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Sample records for lepidopteran host ranges

  1. Two genomes of highly polyphagous lepidopteran pests (Spodoptera frugiperda, Noctuidae) with different host-plant ranges.

    PubMed

    Gouin, Anaïs; Bretaudeau, Anthony; Nam, Kiwoong; Gimenez, Sylvie; Aury, Jean-Marc; Duvic, Bernard; Hilliou, Frédérique; Durand, Nicolas; Montagné, Nicolas; Darboux, Isabelle; Kuwar, Suyog; Chertemps, Thomas; Siaussat, David; Bretschneider, Anne; Moné, Yves; Ahn, Seung-Joon; Hänniger, Sabine; Grenet, Anne-Sophie Gosselin; Neunemann, David; Maumus, Florian; Luyten, Isabelle; Labadie, Karine; Xu, Wei; Koutroumpa, Fotini; Escoubas, Jean-Michel; Llopis, Angel; Maïbèche-Coisne, Martine; Salasc, Fanny; Tomar, Archana; Anderson, Alisha R; Khan, Sher Afzal; Dumas, Pascaline; Orsucci, Marion; Guy, Julie; Belser, Caroline; Alberti, Adriana; Noel, Benjamin; Couloux, Arnaud; Mercier, Jonathan; Nidelet, Sabine; Dubois, Emeric; Liu, Nai-Yong; Boulogne, Isabelle; Mirabeau, Olivier; Le Goff, Gaelle; Gordon, Karl; Oakeshott, John; Consoli, Fernando L; Volkoff, Anne-Nathalie; Fescemyer, Howard W; Marden, James H; Luthe, Dawn S; Herrero, Salvador; Heckel, David G; Wincker, Patrick; Kergoat, Gael J; Amselem, Joelle; Quesneville, Hadi; Groot, Astrid T; Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle; Nègre, Nicolas; Lemaitre, Claire; Legeai, Fabrice; d'Alençon, Emmanuelle; Fournier, Philippe

    2017-09-25

    Emergence of polyphagous herbivorous insects entails significant adaptation to recognize, detoxify and digest a variety of host-plants. Despite of its biological and practical importance - since insects eat 20% of crops - no exhaustive analysis of gene repertoires required for adaptations in generalist insect herbivores has previously been performed. The noctuid moth Spodoptera frugiperda ranks as one of the world's worst agricultural pests. This insect is polyphagous while the majority of other lepidopteran herbivores are specialist. It consists of two morphologically indistinguishable strains ("C" and "R") that have different host plant ranges. To describe the evolutionary mechanisms that both enable the emergence of polyphagous herbivory and lead to the shift in the host preference, we analyzed whole genome sequences from laboratory and natural populations of both strains. We observed huge expansions of genes associated with chemosensation and detoxification compared with specialist Lepidoptera. These expansions are largely due to tandem duplication, a possible adaptation mechanism enabling polyphagy. Individuals from natural C and R populations show significant genomic differentiation. We found signatures of positive selection in genes involved in chemoreception, detoxification and digestion, and copy number variation in the two latter gene families, suggesting an adaptive role for structural variation.

  2. Suitability of different lepidopteran host species for development of Bracon hebetor (Hymenoptera: Braconidae).

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Mukti N; Phillips, Thomas W

    2010-04-01

    Bracon hebetor Say (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is a gregarious larval ectoparasitoid of several species of Lepidoptera that are associated with stored products. The suitability of 12 potential lepidopteran host species representing four families was studied in this study for the development and reproduction of B. hebetor. The Lepidoptera species used were the Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hübner), Mediterranean flour moth, Ephestia kuehniella (Zeller), almond moth, E. cautella (Walker), rice moth, Corcyra cephalonica (Walker), navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Stainton), greater wax moth (laboratory reared and commercial), Galleria mellonella (Linnaeus) (all Pyralidae); tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens (Fabricus), corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner) (all Noctuidae); webbing clothes moth, Tineola bisselliella (Hummel) (Tineidae); and Angoumois grain moth, Sitotroga cerealella (Olivier) (Gelichiidae). Experiments were conducted using petri dishes (100 by 15 mm) as experimental arenas at 29 +/- 1 degrees C, 65 +/- 5% RH, and a photoperiod of 14:10 (L: D) h. B. hebetor females were introduced singly into arenas and given a full-grown host larva every day for 5 consecutive d. Paralysis of the host larvae and oviposition by B. hebetor females were significantly affected by host species. The cumulative fecundity in the 5-d period was highest on A. transitella (106.42 +/- 5.19) and lowest on T. bisselliella (9.64 +/- 1.28). The egg-to-adult survivorship and progeny sex ratio were also significantly affected by the host species. The highest percentage of parasitoid survival to the adult stage was on A. transitella (84.07 +/- 2.26) and zero on T. bisselliella. Egg to adult development time was shortest on E. cautella (9.75 +/- 0.25 d) and longest on G. mellonella (12.63 +/- 0.28 d). Results from these studies suggest that B. hebetor females can use a wide range of lepidopteran hosts for paralysis and

  3. Baculovirus cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyases show a close relationship with lepidopteran host homologues.

    PubMed

    Biernat, M A; Ros, V I D; Vlak, J M; van Oers, M M

    2011-08-01

    Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) photolyases repair ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage using blue light. To get insight in the origin of baculovirus CPD photolyase (phr) genes, homologues in the lepidopteran insects Chrysodeixis chalcites, Spodoptera exigua and Trichoplusia ni were identified and characterized. Lepidopteran and baculovirus phr genes each form a monophyletic group, and together form a well-supported clade within the insect photolyases. This suggests that baculoviruses obtained their phr genes from an ancestral lepidopteran insect host. A likely evolutionary scenario is that a granulovirus, Spodoptera litura GV or a direct ancestor, obtained a phr gene. Subsequently, it was horizontally transferred from this granulovirus to several group II nucleopolyhedroviruses (NPVs), including those that infect noctuids of the Plusiinae subfamily. © 2011 The Authors. Insect Molecular Biology © 2011 The Royal Entomological Society.

  4. Estimating parasite host range.

    PubMed

    Dallas, Tad; Huang, Shan; Nunn, Charles; Park, Andrew W; Drake, John M

    2017-08-30

    Estimating the number of host species that a parasite can infect (i.e. host range) provides key insights into the evolution of host specialism and is a central concept in disease ecology. Host range is rarely estimated in real systems, however, because variation in species relative abundance and the detection of rare species makes it challenging to confidently estimate host range. We applied a non-parametric richness indicator to estimate host range in simulated and empirical data, allowing us to assess the influence of sampling heterogeneity and data completeness. After validating our method on simulated data, we estimated parasite host range for a sparsely sampled global parasite occurrence database (Global Mammal Parasite Database) and a repeatedly sampled set of parasites of small mammals from New Mexico (Sevilleta Long Term Ecological Research Program). Estimation accuracy varied strongly with parasite taxonomy, number of parasite occurrence records, and the shape of host species-abundance distribution (i.e. the dominance and rareness of species in the host community). Our findings suggest that between 20% and 40% of parasite host ranges are currently unknown, highlighting a major gap in our understanding of parasite specificity, host-parasite network structure, and parasite burdens. © 2017 The Author(s).

  5. Broad host range plasmids.

    PubMed

    Jain, Aayushi; Srivastava, Preeti

    2013-11-01

    Plasmids are and will remain important cloning vehicles for biotechnology. They have also been associated with the spread of a number of diseases and therefore are a subject of environmental concern. With the advent of sequencing technologies, the database of plasmids is increasing. It will be of immense importance to identify the various bacterial hosts in which the plasmid can replicate. The present review article describes the features that confer broad host range to the plasmids, the molecular basis of plasmid host range evolution, and applications in recombinant DNA technology and environment.

  6. Extensive Transcription Analysis of the Hyposoter didymator Ichnovirus Genome in Permissive and Non-Permissive Lepidopteran Host Species

    PubMed Central

    Dorémus, Tristan; Cousserans, François; Gyapay, Gabor; Jouan, Véronique; Milano, Patricia; Wajnberg, Eric; Darboux, Isabelle; Cônsoli, Fernando Luis; Volkoff, Anne-Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Ichnoviruses are large dsDNA viruses that belong to the Polydnaviridae family. They are specifically associated with endoparasitic wasps of the family Ichneumonidae and essential for host parasitization by these wasps. We sequenced the Hyposoter didymator Ichnovirus (HdIV) encapsidated genome for further analysis of the transcription pattern of the entire set of HdIV genes following the parasitization of four different lepidopteran host species. The HdIV genome was found to consist of at least 50 circular dsDNA molecules, carrying 135 genes, 98 of which formed 18 gene families. The HdIV genome had general features typical of Ichnovirus (IV) genomes and closely resembled that of the IV carried by Hyposoter fugitivus. Subsequent transcriptomic analysis with Illumina technology during the course of Spodoptera frugiperda parasitization led to the identification of a small subset of less than 30 genes with high RPKM values in permissive hosts, consisting with these genes encoding crucial virulence proteins. Comparisons of HdIV expression profiles between host species revealed differences in transcript levels for given HdIV genes between two permissive hosts, S. frugiperda and Pseudoplusia includens. However, we found no evident intrafamily gene-specific transcription pattern consistent with the presence of multigenic families within IV genomes reflecting an ability of the wasps concerned to exploit different host species. Interestingly, in two non-permissive hosts, Mamestra brassiccae and Anticarsia gemmatalis (most of the parasitoid eggs were eliminated by the host cellular immune response), HdIV genes were generally less strongly transcribed than in permissive hosts. This suggests that successful parasitism is dependent on the expression of given HdIV genes exceeding a particular threshold value. These results raise questions about the mecanisms involved in regulating IV gene expression according to the nature of the lepidopteran host species encountered. PMID

  7. Determining larval host plant use by a polyphagous lepidopteran through analysis of adult moths for plant secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Orth, Robert G; Head, Graham; Mierkowski, Mary

    2007-06-01

    Many polyphagous insect species are important economic pests on one or more of their crop hosts. For most important insect pests, the common crop hosts are well-known, but knowledge of weedy and unmanaged hosts is limited. Furthermore, the relative contribution of different hosts to local and regional populations has rarely been ascertained because this requires having some way to determine which plant hosts are the source of the adult moths observed ovipositing in a crop field at a given place and time. One way of determining the larval host of polyphagous pest species is to analyze for several plant-derived chemicals that are each specific to a different small set of related plant species and are preserved in detectable amounts in adult moths. In this paper, we describe novel methods for analyzing adults of the polyphagous lepidopteran, the tobacco budworm (TBW) Heliothis virescens (F.), for plant secondary metabolites, specifically cotinine and gossypol, which are diagnostic for larval feeding on tobacco and cotton, respectively. Cotinine was extracted from individual TBW moths with acetic acid and methanol, then concentrated and analyzed directly by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The same moths then were analyzed for bound gossypol by creating a Schiff's base that used aniline, and the resulting dianilino-gossypol complex was quantified using high pressure chromatography coupled with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS) as the detector. Based on analysis of standards, the detection limit for the cotinine was less than 1.5 ppb by dry weight. Comparable standards were not available for the gossypol derivative so a quantitative limit of detection could not be calculated. When TBW moths reared on known hosts were analyzed for gossypol and/or cotinine, all of the moths reared on tobacco or cotton were correctly identified, although some false positives were recorded with the gossypol method. Analysis of TBW moths of various ages and at various

  8. Accidental genetic engineers: horizontal sequence transfer from parasitoid wasps to their Lepidopteran hosts.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Sean E; Thomas, James H

    2014-01-01

    We show here that 105 regions in two Lepidoptera genomes appear to derive from horizontally transferred wasp DNA. We experimentally verified the presence of two of these sequences in a diverse set of silkworm (Bombyx mori) genomes. We hypothesize that these horizontal transfers are made possible by the unusual strategy many parasitoid wasps employ of injecting hosts with endosymbiotic polydnaviruses to minimize the host's defense response. Because these virus-like particles deliver wasp DNA to the cells of the host, there has been much interest in whether genetic information can be permanently transferred from the wasp to the host. Two transferred sequences code for a BEN domain, known to be associated with polydnaviruses and transcriptional regulation. These findings represent the first documented cases of horizontal transfer of genes between two organisms by a polydnavirus. This presents an interesting evolutionary paradigm in which host species can acquire new sequences from parasitoid wasps that attack them. Hymenoptera and Lepidoptera diverged ∼300 MYA, making this type of event a source of novel sequences for recipient species. Unlike many other cases of horizontal transfer between two eukaryote species, these sequence transfers can be explained without the need to invoke the sequences 'hitchhiking' on a third organism (e.g. retrovirus) capable of independent reproduction. The cellular machinery necessary for the transfer is contained entirely in the wasp genome. The work presented here is the first such discovery of what is likely to be a broader phenomenon among species affected by these wasps.

  9. Intraspecific variation of host plant and locality influence the lepidopteran-parasitoid system of Brassica oleracea crops.

    PubMed

    Santolamazza-Carbone, S; Velasco, P; Selfa, J; Soengas, P; Cartea, M E

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the attractiveness to herbivores and parasitoids of two cultivars of Brassica oleracea L., namely, B. oleracea variety acephala (kale) and B. oleracea variety capitata (cabbage), that exhibit differences of morphological and biochemical traits. To this end, field samplings were replicated at seven localities in Galicia (northwestern Spain). Three specialist and three generalist lepidopteran species were sampled. In total, 7,050 parasitoids were obtained, belonging to 18 genera and 22 species. The results showed that 1) parasitism rate and parasitoid species richness changed with locality and was higher in cabbage, although this crop had lower herbivore abundance; 2) the proportion of specialist herbivores was higher in cabbage crops, whereas generalists dominated in kale crops; 3) the abundance of the parasitoids Telenomus sp. (Hymenoptera, Scelionidae), Cotesia glomerata L. (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), and Diadegma fenestrale (Holmgren) (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae) was higher in kale crops; and 4) parasitism rate of Pieris rapae larvae and pupae and Mamestra brassicae eggs were higher in kale crops. In contrast with the notion that plant structural complexity provides physical refuge to the hosts and can interfere with parasitoid foraging, parasitism rate was higher on cabbage plants, which form heads of overlapped leaves. Possibly, different chemical profiles of cultivars also influenced the host-parasitoid relationship. These results suggest that top-down and bottom-up forces may enhance cabbage crops to better control herbivore pressure during the studied season. In Spain, information on natural occurring parasitoid guilds of Brassica crops is still scarce. The data provided here also represent a critical first step for conservation biological control plans of these cultivations.

  10. A comprehensive transcriptome and immune-gene repertoire of the lepidopteran model host Galleria mellonella

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The larvae of the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella are increasingly used (i) as mini-hosts to study pathogenesis and virulence factors of prominent bacterial and fungal human pathogens, (ii) as a whole-animal high throughput infection system for testing pathogen mutant libraries, and (iii) as a reliable host model to evaluate the efficacy of antibiotics against human pathogens. In order to compensate for the lack of genomic information in Galleria, we subjected the transcriptome of different developmental stages and immune-challenged larvae to next generation sequencing. Results We performed a Galleria transcriptome characterization on the Roche 454-FLX platform combined with traditional Sanger sequencing to obtain a comprehensive transcriptome. To maximize sequence diversity, we pooled RNA extracted from different developmental stages, larval tissues including hemocytes, and from immune-challenged larvae and normalized the cDNA pool. We generated a total of 789,105 pyrosequencing and 12,032 high-quality Sanger EST sequences which clustered into 18,690 contigs with an average length of 1,132 bases. Approximately 40% of the ESTs were significantly similar (E ≤ e-03) to proteins of other insects, of which 45% have a reported function. We identified a large number of genes encoding proteins with established functions in immunity related sensing of microbial signatures and signaling, as well as effector molecules such as antimicrobial peptides and inhibitors of microbial proteinases. In addition, we found genes known as mediators of melanization or contributing to stress responses. Using the transcriptomic data, we identified hemolymph peptides and proteins induced upon immune challenge by 2D-gelelectrophoresis combined with mass spectrometric analysis. Conclusion Here, we have developed extensive transcriptomic resources for Galleria. The data obtained is rich in gene transcripts related to immunity, expanding remarkably our knowledge about immune and

  11. Electroantennogram (EAG) responses of Microplitis croceipes and Cotesia marginiventris and their lepidopteran hosts to a wide array of odor stimuli: correlation between EAG response and degree of host specificity?

    PubMed

    Ngumbi, Esther; Chen, Li; Fadamiro, Henry

    2010-09-01

    In order to test whether the electroantennogram (EAG) response spectrum of an insect correlates to its degree of host specificity, we recorded EAG responses of two parasitoid species with different degrees of host specificity, Microplitis croceipes (specialist) and Cotesia marginiventris (generalist), to a wide array of odor stimuli including compounds representing green leaf volatiles (GLVs), herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPV), ecologically irrelevant (not used by the parasitoid species and their hosts for host location) plant volatiles, and host-specific odor stimuli (host sex pheromones, and extracts of host caterpillar body and frass). We also tested the EAG responses of female moths of the caterpillar hosts of the parasitoids, Heliothis virescens and Spodoptera exigua, to some of the odor stimuli. We hypothesized that the specialist parasitoid will have a narrower EAG response spectrum than the generalist, and that the two lepidopteran species, which are similar in their host plant use, will show similar EAG response spectra to plant volatiles. As predicted, the specialist parasitoid showed greater EAG responses than the generalist to host-specific odor and one HIPV (cis-3-hexenyl butyrate), whereas the generalist showed relatively greater EAG responses to the GLVs and unrelated plant volatiles. We detected no differences in the EAG responses of H. virescens and S. exigua to any of the tested odor.

  12. Cowpox: reservoir hosts and geographic range.

    PubMed Central

    Chantrey, J.; Meyer, H.; Baxby, D.; Begon, M.; Bown, K. J.; Hazel, S. M.; Jones, T.; Montgomery, W. I.; Bennett, M.

    1999-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the reservoir hosts of cowpox virus are wild rodents, although direct evidence for this is lacking for much of the virus's geographic range. Here, through a combination of serology and PCR, we demonstrate conclusively that the main hosts in Great Britain are bank voles, wood mice and short-tailed field voles. However, we also suggest that wood mice may not be able to maintain infection alone, explaining the absence of cowpox from Ireland where voles are generally not found. Infection in wild rodents varies seasonally, and this variation probably underlies the marked seasonal incidence of infection in accidental hosts such as humans and domestic cats. PMID:10459650

  13. Expression of Early Immune-Response Genes in Lepidopteran Host are Suppressed by Venom From an Endoparasitoid, Pteromalus puparum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The relationships between parasitoids and their insect hosts have attracted attention at two levels. First, the basic biology of host-parasitoid interactions is of fundamental interest. Second, parasitoids have tremendous potential as biological control agents in sustainable agriculture programs. Pt...

  14. Host Range and Emerging and Reemerging Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Gowtage-Sequeria, Sonya

    2005-01-01

    An updated literature survey identified 1,407 recognized species of human pathogen, 58% of which are zoonotic. Of the total, 177 are regarded as emerging or reemerging. Zoonotic pathogens are twice as likely to be in this category as are nonzoonotic pathogens. Emerging and reemerging pathogens are not strongly associated with particular types of nonhuman hosts, but they are most likely to have the broadest host ranges. Emerging and reemerging zoonoses are associated with a wide range of drivers, but changes in land use and agriculture and demographic and societal changes are most commonly cited. However, although zoonotic pathogens do represent the most likely source of emerging and reemerging infectious disease, only a small minority have proved capable of causing major epidemics in the human population. PMID:16485468

  15. Host range, host specificity and hypothesized host shift events among viruses of lower vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Bandín, Isabel; Dopazo, Carlos P

    2011-05-18

    The successful replication of a viral agent in a host is a complex process that often leads to a species specificity of the virus and can make interspecies transmission difficult. Despite this difficulty, natural host switch seems to have been frequent among viruses of lower vertebrates, especially fish viruses, since there are several viruses known to be able to infect a wide range of species. In the present review we will focus on well documented reports of broad host range, variations in host specificity, and host shift events hypothesized for viruses within the genera Ranavirus, Novirhabdovirus, Betanodavirus, Isavirus, and some herpesvirus.

  16. Host range, host specificity and hypothesized host shift events among viruses of lower vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The successful replication of a viral agent in a host is a complex process that often leads to a species specificity of the virus and can make interspecies transmission difficult. Despite this difficulty, natural host switch seems to have been frequent among viruses of lower vertebrates, especially fish viruses, since there are several viruses known to be able to infect a wide range of species. In the present review we will focus on well documented reports of broad host range, variations in host specificity, and host shift events hypothesized for viruses within the genera Ranavirus, Novirhabdovirus, Betanodavirus, Isavirus, and some herpesvirus. PMID:21592358

  17. When history repeats itself: exploring the genetic architecture of host-plant adaptation in two closely related lepidopteran species.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Hermine; Ponsard, Sergine; Bourguet, Denis; Vitalis, Renaud; Audiot, Philippe; Cros-Arteil, Sandrine; Streiff, Réjane

    2013-01-01

    The genus Ostrinia includes two allopatric maize pests across Eurasia, namely the European corn borer (ECB, O. nubilalis) and the Asian corn borer (ACB, O. furnacalis). A third species, the Adzuki bean borer (ABB, O. scapulalis), occurs in sympatry with both the ECB and the ACB. The ABB mostly feeds on native dicots, which probably correspond to the ancestral host plant type for the genus Ostrinia. This situation offers the opportunity to characterize the two presumably independent adaptations or preadaptations to maize that occurred in the ECB and ACB. In the present study, we aimed at deciphering the genetic architecture of these two adaptations to maize, a monocot host plant recently introduced into Eurasia. To this end, we performed a genome scan analysis based on 684 AFLP markers in 12 populations of ECB, ACB and ABB. We detected 2 outlier AFLP loci when comparing French populations of the ECB and ABB, and 9 outliers when comparing Chinese populations of the ACB and ABB. These outliers were different in both countries, and we found no evidence of linkage disequilibrium between any two of them. These results suggest that adaptation or preadaptation to maize relies on a different genetic architecture in the ECB and ACB. However, this conclusion must be considered in light of the constraints inherent to genome scan approaches and of the intricate evolution of adaptation and reproductive isolation in the Ostrinia spp. complex.

  18. When History Repeats Itself: Exploring the Genetic Architecture of Host-Plant Adaptation in Two Closely Related Lepidopteran Species

    PubMed Central

    Alexandre, Hermine; Ponsard, Sergine; Bourguet, Denis; Vitalis, Renaud; Audiot, Philippe; Cros-Arteil, Sandrine; Streiff, Réjane

    2013-01-01

    The genus Ostrinia includes two allopatric maize pests across Eurasia, namely the European corn borer (ECB, O. nubilalis) and the Asian corn borer (ACB, O. furnacalis). A third species, the Adzuki bean borer (ABB, O. scapulalis), occurs in sympatry with both the ECB and the ACB. The ABB mostly feeds on native dicots, which probably correspond to the ancestral host plant type for the genus Ostrinia. This situation offers the opportunity to characterize the two presumably independent adaptations or preadaptations to maize that occurred in the ECB and ACB. In the present study, we aimed at deciphering the genetic architecture of these two adaptations to maize, a monocot host plant recently introduced into Eurasia. To this end, we performed a genome scan analysis based on 684 AFLP markers in 12 populations of ECB, ACB and ABB. We detected 2 outlier AFLP loci when comparing French populations of the ECB and ABB, and 9 outliers when comparing Chinese populations of the ACB and ABB. These outliers were different in both countries, and we found no evidence of linkage disequilibrium between any two of them. These results suggest that adaptation or preadaptation to maize relies on a different genetic architecture in the ECB and ACB. However, this conclusion must be considered in light of the constraints inherent to genome scan approaches and of the intricate evolution of adaptation and reproductive isolation in the Ostrinia spp. complex. PMID:23874914

  19. In vitro host range of feline morbillivirus

    PubMed Central

    SAKAGUCHI, Shoichi; KOIDE, Rie; MIYAZAWA, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Feline morbillivirus (FmoPV) is an emerging virus in cats, which is associated with tubulointerstitial nephritis. To study the in vitro host range of FmoPV, we inoculated FmoPV strain SS1 to 32 cell lines originated from 13 species and cultured for 2 weeks, followed by RNA extraction and reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction for FmoPV detection. As a result, only cell lines derived from cats and African green monkeys were susceptible to FmoPV. FmoPV infects diverse feline cell lines: epithelial, fibroblastic, lymphoid and glial cells. These results indicate that the receptor (s) for FmoPV are ubiquitously expressed in cats. No infectivity of FmoPV was observed in human cell lines, which suggests least threatening of cross-species transmission of FmoPV from cats to humans. PMID:26027844

  20. More Is Better: Selecting for Broad Host Range Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Alexa; Ward, Samantha; Hyman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. In this perspective, we discuss several aspects of a characteristic feature of bacteriophages, their host range. Each phage has its own particular host range, the range of bacteria that it can infect. While some phages can only infect one or a few bacterial strains, other phages can infect many species or even bacteria from different genera. Different methods for determining host range may give different results, reflecting the multiple mechanisms bacteria have to resist phage infection and reflecting the different steps of infection each method depends on. This makes defining host range difficult. Another difficulty in describing host range arises from the inconsistent use of the words “narrow” and especially “broad” when describing the breadth of the host range. Nearly all bacteriophages have been isolated using a single host strain of bacteria. While this procedure is fairly standard, it may more likely produce narrow rather than broad host range phage. Our results and those of others suggest that using multiple host strains during isolation can more reliably produce broader host range phages. This challenges the common belief that most bacteriophages have a narrow host range. We highlight the implications of this for several areas that are affected by host range including horizontal gene transfer and phage therapy. PMID:27660623

  1. Poxviruses and the Evolution of Host Range and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Haller, Sherry L.; Peng, Chen; McFadden, Grant; Rothenburg, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Poxviruses as a group can infect a large number of animals. However, at the level of individual viruses, even closely related poxviruses display highly diverse host ranges and virulence. For example, variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, is human-specific and highly virulent only to humans, whereas related cowpox viruses naturally infect a broad spectrum of animals and only cause relatively mild disease in humans. The successful replication of poxviruses depends on their effective manipulation of the host antiviral responses, at the cellular-, tissue- and species-specific levels, which constitutes a molecular basis for differences in poxvirus host range and virulence. A number of poxvirus genes have been identified that possess host range function in experimental settings, and many of these host range genes target specific antiviral host pathways. Herein, we review the biology of poxviruses with a focus on host range, zoonotic infections, virulence, genomics and host range genes as well as the current knowledge about the function of poxvirus host range factors and how their interaction with the host innate immune system contributes to poxvirus host range and virulence. We further discuss the evolution of host range and virulence in poxviruses as well as host switches and potential poxvirus threats for human and animal health. PMID:24161410

  2. Host Range Specificity in Verticillium dahliae.

    PubMed

    Bhat, R G; Subbarao, K V

    1999-12-01

    ABSTRACT Verticillium dahliae isolates from artichoke, bell pepper, cabbage, cauliflower, chili pepper, cotton, eggplant, lettuce, mint, potato, strawberry, tomato, and watermelon and V. albo-atrum from alfalfa were evaluated for their pathogenicity on all 14 hosts. One-month-old seedlings were inoculated with a spore suspension of about 10(7) conidia per ml using a root-dip technique and incubated in the greenhouse. Disease incidence and severity, plant height, and root and shoot dry weights were recorded 6 weeks after inoculation. Bell pepper, cabbage, cauliflower, cotton, eggplant, and mint isolates exhibited host specificity and differential pathogenicity on other hosts, whereas isolates from artichoke, lettuce, potato, strawberry, tomato, and watermelon did not. Bell pepper was resistant to all Verticillium isolates except isolates from bell pepper and eggplant. Thus, host specificity exists in some isolates of V. dahliae. The same isolates were characterized for vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs) through complementation of nitrate nonutilizing (nit) mutants. Cabbage and cauliflower isolates did not produce nit mutants. The isolate from cotton belonged to VCG 1; isolates from bell pepper, eggplant, potato, and tomato, to VCG 4; and the remaining isolates, to VCG 2. These isolates were also analyzed using the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method. Forty random primers were screened, and eighteen of them amplified DNA from Verticillium. Based on RAPD banding patterns, cabbage and cauliflower isolates formed a unique group, distinct from other V. dahliae and V. albo-atrum groups. Minor genetic variations were observed among V. dahliae isolates from other hosts, regardless of whether they were host specific or not. There was no correlation among pathogenicity, VCGs, and RAPD banding patterns. Even though the isolates belonged to different VCGs, they shared similar RAPD profiles. These results suggest that management of Verticillium wilt in some crops

  3. Host range of emerald ash borer

    Treesearch

    Robert A. Haack; Toby R. Petrice; Deborah L. Miller; Leah S. Bauer; Nathan M. Schiff

    2004-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, is native to China, Korea, Japan, Mongolia, Russia, and Taiwan (Haack et al. 2002). Established populations of EAB were first discovered in Michigan and Ontario in 2002. Smaller populations, which resulted from human assisted movement of infested host material, were found in Ohio, Maryland,...

  4. GENETICS OF HOST RANGE IN LEPIDOPTERA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The genetic basis of complex, ecologically relevant traits is not well known for any organism. The question is particularly compelling where closely-related species have diverged radically in their adaptation to the environment. Differences in host plant use among moths and butterflies often provi...

  5. Expanding the host range of small insect RNA viruses: Providence virus (Carmotetraviridae) infects and replicates in a human tissue culture cell line.

    PubMed

    Jiwaji, Meesbah; Short, James Roswell; Dorrington, Rosemary Ann

    2016-10-01

    Tetraviruses are small, positive (+ve)-sense ssRNA viruses that infect the midgut cells of lepidopteran larvae. Providence virus (PrV) is the only member of the family Carmotetraviridae (previously Tetraviridae). PrV particles exhibit the characteristic tetraviral T=4 icosahedral symmetry, but PrV is distinct from other tetraviruses with respect to genome organization and viral non-structural proteins. Currently, PrV is the only tetravirus known to infect and replicate in lepidopteran cell culture lines. In this report we demonstrate, using immunofluorescence microscopy, that PrV infects and replicates in a human tissue culture cell line (HeLa), producing infectious virus particles. We also provide evidence for PrV replication in vitro in insect, mammalian and plant cell-free systems. This study challenges the long-held view that tetraviruses have a narrow host range confined to one or a few lepidopteran species and highlights the need to consider the potential for apparently non-infectious viruses to be transferred to new hosts in the laboratory.

  6. A survey of host range genes in poxvirus genomes

    PubMed Central

    Bratke, Kirsten A.; McLysaght, Aoife; Rothenburg, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Poxviruses are widespread pathogens, which display extremely different host ranges. Whereas some poxviruses, including variola virus, display narrow host ranges, others such as cowpox viruses naturally infect a wide range of mammals. The molecular basis for differences in host range are poorly understood but apparently depend on the successful manipulation of the host antiviral response. Some poxvirus genes have been shown to confer host tropism in experimental settings and are thus called host range factors. Identified host range genes include vaccinia virus K1L, K3L, E3L, B5R, C7L and SPI-1, cowpox virus CP77/CHOhr, ectromelia virus p28 and 022, and myxoma virus T2, T4, T5, 11L, 13L, 062R and 063R. These genes encode for ankyrin repeat-containing proteins, tumor necrosis factor receptor II homologs, apoptosis inhibitor T4-related proteins, Bcl-2-related proteins, pyrin domain-containing proteins, cellular serine protease inhibitors (serpins), short complement-like repeats containing proteins, KilA-N/RING domain-containing proteins, as well as inhibitors of the double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase PKR. We conducted a systematic survey for the presence of known host range genes and closely related family members in poxvirus genomes, classified them into subgroups based on their phylogenetic relationship and correlated their presence with the poxvirus phylogeny. Common themes in the evolution of poxvirus host range genes are lineage-specific duplications and multiple independent inactivation events. Our analyses yield new insights into the evolution of poxvirus host range genes. Implications of our findings for poxvirus host range and virulence are discussed. PMID:23268114

  7. The Poxvirus C7L Host Range Factor Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Rothenburg, Stefan; McFadden, Grant

    2012-01-01

    Host range factors, expressed by the poxvirus family, determine the host tropism of species, tissue, and cell specificity. C7L family members exist in the genomes of most sequenced mammalian poxviruses, suggesting an evolutionarily conserved effort adapting to the hosts. In general, C7L orthologs influence the host tropism in mammalian cell culture, and for some poxviruses it is essential for the complete viral life cycle in vitro and in vivo. The C7L family members lack obvious sequence homology with any other known viral or cellular proteins. Here we review recent findings from an evolutionary perspective and summarize recent progress that broadens our view on the role of C7L family members in mediating poxvirus host range and antagonizing the host defense system. PMID:23103013

  8. Host Range of, and Plant Reaction to, Subanguina picridis

    PubMed Central

    Watson, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    The host range of the knapweed nematode, Subanguina picridis (Kirjanova) Brzeski, under controlled environmental conditions was extended to include, in addition to Russian knapweed, Acroptilon repens (L.) DC., plant species within the Centaureinae, and Carduinae subtribes of the Cynareae tribe of the Asteraceae family. Examination of host response to nematode infection revealed that Russian knapweed was the only highly susceptible host plant. Diffuse knapweed (Centaurea diffusa Lam.) was moderately susceptible, and other plants which formed galls were resistant to S. picridis. PMID:19294150

  9. Scale insect host ranges are broader in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Nate B; Peterson, Daniel A; Normark, Benjamin B

    2015-12-01

    The specificity of the interactions between plants and their consumers varies considerably. The evolutionary and ecological factors underlying this variation are unclear. Several potential explanatory factors vary with latitude, for example plant species richness and the intensity of herbivory. Here, we use comparative phylogenetic methods to test the effect of latitude on host range in scale insects. We find that, on average, scale insects that occur in lower latitudes are more polyphagous. This result is at odds with the general pattern of greater host-plant specificity of insects in the tropics. We propose that this disparity reflects a high cost for host specificity in scale insects, stemming from unusual aspects of scale insect life history, for example, passive wind-driven dispersal. More broadly, the strong evidence for pervasive effects of geography on host range across insect groups stands in stark contrast to the weak evidence for constraints on host range due to genetic trade-offs.

  10. Prospects for altering host range for baculovirus bioinsecticides.

    PubMed

    Thiem, S M

    1997-06-01

    Advances in the understanding of baculovirus replication and the identification of genes that affect host range set the stage for constructing recombinant baculoviruses for specific past insects. The modification of baculovirus host specificity has recently been achieved by inserting or deleting genes that affect virus replication or cellular defenses.

  11. An Experimental Host Range of Triticum Mosaic Virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) is a newly discovered virus isolated from wheat. This study was conducted to determine an experimental host range for TriMV and identify species that could serve as differential hosts for isolating TriMV from Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV). Plants tested were mechan...

  12. Invasion success of a scarab beetle within its native range: host range expansion versus host-shift

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Stéphane; De Romans, Saïana; Glare, Travis; Armstrong, Karen; Worner, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Only recently has it been formally acknowledged that native species can occasionally reach the status of ‘pest’ or ‘invasive species’ within their own native range. The study of such species has potential to help unravel fundamental aspects of biological invasions. A good model for such a study is the New Zealand native scarab beetle, Costelytra zealandica (White), which even in the presence of its natural enemies has become invasive in exotic pastures throughout the country. Because C. zealandica still occurs widely within its native habitat, we hypothesised that this species has only undergone a host range expansion (ability to use equally both an ancestral and new host) onto exotic hosts rather than a host shift (loss of fitness on the ancestral host in comparison to the new host). Moreover, this host range expansion could be one of the main drivers of its invasion success. In this study, we investigated the fitness response of populations of C. zealandica from native and exotic flora, to several feeding treatments comprising its main exotic host plant as well as one of its ancestral hosts. Our results suggest that our initial hypothesis was incorrect and that C. zealandica populations occurring in exotic pastures have experienced a host-shift rather than simply a host-range expansion. This finding suggests that an exotic plant introduction can facilitate the evolution of a distinct native host-race, a phenomenon often used as evidence for speciation in phytophagous insects and which may have been instrumental to the invasion success of C. zealandica. PMID:24795845

  13. Host-dependent differences in abundance, composition and host range of cyanophages from the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Dekel-Bird, Naama P; Sabehi, Gazalah; Mosevitzky, Bar; Lindell, Debbie

    2015-04-01

    Cyanobacteria coexist in the oceans with a wealth of phages that infect them. While numerous studies have investigated Synechococcus phages, much less data are available for Prochlorococcus phages. Furthermore, little is known about cyanophage composition. Here, we examined the abundance and relative composition of cyanophages on six cyanobacterial hosts in samples collected during spring and summer from the Red Sea. Maximal abundances found on Synechococcus of 35 000 phages/ml are within ranges found previously, whereas the 24 000 phages/ml found on Prochlorococcus are approximately 10-fold higher than previous findings. T7-like, T4-like and 'unknown' phages were isolated on all hosts, including many T4-like phages on high-light adapted Prochlorococcus strains, whereas TIM5-like phages were found only on Synechococcus. Large differences in cyanophage abundance and composition were found for different hosts on the same sampling date, as well as for the same host on different dates, with few predictable patterns discerned. Host range analyses showed that T7-like and TIM5-like phages were quite host-specific, whereas the breadth of hosts for T4-like phages was related to host type: those isolated on high-light adapted Prochlorococcus were considerably more host-specific than those on low-light adapted Prochlorococcus or Synechococcus. These host-related differences likely contribute to the complexity of host-phage interactions in the oceans. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Host compatibility rather than vector-host-encounter rate determines the host range of avian Plasmodium parasites.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Matthew C I; Hamer, Gabriel L; Ricklefs, Robert E

    2013-06-07

    Blood-feeding arthropod vectors are responsible for transmitting many parasites between vertebrate hosts. While arthropod vectors often feed on limited subsets of potential host species, little is known about the extent to which this influences the distribution of vector-borne parasites in some systems. Here, we test the hypothesis that different vector species structure parasite-host relationships by restricting access of certain parasites to a subset of available hosts. Specifically, we investigate how the feeding patterns of Culex mosquito vectors relate to distributions of avian malaria parasites among hosts in suburban Chicago, IL, USA. We show that Plasmodium lineages, defined by cytochrome b haplotypes, are heterogeneously distributed across avian hosts. However, the feeding patterns of the dominant vectors (Culex restuans and Culex pipiens) are similar across these hosts, and do not explain the distributions of Plasmodium parasites. Phylogenetic similarity of avian hosts predicts similarity in their Plasmodium parasites. This effect was driven primarily by the general association of Plasmodium parasites with particular host superfamilies. Our results suggest that a mosquito-imposed encounter rate does not limit the distribution of avian Plasmodium parasites across hosts. This implies that compatibility between parasites and their avian hosts structure Plasmodium host range.

  15. Host plant utilization, host range oscillations and diversification in nymphalid butterflies: a phylogenetic investigation.

    PubMed

    Nylin, Sören; Slove, Jessica; Janz, Niklas

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that phenotypic plasticity is a major factor in the diversification of life, and that variation in host range in phytophagous insects is a good model for investigating this claim. We explore the use of angiosperm plants as hosts for nymphalid butterflies, and in particular the evidence for past oscillations in host range and how they are linked to host shifts and to diversification. At the level of orders of plants, a relatively simple pattern of host use and host shifts emerges, despite the 100 million years of history of the family Nymphalidae. We review the evidence that these host shifts and the accompanying diversifications were associated with transient polyphagous stages, as suggested by the "oscillation hypothesis." In addition, we investigate all currently polyphagous nymphalid species and demonstrate that the state of polyphagy is rare, has a weak phylogenetic signal, and a very apical distribution in the phylogeny; we argue that these are signs of its transient nature. We contrast our results with data from the bark beetles Dendroctonus, in which a more specialized host use is instead the apical state. We conclude that plasticity in host use is likely to have contributed to diversification in nymphalid butterflies.

  16. HOST PLANT UTILIZATION, HOST RANGE OSCILLATIONS AND DIVERSIFICATION IN NYMPHALID BUTTERFLIES: A PHYLOGENETIC INVESTIGATION

    PubMed Central

    Nylin, Sören; Slove, Jessica; Janz, Niklas

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that phenotypic plasticity is a major factor in the diversification of life, and that variation in host range in phytophagous insects is a good model for investigating this claim. We explore the use of angiosperm plants as hosts for nymphalid butterflies, and in particular the evidence for past oscillations in host range and how they are linked to host shifts and to diversification. At the level of orders of plants, a relatively simple pattern of host use and host shifts emerges, despite the 100 million years of history of the family Nymphalidae. We review the evidence that these host shifts and the accompanying diversifications were associated with transient polyphagous stages, as suggested by the “oscillation hypothesis.” In addition, we investigate all currently polyphagous nymphalid species and demonstrate that the state of polyphagy is rare, has a weak phylogenetic signal, and a very apical distribution in the phylogeny; we argue that these are signs of its transient nature. We contrast our results with data from the bark beetles Dendroctonus, in which a more specialized host use is instead the apical state. We conclude that plasticity in host use is likely to have contributed to diversification in nymphalid butterflies. PMID:24372598

  17. Determinants of host species range in plant viruses.

    PubMed

    Moury, Benoît; Fabre, Frédéric; Hébrard, Eugénie; Froissart, Rémy

    2017-04-01

    Prediction of pathogen emergence is an important field of research, both in human health and in agronomy. Most studies of pathogen emergence have focused on the ecological or anthropic factors involved rather than on the role of intrinsic pathogen properties. The capacity of pathogens to infect a large set of host species, i.e. to possess a large host range breadth (HRB), is tightly linked to their emergence propensity. Using an extensive plant virus database, we found that four traits related to virus genome or transmission properties were strongly and robustly linked to virus HRB. Broader host ranges were observed for viruses with single-stranded genomes, those with three genome segments and nematode-transmitted viruses. Also, two contrasted groups of seed-transmitted viruses were evidenced. Those with a single-stranded genome had larger HRB than non-seed-transmitted viruses, whereas those with a double-stranded genome (almost exclusively RNA) had an extremely small HRB. From the plant side, the family taxonomic rank appeared as a critical threshold for virus host range, with a highly significant increase in barriers to infection between plant families. Accordingly, the plant-virus infectivity matrix shows a dual structure pattern: a modular pattern mainly due to viruses specialized to infect plants of a given family and a nested pattern due to generalist viruses. These results contribute to a better prediction of virus host jumps and emergence risks.

  18. Characterization of a novel protein with homology to C-type lectins expressed by the Cotesia rubecula bracovirus in larvae of the lepidopteran host, Pieris rapae.

    PubMed

    Glatz, Richard; Schmidt, Otto; Asgari, Sassan

    2003-05-30

    Polydnaviruses are essential for the survival of many Ichneumonoid endoparasitoids, providing active immune suppression of the host in which parasitoid larvae develop. The Cotesia rubecula bracovirus is unique among polydnaviruses in that only four major genes are detected in parasitized host (Pieris rapae) tissues, and gene expression is transient. Here we describe a novel C. rubecula bracovirus gene (CrV3) encoding a lectin monomer composed of 159 amino acids, which has conserved residues consistent with invertebrate and mammalian C-type lectins. Bacterially expressed CrV3 agglutinated sheep red blood cells in a divalent ion-dependent but Ca2+-independent manner. Agglutination was inhibited by EDTA but not by biological concentrations of any saccharides tested. Two monomers of approximately 14 and approximately 17 kDa in size were identified on SDS-PAGE in parasitized P. rapae larvae. The 17-kDa monomer was found to be an N-glyscosylated form of the 14-kDa monomer. CrV3 is produced in infected hemocytes and fat body cells and subsequently secreted into hemolymph. We propose that CrV3 is a novel lectin, the first characterized from an invertebrate virus. CrV3 shows over 60% homology with hypothetical proteins isolated from polydnaviruses in two other Cotesia wasps, indicating that these proteins may also be C-type lectins and that a novel polydnavirus lectin family exists in Cotesia-associated bracoviruses. CrV3 is probably interacting with components in host hemolymph, resulting in suppression of the Pieris immune response. The high similarity of CrV3 with invertebrate lectins, as opposed to those from viruses, may indicate that some bracovirus functions were acquired from their hosts.

  19. Genome characteristics of facultatively symbiotic Frankia sp. strains reflect host range and host plant biogeography

    PubMed Central

    Normand, Philippe; Lapierre, Pascal; Tisa, Louis S.; Gogarten, Johann Peter; Alloisio, Nicole; Bagnarol, Emilie; Bassi, Carla A.; Berry, Alison M.; Bickhart, Derek M.; Choisne, Nathalie; Couloux, Arnaud; Cournoyer, Benoit; Cruveiller, Stephane; Daubin, Vincent; Demange, Nadia; Francino, Maria Pilar; Goltsman, Eugene; Huang, Ying; Kopp, Olga R.; Labarre, Laurent; Lapidus, Alla; Lavire, Celine; Marechal, Joelle; Martinez, Michele; Mastronunzio, Juliana E.; Mullin, Beth C.; Niemann, James; Pujic, Pierre; Rawnsley, Tania; Rouy, Zoe; Schenowitz, Chantal; Sellstedt, Anita; Tavares, Fernando; Tomkins, Jeffrey P.; Vallenet, David; Valverde, Claudio; Wall, Luis G.; Wang, Ying; Medigue, Claudine; Benson, David R.

    2007-01-01

    Soil bacteria that also form mutualistic symbioses in plants encounter two major levels of selection. One occurs during adaptation to and survival in soil, and the other occurs in concert with host plant speciation and adaptation. Actinobacteria from the genus Frankia are facultative symbionts that form N2-fixing root nodules on diverse and globally distributed angiosperms in the “actinorhizal” symbioses. Three closely related clades of Frankia sp. strains are recognized; members of each clade infect a subset of plants from among eight angiosperm families. We sequenced the genomes from three strains; their sizes varied from 5.43 Mbp for a narrow host range strain (Frankia sp. strain HFPCcI3) to 7.50 Mbp for a medium host range strain (Frankia alni strain ACN14a) to 9.04 Mbp for a broad host range strain (Frankia sp. strain EAN1pec.) This size divergence is the largest yet reported for such closely related soil bacteria (97.8%–98.9% identity of 16S rRNA genes). The extent of gene deletion, duplication, and acquisition is in concert with the biogeographic history of the symbioses and host plant speciation. Host plant isolation favored genome contraction, whereas host plant diversification favored genome expansion. The results support the idea that major genome expansions as well as reductions can occur in facultative symbiotic soil bacteria as they respond to new environments in the context of their symbioses. PMID:17151343

  20. Generating a host range-expanded recombinant baculovirus

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chunfeng; Deng, Zihao; Long, Zhao; Cai, Yi; Ying, Zhongfu; Yin, Hanqi; Yuan, Meijin; Clem, Rollie J.; Yang, Kai; Pang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    As baculoviruses usually have a narrow insecticidal spectrum, knowing the mechanisms by which they control the host-range is prerequisite for improvement of their applications as pesticides. In this study, from supernatant of culture cells transfected with DNAs of an Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) mutant lacking the antiapoptotic gene p35 (vAc∆P35) and a cosmid representing a fragment of Spodoptera exigua nucleopolyhedrovirus (SeMNPV), a viral strain was plaque-purified and named vAcRev. vAcRev had a broader host range than either vAc∆P35 or SeMNPV parental virus, being able to infect not only the permissive hosts of its parental viruses but also a nonpermissive host (Spodoptera litura). Genome sequencing indicated that vAcRev comprises a mixture of two viruses with different circular dsDNA genomes. One virus contains a genome similar to vAc∆P35, while in the other viral genome, a 24.4 kbp-fragment containing 10 essential genesis replaced with a 4 kbp-fragment containing three SeMNPV genes including a truncated Se-iap3 gene. RNA interference and ectopic expression assays found that Se-iap3 is responsible for the host range expansion of vAcRev, suggesting that Se-iap3 inhibits the progression of apoptosis initiated by viral infection and promotes viral propagation in hosts both permissive and non-permissive for AcMNPV and SeMNPV. PMID:27321273

  1. Factors affecting host range in a generalist seed pathogen of semi-arid shrublands

    Treesearch

    Julie Beckstead; Susan E. Meyer; Kurt O. Reinhart; Kellene M. Bergen; Sandra R. Holden; Heather F. Boekweg

    2014-01-01

    Generalist pathogens can exhibit differential success on different hosts, resulting in complex host range patterns. Several factors operate to reduce realized host range relative to potential host range, particularly under field conditions. We explored factors influencing host range of the naturally occurring generalist ascomycete grass seed pathogen Pyrenophora...

  2. Brain infection and activation of neuronal repair mechanisms by the human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes in the lepidopteran model host Galleria mellonella

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Krishnendu; Hain, Torsten; Fischer, Rainer; Chakraborty, Trinad; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes the causative agent of the foodborne disease listeriosis in humans often involves fatal brainstem infections leading to meningitis and meningoencephalitis. We recently established the larvae of the greater wax moth (Galleria mellonella) as a model host for the investigation of L. monocytogenes pathogenesis and as a source of peptides exhibiting anti-Listeria-activity. Here we show that G. mellonella can be used to study brain infection and its impact on larval development as well as the activation of stress responses and neuronal repair mechanisms. The infection of G. mellonella larvae with L. monocytogenes elicits a cellular immune response involving the formation of melanized cellular aggregates (nodules) containing entrapped bacteria. These form under the integument and in the brain, resembling the symptoms found in human patients. We screened the G. mellonella transcriptome with marker genes representing stress responses and neuronal repair, and identified several modulated genes including those encoding heat shock proteins, growth factors, and regulators of neuronal stress. Remarkably, we discovered that L. monocytogenes infection leads to developmental shift in larvae and also modulates the expression of genes involved in the regulation of endocrine functions. We demonstrated that L. monocytogenes pathogenesis can be prevented by treating G. mellonella larvae with signaling inhibitors such as diclofenac, arachidonic acid, and rapamycin. Our data extend the utility of G. mellonella larvae as an ideal model for the high-throughput in vivo testing of potential compounds against listeriosis. PMID:23348912

  3. Brain infection and activation of neuronal repair mechanisms by the human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes in the lepidopteran model host Galleria mellonella.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Krishnendu; Hain, Torsten; Fischer, Rainer; Chakraborty, Trinad; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2013-05-15

    Listeria monocytogenes the causative agent of the foodborne disease listeriosis in humans often involves fatal brainstem infections leading to meningitis and meningoencephalitis. We recently established the larvae of the greater wax moth (Galleria mellonella) as a model host for the investigation of L. monocytogenes pathogenesis and as a source of peptides exhibiting anti-Listeria-activity. Here we show that G. mellonella can be used to study brain infection and its impact on larval development as well as the activation of stress responses and neuronal repair mechanisms. The infection of G. mellonella larvae with L. monocytogenes elicits a cellular immune response involving the formation of melanized cellular aggregates (nodules) containing entrapped bacteria. These form under the integument and in the brain, resembling the symptoms found in human patients. We screened the G. mellonella transcriptome with marker genes representing stress responses and neuronal repair, and identified several modulated genes including those encoding heat shock proteins, growth factors, and regulators of neuronal stress. Remarkably, we discovered that L. monocytogenes infection leads to developmental shift in larvae and also modulates the expression of genes involved in the regulation of endocrine functions. We demonstrated that L. monocytogenes pathogenesis can be prevented by treating G. mellonella larvae with signaling inhibitors such as diclofenac, arachidonic acid, and rapamycin. Our data extend the utility of G. mellonella larvae as an ideal model for the high-throughput in vivo testing of potential compounds against listeriosis.

  4. Molecular phylogenetic assessment of host range in five Dermanyssus species.

    PubMed

    Roy, L; Dowling, A P G; Chauve, C M; Lesna, I; Sabelis, M W; Buronfosse, T

    2009-06-01

    Given that 14 out of the 25 currently described species of Dermanyssus Dugès, 1834, are morphologically very close to each another, misidentifications may occur and are suspected in at least some records. One of these 14 species is the red fowl mite, D. gallinae (De Geer, 1778), a blood parasite of wild birds, but also a pest in the poultry industry. Using molecular phylogenetic tools we aimed to answer two questions concerning host specificity and synanthropicity: (1) is D. gallinae the only species infesting European layer farms?, and (2) can populations of D. gallinae move from wild to domestic birds and vice versa? Mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene sequences were obtained from 73 Dermanyssus populations collected from nests of wild European birds and from poultry farms and these were analyzed using maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference. Mapping of the observed host range on the obtained topology and correlation with behavioural observations revealed that (1) host range is strongly dependent on some ecological parameters (e.g. nest hygiene, exposure to pesticides and predators), that (2) out of five species under test, synanthropic populations were found only in lineages of D. gallinae, and that (3) at least some haplotypes found in wild birds were very close to those found in association with domestic birds.

  5. Phylogenetic signal in plant pathogen–host range

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Gregory S.; Webb, Campbell O.

    2007-01-01

    What determines which plant species are susceptible to a given plant pathogen is poorly understood. Experimental inoculations with fungal pathogens of plant leaves in a tropical rain forest show that most fungal pathogens are polyphagous but that most plant species in a local community are resistant to any given pathogen. The likelihood that a pathogen can infect two plant species decreases continuously with phylogenetic distance between the plants, even to ancient evolutionary distances. This phylogenetic signal in host range allows us to predict the likely host range of plant pathogens in a local community, providing an important tool for plant ecology, design of agronomic systems, quarantine regulations in international trade, and risk analysis of biological control agents. In particular, the results suggest that the rate of spread and ecological impacts of a disease through a natural plant community will depend strongly on the phylogenetic structure of the community itself and that current regulatory approaches strongly underestimate the local risks of global movement of plant pathogens or their hosts. PMID:17360396

  6. In vitro host range of the Hz-1 nonoccluded virus in insect cell lines.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Arthur H; Grasela, James J; Ignoffo, Carlo M

    2007-01-01

    A total of 13 insect cell lines spanning 4 orders (Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, Diptera, and Homoptera) were tested for their ability to replicate the nonoccluded virus Hz-1. Only the Lepidopteran cell lines supported replication of the virus with TN-CL1 and BCIRL-HZ-AM1 producing the highest titers of 2.4 x 10(8) tissue culture infective dose (TCID)50/ml and 2.0 x 10(8) TCID50/ml, respectively. A codling moth cell line (CP-169) was the only Lepidopteran cell line that did not replicate the virus and transfection of this cell line with Hz-1 DNA failed to replicate the virus. Also, transfection with DNA from a recombinant baculovirus carrying the red fluorescent protein gene (AcMNPVhsp70 Red) was not expressed in CP-169 cells. The replication cycle of Hz-1 in BCIRL-HZ-AM1 cells showed that this virus replicated rapidly starting at 16 h postinoculation (p.i.) and reaching a peak titer of 1.0 x 10(8) TCID50/ml 56 h postinoculation. Hz-1 when compared with several other baculoviruses has the widest in vitro host spectrum.

  7. Host range, host ecology, and distribution of more than 11800 fish parasite species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strona, Giovanni; Palomares, Maria Lourdes D.; Bailly, Nicholas; Galli, Paolo; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Our data set includes 38 008 fish parasite records (for Acanthocephala, Cestoda, Monogenea, Nematoda, Trematoda) compiled from the scientific literature, Internet databases, and museum collections paired to the corresponding host ecological, biogeographical, and phylogenetic traits (maximum length, growth rate, life span, age at maturity, trophic level, habitat preference, geographical range size, taxonomy). The data focus on host features, because specific parasite traits are not consistently available across records. For this reason, the data set is intended as a flexible resource able to extend the principles of ecological niche modeling to the host–parasite system, providing researchers with the data to model parasite niches based on their distribution in host species and the associated host features. In this sense, the database offers a framework for testing general ecological, biogeographical, and phylogenetic hypotheses based on the identification of hosts as parasite habitat. Potential applications of the data set are, for example, the investigation of species–area relationships or the taxonomic distribution of host-specificity. The provided host–parasite list is that currently used by Fish Parasite Ecology Software Tool (FishPEST, http://purl.oclc.org/fishpest), which is a website that allows researchers to model several aspects of the relationships between fish parasites and their hosts. The database is intended for researchers who wish to have more freedom to analyze the database than currently possible with FishPEST. However, for readers who have not seen FishPEST, we recommend using this as a starting point for interacting with the database.

  8. Extension of the Avian Host Range of Collyriclosis in Europe.

    PubMed

    Tahas, Stamatios A; Diakou, Anastasia; Dressel, Monika; Frei, Samuel; Azevedo, Fábia M Pinto; Casero, Maria V Mena; Maia, Carla; Grest, Paula; Grimm, Felix; Sitko, Jiljí; Literak, Ivan

    2017-01-18

    We describe cases of collyriclosis in apodiform and passeriform birds in Portugal, Switzerland, and Germany. We extend the host range of Collyriculm faba to include apodiform birds ( Apus apus , Apus melba , and Apus pallidus ) and the passerine Sitta europaea (Eurasian Nuthatch). Infections varied in severity from an incidental finding to severe debilitation and death. The infection route remains unclear with the apparent absence from Germany, Portugal, and Switzerland of the first intermediate host of C. faba, the aquatic gastropod Bythinella austriaca, implying that other organisms might be involved in the parasite's life cycle. Furthermore, the detection of C. faba cysts in very young passerine birds may indicate an infection during the nestling stage and a rapid development of parasite-containing subcutaneous cysts. This series of cases highlights an increased geographic range into Portugal and the potential debilitating nature of a parasite of migratory birds in Europe. However, given the rarity of cases, collyriclosis does not seem to present an important threat to migratory species preservation.

  9. Ectomycorrhizal fungal richness declines towards the host species' range edge.

    PubMed

    Lankau, Richard A; Keymer, Daniel P

    2016-07-01

    Plant range boundaries are generally considered to reflect abiotic conditions; however, a rise in negative or decline in positive species interactions at range margins may contribute to these stable boundaries. While evidence suggests that pollinator mutualisms may decline near range boundaries, little is known about other important plant mutualisms, including microbial root symbionts. Here, we used molecular methods to characterize root-associated fungal communities in populations of two related temperate tree species from across the species' range in the eastern United States. We found that ectomycorrhizal fungal richness on plant roots declined with distance from the centre of the host species range. These patterns were not evident in nonmycorrhizal fungal communities on roots nor in fungal communities in bulk soil. Climatic and soil chemical variables could not explain these biogeographic patterns, although these abiotic gradients affected other components of the bulk soil and rhizosphere fungal community. Depauperate ectomycorrhizal fungal communities may represent an underappreciated challenge to marginal tree populations, especially as rapid climate change pushes these populations outside their current climate niche.

  10. Staphylococcus aureus Host Range and Human-Bovine Host Shift ▿†

    PubMed Central

    Sakwinska, Olga; Giddey, Marlyse; Moreillon, Martine; Morisset, Delphine; Waldvogel, Andreas; Moreillon, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major agent of bovine mastitis. The concomitant emergence of pig-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in human carriage and infection requires a reexamination of the host range and specificity of human- and cow-associated S. aureus strains, something which has not been systematically studied previously. The genetic relatedness of 500 S. aureus isolates from bovine mastitis cases, 57 isolates from nasal carriage of farmers, and 133 isolates from nonfarmers was determined by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis and spa typing. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was conducted on a subset of isolates to match AFLP clusters with MLST clonal complexes (CCs). This data set allowed us to study host range and host specificity and to estimate the extent of bovine-to-human transmission. The genotype compositions of S. aureus isolates from farmers and nonfarmers were very similar, while the mastitis isolates were quite distinct. Overall, transmission was low, but specific genotypes did show increased cow-to-human transmission. Unexpectedly, more than one-third of mastitis isolates belonged to CC8, a lineage which has not been considered to be bovine mastitis associated, but it is well known from human carriage and infection (i.e., USA300). Despite the fact that we did detect some transmission of other genotypes from cows to farmers, no transmission of CC8 isolates to farmers was detected, except for one tentative case. This was despite the close genetic relatedness of mastitis CC8 strains to nonfarmer carriage strains. These results suggest that the emergence of the new bovine-adapted genotype was due to a recent host shift from humans to cows concurrent with a loss of the ability to colonize humans. More broadly, our results indicate that host specificity is a lineage-specific trait that can rapidly evolve. PMID:21742927

  11. Sensitivity to BST-2 restriction correlates with Orthobunyavirus host range.

    PubMed

    Varela, Mariana; Piras, Ilaria M; Mullan, Catrina; Shi, Xiaohong; Tilston-Lunel, Natasha L; Pinto, Rute Maria; Taggart, Aislynn; Welch, Stephen R; Neil, Stuart J D; Kreher, Felix; Elliott, Richard M; Palmarini, Massimo

    2017-09-01

    Orthobunyaviruses include several recently emerging viruses of significant medical and veterinary importance. There is currently very limited understanding on what determines the host species range of these pathogens. In this study we discovered that BST-2/tetherin restricts orthobunyavirus replication in a host-specific manner. We show that viruses with human tropism (Oropouche virus and La Crosse virus) are restricted by sheep BST-2 but not by the human orthologue, while viruses with ruminant tropism (Schmallenberg virus and others) are restricted by human BST-2 but not by the sheep orthologue. We also show that BST-2 blocks orthobunyaviruses replication by reducing the amount of envelope glycoprotein into viral particles egressing from infected cells. This is the first study identifying a restriction factor that correlates with species susceptibility to orthobunyavirus infection. This work provides insight to help us dissect the adaptive changes that bunyaviruses require to cross the species barrier and emerge into new species. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Combining experimental evolution and field population assays to study the evolution of host range breadth.

    PubMed

    Fellous, S; Angot, G; Orsucci, M; Migeon, A; Auger, P; Olivieri, I; Navajas, M

    2014-05-01

    Adapting to specific hosts often involves trade-offs that limit performance on other hosts. These constraints may either lead to narrow host ranges (i.e. specialists, able to exploit only one host type) or wide host ranges often leading to lower performance on each host (i.e. generalists). Here, we combined laboratory experiments on field populations with experimental evolution to investigate the impact of adaptation to the host on host range evolution and associated performance over this range. We used the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae, a model organism for studies on the evolution of specialization. Field mite populations were sampled on three host plant species: tomato, citrus tree and rosebay (Nerium oleander). Testing these populations in the laboratory revealed that tomato populations of mites could exploit tomato only, citrus populations could exploit citrus and tomato whereas Nerium populations could exploit all three hosts. Besides, the wider niche ranges of citrus and Nerium populations came at the cost of low performance on their non-native hosts. Experimental lines selected to live on the same three host species exhibited similar patterns of host range and relative performance. This result suggests that adaptation to a new host species may lead to wider host ranges but at the expense of decreased performance on other hosts. We conclude that experimental evolution may reliably inform on evolution in the field. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  13. Fatty acid-amino acid conjugates diversification in lepidopteran caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Naoko; Alborn, Hans T; Nakanishi, Tomoaki; Suckling, David M; Nishida, Ritsuo; Tumlinson, James H; Mori, Naoki

    2010-03-01

    Fatty acid amino acid conjugates (FACs) have been found in noctuid as well as sphingid caterpillar oral secretions; in particular, volicitin [N-(17-hydroxylinolenoyl)-L-glutamine] and its biochemical precursor, N-linolenoyl-L-glutamine, are known elicitors of induced volatile emissions in corn plants. These induced volatiles, in turn, attract natural enemies of the caterpillars. In a previous study, we showed that N-linolenoyl-L-glutamine in larval Spodoptera litura plays an important role in nitrogen assimilation which might be an explanation for caterpillars synthesizing FACs despite an increased risk of attracting natural enemies. However, the presence of FACs in lepidopteran species outside these families of agricultural interest is not well known. We conducted FAC screening of 29 lepidopteran species, and found them in 19 of these species. Thus, FACs are commonly synthesized through a broad range of lepidopteran caterpillars. Since all FAC-containing species had N-linolenoyl-L-glutamine and/or N-linoleoyl-L-glutamine in common, and the evolutionarily earliest species among them had only these two FACs, these glutamine conjugates might be the evolutionarily older FACs. Furthermore, some species had glutamic acid conjugates, and some had hydroxylated FACs. Comparing the diversity of FACs with lepidopteran phylogeny indicates that glutamic acid conjugates can be synthesized by relatively primitive species, while hydroxylation of fatty acids is limited mostly to larger and more developed macrolepidopteran species.

  14. Evolution of host range in the follicle mite Demodex kutzeri.

    PubMed

    Palopoli, Michael F; Tra, VAN; Matoin, Kassey; Mac, Phuong D

    2016-11-29

    The sequences of four mitochondrial genes were determined for Demodex mites isolated from two distantly related species within the family Cervidae, and identified morphologically as belonging to the species Demodex kutzeri. The sequences were used to test the hypothesis that Demodex are strictly host-specific, and hence cospeciate with their hosts: (1) The estimated divergence time between mites found on elk vs humans agreed closely with a previous estimate of the time that these host species last shared a common ancestor, suggesting cospeciation of mites and hosts, at least over long evolutionary timescales. (2) The extremely low levels of sequence divergence between the mites found on elk vs mule deer hosts indicated that these mites belong to the same species, which suggests that Demodex are able to move across host species boundaries over shorter timescales. Together, the results are consistent with the model that Demodex mites are not strict host-specialists, but instead lose the ability to move between host lineages gradually.

  15. Novel application of species richness estimators to predict the host range of parasites.

    PubMed

    Watson, David M; Milner, Kirsty V; Leigh, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Host range is a critical life history trait of parasites, influencing prevalence, virulence and ultimately determining their distributional extent. Current approaches to measure host range are sensitive to sampling effort, the number of known hosts increasing with more records. Here, we develop a novel application of results-based stopping rules to determine how many hosts should be sampled to yield stable estimates of the number of primary hosts within regions, then use species richness estimation to predict host ranges of parasites across their distributional ranges. We selected three mistletoe species (hemiparasitic plants in the Loranthaceae) to evaluate our approach: a strict host specialist (Amyema lucasii, dependent on a single host species), an intermediate species (Amyema quandang, dependent on hosts in one genus) and a generalist (Lysiana exocarpi, dependent on many genera across multiple families), comparing results from geographically-stratified surveys against known host lists derived from herbarium specimens. The results-based stopping rule (stop sampling bioregion once observed host richness exceeds 80% of the host richness predicted using the Abundance-based Coverage Estimator) worked well for most bioregions studied, being satisfied after three to six sampling plots (each representing 25 host trees) but was unreliable in those bioregions with high host richness or high proportions of rare hosts. Although generating stable predictions of host range with minimal variation among six estimators trialled, distribution-wide estimates fell well short of the number of hosts known from herbarium records. This mismatch, coupled with the discovery of nine previously unrecorded mistletoe-host combinations, further demonstrates the limited ecological relevance of simple host-parasite lists. By collecting estimates of host range of constrained completeness, our approach maximises sampling efficiency while generating comparable estimates of the number of primary

  16. Chemical similarity between historical and novel host plants promotes range and host expansion of the mountain pine beetle in a naïve host ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Erbilgin, Nadir; Ma, Cary; Whitehouse, Caroline; Shan, Bin; Najar, Ahmed; Evenden, Maya

    2014-02-01

    Host plant secondary chemistry can have cascading impacts on host and range expansion of herbivorous insect populations. We investigated the role of host secondary compounds on pheromone production by the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) (MPB) and beetle attraction in response to a historical (lodgepole pine, Pinus contorta var. latifolia) and a novel (jack pine, Pinus banksiana) hosts, as pheromones regulate the host colonization process. Beetles emit the same pheromones from both hosts, but more trans-verbenol, the primary aggregation pheromone, was emitted by female beetles on the novel host. The phloem of the novel host contains more α-pinene, a secondary compound that is the precursor for trans-verbenol production in beetle, than the historical host. Beetle-induced emission of 3-carene, another secondary compound found in both hosts, was also higher from the novel host. Field tests showed that the addition of 3-carene to the pheromone mixture mimicking the aggregation pheromones produced from the two host species increased beetle capture. We conclude that chemical similarity between historical and novel hosts has facilitated host expansion of MPB in jack pine forests through the exploitation of common host secondary compounds for pheromone production and aggregation on the hosts. Furthermore, broods emerging from the novel host were larger in terms of body size. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Predictability of helminth parasite host range using information on geography, host traits and parasite community structure.

    PubMed

    Dallas, Tad; Park, Andrew W; Drake, John M

    2017-02-01

    Host-parasite associations are complex interactions dependent on aspects of hosts (e.g. traits, phylogeny or coevolutionary history), parasites (e.g. traits and parasite interactions) and geography (e.g. latitude). Predicting the permissive host set or the subset of the host community that a parasite can infect is a central goal of parasite ecology. Here we develop models that accurately predict the permissive host set of 562 helminth parasites in five different parasite taxonomic groups. We developed predictive models using host traits, host taxonomy, geographic covariates, and parasite community composition, finding that models trained on parasite community variables were more accurate than any other covariate group, even though parasite community covariates only captured a quarter of the variance in parasite community composition. This suggests that it is possible to predict the permissive host set for a given parasite, and that parasite community structure is an important predictor, potentially because parasite communities are interacting non-random assemblages.

  18. Cucumis melo endornavirus: Genome organization, host range and co-divergence with the host.

    PubMed

    Sabanadzovic, Sead; Wintermantel, William M; Valverde, Rodrigo A; McCreight, James D; Aboughanem-Sabanadzovic, Nina

    2016-03-02

    A high molecular weight dsRNA was isolated from a Cucumis melo L. plant (referred to as 'CL01') of an unknown cultivar and completely sequenced. Sequence analyses showed that dsRNA is associated with an endornavirus for which a name Cucumis melo endornavirus (CmEV) is proposed. The genome of CmEV-CL01 consists of 15,078 nt, contains a single, 4939 codons-long ORF and terminates with a stretch of 10 cytosine residues. Comparisons of the putative CmEV-encoded polyprotein with available references in protein databases revealed a unique genome organization characterized by the presence of the following domains: viral helicase Superfamily 1 (Hel-1), three glucosyltransferases (doublet of putative capsular polysaccharide synthesis proteins and a putative C_28_Glycosyltransferase), and an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). The presence of three glycome-related domains of different origin makes the genome organization of CmEV unique among endornaviruses. Phylogenetic analyses of viral RdRp domains showed that CmEV belongs to a specific lineage within the family Endornaviridae made exclusively of plant-infecting endornaviruses. An RT-PCR based survey demonstrated high incidence of CmEV among melon germplasm accession (>87% of tested samples). Analyses of partial genome sequences of CmEV isolates from 26 different melon genotypes suggest fine-tuned virus adaptation and co-divergence with the host. Finally, results of the present study revealed that CmEV is present in plants belonging to three different genera in the family Cucurbitaceae. Such diverse host range is unreported for known endornaviruses and suggests a long history of CmEV association with cucurbits predating their speciation.

  19. Endophytic Phomopsis species: host range and implications for diversity estimates.

    PubMed

    Murali, T S; Suryanarayanan, T S; Geeta, R

    2006-07-01

    Foliar endophyte assemblages of teak trees growing in dry deciduous and moist deciduous forests of Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve were compared. A species of Phomopsis dominated the endophyte assemblages of teak, irrespective of the location of the host trees. Internal transcribed spacer sequence analysis of 11 different Phomopsis isolates (ten from teak and one from Cassia fistula) showed that they fall into two groups, which are separated by a relatively long branch that is strongly supported. The results showed that this fungus is not host restricted and that it continues to survive as a saprotroph in teak leaf, possibly by exploiting senescent leaves as well as the litter. Although the endophyte assemblage of a teak tree growing about 500 km from the forests was also dominated by a Phomopsis sp., it separated into a different group based on internal transcribed spacer sequence analysis. Our results with an endophytic Phomopsis sp. reinforce the earlier conclusions reached by others for pathogenic Phomopsis sp., i.e., that this fungus is not host specific, and the species concept of Phomopsis needs to be redefined.

  20. Controls on pathogen species richness in plants introduced and native ranges: roles of residence time, range size and host traits

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction of hosts to new geographic regions allows them to escape many pathogens, raising two questions. How quickly do introduced hosts accumulate pathogens? Do the same factors control pathogen accumulation as in the native range? We analyzed fungal and viral pathogen species richness on 124 p...

  1. Geographic host use variabiliy and host range evolutionary dynamics in the phytophagous insect Apagomerella versicolor (Cerambycidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The high diversity of phytophagous insects has been explained by the tendency of the group towards specialization; however, generalism may be advantageous in some environments. The cerambycid Apagomerella versicolor exhibits intraspecific geographical variation in host use. In northern Argentina it ...

  2. Alterations in gp37 expand the host range of a T4-like phage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mianmian; Zhang, Lei; Abdelgader, Sheikheldin A; Yu, Li; Xu, Juntian; Yao, Huochun; Lu, Chengping; Zhang, Wei

    2017-09-22

    The use of phages as antibacterial agents is limited by their generally narrow host range. The aim of this study was to make a T4-like phage, WG01, obtain the host range of another T4-like phage, QL01, by replacing its host determinant gene region with that of QL01. This process triggered a direct expansion of the WG01 host range. The offspring of WG01 obtained the host ranges of both QL01 and WG01, as well as the ability to infect eight additional host bacteria in comparison to the wildtype strains. WQD had the widest host range; therefore, the corresponding QD fragments could be used for constructing a homologous sequence library. Moreover, after a sequencing analysis of gene37, we identified two different mechanisms responsible for the expanded host range: 1) the first generation of WG01 formed chimeras without mutations; and 2) the second generation of WG01 mutants formed from the chimeras. The expansion of the host range indicated that regions other than the C-terminal region may indirectly change the receptor specificity by altering the supportive capacity of the binding site. Additionally, we also found that the subsequent generations acquired a novel means of expanding the host range through acquiring a wider temperature range for lysis by exchanging gene37. The method developed in this work offers a quick way to change or expand the host range of a phage. Future clinical applications for screening phages against a given clinical isolate could be achieved after acquiring more suitable homologous sequences.IMPORTANCE T4-like phages have been established as safe in numerous phage therapy applications. The primary drawbacks to the use of phages as therapeutic agents include their highly specific host range. Thus, changing or expanding the host range of T4-like phages is beneficial for selecting phages for phage therapy. In this study, the host range of one T4-like phage WG01 was expanded using genetic manipulation. The WG01 derivatives acquired a novel means

  3. Prevalence of Broad-Host-Range Lytic Bacteriophages of Sphaerotilus natans, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Ellen C.; Schrader, Holly S.; Rieland, Brenda; Thompson, Thomas L.; Lee, Kit W.; Nickerson, Kenneth W.; Kokjohn, Tyler A.

