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Sample records for leprosy isolation policy

  1. [Leprosy and medicine II--progress and establishment of an absolute isolation policy].

    PubMed

    Mori, Shuichi; Ishii, Norihisa

    2007-02-01

    The leprosy policy of Japan began from when the government enacted "law No. 11 (The leprosy prevention act)" in 1907 (Meiji 40) and several leprosy sanatoriums were built to receive previously homeless patients. Then, with the rise of totalitarianism, the isolation policy of Japan gained national support under the slogan "Patient Relief", which would become a major factor behind the enactment of "Leprosy Prevention Law" in 1931 (Showa 6) by which the leprosy policy was changed to one of absolute isolation aimed at the internment of all leprosy patients. From recent research on the leprosy policy of Japan, the internment of all leprosy patients, isolation for life, social defense, and neglect of patients' human-rights had tragic results in many cases. However, there is little research which can reply clearly to the question of whether the leprosy policy of Japan was really original and what factors led to the formation of the absolute isolation policy. This paper focuses on the relation between leprosy policy and treatment, and from this, I make clear the similarities, or peculiarities, of the isolation policy between Japan and the rest of the world, while clarifying the factors associated with the progress of the absolute isolation policy. The processes involved were historical and medical historical in that the relation between the formation of a national health system and the progress of the isolation policy of Meiji Era, the proposal of the isolation policy by Dr. Keizo Dohi, Dr. Shibasaburo Kitasato, and Dr. Masatsugu Yamane; the practical application of this policy by Dr. Kensuke Mitsuda, and the decision to enact this policy and its support by the Health and Medical Bureau and the Department of the Interior, as well as many other factors, all contributed to the final implementation of the absolute isolation policy.

  2. [Leprosy and medicine I--proposal of an isolation policy and its background].

    PubMed

    Mori, Shuichi; Ishii, Norihisa

    2006-02-01

    The leprosy policy of Japan began from when the government enacted "law No. 11 (The leprosy prevention act)" in 1907 (Meiji 40) and several leprosy sanatoriums were built and the patient who wanders about was received. Then, in rise of totalitarianism, the isolation policy of Japan gained national support under a slogan "Patient Relief", and it would become the big factor to which enactment of "Leprosy Prevention Law" in 1931 (Showa 6) and leprosy policy changed to segregation which aimed at internment of all leprosy patients. From today's research on the leprosy policy of Japan, it is internment of all leprosy patients, whole life isolation, social defense and neglect of patients' human-rights and led to many tragedy of patient. However, there is little research which can reply clearly to the question of whether the leprosy policy of Japan was really original and what the factors of led to the formation of the segregation policy. This paper focuses on the relation between leprosy policy and medicine, and from this, I make clear the similarity, or peculiarity of the isolation policy between Japan and the vest of the world, and clarify the factors of progress of the absolute isolation policy. The processes are historical and medical historical the verification of the relation between the formation of the national medicine and the progress of the isolation policy of Meiji Era, the proposal of the isolation policy by Dr. Keizo Dohi, Dr. Shibasaburo Kitasato, and Dr. Masatsugu Yamane, and the application by Dr. Kensuke Mitsuda, the decision to enact this policy and its support by the Health and Medical Bureau and the Department of the Interior, as well as many factors.

  3. Termination of the leprosy isolation policy in the US and Japan : Science, policy changes, and the garbage can model

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Hajime; Frantz, Janet E

    2005-01-01

    Background In both the US and Japan, the patient isolation policy for leprosy /Hansen's disease (HD) was preserved along with the isolation facilities, long after it had been proven to be scientifically unnecessary. This delayed policy termination caused a deprivation of civil liberties of the involuntarily confined patients, the fostering of social stigmas attached to the disease, and an inefficient use of health resources. This article seeks to elucidate the political process which hindered timely policy changes congruent with scientific advances. Methods Examination of historical materials, supplemented by personal interviews. The role that science played in the process of policy making was scrutinized with particular reference to the Garbage Can model. Results From the vantage of history, science remained instrumental in all period in the sense that it was not the primary objective for which policy change was discussed or intended, nor was it the principal driving force for policy change. When the argument arose, scientific arguments were employed to justify the patient isolation policy. However, in the early post-WWII period, issues were foregrounded and agendas were set as the inadvertent result of administrative reforms. Subsequently, scientific developments were more or less ignored due to concern about adverse policy outcomes. Finally, in the 1980s and 1990s, scientific arguments were used instrumentally to argue against isolation and for the termination of residential care. Conclusion Contrary to public expectations, health policy is not always rational and scientifically justified. In the process of policy making, the role of science can be limited and instrumental. Policy change may require the opening of policy windows, as a result of convergence of the problem, policy, and political streams, by effective exercise of leadership. Scientists and policymakers should be attentive enough to the political context of policies. PMID:15771781

  4. Chemical Characterization of Organisms Isolated from Leprosy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Beaman, Blain L.; Kim, Kwang-Shin; Lanéelle, Marie A.; Barksdale, Lane

    1974-01-01

    Chemical analyses of the cell walls of organisms isolated in various parts of the world from cases of lepromatous and tuberculoid leprosy make possible their assignment to one of the three genera: Corynebacterium, Mycobacterium, or Propionibacterium. One, bacterium 22M, remains unassigned. The combined chemical and enzymatic properties attributed to leprosy bacilli freshly harvested from lepromata are found collectively, but not individually, in these three genera. Images PMID:4813897

  5. [For the sacrifice of isolation: leprosy and philanthropy in Argentina and Brazil, 1930-1946].

    PubMed

    Leandro, José Augusto

    2013-01-01

    Patronato de Leprosos, in Argentina, and Federação das Sociedades de Assistência aos Lázaros e Defesa Contra a Lepra, in Brazil, were created as institutions designed to help people with leprosy and their families. Headed by women from the ruling classes, these entities took very similar actions, despite the different national contexts in which they operated, both supplementing leprosy healthcare policies in their respective countries. This article aims to demonstrate the similarities in the strategies adopted by both philanthropic institutions, which, in the 1930s and 1940s, acted in harmony with the physicians who supported compulsory isolation.

