Science.gov

Sample records for lemon balm leaves

  1. Extraction of light filth from whole leaves of alfalfa, lemon balm, papaya, and spearmint: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, M J; Glaze, L E

    1987-01-01

    Results are reported for a collaborative study to extend AOAC method 44.A06-44.A08 to extraction of light filth from whole leaves of alfalfa, lemon balm, papaya, and spearmint. A 5 g (spearmint) or 10 g (alfalfa, lemon balm, papaya) test portion is defatted with isopropanol in a simple reflux apparatus. Rat hairs, insect fragments, and whole insects are isolated by wet sieving on a No. 230 sieve, a deaerating boil in 40% isopropanol, and flotation with mineral oil-heptane (85 + 15) from Tween 80-Na4EDTA (1 + 1) and 40% isopropanol in a Wildman trap flask. Each product was spiked at a different level. For rat hairs, recoveries averaged 82.2% from alfalfa, 88.9% from lemon balm, 80.6% from papaya, and 79.6% from spearmint. Recoveries of whole or equivalent insects from these products averaged 66.1, 218.8, 69.4, and 85.4%, respectively; recoveries of insect fragments from these products averaged 89.6, 94.4, 94.1, and 88.1%, respectively. The method has been adopted official first action for extraction of light filth from whole leaves of alfalfa, papaya, and spearmint. The extension of the method to lemon balm was not recommended because of interferences by intrinsic whole insects, which were the same species as the spike material.

  2. Extraction of light filth from whole leaves of alfalfa, lemon balm, papaya, and spearmint: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, M J; Glaze, L E

    1987-01-01

    Results are reported for a collaborative study to extend AOAC method 44.A06-44.A08 to extraction of light filth from whole leaves of alfalfa, lemon balm, papaya, and spearmint. A 5 g (spearmint) or 10 g (alfalfa, lemon balm, papaya) test portion is defatted with isopropanol in a simple reflux apparatus. Rat hairs, insect fragments, and whole insects are isolated by wet sieving on a No. 230 sieve, a deaerating boil in 40% isopropanol, and flotation with mineral oil-heptane (85 + 15) from Tween 80-Na4EDTA (1 + 1) and 40% isopropanol in a Wildman trap flask. Each product was spiked at a different level. For rat hairs, recoveries averaged 82.2% from alfalfa, 88.9% from lemon balm, 80.6% from papaya, and 79.6% from spearmint. Recoveries of whole or equivalent insects from these products averaged 66.1, 218.8, 69.4, and 85.4%, respectively; recoveries of insect fragments from these products averaged 89.6, 94.4, 94.1, and 88.1%, respectively. The method has been adopted official first action for extraction of light filth from whole leaves of alfalfa, papaya, and spearmint. The extension of the method to lemon balm was not recommended because of interferences by intrinsic whole insects, which were the same species as the spike material. PMID:3436916

  3. Ultrasound-assisted extraction of bioactive compounds from lemon balm and peppermint leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šic Žlabur, Jana; Voća, Sandra; Dobričević, Nadica; Pliestić, Stjepan; Galić, Ante; Boričević, Ana; Borić, Nataša

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of conventional and ultrasound-assisted extraction (frequency, time, temperature) on the content of bioactive compounds as well as on the antioxidant activity of aqueous extracts from fresh lemon balm and peppermint leaves. Total phenols, flavonoids, non-flavonoids, total chlorophylls, total carotenoids, and radical scavenging capacity were determined. Moreover, the relationship between bioactive compounds and antioxidant capacity was studied by linear regression. A significant increase in all studied bioactive compounds during ultrasonic extraction for 5 to 20 min was found. With the classical extraction method, the highest amounts of total phenols, flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were determined, and the maximum amounts of total chlorophylls and carotenoids were determined during 20 min ultrasonic extraction. The correlation analysis revealed a strong, positive relationship between antioxidant activity and total phenolic compounds.

  4. Flavonoids from lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L., Lamiaceae).

    PubMed

    Patora, Jolanta; Klimek, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    Six flavonoids have been isolated from the leaves of lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L., Lamiaceae). Their structures were determined on the basis of spectral data (UV, 1R, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and FAB MS) as luteolin, luteolin 7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, apigenin 7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, luteolin 7-O-beta-D-glucuronopyranoside, luteolin 3'-O-beta-D-glucuronopyranoside and luteolin 7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside-3'-Obeta-D-glucuronopyranoside. The last three glycosides have been found in lemon balm for the first time and luteolin 7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside-3'-O-beta-D-glucuronopyranoside is a new compound found in plants.

  5. Encapsulation optimization of lemon balm antioxidants in calcium alginate hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Najafi-Soulari, Samira; Shekarchizadeh, Hajar; Kadivar, Mahdi

    2016-11-01

    Calcium alginate hydrogel beads were used to encapsulate lemon balm extract. Chitosan layer was used to investigate the effect of hydrogel coating. To determine the interactions of antioxidant compounds of extract with encapsulation materials and its stability, microstructure of hydrogel beads was thoroughly monitored using scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). Total polyphenols content and antiradical activity of lemon balm extract were also evaluated before and after encapsulation. Three significant parameters (lemon balm extract, sodium alginate, and calcium chloride concentrations) were optimized by response surface methodology to obtain maximum encapsulation efficiency. The FTIR spectra showed no interactions between extract and polymers as there were no new band in spectra of alginate hydrogel after encapsulation of active compounds of lemon balm extract. The antioxidant activity of lemon balm extract did not change after encapsulation. Therefore, it was found that alginate is a suitable material for encapsulation of natural antioxidants. Sodium alginate solution concentration, 1.84%, lemon balm extract concentration, 0.4%, and calcium chloride concentration, 0.2% was determined to be the optimum condition to reach maximum encapsulation efficiency.

  6. Encapsulation optimization of lemon balm antioxidants in calcium alginate hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Najafi-Soulari, Samira; Shekarchizadeh, Hajar; Kadivar, Mahdi

    2016-11-01

    Calcium alginate hydrogel beads were used to encapsulate lemon balm extract. Chitosan layer was used to investigate the effect of hydrogel coating. To determine the interactions of antioxidant compounds of extract with encapsulation materials and its stability, microstructure of hydrogel beads was thoroughly monitored using scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). Total polyphenols content and antiradical activity of lemon balm extract were also evaluated before and after encapsulation. Three significant parameters (lemon balm extract, sodium alginate, and calcium chloride concentrations) were optimized by response surface methodology to obtain maximum encapsulation efficiency. The FTIR spectra showed no interactions between extract and polymers as there were no new band in spectra of alginate hydrogel after encapsulation of active compounds of lemon balm extract. The antioxidant activity of lemon balm extract did not change after encapsulation. Therefore, it was found that alginate is a suitable material for encapsulation of natural antioxidants. Sodium alginate solution concentration, 1.84%, lemon balm extract concentration, 0.4%, and calcium chloride concentration, 0.2% was determined to be the optimum condition to reach maximum encapsulation efficiency. PMID:27540886

  7. DNA isolation protocol for the medicinal plant lemon balm (Melissa officinalis, Lamiaceae).

    PubMed

    Ghaffariyan, S; Mohammadi, S A; Aharizad, S

    2012-01-01

    Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) is a medicinal plant that is widely used as a sedative or calmant, spasmolytic and antibacterial agent and sleep aid. This has led to a high demand for lemon balm products, resulting in the extinction of this species in some of its natural habitats. Molecular techniques have increasingly been used in plant diversity conservation and isolation of PCR amplifiable genomic DNA is an important pre-requisite. Lemon balm contains high levels of polyphenols and polysaccharides, which pose a major challenge for the isolation of high-quality DNA. We compared different genomic DNA extraction protocols, including traditional phenol-chloroform DNA extraction protocols and two commercial kits for DNA purification for their ability to produce good-quality DNA from fresh leaves of five lemon balm genotypes. Quality and quantity of the DNA samples were determined using 0.8% agarose gel electrophoresis and a spectrophotometer. The DNA purity was further confirmed by PCR amplification using barley retrotransposon LTR base primers. The spectral quality of DNA as measured by the A(260)/A(280) ratio ranged from 1.46 to 2.37. The Fermentase genomic DNA purification kit and the CTAB extraction protocol using PVP and ammonium acetate to overcome the high levels of polyphenols and polysaccharides yielded high-quality DNA with a mean A(260)/A(280) ratio of 1.87. The quantity of DNA and its PCR purity were similar with all the protocols, but considering the time and cost required for extraction of DNA from a large number of samples, the CTAB protocol using PVP and ammonium acetate is suitable for lemon balm. PMID:22614273

  8. DNA isolation protocol for the medicinal plant lemon balm (Melissa officinalis, Lamiaceae).

    PubMed

    Ghaffariyan, S; Mohammadi, S A; Aharizad, S

    2012-04-27

    Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) is a medicinal plant that is widely used as a sedative or calmant, spasmolytic and antibacterial agent and sleep aid. This has led to a high demand for lemon balm products, resulting in the extinction of this species in some of its natural habitats. Molecular techniques have increasingly been used in plant diversity conservation and isolation of PCR amplifiable genomic DNA is an important pre-requisite. Lemon balm contains high levels of polyphenols and polysaccharides, which pose a major challenge for the isolation of high-quality DNA. We compared different genomic DNA extraction protocols, including traditional phenol-chloroform DNA extraction protocols and two commercial kits for DNA purification for their ability to produce good-quality DNA from fresh leaves of five lemon balm genotypes. Quality and quantity of the DNA samples were determined using 0.8% agarose gel electrophoresis and a spectrophotometer. The DNA purity was further confirmed by PCR amplification using barley retrotransposon LTR base primers. The spectral quality of DNA as measured by the A(260)/A(280) ratio ranged from 1.46 to 2.37. The Fermentase genomic DNA purification kit and the CTAB extraction protocol using PVP and ammonium acetate to overcome the high levels of polyphenols and polysaccharides yielded high-quality DNA with a mean A(260)/A(280) ratio of 1.87. The quantity of DNA and its PCR purity were similar with all the protocols, but considering the time and cost required for extraction of DNA from a large number of samples, the CTAB protocol using PVP and ammonium acetate is suitable for lemon balm.

  9. Anti-stress effects of lemon balm-containing foods.

    PubMed

    Scholey, Andrew; Gibbs, Amy; Neale, Chris; Perry, Naomi; Ossoukhova, Anastasia; Bilog, Vanessa; Kras, Marni; Scholz, Claudia; Sass, Mathias; Buchwald-Werner, Sybille

    2014-11-01

    Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) has been used historically and contemporarily as a modulator of mood and cognitive function, with anxiolytic effects following administration of capsules, coated tablets and topical application. Following a pilot study with lemon balm extract administered as a water based drink, which confirmed absorption of rosmarinic acid effects on mood and cognitive function, we conducted two similar double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover studies. These evaluated the mood and cognitive effects of a standardised M. officinalis preparation administered in palatable forms in a beverage and in yoghurt. In each study a cohort of healthy young adults' self-rated aspects of mood were measured before and after a multi-tasking framework (MTF) administered one hour and three hours following one of four treatments. Both active lemon balm treatments were generally associated with improvements in mood and/or cognitive performance, though there were some behavioral "costs" at other doses and these effects depended to some degree on the delivery matrix. PMID:25360512

  10. Anti-stress effects of lemon balm-containing foods.

    PubMed

    Scholey, Andrew; Gibbs, Amy; Neale, Chris; Perry, Naomi; Ossoukhova, Anastasia; Bilog, Vanessa; Kras, Marni; Scholz, Claudia; Sass, Mathias; Buchwald-Werner, Sybille

    2014-10-30

    Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) has been used historically and contemporarily as a modulator of mood and cognitive function, with anxiolytic effects following administration of capsules, coated tablets and topical application. Following a pilot study with lemon balm extract administered as a water based drink, which confirmed absorption of rosmarinic acid effects on mood and cognitive function, we conducted two similar double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover studies. These evaluated the mood and cognitive effects of a standardised M. officinalis preparation administered in palatable forms in a beverage and in yoghurt. In each study a cohort of healthy young adults' self-rated aspects of mood were measured before and after a multi-tasking framework (MTF) administered one hour and three hours following one of four treatments. Both active lemon balm treatments were generally associated with improvements in mood and/or cognitive performance, though there were some behavioral "costs" at other doses and these effects depended to some degree on the delivery matrix.

  11. Anti-Stress Effects of Lemon Balm-Containing Foods

    PubMed Central

    Scholey, Andrew; Gibbs, Amy; Neale, Chris; Perry, Naomi; Ossoukhova, Anastasia; Bilog, Vanessa; Kras, Marni; Scholz, Claudia; Sass, Mathias; Buchwald-Werner, Sybille

    2014-01-01

    Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) has been used historically and contemporarily as a modulator of mood and cognitive function, with anxiolytic effects following administration of capsules, coated tablets and topical application. Following a pilot study with lemon balm extract administered as a water based drink, which confirmed absorption of rosmarinic acid effects on mood and cognitive function, we conducted two similar double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover studies. These evaluated the mood and cognitive effects of a standardised M. officinalis preparation administered in palatable forms in a beverage and in yoghurt. In each study a cohort of healthy young adults’ self-rated aspects of mood were measured before and after a multi-tasking framework (MTF) administered one hour and three hours following one of four treatments. Both active lemon balm treatments were generally associated with improvements in mood and/or cognitive performance, though there were some behavioral “costs” at other doses and these effects depended to some degree on the delivery matrix. PMID:25360512

  12. Lemon balm extract causes potent antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic effects in insulin-resistant obese mice.

    PubMed

    Weidner, Christopher; Wowro, Sylvia J; Freiwald, Anja; Kodelja, Vitam; Abdel-Aziz, Heba; Kelber, Olaf; Sauer, Sascha

    2014-04-01

    Over the last decades polyetiological metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes have emerged as a global epidemic. Efficient strategies for prevention and treatment include dietary intervention and the development of validated nutraceuticals. Safe extracts of edible plants provide a resource of structurally diverse molecules that can effectively interfere with multifactorial diseases. In this study, we describe the application of ethanolic lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) leaves extract for the treatment of insulin-resistance and dyslipidemia in mice. We show that lemon balm extract (LBE) activates the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), which have key roles in the regulation of whole body glucose and lipid metabolism. Application of LBE (0.6 mg/mL) to human primary adipocytes resulted in specific peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor target gene expression. LBE treatment of insulin-resistant high-fat diet-fed C57BL/6 mice (200 mg/kg/day) for 6 weeks considerably reduced hyperglycemia and insulin resistance, plasma triacylglycerol, nonesterified fatty acids and LDL/VLDL cholesterol levels. Taken together, ethanolic lemon balm extract can potentially be used to prevent or concomitantly treat type 2 diabetes and associated disorders such as dyslipidemia and hypercholesterolemia. PMID:24272914

  13. Lemon balm extract causes potent antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic effects in insulin-resistant obese mice.

    PubMed

    Weidner, Christopher; Wowro, Sylvia J; Freiwald, Anja; Kodelja, Vitam; Abdel-Aziz, Heba; Kelber, Olaf; Sauer, Sascha

    2014-04-01

    Over the last decades polyetiological metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes have emerged as a global epidemic. Efficient strategies for prevention and treatment include dietary intervention and the development of validated nutraceuticals. Safe extracts of edible plants provide a resource of structurally diverse molecules that can effectively interfere with multifactorial diseases. In this study, we describe the application of ethanolic lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) leaves extract for the treatment of insulin-resistance and dyslipidemia in mice. We show that lemon balm extract (LBE) activates the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), which have key roles in the regulation of whole body glucose and lipid metabolism. Application of LBE (0.6 mg/mL) to human primary adipocytes resulted in specific peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor target gene expression. LBE treatment of insulin-resistant high-fat diet-fed C57BL/6 mice (200 mg/kg/day) for 6 weeks considerably reduced hyperglycemia and insulin resistance, plasma triacylglycerol, nonesterified fatty acids and LDL/VLDL cholesterol levels. Taken together, ethanolic lemon balm extract can potentially be used to prevent or concomitantly treat type 2 diabetes and associated disorders such as dyslipidemia and hypercholesterolemia.

  14. Effects of Lemon Balm on the Oxidative Stability and the Quality Properties of Hamburger Patties during Refrigerated Storage

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Joo; Choi, Yang-Il

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effects of lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) on various quality and antioxidant activity of hamburger patties. Lemon balm extract (LBE) showed the highest amount of total polyphenol (801.00 mg TAE/g DW) and flavonoids (65.05 mg RA/g DW). The IC50 value of DPPH hydroxyl scavenging of LBE was 132 μg/mL. The hamburger patties were prepared by 0% (N), 0.1% (L1), 0.5% (L2), and 1.0% (L3) of the lemon balm powder. The addition of lemon balm powder increased the chewiness value, but did not affect the hardness, cohesiveness, and springiness values. Lemon balm powder had positive effects on sensory evaluation of patties. The pH of all patties decreased with longer storage period. 2-Thiobarbituric acid value, volatile basic nitrogen content, and the total microbial counts of hamburger patties in the L3 group were lower, compared to those of the normal (N group). In conclusion, the L3 group had significantly delayed lipid peroxidation compared to other treatment groups. However, the addition of lemon balm powder into patties showed no significantly influence on proximate composition, calorie contents, water holding capacity and cooking loss of patties. Therefore, lemon balm might be a useful natural antioxidant additive in meat products. PMID:26761292

  15. Effects of Lemon Balm on the Oxidative Stability and the Quality Properties of Hamburger Patties during Refrigerated Storage.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Joo; Choi, You-Jung; Choi, Yang-Il; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effects of lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) on various quality and antioxidant activity of hamburger patties. Lemon balm extract (LBE) showed the highest amount of total polyphenol (801.00 mg TAE/g DW) and flavonoids (65.05 mg RA/g DW). The IC50 value of DPPH hydroxyl scavenging of LBE was 132 μg/mL. The hamburger patties were prepared by 0% (N), 0.1% (L1), 0.5% (L2), and 1.0% (L3) of the lemon balm powder. The addition of lemon balm powder increased the chewiness value, but did not affect the hardness, cohesiveness, and springiness values. Lemon balm powder had positive effects on sensory evaluation of patties. The pH of all patties decreased with longer storage period. 2-Thiobarbituric acid value, volatile basic nitrogen content, and the total microbial counts of hamburger patties in the L3 group were lower, compared to those of the normal (N group). In conclusion, the L3 group had significantly delayed lipid peroxidation compared to other treatment groups. However, the addition of lemon balm powder into patties showed no significantly influence on proximate composition, calorie contents, water holding capacity and cooking loss of patties. Therefore, lemon balm might be a useful natural antioxidant additive in meat products. PMID:26761292

  16. Effects of Lemon Balm on the Oxidative Stability and the Quality Properties of Hamburger Patties during Refrigerated Storage.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Joo; Choi, You-Jung; Choi, Yang-Il; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effects of lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) on various quality and antioxidant activity of hamburger patties. Lemon balm extract (LBE) showed the highest amount of total polyphenol (801.00 mg TAE/g DW) and flavonoids (65.05 mg RA/g DW). The IC50 value of DPPH hydroxyl scavenging of LBE was 132 μg/mL. The hamburger patties were prepared by 0% (N), 0.1% (L1), 0.5% (L2), and 1.0% (L3) of the lemon balm powder. The addition of lemon balm powder increased the chewiness value, but did not affect the hardness, cohesiveness, and springiness values. Lemon balm powder had positive effects on sensory evaluation of patties. The pH of all patties decreased with longer storage period. 2-Thiobarbituric acid value, volatile basic nitrogen content, and the total microbial counts of hamburger patties in the L3 group were lower, compared to those of the normal (N group). In conclusion, the L3 group had significantly delayed lipid peroxidation compared to other treatment groups. However, the addition of lemon balm powder into patties showed no significantly influence on proximate composition, calorie contents, water holding capacity and cooking loss of patties. Therefore, lemon balm might be a useful natural antioxidant additive in meat products.

  17. Occurence of fungal diseases on lemon balm (Mellisa officinalis L.) and peppermint (Mentha x piperita L.) in the region of Malopolska.

    PubMed

    Szczeponek, A; Mazur, S

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the researches carried out on the subject of the diseases on herbs such as lemon balm and peppermint focusing on the health status of the plants grown in the region of Malopolska. The field and laboratory research proved that perpetrators of the diseases on the examined plants were fungi species with the numerical majority. On lemon balm septoria leaf spot (Septoria melissae) was most often observed. Moreover, fungal genera of different taxonomic groups were detected. Alternaria, Epicoccum, Fusarium, and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum occurred most often on the medicinal plant samples. The disease mint rust Puccinia menthae, has caused major problems for the peppermint growers. In the populations of fungi found on the diseased leaves the dominating were Alternaria, Epicoccum and Sphaceloma menthae. It has been stated that among all fungi isolated from lemon balm, the species Fusarium avenaceum had the highest pathogenicity to seedlings (80% of diseased seedlings). For peppermint plants the highest pathogenicity had species Epicoccum purpurascens, and caused 82% of diseased seedlings. Conducted evaluation of health status of plants showed that the lemon balm mean disease index was yearly differentiated and was the highest in 2003 (44.39). For peppermint, the highest disease index was in third year of cultivation (62.75) and was statistically higher than in previous years.

  18. Enrichment of antioxidant compounds from lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) by pressurized liquid extraction and enzyme-assisted extraction.

    PubMed

    Miron, T L; Herrero, M; Ibáñez, E

    2013-05-01

    In this work enzyme-assisted extraction (EAE) and pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) are applied for extraction of natural compounds from lemon balm (Melissa officinalis). Cellulase, endo-β-1,4 xylanase and pectinase were studied in order to degrade cell wall of lemon balm leaves and to release phenolic compounds. On the other hand, in order to compare the performance obtained with EAE, PLE using water and ethanol was employed maintaining 150°C as extraction temperature. The obtained extracts were characterized in terms of antioxidant capacity by using DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging and trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) in vitro assays, whereas the Folin-Ciocalteu procedure was employed to estimate the total phenols content. On the other hand, extracts were chemically characterized by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The results showed that EAE enhanced the total phenolic content and the antioxidant capacity compared to a non-enzymatic control. PLE extracts presented higher amount of phenols and antioxidant capacity than enzyme-assisted extracts, reaching the highest values on water extracts (193.18mggallicacid/gextract and EC50=6.81μg/mL). Among the bioactive phenolic compounds identified in lemon balm, rosmarinic acid was the main component, although other important compounds were also identified, such as caffeic acid derivatives (salvianolic acids, lithospermic acid) and rosmarinic acid derivatives (rosmarinic acid hexoside, sagerinic acid, sulfated rosmarinic acid). The present study confirms that EAE and PLE can be considered alternative methods for the extraction of natural compounds with biological activity from natural sources. PMID:23528869

  19. Enrichment of antioxidant compounds from lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) by pressurized liquid extraction and enzyme-assisted extraction.

    PubMed

    Miron, T L; Herrero, M; Ibáñez, E

    2013-05-01

    In this work enzyme-assisted extraction (EAE) and pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) are applied for extraction of natural compounds from lemon balm (Melissa officinalis). Cellulase, endo-β-1,4 xylanase and pectinase were studied in order to degrade cell wall of lemon balm leaves and to release phenolic compounds. On the other hand, in order to compare the performance obtained with EAE, PLE using water and ethanol was employed maintaining 150°C as extraction temperature. The obtained extracts were characterized in terms of antioxidant capacity by using DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging and trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) in vitro assays, whereas the Folin-Ciocalteu procedure was employed to estimate the total phenols content. On the other hand, extracts were chemically characterized by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The results showed that EAE enhanced the total phenolic content and the antioxidant capacity compared to a non-enzymatic control. PLE extracts presented higher amount of phenols and antioxidant capacity than enzyme-assisted extracts, reaching the highest values on water extracts (193.18mggallicacid/gextract and EC50=6.81μg/mL). Among the bioactive phenolic compounds identified in lemon balm, rosmarinic acid was the main component, although other important compounds were also identified, such as caffeic acid derivatives (salvianolic acids, lithospermic acid) and rosmarinic acid derivatives (rosmarinic acid hexoside, sagerinic acid, sulfated rosmarinic acid). The present study confirms that EAE and PLE can be considered alternative methods for the extraction of natural compounds with biological activity from natural sources.

  20. Flavonoids and Phenolic Acids in Methanolic Extracts, Infusions and Tinctures from Commercial Samples of Lemon Balm.

    PubMed

    Arceusz, Agnieszka; Wesolowski, Marek; Ulewicz-Magulska, Beata

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the levels of flavonoids (rutin, myricetin, quercetin, kaempferol) and phenolic acids (gallic, p-coumaric, rosmarinic, syringic, caffeic, chlorogenic, ellagic, ferulic) in lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) commonly used as a culinary, aromatic and medicinal herb. A rapid and reliable HPLC procedure was developed to determine the phenolic compounds in methanolic extracts, infusions and tinctures prepared from lemon balm. Except for myricetin and quercetin, as well as ellagic, gallic and rosmarinic acids, higher levels of the analytes under study were determined in the methanolic extracts (up to 22 mg/g of dry weight, DW), than in infusions (up to 5 mg/g DW). Tinctures were the poorest in flavonoids and phenolic acids (below 550 μg/g DW), except for ellagic and rosmarinic acids, which were quantified in tinctures at higher levels (mg/g DW). To sum up, the flavonoids were extracted more effectively in the infusions and tinctures than the phenolic acids. Statistically significant correlations were found between phenolic acids, possibly owing to similar biochemical pathways of the compounds. The hierarchical cluster and principal component analyses have also shown that the samples of lemon balm could be differentiated based on the levels of flavonoids and phenolic acids. PMID:26197530

  1. Flavonoids and Phenolic Acids in Methanolic Extracts, Infusions and Tinctures from Commercial Samples of Lemon Balm.

    PubMed

    Arceusz, Agnieszka; Wesolowski, Marek; Ulewicz-Magulska, Beata

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the levels of flavonoids (rutin, myricetin, quercetin, kaempferol) and phenolic acids (gallic, p-coumaric, rosmarinic, syringic, caffeic, chlorogenic, ellagic, ferulic) in lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) commonly used as a culinary, aromatic and medicinal herb. A rapid and reliable HPLC procedure was developed to determine the phenolic compounds in methanolic extracts, infusions and tinctures prepared from lemon balm. Except for myricetin and quercetin, as well as ellagic, gallic and rosmarinic acids, higher levels of the analytes under study were determined in the methanolic extracts (up to 22 mg/g of dry weight, DW), than in infusions (up to 5 mg/g DW). Tinctures were the poorest in flavonoids and phenolic acids (below 550 μg/g DW), except for ellagic and rosmarinic acids, which were quantified in tinctures at higher levels (mg/g DW). To sum up, the flavonoids were extracted more effectively in the infusions and tinctures than the phenolic acids. Statistically significant correlations were found between phenolic acids, possibly owing to similar biochemical pathways of the compounds. The hierarchical cluster and principal component analyses have also shown that the samples of lemon balm could be differentiated based on the levels of flavonoids and phenolic acids.

  2. Lavender, tea tree and lemon oils as antimicrobials in washing liquids and soft body balms.

    PubMed

    Kunicka-Styczyńska, A; Sikora, M; Kalemba, D

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of commercial essential oils: lavender, tea tree and lemon, antimicrobials in washing liquid and O/W soft body balm. The inhibition efficacy of essential oils in washing liquid (1% alone or in mixtures), in soft body balm (0.5% alone), as well as combined with the synthetic preservative DMDM hydantoin and 3-iodo-2-propynyl butyl carbamate mixture (0.1 and 0.3%), was tested against S. aureus ATCC 6538, P. aeruginosa ATCC 9027, Candida sp. ŁOCK 0008 and A. niger ATCC 16404 in compliance with the European Pharmacopoeia standards. The components of the system preserving soft body balm were supplemented with a solubilizer. Washing liquids containing only essential oils met Criterion A E.P. only for S. aureus, Candida sp. and A. niger. In soft body balm formulations, oils at a concentration of 0.5% did not reveal any preserving activity. The introduction of a solubilizer to a system containing 0.5% tea tree oil led to a substantial increase in the bacteriostatic activity of the formulation, but did not significantly affect its fungistatic properties. A combination of 0.5% tea tree oil, 5% solubilizer and 0.3% synthetic preservative ensured the microbiological stability of soft body balm in accordance with Criterion A E.P. PMID:20572887

  3. Lavender, tea tree and lemon oils as antimicrobials in washing liquids and soft body balms.

    PubMed

    Kunicka-Styczyńska, A; Sikora, M; Kalemba, D

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of commercial essential oils: lavender, tea tree and lemon, antimicrobials in washing liquid and O/W soft body balm. The inhibition efficacy of essential oils in washing liquid (1% alone or in mixtures), in soft body balm (0.5% alone), as well as combined with the synthetic preservative DMDM hydantoin and 3-iodo-2-propynyl butyl carbamate mixture (0.1 and 0.3%), was tested against S. aureus ATCC 6538, P. aeruginosa ATCC 9027, Candida sp. ŁOCK 0008 and A. niger ATCC 16404 in compliance with the European Pharmacopoeia standards. The components of the system preserving soft body balm were supplemented with a solubilizer. Washing liquids containing only essential oils met Criterion A E.P. only for S. aureus, Candida sp. and A. niger. In soft body balm formulations, oils at a concentration of 0.5% did not reveal any preserving activity. The introduction of a solubilizer to a system containing 0.5% tea tree oil led to a substantial increase in the bacteriostatic activity of the formulation, but did not significantly affect its fungistatic properties. A combination of 0.5% tea tree oil, 5% solubilizer and 0.3% synthetic preservative ensured the microbiological stability of soft body balm in accordance with Criterion A E.P.

  4. Bioassay-guided fractionation of lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) using an in vitro measure of GABA transaminase activity.

    PubMed

    Awad, Rosalie; Muhammad, Asim; Durst, Tony; Trudeau, Vance L; Arnason, John T

    2009-08-01

    A novel pharmacological mechanism of action for the anxiolytic botanical Melissa officinalis L. (lemon balm) is reported. The methanol extract was identified as a potent in vitro inhibitor of rat brain GABA transaminase (GABA-T), an enzyme target in the therapy of anxiety, epilepsy and related neurological disorders. Bioassay-guided fractionation led to the identification and isolation of rosmarinic acid (RA) and the triterpenoids, ursolic acid (UA) and oleanolic acid (OA) as active principles. Phytochemical characterization of the crude extract determined RA as the major compound responsible for activity (40% inhibition at 100 microg/mL) since it represented approximately 1.5% of the dry mass of the leaves. Synergistic effects may also play a role. PMID:19165747

  5. Bioassay-guided fractionation of lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) using an in vitro measure of GABA transaminase activity.

    PubMed

    Awad, Rosalie; Muhammad, Asim; Durst, Tony; Trudeau, Vance L; Arnason, John T

    2009-08-01

    A novel pharmacological mechanism of action for the anxiolytic botanical Melissa officinalis L. (lemon balm) is reported. The methanol extract was identified as a potent in vitro inhibitor of rat brain GABA transaminase (GABA-T), an enzyme target in the therapy of anxiety, epilepsy and related neurological disorders. Bioassay-guided fractionation led to the identification and isolation of rosmarinic acid (RA) and the triterpenoids, ursolic acid (UA) and oleanolic acid (OA) as active principles. Phytochemical characterization of the crude extract determined RA as the major compound responsible for activity (40% inhibition at 100 microg/mL) since it represented approximately 1.5% of the dry mass of the leaves. Synergistic effects may also play a role.

  6. Variability in the content and composition of essential oil from lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) cultivated in Poland.

    PubMed

    Patora, Jolanta; Majda, Teresa; Góra, Józef; Klimek, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    Essential oil from a few different population of M. officinalis cultivated in Poland has been investigated. The percentage of essential oil ranged from 0.08 to 0.25 ml/100 g in the leaves and from 0.06 to 0.167 ml/100 g in the herb and was higher in the plant material from experimental patch than that from commercial cultivations. Comparative determinations of the essential oil in fresh and dried material showed slightly higher content of the oil in the fresh one. The analysis of the oil composition has been performed by GC and GC/MS. Great differences in the contents of citral, citronellal, linalool, nerol, geraniol beta-caryophyllene and beta-caryophyllene oxide among the populations has been found. Effect of the harvest time, drying and storage on the composition of lemon balm oil has also been studied.

  7. Effect of water supply on growth and polyphenols of lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) and thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Németh-Zámbori, Éva; Pluhár, Zsuzsanna; Szabó, Krisztina; Malekzadeh, Mahmoud; Radácsi, Péter; Inotai, Katalin; Komáromi, Bonifác; Seidler-Lozykowska, Katarzyna

    2016-03-01

    A pot experiment was carried out with lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) and thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.). Different water supply was applied: 25%, 40% and 70% saturation of soil water capacity (SWC). Morphological traits, biomass and phenolic type active ingredients were investigated. Among the two species, main differences were registered in biomass and TPC. Lower SWC resulted in reduced biomass production of lemon balm, while the applied stress treatments did not effect the biomass of thyme. In lemon balm, highest TPC contents were measured in control plants both in shoots and roots but in thyme, the shoots showed a significantly increased TPC at the 25% SWC conditions. Neither the content of total flavonoids nor that of the rosmarinic acid was affected by the treatments. The antioxidant capacity proved to be in tight connection with the TPC in both species (r = 0.766-0.883). The rosmarinic acid content of lemon balm plants contributed to the antioxidant capacity, as well (r = 0.679-0.869).

  8. Effect of water supply on growth and polyphenols of lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) and thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Németh-Zámbori, Éva; Pluhár, Zsuzsanna; Szabó, Krisztina; Malekzadeh, Mahmoud; Radácsi, Péter; Inotai, Katalin; Komáromi, Bonifác; Seidler-Lozykowska, Katarzyna

    2016-03-01

    A pot experiment was carried out with lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) and thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.). Different water supply was applied: 25%, 40% and 70% saturation of soil water capacity (SWC). Morphological traits, biomass and phenolic type active ingredients were investigated. Among the two species, main differences were registered in biomass and TPC. Lower SWC resulted in reduced biomass production of lemon balm, while the applied stress treatments did not effect the biomass of thyme. In lemon balm, highest TPC contents were measured in control plants both in shoots and roots but in thyme, the shoots showed a significantly increased TPC at the 25% SWC conditions. Neither the content of total flavonoids nor that of the rosmarinic acid was affected by the treatments. The antioxidant capacity proved to be in tight connection with the TPC in both species (r = 0.766-0.883). The rosmarinic acid content of lemon balm plants contributed to the antioxidant capacity, as well (r = 0.679-0.869). PMID:26960357

  9. Purification and spectroscopic studies on catechol oxidase from lemon balm (Melissa officinalis).

    PubMed

    Rompel, Annette; Büldt-Karentzopoulos, Klaudia; Molitor, Christian; Krebs, Bernt

    2012-09-01

    A catechol oxidase from lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) moCO which only catalyzes the oxidation of catechols to quinones without hydroxylating tyrosine was purified. The molecular mass of the M. officinalis enzyme of 39,370 Da was obtained by MALDI mass spectrometry and the isoelectric point was determined to be 3.4. Addition of 2 eq. H(2)O(2) to the enzyme leads to oxy catechol oxidase. In the UV/Vis spectrum two new absorption bands occur at 343 nm (ε=8510 M(-1)cm(-1)) and 580 nm (ε=580 M(-1)cm(-1)) due to O(2)(2-)Cu (II) charge transfer transitions in accordance with the oxy forms of other type 3 copper proteins. The N-terminal sequence has been determined by Edman degradation to NPVQAPELDKCGTAT, exhibiting a proline at the second and sixth position conserved in other polyphenol oxidases. PMID:22727580

  10. Purification and spectroscopic studies on catechol oxidase from lemon balm (Melissa officinalis).

    PubMed

    Rompel, Annette; Büldt-Karentzopoulos, Klaudia; Molitor, Christian; Krebs, Bernt

    2012-09-01

    A catechol oxidase from lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) moCO which only catalyzes the oxidation of catechols to quinones without hydroxylating tyrosine was purified. The molecular mass of the M. officinalis enzyme of 39,370 Da was obtained by MALDI mass spectrometry and the isoelectric point was determined to be 3.4. Addition of 2 eq. H(2)O(2) to the enzyme leads to oxy catechol oxidase. In the UV/Vis spectrum two new absorption bands occur at 343 nm (ε=8510 M(-1)cm(-1)) and 580 nm (ε=580 M(-1)cm(-1)) due to O(2)(2-)Cu (II) charge transfer transitions in accordance with the oxy forms of other type 3 copper proteins. The N-terminal sequence has been determined by Edman degradation to NPVQAPELDKCGTAT, exhibiting a proline at the second and sixth position conserved in other polyphenol oxidases.

  11. Investigation of the anxiolytic effects of luteolin, a lemon balm flavonoid in the male Sprague-Dawley rat.

    PubMed

    Raines, Terry; Jones, Paul; Moe, Naomie; Duncan, Robert; McCall, Suzanne; Ceremuga, Thomas E

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the anxiolytic effects of luteolin and its potential interaction with the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptor in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Lemon balm has traditionally been used as an herbal remedy in the treatment of many medical conditions, including anxiety. Luteolin is a major component of the essential oil lemon balm. We divided 55 rats into 5 groups: (1) control (negative control), (2) luteolin, (3) midazolam (positive control), (4) flumazenil and luteolin, and (5) midazolam and luteolin. The behavioral component of anxiety was examined by using the elevated plus-maze (open arm time/total time) and motor movements. Data analyses were performed using a 2-tailed multivariate analysis of variance and Sheffé post hoc test. Our data suggest that luteolin does not produce anxiolysis by modulation of the GABAA receptor; however, luteolin may modulate motor movements and locomotion. PMID:19263826

  12. Investigation of the anxiolytic effects of luteolin, a lemon balm flavonoid in the male Sprague-Dawley rat.

    PubMed

    Raines, Terry; Jones, Paul; Moe, Naomie; Duncan, Robert; McCall, Suzanne; Ceremuga, Thomas E

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the anxiolytic effects of luteolin and its potential interaction with the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptor in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Lemon balm has traditionally been used as an herbal remedy in the treatment of many medical conditions, including anxiety. Luteolin is a major component of the essential oil lemon balm. We divided 55 rats into 5 groups: (1) control (negative control), (2) luteolin, (3) midazolam (positive control), (4) flumazenil and luteolin, and (5) midazolam and luteolin. The behavioral component of anxiety was examined by using the elevated plus-maze (open arm time/total time) and motor movements. Data analyses were performed using a 2-tailed multivariate analysis of variance and Sheffé post hoc test. Our data suggest that luteolin does not produce anxiolysis by modulation of the GABAA receptor; however, luteolin may modulate motor movements and locomotion.

  13. Effect of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi on the Growth and Polyphenol Profile of Marjoram, Lemon Balm, and Marigold.

    PubMed

    Engel, Rita; Szabó, Krisztina; Abrankó, László; Rendes, Kata; Füzy, Anna; Takács, Tünde

    2016-05-18

    The aim of this study is to examine the effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) colonization on biomass, polyphenol profile, and content of economically important herbs. A pot experiment was performed with marjoram, lemon balm, and marigold applying a commercially available AMF mixture for inoculation. Major polyphenols were identified using HPLC-UV-ESI-qTOFMS on the basis of their UV-vis and mass spectral characteristics, and selected ones were quantified. We showed that AMF can provide different services for each herb. Marjoram had the highest level of fungal colonization (82 M%) followed by lemon balm (62 M%) and marigold (17 M%). AMF inoculation significantly increased the biomass of marjoram (1.5-fold), the number of marigold flowers (1.2-fold), and the yield of rosmarinic acid and lithospermic acid isomers of marjoram (1.5-fold) and lemon balm (1.2-fold). Therefore, the quantity and quality of plant material could be improved by the application of optimized AMF inoculum. PMID:27096876

  14. Effect of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi on the Growth and Polyphenol Profile of Marjoram, Lemon Balm, and Marigold.

    PubMed

    Engel, Rita; Szabó, Krisztina; Abrankó, László; Rendes, Kata; Füzy, Anna; Takács, Tünde

    2016-05-18

    The aim of this study is to examine the effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) colonization on biomass, polyphenol profile, and content of economically important herbs. A pot experiment was performed with marjoram, lemon balm, and marigold applying a commercially available AMF mixture for inoculation. Major polyphenols were identified using HPLC-UV-ESI-qTOFMS on the basis of their UV-vis and mass spectral characteristics, and selected ones were quantified. We showed that AMF can provide different services for each herb. Marjoram had the highest level of fungal colonization (82 M%) followed by lemon balm (62 M%) and marigold (17 M%). AMF inoculation significantly increased the biomass of marjoram (1.5-fold), the number of marigold flowers (1.2-fold), and the yield of rosmarinic acid and lithospermic acid isomers of marjoram (1.5-fold) and lemon balm (1.2-fold). Therefore, the quantity and quality of plant material could be improved by the application of optimized AMF inoculum.

  15. Assessment of Lemon Balm (Melissa officinalis L.) Hydrogels: Quality and Bioactivity in Skin Cells.

    PubMed

    Ramanauskienė, Kristina; Stelmakiene, Ada; Majienė, Daiva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to design gels with lemon balm extract, assess their quality, and investigate the effect of rosmarinic acid on skin cells in normal conditions and under oxidative stress. Methods. The quantities of rosmarinic acid (RA) released from gels were evaluated by applying the HPLC technique. HaCaT cell viability was assessed by using the MTT method. ROS generation was measured using DCFH-DA dye. The results showed that the gelling material affected the release of RA content from gels. Lower and slower RA content release was determined in carbomer-based gels. After 6 hours of biopharmaceutical research in vitro, at least 4% of RA was released from the gel. The results of the biological studies on HaCaT cells demonstrated that, in the oxidative stress conditions, RA reduced intracellular ROS amounts to 28%; 0.25-0.5 mg/mL of RA increased cell viability by 10-24% and protected cells from the damage caused by H2O2. Conclusions. According to research results, it is appropriate to use a carbomer as the main gelling material, and its concentration should not exceed 1.0%. RA, depending on the concentration, reduces the amount of intracellular ROS and enhances cell viability in human keratinocytes in oxidative stress conditions. PMID:26600864

  16. Assessment of Lemon Balm (Melissa officinalis L.) Hydrogels: Quality and Bioactivity in Skin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramanauskienė, Kristina; Stelmakiene, Ada; Majienė, Daiva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to design gels with lemon balm extract, assess their quality, and investigate the effect of rosmarinic acid on skin cells in normal conditions and under oxidative stress. Methods. The quantities of rosmarinic acid (RA) released from gels were evaluated by applying the HPLC technique. HaCaT cell viability was assessed by using the MTT method. ROS generation was measured using DCFH-DA dye. The results showed that the gelling material affected the release of RA content from gels. Lower and slower RA content release was determined in carbomer-based gels. After 6 hours of biopharmaceutical research in vitro, at least 4% of RA was released from the gel. The results of the biological studies on HaCaT cells demonstrated that, in the oxidative stress conditions, RA reduced intracellular ROS amounts to 28%; 0.25–0.5 mg/mL of RA increased cell viability by 10–24% and protected cells from the damage caused by H2O2. Conclusions. According to research results, it is appropriate to use a carbomer as the main gelling material, and its concentration should not exceed 1.0%. RA, depending on the concentration, reduces the amount of intracellular ROS and enhances cell viability in human keratinocytes in oxidative stress conditions. PMID:26600864

  17. Assessment of Lemon Balm (Melissa officinalis L.) Hydrogels: Quality and Bioactivity in Skin Cells.

    PubMed

    Ramanauskienė, Kristina; Stelmakiene, Ada; Majienė, Daiva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to design gels with lemon balm extract, assess their quality, and investigate the effect of rosmarinic acid on skin cells in normal conditions and under oxidative stress. Methods. The quantities of rosmarinic acid (RA) released from gels were evaluated by applying the HPLC technique. HaCaT cell viability was assessed by using the MTT method. ROS generation was measured using DCFH-DA dye. The results showed that the gelling material affected the release of RA content from gels. Lower and slower RA content release was determined in carbomer-based gels. After 6 hours of biopharmaceutical research in vitro, at least 4% of RA was released from the gel. The results of the biological studies on HaCaT cells demonstrated that, in the oxidative stress conditions, RA reduced intracellular ROS amounts to 28%; 0.25-0.5 mg/mL of RA increased cell viability by 10-24% and protected cells from the damage caused by H2O2. Conclusions. According to research results, it is appropriate to use a carbomer as the main gelling material, and its concentration should not exceed 1.0%. RA, depending on the concentration, reduces the amount of intracellular ROS and enhances cell viability in human keratinocytes in oxidative stress conditions.

  18. Modulation of mood and cognitive performance following acute administration of Melissa officinalis (lemon balm).

    PubMed

    Kennedy, D O; Scholey, Andrew B; Tildesley, N T J; Perry, E K; Wesnes, K A

    2002-07-01

    Melissa officinalis (lemon balm) is a traditional herbal medicine, which enjoys contemporary usage as a mild sedative, spasmolytic and antibacterial agent. It has been suggested, in light of in vitro cholinergic binding properties, that Melissa extracts may effectively ameliorate the cognitive deficits associated with Alzheimer's disease. To date, no study has investigated the effects on cognition and mood of administration of Melissa to healthy humans. The present randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, balanced-crossover study investigated the acute effects on cognition and mood of a standardised extract of M. officinalis. Twenty healthy, young participants received single doses of 300, 600 and 900 mg of M. officinalis (Pharmaton) or a matching placebo at 7-day intervals. Cognitive performance was assessed using the Cognitive Drug Research (CDR) computerised test battery and two serial subtraction tasks immediately prior to dosing and at 1, 2.5, 4 and 6 h thereafter. In vitro IC(50) concentrations for the displacement of [3H]-(N)-nicotine and [3H]-(N)-scopolamine from nicotinic and muscarinic receptors in human occipital cortex tissue were also calculated. Results, utilising the cognitive factors previously derived from the CDR battery, included a sustained improvement in Accuracy of Attention following 600 mg of Melissa and time- and dose-specific reductions in both Secondary Memory and Working Memory factors. Self-rated "calmness," as assessed by Bond-Lader mood scales, was elevated at the earliest time points by the lowest dose, whilst "alertness" was significantly reduced at all time points following the highest dose. Both nicotinic and muscarinic binding were found to be low in comparison to the levels found in previous studies.

  19. Antioxidant effect of lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) and mate tea (Ilex paraguensys) on quality, lipid peroxidation and DNA oxidation of cryopreserved boar epididymal spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Luño, V; Gil, L; Olaciregui, M; Jerez, R A; de Blas, I; Hozbor, F

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the protective ability of the addition of two antioxidant herb extracts, mate tea and lemon balm, on boar epididymal frozen-thawed spermatozoa quality. Testes from mature boars were collected at local slaughterhouse, and sperm samples from epididymis were recovered by flushing. Spermatozoa were cryopreserved in lactose-egg yolk buffer supplemented with various concentrations of lemon balm and mate tea (0, 2.5, 5 and 10 g l(-1) ) using the straw-freezing procedure. Motion parameters, acrosome and plasma membrane integrity, lipoperoxidation levels and DNA oxidative damage (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine base lesion) were evaluated. There were no differences among experimental groups with regard to motility characteristics, viability, acrosome and plasma membrane integrity; however, the highest concentration of lemon balm produced significant (P < 0.05) improvement in curvilinear trajectory, straightness and amplitude of lateral head displacement after thawing. The supplementation of freezing extender with mate tea and lemon balm reduced sperm lipid membrane peroxidation, and only mate tea protected DNA against oxidative damage during cryopreservation at 120 min post-thawing (P < 0.05). Mate tea experimental extender at concentration of 10 g l(-1) showed the lowest percentage of sperm oxidised DNA and malondialdehyde generation; thus, mate tea is a potential candidate such as antioxidant compound on boar sperm cryopreservation medium. PMID:25382606

  20. Antioxidant effect of lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) and mate tea (Ilex paraguensys) on quality, lipid peroxidation and DNA oxidation of cryopreserved boar epididymal spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Luño, V; Gil, L; Olaciregui, M; Jerez, R A; de Blas, I; Hozbor, F

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the protective ability of the addition of two antioxidant herb extracts, mate tea and lemon balm, on boar epididymal frozen-thawed spermatozoa quality. Testes from mature boars were collected at local slaughterhouse, and sperm samples from epididymis were recovered by flushing. Spermatozoa were cryopreserved in lactose-egg yolk buffer supplemented with various concentrations of lemon balm and mate tea (0, 2.5, 5 and 10 g l(-1) ) using the straw-freezing procedure. Motion parameters, acrosome and plasma membrane integrity, lipoperoxidation levels and DNA oxidative damage (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine base lesion) were evaluated. There were no differences among experimental groups with regard to motility characteristics, viability, acrosome and plasma membrane integrity; however, the highest concentration of lemon balm produced significant (P < 0.05) improvement in curvilinear trajectory, straightness and amplitude of lateral head displacement after thawing. The supplementation of freezing extender with mate tea and lemon balm reduced sperm lipid membrane peroxidation, and only mate tea protected DNA against oxidative damage during cryopreservation at 120 min post-thawing (P < 0.05). Mate tea experimental extender at concentration of 10 g l(-1) showed the lowest percentage of sperm oxidised DNA and malondialdehyde generation; thus, mate tea is a potential candidate such as antioxidant compound on boar sperm cryopreservation medium.

  1. Chestnut and lemon balm based ingredients as natural preserving agents of the nutritional profile in matured "Serra da Estrela" cheese.

    PubMed

    Carocho, Márcio; Barreira, João C M; Bento, Albino; Fernández-Ruiz, Virginia; Morales, Patricia; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2016-08-01

    Chestnut flowers, lemon balm plants and their decoctions were incorporated into "Serra da Estrela" cheese, to assess their potential to preserve its nutritional properties and provide new foodstuffs. The analyses were carried out after the normal ripening period of 1month and after 6months of storage. The most abundant nutrients were proteins and fats. The most abundant minerals were Ca and Na, while C16:0 and C18:1 were the main fatty acids. Saturated fatty acids were the most abundant, followed by the monounsaturated. Moisture seemed to be lower in the samples with the plants incorporated. The dried plants, when incorporated, seemed to be more efficient as preservers then the decoctions, although these better preserved the proteins. These plants can be regarded as promising natural preservers in foodstuffs cheese, given the preservation of key parameters and the slight impact on the nutritional value. PMID:26988492

  2. Antioxidant capacity and total phenolic contents of oregano (Origanum vulgare), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) and lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) from Romania.

    PubMed

    Spiridon, Iuliana; Colceru, Svetlana; Anghel, Narcis; Teaca, Carmen Alice; Bodirlau, Ruxanda; Armatu, Alice

    2011-10-01

    The study reported here presents a comparative screening of three medicinal plants including oregano (Origanum vulgare L.), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) and lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) having the same geographical origin, the Southeast region of Romania, and growing in the same natural conditions. The contents of total phenolics and total flavonoids for the extracts of these were determined. Furthermore, the total antioxidant capacity was also evaluated. It was found that Origanum vulgare and Melissa officinalis extracts present the most effective antioxidant capacity in scavenging DPPH radicals, while Lavandula angustifolia is less active. High performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis was used to identify the components of extracts. Major phenolic acids identified in the analysed species were ferulic, rosmarinic, p-coumaric and caffeic, while predominant flavonoids were quercetin, apigenin kaempherol, which were present as glucosides. PMID:21707233

  3. Antioxidant capacity and total phenolic contents of oregano (Origanum vulgare), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) and lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) from Romania.

    PubMed

    Spiridon, Iuliana; Colceru, Svetlana; Anghel, Narcis; Teaca, Carmen Alice; Bodirlau, Ruxanda; Armatu, Alice

    2011-10-01

    The study reported here presents a comparative screening of three medicinal plants including oregano (Origanum vulgare L.), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) and lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) having the same geographical origin, the Southeast region of Romania, and growing in the same natural conditions. The contents of total phenolics and total flavonoids for the extracts of these were determined. Furthermore, the total antioxidant capacity was also evaluated. It was found that Origanum vulgare and Melissa officinalis extracts present the most effective antioxidant capacity in scavenging DPPH radicals, while Lavandula angustifolia is less active. High performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis was used to identify the components of extracts. Major phenolic acids identified in the analysed species were ferulic, rosmarinic, p-coumaric and caffeic, while predominant flavonoids were quercetin, apigenin kaempherol, which were present as glucosides.

  4. Chestnut and lemon balm based ingredients as natural preserving agents of the nutritional profile in matured "Serra da Estrela" cheese.

    PubMed

    Carocho, Márcio; Barreira, João C M; Bento, Albino; Fernández-Ruiz, Virginia; Morales, Patricia; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2016-08-01

    Chestnut flowers, lemon balm plants and their decoctions were incorporated into "Serra da Estrela" cheese, to assess their potential to preserve its nutritional properties and provide new foodstuffs. The analyses were carried out after the normal ripening period of 1month and after 6months of storage. The most abundant nutrients were proteins and fats. The most abundant minerals were Ca and Na, while C16:0 and C18:1 were the main fatty acids. Saturated fatty acids were the most abundant, followed by the monounsaturated. Moisture seemed to be lower in the samples with the plants incorporated. The dried plants, when incorporated, seemed to be more efficient as preservers then the decoctions, although these better preserved the proteins. These plants can be regarded as promising natural preservers in foodstuffs cheese, given the preservation of key parameters and the slight impact on the nutritional value.

  5. Feeding deterrence and inhibitory effects of bee balm (Monarda didyma) leaves on fall armyworm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fall armyworm [Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith)] is a serious pest of many field and horticulture crops. Because of the many advantages for the use of plant-derived pesticides, we tested whether bee balm (Monarda didyma L.) leaves could have feeding deterrence on fall armyworm. When S. frugipe...

  6. A combination of valerian and lemon balm is effective in the treatment of restlessness and dyssomnia in children.

    PubMed

    Müller, S F; Klement, S

    2006-06-01

    Efficacy and tolerability of a combined valerian/lemon balm preparation were investigated in an open, multicentre study in children less than 12 years suffering from restlessness and nervous dyskoimesis. Patients were dosed individually by the investigators. In total, 918 children were evaluated for therapeutic efficacy and tolerability. A distinct and convincing reduction in severity was found for all symptoms in the investigators' and parents' ratings. The core symptoms dyssomnia and restlessness were reduced from "moderate/severe" to "mild" or "absent" in most of the patients. In total, 80.9% of the patients who suffered from dyssomnia experienced an improvement for this symptom and 70.4% of the patients with restlessness improved clearly. For the other listed symptoms the total improvement was 37.8% on average. Both, parents and investigators assessed efficacy as to be "very good" or "good" (60.5% and 67.7%, respectively). The tolerability of Euvegal forte was considered as "good" (in 96.7% of the patients it was judged to be "very good" or "good"). No study medication-related adverse events occurred. In conclusion, Euvegal forte was effective in the treatment of younger children with restlessness and dyssomnia and it was very well tolerated.

  7. Effects of Melissa officinalis L. (lemon balm) extract on neurogenesis associated with serum corticosterone and GABA in the mouse dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Dae Young; Choi, Jung Hoon; Kim, Woosuk; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Lee, Choong Hyun; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Won, Moo-Ho; Hwang, In Koo

    2011-02-01

    Lemon balm, leaves of Melissa officinalis L., has been used for anti-anxiety and spasmolytics. We observed the extract of Melissa officinalis L. (MOE) on cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) of middle-aged mice (12 months of age) using Ki67 and doublecortin (DCX), respectively. We also observed changes in corticosterone, GAD67 and GABA-transaminase (GABA-T) to check their possible mechanisms related to neurogenesis. We administered 50 or 200 mg/kg MOE to the animals once a day for 3 weeks. For labeling of newly generated cells, we also administered 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) twice a day for 3 days from the day of the first MOE treatment. Administration of 50 or 200 mg/kg MOE dose-dependently increased Ki67 positive nuclei to 244.1 and 763.9% of the vehicle-treated group, respectively. In addition, 50 or 200 mg/kg MOE significantly increased DCX positive neuroblasts with well-developed (tertiary) dendrites. Furthermore, MOE administration significantly increased BrdU/calbindin D-28 k double labeled cells (integrated neurons into granule cells in the DG) to 245.2% of the vehicle-treated group. On the other hand, administration of MOE reduced corticosterone levels in serum and decreased GABA-T levels in the DG homogenates. These results suggest that MOE increases cell proliferation, neuroblast differentiation and integration into granule cells by decreasing serum corticosterone levels as well as by increasing GABA levels in the mouse DG. PMID:21076869

  8. Effects of Melissa officinalis L. (lemon balm) extract on neurogenesis associated with serum corticosterone and GABA in the mouse dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Dae Young; Choi, Jung Hoon; Kim, Woosuk; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Lee, Choong Hyun; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Won, Moo-Ho; Hwang, In Koo

    2011-02-01

    Lemon balm, leaves of Melissa officinalis L., has been used for anti-anxiety and spasmolytics. We observed the extract of Melissa officinalis L. (MOE) on cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) of middle-aged mice (12 months of age) using Ki67 and doublecortin (DCX), respectively. We also observed changes in corticosterone, GAD67 and GABA-transaminase (GABA-T) to check their possible mechanisms related to neurogenesis. We administered 50 or 200 mg/kg MOE to the animals once a day for 3 weeks. For labeling of newly generated cells, we also administered 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) twice a day for 3 days from the day of the first MOE treatment. Administration of 50 or 200 mg/kg MOE dose-dependently increased Ki67 positive nuclei to 244.1 and 763.9% of the vehicle-treated group, respectively. In addition, 50 or 200 mg/kg MOE significantly increased DCX positive neuroblasts with well-developed (tertiary) dendrites. Furthermore, MOE administration significantly increased BrdU/calbindin D-28 k double labeled cells (integrated neurons into granule cells in the DG) to 245.2% of the vehicle-treated group. On the other hand, administration of MOE reduced corticosterone levels in serum and decreased GABA-T levels in the DG homogenates. These results suggest that MOE increases cell proliferation, neuroblast differentiation and integration into granule cells by decreasing serum corticosterone levels as well as by increasing GABA levels in the mouse DG.

  9. The effect of supplementation of clove and agrimony or clove and lemon balm on growth performance, antioxidant status and selected indices of lipid profile of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, V; Marcincak, S; Popelka, P; Simkova, J; Martonova, M; Buleca, J; Marcincakova, D; Tuckova, M; Molnar, L; Kovac, G

    2012-12-01

    The study investigated the effects of diet supplementation with 1% clove flower buds powder combined with either 0.2% lemon balm extract or 0.2% agrimony extract (each of the two pulverized extracts supplied through drinking water) on body weight of broilers, total feed intake, feed conversion ratio and the carcass yield, activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px, EC 1.11.1.9) in blood, concentration of sulfhydryl (-SH) groups, malondialdehyde (MDA), vitamin A and E, low-density lipoproteins in the blood plasma, serum cholesterol, total lipids, triglycerides and high-density lipoproteins in broiler chickens at 42 days of age. On the day of hatching, 120 male and female broilers of Cobb 500 were randomly divided into three groups. The control group (1st group) of broilers received a basal diet (BD) without any feed and water additive. Both experimental groups of chicks were fed BD enriched with clove (Syzygium aromaticum L.) powder at a dose of 10 g/kg DM for 42 days. Moreover, either lemon balm (Mellisa officinalis L.) extract or agrimony (Agrimonia eupatoria L.) extract diluted with drinking water (2:1000) was given to broilers in the 2nd and 3rd group respectively. The results indicated that feeding the diets enriched with selected herbal supplements failed to affect the growth performance of broiler chickens at 42 days of age. In addition, this supplementation had no influence on the activities of SOD and GSH-Px, concentration of vitamin A and selected lipid metabolism indices. On the other hand, we observed beneficial effects on some indices of the antioxidant status (increased concentration of -SH groups and vitamin E, decreased concentration of MDA) in the blood of broilers in both experimental groups in comparison with the control group of chickens (p < 0.05). Furthermore, a slightly better antioxidant capacity was found in the blood of broilers supplied the combination of clove and lemon balm compared

  10. The effect of supplementation of clove and agrimony or clove and lemon balm on growth performance, antioxidant status and selected indices of lipid profile of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, V; Marcincak, S; Popelka, P; Simkova, J; Martonova, M; Buleca, J; Marcincakova, D; Tuckova, M; Molnar, L; Kovac, G

    2012-12-01

    The study investigated the effects of diet supplementation with 1% clove flower buds powder combined with either 0.2% lemon balm extract or 0.2% agrimony extract (each of the two pulverized extracts supplied through drinking water) on body weight of broilers, total feed intake, feed conversion ratio and the carcass yield, activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px, EC 1.11.1.9) in blood, concentration of sulfhydryl (-SH) groups, malondialdehyde (MDA), vitamin A and E, low-density lipoproteins in the blood plasma, serum cholesterol, total lipids, triglycerides and high-density lipoproteins in broiler chickens at 42 days of age. On the day of hatching, 120 male and female broilers of Cobb 500 were randomly divided into three groups. The control group (1st group) of broilers received a basal diet (BD) without any feed and water additive. Both experimental groups of chicks were fed BD enriched with clove (Syzygium aromaticum L.) powder at a dose of 10 g/kg DM for 42 days. Moreover, either lemon balm (Mellisa officinalis L.) extract or agrimony (Agrimonia eupatoria L.) extract diluted with drinking water (2:1000) was given to broilers in the 2nd and 3rd group respectively. The results indicated that feeding the diets enriched with selected herbal supplements failed to affect the growth performance of broiler chickens at 42 days of age. In addition, this supplementation had no influence on the activities of SOD and GSH-Px, concentration of vitamin A and selected lipid metabolism indices. On the other hand, we observed beneficial effects on some indices of the antioxidant status (increased concentration of -SH groups and vitamin E, decreased concentration of MDA) in the blood of broilers in both experimental groups in comparison with the control group of chickens (p < 0.05). Furthermore, a slightly better antioxidant capacity was found in the blood of broilers supplied the combination of clove and lemon balm compared

  11. Effects of lozenge containing lavender oil, extracts from hops, lemon balm and oat on electrical brain activity of volunteers.