    1998-01-01

    Two bacteriophage collections were examined with regard to their ability to form plaques on multiple bacterial host species. Nine of 10 phages studied were found to be broad-host-range bacteriophages. These phages fell into two groups. Group 1, the SN series, was isolated from sewage treatment plant samples with Sphaerotilus natans ATCC 13338 as a host. The DNAs of these bacteriophages contained modified bases and were insensitive to cleavage by type I and II restriction endonucleases. The efficiency of plating of these bacteriophages was changed only slightly on the alternate host. Group 2, the BHR series, was isolated by a two-host enrichment protocol. These bacteriophages were sensitive to restriction, and their efficiency of plating was dramatically reduced on the alternate host. Our results suggest that a multiple-host enrichment protocol may be more effective for the isolation of broad-host-range bacteriophages by avoiding the selection bias inherent in single-host methods. At least two of the broad-host-range bacteriophages mediated generalized transduction. We suggest that broad-host-range bacteriophages play a key role in phage ecology and gene transfer in nature. PMID:9464396

  4. Geographically structured host specificity is caused by the range expansions and host shifts of a symbiotic fungus.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Benjamin E; Pringle, Anne

    2012-04-01

    The inability to associate with local species may constrain the spread of mutualists arriving to new habitats, but the fates of introduced, microbial mutualists are largely unknown. The deadly poisonous ectomycorrhizal fungus Amanita phalloides (the death cap) is native to Europe and introduced to the East and West Coasts of North America. By cataloging host associations across the two continents, we record dramatic changes in specificity among the three ranges. On the East Coast, where the fungus is restricted in its distribution, it associates almost exclusively with pines, which are rarely hosts of A. phalloides in its native range. In California, where the fungus is widespread and locally abundant, it associates almost exclusively with oaks, mirroring the host associations observed in Europe. The most common host of the death cap in California is the endemic coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia), and the current distribution of A. phalloides appears constrained within the distribution of Q. agrifolia. In California, host shifts to native plants are also associated with a near doubling in the resources allocated to sexual reproduction and a prolonged fruiting period; mushrooms are twice as large as they are elsewhere and mushrooms are found throughout the year. Host and niche shifts are likely to shape the continuing range expansion of A. phalloides and other ectomycorrhizal fungi introduced across the world.

  5. Geographically structured host specificity is caused by the range expansions and host shifts of a symbiotic fungus

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Benjamin E; Pringle, Anne

    2012-01-01

    The inability to associate with local species may constrain the spread of mutualists arriving to new habitats, but the fates of introduced, microbial mutualists are largely unknown. The deadly poisonous ectomycorrhizal fungus Amanita phalloides (the death cap) is native to Europe and introduced to the East and West Coasts of North America. By cataloging host associations across the two continents, we record dramatic changes in specificity among the three ranges. On the East Coast, where the fungus is restricted in its distribution, it associates almost exclusively with pines, which are rarely hosts of A. phalloides in its native range. In California, where the fungus is widespread and locally abundant, it associates almost exclusively with oaks, mirroring the host associations observed in Europe. The most common host of the death cap in California is the endemic coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia), and the current distribution of A. phalloides appears constrained within the distribution of Q. agrifolia. In California, host shifts to native plants are also associated with a near doubling in the resources allocated to sexual reproduction and a prolonged fruiting period; mushrooms are twice as large as they are elsewhere and mushrooms are found throughout the year. Host and niche shifts are likely to shape the continuing range expansion of A. phalloides and other ectomycorrhizal fungi introduced across the world. PMID:22134645

  6. Host range of Caloptilia triadicae (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae): an adventive herbivore of Chinese tallowtree (Malpighiales: Euphorbiaceae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In its native range the invasive weed, Rhodomyrtus tomentosa is host to a suite of herbivores. One, Strepsicrates sp. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) was collected in China in 2014, introduced under quarantine in Florida, USA and tested against related species to determine its host range and suitability ...

  7. Fate of ingested iridoid glycosides in lepidopteran herbivores.

    PubMed

    Bowers, M D; Puttick, G M

    1986-01-01

    Thin-layer chromatography was used to follow the fates of iridoid glycosides ingested by four species of lepidopteran herbivores. These four species differed in their feeding strategy, ranging from generalist to monophagous specialist; and in their predator avoidance strategy, ranging from cryptic and palatable to aposematic and unpalatable. The fates of the iridoid glycosides ranged from sequestration by the unpalatable specialist,Euphydryas phaeton (Nymphalidae); to passage into the hemolymph and eventual elimination in the meconium by the specialistsJunonia coenia (Nymphalidae) andCeratomia catalpas (Sphingidae); to elimination of the intact compounds in the feces of the generalist feeder,Lymantria dispar (Lymantriidae).

  8. Biogeographic Variation in Host Range Phenotypes and Taxonomic Composition of Marine Cyanophage Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, China A.; Marston, Marcia F.; Martiny, Jennifer B. H.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the important role of phages in marine systems, little is understood about how their diversity is distributed in space. Biogeographic patterns of marine phages may be difficult to detect due to their vast genetic diversity, which may not be accurately represented by conserved marker genes. To investigate the spatial biogeographic structure of marine phages, we isolated over 400 cyanophages on Synechococcus host strain WH7803 at three coastal locations in the United States (Rhode Island, Washington, and southern California). Approximately 90% of the cyanophage isolates were myoviruses, while the other 10% were podoviruses. The diversity of isolates was further characterized in two ways: (i) taxonomically, using conserved marker genes and (ii) phenotypically, by testing isolates for their ability to infect a suite of hosts, or their “host range.” Because host range is a highly variable trait even among closely related isolates, we hypothesized that host range phenotypes of cyanophage isolates would vary more strongly among locations than would taxonomic composition. Instead, we found evidence for strong biogeographic variation both in taxonomic composition and host range phenotypes, with little taxonomic overlap among the three coastal regions. For both taxonomic composition and host range phenotypes, cyanophage communities from California and Rhode Island were the most dissimilar, while Washington communities exhibited similarity to each of the other two locations. These results suggest that selection imposed by spatial variation in host dynamics influence the biogeographic distribution of cyanophages. PMID:27446023

  9. Characterisation of Host Growth after Infection with a Broad-Range Freshwater Cyanopodophage

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Siobhan C.; Smith, James R.; Hayes, Paul K.; Watts, Joy E. M.

    2014-01-01

    Freshwater cyanophages are poorly characterised in comparison to their marine counterparts, however, the level of genetic diversity that exists in freshwater cyanophage communities is likely to exceed that found in marine environments, due to the habitat heterogeneity within freshwater systems. Many cyanophages are specialists, infecting a single host species or strain; however, some are less fastidious and infect a number of different host genotypes within the same species or even hosts from different genera. Few instances of host growth characterisation after infection by broad host-range phages have been described. Here we provide an initial characterisation of interactions between a cyanophage isolated from a freshwater fishing lake in the south of England and its hosts. Designated ΦMHI42, the phage is able to infect isolates from two genera of freshwater cyanobacteria, Planktothrix and Microcystis. Transmission Electron Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy indicate that ΦMHI42 is a member of the Podoviridae, albeit with a larger than expected capsid. The kinetics of host growth after infection with ΦMHI42 differed across host genera, species and strains in a way that was not related to the growth rate of the uninfected host. To our knowledge, this is the first characterisation of the growth of cyanobacteria in the presence of a broad host-range freshwater cyanophage. PMID:24489900

  10. Shifts in Host Range of a Promiscuous Plasmid through Parallel Evolution of its Replication Initiation Protein

    PubMed Central

    Sota, Masahiro; Yano, Hirokazu; Hughes, Julie; Daughdrill, Gary W.; Abdo, Zaid; Forney, Larry J.; Top, Eva M.

    2011-01-01

    The ability of bacterial plasmids to adapt to novel hosts and thereby shift their host range is key to their long-term persistence in bacterial communities. Promiscuous plasmids of the IncP-1 group can colonize a wide range of hosts, but it is not known if and how they can contract, shift or further expand their host range. To understand the evolutionary mechanisms of host range shifts of IncP-1 plasmids, an IncP-1β mini-replicon was experimentally evolved in four hosts wherein it was initially unstable. After 1000 generations in serial batch cultures under antibiotic selection for plasmid maintenance (kanamycin resistance), the stability of the mini-plasmid had dramatically improved in all coevolved hosts. However, only plasmids evolved in Shewanella oneidensis showed improved stability in the ancestor, indicating that adaptive mutations had occurred in the plasmid itself. Complete genome sequence analysis of nine independently evolved plasmids showed seven unique plasmid genotypes that had various kinds of single mutations at one locus, namely the N-terminal region of the replication initiation protein TrfA. Such parallel evolution indicates that this region was under strong selection. In five of the seven evolved plasmids these trfA mutations resulted in a significantly higher plasmid copy number. Evolved plasmids were found to be stable in four other naïve hosts, but could no longer replicate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This study demonstrates that plasmids can specialize to a novel host through trade-offs between improved stability in the new host and the ability to replicate in a previously permissive host. PMID:20520653

  11. Narrow- and Broad-Host-Range Symbiotic Plasmids of Rhizobium spp. Strains That Nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Brom, Susana; Martinez, Esperanza; Dávila, Guillermo; Palacios, Rafael

    1988-01-01

    Agrobacterium transconjugants containing symbiotic plasmids from different Rhizobium spp. strains that nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris were obtained. All transconjugants conserved the parental nodulation host range. Symbiotic (Sym) plasmids of Rhizobium strains isolated originally from P. vulgaris nodules, which had a broad nodulation host range, and single-copy nitrogenase genes conferred a Fix+ phenotype to the Agrobacterium transconjugants. A Fix− phenotype was obtained with Sym plasmids of strains isolated from P. vulgaris nodules that had a narrow host range and reiterated nif genes, as well as with Sym plasmids of strains isolated from other legumes that presented single nif genes and a broad nodulation host range. This indicates that different types of Sym plasmids can confer the ability to establish an effective symbiosis with P. vulgaris. Images PMID:16347637

  12. Experimental Adaptation of Burkholderia cenocepacia to Onion Medium Reduces Host Range ▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Crystal N.; Cooper, Vaughn S.

    2010-01-01

    It is unclear whether adaptation to a new host typically broadens or compromises host range, yet the answer bears on the fate of emergent pathogens and symbionts. We investigated this dynamic using a soil isolate of Burkholderia cenocepacia, a species that normally inhabits the rhizosphere, is related to the onion pathogen B. cepacia, and can infect the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. We hypothesized that adaptation of B. cenocepacia to a novel host would compromise fitness and virulence in alternative hosts. We modeled adaptation to a specific host by experimentally evolving 12 populations of B. cenocepacia in liquid medium composed of macerated onion tissue for 1,000 generations. The mean fitness of all populations increased by 78% relative to the ancestor, but significant variation among lines was observed. Populations also varied in several phenotypes related to host association, including motility, biofilm formation, and quorum-sensing function. Together, these results suggest that each population adapted by fixing different sets of adaptive mutations. However, this adaptation was consistently accompanied by a loss of pathogenicity to the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans; by 500 generations most populations became unable to kill nematodes. In conclusion, we observed a narrowing of host range as a consequence of prolonged adaptation to an environment simulating a specific host, and we suggest that emergent pathogens may face similar consequences if they become host-restricted. PMID:20154121

  13. Host plant range of Raoiella indica (Acari: Tenuipalpidae) in areas of invasion of the New World.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Daniel; Amalin, Divina; Hosein, Farzan; Roda, Amy; Duncan, Rita E; Peña, Jorge E

    2012-08-01

    Raoiella indica has spread rapidly through the Neotropical region where the mite damages economically and ecologically important plants. Three studies were conducted to determine the host plant range of R. indica, using the presence of colonies containing all life stages as an indicator of reproductive suitability. Periodic surveys at the Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden (Miami Dade County, FL, USA) and the Royal Botanical Gardens (Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago) identified 27 new reproductive host plants. The reproductive suitability of two dicotyledonous species and three native Florida palm species was examined. An updated list of reproductive host plants of R. indica is presented. All reported reproductive hosts (91 plant species) of R. indica are monocots from the orders Arecales (Arecaceae), Zingiberales (Heliconiaceae, Musaceae, Strelitziaceae, Zingiberaceae) and Pandanales (Pandanaceae). Most are palms of the family Arecaceae that originated in areas of the Eastern Hemisphere; about one fourth of the reported hosts are native to the New World and could be considered new host associations of R. indica. Six years after the initial detection in the Caribbean, R. indica has expanded its host plant range. Here we report 27 new reproductive host of R. indica that represent 30% of increase on previous host plant records. As this mite continues spreading in the Neotropical region a great diversity of plants is potentially affected.

  14. Leuconostoc mesenteroides and Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides bacteriophages: Genomics and cross-species host ranges.

    PubMed

    Pujato, Silvina A; Guglielmotti, Daniela M; Martínez-García, Manuel; Quiberoni, Andrea; Mojica, Francisco J M

    2017-09-18

    Unveiling virus-host interactions are relevant for understanding the biology and evolution of microbes globally, but in particular, it has also a paramount impact on the manufacture of fermented dairy products. In this study, we aim at characterizing phages infecting the commonly used heterofermentative Leuconostoc spp. on the basis of host range patterns and genome analysis. Host range of six Leuconostoc phages was investigated using three methods (efficiency of plaquing, spot and turbidity tests) against Ln. mesenteroides and Ln. pseudomesenteroides strains. Complete genome sequencing from four out of the six studied Leuconostoc phages were obtained in this work, while the remaining two have been sequenced previously. According to our results, cross-species host specificity was demonstrated, as all phages tested were capable of infecting both Ln. pseudomesenteroides and Ln. mesenteroides strains, although with different efficiency of plaquing (EOP). Phage adsorption rates and ability of low-EOP host strains to propagate phages by crossing the Leuconostoc species' barrier confirm results. At the genome level, phages CHA, CHB, Ln-7, Ln-8 and Ln-9 revealed high similarity with previously characterized phages infecting mostly Ln. mesenteroides strains, while phage LDG was highly similar to phages infecting Ln. pseudomesenteroides. Additionally, correlation between receptor binding protein (RBP) and host range patterns allowed us to unveil a finer clustering of Leuconostoc phages studied into four groups. This is the first report of overlapped phage host ranges between Leuconostoc species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A plant virus evolved by acquiring multiple nonconserved genes to extend its host range

    PubMed Central

    Tatineni, Satyanarayana; Robertson, Cecile J.; Garnsey, Stephen M.; Dawson, William O.

    2011-01-01

    Viruses have evolved as combinations of genes whose products interact with cellular components to produce progeny virus throughout the plants. Some viral genes, particularly those that are involved in replication and assembly, tend to be relatively conserved, whereas other genes that have evolved for interactions with the specific host for movement and to counter host–defense systems tend to be less conserved. Closteroviridae encode 1–5 nonconserved ORFs. Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), a Closterovirus, possesses nonconserved p33, p18, and p13 genes that are expendable for systemic infection of the two laboratory hosts, Citrus macrophylla and Mexican lime. In this study, we show that the extended host range of CTV requires these nonconserved genes. The p33 gene was required to systemically infect sour orange and lemon trees, whereas either the p33 or the p18 gene was sufficient for systemic infection of grapefruit trees and the p33 or the p13 gene was sufficient for systemic infection of calamondin plants. Thus, these three genes are required for systemic infection of the full host range of CTV, but different genes were specific for different hosts. Remarkably, either of two genes was sufficient for infection of some citrus hybrids. These findings suggest that CTV acquired multiple nonconserved genes (p33, p18, and p13) and, as a result, gained the ability to interact with multiple hosts, thus extending its host range during the course of evolution. These results greatly extend the complexity of known virus–plant interactions. PMID:21987809

  16. Infection of non-host model plant species with the narrow-host-range Cacao swollen shoot virus.

    PubMed

    Friscina, Arianna; Chiappetta, Laura; Jacquemond, Mireille; Tepfer, Mark

    2017-02-01

    Cacao swollen shoot virus (CSSV) is a major pathogen of cacao (Theobroma cacao) in Africa, and long-standing efforts to limit its spread by the culling of infected trees have had very limited success. CSSV is a particularly difficult virus to study, as it has a very narrow host range, limited to several tropical tree species. Furthermore, the virus is not mechanically transmissible, and its insect vector can only be used with difficulty. Thus, the only efficient means to infect cacao plants that have been experimentally described so far are by particle bombardment or the agroinoculation of cacao plants with an infectious clone. We have genetically transformed three non-host species with an infectious form of the CSSV genome: two experimental hosts widely used in plant virology (Nicotiana tabacum and N. benthamiana) and the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. In transformed plants of all three species, the CSSV genome was able to replicate, and, in tobacco, CSSV particles could be observed by immunosorbent electron microscopy, demonstrating that the complete virus cycle could be completed in a non-host plant. These results will greatly facilitate the preliminary testing of CSSV control strategies using plants that are easy to raise and to transform genetically. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  17. Evolutionary Paths That Expand Plasmid Host-Range: Implications for Spread of Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Loftie-Eaton, Wesley; Yano, Hirokazu; Burleigh, Stephen; Simmons, Ryan S; Hughes, Julie M; Rogers, Linda M; Hunter, Samuel S; Settles, Matthew L; Forney, Larry J; Ponciano, José M; Top, Eva M

    2016-04-01

    The World Health Organization has declared the emergence of antibiotic resistance to be a global threat to human health. Broad-host-range plasmids have a key role in causing this health crisis because they transfer multiple resistance genes to a wide range of bacteria. To limit the spread of antibiotic resistance, we need to gain insight into the mechanisms by which the host range of plasmids evolves. Although initially unstable plasmids have been shown to improve their persistence through evolution of the plasmid, the host, or both, the means by which this occurs are poorly understood. Here, we sought to identify the underlying genetic basis of expanded plasmid host-range and increased persistence of an antibiotic resistance plasmid using a combined experimental-modeling approach that included whole-genome resequencing, molecular genetics and a plasmid population dynamics model. In nine of the ten previously evolved clones, changes in host and plasmid each slightly improved plasmid persistence, but their combination resulted in a much larger improvement, which indicated positive epistasis. The only genetic change in the plasmid was the acquisition of a transposable element from a plasmid native to the Pseudomonas host used in these studies. The analysis of genetic deletions showed that the critical genes on this transposon encode a putative toxin-antitoxin (TA) and a cointegrate resolution system. As evolved plasmids were able to persist longer in multiple naïve hosts, acquisition of this transposon also expanded the plasmid's host range, which has important implications for the spread of antibiotic resistance. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Genomic Variation, Host Range, and Infection Kinetics of Closely Related Cyanopodoviruses from New England Coastal Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veglia, A. J.; Milford, C. R.; Marston, M.

    2016-02-01

    Viruses infecting marine Synechococcus are abundant in coastal marine environments and influence the community composition and abundance of their cyanobacterial hosts. In this study, we focused on the cyanopodoviruses which have smaller genomes and narrower host ranges relative to cyanomyoviruses. While previous studies have compared the genomes of diverse podoviruses, here we analyzed the genomic variation, host ranges, and infection kinetics of podoviruses within the same OTU. The genomes of fifty-five podoviral isolates from the coastal waters of New England were fully sequenced. Based on DNA polymerase gene sequences, these isolates fall into five discrete OTUs (termed RIP - Rhode Island Podovirus). Although all the isolates belonging to the same RIP have very similar DNA polymerase gene sequences (>98% sequence identity), differences in genome content, particularly in regions associated with tail fiber genes, were observed among isolates in the same RIP. Host range tests reveal variation both across and within RIPs. Notably within RIP1, isolates that had similar tail fiber regions also had similar host ranges. Isolates belonging to RIP4 do not contain the host-derived psbA photosynthesis gene, while isolates in the other four RIPs do possess a psbA gene. Nevertheless, infection kinetic experiments suggest that the latent period and burst size for RIP4 isolates are similar to RIP1 isolates. We are continuing to investigate the correlations among genome content, host range, and infection kinetics of isolates belonging to the same OTU. Our results to date suggest that there is substantial genomic variation within an OTU and that this variation likely influences cyanopodoviral - host interactions.

  19. Evolutionary interpretations of mycobacteriophage biodiversity and host-range through the analysis of codon usage bias

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Lauren A.; Gupta, Swati; Streiter, Fraida; Prasad, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    In an genomics course sponsored by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), undergraduate students have isolated and sequenced the genomes of more than 1,150 mycobacteriophages, creating the largest database of sequenced bacteriophages able to infect a single host, Mycobacterium smegmatis, a soil bacterium. Genomic analysis indicates that these mycobacteriophages can be grouped into 26 clusters based on genetic similarity. These clusters span a continuum of genetic diversity, with extensive genomic mosaicism among phages in different clusters. However, little is known regarding the primary hosts of these mycobacteriophages in their natural habitats, nor of their broader host ranges. As such, it is possible that the primary host of many newly isolated mycobacteriophages is not M. smegmatis, but instead a range of closely related bacterial species. However, determining mycobacteriophage host range presents difficulties associated with mycobacterial cultivability, pathogenicity and growth. Another way to gain insight into mycobacteriophage host range and ecology is through bioinformatic analysis of their genomic sequences. To this end, we examined the correlations between the codon usage biases of 199 different mycobacteriophages and those of several fully sequenced mycobacterial species in order to gain insight into the natural host range of these mycobacteriophages. We find that UPGMA clustering tends to match, but not consistently, clustering by shared nucleotide sequence identify. In addition, analysis of GC content, tRNA usage and correlations between mycobacteriophage and mycobacterial codon usage bias suggests that the preferred host of many clustered mycobacteriophages is not M. smegmatis but other, as yet unknown, members of the mycobacteria complex or closely allied bacterial species. PMID:28348827

  20. Bacteriophages isolated from Lake Michigan demonstrate broad host-range across several bacterial phyla.

    PubMed

    Malki, Kema; Kula, Alex; Bruder, Katherine; Sible, Emily; Hatzopoulos, Thomas; Steidel, Stephanie; Watkins, Siobhan C; Putonti, Catherine

    2015-10-09

    The study of bacteriophages continues to generate key information about microbial interactions in the environment. Many phenotypic characteristics of bacteriophages cannot be examined by sequencing alone, further highlighting the necessity for isolation and examination of phages from environmental samples. While much of our current knowledge base has been generated by the study of marine phages, freshwater viruses are understudied in comparison. Our group has previously conducted metagenomics-based studies samples collected from Lake Michigan - the data presented in this study relate to four phages that were extracted from the same samples. Four phages were extracted from Lake Michigan on the same bacterial host, exhibiting similar morphological characteristics as shown under transmission electron microscopy. Growth characteristics of the phages were unique to each isolate. Each phage demonstrated a host-range spanning several phyla of bacteria - to date, such a broad host-range is yet to be reported. Genomic data reveals genomes of a similar size, and close similarities between the Lake Michigan phages and the Pseudomonas phage PB1, however, the majority of annotated genes present were ORFans and little insight was offered into mechanisms for host-range. The phages isolated from Lake Michigan are capable of infecting several bacterial phyla, and demonstrate varied phenotypic characteristics despite similarities in host preference, and at the genomic level. We propose that such a broad host-range is likely related to the oligotrophic nature of Lake Michigan, and the competitive benefit that this characteristic may lend to phages in nature.

  1. Host range diversification within the IncP-1 plasmid group

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Hirokazu; Rogers, Linda M.; Knox, Molly G.; Heuer, Holger; Smalla, Kornelia; Brown, Celeste J.

    2013-01-01

    Broad-host-range plasmids play a critical role in the spread of antibiotic resistance and other traits. In spite of increasing information about the genomic diversity of closely related plasmids, the relationship between sequence divergence and host range remains unclear. IncP-1 plasmids are currently classified into six subgroups based on the genetic distance of backbone genes. We investigated whether plasmids from two subgroups exhibit a different host range, using two IncP-1γ plasmids, an IncP-1β plasmid and their minireplicons. Efficiencies of plasmid establishment and maintenance were compared using five species that belong to the Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. The IncP-1β plasmid replicated and persisted in all five hosts in the absence of selection. Of the two IncP-1γ plasmids, both were unable to replicate in alphaproteobacterial host Sphingobium japonicum, and one established itself in Agrobacterium tumefaciens but was very unstable. In contrast, both IncP-1γ minireplicons, which produced higher levels of replication initiation protein than the wild-type plasmids, replicated in all strains, suggesting that poor establishment of the native plasmids is in part due to suboptimal replication initiation gene regulation. The findings suggest that host ranges of distinct IncP-1 plasmids only partially overlap, which may limit plasmid recombination and thus result in further genome divergence. PMID:24002747

  2. Electrically and optically tunable plasmonic guest-host liquid crystals with long-range ordered nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingkun; Yuan, Ye; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2014-07-09

    Practical guest-host devices in which dichroic dye molecules follow electrical switching of a liquid crystal host remain elusive for decades despite promising efficient displays and emergent applications such as smart windows. This is mainly because of poor stability, surface precipitation, and limited means for property engineering of the dyes. To overcome these challenges, we develop plasmonic metal nanoparticle analogues of dichroic guest-host liquid crystals. Nematic dispersions of aligned anisotropic gold nanoparticles are obtained by polymer passivation of their surfaces to impose weak tangential boundary conditions for orientation of anisotropic host molecules. Control of the ensuing surface interactions leads to long-range ordered colloidal dispersions, allowing for collective optical and electrical switching of rod- and platelet-like nanoparticles. This facile control of mesostructured plasmonic medium's optical properties in visible and infrared spectral ranges is of interest for many applications.

  3. Host-range Characterization of Two Pratylenchus coffeae Isolates from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Silva, R. A.; Inomoto, M. M.

    2002-01-01

    Two isolates of Pratylenchus coffeae were collected from coffee roots (in Marília, São Paulo State, Brazil) and Aglaonema (in Rio de Janeiro City, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil) and maintained in the laboratory on alfalfa callus. Twenty-four plants were tested in the greenhouse to characterize the host preference of these isolates. The host ranges of the isolates differed from each other and, interestingly, coffee, banana, and citrus were not among the better hosts of either isolate. Rather, sorghum, maize, rice, millet, okra, melon, eggplant, and lettuce were the best hosts of the Marília isolate. Poor hosts included French marigold, Rangpur lime, banana, sesame, peanut, sunflower, cotton, French bean, onion, and small onion. The best hosts of the Rio de Janeiro isolate were sesame, soybean, sorghum, castor oil plant, watermelon, squash, eggplant, and melon; the poorest hosts were French marigold, coffee, Rangpur lime, banana, sunflower, peanut, maize, millet, French bean, cotton, onion, sweet pepper, lettuce, okra, and small onion. These isolates have important molecular and morphological differences, suggesting host preference is linked to these characteristics. PMID:19265921

  4. Host plant range of a fruit fly community (Diptera: Tephritidae): does fruit composition influence larval performance?

    PubMed

    Hafsi, Abir; Facon, Benoit; Ravigné, Virginie; Chiroleu, Frédéric; Quilici, Serge; Chermiti, Brahim; Duyck, Pierre-François

    2016-09-20

    Phytophagous insects differ in their degree of specialisation on host plants, and range from strictly monophagous species that can develop on only one host plant to extremely polyphagous species that can develop on hundreds of plant species in many families. Nutritional compounds in host fruits affect several larval traits that may be related to adult fitness. In this study, we determined the relationship between fruit nutrient composition and the degree of host specialisation of seven of the eight tephritid species present in La Réunion; these species are known to have very different host ranges in natura. In the laboratory, larval survival, larval developmental time, and pupal weight were assessed on 22 fruit species occurring in La Réunion. In addition, data on fruit nutritional composition were obtained from existing databases. For each tephritid, the three larval traits were significantly affected by fruit species and the effects of fruits on larval traits differed among tephritids. As expected, the polyphagous species Bactrocera zonata, Ceratitis catoirii, C. rosa, and C. capitata were able to survive on a larger range of fruits than the oligophagous species Zeugodacus cucurbitae, Dacus demmerezi, and Neoceratitis cyanescens. Pupal weight was positively correlated with larval survival and was negatively correlated with developmental time for polyphagous species. Canonical correspondence analysis of the relationship between fruit nutrient composition and tephritid survival showed that polyphagous species survived better than oligophagous ones in fruits containing higher concentrations of carbohydrate, fibre, and lipid. Nutrient composition of host fruit at least partly explains the suitability of host fruits for larvae. Completed with female preferences experiments these results will increase our understanding of factors affecting tephritid host range.

  5. Structural basis for antagonizing a host restriction factor by C7 family of poxvirus host-range proteins

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiangzhi; Krumm, Brian; Li, Yongchao; Deng, Junpeng; Xiang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Human sterile alpha motif domain-containing 9 (SAMD9) protein is a host restriction factor for poxviruses, but it can be overcome by some poxvirus host-range proteins that share homology with vaccinia virus C7 protein. To understand the mechanism of action for this important family of host-range factors, we determined the crystal structures of C7 and myxoma virus M64, a C7 family member that is unable to antagonize SAMD9. Despite their different functions and only 23% sequence identity, the two proteins have very similar overall structures, displaying a previously unidentified fold comprised of a compact 12-stranded antiparallel β-sandwich wrapped in two short α helices. Extensive structure-guided mutagenesis of C7 identified three loops clustered on one edge of the β sandwich as critical for viral replication and binding with SAMD9. The loops are characterized with functionally important negatively charged, positively charged, and hydrophobic residues, respectively, together forming a unique “three-fingered molecular claw.” The key residues of the claw are not conserved in two C7 family members that do not antagonize SAMD9 but are conserved in distantly related C7 family members from four poxvirus genera that infect diverse mammalian species. Indeed, we found that all in the latter group of proteins bind SAMD9. Taken together, our data indicate that diverse mammalian poxviruses use a conserved molecular claw in a C7-like protein to target SAMD9 and overcome host restriction. PMID:26578811

  6. Identification of FAM111A as an SV40 Host Range Restriction and Adenovirus Helper Factor

    PubMed Central

    Padi, Megha; Korkhin, Anna; James, Robert L.; Adelmant, Guillaume; Yoon, Rosa; Guo, Luxuan; Berrios, Christian; Zhang, Ying; Calderwood, Michael A.; Velmurgan, Soundarapandian; Cheng, Jingwei; Marto, Jarrod A.; Hill, David E.; Cusick, Michael E.; Vidal, Marc; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.; Litovchick, Larisa; DeCaprio, James A.

    2012-01-01

    The small genome of polyomaviruses encodes a limited number of proteins that are highly dependent on interactions with host cell proteins for efficient viral replication. The SV40 large T antigen (LT) contains several discrete functional domains including the LXCXE or RB-binding motif, the DNA binding and helicase domains that contribute to the viral life cycle. In addition, the LT C-terminal region contains the host range and adenovirus helper functions required for lytic infection in certain restrictive cell types. To understand how LT affects the host cell to facilitate viral replication, we expressed full-length or functional domains of LT in cells, identified interacting host proteins and carried out expression profiling. LT perturbed the expression of p53 target genes and subsets of cell-cycle dependent genes regulated by the DREAM and the B-Myb-MuvB complexes. Affinity purification of LT followed by mass spectrometry revealed a specific interaction between the LT C-terminal region and FAM111A, a previously uncharacterized protein. Depletion of FAM111A recapitulated the effects of heterologous expression of the LT C-terminal region, including increased viral gene expression and lytic infection of SV40 host range mutants and adenovirus replication in restrictive cells. FAM111A functions as a host range restriction factor that is specifically targeted by SV40 LT. PMID:23093934

  7. Deep phylogeographical structure and parallel host range evolution in the leaf beetle Agelasa nigriceps.

    PubMed

    Kohyama, Tetsuo I; Matsumoto, Kazuma; Katakura, Haruo

    2014-02-01

    To understand the mechanisms behind the diversification of herbivorous insects through insect-plant interactions, it is important to know how the insects change their diet breadth in response to environmental changes. In this study, we investigated the phylogeographical pattern of the leaf beetle Agelasa nigriceps to infer the evolutionary history of its host range. While this beetle commonly uses Actinidia arguta (Actinidiaceae) as a host plant, it has been recorded recently on Pterostyrax hispidus (Styracaceae), which is now increasing in abundance at some localities in Japan due to the indirect effects of high population size of a mammalian herbivore. Considerable variation among populations in the ability of Ag. nigriceps to use P. hispidus suggests that P. hispidus is a newly acquired host plant for this beetle. Phylogenetic analyses using mitochondrial DNA sequences and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) revealed a high degree of phylogeographical structure in Ag. nigriceps throughout Japan, which is consistent with the hypothesis that several glacial refugia existed in the Japanese archipelago. In contrast, no genetic structure associated with the host plants was detected. Both the mitochondrial DNA and AFLP analyses showed that populations that can use P. hispidus are polyphyletic. These results and geographical variation in host use suggest that the host range expansion to a novel host, P. hispidus, is a very recent and possibly ongoing phenomenon and has occurred independently in several regions. Our study illustrates that the host range of herbivorous insects can evolve repeatedly in response to similar environmental changes.

  8. Implications of a temperature increase for host plant range: predictions for a butterfly.

    PubMed

    Audusseau, Hélène; Nylin, Sören; Janz, Niklas

    2013-09-01

    Although changes in phenology and species associations are relatively well-documented responses to global warming, the potential interactions between these phenomena are less well understood. In this study, we investigate the interactions between temperature, phenology (in terms of seasonal timing of larval growth) and host plant use in the polyphagous butterfly Polygonia c-album. We found that the hierarchy of larval performance on three natural host plants was not modified by a temperature increase as such. However, larval performance on each host plant and temperature treatment was affected by rearing season. Even though larvae performed better at the higher temperature regardless of the time of the rearing, relative differences between host plants changed with the season. For larvae reared late in the season, performance was always better on the herbaceous plant than on the woody plants. In this species, it is likely that a prolonged warming will lead to a shift from univoltinism to bivoltinism. The demonstrated interaction between host plant suitability and season means that such a shift is likely to lead to a shift in selective regime, favoring specialization on the herbaceous host. Based on our result, we suggest that host range evolution in response to temperature increase would in this species be highly contingent on whether the population undergoes a predicted shift from one to two generations. We discuss the effect of global warming on species associations and the outcome of asynchrony in rates of phenological change.

  9. Implications of a temperature increase for host plant range: predictions for a butterfly

    PubMed Central

    Audusseau, Hélène; Nylin, Sören; Janz, Niklas

    2013-01-01

    Although changes in phenology and species associations are relatively well-documented responses to global warming, the potential interactions between these phenomena are less well understood. In this study, we investigate the interactions between temperature, phenology (in terms of seasonal timing of larval growth) and host plant use in the polyphagous butterfly Polygonia c-album. We found that the hierarchy of larval performance on three natural host plants was not modified by a temperature increase as such. However, larval performance on each host plant and temperature treatment was affected by rearing season. Even though larvae performed better at the higher temperature regardless of the time of the rearing, relative differences between host plants changed with the season. For larvae reared late in the season, performance was always better on the herbaceous plant than on the woody plants. In this species, it is likely that a prolonged warming will lead to a shift from univoltinism to bivoltinism. The demonstrated interaction between host plant suitability and season means that such a shift is likely to lead to a shift in selective regime, favoring specialization on the herbaceous host. Based on our result, we suggest that host range evolution in response to temperature increase would in this species be highly contingent on whether the population undergoes a predicted shift from one to two generations. We discuss the effect of global warming on species associations and the outcome of asynchrony in rates of phenological change. PMID:24101991

  10. Investigations of the Host Range of the Corn Cyst Nematode, Heterodera zeae, from Maryland

    PubMed Central

    Ringer, Chloe E.; Sardanelli, Sandra; Krusberg, Lorin R.

    1987-01-01

    The host range of the corn cyst nematode, Heterodera zeae, recently detected in Maryland, was investigated. A total of 269 plant entries, representing 68 families, 172 genera, and 204 species, was inoculated with cysts or a mixture of eggs and second-stage juveniles of H. zeae. The host range of the Maryland population of H. zeae was limited to plants of the Gramineae and included 11 tribes, 33 genera, 42 species, and 77 entries. All 22 corn (Zea mays) cultivars tested were hosts. Other economic hosts included certain cultivars of barley (Hordeum vulgare), oat (Arena sativa), rice (Oryza sativa), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), sugar cane (Saccharum interspecific hybrid), and wheat (Triticum aestivum). Fall panicum (Panicum dichotomiflorum), a weed species common to cultivated fields in Maryland, was also a host for H. zeae. Other hosts included meadow foxtail (Alopecurus pratensis), Calamagrostis eipgeios, Job's tears (Coix Lachryma-Jobi), green sprangletop (Leptochloa dubia), witchgrass (Panicum capillare), broomcorn (Panicum miliaceum), fountain grass (Pennisetum rueppeli), reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), common reed (Phragmites australis), eastern gamagrass (Tripsacum dactyloides), corn (Zea mays), and teosinte (Zea mexicana). PMID:19290286

  11. A Single Residue in Ebola Virus Receptor NPC1 Influences Cellular Host Range in Reptiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-07

    A single residue in Ebola virus receptor NPC1 influences cellular host range 1   in reptiles 2   3   4   Esther Ndungo1, Andrew S. Herbert2...Chandran#, email: kartik.chandran@einstein.yu.edu 19   John M. Dye#, email: john.m.dye1.civ@mail.mil 20   21   Running title: Ebola virus host range...number of disease outbreaks in human 30   populations, including the current unprecedented Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in Western 31

  12. Hybridization between two cestode species and its consequences for intermediate host range

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many parasites show an extraordinary degree of host specificity, even though a narrow range of host species reduces the likelihood of successful transmission. In this study, we evaluate the genetic basis of host specificity and transmission success of experimental F1 hybrids from two closely related tapeworm species (Schistocephalus solidus and S. pungitii), both highly specific to their respective vertebrate second intermediate hosts (three- and nine-spined sticklebacks, respectively). Methods We used an in vitro breeding system to hybridize Schistocephalus solidus and S. pungitii; hybridization rate was quantified using microsatellite markers. We measured several fitness relevant traits in pure lines of the parental parasite species as well as in their hybrids: hatching rates, infection rates in the copepod first host, and infection rates and growth in the two species of stickleback second hosts. Results We show that the parasites can hybridize in the in vitro system, although the proportion of self-fertilized offspring was higher in the heterospecific breeding pairs than in the control pure parental species. Hybrids have a lower hatching rate, but do not show any disadvantages in infection of copepods. In fish, hybrids were able to infect both stickleback species with equal frequency, whereas the pure lines were only able to infect their normal host species. Conclusions Although not yet documented in nature, our study shows that hybridization in Schistocephalus spp. is in principle possible and that, in respect to their expanded host range, the hybrids are fitter. Further studies are needed to find the reason for the maintenance of the species boundaries in wild populations. PMID:23390985

  13. Revisiting Trypanosoma rangeli Transmission Involving Susceptible and Non-Susceptible Hosts.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Luciana de Lima; Pereira, Marcos Horácio; Guarneri, Alessandra Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma rangeli infects several triatomine and mammal species in South America. Its transmission is known to occur when a healthy insect feeds on an infected mammal or when an infected insect bites a healthy mammal. In the present study we evaluated the classic way of T. rangeli transmission started by the bite of a single infected triatomine, as well as alternative ways of circulation of this parasite among invertebrate hosts. The number of metacyclic trypomastigotes eliminated from salivary glands during a blood meal was quantified for unfed and recently fed nymphs. The quantification showed that ~50,000 parasites can be liberated during a single blood meal. The transmission of T. rangeli from mice to R. prolixus was evaluated using infections started through the bite of a single infected nymph. The mice that served as the blood source for single infected nymphs showed a high percentage of infection and efficiently transmitted the infection to new insects. Parasites were recovered by xenodiagnosis in insects fed on mice with infections that lasted approximately four months. Hemolymphagy and co-feeding were tested to evaluate insect-insect T. rangeli transmission. T. rangeli was not transmitted during hemolymphagy. However, insects that had co-fed on mice with infected conspecifics exhibited infection rates of approximately 80%. Surprisingly, 16% of the recipient nymphs became infected when pigeons were used as hosts. Our results show that T. rangeli is efficiently transmitted between the evaluated hosts. Not only are the insect-mouse-insect transmission rates high, but parasites can also be transmitted between insects while co-feeding on a living host. We show for the first time that birds can be part of the T. rangeli transmission cycle as we proved that insect-insect transmission is feasible during a co-feeding on these hosts.

  14. Revisiting Trypanosoma rangeli Transmission Involving Susceptible and Non-Susceptible Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Luciana de Lima; Pereira, Marcos Horácio; Guarneri, Alessandra Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma rangeli infects several triatomine and mammal species in South America. Its transmission is known to occur when a healthy insect feeds on an infected mammal or when an infected insect bites a healthy mammal. In the present study we evaluated the classic way of T. rangeli transmission started by the bite of a single infected triatomine, as well as alternative ways of circulation of this parasite among invertebrate hosts. The number of metacyclic trypomastigotes eliminated from salivary glands during a blood meal was quantified for unfed and recently fed nymphs. The quantification showed that ~50,000 parasites can be liberated during a single blood meal. The transmission of T. rangeli from mice to R. prolixus was evaluated using infections started through the bite of a single infected nymph. The mice that served as the blood source for single infected nymphs showed a high percentage of infection and efficiently transmitted the infection to new insects. Parasites were recovered by xenodiagnosis in insects fed on mice with infections that lasted approximately four months. Hemolymphagy and co-feeding were tested to evaluate insect-insect T. rangeli transmission. T. rangeli was not transmitted during hemolymphagy. However, insects that had co-fed on mice with infected conspecifics exhibited infection rates of approximately 80%. Surprisingly, 16% of the recipient nymphs became infected when pigeons were used as hosts. Our results show that T. rangeli is efficiently transmitted between the evaluated hosts. Not only are the insect-mouse-insect transmission rates high, but parasites can also be transmitted between insects while co-feeding on a living host. We show for the first time that birds can be part of the T. rangeli transmission cycle as we proved that insect-insect transmission is feasible during a co-feeding on these hosts. PMID:26469403

  15. Biocontrol potential of Steinernema thermophilum and its symbiont Xenorhabdus indica against lepidopteran pests: virulence to egg and larval stages

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Under laboratory conditions, the biocontrol potential of Steinernema thermophilum was tested against eggs and larval stages of two important lepidopteran insect pests, Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera litura (polyphagous pests), as well as Galleria mellonella (used as a model host) . In terms of ...

  16. Genetic interactions of broad host-range plasmid RK2: evidence for a complex replication regulon.

    PubMed

    Figurski, D H; Young, C; Schreiner, H C; Pohlman, R F; Bechhofer, D H; Prince, A S; D'Amico, T F

    1985-01-01

    The kil and kor genes of RK2 are novel genetic determinants further that the kil and kor network constitutes a replication regulon, and that perhaps the function of this regulon is to ensure expression of trfA at appropriate levels. The complexity of this regulon may reflect an ability of the system to adapt to the intracellular environments of a variety of hosts. Indeed, there is tantalizing evidence that regions encoding kil or kor genes are important to host range (1,2,6,28; Schmidhauser and Helinski, pers. comm.). We are therefore hopeful that the study of these genes and the eventual determination of the molecular basis of their actions will lead to a complete understanding of the replication control and broad host range capability of IncP plasmids.

  17. Complete genome sequence of the broad-host-range strain Sinorhizobium fredii USDA257

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Here we announce the complete genome sequence of the symbiotic and nitrogen fixing bacterium Sinorhizobium fredii USDA257. The genome shares a high degree of similarity with the closely related broad-host-range strains S. fredii NGR234 and HH103. Most striking, the USDA257 genome encodes for a wealt...

  18. Oxatub[4]arene: a molecular "transformer" capable of hosting a wide range of organic cations.

    PubMed

    Jia, Fei; Wang, Hao-Yi; Li, Dong-Hao; Yang, Liu-Pan; Jiang, Wei

    2016-04-28

    The molecular "transformer", oxatub[4]arene, was found to be able to host a wide range of organic cations. The strong binding ability is believed to originate from its four interconvertible and deep-cavity conformers. The binding behavior of such adaptable receptors may provide implications for molecular recognition in nature.

  19. Draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas fuscovaginae, a broad-host-range pathogen of plants.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hitendra Kumar; da Silva, Daniel Passos; Devescovi, Giulia; Maraite, Henri; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Studholme, David J; Venturi, Vittorio

    2012-05-01

    Pseudomonas fuscovaginae was first reported as a pathogen of rice causing sheath rot in plants grown at high altitudes. P. fuscovaginae is now considered a broad-host-range plant pathogen causing disease in several economically important plants. We report what is, to our knowledge, the first draft genome sequence of a P. fuscovaginae strain.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas fuscovaginae, a Broad-Host-Range Pathogen of Plants

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Hitendra Kumar; Passos da Silva, Daniel; Devescovi, Giulia; Maraite, Henri; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Studholme, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas fuscovaginae was first reported as a pathogen of rice causing sheath rot in plants grown at high altitudes. P. fuscovaginae is now considered a broad-host-range plant pathogen causing disease in several economically important plants. We report what is, to our knowledge, the first draft genome sequence of a P. fuscovaginae strain. PMID:22535942

  1. Sugarcane aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae): Host range and sorghum resistance including cross-resistance from greenbug sources

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The graminous host range, and sources of sorghum plant resistance including cross resistance from greenbug, Schizaphis graminum (Rond.) sorghums, [Sorghum bicolor L.) Moench], were studied for the newly emerging sugarcane aphid Melanaphis sacchari, (Zehntner) in greenhouse no-choice experiments and ...

  2. Fundamental host range of Leptoypha hospita (Hemiptera: Tingidae), a potential biological control agent of Chinese privet

    Treesearch

    Yanzhuo Zhang; James L. Hanula; Scott Horn; Cera Jones; S. Kristine Braman; Jianghua Sun

    2016-01-01

    Chinese privet, Ligustrum sinense Lour., is an invasive shrub within riparian areas of the southeastern United States. Biological control is considered the most suitable management option for Chinese privet. The potential host range of the lace bug, Leptoypha hospita Drake et...

  3. Evolution of specialization: a phylogenetic study of host range in the red milkweed beetle (Tetraopes tetraophthalmus).

    PubMed

    Rasmann, Sergio; Agrawal, Anurag A

    2011-06-01

    Specialization is common in most lineages of insect herbivores, one of the most diverse groups of organisms on earth. To address how and why specialization is maintained over evolutionary time, we hypothesized that plant defense and other ecological attributes of potential host plants would predict the performance of a specialist root-feeding herbivore (the red milkweed beetle, Tetraopes tetraophthalmus). Using a comparative phylogenetic and functional trait approach, we assessed the determinants of insect host range across 18 species of Asclepias. Larval survivorship decreased with increasing phylogenetic distance from the true host, Asclepias syriaca, suggesting that adaptation to plant traits drives specialization. Among several root traits measured, only cardenolides (toxic defense chemicals) correlated with larval survival, and cardenolides also explained the phylogenetic distance effect in phylogenetically controlled multiple regression analyses. Additionally, milkweed species having a known association with other Tetraopes beetles were better hosts than species lacking Tetraopes herbivores, and milkweeds with specific leaf area values (a trait related to leaf function and habitat affiliation) similar to those of A. syriaca were better hosts than species having divergent values. We thus conclude that phylogenetic distance is an integrated measure of phenotypic and ecological attributes of Asclepias species, especially defensive cardenolides, which can be used to explain specialization and constraints on host shifts over evolutionary time.

  4. Host Range and Selectivity of the Hemiparasitic Plant Thesium chinense (Santalaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Suetsugu, Kenji; Kawakita, Atsushi; Kato, Makoto

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Thesium chinense is a hemiparasitic plant that is common in grassland habitats of eastern Asia. Although the physiology of Thesium has been well studied in attempts to control its weedy habit, there have been few ecological investigations of its parasitic life history. Thesium chinense is thought to parasitize species of Poaceae, but evidence remains circumstantial. Methods A vegetation survey was conducted to test whether any plant species occurs significantly more often in plots with T. chinense than expected. In addition, haustorial connections were examined directly by excavating the roots and post-attachment host selectivity was evaluated by comparing the observed numbers of haustoria on different hosts against those expected according to the relative below-ground biomass. Haustorium sizes were also compared among host species. Key Results Only two of the 38 species recorded, Lespedeza juncea and Eragrostis curvula, occurred more often in plots with Thesium than expected. In contrast to this, T. chinense parasitized 22 plant species in 11 families, corresponding to 57·9 % of plant species found at the study site. Haustoria were non-randomly distributed among host species, suggesting that there is some post-attachment host selectivity. Thesium chinense generally preferred the Poaceae, although haustoria formed on the Fabaceae were larger than those on other hosts. Conclusions This is the first quantitative investigation of the host range and selectivity of hemiparasitic plants of the Santalales. The preference for Fabaceae as hosts may be linked to the greater nutrient availability in these nitrogen-fixing plants. PMID:18492736

  5. Do-or-die life cycles and diverse post-infection resistance mechanisms limit the evolution of parasite host ranges.

    PubMed

    Sieber, Michael; Gudelj, Ivana

    2014-04-01

    In light of the dynamic nature of parasite host ranges and documented potential for rapid host shifts, the observed high host specificity of most parasites remains an ecological paradox. Different variants of host-use trade-offs have become a mainstay of theoretical explanations of the prevalence of host specialism, but empirical evidence for such trade-offs is rare. We propose an alternative theory based on basic features of the parasite life cycle: host selection and subsequent intrahost replication. We introduce a new concept of effective burst size that accounts for the fact that successful host selection does not guarantee intrahost replication. Our theory makes a general prediction that a parasite will expand its host range if its effective burst size is positive. An in silico model of bacteria-phage coevolution verifies our predictions and demonstrates that the tendency for relatively narrow host ranges in parasites can be explained even in the absence of trade-offs.

  6. Ant-lepidopteran associations along African forest edges.

    PubMed

    Dejean, Alain; Azémar, Frédéric; Libert, Michel; Compin, Arthur; Hérault, Bruno; Orivel, Jérôme; Bouyer, Thierry; Corbara, Bruno

    2017-02-01

    Working along forest edges, we aimed to determine how some caterpillars can co-exist with territorially dominant arboreal ants (TDAAs) in tropical Africa. We recorded caterpillars from 22 lepidopteran species living in the presence of five TDAA species. Among the defoliator and/or nectarivorous caterpillars that live on tree foliage, the Pyralidae and Nymphalidae use their silk to protect themselves from ant attacks. The Notodontidae and lycaenid Polyommatinae and Theclinae live in direct contact with ants; the Theclinae even reward ants with abundant secretions from their Newcomer gland. Lichen feeders (lycaenid; Poritiinae), protected by long bristles, also live among ants. Some lycaenid Miletinae caterpillars feed on ant-attended membracids, including in the shelters where the ants attend them; Lachnocnema caterpillars use their forelegs to obtain trophallaxis from their host ants. Caterpillars from other species live inside weaver ant nests. Those of the genus Euliphyra (Miletinae) feed on ant prey and brood and can obtain trophallaxis, while those from an Eberidae species only prey on host ant eggs. Eublemma albifascia (Erebidae) caterpillars use their thoracic legs to obtain trophallaxis and trophic eggs from ants. Through transfer bioassays of last instars, we noted that herbivorous caterpillars living in contact with ants were always accepted by alien conspecific ants; this is likely due to an intrinsic appeasing odor. Yet, caterpillars living in ant shelters or ant nests probably acquire cues from their host colonies because they were considered aliens and killed. We conclude that co-evolution with ants occurred similarly in the Heterocera and Rhopalocera.

  7. Ant-lepidopteran associations along African forest edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejean, Alain; Azémar, Frédéric; Libert, Michel; Compin, Arthur; Hérault, Bruno; Orivel, Jérôme; Bouyer, Thierry; Corbara, Bruno

    2017-02-01

    Working along forest edges, we aimed to determine how some caterpillars can co-exist with territorially dominant arboreal ants (TDAAs) in tropical Africa. We recorded caterpillars from 22 lepidopteran species living in the presence of five TDAA species. Among the defoliator and/or nectarivorous caterpillars that live on tree foliage, the Pyralidae and Nymphalidae use their silk to protect themselves from ant attacks. The Notodontidae and lycaenid Polyommatinae and Theclinae live in direct contact with ants; the Theclinae even reward ants with abundant secretions from their Newcomer gland. Lichen feeders (lycaenid; Poritiinae), protected by long bristles, also live among ants. Some lycaenid Miletinae caterpillars feed on ant-attended membracids, including in the shelters where the ants attend them; Lachnocnema caterpillars use their forelegs to obtain trophallaxis from their host ants. Caterpillars from other species live inside weaver ant nests. Those of the genus Euliphyra (Miletinae) feed on ant prey and brood and can obtain trophallaxis, while those from an Eberidae species only prey on host ant eggs. Eublemma albifascia (Erebidae) caterpillars use their thoracic legs to obtain trophallaxis and trophic eggs from ants. Through transfer bioassays of last instars, we noted that herbivorous caterpillars living in contact with ants were always accepted by alien conspecific ants; this is likely due to an intrinsic appeasing odor. Yet, caterpillars living in ant shelters or ant nests probably acquire cues from their host colonies because they were considered aliens and killed. We conclude that co-evolution with ants occurred similarly in the Heterocera and Rhopalocera.

  8. Revised Host Range and Studies on the Life Cycle of Longidorus africanus

    PubMed Central

    Kolodge, Craig; Radewald, John D.; Shibuya, Fujio

    1987-01-01

    The host range of Longidorus africanus was demonstrated to be much wider than previously reported. All commercial crop plants tested, except two of four crucifers, were hosts of L. africanus. The nematode was widespread in fields, and soil type did not appear to be related to its distribution. The minimum time to complete a life cycle was 9 weeks at 28 C in a plant growth chamber. Field observations of population densities indicated, however, that in undisturbed field soils the life cycle required considerably less time than was indicated by growth chamber studies. PMID:19290109

  9. Prevalence, Genetic Diversity, and Host Range of Tectiviruses among Members of the Bacillus cereus Group

    PubMed Central

    Gillis, Annika

    2014-01-01

    GIL01, Bam35, GIL16, AP50, and Wip1 are tectiviruses preying on the Bacillus cereus group. Despite the significant contributions of phages in different biological processes, little is known about the dealings taking place between tectiviruses and their Gram-positive bacterial hosts. Therefore, this work focuses on characterizing the interactions between tectiviruses and the B. cereus group by assessing their occurrence and genetic diversity and evaluating their host range. To study the occurrence of tectiviruses in the B. cereus group, 2,000 isolates were evaluated using primers designed to be specific to two variable regions detected in previously described elements. PCR and propagation tests revealed that tectivirus-like elements occurred in less than 3% of the isolates. Regardless of this limited distribution, several novel tectiviruses were found, and partial DNA sequencing indicated that a greater diversity exists within the family Tectiviridae. Analyses of the selected variable regions, along with their host range, showed that tectiviruses in the B. cereus group can be clustered mainly into two different groups: the ones infecting B. anthracis and those isolated from other B. cereus group members. In order to address the host range of some novel tectiviruses, 120 strains were tested for sensitivity. The results showed that all the tested tectiviruses produced lysis in at least one B. cereus sensu lato strain. Moreover, no simple relationship between the infection patterns of the tectiviruses and their diversity was found. PMID:24795369

  10. Ecological Genetics and Host Range Expansion by Busseola fusca (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Assefa, Y; Conlong, D E; Van Den Berg, J; Martin, L A

    2015-08-01

    The host plant range of pests can have important consequences for its evolution, and plays a critical role in the emergence and spread of a new pest outbreak. This study addresses the ecological genetics of the indigenous African maize stem borer, Busseola fusca (Fuller) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), in an attempt to investigate the evolutionary forces that may be involved in the recent host range expansion and establishment of this species in Ethiopian and southern African sugarcane. We used populations from Ethiopia, Zimbabwe, and South Africa to examine whether the host range expansion patterns shared by the Ethiopian and the southern African populations of B. fusca have evolved independently. Base-pair differences in the cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene were used to characterize haplotype diversity and phylogenetic relationships. There were seven haplotypes among the 30 sequenced individuals collected on four host plant species from 17 localities in the four countries. Of the seven COI haplotypes identified, the two major ones occurred in both sugarcane and maize. Genetic analyses revealed no detectable genetic differentiation between southern African B. fusca populations from maize and sugarcane (FST = 0.019; P = 0.24). However, there was strong evidence of variation in genetic composition between populations of the pest from different geographic regions (FST = 0.948; P < 0.001). The main implication of these findings is that the B. fusca populations in maize in southern Africa are more likely to shift to sugarcane, suggesting that ecological opportunity is an important factor in host plant range expansion by a pest.

  11. The Fleas (Siphonaptera) in Iran: Diversity, Host Range, and Medical Importance.

    PubMed

    Maleki-Ravasan, Naseh; Solhjouy-Fard, Samaneh; Beaucournu, Jean-Claude; Laudisoit, Anne; Mostafavi, Ehsan

    2017-01-01

    Flea-borne diseases have a wide distribution in the world. Studies on the identity, abundance, distribution and seasonality of the potential vectors of pathogenic agents (e.g. Yersinia pestis, Francisella tularensis, and Rickettsia felis) are necessary tools for controlling and preventing such diseases outbreaks. The improvements of diagnostic tools are partly responsible for an easier detection of otherwise unnoticed agents in the ectoparasitic fauna and as such a good taxonomical knowledge of the potential vectors is crucial. The aims of this study were to make an exhaustive inventory of the literature on the fleas (Siphonaptera) and range of associated hosts in Iran, present their known distribution, and discuss their medical importance. The data were obtained by an extensive literature review related to medically significant fleas in Iran published before 31st August 2016. The flea-host specificity was then determined using a family and subfamily-oriented criteria to further realize and quantify the shared and exclusive vertebrate hosts of fleas among Iran fleas. The locations sampled and reported in the literature were primarily from human habitation, livestock farms, poultry, and rodents' burrows of the 31 provinces of the country. The flea fauna were dominated by seven families, namely the Ceratophyllidae, Leptopsyllidae, Pulicidae, Ctenophthalmidae, Coptopsyllidae, Ischnopsyllidae and Vermipsyllidae. The hosts associated with Iran fleas ranged from the small and large mammals to the birds. Pulicidae were associated with 73% (56/77) of identified host species. Flea-host association analysis indicates that rodents are the common hosts of 5 flea families but some sampling bias results in the reduced number of bird host sampled. Analyses of flea-host relationships at the subfamily level showed that most vertebrates hosted fleas belgonging to 3 subfamilies namely Xenopsyllinae (n = 43), Ctenophthalminae (n = 20) and Amphipsyllinae (n = 17). Meriones persicus was

  12. The Fleas (Siphonaptera) in Iran: Diversity, Host Range, and Medical Importance

    PubMed Central

    Maleki-Ravasan, Naseh; Solhjouy-Fard, Samaneh; Beaucournu, Jean-Claude; Laudisoit, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Background Flea-borne diseases have a wide distribution in the world. Studies on the identity, abundance, distribution and seasonality of the potential vectors of pathogenic agents (e.g. Yersinia pestis, Francisella tularensis, and Rickettsia felis) are necessary tools for controlling and preventing such diseases outbreaks. The improvements of diagnostic tools are partly responsible for an easier detection of otherwise unnoticed agents in the ectoparasitic fauna and as such a good taxonomical knowledge of the potential vectors is crucial. The aims of this study were to make an exhaustive inventory of the literature on the fleas (Siphonaptera) and range of associated hosts in Iran, present their known distribution, and discuss their medical importance. Methodology/Principal Findings The data were obtained by an extensive literature review related to medically significant fleas in Iran published before 31st August 2016. The flea-host specificity was then determined using a family and subfamily-oriented criteria to further realize and quantify the shared and exclusive vertebrate hosts of fleas among Iran fleas. The locations sampled and reported in the literature were primarily from human habitation, livestock farms, poultry, and rodents’ burrows of the 31 provinces of the country. The flea fauna were dominated by seven families, namely the Ceratophyllidae, Leptopsyllidae, Pulicidae, Ctenophthalmidae, Coptopsyllidae, Ischnopsyllidae and Vermipsyllidae. The hosts associated with Iran fleas ranged from the small and large mammals to the birds. Pulicidae were associated with 73% (56/77) of identified host species. Flea-host association analysis indicates that rodents are the common hosts of 5 flea families but some sampling bias results in the reduced number of bird host sampled. Analyses of flea-host relationships at the subfamily level showed that most vertebrates hosted fleas belgonging to 3 subfamilies namely Xenopsyllinae (n = 43), Ctenophthalminae (n = 20) and

  13. Does scavenging extend the host range of entomopathogenic nematodes (Nematoda: Steinernematidae)?

    PubMed

    Půza, Vladimír; Mrácek, Zdenĕk

    2010-05-01

    Living and freeze-killed natural and laboratory hosts, with different susceptibility to entomopathogenic nematodes, were exposed to the larvae of Steinernema affine and Steinernema kraussei in two different experimental arenas (Eppendorf tubes, Petri dishes), and the success of the colonisation and eventual progeny production were observed. Both nematodes were able to colonise both living and dead larvae of Galleria mellonella (Lepidoptera) and adult Blatella germanica (Blattodea) even though the progeny production in dead hosts was lower on average. Living carabid beetles, Poecilus cupreus, and elaterid larvae (Coleoptera) were resistant to the infection, however, both nematodes were able to colonise and multiply in several dead P. cupreus and in a majority of dead elaterid larvae. By scavenging, EPNs can utilise cadavers of insects that are naturally resistant to EPN infection, and so broaden their host range.

  14. Diverse Broad-Host-Range Plasmids from Freshwater Carry Few Accessory Genes

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Diya; Yano, Hirokazu; Bauer, Matthew L.; Rogers, Linda M.; Van der Auwera, Geraldine A.

    2013-01-01

    Broad-host-range self-transferable plasmids are known to facilitate bacterial adaptation by spreading genes between phylogenetically distinct hosts. These plasmids typically have a conserved backbone region and a variable accessory region that encodes host-beneficial traits. We do not know, however, how well plasmids that do not encode accessory functions can survive in nature. The goal of this study was to characterize the backbone and accessory gene content of plasmids that were captured from freshwater sources without selecting for a particular phenotype or cultivating their host. To do this, triparental matings were used such that the only required phenotype was the plasmid's ability to mobilize a nonconjugative plasmid. Based on complete genome sequences of 10 plasmids, only 5 carried identifiable accessory gene regions, and none carried antibiotic resistance genes. The plasmids belong to four known incompatibility groups (IncN, IncP-1, IncU, and IncW) and two potentially new groups. Eight of the plasmids were shown to have a broad host range, being able to transfer into alpha-, beta-, and gammaproteobacteria. Because of the absence of antibiotic resistance genes, we resampled one of the sites and compared the proportion of captured plasmids that conferred antibiotic resistance to their hosts with the proportion of such plasmids captured from the effluent of a local wastewater treatment plant. Few of the captured plasmids from either site encoded antibiotic resistance. A high diversity of plasmids that encode no or unknown accessory functions is thus readily found in freshwater habitats. The question remains how the plasmids persist in these microbial communities. PMID:24096417

  15. Ectomycorrhizal fungi of exotic pine plantations in relation to native host trees in Iran: evidence of host range expansion by local symbionts to distantly related host taxa.

    PubMed

    Bahram, Mohammad; Kõljalg, Urmas; Kohout, Petr; Mirshahvaladi, Shahab; Tedersoo, Leho

    2013-01-01

    Introduction of exotic plants change soil microbial communities which may have detrimental ecological consequences for ecosystems. In this study, we examined the community structure and species richness of ectomycorrhizal (EcM) fungi associated with exotic pine plantations in relation to adjacent native ectomycorrhizal trees in Iran to elucidate the symbiont exchange between distantly related hosts, i.e. Fagales (Fagaceae and Betulaceae) and Pinaceae. The combination of morphological and molecular identification approaches revealed that 84.6 % of species with more than one occurrence (at least once on pines) were shared with native trees and only 5.9 % were found exclusively on pine root tips. The community diversity of ectomycorrhizal fungi in the pine plantations adjacent to native EcM trees was comparable to their adjacent native trees, but the isolated plantations hosted relatively a species-poor community. Specific mycobionts of conifers were dominant in the isolated plantation while rarely found in the plantations adjacent to native EcM trees. These data demonstrate the importance of habitat isolation and dispersal limitation of EcM fungi in their potential of host range expansion. The great number of shared and possibly compatible symbiotic species between exotic Pinaceae and local Fagales (Fagaceae and Betulaceae) may reflect their evolutionary adaptations and/or ancestral compatibility with one another.

  16. Convenient broad-host-range unstable vectors for studying stabilization cassettes in diverse bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bartosik, Aneta A; Glabski, Krzysztof; Kulinska, Anna; Lewicka, Ewa; Godziszewska, Jolanta; Markowska, Aleksandra; Jagura-Burdzy, Grazyna

    2016-04-05

    Low-copy-number vectors of potential wide application in biotechnology need to encode stabilization modules ensuring their stable inheritance. The efficiency of stabilization may vary depending on the plasmid host so a thorough analysis of stabilization functions is required before use. To facilitate such analysis highly unstable, mobilizable, broad-host-range (BHR) vectors based on RK2 replicon were constructed. The vectors are suitable for testing of various stabilization functions, including plasmid and chromosomal partitioning cassettes encoding ParB homologues capable of spreading on DNA. The xylE or lacZ reporter systems facilitate easy monitoring of plasmid segregation. The range of BHR vectors with different reporter cassettes and alternative mobilization systems expands their application in diverse bacterial species.

  17. Phylogenetic relationships and host range of Rhizobium spp. that nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Lucas, I; Segovia, L; Martinez-Romero, E; Pueppke, S G

    1995-01-01

    We determined the nucleotide sequences of 16S rRNA gene segments from five Rhizobium strains that have been isolated from tropical legume species. All share the capacity to nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris L., the common bean. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that these strains are of two different chromosomal lineages. We defined the host ranges of two strains of Rhizobium etli and three strains of R. tropici, comparing them with those of the two most divergently related new strains. Twenty-two of the 43 tested legume species were nodulated by three or more of these strains. All seven strains have broad host ranges that include woody species such as Albizia lebbeck, Gliricidia maculata, and Leucaena leucocephala. PMID:7618891

  18. Host range and in vitro lysis of Listeria monocytogenes seafood isolates by bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Arachchi, Geevika J Ganegama; Cruz, Cristina D; Dias-Wanigasekera, Beatrice M; McIntyre, Lynn; Billington, Craig; Hudson, Andrew; Flint, Steve H; Mutukumira, Anthony N

    2014-12-01

    Listeria-infecting bacteriophages (listeriaphages) can be used to control Listeria monocytogenes in the food industry. However, the sensitivity of many of seafood-borne Listeria strains to phages has not been reported. This research investigated the host ranges of three listeriaphages (FWLLm1, FWLLm3 and FWLLm5) by the formation of lytic zones and plaques on host lawns and in vitro lysis kinetics of listeriaphage FWLLm3. The study also predicted the phage titres required to lyse host cells. The host ranges of the phages were determined using 50 L. monocytogenes strains, of which 48 were isolated from the seafood industry and two from clinical cases. Of the 50 strains, 36 were tested at 25 and 30 ℃ and the remainder (14) at 15 and 25 ℃. Based on the formation of either discrete plaques or lytic zones (host kill zones), the host ranges of FWLLm1, FWLLm3 and FWLLm5 were about 87%, 81% and 87%, respectively, at 25 ℃. Six L. monocytogenes strains from the seafood environment were insensitive to all three phages, while the other seafood strains (42) were phage-sensitive. The adsorption rate constant (k value) of listeriaphage FWLLm3 was between 1.2 × 10(-9) and 1.6 × 10(-9 )ml/min across four host strains in tryptic soy broth at 25 ℃. The cultures (at 3-4 log colony-forming unit (CFU/ml) were completely lysed (<1 log CFU/ml) when cultures were infected with FWLLm3 at > 8.7 log phage-forming units (PFU/ml) for 30 min. Re-growth of phage-infected cultures was not detected after 24 h. The effective empirical phage titre was similar to the calculated titre using a kinetic model. Results indicate the potential use of the three phages for controlling L. monocytogenes strains in seafood processing environments. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  19. A comparison of Olpidium isolates from a range of host plants using internal transcribed spacer sequence analysis and host range studies.

    PubMed

    Hartwright, Lucy M; Hunter, Paul J; Walsh, John A

    2010-01-01

    Olpidium brassicae is a ubiquitous obligate root-infecting fungal pathogen. It is an important vector of a wide range of plant viruses. Olpidium isolates that infected brassica plants did not infect lettuce plants and vice-versa. Host range tests, PCR amplification and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and 5.8S regions of 25 Olpidium isolates from brassica, carrot, cucumber and lettuce originating from four continents revealed differences between isolates. Based on their ability to infect lettuce and brassicas and the differences between their ITS1, 5.8S and ITS2 regions they could be separated into a number of distinct groups. Comparisons with other published sequences revealed two distinct genetic groups of brassica-infecting isolates, two distinct groups of lettuce-infecting isolates, one of which contained a carrot-infecting isolate and a distinct group comprising a cucumber-infecting isolate and a melon-infecting isolate. The possibility of the isolates belonging to three distinct species is discussed. Copyright © 2009 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Broad host range plasmids can invade an unexpectedly diverse fraction of a soil bacterial community

    PubMed Central

    Klümper, Uli; Riber, Leise; Dechesne, Arnaud; Sannazzarro, Analia; Hansen, Lars H; Sørensen, Søren J; Smets, Barth F

    2015-01-01

    Conjugal plasmids can provide microbes with full complements of new genes and constitute potent vehicles for horizontal gene transfer. Conjugal plasmid transfer is deemed responsible for the rapid spread of antibiotic resistance among microbes. While broad host range plasmids are known to transfer to diverse hosts in pure culture, the extent of their ability to transfer in the complex bacterial communities present in most habitats has not been comprehensively studied. Here, we isolated and characterized transconjugants with a degree of sensitivity not previously realized to investigate the transfer range of IncP- and IncPromA-type broad host range plasmids from three proteobacterial donors to a soil bacterial community. We identified transfer to many different recipients belonging to 11 different bacterial phyla. The prevalence of transconjugants belonging to diverse Gram-positive Firmicutes and Actinobacteria suggests that inter-Gram plasmid transfer of IncP-1 and IncPromA-type plasmids is a frequent phenomenon. While the plasmid receiving fractions of the community were both plasmid- and donor- dependent, we identified a core super-permissive fraction that could take up different plasmids from diverse donor strains. This fraction, comprising 80% of the identified transconjugants, thus has the potential to dominate IncP- and IncPromA-type plasmid transfer in soil. Our results demonstrate that these broad host range plasmids have a hitherto unrecognized potential to transfer readily to very diverse bacteria and can, therefore, directly connect large proportions of the soil bacterial gene pool. This finding reinforces the evolutionary and medical significances of these plasmids. PMID:25333461

  1. Short- and long-range cues used by ground-dwelling parasitoids to find their host

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goubert, C.; Josso, C.; Louâpre, P.; Cortesero, A. M.; Poinsot, D.

    2013-02-01

    Parasitoids of phytophagous insects face a detectability-reliability dilemma when foraging for hosts. Plant-related cues are easily detectable, but do not guarantee the presence of the host. Host-related cues are very reliable, but much harder to detect from a distance. Little is known in particular about the way coleopteran parasitoid females use these cues when foraging for a suitable place to lay their eggs. The question is of interest because, unlike hymenopteran larvae, coleopteran parasitoid larvae are highly mobile and able to forage for hosts on their own. We assessed whether females of the parasitoid rove beetle Aleochara bipustulata (L.) (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae) are attracted to plant (Swede roots, Brassica napus) and host-related cues [pupae of the cabbage root fly Delia radicum (L.) (Diptera: Anthomyiidae)]. In the field, A. bipustulata adult females were captured in selective pitfall traps containing pieces of roots damaged by D. radicum larvae, but not in traps containing pieces of healthy roots or D. radicum pupae. However, in the laboratory, the odour of D. radicum pupae attracted A. bipustulata females to mini-pitfalls. Video monitoring in the laboratory showed that foraging A. bipustulata females preferred a zone containing D. radicum pupae and larval tracks rather than one containing an extract of D. radicum-infested roots. Our results suggest a behavioural sequence where A. bipustulata females use plant-related cues at a distance, but then switch their preference to host-related cues at a close range. This would be the first observation of this behaviour in coleopteran parasitoids.

  2. Cryptosporidium from a free-ranging marsupial host: bandicoots in urban Australia.

    PubMed

    Dowle, Matthew; Hill, Nichola J; Power, Michelle L

    2013-11-15

    Expansion of human settlement has increased the interface between people and bandicoots with implications for the emergence and spread of zoonotic parasites. The host status of bandicoots inhabiting suburban areas and their potential role in Cryptosporidium transmission remains unresolved. Our study aimed to determine the prevalence and identity of Cryptosporidium in two sympatric bandicoot species. Cryptosporidium signatures were detected in twelve bandicoot faecal samples (n=98) through amplification of the 18S rRNA. Phylogenetic inference placed the isolates in a clade with Cryptosporidium parvum, a species with a broad host range and zoonotic potential, or loosely related to Cryptosporidium hominis. However, the identity of the bandicoot isolates was not fully resolved and whether they were infected or simply passively transmitting oocysts is unknown. This study revealed that free-ranging bandicoots of northern Sydney were shedding Cryptosporidium oocysts at a prevalence of 12.2% (95% CI [6.76, 20.8]), similar to marsupial species that act as reservoirs for Cryptosporidium. Our findings expand the range of hosts known to shed Cryptosporidium in urban areas.