  6. Leprosy: disease, isolation, and segregation in colonial Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Zamparoni, Valdemir

    2016-11-16

    Drawing on documents produced between the early nineteenth and mid-twentieth centuries, mainly medical reports, this paper indicates the prevailing conceptions in the colonial medical community and local populations about leprosy, its manifestations, and how to deal with it. It focuses on the tensions concerning the practice of segregating lepers and its social and sanitation implications. To comprehend the roots of the discourses and strategies in the Portuguese and colonial medical environment, the trajectory of the definitions of isolation, segregation, and leprosy are traced, as are their use in or absence from the writings of missionaries, chroniclers, and doctors in Angola and Mozambique as of the second half of the seventeenth century.

  7. History and characteristics of isolates maintained at the leprosy research center.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Masanori

    2010-09-01

    The origin, history, sensitivity to anti-leprosy drugs and genotypic characteristics for 27 strains maintained at the Leprosy Research Center in Tokyo are described. Strains are isolated and passaged in nude mouse footpads, and frozen bacillary suspensions with different generations are also maintained. The Leprosy Research Center provides bacillary materials as experimental resources at researchers' request.

  8. Leprosy.

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, R C; Gillis, T P; Krahenbuhl, J L; Franzblau, S G

    1988-01-01

    Leprosy affects over 10 million people in the world. The disease is a model of graded cell-mediated immunity, in this case to the causative organism, Mycobacterium leprae. The clinical manifestations are due to (i) bacterial progression, (ii) immunologic responses of the host, (iii) peripheral nerve damage due to either or both bacterial progression and immunologic responses of the host, and (iv) preventable secondary deformities following nerve damage, which account for most of the stigma of the disease. Treatment modalities are now available to control or minimize the effects of bacterial progression, harmful immunologic responses of the host, peripheral nerve damage, and secondary deformities. Unique biochemical characteristics of M. leprae reside in the cell wall and associated macromolecules. Some of these molecules are potent immunogens in humans, while others constitute the structural integrity of the bacillus. Proteins of M. leprae are currently under intensive investigation as a result of deoxyribonucleic acid cloning of M. leprae genes. Structure-function and antigenic relationships of M. leprae proteins should become available by using recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid procedures coupled with T- and B-cell cloning to advance our understanding of the immunologic reactions encountered in Hansen's disease. Until recently, the study of the immunology of leprosy has been stymied by the lack of immunologically specific M. leprae antigens. The definition of specific antigens and production of recombinant and synthetic immunologic reagents have fostered state-of-the-art research efforts into new immunodiagnostic procedures and development of a leprosy vaccine. Also discussed is progress in understanding of the mechanism(s) underlying the M. leprae-specific immunodeficiency associated with lepromatous leprosy, including the role of suppressor T cells and defective macrophage function. Metabolic studies of M. leprae suggest intact catabolic pathways and energy

  9. [Philanthropy and welfare policies for the families of people with leprosy in the Brazilian state of Goiás, 1920-1962].

    PubMed

    Silva, Leicy Francisca da

    2016-01-26

    This article analyzes the root causes of the shortage of social support for the relatives of people with leprosy, especially their children, in the state of Goiás, Central West region of Brazil, between 1920 and 1962. It focuses on the constitution of discourses that defined the medical and philanthropic care for the children of people isolated in leper colonies as a problem, and how this process resulted in the organization of the Society for the Welfare of Lepers and Defense Against Leprosy, and the construction of Afrânio de Azevedo children's home in Goiânia, the state capital. These elements are directly associated with the construction of a new approach in the regional history and social and medical policies for leprosy.

  10. [Philanthropy and welfare policies for the families of people with leprosy in the Brazilian state of Goiás, 1920-1962].

    PubMed

    Silva, Leicy Francisca da

    2016-01-26

    This article analyzes the root causes of the shortage of social support for the relatives of people with leprosy, especially their children, in the state of Goiás, Central West region of Brazil, between 1920 and 1962. It focuses on the constitution of discourses that defined the medical and philanthropic care for the children of people isolated in leper colonies as a problem, and how this process resulted in the organization of the Society for the Welfare of Lepers and Defense Against Leprosy, and the construction of Afrânio de Azevedo children's home in Goiânia, the state capital. These elements are directly associated with the construction of a new approach in the regional history and social and medical policies for leprosy.

  11. Epidemiology of leprosy on five isolated islands in the Flores Sea, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Mirjam I; Hatta, Mochammad; Kwenang, Agnes; Klatser, Paul R; Oskam, Linda

    2002-09-01

    We conducted a population-based survey on five small islands in South Sulawesi Province (Indonesia) to collect baseline data previous to a chemoprophylactic intervention study aiming at interrupting the transmission of Mycobacterium leprae. Here we describe the present leprosy epidemiology on these geographically isolated islands. Of the 4774 inhabitants living in the study area 4140 were screened for leprosy (coverage: 87%). We identified 96 leprosy patients (85 new and 11 old patients), representing a new case detection rate (CDR) of 205/10 000 and a prevalence rate of 195/10 000. CDRs were similar for males and females. Male patients were more often classified as multibacillary (MB) than women. Of the new patients, 33 (39%) were classified as MB, 16 (19%) as paucibacillary (PB) 2-5 lesions and 36 (42%) as PB single lesion. In this area of high leprosy endemicity leprosy patients were extensively clustered, i.e. not equally distributed among the islands and within the islands among the houses.

