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Sample records for lepomis gibbosus centrarchidae

  1. The effect of elevated temperature on spawning of introduced pumpkinseed Lepomis gibbosus in Europe.

    PubMed

    Ziȩba, G; Fox, M G; Copp, G H

    2010-11-01

    In an experimental comparison of pumpkinseed Lepomis gibbosus reproduction under ambient and climate change water temperature regimes, spawning occurred earlier in the season, which is likely to lead to greater young-of-the-year survival with concomitant implications in the U.K. under warmer climatic conditions.

  2. Interspecific Aggressive Behaviour of Invasive Pumpkinseed Lepomis gibbosus in Iberian Fresh Waters

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, David; Merino-Aguirre, Raquel; Vilizzi, Lorenzo; Copp, Gordon H.

    2014-01-01

    Pumpkinseed Lepomis gibbosus (L.) are successful invaders in Europe, where this species exerts multiple ecological effects, mainly through trophic interactions. Behavioural interference represents a potential impact for native fauna and this is of particular conservation concern in the Iberian Peninsula because of the highly valuable endemic fauna inhabiting streams of this region. However, aggressive interactions have not previously been examined under natural conditions in Iberian fresh waters. To address this gap in knowledge, the aim of the present study was to assess the effect of pumpkinseed aggression on endemic fauna of an Iberian stream, the River Bullaque (central Spain). In September 2009, we analysed the aggression and environmental contexts of these behavioural interactions by snorkelling: aggressor size, aggression type, shoal size, previous activity to aggression, recipient species, response to aggression, microhabitat structure and prey availability. Small pumpkinseed displayed more threat and fewer pursuit behaviours relative to medium and large individuals, reflecting an ontogenetic behavioural shift from low to high aggression intensity. Small aggressors came from large shoals, with bottom feeding being the most frequently observed activity prior to an aggressive interaction; whereas large pumpkinseed were less gregarious and they were mostly ambulating within the water column prior to aggression. Recipient species of aggression included non-native crayfish and fishes, and more importantly, endemic fishes and frogs. Retreat was the most common response to aggression, irrespective of aggressor size. Small pumpkinseed displayed aggressive behaviours over coarse substrata containing elevated macrobenthos biomass; whereas aggression by large individuals was observed in deeper waters. These findings suggest that small and large pumpkinseed exert a high impact on other stream residents through aggression in competition for food and territory defence

  3. Altered trophic pathway and parasitism in a native predator (Lepomis gibbosus) feeding on introduced prey (Dreissena polymorpha).

    PubMed

    Locke, Sean A; Bulté, Grégory; Marcogliese, David J; Forbes, Mark R

    2014-05-01

    Populations of invasive species tend to have fewer parasites in their introduced ranges than in their native ranges and are also thought to have fewer parasites than native prey. This 'release' from parasites has unstudied implications for native predators feeding on exotic prey. In particular, shifts from native to exotic prey should reduce levels of trophically transmitted parasites. We tested this hypothesis in native populations of pumpkinseed sunfish (Lepomis gibbosus) in Lake Opinicon, where fish stomach contents were studied intensively in the 1970s, prior to the appearance of exotic zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) in the mid-1990s. Zebra mussels were common in stomachs of present-day pumpkinseeds, and stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen confirmed their importance in long-term diets. Because historical parasite data were not available in Lake Opinicon, we also surveyed stomach contents and parasites in pumpkinseed in both Lake Opinicon and an ecologically similar, neighboring lake where zebra mussels were absent. Stomach contents of pumpkinseed in the companion lake did not differ from those of pre-invasion fish from Lake Opinicon. The companion lake, therefore, served as a surrogate "pre-invasion" reference to assess effects of zebra mussel consumption on parasites in pumpkinseed. Trophically transmitted parasites were less species-rich and abundant in Lake Opinicon, where fish fed on zebra mussels, although factors other than zebra mussel consumption may contribute to these differences. Predation on zebra mussels has clearly contributed to a novel trophic coupling between littoral and pelagic food webs in Lake Opinicon.

  4. Effects of river flows on growth of redbreast sunfish Lepomis auritus (Centrarchidae) in Georgia rivers.

    PubMed

    Sammons, S M; Maceina, M J

    2009-05-01

    Effects of river discharge on growth of redbreast sunfish Lepomis auritus were investigated in nine rivers in Georgia, U.S.A. Fish were aged and annular total length increments (L(Tinc)) estimated from measurements from sectioned sagittal otoliths using the generalized regression model that held for the effects of decreasing L(Tinc) from annual age (X): L(Tinc)=b(o)-b(1)(X) +/-b(i)(D), where b(o), b(1) and b(i) were the regression coefficients for the intercept and slopes and D, discharge, was either a single or multiple measurements of annular or seasonal flow volume or variation in flow volume. For eight of nine rivers, higher or greater variation in flows from April to June was associated with greater L. auritus growth; in the last river, higher flows from January to March were associated with greater fish growth. Across all rivers, L. auritus growth increments were 22, 45 and 36% greater in a wet year v. a dry year at ages 1, 2 and 3 years, respectively. Based on the results of this study, increasing water withdrawals by an additional 30% in five Georgia rivers would reduce the predicted number of L. auritus recruiting to 203 mm (angler preferred size) by 19-62%.

  5. Effects of river flows on growth of redbreast sunfish Lepomis auritus (Centrarchidae) in Georgia rivers.

    PubMed

    Sammons, S M; Maceina, M J

    2009-05-01

    Effects of river discharge on growth of redbreast sunfish Lepomis auritus were investigated in nine rivers in Georgia, U.S.A. Fish were aged and annular total length increments (L(Tinc)) estimated from measurements from sectioned sagittal otoliths using the generalized regression model that held for the effects of decreasing L(Tinc) from annual age (X): L(Tinc)=b(o)-b(1)(X) +/-b(i)(D), where b(o), b(1) and b(i) were the regression coefficients for the intercept and slopes and D, discharge, was either a single or multiple measurements of annular or seasonal flow volume or variation in flow volume. For eight of nine rivers, higher or greater variation in flows from April to June was associated with greater L. auritus growth; in the last river, higher flows from January to March were associated with greater fish growth. Across all rivers, L. auritus growth increments were 22, 45 and 36% greater in a wet year v. a dry year at ages 1, 2 and 3 years, respectively. Based on the results of this study, increasing water withdrawals by an additional 30% in five Georgia rivers would reduce the predicted number of L. auritus recruiting to 203 mm (angler preferred size) by 19-62%. PMID:20735655

  6. Altered trophic pathway and parasitism in a native predator (Lepomis gibbosus) feeding on introduced prey (Dreissena polymorpha).

    PubMed

    Locke, Sean A; Bulté, Grégory; Marcogliese, David J; Forbes, Mark R

    2014-05-01

    Populations of invasive species tend to have fewer parasites in their introduced ranges than in their native ranges and are also thought to have fewer parasites than native prey. This 'release' from parasites has unstudied implications for native predators feeding on exotic prey. In particular, shifts from native to exotic prey should reduce levels of trophically transmitted parasites. We tested this hypothesis in native populations of pumpkinseed sunfish (Lepomis gibbosus) in Lake Opinicon, where fish stomach contents were studied intensively in the 1970s, prior to the appearance of exotic zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) in the mid-1990s. Zebra mussels were common in stomachs of present-day pumpkinseeds, and stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen confirmed their importance in long-term diets. Because historical parasite data were not available in Lake Opinicon, we also surveyed stomach contents and parasites in pumpkinseed in both Lake Opinicon and an ecologically similar, neighboring lake where zebra mussels were absent. Stomach contents of pumpkinseed in the companion lake did not differ from those of pre-invasion fish from Lake Opinicon. The companion lake, therefore, served as a surrogate "pre-invasion" reference to assess effects of zebra mussel consumption on parasites in pumpkinseed. Trophically transmitted parasites were less species-rich and abundant in Lake Opinicon, where fish fed on zebra mussels, although factors other than zebra mussel consumption may contribute to these differences. Predation on zebra mussels has clearly contributed to a novel trophic coupling between littoral and pelagic food webs in Lake Opinicon. PMID:24562470

  7. Effect of submersed aquatic macrophytes on resource partitioning in yearling rock bass (Ambloplites rupestris) and pumpkinseeds (Lepomis gibbosus) in Lake St. Clair

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    French, John R. P., III

    1988-01-01

    Yearling rock bass (Ambloplites rupestris), pumpkinseeds (Lepomis gibbosus), macroinvertebrates, and submersed aquatic plants were sampled at 2- or 3-week intervals from June to October 1979 in a shallow, heavily vegetated embayment in Lake St. Clair to determine whether seasonal changes in plant canopy and plant taxonomic composition affected resource partitioning in these two fish species. In both species, numbers of prey and gut volumes increased with increasing plant canopy until the plant canopy reached a seasonal maximum in mid-summer. Rock bass consumed fewer, larger prey than pumpkinseeds while large Caenidae-Trichoptera-Coenagrionidae, the prey group most preferred by rock bass, was available. Pumpkinseeds ate smaller amphipods, gastropods, and chironomid-lepidopterans that were more abundant numerically than Caenidae-Trichoptera-Coenagrionidae. After mid-summer, the plant canopy declined slowly to one-half of the maximum value, but built-up densities ofHyalella azteca, gastropods, and chironomid-lepidopterans kept availability of prey high throughout late summer. Rock bass shifted to Gammarus, gastropods, and chironomid-lepidopterans as large Caenidae-Trichoptera-Coenagrionidae became scarce. Pumpkinseeds ate more prey in the late season and displayed no prey preference. Their gut volumes peaked in September. Apparently, increasing combined canopy of bushy plants and Heteranthera dubia hindered the foraging of rock bass more than that of pumpkinseeds and caused resource partitioning in the two species.

  8. Seasonal gonadal development and age-related maturity patterns of introduced pumpkinseed (Lepomis gibbosus Linnaeus, 1758) in a heated thermal reservoir and an adjacent river reach.

    PubMed

    Valente, E; Masson, G; Maul, A; Fox, M G; Meyer, A; Pihan, J C

    2016-05-01

    Testis and ovarian maturation status, maturity profile and gonado-somatic index (GSI) were assessed in pumpkinseed (Lepomis gibbosus) collected from Mirgenbach, a cooling-water reservoir associated with a nuclear power plant, and from the River Moselle 7km downstream of the reservoir's thermal outflow. Histological investigation indicated that in both sexes, gonadal development of pumpkinseed in the heated reservoir was more advanced than in the cooler Moselle River throughout the breeding season. The histological maturity profile of reservoir males ranked by the advancement of sperm cells was highly correlated with its GSI (rs=0.73, P<0.001). GSI of females in the reservoir increased with the stage at maturity, but GSI was not significantly correlated with total length, age or growth rate of the individual. All sampled individuals of both sexes were mature at age 1 in the heated reservoir, whereas 48% of age 1 males and 57% of age 1 females were not mature in the river. GSI patterns suggest that males in the reservoir adopted one of two reproductive strategies (nesters or cuckolders), whereas no small males with large enough testes to be considered cuckolders were apparent in the river. The warm thermal regime of Mirgenbach Reservoir led to precocial maturity, early season reproduction, and the greater prevalence of apparent cuckolder males than would normally occur in this climatic zone.

  9. Alterations in gills of Lepomis gibbosus, after acute exposure to several xenobiotics (pesticide, detergent and pharmaceuticals): morphometric and biochemical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Sara; Correia, Alberto T; Antunes, Sara C; Nunes, Bruno

    2015-04-01

    In recent decades, scientific research about the effects of anthropogenic xenobiotics on non-target organisms has increased. Among the likely effects, some studies reported the evaluation of biochemical and morphological changes in specific tissues or organs of fishes, such as gills, which are key organs for the direct action of pollutants in the aquatic environment. This work intended to assess biochemical [oxidative stress/phase II conjugation isoenzymes glutathione S-transferase (GSTs)] and morphological [secondary lamellar length (SLL), secondary lamellar width (SLW), interlamellar distance (ID), basal epithelial thickness (BET) and proportion of the secondary lamellae available for gas exchange (PAGE)] changes in gills, after acute exposure to the pesticide chlorfenvinphos, the detergent sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) and to the anticholinesterasic pharmaceuticals (neostigmine and pyridostigmine). Our results point to a significant, eventually hormetic, effect in the activity of GSTs following exposure to chlorfenvinphos that significantly increased the activity of GSTs at concentration of 0.2 mg/L. The activity of GSTs increased significantly after exposure to 100 mg/L of neostigmine. Considering the morphometric analysis of the gills, the data obtained showed that chlorfenvinphos exerted mainly minor architectural alterations in gills, with the exception of the highest tested concentration of chlorfenvinphos that produced also a slight decrease of the PAGE. The overall conclusions point to a null or negligible toxicity of the selected toxicants towards L. gibbosus, which may be reverted if exposure is withdrawn.

  10. Substrate choice of territorial male topeka shiners (notropis topeka) in the absence of sunfish (lepomis sp.)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witte, C.C.; Wildhaber, M.L.; Arab, A.; Noltie, Douglas B.

    2009-01-01

    Topeka shiners (Notropis topeka), an endangered minnow species, typically spawn on or around breeding Lepomis sunfish (Centrarchidae) nests. Why spawning Topeka shiners are attracted to these nests is unclear, but having the nesting sunfish provide shiner eggs with improved aeration, a lessening of siltation, and protection from egg predators are possibilities. We tested the substrate utilisation of Topeka shiners in outdoor tanks in the absence of sunfish to determine the shiner's fundamental choice. Shiners were provided with substrate patches of cleaned sand, small gravel, large gravel, and small cobble, and the bare floor of the tank. The substrate above which a male shiner established his territory was used as evidence of choice. A statistically significant choice for sand substrates was demonstrated. This fundamental choice might influence which sunfish nests Topeka shiners use, given that nest substrate characteristics differ both between sunfish species and within species by spawning site location. ?? 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. How Will Climate Warming Affect Non-Native Pumpkinseed Lepomis gibbosus Populations in the U.K.?

    PubMed Central

    Zięba, Grzegorz; Fox, Michael G.; Copp, Gordon H.

    2015-01-01

    Of the non-native fishes introduced to the U.K., the pumpkinseed is one of six species predicted to benefit from the forecasted climate warming conditions. To demonstrate the potential response of adults and their progeny to a water temperature increase, investigations of parental pumpkinseed acclimatization, reproduction and YOY over-wintering were carried out in outdoor experimental ponds under ambient and elevated water temperature regimes. No temperature effects were observed on either adult survivorship and growth, and none of the assessed reproductive activity variables (total spawning time, spawning season length, number of spawning bouts) appeared to be responsible for the large differences observed in progeny number and biomass. However, it was demonstrated in a previous study [Zięba G. et al., 2010] that adults in the heated ponds began spawning earlier than those of the ambient ponds. Ambient ponds produced 2.8× more progeny than the heated ponds, but these progeny were significantly smaller, probably due to their late hatching date, and subsequently suffered very high mortality over the first winter. Pumpkinseed in the U.K. will clearly benefit from climate warming through earlier seasonal reproduction, resulting in larger progeny going into winter, and as a result, higher over-winter survivorship would be expected relative to that which occurs under the present climatic regime. PMID:26302021

  12. Novel potassium channel blocker venom peptides from Mesobuthus gibbosus (Scorpiones: Buthidae).

    PubMed

    Diego-García, Elia; Peigneur, Steve; Debaveye, Sarah; Gheldof, Eveline; Tytgat, Jan; Caliskan, Figen

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we report for the first time, the molecular, biochemical and electrophysiological characterization of the components present in the soluble venom from Mesobuthus gibbosus (Brullé, 1832). According to the epidemiological and clinical situation of scorpion envenomation cases M. gibbosus scorpion is one of the most important health-threatening species of Turkey. Despite the medical importance reported for M. gibbosus, there is no additional information on toxin peptides and venom components to clarify the toxic effect of the M. gibbosus sting. Biochemical characterization of the venom was performed using different protocols and techniques following a bioassay-guided strategy (HPLC, mass spectrometry and Edman degradation sequencing). Venom fractions were tested in electrophysiological assays on a panel of six K(+) channels (K(v)1.1-1.6) by using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. Three new α-KTx peptides were found and called MegKTx1, MegKTx2 and MegKTx3 (M. gibbosus, K(+) channel toxin number 1-3). A cDNA library from the telson was constructed and specific screening of transcripts was performed. Biochemical and molecular characterization of MegKTx peptides and transcripts shows a relation with toxins of three different α-KTx subfamilies (α-KTx3.x, α-KTx9.x and α-KTx16.x). PMID:23142506

  13. Mesobuthus gibbosus (Scorpiones: Buthidae) on the island of Rhodes -- hybridization between Ulysses' stowaways and native scorpions?

    PubMed

    Gantenbein, B; Largiadèr, C R

    2002-05-01

    Allozyme data suggest that the Rhodes population of Mesobuthus gibbosus is a hybrid population of recent origin. Namely, it is a mixture between an autochthonous population and an artificially introduced population probably from the Greek mainland. All samples were mainly composed of F1 hybrid genotypes and genotypes either fixed for autochthonous or introduced alleles. Back-cross hybrid genotypes were very rare. Mitochondrial DNA analysis, in contrast, revealed only one group of closely related haplotypes that are unique for the Rhodes populations, thus suggesting asymmetric introgression of the two marker classes.

  14. Thermoregulatory behavior of bluegill, Lepomis macrochirus from a thermally stressed ecosystem. [Lepomis macrochirus

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, R.U. Jr.

    1984-12-01

    Bluegills, Lepomis macrochirus were used as a representative aquatic ectotherm to determine the importance of behavior in thermoregulation of fish inhabiting a thermally stressed ecosystem. In the first part of the study, the mean final temperature preferenda for small bluegills from the heated and normothermic sites (25.2/sup 0/C vs 25.0/sup 0/C) were not significantly different. In the second part of the study, the acute preferred temperatures of large L. macrochirus (anti X = 26.3/sup 0/C) showed a statistically significant difference from that of small bluegills (anti X = 25.2/sup 0/C). There was no significant difference in the acute preferred temperatures for bluegill from the heated and normothermic sites. In the last phase of the study L. macrochirus from both a thermally stressed and normothermic site were tested for upper avoidance temperature in the absence of and in the presence of two sizes of predators (Micropterus salmoides, largemouth bass). In the absence of a predator the small bluegill had a mean upper avoidance temperature of 30.0/sup 0/C as compared to 29.8/sup 0/C for the large bluegills. In the presence of a small and large predator the small bluegills had a mean upper avoidance temperature of 34.0/sup 0/C and 33.9/sup 0/C respectively, while the large bluegills had mean upper avoidance temperatures of 33.8/sup 0/C and 33.1/sup 0/C. In the presence of a predator bluegill upper avoidance temperatures were significantly higher, however, predator size did not influence this relationship. During the determinations of final temperature preferendum, acute preferred temperature, and upper avoidance temperature, the fish from the heated site always exhibited less variability in temperature measurements than those from the control site. 41 refs., 9 figs., 10 tabs.

  15. In vitro effect of seven antiparasitics on Acolpenteron ureteroecetes (Dactylogyridae) from largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides (Centrarchidae).

    PubMed

    Reimschuessel, Renate; Gieseker, Charles; Poynton, Sarah

    2011-03-16

    Few drugs are approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for treating parasite infections in minor species such as fish, due in part to the high cost of developing such drugs and to a relatively small market share for drug sponsors. Because in vivo effectiveness trials for antiparasitic drugs are costly, time consuming, and use many animals, a systematic in vitro screening approach to describe parasite motility could help find promising drug candidates. We evaluated the effects of 7 antiparasitics on the activity and survival of the endoparasitic monogenean Acolpenteron ureteroecetes (Dactylogyridae) collected from the posterior kidneys of juvenile largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides (Lacepede, 1802) (Centrarchidae) held in the laboratory. Tests were conducted in 12 well tissue culture plates; each well had 3 parasites, and we tested 3 concentrations and 1 control for each of the 7 antiparasitics. The parasites were observed immediately after adding the drug, at 1 to 3 h, and 17 to 26 h, and video recordings were made. Drug effects were recorded by documenting morbidity (reduced movement, tremors, contracted body, abnormal morphology) and mortality. A. ureteroecetes was strongly affected by the quinoline praziquantel, the imidazothiazide levamisole, and the organophosphates dichlorvos and trichlorfon. The parasites were moderately affected by the macrocyclic lactones ivermectin and emamectin, and generally unaffected by the benzimidazole mebendazole. Our study demonstrates the utility of characterizing in vitro responses with video microscopy to document responses of fish parasites for initial screens of drug effects on a fish monogenean.

  16. Physiological tradeoffs may underlie the evolution of hypoxia tolerance and exercise performance in sunfish (Centrarchidae).

    PubMed

    Crans, Kyle D; Pranckevicius, Nicole A; Scott, Graham R

    2015-10-01

    Tradeoffs between hypoxia tolerance and aerobic exercise performance appear to exist in some fish taxa, even though both of these traits are often associated with a high O2 transport capacity. We examined the physiological basis for this potential tradeoff in four species of sunfish from the family Centrarchidae. Hypoxia tolerance was greatest in rock bass, intermediate in pumpkinseed and bluegill and lowest in largemouth bass, based on measurements of critical O2 tension (Pcrit) and O2 tension at loss of equilibrium (PO2 at LOE). Consistent with there being a tradeoff between hypoxia tolerance and aerobic exercise capacity, the least hypoxia-tolerant species had the highest critical swimming speed (Ucrit) during normoxia and suffered the greatest decrease in Ucrit in hypoxia. There was also a positive correlation between Ucrit in normoxia and PO2 at LOE, which remained significant after accounting for phylogeny using phylogenetically independent contrasts. Several sub-organismal traits appeared to contribute to both hypoxia tolerance and aerobic exercise capacity (reflected by traits that were highest in both rock bass and largemouth bass), such as the gas-exchange surface area of the gills, the pH sensitivity of haemoglobin-O2 affinity, and the activities of lactate dehydrogenase and the gluconeogenic enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in the liver. Some other sub-organismal traits were uniquely associated with either hypoxia tolerance (low sensitivity of haemoglobin-O2 affinity to organic phosphates, high pyruvate kinase and lactate dehydrogenase activities in the heart) or aerobic exercise capacity (capillarity and fibre size of the axial swimming muscle). Therefore, the cumulative influence of a variety of respiratory and metabolic traits can result in physiological tradeoffs associated with the evolution of hypoxia tolerance and aerobic exercise performance in fish. PMID:26347564

  17. The effects of urbanization on Lepomis macrochirus using the comet assay

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urbanization has been linked to increased concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in natural waterways. This study was designed to examine the impact of urbanization and a wastewater treatment plant by investigating the impact on field-collected bluegill (Lepomis macr...

  18. Mercury concentrations of bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) vary by sex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; Francis, James T.; Braunscheidel, Jeffrey J.; Bohr, Joseph R.; Geiger, Matthew J.; Knottnerus, G. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Patterns in relative differences in contaminant concentrations between the sexes across many species of fish may reveal clues for important behavioral and physiological differences between the sexes, and may also be useful in developing fish consumption advisories and efficient designs for programs meant to monitor contaminant levels in fish. We determined skin-off fillet and whole-fish total mercury (Hg) concentrations of 28 adult female and 26 adult male bluegills (Lepomis macrochirus) from Squaw Lake, Oakland County, Michigan (MI), USA. Bioenergetics modeling was used to quantify the effect of growth dilution on the difference in Hg concentrations between the sexes. On average, skin-off fillet and whole-fish Hg concentrations were 25.4% higher and 26.6% higher, respectively, in females compared with males. Thus, the relative difference in Hg concentrations between the sexes for skin-off fillets was nearly identical to that for whole fish. However, mean skin-off fillet Hg concentration (363 ng/g) was 2.3 times greater than mean whole-fish Hg concentration (155 ng/g). Males grew substantially faster than females, and bioenergetics modeling results indicated that the growth dilution effect could account for females having 14.4% higher Hg concentrations than males. Our findings should be useful in revising fish consumption advisories.

  19. Hydrodynamics of the escape response in bluegill sunfish, Lepomis macrochirus

    PubMed Central

    Tytell, Eric D.; Lauder, George V.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Escape responses of fishes are one of the best characterized vertebrate behaviors, with extensive previous research on both the neural control and biomechanics of startle response performance. However, very little is known about the hydrodynamics of escape responses, despite the fact that understanding fluid flow patterns during the escape is critical for evaluating how body movement transfers power to the fluid, for defining the time course of power generation, and for characterizing the wake signature left by escaping fishes, which may provide information to predators. In this paper we present an experimental hydrodynamic analysis of the C-start escape response in bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus). We used time-resolved digital particle image velocimetry at 1000 fps to image flow patterns during the escape response. We analyzed flow patterns generated by the body separately from those generated by the dorsal and anal fins, to assess the contribution of these median fins to escape momentum. Each escape response produced three distinct jets of fluid. Summing the components of fluid momentum in the jets provided an estimate of fish momentum that did not differ significantly from momentum measured from the escaping fish body. In contrast to conclusions drawn from previous kinematic analyses and theoretical models, the caudal fin generated momentum that opposes the escape during stage one, while the body bending during stage one contributed substantial propulsive momentum. Additionally, the dorsal and anal fins each contributed substantial momentum. The results underscore the importance of the dorsal and anal fins as propulsors and suggest that the size and placement of these fins may be a key determinant of fast start performance. PMID:18931309

  20. Uptake, biotransformation, and elimination of rotenone by bluegills (Lepomis macrochirus )

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gingerich, W.H.; Rach, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    Yearling bluegills (Lepomis macrochirus) were exposed to sublethal concentrations of [14C]rotenone (5.2 μg/l) for 30 days in a continuous flow exposure system and then transferred to clean, flowing water for an additional 21-day depuration period. Rates of uptake and elimination and profile of the rotenoid metabolites in head, viscera, and carcass components were evaluated by 14C counting and by high performance liquid chromatography. Total [14C]rotenone derived activity was relatively uniform in all body components within 3 days after initial exposure and remained constant during the ensuing 27 days of exposure. Initial uptake rate coefficients were highest in viscera (Ku = 80· h -1) and were nearly identical for head (Ku = 14 · h) and carcass (Ku = 10 · h-1). Analyses of tissue extracts by high performance liquid chromatography confirmed the presence of at least six biotransformation products of rotenone. More than 60% of the activity extracted from viscera was present as a single peak which represented a compound that was extremely soluble in water. Rotenone composed only 0.3% of the extractable activity in viscera taken from fish exposed to rotenone for 30 days; however, rotenone accounted for 15.4% of extractable activity in the head and 20.1% in the carcass components. Rotenolone and 6',7'-dihydro-6'-,7'--dihydroxyrotenolone were tentatively identified as oxidation products in all tissue extracts. Elimination of 14C activity from all body components was biphasic; both phases followed first-order kinetics. The rate of elimination was nearly equal for all body components during the initial phase but was most rapid from viscera during the second phase of elimination. Bioconcentration factors for the head, viscera, and carcass were 165, 3,550, and 125, respectively, when calculated on the basis of total 14C activity but only 25.4, 11, and 26 when calculated as the concentration of parent material.

  1. Growth, life history, and species interactions of bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) under heavy predation

    SciTech Connect

    Belk, M.C.

    1992-12-31

    The purpose of this study was, first, to compare growth and life history characteristics of an unfished population of bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) in the presence of an abundant predator population to characteristic exhibited by bluegills in typical southeastern US reservoirs where the abundance of predators is reduced, but fishing is increased. The second objective was to determine if differences observed between populations were determined genetically or environmentally.

  2. Aggressive interactions between the invasive Rio Grande cichlid (Herichthys cyanoguttatus) and native bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), with notes on redspotted sunfish (Lepomis miniatus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorenz, O. Thomas; O' Connell, Martin T.; Schofield, Pamela J.

    2010-01-01

    The Rio Grande cichlid (Herichthys cyanoguttatus) has been established in the Greater New Orleans Metropolitan area for at least 20 years, and its effect on native fishes is unknown. Behavioral trials were performed to determine if aggressive interactions occur between invasive H. cyanoguttatus and native bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus). When defending a territory as the resident, L. macrochirus were markedly aggressive, averaging 11.6 aggressive actions per lO-min behavioral trial. In contrast, L. macrochirus were extremely passive as invaders, with 0.5 aggressive actions per trial. Herichthys cyanoguttatus were equally aggressive as residents and as invaders, averaging 4.9 and 6.0 aggressive actions per trial, respectively. Herichthys cyanoguttatus interacted aggressively with native species whether they held territory or not, indicating that this invasive species may have fundamentally different strategies of aggression compared with native L. macrochirus. These differences may explain the continued success of H. cyanoguttatus as an invasive fish in southeastern Louisiana.

  3. The effects of urbanization on Lepomis macrochirus using the comet assay.

    PubMed

    Otter, Ryan R; Meier, John; Kubach, Kevin M; Lazorchak, James M; Klaine, Stephen J

    2012-10-01

    Urbanization has been linked to increased concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in natural waterways. This study was designed to examine the impact of urbanization and a wastewater treatment plant by investigating the impact on field-collected bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus). Results show a significant increase in DNA strand breaks in blood cells (comet assay) linked to urbanization and a reduction in DNA strand breaks downstream of the WWTP, likely the result of dilution. A laboratory study exposing L. macrochirus to the known mutagen, methyl methanesulfonate, was performed to validate the comet assay endpoints in this species. Results of the laboratory study showed that the comet assay endpoints of tail length and tail extent moment responded in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Habitat quality assessments, along with chemical concentrations of polycyclic hydrocarbons in sediments showed that habitat quality between all sites were similar and that hydrocarbons likely contributed to the DNA strand breaks observed.

  4. Lethal and sublethal effects of copper on redbreast sunfish, Lepomis auritus

    SciTech Connect

    Esman, L.A.; La Point, T.W.

    1995-12-31

    The popularity of redbreast sunfish (Lepomis auritus) as a sport fishery has been steadily increasing in South Carolina and the southeastern region of the United States. However, little is known about the toxicological sensitivity of this species. Expanding urban and suburban development threatens an increasing number of Piedmont streams with point and nonpoint source toxic discharges. As a result, redbreast sunfish face a greater influx of heavy metals, including copper, into the environment. In addition, the soft waters (10--20 mg/L as CaCO{sub 3}) characteristic of South Carolina increases the bioavailability of metals causing increased toxicity to fish. The authors determined the effect of copper, as copper sulfate (CuSO{sub 4}{center_dot}5H{sub 2}O) on redbreast sunfish using a static renewal toxicity test, monitoring mortality at frequent intervals. The overall 96hr LC50 was 0.18 mg/L Cu. A critical concentration leading to rapid time-to-death appears to fall within the range of 0.15--0.28 mg/L Cu. Normal social behavior is important for successful propagation of this species in the wild. Preliminary testing indicates that predatory behavior is unaffected at concentrations up to 50% LC50. Ultimately, such stress will lower population fitness. Therefore, the authors are determining at what concentration they see behavioral effects on feeding (e.g. handling time, capture efficiency) begin. Results of these experiments expand the behavioral and toxicological data on this species.

  5. Selective predation by bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) on three species of Diaptomus (Copepoda) from subtropical Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Elmore, J.L.; Vodopich, D.S.; Hoover, J.J.

    1983-07-01

    The electivity of young bluegills (Lepomis marochirus) feeding on three species of Diaptomus was examined experimentally in aquaria. Young bluegills consumed more adult female D. floridanus than D. mississippiensis, with D. dorsalis being consumed in the smallest numbers. An experiment was conducted with a nonvisual siphon device in an attempt to separate the visibility and escape ability components of the feeding electivity. Although somewhat variable, escape ability was linearly related to body size of the copepods, with D. dorsalis being captured least often by the siphon, D. floridanus being caught an intermediate number of times, and D. mississippiensis being caught most often. Comparisons of the two experiments indicated that differences in numbers of D. dorsalis and D. floridanus eaten by bluegills were determined primarily by disparities in visibility attributable to pigmentation, whereas differences in numbers of D. dorsalis and D. mississippiensis eaten could be accounted for by their escape ability alone. Trends in numbers of D. mississippiensis and D. floridanus eaten were influenced by both their visibility, as determined by body size, and their escape ability. The finding of this study support the hypothesis that D. floridanus and D. mississippiensis could be excluded by fish predation from lakes in which D. dorsalis occurs. 21 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  6. Phenotypic variation and vulnerability to predation in juvenile bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chipps, S.R.; Dunbar, J.A.; Wahl, David H.

    2004-01-01

    Bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) are known to diversify into two forms specialized for foraging on either limnetic or littoral prey. Because juvenile bluegills seek vegetative cover in the presence of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) predators, natural selection should favor the littoral body design at size ranges most vulnerable to predation. Yet within bluegill populations, both limnetic and littoral forms occur where vegetation and predators are present. While adaptive for foraging in different environments, does habitat-linked phenotypic variation also influence predator evasiveness for juvenile bluegills? We evaluate this question by quantifying susceptibility to predation for two groups of morphologically distinct bluegills; a limnetic form characteristic of bluegills inhabiting open water areas (limnetic bluegill) and a littoral form characteristic of bluegills inhabiting dense vegetation (littoral bluegill). In a series of predation trials, we found that bluegill behaviors differed in open water habitat but not in simulated vegetation. In open water habitat, limnetic bluegills formed more dense shoaling aggregations, maintained a larger distance from the predator, and required longer amounts of time to capture than littoral bluegill. When provided with simulated vegetation, largemouth bass spent longer amounts of time pursuing littoral bluegill and captured significantly fewer littoral bluegills than limnetic fish. Hence, morphological and behavioral variation in bluegills was linked to differential susceptibility to predation in open water and vegetated environments. Combined with previous studies, these findings show that morphological and behavioral adaptations enhance both foraging performance and predator evasiveness in different lake habitats.

  7. Histopathological changes induced by malathion in the gills of bluegill Lepomis macrochirus

    SciTech Connect

    Richmonds, C.; Dutta, H.M. )

    1989-07-01

    Malathion is a widely used broad spectrum organophosphorus insecticide. Its wide use provides many occasions for its entry into aquatic environments. The presence of this chemical in the aquatic environment would adversely affect many non-target species like fish. About 50 to 90% of the absorbed malathion can be eliminated in one to three days by the fish. About 25% of malathion remained in river water after 2 wk, and 10% remained after 4 wk from the time of its entry. Respiratory distress is one of the early symptoms of pesticide poisoning. These toxicants appear to cause a loss of adhesion between the epithelial cells and the underlying pillar cell system, accompanied by a collapse of the structural integrity of the secondary lamellae. Gills are important in respiration as well as osmoregulation of the fish. Therefore it was decided to study the effects of malathion on the gills of bluegill sunfish, Lepomis macrochirus. Bluegills were selected for this study due to the following reasons: (1) Bluegills are more sensitive to malathion when compared to fathead minnows and goldfish. (2) They are important both as edible and game fish. (3) They are easily available and easy to maintain in the laboratory.

  8. Trade-offs between performance and variability in the escape responses of bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus)

    PubMed Central

    Hitchcock, Amanda C.; Chen, Tiffany; Connolly, Erin; Darakananda, Karin; Jeong, Janet; Quist, Arbor; Robbins, Allison; Ellerby, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Successful predator evasion is essential to the fitness of many animals. Variation in escape behaviour may be adaptive as it reduces predictability, enhancing escape success. High escape velocities and accelerations also increase escape success, but biomechanical factors likely constrain the behavioural range over which performance can be maximized. There may therefore be a trade-off between variation and performance during escape responses. We have used bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) escape responses to examine this potential trade-off, determining the full repertoire of escape behaviour for individual bluegill sunfish and linking this to performance as indicated by escape velocity and acceleration. Fish escapes involve an initial C-bend of the body axis, followed by variable steering movements. These generate thrust and establish the escape direction. Directional changes during the initial C-bend were less variable than the final escape angle, and the most frequent directions were associated with high escape velocity. Significant inter-individual differences in escape angles magnified the overall variation, maintaining unpredictability from a predator perspective. Steering in the latter stages of the escape to establish the final escape trajectory also affected performance, with turns away from the stimulus associated with reduced velocity. This suggests that modulation of escape behaviour by steering may also have an associated performance cost. This has important implications for understanding the scope and control of intra- and inter-individual variation in escape behaviour and the associated costs and benefits. PMID:25910940

  9. Determination of ten perfluorinated compounds in bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) fillets

    SciTech Connect

    Delinsky, Amy D.; Strynar, Mark J.; Nakayama, Shoji F.; Varns, Jerry L.; Ye, XiBiao; McCann, Patricia J.; Lindstrom, Andrew B.

    2009-11-15

    A rigorous solid phase extraction/liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method for the measurement of 10 perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) in fish fillets is described and applied to fillets of bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) collected from selected areas of Minnesota and North Carolina. The 4 PFC analytes routinely detected in bluegill fillets were perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorodecanoic acid (C10), perfluoroundecanoic acid (C11), and perflurododecanoic acid (C12). Measures of method accuracy and precision for these compounds showed that calculated concentrations of PFCs in spiked samples differed by less than 20% from their theoretical values and that the %RSD for repeated measurements was less than 20%. Minnesota samples were collected from areas of the Mississippi River near historical PFC sources, from the St. Croix River as a background site, and from Lake Calhoun, which has no documented PFC sources. PFOS was the most prevalent PFC found in the Minnesota samples, with median concentrations of 47.0-102 ng/g at locations along the Mississippi River, 2.08 ng/g in the St. Croix River, and 275 ng/g in Lake Calhoun. North Carolina samples were collected from two rivers with no known historical PFC sources. PFOS was the predominant analyte in fish taken from the Haw and Deep Rivers, with median concentrations of 30.3 and 62.2 ng/g, respectively. Concentrations of C10, C11, and C12 in NC samples were among the highest reported in the literature, with respective median values of 9.08, 23.9, and 6.60 ng/g in fish from the Haw River and 2.90, 9.15, and 3.46 ng/g in fish from the Deep River. These results suggest that PFC contamination in freshwater fish may not be limited to areas with known historical PFC inputs.

  10. Endoparasite Community Differences in Sunfish (Lepomis spp.) Above and Below Coal Mine Effluent in Southern Illinois.

    PubMed

    Claxton, Andrew; Laursen, Jeff

    2015-06-01

    Parasite assemblages acquired through trophic interactions in fish hosts are increasingly cited as a means to determine pollution effects on water quality and food web structure. We examined gastrointestinal parasite community changes above and below coal mine input from 597 individuals representing 3 species of sunfish: green sunfish ( Lepomis cyanellus ), bluegill ( L. macrochirus ), and longear sunfish ( L. megalotis ). Hosts were collected from 6 sites in or near the south fork of the Saline River Basin in southern Illinois in the spring and fall of 2006. Three sites received no known effluent from coal mines. An additional 3 sites received effluent termed acid mine drainage (AMD). We recovered 1,064 parasites from 12 genera. The parasite community in sunfish collected downstream nearest to the source of AMD was significantly different from 3 upstream sites. In addition, 2 sites farther downstream receiving AMD were different from 2 of 3 reference sites. However, there was also considerable variability in parasite assemblages between sites grouped as above or below coal mine effluent. Several parasite species responded to changes in water quality. Spinitectus sp. (Nematoda), which uses sensitive mayfly hosts to complete its life cycle, was less abundant at sites downstream of coal mine effluent in both green sunfish and bluegill. In contrast, 2 acanthocephalans ( Neoechinorhynchus sp. and Eocollis arcanus) and a nematode ( Spiroxys sp.) were found in green sunfish more frequently in areas downstream of AMD. This study further suggests metazoan parasites may be useful as indicators of water quality; however, variability among similar sites may limit their application. In addition, strong assemblage differences were found among the 3 sunfish species, suggesting variable habitat usage and potential resource partitioning among congeneric fish hosts in streams. PMID:25634342

  11. Effects of cadmium on juvenile bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) foraging behavior and growth

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, M.D.

    1993-01-01

    Standardized toxicity testing protocols for assessing chemical hazards to aquatic organisms inadequately consider behavioral effects of toxicants; yet, organisms behaving abnormally in the wild experience reduced growth, fitness, and higher mortality. This study determined the effects of cadmium (0, 30, 60, 120, and 240 [mu]g/L) on juvenile bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) foraging behavior in three 28-d functional response experiments, and one 24-d multi-prey experiment. The study also examined how cadmium-altered behaviors contributed to reduced growth rates. Different sizes of Daphnia magna and D. pulez were used as prey in these experiments. The rate of change (i.e., trends over time) in the number of Daphnia attacker per unit time was the most consistently sensitive behavioral measure of sublethal stress in exposed bluegill; the lowest observed effect concentration (LOEC) for this metric was 30 [mu]g Cd/L. The magnitude and duration of effects on prey attack rates were inversely related to prey size; cadmium had a greater and more prolonged effect on fish foraging on small compared to large prey. Cadmium had little effect on prey capture efficiency and handling time. Patch switching efficiency, as measured by caloric gain per unit time, was not affected by cadmium exposure. Cadmium affected prey selection when preferred prey were scarce, but not when preferred prey were abundant. Evidence suggests that reduced consumption of Daphnia and altered prey selection were the result of cadmium-altered prey search strategy and perhaps reduced motivation to feed. Growth was significantly reduced in bluegill exposed to nominal concentrations of 30 [mu]g Cd/L in two of three experiments and at 60 [mu]g Cd/L in the third experiment. In managing environmental contaminants, exposure must be limited to concentrations that protect organisms' ability to carry-out their most basic and essential ecological activities (i.e., feeding, surviving, and reproducing).

  12. Use of behavioral endpoints to determine protective concentrations of the insecticide fonofos for bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fairchild, J.F.; Little, E.E.

    1999-01-01

    This research compared the results of laboratory and mesocosm studies to determine the effectiveness of using behavioral measures of sublethal exposure to define environmental concentration ranges that are protective of free-ranging populations of bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) exposed to the organophophate insecticide fonofos. Thirty-day laboratory chronic studies were conducted to determine the relative sensitivity of standard (e.g. survival and growth) and non-standard behavioral (e.g. swimming capacity, feeding efficiency, and aggression) endpoints in predicting concentrations of fonofos protective of bluegill growth and survival. The lowest observable effect concentration (LOECs) for the standard measures of survival and growth was 5.6 ??g/L. Two behavioral endpoints were of similar sensitivity to the standard measures: swimming capacity, LOEC of 5.6 ??g/L; and prey strike frequency, LOEC of 5.6 ??g/L. However, aggressive interactions were ten-fold more sensitive than swimming or feeding behavior with a LOEC occurring at 0.6 ??g/L. Lab results were compared to an aquatic mesocosm study which exposed adult and juvenile bluegill to a 9.41 ??g/L concentration of fonofos. The dissipation half-life of fonofos was 5 days in 0.1 hectare aquatic mesocosms. Significant mortality among caged bluegill occurred within 4 days of exposure at 9.41 ??g/L. However, the 9.41 ??g/L concentration of fonofos had no statistically significant effects on survival, growth, reproduction, or total biomass of free-ranging populations of bluegill. We conclude from these studies that laboratory data can accurately estimate concentrations that are lethal in the field and that the use of behavioral endpoints can provide ecologically relevant, yet conservative estimates of concentrations that are protective of field populations.

  13. Three-dimensional analysis of scale morphology in bluegill sunfish, Lepomis macrochirus.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Dylan K; Lauder, George V

    2016-06-01

    Fish scales are morphologically diverse among species, within species, and on individuals. Scales of bony fishes are often categorized into three main types: cycloid scales have smooth edges; spinoid scales have spines protruding from the body of the scale; ctenoid scales have interdigitating spines protruding from the posterior margin of the scale. For this study, we used two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) visualization techniques to investigate scale morphology of bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) on different regions of the body. Micro-CT scanning was used to visualize individual scales taken from different regions, and a new technique called GelSight was used to rapidly measure the 3D surface structure and elevation profiles of in situ scale patches from different regions. We used these data to compare the surface morphology of scales from different regions, using morphological measurements and surface metrology metrics to develop a set of shape variables. We performed a discriminant function analysis to show that bluegill scales differ across the body - scales are cycloid on the opercle but ctenoid on the rest of the body, and the proportion of ctenii coverage increases ventrally on the fish. Scales on the opercle and just below the anterior spinous dorsal fin were smaller in height, length, and thickness than scales elsewhere on the body. Surface roughness did not appear to differ over the body of the fish, although scales at the start of the caudal peduncle had higher skew values than other scales, indicating they have a surface that contains more peaks than valleys. Scale shape also differs along the body, with scales near the base of the tail having a more elongated shape. This study adds to our knowledge of scale structure and diversity in fishes, and the 3D measurement of scale surface structure provides the basis for future testing of functional hypotheses relating scale morphology to locomotor performance. PMID:27062451

  14. Median fin function in bluegill sunfish Lepomis macrochirus: streamwise vortex structure during steady swimming.

    PubMed

    Tytell, Eric D

    2006-04-01

    Fishes have an enormous diversity of body shapes and fin morphologies. From a hydrodynamic standpoint, the functional significance of this diversity is poorly understood, largely because the three-dimensional flow around swimming fish is almost completely unknown. Fully three-dimensional volumetric flow measurements are not currently feasible, but measurements in multiple transverse planes along the body can illuminate many of the important flow features. In this study, I analyze flow in the transverse plane at a range of positions around bluegill sunfish Lepomis macrochirus, from the trailing edges of the dorsal and anal fins to the near wake. Simultaneous particle image velocimetry and kinematic measurements were performed during swimming at 1.2 body lengths s(-1) to describe the streamwise vortex structure, to quantify the contributions of each fin to the vortex wake, and to assess the importance of three-dimensional flow effects in swimming. Sunfish produce streamwise vortices from at least eight distinct places, including both the dorsal and ventral margins of the soft dorsal and anal fins, and the tips and central notched region of the caudal fin. I propose a three-dimensional structure of the vortex wake in which these vortices from the caudal notch are elongated by the dorso-ventral cupping motion of the tail, producing a structure like a hairpin vortex in the caudal fin vortex ring. Vortices from the dorsal and anal fin persist into the wake, probably linking up with the caudal fin vortices. These dorsal and anal fin vortices do not differ significantly in circulation from the two caudal fin tip vortices. Because the circulations are equal and the length of the trailing edge of the caudal fin is approximately equal to the combined trailing edge length of the dorsal and anal fins, I argue that the two anterior median fins produce a total force that is comparable to that of the caudal fin. To provide additional detail on how different positions contribute to

  15. The life cycle of Huffmanela huffmani Moravec, 1987(Nematoda: Trichosomoididae), an endemic marine-relict parasite of Centrarchidae from a Central Texas spring.

    PubMed

    Worsham, McLean L D; Huffman, David G; Moravec, Frantisek; Gibson, J Randy

    2016-01-01

    The life cycle of the swim bladder nematode Huffmanela huffmani Moravec, 1987 (Trichinelloidea: Trichosomoididae), an endemic parasite of centrarchid fishes in the upper spring run of the San Marcos River in Hays County, Texas, USA, was experimentally completed. The amphipods Hyalella cf. azteca (Saussure), Hyalella sp. and Gammarus sp. were successfully infected with larvated eggs of Huffmanela huffmani. After ingestion of eggs of H. huffmani by experimental amphipods, the first-stage larvae hatch from their eggshells and penetrate through the digestive tract to the hemocoel of the amphipod. Within about 5 days in the hemocoel of the experimental amphipods at 22 °C, the larvae presumably attained the second larval stage and were infective for the experimental centrarchid definitive hosts, Lepomis spp. The minimum incubation period before adult nematodes began laying eggs in the swim bladders of the definitive hosts was found to be about 7.5 months at 22 °C. This is the first experimentally completed life cycle within the Huffmanelinae. PMID:27312028

  16. Examining the joint toxicity of chlorpyrifos and atrazine in the aquatic species: Lepomis macrochirus, Pimephales promelas and Chironomus tentans.

    PubMed

    Tyler Mehler, W; Schuler, Lance J; Lydy, Michael J

    2008-03-01

    The joint toxicity of chlorpyrifos and atrazine was compared to that of chlorpyrifos alone to discern any greater than additive response using both acute toxicity testing and whole-body residue analysis. In addition, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition and biotransformation were investigated to evaluate the toxic mode of action of chlorpyrifos in the presence of atrazine. The joint toxicity of atrazine and chlorpyrifos exhibited no significant difference in Lepomis macrochirus compared to chlorpyrifos alone; while studies performed with Pimephales promelas and Chironomus tentans, did show significant differences. AChE activity and biotransformation showed no significant differences between the joint toxicity of atrazine and chlorpyrifos and that of chlorpyrifos alone. From the data collected, the combination of atrazine and chlorpyrifos pose little additional risk than that of chlorpyrifos alone to the tested fish species.

  17. Will jumping snails prevail? Influence of near-future CO₂, temperature and hypoxia on respiratory performance in the tropical conch Gibberulus gibberulus gibbosus.

    PubMed

    Lefevre, Sjannie; Watson, Sue-Ann; Munday, Philip L; Nilsson, Göran E

    2015-10-01

    Tropical coral reef organisms are predicted to be especially sensitive to ocean warming because many already live close to their upper thermal limit, and the expected rise in ocean CO2 is proposed to further reduce thermal tolerance. Little, however, is known about the thermal sensitivity of a diverse and abundant group of reef animals, the gastropods. The humpbacked conch (Gibberulus gibberulus gibbosus), inhabiting subtidal zones of the Great Barrier Reef, was chosen as a model because vigorous jumping, causing increased oxygen uptake (ṀO2 ), can be induced by exposure to odour from a predatory cone snail (Conus marmoreus). We investigated the effect of present-day ambient (417-454 µatm) and projected-future (955-987 µatm) PCO2 on resting (ṀO2 , rest) and maximum (ṀO2 , max) ṀO2 , as well as ṀO2 during hypoxia and critical oxygen tension (PO2 , crit), in snails kept at present-day ambient (28°C) or projected-future temperature (33°C). ṀO2 , rest and ṀO2 , max were measured both at the acclimation temperature and during an acute 5°C increase. Jumping caused a 4- to 6-fold increase in ṀO2 , and ṀO2 , max increased with temperature so that absolute aerobic scope was maintained even at 38°C, although factorial scope was reduced. The humpbacked conch has a high hypoxia tolerance with a PO2 , crit of 2.5 kPa at 28°C and 3.5 kPa at 33°C. There was no effect of elevated CO2 on respiratory performance at any temperature. Long-term temperature records and our field measurements suggest that habitat temperature rarely exceeds 32.6°C during the summer, indicating that these snails have aerobic capacity in excess of current and future needs.

  18. Will jumping snails prevail? Influence of near-future CO₂, temperature and hypoxia on respiratory performance in the tropical conch Gibberulus gibberulus gibbosus.

    PubMed

    Lefevre, Sjannie; Watson, Sue-Ann; Munday, Philip L; Nilsson, Göran E

    2015-10-01

    Tropical coral reef organisms are predicted to be especially sensitive to ocean warming because many already live close to their upper thermal limit, and the expected rise in ocean CO2 is proposed to further reduce thermal tolerance. Little, however, is known about the thermal sensitivity of a diverse and abundant group of reef animals, the gastropods. The humpbacked conch (Gibberulus gibberulus gibbosus), inhabiting subtidal zones of the Great Barrier Reef, was chosen as a model because vigorous jumping, causing increased oxygen uptake (ṀO2 ), can be induced by exposure to odour from a predatory cone snail (Conus marmoreus). We investigated the effect of present-day ambient (417-454 µatm) and projected-future (955-987 µatm) PCO2 on resting (ṀO2 , rest) and maximum (ṀO2 , max) ṀO2 , as well as ṀO2 during hypoxia and critical oxygen tension (PO2 , crit), in snails kept at present-day ambient (28°C) or projected-future temperature (33°C). ṀO2 , rest and ṀO2 , max were measured both at the acclimation temperature and during an acute 5°C increase. Jumping caused a 4- to 6-fold increase in ṀO2 , and ṀO2 , max increased with temperature so that absolute aerobic scope was maintained even at 38°C, although factorial scope was reduced. The humpbacked conch has a high hypoxia tolerance with a PO2 , crit of 2.5 kPa at 28°C and 3.5 kPa at 33°C. There was no effect of elevated CO2 on respiratory performance at any temperature. Long-term temperature records and our field measurements suggest that habitat temperature rarely exceeds 32.6°C during the summer, indicating that these snails have aerobic capacity in excess of current and future needs. PMID:26447195

  19. Exploring spatial distributions of larval yellow perch Perca flavescens, bluegill Lepomis macrochirus and their prey in relation to wind.

    PubMed

    Kaemingk, M A; Jolley, J C; Willis, D W; Graeb, B D S

    2011-04-01

    The objectives of the present study were to determine if spatial differences existed between zooplankton, larval yellow perch Perca flavescens and bluegill Lepomis macrochirus (<13 mm total length, L(T)) in Pelican Lake (332 ha), NE, U.S.A. It was hypothesized that wind could act as a transport mechanism for larval fishes in this shallow lake, because strong winds are common at this geographic location. Potential spatial differences were explored, relating to zooplankton densities, size structure and densities of larval P. flavescens and L. macrochirus. Density differences (east v. west side of the lake) were detected for small- (two occasions), medium- (two occasions) and large-sized (one occasion) L. macrochirus larvae. No density differences were detected for small P. flavescens larvae; however, densities of medium- and large-sized P. flavescens were each higher on the west side of the lake on two occasions. There was no evidence that larval P. flavescens and L. macrochirus distributions were related to wind because they were not associated with large wind events. Likewise, large wind event days did not result in any detectable spatial differences of larval P. flavescens and L. macrochirus densities. There appeared to be no spatial mismatch between larval densities and associated prey in the years examined. Thus, wind was not apparently an influential mechanism for zooplankton and larval P. flavescens and L. macrochirus transport within Pelican Lake, and spatial differences in density may instead be related to vegetation and habitat complexities or spawning locations within this shallow lake.

  20. Testing a bioenergetics-based habitat choice model: bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) responses to food availability and temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2011-01-01

    Using an automated shuttlebox system, we conducted patch choice experiments with 32, 8–12 g bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) to test a behavioral energetics hypothesis of habitat choice. When patch temperature and food levels were held constant within patches but different between patches, we expected bluegill to choose patches that maximized growth based on the bioenergetic integration of food and temperature as predicted by a bioenergetics model. Alternative hypotheses were that bluegill may choose patches based only on food (optimal foraging) or temperature (behavioral thermoregulation). The behavioral energetics hypothesis was not a good predictor of short-term (from minutes to weeks) patch choice by bluegill; the behavioral thermoregulation hypothesis was the best predictor. In the short-term, food and temperature appeared to affect patch choice hierarchically; temperature was more important, although food can alter temperature preference during feeding periods. Over a 19-d experiment, mean temperatures occupied by fish offered low rations did decline as predicted by the behavioral energetics hypothesis, but the decline was less than 1.0 °C as opposed to a possible 5 °C decline. A short-term, bioenergetic response to food and temperature may be precluded by physiological costs of acclimation not considered explicitly in the behavioral energetics hypothesis.

  1. Biodiversity data mining from Argus-eyed citizens: the first illegal introduction record of Lepomis macrochirus macrochirus Rafinesque, 1819 in Japan based on Twitter information.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yusuke; Teramura, Akinori; Senou, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    An apparent illegal introduction of Lepomis macrochirus macrochirus from Yokohama City, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, is reported based on a juvenile specimen and a photograph of two adults collected on 14 June 2015 and deposited in the Kangawa Prefectural Museum of Natural History. The specimens and photographs were initially reported on the internet-based social networking site, Twitter. Two specimens of Carassius auratus, including an aquarium form, were also reported at the same locality and date, suggesting that the illegal introductions originated from an aquarium release. Our report demonstrates an example of web data mining in the discipline of Citizen Science.

  2. Biodiversity data mining from Argus-eyed citizens: the first illegal introduction record of Lepomis macrochirus macrochirus Rafinesque, 1819 in Japan based on Twitter information

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Yusuke; Teramura, Akinori; Senou, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract An apparent illegal introduction of Lepomis macrochirus macrochirus from Yokohama City, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, is reported based on a juvenile specimen and a photograph of two adults collected on 14 June 2015 and deposited in the Kangawa Prefectural Museum of Natural History. The specimens and photographs were initially reported on the internet-based social networking site, Twitter. Two specimens of Carassius auratus, including an aquarium form, were also reported at the same locality and date, suggesting that the illegal introductions originated from an aquarium release. Our report demonstrates an example of web data mining in the discipline of Citizen Science. PMID:27110154

  3. Biodiversity data mining from Argus-eyed citizens: the first illegal introduction record of Lepomis macrochirus macrochirus Rafinesque, 1819 in Japan based on Twitter information.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yusuke; Teramura, Akinori; Senou, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    An apparent illegal introduction of Lepomis macrochirus macrochirus from Yokohama City, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, is reported based on a juvenile specimen and a photograph of two adults collected on 14 June 2015 and deposited in the Kangawa Prefectural Museum of Natural History. The specimens and photographs were initially reported on the internet-based social networking site, Twitter. Two specimens of Carassius auratus, including an aquarium form, were also reported at the same locality and date, suggesting that the illegal introductions originated from an aquarium release. Our report demonstrates an example of web data mining in the discipline of Citizen Science. PMID:27110154

  4. Utilizing stomach content and faecal DNA analysis techniques to assess the feeding behaviour of largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides and bluegill Lepomis macrochirus.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, T; Miura, Y; Krueger, D; Sugiura, S

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the feeding behaviour of the non-native invasive predatory fishes largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides and bluegill Lepomis macrochirus was studied in the Ezura River, a northern tributary of Lake Biwa, Japan. Prey composition was estimated based on visual examination of stomach contents and faecal DNA analysis to determine feeding habits of these predatory fishes. Stomach content analysis showed that native fishes (e.g. ayu Plecoglossus altivelis and gobies Rhinogobius spp.) and shrimps (e.g. Palaemon paucidens) were the major prey items for M. salmoides, while snails, larval Chironomidae and submerged macrophytes were the dominant prey items of L. macrochirus. Micropterus salmoides tended to select larger fish in the case of crucian carp Carassius spp., but smaller fishes in the case of P. altivelis and Rhinogobius spp. Faecal DNA analyses revealed prey compositions similar to those identified in predator stomach contents, and identified additional prey species not detected in stomach content inspection. This study demonstrated that both stomach content inspection and DNA-based analysis bear several inherent shortcomings and advantages. The former method is straightforward, although identification of species can be inaccurate or impossible, whereas the latter method allows for accurate species identification, but cannot distinguish prey size or stage. Hence, integration of morphology-based and DNA-based methods can provide more reliable estimates of foraging habits of predatory fishes. PMID:24661110

  5. Utilizing stomach content and faecal DNA analysis techniques to assess the feeding behaviour of largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides and bluegill Lepomis macrochirus.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, T; Miura, Y; Krueger, D; Sugiura, S

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the feeding behaviour of the non-native invasive predatory fishes largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides and bluegill Lepomis macrochirus was studied in the Ezura River, a northern tributary of Lake Biwa, Japan. Prey composition was estimated based on visual examination of stomach contents and faecal DNA analysis to determine feeding habits of these predatory fishes. Stomach content analysis showed that native fishes (e.g. ayu Plecoglossus altivelis and gobies Rhinogobius spp.) and shrimps (e.g. Palaemon paucidens) were the major prey items for M. salmoides, while snails, larval Chironomidae and submerged macrophytes were the dominant prey items of L. macrochirus. Micropterus salmoides tended to select larger fish in the case of crucian carp Carassius spp., but smaller fishes in the case of P. altivelis and Rhinogobius spp. Faecal DNA analyses revealed prey compositions similar to those identified in predator stomach contents, and identified additional prey species not detected in stomach content inspection. This study demonstrated that both stomach content inspection and DNA-based analysis bear several inherent shortcomings and advantages. The former method is straightforward, although identification of species can be inaccurate or impossible, whereas the latter method allows for accurate species identification, but cannot distinguish prey size or stage. Hence, integration of morphology-based and DNA-based methods can provide more reliable estimates of foraging habits of predatory fishes.

  6. Fin ray sensation participates in the generation of normal fin movement in the hovering behavior of the bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus).

    PubMed

    Williams, Richard; Hale, Melina E

    2015-11-01

    For many fish species, the pectoral fins serve as important propulsors and stabilizers and are precisely controlled. Although it has been shown that mechanosensory feedback from the fin ray afferent nerves provides information on ray bending and position, the effects of this feedback on fin movement are not known. In other taxa, including insects and mammals, sensory feedback from the limbs has been shown to be important for control of limb-based behaviors and we hypothesized that this is also the case for the fishes. In this study, we examined the impact of the loss of sensory feedback from the pectoral fins on movement kinematics during hover behavior. Research was performed with bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), a model for understanding the biomechanics of swimming and for bio-inspired design of engineered fins. The bluegill beats its pectoral fins rhythmically, and in coordination with pelvic and median fin movement, to maintain a stationary position while hovering. Bilateral deafferentation of the fin rays results in a splay-finned posture where fins beat regularly but at a higher frequency and without adducting fully against the side of the body. For unilateral transections, more irregular changes in fin movements were recorded. These data indicate that sensory feedback from the fin rays and membrane is important for generating normal hover movements but is not necessary for generating rhythmic fin movement.

  7. Histopathologic evaluation of postmortem autolytic changes in bluegill (Lepomis macrohirus) and crappie (Pomoxis anularis) at varied time intervals and storage temperatures.

    PubMed

    George, Jami; Van Wettere, Arnaud J; Michaels, Blayk B; Crain, Debbi; Lewbart, Gregory A

    2016-01-01

    Information is lacking on preserving fish carcasses to minimize postmortem autolysis artifacts when a necropsy cannot be performed immediately. The purpose of this study was to qualitatively identify and score histologic postmortem changes in two species of freshwater fish (bluegill-Lepomis macrochirus; crappie-Pomoxis annularis), at varied time intervals and storage temperatures, to assess the histologic quality of collected samples. A pooled sample of 36 mix sex individuals of healthy bluegill and crappie were euthanized, stored either at room temperature, refrigerated at 4 °C, or frozen at -20 °C, and then necropsied at 0, 4, 24, and 48 h intervals. Histologic specimens were evaluated by light microscopy. Data showed that immediate harvesting of fresh samples provides the best quality and refrigeration would be the preferred method of storage if sample collection had to be delayed for up to 24 h. When sample collection must be delayed more than 24 h, the preferred method of storage to minimize autolysis artifacts is freezing if evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract is most important, or refrigeration if gill histology is most important. The gill arch, intestinal tract, followed by the liver and kidney were the most sensitive organs to autolysis. PMID:27114885

  8. Histopathologic evaluation of postmortem autolytic changes in bluegill (Lepomis macrohirus) and crappie (Pomoxis anularis) at varied time intervals and storage temperatures

    PubMed Central

    George, Jami; Van Wettere, Arnaud J.; Michaels, Blayk B.; Crain, Debbi

    2016-01-01

    Information is lacking on preserving fish carcasses to minimize postmortem autolysis artifacts when a necropsy cannot be performed immediately. The purpose of this study was to qualitatively identify and score histologic postmortem changes in two species of freshwater fish (bluegill—Lepomis macrochirus; crappie—Pomoxis annularis), at varied time intervals and storage temperatures, to assess the histologic quality of collected samples. A pooled sample of 36 mix sex individuals of healthy bluegill and crappie were euthanized, stored either at room temperature, refrigerated at 4 °C, or frozen at −20 °C, and then necropsied at 0, 4, 24, and 48 h intervals. Histologic specimens were evaluated by light microscopy. Data showed that immediate harvesting of fresh samples provides the best quality and refrigeration would be the preferred method of storage if sample collection had to be delayed for up to 24 h. When sample collection must be delayed more than 24 h, the preferred method of storage to minimize autolysis artifacts is freezing if evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract is most important, or refrigeration if gill histology is most important. The gill arch, intestinal tract, followed by the liver and kidney were the most sensitive organs to autolysis. PMID:27114885

  9. Cadmium, metal-binding proteins, and growth in bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) exposed to contaminated sediments from the upper Mississippi River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cope, W.G.; Wiener, J.G.; Steingraeber, M.T.; Atchison, G.J.

    1994-01-01

    We exposed juvenile bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) to ~1000 mg·L-1 of continuously suspended river sediment in a 28-d test with six treatments (randomized block with one sediment-free control and five sediments ranging from 1.3 to 21.4 μg Cd·g dry weight-1). Each treatment had three replicates, each with 25 fish. Growth was reduced by exposure to suspended sediment, probably due to physical effects of sediment on feeding and to toxicity in the treatment with the greatest concentrations of metals. Mean whole-body concentrations of cadmium (0.04–0.14 μg wet weight-1) were correlated with cadmium concentration in filtered water (8–72 ng·L-1), suspended sediment (0.61–16.8 μg·L-1), and bulk sediment. The concentration of hepatic nonthionein cytosolic cadmium (cadmium not bound by metal-binding proteins, MBP) in fish exposed to the two most contaminated sediments exceeded that in controls. The mean concentration of hepatic MBP was correlated with cadmium concentration in filtered water, suspended sediment, bulk sediment, and whole fish. Whole-body cadmium concentration was the most sensitive indicator of cadmium exposure, with lowest observed effect concentrations of 1.9 μg Cd·L-1 for suspended sediment and 13 ng Cd·L-1 for filtered water. Sediment-associated cadmium was less available than waterborne cadmium for uptake by fish.

  10. Cadmium, metal-binding proteins, and growth in bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cope, W. Gregory; Wiener, James G.; Steingraeber, Mark T.; Atchison, Gary J.

    1994-01-01

    We exposed juvenile bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) to ~1000 mg∙L−1 of continuously suspended river sediment in a 28-d test with six treatments (randomized block with one sediment-free control and five sediments ranging from 1.3 to 21.4 μg Cd∙g dry weight−1). Each treatment had three replicates, each with 25 fish. Growth was reduced by exposure to suspended sediment, probably due to physical effects of sediment on feeding and to toxicity in the treatment with the greatest concentrations of metals. Mean whole-body concentrations of cadmium (0.04–0.14 μg∙g wet weight−1) were correlated with cadmium concentration in filtered water (8–72 ng∙L−1), suspended sediment (0.61–16.8 μg∙L−1), and bulk sediment. The concentration of hepatic nonthionein cytosolic cadmium (cadmium not bound by metal-binding proteins, MBP) in fish exposed to the two most contaminated sediments exceeded that in controls. The mean concentration of hepatic MBP was correlated with cadmium concentration in filtered water, suspended sediment, bulk sediment, and whole fish. Whole-body cadmium concentration was the most sensitive indicator of cadmium exposure, with lowest observed effect concentrations of 1.9 μg Cd∙L−1 for suspended sediment and 13 ng Cd∙L−1 for filtered water. Sediment-associated cadmium was less available than waterborne cadmium for uptake by fish.

  11. Influence of a heated effluent, season, and fish size of the prevalence and mean intensity of monogenean gill infestation in bluegills (Lepomis macrochirus) in Lake Monona, Dane County, Wisconsin, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of a heated effluent on the prevalence and mean intensity of gill infestation by monogeneans was negligible, while that of season and fish size was significant. Gills were examined from 822 bluegills, Lepomis macrochirus, taken during a 15-month period in three areas, the outfall area (OA) and two reference areas (RA I and RA II), of Lake Monona, Dane County, Wisconsin, USA. The OA, in a heated water effluent from the Madison Gas and Electric Company, was warmest. The RA II, farthest from the discharge, was coolest. Prevalence of monogenean gill infestation was 100% among bluegills taken from all three sampling areas during the entire sampling period. Mean intensity of monogenean gill infestation varied significantly with the time of year and size of fish, but not significantly among the OA, RA I and RA II for the same time of year and size class of fish. In all sampling areas the largest mean worm burdens occurred in June and July, and on bluegills 131-160 mm in total length, while the fewest appeared in January and on 39-70 mm fish.

  12. Water-quality assessment of the Albemarle-Pamlico Drainage Basin, North Carolina and Virginia; organochlorine compounds in Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) soft tissues and whole redbrest sunfish (Lepomis auritus) 1992-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, K.E.; Ruhl, P.M.

    1996-01-01

    The analysis of potential contaminants in biological tissues is an important part of many water-quality assessment programs, including the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. Tissue analyses often are used to provide information about (1) direct threats to ecosystem integrity, and (2) the occurrence and distribution of potential contaminants in the environment. During 1992-93, Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) soft tissues and whole redbreast sunfish (Lepomis auritus) samples were collected and analyzed to obtain information about the occurrence and distribution of organochlorine compounds in the Albemarle-Pamlico drainage Basin of North Carolina and Virginia. The investigation was conducted as part of the NAWQA Program. Relatively few organochlorine compounds were detected and of the compounds detected, all were detected in relatively low concentrations. The organochlorine compounds detected were p,p'-DDD, p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDT, dieldrin, trans-nonachlor, PCB's, and toxaphene. Multiple compounds were detected at 16 of 19 sites sampled. Compared to Asiatic clams, redbreast sunfish appear to be better bioindicators of organochlorine contamination in aquatic systems. Except for one detection of toxaphene, pesticide concentrations are well below the National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Engineering (NAS/NAE) guidelines for the protection of fish-eating wildlife.

  13. Water-quality assessment of the Albemarle-Pamlico drainage basin, North Carolina and Virginia; trace elements in Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) soft tissues and redbreast sunfish (Lepomis auritus) livers, 1992-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruhl, P.M.; Smith, K.E.

    1996-01-01

    The analysis of potential contaminants in biological tissues is an important part of many water-quality assessment programs, including the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. Tissue analyses often are used to provide information about (1) direct threats to ecosystem integrity, and (2) the occurrence and distribution of potential contaminants in the environment. During 1992-93, trace elements in Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) soft tissues and redbreast sunfish (Lepomis auritus) livers were analyzed to obtain information about the occurrence and distribution of trace element contaminants in the Albemarle-Pamlico Drainage Basin of North Carolina and Virginia. The investigation was conducted as part of the NAWQA Program. All but 3 of the 22 trace elements that were analyzed were detected. Although all 10 of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) priority pollutants were detected in the tissues sampled, they were present in relatively low concentrations. Concentrations of U.S. EPA priority pollutants in Asiatic clams collected in the Albemarle-Pamlico Drainage Basin are similar to concentrations observed in other NAWQA study units in the southeastern United States. Mercury (a U.S. EPA priority pollutant) was widely detected, being present in 29 of 30 tissue samples, but concentrations did not exceed the FDA action level for mercury of a risk-based screening value for the general public. Mercury concentrations in Asiatic clams were similar to concentrations in other NAWQA study areas in the Southeast.