  3. Divergent Nod-Containing Bradyrhizobium sp. DOA9 with a Megaplasmid and its Host Range

    PubMed Central

    Teamtisong, Kamonluck; Songwattana, Pongpan; Noisangiam, Rujirek; Piromyou, Pongdet; Boonkerd, Nantakorn; Tittabutr, Panlada; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Nantagij, Achara; Okazaki, Shin; Abe, Mikiko; Uchiumi, Toshiki; Teaumroong, Neung

    2014-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium sp. DOA9, a non-photosynthetic bacterial strain originally isolated from the root nodules of the legume Aeschynomene americana, is a divergent nod-containing strain. It exhibits a broad host range, being able to colonize and efficiently nodulate the roots of most plants from the Dalbergioid, Millettioid, and Robinioid tribes (7 species of Papilionoideae). In all cases, nodulation was determinate. The morphology and size of DOA9 bacteroids isolated from the nodules of various species of Papilionoideae were indistinguishable from the free-living form. However, they were spherical in Arachis hypogaea nodules. GusA-tagged DOA9 also colonized rice roots as endophytes. Since broad-host-range legume symbionts often carry multiple replicons in their genome, we analyzed the replicons for symbiosis genes by electrophoresis. DOA9 carried two replicons, a chromosome (cDOA9) and single megaplasmid (pDOA9) larger than 352 kb. The genes for nodulation (nodA, B, C) and nitrogen fixation (nifH) were localized on the megaplasmid. Southern blot hybridization revealed two copies of nodA on the megaplasmid, single copies of nodB and C on the megaplasmid, and one copy each of nifH on the chromosome and megaplasmid. These results suggested that Bradyrhizobium sp. DOA9 may have the unusual combination of a broad host range, bacteroid differentiation, and symbiosis-mediating replicons. PMID:25283477

  4. Evolution of the feline-subgroup parvoviruses and the control of canine host range in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Truyen, U; Gruenberg, A; Chang, S F; Obermaier, B; Veijalainen, P; Parrish, C R

    1995-01-01

    A related group of parvoviruses infects members of many different carnivore families. Some of those viruses differ in host range or antigenic properties, but the true relationships are poorly understood. We examined 24 VP1/VP2 and 8 NS1 gene sequences from various parvovirus isolates to determine the phylogenetic relationships between viruses isolated from cats, dogs, Asiatic raccoon dogs, mink, raccoons, and foxes. There were about 1.3% pairwise sequence differences between the VP1/VP2 genes of viruses collected up to four decades apart. Viruses from cats, mink, foxes, and raccoons were not distinguished from each other phylogenetically, but the canine or Asiatic raccoon dog isolates formed a distinct clade. Characteristic antigenic, tissue culture host range, and other properties of the canine isolates have previously been shown to be determined by differences in the VP1/VP2 gene, and we show here that there are at least 10 nucleotide sequence differences which distinguish all canine isolates from any other virus. The VP1/VP2 gene sequences grouped roughly according to the time of virus isolation, and there were similar rates of sequence divergence among the canine isolates and those from the other species. A smaller number of differences were present in the NS1 gene sequences, but a similar phylogeny was revealed. Inoculation of mutants of a feline virus isolate into dogs showed that three or four CPV-specific differences in the VP1/VP2 gene controlled the in vivo canine host range. PMID:7609035

  5. Evolution of the feline-subgroup parvoviruses and the control of canine host range in vivo.

    PubMed

    Truyen, U; Gruenberg, A; Chang, S F; Obermaier, B; Veijalainen, P; Parrish, C R

    1995-08-01

    A related group of parvoviruses infects members of many different carnivore families. Some of those viruses differ in host range or antigenic properties, but the true relationships are poorly understood. We examined 24 VP1/VP2 and 8 NS1 gene sequences from various parvovirus isolates to determine the phylogenetic relationships between viruses isolated from cats, dogs, Asiatic raccoon dogs, mink, raccoons, and foxes. There were about 1.3% pairwise sequence differences between the VP1/VP2 genes of viruses collected up to four decades apart. Viruses from cats, mink, foxes, and raccoons were not distinguished from each other phylogenetically, but the canine or Asiatic raccoon dog isolates formed a distinct clade. Characteristic antigenic, tissue culture host range, and other properties of the canine isolates have previously been shown to be determined by differences in the VP1/VP2 gene, and we show here that there are at least 10 nucleotide sequence differences which distinguish all canine isolates from any other virus. The VP1/VP2 gene sequences grouped roughly according to the time of virus isolation, and there were similar rates of sequence divergence among the canine isolates and those from the other species. A smaller number of differences were present in the NS1 gene sequences, but a similar phylogeny was revealed. Inoculation of mutants of a feline virus isolate into dogs showed that three or four CPV-specific differences in the VP1/VP2 gene controlled the in vivo canine host range.

  6. The role of flagella and chemotaxis genes in host pathogen interaction of the host adapted Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin compared to the broad host range serovar S. Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The importance of flagella and chemotaxis genes in host pathogen interaction in Salmonella enterica is mainly based on studies of the broad host range serovar, S. Typhimurium, while little is known on the importance in host specific and host adapted serovars, such as S. Dublin. In the current study we have used previously characterized insertion mutants in flagella and chemotaxis genes to investigate this and possible differences in the importance between the two serovars. Results fliC (encoding the structural protein of the flagella) was essential for adhesion and fliC and cheB (CheB restores the chemotaxis system to pre-stimulus conformation) were essential for invasion of S. Dublin into epithelial Int407 cells. In S. Typhimurium, both lack of flagella (fliC/fljB double mutant) and cheB influenced adhesion, and invasion was influenced by lack of both cheA (the histidine-kinase of the chemotaxis system), fliC/fljB and cheB mutation. Uptake in J774A.1 macrophage cells was significantly reduced in cheA, cheB and fliC mutants of S. Dublin, while cheA was dispensable in S. Typhimurium. Removal of flagella in both serotypes caused an increased ability to propagate intracellular in J774 macrophage cells and decreased cytotoxicity toward these cells. Flagella and chemotaxis genes were found not to influence the oxidative response. The induction of IL-6 from J774A-1 cells depended on the presence of flagella in S. Typhimurium, whilst this was not the case following challenge with S. Dublin. Addition of fliC from S. Typhimurium in trans to a fliC mutant of S. Dublin increased cytotoxicity but it did not increase the IL-6 production. Flagella were demonstrated to contribute to the outcome of infection following oral challenge of mice in S. Dublin, while an S. Typhimurium fliC/fljB mutant showed increased virulence following intra peritoneal challenge. Conclusions The results showed that flagella and chemotaxis genes differed in their role in host pathogen

  7. Ecological host-range of Lilioceris cheni (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a biological control agent of Dioscorea bulbifera L.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Open-field host-specificity testing assesses the host-range of a biological control agent in a setting that permits the agent to use its full complement of host-seeking behaviors. This form of testing, particularly when it includes a no-choice phase in which the target weed is killed, may provide th...

  8. Feline Host Range of Canine parvovirus: Recent Emergence of New Antigenic Types in Cats

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Kazuya; Miyazawa, Takayuki; Tohya, Yukinobu; Takahashi, Eiji; Mochizuki, Masami

    2002-01-01

    Since the emergence of Canine parvovirus (CPV-2) in the late 1970s, CPV-2 has evolved consecutively new antigenic types, CPV-2a and 2b. Although CPV-2 did not have a feline host range, CPV-2a and 2b appear to have gained the ability to replicate in cats. Recent investigations demonstrate the prevalence of CPV-2a and 2b infection in a wide range of cat populations. We illustrate the pathogenic potential of CPV in cats and assesses the risk caused by CPV variants. PMID:11971764

  9. Different Mesorhizobium species associated with Caragana carry similar symbiotic genes and have common host ranges.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen Feng; Guan, Su Hua; Zhao, Chun Tian; Yan, Xue Rui; Man, Chao Xin; Wang, En Tao; Chen, Wen Xin

    2008-06-01

    Fourteen strains representing 11 Caragana-nodulating Mesorhizobium genomic species were identified as representing Mesorhizobium amorphae, Mesorhizobium huakuii, Mesorhizobium septentrionale and groups related to Mesorhizobium plurifarium, Mesorhizobium temperatum, Mesorhizobium tianshanense and Mesorhizobium mediterraneum by sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer, partial housekeeping recA gene, and previously performed sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of proteins and BOX-PCR fingerprinting. Despite their different taxonomic affiliation, highly similar symbiotic genes (>93% similarity for nodC and >91.8% similarity for nifH) were found among the Caragana strains and the three type strains for M. tianshanense, M. temperatum and M. septentrionale. Cross nodulation tests revealed that each of these 14 Caragana mesorhizobia and the three type strains mentioned above could effectively infect each of their original host plants, Caragana microphylla, Glycyrrhiza (host for M. tianshanense type strain) and Astragalus adsurgens (host for M. temperatum and M. septentrionale type strains). These results provide evidence that different Mesorhizobium species can nodulate with Caragana, and they have similar symbiotic genes (probably acquired by a phenomenon of lateral gene transfer) and common host ranges.

  10. Correlated evolution of life history and host range in the nonphotosynthetic parasitic flowering plants Orobanche and Phelipanche (Orobanchaceae).

    PubMed

    Schneeweiss, G M

    2007-03-01

    Most members of the nonphotosynthetic parasitic genera Orobanche and Phelipanche (Orobanchaceae) have narrow host ranges, and, as they grow on perennial hosts, are (at least potentially) perennial themselves. A few species, however, have wide host ranges and grow on annual hosts, and are thus (at least facultatively) annuals themselves. Among the latter are the weedy species, which include economically important pest taxa such as Orobanche crenata or Phelipanche aegyptiaca. Using a phylogenetically based maximum likelihood approach, which takes phylogenetic and branch length uncertainty into account, we can show that the life trait host range and life history evolve in a correlated fashion. This supports the hypothesis that parasite specialization is associated with predictable resources (i.e. long-lived hosts) and generalism with unpredictable ones (i.e. short-lived hosts), a pattern often found in animal parasites. The mechanisms and temporal sequence of the life trait changes and their interrelations remain speculative.

  11. Host-Range Dynamics of Cochliobolus lunatus: From a Biocontrol Agent to a Severe Environmental Threat

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Bengyella; Waikhom, Sayanika Devi; Roy, Pranab; Bhardwaj, Pardeep Kumar; Sharma, Chandradev K.; Singh, Mohendro Wakambam; Talukdar, Narayan Chandra

    2014-01-01

    We undertook an investigation to advance understanding of the host-range dynamics and biocontrol implications of Cochliobolus lunatus in the past decade. Potato (Solanum tuberosum L) farms were routinely surveyed for brown-to-black leaf spot disease caused by C. lunatus. A biphasic gene data set was assembled and databases were mined for reported hosts of C. lunatus in the last decade. The placement of five virulent strains of C. lunatus causing foliar necrosis of potato was studied with microscopic and phylogenetic tools. Analysis of morphology showed intraspecific variations in stromatic tissues among the virulent strains causing foliar necrosis of potato. A maximum likelihood inference based on GPDH locus separated C. lunatus strains into subclusters and revealed the emergence of unclustered strains. The evolving nutritional requirement of C. lunatus in the last decade is exhibited by the invasion of vertebrates, invertebrates, dicots, and monocots. Our results contribute towards a better understanding of the host-range dynamics of C. lunatus and provide useful implications on the threat posed to the environment when C. lunatus is used as a mycoherbicide. PMID:24987680

  12. Secreted effectors in Toxoplasma gondii and related species: determinants of host range and pathogenesis?

    PubMed Central

    English, E D; Adomako-Ankomah, Y; Boyle, J P

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed the discovery of a number of secreted proteins in Toxoplasma gondii that play important roles in host–pathogen interactions and parasite virulence, particularly in the mouse model. However, the role that these proteins play in driving the unique features of T. gondii compared to some of its nearest apicomplexan relatives (Hammondia hammondi and Neospora caninum) is unknown. These unique features include distinct dissemination characteristics in vivo and a vast host range. In this review we comprehensively survey what is known about disease outcome, the host response and host range for T. gondii, H. hammondi, and N. caninum. We then review what is presently known about recently identified secreted virulence effectors in these three genetically related, but phenotypically distinct, species. Finally we exploit the existence of genome sequences for these three organisms and discuss what is known about the presence, and functionality, of key T. gondii effectors in these three species. PMID:25655311

  13. Prediction of steps in the evolution of variola virus host range.

    PubMed

    Smithson, Chad; Purdy, Alex; Verster, Adrian J; Upton, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Variola virus, the agent of smallpox, has a severely restricted host range (humans) but a devastatingly high mortality rate. Although smallpox has been eradicated by a World Health Organization vaccination program, knowledge of the evolutionary processes by which human super-pathogens such as variola virus arise is important. By analyzing the evolution of variola and other closely related poxviruses at the level of single nucleotide polymorphisms we detected a hotspot of genome variation within the smallpox ortholog of the vaccinia virus O1L gene, which is known to be necessary for efficient replication of vaccinia virus in human cells. These mutations in the variola virus ortholog and the subsequent loss of the functional gene from camelpox virus and taterapox virus, the two closest relatives of variola virus, strongly suggest that changes within this region of the genome may have played a key role in the switch to humans as a host for the ancestral virus and the subsequent host-range restriction that must have occurred to create the phenotype exhibited by smallpox.

  14. Prediction of Steps in the Evolution of Variola Virus Host Range

    PubMed Central

    Smithson, Chad; Purdy, Alex; Verster, Adrian J.; Upton, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Variola virus, the agent of smallpox, has a severely restricted host range (humans) but a devastatingly high mortality rate. Although smallpox has been eradicated by a World Health Organization vaccination program, knowledge of the evolutionary processes by which human super-pathogens such as variola virus arise is important. By analyzing the evolution of variola and other closely related poxviruses at the level of single nucleotide polymorphisms we detected a hotspot of genome variation within the smallpox ortholog of the vaccinia virus O1L gene, which is known to be necessary for efficient replication of vaccinia virus in human cells. These mutations in the variola virus ortholog and the subsequent loss of the functional gene from camelpox virus and taterapox virus, the two closest relatives of variola virus, strongly suggest that changes within this region of the genome may have played a key role in the switch to humans as a host for the ancestral virus and the subsequent host-range restriction that must have occurred to create the phenotype exhibited by smallpox. PMID:24626337

  15. Eilat virus, a unique alphavirus with host range restricted to insects by RNA replication.

    PubMed

    Nasar, Farooq; Palacios, Gustavo; Gorchakov, Rodion V; Guzman, Hilda; Da Rosa, Amelia P Travassos; Savji, Nazir; Popov, Vsevolod L; Sherman, Michael B; Lipkin, W Ian; Tesh, Robert B; Weaver, Scott C

    2012-09-04

    Most alphaviruses and many other arboviruses are mosquito-borne and exhibit a broad host range, infecting many different vertebrates including birds, rodents, equids, humans, and nonhuman primates. Consequently, they can be propagated in most vertebrate and insect cell cultures. This ability of arboviruses to infect arthropods and vertebrates is usually essential for their maintenance in nature. However, several flaviviruses have recently been described that infect mosquitoes but not vertebrates, although the mechanism of their host restriction has not been determined. Here we describe a unique alphavirus, Eilat virus (EILV), isolated from a pool of Anopheles coustani mosquitoes from the Negev desert of Israel. Phylogenetic analyses placed EILV as a sister to the Western equine encephalitis antigenic complex within the main clade of mosquito-borne alphaviruses. Electron microscopy revealed that, like other alphaviruses, EILV virions were spherical, 70 nm in diameter, and budded from the plasma membrane of mosquito cells in culture. EILV readily infected a variety of insect cells with little overt cytopathic effect. However, in contrast to typical mosquito-borne alphaviruses, EILV could not infect mammalian or avian cell lines, and viral as well as RNA replication could not be detected at 37 °C or 28 °C. Evolutionarily, these findings suggest that EILV lost its ability to infect vertebrate cells. Thus, EILV seems to be mosquito-specific and represents a previously undescribed complex within the genus Alphavirus. Reverse genetic studies of EILV may facilitate the discovery of determinants of alphavirus host range that mediate disease emergence.

  16. Broad-host-range plasmid vectors for gene expression in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lale, Rahmi; Brautaset, Trygve; Valla, Svein

    2011-01-01

    This chapter provides methods and insights into the use of broad-host-range plasmid vectors useful for expression of genes in a variety of bacteria. The main focus is on IncQ, IncW, IncP, and pBBR1-based plasmids which have all been used for such applications. The specific design of each vector is adapted to its use, and here we describe, as an example, a protocol for construction (in Escherichia coli) of large insert DNA libraries in an IncP type vector and transfer of the library to the desired host. The genes of interest will in this case have to be expressed from their own promoters and the libraries will be screened by a method that best fits the functions of the gene or gene clusters searched for.

  17. Reduced stability and intracellular transport of dsRNA contribute to poor RNAi response in lepidopteran insects.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Jayendra Nath; Kalsi, Megha; Sethi, Amit; Narva, Kenneth E; Fishilevich, Elane; Singh, Satnam; Mogilicherla, Kanakachari; Palli, Subba Reddy

    2016-07-02

    RNA interference (RNAi) has become a widely used reverse genetic tool to study gene function in eukaryotic organisms and is being developed as a technology for insect pest management. The efficiency of RNAi varies among organisms. Insects from different orders also display differential efficiency of RNAi, ranging from highly efficient (coleopterans) to very low efficient (lepidopterans). We investigated the reasons for varying RNAi efficiency between lepidopteran and coleopteran cell lines and also between the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata and tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens. The dsRNA either injected or fed was degraded faster in H. virescens than in L. decemlineata. Both lepidopteran and coleopteran cell lines and tissues efficiently took up the dsRNA. Interestingly, the dsRNA administered to coleopteran cell lines and tissues was taken up and processed to siRNA whereas the dsRNA was taken up by lepidopteran cell lines and tissues but no siRNA was detected in the total RNA isolated from these cell lines and tissues. The data included in this paper showed that the degradation and intracellular transport of dsRNA are the major factors responsible for reduced RNAi efficiency in lepidopteran insects.

  18. Reduced stability and intracellular transport of dsRNA contribute to poor RNAi response in lepidopteran insects

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Jayendra Nath; Kalsi, Megha; Sethi, Amit; Narva, Kenneth E.; Fishilevich, Elane; Singh, Satnam; Mogilicherla, Kanakachari; Palli, Subba Reddy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT RNA interference (RNAi) has become a widely used reverse genetic tool to study gene function in eukaryotic organisms and is being developed as a technology for insect pest management. The efficiency of RNAi varies among organisms. Insects from different orders also display differential efficiency of RNAi, ranging from highly efficient (coleopterans) to very low efficient (lepidopterans). We investigated the reasons for varying RNAi efficiency between lepidopteran and coleopteran cell lines and also between the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata and tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens. The dsRNA either injected or fed was degraded faster in H. virescens than in L. decemlineata. Both lepidopteran and coleopteran cell lines and tissues efficiently took up the dsRNA. Interestingly, the dsRNA administered to coleopteran cell lines and tissues was taken up and processed to siRNA whereas the dsRNA was taken up by lepidopteran cell lines and tissues but no siRNA was detected in the total RNA isolated from these cell lines and tissues. The data included in this paper showed that the degradation and intracellular transport of dsRNA are the major factors responsible for reduced RNAi efficiency in lepidopteran insects. PMID:27245473

  19. Host Range Specificity of Scymnus camptodromus (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), A Predator of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae).

    PubMed

    Limbu, Samita; Cassidy, Katie; Keena, Melody; Tobin, Patrick; Hoover, Kelli

    2016-02-01

    Scymnus (Neopullus) camptodromus Yu and Liu (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) was brought to the United States from China as a potential biological control agent for hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae Annand) (Hemiptera: Adelgidae). Scymnus camptodromus phenology is closely synchronized with that of A. tsugae and has several characteristics of a promising biological control agent. As a prerequisite to field release, S. camptodromus was evaluated for potential nontarget impacts. In host range studies, the predator was given the choice of sympatric adelgid and nonadelgid prey items. Nontarget testing showed that S. camptodromus will feed to some degree on other adelgid species, but highly prefers A. tsugae. We also evaluated larval development of S. camptodromus on pine bark adelgid (Pineus strobi (Hartig)) (Hemiptera: Adelgidae) and larch adelgid (Adelges laricis Vallot) (Hemiptera: Adelgidae); a small proportion of predator larvae was able to develop to adulthood on P. strobi or A. laricis alone. Scymnus camptodromus showed no interest in feeding on woolly alder aphid (Paraprociphilus tessellatus Fitch) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) or woolly apple aphid (Eriosoma lanigerum (Hausmann)) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), and minimal interest in cotton aphid (Aphis gossypii Glover) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) in choice and no-choice experiments. Scymnus camptodromus females did not oviposit on any host material other than A. tsugae-infested hemlock. Under the circumstances of the study, S. camptodromus appears to be a specific predator of A. tsugae, with minimal risk to nontarget species. Although the predator can develop on P. strobi, the likelihood that S. camptodromus would oviposit on pine hosts of this adelgid is small.

  20. A Single Residue in Ebola Virus Receptor NPC1 Influences Cellular Host Range in Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    Ndungo, Esther; Herbert, Andrew S.; Raaben, Matthijs; Obernosterer, Gregor; Biswas, Rohan; Miller, Emily Happy; Wirchnianski, Ariel S.; Carette, Jan E.; Brummelkamp, Thijn R.; Whelan, Sean P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Filoviruses are the causative agents of an increasing number of disease outbreaks in human populations, including the current unprecedented Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in western Africa. One obstacle to controlling these epidemics is our poor understanding of the host range of filoviruses and their natural reservoirs. Here, we investigated the role of the intracellular filovirus receptor, Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) as a molecular determinant of Ebola virus (EBOV) host range at the cellular level. Whereas human cells can be infected by EBOV, a cell line derived from a Russell’s viper (Daboia russellii) (VH-2) is resistant to infection in an NPC1-dependent manner. We found that VH-2 cells are resistant to EBOV infection because the Russell’s viper NPC1 ortholog bound poorly to the EBOV spike glycoprotein (GP). Analysis of panels of viper-human NPC1 chimeras and point mutants allowed us to identify a single amino acid residue in NPC1, at position 503, that bidirectionally influenced both its binding to EBOV GP and its viral receptor activity in cells. Significantly, this single residue change perturbed neither NPC1’s endosomal localization nor its housekeeping role in cellular cholesterol trafficking. Together with other recent work, these findings identify sequences in NPC1 that are important for viral receptor activity by virtue of their direct interaction with EBOV GP and suggest that they may influence filovirus host range in nature. Broader surveys of NPC1 orthologs from vertebrates may delineate additional sequence polymorphisms in this gene that control susceptibility to filovirus infection. IMPORTANCE Identifying cellular factors that determine susceptibility to infection can help us understand how Ebola virus is transmitted. We asked if the EBOV receptor Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) could explain why reptiles are resistant to EBOV infection. We demonstrate that cells derived from the Russell’s viper are not susceptible to infection because EBOV

  1. Clarification on Host Range of Didymella pinodes the Causal Agent of Pea Ascochyta Blight

    PubMed Central

    Barilli, Eleonora; Cobos, Maria José; Rubiales, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Didymella pinodes is the principal causal agent of ascochyta blight, one of the most important fungal diseases of pea (Pisum sativum) worldwide. Understanding its host specificity has crucial implications in epidemiology and management; however, this has not been clearly delineated yet. In this study we attempt to clarify the host range of D. pinodes and to compare it with that of other close Didymella spp. D. pinodes was very virulent on pea accessions, although differences in virulence were identified among isolates. On the contrary, studied isolates of D. fabae, D. rabiei, and D. lentil showed a reduced ability to infect pea not causing macroscopically visible symptoms on any of the pea accessions tested. D. pinodes isolates were also infective to some extend on almost all species tested including species such as Hedysarum coronarium, Lathyrus sativus, Lupinus albus, Medicago spp., Trifolium spp., Trigonella foenum-graecum, and Vicia articulata which were not mentioned before as hosts of D. pinodes. On the contrary, D. lentil and D. rabiei were more specific, infecting only lentil and chickpea, respectively. D. fabae was intermediate, infecting mainly faba bean, but also slightly other species such as Glycine max, Phaseolus vulgaris, Trifolium spp., Vicia sativa, and V. articulata. DNA sequence analysis of the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) was performed to confirm identity of the isolates studies and to determine phylogenetic relationship among the Didymella species, revealing the presence of two clearly distinct clades. Clade one was represented by two supported subclusters including D. fabae isolates as well as D. rabiei with D. lentil isolates. Clade two was the largest and included all the D. pinodes isolates as well as Phoma medicaginis var. pinodella. Genetic distance between D. pinodes and the other Didymella spp. isolates was not correlated with overall differences in pathogenicity. Based on evidences presented here, D

  2. Genetic characterization and phylogenetic analysis of host-range genes of Camelpox virus isolates from India.

    PubMed

    Bera, B C; Barua, S; Shanmugasundaram, K; Anand, T; Riyesh, T; Vaid, R K; Virmani, N; Kundu, S; Yadav, N K; Malik, P; Singh, R K

    2015-09-01

    Camelpox virus (CMLV), a close variant of variola virus (VARV) infects camels worldwide. The zoonotic infections reported from India signify the need to study the host-range genes-responsible for host tropism. We report sequence and phylogenetic analysis of five host-range genes: cytokine response modifier B (crmB), chemokine binding protein (ckbp), viral schlafen-like (v-slfn), myxomavirus T4-like (M-T4-like) and b5r of CMLVs isolated from outbreaks in India. Comparative analysis revealed that these genes are conserved among CMLVs and shared 94.5-100 % identity at both nucleotide (nt) and amino acid (aa) levels. All genes showed identity (59.3-98.4 %) with cowpox virus (CPXV) while three genes-crmB, ckbp and b5r showed similarity (92-96.5 %) with VARVs at both nt and aa levels. Interestingly, three consecutive serine residue insertions were observed in CKBP protein of CMLV-Delhi09 isolate which was similar to CPXV-BR and VACVs, besides five point mutations (K53Q, N67I, F84S, A127T and E182G) were also similar to zoonotic OPXVs. Further, few inconsistent point mutation(s) were also observed in other gene(s) among Indian CMLVs. These indicate that different strains of CMLVs are circulating in India and these mutations could play an important role in adaptation of CMLVs in humans. The phylogeny revealed clustering of all CMLVs together except CMLV-Delhi09 which grouped separately due to the presence of specific point mutations. However, the topology of the concatenated phylogeny showed close evolutionary relationship of CMLV with VARV and TATV followed by CPXV-RatGer09/1 from Germany. The availability of this genetic information will be useful in unveiling new strategies to control emerging zoonotic poxvirus infections.

  3. Broad-host-range IncP-1 plasmids and their resistance potential

    PubMed Central

    Popowska, Magdalena; Krawczyk-Balska, Agata

    2013-01-01

    The plasmids of the incompatibility (Inc) group IncP-1, also called IncP, as extrachromosomal genetic elements can transfer and replicate virtually in all Gram-negative bacteria. They are composed of backbone genes that encode a variety of essential functions and accessory genes that have implications for human health and environmental bioremediation. Broad-host-range IncP plasmids are known to spread genes between distinct phylogenetic groups of bacteria. These genes often code for resistances to a broad spectrum of antibiotics, heavy metals, and quaternary ammonium compounds used as disinfectants. The backbone of these plasmids carries modules that enable them to effectively replicate, move to a new host via conjugative transfer and to be stably maintained in bacterial cells. The adaptive, resistance, and virulence genes are mainly located on mobile genetic elements integrated between the functional plasmid backbone modules. Environmental studies have demonstrated the wide distribution of IncP-like replicons in manure, soils and wastewater treatment plants. They also are present in strains of pathogenic or opportunistic bacteria, which can be a cause for concern, because they may encode multiresistance. Their broad distribution suggests that IncP plasmids play a crucial role in bacterial adaptation by utilizing horizontal gene transfer. This review summarizes the variety of genetic information and physiological functions carried by IncP plasmids, which can contribute to the spread of antibiotic and heavy metal resistance while also mediating the process of bioremediation of pollutants. Due to the location of the resistance genes on plasmids with a broad-host-range and the presence of transposons carrying these genes it seems that the spread of these genes would be possible and quite hazardous in infection control. Future studies are required to determine the level of risk of the spread of resistance genes located on these plasmids. PMID:23471189

  4. Genome degradation in Brucella ovis corresponds with narrowing of its host range and tissue tropism.

    PubMed

    Tsolis, Renee M; Seshadri, Rekha; Santos, Renato L; Sangari, Felix J; Lobo, Juan M García; de Jong, Maarten F; Ren, Qinghu; Myers, Garry; Brinkac, Lauren M; Nelson, William C; Deboy, Robert T; Angiuoli, Samuel; Khouri, Hoda; Dimitrov, George; Robinson, Jeffrey R; Mulligan, Stephanie; Walker, Richard L; Elzer, Philip E; Hassan, Karl A; Paulsen, Ian T

    2009-01-01

    Brucella ovis is a veterinary pathogen associated with epididymitis in sheep. Despite its genetic similarity to the zoonotic pathogens B. abortus, B. melitensis and B. suis, B. ovis does not cause zoonotic disease. Genomic analysis of the type strain ATCC25840 revealed a high percentage of pseudogenes and increased numbers of transposable elements compared to the zoonotic Brucella species, suggesting that genome degradation has occurred concomitant with narrowing of the host range of B. ovis. The absence of genomic island 2, encoding functions required for lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis, as well as inactivation of genes encoding urease, nutrient uptake and utilization, and outer membrane proteins may be factors contributing to the avirulence of B. ovis for humans. A 26.5 kb region of B. ovis ATCC25840 Chromosome II was absent from all the sequenced human pathogenic Brucella genomes, but was present in all of 17 B. ovis isolates tested and in three B. ceti isolates, suggesting that this DNA region may be of use for differentiating B. ovis from other Brucella spp. This is the first genomic analysis of a non-zoonotic Brucella species. The results suggest that inactivation of genes involved in nutrient acquisition and utilization, cell envelope structure and urease may have played a role in narrowing of the tissue tropism and host range of B. ovis.

  5. Mountain pine beetle host-range expansion threatens the boreal forest.

    PubMed

    Cullingham, Catherine I; Cooke, Janice E K; Dang, Sophie; Davis, Corey S; Cooke, Barry J; Coltman, David W

    2011-05-01

    The current epidemic of the mountain pine beetle (MPB), an indigenous pest of western North American pine, has resulted in significant losses of lodgepole pine. The leading edge has reached Alberta where forest composition shifts from lodgepole to jack pine through a hybrid zone. The susceptibility of jack pine to MPB is a major concern, but there has been no evidence of host-range expansion, in part due to the difficulty in distinguishing the parentals and their hybrids. We tested the utility of a panel of microsatellite loci optimized for both species to classify lodgepole pine, jack pine and their hybrids using simulated data. We were able to accurately classify simulated individuals, and hence applied these markers to identify the ancestry of attacked trees. Here we show for the first time successful MPB attack in natural jack pine stands at the leading edge of the epidemic. This once unsuitable habitat is now a novel environment for MPB to exploit, a potential risk which could be exacerbated by further climate change. The consequences of host-range expansion for the vast boreal ecosystem could be significant. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Identification of virulence associated loci in the emerging broad host range plant pathogen Pseudomonas fuscovaginae.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hitendra Kumar; Matiuzzo, Maura; Bertani, Iris; Bigirimana, Vincent de Paul; Ash, Gavin J; Höfte, Monica; Venturi, Vittorio

    2014-11-14

    Pseudomonas fuscovaginae (Pfv) is an emerging plant pathogen of rice and also of other gramineae plants. It causes sheath brown rot disease in rice with symptoms that are characterized by brown lesions on the flag leaf sheath, grain discoloration and sterility. It was first isolated as a high altitude pathogen in Japan and has since been reported in several countries throughout the world. Pfv is a broad host range pathogen and very little is known about its virulence mechanisms. An in planta screen of 1000 random independent Tn5 genomic mutants resulted in the isolation of nine mutants which showed altered virulence. Some of these isolates are mutated for functions which are known to be virulence associated factors in other phytopathogenic bacteria (eg. pil gene, phytotoxins and T6SS) and others might represent novel virulence loci. Being an emerging pathogen worldwide, the broad host range pathogen Pfv has not yet been studied for its virulence functions. The roles of the nine loci identified in the in planta screen are discussed in relation to pathogenicity of Pfv. In summary, this article reports a first study on the virulence of this pathogen involving in planta screening studies and suggests the presence of several virulence features with known and novel functions in the Pseudomonas group of bacteria.

  7. Genome Degradation in Brucella ovis Corresponds with Narrowing of Its Host Range and Tissue Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Tsolis, Renee M.; Seshadri, Rekha; Santos, Renato L.; Sangari, Felix J.; Lobo, Juan M. García; de Jong, Maarten F.; Ren, Qinghu; Myers, Garry; Brinkac, Lauren M.; Nelson, William C.; DeBoy, Robert T.; Angiuoli, Samuel; Khouri, Hoda; Dimitrov, George; Robinson, Jeffrey R.; Mulligan, Stephanie; Walker, Richard L.; Elzer, Philip E.; Hassan, Karl A.; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2009-01-01

    Brucella ovis is a veterinary pathogen associated with epididymitis in sheep. Despite its genetic similarity to the zoonotic pathogens B. abortus, B. melitensis and B. suis, B. ovis does not cause zoonotic disease. Genomic analysis of the type strain ATCC25840 revealed a high percentage of pseudogenes and increased numbers of transposable elements compared to the zoonotic Brucella species, suggesting that genome degradation has occurred concomitant with narrowing of the host range of B. ovis. The absence of genomic island 2, encoding functions required for lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis, as well as inactivation of genes encoding urease, nutrient uptake and utilization, and outer membrane proteins may be factors contributing to the avirulence of B. ovis for humans. A 26.5 kb region of B. ovis ATCC25840 Chromosome II was absent from all the sequenced human pathogenic Brucella genomes, but was present in all of 17 B. ovis isolates tested and in three B. ceti isolates, suggesting that this DNA region may be of use for differentiating B. ovis from other Brucella spp. This is the first genomic analysis of a non-zoonotic Brucella species. The results suggest that inactivation of genes involved in nutrient acquisition and utilization, cell envelope structure and urease may have played a role in narrowing of the tissue tropism and host range of B. ovis. PMID:19436743

  8. Mountain pine beetle host-range expansion threatens the boreal forest

    PubMed Central

    Cullingham, Catherine I; Cooke, Janice E K; Dang, Sophie; Davis, Corey S; Cooke, Barry J; Coltman, David W

    2011-01-01

    The current epidemic of the mountain pine beetle (MPB), an indigenous pest of western North American pine, has resulted in significant losses of lodgepole pine. The leading edge has reached Alberta where forest composition shifts from lodgepole to jack pine through a hybrid zone. The susceptibility of jack pine to MPB is a major concern, but there has been no evidence of host-range expansion, in part due to the difficulty in distinguishing the parentals and their hybrids. We tested the utility of a panel of microsatellite loci optimized for both species to classify lodgepole pine, jack pine and their hybrids using simulated data. We were able to accurately classify simulated individuals, and hence applied these markers to identify the ancestry of attacked trees. Here we show for the first time successful MPB attack in natural jack pine stands at the leading edge of the epidemic. This once unsuitable habitat is now a novel environment for MPB to exploit, a potential risk which could be exacerbated by further climate change. The consequences of host-range expansion for the vast boreal ecosystem could be significant. PMID:21457381

  9. Temperature-dependent alterations in host use drive rapid range expansion in a butterfly.

    PubMed

    Pateman, Rachel M; Hill, Jane K; Roy, David B; Fox, Richard; Thomas, Chris D

    2012-05-25

    Responses of species to climate change are extremely variable, perhaps because of climate-related changes to interactions among species. We show that temperature-related changes in the dependence of the butterfly Aricia agestis on different larval host plants have facilitated rapid range expansion. Historically, the butterfly was largely restricted to a single plant species, Helianthemum nummularium, but recent warmer conditions have enabled the butterfly to increasingly use the more widespread plant species Geranium molle. This has resulted in a substantial increase in available habitat and rapid range expansion by the butterfly (79 kilometers northward in Britain in 20 years). Interactions among species are often seen as constraints on species' responses to climate change, but we show that temperature-dependent changes to interspecific interactions can also facilitate change.

  10. Prevalence, Distribution, and Host Range of Peste des petits ruminants virus, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Özkul, Aykut; Akca, Yilmaz; Alkan, Feray; Barrett, Thomas; Karaoglu, Taner; Dagalp, Seval Bilge; Anderson, John; Yesilbag, Kadir; Cokcaliskan, Can; Gencay, Ayse; Burgu, Ibrahim

    2002-01-01

    Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV, genus Morbillivirus), which causes a severe disease in sheep and goats, has only recently been officially declared to be present in Turkey. We carried out a study to determine the prevalence, distribution, and host range of PPRV in Turkey. A total of 1,607 animals, reared in 18 different locations, were monitored for the presence of antibodies to PPRV and the related virus of large ruminants, Rinderpest virus (RPV). Only two farms had animals that were free of antibody responses to either disease. Prevalence for PPRV infection varied (range 0.87%–82.6%) and was higher in sheep (29.2%) than in goats (20%). The overall antibody responses to PPRV and RPV were 22.4% and 6.28%, respectively. Two PPRVs of lineage 4, which comprises many other PPRVs whose origins are in the Middle East, the Arabian Peninsula, and southern Asia, were isolated from Turkish sheep. PMID:12095439

  11. Restoring lepidopteran diversity in a tropical dry forest: relative importance of restoration treatment, tree identity and predator pressure

    PubMed Central

    Solis-Gabriel, Lizet; Mendoza-Arroyo, Wendy

    2017-01-01

    Tropical dry forests (TDFs) have been widely transformed by human activities worldwide and the ecosystem services they provide are diminishing. There has been an urgent call for conservation and restoration of the degraded lands previously occupied by TDFs. Restoration experiences aim to recover species diversity and ecological functions. Different restoration strategies have been used to maximize plant performance including weeding, planting or using artificial mulching. In this investigation, we evaluated whether different restoration practices influence animal arrival and the reestablishment of biotic interactions. We particularly evaluated lepidopteran larvae diversity and caterpillar predation on plants established under different restoration treatments (mulching, weeding and control) in the Pacific West Coast of México. This study corroborated the importance of plant host identity for lepidopteran presence in a particular area. Lepidopteran diversity and herbivory rates were not affected by the restoration treatment but they were related to tree species. In contrast, caterpillar predation marks were affected by restoration treatment, with a greater number of predation marks in control plots, while caterpillar predation marks among plant species were not significantly different. This study highlights the importance of considering the introduction of high plant species diversity when planning TDF restoration to maximize lepidopteran diversity and ecosystem functioning. PMID:28560101

  12. Restoring lepidopteran diversity in a tropical dry forest: relative importance of restoration treatment, tree identity and predator pressure.

    PubMed

    Solis-Gabriel, Lizet; Mendoza-Arroyo, Wendy; Boege, Karina; Del-Val, Ek

    2017-01-01

    Tropical dry forests (TDFs) have been widely transformed by human activities worldwide and the ecosystem services they provide are diminishing. There has been an urgent call for conservation and restoration of the degraded lands previously occupied by TDFs. Restoration experiences aim to recover species diversity and ecological functions. Different restoration strategies have been used to maximize plant performance including weeding, planting or using artificial mulching. In this investigation, we evaluated whether different restoration practices influence animal arrival and the reestablishment of biotic interactions. We particularly evaluated lepidopteran larvae diversity and caterpillar predation on plants established under different restoration treatments (mulching, weeding and control) in the Pacific West Coast of México. This study corroborated the importance of plant host identity for lepidopteran presence in a particular area. Lepidopteran diversity and herbivory rates were not affected by the restoration treatment but they were related to tree species. In contrast, caterpillar predation marks were affected by restoration treatment, with a greater number of predation marks in control plots, while caterpillar predation marks among plant species were not significantly different. This study highlights the importance of considering the introduction of high plant species diversity when planning TDF restoration to maximize lepidopteran diversity and ecosystem functioning.

  13. “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” Prophage Late Genes May Limit Host Range and Culturability

    PubMed Central

    Fleites, Laura A.; Jain, Mukesh; Zhang, Shujian

    2014-01-01

    “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” is an uncultured alphaproteobacterium that systemically colonizes its insect host both inter- and intracellularly and also causes a severe, crop-destroying disease of citrus called huanglongbing, or citrus “greening.” In planta, “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” is also systemic but phloem limited. “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” strain UF506 carries two predicted prophages, SC1 and SC2. Bacteriophage particles have been observed in experimentally “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus”-infected periwinkle but not in any other host. Comparative gene expression analysis of predicted SC1 late genes showed a much higher level of late gene expression, including holin transcripts (SC1_gp110), in “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus”-infected periwinkle relative to “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus”-infected citrus. To functionally characterize predicted holin and endolysin activity, SC1_gp110 and two predicted endolysins, one within SC1 (SC1_gp035) and another well outside the predicted prophage region (CLIBASIA_04790), were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Both SC1 genes inhibited bacterial growth consistent with holin and endolysin function. The holin (SC1_gp110) promoter region was fused with a uidA reporter on pUFR071, a wide bacterial host range (repW) replicon, and used to transform Liberibacter crescens strain BT-1 by electroporation. BT-1 is the only liberibacter strain cultured to date and was used as a proxy for “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus.” pUFR071 was >95% stable without selection in BT-1 for over 20 generations. The reporter construct exhibited strong constitutive glucuronidase (GUS) activity in culture-grown BT-1 cells. However, GUS reporter activity in BT-1 was suppressed in a dose-dependent manner by crude aqueous extracts from psyllids. Taken together with plant expression data, these observations indicate that “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” prophage activation may limit “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” host

  14. Evolutionary tools for phytosanitary risk analysis: phylogenetic signal as a predictor of host range of plant pests and pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Gregory S; Magarey, Roger; Suiter, Karl; Webb, Campbell O

    2012-01-01

    Assessing risk from a novel pest or pathogen requires knowing which local plant species are susceptible. Empirical data on the local host range of novel pests are usually lacking, but we know that some pests are more likely to attack closely related plant species than species separated by greater evolutionary distance. We use the Global Pest and Disease Database, an internal database maintained by the United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service – Plant Protection and Quarantine Division (USDA APHIS-PPQ), to evaluate the strength of the phylogenetic signal in host range for nine major groups of plant pests and pathogens. Eight of nine groups showed significant phylogenetic signal in host range. Additionally, pests and pathogens with more known hosts attacked a phylogenetically broader range of hosts. This suggests that easily obtained data – the number of known hosts and the phylogenetic distance between known hosts and other species of interest – can be used to predict which plant species are likely to be susceptible to a particular pest. This can facilitate rapid assessment of risk from novel pests and pathogens when empirical host range data are not yet available and guide efficient collection of empirical data for risk evaluation. PMID:23346231

  15. Broad-Host-Range Expression Reveals Native and Host Regulatory Elements That Influence Heterologous Antibiotic Production in Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia Jia; Tang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Michelle; Nguyen, Darlene; Moore, Bradley S

    2017-09-05

    Heterologous expression has become a powerful tool for studying microbial biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs). Here, we extend the transformation-associated recombination cloning and heterologous expression platform for microbial BGCs to include Gram-negative proteobacterial expression hosts. Using a broad-host-range expression platform, we test the implicit assumption that biosynthetic pathways are more successfully expressed in more closely related heterologous hosts. Cloning and expression of the violacein BGC from Pseudoalteromonas luteoviolacea 2ta16 revealed robust production in two proteobacterial hosts, Pseudomonas putida KT2440 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens LBA4404, but very little production of the antibiotic in various laboratory strains of Escherichia coli, despite their closer phylogenetic relationship. We identified a nonclustered LuxR-type quorum-sensing receptor from P. luteoviolacea 2ta16, PviR, that increases pathway transcription and violacein production in E. coli by ∼60-fold independently of acyl-homoserine lactone autoinducers. Although E. coli harbors the most similar homolog of PviR identified from all of the hosts tested, overexpression of various E. coli transcription factors did not result in a statistically significant increase in violacein production, while overexpression of two A. tumefaciens PviR homologs significantly increased production. Thus, this work not only introduces a new genetic platform for the heterologous expression of microbial BGCs, it also challenges the assumption that host phylogeny is an accurate predictor of host compatibility.IMPORTANCE Although Gram-positive heterologous hosts such as Streptomyces have been developed and optimized to support diverse secondary metabolic reactions, there has been comparatively less work on Gram-negative hosts, some of which grow faster and are easier to work with. This work presents a new genetic platform for direct cloning and broad-host-range heterologous expression of BGCs

  16. Characterization of novel virulent broad-host-range phages of Xylella fastidiosa and Xanthomonas.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Stephen J; Das, Mayukh; Bhowmick, Tushar Suvra; Young, Ry; Gonzalez, Carlos F

    2014-01-01

    The xylem-limited bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is the causal agent of several plant diseases, most notably Pierce's disease of grape and citrus variegated chlorosis. We report the isolation and characterization of the first virulent phages for X. fastidiosa, siphophages Sano and Salvo and podophages Prado and Paz, with a host range that includes Xanthomonas spp. Phages propagated on homologous hosts had observed adsorption rate constants of ~4 × 10(-12) ml cell(-1) min(-1) for X. fastidiosa strain Temecula 1 and ~5 × 10(-10) to 7 × 10(-10) ml cell(-1) min(-1) for Xanthomonas strain EC-12. Sano and Salvo exhibit >80% nucleotide identity to each other in aligned regions and are syntenic to phage BcepNazgul. We propose that phage BcepNazgul is the founding member of a novel phage type, to which Sano and Salvo belong. The lysis genes of the Nazgul-like phage type include a gene that encodes an outer membrane lipoprotein endolysin and also spanin gene families that provide insight into the evolution of the lysis pathway for phages of Gram-negative hosts. Prado and Paz, although exhibiting no significant DNA homology to each other, are new members of the phiKMV-like phage type, based on the position of the single-subunit RNA polymerase gene. The four phages are type IV pilus dependent for infection of both X. fastidiosa and Xanthomonas. The phages may be useful as agents for an effective and environmentally responsible strategy for the control of diseases caused by X. fastidiosa.

  17. Gyrodactylus proterorhini in its non-native range: distribution and ability to host-switch in freshwaters.

    PubMed

    Ondračková, Markéta

    2016-08-01

    Successful co-introduction of a parasite and its host relies not only on presence of the parasite on host individuals in the founder population but also on the ability of both host and parasite to persist in the new area. Gyrodactylus proterorhini (Monogenea) has been successfully co-introduced with its Ponto-Caspian goby hosts (Babka gymnotrachelus, Neogobius fluviatilis, Neogobius melanostomus, Ponticola kessleri, Proterorhinus semilunaris) to many freshwater systems in Europe and is now widely distributed over four large European river basins (Danube, Rhine, Scheldt and Vistula). Within Europe, higher infection levels are documented in sites further from the native host range. In North America, however, G. proterorhini appears to be absent. Host specificity of G. proterorhini tested under natural conditions showed accidental host-switching onto local fish species (native Perca fluviatilis and non-native Perccottus glenii) in the river Vistula. Further examination of host-switching under experimental conditions, however, showed that G. proterorhini were unable to survive on non-gobiid hosts longer than 24 h. Our results indicate extremely low potential for host-switching of introduced G. proterorhini to non-gobiid hosts, at least in the freshwater systems of Central and Western Europe.

  18. Expansion of the Known Host Range of the Microsporidium, Pseudoloma neurophilia

    PubMed Central

    Watral, Virginia; Stidworthy, Mark F.; Kent, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The microsporidium, Pseudoloma neurophilia, is the most common infectious organism found in laboratory zebrafish colonies. Many currently used zebrafish lines originally came from pet store fish, and the initial description of P. neurophilia came from zebrafish obtained from a retail pet store. However, as P. neurophilia has not been described from wild-caught zebrafish, whether P. neurophilia is a natural pathogen of zebrafish is an open question. The pooling of fish of different species in the aquarium fish trade is common and a generalist parasite could be transmitted to novel hosts in this scenario. We determined that P. neurophilia can infect seven species of fishes from five families by cohabitation with infected zebrafish: Betta splendens, Xiphophorus maculatus, Devario aequipinnatus, Pimephales promelas, Oryzias latipes, Carassius auratus and Paracheirodon innesi. Infections in these fishes were histologically similar to those of zebrafish. We include a case report of a laboratory population of fathead minnows with naturally acquired P. neurophilia infections. With such a broad host range, including several fish families, other laboratory fishes should be screened routinely for this and other microsporidian parasites. PMID:27182659

  19. Genetic diversity and host range variation of Ralstonia solanacearum strains entering North America.

    PubMed

    Norman, David J; Zapata, Mildred; Gabriel, Dean W; Duan, Y P; Yuen, Jeanne M F; Mangravita-Novo, Arianna; Donahoo, Ryan S

    2009-09-01

    Each year, large volumes of ornamental and food plant propagative stock are imported into the North America; occasionally, Ralstonia solanacearum is found systemically infecting this plant material. In this study, 107 new R. solanacearum strains were collected over a 10-year period from imported propagative stock and compared with 32 previously characterized R. solanacearum strains using repetitive polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR) element (BOX, ERIC, and REP) primers. Additional strain comparisons were made by sequencing the endoglucanase and the cytochrome b561 genes. Using rep-PCR primers, populations could be distinguished by biovar and, to a limited extent, country of origin and original host. Similarity coefficients among rep-PCR clusters within biovars were relatively low in many cases, indicating that disease outbreaks over time may have been caused by different clonal populations. Similar population differentiations of R. solanacearum were obtained when comparing strain sequences using either the endoglucanase or cytochrome b561 genes. We found that most of the new biovar 1 strains of R. solanacearum entering the United States were genetically distinct from the biovar 1 strains currently found infecting vegetable production. These introduced biovar 1 strains also had a broader host range and could infect not only tomato, tobacco, and potato but also anthurium and pothos and cause symptoms on banana. All introductions into North America of race 3, biovar 2 strains in the last few years have been linked to geranium production and appeared to be clonal.

  20. Genetic diversity, host range, and distribution of tomato yellow leaf curl virus in Iran.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, M; Mozafari, J; Rakhshandehroo, F; Shams-Bakhsh, M

    2014-01-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is considered one of the most important tomato pathogens in tropical and subtropical regions including Iran. During the years 2007 to 2009, a total number of 510 symptomatic and asymptomatic vegetable, ornamental and weed samples were collected from fields and greenhouses in ten provinces of Iran. Symptoms included stunting, yellowing, leaf curl and flower senescence. PCR with specific primers showed TYLCV infection in 184 samples (36%) such as cucumber, pepper, tomato and several weeds from seven provinces. Based on the geographical origin, host range and symptoms, twenty three representative isolates were selected for phylogenetic analysis. An amplicon with a size about 608 base pair (bp) comprising partial sequence of the coat (CP) and movement protein (MP) coding regions of the viral genome was sequenced and compared with the corresponding selected sequences available in GenBank for Iran and worldwide. Phylogenetic analyses on the basis of the nucleotide sequences indicated two geographically separated clades. Isolates collected from Hormozgan, Khuzestan and Kerman provinces were grouped together with other Iranian isolates including TYLCV-Ir2, TYLCV-Kahnooj, and an isolate from Oman. It was also revealed that isolates collected from Boushehr, Fars, Tehran, and Isfahan placed close to the Iranian isolate TYLCV-Abadeh and isolates from Israel and Egypt. No correlation was found between the genetic variation and the host species, but selected Iranian isolates were grouped on the basis of the geographical origins. Results of this study indicated a high genetic diversity among Iranian TYLCV isolates.

  1. Prevalence, host range, and spatial distribution of black band disease in the Maldivian Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Montano, Simone; Strona, Giovanni; Seveso, Davide; Galli, Paolo

    2013-07-09

    Little research has been conducted on diseases affecting reef-building corals in the central Indian Ocean. During 2010 and 2011, we performed a quantitative assessment of black band disease (BBD) in the central Republic of Maldives. Distribution, host range, and prevalence of BBD were investigated at 6 coral islands (Magoodhoo, Adanga, Ihuru, Vabbinfaru, Thudufushi, and Athuruga) belonging to 3 different atolls. BBD was found to be widespread among the atolls. All the islands showed a prevalence lower than 0.5%. Magoodhoo Island showed the highest mean disease prevalence. In the whole surveyed area, shallow sites showed higher overall mean BBD prevalence than deep ones. BBD was recorded from 6 scleractinian families (Acroporidae, Faviidae, Poritidae, Siderastreidae, Agariciidae, Fungiidae) and 13 scleractinian genera. Two of them, Gardineroseris and Sandalolitha, constitute new records for the disease. The siderastreid Psammocora (BBD prevalence: 5.33 ± 1.41%, mean ± SE) was the most affected genus, followed by Goniopora (2.7 ± 1.3%). BBD prevalence was positively correlated to the respective host density in both genera. Favites and Acropora were the less affected genera (both <0.1%). Although we observed an extremely low overall disease prevalence in the surveyed area (<1%), the large number of different scleractinian genera affected and the widespread distribution of BBD indicate a need for further investigation.

  2. Influenza virus polymerase: Functions on host range, inhibition of cellular response to infection and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Frandsen, Ariel; Alfonso, Roberto; Nieto, Amelia

    2015-11-02

    The viral polymerase is an essential complex for the influenza virus life cycle as it performs the viral RNA transcription and replication processes. To that end, the polymerase carries out a wide array of functions and associates to a large number of cellular proteins. Due to its importance, recent studies have found numerous mutations in all three polymerase protein subunits contributing to virus host range and pathogenicity. In this review, we will point out viral polymerase polymorphisms that have been associated with virus adaptation to mammalian hosts, increased viral polymerase activity and virulence. Furthermore, we will summarize the current knowledge regarding the new set of proteins expressed from the viral polymerase genes and their contribution to infection. In addition, the mechanisms used by the virus to counteract the cellular immune response in which the viral polymerase complex or its subunits are involved will be highlighted. Finally, the degradative process induced by the viral polymerase on the cellular transcription machinery and its repercussions on virus pathogenicity will be of particular interest. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Species identification, host range and diversity of Cecidophyopsis mites (Acari: Trombidiformes) infesting Ribes in Latvia.

    PubMed

    Stalažs, Arturs; Moročko-Bičevska, Inga

    2016-06-01

    Cecidophyopsis mites are important pests in all cultivation regions of Ribes causing bud galls and sterility. Despite their economic importance, the knowledge on Cecidophyopsis species infesting Ribes in various areas of the world is still deficient. The present study was carried out to identify Cecidophyopsis species occurring in Latvia on cultivated and wild Ribes, to assess their host range and gain insight into the genetic diversity of these insufficiently studied pests by use of multiplex PCR, rDNA sequences and morphological characters. Cecidophyopsis alpina, C. aurea, C. spicata and C. selachodon were detected to occur in all surveyed habitats. For the first time, C. alpina was identified on blackcurrants and redcurrants, and C. aurea on redcurrants, blackcurrants and alpine currants. The presence of C. ribis was not confirmed with molecular tools during this study. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed the presence of four Cecidophyopsis species identified by multiplex PCR. A close phylogenetic relatedness was found for C. aurea and C. alpina, and for C. ribis and C. spicata highlighting the necessity for additional studies. Our findings suggest a need to consider also other Cecidophyopsis species besides C. ribis in breeding programs for host resistance to mites.

  4. Spread of butternut canker in North America, host range, evidence of resistance within butternut populations and conservation genetics

    Treesearch

    M. E. Ostry; K. Woeste

    2004-01-01

    Butternut canker is killing trees throughout the range of butternut in North America and is threatening the viability of many populations in several areas. Although butternut is the primary host, other Juglans species and some hardwood species also are potential hosts. Evidence is building that genetic resistance within butternut populations may be...

  5. Host range and cellular tropism of the human exogenous gammaretrovirus XMRV.

    PubMed

    Stieler, Kristin; Schulz, Claudia; Lavanya, Madakasira; Aepfelbacher, Martin; Stocking, Carol; Fischer, Nicole

    2010-03-30

    Recently, the first human infection with an exogenous gammaretrovirus (XMRV) was reported. In its initial description, XMRV was confined to prostate stromal fibroblasts, although subsequent reports demonstrated XMRV protein expression in prostate epithelial cells. Most recently, XMRV has been detected in blood cells of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. The aim of this study was to elucidate the transmission routes and tissue tropism of XMRV by comparing its host range, receptor usage and LTR functionality with other MLV isolates. We demonstrate using pseudotype experiments that XMRV Env mediates efficient infection of cells from different species. We show that replication competent XMRV infects various human cell types, including hematopoietic cell lines and prostate stromal fibroblasts. XMRV-LTR activity is significantly higher in the prostate cancer cell line LNCaP and in prostate stromal fibroblasts, compared to other cell types tested and could be one factor contributing to efficient viral spread in prostate tissue.

  6. Host range, growth property, and virulence of the smallpox vaccine: Vaccinia virus Tian Tan strain

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Qing; Yang Lin; Zhu Weijun; Liu Li; Wang Haibo; Yu Wenbo; Xiao Genfu; Tien Po; Zhang Linqi; Chen Zhiwei . E-mail: zchen@adarc.org

    2005-05-10

    Vaccinia Tian Tan (VTT) was used as a vaccine against smallpox in China for millions of people before 1980, yet the biological characteristics of the virus remain unclear. We have characterized VTT with respect to its host cell range, growth properties in vitro, and virulence in vivo. We found that 11 of the 12 mammalian cell lines studied are permissive to VTT infection whereas one, CHO-K1, is non-permissive. Using electron microscopy and sequence analysis, we found that the restriction of VTT replication in CHO-K1 is at a step before viral maturation probably due to the loss of the V025 gene. Moreover, VTT is significantly less virulent than vaccinia WR but remains neurovirulent in mice and causes significant body weight loss after intranasal inoculation. Our data demonstrate the need for further attenuation of VTT to serve either as a safer smallpox vaccine or as a live vaccine vector for other pathogens.

  7. Sequences of versatile, broad-host-range vectors of the RK2 family.

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, H. N.; Laible, P. D.; Hanson, D. K.; Biosciences Division

    2003-07-01

    Plasmid pRK404-a smaller derivative of RK2-is a tetracycline-resistant broad-host-range vector that carries a multiple cloning site and the lacZ(alpha) peptide that enables blue/white selection for cloned inserts in Escherichia coli. We present herein the complete and annotated sequence of pRK404 and three related vectors-pRK437, pRK442, and pRK442(H). These derivatives have proven to be valuable tools for genetic manipulation in Gram-negative bacteria. The knowledge of their complete sequences will facilitate efficient future engineering of them and will enhance their general applicability to the design of genetic systems for use in organisms for which new genomic sequence data are becoming available.

  8. Evolution of broad host range in retroviruses leads to cell death mediated by highly cytopathic variants.

    PubMed

    Rainey, G Jonah A; Coffin, John M

    2006-01-01

    The ability of many retroviruses to cause disease can be correlated to their cytopathic effect (CPE) in tissue culture characterized by an acute period of cell death and viral DNA accumulation. Here, we show that mutants of a subgroup B avian retrovirus (Alpharetrovirus) cause a very dramatic CPE in certain susceptible avian cells that is coincident with elevated levels of apoptosis, as measured by nuclear morphology, and persistent viral DNA accumulation. These mutants also have a broadly extended host range that includes rodent, cat, dog, monkey, and human cells (31). Previously, we have shown that the mutants exhibit diminished resistance to superinfection. The results presented here have important implications for the process of evolution of retroviruses to use distinct cellular receptors.

  9. In vitro and in vivo host range of Anopheles gambiae densovirus (AgDNV).

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasutsugu; Barik, Tapan K; Johnson, Rebecca M; Rasgon, Jason L

    2015-07-29

    AgDNV is a powerful gene transduction tool and potential biological control agent for Anopheles mosquitoes. Using a GFP reporter virus system, we investigated AgDNV host range specificity in four arthropod cell lines (derived from An. gambiae, Aedes albopictus and Drosophila melanogaster) and six mosquito species from 3 genera (An. gambiae, An. arabiensis, An. stephensi, Ae. albopictus, Ae. aegypti and Culex tarsalis). In vitro, efficient viral invasion, replication and GFP expression was only observed in MOS55 An. gambiae cells. In vivo, high levels of GFP were observed in An. gambiae mosquitoes. Intermediate levels of GFP were observed in the closely related species An. arabiensis. Low levels of GFP were observed in An. stephensi, Ae. albopictus, Ae. aegypti and Cx. tarsalis. These results suggest that AgDNV is a specific gene transduction tool for members of the An. gambiae species complex, and could be potentially developed into a biocontrol agent with minimal off-target effects.

  10. MAVS-dependent host species range and pathogenicity of human hepatitis A virus.

    PubMed

    Hirai-Yuki, Asuka; Hensley, Lucinda; McGivern, David R; González-López, Olga; Das, Anshuman; Feng, Hui; Sun, Lu; Wilson, Justin E; Hu, Fengyu; Feng, Zongdi; Lovell, William; Misumi, Ichiro; Ting, Jenny P-Y; Montgomery, Stephanie; Cullen, John; Whitmire, Jason K; Lemon, Stanley M

    2016-09-30

    Hepatotropic viruses are important causes of human disease, but the intrahepatic immune response to hepatitis viruses is poorly understood because of a lack of tractable small- animal models. We describe a murine model of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection that recapitulates critical features of type A hepatitis in humans. We demonstrate that the capacity of HAV to evade MAVS-mediated type I interferon responses defines its host species range. HAV-induced liver injury was associated with interferon-independent intrinsic hepatocellular apoptosis and hepatic inflammation that unexpectedly resulted from MAVS and IRF3/7 signaling. This murine model thus reveals a previously undefined link between innate immune responses to virus infection and acute liver injury, providing a new paradigm for viral pathogenesis in the liver. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Host range, growth property, and virulence of the smallpox vaccine: vaccinia virus Tian Tan strain.

    PubMed

    Fang, Qing; Yang, Lin; Zhu, Weijun; Liu, Li; Wang, Haibo; Yu, Wenbo; Xiao, Genfu; Tien, Po; Zhang, Linqi; Chen, Zhiwei

    2005-05-10

    Vaccinia Tian Tan (VTT) was used as a vaccine against smallpox in China for millions of people before 1980, yet the biological characteristics of the virus remain unclear. We have characterized VTT with respect to its host cell range, growth properties in vitro, and virulence in vivo. We found that 11 of the 12 mammalian cell lines studied are permissive to VTT infection whereas one, CHO-K1, is non-permissive. Using electron microscopy and sequence analysis, we found that the restriction of VTT replication in CHO-K1 is at a step before viral maturation probably due to the loss of the V025 gene. Moreover, VTT is significantly less virulent than vaccinia WR but remains neurovirulent in mice and causes significant body weight loss after intranasal inoculation. Our data demonstrate the need for further attenuation of VTT to serve either as a safer smallpox vaccine or as a live vaccine vector for other pathogens.

  12. In vitro and in vivo host range of Anopheles gambiae densovirus (AgDNV)

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yasutsugu; Barik, Tapan K.; Johnson, Rebecca M.; Rasgon, Jason L.

    2015-01-01

    AgDNV is a powerful gene transduction tool and potential biological control agent for Anopheles mosquitoes. Using a GFP reporter virus system, we investigated AgDNV host range specificity in four arthropod cell lines (derived from An. gambiae, Aedes albopictus and Drosophila melanogaster) and six mosquito species from 3 genera (An. gambiae, An. arabiensis, An. stephensi, Ae. albopictus, Ae. aegypti and Culex tarsalis). In vitro, efficient viral invasion, replication and GFP expression was only observed in MOS55 An. gambiae cells. In vivo, high levels of GFP were observed in An. gambiae mosquitoes. Intermediate levels of GFP were observed in the closely related species An. arabiensis. Low levels of GFP were observed in An. stephensi, Ae. albopictus, Ae. aegypti and Cx. tarsalis. These results suggest that AgDNV is a specific gene transduction tool for members of the An. gambiae species complex, and could be potentially developed into a biocontrol agent with minimal off-target effects. PMID:26220140

  13. Canine and feline host ranges of canine parvovirus and feline panleukopenia virus: distinct host cell tropisms of each virus in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Truyen, U; Parrish, C R

    1992-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) emerged as an apparently new virus during the mid-1970s. The origin of CPV is unknown, but a variation from feline panleukopenia virus (FPV) or another closely related parvovirus is suspected. Here we examine the in vitro and in vivo canine and feline host ranges of CPV and FPV. Examination of three canine and six feline cell lines and mitogen-stimulated canine and feline peripheral blood lymphocytes revealed that CPV replicates in both canine and feline cells, whereas FPV replicates efficiently only in feline cells. The in vivo host ranges were unexpectedly complex and distinct from the in vitro host ranges. Inoculation of dogs with FPV revealed efficient replication in the thymus and, to some degree, in the bone marrow, as shown by virus isolation, viral DNA recovery, and Southern blotting and by strand-specific in situ hybridization. FPV replication could not be demonstrated in mesenteric lymph nodes or in the small intestine, which are important target tissues in CPV infection. Although CPV replicated well in all the feline cells tested in vitro, it did not replicate in any tissue of cats after intramuscular or intravenous inoculation. These results indicate that these viruses have complex and overlapping host ranges and that distinct tissue tropisms exist in the homologous and heterologous hosts. Images PMID:1323703

  14. Spatial variation in the phylogenetic structure of flea assemblages across geographic ranges of small mammalian hosts in the Palearctic.

    PubMed

    Krasnov, Boris R; Pilosof, Shai; Shenbrot, Georgy I; Khokhlova, Irina S

    2013-08-01

    We investigated spatial variation in the phylogenetic structure (measured as a degree of phylogenetic clustering) of flea assemblages across the geographic ranges of 11 Palearctic species of small mammalian hosts and asked whether the phylogenetic structure of the flea assemblage of a host in a locality is affected by (i) distance of this locality from the centre of the host's geographic range, (ii) geographic position of the locality (distance to the equator) and (iii) phylogenetic structure of the entire flea assemblage of the locality. Our results demonstrated that the key factor underlying spatial variation of the phylogenetic structure of the flea assemblage of a host was the distance from the centre of the host's geographic range. However, the pattern of this spatial variation differed between host species and might be explained by their species-specific immunogenetic and/or distributional patterns. Local flea assemblages may also, to some extent, be shaped by environmental filtering coupled with historical events. In addition, the phylogenetic structure of a local within-host flea assemblage may mirror the phylogenetic structure of the entire across-host flea assemblage in that locality and, thus, be affected by the availability of certain phylogenetic lineages. Copyright © 2013 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Lacanobia oleracea nucleopolyhedrovirus (LaolNPV): A new European species of alphabaculovirus with a narrow host range

    PubMed Central

    Erlandson, Martin A.; Frayssinet, Marie; Williams, Trevor; Theilmann, David A.; Volkoff, Anne-Nathalie; Caballero, Primitivo

    2017-01-01

    During an insect sampling program in alfalfa crops near Montpellier, France in 2011, Lacanobia oleracea larvae were collected that died due to nucleopolyhedrovirus infection (LaolNPV). This virus was subjected to molecular and biological characterization. The virus was a multiple nucleocapsid NPV that showed similar restriction profiles to Mamestra configurata NPV-A (MacoNPV-A) but with significant differences. Polypeptide analysis demonstrated similar proteins in occlusion bodies and occlusion derived virions, to those observed in NPVs from Mamestra spp. Terminal sequencing revealed that the genome organization shared similarity with that of MacoNPV-A. The most homologous virus was MacoNPV-A 90/2 isolate (95.63% identity and 96.47% similarity), followed by MacoNPV-A 90/4 strain (95.37% and 96.26%), MacoNPV-B (89.21% and 93.53%) and M. brassicae MNPV (89.42% and 93.74%). Phylogenetic analysis performed with lef-8, lef-9, polh and a concatenated set of genes showed that LaolNPV and the Mamestra spp. NPVs clustered together with HaMNPV, but with a closer genetic distance to MacoNPV-A strains. The Kimura 2-parameter (K-2-P) distances of the complete genes were greater than 0.05 between LaolNPV and the MbMNPV/MacoNPV-B/HaMNPV complex, which indicates that LaolNPV is a distinct species. K-2-P distances were in the range 0.015–0.050 for comparisons of LaolNPV with MacoNPV-A strains, such that additional biological characteristics should be evaluated to determine species status. While MacoNPV-A was pathogenic to seven lepidopteran species tested, LaolNPV was only pathogenic to Chrysodeixis chalcites. Given these findings, Lacanobia oleracea nucleopolyhedrovirus should be considered as a new species in the Alphabaculovirus genus. PMID:28426736

  16. Lacanobia oleracea nucleopolyhedrovirus (LaolNPV): A new European species of alphabaculovirus with a narrow host range.

    PubMed

    Simón, Oihane; Erlandson, Martin A; Frayssinet, Marie; Williams, Trevor; Theilmann, David A; Volkoff, Anne-Nathalie; Caballero, Primitivo

    2017-01-01

    During an insect sampling program in alfalfa crops near Montpellier, France in 2011, Lacanobia oleracea larvae were collected that died due to nucleopolyhedrovirus infection (LaolNPV). This virus was subjected to molecular and biological characterization. The virus was a multiple nucleocapsid NPV that showed similar restriction profiles to Mamestra configurata NPV-A (MacoNPV-A) but with significant differences. Polypeptide analysis demonstrated similar proteins in occlusion bodies and occlusion derived virions, to those observed in NPVs from Mamestra spp. Terminal sequencing revealed that the genome organization shared similarity with that of MacoNPV-A. The most homologous virus was MacoNPV-A 90/2 isolate (95.63% identity and 96.47% similarity), followed by MacoNPV-A 90/4 strain (95.37% and 96.26%), MacoNPV-B (89.21% and 93.53%) and M. brassicae MNPV (89.42% and 93.74%). Phylogenetic analysis performed with lef-8, lef-9, polh and a concatenated set of genes showed that LaolNPV and the Mamestra spp. NPVs clustered together with HaMNPV, but with a closer genetic distance to MacoNPV-A strains. The Kimura 2-parameter (K-2-P) distances of the complete genes were greater than 0.05 between LaolNPV and the MbMNPV/MacoNPV-B/HaMNPV complex, which indicates that LaolNPV is a distinct species. K-2-P distances were in the range 0.015-0.050 for comparisons of LaolNPV with MacoNPV-A strains, such that additional biological characteristics should be evaluated to determine species status. While MacoNPV-A was pathogenic to seven lepidopteran species tested, LaolNPV was only pathogenic to Chrysodeixis chalcites. Given these findings, Lacanobia oleracea nucleopolyhedrovirus should be considered as a new species in the Alphabaculovirus genus.

  17. Characterization of a new iridovirus isolated from crickets and investigations on the host range

    PubMed

    Kleespies; Tidona; Darai

    1999-01-01

    Typical signs of an iridovirus infection were observed in two species of fatally diseased crickets, Gryllus campestris L. and Acheta domesticus L. (Orthoptera, Gryllidae). The infection was manifested by hypertrophy and bluish iridescence of the affected fat body cells. Electron microscope investigations led to the identification of a new iridovirus, which was termed cricket iridovirus (CrIV). In negatively stained preparations the size of the icosahedral virus particles ranged from 151 nm (side-side) to 167 nm (apex-apex). Assembly of virions occurred in the cytoplasm of hypertrophied fat body cells, where they often accumulated in paracrystalline arrays. Genetic analyses of purified viral DNA using a variety of restriction enzymes revealed that CrIV is distinct from all other known iridoviruses that have been isolated from insects and reported so far. In host range studies it was shown that CrIV can be transmitted perorally to other orthopteran species, causing characteristic symptoms and fatal disease. These species include Gryllus bimaculatus L. (Orthoptera, Gryllidae) and the African migratory locust Locusta migratoria migratorioides (R. & F.) (Orthoptera, Acrididae), which represents one of the most important pest insects in developing countries, as well as the cockroaches Blattella germanica L. and Blatta orientalis L. (both Orthoptera, Blattidae). Consequently, the isolation and characterization of this new cricket iridovirus is of particular interest in view of its possible use in biological or integrated control. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  18. Comparison of ranging behaviour in a multi-species complex of free-ranging hosts of bovine tuberculosis in relation to their use as disease sentinels.

    PubMed

    Yockney, I J; Nugent, G; Latham, M C; Perry, M; Cross, M L; Byrom, A E

    2013-07-01

    Sentinel species are increasingly used by disease managers to detect and monitor the prevalence of zoonotic diseases in wildlife populations. Characterizing home-range movements of sentinel hosts is thus important for developing improved disease surveillance methods, especially in systems where multiple host species co-exist. We studied ranging activity of major hosts of bovine tuberculosis (TB) in an upland habitat of New Zealand: we compared home-range coverage by ferrets (Mustela furo), wild deer (Cervus elaphus), feral pigs (Sus scrofa), brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) and free-ranging farmed cattle (Bos taurus). We also report in detail the proportional utilization of a seasonal (4-monthly) range area for the latter four species. Possums covered the smallest home range (<30 ha), ferrets covered ~100 ha, pigs ~4 km(2), deer and cattle both >30 km2. For any given weekly period, cattle, deer and pigs were shown to utilize 37–45% of their estimated 4-month range, while possums utilized 62% during any weekly period and 85% during any monthly period of their estimated 4-month range. We suggest that present means for estimating TB detection kernels, based on long-term range size estimates for possums and sentinel species, probably overstate the true local surveillance coverage per individual.

  19. Structure Function Studies of Vaccinia Virus Host Range Protein K1 Reveal a Novel Functional Surface for Ankyrin Repeat Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yongchao; Meng, Xiangzhi; Xiang, Yan; Deng, Junpeng

    2010-06-15

    Poxvirus host tropism at the cellular level is regulated by virus-encoded host range proteins acting downstream of virus entry. The functioning mechanisms of most host range proteins are unclear, but many contain multiple ankyrin (ANK) repeats, a motif that is known for ligand interaction through a concave surface. We report here the crystal structure of one of the ANK repeat-containing host range proteins, the vaccinia virus K1 protein. The structure, at a resolution of 2.3 {angstrom}, showed that K1 consists entirely of ANK repeats, including seven complete ones and two incomplete ones, one each at the N and C terminus. Interestingly, Phe82 and Ser83, which were previously shown to be critical for K1's function, are solvent exposed and located on a convex surface, opposite the consensus ANK interaction surface. The importance of this convex surface was further supported by our additional mutagenesis studies. We found that K1's host range function was negatively affected by substitution of either Asn51 or Cys47 and completely abolished by substitution of both residues. Cys47 and Asn51 are also exposed on the convex surface, spatially adjacent to Phe82 and Ser83. Altogether, our data showed that K1 residues on a continuous convex ANK repeat surface are critical for the host range function, suggesting that K1 functions through ligand interaction and does so with a novel ANK interaction surface.

  20. Seasonal Alterations in Host Range and Fidelity in the Polyphagous Mirid Bug, Apolygus lucorum (Heteroptera: Miridae)

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Hongsheng; Liu, Bing; Lu, Yanhui; Wyckhuys, Kris A. G.

