir of infection of L. chagasi in endemic areas, making it important that studies demonstrate their participation in the epidemiological chain. We demonstrate in this work that wild animals can have an important role in the epidemiological chain and must be considered in order to plan methods of control of this zoonosis.

  17. Cell structure and cytokinesis alterations in multidrug-resistant Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis.

    PubMed

    Borges, V M; Lopes, U G; De Souza, W; Vannier-Santos, M A

    2005-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis may be obtained by in vitro selection with vinblastine. In order to determine whether this phenotype is linked to structural alterations, we analyzed the cell architecture by electron microscopy. The vinblastine resistant CL2 clone of L. (L.) amazonensis, but not wild-type parasites, showed a cytokinesis dysfunction. The CL2 promastigotes had multiple nuclei, kinetoplasts and flagella, suggesting that vinblastine resistance may be associated with truncated cell division. The subpellicular microtubule plasma membrane connection was also affected. Wild-type parasites treated with vinblastine displayed similar alterations, presenting lobulated and multinucleated cells. Taken together, these data indicate that antimicrotubule drug-selected parasites may show evidence of the mutation of cytoskeleton proteins, impairing normal cell function. PMID:15592939

  18. The first case report of Leishmania (leishmania) chagasi in Panthera leo in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Dahroug, Magyda AA; Almeida, Arleana BPF; Sousa, Valéria RF; Dutra, Valéria; Guimarães, Luciana D; Soares, César E; Nakazato, Luciano; de Souza, Roberto L

    2011-01-01

    We reported here the first known case of natural infection of a lion (Panthera leo-Linnaeus, 1758) with Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi (L. chagasi) in Brazil. The specimen was created by a circus handler in the state of Mato Grosso and was donated to the zoological park of the Federal University of Mato Grosso. Infection by L. chagasi was detected using a PCR-RFLP test. It was known that the domestic felids can act as reservoir of infection of L. chagasi in endemic areas, making it important that studies demonstrate their participation in the epidemiological chain. We demonstrate in this work that wild animals can have an important role in the epidemiological chain and must be considered in order to plan methods of control of this zoonosis. PMID:23569768

  19. A deficiency in the B cell response of C57BL/6 mice correlates with loss of macrophage-mediated killing of Leishmania amazonensis

    PubMed Central

    Gibson-Corley, Katherine N.; Boggiatto, Paola M.; Mukbel, Rami M.; Petersen, Christine A.; Jones, Douglas E.

    2010-01-01

    Infection of C3HeB/FeJ and C57BL/6 mice with Leishmania major stimulates a healing cell-mediated immune response, while Leishmania amazonensis infection leads to chronic disease. Here we show C3HeB/FeJ mice co-infected with both species of Leishmania heal, while co-infected C57BL/6 mice do not. Using an in vitro killing assay we determined B cells from infected C57BL/6 mice are ineffective in promoting parasite killing compared with B cells from infected C3HeB/FeJ mice. Furthermore, infected C57BL/6 mice produce less antigen-specific antibodies compared with infected C3HeB/FeJ mice. These findings suggest B cells play a required role in the cell-mediated immune response against L. amazonensis. PMID:20004204

  20. Melatonin attenuates Leishmania (L.) amazonensis infection by modulating arginine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Laranjeira-Silva, Maria Fernanda; Zampieri, Ricardo A; Muxel, Sandra M; Floeter-Winter, Lucile Maria; Markus, Regina P

    2015-11-01

    Acute inflammatory responses induced by bacteria or fungi block nocturnal melatonin synthesis by rodent pineal glands. Here, we show Leishmania infection does not impair daily melatonin rhythm in hamsters. Remarkably, the attenuated parasite burden and lesion progression in hamsters infected at nighttime was impaired by blockage of melatonin receptors with luzindole, whereas melatonin treatment during the light phase attenuated Leishmania infection. In vitro studies corroborated in vivo observations. Melatonin treatment reduced macrophage expression of Cat-2b, Cat1, and ArgI, genes involved in arginine uptake and polyamine synthesis. Indeed, melatonin reduced macrophage arginine uptake by 40%. Putrescine supplementation reverted the attenuation of infectivity by melatonin indicating that its effect was due to the arrest of parasite replication. This study shows that the Leishmania/host interaction varies in a circadian manner according to nocturnal melatonin pineal synthesis. Our results provide new data regarding Leishmania infectiveness and show new approaches for applying agonists of melatonin receptors in Leishmaniasis therapy.

  1. Hepatic extracellular matrix alterations in dogs naturally infected with Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Ferdinan Almeida; Moura, Eliane Perlatto; Ribeiro, Raul Rio; Alves, Cíntia Fontes; Caliari, Marcelo Vidigal; Tafuri, Washington Luiz; da Silva Calabrese, Kátia; Tafuri, Wagner Luiz

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study alterations in the extracellular matrix of liver in dogs naturally infected with Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi that are correlated with clinical aspects and with histological, parasitological and immunological findings. The study was carried out on 30 dogs, 10 uninfected (control group) and 20 infected. The infected animals were further divided into two groups: an asymptomatic group of 10 dogs without clinical signs of the disease; and a symptomatic group of 10 dogs with classical clinical signs. All thirty animals were mongrel dogs of undefined age, obtained from the municipality of Belo Horizonte, MG, metropolitan area. During necropsy, liver fragments were collected and fixed in 10% buffered formaldehyde for histological examination. Paraffined sections of the tissues were stained with haematoxylin–eosin, Gomori’s ammoniacal silver stain for reticular fibres and strepto-avidin peroxidase for immunohistochemical detection of Leishmania amastigotes. Frozen tissue sections were stained by immunofluorescence for fibronectin (FN) and laminin (LN). Liver collagen deposition was significantly greater in the infected than the control animals and differed significantly between the symptomatic and asymptomatic dogs. There was a positive correlation between the parasite load and liver collagen deposition. The increased collagen deposition in infected animal livers may be associated with the parasite burden. Adhesive FN and LN fibres were significantly more highly expressed in the livers of symptomatic than of asymptomatic dogs. Our results demonstrate that canine visceral leishmaniasis causes fibrogenesis in liver, associated with the parasite load and degenerative processes. PMID:19765108