    PubMed

    Dimpfel, W; Pischel, I; Lehnfeld, R

    2004-09-29

    Within a randomized double blind, placebo controlled trial the electrical activity of the human brain has been monitored using charge mode technology (Laplacian estimates) after exposure to a lozenge containing 4 different herbal preparations (lavender oil, extracts from hops, lemon balm and oat) or a matching placebo without any active ingredients. Sixteen healthy volunteers (8 males and 8 females) were tested within a crossover design. After baseline recording each subject sucked a lozenge and 2 hours later a second one. Recording was performed immediately after finishing the lozenge and in hourly intervals thereafter. Comparison to reference periods of 10 min eyes open and 5 min eyes closed, respectively, revealed increases in alpha 1, alpha 2 and beta 1 electrical power at the electrode positions Cz, P3, T3 and T5 which were even more pronounced after a second application two hours later. Since alpha 1 changes repeatedly have been attributed to attentional states, increases of this electrical activity must be seen as indicator of a relaxational psychophysiological state. Changes in the alpha2 frequencies have been related to working memory indicating that an increase can be seen as a correlate for attenuating this circuit. Increases of beta1 activity have been seen in the presence of anxiolytic drugs including major and minor tranquilizers. The changes as observed after the application of this herbal composition are therefore in line with the idea of having induced a state of relaxation and regeneration. This interpretation suggests that one could expect from the ingestion of this lozenge to better cope with psychological and emotional stress. The data are further proof that recording computer aided quantitative EEG is a very fruitful and promising approach in psychophysiology.

  12. Effects of lozenge containing lavender oil, extracts from hops, lemon balm and oat on electrical brain activity of volunteers.

    PubMed

    Dimpfel, W; Pischel, I; Lehnfeld, R

    2004-09-29

    Within a randomized double blind, placebo controlled trial the electrical activity of the human brain has been monitored using charge mode technology (Laplacian estimates) after exposure to a lozenge containing 4 different herbal preparations (lavender oil, extracts from hops, lemon balm and oat) or a matching placebo without any active ingredients. Sixteen healthy volunteers (8 males and 8 females) were tested within a crossover design. After baseline recording each subject sucked a lozenge and 2 hours later a second one. Recording was performed immediately after finishing the lozenge and in hourly intervals thereafter. Comparison to reference periods of 10 min eyes open and 5 min eyes closed, respectively, revealed increases in alpha 1, alpha 2 and beta 1 electrical power at the electrode positions Cz, P3, T3 and T5 which were even more pronounced after a second application two hours later. Since alpha 1 changes repeatedly have been attributed to attentional states, increases of this electrical activity must be seen as indicator of a relaxational psychophysiological state. Changes in the alpha2 frequencies have been related to working memory indicating that an increase can be seen as a correlate for attenuating this circuit. Increases of beta1 activity have been seen in the presence of anxiolytic drugs including major and minor tranquilizers. The changes as observed after the application of this herbal composition are therefore in line with the idea of having induced a state of relaxation and regeneration. This interpretation suggests that one could expect from the ingestion of this lozenge to better cope with psychological and emotional stress. The data are further proof that recording computer aided quantitative EEG is a very fruitful and promising approach in psychophysiology. PMID:15546807

  13. Negative Chronotropic and Antidysrhythmic Effects of Hydroalcoholic Extract of Lemon Balm (Melissa Officinalis L.) on CaCl2-Induced Arrhythmias in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Akhondali, Zahra; Dianat*, Mahin; Radan, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background: In many cases, myocardial infarction leads to arrhythmia. Since antioxidant agents have an important protective role in heart disease, these compounds in medicinal plants are used in traditional medicine. Lemon balm extract, compared to other plants of the lamiaceae family, has been proven to have significant amounts of antioxidant compounds. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of the hydroalcoholic extract of lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) on CaCl2-induced arrhythmias in rats. Methods: This research is an experimental study; male adult Sprague Dawley rats that weighed 200-250 g were divided randomly into three groups, i.e., 1) control (normal saline, 1 ml/kg/day), 2) extract (100 mg/kg), and 3) extract (200 mg/kg). The normal saline and the extracts were gavaged for 14 consecutive days. After anesthesia, lead II electrocardiograms were recorded for calculating the rats’ heart rates (HRs). Arrhythmia was induced by intravenous injection of CaCl2 solution (140 mg/kg), and the percentages of incidence of ventricular tachycardia (VT), ventricular fibrillation (VF), and ventricular premature beats (VPB) were recorded. The results were analyzed by using Fisher’s exact test and one-way ANOVA. P-values less than 0.05 were considered as significant level. Results: Heart rates and percentages of incidence of VPB, VT, and VF were reduced significantly in extract groups (with the highest activity at 200 mg/kg) in comparison with the control group. Conclusion: Melissa officinalis was considered to be an antiarrhythmic agent because it reduced the percentage of incidence of VPB, VT, and VF in the groups that received it. The results indicated that Melissa officinalis had a protective effect on the heart. PMID:26052407

  14. Anti-diabetic effects of lemon balm ( Melissa officinalis) essential oil on glucose- and lipid-regulating enzymes in type 2 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Chung, Mi Ja; Cho, Sung-Yun; Bhuiyan, Muhammad Javidul Haque; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Lee, Sung-Joon

    2010-07-01

    The antioxidant activity of lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) essential oil (LBEO) on 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals and its hypoglycaemic effect in db/db mice were investigated. LBEO scavenged 97 % of DPPH radicals at a 270-fold dilution. Mice administered LBEO (0.015 mg/d) for 6 weeks showed significantly reduced blood glucose (65 %; P < 0.05) and TAG concentrations, improved glucose tolerance, as assessed by an oral glucose tolerance test, and significantly higher serum insulin levels, compared with the control group. The hypoglycaemic mechanism of LBEO was further explored via gene and protein expression analyses using RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Among all glucose metabolism-related genes studied, hepatic glucokinase and GLUT4, as well as adipocyte GLUT4, PPAR-gamma, PPAR-alpha and SREBP-1c expression, were significantly up-regulated, whereas glucose-6-phosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase expression was down-regulated in the livers of the LBEO group. The results further suggest that LBEO administered at low concentrations is an efficient hypoglycaemic agent, probably due to enhanced glucose uptake and metabolism in the liver and adipose tissue and the inhibition of gluconeogenesis in the liver. PMID:20487577

  15. Anti-diabetic effects of lemon balm ( Melissa officinalis) essential oil on glucose- and lipid-regulating enzymes in type 2 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Chung, Mi Ja; Cho, Sung-Yun; Bhuiyan, Muhammad Javidul Haque; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Lee, Sung-Joon

    2010-07-01

    The antioxidant activity of lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) essential oil (LBEO) on 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals and its hypoglycaemic effect in db/db mice were investigated. LBEO scavenged 97 % of DPPH radicals at a 270-fold dilution. Mice administered LBEO (0.015 mg/d) for 6 weeks showed significantly reduced blood glucose (65 %; P < 0.05) and TAG concentrations, improved glucose tolerance, as assessed by an oral glucose tolerance test, and significantly higher serum insulin levels, compared with the control group. The hypoglycaemic mechanism of LBEO was further explored via gene and protein expression analyses using RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Among all glucose metabolism-related genes studied, hepatic glucokinase and GLUT4, as well as adipocyte GLUT4, PPAR-gamma, PPAR-alpha and SREBP-1c expression, were significantly up-regulated, whereas glucose-6-phosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase expression was down-regulated in the livers of the LBEO group. The results further suggest that LBEO administered at low concentrations is an efficient hypoglycaemic agent, probably due to enhanced glucose uptake and metabolism in the liver and adipose tissue and the inhibition of gluconeogenesis in the liver.

  16. [Olfactory influences on the perceived effects of lip balm].

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Fumitoshi; Akita, Yoshika; Abe, Tsuneyuki

    2013-12-01

    This study examined the influence of olfactory impressions on the perceived effects of lip balm. Twenty female college students used two types of lip balm: one with natural essences (lemon or vanilla) and one without. Then they rated their perceived experience of the balms. The results showed that the participants felt that the balm with lemon essence was significantly smoother than the ones with vanilla or without natural essences. Furthermore, the participants felt that the balm with vanilla essence was significantly stickier than the ones with lemon or without natural essences. Also, the participants felt that the balm with lemon essence had marginally better moisturizing properties than the one with vanilla. These results suggest that olfactory cognition influences the perception of tactile sensations. PMID:24505978

  17. [Olfactory influences on the perceived effects of lip balm].

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Fumitoshi; Akita, Yoshika; Abe, Tsuneyuki

    2013-12-01

    This study examined the influence of olfactory impressions on the perceived effects of lip balm. Twenty female college students used two types of lip balm: one with natural essences (lemon or vanilla) and one without. Then they rated their perceived experience of the balms. The results showed that the participants felt that the balm with lemon essence was significantly smoother than the ones with vanilla or without natural essences. Furthermore, the participants felt that the balm with vanilla essence was significantly stickier than the ones with lemon or without natural essences. Also, the participants felt that the balm with lemon essence had marginally better moisturizing properties than the one with vanilla. These results suggest that olfactory cognition influences the perception of tactile sensations.

  18. Modulation of mood and cognitive performance following acute administration of single doses of Melissa officinalis (Lemon balm) with human CNS nicotinic and muscarinic receptor-binding properties.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, D O; Wake, G; Savelev, S; Tildesley, N T J; Perry, E K; Wesnes, K A; Scholey, A B

    2003-10-01

    Melissa officinalis (Lemon balm) is a herbal medicine that has traditionally been attributed with memory-enhancing properties, but which is currently more widely used as a mild sedative and sleep aid. In a previous study it was demonstrated that a commercial Melissa extract led to dose-specific increases in calmness, and dose-dependent decrements in timed memory task performance. However, the extract utilized in that study did not exhibit in vitro cholinergic receptor-binding properties. The current study involved an initial screening of samples of M. officinalis for human acetylcholinesterase inhibition and cholinergic receptor-binding properties. The cognitive and mood effects of single doses of the most cholinergically active dried leaf were then assessed in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, balanced crossover study. Following the in vitro analysis, 20 healthy, young participants received single doses of 600, 1000, and 1600 mg of encapsulated dried leaf, or a matching placebo, at 7-day intervals. Cognitive performance and mood were assessed predose and at 1, 3, and 6 h postdose using the Cognitive Drug Research computerized assessment battery and Bond-Lader visual analog scales, respectively. In vitro analysis of the chosen extract established IC(50) concentrations of 0.18 and 3.47 mg ml(-1), respectively, for the displacement of [(3)H]-(N)-nicotine and [(3)H]-(N)-scopolamine from nicotinic and muscarinic receptors in the human cerebral cortex tissue. However, no cholinesterase inhibitory properties were detected. The most notable cognitive and mood effects were improved memory performance and increased 'calmness' at all postdose time points for the highest (1600 mg) dose. However, while the profile of results was overwhelmingly favorable for the highest dose, decrements in the speed of timed memory task performance and on a rapid visual information-processing task increased with decreasing dose. These results suggest that doses of Melissa

  19. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using lemon leaves extract and its application for antimicrobial finish on fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vankar, Padma S.; Shukla, Dhara

    2012-06-01

    Preparation of silver nanoparticles have been carried out using aqueous extract of lemon leaves ( Citrus limon) which acts as reducing agent and encapsulating cage for the silver nanoparticles. These silver nanoparticles have been used for durable textile finish on cotton and silk fabrics. Remarkable antifungal activity has been observed in the treated fabrics. The antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles derived from lemon leaves showed enhancement in activity due to synergistic effect of silver and essential oil components of lemon leaves. The present investigation shows the extracellular synthesis of highly stable silver nanoparticles by biotransformation using the extract of lemon leaves by controlled reduction of the Ag+ ion to Ag0. Further the silver nanoparticles were used for antifungal treatment of fabrics which was tested by antifungal activity assessment of textile material by Agar diffusion method against Fusarium oxysporum and Alternaria brassicicola. Formation of the metallic nanoparticles was established by FT-IR, UV-Visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy.

  20. Mechanisms involved in the antinociception caused by ethanolic extract obtained from the leaves of Melissa officinalis (lemon balm) in mice.

    PubMed

    Guginski, Giselle; Luiz, Ana Paula; Silva, Morgana Duarte; Massaro, Murilo; Martins, Daniel Fernandes; Chaves, Juliana; Mattos, Robson Willain; Silveira, Damaris; Ferreira, Vânia M M; Calixto, João Batista; Santos, Adair R S

    2009-07-01

    The present study examined the antinociceptive effect of the ethanolic extract from Melissa officinalis L. and of the rosmarinic acid in chemical behavioral models of nociception and investigates some of the mechanisms underlying this effect. The extract (3-1000 mg/kg), given orally (p.o.) 1 h prior to testing, produced dose-dependent inhibition of acetic acid-induced visceral pain, with ID50 value of 241.9 mg/kg. In the formalin test, the extract (30-1000 mg/kg, p.o.) also caused significant inhibition of both, the early (neurogenic pain) and the late (inflammatory pain), phases of formalin-induced licking. The extract (10-1000 mg/kg, p.o.) also caused significant and dose-dependent inhibition of glutamate-induced pain, with ID50 value of 198.5 mg/kg. Furthermore, the rosmarinic acid (0.3-3 mg/kg), given p.o. 1 h prior, produced dose-related inhibition of glutamate-induced pain, with ID50 value of 2.64 mg/kg. The antinociception caused by the extract (100 mg/kg, p.o.) in the glutamate test was significantly attenuated by intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment of mice with atropine (1 mg/kg), mecamylamine (2 mg/kg) or l-arginine (40 mg/kg). In contrast, the extract (100 mg/kg, p.o.) antinociception was not affected by i.p. treatment with naloxone (1 mg/kg) or D-arginine (40 mg/kg). It was also not associated with non-specific effects, such as muscle relaxation or sedation. Collectively, the present results suggest that the extract produced dose-related antinociception in several models of chemical pain through mechanisms that involved cholinergic systems (i.e. through muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors) and the L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway. In addition, the rosmarinic acid contained in this plant appears to contribute for the antinociceptive property of the extract. Moreover, the antinociceptive action demonstrated in the present study supports, at least partly, the ethnomedical uses of this plant. PMID:19358864

  1. Mechanisms involved in the antinociception caused by ethanolic extract obtained from the leaves of Melissa officinalis (lemon balm) in mice.

    PubMed

    Guginski, Giselle; Luiz, Ana Paula; Silva, Morgana Duarte; Massaro, Murilo; Martins, Daniel Fernandes; Chaves, Juliana; Mattos, Robson Willain; Silveira, Damaris; Ferreira, Vânia M M; Calixto, João Batista; Santos, Adair R S

    2009-07-01

    The present study examined the antinociceptive effect of the ethanolic extract from Melissa officinalis L. and of the rosmarinic acid in chemical behavioral models of nociception and investigates some of the mechanisms underlying this effect. The extract (3-1000 mg/kg), given orally (p.o.) 1 h prior to testing, produced dose-dependent inhibition of acetic acid-induced visceral pain, with ID50 value of 241.9 mg/kg. In the formalin test, the extract (30-1000 mg/kg, p.o.) also caused significant inhibition of both, the early (neurogenic pain) and the late (inflammatory pain), phases of formalin-induced licking. The extract (10-1000 mg/kg, p.o.) also caused significant and dose-dependent inhibition of glutamate-induced pain, with ID50 value of 198.5 mg/kg. Furthermore, the rosmarinic acid (0.3-3 mg/kg), given p.o. 1 h prior, produced dose-related inhibition of glutamate-induced pain, with ID50 value of 2.64 mg/kg. The antinociception caused by the extract (100 mg/kg, p.o.) in the glutamate test was significantly attenuated by intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment of mice with atropine (1 mg/kg), mecamylamine (2 mg/kg) or l-arginine (40 mg/kg). In contrast, the extract (100 mg/kg, p.o.) antinociception was not affected by i.p. treatment with naloxone (1 mg/kg) or D-arginine (40 mg/kg). It was also not associated with non-specific effects, such as muscle relaxation or sedation. Collectively, the present results suggest that the extract produced dose-related antinociception in several models of chemical pain through mechanisms that involved cholinergic systems (i.e. through muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors) and the L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway. In addition, the rosmarinic acid contained in this plant appears to contribute for the antinociceptive property of the extract. Moreover, the antinociceptive action demonstrated in the present study supports, at least partly, the ethnomedical uses of this plant.

  2. Fumigant toxicity of summer savory and lemon balm oil constituents and efficacy of spray formulations containing the oils to B- and neonicotinoid-resistant Q-biotypes of Bemisia tabaci (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae).

    PubMed

    Chae, Song-Hwa; Kim, Soon-Il; Yeon, Seong Hum; Perumalsamy, Haribalan; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2014-02-01

    An assessment was made of the fumigant toxicity of 36 constituents from lemon balm oil (LBO) and summer savory oil (SSO) and another additional nine previously identified compounds of the oils, as well as of the control efficacy of four experimental spray formulations containing individual oils (0.5 and 0.1% sprays) and spinosad 10% suspension concentrate (SC) to females from B- and neonicotinoid-resistant Q-biotypes of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae). Based on 24-h LC50 values, Q-biotype females (0.20 microg/cm3) were 40 times less susceptible to dichlorvos than B-biotype females (0.005 microg/cm3). Thymol (LC50, 0.35 microg/cm3) and carvacrol (0.56 microg/cm3) were the most toxic compounds toward Q-biotype females, followed by (1S)-(-)-borneol, alpha-terpineol, nerol, linalool, and carvone (1.06-1.38 microg/cm3). The toxicity of these compounds was virtually identical toward both biotype females, indicating that the terpenoids and the insecticides (neonicotinoids and dichlorvos) do not share a common mode of action or elicit cross-resistance. The 0.5% spray of LBO, SSO, and spinosad 10% SC resulted in >90% mortality toward both biotype females. Global efforts to reduce the level of toxic synthetic insecticides in the agricultural environment justify further studies on LBO- and SSO-derived materials as potential contact-action fumigants for the control of B. tabaci populations. PMID:24665712

  3. Fumigant toxicity of summer savory and lemon balm oil constituents and efficacy of spray formulations containing the oils to B- and neonicotinoid-resistant Q-biotypes of Bemisia tabaci (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae).

    PubMed

    Chae, Song-Hwa; Kim, Soon-Il; Yeon, Seong Hum; Perumalsamy, Haribalan; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2014-02-01

    An assessment was made of the fumigant toxicity of 36 constituents from lemon balm oil (LBO) and summer savory oil (SSO) and another additional nine previously identified compounds of the oils, as well as of the control efficacy of four experimental spray formulations containing individual oils (0.5 and 0.1% sprays) and spinosad 10% suspension concentrate (SC) to females from B- and neonicotinoid-resistant Q-biotypes of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae). Based on 24-h LC50 values, Q-biotype females (0.20 microg/cm3) were 40 times less susceptible to dichlorvos than B-biotype females (0.005 microg/cm3). Thymol (LC50, 0.35 microg/cm3) and carvacrol (0.56 microg/cm3) were the most toxic compounds toward Q-biotype females, followed by (1S)-(-)-borneol, alpha-terpineol, nerol, linalool, and carvone (1.06-1.38 microg/cm3). The toxicity of these compounds was virtually identical toward both biotype females, indicating that the terpenoids and the insecticides (neonicotinoids and dichlorvos) do not share a common mode of action or elicit cross-resistance. The 0.5% spray of LBO, SSO, and spinosad 10% SC resulted in >90% mortality toward both biotype females. Global efforts to reduce the level of toxic synthetic insecticides in the agricultural environment justify further studies on LBO- and SSO-derived materials as potential contact-action fumigants for the control of B. tabaci populations.

  4. Volatile constituents of Melissa officinalis leaves determined by plant age.

    PubMed

    Nurzyńska-Wierdak, Renata; Bogucka-Kocka, Anna; Szymczak, Grazyna

    2014-05-01

    The present study investigated changes in the content and chemical composition of the essential oil extracted by hydrodistillation from air-dried Melissa officinalis L. (lemon balm) leaves in the first and second year of plant growth. The lemon balm oil was analysed by GC-MS and GC-FID. The presence of 106 compounds, representing 100% of the oil constituents, was determined in the oil. The predominant components were geranial (45.2% and 45.1%) and neral (32.8% and 33.8%); their proportions in the examined samples of the oil obtained from one- and two-year-old plants were comparable. However, the age of lemon balm plants affected the concentration of other constituents and the proportions of the following compounds were subject to especially high fluctuations: citronellal (8.7% and 0.4%), geraniol (trace amounts and 0.6%), and geranyl acetate (0.5% and 3.0%), as well as, among others, isogeranial, E-caryophyllene, caryophyllene oxide, germacrene D, and carvacrol. The essential oil of two-year-old plants was characterized by a richer chemical composition than the oil from younger plants. PMID:25026727

  5. Volatile constituents of Melissa officinalis leaves determined by plant age.

    PubMed

    Nurzyńska-Wierdak, Renata; Bogucka-Kocka, Anna; Szymczak, Grazyna

    2014-05-01

    The present study investigated changes in the content and chemical composition of the essential oil extracted by hydrodistillation from air-dried Melissa officinalis L. (lemon balm) leaves in the first and second year of plant growth. The lemon balm oil was analysed by GC-MS and GC-FID. The presence of 106 compounds, representing 100% of the oil constituents, was determined in the oil. The predominant components were geranial (45.2% and 45.1%) and neral (32.8% and 33.8%); their proportions in the examined samples of the oil obtained from one- and two-year-old plants were comparable. However, the age of lemon balm plants affected the concentration of other constituents and the proportions of the following compounds were subject to especially high fluctuations: citronellal (8.7% and 0.4%), geraniol (trace amounts and 0.6%), and geranyl acetate (0.5% and 3.0%), as well as, among others, isogeranial, E-caryophyllene, caryophyllene oxide, germacrene D, and carvacrol. The essential oil of two-year-old plants was characterized by a richer chemical composition than the oil from younger plants.

  6. Populus candicans and the Balm of Gilead.

    PubMed

    Whatley, F R; Greenaway, W; May, J

    1989-01-01

    Bud exudates of some poplars are compared using GC-MS. P. candicans resembles P. balsamifera. A sample of "Balm of Gilead" purchased in Oxford proved not to resemble its supposed source, P. candicans. Instead it was similar to P. nigra, from which it was presumably collected in Europe.

  7. Lemon Cells Revisited--The Lemon-Powered Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartling, Daniel J.; Morgan, Charlotte

    1998-01-01

    Describes a demonstration of the principles of a voltaic cell using lemon cells to power a calculator and other items. A lemon fortified with a penny and a galvanized nail produces a potential of one volt. (PVD)

  8. Effect of feeding dried sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) peel and lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus) leaves on growth performance, carcass traits, serum metabolites and antioxidant status in broiler during the finisher phase.

    PubMed

    Alzawqari, M H; Al-Baddany, A A; Al-Baadani, H H; Alhidary, I A; Khan, Rifat Ullah; Aqil, G M; Abdurab, A

    2016-09-01

    The current experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of feeding dried sweet orange peel (SOP) and lemon grass leaves (LGL) as feed additives on broiler growth performance, serum metabolites, and antioxidant status. A total of 192-day-old (Ross 308) broiler chickens were distributed randomly into 4 dietary treatments with 4 replicates per each treatment. The dietary treatments included a control diet without any feed additive (T1), a diet containing 0.8 % SOP (T2), a diet containing 0.8 % LGL (T3), and a diet containing combination of 0.4 % SOP + 0.4 % LGL (T4) was fed during the growth period from 22 to 42 days. Feed intake (FI), body weight gain (BWG), feed conversion ratio (FCR), carcass traits, serum components, and antioxidant status were measured. At the end of the experimental period, the results indicated that supplementation of SOP and LGL alone or in combination did not significantly (P > 0.05) affect BWG, FI, FCR, and carcass characteristics in broiler chickens. Serum total protein was increased significantly (P < 0.05) in T3 and T4 compared to the other treatments. Also, serum globulin increased significantly (P < 0.05) in the treated groups. Serum glucose, low density lipoprotein, triglyceride, and very low density lipoprotein decreased significantly (P < 0.05) in the treatment groups, while cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein decreased in T2 compared to the other groups. Significantly (P < 0.05) higher total antioxidant status was observed in T2 compared to the other treatments. In conclusion, these results indicate that SOP, LGL, and their combination may positively modify some serum components and the antioxidant status without any beneficial effect on growth performance and carcass traits in broiler chickens. PMID:27209636

  9. Effect of feeding dried sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) peel and lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus) leaves on growth performance, carcass traits, serum metabolites and antioxidant status in broiler during the finisher phase.

    PubMed

    Alzawqari, M H; Al-Baddany, A A; Al-Baadani, H H; Alhidary, I A; Khan, Rifat Ullah; Aqil, G M; Abdurab, A

    2016-09-01

    The current experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of feeding dried sweet orange peel (SOP) and lemon grass leaves (LGL) as feed additives on broiler growth performance, serum metabolites, and antioxidant status. A total of 192-day-old (Ross 308) broiler chickens were distributed randomly into 4 dietary treatments with 4 replicates per each treatment. The dietary treatments included a control diet without any feed additive (T1), a diet containing 0.8 % SOP (T2), a diet containing 0.8 % LGL (T3), and a diet containing combination of 0.4 % SOP + 0.4 % LGL (T4) was fed during the growth period from 22 to 42 days. Feed intake (FI), body weight gain (BWG), feed conversion ratio (FCR), carcass traits, serum components, and antioxidant status were measured. At the end of the experimental period, the results indicated that supplementation of SOP and LGL alone or in combination did not significantly (P > 0.05) affect BWG, FI, FCR, and carcass characteristics in broiler chickens. Serum total protein was increased significantly (P < 0.05) in T3 and T4 compared to the other treatments. Also, serum globulin increased significantly (P < 0.05) in the treated groups. Serum glucose, low density lipoprotein, triglyceride, and very low density lipoprotein decreased significantly (P < 0.05) in the treatment groups, while cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein decreased in T2 compared to the other groups. Significantly (P < 0.05) higher total antioxidant status was observed in T2 compared to the other treatments. In conclusion, these results indicate that SOP, LGL, and their combination may positively modify some serum components and the antioxidant status without any beneficial effect on growth performance and carcass traits in broiler chickens.

  10. Box jellyfish envenomation: case report of effective lemon and oil emulsion treatment.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Carsten R; Hamann, Dathan; Richardson, Clare; Seeburger, Jack

    2014-04-01

    Box jellyfish are highly venomous and numerous possible treatments for envenomation have already been reported in the published literature. The hand of a 55-year-old scuba diver was stung in the Gulf of Guinea resulting in two crops of coalescing vesicles with intense pain and lymphadenopathy. Traditional therapies such as hot water, cold packs and acetic acid were ineffective. Symptoms were rapidly relieved after the application of a lemon-oil emulsion balm. Treatments for jellyfish envenomation generally aim to either denature the jellyfish venom or prevent the discharge of the venom. Lemon-oil emulsion therapy has not yet been reported in the published literature but may be an economical and novel treatment for box jellyfish envenomation. PMID:24334401

  11. Box jellyfish envenomation: case report of effective lemon and oil emulsion treatment.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Carsten R; Hamann, Dathan; Richardson, Clare; Seeburger, Jack

    2014-04-01

    Box jellyfish are highly venomous and numerous possible treatments for envenomation have already been reported in the published literature. The hand of a 55-year-old scuba diver was stung in the Gulf of Guinea resulting in two crops of coalescing vesicles with intense pain and lymphadenopathy. Traditional therapies such as hot water, cold packs and acetic acid were ineffective. Symptoms were rapidly relieved after the application of a lemon-oil emulsion balm. Treatments for jellyfish envenomation generally aim to either denature the jellyfish venom or prevent the discharge of the venom. Lemon-oil emulsion therapy has not yet been reported in the published literature but may be an economical and novel treatment for box jellyfish envenomation.

  12. Evaluation of Melissa officinalis (Lemon Balm) Effects on Heart Electrical System

    PubMed Central

    Joukar, Siyavash; Asadipour, Haleh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Melissa officinalis, an herbal drug, is well known and frequently applied in traditional and modern medicine. Yet, there is inadequate information regarding its effects on electrical properties of the heart. The present study attempted to elucidate the effects of Melissa officinalis aqueous extract on electrocardiogram (ECG) in rat. Objectives: ECG is an easy, fast and valuable tool to evaluate the safety of used materials and drugs on heart electrical and conductivity properties. Many drugs with no cardiovascular indication or any overt cardiovascular effects of therapeutic dosing become cardiotoxic when overdosed (16). On the other hand, there are numerous substances and drugs that can cause ECG changes, even in patients without a history of cardiac disease. Therefore, this study was conducted to elucidate safety and outcome of one-week administration of M. officinalis aqueous extract on blood pressure and ECG parameters of rats. Materials and Methods: Four animal groups received tap water (control group), aqueous extracts of Melissa officinalis 50 (M50), 100 (M100) and 200 (M200) mg/kg/day, respectively and orally for a week. ECG and blood pressure were recorded on the eighth day of experiment. Results: Consumption of Melissa officinalis extract associated with prolonged QRS interval (P < 0.05 for M50 and M100 groups and P < 0.01 for M200 group versus the control group, respectively), prolonged QTc and JT intervals (P < 0.01 for different M groups versus the control group) and prolonged TpTe interval (P < 0.001 when M groups compared with the control group) of ECG. However, different doses of the extract had no significant effect on RR interval, PR interval, amplitudes of ECG waves, heart rate and blood pressure. Conclusions: For the first time, this study revealed that consumption of Melissa officinalis extract is associated with significant ECG alterations in rat. Future studies are necessary to determine potential clinical outcomes. PMID:26396973

  13. Lemon-Lime Science Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Helen

    1995-01-01

    Presents a unit to investigate lemons and experience the real taste of a lemon that includes simple, enjoyable, and inexpensive activities that develop students' observation, prediction, measurement, and inference skills. Students also developed creative arts projects, explored mathematical concepts, and wrote stories about fruit. (NB)

  14. Leaving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Robyn L.

    2011-01-01

    Within this article, the author presents a personal story, "Leaving," which highlights the problematic experience of opposing established practice. The tale tells of the difficulty faced by creative agency when confronted by a constraining structural hegemony. Specifically, it draws attention to the professionalization of academic life through a…

  15. 21 CFR 146.114 - Lemon juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lemon juice. 146.114 Section 146.114 Food and....114 Lemon juice. (a) Identity—(1) Description. Lemon juice is the unfermented juice, obtained by mechanical process, from sound, mature lemons (Citrus limon (L.) Burm. f.), from which seeds...

  16. 21 CFR 146.114 - Lemon juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lemon juice. 146.114 Section 146.114 Food and....114 Lemon juice. (a) Identity—(1) Description. Lemon juice is the unfermented juice, obtained by mechanical process, from sound, mature lemons (Citrus limon (L.) Burm. f.), from which seeds...

  17. 21 CFR 146.114 - Lemon juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lemon juice. 146.114 Section 146.114 Food and....114 Lemon juice. (a) Identity—(1) Description. Lemon juice is the unfermented juice, obtained by mechanical process, from sound, mature lemons (Citrus limon (L.) Burm. f.), from which seeds...

  18. 21 CFR 146.114 - Lemon juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lemon juice. 146.114 Section 146.114 Food and....114 Lemon juice. (a) Identity—(1) Description. Lemon juice is the unfermented juice, obtained by mechanical process, from sound, mature lemons (Citrus limon (L.) Burm. f.), from which seeds...

  19. 21 CFR 146.114 - Lemon juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lemon juice. 146.114 Section 146.114 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... food. The lemon oil and lemon essence (derived from lemons) content may be adjusted in accordance...

  20. The virtues of balm in late medieval literature.

    PubMed

    Truitt, Elly R

    2009-01-01

    This article argues that balm, or balsam, was, by the late medieval period, believed to be a panacea, capable of healing wounds and illnesses, and also preventing putrefaction. Natural history and pharmacological texts on balm from the ancient and late antique periods emphasized specific qualities of balm, especially its heat; these were condensed and repeated in medieval encyclopedias. The rarity and cost of balsam, from antiquity through the medieval period, and the high rate of counterfeiting also demonstrate its high demand and significance in medicine and religious ritual. Travel writing and itineraria from the early and central medieval periods added a new layer to ideas about the capabilities of balsam: that it originated from a Christian miracle and was a particularly Christian plant.

  1. Evaluation of different iron compounds in chlorotic Italian lemon trees (Citrus lemon).

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Patricio Rivera; Castro Meza, Blanca I; de la Garza Requena, Francisco R; Flores, Guillermo Mendoza; Etchevers Barra, Jorge D

    2007-05-01

    The severe deficiency of iron or ferric chlorosis is a serious problem of most citrus trees established in calcareous soils, as a result of the low availability of iron in these soils and the poor uptake and limited transport of this nutrient in trees. The objective of this study was to evaluate the response of chlorotic Italian lemon trees (Citrus lemon) to the application of iron compounds to roots and stems. On comparing the effects of aqueous solutions of ferric citrate, ferrous sulphate and FeEDDHA chelate, applied to 20% of the roots grown in soil and sand, of trees that were planted in pots containing calcareous soil, it was observed that the chelate fully corrected ferric chlorosis, while citrate and sulphate did not solve the problem. EDDHA induced the root uptake of iron as well as the movement of the nutrient up to the leaves. With the use of injections of ferric solutions into the secondary stem of adult trees, ferric citrate corrected chlorosis but ferrous sulphate did not. The citrate ion expanded the mobility of iron within the plant, from the injection points up to the leaves, whereas the sulphate ion did not sufficiently improve the movement of iron towards the leaf mesophyll.

  2. Pick's Theorem: What a Lemon!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Alan R.

    2004-01-01

    Pick's theorem can be used in various ways just like a lemon. This theorem generally finds its way in the syllabus approximately at the middle school level and in fact at times students have even calculated the area of a state considering its outline with the help of the above theorem.

  3. [Claude Balme, a caregiver of the Egyptian expedition of Bonaparte (1766-1850)].

    PubMed

    Ségal, Alain

    2014-01-01

    The author explains military surgeon Balme's biograpyhy, especially during Bonaparte's Egyptian campaign (1798-1801). As there is some possible confusion with another Claude Balme, some archives deserve to be closely scrutinized. Through Balme's reports the author insists on his courageous part in several scurvy or plague epidemics. He was himself marked on his face; he ended his life in Lyons as a town-councillor. PMID:25966538

  4. Is Monstar topologically the same as lemon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vijay; Viswanathan, Nirmal K.

    2015-03-01

    Topological structure of monstar in π-symmetric fields with index Ic = +1/2 and three radial lines ending at C-point is an intermediate structure having properties of lemon and star. We experimentally realized monstar pattern in polarization ellipse orientation via three different routes, from lemon pattern using topologically-invariant squeezing and / or rotation transformations. Our results suggest that lemon and monstar can smoothly transform into each other under any or combination of these transformations leading to one interpretation that monstar is an anisotropic lemon.

  5. 7 CFR 29.1031 - Lemon (L).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lemon (L). 29.1031 Section 29.1031 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1031 Lemon (L). Yellow....

  6. 7 CFR 29.1031 - Lemon (L).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Lemon (L). 29.1031 Section 29.1031 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1031 Lemon (L). Yellow....

  7. 7 CFR 29.1031 - Lemon (L).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Lemon (L). 29.1031 Section 29.1031 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1031 Lemon (L). Yellow....

  8. 7 CFR 29.1031 - Lemon (L).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Lemon (L). 29.1031 Section 29.1031 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1031 Lemon (L). Yellow....

  9. 7 CFR 29.1031 - Lemon (L).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Lemon (L). 29.1031 Section 29.1031 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1031 Lemon (L). Yellow....

  10. Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.): an evidence-based systematic review by the Natural Standard Research Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Ulbricht, Catherine; Brendler, Thomas; Gruenwald, Joerg; Kligler, Benjamin; Keifer, David; Abrams, Tracee Rae; Woods, Jen; Boon, Heather; Kirkwood, Catherine DeFranco; Hackman, Dana A; Basch, Ethan; Lafferty, Heather J

    2005-01-01

    An evidence-based systematic review including written and statistical analysis of scientific analysis of scientific literature, expert opinion, folkloric precedent, history, pharmacology, kinetic/dynamics, interactions, adverse effect, toxicology, and dosing.

  11. Cytogenotoxicity of Cymbopogon citratus (DC) Stapf (lemon grass) aqueous extracts in vegetal test systems.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Saulo M; Silva, Pâmela S; Viccini, Lyderson F

    2010-06-01

    The lemon grass, Cymbopogon citratus (DC) Stapf, is an important species of Poaceae family commonly used in the folk medicine in many countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of aqueous extracts from C. citratus leaves on Lactuca sativa (lettuce) root tip meristem cells by cytogenetic studies that have never been done before for lemon grass extracts. For this, lettuce seeds were treated for 72h with different concentrations of lemon grass aqueous extracts (5; 10; 20 and 30 mg/mL). The percentage of germination, root development and cellular behavior were analyzed, and the results showed that the highest concentration of aqueous extracts reduced the mitotic index, the seed germination and the root development of lettuce. The extracts have also induced chromosome aberrations and cellular death in the roots cells of L. sativa. PMID:20563411

  12. Essential Balm: A Strong Repellent Against Foraging and Defending Red Imported Fire Ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    PubMed

    Wen, Yuzhen; Ma, Tao; Chen, Xuan; Liu, Zhitao; Zhu, Chengqi; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Strecker, Rachel; Henderson, Gregg; Hooper-Bùi, Linda M; Chen, Xiaoyang; Sun, Zhaohui; Wen, Xiujun; Wang, Cai

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, the repellent effects of essential balm, a traditional medicine product in China, was tested against foraging and defending red imported fire ants, Solenopsis invicta Buren, under laboratory and field conditions. The laboratory study showed that both band- (width = 1 cm) and patch-smearing of essential balm at each concentration (0.5, 1, or 2 μl/cm(2)) significantly decreased the number of S. invicta foragers within the 6-h observation period. Moreover, band-smearing of 2 μl/cm(2) essential balm and patch-smearing of 0.5, 1, and 2 μl/cm(2) essential balm inhibited most S. invicta foraging activity at 3, 6, 6, and 24 h into the experiment, respectively. The field study showed that after a disturbance was created on the S. invicta mound, there were significantly less defending ants on the substance treated (patch-smeared) with 0.5, 1, and 2 μl/cm(2) essential balm than the controls, but the number of ants on the substance of these three concentrations was similar. Our study suggested that essential balm is a strong repellent against foraging and defending S. invicta and could be applied when temporary protection from S. invicta is needed.

  13. Essential Balm: A Strong Repellent Against Foraging and Defending Red Imported Fire Ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    PubMed

    Wen, Yuzhen; Ma, Tao; Chen, Xuan; Liu, Zhitao; Zhu, Chengqi; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Strecker, Rachel; Henderson, Gregg; Hooper-Bùi, Linda M; Chen, Xiaoyang; Sun, Zhaohui; Wen, Xiujun; Wang, Cai

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, the repellent effects of essential balm, a traditional medicine product in China, was tested against foraging and defending red imported fire ants, Solenopsis invicta Buren, under laboratory and field conditions. The laboratory study showed that both band- (width = 1 cm) and patch-smearing of essential balm at each concentration (0.5, 1, or 2 μl/cm(2)) significantly decreased the number of S. invicta foragers within the 6-h observation period. Moreover, band-smearing of 2 μl/cm(2) essential balm and patch-smearing of 0.5, 1, and 2 μl/cm(2) essential balm inhibited most S. invicta foraging activity at 3, 6, 6, and 24 h into the experiment, respectively. The field study showed that after a disturbance was created on the S. invicta mound, there were significantly less defending ants on the substance treated (patch-smeared) with 0.5, 1, and 2 μl/cm(2) essential balm than the controls, but the number of ants on the substance of these three concentrations was similar. Our study suggested that essential balm is a strong repellent against foraging and defending S. invicta and could be applied when temporary protection from S. invicta is needed. PMID:27298425

  14. 7 CFR 29.1084 - Whitish-lemon (LL).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Whitish-lemon (LL). 29.1084 Section 29.1084..., 13, 14 and Foreign Type 92) § 29.1084 Whitish-lemon (LL). A whitish-yellow color which usually... whitish-lemon....

  15. 7 CFR 29.1084 - Whitish-lemon (LL).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Whitish-lemon (LL). 29.1084 Section 29.1084..., 13, 14 and Foreign Type 92) § 29.1084 Whitish-lemon (LL). A whitish-yellow color which usually... whitish-lemon....

  16. 7 CFR 29.1084 - Whitish-lemon (LL).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Whitish-lemon (LL). 29.1084 Section 29.1084..., 13, 14 and Foreign Type 92) § 29.1084 Whitish-lemon (LL). A whitish-yellow color which usually... whitish-lemon....

  17. 7 CFR 29.1084 - Whitish-lemon (LL).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Whitish-lemon (LL). 29.1084 Section 29.1084..., 13, 14 and Foreign Type 92) § 29.1084 Whitish-lemon (LL). A whitish-yellow color which usually... whitish-lemon....

  18. 7 CFR 29.1084 - Whitish-lemon (LL).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Whitish-lemon (LL). 29.1084 Section 29.1084..., 13, 14 and Foreign Type 92) § 29.1084 Whitish-lemon (LL). A whitish-yellow color which usually... whitish-lemon....

  19. Ergodicity of the generalized lemon billiards

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jingyu; Mohr, Luke; Zhang, Hong-Kun Zhang, Pengfei

    2013-12-15

    In this paper, we study a two-parameter family of convex billiard tables, by taking the intersection of two round disks (with different radii) in the plane. These tables give a generalization of the one-parameter family of lemon-shaped billiards. Initially, there is only one ergodic table among all lemon tables. In our generalized family, we observe numerically the prevalence of ergodicity among the some perturbations of that table. Moreover, numerical estimates of the mixing rate of the billiard dynamics on some ergodic tables are also provided.

  20. Ergodicity of the generalized lemon billiards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jingyu; Mohr, Luke; Zhang, Hong-Kun; Zhang, Pengfei

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we study a two-parameter family of convex billiard tables, by taking the intersection of two round disks (with different radii) in the plane. These tables give a generalization of the one-parameter family of lemon-shaped billiards. Initially, there is only one ergodic table among all lemon tables. In our generalized family, we observe numerically the prevalence of ergodicity among the some perturbations of that table. Moreover, numerical estimates of the mixing rate of the billiard dynamics on some ergodic tables are also provided.

  1. Acute allergic contact dermatitis of the lips from peppermint oil in a lip balm.

    PubMed

    Tran, Anh; Pratt, Melanie; DeKoven, Joel

    2010-01-01

    The etiology of cheilitis is often not readily apparent. We present a case series of four patients with allergic contact cheilitis (ACC) secondary to exposure to peppermint oil contained in a lip balm product. These patients developed eczematous dermatitis involving their lips and perioral skin. They were tested with the North American Contact Dermatitis Group standard series as well as with an expanded series of flavoring agents, sunscreens, plant and fragrance components, and their own products. The lip balm contained potential sensitizers such as propolis, lanolin, coconut oil, almond oil, peppermint oil, and vitamin E. Our patch-test results showed that peppermint oil was the most likely culprit in these patients' ACC. Peppermint oil is less commonly reported as causing ACC than are more common contactants such as balsam of Peru or nickel sulfate. However, with the widespread use of lip balms containing peppermint oil, more cases of peppermint oil-induced ACC may be expected.

  2. Study on citrus response to huanglongbing highlights a down-regulation of defense-related proteins in lemon plants upon 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' infection.

    PubMed

    Nwugo, Chika C; Duan, Yongping; Lin, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Citrus huanglongbing (HLB) is a highly destructive disease of citrus presumably caused by 'Candidatus Liberibacterasiaticus' (Las), a gram-negative, insect-transmitted, phloem-limited α-proteobacterium. Although almost all citrus plants are susceptible to HLB, reports have shown reduced susceptibility to Las infection in lemon (Citrus limon) plants. The aim of this study is to identify intra-species specific molecular mechanisms associated with Las-induced responses in lemon plants. To achieve this, comparative 2-DE and mass spectrometry, in addition to Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectroscopy (ICPS) analyses, were applied to investigate differences in protein accumulation and the concentrations of cationic elements in leaves of healthy and Las-infected lemon plants. Results showed a differential accumulation of 27 proteins, including an increase in accumulation of starch synthase but decrease in the production of photosynthesis-related proteins in Las-infected lemon plants compared to healthy plants. Furthermore, there was a 6% increase (P > 0.05) in K concentration in leaves of lemon plants upon Las infection, which support results from previous studies and might represent a common response pattern of citrus plants to Las infection. Interestingly, contrary to reports from prior studies, this study showed a general reduction in the production of defense-related pathogen-response proteins but a 128% increase in Zn concentration in lemon plants in response to Las infection. Taken together, this study sheds light on general and intra-species specific responses associated with the response of citrus plants to Las.

  3. Comparative transcriptional and anatomical analyses of tolerant rough lemon and susceptible sweet orange in response to 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' infection.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jing; Chen, Chunxian; Yu, Qibin; Khalaf, Abeer; Achor, Diann S; Brlansky, Ron H; Moore, Gloria A; Li, Zheng-Guo; Gmitter, Frederick G

    2012-11-01

    Although there are no known sources of genetic resistance, some Citrus spp. are reportedly tolerant to huanglongbing (HLB), presumably caused by 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus'. Time-course transcriptional analysis of tolerant rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri) and susceptible sweet orange (C. sinensis) in response to 'Ca. L. asiaticus' infection showed more genes differentially expressed in HLB-affected rough lemon than sweet orange at early stages but substantially fewer at late time points, possibly a critical factor underlying differences in sensitivity to 'Ca. L. asiaticus'. Pathway analysis revealed that stress responses were distinctively modulated in rough lemon and sweet orange. Although microscopic changes (e.g., callose deposition in sieve elements and phloem cell collapse) were found in both infected species, remarkably, phloem transport activity in midribs of source leaves in rough lemon was much less affected by HLB than in sweet orange. The difference in phloem cell transport activities is also implicated in the differential sensitivity to HLB between the two species. The results potentially lead to identification of key genes and the genetic mechanism in rough lemon to restrain disease development and maintain (or recover) phloem transport activity. These potential candidate genes may be used for improving citrus tolerance (or even resistance) to HLB by genetic engineering.

  4. Organic chemistry of balms used in the preparation of pharaonic meat mummies

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Katherine A.; Ikram, Salima; Evershed, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    The funeral preparations for ancient Egyptian dead were extensive. Tomb walls were often elaborately painted and inscribed with scenes and objects deemed desirable for the afterlife. Votive objects, furniture, clothing, jewelry, and importantly, food including bread, cereals, fruit, jars of wine, beer, oil, meat, and poultry were included in the burial goods. An intriguing feature of the meat and poultry produced for the deceased from the highest levels of Egyptian society was that they were mummified to ensure their preservation. However, little is known about the way they were prepared, such as whether balms were used, and if they were used, how they compared with those applied to human and animal mummies? We present herein the results of lipid biomarker and stable carbon isotope investigations of tissues, bandaging, and organic balms associated with a variety of meat mummies that reveal that treatments ranged from simple desiccation and wrapping in bandages to, in the case of the tomb of Yuya and Tjuia (18th Dynasty, 1386–1349 BC), a balm associated with a beef rib mummy containing a high abundance of Pistacia resin and, thus, more sophisticated than the balms found on many contemporaneous human mummies. PMID:24248384

  5. Organic chemistry of balms used in the preparation of pharaonic meat mummies.

    PubMed

    Clark, Katherine A; Ikram, Salima; Evershed, Richard P

    2013-12-17

    The funeral preparations for ancient Egyptian dead were extensive. Tomb walls were often elaborately painted and inscribed with scenes and objects deemed desirable for the afterlife. Votive objects, furniture, clothing, jewelry, and importantly, food including bread, cereals, fruit, jars of wine, beer, oil, meat, and poultry were included in the burial goods. An intriguing feature of the meat and poultry produced for the deceased from the highest levels of Egyptian society was that they were mummified to ensure their preservation. However, little is known about the way they were prepared, such as whether balms were used, and if they were used, how they compared with those applied to human and animal mummies? We present herein the results of lipid biomarker and stable carbon isotope investigations of tissues, bandaging, and organic balms associated with a variety of meat mummies that reveal that treatments ranged from simple desiccation and wrapping in bandages to, in the case of the tomb of Yuya and Tjuia (18th Dynasty, 1386-1349 BC), a balm associated with a beef rib mummy containing a high abundance of Pistacia resin and, thus, more sophisticated than the balms found on many contemporaneous human mummies. PMID:24248384

  6. Bioactive compounds and quality parameters of natural cloudy lemon juices.

    PubMed

    Uçan, Filiz; Ağçam, Erdal; Akyildiz, Asiye

    2016-03-01

    In this study, bioactive compounds (phenolic and carotenoid) and some quality parameters (color, browning index and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF)) of natural cloudy lemon juice, pasteurized (90 °C/15 s) and storage stability of concentrated lemon juice (-25 °C/180 days) were carried out. Fifteen phenolic compounds were determined in the lemon juice and the most abounded phenolic compounds were hesperidin, eriocitrin, chlorogenic acid and neoeriocitrin. In generally, phenolic compound concentrations of lemon juice samples increased after the pasteurization treatment. Four carotenoid compounds (β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lutein and zeaxanthin) were detected in natural cloudy lemon juice. Lutein and β-cryptoxanthin were the most abounded carotenoid compounds in the lemon juice. Color values of the lemon juices were not affected by processing and storage periods. HMF and browning index of the lemon juices increased with concentration and storage. According to the results, storing at -25 °C was considered as sufficient for acceptable quality limits of natural cloudy lemon juice. PMID:27570271

  7. Bioactive compounds and quality parameters of natural cloudy lemon juices.

    PubMed

    Uçan, Filiz; Ağçam, Erdal; Akyildiz, Asiye

    2016-03-01

    In this study, bioactive compounds (phenolic and carotenoid) and some quality parameters (color, browning index and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF)) of natural cloudy lemon juice, pasteurized (90 °C/15 s) and storage stability of concentrated lemon juice (-25 °C/180 days) were carried out. Fifteen phenolic compounds were determined in the lemon juice and the most abounded phenolic compounds were hesperidin, eriocitrin, chlorogenic acid and neoeriocitrin. In generally, phenolic compound concentrations of lemon juice samples increased after the pasteurization treatment. Four carotenoid compounds (β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lutein and zeaxanthin) were detected in natural cloudy lemon juice. Lutein and β-cryptoxanthin were the most abounded carotenoid compounds in the lemon juice. Color values of the lemon juices were not affected by processing and storage periods. HMF and browning index of the lemon juices increased with concentration and storage. According to the results, storing at -25 °C was considered as sufficient for acceptable quality limits of natural cloudy lemon juice.

  8. Interdonato lemon from Nizza di Sicilia (Italy): chemical composition of hexane extract of lemon peel and histochemical investigation.

    PubMed

    Salvo, Andrea; Bruno, Maurizio; La Torre, Giovanna Loredana; Vadalà, Rossella; Mottese, Antonio Francesco; Saija, Emanuele; Mangano, Valentina; Casale, Katia Ermina; Cicero, Nicola; Dugo, Giacomo

    2016-07-01

    Considering that the determination of authenticity and of the geographical origin of food is a very challenging issue, in this study we studied by means of histological and histochemical analyses the famous Sicilian lemon known as 'Interdonato Lemon of Messina PGI'. Since the protected geographical indication Interdonato lemon of Messina possesses high organoleptic properties, the composition of the hexane extract of lemon peel was determined by HRGC and HRGC-MS analyses and compared with that of lemon of different cultivars. The results obtained are informative of the oil's quality and explain the variation of the lemon essential oil composition. Given the fundamental economic implications of any fraud, the aim of this study was to determine a fingerprint able to evaluate the authentication of the geographic origin in such way to prevent frauds in national and international markets.

  9. Interdonato lemon from Nizza di Sicilia (Italy): chemical composition of hexane extract of lemon peel and histochemical investigation.

    PubMed

    Salvo, Andrea; Bruno, Maurizio; La Torre, Giovanna Loredana; Vadalà, Rossella; Mottese, Antonio Francesco; Saija, Emanuele; Mangano, Valentina; Casale, Katia Ermina; Cicero, Nicola; Dugo, Giacomo

    2016-07-01

    Considering that the determination of authenticity and of the geographical origin of food is a very challenging issue, in this study we studied by means of histological and histochemical analyses the famous Sicilian lemon known as 'Interdonato Lemon of Messina PGI'. Since the protected geographical indication Interdonato lemon of Messina possesses high organoleptic properties, the composition of the hexane extract of lemon peel was determined by HRGC and HRGC-MS analyses and compared with that of lemon of different cultivars. The results obtained are informative of the oil's quality and explain the variation of the lemon essential oil composition. Given the fundamental economic implications of any fraud, the aim of this study was to determine a fingerprint able to evaluate the authentication of the geographic origin in such way to prevent frauds in national and international markets. PMID:26649795

  10. Long-term natal site-fidelity by immature lemon sharks (Negaprion brevirostris) at a subtropical island.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Demian D; Babcock, Elizabeth A; Gruber, Samuel H; Dibattista, Joseph D; Franks, Bryan R; Kessel, Steven A; Guttridge, Tristan; Pikitch, Ellen K; Feldheim, Kevin A

    2009-08-01

    Although many sharks begin their life confined in nursery habitats, it is unknown how rapidly they disperse away from their natal area once they leave the nursery. We examine this issue in immature lemon sharks (Negaprion brevirostris) from the time they leave the nursery (approximately age 3) at a subtropical island (Bimini, Bahamas), through to the onset of sexual maturity (approximately age 12). From 1995 to 2007 we tagged and genotyped a large fraction of the nursery-bound sharks at this location (0-3 years of age, N = 1776 individuals). From 2003 to 2007 we sampled immature sharks aged from 3 to 11 years (N = 150) living around the island and used physical/genetic tag recaptures coupled with kinship analysis to determine whether or not each of these 'large immature sharks' was locally born. We show that many island-born lemon sharks remain close to their natal area for long periods (years) after leaving the nursery; more than half of the sampled sharks up to 135 cm total length ( approximately 6 years old) were locally born. The fraction of locally born sharks gradually declined with increasing shark size, indicating that dispersal is relatively slow and does not primarily occur after sharks reach a threshold size. Local conservation measures (e.g. localized fishery closures, marine protected areas) can therefore help protect island-born lemon sharks even after they leave the nursery habitat. PMID:19659480

  11. Northwestern Argentina: a center of genetic diversity of lemon verbena (Aloysia citriodora PALÁU, Verbenaceae).

    PubMed

    Di Leo Lira, Paola; van Baren, Catalina M; López, Simon; Molina, Ana; Heit, Cecilia; Viturro, Carmen; de Lampasona, Marina P; Catalán, Cesar A; Bandoni, Arnaldo

    2013-02-01

    The aerial parts of lemon verbena (Aloysia citriodora PALÁU) are worldwide used due to their medicinal and aromatic properties. The essential-oil and acteoside contents have been proposed as the main quality markers for their pharmacological and organoleptic features. The northwestern region of Argentina has been repeatedly proposed as the place of origin for this species. For this reason, the essential-oil yields and chemical compositions of leaves of 25 populations of lemon verbena from both wild collections and experimental crops from this region were studied. Plants from six different collections were subsequently grown on the same experimental parcel located at Cerrillos, Salta province, during more than seven years. In addition, the acteoside contents determined in all the samples collected in 2010 showed significant variations (from 0.5 to 4.0%). Large differences were observed in the essential-oil composition and yields, which ranged from 0.4 to 2.1% (v/w). Nevertheless, most of the samples complied with the European Pharmacopoeia specifications. A remarkable chemical diversity with at least four clearly defined chemotypes was detected in this region. Therefore, it would be urgent to encourage actions to protect these genotypes of lemon verbena in the northwestern Argentina. PMID:23418172

  12. Juan's Dilemma: A New Twist on the Old Lemon Battery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Vanessa; Sorey, Timothy; Balandova, Evguenia; Palmquist, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    When life hands you lemons, make a battery! In this article, the authors describe an activity they refer to as "Juan's Dilemma," an extension of the familiar lemon-battery activity (Goodisman 2001). Juan's Dilemma integrates oxidation and reduction chemistry with circuit theory in a fun, real-world exercise. The authors designed this activity for…

  13. A Lemon Cell Battery for High-Power Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muske, Kenneth R.; Nigh, Christopher W.; Weinstein, Randy D.

    2007-01-01

    The use of lemon cell battery to run an electric DC motor is demonstrated for chemistry students. This demonstration aids the students in understanding principles behind the design and construction of the lemon cell battery and principles governing the electric DC motor and other basic principles.

  14. All Things Considered: Still Life with Glass and Lemon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts: The Art Education Magazine for Teachers, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This brief article presents describes Pablo Picasso's oil on canvas painting, "Still Life with Glass and Lemon, 1910." Composed of abstract, monochromatic shapes, this painting's original subject is surprisingly a glass and lemon. The artist, Pablo Picasso, developed this unique system of breaking down objects into their basic geometric parts with…

  15. Analysis of some Italian lemon liquors (limoncello).

    PubMed

    Andrea, Versari; Nadia, Natali; Teresa, Russo Maria; Andrea, Antonelli

    2003-08-13

    The chemical composition of several commercial Italian Limoncellos, lemon-peel-based alcoholic beverages, was studied by chromatographic techniques. These methods allowed a rapid monitoring of Limoncello, giving information on quality markers and possible adulteration of the product. Quantitative data for more than 60 compounds are reported. Limoncellos were characterized by the presence of selected volatile (terpenes, aldehydes, alcohols) and nonvolatile compounds (psoralens, coumarins, phenolics, carbohydrates and acids). On the basis of their composition, the samples were grouped by PCA analysis in two sets; the first group showed a composition similar to lemon essential oils, with a high content of b-pinene, myrcene, trans-a-bergamottene, and b-bisabolene, and a low content in neral and geranial. The composition of the second group suggested the occurrence of oxidative phenomena and/or the addition of flavors. The presence of ethyl acetate, acetaldehyde, 2-methyl-1-propanol and glycerol showed that a fermentation probably occurred in the sugar syrup used to dilute the Limoncello after the extraction process.

  16. Study on Citrus Response to Huanglongbing Highlights a Down-Regulation of Defense-Related Proteins in Lemon Plants Upon ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nwugo, Chika C.; Duan, Yongping; Lin, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Citrus huanglongbing (HLB) is a highly destructive disease of citrus presumably caused by ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las), a gram-negative, insect-transmitted, phloem-limited α-proteobacterium. Although almost all citrus plants are susceptible to HLB, reports have shown reduced susceptibility to Las infection in lemon (Citruslimon) plants. The aim of this study is to identify intra-species specific molecular mechanisms associated with Las-induced responses in lemon plants. To achieve this, comparative 2-DE and mass spectrometry, in addition to Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectroscopy (ICPS) analyses, were applied to investigate differences in protein accumulation and the concentrations of cationic elements in leaves of healthy and Las-infected lemon plants. Results showed a differential accumulation of 27 proteins, including an increase in accumulation of starch synthase but decrease in the production of photosynthesis-related proteins in Las-infected lemon plants compared to healthy plants. Furthermore, there was a 6% increase (P > 0.05) in K concentration in leaves of lemon plants upon Las infection, which support results from previous studies and might represent a common response pattern of citrus plants to Las infection. Interestingly, contrary to reports from prior studies, this study showed a general reduction in the production of defense-related pathogen-response proteins but a 128% increase in Zn concentration in lemon plants in response to Las infection. Taken together, this study sheds light on general and intra-species specific responses associated with the response of citrus plants to Las. PMID:23922636

  17. Juicy lemons for measuring basic empathic resonance.

    PubMed

    Hagenmuller, Florence; Rössler, Wulf; Wittwer, Amrei; Haker, Helene

    2014-10-30

    Watch or even think of someone biting into a juicy lemon and your saliva will flow. This is a phenomenon of resonance, best described by the Perception-Action Model, where a physiological state in a person is activated through observation of this state in another. Within a broad framework of empathy, including manifold abilities depending on the Perception-Action link, resonance has been proposed as one physiological substrate for empathy. Using 49 healthy subjects, we developed a standardized salivation paradigm to assess empathic resonance at the autonomic level. Our results showed that this physiological resonance correlated positively with self-reported empathic concern. The salivation test, delivered an objective and continuous measure, was simple to implement in terms of setup and instruction, and could not easily be unintentionally biased or intentionally manipulated by participants. Therefore, these advantages make such a test a useful tool for assessing empathy-related abilities in psychiatric populations. PMID:24953424

  18. The Lemon Screamer, the Lasagna Cell, and the Physics Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Courtney W.; Nicholson, Lois

    1990-01-01

    Described is a demonstration which uses two electrodes attached to a piezoelectric buzzer that operates when inserted into a lemon. The calculation of cell potentials and the effects demonstrated are discussed. (CW)

  19. A Lemon Cell Battery for High-Power Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muske, Kenneth R.; Nigh, Christopher W.; Weinstein, Randy D.