  12. Impact of a Reference Center on Leprosy Control under a Decentralized Public Health Care Policy in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Raquel Rodrigues; Sales, Anna Maria; Hacker, Mariana Andrea; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Duppre, Nádia Cristina; Machado, Alice de Miranda; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes

    2016-01-01

    Reorientation of the public health policies in Brazil over the last 20 years in association with a stable rate of new-case detection prompted the establishment of a decentralized leprosy control strategy. The aim was to move from a vertical model associated with general dermatological services to one in which the diagnosis and treatment of the disease would be integrated into the primary care level of the national health care facilities. Once patients demand for leprosy reference centers began to be affected by the process of integrating leprosy diagnosis into the basic health care services, it was necessary to determine the profile of all our referrals in light of the new decentralization policy. Objective We evaluated the profile of patients referred to the Fiocruz Outpatient Clinic, a reference center for the diagnosis and treatment of leprosy in Rio de Janeiro, RJ, and analyzed the origins and outcomes of these referrals. Methods This is an observational retrospective study based on information collected from the Leprosy Laboratory database at Fiocruz, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil. A total of 1,845 suspected leprosy cases examined at the reference center between 2010 and 2014 were included. The originating health service referrals and diagnostic outcomes were analyzed as well as the clinical and epidemiological data of patients diagnosed with leprosy. Result Our data show that the profile of the patients treated at the Clinic has changed in recent years. There was an increase in both the proportion of patients with other skin diseases and those who had visited only one health service prior to our Clinic. Among the total 1,845 cases analyzed, the outcomes of 1,380 were linked to other diseases and, in 74% of these cases, a biopsy was not necessary to reach a diagnostic conclusion. A decrease in new leprosy case detection among our patients was also observed. Yet, among the leprosy patients, 40% had some degree of disability at diagnosis. Conclusion The results of

  13. Drug resistance patterns in Mycobacterium leprae isolates from relapsed leprosy patients attending The Leprosy Mission (TLM) Hospitals in India.

    PubMed

    Lavania, Mallika; Jadhav, Rupendra S; Chaitanya, Vedithi Sundeep; Turankar, Ravindra; Selvasekhar, Abraham; Das, Loretta; Darlong, Famkima; Hambroom, Ujjwal K; Kumar, Sandip; Sengupta, Utpal

    2014-09-01

    Implementation of multidrug therapy (MDT) in leprosy control programmes has significantly reduced the global prevalence of the disease in the last two decades. After many years of use of MDT, it is expected that drug resistance in Mycobacterium leprae may emerge. This is a major concern, especially during the stage of elimination. In the present study, slit-skin smears were collected from 140 leprosy relapse cases from different Leprosy Mission hospitals across India. DNA extracted from 111 (79%) of these samples was analysed for the genes associated with drug resistance in M. leprae. More than 90% of the patients relapsed as multibacillary (MB) cases. In our study, four (3.6%) of the DNA samples analysed showed mutations associated with rifampicin resistance. We also observed that mutations associated with resistance to dapsone and ofloxacin were observed in 9 (8.1%) of the DNA samples each; two samples had both dapsone and ofloxacin resistance. Further surveillance and appropriate interventions are needed to ensure the continued success of chemotherapy for leprosy.

  14. An isolated case of leprosy presenting in a migrant worker in Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Stafford, S J; Wilson, R R

    2006-09-01

    Leprosy was first recorded in 600 bc in India. Europe saw its first cases in the fourteenth century. The worldwide incidence is falling, but the disease can still present in the most unexpected places: this is a report of the first case of leprosy presenting to an emergency department in Northern Ireland. It is important for physicians in both community and hospital medicine to have a high index of suspicion for leprosy in patients with chronic skin conditions who were born outside the UK or other developed countries.

  15. New Insights into the Geographic Distribution of Mycobacterium leprae SNP Genotypes Determined for Isolates from Leprosy Cases Diagnosed in Metropolitan France and French Territories.

    PubMed

    Reibel, Florence; Chauffour, Aurélie; Brossier, Florence; Jarlier, Vincent; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Aubry, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Between 20 and 30 bacteriologically confirmed cases of leprosy are diagnosed each year at the French National Reference Center for mycobacteria. Patients are mainly immigrants from various endemic countries or living in French overseas territories. We aimed at expanding data regarding the geographical distribution of the SNP genotypes of the M. leprae isolates from these patients. Skin biopsies were obtained from 71 leprosy patients diagnosed between January 2009 and December 2013. Data regarding age, sex and place of birth and residence were also collected. Diagnosis of leprosy was confirmed by microscopic detection of acid-fast bacilli and/or amplification by PCR of the M. leprae-specific RLEP region. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP), present in the M. leprae genome at positions 14 676, 1 642 875 and 2 935 685, were determined with an efficiency of 94% (67/71). Almost all patients were from countries other than France where leprosy is still prevalent (n = 31) or from French overseas territories (n = 36) where leprosy is not totally eradicated, while only a minority (n = 4) was born in metropolitan France but have lived in other countries. SNP type 1 was predominant (n = 33), followed by type 3 (n = 17), type 4 (n = 11) and type 2 (n = 6). SNP types were concordant with those previously reported as prevalent in the patients' countries of birth. SNP types found in patients born in countries other than France (Comoros, Haiti, Benin, Congo, Sri Lanka) and French overseas territories (French Polynesia, Mayotte and La Réunion) not covered by previous work correlated well with geographical location and history of human settlements. The phylogenic analysis of M. leprae strains isolated in France strongly suggests that French leprosy cases are caused by SNP types that are (a) concordant with the geographic origin or residence of the patients (non-French countries, French overseas territories, metropolitan France) or (b) more likely random in regions where diverse

  16. [The leprosy "drama": Governador Valadares, public health policies, and their territorial implications in the 1980s].

    PubMed

    Genovez, Patrícia Falco; Pereira, Flávia Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of leprosy in Governador Valadares, Brazil, in the 1980s spurred this town to pioneer the introduction of polychemotherapy. The aim of this research was to understand how the different actors involved in this context interacted, especially the employees and patients at the Special Public Health Service. To identify the territories that these interactions inevitably constituted, a variety of theoretical instruments were used, including dramatism (Burke) and performance (Turner). By taking a theatrical metaphor, we sought to find out the dynamics by which the different actors took the stage and established their most significant relationships in a dynamic process of constituted and reconstituted territories.