  2. Impact of phlebotomine sand flies on U.S. military operations at Tallil Air Base, Iraq: 4. Detection and identification of leishmania parasites in sand flies.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Russell E; Hochberg, Lisa P; Swanson, Katherine I; Lee, John S; McAvin, James C; Moulton, John K; Eddington, David O; Groebner, Jennifer L; O'Guinn, Monica L; Putnam, John L

    2009-05-01

    Sand flies collected between April 2003 and November 2004 at Tallil Air Base, Iraq, were evaluated for the presence of Leishmania parasites using a combination of a real-time Leishmania-generic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and sequencing of a 360-bp fragment of the glucose-6-phosphate-isomerase (GPI) gene. A total of 2,505 pools containing 26,574 sand flies were tested using the real-time PCR assay. Leishmania DNA was initially detected in 536 pools; however, after extensive retesting with the real-time PCR assay, a total of 456 pools were considered positive and 80 were considered indeterminate. A total of 532 samples were evaluated for Leishmania GPI by sequencing, to include 439 PCR-positive samples, 80 PCR-indeterminate samples, and 13 PCR-negative samples. Leishmania GPI was detected in 284 samples that were sequenced, to include 281 (64%) of the PCR-positive samples and 3 (4%) of the PCR-indeterminate samples. Of the 284 sequences identified as Leishmania, 261 (91.9%) were L. tarentolae, 18 (6.3%) were L. donovani-complex parasites, 3 (1.1%) were L. tropica, and 2 were similar to both L. major and L. tropica. Minimum field infection rates were 0.09% for L. donovani-complex parasites, 0.02% for L. tropica, and 0.01% for the L. major/tropica-like parasite. Subsequent sequencing of a 600-bp region of the "Hyper" gene of 12 of the L. donovani-complex parasites showed that all 12 parasites were L. infantum. These data suggest that L. infantum was the primary leishmanial threat to U.S. military personnel deployed to Tallil Air Base. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  3. Studies on visceral Leishmania tropica infection in BALB/c mice. I. Clinical features and cellular changes.

    PubMed Central

    Djoko-Tamnou, J; Leclerc, C; Modabber, F; Chedid, L

    1981-01-01

    The visceral and lethal infection produced in BALB/c mice by Leishmania tropica (major) is accompanied by splenomegaly, anaemia and reversal of albumin-to-globulin ratio. The percentages of both B and T cells are decreased in the spleen. The spleen and lymph nodes become populated with large Ig-, Thy 1.2- 'null' cells. The similarity of some of these parameters with those produced in human kala-azar is discussed. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7337976

  4. Leishmania Metacyclogenesis Is Promoted in the Absence of Purines

    PubMed Central

    Serafim, Tiago Donatelli; Figueiredo, Amanda Braga; Costa, Pedro Augusto Carvalho; Marques-da-Silva, Eduardo Almeida; Gonçalves, Ricardo; de Moura, Sandra Aparecida Lima; Gontijo, Nelder Figueiredo; da Silva, Sydnei Magno; Michalick, Marilene Suzan Marques; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto; de Carvalho, Roberto Paes; Uliana, Silvia Reni Bortolin; Fietto, Juliana Lopes Rangel; Afonso, Luís Carlos Crocco

    2012-01-01

    Leishmania parasites, the causative agent of leishmaniasis, are transmitted through the bite of an infected sand fly. Leishmania parasites present two basic forms known as promastigote and amastigote which, respectively, parasitizes the vector and the mammalian hosts. Infection of the vertebrate host is dependent on the development, in the vector, of metacyclic promastigotes, however, little is known about the factors that trigger metacyclogenesis in Leishmania parasites. It has been generally stated that “stressful conditions” will lead to development of metacyclic forms, and with the exception of a few studies no detailed analysis of the molecular nature of the stress factor has been performed. Here we show that presence/absence of nucleosides, especially adenosine, controls metacyclogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. We found that addition of an adenosine-receptor antagonist to in vitro cultures of Leishmania amazonensis significantly increases metacyclogenesis, an effect that can be reversed by the presence of specific purine nucleosides or nucleobases. Furthermore, our results show that proliferation and metacyclogenesis are independently regulated and that addition of adenosine to culture medium is sufficient to recover proliferative characteristics for purified metacyclic promastigotes. More importantly, we show that metacyclogenesis was inhibited in sand flies infected with Leishmania infantum chagasi that were fed a mixture of sucrose and adenosine. Our results fill a gap in the life cycle of Leishmania parasites by demonstrating how metacyclogenesis, a key point in the propagation of the parasite to the mammalian host, can be controlled by the presence of specific purines. PMID:23050028

  5. Leishmania metacyclogenesis is promoted in the absence of purines.

    PubMed

    Serafim, Tiago Donatelli; Figueiredo, Amanda Braga; Costa, Pedro Augusto Carvalho; Marques-da-Silva, Eduardo Almeida; Gonçalves, Ricardo; de Moura, Sandra Aparecida Lima; Gontijo, Nelder Figueiredo; da Silva, Sydnei Magno; Michalick, Marilene Suzan Marques; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto; de Carvalho, Roberto Paes; Uliana, Silvia Reni Bortolin; Fietto, Juliana Lopes Rangel; Afonso, Luís Carlos Crocco

    2012-01-01

    Leishmania parasites, the causative agent of leishmaniasis, are transmitted through the bite of an infected sand fly. Leishmania parasites present two basic forms known as promastigote and amastigote which, respectively, parasitizes the vector and the mammalian hosts. Infection of the vertebrate host is dependent on the development, in the vector, of metacyclic promastigotes, however, little is known about the factors that trigger metacyclogenesis in Leishmania parasites. It has been generally stated that "stressful conditions" will lead to development of metacyclic forms, and with the exception of a few studies no detailed analysis of the molecular nature of the stress factor has been performed. Here we show that presence/absence of nucleosides, especially adenosine, controls metacyclogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. We found that addition of an adenosine-receptor antagonist to in vitro cultures of Leishmania amazonensis significantly increases metacyclogenesis, an effect that can be reversed by the presence of specific purine nucleosides or nucleobases. Furthermore, our results show that proliferation and metacyclogenesis are independently regulated and that addition of adenosine to culture medium is sufficient to recover proliferative characteristics for purified metacyclic promastigotes. More importantly, we show that metacyclogenesis was inhibited in sand flies infected with Leishmania infantum chagasi that were fed a mixture of sucrose and adenosine. Our results fill a gap in the life cycle of Leishmania parasites by demonstrating how metacyclogenesis, a key point in the propagation of the parasite to the mammalian host, can be controlled by the presence of specific purines.