    2007-04-01

    This article discusses the development of a lemon cell battery for high-power applications. The target application is the power source of a dc electric motor for a model car constructed by first-year engineering students as part of their introductory course design project and competition. The battery is composed of a series of lemon juice cells made from UV vis cuvets that use a magnesium anode and copper cathode. Dilution of the lemon juice to reduce the rate of corrosion of the magnesium anode and the addition of table salt to reduce the internal resistance of the cell are examined. Although our specific interest is the use of this lemon cell battery to run an electric dc motor, high-power applications such as radios, portable cassette or CD players, and other battery-powered toys are equally appropriate for demonstration and laboratory purposes using this battery.

  20. Biological activity of propolis-honey balm in the treatment of experimentally-evoked burn wounds.

    PubMed

    Jastrzębska-Stojko, Zaneta; Stojko, Rafał; Rzepecka-Stojko, Anna; Kabała-Dzik, Agata; Stojko, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    Medicines of biogenic origin with micro-organic, regenerative and analgesic properties are becoming more and more significant in the treatment of burn wounds. These properties are found in apitherapeutics such as propolis and honey--products collected and processed by a honey bee. Their effect on the course of the healing processes is multidirectional. The aim of the study was a histopathological and biochemical analysis of the processes of scar formation in experimentally evoked burn wounds in white pigs treated with the 1% and 3% Sepropol balms containing standardized extracts of propolis and honey. The results were compared with the therapeutic effects obtained with dermazin cream (1% silver sulfadiazine). The level of collagen was determined in the wounds treated with 1% and 3% Sepropol and compared with the collagen level in healthy skin and wounds treated with dermazin. Granulation and regenerated epithelium formation times were compared, with the 3% Sepropol being by far the most effective. The 3% Sepropol also increased the collagen level to 116% with the control sub-groups scoring between 80% and 98%. The results show the healing process of burn wounds in pigs treated with the Sepropol balm starts earlier and has a faster course than the standard dermazin therapy.

  1. Characterisation of embalming materials of a mummy of the Ptolemaic era. Comparison with balms from mummies of different eras.

    PubMed

    Tchapla, Alain; Méjanelle, Philippe; Bleton, Jean; Goursaud, Serge

    2004-02-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry has been used to determine the nature of organic materials used in mummification balms. A comparative analysis of samples taken from Egyptian mummies is developed. The results are given in two parts. First, it is shown that the chemical composition of the balm is practically independent of the part of the mummy from which it is taken. This study was done on a Ptolemaic mummy (circa 100 BC from the Guimet Museum in Lyon). Fats, beeswax, and diterpenic resins were the main components: they were found everywhere. Castor oil was also very often detected (in half of the samples). This particular fat is present in the balm inside the thorax but not in the skull. Moreover it is shown that a vegetable tannin was employed. Components indicative of vegetable tannin input (gallic acid and inositols) were found in seven samples out of eighteen, particularly close to the body and on the canopic pack of the heart. Secondly, some conclusions from a comparative study of the composition of balms from mummies of various social levels as well as of different Egyptian periods are reported. It is shown that beeswax was used as from very early times (XVIIIth dynasty). The mixture of beeswax, fats, and diterpenoid resins would appear to be more recent. The balms of three mummies dating from more recent Egyptian periods (XIXth to XXVth dynasty) were analysed. No evidence of a resin, gum-resin, or plant gum could be found. Some mummies would appear to have been embalmed with fats or beeswax. Finally, the entrails canopic pack said to belong to Ramses II undoubtedly shows an embalming process with a triterpenic resin of the mastic type. The adopted analytical methodology enabled us to achieve simultaneous detection of four components of the balm of the Ptolemaic mummy. Analysis of the other five mummies revealed far less complex chemical compositions for the balms. This may be an indication of different embalming processes, although we should bear in

  2. Chemicals and lemon essential oil effect on Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris viability.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Maria Cristina; Aban, Marina Paola; Navarro, Antonio Roberto

    2013-12-01

    Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris is considered to be one of the important target microorganisms in the quality control of acidic canned foods. There is an urgent need to develop a suitable method for inhibiting or controlling the germination and outgrowth of A.acidoterrestris in acidic drinks. The aim of this work was to evaluate the chemicals used in the lemon industry (sodium benzoate, potassium sorbate), and lemon essential oil as a natural compound, against a strain of A.acidoterrestris in MEB medium and in lemon juice concentrate. The results pointed out that sodium benzoate (500-1000-2000 ppm) and lemon essential oil (0.08-0.12-0.16%) completely inhibited the germination of A. acidoterrestris spores in MEB medium and LJC for 11 days. Potassium sorbate (600-1200 ppm) was more effective to inhibit the growth of the microbial target in lemon juice than in MEB medium. The effect of sodium benzoate, potassium sorbate and essential oil was sporostatic in MEB and LJC as they did not affect spore viability. PMID:24688502

  3. Chemicals and lemon essential oil effect on Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris viability.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Maria Cristina; Aban, Marina Paola; Navarro, Antonio Roberto

    2013-12-01

    Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris is considered to be one of the important target microorganisms in the quality control of acidic canned foods. There is an urgent need to develop a suitable method for inhibiting or controlling the germination and outgrowth of A.acidoterrestris in acidic drinks. The aim of this work was to evaluate the chemicals used in the lemon industry (sodium benzoate, potassium sorbate), and lemon essential oil as a natural compound, against a strain of A.acidoterrestris in MEB medium and in lemon juice concentrate. The results pointed out that sodium benzoate (500-1000-2000 ppm) and lemon essential oil (0.08-0.12-0.16%) completely inhibited the germination of A. acidoterrestris spores in MEB medium and LJC for 11 days. Potassium sorbate (600-1200 ppm) was more effective to inhibit the growth of the microbial target in lemon juice than in MEB medium. The effect of sodium benzoate, potassium sorbate and essential oil was sporostatic in MEB and LJC as they did not affect spore viability.

  4. LEMON - LHC Era Monitoring for Large-Scale Infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marian, Babik; Ivan, Fedorko; Nicholas, Hook; Hector, Lansdale Thomas; Daniel, Lenkes; Miroslav, Siket; Denis, Waldron

    2011-12-01

    At the present time computer centres are facing a massive rise in virtualization and cloud computing as these solutions bring advantages to service providers and consolidate the computer centre resources. However, as a result the monitoring complexity is increasing. Computer centre management requires not only to monitor servers, network equipment and associated software but also to collect additional environment and facilities data (e.g. temperature, power consumption, cooling efficiency, etc.) to have also a good overview of the infrastructure performance. The LHC Era Monitoring (Lemon) system is addressing these requirements for a very large scale infrastructure. The Lemon agent that collects data on every client and forwards the samples to the central measurement repository provides a flexible interface that allows rapid development of new sensors. The system allows also to report on behalf of remote devices such as switches and power supplies. Online and historical data can be visualized via a web-based interface or retrieved via command-line tools. The Lemon Alarm System component can be used for notifying the operator about error situations. In this article, an overview of the Lemon monitoring is provided together with a description of the CERN LEMON production instance. No direct comparison is made with other monitoring tool.

  5. Drying kinetics and colour change of lemon slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvishi, Hosain; Khoshtaghaza, Mohammad H.; Minaei, Saeid

    2014-03-01

    The effect of microwave-convective heating on drying characteristics and colour change of lemon slices was investigated. The drying experiments were carried out at 180, 360, 540 and 720Wand at 22°C, with air velocity of 1ms-1. The values of effective moisture diffusivity were found to be in the range between 1.87 10-8 and 3.95 10-8 m2 s-1, and the activation energy was estimated to be 10.91 Wg-1. The drying data were fitted with ten mathematical models available in the literature. The model describing drying kinetics of lemon slices in the best way was found. The colour change of the dried lemon slices was analysed and considered as a quality index affecting the drying quality of the product. The values of lightness/darkness, yellowness/blueness and hue angle increased, while the value of redness/greenness decreased with increasing microwave power.

  6. 78 FR 48145 - Lemon Juice From Argentina: Continuation of Suspended Antidumping Duty Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-07

    ..., 77 FR 45589 (August 1, 2012) and [Investigation Nos. 731-TA-1105-1106 (Review)] Lemon Juice from... Lemon Juice from Argentina, 78 FR 46610 (August 1, 2013). Therefore, pursuant to section 351.218(f)(4... Antidumping Duty Investigation: Lemon Juice From Argentina, 72 FR 53991 (September 21, 2007). Pursuant...

  7. Host status of Meyer and Eureka lemons for Anastrepha ludens.

    PubMed

    Mangan, Robert L; Moreno, Aleena Tarshis

    2012-04-01

    Host status for Mexican fruit fly (Anastrepha ludens (Loew)) was examined under laboratory conditions in cage infested Eureka and Meyer lemons. Our approach was to allow females to oviposit on the two cultivars in separate laboratory cages with aluminum foil covering to restrict the areas where females had access to fruit surface. Fruit of each cultivar were placed in covered trays for incubations and at approximately weekly intervals, fruit were removed, dissected, and live and dead eggs and larvae tabulated in each tissue of the fruit. Infestation and survival were tabulated and analyzed for the effects of harvest date, fruit color and brix indices, postoviposition period, and cultivar. Infestation rate, determined by counts of total eggs and larvae was significantly higher in Meyer lemons. In both cultivars, females deposited eggs into both albedo and pulp tissue but not into flavedo. Both cultivars showed high resistance (> 90% mortality) to egg and first instars survival in albedo and pulp. Second and third instars surviving in the pulp had high survival rates (> 60%) in both cultivars in fruit dissected at weeks 2-4 after infestation. Total adults produced were slightly higher, and total second and third stage larvae were also higher for Meyer lemons. Numbers of adults and total second and third stage larvae increased in Eureka lemons in more mature fruit, but the higher numbers in Meyer lemons were not associated with fruit maturity, at time of infestation. Numbers of second and third stage larvae were significantly correlated with some fruit color indices in Eureka but not in Meyer lemons. Application of these results to quarantine risk analysis is discussed. PMID:22606804

  8. Lemon juice has protective activity in a rat urolithiasis model

    PubMed Central

    Touhami, Mohammed; Laroubi, Amine; Elhabazi, Khadija; Loubna, Farouk; Zrara, Ibtissam; Eljahiri, Younes; Oussama, Abdelkhalek; Grases, Félix; Chait, Abderrahman

    2007-01-01

    Background The use of herbal medicines (medicinal plants or phytotherapy) has recently gained popularity in Europe and the United States. Nevertheless the exact mechanism of the preventive effects of these products is still far to be clearly established, being its knowledge necessary to successfully apply these therapies to avoid stone formation. Methods The effect of oral lemon juice administration on calcium oxalate urolithiasis was studied in male Wistar rats. Rats were rendered nephrolithic by providing drinking water containing 0.75% ethylene glycol [v/v] (EG) and 2% ammonium chloride [w/v] (AC) for 10 days. In addition to EG/AC treatment, three groups of rats were also gavage-administered solutions containing 100%, 75% or 50% lemon juice [v/v] (6 μl solution/g body weight). Positive control rats were treated with EG/AC but not lemon juice. Negative control rats were provided with normal drinking water, and were administered normal water by gavage. Each group contained 6 rats. After 10 days, serum samples were collected for analysis, the left kidney was removed and assessed for calcium levels using flame spectroscopy, and the right kidney was sectioned for histopathological analysis using light microscopy. Results Analysis showed that the rats treated with EG/AC alone had higher amounts of calcium in the kidneys compared to negative control rats. This EG/AC-induced increase in kidney calcium levels was inhibited by the administration of lemon juice. Histology showed that rats treated with EG/AC alone had large deposits of calcium oxalate crystals in all parts of the kidney, and that such deposits were not present in rats also treated with either 100% or 75% lemon juice. Conclusion These data suggest that lemon juice has a protective activity against urolithiasis. PMID:17919315

  9. Host status of Meyer and Eureka lemons for Anastrepha ludens.

    PubMed

    Mangan, Robert L; Moreno, Aleena Tarshis

    2012-04-01

    Host status for Mexican fruit fly (Anastrepha ludens (Loew)) was examined under laboratory conditions in cage infested Eureka and Meyer lemons. Our approach was to allow females to oviposit on the two cultivars in separate laboratory cages with aluminum foil covering to restrict the areas where females had access to fruit surface. Fruit of each cultivar were placed in covered trays for incubations and at approximately weekly intervals, fruit were removed, dissected, and live and dead eggs and larvae tabulated in each tissue of the fruit. Infestation and survival were tabulated and analyzed for the effects of harvest date, fruit color and brix indices, postoviposition period, and cultivar. Infestation rate, determined by counts of total eggs and larvae was significantly higher in Meyer lemons. In both cultivars, females deposited eggs into both albedo and pulp tissue but not into flavedo. Both cultivars showed high resistance (> 90% mortality) to egg and first instars survival in albedo and pulp. Second and third instars surviving in the pulp had high survival rates (> 60%) in both cultivars in fruit dissected at weeks 2-4 after infestation. Total adults produced were slightly higher, and total second and third stage larvae were also higher for Meyer lemons. Numbers of adults and total second and third stage larvae increased in Eureka lemons in more mature fruit, but the higher numbers in Meyer lemons were not associated with fruit maturity, at time of infestation. Numbers of second and third stage larvae were significantly correlated with some fruit color indices in Eureka but not in Meyer lemons. Application of these results to quarantine risk analysis is discussed.

  10. Increased and Altered Fragrance of Tobacco Plants after Metabolic Engineering Using Three Monoterpene Synthases from Lemon

    PubMed Central

    Lücker, Joost; Schwab, Wilfried; van Hautum, Bianca; Blaas, Jan; van der Plas, Linus H. W.; Bouwmeester, Harro J.; Verhoeven, Harrie A.

    2004-01-01

    Wild-type tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants emit low levels of terpenoids, particularly from the flowers. By genetic modification of tobacco cv Petit Havana SR1 using three different monoterpene synthases from lemon (Citrus limon L. Burm. f.) and the subsequent combination of these three into one plant by crossings, we show that it is possible to increase the amount and alter the composition of the blend of monoterpenoids produced in tobacco plants. The transgenic tobacco plant line with the three introduced monoterpene synthases is emitting β-pinene, limonene, and γ-terpinene and a number of side products of the introduced monoterpene synthases, from its leaves and flowers, in addition to the terpenoids emitted by wild-type plants. The results show that there is a sufficiently high level of substrate accessible for the introduced enzymes. PMID:14718674

  11. Is the lemon test an index of arousal level?

    PubMed

    Corcoran, D W; Houston, T G

    1977-08-01

    On the basis of numerous studies, it was predicted that salivary output to lemon juice would increase in a noisy relative to a quiet environment. Following the accepted procedure (Corcoran, 1964) salivary output to lemon juice was measured under quiet conditions; then experimental subjects selected a level of noise 'just too loud for comfort' and the salivary index was reassessed. Controls were treated identically except that both measures were conducted in the quiet. It was found that salivation increased in noise, and the weight of saliva produced correlated with the level of noise chosen.

  12. Targeted and non-targeted detection of lemon juice adulteration by LC-MS and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengfang; Jablonski, Joseph E

    2016-01-01

    Economically motivated adulteration (EMA) of lemon juice was detected by LC-MS and principal component analysis (PCA). Twenty-two batches of freshly squeezed lemon juice were adulterated by adding an aqueous solution containing 5% citric acid and 6% sucrose to pure lemon juice to obtain 30%, 60% and 100% lemon juice samples. Their total titratable acidities, °Brix and pH values were measured, and then all the lemon juice samples were subject to LC-MS analysis. Concentrations of hesperidin and eriocitrin, major phenolic components of lemon juice, were quantified. The PCA score plots for LC-MS datasets were used to preview the classification of pure and adulterated lemon juice samples. Results showed a large inherent variability in the chemical properties among 22 batches of 100% lemon juice samples. Measurement or quantitation of one or several chemical properties (targeted detection) was not effective in detecting lemon juice adulteration. However, by using the LC-MS datasets, including both chromatographic and mass spectrometric information, 100% lemon juice samples were successfully differentiated from adulterated samples containing 30% lemon juice in the PCA score plot. LC-MS coupled with chemometric analysis can be a complement to existing methods for detecting juice adulteration. PMID:26807674

  13. Targeted and non-targeted detection of lemon juice adulteration by LC-MS and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengfang; Jablonski, Joseph E

    2016-01-01

    Economically motivated adulteration (EMA) of lemon juice was detected by LC-MS and principal component analysis (PCA). Twenty-two batches of freshly squeezed lemon juice were adulterated by adding an aqueous solution containing 5% citric acid and 6% sucrose to pure lemon juice to obtain 30%, 60% and 100% lemon juice samples. Their total titratable acidities, °Brix and pH values were measured, and then all the lemon juice samples were subject to LC-MS analysis. Concentrations of hesperidin and eriocitrin, major phenolic components of lemon juice, were quantified. The PCA score plots for LC-MS datasets were used to preview the classification of pure and adulterated lemon juice samples. Results showed a large inherent variability in the chemical properties among 22 batches of 100% lemon juice samples. Measurement or quantitation of one or several chemical properties (targeted detection) was not effective in detecting lemon juice adulteration. However, by using the LC-MS datasets, including both chromatographic and mass spectrometric information, 100% lemon juice samples were successfully differentiated from adulterated samples containing 30% lemon juice in the PCA score plot. LC-MS coupled with chemometric analysis can be a complement to existing methods for detecting juice adulteration.

  14. Effect of the rootstock and interstock grafted in lemon tree (Citrus limon (L.) Burm.) on the flavonoid content of lemon juice.

    PubMed

    Gil-Izquierdo, Angel; Riquelme, María T; Porras, Ignacio; Ferreres, Federico

    2004-01-28

    The grafting of the rootstock with the lemon tree is an agronomical technique used to improve production and/or quality of the fruit. The interstock has been used with different fruit trees to modulate the tree size, fruit production and quality, and the aging of the tree. The lemon trees grafted with interstocks increase their longevity, lemon production and quality; interstocks are also used to decrease the thickness of the trunk at the grafting point. This enlarging of the trunk provokes a decrease of the sap flow. In our study, "Verna" lemon trees were grafted with interstock between the rootstock and the lemon tree to follow the flavonoid content of the lemon juice. The lemon juice was obtained from the lemons collected of the grafted lemon trees. Two types of rootstocks were used: Citrus aurantium L. and Citrus macrophylla L. Seven interstocks from five cultivars of orange tree, one cultivar of lime tree, and one cultivar of tangerine tree were used. "Verna" lemon trees were also grafted directly to the rootstock. The rootstock was more important agronomic factor than the interstock on the total flavonoid content of lemon juice. The interstock grafting had only a small influence on the flavonoid content of the lemon juice, and it modulated the individual flavonoid content. Citrus aurantium L. rootstock and "Berna" and "Washington Navel" interstocks were the most appropriate to graft in the lemon tree. This interstock grafting technique does not increase the flavonoid content of the lemon juice. Regarding the individual flavonoids, the 6,8-di-C-glucosyl diosmetin was the most affected flavonoid by the type of rootstock used. The interstock used is able to alter the individual quantitative flavonoid order of eriocitrin, diosmin, and hesperidin. In addition, the HPLC-ESI/MS(n) analyses provided the identification of two new flavonoids in the lemon juice: Quercetin 3-O-rutinoside-7-O-glucoside and chrysoeriol 6,8-di-C-glucoside (stellarin-2). The occurrence of

  15. The lemon illusion: seeing curvature where there is none

    PubMed Central

    Strother, Lars; Killebrew, Kyle W.; Caplovitz, Gideon P.

    2015-01-01

    Curvature is a highly informative visual cue for shape perception and object recognition. We introduce a novel illusion—the Lemon Illusion—in which subtle illusory curvature is perceived along contour regions that are devoid of physical curvature. We offer several perceptual demonstrations and observations that lead us to conclude that the Lemon Illusion is an instance of a more general illusory curvature phenomenon, one in which the presence of contour curvature discontinuities lead to the erroneous extension of perceived curvature. We propose that this erroneous extension of perceived curvature results from the interaction of neural mechanisms that operate on spatially local contour curvature signals with higher-tier mechanisms that serve to establish more global representations of object shape. Our observations suggest that the Lemon Illusion stems from discontinuous curvature transitions between rectilinear and curved contour segments. However, the presence of curvature discontinuities is not sufficient to produce the Lemon Illusion, and the minimal conditions necessary to elicit this subtle and insidious illusion are difficult to pin down. PMID:25755640

  16. The Unheralded History of the Lemon Grove Desegregation Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madrid, E. Michael

    2008-01-01

    In 1931, the Southern California community of Lemon Grove served as the unlikely stage for a dramatic and significant civil rights court case. A group of Mexican and Mexican-American parents and their children won a major victory in the battle against school segregation and the notion of separate but equal facilities. The case, now commonly…

  17. 77 FR 45653 - Lemon Juice From Argentina and Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-01

    ... investigations on imports of lemon juice from Argentina and Mexico (72 FR 53991 and 53995, September 21, 2007..., and F (19 CFR part 207), as most recently amended at 74 FR 2847 (January 16, 2009). \\1\\ No response to... employment statute for Federal employees, and Commission rule 201.15(b) (19 CFR 201.15(b)), 73 FR 24609...

  18. 78 FR 47006 - Lemon Juice From Argentina and Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... lemon juice from Argentina. Background The Commission instituted these reviews on August 1, 2012 (77 FR 45653) and determined on November 5, 2012 that it would conduct full reviews (77 FR 67833, November 14... 5, 2012 (77 FR 72384). The hearing was held in Washington, DC, on May 16, 2013, and all persons...

  19. 78 FR 46610 - Lemon Juice From Argentina and Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ... lemon juice from Argentina. Background The Commission instituted these reviews on August 1, 2012 (77 FR 45653) and determined on November 5, 2012 that it would conduct full reviews (77 FR 67833, November 14... 5, 2012 (77 FR 72384). The hearing was held in Washington, DC, on May 16, 2013, and all persons...

  20. Quantitative HPLC Analysis of Rosmarinic Acid in Extracts of "Melissa officinalis" and Spectrophotometric Measurement of Their Antioxidant Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canelas, Vera; da Costa, Cristina Teixeira

    2007-01-01

    The students prepare tea samples using different quantities of lemon balm leaves ("Melissa officinalis") and measure the rosmarinic acid contents by an HPLC-DAD method. The antioxidant properties of the tea samples are evaluated by a spectrophotometric method using a radical-scavenging assay with DPPH. (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl). Finally the…

  1. The metabolic profile of lemon juice by proton HR-MAS NMR: the case of the PGI Interdonato Lemon of Messina.

    PubMed

    Cicero, Nicola; Corsaro, Carmelo; Salvo, Andrea; Vasi, Sebastiano; Giofré, Salvatore V; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo; Di Stefano, Vita; Mallamace, Domenico; Dugo, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    We have studied by means of High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (HR-MAS NMR) the metabolic profile of the famous Sicilian lemon known as 'Interdonato Lemon of Messina PGI'. The PGI Interdonato Lemon of Messina possesses high organoleptic and healthy properties and is recognised as one of the most nutrient fruits. In particular, some of its constituents are actively studied for their chemo-preventive and therapeutic properties. In this paper, we have determined by means of HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy the molar concentration of the main metabolites constituent the juice of PGI Interdonato Lemon of Messina in comparison with that of the not-PGI Interdonato Lemon of Turkey. Our aim is to develop an analytical technique, in order to determine a metabolic fingerprint able to reveal commercial frauds in national and international markets.

  2. On Another Edge of Defocusing: Hyperbolicity of Asymmetric Lemon Billiards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunimovich, Leonid; Zhang, Hong-Kun; Zhang, Pengfei

    2016-02-01

    Defocusing mechanism provides a way to construct chaotic (hyperbolic) billiards with focusing components by separating all regular components of the boundary of a billiard table sufficiently far away from each focusing component. If all focusing components of the boundary of the billiard table are circular arcs, then the above separation requirement reduces to that all circles obtained by completion of focusing components are contained in the billiard table. In the present paper we demonstrate that a class of convex tables— asymmetric lemons, whose boundary consists of two circular arcs, generate hyperbolic billiards. This result is quite surprising because the focusing components of the asymmetric lemon table are extremely close to each other, and because these tables are perturbations of the first convex ergodic billiard constructed more than 40 years ago.

  3. Flavor chemistry of lemon-lime carbonated beverages.

    PubMed

    Hausch, Bethany J; Lorjaroenphon, Yaowapa; Cadwallader, Keith R

    2015-01-14

    The most potent aroma-active components of Sprite (SP), Sierra Mist (SM), and 7UP (7UP) were identified. Aroma extracts were prepared by liquid–liquid continuous extraction/solvent-assisted flavor evaporation (LLCE/SAFE). Twenty-eight compounds were detected by gas chromatography–olfactometry (GC-O) with linalool (floral, lavender), octanal (pungent orange), and 2,3-dehydro-1,8-cineole (minty) determined to be predominant aroma compounds based on their high flavor dilution (FD) factors by aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA). The data indicate that lemon-lime flavor is composed of a small number of compounds (22 at the most in SM), and only a subset of these may be important because many compounds were detected only at low FD factors. Predominant aroma compounds (23) were quantified using static headspace solid phase microextraction (SPME) combined with stable isotope dilution assays (SIDA). In contrast to FD factors, the calculated odor-activity values (OAVs) indicate that octanal and limonene make the greatest contribution to the overall aroma of lemon-lime carbonated beverages, followed by nonanal, decanal, linalool, 1,8-cineole, and geranyl acetate. The results demonstrate that lemon-lime carbonated beverages share many of the same compounds but the relative abundance of these compounds varies by brand. PMID:25494537

  4. Flavor chemistry of lemon-lime carbonated beverages.

    PubMed

    Hausch, Bethany J; Lorjaroenphon, Yaowapa; Cadwallader, Keith R

    2015-01-14

    The most potent aroma-active components of Sprite (SP), Sierra Mist (SM), and 7UP (7UP) were identified. Aroma extracts were prepared by liquid–liquid continuous extraction/solvent-assisted flavor evaporation (LLCE/SAFE). Twenty-eight compounds were detected by gas chromatography–olfactometry (GC-O) with linalool (floral, lavender), octanal (pungent orange), and 2,3-dehydro-1,8-cineole (minty) determined to be predominant aroma compounds based on their high flavor dilution (FD) factors by aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA). The data indicate that lemon-lime flavor is composed of a small number of compounds (22 at the most in SM), and only a subset of these may be important because many compounds were detected only at low FD factors. Predominant aroma compounds (23) were quantified using static headspace solid phase microextraction (SPME) combined with stable isotope dilution assays (SIDA). In contrast to FD factors, the calculated odor-activity values (OAVs) indicate that octanal and limonene make the greatest contribution to the overall aroma of lemon-lime carbonated beverages, followed by nonanal, decanal, linalool, 1,8-cineole, and geranyl acetate. The results demonstrate that lemon-lime carbonated beverages share many of the same compounds but the relative abundance of these compounds varies by brand.

  5. Geraniol synthase whose mRNA is induced by host-selective ACT-toxin in the ACT-toxin-insensitive rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri).

    PubMed

    Shishido, Hodaka; Miyamoto, Yoko; Ozawa, Rika; Taniguchi, Shiduku; Takabayashi, Junji; Akimitsu, Kazuya; Gomi, Kenji

    2012-09-15

    Host-selective toxins (HSTs) produced by some strains of Alternaria alternata are selectively toxic to certain cultivars of plants. However, the role of HSTs in toxin-insensitive plants is currently unknown. Here, we studied the role of ACT-toxin using an ACT-toxin producing A. alternata strain SH20 and the ACT-toxin-insensitive plant rough lemon. Induction of some defense related genes in response to SH20 were faster or stronger than in response to the ACT-toxin deficient SH20 mutant. By sequencing subtractive PCR clones obtained from mRNA of rough lemon leaves inoculated with SH20 after subtraction with that of the ACT-toxin deficient SH20 mutant, we isolated the SH20-responsive genes in rough lemon. Among the SH20-responsive genes analyzed in this study, we isolated a terpene synthase (TPS) gene, RlemTPS3. We also determined that RlemTPS3 localizes to the chloroplast and produces the monoterpene geraniol.

  6. A novel trans-4-hydroxycinnamic acid derivative from Meyer lemon (Citrus meyeri).

    PubMed

    Miyake, Yoshiaki; Ito, Chihiro; Itoigawa, Masataka

    2012-12-15

    Isolation and structural elucidation of a new trans-4-hydroxycinnamic acid derivative from Meyer lemon (Citrus meyeri hort. ex Y. Tanaka) was carried out. The derivative exhibited the antioxidative activity by ORAC (oxygen radical absorbance capacity) assay and was found in the flavedo and alvedo of Meyer lemon peel.

  7. 78 FR 48148 - Lemon Juice From Mexico: Termination of Suspended Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-07

    ...''') Review and Correction, 77 FR 45589 (August 1, 2012). \\2\\ Lemon Juice from Argentina and Mexico, 77 FR...\\ Suspension of Antidumping Duty Investigation: Lemon Juice From Mexico, 72 FR 53995 (September 21, 2007... Suspended Antidumping Duty Investigation, 78 FR 38944 (June 28, 2013). On August 1, 2013, the ITC...

  8. LEMON: an (almost) completely automated differential-photometry pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrón, V.; Fernández, M.

    2011-11-01

    We present LEMON, the CCD differential-photometry pipeline, written in Python, developed at the Institute of Astrophysics of Andalusia (CSIC) and originally designed for its use at the 1.23 m CAHA telescope for automated variable stars detection and analysis. The aim of our tool is to make it possible to completely reduce thousands of images of time series in a matter of hours and with minimal user interaction, if not none at all, automatically detecting variable stars and presenting the results to the astronomer.

  9. Temperature dependent primary irritant dermatitis from lemon perfume.

    PubMed

    Rothenborg, H W; Menné, T; Sjolin, K E

    1977-02-01

    In a recent outbreak of hand eczema amongst cleaning personnel after the introduction of a new, lemon-scented detergent, it was noted that the patients complained of a burning, stinging sensation when their hands were submerged in hot detergent solutions. Since routine patch testing with the Standard Series and perfume components was of no help in pinpointing the responsible agent, testing with selected perfume components was repeated at higher temperatures. Identical tests were placed on both forearms for 20 min, one arm being exposed to 43 degrees C, the other to 23-25 degrees C. Little or no reaction was seen on the "cold" arm, whereas the lemon perfume component Citral proved to be a strong primary irritant at higher temperatures. Histological examination of the test sites showed the reaction to be of a toxic (primary irritant) nature. Surprisingly, the toxic character could still be recongized in biopsies taken as late as 48 h after exposure. It is suggested that: 1. Heat plays an important part in the outbreak of primary irritant (toxic) dermatitis and can be used as an accelerating factor when testing for primary irritants. 2. It is important to be sure that detergents and detergent perfumes do not contain substances which act as irritants at the temperatures at which they are habitually used (45-50 degrees C). 3. We probably ought to use lukewarm rather than hot water for manual dishwashing and cleaning whenever it is possible.

  10. Social learning in juvenile lemon sharks, Negaprion brevirostris.

    PubMed

    Guttridge, Tristan L; van Dijk, Sander; Stamhuis, Eize J; Krause, Jens; Gruber, Samuel H; Brown, Culum

    2013-01-01

    Social learning is taxonomically widespread and can provide distinct behavioural advantages, such as in finding food or avoiding predators more efficiently. Although extensively studied in bony fishes, no such empirical evidence exists for cartilaginous fishes. Our aim in this study was to experimentally investigate the social learning capabilities of juvenile lemon sharks, Negaprion brevirostris. We designed a novel food task, where sharks were required to enter a start zone and subsequently make physical contact with a target in order to receive a food reward. Naive sharks were then able to interact with and observe (a) pre-trained sharks, that is, 'demonstrators', or (b) sharks with no previous experience, that is, 'sham demonstrators'. On completion, observer sharks were then isolated and tested individually in a similar task. During the exposure phase observers paired with 'demonstrator' sharks performed a greater number of task-related behaviours and made significantly more transitions from the start zone to the target, than observers paired with 'sham demonstrators'. When tested in isolation, observers previously paired with 'demonstrator' sharks completed a greater number of trials and made contact with the target significantly more often than observers previously paired with 'sham demonstrators'. Such experience also tended to result in faster overall task performance. These results indicate that juvenile lemon sharks, like numerous other animals, are capable of using socially derived information to learn about novel features in their environment. The results likely have important implications for behavioural processes, ecotourism and fisheries. PMID:22933179

  11. Social learning in juvenile lemon sharks, Negaprion brevirostris.

    PubMed

    Guttridge, Tristan L; van Dijk, Sander; Stamhuis, Eize J; Krause, Jens; Gruber, Samuel H; Brown, Culum

    2013-01-01

    Social learning is taxonomically widespread and can provide distinct behavioural advantages, such as in finding food or avoiding predators more efficiently. Although extensively studied in bony fishes, no such empirical evidence exists for cartilaginous fishes. Our aim in this study was to experimentally investigate the social learning capabilities of juvenile lemon sharks, Negaprion brevirostris. We designed a novel food task, where sharks were required to enter a start zone and subsequently make physical contact with a target in order to receive a food reward. Naive sharks were then able to interact with and observe (a) pre-trained sharks, that is, 'demonstrators', or (b) sharks with no previous experience, that is, 'sham demonstrators'. On completion, observer sharks were then isolated and tested individually in a similar task. During the exposure phase observers paired with 'demonstrator' sharks performed a greater number of task-related behaviours and made significantly more transitions from the start zone to the target, than observers paired with 'sham demonstrators'. When tested in isolation, observers previously paired with 'demonstrator' sharks completed a greater number of trials and made contact with the target significantly more often than observers previously paired with 'sham demonstrators'. Such experience also tended to result in faster overall task performance. These results indicate that juvenile lemon sharks, like numerous other animals, are capable of using socially derived information to learn about novel features in their environment. The results likely have important implications for behavioural processes, ecotourism and fisheries.

  12. Integrative Multi-omics Module Network Inference with Lemon-Tree

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Eric; Calzone, Laurence; Michoel, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Module network inference is an established statistical method to reconstruct co-expression modules and their upstream regulatory programs from integrated multi-omics datasets measuring the activity levels of various cellular components across different individuals, experimental conditions or time points of a dynamic process. We have developed Lemon-Tree, an open-source, platform-independent, modular, extensible software package implementing state-of-the-art ensemble methods for module network inference. We benchmarked Lemon-Tree using large-scale tumor datasets and showed that Lemon-Tree algorithms compare favorably with state-of-the-art module network inference software. We also analyzed a large dataset of somatic copy-number alterations and gene expression levels measured in glioblastoma samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas and found that Lemon-Tree correctly identifies known glioblastoma oncogenes and tumor suppressors as master regulators in the inferred module network. Novel candidate driver genes predicted by Lemon-Tree were validated using tumor pathway and survival analyses. Lemon-Tree is available from http://lemon-tree.googlecode.com under the GNU General Public License version 2.0. PMID:25679508

  13. Inhibitory activity of Melissa officinalis L. extract on Herpes simplex virus type 2 replication.

    PubMed

    Mazzanti, G; Battinelli, L; Pompeo, C; Serrilli, A M; Rossi, R; Sauzullo, I; Mengoni, F; Vullo, V

    2008-01-01

    Melissa officinalis L. (Lamiaceae) (lemon balm) is used in folk medicine for nervous complaints, lower abdominal disorders and, more recently, for treating Herpes simplex lesions. In this work the antiviral activity of a hydroalcoholic extract of lemon balm leaves against the Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) was assessed by the cytopathic effect inhibition assay on Vero cells (ATCC CCL-81), in comparison with acyclovir. The cytotoxicity of the extract on Vero cells was previously tested by evaluating the cellular death and was confirmed by the Trypan blue test. Lemon balm showed to reduce the cytopathic effect of HSV-2 on Vero cells, in the range of non-toxic concentrations of 0.025-1 mg mL(-1) (with reference to the starting crude herbal material). The maximum inhibiting effect (60%) was obtained with 0.5 mg mL(-1). The viral binding assay showed that the extract does not prevent the entry of HSV-2 in the cells, thus suggesting a mechanism of action subsequent to the penetration of the virus in the cell. The extract was also chemically characterised by NMR and HPLC analysis; it showed to contain cinnamic acid-like compounds, mainly rosmarinic acid (4.1% w/w). Our experiments support the use of lemon balm for treating Herpes simplex lesions and encourage clinical trials on this medicinal plant. PMID:19023806

  14. Inhibitory activity of Melissa officinalis L. extract on Herpes simplex virus type 2 replication.

    PubMed

    Mazzanti, G; Battinelli, L; Pompeo, C; Serrilli, A M; Rossi, R; Sauzullo, I; Mengoni, F; Vullo, V

    2008-01-01

    Melissa officinalis L. (Lamiaceae) (lemon balm) is used in folk medicine for nervous complaints, lower abdominal disorders and, more recently, for treating Herpes simplex lesions. In this work the antiviral activity of a hydroalcoholic extract of lemon balm leaves against the Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) was assessed by the cytopathic effect inhibition assay on Vero cells (ATCC CCL-81), in comparison with acyclovir. The cytotoxicity of the extract on Vero cells was previously tested by evaluating the cellular death and was confirmed by the Trypan blue test. Lemon balm showed to reduce the cytopathic effect of HSV-2 on Vero cells, in the range of non-toxic concentrations of 0.025-1 mg mL(-1) (with reference to the starting crude herbal material). The maximum inhibiting effect (60%) was obtained with 0.5 mg mL(-1). The viral binding assay showed that the extract does not prevent the entry of HSV-2 in the cells, thus suggesting a mechanism of action subsequent to the penetration of the virus in the cell. The extract was also chemically characterised by NMR and HPLC analysis; it showed to contain cinnamic acid-like compounds, mainly rosmarinic acid (4.1% w/w). Our experiments support the use of lemon balm for treating Herpes simplex lesions and encourage clinical trials on this medicinal plant.

  15. Washing of cut persimmon with thyme or lemon essential oils.

    PubMed

    Almela, Celia; Castelló, María L; Tarrazó, José; Ortolá, María D

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a minimally processed persimmon product by applying different concentrations of thyme essential oil or lemon essential oil on the product in order to increase its shelf life. Essential oils were applied on cut persimmon in a preliminary stage of immersion, and the samples were then stored at 4 ℃ for seven days. Moisture content, soluble solids content, antioxidant capacity, total phenols, pH, optical and mechanical properties and microbiology counts were periodically analysed. Noteworthy was that the application of thyme essential oil in the washing stage improved the preservation of the fruits' colour. All samples would be considered safe according to microbiology requirements and based on the period of study, regardless of the type of essential oil applied.

  16. Effect of chitosan-lemon essential oil coatings on volatile profile of strawberries during storage.

    PubMed

    Perdones, Ángela; Escriche, Isabel; Chiralt, Amparo; Vargas, Maria

    2016-04-15

    Chitosan coatings containing lemon essential oils were described as effective at controlling fruit fungal decay at 20°C during 7 days. In this work, GC-MS was used to characterise the volatile compounds of strawberries during cold storage in order to analyse the influence of fruit coatings with chitosan, containing or not containing lemon essential oil, on the volatile profile of the fruits. The coatings affected the metabolic pathways and volatile profile of the fruits. Pure chitosan promoted the formation of esters and dimethyl furfural in very short time after coating, while coatings containing lemon essential oil incorporated terpenes (limonene, γ-terpinene, p-cymene and α-citral) to the fruit volatiles and enhanced the fermentative process, modifying the typical fruit aroma composition. No effect of chitosan coatings was sensorially perceived, the changes induced by lemon essential oil were notably appreciated. PMID:26617043

  17. Effect of chitosan-lemon essential oil coatings on volatile profile of strawberries during storage.

    PubMed

    Perdones, Ángela; Escriche, Isabel; Chiralt, Amparo; Vargas, Maria

    2016-04-15

    Chitosan coatings containing lemon essential oils were described as effective at controlling fruit fungal decay at 20°C during 7 days. In this work, GC-MS was used to characterise the volatile compounds of strawberries during cold storage in order to analyse the influence of fruit coatings with chitosan, containing or not containing lemon essential oil, on the volatile profile of the fruits. The coatings affected the metabolic pathways and volatile profile of the fruits. Pure chitosan promoted the formation of esters and dimethyl furfural in very short time after coating, while coatings containing lemon essential oil incorporated terpenes (limonene, γ-terpinene, p-cymene and α-citral) to the fruit volatiles and enhanced the fermentative process, modifying the typical fruit aroma composition. No effect of chitosan coatings was sensorially perceived, the changes induced by lemon essential oil were notably appreciated.

  18. Phytostabilisation potential of lemon grass (Cymbopogon flexuosus (Nees ex Stend) Wats) on iron ore tailings.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, M; Dhal, N K; Patra, P; Das, B; Reddy, P S R

    2012-01-01

    The present pot culture study was carried out for the potential phytostabilisation of iron ore tailings using lemon grass (Cymbopogon flexuosus) a drought tolerant, perennial, aromatic grass. Experiments have been conducted by varying the composition of garden soil (control) with iron ore tailings. The various parameters, viz. growth of plants, number of tillers, biomass and oil content of lemon grass are evaluated. The studies have indicated that growth parameters of lemon grass in 1:1 composition of garden soil and iron ore tailings are significantly more (-5% increase) compared to plants grown in control soil. However, the oil content of lemon grass in both the cases more or less remained same. The results also infer that at higher proportion of tailings the yield of biomass decreases. The studies indicate that lemongrass with its fibrous root system is proved to be an efficient soil binder by preventing soil erosion.

  19. An exploratory investigation of coffee and lemon scents and odor identification.

    PubMed

    Grosofsky, Alexis; Haupert, Margaret L; Versteeg, Schyler W

    2011-04-01

    Fragrance sellers often provide coffee beans to their customers as a "nasal palate cleanser," to reduce the effects of olfactory adaptation and habituation. To test this idea, college students smelled three fragrances multiple times, rating odors each time. After completing nine trials, participants sniffed coffee beans, lemon slices, or plain air. Participants then indicated which of four presented fragrances had not been previously smelled; Coffee beans did not yield better performance than lemon slices or air.

  20. Process optimization for the manufacture of lemon based beverage from hydrolyzed whey.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sudhir; Khemariya, Priti; Rai, Ashutosh

    2014-04-01

    Whey obtained during the manufacture of Cheddar cheese and paneer was lactose hydrolyzed to develop lemon based whey beverage. The lactose present in whey was hydrolyzed by Maxilact L-2000 lactase enzyme. Maximum (85-90%) hydrolysis in cheese and paneer whey was optimized with enzyme concentration of 0.4% at pH 6.75 after incubation at 40 °C for 3 h. The sweetness level in hydrolyzed whey was equivalent to 2.5% sucrose solution. Response surface methodology was used to optimize the levels of sugar, lemon juice, lemon flavor and stabilizer i.e. carboxyl methyl cellulose (CMC). The most acceptable lemon based beverage contained 8, 4, 0.1 and 0.05% of sugar, lemon juice, lemon flavor and CMC, respectively. The beverage had greater acceptability to judges after heat treatment at 90 °C for 2 min than the heat treatment of 5 psi for 5 min. PMID:24741162

  1. Changes in essential oil during enzyme-assisted ensiling of lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus Stapf.) and lemon eucalyptus (Eucalyptus citriodora Hook).

    PubMed

    Dudai, N; Weinberg, Z G; Larkov, O; Ravid, U; Ashbell, G; Putievsky, E

    2001-05-01

    Changes in essential oil during ensiling of lemongrass and lemon eucalyptus were studied. Wilted lemongrass and eucalyptus leaves were ensiled in 0.25-L anaerobic jars. Samples consisted of a control (no additives) and a treated sample (0.5% glucose and lactic acid bacteria and 1% cellulase plus 1% hemicellulase plus pectinase). Three jars per treatment were sampled on days 2, 6, 10, and 36 for analysis of essential oil. Essential oil was obtained by extraction and by hydrodistillation. Extraction efficacy of essential oil from the lemongrass was improved by the enzyme treatment, but it was much lower than the amount obtained by distillation. The major components of the essential oil were neral and geranial. In the eucalyptus, total essential oils obtained by distillation decreased during ensiling, and the amount was similar to the amount obtained by extraction. Citronellal, which was the major component of the essential oil in the fresh eucalyptus leaves, decreased, whereas isopulegol and 3,8-terpinolhydrate increased during ensiling. PMID:11368586

  2. New data visualization of the LHC Era Monitoring (Lemon) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivan, Fedorko; Veronique, Lefebure; Daniel, Lenkes; Omar, Pera Mira

    2012-12-01

    In the last few years, new requirements have been received for visualization of monitoring data: advanced graphics, flexibility in configuration and decoupling of the presentation layer from the monitoring repository. Lemonweb is the data visualization component of the LHC Era Monitoring (Lemon) system. Lemonweb consists of two subcomponents: a data collector and a web visualization interface. The data collector is a daemon, implemented in Python, responsible for data gathering from the central monitoring repository and storing into time series data structures. Data is stored on disk in Round Robin Database (RRD) files: one file per monitored entity, with set of entity related metrics. Entities may be grouped into a hierarchical structure, called “clusters” and supporting mathematical operations over entities and clusters (e.g. cluster A + cluster B /clusters C - entity XY). Using the configuration information, a cluster definition is evaluated in the collector engine and, at runtime, a sequence of data selects is built, to optimize access to the central monitoring repository. In this article, an overview of the design and architecture as well as highlights of some implemented features will be presented.

  3. In situ localization of gene transcriptions for monoterpene synthesis in irregular parenchymic cells surrounding the secretory cavities in rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri).

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Yumiko; Akimitsu, Kazuya

    2007-11-01

    A cDNA (RlemispF) encoding 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate synthase, an enzyme of the methyl erythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway, and two homologs (RlemTPS1 and RlemTPS2) of citrus monoterpene synthase cDNA were isolated from the rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri). Transient localization of all or a part of RlemispF fused to a green fluorescence protein using particle gun-mediated DNA delivery localized RlemispF in the chloroplast. Transcripts of RlemispF and other monoterpene synthase genes are constitutively expressed in leaves of rough lemon. Transcript accumulations of RlemispF and RlemTPS1 were not induced by microbe attacks, but microbe attack weakly induced RlemTPS2 expression. Wounding decreased RlemispF expression. RlemispF and two different monoterpene synthase genes were specifically expressed in the epithelial tissue cells with dense cytoplasm that surround secretory cavities, which form a broadly round package containing a large volume of essential oils composed of monoterpenes. Interestingly, although expressions of RlemTPS1 and RlemTPS2 were detected at both mature and developing secretory cavities, the RlemispF-expressing cells were found more at around developing secretory cavities.

  4. [Study on Kinetic of Hg2+ from Wastewater Absorbed by Lemon Residues].

    PubMed

    Shen, Wang-qing; Wang, Miao; Yang, Ting

    2016-03-01

    With low price and its superior adsorption performance after modification, currently agricultural waste is used as adsorbent of heavy metals in wastewater, which has become a hot research topic. To study on Hg2+ from wastewater absorbed by lemon residues that has been modified by 15% concentration of sulphuric acid. The pore volume, pore size and other properties of the adsorbent were test. The samples were characterized by differential thermal analysis, IR, electron microscopy and spectroscopy. The result showed that the adsorption rate was controlled by membrane diffusion kinetics that was viewed as the first order kinetics equation of the Lagergren, which was physically absorbed. The adsorption properties of modified lemon residues were improved greatly, and the pore size distribution mainly was medium. There were three losses-weight process. There was a endothermic peak around 66 degrees C and two exotherm near 316 degrees C and 494 degrees C. Basic framework of Lemon residues was not changed and structure of Lemon residues was amorphous; the surface of modified lemon residues loosen and many pores formed, and Hg2+ have been adsorbed effectively. PMID:27400525

  5. [Study on Kinetic of Hg2+ from Wastewater Absorbed by Lemon Residues].

    PubMed

    Shen, Wang-qing; Wang, Miao; Yang, Ting

    2016-03-01

    With low price and its superior adsorption performance after modification, currently agricultural waste is used as adsorbent of heavy metals in wastewater, which has become a hot research topic. To study on Hg2+ from wastewater absorbed by lemon residues that has been modified by 15% concentration of sulphuric acid. The pore volume, pore size and other properties of the adsorbent were test. The samples were characterized by differential thermal analysis, IR, electron microscopy and spectroscopy. The result showed that the adsorption rate was controlled by membrane diffusion kinetics that was viewed as the first order kinetics equation of the Lagergren, which was physically absorbed. The adsorption properties of modified lemon residues were improved greatly, and the pore size distribution mainly was medium. There were three losses-weight process. There was a endothermic peak around 66 degrees C and two exotherm near 316 degrees C and 494 degrees C. Basic framework of Lemon residues was not changed and structure of Lemon residues was amorphous; the surface of modified lemon residues loosen and many pores formed, and Hg2+ have been adsorbed effectively.

  6. Hydrology, geomorphology, and flood profiles of Lemon Creek, Juneau, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Host, Randy H.; Neal, Edward G.

    2005-01-01

    Lemon Creek near Juneau, Alaska has a history of extensive gravel mining, which straightened and deepened the stream channel in the lower reaches of the study area. Gravel mining and channel excavation began in the 1940s and continued through the mid-1980s. Time sequential aerial photos and field investigations indicate that the channel morphology is reverting to pre-disturbance conditions through aggradation of sediment and re-establishment of braided channels, which may result in decreased channel conveyance and increased flooding potential. Time sequential surveys of selected channel cross sections were conducted in an attempt to determine rates of channel aggradation/degradation throughout three reaches of the study area. In order to assess flooding potential in the lower reaches of the study area the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center River Analysis System model was used to estimate the water-surface elevations for the 2-, 10-, 25-, 50-, and 100-year floods. A regionally based regression equation was used to estimate the magnitude of floods for the selected recurrence intervals. Forty-two cross sections were surveyed to define the hydraulic characteristics along a 1.7-mile reach of the stream. High-water marks from a peak flow of 1,820 cubic feet per second, or about a 5-year flood, were surveyed and used to calibrate the model throughout the study area. The stream channel at a bridge in the lower reach could not be simulated without violating assumptions of the model. A model without the lower bridge indicates flood potential is limited to a small area.

  7. 77 FR 73021 - Lemon Juice From Argentina: Final Results of the Expedited First Sunset Review of the Suspended...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ...''). See Initiation of Five-Year (``Sunset'') Review, 77 FR 45589 (August 1, 2012). The Department received... International Trade Administration Lemon Juice From Argentina: Final Results of the Expedited First Sunset... sunset review of the suspended antidumping duty investigation on lemon juice from Argentina....

  8. 78 FR 38944 - Lemon Juice From Mexico: Final Results of Full Sunset Review of the Suspended Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ... Antidumping Duty Investigation, 77 FR 75998 (December 26, 2012) (``Preliminary Results''). \\4\\ Lemon Juice... of Five-Year (``Sunset'') Review and Correction, 77 FR 45589 (August 1, 2012). \\2\\ Memorandum to... International Trade Administration Lemon Juice From Mexico: Final Results of Full Sunset Review of the...

  9. 77 FR 67833 - Lemon Juice From Argentina and Mexico; Notice of Commission Determination To Conduct Full Five...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-14

    ... both the domestic and respondent interested party group responses to its notice of institution (77 FR... COMMISSION Lemon Juice From Argentina and Mexico; Notice of Commission Determination To Conduct Full Five... investigations on lemon juice from Argentina and Mexico would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence...

  10. Contribution of anterior cingulate cortex and descending pain inhibitory system to analgesic effect of lemon odor in mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Affections are thought to regulate pain perception through the descending pain inhibitory system in the central nervous system. In this study, we examined in mice the affective change by inhalation of the lemon oil, which is well used for aromatherapy, and the effect of lemon odor on pain sensation. We also examined the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and descending pain inhibitory system to such regulation of pain. Results In the elevated plus maze, the time spent in the open arms was increased by inhalation of lemon oil. The pain behavior induced by injection of formalin into the hind paw was decreased. By inhalation of lemon oil, the number of c-Fos expression by formalin injection was significantly increased in the ACC, periaqueductal grey (PAG), nucleu raphe magnus (NRM) and locus ceruleus, and decreased in the spinal dorsal horn (SDH). The destruction of the ACC with ibotenic acid led to prevent the decrease of formalin-evoked nocifensive behavior in mice exposed to lemon oil. In these mice, the change of formalin-induced c-Fos expression in the ACC, lateral PAG, NRM and SDH by lemon odor was also prevented. Antagonize of dopamine D1 receptor in the ACC prevented to the analgesic effect of lemon oil. Conclusions These results suggest that the analgesic effect of lemon oil is induced by dopamine-related activation of ACC and the descending pain inhibitory system. PMID:24555533

  11. Pectic oligosacharides from lemon peel wastes: production, purification, and chemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Belén; Gullón, Beatriz; Yáñez, Remedios; Parajó, Juan C; Alonso, Jose L

    2013-10-23

    Lemon peel wastes were extracted with water to remove free sugars and other soluble compounds, and the insoluble solid was employed as a substrate for the manufacture of pectin-derived oligosaccharides by processing with hot, compressed water. When water-extracted lemon peel wastes were treated with water at 160 °C, the oligomer concentration reached the maximum value (31 g/L). Autohydrolysis liquors were subjected to two membrane filtration stages (diafiltration followed by concentration), yielding a refined product containing about 98 wt % of oligomers at a global yield of 14 kg/100 kg oven-dry lemon peel. The concentrate contained oligogalacturonides (with DP in the range of 2-18) and arabinooligosaccharides (with DP in the range of 2-8).

  12. Potentiating effects of honey on antioxidant properties of lemon-flavoured black tea.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Carla; Barros, Lillian; Vilas-Boas, Miguel; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2013-03-01

    Health benefits including antioxidant potential of black tea (Camellia sinensis), lemon (Citrus limon) and honey bees (Apis mellifera) have been extensively reported. Nevertheless, nothing is reported about the effects of their concomitant use. Herein, those effects were evaluated in infusions of lemon-flavoured black tea with three different kinds of honey (light amber, amber and dark amber) from Lavandula stoechas, Erica sp. pl. and other indigenous floral species from north-east Portugal, a region with high amounts of this food product. Data obtained showed that the use of honey (dark amber>amber>light amber) potentiates the antioxidant activity of lemon-flavoured black tea, increasing the reducing power and lipid peroxidation inhibition properties, as also the antioxidant contents such as phenolics, flavonoids and organic acids including ascorbic acid.

  13. Pectic oligosacharides from lemon peel wastes: production, purification, and chemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Belén; Gullón, Beatriz; Yáñez, Remedios; Parajó, Juan C; Alonso, Jose L

    2013-10-23

    Lemon peel wastes were extracted with water to remove free sugars and other soluble compounds, and the insoluble solid was employed as a substrate for the manufacture of pectin-derived oligosaccharides by processing with hot, compressed water. When water-extracted lemon peel wastes were treated with water at 160 °C, the oligomer concentration reached the maximum value (31 g/L). Autohydrolysis liquors were subjected to two membrane filtration stages (diafiltration followed by concentration), yielding a refined product containing about 98 wt % of oligomers at a global yield of 14 kg/100 kg oven-dry lemon peel. The concentrate contained oligogalacturonides (with DP in the range of 2-18) and arabinooligosaccharides (with DP in the range of 2-8). PMID:24066740

  14. Bioavailability of lemon verbena (Aloysia triphylla) polyphenols in rats: impact of colonic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Felgines, Catherine; Fraisse, Didier; Besson, Catherine; Vasson, Marie-Paule; Texier, Odile

    2014-05-28

    Lemon verbena (Aloysia triphylla) infusion, a widely consumed herbal tea, contains significant amounts of polyphenols such as flavone diglucuronides and phenylpropanoid glycosides (mainly verbascoside). We have recently shown that lemon verbena infusion offers beneficial effects against dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-induced colonic inflammation in rats. The present study aimed to evaluate the bioavailability and intestinal absorption of polyphenols derived from lemon verbena infusion in both healthy and colitic rats. For this purpose, lemon verbena infusion was given to rats ad libitum for 14 d, and then 4 % DSS was added to the infusion for 7 d. Before and after DSS administration, 24 h urinary excretion of polyphenols was determined. Flavones were excreted in the urine as conjugated aglycones, and their excretion was not significantly altered by colonic inflammation. Only trace amounts of verbascoside were excreted in the urine, but various metabolites (hydroxycinnamic acids) were detected. The urinary excretion of hydroxycinnamic acids, particularly that of caffeic acid, increased after DSS administration (P< 0·05). Only flavone aglycones (luteolin and diosmetin) were excreted in the faeces in small proportions (3·2 % of ingested flavones). Intestinal absorption of lemon verbena polyphenols was examined using an in situ intestinal perfusion model. Intestinal absorption of verbascoside and flavone diglucuronides did not significantly differ between the healthy and colitic rats. Collectively, these results show that intestinal absorption and urinary excretion of lemon verbena flavone diglucuronides were not altered by colonic inflammation, but that urinary excretion of hydroxycinnamic acids derived from verbascoside was affected in a colitic situation.

  15. Bioavailability of lemon verbena (Aloysia triphylla) polyphenols in rats: impact of colonic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Felgines, Catherine; Fraisse, Didier; Besson, Catherine; Vasson, Marie-Paule; Texier, Odile

    2014-05-28

    Lemon verbena (Aloysia triphylla) infusion, a widely consumed herbal tea, contains significant amounts of polyphenols such as flavone diglucuronides and phenylpropanoid glycosides (mainly verbascoside). We have recently shown that lemon verbena infusion offers beneficial effects against dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-induced colonic inflammation in rats. The present study aimed to evaluate the bioavailability and intestinal absorption of polyphenols derived from lemon verbena infusion in both healthy and colitic rats. For this purpose, lemon verbena infusion was given to rats ad libitum for 14 d, and then 4 % DSS was added to the infusion for 7 d. Before and after DSS administration, 24 h urinary excretion of polyphenols was determined. Flavones were excreted in the urine as conjugated aglycones, and their excretion was not significantly altered by colonic inflammation. Only trace amounts of verbascoside were excreted in the urine, but various metabolites (hydroxycinnamic acids) were detected. The urinary excretion of hydroxycinnamic acids, particularly that of caffeic acid, increased after DSS administration (P< 0·05). Only flavone aglycones (luteolin and diosmetin) were excreted in the faeces in small proportions (3·2 % of ingested flavones). Intestinal absorption of lemon verbena polyphenols was examined using an in situ intestinal perfusion model. Intestinal absorption of verbascoside and flavone diglucuronides did not significantly differ between the healthy and colitic rats. Collectively, these results show that intestinal absorption and urinary excretion of lemon verbena flavone diglucuronides were not altered by colonic inflammation, but that urinary excretion of hydroxycinnamic acids derived from verbascoside was affected in a colitic situation. PMID:24513110

  16. Surface mass balance reanalysis of Taku and Lemon Creek glaciers, Alaska: 1946-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, Christopher

    We reanalyzed geodetic and glaciological surface mass balance records of Taku and Lemon Creek glaciers for the period 1946--2015 to determine what has driven the contradictory behavior of these glaciers. During the past century, Taku Glacier has been increasing in area and mass, while Lemon Creek Glacier has simultaneously shrunk in area and mass. Between 1948 and 1999 geodetic mass balance rates are +0.33+/-0.34 m w.e. a--1 for Taku Glacier and 0.61+/-0.34 m w.e. a--1 for Lemon Creek Glacier. Geodetic mass balance rates decreased to +0.01+/-0.23 m w.e. a--1 and --0.65 +/-0.23 m w.e. a--1 for Taku and Lemon Creek glaciers respectively, between 1999 and 2013. We updated the glaciological analysis of annual field data, and found no significant difference between updated and previous annual mass balance solutions (p--value < 0.001). We used the geodetic mass balance to calibrate annual glaciological estimates between 1946 and 2015, removing systematic biases of +0.06 m w.e. a--1 from the Taku Glacier record and --0.06 m w.e. a --1 from the Lemon Creek Glacier record. Comparing mass balance anomalies we determined inter--annual variability of surface mass balance is the same for Taku and Lemon Creek glaciers. However, differences in glacier specific hypsometry and mass balance profile drive systematic differences in both annual and long--term glacier mass balance rates.

  17. In vitro dissolution of gallbladder stone by edible leaves, fruits and homoeopathic medicines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Ishwar; Singh, Yogendra; Ansari, Shoeb A.; Agrawal, Namita R.

    2005-10-01

    Gallbladder stone sample of a female patient was analysed by diagnostic, spectroscopic methods and by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Besides cholesterol as the major constituent, bilirubin, creatinine and blood urea were also found to be present in the sample. Bile acid (ursodeoxycholic acid) was used to study its effect on the dissolution of cholestrol present in the stone. Extracts of edible leaves and fruits (amla, lemon and mausammi) and the homoeopathic medicines Berberis vulgaris Q. Dioscorea Q. and Calcarea carb 200 in the concentration range 0-3% (v/v) were found to be effective in the dissolution process in the following sequences: B. vulgaris Q. and Dioscorea Q.> C. carb 200, lemon>mausammi, amla was found to be more effective than jamun and tulsi leaf extracts in the given concentration range.