    2015-01-01

    In herbivorous insects, host plant switching is commonly observed and plays an important role in their annual life cycle. However, much remains to be learned about seasonal host switching of various pestiferous arthropods under natural conditions. From 2006 until 2012, we assessed Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür) host plant use in successive spring, summer and winter seasons at one single location (Langfang, China). Data were used to quantify changes in host plant breadth and host fidelity between seasons. Host fidelity of A. lucorum differed between seasons, with 87.9% of spring hosts also used in the summer and 36.1% of summer hosts used in winter. In contrast, as little as 25.6% host plant species were shared between winter and spring. Annual herbaceous plants are most often used for overwintering, while perennial woody plants are relatively important for initial population build-up in the spring. Our study contributes to an improved understanding of evolutionary interactions between A. lucorum and its host plants and lays the groundwork for the design of population management strategies for this important pest in myriad crops. PMID:25692969

  1. Species Boundaries and Host Range of Tortoise Mites (Uropodoidea) Phoretic on Bark Beetles (Scolytinae), Using Morphometric and Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Knee, Wayne; Beaulieu, Frédéric; Skevington, Jeffrey H.; Kelso, Scott; Cognato, Anthony I.; Forbes, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the ecology and evolutionary history of symbionts and their hosts requires accurate taxonomic knowledge, including clear species boundaries and phylogenies. Tortoise mites (Mesostigmata: Uropodoidea) are among the most diverse arthropod associates of bark beetles (Curculionidae: Scolytinae), but their taxonomy and host associations are largely unstudied. We tested the hypotheses that (1) morphologically defined species are supported by molecular data, and that (2) bark beetle uropodoids with a broad host range comprise cryptic species. To do so, we assessed the species boundaries of uropodoid mites collected from 51 host species, across 11 countries and 103 sites, using morphometric data as well as partial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) and nuclear large subunit ribosomal DNA (28S). Overall, morphologically defined species were confirmed by molecular datasets, with a few exceptions. Twenty-nine of the 36 uropodoid species (Trichouropoda, Nenteria and Uroobovella) collected in this study had narrow host ranges, while seven species had putative broad host ranges. In all but one species, U. orri, our data supported the existence of these host generalists, which contrasts with the typical finding that widespread generalists are actually complexes of cryptic specialists. PMID:23071768

  2. Relative geographic range of sibling species of host damselflies does not reliably predict differential parasitism by water mites

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    related hosts species, no such differences were found between other related host species. Differences in geographic range of related host species does not reliably explain differential levels of parasitism by water mites. PMID:24351055

  3. Host range and community structure of avian nest parasites in the genus Philornis (Diptera: Muscidae) on the island of Trinidad

    PubMed Central

    Bulgarella, Mariana; Heimpel, George E

    2015-01-01

    Parasite host range can be influenced by physiological, behavioral, and ecological factors. Combining data sets on host–parasite associations with phylogenetic information of the hosts and the parasites involved can generate evolutionary hypotheses about the selective forces shaping host range. Here, we analyzed associations between the nest-parasitic flies in the genus Philornis and their host birds on Trinidad. Four of ten Philornis species were only reared from one species of bird. Of the parasite species with more than one host bird species, P. falsificus was the least specific and P. deceptivus the most specific attacking only Passeriformes. Philornis flies in Trinidad thus include both specialists and generalists, with varying degrees of specificity within the generalists. We used three quantities to more formally compare the host range of Philornis flies: the number of bird species attacked by each species of Philornis, a phylogenetically informed host specificity index (Poulin and Mouillot's STD), and a branch length-based STD. We then assessed the phylogenetic signal of these measures of host range for 29 bird species. None of these measures showed significant phylogenetic signal, suggesting that clades of Philornis did not differ significantly in their ability to exploit hosts. We also calculated two quantities of parasite species load for the birds – the parasite species richness, and a variant of the STD index based on nodes rather than on taxonomic levels – and assessed the signal of these measures on the bird phylogeny. We did not find significant phylogenetic signal for the parasite species load or the node-based STD index. Finally, we calculated the parasite associations for all bird pairs using the Jaccard index and regressed these similarity values against the number of nodes in the phylogeny separating bird pairs. This analysis showed that Philornis on Trinidad tend to feed on closely related bird species more often than expected by

  4. Modulation of pPS10 Host Range by Plasmid-Encoded RepA Initiator Protein

    PubMed Central

    Maestro, Beatriz; Sanz, Jesús M.; Díaz-Orejas, Ramón; Fernández-Tresguerres, Elena

    2003-01-01

    We report here the isolation and analysis of novel repA host range mutants of pPS10, a plasmid originally found in Pseudomonas savastanoi. Upon hydroxylamine treatment, five plasmid mutants were selected for their establishment in Escherichia coli at 37°C, a temperature at which the wild-type form cannot be established. The mutations were located in different functional regions of the plasmid RepA initiation protein, and the mutants differ in their stable maintenance, copy number, and ability to interact with sequences of the basic replicon. Four of them have broadened their host range, and one of them, unable to replicate in Pseudomonas, has therefore changed its host range. Moreover, the mutants also have increased their replication efficiency in strains other than E. coli such as Pseudomonas putida and Alcaligenes faecalis. None of these mutations drastically changed the structure or thermal stability of the wild-type RepA protein, but in all cases an enhanced interaction with host-encoded DnaA protein was detected by gel filtration chromatography. The effects of the mutations on the functionality of RepA protein are discussed in the framework of a three-dimensional model of the protein. We propose possible explanations for the host range effect of the different repA mutants, including the enhancement of limiting interactions of RepA with specific host replication factors such as DnaA. PMID:12562807

  5. Broad-Host Range Vector-Particle: Gene Transfer Particles From Thermal Vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiura, H. X.; Nakamura, K.; Fukazawa, Y.; Nakata, D.; Tomaru, A.; Okita, N.; Hoaki, T.

    2002-12-01

    Viruses or virus-like particles (VLPs) are common in aquatic ecosystems, however, VLP-host interactions and its commitments to gene transfer in the environment is yet unclear. We have proposed that at least some of the widely distributed VLPs could be general gene transfer agents among a wide range of microbial host cells, and might function as a universal vector (1-4). To elucidate such a broad host range gene transfer mediated by "VLP", the sampling site was extended to the hyper hydrothermal vent, and boring cores. VLP (v) and cell (b) abundances per ml water samples from drilling holes of Suiyo seamount were: APSK04 (28°34.303'N, 140°38.618'E, 1385 m deep, 21°C, b = 8.26 *E^{6}, v = 6.03 x 10^{6}); APSK07 (28°34.299'N, 140°38.690'E, 1386 m deep, 250.5°C, b = 5.33 \\times 104, v = 2.52 \\times 104); a natural vent near APSK05 (28°34.322'N, 140°38.594'E, 1382 m deep, 304.7°C, b = 3.23 x 10^{4}, v = 1.85 x 10^{4}). A boring core sample was obtained from APSK06 (28°34.313'N, 140°38.617', 1386 m deep), from which a hyper thermophilic Archaean, Thermococcus kodakaraensis was successfully cultivated in sulphur supplemented medium between 70 and 90°C. VLP production was observed from T. kodakaraensis, whose VLP (v) and cell (b) abundances per ml at 480 h culture at 70°C were: b = 3.61 *E^{9}, v = 3.46 *E^{9}. Transduction experiment at multiplicity of infection of ca 0.2 using particles from APSK07 and T. kodakaraensis showed a plate efficiency on recipient Escherichia coli AB1157 by ca 72 % and ca 89 % regardless of UV treatment of the particle. Gene transfer frequency of APSK07 particle was (x 10^{-5} cfu/particle) between 2.4 and 0.92, and that of T. kodakaraensis particle was between x 10^{-4} and x 10^{-5}$ cfu/particle. These findings suggest the non-specific gene transfer by such particles may be a ubiquitous event in the natural environment. Such gene transfer particles may have mediated gene flux among phylogenetically diverse microbial

  6. Role of larval host plants in the climate-driven range expansion of the butterfly Polygonia c-album.

    PubMed

    Braschler, Brigitte; Hill, Jane K

    2007-05-01

    1. Some species have expanded their ranges during recent climate warming and the availability of breeding habitat and species' dispersal ability are two important factors determining expansions. The exploitation of a wide range of larval host plants should increase an herbivorous insect species' ability to track climate by increasing habitat availability. Therefore we investigated whether the performance of a species on different host plants changed towards its range boundary, and under warmer temperatures. 2. We studied the polyphagous butterfly Polygonia c-album, which is currently expanding its range in Britain and apparently has altered its host plant preference from Humulus lupulus to include other hosts (particularly Ulmus glabra and Urtica dioica). We investigated insect performance (development time, larval growth rate, adult size, survival) and adult flight morphology on these host plants under four rearing temperatures (18-28.5 degrees C) in populations from core and range margin sites. 3. In general, differences between core and margin populations were small compared with effects of rearing temperature and host plant. In terms of insect performance, host plants were generally ranked U. glabra > or = U. dioica > H. lupulus at all temperatures. Adult P. c-album can either enter diapause or develop directly and higher temperatures resulted in more directly developing adults, but lower survival rates (particularly on the original host H. lupulus) and smaller adult size. 4. Adult flight morphology of wild-caught individuals from range margin populations appeared to be related to increased dispersal potential relative to core populations. However, there was no difference in laboratory reared individuals, and conflicting results were obtained for different measures of flight morphology in relation to larval host plant and temperature effects, making conclusions about dispersal potential difficult. 5. Current range expansion of P. c-album is associated with the

  7. The Role of Flavonoids in Nodulation Host-Range Specificity: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cheng-Wu; Murray, Jeremy D.

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids are crucial signaling molecules in the symbiosis between legumes and their nitrogen-fixing symbionts, the rhizobia. The primary function of flavonoids in the interaction is to induce transcription of the genes for biosynthesis of the rhizobial signaling molecules called Nod factors, which are perceived by the plant to allow symbiotic infection of the root. Many legumes produce specific flavonoids that only induce Nod factor production in homologous rhizobia, and therefore act as important determinants of host range. Despite a wealth of evidence on legume flavonoids, relatively few have proven roles in rhizobial infection. Recent studies suggest that production of key “infection” flavonoids is highly localized at infection sites. Furthermore, some of the flavonoids being produced at infection sites are phytoalexins and may have a role in the selection of compatible symbionts during infection. The molecular details of how flavonoid production in plants is regulated during nodulation have not yet been clarified, but nitrogen availability has been shown to play a role. PMID:27529286

  8. The avian and mammalian host range of highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Bryan S; Webby, Richard J

    2013-12-05

    Highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses have been isolated from a number of avian and mammalian species. Despite intensive control measures the number of human and animal cases continues to increase. A more complete understanding of susceptible species and of contributing environmental and molecular factors is crucial if we are to slow the rate of new cases. H5N1 is currently endemic in domestic poultry in only a handful of countries with sporadic and unpredictable spread to other countries. Close contact of terrestrial bird or mammalian species with infected poultry/waterfowl or their biological products is the major route for interspecies transmission. Intra-species transmission of H5N1 in mammals, including humans, has taken place on a limited scale though it remains to be seen if this will change; recent laboratory studies suggest that it is indeed possible. Here we review the avian and mammalian species that are naturally susceptible to H5N1 infection and the molecular factors associated with its expanded host range.

  9. A T3 and T7 Recombinant Phage Acquires Efficient Adsorption and a Broader Host Range

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tiao-Yin; Lo, Yi-Haw; Tseng, Pin-Wei; Chang, Shun-Fu; Lin, Yann-Tsyr; Chen, Ton-Seng

    2012-01-01

    It is usually thought that bacteriophage T7 is female specific, while phage T3 can propagate on male and female Escherichia coli. We found that the growth patterns of phages T7M and T3 do not match the above characteristics, instead showing strain dependent male exclusion. Furthermore, a T3/7 hybrid phage exhibits a broader host range relative to that of T3, T7, as well as T7M, and is able to overcome the male exclusion. The T7M sequence closely resembles that of T3. T3/7 is essentially T3 based, but a DNA fragment containing part of the tail fiber gene 17 is replaced by the T7 sequence. T3 displays inferior adsorption to strains tested herein compared to T7. The T3 and T7 recombinant phage carries altered tail fibers and acquires better adsorption efficiency than T3. How phages T3 and T7 recombine was previously unclear. This study is the first to show that recombination can occur accurately within only 8 base-pair homology, where four-way junction structures are identified. Genomic recombination models based on endonuclease I cleavages at equivalent and nonequivalent sites followed by strand annealing are proposed. Retention of pseudo-palindromes can increase recombination frequency for reviving under stress. PMID:22347414

  10. Avian host range of Chlamydophila spp. based on isolation, antigen detection and serology.

    PubMed

    Kaleta, E F; Taday, Eva M A

    2003-10-01

    Published reports and our own diagnostic data on the avian host range of avian Chlamydophila spp. are presented in an attempt to provide evidence for the large number of bird species that have been naturally infected with chlamydia. The term 'chlamydia-positive' is based on either isolation of the organism and antigen detection or on serological detection of circulating antibodies. The list of chlamydia-positive birds contains the six major domestic species (chicken, turkey, Pekin duck, Muscovy duck, goose, and pigeon), the three minor domestic species (Japanese quail, bobwhite quail, and peafowl) and a total of 460 free-living or pet bird species in 30 orders. The order Psittaciformes contains by far the most (153 of 342; 45%) chlamydia-positive bird species. More than 20% of all species per order are positive for chlamydia in the orders Lariformes (gulls, 26 of 92 species; 28%), Alciformes (alks, six of 23 species; 26%), Sphenisciformes (penguins, four of 16 species; 25%), and Anseriformes (ducks and geese, 33 of 157 species; 21%). Only 5% of all bird species (14 of 259 species) in the order Phasianiformes (gallinaceus birds) are chlamydia-positive. The different percentages of chlamydia-positive bird species reflect: (i) a high rate of investigations (e.g. of domestic birds) compared with infrequent testing (e.g. of Charadriiformes or Cuculiformes), (ii) frequent zoonotic implications (e.g. psittacine and columbiform birds), and (iii) an assumed high susceptibility to infection and subsequent seroconversion (e.g. waterfowl).

  11. The avian and mammalian host range of highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Bryan S.; Webby, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses have been isolated from a number of avian and mammalian species. Despite intensive control measures the number of human and animal cases continues to increase. A more complete understanding of susceptible species and of contributing environmental and molecular factors is crucial if we are to slow the rate of new cases. H5N1 is currently endemic in domestic poultry in only a handful of countries with sporadic and unpredictable spread to other countries. Close contact of terrestrial bird or mammalian species with infected poultry/waterfowl or their biological products is the major route for interspecies transmission. Intra-species transmission of H5N1 in mammals, including humans, has taken place on a limited scale though it remains to be seen if this will change; recent laboratory studies suggest that it is indeed possible. Here we review the avian and mammalian species that are naturally susceptible to H5N1 infection and the molecular factors associated with its expanded host range. PMID:24025480

  12. A novel expression system based on host-range expansion of baculovirus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y; Qi, Y; Liu, D; Joshua, M N; Wang, Y

    1998-12-01

    A host range expanded recombinant Autographa californica multiple-nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrosis virus AcMNPV/r2 was obtained by cotransfection of the bacmid DNA from Escherichia coli DH10Bac along with a plasmid pBmH-M containing HindIII M fragment of Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus (BmNPV) genomic DNA. A recombinant transposon vector carrying a mutant green fluorescent protein gene (GFP) and a polyhedrin gene was constructed. Transposition was carried out in both E. coli DH10Bac and E. coli DH10BmH, which contains AcMNPV/r2 and a helper plasmid. Recombinant DNAs were transfected into Sf-9 cells to generate recombinant virus AcMNPV/r3 and AcMNPV/r4 respectively. Viral stock of AcMNPV/r4 was then infected into Bombyx mori cells (BmN) and Bombyx mori larvae (silkworm). Analysis shows that GFP was highly expressed in Bombyx mori larvae. This expression system, is practicable therefore for mass production of foreign gene products.

  13. A T3 and T7 recombinant phage acquires efficient adsorption and a broader host range.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tiao-Yin; Lo, Yi-Haw; Tseng, Pin-Wei; Chang, Shun-Fu; Lin, Yann-Tsyr; Chen, Ton-Seng

    2012-01-01

    It is usually thought that bacteriophage T7 is female specific, while phage T3 can propagate on male and female Escherichia coli. We found that the growth patterns of phages T7M and T3 do not match the above characteristics, instead showing strain dependent male exclusion. Furthermore, a T3/7 hybrid phage exhibits a broader host range relative to that of T3, T7, as well as T7M, and is able to overcome the male exclusion. The T7M sequence closely resembles that of T3. T3/7 is essentially T3 based, but a DNA fragment containing part of the tail fiber gene 17 is replaced by the T7 sequence. T3 displays inferior adsorption to strains tested herein compared to T7. The T3 and T7 recombinant phage carries altered tail fibers and acquires better adsorption efficiency than T3. How phages T3 and T7 recombine was previously unclear. This study is the first to show that recombination can occur accurately within only 8 base-pair homology, where four-way junction structures are identified. Genomic recombination models based on endonuclease I cleavages at equivalent and nonequivalent sites followed by strand annealing are proposed. Retention of pseudo-palindromes can increase recombination frequency for reviving under stress.

  14. Host and geographic range extensions of the North American strain of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedrick, R.P.; Batts, W.N.; Yun, S.; Traxler, G.S.; Kaufman, J.; Winton, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) was isolated from populations of Pacific sardine Sardinops sagaxfrom the coastal waters of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada, and central and southern California, USA. The virus was also isolated from Pacific mackerel Scomber japonicus in southern California, from eulachon or smeltThaleichthys pacificus, and surf smelt Hypomesus pretiosus pretiosus from Oregon, USA. Mortality and skin lesions typical of viral hemorrhagic septicemia in other marine fish species were observed among sardine in Canada and in a few surf smelt from Oregon, but the remaining isolates of VHSV were obtained from healthy appearing fish. The prevalence of VHSV among groups of apparently healthy sardine, mackerel and smelt ranged from 4 to 8% in California and Oregon. A greater prevalence of infection (58%) occurred in groups of sardine sampled in Canada that sustained a naturally occurring epidemic during 1998-99. A captive group of surf smelt in Oregon exhibited an 81% prevalence of infection with clinical signs in only a few fish. The new isolates were confirmed as North American VHSV and were closely related based on comparisons of the partial nucleotide sequence of the glycoprotein (G) gene. The VHSV isolates from sardine in Canada and California were the most closely related, differing from isolates obtained from other marine fish species and salmonids in British Columbia, Canada, Alaska and Washington, USA. These new virus isolations extend both the known hosts (sardine, mackerel and 2 species of smelt) and geographic range (Oregon and California, USA) of VHSV.

  15. Colonization behaviors of mountain pine beetle on novel hosts: Implications for range expansion into northeastern North America.

    PubMed

    Rosenberger, Derek W; Venette, Robert C; Maddox, Mitchell P; Aukema, Brian H

    2017-01-01

    As climates change, thermal limits may no longer constrain some native herbivores within their historical ranges. The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, is a tree-killing bark beetle native to western North America that is currently expanding its range. Continued eastward expansion through the newly invaded and novel jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) trees of the Canadian boreal forest could result in exposure of several species of novel potential host pines common in northeastern North America to this oligophagous herbivore. Due to the tightly co-evolved relationship between mountain pine beetle and western pine hosts, in which the insect utilizes the defensive chemistry of the host to stimulate mass attacks, we hypothesized that lack of co-evolutionary association would affect the host attraction and acceptance behaviors of this insect among novel hosts, particularly those with little known historical association with an aggressive stem-infesting insect. We studied how beetle behavior differed among the various stages of colonization on newly cut logs of four novel potential pine host species; jack, red (P. resinosa Ait.), eastern white (P. strobus L.) and Scots (P. sylvestris L.) pines, as well as two historical hosts, ponderosa (P. ponderosa Dougl. ex. Laws. var. scopulorum Engelm.) and lodgepole (P. contorta Dougl. var. latifolia Engelm.) pines. Overall, we found that beetle colonization behaviors at each stage in the colonization process differ between pine hosts, likely due to differing chemical and physical bark traits. Pines without co-evolved constitutive defenses against mountain pine beetle exhibited reduced amounts of defensive monoterpenoid chemicals; however, such patterns also reduced beetle attraction and colonization. Neither chemical nor physical defenses fully defended trees against the various stages of host procurement that can result in tree colonization and death.

  16. Colonization behaviors of mountain pine beetle on novel hosts: Implications for range expansion into northeastern North America

    PubMed Central

    Venette, Robert C.; Maddox, Mitchell P.; Aukema, Brian H.

    2017-01-01

    As climates change, thermal limits may no longer constrain some native herbivores within their historical ranges. The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, is a tree-killing bark beetle native to western North America that is currently expanding its range. Continued eastward expansion through the newly invaded and novel jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) trees of the Canadian boreal forest could result in exposure of several species of novel potential host pines common in northeastern North America to this oligophagous herbivore. Due to the tightly co-evolved relationship between mountain pine beetle and western pine hosts, in which the insect utilizes the defensive chemistry of the host to stimulate mass attacks, we hypothesized that lack of co-evolutionary association would affect the host attraction and acceptance behaviors of this insect among novel hosts, particularly those with little known historical association with an aggressive stem-infesting insect. We studied how beetle behavior differed among the various stages of colonization on newly cut logs of four novel potential pine host species; jack, red (P. resinosa Ait.), eastern white (P. strobus L.) and Scots (P. sylvestris L.) pines, as well as two historical hosts, ponderosa (P. ponderosa Dougl. ex. Laws. var. scopulorum Engelm.) and lodgepole (P. contorta Dougl. var. latifolia Engelm.) pines. Overall, we found that beetle colonization behaviors at each stage in the colonization process differ between pine hosts, likely due to differing chemical and physical bark traits. Pines without co-evolved constitutive defenses against mountain pine beetle exhibited reduced amounts of defensive monoterpenoid chemicals; however, such patterns also reduced beetle attraction and colonization. Neither chemical nor physical defenses fully defended trees against the various stages of host procurement that can result in tree colonization and death. PMID:28472047

  17. Phylogenetics and genetic diversity of the Cotesia flavipes complex of parasitoid wasps (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), biological control agents of lepidopteran stemborers.

    PubMed

    Muirhead, Kate A; Murphy, Nicholas P; Sallam, Nader; Donnellan, Stephen C; Austin, Andrew D

    2012-06-01

    The Cotesia flavipes complex of parasitoid wasps (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) are economically important for the biological control of lepidopteran stemboring pests associated with gramineous crops. Some members of the complex successfully parasitize numerous stemborer pest species, however certain geographic populations have demonstrated variation in the range of hosts that they parasitize. In addition, the morphology of the complex is highly conserved and considerable confusion surrounds the identity of species and host-associated biotypes. We generated nucleotide sequence data for two mtDNA genes (COI, 16S) and three anonymous nuclear loci (CfBN, CfCN, CfEN) for the C. flavipes complex. To analyze genetic variation and relationships among populations we used (1) concatenated mtDNA and nDNA data, (2) a nDNA multilocus network approach, and (3) two species tree inference methods, i.e. Bayesian estimation of species trees (BEST) and Bayesian inference of species trees from multilocus data with (*)BEAST. All phylogenetic analyses provide strong support for monophyly of the complex and the presence of at least four species, C. chilonis (from China and Japan), C. sesamiae (from Africa), C. flavipes (originating from the Indo-Asia region but introduced into Africa and the New World), and C. nonagriae (from Australia and Papua New Guinea). Haplotype diversity of geographic populations relates to historical biogeographic barriers and biological control introductions, and reflects previous reports of ecological variation in these species. Strong discordance was found between the mitochondrial and nuclear markers in the Papua New Guinea haplotypes, which may be an outcome of hybridization and introgression of C. flavipes and C. nonagriae. The position of Cotesia flavipes from Japan was not well supported in any analysis and was the sister taxon to C. nonagriae (mtDNA, (*)BEAST), C. flavipes (nDNA) or C. flavipes+C. nonagriae (BEST) and, may represent a cryptic species. The

  18. Host Range Assessment of Helicotylenchus pseudorobustus (Tylenchida: Hoplolaimidae) on Pasture Species

    PubMed Central

    Davis, L. T.; Bell, N. L.; Watson, R.N.; Rohan, T. C.

    2004-01-01

    The host status of 15 commonly occurring pasture species for Helicotylenchus pseudorobustus was tested in a greenhouse trial. Only tall fescue, with and without Neotyphodium endophyte infection, was a good host (Pf/Pi = final/initial population > 1). Inoculation survival was tested in a second trial, which showed that only 10% of the H. pseudorobustus nematodes survived the first 7 days after inoculation. When the Pf/Pi was adjusted to account for a 10% survival, all of the grass and clover hosts tested had a Pf/Pi > 1. Both trials showed a positive correlation between increased numbers of H. pseudorobustus and free-living nematodes. PMID:19262829

  19. A simple procedure to determine the infectivity and host range of viruses infecting anaerobic and hyperthermophilic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Gorlas, Aurore; Geslin, Claire

    2013-03-01

    Plaque assay is the method traditionally used to isolate and purify lytic viruses, to determine the viral titer and host range. Whereas most bacterioviruses are either temperate or lytic, the majority of known archeoviruses are not lytic (i.e. they are temperate or chronic). In view of the widespread occurrence of such viruses in extreme environments, we designed an original method, called the inverted spot test, to determine the host range and infectivity of viruses isolated from anaerobic hyperthermophilic and sulfur-reducing microorganisms. Here, we used this approach to prove for the first time the infectivity of Pyrococcus abyssi virus 1 (PAV1) and to confirm the host range of Thermococcus prieurii virus 1 (TPV1), the only two viruses isolated so far from any of the described marine hyperthermophilic archaea (Euryarchaeota phylum, Thermococcales order).

  20. Construction and characterization of regulated L-arabinose-inducible broad host range expression vectors in Xanthomonas.

    PubMed

    Sukchawalit, R; Vattanaviboon, P; Sallabhan, R; Mongkolsuk, S

    1999-12-15

    Several versions of broad host range (BHR), L-arabinose-inducible expression vectors were constructed. These expression vectors were based on a high copy number BHR pBBR1MCS-4 replicon that could replicate in both enteric and non-enteric Gram-negative bacteria. Two versions of expression cassettes containing multiple cloning sites either with or without a ribosome binding site were placed under transcriptional control of the Escherichia coli BAD promoter and araC gene. Three versions of vectors containing ampicillin or kanamycin or tetracycline resistance genes as selectable markers were constructed. In all six new L-arabinose-inducible BHR expression vectors containing many unique cloning sites, selectable markers were made to facilitate cloning and expression of genes in various Gram-negative bacteria. A Tn9 chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (cat) gene was cloned into an expression vector, resulting in pBBad18Acat that was used to establish optimal expression conditions (addition of 0.02% L-arabinose to mid-exponential phase cells for at least 1 h) in a Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli. Comparison of the Cat enzyme activities between uninduced and a 180-min L-arabinose-induced culture showed a greater than 150-fold increased Cat specific activity. In addition, L-arabinose induction of exponential phase cells harboring pBBad18Acat gave a higher amount of Cat than similarly treated stationary phase cells. The usefulness of the expression vector was also demonstrated in both enteric and non-enteric Gram-negative bacteria.

  1. A rabbitpox virus serpin gene controls host range by inhibiting apoptosis in restrictive cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, M A; Ali, A N; Turner, P C; Moyer, R W

    1995-01-01

    Poxviruses are unique among viruses in encoding members of the serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) superfamily. Orthopoxviruses contain three serpins, designated SPI-1, SPI-2, and SPI-3. SPI-1 encodes a 40-kDa protein that is required for the replication of rabbitpox virus (RPV) in PK-15 or A549 cells in culture (A. N. Ali, P. C. Turner, M. A. Brooks, and R. W. Moyer, Virology 202:305-314, 1994). Examination of nonpermissive human A549 cells infected with an RPV mutant disrupted in the SPI-1 gene (RPV delta SPI-1) suggests there are no gross defects in protein or DNA synthesis. The proteolytic processing of late viral structural proteins, a feature of orthopoxvirus infections associated with the maturation of virus particles, also appears relatively normal. However, very few mature virus particles of any kind are produced compared with the level found in infections with wild-type RPV. Morphological examination of RPV delta SPI-1-infected A549 cells, together with an observed fragmentation of cellular DNA, suggests that the host range defect is associated with the onset of apoptosis. Apoptosis is seen only in RPV delta SPI-1 infection of nonpermissive (A549 or PK-15) cells and is absent in all wild-type RPV infections and RPV delta SPI-2 mutant infections examined to date. Although the SPI-1 gene is expressed early, before DNA replication, the triggering apoptotic event occurs late in the infection, as RPV delta SPI-1-infected A549 cells do not undergo apoptosis when infections are carried out in the presence of cytosine arabinoside. While the SPI-2 (crmA) gene, when transfected into cells, has been shown to inhibit apoptosis, our experiments provide the first indication that a poxvirus serpin protein can inhibit apoptosis during a poxvirus infection. PMID:7494278

  2. Use of wide-host-range bacteriophages to reduce Salmonella on poultry products

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacteriophages used to treat infections are typically amplified in a pathogenic host. However, this practice introduces the risk of administering any remaining bacteriophage-resistant pathogen during bacteriophage application if separate techniques are less than perfect. In this study, bacteriopha...

  3. Expansion of Groundnut ringspot virus host and geographic ranges in solanaceous vegetables in peninsular Florida

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This report provides a timely account of Groundnut ringspot virus infection of additional hosts (pepper, tomatillo and eggplant) and in additional locations to growers, Extension personnel, crop consultants, and state and Federal regulatory and research scientists....

  4. Host range and distribution of fruit-infesting pestiferous fruit flies (Diptera, Tephritidae) in selected areas of Central Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mwatawala, M W; De Meyer, M; Makundi, R H; Maerere, A P

    2009-12-01

    The host range of major fruit fly pests in Central Tanzania was evaluated from October 2004 to October 2006. Samples of 48 potential hosts were collected and incubated for fruit fly emergence. Bactrocera invadens was the dominant species in incidence expressed as the ratio of infested to total number samples collected, as well as infestation rate, expressed as number of flies emerging per unit weight. Eight new host fruits are reported. Infestation by native pests, such as Ceratitis capitata and C. cosyra, was minor compared to B. invadens. Ceratitis rosa was the dominant species in temperate fruits, and Cucurbitaceae were mainly infested by Bactrocera cucurbitae, a specialized cucurbit feeder. Among commercial fruits, high infestation incidences were observed in mango and guava, but they decreased throughout the fruiting season. Low infestation rates were observed in all Citrus species and in avocado, indicating these fruits as poor hosts for the studied fruit fly pests in this region. Widespread availability and abundance of fruit species studied here ensures year-round breeding of B. invadens. Seasonal infestation differs, with mango being the most important host in October to January, while guava being important from February to August. Tropical almond showed very high incidence and infestation rate for B. invadens and might act as an important reservoir host, bridging the fruiting seasons of mango and guava. Soursop acts as an important host for C. cosyra after the mango season. Ceratitis capitata is a pest of minor importance of the commercial fruits studied in this region.

  5. Pristionchus uniformis, should I stay or should I go? Recent host range expansion in a European nematode

    PubMed Central

    D'Anna, Isabella; Sommer, Ralf J

    2011-01-01

    Pristionchus pacificus has been developed as a model system in evolutionary developmental biology, evolutionary ecology, and population genetics. This species has a well-known ecological association with scarab beetles. Generally, Pristionchus nematodes have a necromenic association with their beetle hosts. Arrested dauer larvae invade the insect and wait for the host's death to resume development. Only one Pristionchus species is known to frequently associate with a non-scarab beetle. Pristionchus uniformis has been isolated from the chrysomelid Leptinotarsa decemlineata, also known as the Colorado potato beetle, in Europe and North America, but is also found on scarab beetles. This unusual pattern of association with two unrelated groups of beetles on two continents requires the involvement of geographical and host range expansion events. Here, we characterized a collection of 81 P. uniformis isolates from North America and Europe and from both scarab beetles and L. decemlineata. We used population genetic and phylogenetic analyses of the mitochondrial gene nd2 to reconstruct the genetic history of P. uniformis and its beetle association. Olfactory tests on beetles chemical extracts showed that P. uniformis has a unique chemoattractive profile toward its beetle hosts. Our results provide evidence for host range expansion through host-switching events in Europe where P. uniformis was originally associated with scarab beetles and the nematode's subsequent invasion of North America. PMID:22393515

  6. Isolation and Characterization of Mink Cell Focus-Inducing Murine Leukemia Viruses with Xenotropic Host Range from Mouse Strain SL

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Akio; Sakai, Koji; Ishimoto, Akinori

    1983-01-01

    A new type of mink cell focus-inducing virus was persistently isolated from the leukemic tissues of SL mice. In contrast to the dual tropic mink cell focus-inducing viruses reported to date, the new virus has the host range of the xenotropic murine leukemia virus. Analysis of RNase T1 fingerprints of genomic RNAs suggested that the mink cell focus-inducing virus with the xenotropic host range isolated from SL mice is a recombinant virus deriving from xenotropic murine leukemia virus. Images PMID:6296452

  7. Complexity and Variability of Gut Commensal Microbiota in Polyphagous Lepidopteran Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Heiko; Ping, Liyan; Shao, Yongqi; Cordero, Erika Arias; Andersen, Gary; Westermann, Martin; Heckel, David G.; Boland, Wilhelm

    2012-01-01

    Background The gut of most insects harbours nonpathogenic microorganisms. Recent work suggests that gut microbiota not only provide nutrients, but also involve in the development and maintenance of the host immune system. However, the complexity, dynamics and types of interactions between the insect hosts and their gut microbiota are far from being well understood. Methods/Principal Findings To determine the composition of the gut microbiota of two lepidopteran pests, Spodoptera littoralis and Helicoverpa armigera, we applied cultivation-independent techniques based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing and microarray. The two insect species were very similar regarding high abundant bacterial families. Different bacteria colonize different niches within the gut. A core community, consisting of Enterococci, Lactobacilli, Clostridia, etc. was revealed in the insect larvae. These bacteria are constantly present in the digestion tract at relatively high frequency despite that developmental stage and diet had a great impact on shaping the bacterial communities. Some low-abundant species might become dominant upon loading external disturbances; the core community, however, did not change significantly. Clearly the insect gut selects for particular bacterial phylotypes. Conclusions Because of their importance as agricultural pests, phytophagous Lepidopterans are widely used as experimental models in ecological and physiological studies. Our results demonstrated that a core microbial community exists in the insect gut, which may contribute to the host physiology. Host physiology and food, nevertheless, significantly influence some fringe bacterial species in the gut. The gut microbiota might also serve as a reservoir of microorganisms for ever-changing environments. Understanding these interactions might pave the way for developing novel pest control strategies. PMID:22815679

  8. Eop1 from a Rubus strain of Erwinia amylovora functions as a host-range limiting factor.

    PubMed

    Asselin, J E; Bonasera, J M; Kim, J F; Oh, C-S; Beer, S V

    2011-08-01

    Strains of Erwinia amylovora, the bacterium causing the disease fire blight of rosaceous plants, are separated into two groups based on host range: Spiraeoideae and Rubus strains. Spiraeoideae strains have wide host ranges, infecting plants in many rosaceous genera, including apple and pear. In the field, Rubus strains infect the genus Rubus exclusively, which includes raspberry and blackberry. Based on comparisons of limited sequence data from a Rubus and a Spiraeoideae strain, the gene eop1 was identified as unusually divergent, and it was selected as a possible host specificity factor. To test this, eop1 genes from a Rubus strain and a Spiraeoideae strain were cloned and mutated. Expression of the Rubus-strain eop1 reduced the virulence of E. amylovora in immature pear fruit and in apple shoots. Sequencing the orfA-eop1 regions of several strains of E. amylovora confirmed that forms of eop1 are conserved among strains with similar host ranges. This work provides evidence that eop1 from a Rubus-specific strain can function as a determinant of host specificity in E. amylovora.

  9. [Trichogramma species (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) parasitoids of Lepidopteran eggs in Lara State, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Morales, José; Vásquez, Carlos; Pérez B, Nieves L; Valera, Neicy; Ríos, Yolmar; Arrieche, Norayda; Querino, Ranyse B

    2007-01-01

    This work was conducted to determine the occurrence of Trichogramma wasp species in Lara State, Venezuela. Lepidopteran egg samples collected from various crop leaves were observed daily under laboratory conditions for emergence of Trichogramma species adult wasps. Trichogramma were also obtained from traps containing eggs from the hosts Sitotroga cerealella (Olivier) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) and Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). In the laboratory, specimens of Trichogramma species were mounted on microscope slides to show male genitalia and other morphological characters used for its identification. Trichogramma atopovirilia Oatman y Platner emerged from S. frugiperda eggs collected in a cornfield at La Palomera, Humocaro Alto and at El Parchal, Humocaro Bajo, Municipio Morán. T. atopovirilia also emerged from S. frugiperda eggs collected in a cornfield at Sabana Grande and from S. cerealella eggs used as traps in a pepper culture at Tintinal, Municipio Andrés Eloy Blanco. T. exiguum Pinto y Platner emerged from S. frugiperda eggs used as traps or collected in cornfield at Totumito and at La Palomera, Humocaro Alto. T. pretiosum Riley emerged from Phthorimaea operculella Zeller eggs collected on stored potatoes at Monte Carmelo, Sanare. The identification of Trichogramma species in Lara State would be useful in the development of biological control programs for lepidopteran pests.

  10. Cry1F resistance among lepidopteran pests: a model for improved resistance management?

    PubMed

    Vélez, Ana M; Vellichirammal, Neetha Nanoth; Jurat-Fuentes, Juan Luis; Siegfried, Blair D

    2016-06-01

    The Cry1Fa protein from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is known for its potential to control lepidopteran pests, especially through transgenic expression in maize and cotton. The maize event TC1507 expressing the cry1Fa toxin gene became commercially available in the United States in 2003 for the management of key lepidopteran pests including the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, and the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda. A high-dose/refuge strategy has been widely adopted to delay evolution of resistance to event TC1507 and other transgenic Bt crops. Efficacy of this strategy depends on the crops expressing a high dose of the Bt toxin to targeted pests and adjacent refuges of non-Bt host plants serving as a source of abundant susceptible insects. While this strategy has proved effective in delaying O. nubilalis resistance, field-evolved resistance to event TC1507 has been reported in S. frugiperda populations in Puerto Rico, Brazil, and the southeastern United States. This paper examines available information on resistance to Cry1Fa in O. nubilalis and S. frugiperda and discusses how this information identifies opportunities to refine resistance management recommendations for Bt maize. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Host growth temperature and a conservative amino acid substitution in the replication protein of pPS10 influence plasmid host range.

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Tresguerres, M E; Martín, M; García de Viedma, D; Giraldo, R; Díaz-Orejas, R

    1995-01-01

    pPS10 is a replicon isolated from Pseudomonas syringe pv. savastanoi that can be established at 37 degrees C efficiently in Pseudomonas aeruginosa but very inefficiently in Escherichia coli. The establishment of the wild-type pPS10 replicon in E. coli is favored at low temperatures (30 degrees C or below). RepA protein of pPS10 promotes in vitro plasmid replication in extracts from E. coli, and this replication depends on host proteins DnaA, DnaB, DnaG, and SSB. Mutant plasmids able to efficiently replicate in E. coli at 37 degrees C were obtained. Three of four mutants whose mutations were mapped show a conservative Ala-->Val change in the amino-terminal region of the replication protein RepA. Plasmids carrying this mutation maintain the capacity to replicate in P. aeruginosa and have a fourfold increase in copy number in this host. The mutation does not substantially alter the autoregulation mediated by RepA. These results show that the physiological conditions of the host as well as subtle changes in the plasmid replication protein can modulate the host range of the pPS10 replicon. PMID:7635822

  12. Transforming Lepidopteran Insect Cells for Improved Protein Processing and Expression

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The lepidopteran insect cells used with the baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS) are capable of synthesizing and accurately processing foreign proteins. However, proteins expressed in baculovirus-infected cells often fail to be completely processed, or are not processed in a manner that meet...

  13. Identification from diverse mammalian poxviruses of host-range regulatory genes functioning equivalently to vaccinia virus C7L.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangzhi; Chao, Jie; Xiang, Yan

    2008-03-15

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) C7L is a host-range gene that regulates cellular tropism of VACV. Distantly related C7L homologues are encoded by nearly all mammalian poxviruses, but whether they are host-range genes functioning similar to VACV C7L has not been determined. Here, we used VACV as a model system to analyze five different C7L homologues from diverse mammalian poxviruses for their abilities to regulate poxvirus cellular tropism. Three C7L homologues (myxoma virus M63R, M64R and cowpox virus 020), when expressed with an epitope tag and from a VACV mutant lacking the host-range genes K1L and C7L (vK1L-C7L-), failed to support productive viral replication in human and murine cells. In nonpermissive cells, these viruses did not synthesize viral late proteins, expressed a reduced level of the early protein E3L, and were defective at suppressing cellular PKR activation. In contrast, two other C7L homologues, myxoma virus (MYXV) M62R and yaba-like disease virus (YLDV) 67R, when expressed with an epitope tag and from vK1L(-)C7L(-), supported normal viral replication in human and murine cells and restored the ability of the virus to suppress PKR activation. Furthermore, M62R rescued the defect of vK1L(-)C7L(-) at replicating and disseminating in mice following intranasal inoculation. These results show that MYXV M62R and YLDV 67R function equivalently to C7L at supporting VACV replication in mammalian hosts and suggest that a C7L-like host-range gene is essential for the replication of many mammalian poxviruses in mammalian hosts.

  14. Identification from Diverse Mammalian Poxviruses of Host-range Regulatory Genes Functioning Equivalently to Vaccinia Virus C7L

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiangzhi; Chao, Jie; Xiang, Yan

    2008-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) C7L is a host-range gene that regulates cellular tropism of VACV. Distantly related C7L homologues are encoded by nearly all mammalian poxviruses, but whether they are host-range genes functioning similar to VACV C7L has not been determined. Here, we used VACV as a model system to analyze five different C7L homologues from diverse mammalian poxviruses for their abilities to regulate poxvirus cellular tropism. Three C7L homologues (myxoma virus M63R, M64R and cowpox virus 020), when expressed with an epitope tag and from a VACV mutant lacking the host-range genes K1L and C7L (vK1L−C7L−), failed to support productive viral replication in human and murine cells. In nonpermissive cells, these viruses did not synthesize viral late proteins, expressed a reduced level of the early protein E3L, and were defective at suppressing cellular PKR activation. In contrast, two other C7L homologues, myxoma virus (MYXV) M62R and Yaba-like disease virus (YLDV) 67R, when expressed with an epitope tag and from vK1L−C7L−, supported normal viral replication in human and murine cells and restored the ability of the virus to suppress PKR activation. Furthermore, M62R rescued the defect of vK1L−C7L− at replicating and disseminating in mice following intranasal inoculation. These results show that MYXV M62R and YLDV 67R function equivalently to C7L at supporting VACV replication in mammalian hosts and suggest that a C7L-like host-range gene is essential for the replication of many mammalian poxviruses in mammalian hosts. PMID:18054061

  15. Biology and host range of Heterapoderopsis bicallosicollis; a potential biological control agent for Chinese tallow Triadica sebifera

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chinese tallow, Triadica sebifera, is an invasive weed that infests natural and agricultural areas of the southeastern USA. A candidate for biological control of Chinese tallow has been studied under quarantine conditions. The biology and host range of a primitive leaf feeding beetle, Heterapoderops...

  16. Conjugal Transfer of Broad-Host-Range Plasmid pAMβ1 into Enteric Species of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Vescovo, M.; Morelli, L.; Bottazzi, V.; Gasson, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    The broad-host-range plasmid pAMβ1, which codes for erythromycin and lincomycin resistance, was transferred by conjugation into Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus reuteri, and Lactobacillus salivarius. A novel 17-megadalton plasmid molecule was detected in the transconjugants, confirming the introduction of pAMβ1 into each species. Images PMID:16346389

  17. Host range of the European leaf sheath mining midge, Lasioptera donacis Coutin, a biological control of giant reed, Arundo donax

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The fundamental host range of the arundo leafminer, Lasioptera donacis a candidate agent for the invasive weed, Arundo donax was evaluated. Lasioptera donacis collects and inserts spores of a saprophytic fungus, Arthrinium arundinis, during oviposition. Larvae feed and develop in the decomposing le...

  18. The N-terminus of vaccinia virus host range protein C7L is essential for function

    PubMed Central

    Terajima, Masanori; Urban, Stina L.; Leporati, Anita M.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV), a member of the Poxviridae family of large double-stranded DNA viruses, is being used as a smallpox vaccine as well as an expression vector for immunization against other infectious diseases and cancer. The host range of wild type VACV is very broad among mammalian cells. C7L is a host range gene identified in VACV and is well conserved in mammalian poxviruses except for parapoxviruses and molluscum contagiosum virus. The molecular mechanisms by which the C7L gene exerts host range function are not well understood. The C7L protein does not have any known conserved domains or show sequence similarity to cellular proteins or viral proteins other than the C7L homologues in mammalian poxviruses. We generated recombinant vaccinia viruses carrying deletion mutants of the C7L gene using NYVAC as a parental strain and found that the N-terminus is essential for host range function of C7L, which is consistent with a previous report that showed homology among C7L homologues are greater near the N-terminus than the C-terminus. PMID:23001690

  19. 'Candidatus Megaira polyxenophila' gen. nov., sp. nov.: considerations on evolutionary history, host range and shift of early divergent rickettsiae.

    PubMed

    Schrallhammer, Martina; Ferrantini, Filippo; Vannini, Claudia; Galati, Stefano; Schweikert, Michael; Görtz, Hans-Dieter; Verni, Franco; Petroni, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    "Neglected Rickettsiaceae" (i.e. those harboured by non-hematophagous eukaryotic hosts) display greater phylogenetic variability and more widespread dispersal than pathogenic ones; yet, the knowledge about their actual host range and host shift mechanism is scarce. The present work reports the characterization following the full-cycle rRNA approach (SSU rRNA sequence, specific in situ hybridization, and ultrastructure) of a novel rickettsial bacterium, herewith proposed as 'Candidatus Megaira polyxenophila' gen. nov., sp. nov. We found it in association with four different free-living ciliates (Diophrys oligothrix, Euplotes octocarinatus, Paramecium caudatum, and Spirostomum sp., all belonging to Alveolata, Ciliophora); furthermore it was recently observed as intracellular occurring in Carteria cerasiformis and Pleodorina japonica (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta). Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated the belonging of the candidate new genus to the family Rickettsiaceae (Alphaproteobacteria, Rickettsiales) as a sister group of the genus Rickettsia. In situ observations revealed the ability of the candidate new species to colonize either nuclear or cytoplasmic compartments, depending on the host organism. The presence of the same bacterial species within different, evolutionary distant, hosts indicates that 'Candidatus Megaira polyxenophila' recently underwent several distinct host shifts, thus suggesting the existence of horizontal transmission pathways. We consider these findings as indicative of an unexpected spread of rickettsial infections in aquatic communities, possibly by means of trophic interactions, and hence propose a new interpretation of the origin and phylogenetic diversification of rickettsial bacteria.

  20. Comparative Genomics of the Apicomplexan Parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum: Coccidia Differing in Host Range and Transmission Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Adam James; Vermont, Sarah J.; Cotton, James A.; Harris, David; Hill-Cawthorne, Grant A.; Könen-Waisman, Stephanie; Latham, Sophia M.; Mourier, Tobias; Norton, Rebecca; Quail, Michael A.; Sanders, Mandy; Shanmugam, Dhanasekaran; Sohal, Amandeep; Wasmuth, James D.; Brunk, Brian; Grigg, Michael E.; Howard, Jonathan C.; Parkinson, John; Roos, David S.; Trees, Alexander J.; Berriman, Matthew; Pain, Arnab; Wastling, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a zoonotic protozoan parasite which infects nearly one third of the human population and is found in an extraordinary range of vertebrate hosts. Its epidemiology depends heavily on horizontal transmission, especially between rodents and its definitive host, the cat. Neospora caninum is a recently discovered close relative of Toxoplasma, whose definitive host is the dog. Both species are tissue-dwelling Coccidia and members of the phylum Apicomplexa; they share many common features, but Neospora neither infects humans nor shares the same wide host range as Toxoplasma, rather it shows a striking preference for highly efficient vertical transmission in cattle. These species therefore provide a remarkable opportunity to investigate mechanisms of host restriction, transmission strategies, virulence and zoonotic potential. We sequenced the genome of N. caninum and transcriptomes of the invasive stage of both species, undertaking an extensive comparative genomics and transcriptomics analysis. We estimate that these organisms diverged from their common ancestor around 28 million years ago and find that both genomes and gene expression are remarkably conserved. However, in N. caninum we identified an unexpected expansion of surface antigen gene families and the divergence of secreted virulence factors, including rhoptry kinases. Specifically we show that the rhoptry kinase ROP18 is pseudogenised in N. caninum and that, as a possible consequence, Neospora is unable to phosphorylate host immunity-related GTPases, as Toxoplasma does. This defense strategy is thought to be key to virulence in Toxoplasma. We conclude that the ecological niches occupied by these species are influenced by a relatively small number of gene products which operate at the host-parasite interface and that the dominance of vertical transmission in N. caninum may be associated with the evolution of reduced virulence in this species. PMID:22457617

  1. Variations in type III effector repertoires, pathological phenotypes and host range of Xanthomonas citri pv. citri pathotypes.

    PubMed

    Escalon, Aline; Javegny, Stéphanie; Vernière, Christian; Noël, Laurent D; Vital, Karine; Poussier, Stéphane; Hajri, Ahmed; Boureau, Tristan; Pruvost, Olivier; Arlat, Matthieu; Gagnevin, Lionel

    2013-06-01

    The mechanisms determining the host range of Xanthomonas are still undeciphered, despite much interest in their potential roles in the evolution and emergence of plant pathogenic bacteria. Xanthomonas citri pv. citri (Xci) is an interesting model of host specialization because of its pathogenic variants: pathotype A strains infect a wide range of Rutaceous species, whereas pathotype A*/A(W) strains have a host range restricted to Mexican lime (Citrus aurantifolia) and alemow (Citrus macrophylla). Based on a collection of 55 strains representative of Xci worldwide diversity assessed by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), we investigated the distribution of type III effectors (T3Es) in relation to host range. We examined the presence of 66 T3Es from xanthomonads in Xci and identified a repertoire of 28 effectors, 26 of which were shared by all Xci strains, whereas two (xopAG and xopC1) were present only in some A*/A(W) strains. We found that xopAG (=avrGf1) was present in all A(W) strains, but also in three A* strains genetically distant from A(W) , and that all xopAG-containing strains induced the hypersensitive response (HR) on grapefruit and sweet orange. The analysis of xopAD and xopAG suggested horizontal transfer between X. citri pv. bilvae, another citrus pathogen, and some Xci strains. A strains were genetically less diverse, induced identical phenotypic responses and possessed indistinguishable T3E repertoires. Conversely, A*/A(W) strains exhibited a wider genetic diversity in which clades correlated with geographical origin and T3E repertoire, but not with pathogenicity, according to T3E deletion experiments. Our data outline the importance of taking into account the heterogeneity of Xci A*/A(W) strains when analysing the mechanisms of host specialization.

  2. Small Ruminant Lentiviruses (SRLVs) Break the Species Barrier to Acquire New Host Range

    PubMed Central

    Minardi da Cruz, Juliano Cezar; Singh, Dinesh Kumar; Lamara, Ali; Chebloune, Yahia

    2013-01-01

    Zoonotic events of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) from non-human primates to humans have generated the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), one of the most devastating infectious disease of the last century with more than 30 million people dead and about 40.3 million people currently infected worldwide. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 and HIV-2), the two major viruses that cause AIDS in humans are retroviruses of the lentivirus genus. The genus includes arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV) and Maedi-Visna virus (MVV), and a heterogeneous group of viruses known as small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLVs), affecting goat and sheep. Lentivirus genome integrates into the host DNA, causing persistent infection associated with a remarkable diversity during viral replication. Direct evidence of mixed infections with these two closely related SRLVs was found in both sheep and goats. The evidence of a genetic continuum with caprine and ovine field isolates demonstrates the absence of an efficient species barrier preventing cross-species transmission. In dual-infected animals, persistent infections with both CAEV and MVV have been described, and viral chimeras have been detected. This not only complicates animal trade between countries but favors the risk that highly pathogenic variants may emerge as has already been observed in the past in Iceland and, more recently, in outbreaks with virulent strains in Spain. SRLVs affecting wildlife have already been identified, demonstrating the existence of emergent viruses adapted to new hosts. Viruses adapted to wildlife ruminants may acquire novel biopathological properties which may endanger not only the new host species but also domestic ruminants and humans. SRLVs infecting sheep and goats follow a genomic evolution similar to that observed in HIV or in other lentiviruses. Lentivirus genetic diversity and host factors leading to the establishment of naturally occurring virulent versus avirulent infections, in addition to

  3. Amerindian Helicobacter pylori strains go extinct, as european strains expand their host range.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Bello, Maria G; Pérez, Maria E; Bortolini, Maria C; Salzano, Francisco M; Pericchi, Luis R; Zambrano-Guzmán, Orlisbeth; Linz, Bodo

    2008-10-02

    We studied the diversity of bacteria and host in the H. pylori-human model. The human indigenous bacterium H. pylori diverged along with humans, into African, European, Asian and Amerindian groups. Of these, Amerindians have the least genetic diversity. Since niche diversity widens the sets of resources for colonizing species, we predicted that the Amerindian H. pylori strains would be the least diverse. We analyzed the multilocus sequence (7 housekeeping genes) of 131 strains: 19 cultured from Africans, 36 from Spanish, 11 from Koreans, 43 from Amerindians and 22 from South American Mestizos. We found that all strains that had been cultured from Africans were African strains (hpAfrica1), all from Spanish were European (hpEurope) and all from Koreans were hspEAsia but that Amerindians and Mestizos carried mixed strains: hspAmerind and hpEurope strains had been cultured from Amerindians and hpEurope and hpAfrica1 were cultured from Mestizos. The least genetically diverse H. pylori strains were hspAmerind. Strains hpEurope were the most diverse and showed remarkable multilocus sequence mosaicism (indicating recombination). The lower genetic structure in hpEurope strains is consistent with colonization of a diversity of hosts. If diversity is important for the success of H. pylori, then the low diversity of Amerindian strains might be linked to their apparent tendency to disappear. This suggests that Amerindian strains may lack the needed diversity to survive the diversity brought by non-Amerindian hosts.

  4. Amerindian Helicobacter pylori Strains Go Extinct, as European Strains Expand Their Host Range

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-Bello, Maria G.; Pérez, Maria E.; Bortolini, Maria C.; Salzano, Francisco M.; Pericchi, Luis R.; Zambrano-Guzmán, Orlisbeth; Linz, Bodo

    2008-01-01

    We studied the diversity of bacteria and host in the H. pylori-human model. The human indigenous bacterium H. pylori diverged along with humans, into African, European, Asian and Amerindian groups. Of these, Amerindians have the least genetic diversity. Since niche diversity widens the sets of resources for colonizing species, we predicted that the Amerindian H. pylori strains would be the least diverse. We analyzed the multilocus sequence (7 housekeeping genes) of 131 strains: 19 cultured from Africans, 36 from Spanish, 11 from Koreans, 43 from Amerindians and 22 from South American Mestizos. We found that all strains that had been cultured from Africans were African strains (hpAfrica1), all from Spanish were European (hpEurope) and all from Koreans were hspEAsia but that Amerindians and Mestizos carried mixed strains: hspAmerind and hpEurope strains had been cultured from Amerindians and hpEurope and hpAfrica1 were cultured from Mestizos. The least genetically diverse H. pylori strains were hspAmerind. Strains hpEurope were the most diverse and showed remarkable multilocus sequence mosaicism (indicating recombination). The lower genetic structure in hpEurope strains is consistent with colonization of a diversity of hosts. If diversity is important for the success of H. pylori, then the low diversity of Amerindian strains might be linked to their apparent tendency to disappear. This suggests that Amerindian strains may lack the needed diversity to survive the diversity brought by non-Amerindian hosts. PMID:18830403

  5. Novel papillomaviruses in free-ranging Iberian bats: no virus-host co-evolution, no strict host specificity, and hints for recombination.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, Raquel; Ibáñez, Carlos; Godínez, Jose M; Aréchiga, Nidia; Garin, Inazio; Pérez-Suárez, Gonzalo; de Paz, Oscar; Juste, Javier; Echevarría, Juan E; Bravo, Ignacio G

    2014-01-01

    Papillomaviruses (PVs) are widespread pathogens. However, the extent of PV infections in bats remains largely unknown. This work represents the first comprehensive study of PVs in Iberian bats. We identified four novel PVs in the mucosa of free-ranging Eptesicus serotinus (EserPV1, EserPV2, and EserPV3) and Rhinolophus ferrumequinum (RferPV1) individuals and analyzed their phylogenetic relationships within the viral family. We further assessed their prevalence in different populations of E. serotinus and its close relative E. isabellinus. Although it is frequent to read that PVs co-evolve with their host, that PVs are highly species-specific, and that PVs do not usually recombine, our results suggest otherwise. First, strict virus-host co-evolution is rejected by the existence of five, distantly related bat PV lineages and by the lack of congruence between bats and bat PVs phylogenies. Second, the ability of EserPV2 and EserPV3 to infect two different bat species (E. serotinus and E. isabellinus) argues against strict host specificity. Finally, the description of a second noncoding region in the RferPV1 genome reinforces the view of an increased susceptibility to recombination in the E2-L2 genomic region. These findings prompt the question of whether the prevailing paradigms regarding PVs evolution should be reconsidered.

  6. Novel Papillomaviruses in Free-Ranging Iberian Bats: No Virus–Host Co-evolution, No Strict Host Specificity, and Hints for Recombination

    PubMed Central

    García-Pérez, Raquel; Ibáñez, Carlos; Godínez, Jose M.; Aréchiga, Nidia; Garin, Inazio; Pérez-Suárez, Gonzalo; de Paz, Oscar; Juste, Javier; Echevarría, Juan E.; Bravo, Ignacio G.

    2014-01-01

    Papillomaviruses (PVs) are widespread pathogens. However, the extent of PV infections in bats remains largely unknown. This work represents the first comprehensive study of PVs in Iberian bats. We identified four novel PVs in the mucosa of free-ranging Eptesicus serotinus (EserPV1, EserPV2, and EserPV3) and Rhinolophus ferrumequinum (RferPV1) individuals and analyzed their phylogenetic relationships within the viral family. We further assessed their prevalence in different populations of E. serotinus and its close relative E. isabellinus. Although it is frequent to read that PVs co-evolve with their host, that PVs are highly species-specific, and that PVs do not usually recombine, our results suggest otherwise. First, strict virus–host co-evolution is rejected by the existence of five, distantly related bat PV lineages and by the lack of congruence between bats and bat PVs phylogenies. Second, the ability of EserPV2 and EserPV3 to infect two different bat species (E. serotinus and E. isabellinus) argues against strict host specificity. Finally, the description of a second noncoding region in the RferPV1 genome reinforces the view of an increased susceptibility to recombination in the E2-L2 genomic region. These findings prompt the question of whether the prevailing paradigms regarding PVs evolution should be reconsidered. PMID:24391150

  7. Limits to the host range of the highly polyphagous tephritid fruit fly Anastrepha ludens in its natural habitat.

    PubMed

    Birke, A; Acosta, E; Aluja, M

    2015-12-01

    Anastepha ludens (Diptera: Tephritidae) is a highly polyphagous fruit fly that is able to develop in a wide range of hosts. Understanding the limits of this pest's host range could provide valuable information for pest management and plant breeding for pest resistance. Previous studies have shown that guavas (Psidium guajava (Myrtaceae) L.), are not attacked under natural conditions by A. ludens. To understand this phenomenon, guavas were exposed to natural infestation by A. ludens and to other fruit fly species that infest guavas in nature (Anastrepha striata Schiner, Anastepha fraterculus (Wiedemann), Anastepha obliqua (Macquart)). Once the susceptible phenological stage of guavas was determined, fruit infestation levels were compared between A. ludens and A. striata. Choice and non-choice tests were performed under field-cage conditions. Under field conditions, guavas were susceptible to A. striata and A. fraterculus attack all the way from when fruit was undeveloped to when fruit began to ripen. No infestation by A. ludens was recorded under natural conditions. Similar results were obtained when forced exposures were performed, indicating that unripe guavas were preferred by A. striata over ripe fruit, and that infestation rates were higher at early fruit maturity stages. Under forced oviposition conditions, A. ludens larvae were unable to develop in unripe guavas but did so in fully ripe fruit. However, A. ludens fitness parameters were dramatically affected, exhibiting reduced survival and reduced pupal weight compared to conspecifics that developed in a natural host, grapefruit. We confirm that P. guajava should not be treated as a natural host of this pestiferous species, and suggest that both behavioral aspects and the fact that larvae are unable to adequately develop in this fruit, indeed represent clear limits to A. ludens's broad host range.

  8. LysM domains mediate lipochitin–oligosaccharide recognition and Nfr genes extend the symbiotic host range

    PubMed Central

    Radutoiu, Simona; Madsen, Lene H; Madsen, Esben B; Jurkiewicz, Anna; Fukai, Eigo; Quistgaard, Esben M H; Albrektsen, Anita S; James, Euan K; Thirup, Søren; Stougaard, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Legume–Rhizobium symbiosis is an example of selective cell recognition controlled by host/non-host determinants. Individual bacterial strains have a distinct host range enabling nodulation of a limited set of legume species and vice versa. We show here that expression of Lotus japonicus Nfr1 and Nfr5 Nod-factor receptor genes in Medicago truncatula and L. filicaulis, extends their host range to include bacterial strains, Mesorhizobium loti or DZL, normally infecting L. japonicus. As a result, the symbiotic program is induced, nodules develop and infection threads are formed. Using L. japonicus mutants and domain swaps between L. japonicus and L. filicaulis NFR1 and NFR5, we further demonstrate that LysM domains of the NFR1 and NFR5 receptors mediate perception of the bacterial Nod-factor signal and that recognition depends on the structure of the lipochitin–oligosaccharide Nod-factor. We show that a single amino-acid variation in the LysM2 domain of NFR5 changes recognition of the Nod-factor synthesized by the DZL strain and suggests a possible binding site for bacterial lipochitin–oligosaccharide signal molecules. PMID:17690687

  9. LysM domains mediate lipochitin-oligosaccharide recognition and Nfr genes extend the symbiotic host range.

    PubMed

    Radutoiu, Simona; Madsen, Lene H; Madsen, Esben B; Jurkiewicz, Anna; Fukai, Eigo; Quistgaard, Esben M H; Albrektsen, Anita S; James, Euan K; Thirup, Søren; Stougaard, Jens

    2007-09-05

    Legume-Rhizobium symbiosis is an example of selective cell recognition controlled by host/non-host determinants. Individual bacterial strains have a distinct host range enabling nodulation of a limited set of legume species and vice versa. We show here that expression of Lotus japonicus Nfr1 and Nfr5 Nod-factor receptor genes in Medicago truncatula and L. filicaulis, extends their host range to include bacterial strains, Mesorhizobium loti or DZL, normally infecting L. japonicus. As a result, the symbiotic program is induced, nodules develop and infection threads are formed. Using L. japonicus mutants and domain swaps between L. japonicus and L. filicaulis NFR1 and NFR5, we further demonstrate that LysM domains of the NFR1 and NFR5 receptors mediate perception of the bacterial Nod-factor signal and that recognition depends on the structure of the lipochitin-oligosaccharide Nod-factor. We show that a single amino-acid variation in the LysM2 domain of NFR5 changes recognition of the Nod-factor synthesized by the DZL strain and suggests a possible binding site for bacterial lipochitin-oligosaccharide signal molecules.

  10. M062 is a host range factor essential for myxoma virus pathogenesis and functions as an antagonist of host SAMD9 in human cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Wennier, Sonia; Zhang, Leiliang; McFadden, Grant

    2011-04-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) M062R is a functional homolog of the C7L family of host range genes from orthopoxviruses. We constructed a targeted M062R-knockout-MYXV (vMyxM062-KO) and characterized its properties in vitro and in vivo. In European rabbits, infection by vMyxM062-KO was completely asymptomatic. The surviving rabbits did not gain full protection against the subsequent lethal-dose challenge with wild-type MYXV. We also looked for cellular tropism defects in a variety of cultured cells. In all of the rabbit cells tested, vMyxM062-KO conducts an abortive infection, although it initiates viral DNA replication. In many, but not all, human cancer cells that are permissive for wild-type MYXV, vMyxM062-KO exhibited a profound replication defect. We categorized human cells tested into two groups: (i) type A, which support productive replication for wild-type MYXV but are unable to produce significant levels of progeny virus by vMyxM062-KO, and (ii) type B, which are permissive to infections by both wild-type MYXV and vMyxM062-KO. Furthermore, using proteomic strategies, we identified sterile α motif domain containing 9 (SAMD9), an interferon-regulated cellular protein implicated in human inflammatory disorders, as a unique host binding partner of M062 in human cells. Significantly, knocking down SAMD9 in type A human cancer cells led to a substantial rescue of vMyxM062-KO infection. In summary, M062 is a novel host range factor that controls productive MYXV replication in rabbit cells and in a wide variety of human cells. M062 also binds and antagonizes cellular SAMD9 in human cells, suggesting that SAMD9 is a novel innate antiviral factor against poxviruses.

  11. Genome Analysis of a Novel Broad Host Range Proteobacteria Phage Isolated from a Bioreactor Treating Industrial Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    de Leeuw, Marina; Baron, Maayan; Brenner, Asher; Kushmaro, Ariel

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria, and consequently they have a major impact on the development of a microbial population. In this study, the genome of a novel broad host range bacteriophage, Aquamicrobium phage P14, isolated from a wastewater treatment plant, was analyzed. The Aquamicrobium phage P14 was found to infect members of different Proteobacteria classes (Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria). This phage contains a 40,551 bp long genome and 60% of its genes had blastx hits. Furthermore, the bacteriophage was found to share more than 50% of its genes with several podoviruses and has the same gene order as other polyvalent bacteriophages. The results obtained in this study led to the conclusion that indeed general features of the genome of the Aquamicrobium phage P14 are shared with other broad host range bacteriophages, however further analysis of the genome is needed in order to identify the specific mechanisms which enable the bacteriophage to infect both Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. PMID:28106814

  12. The Presence of Two Receptor-Binding Proteins Contributes to the Wide Host Range of Staphylococcal Twort-Like Phages

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Ippei; Osada, Keita; Azam, Aa Haeruman; Asakawa, Hiroaki; Miyanaga, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Thanks to their wide host range and virulence, staphylococcal bacteriophages (phages) belonging to the genus Twortlikevirus (staphylococcal Twort-like phages) are regarded as ideal candidates for clinical application for Staphylococcus aureus infections due to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria of this species. To increase the usability of these phages, it is necessary to understand the mechanism underlying host recognition, especially the receptor-binding proteins (RBPs) that determine host range. In this study, we found that the staphylococcal Twort-like phage ΦSA012 possesses at least two RBPs. Genomic analysis of five mutant phages of ΦSA012 revealed point mutations in orf103, in a region unique to staphylococcal Twort-like phages. Phages harboring mutated ORF103 could not infect S. aureus strains in which wall teichoic acids (WTAs) are glycosylated with α-N-acetylglucosamine (α-GlcNAc). A polyclonal antibody against ORF103 also inhibited infection by ΦSA012 in the presence of α-GlcNAc, suggesting that ORF103 binds to α-GlcNAc. In contrast, a polyclonal antibody against ORF105, a short tail fiber component previously shown to be an RBP, inhibited phage infection irrespective of the presence of α-GlcNAc. Immunoelectron microscopy indicated that ORF103 is a tail fiber component localized at the bottom of the baseplate. From these results, we conclude that ORF103 binds α-GlcNAc in WTAs, whereas ORF105, the primary RBP, is likely to bind the WTA backbone. These findings provide insight into the infection mechanism of staphylococcal Twort-like phages. IMPORTANCE Staphylococcus phages belonging to the genus Twortlikevirus (called staphylococcal Twort-like phages) are considered promising agents for control of Staphylococcus aureus due to their wide host range and highly lytic capabilities. Although staphylococcal Twort-like phages have been studied widely for therapeutic purposes, the host recognition process of staphylococcal Twort

  13. Differentiation of polyvalent bacteriophages specific to uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis strains based on the host range pattern and RFLP.

    PubMed

    Maszewska, Agnieszka; Wójcik, Ewelina; Ciurzyńska, Aneta; Wojtasik, Arkadiusz; Piątkowska, Iwona; Dastych, Jarosław; Różalski, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by P. mirabilis are difficult to cure because of the increasing antimicrobial resistance of these bacteria. Phage therapy is proposed as an alternative infection treatment. The aim of this study was to isolate and differentiate uropathogenic P. mirabilis strain specific polyvalent bacteriophages producing polysaccharide depolymerases (PDs). 51 specific phages were obtained. The plaques of 29 bacteriophages were surrounded by halos, which indicated that they produced PDs. The host range analysis showed that, except phages 58B and 58C, the phage host range profiles differed from each other. Phages 35 and 45 infected all P. mirabilis strains tested. Another 10 phages lysed more than 90% of isolates. Among these phages, 65A, 70, 66 and 66A caused a complete lysis of the bacterial lawn formed by 62% to 78% of strains. Additionally, phages 39A and 70 probably produced PDs. The phages' DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis demonstrated that genomes of 51 isolated phages represented 34 different restriction profiles. DNA of phage 58A seemed to be resistant to selected EcoRV endonuclease. The 33 RFLP-EcoRV profiles showed a Dice similarity index of 38.8%. 22 RFLP patterns were obtained from single phage isolates. The remaining 12 restriction profiles consisted of 2 to 4 viruses. The results obtained from phage characterization based on the pattern of phage host range in combination with the RFLP method enabled effective differentiation of the studied phages and selection of PD producing polyvalent phages for further study.

  14. Second site mutation in the virus envelope expands the host range of a cytopathic variant of Moloney murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Ferrarone, John; Knoper, Ryan C; Li, Randolph; Kozak, Christine A

    2012-11-10

    Spl574 MLV (murine leukemia virus) is a variant of Moloney ecotropic MLV (MoMLV) that is cytopathic in Mus dunni cells and restricted by other mouse cells. Its host range and cytopathicity are due to a mutation, S82F, at a site critical for binding to the CAT-1 receptor. To identify residues that affect affinity for receptor variants, virus with S82F was passed in restrictive cells. The env genes of the adapted viruses contained 18 novel mutations, including one, E114G, present in 6 of 30 sequenced envs. MoMLV-E114G efficiently infected all mouse cells as well as ecotropic MLV resistant Chinese hamster cells. Virus with E114G and S82F induced large multinucleated syncytia in NIH 3T3 and SC-1 cells as well as M. dunni cells. Inoculation of Mo-S82F,E114G into mice produced lymphomas typical of MoMLV. Residues at env position 114 are thus important determinants of host range, and E114G suppresses host range restriction due to S82F, but does not affect S82F-governed cytopathicity.

  15. Roles of host plants in boll weevil range expansion beyond tropical Mesoamerica

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    New findings on boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), biology and ecology have had repercussions on the current level of understanding about short- and long-range boll weevil dispersal, and range expansion from its original tropical Mesoamerican habitat. The w...

  16. Climate Change May Alter Breeding Ground Distributions of Eastern Migratory Monarchs (Danaus plexippus) via Range Expansion of Asclepias Host Plants

    PubMed Central

    Lemoine, Nathan P.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change can profoundly alter species’ distributions due to changes in temperature, precipitation, or seasonality. Migratory monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) may be particularly susceptible to climate-driven changes in host plant abundance or reduced overwintering habitat. For example, climate change may significantly reduce the availability of overwintering habitat by restricting the amount of area with suitable microclimate conditions. However, potential effects of climate change on monarch northward migrations remain largely unknown, particularly with respect to their milkweed (Asclepias spp.) host plants. Given that monarchs largely depend on the genus Asclepias as larval host plants, the effects of climate change on monarch northward migrations will most likely be mediated by climate change effects on Asclepias. Here, I used MaxEnt species distribution modeling to assess potential changes in Asclepias and monarch distributions under moderate and severe climate change scenarios. First, Asclepias distributions were projected to extend northward throughout much of Canada despite considerable variability in the environmental drivers of each individual species. Second, Asclepias distributions were an important predictor of current monarch distributions, indicating that monarchs may be constrained as much by the availability of Asclepias host plants as environmental variables per se. Accordingly, modeling future distributions of monarchs, and indeed any tightly coupled plant-insect system, should incorporate the effects of climate change on host plant distributions. Finally, MaxEnt predictions of Asclepias and monarch distributions were remarkably consistent among general circulation models. Nearly all models predicted that the current monarch summer breeding range will become slightly less suitable for Asclepias and monarchs in the future. Asclepias, and consequently monarchs, should therefore undergo expanded northern range limits in summer months

  17. Climate change may alter breeding ground distributions of eastern migratory monarchs (Danaus plexippus) via range expansion of Asclepias host plants.

    PubMed

    Lemoine, Nathan P

    2015-01-01

    Climate change can profoundly alter species' distributions due to changes in temperature, precipitation, or seasonality. Migratory monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) may be particularly susceptible to climate-driven changes in host plant abundance or reduced overwintering habitat. For example, climate change may significantly reduce the availability of overwintering habitat by restricting the amount of area with suitable microclimate conditions. However, potential effects of climate change on monarch northward migrations remain largely unknown, particularly with respect to their milkweed (Asclepias spp.) host plants. Given that monarchs largely depend on the genus Asclepias as larval host plants, the effects of climate change on monarch northward migrations will most likely be mediated by climate change effects on Asclepias. Here, I used MaxEnt species distribution modeling to assess potential changes in Asclepias and monarch distributions under moderate and severe climate change scenarios. First, Asclepias distributions were projected to extend northward throughout much of Canada despite considerable variability in the environmental drivers of each individual species. Second, Asclepias distributions were an important predictor of current monarch distributions, indicating that monarchs may be constrained as much by the availability of Asclepias host plants as environmental variables per se. Accordingly, modeling future distributions of monarchs, and indeed any tightly coupled plant-insect system, should incorporate the effects of climate change on host plant distributions. Finally, MaxEnt predictions of Asclepias and monarch distributions were remarkably consistent among general circulation models. Nearly all models predicted that the current monarch summer breeding range will become slightly less suitable for Asclepias and monarchs in the future. Asclepias, and consequently monarchs, should therefore undergo expanded northern range limits in summer months

  18. Host Range and Distribution of the Clover Root-knot Nematode, Meloidogyne trifoliophila

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, E. C.; Jennings, P. L.