  6. Performance of commercially available serological diagnostic tests to detect Leishmania infantum infection on experimentally infected dogs.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cortés, Alhelí; Ojeda, Ana; Todolí, Felicitat; Alberola, Jordi

    2013-01-31

    Leishmania infantum (syn. Leishmania chagasi) is the etiological agent of a widespread serious zoonotic disease that affects both humans and dogs. Prevalence and incidence of the canine infection are important parameters to determine the risk and the ways to control this reemergent zoonosis. Unfortunately, there is not a gold standard test for Leishmania infection. Our aim was to assess the operative validity of commercial tests used to detect antibodies to Leishmania in serum samples from experimental infections. Three ELISA tests (LEISCAN(®) Leishmania ELISA Test, INGEZIM(®) LEISHMANIA, and INGEZIM(®) LEISHMANIA VET), three immunochromatographic tests (INGEZIM(®) LEISHMACROM, SNAP(®) Leishmania, and WITNESS(®) Leishmania), and one IFAT were evaluated. LEISCAN(®) Leishmania ELISA test achieved the highest sensitivity and accuracy (both 0.98). Specificity was 1 for all tests except for IFAT. All tests but IFAT obtained a positive predictive value of 1, while the maximum negative predictive value was achieved by LEISCAN(®) Leishmania ELISA Test (0.93). The best positive likelihood ratio was obtained by INGEZIM(®) LEISHMANIA VET (30.26), while the best negative likelihood ratio was obtained by LEISCAN(®) Leishmania ELISA Test (0.02). The highest diagnostic odds ratio was achieved by LEISCAN(®) Leishmania ELISA Test (729.00). The largest area under the ROC curve was obtained by LEISCAN(®) Leishmania ELISA Test (0.981). Quantitative ELISA based tests performmed better than qualitative tests ("Rapid Tests"), and the test best suited to detect Leishmania in infected dogs and to provide clinically useful information was LEISCAN(®) Leishmania ELISA Test. This and other results point also to the need of revising the status of IFAT as a gold standard for the diagnosis of leishmaniasis.

  7. Structures of the Leishmania infantum polymerase beta

    PubMed Central

    Mejia, Edison; Burak, Matthew; Alonso, Ana; Larraga, Vicente; Kunkel, Thomas A.; Bebenek, Katarzyna; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Protozoans of the genus Leishmania, the pathogenic agent causing leishmaniasis, encode the family X DNA polymerase Li Pol β. Here, we report the first crystal structures of Li Pol β. Our pre- and post-catalytic structures show that the polymerase adopts the common family X DNA polymerase fold. However, in contrast to other family X DNA polymerases, the dNTP-induced conformational changes in Li Pol β are much more subtle. Moreover, pre- and post-catalytic structures reveal that Li Pol β interacts with the template strand through a nonconserved, variable region known as loop3. Li Pol β Δloop3 mutants display a higher catalytic rate, catalytic efficiency and overall error rates with respect to WT Li Pol β. These results further demonstrate the subtle structural variability that exists within this family of enzymes and provides insight into how this variability underlies the substantial functional differences among their members. PMID:24666693

  8. Leishmaniosis (Leishmania infantum infection) in dogs.

    PubMed

    Gharbi, M; Mhadhbi, M; Rejeb, A; Jaouadi, K; Rouatbi, M; Darghouth, M A

    2015-08-01

    The authors present an overview of canine leishmaniosis due to Leishmania infantum. This protozoan is transmitted by sandflies and the disease is frequently characterised by chronic evolution. Cutaneous and visceral clinical signs appear as the infection progresses. Lymph node enlargement, emaciation and skin lesions are the main signs observed in the classical forms of the disease. Control is difficult since infected dogs remain carriers for years and may relapse at any time. The mass screening of infected animals and their treatment or euthanasia represent the best way to reduce the prevalence of this disease in endemic regions. Further research is needed to improve the efficiency of the vaccines available to protect dogs against infection. This disease is zoonotic; in humans, clinical cases are reported mainly in elderly people, the young and those whose immune systems have been compromised. PMID:26601461

  9. Delayed culture of Leishmania in skin biopsies.

    PubMed

    Dedet, J P; Pratlong, F; Pradinaud, R; Moreau, B

    1999-01-01

    Between January 1997 and October 1998, 16 skin biopsies collected from 13 patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis in French Guiana were inoculated in culture medium after travel for 3-17 days from the place of biopsy to the culture laboratory in France. Each biopsy fragment was introduced near the flame of a Bunsen burner into the transport medium (RPMI medium supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum) which was maintained at ambient temperature during postal delivery to France. In France the biopsies were ground in sterile saline before being inoculated into NNN culture tubes. The cultures were incubated at 25 degrees C and subcultured every week until the 5th week. The cultures were positive in 9 cases, remained negative in 4, and were contaminated in 3 cases. Positive results were obtained at all seasons and for 3 different Leishmania species. The study indicates that delayed culture can yield useful results from biopsies taken in field conditions.