  18. A refreshing beverage from mature coconut water blended with lemon juice.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, O P; Archana, B S; Singh, Asha; Raju, P S; Bawa, A S

    2014-11-01

    Coconut water obtained from the mature coconuts was blended with lemon juice to develop a refreshing beverage. The levels of total soluble solids (°Brix) in the coconut beverage and lemon juice (%), were optimized using response surface methodology and considering pH, CIE L* value and sensory attributes (colour, aroma, taste, consistency and overall acceptability) as responses. A number total of 14 experiments were carried out following Central Composite Rotatable Design (CCRD) keeping 6 experiments at centre point. The data obtained were analyzed using multiple regression technique and the quadratic equations (R(2), 98.14-99.89 %) were found to fit well in describing the effect of variables on responses studied. An optimum condition for the coconut water beverage was obtained at 13.5°Brix blended with 2 % lemon juice. The mature coconut water beverage blended with lemon juice showed a shelf-life of 6 months in packed conditions at low (5 °C), ambient (25 ± 2 °C) and high (37 °C) temperatures on the basis of physicochemical, microbiological and sensory attributes. PMID:26396331

  19. Using genetic inference to re-evaluate the minimum longevity of the lemon shark Negaprion brevirostris.

    PubMed

    Brooks, J L; Guttridge, T L; Franks, B R; Grubbs, R D; Chapman, D D; Gruber, S H; Dibattista, J D; Feldheim, K A

    2016-05-01

    A combination of mark-recapture and genetic sampling was used to extend the minimum longevity of an elasmobranch species and the life span estimate of the lemon shark Negaprion brevirostris was increased conservatively from 20·2 to 37 years. This increase in longevity means higher vulnerability and a longer recovery time from exploitation. PMID:27060882

  20. "Lee v. Weisman": The Tenth Justice Takes Aim at the "Lemon" Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, T. Page

    1991-01-01

    U.S. Solicitor General Kenneth W. Starr has asked the Supreme Court to abandon the Establishment Clause it formulated in "Lemon v. Kurtzman" (1971) for cases involving governmental accommodation of religion in civic life. Starr's "amicus curiae" in "Lee v. Weisman" questions the clause's persistent tendency to invalidate practices with…

  1. Comparative analysis of aroma compounds and sensorial features of strawberry and lemon guavas (Psidium cattleianum Sabine).

    PubMed

    Egea, Mariana Buranelo; Pereira-Netto, Adaucto Bellarmino; Cacho, Juan; Ferreira, Vicente; Lopez, Ricardo

    2014-12-01

    The aroma of strawberry and lemon guava fruits (Psidium cattleianum Sabine) was studied by sensory analysis, gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) and quantitative analysis. Volatiles released from the pulps were collected in a trapping system consisting of LiChrolut EN resins and eluted with dichloromethane/methanol. In total, 23 odour zones were detected by GC-O, of which 16 were found in the extract from the strawberry guava pulp and 17 in the extract from the lemon guava pulp. Among the compounds identified, only 10 were common to both strawberry and lemon guavas. The descriptive sensorial analysis differentiated between the aroma profiles of the strawberry guava pulp with the descriptor "tomato" and the lemon guava pulp with the descriptor "tropical fruit". The typical aroma of the guava fruits was dominated by the presence of numerous aldehydes and ketones among which (Z)-3-hexenal was the most intense odorant, while 1,8-cineole and linalool were also revealed as important aroma constituents.

  2. Effect of marinating chicken meat with lemon, green tea, and turmeric against foodborne bacterial pathogenss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foodborne diseases affect millions of people each year. To reduce the incidence of bacterial foodborne pathogens more effective treatment methods are needed. In this study we evaluated the effect of marinating chicken breast fillets with extracts of lemon, green tea, and turmeric against Campylob...

  3. Esophageal Obstruction by a Lemon that Required Esophagotomy: Thoughts on Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohiya, Gham-Shyam; Tan-Figueroa, Lilia; Van Le, Hung; Rusu, Lucia

    2005-01-01

    A patient with pica and Lennox Gastaut syndrome suddenly refused oral intake. Neck radiographs revealed no foreign body. Barium swallow identified an irregular filling defect in the cervical esophagus. Esophagoscopy showed a gold ball-like object (half a lemon) 3 cm distal to the cricopharyngeus. This object had to be removed by esophagotomy after…

  4. A Better Lemon Squeezer? Maximum-Likelihood Regression with Beta-Distributed Dependent Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smithson, Michael; Verkuilen, Jay

    2006-01-01

    Uncorrectable skew and heteroscedasticity are among the "lemons" of psychological data, yet many important variables naturally exhibit these properties. For scales with a lower and upper bound, a suitable candidate for models is the beta distribution, which is very flexible and models skew quite well. The authors present maximum-likelihood…

  5. Chemical guide parameters for Spanish lemon (Citrus limon (L.) Burm.) juices.

    PubMed

    Lorente, José; Vegara, Salud; Martí, Nuria; Ibarz, Albert; Coll, Luís; Hernández, Julio; Valero, Manuel; Saura, Domingo

    2014-11-01

    To contribute for setting reference guideline for commercial juice extracted from the Spanish lemon varieties, chemical composition of 92 direct and 92 reconstituted samples were investigated. In direct lemon juice, titratable acidity was 52.4 g/L, being the citric acid the main component. Glucose, fructose and sucrose concentrations were 7.9, 7.3 and 4.5 g/L, respectively. Predominant mineral was potassium (1264.2mg/L), followed by phosphorous (306 mg/L), calcium (112 mg/L) and magnesium (92.6 mg/L). Hesperidin ranged from 257 to 484.8 mg/L, while water soluble pectins varied between 164.8 and 550 mg/L. Similar values were obtained in reconstituted lemon juice. There are different parameters that did not reach or exceeded the limits proposed by the European Association of the Industry of Juices and Nectars. These levels should be taken into account to modify the present reference guideline and that Spanish lemon juices are not discarded for to have lower or bigger values.

  6. Comparative analysis of aroma compounds and sensorial features of strawberry and lemon guavas (Psidium cattleianum Sabine).

    PubMed

    Egea, Mariana Buranelo; Pereira-Netto, Adaucto Bellarmino; Cacho, Juan; Ferreira, Vicente; Lopez, Ricardo

    2014-12-01

    The aroma of strawberry and lemon guava fruits (Psidium cattleianum Sabine) was studied by sensory analysis, gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) and quantitative analysis. Volatiles released from the pulps were collected in a trapping system consisting of LiChrolut EN resins and eluted with dichloromethane/methanol. In total, 23 odour zones were detected by GC-O, of which 16 were found in the extract from the strawberry guava pulp and 17 in the extract from the lemon guava pulp. Among the compounds identified, only 10 were common to both strawberry and lemon guavas. The descriptive sensorial analysis differentiated between the aroma profiles of the strawberry guava pulp with the descriptor "tomato" and the lemon guava pulp with the descriptor "tropical fruit". The typical aroma of the guava fruits was dominated by the presence of numerous aldehydes and ketones among which (Z)-3-hexenal was the most intense odorant, while 1,8-cineole and linalool were also revealed as important aroma constituents. PMID:24996334

  7. A refreshing beverage from mature coconut water blended with lemon juice.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, O P; Archana, B S; Singh, Asha; Raju, P S; Bawa, A S

    2014-11-01

    Coconut water obtained from the mature coconuts was blended with lemon juice to develop a refreshing beverage. The levels of total soluble solids (°Brix) in the coconut beverage and lemon juice (%), were optimized using response surface methodology and considering pH, CIE L* value and sensory attributes (colour, aroma, taste, consistency and overall acceptability) as responses. A number total of 14 experiments were carried out following Central Composite Rotatable Design (CCRD) keeping 6 experiments at centre point. The data obtained were analyzed using multiple regression technique and the quadratic equations (R(2), 98.14-99.89 %) were found to fit well in describing the effect of variables on responses studied. An optimum condition for the coconut water beverage was obtained at 13.5°Brix blended with 2 % lemon juice. The mature coconut water beverage blended with lemon juice showed a shelf-life of 6 months in packed conditions at low (5 °C), ambient (25 ± 2 °C) and high (37 °C) temperatures on the basis of physicochemical, microbiological and sensory attributes.

  8. Powder lemon juice containing oligosaccharides obtained by dextransucrase acceptor reaction synthesis and dehydrated in sprouted bed.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Raquel Macedo Dantas; Araújo, Antônia Daiana Andrade; Fontes, Cláudia Patrícia Mourão Lima; da Silva, Ana Raquel Araujo; da Costa, José Maria Correia; Rodrigues, Sueli

    2015-09-01

    Oligosaccharides can be synthesized using the sugars present in the fruit juices through the dextransucrase acceptor reaction. In the present work, the effect of reducing sugar and sucrose concentration on oligosaccharide formation in lemon juice was evaluated through response surface methodology. The oligosaccharide formation in lemon juice was favored at high concentrations of sucrose (75 g/L) and reducing sugar (75 g/L). At this synthesis conditions, an oligosaccharide concentration of 94.81 g/L was obtained with a conversion of 63.21% of the initial sugars into the target product. Oligosaccharides with degree of polymerization up to 11 were obtained. The lemon juice was dehydrated in spouted bed using maltodextrin as drying adjuvant. The powder obtained at 60°C with 20 % maltodextrin presented low moisture (2.24 %), low water activity (Aw = 0.18) and the lowest reconstitution time (~46 s). The results showed that lemon juice is suitable for oligosaccharides enzyme synthesis and can be dehydrated in spouted bed.

  9. Phytochemical profile of a blend of black chokeberry and lemon juice with cholinesterase inhibitory effect and antioxidant potential.

    PubMed

    Gironés-Vilaplana, Amadeo; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B; Ferreres, Federico; Moreno, Diego A; García-Viguera, Cristina

    2012-10-15

    In this study, black chokeberry concentrate was added (5% w/v) to lemon juice, since previous reports suggested potential health benefits of this blend. The phytochemical composition, antioxidant capacity (scavenging of DPPH, superoxide and hydroxyl radicals, and hypochlorous acid), and inhibitory activity against cholinesterase of the new blend were determined and compared with those of lemon juice and chokeberry in citric acid (5%). The chokeberry concentrate, rich in cyanidin-glycosides, quercetin derivatives, and 3-O-caffeoylquinic acid, and lemon juice, possessing flavones, flavanones, quercetin derivates, and hydroxycinnamic acids, were characterised. The new drink showed a higher antioxidant effect than the chokeberry or lemon controls for all the tested methods, except for hypochlorous acid, in which lemon juice displayed higher activity. Both the lemon juice and chokeberry controls inhibited acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase, and this effect was increased in the new mixtures. The results of the different radical scavenging assays indicate that the lemon-black chokeberry (5% w/v) mixture was more antioxidative than the respective controls separately. Moreover, their inhibition of cholinesterase is of interest regarding neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, or senile dementia.

  10. Salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate improve chilling tolerance in cold-stored lemon fruit (Citrus limon).

    PubMed

    Siboza, Xolani Irvin; Bertling, Isa; Odindo, Alfred Oduor

    2014-11-15

    Chilling injury (CI) is associated with the degradation of membrane integrity which can be aligned to phenolic oxidation activated by polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and peroxidase (POD), enzymes responsible for tissue browning. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) is a further enzyme prominent in the phenolic metabolism that is involved in acclimation against chilling stress. It was hypothesized that treatment with methyl jasmonate (MJ) and salicylic acid (SA) may enhance chilling tolerance in lemon fruit by increasing the synthesis of total phenolics and PAL by activating the key enzyme regulating the shikimic acid pathway whilst inhibiting the activity of POD and PPO. Lemon fruit were treated with 10μM MJ, 2mM SA or 10μM MJ plus 2mM SA, waxed, stored at -0.5, 2 or 4.5°C for up to 28 days plus 7 days at 23°C. Membrane integrity was studied by investigating membrane permeability and the degree of membrane lipid peroxidation in lemon flavedo following cold storage. The 10μM MJ plus 2mM SA treatment was most effective in enhancing chilling tolerance of lemon fruit, significantly reducing chilling-induced membrane permeability and membrane lipid peroxidation of lemon flavedo tissue. This treatment also increased total phenolics and PAL activity in such tissue while inhibiting POD activity, the latter possibly contributing to the delay of CI manifestation. PPO activity was found to be a poor biochemical marker of CI. Treatment with 10μM MJ plus 2mM SA resulted in an alteration of the phenolic metabolism, enhancing chilling tolerance, possibly through increased production of total phenolics and the activation of PAL and inhibition of POD.

  11. β-Caryophyllene, a Compound Isolated from the Biblical Balm of Gilead (Commiphora gileadensis), Is a Selective Apoptosis Inducer for Tumor Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Amiel, Eitan; Ofir, Rivka; Dudai, Nativ; Soloway, Elaine; Rabinsky, Tatiana; Rachmilevitch, Shimon

    2012-01-01

    The biblical balm of Gilead (Commiphora gileadensis) was investigated in this study for anticancerous activity against tumor cell lines. The results obtained from ethanol-based extracts and from essential oils indicated that β-caryophyllene (trans-(1R,9S)-8-methylene-4,11,11-trimethylbicyclo[7.2.0]undec-4-ene) is a key component in essential oils extracted from the balm of Gilead. β-Caryophyllene can be found in spice blends, citrus flavors, soaps, detergents, creams, and lotions, as well as in a variety of food and beverage products, and it is known for its anti-inflammatory, local anaesthetic, and antifungal properties. It is also a potent cytotoxic compound over a wide range of cell lines. In the current paper, we found that Commiphora gileadensis stem extracts and essential oil have an antiproliferative proapoptotic effect against tumor cells and not against normal cells. β-caryophyllene caused a potent induction of apoptosis accompanied by DNA ladder and caspase-3 catalytic activity in tumor cell lines. In summary, we showed that C. gileadensis stems contain an apoptosis inducer that acts, in a selective manner, against tumor cell lines and not against normal cells. PMID:22567036

  12. β-Caryophyllene, a Compound Isolated from the Biblical Balm of Gilead (Commiphora gileadensis), Is a Selective Apoptosis Inducer for Tumor Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Amiel, Eitan; Ofir, Rivka; Dudai, Nativ; Soloway, Elaine; Rabinsky, Tatiana; Rachmilevitch, Shimon

    2012-01-01

    The biblical balm of Gilead (Commiphora gileadensis) was investigated in this study for anticancerous activity against tumor cell lines. The results obtained from ethanol-based extracts and from essential oils indicated that β-caryophyllene (trans-(1R,9S)-8-methylene-4,11,11-trimethylbicyclo[7.2.0]undec-4-ene) is a key component in essential oils extracted from the balm of Gilead. β-Caryophyllene can be found in spice blends, citrus flavors, soaps, detergents, creams, and lotions, as well as in a variety of food and beverage products, and it is known for its anti-inflammatory, local anaesthetic, and antifungal properties. It is also a potent cytotoxic compound over a wide range of cell lines. In the current paper, we found that Commiphora gileadensis stem extracts and essential oil have an antiproliferative proapoptotic effect against tumor cells and not against normal cells. β-caryophyllene caused a potent induction of apoptosis accompanied by DNA ladder and caspase-3 catalytic activity in tumor cell lines. In summary, we showed that C. gileadensis stems contain an apoptosis inducer that acts, in a selective manner, against tumor cell lines and not against normal cells.

  13. β-Caryophyllene, a Compound Isolated from the Biblical Balm of Gilead (Commiphora gileadensis), Is a Selective Apoptosis Inducer for Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Amiel, Eitan; Ofir, Rivka; Dudai, Nativ; Soloway, Elaine; Rabinsky, Tatiana; Rachmilevitch, Shimon

    2012-01-01

    The biblical balm of Gilead (Commiphora gileadensis) was investigated in this study for anticancerous activity against tumor cell lines. The results obtained from ethanol-based extracts and from essential oils indicated that β-caryophyllene (trans-(1R,9S)-8-methylene-4,11,11-trimethylbicyclo[7.2.0]undec-4-ene) is a key component in essential oils extracted from the balm of Gilead. β-Caryophyllene can be found in spice blends, citrus flavors, soaps, detergents, creams, and lotions, as well as in a variety of food and beverage products, and it is known for its anti-inflammatory, local anaesthetic, and antifungal properties. It is also a potent cytotoxic compound over a wide range of cell lines. In the current paper, we found that Commiphora gileadensis stem extracts and essential oil have an antiproliferative proapoptotic effect against tumor cells and not against normal cells. β-caryophyllene caused a potent induction of apoptosis accompanied by DNA ladder and caspase-3 catalytic activity in tumor cell lines. In summary, we showed that C. gileadensis stems contain an apoptosis inducer that acts, in a selective manner, against tumor cell lines and not against normal cells. PMID:22567036

  14. Genotype and harvest time influence the phytochemical quality of Fino lemon juice (Citrus limon (L.) Burm. F.) for industrial use.

    PubMed

    González-Molina, Elena; Moreno, Diego A; García-Viguera, Cristina

    2008-03-12

    Two clonal selections of lemon tree (Citrus limon Burm. f. cv. Fino), named Fino-49-5 and Fino-95, were studied to ascertain the influence of genetic (clone) and environmental (season) factors on the human-health bioactive compounds of lemon juice (vitamin C and flavonoids) and the possible relationship between composition and in vitro antioxidant capacity (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethyl-benzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), and ferric reducing antioxidant power) of the juice. The cultivar Fino-49-5 performed better in terms of flavonoid and vitamin C contents. Variability in the weather conditions determined, at least in part, differences in the content of lemon juice bioactives more importantly than the genetic background did. Therefore, the food industry would have phytochemically rich and nutritive lemons with practically complete independence of the harvest time and the selected cultivar. PMID:18254590

  15. Headspace solid-phase microextraction for characterization of fragrances of lemon verbena (Aloysia triphylla) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam-Sun; Lee, Dong-Sun

    2004-01-01

    Natural fragrances from lemon verbena (Aloysia triphylla) were studied by headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) techniques followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), with six different fibre coatings being tested to evaluate the extraction efficiencies of several selected compounds. A total of 14 compounds were identified in the fragrances of lemon verbena. Geranial and neral were detected as major components and alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, beta-caryophyllene, and curcumene as minor components. Enantiomeric analysis of chiral compounds from lemon verbena was carried out on a chiral column. alpha-Pinene, limonene, and camphor in the fragrances emitted from lemon verbena were found in the (+), (-), and (-) forms, respectively.

  16. Headspace solid-phase microextraction for characterization of fragrances of lemon verbena (Aloysia triphylla) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam-Sun; Lee, Dong-Sun

    2004-01-01

    Natural fragrances from lemon verbena (Aloysia triphylla) were studied by headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) techniques followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), with six different fibre coatings being tested to evaluate the extraction efficiencies of several selected compounds. A total of 14 compounds were identified in the fragrances of lemon verbena. Geranial and neral were detected as major components and alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, beta-caryophyllene, and curcumene as minor components. Enantiomeric analysis of chiral compounds from lemon verbena was carried out on a chiral column. alpha-Pinene, limonene, and camphor in the fragrances emitted from lemon verbena were found in the (+), (-), and (-) forms, respectively. PMID:15335064

  17. Genotype and harvest time influence the phytochemical quality of Fino lemon juice (Citrus limon (L.) Burm. F.) for industrial use.

    PubMed

    González-Molina, Elena; Moreno, Diego A; García-Viguera, Cristina

    2008-03-12

    Two clonal selections of lemon tree (Citrus limon Burm. f. cv. Fino), named Fino-49-5 and Fino-95, were studied to ascertain the influence of genetic (clone) and environmental (season) factors on the human-health bioactive compounds of lemon juice (vitamin C and flavonoids) and the possible relationship between composition and in vitro antioxidant capacity (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethyl-benzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), and ferric reducing antioxidant power) of the juice. The cultivar Fino-49-5 performed better in terms of flavonoid and vitamin C contents. Variability in the weather conditions determined, at least in part, differences in the content of lemon juice bioactives more importantly than the genetic background did. Therefore, the food industry would have phytochemically rich and nutritive lemons with practically complete independence of the harvest time and the selected cultivar.

  18. Assessment of stability of binary sweetener blend (aspartame x acesulfame-K) during storage in whey lemon beverage.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sumit; Shendurse, Ashish M; Sharma, Vivek; Wadhwa, Balbir K; Singh, Ashish K

    2013-08-01

    In the present study, artificial sweeteners-aspartame, acesulfame-K and binary sweetener blend of aspartame x acesulfame-K were assessed for stability during storage in whey lemon beverage. A solid phase extraction method using C18 cartridges was standardized for the isolation of aspartame, acesulfame-K and their degradation products in whey lemon beverage. HPLC analytical conditions were standardized over C18 column for simultaneous separation of multiple sweeteners and their degradation products in sample isolates. Storage studies revealed that increase in acidity and viscosity and decrease in pH and ascorbic acid content of artificially sweetened whey lemon beverage samples were similar to the changes occurring in control samples during storage. Analysis using HPLC showed that aspartame (added either singly or in a blend) and acesulfame-K (added in a blend) were stable in whey lemon beverage under refrigerated condition for 15 days.

  19. Determination of physical characteristics, chemical composition and digestion coefficients of treated lemon pulp with Saccharomyces cerevisiae in goat diet.

    PubMed

    Dadvar, P; Dayani, O; Mehdipour, M; Morovat, M

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of processing of lemon pulp with Saccharomyces cerevisiae on physical properties, chemical composition, digestion coefficients and blood parameters. Eight adult male Raeini goats were used in a 28-day period. The experimental design was a completely randomised design with two treatments and four replicates. The first 21 days were for adaptation, and the last 7 days were for collecting samples. The animals were housed in individual metabolic cages equipped with a urine-faeces separator and were fed with diet containing alfalfa hay (60%) and lemon pulp (40%) at the maintenance level. Collected data were subjected to analysis of completely randomised design. With diet containing processed lemon pulp, functional specific gravity, bulk density, soluble dry matter, percentage of crude protein, neutral detergent fibre (NDF), acid detergent fibre and crude ash were significantly increased and water-holding capacity, insoluble dry matter, insoluble ash percentage of dry matter, organic matter, crude fat, non-fibrous carbohydrates and nitrogen-free extract were significantly decreased (p < 0.05). Digestion coefficient of organic matter in dry matter and metabolisable energy were also decreased in treated lemon pulp (p < 0.05). Compared with untreated lemon pulp, digestibility of crude protein and NDF was higher (p < 0.05), but digestibility of crude fat was lower (p < 0.05). In general, processing of lemon pulp with S. cerevisiae improved the physical characteristics and increased the percentage of crude protein and the digestion coefficients of protein and NDF.

  20. The antioxidant activity and thermal stability of lemon verbena (Aloysia triphylla) infusion.

    PubMed

    Abderrahim, Fatima; Estrella, Seyer; Susín, Cristina; Arribas, Silvia M; González, M Carmen; Condezo-Hoyos, Luis

    2011-05-01

    Because of its good sensorial attributes, lemon verbena is used as a primary ingredient in infusions and nonalcoholic drinks. The present study was designed to assess the antioxidant activity (AA) of lemon verbena infusion (LVI) as well as the thermal stability of its AA and the content of polyphenolic compounds. The values reflecting the AA of LVI, including AA index, fast scavenging rate against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, and hydroxyl radical scavenging, are higher than those of many herbal infusions and antioxidant drinks estimated from reported data. In addition, the slope lag time and specific oxyradical antioxidant capacity values of LVI are comparable to those of a commercial antioxidant drink based on green tea. Hence, LVI is a source of bifunctional antioxidants, and thus in vivo studies of the antioxidant capacity of LVI would be useful to evaluate its potential as an ingredient in antioxidant drinks.

  1. Application of ionic liquids in the microwave-assisted extraction of pectin from lemon peels.

    PubMed

    Guolin, Huang; Jeffrey, Shi; Kai, Zhang; Xiaolan, Huang

    2012-01-01

    Microwave-assisted extraction of pectin from lemon peels by using ionic liquid as alternative solvent was investigated. The extracted pectin was detected by Fourier transform infrared spectra. The extraction conditions were optimized through the different experiments in conjunction with the response surface methodology. A pectin yield of 24.68 % was obtained under the optimal parameters: the extraction temperature of 88°C, the extraction time of 9.6 min, and a liquid-solid ratio of 22.7 ml · g(-1). The structure of the pretreated lemon peel samples and the samples after microwave-assisted extraction were characterized by a field emission scanning electron microscope.

  2. The antioxidant activity and thermal stability of lemon verbena (Aloysia triphylla) infusion.

    PubMed

    Abderrahim, Fatima; Estrella, Seyer; Susín, Cristina; Arribas, Silvia M; González, M Carmen; Condezo-Hoyos, Luis

    2011-05-01

    Because of its good sensorial attributes, lemon verbena is used as a primary ingredient in infusions and nonalcoholic drinks. The present study was designed to assess the antioxidant activity (AA) of lemon verbena infusion (LVI) as well as the thermal stability of its AA and the content of polyphenolic compounds. The values reflecting the AA of LVI, including AA index, fast scavenging rate against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, and hydroxyl radical scavenging, are higher than those of many herbal infusions and antioxidant drinks estimated from reported data. In addition, the slope lag time and specific oxyradical antioxidant capacity values of LVI are comparable to those of a commercial antioxidant drink based on green tea. Hence, LVI is a source of bifunctional antioxidants, and thus in vivo studies of the antioxidant capacity of LVI would be useful to evaluate its potential as an ingredient in antioxidant drinks. PMID:21434775

  3. [Antioxidant properties of essential oils from lemon, grapefruit, coriander, clove, and their mixtures].

    PubMed

    Misharina, T A; Samusenko, A L

    2008-01-01

    Antioxidant properties of individual essential oils from lemon (Citrus limon L.), pink grapefruit (Citrus paradise L.), coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.), and clove (Caryophyllus aromaticus L.) buds and their mixtures were studied by capillary gas-liquid chromatography. Antioxidant activity was assessed by oxidation of the aliphatic aldehyde hexanal to the carboxylic acid. The lowest and highest antioxidant activities were exhibited by grapefruit and clove bud essential oils, respectively. Mixtures containing clove bud essential oil also strongly inhibited oxidation of hexanal. Changes in the composition of essential oils and their mixtures in the course of long-term storage in the light were studied. The stability of components of lemon and coriander essential oils in mixtures increased compared to individual essential oils.

  4. Beverages of lemon juice and exotic noni and papaya with potential for anticholinergic effects.

    PubMed

    Gironés-Vilaplana, Amadeo; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B; Ferreres, Federico; Moreno, Diego A; García-Viguera, Cristina

    2015-03-01

    Lemon (Citrus limon (L.) Burm. f.) juice beverages enriched either with noni (Morinda citrifolia L.) (LN) or papaya (Carica papaya L.) (LP), were characterized by HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS(n), the antioxidant capacity was evaluated by (DPPH·), superoxide (O2(·-)), hydroxyl radicals (·OH) and hypochlorous acid (HOCl) assays, and their potential as acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) inhibitors was also assessed. The fruits are rich in a wide range of bioactive phenolics. Regarding DPPH·, ·OH and HOCl assays, the LP displayed strong activity, and LN was the most active against O2(·-). Concerning cholinesterases, LP was the most active, mainly due to lemon juice contribution. The effect on the cholinesterases was not as strong as in previous reports on purified extracts, but the bioactive-rich beverages offer the possibility of dietary coadjutants for daily consumption of health-promoting substances by adults with aging-related cognitive or physical disorders.

  5. The traditional irrigation technique of Lake Garda lemon--houses (Northern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barontini, Stefano; Vitale, Nicola; Fausti, Federico; Bettoni, Barbara; Bonati, Sara; Peli, Marco; Pietta, Antonella; Tononi, Marco; Ranzi, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    Between 16th and 19th centuries the North-Western side of Lake Garda was seat of an important district which, at the time of its maximum splendour between 18th and 19th centuries, produced and exported lemons and citrus even toward the Northern Europe and the Russia. The limonaie del Garda (Lake-Garda lemon-houses), the local name of the citrus orchards, were settled on terraces built on steep slopes, with landfill taken from the Eastern side of the lake, and closed by greenhouses during late autumn and winter in order to protect the cultivations. The terraces were built nearby streams, they were South-Eastern exposed and protected by walls from the cold winds. Thanks in fact to the Lake Garda microclimate, lemon trees were not cultivated in pots, as in the typical orangeries of mid-latitudes Europe, but directly in the soil. Here the citrus cultivation technique reached a remarkably high degree of standardisation, with local cultivar as the Madernino or lemon from Maderno, and it involved, as in modern industrial districts, all the surrounding land in order to satisfy the needing of required materials to build the terraces, the walls, the greenhouses and the wooden frames to hold the branches laden with fruits. Due to the great water requirement of lemon trees during summer, which is estimated to range from 150 to 300 ℓ every ten days, the water management played a key role in the cultivation technique. The traditional irrigation technique was standardized as well. During our surveys, we observed that most of the lemon-houses still conserve little stone flumes along the walls upslope to the terraces, with spillways every adult tree, i.e. about every 4 m. The flumes were filled with water taken from an upstream reservoir, built nearby a stream. The spillways were activated with a backwater obtained by means of a sand bag placed within the flume, just downstream to the spillway itself. In order to avoid any excavation, spilled water was driven to the base of each

  6. Estimation of whole lemon mass transfer parameters during hot air drying using different modelling methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torki-Harchegani, Mehdi; Ghanbarian, Davoud; Sadeghi, Morteza

    2015-08-01

    To design new dryers or improve existing drying equipments, accurate values of mass transfer parameters is of great importance. In this study, an experimental and theoretical investigation of drying whole lemons was carried out. The whole lemons were dried in a convective hot air dryer at different air temperatures (50, 60 and 75 °C) and a constant air velocity (1 m s-1). In theoretical consideration, three moisture transfer models including Dincer and Dost model, Bi- G correlation approach and conventional solution of Fick's second law of diffusion were used to determine moisture transfer parameters and predict dimensionless moisture content curves. The predicted results were then compared with the experimental data and the higher degree of prediction accuracy was achieved by the Dincer and Dost model.

  7. Online RPLC-GC via TOTAD method to isolate (+)-methyl epijasmonate from lemon (Citrus limon Burm.).

    PubMed

    del Mar Caja, Maria; Blanch, Gracia Patricia; Ruiz del Castillo, Maria Luisa

    2008-07-23

    Pure (+)-methyl epijasmonate was isolated from lemon ( Citrus limon Burm.) for the first time. To that aim, two commercial essential oils and one homemade extract were included in the present paper. First, a study on the appropriate chromatographic conditions to avoid the epimerization from methyl epijasmonate to the more stable methyl jasmonate was accomplished. The results obtained are discussed. The presence of (+)-methyl epijasmonate in the three samples studied was initially established through the direct injection into GC-MS. However, the overlapping of (+)-methyl epijasmonate with other matrix components made it necessary to employ a multidimensional technique. RPLC-GC analysis via through-oven transfer adsorption-desorption (TOTAD) provided the selectivity and sensitivity required, reflecting that the homemade lemon extract was an adequate natural source to obtain pure (+)-methyl epijasmonate by means of the collection of the corresponding RPLC fraction.

  8. Evaluation of the Stability of Concentrated Emulsions for Lemon Beverages Using Sequential Experimental Designs

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Teresa Cristina Abreu; Larentis, Ariane Leites; Ferraz, Helen Conceição

    2015-01-01

    The study of the stability of concentrated oil-in-water emulsions is imperative to provide a scientific approach for an important problem in the beverage industry, contributing to abolish the empiricism still present nowadays. The use of these emulsions would directly imply a reduction of transportation costs between production and the sales points, where dilution takes place. The goal of this research was to evaluate the influence of the main components of a lemon emulsion on its stability, aiming to maximize the concentration of oil in the beverage and to correlate its physicochemical characteristics to product stability, allowing an increase of shelf life of the final product. For this purpose, analyses of surface and interface tension, electrokinetic potential, particle size and rheological properties of the emulsions were conducted. A 24-1 fractional factorial design was performed with the following variables: lemon oil/water ratio (30% to 50%), starch and Arabic gum concentrations (0% to 30%) and dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (0 mg/L to 100 mg/L), including an evaluation of the responses at the central conditions of each variable. Sequentially, a full design was prepared to evaluate the two most influential variables obtained in the first plan, in which concentration of starch and gum ranged from 0% to 20%, while concentration of lemon oil/water ratio was fixed at 50%, without dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate. Concentrated emulsions with stability superior to 15 days were obtained with either starch or Arabic gum and 50% lemon oil. The most stable formulations presented viscosity over 100 cP and ratio between the surface tension of the emulsion and the mucilage of over 1. These two answers were selected, since they better represent the behavior of emulsions in terms of stability and could be used as tools for an initial selection of the most promising formulations. PMID:25793301

  9. Evaluation of the stability of concentrated emulsions for lemon beverages using sequential experimental designs.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Teresa Cristina Abreu; Larentis, Ariane Leites; Ferraz, Helen Conceição

    2015-01-01

    The study of the stability of concentrated oil-in-water emulsions is imperative to provide a scientific approach for an important problem in the beverage industry, contributing to abolish the empiricism still present nowadays. The use of these emulsions would directly imply a reduction of transportation costs between production and the sales points, where dilution takes place. The goal of this research was to evaluate the influence of the main components of a lemon emulsion on its stability, aiming to maximize the concentration of oil in the beverage and to correlate its physicochemical characteristics to product stability, allowing an increase of shelf life of the final product. For this purpose, analyses of surface and interface tension, electrokinetic potential, particle size and rheological properties of the emulsions were conducted. A 2(4-1) fractional factorial design was performed with the following variables: lemon oil/water ratio (30% to 50%), starch and Arabic gum concentrations (0% to 30%) and dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (0 mg/L to 100 mg/L), including an evaluation of the responses at the central conditions of each variable. Sequentially, a full design was prepared to evaluate the two most influential variables obtained in the first plan, in which concentration of starch and gum ranged from 0% to 20%, while concentration of lemon oil/water ratio was fixed at 50%, without dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate. Concentrated emulsions with stability superior to 15 days were obtained with either starch or Arabic gum and 50% lemon oil. The most stable formulations presented viscosity over 100 cP and ratio between the surface tension of the emulsion and the mucilage of over 1. These two answers were selected, since they better represent the behavior of emulsions in terms of stability and could be used as tools for an initial selection of the most promising formulations.

  10. Lemon: An MPI parallel I/O library for data encapsulation using LIME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deuzeman, Albert; Reker, Siebren; Urbach, Carsten; ETM Collaboration

    2012-06-01

    We introduce Lemon, an MPI parallel I/O library that provides efficient parallel I/O of both binary and metadata on massively parallel architectures. Motivated by the demands of the Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics community, the data is stored in the SciDAC Lattice QCD Interchange Message Encapsulation format. This format allows for storing large blocks of binary data and corresponding metadata in the same file. Even if designed for LQCD needs, this format might be useful for any application with this type of data profile. The design, implementation and application of Lemon are described. We conclude with presenting the excellent scaling properties of Lemon on state-of-the-art high performance computers. Program summaryProgram title: Lemon Catalogue identifier: AELP_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AELP_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 32 860 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 223 762 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: MPI and C Computer: Any which supports MPI I/O Operating system: Any Has the code been vectorised or parallelised?: Yes. Includes MPI directives. RAM: Depending on input used Classification: 11.5 External routines: MPI Nature of problem: Distributed file I/O with metadata Solution method: MPI parallel I/O based implementation of LIME format Running time: Varies depending on file and architecture size, in the order of seconds

  11. Evaluation of the stability of concentrated emulsions for lemon beverages using sequential experimental designs.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Teresa Cristina Abreu; Larentis, Ariane Leites; Ferraz, Helen Conceição

    2015-01-01

    The study of the stability of concentrated oil-in-water emulsions is imperative to provide a scientific approach for an important problem in the beverage industry, contributing to abolish the empiricism still present nowadays. The use of these emulsions would directly imply a reduction of transportation costs between production and the sales points, where dilution takes place. The goal of this research was to evaluate the influence of the main components of a lemon emulsion on its stability, aiming to maximize the concentration of oil in the beverage and to correlate its physicochemical characteristics to product stability, allowing an increase of shelf life of the final product. For this purpose, analyses of surface and interface tension, electrokinetic potential, particle size and rheological properties of the emulsions were conducted. A 2(4-1) fractional factorial design was performed with the following variables: lemon oil/water ratio (30% to 50%), starch and Arabic gum concentrations (0% to 30%) and dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (0 mg/L to 100 mg/L), including an evaluation of the responses at the central conditions of each variable. Sequentially, a full design was prepared to evaluate the two most influential variables obtained in the first plan, in which concentration of starch and gum ranged from 0% to 20%, while concentration of lemon oil/water ratio was fixed at 50%, without dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate. Concentrated emulsions with stability superior to 15 days were obtained with either starch or Arabic gum and 50% lemon oil. The most stable formulations presented viscosity over 100 cP and ratio between the surface tension of the emulsion and the mucilage of over 1. These two answers were selected, since they better represent the behavior of emulsions in terms of stability and could be used as tools for an initial selection of the most promising formulations. PMID:25793301

  12. A conservative treatment approach using direct composite resins for anterior teeth eroded by lemon sucking.

    PubMed

    Passos, Vanara Florencio; de Souza, Andre Mattos Brito; Rodrigues, Lidiany Karla Azevedo; Bombonatti, Juliana Campos Fraga Soares; Santiago, Sergio Lima

    2013-08-01

    An excessively acidic diet results in the progressive deterioration of dental health, with functional, esthetic, and biological consequences. Previously, rehabilitation required placing numerous full crowns and root canal treatments; however, with improved adhesive techniques, a more conservative approach may be utilized to preserve tooth structure. This article describes 2 cases that utilized conservative dental treatments (involving direct composite resins with minimal preparation of the tooth structure) to treat eroded dentition induced by lemon sucking. PMID:23928446

  13. Mechanism of seedlessness in a new lemon cultivar 'Xiangshui' [Citrus limon (L.) Burm. F].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-Wei; Huang, Gui-Xiang; Ding, Feng; He, Xin-Hua; Pan, Jie-Chun

    2012-12-01

    Seedlessness is an important economic trait of lemon. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms of seedlessness in 'Xiangshui' lemon requires detailed data on pollen and embryo sac fertility, embryo development and compatibility mechanisms governing self- and cross-pollination. The results of the current study indicate that the fertility of pollen and mature embryo sac remains normal. When flowers were self- or cross-pollinated, pollen grains of 'Xiangshui' were able to germinate on the stigma. In the case of self-pollination, pollen tubes became twisted, tube tips enlarged and tubes ruptured in the bottom of stigma. Following cross-pollination, tubes were able to grow normally in the style and ovary and enter the embryo sac, where double fertilization took place. Embryonic development resulting from cross-pollination was normal. After cross-pollination, the zygote began to divide at 2 weeks post-pollination, with early globular embryos observed after 3 weeks, globular and heart-shaped embryos at 4 weeks, torpedo-shaped embryos at 5 weeks, cotyledonary embryos at 6 weeks and thereafter germinable seeds. After self-pollination, however, ovules began to abort at 2 weeks post-pollination, with ovules disappearing at 5 weeks, ultimately producing seedless fruits. Emasculated unpollinated flowers also developed into seedless fruits, indicating that seedlessness contributes to parthenocarpy. However, gametophytic self-incompatibility has a major role in seedlessness in 'Xiangshui' lemon by blocking fertilization at the bottom of the stigma. PMID:23114638

  14. Monogenoid infection of neonatal and older juvenile lemon sharks, Negaprion brevirostris (Carcharhinidae), in a shark nursery.

    PubMed

    Young, Joy M; Frasca, Salvatore; Gruber, Samuel H; Benz, George W

    2013-12-01

    Fifty lemon sharks, Negaprion brevirostris , were captured in a shallow, mangrove-fringed shark nursery at Bimini, Bahamas and examined for the presence of skin-dwelling ectoparasitic monogenoids (Monogenoidea). Sixteen sharks were infected by Dermophthirius nigrellii (Microbothriidae); the youngest host was estimated to be 3- to 4-wk-old. Infection prevalence, mean intensity, and median intensity (0.32, 2.63, and 2.0, respectively, for all sharks) were not significantly different between neonates (estimated ages 3- to 10-wk-old) and non-neonatal juveniles (estimated ages 1- to 4-yr-old), suggesting that soon after parturition lemon sharks acquire infection levels of D. nigrellii matching those of juvenile conspecifics. Monogenoids were only found on the trailing portion of the first and second dorsal fins and upper lobe of the caudal fin. The prevalence of D. nigrellii was highest on the first dorsal fin; however, the mean and median intensities of D. nigrellii were similar between fins in all but 1 case. These results raise important husbandry implications regarding the practice of preferentially seeking neonatal and other small lemon sharks for captivity.

  15. Native Killer Yeasts as Biocontrol Agents of Postharvest Fungal Diseases in Lemons

    PubMed Central

    Garnica, Nydia Mercedes; Fernández-Zenoff, María Verónica; Farías, María Eugenia; Sepulveda, Milena; Ramallo, Jacqueline; Dib, Julián Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Economic losses caused by postharvest diseases represent one of the main problems of the citrus industry worldwide. The major diseases affecting citrus are the "green mold" and "blue mold", caused by Penicillium digitatum and P. italicum, respectively. To control them, synthetic fungicides are the most commonly used method. However, often the emergence of resistant strains occurs and their use is becoming more restricted because of toxic effects and environmental pollution they generate, combined with trade barriers to international markets. The aim of this work was to isolate indigenous killer yeasts with antagonistic activity against fungal postharvest diseases in lemons, and to determine their control efficiency in in vitro and in vivo assays. Among 437 yeast isolates, 8.5% show to have a killer phenotype. According to molecular identification, based on the 26S rDNA D1/D2 domain sequences analysis, strains were identified belonging to the genera Saccharomyces, Wickerhamomyces, Kazachstania, Pichia, Candida and Clavispora. Killers were challenged with pathogenic molds and strains that caused the maximum in vitro inhibition of P. digitatum were selected for in vivo assays. Two strains of Pichia and one strain of Wickerhamomyces depicted a significant protection (p <0.05) from decay by P. digitatum in assays using wounded lemons. Thus, the native killer yeasts studied in this work showed to be an effective alternative for the biocontrol of postharvest fungal infections of lemons and could be promising agents for the development of commercial products for the biological control industry. PMID:27792761

  16. Anaerobic treatment of residual lemon pulp in digesters with semi-continuous feed.

    PubMed

    Navarro, A R; Lopez, Z; Salguero, J; Maldonado, M C

    2013-01-01

    Lemon growing areas in the north of Argentina have industries that produce concentrated juice, peel and essential oil and generate a significant amount of liquid and solid waste as lemon pulp. In Argentina, despite the potential applications that the pulp has as animal feed and human and industrial raw material, only 10% is used for these purposes and the rest is discarded into the environment causing many ecological and economic problems. There is little information in the literature on biotechnologies for the treatment of this industrial waste. This paper shows that lemon pulp is a suitable substrate to be treated by anaerobic digestion. We obtained 86 and 92% reduction of chemical oxygen demand in a digester with a semi-continuous feed and retention time of 10 and 20 days respectively and a productivity of 0.406 g CH(4)/g VS h. Comparative tests showed that pre-digesting the pulp improved the process of digestion and increased biogas generation by 20%. PMID:23202554

  17. Mechanism of seedlessness in a new lemon cultivar 'Xiangshui' [Citrus limon (L.) Burm. F].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-Wei; Huang, Gui-Xiang; Ding, Feng; He, Xin-Hua; Pan, Jie-Chun

    2012-12-01

    Seedlessness is an important economic trait of lemon. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms of seedlessness in 'Xiangshui' lemon requires detailed data on pollen and embryo sac fertility, embryo development and compatibility mechanisms governing self- and cross-pollination. The results of the current study indicate that the fertility of pollen and mature embryo sac remains normal. When flowers were self- or cross-pollinated, pollen grains of 'Xiangshui' were able to germinate on the stigma. In the case of self-pollination, pollen tubes became twisted, tube tips enlarged and tubes ruptured in the bottom of stigma. Following cross-pollination, tubes were able to grow normally in the style and ovary and enter the embryo sac, where double fertilization took place. Embryonic development resulting from cross-pollination was normal. After cross-pollination, the zygote began to divide at 2 weeks post-pollination, with early globular embryos observed after 3 weeks, globular and heart-shaped embryos at 4 weeks, torpedo-shaped embryos at 5 weeks, cotyledonary embryos at 6 weeks and thereafter germinable seeds. After self-pollination, however, ovules began to abort at 2 weeks post-pollination, with ovules disappearing at 5 weeks, ultimately producing seedless fruits. Emasculated unpollinated flowers also developed into seedless fruits, indicating that seedlessness contributes to parthenocarpy. However, gametophytic self-incompatibility has a major role in seedlessness in 'Xiangshui' lemon by blocking fertilization at the bottom of the stigma.

  18. To leave or not to leave.

    PubMed

    Buchan, James

    2016-06-22

    Lies, damned lies and Brexit statistics. It's not been a good month for anyone espousing evidence-based policy and politics after the chair of the Commons health committee switched from Leave to Remain, citing misuse of data by the Leave campaign. PMID:27332589

  19. Influence of technological processes on phenolic compounds, organic acids, furanic derivatives, and antioxidant activity of whole-lemon powder.

    PubMed

    García-Salas, Patricia; Gómez-Caravaca, Ana María; Arráez-Román, David; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Guerra-Hernández, Eduardo; García-Villanova, Belén; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto

    2013-11-15

    The healthy properties of citrus fruits have been attributed to ascorbic acid and phenolic compounds, mainly to flavonoids. Flavonoids are important phytonutrients because they have a wide range of biological effects that provide health-related properties. In this context, this study seeks to characterise the phenolic compounds in lemon and their stability in different drying processes (freeze-drying and vacuum-drying) and storage conditions (-18 and 50°C for 1 and 3months). A powerful high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to DAD and electrospray-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-TOF-MS) method has been applied for the separation, identification, and quantification of 19 phenolic compounds and 4 organic acids. To our knowledge, two hydroxycinnamic acids have been identified for the first time in lemon. Folin-Ciocalteu was applied to determine total phenolic compounds and TEAC, FRAP, and ORAC were applied to determine the antioxidant capacity of lemon. Total phenolic content significantly differed in the samples analysed, vacuum-dried lemon showing the highest phenolic content, followed by freeze-dried lemon and, finally, vacuum-dried lemon stored at 50°C for 1 and 3months. The content in furanic compounds was determined to evaluate the heat damage in lemon and it was showed an increase with the thermal treatment because of the triggering of Maillard reaction. As exception of ORAC, antioxidant-capacity assays were not correlated to phenolic content by HPLC due to the formation of antioxidant compounds during Maillard reaction. PMID:23790861

  20. Influence of technological processes on phenolic compounds, organic acids, furanic derivatives, and antioxidant activity of whole-lemon powder.

    PubMed

    García-Salas, Patricia; Gómez-Caravaca, Ana María; Arráez-Román, David; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Guerra-Hernández, Eduardo; García-Villanova, Belén; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto

    2013-11-15

    The healthy properties of citrus fruits have been attributed to ascorbic acid and phenolic compounds, mainly to flavonoids. Flavonoids are important phytonutrients because they have a wide range of biological effects that provide health-related properties. In this context, this study seeks to characterise the phenolic compounds in lemon and their stability in different drying processes (freeze-drying and vacuum-drying) and storage conditions (-18 and 50°C for 1 and 3months). A powerful high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to DAD and electrospray-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-TOF-MS) method has been applied for the separation, identification, and quantification of 19 phenolic compounds and 4 organic acids. To our knowledge, two hydroxycinnamic acids have been identified for the first time in lemon. Folin-Ciocalteu was applied to determine total phenolic compounds and TEAC, FRAP, and ORAC were applied to determine the antioxidant capacity of lemon. Total phenolic content significantly differed in the samples analysed, vacuum-dried lemon showing the highest phenolic content, followed by freeze-dried lemon and, finally, vacuum-dried lemon stored at 50°C for 1 and 3months. The content in furanic compounds was determined to evaluate the heat damage in lemon and it was showed an increase with the thermal treatment because of the triggering of Maillard reaction. As exception of ORAC, antioxidant-capacity assays were not correlated to phenolic content by HPLC due to the formation of antioxidant compounds during Maillard reaction.

  1. Lemon detox diet reduced body fat, insulin resistance, and serum hs-CRP level without hematological changes in overweight Korean women.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Joung; Hwang, Jung Hyun; Ko, Hyun Ji; Na, Hye Bock; Kim, Jung Hee

    2015-05-01

    The lemon detox program is a very low-calorie diet which consists of a mixture of organic maple and palm syrups, and lemon juice for abstinence period of 7 days. We hypothesized that the lemon detox program would reduce body weight, body fat mass, thus lowering insulin resistance and known risk factors of cardiovascular disease. We investigated anthropometric indices, insulin sensitivity, levels of serum adipokines, and inflammatory markers in overweight Korean women before and after clinical intervention trial. Eighty-four premenopausal women were randomly divided into 3 groups: a control group without diet restriction (Normal-C), a pair-fed placebo diet group (Positive-C), and a lemon detox diet group (Lemon-D). The intervention period was 11 days total: 7 days with the lemon detox juice or the placebo juice, and then 4 days with transitioning food. Changes in body weight, body mass index, percentage body fat, and waist-hip ratio were significantly greater in the Lemon-D and Positive-C groups compared to the Normal-C group. Serum insulin level, homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance scores, leptin, and adiponectin levels decreased in the Lemon-D and Positive-C groups. Serum high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels were also reduced only in the Lemon-D group. Hemoglobin and hematocrit levels remained stable in the Lemon-D group while they decreased in the Positive-C and Normal-C groups. Therefore, we suppose that the lemon detox program reduces body fat and insulin resistance through caloric restriction and might have a potential beneficial effect on risk factors for cardiovascular disease related to circulating hs-CRP reduction without hematological changes. PMID:25912765

  2. Lemon detox diet reduced body fat, insulin resistance, and serum hs-CRP level without hematological changes in overweight Korean women.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Joung; Hwang, Jung Hyun; Ko, Hyun Ji; Na, Hye Bock; Kim, Jung Hee

    2015-05-01

    The lemon detox program is a very low-calorie diet which consists of a mixture of organic maple and palm syrups, and lemon juice for abstinence period of 7 days. We hypothesized that the lemon detox program would reduce body weight, body fat mass, thus lowering insulin resistance and known risk factors of cardiovascular disease. We investigated anthropometric indices, insulin sensitivity, levels of serum adipokines, and inflammatory markers in overweight Korean women before and after clinical intervention trial. Eighty-four premenopausal women were randomly divided into 3 groups: a control group without diet restriction (Normal-C), a pair-fed placebo diet group (Positive-C), and a lemon detox diet group (Lemon-D). The intervention period was 11 days total: 7 days with the lemon detox juice or the placebo juice, and then 4 days with transitioning food. Changes in body weight, body mass index, percentage body fat, and waist-hip ratio were significantly greater in the Lemon-D and Positive-C groups compared to the Normal-C group. Serum insulin level, homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance scores, leptin, and adiponectin levels decreased in the Lemon-D and Positive-C groups. Serum high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels were also reduced only in the Lemon-D group. Hemoglobin and hematocrit levels remained stable in the Lemon-D group while they decreased in the Positive-C and Normal-C groups. Therefore, we suppose that the lemon detox program reduces body fat and insulin resistance through caloric restriction and might have a potential beneficial effect on risk factors for cardiovascular disease related to circulating hs-CRP reduction without hematological changes.

  3. LEMONS – A Tool for the Identification of Splice Junctions in Transcriptomes of Organisms Lacking Reference Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Bouskila, Amos; Chorev, Michal; Carmel, Liran; Mishmar, Dan

    2015-01-01

    RNA-seq is becoming a preferred tool for genomics studies of model and non-model organisms. However, DNA-based analysis of organisms lacking sequenced genomes cannot rely on RNA-seq data alone to isolate most genes of interest, as DNA codes both exons and introns. With this in mind, we designed a novel tool, LEMONS, that exploits the evolutionary conservation of both exon/intron boundary positions and splice junction recognition signals to produce high throughput splice-junction predictions in the absence of a reference genome. When tested on multiple annotated vertebrate mRNA data, LEMONS accurately identified 87% (average) of the splice-junctions. LEMONS was then applied to our updated Mediterranean chameleon transcriptome, which lacks a reference genome, and predicted a total of 90,820 exon-exon junctions. We experimentally verified these splice-junction predictions by amplifying and sequencing twenty randomly selected genes from chameleon DNA templates. Exons and introns were detected in 19 of 20 of the positions predicted by LEMONS. To the best of our knowledge, LEMONS is currently the only experimentally verified tool that can accurately predict splice-junctions in organisms that lack a reference genome. PMID:26606265

  4. Comparison of the antibacterial activity of essential oils and extracts of medicinal and culinary herbs to investigate potential new treatments for irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder, which may result from alteration of the gastrointestinal microbiota following gastrointestinal infection, or with intestinal dysbiosis or small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. This may be treated with antibiotics, but there is concern that widespread antibiotic use might lead to antibiotic resistance. Some herbal medicines have been shown to be beneficial, but their mechanism(s) of action remain incompletely understood. To try to understand whether antibacterial properties might be involved in the efficacy of these herbal medicines, and to investigate potential new treatments for IBS, we have conducted a preliminary study in vitro to compare the antibacterial activity of the essential oils of culinary and medicinal herbs against the bacterium, Esherichia coli. Methods Essential oils were tested for their ability to inhibit E. coli growth in disc diffusion assays and in liquid culture, and to kill E. coli in a zone of clearance assay. Extracts of coriander, lemon balm and spearmint leaves were tested for their antibacterial activity in the disc diffusion assay. Disc diffusion and zone of clearance assays were analysed by two-tailed t tests whereas ANOVA was performed for the turbidometric assays. Results Most of the oils exhibited antibacterial activity in all three assays, however peppermint, lemon balm and coriander seed oils were most potent, with peppermint and coriander seed oils being more potent than the antibiotic rifaximin in the disc diffusion assay. The compounds present in these oils were identified by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Finally, extracts were made of spearmint, lemon balm and coriander leaves with various solvents and these were tested for their antibacterial activity against E. coli in the disc diffusion assay. In each case, extracts made with ethanol and methanol exhibited potent antibacterial activity. Conclusions Many of the essential oils

  5. New beverages of lemon juice enriched with the exotic berries maqui, açaı́, and blackthorn: bioactive components and in vitro biological properties.

    PubMed

    Gironés-Vilaplana, Amadeo; Valentão, Patrícia; Moreno, Diego A; Ferreres, Federico; García-Viguera, Cristina; Andrade, Paula B

    2012-07-01

    Following previous research on lemon juice enriched with berries, the aim of this work was to design new blends based on lemon juice mixed with different edible berries of exotic and national origin: maqui ( Aristotelia chilensis (Molina) Stuntz), açaı́ ( Euterpe oleracea Mart.), and blackthorn ( Prunus spinosa L.). The phytochemical characterization of controls and blends was performed by HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS(n). Their antioxidant capacity against DPPH, superoxide, and hydroxyl radicals and hypochlorous acid and their potential to inhibit cholinesterases were also assessed. The profiling of the red fruits and lemon revealed a wide range of bioactive phenolics. The novel beverage based on lemon juice and maqui berry (LM) was the most interesting blend in terms of antioxidant capacity. Berry control samples displayed reduced effects on acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase, the lemon juice control being always the most active. This activity was also remarkable for lemon-blackthorn (LB) and lemon-açaı́ (LA) blends, the last being the most effective inhibitor of cholinesterases among all samples. The results suggested that lemon juice enriched with berries could be of potential interest in the design of new drinks with a nutritive related function on health for chronic diseases.

  6. Isolation of a sesquiterpene synthase expressing in specialized epithelial cells surrounding the secretory cavities in rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri).

    PubMed

    Uji, Yuya; Ozawa, Rika; Shishido, Hodaka; Taniguchi, Shiduku; Takabayashi, Junji; Akimitsu, Kazuya; Gomi, Kenji

    2015-05-15

    Volatile terpenoids such as monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes play multiple roles in plant responses and are synthesized by terpene synthases (TPSs). We have previously isolated a partial TPS gene, RlemTPS4, that responds to microbial attack in rough lemon. In this study, we isolated a full length RlemTPS4 cDNA from rough lemon. RlemTPS4 localized in the cytosol. The recombinant RlemTPS4 protein was obtained using a prokaryotic expression system and GC-MS analysis of the terpenes produced by the RlemTPS4 enzymatic reaction determined that RlemTPS4 produces some sesquiterpenes such as δ-elemene. The RlemTPS4 gene was specifically expressed in specialized epithelial cells surrounding the oil secretory cavities in rough lemon leaf tissue.

  7. Field test of a lemon eucalyptus repellent against Leptoconops biting midges.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Scott P; Loye, Jenella

    2006-09-01

    We tested a lemon eucalyptus-based repellent against the biting midge Leptoconops carteri Hoffman in the Central Valley of California. This relatively new active ingredient has demonstrated high efficacy in a number of studies with mosquitoes. Ten subjects tested spray and lotion formulations on 2 consecutive days, along with a deet-positive control and an untreated control, with 6 h of continuous exposure per treatment. Half of the eucalyptus subjects received no bites, and the true median protection time probably exceeded the test duration. PMID:17067050

  8. Field test of a lemon eucalyptus repellent against Leptoconops biting midges.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Scott P; Loye, Jenella

    2006-09-01

    We tested a lemon eucalyptus-based repellent against the biting midge Leptoconops carteri Hoffman in the Central Valley of California. This relatively new active ingredient has demonstrated high efficacy in a number of studies with mosquitoes. Ten subjects tested spray and lotion formulations on 2 consecutive days, along with a deet-positive control and an untreated control, with 6 h of continuous exposure per treatment. Half of the eucalyptus subjects received no bites, and the true median protection time probably exceeded the test duration.

  9. Contribution to the improvement of a porridge made with fermented maize: effect of selected foods and lemon on energy density, pH, viscosity and nutritional quality.

    PubMed

    Ejigui, Jeanne; Desrosiers, Therese

    2011-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to use lemon and selected foods to improve the nutritional characteristics, quality and the nutrient content of a traditional complementary porridge made of lactic acid fermented yellow maize. Boiled egg yolk, roasted peanut paste, dry crayfish flour, roasted soybean flour and lemon juice were used as food additions. Amounts of food added were calculated on the basis of World Health Organization estimated energy needs from complementary foods of well-nourished children in developing countries, aged 9-11 months, at four servings per day and a low amount of breast milk energy. The pH and viscosity increased in porridges with food addition, but lemon juice contributed to lowering them. Energy and nutrient densities/100 g porridge improved with food addition regardless of the use of lemon juice. An increase in iron, zinc and calcium in vitro availability was observed (P < 0.05) with the addition of lemon juice.

  10. Determination of physical characteristics, chemical composition and digestion coefficients of treated lemon pulp with Saccharomyces cerevisiae in goat diet.

    PubMed

    Dadvar, P; Dayani, O; Mehdipour, M; Morovat, M

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of processing of lemon pulp with Saccharomyces cerevisiae on physical properties, chemical composition, digestion coefficients and blood parameters. Eight adult male Raeini goats were used in a 28-day period. The experimental design was a completely randomised design with two treatments and four replicates. The first 21 days were for adaptation, and the last 7 days were for collecting samples. The animals were housed in individual metabolic cages equipped with a urine-faeces separator and were fed with diet containing alfalfa hay (60%) and lemon pulp (40%) at the maintenance level. Collected data were subjected to analysis of completely randomised design. With diet containing processed lemon pulp, functional specific gravity, bulk density, soluble dry matter, percentage of crude protein, neutral detergent fibre (NDF), acid detergent fibre and crude ash were significantly increased and water-holding capacity, insoluble dry matter, insoluble ash percentage of dry matter, organic matter, crude fat, non-fibrous carbohydrates and nitrogen-free extract were significantly decreased (p < 0.05). Digestion coefficient of organic matter in dry matter and metabolisable energy were also decreased in treated lemon pulp (p < 0.05). Compared with untreated lemon pulp, digestibility of crude protein and NDF was higher (p < 0.05), but digestibility of crude fat was lower (p < 0.05). In general, processing of lemon pulp with S. cerevisiae improved the physical characteristics and increased the percentage of crude protein and the digestion coefficients of protein and NDF. PMID:24842042

  11. Characterization of the 'Xiangshui' lemon transcriptome by de novo assembly to discover genes associated with self-incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuwei; Ding, Feng; He, Xinhua; Luo, Cong; Huang, Guixiang; Hu, Ying

    2015-02-01

    Seedlessness is a desirable character in lemons and other citrus species. Seedless fruit can be induced in many ways, including through self-incompatibility (SI). SI is widely used as an intraspecific reproductive barrier that prevents self-fertilization in flowering plants. Although there have been many studies on SI, its mechanism remains unclear. The 'Xiangshui' lemon is an important seedless cultivar whose seedlessness has been caused by SI. It is essential to identify genes involved in SI in 'Xiangshui' lemon to clarify its molecular mechanism. In this study, candidate genes associated with SI were identified using high-throughput Illumina RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). A total of 61,224 unigenes were obtained (average, 948 bp; N50 of 1,457 bp), among which 47,260 unigenes were annotated by comparison to six public databases (Nr, Nt, Swiss-Prot, KEGG, COG, and GO). Differentially expressed genes were identified by comparing the transcriptomes of no-, self-, and cross-pollinated stigmas with styles of the 'Xiangshui' lemon. Several differentially expressed genes that might be associated with SI were identified, such as those involved in pollen tube growth, programmed cell death, signal transduction, and transcription. NADPH oxidase genes associated with apoptosis were highly upregulated in the self-pollinated transcriptome. The expression pattern of 12 genes was analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. A putative S-RNase gene was identified that had not been previously associated with self-pollen rejection in lemon or citrus. This study provided a transcriptome dataset for further studies of SI and seedless lemon breeding.