    1997-01-01

    The ability of Meloidogyne trifoliophila to gall 230 species and cultivars of plants was determined in a greenhouse. All clovers (Trifolium spp.) were severely galled regardless of species or cultivar. Most soybean cultivars were moderately to severely galled. Among other legumes, broad bean, garden pea, Korean lespedeza, sweetclover, and common vetch were good hosts, but alfalfa, bird's-foot trefoil, peanut, and pole bean were poor or nonhosts. Among other plant families, most Apiaceae (Umbelliferae) and Brassicaceae (Cruciferae) were galled, but Cucurbitaceae, Iridaceae, Malvaceae, Poaceae, and Solanaceae were rarely or never galled. Results for Amaryllidaceae, Asteraceae, Lamiaceae, and Liliaceae were variable. This nematode was not found in a survey of pasture and soybean fields in southwestern Tennessee. PMID:19274266

  19. Diversity of lepidopteran stem borers on monocotyledonous plants in eastern Africa and the islands of Madagascar and Zanzibar revisited.

    PubMed

    Le Ru, B P; Ong'amo, G O; Moyal, P; Ngala, L; Musyoka, B; Abdullah, Z; Cugala, D; Defabachew, B; Haile, T A; Matama, T Kauma; Lada, V Y; Negassi, B; Pallangyo, K; Ravolonandrianina, J; Sidumo, A; Omwega, C O; Schulthess, F; Calatayud, P A; Silvain, J F

    2006-12-01

    Surveys were completed in Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar, Mozambique, Tanzania, Uganda and Zanzibar to assess the lepidopteran stem borer species diversity on wild host plants. A total of 24,674 larvae belonging to 135 species were collected from 75 species of wild host plants belonging to the Poaceae, Cyperaceae and Typhaceae. Amongst them were 44 noctuid species belonging to at least nine genera, 33 crambids, 15 pyralids, 16 Pyraloidea species not yet identified, 25 tortricids and three cossids. The noctuid larvae represented 73.6% of the total number of larvae collected, with 66.3, 3.5 and 3.8% found on Poaceae, Cyperaceae and Typhaceae, respectively. The Crambidae, Pyralidae, Tortricidae and Cossidae represented 19.8, 1.9, 2.5 and 0.1% of the total larvae collected, respectively, with 90.4% of the Crambidae and Pyralidae collected from Poaceae, and 99.7% of the Tortricidae collected from Cyperaceae. The lepidopteran stem borer species diversity in the wild host plants was far more diverse than previously reported.

  20. A Multivalent Adsorption Apparatus Explains the Broad Host Range of Phage phi92: a Comprehensive Genomic and Structural Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Buettner, Falk F. R.; Browning, Christopher; Nazarov, Sergey; Rabsch, Wolfgang; Bethe, Andrea; Oberbeck, Astrid; Bowman, Valorie D.; Stummeyer, Katharina; Mühlenhoff, Martina; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophage phi92 is a large, lytic myovirus isolated in 1983 from pathogenic Escherichia coli strains that carry a polysialic acid capsule. Here we report the genome organization of phi92, the cryoelectron microscopy reconstruction of its virion, and the reinvestigation of its host specificity. The genome consists of a linear, double-stranded 148,612-bp DNA sequence containing 248 potential open reading frames and 11 putative tRNA genes. Orthologs were found for 130 of the predicted proteins. Most of the virion proteins showed significant sequence similarities to proteins of myoviruses rv5 and PVP-SE1, indicating that phi92 is a new member of the novel genus of rv5-like phages. Reinvestigation of phi92 host specificity showed that the host range is not limited to polysialic acid-encapsulated Escherichia coli but includes most laboratory strains of Escherichia coli and many Salmonella strains. Structure analysis of the phi92 virion demonstrated the presence of four different types of tail fibers and/or tailspikes, which enable the phage to use attachment sites on encapsulated and nonencapsulated bacteria. With this report, we provide the first detailed description of a multivalent, multispecies phage armed with a host cell adsorption apparatus resembling a nanosized Swiss army knife. The genome, structure, and, in particular, the organization of the baseplate of phi92 demonstrate how a bacteriophage can evolve into a multi-pathogen-killing agent. PMID:22787233

  1. Myxoma virus M063R is a host range gene essential for virus replication in rabbit cells.

    PubMed

    Barrett, John W; Shun Chang, Chew; Wang, Gen; Werden, Steven J; Shao, Zhuhong; Barrett, Catherine; Gao, Xiujuan; Belsito, Tara A; Villenevue, Danielle; McFadden, Grant

    2007-04-25

    The myxoma virus M063R gene product exhibits some sequence similarity to the poxvirus host range gene, C7L, of vaccinia virus. To address the potential host range function of the M063R gene product in rabbits, a deletion mutant of myxoma virus (vMyx63KO) was generated and characterized. vMyx63KO replicated to normal titre levels and produced foci that were indistinguishable from those produced by MV in vitro in a monkey kidney cell line (BGMK) that are permissive for wild type MV. However, vMyx63KO failed to replicate in all rabbit cell lines tested, including both primary and established cells lines, as well as cells derived from a variety of tissues. M063R expression was not required for myxoma virus binding, entry or early gene expression, whereas DNA replication was aborted and late genes were not expressed in vMyx63KO infected rabbit cells. Thus, the replication block for vMyx63KO in rabbit cells preceded the stage of late gene expression and DNA replication. Finally, an in vivo pathogenesis study indicated that vMyx63KO failed to cause any signs of classic myxomatosis in infected rabbits, but functioned as a non-replicating vaccine and provided protection for subsequent challenge by wild type myxoma virus. Altogether, these observations demonstrate that M063R plays a critical role in determining the host specificity of myxoma virus in rabbit cells.

  2. A wide host-range metagenomic library from a waste water treatment plant yields a novel alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Margaret; Bond, Philip L; Richardson, David J; Johnston, Andrew W B

    2005-12-01

    Using DNA obtained from the metagenome of an anaerobic digestor in a waste water treatment plant, we constructed a gene library cloned in the wide host-range cosmid pLAFR3. One cosmid enabled Rhizobium leguminosarum to grow on ethanol as sole carbon and energy source, this being due to the presence of a gene, termed adhEMeta. The AdhEMeta protein most closely resembles the AdhE alcohol dehydrogenase of Clostridium acetobutylicum, where it catalyses the formation of ethanol and butanol in a two-step reductive process. However, cloned adhEMeta did not confer ethanol utilization ability to Escherichia coli or to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, even though it was transcribed in both these hosts. Further, cell-free extracts of E. coli and R. leguminosarum containing cloned adhEMeta had butanol and ethanol dehydrogenase activities when assayed in vitro. In contrast to the well-studied AdhE proteins of C. acetobutylicum and E. coli, the enzyme specified by adhEMeta is not inactivated by oxygen and it enables alcohol to be catabolized. Cloned adhEMeta did, however, confer one phenotype to E. coli. AdhE- mutants of E. coli fail to ferment glucose and introduction of adhEMeta restored the growth of such mutants when grown under fermentative conditions. These observations show that the use of wide host-range vectors enhances the efficacy with which metagenomic libraries can be screened for genes that confer novel functions.

  3. Biology and preliminary host range assessment of two potential kudzu biological control agents.

    PubMed

    Frye, Matthew J; Hough-Goldstein, Judith; Sun, Jiang-Hua

    2007-12-01

    Two insect species from China, Gonioctena tredecimmaculata (Jacoby) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and Ornatalcides (Mesalcidodes) trifidus (Pascoe) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), were studied in quarantine in the United States as potential biological control agents for kudzu, Pueraria montana variety lobata (Willd.) Maesen and S. Almeida. Adults of G. tredecimmaculata were ovoviviparous and reproduced throughout the summer, producing offspring that had an obligate adult diapause. In no-choice tests, adult and larval G. tredecimmaculata rejected most of the plant species tested, but consumed foliage and completed their life cycle on soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) and on a native woodland plant, hog-peanut (Amphicarpaea bracteata L. Fernald), which are in the same subtribe as kudzu (Glycininae). Insects showed similar responses to field- and greenhouse-grown soybean and kudzu foliage, despite measurable differences in leaf traits: field-grown foliage of both plants had greater leaf toughness, higher total carbon content, higher trichome density, and lower water content than greenhouse foliage. O. trifidus adults also rejected most of the plants tested but fed on and severely damaged potted soybean and hog-peanut plants in addition to kudzu. Further tests in China are needed to determine whether these species will accept nontarget host plants under open-field conditions.

  4. Occurrence of Belonolaimus in Sinaloa, Northwestern Mexico: A New Report on Distribution and Host Range.

    PubMed

    Mundo-Ocampo, Manuel; Baldwin, J G; Pereira, T J; Camacho-Baez, J R; Armenta-Bojorquez, A D; Camacho-Haro, M; Becker, J O

    2017-03-01

    The present study reports the occurrence of the genus Belonolaimus in the state of Sinaloa, Mexico, associated with native plants (i.e., Ziziphus amole and Stenocereus alamosensis) in a natural coastal ecosystem. Both morphological and molecular approaches were employed to characterize the Sinaloa population. Notwithstanding of some morphological and morphometric variation between Belonolaimus from Sinaloa and other valid species, the characterization indicates that this population might belong to the Belonolaimus longicaudatus species complex. Molecular analyses based on the 28S gene and ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 regions of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) identified four major clades within Belonolaimus; however, none of the species including B. longicaudatus, B. gracilis, and B. euthychilus were supported as monophyletic; yet monophyly is argued to be a basic requirement of species status. Sequence divergence among different Belonolaimus populations and species varied according to the rRNA dataset (i.e., ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 > 28S > 18S) used, thus showing the importance of using genes with different rates of evolution to estimate species relationships. The fact that Belonolaimus has not been found in other cultivated (including on suitable hosts) areas in Sinaloa and that this population is relatively distant from the common B. longicaudatus groups (i.e., clades A and B) suggests that its appearance was not due to a recent introduction associated with the local agriculture.

  5. Occurrence of Belonolaimus in Sinaloa, Northwestern Mexico: A New Report on Distribution and Host Range

    PubMed Central

    Mundo-Ocampo, Manuel; Baldwin, J. G.; Pereira, T. J.; Camacho-Baez, J. R.; Armenta-Bojorquez, A. D.; Camacho-Haro, M.; Becker, J. O.

    2017-01-01

    The present study reports the occurrence of the genus Belonolaimus in the state of Sinaloa, Mexico, associated with native plants (i.e., Ziziphus amole and Stenocereus alamosensis) in a natural coastal ecosystem. Both morphological and molecular approaches were employed to characterize the Sinaloa population. Notwithstanding of some morphological and morphometric variation between Belonolaimus from Sinaloa and other valid species, the characterization indicates that this population might belong to the Belonolaimus longicaudatus species complex. Molecular analyses based on the 28S gene and ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 regions of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) identified four major clades within Belonolaimus; however, none of the species including B. longicaudatus, B. gracilis, and B. euthychilus were supported as monophyletic; yet monophyly is argued to be a basic requirement of species status. Sequence divergence among different Belonolaimus populations and species varied according to the rRNA dataset (i.e., ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 > 28S > 18S) used, thus showing the importance of using genes with different rates of evolution to estimate species relationships. The fact that Belonolaimus has not been found in other cultivated (including on suitable hosts) areas in Sinaloa and that this population is relatively distant from the common B. longicaudatus groups (i.e., clades A and B) suggests that its appearance was not due to a recent introduction associated with the local agriculture. PMID:28512382

  6. Host Range Restriction of Insect-Specific Flaviviruses Occurs at Several Levels of the Viral Life Cycle.

    PubMed

    Junglen, Sandra; Korries, Marvin; Grasse, Wolfgang; Wieseler, Janett; Kopp, Anne; Hermanns, Kyra; León-Juárez, Moises; Drosten, Christian; Kümmerer, Beate Mareike

    2017-01-01

    The genus Flavivirus contains emerging arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) infecting vertebrates, as well as insect-specific viruses (ISVs) (i.e., viruses whose host range is restricted to insects). ISVs are evolutionary precursors to arboviruses. Knowledge of the nature of the ISV infection block in vertebrates could identify functions necessary for the expansion of the host range toward vertebrates. Mapping of host restrictions by complementation of ISV and arbovirus genome functions could generate knowledge critical to predicting arbovirus emergence. Here we isolated a novel flavivirus, termed Niénokoué virus (NIEV), from mosquitoes sampled in Côte d'Ivoire. NIEV groups with insect-specific flaviviruses (ISFs) in phylogeny and grows in insect cells but not in vertebrate cells. We generated an infectious NIEV cDNA clone and a NIEV reporter replicon to study growth restrictions of NIEV in comparison to yellow fever virus (YFV), for which the same tools are available. Efficient RNA replication of the NIEV reporter replicon was observed in insect cells but not in vertebrate cells. Initial translation of the input replicon RNA in vertebrate cells was functional, but RNA replication did not occur. Chimeric YFV carrying the envelope proteins of NIEV was recovered via electroporation in C6/36 insect cells but did not infect vertebrate cells, indicating a block at the level of entry. Since the YF/NIEV chimera readily produced infectious particles in insect cells but not in vertebrate cells despite efficient RNA replication, restriction is also determined at the level of assembly/release. Taking the results together, the ability of ISF to infect vertebrates is blocked at several levels, including attachment/entry and RNA replication as well as assembly/release. IMPORTANCE Most viruses of the genus Flavivirus, e.g., YFV and dengue virus, are mosquito borne and transmitted to vertebrates during blood feeding of mosquitoes. Within the last decade, an increasing number

  7. Host Range Restriction of Insect-Specific Flaviviruses Occurs at Several Levels of the Viral Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Junglen, Sandra; Korries, Marvin; Grasse, Wolfgang; Wieseler, Janett; Kopp, Anne; Hermanns, Kyra; León-Juárez, Moises; Drosten, Christian

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genus Flavivirus contains emerging arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) infecting vertebrates, as well as insect-specific viruses (ISVs) (i.e., viruses whose host range is restricted to insects). ISVs are evolutionary precursors to arboviruses. Knowledge of the nature of the ISV infection block in vertebrates could identify functions necessary for the expansion of the host range toward vertebrates. Mapping of host restrictions by complementation of ISV and arbovirus genome functions could generate knowledge critical to predicting arbovirus emergence. Here we isolated a novel flavivirus, termed Niénokoué virus (NIEV), from mosquitoes sampled in Côte d’Ivoire. NIEV groups with insect-specific flaviviruses (ISFs) in phylogeny and grows in insect cells but not in vertebrate cells. We generated an infectious NIEV cDNA clone and a NIEV reporter replicon to study growth restrictions of NIEV in comparison to yellow fever virus (YFV), for which the same tools are available. Efficient RNA replication of the NIEV reporter replicon was observed in insect cells but not in vertebrate cells. Initial translation of the input replicon RNA in vertebrate cells was functional, but RNA replication did not occur. Chimeric YFV carrying the envelope proteins of NIEV was recovered via electroporation in C6/36 insect cells but did not infect vertebrate cells, indicating a block at the level of entry. Since the YF/NIEV chimera readily produced infectious particles in insect cells but not in vertebrate cells despite efficient RNA replication, restriction is also determined at the level of assembly/release. Taking the results together, the ability of ISF to infect vertebrates is blocked at several levels, including attachment/entry and RNA replication as well as assembly/release. IMPORTANCE Most viruses of the genus Flavivirus, e.g., YFV and dengue virus, are mosquito borne and transmitted to vertebrates during blood feeding of mosquitoes. Within the last decade, an

  8. Baseline sensitivity of lepidopteran corn pests in India to Cry1Ab insecticidal protein of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Sushil K; Lalitha, Yadavalli; Kamath, Subray P; Mohan, Komarlingam S; Head, Graham P

    2010-08-01

    Genetically engineered corn (Bt corn) expressing Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner insecticidal protein Cry1Ab is a biotechnological option being considered for management of lepidopteran corn pests in India. As a resistance management practice it was essential to determine the sensitivity of multiple populations of the stalk borer Chilo partellus (Swinhoe), pink borer Sesamia inferens (Walker) and the cob borer Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) to Cry1Ab protein through bioassays. The insect populations were collected during growing seasons of Rabi 2005 (October 2005 to February 2006) and Kharif 2006 (May to September 2006). Multiple populations of the three lepidopteran corn pests were found to be susceptible to Cry1Ab. Median lethal concentrations (LC(50)) ranged between 0.008 and 0.068 microg Cry1Ab mL(-1) diet for 18 populations of C. partellus (across two seasons), between 0.12 and 1.99 microg mL(-1) for seven populations of H. armigera and between 0.46 and 0.56 microg mL(-1) for two populations of S. inferens. Dose-response concentrations for lethality and growth inhibition have been determined to mark baseline sensitivity of multiple populations of key lepidopteran corn pests in India to Cry1Ab protein. These benchmark values will be referenced while monitoring resistance to Cry1Ab should Bt corn hybrids expressing Cry1Ab be approved for commercial cultivation in India. Copyright (c) 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. All five host-range variants of Xanthomonas citri carry one pthA homolog with 17.5 repeats that determines pathogenicity on citrus, but none determine host-range variation.

    PubMed

    Al-Saadi, Abdulwahid; Reddy, Joseph D; Duan, Yong P; Brunings, Asha M; Yuan, Qiaoping; Gabriel, Dean W

    2007-08-01

    Citrus canker disease is caused by five groups of Xanthomonas citri strains that are distinguished primarily by host range: three from Asia (A, A*, and A(w)) and two that form a phylogenetically distinct clade and originated in South America (B and C). Every X. citri strain carries multiple DNA fragments that hybridize with pthA, which is essential for the pathogenicity of wide-host-range X. citri group A strain 3213. DNA fragments that hybridized with pthA were cloned from a representative strain from all five groups. Each strain carried one and only one pthA homolog that functionally complemented a knockout mutation of pthA in 3213. Every complementing homolog was of identical size to pthA and carried 17.5 nearly identical, direct tandem repeats, including three new genes from narrow-host-range groups C (pthC), A(w) (pthAW), and A* (pthA*). Every noncomplementing paralog was of a different size; one of these was sequenced from group A* (pthA*-2) and was found to have an intact promoter and full-length reading frame but with 15.5 repeats. None of the complementing homologs nor any of the noncomplementing paralogs conferred avirulence to 3213 on grapefruit or suppressed avirulence of a group A* strain on grapefruit. A knockout mutation of pthC in a group C strain resulted in loss of pathogenicity on lime, but the strain was unaffected in ability to elicit an HR on grapefruit. This pthC- mutant was fully complemented by pthA, pthB, or pthC. Analysis of the predicted amino-acid sequences of all functional pthA homologs and nonfunctional paralogs indicated that the specific sequence of the 17th repeat may be essential for pathogenicity of X. citri on citrus.

  10. Kairomone utilization in the host range evaluation of potential biological control agent Trissolcus japonicus (Hymenoptera: Scelionidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys, is a highly polyphagous species native to Asia that has become a serious invasive agricultural and nuisance pest across North America. Its ability to feed on over 120 plant species, ranging from field crops and orchard fruit to ornamentals and nativ...

  11. North American tree squirrels and ground squirrels with overlapping ranges host different Cryptosporidium species and genotypes.

    PubMed

    Stenger, Brianna L S; Clark, Mark E; Kváč, Martin; Khan, Eakalak; Giddings, Catherine W; Prediger, Jitka; McEvoy, John M

    2015-12-01

    Wildlife-associated Cryptosporidium are an emerging cause of cryptosporidiosis in humans. The present study was undertaken to determine the extent to which North American tree squirrels and ground squirrels host zoonotic Cryptosporidium species and genotypes. Fragments of the Cryptosporidium 18S rRNA and actin genes were amplified and sequenced from fecal samples obtained from three tree squirrel and three ground squirrel species. In tree squirrels, Cryptosporidium was identified in 40.5% (17/42) of American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus), 40.4% (55/136) of eastern gray squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis), and 28.6% (2/7) of fox squirrels (Sciurus niger). Human-pathogenic Cryptosporidium ubiquitum and Cryptosporidium skunk genotype were the most prevalent species/genotypes in tree squirrels. Because tree squirrels live in close proximity to humans and are frequently infected with potentially zoonotic Cryptosporidium species/genotypes, they may be a significant reservoir of infection in humans. In ground squirrels, Cryptosporidium was detected in 70.2% (33/47) of 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus), 35.1% (27/77) of black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus), and the only golden-mantled ground squirrel (Callospermophilus lateralis) that was sampled. Cryptosporidium rubeyi and ground squirrel genotypes I, II, and III were identified in isolates from these ground squirrel species. In contrast to the Cryptosporidium infecting tree squirrels, these species/genotypes appear to be specific for ground squirrels and are not associated with human disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Dead-end hollow-fiber ultrafiltration for concentration and enumeration of Escherichia coli and broad-host-range plasmid DNA from wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Asfahl, Kyle L.; Savin, Mary C.

    2012-01-01

    Broad-host-range plasmids can facilitate dissemination of antibiotic resistance determinants among diverse bacterial populations. We evaluated hollow-fiber ultrafiltration for increases in detection efficiency of broad-host-range plasmids and Escherichia coli DNA in wastewater. Ultrafiltration followed by PCR showed limited increases in DNA detection and quantification in effluent compared with membrane filtration alone. PMID:22251424

  13. Fulfillment of Koch’s postulates and partial host range of Septoria lepidii Desm., a fungal pathogen for potential biological control of hoary cress (Lepidium spp.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We have fulfilled Koch’s postulates and conducted host range tests with Septoria lepidii Desm. on five geographical accessions of hoary cress. Host range results showed the fungus specific to Lepidium spp. and damaging to hoary cress. This fungus is potentially an important biological control agent ...

  14. Phenolic Compounds and Their Fates In Tropical Lepidopteran Larvae: Modifications In Alkaline Conditions.

    PubMed

    Vihakas, Matti; Gómez, Isrrael; Karonen, Maarit; Tähtinen, Petri; Sääksjärvi, Ilari; Salminen, Juha-Pekka

    2015-09-01

    Lepidopteran larvae encounter a variety of phenolic compounds while consuming their host plants. Some phenolics may oxidize under alkaline conditions prevailing in the larval guts, and the oxidation products may cause oxidative stress to the larvae. In this study, we aimed to find new ways to predict how phenolic compounds may be modified in the guts of herbivorous larvae. To do so, we studied the ease of oxidation of phenolic compounds from 12 tropical tree species. The leaf extracts were incubated in vitro in alkaline conditions, and the loss of total phenolics during incubation was used to estimate the oxidizability of extracts. The phenolic profiles of the leaf extracts before and after incubation were compared, revealing that some phenolic compounds were depleted during incubation. The leaves of the 12 tree species were each fed to 12 species of lepidopteran larvae that naturally feed on these trees. The phenolic profiles of larval frass were compared to those of in vitro incubated leaf extracts. These comparisons showed that the phenolic profiles of alkali-treated samples and frass samples were similar in many cases. This suggested that certain phenolics, such as ellagitannins, proanthocyanidins, and galloylquinic acid derivatives were modified by the alkaline pH of the larval gut. In other cases, the chromatographic profiles of frass and in vitro incubated leaf extracts were not similar, and new modifications of phenolics were detected in the frass. We conclude that the actual fates of phenolics in vivo are often more complicated than can be predicted by a simple in vitro method.

  15. Broad-Host-Range Plasmids from Agricultural Soils Have IncP-1 Backbones with Diverse Accessory Genes▿

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Diya; Van der Auwera, Geraldine A.; Rogers, Linda M.; Thomas, Christopher M.; Brown, Celeste J.; Top, Eva M.

    2011-01-01

    Broad-host-range plasmids are known to spread genes between distinct phylogenetic groups of bacteria. These genes often code for resistances to antibiotics and heavy metals or degradation of pollutants. Although some broad-host-range plasmids have been extensively studied, their evolutionary history and genetic diversity remain largely unknown. The goal of this study was to analyze and compare the genomes of 12 broad-host-range plasmids that were previously isolated from Norwegian soils by exogenous plasmid isolation and that encode mercury resistance. Complete nucleotide sequencing followed by phylogenetic analyses based on the relaxase gene traI showed that all the plasmids belong to one of two subgroups (β and ε) of the well-studied incompatibility group IncP-1. A diverse array of accessory genes was found to be involved in resistance to antimicrobials (streptomycin, spectinomycin, and sulfonamides), degradation of herbicides (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and 2,4-dichlorophenoxypropionic acid), and a putative new catabolic pathway. Intramolecular transposition of insertion sequences followed by deletion was found to contribute to the diversity of some of these plasmids. The previous observation that the insertion sites of a Tn501-related element are identical in four IncP-1β plasmids (pJP4, pB10, R906, and R772) was further extended to three more IncP-1β plasmids (pAKD15, pAKD18, and pAKD29). We proposed a hypothesis for the evolution of these Tn501-bearing IncP-1β plasmids that predicts recent diversification followed by worldwide spread. Our study increases the available collection of complete IncP-1 plasmid genome sequences by 50% and will aid future studies to enhance our understanding of the evolution and function of this important plasmid family. PMID:21948829

  16. Characterization of Extended-Host-Range Pseudo-T-Even Bacteriophage Kpp95 Isolated on Klebsiella pneumoniae▿

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lii-Tzu; Chang, Shu-Ying; Yen, Ming-Ren; Yang, Tsuey-Ching; Tseng, Yi-Hsiung

    2007-01-01

    Kpp95, isolated on Klebsiella pneumoniae, is a bacteriophage with the morphology of T4-type phages and is capable of rapid lysis of host cells. Its double-stranded genomic DNA (ca. 175 kb, estimated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis) can be cut only by restriction endonucleases with a cleavage site flanked either by A and T or by T, as tested, suggesting that it contains the modified derivative(s) of G and/or C. Over 26 protein bands were visualized upon sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the virion proteins. N-terminal sequencing indicated that the most abundant band (46 kDa) is the major coat protein (gp23) which has been cleaved from a signal peptide likely with a length similar to that of T4. Phylogenetic analyses based on the sequences of the central region (263 amino acid residues) of gp23 and the full length of gp18 and gp19 placed Kpp95 among the pseudo-T-even subgroup, most closely related to the coliphage JS98. In addition to being able to lyse many extended-spectrum β-lactamase strains of K. pneumoniae, Kpp95 can lyse Klebsiella oxytoca, Enterobacter agglomerans, and Serratia marcescens cells. Thus, Kpp95 deserves further studies for development as a component of a therapeutic cocktail, owing to its high efficiencies of host lysis plus extended host range. PMID:17337566

  17. Multilocus sequence analysis of Anaplasma phagocytophilum reveals three distinct lineages with different host ranges in clinically ill French cattle.

    PubMed

    Chastagner, Amélie; Dugat, Thibaud; Vourc'h, Gwenaël; Verheyden, Hélène; Legrand, Loïc; Bachy, Véronique; Chabanne, Luc; Joncour, Guy; Maillard, Renaud; Boulouis, Henri-Jean; Haddad, Nadia; Bailly, Xavier; Leblond, Agnès

    2014-12-09

    Molecular epidemiology represents a powerful approach to elucidate the complex epidemiological cycles of multi-host pathogens, such as Anaplasma phagocytophilum. A. phagocytophilum is a tick-borne bacterium that affects a wide range of wild and domesticated animals. Here, we characterized its genetic diversity in populations of French cattle; we then compared the observed genotypes with those found in horses, dogs, and roe deer to determine whether genotypes of A. phagocytophilum are shared among different hosts. We sampled 120 domesticated animals (104 cattle, 13 horses, and 3 dogs) and 40 wild animals (roe deer) and used multilocus sequence analysis on nine loci (ankA, msp4, groESL, typA, pled, gyrA, recG, polA, and an intergenic region) to characterize the genotypes of A. phagocytophilum present. Phylogenic analysis revealed three genetic clusters of bacterial variants in domesticated animals. The two principal clusters included 98% of the bacterial genotypes found in cattle, which were only distantly related to those in roe deer. One cluster comprised only cattle genotypes, while the second contained genotypes from cattle, horses, and dogs. The third contained all roe deer genotypes and three cattle genotypes. Geographical factors could not explain this clustering pattern. These results suggest that roe deer do not contribute to the spread of A. phagocytophilum in cattle in France. Further studies should explore if these different clusters are associated with differing disease severity in domesticated hosts. Additionally, it remains to be seen if the three clusters of A. phagocytophilum genotypes in cattle correspond to distinct epidemiological cycles, potentially involving different reservoir hosts.

  18. Free-ranging Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) as host of Toxoplasma gondii in Finland.

    PubMed

    Jokelainen, Pikka; Deksne, Gunita; Holmala, Katja; Näreaho, Anu; Laakkonen, Juha; Kojola, Ilpo; Sukura, Antti

    2013-07-01

    We investigated the presence of Toxoplasma gondii infections in Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) in Finland by analyzing samples from 337 lynx that were legally hunted during the 2010-2011 season and by performing a retrospective nationwide database search of postmortem toxoplasmosis diagnoses in this species. We detected specific anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies in 290 (86.1%) of the 337 lynx. The method used was a direct agglutination test, and samples positive at the used dilution 1:40 were defined as antibody positive. Older lynx had 14.3 times higher odds of being antibody-positive than did lynx of the presumed age of 7-10 mo, and lynx weighing >15 kg had 16.7 times higher odds of being antibody positive than did those ≤ 15 kg. Lynx from the southwest were more often antibody positive, with an odds ratio 6.3, than lynx from the northeast. None of the 332 fecal samples available was positive for the presence of T. gondii-like oocysts with a quantitative MgSO4 flotation technique, and none of the 167 free-ranging Eurasian lynx examined postmortem by veterinary pathologists from January 2000 to May 2010 had died from toxoplasmosis. Although Finnish lynx were confirmed to commonly encounter T. gondii, we found no evidence of an ongoing contribution to the environmental oocyst burden nor of the lynx dying from the infection.

  19. Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA Differs with Burrowing Nematode Collection Site, but not with Host Range.

    PubMed

    Marin, D H; Kaplan, D T; Opperman, C H

    1999-06-01

    The genetic variability of 12 burrowing nematode (Radopholus sp.) isolates from Central America, the Caribbean, and Florida, and one isolate from Ivory Coast were compared with RAPD analysis. A high degree of genetic similarity (>0.82) was determined for isolates from the Western Hemisphere. Genome similarity was greatest among isolates collected within a country. Among isolates collected in Central America and the Caribbean, burrowing nematodes from Belize and Guatemala were genetically more distant. However, the genome of the isolate from Ivory Coast was most dissimilar (>0.30). These results suggest that African and American burrowing-nematode isolates may have had different origins or that they have been geographically isolated for a sufficient amount of time to have accumulated genetic changes detectable by RAPD analysis. No relationship was found between the genomic similarity and extent of reproduction or damage to banana or citrus roots. Morphometric analysis involving eight of the isolates indicated that they were morphologically identical and values for morphometric parameters were well within the range previously published for banana and citrusparasitic burrowing nematodes.

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of the Broad-Host-Range Vibriophage KVP40: Comparative Genomics of a T4-Related Bacteriophage

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Eric S.; Heidelberg, John F.; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Nelson, William C.; Durkin, A. Scott; Ciecko, Ann; Feldblyum, Tamara V.; White, Owen; Paulsen, Ian T.; Nierman, William C.; Lee, Jong; Szczypinski, Bridget; Fraser, Claire M.

    2003-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of the T4-like, broad-host-range vibriophage KVP40 has been determined. The genome sequence is 244,835 bp, with an overall G+C content of 42.6%. It encodes 386 putative protein-encoding open reading frames (CDSs), 30 tRNAs, 33 T4-like late promoters, and 57 potential rho-independent terminators. Overall, 92.1% of the KVP40 genome is coding, with an average CDS size of 587 bp. While 65% of the CDSs were unique to KVP40 and had no known function, the genome sequence and organization show specific regions of extensive conservation with phage T4. At least 99 KVP40 CDSs have homologs in the T4 genome (Blast alignments of 45 to 68% amino acid similarity). The shared CDSs represent 36% of all T4 CDSs but only 26% of those from KVP40. There is extensive representation of the DNA replication, recombination, and repair enzymes as well as the viral capsid and tail structural genes. KVP40 lacks several T4 enzymes involved in host DNA degradation, appears not to synthesize the modified cytosine (hydroxymethyl glucose) present in T-even phages, and lacks group I introns. KVP40 likely utilizes the T4-type sigma-55 late transcription apparatus, but features of early- or middle-mode transcription were not identified. There are 26 CDSs that have no viral homolog, and many did not necessarily originate from Vibrio spp., suggesting an even broader host range for KVP40. From these latter CDSs, an NAD salvage pathway was inferred that appears to be unique among bacteriophages. Features of the KVP40 genome that distinguish it from T4 are presented, as well as those, such as the replication and virion gene clusters, that are substantially conserved. PMID:12923095

  1. Adaptation of chimeric retroviruses in vitro and in vivo: isolation of avian retroviral vectors with extended host range.

    PubMed

    Barsov, E V; Payne, W S; Hughes, S H

    2001-06-01

    We have designed and characterized two new replication-competent avian sarcoma/leukosis virus-based retroviral vectors with amphotropic and ecotropic host ranges. The amphotropic vector RCASBP-M2C(797-8), was obtained by passaging the chimeric retroviral vector RCASBP-M2C(4070A) (6) in chicken embryos. The ecotropic vector, RCASBP(Eco), was created by replacing the env-coding region in the retroviral vector RCASBP(A) with the env region from an ecotropic murine leukemia virus. It replicates efficiently in avian DFJ8 cells that express murine ecotropic receptor. For both vectors, permanent cell lines that produce viral stocks with titers of about 5 x 10(6) CFU/ml on mammalian cells can be easily established by passaging transfected avian cells. Some chimeric viruses, for example, RCASBP(Eco), replicate efficiently without modifications. For those chimeric viruses that do require modification, adaptation by passage in vitro or in vivo is a general strategy. This strategy has been used to prepare vectors with altered host range and could potentially be used to develop vectors that would be useful for targeted gene delivery.

  2. Adaptation of Chimeric Retroviruses In Vitro and In Vivo: Isolation of Avian Retroviral Vectors with Extended Host Range

    PubMed Central

    Barsov, Eugene V.; Payne, William S.; Hughes, Stephen H.

    2001-01-01

    We have designed and characterized two new replication-competent avian sarcoma/leukosis virus-based retroviral vectors with amphotropic and ecotropic host ranges. The amphotropic vector RCASBP-M2C(797-8), was obtained by passaging the chimeric retroviral vector RCASBP-M2C(4070A) (6) in chicken embryos. The ecotropic vector, RCASBP(Eco), was created by replacing the env-coding region in the retroviral vector RCASBP(A) with the env region from an ecotropic murine leukemia virus. It replicates efficiently in avian DFJ8 cells that express murine ecotropic receptor. For both vectors, permanent cell lines that produce viral stocks with titers of about 5 × 106 CFU/ml on mammalian cells can be easily established by passaging transfected avian cells. Some chimeric viruses, for example, RCASBP(Eco), replicate efficiently without modifications. For those chimeric viruses that do require modification, adaptation by passage in vitro or in vivo is a general strategy. This strategy has been used to prepare vectors with altered host range and could potentially be used to develop vectors that would be useful for targeted gene delivery. PMID:11333876

  3. Emerging Trends in Molecular Interactions between Plants and the Broad Host Range Fungal Pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    PubMed Central

    Mbengue, Malick; Navaud, Olivier; Peyraud, Rémi; Barascud, Marielle; Badet, Thomas; Vincent, Rémy; Barbacci, Adelin; Raffaele, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Fungal plant pathogens are major threats to food security worldwide. Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea are closely related Ascomycete plant pathogens causing mold diseases on hundreds of plant species. There is no genetic source of complete plant resistance to these broad host range pathogens known to date. Instead, natural plant populations show a continuum of resistance levels controlled by multiple genes, a phenotype designated as quantitative disease resistance. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms controlling the interaction between plants and S. sclerotiorum and B. cinerea but significant advances were made on this topic in the last years. This minireview highlights a selection of nine themes that emerged in recent research reports on the molecular bases of plant-S. sclerotiorum and plant-B. cinerea interactions. On the fungal side, this includes progress on understanding the role of oxalic acid, on the study of fungal small secreted proteins. Next, we discuss the exchanges of small RNA between organisms and the control of cell death in plant and fungi during pathogenic interactions. Finally on the plant side, we highlight defense priming by mechanical signals, the characterization of plant Receptor-like proteins and the hormone abscisic acid in the response to B. cinerea and S. sclerotiorum, the role of plant general transcription machinery and plant small bioactive peptides. These represent nine trends we selected as remarkable in our understanding of fungal molecules causing disease and plant mechanisms associated with disease resistance to two devastating broad host range fungi. PMID:27066056

  4. The influence of fire on lepidopteran abundance and community structure in forested habitats of eastern Texas

    Treesearch

    D. Craig Rudolph; Charles A. Ely

    2000-01-01

    Transect surveys were used to examine the influence of fire on lepidopteran communities (Papilionoidea and Hesperioidea) in forested habitats in eastern Texas. Lepidopteran abundance was greater in pine forests where prescribed fire maintained an open mid- and understory compared to forests where fire had less impact on forest structure. Ahundance of nectar sources...

  5. Update on monitoring of resistance to Bt cotton in key lepidopteran pests in the USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Producers sprayed more Bollgard II to control target lepidopteran pests in 2010 than in previous years, and therefore concerns have been expressed that the susceptibility of the target lepidopteran pests to the Bt Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab proteins in Bollgard II has significantly decreased. However, resist...

  6. An interaction domain in human SAMD9 is essential for myxoma virus host-range determinant M062 antagonism of host anti-viral function.

    PubMed

    Nounamo, Bernice; Li, Yibo; O'Byrne, Peter; Kearney, Aoife M; Khan, Amir; Liu, Jia

    2017-03-01

    In humans, deleterious mutations in the sterile α motif domain protein 9 (SAMD9) gene are associated with cancer, inflammation, weakening of the immune response, and developmental arrest. However, the biological function of SAMD9 and its sequence-structure relationships remain to be characterized. Previously, we found that an essential host range factor, M062 protein from myxoma virus (MYXV), antagonized the function of human SAMD9. In this study, we examine the interaction between M062 and human SAMD9 to identify regions that are critical to SAMD9 function. We also characterize the in vitro kinetics of the interaction. In an infection assay, exogenous expression of SAMD9 N-terminus leads to a potent inhibition of wild-type MYXV infection. We reason that this effect is due to the sequestration of viral M062 by the exogenously expressed N-terminal SAMD9 region. Our studies reveal the first molecular insight into viral M062-dependent mechanisms that suppress human SAMD9-associated antiviral function.

  7. Heterologous expression of Paranosema (Antonospora) locustae hexokinase in lepidopteran, Sf9, cells is followed by accumulation of the microsporidian protein in insect cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Timofeev, Sergey A; Senderskiy, Igor V; Tsarev, Alexander A; Tokarev, Yuri S; Dolgikh, Viacheslav V

    2017-02-01

    Paranosema (Nosema, Antonospora) locustae is the only microsporidium produced as a commercial product for biological control. Molecular mechanisms of the effects of this pathogen and other invertebrate microsporidia on host cells remain uncharacterized. Previously, we immunolocalized P. locustae hexokinase in nuclei of Locusta migratoria infected adipocytes. Here, the microsporidian protein was expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris and in lepidopteran Sf9 cells. During heterologous expression, P. locustae hexokinase was accumulated in the nuclei of insect cells but not in yeast cell nuclei. This confirms nuclear localization of hexokinase secreted by microsporidia into infected host cells and suggests convenient model for its further study.

  8. Characterization of an Ancient Lepidopteran Lateral Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, David; Redding, Amanda J.; Werren, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria to eukaryote lateral gene transfers (LGT) are an important potential source of material for the evolution of novel genetic traits. The explosion in the number of newly sequenced genomes provides opportunities to identify and characterize examples of these lateral gene transfer events, and to assess their role in the evolution of new genes. In this paper, we describe an ancient lepidopteran LGT of a glycosyl hydrolase family 31 gene (GH31) from an Enterococcus bacteria. PCR amplification between the LGT and a flanking insect gene confirmed that the GH31 was integrated into the Bombyx mori genome and was not a result of an assembly error. Database searches in combination with degenerate PCR on a panel of 7 lepidopteran families confirmed that the GH31 LGT event occurred deep within the Order approximately 65–145 million years ago. The most basal species in which the LGT was found is Plutella xylostella (superfamily: Yponomeutoidea). Array data from Bombyx mori shows that GH31 is expressed, and low dN/dS ratios indicates the LGT coding sequence is under strong stabilizing selection. These findings provide further support for the proposition that bacterial LGTs are relatively common in insects and likely to be an underappreciated source of adaptive genetic material. PMID:23533610

  9. Genome sequence and analysis of a broad-host range lytic bacteriophage that infects the Bacillus cereus group

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Comparatively little information is available on members of the Myoviridae infecting low G+C content, Gram-positive host bacteria of the family Firmicutes. While numerous Bacillus phages have been isolated up till now only very few Bacillus cereus phages have been characterized in detail. Results Here we present data on the large, virulent, broad-host-range B. cereus phage vB_BceM_Bc431v3 (Bc431v3). Bc431v3 features a 158,618 bp dsDNA genome, encompassing 239 putative open reading frames (ORFs) and, 20 tRNA genes encoding 17 different amino acids. Since pulsed-field gel electrophoresis indicated that the genome of this phage has a mass of 155-158 kb Bc431v3 DNA appears not to contain long terminal repeats that are found in the genome of Bacillus phage SPO1. Conclusions Bc431v3 displays significant sequence similarity, at the protein level, to B. cereus phage BCP78, Listeria phage A511 and Enterococcus phage ØEF24C and other morphologically related phages infecting Firmicutes such as Staphylococcus phage K and Lactobacillus phage LP65. Based on these data we suggest that Bc431v3 should be included as a member of the Spounavirinae; however, because of all the diverse taxonomical information has been addressed recently, it is difficult to determine the genus. The Bc431v3 phage contains some highly unusual genes such as gp143 encoding putative tRNAHis guanylyltransferase. In addition, it carries some genes that appear to be related to the host sporulation regulators. These are: gp098, which encodes a putative segregation protein related to FstK/SpoIIIE DNA transporters; gp105, a putative segregation protein; gp108, RNA polymerase sigma factor F/B; and, gp109 encoding RNA polymerase sigma factor G. PMID:23388049

  10. Discovery of a polyomavirus in European badgers (Meles meles) and the evolution of host range in the family Polyomaviridae

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Sarah C.; Murphy, Aisling A.; Cotten, Matthew; Palser, Anne L.; Benson, Phillip; Lesellier, Sandrine; Gormley, Eamonn; Richomme, Céline; Grierson, Sylvia; Bhuachalla, Deirdre Ni; Chambers, Mark; Kellam, Paul; Boschiroli, María-Laura

    2015-01-01

    Polyomaviruses infect a diverse range of mammalian and avian hosts, and are associated with a variety of symptoms. However, it is unknown whether the viruses are found in all mammalian families and the evolutionary history of the polyomaviruses is still unclear. Here, we report the discovery of a novel polyomavirus in the European badger (Meles meles), which to our knowledge represents the first polyomavirus to be characterized in the family Mustelidae, and within a European carnivoran. Although the virus was discovered serendipitously in the supernatant of a cell culture inoculated with badger material, we subsequently confirmed its presence in wild badgers. The European badger polyomavirus was tentatively named Meles meles polyomavirus 1 (MmelPyV1). The genome is 5187 bp long and encodes proteins typical of polyomaviruses. Phylogenetic analyses including all known polyomavirus genomes consistently group MmelPyV1 with California sea lion polyomavirus 1 across all regions of the genome. Further evolutionary analyses revealed phylogenetic discordance amongst polyomavirus genome regions, possibly arising from evolutionary rate heterogeneity, and a complex association between polyomavirus phylogeny and host taxonomic groups. PMID:25626684

  11. Discovery of a polyomavirus in European badgers (Meles meles) and the evolution of host range in the family Polyomaviridae.

    PubMed

    Hill, Sarah C; Murphy, Aisling A; Cotten, Matthew; Palser, Anne L; Benson, Phillip; Lesellier, Sandrine; Gormley, Eamonn; Richomme, Céline; Grierson, Sylvia; Bhuachalla, Deirdre Ni; Chambers, Mark; Kellam, Paul; Boschiroli, María-Laura; Ehlers, Bernhard; Jarvis, Michael A; Pybus, Oliver G

    2015-06-01

    Polyomaviruses infect a diverse range of mammalian and avian hosts, and are associated with a variety of symptoms. However, it is unknown whether the viruses are found in all mammalian families and the evolutionary history of the polyomaviruses is still unclear. Here, we report the discovery of a novel polyomavirus in the European badger (Meles meles), which to our knowledge represents the first polyomavirus to be characterized in the family Mustelidae, and within a European carnivoran. Although the virus was discovered serendipitously in the supernatant of a cell culture inoculated with badger material, we subsequently confirmed its presence in wild badgers. The European badger polyomavirus was tentatively named Meles meles polyomavirus 1 (MmelPyV1). The genome is 5187 bp long and encodes proteins typical of polyomaviruses. Phylogenetic analyses including all known polyomavirus genomes consistently group MmelPyV1 with California sea lion polyomavirus 1 across all regions of the genome. Further evolutionary analyses revealed phylogenetic discordance amongst polyomavirus genome regions, possibly arising from evolutionary rate heterogeneity, and a complex association between polyomavirus phylogeny and host taxonomic groups.

  12. Construction of broad-host-range cosmid cloning vectors: identification of genes necessary for growth of Methylobacterium organophilum on methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, L.N.; Hanson, R.S.

    1985-03-01

    Four new cloning vectors have been constructed from the broad-host-range cloning vector pRK290. These vectors, pLA2901, pLA2905, pLA2910, and pLA2917, confer resistance to kanamycin and tetracycline. The latter two are cosmid derivatives of pLA2901. The new vectors can be mobilized into, and are stably maintained in, a variety of gram-negative bacteria. A Sau3A genomic bank of Methylobacterium organophilum strain xx DNA has been constructed in pLA2917, and complementation analysis, with a variety of mutants unable to grow on methanol, revealed at least five separate regions necessary for growth on methanol. Complementation analysis and Tn5 mutagenesis data suggest that at least three genes are responsible for expression of active methanol dehydrogenase.

  13. Salmonella phages isolated from dairy farms in Thailand show wider host range than a comparable set of phages isolated from U.S. dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Wongsuntornpoj, Sarach; Moreno Switt, Andrea I; Bergholz, Peter; Wiedmann, Martin; Chaturongakul, Soraya

    2014-08-06

    Salmonella is a zoonotic pathogen with globally distributed serovars as well as serovars predominantly found in certain regions; for example, serovar Weltevreden is rarely isolated in the U.S., but is common in Thailand. Relative to our understanding of Salmonella diversity, our understanding of the global diversity of Salmonella phages is limited. We hypothesized that the serovar diversity in a given environment and farming system will affect the Salmonella phage diversity associated with animal hosts. We thus isolated and characterized Salmonella phages from 15 small-scale dairy farms in Thailand and compared the host ranges of the 62 Salmonella phage isolates obtained with host range diversity for 129 phage isolates obtained from dairy farms in the U.S. The 62 phage isolates from Thailand represented genome sizes ranging from 40 to 200 kb and showed lysis of 6-25 of the 26 host strains tested (mean number of strain lysed=19). By comparison, phage isolates previously obtained in a survey of 15 U.S. dairy farms showed a narrow host range (lysis of 1-17; mean number of strains lysed=4); principal coordinate analysis also confirmed U.S. and Thai phages had distinct host lysis profiles. Our data indicate that dairy farms that differ in management practices and are located on different continents can yield phage isolates that differ in their host ranges, providing an avenue for isolation of phages with desirable host range characteristics for commercial applications. Farming systems characterized by coexistence of different animals may facilitate presence of Salmonella phages with wide host ranges.

  14. Salmonella phages isolated from dairy farms in Thailand show wider host range than a comparable set of phages isolated from U.S. dairy farms

    PubMed Central

    Wongsuntornpoj, Sarach; Switt, Andrea I Moreno; Bergholz, Peter; Wiedmann, Martin; Chaturongakul, Soraya

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella is a zoonotic pathogen with globally distributed serovars as well as serovars predominantly found in certain regions; for example, serovar Weltevreden is rarely isolated in the U.S., but is common in Thailand. Relative to our understanding of Salmonella diversity, our understanding of the global diversity of Salmonella phages is limited. We hypothesized that the serovar diversity in a given environment and farming system will affect the Salmonella phage diversity associated with animal hosts. We thus isolated and characterized Salmonella phages from 15 small-scale dairy farms in Thailand and compared the host ranges of the 62 Salmonella phage isolates obtained with host range diversity for 129 phage isolates obtained from dairy farms in the U.S. The 62 phage isolates from Thailand represented genome sizes ranging from 40 to 200 kb and showed lysis of 6 to 25 of the 26 host strains tested (mean number of strain lysed = 19). By comparison, phage isolates previously obtained in a survey of 15 U.S. dairy farms showed a narrow host range (lysis of 1 to 17; mean number of strains lysed = 4); principal coordinate analysis also confirmed U.S. and Thai phages had distinct host lysis profiles. Our data indicate that dairy farms that differ in management practices and are located on different continents can yield phage isolates that differ in their host ranges, providing an avenue for isolation of phages with desirable host range characteristics for commercial applications. Farming systems characterized by coexistence of different animals may facilitate presence of Salmonella phages with wide host ranges. PMID:24939592

  15. PB2 and Hemagglutinin Mutations Are Major Determinants of Host Range and Virulence in Mouse-Adapted Influenza A Virus▿

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Jihui; Dankar, Samar K.; Forbes, Nicole E.; Keleta, Liya; Zhou, Yan; Tyler, Shaun; Brown, Earl G.

    2010-01-01

    Serial mouse lung passage of a human influenza A virus, A/Hong Kong/1/68 (H3N2) (HK-wt), produced a mouse-adapted variant, MA, with nine mutations that was >103.8-fold more virulent. In this study, we demonstrate that MA mutations of the PB2 (D701N) and hemagglutinin (HA) (G218W in HA1 and T156N in HA2) genes were the most adaptive genetic determinants for increased growth and virulence in the mouse model. Recombinant viruses expressing each of the mutated MA genome segments on the HK-wt backbone showed significantly increased disease severity, whereas only the mouse-adapted PB2 gene increased virulence, as determined by the 50% lethal dose ([LD50] >101.4-fold). The converse comparisons of recombinant MA viruses expressing each of the HK-wt genome segments showed the greatest decrease in virulence due to the HA gene (102-fold), with lesser decreases due to the M1, NS1, NA, and PB1 genes (100.3- to 100.8-fold), and undetectable effects on the LD50 for the PB2 and NP genes. The HK PB2 gene did, however, attenuate MA infection, as measured by weight loss and time to death. Replication of adaptive mutations in vivo and in vitro showed both viral gene backbone and host range effects. Minigenome transcription assays showed that PB1 and PB2 mutations increased polymerase activity and that the PB2 D701N mutation was comparable in effect to the mammalian adaptive PB2 E627K mutation. Our results demonstrate that host range and virulence are controlled by multiple genes, with major roles for mutations in PB2 and HA. PMID:20702632

  16. Host ranges of gregarious muscoid fly parasitoids: Muscidifurax raptorellus (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), Tachinaephagus zealandicus (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), and Trichopria nigra (Hymenoptera: Diapriidae).

    PubMed

    Geden, Christopher J; Moon, Roger D

    2009-06-01

    Attack rates, progeny production, sex ratios, and host utilization efficiency of Muscidifurax raptorellus (Kogan and Legner) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), Tachinaephagus zealandicus Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), and Trichopria nigra (Nees) (Hymenoptera: Diapriidae) were evaluated in laboratory bioassays with five dipteran hosts: house fly (Musca domestica L.), stable fly (Stomoxys calcitrans L.), horn fly (Hematobia irritans L.), black dump fly [Hydrotaea aenescens (Weidemann)] (Diptera: Muscidae), and a flesh fly (Sarcophaga bullata Parker) (Diptera: Sarcophagidae). M. raptorellus killed and successfully parasitized all five host species and produced an average 2.6 parasitoid progeny from each host. Host attack rates were highest on stable fly and lowest on horn fly; there were no differences among hosts in the total number of progeny produced. T. zealandicus killed larvae of all fly host species in similar numbers, but parasitism was most successful on H. aenescens and S. bullata and least successful on horn fly and house fly hosts. Significantly more parasitoid progeny emerged from S. bullata (10.2 parasitoids per host) than the other hosts; only 2.5 progeny were produced from parasitized horn fly hosts. Most of the killed puparia that produced neither adult flies nor parasitoids ("duds") contained dead parasitoids; in house fly, stable fly, and horn fly hosts, >30% of these dudded pupae contained adult wasps that failed to eclose. T. nigra successfully parasitized pupae of all host species except house fly and was most successful on stable fly. Significantly more parasitoid progeny emerged from S. bullata (30.6 parasitoids per host) than the other hosts; only 5.7 progeny were produced from horn fly hosts.

  17. Promoters of the Broad Host Range Plasmid Rk2: Analysis of Transcription (Initiation) in Five Species of Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Greener, A.; Lehman, S. M.; Helinski, D. R.

    1992-01-01

    A broad host range cloning vector was constructed, suitable for monitoring promoter activity in diverse Gram-negative bacteria. This vector, derived from plasmid RSF1010, utilized the firefly luciferase gene as the reporter, since the assay for its bioluminescent product is sensitive, and measurements can be made without background from the host. Twelve DNA fragments with promoter activity were obtained from broad host range plasmid RK2 and inserted into the RSF1010 derived vector. The relative luciferase activities were determined for these fragments in five species of Gram-negative bacteria. In addition, four promoters were analyzed by primer extension to locate transcriptional start sites in each host. The results show that several of the promoters vary substantially in relative strengths or utilize different transcriptional start sites in different bacteria. Other promoters exhibited similar activities and identical start sites in the five hosts examined. PMID:1732166

  18. Survey, symptomatology, transmission, host range and characterization of begomovirus associated with yellow mosaic disease of ridge gourd in southern India.

    PubMed

    Patil, Chandrakant V; Ramdas, S V; Premchand, U; Shankarappa, K S

    2017-06-01

    Ridge gourd is an important vegetable crop and is affected by several biotic and abiotic factors. Among the different biotic factors, ridge gourd yellow mosaic disease (RgYMD) is new emerging threat for the production of ridge gourd. The incidence of the RgYMD varied from 30 to 100% in southern India with highest disease incidence of 100% observed in Belagavi district of Karnataka state. The infected plants showed chlorosis, mosaic, cupping of leaves, blistering, reduction in leaf size and stunted growth. The varieties/hybrids grown in the farmer's fields were found to be susceptible to the disease. Begomovirus was detected in 61 out 64 samples collected from different areas of southern India. Further, all the samples failed to give amplification for beta and alpha satellites. The transmission studies revealed that single whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) is enough to transmit the virus, however, 100% transmission was observed with 10 whiteflies. The minimum acquisition access period and inoculation access period for transmission of virus by whitefly was 15 min. Among the 56 host plants belonging to diversified families tested for host range, sponge gourd, ash gourd, bottle gourd, pumpkin, cucumber, summer squash, cluster bean, tobacco and datura were shown to be susceptible. Seventy six varieties/hybrids evaluated for identifying the resistance source for RgYMD, all were found highly susceptible. Sequence analysis of DNA-A revealed that the causal virus shared highest nucleotide sequence identity (92.3%) with Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV) infecting sponge gourd from northern India. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of both DNA-A and DNA-B components showed that the begomovirus associated with RgYMD is found to be strain of ToLCNDV. This is first report of ToLCNDV association with RgYMD from southern India.

  19. Host range and cell cycle activation properties of polyomavirus large T-antigen mutants defective in pRB binding

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, R.; Bauer, P.H.; Benjamin, T.L.; Crissman, H.A.; Bradbury, E.M. |

    1994-11-01

    The authors have examined the growth properties of polyomavirus large T-antigen mutants that ar unable to bind pRB, the product of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene. These mutants grow poorly on primary mouse cells yet grow well on NIH 3T3 and other established mouse cell lines. Preinfection of primary baby mouse kidney (BMK) epithelial cells with wild-type simian virus 40 renders these cells permissive to growth of pRB-binding polyomavirus mutants. Conversely, NIH 3T3 cells transfected by and expressing wild-type human pRB become nonpermissive. Primary fibroblasts for mouse embryos that carry a homozygous knockout of the RB gene are permissive, while those from normal littermates are nonpermissive. The host range of polyomavirus pRB-binding mutants is thus determined by expression or lack of expression of functional pRB by the host. These results demonstrate the importance of pRB binding by large T antigen for productive viral infection in primary cells. Failure of pRB-binding mutants to grow well in BMK cells correlates with their failure to induce progression from G{sub 0} or G{sub 1} through the S phase of the cell cycle. Time course studies show delayed synthesis and lower levels of accumulation of large T antigen, viral DNA, and VP1 in mutant compared with wild-type virus-infected BMK cells. These results support a model in which productive infection by polyomavirus in normal mouse cells is tightly coupled to the induction and progression of the cell cycle. 48 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Sensory basis of lepidopteran migration: Focus on the monarch butterfly

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Patrick A.; Reppert, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    In response to seasonal habitats, migratory lepidopterans, exemplified by the monarch butterfly, have evolved migration to deal with dynamic conditions. During migration, monarchs use orientation mechanisms, exploiting a time-compensated sun compasses and a light-sensitive inclination magnetic compass to facilitate fall migration south. The sun compass is bidirectional with overwintering coldness triggering the change in orientation direction for remigration northward in the spring. The timing of the remigration and milkweed emergence in the southern US have co-evolved for propagation of the migration. Current research is uncovering the anatomical and molecular substrates that underlie migratory-relevant sensory mechanisms with the antennae being critical components. Orientation mechanisms may be detrimentally affected by environmental factors such as climate change and sensory interference from human-generated sources. PMID:25625216

  1. Abd-B suppresses lepidopteran proleg development in posterior abdomen.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Shuichiro; Kikuchi, Atsumi

    2009-04-15

    Pterygotes lack abdominal appendages except for pleuropods and prolegs. The larvae of some holometabolous insects develop prolegs, which are used for locomotion. We analyzed the role of the homeotic genes abd-A and Abd-B in lepidopteran proleg development using mutant analysis and embryonic RNAi in the silkworm Bombyx mori. The E(Mu) mutant developed extra prolegs in its posterior abdomen and showed the misexpression of both genes, suggesting their involvement in proleg formation. The depletion of Abd-B by embryonic RNAi caused the development of extra prolegs on all segments posterior to A6, indicating the suppressive function of Abd-B. The abd-A RNAi animals failed to develop prolegs. These results indicate that abd-A and Abd-B are involved in proleg development in B. mori.

  2. Sensory basis of lepidopteran migration: focus on the monarch butterfly.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Patrick A; Reppert, Steven M

    2015-10-01

    In response to seasonal habitats, migratory lepidopterans, exemplified by the monarch butterfly, have evolved migration to deal with dynamic conditions. During migration, monarchs use orientation mechanisms, exploiting a time-compensated sun compass and a light-sensitive inclination magnetic compass to facilitate fall migration south. The sun compass is bidirectional with overwintering coldness triggering the change in orientation direction for remigration northward in the spring. The timing of the remigration and milkweed emergence in the southern US have co-evolved for propagation of the migration. Current research is uncovering the anatomical and molecular substrates that underlie migratory-relevant sensory mechanisms with the antennae being critical components. Orientation mechanisms may be detrimentally affected by environmental factors such as climate change and sensory interference from human-generated sources. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic structure of Aegilops cylindrica Host in its native range and in the United States of America.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Harish T; Vales, M Isabel; Mallory-Smith, Carol; Riera-Lizarazu, Oscar

    2009-10-01

    Chloroplast and nuclear microsatellite markers were used to study genetic diversity and genetic structure of Aegilops cylindrica Host collected in its native range and in adventive sites in the USA. Our analysis suggests that Ae. cylindrica, an allotetraploid, arose from multiple hybridizations between Ae. markgrafii (Greuter) Hammer. and Ae. tauschii Coss. presumably along the Fertile Crescent, where the geographic distributions of its diploid progenitors overlap. However, the center of genetic diversity of this species now encompasses a larger area including northern Iraq, eastern Turkey, and Transcaucasia. Although the majority of accessions of Ae. cylindrica (87%) had D-type plastomes derived from Ae. tauschii, accessions with C-type plastomes (13%), derived from Ae. markgrafii, were also observed. This corroborates a previous study suggesting the dimaternal origin of Ae. cylindrica. Model-based and genetic distance-based clustering using both chloroplast and nuclear markers indicated that Ae. tauschii ssp. tauschii contributed one of its D-type plastomes and its D genome to Ae. cylindrica. Analysis of genetic structure using nuclear markers suggested that Ae. cylindrica accessions could be grouped into three subpopulations (arbitrarily named N-K1, N-K2, and N-K3). Members of the N-K1 subpopulation were the most numerous in its native range and members of the N-K2 subpopulation were the most common in the USA. Our analysis also indicated that Ae. cylindrica accessions in the USA were derived from a few founder genotypes. The frequency of Ae. cylindrica accessions with the C-type plastome in the USA (approximately 24%) was substantially higher than in its native range of distribution (approximately 3%) and all C-type Ae. cylindrica in the USA except one belonged to subpopulation N-K2. The high frequency of the C-type plastome in the USA may reflect a favorable nucleo-cytoplasmic combination.

  4. [Isolation and characterization of petroleum catabolic broad-host-range plasmids from Shen-Fu wastewater irrigation zone].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Fei; Wang, Ya-Fei; Li, Hui; Li, Xiao-Bin

    2013-11-01

    Based on triparental mating, we isolated a total of eight broad host range (BHR) petroleum hydrocarbon catabolic plasmids from the soils, sediments, and wastewater samples in the Shen-Fu irrigation zone. The antibiotic resistance of the plasmids was tested, and then, the plasmids were transferred to Escherichia coli EC100. The plasmids carrying no antibiotic resistance were tagged by miniTn5 transposon consisting of antibiotic resistant genes. The PCR-based incompatibility test revealed that the pS3-2C and pS4-6G belonged to Inc P group, the pS3-2G, pW22-3G, and pA15-7G belonged to Inc N group, the pS7-2G was identified as Inc W plasmid, and the pA23-1G and pA10-1C were placed into Inc Q group. By adopting the reported PCR amplification methods of petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading catabolic genes, the petroleum-degrading capability of these BHR plasmids were preliminarily analyzed. The plasmids pS3-2G, pS7-2G, pA23-1G, pW22-3G, and pA10-1C carried aromatic ring- hydroxylating dioxygenase gene phdA and toluene monooxygenase gene touA; the plasmid pA15-7G carried touA and toluene dioxygenase gene tod; the plasmid pS3-2C carried ben, phdA, and tod; whereas the pS4-6G only carried ben. The host range test showed that all the isolated plasmids except pS3-2C could be transferred and maintained stably in the representative strains Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58, Cupriavidus necator JMP228, and E. coli EC100 of the alpha-, beta-, and gamma-Proteobacteria, respectively.

  5. Predicting the host range of Nystalea ebalea: secondary plant chemistry and host selection by a surrogate biological control agent of Schinus terebinthifolia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The safety of weed biological control depends upon the selection and utilization of the target weed by the agent while causing minimal harm to non-target species. Selection of weed species by biological control agents is determined by the presence of behavioral cues, generally host secondary plant c...

  6. Biology and management of economically important lepidopteran cereal stem borers in Africa.

    PubMed

    Kfir, Rami; Overholt, W A; Khan, Z R; Polaszek, A

    2002-01-01

    Cereals (maize, sorghum, millet, rice) are extremely important crops grown in Africa for human consumption. Of the various insect pests attacking cereal crops in Africa, lepidopteran stem borers are by far the most injurious. All 21 economically important stem borers of cultivated grasses in Africa are indigenous except Chilo partellus, which invaded the continent from India, and C. sacchariphagus, which has recently been found in sugarcane in Mozambique. C. partellus is competitively displacing indigenous stem borers in East and southern Africa. A parasitoid, Cotesia flavipes, was introduced from Pakistan for biological control of C. partellus and caused a 32-55% decrease in stem borer densities. This article is an attempt to summarize the status of knowledge about economically important cereal stem borers in Africa with emphasis on their distribution, pest status and yield losses, diapause, natural enemies, cultural control, host plant resistance, and biological control. Special attention is given to Busseola fusca and C. partellus, the most important pests of maize and grain sorghum.

  7. Engineered Repressible Lethality for Controlling the Pink Bollworm, a Lepidopteran Pest of Cotton

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Neil I.; Simmons, Gregory S.; Fu, Guoliang; O’Connell, Sinead; Walker, Adam S.; Dafa’alla, Tarig; Walters, Michelle; Claus, John; Tang, Guolei; Jin, Li; Marubbi, Thea; Epton, Matthew J.; Harris, Claire L.; Staten, Robert T.; Miller, Ernest; Miller, Thomas A.; Alphey, Luke

    2012-01-01

    The sterile insect technique (SIT) is an environmentally friendly method of pest control in which insects are mass-produced, irradiated and released to mate with wild counterparts. SIT has been used to control major pest insects including the pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella Saunders), a global pest of cotton. Transgenic technology has the potential to overcome disadvantages associated with the SIT, such as the damaging effects of radiation on released insects. A method called RIDL (Release of Insects carrying a Dominant Lethal) is designed to circumvent the need to irradiate insects before release. Premature death of insects’ progeny can be engineered to provide an equivalent to sterilisation. Moreover, this trait can be suppressed by the provision of a dietary antidote. In the pink bollworm, we generated transformed strains using different DNA constructs, which showed moderate-to-100% engineered mortality. In permissive conditions, this effect was largely suppressed. Survival data on cotton in field cages indicated that field conditions increase the lethal effect. One strain, called OX3402C, showed highly penetrant and highly repressible lethality, and was tested on host plants where its larvae caused minimal damage before death. These results highlight a potentially valuable insecticide-free tool against pink bollworm, and indicate its potential for development in other lepidopteran pests. PMID:23226548

  8. Host Range of a Population of Pratylenchus vulnus in Commercial Fruit, Nut, Citrus, and Grape Rootstocks in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Pinochet, J.; Verdejo, S.; Soler, A.; Canals, J.

    1992-01-01

    In a host-range study carried out under greenhouse conditions, a total of 37 commercial fruit tree, grape, and citrus rootstocks were tested for their reaction to a population of the lesion nematode, Pratylenchus vulnus, in Spain. Twenty-five rootstocks had a Pf/Pi > 1.5. These included almond (Desmayo Rojo, 1143), apple (EM-9, EM-106), avocado (Hass), cherry (Santa Lucia 64, Camil, M × M 14, Masto de Montafiana), grape (41-B, Fercal, Ritcher 110), hazelnut (Pauetet), loquat (Nadal), peach (Montclar, GF-305), pear (OHF-333), pistachio (P. atlantica, P. vera, P. terebinthus), plum (San Julian 655-2, Montizo, Pixy, Myrobalan 605), and walnut (Serf). The peach rootstock Nemaguard and the grape 161-49 had Pf/Pi between 1.0 and 1.5 (slightly higher than inoculation level). All the tested citrus (Alemow, rough lemon, Carrizo citrange, sour orange, Troyer citrange, Citrumelo), plus three grape (SO4, Vitis rupestris, 1103-P), and the olive rootstock Arbequina had a Pf/Pi < 1.0. PMID:19283047

  9. A correlation between macronutrient balancing and insect host-plant range: evidence from the specialist caterpillar Spodoptera exempta (Walker).

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Pum; Raubenheimer, David; Behmer, Spencer T; Simpson, Stephen J

    2003-12-01

    In an earlier study, we showed that the ingestive responses of the generalist caterpillar Spodoptera littoralis to foods imbalanced in their protein:carbohydrate content is similar to generalist locusts, but differs from that of specialist-feeding locusts. Here we further pursued the comparison by repeating the experiments using a closely related specialist caterpillar, Spodoptera exempta. First, caterpillars were allowed to self-compose a diet of preferred protein:carbohydrate balance by mixing between nutritionally complementary foods. Then, they were confined to one of five imbalanced foods, in which we measured the trade-off between over- and under-ingesting the two nutrients. On complementary foods, the caterpillars actively regulated their protein and carbohydrate intake. In the no-choice experiment, those fed excess-protein foods ingested small surpluses of protein compared with generalist feeders, thus showing a pattern of nutrient balancing similar to that observed in specialist locusts. Utilisation data indicated that ingested excesses and deficits were to some extent offset by differential utilisation. Evidence also showed that post-ingestive responses of the specialist S. exempta were less flexible than those observed in the generalist S. littoralis, a pattern which is again in accordance with comparisons of acridids differing in their host-plant range.

  10. Host range and complete genome sequence of Cucurbit chlorotic yellows virus, a new member of the genus Crinivirus.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Mitsuru; Okazaki, Shinichiro; Yamasaki, Shuichi; Okuda, Shiori; Sugiyama, Mitsuhiro

    2010-06-01

    Cucurbit chlorotic yellows virus (CCYV) causes chlorotic yellows on cucumber (Cucumis sativus) and melon (Cucumis melo) and is transmitted by Bemisia tabaci biotype B and Q whiteflies. To characterize the host range of CCYV, 21 cucurbitaceous and 12 other plant species were inoculated using whitefly vectors. All tested Cucumis spp. except Cucumis anguria and Cucumis zeyheri were systemically infected with CCYV, although infection rates varied among species. Citrullus lanatus, Cucurbita pepo, and Luffa cylindrica were susceptible to CCYV; however, the infection rates were low and symptoms were unclear. In addition to the cucurbitaceous plants, Beta vulgaris, Chenopodium amaranticolor, Chenopodium quinoa, Spinacia oleracea, Lactuca sativa, Datura stramonium, and Nicotiana benthamiana were also systemically infected by CCYV. Complete RNA1 and RNA2 were reverse-transcribed, cloned, and sequenced. CCYV RNA1 was found to be 8,607 nucleotides (nt) long and contained four open reading frames (ORFs). The first ORF spanned methyltransferase and RNA helicase domains followed by an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase domain, presumably translated by a +1 ribosomal frameshift. CCYV RNA2 was found to be 8,041 nt long and contained eight ORFs, including the hallmark gene array of the family Closteroviridae. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that CCYV was genetically close to Lettuce chlorosis virus, Bean yellow disorder virus, and Cucurbit yellow stunting disorder virus. Amino acid sequence similarities of representative proteins with these viruses indicated that CCYV should be classified as a distinct crinivirus species.

  11. Production of high-titer helper virus-free retroviral vectors by cocultivation of packaging cells with different host ranges.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, C M; Miller, A D

    1991-01-01

    The titer of retroviral vectors can be increased by cocultivation of retrovirus packaging cells that produce a vector with packaging cells having a different host range. Multiple rounds of infection occur in such cultures, producing an amplification of vector copy number and titer. Production of a vector with a very high titer of over 10(10) CFU per ml of conditioned medium has been reported, although replication-competent helper virus was also present. Since helper-free virus is a requirement for many applications of retroviral vectors, we repeated this procedure with a modified vector and achieved a 2- to 10-fold amplification of vector titer in the absence of helper virus, up to 2 x 10(7) CFU/ml. We have also repeated these experiments with the same vector and methods described previously or have assayed virus from the high-titer vector-producing cell line reported previously and observed maximum titers of 10(8) CFU/ml, invariably accompanied by helper virus. Thus, while amplification of vector titer in the absence of helper virus is possible, some unexplained difference in the assays for virus titer must account for our inability to obtain the exceptionally high vector titers that were reported previously. PMID:2041097

  12. Host Range of a Population of Pratylenchus vulnus in Commercial Fruit, Nut, Citrus, and Grape Rootstocks in Spain.

    PubMed

    Pinochet, J; Verdejo, S; Soler, A; Canals, J

    1992-12-01

    In a host-range study carried out under greenhouse conditions, a total of 37 commercial fruit tree, grape, and citrus rootstocks were tested for their reaction to a population of the lesion nematode, Pratylenchus vulnus, in Spain. Twenty-five rootstocks had a Pf/Pi > 1.5. These included almond (Desmayo Rojo, 1143), apple (EM-9, EM-106), avocado (Hass), cherry (Santa Lucia 64, Camil, M x M 14, Masto de Montafiana), grape (41-B, Fercal, Ritcher 110), hazelnut (Pauetet), loquat (Nadal), peach (Montclar, GF-305), pear (OHF-333), pistachio (P. atlantica, P. vera, P. terebinthus), plum (San Julian 655-2, Montizo, Pixy, Myrobalan 605), and walnut (Serf). The peach rootstock Nemaguard and the grape 161-49 had Pf/Pi between 1.0 and 1.5 (slightly higher than inoculation level). All the tested citrus (Alemow, rough lemon, Carrizo citrange, sour orange, Troyer citrange, Citrumelo), plus three grape (SO4, Vitis rupestris, 1103-P), and the olive rootstock Arbequina had a Pf/Pi < 1.0.

  13. Molecular diversity, geographic distribution and host range of monocot-infecting mastreviruses in Africa and surrounding islands.