  14. Laboratory and field validation of a simple method for detecting four species of non-native freshwater fish using eDNA.

    PubMed

    Davison, P I; Créach, V; Liang, W-J; Andreou, D; Britton, J R; Copp, G H

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the first phase in the development and validation of a simple and reliable environmental (e)DNA method using conventional PCR to detect four species of non-native freshwater fish: pumpkinseed Lepomis gibbosus, sunbleak Leucaspius delineatus, fathead minnow Pimephales promelas and topmouth gudgeon Pseudorasbora parva. The efficacy of the approach was demonstrated in indoor tank (44 l) trials in which all four species were detected within 24 h. Validation was through two field trials, in which L. gibbosus was detected 6-12 h after its introduction into outdoor experimental ponds and P. parva was successfully detected in disused fish rearing ponds where the species was known to exist. Thus, the filtration of small (30 ml) volumes of pond water was sufficient to capture fish eDNA and the approach emphasised the importance of taking multiple water samples of sufficient spatial coverage for detecting species of random or patchy distribution. PMID:27465299

  15. Intermediate Kinematics Produce Inferior Feeding Performance in a Classic Case of Natural Hybridization.

    PubMed

    McGee, Matthew D; Reustle, Joseph W; Oufiero, Christopher E; Wainwright, Peter C

    2015-12-01

    Selection on naturally occurring hybrid individuals is a key component of speciation theory, but few studies examine the functional basis of hybrid performance. We examine the functional consequences of hybridization in nature, using the freshwater sunfishes (Centrarchidae), where natural hybrids have been studied for more than a century and a half. We examined bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus), and their naturally occurring hybrid, using prey-capture kinematics and morphology to parameterize suction-feeding simulations on divergent parental resources. Hybrid individuals exhibited kinematics intermediate between those of the two parental species. However, performance assays indicated that hybrids display performance most similar to the worse-performing species for a given parental resource. Our results show that intermediate hybrid phenotypes can be impaired by a less-than-intermediate performance and hence suffer a larger loss in fitness than could be inferred from morphology alone. PMID:26655987

  16. Fishery survey and related limnological conditions of Williams Lake, Hubbard County, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, W.W.; LaBaugh, J.W.; Freeberg, M.H.; Dowling, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), pumpkinseed sunfish (Lepomis gibbosus), largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), yellow perch (Perca flavescens) rock bass (Amploplites rupestris), black crappie (Pomozis nigromaculatus), and northern pike (Esox lucius) were found in Williams Lake, Hubbard County, Minnesota, during a fishery survey of the lake in late August 1982. The most abundant fish were the bluegills. These fish live in the large littoral zone of the lake; this zone underlies 55% of the surface area of the lake. The most ubiquitous benthic invertebrate in the littoral zone (amphipods) and the most abundant benthic invertebrate (chironomid larvae) were major food sources for the bluegill. Other organisms found in the stomach contents of fish collected in this survey were zooplankton, gastropods, Diptera larvae, odonates, terrestrial insects, and other fish. Daphnia were the only zooplankters of a diverse plankton community that were found in stomach contents. The abundance of fish other than bluegill was typical for a system in which northern pike is the major predator.

  17. Distinguishing centrarchid genera by use of lateral line scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, N.M.; Rabeni, C.F.; Stanovick, J.S.

    2007-01-01

    Predator-prey relations involving fishes are often evaluated using scales remaining in gut contents or feces. While several reliable keys help identify North American freshwater fish scales to the family level, none attempt to separate the family Centrarchidae to the genus level. Centrarchidae is of particular concern in the midwestern United States because it contains several popular sport fishes, such as smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu, largemouth bass M. salmoides, and rock bass Ambloplites rupestris, as well as less-sought-after species of sunfishes Lepomis spp. and crappies Pomoxis spp. Differentiating sport fish from non-sport fish has important management implications. Morphological characteristics of lateral line scales (n = 1,581) from known centrarchid fishes were analyzed. The variability of measurements within and between genera was examined to select variables that were the most useful in further classifying unknown centrarchid scales. A linear discriminant analysis model was developed using 10 variables. Based on this model, 84.4% of Ambloplites scales, 81.2% of Lepomis scales, and 86.6% of Micropterus scales were classified correctly using a jackknife procedure. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  18. Some effects of Heptachlor on bluegills (Lepomis macrochirus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, Austin K.; Stebbings, Bruce E.; Van Valin, Charles C.

    1966-01-01

    In complementary studies of the chronic effects of heptachlor on bluegills, four similar earthen ponds were treated once with different concentrations of heptachlor, and the fish in six plastic pools were routinely fed different levels of heptachlor. A fifth pond and two plastic pools were used as controls. Higher dosages resulted in higher concentrations of heptachlor residues, more pronounced tissue pathology, and higher mortality in the test fish. Heptachlor reached a maximum in the pond fish about 3 days after treatment, and could no longer be found in the fish or mud after 56 days. The fish fed continuous levels of heptachlor developed their highest residues at 56 days. Invertebrate populations in the two higher treatment level ponds were eliminated. Lesser effects appeared in the two lower concentrations. At the termination of the experiment, invertebrate populations in the treated ponds and the control were not significantly different, and had achieved or surpassed pretreatment levels. Degenerative liver lesions became pronounced in fish from the two higher exposure ponds, but a heavy infestation of trematode metacercariae in the fish of all the test ponds, except the control, clouded further interpretation of histopathological examinations. Pathology results from the fish in the feeding test, although inconclusive, tended to support the trends which were developing in the contact test. There was an inverse proportional relationship between growth of fish in the feeding test and the amount of heptachlor introduced. The control group showed the highest growth rate, and the groups with progressively higher intake of heptachlor had progressively lower growth rates.

  19. Streamwise vortices destabilize swimming bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus).

    PubMed

    Maia, Anabela; Sheltzer, Alex P; Tytell, Eric D

    2015-03-01

    In their natural environment, fish must swim stably through unsteady flows and vortices, including vertical vortices, typically shed by posts in a flow, horizontal cross-flow vortices, often produced by a step or a waterfall in a stream, and streamwise vortices, where the axis of rotation is aligned with the direction of the flow. Streamwise vortices are commonly shed by bluff bodies in streams and by ships' propellers and axial turbines, but we know little about their effects on fish. Here, we describe how bluegill sunfish use more energy and are destabilized more often in flow with strong streamwise vorticity. The vortices were created inside a sealed flow tank by an array of four turbines with similar diameter to the experimental fish. We measured oxygen consumption for seven sunfish swimming at 1.5 body lengths (BL) s(-1) with the turbines rotating at 2 Hz and with the turbines off (control). Simultaneously, we filmed the fish ventrally and recorded the fraction of time spent maneuvering side-to-side and accelerating forward. Separately, we also recorded lateral and ventral video for a combination of swimming speeds (0.5, 1.5 and 2.5 BL s(-1)) and turbine speeds (0, 1, 2 and 3 Hz), immediately after turning the turbines on and 10 min later to test for accommodation. Bluegill sunfish are negatively affected by streamwise vorticity. Spills (loss of heading), maneuvers and accelerations were more frequent when the turbines were on than in the control treatment. These unsteady behaviors, particularly acceleration, correlated with an increase in oxygen consumption in the vortex flow. Bluegill sunfish are generally fast to recover from roll perturbations and do so by moving their pectoral fins. The frequency of spills decreased after the turbines had run for 10 min, but was still markedly higher than in the control, showing that fish partially adapt to streamwise vorticity, but not completely. Coping with streamwise vorticity may be an important energetic cost for stream fishes or migratory fishes. PMID:25617456

  20. Scaling of in vivo muscle velocity during feeding in the largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides (Centrarchidae).

    PubMed

    Carroll, Andrew M; Wainwright, Peter C

    2011-01-01

    Many vertebrates undergo large increases in body size over the course of a lifetime, and these increases are often accompanied by changes in morphological and physiological parameters. For instance, in most animals, increases in size with growth are accompanied by decreases in the maximum speed of shortening (V(max)) in locomotor muscles. Curiously, in muscles involved in suction feeding, V(max) shows no decreases with size in vitro, despite the fact that timing of kinematic events involved in suction feeding (e.g., time to peak gape) slow with increased size. The goal of this study was to examine whether muscular speed in vivo varies with size during suction feeding in the largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). The dorsal epaxial musculature of 10 individual bass (varying from 123 to 685 g and from 18.1 to 32.0 cm standard length [SL]) was implanted with sonometric crystals to measure muscle length during feeding on elusive prey (large goldfish). No relationship was found between the mean individual or maximum speed of shortening with mean individual log-transformed SL. However, mean magnitude of shortening and maximum shortening magnitude showed nonsignificant increases with SL ([Formula: see text] and 0.06, respectively). Average duration of shortening was found to increase with log-transformed SL. The size invariance of observed shortening velocity in the epaxial muscles during feeding may stem from size invariance of imposed loads during suction feeding. This is in contrast to what is normally seen in locomotor systems where loads on muscles often increase with body size. PMID:22030854

  1. [Micropterus salmoides (Pisces: Centrarchidae) reproduction in the Gustavo Diaz Ordaz reservoir, Sinaloa, México].

    PubMed

    Beltrán Alvarez, Rigoberto; Sánchez Palacios, Jesús; Ramírez Lozano, Juan Pedro; Ortega Salas, Adolfo-Armando

    2013-09-01

    Micropterus salmoides is an important fish species for sport fishing activities, condition that has promoted its introduction to different reservoirs in Mexico and worldwide. With the aim to improve its fisheries management, this research dealt with some reproductive aspects of this species in the Gustavo Diaz Ordaz reservoir, where it was studied from August 2008 through March 2011. To this end, we obtained 938 specimens, with gillnets of different sizes, to determine their total length (Lt, in cm), weight (Pt, in g), sex, gonadosomatic index, condition factor, fecundity and size at first maturity. Lt and Pt ranged from 15.9 to 63 cm (37.4 +/- 78.0) and 57 to 4431 g (731.7 +/- 619.0), respectively. The Pt-Lt relationship showed a positive allometric growth, with no significant difference between males and females (F = 0.9955, p = 0.3187). The male: female ratio obtained was 1:0.83. Mass spawning lasted from December to April. Size at first maturity was 33.7 cm and average fecundity was 32294 +/- 12878.7 oocytes/female. The gonadosomatic index was low from May through November, and increased between January and March. The condition factor was high before the spawning season and decreased after the reproductive period. We recommend a fishing ban from January to March, and to allow the capture size between 33 and 40 cm. PMID:24027925

  2. Scaling of in vivo muscle velocity during feeding in the largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides (Centrarchidae).

    PubMed

    Carroll, Andrew M; Wainwright, Peter C

    2011-01-01

    Many vertebrates undergo large increases in body size over the course of a lifetime, and these increases are often accompanied by changes in morphological and physiological parameters. For instance, in most animals, increases in size with growth are accompanied by decreases in the maximum speed of shortening (V(max)) in locomotor muscles. Curiously, in muscles involved in suction feeding, V(max) shows no decreases with size in vitro, despite the fact that timing of kinematic events involved in suction feeding (e.g., time to peak gape) slow with increased size. The goal of this study was to examine whether muscular speed in vivo varies with size during suction feeding in the largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). The dorsal epaxial musculature of 10 individual bass (varying from 123 to 685 g and from 18.1 to 32.0 cm standard length [SL]) was implanted with sonometric crystals to measure muscle length during feeding on elusive prey (large goldfish). No relationship was found between the mean individual or maximum speed of shortening with mean individual log-transformed SL. However, mean magnitude of shortening and maximum shortening magnitude showed nonsignificant increases with SL ([Formula: see text] and 0.06, respectively). Average duration of shortening was found to increase with log-transformed SL. The size invariance of observed shortening velocity in the epaxial muscles during feeding may stem from size invariance of imposed loads during suction feeding. This is in contrast to what is normally seen in locomotor systems where loads on muscles often increase with body size.

  3. [Micropterus salmoides (Pisces: Centrarchidae) reproduction in the Gustavo Diaz Ordaz reservoir, Sinaloa, México].

    PubMed

    Beltrán Alvarez, Rigoberto; Sánchez Palacios, Jesús; Ramírez Lozano, Juan Pedro; Ortega Salas, Adolfo-Armando

    2013-09-01

    Micropterus salmoides is an important fish species for sport fishing activities, condition that has promoted its introduction to different reservoirs in Mexico and worldwide. With the aim to improve its fisheries management, this research dealt with some reproductive aspects of this species in the Gustavo Diaz Ordaz reservoir, where it was studied from August 2008 through March 2011. To this end, we obtained 938 specimens, with gillnets of different sizes, to determine their total length (Lt, in cm), weight (Pt, in g), sex, gonadosomatic index, condition factor, fecundity and size at first maturity. Lt and Pt ranged from 15.9 to 63 cm (37.4 +/- 78.0) and 57 to 4431 g (731.7 +/- 619.0), respectively. The Pt-Lt relationship showed a positive allometric growth, with no significant difference between males and females (F = 0.9955, p = 0.3187). The male: female ratio obtained was 1:0.83. Mass spawning lasted from December to April. Size at first maturity was 33.7 cm and average fecundity was 32294 +/- 12878.7 oocytes/female. The gonadosomatic index was low from May through November, and increased between January and March. The condition factor was high before the spawning season and decreased after the reproductive period. We recommend a fishing ban from January to March, and to allow the capture size between 33 and 40 cm.

  4. Interspecific relationships and the evolution of sexual dimorphism in pygmy sunfishes (Centrarchidae: Elassoma).

    PubMed

    Sandel, Michael; Rohde, Fritz C; Harris, Phillip M

    2014-08-01

    The genus Elassoma represents a small but unique component of the aquatic biodiversity hotspot in southeastern North America. We present the first phylogeny of the seven described species, corroborated by sequence data from mitochondrial and nuclear protein coding genes. This analysis reveals a Coastal Plain clade sister to the geographically isolated, and federally protected, Elassoma alabamae. The Coastal Plain clade contains the widespread E. zonatum, which is sister to a clade primarily restricted to lowland Neogene subprovinces. We analyzed morphometric data in a phylogenetic context to illustrate the evolution of sexual shape dimorphism within the genus. Sixteen univariate and three multivariate traits were tested for significant sexual dimorphism for each species, and relative transformation rates were inferred from the time tree. A simple index of interspecific sexual dimorphism revealed greater disparity among sympatric species comparisons than among allopatric comparisons. Results implicate geology as a primary factor influencing ecological diversification, and sexual selection as a mechanism reinforcing reproductive isolation in areas of secondary contact. We discuss putative roles of geological history and sexual selection in the generation and maintenance of the aquatic biodiversity gradient in southeastern North America. PMID:24780749

  5. First record of Neoergasilus japonicus (Poecilostomatoida: Ergasilidae), a parasitic copepod new to the Laurentian Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, Patrick L.; Bowen, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    The parasitic copepod Neoergasilus japonicus, native to eastern Asia, was first collected from 4 species of fish (fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas; largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides; pumpkinseed sunfish, Lepomis gibbosus; and yellow perch, Perca flavescens) in July 1994 in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron, Michigan. Further sampling in the bay in 2001 revealed infections on 7 additional species (bluegill, Lepomis macrochirus; carp, Cyprinus carpio; channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus; goldfish, Carassius auratus; green sunfish, Lepomis cyanellus; rock bass, Ambloplites rupestris; and smallmouth bass, Micropterus dolomieu). An additional 21 species examined in 2001 were devoid of the parasite. A limited collection of fish from Lake Superior (n = 8) and Lake Michigan (n = 46) in 1994 showed no infection. Neoergasilus japonicus is most frequently found attached to the dorsal fin and, in decreasing frequency, on the anal, tail, pelvic, and pectoral fins. Prevalence generally ranged from 15 to 70 and intensity from 1 to 10. The greatest number of copepods on a single host was 44. The copepod Neoergasilus japonicus appears to disperse over long distances rather quickly, spreading across Europe in 20 yr and then moving on to North America over a span of 10 yr. Its main vehicle of transport and introduction into the Great Lakes is probably exotic fish hosts associated with the fish-culture industry.

  6. Actinobdella inequinnulata (Annelida: Hirudinida:Rhynchobdellida:Glossiphoniidae) from White Crappie, Pomoxis annularis (Perciformes: Centrarchidae), in Arkansas, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of 4 (25%) white crappie, Pomoxis annularis from the Ouachita River, Dallas County, Arkansas, was found to be infested with 8 glossiphoniid leeches, Actinobdella inequiannulata Moore, 1901. Leeches were removed from within the oeprculum on gills and gill arches. This leech i...

  7. Diversity within the Redeye Bass, Micropterus coosae (Perciformes: Centrarchidae) species group, with descriptions of four new species.

    PubMed

    Baker, Winston H; Blanton, Rebecca E; Johnston, Carol E

    2013-01-01

    The Redeye Bass, Micropterus coosae, was described from the Mobile River basin, Chattahoochee, and Savannah rivers in Alabama and Georgia, USA, by Hubbs and Bailey (1940). At that time the authors recognized significant variation in the Black Warrior River population, and noted that with further study this form may be recognized as a separate taxon. An examination of variation in morphology and mitochondrial DNA supported this observation, and highlighted additional species-level variation, resulting in descriptions of a total of four new species: Micropterus cahabae, new sp., restricted to the Cahaba River system; Micropterus tallapoosae, new sp., restricted to the Tallapoosa River system; Micropterus warriorensis, new sp., from the Black Warrior River system; and Micropterus chattahoochae, new sp., from the Chattahoochee River system. Micropterus coosae is restricted to the Coosa River system. The new species differ from each other and from M. coosae by a combination of pigmentation and scale count characteristics, development of the tooth patch, and divergence within the ND2 gene. While two of these species are relatively common in upland streams within their ranges, M. warriorensis, M. cahabae and M. chattahoochae are uncommon and may warrant protection.

  8. Chromium accumulation in three species of central Florida centrarchids

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, K.R. |

    1995-02-01

    Stormwater ponds are required in Central Florida when land is developed to treat the resulting stormwater. The St. Johns River Water Management District, the agency that regulates stormwater discharges in Central Florida, frequently approves plans that create habitat for fish and wildlife by planting desirable wetland and aquatic vegetation in the littoral zones of stormwater ponds to compensate for the loss of wetlands. The various species of fish that inhabit stormwater ponds serve as a food source to wildlife, especially wading birds. The objective of this study was to determine if fish that live in stormwater treatment ponds in Orlando, Florida contained significant concentrations of chromium. In order to determine if there were differences in chromium concentrations in fish with different foraging strategies, three species of sunfish (Centrarchidae) with substantially different foraging strategies were selected for this study: largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), a predator; redear sunfish (Lepomis microlophus), a bottom feeder; and bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), an omnivore. Many researchers have shown that large quantities of chromium are found in urban runoff. Chromium sources are largely associates with the operation of motor vehicles. Several investigators have determined that chromium from urban runoff concentrates in the sediment of stormwater ponds. Sediments represent the most concentrated physical pool of metals in aquatic environments, and they are ingested by many types of aquatic organisms. Most fish are capable of accumulating heavy metals from their diet and from water through their gills. 17 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  9. A molecular genetic examination of the mating system of pumpkinseed sunfish reveals high pay-offs for specialized sneakers.

    PubMed

    Rios-Cardenas, Oscar; Webster, Michael S

    2008-05-01

    Intrasexual variation in reproductive behaviour and morphology are common in nature. Often, such variation appears to result from conditional strategies in which some individuals (e.g. younger males or those in poor condition) adopt a low pay-off phenotype as a 'best of a bad job'. Alternatively, reproductive polymorphisms can be maintained by balancing selection, with male phenotypes having equal fitnesses at equilibrium, but examples from nature are rare. Many species of sunfish (genus Lepomis) are thought to have alternative male reproductive behaviours, but most empirical work has focused on the bluegill sunfish and the mating systems of other sunfish remain poorly understood. We studied a population of pumpkinseed sunfish (Lepomis gibbosus) in upstate New York. Field observations confirm the existence of two male reproductive strategies: 'parentals' were relatively old and large males that maintained nests, and 'sneakers' were relatively young and small males that fertilize eggs by darting into nests of parentals during spawning. The sneaker and parental male strategies appear to be distinct life-history trajectories. Sneaker males represented 39% of the males observed spawning, and sneakers intruded on 43% of all mating attempts. Microsatellite analyses revealed that sneaker males fertilized an average of 15% of the eggs within a nest. This level of paternity by sneaker males appears to be higher than seen in most other fishes, and preliminary analyses suggest that the two male reproductive strategies are maintained as a balanced polymorphism. PMID:18429852

  10. Linkage Relationships of Six Enzyme Loci in Interspecific Sunfish Hybrids (Genus Lepomis)

    PubMed Central

    Wheat, T. E.; Whitt, G. S.; Childers, W. F.

    1973-01-01

    Backcross hybrids produced from the bluegill, the red-ear sunfish, and their F1 interspecific hybrid have been analyzed for the inheritance of six enzyme phenotypes. Malate dehydrogenase A and B, tetrazolium oxidase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, skeletal muscle esterase, and liver α-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase are all inherited in a mendelian manner as codominant alleles at nuclear loci. 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and α-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase are encoded by linked loci, undergoing recombination at a frequency of 15%-22%. No other case of linkage was observed. The absence of linkage between the homologous malate dehydrogenase loci is of particular interest. These interspecific hybrids appear to be very useful for studies of biochemical genetics. PMID:17248621

  11. BEHAVIORAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES OF DAPHNIA MAGNA, CHLORELLA VULGARIS, CORBICULA FLUMINEA, LEPOMIS MACROCHIRUS, AND VIBRO FISCHERI

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research presented here is a continuation of work designed to further the science of available and developing continuous, automated water quality monitors and how they may be most effectively deployed in a watershed management plan and/or water quality early warning system (W...

  12. BEHAVIORAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES OF DAPHNIA MAGNA, CHLORELLA VULGARIS, LEPOMIS MACROCHIRUS, AND VIBRIO FISCHERI TO TOLUENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research presented here is a continuation of work designed to further the science of available and developing online toxicity monitors(OTMs) and how they may be most effectively deployed in a watershed management plan and/or water quality early warning system. Source waters o...

  13. Toxicity of Chautauqua Lake bridge runoff to young-of-the-year sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus)

    SciTech Connect

    Kszos, L.A. ); Winter, J.D.; Storch, T.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Five 12-d bioassays were conducted to evaluate the toxicity of runoff from the bridge to YOY bluegill sunfish. One bioassay used fall runoff; tow bioassays used winter runoff; and one bioassay used spring runoff. At the beginning of each bioassay, test water was collected, acidified, and stored for a maximum of 6 mo. at 4C. These samples were analyzed for Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb and Zn with a Perkin-Elmer model 2380 atomic absorption spectrophotometer equipped with an HGA-400 graphite furnace using standard graphite furnace techniques and deuterium background correction. Sensitivity was 0.003 {mu}g/mL Cd, 0.007 {mu}g/mL Cr, 0.01 {mu}g/mL Cu, 0.01 {mu}g/mL Fr, 0.04 {mu}g/mL Ni, 0.025 {mu}g/mL Pb and 0.0007 {mu}g/mL Zn. Reagent blanks were used throughout sample preparation and analysis to evaluate possible contamination. All data were analyzed through the use of MINITAB and SPSS statistical computer programs on a Burroughs 7900B computer. The SPSS survival analysis was used to compute the proportion surviving during each day of the bioassay, to calculate a survival curve for each test concentration, and to determine significant difference from the survival analysis calculates a statistic D from the survival scores. D is asymptotically distributed as chi-square with g-1 degrees of freedom.

  14. Determination of Ten Perfluorinated Compounds in Bluegill Sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) Fillets

    EPA Science Inventory

    Limited information is known about the environmental distributions of the perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) such as perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), in part due to a lack of well characterized analytical methods that can be used to accurately mea...

  15. Dim light vision--morphological and functional adaptations of the eye of the mormyrid fish, Gnathonemus petersii.

    PubMed

    Landsberger, Meik; von der Emde, Gerhard; Haverkate, Dorothee; Schuster, Stefan; Gentsch, Janina; Ulbricht, Elke; Reichenbach, Andreas; Makarov, Felix; Wagner, Hans-Joachim

    2008-01-01

    The African weakly electric fish Gnathonemus petersii is well known for its electrosensory capabilities. These animals can detect and distinguish objects through active electrolocation in complete darkness. Because of their nocturnal lifestyle, a low contribution of vision for orientation and object detection has been expected. However, as we show in this review, the retina of G. petersii is highly specialized with hundreds of rods and tens of cones grouped together in bundles in a complex way, ensheathed by a tapetum lucidum. The structure of the bundles goes beyond what would be expected if only photon catch was supposed to be increased. During daytime, the structure of these "macro-receptors" changes dramatically depending on retinomotor movements. During the day, the rods and cones are located in different compartments of the bundle, separated by a narrow canal in the form of a "bottle neck". Investigations on cell structure and neurochemistry in the retina indicate a general organization that is simpler in terms of bipolar and ganglion cell diversity than in tetrachromatic species such as goldfish, yet similar in terms of neurochemical differentiation of amacrine cells. In both respects, the inner retina of the elephantnose fish bears the greatest similarity to catfish and some deep-sea fish retinae. Neuronal circuits and bundle structure give hints of possible adaptations for contrast and/or movement detection. Behavioral experiments suggest that, in contrast to the vision specialists Lepomis gibbosus, pattern detection of G. petersii is not affected by higher spatial frequencies. A pattern of low spatial frequencies, however, was equally well detected by G. petersii and L. gibbosus. Optomotor response experiments indicate that motion vision is important for Gnathonemus, narrowing down the search for the functional specialization of the Gnathonemus retina and providing a starting point for work on multisensory integration in these fish. PMID:18992335

  16. High prevalence of buccal ulcerations in largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides (Centrarchidae) from Michigan inland lakes associated with Myzobdella lugubris Leidy 1851 (Annelida: Hirudinea).

    PubMed

    Faisal, M; Schulz, C; Eissa, A; Whelan, G

    2011-02-01

    Widespread mouth ulcerations were observed in largemouth bass collected from eight inland lakes in the Lower Peninsula of Michigan during the summer months of 2002 and 2003. These ulcerations were associated with, and most likely caused by, leech parasitism. Through the use of morphological dichotomous keys, it was determined that all leeches collected are of one species: Myzobdella lugubris. Among the eight lakes examined, Lake Orion and Devils Lake had the highest prevalence of leech parasitism (34% and 29%, respectively) and mouth ulcerations (53% and 68%, respectively). Statistical analyses demonstrated that leech and ulcer prevalence varied significantly from one lake to the other. Additionally, it was determined that the relationship between the prevalence of ulcers and the prevalence of leech attachment is significant, indicating that leech parasitism is most likely the cause of ulceration. The ulcers exhibited deep hemorrhagic centers and raised irregular edges. Affected areas lost their epithelial lining and submucosa, with masses of bacteria colonizing the damaged tissues. Since largemouth bass is a popular global sportfish and critical to the food web of inland lakes, there are concerns that the presence of leeches, damaged buccal mucosa, and general unsightliness may negatively affect this important sportfishery.

  17. Urbanization is a major influence on microplastic ingestion by sunfish in the Brazos River Basin, Central Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    Peters, Colleen A; Bratton, Susan P

    2016-03-01

    Microplastics, degraded and weathered polymer-based particles, and manufactured products ranging between 50 and 5000 μm in size, are found within marine, freshwater, and estuarine environments. While numerous peer-reviewed papers have quantified the ingestion of microplastics by marine vertebrates, relatively few studies have focused on microplastic ingestion by freshwater organisms. This study documents microplastic and manufactured fiber ingestion by bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) and longear (Lepomis megalotis) sunfish (Centrarchidae) from the Brazos River Basin, between Lake Whitney and Marlin, Texas, USA. Fourteen sample sites were studied and categorized into urban, downstream, and upstream areas. A total of 436 sunfish were collected, and 196 (45%) stomachs contained microplastics. Four percent (4%) of items sampled were debris on the macro size scale (i.e. >5 mm) and consisted of masses of plastic, metal, Styrofoam, or fishing material, while 96% of items sampled were in the form of microplastic threads. Fish length was statistically correlated to the number of microplastics detected (p = 0.019). Fish collected from urban sites displayed the highest mean number of microplastics ingested, followed by downstream and upstream sites. Microplastics were associated with the ingestion of other debris items (e.g. sand and wood) and correlated to the ingestion of fish eggs, earthworms, and mollusks, suggesting that sunfish incidentally ingest microplastics during their normal feeding methods. The high frequency of microplastic ingestion suggest that further research is needed to determine the residence time of microplastics within the stomach and gut, potential for food web transfer, and adverse effects on wildlife and ecosystemic health.

  18. Urbanization is a major influence on microplastic ingestion by sunfish in the Brazos River Basin, Central Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    Peters, Colleen A; Bratton, Susan P

    2016-03-01

    Microplastics, degraded and weathered polymer-based particles, and manufactured products ranging between 50 and 5000 μm in size, are found within marine, freshwater, and estuarine environments. While numerous peer-reviewed papers have quantified the ingestion of microplastics by marine vertebrates, relatively few studies have focused on microplastic ingestion by freshwater organisms. This study documents microplastic and manufactured fiber ingestion by bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) and longear (Lepomis megalotis) sunfish (Centrarchidae) from the Brazos River Basin, between Lake Whitney and Marlin, Texas, USA. Fourteen sample sites were studied and categorized into urban, downstream, and upstream areas. A total of 436 sunfish were collected, and 196 (45%) stomachs contained microplastics. Four percent (4%) of items sampled were debris on the macro size scale (i.e. >5 mm) and consisted of masses of plastic, metal, Styrofoam, or fishing material, while 96% of items sampled were in the form of microplastic threads. Fish length was statistically correlated to the number of microplastics detected (p = 0.019). Fish collected from urban sites displayed the highest mean number of microplastics ingested, followed by downstream and upstream sites. Microplastics were associated with the ingestion of other debris items (e.g. sand and wood) and correlated to the ingestion of fish eggs, earthworms, and mollusks, suggesting that sunfish incidentally ingest microplastics during their normal feeding methods. The high frequency of microplastic ingestion suggest that further research is needed to determine the residence time of microplastics within the stomach and gut, potential for food web transfer, and adverse effects on wildlife and ecosystemic health. PMID:26807984

  19. Ionoregulatory Aspects of the Osmorespiratory Compromise during Acute Environmental Hypoxia in 12 Tropical and Temperate Teleosts.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Lisa M; Val, Adalberto Luis; Almeida-Val, Vera F; Wood, Chris M

    2015-01-01

    In the traditional osmorespiratory compromise, as seen in the hypoxia-intolerant freshwater rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), the branchial modifications that occur to improve O2 uptake during hypoxia result in unfavorable increases in the fluxes of ions and water. However, at least one hypoxia-tolerant freshwater species, the Amazonian oscar (Astronotus ocellatus), shows exactly the opposite: decreased branchial flux rates of ions, water, and nitrogenous wastes during acute hypoxia. In order to find out whether the two strategies were widespread, we used a standard 2-h normoxia, 2-h hypoxia (20%-30% saturation), 2-h normoxic recovery protocol to survey 10 other phylogenetically diverse tropical and temperate species. Unidirectional influx and efflux rates of Na(+) and net flux rates of K(+), ammonia, and urea-N were measured. The flux reduction strategy was seen only in one additional species, the Amazonian tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum), which is similarly hypoxia tolerant and lives in the same ion-poor waters as the oscar. However, five other species exhibited evidence of the increased flux rates typical of the traditional osmorespiratory compromise in the trout: the rosaceu tetra (Hyphessobrycon bentosi rosaceus), the moenkhausia tetra (Moenkhausia diktyota), the bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), the zebra fish (Danio rerio), and the goldfish (Carassius auratus). Four other species exhibited no marked flux changes during hypoxia: the cardinal tetra (Paracheirodon axelrodi), the hemigrammus tetra (Hemigrammus rhodostomus), the pumpkinseed sunfish (Lepomis gibbosus), and the Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus). Overall, a diversity of strategies exist; we speculate that these may be linked to differences in habitat and/or lifestyle. PMID:26052633

  20. Fish abundances in shoreline habitats and submerged aquatic vegetation in a tidal freshwater embayment of the Potomac River.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Richard T; Jones, R Christian

    2012-05-01

    Submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) is considered an important habitat for juvenile and small forage fish species, but many long-term recruitment surveys do not effectively monitor fish communities in SAV. To better understand the impact of recent large increases of SAV on the fish community in tidal freshwater reaches of the Potomac River, we compared traditional seine sampling from shore with drop ring sampling of SAV beds (primarily Hydrilla) in a shallow water (depths, <1.5 m) embayment, Gunston Cove. To accomplish this, we developed species-specific catch efficiency values for the seine gear and calculated area-based density in both shoreline and SAV habitats in late summer of three different years (2007, 2008, and 2009). For the dominant species (Fundulus diaphanus, Lepomis macrochirus, Etheostoma olmstedi, Morone americana, Lepomis gibbosus, and Fundulus heteroclitus), density was nearly always higher in SAV, but overall, species richness was highest in shoreline habitats sampled with seines. Although historical monitoring of fish in Gunston Cove (and throughout Chesapeake Bay) is based upon seine sampling (and trawl sampling in deeper areas), the high densities of fish and larger areal extent of SAV indicated that complementary sampling of SAV habitats would produce more accurate trends in abundances of common species. Because drop ring samples cover much less area than seines and may miss rare species, a combination of methods that includes seine sampling is needed for biodiversity assessment. The resurgence of SAV in tidal freshwater signifies improving water quality, and methods we evaluated here support improved inferences about population trends and fish community structure as indicators of ecosystem condition. PMID:21713468

  1. Biomarker responses in sunfish species and largemouth bass from the Saluda River, South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Mierzejewski, Jessica; Haney, Dennis C; van den Hurk, Peter

    2014-12-01

    The upstate and Piedmont region of South Carolina is a rapidly urbanizing area as a result of a steadily growing population. This increase in population and development has the potential to negatively impact local aquatic systems like the Saluda River due to increased pollution from runoff, and effluents from industrial and wastewater treatment facilities. During the summer months of 2010, 159 fish from the Centrarchidae family (sunfish species (Lepomis) and largemouth bass - Micropterus salmoides) were collected from 13 sites along the Saluda River. A suite of biomarker assays, including ethoxyresosufin-O-deethylase, bile fluorescence, glutathione S-transferase, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, bile estrogens, acetylcholinesterase inhibition, metallothionein and tissue metal levels were applied to investigate the impacts of diminished water quality on fish health. Results indicate that fish from the Saluda River are responding to contamination in a site specific manner, with up to four significant biomarker responses in the most impacted sites. Sampling sites in the lower portion of the Saluda watershed are less impacted by pollution than the upper and central sections. The observed biomarker responses can be explained by the proximity of urban areas, point sources and general land use, and demonstrate the applicability of biomarkers in environmental biomonitoring programs. PMID:25173848

  2. Genetic monogamy and biparental care in an externally fertilizing fish, the largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides).

    PubMed

    DeWoody, J A; Fletcher, D E; Wilkins, S D; Nelson, W S; Avise, J C

    2000-12-01

    Breeding, male North American sunfish (Centrarchidae), are often brightly coloured and promiscuous. However, the largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) is sexually monomorphic in appearance and socially monogamous. Unlike some other nest-tending centrarchids in the genus Lepomis, largemouth bass have also been reported to provide biparental care to eggs and fry. Here we use microsatellite markers in order to test whether social monogamy predicts genetic monogamy in the largemouth bass. Offspring were collected from 26 nests each usually guarded by a pair of adults, many of which were also captured. Twenty-three of these progeny cohorts (88%) proved to be composed almost exclusively of full-sibs and were thus the product of monogamous matings. Cuckoldry by males was rare. The genetic data also revealed that some nests contain juveniles that were not the progeny of the guardian female, a finding that can be thought of as low-level 'female cuckoldry'. Overall, however, the data provide what may be the first genetic documentation of near-monogamy and biparental care in a vertebrate with external fertilization.

  3. Biomarker responses in sunfish species and largemouth bass from the Saluda River, South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Mierzejewski, Jessica; Haney, Dennis C; van den Hurk, Peter

    2014-12-01

    The upstate and Piedmont region of South Carolina is a rapidly urbanizing area as a result of a steadily growing population. This increase in population and development has the potential to negatively impact local aquatic systems like the Saluda River due to increased pollution from runoff, and effluents from industrial and wastewater treatment facilities. During the summer months of 2010, 159 fish from the Centrarchidae family (sunfish species (Lepomis) and largemouth bass - Micropterus salmoides) were collected from 13 sites along the Saluda River. A suite of biomarker assays, including ethoxyresosufin-O-deethylase, bile fluorescence, glutathione S-transferase, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, bile estrogens, acetylcholinesterase inhibition, metallothionein and tissue metal levels were applied to investigate the impacts of diminished water quality on fish health. Results indicate that fish from the Saluda River are responding to contamination in a site specific manner, with up to four significant biomarker responses in the most impacted sites. Sampling sites in the lower portion of the Saluda watershed are less impacted by pollution than the upper and central sections. The observed biomarker responses can be explained by the proximity of urban areas, point sources and general land use, and demonstrate the applicability of biomarkers in environmental biomonitoring programs.

  4. BEHAVIORAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES OF DAPHNIA MAGNA, CHLORELLA VULGARIS, CORBICULA FLUMINEA, AND LEPOMIS MACROCHIRUS TO COPPER AND CYANIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research presented here was designed to further the science of available and developing continuous, automated water quality monitors and how they may be most effectively deployed in a watershed management plan and/or water quality early warning system (WQEWS). Source waters ...

  5. Experimental investigation of physiological factors that may influence microhabitat specificity exhibited by Leptorhynchoides thecatus (Acanthocephala) in green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus).

    PubMed

    Richardson, D J; Nickol, B B

    2000-08-01

    Representatives of Leptorhynchoides thecatus (Acanthocephala) inhabit ceca of green sunfish but cannot survive in the anterior intestine. The influence of elevated cecal protein concentrations, pH, and amounts of lumenal materials on the microhabitat specificity of L. thecatus was investigated. An attempt was made to alter the distribution of worms in starved fish, in fish of which cecal pH was reduced, and in fish of which intestinal protein concentration was elevated. Protein concentration and pH showed no effect on worm distribution. Starving hosts had no effect on worm number or distribution but resulted in retardation of worm growth and development, providing a mechanism by which worms may overwinter and by which peak egg production may coincide with abundance of the amphipod intermediate host. None of the factors investigated is solely responsible for the microhabitat specificity of L. thecatus. It is suggested that helminth site specificity is characterized by long histories of adaptation to specific habitats with many physiological adaptations being facilitated synergistically. Maximization of sexual congress may exert an important selective pressure favoring this establishment of microhabitat specificity.

  6. Uptake of 3H-cAMP by retinal pigment epithelium isolated from bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus)

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Thomas A; Radhakrishnan, Varsha; Moredock, Steve; García, Dana M

    2006-01-01

    Background In bluegill sunfish, the melanin-containing pigment granules of the retinal pigment epithelium undergo cyclic movements in response both to ambient lighting and circadian cues. Pigment granules aggregate into the cell body at night (in the dark), and disperse into apical processes during the day (in the light). Regulation of pigment granule aggregation in a number of fishes depends on modulating the intracellular levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate. Results Here we show isolated RPE takes up cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) in a saturable manner, exogenously applied cAMP induces pigment granule aggregation in retinal pigment epithelium isolated from bluegill, and aggregation induced in this manner is inhibited by treatment with probenecid, an organic anion transport inhibitor. Conclusion Our results raise the possibility that cAMP functions as a messenger secreted from the neural retina to signal darkness to the RPE, which takes it up. It further suggests that organic anion transport systems are the route by which cAMP crosses RPE cell membranes since probenecid inhibits extracellular cAMP from causing pigment granule aggregation. PMID:17196104

  7. Enantioselective analysis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in freshwater fish based on microextraction with a supramolecular liquid and chiral liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Caballo, Carmen; Sicilia, Maria Dolores; Rubio, Soledad

    2015-06-01

    Toxicity of pharmaceuticals to aquatic biota is still largely unknown, and no research on the stereoselective toxicity of chiral drugs to these organisms has been undertaken to date. Because of the lack of analytical methods available for this purpose, this manuscript deals, for the first time, with the enantioselective analysis of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) ibuprofen, naproxen and ketoprofen in freshwater fish. The method was based on the microextraction of NSAIDs from fish muscle with a supramolecular liquid made up of inverted hexagonal aggregates of decanoic acid, their enantiomeric separation by liquid chromatography onto a (R)-1-naphthylglycine and 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid stationary phase and quantification by tandem mass spectrometry. Limits of quantitation (LOQs) for NSAID enantiomers were in the range 1.7-3.3 ng g(-1). Absolute recoveries were from 97 to 104 %, which indicated the high extraction efficiency of the supramolecular solvent. Extraction equilibrium conditions were reached after 10 min which permitted fast sample treatment. Relative standard deviations for enantiomers in fish muscle were always below 6 %. Isotopically labelled internal standards were used to compensate for matrix interferences. The method in-house validation was carried out with the Oncorhynchus mykiss species, and it was applied to the determination of NSAID enantiomers in different fortified freshwater fish species (Alburnus alburnus, Lepomis gibbosus, Micropterus salmoides, O. mykiss and Cyprinus carpio). PMID:25869485

  8. The representation of conspecific sounds in the auditory brainstem of teleost fishes.

    PubMed

    Wysocki, Lidia Eva; Ladich, Friedrich

    2003-07-01

    Temporal patterns of sounds are thought to be the most important carriers of acoustic information in teleost fishes. In order to investigate how conspecific sounds are processed by the auditory system, auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) elicited by conspecific sounds were recorded in five species of teleosts. In the catfishes Platydoras costatus and Pimelodus pictus, the loach Botia modesta and the labyrinth fish Trichopsis vittata, all of which are hearing specialists, each pulse within the sounds elicited a separate brainwave that closely followed the temporal structure. The ABRs of P. costatus and B. modesta also represent amplitude patterns of conspecific sounds. By contrast, ABRs of the sunfish Lepomis gibbosus, a hearing non-specialist, consisted of long series of waves that could not be attributed to specific sound pulses. A more detailed analysis, however, indicated that each stimulus pulse contributed to the compound ABR waveform. Spectral analysis of low-pitched drumming sounds of P. pictus and corresponding ABRs showed peaks in the ABR spectra at the harmonics of the sound. Our results indicate that, besides temporal patterns, amplitude fluctuations and the frequency content of sounds can be represented in the auditory system and help the fish to extract important information for acoustic communication. PMID:12771172

  9. Use of fish-otolith-length regressions to infer size of double-crested cormorant prey fish from recovered otoliths in Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, Robert M.; Johnson, James H.; Adams, Connie M.

    2005-01-01

    To provide a method for estimating fish size from fish otoliths for forensic applications or other predictive uses, morphometric measurements were obtained from three centrarchid fishes (pumpkinseed [Lepomis gibbosus], rock bass [Ambloplites rupestris], and smallmouth bass [Micropterus dolomieu]), two percids (yellow perch [Perca flavescens] and walleye [Stizostedion vitreum]), and one clupeid (alewife [Alosa pseudoharengus]) from the eastern basin of Lake Ontario. These species are the principal or economically important prey of Double-crested Cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus), whose diet can be determined from regurgitated digestive pellets containing fish otoliths. A fuller understanding of the ecosystem roles of cormorants requires estimation of prey-fish size, obtainable from regressions of otolith length on fish length. Up to 100 fish of each species were collected from eastern Lake Ontario and measured for total length and otolith length. Least-squares regressions of otolith length on fish length were calculated for all species, covering life-stage ranges of immature fish to large adults near maximum known size. The regressions with 95% confidence intervals may be applicable outside the Lake Ontario ecosystem if used with caution.

  10. Morphological change and phenotypic plasticity in native and non-native pumpkinseed sunfish in response to competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavno, Stan; Rooke, Anna C.; Fox, Michael G.

    2014-06-01

    Non-indigenous species are oftentimes exposed to ecosystems with unfamiliar species, and organisms that exhibit a high degree of phenotypic plasticity may be better able to contend with the novel competitors that they may encounter during range expansion. In this study, differences in morphological plasticity were investigated using young-of-year pumpkinseed sunfish ( Lepomis gibbosus) from native North American and non-native European populations. Two Canadian populations, isolated from bluegill sunfish ( L. macrochirus) since the last glaciation, and two Spanish populations, isolated from bluegill since their introduction in Europe, were reared in a common environment using artificial enclosures. Fish were subjected to allopatric (without bluegill) or sympatric (with bluegill) conditions, and differences in plasticity were tested through a MANOVA of discriminant function scores. All pumpkinseed populations exhibited dietary shifts towards more benthivorous prey when held with bluegill. Differences between North American and European populations were observed in body dimensions, gill raker length and pelvic fin position. Sympatric treatments induced an increase in body width and a decrease in caudal peduncle length in native fish; non-native fish exhibited longer caudal peduncle lengths when held in sympatry with bluegill. Overall, phenotypic plasticity influenced morphological divergence less than genetic factors, regardless of population. Contrary to predictions, pumpkinseeds from Europe exhibited lower levels of phenotypic plasticity than Canadian populations, suggesting that European pumpkinseeds are more canalized than their North American counterparts.

  11. Fish assemblage structure and habitat associations in a large western river system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, C.D.; Quist, Michael; Hardy, R. S.

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinal gradients of fish assemblage and habitat structure were investigated in the Kootenai River of northern Idaho. A total of 43 500-m river reaches was sampled repeatedly with several techniques (boat-mounted electrofishing, hoop nets and benthic trawls) in the summers of 2012 and 2013. Differences in habitat and fish assemblage structure were apparent along the longitudinal gradient of the Kootenai River. Habitat characteristics (e.g. depth, substrate composition and water velocity) were related to fish assemblage structure in three different geomorphic river sections. Upper river sections were characterized by native salmonids (e.g. mountain whitefish Prosopium williamsoni), whereas native cyprinids (peamouth Mylocheilus caurinus, northern pikeminnow Ptychocheilus oregonensis) and non-native fishes (pumpkinseed Lepomis gibbosus, yellow perch Perca flavescens) were common in the downstream section. Overall, a general pattern of species addition from upstream to downstream sections was discovered and is likely related to increased habitat complexity and additions of non-native species in downstream sections. Assemblage structure of the upper sections were similar, but were both dissimilar to the lower section of the Kootenai River. Species-specific hurdle regressions indicated the relationships among habitat characteristics and the predicted probability of occurrence and relative abundance varied by species. Understanding fish assemblage structure in relation to habitat could improve conservation efforts of rare fishes and improve management of coldwater river systems.

  12. Evidence of secondary consumption of invertebrate prey by Double-crested Cormorants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J.H.; Ross, R.M.; Smith, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    The piscivorous nature of the Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) is well documented. However, many researchers who have used regurgitated pellets to describe the diet of cormorants report that invertebrates compose a small but consistent portion of the diet. We examined the hypothesis that invertebrates found in pellets are primarily the result of secondary consumption. We used odds ratio analysis to examine associations in 2,846 individual pellets between the presence of specific invertebrate prey and the presence of fish species known to consume those invertebrate taxa. Significant (P < 0.05) relationships occurred between gastropods and pumpkinseed (Lepomis gibbosus) and ictalurids, and between decapods and rock bass (Ambloplites rupestris) and smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu). Significant (P < 0.05) relationships were also found between pelecypods and pumpkinseed and ictalurids. We suggest that the invertebrate prey we observed in pellets were present in the digestive tracts of fish that were consumed by Double-crested Cormorants and hence represent secondary consumption by cormorants. We conclude that consumption of invertebrates by Double-crested Cormorants may be overestimated in the literature in instances where the diet was described using pellets.

  13. Do laboratory species protect endangered species? Interspecies variation in responses to 17β-estradiol, a model endocrine active compound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jorgenson, Zachary G.; Buhl, Kevin J.; Bartell, Stephen E.; Schoenfuss, Heiko L.

    2015-01-01

    Although the effects of estrogens on model laboratory species are well documented, their utility as surrogates for other species, including those listed as endangered, are less clear. Traditionally, conservation policies are evaluated based on model organism responses but are intended to protect all species in an environment. We tested the hypothesis that the endangered Rio Grande silvery minnow (Hybognathus amarus) is more vulnerable to endocrine disruption—as assessed through its larval predator-escape performance, survival, juvenile sex ratios, and whole-body vitellogenin concentration—than the commonly used toxicological model species fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and the bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus). Fish were exposed concurrently for 21 days to the model endocrine active compound (EAC) 17ß-estradiol (E2) at 10 ng E2/L and 30 ng E2/L in a flow-through system using reconstituted water that simulated the physicochemical conditions of the Middle Rio Grande in New Mexico, USA. No significant differences were observed between the fathead and silvery minnow in larval predator-escape response or juvenile sex ratio. Rio Grande silvery minnow survival decreased significantly at day 14 compared with the other two species; by day 21, both cyprinid species (silvery minnow and fathead minnow) exhibited a significant decrease in survival compared with bluegill sunfish, a member of the family Centrarchidae. Male Rio Grande silvery minnow showed a significant increase in whole-body vitellogenin concentration in the 10 ng/L treatment, whereas fathead minnow and bluegill sunfish showed no significant increases in vitellogenin concentrations across treatments. Our study showed response differences to estrogen exposures between the two cyprinid species and further divergence in responses between the families Cyprinidae and Centrarchidae. These results suggest that commonly used laboratory model organisms may be less sensitive to EACs than the endangered

  14. Do laboratory species protect endangered species? Interspecies variation in responses to 17β-estradiol, a model endocrine active compound.

    PubMed

    Jorgenson, Z G; Buhl, K; Bartell, S E; Schoenfuss, H L

    2015-01-01

    Although the effects of estrogens on model laboratory species are well documented, their utility as surrogates for other species, including those listed as endangered, are less clear. Traditionally, conservation policies are evaluated based on model organism responses but are intended to protect all species in an environment. We tested the hypothesis that the endangered Rio Grande silvery minnow (Hybognathus amarus) is more vulnerable to endocrine disruption-as assessed through its larval predator-escape performance, survival, juvenile sex ratios, and whole-body vitellogenin concentration-than the commonly used toxicological model species fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and the bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus). Fish were exposed concurrently for 21 days to the model endocrine active compound (EAC) 17ß-estradiol (E2) at 10 ng E2/L and 30 ng E2/L in a flow-through system using reconstituted water that simulated the physicochemical conditions of the Middle Rio Grande in New Mexico, USA. No significant differences were observed between the fathead and silvery minnow in larval predator-escape response or juvenile sex ratio. Rio Grande silvery minnow survival decreased significantly at day 14 compared with the other two species; by day 21, both cyprinid species (silvery minnow and fathead minnow) exhibited a significant decrease in survival compared with bluegill sunfish, a member of the family Centrarchidae. Male Rio Grande silvery minnow showed a significant increase in whole-body vitellogenin concentration in the 10 ng/L treatment, whereas fathead minnow and bluegill sunfish showed no significant increases in vitellogenin concentrations across treatments. Our study showed response differences to estrogen exposures between the two cyprinid species and further divergence in responses between the families Cyprinidae and Centrarchidae. These results suggest that commonly used laboratory model organisms may be less sensitive to EACs than the endangered Rio

  15. Lack of CYP1A responsiveness in species inhabiting chronically contaminated habitats: two varieties of resistance?

    PubMed

    Brammell, Ben F; Price, David J; Birge, Wesley J; Elskus, Adria A

    2013-03-01

    Organisms chronically exposed to organic pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) can develop resistance to these chemicals, a condition associated with reduced inducibility of the biomarker enzyme cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A). This study addresses the CYP1A response of members of the families Ictaluridae and Centrarchidae, two fish families found throughout much of the United States. We measured CYP1A expression, PCB body burdens, and conducted CYP1A challenge experiments in species from these families residing in the Town Branch/Mud River system (Logan County, KY, USA), a stream system historically contaminated with high levels of PCBs. Despite PCB concentrations in muscle tissue typically associated with elevated CYP1A (16.7 to 75.2μgPCB/g wet edible flesh), resident fish in the contaminated Town Branch/Mud River sites (yellow bullhead [Ameiurus natalis], green sunfish [Lepomis cyanellus], and spotted bass [Micropterus punctulatus]) had hepatic CYP1A activity levels similar to, rather than higher than, those in reference fish, suggesting reduced sensitivity to CYP1A induction. Lack of CYP1A expression following direct contaminant exposure has often been associated with resistance to those contaminants. To determine if CYP1A in resident populations was resistant to induction by PCBs, we exposed resident fish to a single, intraperitoneal injection with a potent CYP1A inducer, 3,4,3',4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (PCB 77). PCB 77 treatment significantly induced hepatic CYP1A activity and protein in yellow bullhead from reference, but not contaminated, sites and had no effect on CYP1A in green sunfish from either site. The low CYP1A expression levels in resident fish with elevated PCB body burdens, together with the failure of PCB injection to induce CYP1A in certain populations, indicate an acclimatory CYP1A response in yellow bullheads and likely an inherently resistant CYP1A in green sunfish. This work demonstrates for the first time acclimation of CYP1A to

  16. Factors affecting food chain transfer of mercury in the vicinity of the Nyanza site, Sudbury River, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haines, T.A.; May, T.W.; Finlayson, R.T.; Mierzykowski, S.E.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of the Nyanza Chemical Waste Dump Superfund Site on the Sudbury River, Massachusetts, was assessed by analysis of sediment, fish prey organisms, and predator fish from four locations in the river system. Whitehall Reservoir is an impoundment upstream of the site, and Reservoir #2 is an impoundment downstream of the site. Cedar Street is a flowing reach upstream of the site, and Sherman Bridge is a flowing reach downstream of the site. Collections of material for analysis were made three times, in May, July, and October. Sediment was analyzed for acid-volatile sulfide (AVS), simultaneously-extracted (SEM) metals (As, Cd, Cr, Hg, Pb, Sb, Zn), and total recoverable Hg. The dominant predatory fish species collected at all sites, largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), was analyzed for the same suite of metals as sediment. Analysis of stomach contents of bass identified small fish (yellow perch Perca flavescens, bluegill Lepomis macrochirus, and pumpkinseed Lepomis gibbosus), crayfish, and dragonfly larvae as the dominant prey organisms. Samples of the prey were collected from the same locations and at the same times as predator fish, and were analyzed for total and methyl mercury. Results of AVS and SEM analyses indicated that sediments were not toxic to aquatic invertebrates at any site. The SEM concentrations of As, Cd, and Cr were significantly higher at Reservoir #2 than at the reference sites, and SEM As and Cd were significantly higher at Sherman Bridge than at Cedar St. Sediment total Hg was elevated only at Reservoir #2. Hg was higher at site-influenced locations in all fish species except brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus). Cd was higher in bluegill, black crappie (Pomoxis nigromaculatus), and brown bullhead, and Cr was higher in largemouth bass fillet samples but not in whole-body samples. There were no seasonal differences in sediment or prey organism metals, but some metals in some fish species did vary over time in an inconsistent manner

  17. Stress in the neighborhood: Tissue glucocorticoids relative to stream quality for five species of fish.

    PubMed

    King, Gregory D; Chapman, Jacqueline M; Cooke, Steven J; Suski, Cory D

    2016-03-15

    Anthropogenic alterations to terrestrial habitat (e.g., urbanization, deforestation, agriculture) can have a variety of negative effects on watercourses that flow through disturbed landscapes. Currently, the relationship between stream habitat quality and fish condition remains poorly understood. The use of physiological metrics such as glucocorticoids (GCs) provides a useful tool for quantifying these effects by relating the health of resident fishes to stream quality. To date, however, most studies that measure GC levels tend to focus on a single, large-bodied species, rather than evaluating how GCs may be influenced differently between species in a community. In this study, we measured cortisol, the glucocorticoid found in fishes, from fish tissues to quantify effects of habitat degradation on the glucocorticoid function of five species of juvenile and small-bodied stream fish which differ ecologically and phylogenetically. Largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides, brown bullhead Ameiurus nebulosus, white sucker Catostomus commersonii, pumpkinseed Lepomis gibbosus, and logperch Percina caprodes were sampled from a reference and a degraded stream. Upon capture, fish were either euthanized immediately, to quantify baseline stress parameters, or following a standardized stressor, to quantify GC responsiveness. As a result of stream degradation largemouth bass possessed altered baseline GC concentrations and brown bullhead and logperch had altered GC responses to a stressor. White sucker and pumpkinseed did not demonstrate any alteration in baseline or post-stress GC concentrations. Together, our results show that different species residing in identical habitats can demonstrate a variety of responses to environmental stress, highlighting the variation in physiological ability to cope under poor environmental conditions, as well as the difficulty of predicting GC dynamics in wild animals. Understanding the relationships between GC function, habitat quality, and

  18. Impacts of invasive fish removal through angling on population characteristics and juvenile growth rate

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, Charlotte; Britton, Robert J; Cucherousset, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Exploitation can modify the characteristics of fish populations through the selective harvesting of individuals, with this potentially leading to rapid ecological and evolutionary changes. Despite the well-known effects of invasive fishes on aquatic ecosystems generally, the potential effects of their selective removal through angling, a strategy commonly used to manage invasive fish, are poorly understood. The aim of this field-based study was to use the North American pumpkinseed Lepomis gibbosus as the model species to investigate the consequences of selective removal on their population characteristics and juvenile growth rates across 10 populations in artificial lakes in southern France. We found that the maximal individual mass in populations decreased as removal pressure through angling increased, whereas we did not observed any changes in the maximal individual length in populations as removal pressure increased. Total population abundance did not decrease as removal pressure increased; instead, here was a U-shaped relationship between removal pressure and the abundance of medium-bodied individuals. In addition, population biomass had a U-shaped curve response to removal pressure, implying that invasive fish populations can modulate their characteristics to compensate for the negative effects of selective removals. In addition, individual lengths at age 2 and juvenile growth rates decreased as removal pressure through angling increased, suggesting a shift toward an earlier size at maturity and an overall slower growing phenotype. Therefore, these outputs challenge the efficiency of selective management methods, suggesting the use of more proactive strategies to control invasive populations, and the need to investigate the potential ecological and evolutionary repercussions of nonrandom removal. PMID:26078856

  19. Interspecific and environment-induced variation in hypoxia tolerance in sunfish.

    PubMed

    Borowiec, Brittney G; Crans, Kyle D; Khajali, Fariborz; Pranckevicius, Nicole A; Young, Alexander; Scott, Graham R

    2016-08-01

    Hypoxia tolerance is a plastic trait, and can vary between species. We compared hypoxia tolerance (hypoxic loss of equilibrium, LOE, and critical O2 tension, Pcrit) and traits that dictate O2 transport and metabolism in pumpkinseed (Lepomis gibbosus), bluegill (L. macrochirus), and the naturally occurring hybrid in different acclimation environments (wild versus lab-acclimated fish) and at different temperatures. Wild fish generally had lower Pcrit and lower PO2 at LOE in progressive hypoxia than lab-acclimated fish, but time to LOE in sustained hypoxia (PO2 of 2kPa) did not vary between environments. Wild fish also had greater gill surface area and higher haematocrit, suggesting that increased O2 transport capacity underlies the environmental variation in Pcrit. Metabolic (lactate dehydrogenase, LDH; pyruvate kinase, PK; citrate synthase; cytochrome c oxidase) and antioxidant (catalase and superoxide dismutase) enzyme activities varied appreciably between environments. Wild fish had higher protein contents across tissues and higher activities of LDH in heart, PK in brain, and catalase in brain, liver, and skeletal muscle. Otherwise, wild fish had lower activities for most enzymes. Warming temperature from 15 to 25°C increased O2 consumption rate, Pcrit, PO2 at LOE, and haemoglobin-O2 affinity, and decreased time to LOE, but pumpkinseed had ≥2-fold longer time to LOE than bluegill and hybrids across this temperature range. This was associated with higher LDH activities in the heart and muscle, and lower or similar antioxidant enzyme activities in several tissues. However, the greater hypoxia tolerance of pumpkinseed collapsed at 28°C, demonstrating that the interactive effects of hypoxia and warming temperature can differ between species. Overall, distinct mechanisms appear to underpin interspecific and environment-induced variation in hypoxia tolerance in sunfish. PMID:27085372

  20. Biotic and abiotic correlates with black bullhead population characteristics in Nebraska sandhill lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phelps, Q.E.; Ward, M.J.; Paukert, C.P.; Chipps, S.R.; Willis, D.W.

    2005-01-01

    We explored relationships among black bullhead (Ameiurus melas) population characteristics and physicochemical attributes in shallow lakes and quantified relationships between population characteristics of black bullhead and sport fishes. Lake characteristics and fisheries survey data were collected from the Sandhills region of northcentral Nebraska from May through June, 1998 and 1999. Relative abundance of black bullheads was inversely related to proportional stock density (r=-0.672, df=15, P=0.004); however, neither relative weight nor growth was significantly (P ??? 0.20) related to black bullhead relative abundance. Population characteristics of common panfish species such as bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), green sunfish (L. cyanellus), pumpkinseed (L. gibbosus), and yellow perch (Perca flavescens) were not correlated with black bullhead relative abundance or size structure. Rather, proportional stock density (r=0.655, df=10, P=0.029) and growth (r=0.59, df=11, P=0.04) of black bullhead were positively related to relative abundance of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Similarly, black bullhead relative abundance was inversely related to largemouth bass size structure (r=-0.51, df=14, P= 0.05). Black bullhead mean length at age 3 was positively related to total phosphorous concentration (r=0.65, df=16, P=0.004), and bullhead relative abundance was positively related to shoreline development index (r=0.46, df=22, P=0.03). Population characteristics of black bullhead appeared to have little influence on panfish communities. Rather, black bullhead abundance, predator density, and lake productivity exhibited stronger relationships with black bullhead population characteristics.

  1. Little Galloo Island, Lake Ontario: A review of nine years of double-crested cormorant diet and fish consumption information

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, James H.; Ross, Robert M.; McCullough, Russ D.

    2002-01-01

    The diet of double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) on Little Galloo Island (LGI) in the eastern basin of Lake Ontario has been quantified since 1992. Over the past nine years considerable information has been generated on cormorant feeding ecology through the examination of approximately 12,000 pellets collected on LGI, where three distinct cormorant feeding periods, pre-chick, chick, and post-chick, are delineated by differences in diet composition and daily fish consumption. Yellow perch (Perca flavescens) were the major prey during pre-chick and post-chick feeding periods. Alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus), which move inshore to spawn in mid-June, dominated (>60%) cormorant diets during the chick feeding period. Mean daily fish consumption (14.6) during the pre-chick feeding period was significantly greater than during the chick feeding (9.3) or post-chick feeding (8.0) periods. The proportion of smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) in the diet increased over the season (0.8% to 7.2%), while the size of bass consumed declined (214 mm to 143 mm). Forage fish (mainly alewife, three-spine sticklebacks [Gasterosteus aculeatus] and minnows) comprised 58% of the diet of LGI cormorants, followed by panfish (37%) (yellow perch, pumpkinseed [Lepomis gibbosus], rock bass [Ambloplites rupestris]) and gamefish (5%) (mostly smallmouth bass). On the average LGI cormorants consumed about 32.8 million fish annually, weighing about 1.4 million kilograms. Cormorants from LGI consumed more biomass of smallmouth bass and yellow perch annually than is taken by sport (bass and yellow perch) and commercial (perch) fishermen.

  2. Effects of introduced fishes on wild juvenile coho salmon in three shallow pacific northwest lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonar, Scott A.; Bolding, B.D.; Divens, M.; Meyer, W.

    2005-01-01

    Declines in Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp. have been blamed on hydropower, overfishing, ocean conditions, and land use practices; however, less is known about the impacts of introduced fish. Most of the hundreds of lakes and ponds in the Pacific Northwest contain introduced fishes, and many of these water bodies are also important for salmon production, especially of coho salmon O. kisutch. Over 2 years, we examined the predation impacts of 10 common introduced fishes (brown bullhead Ameiurus nebulosus, black crappie Pomoxis nigro-maculatus, bluegill Lepomis macrochirus, golden shiner Notemigonus crysoleucas, green sunfish L. cyanellus, largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides, pumpkinseed L. gibbosus, rainbow trout O. mykiss, warmouth L. gulosus, and yellow perch Perca flavescens) and two native fishes (cutthroat trout O. clarkii and prickly sculpin Cottus asper) on wild juvenile coho salmon in three shallow Pacific Northwest lakes, all located in different watersheds. Of these species, largemouth bass were responsible for an average of 98% of the predation on coho salmon in all lakes, but the total impact to each run varied among lakes and years. Very few coho salmon were eaten by black crappies, brown bullheads, cutthroat trout, prickly sculpin, or yellow perch, whereas other species were not observed to eat coho salmon. Juvenile coho salmon growth in all lakes was higher than in nearby streams. Therefore, food competition between coho salmon and introduced fishes in lakes was probably not limiting coho salmon populations. Largemouth bass are widespread and are present in 85% of lowland warmwater public-access lakes in Washington (n = 421), 84% of those in Oregon (n = 179), and 74% of those in the eight northwesternmost counties in California (n = 19). Future research would help to identify the impact of largemouth bass predation across the region and prioritize lakes where impacts are most severe. Nevertheless, attempts to transplant or increase largemouth bass

  3. Invasibility of Mediterranean-Climate Rivers by Non-Native Fish: The Importance of Environmental Drivers and Human Pressures

    PubMed Central

    Ilhéu, Maria; Matono, Paula; Bernardo, João Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Invasive species are regarded as a biological pressure to natural aquatic communities. Understanding the factors promoting successful invasions is of great conceptual and practical importance. From a practical point of view, it should help to prevent future invasions and to mitigate the effects of recent invaders through early detection and prioritization of management measures. This study aims to identify the environmental determinants of fish invasions in Mediterranean-climate rivers and evaluate the relative importance of natural and human drivers. Fish communities were sampled in 182 undisturbed and 198 disturbed sites by human activities, belonging to 12 river types defined for continental Portugal within the implementation of the European Union's Water Framework Directive. Pumpkinseed sunfish, Lepomis gibbosus (L.), and mosquitofish, Gambusia holbrooki (Girard), were the most abundant non-native species (NNS) in the southern river types whereas the Iberian gudgeon, Gobio lozanoi Doadrio and Madeira, was the dominant NNS in the north/centre. Small northern mountain streams showed null or low frequency of occurrence and abundance of NNS, while southern lowland river types with medium and large drainage areas presented the highest values. The occurrence of NNS was significantly lower in undisturbed sites and the highest density of NNS was associated with high human pressure. Results from variance partitioning showed that natural environmental factors determine the distribution of the most abundant NNS while the increase in their abundance and success is explained mainly by human-induced disturbance factors. This study stresses the high vulnerability of the warm water lowland river types to non-native fish invasions, which is amplified by human-induced degradation. PMID:25372284

  4. Stress in the neighborhood: Tissue glucocorticoids relative to stream quality for five species of fish.

    PubMed

    King, Gregory D; Chapman, Jacqueline M; Cooke, Steven J; Suski, Cory D

    2016-03-15

    Anthropogenic alterations to terrestrial habitat (e.g., urbanization, deforestation, agriculture) can have a variety of negative effects on watercourses that flow through disturbed landscapes. Currently, the relationship between stream habitat quality and fish condition remains poorly understood. The use of physiological metrics such as glucocorticoids (GCs) provides a useful tool for quantifying these effects by relating the health of resident fishes to stream quality. To date, however, most studies that measure GC levels tend to focus on a single, large-bodied species, rather than evaluating how GCs may be influenced differently between species in a community. In this study, we measured cortisol, the glucocorticoid found in fishes, from fish tissues to quantify effects of habitat degradation on the glucocorticoid function of five species of juvenile and small-bodied stream fish which differ ecologically and phylogenetically. Largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides, brown bullhead Ameiurus nebulosus, white sucker Catostomus commersonii, pumpkinseed Lepomis gibbosus, and logperch Percina caprodes were sampled from a reference and a degraded stream. Upon capture, fish were either euthanized immediately, to quantify baseline stress parameters, or following a standardized stressor, to quantify GC responsiveness. As a result of stream degradation largemouth bass possessed altered baseline GC concentrations and brown bullhead and logperch had altered GC responses to a stressor. White sucker and pumpkinseed did not demonstrate any alteration in baseline or post-stress GC concentrations. Together, our results show that different species residing in identical habitats can demonstrate a variety of responses to environmental stress, highlighting the variation in physiological ability to cope under poor environmental conditions, as well as the difficulty of predicting GC dynamics in wild animals. Understanding the relationships between GC function, habitat quality, and

  5. How well can fishes prey on zebra mussels in eastern North America?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    French, John R. P.

    1993-01-01

    Literature on mollusk-eating fishes was reviewed to determine the potential for different species of fish to control zebra mussels in eastern North America. At least six species are potential predators of zebra mussels because they possess (1) both upper and lower pharyngeal teeth or (2) lower pharyngeal teeth and chewing pads located on the dorsal roof for crushing mollusk shells. Freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) and two centrarchids, redear sunfish (Lepomis microlophus) and pumpkinseed (L. gibbosus), possess both upper and lower pharyngeal teeth and are likely to consume more zebra mussels than fishes with only lower pharyngeal teeth. Only two catostomid species, copper and river redhorses (Moxostoma hubbsi and M. carinatum), have chewing pads that enable them to crush mollusks. The exotic omnivorous common carp (Cyprinus carpio), possessing lower teeth and a chewing pad, may prey on zebra mussels when aquatic insect larvae, its preferred food, become rare. Managing populations of drum, sunfishes and redhorses to reduce exploitation of large individuals and improve their habitats are suggested as means to intensify biological control of zebra mussels in eastern North America. Other Eurasian molluscivores, the roach (Rutilus rutilus) and the black carp (Mylopharyngodon piceus) should not be introduced into North America because research has shown repeatedly that an introduced biological controller usually does not forage for unwanted pests or reside only in preferred habitats of pests. Drum, sunfishes and redhorses should be preferred over these exotics as biological controllers of zebra mussels in North America because these native fishes will likely occupy newly established habitats of zebra mussels.

  6. Estimating the size of fish consumed by double-crested cormorants: Considerations for better understanding cormorant-fish interactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, James H.; Ross, Robert M.; McKenna, James E.; Lewis, Graham E.