  17. Leprosy in six isolated residents of northern Louisiana. Time-clustered cases in an essentially nonendemic area.

    PubMed

    West, B C; Todd, J R; Lary, C H; Blake, L A; Fowler, M E; King, J W

    1988-09-01

    Northern Louisiana has been essentially free of indigenous leprosy, and now it is not. Six new cases of leprosy have been diagnosed: three in 1986, the other three in 1985, 1983, and 1982, respectively. The patients had been lifelong residents of six scattered rural parishes. Leprosy had never been reported from five of them. No patient had had contact with human leprosy. The patients were white; four were women; the mean +/- SD age at onset was 60.3 +/- 16.4 years (age range, 31 to 80 years); and the mean +/- SD interval to diagnosis was 1.2 +/- 1.4 years. One patient had Hodgkin's disease at the age of 25 years and leprosy at the age of 31 years; another patient had cervical carcinoma. All rural northern Louisiana residents coexist with armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus), some of which are infected with Mycobacterium leprae, the significance of which is unknown. Hypothetically, exposure to an unknown human case, reactivation of "asymptomatic" leprosy through immunosenescence or immunosuppression, or infection from an environmental source might have occurred. Because the patients lacked contact, travel, residence, and exposure risk factors, the origin of leprosy in the new indigenous cases is noteworthy and is not understood.

  18. [Coping with leprosy in the Dutch West Indies in the 19th century; opposing but meaningful views from Suriname].

    PubMed

    Menke, Henk; Snelders, Stephen; Pieters, Toine

    2009-01-01

    Leprosy was highly prevalent among African slaves in the Dutch West Indian colony of Suriname. Largely based on observations in Suriname, Dutch physicians described the aetiology of leprosy in terms of'a substrate' to which all sorts of mixtures of infection, heredity and hygiene contributed ('seed and soil'). This explanatory model with multiple options for prevention and treatment left room for different developmental trajectories to control the spread of the disease in the various tropical colonies of the Dutch empire. In Suriname there was a growing worry in the 19th century regarding the spread of leprosy, threatening the health of slaves, settlers and colonial administrators. And this could be harmful to an already weakening plantation economy. This concern prompted the local administration to develop a rigorous policy of strict isolation of leprosy sufferers. This, in turn, intersected with a changing insight in Europe - including the Netherlands - that leprosy was non-contagious. However,'in splendid isolation' in the economically and politically marginal colony Suriname, Dutch physicians like Charles Landre and his son, Charles Louis Drognat Landré, could afford to ignore the European non-contagious approach and continue to support the strict isolation policies. Moreover, they developed a dissident radical explanation of leprosy as a disease caused only by contagion. In the absence of a receptive Dutch audience Drognat Landré published his contagion theory in French and so succeeded in inspiring the Norwegian Hansen, who subsequently discovered the culpable micro-organism. At the same time colonial administrators and physicians in the economically and politically important Dutch colonies in the East Indies adhered to the prevailing European concept and changed policies: the system of isolation was abolished. Given the rather different trajectories of leprosy health policies in the Dutch East and West Indies we point out the importance of a comparative

  19. Drug and Multidrug Resistance among Mycobacterium leprae Isolates from Brazilian Relapsed Leprosy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Adalgiza da Silva; Cunha, Maria das Graças; Diniz, Lucia Martins; Salgado, Claudio; Aires, Maria Araci P.; Nery, José Augusto; Gallo, Eugênia Novisck; Miranda, Alice; Magnanini, Monica M. F.; Matsuoka, Masanori; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Suffys, Philip Noel

    2012-01-01

    Skin biopsy samples from 145 relapse leprosy cases and from five different regions in Brazil were submitted for sequence analysis of part of the genes associated with Mycobacterium leprae drug resistance. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in these genes were observed in M. leprae from 4 out of 92 cases with positive amplification (4.3%) and included a case with a mutation in rpoB only, another sample with SNPs in both folP1 and rpoB, and two cases showing mutations in folP1, rpoB, and gyrA, suggesting the existence of multidrug resistance (MDR). The nature of the mutations was as reported in earlier studies, being CCC to CGC in codon 55 in folP (Pro to Arg), while in the case of rpoB, all mutations occurred at codon 531, with two being a transition of TCG to ATG (Ser to Met), one TCG to TTC (Ser to Phe), and one TCG to TTG (Ser to Leu). The two cases with mutations in gyrA changed from GCA to GTA (Ala to Val) in codon 91. The median time from cure to relapse diagnosis was 9.45 years but was significantly shorter in patients with mutations (3.26 years; P = 0.0038). More than 70% of the relapses were multibacillary, including three of the mutation-carrying cases; one MDR relapse patient was paucibacillary. PMID:22495562

  20. Impact of a Reference Center on Leprosy Control under a Decentralized Public Health Care Policy in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Raquel Rodrigues; Sales, Anna Maria; Hacker, Mariana Andrea; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Duppre, Nádia Cristina; Machado, Alice de Miranda; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes

    2016-10-01

    We evaluated the profile of patients referred to the Fiocruz Outpatient Clinic, a reference center for the diagnosis and treatment of leprosy in Rio de Janeiro, RJ, and analyzed the origins and outcomes of these referrals. This is an observational retrospective study based on information collected from the Leprosy Laboratory database at Fiocruz, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil. A total of 1,845 suspected leprosy cases examined at the reference center between 2010 and 2014 were included. The originating health service referrals and diagnostic outcomes were analyzed as well as the clinical and epidemiological data of patients diagnosed with leprosy. Our data show that the profile of the patients treated at the Clinic has changed in recent years. There was an increase in both the proportion of patients with other skin diseases and those who had visited only one health service prior to our Clinic. Among the total 1,845 cases analyzed, the outcomes of 1,380 were linked to other diseases and, in 74% of these cases, a biopsy was not necessary to reach a diagnostic conclusion. A decrease in new leprosy case detection among our patients was also observed. Yet, among the leprosy patients, 40% had some degree of disability at diagnosis. The results of the present study demonstrated the importance of referral centers in support of basic health services within the decentralization strategy. But, the success of the program depends on the advent of new developmental tools to augment diagnostic accuracy for leprosy. However, it should be emphasized that for new diagnostic methods to be developed, a greater commitment on the part of the health care system regarding research is urgently needed.