  10. Quantitative Proteome Analysis of Leishmania donovani under Spermidine Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shalini; Dubey, Vikash Kumar

    2016-01-01

    We have earlier reported antileishmanial activity of hypericin by spermidine starvation. In the current report, we have used label free proteome quantitation approach to identify differentially modulated proteins after hypericin treatment. A total of 141 proteins were found to be differentially regulated with ANOVA P value less than 0.05 in hypericin treated Leishmania promastigotes. Differentially modulated proteins have been broadly classified under nine major categories. Increase in ribosomal protein S7 protein suggests the repression of translation. Inhibition of proteins related to ubiquitin proteasome system, RNA binding protein and translation initiation factor also suggests altered translation. We have also observed increased expression of Hsp 90, Hsp 83–1 and stress inducible protein 1. Significant decreased level of cyclophilin was observed. These stress related protein could be cellular response of the parasite towards hypericin induced cellular stress. Also, defective metabolism, biosynthesis and replication of nucleic acids, flagellar movement and signalling of the parasite were observed as indicated by altered expression of proteins involved in these pathways. The data was analyzed rigorously to get further insight into hypericin induced parasitic death. PMID:27123864

  11. Leishmania amazonensis: characterization of an ecto-pyrophosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Freitas-Mesquita, Anita Leocadio; Fonseca-de-Souza, André Luiz; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2014-02-01

    Several ecto-enzymatic activities have been described in the plasma membrane of the protozoan Leishmania amazonensis, which is the major etiological agent of diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis in South America. These enzymes, including ecto-phosphatases, contribute to the survival of the parasite by participating in phosphate metabolism. This work identifies and characterizes the extracellular hydrolysis of inorganic pyrophosphate related to an ecto-pyrophosphatase activity of the promastigote form of L. amazonensis. This ecto-pyrophosphatase activity is insensitive to MnCl2 but is strongly stimulated by MgCl2. This stimulation was not observed during the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate (p-NPP) or β-glycerophosphate, two substrates for different ecto-phosphatases present in the L. amazonensis plasma membrane. Furthermore, extracellular PPi hydrolysis is more efficient at alkaline pHs, while p-NPP hydrolysis occurs mainly at acidic pHs. These results led us to conclude that extracellular PPi is hydrolyzed not by non-specific ecto-phosphatases but rather by a genuine ecto-pyrophosphatase. In the presence of 5mM MgCl2, the ecto-pyrophosphatase activity from L. amazonensis is sensitive to micromolar concentrations of NaF and millimolar concentrations of CaCl2. Moreover, this activity is significantly higher during the first days of L. amazonensis culture, which suggests a possible role for this enzyme in parasite growth.

  12. Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and cytochrome B gene sequencing-based identification of Leishmania isolates from different foci of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Marco, Jorge D; Bhutto, Abdul M; Soomro, Farooq R; Baloch, Javed H; Barroso, Paola A; Kato, Hirotomo; Uezato, Hiroshi; Katakura, Ken; Korenaga, Masataka; Nonaka, Shigeo; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa

    2006-08-01

    Seventeen Leishmania stocks isolated from cutaneous lesions of Pakistani patients were studied by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and by polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing of the cytochrome b (Cyt b) gene. Eleven stocks that expressed nine zymodemes were assigned to L. (Leishmania) major. All of them were isolated from patients in the lowlands of Larkana district and Sibi city in Sindh and Balochistan provinces, respectively. The remaining six, distributed in two zymodemes (five and one), isolated from the highland of Quetta city, Balochistan, were identified as L. (L.) tropica. The same result at species level was obtained by the Cyt b sequencing for all the stocks examined. No clear-cut association between the clinical features (wet or dry type lesions) and the Leishmania species involved was found. Leishmania (L.) major was highly polymorphic compared with L. (L.) tropica. This difference may be explained by the fact that humans may act as a sole reservoir of L. (L.) tropica in anthroponotic cycles; however, many wild mammals can be reservoirs of L. (L.) major in zoonotic cycles.

  13. Silver and Nitrate Oppositely Modulate Antimony Susceptibility through Aquaglyceroporin 1 in Leishmania (Viannia) Species.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Juvana M; Baba, Elio H; Machado-de-Avila, Ricardo A; Chavez-Olortegui, Carlos; Demicheli, Cynthia P; Frézard, Frédéric; Monte-Neto, Rubens L; Murta, Silvane M F

    2016-08-01

    Antimony (Sb) resistance in leishmaniasis chemotherapy has become one of the major challenges to the control of this spreading worldwide public health problem. Since the plasma membrane pore-forming protein aquaglyceroporin 1 (AQP1) is the major route of Sb uptake in Leishmania, functional studies are relevant to characterize drug transport pathways in the parasite. We generated AQP1-overexpressing Leishmania guyanensis and L. braziliensis mutants and investigated their susceptibility to the trivalent form of Sb (Sb(III)) in the presence of silver and nitrate salts. Both AQP1-overexpressing lines presented 3- to 4-fold increased AQP1 expression levels compared with those of their untransfected counterparts, leading to an increased Sb(III) susceptibility of about 2-fold. Competition assays using silver nitrate, silver sulfadiazine, or silver acetate prior to Sb(III) exposure increased parasite growth, especially in AQP1-overexpressing mutants. Surprisingly, Sb(III)-sodium nitrate or Sb(III)-potassium nitrate combinations showed significantly enhanced antileishmanial activities compared to those of Sb(III) alone, especially against AQP1-overexpressing mutants, suggesting a putative nitrate-dependent modulation of AQP1 activity. The intracellular level of antimony quantified by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry showed that the concomitant exposure to Sb(III) and nitrate favors antimony accumulation in the parasite, increasing the toxicity of the drug and culminating with parasite death. This is the first report showing evidence of AQP1-mediated Sb(III) susceptibility modulation by silver in Leishmania and suggests the potential antileishmanial activity of the combination of nitrate salts and Sb(III). PMID:27161624

  14. Recombinant Leishmania infantum heat shock protein 83 for the serodiagnosis of cutaneous, mucosal, and visceral leishmaniases.