    2006-01-01

    We measured 926 smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu), 6,935 yellow perch (Perca flavescens), 6,416 rock bass (Ambloplites rupestris), and 4,852 pumpkinseed (Lepomis gibbosus) otoliths recovered from double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) pellets to determine the sizes (total lengths) of these fish consumed by cormorants. Otoliths were recovered from cormorant pellets collected from 1993 to 2002 at six colonies along the eastern Lake Ontario–St. Lawrence River corridor. Otolith –length fish length regressions were used to estimate the length of fish species consumed by cormorants. Only 1.5% of these otoliths had no visible erosion, 33.3% had minor erosion, and 65.2% had moderate erosion. We found that the exclusive use of uneroded otoliths severely limited the sample size available for estimating fish size and likely would cause an overestimation of fish size. Species-specific differences were evident when using erosion criteria to determine fish size and could result in bias when estimating length, especially for species such as smallmouth bass whose otoliths possess a rostrum that is readily eroded. Using a random sample (n = 100) of all intact otoliths recovered in pellets provided a conservative estimate of fish length that was smaller than that derived from uneroded or minimally eroded otoliths. Annual variation in the size of fish consumed by cormorants was more pronounced than seasonal variation for most species. We describe and recommend a new technique that incorporates both chick regurgitant and pellet samples for estimating the size of fish consumed by cormorants.

  7. Multidimensional analysis of suction feeding performance in fishes: fluid speed, acceleration, strike accuracy and the ingested volume of water.

    PubMed

    Higham, Timothy E; Day, Steven W; Wainwright, Peter C

    2006-07-01

    Suction feeding fish draw prey into the mouth using a flow field that they generate external to the head. In this paper we present a multidimensional perspective on suction feeding performance that we illustrate in a comparative analysis of suction feeding ability in two members of Centrarchidae, the largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus). We present the first direct measurements of maximum fluid speed capacity, and we use this to calculate local fluid acceleration and volumetric flow rate. We also calculated the ingested volume and a novel metric of strike accuracy. In addition, we quantified for each species the effects of gape magnitude, time to peak gape, and swimming speed on features of the ingested volume of water. Digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) and high-speed video were used to measure the flow in front of the mouths of three fish from each species in conjunction with a vertical laser sheet positioned on the mid-sagittal plane of the fish. From this we quantified the maximum fluid speed (in the earthbound and fish's frame of reference), acceleration and ingested volume. Our method for determining strike accuracy involved quantifying the location of the prey relative to the center of the parcel of ingested water. Bluegill sunfish generated higher fluid speeds in the earthbound frame of reference, accelerated the fluid faster, and were more accurate than largemouth bass. However, largemouth bass ingested a larger volume of water and generated a higher volumetric flow rate than bluegill sunfish. In addition, because largemouth bass swam faster during prey capture, they generated higher fluid speeds in the fish's frame of reference. Thus, while bluegill can exert higher drag forces on stationary prey items, largemouth bass more quickly close the distance between themselves and prey. The ingested volume and volumetric flow rate significantly increased as gape increased for both species, while time to peak

  8. Fish and Aquatic Invertebrate Communities in Waterways, and Contaminants in Fish, at the Barataria Preserve of Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve, Louisiana, 1999-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, Christopher M.; Mize, Scott V.; Thompson, Bruce A.; Peterson, Gary W.

    2004-01-01

    Fish and aquatic invertebrate communities in waterways of the Barataria Preserve of Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve, Louisiana, were surveyed from 1999 to 2000. An inventory of fish in the Barataria Preserve was established, and concentrations of selected organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and trace elements; iron; and manganese in fish tissue for selected species were determined. The fish and aquatic invertebrate sampling completed for this study indicated that abundant and diverse communities are present in the Barataria Preserve. Thirty-two species of fish were identified in the Barataria Preserve during this survey. The total number of species identified in a single sampling ranged from 20 to 26. Most of the fish sampled are designated as intermediate in their tolerance to poor water quality. Three species of fish designated as tolerant (common carp, Cyprinus carpio; golden shiner, Notemigonus crysoleucas; and yellow bullhead, Ameiurus natalis), and one as intolerant (lake chubsucker, Erymizon sucetta), were identified. In November 1999, the average total weight of all fish collected by boat-mounted electroshocker from a single site was about 35,000 grams; in May and July 1999, the average total weight was between 9,000 and 10,000 grams. The contribution of spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus) to the total weight of the fish averaged between 38 and 41 percent among the three sample periods. Members of the sunfish family (Centrarchidae) contributed between 18 and 28 percent of the total weight. For each sampling period, 60 to 83 percent of the total weight from the sunfish family was contributed by bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Aquatic invertebrates were sampled at three sites. Most aquatic invertebrates identified were freshwater species, but some were brackish-water and marine species. About 234,000 organisms were identified and enumerated from the richest-targeted habitat (RTH

  9. Assessment of Habitat, Fish Communities, and Streamflow Requirements for Habitat Protection, Ipswich River, Massachusetts, 1998-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armstrong, David S.; Richards, Todd A.; Parker, Gene W.

    2001-01-01

    The relations among stream habitat, fish communities, and hydrologic conditions were investigated in the Ipswich River Basin in northeastern Massachusetts. Data were assessed from 27 sites on the mainstem of the Ipswich River from July to September 1998 and from 10 sites on 5 major tributaries in July and August 1999. Habitat assessments made in 1998 determined that in a year with sustained streamflow for most of the summer, the Ipswich River contains diverse, high-quality aquatic habitat. Channel types are predominantly low gradient glides, pools, and impoundments, with a sandy streambed and a forest or shrub riparian zone. Features that provide fish habitat are located mostly along stream margins; these features include overhanging brush, undercut banks, exposed roots, and woody debris. These habitat features decrease in availability to aquatic communities with declining streamflows and generally become unavailable after streamflows drop to the point where the edge of water recedes from the stream banks.The mainstem and tributaries were sampled to determine fish species composition, relative abundance, and length frequency. Fish sampling indicates that the fish community in the Ipswich River is currently a warm-water fish community dominated by pond-type fish. However, historical temperature data, and survival of stocked trout in the mainstem Ipswich into late summer of 1998, indicate that the Ipswich River potentially could support cold-water fish species if adequate flows are maintained. Dominant fish species sampled in the mainstem Ipswich River were redfin pickerel (Esox americanus), American eel (Anguilla rostrata), and pumpkinseed (Lepomis gibbosus), which together represented 41, 22, and 10 percent, respectively, of 4,745 fish sampled. The fish communities of the mainstem and tributaries contained few fluvial-dependent or fluvial-specialist species (requiring flow), and were dominated by macrohabitat generalists (tolerant of low-flow, warm-water, and

  10. Survival of vaccinated,feed-trained largemouth bass fry (Micropterus Salmoides Floridanus) during natural exposure to Flavobacterium columnare

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides floridanus; Centrarchidae) are often reared in government hatchery programs, then stocked to supplement wild fish populations. After the eggs obtained from broodstock are hatched, fry are stocked into ponds to feed on zooplankton and other small invertebrates....

  11. Concentrations of Elements in Hellbender Blood and Fish Fillets from the Missouri Department of Conservation Monitoring Programs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Thomas W.; Walther, Mike J.; Brumbaugh, William G.

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the results of contaminant monitoring surveys conducted annually by the Missouri Department of Conservation to examine the levels of selected elemental contaminants in hellbender (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis) blood and fish. Catfish (Ictalurus furcatus, Ictalurus punctatus, Pylodictis olivaris), redhorse (Moxostoma anisorum, Moxostoma erythrurum), bass (Micropterus salmoides, Micropterus punctulatus, Micropterus Lacepede, Ambloplites rupestris), walleye (Sander vitreus), and sunfish (Lepomis megalotis) were collected from 17 sites as part of the Department's General Contaminant Monitoring Program. Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) and other sunfish (Lepomis megalotis, Lepomis cyanellus) were collected from 18 sites as part of the Department's Resource Assessment and Monitoring Program. Blood from hellbenders was collected from seven sites as part of the Department's Hellbender Monitoring Program.

  12. INDICATORS OF GENETIC DAMAGE IN MODEL STREAM FISH USING CONTROLLED LABORATORY EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The micronucleus (MN) and single cell gel electrophoresis (SCG) assays are being applied to peripheral blood cells from several fish species using model genotoxicants and envirornmentally relevant pollutants. In initial studies, bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus, 4 to 5 per ...

  13. The trade-off between food and temperature in the habitat choice of bluegill sunfish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wildhaber, M.L.

    2001-01-01

    A model is presented to describe the trade-off between food and temperature in bluegills Lepomis macrochirus, where temperature was the primary factor used in determining the patch in which to reside.

  14. Bull Run Fossil Plant toxicity biomonitoring study

    SciTech Connect

    Hackney, P.A.; Moses, J.

    1986-11-01

    This report presents the results of toxicity testing of the whole waste discharge from the Bull Run Steam-Electric Plant ashpond. Water chemistry tests were conducted for heavy metals content and suspended solids. Both acute and chronic toxicity tests were conducted on Daphnia pulex, Ceriodaphnia spp., Pimephales promelas, Micropterus salmoides, Lepomis macrochirus, and Cyprinus carpio. (ACR)

  15. Effect of block net use and time of sampling on backpack electrofishing catches in three Kansas reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoenebeck, C.W.; Strakosh, T.R.; Guy, C.S.

    2005-01-01

    Using backpack electrofishing in three Kansas reservoirs, we investigated the need for block nets when estimating density (fish/ha) and species diversity and determined whether time of sampling affected catch rates (fish/h) of age-0 largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides and age-0 Lepomis spp. and species diversity. Block nets were used to enclose or buoys were used to mark the boundaries of 149 m2 of reservoir surface area. Species richness, diversity, and density of age-0 largemouth bass and Lepomis spp. did not differ significantly between areas enclosed with block nets and areas marked with buoys, but species richness, diversity, and catch rates differed significantly between day and night sampling. Age-0 largemouth bass and Lepomis spp. catch rates, species richness, and species diversity were all significantly higher during night sampling. Our results indicate that use of block nets may not be necessary to estimate age-0 largemouth bass and Lepomis spp. densities, species richness, or diversity in reservoir littoral areas. We recommend night sampling because of significantly higher catch rates and better representation of the littoral fish assemblage. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  16. Use of a partial-differential-equation model to estimate impingement impact at Cumberland Steam Electric Plant, Barkley Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    McDonough, T.A.

    1981-03-01

    Computer simulation techniques were used to investigate to what extent observed decreases in Barkley Reservoir Fish stocks could result from impingement mortality at the Cumberland Steam Electric Plant. Species investigated were threadfin shad (Dorosoma petenense), bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), white crappie (Pomoxis annularis), and freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens). (ACR)

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Aeromonas hydrophila TN97-08

    PubMed Central

    Tekedar, Hasan C.; Kumru, Salih; Karsi, Attila; Waldbieser, Geoffrey C.; Sonstegard, Tad; Schroeder, Steven G.; Liles, Mark R.; Griffin, Matt J.

    2016-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is an opportunistic pathogen residing in freshwater environments that causes infection in fish and mammals. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of A. hydrophila strain TN97-08 isolated from a diseased bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) in 1997. PMID:27231367

  18. DNA DAMAGE AND VITELLOGENIN RESPONSES IN FERAL FISH EXPOSED TO URBANIZATION AND WASTE WATER TREATMENT EFFLUENT IN SOUTH CAROLINA, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was designed to look at the impact of urbanization and a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) by using field-collected bluegill (Lepomis machrochkrus). Fish were collected from four locations in the same river: above city (reference); below city and above the WWTP; direc...

  19. Fish hosts for glochidia of the endangered freshwater mussel Lampsilis higginsi Lea (Bivalvia: Unionidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, D.L.; Holland Bartels, L. E.

    1988-01-01

    Laboratory tests of nine species of fish as hosts for glochidia of Lampsilis higginsi Lea indicated that four species were fully suitable: largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides Lacepede), smallmouth bass (M. dolomieui Lacepede), walleye (Stizostedion vitreum vitreum Mitchill), and yellow perch (Perca flavescens Mitchill). Juvenile L. higginsi also developed on green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus Rafinesque) but some fish sloughed their infections prematurely.

  20. The complete mitochondrial genomes of largemouth bass of the northern subspecies (Micropterus salmoides salmoides) and Florida subspecies (Micropterus salmoides floridanus) and their applications in the identification of largemouth bass species.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-Jie; Bai, Jun-Jie; Cai, Lei; Ma, Dong-Mei; Du, Fang-Fang

    2012-04-01

    The largemouth bass belongs to the family Centrarchidae, which includes two subspecies: the northern subspecies, Micropterus salmoides salmoides, and the Florida subspecies, Micropterus salmoides floridanus. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genomes of the two subspecies were sequenced, and their genetic differences were identified. The mitogenomes of M. s. salmoides and M. s. floridanus are 16,486 and 16,479 bp in length, respectively. The two subspecies consisted of 37 genes (13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA, and 22 transfer RNA), which are typical for vertebrate mtDNA. Phylogenetic analysis provided statistical support for the monophyly of the family Centrarchidae. Comparison of the two subspecies' mitogenomes revealed a relatively high number (450) of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in protein-coding genes. We characterized SNPs in the partial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene of different individuals from three cultured populations, one wild northern subspecies population, and one wild Florida subspecies population. Twenty-eight SNPs were fixed with alternative nucleotides in the two subspecies, which could be used for differentiating them. Based on this gene, phylogenetic tree and genetic distance analyses supported that cultured largemouth bass in China belongs to the northern subspecies. PMID:22409750

  1. The complete mitochondrial genomes of largemouth bass of the northern subspecies (Micropterus salmoides salmoides) and Florida subspecies (Micropterus salmoides floridanus) and their applications in the identification of largemouth bass species.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-Jie; Bai, Jun-Jie; Cai, Lei; Ma, Dong-Mei; Du, Fang-Fang

    2012-04-01

    The largemouth bass belongs to the family Centrarchidae, which includes two subspecies: the northern subspecies, Micropterus salmoides salmoides, and the Florida subspecies, Micropterus salmoides floridanus. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genomes of the two subspecies were sequenced, and their genetic differences were identified. The mitogenomes of M. s. salmoides and M. s. floridanus are 16,486 and 16,479 bp in length, respectively. The two subspecies consisted of 37 genes (13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA, and 22 transfer RNA), which are typical for vertebrate mtDNA. Phylogenetic analysis provided statistical support for the monophyly of the family Centrarchidae. Comparison of the two subspecies' mitogenomes revealed a relatively high number (450) of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in protein-coding genes. We characterized SNPs in the partial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene of different individuals from three cultured populations, one wild northern subspecies population, and one wild Florida subspecies population. Twenty-eight SNPs were fixed with alternative nucleotides in the two subspecies, which could be used for differentiating them. Based on this gene, phylogenetic tree and genetic distance analyses supported that cultured largemouth bass in China belongs to the northern subspecies.

  2. Mollusk collecting and environmental change during the Prehistoric Period in the Mariana Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amesbury, J. R.

    2007-12-01

    Archaeological research in the Mariana Islands has revealed changes in mollusk collecting during the Prehistoric Period (approximately 1500 BC to AD 1521). The earliest people at Tumon Bay, Guam and Chalan Piao, Saipan collected mostly bivalves, especially the arc clam Anadara antiquata. After several hundred years, they no longer collected A. antiquata, but collected smaller bivalves instead. By AD 1000, they collected mostly gastropods, primarily the coral reef species Strombus gibberulus gibbosus. One possible explanation is that the people preferred the large arc clam but overharvested it until they were forced to eat the smaller bivalves and then the snails. However, recent evidence in the form of mangrove wood and mangrove pollen supports another explanation, one of non-anthropogenic environmental change. In this case, the relative sea-level decline, which took place in the Marianas within the last 4,000 years, caused the demise of mangrove habitats and of the arc clam at Tumon Bay, Guam and Chalan Piao, Saipan. As mangrove habitats were diminished by sea-level decline, collecting effort shifted to coral reefs, and S. gibberulus gibbosus was harvested throughout the remainder of the Prehistoric Period and into the Historic Period. Southern Guam is the only area in the Marianas in which A. antiquata increased in abundance during the Prehistoric Period. The same types of evidence, mangrove wood and mangrove pollen, indicate that, in contrast to the situation at Tumon Bay and Chalan Piao, mangroves increased in abundance in southern Guam.

  3. Prey morphology constrains the feeding ecology of an aquatic generalist predator.

    PubMed

    Willson, John D; Hopkins, William A

    2011-03-01

    Resource availability and accessibility are primary factors guiding the distribution and abundance of organisms. For generalists, prey availability reflects both prey abundance and differences in quality among prey taxa. Although some aspects of prey quality, such as nutritional composition, are well studied, our understanding of how prey morphology contributes to overall prey quality is limited. Because snakes cannot reduce prey size by mastication, many aspects of their feeding ecology (e.g., maximum prey size, feeding performance, and the degree of postprandial locomotor impairment) may be affected by prey shape. We conducted a uniquely comprehensive comparison of prey quality for a generalist species, the banded watersnake (Nerodia fasciata), using prey that were similar in mass and presumably similar in nutritional composition but different in shape and habitat association. Specifically, we compared nutritional composition and shape of paedomorphic salamanders (Ambystoma talpoideum) and sunfish (Lepomis MARGINATUS) and used a series of repeated-measures experiments to examine feeding performance (number of prey consumed, maximum prey size, and intra-oral transport time), digestive metabolism (specific dynamic action, SDA), and postprandial locomotor performance of snakes fed Ambystoma and Lepomis. Cost of digestion was similar between the prey types, likely reflecting their similar nutritional composition. However, snakes consumed larger Ambystoma than Lepomis and intra-oral transport time was much shorter for Ambystoma. Snakes fed Lepomis also suffered greater reduction in crawling speed than those fed Ambystoma. These differences highlight the need for behaviorally integrated approaches to understanding prey quality and support field observations of the importance of amphibian prey for juvenile watersnakes.

  4. An evaluation of fluorescent elastomer for marking bluegills in experimental studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dewey, Michael R.; Zigler, Steven J.

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated subdermal injection of a fluorescent elastomer for marking bluegills Lepomis macrochirus in laboratory and pond studies. Marking did not affect the growth or survival of adult or juvenile bluegills. Marks were visible for at least 6 months. This technique is a reliable, relatively inexpensive marking method for the identification of individual fish in experimental studies. Costs of application range from US$0.01 to $0.03 per mark.

  5. Are rapid transitions between invasive and native species caused by alternative stable states, and does it matter?

    PubMed

    Hansen, Gretchen J A; Ives, Anthony R; Vander Zanden, M Jake; Carpenter, Stephen R

    2013-10-01

    Rapid transitions in ecosystem structure, or regime shifts, are a hallmark of alternative stable states (ASS). However, regime shifts can occur even when feedbacks are not strong enough to cause ASS. We investigated the potential for ASS to explain transitions between dominance of an invasive species, rusty crayfish (Orconectes rusticus), and native sunfishes (Lepomis spp.) in northern Wisconsin (USA) lakes. A rapid transition from Lepomis to rusty crayfish dominance occurred as rusty crayfish invaded Trout Lake, and the reverse transition resulted from an eight-year experimental removal of rusty crayfish from Sparkling Lake. We fit a stage-structured population model of species interactions to 31 years of time-series data from each lake. The model identified water level as an important driver, with drought conditions reducing rusty crayfish recruitment and allowing Lepomis dominance. The maximum-likelihood parameter estimates of the negative interaction between rusty crayfish and Lepomis led to ASS in the model, where each species was capable of excluding the other within a narrow range of environmental conditions. However, uncertainty in parameter estimates made it impossible to exclude the potential that rapid transitions were caused by a simpler threshold response lacking alternative equilibria. Simulated forward and backward transitions between species dominance occurred at different environmental conditions (i.e., hysteresis), even when the parameters used for simulation did not predict ASS as a result of slow species responses to environmental drivers. Thus, ASS are possible, but by no means certain, explanations for rapid transitions in this system, and our results highlight the difficulties associated with distinguishing ASS from other types of threshold responses. However, whether regime shifts are caused by ASS may be relatively unimportant in this system, as the range of conditions over which transitions occur is narrow, and under most conditions, the

  6. Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish

    SciTech Connect

    Abernethy, Cary S.; Amidan, Brett G.; Cada, G F.

    2001-03-23

    The objective of this study was to examine the relative importance of pressure changes as a source of turbine-passage injury and mortality. Specific tests were designed to quantify the response of fish to rapid pressure changes typical of turbine passage, with and without the complication of the fish being acclimated to gas supersaturated water. We investigated the responses of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha), and bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) to these two stresses, both singly and in combination.

  7. A Simple, Inexpensive in Situ Method for Assessing Acute Toxicity of Effluents to Fish

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, E.W.

    2001-05-29

    Test chambers for conducting in situ fish bioassays were constructed from 8L polyethylene bottles. Yearling fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and young-of-the-year bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) demonstrated greater than 50 percent survival in the chambers after 65 days of exposure in a reservoir, river, and creek. Fathead minnow survival was substantially greater than that of bluegills. The chambers provide a simple, inexpensive, sensitive technique to screen effluents for toxicity.

  8. Food and feeding of fish in Hartwell Reservoir tailwater, Georgia-South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barwick, D. Hugh; Hudson, Patrick L.

    1985-01-01

    Food of silver redhorse (Moxostoma anisurum), redbreast sunfish (Lepomis auritus), green sunfish (L. cyanellus), and bluegills (L. macrochirus) was examined to determine whether or not these fish in the Hartwell Reservoir tailwater (Savannah River, Georgia-South Carolina) ate organisms entrained from the reservoir or displaced from the tailwater during water releases associated with the production of hydropower. These fish fed primarily on aquatic insects, crayfish, and terrestrial organisms originating from the tailwater. Major periods of feeding occurred during nongeneration.

  9. Potential human health risk by 234,238U and 210Po due to consumption of fish from the "Luis L. Leon" reservoir (Northern Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna-Porres, M. Y.; Rodríguez-Villa, M. A.; Herrera-Peraza, E.; Cabral-Lares, M.; Renteria-Villalobos, M.; Montero-Cabrera, M. E.

    2014-07-01

    The Conchos River is one of the most important in northern Mexico and the main surface waterway in the arid state of Chihuahua. The Luis L. Leon dam produces the Luis L. Leon Reservoir, which is the last major reservoir before the Conchos River enters the Rio Grande at the Texas-Chihuahua border. Activity concentrations (AC) of 234,238U and 210Po in fillet and liver of three stocked fish species (Lepomis cyanellus, Cyprinus carpio and Ictalurus furcatus), as well as in water from the Luis L. Leon reservoir were determined. 238U and 234U ACs in fillet samples showed values of 0.007-0.014 and 0.01-0.02 Bq kg-1 wet weight (ww), respectively. Liver samples for Lepomis cyanellus, Cyprinus carpio and Ictalurus furcatus species, present 210Po AC of 1.16-3.26 0.70-1.13 and 0.93-1.37 Bqṡkg-1 ww. The elemental Bioaccumulation Factor (BAF) for fish tissues respect to their concentrations in water was determined. Lepomis cyanellus species showed the highest BAF for total uranium in fillet, with value 1.5. The annual effective dose for uranium in adults by fish consumption in this work ranged from 4.46×10-3 to 3.68×10-2 μSvṡyear-1. The difference in concentrations of uranium in fillet among the studied species is likely primarily due to their differences in diet and habitat.

  10. Movements by two small fishes in a large stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freeman, Mary C.

    1995-01-01

    Movements by adult Percina nigrojasciata and juvenile Lepomis auritus were examined in a large Coastal Plain stream in the southeastern United States. I marked fishes with subcutaneous injections of acrylic paints to indicate capture location within a 550-m long study site. Recaptures over an 18-month period primarily occurred within 33m of the original capture location, suggesting long-term residence in relatively small areas. However, 11 Percina and three Lepomis moved at least 100 m (maximum distance moved = 200 m for Lepomis, 420 m for Percina), and individuals of both species shifted between distinctly different mesohabitats (boulder riffle, sand pool, and gravel riffle). Distance moved did not strongly relate to time between captures. Long-distance movements (> 33 m) by Percina mostly occurred from Nov. through June. The winter and springtime movements by darters occurred in upstream and downstream directions and into all three mesohabitats, and at least 40% of these movements were unassociated with periods of extreme high flow. Periodic long-range movements may allow small fishes to respond to variation in resources over a large area and across a variety of stream habitats.

  11. Effects of zebra mussels on food webs: Interactions with juvenile bluegill and water residence time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richardson, W.B.; Bartsch, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated how water residence time mediated the impact of zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha and bluegill sunfish Lepomis macrochirus on experimental food webs established in 1100-1 outdoor mesocosms. Water residence time was manipulated as a surrogate for seston resupply - a critical variable affecting growth and survival of suspension-feeding invertebrates. We used a 2 x 2 x 2 factorial experimental design with eight treatment combinations (3 replicates/treatment) including the presence or absence of Dreissena (2000 per m2), juvenile bluegill (40 per mesocosm), and short (1100 1 per d) or long (220 1 per d) water residence time. Measures of seston concentration (chlorophyll a, turbidity and suspended solids) were greater in the short- compared to long water-residence mesocosms, but intermediate in short water-residence mesocosms containing Dreissena. Abundance of rotifers (Keratella and Polyarthra) was reduced in Dreissena mesocosms and elevated in short residence time mesocosms. Cladocera abundance, in general, was unaffected by the presence of Dreissena; densities were higher in short-residence time mesocosms, and reduced in the presence of Lepomis. The growth of juvenile Lepomis were unaffected by Dreissena because of abundant benthic food. The final total mass of Dreissena was significantly greater in short- than long-residence mesocosms. Impacts of Dreissena on planktonic food webs may not only depend on the density of zebra mussels but also on the residence time of the surrounding water and the resupply of seston. ?? 1997 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  12. Many unique characteristics revealed by the complete mitochondrial genome of the scorpion Tityus serrulatus (Lutz e Mello 1922) (Chelicerata; Arachnida).

    PubMed

    Martins, Ana Paula Vimieiro; Carmo, Anderson Oliveira do; Mesquita, Flavia Oliveira; Pimenta, Ricardo José Gonzaga; Chagas, Aline Torres de Azevedo; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes

    2016-09-01

    This is the first complete mitochondrial genome of a Tityus species, although it is the most medically important genus in South America. Tityus serrulatus (Brazilian yellow scorpion) mtDNA revealed the same gene arrangement of three out of four other mitogenomes published by now for the same family (Centruroides limpidus, Mesobuthus gibbosus, M. martensii and Buthus occitanus). However, it presented many unique characteristics such as possession of Cox1 gene, different from all other protein-coding genes of scorpion mtDNA, starts with an atypical start codon (CTG). Moreover, no tRNA gene have complete typical secondary structure and the Tytius genome presented three non-coding regions longer than 100bp. Also, it contains the smallest scorpion 16S gene reported by now. Phylogenetic analysis using concatenated homologous genes confirmed Buthidae as a monophyletic clade and supports a monophyletic group including T. serrulatus and the other American species, C. limpidus.

  13. Effects of littoral habitat complexity and sunfish composition on fish production

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carey, M.P.; Maloney, K.O.; Chipps, S.R.; Wahl, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Habitat complexity is a key driver of food web dynamics because physical structure dictates resource availability to a community. Changes in fish diversity can also alter trophic interactions and energy pathways in food webs. Few studies have examined the direct, indirect, and interactive effects of biodiversity and habitat complexity on fish production. We explored the effects of habitat complexity (simulated vegetation), sunfish diversity (intra- vs. inter-specific sunfish), and their interaction using a mesocosm experiment. Total fish production was examined across two levels of habitat complexity (low: 161 strands m-2 and high: 714 strands m-2) and two sunfish diversity treatments: bluegill only (Lepomis macrochirus) and bluegill, redear sunfish (Lepomis microlophus), and green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus) combination. We also measured changes in total phosphorus, phytoplankton, periphyton, and invertebrates to explain patterns in fish production. Bluegill and total fish production were unaffected by the sunfish treatments. Habitat complexity had a large influence on food web structure by shifting primary productivity from pelagic to a more littoral pathway in the high habitat treatments. Periphyton was higher with dense vegetation, leading to reductions in total phosphorus, phytoplankton, cladoceran abundance and fish biomass. In tanks with low vegetation, bluegill exhibited increased growth. Habitat complexity can alter energy flow through food webs ultimately influencing higher trophic levels. The lack of an effect of sunfish diversity on fish production does not imply that conserving biodiversity is unimportant; rather, we suggest that understanding the context in which biodiversity is important to food web dynamics is critical to conservation planning. ?? 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. ON CRITICAL FREQUENCY AND CRITICAL ILLUMINATION FOR RESPONSE TO FLICKERED LIGHT

    PubMed Central

    Crozier, W. J.; Wolf, Ernst; Zerrahn-Wolf, Gertrud

    1936-01-01

    The curve of mean critical flicker frequency as a function of illumination has been determined for the reaction of the sunfish Lepomis to flicker. It exhibits expected quantitative disagreements with the curve of mean critical illumination as a function of flicker frequency in the same organism. The form of the dependence of the variation of critical frequency of flicker upon illumination can be predicted from a knowledge of the way in which variation of critical illumination depends upon flicker frequency. It is pointed out that these findings have an important bearing upon the interpretation of the data of intensity discrimination. PMID:19872990

  15. Environmental and water-quality operational studies. Prey selection and feeding patterns of fish in a Southern United States hydropower tailwater. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Barwick, D.; Hudson, P.L.; Nestler, J.M.

    1985-10-01

    The downstream effects of peaking hydropower generation at Lake Hartwell Georgia-South Carolina, on the diel prey selection and feeding of four species of fish-silver redhorse (Moxostoma anisurum), redbreast sunfish (Lepomis auritus), green sunfish (L. cyanellus), and bluegill (L. macrochirus)--were determined. Aquatic insects (primarily dipterans, ephemeropterans, and trichopterans), crayfish, and terrestrial organisms (primarily insects) composed most of the food eaten. These fish fed primarily during daylight, before daily hydropower generation began, and little or no feeding occurred during generation. Consequently, few organisms entrained from the reservoir or displaced from the tailwater during hydropower generation were eaten by these fish.

  16. Influence of prey abundance on size-selective predation by bluegills

    SciTech Connect

    Bartell, S.M.

    1982-01-01

    Bluegills Lepomis macrochirus in Lake Wingra consume zooplankton in a size-selective fashion. Length-frequency distributions of ingested and available prey demonstrated that bluegills feed on a smaller range of ever larger Daphnia galeata and Bosmina longirostris as these prey species increased in abundance. The same was not apparent for Cyclops bicuspidatus as prey. Regression of intensity-of-selection indices for Daphnia and Bosmina versus their combined abundance suggests that these prey species are not differentiated by bluegills in Lake Wingra.

  17. Degradation of organophosphates by fish liver phosphatases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hogan, James W.; Knowles, Charles O.

    1968-01-01

    Liver homogenates of bluegill, Lepomis macrochirus Rafinesque, and channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus (Walbaum), were shown by a manometric technique to contain soluble enzymes capable of degrading diisopropyl phosphorofluoridate (DFP) and 2,2-dichlorovinyl dimethyl phosphate (dichlorvos). Hydrolysis of the compounds was greatest in the presence of the manganic ion. Tentative identification of certain of the hydrolysis products suggested that cleavage of the anhydride bond was a degradation pathway for DFP and dichlorvos in vitro under the assay conditions employed. Substrate summation, inhibition, and activation experiments failed to clearly indicate more than a single enzyme hydrolyzing DFP and dichlorvos in the two fish.

  18. Evidence for leptin expression in fishes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R M; Johnson, T M; Londraville, R L

    2000-06-01

    Tissues from bony fish were screened with anti-mouse leptin antibodies to detect the presence of the fat-regulating hormone in fishes. Low molecular-weight (16 kDa) immunoreactive bands were detected in blood, brain, heart and liver of green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus), bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), white crappie (Pomonix annularis), channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). To further verify that we had identified leptin, the response of fish "leptin" was measured in fed and fasted green sunfish. Fed sunfish had approximately threefold higher concentration of leptin in blood than did fasted sunfish (fed vs. fasted; 0.599 +/- 0.03 microg/microl vs. 0.196 +/- 0.04 microg/microl; P > F = 0.0001), which is consistent with mammalian models of leptin function. Brain leptin concentration is also positively correlated with percent body fat in white crappie and bluegill. Based upon electrophoretic mobility, immunoreactivity, response to fasting, and correlation with adiposity, we believe we have the first evidence for leptin expression in an ectotherm.

  19. Fish mortality and physicochemistry in a managed floodplain wetland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sargent, J.C.; Galat, D.L.

    2002-01-01

    Patterns of fish mortality and associated physicochemical factors were studied during late spring in a managed wetland canal along the lower Missouri River, Missouri. Mean dawn dissolved oxygen was lower and mean un-ionized ammonia and turbidity were higher during the fish kill than before or after the kill, or than was observed in a nearby wetland canal where no fish kill occurred. Dissolved oxygen at dawn and un-ionized ammonia concentrations were at critically low and high levels respectively, so that both likely contributed to the fish mortality. Timing and magnitude of observed carcasses suggested that Ameiurus melas Rafinesques was the most tolerant species for the sizes observed compared to Ictiobus cyprinellus Valenciennes, Lepomis macrochirus Rafinesque, Cyprinus carpio Linneaus, and Lepomis cyanellus Rafinesque. Decreasing mean lengths of fish carcasses during the fish kill for C. carpio, L. cyanellus, and A. melas, indicate that smaller fishes may have been more tolerant of harsh environmental conditions than larger individuals of the same species. Differential mortalities among species and sizes during drawdowns in actively managed wetland pools may have intentional and unintentional ramifications on wetland and riverine fish community structure, fish-avian interactions, and implementing an ecosystem management perspective to restoring more naturalized river floodplain wetland functions. Late summer and early autumn draining of managed wetlands might be used to benefit a wider diversity of wildlife and fishes.

  20. Prey vulnerability to peacock cichlids and largemouth bass based on predator gape and prey body depth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, Jeffrey E.; Nico, Leo G.; Cichra, Charles E.; Gilbert, Carter R.

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of prey fish body depth and predator gape size may produce prey assemblages dominated by invulnerable prey and excessive prey-to-predator biomass ratios. Peacock cichlids (Cichla ocellaris) were stocked into southeast Florida canals to consume excess prey fish biomass, particularly spotted tilapia (Tilapia mariae). The ecomorphologically similar largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) was already present in the canals. We present relations of length-specific gape size for peacock cichlids and largemouth bass. Both predators have broadly overlapping gape size, but largemouth bass ?126 mm total length have slightly larger gape sizes than peacock cichlids of the same length. Also, we experimentally tested the predictions of maximum prey size for peacock cichlids and determined that a simple method of measuring gape size used for largemouth bass also is appropriate for peacock cichlids. Lastly, we determined relations of body depth and length of prey species to investigate relative vulnerability. Using a simple predator-prey model and length frequencies of predators and bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), redear sunfish (Lepomis microlophus), and spotted tilapia prey, we documented that much of the prey biomass in southeast Florida canals is unavailable for largemouth bass and peacock cichlid predation.

  1. Effects of predatory fish on survival and behavior of larval gopher frogs (Rana capito) and Southern Leopard Frogs (Rana sphenocephala)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gregoire, D.R.; Gunzburger, M.S.

    2008-01-01

    Southern Leopard Frogs, Rana sphenocephala, are habitat generalists occurring in virtually all freshwater habitats within their geographic range, whereas Gopher Frogs, Rana capito, typically breed in ponds that do not normally contain fish. To evaluate the potential for predation by fish to influence the distribution of these species, we conducted a randomized factorial experiment. We examined the survival rate and behavior of tadpoles when exposed to Warmouth Sunfish, Lepomis gulosus, Banded Sunfish, Enneacanthus obesus, and Eastern Mosquitofish, Gambusia holbrooki. We also conducted a choice experiment to examine the survival rate of the two species of tadpoles when a predator is given a choice of both species simultaneously. Lepomis gulosus consumed the most tadpoles and ate significantly more tadpoles of R. capito than R. sphenocephala. Gambusia holbrooki injured the most tadpoles, especially R. capito. Enneacanthus obesus did not have an effect on behavior or survival of either anuran species. Tadpoles of both anurans increased hiding when in the presence of L. gulosus and G. holbrooki, but a greater proportion of R. capito hid than did R. sphenocephala. Our results suggest that R. capito are more vulnerable to predation by fish than are R. sphenocephala. The introduction of fish may play a role in population declines of certain anurans breeding in normally fish-free wetlands, and even small fish, such as mosquitofish, may have significant negative effects on the tadpoles of R. capito. Copyright 2008 Society for the Study or Amphibians and Reptiles.

  2. Hypoxia tolerance of two centrarchid sunfishes and an introduced cichlid from karstic Everglades wetlands of southern Florida, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schofield, P.J.; Loftus, W.F.; Brown, M.E.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the hypoxia tolerance of three Everglades fishes, two native centrarchids (Lepomis gulosus and Lepomis marginatus) and a recently introduced cichlid (Hemichromis letourneuxi), were documented. Aquatic surface respiration (ASR) thresholds were lowest for H. letourneuxi, followed by L. gulosus, then L. marginatus. The ASR thresholds for L. marginatus were within ranges reported for small, freshwater tropical fishes, while those for L. gulosus were similar to swamp-adapted fishes. For H. letourneuxi, ASR thresholds were some of the lowest reported. All three species showed excellent tolerance of low dissolved oxygen levels when allowed access to the surface. When denied surface access, L. marginatus lost equilibrium at a higher oxygen tension than the other species. Overall, although all species easily tolerated hypoxia, H. letourneuxi appeared to be best equipped to deal with hypoxia, followed by L. gulosus, then L. marginatus. Hemichromis letourneuxi also exhibited more aggressive behaviours than the centrarchids. These results suggest that hypoxia is not likely to prevent H. letourneuxi from exploiting the seasonally inundated wetlands of south Florida while expanding its range there.

  3. Larval fish dynamics in spring pools in middle Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bettoli, Phillip William; Goldsworthy, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    We used lighted larval traps to assess reproduction by fishes inhabiting nine spring pools in the Barrens Plateau region of middle Tennessee between May and September 2004. The traps (n = 162 deployments) captured the larval or juvenile forms of Etheostoma crossopterum (Fringed Darter) (n = 188), Gambusia affinis (Western Mosquitofish) (n = 139), Hemitremia flammea (Flame Chub) (n = 55), the imperiled Fundulus julisia (Barrens Topminnow) (n = 10), and Forbesichthys agassizii (Spring Cavefish) (n = 1). The larval forms of four other species (Families Centrarchidae, Cyprinidae, and Cottidae) were not collected, despite the presence of adults. Larval Barrens Topminnow hatched over a protracted period (early June through late September); in contrast, hatching intervals were much shorter for Fringed Darter (mid-May through early June). Flame Chub hatching began before our first samples in early May and concluded by late-May. Juvenile Western Mosquitofish were collected between early June and late August. Our sampling revealed that at least two species (Flame Chub and Fringed Darter) were able to reproduce and recruit in habitats harboring the invasive Western Mosquitofish, while Barrens Topminnow could not.

  4. Morphometric and molecular analyses of Tylodelphys sp. metacercariae (Digenea: Diplostomidae) from the vitreous humour of four fish species from Lake Naivasha, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Otachi, E O; Locke, S A; Jirsa, F; Fellner-Frank, C; Marcogliese, D J

    2015-07-01

    Even in the relatively well-characterized faunas of the developed world, it is difficult to discriminate species of metacercariae in the Diplostomidae using morphology, infection site or host use. The taxonomy, diversity and ecology of diplostomids infecting freshwater fishes in the African continent are particularly poorly known, but recent morphometric and genetic studies have revealed four species of diplostomids in the eyes and brains of siluriform fishes. In the present study, diplostomid metacercariae were collected from the eyes of 288 fish comprising two species within the Cyprinidae (Cyprinus carpio, n = 145, and Barbus paludinosus, n = 67), two Cichlidae (Oreochromis leucostictus, n = 56, and Tilapia zillii, n = 18) and one Centrarchidae (Micropterus salmoides, n = 2) caught in Lake Naivasha, Kenya. Morphometric (14 characters and 8 indices in 111 specimens) and molecular (sequences from the barcode region of the cytochrome c oxidase 1 gene in 11 specimens) data were used to discriminate species. All fish species except B. paludinosus were infected with Tylodelphys metacercariae that were initially separated into two types differing mainly in body length. However, this morphological distinction received only intermediate support in quantitative morphological analysis and molecular data indicated that both morphotypes were conspecific. All the specimens therefore are inferred to belong to a single unidentified species of Tylodelphys, which is not conspecific with any other diplostomid for which comparable molecular data are available, including four diplostomid species known from siluriform fish in Nigeria and Tanzania. PMID:24690126

  5. Experimental acidification of Little Rock Lake (Wisconsin): Fish research approach and early responses

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, W.A.; McCormick, J.H.; Simonson, T.D.; Jensen, K.M.; Eaton, J.G.

    1989-01-01

    One goal of research at Little Rock Lake, Wisconsin is to enhance understanding of lake-acidification effects on warm- and cool-water fishery resources. The Little Rock Lake fish assemblage is characteristic of many acid-sensitive waters in North America and is dominated by yellow perch (Percidae) and sunfishes (Centrarchidae). Analyses of reproduction, early survival, and growth rates in the field were designed around the differing reproductive modes of these taxa. Complementary laboratory research on early-life stages was conducted to assist in isolating direct effect mechanisms and to determine the reliability of laboratory results in predicting field response. Preliminary findings suggest that lake acidification to pH 5.6 has not influenced reproductive activity of the four most abundant fish species. However, the field results suggest that year-class failure of rock bass (Ambloplites rupestris) may be occurring due to reduced survival of early-life stages. Reduced growth and food-conversion efficiency of Age 0 largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) is also suggested. The laboratory bioassays indicate rock bass is the most acid-sensitive Little Rock Lake species tested. However, rock bass fry survival was not significantly affected until pH was reduced from 5.6 to 5.0.

  6. Constructed Pools-and-Riffles: Application and Assessment in Illinois.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, D. M.; Dodd, H. R.; Carney, D. A.; Holtrop, A. M.; Whiles, M. R.; White, B.; Roseboom, D.; Kinney, W.; Keefer, L. L.; Beardsley, J.

    2005-05-01

    The diversity of Illinois' streams provides a broad range of conditions, and thus a variety of restoration techniques may be required to adequately compensate for watershed alterations. Resource management agencies and research institutions in the state have collaborated on a variety of applied research initiatives to assess the efficacy of various stream protection and restoration techniques. Constructed pool-and-riffle structures have received significant attention because they tend to address watershed processes (i.e., channel evolution model) and may benefit biotic communities and processes along with physical habitat. Constructed pools-and-riffles have been applied primarily to address geomorphic instability, yet understanding biological responses can provide further rationale for their use and design specifications. In three stream systems around the state, fish were collected pre- and post- installation of structures, using primarily electrofishing techniques (e.g., electric seine & backpack). In general, within the first five years after installation, changes in fish communities have included a shift from high-abundance, small cyprinid-dominated assemblages to low-density Centrarchidae and Catostomidae assemblages. Changes in macro invertebrates at selected sites included increases in filter feeders and sensitive taxa such as the Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera (EPT). Ongoing assessments will be critical for understanding long-term influences on stream ecosystem structure and function.

  7. Determining a regional framework for assessing biotic integrity of virginia streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smogor, Roy A.; Angermeier, P.L.

    2001-01-01

    The utility of an index of biotic integrity (IBI) depends on its ability to distinguish anthropogenic effects on biota amid natural biological variability. To enhance this ability, we examined fish assemblage data from least-disturbed stream sites in Virginia to determine the best way to regionally stratify natural variation in candidate IBI metrics and their scoring criteria. Specifically, we examined metric variation among physiographic regions, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ecoregions, and drainage basins to judge their utility as regions in which to develop and use distinct versions of the IBI for Virginia warmwater streams. Statewide, metrics differed most among physiographic regions; thus, we recommend their use as IBI regions. Largest differences were found for taxonomic metrics between coastal plain and mountain sites, particularly in numbers of native minnow (Cyprinidae), sunfish (Centrarchidae), and darter (Percidae) species. Trophic and reproductive metrics also differed between coastal plain and more-upland streams, presumably reflecting differences in functional adaptations of fishes to upland versus lowland stream habitats. We suggest three preliminary regional IBis for Virginia, each having a distinctive set of taxonomic, trophic, and reproductive metrics and corresponding scoring criteria.

  8. Experimental acidification of Little Rock Lake (Wisconsin): fish research approach and early responses.

    PubMed

    Swenson, W A; McCormick, J H; Simonson, T D; Jensen, K M; Eaton, J G

    1989-01-01

    One goal of research at Little Rock Lake, Wisconsin, is to enhance understanding of lake acidification effects on warm- and cool-water fishery resources. The Little Rock Lake fish assemblage is characteristic of many acid sensitive waters in North America and is dominated by yellow perch (Percidae) and sunfishes (Centrarchidae). Analyses of reproduction, early survival and growth rates in the field were designed around the differing reproductive modes of these taxa. Complementary laboratory research on early life stages was conducted to assist in isolating direct effect mechanisms and to determine the reliability of laboratory results in predicting field response. Preliminary findings suggest that lake acidification to pH 5.6 has not influenced reproductive activity of the four most abundant fish species. However, the field results suggest that year-class failure of rock bass (Ambloplites rupestris) may be occurring due to reduced survival of early life stages. Reduced growth and food conversion efficiency of Age 0 largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) is also suggested. The laboratory bioassays indicate rock bass is the most acid-sensitive Little Rock Lake species tested. However, rock bass fry survival was not significantly affected until pH was reduced from 5.6 to 5.0.

  9. Connectedness of land use, nutrients, primary production, and fish assemblages in oxbow lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miranda, Leandro E.; Andrews, Caroline S.; Kroger, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We explored the strength of connectedness among hierarchical system components associated with oxbow lakes in the alluvial valley of the Lower Mississippi River. Specifically, we examined the degree of canonical correlation between land use (agriculture and forests), lake morphometry (depth and size), nutrients (total nitrogen and total phosphorus), primary production (chlorophyll-a), and various fish assemblage descriptors. Watershed (p < 0.01) and riparian (p = 0.02) land use, and lake depth (p = 0.05) but not size (p = 0.28), were associated with nutrient concentrations. In turn, nutrients were associated with primary production (p < 0.01), and primary production was associated with sunfish (Centrarchidae) assemblages (p < 0.01) and fish biodiversity (p = 0.08), but not with those of other taxa and functional guilds. Multiple chemical and biological components of oxbow lake ecosystems are connected to landscape characteristics such as land use and lake depth. Therefore, a top-down hierarchical approach can be useful in developing management and conservation plans for oxbow lakes in a region impacted by widespread landscape changes due to agriculture.

  10. Electrofishing survey of the Great Miami River, September 17--18, 1996. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Moller, B.; Miller, M.C.; Buschelmann, F.; Evans, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    The electrofishing survey of fish from the Great Miami River at RM 19, 24 and 38 from late summer 1996 demonstrated the sensitivity of the fish community to microhabitat variation. The variation was particularly clear between the pooled, low flow sections of the river and the runs, where fast current habitats occurred. In 1996, like most recent years, the differences were obvious between Rm 24 and RM 19 and RM 38. River Mile 24 was characterized by a fish community of current-loving fish, dominated by Catastomidae (suckers), and Ictaluridae (catfish). In contrast, samples from pooled stations at RM 19 and 38 were dominated by Centrarchidae, Clupeidae and Cyprinidae, particularly the carp. The microhabitats sampled around the abutments of bridges at RM 19 and 38 where fast current and physical structure occurred, both resembled the community at RM 24. Changes in the fish communities associated with the upstream/downstream changes in stream volume, channel size, morphology, etc., were evidenced by the community coefficients which showed least similarity between the most distant sites.

  11. Late-glacial pollen, macrofossils and fish remains in northeastern U.S.A. — The Younger Dryas oscillation. A contribution to the 'North Atlantic seaboard programme' of IGCP-253, 'Termination of the Pleistocene'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peteet, D. M.; Daniels, R. A.; Heusser, L. E.; Vogel, J. S.; Southon, J. R.; Nelson, D. E.

    The late-glacial environmental histories of Allamuchy Pond, New Jersey and Linsley Pond, Connecticut are reconstructed from pollen, macrofossil and fish scale remains. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14C dating of seeds and needles indicates that the first organic deposition, evidenced by fossil Picea (spruce) needles, occurred approximately 12,400 BP. A major regional warming began in the northeastern United States at this time, correlative with the Bølling/Allerød warming of Europe and Greenland. The increase in Quercus (oak) pollen and presence of Pinus strobus (white pine) needles demonstrates the magnitude of warming reached at about 11,000 BP. The subsequent decline of thermophilous species and increase in boreal Picea, Abies (fir), Larix (larch), Betula papyrifera (paper birch) and Alnus (alder) from 10,800-10,000 BP was a regional vegetational reversal. Thus we find a North American expression of the Younger Dryas with a mean annual temperature depression of 3-4° C. The subsequent classical southern New England pine pollen zone 'B' and Pinus strobus macrofossils signalled a return to warmer conditions at approximately 10,000 BP, regionally, within approximately 50-100 years. A large increase in Quercus follows. This study is unique in documenting a continuous late-glacial record of fish remains from Allamuchy Pond, New Jersey sediments, indicating that members of the families Centrarchidae (sunfish), Salmonidae (trout), Percidae (perch) and Cyprinidae (minnow) were regionally present.

  12. Electrofishing effort required to estimate biotic condition in Southern Idaho Rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maret, T.R.; Ott, D.S.; Herlihy, A.T.

    2007-01-01

    An important issue surrounding biomonitoring in large rivers is the minimum sampling effort required to collect an adequate number of fish for accurate and precise determinations of biotic condition. During the summer of 2002, we sampled 15 randomly selected large-river sites in southern Idaho to evaluate the effects of sampling effort on an index of biotic integrity (IBI). Boat electrofishing was used to collect sample populations of fish in river reaches representing 40 and 100 times the mean channel width (MCW; wetted channel) at base flow. Minimum sampling effort was assessed by comparing the relation between reach length sampled and change in IBI score. Thirty-two species of fish in the families Catostomidae, Centrarchidae, Cottidae, Cyprinidae, Ictaluridae, Percidae, and Salmonidae were collected. Of these, 12 alien species were collected at 80% (12 of 15) of the sample sites; alien species represented about 38% of all species (N = 32) collected during the study. A total of 60% (9 of 15) of the sample sites had poor IBI scores. A minimum reach length of about 36 times MCW was determined to be sufficient for collecting an adequate number of fish for estimating biotic condition based on an IBI score. For most sites, this equates to collecting 275 fish at a site. Results may be applicable to other semiarid, fifth-order through seventh-order rivers sampled during summer low-flow conditions. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  13. Flow cytometric sexing of spider sperm reveals an equal sperm production ratio in a female-biased species

    PubMed Central

    Vanthournout, B.; Deswarte, K.; Hammad, H.; Bilde, T.; Lambrecht, B.; Hendrickx, F.

    2014-01-01

    Producing equal amounts of male and female offspring has long been considered an evolutionarily stable strategy. Nevertheless, exceptions to this general rule (i.e. male and female biases) are documented in many taxa, making sex allocation an important domain in current evolutionary biology research. Pinpointing the underlying mechanism of sex ratio bias is challenging owing to the multitude of potential sex ratio-biasing factors. In the dwarf spider, Oedothorax gibbosus, infection with the bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia results in a female bias. However, pedigree analysis reveals that other factors influence sex ratio variation. In this paper, we investigate whether this additional variation can be explained by the unequal production of male- and female-determining sperm cells during sperm production. Using flow cytometry, we show that males produce equal amounts of male- and female-determining sperm cells; thus bias in sperm production does not contribute to the sex ratio bias observed in this species. This demonstrates that other factors such as parental genes suppressing endosymbiont effects and cryptic female choice might play a role in sex allocation in this species. PMID:24850893

  14. Annual and spatial variability in endo- and ectoparasite infections of North Sea cod (Gadus morhua Linnaeus, 1758) larvae, post-larvae and juveniles.

    PubMed

    Mehrdana, Foojan; Bahlool, Qusay Z M; Skovgaard, Alf; Kuhn, Jesper A; Kania, Per W; Munk, Peter; Buchmann, Kurt

    2014-06-01

    A parasitological investigation was performed on a total of 5380 Atlantic cod larvae, post-larvae and small juveniles sampled from the North Sea during a period of five years. The copepod Caligus elongatus (Von Nordmann, 1832) and the nematode Hysterothylacium aduncum (Rudolphi, 1802) were found at a relatively high prevalence of infection (4.6% and 5.2%, respectively). The infection by both parasites showed annual and spatial variability. C. elongatus showed a higher prevalence in 1992 compared to the following years, whereas the prevalence of H. aduncum increased from 1992 to 2001.We observed a relation between parasite distribution and parameters such as latitude and water depth. Adult digeneans (Lecithaster gibbosus and Derogenes varicus) and larval cestodes were also found with lower infection rates. Since changes of infection levels coincided with increasing North Sea water temperature in the studied period, it is hypothesized that temperature may affect parasite population levels. However, it is likely that other environmental factors may contribute to the observed variations. Absence of infection intensities higher than one nematode per fish in small larvae and post-larvae suggests that host survival may be affected by a high infection pressure. The relatively high levels of infection in the younger stages of cod, and the annual/spatial variability of these infections should be considered in the understanding of the early life dynamics of the species. PMID:24827100

  15. Composition of Age-0 Fish Assemblages in the Apalachicola River, River Styx, and Battle Bend, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, Stephen J.; Buttermore, Elissa N.; Burgess, O. Towns; Pine, William E.

    2009-01-01

    Light traps were used to sample the age-0 year class of fish communities in the Apalachicola River and associated floodplain water bodies of River Styx and Battle Bend, Florida, in 2006-2007. A total of 629 light traps were deployed during the spring and early summer months (341 between March 15 and June 6, 2006; 288 between March 9 and July 3, 2007). For combined years, 13.8 percent of traps were empty and a total of 20,813 age-0 fish were captured representing at least 40 taxa of 29 genera and 16 families. Trap catches were dominated by relatively few species, with the most abundant groups represented by cyprinids, centrarchids, percids, and catostomids. Six taxa accounted for about 80 percent of all fish collected: Micropterus spp. (28.9 percent), Notropis texanus (28.9 percent), Lepomis macrochirus (7.9 percent), Carpiodes cyprinus (6.2 percent), Cyprinidae sp. (4.6 percent), and Minytrema melanops (4.2 percent). Based on chronological appearance in light traps and catch-per-unit effort, including data from previous years of sampling, peak spawning periods for most species occurred between early March and mid-June. A complementary telemetry study of pre-reproductive adults of select target species (Micropterus spp., Lepomis spp., and M. melanops) revealed distinct patterns of habitat use, with some individual fish exclusively utilizing mainstem river habitat or floodplain habitat during spawning and post-spawning periods, and other individuals migrating between habitats. A comparison of light-trap catches between a pre-enhancement, high-water year (2003) and post-enhancement, low-water year (2007) for the oxbow at Battle Bend revealed some difference in community composition, with slightly greater values of diversity and evenness indices in 2007. Two dominant species, Lepomis macrochirus and Micropterus salmoides, were substantially greater in relative abundance among all age-0 fish collected in 2007 in comparison to 2003. Excavation of sediments at the mouth

  16. Bioaccumulation and food-chain transfer of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heavy metals: A laboratory and field investigation. Final report, 15 Oct 91-14 Oct 92

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, W.H.

    1992-10-14

    The extent to which heavy metals and Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) may be transferred up the food chain from sediments to benthic invertebrates and then on to fish species was examined using both laboratory and field techniques. PAHs were shown to bioaccumulate in a chironomid invertebrate (chironomus riparius) to relatively high levels depending on the specific compound. Accumulation in a fish specie (Lepomis macrochirus) that was fed contaminated chironomids was found to be generally low. Mobilization of PAHs from sediments into water was affected by benthic organisms enhancing the bioavailability of these contaminants to other organisms. In field studies, certain benthic invertebrates and abiotic sediment components were also shown to accumulate heavy metals. This metal accumulation persisted even when metal concentrations in the water were diminishing.

  17. Behavior of fish predators and their prey: habitat choice between open water and dense vegetation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savino, Jacqueline F.; Stein, Roy A.

    1989-01-01

    Behavior of largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides, and northern pike, Esox lucius, foraging on fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, or bluegills, Lepomis macrochirus, was quantified in pools with 50% cover (half the pool had artificial stems at a density of 1000 stems m−2). Both predators spent most of their time in the vegetation. Largemouth bass searched for bluegills and ambushed minnows, whereas the relatively immobile northern pike ambushed all prey. Minnows were closer to predators and were captured more frequently than bluegills. Even when minnows dispersed, they moved continually and eventually wandered within striking distance of a predator. Bluegills dispersed in the cover with predators. Bass captured the few bluegills that strayed into the open and pike captured those that approached too closely in the cover. The ability of predators to capture prey while residing in habitats containing patches of dense cover may explain their residence in areas often considered to be poor ones for foraging.

  18. Hydrazine: acute toxicity to bluegills and sublethal effects on dorsal light response and agression

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, J.W.; Harrah, C.B.; Berry, W.O.

    1980-05-01

    The effects of hydrazine on bluegills, Lepomis macrochirus, were assessed in terms of acute toxicity and by examining the alterations hydrazine induced in the dorsal light response and agressiveness. The static 96-hour median lethal concentration (LC50) of hydrazine was 1.08 mg/liter and the 96-hour continuous-flow no-lethal-effect concentration was 0.43 mg/liter. The dorsal light response in the presence of an artificial prey was significantly decreased within 15 minutes of exposure to hydrazine concentrations well below the 96-hour static LC50. This was true both in static and in continuous-flow conditions. In addition, aggresiveness, as measured by the number of attacks on the prey, was increased in a dose-related manner. Control fish made no attacks, but attacks increased as the hydrazine concentrations increased. These behavioral measurements offer some promise as monitors of subtle, sublethal effects of hydrazine and possibly other aquatic pollutants on fish.

  19. Reproductive biology and juvenile recruitment of the shinyrayed pocketbook, Lampsilis subangulata (Bivalvia: Unionidae) in the Gulf Coastal Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Brien, C. A.; Brim-Box, J.

    1999-01-01

    The reproductive biology, glochidial morphology and recruitment of the federally endangered shinyrayed pocketbook, Lampsilis subangulata, were studied from May 1995 to July 1996 in the Flint River system, Georgia. Gravid female L. subangulata were found nine months of the year. On 19 May 1995, a L. subangulata was discovered releasing a superconglutinate, the first record confirming that this species used this specialized reproductive strategy. Superconglutinate release occurred from late May to mid-July in water temperatures ranging from 20.0 to 23.5 C. Laboratory experiments indicated that two fish species served as primary hosts, the spotted bass (Micropterus punctulatus) and largemouth bass (M. salmoides). Secondary host fish included the eastern mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki), guppy (Poecilia reticulata) and bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus). The glochidial morphology of L. subangulata was similar to other lampsiline species. Using quantitative survey methods, no evidence of recent juvenile recruitment was found in the largest known extant L. subangulata population.

  20. Bioenergetic relations in submerged aquatic vegetation: An experimental test of prey use by juvenile bluegills

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richardson, W.B.; Zigler, S.J.; Dewey, M.R.

    1998-01-01

    We experimentally tested the hypotheses that bluegills in vegetated habitats grow more rapidly than in nonvegetated habitats because (1) vegetated habitats contain a greater caloric density and (2) are less susceptible to energetic depletion. The 10-week experiment was conducted in enclosures containing factorial combinations of the presence or absence of Vallisneria americana and juvenile bluegills Lepomis macrochirus. After 6 weeks, Vallisneria-only treatments contained a mean of 1048 cal/m2 in the benthos, whereas treatments with both Vallisneria and bluegills contained 610 cal/m2. Hyalella azteca, a preferred prey of bluegill, were nearly depleted in nonvegetated enclosures, whereas Hyalella densities in enclosures with Vallisneria were much less effected by fish. Bluegill growth was significantly greater with Vallisneria than without but declining water temperatures after week 6 resulted in slower growth despite abundant prey. Ultimately, growth of bluegill resulted from an interaction between availability and ingestion of prey, and water temperature. ?? Munksgaard, 1998.

  1. Effects of a non-native cichlid fish (African jewelfish, Hemichromis letourneuxi Sauvage 1880) on a simulated Everglades aquatic community

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schofield, Pamela J.; Slone, Daniel H.; Gregoire, Denise R.; Loftus, William F.

    2014-01-01

    In an 8-month mesocosm experiment, we examined how a simulated Everglades aquatic community of small native fishes, snails, and shrimp changed with the addition of either a native predator (dollar sunfish Lepomis marginatus) or a non-native predator (African jewelfish Hemichromis letourneuxi) compared to a no-predator control. Two snail species (Planorbella duryi, Physella cubensis) and the shrimp (Palaemonetes paludosus) displayed the strongest predator-treatment effects, with significantly lower biomasses in tanks with Hemichromis. One small native fish (Heterandria formosa) was significantly less abundant in Hemichromis tanks, but there were no significant treatment effects for Gambusia holbrooki, Jordanella floridae, or Pomacea paludosa (applesnail). Overall, there were few treatment differences between native predator and no-predator control tanks. The results suggest that the potential of Hemichromis to affect basal food-web species that link primary producers with higher-level consumers in the aquatic food web, with unknown consequences for Florida waters.

  2. Behavioural interaction between fish predators and their prey: effects of plant density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savino, Jacqueline F.; Stein, Roy A.

    1989-01-01

    Prey-specific anti-predatory behaviour under different degrees of structural complexity determines foraging success of predators. The behaviour of piscivorous fish (largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides and northern pike, Esox lucius) and their prey (bluegills, Lepomis macrochirus, and fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas) were quantified in 60-min experiments in laboratory pools (2 multiplied by 4 m in diameter, 0 multiplied by 5 m deep) with artificial vegetation at densities of 0, 50, 250, and 1000 stems/m2. Largemouth bass switched predatory tactics from searching to ambushing as plant density increased whereas northern pike always used ambushing. At high plant density, both predators captured minnows, but not bluegills. Bluegills modified their behaviour more than minnows in response to predators, thereby avoiding predation at high plant densities. Structural complexity alone did not always provide refuge for prey; prey must use the structure to avoid predators. Predators may seek vegetated areas if appropriate, vulnerable prey are present.

  3. Diet overlap of introduced rainbow trout and three native fishes in an Ozark stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fenner, D.B.; Walsh, M.G.; Winkelman, D.L.

    2005-01-01

    Private angling groups in Oklahoma have requested permission to stock rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss into streams of northeastern Oklahoma although little is known regarding interactions between introduced rainbow trout and native fishes in these systems. Our study objectives were to assess diet overlap between introduced rainbow trout and native smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu, shadow bass Ambloplites ariommus, and bluegill sunfish Lepomis macrochirus in Brush Creek, Oklahoma, a small spring-fed Ozark stream. Rainbow trout diet composition differed from that of all three native fishes in the 2 months of comparison (March and May 2001), and rainbow trout diets contained relatively low numbers of prey. It is unlikely that exploitative competition for food resources occurred between rainbow trout and these three native fishes. ?? 2004 by the American Fisheries Society.

  4. Diet of double-crested cormorants wintering in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campo, J.J.; Thompson, B.C.; Barron, J.C.; Telfair II, R. C.; Durocher, P.; Gutreuter, S.

    1993-01-01

    The diets of 420 Double-crested Cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) were studied during November 1986-March 1987 on eight public reservoirs in Texas. Prey included 29 fish species and the mean live weight of fish per bird was 122 g. Fishes a??415 mm long were ingested, but those a??125 mm accounted for 90% of cormorant food contents by number. Shad (Dorosoma spp.) and sunfishes (Lepomis spp.) accounted for 90% of the total food items by number. Consumption of fishes (percent by weight) was different for male vs. female and adult vs. juvenile cormorants. Total consumption of fish by weight was consistent throughout the period; however, fewer but much larger fish were consumed after 15 February. Cormorants ate fishes that were most abundant in reservoirs. Sport fishes made up a substantial portion of cormorant food by weight, but not by number on some reservoirs. Cormorants ate very few large sport fish, however.

  5. A digital underwater video camera system for aquatic research in regulated rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Benjamin M.; Irwin, Elise R.

    2010-01-01

    We designed a digital underwater video camera system to monitor nesting centrarchid behavior in the Tallapoosa River, Alabama, 20 km below a peaking hydropower dam with a highly variable flow regime. Major components of the system included a digital video recorder, multiple underwater cameras, and specially fabricated substrate stakes. The innovative design of the substrate stakes allowed us to effectively observe nesting redbreast sunfish Lepomis auritus in a highly regulated river. Substrate stakes, which were constructed for the specific substratum complex (i.e., sand, gravel, and cobble) identified at our study site, were able to withstand a discharge level of approximately 300 m3/s and allowed us to simultaneously record 10 active nests before and during water releases from the dam. We believe our technique will be valuable for other researchers that work in regulated rivers to quantify behavior of aquatic fauna in response to a discharge disturbance.

  6. Host fish suitability for glochidia of Ligumia recta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Khym, J.R.; Layzer, J.B.

    2000-01-01

    In the early 1900s several hosts were identified for the black sandshell Ligumia recta. Recent attempts to propagate juvenile L. recta with two of the reported hosts (bluegill Lepomis macrochirus and largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides) have produced inconsistent results and few juveniles. We conducted this study to determine which of the reported hosts or other fish hosts were the most suitable for glochidial metamorphosis. The duration of glochidial metamorphosis varied among seasons. Despite similar water temperatures, juveniles metamorphosed sooner and over a shorter period of time in the spring than early fall; the modal day of metamorphosis differed by 78 d. Relatively few juveniles were recovered from bluegill and largemouth bass in three trials. White crappie Pomoxis annularis and black crappie P. nigromaculatus were marginally suitable hosts. Although glochidia encysted on all hosts, >10x more juveniles metamorphosed on sauger Stizostedion canadense compared to other hosts tested.

  7. Linear and nonlinear models for predicting fish bioconcentration factors for pesticides.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jintao; Xie, Chun; Zhang, Ting; Sun, Jinfang; Yuan, Xuejie; Yu, Shuling; Zhang, Yingbiao; Cao, Yunyuan; Yu, Xingchen; Yang, Xuan; Yao, Wu

    2016-08-01

    This work is devoted to the applications of the multiple linear regression (MLR), multilayer perceptron neural network (MLP NN) and projection pursuit regression (PPR) to quantitative structure-property relationship analysis of bioconcentration factors (BCFs) of pesticides tested on Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus). Molecular descriptors of a total of 107 pesticides were calculated with the DRAGON Software and selected by inverse enhanced replacement method. Based on the selected DRAGON descriptors, a linear model was built by MLR, nonlinear models were developed using MLP NN and PPR. The robustness of the obtained models was assessed by cross-validation and external validation using test set. Outliers were also examined and deleted to improve predictive power. Comparative results revealed that PPR achieved the most accurate predictions. This study offers useful models and information for BCF prediction, risk assessment, and pesticide formulation. PMID:27183335

  8. Parasite-induced alteration of odour responses in an amphipod-acanthocephalan system.

    PubMed

    Stone, Charles F; Moore, Janice

    2014-11-01

    Odour-related behaviours in aquatic invertebrates are important and effective anti-predator behaviours. Parasites often alter invertebrate host behaviours to increase transmission to hosts. This study investigated the responses of the amphipod Hyalella azteca when presented with two predator chemical cues: (i) alarm pheromones produced by conspecifics and (ii) kairomones produced by a predatory Green Sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus). We compared the responses of amphipods uninfected and infected with the acanthocepalan parasite Leptorhynchiodes thecatus. Uninfected amphipods reduced activity and increased refuge use after detecting both the alarm pheromones and predator kairomones. Infected amphipods spent significantly more time being active and less time on the refuge than uninfected amphipods, and behaved as if they had not detected the chemical stimulus. Therefore, L. thecatus infections disrupt the amphipods' anti-predator behaviours and likely make their hosts more susceptible to predation. PMID:25200352

  9. Effects of fish predation on invertebrates associated with a macrophyte in Lake Onalaska, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chilton, E.W., II; Margraf, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    We tested the effects of fish predation on the macroinvertebrates associated with Vallisneria americana (Michx) by using enclosure/exclosure experiments in lake Onalaska, Wisconsin. Four treatments were used: open water (cageless) controls, cage-effect controls (partially enclosed cages), exclosures (all fish removed), and enclosures (cages stocked with a known density of bluegills Lepomis macrochirus, Rafinesque). Bluegill predation at the density tested (one 70 mm fish per 0.37m2) did not depress Vallisneria associated invertebrate density. Mean invertebrate abundance and biomass (number and dry weight of invertebrates per g dry plant weight) increased in both exclosures and enclosures relative to open water controls. The most likely explanation is that the cages excluded some vertebrate predator(s) from those two treatments and decreased predation pressure within the cages. Large invertebrates, such as Hyalella azteca, Enallagma sp., Gyraulus sp., and Physa sp., increased in abundance within cages, whereas, small invertebrates such as chironomid larvae decreased in abundance.

  10. Teratogenic effects and monetary cost of selenium poisoning of fish in Lake Sutton, North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Lemly, A Dennis

    2014-06-01

    Selenium pollution from coal ash wastewater was investigated in Lake Sutton, NC. This lake has been continuously used as a cooling pond for a coal-fired power plant since 1972. Historic and recent levels of contamination in fish tissues (14-105µg Se/g dry weight in liver, 24-127 in eggs, 4-23 in muscle, 7-38 in whole-body) exceeded toxic thresholds and teratogenic effects were observed in fish collected in 2013. A high proportion (28.9 percent) of juvenile Lepomis spp. exhibited spinal and craniofacial malformations that were consistent with selenium poisoning. Teratogenic Deformity Index values indicated population-level impacts on the fishery. The partially monetized cost of resultant fishery losses was calculated at over $US 8.6 million annually, and over $US 217 million for the entire period of damage, which dates back to 1987 when chemical and biological monitoring began.

  11. Effects of increased feeding frequency on growth of hybrid bluegill in ponds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sager, C.R.; Winkelman, D.L.

    2006-01-01

    Increased feeding frequency has been used in aquaculture to increase growth and food conversion efficiency, and recent laboratory studies have indicated that feeding frequency could be used to reduce the size variation within groups of hybrid bluegills (F1: male bluegill Lepomis macrochirus x female green sunfish L. cyanellus). Our experiment evaluated the growth of pond-reared hybrid bluegills fed equal amounts of food either once or four times per day. We were particularly interested in reducing the size variation and increasing the percentage of harvestable-size fish (???110 g). After 194 d, there was no significant effect of feeding frequency on growth, food conversion efficiency, size variation, or percentage of harvestable-size fish.