  1. Mathematical modelling of leprosy and its control.

    PubMed

    Blok, David J; de Vlas, Sake J; Fischer, Egil A J; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2015-03-01

    Leprosy or Hansen's disease is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium leprae. The annual number of new leprosy cases registered worldwide has remained stable over the past years at over 200,000. Early case finding and multidrug therapy have not been able interrupt transmission completely. Elimination requires innovation in control and sustained commitment. Mathematical models can be used to predict the course of leprosy incidence and the effect of intervention strategies. Two compartmental models and one individual-based model have been described in the literature. Both compartmental models investigate the course of leprosy in populations and the long-term impact of control strategies. The individual-based model focusses on transmission within households and the impact of case finding among contacts of new leprosy patients. Major improvement of these models should result from a better understanding of individual differences in exposure to infection and developing leprosy after exposure. Most relevant are contact heterogeneity, heterogeneity in susceptibility and spatial heterogeneity. Furthermore, the existing models have only been applied to a limited number of countries. Parameterization of the models for other areas, in particular those with high incidence, is essential to support current initiatives for the global elimination of leprosy. Many challenges remain in understanding and dealing with leprosy. The support of mathematical models for understanding leprosy epidemiology and supporting policy decision making remains vital.

  2. Type 2 leprosy reaction with Sweet's syndrome-like presentation*

    PubMed Central

    Chiaratti, Francielle Chiavelli; Daxbacher, Egon Luiz Rodrigues; Neumann, Antonielle Borges Faria; Jeunon, Thiago

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic disease characterized by manifestations in the peripheral nerves and skin. The course of the disease may be interrupted by acute phenomena called reactions. This article reports a peculiar case of type 2 leprosy reaction with Sweet's syndrome-like features as the first clinical manifestation of leprosy, resulting in a delay in the diagnosis due to unusual clinical presentation. The patient had clinical and histopathological features reminiscent of Sweet's syndrome associated with clusters of vacuolated histiocytes containing acid-fast bacilli isolated or forming globi. Herein, it is discussed how to recognize type 2 leprosy reaction with Sweet's syndrome features, the differential diagnosis with type 1 leprosy reaction and the treatment options. When this kind of reaction is the first clinical presentation of leprosy, the correct diagnosis might be not suspected clinically, and established only with histopathologic evaluation. PMID:27438203

  3. [The discovery of the leprosy bacillus].

    PubMed

    Irgens, Lorentz M

    2002-03-10

    Gerhard Henrik Armauer Hansen (1841-1912) worked on leprosy throughout his career. Following his discovery of the leprosy bacillus in 1873, he proposed legislation that, when enacted in 1877 and 1885, established preventive measures aimed at isolating infectious patients. Around 1920, leprosy was more or less eradicated in Norway after a period of decline starting in 1850. Over this period, more than 8,000 cases were registered. Armauer Hansen's unique research achievement was based on a scientific and medical infrastructure in place long before he started his work. This context had several implications, though the discovery of the leprosy bacillus holds a particular fascination, with bearings on the interaction between medicine and the community even today.

  4. SNP genotypes of Mycobacterium leprae isolates in Thailand and their combination with rpoT and TTC genotyping for analysis of leprosy distribution and transmission.

    PubMed

    Phetsuksiri, Benjawan; Srisungngam, Sopa; Rudeeaneksin, Janisara; Bunchoo, Supranee; Lukebua, Atchariya; Wongtrungkapun, Ruch; Paitoon, Soontara; Sakamuri, Rama Murthy; Brennan, Patrick J; Vissa, Varalakshmi

    2012-01-01

    Based on the discovery of three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Mycobacterium leprae, it has been previously reported that there are four major SNP types associated with different geographic regions around the world. Another typing system for global differentiation of M. leprae is the analysis of the variable number of short tandem repeats within the rpoT gene. To expand the analysis of geographic distribution of M. leprae, classified by SNP and rpoT gene polymorphisms, we studied 85 clinical isolates from Thai patients and compared the findings with those reported from Asian isolates. SNP genotyping by PCR amplification and sequencing revealed that all strains like those in Myanmar were SNP type 1 and 3, with the former being predominant, while in Japan, Korea, and Indonesia, the SNP type 3 was found to be more frequent. The pattern of M. leprae distribution in Thailand and Myanmar is quite similar, except that SNP type 2 was not found in Thailand. In addition, the 3-copy hexamer genotype in the rpoT gene is shared among the isolates from these two neighboring countries. On the basis of these two markers, we postulate that M. leprae in leprosy patients from Myanmar and Thailand has a common historical origin. Further differentiation among Thai isolates was possible by assessing copy numbers of the TTC sequence, a more polymorphic microsatellite locus.

  5. Introducing operations research into management and policy practices of a non-governmental organization (NGO): a partnership between an Indian leprosy NGO and an international academic institution.

    PubMed

    Porter, J D H; Ogden, J A; Rao, P V Ranganadha; Rao, V Prabhakar; Rajesh, D; Buskade, R A; Soutar, D

    2004-03-01

    This paper reports on a partnership between LEPRA, a non-governmental organization (NGO), and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) to explore the feasibility and appropriateness of incorporating operations research into the management and decision-making of a leprosy NGO. A pilot study in Orissa was used to determine the advantages and disadvantages of introducing operations research to assist in decision-making and programme implementation within the organization. The results highlight the difficulty and complexity of the process, but point to several important themes: partnership, changing perspectives, use of time and priority-setting, identification of gaps in systems, and building institutional and personal capabilities. The results of the study provide support to encourage NGOs to become actively involved in research. Because of their work and service to local communities, NGOs have the opportunity to collect information about the perceptions, resources and constraints of individuals, families and the communities themselves in accessing appropriate care. Their proximity to communities gives them a feeling of responsibility for ensuring that this information is translated to the district, national and ultimately international level. This will help to ensure the creation of appropriate infectious disease control policies that support the needs of patients. 'Outside' academic institutions can help NGOs to facilitate this up-stream flow of information from the local to the national and international level, to help to ensure that international disease control policies are appropriately serving local communities.