    PubMed

    Kraberger, Simona; Saumtally, Salem; Pande, Daniel; Khoodoo, Michel H R; Dhayan, Sonalall; Dookun-Saumtally, Asha; Shepherd, Dionne N; Hartnady, Penelope; Atkinson, Richard; Lakay, Francisco M; Hanson, Britt; Redhi, Devasha; Monjane, Adérito L; Windram, Oliver P; Walters, Matthew; Oluwafemi, Sunday; Michel-Lett, Jean; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Martin, Darren P; Varsani, Arvind

    2017-06-15

    Maize streak virus (MSV), an important pathogen of maize in Africa, is the most extensively studied member of the Mastrevirus genus in the family Geminiviridae. Comparatively little is known about other monocot-infecting African mastreviruses, most of which infect uncultivated grasses. Here we determine the complete sequences of 134 full African mastrevirus genomes from predominantly uncultivated Poaceae species. Based on established taxonomic guidelines for the genus Mastrevirus, these genomes could be classified as belonging to the species Maize streak virus, Eragrostis minor streak virus, Maize streak Reunion virus, Panicum streak virus, Sugarcane streak Reunion virus and Sugarcane streak virus. Together with all other publicly available African monocot-infecting mastreviruses, the 134 new isolates extend the known geographical distributions of many of these species, including MSV which we found infecting Digitaria sp. on the island of Grand Canaria: the first definitive discovery of any African monocot-infecting mastreviruses north-west of the Saharan desert. These new isolates also extend the known host ranges of both African mastrevirus species and the strains within these. Most notable was the discovery of MSV-C isolates infecting maize which suggests that this MSV strain, which had previously only ever been found infecting uncultivated species, may be in the process of becoming adapted to this important staple crop. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Coexpression of the simian immunodeficiency virus Env and Rev proteins by a recombinant human adenovirus host range mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, S M; Lee, S G; Ronchetti-Blume, M; Virk, K P; Mizutani, S; Eichberg, J W; Davis, A; Hung, P P; Hirsch, V M; Chanock, R M

    1992-01-01

    Recombinant human adenoviruses (Ads) that replicate in the intestinal tract offer a novel, yet practical, means of immunoprophylaxis against a wide variety of viral and bacterial pathogens. For some infectious agents such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the potential for residual infectious material in vaccine preparations must be eliminated. Therefore, recombinant human Ads that express noninfectious HIV or other microbial proteins are attractive vaccine candidates. To test such an approach for HIV, we chose an experimental model of AIDS based on simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of macaques. Our data demonstrate that the SIV Env gene products are expressed in cultured cells after infection with a recombinant Ad containing both SIV env and rev genes. An E3 deletion vector derived from a mutant of human Ad serotype 5 that efficiently replicates in both human and monkey cells was used to bypass the usual host range restriction of Ad infection. In addition, we show that the SIV rev gene is properly spliced from a single SIV subgenomic DNA fragment and that the Rev protein is expressed in recombinant Ad-SIV-infected human as well as monkey cells. The expression of SIV gene products in suitable live Ad vectors provides an excellent system for studying the regulation of SIV gene expression in cultured cells and evaluating the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of SIV proteins in macaques. Images PMID:1404612

  15. Laboratory host range of Parafreutreta regalis (Diptera: Tephritidae), a candidate agent for biological control of Cape-ivy.

    PubMed

    Balciunas, Joe; Mehelis, Chris; Van Der Westhuizen, Liamé; Neser, Stefan

    2010-06-01

    Cape-ivy (Delairea odorata Lamaire) is an ornamental vine that has escaped into natural areas in many countries and become a serious pest. It is native to the eastern part of South Africa, and surveys there located several potential biological control agents for this weed. One of these is Parafreutreta regalis Munro, a tephritid fly that causes large galls to form on the stems of the vine. In a collaborative effort, we began to evaluate, in both California and South Africa, the host range of this fly. Between the two locations, we tested 93 plant species and 2 varieties of Cape-ivy to see if, after being exposed to four pairs of flies for a week, any galls would develop on them. No galls were formed on any of the test species, although an average of six galls developed on each of the Cape-ivy controls. We also tested to see whether P. regalis showed any preference for either of the two varieties of Cape-ivy. There was no significant difference between the numbers of galls forming on the stipulate or astipulate varieties. Our tests indicate that this fly is essentially monospecific. Earlier research had shown that P. regalis galls cause a significant reduction in the height and nongall biomass of Cape-ivy. A petition has been submitted to initiate the process of obtaining permission to release P. regalis in California to control the Cape-ivy infestations there.

  16. In-Silico Determination of Insecticidal Potential of Vip3Aa-Cry1Ac Fusion Protein Against Lepidopteran Targets Using Molecular Docking

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Aftab; Javed, Muhammad R.; Rao, Abdul Q.; Khan, Muhammad A. U.; Ahad, Ammara; Din, Salah ud; Shahid, Ahmad A.; Husnain, Tayyab

    2015-01-01

    Study and research of Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) transgenic plants have opened new ways to combat insect pests. Over the decades, however, insect pests, especially the Lepidopteran, have developed tolerance against Bt delta-endotoxins. Such issues can be addressed through the development of novel toxins with greater toxicity and affinity against a broad range of insect receptors. In this computational study, functional domains of Bacillus thuringiensis crystal delta-endotoxin (Cry1Ac) insecticidal protein and vegetative insecticidal protein (Vip3Aa) have been fused to develop a broad-range Vip3Aa-Cry1Ac fusion protein. Cry1Ac and Vip3Aa are non-homologous insecticidal proteins possessing receptors against different targets within the midgut of insects. The insecticidal proteins were fused to broaden the insecticidal activity. Molecular docking analysis of the fusion protein against aminopeptidase-N (APN) and cadherin receptors of five Lepidopteran insects (Agrotis ipsilon, Helicoverpa armigera, Pectinophora gossypiella, Spodoptera exigua, and Spodoptera litura) revealed that the Ser290, Ser293, Leu337, Thr340, and Arg437 residues of the fusion protein are involved in the interaction with insect receptors. The Helicoverpa armigera cadherin receptor, however, showed no interaction, which might be due to either loss or burial of interactive residues inside the fusion protein. These findings revealed that the Vip3Aa-Cry1Ac fusion protein has a strong affinity against Lepidopteran insect receptors and hence has a potential to be an efficient broad-range insecticidal protein. PMID:26697037

  17. In-Silico Determination of Insecticidal Potential of Vip3Aa-Cry1Ac Fusion Protein Against Lepidopteran Targets Using Molecular Docking.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Aftab; Javed, Muhammad R; Rao, Abdul Q; Khan, Muhammad A U; Ahad, Ammara; Din, Salah Ud; Shahid, Ahmad A; Husnain, Tayyab

    2015-01-01

    Study and research of Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) transgenic plants have opened new ways to combat insect pests. Over the decades, however, insect pests, especially the Lepidopteran, have developed tolerance against Bt delta-endotoxins. Such issues can be addressed through the development of novel toxins with greater toxicity and affinity against a broad range of insect receptors. In this computational study, functional domains of Bacillus thuringiensis crystal delta-endotoxin (Cry1Ac) insecticidal protein and vegetative insecticidal protein (Vip3Aa) have been fused to develop a broad-range Vip3Aa-Cry1Ac fusion protein. Cry1Ac and Vip3Aa are non-homologous insecticidal proteins possessing receptors against different targets within the midgut of insects. The insecticidal proteins were fused to broaden the insecticidal activity. Molecular docking analysis of the fusion protein against aminopeptidase-N (APN) and cadherin receptors of five Lepidopteran insects (Agrotis ipsilon, Helicoverpa armigera, Pectinophora gossypiella, Spodoptera exigua, and Spodoptera litura) revealed that the Ser290, Ser293, Leu337, Thr340, and Arg437 residues of the fusion protein are involved in the interaction with insect receptors. The Helicoverpa armigera cadherin receptor, however, showed no interaction, which might be due to either loss or burial of interactive residues inside the fusion protein. These findings revealed that the Vip3Aa-Cry1Ac fusion protein has a strong affinity against Lepidopteran insect receptors and hence has a potential to be an efficient broad-range insecticidal protein.

  18. A cysteine/methionine auxotroph of the opportunistic fungus Aspergillus flavus is associated with host-range restriction: a model for emerging diseases.

    PubMed

    Scully, Lisa R; Bidochka, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of host specialization in pathogens is a topic of considerable interest, particularly since it can represent a decisive step in the emergence of infectious diseases. Aspergillus flavus is an opportunistic fungus capable of infecting a wide variety of hosts, including plants, insects and mammals, although with low virulence. Here the derivation of an A. flavus strain that exhibits severe host restriction is reported. This strain exhibited a severe diminution or a complete lack of conidial production on a variety of standard agar media and on various plant species. However, it retained its ability to infect insects from various orders and to re-emerge from and adequately conidiate on the insect cadavers as a culmination of the pathogenic life cycle. This strain, demonstrating insect-dependent conidiation, was discovered to be a cysteine/methionine auxotroph due to an inability to reduce sulfate to sulfite. However, other A. flavus auxotrophs tested for plant and insect host range failed to show insect-dependent conidiation. An association between this specific auxotroph and a decreased host range is shown, emphasizing the role of nutrition in the host-pathogen relationship with respect to host restriction and evolution towards obligate pathogenesis.

  19. The roles of ecological fitting, phylogeny and physiological equivalence in understanding realized and fundamental host ranges in endoparasitoid wasps.

    PubMed

    Harvey, J A; Ximénez de Embún, M G; Bukovinszky, T; Gols, R

    2012-10-01

    Co-evolutionary theory underpins our understanding of interactions in nature involving plant-herbivore and host-parasite interactions. However, many studies that are published in the empirical literature that have explored life history and development strategies between endoparasitoid wasps and their hosts are based on species that have no evolutionary history with one another. Here, we investigated novel associations involving two closely related solitary endoparasitoids that originate from Europe and North America and several of their natural and factitious hosts from both continents. The natural hosts of both species are also closely related, all being members of the same family. We compared development and survival of both parasitoids on the four host species and predicted that parasitoid performance is better on their own natural hosts. In contrast with this expectation, survival, adult size and development time of both parasitoids were similar on all (with one exception) hosts, irrespective as to their geographic origin. Our results show that phylogenetic affinity among the natural and factitious hosts plays an important role in their nutritional suitability for related parasitoids. Evolved traits in parasitoids, such as immune suppression and development, thus enable them to successfully develop in novel host species with which they have no evolutionary history. Our results show that host suitability for specialized organisms like endoparasitoids is closely linked with phylogenetic history and macro-evolution as well as local adaptation and micro-evolution. We argue that the importance of novel interactions and 'ecological fitting' based on phylogeny is a greatly underappreciated concept in many resource-consumer studies. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2012 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  20. Prevalence, Genetic Characterization, and 18S Small Subunit Ribosomal RNA Diversity of Trypanosoma rangeli in Triatomine and Mammal Hosts in Endemic Areas for Chagas Disease in Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Ocaña-Mayorga, Sofia; Aguirre-Villacis, Fernanda; Pinto, C. Miguel; Vallejo, Gustavo A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Trypanosoma rangeli is a nonpathogenic parasite for humans; however, its medical importance relies in its similarity and overlapping distribution with Trypanosoma cruzi, causal agent of Chagas disease in the Americas. The genetic diversity of T. rangeli and its association with host species (triatomines and mammals) has been identified along Central and the South America; however, it has not included data of isolates from Ecuador. This study reports infection with T. rangeli in 18 genera of mammal hosts and five species of triatomines in three environments (domestic, peridomestic, and sylvatic). Higher infection rates were found in the sylvatic environment, in close association with Rhodnius ecuadoriensis. The results of this study extend the range of hosts infected with this parasite and the geographic range of the T. rangeli genotype KP1(−)/lineage C in South America. It was not possible to detect variation on T. rangeli from the central coastal region and southern Ecuador with the analysis of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU-rRNA) gene, even though these areas are ecologically different and a phenotypic subdivision of R. ecuadoriensis has been found. R. ecuadoriensis is considered one of the most important vectors for Chagas disease transmission in Ecuador due to its wide distribution and adaptability to diverse environments. An extensive knowledge of the trypanosomes circulating in this species of triatomine, and associated mammal hosts, is important for delineating transmission dynamics and preventive measures in the endemic areas of Ecuador and Northern Peru. PMID:26645579

  1. Prevalence, Genetic Characterization, and 18S Small Subunit Ribosomal RNA Diversity of Trypanosoma rangeli in Triatomine and Mammal Hosts in Endemic Areas for Chagas Disease in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Ocaña-Mayorga, Sofia; Aguirre-Villacis, Fernanda; Pinto, C Miguel; Vallejo, Gustavo A; Grijalva, Mario J

    2015-12-01

    Trypanosoma rangeli is a nonpathogenic parasite for humans; however, its medical importance relies in its similarity and overlapping distribution with Trypanosoma cruzi, causal agent of Chagas disease in the Americas. The genetic diversity of T. rangeli and its association with host species (triatomines and mammals) has been identified along Central and the South America; however, it has not included data of isolates from Ecuador. This study reports infection with T. rangeli in 18 genera of mammal hosts and five species of triatomines in three environments (domestic, peridomestic, and sylvatic). Higher infection rates were found in the sylvatic environment, in close association with Rhodnius ecuadoriensis. The results of this study extend the range of hosts infected with this parasite and the geographic range of the T. rangeli genotype KP1(-)/lineage C in South America. It was not possible to detect variation on T. rangeli from the central coastal region and southern Ecuador with the analysis of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU-rRNA) gene, even though these areas are ecologically different and a phenotypic subdivision of R. ecuadoriensis has been found. R. ecuadoriensis is considered one of the most important vectors for Chagas disease transmission in Ecuador due to its wide distribution and adaptability to diverse environments. An extensive knowledge of the trypanosomes circulating in this species of triatomine, and associated mammal hosts, is important for delineating transmission dynamics and preventive measures in the endemic areas of Ecuador and Northern Peru.

  2. Baculovirus-encoded protein BV/ODV-E26 determines tissue tropism and virulence in lepidopteran insects.

    PubMed

    Katsuma, Susumu; Kobayashi, Jun; Koyano, Yasue; Matsuda-Imai, Noriko; Kang, WonKyung; Shimada, Toru

    2012-03-01

    Lepidopteran nucleopolyhedroviruses (NPVs) show distinct tissue tropism in host insect larvae. However, the molecular mechanism of this tropism is largely unknown. We quantitatively investigated NPV tissue tropism by measuring mRNA levels of viral genes in 16 tissues from Bombyx mori NPV (BmNPV)-infected B. mori larvae and found clear tissue tropism, i.e., BmNPV replicates poorly in the silk glands, midgut, and Malpighian tubule compared with other larval tissues. We next identified the viral genes determining tissue tropism in NPV infection by investigating the phenotypes of larvae infected with 44 BmNPV mutants in which one gene was functionally disrupted by a LacZ cassette insertion. We found that occlusion body (OB) production was markedly enhanced compared with that of the wild type in the middle silk glands (MSGs) of larvae infected with three mutants in which one of three tandemly arrayed genes (Bm7, Bm8, and Bm9) was disrupted. We generated additional mutants in which one or two genes of this gene cluster were partially deleted and showed that Bm8, also known as BV/ODV-E26, was solely required for the suppression of OB production in the MSGs of BmNPV-infected B. mori larvae. Western blotting showed that a LacZ cassette insertion in Bm7 or Bm9 resulted in aberrant expression of Bm8, presumably leading to abnormal OB production in the MSGs. Larval bioassays also revealed that disruption of Bm8 accelerated the death of B. mori larvae. These results suggest that the group I NPV-specific protein BV/ODV-E26 determines tissue tropism and virulence in host lepidopteran insects.

  3. Survivorship of Z-Pheromone Race European Corn Borer (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) on a Range of Host Plants Varying in Defensive Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Kelsey E; Mason, Charles E; Flexner, J Lindsey; Hough-Goldstein, Judith; McDonald, John H

    2017-03-03

    The European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (Hübner), was introduced in North America in the early 1900s and became a major pest of corn. After its introduction, it was found on > 200 other plant hosts, but corn remained its primary host. Early life history studies indicated that European corn borer had the potential of a wide host range. For nearly 80 yr before the introduction of Bt corn, the European corn borer was a major pest of corn in North America. This study investigated the growth and survivorship of the Z-pheromone race European corn borer on a range of hosts that vary in defensive chemistries and historic degree of infestation to better understand the current host plant range of Z-pheromone race of O. nubilalis. The plants tested include sweet corn, cry1F Bt field corn, non-Bt corn, cucumber, tomato, and green bean. Experiments were conducted in the growth chamber, greenhouse, and field to determine survival under different conditions. In most cases, results supported the expected outcome, with significantly higher survival on non-Bt corn hosts than the other hosts tested. Neonate larvae fed exclusively on leaves of green bean exhibited intermediate survival, whereas third-instars fed on only leaves of cucumber survived intermediately. Larvae on Bt corn and tomato had comparable low survival rates, overall suggesting that the defensive features of tomato are about as effective as Cry1F Bt corn. Non-Bt corn was found to be the most suitable host plant, overall for European corn borer among those tested.

  4. A method for evaluating the host range of bacteriophages using phages fluorescently labeled with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU).

    PubMed

    Ohno, Sayaka; Okano, Hironori; Tanji, Yasunori; Ohashi, Akiyoshi; Watanabe, Kazuya; Takai, Ken; Imachi, Hiroyuki

    2012-08-01

    The evaluation of bacteriophage (phage) host range is a significant issue in understanding phage and prokaryotic community interactions. However, in conventional methods, such as plaque assay, target host strains must be isolated, although almost all environmental prokaryotes are recalcitrant to cultivation. Here, we introduce a novel phage host range evaluation method using fluorescently labeled phages (the FLP method), which consists of the following four steps: (i) Fluorescently labeled phages are added to a microbial consortium, and host cells are infected and fluorescently labeled. (ii) Fluorescent cells are sorted by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. (iii) 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved from sorted cells are analyzed, and specific oligonucleotide probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) are designed. (iv) Cells labeled with both fluorescently labeled phage and FISH probe are identified as host cells. To verify the feasibility of this method, we used T4 phage and Escherichia coli as a model. We first used nucleic acid stain reagents for phage labeling; however, the reagents also stained non-host cells. Next, we employed the Click-iT EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine) assay kit from Invitrogen for phage labeling. Using EdU-labeled T4 phage, we could specifically detect E. coli cells in a complex microbial consortium from municipal sewage. We also confirmed that FISH could be applied to the infected E. coli cells. These results suggest that this FLP method using the EdU assay kit is a useful method for evaluating phage host range and may have a potential application for various types of phages, even if their prokaryotic hosts are currently unculturable.

  5. The biology and preliminary host range of Megacopta cribraria (Heteroptera: Plataspidae) and its impact on kudzu growth.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanzhuo; Hanula, James L; Horn, Scott

    2012-02-01

    The bean plataspid, Megacopta cribraria (F.), recently was discovered in the United States feeding on kudzu, Pueraria montana Lour. (Merr.) variety lobata (Willd.), an economically important invasive vine. We studied its biology on kudzu and its impact on kudzu growth. We also tested its ability to use other common forest legumes for oviposition and development. Flight intercept traps operated from 17 May 2010 to 31 May 2011 in a kudzu field near Athens, GA showed three peaks of adult flight activity suggesting there are two generations per year on kudzu. Vine samples examined for eggs from April 2010 to April 2011 and June to October 2011 showed two periods of oviposition activity in 2010, which coincided with the peaks in adult activity. In 2011, the second period of oviposition began on or before 24 June and then egg abundance declined gradually thereafter until late August when we recovered <2 eggs/0.5 m of vine. Samples of the five nymphal instars and adults on vines did not show similar trends in abundance. Adults did not lay eggs on the various legume species tested in 2010 in a no-choice test possibly because the cages were too small. In the 2011 field host range experiments conducted in a kudzu field by using 12 legume species, M. cribraria preferentially oviposited on kudzu over soybean, Glycine max Merrill., but they still laid 320 eggs per plant on soybean. Lespedeza hirta (L.) Hornem. and Lespedeza cuneata (Dum. Cours.) G. Don had 122.2 and 108.4 eggs per plant, respectively. Kudzu and soybean were the only species M. cribraria completed development on. Plots protected from M. cribraria feeding by biweekly insecticide applications had 32.8% more kudzu biomass than unprotected plots. Our results show that M. cribraria has a significant impact on kudzu growth and could help suppress this pest weed.

  6. Using Cloud-Hosted Real-time Data Services for the Geosciences (CHORDS) in a range of geoscience applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, M. D.; Kerkez, B.; Chandrasekar, V.; Graves, S. J.; Stamps, D. S.; Dye, M. J.; Keiser, K.; Martin, C. L.; Gooch, S. R.

    2016-12-01

    Cloud-Hosted Real-time Data Services for the Geosciences, or CHORDS, addresses the ever-increasing importance of real-time scientific data, particularly in mission critical scenarios, where informed decisions must be made rapidly. Part of the broader EarthCube initiative, CHORDS seeks to investigate the role of real-time data in the geosciences. Many of the phenomenon occurring within the geosciences, ranging from hurricanes and severe weather, to earthquakes, volcanoes and floods, can benefit from better handling of real-time data. The National Science Foundation funds many small teams of researchers residing at Universities whose currently inaccessible measurements could contribute to a better understanding of these phenomenon in order to ultimately improve forecasts and predictions. This lack of easy accessibility prohibits advanced algorithm and workflow development that could be initiated or enhanced by these data streams. Often the development of tools for the broad dissemination of their valuable real-time data is a large IT overhead from a pure scientific perspective, and could benefit from an easy to use, scalable, cloud-based solution to facilitate access. CHORDS proposes to make a very diverse suite of real-time data available to the broader geosciences community in order to allow innovative new science in these areas to thrive. We highlight the recently developed CHORDS portal tools and processing systems aimed at addressing some of the gaps in handling real-time data, particularly in the provisioning of data from the "long-tail" scientific community through a simple interface deployed in the cloud. Examples shown include hydrology, atmosphere and solid earth sensors. Broad use of the CHORDS framework will expand the role of real-time data within the geosciences, and enhance the potential of streaming data sources to enable adaptive experimentation and real-time hypothesis testing. CHORDS enables real-time data to be discovered and accessed using

  7. Recent host range expansion of canine distemper virus and variation in its receptor, the signaling lymphocyte activation molecule, in carnivores.

    PubMed

    Ohishi, Kazue; Suzuki, Rintaro; Maeda, Taro; Tsuda, Miwako; Abe, Erika; Yoshida, Takao; Endo, Yasuyuki; Okamura, Maki; Nagamine, Takashi; Yamamoto, Hanae; Ueda, Miya; Maruyama, Tadashi

    2014-07-01

    The signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) is a receptor for morbilliviruses. To understand the recent host range expansion of canine distemper virus (CDV) in carnivores, we determined the nucleotide sequences of SLAMs of various carnivores and generated three-dimensional homology SLAM models. Thirty-four amino acid residues were found for the candidates binding to CDV on the interface of the carnivore SLAMs. SLAM of the domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris) were similar to those of other members of the suborder Caniformia, indicating that the animals in this group have similar sensitivity to dog CDV. However, they were different at nine positions from those of felids. Among the nine residues, four of domestic cat (Felis catus) SLAM (72, 76, 82, and 129) and three of lion (Panthera leo persica) SLAM (72, 82, and 129) were associated with charge alterations, suggesting that the felid interfaces have lower affinities to dog CDV. Only the residue at 76 was different between domestic cat and lion SLAM interfaces. The domestic cat SLAM had threonine at 76, whereas the lion SLAM had arginine, a positively charged residue like that of the dog SLAM. The cat SLAM with threonine is likely to have lower affinity to CDV-H and to confer higher resistance against dog CDV. Thus, the four residues (72, 76, 82, and 129) on carnivore SLAMs are important for the determination of affinity and sensitivity with CDV. Additionally, the CDV-H protein of felid strains had a substitution of histidine for tyrosine at 549 of dog CDV-H and may have higher affinity to lion SLAM. Three-dimensional model construction is a new risk assessment method of morbillivirus infectivity. Because the method is applicable to animals that have no information about virus infection, it is especially useful for morbillivirus risk assessment and wildlife conservation.

  8. Bacteriophage module reshuffling results in adaptive host range as exemplified by the baseplate model of listerial phage A118.

    PubMed

    Cambillau, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Each phage infects its specific bacterial host strain through highly specific interactions between the baseplate-associated receptor binding protein (RBP) at the tip of the phage tail and the receptor at the host surface. Baseplates incorporate structural core modules, Dit and Tal, largely conserved among phages, and peripheral modules anchoring the RBPs. Exploiting structural information from the HHpred program and EM data from the Bielmann et al. (2015) paper, a molecular model of the A118 phage baseplate was generated from different building blocks. This model implies the occurrence of baseplate module reshuffling and suggests that listerial phage A118 may have been derived from lactococcal phage TP901-1 through host species exchange. With the increase of available viral module structures, modelling phage baseplates will become easier and more reliant, and will provide insightful information on the nature of the phage host receptor and its mode of recognition.

  9. Myxoma Virus M064 Is a Novel Member of the Poxvirus C7L Superfamily of Host Range Factors That Controls the Kinetics of Myxomatosis in European Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Wennier, Sonia; Moussatche, Nissin; Reinhard, Mary; Condit, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The myxoma virus (MYXV) carries three tandem C7L-like host range genes (M062R, M063R, and M064R). However, despite the fact that the sequences of these three genes are similar, they possess very distinctive functions in vivo. The role of M064 in MYXV pathogenesis was investigated and compared to the roles of M062 and M063. We report that M064 is a virulence factor that contributes to MYXV pathogenesis but lacks the host range properties associated with M062 and M063. PMID:22379095

  10. Myxoma virus M064 is a novel member of the poxvirus C7L superfamily of host range factors that controls the kinetics of myxomatosis in European rabbits.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Wennier, Sonia; Moussatche, Nissin; Reinhard, Mary; Condit, Richard; McFadden, Grant

    2012-05-01

    The myxoma virus (MYXV) carries three tandem C7L-like host range genes (M062R, M063R, and M064R). However, despite the fact that the sequences of these three genes are similar, they possess very distinctive functions in vivo. The role of M064 in MYXV pathogenesis was investigated and compared to the roles of M062 and M063. We report that M064 is a virulence factor that contributes to MYXV pathogenesis but lacks the host range properties associated with M062 and M063.

  11. Single Mutations in the VP2 300 Loop Region of the Three-Fold Spike of the Carnivore Parvovirus Capsid Can Determine Host Range

    PubMed Central

    Organtini, Lindsey J.; Zhang, Sheng; Hafenstein, Susan L.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sylvatic carnivores, such as raccoons, have recently been recognized as important hosts in the evolution of canine parvovirus (CPV), a pandemic pathogen of domestic dogs. Although viruses from raccoons do not efficiently bind the dog transferrin receptor (TfR) or infect dog cells, a single mutation changing an aspartic acid to a glycine at capsid (VP2) position 300 in the prototype raccoon CPV allows dog cell infection. Because VP2 position 300 exhibits extensive amino acid variation among the carnivore parvoviruses, we further investigated its role in determining host range by analyzing its diversity and evolution in nature and by creating a comprehensive set of VP2 position 300 mutants in infectious clones. Notably, some position 300 residues rendered CPV noninfectious for dog, but not cat or fox, cells. Changes of adjacent residues (residues 299 and 301) were also observed often after cell culture passage in different hosts, and some of the mutations mimicked changes seen in viruses recovered from natural infections of alternative hosts, suggesting that compensatory mutations were selected to accommodate the new residue at position 300. Analysis of the TfRs of carnivore hosts used in the experimental evolution studies demonstrated that their glycosylation patterns varied, including a glycan present only on the domestic dog TfR that dictates susceptibility to parvoviruses. Overall, there were significant differences in the abilities of viruses with alternative position 300 residues to bind TfRs and infect different carnivore hosts, demonstrating that the process of infection is highly host dependent and that VP2 position 300 is a key determinant of host range. IMPORTANCE Although the emergence and pandemic spread of canine parvovirus (CPV) are well documented, the carnivore hosts and evolutionary pathways involved in its emergence remain enigmatic. We recently demonstrated that a region in the capsid structure of CPV, centered around VP2 position 300

  12. Lepidopteran cells, an alternative for the production of recombinant antibodies?

    PubMed Central

    Cérutti, Martine; Golay, Josée

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are used with great success in many different therapeutic domains. In order to satisfy the growing demand and to lower the production cost of these molecules, many alternative systems have been explored. Among them, the baculovirus/insect cells system is a good candidate. This system is very safe, given that the baculoviruses have a highly restricted host range and they are not pathogenic to vertebrates or plants. But the major asset is the speed with which it is possible to obtain very stable recombinant viruses capable of producing fully active proteins whose glycosylation pattern can be modulated to make it similar to the human one. These features could ultimately make the difference by enabling the production of antibodies with very low costs. However, efforts are still needed, in particular to increase production rates and thus make this system commercially viable for the production of these therapeutic agents. PMID:22531440

  13. Baculovirus studies in new, indigenous lepidopteran cell lines.

    PubMed

    Pant, U; Sudeep, A B; Athawale, S S; Vipat, V C

    2002-01-01

    Eight lepidopteran cell lines were established recently and their susceptibility to different insect viruses was studied. Two Spodoptera litura cell lines from the larval and pupal ovaries, were found highly susceptible to S. litura nuclear polyhedrosis virus (SLNPV, 5-6 x 10(6) NPV/ml). The Helicoverpa armigera cell line from the embryonic tissue was highly susceptible to H. armigera NPV (HaNPV, 6.3 x 10(6) NPV/ml). These in vitro grown SLNPV and HaNPV caused 100% mortality to respective 2nd instar larvae. The susceptibility of the cryo-preserved cell lines to respective baculoviruses (SLNPV/HaNPV) was studied and no significant difference in their susceptibility status was observed. The cultures could grow as suspension culture on shakers and may find application for in vitro production of wild type/recombinant baculoviruses as bio-insecticides. S. litura and Bombyx mori cell lines from larval ovaries, were highly susceptible to Autographa californica NPV (5.5 x 10(6) NPV/ml) and Bombyx mori NPV (BmNPV, 6.1 x 10(6) NPV/ml) respectively. These cell lines may find application in baculovirus expression vector studies for the production of recombinant proteins, useful in the development of diagnostic kits or as vaccines.

  14. Structure of the lepidopteran proboscis in relation to feeding guild.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, Matthew S; Beard, Charles E; Gerard, Patrick D; Kornev, Konstantin G; Adler, Peter H

    2016-02-01

    Most butterflies and moths (Lepidoptera) use modified mouthparts, the proboscis, to acquire fluids. We quantified the proboscis architecture of five butterfly species in three families to test the hypothesis that proboscis structure relates to feeding guild. We used scanning electron microscopy to elucidate the fine structure of the proboscis of both sexes and to quantify dimensions, cuticular patterns, and the shapes and sizes of sensilla and dorsal legulae. Sexual dimorphism was not detected in the proboscis structure of any species. A hierarchical clustering analysis of overall proboscis architecture reflected lepidopteran phylogeny, but did not produce a distinct group of flower visitors or of puddle visitors within the flower visitors. Specific characters of the proboscis, nonetheless, can indicate flower and nonflower visitors, such as the configuration of sensilla styloconica, width of the lower branches of dorsal legulae, presence or absence of dorsal legulae at the extreme apex, and degree of proboscis tapering. We suggest that the overall proboscis architecture of Lepidoptera reflects a universal structural organization that promotes fluid uptake from droplets and films. On top of this fundamental structural organization, we suggest that the diversity of floral structure has selected for structural adaptations that facilitate entry of the proboscis into floral tubes.

  15. Tick infestation patterns in free ranging African buffalo (Syncercus caffer): Effects of host innate immunity and niche segregation among tick species☆

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kadie; Ezenwa, Vanessa O.; Jolles, Anna E.

    2012-01-01

    Ticks are of vast importance to livestock health, and contribute to conflicts between wildlife conservation and agricultural interests; but factors driving tick infestation patterns on wild hosts are not well understood. We studied tick infestation patterns on free-ranging African buffalo (Syncercus caffer), asking (i) is there evidence for niche segregation among tick species?; and (ii) how do host characteristics affect variation in tick abundance among hosts? We identified ticks and estimated tick burdens on 134 adult female buffalo from two herds at Kruger National Park, South Africa. To assess niche segregation, we evaluated attachment site preferences and tested for correlations between abundances of different tick species. To investigate which host factors may drive variability in tick abundance, we measured age, body condition, reproductive and immune status in all hosts, and examined their effects on tick burdens. Two tick species were abundant on buffalo, Amblyomma hebraeum and Rhipicephalus evertsi evertsi. A. hebraeum were found primarily in the inguinal and axillary regions; R. e. evertsi attached exclusively in the perianal area. Abundances of A. hebraeum and R. e. evertsi on the host were unrelated. These results suggest spatial niche segregation between A. hebraeum and R. e. evertsi on the buffalo. Buffalo with stronger innate immunity, and younger buffalo, had fewer ticks. Buffalo with low body condition scores, and pregnant buffalo, had higher tick burdens, but these effects varied between the two herds we sampled. This study is one of the first to link ectoparasite abundance patterns and immunity in a free-ranging mammalian host population. Based on independent abundances of A. hebraeum and R. e. evertsi on individual buffalo, we would expect no association between the diseases these ticks transmit. Longitudinal studies linking environmental variability with host immunity are needed to understand tick infestation patterns and the dynamics of tick

  16. Bacteria influence mountain pine beetle brood development through interactions with symbiotic and antagonistic fungi: implications for climate-driven host range expansion.

    PubMed

    Therrien, Janet; Mason, Charles J; Cale, Jonathan A; Adams, Aaron; Aukema, Brian H; Currie, Cameron R; Raffa, Kenneth F; Erbilgin, Nadir

    2015-10-01

    Bark beetles are associated with diverse communities of symbionts. Although fungi have received significant attention, we know little about how bacteria, and in particular their interactions with fungi, affect bark beetle reproduction. We tested how interactions between four bacterial associates, two symbiotic fungi, and two opportunistic fungi affect performance of mountain pine beetles (Dendroctonus ponderosae) in host tissue. We compared beetle performance in phloem of its historical host, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), and its novel host recently accessed through warming climate, jack pine (Pinus banksiana). Overall, beetles produced more larvae, and established longer ovipositional and larval galleries in host tissue predominantly colonized by the symbiotic fungi, Grosmannia clavigera, or Ophiostoma montium than by the opportunistic colonizer Aspergillus and to a lesser extent, Trichoderma. This occurred in both historical and naïve hosts. Impacts of bacteria on beetle reproduction depended on particular fungus-bacterium combinations and host species. Some bacteria, e.g., Pseudomonas sp. D4-22 and Hy4T4 in P. contorta and Pseudomonas sp. Hy4T4 and Stenotrophomonas in P. banksiana, reduced antagonistic effects by Aspergillus and Trichoderma resulting in more larvae and longer ovipositional and larval galleries. These effects were not selective, as bacteria also reduced beneficial effects by symbionts in both host species. Interestingly, Bacillus enhanced antagonistic effects by Aspergillus in both hosts. These results demonstrate that bacteria influence brood development of bark beetles in host tissue. They also suggest that climate-driven range expansion of D. ponderosae through the boreal forest will not be significantly constrained by requirements of, or interactions among, its microbial associates.

  17. Host range and genetic relatedness of Colletotrichum acutatum isolates from fruit crops and leatherleaf fern in Florida.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, S J; Peres, N A; Barquero, M P; Arauz, L F; Timmer, L W

    2009-05-01

    Isolates of Colletotrichum acutatum were collected from anthracnose-affected strawberry, leatherleaf fern, and Key lime; ripe-rot-affected blueberry; and postbloom fruit drop (PFD)-affected sweet orange in Florida. Additional isolates from ripe-rot-affected blueberry were collected from Georgia and North Carolina and from anthracnose-affected leatherleaf fern in Costa Rica. Pathogenicity tests on blueberry and strawberry fruit; foliage of Key lime, leatherleaf fern, and strawberry; and citrus flowers showed that isolates were highly pathogenic to their host of origin. Isolates were not pathogenic on foliage of heterologous hosts; however, several nonhomologous isolates were mildly or moderately pathogenic to citrus flowers and blueberry isolates were pathogenic to strawberry fruit. Based on sequence data from the internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1-5.8S rRNA-ITS2 region of the rDNA repeat, the glutaraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase intron 2 (G3PD), and the glutamine synthase intron 2 (GS), isolates from the same host were identical or very similar to each other and distinct from those isolated from other hosts. Isolates from leatherleaf fern in Florida were the only exception. Among these isolates, there were two distinct G3PD and GS sequences that occurred in three of four possible combinations. Only one of these combinations occurred in Costa Rica. Although maximum parsimony trees constructed from genomic regions individually displayed little or no homoplasy, there was a lack of concordance among genealogies that was consistent with a history of recombination. This lack of concordance was particularly evident within a clade containing PFD, Key lime, and leatherleaf fern isolates. Overall, the data indicated that it is unlikely that a pathogenic strain from one of the hosts examined would move to another of these hosts and produce an epidemic.

  18. Host range of Tetramesa romana Walker (Hymenoptera: Eurytomidae), a potential biological control of giant reed, Arundo donax L. in North America

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The eurytomid wasp, Tetramesa romana Walker, was evaluated as a potential biological control agent of the invasive reed grass, Arundo donax in North America. No-choice tests and timed behavioral studies were used to determine the fundamental host range of two genotypes of the wasp collected from Gr...

  19. Life history and host range of the leaf blotcher Eucosmophora schinusivora; a candidate for biological control of Schinus terebinthifolius in the USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The host range of Eucosmophora schinusivora Davis & Wheeler (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae) was studied to assess its suitability as a biological control agent of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi (Anacardiaceae), a serious environmental and agricultural weed in the USA and elsewhere in the world. The l...

  20. Slow cell infection, inefficient primary infection and inability to replicate in fat body determine host-range of Thysanoplusia orichalcea M Nucleopolyhedrovirus (ThorMNPV)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene expression cassette was inserted at the gp37 locus of Thysanoplusia orichacea M nucleopolyhedrovirus (ThorMNPV) to produce vThGFP to study host-range mechanisms. Using EGFP to monitor infection in vitro, many cell lines showed EGFP expression sugges...

  1. Host range testing and biology of Abia sericea (Cimbicidae), a candidate for biological control of invasive teasels (Dipsacus spp.) in North America

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Invasive teasels (Dipsacus spp., Dipsacaceae) are widespread in the USA, being present in 43 states and listed as noxious in five. The cimbicid sawfly Abia sericea (L.) is under evaluation as a potential agent for biological control of teasels. The host range, biology, and life history of this ins...

  2. Characterization and host range of the symbiotic fungus Fusarium euwallaceae sp. nov., vectored by the invasive ambrosia beetle Euwallacea sp.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A novel symbiotic Fusarium euwallaceae fungus that serves as a specific nutritional source for the invasive Asian ambrosia beetle Euwallacea sp. (Coleoptera, Scolytinae, Xyleborini) is farmed in the galleries of host plants. This beetle-fungus complex, which has invaded Israel and California, is clo...

  3. Extended geographical distribution and host range of the cactus moth Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera Pyralidae)in Argentina

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A field exploration was conducted to confirm the southernmost distribution of Cactoblastis cactorum in Argentina. The distribution of the moth was extended to the south (40° 10´S) and west (66° 56´W). The native Opuntia penicilligera was recorded as a host for the first time. These findings should ...

  4. Computational and Functional Analysis of the Virus-Receptor Interface Reveals Host Range Trade-Offs in New World Arenaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Scott A.; Jackson, Eleisha L.; Lungu, Oana I.; Meyer, Austin G.; Demogines, Ann; Ellington, Andrew D.; Georgiou, George

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Animal viruses frequently cause zoonotic disease in humans. As these viruses are highly diverse, evaluating the threat that they pose remains a major challenge, and efficient approaches are needed to rapidly predict virus-host compatibility. Here, we develop a combined computational and experimental approach to assess the compatibility of New World arenaviruses, endemic in rodents, with the host TfR1 entry receptors of different potential new host species. Using signatures of positive selection, we identify a small motif on rodent TfR1 that conveys species specificity to the entry of viruses into cells. However, we show that mutations in this region affect the entry of each arenavirus differently. For example, a human single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in this region, L212V, makes human TfR1 a weaker receptor for one arenavirus, Machupo virus, but a stronger receptor for two other arenaviruses, Junin and Sabia viruses. Collectively, these findings set the stage for potential evolutionary trade-offs, where natural selection for resistance to one virus may make humans or rodents susceptible to other arenavirus species. Given the complexity of this host-virus interplay, we propose a computational method to predict these interactions, based on homology modeling and computational docking of the virus-receptor protein-protein interaction. We demonstrate the utility of this model for Machupo virus, for which a suitable cocrystal structural template exists. Our model effectively predicts whether the TfR1 receptors of different species will be functional receptors for Machupo virus entry. Approaches such at this could provide a first step toward computationally predicting the “host jumping” potential of a virus into a new host species. IMPORTANCE We demonstrate how evolutionary trade-offs may exist in the dynamic evolutionary interplay between viruses and their hosts, where natural selection for resistance to one virus could make humans or rodents susceptible

  5. Plant cyclotides disrupt epithelial cells in the midgut of lepidopteran larvae

    PubMed Central

    Barbeta, Barbara L.; Marshall, Alan T.; Gillon, Amanda D.; Craik, David J.; Anderson, Marilyn A.

    2008-01-01

    Several members of the Rubiaceae and Violaceae plant families produce a series of cyclotides or macrocyclic peptides of 28–37 aa with an embedded cystine knot. The cyclic peptide backbone together with the knotted and strongly braced structure confers exceptional chemical and biological stability that has attracted attention for potential pharmaceutical applications. Cyclotides display a diverse range of biological activities, such as uterotonic action, anti-HIV activity, and neurotensin antagonism. In plants, their primary role is probably protection from insect attack. Ingestion of the cyclotide kalata B1 severely retards the growth of larvae from the Lepidopteran species Helicoverpa armigera. We examined the gut of these larvae after consumption of kalata B1 by light, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy. We established that kalata B1 induces disruption of the microvilli, blebbing, swelling, and ultimately rupture of the cells of the gut epithelium. The histology of this response is similar to the response of H. armigera larvae to the Bacillus thuringiensis delta-endotoxin, which is widely used to control these insect pests of crops such as cotton. PMID:18202177

  6. No excess gene movement is detected off the avian or lepidopteran Z chromosome.

    PubMed

    Toups, Melissa A; Pease, James B; Hahn, Matthew W

    2011-01-01

    Most of our knowledge of sex-chromosome evolution comes from male heterogametic (XX/XY) taxa. With the genome sequencing of multiple female heterogametic (ZZ/ZW) taxa, we can now ask whether there are patterns of evolution common to both sex chromosome systems. In all XX/XY systems examined to date, there is an excess of testis-biased retrogenes moving from the X chromosome to the autosomes, which is hypothesized to result from either sexually antagonistic selection or escape from meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). We examined RNA-mediated (retrotransposed) and DNA-mediated gene movement in two independently evolved ZZ/ZW systems, birds (chicken and zebra finch) and lepidopterans (silkworm). Even with sexually antagonistic selection likely operating in both taxa and MSCI having been identified in the chicken, we find no evidence for an excess of genes moving from the Z chromosome to the autosomes in either lineage. We detected no excess for either RNA- or DNA-mediated duplicates, across a range of approaches and methods. We offer some potential explanations for this difference between XX/XY and ZZ/ZW sex chromosome systems, but further work is needed to distinguish among these hypotheses. Regardless of the root causes, we have identified an additional, potentially inherent, difference between XX/XY and ZZ/ZW systems.

  7. Role of the parCBA Operon of the Broad-Host-Range Plasmid RK2 in Stable Plasmid Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Easter, Carla L.; Schwab, Helmut; Helinski, Donald R.

    1998-01-01

    The par region of the stably maintained broad-host-range plasmid RK2 is organized as two divergent operons, parCBA and parDE, and a cis-acting site. parDE encodes a postsegregational killing system, and parCBA encodes a resolvase (ParA), a nuclease (ParB), and a protein of unknown function (ParC). The present study was undertaken to further delineate the role of the parCBA region in the stable maintenance of RK2 by first introducing precise deletions in the three genes and then assessing the abilities of the different constructs to stabilize RK2 in three strains of Escherichia coli and two strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The intact parCBA operon was effective in stabilizing a conjugation-defective RK2 derivative in E. coli MC1061K and RR1 but was relatively ineffective in E. coli MV10Δlac. In the two strains in which the parCBA operon was effective, deletions in parB, parC, or both parB and parC caused an approximately twofold reduction in the stabilizing ability of the operon, while a deletion in the parA gene resulted in a much greater loss of parCBA activity. For P. aeruginosa PAO1161Rifr, the parCBA operon provided little if any plasmid stability, but for P. aeruginosa PAC452Rifr, the RK2 plasmid was stabilized to a substantial extent by parCBA. With this latter strain, parA and res alone were sufficient for stabilization. The cer resolvase system of plasmid ColE1 and the loxP/Cre system of plasmid P1 were tested in comparison with the parCBA operon. We found that, not unlike what was previously observed with MC1061K, cer failed to stabilize the RK2 plasmid with par deletions in strain MV10Δlac, but this multimer resolution system was effective in stabilizing the plasmid in strain RR1. The loxP/Cre system, on the other hand, was very effective in stabilizing the plasmid in all three E. coli strains. These observations indicate that the parA gene, along with its res site, exhibits a significant level of plasmid stabilization in the absence of the parC and

  8. Comparative studies of lepidopteran baculovirus-specific protein FP25K: development of a novel Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus-based vector with a modified fp25K gene.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Tadashi; Goto, Chie; Kobayashi, Michihiro; Kang, Wonkyung; Suzuki, Takehiro; Dohmae, Naoshi; Matsumoto, Shogo; Shimada, Toru; Katsuma, Susumu

    2010-05-01

    Lepidopteran baculovirus-specific protein FP25K performs many roles during the infection cycle, including functions in the production of occlusion bodies (OBs) and budded viruses (BVs), oral infection, and postmortem host degradation. To explore the common and specific functions of FP25K proteins among lepidopteran baculoviruses, we performed comparative analyses of FP25K proteins from group I and group II nucleopolyhedroviruses (NPVs) and granulovirus (GV). Using recombinant Bombyx mori NPVs (BmNPVs), we showed that the FP25Ks from NPVs were able to eliminate all the phenotypic defects observed in an infection with a BmNPV mutant lacking functional fp25K but that FP25K from GV did not show abilities to recover oral infectivity and postmortem host degradation. We also observed that introduction of Autographa californica multiple NPV (AcMNPV) fp25K into the BmNPV genome enhanced OB and BV production. According to these results, we generated a novel BmNPV-based expression vector with AcMNPV fp25K and examined its potential in BmN cells and B. mori larvae. Our results showed that the introduction of AcMNPV fp25K significantly increases the expression of foreign gene products in cultured cells and shortens the time for obtaining the secreted recombinant proteins from larval hemolymph.

  9. Rumen microbial community composition varies with diet and host, but a core microbiome is found across a wide geographical range

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Gemma; Cox, Faith; Ganesh, Siva; Jonker, Arjan; Young, Wayne; Abecia, Leticia; Angarita, Erika; Aravena, Paula; Nora Arenas, Graciela; Ariza, Claudia; Attwood, Graeme T.; Mauricio Avila, Jose; Avila-Stagno, Jorge; Bannink, André; Barahona, Rolando; Batistotti, Mariano; Bertelsen, Mads F.; Brown-Kav, Aya; Carvajal, Andres M.; Cersosimo, Laura; Vieira Chaves, Alexandre; Church, John; Clipson, Nicholas; Cobos-Peralta, Mario A.; Cookson, Adrian L.; Cravero, Silvio; Cristobal Carballo, Omar; Crosley, Katie; Cruz, Gustavo; Cerón Cucchi, María; de la Barra, Rodrigo; De Menezes, Alexandre B.; Detmann, Edenio; Dieho, Kasper; Dijkstra, Jan; dos Reis, William L. S.; Dugan, Mike E. R.; Hadi Ebrahimi, Seyed; Eythórsdóttir, Emma; Nde Fon, Fabian; Fraga, Martín; Franco, Francisco; Friedeman, Chris; Fukuma, Naoki; Gagić, Dragana; Gangnat, Isabelle; Javier Grilli, Diego; Guan, Le Luo; Heidarian Miri, Vahideh; Hernandez-Sanabria, Emma; Gomez, Alma Ximena Ibarra; Isah, Olubukola A.; Ishaq, Suzanne; Jami, Elie; Jelincic, Juan; Kantanen, Juha; Kelly, William J.; Kim, Seon-Ho; Klieve, Athol; Kobayashi, Yasuo; Koike, Satoshi; Kopecny, Jan; Nygaard Kristensen, Torsten; Julie Krizsan, Sophie; LaChance, Hannah; Lachman, Medora; Lamberson, William R.; Lambie, Suzanne; Lassen, Jan; Leahy, Sinead C.; Lee, Sang-Suk; Leiber, Florian; Lewis, Eva; Lin, Bo; Lira, Raúl; Lund, Peter; Macipe, Edgar; Mamuad, Lovelia L.; Cuquetto Mantovani, Hilário; Marcoppido, Gisela Ariana; Márquez, Cristian; Martin, Cécile; Martinez, Gonzalo; Eugenia Martinez, Maria; Lucía Mayorga, Olga; McAllister, Tim A.; McSweeney, Chris; Mestre, Lorena; Minnee, Elena; Mitsumori, Makoto; Mizrahi, Itzhak; Molina, Isabel; Muenger, Andreas; Munoz, Camila; Murovec, Bostjan; Newbold, John; Nsereko, Victor; O’Donovan, Michael; Okunade, Sunday; O’Neill, Brendan; Ospina, Sonia; Ouwerkerk, Diane; Parra, Diana; Pereira, Luiz Gustavo Ribeiro; Pinares-Patino, Cesar; Pope, Phil B.; Poulsen, Morten; Rodehutscord, Markus; Rodriguez, Tatiana; Saito, Kunihiko; Sales, Francisco; Sauer, Catherine; Shingfield, Kevin; Shoji, Noriaki; Simunek, Jiri; Stojanović-Radić, Zorica; Stres, Blaz; Sun, Xuezhao; Swartz, Jeffery; Liang Tan, Zhi; Tapio, Ilma; Taxis, Tasia M.; Tomkins, Nigel; Ungerfeld, Emilio; Valizadeh, Reza; van Adrichem, Peter; Van Hamme, Jonathan; Van Hoven, Woulter; Waghorn, Garry; John Wallace, R.; Wang, Min; Waters, Sinéad M.; Keogh, Kate; Witzig, Maren; Wright, Andre-Denis G.; Yamano, Hidehisa; Yan, Tianhai; Yanez-Ruiz, David R.; Yeoman, Carl J.; Zambrano, Ricardo; Zeitz, Johanna; Zhou, Mi; Wei Zhou, Hua; Xia Zou, Cai; Zunino, Pablo; Janssen, Peter H.

    2015-01-01

    Ruminant livestock are important sources of human food and global greenhouse gas emissions. Feed degradation and methane formation by ruminants rely on metabolic interactions between rumen microbes and affect ruminant productivity. Rumen and camelid foregut microbial community composition was determined in 742 samples from 32 animal species and 35 countries, to estimate if this was influenced by diet, host species, or geography. Similar bacteria and archaea dominated in nearly all samples, while protozoal communities were more variable. The dominant bacteria are poorly characterised, but the methanogenic archaea are better known and highly conserved across the world. This universality and limited diversity could make it possible to mitigate methane emissions by developing strategies that target the few dominant methanogens. Differences in microbial community compositions were predominantly attributable to diet, with the host being less influential. There were few strong co-occurrence patterns between microbes, suggesting that major metabolic interactions are non-selective rather than specific. PMID:26449758

  10. Rumen microbial community composition varies with diet and host, but a core microbiome is found across a wide geographical range.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Gemma; Cox, Faith; Ganesh, Siva; Jonker, Arjan; Young, Wayne; Janssen, Peter H

    2015-10-09

    Ruminant livestock are important sources of human food and global greenhouse gas emissions. Feed degradation and methane formation by ruminants rely on metabolic interactions between rumen microbes and affect ruminant productivity. Rumen and camelid foregut microbial community composition was determined in 742 samples from 32 animal species and 35 countries, to estimate if this was influenced by diet, host species, or geography. Similar bacteria and archaea dominated in nearly all samples, while protozoal communities were more variable. The dominant bacteria are poorly characterised, but the methanogenic archaea are better known and highly conserved across the world. This universality and limited diversity could make it possible to mitigate methane emissions by developing strategies that target the few dominant methanogens. Differences in microbial community compositions were predominantly attributable to diet, with the host being less influential. There were few strong co-occurrence patterns between microbes, suggesting that major metabolic interactions are non-selective rather than specific.

  11. The origins of new pandemic viruses: the acquisition of new host ranges by canine parvovirus and influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Colin R; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2005-01-01

    Transfer of viruses between hosts to create a new self-sustaining epidemic is rare; however, those new viruses can cause severe outbreaks. Examples of such viruses include three pandemic human influenza A viruses and canine parvovirus in dogs. In each case one virus made the original transfer and spread worldwide, and then further adaptation resulted in the emergence of variants worldwide. For the influenza viruses several changes were required for growth and spread between humans, and the emergence of human H2N2 and H3N2 strains in 1957 and 1968 involved the acquisition of three or two new genomic segments, respectively. Adaptation to humans involved several viral genes including the hemagglutinin, the neuraminidase, and the replication proteins. The canine adaptation of the parvoviruses involved capsid protein changes altering the recognition of the host transferrin receptors, allowing canine transferrin receptor binding and its use as a receptor for cell infection.

  12. Genomic evidence that resource-based trade-offs limit host-range expansion in a seed beetle.

    PubMed

    Gompert, Zachariah; Messina, Frank J

    2016-06-01

    Trade-offs have often been invoked to explain the evolution of ecological specialization. Phytophagous insects have been especially well studied, but there has been little evidence that resource-based trade-offs contribute to the evolution of host specialization in this group. Here, we combine experimental evolution and partial genome resequencing of replicate seed beetle selection lines to test the trade-off hypothesis and measure the repeatability of evolution. Bayesian estimates of selection coefficients suggest that rapid adaptation to a poor host (lentil) was mediated by standing genetic variation at multiple genetic loci and involved many of the same variants in replicate lines. Sublines that were then switched back to the ancestral host (mung bean) showed a more gradual and variable (less repeatable) loss of adaptation to lentil. We were able to obtain estimates of variance effective population sizes from genome-wide differences in allele frequencies within and between lines. These estimates were relatively large, which suggests that the contribution of genetic drift to the loss of adaptation following reversion was small. Instead, we find that some alleles that were favored on lentil were selected against during reversion on mung bean, consistent with the genetic trade-off hypothesis.

  13. Discovery of Novel dsRNA Viral Sequences by In Silico Cloning and Implications for Viral Diversity, Host Range and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huiquan; Fu, Yanping; Xie, Jiatao; Cheng, Jiasen; Ghabrial, Said A.; Li, Guoqing; Yi, Xianhong; Jiang, Daohong

    2012-01-01

    Genome sequence of viruses can contribute greatly to the study of viral evolution, diversity and the interaction between viruses and hosts. Traditional molecular cloning methods for obtaining RNA viral genomes are time-consuming and often difficult because many viruses occur in extremely low titers. DsRNA viruses in the families, Partitiviridae, Totiviridae, Endornaviridae, Chrysoviridae, and other related unclassified dsRNA viruses are generally associated with symptomless or persistent infections of their hosts. These characteristics indicate that samples or materials derived from eukaryotic organisms used to construct cDNA libraries and EST sequencing might carry these viruses, which were not easily detected by the researchers. Therefore, the EST databases may include numerous unknown viral sequences. In this study, we performed in silico cloning, a procedure for obtaining full or partial cDNA sequence of a gene by bioinformatics analysis, using known dsRNA viral sequences as queries to search against NCBI Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) database. From this analysis, we obtained 119 novel virus-like sequences related to members of the families, Endornaviridae, Chrysoviridae, Partitiviridae, and Totiviridae. Many of them were identified in cDNA libraries of eukaryotic lineages, which were not known to be hosts for these viruses. Furthermore, comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of these newly discovered virus-like sequences with known dsRNA viruses revealed that these dsRNA viruses may have co-evolved with respective host supergroups over a long evolutionary time while potential horizontal transmissions of viruses between different host supergroups also is possible. We also found that some of the plant partitiviruses may have originated from fungal viruses by horizontal transmissions. These findings extend our knowledge of the diversity and possible host range of dsRNA viruses and offer insight into the origin and evolution of relevant viruses with their hosts. PMID

  14. Host Range Testing of Diaphorencyrtus aligarhensis (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) for Use in Classical Biological Control of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae) in California.

    PubMed

    Bistline-East, Allison; Pandey, Raju; Kececi, Mehmet; Hoddle, Mark S

    2015-06-01

    Host range tests for Diaphorencyrtus aligarhensis (Shafee, Alam, & Agarwal) (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), an endoparasitoid of Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae), sourced from Punjab Pakistan, were conducted in quarantine at the University of California, Riverside, CA. Seven nontarget psyllid species representing four psyllid families were exposed to mated D. aligarhensis females in four different treatment types: 1) short sequential no-choice treatments, 2) prolonged sequential no-choice treatments, 3) prolonged no-choice static treatments, and 4) choice treatments. Selection of nontarget psyllid species was based on phylogenetic proximity to D. citri, likelihood of being encountered by D. aligarhensis in the prospective release areas in California, and psyllid species in biological control of invasive weeds. D. aligarhensis exhibited high host affinity to D. citri, and only parasitized one nontarget species, the pestiferous potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Sulc), at low levels (<14%). Based on the results of this study, we conclude that D. aligarhensis has a narrow host range and exhibits a high level of host specificity, as it shows a significant attack preference for the target pest, D. citri. Results presented here suggest D. aligarhensis poses minimal risk to nontarget psyllid species in California.

  15. The role of female search behaviour in determining host plant range in plant feeding insects: a test of the information processing hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Janz, N.; Nylin, S.

    1997-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies have suggested that host range in herbivorous insects may be more restricted by constraints on information processing on the ovipositing females than by trade-offs in larval feeding efficiency. We have investigated if females from polyphagous species have to pay for their ability to localize and evaluate plants from different species with a lower ability to discriminate between conspecific host plants with differences in quality. Females of the monophagous butterflies Polygonia satyrus, Vanessa indica and Inachis io and the polyphagous P. c-album and Cynthia cardui (all in Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae) were given a simultaneous choice of stinging nettles (Urtica dioica) of different quality. In addition, the same choice trial was given to females from two populations of P. c-album with different degrees of specificity. As predicted from the information processing hypothesis, all specialists discriminated significantly against the bad quality nettle, whereas the generalists laid an equal amount of eggs on both types of nettle. There were no corresponding differences between specialist and generalist larvae in their ability to utilize poor quality leaves. Our study therefore suggests that female host-searching behaviour plays an important role in determining host plant range.

  16. The Role of Female Search Behaviour in Determining Host Plant Range in Plant Feeding Insects: A Test of the Information Processing Hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janz, Niklas; Nylin, Soren

    1997-05-01

    Recent theoretical studies have suggested that host range in herbivorous insects may be more restricted by constraints on information processing on the ovipositing females than by trade-offs in larval feeding efficiency. We have investigated if females from polyphagous species have to pay for their ability to localize and evaluate plants from different species with a lower ability to discriminate between conspecific host plants with differences in quality. Females of the monophagous butterflies Polygonia satyrus, Vanessa indica and Inachis io and the polyphagous P. c-album and Cynthia cardui (all in Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae) were given a simultaneous choice of stinging nettles (Urtica dioica) of different quality. In addition, the same choice trial was given to females from two populations of P. c-album with different degrees of specificity. As predicted from the information processing hypothesis, all specialists discriminated significantly against the bad quality nettle, whereas the generalists laid an equal amount of eggs on both types of nettle. There were no corresponding differences between specialist and generalist larvae in their ability to utilize poor quality leaves. Our study therefore suggests that female host-searching behaviour plays an important role in determining host plant range.

  17. Distribution, host range, and climatic constraints on Centistes gasseni (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a South American parasitoid of cucumber beetles, Diabrotica spp. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Cabrera Walsh, G; Athanas, M M; Salles, L A B; Schroder, R F W

    2003-12-01

    The genus Diabrotica includes a large number of pest species, including some of the most important crop pests of the Americas. The parasitoid Centistes gasseni Shaw is the first braconid to be described parasitizing Diabrotica in South America, and high natural infestations are reported. Field and experimental observations on the host range, distribution and biology of this parasitoid are described. Centistes gasseniwas collected in southern Brazil, eastern Paraguay and northeastern Argentina, in a region comprising humid lowlands and highlands, and cool temperate to warm subtropical climates, with regular rainfall in excess of 1300 mm. Three Diabroticaspecies, D. limitata (Sahlberg), D. speciosa (Germar) and D. viridula (Fabricius) were found to host the parasitoid, with mean percent parasitism of 5.4, 2.0 and 1.0%, respectively. Diabrotica speciosa and D. viridula are the two most important pest Diabroticaspecies in South America. Laboratory experiments with field-collected beetles and parasitoid cocoons indicated that C. gasseni overwinters in adult host beetles, remaining dormant in its live host below developmental temperatures. A potential distribution of C. gasseni in North America is proposed based on its known climatic range and the distribution of the main pest species of adult overwintering North American Diabrotica.

  18. Host and Environmental Factors Modulate the Exposure of Free-Ranging and Farmed Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) to Coxiella burnetii.

    PubMed

    González-Barrio, David; Velasco Ávila, Ana Luisa; Boadella, Mariana; Beltrán-Beck, Beatriz; Barasona, José Ángel; Santos, João P V; Queirós, João; García-Pérez, Ana L; Barral, Marta; Ruiz-Fons, Francisco

    2015-09-01

    The control of multihost pathogens, such as Coxiella burnetii, should rely on accurate information about the roles played by the main hosts. We aimed to determine the involvement of the red deer (Cervus elaphus) in the ecology of C. burnetii. We predicted that red deer populations from broad geographic areas within a European context would be exposed to C. burnetii, and therefore, we hypothesized that a series of factors would modulate the exposure of red deer to C. burnetii. To test this hypothesis, we designed a retrospective survey of 47 Iberian red deer populations from which 1,751 serum samples and 489 spleen samples were collected. Sera were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) in order to estimate exposure to C. burnetii, and spleen samples were analyzed by PCR in order to estimate the prevalence of systemic infections. Thereafter, we gathered 23 variables-within environmental, host, and management factors-potentially modulating the risk of exposure of deer to C. burnetii, and we performed multivariate statistical analyses to identify the main risk factors. Twenty-three populations were seropositive (48.9%), and C. burnetii DNA in the spleen was detected in 50% of the populations analyzed. The statistical analyses reflect the complexity of C. burnetii ecology and suggest that although red deer may maintain the circulation of C. burnetii without third species, the most frequent scenario probably includes other wild and domestic host species. These findings, taken together with previous evidence of C. burnetii shedding by naturally infected red deer, point at this wild ungulate as a true reservoir for C. burnetii and an important node in the life cycle of C. burnetii, at least in the Iberian Peninsula.

  19. Host and Environmental Factors Modulate the Exposure of Free-Ranging and Farmed Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) to Coxiella burnetii

    PubMed Central

    Velasco Ávila, Ana Luisa; Boadella, Mariana; Beltrán-Beck, Beatriz; Barasona, José Ángel; Santos, João P. V.; Queirós, João; García-Pérez, Ana L.; Barral, Marta; Ruiz-Fons, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The control of multihost pathogens, such as Coxiella burnetii, should rely on accurate information about the roles played by the main hosts. We aimed to determine the involvement of the red deer (Cervus elaphus) in the ecology of C. burnetii. We predicted that red deer populations from broad geographic areas within a European context would be exposed to C. burnetii, and therefore, we hypothesized that a series of factors would modulate the exposure of red deer to C. burnetii. To test this hypothesis, we designed a retrospective survey of 47 Iberian red deer populations from which 1,751 serum samples and 489 spleen samples were collected. Sera were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) in order to estimate exposure to C. burnetii, and spleen samples were analyzed by PCR in order to estimate the prevalence of systemic infections. Thereafter, we gathered 23 variables—within environmental, host, and management factors—potentially modulating the risk of exposure of deer to C. burnetii, and we performed multivariate statistical analyses to identify the main risk factors. Twenty-three populations were seropositive (48.9%), and C. burnetii DNA in the spleen was detected in 50% of the populations analyzed. The statistical analyses reflect the complexity of C. burnetii ecology and suggest that although red deer may maintain the circulation of C. burnetii without third species, the most frequent scenario probably includes other wild and domestic host species. These findings, taken together with previous evidence of C. burnetii shedding by naturally infected red deer, point at this wild ungulate as a true reservoir for C. burnetii and an important node in the life cycle of C. burnetii, at least in the Iberian Peninsula. PMID:26150466

  20. Description of Meloidogyne christiei n. sp. (Nematoda: Meloidogynidae) from Oak with SEM and Host-Range Observations

    PubMed Central

    Golden, A. Morgan; Kaplan, David T.

    1986-01-01

    Meloidogyne christiei n. sp. is described and illustrated from turkey oak (Quercus laevis) in Sanlando Park, Altamonte Springs, Florida. This new nematode species has a distinctive perineal pattern commonly with a high, squarish arch and coarse broken striae which tend to diverge at various angles, especially in and above the anal area. Female labial disc is indented, forming four points or prongs, unlike other species. Eggs are deposited inside the gall in a tubular, coiled manner. Vaginal muscles are exceptionally prominent and dense. SEM observations provided further detail of the perineal pattern and details of the head of females, males, and second-stage juveniles. Galls on the root commonly occur singly, but sometimes in small clusters, and appear as discrete nodules on the side of the root and without adjacent swelling. In general, only one female is found in each gall but occasionally two are present. In greenhouse tests, citrus, tobacco, cotton, pepper, watermelon, peanut, and tomato were not hosts. This nematode occurs throughout central Florida commonly on Q. laevis, the only known host. PMID:19294223

  1. Role of the B Allele of Influenza A Virus Segment 8 in Setting Mammalian Host Range and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Matthew L.; Wise, Helen M.; Nicol, Marlynne Q.; Smith, Nikki; Dunfee, Rebecca L.; Beard, Philippa M.; Jagger, Brett W.; Ligertwood, Yvonne; Hardisty, Gareth R.; Xiao, Haixia; Benton, Donald J.; Coburn, Alice M.; Paulo, Joao A.; Gygi, Steven P.; McCauley, John W.; Taubenberger, Jeffery K.; Lycett, Samantha J.; Weekes, Michael P.; Dutia, Bernadette M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Two alleles of segment 8 (NS) circulate in nonchiropteran influenza A viruses. The A allele is found in avian and mammalian viruses, but the B allele is viewed as being almost exclusively found in avian viruses. This might reflect the fact that one or both of its encoded proteins (NS1 and NEP) are maladapted for replication in mammalian hosts. To test this, a number of clade A and B avian virus-derived NS segments were introduced into human H1N1 and H3N2 viruses. In no case was the peak virus titer substantially reduced following infection of various mammalian cell types. Exemplar reassortant viruses also replicated to similar titers in mice, although mice infected with viruses with the avian virus-derived segment 8s had reduced weight loss compared to that achieved in mice infected with the A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1) parent. In vitro, the viruses coped similarly with type I interferons. Temporal proteomics analysis of cellular responses to infection showed that the avian virus-derived NS segments provoked lower levels of expression of interferon-stimulated genes in cells than wild type-derived NS segments. Thus, neither the A nor the B allele of avian virus-derived NS segments necessarily attenuates virus replication in a mammalian host, although the alleles can attenuate disease. Phylogenetic analyses identified 32 independent incursions of an avian virus-derived A allele into mammals, whereas 6 introductions of a B allele were identified. However, A-allele isolates from birds outnumbered B-allele isolates, and the relative rates of Aves-to-Mammalia transmission were not significantly different. We conclude that while the introduction of an avian virus segment 8 into mammals is a relatively rare event, the dogma of the B allele being especially restricted is misleading, with implications in the assessment of the pandemic potential of avian influenza viruses. IMPORTANCE Influenza A virus (IAV) can adapt to poultry and mammalian species, inflicting a

  2. Multiple amino acids in the capsid structure of canine parvovirus coordinately determine the canine host range and specific antigenic and hemagglutination properties.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, S F; Sgro, J Y; Parrish, C R

    1992-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) and feline panleukopenia virus (FPV) are over 98% similar in DNA sequence but have specific host range, antigenic, and hemagglutination (HA) properties which were located within the capsid protein gene. In vitro mutagenesis and recombination were used to prepare 16 different recombinant genomic clones, and viruses derived from those clones were analyzed for their in vitro host range, antigenic, and HA properties. The region of CPV from 59 to 91 map units determined the ability to replicate in canine cells. A complex series of interactions was observed among the individual sequence differences between 59 and 73 map units. The canine host range required that VP2 amino acids (aa) 93 and 323 both be the CPV sequence, and those two CPV sequences introduced alone into FPV greatly increased viral replication in canine cells. Changing any one of aa 93, 103, or 323 of CPV to the FPV sequence either greatly decreased replication in canine cells or resulted in an inviable plasmid. The Asn-Lys difference of aa 93 alone was responsible for the CPV-specific epitope recognized by monoclonal antibodies. An FPV-specific epitope was affected by aa 323. Amino acids 323 and 375 together determined the pH dependence of HA. Amino acids involved in the various specific properties were all around the threefold spikes of the viral particle. Images PMID:1331498

  3. Colonization behaviors of mountain pine beetle on novel hosts: Implications for range expansion into northeastern North America

    Treesearch

    Derek W. Rosenberger; Robert C. Venette; Mitchell P. Maddox; Brian H. Aukema; Gadi V.P. Reddy

    2017-01-01

    As climates change, thermal limits may no longer constrain some native herbivores within their historical ranges. The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, is a tree-killing bark beetle native to western North America that is currently expanding its range. Continued eastward expansion through the newly invaded and novel jack pine...

  4. Envelope-binding domain in the cationic amino acid transporter determines the host range of ecotropic murine retroviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Albritton, L M; Kim, J W; Tseng, L; Cunningham, J M

    1993-01-01

    Infection of rodent cells by ecotropic type C retroviruses requires the expression of a cationic amino acid transporter composed of multiple membrane-spanning domains. By exchanging portions of cDNAs encoding the permissive mouse and nonpermissive human transporters and examining their abilities to specify virus infection upon expression in human 293 cells, we have identified the amino acid residues in the extracellular loop connecting the fifth and sixth membrane-spanning segments of the mouse transporter that are required for both envelope gp70 binding and infection. These findings strongly suggest that the role of the mouse transporter in determining infection is to provide an envelope-binding site. This role is analogous to those of host membrane proteins composed of a single membrane-spanning domain that serve as binding proteins or receptors for other enveloped viruses such as human immunodeficiency virus, Epstein-Barr virus, and murine and human coronaviruses. PMID:8445722

  5. Host range and diversity of the genus Geosmithia (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) living in association with bark beetles in the Mediterranean area.

    PubMed

    Kolarík, Miroslav; Kostovcík, Martin; Pazoutová, Sylvie

    2007-11-01

    Geosmithia spp. (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) are dry-spored fungi that occur in galleries built by many phloeophagous bark beetles. This study mapped the diversity, host spectrum and area of distribution of Geosmithia spp. occurring in galleries of bark beetle species with a Mediterranean distribution. Eighty-six wood samples of 19 tree species infested by 18 subcortical insect species were collected from across the Mediterranean Basin during the years 2003-2006. Geosmithia spp. were found in 82 samples of angiosperms and two host trees from the family Juniperaceae infested by 14 bark beetles and the bostrichid Scobicia pustulata, suggesting that the association of Geosmithia and phloeophagous bark beetles is very widespread in the Mediterranean. Geosmithia isolates were sorted into 13 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on their phenotype similarity and phylogeny of their ITS regions of rDNA (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2). The OTUs represent five known species (G. flava, G. langdonii, G. lavendula, G. pallida, G. putterillii) and seven undescribed taxa. Most of the bark beetles were associated with on average 1-2.5 OTUs per sample. G. lavendula, considered very uncommon in nature, was found as a common associate of bark beetles. Six out of 13 OTUs were found to be distributed in the Mediterranean but not in neighbouring areas of temperate Europe suggesting that Geosmithia spp. have a geographically limited distribution, probably due to their dependency on the geographically limited area of their vectors. The proportion of generalists and specialists among Geosmithia spp. was smaller compared with data from temperate Europe. A possible explanation is the effective dispersal of Geosmithia by polyphagous bostrichids across the niches defined by mutually exclusive bark beetles.

  6. Evidence for suppression of immunity as a driver for genomic introgressions and host range expansion in races of Albugo candida, a generalist parasite

    PubMed Central

    McMullan, Mark; Gardiner, Anastasia; Bailey, Kate; Kemen, Eric; Ward, Ben J; Cevik, Volkan; Robert-Seilaniantz, Alexandre; Schultz-Larsen, Torsten; Balmuth, Alexi; Holub, Eric; van Oosterhout, Cock; Jones, Jonathan DG

    2015-01-01

    How generalist parasites with wide host ranges can evolve is a central question in parasite evolution. Albugo candida is an obligate biotrophic parasite that consists of many physiological races that each specialize on distinct Brassicaceae host species. By analyzing genome sequence assemblies of five isolates, we show they represent three races that are genetically diverged by ∼1%. Despite this divergence, their genomes are mosaic-like, with ∼25% being introgressed from other races. Sequential infection experiments show that infection by adapted races enables subsequent infection of hosts by normally non-infecting races. This facilitates introgression and the exchange of effector repertoires, and may enable the evolution of novel races that can undergo clonal population expansion on new hosts. We discuss recent studies on hybridization in other eukaryotes such as yeast, Heliconius butterflies, Darwin's finches, sunflowers and cichlid fishes, and the implications of introgression for pathogen evolution in an agro-ecological environment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04550.001 PMID:25723966

  7. Expanding small-molecule functional metagenomics through parallel screening of broad-host-range cosmid environmental DNA libraries in diverse proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Craig, Jeffrey W; Chang, Fang-Yuan; Kim, Jeffrey H; Obiajulu, Steven C; Brady, Sean F

    2010-03-01

    The small-molecule biosynthetic diversity encoded within the genomes of uncultured bacteria is an attractive target for the discovery of natural products using functional metagenomics. Phenotypes commonly associated with the production of small molecules, such as antibiosis, altered pigmentation, or altered colony morphology, are easily identified from screens of arrayed metagenomic library clones. However, functional metagenomic screening methods are limited by their intrinsic dependence on a heterologous expression host. Toward the goal of increasing the small-molecule biosynthetic diversity found in functional metagenomic studies, we report the phenotypic screening of broad-host-range environmental DNA libraries in six different proteobacteria: Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Burkholderia graminis, Caulobacter vibrioides, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida, and Ralstonia metallidurans. Clone-specific small molecules found in culture broth extracts from pigmented and antibacterially active clones, as well as the genetic elements responsible for the biosynthesis of these metabolites, are described. The host strains used in this investigation provided access to unique sets of clones showing minimal overlap, thus demonstrating the potential advantage conferred on functional metagenomics through the use of multiple diverse host species.

  8. Expanding Small-Molecule Functional Metagenomics through Parallel Screening of Broad-Host-Range Cosmid Environmental DNA Libraries in Diverse Proteobacteria▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Jeffrey W.; Chang, Fang-Yuan; Kim, Jeffrey H.; Obiajulu, Steven C.; Brady, Sean F.