  12. Patterns of foraging and distribution of bluegill sunfish in a Mississippi River backwater: Influence of macrophytes and predation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dewey, M.R.; Richardson, W.B.; Zigler, S.J.

    1997-01-01

    We studied the trophic interactions and spatial distributions of bluegills Lepomis macrochirus and largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides in a macrophyte bed in Lake Onalaska, a backwater lake in the upper Mississippi River. The diets of adult and age-0 bluegills were similar and changed seasonally probably in response to changes in life stages of macroinvertebrates (i.e. emergence of winged adults). Diets and diel patterns of abundance of bluegill suggest that age-0 and adults were feeding in the vegetated, littoral zone. Predation by age-0 largemouth bass appears to influence use of vegetated habitat by age-0 bluegills. In summer, when most age-0 bluegills were vulnerable to predation by age-0 largemouth bass, bluegill abundance was strongly correlated with vegetation biomass. In October and November, piscivory by age-0 largemouth bass was limited by gape. Consequently, the relationship between the abundance of age-0 bluegills and vegetation biomass was weakened because predation risk by age-0 largemouth bass was reduced.

  13. The effect of fixative on total length of small-bodied stream fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brinkley, P.D.; Fischer, John R.; Paukert, C.P.

    2008-01-01

    Longnose dace (Rhinichthys cataractae), red shiner (Cyprinella lutrensis), and green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus) were fixed in 5% and 10% formalin and 70% and 95% ethyl alcohol to determine fixative effects on total length (TL). Total length reduced over the first 24h for all species (P<0.0001) but then stabilized. Longnose dace and green sunfish TL reduction was less for 5% formalin than for either 70% or 95% ethanol (both P<0.0001), whereas the fixative solution had no effect on red shiner TL (P=0.347). A greater percentage of change in TL was observed in green sunfish and red shiner than in longnose dace, suggesting that body form (compressiform vs. fusiform) may affect shrinkage rate among adult stream fishes.

  14. Some enzymatic properties of brain Acetylcholinesterase from bluegill and channel catfish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hogan, James W.; Knowles, Charles O.

    1968-01-01

    Using a manometric technique an acetylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.7, acetylcholine acetyl-hydrolase) was demonstrated in brain tissue from the bluegill, Lepomis macrochirus Rafinesque, and the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus (Walbaum). The activities were 19 and 37 μmoles acetylcholine hydrolyzed/milligram protein per hour for the bluegill and channel catfish enzymes, respectively. The optimum substrate concentration for the hydrolysis of acetylcholine was 10 mMfor the enzymes from both species. Generally, the catfish acetylcholinesterase was somewhat more susceptible than the bluegill to the inhibitors tested; however, the bluegill enzyme was more susceptible to inhibition by malathion and malaoxon.

  15. Linear and nonlinear models for predicting fish bioconcentration factors for pesticides.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jintao; Xie, Chun; Zhang, Ting; Sun, Jinfang; Yuan, Xuejie; Yu, Shuling; Zhang, Yingbiao; Cao, Yunyuan; Yu, Xingchen; Yang, Xuan; Yao, Wu

    2016-08-01

    This work is devoted to the applications of the multiple linear regression (MLR), multilayer perceptron neural network (MLP NN) and projection pursuit regression (PPR) to quantitative structure-property relationship analysis of bioconcentration factors (BCFs) of pesticides tested on Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus). Molecular descriptors of a total of 107 pesticides were calculated with the DRAGON Software and selected by inverse enhanced replacement method. Based on the selected DRAGON descriptors, a linear model was built by MLR, nonlinear models were developed using MLP NN and PPR. The robustness of the obtained models was assessed by cross-validation and external validation using test set. Outliers were also examined and deleted to improve predictive power. Comparative results revealed that PPR achieved the most accurate predictions. This study offers useful models and information for BCF prediction, risk assessment, and pesticide formulation.

  16. Protection against heavy metal toxicity by mucous and scales in fish

    SciTech Connect

    Coello, W.F.; Khan, M.A.Q.

    1995-12-31

    Fingerlings of three freshwater fish species showed differences in susceptibility to lethality of 250 mg/L lead suspension or lead nitrate solution in water. Among these the large mouth bass Micropterus salmoides seemed to be more tolerant than green sunfish Lepomis cyanellus and goldfish Carassius auratus. Mucous from large mouth bass, when added to jars containing lead, lowered the toxicity of lead to sunfish and goldfish. Adding scales, especially if these were pretreated with an alkaline solution of cysteine and glycine, made all these species become tolerant to otherwise lethal concentrations of lead nitrate. The scales and mucous together buffered the acidity of lead nitrate and mercuric nitrate solution and sequestered hydrogen ions and lead and mercury from water and then settled to the bottom of jars. Scales of younger fingerling were more efficient than those of older ones.

  17. Preference of redear sunfish on zebra mussels and rams-horn snails

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    French, John R. P.; Morgan, Michael N.

    1995-01-01

    We tested prey preferences of adult (200- to 222-mm long) redear sunfish (Lepomis microlophus) on two size classes of zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) and two-ridge rams-horns (Helisoma anceps) in experimental aquaria. We also tested physical limitations on consuming these mollusks and determined prey bioenergetic profitability. Redear sunfish strongly preferred rams-horns over zebra mussels, but they displayed no size preference for either prey. Ingestion was not physically limited since both prey species up to 15-mm long fit within the pharyngeal gapes of redear sunfish. Rams-horns were more bioenergetically profitable than zebra mussels and ingestion of rams-horn shell fragments was about three times less than zebra mussels. Rams-horns were somewhat more resistant to shell-crushing, but all size ranges of both prey species tested were crushable by redear sunfish. These studies suggested that the redear sunfish should not be considered a panacea for biological control of zebra mussels.

  18. Laboratory studies of the effects of pressure and dissolved gas supersaturation on turbine-passed fish

    SciTech Connect

    Abernethy, C. S.; Amidan, B. G.; Cada, G. F.

    2001-03-01

    Designing advanced turbine systems requires knowledge of environmental conditions that injure or kill fish such as the stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes fish experience during turbine passage and dissolved gas supersaturation (resulting from the release of water from the spillway). The objective of this study was to examine the relative importance of pressure changes as a source of turbine-passage injury and mortality. Specific tests were designed to quantify the response of fish to rapid pressure changes typical of turbine passage, with and without the complication of the fish being acclimated to gas supersaturated water. The study investigated the responses of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha), and bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) to these two stresses, both singly and in combination.

  19. Acute toxicity of TFM and a TFM/niclosamide mixture to selected species of fish, including lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) and mudpuppies (Necturus maculosus), in laboratory and field exposures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boogaard, M.A.; Bills, T.D.; Johnson, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    The toxicity of the lampricides 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) and 2???,5-dichloro-4???-nitrosalicylanilide (niclosamide) to non-target fishes has been a major point of concern since their use to control larval sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) populations began in the early 1960s. The toxicity of TFM to several non-target fish species has been demonstrated in previous studies. However, little information is available on the toxicity of the TFM/1 % niclosamide mixture. One species of particular concern is the lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens). Juvenile lake sturgeon of several size ranges were exposed to determine potential effects of the lampricides to individuals present in treatment streams. Sac fry were most resistant to the lampricides followed by fingerlings in the 200 to 225 mm size range. Swim-up fry and fingerlings less than 100 mm were the most sensitive. Concentrations that produced 50% mortality (LC50s) in juvenile lake sturgeon of these smaller size ranges were at or near the minimum lethal concentrations (MLCs) required for effective control of larval sea lampreys. The mudpuppy (Necturus maculosus), an amphibian native to several tributaries of the Great Lakes, have also become a species of interest in recent years. Laboratory tests conducted with TFM and a TFM/1 % niclosamide mixture on adult mudpuppies indicate that although the amphibian is sensitive to the lampricides, an adequate margin of safety exists for adult mudpuppies to survive when exposed during stream treatments. Fifteen other fish species native to streams treated with lampricides were investigated in the laboratory to determine their sensitivity to the lampricides. Centrarchids, bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) and green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus) were the least sensitive to TFM, while ictalurids, black bullhead (Ictalurus melas), channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), and tadpole madtom (Notorus gyrinus) were the most sensitive. On-site bioassays conducted before lampricide

  20. Acute toxicity of TFM and a TFM/niclosamide mixture to selected species of fish, including lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) and mudpuppies (Necturus maculosus), in laboratory and field exposures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boogaard, M.A.; Bills, T.D.; Johnson, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    The toxicity of the lampricides 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) and 2',5-dichloro-4'-nitrosalicylanilide (niclosamide) to non-target fishes has been a major point of concern since their use to control larval sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) populations began in the early 1960s. The toxicity of TFM to several non-target fish species has been demonstrated in previous studies. However, little information is available on the toxicity of the TFM/1% niclosamide mixture. One species of particular concern is the lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens). Juvenile lake sturgeon of several size ranges were exposed to determine potential effects of the lampricides to individuals present in treatment streams. Sac fry were most resistant to the lampricides followed by fingerlings in the 200 to 225 mm size range. Swim-up fry and fingerlings less than 100 mm were the most sensitive. Concentrations that produced 50% mortality (LC50s) in juvenile lake sturgeon of these smaller size ranges were at or near the minimum lethal concentrations (MLCs) required for effective control of larval sea lampreys. The mudpuppy (Necturus maculosus), an amphibian native to several tributaries of the Great Lakes, have also become a species of interest in recent years. Laboratory tests conducted with TFM and a TFM/1% niclosamide mixture on adult mudpuppies indicate that although the amphibian is sensitive to the lampricides, an adequate margin of safety exists for adult mudpuppies to survive when exposed during stream treatments. Fifteen other fish species native to streams treated with lampricides were investigated in the laboratory to determine their sensitivity to the lampricides. Centrarchids, bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) and green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus) were the least sensitive to TFM, while ictalurids, black bullhead (Ictalurus melas), channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), and tadpole madtom (Notorus gyrinus) were the most sensitive. On-site bioassays conducted before lampricide

  1. Relating fish health and reproductive metrics to contaminant bioaccumulation at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston coal ash spill site

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pracheil, Brenda M.; Marshall Adams, S.; Bevelhimer, Mark S.; Fortner, Allison M.; Greeley, Mark S.; Murphy, Cheryl A.; Mathews, Teresa J.; Peterson, Mark J.

    2016-05-06

    A 4.1 million m3 release of coal ash into the Emory and Clinch rivers in December 2008 at Tennessee Valley Authority s Kingston Fossil Plant has prompted a long-term, large-scale biological monitoring effort to determine if there are chronic effects of this spill on biota. Of concern in this spill were arsenic (As) and selenium (Se), heavy metal constituents of coal ash that can be toxic to fish and wildlife and also mercury (Hg): a legacy contaminant that can interact with Se in organisms. We used fish filet bioaccumulation data from Bluegill Lepomis macrochirus, Redear Lepomis microlophus, Largemouth Bass Micropterusmore » salmoides and Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus and metrics of fish health including fish condition indices, blood chemistry parameters and liver histopathology data collected from 2009-2013 to determine whether tissue heavy metal burdens relate 1) to each other 2) to metrics of fish health (e.g., blood chemistry characteristics and liver histopathology) and condition, and 3) whether relationships between fish health characteristics and heavy metals are related to site and ash-exposure. We found that burdens of Se and As are generally related to each other between tissues, but burdens of Hg between tissues are not generally positively associated. Taking analyses together, there appears to be reductions in growth and sublethal liver and kidney dysfunction in Bluegill and Largemouth Bass as indicated by blood chemistry parameters (elevated blood protein, glucose, phosphorous, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine in ash-affected sites) and related to concentrations of As and Se. Seeing sub-lethal effects in these species of fish is interesting because Redear had the highest filet burdens of Se, but did not have biomarkers indicating disease or dysfunction. We conclude our study by highlighting the complexities inherent in multimetric fish health data and the need for continued monitoring to further untangle contaminant and fish health

  2. Energetic limitations on suction feeding performance in centrarchid fishes.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Andrew M; Wainwright, Peter C

    2009-10-01

    Energetic analysis of ecologically relevant behaviors can be useful because animals are energetically limited by available muscle mass. In this study we hypothesized that two major determinants of suction feeding performance, the magnitudes of buccal volumetric expansion and subambient buccal pressure, would be correlated with, and limited by, available muscle mass. At least four individuals of three centrarchid species were studied: largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) and green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus). Buccal pressure was measured directly via cannulation of the buccal cavity with a catheter-tipped pressure transducer. Buccal expansion was estimated from lateral high-speed video (500 or 1000 Hz) sequences and published data on internal kinematics of largemouth bass. These estimates were calibrated from silicone casts made of the buccal cavity post-mortem. Estimated work and power were found to be significantly correlated with muscle mass over all individuals. The slopes of these relationships, estimates of mass-specific muscle work and power, were found to be 11+/-2 J kg(-1) and 300+/-75 W kg(-1), respectively. These estimates are consistent with observations made of in vivo and in vitro muscle use and with digital particle image velocimetry measurements of water flow in feeding centrarchids. A direct trade-off between mean pressure and change in volume was observed, when the latter was normalized to muscle mass. We conclude that available muscle mass may be a useful metric of suction feeding performance, and that the ratio of muscle mass to buccal volume may be a useful predictor of subambient buccal pressure magnitude. PMID:19801429

  3. Mercury and selenium in fish from the Savannah river: species, trophic level, and locational differences.

    PubMed

    Burger, J; Gaines, K F; Boring, C S; Stephens, W L; Snodgrass, J; Gochfeld, M

    2001-10-01

    Levels of contaminants in fish are of considerable interest because of potential effects on the fish themselves, as well as on other organisms that consume them. In this article we compare the mercury levels in muscle tissue of 11 fish species from the Savannah River, as well as selenium levels because of its known protective effect against mercury toxicity. We sampled fish from three stretches of the river: upstream, along, and downstream the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site, a former nuclear material production facility. We test the null hypothesis that there were no differences in mercury and selenium levels in fish tissue as a function of species, trophic level, and location along the river. There were significant interspecific differences in mercury levels, with bowfin (Amia calva) having the highest levels, followed by largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and pickerel (Esox niger). Sunfish (Lepomis spp.) had the lowest levels of mercury. As expected, these differences generally reflected trophic levels. There were few significant locational differences in mercury levels, and existing differences were not great, presumably reflecting local movements of fish between the sites examined. Selenium and mercury concentrations were positively correlated only for bass, perch (Perca flavescens), and red-breasted sunfish (Lepomis auritus). Mercury levels were positively correlated with body mass of the fish for all species except American eel (Anguilla rostrata) and bluegill sunfish (L. macrochirus). The mercury and selenium levels in fish tissue from the Savannah River are similar to or lower than those reported in many other studies, and in most cases pose little risk to the fish themselves or to other aquatic consumers, although levels in bowfin and bass are sufficiently high to pose a potential threat to high-level consumers.

  4. Temperature-mediated biotic interactions influence enemy release of nonnative species in warming environments.

    PubMed

    Fey, Samuel B; Herren, Cristina M

    2014-08-01

    "Enemy release" occurs when invading species suffer from interactions with pathogens, parasites, herbivores, or predators to a lesser degree than native species due to a lack of shared evolutionary history. Here we provide strong support for the hypothesis that variable thermal sensitivities between a consumer and its resources can generate temperature-dependent enemy release using both a mathematical model and a field experiment. We identify three common scenarios where changes in temperature should alter enemy release based on asymmetric responses among enemies and their resources to changes in temperature: (1) the vital rates of a shared enemy are more sensitive to changes in temperature than its resources, (2) the enemy's thermal maximum for consumption is higher than the resources' maxima for growth, and (3) the invading resource has a higher thermal maximum for growth than its native competitor. Mathematical representations indicated that warming is capable of altering enemy release in each of these three scenarios. We also tested our hypothesis using a mesocosm warming experiment in a system that exhibits variable thermal sensitivities between a predator and its native and nonnative prey. We conducted a six-week experiment manipulating the presence of Lepomis sunfish (present, absent) and water temperature (ambient, heated) using the nonnative crustacean zooplankter, Daphnia lumholtzi, whose morphological defenses reduce predation from juvenile sunfish relative to native Daphnia pulex. Our results indicate that D. lumholtzi benefited to a greater extent from the presence of Lepomis predators as temperatures increase. Taken together, our model and experiment indicate that changes in environmental temperature may directly influence the success of nonnative species and may assist with forecasting the community consequences of biological invasions in a warming world. PMID:25230475

  5. Mercury in sport fish from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta region, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jay A; Greenfield, Ben K; Ichikawa, Gary; Stephenson, Mark

    2008-02-25

    Total mercury (Hg) concentrations were determined in fillet tissue of sport fish captured in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta and surrounding tributaries, a region particularly impacted by historic gold and mercury mining activity. In 1999 and 2000, mercury concentrations were measured in 767 samples from ten fish species. Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), the primary target species, exhibited a median Hg concentration of 0.53 mug g(-1) (N=406). Only 23 largemouth bass (6%) were below a 0.12 mug g(-1) threshold corresponding to a 4 meals per month safe consumption limit. Most of the largemouth bass (222 fish, or 55% of the sample) were above a 0.47 mug g(-1) threshold corresponding to a 1 meal per month consumption limit. Striped bass (Morone saxatilis), channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), white catfish (Ameirus catus), and Sacramento pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus grandis) also had relatively high concentrations, with 31% or more of samples above 0.47 mug g(-1). Concentrations were lowest in redear (Lepomis microlophus) and bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) sunfish, with most samples below 0.12 mug g(-1), suggesting that targeting these species for sport and subsistence fishing may reduce human dietary exposure to Hg in the region. An improved method of analysis of covariance was performed to evaluate spatial variation in Hg in largemouth bass captured in 2000, while accounting for variability in fish length. Using this approach, Hg concentrations were significantly elevated in the Feather River, northern Delta, lower Cosumnes River, and San Joaquin River regions. In spite of elevated Hg concentrations on all of its tributaries, the central Delta had concentrations that were low both in comparison to safe consumption guidelines and to other locations. PMID:18063015

  6. Diel and distributional abundance patterns of fish embryos and larvae in the lower Columbia and Deschutes rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gadomski, D.M.; Barfoot, C.A.

    1998-01-01

    Diel and distributional abundance patterns of free embryos and larvae of fishes in the lower Columbia River Basin were investigated. Ichthyoplankton samples were collected in 1993 during day and night in the main-channel and a backwater of the lower Columbia River, and in a tributary, the Deschutes River. Fish embryos and larvae collected in the main-channel Columbia River were primarily (85.6%) of native taxa (peamouth Mylocheilus caurinus, northern squawfish Ptychocheilus oregonensis, suckers Catostomus spp., and sculpins Cottus spp.), with two introduced species (American shad Alosa sapidissima and common carp Cyprinus carpio) comprising a smaller percentage of the catch (13.3%). Similarly, in the Deschutes River native taxa [lampreys (Petromyzontidae), minnows (Cyprinidae), and suckers Catostomus spp.] dominated collections (99.5% of the catch). In contrast, 83.5% of embryos and larvae in the Columbia River backwater were of introduced taxa [American shad, common carp, and sunfishes (Centrarchidae)]. In all locations, all dominant taxa except sculpins were collected in significantly greater proportions at night. Taxon-specific differences in proportions of embryos and larvae collected at night can in some instances be related to life history styles. In the main-channel Columbia River, northern squawfish and peamouth were strongly nocturnal and high proportions still had yolksacs, suggesting that they had recently hatched and were drifting downriver to rearing areas. In contrast, sculpin abundances were similar during day and night, and sculpins mostly had depleted yolksacs, indicating sculpins were feeding and rearing in offshore limnetic habitats. Taxon-specific diel abundance patterns and their causes must be considered when designing effective sampling programs for fish embryos and larvae.

  7. Exposure of great egret (Ardea albus) nestlings to mercury through diet in the Everglades ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick, P.C.; Spalding, M.G.; Sepulveda, M.S.; Williams, G.E.; Nico, L.; Robins, R.

    1999-09-01

    The authors estimated exposure of great egret (Ardea albus) nestlings to mercury in food in the Florida Everglades, USA, by collecting regurgitated food samples during the 1993 to 1996 breeding seasons and during 1995 measured concentrations of mercury in individual prey items from those samples. Great egret nestlings had a diet composed predominantly of fish, though the species composition of fish in the diet fluctuated considerably among years. Great egrets concentrated on the larger fish available in the marsh, especially members of the Centrarchidae. The importance of all nonnative fish fluctuated from 0 to 32% of the diet by biomass and was dominated by pike killifish (Belonesox belizanus) and cichlids (Cichlidae). Total mercury concentrations in prey fish ranged from 0.04 to 1.40 mg/kg wet weight, and they found a significant relationship between mass of individual fish and mercury concentration. The authors estimated the concentration of total mercury in the diet as a whole by weighting the mercury concentration in a given fish species by the proportion of that species in the diet. They estimate that total mercury concentrations in the diets ranged among years from 0.37 to 0.47 mg/kg fish. The authors estimated total mercury exposure in great egret nestlings by combining these mercury concentrations with measurements of food intake rate, as measured over the course of the nestling period in both lab and field situations. They estimate that, at the 0.41 mg/kg level, nestlings would ingest 4.32 mg total mercury during an 80-day nestling period. Captive feeding studies reported elsewhere suggest that this level of exposure in the wild could be associated with reduced fledgling mass, increased lethargy, decreased appetite, and, possibly, poor health and juvenile survival.

  8. Baseline Assessment of Fish Communities, Benthic Macroinvertebrate Communities, and Stream Habitat and Land Use, Big Thicket National Preserve, Texas, 1999-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moring, J. Bruce

    2003-01-01

    The Big Thicket National Preserve comprises 39,300 hectares in the form of nine preserve units connected by four stream corridor units (with two more corridor units proposed) distributed over the lower Neches and Trinity River Basins of southeastern Texas. Fish and benthic macroinvertebrate data were collected at 15 stream sites (reaches) in the preserve during 1999?2001 for a baseline assessment and a comparison of communities among stream reaches. The fish communities in the preserve were dominated by minnows (family Cyprinidae) and sunfishes (family Centrarchidae). Reaches with smaller channel sizes generally had higher fish species richness than the larger reaches in the Neches River and Pine Island Bayou units of the preserve. Fish communities in geographically adjacent reaches were most similar in overall community structure. The blue sucker, listed by the State as a threatened species, was collected in only one reach?a Neches River reach a few miles downstream from the Steinhagen Lake Dam. Riffle beetles (family Elmidae) and midges (family Chironomidae) dominated the aquatic insect communities at the 14 reaches sampled for aquatic insects in the preserve. The Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera and Trichoptera (EPT) Index, an index sensitive to water-quality degradation, was smallest at the Little Pine Island Bayou near Beaumont reach that is in a State 303(d)-listed stream segment on Little Pine Island Bayou. Trophic structure of the aquatic insect communities is consistent with the river continuum concept with shredder and scraper insect taxa more abundant in reaches with smaller stream channels and filter feeders more abundant in reaches with larger channels. Aquatic insect community metrics were not significantly correlated to any of the stream-habitat or land-use explanatory variables. The percentage of 1990s urban land use in the drainage areas upstream from 12 bioassessment reaches were negatively correlated to the reach structure index, which indicates less

  9. Marine and inland fishes of St. Croix, U. S. Virgin Islands: an annotated checklist.

    PubMed

    Smith-Vaniz, William F; Jelks, Howard L

    2014-01-01

    An historical account is given for the ichthyological research at St. Croix, U. S. Virgin Islands, followed by an annotated list of 544 species of mostly marine shore fishes known or reported from the island to depths of 200 m. Color photographs are included for 103 of these species. Collections made at Buck Island Reef National Monument with the ichthyocide rotenone in 2001 and 2005 increased the known ichthyofauna by about 80 species. The rational for inclusion of each species in the checklist is given, with remarks for those species for which additional documentation or voucher specimens are needed. Reports of species known or presumed to have been based on misidentifications are discussed. Of the total marine fish fauna of the island, 404 species (75%) are restricted to the western Atlantic Ocean, (223 of these species are essentially Caribbean endemics that do not occur south of the Amazon River outflow), and no St. Croix endemic species are known. An additional 17 species (3.2%) also occur at mid-Atlantic islands, 57 species (10.6 %) are limited to both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, and 40 species (7.4%) have circumtropical distributions. The four most species-rich families are the Gobiidae (47 species), Serranidae (groupers and sea basses, 41), Labridae (wrasses and parrotfishes, 31), and Labrisomidae (scaly blennies, 27). Literature reports of Mosquitofish, Gambusia sp., from St. Croix apparently were based on misidentifications of a different introduced poeciliid genus. Four species of the amphidromus goby genus Sicydium occur in St. Croix inland waters, together with three established introduced species (one cichlid and two poeciliids). Also included are one catfish (Ictaluridae) and three sunfishes (Centrarchidae) known only from ponds. The Lionfish, Pterois volitans, the only introduced marine species, was first reported from St. Croix in 2008 and is now common despite control efforts. PMID:24871150

  10. Marine and inland fishes of St. Croix, U. S. Virgin Islands: an annotated checklist

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith-Vaniz, William F.; Jelks, Howard L.

    2014-01-01

    An historical account is given for the ichthyological research at St. Croix, U. S. Virgin Islands, followed by an annotated list of 544 species of mostly marine shore fishes known or reported from the island to depths of 200 m. Color photographs are included for 103 of these species. Collections made at Buck Island Reef National Monument with the ichthyocide rotenone in 2001 and 2005 increased the known ichthyofauna by about 80 species. The rational for inclusion of each species in the checklist is given, with remarks for those species for which additional documentation or voucher specimens are needed. Reports of species known or presumed to have been based on misidentifications are discussed. Of the total marine fish fauna of the island, 404 species (75%) are restricted to the western Atlantic Ocean, (223 of these species are essentially Caribbean endemics that do not occur south of the Amazon River outflow), and no St. Croix endemic species are known. An additional 17 species (3.2%) also occur at mid-Atlantic islands, 57 species (10.6 %) are limited to both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, and 40 species (7.4%) have circumtropical distributions. The four most species-rich families are the Gobiidae (47 species), Serranidae (groupers and sea basses, 41), Labridae (wrasses and parrotfishes, 31), and Labrisomidae (scaly blennies, 27). Literature reports of Mosquitofish, Gambusia sp., from St. Croix apparently were based on misidentifications of a different introduced poeciliid genus. Four species of the amphidromus goby genus Sicydium occur in St. Croix inland waters, together with three established introduced species (one cichlid and two poeciliids). Also included are one catfish (Ictaluridae) and three sunfishes (Centrarchidae) known only from ponds. The Lionfish, Pterois volitans, the only introduced marine species, was first reported from St. Croix in 2008 and is now common despite control efforts.

  11. Response of fishes to floodplain connectivity during and following a 500-year flood event in the unimpounded upper Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barko, V.A.; Herzog, D.P.; O'Connell, M. T.

    2006-01-01

    We examined data collected on fish assemblage structure among three differing floodplain types (broad, moderate, and narrow) during the 1993 flood in the unimpounded reach of the upper Mississippi River. This 500 year flood event provided a unique opportunity to investigate fish-floodplain function because the main river channel is otherwise typically disjunct from approximately 82% of its floodplain by an extensive levee system. Fishes were sampled during three separate periods, and 42 species of adult and young-of-the-year (YOY) fishes were captured. Analysis of similarity (ANOSIM) revealed a significant and distinguishable difference between both adult and YOY assemblage structure among the three floodplain types. Analysis of variance revealed that Secchi transparency, turbidity, water velocity, and dissolved oxygen were significantly different among the floodplain types. However, only depth of gear deployment and Secchi transparency were significantly correlated with adult assemblage structure. None of these variables were significantly correlated with YOY assemblage structure. The numerically abundant families (adult and YOY catches combined) on the floodplain included Centrarchidae, Ictularidae, and Cyprinidae. Both native and non-native fishes were captured on the floodplain, and several of the numerically abundant species that were captured on the floodplain peaked in catch-per-unit-effort 1-3 years after the 1993 flood event. This suggests that some species may have used flooded terrestrial habitat for spawning, feeding, or both. The findings from our study provide much needed insight into fish-floodplain function in a temperate, channelized river system and suggest that lateral connectivity of the main river channel to less degraded reaches of its floodplain should become a management priority not only to maintain faunal biodiversity but also potentially reduce the impacts of non-native species in large river systems.

  12. Exposure of great egret (Ardea albus) nestlings to mercury through diet in the Everglades ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frederick, Peter C; Spalding, Marilyn G.; Sepalveda, Maria S.; Williams, Gary E.; Nico, Leo G.; Robins, Robert H.

    1999-01-01

    We estimated exposure of great egret (Ardea albus) nestlings to mercury in food in the Florida Everglades, USA, by collecting regurgitated food samples during the 1993 to 1996 breeding seasons and during 1995 measured concentrations of mercury in individual prey items from those samples. Great egret nestlings had a diet composed predominantly of fish (>95% of biomass), though the species composition of fish in the diet fluctuated considerably among years. Great egrets concentrated on the larger fish available in the marsh, especially members of the Centrarchidae. The importance of all nonnative fish fluctuated from 0 to 32% of the diet by biomass and was dominated by pike killifish (Belonesox belizanus) and cichlids (Cichlidae). Total mercury concentrations in prey fish ranged from 0.04 to 1.40 mg/kg wet weight, and we found a significant relationship between mass of individual fish and mercury concentration. We estimated the concentration of total mercury in the diet as a whole by weighting the mercury concentration in a given fish species by the proportion of that species in the diet. We estimate that total mercury concentrations in the diets ranged among years from 0.37 to 0.47 mg/kg fish (4-year mean = 0.41 mg/kg). We estimated total mercury exposure in great egret nestlings by combining these mercury concentrations with measurements of food intake rate, as measured over the course of the nestling period in both lab and field situations. We estimate that, at the 0.41 mg/kg level, nestlings would ingest 4.32 mg total mercury during an 80-day nestling period. Captive feeding studies reported elsewhere suggest that this level of exposure in the wild could be associated with reduced fledging mass, increased lethargy, decreased appetite, and, possibly, poor health and juvenile survival.

  13. Marine and inland fishes of St. Croix, U. S. Virgin Islands: an annotated checklist.

    PubMed

    Smith-Vaniz, William F; Jelks, Howard L

    2014-05-29

    An historical account is given for the ichthyological research at St. Croix, U. S. Virgin Islands, followed by an annotated list of 544 species of mostly marine shore fishes known or reported from the island to depths of 200 m. Color photographs are included for 103 of these species. Collections made at Buck Island Reef National Monument with the ichthyocide rotenone in 2001 and 2005 increased the known ichthyofauna by about 80 species. The rational for inclusion of each species in the checklist is given, with remarks for those species for which additional documentation or voucher specimens are needed. Reports of species known or presumed to have been based on misidentifications are discussed. Of the total marine fish fauna of the island, 404 species (75%) are restricted to the western Atlantic Ocean, (223 of these species are essentially Caribbean endemics that do not occur south of the Amazon River outflow), and no St. Croix endemic species are known. An additional 17 species (3.2%) also occur at mid-Atlantic islands, 57 species (10.6 %) are limited to both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, and 40 species (7.4%) have circumtropical distributions. The four most species-rich families are the Gobiidae (47 species), Serranidae (groupers and sea basses, 41), Labridae (wrasses and parrotfishes, 31), and Labrisomidae (scaly blennies, 27). Literature reports of Mosquitofish, Gambusia sp., from St. Croix apparently were based on misidentifications of a different introduced poeciliid genus. Four species of the amphidromus goby genus Sicydium occur in St. Croix inland waters, together with three established introduced species (one cichlid and two poeciliids). Also included are one catfish (Ictaluridae) and three sunfishes (Centrarchidae) known only from ponds. The Lionfish, Pterois volitans, the only introduced marine species, was first reported from St. Croix in 2008 and is now common despite control efforts.

  14. Fish assemblages and environmental variables associated with hard-rock mining in the Coeur d'Alene River basin, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maret, Terry R.; MacCoy, Dorene E.

    2002-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water Quality Assessment Program, fish assemblages, environmental variables, and associated mine densities were evaluated at 18 test and reference sites during the summer of 2000 in the Coeur d'Alene and St. Regis river basins in Idaho and Montana. Multimetric and multivariate analyses were used to examine patterns in fish assemblages and the associated environmental variables representing a gradient of mining intensity. The concentrations of cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) in water and streambed sediment found at test sites in watersheds where production mine densities were at least 0.2 mines/km2 (in a 500-m stream buffer) were significantly higher than the concentrations found at reference sites. Many of these metal concentrations exceeded Ambient Water Quality Criteria (AWQC) and the Canadian Probable Effect Level guidelines for streambed sediment. Regression analysis identified significant relationships between the production mine densities and the sum of Cd, Pb, and Zn concentrations in water and streambed sediment (r2 = 0.69 and 0.66, respectively; P < 0.01). Zinc was identified as the primary metal contaminant in both water and streambed sediment. Eighteen fish species in the families Salmonidae, Cottidae, Cyprinidae, Catostomidae, Centrarchidae, and Ictaluridae were collected. Principal components analysis of 11 fish metrics identified two distinct groups of sites corresponding to the reference and test sites, predominantly on the basis of the inverse relationship between percent cottids and percent salmonids (r = -0.64; P < 0.05). Streams located downstream from the areas of intensive hard-rock mining in the Coeur d'Alene River basin contained fewer native fish and lower abundances as a result of metal enrichment, not physical habitat degradation. Typically, salmonids were the predominant species at test sites where Zn concentrations exceeded the acute AWQC. Cottids were absent at these sites, which

  15. Effects of electrofishing gear type on spatial and temporal variability in fish community sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meador, M.R.; McIntyre, J.P.

    2003-01-01

    Fish community data collected from 24 major river basins between 1993 and 1998 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program were analyzed to assess multiple-reach (three consecutive reaches) and multiple-year (three consecutive years) variability in samples collected at a site. Variability was assessed using the coefficient of variation (CV; SD/mean) of species richness, the Jaccard index (JI), and the percent similarity index (PSI). Data were categorized by three electrofishing sample collection methods: backpack, towed barge, and boat. Overall, multiple-reach CV values were significantly lower than those for multiple years, whereas multiple-reach JI and PSI values were significantly greater than those for multiple years. Multiple-reach and multiple-year CV values did not vary significantly among electrofishing methods, although JI and PSI values were significantly greatest for backpack electrofishing across multiple reaches and multiple years. The absolute difference between mean species richness for multiple-reach samples and mean species richness for multiple-year samples was 0.8 species (9.5% of total species richness) for backpack samples, 1.7 species (10.1%) for towed-barge samples, and 4.5 species (24.4%) for boat-collected samples. Review of boat-collected fish samples indicated that representatives of four taxonomic families - Catostomidae, Centrarchidae, Cyprinidae, and Ictaluridae - were collected at all sites. Of these, catostomids exhibited greater interannual variability than centrarchids, cyprinids, or ictalurids. Caution should be exercised when combining boat-collected fish community data from different years because of relatively high interannual variability, which is primarily due to certain relatively mobile species. Such variability may obscure longer-term trends.

  16. Endosymbiont Dominated Bacterial Communities in a Dwarf Spider

    PubMed Central

    Vanthournout, Bram; Hendrickx, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    The microbial community of spiders is little known, with previous studies focussing primarily on the medical importance of spiders as vectors of pathogenic bacteria and on the screening of known cytoplasmic endosymbiont bacteria. These screening studies have been performed by means of specific primers that only amplify a selective set of endosymbionts, hampering the detection of unreported species in spiders. In order to have a more complete overview of the bacterial species that can be present in spiders, we applied a combination of a cloning assay, DGGE profiling and high-throughput sequencing on multiple individuals of the dwarf spider Oedothorax gibbosus. This revealed a co-infection of at least three known (Wolbachia, Rickettsia and Cardinium) and the detection of a previously unreported endosymbiont bacterium (Rhabdochlamydia) in spiders. 16S rRNA gene sequences of Rhabdochlamydia matched closely with those of Candidatus R. porcellionis, which is currently only reported as a pathogen from a woodlouse and with Candidatus R. crassificans reported from a cockroach. Remarkably, this bacterium appears to present in very high proportions in one of the two populations only, with all investigated females being infected. We also recovered Acinetobacter in high abundance in one individual. In total, more than 99% of approximately 4.5M high-throughput sequencing reads were restricted to these five bacterial species. In contrast to previously reported screening studies of terrestrial arthropods, our results suggest that the bacterial communities in this spider species are dominated by, or even restricted to endosymbiont bacteria. Given the high prevalence of endosymbiont species in spiders, this bacterial community pattern could be widespread in the Araneae order. PMID:25706947

  17. Endosymbiont dominated bacterial communities in a dwarf spider.

    PubMed

    Vanthournout, Bram; Hendrickx, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    The microbial community of spiders is little known, with previous studies focussing primarily on the medical importance of spiders as vectors of pathogenic bacteria and on the screening of known cytoplasmic endosymbiont bacteria. These screening studies have been performed by means of specific primers that only amplify a selective set of endosymbionts, hampering the detection of unreported species in spiders. In order to have a more complete overview of the bacterial species that can be present in spiders, we applied a combination of a cloning assay, DGGE profiling and high-throughput sequencing on multiple individuals of the dwarf spider Oedothorax gibbosus. This revealed a co-infection of at least three known (Wolbachia, Rickettsia and Cardinium) and the detection of a previously unreported endosymbiont bacterium (Rhabdochlamydia) in spiders. 16S rRNA gene sequences of Rhabdochlamydia matched closely with those of Candidatus R. porcellionis, which is currently only reported as a pathogen from a woodlouse and with Candidatus R. crassificans reported from a cockroach. Remarkably, this bacterium appears to present in very high proportions in one of the two populations only, with all investigated females being infected. We also recovered Acinetobacter in high abundance in one individual. In total, more than 99% of approximately 4.5M high-throughput sequencing reads were restricted to these five bacterial species. In contrast to previously reported screening studies of terrestrial arthropods, our results suggest that the bacterial communities in this spider species are dominated by, or even restricted to endosymbiont bacteria. Given the high prevalence of endosymbiont species in spiders, this bacterial community pattern could be widespread in the Araneae order.

  18. Fish assemblage responses to urban intensity gradients in contrasting metropolitan areas: Birmingham, Alabama and Boston, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meador, M.R.; Coles, J.F.; Zappia, H.

    2005-01-01

    We examined fish assemblage responses to urban intensify gradients in two contrasting metropolitan areas: Birmingham, Alabama (BIR) and Boston, Massachusetts (BOS). Urbanization was quantified by using an urban intensity index (UII) that included multiple stream buffers and basin land uses, human population density, and road density variables. We evaluated fish assemblage responses by using species richness metrics and detrended correspondence analyses (DCA). Fish species richness metrics included total fish species richness, and percentages of endemic species richness, alien species, and fluvial specialist species. Fish species richness decreased significantly with increasing urbanization in BIR (r = -0.82, P = 0.001) and BOS (r = -0.48, P = 0.008). Percentages of endemic species richness decreased significantly with increasing urbanization only in BIR (r = - 0.71, P = 0.001), whereas percentages of fluvial specialist species decreased significantly with increasing urbanization only in BOS (r = -0.56, P = 0.002). Our DCA results for BIR indicate that highly urbanized fish assemblages are composed primarily of largescale stoneroller Campostoma oligolepis, largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides, and creek chub Semotilus atromaculatus, whereas the highly urbanized fish assemblages in BOS are dominated by yellow perch Perca flavescens, bluegill Lefomis macrochirus, yellow bullhead Ameiurus natalis, largemouth bass, pumpkinseed L. gibbosus, brown bullhead A. nebulosus, and redfin pickerel Esox americanus. Differences in fish assemblage responses to urbanization between the two areas appear to be related to differences in nutrient enrichment, habitat alterations, and invasive species. Because species richness can increase or decrease with increasing urbanization, a general response model is not applicable. Instead, response models based on species' life histories, behavior, and autecologies offer greater potential for understanding fish assemblage responses to

  19. Effects of an agricultural drainwater bypass on fishes inhabiting the Grassland Water District and the lower San Joaquin River, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saiki, M.K.; Martin, B.A.; Schwarzbach, S.E.; May, T.W.

    2001-01-01

    The Grassland Bypass Project, which began operation in September 1996, was conceived as a means of diverting brackish selenium-contaminated agricultural drainwater away from canals and sloughs needed for transporting irrigation water to wetlands within the Grassland Water District (the Grasslands), Merced County, California. The seleniferous drainwater is now routed into the San Luis Drain for conveyance to North Mud Slough and eventual disposal in the San Joaquin River. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which the Grassland Bypass Project has affected fishes in sloughs and other surface waters within and downstream from the Grasslands. During September-October 1997, 9,795 fish representing 25 species were captured at 13 sampling sites. Although several species exhibited restricted spatial distributions, association analysis and cluster analysis failed to identify more than one fish species assemblage inhabiting the various sites. However, seleniferous drainwater from the San Luis Drain has influenced selenium concentrations in whole fish within North Mud Slough and the San Joaquin River. The highest concentrations of selenium (12-23 ??g/g, dry weight basis) were measured in green sunfish Lepomis cyanellus from the San Luis Drain where seleniferous drainwater is most concentrated, whereas the second highest concentrations occurred in green sunfish (7.6-17 ??g/g) and bluegills Lepomis macrochirus (14-18 ??g/g) from North Mud Slough immediately downstream from the drain. Although there was some variation, fish in the San Joaquin River generally contained higher body burdens of selenium when captured immediately below the mouth of North Mud Slough (3.1-4.8 ??g/g for green sunfish, 3.7-5.0 ??g/g for bluegills) than when captured upstream from the mouth (0.67-3.3 ??g/g for green sunfish, 0.59-3.7 ??g/g for bluegills). Waterborne selenium was the single most important predictor of selenium concentrations in green sunfish and bluegills, as judged by

  20. Response of fish communities to cropland density and natural environmental setting in the Eastern Highland Rim Ecoregion of the lower Tennessee River basin, Alabama and Tennessee, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, Jeffrey R.

    2003-01-01

    Response of fish communities to cropland density and natural environmental setting were evaluated at 20 streams in the Eastern Highland Rim Ecoregion of the lower Tennessee River Basin during the spring of 1999. Sites were selected to represent a gradient of cropland densities in basins draining about 30 to 100 square miles. Fish communities were sampled by using a combination of seining and electrofishing techniques. A total of 10,550 individual fish, representing 63 species and 15 families, were collected during the study and included the families Cyprinidae (minnows), 18 species; Percidae (perch and darters), 12 species; and Centrarchidae (sunfish), 12 species. Assessments of environmental characteristics, including instream and terrestrial data and land-cover data, were conducted for each site. Instream measurements, such as depth, velocity, substrate type, and embeddedness, were recorded at 3 points across 11 equidistant transects at each site. Terrestrial measurements, such as bank angle, canopy angle, and canopy closure percentage, were made along the stream bank and midchannel areas. Water-quality data collected included pH, dissolved oxygen, specific conductivity, water temperature, nutrients, and fecal-indicator bacteria. Substrate embeddedness was the only variable correlated with both cropland density and fish communities (as characterized by ordination scores and several community level metrics). Multivariate and nonparametric correlation techniques were used to evaluate fish-community responses to physical and chemical factors associated with a cropland-density gradient, where the gradient was defined as the percentage of the basin in row crops. Principal component analysis and correspondence analysis suggest that the Eastern Highland Rim Ecoregion is composed of three subgroups of sites based on inherent physical and biological differences. Data for the subgroup containing the largest number of sites were then re-analyzed, revealing that several

  1. Fish communities and related environmental conditions of the lower Boise River, southwestern Idaho, 1974-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacCoy, Dorene E.

    2006-01-01

    Within the last century, the lower Boise River has been transformed from a meandering, braided, gravel-bed river that supported large runs of salmon to a channelized, regulated, urban river that provides flood control and irrigation water to more than 1,200 square miles of land. An understanding of the current status of the river's fish communities and related environmental conditions is important to support the ongoing management of the Boise River. Therefore, fish community data from the U.S. Geological Survey and the Idaho Department of Fish and Game collected since 1974 were analyzed to describe the status of fish communities in the lower Boise River. Each set of data was collected to address different study objectives, but is combined here to provide an overall distribution of fish in the lower Boise River over the last 30 years. Twenty-two species of fish in 7 families have been identified in the lower Boise River-3 salmonidae, trout and whitefish; 2 cottidae, sculpins; 3 catostomidae, suckers; 7 cyprinidae, minnows; 4 centrarchidae, sunfish; 2 ictaluridae, catfish; and 1 cobitidae, loach. Analysis of fish community data using an Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) for Northwest rivers shows a decrease in the biotic integrity in a downstream direction, with the lowest IBI near the mouth of the Boise River. The number of tolerant and introduced fish were greater in the lower reaches of the river. Changes in land use, habitat, and water quality, as well as regulated streamflow have affected the lower Boise River fish community. IBI scores were negatively correlated with maximum instantaneous water temperature, specific conductance, and suspended sediment; as well as the basin land-use metrics, area of developed land, impervious surface area, and the number of major diversions upstream of a site. Fish communities in the upstream reaches were dominated by piscivorous fish, whereas the downstream reaches were dominated by tolerant, omnivorous fish. The percentage of

  2. Non-native species impacts on pond occupancy by an anuran

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, Michael J.; Pearl, Christopher A.; Galvan, Stephanie; McCreary, Brome

    2011-01-01

    Non-native fish and bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus; Rana catesbeiana) are frequently cited as factors contributing to the decline of ranid frogs in the western United States (Bradford 2005). This hypothesis is supported by studies showing competition with or predation by these introduced species (Kupferberg 1997, Kiesecker and Blaustein 1998, Lawler et al. 1999, Knapp et al. 2001) and studies suggesting a deficit of native frogs at sites occupied by bullfrogs or game fish (Hammerson 1982, Schwalbe and Rosen 1988, Fisher and Shaffer 1996, Adams 1999). Conversely, other studies failed to find a negative association between native ranids and bullfrogs and point out that presence of non-native species correlates with habitat alterations that could also contribute to declines of native species (Hayes and Jennings 1986; Adams 1999, 2000; Pearl et al. 2005). A criticism of these studies is that they may not detect an effect of non-native species if the process of displacement is at an early stage. We are not aware of any studies that have monitored a set of native frog populations to determine if non-native species predict population losses. Our objective was to study site occupancy trends in relation to non-native species for northern red-legged frogs (Rana aurora) on federal lands in the southern Willamette Valley, Oregon. We conducted a 5-yr monitoring study to answer the following questions about the status and trends of the northern red-legged frog: 1) What is the rate of local extinction (how often is a site that is occupied in year t unoccupied in year t+1) and what factors predict variation in local extinction? and 2) What is the rate of colonization (how often is a site that is unoccupied in year t occupied in year t+1) and what factors predict variation in colonization? The factors we hypothesized for local extinction were: 1) bullfrog presence, 2) bullfrogs mediated by wetland vegetation, 3) non-native fish (Centrarchidae), 4) non-native fish mediated by

  3. Historical and current perspectives on fish assemblages of the Snake River, Idaho and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maret, T.R.; Mebane, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    The Snake River is the tenth longest river in the United States, extending 1,667 km from its origin in Yellowstone National Park in western Wyoming to its union with the Columbia River at Pasco, Washington. Historically, the main-stem Snake River upstream from the Hells Canyon Complex supported at least 26 native fish species, including anadromous stocks of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead O. mykiss, Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata, and white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus. Of these anadromous species, only the white sturgeon remains in the Snake River between the Hells Canyon Complex and Shoshone Falls. Today, much of the Snake River has been transformed into a river with numerous impoundments and flow diversions, increased pollutant loads, and elevated water temperatures. Current (1993-2002) fish assemblage collections from 15 sites along the Snake River and Henrys Fork contained 35 fish species, including 16 alien species. Many of these alien species such as catfish (Ictaluridae), carp (Cyprinidae), and sunfish (Centrarchidae) are adapted for warmwater impounded habitats. Currently, the Snake River supports 19 native species. An index of biotic integrity (IBI), developed to evaluate large rivers in the Northwest, was used to evaluate recent (1993-2002) fish collections from the Snake River and Henrys Fork in southern Idaho and western Wyoming. Index of biotic integrity site scores and component metrics revealed a decline in biotic integrity from upstream to downstream in both the Snake River and Henrys Fork. Two distinct groups of sites were evident that correspond to a range of IBI scores-an upper Snake River and Henrys Fork group with relatively high biotic integrity (mean IBI scores of 46-84) and a lower Snake River group with low biotic integrity (mean IBI scores of 10-29). Sites located in the lower Snake River exhibited fish assemblages that reflect poor-quality habitat where coldwater and sensitive species are rare or absent, and

  4. Dryinidae of the Neotropical region (Hymenoptera: Chrysidoidea).

    PubMed

    Olmi, Massimo; Virla, Eduardo G

    2014-01-01

    An updated revision of Neotropical Dryinidae is presented. Seven subfamilies, 23 genera and 502 species are treated. Descriptions, geographic distribution, known hosts, natural enemies and type material of each species are presented, together with illustrations of the main morphological characters and keys to the subfamilies, genera and species. Complete lists of references concerning the Neotropical Dryinidae and their hosts are given. A new genus Peckius Olmi & Virla, gen. nov. (type species Peckius insularis Olmi & Virla, sp. nov.) (subfamily Apodryininae) is described. The following eleven new species are described: Anteon xochipalense Olmi & Virla, sp. nov. (Mexico, Guerrero), Deinodryinus levigatus Olmi & Virla, sp. nov. (Peru, Lamabayeque), Deinodryinus xanthonotatus Olmi & Virla, sp. nov. (French Guiana), Dryinus semiruber Olmi & Virla, sp. nov. (Argentina, Corrientes), Dryinus valens Olmi & Virla, sp. nov. (Dominican Republic, Pedernales), Dryinus xanthopus Olmi & Virla, sp. nov. (French Guiana), Megadryinus cacaonis Olmi & Virla, sp. nov. (Brazil, São Paulo), Gonatopus isabelensis Olmi & Virla, sp. nov. (Ecuador, Galapagos Islands), Gonatopus villamilensis Olmi & Virla, sp. nov. (Ecuador, Galapagos Islands), Neodryinus mayanus Olmi & Virla, sp. nov. (Honduras), and Peckius insularis Olmi & Virla, sp. nov. (Ecuador, Galapagos Islands). The following new synonymies are presented: Deinodryinus kawensis Olmi 2011b (April) (=D. caxiuana Coelho, Aguiar & Engel, 2011 (June), syn. nov.); Dryinus gibbosus Olmi, 1984 (=D. multicarinatus Coelho, Aguiar & Engel, 2011, syn. nov.); Dryinus striatus (Fenton, 1927) (=D. sinopensis Olmi, 1984, syn. nov.; =D. cerrensis Olmi, 2004a, syn. nov.); Gonatopus Ljungh, 1810 (=Trichogonatopus Kieffer, 1909, syn. nov.); Eucamptonyx dromedarius (Cameron 1888) (=E. hansoni Olmi, 1991, syn. nov.); Haplogonatopus hernandezae Olmi, 1984 (=H. crucianus Olmi, 1986, syn. nov.). The following new combinations are proposed: Eucamptonyx

  5. Using hierarchical Bayesian multi-species mixture models to estimate tandem hoop-net based habitat associations and detection probabilities of fishes in reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, David R.; Long, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Species distribution models are useful tools to evaluate habitat relationships of fishes. We used hierarchical Bayesian multispecies mixture models to evaluate the relationships of both detection and abundance with habitat of reservoir fishes caught using tandem hoop nets. A total of 7,212 fish from 12 species were captured, and the majority of the catch was composed of Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus (46%), Bluegill Lepomis macrochirus(25%), and White Crappie Pomoxis annularis (14%). Detection estimates ranged from 8% to 69%, and modeling results suggested that fishes were primarily influenced by reservoir size and context, water clarity and temperature, and land-use types. Species were differentially abundant within and among habitat types, and some fishes were found to be more abundant in turbid, less impacted (e.g., by urbanization and agriculture) reservoirs with longer shoreline lengths; whereas, other species were found more often in clear, nutrient-rich impoundments that had generally shorter shoreline length and were surrounded by a higher percentage of agricultural land. Our results demonstrated that habitat and reservoir characteristics may differentially benefit species and assemblage structure. This study provides a useful framework for evaluating capture efficiency for not only hoop nets but other gear types used to sample fishes in reservoirs.

  6. Fish reintroductions reveal smooth transitions between lake community states.

    PubMed

    Mittelbach, Gary G; Garcia, Erica A; Taniguchi, Yoshinori

    2006-02-01

    Whether communities respond smoothly or discontinuously to changing environmental conditions has important consequences for the preservation and restoration of ecosystems. Theory shows that communities may exhibit a variety of responses to environmental change, including abrupt transitions due to the existence of alternate states. However, there have been few opportunities to look for such transitions in nature. Here, we examine the impact of a two-orders-of-magnitude decrease and then increase in planktivore abundance in Wintergreen lake (Michigan, USA), caused by the extinction and reintroduction of two dominant fish species (largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides, and bluegill, Lepomis macrochirus). Over a 16 + yr period of slow change from high planktivory to low planktivory back to high planktivory, the zooplankton community changed smoothly and predictably between states. In years of low planktivory, the zooplankton assemblage was dominated by a single, large, cladoceran species, Daphnia pulicaria, whereas in years of high planktivory, D. pulicaria disappeared and was replaced by a suite of small-bodied cladocerans. We quantified the multivariate change in zooplankton community dissimilarity and found that community state smoothly tracked changes in planktivore density in both a forward and backward direction. Thus, there was little evidence of discontinuity in this system where transitions are strongly driven by planktivory.

  7. Chironomus tentans bioassay for testing synthetic fuel products and effluents, with data on acridine and quinoline

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.; McKamey, M.I.

    1981-05-01

    Sensitive tests of toxicity to aquatic insects are useful for assessing the effects of potential pollutants on aquatic ecosystems. Within the last few years, research emphasis has included the toxicity of coal-related synthetic fuel products and effluents to aquatic biota. As part of an Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) program to evaluate the environmental effects of synthetic fuel products and effluents, a series of tests is being used to measure the toxicity of whole and fractionated synthetic fuel products and effluents and representative pure compounds (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phenols, and azaarenes) to aquatic organisms. Synthetic fuel materials are complex mixtures of inorganic and organic substances, including aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, and N-, S-, and O-substituted aromatics. By testing fractions and components of whole materials, we can begin to explain observed toxic effects and recommend further treatment to reduce toxicity. Test organisms include freshwater crustaceans (Daphnia pulex and magna), green algae (Selenastrum capricornutum), blue-green algae (Microcystis aeruginosa), snails (Physa heterostropha and Helisoma sp.), fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), and rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri).

  8. Environmental mercury concentrations in cultured low-trophic-level fish using food waste-based diets.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhang; Mo, Wing Yin; Man, Yu Bon; Lam, Cheung Lung; Choi, Wai Ming; Nie, Xiang Ping; Liu, Yi Hui; Wong, Ming Hung

    2015-01-01

    In this study, different types of food wastes were used as the major source of protein to replace the fish meal in fish feeds to produce quality fish (polyculture of different freshwater fish). During October 2011-April 2012, the concentrations of Hg in water, suspended particulate matter, and sediment of the three experimental fish ponds located in Sha Tau Kok Organic Farm were monitored, and the results were similar to or lower than those detected in commercial fish ponds around the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region (by comparing data of previous and present studies). Health risk assessments indicated that human consumption of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus), a herbivore which fed food waste feed pellets would be safer than other fish species: mud carp (Cirrhina molitorella), bighead carp (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis), and largemouth bass (Lepomis macrochirus). Due to the lower species diversity and substantially shorter food chains of the polyculture system consisting of only three fish species, the extent of Hg biomagnification was significantly lower than other polyculture ponds around PRD. Furthermore, the use of food waste instead of fish meal (mainly consisted of contaminated trash fish) further reduced the mercury accumulation in the cultured fish.

  9. Epidemiology of columnaris disease affecting fishes within the same watershed.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Haitham H; Arias, Covadonga R

    2014-07-01

    In the southeastern USA, columnaris disease (caused by Flavobacterium columnare) typically affects catfish raised in earthen ponds from early spring until late summer. Recently, unusually severe outbreaks of columnaris disease occurred at the E. W. Shell Fisheries Center located in Auburn, AL, USA. During these outbreaks, catfish and other aquaculture and sport fish species that were in ponds located within the same watershed were affected. Our objective was to investigate the genetic diversity among F. columnare isolates recovered from different sites, sources, and dates to clarify the origin of these outbreaks and, ultimately, to better understand the epidemiology of columnaris disease. A total of 102 F. columnare isolates were recovered from catfishes (channel catfish Ictalurus puntactus, blue catfish I. furcatus, and their hybrid), bluegill Lepomis microchirus, Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus, largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides, egg masses, and water during columnaris outbreaks (from spring 2010 to summer 2012). Putative F. columnare colonies were identified following standard protocols. All isolates were ascribed to Genomovar II following restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. Genetic variability among the isolates was revealed by amplified fragment length polymorphism. Date of isolation explained most of the variability among our isolates, while host was the least influential parameter, denoting a lack of host specificity within Genomovar II isolates. The susceptibility of each of the isolates against commonly used antibiotics was tested by antibiogram. Our data showed that 19.6 and 12.7% of the isolates were resistant to oxytetracycline and kanamycin, respectively. PMID:24991846

  10. The influence of fish length on tissue mercury dynamics: implications for natural resource management and human health risk.

    PubMed

    Sackett, Dana K; Cope, W Gregory; Rice, James A; Aday, D Derek

    2013-02-01

    Consumption of fish has well-known human health benefits, though some fish may contain elevated levels of mercury (Hg) that are especially harmful to developing children. Fish length is most often the basis for establishing fishery harvest regulations that determine which fish will ultimately be consumed by humans. It is, therefore, essential to quantify the relationship between fish length and Hg accumulation in regard to harvest regulations for effective fishery and public health policy. We examined this relationship for three sportfish from six lakes across North Carolina, USA. Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) had the lowest Hg levels and only the very largest fish in the most contaminated site exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Hg screening level. Black crappie (Pomoxis nigromaculatus) had an intermediate level of Hg and larger individuals exceeded the USEPA screening level; however, they tended not to exceed this level before reaching the harvest length limit. Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) exceeded the USEPA screening level at sizes below the fishery length limit in two lakes, leaving only higher risk fish for anglers to harvest and consume. Removing the effects of fish age and trophic position, we found strong positive correlations between Hg and fish length for largemouth bass and black crappie. We suggest public health officials and wildlife managers collaborate to structure fishery regulations and length-based fish consumption advisories that protect consumers from Hg exposure and communicate the relative risk of fish consumption. PMID:23388852

  11. Development and characterization of a largemouth bass cell line.

    PubMed

    Getchell, Rodman G; Groocock, Geoffrey H; Cornwell, Emily R; Schumacher, Vanessa L; Glasner, Lindsay I; Baker, Barry J; Frattini, Stephen A; Wooster, Gregory A; Bowser, Paul R

    2014-09-01

    Abstract The development and characterization of a new cell line, derived from the ovary of Largemouth Bass Micropterus salmoides, is described. Gonad tissue was collected from Largemouth Bass that were electrofished from Oneida Lake, New York. The tissue was processed and grown in culture flasks at approximately 22°C for more than 118 passages during an 8-year period from 2004 to 2011. The identity of these cells as Largemouth Bass origin was confirmed by sequencing a portion of the cytochrome b gene. Growth rate at three different temperatures was documented. The cell line was susceptible to Largemouth Bass virus (LMBV) and its replication was compared with that of Bluegill Lepomis macrochirus fry (BF-2), one of the cell lines recommended for LMBV isolation by the American Fisheries Society Fish Health Section Blue Book. Quantitative PCR results from the replication trial showed the BF-2 cell line produced approximately 10-fold more LMBV copies per cell than the new Largemouth Bass cell line after 6 d, while the titration assay showed similar quantities in each cell line after 1 week. Received February 18, 2014; accepted April 16, 2014. PMID:25229492

  12. Environmental mercury concentrations in cultured low-trophic-level fish using food waste-based diets.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhang; Mo, Wing Yin; Man, Yu Bon; Lam, Cheung Lung; Choi, Wai Ming; Nie, Xiang Ping; Liu, Yi Hui; Wong, Ming Hung

    2015-01-01

    In this study, different types of food wastes were used as the major source of protein to replace the fish meal in fish feeds to produce quality fish (polyculture of different freshwater fish). During October 2011-April 2012, the concentrations of Hg in water, suspended particulate matter, and sediment of the three experimental fish ponds located in Sha Tau Kok Organic Farm were monitored, and the results were similar to or lower than those detected in commercial fish ponds around the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region (by comparing data of previous and present studies). Health risk assessments indicated that human consumption of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus), a herbivore which fed food waste feed pellets would be safer than other fish species: mud carp (Cirrhina molitorella), bighead carp (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis), and largemouth bass (Lepomis macrochirus). Due to the lower species diversity and substantially shorter food chains of the polyculture system consisting of only three fish species, the extent of Hg biomagnification was significantly lower than other polyculture ponds around PRD. Furthermore, the use of food waste instead of fish meal (mainly consisted of contaminated trash fish) further reduced the mercury accumulation in the cultured fish. PMID:25087497

  13. Applying a reservoir functional-zone paradigm to littoral bluegills: differences in length and catch frequency?

    PubMed Central

    DeAngelis, Holly; Crosby, Abigale M.; Roosenburg, Willem M.

    2014-01-01

    Reservoirs exhibit gradients in conditions and resources along the transition from lotic to lentic habitat that may be important to bluegill ecology. The lotic–lentic gradient can be partitioned into three functional zones: the riverine, transitional, and lacustrine zones. We measured catch frequency and length of bluegills (Lepomis macrochirus) captured along the periphery of these areas (i.e., in the littoral zone of each functional zone) for four small reservoirs in Southeastern Ohio during the summer months of three years. Catch frequency differed between zones for two reservoirs, but these differences were not observed in other years. There was no relationship between reservoir zone and either standard length or catch frequency when the data for all reservoirs were pooled, but we did observe a bimodal length distribution in all reservoirs. A combination of ecological factors including inter and intraspecific competition, predation intensity, management practices, limnology, and assemblage complexity may be mitigating bluegill distribution and abundance in reservoirs. Therefore, a functional zone (categorical) approach to understanding bluegill ecology in reservoirs may not be appropriate. PMID:25177535

  14. Oxygen radical production in bluegill sunfish liver microsomes exposed to anthracene and UV radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J.; Oris, J.

    1995-12-31

    Many polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are acutely toxic to fish in the presence of ultraviolet radiation. Oxygen radicals are very reactive and are responsible for many cellular injuries including membrane peroxidation and DNA fragmentation. In this research increased oxygen radical production was hypothesized for the mechanism of UV-PAH acute toxicity. In order to test this hypothesis Bluegill sunfish (Lepomis machrochirus) liver microsomes were exposed to anthracene and UV radiation in four different combinations: (No UV + No Ant), (No UV + Ant), (UV + No Ant), (UV + Ant). The production of superoxide anion was quantified by measuring the spectrophotometric absorbance of acetylated cytochrome c, which is reduced by superoxide anion. 1 ml of reaction solution contained 1 mg of microsomes and, for Ant treatments, 7.7 {micro}g of anthracene. After 3 hours preincubation, acetylated cytochrome c solution was added. The UV treatment groups were exposed to UV-A for 20 minutes at 37 C. The highest mean concentration of reduced acetylated cytochrome c was found in the UV + Ant treatment group and it was significantly different from all other treatment groups. No significant differences were observed among the other three treatment groups. This result coincides with previous studies revealing that anthracene is acutely toxic to fish only under UV radiation, and it implies that the photoinduced toxicity of anthracene, as well as other PAHs, is manifested by the action of oxygen radicals.

  15. Experimental Infections of Bluegill with the Trematode Ribeiroia ondatrae (Digenea: Cathaemasiidae): Histopathology and Hematological Response

    PubMed Central

    Calhoun, Dana M.; Schaffer, Paula A.; Gregory, Jacklyn R.; Hardy, Katherine M.; Johnson, Pieter T. J.

    2016-01-01

    Infections by the digenetic trematode, Ribeiroia ondatrae, cause severe limb malformations in many North American amphibians. Ribeiroia ondatrae also infects fishes as second intermediate hosts, but less is known about the pathology and immune responses initiated in infected fish, even though reports of infected fish date back to early 1900s. To this end, we experimentally exposed juvenile Bluegills Lepomis macrochirus to three doses of R. ondatrae cercariae and monitored the pathology, parasite infection success, and humoral responses over 648 h. All exposed fish became infected with metacercariae, and the average infection load increased with exposure dose. Histologically, infection was associated with acute hemorrhages in the lateral line and local dermis at 36 h, followed by progressive granulomatous inflammation that led to the destruction of encysted metacercariae. Correspondingly, over the course of 648 h we observed an 85% decline in average infection load among hosts, reflecting the host’s clearance of the parasite. Infection was not associated with changes in fish growth or survival, but did correlate with leukocytosis and neutrophilia in circulating host blood. Understanding the physiological responses of R. ondatrae in Bluegill will help to clarify the ecological effects of this parasite and provide a foundation for subsequent comparisons into its effects on behavior, individual health, and population dynamics of Bluegill. PMID:26587684

  16. Histopathological changes in selenium-exposed fish

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, E.M.; Bell, J.S.; Harlan, C.W.

    1983-06-01

    Redear sunfish (Lepomis microlophus) were collected from Martin Lake in east Texas. For at least 8 months, 1 year earlier, aqueous selenium-laden effluent from man-made sources was released into this 5,000-acre reservoir (unpublished data). Redear sunfish from a reference lake, 8 km upstream, were collected for comparison to Martin Lake fish. The hepatopancreas (i.e., liver and associated, disseminated exocrine pancrease), mesonephros (i.e., kidney), gonads, heart, spleen, stomach, and gill arches were preserved for histopathological examination using optical and/or transmission electron microscopy. Livers from Martin Lake redear sunfish (which had accumulated approximately 20 ppm selenium in the liver) showed central necrosis, reduced quantities of rough endoplasmic reticulum and glycogen particles, and increased numbers of lysosome-like structures. Kidneys showed proliferative glomerulonephritis, and exocrine pancreas showed marked hypertrophy at the optical level. Ultrastructurally, architectural disorganization, reduced rough endoplasmic reticulum, increased cisternal space, and proliferation of smooth endoplasmic reticulum were evident. The stomach, spleen, gill, heart, and gonads showed no abnormalities.

  17. Toxicity of selected priority pollutants to various aquatic organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Holcombe, G.W.; Phipps, G.L.; Fiandt, J.T.

    1983-08-01

    Toxicity tests were conducted with selected compounds listed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as priority pollutants. Acute toxicity information was determined for acenaphthene, arsenic trioxide, cadmium chloride, mercury(II) chloride, silver nitrate, chlordane, endosulfan, and heptachlor. Acute tests were conducted using one or more of the following species: fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), brown trout (Salmo trutta), brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis), bluegills (Lepomis macrochirus), snails (Aplexa hypnorum), or chironomids (Tanytarsus dissimilis). Acute values from these tests ranged from a silver nitrate 96-hr LC50 of 6.7 micrograms/liter for fathead minnows to an arsenic trioxide 48-hr LC50 of 97,000 micrograms/liter for chironomids. In addition to acute tests, a fathead minnow embryo-larval exposure was conducted with silver nitrate to estimate chronic toxicity. The estimated maximum acceptable toxicant concentration for silver nitrate, based on fathead minnow survival, lies between 0.37 and 0.65 micrograms/liter.

  18. Evaluation of the resident-species procedure for developing site-specific water quality criteria for copper in Blaine Creek, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, M.G.; Farris, J.L.; Cherry, D.S.; Cairns, J. . Dept. of Biology); Reash, R.J. . Environmental Engineering Div.)

    1994-06-01

    Acute toxicity tests were performed on each of nine different organisms in Blaine Creek (Lawrence County, KY) water to determine 48-h LC50 values for copper (Cu). Blaine Creek is the receiving stream for Kentucky Power Company's Big Sandy Plant fly-ash pond discharge. Selection of the nine tested species and integration of the results were based on the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) resident-species procedure. The following LC50 ([mu]g Cu/L) values were obtained: Daphnia pulex 37; Physella sp. 109; Isonychia bicolor 223; Pimephales promelas 284; Stenonema sp. 453; Eurycea bislineata 1,120; Chironomus riparius 1,170; Orconectes sp. 2,370; Lepomis macrochirus 4,300. A final acute value (FAV) of 10.1 [mu]g Cu/L was derived using the Blaine Creek database, which is lower than the EPA's national FAV. The differences in FAVs were due to the effect of database size, not differences in the relative sensitivity of test organisms. The findings provide caution for dischargers who may choose to use the resident-species procedure for future site-specific water-quality-criteria demonstrations. The resident-species procedure, because of the inherent conservative bias of the calculation process, tends to produce more stringent criteria when used on a site-specific basis. A modified recalculation procedure, in conduction with site-specific metal bioavailability data, was judged to be the most appropriate method for deriving site-specific Cu criteria for Blaine Creek.