    PubMed

    Celeste, Beatriz Julieta; Arroyo Sanchez, Maria Carmen; Ramos-Sanchez, Eduardo Milton; Castro, Luiz Guilherme M; Lima Costa, Francisco Assis; Goto, Hiro

    2014-05-01

    Routine serological diagnoses for leishmaniases, except in visceral cases, are performed using whole-parasite antigens. We used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to evaluate the performance of Leishmania infantum rHsp83 compared with L. major-like total promastigote antigen in the diagnosis of cutaneous (CL), mucosal (ML), and visceral leishmaniases (VL). ELISA-rHsp83 was significantly more sensitive than ELISA-L. major-like when considering either CL/ML (P = 0.041) or all leishmaniasis patients (P = 0.013). When samples from other infectious disease patients were evaluated for cross-reactivity, ELISA-rHsp83 was more specific than ELISA-L. major-like, specifically for Chagas disease samples (P < 0.001). We also evaluated the anti-rHsp83 antibody titers months after treatment and observed no significant difference in ML (P = 0.607) or CL (P = 0.205). We recommend ELISA-L. infantum-rHsp83 as a routine confirmatory serological assay for the diagnosis of Leishmania infection because of the high sensitivity, the specificity, and the insignificant cross-reactivity with other infectious diseases.

  15. Recombinant Leishmania infantum Heat Shock Protein 83 for the Serodiagnosis of Cutaneous, Mucosal, and Visceral Leishmaniases

    PubMed Central

    Celeste, Beatriz Julieta; Arroyo Sanchez, Maria Carmen; Ramos-Sanchez, Eduardo Milton; Castro, Luiz Guilherme M.; Lima Costa, Francisco Assis; Goto, Hiro

    2014-01-01

    Routine serological diagnoses for leishmaniases, except in visceral cases, are performed using whole-parasite antigens. We used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to evaluate the performance of Leishmania infantum rHsp83 compared with L. major-like total promastigote antigen in the diagnosis of cutaneous (CL), mucosal (ML), and visceral leishmaniases (VL). ELISA-rHsp83 was significantly more sensitive than ELISA–L. major-like when considering either CL/ML (P = 0.041) or all leishmaniasis patients (P = 0.013). When samples from other infectious disease patients were evaluated for cross-reactivity, ELISA-rHsp83 was more specific than ELISA–L. major-like, specifically for Chagas disease samples (P < 0.001). We also evaluated the anti-rHsp83 antibody titers months after treatment and observed no significant difference in ML (P = 0.607) or CL (P = 0.205). We recommend ELISA–L. infantum-rHsp83 as a routine confirmatory serological assay for the diagnosis of Leishmania infection because of the high sensitivity, the specificity, and the insignificant cross-reactivity with other infectious diseases. PMID:24615136

  16. COMPARATIVE STUDIES OF HERPETOMONADS AND LEISHMANIAS

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Hideyo; Tilden, Evelyn B.

    1926-01-01

    obtained in culture, all the strains grow well on leptospira medium, as well as on blood slants. Growth takes place both at 26°C. and at 37°. The morphology of the organisms is considerably modified by cultivation. This is especially true of the plant flagellates. In the latex they have ribbon-like bodies, often twisted, and comparatively short flagella; the protoplasm is clear, almost hyaline. The flagellates seen in the gut and feces of insects are usually large, slender organisms, with flagella as long as or even longer than the body, which contains numerous volutin granules in the cytoplasm. In cultures under parallel conditions the flagellates from both these sources become shorter and thicker, the plant forms no longer appear flat and ribbon-like, and in general the organisms approach one another in morphological features. Even in the case of the least modified insect flagellates, i.e. those from flies, there is never exact correspondence between the natural and the cultivated forms. The morphological features of the cultivated flagellates vary according to the medium on which the organisms are grown and the age of the culture. The flagellates grown on the surface of blood slants are pyriform, with truncated anterior portion, and short flagellum; in the condensation water, however, the individuals are elongated and have long active flagella. On the leptospira medium the slender active forms with long flagella predominate. In the presence of fermentable carbohydrate, or in medium containing considerable acid, peculiar bifurcated or multifurcated individuals are seen. Similar forms have been seen under natural conditions. Cultures of Leishmania behave in the same way under the conditions described. There is a striking difference in rapidity of growth between the organisms isolated by us and the leishmanias, H. ctenocephali, and T. rotatorium. While the stock cultures of the group first mentioned multiply rapidly at 37°C., growth becoming visible within 24 hours, the

  17. Identification of developmentally-regulated proteins in Leishmania panamensis by proteome profiling of promastigotes and axenic amastigotes.

    PubMed

    Walker, John; Vasquez, Juan-José; Gomez, Maria Adelaida; Drummelsmith, Jolyne; Burchmore, Richard; Girard, Isabelle; Ouellette, Marc

    2006-05-01

    We have employed proteomics to identify proteins upregulated in the amastigote life-stage of Leishmaniapanamensis, using axenically-differentiated forms as models of authentic intracellular parasites. Resolution of the soluble proteomes of axenic amastigotes and promastigotes by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) in the neutral pI range (5-7) revealed equivalent numbers of protein spots in both life-stages (644-682 using Coomassie Blue and 851-863 by silver staining). Although representing a relatively low proportion (8.1-10.8%) of the predicted 8000 gene products of Leishmania, these proteome maps enabled the reproducible detection of 75 differentially-regulated protein spots in amastigotes, comprising 24 spots "uniquely" expressed in this life-stage and 51 over-expressed by 1.2-5.7-fold compared to promastigotes. Of the 11 amastigote-specific spots analysed by mass spectrometry (MS), 5 yielded peptide sequences with no orthologues in Leishmania major, and the remaining 6 were identified as 7 distinct proteins (some of which were truncated isoforms) representing several functional classes: carbohydrate/energy metabolism (fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase), stress response (heat shock protein [HSP] 83), cell membrane/cytoskeleton (beta-tubulin), amino acid metabolism (cysteine synthase) and cell-cycle (ran-binding protein). Four additional over-expressed spots were tentatively identified as HSPs 60 and 70 and HSP 70-related proteins -1 and -4 by positional analogy with these landmark proteins in the Leishmania guyanensis proteome. Our data demonstrate the feasibility of proteomics as an approach to identify novel developmentally-regulated proteins linked to Leishmania differentiation and intracellular survival, while simultaneously pinpointing therapeutic targets. In particular, the amastigote-specific expression of cysteine synthase underlines the importance of de novo cysteine synthesis both as a

  18. Leishmania pifanoi pathogenesis: selective lack of a local cutaneous response in the absence of circulating antibody.