    2010-01-01

    The small-molecule biosynthetic diversity encoded within the genomes of uncultured bacteria is an attractive target for the discovery of natural products using functional metagenomics. Phenotypes commonly associated with the production of small molecules, such as antibiosis, altered pigmentation, or altered colony morphology, are easily identified from screens of arrayed metagenomic library clones. However, functional metagenomic screening methods are limited by their intrinsic dependence on a heterologous expression host. Toward the goal of increasing the small-molecule biosynthetic diversity found in functional metagenomic studies, we report the phenotypic screening of broad-host-range environmental DNA libraries in six different proteobacteria: Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Burkholderia graminis, Caulobacter vibrioides, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida, and Ralstonia metallidurans. Clone-specific small molecules found in culture broth extracts from pigmented and antibacterially active clones, as well as the genetic elements responsible for the biosynthesis of these metabolites, are described. The host strains used in this investigation provided access to unique sets of clones showing minimal overlap, thus demonstrating the potential advantage conferred on functional metagenomics through the use of multiple diverse host species. PMID:20081001

  9. Comparative genomic and transcriptome analyses of pathotypes of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri provide insights into mechanisms of bacterial virulence and host range

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Citrus bacterial canker is a disease that has severe economic impact on citrus industries worldwide and is caused by a few species and pathotypes of Xanthomonas. X. citri subsp. citri strain 306 (XccA306) is a type A (Asiatic) strain with a wide host range, whereas its variant X. citri subsp. citri strain Aw12879 (Xcaw12879, Wellington strain) is restricted to Mexican lime. Results To characterize the mechanism for the differences in host range of XccA and Xcaw, the genome of Xcaw12879 that was completed recently was compared with XccA306 genome. Effectors xopAF and avrGf1 are present in Xcaw12879, but were absent in XccA306. AvrGf1 was shown previously for Xcaw to cause hypersensitive response in Duncan grapefruit. Mutation analysis of xopAF indicates that the gene contributes to Xcaw growth in Mexican lime but does not contribute to the limited host range of Xcaw. RNA-Seq analysis was conducted to compare the expression profiles of Xcaw12879 and XccA306 in Nutrient Broth (NB) medium and XVM2 medium, which induces hrp gene expression. Two hundred ninety two and 281 genes showed differential expression in XVM2 compared to in NB for XccA306 and Xcaw12879, respectively. Twenty-five type 3 secretion system genes were up-regulated in XVM2 for both XccA and Xcaw. Among the 4,370 common genes of Xcaw12879 compared to XccA306, 603 genes in NB and 450 genes in XVM2 conditions were differentially regulated. Xcaw12879 showed higher protease activity than XccA306 whereas Xcaw12879 showed lower pectate lyase activity in comparison to XccA306. Conclusions Comparative genomic analysis of XccA306 and Xcaw12879 identified strain specific genes. Our study indicated that AvrGf1 contributes to the host range limitation of Xcaw12879 whereas XopAF contributes to virulence. Transcriptome analyses of XccA306 and Xcaw12879 presented insights into the expression of the two closely related strains of X. citri subsp. citri. Virulence genes including genes encoding T3SS components

  10. Rapidly expanding genetic diversity and host range of the Circoviridae viral family and other Rep encoding small circular ssDNA genomes.

    PubMed

    Delwart, Eric; Li, Linlin

    2012-03-01

    The genomes of numerous circoviruses and distantly related circular ssDNA viruses encoding a rolling circle replication initiator protein (Rep) have been characterized from the tissues of mammals, fish, insects, plants (geminivirus and nanovirus), in human and animal feces, in an algae cell, and in diverse environmental samples. We review the genome organization, phylogenetic relationships and initial prevalence studies of cycloviruses, a proposed new genus in the Circoviridae family. Viral fossil rep sequences were also recently identified integrated on the chromosomes of mammals, frogs, lancelets, crustaceans, mites, gastropods, roundworms, placozoans, hydrozoans, protozoans, land plants, fungi, algae, and phytoplasma bacterias and their plasmids, reflecting the very wide past host range of rep bearing viruses. An ancient origin for viruses with Rep-encoding small circular ssDNA genomes, predating the diversification of eukaryotes, is discussed. The cellular hosts and pathogenicity of many recently described rep-containing circular ssDNA genomes remain to be determined. Future studies of the virome of single cell and multi-cellular eukaryotes are likely to further extend the known diversity and host-range of small rep-containing circular ssDNA viral genomes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Rapidly expanding genetic diversity and host range of the Circoviridae viral family and other Rep encoding small circular ssDNA genomes

    PubMed Central

    Delwart, Eric; Li, Linlin

    2011-01-01

    The genomes of numerous circoviruses and distantly related circular DNA viruses encoding a rolling circle replication initiator protein (Rep) have been characterized from the tissues of mammals, fish, insects, and plants (geminivirus and nanovirus), human and animal feces, in an algae cell, and in diverse environmental samples. We review the genome organization, phylogenetic relationships and initial prevalence studies of cycloviruses, a proposed new genus in the Circoviridae family. Viral fossil rep sequences were also identified integrated on the chromosomes of mammals, frogs, lancelets, crustaceans, mites, gastropods, roundworms, placozoans, hydrozoans, protozoans, land plants, fungi, algae, and phytoplasma bacterias and their plasmids, reflecting their past host range. An ancient origin for viruses with rep-encoding single stranded small circular genomes, predating the diversification of eukaryotes, is discussed. The cellular hosts and pathogenicity of many recently described rep-containing circular genomes remain to be determined. Future studies of the virome of single cell and multi-cellular eukaryotes are likely to further extend the known diversity and host-range of small rep-containing circular viral genomes. PMID:22155583

  12. Parasite species richness and intensity of interspecific interactions increase with latitude in two wide-ranging hosts.

    PubMed

    Torchin, Mark E; Miura, Osamu; Hechinger, Ryan F

    2015-11-01

    Although the latitudinal diversity gradient is a well-known and general pattern, the mechanisms structuring it remain elusive. Two key issues limit differentiating these. First, habitat type usually varies with latitude, precluding a standardized evaluation of species richness. Second, broad-scale and local factors hypothesized to shape diversity patterns covary with one another, making it difficult to tease apart independent effects. Examining communities of parasites in widely distributed hosts can eliminate some of these confounding factors. We quantified diversity and interspecific interactions for trematode parasites infecting two similar snail species across 27 degrees of latitude from 43 locations in tropical and temperate oceans. Counter to typical patterns, we found that species richness, levels of parasitism, and intensity of intraguild predation increased with latitude. Because speciation rates are precluded from driving diversity gradients in this particular system, the reversed gradients are likely due to local ecological factors, specifically, increased productivity and stability. We highlight how this system may serve as a useful tool to provide insight into what processes drive diversity gradients in general.

  13. Presence of Extracellular DNA during Biofilm Formation by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Strains with Different Host Range

    PubMed Central

    Sena-Vélez, Marta; Redondo, Cristina; Graham, James H.; Cubero, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) A strain causes citrus bacterial canker, a serious leaf, fruit and stem spotting disease of several Citrus species. X. alfalfae subsp. citrumelonis (Xac) is the cause of citrus bacterial spot, a minor disease of citrus nursery plants and X. campestris pv. campestris (Xc) is a systemic pathogen that causes black rot of cabbage. Xanthomonas spp. form biofilms in planta that facilitate the host infection process. Herein, the role of extracellular DNA (eDNA) was evaluated in the formation and stabilization of the biofilm matrix at different stages of biofilm development. Fluorescence and light microscopy, as well as DNAse treatments, were used to determine the presence of eDNA in biofilms and bacterial cultures. DNAse treatments of Xcc strains and Xac reduced biofilm formation at the initial stage of development, as well as disrupted preformed biofilm. By comparison, no significant effect of the DNAse was detected for biofilm formation by Xc. DNAse effects on biofilm formation or disruption varied among Xcc strains and Xanthomonas species which suggest different roles for eDNA. Variation in the structure of fibers containing eDNA in biofilms, bacterial cultures, and in twitching motility was also visualized by microscopy. The proposed roles for eDNA are as an adhesin in the early stages of biofilm formation, as an structural component of mature bacterial aggregates, and twitching motility structures. PMID:27248687

  14. Characterization of California sea lion polyomavirus 1: expansion of the known host range of the Polyomaviridae to Carnivora.

    PubMed

    Wellehan, James F X; Rivera, Rebecca; Archer, Linda L; Benham, Celeste; Muller, Jennifer K; Colegrove, Kathleen M; Gulland, Frances M D; St Leger, Judy A; Venn-Watson, Stephanie K; Nollens, Hendrik H

    2011-07-01

    The genome of a novel polyomavirus first identified in a proliferative tongue lesion of a California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) is reported. This is only the third described polyomavirus of laurasiatherian mammals, is the first of the three associated with a lesion, and is the first known polyomavirus of a host in the order Carnivora. Predicted large T, small t, VP1, VP2, and VP3 genes were identified based on homology to proteins of known polyomaviruses, and a putative agnoprotein was identified based upon its location in the genome. Phylogenetic analysis of the predicted late region proteins found that the laurasiatherian polyomaviruses, together with Squirrel monkey polyomavirus and Murine pneumotropic virus, form a monophyletic clade. Phylogenetic analysis of the early region was more ambiguous. The noncoding control region of California sea lion polyomavirus 1 is unusual in that only two apparent large T binding sites are present; this is less than any other known polyomavirus. The VP1 of this virus has an unusually long carboxy-terminal region. A quantitative polymerase chain reaction was developed and utilized on various samples from 79 additional animals from either managed or wild stranded California sea lion populations, and California sea lion polyomavirus 1 infection was found in 24% of stranded animals. Sequence of additional samples identified four sites of variation in the t antigens, three of which resulted in predicted coding changes.

  15. Mutational Analysis of the tra Locus of the Broad-Host-Range Streptomyces Plasmid pIJ101

    PubMed Central

    Pettis, Gregg S.; Cohen, Stanley N.

    2000-01-01

    The tra gene of Streptomyces lividans plasmid pIJ101 encodes a 621-amino-acid protein that can mediate both plasmid transfer and the interbacterial transfer of chromosomal genes (i.e., chromosome-mobilizing ability [Cma]) during mating. Here we report the results of in-frame insertional mutagenesis studies aimed at defining regions of Tra required for these functions. While hexameric linker insertions throughout the tra gene affected plasmid and chromosomal gene transfer, insertions in a 200-amino-acid region of the Tra protein that contains presumed nucleotide-binding motifs and that is widely conserved among a functionally diverse family of bacterial and plasmid proteins (K. J. Begg, S. J. Dewar, and W. D. Donachie, J. Bacteriol. 177:6211–6222, 1995) had especially prominent effects on both functions. Insertions near the N terminus of Tra reduced Cma for either circular or linear host chromosomes to a much greater extent than pIJ101 plasmid transfer. Our results suggest that Cma involves Tra functions incremental to those needed for plasmid DNA transfer. PMID:10913083

  16. Presence of Extracellular DNA during Biofilm Formation by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Strains with Different Host Range.

    PubMed

    Sena-Vélez, Marta; Redondo, Cristina; Graham, James H; Cubero, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) A strain causes citrus bacterial canker, a serious leaf, fruit and stem spotting disease of several Citrus species. X. alfalfae subsp. citrumelonis (Xac) is the cause of citrus bacterial spot, a minor disease of citrus nursery plants and X. campestris pv. campestris (Xc) is a systemic pathogen that causes black rot of cabbage. Xanthomonas spp. form biofilms in planta that facilitate the host infection process. Herein, the role of extracellular DNA (eDNA) was evaluated in the formation and stabilization of the biofilm matrix at different stages of biofilm development. Fluorescence and light microscopy, as well as DNAse treatments, were used to determine the presence of eDNA in biofilms and bacterial cultures. DNAse treatments of Xcc strains and Xac reduced biofilm formation at the initial stage of development, as well as disrupted preformed biofilm. By comparison, no significant effect of the DNAse was detected for biofilm formation by Xc. DNAse effects on biofilm formation or disruption varied among Xcc strains and Xanthomonas species which suggest different roles for eDNA. Variation in the structure of fibers containing eDNA in biofilms, bacterial cultures, and in twitching motility was also visualized by microscopy. The proposed roles for eDNA are as an adhesin in the early stages of biofilm formation, as an structural component of mature bacterial aggregates, and twitching motility structures.

  17. Fine structure and cellular responses at the host-parasite interface in a range of fish-helminth systems.

    PubMed

    Dezfuli, B S; Bo, T; Lorenzoni, M; Shinn, A P; Giari, L

    2015-03-15

    A series of ultrastructural-based studies were conducted on the interface region in different fish-helminth systems: (a) an intestinal infection of the cestode Monobothrium wageneri in tench, Tinca tinca; (b) an extensive intestinal submucosa and mucosal infection in tench by metacercariae of an unidentified digenean trematode; (c) an intestinal infection in brown trout, Salmo trutta, by the acanthocephalan Dentitruncus truttae; (d) an extraintestinal infection by larvae of the acanthocephalan, Pomphorhynchus laevis in three-spined sticklebacks, Gasterosteus aculeatus; and (e) an infection in the livers of Eurasian minnow, Phoxinus phoxinus, by larvae of the nematode Raphidascaris acus. Endoparasitic helminths frequently cause inflammation of the digestive tract and associated organs, inducing the recruitment of various immune cells to the site of infection. In each of the fish-helminth systems that were studied, a massive hyperplastic granulocyte response involving mast cells (MCs) and neutrophils in close proximity to the helminths was documented. The current study presents data on the interface region in each fish-helminth system and documents the penetration of mast cells granules within the tegument of P. laevis larvae. No extracellular vesicles containing tegumental secretions from any of the four different taxa of endoparasitic helminths species at the host-parasite interface region were seen.

  18. Belowground resistance to western corn rootworm in Lepidopteran-resistant maize genotypes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Several maize inbred lines developed from an Antiguan maize population have been shown to exhibit resistance to numerous aboveground lepidopteran pests. This study shows that these genotypes are able to significantly reduce the survival of two root feeding pests, western corn rootworm (Diabrotica v...

  19. Efficacy of silk channel injections with insecticides for management of Lepidopteran pests of sweet corn

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The primary Lepidopteran pests of sweet corn in Georgia are the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), and the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith). Control of these pests typically requires multiple insecticide applications from first silking until harvest, with commercial growers fre...

  20. 40 CFR 180.1153 - Lepidopteran pheromones; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1153 Lepidopteran pheromones; exemption from the requirement of a... similar synthetic compounds, designated by an unbranched aliphatic chain (between 9 and 18 carbons) ending...; and applied as a post-harvest treatment to stored food commodities at a rate not to exceed 3.5 grams...

  1. 40 CFR 180.1153 - Lepidopteran pheromones; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1153 Lepidopteran pheromones; exemption from the requirement of a... similar synthetic compounds, designated by an unbranched aliphatic chain (between 9 and 18 carbons) ending...; and applied as a post-harvest treatment to stored food commodities at a rate not to exceed 3.5 grams...

  2. 40 CFR 180.1153 - Lepidopteran pheromones; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1153 Lepidopteran pheromones; exemption from the requirement of a... similar synthetic compounds, designated by an unbranched aliphatic chain (between 9 and 18 carbons) ending...; and applied as a post-harvest treatment to stored food commodities at a rate not to exceed 3.5 grams...

  3. 40 CFR 180.1153 - Lepidopteran pheromones; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1153 Lepidopteran pheromones; exemption from the requirement of a... similar synthetic compounds, designated by an unbranched aliphatic chain (between 9 and 18 carbons) ending...; and applied as a post-harvest treatment to stored food commodities at a rate not to exceed 3.5 grams...

  4. 40 CFR 180.1153 - Lepidopteran pheromones; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1153 Lepidopteran pheromones; exemption from the requirement of a... similar synthetic compounds, designated by an unbranched aliphatic chain (between 9 and 18 carbons) ending...; and applied as a post-harvest treatment to stored food commodities at a rate not to exceed 3.5 grams...

  5. Chapter 9. routine maintenance and storage of lepidopteran insect cell lines and baculoviruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The various methods for maintaining (a.k.a., subculturing, splitting, or passaging) established lepidopteran cell lines are described. Three procedures are presented that are appropriate for different cell lines dependent upon the growth characteristics (in particular, cell attachment properties) o...

  6. Life history and host range of Oxydia vesulia transpeneus, an unsuitable biological control agent of Brazilian peppertree

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The suitability of Oxydia vesulia (Cramer) (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) was assessed as a potential biological control agent of the invasive weed Brazilian Peppertree Schinus terebinthifolia. Larvae were collected in Brazil feeding on the plant in its native range and colonized in quarantine where lif...

  7. Biology and host range of Omolabus piceus, a weevil rejected for biological control for Schinus terebinthifolius in the USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Surveys for biological control agents of the invasive weed Schinus terebinthifolius (Anacardiaceae) discovered two Omolabus weevils (Coleoptera: Attelabidae) feeding on the plant in its native range. Molecular and morphological analysis indicated that one of these species consistently fed on the tar...

  8. Host range of the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) (Coleoptera: Burprestidae): choice and no-choice tests

    Treesearch

    Andrea C. Anulewicz; Deborah G. McCullough; David A. Cappaert; Therese M. Poland; Derborah L. Miller

    2007-01-01

    Previous literature on the emerald ash borer (EAB) suggests that, in its native range in Asia, EAB will attack species other than ash (Fraxinus), including Ulmus sp. and Juglans sp. In North America, as ash trees die in the core zone of infestation, concern has been raised about the potential for species other...

  9. Salivary gland hypertrophy virus of house flies in Denmark: Prevalence, host range, and comparison with a Florida isolate.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    House flies (Musca domestica) infected with Musca domestica salivary gland hypertrophy virus (MdSGHV) were found in fly populations collected from 12 out of 18 Danish livestock farms that were surveyed in 2007 and 2008. Infection rates ranged from 0.5% to 5% and averaged 1.2% overall. None of the ...

  10. Variations in foliar monoterpenes across the range of jack pine reveal three widespread chemotypes: implications to host expansion of invasive mountain pine beetle

    PubMed Central

    Taft, Spencer; Najar, Ahmed; Godbout, Julie; Bousquet, Jean; Erbilgin, Nadir

    2015-01-01

    The secondary compounds of pines (Pinus) can strongly affect the physiology, ecology and behaviors of the bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) that feed on sub-cortical tissues of hosts. Jack pine (Pinus banksiana) has a wide natural distribution range in North America (Canada and USA) and thus variations in its secondary compounds, particularly monoterpenes, could affect the host expansion of invasive mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae), which has recently expanded its range into the novel jack pine boreal forest. We investigated monoterpene composition of 601 jack pine trees from natural and provenance forest stands representing 63 populations from Alberta to the Atlantic coast. Throughout its range, jack pine exhibited three chemotypes characterized by high proportions of α-pinene, β-pinene, or limonene. The frequency with which the α-pinene and β-pinene chemotypes occurred at individual sites was correlated to climatic variables, such as continentality and mean annual precipitation, as were the individual α-pinene and β-pinene concentrations. However, other monoterpenes were generally not correlated to climatic variables or geographic distribution. Finally, while the enantiomeric ratios of β-pinene and limonene remained constant across jack pine's distribution, (−):(+)-α-pinene exhibited two separate trends, thereby delineating two α-pinene phenotypes, both of which occurred across jack pine's range. These significant variations in jack pine monoterpene composition may have cascading effects on the continued eastward spread and success of D. ponderosae in the Canadian boreal forest. PMID:26042134

  11. Establishment, population increase, spread, and ecological host range of Lophodiplosis trifida (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), a biological control agent of the invasive tree Melaleuca quinquenervia (Myrtales: Myrtaceae).

    PubMed

    Pratt, P D; Rayamajhi, M B; Tipping, P W; Center, T D; Wright, S A; Purcell, M

    2013-10-01

    The Australian tree Melaleuca quinquenervia (Cavanilles) Blake is an invasive weed in wetland systems of Florida. A biological control program targeting M. quinquenervia has resulted in the release of the gall forming midge Lophodiplosis trifida Gagné (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae). Populations of the introduced herbivore readily established at all 24 release sites across the weed's range in Florida, and there was no evidence that founding colony size (100, 2,000, or 6,000 adults) influenced herbivore establishment or local population growth rates. Landscape level spread of L. trifida from release sites averaged nearly 6 km/yr, ranging as high as 14.4 km/yr. Prerelease host range testing predicted that L. trifida oviposits indiscriminately on test plant species but does not complete development on any of the test species, including congeners present in Florida. To test the predictability of these host range tests, L. trifida was released in a common garden consisting of 18 test plant species that were interplanted with M. quinquenervia. Plant species postulated to be at risk experienced no gall development by L. trifida while intermingled M. quinquenervia trees supported 704.8 (± 158.5) galls per plant. Historically, many introduced Cecidomyiidae have limited effect on plant performance of target weeds because of recruitment of native parasitoids that disrupt biological control efficacy. In contrast to this trend, there has been no evidence to date that parasitoids are exploiting L. trifida in Florida.

  12. Variations in foliar monoterpenes across the range of jack pine reveal three widespread chemotypes: implications to host expansion of invasive mountain pine beetle.

    PubMed

    Taft, Spencer; Najar, Ahmed; Godbout, Julie; Bousquet, Jean; Erbilgin, Nadir

    2015-01-01

    The secondary compounds of pines (Pinus) can strongly affect the physiology, ecology and behaviors of the bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) that feed on sub-cortical tissues of hosts. Jack pine (Pinus banksiana) has a wide natural distribution range in North America (Canada and USA) and thus variations in its secondary compounds, particularly monoterpenes, could affect the host expansion of invasive mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae), which has recently expanded its range into the novel jack pine boreal forest. We investigated monoterpene composition of 601 jack pine trees from natural and provenance forest stands representing 63 populations from Alberta to the Atlantic coast. Throughout its range, jack pine exhibited three chemotypes characterized by high proportions of α-pinene, β-pinene, or limonene. The frequency with which the α-pinene and β-pinene chemotypes occurred at individual sites was correlated to climatic variables, such as continentality and mean annual precipitation, as were the individual α-pinene and β-pinene concentrations. However, other monoterpenes were generally not correlated to climatic variables or geographic distribution. Finally, while the enantiomeric ratios of β-pinene and limonene remained constant across jack pine's distribution, (-):(+)-α-pinene exhibited two separate trends, thereby delineating two α-pinene phenotypes, both of which occurred across jack pine's range. These significant variations in jack pine monoterpene composition may have cascading effects on the continued eastward spread and success of D. ponderosae in the Canadian boreal forest.

  13. Pathogen-Host Associations and Predicted Range Shifts of Human Monkeypox in Response to Climate Change in Central Africa

    PubMed Central

    Thomassen, Henri A.; Fuller, Trevon; Asefi-Najafabady, Salvi; Shiplacoff, Julia A. G.; Mulembakani, Prime M.; Blumberg, Seth; Johnston, Sara C.; Kisalu, Neville K.; Kinkela, Timothée L.; Fair, Joseph N.; Wolfe, Nathan D.; Shongo, Robert L.; LeBreton, Matthew; Meyer, Hermann; Wright, Linda L.; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Buermann, Wolfgang; Okitolonda, Emile; Hensley, Lisa E.; Lloyd-Smith, James O.; Smith, Thomas B.; Rimoin, Anne W.

    2013-01-01

    Climate change is predicted to result in changes in the geographic ranges and local prevalence of infectious diseases, either through direct effects on the pathogen, or indirectly through range shifts in vector and reservoir species. To better understand the occurrence of monkeypox virus (MPXV), an emerging Orthopoxvirus in humans, under contemporary and future climate conditions, we used ecological niche modeling techniques in conjunction with climate and remote-sensing variables. We first created spatially explicit probability distributions of its candidate reservoir species in Africa's Congo Basin. Reservoir species distributions were subsequently used to model current and projected future distributions of human monkeypox (MPX). Results indicate that forest clearing and climate are significant driving factors of the transmission of MPX from wildlife to humans under current climate conditions. Models under contemporary climate conditions performed well, as indicated by high values for the area under the receiver operator curve (AUC), and tests on spatially randomly and non-randomly omitted test data. Future projections were made on IPCC 4th Assessment climate change scenarios for 2050 and 2080, ranging from more conservative to more aggressive, and representing the potential variation within which range shifts can be expected to occur. Future projections showed range shifts into regions where MPX has not been recorded previously. Increased suitability for MPX was predicted in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. Models developed here are useful for identifying areas where environmental conditions may become more suitable for human MPX; targeting candidate reservoir species for future screening efforts; and prioritizing regions for future MPX surveillance efforts. PMID:23935820

  14. Pathogen-host associations and predicted range shifts of human monkeypox in response to climate change in central Africa.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Henri A; Fuller, Trevon; Asefi-Najafabady, Salvi; Shiplacoff, Julia A G; Mulembakani, Prime M; Blumberg, Seth; Johnston, Sara C; Kisalu, Neville K; Kinkela, Timothée L; Fair, Joseph N; Wolfe, Nathan D; Shongo, Robert L; LeBreton, Matthew; Meyer, Hermann; Wright, Linda L; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Buermann, Wolfgang; Okitolonda, Emile; Hensley, Lisa E; Lloyd-Smith, James O; Smith, Thomas B; Rimoin, Anne W

    2013-01-01

    Climate change is predicted to result in changes in the geographic ranges and local prevalence of infectious diseases, either through direct effects on the pathogen, or indirectly through range shifts in vector and reservoir species. To better understand the occurrence of monkeypox virus (MPXV), an emerging Orthopoxvirus in humans, under contemporary and future climate conditions, we used ecological niche modeling techniques in conjunction with climate and remote-sensing variables. We first created spatially explicit probability distributions of its candidate reservoir species in Africa's Congo Basin. Reservoir species distributions were subsequently used to model current and projected future distributions of human monkeypox (MPX). Results indicate that forest clearing and climate are significant driving factors of the transmission of MPX from wildlife to humans under current climate conditions. Models under contemporary climate conditions performed well, as indicated by high values for the area under the receiver operator curve (AUC), and tests on spatially randomly and non-randomly omitted test data. Future projections were made on IPCC 4(th) Assessment climate change scenarios for 2050 and 2080, ranging from more conservative to more aggressive, and representing the potential variation within which range shifts can be expected to occur. Future projections showed range shifts into regions where MPX has not been recorded previously. Increased suitability for MPX was predicted in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. Models developed here are useful for identifying areas where environmental conditions may become more suitable for human MPX; targeting candidate reservoir species for future screening efforts; and prioritizing regions for future MPX surveillance efforts.

  15. The distribution and host range of the banana Fusarium wilt fungus, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense, in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Agustin B.; Daniells, Jeff; Fourie, Gerda; Hermanto, Catur; Chao, Chih-Ping; Fabregar, Emily; Sinohin, Vida G.; Masdek, Nik; Thangavelu, Raman; Li, Chunyu; Yi, Ganyun; Mostert, Lizel; Viljoen, Altus

    2017-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum formae specialis cubense (Foc) is a soil-borne fungus that causes Fusarium wilt, which is considered to be the most destructive disease of bananas. The fungus is believed to have evolved with its host in the Indo-Malayan region, and from there it was spread to other banana-growing areas with infected planting material. The diversity and distribution of Foc in Asia was investigated. A total of 594 F. oxysporum isolates collected in ten Asian countries were identified by vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs) analysis. To simplify the identification process, the isolates were first divided into DNA lineages using PCR-RFLP analysis. Six lineages and 14 VCGs, representing three Foc races, were identified in this study. The VCG complex 0124/5 was most common in the Indian subcontinent, Vietnam and Cambodia; whereas the VCG complex 01213/16 dominated in the rest of Asia. Sixty-nine F. oxysporum isolates in this study did not match any of the known VCG tester strains. In this study, Foc VCG diversity in Bangladesh, Cambodia and Sri Lanka was determined for the first time and VCGs 01221 and 01222 were first reported from Cambodia and Vietnam. New associations of Foc VCGs and banana cultivars were recorded in all the countries where the fungus was collected. Information obtained in this study could help Asian countries to develop and implement regulatory measures to prevent the incursion of Foc into areas where it does not yet occur. It could also facilitate the deployment of disease resistant banana varieties in infested areas. PMID:28719631

  16. Mitochondrial genome of the cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and comparison with other Lepidopterans.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jiao; Hong, Gui-Yun; Wang, Ai-Min; Cao, Ya-Zhong; Wei, Zhao-Jun

    2010-10-01

    We present the complete sequence of the mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of the cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera. The 15,347-bp mitogenome of H. armigera was arranged in the same order described for all other sequenced lepidopterans, which differs from the most common type found in insects, due to the movement of trnM to a position 5'-upstream of trnI. The gene overlap in the H. armigera mitogenome is totally 23 bp in six locations. The H. armigera mitogenome has a total of 175 bp of intergenic spacer sequences spread over 14 regions ranging in size from 1 to 45 bp. The nucleotide composition of the whole mitogenome of H. armigera is highly A+T biased, accounting for 80.97%, with a slightly positive AT skewness and negative GC skewness, indicating the occurrence of more A than T, C more than G. The protein-encoding genes have typical mitochondrial start codons, except for cox1, which contains the unusual CGA. The cox1, cox2, and nad4 genes have incomplete stop codons (T). The lrRNA and srRNA genes are 1395 and 794-bp long, respectively. All tRNAs have a typical cloverleaf structure of mitochondrial tRNAs, except for trnS1(AGN), the dihydrouridine arm of which could not form a stable stem-loop structure. The H. armigera A+T-rich region contains a conserved structure combining the motif ATAGA and a 19-bp poly-T stretch, but absence of the 9-bp poly-A element upstream of trnM.

  17. Transgenic rice expressing the cry2AX1 gene confers resistance to multiple lepidopteran pests.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, M; Reddy, P Sairam; Mustafa, G; Rajesh, G; Narasu, V M Laxmi; Udayasuriyan, V; Rana, Debashis

    2016-10-01

    A chimeric Bacillus thuringiensis toxin (Bt) gene, cry2AX1was cloned in a bi-selectable marker free binary vector construct. The cry2AX1 gene, driven by the Chrysanthemum rbcS1 promoter, was introduced into JK1044R, the restorer line (Oryza sativa L. ssp. Indica) of a notified commercially grown rice hybrid in India, by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Its effect against two major lepidopteran insect pests viz., yellow stem borer (YSB) Scirpophaga incertulas, rice leaf folder (RLF) Cnaphalocrocis medinalis and one minor insect pest, oriental army worm (OAW) Mythimna separata was demonstrated through bioassays of transgenic rice plants under laboratory and greenhouse conditions. The rbcS1 promoter with chloroplast signal peptide was used to avoid Cry2AX1 protein expression in rice seed endosperm tissue. A total of 37 independent transformants were generated, of which after preliminary molecular characterization and YSB bioassay screening, five events were selected for their protein expression and bioefficacy against all three rice insect. One elite transgenic rice line, BtE15, was identified with Cry2AX1 expression ranging from 0.68 to 1.34 µg g(-1) leaf fresh weight and with 80-92 % levels of resistance against rice pests at the vegetative and reproductive stages. Increase in Cry2AX1 protein concentration was also observed with crop maturity. The Cry2AX1protein concentration in the de-husked seeds was negligible (as low as 2.7-3.6 ng g(-1)). These results indicate the potential application of cry2AX1 gene in rice for protection against YSB, RLF and OAW.

  18. Effects of transgenic cry1Ie maize on non-lepidopteran pest abundance, diversity and community composition.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingfei; He, Kanglai; Bai, Shuxiong; Zhang, Tiantao; Liu, Yunjun; Wang, Fuxin; Wang, Zhenying

    2016-12-01

    Non-lepidopteran pests are exposed to, and may be influenced by, Bt toxins when feeding on Bt maize that express insecticidal Cry proteins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). In order to assess the potential effects of transgenic cry1Ie maize on non-lepidopteran pest species and ecological communities, a 2-year field study was conducted to compare the non-lepidopteran pest abundance, diversity and community composition between transgenic cry1Ie maize (Event IE09S034, Bt maize) and its near isoline (Zong 31, non-Bt maize) by whole plant inspections. Results showed that Bt maize had no effects on non-lepidopteran pest abundance and diversity (Shannon-Wiener diversity index, Simpson's diversity index, species richness, and Pielou's index). There was a significant effect of year and sampling time on those indices analyzed. Redundancy analysis indicated maize type, sampling time and year totally explained 20.43 % of the variance in the non-lepidopteran pest community composition, but no association was presented between maize type (Bt maize and non-Bt maize) and the variance. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling analysis showed that sampling time and year, rather than maize type had close relationship with the non-lepidopteran pest community composition. These results corroborated the hypothesis that, at least in the short-term, the transgenic cry1Ie maize had negligible effects on the non-lepidopteran pest abundance, diversity and community composition.

  19. Complete nucleotide sequence and analysis of two conjugative broad host range plasmids from a marine microbial biofilm.

    PubMed

    Norberg, Peter; Bergström, Maria; Hermansson, Malte

    2014-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of plasmids pMCBF1 and pMCBF6 was determined and analyzed. pMCBF1 and pMCBF6 form a novel clade within the IncP-1 plasmid family designated IncP-1 ς. The plasmids were exogenously isolated earlier from a marine biofilm. pMCBF1 (62 689 base pairs; bp) and pMCBF6 (66 729 bp) have identical backbones, but differ in their mercury resistance transposons. pMCBF1 carries Tn5053 and pMCBF6 carries Tn5058. Both are flanked by 5 bp direct repeats, typical of replicative transposition. Both insertions are in the vicinity of a resolvase gene in the backbone, supporting the idea that both transposons are "res-site hunters" that preferably insert close to and use external resolvase functions. The similarity of the backbones indicates recent insertion of the two transposons and the ongoing dynamics of plasmid evolution in marine biofilms. Both plasmids also carry the insertion sequence ISPst1, albeit without flanking repeats. ISPs1is located in an unusual site within the control region of the plasmid. In contrast to most known IncP-1 plasmids the pMCBF1/pMCBF6 backbone has no insert between the replication initiation gene (trfA) and the vegetative replication origin (oriV). One pMCBF1/pMCBF6 block of about 2.5 kilo bases (kb) has no similarity with known sequences in the databases. Furthermore, insertion of three genes with similarity to the multidrug efflux pump operon mexEF and a gene from the NodT family of the tripartite multi-drug resistance-nodulation-division (RND) system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa was found. They do not seem to confer antibiotic resistance to the hosts of pMCBF1/pMCBF6, but the presence of RND on promiscuous plasmids may have serious implications for the spread of antibiotic multi-resistance.

  20. Genomic and functional characterization of the modular broad-host-range RA3 plasmid, the archetype of the IncU group.

    PubMed

    Kulinska, Anna; Czeredys, Magdalena; Hayes, Finbarr; Jagura-Burdzy, Grazyna

    2008-07-01

    IncU plasmids are a distinctive group of mobile elements with highly conserved backbone functions and variable antibiotic resistance gene cassettes. The IncU archetype is conjugative plasmid RA3, whose sequence (45,909 bp) shows it to be a mosaic, modular replicon with a class I integron different from that of other IncU replicons. Functional analysis demonstrated that RA3 possesses a broad host range and can efficiently self-transfer, replicate, and be maintained stably in alpha-, beta-, and gammaproteobacteria. RA3 contains 50 open reading frames clustered in distinct functional modules. The replication module encompasses the repA and repB genes embedded in long repetitive sequences. RepA, which is homologous to antitoxin proteins from alpha- and gammaproteobacteria, contains a Cro/cI-type DNA-binding domain present in the XRE family of transcriptional regulators. The repA promoter is repressed by RepA and RepB. The minireplicon encompasses repB and the downstream repetitive sequence r1/r2. RepB shows up to 80% similarity to putative replication initiation proteins from environmental plasmids of beta- and gammaproteobacteria, as well as similarity to replication proteins from alphaproteobacteria and Firmicutes. Stable maintenance functions of RA3 are most like those of IncP-1 broad-host-range plasmids and comprise the active partitioning apparatus formed by IncC (ParA) and KorB (ParB), the antirestriction protein KlcA, and accessory stability components KfrA and KfrC. The RA3 origin of transfer was localized experimentally between the maintenance and conjugative-transfer operons. The putative conjugative-transfer module is highly similar in organization and in its products to transfer regions of certain broad-host-range environmental plasmids.

  1. Effect of Simulated Climate Warming on the Ectomycorrhizal Fungal Community of Boreal and Temperate Host Species Growing Near Their Shared Ecotonal Range Limits.

    PubMed

    Mucha, Joanna; Peay, Kabir G; Smith, Dylan P; Reich, Peter B; Stefański, Artur; Hobbie, Sarah E

    2017-07-25

    Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi can influence the establishment and performance of host species by increasing nutrient and water absorption. Therefore, understanding the response of ECM fungi to expected changes in the global climate is crucial for predicting potential changes in the composition and productivity of forests. While anthropogenic activity has, and will continue to, cause global temperature increases, few studies have investigated how increases in temperature will affect the community composition of ectomycorrhizal fungi. The effects of global warming are expected to be particularly strong at biome boundaries and in the northern latitudes. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of experimental manipulations of temperature and canopy structure (open vs. closed) on ectomycorrhizal fungi identified from roots of host seedlings through 454 pyrosequencing. The ecotonal boundary site selected for the study was between the southern boreal and temperate forests in northern Minnesota, USA, which is the southern limit range for Picea glauca and Betula papyrifera and the northern one for Pinus strobus and Quercus rubra. Manipulations that increased air and soil temperature by 1.7 and 3.4 °C above ambient temperatures, respectively, did not change ECM richness but did alter the composition of the ECM community in a manner dependent on host and canopy structure. The prediction that colonization of boreal tree species with ECM symbionts characteristic of temperate species would occur was not substantiated. Overall, only a small proportion of the ECM community appears to be strongly sensitive to warming.

  2. Broad-Host-Range ProUSER Vectors Enable Fast Characterization of Inducible Promoters and Optimization of p-Coumaric Acid Production in Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    PubMed

    Calero, Patricia; Jensen, Sheila I; Nielsen, Alex T

    2016-07-15

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440 has gained increasing interest as a host for the production of biochemicals. Because of the lack of a systematic characterization of inducible promoters in this strain, we generated ProUSER broad-host-expression plasmids that facilitate fast uracil-based cloning. A set of ProUSER-reporter vectors was further created to characterize different inducible promoters. The PrhaB and Pm promoters were orthogonal and showed titratable, high, and homogeneous expression. To optimize the production of p-coumaric acid, P. putida was engineered to prevent degradation of tyrosine and p-coumaric acid. Pm and PrhaB were used to control the expression of a tyrosine ammonia lyase or AroG* and TyrA* involved in tyrosine production, respectively. Pathway expression was optimized by modulating inductions, resulting in small-scale p-coumaric acid production of 1.2 mM, the highest achieved in Pseudomonads under comparable conditions. With broad-host-range compatibility, the ProUSER vectors will serve as useful tools for optimizing gene expression in a variety of bacteria.

  3. Diversity and geographical distribution of Flavobacterium psychrophilum isolates and their phages: patterns of susceptibility to phage infection and phage host range.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Daniel; Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb; Espejo, Romilio; Middelboe, Mathias

    2014-05-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is an important fish pathogen worldwide that causes cold water disease (CWD) or rainbow trout fry syndrome (RTFS). Phage therapy has been suggested as an alternative method for the control of this pathogen in aquaculture. However, effective use of bacteriophages in disease control requires detailed knowledge about the diversity and dynamics of host susceptibility to phage infection. For this reason, we examined the genetic diversity of 49 F. psychrophilum strains isolated in three different areas (Chile, Denmark, and USA) through direct genome restriction enzyme analysis (DGREA) and their susceptibility to 33 bacteriophages isolated in Chile and Denmark, thus covering large geographical (>12,000 km) and temporal (>60 years) scales of isolation. An additional 40 phage-resistant isolates obtained from culture experiments after exposure to specific phages were examined for changes in phage susceptibility against the 33 phages. The F. psychrophilum and phage populations isolated from Chile and Denmark clustered into geographically distinct groups with respect to DGREA profile and host range, respectively. However, cross infection between Chilean phage isolates and Danish host isolates and vice versa was observed. Development of resistance to certain bacteriophages led to susceptibility to other phages suggesting that "enhanced infection" is potentially an important cost of resistance in F. psychrophilum, possibly contributing to the observed co-existence of phage-sensitive F. psychrophilum strains and lytic phages across local and global scales. Overall, our results showed that despite the identification of local communities of phages and hosts, some key properties determining phage infection patterns seem to be globally distributed.

  4. Relative nutritional quality of C3 and C4 grasses for a graminivorous lepidopteran, Paratrytone melane (Hesperiidae).

    PubMed

    Barbehenn, Raymond V; Bernays, Elizabeth A

    1992-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that C4 grasses are inferior to C3 grasses as host plants for herbivorous insects by measuring the relative performance of larvae of a graminivorous lepidopteran, Paratrytone melane (Hesperiidae), fed C3 and C4 grasses. Relative growth rates and final weights were higher in larvae fed a C3 grass in Experiment I. However, in two additional experiments, relative growth rates and final weights were not significantly different in larvae fed C3 and C4 grasses. We examined two factors which are believed to cause C4 grasses to be of lower nutritional value than C3 grasses: foliar nutrient levels and nutrient digestibility. In general, foliar nutrient levels were higher in C3 grasses. In Experiment I, protein and soluble carbohydrates were digested from a C3 and a C4 grass with equivalent efficiencies. Therefore, differences in larval performance are best explained by higher nutrient levels in the C3 grass in this experiment. In Experiment II, soluble carbohydrates were digested with similar efficiencies from C3 and C4 grasses but protein was digested with greater efficiency from the C3 grasses. We conclude (1) that the bundle sheath anatomy of C4 grasses is not a barrier to soluble carbohydrate digestion and does not have a nutritionally significant effect on protein digestion and (2) that P. melane may consume C4 grasses at compensatory rates.

  5. Broad host range vectors for expression of proteins with (Twin-) Strep-tag, His-tag and engineered, export optimized yellow fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Dammeyer, Thorben; Timmis, Kenneth N; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2013-05-20

    In current protein research, a limitation still is the production of active recombinant proteins or native protein associations to assess their function. Especially the localization and analysis of protein-complexes or the identification of modifications and small molecule interaction partners by co-purification experiments requires a controllable expression of affinity- and/or fluorescence tagged variants of a protein of interest in its native cellular background. Advantages of periplasmic and/or homologous expressions can frequently not be realized due to a lack of suitable tools. Instead, experiments are often limited to the heterologous production in one of the few well established expression strains. Here, we introduce a series of new RK2 based broad host range expression plasmids for inducible production of affinity- and fluorescence tagged proteins in the cytoplasm and periplasm of a wide range of Gram negative hosts which are designed to match the recently suggested modular Standard European Vector Architecture and database. The vectors are equipped with a yellow fluorescent protein variant which is engineered to fold and brightly fluoresce in the bacterial periplasm following Sec-mediated export, as shown from fractionation and imaging studies. Expression of Strep-tag®II and Twin-Strep-tag® fusion proteins in Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is demonstrated for various ORFs. The broad host range constructs we have produced enable good and controlled expression of affinity tagged protein variants for single-step purification and qualify for complex co-purification experiments. Periplasmic export variants enable production of affinity tagged proteins and generation of fusion proteins with a novel engineered Aequorea-based yellow fluorescent reporter protein variant with activity in the periplasm of the tested Gram-negative model bacteria Pseudomonas putida KT2440 and Escherichia coli K12 for production, localization or co-localization studies. In addition, the

  6. Broad host range vectors for expression of proteins with (Twin-) Strep-tag, His-tag and engineered, export optimized yellow fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In current protein research, a limitation still is the production of active recombinant proteins or native protein associations to assess their function. Especially the localization and analysis of protein-complexes or the identification of modifications and small molecule interaction partners by co-purification experiments requires a controllable expression of affinity- and/or fluorescence tagged variants of a protein of interest in its native cellular background. Advantages of periplasmic and/or homologous expressions can frequently not be realized due to a lack of suitable tools. Instead, experiments are often limited to the heterologous production in one of the few well established expression strains. Results Here, we introduce a series of new RK2 based broad host range expression plasmids for inducible production of affinity- and fluorescence tagged proteins in the cytoplasm and periplasm of a wide range of Gram negative hosts which are designed to match the recently suggested modular Standard European Vector Architecture and database. The vectors are equipped with a yellow fluorescent protein variant which is engineered to fold and brightly fluoresce in the bacterial periplasm following Sec-mediated export, as shown from fractionation and imaging studies. Expression of Strep-tag®II and Twin-Strep-tag® fusion proteins in Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is demonstrated for various ORFs. Conclusion The broad host range constructs we have produced enable good and controlled expression of affinity tagged protein variants for single-step purification and qualify for complex co-purification experiments. Periplasmic export variants enable production of affinity tagged proteins and generation of fusion proteins with a novel engineered Aequorea-based yellow fluorescent reporter protein variant with activity in the periplasm of the tested Gram-negative model bacteria Pseudomonas putida KT2440 and Escherichia coli K12 for production, localization or co

  7. Isolation of Phages for Phage Therapy: A Comparison of Spot Tests and Efficiency of Plating Analyses for Determination of Host Range and Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Khan Mirzaei, Mohammadali; Nilsson, Anders S.

    2015-01-01

    Phage therapy, treating bacterial infections with bacteriophages, could be a future alternative to antibiotic treatment of bacterial infections. There are, however, several problems to be solved, mainly associated to the biology of phages, the interaction between phages and their bacterial hosts, but also to the vast variation of pathogenic bacteria which implies that large numbers of different phages are going to be needed. All of these phages must under present regulation of medical products undergo extensive clinical testing before they can be applied. It will consequently be of great economic importance that effective and versatile phages are selected and collected into phage libraries, i.e., the selection must be carried out in a way that it results in highly virulent phages with broad host ranges. We have isolated phages using the Escherichia coli reference (ECOR) collection and compared two methods, spot testing and efficiency of plating (EOP), which are frequently used to identify phages suitable for phage therapy. The analyses of the differences between the two methods show that spot tests often overestimate both the overall virulence and the host range and that the results are not correlated to the results of EOP assays. The conclusion is that single dilution spot tests cannot be used for identification and selection of phages to a phage library and should be replaced by EOP assays. The difference between the two methods can be caused by many factors. We have analysed if the differences and lack of correlation could be caused by lysis from without, bacteriocins in the phage lysate, or by the presence of prophages harbouring genes coding for phage resistance systems in the genomes of the bacteria in the ECOR collection. PMID:25761060

  8. Isolation of phages for phage therapy: a comparison of spot tests and efficiency of plating analyses for determination of host range and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Khan Mirzaei, Mohammadali; Nilsson, Anders S

    2015-01-01

    Phage therapy, treating bacterial infections with bacteriophages, could be a future alternative to antibiotic treatment of bacterial infections. There are, however, several problems to be solved, mainly associated to the biology of phages, the interaction between phages and their bacterial hosts, but also to the vast variation of pathogenic bacteria which implies that large numbers of different phages are going to be needed. All of these phages must under present regulation of medical products undergo extensive clinical testing before they can be applied. It will consequently be of great economic importance that effective and versatile phages are selected and collected into phage libraries, i.e., the selection must be carried out in a way that it results in highly virulent phages with broad host ranges. We have isolated phages using the Escherichia coli reference (ECOR) collection and compared two methods, spot testing and efficiency of plating (EOP), which are frequently used to identify phages suitable for phage therapy. The analyses of the differences between the two methods show that spot tests often overestimate both the overall virulence and the host range and that the results are not correlated to the results of EOP assays. The conclusion is that single dilution spot tests cannot be used for identification and selection of phages to a phage library and should be replaced by EOP assays. The difference between the two methods can be caused by many factors. We have analysed if the differences and lack of correlation could be caused by lysis from without, bacteriocins in the phage lysate, or by the presence of prophages harbouring genes coding for phage resistance systems in the genomes of the bacteria in the ECOR collection.

  9. Novel Virulent and Broad-Host-Range Erwinia amylovora Bacteriophages Reveal a High Degree of Mosaicism and a Relationship to Enterobacteriaceae Phages ▿†

    PubMed Central

    Born, Yannick; Fieseler, Lars; Marazzi, Janine; Lurz, Rudi; Duffy, Brion; Loessner, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    A diverse set of 24 novel phages infecting the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora was isolated from fruit production environments in Switzerland. Based on initial screening, four phages (L1, M7, S6, and Y2) with broad host ranges were selected for detailed characterization and genome sequencing. Phage L1 is a member of the Podoviridae, with a 39.3-kbp genome featuring invariable genome ends with direct terminal repeats. Phage S6, another podovirus, was also found to possess direct terminal repeats but has a larger genome (74.7 kbp), and the virus particle exhibits a complex tail fiber structure. Phages M7 and Y2 both belong to the Myoviridae family and feature long, contractile tails and genomes of 84.7 kbp (M7) and 56.6 kbp (Y2), respectively, with direct terminal repeats. The architecture of all four phage genomes is typical for tailed phages, i.e., organized into function-specific gene clusters. All four phages completely lack genes or functions associated with lysogeny control, which correlates well with their broad host ranges and indicates strictly lytic (virulent) lifestyles without the possibility for host lysogenization. Comparative genomics revealed that M7 is similar to E. amylovora virus ΦEa21-4, whereas L1, S6, and Y2 are unrelated to any other E. amylovora phage. Instead, they feature similarities to enterobacterial viruses T7, N4, and ΦEcoM-GJ1. In a series of laboratory experiments, we provide proof of concept that specific two-phage cocktails offer the potential for biocontrol of the pathogen. PMID:21764969

  10. Salivary gland hypertrophy virus of house flies in Denmark: prevalence, host range, and comparison with a Florida isolate.

    PubMed

    Geden, C J; Steenberg, T; Lietze, V-U; Boucias, D G

    2011-12-01

    House flies (Musca domestica) infected with Musca domestica salivary gland hypertrophy virus (MdSGHV) were found in fly populations collected from 12 out of 18 Danish livestock farms that were surveyed in 2007 and 2008. Infection rates ranged from 0.5% to 5% and averaged 1.2%. None of the stable flies (Stomoxys calcitrans), rat-tail maggot flies (Eristalis tenax) or yellow dung flies (Scathophaga stercoraria) collected from MdSGHV-positive farms displayed characteristic salivary gland hypertrophy (SGH). In laboratory transmission tests, SGH symptoms were not observed in stable flies, flesh flies (Sarcophaga bullata), black dump flies (Hydrotaea aenescens), or face flies (Musca autumnalis) that were injected with MdSGHV from Danish house flies. However, in two species (stable fly and black dump fly), virus injection resulted in suppression of ovarian development similar to that observed in infected house flies, and injection of house flies with homogenates prepared from the salivary glands or ovaries of these species resulted in MdSGHV infection of the challenged house flies. Mortality of virus-injected stable flies was the highest among the five species tested. Virulence of Danish and Florida isolates of MdSGHV was similar with three virus delivery protocols, as a liquid food bait (in sucrose, milk, or blood), sprayed onto the flies in a Potter spray tower, or by immersiion in a crude homogenate of infected house flies. The most effective delivery system was immersion in a homogenate of ten infected flies/ml of water, resulting in 56.2% and 49.6% infection of the house flies challenged with the Danish and Florida strains, respectively. © 2011 The Society for Vector Ecology.

  11. Divergence of host range and biological properties between natural isolate and full-length infectious cDNA clone of the Beet mild yellowing virus 2ITB.

    PubMed

    Klein, Elodie; Brault, Véronique; Klein, Delphine; Weyens, Guy; Lefèbvre, Marc; Ziegler-Graff, Véronique; Gilmer, David

    2014-01-01

    Plant infection by poleroviruses is restricted to phloem tissues, preventing any classical leaf rub inoculation with viral RNA or virions. Efficient virus inoculation to plants is achieved by viruliferous aphids that acquire the virus by feeding on infected plants. The use of promoter-driven infectious cDNA is an alternative means to infect plants and allows reverse genetic studies to be performed. Using Beet mild yellowing virus isolate 2ITB (BMYV-2ITB), we produced a full-length infectious cDNA clone of the virus (named BMYV-EK) placed under the control of the T7 RNA polymerase and the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoters. Infectivity of the engineered BMYV-EK virus was assayed in different plant species and compared with that of the original virus. We showed that in vitro- or in planta-derived transcripts were infectious in protoplasts and in whole plants. Importantly, the natural aphid vector Myzus persicae efficiently transmitted the viral progeny produced in infected plants. By comparing agroinoculation and aphid infection in a host range assay, we showed that the engineered BMYV-EK virus displayed a similar host range to BMYV-2ITB, except for Nicotiana benthamiana, which proved to be resistant to systemic infection with BMYV-EK. Finally, both the BMYV-EK P0 and the full-length clone were able to strongly interfere with post-transcriptional gene silencing. © 2013 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  12. Vaccinia virus K1L protein mediates host-range function in RK-13 cells via ankyrin repeat and may interact with a cellular GTPase-activating protein.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Ritu R; Terajima, Masanori

    2005-12-01

    The K1L protein of vaccinia virus is required for its growth in certain cell lines (RK-13 and human). The cowpox host-range protein CP77 has been shown to complement K1L function in RK-13 cells, despite a lack of homology between the two proteins except for ankyrin repeats. We investigated the role of ankyrin repeats of K1L protein in RK-13 cells. The growth of a recombinant vaccinia virus, with K1L gene mutated in the most conserved ankyrin repeat, was severely impaired. Infection with the mutant virus caused shutdown of cellular and viral protein synthesis early in infection. We also investigated the interaction of K1L protein with cellular proteins and found that K1L interacts with the rabbit homologue of human ACAP2, a GTPase-activating protein with ankyrin repeats. Our result suggests the importance of ankyrin repeat for host-range function of K1L in RK-13 cells and identifies ACAP2 as a cellular protein, which may be interacting with K1L.

  13. Host range and distribution of small mammal fleas in South Africa, with a focus on species of medical and veterinary importance.

    PubMed

    VAN DER Mescht, L; Matthee, S

    2017-07-10

    The host range and distribution of flea species on rodents and insectivores across multiple vegetation types in South Africa were investigated. Habitat suitability for flea species considered as important vectors of disease in humans and domestic animals was modelled. Data originated from fleas that were recovered from small mammals captured at 29 localities during 2009-2013 and published literature searched for flea records. Climate-based predictor variables, widely used in arthropod vector distribution, were selected and habitat suitability modelled for 10 flea vector species. A total of 2469 flea individuals representing 33 species and subspecies were collected from 1185 small mammals. Ten of each of the flea and rodent species are plague vectors and reservoirs, respectively. Multiple novel flea-host associations and locality records were noted. Three vector species were recorded from insectivores. Geographic distributions of flea species ranged from broad, across-biome distributions to narrower distributions within one or two biomes. Habitat suitability models performed excellently for the majority of flea vectors and identified regions of summer and all-year rainfall as representing suitable habitats for most vector species. Current knowledge of vector and disease ecology can benefit from similar sampling approaches that will be important not only for South Africa, but also for the sub-region. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  14. Comparative evaluation of phenoloxidase in different larval stages of four lepidopteran pests after exposure to Bacillus thuringiensis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Some lepidopteran insects are important agricultural pests, causing serious crop damage. Microbial entomopathogen-based bioinsecticides are considered effective pest control alternatives to synthetic chemicals. However, insects can defend against pathogens by innate mechanisms, including phenoloxi...

  15. Steinernema carpocapsae DD136: metabolites limit the non-self adhesion responses of haemocytes of two lepidopteran larvae, Galleria mellonella (F. Pyralidae) and Malacosoma disstria (F. Lasiocampidae).

    PubMed

    Walter, Tita N; Dunphy, Gary B; Mandato, Craig A

    2008-10-01

    Live adult and juvenile entomopathogenic Steinernema carpocapsae DD136 (P. Nematoda) were not subjected to adhesion by haemocytes of lepidopteran insect larvae of Galleria mellonella or Malacosoma disstriain vitro or in vivo. In vitro freeze-killed nematodes exhibited haemocyte attachment, the intensity increasing with time. Accumulation of haemocytes on the dead nematodes was associated with host phenoloxidase activity; live nematodes and their exudates did not activate the enzyme whereas dead nematodes but not their exudate did activate phenoloxidase. Live-nematode exudate inhibited granular cell and some plasmatocyte adhesion to slides, increased granular cell but not plasmatocyte dissociation from preformed haemocyte monolayers and in vivo elevated total haemocyte counts and changed the floating haemocyte types while impairing bacterial removal from the haemolymph. Dead-nematode exudate did not affect these parameters thus immunosuppressant activity by live nematodes may represent the release of inhibitors not associated with their cuticle. The third stage juveniles released the inhibitors.

  16. Host haemocyte inactivation by an insect parasitoid: transient expression of a polydnavirus gene.

    PubMed

    Asgari, S; Hellers, M; Schmidt, O

    1996-10-01

    Polydnaviruses produced by the hymenopteran endoparasitoid Cotesia rubecula are deposited together with the egg into the lepidopteran host Pieris rapae and are apparently involved in the suppression of the host's defence system. Around 6 h post-parasitization host haemocytes change their surface properties, actin cytoskeleton structure and adhesion properties. Here we show that a single polydnavirus gene is expressed inside the caterpillar haemocytes in a transient fashion between 4 to 8 h post-parasitization.

  17. Investigating the Host-Range of the Rust Fungus Puccinia psidii sensu lato across Tribes of the Family Myrtaceae Present in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Louise; Aveyard, Ruth; Lidbetter, Jonathan R.; Wilson, Peter G.

    2012-01-01

    The exotic rust fungus Puccinia psidii sensu lato was first detected in Australia in April 2010. This study aimed to determine the host-range potential of this accession of the rust by testing its pathogenicity on plants of 122 taxa, representative of the 15 tribes of the subfamily Myrtoideae in the family Myrtaceae. Each taxon was tested in two separate trials (unless indicated otherwise) that comprised up to five replicates per taxon and six replicates of a positive control (Syzygium jambos). No visible symptoms were observed on the following four taxa in either trial: Eucalyptus grandis×camaldulensis, E. moluccana, Lophostemon confertus and Sannantha angusta. Only small chlorotic or necrotic flecks without any uredinia (rust fruiting bodies) were observed on inoculated leaves of seven other taxa (Acca sellowiana, Corymbia calophylla ‘Rosea’, Lophostemon suaveolens, Psidium cattleyanum, P. guajava ‘Hawaiian’ and ‘Indian’, Syzygium unipunctatum). Fully-developed uredinia were observed on all replicates across both trials of 28 taxa from 8 tribes belonging to the following 17 genera: Agonis, Austromyrtus, Beaufortia, Callistemon, Calothamnus, Chamelaucium, Darwinia, Eucalyptus, Gossia, Kunzea, Leptospermum, Melaleuca, Metrosideros, Syzygium, Thryptomene, Tristania, Verticordia. In contrast, the remaining 83 taxa inoculated, including the majority of Corymbia and Eucalyptus species, developed a broad range of symptoms, often across the full spectrum, from fully-developed uredinia to no visible symptoms. These results were encouraging as they indicate that some levels of genetic resistance to the rust possibly exist in these taxa. Overall, our results indicated no apparent association between the presence or absence of disease symptoms and the phylogenetic relatedness of taxa. It is most likely that the majority of the thousands of Myrtaceae species found in Australia have the potential to become infected to some degree by the rust, although this wide

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of the N2-Fixing Broad Host Range Endophyte Klebsiella pneumoniae 342 and Virulence Predictions Verified in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fouts, Derrick E.; Tyler, Heather L.; DeBoy, Robert T.; Daugherty, Sean; Ren, Qinghu; Badger, Jonathan H.; Durkin, Anthony S.; Huot, Heather; Shrivastava, Susmita; Kothari, Sagar; Dodson, Robert J.; Mohamoud, Yasmin; Khouri, Hoda; Roesch, Luiz F. W.; Krogfelt, Karen A.; Struve, Carsten; Triplett, Eric W.; Methé, Barbara A.

    2008-01-01

    We report here the sequencing and analysis of the genome of the nitrogen-fixing endophyte, Klebsiella pneumoniae 342. Although K. pneumoniae 342 is a member of the enteric bacteria, it serves as a model for studies of endophytic, plant-bacterial associations due to its efficient colonization of plant tissues (including maize and wheat, two of the most important crops in the world), while maintaining a mutualistic relationship that encompasses supplying organic nitrogen to the host plant. Genomic analysis examined K. pneumoniae 342 for the presence of previously identified genes from other bacteria involved in colonization of, or growth in, plants. From this set, approximately one-third were identified in K. pneumoniae 342, suggesting additional factors most likely contribute to its endophytic lifestyle. Comparative genome analyses were used to provide new insights into this question. Results included the identification of metabolic pathways and other features devoted to processing plant-derived cellulosic and aromatic compounds, and a robust complement of transport genes (15.4%), one of the highest percentages in bacterial genomes sequenced. Although virulence and antibiotic resistance genes were predicted, experiments conducted using mouse models showed pathogenicity to be attenuated in this strain. Comparative genomic analyses with the presumed human pathogen K. pneumoniae MGH78578 revealed that MGH78578 apparently cannot fix nitrogen, and the distribution of genes essential to surface attachment, secretion, transport, and regulation and signaling varied between each genome, which may indicate critical divergences between the strains that influence their preferred host ranges and lifestyles (endophytic plant associations for K. pneumoniae 342 and presumably human pathogenesis for MGH78578). Little genome information is available concerning endophytic bacteria. The K. pneumoniae 342 genome will drive new research into this less-understood, but important category

  19. C7L family of poxvirus host range genes inhibits antiviral activities induced by type I interferons and interferon regulatory factor 1.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangzhi; Schoggins, John; Rose, Lloyd; Cao, Jingxin; Ploss, Alexander; Rice, Charles M; Xiang, Yan

    2012-04-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) K1L and C7L function equivalently in many mammalian cells to support VACV replication and antagonize antiviral activities induced by type I interferons (IFNs). While K1L is limited to orthopoxviruses, genes that are homologous to C7L are found in diverse mammalian poxviruses. In this study, we showed that the C7L homologues from sheeppox virus and swinepox virus could rescue the replication defect of a VACV mutant deleted of both K1L and C7L (vK1L(-)C7L(-)). Interestingly, the sheeppox virus C7L homologue could rescue the replication of vK1L(-)C7L(-) in human HeLa cells but not in murine 3T3 and LA-4 cells, in contrast to all other C7L homologues. Replacing amino acids 134 and 135 of the sheeppox virus C7L homologue, however, made it functional in the two murine cell lines, suggesting that these two residues are critical for antagonizing a putative host restriction factor which has some subtle sequence variation in human and murine cells. Furthermore, the C7L family of host range genes from diverse mammalian poxviruses were all capable of antagonizing type I IFN-induced antiviral activities against VACV. Screening of a library of more than 350 IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) identified interferon-regulated factor 1 (IRF1) as an inhibitor of vK1L(-)C7L(-) but not wild-type VACV. Expression of either K1L or C7L, however, rendered vK1L(-)C7L(-) resistant to IRF1-induced antiviral activities. Altogether, our data show that K1L and C7L antagonize IRF1-induced antiviral activities and that the host modulation function of C7L is evolutionally conserved in all poxviruses that can readily replicate in tissue-cultured mammalian cells.

  20. A Standardized Lepidopteran Bioassay to Investigate the Bioactivity of Insecticidal Proteins Produced in Transgenic Crops.

    PubMed

    Graser, Gerson; Walters, Frederick S

    2016-01-01

    Insecticidal bioassays are the only reliable method to investigate the biological activity of an insecticidal protein and therefore provide an essential toolkit for the characterization and potency determination of these proteins. Here we present a standardized method for a lepidopteran larval bioassay, which is optimized to specifically estimate activity of insecticidal proteins produced in transgenic plants. The treatment can be either applied to the surface of the artificial diet, or blended into the diet.

  1. Lepidopteran HMG-CoA reductase is a potential selective target for pest control

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan-mei; Huang, Juan; Tobe, Stephen S.

    2017-01-01

    As a consequence of the negative impacts on the environment of some insecticides, discovery of eco-friendly insecticides and target has received global attention in recent years. Sequence alignment and structural comparison of the rate-limiting enzyme HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR) revealed differences between lepidopteran pests and other organisms, which suggested insect HMGR could be a selective insecticide target candidate. Inhibition of JH biosynthesis in vitro confirmed that HMGR inhibitors showed a potent lethal effect on the lepidopteran pest Manduca sexta, whereas there was little effect on JH biosynthesis in Apis mellifera and Diploptera punctata. The pest control application of these inhibitors demonstrated that they can be insecticide candidates with potent ovicidal activity, larvicidal activity and insect growth regulatory effects. The present study has validated that Lepidopteran HMGR can be a potent selective insecticide target, and the HMGR inhibitors (especially type II statins) could be selective insecticide candidates and lead compounds. Furthermore, we demonstrated that sequence alignment, homology modeling and structural comparison may be useful for determining potential enzymes or receptors which can be eco-friendly pesticide  targets. PMID:28133568

  2. Characterization of protein phosphatase 5 from three lepidopteran insects: Helicoverpa armigera, Mythimna separata and Plutella xylostella.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi'en; Lü, Shumin; Zhang, Yalin

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 5 (PP5), a unique member of serine/threonine phosphatases, regulates a variety of biological processes. We obtained full-length PP5 cDNAs from three lepidopteran insects, Helicoverpa armigera, Mythimna separata and Plutella xylostella, encoding predicted proteins of 490 (55.98 kDa), 490 (55.82 kDa) and 491 (56.07 kDa) amino acids, respectively. These sequences shared a high identity with other insect PP5s and contained the TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat) domains at N-terminal regions and highly conserved C-terminal catalytic domains. Tissue- and stage-specific expression pattern analyses revealed these three PP5 genes were constitutively expressed in all stages and in tested tissues with predominant transcription occurring at the egg and adult stages. Activities of Escherichia coli-produced recombinant PP5 proteins could be enhanced by almost 2-fold by a known PP5 activator: arachidonic acid. Kinetic parameters of three recombinant proteins against substrate pNPP were similar both in the absence or presence of arachidonic acid. Protein phosphatases inhibitors, okadaic acid, cantharidin, and endothall strongly impeded the activities of the three recombinant PP5 proteins, as well as exerted an inhibitory effect on crude protein phosphatases extractions from these three insects. In summary, lepidopteran PP5s share similar characteristics and are all sensitive to the protein phosphatases inhibitors. Our results also imply protein phosphatase inhibitors might be used in the management of lepidopteran pests.

  3. Disentangling Peronospora on Papaver: Phylogenetics, Taxonomy, Nomenclature and Host Range of Downy Mildew of Opium Poppy (Papaver somniferum) and Related Species

    PubMed Central

    Voglmayr, Hermann; Montes-Borrego, Miguel; Landa, Blanca B.

    2014-01-01

    Based on sequence data from ITS rDNA, cox1 and cox2, six Peronospora species are recognised as phylogenetically distinct on various Papaver species. The host ranges of the four already described species P. arborescens, P. argemones, P. cristata and P. meconopsidis are clarified. Based on sequence data and morphology, two new species, P. apula and P. somniferi, are described from Papaver apulum and P. somniferum, respectively. The second Peronospora species parasitizing Papaver somniferum, that was only recently recorded as Peronospora cristata from Tasmania, is shown to represent a distinct taxon, P. meconopsidis, originally described from Meconopsis cambrica. It is shown that P. meconopsidis on Papaver somniferum is also present and widespread in Europe and Asia, but has been overlooked due to confusion with P. somniferi and due to less prominent, localized disease symptoms. Oospores are reported for the first time for P. meconopsidis from Asian collections on Papaver somniferum. Morphological descriptions, illustrations and a key are provided for all described Peronospora species on Papaver. cox1 and cox2 sequence data are confirmed as equally good barcoding loci for reliable Peronospora species identification, whereas ITS rDNA does sometimes not resolve species boundaries. Molecular phylogenetic data reveal high host specificity of Peronospora on Papaver, which has the important phytopathological implication that wild Papaver spp. cannot play any role as primary inoculum source for downy mildew epidemics in cultivated opium poppy crops. PMID:24806292

  4. Ensifer meliloti bv. lancerottense establishes nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with Lotus endemic to the Canary Islands and shows distinctive symbiotic genotypes and host range.

    PubMed

    León-Barrios, Milagros; Lorite, María José; Donate-Correa, Javier; Sanjuán, Juan

    2009-09-01

    Eleven strains were isolated from root nodules of Lotus endemic to the Canary Islands and they belonged to the genus Ensifer, a genus never previously described as a symbiont of Lotus. According to their 16S rRNA and atpD gene sequences, two isolates represented minority genotypes that could belong to previously undescribed Ensifer species, but most of the isolates were classified within the species Ensifer meliloti. These isolates nodulated Lotus lancerottensis, Lotus corniculatus and Lotus japonicus, whereas Lotus tenuis and Lotus uliginosus were more restrictive hosts. However, effective nitrogen fixation only occurred with the endemic L. lancerottensis. The E. meliloti strains did not nodulate Medicago sativa, Medicago laciniata Glycine max or Glycine soja, but induced non-fixing nodules on Phaseolus vulgaris roots. nodC and nifH symbiotic gene phylogenies showed that the E. meliloti symbionts of Lotus markedly diverged from strains of Mesorhizobium loti, the usual symbionts of Lotus, as well as from the three biovars (bv. meliloti, bv. medicaginis, and bv. mediterranense) so far described within E. meliloti. Indeed, the nodC and nifH genes from the E. meliloti isolates from Lotus represented unique symbiotic genotypes. According to their symbiotic gene sequences and host range, the Lotus symbionts would represent a new biovar of E. meliloti for which bv. lancerottense is proposed.

  5. Disentangling Peronospora on Papaver: phylogenetics, taxonomy, nomenclature and host range of downy mildew of opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) and related species.

    PubMed

    Voglmayr, Hermann; Montes-Borrego, Miguel; Landa, Blanca B

    2014-01-01

    Based on sequence data from ITS rDNA, cox1 and cox2, six Peronospora species are recognised as phylogenetically distinct on various Papaver species. The host ranges of the four already described species P. arborescens, P. argemones, P. cristata and P. meconopsidis are clarified. Based on sequence data and morphology, two new species, P. apula and P. somniferi, are described from Papaver apulum and P. somniferum, respectively. The second Peronospora species parasitizing Papaver somniferum, that was only recently recorded as Peronospora cristata from Tasmania, is shown to represent a distinct taxon, P. meconopsidis, originally described from Meconopsis cambrica. It is shown that P. meconopsidis on Papaver somniferum is also present and widespread in Europe and Asia, but has been overlooked due to confusion with P. somniferi and due to less prominent, localized disease symptoms. Oospores are reported for the first time for P. meconopsidis from Asian collections on Papaver somniferum. Morphological descriptions, illustrations and a key are provided for all described Peronospora species on Papaver. cox1 and cox2 sequence data are confirmed as equally good barcoding loci for reliable Peronospora species identification, whereas ITS rDNA does sometimes not resolve species boundaries. Molecular phylogenetic data reveal high host specificity of Peronospora on Papaver, which has the important phytopathological implication that wild Papaver spp. cannot play any role as primary inoculum source for downy mildew epidemics in cultivated opium poppy crops.

  6. The suitability of select ferns as hosts for Archips machlopis (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Surveys for natural enemies of invasive weed Lygodium microphyllum in Thailand resulted in the collection of lepidopteran Archips machlopis. Multiple generations of the tortricid were reared on L. microphyllum in a quarantine laboratory, demonstrating that the plant is a developmental host. Further ...

  7. Rhodomyrtus tomentosa: New Host Records for Metanastria gemella and Arna bipunctapex

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Surveys for host specific natural enemies of R. tomentosa in China (mainland and Hong Kong) resulted in the discovery of two lepidopteran species that have not been previously reported as herbivores of the plant: M. gemella and A. bipunctapex. Multiple generations of both species were reared on R. t...

  8. Complete Genome sequence of Burkholderia phymatum STM815(T), a broad host range and efficient nitrogen-fixing symbiont of Mimosa species.

    PubMed

    Moulin, Lionel; Klonowska, Agnieszka; Caroline, Bournaud; Booth, Kristina; Vriezen, Jan A C; Melkonian, Rémy; James, Euan K; Young, J Peter W; Bena, Gilles; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam; Kyrpides, Nikos; Bruce, David; Chain, Patrick; Copeland, Alex; Pitluck, Sam; Woyke, Tanja; Lizotte-Waniewski, Michelle; Bristow, Jim; Riley, Margaret

    2014-06-15

    Burkholderia phymatum is a soil bacterium able to develop a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with species of the legume genus Mimosa, and is frequently found associated specifically with Mimosa pudica. The type strain of the species, STM 815(T), was isolated from a root nodule in French Guiana in 2000. The strain is an aerobic, motile, non-spore forming, Gram-negative rod, and is a highly competitive strain for nodulation compared to other Mimosa symbionts, as it also nodulates a broad range of other legume genera and species. The 8,676,562 bp genome is composed of two chromosomes (3,479,187 and 2,697,374 bp), a megaplasmid (1,904,893 bp) and a plasmid hosting the symbiotic functions (595,108 bp).