  19. Use of biorobotic models of highly deformable fins for studying the mechanics and control of fin forces in fishes.

    PubMed

    Tangorra, James; Phelan, Chris; Esposito, Chris; Lauder, George

    2011-07-01

    Bony fish swim with a level of agility that is unmatched in human-developed systems. This is due, in part, to the ability of the fish to carefully control hydrodynamic forces through the active modulation of the fins' kinematics and mechanical properties. To better understand how fish produce and control forces, biorobotic models of the bluegill sunfish's (Lepomis macrochirus) caudal fin and pectoral fins were developed. The designs of these systems were based on detailed analyses of the anatomy, kinematics, and hydrodynamics of the biological fins. The fin models have been used to investigate how fin kinematics and the mechanical properties of the fin-rays influence propulsive forces and to explore kinematic patterns that were inspired by biological motions but that were not explicitly performed by the fish. Results from studies conducted with the fin models indicate that subtle changes to the kinematics and mechanical properties of fin rays can significantly impact the magnitude, direction, and time course of the 3D forces used for propulsion and maneuvers. The magnitude of the force tends to scale with the fin's stiffness, but the direction of the force is not invariant, and this causes disproportional changes in the magnitude of the thrust, lift, and lateral components of force. Results from these studies shed light on the multiple strategies that are available to the fish to modulate fin forces. PMID:21653544

  20. Reproductive effects assessment of largemouth bass and bluegill in the Watts Bar Lake/Clinch River system

    SciTech Connect

    Niemela, S.L.; McCracken, M.K.; Ivey, L.J.; Greeley, M.S. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    Successful reproduction is key to the survival and maintenance of viable fish populations and therefore an important consideration in ecological risk assessments. In order to evaluate the reproductive health of fish in the Watts Bar Lake/Clinch River system downstream of the Department of Energy facilities in Oak Ridge, TN, largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) were collected from seven sites at the beginning of the spawning period and a suite of parameters indicative of reproductive condition were measured. Measures of reproductive condition common to male and female fish included gonadal somatic index (GSI), and plasma concentrations of reproductive hormones. Gender specific analyses included a histological examination of the testes in males and a quantitative evaluation of ovarian parameters in females including determinations of fecundity, the number of vitellogenic and atretic oocytes, and the incidences of ovarian parasites. Evidence of reproductive impairment in largemouth bass at the two sites immediately adjacent to the Oak Ridge Reservation included lower GSIs and reproductive hormone levels (males and females), and reduced fecundity and an increase in the number of atretic oocytes (females). Similar trends were not observed in bluegill sunfish. These findings suggest that reproduction in a top-level predatory fish species, the largemouth bass, may be negatively affected by activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  1. Assessing the toxicity to fish embryos of surface water from the Watts Bar Lake/Clinch River system

    SciTech Connect

    Ivey, L.J.; Niemela, S.L.; McCracken, M.K.; Greeley, M.S. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    Successful reproduction of fish populations requires the successful development of offspring into new reproductive cohorts. In order to evaluate the ability of fish offspring to survive and develop properly in the Watts Bar Lake/Clinch River system downstream of the Department of Energy facilities in Oak Ridge, TN, a series of fish embryo-larval toxicity tests were conducted on surface water samples from Poplar Creek and the Clinch River adjacent to the Oak Ridge Reservation. Quarterly tests were conducted over an eighteen-month interval with embryos from laboratory stocks of the Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). Eggs obtained from largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and redbreast sunfish (Lepomis auritus) collected from reference sites during their respective breeding seasons were fertilized in vitro for additional embryo-larval tests utilizing fish species indigenous to the Watts Bar/Clinch River system. Average survival of medaka embryos decreased significantly in water from Poplar Creek sites within the Oak Ridge Reservation, coincident with an increase in the prevalence of certain developmental abnormalities. Similar but less pronounced results were also obtained with redbreast sunfish embryos. Development of largemouth bass eggs was not adversely affected by any of the tested water samples. These findings suggest that the development of fish eggs and fry in certain reaches of the Watts Bar Lake/Clinch River system may be negatively impacted by activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  2. Development and characterization of a largemouth bass cell line.

    PubMed

    Getchell, Rodman G; Groocock, Geoffrey H; Cornwell, Emily R; Schumacher, Vanessa L; Glasner, Lindsay I; Baker, Barry J; Frattini, Stephen A; Wooster, Gregory A; Bowser, Paul R

    2014-09-01

    Abstract The development and characterization of a new cell line, derived from the ovary of Largemouth Bass Micropterus salmoides, is described. Gonad tissue was collected from Largemouth Bass that were electrofished from Oneida Lake, New York. The tissue was processed and grown in culture flasks at approximately 22°C for more than 118 passages during an 8-year period from 2004 to 2011. The identity of these cells as Largemouth Bass origin was confirmed by sequencing a portion of the cytochrome b gene. Growth rate at three different temperatures was documented. The cell line was susceptible to Largemouth Bass virus (LMBV) and its replication was compared with that of Bluegill Lepomis macrochirus fry (BF-2), one of the cell lines recommended for LMBV isolation by the American Fisheries Society Fish Health Section Blue Book. Quantitative PCR results from the replication trial showed the BF-2 cell line produced approximately 10-fold more LMBV copies per cell than the new Largemouth Bass cell line after 6 d, while the titration assay showed similar quantities in each cell line after 1 week. Received February 18, 2014; accepted April 16, 2014.

  3. Differential accumulation of selenium among axial muscle, reproductive and liver tissues of four warmwater fish species

    SciTech Connect

    Sager, D.R.; Cofield, C.R.

    1984-06-01

    Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), white catfish (Ictalurus catus), and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), collected from an electric power plant cooling reservoir and a municipal water supply reservoir near Roxboro, North Carolina, were analyzed for selenium concentrations in axial muscle, reproductive and liver tissues. Fishes from the municipal water reservoir had lower selenium concentrations (<0.2-2.1 ..mu..g/g - wet weight) than found in the cooling reservoir fishes (1.6-70.0 ..mu..g/g - wet weight) but similar distributions of concentrations among the tissues was evident. Selenium was differentially accumulated, with higher concentrations in liver tissues (0.7 - 70.0 ..mu..g/g - wet weight), followed by female productive tissues (0.7 - 25.0 ..mu..g/g - wet weight), axial muscle tissues (< 0.2 - 23.0 ..mu..g/g - wet weight) and male reproductive tissues (0.02 - 7.2 ..mu..g/g - wet weight).

  4. Fish Community Responses to the Establishment of a Piscivore, Northern Pike (Esox lucius), in a Nebraska Sandhill Lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeBates, T.J.; Paukert, C.P.; Willis, D.W.

    2003-01-01

    Northern pike (Esox lucius) was first documented in West Long Lake, Nebraska, in 1998 when two pike <380 mm were collected. In 2002, a Peterson mark-recapture population estimate on northern pike revealed density and standing stock (i.e., biomass) estimates of 35.8 fish/ha (95% CI= ?? 8.8) and 22.0 kg/ha (95% CI= ?? 5.4), respectively. Consequently, West Long Lake was sampled in 2002 to compare relative abundance, size structure, and growth of bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), and yellow perch (Perca flavescens) prior to and after the establishment of a high-density northern pike population. Bluegill, largemouth bass, and yellow perch relative abundances were significantly lower in 2002 than 1998. Similarly, size structures of all three species were significantly different between years. Size structure declined for both bluegill and yellow perch, and increased for largemouth bass. Growth was significantly higher for bluegill, largemouth bass, and yellow perch in 2002 than 1998. While the fish community changes were expected with the establishment of northern pike, they occurred in a relatively short time period (i.e., four years).

  5. Species diversity of fishes in naturally acidic lakes in New Jersey

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, J.H. )

    1993-11-01

    Fish communities in acidic lakes of New Jersey have fewer species than do those in more alkaline lakes of comparable size. This conclusion is based on a multiple regression analysis of published data on fish communities, area, and pH in 85 lakes. Some interesting patterns emerge, however, when species are partitioned into introduced and native species. As expected, diversity of introduced species declines with increasing acidity. The number of native species in a particular lake, however, is independent of pH (range of 4.1 to 9.1). Although diversity of native species is not influenced by pH, species composition changes. The lack of a significant relationship between species diversity of native species and pH can be attributed to the replacement of acid-intolerant species by tolerant species. The smaller number of introduced species in acidic lakes is attributable to both fewer species stocked and a greater frequency of failure for those that were stocked. Species introduction records for largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides and bluegill Lepomis macrochirus, which are not native to New Jersey, reveal far more failed introduction in acidic waters than in neutral or alkaline waters. 54 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Population characteristics and ecological role of northern pike in shallow natural lakes in Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paukert, C.P.; Willis, D.W.

    2003-01-01

    Northern pike Esox lucius were sampled in Nebraska's Sandhill lakes during 1998 and 1999 to determine population characteristics and their influence on the fish community in these shallow, warm lakes at the southwestern edge of this species' natural range. Density-dependent growth, size structure, and condition were not evident in the northern pike populations sampled. Relative abundance of largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides was positively related to size structure of yellow perch Perca flavescens and bluegills Lepomis macrochirus when northen pike were absent. When northern pike and largemouth bass populations were sympatric, these relationships were less evident. Population size structure of yellow perch was lower in lakes with northern pike, but decreased size structure was not evident for bluegills. Northern pike growth decreased with July bottom water temperature, which ranged from 20??C to 25??C. Recruitment patterns of northern pike in the Sandhill lakes appeared to be lake-specific, strong and weak year-classes occurring in the same year among different populations. Northern pike in these shallow, warm lakes act as a top-down predator and appear to structure fish communities predominated by largemouth bass and panfish. Biologists managing warmwater Midwestern lakes thus should consider the effect of northern pike on fish communities.

  7. Purification of the 70-kDa heat-shock protein from catfish liver: Immunological comparison of the protein in different fish species and its potential use as a stress indicator

    SciTech Connect

    Abukhalaf, I.K.; Zimmerman, E.G.; Dickson, K.L.; Masaracchia, R.A.; Donahue, M.J. ); Covington, S. )

    1994-08-01

    The heat-shock protein or stress-70 family was isolated from catfish liver. The homogeneity of the purified protein was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Fish subjected to whole-body hyperthermia contained the constitutive and the heat-inducible stress-70 with approximate molecular weights of 70 and 68 kDa, respectively. The final purification product from livers of catfish raised under normal temperature was only the constitutive stress-70. Western blot analysis with rabbit antiserum prepared against purified catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) liver stress-70 showed that the antibody cross-reacted with liver, muscle, and gill tissue homogenates of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), red shiners (Cyprinella lutrensis), black bass (Micropterus salmoides), and bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), with various intensities suggesting that stress-70s from different tissues of various fish species share common antigenic determinants of the protein. This substantiates that the antigen/antibody approach of stress-70 is useful as a stress indicator and, consequently, as a potential biomarker for water quality.

  8. Site specificity and movement of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) in a thermally altered reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Tuel, T.A.

    1986-12-01

    A mark-recapture experiment was conducted in Pond C, a thermally altered reservoir in the Par Pond system of the Savannah River Plant. The standing crop for bass spread throughout the reservoir was 2.7 to 3.8 kg/ha. From the length/mass relationships, for a given total length, Pond C bass weighed less than bass from other lakes and reservoirs and had a lower condition coefficient than bass from normal lakes and reservoirs. Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) were found, from the length/mass relationships, for a given length, to weigh less than bluegill in other lakes and reservoirs and also had a low condition coefficient which was similar to bluegill found in thermally impacted lakes and reservoirs. Thus, bluegill in Pond C and other thermally affected reservoirs, like bass, also suffer a loss of body condition due to the thermal and trophic stresses in these systems. The rate at which bass move out of the refuge areas (24 m per day) is lower than the rate at which bass move in other lakes and reservoirs. Bluegill move (23 m per day) out of the refuge areas at a rate similar to that of bass. 43 refs., 12 figs., 9 tabs.

  9. Factors controlling mercury and methylmercury concentrations in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and other fish from Maryland reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Sveinsdottir, Audur Yr; Mason, Robert P

    2005-11-01

    The concentration of mercury (Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) was determined for largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) and black crappie (Pomoxis nigromaculatus) from Maryland reservoirs. Overall, there was a large difference in normalized bass MeHg concentration (for fish of approximately 370 mm) between the reservoirs, ranging from <100 ng g(-1) to almost 800 ng g(-1). Furthermore, the relationship between fish weight and MeHg concentration varied substantially between lakes, and showed no geographical relationship. The concentration of Hg, MeHg and ancillary parameters were determined in the water and correlations were sought between the normalized concentration of MeHg in bass and both physical and chemical parameters of the reservoirs, as well as the concentration of MeHg in the prey of the largemouth bass. Bass MeHg concentration correlated with dissolved MeHg and dissolved organic carbon, but not with other chemical parameters. There was no relationship to physical characteristics that varied over orders of magnitude for these reservoirs. Dissolved MeHg did not correlate with any chemical or physical attributes. Overall, this study suggests that water column MeHg is a good predictor of fish concentration but that the water column MeHg cannot be predicted based on usually measured chemical and physical characteristics of fresh water bodies.

  10. Phylogeography and conservation genetics of a distinct lineage of sunfish in the Cuatro Ciénegas valley of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Coghill, Lyndon M; Hulsey, C Darrin; Chaves-Campos, Johel; García de Leon, Francisco J; Johnson, Steven G

    2013-01-01

    The valley of Cuatro Ciénegas, an aquatic oasis located in the Mexican Chihuahuan Desert, exhibits the highest level of endemism in North America and is a Mexican National Protected Area. However, little is known about the evolutionary distinctiveness of several vertebrate species present in the Cuatro Ciénegas valley. We conducted a phylogeographic study using mitochondrial haplotypes from the centrarchid fish Lepomis megalotis to determine if the populations found within the valley were evolutionarily distinct from populations outside the valley. We also examined if there was evidence of unique haplotypes of this sunfish within the valley. Genetic divergence of L. megalotis suggests populations within the valley are evolutionarily unique when compared to L. megalotis outside the valley. Significant mitochondrial sequence divergence was also discovered between L. megalotis populations on either side of the Sierra de San Marcos that bisects the valley. Our results reinforce previous studies that suggest the organisms occupying aquatic habitats not only within Cuatro Ciénegas but also in each of the two lobes of the valley generally deserve independent consideration during management decisions.

  11. Reproductive biology of four freshwater mussels (Bivalvia: Unionidae) endemic to eastern Gulf Coastal Plain drainages of Alabama, Florida, and Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Brien, C. A.; Williams, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    The reproductive biology and glochidial shell morphology of three federally endangered freshwater mussels, the fat threeridge, Amblema neislerii; Gulf moccasinshell, Medionidus penicillatus; and oval pigtoe, Pleurobema pyriforme; and one federally threatened mussel, the purple bankclimber, Elliptoideus sloatianus, were studied from May 1995 to June 1997 in the Apalachicola, Flint, and Ochlockonee river drainages of Florida and Georgia. Gravid A. neislerii were found in early June. Laboratory experiments indicated that five fish species served as hosts: weed shiner, Notropis texanus; bluegill, Lepomis macrochirus; redear sunfish, L. microlophus; largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides; and blackbanded darter, Percina nigrofasciata. Elliptoideus sloatianus were found gravid from late February through mid-April. None of the 14 fish species exposed to E. sloatianus glochidia resulted in the identification of a primary host fish. Medionidus penicillatus were found gravid during September, November, March, and April. The brown darter, Etheostoma edwini, and blackbanded darter, Percina nigrofasciata, were identified as primary host fishes for M. penicillatus. Pleurobema pyriforme were found gravid from March through July. Only the sailfin shiner, Pleronotropis hypsehpterus, was identified as a primary host fish for P. pyriforme. Glochidial shell morphology of A. neislerii, M. penicillatus, and P. pyriforme were similar to other species in their respective genera. The glochidia of the monotypic species E. sloatianus were morphologically most similar to Epioblasma brevidens and E. capsaeformis.

  12. The antioxidant glutathione in the fish cell lines EPC and BCF-2: response to model pro-oxidants as measured by three different fluorescent dyes.

    PubMed

    Jos, A; Cameán, A M; Pflugmacher, S; Segner, H

    2009-04-01

    Reduced glutathione (GSH) protects cells against injury by oxidative stress and maintains a range of vital functions. In vitro cell cultures have been used as experimental models to study the role of GSH in chemical toxicity in mammals; however, this approach has been rarely used with fish cells to date. The present study aimed to evaluate sensitivity and specificity of three fluorescent dyes for measuring pro-oxidant-induced changes of GSH contents in fish cell lines: monochlorobimane (mBCl), 5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate (CMFDA) and 7-amino-4-chloromethylcoumarin (CMAC-blue). Two cell lines were studied, the EPC line established from a skin tumour of carp Cyprinus carpio, and BF-2 cells established from fins of bluegill sunfish Lepomis macrochirus. The cells were exposed for 6 and 24 h to low cytotoxic concentrations of pro-oxidants including hydrogen peroxide, paraquat (PQ), copper and the GSH synthesis inhibitor, L-buthionine-SR-sulfoximine (BSO). The results indicate moderate differences in the GSH response between EPC and BF-2 cells, but distinct differences in the magnitude of the GSH response for the four pro-oxidants. Further, the choice of GSH dye can critically affect the results, with CMFDA appearing to be less specific for GSH than mBCl and CMAC-blue. PMID:19444932

  13. Seasonal and diel patterns of larval fish drift in a western South Carolina swamp

    SciTech Connect

    Kissick, L.A.; Paller, M.H.; Heuer, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    Fish larvae were collected weekly during 1986-1987 from the lower 3 km of Steel Creek (Barnwell County), a riverine swamp, to assess reproduction in this rarely studied habitat type. In 1987, larvae appeared in the following order and abundance (as a percentage of the total diural density): blackbanded darter Percina nigromaculatus (3%) and other darters Etheostoma spp. (32%); pirate perch Aphredoderus sayanus (NA); pygmy sunfish Elassoma spp. (7%); chubsuckers Erimyson spp. (13%); bluespotted sunfish Enneacanthus gloriosus (16%); bluegill Lepomis macrochirus (1%), redbreast sunfish L. auritus (<1%), brook silverside Labidesthes sicculus (6%) and ironcolor shiner Notropis chalybaeus (8%); warmouth L. gulosus (8%); spotted sunfish L. punctatus (NA). Unidentified cyprinids (2%), centrarchids (2%) and miscellaneous species (3%) were collected throughout the study period. Monthly diel collections showed that drift densities of chubsuckers, cyprinids, Etheostoma spp., bluegill and pygmy sunfish increased 41 to 160X after sundown; pirate perch and spotted sunfish were collected only at night. Swamp densities peaked during 2000-0159 h (111.5 per 100m), whereas densities in the channel that drained the swamp into the Savannah River peaked during 0200-0759 h (38.7). The later peak in the channel was attributed to larvae that had drifted from the swamp and were essentially lost from the system. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Gill lesions and death of bluegill in an acid mine drainage mixing zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henry, T.B.; Irwin, E.R.; Grizzle, J.M.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Wildhaber, M.L.

    2001-01-01

    The toxicity of an acid mine drainage (AMD) mixing zone was investigated by placing bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) at the confluence of a stream contaminated by AMD and a stream having neutral pH. A mixing channel receiving water from both streams was assembled in the field, during July and October 1996, to determine the toxicity of freshly mixed and aged water (2.9-7.5 min). The AMD stream had elevated concentrations of Al and Fe, which precipitated upon mixing, and of Mn, which did not precipitate in the mixing zone. Fish exposed to freshly mixed water had higher mortality than fish exposed to water after aging. Precipitating Al, but not Fe, accumulated on the gills of bluegill, and accumulation was more rapid early during the mixing process than after aging. Fish exposed for 3.5 h to freshly mixed water had hypertrophy and hyperplasia of gill filament and lamellar epithelial cells. Similar lesions were observed after 6.0 h in fish exposed to water aged after mixing. Results demonstrated that Al was the predominant metal accumulating on the gills of fish in this AMD mixing zone, and that mixing zones can be more toxic than AMD streams in equilibrium.

  15. Acute toxicity of metals and reference toxicants to a freshwater ostracod, Cypris subglobosa Sowerby, 1840 and correlation to EC(50) values of other test models.

    PubMed

    Khangarot, B S; Das, Sangita

    2009-12-30

    The ostracod Cypris subglobosa Sowerby, 1840 static bioassay test on the basis of a 48h of 50% of immobilization (EC(50)) has been used to measure the toxicity of 36 metals and metalloids and 12 reference toxicants. Among the 36 metals and metalloids, osmium (Os) was found to be the most toxic in the test while boron (B), the least toxic. The EC(50) values of this study revealed positive linear relationship with the established test models of cladoceran (Daphnia magna), sludge worm (Tubifex tubifex), chironomid larvae (Chironomus tentans), protozoan (Tetrahymena pyriformis), fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), and aquatic macrophyte duckweed (Lemna minor). Correlation coefficients (r(2)) for 17 physicochemical properties of metals or metal ions and EC(50)s (as pM) were examined by linear regression analysis. The electronegativity, ionization potential, melting point, solubility product of metal sulfides (pK(sp)), softness parameter and some other physicochemical characteristics were significantly correlated with EC(50)s of metals to C. subglobosa. The reproducibility of toxicity test was determined using 12 reference toxicants. The coefficient of variability of the EC(50)s ranged from 6.95% to 55.37% and variability was comparable to that noticed for D. magna and other aquatic test models. The study demonstrated the need to include crustacean ostracods in a battery of biotests to detect the presence of hazardous chemicals in soils, sewage sludges, sediments and aquatic systems. PMID:19683870

  16. Microchemical analysis of selenium in otoliths of two West Virginia fishes captured near mountaintop removal coal mining operations.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Mariah C; Friedrich, Lisa A; Lindberg, T Ty; Ross, Matthew; Halden, Norman M; Bernhardt, Emily; Palace, Vince P; Di Giulio, Richard T

    2015-05-01

    Otoliths, calcified inner ear structures, were collected from creek chubs (Semotilus atromaculatus) and green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus) living in mountaintop mining-impacted and reference streams and analyzed for selenium (Se) content using laser ablation-inductively coupled mass spectrometry. Significant differences in otolith Se were found between the 2 fish species. Results from the present study suggest that a retrospective reconstruction of Se concentrations in muscle can be derived from Se concentrations in otoliths in creek chub but not green sunfish, exemplifying the importance of species differences when determining partitioning of Se among specific tissues. Green sunfish otoliths from all sites contained background (<1 μg/g) or low (1-4 μg/g) average concentrations of whole-otolith Se. In contrast, creek chub otoliths from the historically mined site contained much higher (≥5 μg/g) concentrations of Se than for the same species in the unmined site or for the green sunfish. These data suggest that body burdens of Se in fish can vary considerably over time and that both the timing of sampling and species choice could heavily influence Se assessments.

  17. A comparison of mercury burdens between St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge and St. Andrew Bay, Florida: Evaluation of fish body burdens and physiological responses in largemouth bass, spotted seatrout, striped mullet, and sunfish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huge, D.H.; Rauschenberger, R.H.; Wieser, F.M.; Hemming, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Musculature from the dorsal region of 130 largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), 140 sunfish (Lepomis sp.), 41 spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus) and 67 striped mullet (Mugil cephalus) were collected from five estuarine and five freshwater sites within the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge and two estuarine and two freshwater sites from St. Andrew Bay, Florida, United States of America. Musculature was analyzed for total mercury content, sagittal otoliths were removed for age determination and physiological responses were measured. Largemouth bass and sunfish from the refuge had higher mercury concentrations in musculature than those from the bay. Male spotted seatrout, male striped mullet, male and female sunfish and female largemouth bass had mercury burdens positively correlated with length. The majority of all four species of fish from both study areas contained mercury levels below 1.5 part per million, the limit for safe consumption recommended the Florida Department of Health. In comparison, a significant percentage of largemouth bass and sunfish from several sampled sites, most notably Otter Lake and Lake Renfroe within St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, had mercury levels consistent with the health department's guidelines of 'limited consumption' or 'no consumption guidelines.'

  18. Intraspecific phenotypic variation among alewife populations drives parallel phenotypic shifts in bluegill

    PubMed Central

    Huss, Magnus; Howeth, Jennifer G.; Osterman, Julia I.; Post, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary diversification within consumer species may generate selection on local ecological communities, affecting prey community structure. However, the extent to which this niche construction can propagate across food webs and shape trait variation in competing species is unknown. Here, we tested whether niche construction by different life-history variants of the planktivorous fish alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) can drive phenotypic divergence and resource use in the competing species bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus). Using a combination of common garden experiments and a comparative field study, we found that bluegill from landlocked alewife lakes grew relatively better when fed small than large zooplankton, had gill rakers better adapted for feeding on small-bodied prey and selected smaller zooplankton compared with bluegill from lakes with anadromous or no alewife. Observed shifts in bluegill foraging traits in lakes with landlocked alewife parallel those in alewife, suggesting interspecific competition leading to parallel phenotypic changes rather than to divergence (which is commonly predicted). Our findings suggest that species may be locally adapted to prey communities structured by different life-history variants of a competing dominant species. PMID:24920478

  19. The development of a site-specific water-quality standard for copper

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    This dissertation proposes to determine, for one toxic chemical, copper, if the Federal water quality standard and the state interpretation of that standard are appropriate for the Duck River, some 50 miles south of Nashville, Tennessee. This involved conducting toxicity tests in Duck River water, and the use of the computer metal speciation program MINTEQA1 to predict instream impact. The speciation model chosen for the determination of chemical equilibria in this study was MINTEQA1. To test the validity of the MINTEQA1 speciation model, water chemistry from the Duck River was entered into the model. At the typical site pH of 7.8, 55.7% of the copper is bound as Cu(OH){sub 2}, 29.8% is bound as copper humate, and 12.7% is found as CuCO{sub 3}. Of extreme importance to the toxicity of copper in the site water is the complete absence of the most toxic species, ionic copper. The test species were the brook silversides minnow (Labidesthes sicculus), mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis), caddisfly larvae (Cheumatopsyche sp.), fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), geniculate river snail (Lithasia geniculata), sunfish (Lepomis sp.), and the amphipod (Hyalella azeca). The test concentrations were confirmed by atomic absorption spectroscopy on selected concentrations. The caddisfly larvae was the single most tolerant species observed during this study, while the amphipod and snail were the two most sensitive species tested.

  20. Implications of stunting on morphology of freshwater fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chizinski, C.J.; Pope, K.L.; Wilde, G.R.; Strauss, R.E.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess morphological differences between stunted and non-stunted white perch Morone americana and green sunfish Lepomis cyanellus. Few female M. americana were captured; thus, morphological differences between adult males and juveniles were assessed for M. americana. Similarly, few immature (juvenile) L. cyanellus were captured for the stunted morphotype; thus, male and female morphological differences were assessed for L. cyanellus. Features of the head tended to be relatively larger in stunted fish of both species, whereas the mid-body tended to be relatively larger in non-stunted M. americana, but not in non-stunted L. cyanellus. Adult and juvenile morphology overlapped considerably in non-stunted M. americana, but there was a clear distinction between adult and juvenile morphology of stunted M. americana. There was little sexual dimorphism in shape in stunted L. cyanellus, whereas sexual dimorphism was evident in non-stunted L. cyanellus. It appears that selective forces imposed by predation and food limitation may contribute to morphological diversification between stunted and non-stunted fishes. ?? 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation ?? 2010 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  1. Localized effects of coal mine drainage on fish assemblages in a Cumberland Plateau stream in Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Schorr, M.S.; Backer, J.C.

    2006-03-15

    The upper watershed of North Chickamauga Creek (NCC), a fourth-order tributary to the Tennessee River, Tennessee, has been impacted by decades of acid mine drainage (AMD) from abandoned coal mines. We assessed fish assemblages, pH, conductivity, and sediment coverage at 12 study reaches (six AMD sites and six reference sites) in the Cumberland Plateau region of the NCC system, May-September 1998. Stream pH increased (3.6 to 6.0) and conductivity decreased (296 to 49 {mu}S/cm) downstream of the AMD-impacted area; however, no discernable gradient was observed in sediment cover. Elevated conductivity at AMD-impacted sites reflected increased concentrations of dissolved metals and other inorganic ions. Reference sites exhibited higher pH (6.0-6.4) and lower conductivity (13-28 {mu}S/cm). Acidified reaches were characterized by low fish species richness and abundance; no fish were observed at sites where the mean pH was {lt} 5. Centrarchids (mostly bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) and green sunfish (L. cyanellus)) comprised {gt} 90 % of the catch at AMD sites, whereas cypriniids (creek chub (Semotilus atromaculatus) and blacknose dace (Rhinichthys atratulus)) accounted for {gt} 90 % of the catch at reference sites. Findings from this study document the negative effects of acid drainage from coal mines on fish assemblages in a Cumberland Plateau stream.

  2. Environmental factors regulating the recruitment of walleye Sander vitreus and white bass Morone chrysops in irrigation reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeBoer, Jason A.; Pope, Kevin L.; Koupal, Keith D.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the environmental factors that regulate fish recruitment is essential for effective management of fisheries. Generally, first-year survival, and therefore recruitment, is inherently less consistent in systems with high intra- and interannual variability. Irrigation reservoirs display sporadic patterns of annual drawdown, which can pose a substantial challenge to recruitment of fishes. We developed species-specific models using an 18-year data set compiled from state and federal agencies to investigate variables that regulate the recruitment of walleye Sander vitreus and white bass Morone chrysops in irrigation reservoirs in south-west Nebraska, USA. The candidate model set for walleye included only abiotic variables (water-level elevation, minimum daily air temperature during winter prior to hatching, annual precipitation, spring warming rate and May reservoir discharge), and the candidate model set for white bass included primarily biotic variables (catch per unit effort (CPUE) of black crappie Pomoxis nigromaculatus, CPUE of age-0 walleye, CPUE of bluegill Lepomis macrochirus and CPUE of age-3 and older white bass), each of which had a greater relative importance than the single abiotic variable (minimum daily air temperature during winter after hatching). Our findings improve the understanding of the recruitment of fishes in irrigation reservoirs and the relative roles of abiotic and biotic factors.

  3. System for maintaining sediment suspensions during larval fish studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chilton, E.W.

    1991-01-01

    A new system was developed for maintaining suspensions of inorganic solids during laboratory studies on early life stages of fish. Microfine bentonite was successfully held in suspension in specially constructed units during a 21-d fishless test, a 28-d experiment with juvenile green sunfish (lepomis cyanellus), and four shorter experiments (5-9 d) with four species of larval fishes, white sucker (catostomus commersoni), northern pike (esox lucius), channel catfish (ictalurus punctatus), and walleye (stizostedion vitreum). Each experiment on larval fish was conducted until the yolk-sac had been absorbed. Concentrations of bentonite ranged from 0 to 728 mg/l. Each unit consisted of a holding chamber set in a stainless steel bowl and two submersible pumps that recirculated the suspension. Turbidity readings remained nearly constant throughout each experiment. Because the turbidity of suspensions was well correlated with bentonite concentration (r2 = 0.989) And easy to measure, turbidity was used as an indicator of concentration. The system is inexpensive, easy to assemble, and does not require a diluter system to maintain constant concentrations of suspended material.

  4. Multiple stressors in amphibian communities: effects of chemical contamination, bullfrogs, and fish.

    PubMed

    Boone, Michelle D; Semlitsch, Raymond D; Little, Edward E; Doyle, Meaghan C

    2007-01-01

    A leading hypothesis of amphibian population declines is that combinations of multiple stressors contribute to declines. We examined the role that chemical contamination, competition, and predation play singly and in combination in aquatic amphibian communities. We exposed larvae of American toads (Bufo americanus), southern leopard frogs (Rana sphenocephala), and spotted salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum) to overwintered bullfrog tadpoles (R. catesbeiana), bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), the insecticide carbaryl, and ammonium nitrate fertilizer in 1000-L mesocosms. Most significantly, our study demonstrated that the presence of multiple factors reduced survival of B. americanus and A. maculatum and lengthened larval periods of R. sphenocephala. The presence of bluegill had the largest impact on the community; it eliminated B. americanus and A. maculatum and reduced the abundance of R. sphenocephala. Chemical contaminants had the second strongest effect on the community with the insecticide, reducing A. maculatum abundance by 50% and increasing the mass of anurans (frogs and toads) at metamorphosis; the fertilizer positively influenced time and mass at metamorphosis for both anurans and A. maculatum. Presence of overwintered bullfrogs reduced mass and increased time to metamorphosis of anurans. While both bluegill and overwintered bullfrog tadpoles had negative effects on the amphibian community, they performed better in the presence of one another and in contaminated habitats. Our results indicate that predicting deleterious combinations from single-factor effects may not be straightforward. Our research supports the hypothesis that combinations of factors can negatively impact some amphibian species and could contribute to population declines. PMID:17479852

  5. Geochemical properties of coal wastes and the toxicological effects on aquatic life. Environmental geology notes

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, W.R.; Krapac, I.G.; Griffin, R.A.; Dickerson, D.R.; Schuller, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    Leachates from solid wastes generated by coal mining, cleaning, and gasification are potentially harmful to the environment. The toxicological effects of leachates on aquatic organisms have not been adequately assessed. In this investigation, samples of seven coal-related wastes were charcterized chemically and mineralogically. Laboratory extracts of each sample, obtained by a variety of extraction methods, were used in both acute and chronic bioassay. A coal-slurry sample (coarse fraction) and two samples of coal-cleaning refuse were chemically and mineralogically similar; they generated acidic water-waste systems, both in the laboratory and in the field. Two mine-spoil samples, essentially shale, tended to generate water-waste systems that were neutral in pH; consequently, they released lower quantities of potential pollutants than the acidic wastes. Each extract was tested for acute toxicity with four species of fresh-water aquatic organisms; the green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus), the fathead minnow, (Pimephales promelas), a crustacean (Daphia magna), and a snail (Physa anatina). The extracts of the two mine spoil samples and of the gasification residue were not toxic to any of the organisms; whereas the extracts from the acidic refuse and slurry samples were acutely toxic to all the organisms.

  6. Intraspecific phenotypic variation among alewife populations drives parallel phenotypic shifts in bluegill.

    PubMed

    Huss, Magnus; Howeth, Jennifer G; Osterman, Julia I; Post, David M

    2014-07-22

    Evolutionary diversification within consumer species may generate selection on local ecological communities, affecting prey community structure. However, the extent to which this niche construction can propagate across food webs and shape trait variation in competing species is unknown. Here, we tested whether niche construction by different life-history variants of the planktivorous fish alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) can drive phenotypic divergence and resource use in the competing species bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus). Using a combination of common garden experiments and a comparative field study, we found that bluegill from landlocked alewife lakes grew relatively better when fed small than large zooplankton, had gill rakers better adapted for feeding on small-bodied prey and selected smaller zooplankton compared with bluegill from lakes with anadromous or no alewife. Observed shifts in bluegill foraging traits in lakes with landlocked alewife parallel those in alewife, suggesting interspecific competition leading to parallel phenotypic changes rather than to divergence (which is commonly predicted). Our findings suggest that species may be locally adapted to prey communities structured by different life-history variants of a competing dominant species. PMID:24920478

  7. Occurrence and Distribution of Organochlorine Compounds in Biological Tissue and Bed Sediment From Streams in the Trinity River Basin, Texas, 1992-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moring, J. Bruce

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the occurrence and distribution of organochlorine compounds in biological tissue and bed sediment from the Trinity River Basin study area of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Concentrations of organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other organochlorine compounds were determined in biological tissue and surficial bed sediment from 16 stream sites in the Trinity River Basin of east-central Texas. Asiatic clams (Corbicula fluminea) were collected at 10 sites, and fish, including blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus), common carp (Cyprinus carpio), bluegill (Lepomis cyanellus), and yellow bullhead (Ameiurus natalis) were collected at all mainstem and two tributary sites. Thirty of the 36 compounds analyzed in biological tissue or surficial bed sediment were detected in one or both media. Overall, more organochlorine compounds were detected in bed sediment than in biological tissue; however, various chlordane isomers, DDT metabolites, and PCBs were detected more frequently in tissue than in sediment. The chlordane isomers and PCBs that were detected more frequently in biological tissue also were detected more frequently at urban sites than at agricultural sites. Organochlorine compound concentrations generally were highest in fish tissue from Trinity River mainstem sites. Fish tissue from the mainstem sites contained a higher percentage of lipids than did fish- and clam-tissue samples from the tributary sites.

  8. Behavioral responses of anuran larvae to chemical cues of native and introduced predators in the Pacific Northwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearl, Christopher A.; Adams, Michael J.; Schuytema, Gerald S.; Nebeker, A.V.

    2003-01-01

    We compared behavioral responses of larvae of three Pacific Northwest anurans from different hydroperiods to water borne cues of native and introduced predators. Two native anurans (Pacific Treefrog, Pseudacris regilla, and Northern Red-Legged Frog, Rana aurora aurora) and introduced Bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) responded to water conditioned by native Redside Shiners (Richardsonius balteatus) by increasing refuge use. The larvae of the two native anurans differed in their response to introduced predator cues. Rana aurora aurora, which occur in temporary and permanent waters, responded to both introduced Bluegill Sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) and introduced Crayfish (Procambarus clarkii). Pseudacris regilla, which occur primarily in temporary ponds, did not respond to water borne cues from either introduced predator. The broader responses of R. a. aurora may indicate greater behavioral plasticity or more exposure to novel predators than experienced by P. regilla. Larvae of introduced R. catesbeiana responded strongly to cues from two fish native to the Pacific northwest but did not alter behavior in response to any of five potential predators with which they coexist in their native range. Fish that occur with R. catesbeiana in their native range generally find Bullfrog larvae unpalatable. This pattern suggests that Bullfrog larvae can recognize cues of novel predators that may find them palatable, which could contribute to their success as an invasive species in the region.

  9. Evaluation of screening procedures for bioconcentratable organic chemicals in effluents and sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhard, L.P.; Sheedy, B.R.

    1995-04-01

    Screening procedures have been developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to isolate and tentatively identify nonpolar organic chemicals in effluent and sediment samples with high potential to form chemical residues in aquatic organisms. The objective of this study was to determine if the sample components tentatively identified by the effluent- and sediment-screening procedures actually form chemical residues in aquatic organisms. This evaluation consisted of analyzing effluent and sediment samples from a field site with discharges from two coke-manufacturing facilities using the screening procedures. Effluent, sediment, crayfish (Decapoda), and sunfish (Lepomis sp.) samples from the field site were also prepared using conventional sample preparation procedures and analyzed for the tentatively identified chemicals (TIDs) reported by the screening procedures. Results of the screening procedures were then compared to the results of the analyses on the samples prepared using the conventional sample preparation procedures. For the effluent-screening procedure, 182 of 183 TIDs in Coke Plant 1 effluent and all of the 7 TIDs in Coke Plant 2 effluent were found in the crayfish, sunfish, and/or sediment samples downstream of the discharges. For the sediment-screening procedure, 92 of 93 TIDs and all of 47 TIDs in sediment samples from two sampling stations downstream of the discharges were found in the crayfish and/or sunfish samples.

  10. Concentrations of elements in fish fillets, fish muscle plugs, and crayfish from the 2011 Missouri Department of Conservation general contaminant monitoring program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Thomas W.; Walther, Michael J.; Brumbaugh, William G.; McKee, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    This report presents the results of a contaminant monitoring survey conducted annually by the Missouri Department of Conservation to examine the levels of selected elemental contaminants in fish fillets, fish muscle plugs, and crayfish. Fillet samples of yellow bullhead (Ameiurus natalis), golden redhorse (Moxostoma erythrurum), longear sunfish (Lepomis megalotis), and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were collected from six sites as part of the Missouri Department of Conservation’s Fish Contaminant Monitoring Program. Fish dorsal muscle plugs were collected from largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) at eight of the sites, and crayfish from two sites. Following preparation and analysis of the samples, highlights of the data were as follows: cadmium and lead residues were most elevated in crayfish tissue samples from the Big River at Cherokee Landing, with 1 to 8 micrograms per gram dry weight and 22 to 45 micrograms per gram dry weight, respectively. Some dorsal muscle plugs from largemouth bass collected from Clearwater Lake, Lake St. Louis, Noblett Lake, Hazel Creek Lake, and Harrison County Lake contained mercury residues (1.7 to 4.7 micrograms per gram dry weight) that exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Water Quality Criterion of 1.5 micrograms per gram dry weight of fish tissue (equivalent to 0.30 micrograms per gram wet weight).

  11. Interactions of bullfrog tadpole predators and an insecticide: Predation release and facilitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boone, M.D.; Semlitsch, R.D.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of a contaminant on a community may not be easily predicted, given that complex changes in food resources and predator-prey dynamics may result. The objectives of our study were to determine the interactive effects of the insecticide carbaryl and predators on body size, development, survival, and activity of tadpoles of the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana). We conducted the study in cattle tank mesocosm ponds exposed to 0, 3.5, or 7.0 mg/l carbaryl, and no predators or two red-spotted newts (Notophthalmus viridescens), bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), or crayfish (Orconectes sp.). Carbaryl negatively affected predator survival by eliminating crayfish from all ponds, and by eliminating bluegill sunfish from ponds exposed to the highest concentration of carbaryl; carbaryl exposure did not effect survival of red-spotted newts. Because crayfish were eliminated by carbaryl, bullfrogs were released from predation and survival was near that of predator controls at low concentrations of carbaryl exposure. High concentrations of carbaryl reduced tadpole survival regardless of whether predators survived carbaryl exposure or not. Presence of crayfish and newts reduced tadpole survival, while bluegill sunfish appeared to facilitate bullfrog tadpole survival. Presence of carbaryl stimulated bullfrog tadpole mass and development. Our study demonstrates that the presence of a contaminant stress can alter community regulation by releasing prey from predators that are vulnerable to contaminants in some exposure scenarios.

  12. A pilot study testing a natural and a synthetic Molluscicide for controlling invasive apple snails (Pomacea maculata)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olivier, Heather M.; Jenkins, Jill A.; Berhow, Mark; Carter, Jacoby

    2016-01-01

    Pomacea maculata (formerly P. insularum), an apple snail native to South America, was discovered in Louisiana in 2008. These snails strip vegetation, reproduce at tremendous rates, and have reduced rice production and caused ecosystem changes in Asia. In this pilot study snails were exposed to two molluscicides, a tea (Camellia sinensis) seed derivative (TSD) or niclosamide monohydrate (Pestanal®, 2′,5-dichloro-4′-nitrosalicylanilide, CAS #73360-56-2). Mortality was recorded after exposure to high or low concentrations (0.03 and 0.015 g/L for TSD, 1.3 and 0.13 mg/L for niclosamide). The TSD induced 100 % mortality at both concentrations. Niclosamide caused 100 % and 17 % mortality at high and low concentrations respectively. These molluscicides were also tested on potential biocontrol agents, the red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) and redear sunfish (Lepomis microlophus). No crayfish mortalities occurred at either concentration for either chemical, but sunfish experienced 100 % mortality with TSD (0.03 g/L), and 21 % mortality with niclosamide (0.13 mg/L).

  13. US Army Biomedical Research and Development Laboratory aquatic biomonitoring trailer version 1. 0: Operations manual. Final report, November 1988-December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Herriott, R.S.; Burton, D.T.

    1992-03-01

    The U.S. Army Biomedical Research and Development Laboratory (USABRDL) Aquatic Biomonitoring Trailer Version 1.0 is a mobile laboratory which employs several biological biomonitoring systems for hazard assessment of potentially contaminated wastewater, complex effluents, and groundwater. This operations manual has been designed to provide a specific overview of the Aquatic Biomonitoring Trailer. Included in the manual is a general description of the trailer; initial utility, diluent water, test material, and waste drainage hook-up of the trailer; types of tests/assays performed; recommended water quality tests to be performed; daily trailer maintenance/operations; and complete shutdown of the trailer for site relocation. The manual also contains several procedures which explain in detail the operation of the various pieces of equipment and systems that are utilized during testing in the trailer. In addition, several diagrams are included as visual representations of the trailer and its associated equipment.... Mobile biomonitoring trailer, Toxicity testing, Wastewater, Effluent, Groundwater, Invertebrates, Fish, Toxicity, Bluegill, Lepomis macrochirus, Japanese medaka, Oryzias latipes.

  14. Comparison of two birnavirus-rhabdovirus coinfections in fish cell lines.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, S; Alonso, M; Pérez-Prietol, S I

    2005-11-28

    Aquabirnaviruses, such as the infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV), Novirhabdoviruses, such as the infectious hematopoiteic necrosis virus (IHNV) and the viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), cause considerable losses to the salmonid industry worldwide. Coinfections of 2 viruses have been described, but the interactions between rhabdoviruses and birnaviruses have not been examined closely. Using virus titration, flow cytometry and RT-PCR assays, we compared the effect of IPNV on the replication of IHNV and VHSV in tissue culture cells. RT-PCR assays indicated that simultaneous infection of IPNV with VHSV does not affect the replication of the rhabdovirus either in the first or successive passages; the infective titers were similar in single and double infections. In contrast, coinfection of IPNV with IHNV induced a fall in infectivity, with reduced expression of IHNV viral antigens in BF-2 cells from Lepomis macrochirus and a loss of 4.5 log10 units of the infective titer after 3 successive passages. It was possible to stimulate BF-2 cells to produce significant interferon-like activity against IHNV but not against VHSV.

  15. Potential direct and indirect effects of climate change on a shallow natural lake fish assemblage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breeggemann, Jason J.; Kaemingk, Mark A.; DeBates, T.J.; Paukert, Craig P.; Krause, J.; Letvin, Alexander P.; Stevens, Tanner M.; Willis, David W.; Chipps, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Much uncertainty exists around how fish communities in shallow lakes will respond to climate change. In this study, we modelled the effects of increased water temperatures on consumption and growth rates of two piscivores (northern pike [Esox lucius] and largemouth bass [Micropterus salmoides]) and examined relative effects of consumption by these predators on two prey species (bluegill [Lepomis macrochirus] and yellow perch [Perca flavescens]). Bioenergetics models were used to simulate the effects of climate change on growth and food consumption using predicted 2040 and 2060 temperatures in a shallow Nebraska Sandhill lake, USA. The patterns and magnitude of daily and cumulative consumption during the growing season (April–October) were generally similar between the two predators. However, growth of northern pike was always reduced (−3 to −45% change) compared to largemouth bass that experienced subtle changes (4 to −6% change) in weight by the end of the growing season. Assuming similar population size structure and numbers of predators in 2040–2060, future consumption of bluegill and yellow perch by northern pike and largemouth bass will likely increase (range: 3–24%), necessitating greater prey biomass to meet future energy demands. The timing of increased predator consumption will likely shift towards spring and fall (compared to summer), when prey species may not be available in the quantities required. Our findings suggest that increased water temperatures may affect species at the edge of their native range (i.e. northern pike) and a potential mismatch between predator and prey could exist.

  16. Differences between main-channel and off-channel food webs in the upper Mississippi River revealed by fatty acid profiles of consumers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, James H.; Bartsch, Michelle; Gutreuter, Steve; Knights, Brent C.; Bartsch, Lynn; Richardson, William B.; Vallazza, Jonathan M.; Arts, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Large river systems are often thought to contain a mosaic of patches with different habitat characteristics driven by differences in flow and mixing environments. Off-channel habitats (e.g., backwater areas, secondary channels) can become semi-isolated from main-channel water inputs, leading to the development of distinct biogeochemical environments. Observations of adult bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) in the main channel of the Mississippi River led to speculation that the main channel offered superior food resources relative to off-channel areas. One important aspect of food quality is the quantity and composition of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). We sampled consumers from main-channel and backwater habitats to determine whether they differed in PUFA content. Main-channel individuals for relatively immobile species (young-of-year bluegill, zebra mussels [Dreissena polymorpha], and plain pocketbook mussels [Lampsilis cardium]) had significantly greater PUFA content than off-channel individuals. No difference in PUFA was observed for the more mobile gizzard shad (Dorsoma cepedianum), which may move between main-channel and off-channel habitats even at early life-history stages. As off-channel habitats become isolated from main-channel waters, flow and water column nitrogen decrease, potentially improving conditions for nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria and vascular plants that, in turn, have low PUFA content. We conclude that main-channel food webs of the upper Mississippi River provide higher quality food resources for some riverine consumers as compared to food webs in off-channel habitats.

  17. Bioaccumulation of organic and inorganic selenium in a laboratory food chain

    SciTech Connect

    Besser, J.M.; Canfield, T.J.; La Point, T.W. )

    1993-01-01

    Aquatic organisms accumulated selenium (Se) from inorganic and organic Se species via aqueous and food-chain exposure routes. The authors measured aqueous and food-chain Se bioaccumulation from selenate, selenite, and seleno-L-methionine in a laboratory food chain of algae (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii), daphnids (Daphnia magna), and fish (bluegill, Lepomis macrochirus). Selenium concentrations were monitored radiometrically with [sup 75]Se-labeled compounds. All three organisms concentrated Se more strongly from aqueous selenomethionine than from either inorganic Se species. Bioconcentration factors estimated from 1 [mu]g Se/L Se-methionine exposures were approximately 16,000 for algae, 200,000 for daphnids, and 5,000 for bluegills. Algae and daphnids concentrated Se more strongly from selenite than selenate whereas bluegills concentrated Se about equally from both inorganic species. Bioaccumulation of foodborne Se by daphnids and bluegills was similar in food chains dosed with different Se species. Daphnids and bluegills did not accumulate Se concentrations greater than those in their diet, except at very low dietary Se concentrations. Food-chain concentration factors (CFs) for daphnids decreased from near 1.0 to 0.5 with increases in algal Se concentrations, whereas CFs estimated from bluegill exposures averaged 0.5 over a range of foodborne Se concentrations. In exposures based on selenite, bluegills accumulated greater Se concentrations from food than from water.

  18. Aquatic hazard assessment of the organophosphate insecticide fonofos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fairchild, James F.; Little, Edward E.; Huckins, James N.

    1992-01-01

    This study determined the acute and chronic toxicity of the organophosphate insecticide fonofos to standard freshwater aquatic organisms under laboratory conditions. Fonofos was acutely toxic to bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), Daphnia (D. magna), and midge (Chironomous riparius) at 5.3, 2.7, and 39 μg/L, respectively. Three fonofos formulations (technical, 94.8% A.I.; 20G, field granular 20% A.I.; and 4E, field liquid 4#/gal A.I.) exhibited similar acute toxicities to bluegill. Exposure to fonofos delayed reproduction and decreased the intrinsic rate of increase of Daphnia during 21-d chronic exposure at the lowest tested concentration (0.08 μg/L). The no observable effect concentration (NOEC) for Daphnia survival was 0.42 μg/L; 0% survival occurred at the lowest observable effect concentration (LOEC) of 1.45 μg/L. The NOEC for midge emergence was 3.42 μg/L; only 34% emergence occurred at the LOEC of 8.24 μg/L. Chronic 30-d exposure of juvenile bluegills decreased growth and survival at 5.65 μg/L (LOEC), but no effects occurred at 2.33 μg/L (NOEC). The relative hazard of fonofos to aquatic life is similar to other carbamate and organophosphate corn insecticides.

  19. Multiple stressors in amphibian communities: Effects of chemical contamination, bullfrogs, and fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boone, M.D.; Semlitsch, R.D.; Little, E.E.; Doyle, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    A leading hypothesis of amphibian population declines is that combinations of multiple stressors contribute to declines. We examined the role that chemical contamination, competition, and predation play singly and in combination in aquatic amphibian communities. We exposed larvae of American toads (Bufo americanus), southern leopard frogs (Rana sphenocephala), and spotted salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum) to overwintered bullfrog tadpoles (R. catesbeiana), bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), the insecticide carbaryl, and ammonium nitrate fertilizer in 1000-L mesocosms. Most significantly, our study demonstrated that the presence of multiple factors reduced survival of B. americanus and A. maculatum and lengthened larval periods of R. sphenocephala. The presence of bluegill had the largest impact on the community; it eliminated B. americanus and A. maculatum and reduced the abundance of R. sphenocephala. Chemical contaminants had the second strongest effect on the community with the insecticide, reducing A. maculatum abundance by 50% and increasing the mass of anurans (frogs and toads) at metamorphosis; the fertilizer positively influenced time and mass at metamorphosis for both anurans and A. maculatum. Presence of overwintered bullfrogs reduced mass and increased time to metamorphosis of anurans. While both bluegill and overwintered bullfrog tadpoles had negative effects on the amphibian community, they performed better in the presence of one another and in contaminated habitats. Our results indicate that predicting deleterious combinations from single-factor effects may not be straightforward. Our research supports the hypothesis that combinations of factors can negatively impact some amphibian species and could contribute to population declines. ?? 2007 by the Ecological Society of America.

  20. Thidiazuron uptake, distribution and metabolism in bluegills and channel catfish.

    PubMed

    Knowles, C O; Benezet, H J; Mayer, F L

    1980-01-01

    Bluegills (Lepomis macrochirus) exposed to 0.1 ppm of thidiazuron-14C cotton defoliant for 28 days under continuous flow conditions accumulated relatively low levels of radiocarbon. The maximum detected was 5.4 ppm in fillet tissue after 1 day. During a 14 day depuration period, radioactivity declined to 1.0 ppm or less. Fractionation of offal and fillet tissues from bluegills collected at 28 days indicated that most of the radioactive material was water soluble, although appreciable amounts of organosoluble radioactive material also were present. When bluegills were injected intraperitoneally with thidiazuron-14C, metabolism and elimination were relatively rapid. Organosoluble radioactive material isolated from fish tissue included thidiazuron, its 2-hydroxyphenyl derivative, phenylurea, and several unknowns. Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) exposed under static conditions to a system containing 0.15 ppm of thidiazuron-14C incorporated into soil also accumulated only low concentrations of radiocarbon. The maximum detected was 2.5 ppb in offal tissue at 7 days. In fillet tissue, radioactivity did not exceed 0.5 ppb. There was no evidence from these studies to indicate that thidiazuron would pose a hazard to the aquatic ecosystem. PMID:7400538

  1. The effects of steady swimming on fish escape performance.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Sanam B; Cathcart, Kelsey; Darakananda, Karin; Gaing, Ashley N; Shin, Seo Yim; Vronay, Xena; Wright, Dania N; Ellerby, David J

    2016-06-01

    Escape maneuvers are essential to the survival and fitness of many animals. Escapes are frequently initiated when an animal is already in motion. This may introduce constraints that alter the escape performance. In fish, escape maneuvers and steady, body caudal fin (BCF) swimming are driven by distinct patterns of curvature of the body axis. Pre-existing muscle activity may therefore delay or diminish a response. To quantify the performance consequences of escaping in flow, escape behavior was examined in bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) in both still-water and during steady swimming. Escapes executed during swimming were kinematically less variable than those made in still-water. Swimming escapes also had increased response latencies and lower peak velocities and accelerations than those made in still-water. Performance was also lower for escapes made up rather than down-stream, and a preference for down-stream escapes may be associated with maximizing performance. The constraints imposed by pre-existing motion and flow, therefore, have the potential to shape predator-prey interactions under field conditions by shifting the optimal strategies for both predators and prey. PMID:27161016

  2. Bioaccumulation and speciation of selenium in fish and insects collected from a mountaintop removal coal mining-impacted stream in West Virginia.

    PubMed

    Arnold, M C; Lindberg, T Ty; Liu, Y T; Porter, K A; Hsu-Kim, H; Hinton, D E; Di Giulio, R T

    2014-07-01

    A major contaminant of concern for mountaintop removal/valley fill (MTR/VF) coal mining is selenium (Se), an essential micronutrient that can be toxic to fish. Creek chubs (Semotilus atromaculatus), green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus), and composite insect samples were collected in March-July, 2011-2013 at two sites within the Mud River, West Virginia. One site (MR7) receives MTR/VF coal mining effluent, while the reference site (LFMR) does not. MR7 water had significantly higher concentrations of soluble Se (p < 0.01) and conductivity (p < 0.005) compared to LFMR. MR7 whole insects contained significantly higher concentrations of Se compared to LFMR insects (p < 0.001). MR7 creek chubs had significantly higher Se in fillets, liver, and ovary tissues compared to LFMR samples (p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001, and p < 0.02, respectively). MR7 green sunfish fillets contained significantly higher Se (p < 0.0001). Histological examination showed LFMR creek chub gills contained a typical amount of parasitic infestations; however MR7 gills contained minimal to no visible parasites. X-ray absorption spectroscopic analyses revealed that MR7 whole insects and creek chub tissues primarily contained organic Se and selenite. These two species of Mud River fish were shown to specifically accumulate Se differently in tissues compartments. Tissue-specific concentrations of Se may be useful in determining potential reproductive consequences of Se exposure in wild fish populations.

  3. Interactions of Amphibians, Fish, and Macroinvertebrates in a Southeastern Wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultheis, R. D.; Batzer, D. P.

    2005-05-01

    In fishless habitats, amphibians often compete with and are predators of macroinvertebrates. Unlike fish, the effects these interactions have on macroinvertebrate communities have been largely unexplored. We conducted an experiment in a semi-permanent oxbow wetland in the Piedmont region of Georgia to explore interactions between amphibians and macroinvertebrates. The predator community was dominated by Ambystoma opacum (Marbled Salamander) and Notophthalmus viridescens (Eastern Newt). Salamanders and newts were excluded from areas of wetland habitat using wire mesh cages (1.5M x 1.5M, 3mm mesh). The macroinvertebrate communities within the cages were then compared to the ambient habitat outside the cages. Fish, mostly Lepomis macrochirus (Bluegill) and Gambusia affinis (Mosquito Fish), colonized the wetland late in the first year of the study, and became common by year two. Also in year two, Rana catesbeiana (Bullfrog) became established. Thus, we were able to explore the variable effects on the macroinvertebrate community of a changing predator complex over a two year period.

  4. Relationship of weed shiner and young-of-year bluegill and largemouth bass abundance to submersed aquatic vegetation in Navigation Pools 4, 8, and 13 of the Upper Mississippi River, 1998-2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeLain, Steven A.; Popp, Walter A.

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic vegetation provides food resources and shelter for many species of fish. This study found a significant relationship between increases in submersed aquatic vegetation (SAV) in four study reaches of the Upper Mississippi River (UMR) and increases in catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE) of weed shiners (Notropis texanus) and age-0 bluegills (Lepomis macrochirus) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) when all of the study reaches were treated collectively using Long Term Resource Monitoring Program (LTRMP) vegetation and fish data for 1998–2012. The selected fishes were more abundant in study reaches with higher SAV frequencies (Pool 8 and Lower Pool 4) and less abundant in reaches with lower SAV frequencies (Pool 13 and Upper Pool 4). When each study reach was examined independently, the relationship between SAV frequency and CPUE of the three species was not significant in most cases, the primary exception being weed shiners in Lower Pool 4. Results of this study indicate that the prevalence of SAV does affect relative abundance of these vegetation-associated fish species. However, the poor annual relationship between SAV frequency and age-0 relative abundance in individual study reaches indicates that several other factors also govern age-0 abundance. The data indicate that there may be a SAV frequency threshold in backwaters above which there is not a strong relationship with abundance of these fish species. This is indicated by the high annual CPUE variability of the three selected fishes in backwaters of Pool 8 and Lower Pool 4 when SAV exceeded certain frequencies.

  5. Concentration trends for lead and calcium-normalized lead in fish fillets from the Big River, a mining-contaminated stream in southeastern Missouri USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmitt, Christopher J.; McKee, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Lead (Pb) and calcium (Ca) concentrations were measured in fillet samples of longear sunfish (Lepomis megalotis) and redhorse suckers (Moxostoma spp.) collected in 2005–2012 from the Big River, which drains a historical mining area in southeastern Missouri and where a consumption advisory is in effect due to elevated Pb concentrations in fish. Lead tends to accumulated in Ca-rich tissues such as bone and scale. Concentrations of Pb in fish muscle are typically low, but can become elevated in fillets from Pb-contaminated sites depending in part on how much bone, scale, and skin is included in the sample. We used analysis-of-covariance to normalize Pb concentration to the geometric mean Ca concentration (415 ug/g wet weight, ww), which reduced variation between taxa, sites, and years, as was the number of samples that exceeded Missouri consumption advisory threshold (300 ng/g ww). Concentrations of Pb in 2005–2012 were lower than in the past, especially after Ca-normalization, but the consumption advisory is still warranted because concentrations were >300 ng/g ww in samples of both taxa from contaminated sites. For monitoring purposes, a simple linear regression model is proposed for estimating Ca-normalized Pb concentrations in fillets from Pb:Ca molar ratios as a way of reducing the effects of differing preparation methods on fillet Pb variation.

  6. Determination of Total Mercury in Fillets of Sport Fishes Collected from Folsom Reservoir, California, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Thomas W.; Brumbaugh, William G.

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study by the U.S. Geological Survey, done in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, to determine mercury concentrations in selected sport fishes from Folsom Reservoir in California. Fillets were collected from each fish sample, and after homogenization and lyophilization of fish fillets, mercury concentrations were determined with a direct mercury analyzer utilizing the process of thermal combustion-gold amalgamation atomic absorption spectroscopy. Mercury concentrations in fillets ranged from 0.031 to 0.20 micrograms per gram wet weight in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) samples and 0.071 to 0.16 micrograms per gram wet weight in bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) samples. Mercury concentration was 0.98 microgram per gram wet weight in a single spotted bass (Micropterus punctulatus) sample, which was the only one in the sample set which exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's fish consumption advisory of 0.30 microgram per gram wet weight.

  7. Efficacy of candidate chemicals for preventing attachment of zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cope, W.G.; Bartsch, M.R.; Marking, L.L.

    1997-01-01

    Forty-seven chemicals having potential for preventing the attachment of zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha were identified and tested. For each chemical, 15 zebra mussels (5-8-mm shell length) in each of two replicates and six treatments were exposed for 48 h followed by a 48-h postexposure period in untreated water. Eleven of the chemicals inhibited the reattachment of zebra mussels after the 48-h exposure; eight had EC50 values ranging from 0.4 to 5.4 mg /L, and three had EC50 values ranging from 19.4 to 29.0 mg/L. Based on an analysis of chemical cost, solubility in water, anticipated treatment concentrations, and potential hazards to humans or the environment, three of the most promising chemicals, all antioxidants (butylated hydroxyanisole [BHA], tert-butylhydroquinone, and tannic acid) were tested on nontarget fish (bluegill, Lepomis macrochirus; channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus; and rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss). These chemicals were not selectively toxic to zebra mussels; only the tests with bluegill and BHA and with channel catfish and tannic acid had 48-h LC50 values greater than the concentrations effective for preventing the reattachment of zebra mussels. Although the attachment of zebra mussels can be prevented with selected antioxidants, an alternative formulation should be investigated to minimize effects on nontarget organisms, such as fish.

  8. Effects of bioaccumulation of PCBs on biodiversity and distribution of fish in two creeks in east Tennessee (USA).

    PubMed

    Marchettini, N; Panzieri, M; Tiezzi, E B

    2001-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Reservation, established in Tennessee during World War II as a research, development and process facilities support for the Manhattan Project, released large quantities of organic, inorganic and radionuclear contaminants into the environment. Their effects are particularly evident in aquatic ecosystems, as chemical concentrations in water, and as a disease in biodiversity and species richness. East Fork Poplar Creek and its tributary, Bear Creek flow inside the Reservation and have highly degraded natural habitats, unsatisfactory water quality and impoverished biota. PCB concentrations exceed recommended criteria for aquatic life safety and appear as a primary cause of environment degradation and reduced species richness. An uptake model, FGETS (Food and Gill Exchange of Toxic Substances) was used to analyse fish biodiversity and distribution in the two streams in relation to bioaccumulation of PCB congeners 1254 and 1260. Bioaccumulation of the two polychlorinated biphenyls was estimated in four different species of fish common in Tennessee rivers and streams: Catostomus commersoni, Lepomis macrochirus, Cyprinus carpio and Micropterus salmoides to integrate the available set of data and to evaluate the entity of human impact on these escosystems.

  9. New species of Proterometra (Digenea: Azygiidae) and its life cycle in the Chickasawhay River, Mississippi, USA, with supplemental observations of Proterometra autraini.

    PubMed

    Womble, Matthew R; Orélis-Ribeiro, Raphael; Bullard, Stephen A

    2016-02-01

    We describe Proterometra ariasae n. sp. based upon cercariae shed from a freshwater snail, Pleurocera sp., and adults infecting the buccal cavity of longear sunfish, Lepomis megalotis, captured from the Chickasawhay River, Mississippi, USA. We also provide supplemental observations of cercarial and adult paratypes of Proterometra autraini from the Au Train River, Michigan, USA. Sequence data for the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) from adults and cercariae of the new species were identical. Adults of the new species differ from congeners by having (i) a markedly large body, (ii) a proportionally large oral sucker, (iii) ovoid testes, (iv) a strongly muscular and laterally expanded pars prostatica, (v) a uterus that is extensively convoluted between the ovary and ventral sucker (vi) and a vitellarium as long as the caeca and extending posteriad beyond the anterior margin of the testes. Cercariae of the new species differ from those of its congeners by having (i) a tail stem that is shorter than 10mm and that lacks a medial constriction, (ii) obcordate furcae that are wider than long, (iii) mamillae distributed throughout the anterior tail stem only, and (v) a proportionally small distome that has relatively few uterine eggs and remains withdrawn in the anterior tail stem region in actively swimming cercariae. This is the first report of Proterometra from Mississippi, the second description to employ morphology and sequence data to elucidate a life cycle for Proterometra, and the third species of Proterometra from an intermediate host not assigned to Elimia. PMID:26384966

  10. Isolation and Molecular Characterization of a Novel Picornavirus from Baitfish in the USA

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, Nicholas B. D.; Mor, Sunil K.; Armien, Anibal G.; Batts, William; Goodwin, Andrew E.; Hopper, Lacey; McCann, Rebekah; Ng, Terry Fei Fan; Puzach, Corey; Waltzek, Thomas B.; Delwart, Eric; Winton, James; Goyal, Sagar M.

    2014-01-01

    During both regulatory and routine surveillance sampling of baitfish from the states of Illinois, Minnesota, Montana, and Wisconsin, USA, isolates (n = 20) of a previously unknown picornavirus were obtained from kidney/spleen or entire viscera of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and brassy minnows (Hybognathus hankinsoni). Following the appearance of a diffuse cytopathic effect, examination of cell culture supernatant by negative contrast electron microscopy revealed the presence of small, round virus particles (∼30–32 nm), with picornavirus-like morphology. Amplification and sequence analysis of viral RNA identified the agent as a novel member of the Picornaviridae family, tentatively named fathead minnow picornavirus (FHMPV). The full FHMPV genome consisted of 7834 nucleotides. Phylogenetic analysis based on 491 amino acid residues of the 3D gene showed 98.6% to 100% identity among the 20 isolates of FHMPV compared in this study while only 49.5% identity with its nearest neighbor, the bluegill picornavirus (BGPV) isolated from bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus). Based on complete polyprotein analysis, the FHMPV shared 58% (P1), 33% (P2) and 43% (P3) amino acid identities with BGPV and shared less than 40% amino acid identity with all other picornaviruses. Hence, we propose the creation of a new genus (Piscevirus) within the Picornaviridae family. The impact of FHMPV on the health of fish populations is unknown at present. PMID:24586283

  11. Competitive Interactions between Invasive Nile Tilapia and Native Fish: The Potential for Altered Trophic Exchange and Modification of Food Webs

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Charles W.; Valentine, Marla M.; Valentine, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted both the positive and negative impacts of species invasions. Most of these studies have been conducted on either immobile invasive plants or sessile fauna found at the base of food webs. Fewer studies have examined the impacts of vagile invasive consumers on native competitors. This is an issue of some importance given the controlling influence that consumers have on lower order plants and animals. Here, we present results of laboratory experiments designed to assess the impacts of unintended aquaculture releases of the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), in estuaries of the Gulf of Mexico, on the functionally similar redspotted sunfish (Lepomis miniatus). Laboratory choice tests showed that tilapia prefer the same structured habitat that native sunfish prefer. In subsequent interspecific competition experiments, agonistic tilapia displaced sunfish from their preferred structured habitats. When a piscivore (largemouth bass) was present in the tank with both species, the survival of sunfish decreased. Based on these findings, if left unchecked, we predict that the proliferation of tilapia (and perhaps other aggressive aquaculture fishes) will have important detrimental effects on the structure of native food webs in shallow, structured coastal habitats. While it is likely that the impacts of higher trophic level invasive competitors will vary among species, these results show that consequences of unintended releases of invasive higher order consumers can be important. PMID:21200433

  12. Isolation and molecular characterization of a novel picornavirus from baitfish in the USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phelps, Nicholas B.D.; Mor, Sunil K.; Armien, Anibal G.; Batts, William N.; Goodwin, Andrew E.; Hopper, Lacey; McCann, Rebekah; Ng, Terry Fei Fan; Puzach, Corey; Waltzek, Thomas B.; Delwart, Eric; Winton, James; Goyal, Sagar M.

    2014-01-01

    During both regulatory and routine surveillance sampling of baitfish from the states of Illinois, Minnesota, Montana, and Wisconsin, USA, isolates (n = 20) of a previously unknown picornavirus were obtained from kidney/spleen or entire viscera of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and brassy minnows (Hybognathus hankinsoni). Following the appearance of a diffuse cytopathic effect, examination of cell culture supernatant by negative contrast electron microscopy revealed the presence of small, round virus particles (∼30–32 nm), with picornavirus-like morphology. Amplification and sequence analysis of viral RNA identified the agent as a novel member of the Picornaviridae family, tentatively named fathead minnow picornavirus (FHMPV). The full FHMPV genome consisted of 7834 nucleotides. Phylogenetic analysis based on 491 amino acid residues of the 3D gene showed 98.6% to 100% identity among the 20 isolates of FHMPV compared in this study while only 49.5% identity with its nearest neighbor, the bluegill picornavirus (BGPV) isolated from bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus). Based on complete polyprotein analysis, the FHMPV shared 58% (P1), 33% (P2) and 43% (P3) amino acid identities with BGPV and shared less than 40% amino acid identity with all other picornaviruses. Hence, we propose the creation of a new genus (Piscevirus) within the Picornaviridae family. The impact of FHMPV on the health of fish populations is unknown at present.

  13. Snake (Colubridae: Thamnophis) predatory responses to chemical cues from native and introduced prey species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mullin, S.J.; Imbert, H.; Fish, J.M.; Ervin, E.L.; Fisher, R.N.

    2004-01-01

    Several aquatic vertebrates have been introduced into freshwater systems in California over the past 100 years. Some populations of the two-striped garter snake (Thamnophis hammondii) have lived in sympatry with these species since their introduction; other populations have never encountered them. To assess the possible adaptation to a novel prey, we tested the predatory responses of T. hammondii from different populations to different chemosensory cues from native and introduced prey species. We presented chemical extracts from potential prey types and 2 control odors to individual snakes on cotton swabs and recorded the number of tongue flicks and attacks directed at each swab. Subject response was higher for prey odors than control substances. Odors from introduced centrarchid fish (Lepomis) elicited higher response levels than other prey types, including native anuran larvae (Pseudacris regilla). The pattern of response was similar for both populations of snakes (experienced and nai??ve, with respect to the introduced prey). We suggest that the generalist aquatic lifestyle of T. hammondii has allowed it to take advantage of increasing populations of introduced prey. Decisions on the management strategies for some of these introduced prey species should include consideration of how T. hammondii populations might respond in areas of sympatry.

  14. A Pilot Study Testing a Natural and a Synthetic Molluscicide for Controlling Invasive Apple Snails (Pomacea maculata).