    PubMed

    Colmenares, María; Constant, Stephanie L; Kima, Peter E; McMahon-Pratt, Diane

    2002-12-01

    Recently, a role for B cells in the pathogenesis associated with infection by Leishmania (Leishmania mexicana complex and L. donovani) has been established. In the case of L. mexicana complex parasites (L. mexicana, L. pifanoi, and L. amazonensis), a critical role for immunoglobulin G-mediated mechanisms for the amastigote stage in the host is evident; however, the immunological mechanisms involved remain to be established. In vitro analysis of the kinetics of parasite uptake by macrophages failed to indicate a major effect of antibody opsonization. Given the importance of CD4(+) T cells in the development of disease caused by these parasites, the possibility that the lack of pathogenesis was due to the lack of development of an immune response at the local site (draining lymph node and/or cutaneous site) was explored. Interestingly, the level of CD4(+)-T-cell activation (proliferation and cytokine) in draining lymph nodes from mice lacking circulating antibody (resistant) was found to be comparable to that in nodes from wild-type mice (susceptible) at 2, 5, and 10 weeks postinfection. However, antibody-deficient animals had markedly reduced numbers of monocytes and lymphocytes recruited or retained at the site of cutaneous infection in comparison to wild-type mice, indicating a selective impairment in the local cutaneous immune response. In vitro antigen presentation studies employing tissue-derived (opsonized) amastigotes demonstrated that L. pifanoi-infected FcR(-/-) macrophages, in contrast to comparably infected wild-type cells, failed to activate Leishmania antigen-specific T lymphocytes. These data, taken together, suggest that one possible mechanism for the role of antibody in pathogenesis may be to mediate parasite uptake and regulate the immune response at the local cutaneous site of infection.

  19. Pterocarpanquinone LQB-118 induces apoptosis in Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis and controls lesions in infected hamsters.

    PubMed

    Costa, Luciana; Pinheiro, Roberta O; Dutra, Patrícia M L; Santos, Rosiane F; Cunha-Júnior, Edézio F; Torres-Santos, Eduardo C; da Silva, Alcides J M; Costa, Paulo R R; Da-Silva, Silvia A G

    2014-01-01

    Previous results demonstrate that the hybrid synthetic pterocarpanquinone LQB-118 presents antileishmanial activity against Leishmania amazonensis in a mouse model. The aim of the present study was to use a hamster model to investigate whether LQB-118 presents antileishmanial activity against Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, which is the major Leishmania species related to American tegumentary leishmaniasis. The in vitro antileishmanial activity of LQB-118 on L. braziliensis was tested on the promastigote and intracellular amastigote forms. The cell death induced by LQB-118 in the L. braziliensis promastigotes was analyzed using an annexin V-FITC/PI kit, the oxidative stress was evaluated by 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H2DCFDA) and the ATP content by luminescence. In situ labeling of DNA fragments by terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) was used to investigate apoptosis in the intracellular amastigotes. L. braziliensis-infected hamsters were treated from the seventh day of infection with LQB-118 administered intralesionally (26 µg/kg/day, three times a week) or orally (4,3 mg/kg/day, five times a week) for eight weeks. LQB-118 was active against the L. braziliensis promastigotes and intracellular amastigotes, producing IC50 (50% inhibitory concentration) values of 3,4±0,1 and 7,5±0,8 µM, respectively. LQB-118 induced promastigote phosphatidylserine externalization accompanied by increased reactive oxygen species production and ATP depletion. Intracellular amastigote DNA fragmentation was also observed, without affecting the viability of macrophages. The treatment of L. braziliensis-infected hamsters with LQB-118, either orally or intralesionally, was effective in the control of lesion size, parasite load and increase intradermal reaction to parasite antigen. Taken together, these results show that the antileishmanial effect of LQB-118 extends to L. braziliensis in the hamster model, involves the

  20. Transgenic, Fluorescent Leishmania mexicana Allow Direct Analysis of the Proteome of Intracellular Amastigotes*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Paape, Daniel; Lippuner, Christoph; Schmid, Monika; Ackermann, Renate; Barrios-Llerena, Martin E.; Zimny-Arndt, Ursula; Brinkmann, Volker; Arndt, Benjamin; Pleissner, Klaus Peter; Jungblut, Peter R.; Aebischer, Toni

    2008-01-01

    Investigating the proteome of intracellular pathogens is often hampered by inadequate methodologies to purify the pathogen free of host cell material. This has also precluded direct proteome analysis of the intracellular, amastigote form of Leishmania spp., protozoan parasites that cause a spectrum of diseases that affect some 12 million patients worldwide. Here a method is presented that combines classic, isopycnic density centrifugation with fluorescent particle sorting for purification by exploiting transgenic, fluorescent parasites to allow direct proteome analysis of the purified organisms. By this approach the proteome of intracellular Leishmania mexicana amastigotes was compared with that of extracellular promastigotes that are transmitted by insect vectors. In total, 509 different proteins were identified by mass spectrometry and database search. This number corresponds to ∼6% of gene products predicted from the reference genome of Leishmania major. Intracellular amastigotes synthesized significantly more proteins with basic pI and showed a greater abundance of enzymes of fatty acid catabolism, which may reflect their living in acidic habitats and metabolic adaptation to nutrient availability, respectively. Bioinformatics analyses of the genes corresponding to the protein data sets produced clear evidence for skewed codon usage and translational bias in these organisms. Moreover analysis of the subset of genes whose products were more abundant in amastigotes revealed characteristic sequence motifs in 3′-untranslated regions that have been linked to translational control elements. This suggests that proteome data sets may be used to identify regulatory elements in mRNAs. Last but not least, at 6% coverage the proteome identified all vaccine antigens tested to date. Thus, the present data set provides a valuable resource for selection of candidate vaccine antigens. PMID:18474515

  1. Pterocarpanquinone LQB-118 Induces Apoptosis in Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis and Controls Lesions in Infected Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Luciana; Pinheiro, Roberta O.; Dutra, Patrícia M. L.; Santos, Rosiane F.; Cunha-Júnior, Edézio F.; Torres-Santos, Eduardo C.; da Silva, Alcides J. M.; Costa, Paulo R. R.; Da-Silva, Silvia A. G.