  12. Mineral composition of two populations of leaves - green and iron chlorotic - of the same age all from the same tree

    SciTech Connect

    Procopiou, J.; Wallace, A.

    1981-01-01

    Since carefully washed Fe chlorotic leaves often contain more total Fe on the dry weight basis than do green leaves, a population of leaves of the same age representing chlorotic leaves from each of two lemon trees and green leaves also of the same age and from the same two trees were analyzed individually for mineral elements to determine, especially, the frequency distribution of Fe in the various groups of leaves (n = 47, 48, 71, 48). The chlorotic leaves from one tree had mineral composition typical of lime-induced chlorosis. The chlorotic leaves for this tree were, on the average, higher in P, K, and Fe and lower in Ca than the green leaves. For the other tree the chlorotic leaves appeared to be truly Fe deficient; P was not higher in these leaves but the mean K and Ca showed the same pattern as in the first tree. Zinc was higher in the deficient leaves than in the green ones on this tree which can be expected for true Fe deficiency. Mean zinc levels were below the critical levels. Mean manganese was below the critical level for all groups. The coefficient of variation for each element in each group was usually around 30%. Maximum-minimum data indicated that many individual leaves did not fit the patterns just described. Correlation coefficients indicated that most major patterns were consistent in spite of the variability, although there were some differences. The frequency distribution for each of most elements was much like a normal curve with usually a three-fold range for each of the elements. Many of the Fe-deficient leaves had more Fe than some of the green leaves. Analysis of an individual leaf, therefore, cannot result in accurate description of lime-induced chlorosis.

  13. Expression of the H+-ATPase AHA10 proton pump is associated with citric acid accumulation in lemon juice sac cells.

    PubMed

    Aprile, Alessio; Federici, Claire; Close, Timothy J; De Bellis, Luigi; Cattivelli, Luigi; Roose, Mikeal L

    2011-12-01

    The sour taste of lemons (Citrus limon (L.) Burm.) is determined by the amount of citric acid in vacuoles of juice sac cells. Faris is a "sweet" lemon variety since it accumulates low levels of citric acid. The University of California Riverside Citrus Variety Collection includes a Faris tree that produces sweet (Faris non-acid; FNA) and sour fruit (Faris acid; FA) on different branches; it is apparently a graft chimera with layer L1 derived from Millsweet limetta and layer L2 from a standard lemon. The transcription profiles of Faris sweet lemon were compared with Faris acid lemon and Frost Lisbon (L), which is a standard sour lemon genetically indistinguishable from Faris in prior work with SSR markers. Analysis of microarray data revealed that the transcriptomes of the two sour lemon genotypes were nearly identical. In contrast, the transcriptome of Faris sweet lemon was very different from those of both sour lemons. Among about 1,000 FNA-specific, presumably pH-related genes, the homolog of Arabidopsis H(+)-ATPase proton pump AHA10 was not expressed in FNA, but highly expressed in FA and L. Since Arabidopsis AHA10 is involved in biosynthesis and acidification of vacuoles, the lack of expression of the AHA10 citrus homolog represents a very conspicuous molecular feature of the FNA sweet phenotype. In addition, high expression of several 2-oxoglutarate degradation-related genes in FNA suggests activation of the GABA shunt and degradation of valine and tyrosine as components of the mechanism that reduces the level of citric acid in sweet lemon.

  14. Leaf volatile compounds of six citrus somatic allotetraploid hybrids originating from various combinations of lime, lemon, citron, sweet orange, and grapefruit.

    PubMed

    Gancel, Anne-Laure; Ollitrault, Patrick; Froelicher, Yann; Tomi, Felix; Jacquemond, Camille; Luro, Francois; Brillouet, Jean-Marc

    2005-03-23

    Volatile compounds were extracted by a pentane/ether (1:1) mixture from the leaves of six citrus somatic allotetraploid hybrids resulting from various combinations of lime, lemon, citron, sweet orange, and grapefruit. Extracts were examined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and compared with those of their respective parents. All hybrids having an acid citrus parent exhibit the same relative contents in hydrocarbons and oxygenated compounds as the acid citrus, while the (grapefruit + orange) hybrid behaves similarly to its two parents. When volatile compound contents (microg g(-1)) are examined in detail, several behaviors are encountered in hybrids and seem to depend on the presence/absence of the considered parental compound and on the corresponding hybrid combination. Meanwhile, the sesquiterpene hydrocarbons are present in all hybrids at concentrations systematically lower than those of the highest parental producers. Statistical analyses show that hybrids exhibit hardly discriminable aromatic profiles, meaning that no strong dominance of one or the other parent was observed in hybrids with regards to the leaf volatile compound production.

  15. Sustainability evaluation of Sicily's lemon and orange production: an energy, economic and environmental analysis.

    PubMed

    Pergola, M; D'Amico, M; Celano, G; Palese, A M; Scuderi, A; Di Vita, G; Pappalardo, G; Inglese, P

    2013-10-15

    The island of Sicily has a long standing tradition in citrus growing. We evaluated the sustainability of orange and lemon orchards, under organic and conventional farming, using an energy, environmental and economic analysis of the whole production cycle by using a life cycle assessment approach. These orchard systems differ only in terms of a few of the inputs used and the duration of the various agricultural operations. The quantity of energy consumption in the production cycle was calculated by multiplying the quantity of inputs used by the energy conversion factors drawn from the literature. The production costs were calculated considering all internal costs, including equipment, materials, wages, and costs of working capital. The performance of the two systems (organic and conventional), was compared over a period of fifty years. The results, based on unit surface area (ha) production, prove the stronger sustainability of the organic over the conventional system, both in terms of energy consumption and environmental impact, especially for lemons. The sustainability of organic systems is mainly due to the use of environmentally friendly crop inputs (fertilizers, not use of synthetic products, etc.). In terms of production costs, the conventional management systems were more expensive, and both systems were heavily influenced by wages. In terms of kg of final product, the organic production system showed better environmental and energy performances. PMID:23850762

  16. The breeding biology of lemon sharks at a tropical nursery lagoon.

    PubMed Central

    Feldheim, Kevin A; Gruber, Samuel H; Ashley, Mary V

    2002-01-01

    Surprisingly little is known about the reproductive behaviour and breeding biology of most shark species, especially in natural populations. Here, we characterize reproductive patterns and use of a natal nursery at Bimini, Bahamas by lemon sharks, Negaprion brevirostris. We systematically and exhaustively sampled young lemon sharks at Bimini annually from 1995 to 2000 and opportunistically sampled adults over the same period. Out of the 897 young sharks sampled, 119 could be assigned to five sampled mothers using microsatellite genotyping. Reproductive females showed strong philopatry to the nursery, returning to Bimini every two years to give birth. Each of these females may rely entirely on the Bimini nursery for recruitment. The protection of known nursery grounds should therefore figure prominently in conservation efforts for large coastal shark species. The reconstruction of paternal genotypes indicates that litters are sired by multiple males, and females mate with different males nearly every breeding cycle. The ubiquitous polyandry reported here raises the possibility that genetic incompatibility and post-copulatory paternity-biasing mechanisms may operate in viviparous sharks. PMID:12204125

  17. Lemon-shaped halo archaeal virus His1 with uniform tail but variable capsid structure

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Chuan; Pietilä, Maija K.; Fu, Caroline J.; Schmid, Michael F.; Bamford, Dennis H.; Chiu, Wah

    2015-01-01

    Lemon-shaped viruses are common in nature but so far have been observed to infect only archaea. Due to their unusual shape, the structures of these viruses are challenging to study and therefore poorly characterized. Here, we have studied haloarchaeal virus His1 using cryo-electron tomography as well as biochemical dissociation. The virions have different sizes, but prove to be extremely stable under various biochemical treatments. Subtomogram averaging of the computationally extracted virions resolved a tail-like structure with a central tail hub density and six tail spikes. Inside the tail there are two cavities and a plug density that separates the tail hub from the interior genome. His1 most likely uses the tail spikes to anchor to host cells and the tail hub to eject the genome, analogous to classic tailed bacteriophages. Upon biochemical treatment that releases the genome, the lemon-shaped virion transforms into an empty tube. Such a dramatic transformation demonstrates that the capsid proteins are capable of undergoing substantial quaternary structural changes, which may occur at different stages of the virus life cycle. PMID:25675521

  18. Sustainability evaluation of Sicily's lemon and orange production: an energy, economic and environmental analysis.

    PubMed

    Pergola, M; D'Amico, M; Celano, G; Palese, A M; Scuderi, A; Di Vita, G; Pappalardo, G; Inglese, P

    2013-10-15

    The island of Sicily has a long standing tradition in citrus growing. We evaluated the sustainability of orange and lemon orchards, under organic and conventional farming, using an energy, environmental and economic analysis of the whole production cycle by using a life cycle assessment approach. These orchard systems differ only in terms of a few of the inputs used and the duration of the various agricultural operations. The quantity of energy consumption in the production cycle was calculated by multiplying the quantity of inputs used by the energy conversion factors drawn from the literature. The production costs were calculated considering all internal costs, including equipment, materials, wages, and costs of working capital. The performance of the two systems (organic and conventional), was compared over a period of fifty years. The results, based on unit surface area (ha) production, prove the stronger sustainability of the organic over the conventional system, both in terms of energy consumption and environmental impact, especially for lemons. The sustainability of organic systems is mainly due to the use of environmentally friendly crop inputs (fertilizers, not use of synthetic products, etc.). In terms of production costs, the conventional management systems were more expensive, and both systems were heavily influenced by wages. In terms of kg of final product, the organic production system showed better environmental and energy performances.

  19. Apoptosis-mediated inhibition of human breast cancer cell proliferation by lemon citrus extract.

    PubMed

    Alshatwi, Ali A; Shafi, Gowhar; Hasan, Tarique N; Al-Hazzani, Amal A; Alsaif, Mohammed A; Alfawaz, Mohammed A; Lei, K Y; Munshi, Anjana

    2011-01-01

    Dietary phytochemicals have a variety of antitumor properties. In the present study, the antitumor activity of methanolic extract of lemon fruit (lemon extract; LE) (LE) on the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line was investigated in vitro. Apoptotic cell death was analyzed using the TUNEL assay. In addition, the apoptosis mediated by LE extract in the MCF-7 cells was associated with the increased expression of the tumor suppressor p53 and caspase-3. Additionally, the expression of a pro-apoptotic gene, bax, was increased, and the expression of an anti-apoptotic gene, bcl-2, was decreased by LE extract treatment, resulting in a shift in the Bax:Bcl-2 ratio to one that favored apoptosis. The expression of a major apoptotic gene, caspase-3, was increased by LE extract treatment. In light of the above results, we concluded that LE extract can induce the apoptosis of MCF-7 breast cancer cells via Bax-related caspase-3 activation. This study provides experimental data that are relevant to the possible future clinical use of LE to treat breast cancer.

  20. Problematising Early School Leaving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Alistair; Leathwood, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Early school leaving has been identified as a key policy priority across Europe. In this article, we critically discuss the underpinning assumptions and rationale for this policy focus, challenging the association that is made between early school leaving, economic growth and employment. We suggest that ESL is important, not because it is…

  1. Differentiation of lemon essential oil based on volatile and non-volatile fractions with various analytical techniques: a metabolomic approach.

    PubMed

    Mehl, Florence; Marti, Guillaume; Boccard, Julien; Debrus, Benjamin; Merle, Philippe; Delort, Estelle; Baroux, Lucie; Raymo, Vilfredo; Velazco, Maria Inés; Sommer, Horst; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Rudaz, Serge

    2014-01-15

    Due to the importance of citrus lemon oil for the industry, fast and reliable analytical methods that allow the authentication and/or classification of such oil, using the origin of production or extraction process, are necessary. To evaluate the potential of volatile and non-volatile fractions for classification purposes, volatile compounds of cold-pressed lemon oils were analyzed, using GC-FID/MS and FT-MIR, while the non-volatile residues were studied, using FT-MIR, (1)H-NMR and UHPLC-TOF-MS. 64 Lemon oil samples from Argentina, Spain and Italy were considered. Unsupervised and supervised multivariate analyses were sequentially performed on various data blocks obtained by the above techniques. Successful data treatments led to statistically significant models that discriminated and classified cold-pressed lemon oils according to their geographic origin, as well as their production processes. Studying the loadings allowed highlighting of important classes of discriminant variables that corresponded to putative or identified chemical functions and compounds. PMID:24054247

  2. First report of citrus exocortis viroid and two citrus variants of the hop stunt viroid on lemon in Azerbaijan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Budwood received from a lemon tree growing at the Bioresources Institute Nakhichivan, Azerbaijan, produced symptoms corresponding with citrus viroids and cachexia on biological indicators ‘S-1’ citron and ‘Parson’s Special’ (PSM) mandarin, respectively. Sequential poly acrylamide gel electrophoresis...

  3. Differentiation of lemon essential oil based on volatile and non-volatile fractions with various analytical techniques: a metabolomic approach.

    PubMed

    Mehl, Florence; Marti, Guillaume; Boccard, Julien; Debrus, Benjamin; Merle, Philippe; Delort, Estelle; Baroux, Lucie; Raymo, Vilfredo; Velazco, Maria Inés; Sommer, Horst; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Rudaz, Serge

    2014-01-15

    Due to the importance of citrus lemon oil for the industry, fast and reliable analytical methods that allow the authentication and/or classification of such oil, using the origin of production or extraction process, are necessary. To evaluate the potential of volatile and non-volatile fractions for classification purposes, volatile compounds of cold-pressed lemon oils were analyzed, using GC-FID/MS and FT-MIR, while the non-volatile residues were studied, using FT-MIR, (1)H-NMR and UHPLC-TOF-MS. 64 Lemon oil samples from Argentina, Spain and Italy were considered. Unsupervised and supervised multivariate analyses were sequentially performed on various data blocks obtained by the above techniques. Successful data treatments led to statistically significant models that discriminated and classified cold-pressed lemon oils according to their geographic origin, as well as their production processes. Studying the loadings allowed highlighting of important classes of discriminant variables that corresponded to putative or identified chemical functions and compounds.

  4. 77 FR 72384 - Lemon Juice From Argentina and Mexico; Scheduling of Full Five-Year Reviews Concerning the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ...-year reviews were such that full reviews pursuant to section 751(c)(5) of the Act should proceed (77 FR... 7, 2011. See 76 FR 61937 (Oct. 6, 2011) and the newly revised Commission's Handbook on E- Filing... COMMISSION Lemon Juice From Argentina and Mexico; Scheduling of Full Five- Year Reviews Concerning...

  5. Falling for Clay Leaves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kernan, Christine

    2002-01-01

    Describes an art project that integrated science and art education. Explains that students create ceramic bowls by using real leaves. Discusses the process of creating the ceramic bowls, including how to glaze the bowls. Includes a list of materials. (CMK)

  6. Citron and lemon under the lens of HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mucci, Adele; Parenti, Francesca; Righi, Valeria; Schenetti, Luisa

    2013-12-01

    High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HR-MAS) is an NMR technique that can be applied to semi-solid samples. Flavedo, albedo, pulp, seeds, and oil gland content of lemon and citron were studied through HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy, which was used directly on intact tissue specimens without any physicochemical manipulation. HR-MAS NMR proved to be a very suitable technique for detecting terpenes, sugars, organic acids, aminoacids and osmolites. It is valuable in observing changes in sugars, principal organic acids (mainly citric and malic) and ethanol contents of pulp specimens and this strongly point to its use to follow fruit ripening, or commercial assessment of fruit maturity. HR-MAS NMR was also used to derive the molar percentage of fatty acid components of lipids in seeds, which can change depending on the Citrus species and varieties. Finally, this technique was employed to elucidate the metabolic profile of mold flavedo. PMID:23871074

  7. Diel temperature patterns of juvenile lemon sharks Negaprion brevirostris, in a shallow-water nursery.

    PubMed

    DiGirolamo, A L; Gruber, S H; Pomory, C; Bennett, W A

    2012-04-01

    The relatively complex pattern of temperature selection exhibited by juvenile lemon sharks Negaprion brevirostris in the North Sound differed markedly from many previously described responses of fish preferenda. Thermal data demonstrated that juvenile N. brevirostris did not attempt to behaviourally maintain a constant eccritic temperature. Rather, juveniles selected progressively warmer temperatures throughout the day until reaching the highest temperatures available, and then moved to cooler temperatures during late evening and early morning hours. It is possible that by exploiting habitat thermal heterogeneity juvenile N. brevirostris prolong activities such as feeding or digestion well into the cooler parts of the evening. The complex pattern of temperature occupation by juvenile N. brevirostris within the thermally heterogeneous North Sound nursery is probably linked to key daily activities such as prey capture, predator avoidance and digestive efficiency. PMID:22497392

  8. In vitro studies on the antibacterial activity of phenoxyethanol in combination with lemon grass oil.

    PubMed

    Onawunmi, G O

    1988-01-01

    Lemon grass oil (LGO) has been reported to possess appreciable antibacterial activity especially against Grampositive bacteria. The effect of LGO on the antibacterial activity of phenoxyethanol was studied using MIC, growth inhibition, diffusion tests and bactericidal activity studies. Results showed appreciable increase in the activity of phenoxyethanol against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus when combined with 0.03% v/v LGO but not against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The results show that the combined use of LGO and phenoxyethanol would increase the spectrum of activity of phenoxyethanol whose activity is mainly against Ps. aeruginosa. In addition, the combination reduced the effective concentration of both compounds necessary for activity. This would reduce any toxicological hazards as well as production costs.

  9. Characterization of a sabinene synthase gene from rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri).

    PubMed

    Kohzaki, Keisuke; Gomi, Kenji; Yamasaki-Kokudo, Yumiko; Ozawa, Rika; Takabayashi, Junji; Akimitsu, Kazuya

    2009-10-15

    We previously isolated two putative monoterpene synthase genes, RlemTPS1 and RlemTPS2, from rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri) and showed that gene expression of RlemTPS2 was induced by microbial attack. The protein product of RlemTPS2 was obtained using a prokaryotic expression system, and GC and GC-MS of monoterpene synthesis by RlemTPS2 determined that RlemTPS2 encodes a sabinene synthase. Sabinene has antifungal activity toward Alternaria alternata. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis identified one amino acid, Ile, located at the front of the metal ion binding motif as an important residue for the product specificity of sabinene synthase.

  10. Targeting excessive free radicals with peels and juices of citrus fruits: grapefruit, lemon, lime and orange.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Rafaela; Barros, Lillian; Barreira, João C M; Sousa, M João; Carvalho, Ana Maria; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2010-01-01

    A comparative study between the antioxidant properties of peel (flavedo and albedo) and juice of some commercially grown citrus fruit (Rutaceae), grapefruit (Citrus paradisi), lemon (Citrus limon), lime (Citrusxaurantiifolia) and sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) was performed. Different in vitro assays were applied to the volatile and polar fractions of peels and to crude and polar fraction of juices: 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging capacity, reducing power and inhibition of lipid peroxidation using beta-carotene-linoleate model system in liposomes and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay in brain homogenates. Reducing sugars and phenolics were the main antioxidant compounds found in all the extracts. Peels polar fractions revealed the highest contents in phenolics, flavonoids, ascorbic acid, carotenoids and reducing sugars, which certainly contribute to the highest antioxidant potential found in these fractions. Peels volatile fractions were clearly separated using discriminant analysis, which is in agreement with their lowest antioxidant potential.

  11. Molecular cloning and characterization of a geranyl diphosphate-specific aromatic prenyltransferase from lemon.

    PubMed

    Munakata, Ryosuke; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Koeduka, Takao; Karamat, Fazeelat; Olry, Alexandre; Sugiyama, Akifumi; Takanashi, Kojiro; Dugrand, Audray; Froelicher, Yann; Tanaka, Ryo; Uto, Yoshihiro; Hori, Hitoshi; Azuma, Jun-Ichi; Hehn, Alain; Bourgaud, Frédéric; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2014-09-01

    Prenyl residues confer divergent biological activities such as antipathogenic and antiherbivorous activities on phenolic compounds, including flavonoids, coumarins, and xanthones. To date, about 1,000 prenylated phenolics have been isolated, with these compounds containing various prenyl residues. However, all currently described plant prenyltransferases (PTs) have been shown specific for dimethylallyl diphosphate as the prenyl donor, while most of the complementary DNAs encoding these genes have been isolated from the Leguminosae. In this study, we describe the identification of a novel PT gene from lemon (Citrus limon), ClPT1, belonging to the homogentisate PT family. This gene encodes a PT that differs from other known PTs, including flavonoid-specific PTs, in polypeptide sequence. This membrane-bound enzyme was specific for geranyl diphosphate as the prenyl donor and coumarin as the prenyl acceptor. Moreover, the gene product was targeted to plastid in plant cells. To our knowledge, this is the novel aromatic PT specific to geranyl diphosphate from citrus species.

  12. Scientific basis for the therapeutic use of Cymbopogon citratus, stapf (Lemon grass)

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Gagan; Shri, Richa; Panchal, Vivek; Sharma, Narender; Singh, Bharpur; Mann, A. S.

    2011-01-01

    Cymbopogon citratus, Stapf (Lemon grass) is a widely used herb in tropical countries, especially in Southeast Asia. The essential oil of the plant is used in aromatherapy. The compounds identified in Cymbopogon citratus are mainly terpenes, alcohols, ketones, aldehyde and esters. Some of the reported phytoconstituents are essential oils that contain Citral α, Citral β, Nerol Geraniol, Citronellal, Terpinolene, Geranyl acetate, Myrecene and Terpinol Methylheptenone. The plant also contains reported phytoconstituents such as flavonoids and phenolic compounds, which consist of luteolin, isoorientin 2’-O-rhamnoside, quercetin, kaempferol and apiginin. Studies indicate that Cymbopogon citratus possesses various pharmacological activities such as anti-amoebic, antibacterial, antidiarrheal, antifilarial, antifungal and anti-inflammatory properties. Various other effects like antimalarial, antimutagenicity, antimycobacterial, antioxidants, hypoglycemic and neurobehaviorial have also been studied. These results are very encouraging and indicate that this herb should be studied more extensively to confirm these results and reveal other potential therapeutic effects. PMID:22171285

  13. Influence of curing times on the effectiveness of treatments with acetic acid on the control of P. digitatum on lemons.

    PubMed

    Venditti, T; D'Hallewin, G; Dore, A; Molinu, M G

    2011-01-01

    The restricted number of postharvest fungicides used in packing houses is leading to the selection of resistant strains of Penicillium digitatum (citrus green mould), one of the most common and serious pathogens during storage and marketing of lemons. Furthermore a growing concern for human health and a greater awareness for environmental conservation have multiplied the studies on new ecological technologies. Among the alternatives to synthetic postharvest fungicides, the use of acetic acid (classified as GRAS) together with a physical method such as curing, have led to encouraging results. In the present study is reported the combined use of curing, performed at reduced times compared to those reported to be effective, followed by acetic acid (AAC) treatments. Lemons of the variety "Limone di Massa" artificially inoculated with P. digitatum at a concentration of 10(4) spores/mL were cured for 0, 3, 6, 12 and 24 hours and then treated with three different concentrations of AAC (25, 50 and 75 microL/L) for 15 min. Fruit was then stored at 20 degrees C and 80% relative humidity (RH) for 9 days, when the number of decayed fruits was monitored. The same combined treatments were also carried out on naturally infected lemons, stored for 6 or 8 weeks at 5 degrees C and 90% RH. After 9 days of storage the lowest percentage of infected wounds, in artificially inoculated fruit, was 0% after 6 hours of curing followed by AAC fumigation performed at 50 microL/L, while lemons untreated or cured for three hours showed the worst results with 71.4 and 61.9% of rotted fruit respectively. In naturally infected lemons the best results were achieved with curing performed for 24 hours followed by AAC fumigation at 50 microL/L. In these cases the combined treatment reduced decay by the 91.0 and 66.5% after 6 or 8 weeks of storage respectively, if compared to untreated fruit. The weight loss was not affected by any of the treatments. These results show that a good control of green mould

  14. Effect of yogurt and pH equivalent lemon juice on salivary flow rate in healthy volunteers – An experimental crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Murugesh, Jeevitha; Annigeri, Rajeshwari G.; Raheel, Syed Ahmed; Azzeghaiby, Saleh; Alshehri, Mohammad; Kujan, Omar

    2015-01-01

    Background Xerostomia is a common clinical problem, and different medications have been tried in its management. In the present study, routine dietary products are used to assess their effect on salivary flow. Aim To assess the efficacy of yogurt and lemon juice on increase in salivation and its comparison with that of unstimulated saliva. Materials and Methods A total of 40 volunteers (aged 19–48) were selected. The pH of yogurt was calculated, and equivalent pH lemon juice was prepared. First, normal resting saliva was collected as baseline followed by every 1 min for 5 min. Patients were given lemon juice or yogurt and then crossed over to the other group to assess the impact of the stimulants on salivary flow from 1 to 5 min. Results The results were analyzed statistically. Comparisons between baseline saliva secretion and that by yogurt and lemon juice (using the ANOVA test) showed that there was a significant increase after treatment at the end of the experiment for both yogurt and lemon juice. However, yogurt showed a significant increase in saliva secretion compared to baseline than lemon juice. Conclusions Our findings suggest that yogurt is a potential candidate for the treatment of dry mouth. PMID:26767120

  15. Oxidative stability and alpha-tocopherol retention in soybean oil with lemon seed extract (Citrus limon) under thermoxidation.

    PubMed

    Luzia, Débora Maria Moreno; Jorge, Neuza

    2009-11-01

    The synergistic effect of lemon seed extract with tert-butylhydroquinone (TBHQ) in soybean oil subjected to thermoxidation by Rancimat was investigated, and the influence of these antioxidants on a-tocopherol degradation in thermoxidized soybean oil. Control, LSE (2400 mg/kg Lemon Seed Extract), TBHQ (50 mg/kg), Mixture 1 (LSE + 50 mg/kg TBHQ) and Mixture 2 (LSE + 25 mg/kg TBHQ) were subjected to 180 degrees C for 20 h. Samples were taken at time 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 h intervals and analysed for oxidative stability and alpha-tocopherol content. LSE and Mixtures 1 and 2 showed the capacity of retarding lipid oxidation when added to soya oil and also contributed to alpha-tocopherol retention in oil heated at high temperatures. However, Mixtures 1 and 2 added to the oil presented a greater antioxidant power, consequently proving the antioxidants synergistic effect.

  16. Essential oil composition of Citrus meyerii Y. Tan. and Citrus medica L. cv. Diamante and their lemon hybrids.

    PubMed

    Verzera, Antonella; Trozzi, Alessandra; Zappalá, Mario; Condurso, Cettina; Cotroneo, Antonella

    2005-06-15

    In this paper we report the volatile fraction composition of Citrus meyerii Y. Tan. and Citrus medica L. cv. Diamante and two new lemon hybrids obtained by cross-breeding them with the tetraploid Citrus limon Burm. cv. Cavone. Both parent and hybrid oils were laboratory-extracted from the peel fruits and analyzed by HRGC-MS and HRGC-FID. Sixty-three components were fully characterized by mass spectra, linear retention indices, and injection of standards. The average composition as single components for all the oils analyzed is reported. Moreover, the data obtained were statistically analyzed. Since limonene is by far the main component of all the essential oils examined, analysis of variance and multivariate analysis gave interesting information on the similarities and differences between the oils analyzed. The new hybrid oils analyzed have potential commercial value because they could be an acceptable alternative to the valuable lemon oil.

  17. Comparative laboratory and field evaluation of repellent formulations containing deet and lemon eucalyptus oil against mosquitoes in Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Frances, S P; Rigby, L M; Chow, W K

    2014-03-01

    A field trial comparing a formulation containing 40% deet (N,N-diethyl-3-methyl benzamide) in ethanol (Bushman) and 32% lemon eucalyptus oil (LEO; Mosi-guard) as protection against mosquitoes at Redcliffe, Queensland, Australia, was conducted in February 2012 and February 2013. The 40% deet formulation provided 100% protection against mosquitoes for 7 h, while the 32% LEO provided >95% protection for 3 h.

  18. The immobilization of all spermatozoa in vitro by bitter lemon drink and the effect of alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Nwoha, P U

    1992-12-01

    Researchers at Obafemi Awolowo University in Ile-Ife, Nigeria, collected semen samples from 7 healthy men 25-30 years old who had abstained from sex for at least 5 days in order to examine the spermicidal action of 4 soft drinks (Krest bitter lemon, Afri-Cola, Coca-Cola, and Pepsi-Cola), the effect of increased temperature of the drinks on spermicidal action, and the effect of changing the soft drinks from an acid, as it comes from the factory, (ph 2.4) to an alkaline (pH 7.5). Increasing the temperature of the soft drinks from room temperature (22 degrees Celsius) to body temperatures (37 degrees Celsius) did not significantly change the spermicidal action any of the soft drinks. All soft drinks with an acid pH, except Coca-Cola, had a significantly lower percent of sperm motility than those with an alkaline pH (0-42.3% vs. 20-52.1%; p .001). In fact, Krest bitter lemon in its factory form (acid pH) completely immobilized all spermatozoa within 1 minute after the researchers diluted the semen with the soft drink. Alkaline Coca-Cola had a significantly lower percent of sperm motility than did acid Coca-Cola (35.8% vs. 46.5%; p .001). Other than Krest bitter lemon, the significant decreases in sperm motility were not enough to prevent pregnancy. These findings indicated that researchers should test Krest bitter lemon for effectiveness as a postcoital contraceptive. If indeed it proves effective, it has great potential as such a contraceptive among the poor in the densely population developed countries since it is readily available and inexpensive.

  19. Comparative laboratory and field evaluation of repellent formulations containing deet and lemon eucalyptus oil against mosquitoes in Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Frances, S P; Rigby, L M; Chow, W K

    2014-03-01

    A field trial comparing a formulation containing 40% deet (N,N-diethyl-3-methyl benzamide) in ethanol (Bushman) and 32% lemon eucalyptus oil (LEO; Mosi-guard) as protection against mosquitoes at Redcliffe, Queensland, Australia, was conducted in February 2012 and February 2013. The 40% deet formulation provided 100% protection against mosquitoes for 7 h, while the 32% LEO provided >95% protection for 3 h. PMID:24772681

  20. Follow-up of the fate of imazalil from post-harvest lemon surface treatment to a baking experiment.

    PubMed

    Vass, Andrea; Korpics, Evelin; Dernovics, Mihály

    2015-01-01

    Imazalil is one of the most widespread fungicides used for the post-harvest treatment of citrus species. The separate use of peel during food preparation and processing may hitherto concentrate most of the imazalil into food products, where specific maximum residue limits hardly exist for this fungicide. In order to monitor comprehensively the path of imazalil, our study covered the monitoring of the efficiency of several washing treatments, the comparison of operative and related sample preparation methods for the lemon samples, the validation of a sample preparation technique for a fatty cake matrix, the preparation of a model cake sample made separately either with imazalil containing lemon peel or with imazalil spiking, the monitoring of imazalil degradation into α-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-1H-imidazole-1-ethanol because of the baking process, and finally the mass balance of imazalil throughout the washing experiments and the baking process. Quantification of imazalil was carried out with an LC-ESI-MS/MS set-up, while LC-QTOF was used for the monitoring of imazalil degradation. Concerning the washing, none of the addressed five washing protocols could remove more than 30% of imazalil from the surface of the lemon samples. The study revealed a significant difference between the extraction efficiency of imazalil by the EN 15662:2008 and AOAC 2007.1 methods, with the advantage of the former. The use of the model cake sample helped to validate a modified version of the EN 15662:2008 method that included a freeze-out step to efficiently recover imazalil (>90%) from the fatty cake matrix. The degradation of imazalil during the baking process was significantly higher when this analyte was spiked into the cake matrix than in the case of preparing the cake with imazalil-containing lemon peel (52% vs. 22%). This observation calls the attention to the careful evaluation of pesticide stability data that are based on solution spiking experiments.

  1. The Effect of Lemon Inhalation Aromatherapy on Nausea and Vomiting of Pregnancy: A Double-Blinded, Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yavari kia, Parisa; Safajou, Farzaneh; Shahnazi, Mahnaz; Nazemiyeh, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nausea and vomiting of pregnancy are amongst the most common complaints that effects on both the physical and mental conditions of the pregnant women. Due to the increasing tendency of women to use herbal medications during pregnancy, the effect of lemon inhalation aromatherapy on nausea and vomiting of pregnancy was investigated in this study. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of lemon inhalation aromatherapy on nausea and vomiting during pregnancy. Materials and Methods: This was a randomized clinical trial in which 100 pregnant women with nausea and vomiting who had eligibility criteria were randomly divided into intervention and control groups based on four- and six-random block sampling method. Lemon essential oil and placebo were given to the intervention and control groups, respectively, to inhale it as soon as they felt nausea. The nausea, vomiting, and retch intensity were investigated 24 hours before and during the four days of treatment by means of PUQE-24 (24-hour Pregnancy Unique Quantification of Emesis). Results: There was a statistically significant difference between the two groups in the mean scores of nausea and vomiting on the second and fourth days (P = 0.017 and P = 0.039, respectively). The means of nausea and vomiting intensity in the second and fourth days in the intervention group were significantly lower than the control group. In addition, in intragroup comparison with ANOVA with repeated measures, the nausea and vomiting mean in the five intervals, showed a statistically significant difference in each group (P < 0.001 and P = 0.049, respectively). Conclusions: Lemon scent can be effective in reducing nausea and vomiting of pregnancy. PMID:24829772

  2. Laboratory and field tests of the effectiveness of the lemon-eucalyptus extract, Citridiol, as a repellent against land leeches of the genus Haemadipsa (Haemadipsidae).

    PubMed

    Kirton, L G

    2005-10-01

    Citridiol is an extract of the leaves of Corymbia citriodora (Myrtaceae), the lemon eucalyptus, and mostly consists of p-menthane-3,8-diol isomers. The effectiveness of this extract as a repellent against land leeches of the genus Haemadipsa (Haemadipsidae), primarily H. sylvestris, was tested in the laboratory and field, in Peninsular Malaysia. The formulation tested, Mosi-guard Natural spray, contained 40% (w/w) Citridiol in a base of ethanol, water and isopropanol. In the laboratory test, specimens of H. sylvestris that were placed within moist, untreated arenas enclosed by treated paper rings made numerous attempts to cross the rings but were prevented or delayed from crossing over, in a dose-dependent manner. Mortality was high among the leeches that attempted to cross over the paper rings that had been sprayed to saturation point but low among the leeches that attempted to cross over paper rings that had only been partially treated, with a droplet-spray. The field study was carried out using indices that were formulated to reflect the severity of leech attack and the degree of repellency. Heavy or moderate spraying of footwear and trouser legs (tucked into socks) not only gave complete protection against bites by H. sylvestris and H. picta but also provided high enough repellency to keep the treated footwear virtually free of leeches. Even a light spray greatly reduced the numbers of leeches on footwear and delayed their progression toward biting the test subjects, although it failed to prevent bites completely. There was no decline in the repellency of the Citridiol when hourly assessments were made over a 6-h test period in the field. The results of the study show that Citridiol is highly repellent as well as toxic to leeches, and can be effectively used to prevent leech bites in the field. PMID:16212803

  3. Chemical composition of the essential oils of variegated pink-fleshed lemon (Citrus x limon L. Burm. f.) and their anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Dalia; Ashour, Mohamed L; Mulyaningsih, Sri; El-Shazly, Assem; Wink, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The volatile secondary metabolites of essential oils from fruit peel and leaves of variegated pink-fleshed lemon (Citrus x limon) were investigated using GLC and GLC-MS (gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy). Altogether 141 compounds were identified and quantified, accounting for 99.59% and 96.33% of the total hydrodistilled peel and leaf oil, respectively. Limonene occurred in higher amounts in fruit peel (52.73%) than in leaf oil (29.13%). Neral (12.72%), neryl acetate (8.53%), p-menth-1-en-7-al (4.63%), beta-pinene (6.35%), and nerol (4.42%) were the most abundant constituents in leaf oil, whereas gamma-terpinene (9.88%), beta-pinene (7.67%), geranial (4.44%), and neral (3.64%) dominated in the fruit peel oil. The antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antitrypanosomal, and antimicrobial activities of the fruit peel essential oil were evaluated. The oil had a low antioxidant activity with an IC50 value of (26.66 +/- 2.07) mg/ml as compared to the efficient antioxidant ascorbic acid [IC50 (16.32 +/- 0.16) microg/ml]. The oil moderately inhibited soybean 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) with an IC50 value of (32.05 +/- 3.91) microg/ml and had moderate antitrypanosomal activity [IC50 (60.90 +/- 0.91) microg/ml]. In addition, moderate antimicrobial activities were detected against Gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus capitis, Micrococcus luteus), one Gram-negative bacterium (Pseudomonas fluorescens), and yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida parapsilosis).

  4. Determination of citric acid of lemon vinegar using visible/near infrared spectroscopy and least squares-support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei; Wang, Li; He, Yong

    2008-11-01

    The determination of citric acid of lemon vinegar was processed using visible and near infrared (Vis/NIR) spectroscopy combined with least squares-support vector machine (LS-SVM). Five concentration levels (100%, 80%, 60%, 40% and 20%) of lemon vinegar were studied. The calibration set was consisted of 225 samples (45 samples for each level) and the remaining 75 samples for the validation set. Partial least squares (PLS) analysis was employed for the calibration models as well as extraction of certain latent variables (LVs) and effective wavelengths (EWs). Different preprocessing methods were compared in PLS models including smoothing, standard normal variate (SNV), the first and second derivative. The selected LVs and EWs were employed as the inputs to develop least square-support vector machine (LSSVM) models. The optimal prediction results were achieved by LV-LS-SVM model, and the correlation coefficient (r), root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) and bias for validation set were 0.9990, 0.1972 and -0.0334, respectively. Moreover, the EW-LS-SVM model was also acceptable and slightly better than all PLS models. The results indicated that Vis/NIR spectroscopy could be utilized as a parsimonious and efficient way for the determination of citric acid of lemon vinegar based on LS-SVM method.

  5. Scent of a mite: origin and chemical characterization of the lemon-like flavor of mite-ripened cheeses.

    PubMed

    Brückner, Adrian; Heethoff, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Cheese infested with cheese mites is usually treated as unpalatable. Nevertheless, some traditional cheese manufactories in Germany and France intentionally use mites for fermentation of special varieties (i.e. Milbenkäse and Mimolette). While their production includes different mite species, both are characterized by a "lemon-like" flavor. However, the chemical nature and origin of this flavor-component is unknown. The cheese mites possess a pair of opisthosomal glands producing blends of hydrocarbons, terpenes and aromatics. Here, we describe the chemical profiles of the astigmatid mite species Tyrolichus casei (Milbenkäse) and Acarus siro (Mimolette). Although the chemical profiles differ in several aspects, both mite species produce neral (a volatile flavor component of lemon oil), which was absent from the headspace of both cheeses without mites. We conclude that the lemon-like flavor of mite cheese is not a consequence of fermentation of the cheese itself but a component from secretions of the cheese mites. PMID:27059866

  6. Rhubarb leaves poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the leaves (leaf blade) of the rhubarb plant. The stalk can be eaten. ... may include: Breathing difficulty Burning in the mouth Burning in the throat Coma Diarrhea Eye pain Kidney stones Nausea and vomiting Red-colored urine Seizures Stomach pain Weakness

  7. Leaves: Nature's Solar Collectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isabelle, Aaron D.; de Groot, Cornelis

    2009-01-01

    One of the most captivating things about plants is the way they capture the Sun's energy, but this can be a difficult topic to cover with elementary students. Therefore, to help students to make a concrete connection to this abstract concept, this series of solar-energy lessons focuses on leaves and how they act as "solar collectors." As students…

  8. Maternity Leave in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feng, Joyce Yen; Han, Wen-Jui

    2010-01-01

    Using the first nationally representative birth cohort study in Taiwan, this paper examines the role that maternity leave policy in Taiwan plays in the timing of mothers returning to work after giving birth, as well as the extent to which this timing is linked to the amount of time mothers spend with their children and their use of breast milk…

  9. Maternity Leave in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Joyce Yen; Han, Wen-Jui

    2011-01-01

    Using the first nationally representative birth cohort study in Taiwan, this paper examines the role that maternity leave policy in Taiwan plays in the timing of mothers returning to work after giving birth, as well as the extent to which this timing is linked to the amount of time mothers spend with their children and their use of breast milk versus formula. We found that the time when mothers returned to work coincided with the duration of guaranteed leave. In particular, mothers with a labor pension plan resumed work significantly earlier than mothers with no pension plan, and mothers with no pension plan returned to work significantly later than those with pension plans. The short leave of absence guaranteed under existing policies translated into mothers spending less time with their children and being more likely to exclusively use formula by 6 months after birth. In contrast, mothers who resumed work later than 6 months after birth were more likely to have not worked before birth or to have quit their jobs during pregnancy. Implications and recommendations for parental leave policy in Taiwan are discussed. PMID:21603074

  10. Chemical composition and phytotoxicity of volatile essential oil from intact and fallen leaves of Eucalyptus citriodora.

    PubMed

    Batish, Daizy R; Singh, Harminder P; Setia, Nidhi; Kaur, Shalinder; Kohli, Ravinder K

    2006-01-01

    A total of 23 volatile constituents was identified and characterized by GC and GC-MS in the volatile essential oil extracted from intact (juvenile and adult) and fallen (senescent and leaf litter) leaves of lemon-scented eucalyptus (Eucalyptus citriodora Hook.). The leaves differed in their pigment, water and protein content, and C/N ratio. The oils were, in general, monoterpenoid in nature with 18 monoterpenes and 5 sesquiterpenes. However, a great variability in the amount of essential oils and their individual constituents was observed in different leaf tissues. The amount was maximum in the senescent leaves collected from the floor of the tree closely followed by that from juvenile leaves. In all, 19 constituents were identified in oil from juvenile and senescent leaves compared to 23 in adult leaves and 20 in leaf litter, respectively. Citronellal, a characteristic monoterpene of the oil reported hitherto was found to be more (77-78%) in the juvenile and senescent leaves compared to 48 and 54%, respectively, in the adult leaves and leaf litter. In the adult leaves, however, the content of citronellol--another important monoterpene-- was very high (21.9%) compared to other leaf types (7.8-12.2%). Essential oil and its two major monoterpenes viz. citronellal and citronellol were tested for their phytotoxicity against two weeds (Amaranthus viridis and Echinochloa crus-galli) and two crops (Triticum aestivum and Oryza sativa) under laboratory conditions. A difference in the phytotoxicity, measured in terms of seedling length and dry weight, of oil from different leaves and major monoterpenes was observed. Oil from adult leaves was found to be most phytotoxic although it occurs in smaller amount (on unit weight basis). The different toxicity of different oil types was due to the relative amount of individual monoterpenes present in the oil, their solubility and interactive action. The study concludes that oil from senescent and juvenile leaves being rich in

  11. Effective mitigation of debris flows at Lemon Dam, La Plata County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    deWolfe, V.G.; Santi, P.M.; Ey, J.; Gartner, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    To reduce the hazards from debris flows in drainage basins burned by wildfire, erosion control measures such as construction of check dams, installation of log erosion barriers (LEBs), and spreading of straw mulch and seed are common practice. After the 2002 Missionary Ridge Fire in southwest Colorado, these measures were implemented at Knight Canyon above Lemon Dam to protect the intake structures of the dam from being filled with sediment. Hillslope erosion protection measures included LEBs at concentrations of 220-620/ha (200-600% of typical densities), straw mulch was hand spread at concentrations up to 5.6??metric tons/hectare (125% of typical densities), and seeds were hand spread at 67-84??kg/ha (150% of typical values). The mulch was carefully crimped into the soil to keep it in place. In addition, 13 check dams and 3 debris racks were installed in the main drainage channel of the basin. The technical literature shows that each mitigation method working alone, or improperly constructed or applied, was inconsistent in its ability to reduce erosion and sedimentation. At Lemon Dam, however, these methods were effective in virtually eliminating sedimentation into the reservoir, which can be attributed to a number of factors: the density of application of each mitigation method, the enhancement of methods working in concert, the quality of installation, and rehabilitation of mitigation features to extend their useful life. The check dams effectively trapped the sediment mobilized during rainstorms, and only a few cubic meters of debris traveled downchannel, where it was intercepted by debris racks. Using a debris volume-prediction model developed for use in burned basins in the Western U.S., recorded rainfall events following the Missionary Ridge Fire should have produced a debris flow of approximately 10,000??m3 at Knight Canyon. The mitigation measures, therefore, reduced the debris volume by several orders of magnitude. For comparison, rainstorm

  12. Lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus) essential oil as a potent anti-inflammatory and antifungal drugs

    PubMed Central

    Boukhatem, Mohamed Nadjib; Ferhat, Mohamed Amine; Kameli, Abdelkrim; Saidi, Fairouz; Kebir, Hadjer Tchoketch

    2014-01-01

    Background Volatile oils obtained from lemon grass [Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf, Poaceae family] are used in traditional medicine as remedies for the treatment of various diseases. Aims In the present study, lemon grass essential oil (LGEO) was evaluated for its in vivo topical and oral anti-inflammatory effects, and for its in vitro antifungal activity using both liquid and vapor phases. Methods The chemical profile of LGEO as determined by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis revealed two major components: geranial (42.2%), and neral (31.5%). The antifungal activity of LGEO was evaluated against several pathogenic yeasts and filamentous fungi using disc diffusion and vapor diffusion methods. Results LGEO exhibited promising antifungal effect against Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, and Aspergillus niger, with different inhibition zone diameters (IZDs) (35–90 mm). IZD increased with increasing oil volume. Significantly, higher anti-Candida activity was observed in the vapor phase. For the evaluation of the anti-inflammatory effect, LGEO (10 mg/kg, administered orally) significantly reduced carrageenan-induced paw edema with a similar effect to that observed for oral diclofenac (50 mg/kg), which was used as the positive control. Oral administration of LGEO showed dose-dependent anti-inflammatory activity. In addition, topical application of LGEO in vivo resulted in a potent anti-inflammatory effect, as demonstrated by using the mouse model of croton oil-induced ear edema. To our knowledge, this is the first such report to be published. The topical application of LGEO at doses of 5 and 10 µL/ear significantly reduced acute ear edema induced by croton oil in 62.5 and 75% of the mice, respectively. In addition, histological analysis clearly confirmed that LGEO inhibits the skin inflammatory response in animal models. Conclusion Results of the present study indicate that LGEO has a noteworthy potential for the development of drugs for the treatment of

  13. Effective mitigation of debris flows at Lemon Dam, La Plata County, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    deWolfe, Victor G.; Santi, Paul M.; Ey, J.; Gartner, Joseph E.

    2008-04-01

    To reduce the hazards from debris flows in drainage basins burned by wildfire, erosion control measures such as construction of check dams, installation of log erosion barriers (LEBs), and spreading of straw mulch and seed are common practice. After the 2002 Missionary Ridge Fire in southwest Colorado, these measures were implemented at Knight Canyon above Lemon Dam to protect the intake structures of the dam from being filled with sediment. Hillslope erosion protection measures included LEBs at concentrations of 220-620/ha (200-600% of typical densities), straw mulch was hand spread at concentrations up to 5.6 metric tons/hectare (125% of typical densities), and seeds were hand spread at 67-84 kg/ha (150% of typical values). The mulch was carefully crimped into the soil to keep it in place. In addition, 13 check dams and 3 debris racks were installed in the main drainage channel of the basin. The technical literature shows that each mitigation method working alone, or improperly constructed or applied, was inconsistent in its ability to reduce erosion and sedimentation. At Lemon Dam, however, these methods were effective in virtually eliminating sedimentation into the reservoir, which can be attributed to a number of factors: the density of application of each mitigation method, the enhancement of methods working in concert, the quality of installation, and rehabilitation of mitigation features to extend their useful life. The check dams effectively trapped the sediment mobilized during rainstorms, and only a few cubic meters of debris traveled downchannel, where it was intercepted by debris racks. Using a debris volume-prediction model developed for use in burned basins in the Western U.S., recorded rainfall events following the Missionary Ridge Fire should have produced a debris flow of approximately 10,000 m 3 at Knight Canyon. The mitigation measures, therefore, reduced the debris volume by several orders of magnitude. For comparison, rainstorm-induced debris

  14. Effect of plant extracts on Alzheimer's disease: An insight into therapeutic avenues.

    PubMed

    Obulesu, M; Rao, Dowlathabad Muralidhara

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastative neurodegenerative disorder which needs adequate studies on effective treatment options. The extracts of plants and their effect on the amelioration of AD symptoms have been extensively studied. This paper summarizes the mechanisms like acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition, modification of monoamines, antiamyloid aggregation effect, and antioxidant activity which are actively entailed in the process of amelioration of AD symptoms. These effects are induced by extracts of a few plants of different origin like Yizhi Jiannao, Moringa oleifera (Drumstick tree), Ginkgo Biloba (Ginkgo/Maidenhair tree), Cassia obtisufolia (Sicklepod), Desmodium gangeticum (Sal Leaved Desmodium), Melissa officinalis (Lemon Balm), and Salvia officinalis (Garden sage, common sage). PMID:21716802

  15. Effect of plant extracts on Alzheimer's disease: An insight into therapeutic avenues

    PubMed Central

    Obulesu, M; Rao, Dowlathabad Muralidhara

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastative neurodegenerative disorder which needs adequate studies on effective treatment options. The extracts of plants and their effect on the amelioration of AD symptoms have been extensively studied. This paper summarizes the mechanisms like acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition, modification of monoamines, antiamyloid aggregation effect, and antioxidant activity which are actively entailed in the process of amelioration of AD symptoms. These effects are induced by extracts of a few plants of different origin like Yizhi Jiannao, Moringa oleifera (Drumstick tree), Ginkgo Biloba (Ginkgo/Maidenhair tree), Cassia obtisufolia (Sicklepod), Desmodium gangeticum (Sal Leaved Desmodium), Melissa officinalis (Lemon Balm), and Salvia officinalis (Garden sage, common sage). PMID:21716802

  16. Assessment of the repellent effect of citronella and lemon eucalyptus oil against South African Culicoides species.

    PubMed

    Venter, Gert J; Labuschagne, Karien; Boikanyo, Solomon N B; Morey, Liesl

    2014-01-01

    The use of insect repellents to reduce the attack rate of Culicoides species (Diptera:Ceratopogonidae) should form part of an integrated control programme to combat African horse sickness and other diseases transmitted by these blood-feeding midges. In the present study the repellent effects of a commercially available mosquito repellent, a combination of citronella and lemon eucalyptus oils, on Culicoides midges was determined. The number of midges collected with two 220 V Onderstepoort traps fitted with 8 W 23 cm white light tubes and baited with peel-stick patches, each containing 40 mg of active ingredient, was compared with that of two unbaited traps. Two trials were conducted and in each trial the four traps were rotated in two replicates of a 4 x 4 randomised Latin square design. Although more midges were collected in the baited traps, the mean number in the baited and unbaited traps was not significantly different. This mosquito repellent did not influence either the species composition or the physiological groups of Culicoides imicola Kieffer. The higher mean numbers in the baited traps, although not statistically significant, may indicate that this mosquito repellent might even attract Culicoides midges under certain conditions.

  17. Assessment of the repellent effect of citronella and lemon eucalyptus oil against South African Culicoides species.

    PubMed

    Venter, Gert J; Labuschagne, Karien; Boikanyo, Solomon N B; Morey, Liesl

    2014-01-01

    The use of insect repellents to reduce the attack rate of Culicoides species (Diptera:Ceratopogonidae) should form part of an integrated control programme to combat African horse sickness and other diseases transmitted by these blood-feeding midges. In the present study the repellent effects of a commercially available mosquito repellent, a combination of citronella and lemon eucalyptus oils, on Culicoides midges was determined. The number of midges collected with two 220 V Onderstepoort traps fitted with 8 W 23 cm white light tubes and baited with peel-stick patches, each containing 40 mg of active ingredient, was compared with that of two unbaited traps. Two trials were conducted and in each trial the four traps were rotated in two replicates of a 4 x 4 randomised Latin square design. Although more midges were collected in the baited traps, the mean number in the baited and unbaited traps was not significantly different. This mosquito repellent did not influence either the species composition or the physiological groups of Culicoides imicola Kieffer. The higher mean numbers in the baited traps, although not statistically significant, may indicate that this mosquito repellent might even attract Culicoides midges under certain conditions. PMID:25686204

  18. Effect of sample pretreatment on the extraction of lemon (Citrus limon) components.

    PubMed

    Ledesma-Escobar, Carlos A; Priego-Capote, Feliciano; Luque de Castro, María D

    2016-06-01

    A study on the key role of lemon sample pretreatment on the analytical results is here presented. The objective of the study was to analyze the differences between extracts obtained from lyophilized and air-dried samples-the most common sample pretreatment in citrus studies-in comparison to extracts from fresh samples. All the extracts were obtained with ultrasound assistance and analyzed by LC-QTOF MS/MS. The dataset, constituted by 74 tentative identified metabolites, was first evaluated by ANOVA, which showed significant differences in the concentration of 44 out of 74 metabolites (p≤0.01). Also, the pairwise mean comparison (Tukey HSD; p≤0.01) revealed that the concentration of metabolites in the extracts from fresh and air-dried samples was quite similar and differed from that in lyophilized samples. On the other hand, application of principal component analysis (PCA) showed a clear discrimination between pretreatments, explaining 86.20% of the total variability. The results of this study suggest that the main differences between extracts could be attributed to the effect of freezing or heating on metabolic pathways, and not only to thermolability of the compounds.

  19. Effect of citrus lemon oil on growth and adherence of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Zhang, Xiangyu; Wang, Yuzhi; Chen, Feifei; Yu, Zhifen; Wang, Li; Chen, Shuanglu; Guo, Maoding

    2013-07-01

    In order to exploit novel anticaries agents, we investigated the effects of citrus lemon oil (CLO), a type of natural product, on growth and adherence of the primary oral cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). The growth inhibitory effect was explored with a micro-dilution assay. Adherence was analyzed by colony counts on the respective surfaces and the adherence inhibition rate (AIR). Real time-PCR was used to investigate the effects of CLO on transcription of glucosyltransferase (Gtf) encoding genes, gtfB, C and D. Neson-Somogyi method was used to measure the effects of CLO on Gtf activity. The minimum inhibitory concentration of CLO against S. mutans was 4.5 mg/ml. The CLO effectively reduced the adherence of S. mutans on glass surface (the AIR were from 98.3 to 100 %, P > 0.05) and saliva-coated enamel surface (the AIR were from 54.8 to 79.2 %, P < 0.05). CLO effectively reduced the activity of Gtf and the transcription of gtfs in a dose dependent manner (P < 0.05). In conclusion, CLO can effectively inhibit the growth and the adherence to glass and saliva-coated enamel surfaces of S. mutans. It can also inhibit the transcription of gtfs, as well as the Gtf enzyme activity.

  20. Dehydration characteristics and mathematical modelling of lemon slices drying undergoing oven treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torki-Harchegani, Mehdi; Ghasemi-Varnamkhasti, Mahdi; Ghanbarian, Davoud; Sadeghi, Morteza; Tohidi, Mojtaba

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the effect of drying temperature on drying behaviour and mass transfer parameters of lemon slices was investigated. The drying experiments were conducted in a laboratory air ventilated oven dryer at temperatures of 50, 60 and 75 °C. It was observed that the drying temperature affected the drying time and drying rate significantly. Drying rate curves revealed that the process at the temperature levels taken place in the falling rate period entirely. The usefulness of eight thin layer models to simulate the drying kinetics was evaluated and the Midilli and Kucuk model showed the best fit to experimental drying curves. The effective moisture diffusivity was determined on the basis of Fick's second law and obtained to be 1.62 × 10-11, 3.25 × 10-11 and 8.11 × 10-11 m2 s-1 for the temperatures of 50, 60 and 75 °C, respectively. The activation energy and Arrhenius constant were calculated to be 60.08 kJ mol-1 and 0.08511 m2 s-1, respectively. The average value of convective mass transfer coefficient for the drying temperatures of 50, 60 and 75 °C was calculated to be 5.71 × 10-7, 1.62 × 10-6 and 2.53 × 10-6 m s-1, respectively.

  1. Massey to leave NSF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Susan

    National Science Foundation Director Walter E. Massey has been recommended for appointment to the position of senior vice president for academic affairs and provost for the entire University of California system. The recommendation, which was announced on January 27, came from UC President Jack W. Peltason and will be acted upon by UC's Board of Regents. Massey has accepted the position, and it is expected that he will leave NSF early in February.Massey said that he was honored to receive the nomination and had not planned to leave his current position. “It's such a fantastic opportunity to be part of the leadership of the greatest public university in the world.…It's an opportunity that I cannot pass up,” he commented. Massey was named to a 6-year term as NSF director by former President George Bush in March 1991.

  2. Preliminary Assessment of Landslides Along the Florida River Downstream from Lemon Reservoir, La Plata County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulz, William H.; Coe, Jeffrey A.; Ellis, William L.; Kibler, John D.

    2006-01-01

    Nearly two-dozen shallow landslides were active during spring 2005 on a hillside located along the east side of the Florida River about one kilometer downstream from Lemon Reservoir in La Plata County, southwestern Colorado. Landslides on the hillside directly threaten human safety, residential structures, a county roadway, utilities, and the Florida River, and indirectly threaten downstream areas and Lemon Dam. Most of the area where the landslides occurred was burned during the 2002 Missionary Ridge wildfire. We performed geologic mapping, subsurface exploration and sampling, radiocarbon dating, and shallow ground-water and ground-displacement monitoring to assess landslide activity. Active landslides during spring 2005 were as large as 35,000 m3 and confined to colluvium. Debris flows were mobilized from most of the landslides, were as large as 1,500 m3, and traveled as far as 250 m. Landslide activity was triggered by elevated ground-water pressures within the colluvium caused by infiltration of snowmelt. Landslide activity ceased as ground-water pressures dropped during the summer. Shallow landslides on the hillside appear to be much more likely following the Missionary Ridge fire because of the loss of tree root strength and evapotranspiration. We used monitoring data and observations to develop preliminary, approximate rainfall/snowmelt thresholds above which shallow landslide activity can be expected. Landslides triggered during spring 2005 occurred within a 1.97 x 107 m3 older landslide that extends, on average, about 40 m into bedrock. The south end of this older landslide appears to have experienced deep secondary landsliding. Radiocarbon dating of sediments at the head of the older landslide suggests that the landslide was active about 1,424-1,696 years ago. A relatively widespread wildfire may have preceded the older landslide, and the landslide may have occurred during a wetter time. The wetter climate and effects of the wildfire would likely have

  3. A prospective cross-over field trial shows protection of lemon eucalyptus extract against tick bites.

    PubMed

    Gardulf, Ann; Wohlfart, Ingrid; Gustafson, Rolf

    2004-11-01

    Ixodes ricinus can transmit several microorganisms, out of which Borrelia burgdorferi and tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus are the most important pathogens in humans. A lemon eucalyptus extract (Citriodiol) has been shown to be a natural repellent against mosquitoes, stable flies, and midges. We have investigated whether the use of the extract would reduce the number of attached I. ricinus ticks in humans. A volunteer sample of 111 individuals was recruited among healthy, outdoor active adults living in two highly I. ricinus-infested areas. They were randomly divided into two groups: one group applied the Citriodiol spray daily for 2 wk to the lower extremities, whereas the other group was instructed not to use any type of repellent on any part of the body. After 2 wk, the scheme was reversed. All volunteers filled in a daily diary, giving information about outdoor activities and the number of observed, attached, or not yet attached ticks, including the anatomical location of the ticks found. Forty-two attached ticks were reported during the weeks when the Citriodiol spray was used, and 112 were reported when it was not. The median number of reported attached ticks per person decreased from 1.5 (range, 0-9) to 0.5 (range, 0-2; P < 0.05) during the weeks when the repellent was used. The number of reported attached ticks noted below the waist was 13/42 (31%) during the period when the spray was used and 73/112 (65%) when no spray was used (P < 0.001). No evident redistribution of attached ticks from protected areas to unprotected areas was seen. Citriodiol may become a useful means in reducing the number of tick bites and thereby tick-borne infections, although additional studies are warranted. PMID:15605645

  4. Freezing injury in potato leaves.

    PubMed

    Sukumaran, N P; Weiser, C J

    1972-11-01

    Time-temperature profiles of freezing leaves from frost-resistant (Solanum acaule Bitt.) and frost-susceptible (Solanum tuberosum L. subsp. tuberosum Hawkes) types of potatoes did not reveal any major differences. The pattern of change in resistance of leaves to low voltage, low frequency current during freezing was different in the frost-resistant and susceptible leaves. In tissue sections from both types of leaves, cells freeze extracellularly at cooling velocities lower than 5 C per minute. Cells from leaves of resistant plants showed a higher osmotic pressure but not a higher water permeability than those from susceptible plants. The extent of injury caused by even very slow freezing was greater than that caused by equivalent isopiestic desiccation, particularly in susceptible leaves. The higher osmotic pressure in cells of leaves from resistant plants can account for the greater desiccation resistance but not for the frost resistance observed. PMID:16658217

  5. Regional-Scale Migrations and Habitat Use of Juvenile Lemon Sharks (Negaprion brevirostris) in the US South Atlantic

    PubMed Central

    Reyier, Eric A.; Franks, Bryan R.; Chapman, Demian D.; Scheidt, Douglas M.; Stolen, Eric D.; Gruber, Samuel H.