    PubMed

    Olivier, Heather M; Jenkins, Jill A; Berhow, Mark; Carter, Jacoby

    2016-03-01

    Pomacea maculata (formerly P. insularum), an apple snail native to South America, was discovered in Louisiana in 2008. These snails strip vegetation, reproduce at tremendous rates, and have reduced rice production and caused ecosystem changes in Asia. In this pilot study snails were exposed to two molluscicides, a tea (Camellia sinensis) seed derivative (TSD) or niclosamide monohydrate (Pestanal(®), 2',5-dichloro-4'-nitrosalicylanilide, CAS #73360-56-2). Mortality was recorded after exposure to high or low concentrations (0.03 and 0.015 g/L for TSD, 1.3 and 0.13 mg/L for niclosamide). The TSD induced 100 % mortality at both concentrations. Niclosamide caused 100 % and 17 % mortality at high and low concentrations respectively. These molluscicides were also tested on potential biocontrol agents, the red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) and redear sunfish (Lepomis microlophus). No crayfish mortalities occurred at either concentration for either chemical, but sunfish experienced 100 % mortality with TSD (0.03 g/L), and 21 % mortality with niclosamide (0.13 mg/L). PMID:26687501

  15. Bluegill growth as modified by plant density: an exploration of underlying mechanisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savino, Jacqueline F.; Marschall, Elizabeth A.; Stein, Roy A.

    1992-01-01

    Bluegill (Lepomis macrochira) growth varies inconsistently with plant density. In laboratory and field experiments, we explored mechanisms underlying bluegill growth as a function of plant and invertebrate density. In the laboratory, bluegills captured more chironomids (Chironomus riparius) than damselflies (Enallagma spp. and Ischnura spp.), but energy intake per time spent searching did not differ between damselfly and chironomid treatments. From laboratory data, we described prey encounter rates as functions of plant and invertebrate density. In Clark Lake, Ohio, we created 0.05-ha mesocosms of inshore vegetation to generate macrophyte densities of 125, 270, and 385 stems/m2 of Potamogeton and Ceratophyllum and added 46-mm bluegill (1/m2). In these mesocosms, invertebrate density increased as a function of macrophyte density. Combining this function with encounter rate functions derived from laboratory data, we predicted that bluegill growth should peak at a high macrophyte density, greater than 1000 stems/m2, even though growth should change only slightly beyond 100 stems/m2. Consistent with our predictions, bluegills did not grow differentially, nor did their use of different prey taxa differ, across macrophyte densities in the field. Bluegills preferred chironomid pupae, which were relatively few in numbers but vulnerable to predation, whereas more cryptic, chironomid larvae, which were associated with vegetation but were relatively abundant, were eaten as encountered. Bluegill avoided physid snails. Contrary to previous work, vegetation did not influence growth or diet of bluegill beyond relatively low densities owing to the interaction between capture probabilities and macroinvertebrate densities.

  16. Importance of floodplain connectivity to fish populations in the Apalachicola River, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burgess, O.T.; Pine, William E.; Walsh, S.J.

    2013-01-01

    Floodplain habitats provide critical spawning and rearing habitats for many large-river fishes. The paradigm that floodplains are essential habitats is often a key reason for restoring altered rivers to natural flow regimes. However, few studies have documented spatial and temporal utilization of floodplain habitats by adult fish of sport or commercial management interest or assessed obligatory access to floodplain habitats for species' persistence. In this study, we applied telemetry techniques to examine adult fish movements between floodplain and mainstem habitats, paired with intensive light trap sampling of larval fish in these same habitats, to assess the relationships between riverine flows and fish movement and spawning patterns in restored and unmodified floodplain distributaries of the Apalachicola River, Florida. Our intent is to inform resource managers on the relationships between the timing, magnitude and duration of flow events and fish spawning as part of river management actions. Our results demonstrate spawning by all study species in floodplain and mainstem river habitat types, apparent migratory movements of some species between these habitats, and distinct spawning events for each study species on the basis of fish movement patterns and light trap catches. Additionally, Micropterus spp., Lepomis spp. and, to a lesser degree, Minytrema melanops used floodplain channel habitat that was experimentally reconnected to the mainstem within a few weeks of completing the restoration. This result is of interest to managers assessing restoration activities to reconnect these habitats as part of riverine restoration programmes globally.

  17. Fish assemblage structure in an Oklahoma Ozark stream before and after rainbow trout introduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, M.G.; Winkelman, D.L.

    2005-01-01

    Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss have been widely stocked throughout the United States as a popular sport fish. Our study was initiated to evaluate potential effects of rainbow trout introduction on native fishes to inform future decisions about trout stocking in northeastern Oklahoma streams. We sampled fish assemblages in pools, glides, and riffles in Brush Creek, Delaware County, Oklahoma, from February 2000 to September 2002, and experimentally stocked rainbow trout into the stream from November 2000 to March 2001 and November 2001 to March 2002. We used a combination of multivariate analyses to evaluate seasonal and habitat effects on native fish assemblages and to compare assemblage structure between prestocking, the first year of stocking, and the second year of stocking. Mesohabitat type significantly affected assemblage structure among years, whereas we did not detect an effect of season. We did not detect differences in assemblage structure among years in glide or riffle habitats. Native fish assemblage structure in pool habitats before rainbow trout introduction differed from assemblage structure in both the first and second year of stocking. Declines in seven species, including two native game fish (smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu and bluegill Lepomis machrochirus), contributed to assemblage dissimilarity in pool habitats between prestocking conditions and the second year of stocking. Our results indicate that stocking rainbow trout may cause local disruption in assemblage structure in pool habitats. ?? 2004 by the American Fisheries Society.

  18. Assessing variability in chemical acute toxicity of unionid mussels: Influence of intra- and interlaboratory testing, life stage, and species.

    PubMed

    Raimondo, Sandy; Lilavois, Crystal R; Lee, Larisa; Augspurger, Tom; Wang, Ning; Ingersoll, Chris G; Bauer, Candice; Hammer, Edward; Barron, Mace G

    2016-03-01

    The authors developed a toxicity database for unionid mussels to examine the extent of intra- and interlaboratory variability in acute toxicity tests with mussel larvae (glochidia) and juveniles; the extent of differential sensitivity of the 2 life stages; and the variation in sensitivity among commonly tested mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea, Utterbackia imbecillis, and Villosa iris), commonly tested cladocerans (Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia), and fish (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Pimephales promelas, and Lepomis macrochirus). The results of these analyses indicate that intralaboratory variability for median effect concentrations (EC50) averaged about 2-fold for both life stages, whereas interlaboratory variability averaged 3.6-fold for juvenile mussels and 6.3-fold for glochidia. The EC50s for juveniles and glochidia were within a factor of 2 of each other for 50% of paired records across chemicals, with juveniles more sensitive than glochidia by more than 2-fold for 33% of the comparisons made between life stages. There was a high concurrence of sensitivity of commonly tested L. siliquoidea, U. imbecillis, and V. iris to that of other mussels. However, this concurrence decreased as the taxonomic distance of the commonly tested cladocerans and fish to mussels increased. The compiled mussel database and determination of data variability will advance risk assessments by including more robust species sensitivity distributions, interspecies correlation estimates, and availability of taxon-specific empirically derived application factors for risk assessment. PMID:26369904

  19. Thidiazuron uptake, distribution and metabolism in bluegills and channel catfish.

    PubMed

    Knowles, C O; Benezet, H J; Mayer, F L

    1980-01-01

    Bluegills (Lepomis macrochirus) exposed to 0.1 ppm of thidiazuron-14C cotton defoliant for 28 days under continuous flow conditions accumulated relatively low levels of radiocarbon. The maximum detected was 5.4 ppm in fillet tissue after 1 day. During a 14 day depuration period, radioactivity declined to 1.0 ppm or less. Fractionation of offal and fillet tissues from bluegills collected at 28 days indicated that most of the radioactive material was water soluble, although appreciable amounts of organosoluble radioactive material also were present. When bluegills were injected intraperitoneally with thidiazuron-14C, metabolism and elimination were relatively rapid. Organosoluble radioactive material isolated from fish tissue included thidiazuron, its 2-hydroxyphenyl derivative, phenylurea, and several unknowns. Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) exposed under static conditions to a system containing 0.15 ppm of thidiazuron-14C incorporated into soil also accumulated only low concentrations of radiocarbon. The maximum detected was 2.5 ppb in offal tissue at 7 days. In fillet tissue, radioactivity did not exceed 0.5 ppb. There was no evidence from these studies to indicate that thidiazuron would pose a hazard to the aquatic ecosystem.

  20. Habitat selection by three littoral zone fishes: effects of predation pressure, plant density and macrophyte type

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chick, J.H.; McIvor, C.C.

    1997-01-01

    We conducted laboratory experiments which demonstrated that three littoral zone fishes differentially selected among three macrophytes when seeking refuge from predation. In the presence of a predator (a juvenile Micropterus salmoides), mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki), sailfin mollies (Poecilia latipinna). and dollar sunfish (Lepomis marginatus) displayed ferential use of four tank areas containing patches of either Hydrilla verticillata, Potamogeton illinoensis, Panicum hemitomon, or no plants. Patterns habitat selection, and the consistency of these patterns among replicates, differed among the three fishes and among three plant-density treatments - natural (each macrophyte presented at its mean field density), equal (all three macrophytes at the same density), and control (no plants). Selection for H. verticillata by mosquitofish was significant for both the equal and natural treatments, and thus was not caused by differences in plant density alone. Sailfin mollies displayed significant selection for H. verticillata only in the natural plant-density treatments. Dollar sunfish showed less consistent habitat selection than either mosquitofish or sailfin mollies. Significant habitat selection was not found in the absence of a predator, and there was no evidence for lection among the tank areas in control treatments. Patterns of habitat selection by the three fishes in our laboratory study corresponded to observed habitat use in Lake Okeechobee.

  1. Small nonnative fishes as predators of larval razorback suckers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, J.; Mueller, G.A.

    2008-01-01

    The razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus), an endangered big-river fish of the Colorado River basin, has demonstrated no sustainable recruitment in 4 decades, despite presence of spawning adults and larvae. Lack of adequate recruitment has been attributed to several factors, including predation by nonnative fishes. Substantial funding and effort has been expended on mechanically removing nonnative game fishes, typically targeting large predators. As a result, abundance of larger predators has declined, but the abundance of small nonnative fishes has increased in some areas. We conducted laboratory experiments to determine if small nonnative fishes would consume larval razorback suckers. We tested adults of three small species (threadfin shad, Dorosoma petenense; red shiner, Cyprinella lutrensis; fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas) and juveniles of six larger species (common carp, Cyprinus carpio; yellow bullhead, Ameiurus natalis; channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus; rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss; green sunfish, Lepomis cyanellus; bluegill, L. macrochirus). These nonnative fishes span a broad ecological range and are abundant within the historical range of the razorback sucker. All nine species fed on larval razorback suckers (total length, 9-16 mm). Our results suggest that predation by small nonnative fishes could be responsible for limiting recovery of this endangered species.

  2. Test system for exposing fish to resuspended, contaminated sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cope, W.G.; Wiener, J.G.; Steingraeber, M.T.

    1996-01-01

    We describe a new test system for exposing fish to resuspended sediments and associated contaminants. Test sediments were resuspended by revolving test chambers on rotating shafts driven by an electric motor. The timing, speed, and duration of test-chamber revolution were controlled by a rheostat and electronic timer. Each chamber held 45 litres of water and accommodated about 49 g of test fish. The system described had three water baths, each holding six test chambers. We illustrate the performance of this system with results from a 28-day test in which juvenile bluegills Lepomis macrochirus were exposed to resuspended, riverine sediments differing in texture and cadmium content. The test had one sediment-free control and five sediment treatments, with three replicates (chambers) per treatment and 25 fish per replicate. Two-thirds (30 litres) of the test water and sediment in each chamber was renewed weekly. The mean concentration of total suspended solids (TSS) did not vary among treatments; the grand-mean TSS in the five sediment treatments was 975 mg litre-1, similar to the target TSS of 1000 mg litre-1. At the end of the test, an average of 50% of the introduced cadmium was associated with the suspended sediment compartment, whereas the filtered (0.45 μm) water contained 0.4% and bluegills 1.8% of the cadmium.

  3. Fish lesions in the Chesapeake Bay: Pfiesteria-like dinoflagellates and other etiologies.

    PubMed

    Kane, A S; Oldach, D; Reimschuessel, R

    1998-05-01

    Ulcerative lesions and mass mortalities of Atlantic estuarine fish, particularly menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus), have been associated with exposure to Pfiesteria-like dinoflagellates and their toxins. We collected fish from the Chicamacomico River, Maryland, and observed solitary ulcerative lesions on the majority of menhaden sampled. One striped bass (Morone saxatilis) had an area of reddening around the base of the dorsal fin. Bluegill (Lepomis machrochirus), channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), yellow perch (Perca flavescens), and carp (Cyprinus carpio) were externally nonremarkable. Histologically ulcerative menhaden lesions demonstrated marked chronic inflammatory infiltrate in large areas of exposed necrotic muscle. The ulcers contained granulomata with fungal hyphae in the necrotic tissue. Gram negative rod-shaped bacteria were also observed in the lesions, a common finding in ulcers of aquatic organisms. Our data suggest that typical ulcerative lesions observed on fish from areas of Pfiesteria-like dinoflagellate blooms are reflective of dermatosis, which may be related to a variety of individual or combined environmental stressors. Exposure to dinoflagellate toxin)s) potentially represents one such stressor. The role of Pfiesteria-like dinoflagellate toxin in fish primary lesion development is currently under investigation. PMID:9601194

  4. Acidification as environmental pollution: effects on fish-pond ecology

    SciTech Connect

    Murad, H.A.

    1987-01-01

    To establish the impact of acidity on fish production in ponds, experiments were conducted in fertilized sunfish (Lepomis spp.) ponds and fed channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) ponds. The alkalinity and pH of pond water were lowered by additions of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. Total alkalinity levels were 1, 3, 6, 8, and 20 mg/liter in sunfish ponds and 0, 5, and 20 in catfish production ponds. Water quality and phytoplankton density were monitored. The decrease in alkalinity caused changes in fish production and phytoplankton communities. Production of sunfish decreased with decreasing alkalinity below 20 mg/liter. Channel catfish yields were not affected significantly at a total alkalinity of 5 mg/liter and above (P > 0.05). No sign of fish stress of aluminum accumulation in the tissue were detected in catfish. There was no relation between alkalinity level and off-flavor in catfish. Chlorophyll a concentration increased as alkalinity and pH decreased, although total number of phytoplankters, gross photosynthesis, and turbidity decreased with decreases in total alkalinity. Phosphorus was more available at low alkalinity levels. Total hardness increased as alkalinity decreased.

  5. New species of Proterometra (Digenea: Azygiidae) and its life cycle in the Chickasawhay River, Mississippi, USA, with supplemental observations of Proterometra autraini.

    PubMed

    Womble, Matthew R; Orélis-Ribeiro, Raphael; Bullard, Stephen A

    2016-02-01

    We describe Proterometra ariasae n. sp. based upon cercariae shed from a freshwater snail, Pleurocera sp., and adults infecting the buccal cavity of longear sunfish, Lepomis megalotis, captured from the Chickasawhay River, Mississippi, USA. We also provide supplemental observations of cercarial and adult paratypes of Proterometra autraini from the Au Train River, Michigan, USA. Sequence data for the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) from adults and cercariae of the new species were identical. Adults of the new species differ from congeners by having (i) a markedly large body, (ii) a proportionally large oral sucker, (iii) ovoid testes, (iv) a strongly muscular and laterally expanded pars prostatica, (v) a uterus that is extensively convoluted between the ovary and ventral sucker (vi) and a vitellarium as long as the caeca and extending posteriad beyond the anterior margin of the testes. Cercariae of the new species differ from those of its congeners by having (i) a tail stem that is shorter than 10mm and that lacks a medial constriction, (ii) obcordate furcae that are wider than long, (iii) mamillae distributed throughout the anterior tail stem only, and (v) a proportionally small distome that has relatively few uterine eggs and remains withdrawn in the anterior tail stem region in actively swimming cercariae. This is the first report of Proterometra from Mississippi, the second description to employ morphology and sequence data to elucidate a life cycle for Proterometra, and the third species of Proterometra from an intermediate host not assigned to Elimia.

  6. Long-term changes in mercury concentrations in fish from the middle Savannah River.

    PubMed

    Paller, M H; Littrell, James W

    2007-09-01

    Total mercury levels were measured in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), "sunfish" (Lepomis spp.), and "catfish" (primarily Ameiurus spp. and Ictalurus punctatus) from 1971 to 2004 in the middle Savannah River (river km 191 to 302), which drains the coastal plain of the southeastern U.S. Total mercury concentrations were higher in largemouth bass (overall mean of 0.55 mg/kg from 1971 to 2004), a piscivorous (trophic level 4) species than in the other taxa (means of 0.22-0.26 mg/kg), but temporal trends were generally similar among taxa. Mercury levels were highest in 1971 but declined over the next 10 years due to the mitigation of point source industrial pollution. Mercury levels in fish began to increase in the 1980s as a likely consequence of mercury inputs from tributaries and associated wetlands where mercury concentrations were significantly elevated in water and fish. Mercury levels in Savannah River fish decreased sharply in 2001-2003 coincident with a severe drought in the Savannah River basin, but returned to previous levels in 2004 with the resumption of normal precipitation. Regression models showed that mercury levels in fish changed significantly over time and were affected by river discharge. Mercury levels in Savannah River fish were only slightly lower in 2004 (0.3 to 0.8 mg/kg) than in 1971 (0.4 to 1.0 mg/kg) despite temporal changes during the intervening years.

  7. Metal levels in fish from the Savannah River: potential hazards to fish and other receptors.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Gaines, Karen F; Boring, C Shane; Stephens, Warren L; Snodgrass, Joel; Dixon, Carline; McMahon, Michael; Shukla, Sheila; Shukla, Tara; Gochfeld, Michael

    2002-05-01

    Fish are ideal indicators of heavy metal contamination in aquatic systems because they occupy different trophic levels and are different sizes and ages. In this paper, we report concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, manganese, strontium(88) and mercury in the muscle of 11 species of fish from the Savannah River near the Savannah River Site. We test the hypotheses that there are no locational, species, or trophic-level differences in contaminant levels. There were significant species differences for all metals; higher-trophic-level fish generally had higher levels of arsenic, chromium, and copper. There were relatively few locational differences, and where there were such differences, they were small. The relationships between body weight and contaminant levels were generally positive, except for strontium, where there was a negative correlation for bowfin (Amia cal va), bass (Micropterus salmoides), yellow perch (Perca flavescens), and shellcracker (Lepomis microlophus) and no relationship for the other species. The levels of most metals were similar to, or lower than, those for the United States generally, and the levels of metals in fish from the Savannah River do not appear to pose a health threat to the fish themselves or to higher-order consumers, based on levels known to cause effects.

  8. Selenium and other trace metals in fish inhabiting a fly ash stream: implications for regulatory tissue thresholds.

    PubMed

    Reash, Robin J; Lohner, Timothy W; Wood, Kenneth V

    2006-08-01

    Bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) and caddis flies (Trichoptera: Hydropsychidae) were collected from a stream receiving fly ash discharge and nearby reference streams to determine tissue levels of selenium (Se) and other metals, and compare these levels to published "no effect" thresholds. Stingy Run samples contained elevated levels of several metals. Mean Se concentrations in bullhead minnow whole body, bluegill whole body, bluegill ovary, and testes tissues were 44.6, 17.3, 32.5, and 37.1 microg/g (dry wt), respectively. These levels were 2-3 times higher than proposed toxic thresholds for fish whole body (7.9 microg/g) and ovary (17 microg/g). Although monitoring indicated a persistent bluegill population, some reproductive impairment may have occurred. Tissue residue data should be treated with caution because feral fish may accumulate several metals. In Stingy Run, persistence of a bluegill population may be explained by antagonistic interactions with other metals that were also elevated in the fish.

  9. Isolation of Acholeplasma laidlawii from centrarchids in a Central Florida Lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Francis-Floyd, R.; Reed, P.; Gibbs, P.; Shotts, E.; Bolon, B.; Coleman, W.; Klinger, R.

    1998-01-01

    In 1991, the poor physical condition of largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides from Lake Harris, Florida, was associated with the decline of the lake's fishery. The swim bladders of emaciated bass had mild inflammation and ecchymotic hemorrhages. A mycoplasma-like organism isolated from swim bladders was initially believed to be the causative agent. The organism was later identified as Acholeplasma laidlawii by using a fluorescent antibody procedure and was demonstrated to be nonpathogenic. Parenteral injection of the organism into healthy largemouth bass fingerlings produced no signs of disease or difference in growth rate compared with control fish during a 16-month period. Field studies resulted in isolation of A. laidlawii from black crappies Pomoxis nigromaculatus, bluegills Lepomis macrochirus, and redear sunfish L. microlophus, but not from noncentrarchids in Lake Harris or from any fish species in a control fishery (Lake Holly, Florida). The absence of organisms in all emaciated bass, our inability to reproduce the disease, and isolation of the organism from seemingly healthy fish suggest this organism was not pathogenic.

  10. Effect of suspended sediment on vulnerability of young razorback suckers to predation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J.E.; Hines, R.T.

    1999-01-01

    The decline of native fishes in North America is principally a result of altered habitats, and the impact of mainstream dams has accounted for many of the habitat changes. Diminished turbidity, and introduced nonnative predators were investigated as possible reasons for the decline of endangered razorback suckers Xyrauchen texanus in the Colorado River. In laboratory tests, young razorback suckers selected clear water over two water samples with higher concentrations of suspended sediment. In clear water, however, young razorback suckers were extremely susceptible to predation; native Colorado squawfish Ptychocheilus lucius consumed 90% of test razorback suckers, and nonnative green sunfish Lepomis cyanellus consumed 99.6%. As turbidity increased, razorback sucker predator avoidance improved and differences in predator success disappeared. Winter-spring spawning by razorback suckers in Lake Mohave, along with the extreme susceptibility of larvae to predation in clear water, may account for total recruitment failure in that lake. However, in upper basin rivers, suspended sediments remain high enough to limit predation by fishes tested, suggesting that other impacts, including contaminants and lack of floodplain habitat, may be thwarting recruitment in those rivers.

  11. Ecology and control of an introduced population of Southern Watersnakes (Nerodia fasciata) in southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, Robert; Todd, Brian D; Miano, Oliver J.; Canfield, Mark; Fisher, Robert N.; McMartin, Louanne

    2016-01-01

    Native to the southeastern United States, Southern Watersnakes (Nerodia fasciata) are known from two sites in California, but their ecological impacts are poorly understood. We investigated the ecology of Southern Watersnakes in Machado Lake, Harbor City, Los Angeles County, California, including an assessment of control opportunities. We captured 306 watersnakes as a result of aquatic trapping and hand captures. We captured snakes of all sizes (162–1063 mm snout–vent length [SVL], 3.5–873.3 g), demonstrating the existence of a well-established population. The smallest reproductive female was 490 mm SVL and females contained 12–46 postovulatory embryos (mean  =  21). Small watersnakes largely consumed introduced Western Mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis), while larger snakes specialized on larval and metamorph American Bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus) and Green Sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus). Overall capture per unit effort (CPUE) in traps declined with time during an intensive 76-d trapping bout, but CPUE trends varied considerably among traplines and it is unlikely that the overall decline in CPUE represented a major decrease in the snake population size. Although we found no direct evidence that Southern Watersnakes are affecting native species in Machado Lake, this population may serve as a source for intentional or unintentional transportation of watersnakes to bodies of water containing imperiled native prey species or potential competitors.

  12. Sensitivity of juvenile striped bass to chemicals used in aquaculture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bills, Terry D.; Marking, Leif L.; Howe, George E.

    1993-01-01

    Efforts to restore anadromous striped bass (Morone saxatilis) populations by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and other agencies over the past 20 years have concentrated on hatchery culture to supplement dwindling natural reproduction. Adult fish captured for artificial spawning are stressed by handling and crowding in rearing ponds and are often exposed to therapeutants, anesthetics, disinfectants, and herbicides used in fish culture. We determined the toxicity of 17 fishery chemicals (chloramine-T, erythromycin, formalin, Hyamine 3500, Roccal, malachite green, sulfamerazine, benzocaine, etomidate, Finquel (MS-222) , metomidate, quinaldine sulfate, chlorine, potassium permanganate, Aquazine, copper sulfate, and Rodeo) to striped bass fry (average weight = 1 g) in reconstituted water (total hardness 40 mg/L) at 12 degree C. The 96-h LC50's (concentration calculated to produce 50% mortality in a population) ranged from 0.129 mg/L for malachite green to 340 mg/L for erythromycin. We also determined the effects of selected levels of water temperature, hardness, and pH on the toxicity of chloramine-T, formalin, malachite green, and Roccal. There were no differences in toxicity for any of the chemicals at any water quality variable tested except for chloramine-T, which was about 25 times more toxic in soft, acid water than in soft, alkaline water. Our data show that the striped bass is as sensitive to fishery chemicals as rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), but is generally less resistant than bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus).

  13. Presence and biomagnification of organochlorine chemical residues in oxbow lakes of northeastern Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Niethammer, K.R.; White, D.H.; Baskett, T.S.; Sayre, M.W.

    1984-01-01

    Samples (98) of 16 spp. of animals were collected at Lake Providence, 88 samples of 15 spp. at Lake Bruin and 21 samples of 5 spp. at Lake St. John, Louisiana, between July 15 and Sept. 25, 1980. Residues of 13 organochlorine compounds were identified in these samples. Substantial concentrations of many compounds throughout the food webs of all 3 lakes showed that the lakes acted as sumps, accumulating residues from nearby agricultural land. DDT and its metabolites (DDE, TDE and DDMU [1-chloro-2,2,-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene]), toxaphene and polychlorobiphenyls (PCB) were the principal organochloride residues detected. With few exceptions, biomagnification of the principal residues was clearly illustrated. Tertiary consumers such as green-backed heron (Butorides striatus), snakes, spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) contained the highest residues. Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), blacktail shiner (Notropis venustus), yellow-crowned night heron (Nycticorax violaceus) and other secondary consumers contained lower levels of residues. Primary consumers, crayfish (Orconectes lancifer) and threadfin shad (Dorosoma petenense), contained relatively low residue levels of most compounds. Frogs contained lower residue levels than expected based on their position in the food web. Residue levels in immature green-backed herons and .gtoreq. 1 of the longer-lived predators, e.g., snakes, gars or largemouth bass could be monitored to evaluate levels of organochlorine chemical contaminants in aquatic habitats.

  14. Strong effects of predation by fishes on an invasive macroinvertebrate in a large floodplain river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartsch, M.R.; Bartsch, L.A.; Gutreuter, S.

    2005-01-01

    We assessed the effects of fish predation on zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) in Navigation Pool 8 of the Upper Mississippi River from 13 May to 5 October, 1998. Concrete-block samplers were deployed at 18 randomly chosen sites in the main-channel border, with 6 sites in the upper, middle, and lower segments of the pool. Two blocks, 1 of which was enclosed in a cage to exclude large predatory fishes, were deployed at each site. After 145 d, blocks were retrieved from 12 of the 18 sites, and zebra mussels were found on all blocks. Densities of zebra mussels were higher on caged blocks than uncaged blocks, and the magnitudes of the differences varied spatially. Mean mussel densities on uncaged blocks were reduced by 66%, 86%, and 20% compared to caged blocks in the upper, middle, and lower pool segments, respectively, over the 145-d interval. Mean daily instantaneous zebra mussel mortality rates from large predators ranged from 0.0016 to 0.0138. Similarly, biomass of zebra mussels was higher on caged than uncaged blocks. Mean mussel biomass on uncaged blocks was reduced by 64% pool-wide, relative to biomass on caged blocks. Zebra mussels were consumed by at least 6 fish taxa including redhorse stickers (Moxostoma spp.), common carp (Cyprinus carpio), bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), quillback carpsucker (Carpiodes cyprinus), flathead catfish (Pylodictis olivaris), and freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens). Fish predation had an important moderating effect on zebra mussel demography in Pool 8.

  15. Derivation of water quality criteria of phenanthrene using interspecies correlation estimation models for aquatic life in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiangyue; Liu, Zhengtao; Yan, Zhenguang; Yi, Xianliang

    2015-06-01

    Species sensitivity distribution (SSD) method has been widely used to derive water quality criteria (WQC). However, the toxicity data of some environmental pollutants are not easily accessible, especially for endangered and threatened species. Thus, it would be very desirable and economical to predict the toxicity of those species not subjected to toxicity test with the aid of a mathematical model. The interspecies correlation estimation (ICE) model (developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)) uses the initial toxicity estimate for one species to produce correlated toxicity values for multiple species, and it can be utilized to develop SSD and HC5 (hazardous concentration, 5th percentile). In this study, we explored the applicability of ICE to predict toxicity of phenanthrene to various species. ICE-based SSDs were generated using three surrogate species (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Lepomis macrochirus, and Daphnia magna) and compared with the metrical-based SSD. The corresponding HC5 of both models were also compared. The results showed there were no significant differences between HC5 derived from measured acute and ICE-based predicted values. The ICE model was verified as a valid approach for generating SSDs with limited toxicity data and deriving WQC for phenanthrene.

  16. A microscaled mercury saturation assay for metallothionein in fish.

    PubMed

    Shaw-Allen, Patricia; Elliott, Muriel; Jagoe, Charles H

    2003-09-01

    A mercury (Hg) saturation assay for measuring metallothionein (MT) in fish liver was modified by optimizing binding conditions to minimize the mercury and tissue consumed. The revised method uses stable Hg at low concentrations instead of 203Hg. At the reduced Hg concentrations used, MT concentrations in livers homogenized in saline appeared to increase systematically with dilution in both bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). This error suggested a binding limitation due to sulfhydryl oxidation or competition for and removal of mercury by non-MT proteins. Homogenizing tissues in trichloroacetic acid (TCA) eliminated the interference. To further evaluate the method, the protocol was tested in the laboratory and field. Metallothionein in bluegill injected with 0.6 mg/kg zinc chloride increased at a rate of 0.03 nmole MT/g liver/h (r2 = 0.53, p = 0.001). Linearity improved when data were corrected for protein content (r2 = 0.74, p < 0.0001). Metallothionein levels in bluegill from a coal ash-contaminated environment were significantly increased over that of hatchery-reared sunfish (F = 20.17, p = 0.0003). The microscaled procedure minimizes concerns related to radioisotope use and waste generation while retaining the high sensitivity of the 203Hg assay. PMID:12959524

  17. Observations of bluegills fed selenium-contaminated Hexagenia nymphs collected from Belews Lake, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, K.A.

    1985-12-01

    Belews Lake, a 1563-ha reservoir in the Piedmont region of North Carolina, was impounded in the early 1970's to provide cooling water for a 2240 Mw coal-fired electric generating station. Hatchery-raised bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) fingerlings stocked in several net-isolated Belews Lake coves during 1979 experienced a rapid uptake of coal ash-associated trace elements, principally selenium, in skeletal muscle and visceral tissues. Generally, higher selenium concentrations and evidences of acute toxicity, including exophthalmos and extreme abdominal distention, were observed only among fish having unrestricted access to sediments and benthos. Bluegills which were caged above the sediments in the same coves, and presumably had less opportunity to feed on benthic organisms, concentrated selenium to a lesser degree. Those observations, in addition to information provided by inspection of fish stomach contents and tissue elemental analyses of fish and benthic macroinvertebrates, strongly implicate predation on contaminated benthos as an important pathway for selenium uptake and resulting toxicity to fish in Belews Lakes. However, direct experimental evidence relating levels of dietary selenium to toxic effects among warm water fish species is sparse. The present study was intended to document the occurrence of selenium toxicity in bluegills fed to satiation a diet consisting of a common benthic food organism found in Belews Lake.

  18. Impact of atrazine on chlorpyrifos toxicity in four aquatic vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Wacksman, M N; Maul, J D; Lydy, M J

    2006-11-01

    Atrazine has been shown previously to potentiate chlorpyrifos toxicity in selected invertebrates. This study examined interactions of atrazine and chlorpyrifos in four aquatic vertebrates. Organisms were exposed to binary mixtures of atrazine and chlorpyrifos during toxicity bioassays. Inhibition of cholinesterase (ChE) enzyme activity and chlorpyrifos uptake kinetics were also examined with and without atrazine exposure. Atrazine alone did not affect organisms at concentrations up to 5000 microg/L; however, the presence of atrazine at 1000 microg/L did result in a significant increase in the acute toxicity of chlorpyrifos in Xenopus laevis. Mixed results were encountered with Pimephales promelas; some bioassays showed greater than additive toxicity, while others showed an additive response. No effect of atrazine on chlorpyrifos toxicity was observed for Lepomis macrochirus and Rana clamitans. Atrazine did not affect ChE activity or chlorpyrifos uptake rates, indicating that these toxicodynamic and toxicokinetic parameters may not be related to the mechanism of atrazine potentiation of chlorpyrifos toxicity. Based on the results of this study, it does not appear that a mixture toxicity of atrazine and chlorpyrifos at environmentally relevant concentrations presents a risk to the vertebrate organisms examined in this study.

  19. The Influence of Fish Length on Tissue Mercury Dynamics: Implications for Natural Resource Management and Human Health Risk

    PubMed Central

    Sackett, Dana K.; Cope, W. Gregory; Rice, James A.; Aday, D. Derek

    2013-01-01

    Consumption of fish has well-known human health benefits, though some fish may contain elevated levels of mercury (Hg) that are especially harmful to developing children. Fish length is most often the basis for establishing fishery harvest regulations that determine which fish will ultimately be consumed by humans. It is, therefore, essential to quantify the relationship between fish length and Hg accumulation in regard to harvest regulations for effective fishery and public health policy. We examined this relationship for three sportfish from six lakes across North Carolina, USA. Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) had the lowest Hg levels and only the very largest fish in the most contaminated site exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Hg screening level. Black crappie (Pomoxis nigromaculatus) had an intermediate level of Hg and larger individuals exceeded the USEPA screening level; however, they tended not to exceed this level before reaching the harvest length limit. Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) exceeded the USEPA screening level at sizes below the fishery length limit in two lakes, leaving only higher risk fish for anglers to harvest and consume. Removing the effects of fish age and trophic position, we found strong positive correlations between Hg and fish length for largemouth bass and black crappie. We suggest public health officials and wildlife managers collaborate to structure fishery regulations and length-based fish consumption advisories that protect consumers from Hg exposure and communicate the relative risk of fish consumption. PMID:23388852

  20. The influence of fish length on tissue mercury dynamics: implications for natural resource management and human health risk.

    PubMed

    Sackett, Dana K; Cope, W Gregory; Rice, James A; Aday, D Derek

    2013-02-01

    Consumption of fish has well-known human health benefits, though some fish may contain elevated levels of mercury (Hg) that are especially harmful to developing children. Fish length is most often the basis for establishing fishery harvest regulations that determine which fish will ultimately be consumed by humans. It is, therefore, essential to quantify the relationship between fish length and Hg accumulation in regard to harvest regulations for effective fishery and public health policy. We examined this relationship for three sportfish from six lakes across North Carolina, USA. Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) had the lowest Hg levels and only the very largest fish in the most contaminated site exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Hg screening level. Black crappie (Pomoxis nigromaculatus) had an intermediate level of Hg and larger individuals exceeded the USEPA screening level; however, they tended not to exceed this level before reaching the harvest length limit. Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) exceeded the USEPA screening level at sizes below the fishery length limit in two lakes, leaving only higher risk fish for anglers to harvest and consume. Removing the effects of fish age and trophic position, we found strong positive correlations between Hg and fish length for largemouth bass and black crappie. We suggest public health officials and wildlife managers collaborate to structure fishery regulations and length-based fish consumption advisories that protect consumers from Hg exposure and communicate the relative risk of fish consumption.

  1. Exposure of fish to high-intensity sonar does not induce acute pathology.

    PubMed

    Kane, A S; Song, J; Halvorsen, M B; Miller, D L; Salierno, J D; Wysocki, L E; Zeddies, D; Popper, A N

    2010-05-01

    This study investigated immediate effects of intense sound exposure associated with low-frequency (170-320 Hz) or with mid-frequency (2.8-3.8 kHz) sonars on caged rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus and hybrid sunfish Lepomis sp. in Seneca Lake, New York, U.S.A. This study focused on potential effects on inner ear tissues using scanning electron microscopy and on non-auditory tissues using gross and histopathology. Fishes were exposed to low-frequency sounds for 324 or 628 s with a received peak signal level of 193 dB re 1 microPa (root mean square, rms) or to mid-frequency sounds for 15 s with a received peak signal level of 210 dB re 1 microPa (rms). Although a variety of clinical observations from various tissues and organ systems were described, no exposure-related pathologies were observed. This study represents the first investigation of the effects of high-intensity sonar on fish tissues in vivo. Data from this study indicate that exposure to low and midfrequency sonars, as described in this report, might not have acute effects on fish tissues.

  2. Consequences of Hatch Phenology on Stages of Fish Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Bogner, David M.; Wuellner, Melissa R.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how hatch phenology (e.g., the start, peak, and duration of hatching) could influence subsequent recruitment of freshwater fishes into a population. We used two commonly sympatric fish species that exhibit different hatching phenologies to examine recruitment across multiple life stages. Nine yellow perch (Perca flavescens) and bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) annual cohorts were sampled from 2004 through 2013 across larval, age-0, age-1, and age-2 life stages in a Nebraska (U.S.A.) Sandhill lake. Yellow perch hatched earlier in the season and displayed a more truncated hatch duration compared to bluegill. The timing of hatch influenced recruitment dynamics for both species but important hatching metrics were not similar between species across life stages. A longer hatch duration resulted in greater larval yellow perch abundance but greater age-1 bluegill abundance. In contrast, bluegill larval and age-0 abundances were greater during years when hatching duration was shorter and commenced earlier, whereas age-0 yellow perch abundance was greater when hatching occurred earlier. As a result of hatch phenology, yellow perch recruitment variability was minimized sooner (age-0 life stage) than bluegill (age-1 life stage). Collectively, hatch phenology influenced recruitment dynamics across multiple life stages but was unique for each species. Understanding the complexities of when progeny enter an environment and how this influences eventual recruitment into a population will be critical in the face of ongoing climate change. PMID:27764216

  3. Comparison of treatments to inactivate viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV-IVb) in frozen baitfish.

    PubMed

    Phelps, Nicholas B D; Goodwin, Andrew E; Marecaux, Emily; Goyal, Sagar M

    2013-02-28

    Current US state and federal fish health regulations target the spread of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus-IVb (VHSV-IVb) through movement restrictions of live fish; however, they largely ignore the potential for the virus to be spread through commercial distribution and use of frozen baitfish from VHSV-IVb-positive regions. Some state laws do require treatment of frozen baitfish to inactivate VHSV, and additional methods have been proposed, but few scientific studies have examined the efficacy of these treatments. In this study, bluegills Lepomis macrochirus were challenged with VHSV-IVb and frozen to represent standard industry methods, disinfected by various treatments, and tested for infectious VHSV-IVb using virus isolation. The virus was isolated from 70% of fish subjected to 3 freeze/thaw cycles. All other treatment methods were effective in inactivating the virus, including treatment with isopropyl alcohol, mineral oil, salt and borax, and dehydration. Dehydration followed by rehydration is rapid and effective, and therefore, seems to be the best option for inactivating VHSV-IVb present in frozen baitfish while maintaining their usefulness as bait. PMID:23446970

  4. LONG-TERM CHANGES IN MERCURY CONCENTRATIONS IN FISH FROM THE MIDDLE SAVANNAH RIVER

    SciTech Connect

    Paller, M; Bill Littrell, B

    2007-01-02

    Total mercury levels were measured in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), ''sunfishes'' (Lepomis spp)., and ''catfish'' (primarily Ameiurus spp.) from 1971 to 2004 in the middle reaches of the Savannah River, which drains the coastal plain of the southeastern U.S. Mercury levels were highest in 1971 but declined over the next ten years due to the mitigation of point sources of industrial pollution. Mercury levels began to increase in the 1980s as a possible consequence of mercury inputs from tributaries and associated wetlands where mercury concentrations were significantly elevated in water and fish. Mercury levels in Savannah River fish decreased sharply in 2001-2003 coincident with a severe drought in the Savannah River basin, but returned to previous levels in 2004 with the resumption of normal precipitation. Regression models showed that mercury levels in Savannah River fish changed significantly over time and were affected by river discharge. Despite temporal changes, there was little overall difference in Savannah River fish tissue mercury levels between 1971 and 2004.

  5. Use of main channel and two backwater habitats by larval fishes in the Detroit River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDonald, Erik A.; McNaught, A. Scott; Roseman, Edward F.

    2014-01-01

    Recent investigations in the Detroit River have revealed renewed spawning activity by several important fishes, but little is known about their early life history requirements. We surveyed two main channel and two backwater areas in the lower Detroit River weekly from May to July 2007 to assess habitat use by larval fishes. Backwater areas included a soft-sediment embayment (FI) and a hard-sediment area (HIW). Main channel sites were located adjacent to each backwater area. Water temperature, velocity and clarity measurements and zooplankton samples were collected weekly. A macrophyte assessment was conducted in July. Growth and diet of larval yellow perch (Perca flavescens), bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) and round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) were used to assess habitat quality. Macrophyte diversity and percent cover were higher and velocity lower at FI than HIW. Although larval fish diversity was highest in the main channel, yellow perch and bluegill larvae only grew beyond the yolk stage at FI, where they preferentially selected copepods, while Daphnia were selected in the main channel. Round goby ate harpacticoid copepods and Daphnia and grew at similar rates in HIW and the main channel. These data indicate that FI was a valuable nursery area for yellow perch and bluegill, whereas HIW was better suited to round goby. We only assessed two backwater areas, thus a complete census of wetland areas in the Detroit River is needed to identify valuable habitats. Restoration of shallow backwater areas is essential for rehabilitating fish populations and should be a priority in the Detroit River.

  6. Evaluation of the flood-pulse concept based on statistical models of growth of selected fishes of the upper Mississippi River system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gutreuter, S.; Bartels, A.D.; Irons, K.; Sandheinrich, M.B.

    1999-01-01

    The flood-pulse concept (FPC) states that annual inundation is the principal force responsible for productivity and biotic interactions in river-floodplain systems. Somatic growth is one component of production, and we hypothesized that, if the FPC applies, growth of fishes that use the moving littoral zone should differ among years with differing flood pattern, whereas nonlittoral fishes would show no such response. Growth of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), species that exploit littoral resources, increased during a year having an unusual warm-season flood in the Upper Mississippi River system and was reduced during low-water years. Growth of white bass (Morone chrysops), which do not rely heavily on the littoral zone, did not differ significantly between the extreme-flood and low-water years. Patterns of growth of black crappie (Pomoxis nigromaculatus), which have intermediate dependence on the moving littoral zone, were somewhat ambiguous. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the FPC applies, at least under certain conditions, to this temperate river system. Our results can also provide an important basis from which to assess some costs and benefits of water level management strategies in large regulated temperate rivers.

  7. Comparison of treatments to inactivate viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV-IVb) in frozen baitfish.

    PubMed

    Phelps, Nicholas B D; Goodwin, Andrew E; Marecaux, Emily; Goyal, Sagar M

    2013-02-28

    Current US state and federal fish health regulations target the spread of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus-IVb (VHSV-IVb) through movement restrictions of live fish; however, they largely ignore the potential for the virus to be spread through commercial distribution and use of frozen baitfish from VHSV-IVb-positive regions. Some state laws do require treatment of frozen baitfish to inactivate VHSV, and additional methods have been proposed, but few scientific studies have examined the efficacy of these treatments. In this study, bluegills Lepomis macrochirus were challenged with VHSV-IVb and frozen to represent standard industry methods, disinfected by various treatments, and tested for infectious VHSV-IVb using virus isolation. The virus was isolated from 70% of fish subjected to 3 freeze/thaw cycles. All other treatment methods were effective in inactivating the virus, including treatment with isopropyl alcohol, mineral oil, salt and borax, and dehydration. Dehydration followed by rehydration is rapid and effective, and therefore, seems to be the best option for inactivating VHSV-IVb present in frozen baitfish while maintaining their usefulness as bait.

  8. Assessing variability in chemical acute toxicity of unionid mussels: Influence of intra- and inter-laboratory testing, life stage, and species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raimondo, Sandy; Lilavois, Crystal R.; Lee, Larisa; Augspurger, Tom; Wang, Ning; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Bauer, Candice R.; Hammer, Edward J.; Barron, Mace G.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a toxicity database for unionid mussels to examine the extent of intra- and inter-laboratory variability in acute toxicity tests with mussel larvae (glochidia) and juveniles; the extent of differential sensitivity of the two life stages; and the variation in sensitivity among commonly tested mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea, Utterbackia imbecillis, Villosa iris), commonly tested cladocerans (Daphnia magna, Ceriodaphnia dubia) and fish (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Pimephales promelas, Lepomis macrochirus). The results of these analyses indicate intra-laboratory variability for median effect concentrations (EC50) averaged about 2 fold for both life stages, while inter-laboratory variability averaged 3.6 fold for juvenile mussels and 6.3 fold for glochidia. The EC50s for juveniles and glochidia were within a factor of 2 of each other for 50% of paired records across chemicals, with juveniles more sensitive than glochidia by more than 2 fold for 33% of the comparisons made between life stages. There was a high concurrence of the sensitivity of commonly tested L. siliquoidea, U. imbecillis, and V. iris to that of other mussels. However, this concurrence decreases as the taxonomic distance of the commonly tested cladocerans and fish to mussels increases. The compiled mussel database and determination of data variability will advance risk assessments by including more robust species sensitivity distributions, interspecies correlation estimates, and availability of taxon-specific empirically derived application factors for risk assessment.

  9. Biological structure and dynamics of littoral fish assemblages in the eastern Finger Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenna, James E.

    2001-01-01

    Fish assemblages from three of the New York Finger Lakes were examined for structure within and between lakes and over time. Species-area relationships indicated that local fish assemblages are the result of recent, lake-specific events that altered the regional species pool. Fish assemblages varied among seasons and those occupying eutrophic waters had different characteristics from those in oligotrophic waters. Bluntnose minnows (Pimephales notatus) were a persistent and important component of most assemblages, but abundance of bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) was the most distinguishing feature. Species associations indicated that interactions among the fishes had little influence on assemblage structure. Correlations between community structure and abiotic factors were identified. Ten abiotic variables were strongly associated with the species assemblages, but could not fully explain differences between assemblages. Results indicate that the abundance and diversity of water column feeders was related to productivity of lake habitat. In general, fish populations were smaller in oligotrophic waters and water column feeders were poorly represented in those assemblages. Productivity at various trophic levels was implicated as a major factor determining lake fish assemblage structure.

  10. Treated municipal sewage discharge affects multiple levels of biological organization in fish.

    PubMed

    Porter, Clint M; Janz, David M

    2003-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine cellular-, organ-, and organism-level responses in longear sunfish (Lepomis megalotis) and fish community structure in a stream in which treated municipal sewage effluent is discharged and in a nearby reference stream with little surrounding land use. A modified version of the U.S.E.P.A. Rapid Bioassessment Protocol V, which combines a habitat assessment with Karr's index of biotic integrity, was used on 400-m reaches of each stream. The study site had a higher proportion of tolerant species and omnivores and a lower proportion of top predators, suggesting alterations in the fish community and a slight level of water quality impairment. Significant increases in condition factor, hepatosomatic index, serum testosterone, and plasma vitellogenin concentrations were observed in male sunfish collected from the study stream in comparison to fish collected from the reference stream. There were no differences between sites in hepatic expression of the 70-kDa stress protein (HSP70). In conclusion, effects were observed at cellular, organ, organism, and community levels of biological organization in fishes exposed to treated municipal sewage effluent.

  11. Thermoregulation of fish and other aquatic vertebrates in thermally stressed habitats: roles of behavior, competition, predation and nutrients. Progress report, 1 January 1984-31 December 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Spotila, J.R.; Standora, E.A.

    1986-06-01

    The mechanisms by which fish and turtles thermoregulate in thermally stressed habitats were quantitatively determined. Experiments on the roles of behavior, competition and predation on the thermoregulation of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) in extreme environments are described. The presence of the bass changes the upper avoidance temperature of a bluegill. Bass from Par Pond and Pond C on the Savannah River Plant have the same selected temperature but the responses of small bass to tests of selected temperature and upper avoidance temperature are altered by the presence of large conspecific. Field enclosure experiments documented the complex nature of the bluegill-bass interaction in Pond C. The effect of diet protein content and temperature on the growth and assimilation efficiency of the turtle Pseudemys scripta are related. Growth rate increased when turtles were fed diets with a higher protein content. Yearling snapping turtles, Chelydra serpentina, did not grow when kept at 15/sup 0/C. Those kept at 25/sup 0/C grew rapidly. There was no difference in selected temperature between the two groups, although CTM's were significantly different. Mathematical modeling focused on an analysis of the relationship between the thermal conductance of animals, the insulative properties of skin and fur and the external properties of animal-environmental interactions. 70 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  12. Seasonal and diel habitat selection by bluegills in a shallow natural lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paukert, C.P.; Willis, D.W.

    2002-01-01

    Habitat use by bluegill Lepomis macrochirus may be dictated by the avoidance of predators and the availability of prey. Previous work suggests that bluegills large enough to avoid predators will select habitats based on foraging profitability. However, these studies focused on smaller fish (200 mm total length [TL]) bluegills in a shallow (mean depth = 1.2 m), 332-ha, natural lake (Pelican Lake, Nebraska) with both emergent and submergent vegetation distributed throughout. A total of 78 bluegills (200-273 mm TL) were implanted with radio transmitters and relocated daily for 6 d per month (April-September); up to 20 of the tagged fish were relocated every 2 h for a 24-h period once each month. Regardless of diel period, bluegills used open-water, emergent vegetation, submergent vegetation, and mixed emergent - submergent vegetation habitat types in similar proportions. During April, June, and July, male bluegills positively selected emergent vegetation, whereas female bluegills showed no vegetation selection preference during any month. Throughout the study period, bluegills never avoided open-water habitats, suggesting that larger individuals may continue to use open-water habitats in proportion to their availability. In addition, emergent vegetation appeared to be important, particularly for male bluegills. Although the mechanism for the positive selection of emergent vegetation by males was unclear, the protection or enhancement of such habitats may facilitate the preservation of quality bluegill populations in shallow lakes.

  13. Kinetics of hepatic phase I and II biotransformation reactions in eight finfish species.

    PubMed

    González, Jaime Fernando; Reimschuessel, Renate; Shaikh, Badar; Kane, Andrew S

    2009-01-01

    Hepatic microsomes and cytosols of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), red tilapia (Oreochromis sp.), largemouth bass (Micropterussalmoides), striped bass (Morone saxatilis), hybrid striped bass (M. saxatilis x M. crysops), and bluegill (Lepomis macrochuris) (n=8) were used to study the kinetics of phase I (ECOD, EROD, PROD, BROD) and phase II (UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UDPGT)-, sulfotransferase (ST)- and glutathione-s-transferase (GST)-mediated) reactions. The best catalytic efficiency for ECOD and GST activities was performed by channel catfish, Atlantic salmon, rainbow trout and tilapia. The highest EROD catalytic efficiency was for Atlantic salmon. None of the species had either PROD or BROD activities. Rainbow trout had very similar UDPGT catalytic efficiency to tilapia, channel catfish, Atlantic salmon, largemouth bass and bluegill. Sulfotransferase conjugation had no significant differences among the species. In summary, tilapia, channel catfish, Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout had the best biotransforming capabilities; striped bass, hybrid striped bass and bluegill were low metabolizers and largemouth bass shared some capabilities with both groups.

  14. Analysis of blood biomarkers from bluegill sunfish

    SciTech Connect

    Gettys, C.E. ); Shugart, L.R.; Gustin, M.K. )

    1988-09-01

    The test animal for this project was a hybrid of the bluegill sunfish, Lepomis machrochirus. These fish were lab-reared and maintained in large, flow-through tanks at 10 C. The chemical benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) was used in the experiments. It is a carcinogen found in the environment most often as a by product of combustion of organic material. BaP is also an inducer of the mixed function oxidase system, which is the organisms detoxification system and which produces metabolites of the original chemicals. It is these metabolites which have the potential to interact with the DNA. The toxicant was present in the water at approximately 1 ppb. This was obtained by passing water through a generator column of glass beads, to which BaP had been adsorbed. This was a long-term, low level chronic exposure. Two procedures were used to evaluate the effects of BaP on the fish. The DNA of the livers was examined for strand breaks by the alkaline unwinding assay and the nuclei of the whole blood cells were examined for abnormalities by flow cytometry.

  15. Competitive interactions between invasive Nile tilapia and native fish: the potential for altered trophic exchange and modification of food webs.

    PubMed

    Martin, Charles W; Valentine, Marla M; Valentine, John F

    2010-12-21

    Recent studies have highlighted both the positive and negative impacts of species invasions. Most of these studies have been conducted on either immobile invasive plants or sessile fauna found at the base of food webs. Fewer studies have examined the impacts of vagile invasive consumers on native competitors. This is an issue of some importance given the controlling influence that consumers have on lower order plants and animals. Here, we present results of laboratory experiments designed to assess the impacts of unintended aquaculture releases of the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), in estuaries of the Gulf of Mexico, on the functionally similar redspotted sunfish (Lepomis miniatus). Laboratory choice tests showed that tilapia prefer the same structured habitat that native sunfish prefer. In subsequent interspecific competition experiments, agonistic tilapia displaced sunfish from their preferred structured habitats. When a piscivore (largemouth bass) was present in the tank with both species, the survival of sunfish decreased. Based on these findings, if left unchecked, we predict that the proliferation of tilapia (and perhaps other aggressive aquaculture fishes) will have important detrimental effects on the structure of native food webs in shallow, structured coastal habitats. While it is likely that the impacts of higher trophic level invasive competitors will vary among species, these results show that consequences of unintended releases of invasive higher order consumers can be important.

  16. Fish Scale Evidence for Rapid Post Glacial Colonization of an Atlantic Coastal Pond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, R. A.; Peteet, Dorothy

    1996-01-01

    Fish scales from the sediment of Allamuchy Pond, New Jersey, USA, indicate that fishes were present in the pond within 400 years of the time of the first deposition of organic material, at approximately 12,600 yrs BP. The earliest of the scales, from a white sucker, Catostomus commersoni, appears in sediment dated 12,260 +/- 220 yrs BP. Presence of scales in sediment deposited before I 0,000 yrs BP indicates that Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, sunfish, Lepomis sp., and yellow perch, Perca flavescens, also were early inhabitants of the pond. The timing of the arrival of each of these fishes suggests that they migrated out from Atlantic coastal refugia. A minnow scale, referred to Phoxininae, was also retrieved; it could not be matched to any cyprinid currently found in northeastern North America. The species present historically in this pond are from five families found currently in ponds throughout the Northeast and sugoest that the lentic palaeo-enviromnent was similar to present mid-elevation or high-latitude lentic systems.

  17. The application of conducting polymers to a biorobotic fin propulsor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangorra, James; Anquetil, Patrick; Fofonoff, Timothy; Chen, Angela; DelZio, Mike; Hunter, Ian

    2007-06-01

    Conducting polymer actuators based on polypyrrole are being developed for use in biorobotic fins that are designed to create and control forces like the pectoral fin of the bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus). It is envisioned that trilayer bending actuators will be used within, and as, the fin's webbing to create a highly controllable, shape morphing, flexible fin surface, and that linear conducting polymer actuators will be used to actuate the bases of the fin's fin-rays, like an agonist-antagonist muscle pair, and control the fin's stiffness. For this application, trilayer bending actuators were used successfully to reproduce the cupping motion of the sunfish pectoral fin by controlling the curvature of the fin's surface and the motion of its dorsal and ventral edges. However, the speed of these large polymer films was slow, and must be increased if the fin's shape is to be modulated synchronously with the fin's flapping motion. Free standing linear conducting polymer films can generate large stresses and strains, but there are many engineering obstacles that must be resolved in order to create linear polymer actuators that generate simultaneously the forces, displacements and actuation rates required by the fin. We present two approaches that are being used to solve the engineering challenges involved in utilizing conducting polymer linear actuators: the manufacture of long, uniform ribbons of polymer and gold film, and the parallel actuation of multiple conducting polymer films.

  18. Selenium in ecosystems within the mountaintop coal mining and valley-fill region of southern West Virginia-assessment and ecosystem-scale modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Presser, Theresa S.

    2013-01-01

    acted as an integrator of organic-rich, fine-grained biomass present in streams. The base-case food web modeled for streams was suspended particulate material to aquatic insect to creek chub, with comparative modeling of a direct particulate-to-stoneroller food web. Model species for a reservoir setting were based on an earlier study of bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus), and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Several reservoir food webs were considered based on a variety of invertebrates (insect, snail, clam). For stream and reservoir settings, predicted Se concentrations in exposure scenarios showed a high degree of correlation (r2 = 0.91 for invertebrates and 0.75 for fish) with field observations of Se concentrations when modeling was initiated from suspended-particulate-material Se concentrations and model transfer parameters defined previously in the literature were used. These strong correlations validate the derived site-specific model and establish sufficient confidence that the predictions from the developed model can be quantitatively applied to the ecosystems in southern West Virginia. An application of modeling used a metric describing the partitioning of Se between particulate material and dissolved phases (Kd) to allow determination of a dissolved Se concentration that would be necessary to attain a site-specific Se fish body burden. The operationally defined Kd quantifies the complex process of transformation at the base of a food web on a site-specific basis. The magnitude of this metric is known to vary with such factors as Se speciation, particulate-material type, and hydrology. This application (1) ties dissolved Se concentrations to fish tissue concentrations; (2) allows consideration of different choices for intervening site-specific exposure steps that set Se bioaccumulation, partitioning, and bioavailability; and (3) generates implications for management decisions that define protection through

  19. Mercury Contamination and Bioaccumulation Associated with Historical Gold Mining in the Bear and Yuba River Watersheds, Sierra Nevada, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpers, C. N.; Hunerlach, M. P.; Hothem, R. L.; May, J. T.; Taylor, H. E.; DeWild, J. F.; Olson, M. L.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Marvin-DiPasquale, M.

    2001-12-01

    Extensive use of mercury in the mining and recovery of gold during the late 19th and early 20th centuries has led to widespread mercury contamination of water, sediment, and biota in the Sierra Nevada foothills of California. The watersheds of the Bear and Yuba Rivers were selected for study by the U.S. Geological Survey and other federal, state, and local agencies on the basis of (1) results of previous studies of bioaccumulation, (2) observations of visible elemental mercury at numerous mine sites and in river sediments, and (3) extensive historical mining on federal lands and adjacent private lands. Of 53 unfiltered water samples analyzed for total recoverable mercury (Hg-T), 17 samples (32 percent) had concentrations in excess of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) aquatic-life criterion of 50 nanograms per liter (ng/L). Water flowing from two separate tunnels in one mining district had Hg-T concentrations greater than 100,000 ng/L, exceeding the EPA drinking-water standard of 2,000 ng/L. Monthly sampling of the Bear River near its mouth revealed monomethylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in unfiltered water samples greater than 0.4 ng/L during July-August 1999 and January 2000. Game fish were collected from 5 reservoirs and 14 stream sites during 1999 to assess the distribution of mercury in the food chain and to examine the potential risk for humans and wildlife. Of 141 fish fillet samples of black basses (Micropterus spp.), sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus and Lepomis cyanellus), black crappie (Poxomis nigromaculatus), channel catfish (Ictularus punctatus), brown trout (Salmo trutta), and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) analyzed for Hg-T, 52 percent exceeded the EPA criterion of 0.3 parts per million (ppm), wet basis. Eighty-nine percent of the bass had Hg-T greater than 0.3 ppm total mercury. Based on these data, three counties issued a public health notification recommending limited consumption of game fish from the Bear and Yuba watersheds

  20. Mercury bioaccumulation in fish in a region affected by historic gold mining; the South Yuba River, Deer Creek, and Bear River watersheds, California, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Jason T.; Hothem, Roger L.; Alpers, Charles N.; Law, Matthew A.

    2000-01-01

    Mercury that was used historically for gold recovery in mining areas of the Sierra Nevada continues to enter local and downstream water bodies, including the Sacramento Delta and the San Francisco Bay of northern California. Methylmercury is of particular concern because it is the most prevalent form of mercury in fish and is a potent neurotoxin that bioaccumulates at successive trophic levels within food webs. In April 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with several other agencies the Forest Service (U.S. Department of Agriculture), the Bureau of Land Management, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the California State Water Resources Control Board, and the Nevada County Resource Conservation District began a pilot investigation to characterize the occurrence and distribution of mercury in water, sediment, and biota in the South Yuba River, Deer Creek, and Bear River watersheds of California. Biological samples consisted of semi-aquatic and aquatic insects, amphibians, bird eggs, and fish. Fish were collected from 5 reservoirs and 14 stream sites during August through October 1999 to assess the distribution of mercury in these watersheds. Fish that were collected from reservoirs included top trophic level predators (black basses, Micropterus spp.) intermediate trophic level predators [sunfish (blue gill, Lepomis macrochirus; green sunfish, Lepomis cyanellus; and black crappie, Poxomis nigromaculatus)] and benthic omnivores (channel catfish, Ictularus punctatus). At stream sites, the species collected were upper trophic level salmonids (brown trout, Salmo trutta) and upper-to-intermediate trophic level salmonids (rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss). Boneless and skinless fillet portions from 161 fish were analyzed for total mercury; 131 samples were individual fish, and the remaining 30 fish were combined into 10 composite samples of three fish each of the same species and size class. Mercury concentrations in samples of black basses

  1. Proterometra epholkos sp. n. (Digenea: Azygiidae) from Terrapin Creek, Alabama, USA: molecular characterization of life cycle, redescription of Proterometra albacauda, and updated lists of host and geographic locality records for Proterometra spp. in North America.

    PubMed

    Womble, Matthew R; Orélis-Ribeiro, Raphael; Bullard, Stephen A

    2015-02-01

    Proterometra epholkos sp. n. asexually reproduces in the stream dwelling prosobranch, Elimia cf. modesta (Cerithioidea: Pleuroceridae) and infects the buccal cavity epithelium of spotted bass, Micropterus punctulatus (Perciformes: Centrarchidae) in the Coosa River (Terrapin Creek; N33°51'36.56″, W85°31'28.15″; Cleburne County, Alabama, USA). We characterize cercariae and adults of the new species using morphology and molecular sequence data and redescribe its morphologically similar congener Proterometra albacauda based on the holotype and paratype (USNPC Nos. 61229-30). The new species can be distinguished most easily from P. albacauda by the combination of having cercariae with long mamillae (>100μm) that encircle the tail stem anteriorly, that are restricted to 1 lateral column per body margin at midbody, and that are absent from the medial surface of the tail stem as well as by having adults with a partly extracecal uterus, a transverse metraterm occupying the space between the oral sucker and prostatic sac, and a vitellarium that is longer than the ceca and extends anteriad to the level of or beyond the posterior margin of the oral sucker. Sequence data from the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2; 251bp) did not reject the notion that the cercariae and adults we collected simultaneously from those infected, sympatric, individual snails and fish in Terrapin Creek were conspecific. Also provided herein for species of Proterometra are (i) taxonomic keys for cercariae and adults based on morphological and behavioral characteristics sourced from the published literature, (ii) updated lists of host records (prosobranchs and fishes) and geographic locality records for Proterometra spp., and (iii) synopses and assessments of the morphological features previously used to differentiate them. Proterometra macrostoma (type species), Proterometra melanophora, and Proterometra hodgesiana are species inquirendae; requiring new collections from type

  2. Phylogeny and temporal diversification of darters (Percidae: Etheostomatinae).

    PubMed

    Near, Thomas J; Bossu, Christen M; Bradburd, Gideon S; Carlson, Rose L; Harrington, Richard C; Hollingsworth, Phillip R; Keck, Benjamin P; Etnier, David A

    2011-10-01

    Discussions aimed at resolution of the Tree of Life are most often focused on the interrelationships of major organismal lineages. In this study, we focus on the resolution of some of the most apical branches in the Tree of Life through exploration of the phylogenetic relationships of darters, a species-rich clade of North American freshwater fishes. With a near-complete taxon sampling of close to 250 species, we aim to investigate strategies for efficient multilocus data sampling and the estimation of divergence times using relaxed-clock methods when a clade lacks a fossil record. Our phylogenetic data set comprises a single mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene and two nuclear genes sampled from 245 of the 248 darter species. This dense sampling allows us to determine if a modest amount of nuclear DNA sequence data can resolve relationships among closely related animal species. Darters lack a fossil record to provide age calibration priors in relaxed-clock analyses. Therefore, we use a near-complete species-sampled phylogeny of the perciform clade Centrarchidae, which has a rich fossil record, to assess two distinct strategies of external calibration in relaxed-clock divergence time estimates of darters: using ages inferred from the fossil record and molecular evolutionary rate estimates. Comparison of Bayesian phylogenies inferred from mtDNA and nuclear genes reveals that heterospecific mtDNA is present in approximately 12.5% of all darter species. We identify three patterns of mtDNA introgression in darters: proximal mtDNA transfer, which involves the transfer of mtDNA among extant and sympatric darter species, indeterminate introgression, which involves the transfer of mtDNA from a lineage that cannot be confidently identified because the introgressed haplotypes are not clearly referable to mtDNA haplotypes in any recognized species, and deep introgression, which is characterized by species diversification within a recipient clade subsequent to the transfer of

  3. Water-quality, sediment-quality, stream-habitat, and biological data for Mustang Bayou near Houston, Texas, 2004-05

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sneck-Fahrer, Debra A.; East, Jeffery W.

    2007-01-01

    the stream bottom at M1 and analyzed for concentrations of trace elements (metals), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, organochlorine pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls. No organochlorine pesticides or polychlorinated biphenyls were detected. No concentrations of metals exceeded State screening levels. Measurable concentrations of 11 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds were detected, and three other PAH compounds were detected but not quantified by the laboratory. Stream habitat and aquatic biota (benthic macroinvertebrates and fish) were surveyed at each site three times during the study to evaluate aquatic life use. Characteristics of habitat measured during each survey were scored using a habitat quality index. Average aquatic-life-use scores were 'limited' for M3-M6 and 'intermediate' for M1 and M2. A total of 2,557 macroinvertebrate individuals were identified from Mustang Bayou. Benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages were scored using indexes specified by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. Average aquatic-life-use scores were 'limited' at M1, 'intermediate' at M3-M6, and 'high' at M2. Forty-six species of fish representing 20 families were collected from Mustang Bayou. A total of 4,115 fish were collected. Sunfish (Centrarchidae) was the most abundant family, accounting for about 28 percent. Aquatic-life-use scores at sites in Mustang Bayou were determined using the regional index of biotic integrity for ecoregion 34 and were 'high' for all sites.

  4. Tradeoffs of warm adaptation in aquatic ectotherms: Live fast, die young?

    PubMed

    Martinez, E; Porreca, A P; Colombo, R E; Menze, M A

    2016-01-01

    In the face of a changing climate, questions regarding sub-lethal effects of elevated habitat temperature on the physiology of ectotherms remain unanswered. In particular, long-term responses of ectotherms to the warming trend in tropical regions are unknown, and understudied due to the difficulties in specimen and community traceability. In freshwater lakes employed as cooling reservoirs for power plants, increased physiological stress from high water temperature can potentially alter the community structure of fishes. We employ this highly tractable system to assess how thermal regimes can alter the physiology and ecology of aquatic species. We documented a significantly reduced lifespan, growth performance, and a shift in the age structure towards younger individuals in the thermally- impacted Coffeen Lake population of bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), compared to a non-impacted control group (Lake Mattoon). Average age calculated for the Lake Mattoon population was 2.42 years, whereas the average age of bluegill from Coffeen Lake was only 0.96 years, and average specimen mass in Lake Mattoon was more than six times that of Coffeen Lake. During laboratory cross-acclimation studies of bluegill from Lake Mattoon at 17.5 and 35.0°C, citrate synthase (CS) activity obtained from white muscle was regulated through acclimation, whereas cold-acclimated specimens exhibited twice the activity at 25°C, if compared to CS activity values from warm-acclimated specimens. This study raises the questions about the causal relationships between physiological performance and habitat temperature, in particular how thresholds in an organism's physiology may modulate their community structure, and consequently their ecological success. PMID:26247882

  5. Hydrologic modification to improve habitat in riverine lakes: Management objectives, experimental approach, and initial conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Barry L.; Barko, John W.; Gerasimov, Yuri; James, William F.; Litvinov, Alexander; Naimo, Teresa J.; Wiener, James G.; Gaugush, Robert F.; Rogala, James T.; Rogers, Sara J.; Schoettger, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    The Finger Lakes habitat-rehabilitation project is intended to improve physical and chemical conditions for fish in six connected back water lakes in Navigation Pool 5 of the upper Missouri River. The primary management objective is to improve water temperature, dissolved oxygen concentration and current velocity during winter for bluegills, Lepomis macrochirus, and black crappies, Pomoxis nigromaculatus, two of the primary sport fishes in the lakes. The lakes will be hydrologically altered by Installing culverts to Introduce controlled flows of oxygenated water into four lakes, and an existing unregulated culvert on a fifth lake will be equipped with a control gate to regulate inflow. These habitat modifications constitute a manipulative field experiment that will compare pre-project (1991 to summer 1993) and post-project (fall 1993 to 1996) conditions in the lakes, including hydrology, chemistry, rooted vegetation, and fish and macroinvertebrate communities. Initial data indicate that the Finger Lakes differ in water chemistry, hydrology, and macrophyte abundance. Macroinvertebrate communities also differed among lakes: species diversity was highest in lakes with dense aquatic macrophytes. The system seems to support a single fish community, although some species concentrated in individual lakes at different times. The introduction of similar flows into five of the lakes will probably reduce the existing physical and chemical differences among lakes. However, our ability to predict the effects of hydrologic modification on fish populations is limited by uncertainties concerning both the interactions of temperature, oxygen and current in winter and the biological responses of primary and secondary producers. Results from this study should provide guidance for similar habitat-rehabilitation projects in large rivers.

  6. Biomarkers of metals exposure in fish from lead-zinc mining areas of Southeastern Missouri, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmitt, C.J.; Whyte, J.J.; Roberts, A.P.; Annis, M.L.; May, T.W.; Tillitt, D.E.