    2014-01-01

    Previous results demonstrate that the hybrid synthetic pterocarpanquinone LQB-118 presents antileishmanial activity against Leishmania amazonensis in a mouse model. The aim of the present study was to use a hamster model to investigate whether LQB-118 presents antileishmanial activity against Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, which is the major Leishmania species related to American tegumentary leishmaniasis. The in vitro antileishmanial activity of LQB-118 on L. braziliensis was tested on the promastigote and intracellular amastigote forms. The cell death induced by LQB-118 in the L. braziliensis promastigotes was analyzed using an annexin V-FITC/PI kit, the oxidative stress was evaluated by 2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H2DCFDA) and the ATP content by luminescence. In situ labeling of DNA fragments by terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) was used to investigate apoptosis in the intracellular amastigotes. L. braziliensis-infected hamsters were treated from the seventh day of infection with LQB-118 administered intralesionally (26 µg/kg/day, three times a week) or orally (4,3 mg/kg/day, five times a week) for eight weeks. LQB-118 was active against the L. braziliensis promastigotes and intracellular amastigotes, producing IC50 (50% inhibitory concentration) values of 3,4±0,1 and 7,5±0,8 µM, respectively. LQB-118 induced promastigote phosphatidylserine externalization accompanied by increased reactive oxygen species production and ATP depletion. Intracellular amastigote DNA fragmentation was also observed, without affecting the viability of macrophages. The treatment of L. braziliensis-infected hamsters with LQB-118, either orally or intralesionally, was effective in the control of lesion size, parasite load and increase intradermal reaction to parasite antigen. Taken together, these results show that the antileishmanial effect of LQB-118 extends to L. braziliensis in the hamster model, involves the

  2. A possible role for Phlebotomus (Anaphlebotomus) rodhaini (Parrot, 1930) in transmission of Leishmania donovani

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis (VL, kala azar), caused by Leishmania donovani is a major health problem in Sudan and other East African countries. In this region the only proven vectors of L. donovani are Phlebotomus orientalis in eastern Sudan, Ethiopia and Upper Nile areas of Southern Sudan and Phlebotomus martini in Ethiopia, Kenya and Southern Sudan. In this report, we present the first evidence that Phlebotomus rodhaini may also play a role in maintaining transmission of L. donovani between animal reservoir hosts in eastern Sudan. The study was conducted in a zoonotic focus of visceral leishmaniasis in Dinder National Park, eastern Sudan, where previous work showed high infection rates of L. donovani in P. orientalis. Sand flies, captured by CDC traps were dissected and examined for infection with Leishmania parasites. Parasite isolates were subjected to L. donovani specific PCR. Field experiments were also carried out to compare efficiency of rodent baited and un-baited CDC traps in collection of P. rodhaini and determine its man-biting rate. Results Three female P. rodhaini were found infected with Leishmania parasites in an astonishingly small number of flies captured in three separate field trips. Two of these isolates were typed by molecular methods as L. donovani, while the third isolate was inoculated into a hamster that was subsequently lost. Although P. rodhaini is generally considered a rare species, results obtained in this study indicate that it can readily be captured by rodent-baited traps. Results of human landing collection showed that it rarely bites humans in the area. Conclusion It is concluded that P. rodhaini is a possible vector of L. donovani between animal reservoir hosts but is not responsible for infecting humans. It is suggested that the role of P. rodhaini in transmission of L. donovani in other zoonotic foci of visceral leishmaniasis in Africa should be re-examined. PMID:22188864

  3. Rattus norvegicus (Rodentia: Muridae) Infected by Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum (syn. Le. chagasi) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lara-Silva, Fabiana de Oliveira; Barata, Ricardo Andrade; Michalsky, Erika Monteiro; Ferreira, Eduardo de Castro; Lopes, Maria Olímpia Garcia; Pinheiro, Aimara da Costa; Fortes-Dias, Consuelo Latorre; Dias, Edelberto Santos

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we surveyed the fauna of phlebotomine sand flies and small mammals in peridomestic areas from a Brazilian municipality where the American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL) is endemic. A total of 608 female phlebotomine sand flies were captured during nine months in 2009 and 2010. Seven different species were represented with 60% of them being Lutzomyia intermedia and Lu. whitmani, both incriminated vectors of ACL. Lu. longipalpis, a proven vector of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) was also captured at high proportion (12.8%). Genomic DNA analysis of 136 species-specific pools of female sand flies followed by molecular genotyping showed the presence of Leishmania infantum DNA in two pools of Lu. longipalpis. The same Leishmania species was found in one blood sample from Rattus norvegicus among 119 blood and tissue samples analysed. This is the first report of Le. infantum in R. norvegicus in the Americas and suggests a possible role for this rodent species in the zoonotic cycle of VL. Our study coincided with the reemergence of VL in Governador Valadares.

  4. Cytokine mRNA expression in Peromyscus yucatanicus (Rodentia: Cricetidae) infected by Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana.