    2014-01-01

    Resolving the geographic extent and timing of coastal shark migrations, as well as their environmental cues, is essential for refining shark management strategies in anticipation of increasing anthropogenic stressors to coastal ecosystems. We employed a regional-scale passive acoustic telemetry array encompassing 300 km of the east Florida coast to assess what factors influence site fidelity of juvenile lemon sharks (Negaprion brevirostris) to an exposed coastal nursery at Cape Canaveral, and to document the timing and rate of their seasonal migrations. Movements of 54 juvenile lemon sharks were monitored for three years with individuals tracked for up to 751 days. While most sharks demonstrated site fidelity to the Cape Canaveral region December through February under typical winter water temperatures, historically extreme declines in ocean temperature were accompanied by rapid and often temporary, southward displacements of up to 190 km along the Florida east coast. From late February through April each year, most sharks initiated a northward migration at speeds of up to 64 km day−1 with several individuals then detected in compatible estuarine telemetry arrays in Georgia and South Carolina up to 472 km from release locations. Nineteen sharks returned for a second or even third consecutive winter, thus demonstrating strong seasonal philopatry to the Cape Canaveral region. The long distance movements and habitat associations of immature lemon sharks along the US southeast coast contrast sharply with the natal site fidelity observed in this species at other sites in the western Atlantic Ocean. These findings validate the existing multi-state management strategies now in place. Results also affirm the value of collaborative passive arrays for resolving seasonal movements and habitat preferences of migratory coastal shark species not easily studied with other tagging techniques. PMID:24586329

  6. Regional-scale migrations and habitat use of juvenile lemon sharks (Negaprion brevirostris) in the US South Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Reyier, Eric A; Franks, Bryan R; Chapman, Demian D; Scheidt, Douglas M; Stolen, Eric D; Gruber, Samuel H

    2014-01-01

    Resolving the geographic extent and timing of coastal shark migrations, as well as their environmental cues, is essential for refining shark management strategies in anticipation of increasing anthropogenic stressors to coastal ecosystems. We employed a regional-scale passive acoustic telemetry array encompassing 300 km of the east Florida coast to assess what factors influence site fidelity of juvenile lemon sharks (Negaprion brevirostris) to an exposed coastal nursery at Cape Canaveral, and to document the timing and rate of their seasonal migrations. Movements of 54 juvenile lemon sharks were monitored for three years with individuals tracked for up to 751 days. While most sharks demonstrated site fidelity to the Cape Canaveral region December through February under typical winter water temperatures, historically extreme declines in ocean temperature were accompanied by rapid and often temporary, southward displacements of up to 190 km along the Florida east coast. From late February through April each year, most sharks initiated a northward migration at speeds of up to 64 km day(-1) with several individuals then detected in compatible estuarine telemetry arrays in Georgia and South Carolina up to 472 km from release locations. Nineteen sharks returned for a second or even third consecutive winter, thus demonstrating strong seasonal philopatry to the Cape Canaveral region. The long distance movements and habitat associations of immature lemon sharks along the US southeast coast contrast sharply with the natal site fidelity observed in this species at other sites in the western Atlantic Ocean. These findings validate the existing multi-state management strategies now in place. Results also affirm the value of collaborative passive arrays for resolving seasonal movements and habitat preferences of migratory coastal shark species not easily studied with other tagging techniques.

  7. Lemon Odor Reduces Stress-induced Neuronal Activation in the Emotion Expression System: An Animal Model Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanada, Kazue; Sugimoto, Koji; Shutoh, Fumihiro; Hisano, Setsuji

    Perception of particular sensory stimuli from the surroundings can influence emotion in individuals. In an uncomfortable situation, humans protect themselves from some aversive stimulus by acutely evoking a stress response. Animal model studies have contributed to an understanding of neuronal mechanisms underlying the stress response in humans. To study a possible anti-stressful effect of lemon odor, an excitation of neurons secreting corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) as a primary factor of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) was analyzed in animal model experiments, in which rats are restrained in the presence or absence of the odor. The effect was evaluated by measuring expression of c-Fos (an excited neuron marker) in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), a key structure of the HPA in the brain. We prepared 3 animal groups: Groups S, L and I. Groups S and L were restrained for 30 minutes while being blown by air and being exposed to the lemon odor, respectively. Group I was intact without any treatment. Two hours later of the onset of experiments, brains of all groups were sampled and processed for microscopic examination. Brain sections were processed for c-Fos immunostaining and/or in situ hybridization for CRH. In Group S but not in Group I, c-Fos expression was found in the PVN. A combined in situ hybridization-immunohistochemical dual labeling revealed that CRH mRNA-expressing neurons express c-Fos. In computer-assisted automatic counting, the incidence of c-Fos-expressing neurons in the entire PVN was statistically lower in Group L than in Group S. Detailed analysis of PVN subregions demonstrated that c-Fos-expressing neurons are fewer in Group L than in Group S in the dorsal part of the medial parvocellular subregion. These results may suggest that lemon odor attenuates the restraint stress-induced neuronal activation including CRH neurons, presumably mimicking an aspect of stress responses in humans.

  8. Assessment of Thermal and Textural Characteristics and Consumer Preferences of Lemon and Strawberry Flavored Fish Oil Organogels.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Emin; Öǧütcü, Mustafa; Arifoglu, Nazan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, strawberry and lemon flavored fish oil organogels (FOO) were prepared with beeswax as the organogelator. The physical, thermal and textural characteristics as well as the consumer preferences of the flavored organogels were determined in comparison with fish oil and FOO containing no flavor. Furthermore, the stability of the organogels was evaluated during 90 day storage at 4°C. The results revealed that, structurally stable fish oil organogels as spreadable products might be formed and that flavoring of the gels enhances consumer preference. Thus, flavoring of fish oil organogels could be a challenge in increasing the consumption of fish oil. PMID:26369597

  9. Chemical composition and inhibitory activity of essential oil from decaying leaves of Eucalyptus citriodora.

    PubMed

    Batish, Daizy R; Singh, Harminder Pal; Setia, Nidhi; Kaur, Shalinder; Kohli, Ravinder K

    2006-01-01

    A study was undertaken to explore the content and composition of volatile oil from decaying leaves of lemon-scented eucalypt (Eucalyptus citriodora Hook.) not analyzed earlier. GC and GC-MS analysis of the oil (yield 0.6%) revealed the monoterpenoid nature with citronellal (52.2%), citronellol (12.3%) and isoisopulegol (11.9%) as the major constituents. Overall, 17 components were identified that accounted for over 94% of the decaying leaf oil. Surprisingly, the decaying leaf oil contained nearly 1.8% of trans-rose oxide, which is generally absent in eucalypt essential oil. Decaying leaf oil and its major 2 components (citronellal and citronellol) inhibited the germination and root elongation of two weeds--Cassia occidentalis (broad-leaved) and Echinochloa crus-galli (grassy weed). Based on the dose-response studies, I50 values were determined for decaying leaf oil and the effect was more on germination only of broad-leaved weed (C. occidentalis), whereas that of citronellal and citronellol were on germination as well as root length of E. crus-galli (grassy weed). Based on I50 values it was observed that citronellal was more phytotoxic and germination inhibiting in nature, whereas citronellol was a more potent root inhibitor, thereby indicating a possible different mode of action. The study concludes that decaying leaf oil hold a good commercial value for exploitation as weed management agent.

  10. Water isotopologues in leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, M.; Ogée, J.; Farquhar, G. D.; Cernusak, L. A.; Peylin, P.; Bariac, T.

    2007-12-01

    Leaf water isotope enrichment is a cornerstone of a variety of isotopic applications. It imprints on different substances such as atmospheric CO2, O2, and plant organic matter. But different applications use enrichment in different parts of the leaf and weighted by different fluxes. For example, leaf organic matter is determined by the assimilation-weighted average bulk water enrichment. Atmospheric CO2 and O2 are determined by the enrichment near the evaporating sites, either weighted by the one-way CO2 flux from the stomata to the atmosphere or by electron transport, resp. These applications of leaf water enrichment are used from the leaf level up to global scales. It is therefore essential to understand the time course of leaf water enrichment at both the evaporating sites and in the mesophyll but also to asses the suitability of simple models such as the Craig & Gordon (1965) steady-state prediction or the Dongmann et al. (1974) non-steady-state model. We describe here advection and diffusion of water isotopologues in leaves in the non-steady state. We first show how this relates to earlier non-steady state bulk leaf water enrichment models. The adv.-diff. model compares very well with observations of bulk mesophyll water during the whole diel cycle. It compares well with the enrichment at the evaporative sites during the day but shows some deviations at night. It is clear that night-time stomatal conductance should be measured in the future. However, varying mesophyll water volume did not seem critical for a good prediction. In addition, observations of single diurnal cycles do not constrain the effective length in the mesophyll. Finally, we show when simpler models of leaf water enrichment are suitable for applications of leaf water isotopes once weighted with the appropriate gas exchange flux. We then present a two-dimensional adv.-diff. description of leaf water enrichment along monocot leaves. The model reproduces well all published measurements along

  11. Does short-term lemon honey juice fasting have effect on lipid profile and body composition in healthy individuals?

    PubMed

    Shetty, Prashanth; Mooventhan, A; Nagendra, Hongasandra Ramarao

    2016-03-01

    Fasting is one of the fundamental treatments of naturopathy. Use of lemon and honey for various medicinal purposes were documented since ancient days but there is a lack of evidence on short-term effects of lemon honey juice fasting (LHJF). Hence, we aim at evaluating the short-term effect of LHJF on lipid profile and body composition in healthy individuals. A total of 50 healthy subjects were recruited and they received 300-ml of LHJ, 4 times a day for four successive days of fasting. Assessments were performed before and after the intervention. Statistical analysis was performed by student's paired t-test with the use of Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version-16. Our study showed significant reduction in weight, body mass index (BMI), fat mass (FM), free FM (FFM), and total serum triglycerides (TSTGs) with insignificant reduction in fat percentage and total serum cholesterol compared to baseline. Within group analysis of females showed similar results, unlike males. Our results suggest that LHJF may be useful for reduction of body weight, BMI, FM, FFM, and TSTG in healthy individuals, which might be useful for the prevention of obesity and hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:27297504

  12. Fatty acids profile and alteration of lemon seeds extract (Citrus limon) added to soybean oil under thermoxidation.

    PubMed

    Luzia, Débora Maria Moreno; Jorge, Neuza

    2013-10-01

    This paper aimed at evaluating fatty acids profile and the total alteration of lemon seeds extract added to soybean oil under thermoxidation, verifying the isolated and synergistic effect of these antioxidants. Therefore, Control treatments, LSE (2,400 mg/kg Lemon Seeds Extract), TBHQ (mg/kg), Mixture 1 (LSE + 50 mg/kg TBHQ) and Mixture 2 (LSE + 25 mg/kg TBHQ) were subjected to 180°C for 20 h. Samples were taken at 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 h intervals and analyzed as for fatty acid profile and total polar compounds. Results were subjected to variance analyses and Tukey tests at a 5% significance level. An increase in the percentage of saturated fatty acids and mono-unsaturated, and decrease in polyunsaturated fatty acids was observed, regardless of the treatments studied. For total polar compounds, it was verified that Mixtures 1 and 2 presented values lower than 25% with 20 h of heating, not surpassing the limits established in many countries for disposal of oils and fats under high temperatures, thus proving the synergistic effect of antioxidants. PMID:24426004

  13. Batch and Pulsed Fed-Batch Cultures of Aspergillus flavipes FP-500 Growing on Lemon Peel at Stirred Tank Reactor.

    PubMed

    Wolf-Márquez, V E; García-García, E; García-Rivero, M; Aguilar-Osorio, G; Martínez Trujillo, M A

    2015-11-01

    Aspergillus flavipes FP-500 grew up on submerged cultures using lemon peel as the only carbon source, developing several batch and pulsed fed-batch trials on a stirred tank reactor. The effect of carbon source concentration, reducing sugar presence and initial pH on exopectinase and endopectinase production, was analyzed on batch cultures. From this, we observed that the highest substrate concentration favored biomass (X max) but had not influence on the corresponding specific production (q p) of both pectinases; the most acid condition provoked higher endopectinase-specific productions but had not a significant effect on those corresponding to exopectinases; and reducing sugar concentrations higher than 1.5 g/L retarded pectinase production. On the other hand, by employing the pulsed fed-batch operation mode, we observed a prolonged growth phase, and an increase of about twofold on endopectinase production without a significant raise on biomass concentration. So, pulsed fed-batch seems to be a good alternative for obtaining higher endopectinase titers by using high lemon peel quantities without having mixing and repression problems to the system. The usefulness of unstructured kinetic models for explaining, under a theoretic level, the behavior of the fungus along the batch culture with regard to pectinase production was evident.

  14. Mercury and selenium levels in lemon sharks (Negaprion brevirostris) in relation to a harmful red tide event.

    PubMed

    Nam, Dong-Ha; Adams, Douglas H; Reyier, Eric A; Basu, Niladri

    2011-05-01

    Tissue levels of mercury (Hg; total, organic) and selenium (Se) were assessed in juvenile lemon sharks (Negaprion brevirostris) from Florida nearshore waters collected during a harmful algal bloom (HAB, brevetoxin) event and compared with sharks not exposed to HABs. In all sharks studied, total Hg levels in the muscle were generally present in a molar excess over Se (which may protect against Hg toxicity) and mean muscle Hg levels (0.34 microg/g) exceed safe human consumption guidelines. While there was generally no difference in tissue Hg and Se levels following exposure of sharks to HABs, hepatic Hg levels were significantly lower (56% reduction) in the HAB-exposed sharks compared to controls. As Hg and HABs are globally increasing in scope and magnitude, further work is warranted to assess their interactions and biotic impacts within aquatic ecosystems, especially for a species such as the lemon shark that is classified as a near-threatened species by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature.

  15. Batch and Pulsed Fed-Batch Cultures of Aspergillus flavipes FP-500 Growing on Lemon Peel at Stirred Tank Reactor.

    PubMed

    Wolf-Márquez, V E; García-García, E; García-Rivero, M; Aguilar-Osorio, G; Martínez Trujillo, M A

    2015-11-01

    Aspergillus flavipes FP-500 grew up on submerged cultures using lemon peel as the only carbon source, developing several batch and pulsed fed-batch trials on a stirred tank reactor. The effect of carbon source concentration, reducing sugar presence and initial pH on exopectinase and endopectinase production, was analyzed on batch cultures. From this, we observed that the highest substrate concentration favored biomass (X max) but had not influence on the corresponding specific production (q p) of both pectinases; the most acid condition provoked higher endopectinase-specific productions but had not a significant effect on those corresponding to exopectinases; and reducing sugar concentrations higher than 1.5 g/L retarded pectinase production. On the other hand, by employing the pulsed fed-batch operation mode, we observed a prolonged growth phase, and an increase of about twofold on endopectinase production without a significant raise on biomass concentration. So, pulsed fed-batch seems to be a good alternative for obtaining higher endopectinase titers by using high lemon peel quantities without having mixing and repression problems to the system. The usefulness of unstructured kinetic models for explaining, under a theoretic level, the behavior of the fungus along the batch culture with regard to pectinase production was evident. PMID:26304128

  16. Biomimetic synthesis of silver nanoparticles by Citrus limon (lemon) aqueous extract and theoretical prediction of particle size.

    PubMed

    Prathna, T C; Chandrasekaran, N; Raichur, Ashok M; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, silver nanoparticles were rapidly synthesized at room temperature by treating silver ions with the Citrus limon (lemon) extract. The effect of various process parameters like the reductant concentration, mixing ratio of the reactants and the concentration of silver nitrate were studied in detail. In the standardized process, 10(-2)M silver nitrate solution was interacted for 4h with lemon juice (2% citric acid concentration and 0.5% ascorbic acid concentration) in the ratio of 1:4 (vol:vol). The formation of silver nanoparticles was confirmed by Surface Plasmon Resonance as determined by UV-Visible spectra in the range of 400-500 nm. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed the distinctive facets (111, 200, 220, 222 and 311 planes) of silver nanoparticles. We found that citric acid was the principal reducing agent for the nanosynthesis process. FT-IR spectral studies demonstrated citric acid as the probable stabilizing agent. Silver nanoparticles below 50 nm with spherical and spheroidal shape were observed from transmission electron microscopy. The correlation between absorption maxima and particle sizes were derived for different UV-Visible absorption maxima (corresponding to different citric acid concentrations) employing "MiePlot v. 3.4". The theoretical particle size corresponding to 2% citric acid concentration was compared to those obtained by various experimental techniques like X-ray diffraction analysis, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy.

  17. Does short-term lemon honey juice fasting have effect on lipid profile and body composition in healthy individuals?

    PubMed

    Shetty, Prashanth; Mooventhan, A; Nagendra, Hongasandra Ramarao

    2016-03-01

    Fasting is one of the fundamental treatments of naturopathy. Use of lemon and honey for various medicinal purposes were documented since ancient days but there is a lack of evidence on short-term effects of lemon honey juice fasting (LHJF). Hence, we aim at evaluating the short-term effect of LHJF on lipid profile and body composition in healthy individuals. A total of 50 healthy subjects were recruited and they received 300-ml of LHJ, 4 times a day for four successive days of fasting. Assessments were performed before and after the intervention. Statistical analysis was performed by student's paired t-test with the use of Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version-16. Our study showed significant reduction in weight, body mass index (BMI), fat mass (FM), free FM (FFM), and total serum triglycerides (TSTGs) with insignificant reduction in fat percentage and total serum cholesterol compared to baseline. Within group analysis of females showed similar results, unlike males. Our results suggest that LHJF may be useful for reduction of body weight, BMI, FM, FFM, and TSTG in healthy individuals, which might be useful for the prevention of obesity and hypertriglyceridemia.

  18. Pelletization process of postproduction plant waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obidziński, S.

    2012-07-01

    The results of investigations on the influence of material, process, and construction parameters on the densification process and density of pellets received from different mixtures of tobacco and fine-grained waste of lemon balm are presented. The conducted research makes it possible to conclude that postproduction waste eg tobacco and lemon balm wastes can be successfully pelletized and used as an ecological, solid fuels.

  19. Essential oils from clove affect growth of Penicillium species obtained from lemons.

    PubMed

    Martínez, J A; González, R

    2013-01-01

    Continuous use of fungicides to control citrus postharvest diseases has led to increasing resistant strains of pathogens. Since the appearance of fungicide resistance has become an important factor in limiting the efficacy fungicide treatments, new studies have been needed in order to improve control methods. There is a growing consumer's concern about the possible harmful effects of synthetic fungicides on the human health and the environment. Alternatives to synthetic fungicides for citrus decay control include essential oils. These compounds are known for their natural components and they are searched for potential bioactive plant extracts against fungi. In this study, two isolates of P. digitatum and P. italicum each were collected from lemon fruits affected by green and blue mould, respectively. Isolates were purified in potato dextrose agar (PDA) in order to separate the two species which we are demonstrated that they commonly grow together in nature. In vitro assays, in which isolates were grown at 26 degrees C on Petri dishes containing PDA for up to 17 days, were carried out by pouring several doses of essential oils from clove (Syzygium aromaticum L.) on PDA to obtain the following concentrations (v/v): 1.6; 8, 40, 200 and 500 microL L(-1) + tween 80 (0.1 mL L(-1)). Mycelial growth curves and growth, conidiation, mass of aerial mycelium and conidial size were measured. Penicillium isolates showed a slight degree of variability in their growth kinetics, depending on the isolate. 500 microL L(-1) inhibited the growth of all the isolates, whereas concentrations lower than 40 microL L(-1) slightly increased the growth. 200 microL L(-1) reduced both growth and conidiation in all isolates. Aerial mycelium of P. digitatum was not affected by clove, whereas reduced the mass of mycelium of P. italicum at concentrations higher than 8 microL L(-1). In vivo experiment was carried out inoculating a drop of an extract of conidia with a hypodermal syringe though a

  20. Inhibition of clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth by buffered vinegar and lemon juice concentrate during chilling.....of ground turkey road containing minimal ingredients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth in ground turkey roast containing minimal ingredients (salt and sugar), by buffered vinegar (MoStatin V) and a blend (buffered) of lemon juice concentrate and vinegar (MoStatin LV) was evaluated. Ground turkey roast was formulat...

  1. Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth by lemon juice and vinegar product in reduced NaCl roast beef

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth in reduced sodium roast beef by a blend of buffered lemon juice concentrate and vinegar (MoStatin LV) during abusive exponential cooling was evaluated. Roast beef containing salt (NaCl; 1, 1.5, or 2%, wt/wt), blend of sodium pyro-...

  2. Identification and quantification of a major anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory phenolic compound found in basil, lemon, thyme, mint, oregano, rosemary, sage, and thyme

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Basil, lemon thyme, mint, oregano, rosemary, sage, and thyme are in the mint family of plants that are used as culinary herbs world-wide. These herbs contain phenolic compounds that are believed to have strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Therefore, the major phenolic compounds fr...

  3. Laboratory Production of Lemon Liqueur (Limoncello) by Conventional Maceration and a Two-Syringe System to Illustrate Rapid Solid-Liquid Dynamic Extraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naviglio, Daniele; Montesano, Domenico; Gallo, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Two experimental techniques of solid-liquid extraction are compared relating to the lab-scale production of lemon liqueur, most commonly named "limoncello"; the first is the official method of maceration for the solid-liquid extraction of analytes and is widely used to extract active ingredients from a great variety of natural products;…

  4. Identification, synthesis, and characterization of novel sulfur-containing volatile compounds from the in-depth analysis of Lisbon lemon peels (Citrus limon L. Burm. f. cv. Lisbon).

    PubMed

    Cannon, Robert J; Kazimierski, Arkadiusz; Curto, Nicole L; Li, Jing; Trinnaman, Laurence; Jańczuk, Adam J; Agyemang, David; Da Costa, Neil C; Chen, Michael Z

    2015-02-25

    Lemons (Citrus limon) are a desirable citrus fruit grown and used globally in a wide range of applications. The main constituents of this sour-tasting fruit have been well quantitated and characterized. However, additional research is still necessary to better understand the trace volatile compounds that may contribute to the overall aroma of the fruit. In this study, Lisbon lemons (C. limon L. Burm. f. cv. Lisbon) were purchased from a grove in California, USA, and extracted by liquid-liquid extraction. Fractionation and multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were utilized to separate, focus, and enhance unidentified compounds. In addition, these methods were employed to more accurately assign flavor dilution factors by aroma extract dilution analysis. Numerous compounds were identified for the first time in lemons, including a series of branched aliphatic aldehydes and several novel sulfur-containing structures. Rarely reported in citrus peels, sulfur compounds are known to contribute significantly to the aroma profile of the fruit and were found to be aroma-active in this particular study on lemons. This paper discusses the identification, synthesis, and organoleptic properties of these novel volatile sulfur compounds.

  5. Inactivation by lemon juice of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Enteritidis, and Listeria monocytogenes in beef marinating for the ethnic food kelaguen.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Lee, Delores; Afaisen, Shayna; Gadi, Rama

    2013-01-01

    Lemon juice, a major source of acidulant citric acid, is frequently used in the preparation of ethnic foods. Raw or partially cooked meats are marinated with lemon juice in the preparation of a popular Chamorro dish called kelaguen, which is, unfortunately, strongly associated with foodborne illness outbreaks in Guam. We investigated the efficacy of lemon juice in reducing numbers of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Enteritidis, and Listeria monocytogenes at stationary phase during marination. Beef inoculated with a three-strain mixture of E. coli O157:H7, S. Enteritidis, or L. monocytogenes at 10(6)CFU/mL was marinated with lemon juice from 0.2 to 10mL/g for 48h at 28°C. The decline of the pathogens during marination exhibited various degrees of deviation from first-order kinetics. Based on calculations with both linear regression and Weibull models, the decimal reduction time (4-D values) over the range of lemon concentrations was 366-5.1h for E. coli O157:H7, 282-2.4h for S. Enteritidis, and 104-2.4h for L. monocytogenes, indicating that E. coli O157:H7 was the most lemon-juice-resistant of the three. The pathogen reduction time (log 4-D values) plotted against undissociated titratable citric acid exhibited a biphasic pattern. The pathogen reduction time (log 4-D or δ values) was linearly correlated with the pH of the marinating beef (R(2)=0.92 to 0.98). The Z(pH) values (pH dependence of death rate) with beef marination were 1.03 for E. coli O157:H7, 0.92 for S. Enteritidis, and 1.29 for L. monocytogenes, indicating that L. monocytogenes was the most pH resistant of the three. L. monocytogenes exhibited less resistance to lemon juice than S. Enteritidis at pH of 3.5-4.4 but more resistance at pH of 2.6-2.8. In addition, at 4°C, all three pathogens exhibited 4-D values 1.7-4.1 times greater than those at 24°C at 5mL lemon juice/g beef. In conclusion, the usual beef marinating practice for kelaguen preparation (<0.5mL lemon juice/g beef for 1-12h) did not

  6. 5 CFR 630.1003 - Establishing leave banks and leave bank boards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Establishing leave banks and leave bank... REGULATIONS ABSENCE AND LEAVE Voluntary Leave Bank Program § 630.1003 Establishing leave banks and leave bank boards. (a) Each agency that participates in the voluntary leave bank program shall, in accordance...

  7. 5 CFR 630.1003 - Establishing leave banks and leave bank boards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Establishing leave banks and leave bank... REGULATIONS ABSENCE AND LEAVE Voluntary Leave Bank Program § 630.1003 Establishing leave banks and leave bank boards. (a) Each agency that participates in the voluntary leave bank program shall, in accordance...

  8. 5 CFR 630.1003 - Establishing leave banks and leave bank boards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Establishing leave banks and leave bank... REGULATIONS ABSENCE AND LEAVE Voluntary Leave Bank Program § 630.1003 Establishing leave banks and leave bank boards. (a) Each agency that participates in the voluntary leave bank program shall, in accordance...

  9. 5 CFR 630.1003 - Establishing leave banks and leave bank boards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Establishing leave banks and leave bank... REGULATIONS ABSENCE AND LEAVE Voluntary Leave Bank Program § 630.1003 Establishing leave banks and leave bank boards. (a) Each agency that participates in the voluntary leave bank program shall, in accordance...

  10. 5 CFR 630.1003 - Establishing leave banks and leave bank boards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Establishing leave banks and leave bank... REGULATIONS ABSENCE AND LEAVE Voluntary Leave Bank Program § 630.1003 Establishing leave banks and leave bank boards. (a) Each agency that participates in the voluntary leave bank program shall, in accordance...

  11. Key Obama officials leave administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-01-01

    Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar is one of the latest members of the Obama administration to announce that he is leaving his position near the start of President Obama's second term in office. Salazar, who has served as interior secretary since January 2009, intends to leave the department by the end of March, the department noted on 16 January. Salazar joins a number of other key officials who are planning to leave the administration. They include Environmental Protection Agency administrator Lisa Jackson, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration administrator Jane Lubchenco, and U.S. Geological Survey director Marcia McNutt.

  12. Genetic Network and Breeding Patterns of a Sicklefin Lemon Shark (Negaprion acutidens) Population in the Society Islands, French Polynesia

    PubMed Central

    Mourier, Johann; Buray, Nicolas; Schultz, Jennifer K.; Clua, Eric; Planes, Serge

    2013-01-01

    Human pressures have put many top predator populations at risk of extinction. Recent years have seen alarming declines in sharks worldwide, while their resilience remains poorly understood. Studying the ecology of small populations of marine predators is a priority to better understand their ability to withstand anthropogenic and environmental stressors. In the present study, we monitored a naturally small island population of 40 adult sicklefin lemon sharks in Moorea, French Polynesia over 5 years. We reconstructed the genetic relationships among individuals and determined the population’s mating system. The genetic network illustrates that all individuals, except one, are interconnected at least through one first order genetic relationship. While this species developed a clear inbreeding avoidance strategy involving dispersal and migration, the small population size, low number of breeders, and the fragmented environment characterizing these tropical islands, limits its complete effectiveness. PMID:23967354

  13. Genetic network and breeding patterns of a sicklefin lemon shark (Negaprion acutidens) population in the Society Islands, French Polynesia.

    PubMed

    Mourier, Johann; Buray, Nicolas; Schultz, Jennifer K; Clua, Eric; Planes, Serge

    2013-01-01

    Human pressures have put many top predator populations at risk of extinction. Recent years have seen alarming declines in sharks worldwide, while their resilience remains poorly understood. Studying the ecology of small populations of marine predators is a priority to better understand their ability to withstand anthropogenic and environmental stressors. In the present study, we monitored a naturally small island population of 40 adult sicklefin lemon sharks in Moorea, French Polynesia over 5 years. We reconstructed the genetic relationships among individuals and determined the population's mating system. The genetic network illustrates that all individuals, except one, are interconnected at least through one first order genetic relationship. While this species developed a clear inbreeding avoidance strategy involving dispersal and migration, the small population size, low number of breeders, and the fragmented environment characterizing these tropical islands, limits its complete effectiveness. PMID:23967354

  14. Characterization of lemon (Citrus limon) polar extract by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in high resolution mode.

    PubMed

    Ledesma-Escobar, C A; Priego-Capote, F; Luque de Castro, M D

    2015-11-01

    Eighty four metabolites (32 flavonoids, 15 amino acids, nine carboxylic acids, six coumarins, six sugars, five phenolic acids and 11 unclassified compounds) have been tentatively identified in a polar extract from lemon, without reference standards, based on their liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight MS/MS spectra and the comparison with databases. Despite information in databases for some families of plant compounds is poor, tentative identification based on MS/MS information (mass of the precursor ion and their fragments, together with neutral mass loss) was possible with the help of known fragmentation patterns for the given families of compounds. Both positive and negative ionization modes and at least two collision energies were always applied to obtain as much information as possible from each molecular entity, thus helping for identification. As the tentatively identified metabolites are the same regardless of the organism they belong, their fragmentation patterns are useful for identification with independence of the sample nature.

  15. Identity and Behavior of Xylem-Residing Bacteria in Rough Lemon Roots of Florida Citrus Trees †

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, John M.; Feldman, Albert W.; Zablotowicz, Robert M.

    1982-01-01

    An aseptic vacuum extraction technique was used to obtain xylem fluid from the roots of rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri Lush.) rootstock of Florida citrus trees. Bacteria were consistently isolated from vascular fluid of both healthy and young tree decline-affected trees. Thirteen genera of bacteria were found, the most frequently occurring genera being Pseudomonas (40%), Enterobacter (18%), Bacillus, Corynebacterium, and other gram-positive bacteria (16%), and Serratia (6%). Xylem bacterial counts fluctuated seasonally. Bacterial populations ranged from 0.1 to 22 per mm3 of root tissue (about 102 to 2 × 104 bacteria per g of xylem) when bacterial counts were made on vascular fluid, but these numbers were 10- to 1,000-fold greater when aseptically homogenized xylem tissue was examined similarly. Some of the resident bacteria (4%) are potentially phytopathogenic. It is proposed that xylem bacteria have an important role in the physiology of citrus. PMID:16346030

  16. Organic and conventional fertilisation procedures on the nitrate, antioxidants and pesticide content in parts of vegetables.

    PubMed

    Lima, G P P; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Bernhard, A B; Pirozzi, D C Z; Fleuri, L F; Vianello, F

    2012-01-01

    Different parts of plant foods are generally discarded by consumers such as peel, stalk and leaves, which could however possess a nutritional value. However, few studies have analysed the composition of these marginal foods. The phenolic compound, flavonoid, polyamine, nitrate and pesticide contents of parts of vegetables that are usually discarded--but which were cultivated according to conventional and non-conventional procedures--were analysed to provide suggestions on how to improve the consumption of these parts and to reduce the production of urban solid waste. Few, but significant, differences between the two manuring procedures were observed. Higher nitrate content and the presence of organochlorine pesticides were found in conventional cultivated papaya peel, lemon balm leaves, jack fruit pulp, and beet stalk and peel. Discarded parts of plant foods such as stalk, leaves and peels can be used as a source of antioxidant compounds, such as phenolic compounds. PMID:24779784

  17. Organic and conventional fertilisation procedures on the nitrate, antioxidants and pesticide content in parts of vegetables.

    PubMed

    Lima, G P P; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Bernhard, A B; Pirozzi, D C Z; Fleuri, L F; Vianello, F

    2012-01-01

    Different parts of plant foods are generally discarded by consumers such as peel, stalk and leaves, which could however possess a nutritional value. However, few studies have analysed the composition of these marginal foods. The phenolic compound, flavonoid, polyamine, nitrate and pesticide contents of parts of vegetables that are usually discarded--but which were cultivated according to conventional and non-conventional procedures--were analysed to provide suggestions on how to improve the consumption of these parts and to reduce the production of urban solid waste. Few, but significant, differences between the two manuring procedures were observed. Higher nitrate content and the presence of organochlorine pesticides were found in conventional cultivated papaya peel, lemon balm leaves, jack fruit pulp, and beet stalk and peel. Discarded parts of plant foods such as stalk, leaves and peels can be used as a source of antioxidant compounds, such as phenolic compounds.

  18. Processes modulating calcium distribution in citrus leaves. An investigation using x-ray microanalysis with strontium as a tracer.

    PubMed

    Storey, Richard; Leigh, Roger A

    2004-11-01

    Citrus leaves accumulate large amounts of calcium that must be compartmented effectively to prevent stomatal closure by extracellular Ca2+ and interference with Ca(2+)-based cell signaling pathways. Using x-ray microanalysis, the distribution of calcium between vacuoles in different cell types of leaves of rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri Lush.) was investigated. Calcium was accumulated principally in palisade, spongy mesophyll, and crystal-containing idioblast cells. It was low in epidermal and bundle sheath cells. Potassium showed the reverse distribution. Rubidium and strontium were used as tracers to examine the pathways by which potassium and calcium reached these cells. Comparisons of strontium and calcium distribution indicated that strontium is a good tracer for calcium, but rubidium did not mirror the potassium distribution pattern. The amount of strontium accumulated was highest in palisade cells, lowest in bundle sheath and epidermal cells, and intermediate in the spongy mesophyll. Accumulation of strontium in palisade and spongy mesophyll was accompanied by loss of potassium from these cells and its accumulation in the bundle sheath. Strontium moved apoplastically from the xylem to all cell types, and manipulation of water loss from the adaxial leaf surface suggested that diffusion is responsible for strontium movement to this side of the leaf. The results highlight the importance of palisade and spongy mesophyll as repositories for calcium and suggest that calcium distribution between different cell types is the result of differential rates of uptake. This tracer technique can provide important information about the ion uptake and accumulation properties of cells in intact leaves.

  19. New isotonic drinks with antioxidant and biological capacities from berries (maqui, açaí and blackthorn) and lemon juice.

    PubMed

    Gironés-Vilaplana, Amadeo; Villaño, Débora; Moreno, Diego A; García-Viguera, Cristina

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study was to design new isotonic drinks with lemon juice and berries: maqui [Aristotelia chilensis (Molina) Stuntz], açaí (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) and blackthorn (Prunus spinosa L.), following on from previous research. Quality parameters - including colour (CIELab parameters), minerals, phytochemical identification and quantification by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector, total phenolic content by the Folin-Ciocalteu reagent, the antioxidant capacity (ABTS(+), DPPH• and [Formula: see text] assays) and biological activities (in vitro alpha-glucosidase and lipase inhibitory effects) - were tested in the samples and compared to commercially available isotonic drinks. The new isotonic blends with lemon and anthocyanins-rich berries showed an attractive colour, especially in maqui samples, which is essential for consumer acceptance. Significantly higher antioxidant and biological effects were determined in the new blends, in comparison with the commercial isotonic beverages.

  20. How do background ozone concentrations affect the biosynthesis of rosmarinic acid in Melissa officinalis?

    PubMed

    Döring, Anne S; Pellegrini, Elisa; Della Batola, Michele; Nali, Cristina; Lorenzini, Giacomo; Petersen, Maike

    2014-03-01

    Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis; Lamiaceae) plants were exposed to background ozone (O3) dosages (80ppb for 5h), because high background levels of O3 are considered to be as harmful as episodic O3 peaks. Immediately at the end of fumigation the plants appeared visually symptomless, but necrotic lesions were observed later. The biosynthesis of rosmarinic acid (RA) comprises eight enzymes, among them phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase (4CL), tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) and rosmarinic acid synthase (RAS). The transcript levels of these genes have been investigated by quantitative RT-PCR. There was a quick up-regulation of all genes at 3h of O3 exposure, but at 24h from beginning of exposure (FBE) only RAS and PAL were up-regulated. The specific activity of RAS was closely correlated with a decrease of RA concentration in lemon balm leaves. The specific activity of PAL increased at 12h FBE to 163% in comparison to control levels. This work provides insight into the effect of O3 stress on the formation of the main phenolic ingredient of the pharmaceutically important plant M. officinalis. PMID:24484956

  1. Estimation of Potential Availability of Essential Oil in Some Brands of Herbal Teas and Herbal Dietary Supplements

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, Radosław; Baj, Tomasz; Kowalska, Grażyna; Pankiewicz, Urszula

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to estimate potential availability of essential oil in some brands of herbal products. Methods A comparison was performed on the basis of the essential oil yield in the unprocessed raw materials such as leaves of peppermint and lemon balm and inflorescence of chamomile as well as herbal tea bags and in dietary supplements. The yield of essential oil was determined by distillation. Essential oil was analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS. Results It was found that the average potential availability of essential oils in the products such as dietary supplements for the doses recommended by the producers is lower than in the corresponding tea infusions: for peppermint formulations approximately 6-fold lower, for the formulations with lemon balm about 4-fold lower, and for the chamomile preparations about 3-fold lower. It was found that essential oils extracted from herbal teas have a similar chemical profile with characteristic deviations in the amount of individual components, which arise from the origin of the raw material. Discussion In contrast to homogenous pharmaceutical herbal mixtures consistent with, the Pharmacopoeia requirements, herbal teas (available in grocery stores) and dietary supplements are often out of control in terms of the yield and composition of the essential oil, which is primarily responsible for the health benefits and aromatic qualities of these products. Analysis of the composition of the dietary supplements showed that they contain on average significantly lower amounts of plant material compared to the herbal teas. PMID:26110869

  2. How do background ozone concentrations affect the biosynthesis of rosmarinic acid in Melissa officinalis?

    PubMed

    Döring, Anne S; Pellegrini, Elisa; Della Batola, Michele; Nali, Cristina; Lorenzini, Giacomo; Petersen, Maike

    2014-03-01

    Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis; Lamiaceae) plants were exposed to background ozone (O3) dosages (80ppb for 5h), because high background levels of O3 are considered to be as harmful as episodic O3 peaks. Immediately at the end of fumigation the plants appeared visually symptomless, but necrotic lesions were observed later. The biosynthesis of rosmarinic acid (RA) comprises eight enzymes, among them phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase (4CL), tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) and rosmarinic acid synthase (RAS). The transcript levels of these genes have been investigated by quantitative RT-PCR. There was a quick up-regulation of all genes at 3h of O3 exposure, but at 24h from beginning of exposure (FBE) only RAS and PAL were up-regulated. The specific activity of RAS was closely correlated with a decrease of RA concentration in lemon balm leaves. The specific activity of PAL increased at 12h FBE to 163% in comparison to control levels. This work provides insight into the effect of O3 stress on the formation of the main phenolic ingredient of the pharmaceutically important plant M. officinalis.

  3. BRDF model for new leaves on tea leaves and new leaves monitoring through BRDF monitoring with Web cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Kohei

    In order to monitor size of new leaves, BRDF model is created with Minnaert function based on Monte Carlo model. New leaves grow up on semi-parmanent old leaves, in general, for tea leaves. It is difficult to monitor size of new leaves by measuring spectral reflectance from nadir view only. BRDF would help to estimate size of new leaves. BRDF, meanwhile, can not be measured easely. BRDF model is needed for estimation of size of new leaves. Through theoretical and simulation studies, BRDF model is created. In order to estimate size of new leaves, the most significant observation angle as well as the most effective wavelength regions for spectral reflectance measurement are estimated through simulation and experiments. Visible and near infrared cameras monitoring tea fields from 45 degrees of zenith angle of observation allows monitor size of tea leaves so that the most appropriate time for pick tea leaves up can be determined.

  4. 75 FR 75363 - Absence and Leave; Sick Leave

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-03

    ... regulations are in response to only a portion of OPM's proposed regulations (74 FR 43064) issued on August 26... covered servicemember undergoing medical treatment, recuperation, or therapy, for a serious injury or... regulations (75 FR 33491) amending the definition of family member for sick leave purposes to now...

  5. 75 FR 70845 - Absence and Leave; Qualifying Exigency Leave

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-19

    ... NDAA legislation. DOL issued its final regulations on November 17, 2008, (73 FR 67934) to implement the... proposed FMLA regulations on August 26, 2009, (74 FR 43064, at http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2009/pdf/E9... leave may be found in the DOL proposed regulations published on February 11, 2008, at 73 FR 7876...

  6. Pineapple and banana pectins comprise fewer homogalacturonan building blocks with a smaller degree of polymerization as compared with yellow passion fruit and lemon pectins: implication for gelling properties.

    PubMed

    Yapo, Beda M

    2009-04-13

    Pectins are viewed as multiblock cobiopolymers of different pectic polysaccharides, notably, homogalacturonan (HG) and rhamnogalacturonan I (RG I). Furthermore, on the basis of HGs isolated from different (pectins from) dicot cell walls, HG is supposed to have an average degree of polymerization (DP) of approximately 100 irrespective of the plant source. To validate or invalidate these suppositions, pectins from both monocot (pineapple and banana) and dicot (yellow passion fruit and lemon) cell walls were examined. The results show that all the extracted pectins comprise HGs as well as type I and II arabinogalactan side chain-containing RGs I, but of significantly (p < 0.05) different relative proportions; lemon pectin being the richest in HGs, followed by yellow passion fruit pectin. The HG building blocks of each pectin are homogeneous with respect to the molecular size but have a significantly (p < 0.05) reduced length in monocot pectins (59-67) compared to dicot ones (93-102). Lemon pectin displayed the highest degree of esterification (DE), viscosity-average molecular weight (M(v)), and gelling ability, whereas with similar DEs and a higher M(v), banana pectin exhibited a lower gelling ability than yellow passion fruit pectin. It is concluded that both the HG amount and DP strongly influence the gelling properties of pectin.

  7. Short-term UV-B exposure induces metabolic and anatomical changes in peel of harvested lemons contributing in fruit protection against green mold.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, V E; Interdonato, R; Cerioni, L; Albornoz, P; Ramallo, J; Prado, F E; Hilal, M; Rapisarda, V A

    2016-06-01

    UV-B radiation (UVBR) is a small fraction of the solar spectrum from 280 to 315nm. UVBR produces photomorphogenic acclimation responses in plants, modulating their cellular structure and physiology. Here, changes in the peel of harvested lemons after short time exposure to UVBR were analyzed and its potential effects against fungal infection were studied. In the flavedo, UVBR treatment induced variations in the respiratory profiles and increased the phenolic compound contents. Final products of the flavonoid pathway (flavones, flavonols and anthocyanins) increased more markedly than their precursors (flavanones and dihydroflavonols). The increased accumulation of soluble phenolics in the flavedo of treated lemons is associated with the high antioxidant activity found in the flavedo of these samples. Supporting the biochemical determinations, anatomical observations showed abundant intravacuolar deposits of phenolic compounds and an increase in the cell wall thickness in UVBR-treated samples. Metabolic and anatomical modifications associated to UVBR improved natural defenses against Penicillium digitatum, the causal agent of green mold disease. Our results suggest that mature postharvest lemons exposed to the artificial radiation showed phenotypic plasticity, allowing an acclimation response to UVBR which confers fruit resistance to pathogens. Thus, combination of UVBR with other treatments could represent an important improvement to control postharvest diseases on citrus.

  8. Short-term UV-B exposure induces metabolic and anatomical changes in peel of harvested lemons contributing in fruit protection against green mold.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, V E; Interdonato, R; Cerioni, L; Albornoz, P; Ramallo, J; Prado, F E; Hilal, M; Rapisarda, V A

    2016-06-01

    UV-B radiation (UVBR) is a small fraction of the solar spectrum from 280 to 315nm. UVBR produces photomorphogenic acclimation responses in plants, modulating their cellular structure and physiology. Here, changes in the peel of harvested lemons after short time exposure to UVBR were analyzed and its potential effects against fungal infection were studied. In the flavedo, UVBR treatment induced variations in the respiratory profiles and increased the phenolic compound contents. Final products of the flavonoid pathway (flavones, flavonols and anthocyanins) increased more markedly than their precursors (flavanones and dihydroflavonols). The increased accumulation of soluble phenolics in the flavedo of treated lemons is associated with the high antioxidant activity found in the flavedo of these samples. Supporting the biochemical determinations, anatomical observations showed abundant intravacuolar deposits of phenolic compounds and an increase in the cell wall thickness in UVBR-treated samples. Metabolic and anatomical modifications associated to UVBR improved natural defenses against Penicillium digitatum, the causal agent of green mold disease. Our results suggest that mature postharvest lemons exposed to the artificial radiation showed phenotypic plasticity, allowing an acclimation response to UVBR which confers fruit resistance to pathogens. Thus, combination of UVBR with other treatments could represent an important improvement to control postharvest diseases on citrus. PMID:27017432

  9. Pre-treatment of Stegomyia aegypti mosquitoes with a sublethal dose of imidacloprid impairs behavioural avoidance induced by lemon oil and DEET.

    PubMed

    Thany, S H; Tong, F; Bloomquist, J R

    2015-03-01

    The present study was conducted to determine whether imidacloprid can impair the avoidance behaviour of the mosquito Stegomyia aegypti. Laboratory investigations using a T-maze apparatus showed that St. aegypti mosquitoes present long term avoidance behaviour when they are exposed to repetitive trials with lemon oil and DEET. The present study tested the effect of a sublethal dose of imidacloprid on the avoidance behaviour of St. aegypti mosquitoes over a 48 h period. Data suggest that 0.5 ng of imidacloprid/mosquito reduces the avoidance behaviour of mosquitoes exposed to lemon oil, on the first day of exposure, after the second trial; whereas imidacloprid affected DEET repellency only the first day of exposure, after the second trial. Imidacloprid was toxic against St. aegypti mosquitoes, and at sublethal doses was able to impair the repellency induced by lemon oil and DEET. The present data were consistent with the finding that St. aegypti mosquitoes exhibit long term avoidance behaviour, and treatment of mosquitoes with a sublethal dose of imidacloprid under DEET application can affect the repellency of DEET against St. aegypti. PMID:25155403

  10. The Effect of Milk, Water and Lemon Juice on Various Subdiaphragmatic Activity-Related Artifacts in Myocardial Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Malek, Hadi; Hedayati, Raheleh; Yaghoobi, Nahid; Bitarafan-Rajabi, Ahmad; Firoozabadi, Seyed Hassan; Rastgou, Feridoon

    2015-01-01

    Background: Subdiaphragmatic activity can produce subdiaphragmatic-related artifacts, which can degrade the quality of myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Objectives: We examined the impact of drinking milk, water, and lemon juice on different subdiaphragmatic-related artifacts by using 99mTc-sestamibi myocardial single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in order to determine a feasible method for improving the image quality. Patients and Methods: A total of 179 patients (age 58 ± 9.6 years) were enrolled in this study. The patients were randomly divided into five groups. Ten minutes after injection of 740 MBq 99mTc-sestamibi in both pharmacologic stress and rest phases, the individuals in group 1 were given water and milk (125 mL of each); those in group 2 were given lemon juice (250 mL); group 3 was given milk (250 mL); and group 4 was given water (250 mL), whereas no intervention was performed in group 5. The study was double-blind for both subjects and data collectors. MPI was performed for all patients and image quality was controlled by 2 experienced nuclear physicians. Interfering activity was determined visually on reconstructed images and categorized as extracardiac normalization artifact, overlapping of activity, scattering of activity, and ramp filter artifact. Results: There were significant differences in terms of interfering activity among the five groups; group 3 (milk) had significantly lower interfering activity than other groups had, as defined by overlapping of activity (on both stress and rest images), ramp filter artifact (stress images), and scatter artifact (rest images) (P < 0.05). Furthermore, there was a significant difference in the incidence of good-quality images, with no interfering activity in group 3 in the resting state compared with the other groups in the study (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Drinking 250 mL of milk in either the stress phase or the rest phase of imaging diminishes interfering subdiaphragmatic-related artifacts

  11. Leaves: Elevated CO2 levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Burning fossil fuels and land use changes such as deforestation and urbanization have led to a dramatic rise in the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere since the onset of the Industrial Revolution. The highly dilute CO2 from the atmosphere enters plant leaves where it is concentr...

  12. Efficacy of full-fat milk and diluted lemon juice in reducing infra-cardiac activity of 99mTc sestamibi during myocardial perfusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Purbhoo, Khushica; Di Tamba, Mboyo; Vangu, Willy

    2015-01-01

    Background When using 99mTc sestamibi for myocardial perfusion imaging, increased splanchnic activity creates a problem in the visual and quantitative interpretation of the inferior and infero-septal walls of the left ventricle. We sought to determine whether the administration of diluted lemon juice or full-fat milk would be effective in reducing interfering infra-cardiac activity and therefore result in an improvement in image quality. We compared the administration of full-fat milk and diluted lemon juice to a control group that had no intervention. Methods The study was carried out prospectively. All patients referred to our institution for myocardial perfusion imaging from November 2009 to May 2012 were invited to be enrolled in the study. A total of 630 patients were randomised into three groups. Group 0 (G0), 246 patients, were given diluted lemon juice, group 1 (G1), 313 patients, were given full-fat milk, and group 2 (G2), 71 patients, had no intervention (control group). A routine two-day protocol was used and the patients were given the same intervention on both days. Raw data of both the stress and rest images were visually assessed for the presence of infra-cardiac activity, and quantitative grading of the relative intensity of myocardial activity to infra-cardiac activity was determined. The physicians were blinded to the intervention received and the data were reviewed simultaneously. Results The overall incidence of interfering infra-cardiac activity at stress was 84.1, 84.5 and 96.6% in G0, G1 and G2, respectively (p = 0.005). At rest it was 91.7, 90.1 and 100% in G0, G1 and G2, respectively (p = 0.0063). The visual and quantitative results favoured both milk and lemon juice in reducing the amount of interfering infra-cardiac activity versus no intervention. Conclusion The administration of milk or lemon juice resulted in a significant decrease in the intensity of infra-cardiac activity compared to the control group. This reduction in intensity was

  13. 5 CFR 630.1015 - Movement between voluntary leave bank and leave transfer programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS ABSENCE AND LEAVE Voluntary Leave Bank Program § 630.1015 Movement... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Movement between voluntary leave bank and... with the employee's right to submit an application to become a leave donor (or leave contributor,...

  14. 5 CFR 630.1015 - Movement between voluntary leave bank and leave transfer programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS ABSENCE AND LEAVE Voluntary Leave Bank Program § 630.1015 Movement... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Movement between voluntary leave bank and... with the employee's right to submit an application to become a leave donor (or leave contributor,...

  15. 5 CFR 630.1015 - Movement between voluntary leave bank and leave transfer programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS ABSENCE AND LEAVE Voluntary Leave Bank Program § 630.1015 Movement... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Movement between voluntary leave bank and... with the employee's right to submit an application to become a leave donor (or leave contributor,...

  16. 5 CFR 630.1015 - Movement between voluntary leave bank and leave transfer programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS ABSENCE AND LEAVE Voluntary Leave Bank Program § 630.1015 Movement... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Movement between voluntary leave bank and... with the employee's right to submit an application to become a leave donor (or leave contributor,...

  17. 29 CFR 825.205 - Increments of FMLA leave for intermittent or reduced schedule leave.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Employee Leave Entitlements Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.205 Increments of FMLA leave for intermittent or... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Increments of FMLA leave for......

  18. 29 CFR 825.205 - Increments of FMLA leave for intermittent or reduced schedule leave.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Employee Leave Entitlements Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.205 Increments of FMLA leave for intermittent or... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Increments of FMLA leave for......

  19. 29 CFR 825.205 - Increments of FMLA leave for intermittent or reduced schedule leave.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Employee Leave Entitlements Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.205 Increments of FMLA leave for intermittent or... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Increments of FMLA leave for......

  20. 29 CFR 825.205 - Increments of FMLA leave for intermittent or reduced schedule leave.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Employee Leave Entitlements Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.205 Increments of FMLA leave for intermittent or... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Increments of FMLA leave for......

  1. 29 CFR 825.205 - Increments of FMLA leave for intermittent or reduced schedule leave.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Employee Leave Entitlements Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.205 Increments of FMLA leave for intermittent or... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Increments of FMLA leave for......

  2. Microbial communities of the Lemon Creek Glacier show subtle structural variation yet stable phylogenetic composition over space and time.

    PubMed

    Sheik, Cody S; Stevenson, Emily I; Den Uyl, Paul A; Arendt, Carli A; Aciego, Sarah M; Dick, Gregory J

    2015-01-01

    Glaciers are geologically important yet transient ecosystems that support diverse, biogeochemically significant microbial communities. During the melt season glaciers undergo dramatic physical, geochemical, and biological changes that exert great influence on downstream biogeochemical cycles. Thus, we sought to understand the temporal melt-season dynamics of microbial communities and associated geochemistry at the terminus of Lemon Creek Glacier (LCG) in coastal southern Alaska. Due to late season snowfall, sampling of LCG occurred in three interconnected areas: proglacial Lake Thomas, the lower glacial outflow stream, and the glacier's terminus. LCG associated microbial communities were phylogenetically diverse and varied by sampling location. However, Betaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes dominated communities at all sampling locations. Strict anaerobic groups such as methanogens, SR1, and OP11 were also recovered from glacier outflows, indicating anoxic conditions in at least some portions of the LCG subglacial environment. Microbial community structure was significantly correlated with sampling location and sodium concentrations. Microbial communities sampled from terminus outflow waters exhibited day-to-day fluctuation in taxonomy and phylogenetic similarity. However, these communities were not significantly different from randomly constructed communities from all three sites. These results indicate that glacial outflows share a large proportion of phylogenetic overlap with downstream environments and that the observed significant shifts in community structure are driven by changes in relative abundance of different taxa, and not complete restructuring of communities. We conclude that LCG glacial discharge hosts a diverse and relatively stable microbiome that shifts at fine taxonomic scales in response to geochemistry and likely water residence time.

  3. The behaviour and recovery of juvenile lemon sharks Negaprion brevirostris in response to external accelerometer tag attachment.

    PubMed

    Bullock, R W; Guttridge, T L; Cowx, I G; Elliott, M; Gruber, S H

    2015-12-01

    Behavioural responses of lemon sharks Negaprion brevirostris to a fin-mounted tag package (CEFAS G6A tri-axial accelerometer with epoxied Sonotronics PT4 acoustic transmitter) were measured in a controlled captive environment (n = 10, total length, LT range 80-140 cm) and in free-ranging sharks upon release (n = 7, LT range 100-160 cm). No changes were detected in behaviour (i.e. swimming speed, tailbeat frequency, time spent resting and frequency of chafing) between control and tagged captive shark trials, suggesting that the tag package itself does not alter behaviour. In the free-ranging trials, an initial period of elevated swimming activity was found in all individuals (represented by overall dynamic body acceleration). Negaprion brevirostris, however, appeared to recover quickly, returning to a steady swimming state between 2 and 35 min after release. Post-release tracking found that all sharks swim immediately for the shoreline and remain within 100 m of shore for prolonged periods. Hence, although N. brevirostris are capable of quick adaptation to stressors and demonstrate rapid recovery in terms of activity, tracking data suggest that they may modify their spatial use patterns post release. This research is important in separating deviation in behaviour due to environmental stressors from artefacts caused by experimental techniques.

  4. Aroma Stability of Lemon-Flavored Hard Iced Tea Assessed by Chirality and Aroma Extract Dilution Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Fang; He, Fei; Qian, Yanping; Zheng, Jia; Qian, Michael C

    2016-07-20

    The aroma of fresh and aged lemon-flavored hard tea was investigated by aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA), quantitative comparison, and two-dimensional chirality analysis. Aroma extract dilution analysis of fresh hard tea samples showed 3-methylbutanal, isoamyl alcohol, β-damascenone, β-ionone, 2-phenylethanol, 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone, and vanillin could be the most important aroma contributors to the hard tea due to their high FD values. The analysis of the aged hard tea samples did not reveal new compound formation during storage; however, compared with fresh samples, the flavor dilution value changed substantially in the aged samples. Both AEDA and quantitative analysis demonstrated that β-damascenone increased substantially in aged samples, whereas terpene aldehydes decreased substantially after storage. In addition, the FD value of linalool decreased dramatically in aged samples. Two-dimensional GC-MS chirality analysis revealed the FD value decrease of linalool in aged samples was largely due to the transformation of (R)-linalool to (S)-linalool, which has a higher sensory threshold. PMID:27319225

  5. The behaviour and recovery of juvenile lemon sharks Negaprion brevirostris in response to external accelerometer tag attachment.

    PubMed

    Bullock, R W; Guttridge, T L; Cowx, I G; Elliott, M; Gruber, S H

    2015-12-01

    Behavioural responses of lemon sharks Negaprion brevirostris to a fin-mounted tag package (CEFAS G6A tri-axial accelerometer with epoxied Sonotronics PT4 acoustic transmitter) were measured in a controlled captive environment (n = 10, total length, LT range 80-140 cm) and in free-ranging sharks upon release (n = 7, LT range 100-160 cm). No changes were detected in behaviour (i.e. swimming speed, tailbeat frequency, time spent resting and frequency of chafing) between control and tagged captive shark trials, suggesting that the tag package itself does not alter behaviour. In the free-ranging trials, an initial period of elevated swimming activity was found in all individuals (represented by overall dynamic body acceleration). Negaprion brevirostris, however, appeared to recover quickly, returning to a steady swimming state between 2 and 35 min after release. Post-release tracking found that all sharks swim immediately for the shoreline and remain within 100 m of shore for prolonged periods. Hence, although N. brevirostris are capable of quick adaptation to stressors and demonstrate rapid recovery in terms of activity, tracking data suggest that they may modify their spatial use patterns post release. This research is important in separating deviation in behaviour due to environmental stressors from artefacts caused by experimental techniques. PMID:26511658

  6. Impact of natural control agents of the citrus leafminer Phyllocnistis citrella on lemon trees varies among seasons.

    PubMed

    Goane, L; Casmuz, A; Salas, H; Willink, E; Mangeaud, A; Valladares, G

    2015-12-01

    Studies on insect natural enemies and their effects on host populations are of immense practical value in pest management. Predation and parasitism on a citrus pest, the leafminer Phyllocnistis citrella Stainton, were evaluated by sampling over 3 years in four locations within a world leading lemon producing area in Northwest Argentina. Both mortality factors showed seasonal trends consistent across locations, with predation exerting earlier and more sustained pressure than parasitism, which showed wider seasonal variations. The dominant parasitoids, native Cirrospilus neotropicus and introduced Ageniaspis citricola, showed different seasonal trends: C. neotropicus was dominant in spring whereas A. citricola superseded it in autumn and winter. Although parasitism rates were relatively low, the native C. neotropicus revealed favourable features as potential control agent, by showing density-dependence, parasitism rates comparable with those of the specific A. citricola during part of the cycle, and earlier synchronization with the host. The study provides highly relevant information for a sustainable management of this worldwide pest, for which biological control is considered the best long-term option. PMID:26344662

  7. Temperature and pH dependence of DNA ejection from archaeal lemon-shaped virus His1.

    PubMed

    Hanhijärvi, K J; Ziedaite, G; Hæggström, E; Bamford, D H

    2016-07-01

    The archaeal virus His1 isolated from a hypersaline environment infects an extremely halophilic archaeon Haloarcula hispanica. His1 features a lemon-shaped capsid, which is so far found only in archaeal viruses. This unique capsid can withstand high salt concentrations, and can transform into a helical tube, which in turn is resistant to extremely harsh conditions. Hypersaline environments exhibit a wide range of temperatures and pH conditions, which present an extra challenge to their inhabitants. We investigated the influence of pH and temperature on DNA ejection from His1 virus using single-molecule fluorescence experiments. The observed number of ejecting viruses is constant in pH 5 to 9, while the ejection process is suppressed at pH below 5. Similarly, the number of ejections within 15-42 °C shows only a minor increase around 25-37 °C. The maximum velocity of single ejected DNA increases with temperature, in qualitative agreement with the continuum model of dsDNA ejection. PMID:26820561

  8. Impact of natural control agents of the citrus leafminer Phyllocnistis citrella on lemon trees varies among seasons.

    PubMed

    Goane, L; Casmuz, A; Salas, H; Willink, E; Mangeaud, A; Valladares, G

    2015-12-01

    Studies on insect natural enemies and their effects on host populations are of immense practical value in pest management. Predation and parasitism on a citrus pest, the leafminer Phyllocnistis citrella Stainton, were evaluated by sampling over 3 years in four locations within a world leading lemon producing area in Northwest Argentina. Both mortality factors showed seasonal trends consistent across locations, with predation exerting earlier and more sustained pressure than parasitism, which showed wider seasonal variations. The dominant parasitoids, native Cirrospilus neotropicus and introduced Ageniaspis citricola, showed different seasonal trends: C. neotropicus was dominant in spring whereas A. citricola superseded it in autumn and winter. Although parasitism rates were relatively low, the native C. neotropicus revealed favourable features as potential control agent, by showing density-dependence, parasitism rates comparable with those of the specific A. citricola during part of the cycle, and earlier synchronization with the host. The study provides highly relevant information for a sustainable management of this worldwide pest, for which biological control is considered the best long-term option.