    2007-01-01

    The potential effects of proposed lead-zinc mining in an ecologically sensitive area were assessed by studying a nearby mining district that has been exploited for about 30 y under contemporary environmental regulations and with modern technology. Blood and liver samples representing fish of three species (largescale stoneroller, Campostoma oligolepis, n=91; longear sunfish, Lepomis megalotis, n=105; and northern hog sucker, Hypentelium nigricans, n=20) from 16 sites representing a range of conditions relative to mining activities were collected. Samples were analyzed for metals (also reported in a companion paper) and for biomarkers of metals exposure [erythrocyte ??-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALA-D) activity; concentrations of zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP), iron, and hemoglobin (Hb) in blood; and hepatic metallothionein (MT) gene expression and lipid peroxidation]. Blood lead concentrations were significantly higher and ALA-D activity significantly lower in all species at sites nearest to active lead-zinc mines and in a stream contaminated by historical mining than at reference or downstream sites. ALA-D activity was also negatively correlated with blood lead concentrations in all three species but not with other metals. Iron and Hb concentrations were positively correlated in all three species, but were not correlated with any other metals in blood or liver in any species. MT gene expression was positively correlated with liver zinc concentrations, but neither MT nor lipid peroxidase differences among fish grouped according to lead concentrations were statistically significant. ZPP was not detected by hematofluorometry in most fish, but fish with detectable ZPP were from sites affected by mining. Collectively, these results confirm that metals are released to streams from active lead-zinc mining sites and are accumulated by fish. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects on aquatic and human health due to large scale bioenergy crop expansion.

    PubMed

    Love, Bradley J; Einheuser, Matthew D; Nejadhashemi, A Pouyan

    2011-08-01

    In this study, the environmental impacts of large scale bioenergy crops were evaluated using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). Daily pesticide concentration data for a study area consisting of four large watersheds located in Michigan (totaling 53,358 km²) was estimated over a six year period (2000-2005). Model outputs for atrazine, bromoxynil, glyphosate, metolachlor, pendimethalin, sethoxydim, triflualin, and 2,4-D model output were used to predict the possible long-term implications that large-scale bioenergy crop expansion may have on the bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) and humans. Threshold toxicity levels were obtained for the bluegill and for human consumption for all pesticides being evaluated through an extensive literature review. Model output was compared to each toxicity level for the suggested exposure time (96-hour for bluegill and 24-hour for humans). The results suggest that traditional intensive row crops such as canola, corn and sorghum may negatively impact aquatic life, and in most cases affect the safe drinking water availability. The continuous corn rotation, the most representative rotation for current agricultural practices for a starch-based ethanol economy, delivers the highest concentrations of glyphosate to the stream. In addition, continuous canola contributed to a concentration of 1.11 ppm of trifluralin, a highly toxic herbicide, which is 8.7 times the 96-hour ecotoxicity of bluegills and 21 times the safe drinking water level. Also during the period of study, continuous corn resulted in the impairment of 541,152 km of stream. However, there is promise with second-generation lignocellulosic bioenergy crops such as switchgrass, which resulted in a 171,667 km reduction in total stream length that exceeds the human threshold criteria, as compared to the base scenario. Results of this study may be useful in determining the suitability of bioenergy crop rotations and aid in decision making regarding the adaptation of large

  8. In vitro infection of a cell line from Ictalurus nebulosus with Piscirickettsia salmonis.

    PubMed

    Almendras, F E; Jones, S R; Fuentealba, C; Wright, G M

    1997-01-01

    Piscirickettsia salmonis, the etiologic agent of salmonid rickettsial septicemia (SRS), affects several species of salmonids. Previous reports using the appearance of cytopathic effect (CPE) as the criterion for susceptibility, showed that Piscirickettsia salmonis (ATCC strain) can be grown in vitro in some cells lines derived from salmonid fish, but not in BB cells from brown bullhead (Ictalurus nebulosus) and BF-2 cells from bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus). In this study we describe growth of P. salmonis (ATCC strain VR 1361) in a cell line previously believed to be nonpermissive for this organism. CPE was first detected in chinook salmon embryo (CHSE-214) and epithelioma papulosum ciprini (EPC) cell lines at 6 d postinfection (dpi). In contrast, using BB cell line, CPE was first detected 45 dpi and the monolayer completed CPE by 78 dpi. Electron microscopic examination of BB cells 78 dpi revealed free, intracytoplasmic and extracellular localization of the agent. P. salmonis was also observed within membrane-bounded vacuoles in BB cells, similar to that described in CHSE 214 cells. Contrary to earlier reports, results from the present study show that the BB cell line, is susceptible to Piscirickettsia salmonis infection. The delayed onset of CPE in BB cells in comparison to other permissive cell lines suggests that BB cells are not ideal hosts for P. salmonis. Interestingly, however, these results demonstrate that P. salmonis can infect non-salmonid cell lines, and raises the possibility that non-salmonid fish may play a role in the persistence and transmission of SRS in the natural environment.

  9. Quantifying ultraviolet radiation mortality risk in bluegill larvae: effects of nest location.

    PubMed

    Olson, Mark H; Colip, Matthew R; Gerlach, Justin S; Mitchell, David L

    2006-02-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation (280-400 nm) is an increasing threat to aquatic organisms due to stratospheric ozone depletion and reductions in concentrations of dissolved organic carbon. Because fish are most vulnerable to UV during the egg and larval stages, parental spawning site selection can strongly influence mortality risk. We examined the role of nest location in determining UV-induced mortality risk for bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) in Lake Giles, Pennsylvania, USA. In a series of five short-term incubation experiments, we found that survival of yolk sac larvae across the range of depths at which bluegill spawn was significantly lower in the presence of ambient-UV levels relative to larvae that were shielded from UV radiation. In addition, survival decreased as a function of cumulative UV exposure, as measured by the number of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers per megabase DNA in DNA dosimeters. Although UV had the potential to significantly reduce larval survival, DNA dosimeters placed in bluegill nests concurrently with incubation experiments indicated that most nests were exposed to relatively low levels of UV. Only 19% of nests had predicted UV-induced mortality greater than 25%. Consequently, current levels of UV may be an important mortality source at the level of individual nests, but not at the population level. One reason for the weak predicted effect of UV on bluegill survival is that many nests were located at depths by which much of the incident UV had been attenuated. In addition, many of the shallower nests were protected by overhanging trees or other submerged structures. It is important to note that Lake Giles is highly transparent and therefore not representative of all lakes in which bluegill are found. Nevertheless, Lake Giles is a natural system and may be representative of north temperate lakes in the future. PMID:16705983

  10. Droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (PCR) outperforms real-time PCR in the detection of environmental DNA from an invasive fish species.

    PubMed

    Doi, Hideyuki; Takahara, Teruhiko; Minamoto, Toshifumi; Matsuhashi, Saeko; Uchii, Kimiko; Yamanaka, Hiroki

    2015-05-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) has been used to investigate species distributions in aquatic ecosystems. Most of these studies use real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect eDNA in water; however, PCR amplification is often inhibited by the presence of organic and inorganic matter. In droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), the sample is partitioned into thousands of nanoliter droplets, and PCR inhibition may be reduced by the detection of the end-point of PCR amplification in each droplet, independent of the amplification efficiency. In addition, real-time PCR reagents can affect PCR amplification and consequently alter detection rates. We compared the effectiveness of ddPCR and real-time PCR using two different PCR reagents for the detection of the eDNA from invasive bluegill sunfish, Lepomis macrochirus, in ponds. We found that ddPCR had higher detection rates of bluegill eDNA in pond water than real-time PCR with either of the PCR reagents, especially at low DNA concentrations. Limits of DNA detection, which were tested by spiking the bluegill DNA to DNA extracts from the ponds containing natural inhibitors, found that ddPCR had higher detection rate than real-time PCR. Our results suggest that ddPCR is more resistant to the presence of PCR inhibitors in field samples than real-time PCR. Thus, ddPCR outperforms real-time PCR methods for detecting eDNA to document species distributions in natural habitats, especially in habitats with high concentrations of PCR inhibitors.

  11. Effects of landscape change on fish assemblage structure in a rapidly growing metropolitan area in North Carolina, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennen, J.G.; Chang, M.; Tracy, B.H.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated a comprehensive set of natural and land-use attributes that represent the major facets of urban development at fish monitoring sites in the rapidly growing Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina metropolitan area. We used principal component and correlation analysis to obtain a nonredundant subset of variables that extracted most variation in the complete set. With this subset of variables, we assessed the effect of urban growth on fish assemblage structure. We evaluated variation in fish assemblage structure with nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS). We used correlation analysis to identify the most important environmental and landscape variables associated with significant NMDS axes. The second NMDS axis is related to many indices of land-use/land-cover change and habitat. Significant correlations with proportion of largest forest patch to total patch size (r = -0.460, P < 0.01), diversity of patch types (r = 0.554, P < 0.001), and population density (r = 0.385, P < 0.05) helped identify NMDS axis 2 as a disturbance gradient. Positive and negative correlations between the abundance of redbreast sunfish Lepomis auritus and bluehead chub Nocomis leptocephalus, respectively, and NMDS axis 2 also were evident. The North Carolina index of biotic integrity and many of its component metrics were highly correlated with urbanization. These results indicate that aquatic ecosystem integrity would be optimized by a comprehensive integrated management strategy that includes the preservation of landscape function by maximizing the conservation of contiguous tracts of forested lands and vegetative cover in watersheds. ?? 2005 by the American Fisheries Society.

  12. Arsenic contamination in the freshwater fish ponds of Pearl River Delta: bioaccumulation and health risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhang; Chen, Kun-Ci; Li, Kai-Bin; Nie, Xiang-Ping; Wu, Sheng Chun; Wong, Chris Kong-Chu; Wong, Ming-Hung

    2013-07-01

    This study investigated the extent of arsenic (As) contamination in five common species of freshwater fish (northern snakehead [Channa argus], mandrarin fish [Siniperca chuatsi], largemouth bass [Lepomis macrochirous], bighead carp [Aristichthys nobilis] and grass carp [Ctenopharyngodon idellus]) and their associated fish pond sediments collected from 18 freshwater fish ponds around the Pearl River Delta (PRD). The total As concentrations detected in fish muscle and sediment in freshwater ponds around the PRD were 0.05-3.01 mg kg(-1) wet weight (w. wt) and 8.41-22.76 mg kg(-1) dry weight (d. wt), respectively. In addition, the As content was positively correlated (p < 0.05) to total organic carbon (TOC) contents in sediments. Biota sediment accumulation factor (BSAF) showed that omnivorous fish and zooplankton accumulated higher concentrations of heavy metals from the sediment than carnivorous fish. In addition, feeding habits of fish also influence As accumulation in different fish species. In this study, two typical food chains of the aquaculture ponds were selected for investigation: (1) omnivorous food chain (zooplankton, grass carp and bighead carp) and (2) predatory food chain (zooplankton, mud carp and mandarin fish). Significant linear relationships were obtained between log As and δ (15)N. The slope of the regression (-0.066 and -0.078) of the log transformed As concentrations and δ (15)N values, as biomagnifications power, indicated there was no magnification or diminution of As from lower trophic levels (zooplankton) to fish in the aquaculture ponds. Consumption of largemouth bass, northern snakehead and bighead carp might impose health risks of Hong Kong residents consuming these fish to the local population, due to the fact that its cancer risk (CR) value exceeded the upper limit of the acceptable risk levels (10(-4)) stipulated by the USEPA.

  13. Myosin heavy chain and parvalbumin expression in swimming and feeding muscles of centrarchid fishes: the molecular basis of the scaling of contractile properties.

    PubMed

    Campion, L A; Choi, S; Mistry, H L; Coughlin, D J

    2012-10-01

    In centrarchid fishes, such as bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus, Rafinesque) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides, Lacepède), the contractile properties of feeding and swimming muscles show different scaling patterns. While the maximum shortening velocity (V(max)) and rate of relaxation from tetanus of swimming or myotomal muscle slow with growth, the feeding muscle shows distinctive scaling patterns. Cranial epaxial muscle, which is used to elevate the head during feeding strikes, retains fast contractile properties across a range of fish sizes in both species. In bass, the sternohyoideous muscle, which depresses the floor of the mouth during feeding strikes, shows faster contractile properties with growth. The objective of this study was to determine the molecular basis of these different scaling patterns. We examined the expression of two muscle proteins, myosin heavy chain (MyHC) and parvalbumin (PV), that affect contractile properties. We hypothesized that the relative contribution of slow and fast MyHC isoforms will modulate V(max) in these fishes, while the presence of PV in muscle will enhance rates of muscle relaxation. Myotomal muscle displays an increase in sMyHC expression with growth, in agreement with its physiological properties. Feeding muscles such as epaxial and sternohyoideus show no change or a decrease in sMyHC expression with growth, again as predicted from contractile properties. PV expression in myotomal muscle decreases with growth in both species, as has been seen in other fishes. The feeding muscles again show no change or an increase in PV expression with growth, contributing to faster contractile properties in these fishes. Both MyHC and PV appear to play important roles in modulating muscle contractile properties of swimming and feeding muscles in centrarchid fishes. PMID:22705556

  14. Relating fish health and reproductive metrics to contaminant bioaccumulation at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston coal ash spill site.

    PubMed

    Pracheil, Brenda M; Marshall Adams, S; Bevelhimer, Mark S; Fortner, Allison M; Greeley, Mark S; Murphy, Cheryl A; Mathews, Teresa J; Peterson, Mark J

    2016-08-01

    A 4.1 million m(3) coal ash release into the Emory and Clinch rivers in December 2008 at the Tennessee Valley Authority's Kingston Fossil Plant in east Tennessee, USA, prompted a long-term, large-scale biological monitoring effort to determine if there are chronic effects of this spill on resident biota. Because of the magnitude of the ash spill and the potential for exposure to coal ash-associated contaminants [e.g., selenium (Se), arsenic (As), and mercury (Hg)] which are bioaccumulative and may present human and ecological risks, an integrative, bioindicator approach was used. Three species of fish were monitored-bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), redear sunfish (L. microlophus), and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides)-at ash-affected and reference sites annually for 5 years following the spill. On the same individual fish, contaminant burdens were measured in various tissues, blood chemistry parameters as metrics of fish health, and various condition and reproduction indices. A multivariate statistical approach was then used to evaluate relationships between contaminant bioaccumulation and fish metrics to assess the chronic, sub-lethal effects of exposure to the complex mixture of coal ash-associated contaminants at and around the ash spill site. This study suggests that while fish tissue concentrations of some ash-associated contaminants are elevated at the spill site, there was no consistent evidence of compromised fish health linked with the spill. Further, although relationships between elevated fillet burdens of ash-associated contaminants and some fish metrics were found, these relationships were not indicative of exposure to coal ash or spill sites. The present study adds to the weight of evidence from prior studies suggesting that fish populations have not incurred significant biological effects from spilled ash at this site: findings that are relevant to the current national discussions on the safe disposal of coal ash waste. PMID:27154845

  15. Visibility from roads predict the distribution of invasive fishes in agricultural ponds.

    PubMed

    Kizuka, Toshikazu; Akasaka, Munemitsu; Kadoya, Taku; Takamura, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    Propagule pressure and habitat characteristics are important factors used to predict the distribution of invasive alien species. For species exhibiting strong propagule pressure because of human-mediated introduction of species, indicators of introduction potential must represent the behavioral characteristics of humans. This study examined 64 agricultural ponds to assess the visibility of ponds from surrounding roads and its value as a surrogate of propagule pressure to explain the presence and absence of two invasive fish species. A three-dimensional viewshed analysis using a geographic information system quantified the visual exposure of respective ponds to humans. Binary classification trees were developed as a function of their visibility from roads, as well as five environmental factors: river density, connectivity with upstream dam reservoirs, pond area, chlorophyll a concentration, and pond drainage. Traditional indicators of human-mediated introduction (road density and proportion of urban land-use area) were alternatively included for comparison instead of visual exposure. The presence of Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) was predicted by the ponds' higher visibility from roads and pond connection with upstream dam reservoirs. Results suggest that fish stocking into ponds and their dispersal from upstream sources facilitated species establishment. Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) distribution was constrained by chlorophyll a concentration, suggesting their lower adaptability to various environments than that of Bluegill. Based on misclassifications from classification trees for Bluegill, pond visual exposure to roads showed greater predictive capability than traditional indicators of human-mediated introduction. Pond visibility is an effective predictor of invasive species distribution. Its wider use might improve management and mitigate further invasion. The visual exposure of recipient ecosystems to humans is important for many invasive species that

  16. Chemical defense of the eastern newt (Notophthalmus viridescens): variation in efficiency against different consumers and in different habitats.

    PubMed

    Marion, Zachary H; Hay, Mark E

    2011-01-01

    Amphibian secondary metabolites are well known chemically, but their ecological functions are poorly understood--even for well-studied species. For example, the eastern newt (Notophthalmus viridescens) is a well known secretor of tetrodotoxin (TTX), with this compound hypothesized to facilitate this salamander's coexistence with a variety of aquatic consumers across the eastern United States. However, this assumption of chemical defense is primarily based on observational data with low replication against only a few predator types. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that N. viridescens is chemically defended against co-occurring fishes, invertebrates, and amphibian generalist predators and that this defense confers high survivorship when newts are transplanted into both fish-containing and fishless habitats. We found that adult eastern newts were unpalatable to predatory fishes (Micropterus salmoides, Lepomis macrochirus) and a crayfish (Procambarus clarkii), but were readily consumed by bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus). The eggs and neonate larvae were also unpalatable to fish (L. macrochirus). Bioassay-guided fractionation confirmed that deterrence is chemical and that ecologically relevant concentrations of TTX would deter feeding. Despite predatory fishes rejecting eastern newts in laboratory assays, field experiments demonstrated that tethered newts suffered high rates of predation in fish-containing ponds. We suggest that this may be due to predation by amphibians (frogs) and reptiles (turtles) that co-occur with fishes rather than from fishes directly. Fishes suppress invertebrate consumers that prey on bullfrog larvae, leading to higher bullfrog densities in fish containing ponds and thus considerable consumption of newts due to bullfrog tolerance of newt chemical defenses. Amphibian chemical defenses, and consumer responses to them, may be more complex and indirect than previously appreciated. PMID:22164212

  17. Arsenic contamination in the freshwater fish ponds of Pearl River Delta: bioaccumulation and health risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhang; Chen, Kun-Ci; Li, Kai-Bin; Nie, Xiang-Ping; Wu, Sheng Chun; Wong, Chris Kong-Chu; Wong, Ming-Hung

    2013-07-01

    This study investigated the extent of arsenic (As) contamination in five common species of freshwater fish (northern snakehead [Channa argus], mandrarin fish [Siniperca chuatsi], largemouth bass [Lepomis macrochirous], bighead carp [Aristichthys nobilis] and grass carp [Ctenopharyngodon idellus]) and their associated fish pond sediments collected from 18 freshwater fish ponds around the Pearl River Delta (PRD). The total As concentrations detected in fish muscle and sediment in freshwater ponds around the PRD were 0.05-3.01 mg kg(-1) wet weight (w. wt) and 8.41-22.76 mg kg(-1) dry weight (d. wt), respectively. In addition, the As content was positively correlated (p < 0.05) to total organic carbon (TOC) contents in sediments. Biota sediment accumulation factor (BSAF) showed that omnivorous fish and zooplankton accumulated higher concentrations of heavy metals from the sediment than carnivorous fish. In addition, feeding habits of fish also influence As accumulation in different fish species. In this study, two typical food chains of the aquaculture ponds were selected for investigation: (1) omnivorous food chain (zooplankton, grass carp and bighead carp) and (2) predatory food chain (zooplankton, mud carp and mandarin fish). Significant linear relationships were obtained between log As and δ (15)N. The slope of the regression (-0.066 and -0.078) of the log transformed As concentrations and δ (15)N values, as biomagnifications power, indicated there was no magnification or diminution of As from lower trophic levels (zooplankton) to fish in the aquaculture ponds. Consumption of largemouth bass, northern snakehead and bighead carp might impose health risks of Hong Kong residents consuming these fish to the local population, due to the fact that its cancer risk (CR) value exceeded the upper limit of the acceptable risk levels (10(-4)) stipulated by the USEPA. PMID:23247527

  18. Acute toxicity of an acid mine drainage mixing zone to juvenile bluegill and largemouth bass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henry, T.B.; Irwin, E.R.; Grizzle, J.M.; Wildhaber, M.L.; Brumbaugh, W.G.

    1999-01-01

    The toxicity of an acid mixing zone produced at the confluence of a stream that was contaminated by acid mine drainage (AMD) and a pH-neutral stream was investigated in toxicity tests with juvenile bluegill Lepomis macrochirus and largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides. Fish mortalities in instream cages located in the mixing zone, below the mixing zone, and upstream in both tributaries were compared to determine relative toxicity at each site. In all tests and for both species, significantly higher mortality was observed in the mixing zone than at any other location, including the acid stream, which had lower pH (2.9-4.3). The mixing zone was defined chemically by rapid precipitation of dissolved aluminum and iron, which arrived from the low-pH stream, and by the presence of white precipitates, which were attached to the substratum and which extended below the confluence. Possible seasonal changes in mixing zone toxicity were investigated by conducting field tests with bluegill in June, July, and August 1996 and in January 1997 and by conducting field tests with largemouth bass in April and May 1997. Toxicity was not significantly different at the extremes of temperature, pH, and metal concentration that occurred in June and July, as compared with January. Toxicity was significantly lower in August; however, elevated stream discharge during the August test may have disturbed mixing zone characteristics. High toxicity in AMD mixing zones may lower the survival of fishes in streams, reduce available habitat, and impede movements of migratory fish.

  19. Toxicity of nitrite to fish: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, W.M. Jr.; Morris, D.P.

    1986-03-01

    Nitrite, an intermediate in the oxidation of ammonium to nitrate, changes hemoglobin to methemoglobin, which does not carry oxygen; nitrite may thus cause anoxia in fish and other aquatic organisms. The published literature on nitrite toxicity to fish, which consists of about 40 papers, shows that the ratio of the 24-h LC50 (concentration lethal to half of the test organisms in 24 h) to the 96-h LC50 has a median value of 2.0 and is fairly uniform across species; toxicity tests of differing duration can therefore be standardized to a common duration. In general, chronic effects are difficult to detect at concentrations below one-fifth of the 96-h LC50. Most fish concentrate nitrite in fresh water; chloride in the external environment offsets the toxicity of nitrite by competing with nitrite for uptake through the chloride cells of the gills. Bicarbonate also reduces the toxicity of nitrite, but it is less than 1% as effective as chloride. Calcium reduces the toxicity of nitrite, but much less than chloride; the effects of other metal cations have not been studied. Hydrogen ion concentration of the medium has not been shown to have a discrete effect on the toxicity of nitrite except at extreme concentrations uncharacteristic of the environments in which fish ordinarily live. Nitrite toxicity is exacerbated by low oxygen concentrations because nitrite reduces the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood. Very small fish seem less sensitive to nitrite than fish of intermediate or large size. Present evidence suggests that salmonids are among the fishes most sensitive to nitrite. The least-sensitive species tested thus far are the largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides and bluegill Lepomis macrochirus; the largemouth bass does not concentrate nitrite.

  20. Locomotion with flexible propulsors: I. Experimental analysis of pectoral fin swimming in sunfish.

    PubMed

    Lauder, George V; Madden, Peter G A; Mittal, Rajat; Dong, Haibo; Bozkurttas, Meliha

    2006-12-01

    A full understanding of the mechanics of locomotion can be achieved by incorporating descriptions of (1) three-dimensional kinematics of propulsor movement, (2) material properties of the propulsor, (3) power input and control and (4) the fluid dynamics effects of propulsor motion into (5) a three-dimensional computational framework that models the complexity of propulsors that deform and change area. In addition, robotic models would allow for further experimental investigation of changes to propulsor design and for testing of hypothesized relationships between movement and force production. Such a comprehensive suite of data is not yet available for any flexible propulsor. In this paper, we summarize our research program with the goal of producing a comprehensive data set for each of the five components noted above through a study of pectoral fin locomotion in one species of fish: the bluegill sunfish Lepomis macrochirus. Many fish use pectoral fins exclusively for locomotion, and pectoral fins in most fish are integral to generating force during maneuvering. Pectoral fins are complex structures composed of jointed bony supports that are under active control via pectoral fin musculature. During propulsion in sunfish, the fin deforms considerably, has two leading edges, and sunfish can rotate the whole fin or just control individual sections to vector thrust. Fin material properties vary along the length of fin rays and among rays. Experimental fluid dynamic analysis of sunfish pectoral fin locomotion reveals that the fin generates thrust throughout the fin beat cycle, and that the upper and lower edges each produce distinct simultaneous leading edge vortices. The following companion paper provides data on the computational approach taken to understand locomotion using flexible pectoral fins. PMID:17671315

  1. A comparison of the dynamics and bioconcentration of mercury in Oregon reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.; Curtis, L.

    1995-12-31

    The authors assessed the extent of mercury pollution and its bioconcentration effects in fish in two Oregon reservoirs. Cottage Grove and Dorena Reservoirs are located in same ecoregions but distinguished by the history of mercury mining in the formers watershed. Past mercury mining activity deposited up to 271 {micro}g/g mercury and 2.6 mg/g sulfur in soils of near Black Butte Mine, OR. Sediment mercury concentration in the main tributary of Cottage Grove Reservoir, which drains the tailings of the past mercury mine, was ten times higher than in sediment from other tributaries to the reservoir. However there was no significantly difference between mercury concentration in each tributary of Dorena Reservoir, which has no mercury mining history in its watershed. Average mercury concentration in sediment of Cottage Grove Reservoir (0.67 {micro}g/g dw) was higher than of Dorena Reservoir (0.12 {micro}g/g dw). The authors also determined percent volatile solid and grain size effect in sediment. Maximum mercury concentration exceeded the FDA limit 1 {micro}g/g ww for largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) in Cottage Grove Reservoir. All fish species (largemouth bass, bluegill, crappie (Pomoxis nigromaculatus), catfish (Ictalurus nebulosus)) from Cottage Grove Reservoir had significantly higher levels of mercury than from Dorena Reservoir. Fish weight and age was positively correlated with mercury concentration in both-reservoirs and seasonal variation of mercury concentration in fish was examined. These results indicate that the Black Butte Mine is the main source of mercury and mercury bioconcentration in fish represents a management problem in Cottage Grove Reservoir.

  2. Ecological half-life of 137Cs in fish from a stream contaminated by nuclear reactor effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Peles, J.; BryanJr, A.; Garten Jr, Charles T; Ribble, D.; Smith, M.

    2000-12-01

    Radiocesium ({sup 137}Cs) concentrations were determined during 1974, 1981 and 1998 for seven species of fish inhabiting a stream (Steel Creek) contaminated by effluents from a nuclear reactor to examine the decline of this radionuclide in a natural ecosystem. Median {sup 137}Cs concentrations were highest in Micropterus salmoides (largemouth bass) during each year of the investigation (1974 = 6.67 Bq g{sup -1} dry wt. of whole body; 1981 = 3.72 Bq g{sup -1}; 1998 = 0.35 Bq g{sup -1}), but no patterns of differences were observed among Aphredoderus sayanus (pirate perch), Esox americanus (redfin pickerel), Lepomis auritus (redbreast sunfish), L. gulosus (warmouth), L. punctatus (spotted sunfish), and Notropis cummingsae (dusky shiner). Results demonstrated a rapid decline in {sup 137}Cs within fish from Steel Creek during the 24-year period. For example, {sup 137}Cs concentrations in all fish species declined significantly among years, even after accounting for radioactive decay. The observed percent declines in {sup 137}Cs concentrations of individual species were 3-4 times greater between 1974 and 1981 compared to that expected by physical decay alone, and 2-3 times greater during 1981-1998. Ecological half-lives (EHLs) of {sup 137}Cs in fish ranged from 4.43 years in A. sayanus to 6.53 years in L. gulosus. The EHL for {sup 137}Cs in all fish species combined was 5.54 years. Current levels of {sup 137}Cs in fish from Steel Creek (1.16 Bq g{sup -1} dry wt. of whole body to below detection limits) indicate that the consumption of fish from this ecosystem poses little risk to humans and sensitive wildlife species. These results demonstrate the importance of incorporating the concept of ecological half-life into determinations concerning the length and severity of potential risks associated with radiocontaminants.

  3. Distribution and abundance of nonnative fishes in streams of the western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schade, C.B.; Bonar, Scott A.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents data from one of the largest standardized stream surveys conducted in he western United States, which shows that one of every four individual fish in streams of 12 western states are nonnative. The states surveyed included Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. The most widely distributed and abundant nonnative fishes in the western USA were brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis, brown trout Salmo trutta, rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, common carp Cyprinus carpio, smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu, largemouth bass M. salmoides, green sunfish Lepomis cyanellus, fathead minnow Pimephales promelas, yellow perch Percaflavescens, yellow bullhead Ameiurus natalis, cutthroat trout O. clarkii, western mosquitofish Gambusia affinis, golden shiner Notemigonus crysoleucas, channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus, and red shiner Cyprinella lutrensis. The greatest abundance and distribution of nonnative fishes was in interior states, and the most common nonnatives were introduced for angling. Nonnative fishes were widespread in pristine to highly disturbed streams influenced by all types of land use practices. We present ranges in water temperature, flow, stream order, riparian cover, human disturbance, and other environmental conditions where the 10 most common introduced species were found. Of the total western U.S. stream length bearing fish, 50.1% contained nonnative fishes while 17.9% contained physical environment that was ranked highly or moderately disturbed by humans. Introduced fishes can adversely affect stream communities, and they are much more widespread in western U.S. streams than habitat destruction. The widespread distribution and high relative abundance of nonnative fishes and their documented negative effects suggest their management and control should elicit at least as much attention as habitat preservation in the protection of native western U.S. stream

  4. Behavioral and physiological antipredator responses of the San Marcos salamander, Eurycea nana.

    PubMed

    Davis, Drew R; Gabor, Caitlin R

    2015-02-01

    Exposure to predatory stimuli typically results in the elevation of circulating glucocorticoid levels and a behavioral response of freezing or escape behavior in many prey species. Corticosterone (CORT) is the main glucocorticoid in amphibians and is known to be important in modulating many behaviors and developmental functions. The federally threatened San Marcos salamander, Eurycea nana, decreases activity in response to both native and introduced predatory fish, however, experience may further influence these interactions. To better understand the indirect effects of fish predators on this salamander, we examined both the antipredator behavior and water-borne CORT release rates in response to chemical cues (kairomones) from two fish species that varied in temporal risk of predation: (1) a low encounter frequency predator (largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides), (2) a high encounter frequency predator (redbreast sunfish, Lepomis auritus), and (3) a blank water control. Salamanders reduced activity (antipredator response) after exposure to both predator treatments, but not to the blank water control, and the response to M. salmoides was significantly stronger than that to L. auritus. The CORT response (post-stimulus/pre-stimulus release rates) did not differ between the blank water control and L. auritus treatments, and both were significantly less than the CORT response to M. salmoides. Overall, E. nana showed a decreased antipredator response and no CORT response towards the high encounter frequency L. auritus as compared to the low encounter frequency M. salmoides. Eurycea nana may mute antipredator and CORT responses to high temporal frequency predators. There was, however, no correlation between CORT release rates and antipredator behavior, which suggests that the presence of predators may be affecting CORT response and behavior independently. PMID:25446225

  5. Temporal changes in taxonomic and functional diversity of fish assemblages downstream from mountaintop mining

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hitt, Nathaniel P.; Chambers, Douglas B.

    2014-01-01

    Mountaintop mining (MTM) affects chemical, physical, and hydrological properties of receiving streams, but the long-term consequences for fish-assemblage structure and function are poorly understood. We sampled stream fish assemblages using electrofishing techniques in MTM exposure sites and reference sites within the Guyandotte River basin, USA, during 2010–2011. We calculated indices of taxonomic diversity (species richness, abundance, Shannon diversity) and functional diversity (functional richness, functional evenness, functional divergence) to compare exposure and reference assemblages between seasons (spring and autumn) and across years (1999–2011). We based temporal comparisons on 2 sites that were sampled during 1999–2001 by Stauffer and Ferreri (2002). Exposure assemblages had lower taxonomic and functional diversity than reference assemblages or simulated assemblages that accounted for random variation. Differences in taxonomic composition between reference and exposure assemblages were associated with conductivity and aqueous Se concentrations. Exposure assemblages had fewer species, lower abundances, and less biomass than reference assemblages across years and seasons. Green Sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus) and Creek Chub (Semotilus atromaculatus) became numerically dominant in exposure assemblages over time because of their persistence and losses of other taxa. In contrast, species richness increased over time in reference assemblages, a result that may indicate recovery from drought. Mean individual biomass increased as fish density decreased and most obligate invertivores were apparently extirpated at MTM exposure sites. Effects of MTM were not related to physical-habitat conditions but were associated with water-quality variables, which may limit quality and availability of benthic macroinvertebrate prey. Simulations revealed effects of MTM that could not be attributed to random variation in fish assemblage structure.

  6. Non-invasive measurement of instantaneous forces during aquatic locomotion: a case study of the bluegill sunfish pectoral fin.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jifeng; Dabiri, John O; Madden, Peter G; Lauder, George V

    2007-02-01

    Swimming and flying animals generate unsteady locomotive forces by delivering net momentum into the fluid wake. Hence, swimming and flying forces can be quantified by measuring the momentum of animal wakes. A recently developed model provides an approach to empirically deduce swimming and flying forces based on the measurement of velocity and vortex added-mass in the animal wake. The model is contingent on the identification of the vortex boundary in the wake. This paper demonstrates the application of that method to a case study quantifying the instantaneous locomotive forces generated by the pectoral fins of the bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus Rafinesque), measured using digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV). The finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) field calculated from the DPIV data was used to determine the wake vortex boundary, according to recently developed fluid dynamics theory. Momentum of the vortex wake and its added-mass were determined and the corresponding instantaneous locomotive forces were quantified at discrete time points during the fin stroke. The instantaneous forces estimated in this study agree in magnitude with the time-averaged forces quantified for the pectoral fin of the same species swimming in similar conditions and are consistent with the observed global motion of the animals. A key result of this study is its suggestion that the dynamical effect of the vortex wake on locomotion is to replace the real animal fin with an ;effective appendage', whose geometry is dictated by the FTLE field and whose interaction with the surrounding fluid is wholly dictated by inviscid concepts from potential flow theory. Benefits and limitations of this new framework for non-invasive instantaneous force measurement are discussed, and its application to comparative biomechanics and engineering studies is suggested.

  7. Visibility from Roads Predict the Distribution of Invasive Fishes in Agricultural Ponds

    PubMed Central

    Kizuka, Toshikazu; Akasaka, Munemitsu; Kadoya, Taku; Takamura, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    Propagule pressure and habitat characteristics are important factors used to predict the distribution of invasive alien species. For species exhibiting strong propagule pressure because of human-mediated introduction of species, indicators of introduction potential must represent the behavioral characteristics of humans. This study examined 64 agricultural ponds to assess the visibility of ponds from surrounding roads and its value as a surrogate of propagule pressure to explain the presence and absence of two invasive fish species. A three-dimensional viewshed analysis using a geographic information system quantified the visual exposure of respective ponds to humans. Binary classification trees were developed as a function of their visibility from roads, as well as five environmental factors: river density, connectivity with upstream dam reservoirs, pond area, chlorophyll a concentration, and pond drainage. Traditional indicators of human-mediated introduction (road density and proportion of urban land-use area) were alternatively included for comparison instead of visual exposure. The presence of Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) was predicted by the ponds' higher visibility from roads and pond connection with upstream dam reservoirs. Results suggest that fish stocking into ponds and their dispersal from upstream sources facilitated species establishment. Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) distribution was constrained by chlorophyll a concentration, suggesting their lower adaptability to various environments than that of Bluegill. Based on misclassifications from classification trees for Bluegill, pond visual exposure to roads showed greater predictive capability than traditional indicators of human-mediated introduction. Pond visibility is an effective predictor of invasive species distribution. Its wider use might improve management and mitigate further invasion. The visual exposure of recipient ecosystems to humans is important for many invasive species that

  8. Non-invasive measurement of instantaneous forces during aquatic locomotion: a case study of the bluegill sunfish pectoral fin.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jifeng; Dabiri, John O; Madden, Peter G; Lauder, George V

    2007-02-01

    Swimming and flying animals generate unsteady locomotive forces by delivering net momentum into the fluid wake. Hence, swimming and flying forces can be quantified by measuring the momentum of animal wakes. A recently developed model provides an approach to empirically deduce swimming and flying forces based on the measurement of velocity and vortex added-mass in the animal wake. The model is contingent on the identification of the vortex boundary in the wake. This paper demonstrates the application of that method to a case study quantifying the instantaneous locomotive forces generated by the pectoral fins of the bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus Rafinesque), measured using digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV). The finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) field calculated from the DPIV data was used to determine the wake vortex boundary, according to recently developed fluid dynamics theory. Momentum of the vortex wake and its added-mass were determined and the corresponding instantaneous locomotive forces were quantified at discrete time points during the fin stroke. The instantaneous forces estimated in this study agree in magnitude with the time-averaged forces quantified for the pectoral fin of the same species swimming in similar conditions and are consistent with the observed global motion of the animals. A key result of this study is its suggestion that the dynamical effect of the vortex wake on locomotion is to replace the real animal fin with an ;effective appendage', whose geometry is dictated by the FTLE field and whose interaction with the surrounding fluid is wholly dictated by inviscid concepts from potential flow theory. Benefits and limitations of this new framework for non-invasive instantaneous force measurement are discussed, and its application to comparative biomechanics and engineering studies is suggested. PMID:17267654

  9. Distribution and accumulation of rotenone in tissues of warm water fishes

    SciTech Connect

    Rach, J.J.; Gingerich, W.H.

    1986-03-01

    The tissue distribution of rotenoid residues was determined in tissues of common carp Cyprinus carpio (88.2 g), bluegills Lepomis macrochirus (47.9 g), and yellow perch Perca flavescens (67.7 g) after the fish were exposed to 50..mu..g/L of rotenone-6a/sup 14/C(15.9 x 10/sup 4/ Bq/..mu..M). Exposures were terminated 1 h after the fish were moribund and failed to respond to gentle prodding. The fish were dissected, and various tissues were oxidized to determine /sup 14/C-rotenone accumulation and distribution. Major rotenone metabolites were identified by gradient-elution high performance liquid chromatography. The exposure time required for fish to reach total incapacitation was 3 h for bluegills and yellow perch, and 11.25 h for common carp. The mean rotenoid concentrations (..mu..g/100g fish) in the whole body were 22.4 in yellow perch, 39.7 in bluegills, and 107.8 in common carp. The percentage of rotenone-derived /sup 14/C activity was higher in the carcass components than in the head or viscera; the skin and bone contained about 60% of the carcass activity. The highest relative rotenoid concentrations were found in the liver, bile, gills, brain, and heart. Percentages of total rotenoid material as parent rotenone were highest in yellow perch (70.0 in the viscera and 84.4 in the fillet), followed by those for bluegills (22.7 and 27.8) and common carp (9.7 and 48.5).

  10. Summary of total mercury concentrations in fillets of selected sport fishes collected during 2000-2003 from Lake Natoma, Sacramento County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saiki, Michael K.; Slotton, Darrell G.; May, Thomas W.; Ayers, Shaun M.; Alpers, Charles N.

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes results of total mercury measurements in skinless fillets of sport fishes collected during August 2000, September?October 2002, and July 2003 from Lake Natoma, a small (8,760 acre-feet) afterbay for Folsom Dam on the lower American River. The primary objective of the study was to determine if mercury concentrations in fillets approached or exceeded guidelines for human consumption. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) human-health action level for methylmercury in commercially caught fish is 1.0 ?g/g (microgram per gram); the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) human-health criterion for methylmercury residue in fish tissue is 0.30 ?g/g. Wet weight concentrations of total mercury in skinless fillets were as high as 0.19 ?g/g in bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), 0.39 ?g/g in redear sunfish (L. microlophus), 1.02 ?g/g in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), and 1.89 ?g/g in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). Maximum concentrations of mercury in other fish species varied from 0.10 ?g/g in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to 0.56 ?g/g in white catfish (A-meiurus catus). Altogether, 1 of 86 largemouth bass and 11 of 11 channel catfish exceeded the FDA human-health action level. In addition, 1 of 20 redear sunfish, 26 of 86 largemouth bass, 2 of 3 spotted bass (M. punctulatus), 1 of 1 brown bullhead (A. nebulosus), and 1 of 1 white catfish exceeded the USEPA human-health criterion. These results indicate that some fish species inhabiting Lake Natoma contain undesirably high concentrations of mercury in their skinless fillets.

  11. Hydrodynamics of a robotic fish tail: effects of the caudal peduncle, fin ray motions and the flow speed.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ziyu; Yang, Xingbang; Wang, Tianmiao; Wen, Li

    2016-02-01

    Recent advances in understanding fish locomotion with robotic devices have included the use of biomimetic flapping based and fin undulatory locomotion based robots, treating two locomotions separately from each other. However, in most fish species, patterns of active movements of fins occur in concert with the body undulatory deformation during swimming. In this paper, we describe a biomimetic robotic caudal fin programmed with individually actuated fin rays to mimic the fin motion of the Bluegill Sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) and coupled with heave and pitch oscillatory motions adding to the robot to mimic the peduncle motion which is derived from the undulatory fish body. Multiple-axis force and digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) experiments from both the vertical and horizontal planes behind the robotic model were conducted under different motion programs and flow speeds. We found that both mean thrust and lift could be altered by changing the phase difference (φ) from 0° to 360° between the robotic caudal peduncle and the fin ray motion (spanning from 3 mN to 124 mN). Notably, DPIV results demonstrated that the caudal fin generated multiple wake flow patterns in both the vertical and horizontal planes by varying φ. Vortex jet angle and thrust impulse also varied significantly both in these two planes. In addition, the vortex shedding position along the spanwise tail direction could be shifted around the mid-sagittal position between the upper and lower lobes by changing the phase difference. We hypothesize that the fish caudal fin may serve as a flexible vectoring propeller during swimming and may be critical for the high maneuverability of fish. PMID:26855405

  12. Diet dynamics of the juvenile piscivorous fish community in Spirit Lake, Iowa, USA, 1997-1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pelham, M.E.; Pierce, C.L.; Larscheid, J.G.

    2001-01-01

    We assessed temporal dynamics and variation among species and age-classes in the diets of age 0 and age 1 piscivorous fish species in Spirit Lake, Iowa, USA during 1997 and 1998. Species included walleye Stizostedion vitreum, yellow perch Perca flavescens, smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieui, largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides, black crappie Pomoxis nigromaculatus and white bass Morone chrysops. Thirty taxa were identified in diets, including 12 species of fish. We found dramatic differences in diets among species, among age-classes within species and over time. Walleye, largemouth bass, smallmouth bass and white bass were piscivorous at age 0. Black crappie began piscivory at age 1. Yellow perch also began piscivory at age 1, but fish were a very small fraction of age-1 diets. The primary temporal pattern, seen in several species and age- classes, was an increase in piscivory from spring to fall. This pattern was due to the lack of small, age-0 prey fish in spring. Although some patterns were evident, the taxonomic composition of the diets of all species was highly variable over time, making generalizations difficult. A surprising result was the absence of yellow perch in the diet of age-0 walleye, despite their abundance in Spirit Lake and prominence in diets of age-1 walleye and other age 1-piscivores. Age-0 yellow perch were consistently too large to be eaten by age-0 piscivores, which preyed primarily on invertebrates and smaller fish such as johnny darters Etheostoma nigrum and age 0 bluegill Lepomis macrochirus. This finding suggests that predator-prey interactions and resulting population dynamics may be quite different in Spirit Lake than in other systems dominated by walleye and yellow perch.

  13. Effects of implanted transmitters on adult bluegills at two temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knights, Brent C.; Lasee, Becky A.

    1996-01-01

    Laterally compressed panfishes are small and have limited intraperitoneal space; thus, they may suffer adversely from surgically implanted transmitters even if the transmitter meets the generally recommended ratio of transmitter weight to fish weight of 2%. We studied the effects of intraperitoneal transmitters (2.81 g) on survival, growth, healing, and health of bluegills Lepomis macrochirus (mean weight 133 g) held for 8 weeks at 6 degree C and 20 degree C. Radio-tagged bluegills at 20 degree C had a mortality rate of 10% and tag loss rate of 15%. At 6 degree C, bluegills had no mortality or tag loss. Radio-tagged and reference fish fed in both 20 degree C raceways; however, a few reference fish appeared dominant at feeding time. This dominance by a few reference fish was also indicated by a large weight gain for three reference fish in each 20 degree C raceway. At 6 degree C, neither reference fish nor radio-tagged fish fed activity. Radio-tagged fish held at 20 degree C exhibited pelvic fin erosion, erythema and necrosis at the antenna exit and at suture insertions, and lost or loose sutures, effects not observed in other test fishes. Examination of fish held at 20 degree C also showed enclosure of the transmitters in a fibrous capsule and adhesion of visceral organs. Epithelialization over the incision occurred in radio-tagged bluegills at both temperatures, but there was little further healing at 6 degree C. At 20 degree C, tissue responses included chronic inflammation and dermal granulation. Radio-tagged fish did not appear to be more susceptible than reference fish to bacterial infection. Mortality, adverse morphological effects, altered behavior, and limited healing in bluegills suggest that implanted transmitters impaired their health. Thus, movement and habitat use data collected by telemetry for this species and perhaps for other panfishes should be interpreted with caution.

  14. Trophic relations of introduced flathead catfish in an atlantic river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baumann, Jessica R.; Kwak, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    The flathead catfish Pylodictis olivaris is a large piscivore that is native to the Mississippi and Rio Grande river drainages but that has been widely introduced across the United States. River ecologists and fisheries managers are concerned about introduced flathead catfish populations because of the negative impacts on native fish communities or imperiled species associated with direct predation and indirect competition from this apex predator. We studied the trophic relations of introduced flathead catfish in an Atlantic river to further understand the effects on native fish communities. Crayfish (Astacidea) occurred most frequently in the flathead catfish diet, while sunfish Lepomis spp. comprised the greatest percentage by weight. Neither of two sympatric imperiled fish species (the federally endangered Cape Fear shiner Notropis mekistocholas and the Carolina redhorse Moxostoma sp., a federal species of concern) was found in any diet sample. An ontogenetic shift in diet was evident when flathead catfish reached about 300 mm, and length significantly explained the variation in the percent composition by weight of sunfish and darters Etheostoma and Percina spp. Flathead catfish showed positive prey selectivity for taxa that occupied similar benthic microhabitat, highlighting the importance of opportunistic feeding and prey encounter rates. Flathead catfish displayed a highly variable diel feeding chronology during July, when they had a mean stomach fullness of 0.32%, but then showed a single midday feeding peak during August (mean fullness = 0.52%). The gastric evacuation rate increased between July (0.40/h) and August (0.59/h), as did daily ration, which more than doubled between the 2 months (3.06% versus 7.37%). Our findings increase the understanding of introduced flathead catfish trophic relations and the degree of vulnerability among prey taxa, which resource managers may consider in fisheries management and conservation of native fish populations and

  15. Consumptive effects of fish reduce wetland crayfish recruitment and drive species turnover.

    PubMed

    Kellogg, Christopher M; Dorn, Nathan J

    2012-04-01

    Predators and dry-disturbances have pronounced effects on invertebrate communities and can deterministically affect compositional turnover between discrete aquatic habitats. We examined the effect of sunfish (Lepomis spp.) predators on two native crayfish, Procambarus alleni and P. fallax, that regionally coexist in an expansive connected wetland in order to test the hypotheses that sunfish predation limits crayfish recruitment (both species) and that it disproportionately affects P. alleni, the species inhabiting temporary wetlands. In replicate vegetated wetlands (18.6 m(2)), we quantified summertime crayfish recruitment and species composition across an experimental gradient of sunfish density. Separately, we quantified effects of sunfish on crayfish growth, conducted a complimentary predation assay in mesocosms, and compared behavior of the two crayfish. Sunfish reduced P. alleni summertime recruitment by >99% over the full sunfish gradient, and most of the effect was caused by low densities of sunfish (0.22-0.43 m(-2)). P. alleni dominated wetlands with few or no sunfish, but the composition shifted towards P. fallax dominance in wetlands with abundant sunfish. P. fallax survived better than P. alleni over 40 h in smaller mesocosms stocked with warmouth. Sunfish reduced P. fallax recruitment 62% in a second wetland experiment, but growth rates of caged crayfish (both species) were unaffected by sunfish presence, suggesting predatory effects were primarily consumptive. Consistent with life histories of relatively fish-sensitive invertebrates, P. alleni engaged in more risky behaviors in the laboratory. Our results indicate that sunfish predators limit recruitment of both species, but disproportionately remove the more active and competitively dominant P. alleni. Spatially and temporally variable dry-disturbances negatively co-varying with sunfish populations allow for regional coexistence of these two crayfish and may release populations of either species from

  16. Ecological half-life of 137Cs in fish from a stream contaminated by nuclear reactor effluents.

    PubMed

    Peles, J D; Bryan, A L; Garten, C T; Ribble, D O; Smith, M H

    2000-12-18

    Radiocesium (137Cs) concentrations were determined during 1974, 1981 and 1998 for seven species of fish inhabiting a stream (Steel Creek) contaminated by effluents from a nuclear reactor to examine the decline of this radionuclide in a natural ecosystem. Median 137Cs concentrations were highest in Micropterus salmoides (largemouth bass) during each year of the investigation (1974 = 6.67 Bq g(-1) dry wt. of whole body; 1981 = 3.72 Bq g(-1); 1998 = 0.35 Bq g(-1)), but no patterns of differences were observed among Aphredoderus sayanus (pirate perch), Esox americanus (redfin pickerel), Lepomis auritus (redbreast sunfish), L. gulosus (warmouth), L. punctatus (spotted sunfish), and Notropis cummingsae (dusky shiner). Results demonstrated a rapid decline in 137Cs within fish from Steel Creek during the 24-year period. For example, 137Cs concentrations in all fish species declined significantly among years, even after accounting for radioactive decay. The observed percent declines in 137Cs concentrations of individual species were 3-4 times greater between 1974 and 1981 compared to that expected by physical decay alone, and 2-3 times greater during 1981-1998. Ecological half-lives (EHLs) of 137Cs in fish ranged from 4.43 years in A. sayanus to 6.53 years in L. gulosus. The EHL for 137Cs in all fish species combined was 5.54 years. Current levels of 137Cs in fish from Steel Creek (1.16 Bq g(-1) dry wt. of whole body to below detection limits) indicate that the consumption of fish from this ecosystem poses little risk to humans and sensitive wildlife species. These results demonstrate the importance of incorporating the concept of ecological half-life into determinations concerning the length and severity of potential risks associated with radiocontaminants.

  17. Hepatic cadmium, metal-binding proteins and bioaccumulation in bluegills exposed to aqueous cadmium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cope, W.G.; Atchison, G.J.; Wiener, J.G.

    1994-01-01

    We examined sublethal responses of juvenile bluegills Lepomis macrochirus to aqueous cadmium in two 28-d tests (test I, 0.0-8.4 μg Cd per liter; test II, 0.0-32.3 μg Cd per liter) in an intermittent-flow diluter. The experimental design was completely randomized, with two replicates in each of eight treatments (seven Cd exposures and one water control with 25 fish per replicate). Cadmium did not affect the growth of test fish. The mean whole-body concentrations of Cd in exposed fish were 1.8- to 44-fold those in controls in the two tests. Mean concentrations of hepatic nonthionein cytosolic Cd (not bound by metal-binding proteins, MBP) in all Cd treatments greatly exceeded those in controls, and mean concentrations of hepatic MBP in all treatments except one (0.8 μg Cd per liter in test I) exceeded those in controls. Nonthionein cytosolic Cd, hepatic MBP, and whole-body Cd in bluegills were linearly related to exposure concentrations within the range 0 to 20 μg Cd per liter. Much of the total Cd-binding capacity of hepatic MBP per fish was occupied by Cd after the 28-d exposures, although additional Cd-binding capacity remained unoccupied by Cd in fish in all treatments. The mean total Cd-binding capacity of hepatic MBP per fish, which ranged from 1.7 to 14 nmol Cd in test I and from 0.8 to 24 nmol Cd in test II, increased in a concentration-response manner at exposure concentrations below 13 μg/L. Nonthionein cytosolic Cd was the most sensitive indicator of Cd exposure, based on an LOEC of 0.8 μg Cd per liter.

  18. Comparative toxicity of copper and acridine to fish, Daphnia and algae

    SciTech Connect

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; McCarthy, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    A comparison was made of the sensitivity of fish, Daphnia and algae to the toxic effects of copper and acridine. A series of toxicity tests was conducted with these organisms, and the following biological endpoints determined: LC50s for fish, LC50s and effects on reproduction of Daphnia and 50% inhibition of the growth rate of algae. The 96-h LCO50s for bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) and Daphnia magna exposed to copper were 2.2 and 0.13 mg/L, respectively. A chronic exposure to 0.03 mg/L of copper for 14 d significantly decreased reproduction in Daphnia. Exposure to 0.4 and 0.2 mg/L copper inhibited the growth rate of Selenastrum capricornutum and Chlorella vulgaris, respectively, by 50%. The 96-h LC50s for fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and D. magna exposed to acridine were 2.3 and 3.1 mg/L, respectively. A chronic exposure to 1.25 mg/L acridine for 14 d significantly inhibited reproduction in Daphnia, and an exposure to 0.9 mg/L inhibited the growth rate of S. capricornutum by 50%. Based on the biological endpoints determined in these tests, Daphnia were more sensitive to copper than were fish or algae. In contrast, the most sensitive biological endpoint in tests with acridine was the inhibition of algal growth. Comparison of these test results indicates that short-term toxicity tests used for screening toxicants for possible environmental effects should include both plant and animal species. 16 references, 4 figures, 4 tables.

  19. Movement, home range, and site fidelity of bluegills in a Great Plains Lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paukert, C.P.; Willis, D.W.; Bouchard, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about the distribution, movement, and home ranges of bluegills Lepomis macrochirus in lentic environments. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to evaluate the seasonal and diel differences in movement rates, site fidelity, and home range of bluegills in a shallow, natural Great Plains lake. A total of 78 bluegills (200-273 mm total length) were implanted with radio transmitters in March and May 2000. Of these fish, 10 males and 10 females were randomly selected and located every 2 h during one 24-h period each month from April to September 2000. Bluegill movement peaked during midsummer: however, there was little difference in diel movements, suggesting relatively consistent movement throughout the 24-h period. Home range estimates (which included the 24-h tracking plus an additional six locations from the same fish located once per day for six consecutive days each month) ranged up to 172 ha, probably because only about half of the bluegills exhibited site fidelity during any month sampled. Bluegill movement did not appear to be strongly linked with water temperature, barometric pressure, or wind speed. These results suggest that bluegills move considerable distances and that many roam throughout this 332-ha shallow lake. However, diel patterns were not evident. Sampling bluegills in Great Plains lakes using passive gears (e.g., trap nets) may be most effective during the summer months, when fish are most active. Active sampling (e.g., electrofishing) may be more effective than the use of passive gears in spring and fall, when bluegills are less active.

  20. Northwestern salamanders Ambystoma gracile in mountain lakes: record oviposition depths among salamanders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, R.; Pearl, C.A.; Larson, G.L.; Samora, B.

    2012-01-01

    Oviposition timing, behaviors, and microhabitats of ambystomatid salamanders vary considerably (Egan and Paton 2004; Figiel and Semlitsch 1995; Howard and Wallace 1985; Mac-Cracken 2007). Regardless of species, however, females typically oviposit using sites conducive to embryo development and survival. For example, the results of an experiment by Figiel and Semlitsch (1995) on Ambystoma opacum (Marbled Salamander) oviposition indicated that females actively selected sites that were under grass clumps in wet versus dry treatments, and surmised that environmental conditions such as humidity, moisture, and temperature contributed to their results. Other factors associated with ambystomatid oviposition and embryo survival include water temperature (Anderson 1972; Brown 1976), dissolved oxygen concentration (Petranka et al. 1982; Sacerdote and King 2009), oviposition depth (Dougherty et al. 2005; Egan and Paton 2004), and oviposition attachment structures such as woody vegetation (McCracken 2007; Nussbaum et al. 1983). Resetarits (1996), in creating a model of oviposition site selection for anuran amphibians, hypothesized that oviparous organisms were also capable of modifying oviposition behavior and site selection to accommodate varying habitat conditions and to minimize potential negative effects of environmental stressors. Kats and Sih (1992), investigating the oviposition of Ambystoma barbouri (Streamside Salamander) in pools of a Kentucky stream, found that females preferred pools without predatory Lepomis cyanellus (Green Sunfish), and that the number of egg masses present in a pool historically containing fish increased significantly the year after fish had been extirpated from the pool. Palen et al. (2005) determined that Ambystoma gracile (Northwestern Salamander) and Ambystoma macrodactylum (Longtoed Salamander) eggs were deposited either at increased depth or in full shaded habitats, respectively, as water transperancy to UV-B radiation increased.

  1. Predicting propulsive forces using distributed sensors in a compliant, high DOF, robotic fin.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Jeff C; Peretz, David J; Tangorra, James L

    2015-05-18

    Engineered robotic fins have adapted principles of propulsion from bony-finned fish, using spatially-varying compliance and complex kinematics to produce and control the fin's propulsive force through time. While methods of force production are well understood, few models exist to predict the propulsive forces of a compliant, high degree of freedom, robotic fin as it moves through fluid. Inspired by evidence that the bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) has bending sensation in its pectoral fins, the objective of this study is to understand how sensors distributed within a compliant robotic fin can be used to estimate and predict the fin's propulsive force. A biorobotic model of a bluegill sunfish pectoral fin was instrumented with pressure and bending sensors at multiple locations. Experiments with the robotic fin were executed that varied the swimming gait, flapping frequency, stroke phase, and fin stiffness to understand the forces and sensory measures that occur during swimming. A convolution-based, multi-input-single-output (MISO) model was selected to model and study the relationships between sensory data and propulsive force. Subsets of sensory data were studied to determine which sensor modalities and sensor placement locations resulted in the best force predictions. The propulsive forces of the fin were accurately predicted using the linear MISO model on intrinsic sensory data. Bending sensation was more effective than pressure sensation for predicting propulsive forces, and the importance of bending sensation was consistent with several results in biology and engineering studies. It was important to have a spatial distribution of sensors and multiple sensory modalities in order to predict forces across large changes to dynamics. The relationship between propulsive forces and intrinsic sensory measures is complex, and good models should allow for temporal lags between forces and sensory data, changes to the model within a fin stroke, and changes to the

  2. Double Cones as a Basis for Polarization Sensitivity in Vertebrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, Manoel

    1995-01-01

    Over the course of the past 50 years there has been an increasing number of claims that certain vertebrates are sensitive to the linear polarization state of visible radiation. However, the mechanism(s) that mediates this polarization sensitivity remains elusive at the present time. The retinas of most vertebrates contain anatomical structures loosely referred to as double cones--composite entities constituted by the apposition of two independently developed, diurnally active photoreceptors. The significance of this apposition for visual function also remains elusive. It is possible that double cones mediate polarization sensitivity as a consequence of geometric birefringence; light polarized parallel to the axis joining the centers of the two halves of a double cone can potentially stimulate the receptors more strongly than light polarized in the direction perpendicular to both that axis and the normal axis of light propagation down the length of the double cone. The feasibility of this mechanism for polarization sensitivity has been examined here with specific reference to the retina of a representative animal, the green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus). Transmission electron micrographs of thin sections from a sunfish retina were analyzed in order to develop simple models of waveguiding down the long axis of a sunfish double cone. The results of the computations indicate that the mechanism is feasible only if there are refractive index gradients in the photoreceptors of sunfish. Isolated receptors were thus examined with scanning microinterferometry to demonstrate the presence of such gradients. In the course of the investigation, the literature pertaining to vertebrate polarization sensitivity and retinal anatomy were reviewed to delimit the generality of the conclusions drawn from sunfish photoreceptors. As a result of this analysis, it should be concluded that much future research is needed to clarify what (if any) role optical polarization plays in the sensory

  3. Ecological risk of methylmercury in Everglades National Park, Florida, USA.

    PubMed

    Rumbold, D G; Lange, T R; Axelrad, D M; Atkeson, T D

    2008-10-01

    Dramatic declines in mercury levels have been reported in Everglades biota in recent years. Yet, methylmercury (MeHg) hot spots remain. This paper summarizes a risk assessment of MeHg exposure to three piscivorous wildlife species (bald eagle, Haliaeetus leucocephalus; wood stork, Mycteria americana; and great egret, Ardea albus) foraging at a MeHg hot spot in northern Everglades National Park (ENP). Available data consisted of literature-derived life history parameters and tissue concentrations measured in 60 largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), 60 sunfish (Lepomis spp.), and three composite samples of mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) collected from 2003 to 2005. To assess risk, daily MeHg intake was estimated using Monte Carlo methods and compared to literature-derived effects thresholds. The results indicated the likelihood was very high, ranging from 98-100% probability, that these birds would experience exposures above the acceptable dose when foraging in northern ENP. Moreover, the likelihood that these birds would experience exposures above the lowest-observed-adverse-effect level (LOAEL) ranged from a 14% probability for the wood stork to 56% probability for the eagle. Data from this study, along with the results from several other surveys suggest that biota in ENP currently contain the highest MeHg levels in South Florida and that these levels are similar to or greater than other known MeHg hot spots in the United States. Given these findings, this paper also outlines a strategic plan to obtain additional measured and modeled information to support risk-based management decisions in ENP. PMID:18679795

  4. Hydrodynamics of a robotic fish tail: effects of the caudal peduncle, fin ray motions and the flow speed.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ziyu; Yang, Xingbang; Wang, Tianmiao; Wen, Li

    2016-02-01

    Recent advances in understanding fish locomotion with robotic devices have included the use of biomimetic flapping based and fin undulatory locomotion based robots, treating two locomotions separately from each other. However, in most fish species, patterns of active movements of fins occur in concert with the body undulatory deformation during swimming. In this paper, we describe a biomimetic robotic caudal fin programmed with individually actuated fin rays to mimic the fin motion of the Bluegill Sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) and coupled with heave and pitch oscillatory motions adding to the robot to mimic the peduncle motion which is derived from the undulatory fish body. Multiple-axis force and digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) experiments from both the vertical and horizontal planes behind the robotic model were conducted under different motion programs and flow speeds. We found that both mean thrust and lift could be altered by changing the phase difference (φ) from 0° to 360° between the robotic caudal peduncle and the fin ray motion (spanning from 3 mN to 124 mN). Notably, DPIV results demonstrated that the caudal fin generated multiple wake flow patterns in both the vertical and horizontal planes by varying φ. Vortex jet angle and thrust impulse also varied significantly both in these two planes. In addition, the vortex shedding position along the spanwise tail direction could be shifted around the mid-sagittal position between the upper and lower lobes by changing the phase difference. We hypothesize that the fish caudal fin may serve as a flexible vectoring propeller during swimming and may be critical for the high maneuverability of fish.

  5. Chemical defense of the eastern newt (Notophthalmus viridescens): variation in efficiency against different consumers and in different habitats.

    PubMed

    Marion, Zachary H; Hay, Mark E

    2011-01-01

    Amphibian secondary metabolites are well known chemically, but their ecological functions are poorly understood--even for well-studied species. For example, the eastern newt (Notophthalmus viridescens) is a well known secretor of tetrodotoxin (TTX), with this compound hypothesized to facilitate this salamander's coexistence with a variety of aquatic consumers across the eastern United States. However, this assumption of chemical defense is primarily based on observational data with low replication against only a few predator types. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that N. viridescens is chemically defended against co-occurring fishes, invertebrates, and amphibian generalist predators and that this defense confers high survivorship when newts are transplanted into both fish-containing and fishless habitats. We found that adult eastern newts were unpalatable to predatory fishes (Micropterus salmoides, Lepomis macrochirus) and a crayfish (Procambarus clarkii), but were readily consumed by bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus). The eggs and neonate larvae were also unpalatable to fish (L. macrochirus). Bioassay-guided fractionation confirmed that deterrence is chemical and that ecologically relevant concentrations of TTX would deter feeding. Despite predatory fishes rejecting eastern newts in laboratory assays, field experiments demonstrated that tethered newts suffered high rates of predation in fish-containing ponds. We suggest that this may be due to predation by amphibians (frogs) and reptiles (turtles) that co-occur with fishes rather than from fishes directly. Fishes suppress invertebrate consumers that prey on bullfrog larvae, leading to higher bullfrog densities in fish containing ponds and thus considerable consumption of newts due to bullfrog tolerance of newt chemical defenses. Amphibian chemical defenses, and consumer responses to them, may be more complex and indirect than previously appreciated.

  6. Behavioral and physiological antipredator responses of the San Marcos salamander, Eurycea nana.

    PubMed

    Davis, Drew R; Gabor, Caitlin R

    2015-02-01

    Exposure to predatory stimuli typically results in the elevation of circulating glucocorticoid levels and a behavioral response of freezing or escape behavior in many prey species. Corticosterone (CORT) is the main glucocorticoid in amphibians and is known to be important in modulating many behaviors and developmental functions. The federally threatened San Marcos salamander, Eurycea nana, decreases activity in response to both native and introduced predatory fish, however, experience may further influence these interactions. To better understand the indirect effects of fish predators on this salamander, we examined both the antipredator behavior and water-borne CORT release rates in response to chemical cues (kairomones) from two fish species that varied in temporal risk of predation: (1) a low encounter frequency predator (largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides), (2) a high encounter frequency predator (redbreast sunfish, Lepomis auritus), and (3) a blank water control. Salamanders reduced activity (antipredator response) after exposure to both predator treatments, but not to the blank water control, and the response to M. salmoides was significantly stronger than that to L. auritus. The CORT response (post-stimulus/pre-stimulus release rates) did not differ between the blank water control and L. auritus treatments, and both were significantly less than the CORT response to M. salmoides. Overall, E. nana showed a decreased antipredator response and no CORT response towards the high encounter frequency L. auritus as compared to the low encounter frequency M. salmoides. Eurycea nana may mute antipredator and CORT responses to high temporal frequency predators. There was, however, no correlation between CORT release rates and antipredator behavior, which suggests that the presence of predators may be affecting CORT response and behavior independently.

  7. Comparative Evaluation of Four Presumptive Tests for Blood to Detect Epithelial Injury on Fish

    SciTech Connect

    Colotelo, Alison HA; Smokorowski, Karen; Haxton, Tim; Cooke, Steven J.

    2014-06-01

    Current methods of fish epithelial injury detection are limited to gross macroscopic examination that has a subjective bias as well as an inability to reliably quantify the degree of injury. Fluorescein, a presumptive test for blood, has been shown to have the capability to detect and quantify fish epithelial injury. However, there are several other presumptive tests for blood (Bluestar*, phenolphthalein, and HemastixH) that may have benefits over the use of fluorescein, particularly for field research on wild fish. This study investigated the capabilities of these four tests to detect and quantify a variety of injuries commonly encountered by fish (abrasion, cuts, fin frays, and punctures) using the freshwater bluegill Lepomis macrochirus as a model. Fluorescein was consistently found to be the most reliable (i.e., detected the highest proportion of true positive results and rarely detected false positive reactions) of the four presumptive tests for blood compared. Further testing was conducted to examine the reliability of fluorescein. By 24 h after an injury was inflicted, the injury was no longer detectable by fluorescein, and when fluorescein was applied to an injured fish, the fluorescein was no longer detectable 3 h after application. In a comparison of two common anaesthetics used in fisheries research, there was no significant difference in the proportion of injury detected when 3- aminobenzoic acid ethyl ester methanesulfate (tricaine) was used compared with a clove oil and ethanol (1:9) solution. In summary, fluorescein was the most reliable presumptive test for blood examined in this study for the detection and quantification of recent (hours) fish epithelial injury.

  8. Ecological effects of an anionic C12-15 AE-3S alkylethoxysulfate surfactant in outdoor stream mesocosms.

    PubMed

    Lizotte, Richard E; Dorn, Philip B; Steinriede, R Wade; Wong, Diana C L; Rodgers, John H

    2002-12-01

    The ecological assessment of a C12-15 AE-3S linear alkylethoxysulfate (AES) anionic surfactant to invertebrates, fish, periphyton, and an aquatic macrophyte was conducted in a 30-d outdoor stream mesocosm study with five replicated concentrations and controls. Alkylethoxysulfate structural integrity and exposure concentrations were maintained during the 30-d treatment period, with average measured concentrations of 0.7, 1.27, 2.2, 4.31, and 10.18 mg/L. No effects were observed on the aquatic macrophyte Myriophyllum aquaticum at the highest concentration tested. A sevenfold increase in periphyton biomass at 10.18 mg/L was observed relative to controls primarily because of increases in density of the filamentous alga Mougeotia sp. Densities of the invertebrates Annelida (Stylaria), Amphipoda, Copepoda, Trichoptera (Hydropsychidae), Cladocera, and Diptera (Chironomidae) significantly decreased in streams treated with AES at 10.18 mg/L. Densities of drifting invertebrates were not observed to be affected at any concentration tested. Reproduction of Pimephales promelas significantly decreased at 1.27 mg/L and growth of juvenile Lepomis macrochirus was significantly affected at 4.31 mg/L. Multivariate cluster analysis and nonmetric multidimensional scaling ordination showed distinct structural effects on the invertebrate communities in the streams treated with AES at 10.18 mg/ L compared to the control and streams treated at < 10.18 mg/L through the 30-d treatment. Convergence of the communities treated at 10.18 mg/L toward control communities in the ordination suggests recovery in these communities after termination of surfactant treatment. The results from this study support an ecosystem value of > 2.0 mg/L, and indicate that the conservative Dutch risk assessment for AESs has at least a fivefold margin of safety.

  9. Predation on exotic zebra mussels by native fishes: Effects on predator and prey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Magoulick, D.D.; Lewis, L.C.