  6. Leprosy in the Bible.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Nita, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    For many years, the biblical term tzaraat has referred to leprosy. In fact, the disease or diseases described under this name have no relationship to leprosy, as it was known in the Middle Ages or today; moreover, the term referred not only to skin disease, but also to the state of the ritual impurity and punishment for the sins. Although the real nature of tzaraat remains unknown, the differential diagnosis might include the following: Psoriasis, seborrheic dermatitis, favus, dermatophyte infections, nummular dermatitis, atopic dermatitis, pityriasis rosea, crusted scabies, syphilis, impetigo, sycosis barbae, alopecia areata, furuncles, scabies, neurodermatitis, scarlet fever, lupus erythematosus, lichen sclerosus et atrophicus, folliculitis decalvans, morphea, sarcoidosis, and lichen planopilaris. Leprosy became interchangeable with the biblical leprosy due to two inaccurate translations: The Hebrew tzaraat was first translated into Greek as leprosy in the sixth century, and later, the word leprosy was translated into Arabic as lepra in the ninth century.

  7. Endocrine dysfunction in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Leal, A M O; Foss, N T

    2009-01-01

    Leprosy is still an endemic disease, especially in Third World countries, and, because of migration, it still persists in Europe and the United States. The disease affects the peripheral nerves, skin, and multiple internal organs, making its clinical recognition difficult. In particular, the endocrine manifestations caused by leprosy have been underestimated, even by specialists. The endocrine changes present in leprosy include hypogonadism, sterility, and osteoporosis. In addition, the spectral immune nature of leprosy offers an attractive model to investigate the pathogenetic correlation between the patterns of inflammation in the poles of its spectrum and the hormonal disarrangements observed in this disease. It is important that those involved in leprosy management be aware of the potential endocrine changes and their treatment to address the disease in all of its aspects. In this article, we review the findings on endocrine dysfunction in leprosy, including a survey of the literature and of our own work.

  8. Leprosy: a glossary.

    PubMed

    Virmond, Marcos; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Virmond, Luiza

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy continues to afflict residents from a number of countries in Africa, South America, and southeast Asia, despite the marked reduction in the number of cases of leprosy worldwide, after the introduction of the multidrug regimens as recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO-MDT). With the increasing immigration of individuals from risk areas to Europe and the United States, knowledge of the basic concepts of leprosy would be helpful to clinicians caring for immigrants in nonendemic areas. We present a comprehensive, updated, and critical glossary of the most relevant terms related to leprosy. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Multiple nerve abscesses on cutaneous radial nerve--a case of pure neural leprosy.

    PubMed

    Ankad, B S; Jawalgi, A; Dombale, V D; Telkar, S

    2013-01-01

    Leprosy is a unique infectious disease due to varied spectrum of clinical signs it exhibits. Pure neural leprosy (PNL) is an unusual form of leprosy and accounts for 4-8% of all leprosy cases. It can manifest as a simple tingling sensation to complex and tragic motor paralysis. Here we report a case of PNL involving isolated cutaneous radial nerve as multiple abscesses along the course of the nerve. To the best of our knowledge, this is rarest presentation of pure neural leprosy.

  10. Neuropathic pain in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Raicher, Irina; Stump, Patrick Raymond Nicolas Andre Ghislain; Baccarelli, Rosemari; Marciano, Lucia H S C; Ura, Somei; Virmond, Marcos C L; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Ciampi de Andrade, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Nerve impairment is a key clinical aspect of leprosy and may present the distribution of mononeuropathy or multiple nerve trunks, small cutaneous nerve fibers, and free nerve endings. The clinical range of leprosy is determined by individual cell-mediated immune response to infection that also may play a role in different types of pain syndromes in leprosy. Previous studies reported a high prevalence of neuropathic pain in leprosy. In an Ethiopian study with 48 patients, pure nociceptive pain was experienced by 43% of patients and pure neuropathic pain (NeP) by 11% of patients. In an Indian study, 21.8% of leprosy patients had pain with neuropathic characteristics. These rates underlie the need to develop tools for the early diagnosis and detection of infection and its complications, such as nerve damage and pain. In a larger sample with leprosy-associated NeP (n = 90), we have applied the Douleur Neuropathique en 4 questions (DN4) and found sensitivity = 97.1% and specificity = 57.9%. The high sensitivity of this tool in leprosy patients suggests that it could be a valuable tool to screen for neuropathic pain in this population and could be used as part of health care programs aimed at detecting, treating, and rehabilitating leprosy in endemic areas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Citrus leprosis research update

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Citrus leprosis is one of the oldest citrus diseases, but is also one of the most important emerging citrus diseases in South and Central America, and it is apparently spreading northward towards the U.S. Research in our labs and by others has shown that citrus leprosis disease is caused by a compl...

  12. Leprosy on the scalp*

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Raila de Brito; Santos, Tárcio; Ramos, Paulyane Bezerra Sampaio; Takano, Daniela Mayumi; Leal, Virgínia Sampaio Madeiro

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. This bacillus has a high predilection for skin and peripheral nerves. The scalp’s anatomical properties do not favor the development of such mycobacterium. We report a case of leprosy with scalp involvement, a rare occurrence in our literature. PMID:28300899

  13. [Leprosy in a chimpanzee].

    PubMed

    Ishii, Norihisa; Udono, Toshifumi; Fujisawa, Michiko; Idani, Genichi; Tanigawa, Kazunari; Miyamura, Tatsuo; Suzuki, Koichi

    2011-02-01

    Leprosy is suspected to develop after a long period of latency following infection with Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae) during infancy, but definitive proof has been lacking. We found a rare case of leprosy in a chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) born in West Africa (Sierra Leone) and brought to Japan around 2 years of age. At 31, the ape started exhibiting pathognomic signs of leprosy. Pathological diagnosis, skin smear, serum anti-phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I) antibody, and by PCR analysis demonstrated lepromatous leprosy. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis verified the West African origin of the bacilli. This occurrence suggests the possibility of leprosy being endemic among wild chimpanzees in West Africa, potentially posing a zoonotic risk.