  9. Carnivorous leaves from Baltic amber.

    PubMed

    Sadowski, Eva-Maria; Seyfullah, Leyla J; Sadowski, Friederike; Fleischmann, Andreas; Behling, Hermann; Schmidt, Alexander R

    2015-01-01

    The fossil record of carnivorous plants is very scarce and macrofossil evidence has been restricted to seeds of the extant aquatic genus Aldrovanda of the Droseraceae family. No case of carnivorous plant traps has so far been reported from the fossil record. Here, we present two angiosperm leaves enclosed in a piece of Eocene Baltic amber that share relevant morphological features with extant Roridulaceae, a carnivorous plant family that is today endemic to the Cape flora of South Africa. Modern Roridula species are unique among carnivorous plants as they digest prey in a complex mutualistic association in which the prey-derived nutrient uptake depends on heteropteran insects. As in extant Roridula, the fossil leaves possess two types of plant trichomes, including unicellular hairs and five size classes of multicellular stalked glands (or tentacles) with an apical pore. The apices of the narrow and perfectly tapered fossil leaves end in a single tentacle, as in both modern Roridula species. The glandular hairs of the fossils are restricted to the leaf margins and to the abaxial lamina, as in extant Roridula gorgonias. Our discovery supports current molecular age estimates for Roridulaceae and suggests a wide Eocene distribution of roridulid plants.

  10. Carnivorous leaves from Baltic amber.

    PubMed

    Sadowski, Eva-Maria; Seyfullah, Leyla J; Sadowski, Friederike; Fleischmann, Andreas; Behling, Hermann; Schmidt, Alexander R

    2015-01-01

    The fossil record of carnivorous plants is very scarce and macrofossil evidence has been restricted to seeds of the extant aquatic genus Aldrovanda of the Droseraceae family. No case of carnivorous plant traps has so far been reported from the fossil record. Here, we present two angiosperm leaves enclosed in a piece of Eocene Baltic amber that share relevant morphological features with extant Roridulaceae, a carnivorous plant family that is today endemic to the Cape flora of South Africa. Modern Roridula species are unique among carnivorous plants as they digest prey in a complex mutualistic association in which the prey-derived nutrient uptake depends on heteropteran insects. As in extant Roridula, the fossil leaves possess two types of plant trichomes, including unicellular hairs and five size classes of multicellular stalked glands (or tentacles) with an apical pore. The apices of the narrow and perfectly tapered fossil leaves end in a single tentacle, as in both modern Roridula species. The glandular hairs of the fossils are restricted to the leaf margins and to the abaxial lamina, as in extant Roridula gorgonias. Our discovery supports current molecular age estimates for Roridulaceae and suggests a wide Eocene distribution of roridulid plants. PMID:25453067

  11. Carnivorous leaves from Baltic amber

    PubMed Central

    Sadowski, Eva-Maria; Seyfullah, Leyla J.; Sadowski, Friederike; Fleischmann, Andreas; Behling, Hermann; Schmidt, Alexander R.

    2015-01-01

    The fossil record of carnivorous plants is very scarce and macrofossil evidence has been restricted to seeds of the extant aquatic genus Aldrovanda of the Droseraceae family. No case of carnivorous plant traps has so far been reported from the fossil record. Here, we present two angiosperm leaves enclosed in a piece of Eocene Baltic amber that share relevant morphological features with extant Roridulaceae, a carnivorous plant family that is today endemic to the Cape flora of South Africa. Modern Roridula species are unique among carnivorous plants as they digest prey in a complex mutualistic association in which the prey-derived nutrient uptake depends on heteropteran insects. As in extant Roridula, the fossil leaves possess two types of plant trichomes, including unicellular hairs and five size classes of multicellular stalked glands (or tentacles) with an apical pore. The apices of the narrow and perfectly tapered fossil leaves end in a single tentacle, as in both modern Roridula species. The glandular hairs of the fossils are restricted to the leaf margins and to the abaxial lamina, as in extant Roridula gorgonias. Our discovery supports current molecular age estimates for Roridulaceae and suggests a wide Eocene distribution of roridulid plants. PMID:25453067

  12. Arsenic Sorption in Dried Leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Gabriela C.; de Carvalho, Regina P.; Duarte, Grazielle; Santos, Mércia H.

    2005-10-01

    Biosorption is the retention of metal ions from aqueous solutions by biomasses. This phenomenon can be helpful in the design of alternative filters for the depollution of industrial and mining waste waters. The recovery of filtered metal ions can also be commercially interesting. Although many studies about the sorptive capacity of biomasses have been done for different metals, few have investigated sorption sites and mechanisms in these systems. We studied the retention of arsenic ions from aqueous solutions using dried lettuce leaves (L. sativa) as biomass. The toxic arsenic forms As(III) and As(V) are commonly found in mining waste waters. Early studies have shown that lettuce leaves have a good sorptive capacity for copper and iron ions, comparable to other sorbents such as activated carbon or ionic-exchange resins. Arsenic sorption by lettuce dried leaves was not found to be effective when in natura biomass was used. Sorptive capacity was improved and became comparable to the sorption of the other ions studied when the biomass was charged with Fe(III). The sorption mechanism of arsenic in Fe-charged biomass must be similar to the one proposed for As sorption by mineral clays, where As ions bind to Fe(III) atoms in the clay structure.

  13. Smoking Leaves Lasting Marks on DNA: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_161060.html Smoking Leaves Lasting Marks on DNA: Study Changes related to disease found in more ... cigarettes can leave a lasting imprint on human DNA, altering more than 7,000 genes in ways ...

  14. 46 CFR 310.8 - Leave.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... hospitalized, sick at home, or confined in the sick bay, leave shall not exceed four (4) months. (2) For an... may be granted leaves of absence without pay, as approved by the Superintendent, for periods not...

  15. 46 CFR 310.8 - Leave.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... hospitalized, sick at home, or confined in the sick bay, leave shall not exceed four (4) months. (2) For an... may be granted leaves of absence without pay, as approved by the Superintendent, for periods not...

  16. 46 CFR 310.8 - Leave.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... hospitalized, sick at home, or confined in the sick bay, leave shall not exceed four (4) months. (2) For an... may be granted leaves of absence without pay, as approved by the Superintendent, for periods not...

  17. 46 CFR 310.8 - Leave.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... hospitalized, sick at home, or confined in the sick bay, leave shall not exceed four (4) months. (2) For an... may be granted leaves of absence without pay, as approved by the Superintendent, for periods not...

  18. 46 CFR 310.8 - Leave.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... hospitalized, sick at home, or confined in the sick bay, leave shall not exceed four (4) months. (2) For an... may be granted leaves of absence without pay, as approved by the Superintendent, for periods not...

  19. Microbial communities of the Lemon Creek Glacier show subtle structural variation yet stable phylogenetic composition over space and time

    PubMed Central

    Sheik, Cody S.; Stevenson, Emily I.; Den Uyl, Paul A.; Arendt, Carli A.; Aciego, Sarah M.; Dick, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Glaciers are geologically important yet transient ecosystems that support diverse, biogeochemically significant microbial communities. During the melt season glaciers undergo dramatic physical, geochemical, and biological changes that exert great influence on downstream biogeochemical cycles. Thus, we sought to understand the temporal melt-season dynamics of microbial communities and associated geochemistry at the terminus of Lemon Creek Glacier (LCG) in coastal southern Alaska. Due to late season snowfall, sampling of LCG occurred in three interconnected areas: proglacial Lake Thomas, the lower glacial outflow stream, and the glacier’s terminus. LCG associated microbial communities were phylogenetically diverse and varied by sampling location. However, Betaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes dominated communities at all sampling locations. Strict anaerobic groups such as methanogens, SR1, and OP11 were also recovered from glacier outflows, indicating anoxic conditions in at least some portions of the LCG subglacial environment. Microbial community structure was significantly correlated with sampling location and sodium concentrations. Microbial communities sampled from terminus outflow waters exhibited day-to-day fluctuation in taxonomy and phylogenetic similarity. However, these communities were not significantly different from randomly constructed communities from all three sites. These results indicate that glacial outflows share a large proportion of phylogenetic overlap with downstream environments and that the observed significant shifts in community structure are driven by changes in relative abundance of different taxa, and not complete restructuring of communities. We conclude that LCG glacial discharge hosts a diverse and relatively stable microbiome that shifts at fine taxonomic scales in response to geochemistry and likely water residence time. PMID:26042114

  20. Geothermal Geodatabase for Rico Hot Springs Area and Lemon Hot Springs, Dolores and San Miguel Counties, Colorado

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard

    2012-11-01

    Geothermal Geodatabase for Rico Hot Springs Area and Lemon Hot Springs, Dolores and San Miguel Counties, Colorado By Richard “Rick” Zehner Geothermal Development Associates Reno Nevada USA For Flint Geothermal LLC, Denver Colorado Part of DOE Grant EE0002828 2013 This is an ESRI geodatabase version 10, together with an ESRI MXD file version 10.2 Data is in UTM Zone 13 NAD27 projection North boundary: approximately 4,215,000 South boundary: approximately 4,160,000 West boundary: approximately 216,000 East boundary: approximately 245,000 This geodatabase was built to cover several geothermal targets developed by Flint Geothermal in 2012 during a search for high-temperature systems that could be exploited for electric power development. Several of the thermal springs have geochemistry and geothermometry values indicative of high-temperature systems. In addition, the explorationists discovered a very young Climax-style molybdenum porphyry system northeast of Rico, and drilling intersected thermal waters at depth. The datasets in the geodatabase are a mixture of public domain data as well as data collected by Flint Geothermal, now being made public. It is assumed that the user has internet access, for the mxd file accesses ESRI’s GIS servers. Datasets include: 1. Structural data collected by Flint Geothermal 2. Point information 3. Mines and prospects from the USGS MRDS dataset 4. Results of reconnaissance shallow (2 meter) temperature surveys 5. Air photo lineaments 6. Areas covered by travertine 7. Groundwater geochemistry 8. Land ownership in the Rico area 9. Georeferenced geologic map of the Rico Quadrangle, by Pratt et al. 10. Various 1:24,000 scale topographic maps

  1. Hooking injury, physiological status and short-term mortality of juvenile lemon sharks (Negaprion bevirostris) following catch-and-release recreational angling.

    PubMed

    Danylchuk, Andy J; Suski, Cory D; Mandelman, John W; Murchie, Karen J; Haak, Christopher R; Brooks, Annabelle M L; Cooke, Steven J

    2014-01-01

    Sport fishing for sharks, including fishing with the intent to release, is becoming more prevalent within the recreational angling community. Common targets of recreational anglers are juvenile lemon sharks (Negaprion brevirostris) that frequent shallow tropical nearshore habitats. In this study, we captured 32 juvenile lemon sharks (530-875 mm total length) with conventional angling gear (i.e. spinning rods, dead fish bait and 5/0 barbed circle hooks) from the coastal waters of Eleuthera, The Bahamas, to determine the consequences of capture for individual sharks. Each shark was examined for hooking injuries, blood sampled to quantify physiological disturbance, assessed for reflex impairment and then monitored to assess post-release behaviour and mortality. Four sharks (12.5%) died following release during the 15 min tracking period. Principal components (PC) analysis revealed four axes describing 66.5% of the variance for blood physiology parameters, total length and water temperature. The PC1 and PC3 scores, characterized by positive factor loadings for indicators of exercise-induced stress and blood ion concentrations, respectively, were significantly related to fight time but were not associated with short-term mortality. Short-term mortality was significantly related to factor scores for PC4 that loaded heavily for water temperature and total length. Ten sharks (31%) exhibited impaired reflexes, with loss of bite reflex being most prevalent. Sharks that died had the following characteristics: (i) they had two or more impaired reflexes; (ii) they were hooked in the basihyal; (iii) they exhibited no movement after the initial bout of directional swimming; and (iv) they experienced high water temperatures (i.e. >31°C). Collectively, these results indicate that for juvenile lemon sharks inhabiting tropical flats, fight time can influence the degree of physiological disturbance, while water temperature contributes to the likelihood of survival

  2. Hooking injury, physiological status and short-term mortality of juvenile lemon sharks (Negaprion bevirostris) following catch-and-release recreational angling

    PubMed Central

    Danylchuk, Andy J.; Suski, Cory D.; Mandelman, John W.; Murchie, Karen J.; Haak, Christopher R.; Brooks, Annabelle M. L.; Cooke, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Sport fishing for sharks, including fishing with the intent to release, is becoming more prevalent within the recreational angling community. Common targets of recreational anglers are juvenile lemon sharks (Negaprion brevirostris) that frequent shallow tropical nearshore habitats. In this study, we captured 32 juvenile lemon sharks (530–875 mm total length) with conventional angling gear (i.e. spinning rods, dead fish bait and 5/0 barbed circle hooks) from the coastal waters of Eleuthera, The Bahamas, to determine the consequences of capture for individual sharks. Each shark was examined for hooking injuries, blood sampled to quantify physiological disturbance, assessed for reflex impairment and then monitored to assess post-release behaviour and mortality. Four sharks (12.5%) died following release during the 15 min tracking period. Principal components (PC) analysis revealed four axes describing 66.5% of the variance for blood physiology parameters, total length and water temperature. The PC1 and PC3 scores, characterized by positive factor loadings for indicators of exercise-induced stress and blood ion concentrations, respectively, were significantly related to fight time but were not associated with short-term mortality. Short-term mortality was significantly related to factor scores for PC4 that loaded heavily for water temperature and total length. Ten sharks (31%) exhibited impaired reflexes, with loss of bite reflex being most prevalent. Sharks that died had the following characteristics: (i) they had two or more impaired reflexes; (ii) they were hooked in the basihyal; (iii) they exhibited no movement after the initial bout of directional swimming; and (iv) they experienced high water temperatures (i.e. >31°C). Collectively, these results indicate that for juvenile lemon sharks inhabiting tropical flats, fight time can influence the degree of physiological disturbance, while water temperature contributes to the likelihood of survival

  3. Resource capture by single leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Long, S.P.

    1992-05-01

    Leaves show a variety of strategies for maximizing CO{sub 2} and light capture. These are more meaningfully explained if they are considered in the context of maximizing capture relative to the utilization of water, nutrients and carbohydrates reserves. There is considerable variation between crops in their efficiency of CO{sub 2} and light capture at the leaf level. Understanding of these mechanisms indicate some ways in which efficiency of resource capture could be level cannot be meaningfully considered without simultaneous understanding of implications at the canopy level. 36 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Identification of arsenobetaine in sole, lemon sole, flounder, dab, crab and shrimps by field desorption and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Luten, J.B.; Riekwel-Booy, G.; Greef, M.C.; de Brauw, I.N.

    1983-01-01

    Organo-arsenic has been isolated from sole, lemon sole, flounder, dab, crab and shrimps by extraction or ion-exchange in combination with thin-layer chromatography. An alkaline digestion of the samples, followed by a reduction with sodiumborohydride leads to the formation of trimethylarsine. Field desorption mass spectrometry (FDMS) can be used to identify arsenobetaine in the isolates. Sufficient purification by thin-layer chromatography is found to be a prerequisite for the detection of a protonated molecular ion of arsenobetaine. If this situation is not met acid enchanced FDMS or Fast Atom Bombardment mass spectrometry in high resolution can be used successfully.

  5. 5 CFR 630.1013 - Participation in voluntary leave transfer and leave bank programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS ABSENCE AND LEAVE Voluntary Leave Bank Program § 630.1013 Participation in voluntary leave transfer and leave bank programs. (a) If an agency or organizational subunit... this subpart; and (3) The agency or organizational subunit shall establish policies or...

  6. 5 CFR 630.1015 - Movement between voluntary leave bank and leave transfer programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS ABSENCE AND LEAVE Voluntary Leave Bank Program § 630.1015 Movement... organizational subunit covered by a voluntary leave bank program under this subpart and an agency or organizational subunit covered by a voluntary leave transfer program under subpart I of this part, the...

  7. 5 CFR 630.1104 - Donations from a leave bank to an emergency leave transfer program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Donations from a leave bank to an emergency leave transfer program. 630.1104 Section 630.1104 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS ABSENCE AND LEAVE Emergency Leave Transfer Program § 630.1104...

  8. 5 CFR 630.1104 - Donations from a leave bank to an emergency leave transfer program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Donations from a leave bank to an emergency leave transfer program. 630.1104 Section 630.1104 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS ABSENCE AND LEAVE Emergency Leave Transfer Program § 630.1104...

  9. Effect of Garlic and Lemon Juice Mixture on Lipid Profile and Some Cardiovascular Risk Factors in People 30-60 Years Old with Moderate Hyperlipidaemia: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, Negar; Entezari, Mohammad Hasan; Askari, Gholamreza; Maghsoudi, Zahra; Maracy, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was performed to effects of garlic and lemon juice mixture on lipid profile and some cardiovascular risk factors in people 30–60 years old with moderate hyperlipidemia. Methods: In a parallel-designed randomized controlled clinical trial, a total of 112 hyperlipidemic patients 30–60 years, were recruited from Isfahan Cardiovascular Research Center. People were selected and randomly divided into four groups. Control blood samples were taken and height, weight, and blood pressure were recorded. (1) Received 20 g of garlic daily, plus 1 tablespoon lemon juice, (2) received 20 g garlic daily, (3) received 1 tablespoon of lemon juice daily, and (4) did not receive garlic or lemon juice. A study technician was done the random allocations using a random numbers table. All participants presented 3 days of dietary records and 3 days of physical activity records during 8 weeks. Blood samples were obtained at study baseline and after 8 weeks of intervention. Results: Results showed a significant decrease in total cholesterol (changes from baseline: 40.8 ± 6.1, P < 0.001), low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (29.8 ± 2.6, P < 0.001), and fibrinogen (111.4 ± 16.1, P < 0.001) in the Group 1, in comparison with other groups. A greater reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure was observed in Group 1 compared with the Groups 3 and 4 (37 ± 10, P = 0.01) (24 ± 1, P = 0.02); respectively. Furthermore, a great reduction in body mass index was observed in the mixed group compared with the lemon juice and control groups (1.6 ± 0.1, P = 0.04). Conclusions: Administration of garlic plus lemon juice resulted in an improvement in lipid levels, fibrinogen and blood pressure of patients with hyperlipidemia. PMID:27563431

  10. Effects of Melissa officinalis L. on oxidative status and DNA damage in subjects exposed to long-term low-dose ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Zeraatpishe, Akbar; Oryan, Shahrbano; Bagheri, Mohammad Hadi; Pilevarian, Ali Asghar; Malekirad, Ali Akbar; Baeeri, Maryam; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the capability of Melissa officinalis L. (Lemon balm) infusion on improvement of oxidative stress status in radiology staff that were exposed to persistent low-dose radiation during work. The study was a before-after clinical trial performed on 55 radiology staff. They were asked to drink Lemon balm infusion which was prepared like a tea bag twice daily (1.5 g/100 mL) for 30 days. In the plasma, lipid peroxidation, DNA damage, catalase, superoxide dismutase, myeloperoxidase, and glutathione peroxidase activity were measured before and after using Lemon balm infusion.Use of Lemon balm infusion in radiology unit workers resulted in a significant improvement in plasma levels of catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase and a marked reduction in plasma DNA damage, myeloperoxidase, and lipid peroxidation. It is concluded that infusion of Lemon balm markedly improve oxidative stress condition and DNA damage in radiology staff when used as a dietary supplement for radiation protection. PMID:20858648

  11. Systematic comparison of nutraceuticals and antioxidant potential of cultivated, in vitro cultured and commercial Melissa officinalis samples.

    PubMed

    Dias, Maria Inês; Barros, Lillian; Sousa, Maria João; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2012-06-01

    Melissa officinalis (lemon balm) infusions are used worldwide for digestive, analgesic and other pharmaceutical applications. Herein, the nutraceuticals production and antioxidant potential in garden cultivated, in vitro cultured and two commercial samples (bags and granulated) of lemon balm was compared. The profile of in vitro cultured lemon balm is closer of garden cultivated sample than of both commercial samples (bag or granulate). It presented the highest levels of proteins and ash, and the lowest energetic value. The most favorable n6/n3 ration, as also the highest PUFA (mostly α-linolenic acid), tocopherols (including α-, γ- and δ-isoforms) and ascorbic acid contents were also observed in this sample. Nevertheless, it was the commercial bag lemon balm that gave the highest antioxidant activity and the highest levels of phenolics and flavonoids. As far as we kwon, this is the first comparison of nutraceuticals and antioxidant potential of cultivated, in vitro cultured and commercial lemon balm samples. Moreover, it proved that in vitro culture might be used to stimulate vitamins production. PMID:22445737

  12. Effects of Melissa officinalis L. on oxidative status and DNA damage in subjects exposed to long-term low-dose ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Zeraatpishe, Akbar; Oryan, Shahrbano; Bagheri, Mohammad Hadi; Pilevarian, Ali Asghar; Malekirad, Ali Akbar; Baeeri, Maryam; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the capability of Melissa officinalis L. (Lemon balm) infusion on improvement of oxidative stress status in radiology staff that were exposed to persistent low-dose radiation during work. The study was a before-after clinical trial performed on 55 radiology staff. They were asked to drink Lemon balm infusion which was prepared like a tea bag twice daily (1.5 g/100 mL) for 30 days. In the plasma, lipid peroxidation, DNA damage, catalase, superoxide dismutase, myeloperoxidase, and glutathione peroxidase activity were measured before and after using Lemon balm infusion.Use of Lemon balm infusion in radiology unit workers resulted in a significant improvement in plasma levels of catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase and a marked reduction in plasma DNA damage, myeloperoxidase, and lipid peroxidation. It is concluded that infusion of Lemon balm markedly improve oxidative stress condition and DNA damage in radiology staff when used as a dietary supplement for radiation protection.

  13. Systematic comparison of nutraceuticals and antioxidant potential of cultivated, in vitro cultured and commercial Melissa officinalis samples.

    PubMed

    Dias, Maria Inês; Barros, Lillian; Sousa, Maria João; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2012-06-01

    Melissa officinalis (lemon balm) infusions are used worldwide for digestive, analgesic and other pharmaceutical applications. Herein, the nutraceuticals production and antioxidant potential in garden cultivated, in vitro cultured and two commercial samples (bags and granulated) of lemon balm was compared. The profile of in vitro cultured lemon balm is closer of garden cultivated sample than of both commercial samples (bag or granulate). It presented the highest levels of proteins and ash, and the lowest energetic value. The most favorable n6/n3 ration, as also the highest PUFA (mostly α-linolenic acid), tocopherols (including α-, γ- and δ-isoforms) and ascorbic acid contents were also observed in this sample. Nevertheless, it was the commercial bag lemon balm that gave the highest antioxidant activity and the highest levels of phenolics and flavonoids. As far as we kwon, this is the first comparison of nutraceuticals and antioxidant potential of cultivated, in vitro cultured and commercial lemon balm samples. Moreover, it proved that in vitro culture might be used to stimulate vitamins production.

  14. Phytic acid in green leaves.

    PubMed

    Hadi Alkarawi, H; Zotz, G

    2014-07-01

    Phytic acid or phytate, the free-acid form of myo-inositolhexakiphosphate, is abundant in many seeds and fruits, where it represents the major storage form of phosphorus. Although also known from other plant tissues, available reports on the occurrence of phytic acid, e.g. in leaves, have never been compiled, nor have they been critically reviewed. We found 45 published studies with information on phytic acid content in leaves. Phytic acid was almost always detected when studies specifically tried to detect it, and accounted for up to 98% of total P. However, we argue that such extreme values, which rival findings from storage organs, are dubious and probably result from measurement errors. Excluding these high values from further quantitative analysis, foliar phytic acid-P averaged 2.3 mg·g(-1) , and represented, on average, 7.6% of total P. Remarkably, the ratio of phytic acid-P to total P did not increase with total P, we even detected a negative correlation of the two variables within one species, Manihot esculenta. This enigmatic finding warrants further attention.

  15. Cytological Aspects on the Effects of a Nasal Spray Consisting of Standardized Extract of Citrus Lemon and Essential Oils in Allergic Rhinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Lydia; Naviglio, Daniele; Armone Caruso, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a new formulation of nasal spray was set up based on the extract of lemon pulp, obtained by using a new solid-liquid technology of extraction, added to pure Aloe juice, soluble propoli, and essential oils of Ravensara and Niaouly. It was tested in a clinical study in which 100 subjects were recruited for a period of one month. Nasal scraping was used for collecting samples and after the application of the May-Grünwald Giemsa standard technique, glass slides were analysed by using optical microscope with a 1000x oil immersion. A control group constituted of ten people was recruited as control and this group was administered with physiological solution (saline solution). The comparison of results obtained before and after the application of nasal spray showed a total reduction of eosinophils granulocytes and mast cells; clinical data were confirmed by improvement of clinical pictures of patients. The lemon-based nasal spray was a good alternative to conventional medicine for the treatment of perennial and seasonal allergic and vasomotor rhinopathy. PMID:23304560

  16. (13)C/(12)C isotope ratios of organic acids, glucose and fructose determined by HPLC-co-IRMS for lemon juices authenticity.

    PubMed

    Guyon, Francois; Auberger, Pauline; Gaillard, Laetita; Loublanches, Caroline; Viateau, Maryse; Sabathié, Nathalie; Salagoïty, Marie-Hélène; Médina, Bernard

    2014-03-01

    High performance liquid chromatography linked to isotope ratio mass spectrometry via an interface allowing the chemical oxidation of organic matter (HPLC-co-IRMS) was used to simultaneously determine carbon 13 isotope ratio (δ(13)C) of organic acids, glucose and fructose in lime and lemon juices. Because of the significant difference between organic acids and sugars concentrations, the experimental protocol was optimised by applying a "current jump" to the IRMS device. The filament current is increased of 300μA during elution in order to enhance IRMS sensitivity. Then, analysis were performed on 35 lemon and lime fruits from various geographical origins and squeezed in the laboratory. An overall average δ(13)C values of -25.40±1.62‰, -23.83±1.82‰ and -25.67±1.72‰ is found for organic acids mixture mainly made up of citric acid, glucose and fructose, respectively. These authentic samples allowed the definition of a confidence domain to which have been confronted 30 commercial juices (24 "pure juices" and 6 coming from concentrate). Among these 30 samples, 10 present δ(13)C values outside the defined range revealing an added "C4" type organic acids or sugars, addition not specified on the label that is not in agreement with EU regulation. PMID:24176310

  17. Evidence of Recombinant Citrus tristeza virus Isolate Occurring in Acid Lime cv. Pant Lemon Orchard in Uttarakhand Terai Region of Northern Himalaya in India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jaywant Kumar; Tarafdar, Avijit; Sharma, Susheel Kumar; Biswas, Kajal Kumar

    2013-06-01

    The present study for the first time describes biological and molecular characterization of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) occurring in the Terai area of Uttarakhand State in Northern Himalaya region of India. Direct antigen coated-ELISA and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) detected the CTV infection in Acid lime cv. Pant lemon (Citrus aurantifolia) orchards of Pantnagar with an estimated disease incidence of 16.6-20.5 %. To know the biological and genetic properties, an isolate, CTV Pant 4 was characterized. Isolate Pant 4 could be graft transmitted to Kinnow, Nagpur and Darjeeling mandarins, Mosambi sweet orange, Kagzi lime, Sweet lime, Sour orange but not to Rough lemon. The sequence analyses of the 5'ORF1a (3038 nucleotides) of LPro domain and 3'end (2058 nt) covering ORF7-ORF10 regions of the CTV genome revealed that Pant 4 was closely related to the previously reported Indian CTV isolate, Kpg3 from Northeastern Himalaya region with 97 and 98 % sequence identity, respectively. Whereas, it differed from the previously reported CTV isolate B165 from Southern India with 79 and 92 % identity, respectively for 5'ORF1a and 3' end regions. Recombination and SplitsTree decomposition analyses indicated that CTV isolate Pant 4 was a recombinant isolate originating from Kpg3 as a major and B165 as a minor donor. PMID:24426255

  18. Evaluation of lemon fruit extract as an antioxidant agent against histopathological changes induced by cyclophosphamide in the testes of albino mice

    PubMed Central

    Quita, Salwa Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to determine the protective effects of lemon fruit extracts (LFE) against histopathological changes induced in the testes of male mice treated with cyclophosphamide (CP). Methods Thirty male mice were divided evenly into six groups: 1) group 1: the controls, 2) group 2: treated with LFE (10 ml/kg b wt.), 3) group 3: treated with CP (10 mg/kg b wt.), 4) group 4: treated with CP (20 mg/kg b wt.), 5) group 5: treated with LFE (10 ml/kg) + CP (10 mg/kg), 6) group 6: treated with LFE (10 ml/kg) + CP (20 mg/kg). Results Histological examination of the testes of mice treated with CP revealed histopathological changes, such as atrophy, degeneration, incomplete spermatogenic series in most seminiferous tubules, and spermatogenic necrosis with pyknotic nuclei. Advanced degree of improvement was seen in testes of mice treated with LFE co-administered with CP. Most of the seminiferous tubules restored their normal structure and spermatogenic layers appeared semi-normal with complete spermatogenic series. Conclusion Lemon fruit extract in conjunction with drug treatment protects the testicular tissue against CP-induced testicular injury in mice. PMID:26955455

  19. Cytological aspects on the effects of a nasal spray consisting of standardized extract of citrus lemon and essential oils in allergic rhinopathy.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Lydia; Naviglio, Daniele; Armone Caruso, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a new formulation of nasal spray was set up based on the extract of lemon pulp, obtained by using a new solid-liquid technology of extraction, added to pure Aloe juice, soluble propoli, and essential oils of Ravensara and Niaouly. It was tested in a clinical study in which 100 subjects were recruited for a period of one month. Nasal scraping was used for collecting samples and after the application of the May-Grünwald Giemsa standard technique, glass slides were analysed by using optical microscope with a 1000x oil immersion. A control group constituted of ten people was recruited as control and this group was administered with physiological solution (saline solution). The comparison of results obtained before and after the application of nasal spray showed a total reduction of eosinophils granulocytes and mast cells; clinical data were confirmed by improvement of clinical pictures of patients. The lemon-based nasal spray was a good alternative to conventional medicine for the treatment of perennial and seasonal allergic and vasomotor rhinopathy.

  20. A national outbreak of verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli O157 associated with consumption of lemon-and-coriander chicken wraps from a supermarket chain.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, P J; Sopwith, W; Quigley, C; Gillespie, I; Willshaw, G A; Lycett, C; Surman-Lee, S; Baxter, D; Adak, G K; Syed, Q

    2009-03-01

    A national outbreak of verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli O157 infection affected five English regions and Wales. Twelve cases were associated with lemon-and-coriander chicken wrap from a single supermarket chain consumed over a 5-day period. An outbreak investigation aimed to identify the source of infection. Descriptive epidemiology and phenotypic and genotypic tests on human isolates indicated a point-source outbreak; a case-control study showed a very strong association between consumption of lemon-and-coriander chicken wrap from the single supermarket chain and being a case (OR 46.40, 95% CI 5.39-infinity, P=0.0002). Testing of raw ingredients, products and faecal samples from staff in the food production unit did not yield any positive results. The outbreak was probably caused by one contaminated batch of an ingredient in the chicken wrap. Even when current best practice is in place, ready-to-eat foods can still be a risk for widespread infection.

  1. (13)C/(12)C isotope ratios of organic acids, glucose and fructose determined by HPLC-co-IRMS for lemon juices authenticity.

    PubMed

    Guyon, Francois; Auberger, Pauline; Gaillard, Laetita; Loublanches, Caroline; Viateau, Maryse; Sabathié, Nathalie; Salagoïty, Marie-Hélène; Médina, Bernard

    2014-03-01

    High performance liquid chromatography linked to isotope ratio mass spectrometry via an interface allowing the chemical oxidation of organic matter (HPLC-co-IRMS) was used to simultaneously determine carbon 13 isotope ratio (δ(13)C) of organic acids, glucose and fructose in lime and lemon juices. Because of the significant difference between organic acids and sugars concentrations, the experimental protocol was optimised by applying a "current jump" to the IRMS device. The filament current is increased of 300μA during elution in order to enhance IRMS sensitivity. Then, analysis were performed on 35 lemon and lime fruits from various geographical origins and squeezed in the laboratory. An overall average δ(13)C values of -25.40±1.62‰, -23.83±1.82‰ and -25.67±1.72‰ is found for organic acids mixture mainly made up of citric acid, glucose and fructose, respectively. These authentic samples allowed the definition of a confidence domain to which have been confronted 30 commercial juices (24 "pure juices" and 6 coming from concentrate). Among these 30 samples, 10 present δ(13)C values outside the defined range revealing an added "C4" type organic acids or sugars, addition not specified on the label that is not in agreement with EU regulation.

  2. Evidence of Recombinant Citrus tristeza virus Isolate Occurring in Acid Lime cv. Pant Lemon Orchard in Uttarakhand Terai Region of Northern Himalaya in India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jaywant Kumar; Tarafdar, Avijit; Sharma, Susheel Kumar; Biswas, Kajal Kumar

    2013-06-01

    The present study for the first time describes biological and molecular characterization of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) occurring in the Terai area of Uttarakhand State in Northern Himalaya region of India. Direct antigen coated-ELISA and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) detected the CTV infection in Acid lime cv. Pant lemon (Citrus aurantifolia) orchards of Pantnagar with an estimated disease incidence of 16.6-20.5 %. To know the biological and genetic properties, an isolate, CTV Pant 4 was characterized. Isolate Pant 4 could be graft transmitted to Kinnow, Nagpur and Darjeeling mandarins, Mosambi sweet orange, Kagzi lime, Sweet lime, Sour orange but not to Rough lemon. The sequence analyses of the 5'ORF1a (3038 nucleotides) of LPro domain and 3'end (2058 nt) covering ORF7-ORF10 regions of the CTV genome revealed that Pant 4 was closely related to the previously reported Indian CTV isolate, Kpg3 from Northeastern Himalaya region with 97 and 98 % sequence identity, respectively. Whereas, it differed from the previously reported CTV isolate B165 from Southern India with 79 and 92 % identity, respectively for 5'ORF1a and 3' end regions. Recombination and SplitsTree decomposition analyses indicated that CTV isolate Pant 4 was a recombinant isolate originating from Kpg3 as a major and B165 as a minor donor.

  3. Role of leaves in phototropism.

    PubMed

    Lam, S L; Leopold, A C

    1966-05-01

    Experiments with green seedlings of sunflower (Helianthus annuns L.) indicate the existence of a phototropic mechanism which involves the leaves or cotyledons, and which can produce an asymmetry of auxin content without the involvement of lateral auxin transport, the classic explanation of phototropism in etiolated seedlings. The basic lines of evidence for the leaf-mediated tropism are: 1) darkening of one cotyledon will cause curvature of the stem toward the lighted cotyledon: 2) the darkened cotyledon sustains an enhanced growth rate in the stem below it: 3) conversely, light suppresses the growth-stimulating effects of a single cotyledon: and 4) more diffusible auxin is obtained from the stem below darkened cotyledons than below lighted ones.

  4. The cardioprotective power of leaves

    PubMed Central

    Boncler, Magdalena; Watala, Cezary

    2015-01-01

    Lack of physical activity, smoking and/or inappropriate diet can contribute to the increase of oxidative stress, in turn affecting the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases. Strong anti-oxidant properties of plant polyphenolic compounds might underlie their cardioprotective activity. This paper reviews recent findings on the anti-oxidant activity of plant leaf extracts and emphasizes their effects on blood platelets, leukocytes and endothelial cells – the targets orchestrating the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. We also review the evidence linking supplementation with plant leaf extracts and the risk factors defining the metabolic syndrome. The data point to the importance of leaves as an alternative source of polyphenolic compounds in the human diet and their role in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26322095

  5. Phenolics of Moringa oleifera leaves.

    PubMed

    Manguro, Lawrence Onyango Arot; Lemmen, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Five flavonol glycosides characterised as kaempferide 3-O-(2'',3''-diacetylglucoside), kaempferide 3-O-(2''-O-galloylrhamnoside), kaempferide 3-O-(2''-O-galloylrutinoside)-7-O-alpha-rhamnoside, kaempferol 3-O-[beta-glucosyl-(1 --> 2)]-[alpha-rhamnosyl-(1 --> 6)]-beta-glucoside-7-O-alpha-rhamnoside and kaempferol 3-O-[alpha-rhamnosyl-(1 --> 2)]-[alpha-rhamnosyl-(1 --> 4)]-beta-glucoside-7-O-alpha-rhamnoside together with benzoic acid 4-O-beta-glucoside, benzoic acid 4-O-alpha-rhamnosyl-(1 --> 2)-beta-glucoside and benzaldehyde 4-O-beta-glucoside have been isolated from methanolic extract of Moringa oleifera leaves. Also obtained from the same extract were known compounds, kaempferol 3-O-alpha-rhamnoside, kaempferol, syringic acid, gallic acid, rutin and quercetin 3-O-beta-glucoside. Their structures were determined using spectroscopic methods as well as comparison with data from known compounds.

  6. Phenolics of Moringa oleifera leaves.

    PubMed

    Manguro, Lawrence Onyango Arot; Lemmen, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Five flavonol glycosides characterised as kaempferide 3-O-(2'',3''-diacetylglucoside), kaempferide 3-O-(2''-O-galloylrhamnoside), kaempferide 3-O-(2''-O-galloylrutinoside)-7-O-alpha-rhamnoside, kaempferol 3-O-[beta-glucosyl-(1 --> 2)]-[alpha-rhamnosyl-(1 --> 6)]-beta-glucoside-7-O-alpha-rhamnoside and kaempferol 3-O-[alpha-rhamnosyl-(1 --> 2)]-[alpha-rhamnosyl-(1 --> 4)]-beta-glucoside-7-O-alpha-rhamnoside together with benzoic acid 4-O-beta-glucoside, benzoic acid 4-O-alpha-rhamnosyl-(1 --> 2)-beta-glucoside and benzaldehyde 4-O-beta-glucoside have been isolated from methanolic extract of Moringa oleifera leaves. Also obtained from the same extract were known compounds, kaempferol 3-O-alpha-rhamnoside, kaempferol, syringic acid, gallic acid, rutin and quercetin 3-O-beta-glucoside. Their structures were determined using spectroscopic methods as well as comparison with data from known compounds. PMID:17365690

  7. Comparative Study of the Effect of Sample Pretreatment and Extraction on the Determination of Flavonoids from Lemon (Citrus limon)

    PubMed Central

    Ledesma-Escobar, Carlos A.; Priego-Capote, Feliciano; Luque de Castro, María D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Flavonoids have shown to exert multiple beneficial effects on human health, being also appreciated by both food and pharmaceutical industries. Citrus fruits are a key source of flavonoids, thus promoting studies to obtain them. Characteristics of these studies are the discrepancies among sample pretreatments and among extraction methods, and also the scant number of comparative studies developed so far. Objective Evaluate the effect of both the sample pretreatment and the extraction method on the profile of flavonoids isolated from lemon. Results Extracts from fresh, lyophilized and air-dried samples obtained by shaking extraction (SE), ultrasound-assisted extraction (USAE), microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and superheated liquid extraction (SHLE) were analyzed by LC–QTOF MS/MS, and 32 flavonoids were tentatively identified using MS/MS information. ANOVA applied to the data from fresh and dehydrated samples and from extraction by the different methods revealed that 26 and 32 flavonoids, respectively, were significant (p≤0.01). The pairwise comparison (Tukey HSD; p≤0.01) showed that lyophilized samples are more different from fresh samples than from air-dried samples; also, principal component analysis (PCA) showed a clear discrimination among sample pretreatment strategies and suggested that such differences are mainly created by the abundance of major flavonoids. On the other hand, pairwise comparison of extraction methods revealed that USAE and MAE provided quite similar extracts, being SHLE extracts different from the other two. In this case, PCA showed a clear discrimination among extraction methods, and their position in the scores plot suggests a lower abundance of flavonoids in the extracts from SHLE. In the two PCA the loadings plots revealed a trend to forming groups according to flavonoid aglycones. Conclusions The present study shows clear discrimination caused by both sample pretreatments and extraction methods. Under the studied

  8. Tracking seasonal subglacial drainage evolution of alpine glaciers using radiogenic Nd and Sr isotope systematics: Lemon Creek Glacier, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinger, A. E.; Aciego, S.; Stevenson, E. I.; Arendt, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    The transport pathways of water beneath a glacier are subject to change as melt seasons progress due to variability in the balance between basal water pressure and water flux. Subglacial hydrology has been well studied, but the understanding of spatial distribution is less well constrained. Whereas radiogenic isotopic tracers have been traditionally used as proxies to track spatial variability and weathering rates in fluvial and riverine systems, these techniques have yet to be applied extensively to the subglacial environment and may help resolve ambiguity in subglacial hydrology. Research has shown the 143Nd/144Nd values can reflect variation in source provenance processes due to variations in the age of the continental crust. Correlating the 143Nd/144Nd with other radiogenic isotope systematics such as strontium (87Sr/86Sr) provides important constraints on the role of congruent and incongruent weathering processes. Our study presents the application of Nd and Sr systematics using isotopic ratios to the suspended load of subglacial meltwater collected over a single melt season at Lemon Creek Glacier, USA (LCG). The time-series data show an average ɛNd ~ -6.83, indicating a young bedrock (~60 MYA). Isotopic variation helps track the seasonal expansion of the subglacial meltwater channels and subsequent return to early season conditions due to the parabolic trend towards less radiogenic Nd in June and towards more radiogenic Nd beginning in mid-August. However, the high variability in July and early August may reflect a mixture of source as the channels diverge and derive sediment from differently aged lithologies. We find a poor correlation between 143Nd/144Nd and 87Sr/86Sr (R2= 0.38) along with a slight trend towards more radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr values with time ((R2= 0.49). This may indicate that, even as the residence time decreases over the melt season, the LCG subglacial system is relatively stable and that the bedrock is congruently weathered. Our study

  9. 5 CFR 630.703 - Computation of shore leave.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Computation of shore leave. 630.703... AND LEAVE Shore Leave § 630.703 Computation of shore leave. (a) An employee earns shore leave at the rate of 1 day of shore leave for each 15 calendar days of absence on one or more extended voyages....

  10. Ion exchanger from chemically modified banana leaves.

    PubMed

    El-Gendy, Ahmed A; Mohamed, Samar H; Abd-Elkader, Amal H

    2013-07-25

    Cation exchangers from chemically modified banana leaves have been prepared. Banana leaves were treated with different molarities of KMnO4 and cross linked with epichlorohydrin and their effect on metal ion adsorption was investigated. Phosphorylation of chemically modified banana leaves was also studied. The metal ion uptake by these modified banana leaves was clarified. Effect of different varieties, e.g. activation of produced cation exchanger, concentration of metal ions was also investigated. Characterization of the prepared ion exchangers by using infrared and thermal analysis was also taken in consideration. PMID:23768590

  11. Paid Sick Leave and Job Stability.

    PubMed

    Hill, Heather D

    2013-05-01

    A compelling, but unsubstantiated, argument for paid sick leave legislation is that workers with leave are better able to address own and family member health needs without risking a voluntary or involuntary job separation. This study tests that claim using the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and regression models controlling for a large set of worker and job characteristics, as well as with propensity score techniques. Results suggest that paid sick leave decreases the probability of job separation by at least 2.5 percentage points, or 25%. The association is strongest for workers without paid vacation leave and for mothers. PMID:24235780

  12. Paid Sick Leave and Job Stability

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Heather D.

    2013-01-01

    A compelling, but unsubstantiated, argument for paid sick leave legislation is that workers with leave are better able to address own and family member health needs without risking a voluntary or involuntary job separation. This study tests that claim using the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and regression models controlling for a large set of worker and job characteristics, as well as with propensity score techniques. Results suggest that paid sick leave decreases the probability of job separation by at least 2.5 percentage points, or 25%. The association is strongest for workers without paid vacation leave and for mothers. PMID:24235780

  13. [Inhibitors of alpha-amylase from plants--a possibility to treat diabetes mellitus type II by phytotherapy?].

    PubMed

    Melzig, Matthias F; Funke, Ines

    2007-01-01

    Antidiabetics of plant origin are in common use. A proof of their effectiveness or their mode of action is often missing. The aim of this work was to review the knowledge about inhibitors of alpha-amylase from plants and to comment on the use in anti-diabetic treatment. Herbal alpha-amylase inhibitors are rarely described in the literature, nevertheless they have the ability to lower postprandial blood glucose level and should be used in the supplementary treatment of diabetes. Important constituents for the inhibitory activity against alpha-amylase are mainly polyphenolic compounds. There is a need for further clinical studies to establish a rational therapy with traditional herbal preparations, especially for the leaves from the blueberry, tamarind, lemon balm and rosemary, the hulls from white kidney beans or green tea extract. PMID:17704980

  14. Sweetening Statistical Lemons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perreault, George

    2000-01-01

    Criticizes Jay Mathews'"Newsweek" article ranking the 100 "best" American high schools by a Challenge Index dividing the number of advanced placement/international baccalaureate tests taken by the number of graduating seniors. Clifford Adelman's research on good academic content and good teachers provides more useful criteria. (MLH)

  15. Resilience and Young People Leaving Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Mike

    2008-01-01

    How do we promote the resilience of young people leaving care? This article explores this question by bringing together research findings on the resilience of young people from disadvantaged family backgrounds with research studies on young people leaving care. These findings are applied to young people during their journey to adulthood: their…

  16. Developments in Educational Leave of Absence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France). Centre for Educational Research and Innovation.

    The document evaluates present international developments in the area of leave of absence during working hours for educational purposes. Part 1, Educational Leave of Absence: A Comparative Analysis, contains five chapters: (1) Towards a New Right to Education, discussing recurrent education, the world of work, the International Labor Organization,…

  17. A Feminist Perspective on Parental Leave Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sallee, Margaret W.

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on the ways that three feminist theories--liberal feminism, cultural feminism, and feminist poststructuralism--might be used to craft parental leave policies. After examining each theory in detail, the article concludes by offering one example of an ideal parental leave policy that combines the best features of each theory to…

  18. Antioxidant activity of Arbutus unedo leaves.

    PubMed

    Pabuçcuoğlu, A; Kivçak, B; Baş, M; Mert, T

    2003-09-01

    The ethanol and methanol extracts of Arbutus unedo leaves were screened for antioxidant activity. The antioxidant activity was determined by an improved assay based on the decolorization of the radical monocation of [2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)] (ABTS). The ethanol and methanol extract of A. unedo leaves displayed potent antioxidant activity. PMID:12946724

  19. Patterns of ehtylene production in senescing leaves.

    PubMed

    Aharoni, N; Lieberman, M

    1979-11-01

    Changes in the patterns of ethylene production, chlorophyll content, and respiration were studied in relation to the senescence of intact leaves and leaf discs. The primary leaves of pinto bean, which abscise readily during natural senescence, and tobacco and sugar beet leaves, which do not abscise, were used. A decrease in the rate of ethylene production and respiration, during the slow phase of chlorophyll degradation, was observed in leaf-blade discs cut from mature leaves and aged in the dark. During rapid chlorophyll loss both ethylene production and respiration increased and then decreased. These climacteric-like patterns were shown by leaf discs of all three species. Discs taken from leaves that had been senescing on the plant also showed a climacteric-like rise in ethylene production but not in respiration, which decreased continuously with leaf age. Climacteric-like patterns in the rise of ethylene and respiration for leaf discs were also shown by the petioles of both bean and tobacco leaves. This indicates that the rise of ethylene and respiration is characteristic of the general process of senescence in leaves and is not restricted to the abscission process. In contrast to the ethylene-forming systems in climacteric fruits and many flowers, the one in leaves declines sharply in the early stages of senescence. The subsequent rise of ethylene production appears to be associated with the rapid phase of chlorophyll breakdown, and may indicate the final stage of the senescence process during which ethylene could be actively involved in inducing leaf abscission.

  20. When and Why Dropouts Leave High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stearns, Elizabeth; Glennie, Elizabeth J.

    2006-01-01

    Teens may leave school because of academic failure, disciplinary problems, or employment opportunities. In this article, the authors test whether the reasons dropouts leave school differ by grade level and age. We compare dropout rates and reasons across grade levels and ages for all high school students, ethnic groups, and gender groups. Across…

  1. 29 CFR 825.202 - Intermittent leave or reduced leave schedule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... illness, there must be a medical need for leave and it must be that such medical need can be best... illness, if required by the employer, addresses the medical necessity of intermittent leave or leave on a... condition or of a covered servicemember's serious injury or illness, or for recovery from treatment...

  2. 29 CFR 825.202 - Intermittent leave or reduced leave schedule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... illness, there must be a medical need for leave and it must be that such medical need can be best... illness, if required by the employer, addresses the medical necessity of intermittent leave or leave on a... condition or of a covered servicemember's serious injury or illness, or for recovery from treatment...

  3. 29 CFR 825.202 - Intermittent leave or reduced leave schedule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... illness, there must be a medical need for leave and it must be that such medical need can be best... illness, if required by the employer, addresses the medical necessity of intermittent leave or leave on a... condition or of a covered servicemember's serious injury or illness, or for recovery from treatment...

  4. Women's reasons for leaving abusive spouses.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Y C

    1991-01-01

    Research has focused on factors associated with leaving physically abusive relationships, yet little is known about what the woman thinks when she leaves. Fifty-one formerly battered women from rural and metropolitan areas in two midwestern states described 86 reasons for leaving a physically abusive relationship. During open-ended interviews, women who rated themselves as severely abused spontaneously emphasized leaving as a process. Content analysis resulted in reasons categorized as safety, dependency, and personal growth. Self-report retrospective data from a nonrandom sample limit generalizability of results; however, the awareness and reasoning of the women, coupled with their emphasis on leaving as process and personal growth, suggest the importance of education and support programs for abused women and women at risk for abuse.

  5. Changes in spectral properties of detached leaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daughtry, C. S. T.; Biehl, L. L.

    1984-01-01

    If leaf senescence can be delayed for several days without significant changes in spectral properties, then samples of leaves at remote test sites could be prepared and shipped to laboratories to measure spectral properties. The changes in spectral properties of detached leaves were determined. Leaves from red birch and red pine were immersed in water or 0.001 M benzylaminopurine (BAP) and stored in plastic bags in the dark at either 5 or 25 C. Total directional-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance of the adaxial surface of birch leaves were measured over the 400 to 1100 nm wavelength region with a spectroradiometer and integrating sphere. Pine needles were taped together and reflectance of the mat of needles was measured. Spectral properties changed less than 5% of initial values during the first week when leaves were stored at 5 C. Storage at 25 C promoted rapid senescence and large changes in spectral properties. BAP delayed, but did not stop, senescence at 25 C.

  6. Simultaneous Determination of Potassium Sorbate, Sodium Benzoate, Quinoline Yellow and Sunset Yellow in Lemonades and Lemon Sauces by HPLC Using Experimental Design.

    PubMed

    Dinç Zor, Şule; Aşçı, Bürge; Aksu Dönmez, Özlem; Yıldırım Küçükkaraca, Dilek

    2016-07-01

    In this study, development and validation of a HPLC method was described for simultaneous determination of potassium sorbate, sodium benzoate, quinoline yellow and sunset yellow. A Box-Behnken design using three variables at three levels was employed to determine the optimum conditions of chromatographic separation: pH of mobile phase, 6.0-7.0; flow rate, 0.8-1.2 mL min(-1) and the ratio of mobile phase composed of a 0.025 M sodium acetate/acetic acid buffer, 80-90%. Resolution was chosen as a response. The optimized method was validated for linearity, the limits of detection and quantification, accuracy, precision and stability. All the validation parameters were within the acceptance range. The applicability of the developed method to the determination of these food additives in commercial lemonade and lemon sauce samples was successfully demonstrated. PMID:26951541

  7. The protective effect of lemon fruit extract on histopathological changes induced in small intestines and pancreas of male mice by cyclophosphamide

    PubMed Central

    Quita, Salwa Mohammed; Balbaid, Samira Omar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cyclophosphamide (CP) is alkylating agent and the most commonly used chemotherapeutic drug for various types of cancer; it causes severe toxicity. The aim of the research was to assess the protective effect of lemon fruit extract (LFE) against the side effects of the anti-cancer drug “cyclophosphamide” (CP). Methods This experimental study was conducted in 2015. Thirty male mice were divided into six groups: group A (control): intraperitoneal injection of saline, group B: oral LFE (10ml/kg), group C: intraperitoneal injection of CP (10 mg/kg), group D: intraperitoneal injection of CP (20 mg/kg), group E: intraperitoneal injection of CP (10 mg/kg) and oral LFE (10 ml/kg), and group F: intraperitoneal injection of CP (20 mg/kg) and oral LFE (10 ml/kg). All groups were treated daily for five consecutive days. Results The results of the group treated with the drug C and D was that, in their intestines, the effect was uneven between a severe to a sharp effect, and there was a lack of dense connective tissue and its collagen fibers and fat cells, the intestinal glands or crypt of Lieberkühn appeared few in number and distorted in composition when compared with control A, as the pancreas appeared divided into several lobes containing small numbers of pancreatic Acini, padded with secretory pyramid-shaped cells, although some of them appeared exaggerated. While treatment in group E and F resulted in the intestines and pancreas appearing to be semi-normal; regarding the pancreas, it showed an observed improvement more than the response of the intestines. Conclusion The results support the protective effect of lemon fruit extract against CP-induced intestinal and pancreatic injury. PMID:26516452

  8. Influence of pesticides on yeasts colonizing leaves.

    PubMed

    Vadkertiová, Renata; Sláviková, Elena

    2011-01-01

    The effect of nine different pesticides on the growth of yeasts isolated from the leaves of fruit and forest trees was investigated. Four insecticides (with the active ingredients: thiacloprid, deltamethrin, lambdacyhalothrin, and thiamethoxam) and five fungicides (with the effective substances: bitertanol, kresoxim-methyl, mancozeb, trifloxystrobin, and cupric oxychloride) were tested. The concentrations of chemicals were those recommended by the manufacturers for the spraying of trees. The yeast strains isolated from the leaves of fruit trees were not sensitive to any of the insecticides. The majority of yeast strains isolated from the leaves of forest trees were either not sensitive or only to a small extent. While Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and Pichia anomala were not affected by any insecticide, the strains of Cryptococcus laurentii and Rhodotorula glutinis showed the highest sensitivity. The effects of fungicides on the growth of isolated yeasts were more substantial. The fungicide Dithane DG (mancozeb) completely inhibited the growth of all yeasts. All strains isolated from fruit tree leaves were more resistant to the tested fungicides than those isolated from the leaves of forest trees. The most resistant strains from the leaves of fruit trees belonged to the species Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Pichia anomala, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, whereas Cryptococcus albidus and C. laurentii, originating from the leaves of forest trees, showed the highest sensitivity to fungicides. PMID:22351984

  9. 5 CFR 630.704 - Granting shore leave.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Granting shore leave. 630.704 Section 630... LEAVE Shore Leave § 630.704 Granting shore leave. (a) Authority. (1) An employee has an absolute right to use shore leave, subject to the right of the head of the agency to fix the time at which...

  10. 5 CFR 630.911 - Restoration of transferred annual leave.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...' Compensation Programs under 20 CFR 10.202 and 10.310, and the annual leave was leave transferred under § 630... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restoration of transferred annual leave... REGULATIONS ABSENCE AND LEAVE Voluntary Leave Transfer Program § 630.911 Restoration of transferred...

  11. 5 CFR 630.911 - Restoration of transferred annual leave.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...' Compensation Programs under 20 CFR 10.202 and 10.310, and the annual leave was leave transferred under § 630... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Restoration of transferred annual leave... REGULATIONS ABSENCE AND LEAVE Voluntary Leave Transfer Program § 630.911 Restoration of transferred...

  12. 38 CFR 21.6340 - Leaves of absence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Leaves of absence. 21... Recipients Leaves of Absence § 21.6340 Leaves of absence. (a) General. VA may approve leaves of absence under vertain conditions. During approved leaves of absence, a ceteran shall be considered to be...

  13. 29 CFR 825.207 - Substitution of paid leave.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Employee Leave Entitlements Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825...' compensation absences and FMLA leave. (f) Section 7(o) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) permits public... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substitution of paid leave.......

  14. 29 CFR 825.207 - Substitution of paid leave.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Employee Leave Entitlements Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825... between workers' compensation absences and FMLA leave. (f) Section 7(o) of the Fair Labor Standards Act... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Substitution of paid leave. 825.207......

  15. 29 CFR 825.207 - Substitution of paid leave.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Employee Leave Entitlements Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825... between workers' compensation absences and FMLA leave. (f) Section 7(o) of the Fair Labor Standards Act... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substitution of paid leave. 825.207......

  16. 29 CFR 825.207 - Substitution of paid leave.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Employee Leave Entitlements Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825... between workers' compensation absences and FMLA leave. (f) Section 7(o) of the Fair Labor Standards Act... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substitution of paid leave. 825.207......

  17. 29 CFR 825.207 - Substitution of paid leave.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Employee Leave Entitlements Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825...' compensation absences and FMLA leave. (f) Section 7(o) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) permits public... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substitution of paid leave.......

  18. 5 CFR 630.606 - Grant of home leave.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Grant of home leave. 630.606 Section 630... LEAVE Home Leave § 630.606 Grant of home leave. (a) Entitlement. Except as otherwise authorized by statute, an employee is entitled to home leave only when he has completed a basic service period of...

  19. 5 CFR 630.605 - Computation of home leave.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Computation of home leave. 630.605... AND LEAVE Home Leave § 630.605 Computation of home leave. (a) For each month of service abroad, an employee earns home leave under the rates fixed by § 630.604(a) in the amounts set forth in the...

  20. Atomic balm: Finding hope in isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, K.

    1996-12-31

    This article provides a glimpse of the research program at ORNL carried out as part of the nuclear medicine group, aimed at the application of radioisotopes for medical applications. These can be either diagnostic or treatment based applications. Faced with shrinking research budgets, the department focuses primarily on applications of reactor produced isotopes because of the continued availability of a reactor for producing such isotopes. This paper describes collaborative work to use rhenium-188 and iodine-123 for cancer and pain treatments, and for diagnosing Alzheimer`s disease.

  1. A Rhetorical Balm: Eulogy for the Challenger.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klinger-Vartabedian, Laurel

    The American space shuttle Challenger's explosion prompted a national grieving process typified by stages of shock, disbelief, acknowledgement, and finally recovery/adaptation. President Reagan's speech on the evening of the disaster assisted this process by integrating content and structure with the psychological needs of the audience. Reagan's…

  2. Phytochemical and antifungal activities of Uvaria. chamae leaves and roots, Spondias mombin leaves and bark and Combretum racemosum leaves.

    PubMed

    Okwuosa, O M T B; Chukwura, E I; Chukwuma, G O; Okwuosa, C N; Enweani, I B; Agbakoba, N R; Chukwuma, C M; Manafa, P O; Umedum, C U

    2012-12-01

    The effects of crude and dilutions of aqueous, methanolic and n-hexane extracts of Uvaria chamae (roots and leaves), Spondias mombin (leaves and bark) and Combretum racemosum (Leaves), on pathogenic candida albicans and aspergillus niger was studied. The aim was to contribute to the search for a cheaper, conventional cure for both fungi. Phytochemical analysis revealed varying degrees of alkaloids, glycosides, saponin, lipid and oil, tannins, flavonoids, terpenoids and acids. Agar diffusion method was used for anti fungal assay. Minimum inhibitory concentration (mic) used was 10 mg/ml of extract and dilutions of the non polar solvents of 10 (-1) and 10(-2) was used. Results showed that none of the plant parts was active against aspergillus niger. Combretum racemosum had no antifungal effect on tested organisms as well as the different dilutions. However crude methanolic extract of uvaria (roots and leaves), spondias ( bark and leaves ), and n-hexane extracts of uvaria (leaves and roots), produced anti candidal effects with diameters in this order 14.67 +/- 0.72mm, 10.67 +/- 0.52 mm, 11.00 +/- 0.47 mm, 15.00 +/- 0.47 mm, and 14.67 +/- 0.72 mm respectively. Some of the plant parts especially uvaria had zones of inhibition at a confidence limit comparable with control drug which is ketoconazole and it had inhibitory effects at a diameter of 20.06 +/- 0.40 mm. PMID:23678643

  3. The Chromatography of Leaves and Inks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemecology, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Describes the use of a simple process known as chromatography to separate and observe the color pigments in leaves, inks, and other materials. Provides some historical background and detailed procedures. (DDR)

  4. Cadmium accumulation in leaves of leafy vegetables.

    PubMed

    Baldantoni, Daniela; Morra, Luigi; Zaccardelli, Massimo; Alfani, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Leafy vegetables have a relatively high potential for Cd uptake and translocation, and are thus considered Cd accumulators. For this reason, leaves and roots of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and endive (Cichorium endivia L.) plants, grown on different agricultural soils in Campania region (southern Italy), subjected to different fertilisation treatments (unfertilisation, compost amendment and mineral fertilisation), were analysed for Cd concentrations. Moreover, to clarify if the highest concentrations found are linked to older and inedible or to younger and edible leaves, external and internal endive leaves were separately analysed. All the leafy vegetables analysed showed on average 2-fold higher Cd concentrations in leaves than in roots. Leaf Cd concentrations in both lettuce and endive plants significantly differed among fertilisation treatments, with values highest in the plants grown on mineral fertilised soils. Apart from the soil fertilisation treatments, however, Cd leaf concentrations were often higher (up to 4-fold) than the threshold deduced by the EU 420/2011 Regulation, although the plants grew on unpolluted soils. Anyway, external leaves of endive plants showed significantly higher concentrations than internal leaves (in some cases the values were 3-fold higher), partly reassuring on the consumption of the younger leaves. Moreover, this study points out two major drawbacks in the Italian and European regulatory frameworks: (1) metal concentration (as total and/or available fraction) limits in agricultural soils are lacking; (2) metal concentration thresholds (currently existing only for Cd and Pb in crops) reported in the EU 420/2011 Regulation, expressed on the fresh weight basis rather than on the dry weight basis, appear not suitable.