    2002-01-01

    1. Exotic zebra mussels, Dreissena polymorpha, occur in southern U.S. waterways in high densities, but little is known about the interaction between native fish predators and zebra mussels. Previous studies have suggested that exotic zebra mussels are low profitability prey items and native vertebrate predators are unlikely to reduce zebra mussel densities. We tested these hypotheses by observing prey use of fishes, determining energy content of primary prey species of fishes, and conducting predator exclusion experiments in Lake Dardanelle, Arkansas. 2. Zebra mussels were the primary prey eaten by 52.9% of blue catfish, Ictalurus furcatus; 48.2% of freshwater drum, Aplodinotus grunniens; and 100% of adult redear sunfish, Lepomis microlophus. Blue catfish showed distinct seasonal prey shifts, feeding on zebra mussels in summer and shad, Dorosoma spp., during winter. Energy content (joules g-1) of blue catfish prey (threadfin shad, Dorosoma petenense; gizzard shad, D. cepedianum; zebra mussels; and asiatic clams, Corbicula fluminea) showed a significant species by season interaction, but shad were always significantly greater in energy content than bivalves examined as either ash-free dry mass or whole organism dry mass. Fish predators significantly reduced densities of large zebra mussels (>5 mm length) colonising clay tiles in the summers of 1997 and 1998, but predation effects on small zebra mussels (???5 mm length) were less clear. 3. Freshwater drum and redear sunfish process bivalve prey by crushing shells and obtain low amounts of higher-energy food (only the flesh), whereas blue catfish lack a shell-crushing apparatus and ingest large amounts of low-energy food per unit time (bivalves with their shells). Blue catfish appeared to select the abundant zebra mussel over the more energetically rich shad during summer, then shifted to shad during winter when shad experienced temperature-dependent stress and mortality. Native fish predators can suppress adult zebra

  10. Indirect effects of heavy metals on parasites may cause shifts in snail species compositions.

    PubMed

    Lefcort, H; Aguon, M Q; Bond, K A; Chapman, K R; Chaquette, R; Clark, J; Kornachuk, P; Lang, B Z; Martin, J C

    2002-07-01

    We studied the direct and indirect effects of pollution on the distributions and abundances of two closely related species of pulmonate freshwater snails. Physella columbiana is more numerous at heavy metal-polluted lakes, and Lymnaea palustris is more numerous at reference lakes. Both species are present at all sites, as are predatory bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus). The direct effects examined included the snails' growth and reproduction in both the presence and absence of heavy metals and their short-term survival when exposed to large concentrations of heavy metals. The indirect effects were the species' ability to elude capture by sunfish and the diversity and abundance of parasites within the snails. We found that heavy metals had little direct effect on growth and reproduction and that both species acquired similar levels of metals in their tissues. Interestingly, P. columbiana (the more abundant species in polluted lakes) actually exhibited higher recruitment in the absence of metals than did L. palustris (reference lakes). L. palustris has life history characteristics that favor increased growth and reduced reproduction. These characteristics resulted in decreased predation of adults by gape-limited predators and a greater ability to cope with heavy parasite burdens. P. columbiana exhibited slower growth, which resulted in increased predation although higher reproduction rates may compensate.The major effect of heavy metals on species distributions was indirect on the snails' parasites. Parasites appeared to be very susceptible to metals, and this resulted in lower parasite diversity and intensities at polluted sites for both species of snails. P. columbiana may only be able to outcompete L. palustris at polluted sites due to the indirect effects of heavy metals; the negative effect of heavy metals on parasites, and a proposed negative effect of metals on the foraging ability of sunfish that favors the faster-reproducing P. columbiana.

  11. Circadian rhythms in the green sunfish retina

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    We investigated the occurrence of circadian rhythms in retinomotor movements and retinal sensitivity in the green sunfish, Lepomis cyanellus. When green sunfish were kept in constant darkness, cone photoreceptors exhibited circadian retinomotor movements; rod photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) pigment granules did not. Cones elongated during subjective night and contracted during subjective day. These results corroborate those of Burnside and Ackland (1984. Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science. 25:539-545). Electroretinograms (ERGs) recorded in constant darkness in response to dim flashes (lambda = 640 nm) exhibited a greater amplitude during subjective night than during subjective day. The nighttime increase in the ERG amplitude corresponded to a 3-10-fold increase in retinal sensitivity. The rhythmic changes in the ERG amplitude continued in constant darkness with a period of approximately 24 h, which indicates that the rhythm is generated by a circadian oscillator. The spectral sensitivity of the ERG recorded in constant darkness suggests that cones contribute to retinal responses during both day and night. Thus, the elongation of cone myoids during the night does not abolish the response of the cones. To examine the role of retinal efferents in generating retinal circadian rhythms, we cut the optic nerve. This procedure did not abolish the rhythms of retinomotor movement or of the ERG amplitude, but it did reduce the magnitude of the nighttime phases of both rhythms. Our results suggest that more than one endogenous oscillator regulates the retinal circadian rhythms in green sunfish. Circadian signals controlling the rhythms may be either generated within the eye or transferred to the eye via a humoral pathway. PMID:3598559

  12. Early life history and spatiotemporal changes in distribution of the rediscovered Suwannee moccasinshell Medionidus walkeri (Bivalvia: Unionidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Nathan A.; Mcleod, John; Holcomb, Jordan; Rowe, Matthew T.; Williams, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate distribution data are critical to the development of conservation and management strategies for imperiled species, particularly for narrow endemics with life history traits that make them vulnerable to extinction. Medionidus walkeri is a rare freshwater mussel endemic to the Suwannee River Basin in southeastern North America. This species was rediscovered in 2012 after a 16-year hiatus between collections and is currently proposed for listing under the Endangered Species Act. Our study fills knowledge gaps regarding changes in distribution and early life history requirements of M. walkeri. Spatiotemporal changes in M. walkeri distribution were displayed using a conservation status assessment map incorporating metadata from 98 historical (1916–1999) and 401 recent (2000–2015) site surveys from museums and field notes representing records for 312 specimens. Recent surveys detected M. walkeri only in the middle Suwannee subbasin (n = 86, 22 locations) and lower Santa Fe subbasin (n = 2, 2 locations), and it appears the species may be extirpated from 67% of historically occupied 10-digit HUCs. In our laboratory experiments, M. walkeri successfully metamorphosed onPercina nigrofasciata (56.2% ± 8.9) and Etheostoma edwini (16.1% ± 7.9) but not on Trinectes maculatus, Lepomis marginatus, Notropis texanus, Noturus leptacanthus, Etheostoma fusiforme, orGambusia holbrooki. We characterize M. walkeri as a lure-displaying host fish specialist and a long-term brooder (bradytictic), gravid from fall to early summer of the following year. The early life history and distribution data presented here provide the baseline framework for listing decisions and future efforts to conserve and recover the species.

  13. Effect of species, life stage, and water temperature on the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide to fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rach, J.J.; Schreier, T.M.; Howe, G.E.; Redman, S.D.

    1997-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a drug of low regulatory priority status that is effective in treating fish and fish eggs infected by fungi. However, only limited information is available to guide fish culturists in administering hydrogen peroxide to diseased fish. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine (1) the sensitivity of brown trout Salmo trutta, lake trout Salvelinus namaycush, fathead minnow Pimephales promelas, walleye Stizostedion vitreum, channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus, and bluegill Lepomis, machrochirus to hydrogen peroxide treatments; (2) the sensitivity of various life stages of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss to hydrogen peroxide treatments; and (3) the effect of water temperature on the acute toxicity of hydrogen peroxide to three fish species. Fish were exposed to hydrogen peroxide concentrations ranging from 100 to 5,000 mu L/L (ppm) for 15-min or 45-min treatments every other day for four consecutive treatments to determine the sensitivity of various species and life stages of fish. Except for walleye, most species of fish tested (less than or equal to 2 g) tolerated hydrogen peroxide of 1,000 mu L/L or greater. Walleyes were sensitive to hydrogen peroxide concentrations as low as 100 mu L/L. A correlation was found between the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide and the life stages of rainbow trout; larger fish were more sensitive. Generally, the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide increased for all species as water temperature increased. The results of these experiments demonstrate that it is important to consider the effects of species, life stage, and water temperature when conducting hydrogen peroxide treatments.

  14. Predictability of littoral-zone fish communities through ontogeny in Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eggleton, M.A.; Ramirez, R.; Hargrave, C.W.; Gido, K.B.; Masoner, J.R.; Schnell, G.D.; Matthews, W.J.

    2005-01-01

    We sampled larval, juvenile and adult fishes from littoral-zone areas of a large reservoir (Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas) (1) to characterize environmental factors that influenced fish community structure, (2) to examine how consistent fish-environment relationships were through ontogeny (i.e., larval vs. juvenile and adult), and (3) to measure the concordance of larval communities sampled during spring to juvenile and adult communities sampled at the same sites later in the year. Larval, juvenile and adult fish communities were dominated by Atherinidae (mainly inland silverside, Menidia beryllina) and Moronidae (mainly juvenile striped bass, Morone saxatilis) and were consistently structured along a gradient of site exposure to prevailing winds and waves. Larval, juvenile and adult communities along this gradient varied from atherinids and moronids at highly exposed sites to mostly centrarchids (primarily Lepomis and Micropterus spp.) at protected sites. Secondarily, zooplankton densities, water clarity, and land-use characteristics were related to fish community structure. Rank correlation analyses and Mantel tests indicated that the spatial consistency and predictability of fish communities was high as larval fishes sampled during spring were concordant with juvenile and adult fishes sampled at the same sites during summer and fall in terms of abundance, richness, and community structure. We propose that the high predictability and spatial consistency of littoral-zone fishes in Lake Texoma was a function of relatively simple communities (dominated by 1-2 species) that were structured by factors, such as site exposure to winds and waves, that varied little through time. ?? Springer 2005.

  15. Quantifying precision of in situ length and weight measurements of fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gutreuter, S.; Krzoska, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    We estimated and compared errors in field-made (in situ) measurements of lengths and weights of fish. We made three measurements of length and weight on each of 33 common carp Cyprinus carpio, and on each of a total of 34 bluegills Lepomis macrochirus and black crappies Pomoxis nigromaculatus. Maximum total lengths of all fish were measured to the nearest 1 mm on a conventional measuring board. The bluegills and black crappies (85–282 mm maximum total length) were weighed to the nearest 1 g on a 1,000-g spring-loaded scale. The common carp (415–600 mm maximum total length) were weighed to the nearest 0.05 kg on a 20-kg spring-loaded scale. We present a statistical model for comparison of coefficients of variation of length (Cl ) and weight (Cw ). Expected Cl was near zero and constant across mean length, indicating that length can be measured with good precision in the field. Expected Cw decreased with increasing mean length, and was larger than expected Cl by 5.8 to over 100 times for the bluegills and black crappies, and by 3 to over 20 times for the common carp. Unrecognized in situ weighing errors bias the apparent content of unique information in weight, which is the information not explained by either length or measurement error. We recommend procedures to circumvent effects of weighing errors, including elimination of unnecessary weighing from routine monitoring programs. In situ weighing must be conducted with greater care than is common if the content of unique and nontrivial information in weight is to be correctly identified.

  16. Species dispersal rates alter diversity and ecosystem stability in pond metacommunities.

    PubMed

    Howeth, Jennifer G; Leibold, Mathew A

    2010-09-01

    Metacommunity theory suggests that relationships between diversity and ecosystem stability can be determined by the rate of species dispersal among local communities. The predicted relationships, however, may depend upon the relative strength of local environmental processes and disturbance. Here we evaluate the role of dispersal frequency and local predation perturbations in affecting patterns of diversity and stability in pond plankton metacommunities. Pond metacommunities were composed of three mesocosm communities: one of the three communities maintained constant "press" predation from a selective predator, bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus); the second community maintained "press" conditions without predation; and the third community experienced recurrent "pulsed" predation from bluegill sunfish. The triads of pond communities were connected at either no, low (0.7%/d), or high (20%/d) planktonic dispersal. Richness and composition of zooplankton and stability of plankton biomass and ecosystem productivity were measured at local and regional spatial scales. Dispersal significantly affected diversity such that local and regional biotas at the low dispersal rate maintained the greatest number of species. The unimodal local dispersal-diversity relationship was predator-dependent, however, as selective press predation excluded species regardless of dispersal. Further, there was no effect of dispersal on beta diversity because predation generated local conditions that selected for distinct community assemblages. Spatial and temporal ecosystem stability responded to dispersal frequency but not predation. Low dispersal destabilized the spatial stability of producer biomass but stabilized temporal ecosystem productivity. The results indicate that selective predation can prevent species augmentation from mass effects but has no apparent influence on stability. Dispersal rates, in contrast, can have significant effects on both species diversity and ecosystem

  17. Injury and mortality of warmwater fishes immobilized by electrofishing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dolan, C.R.; Miranda, L.E.

    2004-01-01

    Most studies of injury associated with electrofishing have focused on salmonids: few have given attention to warmwater fishes. Under controlled laboratory conditions, we treated bluegill Lepomis macrochirus, channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus, and largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides of various sizes to duty cycles ranging from 1.5% to 100%. This range of duty cycles represented continuous DC and pulsed-DC frequencies ranging from 15 to 110 Hz and pulse durations of 1 to 6 ms. At each duty cycle, fish were exposed to power densities in excess of those required to immobilize them within 3 s, and we subsequently determined the incidence of hemorrhage, spinal injury, and mortality. Incidence of hemorrhage averaged 3% (range, 0-25%), differed among species, and was not related to duty cycle or fish size. Incidence of spinal injury averaged 3% (range, 0-22%) and mortality averaged 10% (range, 0-75%); both differed among species and were related to duty cycle, fish size, and interactions among these variables. Largemouth bass was the species most vulnerable to hemorrhage, spinal injury, and mortality, channel catfish the least vulnerable; bluegills exhibited effects that were intermediate. Small centrarchids were especially susceptible to mortality. Fish tetanized by the electrical treatment were more likely to experience injury and mortality than fish that were only narcotized. However, mortality was not related to the injuries studied because hemorrhage and spinal injuries were similar in fish that survived electroshock and in those that died. We suggest that electrofishing with intermediate to high duty cycles could reduce electrofishing-induced injury and mortality to warmwater fish. Additionally, the power output and electrode system should be managed to induce narcosis and prevent tetany and to avoid the large peak powers required to immobilize small individuals.

  18. Frequency and Severity of Trauma in Fishes Subjected to Multiple-pass Depletion Electrofishing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panek, Frank; Densmore, Christine L.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence and severity of trauma associated with multiple-pass electrofishing and the effects on short-term (30-d) survival and growth of Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis, and five representative co-inhabiting nontarget or bycatch species were examined. Fish were held in four rectangular fiberglass tanks (190 × 66 cm) equipped with electrodes, a gravel–cobble stream substrate, and continuous water flow. Fish were exposed to one, two, or three electroshocks (100-V, 60-Hz pulsed DC) spaced 1 h apart or were held as a control. The heterogeneous field produced a mean (±SD) voltage gradient of 0.23 ± 0.024 V/cm (range = 0.20–0.30 V/cm) with a duty cycle of 30% and a 5-s exposure. Radiographs of 355 fish were examined for evidence of spinal injuries, and necropsies were performed on 303 fish to assess hemorrhagic trauma in soft tissue. Using linear regression, we demonstrated significant relationships between the number of electrical shocks and the frequency and severity of hemorrhagic and spinal trauma in each of the nontarget species (Potomac Sculpin Cottus girardi, Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus, Fathead Minnow Pimephales promelas, Green Sunfish Lepomis cyanellus, and Largemouth Bass Micropterus salmoides). Most of the injuries in these species were either minor or moderate. Rainbow Trout and Brook Trout generally sustained the highest incidence and severity of injuries, but those injuries were generally independent of the number of treatments. The 30-d postshock survival for the trout species was greater than 94%; survival for the bycatch species ranged from 80% (Fathead Minnow) to 100% (Green Sunfish and Channel Catfish). There were no significant differences in 30-d postshock condition factors despite observations of altered feeding behavior lasting several days to 1 week posttreatment in several of the study species.

  19. Piscivory in juvenile walleyes: Relative importance of prey species, timing of spawning of prey fish, and density on growth and survival

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolar, C.S.; Wahl, David H.; Hooe, M.L.

    2003-01-01

    We examined the effect of the timing of spawning by prey fish and the species of prey fish on the growth and survival of juvenile walleye Stizostedion vitreum. We expected that age-0 walleyes would grow more in ponds when stocked about the same time as the spawning of gizzard shad Dorosoma cepedianum than when stocked about 6 weeks after spawning. We found, however, that the timing of larval gizzard shad presence did not affect walleye growth or survival. Also contrary to our expectations, walleyes from ponds with bluegill Lepomis macrochirus grew more (by 9% in total length and 38% in mass) than those from ponds with gizzard shad. However, the density of gizzard shad was lower than that of bluegills, particularly after the first few weeks of the experiment. Bluegills remained within the gape limits of walleyes throughout the experiment, whereas gizzard shad outgrew their vulnerability to predation. Late-spawned gizzard shad remained vulnerable to walleye predation only slightly longer than did those from early spawned ponds. The survival of age-0 walleyes was unaffected by water temperature, the timing of spawning by prey fish, prey species, or density. Our results suggest that even though walleyes typically grow faster in systems with gizzard shad as prey than in those with bluegills, juvenile walleyes can still grow well in bluegill-dominated systems. In some systems, high densities of a less beneficial prey (e.g., abundant bluegills rather than less abundant gizzard shad) may overcome the growth differences of juvenile walleyes that would be expected based on the differences in prey species alone. A wide variation in individual walleye growth in our ponds, even within prey treatments, indicated the complexity of interactions among the factors affecting juvenile walleye growth.

  20. Using data from an encounter sampler to model fish dispersal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Obaza, A.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Trexler, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    A method to estimate speed of free-ranging fishes using a passive sampling device is described and illustrated with data from the Everglades, U.S.A. Catch per unit effort (CPUE) from minnow traps embedded in drift fences was treated as an encounter rate and used to estimate speed, when combined with an independent estimate of density obtained by use of throw traps that enclose 1 m2 of marsh habitat. Underwater video was used to evaluate capture efficiency and species-specific bias of minnow traps and two sampling studies were used to estimate trap saturation and diel-movement patterns; these results were used to optimize sampling and derive correction factors to adjust species-specific encounter rates for bias and capture efficiency. Sailfin mollies Poecilia latipinna displayed a high frequency of escape from traps, whereas eastern mosquitofish Gambusia holbrooki were most likely to avoid a trap once they encountered it; dollar sunfish Lepomis marginatus were least likely to avoid the trap once they encountered it or to escape once they were captured. Length of sampling and time of day affected CPUE; fishes generally had a very low retention rate over a 24 h sample time and only the Everglades pygmy sunfish Elassoma evergladei were commonly captured at night. Dispersal speed of fishes in the Florida Everglades, U.S.A., was shown to vary seasonally and among species, ranging from 0.05 to 0.15 m s-1 for small poeciliids and fundulids to 0.1 to 1.8 m s-1 for L. marginatus. Speed was generally highest late in the wet season and lowest in the dry season, possibly tied to dispersal behaviours linked to finding and remaining in dry-season refuges. These speed estimates can be used to estimate the diffusive movement rate, which is commonly employed in spatial ecological models.

  1. Do trout swim better than eels? Challenges for estimating performance based on the wake of self-propelled bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tytell, Eric D.

    Engineers and biologists have long desired to compare propulsive performance for fishes and underwater vehicles of different sizes, shapes, and modes of propulsion. Ideally, such a comparison would be made on the basis of either propulsive efficiency, total power output or both. However, estimating the efficiency and power output of self-propelled bodies, and particularly fishes, is methodologically challenging because it requires an estimate of thrust. For such systems traveling at a constant velocity, thrust and drag are equal, and can rarely be separated on the basis of flow measured in the wake. This problem is demonstrated using flow fields from swimming American eels, Anguilla rostrata, measured using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and high-speed video. Eels balance thrust and drag quite evenly, resulting in virtually no wake momentum in the swimming (axial) direction. On average, their wakes resemble those of self-propelled jet propulsors, which have been studied extensively. Theoretical studies of such wakes may provide methods for the estimation of thrust separately from drag. These flow fields are compared with those measured in the wakes of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, and bluegill sunfish, Lepomis macrochirus. In contrast to eels, these fishes produce wakes with axial momentum. Although the net momentum flux must be zero on average, it is neither spatially nor temporally homogeneous; the heterogeneity may provide an alternative route for estimating thrust. This review shows examples of wakes and velocity profiles from the three fishes, indicating challenges in estimating efficiency and power output and suggesting several routes for further experiments. Because these estimates will be complicated, a much simpler method for comparing performance is outlined, using as a point of comparison the power lost producing the wake. This wake power, a component of the efficiency and total power, can be estimated in a straightforward way from the flow

  2. Do trout swim better than eels? Challenges for estimating performance based on the wake of self-propelled bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tytell, Eric D.

    2007-11-01

    Engineers and biologists have long desired to compare propulsive performance for fishes and underwater vehicles of different sizes, shapes, and modes of propulsion. Ideally, such a comparison would be made on the basis of either propulsive efficiency, total power output or both. However, estimating the efficiency and power output of self-propelled bodies, and particularly fishes, is methodologically challenging because it requires an estimate of thrust. For such systems traveling at a constant velocity, thrust and drag are equal, and can rarely be separated on the basis of flow measured in the wake. This problem is demonstrated using flow fields from swimming American eels, Anguilla rostrata, measured using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and high-speed video. Eels balance thrust and drag quite evenly, resulting in virtually no wake momentum in the swimming (axial) direction. On average, their wakes resemble those of self-propelled jet propulsors, which have been studied extensively. Theoretical studies of such wakes may provide methods for the estimation of thrust separately from drag. These flow fields are compared with those measured in the wakes of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, and bluegill sunfish, Lepomis macrochirus. In contrast to eels, these fishes produce wakes with axial momentum. Although the net momentum flux must be zero on average, it is neither spatially nor temporally homogeneous; the heterogeneity may provide an alternative route for estimating thrust. This review shows examples of wakes and velocity profiles from the three fishes, indicating challenges in estimating efficiency and power output and suggesting several routes for further experiments. Because these estimates will be complicated, a much simpler method for comparing performance is outlined, using as a point of comparison the power lost producing the wake. This wake power, a component of the efficiency and total power, can be estimated in a straightforward way from the flow

  3. Effects of three homologous nonionic surfactants on fish in stream mesocosms

    SciTech Connect

    Lizotte, R.E. Jr.; Rodgers, J.H. Jr.; Dorn, P.B.; Dubey, S.T.

    1995-12-31

    The effects of three linear alcohol ethoxylate (LAE) surfactants (with an average carbon chain length of 10, 12.3, and 14.5, and an average of 6, 7, and 7 ethylene oxide units/mole, respectively) on fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas R.) and bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus R.) were examined in separate 30-d stream mesocosm studies. Average measured exposures were 730 to 11,240 {micro}g/L for the C{sub 10} LAE, 320 to 5,200 {micro}g/L C{sub 12.8} LAE, and 80 to 550 {micro}g/L for the C{sub 14.5} LAE. Fathead minnow survival and reproduction, and juvenile bluegill survival and growth were measured. For all of the parameters measured, toxicity or adverse effects were directly related to carbon chain length. The stream mesocosm NOECs for fathead minnow survival ranged from 2,040 {micro}g/L to 280 {micro}g/L and the LOECs ranged from 4,350 {micro}g/L to 330 {micro}g/L. The NOECs for fathead minnow reproduction ranged from 730 {micro}g/L, to 110 {micro}g/L and the LOECs ranged from 4,350 {micro}g/L to 330 {micro}g/L. The NOECs for bluegill survival ranged from 5,700 {micro}g/L to 330 {micro}g/L and the LOECs ranged from 11,200 {micro}g/L to > 330 {micro}g/L. The NOECs for bluegill growth ranged from 5,700 {micro}g/L to 330 {micro}g/L and the LOECs ranged from 11,200 {micro}g/L to > 330 {micro}g/L. Fish NOECs decreased from 6.6 times (for fathead minnow reproduction) to 17.3 times (for juvenile bluegill survival and growth) as surfactant carbon chain length increased.

  4. Effects of depletion sampling by standard three-pass pulsed DC electrofishing on blood chemistry parameters of fishes from Appalachian streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Densmore, Christine L.; Panek, Frank M.

    2013-01-01

    Adverse effects on fishes captured by electrofishing techniques have long been recognized, although the extent of associated physical injury and behavioral alterations are highly variable and dependent on a number of factors. We examined the effects of three-pass pulsed DC (PDC) electrofishing on two salmonid species (Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis) and five other genera (Green Sunfish Lepomis cyanellus, Potomac Sculpin Cottus girardi, Fathead Minnow Pimephales promelas, Largemouth Bass Micropterus salmoides, and Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus) common to Appalachian streams. We examined the corresponding effects of PDC electroshock on the following physiological indicators of stress and trauma: blood glucose and serum lactate, as well as on other blood chemistry, namely, enzymes, electrolytes, minerals, and proteins. All species demonstrated physiological responses to PDC electroshock, indicated by the biochemical differences in blood parameters in unshocked and shocked groups of fish with or without gross evidence of hemorrhagic trauma. Serum lactate was the most consistent indicator of these effects. Significant differences in whole blood glucose levels were also noted in treatment groups in all species except Green Sunfish, although the patterns observed were not as consistent as for serum lactate. Elevations in the serum enzymes, aspartate aminotransferase and creatine kinase, in the electroshocked fish occurred only in the two salmonid species. In many instances, although blood parameters were elevated in electroshocked fish compared with the unshocked controls for a given species, there were no differences in those levels in electroshocked fish based on the presence of gross hemorrhagic trauma to axial musculature. While some of the blood parameters examined correlated with both the occurrence of electroshock and the resultant tissue injury, there was no apparent link between the altered blood chemistry and

  5. Multimodal communication, mismatched messages and the effects of turbidity on the antipredator behavior of the Barton Springs salamander, Eurycea sosorum.

    PubMed

    Zabierek, Kristina C; Gabor, Caitlin R

    2016-09-01

    Prey may use multiple sensory channels to detect predators, whose cues may differ in altered sensory environments, such as turbid conditions. Depending on the environment, prey may use cues in an additive/complementary manner or in a compensatory manner. First, to determine whether the purely aquatic Barton Springs salamander, Eurycea sosorum, show an antipredator response to visual cues, we examined their activity when exposed to either visual cues of a predatory fish (Lepomis cyanellus) or a non-predatory fish (Etheostoma lepidum). Salamanders decreased activity in response to predator visual cues only. Then, we examined the antipredator response of these salamanders to all matched and mismatched combinations of chemical and visual cues of the same predatory and non-predatory fish in clear and low turbidity conditions. Salamanders decreased activity in response to predator chemical cues matched with predator visual cues or mismatched with non-predator visual cues. Salamanders also increased latency to first move to predator chemical cues mismatched with non-predator visual cues. Salamanders decreased activity and increased latency to first move more in clear as opposed to turbid conditions in all treatment combinations. Our results indicate that salamanders under all conditions and treatments preferentially rely on chemical cues to determine antipredator behavior, although visual cues are potentially utilized in conjunction for latency to first move. Our results also have potential conservation implications, as decreased antipredator behavior was seen in turbid conditions. These results reveal complexity of antipredator behavior in response to multiple cues under different environmental conditions, which is especially important when considering endangered species. PMID:27370360

  6. Centrarchid assemblages in Mississippi state-operated fishing lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olive, J.A.; Miranda, L.E.; Hubbard, W.D.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated electrofishing catch per effort in 27 state-operated fishing lakes in Mississippi to identify patterns of centrarchid community composition and to determine whether those patterns were related to selected environmental characteristics and to artificial nutrient enrichment. Ordination with detrended correspondence analysis recognized two major axes accounting for 77% of the variability in species ordination. Axis 1 showed a distinct separation between the body sizes of various species. A notable exception was the density of small (<30 cm) largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides, which aligned with the large individuals of other centrarchid species. This pattern suggested that through predation, high densities of small largemouth bass exerted significant control over the size structure of fish communities. Axis 2 separated species of crappies Pomoxis spp., suggesting that conditions other than strong species interactions also moderated the composition of crappies in the assemblages. However, neither lake morphometry nor watershed composition exhibited a major influence over axes 1 or 2. In small, intensively managed lakes with low habitat complexity, the regulatory importance of biotic interactions may overwhelm that of abiotic factors. Nutrient enrichment influenced community structure by changing the densities of bluegill Lepomis macrochirus and largemouth bass substantially but had a minor or no effect on other species. The management techniques used in these state-operated lakes are usually targeted toward a particular species without adequately considering the other species within the community. Our results show that attention to community-level interactions could provide valuable insight into factors that affect the quality of the fishery, insight that is not available through traditional population-level assessments. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  7. Impacts of golden alga Prymnesium parvum on fish populations in reservoirs of the upper Colorado River and Brazos River basins, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    VanLandeghem, Matthew M.; Farooqi, Mukhtar; Farquhar, B.; Patino, Reynaldo

    2013-01-01

    Several reservoirs in the upper Colorado River and Brazos River basins in Texas have experienced toxic blooms of golden alga Prymnesium parvum and associated fish kills since 2001. There is a paucity of information, however, regarding the population-level effects of such kills in large reservoirs, species-specific resistance to or recovery from kills, or potential differences in the patterns of impacts among basins. We used multiple before-after, control-impact analysis to determine whether repeated golden alga blooms have led to declines in the relative abundance and size structure of fish populations. Sustained declines were noted for 9 of 12 fish species surveyed in the upper Colorado River, whereas only one of eight species was impacted by golden alga in the Brazos River. In the upper Colorado River, White Bass Morone chrysops, White Crappie Pomoxis annularis, Largemouth Bass Micropterus salmoides, Bluegill Lepomis macrochirus, River Carpsucker Carpiodes carpio, Freshwater Drum Aplodinotus grunniens, Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus, Flathead Catfish Pylodictis olivaris, and Blue Catfish I. furcatus exhibited sustained declines in relative abundance, size structure, or both; Gizzard Shad Dorosoma cepedianum, Longnose Gar Lepisosteus osseus, and Common Carp Cyprinus carpio did not exhibit those declines. In the Brazos River, only the relative abundance of Blue Catfish was impacted. Overall, toxic golden alga blooms can negatively impact fish populations over the long-term, but the patterns of impact can vary considerably among river basins and species. In the Brazos River, populations of most fish species appear to be healthy, suggesting a positive angling outlook for this basin. In the upper Colorado River, fish populations have been severely impacted, and angling opportunities have been reduced. Basin-specific management plans aimed at improving water quality and quantity will likely reduce bloom intensity and allow recovery of fish populations to the

  8. Self-imposed length limits in recreational fisheries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chizinski, Christopher J.; Martin, Dustin R.; Hurley, Keith L.; Pope, Kevin L.

    2014-01-01

    A primary motivating factor on the decision to harvest a fish among consumptive-orientated anglers is the size of the fish. There is likely a cost-benefit trade-off for harvest of individual fish that is size and species dependent, which should produce a logistic-type response of fish fate (release or harvest) as a function of fish size and species. We define the self-imposed length limit as the length at which a captured fish had a 50% probability of being harvested, which was selected because it marks the length of the fish where the probability of harvest becomes greater than the probability of release. We assessed the influences of fish size, catch per unit effort, size distribution of caught fish, and creel limit on the self-imposed length limits for bluegill Lepomis macrochirus, channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus, black crappie Pomoxis nigromaculatus and white crappie Pomoxis annularis combined, white bass Morone chrysops, and yellow perch Perca flavescens at six lakes in Nebraska, USA. As we predicted, the probability of harvest increased with increasing size for all species harvested, which supported the concept of a size-dependent trade-off in costs and benefits of harvesting individual fish. It was also clear that probability of harvest was not simply defined by fish length, but rather was likely influenced to various degrees by interactions between species, catch rate, size distribution, creel-limit regulation and fish size. A greater understanding of harvest decisions within the context of perceived likelihood that a creel limit will be realized by a given angler party, which is a function of fish availability, harvest regulation and angler skill and orientation, is needed to predict the influence that anglers have on fish communities and to allow managers to sustainable manage exploited fish populations in recreational fisheries.

  9. Multimodal communication, mismatched messages and the effects of turbidity on the antipredator behavior of the Barton Springs salamander, Eurycea sosorum.

    PubMed

    Zabierek, Kristina C; Gabor, Caitlin R

    2016-09-01

    Prey may use multiple sensory channels to detect predators, whose cues may differ in altered sensory environments, such as turbid conditions. Depending on the environment, prey may use cues in an additive/complementary manner or in a compensatory manner. First, to determine whether the purely aquatic Barton Springs salamander, Eurycea sosorum, show an antipredator response to visual cues, we examined their activity when exposed to either visual cues of a predatory fish (Lepomis cyanellus) or a non-predatory fish (Etheostoma lepidum). Salamanders decreased activity in response to predator visual cues only. Then, we examined the antipredator response of these salamanders to all matched and mismatched combinations of chemical and visual cues of the same predatory and non-predatory fish in clear and low turbidity conditions. Salamanders decreased activity in response to predator chemical cues matched with predator visual cues or mismatched with non-predator visual cues. Salamanders also increased latency to first move to predator chemical cues mismatched with non-predator visual cues. Salamanders decreased activity and increased latency to first move more in clear as opposed to turbid conditions in all treatment combinations. Our results indicate that salamanders under all conditions and treatments preferentially rely on chemical cues to determine antipredator behavior, although visual cues are potentially utilized in conjunction for latency to first move. Our results also have potential conservation implications, as decreased antipredator behavior was seen in turbid conditions. These results reveal complexity of antipredator behavior in response to multiple cues under different environmental conditions, which is especially important when considering endangered species.

  10. Field investigations and on-site toxicity testing: an assessment of habitat suitability-Arkansas River, Pueblo, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.F.; Baldridge, D.A.; Iley, G.; Nimmo, D.R.

    1981-10-01

    An on-site bioassay and aquatic ecological survey were conducted on the Arkansas River near Pueblo, CO. A mobile bioassay trailer was used to test the toxicity of sewage treatment plant (STP) effluent using Arkansas River water for dilution. The aquatic survey was conducted upstream and downstream of the STP's outfall. This study was conceived in accordance with the intent of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) site-specific water quality criteria guidelines, which recognize that national criteria may not be applicable to species in specific bodies of water because of biological, chemical, and physical variables. Flow-through tests were conducted using bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), and a daphnid (Daphnia magna). Standard field and laboratory techniques were used to evaluate physical and biological components of the stream ecosystem. The physical components included flow, substrate, and qualitative fishery habitat description, and the biological components included benthic macroinvertebrate densities, diversity calculations, and fish population surveys. The results of the bioassay tests generally indicated the following: there were distinct differences in species' sensitivity to the effluent (that is, the sensitivity was bluegills > fathead minnows > daphnid); the required dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in the test tanks were difficult to maintain even though the flow-through rate was increased to four times that required by protocol; the toxicity of the postchlorinated/dechlorinated effluent was less than that of the prechlorinated effluent; no single pollutant could be targeted as the toxic fraction, however, concentrations of chlorine, cyanide, copper, and zinc were at or near LC/sub 50/ values for the test organisms.

  11. Undulatory locomotion of flexible foils as biomimetic models for understanding fish propulsion.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Ryan M; Thornycroft, Patrick J M; Lauder, George V

    2014-06-15

    An undulatory pattern of body bending in which waves pass along the body from head to tail is a major mechanism of creating thrust in many fish species during steady locomotion. Analyses of live fish swimming have provided the foundation of our current understanding of undulatory locomotion, but our inability to experimentally manipulate key variables such as body length, flexural stiffness and tailbeat frequency in freely swimming fish has limited our ability to investigate a number of important features of undulatory propulsion. In this paper we use a mechanical flapping apparatus to create an undulatory wave in swimming flexible foils driven with a heave motion at their leading edge, and compare this motion with body bending patterns of bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) and clown knifefish (Notopterus chitala). We found similar swimming speeds, Reynolds and Strouhal numbers, and patterns of curvature and shape between these fish and foils, suggesting that flexible foils provide a useful model for understanding fish undulatory locomotion. We swam foils with different lengths, stiffnesses and heave frequencies while measuring forces, torques and hydrodynamics. From measured forces and torques we calculated thrust and power coefficients, work and cost of transport for each foil. We found that increasing frequency and stiffness produced faster swimming speeds and more thrust. Increasing length had minimal impact on swimming speed, but had a large impact on Strouhal number, thrust coefficient and cost of transport. Foils that were both stiff and long had the lowest cost of transport (in mJ m(-1) g(-1)) at low cycle frequencies, and the ability to reach the highest speed at high cycle frequencies.

  12. Influence of behavior and mating success on brood-specific contribution to fish recruitment in ponds.

    PubMed

    Parkos, Joseph J; Wahl, David H; Philipp, David P

    2011-10-01

    One source of uncertainty in predicting the response of populations to exploitation is individual differences within a population in both vulnerability to capture and contribution to population renewal. For species with parental care, individuals engaged in nesting behavior are often targeted for exploitation, but predicting outcomes of this nonrandom vulnerability will depend in part on an understanding of how parental traits are related to potential for brood contribution to the population. Variation in brood-specific contribution to recruitment of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), a fish species with extended parental care, was quantified to determine if differences in mating success, parental care behaviors, and timing of reproduction influenced offspring recruitment. Dependence of these relationships on brood predation was tested in communities that differed in the presence of bluegill, Lepomis macrochirus, an important nest predator. Daily snorkel surveys were conducted in experimental ponds during spring to monitor male spawning and parental care behaviors in populations of largemouth bass. Tissue samples collected from larvae in nests were used to develop brood-specific DNA fingerprints for determining nest origins of fall recruits. Largemouth bass spawning period in bluegill ponds was longer and more variable in duration, with lower, more variable mating success, than in ponds without bluegill. In all populations, only one or two broods provided the majority of recruits, and these were broods produced during the earliest days of spawning by the oldest, largest males. In bluegill ponds, brood contribution from earliest nests also increased with brood size. Earliest nesters were the oldest males, and recruits from these nests were often above average in body size. Offspring needed to be guarded to at least swim-up larval stage to contribute any recruits. Termination of parental protection before offspring were free swimming mainly occurred with broods

  13. Potential Human Health Risk by Metal(loid)s, 234,238U and 210Po due to Consumption of Fish from the “Luis L. Leon” Reservoir (Northern México)

    PubMed Central

    Luna-Porres, Mayra Y.; Rodríguez-Villa, Marco A.; Herrera-Peraza, Eduardo F.; Renteria-Villalobos, Marusia; Montero-Cabrera, María E.

    2014-01-01

    Concentrations of As, Cu, Fe, Hg, Pb and Zn and activity concentrations from 234,238U and 210Po in water, fillet, liver and gills were determined in three stocked fish species from the Luis L. Leon reservoir, located in Northern Mexico. The considered species were Lepomis cyanellus, Cyprinus carpio and Ictalurus furcatus. 238U and 234U activity concentration (AC) in fillet samples showed values of 0.007–0.014 and 0.01–0.02 Bq∙kg−1 wet weight (ww), respectively. Liver samples for L. cyanellus, C. carpio and I. furcatus present 210Po AC of 1.16–3.26, 0.70–1.13 and 0.93–1.37 Bq∙kg−1 ww. Arsenic, mercury and lead concentration intervals in fillet samples were 0.13–0.39, 0.005–0.126 and 0.009–0.08 mg∙kg−1 ww, respectively, while in gill samples they were 0.11–0.43, 0.002–0.039 and 0.02–0.26 mg∙kg−1 ww. The elemental Bioaccumulation Factor (BAF) for fish tissues with respect to their concentrations in water was determined. L. cyanellus showed the highest BAF values for As and total U, being BAFAs = 37 and 40 L∙kg−1 in fillet and gills, respectively, and BAFU total = 1.5 L∙kg−1 in fillet. I. furcatus showed the highest BAF values for Hg and Pb, being BAFHg = 40 and 13 L∙kg−1 in fillet and gills, and BAFPb = 6.5 and 22 L∙kg−1 in fillet and gills, respectively. Some metal(loid) concentrations are slightly higher than European regulations for fish fillets. The difference in concentrations of metal(loid)s in fillet among the studied species is probably due to their differences in diet and habitat. PMID:24968208

  14. Total mercury concentrations in fillets of bluegill, redear sunfish, largemouth bass, and other fishes from Lake Natoma, Sacramento County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saiki, M.K.; Martin, B.A.; May, T.W.; Alpers, C.N.

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted during September-October 2002 to verify preliminary findings of elevated total mercury concentrations in skinless fillets of sportfishes inhabiting Lake Natoma. Although we measured total mercury concentrations, most mercury in fish flesh occurs in the methylated form. In August 2000, other investigators collected a small number of fish containing mercury concentrations that exceeded 0.30 ??g/g wet weight, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) tissue residue criterion derived from a reference dose for methylmercury that may cause undesirable neurological abnormalities in human infants exposed in utero when pregnant women consume mercury-contaminated foods. During our study, skinless fillets of bluegill, Lepomis macrochirus, contained as much as 0.19 ??g Hg/g wet weight (1.06 ??g Hg/g dry weight); redear sunfish, L. microlophus, contained as much as 0.39 ??g Hg/g wetweight (1.99 ??g Hg/g dry weight); and largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides, contained as much as 0.86 ??g Hg/g wet weight (3.85 ??g Hg/g dry weight). Maximum concentrations of mercury in other fish species varied from 0.097 ??g/g wet weight (0.537 ??g/g dry weight) in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, to 0.56 ??g/g wet weight (3.07 ??g/g dry weight) in white catfish, Ameiurus catus. Altogether, 1 of 20 redear sunfish, 14 of 61 largemouth bass, 1 of 1 brown builhead, A. nebulosus, 2 of 3 spotted bass, M. punctulatus, and 1 of 1 white catfish exceeded the USEPA fish tissue methylmercury residue criterion. Only bluegill and largemouth bass exhibited significant correlations between fish total length (TL), weight, and age, and total mercury concentration in fillets. Judging from a best-fit power-curve equation, largemouth bass measuring 273 mm TL (roughly 292g) or larger are estimated to contain total mercury concentrations in their fillets that exceed the USEPA fish tissue methylmercury criterion. These results confirmed that some fish species inhabiting Lake Natoma

  15. Experimental hydrodynamics of swimming in fishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tytell, Eric Daniel

    2005-11-01

    The great diversity of fish body shapes suggests that they have adapted to different selective pressures. For many fishes, the pressures include hydrodynamic demands: swimming efficiently or accelerating rapidly, for instance. However, the hydrodynamic advantages or disadvantages to specific morphologies are poorly understood. In particular, eels have been considered inefficient swimmers, but they migrate long distances without feeding, a task that requires efficient swimming. This dissertation, therefore, begins with an examination of the swimming hydrodynamics of American eels, Anguilla rostrata, at steady swimming speeds from 0.5 to 2 body lengths (L) per second and during accelerations from -1.4 to 1.3 L s -2. The final chapter examines the hydrodynamic effects of body shape directly by describing three-dimensional flow around swimming bluegill sunfish, Lepomis macrochirus. In all chapters, flow is quantified using digital particle image velocimetry, and simultaneous kinematics are measured from high-resolution digital video. The wake behind a swimming eel in the horizontal midline plane is described first. Rather than producing a wake with fluid jets angled backwards, like in fishes such as sunfish, eels have a wake with exclusively lateral jets. The lack of downstream momentum indicates that eels balance the axial forces of thrust and drag evenly over time and over their bodies, and therefore do not change axial fluid momentum. This even balance, present at all steady swimming speeds, is probably due to the relatively uniform body shape of eels. As eels accelerate, thrust exceeds drag, axial momentum increases, and the wake approaches that of other fishes. During steady swimming, though, the lack of axial momentum prevents direct efficiency estimation. The effect of body shape was examined directly by measuring flow in multiple transverse planes along the body of bluegill sunfish swimming at 1.2 L s-1. The dorsal and anal fin, neglected in many previous

  16. Influence of metal(loid) bioaccumulation and maternal transfer on embryo-larval development in fish exposed to a major coal ash spill

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Greeley, Jr., Mark Stephen; Adams, S. Marshall; Elmore, Logan R.; McCracken, Mary Kitty

    2016-01-03

    In December 2008, an earthen retaining wall at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Fuel Plant failed and released 4.1 million m3 of coal ash to rivers flowing into Watts Bar Reservoir in east Tennessee, United States (U.S.). As part of a comprehensive effort to evaluate the risks to aquatic resources from this spill – the largest in U.S. history – we compared bioaccumulation and maternal transfer of selenium (Se), arsenic (As), and mercury (Hg) in adult redear sunfish (Lepomis macrolophus), collected two years after the spill from both coal-ash exposed and non-exposed areas of the Emory and Clinchmore » Rivers, with the success of embryo-larval development in their offspring. Whole body and ovary concentrations of Se in female sunfish at three study sites downstream of the spill were significantly elevated (site means = 4.9–5.3 and 6.7–9.0 mg/kg d.w. whole body and ovary concentrations, respectively) compared with concentrations in fish from reference sites upstream of the spill site (2.2–3.2 mg/kg d.w. for whole bodies and 3.6–4.8 mg/kg d.w. for ovaries). However, Se concentrations in coal ash-exposed areas remain below proposed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) criteria for the protection of aquatic life. Site-to-site variation in fish concentrations of As and Hg were not well-correlated with ash-exposure, reflecting the multiple sources of these metal(loid)s in the affected watersheds. In 7-day laboratory tests of embryos and larvae derived from in vitro crosses of eggs and sperm from these field-collected sunfish, fertilization success, hatching success, embryo-larval survival, and incidences of developmental abnormalities did not differ significantly between ash-exposed and non-exposed fish. Furthermore, these developmental endpoints were not correlated with whole body or ovary concentrations of Se, As, or Hg in the maternal fish, or with fish size, ovary weight, or gonadal-somatic indices. Furthermore, results from

  17. Identifying the Effects on Fish of Changes in Water Pressure during Turbine Passage

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, James M.; Abernethy, Cary S.; Dauble, Dennis D.

    2003-09-01

    Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage and dissolved gas supersaturation. We investigated the responses of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) to these two stresses, singly and in combination, in the laboratory. Fish were exposed to total dissolved gas levels of 100%, 120%, or 135% of saturation while being held at either surface or 30 ft of pressure. Some of these fish were then subjected to decreases in pressure simulating passage through a Kaplan turbine under “worst case” (to 0.1 atmospheres) or more “fish friendly” (to 0.5 atmospheres) scenarios. Surface- and depth-acclimated Chinook salmon and bluegill, with no exposure to dissolved gas above ambient levels, were subjected to decreases in pressure simulating passage through a bulb turbine under “worst case” (to 0.68 atmospheres) or more “fish friendly” (to 1.0 atmospheres) scenarios. Bluegill, the most pressure-sensitive among the three species, incurred injuries that ranged from mild (internal hemorrhaging) (bulb turbine) to death (Kaplan turbine). For each type of turbine passage, bluegill acclimated to 30 ft depth and subjected to the more severe pressure nadir were more susceptible to injury/death. However, even control bluegill (i.e., not subjected to simulated turbine passage) experienced mild to moderate injury from rapidly ascending from 30 ft of pressure to surface pressure. The dissolved gas level had only a small additive effect on the injury/death rate of bluegill subjected to simulated Kaplan turbine passage. Thus, while physoclistous fish, such as bluegill, appear to be susceptible to injury from any rapid pressure decrease, those that are most severe (e.g., Kaplan turbine passage) are likely to be most injurious. Chinook salmon and rainbow trout were much

  18. Accumulation of metals in fish from lead-zinc mining areas of southeastern Missouri, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmitt, C.J.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; May, T.W.

    2007-01-01

    The potential effects of proposed lead-zinc mining in an ecologically sensitive area were assessed by studying a nearby mining district that has been exploited for about 30 yr under contemporary environmental regulations and with modern technology. Blood and liver samples representing fish of three species (largescale stoneroller, Campostoma oligolepis, n=91; longear sunfish, Lepomis megalotis, n=105; and northern hog sucker, Hypentelium nigricans, n=20) were collected from 16 sites representing a range of conditions relative to lead-zinc mining and ore beneficiation in southeastern Missouri. Samples were analyzed for lead, zinc, and cadmium, and for a suite of biomarkers (reported in a companion paper). A subset of the hog sucker (n=9) representing three sites were also analyzed for nickel and cobalt. Blood and liver lead concentrations were highly correlated (r=0.84-0.85, P<0.01) in all three species and were significantly (ANOVA, P<0.01) greater at sites <10 km downstream of active lead-zinc mines and mills and in a historical lead-zinc mining area than at reference sites, including a site in the area proposed for new mining. Correlations between blood and liver cadmium concentrations were less evident than for lead but were nevertheless statistically significant (r=0.26-0.69, P <0.01-0.07). Although blood and liver cadmium concentrations were highest in all three species at sites near mines, within-site variability was greater and mining-related trends were less evident than for lead. Blood and liver zinc concentrations were significantly correlated only in stoneroller (r=0.46, P<0.01) and mining-related trends were not evident. Concentrations of cobalt and nickel in blood and liver were significantly higher (ANOVA, P<0.01) at a site near an active mine than at a reference site and a site in the historical lead-zinc mining area. These findings confirm previous studies indicating that lead and other metals are released to streams from active lead-zinc mines and

  19. Influence of metal(loid) bioaccumulation and maternal transfer on embryo-larval development in fish exposed to a major coal ash spill.

    PubMed

    Greeley, Mark S; Adams, S Marshall; Elmore, Logan R; McCracken, Mary K

    2016-04-01

    In December 2008, an earthen retaining wall at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Fuel Plant failed and released 4.1 millionm(3) of coal ash to rivers flowing into Watts Bar Reservoir in east Tennessee, United States (U.S.). As part of a comprehensive effort to evaluate the risks to aquatic resources from this spill - the largest in U.S. history - we compared bioaccumulation and maternal transfer of selenium (Se), arsenic (As), and mercury (Hg) in adult redear sunfish (Lepomis macrolophus), collected two years after the spill from both coal-ash exposed and non-exposed areas of the Emory and Clinch Rivers, with the success of embryo-larval development in their offspring. Whole body and ovary concentrations of Se in female sunfish at three study sites downstream of the spill were significantly elevated (site means=4.9-5.3 and 6.7-9.0mg/kg d.w. whole body and ovary concentrations, respectively) compared with concentrations in fish from reference sites upstream of the spill site (2.2-3.2mg/kg d.w. for whole bodies and 3.6-4.8mg/kg d.w. for ovaries). However, Se concentrations in coal ash-exposed areas remain below proposed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) criteria for the protection of aquatic life. Site-to-site variation in fish concentrations of As and Hg were not well-correlated with ash-exposure, reflecting the multiple sources of these metal(loid)s in the affected watersheds. In 7-day laboratory tests of embryos and larvae derived from in vitro crosses of eggs and sperm from these field-collected sunfish, fertilization success, hatching success, embryo-larval survival, and incidences of developmental abnormalities did not differ significantly between ash-exposed and non-exposed fish. Furthermore, these developmental endpoints were not correlated with whole body or ovary concentrations of Se, As, or Hg in the maternal fish, or with fish size, ovary weight, or gonadal-somatic indices. Results from this and related studies associated

  20. Road crossing designs and their impact on fish assemblages of Great Plains streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bouska, Wesley W.; Paukert, Craig P.

    2010-01-01

    A mark-recapture field study was conducted to determine fish passage at 5 concrete box culverts and 5 low-water crossings (concrete slabs vented by culverts) as well as 10 control sites (below a natural riffle) in Flint Hills streams of northeastern Kansas. Additionally, we tested the upstream passage of four fish species native to Great Plains streams (Topeka shiner Notropis topeka, green sunfish Lepomis cyanellus, red shiner Cyprinella lutrensis, and southern redbelly dace Phoxinus erythrogaster) through three simulated crossing designs (box culverts, round corrugated culverts, and natural rock riffles) at water velocities of 0.1 to 1.1 m/s in an experimental stream. The field study indicated that cyprinids were twice as likely to move upstream of box culverts than low-water crossings and 1.4 times as likely to move upstream of control reaches than any crossing type. The best models indicated that the proportion of cyprinids that moved upstream increased with decreased culvert slope and length, perching, and increased culvert width. Our controlled experiment indicated that fish can move through velocities up to 1.1 m/s in a 1.86-m simulated stream and that the proportion of fish that moved upstream did not differ among crossing designs for southern redbelly dace, green sunfish, or Topeka shiner; however, natural rock riffles had lower proportional movements (mean = 0.19) than the box (0.38) or corrugated culvert designs (0.43) for red shiners. Water velocity did not affect the proportional upstream movement of any species except that of Topeka shiners, which increased with water velocity. Crossing design alone may not determine fish passage, and water velocities up to 1.1 m/s may not affect the passage of many Great Plains fishes. Barriers to fish movement may be the result of other factors (e.g., perching, slope, and crossing length). The use of properly designed and installed crossings has promise in conserving Great Plains stream fishes.

  1. Characterization of alpha-2-macroglobulin from groupers.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Wen-Hsiao; Lee, Kuo-Kau; Liu, Ping-Chung

    2013-08-01

    was performed respectivity. However, no band was detected using plasma from the freshwater fish species and other animal species. Thus, further indicates that the protein structure of α-2-M of Epinephelus spp. was closely related among seawater fish species. In addition the identity of the two subunits was identified using LC/MS/MS which was similar to α-2-M of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) and bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) on the protein hit. PMID:23711467

  2. The Release Rate of Environmental DNA from Juvenile and Adult Fish

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Atsushi; Nakamura, Keisuke; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Kondoh, Michio; Minamoto, Toshifumi

    2014-01-01

    The environmental DNA (eDNA) technique is expected to become a powerful, non-invasive tool for estimating the distribution and biomass of organisms. This technique was recently shown to be applicable to aquatic vertebrates by collecting extraorganismal DNA floating in the water or absorbed onto suspended particles. However, basic information on eDNA release rate is lacking, despite it being essential for practical applications. In this series of experiments with bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), we examined the effect of fish developmental stage on eDNA release rate. eDNA concentration reached equilibrium 3 days after the individual fish were introduced into the separate containers, enabling calculation of the eDNA release rate (copies h−1) from individual fish on the assumption that the number of eDNA released from the fish per unit time equals total degradation in the container (copies h−1). The eDNA release rate was 3–4 times higher in the adult (body weight: 30–75 g) than in the juvenile group (0.5–2.0 g). Such positive relationship between fish size and eDNA release rate support the possibility of biomass rather than density estimation using eDNA techniques. However, the eDNA release rate per fish body weight (copies h−1 g−1) was slightly higher in the juvenile than the adult group, which is likely because of the ontogenetic reduction in metabolic activity. Therefore, quantitative eDNA data should be carefully interpreted to avoid overestimating biomass when the population is dominated by juveniles, because the age structure of the focal population is often variable and unseen in the field. eDNA degradation rates (copies l−1 h−1), calculated by curve fitting of time-dependent changes in eDNA concentrations after fish removal, were 5.1–15.9% per hour (half-life: 6.3 h). This suggests that quantitative eDNA data should be corrected using a degradation curve attained in the target field. PMID:25479160

  3. Environmental risk assessment for the polycyclic musks, AHTN and HHCB. II. Effect assessment and risk characterisation.

    PubMed

    Balk, F; Ford, R A

    1999-12-20

    Reports of the polycyclic musks AHTN and HHCB in surface water and fish, primarily in Europe, have prompted studies of their environmental effects. These effects then are used, along with the predicted environmental concentrations in a risk assessment according to the approach developed under European Union Regulation 793/93, in line with the Technical Guidance Document for risk assessment of new and existing chemicals. In 72-h studies with algae (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata), NOECs were 0.374 mg/l (AHTN) and 0.201 mg/l (HHCB). In 21-day reproductive tests with daphnia (Daphnia magna) NOECs were 0.196 (AHTN) and 0.111 mg/l (HHCB). In 21-day growth tests with bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), NOECs were 0.067 (AHTN) and 0.068 mg/l (HHCB). And, finally 35-day early life stage tests with fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) resulted in NOECs of 0.035 (AHTN) and 0.068 mg/l (HHCB). These results lead to Predicted No Effect Concentrations (PNEC) of 3.5 microg/l (AHTN) and 6.8 microg/l (HHCB) for aquatic organisms. For the soil compartment, 8-week studies with earthworms (Eisenia fetida) resulted in NOECs of 105 (AHTN) and 45 mg/kg (HHCB) and 4-week studies with springtails (Folsomia candida) resulted in a NOECs of 45 mg/kg for both substances. These values lead to a PNEC of 0.32 mg/kg dw for both materials. Using mammalian studies, PNECs for fish or worm eating predators of 10 mg/kg fw (AHTN) and 100 mg/kg fw (HHCB) can be derived. For sediment dwelling organisms, PNECs were derived by equilibrium partitioning using the aquatic PNECs. Comparing PNECs with the measured or predicted environmental exposures leads to risk characterisation ratios as follows: aquatic species: AHTN 0.086, HHCB 0.074; sediment organisms: AHTN 0.44, HHCB 0.064; soil organisms: AHTN 0.091, HHCB 0.10; fish eating predators: AHTN 0.012, HHCB 0.001; worm eating predators: AHTN 0.007, HHCB 0.001.

  4. An Assessment of the Bioaccumulation of PCBs and Chloridane Near the U.S. Department of Energy's Kansas City Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, M.J.

    2003-12-30

    important component of this effort, the fish sampling locations and species collected were essentially the same as in previous studies. In general, locations were chosen upstream and downstream of major KCP outfalls to help evaluate the importance of those outfalls as sources of PCBs. Green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus) and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were again the primary species collected.

  5. Heavy metals and arsenic concentrations in ten fish species from the Šalek lakes (Slovenia): assessment of potential human health risk due to fish consumption.

    PubMed

    Al Sayegh Petkovšek, Samar; Mazej Grudnik, Zdenka; Pokorny, Boštjan

    2012-05-01

    The study, which measured the concentrations of Hg, Pb, Cd, Zn and As in various fish tissues (muscle, gill and liver) of 10 fish species (Abramis brama danubii, Alburnus alburnus alburnus, Barbus meridionalis petenyi, Carassius auratius gibelio, Cyprinus carpio, Lepomis gibossus, Leuciscius cephalus cephalus, Perca fluviatilis fluviatilis, Rutilus rutilus, Scardinus erythrophtlalmus erythrophtlalmus) collected in the Šalek lakes, is the first survey regarding metal concentrations in fish species with samples originating from Slovene lakes, while only a limited number of such studies have been carried out in southeastern Europe. Since these lakes are situated in the close vicinity of the largest Slovene thermal power plant, the study provides an insight into the potential impact of increased levels of metals in the environment as well as an estimate of the contamination of fish tissues with metals. Furthermore, it was possible to compare the results obtained with those from other studies regarding metal levels in freshwater fish species. The mean metal concentrations of different tissues irrespective of species varied in the following ranges: Zn 4.31-199 mg/kg ww, Pb 0.01-0.48 mg/kg ww, As 0.02-0.44 mg/kg ww, Hg <0.01-0.31 mg/kg ww, Cd < 0.01-0.19 mg/kg ww. In general, higher contents of Hg were found in muscles and livers than in gills and higher contents of As in gills and livers than in muscles, respectively. The accumulation of Pb and Zn was most pronounced in gills. The result obtained regarding metal concentrations in fish revealed that the ecosystems of the Šalek lakes are not polluted with Hg and Pb, slightly loaded with As and Cd and moderately polluted with Zn. In addition, the potential human health risk due to fish consumption was assessed. This showed that the estimated weekly intakes for all metals were far below provisional permissible tolerable weekly intakes determined by WHO/FAO. The consumption of fish from the Šalek lakes, therefore

  6. Influence of metal(loid) bioaccumulation and maternal transfer on embryo-larval development in fish exposed to a major coal ash spill.

    PubMed

    Greeley, Mark S; Adams, S Marshall; Elmore, Logan R; McCracken, Mary K

    2016-04-01

    In December 2008, an earthen retaining wall at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Fuel Plant failed and released 4.1 millionm(3) of coal ash to rivers flowing into Watts Bar Reservoir in east Tennessee, United States (U.S.). As part of a comprehensive effort to evaluate the risks to aquatic resources from this spill - the largest in U.S. history - we compared bioaccumulation and maternal transfer of selenium (Se), arsenic (As), and mercury (Hg) in adult redear sunfish (Lepomis macrolophus), collected two years after the spill from both coal-ash exposed and non-exposed areas of the Emory and Clinch Rivers, with the success of embryo-larval development in their offspring. Whole body and ovary concentrations of Se in female sunfish at three study sites downstream of the spill were significantly elevated (site means=4.9-5.3 and 6.7-9.0mg/kg d.w. whole body and ovary concentrations, respectively) compared with concentrations in fish from reference sites upstream of the spill site (2.2-3.2mg/kg d.w. for whole bodies and 3.6-4.8mg/kg d.w. for ovaries). However, Se concentrations in coal ash-exposed areas remain below proposed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) criteria for the protection of aquatic life. Site-to-site variation in fish concentrations of As and Hg were not well-correlated with ash-exposure, reflecting the multiple sources of these metal(loid)s in the affected watersheds. In 7-day laboratory tests of embryos and larvae derived from in vitro crosses of eggs and sperm from these field-collected sunfish, fertilization success, hatching success, embryo-larval survival, and incidences of developmental abnormalities did not differ significantly between ash-exposed and non-exposed fish. Furthermore, these developmental endpoints were not correlated with whole body or ovary concentrations of Se, As, or Hg in the maternal fish, or with fish size, ovary weight, or gonadal-somatic indices. Results from this and related studies associated

  7. Angler effort and catch within a spatially complex system of small lakes.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pope, Kevin L.; Chizinski, Christopher J.; Martin, Dustin R.; Barada, Tony J.; Schuckman, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Spatial layout of waterbodies and waterbody size can affect a creel clerk’s ability to intercept anglers for interviews and to accurately count anglers, which will affect the accuracy and precision of estimates of effort and catch. This study aimed to quantify angling effort and catch across a spatially complex system of 19 small (<100 ha) lakes, the Fremont lakes. Total (±SE) angling effort (hours) on individual lakes ranged from 0 (0) to 7,137 (305). Bank anglers utilized 18 of the 19 lakes, and their mean (±SE) trip lengths (hours) ranged from 0.80 (0.31) to 7.75 (6.75), depending on the waterbody. In contrast, boat anglers utilized 14 of the 19 lakes, and their trip lengths ranged from 1.39 (0.24) to 4.25 (0.71), depending on the waterbody. The most sought fishes, as indexed by number of lakes on which effort was exerted, were anything (17 of 19 lakes), largemouth bassMicropterus salmoides (15 of 19 lakes), and channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus (13 of 19 lakes). Bluegill Lepomis machrochirus, crappie Pomoxis spp., and largemouth bass were caught most frequently across the lakes, but catch rates varied considerably by lake. Of the 1,138 parties interviewed, most parties (93%) visited a single lake but there were 77 (7%) parties that indicated that they had visited multiple lakes during a single day. The contingent of parties that visited more than one lake a day were primarily (87%) bank anglers.. The number of lake-to-lake connections made by anglers visiting more than one waterbody during a single day was related to catch rates and total angling effort. The greater resolution that was achieved with a lake specific creel survey at Fremont lakes revealed a system of lakes with a large degree of spatial variation in angler effort and catch that would be missed by a coarser, system-wide survey that did not differentiate individual lakes.

  8. A taxonomic monograph of the genus Tylodinus Champion (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Cryptorhynchinae: Tylodina) of Chiapas, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Luna-Cozar, Jesús; Anderson, Robert S; Jones, Robert W; León-Corté, Jorge L

    2014-04-15

    nodulosus species group (3) T. andersoni new species (Chiapas, Ángel Albino Corzo, Reserva El Triunfo, Polígono 1), T. nodulosus (Boheman), T. zilchi Kuschel; Tylodinus pusillus species group (2) T. porvenirensis new species (type locality: Chiapas, El Porvenir, El Porvenir (2 km NE)), T. pusillus new species (type locality: Chiapas, 4 km SE Custepec); Tylodinus spiniventris species group (2) T. lum new species (Chiapas, San Cristóbal de las Casas, Cerro Huitepec), and T. spiniventris new species (type locality: Chiapas, San Cristóbal de las Casas, Reserva Huitepec); Incertae sedis (13) T. pinguis new species (type locality: Chiapas, Ángel Albino Corzo, Reserva El Triunfo, Polígono 1) , T. kissingeri new species (type locality: Chiapas, Tapalapa, ca. 14 km NE Coapilla), T. complicatus new species (type locality: Chiapas, Pueblo Nuevo Solistahuacán, La Yerbabuena), T. dominicus new species (type locality: Chiapas, Villa Corzo, Reserva de la Biósfera La Sepultura), T. noctis new species (type locality: Chiapas, Coapilla, ca. 10.5 km NE Coapilla), T. rufus new species (type locality: Chiapas, San Cristóbal de las Casas, Cerro Huitepec); T. branstetteri new species (type locality: Chiapas, La Concordia, 4 km SE Custepec), T. kuscheli new species (type locality: Chiapas, Villa Flores, Ejido Sierra Morena), T. pappi new species (type locality: Chiapas, Unión Juárez, Volcán Tacan), T. gibbosus new species (type locality: Chiapas, Pueblo Nuevo Solistahuacán, Yerbabuena Reserve), T. immundus new species (type locality: Chiapas, San Cristóbal de las Casas Cerro Huitepec), T. intzin new species (type locality: Chiapas, Tenejapa, Yashanal), T. elongatus new species (type locality: Chiapas, Ángel Albino Corzo, Reserva El Triunfo, Polígono 1). Three species (T. nodulosus (Boheman), T. zilchi Kuschel and T. cavicrus Champion) are not known to occur in Chiapas but were included in this study to be more representative of inter- and intraspecific variation and to provide a

  9. Selenium Speciation and Mobilization in a Controlled Wetland System: Pariette Wetlands, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, S.; Crawford, M.; Kelly, L.; Ford, S. K.; Hettiarachchi, G.; van Der Merwe, D.; Tuttle, M. L.; Karna, R.

    2011-12-01

    With headwaters in the heavily irrigated Pleasant Valley, Pariette Wetlands (PW) is an area with high selenium concentrations in both water and sediments. While selenium is an important nutrient, it is toxic at high concentration for many aquatic organisms in their developmental stages, such as reported cases in PW waterfowl. Other PW residents known to be susceptible to selenium poisoning include the locally abundant green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus). In order to determine the relationship between Se concentrations in the water and sediments, water and wetland sediments were systematically sampled throughout the reach of PW. An observed trend of increased pH from upstream to downstream, and the relative stability of redox potential suggest that the wetlands are a pH controlled system. Total Se and Se speciation in waters were determined by HG-AFS. Water samples from two seasons showed a decreasing trend in total Se from an upstream high of approximately 10ppb to as low as 1ppb downstream. Se concentrations at the end of the irrigation season were approximate 3 times greater than those during the height of irrigation indicating seasonal fluctuations and influence of irrigation practices. As a percent of total Se from upstream to downstream Se (VI) was reduced from approximately 70% to below zero while organically associated Se was inversely proportional to Se (VI). Se (IV) remained relatively steady. Water samples are being analyzed for total anions and cations via IC and ICP-OES. A four acid digestion analysis was employed to determine extractable sediment Se. It ranged from 1.7 mg/L to 0.4 mg/L. Se concentrations in pond sediments were nearly twice that of channel sediments. TOC remained relatively steady for all channel sediments between 0.15 to 0.3 wt% but spiked to as high as 1.75 in the wetland pond sediments. Mineralogy has been determined by μXRF mapping and μXRD on selected hotspots. Semiquantitative speciation within sediments was determined by linear

  10. South Fork Shenandoah River habitat-flow modeling to determine ecological and recreational characteristics during low-flow periods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krstolic, Jennifer L.; Ramey, R. Clay

    2012-01-01

    The ecological habitat requirements of aquatic organisms and recreational streamflow requirements of the South Fork Shenandoah River were investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Central Shenandoah Valley Planning District Commission, the Northern Shenandoah Valley Regional Commission, and Virginia Commonwealth University. Physical habitat simulation modeling was conducted to examine flow as a major determinant of physical habitat availability and recreation suitability using field-collected hydraulic habitat variables such as water depth, water velocity, and substrate characteristics. Fish habitat-suitability criteria specific to the South Fork Shenandoah River were developed for sub-adult and adult smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu), juvenile and sub-adult redbreast sunfish (Lepomis auritus), spotfin or satinfin shiner (Cyprinella spp), margined madtom (Noturus insignis),and river chub (Nocomis micropogon). Historic streamflow statistics for the summer low-flow period during July, August, and September were used as benchmark low-flow conditions and compared to habitat simulation results and water-withdrawal scenarios based on 2005 withdrawal data. To examine habitat and recreation characteristics during droughts, daily fish habitat or recreation suitability values were simulated for 2002 and other selected drought years. Recreation suitability during droughts was extremely low, because the modeling demonstrated that suitable conditions occur when the streamflows are greater than the 50th percentile flow for July, August, and September. Habitat availability for fish is generally at a maximum when streamflows are between the 75th and 25th percentile flows for July, August, and September. Time-series results for drought years, such as 2002, showed that extreme low-flow conditions less than the 5th percentile of flow for July, August, and September corresponded to below-normal habitat availability for both game and nongame fish in the

  11. Bioaccumulation Studies Associated with the Kingston Fly Ash Spill, Spring 2009 - Fall 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Marshall; Brandt, Craig C; Fortner, Allison M

    2012-05-01

    four seasonal collections: Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, and Fall 2010. Both the Spring and Fall studies have focused on 3-4 sentinel fish species that represent different feeding habits, behaviors, and home ranges. In addition to bioaccumulation studies, the Spring investigations also included evaluation of fish health and reproductive integrity on the same fish used for bioaccumulation. Two associated reports present the fish health (Adams et al 2012) and reproductive studies (Greeley et al 2012) conducted in 2009 and 2010. The fish health study conducted in conjunction with the bioaccumulation and reproductive study is critical for assessing and evaluating possible causal relationships between contaminant exposure (bioaccumulation) and the response of fish to exposure as reflected by the various measurements of fish health. This report emphasizes evaluation of arsenic and selenium bioaccumulation in fish and consists of four related studies (Sections 2-5) including, (1) bioaccumulation in liver and ovaries, (2) bioaccumulation in whole body gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum), (3) bioaccumulation in muscle tissue or fillets, and (4) a reconstruction analysis which establishes the relationship between selenium in muscle tissue and that of the whole body of bluegill (Lepomis machrochirus). Metals other than arsenic and selenium are evaluated separately in Section 6. This report focuses on selenium and arsenic for the following reasons: (1) based on baseline studies conducted in early 2009 in the Emory and Clinch River, only two potentially fly-ash related metals, selenium and arsenic, appeared to be elevated above background or reference levels, (2) selenium and arsenic are two of the metals in coal ash that are known to bioaccumulate and cause toxicity in wildlife, and (3) based on bioaccumulation studies of bluegill and carp (Cyprinus carpio) in the Stilling Pond during Spring 2009, which would represent a worst case situation for metal bioaccumulation