  9. Complete Genome sequence of Burkholderia phymatum STM815T, a broad host range and efficient nitrogen-fixing symbiont of Mimosa species

    PubMed Central

    Moulin, Lionel; Klonowska, Agnieszka; Caroline, Bournaud; Booth, Kristina; Vriezen, Jan A.C.; Melkonian, Rémy; James, Euan K.; Young, J. Peter W.; Bena, Gilles; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam; Kyrpides, Nikos; Bruce, David; Chain, Patrick; Copeland, Alex; Pitluck, Sam; Woyke, Tanja; Lizotte-Waniewski, Michelle; Bristow, Jim; Riley, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia phymatum is a soil bacterium able to develop a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with species of the legume genus Mimosa, and is frequently found associated specifically with Mimosa pudica. The type strain of the species, STM 815T, was isolated from a root nodule in French Guiana in 2000. The strain is an aerobic, motile, non-spore forming, Gram-negative rod, and is a highly competitive strain for nodulation compared to other Mimosa symbionts, as it also nodulates a broad range of other legume genera and species. The 8,676,562 bp genome is composed of two chromosomes (3,479,187 and 2,697,374 bp), a megaplasmid (1,904,893 bp) and a plasmid hosting the symbiotic functions (595,108 bp). PMID:25197461

  10. Host Range of the Conjugative Transfer System of IncP-9 Naphthalene-Catabolic Plasmid NAH7 and Characterization of Its oriT Region and Relaxase

    PubMed Central

    Kishida, Kouhei; Inoue, Kei; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Nagata, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT NAH7 and pWW0 from gammaproteobacterial Pseudomonas putida strains are IncP-9 conjugative plasmids that carry the genes for degradation of naphthalene and toluene, respectively. Although such genes on these plasmids are well-characterized, experimental investigation of their conjugation systems remains at a primitive level. To clarify these conjugation systems, in this study, we investigated the NAH7-encoded conjugation system by (i) analyzing the origin of its conjugative transfer (oriT)-containing region and its relaxase, which specifically nicks within the oriT region for initiation of transfer, and (ii) comparing the conjugation systems between NAH7 and pWW0. The NAH7 oriT (oriTN) region was located within a 430-bp fragment, and the strand-specific nicking (nic) site and its upstream sequences that were important for efficient conjugation in the oriTN region were identified. Unlike many other relaxases, the NAH7 relaxase exhibited unique features in its ability to catalyze, in a conjugation-independent manner, the site-specific intramolecular recombination between two copies of the oriTN region, between two copies of the pWW0 oriT (oriTW) region (which is clearly different from the oriTN region), and between the oriTN and oriTW regions. The pWW0 relaxase, which is also clearly different from the NAH7 relaxase, was strongly suggested to have the ability to conjugatively and efficiently mobilize the oriTN-containing plasmid. Such a plasmid was, in the presence of the NAH7Δnic derivative, conjugatively transferable to alphaproteobacterial and betaproteobacterial strains in which the NAH7 replication machinery is nonfunctional, indicating that the NAH7 conjugation system has a broader host range than its replication system. IMPORTANCE Various studies have strongly suggested an important contribution of conjugative transfer of catabolic plasmids to the rapid and wide dissemination of the plasmid-loaded degradation genes to microbial populations

  11. Complete Genome sequence of Burkholderia phymatum STM815, a broad host range and efficient nitrogen-fixing symbiont of Mimosa species

    SciTech Connect

    Moulin, Lionel; Klonowska, Agnieszka; Caroline, Bournaud; Booth, Kristina; Vriezen, Jan A.C.; Melkonian, Remy; James, Euan; Young, Peter W.; Bena, Gilles; Hauser, Loren John; Land, Miriam L; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Bruce, David; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Copeland, A; Pitluck, Sam; Woyke, Tanja; Lizotte-Waniewski, Michelle; Bristow, James; Riley, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia phymatum is a soil bacterium able to develop a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with species of the legume genus Mimosa, and is frequently found associated specifically with Mimosa pudica. The type strain of the species, STM 815T, was isolated from a root nodule in French Guiana in 2000. The strain is an aerobic, motile, non-spore forming, Gram-negative rod, and is a highly competitive strain for nodulation compared to other Mimosa symbionts, as it also nodulates a broad range of other legume genera and species. The 8,676,562 bp genome is composed of two chromosomes (3,479,187 and 2,697,374 bp), a megaplasmid (1,904,893 bp) and a plasmid hosting the symbiotic functions (595,108 bp).

  12. Reversal of Fv-1 host range by in vitro restriction endonuclease fragment exchange between molecular clones of N-tropic and B-tropic murine leukemia virus genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, L.R.; Myer, F.E.; Yang, D.M.; Ou, C.Y.; Koh, C.K.; Roberson, L.E.; Tennant, R.W.; Yang, W.K.

    1983-10-01

    Unintegrated viral DNA of the BALB/c endogenous N-tropic and B-tropic murine leukemia retroviruses and invitro passaged N-tropic Gross (passage A) murine leukemia retroviruses were molecularly cloned. Recombinant genomes were constructed in vitro by exchanging homologous restriction enzyme fragments from N- or B-tropic parents and subsequent recloning. Infectious virus was recovered after transfection of these recombinant genomes into NIH-3T3 cells and cocultivation with the Fv-1 nonrestrictive SC-1 cells. XC plaque assays of recombinant virus progeny on Fv-1/sup n/ and Fv-1/sup b/ cells indicated the the Fv-1 host range was determined by sequences located between the BamHI site in the p30 region of the gag gene (1.6 kilobase pairs from the left end of the map) and the HindIII site located in the pol gene (2.9 kilobase pairs from the left end of the map.

  13. Reversal of Fv-1 host range by in vitro restriction endonuclease fragment exchange between molecular clones of N-tropic and B-tropic murine leukemia virus genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, L.R.; Myer, F.E.; Yang, D.M.; Ou, C.Y.; Koh, C.K.; Roberson, L.E.; Tennant, R.W.; Yang, W.K.

    1983-10-01

    The authors molecularly cloned unintegrated viral DNA of the BALB/c endogenous N-tropic and B-tropic murine leukemia retroviruses and in vitro passage N-tropic Gross (passage A) murine leukemia retroviruses. Recombinant genomes were constructed in vitro by exchanging homologous restriction enzyme fragments from N- or B-tropic parents and subsequent recloning. Infectious virus was recovered after transfection of these recombinant genomes into NIH-3T3 cells and cocultivation with the Fv-1 nonrestrictive SC-1 cells. XC plaque assays of recombinant virus progeny on Fv-1/sup n/ and Fv-1/sup b/ cells indicated that the Fv-1 host range was determined by sequences located between the BamHI site in the p30 region of the gag gene (1.6 kilobase pairs from the left end of the map) and the HindIII site located in pol gene (2.9 kilobase pairs from the left end of the map).

  14. Host-range testing of Eucryptorrhynchus brandti (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a candidate for biological control of tree-of-heaven, Ailanthus altissima.

    PubMed

    Herrick, N J; McAvoy, T J; Snyder, A L; Salom, S M; Kok, L T

    2012-02-01

    Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) Swingle, tree-of-heaven, is an invasive species native to Asia. It first was introduced into the United States in the 1700 s and now is distributed throughout much of North America. Mechanical and chemical controls are current suppression tactics, however, implementation is costly. A weevil, Eucryptorrhynchus brandti (Harold), was identified in China and imported for quarantine testing in 2004 as a potential biological control agent. Host specificity tests on adult feeding, larval development, and oviposition of this weevil were conducted from 2007 to 2011 on A. altissima and 29 nontarget species. Eucryptorrhynchus brandti adults fed significantly more on A. altissima foliage when compared with all test species. Range of means for feeding on A. altissima was 32.5-106.5 mm(2)/adult/d. In no-choice tests, Simarouba glauca DC, Leitneria floridana Chapm., and Citrus limon (L.) Burm. F., had feeding rates of only 10, 49, and 10%, respectively, compared with the level of feeding on A. altissima. The mean range of adult feeding by E. brandti on all other test species was <7% of feeding on A. altissima (0.0-3.3 ± 5.0 mm(2)/adult/d). In the no-choice larval inoculation tests, larval development only occurred in two of 10 L. floridana seedlings compared with seven of 10 A. altissima seedlings. In the no-choice oviposition tests, oviposition and subsequent larval development did not occur in L. floridiana, whereas all seven A. altissima seedlings supported oviposition and subsequent larval development. The weevil did not appear to be a threat to L. floridana or any other nontarget species tested. Therefore, we conclude that Eucryptorrhynchus brandti is highly host specific to A. altissima.

  15. Suppressors of a Host Range Mutation in the Rabbitpox Virus Serpin SPI-1 Map to Proteins Essential for Viral DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Luttge, Benjamin G.; Moyer, Richard W.

    2005-01-01

    The orthopoxvirus serpin SPI-1 is an intracellular serine protease inhibitor that is active against cathepsin G in vitro. Rabbitpox virus (RPV) mutants with deletions of the SPI-1 gene grow on monkey kidney cells (CV-1) but do not plaque on normally permissive human lung carcinoma cells (A549). This reduced-host-range (hr) phenotype suggests that SPI-1 may interact with cellular and/or other viral proteins. We devised a genetic screen for suppressors of SPI-1 hr mutations by first introducing a mutation into SPI-1 (T309R) at residue P14 of the serpin reactive center loop. The SPI-1 T309R serpin is inactive as a protease inhibitor in vitro. Introduction of the mutation into RPV leads to the same restricted hr phenotype as deletion of the SPI-1 gene. Second-site suppressors were selected by restoration of growth of the RPV SPI-1 T309R hr mutant on A549 cells. Both intragenic and extragenic suppressors of the T309R mutation were identified. One novel intragenic suppressor mutation, T309C, restored protease inhibition by SPI-1 in vitro. Extragenic suppressor mutations were mapped by a new procedure utilizing overlapping PCR products encompassing the entire genome in conjunction with marker rescue. One suppressor mutation, which also rendered the virus temperature sensitive for growth, mapped to the DNA polymerase gene (E9L). Several other suppressors mapped to gene D5R, an NTPase required for DNA replication. These results unexpectedly suggest that the host range function of SPI-1 may be associated with viral DNA replication by an as yet unknown mechanism. PMID:15994811

  16. The Detection and Sequencing of a Broad-Host-Range Conjugative IncP-1β Plasmid in an Epidemic Strain of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii

    PubMed Central

    Leão, Sylvia Cardoso; Matsumoto, Cristianne Kayoko; Carneiro, Adriana; Ramos, Rommel Thiago; Nogueira, Christiane Lourenço; Junior, James Daltro Lima; Lima, Karla Valéria; Lopes, Maria Luiza; Schneider, Horacio; Azevedo, Vasco Ariston; da Costa da Silva, Artur

    2013-01-01

    Background An extended outbreak of mycobacterial surgical infections occurred in Brazil during 2004–2008. Most infections were caused by a single strain of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii, which was characterized by a specific rpoB sequevar and two highly similar pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns differentiated by the presence of a ∼50 kb band. The nature of this band was investigated. Methodology/Principal Findings Genomic sequencing of the prototype outbreak isolate INCQS 00594 using the SOLiD platform demonstrated the presence of a 56,264-bp circular plasmid, designated pMAB01. Identity matrices, genetic distances and phylogeny analyses indicated that pMAB01 belongs to the broad-host-range plasmid subgroup IncP-1β and is highly related to BRA100, pJP4, pAKD33 and pB10. The presence of pMAB01-derived sequences in 41 M. abscessus subsp. bolletii isolates was evaluated using PCR, PFGE and Southern blot hybridization. Sixteen of the 41 isolates showed the presence of the plasmid. The plasmid was visualized as a ∼50-kb band using PFGE and Southern blot hybridization in 12 isolates. The remaining 25 isolates did not exhibit any evidence of this plasmid. The plasmid was successfully transferred to Escherichia coli by conjugation and transformation. Lateral transfer of pMAB01 to the high efficient plasmid transformation strain Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155 could not be demonstrated. Conclusions/Significance The occurrence of a broad-host-range IncP-1β plasmid in mycobacteria is reported for the first time. Thus, genetic exchange could result in the emergence of specific strains that might be better adapted to cause human disease. PMID:23565273

  17. The newly described mecA homologue, mecALGA251, is present in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates from a diverse range of host species

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, G. K.; Larsen, A. R.; Robb, A.; Edwards, G. E.; Pennycott, T. W.; Foster, G.; Mot, D.; Hermans, K.; Baert, K.; Peacock, S. J.; Parkhill, J.; Zadoks, R. N.; Holmes, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives A previously unidentified mecA homologue, mecALGA251, has recently been described in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from humans and dairy cattle. The origin and epidemiology of this novel homologue are unclear. The objective of this study was to provide basic descriptive information of MRSA isolates harbouring mecALGA251 from a range of host animal species. Methods A number of S. aureus isolates from historical animal isolate collections were chosen for investigation based on their similarity to known mecALGA251 MRSA isolates. The presence of mecALGA251 was determined using a multiplex PCR and antimicrobial susceptibility testing performed by disc diffusion. Results MRSA harbouring mecALGA251 were found in isolates from a domestic dog, brown rats, a rabbit, a common seal, sheep and a chaffinch. All of the isolates were phenotypically MRSA, although this depended on which test was used; some isolates would be considered susceptible with certain assays. All isolates were susceptible to linezolid, rifampicin, kanamycin, norfloxacin, erythromycin, clindamycin, fusidic acid, tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and mupirocin. Five multilocus sequence types were represented (2273, 130, 425, 1764 and 1245) and six spa types (t208, t6293, t742, t6594, t7914 and t843). Conclusions The discovery of MRSA isolates possessing mecALGA251 from a diverse range of host species, including different taxonomic classes, has important implications for the diagnosis of MRSA in these species and our understanding of the epidemiology of this novel mecA homologue. PMID:22941897

  18. Suppressors of a host range mutation in the rabbitpox virus serpin SPI-1 map to proteins essential for viral DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Luttge, Benjamin G; Moyer, Richard W

    2005-07-01

    The orthopoxvirus serpin SPI-1 is an intracellular serine protease inhibitor that is active against cathepsin G in vitro. Rabbitpox virus (RPV) mutants with deletions of the SPI-1 gene grow on monkey kidney cells (CV-1) but do not plaque on normally permissive human lung carcinoma cells (A549). This reduced-host-range (hr) phenotype suggests that SPI-1 may interact with cellular and/or other viral proteins. We devised a genetic screen for suppressors of SPI-1 hr mutations by first introducing a mutation into SPI-1 (T309R) at residue P14 of the serpin reactive center loop. The SPI-1 T309R serpin is inactive as a protease inhibitor in vitro. Introduction of the mutation into RPV leads to the same restricted hr phenotype as deletion of the SPI-1 gene. Second-site suppressors were selected by restoration of growth of the RPV SPI-1 T309R hr mutant on A549 cells. Both intragenic and extragenic suppressors of the T309R mutation were identified. One novel intragenic suppressor mutation, T309C, restored protease inhibition by SPI-1 in vitro. Extragenic suppressor mutations were mapped by a new procedure utilizing overlapping PCR products encompassing the entire genome in conjunction with marker rescue. One suppressor mutation, which also rendered the virus temperature sensitive for growth, mapped to the DNA polymerase gene (E9L). Several other suppressors mapped to gene D5R, an NTPase required for DNA replication. These results unexpectedly suggest that the host range function of SPI-1 may be associated with viral DNA replication by an as yet unknown mechanism.

  19. Genome Replication and Postencapsidation Functions Mapping to the Nonstructural Gene Restrict the Host Range of a Murine Parvovirus in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Mari-Paz; Guerra, Susana; Almendral, José M.

    2001-01-01

    The infection outcome of the Parvoviridae largely relies on poorly characterized intracellular factors modulated by proliferation, differentiation, and transformation of host cells. We have studied the interactions displayed by the highly homologous p and i strains of the murine parvovirus minute virus of mice (MVM), with a series of transformed cells of rat (C6) and human (U373, U87, SW1088, SK-N-SH) nervous system origin, seeking for molecular mechanisms governing parvovirus host range. The MVMp infection of C6 and U373 cells was cytotoxic and productive, whereas the other nervous cells behaved essentially as resistant to this virus. In contrast, MVMi did not complete its life cycle in any of the human nervous cells, though it efficiently killed the astrocytic tumor cells by two types of nonproductive infections: (i) normal synthesis of all viral macromolecules with a late defect in infectious virion maturation and release to the medium in U373; and (ii) high levels of accumulation of the full set of viral messenger RNAs and of both nonstructural (NS-1) and structural (VP-1 and VP-2) proteins, under a very low viral DNA amplification, in U87 and SW1088 cells. Further analyses showed that U87 was permissive for nuclear transport of MVMi proteins, leading to efficient assembly of empty viral capsids with a normal phosphorylation and VP1-to-VP2 ratio. The DNA amplification blockade in U87 occurred after conversion of the incoming MVMi genome to the monomeric replicative form, and it operated independently of the delivery pathway used by the viral particle, since it could not be overcome by transfection with cloned infectious viral DNA. Significantly, a chimeric MVMi virus harboring the coding region of the nonstructural (NS) gene replaced with that of MVMp showed a similar pattern of restriction in U87 cells as the parental MVMi virus, and it attained in U373 cultures an infectious titer above 100-fold higher under equal levels of DNA amplification and genome

  20. Conserved RNA cis-elements regulate alternative splicing of Lepidopteran doublesex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiu-Ye; Zheng, Zeng-Zhang; Song, Hong-Sheng; Xu, Yong-Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Doublesex (dsx) is a downstream key regulator in insect sex determination pathway. In Drosophila, alternative splicing of Dm-dsx gene is sex-specifically regulated by transformer (tra), in which the functional TRA promotes female-specific Dm-dsx. However, the sex determination pathway in Lepidoptera is not well understood; here we focused on alternative splicing of doublesex (dsx) in two agricultural pests, Asian corn borer (Ostrinia furnacalis) and cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera), as well as the silkworm (Bombyx mori). More than a dozen new alternative splicing isoforms of dsx were found in the Lepidopteran females, which exist in all tested developmental stages and differentiated tissues. Alignment of mRNA and protein sequences of doublesex revealed high conservation of this gene in Lepidoptera. Strength analysis of splice sites revealed a weak 5' splice site at intron 3 in Lepidopteran dsx, which was experimentally confirmed. Furthermore, we identified highly conserved RNA sequences in the Lepidopteran dsx, including RNA elements I (14 nt), II (11 nt), III (26 nt), IV (17 nt), 3E-1 (8 nt) and 3E-2 (8 nt). The RNA elements III and IV were previously found in exon 4 of B. mori dsx and bound with Bm-PSI, which suppressed the inclusion of exons 3 & 4 into the male-specific Bm-dsx. Then we identified and analyzed the homologous genes of Bm-psi in the two Lepidopteran pests, which expressed at similar levels and exhibited a unique isoform in the males and females from each Lepidoptera. Importantly, mutagenesis of Bm-dsx mini-genes and their expression in BmN cell line demonstrated that three RNA elements are involved in the female-specific alternative splicing of Bm-dsx. Mutations in the RNA cis-elements 3E-1 and 3E-2 resulted in decreased inclusion of exon 3 into the female-specific dsx mRNA, suggesting that these two elements would be exonic splicing enhancers that facilitate the recognition of the weak 5' splice site at intron 3 of Lepidopteran dsx. We

  1. A Lepidopteran-Specific Gene Family Encoding Valine-Rich Midgut Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Odman-Naresh, Jothini; Duevel, Margret; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Merzendorfer, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Many lepidopteran larvae are serious agricultural pests due to their feeding activity. Digestion of the plant diet occurs mainly in the midgut and is facilitated by the peritrophic matrix (PM), an extracellular sac-like structure, which lines the midgut epithelium and creates different digestive compartments. The PM is attracting increasing attention to control lepidopteran pests by interfering with this vital function. To identify novel PM components and thus potential targets for insecticides, we performed an immunoscreening with anti-PM antibodies using an expression library representing the larval midgut transcriptome of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. We identified three cDNAs encoding valine-rich midgut proteins of M. sexta (MsVmps), which appear to be loosely associated with the PM. They are members of a lepidopteran-specific family of nine VMP genes, which are exclusively expressed in larval stages in M. sexta. Most of the MsVMP transcripts are detected in the posterior midgut, with the highest levels observed for MsVMP1. To obtain further insight into Vmp function, we expressed MsVMP1 in insect cells and purified the recombinant protein. Lectin staining and glycosidase treatment indicated that MsVmp1 is highly O-glycosylated. In line with results from qPCR, immunoblots revealed that MsVmp1 amounts are highest in feeding larvae, while MsVmp1 is undetectable in starving and molting larvae. Finally using immunocytochemistry, we demonstrated that MsVmp1 localizes to the cytosol of columnar cells, which secrete MsVmp1 into the ectoperitrophic space in feeding larvae. In starving and molting larvae, MsVmp1 is found in the gut lumen, suggesting that the PM has increased its permeability. The present study demonstrates that lepidopteran species including many agricultural pests have evolved a set of unique proteins that are not found in any other taxon and thus may reflect an important adaptation in the highly specialized lepidopteran digestive tract facing

  2. Understanding phyolgenetic relationships among species in the Nosema/Vairimorpha clade: what does genetic similarity say about host switching in the microsporidia?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Microsporidian species with high genetic identity based on rDNA phylogenies have been isolated from different insect species and even higher level host taxa across the globe. Complicating the picture, for genera such as the lepidopteran Nosema and Vairimorpha, isolates from different hosts may be mo...

  3. Coevolutionary arms race versus host defense chase in a tropical herbivore-plant system.

    PubMed

    Endara, María-José; Coley, Phyllis D; Ghabash, Gabrielle; Nicholls, James A; Dexter, Kyle G; Donoso, David A; Stone, Graham N; Pennington, R Toby; Kursar, Thomas A

    2017-09-05

    Coevolutionary models suggest that herbivores drive diversification and community composition in plants. For herbivores, many questions remain regarding how plant defenses shape host choice and community structure. We addressed these questions using the tree genus Inga and its lepidopteran herbivores in the Amazon. We constructed phylogenies for both plants and insects and quantified host associations and plant defenses. We found that similarity in herbivore assemblages between Inga species was correlated with similarity in defenses. There was no correlation with phylogeny, a result consistent with our observations that the expression of defenses in Inga is independent of phylogeny. Furthermore, host defensive traits explained 40% of herbivore community similarity. Analyses at finer taxonomic scales showed that different lepidopteran clades select hosts based on different defenses, suggesting taxon-specific histories of herbivore-host plant interactions. Finally, we compared the phylogeny and defenses of Inga to phylogenies for the major lepidopteran clades. We found that closely related herbivores fed on Inga with similar defenses rather than on closely related plants. Together, these results suggest that plant defenses might be more evolutionarily labile than the herbivore traits related to host association. Hence, there is an apparent asymmetry in the evolutionary interactions between Inga and its herbivores. Although plants may evolve under selection by herbivores, we hypothesize that herbivores may not show coevolutionary adaptations, but instead "chase" hosts based on the herbivore's own traits at the time that they encounter a new host, a pattern more consistent with resource tracking than with the arms race model of coevolution.

  4. A baseline analysis of the distribution, host-range, and severity of the rust Puccinia Psidii in the Hawaiian islands, 2005-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Puccinia psidii was first described by Winter (1884) on guava (Psidium guajava L.) in Brazil. The rust is still a major pest of native guava in Brazil and is often referred to as “guava rust” internationally. It is unusual among rust fungi because of its broad and ever-expanding host-range within the Myrtaceae plant family (Simpson et al. 2006). The pathogen is regarded as a major threat to Eucalyptus plantations and other Myrtaceae worldwide (Coutinho et al. 1998, Grgurinovic et al. 2006, Glen et al. 2007). Infections of leaves and meristems are particularly severe on susceptible seedlings, cuttings, young trees, and coppice, causing plants to be stunted and multi-branched, inhibiting normal growth and development, and sometimes causing death to young seedlings (Booth et al. 2000, Rayachhetry et al. 2001). The fungus has expanded its host-range in Brazil, affecting both native and introduced Myrtaceae (Coutinho et al. 1998).


    Since its discovery in 1884, P. psidii has continually been discovered to have an expanding host-range within the Myrtaceae, affecting hosts throughout much of South and Central America and the Caribbean. Spreading out originally from Brazil in 1884, the fungus has been reported on hosts in the following countries (first record in parentheses): Paraguay (1884), Uruguay (1889), Ecuador (1891), Colombia (1913), Puerto Rico (1913), Cuba (1926), Dominican Republic (1933), Venezuela (1934), Jamaica (1936), Argentina (1946), Dominica (1948), Trinidad and Tobago (1951), Guatemala (1968), United States (Florida; 1977), Mexico (1981), El Salvador (1987), and Costa Rica (1998) (Simpson et al. 2006). It is possible that P. psidii was present in El Salvador and Costa Rica prior to 1980, but was not reported until 1987 and 1998, respectively.


    Until recently, Puccinia psidii was restricted to the Neotropics, Mexico, and the

  5. Habitat, world geographic range, and embryonic development of hosts explain the prevalence of avian hematozoa at small spatial and phylogenetic scales

    PubMed Central

    Tella, José L.; Blanco, Guillermo; Forero, Manuela G.; Gajón, Álvaro; Donázar, José A.; Hiraldo, Fernando

    1999-01-01

    The factors explaining interspecific differences in prevalences of blood parasites in birds are poorly known. We simultaneously assessed 20 social, ecological, life history, and sampling-related variables that could influence hemoparasite prevalences among diurnal birds of prey in Spain. Our results show that multiple factors are responsible for the studied host–parasite association. We confirmed for the first time that prevalence is inversely correlated to the embryonic development period, and thus probably to immune performance, even among closely related birds. Macrohabitat features related to vector availability are also important, prevalences being higher in species breeding in forested habitats. Finally, prevalence is positively correlated with the host’s world geographic range. We hypothesize that larger geographic ranges offered more opportunities for host-vector-hemoparasite associations to become established. The results from our multivariate analyses differ from those obtained through univariate ones, showing that all potential factors should be assessed jointly when testing any ecological or evolutionary hypothesis dealing with parasites. PMID:9990102

  6. Different Phenotypes of Walker-Like A Box Mutants of ParA Homolog IncC of Broad-Host-Range IncP Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Siddique, Azeem; Figurski, David H.

    2012-01-01

    The promiscuous IncPα plasmids RK2 and R995 encode a broad-host-range partition system, whose essential components include the incC and korB genes and a DNA site (OB) to which the korB product binds. IncC2, the smaller of the two incC products, is sufficient for stabilization of R995ΔincC. It is a member of the type Ia ParA family of partition ATPases. To better understand the role of ATP in partition, we constructed three alanine-substitution mutants of IncC2. Each mutation changed a different residue of the Walker-like ATP-binding and hydrolysis motif, including a lysine (K10) conserved solely among members of the ParA and MinD families. All three IncC2 mutants were defective in plasmid partition, but they differed from one another in other respects. The IncC2 T16A mutant, predicted to be defective in Mg2+ coordination, was severely impaired in all activities tested. IncC2 K10A, predicted to be defective in ATP hydrolysis, mediated enhanced incompatibility with R995 derivatives. IncC2 K15A, predicted to be defective in ATP binding, exhibited two distinct incompatibility properties depending on the genotype of the target plasmid. When in trans to plasmids carrying a complementable incC deletion, IncC2 K15A caused dramatic plasmid loss, even at low levels of expression. In trans to wild-type R995 or to R995ΔincC carrying a functional P1 partition system, IncC2 K15A-mediated incompatibility was significantly less than that caused by wild-type IncC2. All three Walker-like A box mutants were also defective for the host toxicity that normally results from co-overexpression of incC and korB. The phenotypes of the mutants support a model in which nucleotide hydrolysis is required for separation of paired plasmid complexes and possible interaction with a host factor. PMID:22579980

  7. C7L Family of Poxvirus Host Range Genes Inhibits Antiviral Activities Induced by Type I Interferons and Interferon Regulatory Factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiangzhi; Schoggins, John; Rose, Lloyd; Cao, Jingxin; Ploss, Alexander; Rice, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) K1L and C7L function equivalently in many mammalian cells to support VACV replication and antagonize antiviral activities induced by type I interferons (IFNs). While K1L is limited to orthopoxviruses, genes that are homologous to C7L are found in diverse mammalian poxviruses. In this study, we showed that the C7L homologues from sheeppox virus and swinepox virus could rescue the replication defect of a VACV mutant deleted of both K1L and C7L (vK1L−C7L−). Interestingly, the sheeppox virus C7L homologue could rescue the replication of vK1L−C7L− in human HeLa cells but not in murine 3T3 and LA-4 cells, in contrast to all other C7L homologues. Replacing amino acids 134 and 135 of the sheeppox virus C7L homologue, however, made it functional in the two murine cell lines, suggesting that these two residues are critical for antagonizing a putative host restriction factor which has some subtle sequence variation in human and murine cells. Furthermore, the C7L family of host range genes from diverse mammalian poxviruses were all capable of antagonizing type I IFN-induced antiviral activities against VACV. Screening of a library of more than 350 IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) identified interferon-regulated factor 1 (IRF1) as an inhibitor of vK1L−C7L− but not wild-type VACV. Expression of either K1L or C7L, however, rendered vK1L−C7L− resistant to IRF1-induced antiviral activities. Altogether, our data show that K1L and C7L antagonize IRF1-induced antiviral activities and that the host modulation function of C7L is evolutionally conserved in all poxviruses that can readily replicate in tissue-cultured mammalian cells. PMID:22345458

  8. Geochemistry and geochronology of carbonate-hosted base metal deposits in the southern Brooks Range, Alaska: temporal association with VMS deposits and metallogenic implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, Karen; Slack, John; Selby, David

    2009-01-01

    The Brooks Range contains enormous accumulations of zinc and copper, either as VMS or sediment-hosted deposits. The Ruby Creek and Omar deposits are Cu-Co stratabound deposits associated with dolomitic breccias. Numerous volcanogenic Cu-Zn (+/-Ag, Au) deposits are situated ~20 km north of the Ruby Creek deposit. The carbonate-hosted deposits consist of chalcopyrite and bornite that fill open spaces, replace the matrix of the breccias, and occur in later cross-cutting veins. Cobaltiferous pyrite, chalcocite, minor tennantite-tetrahedrite, galena, and sphalerite are also present. At Ruby Creek, phases such as carrollite, renierite, and germanite occur rarely. The deposits have undergone post-depositional metamorphism (Ruby Creek, low greenschist facies; Omar, blueschist facies). The unusual geochemical signature includes Cu-Co +/- Ag, As, Au, Bi, Ge, Hg, Sb, and U with sporadic high Re concentrations (up to 2.7 ppm). New Re-Os data were obtained for chalcopyrite, bornite, and pyrite from the Ruby Creek deposit (analyses of sulfides from Omar are in progress). The data show extremely high Re abundances (hundreds of ppb, low ppm) and contain essentially no common Os. The Re-Os data provide the first absolute ages of ore formation for the Ruby Creek deposit and demonstrate that the Re-Os systematics of pyrite, chalcopyrite, and bornite are unaffected by greenschist metamorphism. The Re-Os data show that the main phase of Cu mineralization occurred at 384 +/-4.2 Ma, which coincides with zircon U-Pb ages from igneous rocks that are spatially and genetically associated with VMS deposits. This suggests a temporal link between regional magmatism and hydrothermal mineralization.

  9. A self-transmissible, narrow-host-range endogenous plasmid of Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1: physical structure, incompatibility determinants, origin of replication, and transfer functions.

    PubMed Central

    Suwanto, A; Kaplan, S

    1992-01-01

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 naturally harbors five cryptic endogenous plasmids (C. S. Fornari, M. Watkins, and S. Kaplan, Plasmid 11:39-47, 1984). The smallest plasmid (pRS241e), with a molecular size of 42 kb, was observed to be a self-transmissible plasmid which can transfer only to certain strains of R. sphaeroides. Transfer frequencies can be as high as 10(-2) to 10(-3) per donor under optimal mating conditions in liquid media in the absence of oxygen. pRS241e, designated the S factor, was also shown to possess a narrow host range, failing either to replicate or to be maintained in Escherichia coli, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and Rhizobium meliloti. It was further revealed that one of the remaining four endogenous plasmids, pRS241d, was also transmissible at a frequency similar to that of the S. factor. As a cointegrate with pSUP203, S was maintained in E. coli, providing sufficient DNA from which a physical map of S could be constructed. Progressive subcloning of S-factor DNA, in conjunction with assays of plasmid transfer, led to the localization and identification of oriV (IncA), IncB, and the putative oriT locus. The DNA sequence of the 427 bp containing oriTs revealed topological similarity to other described oriT sequences, consisting of an A-T-rich DNA region, several direct and inverted repeats, and putative integration host factor (IHF)-binding sites, and was shown to be functional in promoting plasmid transfer. Images PMID:1735707

  10. Fundamental host range of Pseudophilothrips ichini s.l. (Thysanoptera: Phlaeothripidae): a candidate biological control agent of Schinus terebinthifolius (Sapindales: Anacardiaceae) in the United States.

    PubMed

    Cuda, J P; Medal, J C; Gillmore, J L; Habeck, D H; Pedrosa-Macedo, J H

    2009-12-01

    Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi (Sapindales: Anacardiaceae) is a non-native perennial woody plant that is one of the most invasive weeds in Florida, Hawaii, and more recently California and Texas. This plant was introduced into Florida from South America as a landscape ornamental in the late 19th century, eventually escaped cultivation, and now dominates entire ecosystems in south-central Florida. Recent DNA studies have confirmed two separate introductions of S. terebinthifolius in Florida, and there is evidence of hybridization. A thrips, Pseudophilothrips ichini s.l. (Hood) (Thysanoptera: Phlaeothripidae), is commonly found attacking shoots and flowers of S. terebinthifolius in Brazil. Immatures and occasionally adults form large aggregations on young terminal growth (stems and leaves) of the plant. Feeding damage by P. ichini s.l. frequently kills new shoots, which reduces vigor and restricts growth of S. terebinthifolius. Greenhouse and laboratory host range tests with 46 plant species in 18 families and 10 orders were conducted in Paraná, Brazil, and Florida. Results of no-choice, paired-choice, and multiple-choice tests indicated that P. ichini s.l. is capable of reproducing only on S. terebinthifolius and possibly Schinus molle L., an ornamental introduced into California from Peru that has escaped cultivation and is considered invasive. Our results showed that P. ichini s.l. posed minimal risk to mature S. molle plants or the Florida native Metopium toxiferum L. Krug and Urb. In May 2007, the federal interagency Technical Advisory Group for Biological Control Agents of Weeds (TAG) concluded P. ichini s.l. was sufficiently host specific to recommend its release from quarantine.

  11. A mitochondrial genome phylogeny of owlet moths (Lepidoptera: Noctuoidea), and examination of the utility of mitochondrial genomes for lepidopteran phylogenetics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiushuai; Cameron, Stephen L; Lees, David C; Xue, Dayong; Han, Hongxiang

    2015-04-01

    A phylogenetic hypothesis for the lepidopteran superfamily Noctuoidea was inferred based on the complete mitochondrial (mt) genomes of 12 species (six newly sequenced). The monophyly of each noctuoid family in the latest classification was well supported. Novel and robust relationships were recovered at the family level, in contrast to previous analyses using nuclear genes. Erebidae was recovered as sister to (Nolidae+(Euteliidae+Noctuidae)), while Notodontidae was sister to all these taxa (the putatively basalmost lineage Oenosandridae was not included). In order to improve phylogenetic resolution using mt genomes, various analytical approaches were tested: Bayesian inference (BI) vs. maximum likelihood (ML), excluding vs. including RNA genes (rRNA or tRNA), and Gblocks treatment. The evolutionary signal within mt genomes had low sensitivity to analytical changes. Inference methods had the most significant influence. Inclusion of tRNAs positively increased the congruence of topologies, while inclusion of rRNAs resulted in a range of phylogenetic relationships varying depending on other analytical factors. The two Gblocks parameter settings had opposite effects on nodal support between the two inference methods. The relaxed parameter (GBRA) resulted in higher support values in BI analyses, while the strict parameter (GBDH) resulted in higher support values in ML analyses.

  12. Persistent RNA virus infection of lepidopteran cell lines: Interactions with the RNAi machinery.

    PubMed

    Swevers, Luc; Ioannidis, Konstantinos; Kolovou, Marianna; Zografidis, Aris; Labropoulou, Vassiliki; Santos, Dulce; Wynant, Niels; Broeck, Jozef Vanden; Wang, Luoluo; Cappelle, Kaat; Smagghe, Guy

    RNAi is broadly used as a technique for specific gene silencing in insects but few studies have investigated the factors that can affect its efficiency. Viral infections have the potential to interfere with RNAi through their production of viral suppressors of RNAi (VSRs) and the production of viral small RNAs that can saturate and inactivate the RNAi machinery. In this study, the impact of persistent infection of the RNA viruses Flock house virus (FHV) and Macula-like virus (MLV) on RNAi efficiency was investigated in selected lepidopteran cell lines. Lepidopteran cell lines were found to be readily infected by both viruses without any apparent pathogenic effects, with the exception of Bombyx-derived Bm5 and BmN4 cells, which could not be infected by FHV. Because Sf21 cells were free from both FHV and MLV and Hi5-SF were free from FHV and only contained low levels of MLV, they were tested to evaluate the impact of the presence of the virus. Two types of RNAi reporter assays however did not detect a significant interference with gene silencing in infected Sf21 and Hi5-SF cells when compared to virus-free cells. In Hi5 cells, the presence of FHV could be easily cleared through the expression of an RNA hairpin that targets its VSR gene, confirming that the RNAi mechanism was not inhibited. Sequencing indicated that the B2 RNAi inhibitor gene of FHV and a putative VSR gene from MLV were intact in persistently infected cell lines, indicating that protection against RNAi remains essential for virus survival. It is proposed that infection levels of persistent viruses in the cell lines are too low to have an impact on RNAi efficiency in the lepidopteran cell lines and that encoded VSRs act locally at the sites of viral replication (mitochondrial membranes) without affecting the rest of the cytoplasm.

  13. Mitochondrial genome characterization of Tecia solanivora (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) and its phylogenetic relationship with other lepidopteran insects.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Ríos, Viviana; Franco-Sierra, Nicolás D; Alvarez, Javier Correa; Saldamando-Benjumea, Clara I; Villanueva-Mejía, Diego F

    2016-05-01

    The complete mitogenome of the potato tuber moth Tecia solanivora (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) was sequenced, annotated, characterized and compared with 140 species of the order Lepidoptera. The circular genome is 15,251 bp, containing 37 genes (13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), two rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and an A+T-rich region). The gene arrangement was identical to other lepidopteran mitogenomes but different from the ancestral arrangement found in most insects for the tRNA-Met gene (A+T-region, tRNA-I, tRNA-Q, tRNA-M). The mitogenome of T. solanivora is highly A+T-biased (78.2%) and exhibits negative AT- and GC-skews. All PCGs are initiated by canonical ATN start codons, except for Cytochrome Oxidase subunit 1 (COI), which is initiated by CGA. Most PCGs have a complete typical stop codon (TAA). Only NAD1 has a TAG stop codon and the COII and NAD5 genes have an incomplete stop codon consisting of just a T. The A+T-rich region is 332 bp long and contains common features found in lepidopteran mitogenomes, including the 'ATAGA' motif, a 17 bp poly (T) stretch and a (AT)8 element preceded by the 'ATTTA' motif. Other tandem repeats like (TAA)4 and (TAT)7 were found, as well as (T)6 and (A)10 mononucleotide repeat elements. Finally, this mitogenome has 20 intergenic spacer regions. The phylogenetic relationship of T. solanivora with 28 other lepidopteran families (12 superfamilies) showed that taxonomic classification by morphological features coincides with the inferred phylogeny. Thus, the Gelechiidae family represents a monophyletic group, suggesting that T. solanivora and Pectinophora gossypiella have a recent common ancestor.

  14. Chlorantraniliprole as a candidate pesticide used in combination with the attracticides for lepidopteran moths

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yongqiang; Gao, Yu; Liang, Gemei

    2017-01-01

    Methomyl is currently used as a toxicant for the attracticide BioAttract in cotton and vegetables in China. However, methomyl is highly toxic to non-target organisms and a more environmental friendly acceptable alternative is required. Larvae of three lepidopteran insects Helicoverpa armigera, Agrotis ipsilon and Spodoptera litura are important pests of these crops in China. In the present study, the toxicity of 23 commonly used insecticides were tested on H. armigera, then tested the susceptibility of A. ipsilon and S. litura moths to the insecticides which were the most toxic to H. armigera, and the acute toxicity of the most efficacious insecticides were further investigated under laboratory conditions. Chlorantraniliprole, emamectin benzoate, spinetoram, spinosad and methomyl exhibited high levels of toxicity to H. armigera moths with a mortality of 86.67%, 91.11%, 73.33%, 57.78% and 80.00%, respectively, during 24 h period at the concentration of 1 mg a.i. L-1. Among these five insecticides, A. ipsilon and S. litura moths were more sensitive to chlorantraniliprole, emamectin benzoate and methomyl. The lethal time (LT50) values of chlorantraniliprole and methomyl were shorter than emamectin benzoate for all three lepidopteran moth species at 1000 mg a.i. L-1 compared to concentrations of 500, 100 and 1 mg a.i L-1. Chlorantraniliprole was found to have similar levels of toxicity and lethal time on the three lepidopteran moths tested to the standard methomyl, and therefore, can be used as an alternative insecticide to methomyl in the attracticide for controlling these pest species. PMID:28658277

  15. Constitutive hyperactivity of histone deacetylases enhances radioresistance in Lepidopteran Sf9 insect cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kanupriya; Kumar, Ashish; Chandna, Sudhir

    2016-06-01

    Lepidopteran insect cells withstand multifold higher radiation doses and suffer far less DNA damage despite carrying numerous structural/functional homologies with mammalian cells. Since DNA-histone interactions significantly influence radiation-induced DNA damage, we investigated the role of histones in insect cell radioresistance. Modified comet assay was used to assess the γ-radiation-induced DNA damage following serial histone depletion by varied salt concentrations. Acid-Urea-Triton (AUT) gel analysis combined with in silico predictions was used to compare mammalian and insect histones and acetylation status while HDAC activity was assessed/modified for studying the latter's role in radioresistance. Cell death was measured by morphological analysis and flow cytometry. High-salt extraction pattern from Sf9 nuclei suggested stronger DNA-histone affinity as the two core histones H2A/H2B could be extracted at much higher (2M) concentration as compared to 1.2M NaCl in mammalian (AA8) cells. Electrophoretic mobility of unirradiated Sf9 cells remained unaltered at all salt concentrations (0.14M-2M NaCl), and radiation-induced DNA damage increased only by 2M-NaCl pre-treatment. In silico analysis confirmed excellent conservation of Lepidopteran H2A/H2B sequence with human histones including comparable N-terminal lysine residues, yet these had ~60% lower acetylation. Importantly, insect cells showed ~70% higher histone deacetylase activity whose inhibition by Trichostatin-A reversed hypo-acetylation state and caused significant radiosensitization, thereby confirming the protective contribution of reduced acetylation. Our study reveals that the hypo-acetylated state of well-conserved core histones, maintained by considerable HDAC activity, contributes significantly in Lepidopteran radioresistance. This investigation shows constitutively high activity of HDACs as a potential radioprotective mechanism existing in insect cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  16. Chlorantraniliprole as a candidate pesticide used in combination with the attracticides for lepidopteran moths.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongqiang; Gao, Yu; Liang, Gemei; Lu, Yanhui

    2017-01-01

    Methomyl is currently used as a toxicant for the attracticide BioAttract in cotton and vegetables in China. However, methomyl is highly toxic to non-target organisms and a more environmental friendly acceptable alternative is required. Larvae of three lepidopteran insects Helicoverpa armigera, Agrotis ipsilon and Spodoptera litura are important pests of these crops in China. In the present study, the toxicity of 23 commonly used insecticides were tested on H. armigera, then tested the susceptibility of A. ipsilon and S. litura moths to the insecticides which were the most toxic to H. armigera, and the acute toxicity of the most efficacious insecticides were further investigated under laboratory conditions. Chlorantraniliprole, emamectin benzoate, spinetoram, spinosad and methomyl exhibited high levels of toxicity to H. armigera moths with a mortality of 86.67%, 91.11%, 73.33%, 57.78% and 80.00%, respectively, during 24 h period at the concentration of 1 mg a.i. L-1. Among these five insecticides, A. ipsilon and S. litura moths were more sensitive to chlorantraniliprole, emamectin benzoate and methomyl. The lethal time (LT50) values of chlorantraniliprole and methomyl were shorter than emamectin benzoate for all three lepidopteran moth species at 1000 mg a.i. L-1 compared to concentrations of 500, 100 and 1 mg a.i L-1. Chlorantraniliprole was found to have similar levels of toxicity and lethal time on the three lepidopteran moths tested to the standard methomyl, and therefore, can be used as an alternative insecticide to methomyl in the attracticide for controlling these pest species.

  17. Evaluation of the human host range of bovine and porcine viruses that may contaminate bovine serum and porcine trypsin used in the manufacture of biological products.

    PubMed

    Marcus-Sekura, Carol; Richardson, James C; Harston, Rebecca K; Sane, Nandini; Sheets, Rebecca L

    2011-11-01

    Current U.S. requirements for testing cell substrates used in production of human biological products for contamination with bovine and porcine viruses are U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) 9CFR tests for bovine serum or porcine trypsin. 9CFR requires testing of bovine serum for seven specific viruses in six families (immunofluorescence) and at least 2 additional families non-specifically (cytopathicity and hemadsorption). 9CFR testing of porcine trypsin is for porcine parvovirus. Recent contaminations suggest these tests may not be sufficient. Assay sensitivity was not the issue for these contaminations that were caused by viruses/virus families not represented in the 9CFR screen. A detailed literature search was undertaken to determine which viruses that infect cattle or swine or bovine or porcine cells in culture also have human host range [ability to infect humans or human cells in culture] and to predict their detection by the currently used 9CFR procedures. There are more viruses of potential risk to biological products manufactured using bovine or porcine raw materials than are likely to be detected by 9CFR testing procedures; even within families, not all members would necessarily be detected. Testing gaps and alternative methodologies should be evaluated to continue to ensure safe, high quality human biologicals. Copyright © 2011 The International Alliance for Biological Standardization. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of the Human Host Range of Bovine and Porcine Viruses that may Contaminate Bovine Serum and Porcine Trypsin Used in the Manufacture of Biological Products

    PubMed Central

    Marcus-Sekura, Carol; Richardson, James C.; Harston, Rebecca K.; Sane, Nandini; Sheets, Rebecca L.

    2011-01-01

    Current U.S. requirements for testing cell substrates used in production of human biological products for contamination with bovine and porcine viruses are U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) 9CFR tests for bovine serum or porcine trypsin. 9CFR requires testing of bovine serum for seven specific viruses in six families (immunofluorescence) and at least 2 additional families non-specifically (cytopathicity and hemadsorption). 9CFR testing of porcine trypsin is for porcine parvovirus. Recent contaminations suggest these tests may not be sufficient. Assay sensitivity was not the issue for these contaminations that were caused by viruses/virus families not represented in the 9CFR screen. A detailed literature search was undertaken to determine which viruses that infect cattle or swine or bovine or porcine cells in culture also have human host range [ability to infect humans or human cells in culture] and to predict their detection by the currently used 9CFR procedures. There are more viruses of potential risk to biological products manufactured using bovine or porcine raw materials than are likely to be detected by 9CFR testing procedures; even within families, not all members would necessarily be detected. Testing gaps and alternative methodologies should be evaluated to continue to ensure safe, high quality human biologicals. PMID:22000165

  19. Isolation and characterization of insertion sequence elements from gram-negative bacteria by using new broad-host-range, positive selection vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, R; Hötte, B; Klauke, B; Kosier, B

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of an RSF1010-derived broad-host-range vector, three different systems which enable positive detection and isolation of insertion sequence (IS) elements from gram-negative bacteria were constructed. Vectors pSUP104-pheS, pSUP104-rpsL, and pSUP104-sac were used successfully in a number of Rhizobium strains and in Xanthomonas campestris. More than 20 different IS elements were isolated and characterized. The 16 IS elements from Rhizobium meliloti were further used to characterize various R. meliloti strains by hybridization. The resulting hybridization patterns were different for every strain and gave a clear and definite IS fingerprint of each strain. These IS fingerprints can be used to identify and characterize R. meliloti strains rapidly and unequivocally, as they proved to be relatively stable. Some of the IS elements were found to be identical when the IS fingerprints from a given strain were compared. This method of IS fingerprinting can also establish whether IS elements are the same, related, or different. Images PMID:1847366

  20. Construction and use of a broad-host-range plasmid expressing the lamB gene for utilization of bacteriophage lambda vectors in the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Jasiecki, J; Czy, A; Gabig, M; Wegrzyn, G

    2001-07-01

    The remarkable success of Escherichia coli as a model organism in molecular genetics was dependent, among other things, on its susceptibility to genetic manipulation. Many versatile and sophisticated genetic tools for molecular biology studies are derived from bacteriophage lambda. However, this bacteriophage is specific for E. coli, and thus lambda-based techniques have been restricted to this bacterium. Plasmids expressing the E. coli gene coding for bacteriophage lambda receptor were reported previously, and introduction of such plasmids into cells of some other bacteria made them sensitive to phage lambda infection. However, we found that these systems were not efficient for Vibrio harveyi, one of the most frequently investigated species of marine bacteria. Here we describe construction of a broad-host-range plasmid expressing the lamB gene. Introduction of this plasmid to V. harveyi cells and expression of lamB made this strain susceptible to bacteriophage lambda adsorption and lambda DNA injection. Foreign genetic material could be introduced into cells of this strain using a cosmid vector.

  1. Novel trypanosome Trypanosoma gilletti sp. (Euglenozoa: Trypanosomatidae) and the extension of the host range of Trypanosoma copemani to include the koala ( Phascolarctos cinereus).

    PubMed

    McInnes, L M; Hanger, J; Simmons, G; Reid, S A; Ryan, U M

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosoma irwini was previously described from koalas and we now report the finding of a second novel species, T. gilletti, as well as the extension of the host range of Trypanosoma copemani to include koalas. Phylogenetic analysis at the 18S rDNA and gGAPDH loci demonstrated that T. gilletti was genetically distinct with a genetic distance (± s.e.) at the 18S rDNA locus of 2.7 ± 0.5% from T. copemani (wombat). At the gGAPDH locus, the genetic distance (± s.e.) of T. gilletti was 8.7 ± 1.1% from T. copemani (wombat). Trypanosoma gilletti was detected using a nested trypanosome 18S rDNA PCR in 3/139 (∼2%) blood samples and in 2/29 (∼7%) spleen tissue samples from koalas whilst T. irwini was detected in 72/139 (∼52%) blood samples and T. copemani in 4/139 (∼3%) blood samples from koalas. In addition, naturally occurring mixed infections were noted in 2/139 (∼1.5%) of the koalas tested.

  2. A characterization of non-biotic environmental features of prairies hosting the Dakota Skipper (Hesperia dacotae, Hesperiidae) across its remaining U.S. range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royer, R.A.; McKenney, R.A.; Newton, W.E.

    2008-01-01

    Within the United States, the Dakota Skipper now occurs only in Minnesota, North Dakota, and South Dakota. In these states it has been associated with margins of glacial lakes and calcareous mesic prairies that host warm-season native grasses. Preliminary geographic information system (GIS) analysis in North Dakota has indicated a close congruency between historic distribution of the Dakota Skipper and that of specific near-shore glacial lake features and related soil associations. This study analyzed humidity-related non-biotic microhabitat characteristics within three remaining occupied Dakota Skipper sites in each state during the larval growth period in 2000. Measured parameters included topographic relief, soil compaction, soil pH, moisture, and temperature at various depths, soil bulk density, soil texture, and temperature and humidity within the larval nest zone. Results of these efforts reveal two distinctive habitat substrates, one of relatively low surface relief with dense but relatively less compact soils, and another of relatively high relief with less dense but more compact soils. In the low-relief habitat, grazing appears to compact soils unfavorably in otherwise similar prairies in the more xeric western portion of the range, potentially by affecting ground-water buffering of larval nest zone humidity.

  3. Characterization of the basic replicon of pCM1, a narrow-host-range plasmid from the moderate halophile Chromohalobacter marismortui.

    PubMed Central

    Mellado, E; Asturias, J A; Nieto, J J; Timmis, K N; Ventosa, A

    1995-01-01

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Chromohalobacter marismortui contains a 17.5-kb narrow-host-range plasmid, pCM1, which shows interesting properties for the development of cloning vectors for the genetic manipulation of this important group of extremophiles. Plasmid pCM1 can stably replicate and is maintained in most gram-negative moderate halophiles tested. The replication origin has been identified and sequenced, and the minimal pCM1 replicon has been localized to a 1,600-bp region which includes two functionally discrete regions, the oriV region and the repA gene. oriV, located on a 700-bp fragment, contains four iterons 20 bp in length adjacent to a DnaA box that is dispensable but required for efficient replication of pCM1, and it requires trans-acting functions. The repA gene, which encodes a replication protein of 289 residues, is similar to the replication proteins of other gram-negative bacteria. PMID:7768853

  4. Bactrocera invadens (Diptera: Tephritidae), a new invasive fruit fly pest for the Afrotropical region: host plant range and distribution in West and Central Africa.

    PubMed

    Goergen, Georg; Vayssières, Jean-François; Gnanvossou, Désiré; Tindo, Maurice

    2011-08-01

    In 2003, the invasive fruit fly Bactrocera invadens Drew, Tsuruta & White (Diptera: Tephritidae) (Drew et al. 2005), of possible Sri Lankan origin, has been detected in the East and about 1 yr later in West Africa. In regular surveys in Benin and Cameroon covering 4 yr, samples from 117 plant species across 43 families have been obtained. Incubation of field-collected fruits demonstrate that in West and Central Africa (WCA) B. invadens is highly polyphagous, infesting wild and cultivated fruits of at least 46 species from 23 plant families with guava (Psidium spp.), mango (Mangifera spp.), and citrus (spp.), and the wild hosts tropical almond (Terminalia catappa L.), African wild mango (Irvingia gabonensis (Aubry-Lecomte) Baill.), and sheanut (Vitellaria paradoxa C.F.Gaertn.) showing the highest infestation index. B. invadens occurs in 22 countries of WCA with new records for Angola, Central African Republic, the Congo, DR Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Gambia, Guinea Bissau, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, and Sierra Leone. Overall, the pest has spread across a North-South distance of ≍5,000 km representing a contiguous area of >8.3 million km(2) within WCA. B. invadens has adapted to a wide range of ecological and climatic conditions extending from low land rainforest to dry savanna. Because of its highly destructive and invasive potential, B. invadens poses a serious threat to horticulture in Africa if left uncontrolled. Moreover, the presence of this quarantine pest causes considerable restrictions on international trade of affected crops.

  5. Induction of nodule primordia on Phaseolus and Acacia by lipo-chitin oligosaccharide nodulation signals from broad-host-range Rhizobium strain GRH2.

    PubMed

    López-Lara, I M; van der Drift, K M; van Brussel, A A; Haverkamp, J; Lugtenberg, B J; Thomas-Oates, J E; Spaink, H P

    1995-11-01

    Rhizobium wild-type strain GRH2 was originally isolated from the tree, Acacia cyanophylla, and has a broad host-range which includes herbaceous legumes, such as Phaseolus and Trifolium species. Here we show that strains of Rhizobium sp. GRH2, into which heterologous nodD alleles have been introduced, produce a large diversity of both sulphated and non-sulphated lipo-chitin oligosaccharides (LCOs). Most of the molecular species contain an N-methyl group on the reducing-terminal N-acetyl-glucosamine. The LCOs vary in the nature of the fatty acyl chain and in the length of the chitin backbone. The majority of the LCOs have an oligosaccharide chain length of five GlcNAc residues, but a few are oligomers having six GlcNAc units. LCOs purified from GRH2 are able to induce root hair formation and deformation on Acacia cyanophylla and A. melanoxylon plants. We show that an N-vaccenoyl-chitopentaose bearing an N-methyl group is able to induce nodule primordia on Phaseolus vulgaris, A. cyanophylla, and A. melanoxylon, indicating that for these plants an N-methyl modification is sufficient for nodule primordia induction.

  6. In vivo expression of genes in the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana during infection of lepidopteran larvae.

    PubMed

    Galidevara, Sandhya; Reineke, Annette; Koduru, Uma Devi

    2016-05-01

    The entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana (Bals.) Vuillemin is commercially available as a bio insecticide. The expression of three genes previously identified to have a role in pathogenicity in in vitro studies was validated in vivo in three lepidopteran insects infected with B. bassiana. Expression of all three genes was observed in all the tested insects starting from 48 or 72h to 10d post infection corroborating their role in pathogenicity. We suggest that it is essential to test the expression of putative pathogenicity genes both in vitro and in vivo to understand their role in different insect species.

  7. The Cotesia sesamiae story: insight into host-range evolution in a Hymenoptera parasitoid and implication for its use in biological control programs.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, L; Dupas, S; Branca, A; Herniou, E A; Clarke, C W; Capdevielle Dulac, C; Obonyo, J; Benoist, R; Gauthier, J; Calatayud, P A; Silvain, J F; Le Ru, B P

    2017-09-22

    This review covers nearly 20 years of studies on the ecology, physiology and genetics of the Hymenoptera Cotesia sesamiae, an African parasitoid of Lepidoptera that reduces populations of common maize borers in East and South Africa. The first part of the review presents studies based on sampling of C. sesamiae from maize crops in Kenya. From this agrosystem including one host plant and three main host borer species, studies revealed two genetically differentiated populations of C. sesamiae species adapted to their local host community, and showed that their differentiation involved the joint evolution of virulence genes and sensory mechanisms of host acceptance, reinforced by reproductive incompatibility due to Wolbachia infection status and natural inbreeding. In the second part, we consider the larger ecosystem of wild Poales plant species hosting many Lepidoptera stem borer species that are potential hosts for C. sesamiae. The hypothesis of other host-adapted C. sesamiae populations was investigated based on a large sampling of stem borer larvae on various Poales across sub-Saharan Africa. The sampling provided information on the respective contribution of local hosts, biogeography and Wolbachia in the genetic structure of C. sesamiae populations. Molecular evolution analyses highlighted that several bracovirus genes were under positive selection, some of them being under different selection pressure in C. sesamiae populations adapted to different hosts. This suggests that C. sesamiae host races result from co-evolution acting at the local scale on different bracovirus genes. The third part considers the mechanisms driving specialization. C. sesamiae host races are more or less host-specialized. This character is crucial for efficient and environmentally-safe use of natural enemies for biological control of pests. One method to get an insight in the evolutionary stability of host-parasite associations is to characterize the phylogenetic relationships between

  8. Reconnaissance exploration geochemistry in the central Brooks Range, northern Alaska: Implications for exploration of sediment-hosted zinc-lead-silver deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelley, K.D.; Kelley, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    A reconnaissance geochemical survey was conducted in the southern Killik River quadrangle, central Brooks Range, northern Alaska. The Brooks Range lies within the zone of continuous permafrost which may partially inhibit chemical weathering and oxidation. The minus 30-mesh and nonmagnetic heavy-mineral concentrate fractions of sediment samples were chosen as the sample media for the survey so that mechanical rather than chemical dispersion patterns would be enhanced. A total of 263 sites were sampled within the southern half of the Killik River quadrangle at an average sample density of approximately one sample per 12 km2. All samples were submitted for multi-element analyses. In the western and central Brooks Range, several known sediment-hosted Zn-Pb-Ag(-Ba) deposits occur within a belt of Paleozoic rocks of the Endicott Mountains allochthon. Exploration for this type of deposit in the Brook Range is difficult, due to the inherently high background values for Ba, Zn and Pb in shale and the common occurrence of metamorphic quartz-calcite veins, many of which contain traces of sulfide minerals. Stream sediments derived from these sources produce numerous geochemical anomalies which are not necessarily associated with significant mineralization. R-mode factor analysis provides a means of distinguishing between element associations related to lithology and those related to possible mineralization. Factor analysis applied to the multi-element data from the southern Killik River quadrangle resulted in the discovery of two additional Zn-Pb-Ag mineral occurrences of considerable areal extent which are 80-100 km east of any previously known deposit. These have been informally named the Kady and Vidlee. Several lithogeochemical element associations, or factors, and three factors which represent sulfide mineralization were identified: Ag-Pb-Zn (galena and sphalerite) and Fe-Ni-Co-Cu (pyrite ?? chalcopyrite) in the concentrate samples and Cd-Zn-Pb-As-Mn in the sediment

  9. Wheat curl mite (Aceria tosichella s.l.) cryptic biotypes with divergent host ranges: Implications for using Eriophyidae for biological control of invasive grasses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Host-specificity is the most important criterion for biological control agents (BCAs) and is particularly important for BCAs of invasive grasses that are close relatives of grass crop species. Plant-feeding mites in the family Eriophyidae are often highly host-specific. A study was conducted on th...

  10. Sarcocystis calchasi has an expanded host range and induces neurological disease in cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus) and North American rock pigeons (Columbia livia f. dom.).

    PubMed

    Olias, Philipp; Maier, Kristina; Wuenschmann, Arno; Reed, Leslie; Armién, Aníbal G; Shaw, Daniel P; Gruber, Achim D; Lierz, Michael

    2014-02-24

    Pigeon protozoal encephalitis (PPE) is an emerging central nervous system disease of pigeons (Columba livia f. domestica) caused by the apicomplexan parasite Sarcocystis calchasi. The intermediate host specificity of S. calchasi had been considered high, as domestic chickens were resistant to experimental infection. Here, we have re-evaluated this concept and expanded the known host range of S. calchasi by experimental infection of cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus), a species distantly related to pigeons. In this work, a group of eight cockatiels were experimentally infected with S. calchasi, which resulted in a biphasic central nervous system disease that paralleled PPE in many aspects, albeit with a more diverse pathology. All cockatiels became lethargic and polyuric between days 7 and 13 pi and during that time schizonts of S. calchasi were found primarily in the liver and spleen accompanied by necrosis and inflammation. As with pigeons, neurological signs occurred during a chronic phase of the disease in three cockatiels between 57 and 63 dpi. However, all five cockatiels necropsied in that period, or at the end of the trial at 76 dpi, had a severe lymphohistiocytic and necrotizing encephalitis. No tissue cysts were found in the heart, and cockatiels infected with 10(5) sporocysts only had a negligible parasite load in skeletal muscles despite the presence of severe central nervous system lesions. Notably, intralesional schizonts were identified in the brain of one cockatiel. In contrast to previous results, intralesional schizonts were also identified in the brains of three of six naturally infected pigeons from Minnesota and Missouri examined as part of an epidemiological investigation. In both the cockatiel and the pigeons, tissue cysts were found concurrently with schizonts suggesting an uncommon phenomenon in the Sarcocystis life cycle. Based on the results of this study, transmission of S. calchasi to avian species other than the domestic pigeon is

  11. Disruption of M-T5, a novel myxoma virus gene member of poxvirus host range superfamily, results in dramatic attenuation of myxomatosis in infected European rabbits.

    PubMed

    Mossman, K; Lee, S F; Barry, M; Boshkov, L; McFadden, G

    1996-07-01

    Myxoma virus is a pathogenic poxvirus that induces a lethal myxomatosis disease profile in European rabbits, which is characterized by fulminating lesions at the primary site of inoculation, rapid dissemination to secondary internal organs and peripheral external sites, and supervening gram-negative bacterial infection. Here we describe the role of a novel myxoma virus protein encoded by the M-T5 open reading frame during pathogenesis. The myxoma virus M-T5 protein possesses no significant sequence homology to nonviral proteins but is a member of a larger poxviral superfamily designated host range proteins. An M-T5- mutant virus was constructed by disruption of both copies of the M-T5 gene followed by insertion of the selectable marker p7.5Ecogpt. Although the M-T5- deletion mutant replicated with wild-type kinetics in rabbit fibroblasts, infection of a rabbit CD4+ T-cell line (RL5) with the myxoma virus M-T5- mutant virus resulted in the rapid and complete cessation of both host and viral protein synthesis, accompanied by the manifestation of all the classical features of programmed cell death. Infection of primary rabbit peripheral mononuclear cells with the myxoma virus M-T5-mutant virus resulted in the apoptotic death of nonadherent lymphocytes but not adherent monocytes. Within the European rabbit, disruption of the M-T5 open reading frame caused a dramatic attenuation of the rapidly lethal myxomatosis infection, and none of the infected rabbits displayed any of the characteristic features of myxomatosis. The two most significant histological observations in rabbits infected with the M-T5-mutant virus were (i) the lack of progression of the infection past the primary site of inoculation, coupled with the establishment of a rapid and effective inflammatory reaction, and (ii) the inability of the virus to initiate a cellular reaction within secondary immune organs. We conclude that M-T5 functions as a critical virulence factor by allowing productive infection of

  12. Disruption of M-T5, a novel myxoma virus gene member of poxvirus host range superfamily, results in dramatic attenuation of myxomatosis in infected European rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Mossman, K; Lee, S F; Barry, M; Boshkov, L; McFadden, G

    1996-01-01

    Myxoma virus is a pathogenic poxvirus that induces a lethal myxomatosis disease profile in European rabbits, which is characterized by fulminating lesions at the primary site of inoculation, rapid dissemination to secondary internal organs and peripheral external sites, and supervening gram-negative bacterial infection. Here we describe the role of a novel myxoma virus protein encoded by the M-T5 open reading frame during pathogenesis. The myxoma virus M-T5 protein possesses no significant sequence homology to nonviral proteins but is a member of a larger poxviral superfamily designated host range proteins. An M-T5- mutant virus was constructed by disruption of both copies of the M-T5 gene followed by insertion of the selectable marker p7.5Ecogpt. Although the M-T5- deletion mutant replicated with wild-type kinetics in rabbit fibroblasts, infection of a rabbit CD4+ T-cell line (RL5) with the myxoma virus M-T5- mutant virus resulted in the rapid and complete cessation of both host and viral protein synthesis, accompanied by the manifestation of all the classical features of programmed cell death. Infection of primary rabbit peripheral mononuclear cells with the myxoma virus M-T5-mutant virus resulted in the apoptotic death of nonadherent lymphocytes but not adherent monocytes. Within the European rabbit, disruption of the M-T5 open reading frame caused a dramatic attenuation of the rapidly lethal myxomatosis infection, and none of the infected rabbits displayed any of the characteristic features of myxomatosis. The two most significant histological observations in rabbits infected with the M-T5-mutant virus were (i) the lack of progression of the infection past the primary site of inoculation, coupled with the establishment of a rapid and effective inflammatory reaction, and (ii) the inability of the virus to initiate a cellular reaction within secondary immune organs. We conclude that M-T5 functions as a critical virulence factor by allowing productive infection of

  13. Sphaeromyxids form part of a diverse group of myxosporeans infecting the hepatic biliary systems of a wide range of host organisms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Approximately 40 species of Sphaeromyxa have been described, all of which are coelozoic parasites from gall bladders of marine fish. They are unique amongst the myxosporeans as they have polar filaments that are flat and folded instead of being tubular and spirally wound. This unusual feature was used as a subordinal character to erect the suborder Sphaeromyxina, which contains one family, the Sphaeromyxidae, and a single genus Sphaeromyxa. Methods In the present study, we examine eelpout from the genus Lycodes from Iceland for the presence of myxosporean parasites in the gall bladder and perform morphological and DNA studies. Results A novel myxosporean, Sphaeromyxa lycodi n. sp., was identified in the gall bladders of five of the six species of Lycodes examined, with a prevalence ranging from 29 - 100%. The coelozoic plasmodia are large, polysporous and contain disporic pansporoblasts and mature spores which are arcuate. The pyriform polar capsules encase long and irregularly folded ribbon-like polar filaments. Each spore valve has two distinct ends and an almost 180° twist along the relatively indistinct suture line. The single sporoplasm is granular with two nuclei. Sphaeromyxa lycodi is phylogenetically related to other arcuate sphaeromyxids and is reproducibly placed with all known sphaeromyxids and forms part of a robustly supported clade of numerous myxosporean genera which infect the hepatic biliary systems of a wide range of hosts. Conclusions Sphaeromyxa lycodi is a common gall bladder myxosporean in eelpout of the genus Lycodes from Northern Iceland. It has characteristics typical of the genus and develops arcuate spores. Molecular phylogenetic analyses confirm that sphaeromyxids form a monophyletic group, subdivided into straight and arcuate spore forms, within the hepatic biliary clade that infect a wide range of freshwater associated animals. The ancestral spore form for the hepatic biliary clade was probably a Chloromyxum morphotype

  14. Chromosomal characterisation of five lepidopteran cell lines of Malacosoma disstria (Lasiocampidae) and Christoneura fumiferana (Tortricidae).

    PubMed

    Ennis, T J; Sohi, S S

    1976-09-01

    Chromosome number and morphology have been examined in four established cell lines (Md63, Md66, Md108, and Md109) of the forest tent caterpillar, Malacosoma disstria Hübner, and one (Cf124) of the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana (Clemens). Chromosome number distributions of Md63 (mode = 112) Md108 (mode = 103), Md109 (mode= 103), and Cf124 (mode = 110) overlap sufficiently to prevent identification of individual lines by number alone. However, Md66 is exceptional in possessing a modal number of 157. One large chromosome occurs in cells of all lines. The presence of this chromosome, the lack of any distinct polyploid series among chromosome numbers encountered, and the general inverse relationship between number and size of chromosomes, suggest that the high level of heteroploidy characteristic of these and other lepidopteran cell lines reflects not only a possible polyploid origin but also extensive chromosomal rearrangement and fragmentation. Tolerance for such change is attributed to the holokinetic organisation of lepidopteran chromosomes. A distinct heteropycnotic body is present in about 10% of Cf124 cell nuclei, and can be used as a marker for this line. This body may represent the sex chromatin normally encountered in somatic cells of female C. fumiferana.

  15. Panning for sperm gold: Isolation and purification of apyrene and eupyrene sperm from lepidopterans.

    PubMed

    Karr, Timothy L; Walters, James R

    2015-08-01

    We describe a simple and straightforward procedure for the purification and separation of apyrene and eupyrene forms of lepidopteran sperm. The procedure is generally applicable to both butterfly and moth species with results varying according to the relative amounts of sperm produced and size of sperm storage organs. The technique relies upon inherent differences between eupyene sperm bundles and free apyrene sperm morphology. These differences allow for separation of the sperm morphs by repeated "panning" of sperm bundles into the center of a plastic dish. The purified eupyrene sperm bundles can then be removed and apyrene sperm collected from the supernatant by centrifugation. Efficacy of the purification process was confirmed by light microscopy and gel electrophoresis of the resulting fractions. Both one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis identified significant protein differences between the fractions further suggesting that the panning procedure effectively separated eurpyrene from apyrene sperm. The panning procedure should provide a convenient and accessible technique for further studies of sperm biology in lepidopterans.

  16. Seeing red; the development of pON.mCherry, a broad-host range constitutive expression plasmid for Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, Michael J; Jacobson, Rachael K; Shuman, Howard A

    2017-01-01

    The development of plasmid-mediated gene expression control in bacteria revolutionized the field of bacteriology. Many of these expression control systems rely on the addition of small molecules, generally metabolites or non-metabolized analogs thereof, to the growth medium to induce expression of the genes of interest. The paradigmatic example of an expression control system is the lac system from Escherichia coli, which typically relies on the Ptac promoter and the Lac repressor, LacI. In many cases, however, constitutive gene expression is desired, and other experimental approaches require the coordinated control of multiple genes. While multiple systems have been developed for use in E. coli and its close relatives, the utility and/or functionality of these tools does not always translate to other species. For example, for the Gram-negative pathogen, Legionella pneumophila, a causative agent of Legionnaires' Disease, the aforementioned Ptac system represents the only well-established expression control system. In order to enhance the tools available to study bacterial gene expression in L. pneumophila, we developed a plasmid, pON.mCherry, which confers constitutive gene expression from a mutagenized LacI binding site. We demonstrate that pON.mCherry neither interferes with other plasmids harboring an intact LacI-Ptac expression system nor alters the growth of Legionella species during intracellular growth. Furthermore, the broad-host range plasmid backbone of pON.mCherry allows constitutive gene expression in a wide variety of Gram-negative bacterial species, making pON.mCherry a useful tool for the greater research community.

  17. Insect-Specific Flaviviruses: A Systematic Review of Their Discovery, Host Range, Mode of Transmission, Superinfection Exclusion Potential and Genomic Organization

    PubMed Central

    Blitvich, Bradley J.; Firth, Andrew E.

    2015-01-01

    There has been a dramatic increase in the number of insect-specific flaviviruses (ISFs) discovered in the last decade. Historically, these viruses have generated limited interest due to their inability to infect vertebrate cells. This viewpoint has changed in recent years because some ISFs have been shown to enhance or suppress the replication of medically important flaviviruses in co-infected mosquito cells. Additionally, comparative studies between ISFs and medically important flaviviruses can provide a unique perspective as to why some flaviviruses possess the ability to infect and cause devastating disease in humans while others do not. ISFs have been isolated exclusively from mosquitoes in nature but the detection of ISF-like sequences in sandflies and chironomids indicates that they may also infect other dipterans. ISFs can be divided into two distinct phylogenetic groups. The first group currently consists of approximately 12 viruses and includes cell fusing agent virus, Kamiti River virus and Culex flavivirus. These viruses are phylogenetically distinct from all other known flaviviruses. The second group, which is apparently not monophyletic, currently consists of nine viruses and includes Chaoyang virus, Nounané virus and Lammi virus. These viruses phylogenetically affiliate with mosquito/vertebrate flaviviruses despite their apparent insect-restricted phenotype. This article provides a review of the discovery, host range, mode of transmission, superinfection exclusion ability and genomic organization of ISFs. This article also attempts to clarify the ISF nomenclature because some of these viruses have been assigned more than one name due to their simultaneous discoveries by independent research groups. PMID:25866904

  18. Host range of the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in North America: results of multiple-choice field experiments.

    PubMed

    Anulewicz, Andrea C; McCullough, Deborah G; Cappaert, David L; Poland, Therese M

    2008-02-01

    Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive phloem-feeding pest, was identified as the cause of widespread ash (Fraxinus) mortality in southeast Michigan and Windsor, Ontario, Canada, in 2002. A. planipennis reportedly colonizes other genera in its native range in Asia, including Ulmus L., Juglans L., and Pterocarya Kunth. Attacks on nonash species have not been observed in North America to date, but there is concern that other genera could be colonized. From 2003 to 2005, we assessed adult A. planipennis landing rates, oviposition, and larval development on North American ash species and congeners of its reported hosts in Asia in multiple-choice field studies conducted at several southeast Michigan sites. Nonash species evaluated included American elm (U. americana L.), hackberry (Celtis occidentalis L.), black walnut (J. nigra L.), shagbark hickory [Carya ovata (Mill.) K.Koch], and Japanese tree lilac (Syringa reticulata Bl.). In studies with freshly cut logs, adult beetles occasionally landed on nonash logs but generally laid fewer eggs than on ash logs. Larvae fed and developed normally on ash logs, which were often heavily infested. No larvae were able to survive, grow, or develop on any nonash logs, although failed first-instar galleries occurred on some walnut logs. High densities of larvae developed on live green ash and white ash nursery trees, but there was no evidence of larval survival or development on Japanese tree lilac and black walnut trees in the same plantation. We felled, debarked, and intensively examined >28 m2 of phloem area on nine American elm trees growing in contact with or adjacent to heavily infested ash trees. We found no sign of A. planipennis feeding on any elm.