  5. A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Study of the Effect of a Combination of Lemon Verbena Extract and Fish Oil Omega-3 Fatty Acid on Joint Management

    PubMed Central

    Caturla, Nuria; Funes, Lorena; Pérez-Fons, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of an antioxidant/anti-inflammatory supplement containing standardized lemon verbena (Aloysia triphylla, Lippia citriodora) extract and fish oil omega-3 fatty acid in a human pilot trial as an alternative treatment for joint management. Methods and design First, antioxidant activity of the supplement was determined through an oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay. In a randomized, double-blinded placebo-controlled trial, 45 subjects with pain discomfort received the nutritional supplement or placebo for 9 weeks. Western Ontario MacMaster (WOMAC) and Lequesne's questionnaires, which are disease-specific measurements validated to measure joint dysfunction and pain, were administered and evaluated once per week in the placebo and intervention groups. Outcome measures Pain and stiffness symptoms, and joint function were determined once per week through recording their respective WOMAC and Lequesne's scores in the placebo and intervention groups. Statistically significant differences were determined at every measurement point between the two groups. Results Lemon verbena extract showed strong antioxidant properties as measured by the ORAC assay. The nutritional supplement containing standardized lemon verbena extract (14% verbascoside, w/w) and fish oil omega-3 fatty acid reduced symptoms of pain and stiffness significantly, and improved physical function as shown by WOMAC and Lequesne's scores after 9 weeks of treatment. WOMAC and Lequesne's total scores decreased 53% and 78%, respectively, at the end of the study compared to initial conditions. Onset of the effect was observed at the third and fourth weeks, when statistically significant differences were detected, compared to placebo. Conclusions This pilot study reveals that supplementation with lemon verbena combined with omega-3 fatty acids may be considered for further investigation as a complementary and alternative treatment for

  6. The extraction of characteristic wavebands for radish leaves and rice leaves based on LCTF imaging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Peng-fei; Feng, Jie; Li, Hong-ning

    2013-08-01

    In order to identify and classify horticultural crops rapidly, it is great importance of selecting effective characteristic wavebands from a large number of imaging data. Extracting effective characteristic wavebands can nearly represent holistic information of the research target from rich imaging spectral data, mainly used for rapid characteristic identification, cluster analysis and establishing database, especially in high spectral sensing to recognize targets for a long distance. The experiment chooses radish leaves and rice leaves as research samples so as to obtain spectral information from the surface of samples by interval of 5nm based on LCTF imaging; then, the standard deviation and correlation coefficient of the gray images are calculated for these two kinds of leaves; next, we calculate the value of waveband index according to standard deviation and correlation coefficient, and extract the effective characteristic wavebands for radish leaves and rice leaves through the sorting of waveband index. By those, the experimental results show there are six ideal wavebands at 530nm, 550nm, 555nm, 715nm, 510nm and 565nm for radish leaves, 645nm, 675nm, 685nm, 670nm, 690nm and 660nm for rice leaves separately. Further, according to the principle of Euclidean distance, we also give an assessment of classification accuracy for these two samples by comparing characteristic wavebands with full wavebands, and the classification accuracy of radish leaves and rice leaves is 80.00% and 86.67% respectively. Therefore, choosing these wavebands can be used as effective characteristic wavebands for radish leaves and rice leaves.

  7. Maize Leaves Turn Away from Neighbors1

    PubMed Central

    Maddonni, Gustavo Angel; Otegui, María Elena; Andrieu, Bruno; Chelle, Michael; Casal, Jorge J.

    2002-01-01

    In commercial crops, maize (Zea mays) plants are typically grown at a larger distance between rows (70 cm) than within the same row (16–23 cm). This rectangular arrangement creates a heterogeneous environment in which the plants receive higher red light (R) to far-red light (FR) ratios from the interrow spaces. In field crops, the hybrid Dekalb 696 (DK696) showed an increased proportion of leaves toward interrow spaces, whereas the experimental hybrid 980 (Exp980) retained random leaf orientation. Mirrors reflecting FR were placed close to isolated plants to simulate the presence of neighbors in the field. In addition, localized FR was applied to target leaves in a growth chamber. During their expansion, the leaves of DK696 turned away from the low R to FR ratio signals, whereas Exp980 leaves remained unaffected. On the contrary, tillering was reduced and plant height was increased by low R to FR ratios in Exp980 but not in DK696. Isolated plants preconditioned with low R/FR-simulating neighbors in a North-South row showed reduced mutual shading among leaves when the plants were actually grouped in North-South rows. These observations contradict the current view that phytochrome-mediated responses to low R/FR are a relic from wild conditions, detrimental for crop yield. PMID:12427985

  8. Parenthood and Leaving Home in Young Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Hofferth, Sandra L.; Curtin, Sally C.

    2014-01-01

    With increases in nonmarital fertility, the sequencing of transitions in early adulthood has become even more complex. Once the primary transition out of the parental home, marriage was first replaced by nonfamily living and cohabitation; more recently, many young adults have become parents before entering a coresidential union. Studies of leaving home, however, have not examined the role of early parenthood. Using the Young Adult Study of the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (n = 4,674), we use logistic regression to analyze parenthood both as a correlate of leaving home and as a route from the home. We find that even in mid-adolescence, becoming a parent is linked with leaving home. Coming from a more affluent family is linked with leaving home via routes that do not involve children rather than those that do, and having a warm relationship with either a mother or a father retards leaving home, particularly to nonfamily living, but is not related to parental routes out of the home. PMID:25544790

  9. [Morphogenesis of proximal branch leaves in mosses].

    PubMed

    Ignatov, M S; Spirina, U N

    2012-01-01

    The formation of deeply dissected and compound leaves at the bases of branches, their homology between different groups of mosses, and probable factors responsible for their development are considered. Previous authors differ in the interpretation of such leaves and in most cases describe them as special morphological structures named pseudoparaphyllia. It is shown, however, that this term has been applied both to whole leaves and to separate leaf parts. Among the patterns of leaf formation deviating from the basic type, a special place belongs to the Hampeella variant, where deeply dissected and compound leaves are formed due to the delayed development of branch primordia. The families representing this variant occupy a basal position in the phylogenetic tree of pleurocarpous mosses. The Leucodon variant, where splitting of leaves into lobes is apparently explained by strong stem extension, is not specific for any definite phylogenetic group and manifests itself in different families. The Hypnum variant is also not associated with certain phylogenetic lineages, but it provides an example of more profound specialization.

  10. University Students Leaving Relationships (USLR): Scale Development and Gender Differences in Decisions to Leave Romantic Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendy, Helen M.; Can, S. Hakan; Joseph, Lauren J.; Scherer, Cory R.

    2013-01-01

    The University Students Leaving Relationships scale was developed to identify student concerns when contemplating dissolution of romantic relationships. Participants included 1,106 students who rated the importance of issues when deciding to leave relationships. Factor analysis produced three dimensions: Missing the Relationship, Social…

  11. Decision to Leave Scale: Perceived Reasons to Stay in or Leave Violent Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendy, Helen M.; Eggen, Doreen; Gustitus, Cheryl; McLeod, Kelli C.; Ng, Phillip

    2003-01-01

    The 30-item Decision to Leave Scale (DLS) was developed with 631 college women and 420 college women and women in shelters. Seven DLS subscales emerged for concerns in deciding to stay or leave: Fear of Loneliness, Child Care Needs, Financial Problems, Social Embarrassment, Poor Social Support, Fear of Harm, Hopes Things Change. Mean internal…

  12. Uptake of perfluoroalkyl acids in the leaves of coniferous and deciduous broad-leaved trees.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huanhuan; Liu, Wei; He, Xin; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Qian

    2015-07-01

    Analytical methods for determining perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in leaves were developed to quantify a suite of analytes in both coniferous and deciduous broad-leaved trees. Sodium hydroxide-methanol and solid-phase extraction was selected as the extracting and cleanup strategy for PFAA analysis. Ten perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) and 4 perfluorosulfonic acids (PFSAs) were monitored in 7 kinds of leaves grown in the urban areas of Dalian, China. The results show that coniferous tree leaves take up more PFAAs than broad-leaved tree leaves, with the highest amount of 150 ng/g in pine needles. Leaf PFCA levels were much higher than PFSAs level. Short carbon-chain PFCAs with 3 to 6 perfluorinated carbons account for approximately 40% to 80% of the total leaf PFAAs, where uptake decreased with increasing carbon chain length. Temporal observation of leaf PFAAs revealed no significant variation of concentrations in the leaves over a weekly interval and the absence of significant seasonal change in pine needles and sophora. The present study provides some evidence for the accumulation of PFAAs in leaves, which is valuable for understanding their environmental behavior and the development of alternative bioindicator.

  13. Accumulation of calcium in the centre of leaves of coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) is due to an uncoupling of water and ion transport.

    PubMed

    Kerton, Matt; Newbury, H John; Hand, David; Pritchard, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the parameters regulating calcium ion distribution in leaves. Accumulation of ions in leaf tissue is in part dependent on import from the xylem. This import via the transpiration stream is more important for ions such as calcium that are xylem but not phloem mobile and cannot therefore be retranslocated. Accumulation of calcium was measured on bulk coriander leaf tissue (Coriandrum sativum L. cv. Lemon) using ion chromatography and calcium uptake was visualized using phosphor-images of (45)Ca(2+). Leaves of plants grown in hydroponics had elevated calcium in the centre of the leaf compared with the leaf margin, while K(+) was distributed homogeneously over the leaf. This calcium was shown to be localised to the mesophyll vacuoles using EDAX. Stomatal density and evapotranspiration (water loss per unit area of leaf) were equal at inner and outer sections of the leaf. Unequal ion distribution but uniformity of water loss suggested that there was a difference in the extent of uncoupling of calcium and water transport between the inner and outer leaf. Since isolated tissue from the inner and outer leaf were able to accumulate similar amounts of calcium, it is proposed that the spatial variation of leaf calcium concentration is due to differential ion delivery to the two regions rather than tissue/cell-specific differences in ion uptake capacity. There was a positive correlation between whole leaf calcium concentration and the difference in calcium concentration between inner and outer leaf tissue. Exposing the plants to increased humidity reduced transpiration and calcium delivery to the leaf and abolished this spatial variation of calcium concentration. Mechanisms of calcium delivery to leaves are discussed. An understanding of calcium delivery and distribution within coriander will inform strategies to reduce the incidence of calcium-related syndromes such as tip-burn and provides a robust model for the transport of ions and

  14. 5 CFR 630.208 - Reduction in leave credits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reduction in leave credits. 630.208 Section 630.208 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS ABSENCE AND LEAVE Definitions and General Provisions for Annual and Sick Leave § 630.208 Reduction in leave credits. (a) When the number of hours in a...

  15. 48 CFR 752.7031 - Leave and holidays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Leave and holidays. 752... Leave and holidays. For use in all USAID cost-reimbursement contracts for technical or professional services. Leave and Holidays (OCT 1989) (a) Vacation leave. (1) The Contractor may grant to its...

  16. 48 CFR 752.7031 - Leave and holidays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Leave and holidays. 752... Leave and holidays. For use in all USAID cost-reimbursement contracts for technical or professional services. Leave and Holidays (OCT 1989) (a) Vacation leave. (1) The Contractor may grant to its...

  17. 48 CFR 752.7031 - Leave and holidays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the endorsement of the Mission) approves one of the following as an alternative: (i) Taking, during... contract. The use of home leave authorized under this clause shall not constitute a break in service for... leave at the completion of their duties under this contract. (c) Home leave. (1) Home leave is...

  18. 38 CFR 21.342 - Leave accounting policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Leave accounting policy. 21.342 Section 21.342 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS.... Chapter 31 Leaves of Absence § 21.342 Leave accounting policy. (a) Amount of leave. A veteran pursuing...

  19. 38 CFR 21.342 - Leave accounting policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Leave accounting policy. 21.342 Section 21.342 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS.... Chapter 31 Leaves of Absence § 21.342 Leave accounting policy. (a) Amount of leave. A veteran pursuing...

  20. 38 CFR 21.8340 - Leaves of absence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Leaves of absence. 21... Vietnam Veterans-Spina Bifida and Covered Birth Defects Leaves of Absence § 21.8340 Leaves of absence. (a... absence. The VR&E case manager may grant the child leaves of absence for periods during which the...

  1. 29 CFR 825.200 - Amount of leave.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Employee Leave Entitlements Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.200 Amount of... a family and medical leave statute. The State may require a single......

  2. 29 CFR 825.120 - Leave for pregnancy or birth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.120 Leave for... of a child as follows: (1) Both the mother and father are entitled to FMLA leave for the......

  3. 29 CFR 825.200 - Amount of leave.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Employee Leave Entitlements Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.200 Amount of... the Act's leave requirements. (2) An exception to this required uniformity......

  4. 29 CFR 825.120 - Leave for pregnancy or birth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.120 Leave for... of a child as follows: (1) Both the mother and father are entitled to FMLA leave for the......

  5. 29 CFR 825.120 - Leave for pregnancy or birth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.120 Leave for... of a child as follows: (1) Both the mother and father are entitled to FMLA leave for the......

  6. 29 CFR 825.200 - Amount of leave.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Employee Leave Entitlements Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.200 Amount of... a family and medical leave statute. The State may require a single......

  7. 29 CFR 825.120 - Leave for pregnancy or birth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.120 Leave for... of a child as follows: (1) Both the mother and father are entitled to FMLA leave for the......

  8. 29 CFR 825.120 - Leave for pregnancy or birth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.120 Leave for... of a child as follows: (1) Both the mother and father are entitled to FMLA leave for the......

  9. 29 CFR 825.200 - Amount of leave.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Employee Leave Entitlements Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.200 Amount of... the Act's leave requirements. (2) An exception to this required uniformity......

  10. 29 CFR 825.200 - Amount of leave.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Employee Leave Entitlements Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.200 Amount of... a family and medical leave statute. The State may require a single......

  11. 38 CFR 21.342 - Leave accounting policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Leave accounting policy. 21.342 Section 21.342 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS.... Chapter 31 Leaves of Absence § 21.342 Leave accounting policy. (a) Amount of leave. A veteran pursuing...

  12. The geometry of unfolding tree leaves

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, H.; Kresling, B.; Vincent, J. F. V.

    1998-01-01

    Leaves of hornbeam (Carpinus betulus) and beech (Fagus sylvaticus) were modelled to a first approximation as plane surfaces, with straight parallel folds, using numerical methods. In both species the lateral veins, when the leaves are outstretched, are angled at 30 to 50 degrees from the centre vein. A higher angle allows the leaf to be folded more compactly within the bud, but it takes longer to expand. This may allow the plant to optimize the timing of leaf deployment with ecological and physiological conditions.

  13. Repellency of oils of lemon eucalyptus, geranium, and lavender and the mosquito repellent MyggA natural to Ixodes ricinus (Acari: Ixodidae) in the laboratory and field.

    PubMed

    Jaenson, Thomas G T; Garboui, Samira; Palsson, Katinka

    2006-07-01

    MyggA Natural (Bioglan, Lund, Sweden) is a commercially available repellent against blood-feeding arthropods. It contains 30% of lemon-scented eucalyptus, Corymbia citriodora (Hook.) K. D. Hill & L. A. S. Johnson (Myrtaceae), oil with a minimum of 50% p-menthane-3,8-diol. MyggA Natural also contains small amounts of the essential oils of lavender, Lavandula angustifolia Mill. (Lamiaceae), and geranium, Pelargonium graveolens L'Her. (Geraniaceae). In laboratory bioassays, MyggA Natural and C. citriodora oil exhibited 100% repellency against host-seeking nymphs of Ixodes ricinus (L.) (Acari: Ixodidae). Lavender oil and geranium oil, when diluted to 1% in 1,2-propanediol, had weak repellent activities on I. ricinus nymphs, but when diluted to 30% in 1,2-propanediol had 100% repellencies. 1,2-Propanediol (100%) had no significant repellent activity in comparison with that of the control. In field tests in tick-infested areas in central Sweden, tick repellency of MyggA Natural and C. citriodora oil was tested by the blanket-dragging technique for 4 d during a 6-d period. The repellencies (74 and 85%, respectively) on day 1 are similar (89%) to that of blankets treated in a similar manner with 19% diethyl-methyl-benzamide, based on previous work. Repellencies declined significantly from day 1 to day 6 (74 to 45% for MyggA Natural; 85 to 42% for C. citriodora oil). PMID:16892632

  14. The Comparative Effect of Carrot and Lemon Fiber as a Fat Replacer on Physico-chemical, Textural, and Organoleptic Quality of Low-fat Beef Hamburger.

    PubMed

    Soncu, Eda Demirok; Kolsarıcı, Nuray; Çiçek, Neslihan; Öztürk, Görsen Salman; Akoğlu, Ilker T; Arıcı, Yeliz Kaşko

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the usability of lemon fiber (LF-2%, 4%, 6%) and carrot fiber (CF-2%, 4%, 6%) to produce low-fat beef hamburgers. To that end, a certain amount of fat was replaced with each fiber. The proximate composition, pH value, cholesterol content, cooking characteristics, color, texture profile, and sensory properties of low-fat beef hamburgers were investigated. LF increased moisture content and cooking yield due to its better water binding properties, while CF caused higher fat and cholesterol contents owing to its higher fat absorption capacity (p<0.05). LF resulted in a lighter, redder, and more yellow color (p<0.05). Hardness, gumminess, springiness, and chewiness parameters decreased when the usage level of both fibers increased (p<0.05). However, more tender, gummy, springy, and smoother hamburgers were produced by the addition of CF in comparison with LF (p<0.05). Moreover, hamburgers including CF were rated with higher sensory scores (p<0.05). In conclusion, LF demonstrated better technological results in terms of cooking yield, shrinkage, moisture retention, and fat retention. However it is suggested that CF produces better low-fat hamburgers since up to 2% CF presented sensory and textural properties similar to those of regular hamburgers.

  15. Enrichment of neonicotinoid insecticides from lemon juice sample with magnetic three-dimensional graphene as the adsorbent followed by determination with high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Feng, Tao; Wang, Chun; Wu, Qiuhua; Wang, Zhi

    2014-06-01

    A novel 3D-graphene (3D-G) magnetic nanomaterial was prepared and used as an adsorbent for the extraction of four neonicotinoid insecticides (acetamiprid, imidacloprid, thiacloprid, and thiamethoxam) from lemon juice sample. Then, HPLC with UV detection was applied for the determination of the neonicotinoid insecticides desorbed from the 3D-G magnetic nanomaterial. The main experimental parameters that affect the extraction efficiencies such as the amount of 3D-G magnetic nanomaterial, sample solution pH, extraction time, salting-out effect, and desorption conditions were studied and optimized. As a result, the linear concentration range of the method was from 0.3 to 100.0 ng/mL for thiacloprid, from 0.5 to 100.0 ng/mL for imidacloprid and acetamiprid, and from 1.0 to 100.0 ng/mL for thiamethoxam, with correlation coefficients of 0.9965-0.9985, respectively. The LODs of the method based on an S/N of 3 were between 0.08 and 0.2 ng/mL. The enrichment factors obtained were between 67 and 427, and the RSDs (n = 6) were in the range from 4.6 to 7.1%, and the recoveries of the method fell in the range of 88.75 to 111.60%. PMID:24634391

  16. Oxidative stress and antioxidants at skin biosurface: a novel antioxidant from lemon oil capable of inhibiting oxidative damage to the skin.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, V; Scapagnini, G; Randazzo, S D; Randazzo, G; Catalano, C; Geraci, G; Morganti, P

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric pollutants are an important source of oxidative and nitrosative stress both to terrestrial plants and to animals. Skin, which has a highly differentiated and certainly complex organizational structure, is particularly vulnerable to free radical damage because of its contact with oxygen and with other environmental stimuli. Fruit and vegetables contain several classes of compounds that when ingested can potentially contribute to antioxidant defenses. In the present study we employed a novel gas chromatographic method to assess the antioxidant properties of a natural compound isolated from lemon oil, which we have called Lem1. We provide experimental evidence that Lem1 is endowed with a strong antioxidant activity and that it is capable of inhibiting free radical-mediated reactions, as evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The present study extends our previous findings and demonstrates that topical application of Lem1 in healthy volunteers significantly increases the antioxidative potential of skin biosurface, thus highlighting the effectiveness of a natural antioxidant biotechnology in the antiaging management of skin.

  17. Effects of fibre type and kefir, wine lemon, and pineapple marinades on texture and sensory properties of wild boar and deer longissimus muscle.

    PubMed

    Żochowska-Kujawska, J; Lachowicz, K; Sobczak, M

    2012-12-01

    Fibre type percentage and changes in textural parameters, sensory properties as well as mean fibre cross sectional area (CSA), fibre shape, endomysium and perimysium thickness of wild boar and deer longissimus (L) muscle subjected to ageing with kefir, dry red wine, lemon and pineapple juice marinades for 4 days were studied. Among the non-marinated and non-aged samples of muscles it was found that wild boar meat with its higher percentage of red fibres, higher CSA, thicker connective tissue as compared with deer meat, was harder, more springy and stringy. Muscles ageing, regardless of methods, resulted in a decrease in both the CSA and thickness of the connective tissue, and improve in fibre shape. As a consequence ageing caused a reduction in hardness, cohesiveness, springiness, and stringiness as well as in augmentation of tenderness, juiciness and general attractiveness of the muscles studied. As demonstrated by obtained data, regardless of ageing methods, deer L muscle contained more white fibres compared to wild boar muscle, were more susceptible to tenderization. The highest structural and textural changes, but the worst general attractiveness was found in muscles marinated with pineapple juice addition. Insignificantly lower changes in both quality traits were found in muscles aged with kefir marinade which at the same time were characterized by the high tenderness, the highest juiciness and general attractiveness.

  18. The Comparative Effect of Carrot and Lemon Fiber as a Fat Replacer on Physico-chemical, Textural, and Organoleptic Quality of Low-fat Beef Hamburger

    PubMed Central

    Soncu, Eda Demirok; Kolsarıcı, Nuray; Çiçek, Neslihan; Öztürk, Görsen Salman; Akoğlu, ilker T.; Arıcı, Yeliz Kaşko

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the usability of lemon fiber (LF-2%, 4%, 6%) and carrot fiber (CF-2%, 4%, 6%) to produce low-fat beef hamburgers. To that end, a certain amount of fat was replaced with each fiber. The proximate composition, pH value, cholesterol content, cooking characteristics, color, texture profile, and sensory properties of low-fat beef hamburgers were investigated. LF increased moisture content and cooking yield due to its better water binding properties, while CF caused higher fat and cholesterol contents owing to its higher fat absorption capacity (p<0.05). LF resulted in a lighter, redder, and more yellow color (p<0.05). Hardness, gumminess, springiness, and chewiness parameters decreased when the usage level of both fibers increased (p<0.05). However, more tender, gummy, springy, and smoother hamburgers were produced by the addition of CF in comparison with LF (p<0.05). Moreover, hamburgers including CF were rated with higher sensory scores (p<0.05). In conclusion, LF demonstrated better technological results in terms of cooking yield, shrinkage, moisture retention, and fat retention. However it is suggested that CF produces better low-fat hamburgers since up to 2% CF presented sensory and textural properties similar to those of regular hamburgers. PMID:26761851

  19. Three decades of longlining in Bimini, Bahamas, reveals long-term trends in lemon shark Negaprion brevirostris (Carcharhinidae) catch per unit effort.

    PubMed

    Kessel, S T; Hansell, A C; Gruber, S H; Guttridge, T L; Hussey, N E; Perkins, R G

    2016-06-01

    In Bimini, Bahamas, the consistent employment of longlines, beginning in 1982, provided a rare opportunity to explore population trends for large resident sharks. This study assessed three shallow water longline survey periods at this location; 1982-1989, 1992-2002 and 2003-2014, with the aim of determining trends in annual catch per unit effort (CPUE) for an IUCN listed near-threatened species, the lemon shark Negaprion brevirostris. A general additive model (GAM) was used to analyse the non-linear annual CPUE values over the entire 32-year research period. The GAM displayed high variability of annual CPUE, with a peak value of 0·026 N. brevirostris per hook day (hooks day(-1) ) in 2000. The temporal pattern of CPUE indicated an abundance trend with a complete cycle, from trough to trough, occurring over a period of approximately 18 years. The 1982-1989 survey period saw the highest proportion of mature individuals (19·8%) and the smallest average pre-caudal length (LPC ; 124·8 cm). The 1992-2002 survey period had the highest average annual CPUE (0·018 hooks day(-1) ), while the 2003-2014 research period saw largest average LPC size (134·8 cm) and the lowest average CPUE values (0·009 hooks day(-1) ) of the entire research period. The long-term trend identified in this study provides a baseline for future assessment. PMID:27245624

  20. Three decades of longlining in Bimini, Bahamas, reveals long-term trends in lemon shark Negaprion brevirostris (Carcharhinidae) catch per unit effort.

    PubMed

    Kessel, S T; Hansell, A C; Gruber, S H; Guttridge, T L; Hussey, N E; Perkins, R G

    2016-06-01

    In Bimini, Bahamas, the consistent employment of longlines, beginning in 1982, provided a rare opportunity to explore population trends for large resident sharks. This study assessed three shallow water longline survey periods at this location; 1982-1989, 1992-2002 and 2003-2014, with the aim of determining trends in annual catch per unit effort (CPUE) for an IUCN listed near-threatened species, the lemon shark Negaprion brevirostris. A general additive model (GAM) was used to analyse the non-linear annual CPUE values over the entire 32-year research period. The GAM displayed high variability of annual CPUE, with a peak value of 0·026 N. brevirostris per hook day (hooks day(-1) ) in 2000. The temporal pattern of CPUE indicated an abundance trend with a complete cycle, from trough to trough, occurring over a period of approximately 18 years. The 1982-1989 survey period saw the highest proportion of mature individuals (19·8%) and the smallest average pre-caudal length (LPC ; 124·8 cm). The 1992-2002 survey period had the highest average annual CPUE (0·018 hooks day(-1) ), while the 2003-2014 research period saw largest average LPC size (134·8 cm) and the lowest average CPUE values (0·009 hooks day(-1) ) of the entire research period. The long-term trend identified in this study provides a baseline for future assessment.

  1. Regulation of urinary crystal inhibiting proteins and inflammatory genes by lemon peel extract and formulated citrus bioflavonoids on ethylene glycol induced urolithic rats.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Badrinathan; Mehra, Yogita; Ganesh, Rajesh Nachiappa; Viswanathan, Pragasam

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study is to check the regulation of crystal matrix proteins and inflammatory mediators by citrus bioflavonoids (CB) and Lemon peel (LP) extract in hyperoxaluric rats. The animals were divided into six groups with 6 animals each. Group 1: Control, Group 2: Urolithic (Ethylene glycol (EG)-0.75%); Group 3 & 5: Preventive study (EG + CB (20 mg/kg body weight) and LP (100 mg/kg body weight) extract administration from 0th-7th week) respectively; Group 4 & 6: Curative study (EG + CB and LP extract administration from 4th-7th week) respectively by oral administration. Urinary lithogenic factors (Calcium, oxalate, phosphate and citrate) were normalized in CB & LP supplemented rats, while serum parameters revealed the nephroprotective nature of the intervening agents compared to urolithic rats (p < 0.001). Immunoblotting studies showed significantly increased expression of THP, osteopontin and transferrin in kidneys of urolithic rats (p < 0.001), while preventive and curative study showed near normal expression of these proteins. Expression of NF-κB, TNF-α and IL-6 were raised significantly (p < 0.001), while a very minimal increase in MCP-1 expression was observed in urolithic rats compared to control. Hence, supplementation of CB and LP reduced the crystal promoting factors and provides protection from crystal induced renal damage.

  2. Confined direct analysis in real time ion source and its applications in analysis of volatile organic compounds of Citrus limon (lemon) and Allium cepa (onion).

    PubMed

    Li, Yue

    2012-05-30

    The DART (direct analysis in real time) ion source is a novel atmospheric pressure ionization technique that enables efficient ionization of gases, liquids and solids with high throughput. A major limit to its wider application in the analysis of gases is its poor detection sensitivity caused by open-air sampling. In this study, a confined interface between the DART ion source outlet and mass spectrometer sampling orifice was developed, where the plasma generated by the atmospheric pressure glow discharge collides and ionizes gas-phase molecules in a Tee-shaped flow tube instead of in open air. It leads to significant increase of collision reaction probability between high energy metastable molecules and analytes. The experimental results show that the ionization efficiency was increased at least by two orders of magnitude. This technique was then applied in the real time analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of Citrus Limon (lemon) and wounded Allium Cepa (onion). The confined DART ion source was proved to be a powerful tool for the studies of plant metabolomics.

  3. Morphostructural Damage in Food-Spoiling Bacteria due to the Lemon Grass Oil and Its Vapour: SEM, TEM, and AFM Investigations.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Amit Kumar; Malik, Anushree

    2012-01-01

    In this study, antimicrobial activity and morphostructural damages due to lemon grass oil (LGO) and its vapour (LGOV) against Escherichia coli strains were investigated. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of LGO were determined by broth-dilution method to be 0.288 mg/mL and 0.567 mg/mL, respectively. Furthermore, the zone of inhibition (45 mm) due to the vapour phase antimicrobial efficacy evaluated using disc volatilization assay was compared with that using disc diffusion assay (i.e., 13.5 mm for the same dose of oil). The morphological and ultrastructural alterations in LGO- and LGOV-treated E. coli cells were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic-force microscopy (AFM). In SEM observation, LGO-treated cells appeared to be aggregated and partially deformed, while LGOV-treated cells lost their turgidity, and the cytoplasmic material completely leaked from the cells. In TEM observation, extensive intracytoplasmic changes and various abnormalities were observed in LGOV-treated cells more than LGO-treated cells. Significant variations in the height and root mean square values of untreated, LGO-, and LGOV-treated E. coli cells were noticed by AFM. Present results indicate that LGO is highly effective against E. coli in vapour phase.

  4. Enrichment of neonicotinoid insecticides from lemon juice sample with magnetic three-dimensional graphene as the adsorbent followed by determination with high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Feng, Tao; Wang, Chun; Wu, Qiuhua; Wang, Zhi

    2014-06-01

    A novel 3D-graphene (3D-G) magnetic nanomaterial was prepared and used as an adsorbent for the extraction of four neonicotinoid insecticides (acetamiprid, imidacloprid, thiacloprid, and thiamethoxam) from lemon juice sample. Then, HPLC with UV detection was applied for the determination of the neonicotinoid insecticides desorbed from the 3D-G magnetic nanomaterial. The main experimental parameters that affect the extraction efficiencies such as the amount of 3D-G magnetic nanomaterial, sample solution pH, extraction time, salting-out effect, and desorption conditions were studied and optimized. As a result, the linear concentration range of the method was from 0.3 to 100.0 ng/mL for thiacloprid, from 0.5 to 100.0 ng/mL for imidacloprid and acetamiprid, and from 1.0 to 100.0 ng/mL for thiamethoxam, with correlation coefficients of 0.9965-0.9985, respectively. The LODs of the method based on an S/N of 3 were between 0.08 and 0.2 ng/mL. The enrichment factors obtained were between 67 and 427, and the RSDs (n = 6) were in the range from 4.6 to 7.1%, and the recoveries of the method fell in the range of 88.75 to 111.60%.

  5. Mary Glover Lecture 2004: leaving a legacy.

    PubMed

    Reimer, Marlene

    2005-09-01

    Mary Glover was a Head Nurse at St. Paul's Hospital in Vancouver. She was killed in a plane crash more than 25 years ago. Yet, through this neuroscience nurse's passion for her specialty, we share in her legacy through the annual Mary Glover Lecture, which was established by her parents after her death. The first Mary Glover Lecturer was Pamela Mitchell, a well-known neuroscience nurse from the School of Nursing at the University of Washington. She is leaving a multifaceted legacy through her research on intracranial pressure and quality of care as well as her books and her mentorship. Jessie Young has left a legacy as the founder and first president of the Canadian Association of Neuroscience Nurses (CANN). CANN is leaving a legacy with many firsts among Canadian nursing specialty organizations. Leaving a legacy is not just about donating money or writing a famous book. For most of us, our legacy comes in the little everyday things of life. Ask yourself, what is the legacy that you are leaving as a neuroscience nurse and as an individual?

  6. Sun and Shade Leaves: Some Field Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomley, David

    1983-01-01

    Several simple experiments illustrating how the light regime affects the final form of dog's mercury (Mercurialis perennis) are provided. These experiments, which can also be done with other plants, focus on differences in the anatomy, morphology, and physiology of sun and shade leaves. (JN)

  7. Practical Approaches for Teaching Leave No Trace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attarian, Aram

    As participation in outdoor recreation grows, natural resources suffer a variety of environmental and social impacts. A minimum-impact back country educational program first developed during the 1970s, Leave No Trace (LNT), has been revitalized by the National Outdoor Leadership School, six federal agencies, and members of the outdoor products…

  8. Diterpenoids from Leaves of Rubus chingii.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jicheng; Huang, Yingzheng; Cui, Hangqing; Peng, Caiying; Liu, Jianqun; Huang, Huilian

    2016-03-01

    The leaves of Rubus chingii were examined for their phytochemical composition and anti-yeast activity. In the process, seven diterpenoids (compounds 1-7), including a new natural compound (14β, 16-epoxy-7-pimarene-3α, 15β-diol, 1), were isolated and elucidated. Compound 1 exhibited moderate anti-Candida activity.

  9. Leave no trace in the outdoors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marion, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    The essential guide for enjoying the outdoors without harming the environment. - Details the seven core principles of Leave No Trace ethics and practices - Covers hiking, campfires, food storage, and personal hygiene - Endorsed by the USDI National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management, Fish & Wildlife Service, U.S. Geological Survey, and the USDA Forest Service

  10. Sabbatical Leave: Who Gains and How Much?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Oranit B.; Eden, Dov; Westman, Mina; Cohen-Charash, Yochi; Hammer, Leslie B.; Kluger, Avraham N.; Krausz, Moshe; Maslach, Christina; O'Driscoll, Michael; Perrewe, Pamela L.; Quick, James Campbell; Rosenblatt, Zehava; Spector, Paul E.

    2010-01-01

    A rigorous quasi-experiment tested the ameliorative effects of a sabbatical leave, a special case of respite from routine work. We hypothesized that (a) respite increases resource level and well-being and (b) individual differences and respite features moderate respite effects. A sample of 129 faculty members on sabbatical and 129 matched controls…

  11. The Biology of Ageing in Leaves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, John; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes laboratory procedures for observing the progressive change deciduous leaves undergo prior to abscission. Outlines the starch test, sugar test, extraction and chromatography of pigments, and experimental results. States that obtained results enable the events of leaf senescence to be correlated with the carbohydrate economy of a tree in…

  12. Diterpenoids from Leaves of Rubus chingii.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jicheng; Huang, Yingzheng; Cui, Hangqing; Peng, Caiying; Liu, Jianqun; Huang, Huilian

    2016-03-01

    The leaves of Rubus chingii were examined for their phytochemical composition and anti-yeast activity. In the process, seven diterpenoids (compounds 1-7), including a new natural compound (14β, 16-epoxy-7-pimarene-3α, 15β-diol, 1), were isolated and elucidated. Compound 1 exhibited moderate anti-Candida activity. PMID:27169185

  13. Limonoids from the leaves of Cipadessa baccifera.

    PubMed

    Ning, Jing; Di, Ying-Tong; Fang, Xin; He, Hong-Pin; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Yan; Li, Shun-Lin; Hao, Xiao-Jiang

    2010-08-27

    Eight new limonoids with four different structural frameworks, including gedunin (1, 2), havanensin (3, 4), mexicanolide (5, 6), and methyl angolensate types (7, 8), together with six known limonoids, were isolated from the leaves of Cipadessa baccifera. Compounds 2 and 5 exhibited moderate cytotoxicity against the HL-60 cell line with an IC(50) value of 20 microM. PMID:20666364

  14. Industry Work Experience Leave for Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Don R.

    Working leaves for faculty in two-year diploma programs provide colleges with more experienced and current faculty, provide industry with new employees or consultants with fresh ideas, and present faculty with opportunities to use up-to-date technologies and methodologies and share those experiences with students. At the University College of the…

  15. Ecojustice in Science Education: Leaving the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    Eduardo Dopico and Eva Garcia-Vazquez's article enriched the ecojustice literature with an interesting metaphor of leaving the classroom, which I argue for here. Glasson and Boggs help to highlight the challenges and fortitude of working ecojustice perspectives in science education and the ways that a dialogical conversation addresses the world at…

  16. Ladybugs and Lettuce Leaves. Teachers' Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Tracy; And Others

    This is a guide for use with "Ladybugs and Lettuce Leaves" activity cards which are activities for elementary school students (grades 4 to 6) focusing on gardening. It includes educational objectives for each topic as well as lists of vocabulary words, comments, questions for discussion, additional activities, and resources. An interdisciplinary…

  17. Investigations on heat resistance of spinach leaves.

    PubMed

    Santarius, K A; Müller, M

    1979-10-01

    Exposure of spinach plants to high temperature (35° C) increased the heat resistance of the leaves by about 3° C. This hardening process occurred within 4 to 6 h, whereas dehardening at 20°/15° C required 1 to 2 days. At 5° C dehardening did not take place. Hardening and dehardening occurred in both the dark and the light. The hardiness was tested by exposure of the leaves to heat stress and subsequent measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence induction and light-induced absorbance changes at 535 nm on the leaves and of the photosynthetic electron transport in thylakoids isolated after heat treatment. Heat-induced damage to both heat-hardened and non-hardened leaves seemed to consist primarily in a breakdown of the membrane potential of the thylakoids accompanied by partial inactivation of electron transport through photosystem II. The increase in heat resistance was not due to temperature-induced changes in lipid content and fatty acid composition of the thylakoids, and no conspicuous changes in the polypeptide composition of the membranes were observed. Prolonged heat treatment at 35° C up to 3 days significantly decreased the total lipid content and the degree of unsaturation of the fatty acids of membrane lipids without further increase in the thermostability of the leaves. Intact chloroplasts isolated from heat-hardened leaves retained increased heat resistance. When the stroma of the chloroplasts was removed, the thermostability of the thylakoids was decreased and was comparable to the heat resistance of chloroplast membranes obtained from non-hardened control plants. Compartmentation studies demonstrated that the content of soluble sugars within the chloroplasts and the whole leaf tissue decreased as heat hardiness increased. This indicated that in spinach leaves, sugars play no protective role in heat hardiness. The results suggest that changes in the ultrastructure of thylakoids in connection with a stabilizing effect of soluble non-sugar stroma

  18. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection by aqueous extracts of Prunella vulgaris L

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mint family produces many metabolites with medicinal properties. Several species are reported to have antiviral activity, including lemon balm, peppermint, hyssop, basil, sage and self-heal. To further characterize the anti-lentiviral activity of self-heal (Prunella vulgaris), we tested water an...

  19. Phenolic profiles of cultivated, in vitro cultured and commercial samples of Melissa officinalis L. infusions.

    PubMed

    Barros, Lillian; Dueñas, Montserrat; Dias, Maria Inês; Sousa, Maria João; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2013-01-01

    Melissa officinalis L. (lemon balm) is normally consumed as an infusion and presents therapeutic properties, such as sedative, carminative and antispasmodic, also being included in some pharmaceutical preparations. The phenolic profiles of different samples of lemon balm, prepared as infusions, were evaluated by HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS. The profiles were compared in order to understand the differences between cultivated, in vitro cultured and commercial (bags and granulated) samples. All the samples showed a similar phenolic profile, presenting differences only in the quantities found of each compound. Rosmarinic acid was the most abundant compound, being higher in commercial samples, especially in tea bag sample (55.68mg/g of infusion) and lower in in vitro cultured sample (15.46mg/g). Moreover, dimers, trimers and tetramers of caffeic acid were identified and quantified for the first time in lemon balm. Only one flavonoid, luteolin-3'-O-glucuronide was found in all the samples, ranging from 8.43mg/g in commercial granulate sample to 1.22mg/g in in vitro cultured sample. Overall, cultivated and in vitro cultured samples presented the lowest amounts of phenolic compounds (59.59 and 30.21mg/g, respectively); otherwise, commercial samples showed the highest contents (109.24mg/g for tea bag and 101.03mg/g for granulate sample). The present study shows that infusion of lemon balm can be a source of phenolic compounds, known for their bioactive effects. PMID:23017385

  20. Rosmarinic Acid and Melissa officinalis Extracts Differently Affect Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramanauskiene, Kristina; Raudonis, Raimondas

    2016-01-01

    Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) has many biological effects but especially important is its neuroprotective activity. The aim of the study is to produce different extracts of Melissa officinalis and analyse their chemical composition and biological properties on rat glioblastoma C6 cells. Results revealed that rosmarinic acid (RA) is the predominant compound of lemon balm extracts. RA has cytotoxic effect on glioblastoma cells (LC50 290.5 μM after the incubation of 24 h and LC50 171.3 μM after 48 h). RA at concentration 80–130 μM suppresses the cell proliferation and has an antioxidant effect. 200 μM and higher concentrations of RA have a prooxidant effect and initiate cell death through necrosis. The aqueous extract of lemon balm is also enriched in phenolic compounds: protocatechuic, caftaric, caffeic, ferulic, and cichoric acids and flavonoid luteolin-7-glucoside. This extract at concentrations 50 μM–200 μM RA has cytotoxic activity and initiates cell death through apoptosis. Extracts prepared with 70% ethanol contain the biggest amount of active compounds. These extracts have the highest cytotoxic activity on glioblastoma cells. They initiate generation of intracellular ROS and cell death through apoptosis and necrosis. Our data suggest that differently prepared lemon balm extracts differently affect glioblastoma cells and can be used as neuroprotective agents in several therapeutic strategies.

  1. Rosmarinic Acid and Melissa officinalis Extracts Differently Affect Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramanauskiene, Kristina; Raudonis, Raimondas

    2016-01-01

    Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) has many biological effects but especially important is its neuroprotective activity. The aim of the study is to produce different extracts of Melissa officinalis and analyse their chemical composition and biological properties on rat glioblastoma C6 cells. Results revealed that rosmarinic acid (RA) is the predominant compound of lemon balm extracts. RA has cytotoxic effect on glioblastoma cells (LC50 290.5 μM after the incubation of 24 h and LC50 171.3 μM after 48 h). RA at concentration 80–130 μM suppresses the cell proliferation and has an antioxidant effect. 200 μM and higher concentrations of RA have a prooxidant effect and initiate cell death through necrosis. The aqueous extract of lemon balm is also enriched in phenolic compounds: protocatechuic, caftaric, caffeic, ferulic, and cichoric acids and flavonoid luteolin-7-glucoside. This extract at concentrations 50 μM–200 μM RA has cytotoxic activity and initiates cell death through apoptosis. Extracts prepared with 70% ethanol contain the biggest amount of active compounds. These extracts have the highest cytotoxic activity on glioblastoma cells. They initiate generation of intracellular ROS and cell death through apoptosis and necrosis. Our data suggest that differently prepared lemon balm extracts differently affect glioblastoma cells and can be used as neuroprotective agents in several therapeutic strategies. PMID:27688825

  2. Stand establishment and yield potential of organically grown seeded and transplanted medicinal herbs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field studies were conducted at Las Cruces, N.M., and Alcalde, N.M., to compare direct seeding to transplanting for stand establishment and yield estimates of calendula (Calendula officinalis L.), catnip (Nepeta cataria L.), lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.), stinging nettles (Urtica dioica L.), a...

  3. Phenolic profiles of cultivated, in vitro cultured and commercial samples of Melissa officinalis L. infusions.

    PubMed

    Barros, Lillian; Dueñas, Montserrat; Dias, Maria Inês; Sousa, Maria João; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2013-01-01

    Melissa officinalis L. (lemon balm) is normally consumed as an infusion and presents therapeutic properties, such as sedative, carminative and antispasmodic, also being included in some pharmaceutical preparations. The phenolic profiles of different samples of lemon balm, prepared as infusions, were evaluated by HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS. The profiles were compared in order to understand the differences between cultivated, in vitro cultured and commercial (bags and granulated) samples. All the samples showed a similar phenolic profile, presenting differences only in the quantities found of each compound. Rosmarinic acid was the most abundant compound, being higher in commercial samples, especially in tea bag sample (55.68mg/g of infusion) and lower in in vitro cultured sample (15.46mg/g). Moreover, dimers, trimers and tetramers of caffeic acid were identified and quantified for the first time in lemon balm. Only one flavonoid, luteolin-3'-O-glucuronide was found in all the samples, ranging from 8.43mg/g in commercial granulate sample to 1.22mg/g in in vitro cultured sample. Overall, cultivated and in vitro cultured samples presented the lowest amounts of phenolic compounds (59.59 and 30.21mg/g, respectively); otherwise, commercial samples showed the highest contents (109.24mg/g for tea bag and 101.03mg/g for granulate sample). The present study shows that infusion of lemon balm can be a source of phenolic compounds, known for their bioactive effects.

  4. Green leaves are the stuff of life.

    PubMed

    1993-01-01

    Children, pregnant women, nursing mothers, and the elderly need to eat dark green leafy vegetables. These vegetables provide vitamin A which prevents night blindness and increases resistance to illness. The vitamin is also transferred to babies in breast milk; so mothers, in particular, need to consume these vegetables. Vitamin A is also contained in squash, sweet potatoes, carrots, mangoes, milk, eggs, and liver. Iron, which prevents tiredness and weakness, is found in meat, peas, beans, spinach, cassava leaves, and pumpkin leaves. Folic acid, which is necessary for healthy blood, is also found in dark green leafy vegetables. Pregnant women and the elderly especially need it. Protein is needed by all. Children need it for growth. Sources include meat, fish, eggs, milk, and cheese. However, protein is also found in dark green leafy vegetables, which can be grown or foraged, when the aforementioned sources are in short supply. Cultivated vegetable sources of protein include spinach, leeks, and the leaves of okra, cassava, papaya, hot peppers, beets, taro, and sweet potatoes. Wild vegetable sources are also available; however, care must be taken concerning plants that are poisonous or bitter. Some may require special preparation before eating. Vitamins and minerals escape with cooking, so a lid should be used and the time allotted should be as short as possible. Cooking water may be used for stew or soup, except when the leaves are poisonous before they are cooked (An example of this is cassava.). Children should begin eating these vegetables as soon as they stop breastfeeding. The vegetables can be mashed, ground, sieved or pureed in order for the children to eat them.

  5. Texture and wettability of metallic lotus leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankiewicz, C.; Attinger, D.

    2016-02-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces with the self-cleaning behavior of lotus leaves are sought for drag reduction and phase change heat transfer applications. These superrepellent surfaces have traditionally been fabricated by random or deterministic texturing of a hydrophobic material. Recently, superrepellent surfaces have also been made from hydrophilic materials, by deterministic texturing using photolithography, without low-surface energy coating. Here, we show that hydrophilic materials can also be made superrepellent to water by chemical texturing, a stochastic rather than deterministic process. These metallic surfaces are the first analog of lotus leaves, in terms of wettability, texture and repellency. A mechanistic model is also proposed to describe the influence of multiple tiers of roughness on wettability and repellency. This demonstrated ability to make hydrophilic materials superrepellent without deterministic structuring or additional coatings opens the way to large scale and robust manufacturing of superrepellent surfaces.Superhydrophobic surfaces with the self-cleaning behavior of lotus leaves are sought for drag reduction and phase change heat transfer applications. These superrepellent surfaces have traditionally been fabricated by random or deterministic texturing of a hydrophobic material. Recently, superrepellent surfaces have also been made from hydrophilic materials, by deterministic texturing using photolithography, without low-surface energy coating. Here, we show that hydrophilic materials can also be made superrepellent to water by chemical texturing, a stochastic rather than deterministic process. These metallic surfaces are the first analog of lotus leaves, in terms of wettability, texture and repellency. A mechanistic model is also proposed to describe the influence of multiple tiers of roughness on wettability and repellency. This demonstrated ability to make hydrophilic materials superrepellent without deterministic structuring or additional

  6. Morphology of leaves cuticle by fringe projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Amalia; Rayas Alvarez, J. A.; Cordero, Raúl; Balieiro R., Daniela

    2011-10-01

    The development of this work is important in the morphological study of plant parts, specifically in the study of the cuticle of fruits or leaves. The implemented optical technique for fringe projection can identify potential fracture zones which damage the presentation of the fruits impacting business as well as producing them. Specifically, we obtained information on the thickness of a cuticle corresponding to the abaxial surface of a leaf of apple (Malus domestica) of the variety Golden Delicious.

  7. Molecular characterization of Citrus tatter leaf virus historically associated with Meyer lemon trees: complete genome sequence and development of biologically active in vitro transcripts.

    PubMed

    Tatineni, Satyanarayana; Afunian, Mohammad R; Hilf, Mark E; Gowda, Siddarame; Dawson, William O; Garnsey, Stephen M

    2009-04-01

    Citrus tatter leaf virus isolated from Meyer lemon trees (CTLV-ML) from California and Florida induces bud union incompatibility of citrus trees grafted on the widely used trifoliate and trifoliate hybrid rootstocks. The complete genome sequence of CTLV-ML was determined to be 6,495 nucleotides (nts), with two overlapping open reading frames (ORFs) and a poly (A) tail at the 3' end. The genome organization is similar to other capilloviruses, with ORF1 (nts 37 to 6,354) encoding a putative 242-kDa polyprotein which contains replication-associated domains plus a coat protein (CP), and ORF2 (nts 4,788 to 5,750), which is located within ORF1 in a different reading frame and encodes a putative movement protein. Although the proteins encoded by CTLV-ML possesses 84 to 96% amino acid sequence identity with strains of Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV), we observed two strikingly different regions in ORF1: variable region I (amino acids 532 to 570) and variable region II (amino acids 1,583 to 1,868), with only 15 to 18 and 56 to 62% identities, respectively, with the corresponding regions of ASGV strains. Conditions for a herbaceous systemic assay host were optimized in which the wild-type virus induced systemic infection in Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Light Red Kidney (LRK) bean plants at 19 or 22 degrees C but not at higher temperatures. In vitro transcripts generated from full-length cDNA clones induced systemic symptoms on LRK bean plants similar to that of the wild-type virus. Replication of the recombinant virus was confirmed by hybridization of a 5' positive-stranded RNA-specific probe to a genome-sized RNA and by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction.

  8. Melissa officinalis oil affects infectivity of enveloped herpesviruses.

    PubMed

    Schnitzler, P; Schuhmacher, A; Astani, A; Reichling, Jürgen

    2008-09-01

    Extracts and essential oils of medicinal plants are increasingly of interest as novel drugs of antimicrobial and antiviral agents, since herpes simplex virus (HSV) might develop resistance to commonly used antiviral agents. Melissa officinalis essential oil was phytochemically examined by GC-MS analysis, its main constituents were identified as monoterpenaldehydes citral a, citral b and citronellal. The antiviral effect of lemon balm oil, the essential oil of Melissa officinalis, on herpes simplex virus was examined. The inhibitory activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) was tested in vitro on monkey kidney cells using a plaque reduction assay. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of balm oil for herpes simplex virus plaque formation was determined at high dilutions of 0.0004% and 0.00008% for HSV-1 and HSV-2, respectively. At noncytotoxic concentrations of the oil,plaque formation was significantly reduced by 98.8% for HSV-1 and 97.2% for HSV-2, higher concentrations of lemon balm oil abolished viral infectivity nearly completely. In order to determine the mode of antiviral action of this essential oil, time-on-addition assays were performed. Both herpesviruses were significantly inhibited by pretreatment with balm oil prior to infection of cells. These results indicate that Melissa oil affected the virus before adsorption, but not after penetration into the host cell, thus lemon balm oil is capable of exerting a direct antiviral effect on herpesviruses. Considering the lipophilic nature of lemon balm essential oil, which enables it to penetrate the skin, and a high selectivity index, Melissa officinalis oil might be suitable for topical treatment of herpetic infections. PMID:18693101

  9. Melissa officinalis oil affects infectivity of enveloped herpesviruses.

    PubMed

    Schnitzler, P; Schuhmacher, A; Astani, A; Reichling, Jürgen

    2008-09-01

    Extracts and essential oils of medicinal plants are increasingly of interest as novel drugs of antimicrobial and antiviral agents, since herpes simplex virus (HSV) might develop resistance to commonly used antiviral agents. Melissa officinalis essential oil was phytochemically examined by GC-MS analysis, its main constituents were identified as monoterpenaldehydes citral a, citral b and citronellal. The antiviral effect of lemon balm oil, the essential oil of Melissa officinalis, on herpes simplex virus was examined. The inhibitory activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) was tested in vitro on monkey kidney cells using a plaque reduction assay. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of balm oil for herpes simplex virus plaque formation was determined at high dilutions of 0.0004% and 0.00008% for HSV-1 and HSV-2, respectively. At noncytotoxic concentrations of the oil,plaque formation was significantly reduced by 98.8% for HSV-1 and 97.2% for HSV-2, higher concentrations of lemon balm oil abolished viral infectivity nearly completely. In order to determine the mode of antiviral action of this essential oil, time-on-addition assays were performed. Both herpesviruses were significantly inhibited by pretreatment with balm oil prior to infection of cells. These results indicate that Melissa oil affected the virus before adsorption, but not after penetration into the host cell, thus lemon balm oil is capable of exerting a direct antiviral effect on herpesviruses. Considering the lipophilic nature of lemon balm essential oil, which enables it to penetrate the skin, and a high selectivity index, Melissa officinalis oil might be suitable for topical treatment of herpetic infections.

  10. Rehydration characteristics of dehydrated West African pepper (Piper guineense) leaves.

    PubMed

    Okpala, Laura C; Ekechi, Constance A

    2014-11-01

    The rehydration characteristics of dehydrated West African pepper leaves were investigated at hydration temperatures of 28, 60, 70, and 80°C. Four treatments were given to the leaves: blanched and sun dried, unblanched and sun dried, blanched and shade dried, and unblanched and shade dried. The hydration process of the dehydrated leaves was adequately described by the Peleg's equation. As the hydration temperature increased from 28 to 70°C, there was a significant decrease in the Peleg's constant K 1, while for most of the leaves the Peleg's constant K 2 varied with temperature. Rehydration ratio values ranged from 3.75 in blanched shade dried leaves to 4.26 in unblanched sun dried leaves with the unblanched leaves generally exhibiting higher ratios than the blanched leaves.

  11. A workflow for multiclass determination of 256 pesticides in essential oils by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using evaporation and dilution approaches: Application to lavandin, lemon and cypress essential oils.

    PubMed

    Fillatre, Yoann; Rondeau, David; Daguin, Antoine; Communal, Pierre-Yves

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the determination of 256 multiclass pesticides in cypress and lemon essential oils (EOs) by the way of liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI/MS/MS) analysis using the scheduled selected reaction monitoring mode (sSRM) available on a hybrid quadrupole linear ion trap (QLIT) mass spectrometer. The performance of a sample preparation of lemon and cypress EOs based on dilution or evaporation under nitrogen assisted by a controlled heating were assessed. The best limits of quantification (LOQs) were achieved with the evaporation under nitrogen method giving LOQs≤10µgL(-1) for 91% of the pesticides. In addition the very satisfactory results obtained for recovery, repeatability and linearity showed that for EOs of relatively low evaporation temperature, a sample preparation based on evaporation under nitrogen is well adapted and preferable to dilution. By compiling these results with those previously published by some of us on lavandin EO, we proposed a workflow dedicated to multiresidue determination of pesticides in various EOs by LC-ESI/sSRM. Among the steps involved in this workflow, the protocol related to mass spectrometry proposes an alternative confirmation method to the classical SRM ratio criteria based on a sSRM survey scan followed by an information-dependent acquisition using the sensitive enhanced product ion (EPI) scan to generate MS/MS spectra then compared to a reference. The submitted workflow was applied to the case of lemon EOs samples highlighting for the first time the simultaneous detection of 20 multiclass pesticides in one EO. Some pesticides showed very high concentration levels with amounts greatly exceeding the mgL(-1).

  12. Lemon (Citrus limon, Burm.f.) essential oil enhances the trans-epidermal release of lipid-(A, E) and water-(B6, C) soluble vitamins from topical emulsions in reconstructed human epidermis.

    PubMed

    Valgimigli, L; Gabbanini, S; Berlini, E; Lucchi, E; Beltramini, C; Bertarelli, Y L

    2012-08-01

    Topical bioavailability of lipid- and water-soluble vitamins is a critical issue for protecting or anti-ageing formulations. Using 17-day-old SkinEthic(®) reconstructed human epidermis, we investigated (at 34°C) the role of lemon EO in enhancing the penetration of α-tocopherol (E) and retinyl acetate (A), pyridoxine (B(6)) and ascorbic acid (C), released from O/W or W/O emulsions. D-limonene, α-pinene and p-cymene (65.9, 2.2 and 0.5%w/w of the oil) had skin permeability coefficients Ps (10(-3) cm h(-1)) of 0.56 ± 0.03 (or 0.73 ± 0.02), 0.72 ± 0.05 (or 0.98 ± 0.05) and 0.84 ± 0.04 (or 1.14 ± 0.04), respectively, when incorporated in a W/O (or O/W) emulsion. Vitamins B6, C and A had Ps values of (3.0 ± 0.4) × 10(-3), (7.9 ± 0.6) × 10(-3) and (0.37 ± 0.02) × 10(-5) cm h(-1), respectively, and their flux through the skin was enhanced by a factor of 4.1, 3.4 and 5.8, respectively, in the presence of lemon EO. The penetration of vitamin E was nine-fold enhanced. Lemon EO produced only reversible modification of TEWL, and it is a safe and effective penetration enhancer for topical administration of lipid- and water-soluble vitamins.

  13. Learning to live with the Family and Medical Leave Act.

    PubMed

    White, J D

    1994-03-01

    Many issues surround the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993. Employer concerns focus on eligibility, lost work hours, and the conditions of granting leave. Employees would like to know what their new rights are, how the Act affects their benefits, and what documentation they must present to demonstrate a need for leave. Both agency administrators and home care workers will find clarification here.

  14. 5 CFR 630.208 - Reduction in leave credits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reduction in leave credits. 630.208... credits. (a) When the number of hours in a nonpay status in a full-time employee's leave year equals the number of basepay hours in a pay period, the agency shall reduce his credits for leave by an amount...

  15. 5 CFR 630.208 - Reduction in leave credits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reduction in leave credits. 630.208... credits. (a) When the number of hours in a nonpay status in a full-time employee's leave year equals the number of basepay hours in a pay period, the agency shall reduce his credits for leave by an amount...

  16. Keep on growing: building and patterning leaves in the grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monocot leaves have unique features that arise early in their development. Maturing leaves protectively enclose younger leaves and the meristem, the pool of founder cells from which a leaf emerges. Through the maturation process, proximal sheath and distal blade tissues differentiate and are separat...

  17. Why Band Directors Leave: From the Mouths of Maestros

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheib, John W.

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses the results of a survey conducted by the author asking music teachers why they leave their jobs. The author compiled an e-mail survey and sent it to instrumental music teachers who were making plans to leave their jobs for new positions or to leave the music education profession entirely. In order to widen the pool of…

  18. Self-Funded Leave and Life Role Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furbish, Dale S.

    2009-01-01

    Self-funded leave is an employee benefit that provides a time resource to those who wish to develop interests and other life roles. Semistructured interviews were used for this qualitative study to explore the motivations for enrolling in the self-funded leave program, how the leave contributed to work-life balance through development of other…

  19. An Update on the Family Medical Leave Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Charles J.; Massucci, Joseph D.

    1998-01-01

    There has been little litigation since the Family Medical Leave Act's inception in 1993. This article highlights FMLA's scope of coverage, leave requirements, notice and verification, special rules for employees and local education agencies, employment and leave entitlements, and enforcement. Employers violating the FMLA may have to reinstate and…

  20. 48 CFR 752.7031 - Leave and holidays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of the undertaking of the new appointment the regular employee, except for reasons beyond his/her... services. Leave and Holidays (OCT 1989) (a) Vacation leave. (1) The Contractor may grant to its employees... for its employees, but in no event shall such vacation leave be earned at a rate exceeding 26...