  14. Case study--leprosy.

    PubMed

    Wood, A M; Wood, C M; Bakker-Dyos, J

    2010-01-01

    We present the case of a 26 year old Indian base worker who attended the Role 2 enhanced hospital in Iraq with a case of leprosy. The patient presented four times over a 12 month period with non-specific pain in the right hand and forearm combined with a large lesion of dry skin and reduced sensation in the forearm. A clinical diagnosis of leprosy was made, which was subsequently confirmed as paucibacillary leprosy by skin smears sent to the UK. It was not possible to treat the patient locally and a recommendation made to the patient's employer that the patient return to India to commence treatment.

  15. Genetics and human rights. Two histories: Restoring genetic identity after forced disappearance and identity suppression in Argentina and after compulsory isolation for leprosy in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Penchaszadeh, Victor B; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia

    2014-03-01

    Over the past three decades, there has been an accelerated development of genetic technology, leading to its use in human genetic identification for many purposes. Additionally, it has been made explicit that identity is a fundamental human right. A number of historical circumstances have connected these developments. Personal identity is increasingly associated with the preservation and defense of human rights and is a tool to repair the violation of these rights, particularly the right to identity. In this article, we report the use of genetics to support the right to identity in two historical circumstances. First, we report the search, localization, DNA testing and genetic identification of 110 individuals who were appropriated as babies by the Argentine military dictatorship of 1976-1983 in the context of savage repression and egregious violations of human rights, including forced disappearance and suppression of identity. Second, we report on the repair of right-to-identity violations of hundreds of individuals that occurred during the process of compulsory isolation of patients with leprosy in Brazil through the Program "Reencontro", which has led to the genetic identification of 158 pairs of individuals who previously did not have proof that they were siblings. The high value placed on genetic identification by victims of identity suppression did not counter the prevailing view that genetic factors were not more important than other factors (social, emotional, educational, cultural, spiritual) in determining the complex phenomenon of personal identity. The use of genetic identification as a tool to redress and repair human rights violations is a novel application of human genetics for the benefit of mankind.

  16. Genetics and human rights. Two histories: Restoring genetic identity after forced disappearance and identity suppression in Argentina and after compulsory isolation for leprosy in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Penchaszadeh, Victor B.; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia

    2014-01-01

    Over the past three decades, there has been an accelerated development of genetic technology, leading to its use in human genetic identification for many purposes. Additionally, it has been made explicit that identity is a fundamental human right. A number of historical circumstances have connected these developments. Personal identity is increasingly associated with the preservation and defense of human rights and is a tool to repair the violation of these rights, particularly the right to identity. In this article, we report the use of genetics to support the right to identity in two historical circumstances. First, we report the search, localization, DNA testing and genetic identification of 110 individuals who were appropriated as babies by the Argentine military dictatorship of 1976–1983 in the context of savage repression and egregious violations of human rights, including forced disappearance and suppression of identity. Second, we report on the repair of right-to-identity violations of hundreds of individuals that occurred during the process of compulsory isolation of patients with leprosy in Brazil through the Program “Reencontro”, which has led to the genetic identification of 158 pairs of individuals who previously did not have proof that they were siblings. The high value placed on genetic identification by victims of identity suppression did not counter the prevailing view that genetic factors were not more important than other factors (social, emotional, educational, cultural, spiritual) in determining the complex phenomenon of personal identity. The use of genetic identification as a tool to redress and repair human rights violations is a novel application of human genetics for the benefit of mankind. PMID:24764764

  17. Hypercalcemia in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Ryzen, E; Singer, F R

    1985-07-01

    We report a case of hypercalcemia in a patient with leprosy. Aminoterminal parathyroid hormone and 25-hydroxy-cholecalciferol concentrations were suppressed. Urinary hydroxyproline concentrations were elevated. There was no evidence of malignancy. The hypercalcemia resolved with corticosteroid therapy.

  18. Pride and prejudice--identity and stigma in leprosy work.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kristine

    2011-06-01

    This article sets out to expand the way stigma, and those affected by it, are understood within leprosy discourse and to apply these insights to the analysis of the experiences of leprosy workers. The term stigma is often used simply as shorthand for 'negative social experience'. However, to reduce the negative aspects of complex everyday life experiences to a single word is often overly simplistic and can serve to objectify, rather than illuminate, the experiences of those affected. This article argues that in order to understand the lived experience of stigma we must come to understand stigma as an ongoing, dialectical social process and develop an approach to stigma that analytically separates stigma from its negative social consequences. The article applies these insights to data collected during 14 months of fieldwork with front-line leprosy workers in India, which suggests that falling leprosy prevalence rates and a rapidly changing policy landscape have led to leprosy workers feeling marginalised and stigmatised within their own organisation. The article argues that, rather than seeing stigma merely as a negative process in which leprosy workers are passive victims, we must recognise that stigma also plays a key role in the creation and maintenance of leprosy workers' identity and is utilised as a strategic tool in the struggle for influence between different groups within the organisation. Finally, the article argues for the benefit of expanding our understanding of stigma across public health and of applying these insights to designing future interventions.

  19. Leprosy: Social implications from antiquity to the present.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Sak, Jarosław; Pawlikowski, Jakub; Nita, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    One of the most important dermatologic diseases from the sociologic viewpoint has been leprosy. Those with leprosy were isolated, excluded from society, and stigmatized. Such a stigma indicates the strong feeling that a leprosy patient is shameful and should not be accepted by society. During the first millennium, leprosy was rapidly inscribed in the system of religious prohibitions-the disease was a punishment by God for wrongdoing, and the disease was associated with the lower spheres of the society. Social perception of leprosy gradually changed during the time of Crusades. The care for lepers became a Christian obligation, and celebrating Holy Masses as for the dead was forsaken. The sick were forced to stay at leprosaria, particularly from the 14th through the 19th centuries when fear of leprosy was at a high point. Admission to a leprosarium was mandatory not only for patients with leprosy but also even those suspected of having the disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Leprosy control in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Dewapura, D R