    PubMed

    Loria-Cervera, Elsy Nalleli; Sosa-Bibiano, Erika Ivett; Van Wynsberghe, Nicole Raymonde; Saldarriaga, Omar Abdul; Melby, Peter C; Andrade-Narvaez, Fernando Jose

    2016-07-01

    Peromyscus yucatanicus, the main reservoir of Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana in the Yucatan peninsula of Mexico, reproduces clinical and histological pictures of LCL in human as well as subclinical infection. Thus, we used this rodent as a novel experimental model. In this work, we analyzed cytokine mRNA expression in P. yucatanicus infected with L. (L.) mexicana. Animals were inoculated with either 2.5×10(6) or 1×10(2) promastigotes and cytokine expressions were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR in skin at 4 and 12weeks post-infection (wpi). Independently of the parasite inoculum none of the infected rodents had clinical signs of LCL at 4wpi and all expressed high IFN-γ mRNA. All P. yucatanicus inoculated with 2.5×10(6) promastigotes developed signs of LCL at 12wpi while the mice inoculated with 1×10(2) remained subclinical. At that time, both IFN-γ and IL-10 were expressed in P. yucatanicus with clinical and subclinical infections. Expressions of TNF-α and IL-4 were significantly higher in clinical animals (2.5×10(6)) compared with subclinical ones (1×10(2)). High TGF-β expression was observed in P. yucatanicus with clinical signs when compared with healthy animals. Results suggested that the clinical course of L. (L.) mexicana infection in P. yucatanicus was associated with a specific local pattern of cytokine production at 12wpi. PMID:27155064

  5. A vaccine combining two Leishmania braziliensis proteins offers heterologous protection against Leishmania infantum infection.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Mariana C; Lage, Daniela P; Martins, Vívian T; Costa, Lourena E; Lage, Letícia M R; Carvalho, Ana Maria R S; Ludolf, Fernanda; Santos, Thaís T O; Roatt, Bruno M; Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Tavares, Carlos A P; Coelho, Eduardo A F

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, two Leishmania braziliensis proteins, one hypothetical and the eukaryotic initiation factor 5a (EiF5a), were cloned and used as a polyproteins vaccine for the heterologous protection of BALB/c mice against infantum infection. Animals were immunized with the antigens separately or in association, and in both cases saponin was used as an adjuvant. In the results, spleen cells from mice inoculated with the individual or polyproteins vaccine and lately challenged produced significantly higher levels of protein- and parasite-specific IFN-γ, IL-12, and GM-CSF, when both a capture ELISA and flow cytometry assays were performed. Evaluating the parasite load by a limiting dilution as well as by RT-PCR, these animals presented significant reductions in the parasite number in all evaluated organs, when compared to the control (saline and saponin) groups. The best protection was reached when the polyproteins vaccine was employed. Protection was associated with the IFN-γ production against parasite extracts, which was mediated by both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and correlated with the antileishmanial nitrite production. In this context, this vaccine combining two L. braziliensis proteins was able to induce a heterologous protection against VL, and could be considered in future studies to be tested against other Leishmania species or in other mammalian hosts.

  6. A vaccine combining two Leishmania braziliensis proteins offers heterologous protection against Leishmania infantum infection.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Mariana C; Lage, Daniela P; Martins, Vívian T; Costa, Lourena E; Lage, Letícia M R; Carvalho, Ana Maria R S; Ludolf, Fernanda; Santos, Thaís T O; Roatt, Bruno M; Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Tavares, Carlos A P; Coelho, Eduardo A F

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, two Leishmania braziliensis proteins, one hypothetical and the eukaryotic initiation factor 5a (EiF5a), were cloned and used as a polyproteins vaccine for the heterologous protection of BALB/c mice against infantum infection. Animals were immunized with the antigens separately or in association, and in both cases saponin was used as an adjuvant. In the results, spleen cells from mice inoculated with the individual or polyproteins vaccine and lately challenged produced significantly higher levels of protein- and parasite-specific IFN-γ, IL-12, and GM-CSF, when both a capture ELISA and flow cytometry assays were performed. Evaluating the parasite load by a limiting dilution as well as by RT-PCR, these animals presented significant reductions in the parasite number in all evaluated organs, when compared to the control (saline and saponin) groups. The best protection was reached when the polyproteins vaccine was employed. Protection was associated with the IFN-γ production against parasite extracts, which was mediated by both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and correlated with the antileishmanial nitrite production. In this context, this vaccine combining two L. braziliensis proteins was able to induce a heterologous protection against VL, and could be considered in future studies to be tested against other Leishmania species or in other mammalian hosts. PMID:27387277

  7. Rattus norvegicus (Rodentia: Muridae) Infected by Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum (syn. Le. chagasi) in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Lara-Silva, Fabiana de Oliveira; Michalsky, Érika Monteiro; Ferreira, Eduardo de Castro; Lopes, Maria Olímpia Garcia; Pinheiro, Aimara da Costa; Fortes-Dias, Consuelo Latorre; Dias, Edelberto Santos

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we surveyed the fauna of phlebotomine sand flies and small mammals in peridomestic areas from a Brazilian municipality where the American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL) is endemic. A total of 608 female phlebotomine sand flies were captured during nine months in 2009 and 2010. Seven different species were represented with 60% of them being Lutzomyia intermedia and Lu. whitmani, both incriminated vectors of ACL. Lu. longipalpis, a proven vector of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) was also captured at high proportion (12.8%). Genomic DNA analysis of 136 species-specific pools of female sand flies followed by molecular genotyping showed the presence of Leishmania infantum DNA in two pools of Lu. longipalpis. The same Leishmania species was found in one blood sample from Rattus norvegicus among 119 blood and tissue samples analysed. This is the first report of Le. infantum in R. norvegicus in the Americas and suggests a possible role for this rodent species in the zoonotic cycle of VL. Our study coincided with the reemergence of VL in Governador Valadares. PMID:24707492

  8. Chronic infection by Leishmania amazonensis mediated through MAPK ERK mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Pedro A.; Petersen, Christine A.

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania amazonensis is an intracellular protozoan parasite responsible for chronic cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). CL is a neglected tropical disease responsible for infecting millions of people worldwide. L. amazonensis promotes alteration of various signaling pathways that are essential for host cell survival. Specifically, through parasite-mediated phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK), L. amazonensis inhibits cell-mediated parasite killing and promotes its own survival by co-opting multiple host cell functions. In this review we highlight Leishmania-host cell signaling alterations focusing on those specific to 1) motor proteins, 2) prevention of NADPH subunit phosphorylation impairing reactive oxygen species production (ROS), and 3) localized endosomal signaling to up-regulate ERK phosphorylation. This review will focus upon mechanisms and possible explanations as to how Leishmania spp. evades the various layers of defense employed by the host immune response. PMID:24838145