    1994-01-01

    Even though health workers have treated all registered cases of leprosy in Sri Lanka with multiple drug therapy since 1982, it continues to be transmitted. The government has launched a social marketing and social mobilization campaign to reduce the incidence of leprosy. It has expanded the network of leprosy services. A national advertising program included mass media ads, posters, stickers on buses, and radio and television serials to create awareness of the early signs of leprosy and to reduce fear to leprosy. Health workers distributed leaflets and booklets to the general public and to new patients. The Anti-Leprosy Campaign of Sri Lanka organized 1-week health education programs for administrative officer, village leaders, religious leaders, teachers, and voluntary workers. Skin camps were set up to detect leprosy cases and to treat minor skin disorders. Teachers received flip charts on leprosy to help them teach colleagues and children about leprosy. All primary level staff, medical officers in hospital staff, and estate medical and paramedical staff have undergone special training on diagnosing leprosy and on reducing their fear of it. Almost every district has at least 1 leprosy control specialist. 2 leprosy control specialists work in those districts where leprosy is endemic Each district has a trained medical laboratory technician, who stains and interprets leprosy smears. In 1992, school, contact, and mass surveys have found 31, 149, and 225 new cases, respectively. Active case findings methods found 16.5% of new cases. 50% of new cases are self- reported, compared to less than 10% in 1989, suggesting increased awareness of early signs of leprosy and a reduced fear of it. 25 more clinics opened in 1991 to meet the demand for leprosy services.

  1. The first international leprosy conference, Berlin, 1897: the politics of segregation.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Shubhada S

    2003-01-01

    The present paper examines the first attempts to internationalize the problem of leprosy, a subject hitherto overlooked by historians of imperialism and disease. The last decade of the nineteenth century saw many in the 'civilized countries' of the imperialist West gripped by a paranoia about an invasion of leprosy via germ-laden immigrants and returning expatriates who had acquired the infection in leprosy-endemic colonial possessions. Such alarmists clamoured for the adoption of vigorous leper segregation policies in such colonies. But the contagiousness of leprosy did not go unquestioned by other westerners. The convocation in Berlin of the first international meeting on leprosy revealed the interplay of differing and sometimes incompatible views about the containment of leprosy by segregation. The roles of officials from several countries, as well as the roles of five protagonists (Albert Ashmead, Jules Goldschmidt, Edvard Ehlers, Armauer Hansen, and Phineas Abraham) in the shaping of the Berlin Conference are here examined.

  2. The first international leprosy conference, Berlin, 1897: the politics of segregation.

    PubMed

    Pandya, S S

    2004-01-01

    The present paper examines the first attempts to internationalise the problem of leprosy, a subject hitherto overlooked by historians of imperialism and disease. The last decade of the nineteenth century saw many in the civilised countries of the imperialist West gripped by a paranoia about an invasion of leprosy via germ-laden immigrants and returning expatriates who had acquired the infection in leprosy endemic colonial possessions. Such alarmists clamoured for the adoption of vigorous leper segregation policies in such colonies. But the contagiousness of leprosy did not go unquestioned by other westerners. The convocation in Berlin of the first international meeting on leprosy revealed the interplay of differing and sometimes incompatible views about the containment of leprosy by segregation. The roles of officials from several countries, as well as the roles of five protagonists (Albert Ashmead, Jules Goldschmidt, Edvard Ehlers. Armauer Hansen, and Phineas Abraham) in the shaping of the Berlin Conference are here examined.

  3. Imported leprosy in Italy.

    PubMed

    Massone, C; Brunasso, A M G; Noto, S; Campbell, T M; Clapasson, A; Nunzi, E

    2012-08-01

    Leprosy is far from being eliminated with more than 200,000 new cases detected (NCD)/year. Retrospective analysis between 2003 and 2009 to compare the New Case Detected Rate (NCDR) observed in Italy in the immigrant population with the NCDR of the same population in their country of origin to verify if the cases observed are those expected or not. Leprosy statistics were retrieved from the Italian leprosy register and from official WHO data. The NCD in Italy were lower than expected, from 2003 when the expected number of NCD was 40.5 between the legally resident immigrants, but only one case was diagnosed (98% of lower from the expected), to 2009 when four NCD were diagnosed and 41 were expected (90% lower from expected). This study points out a discrepancy between the observed and the expected cases of leprosy in Italy. Specifically, the number of NCD was less than expected for each studied year. Of course our data do not represent a validation, but only an indication of the leprosy diagnosis in Italy. Difficulty in accessing the health systems, fear of segregation, ignorance and illegal immigrant status with consequent fear of police arrest are possible explaining factors. The critical issue anyhow is the medical expertise. The role of the dermatologist is fundamental. For these reasons, there is still a need for wide spread leprosy teaching programmes. Although with few limitations, this study represents a first approach to validate the accuracy in leprosy diagnosis in Italy. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2011 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  4. Assessing nerves in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Garbino, José Antonio; Heise, Carlos Otto; Marques, Wilson

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy neuropathy is dependent on the patient's immune response and expresses itself as a focal or multifocal neuropathy with asymmetric involvement. Leprosy neuropathy evolves chronically but recurrently develops periods of exacerbation during type 1 or type 2 reactions, leading to acute neuropathy. Nerve enlargement leading to entrapment syndromes is also a common manifestation. Pain may be either of inflammatory or neuropathic origin. A thorough and detailed evaluation is mandatory for adequate patient follow-up, including nerve palpation, pain assessment, graded sensory mapping, muscle power testing, and autonomic evaluation. Nerve conduction studies are a sensitive tool for nerve dysfunction, including new lesions during reaction periods or development of entrapment syndromes. Nerve ultrasonography is also a very promising method for nerve evaluation in leprosy. The authors propose a composite nerve clinical score for nerve function assessment that can be useful for longitudinal evaluation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Leprosy in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Hoffner, R J; Esekogwu, V; Mallon, W K

    2000-04-01

    Los Angeles County-University of Southern California Medical Center, like many large urban hospitals, has a large immigrant population from regions of the world where leprosy is endemic. Emergency physicians (EPs) in these settings can expect to encounter leprosy patients. This study reviewed the emergency department (ED) course of patients with confirmed leprosy in an attempt to describe the most common presenting patterns so that future cases can be more easily recognized. This was a retrospective chart review of all patients followed in the Hansen's disease clinic. Demographics, leprosy type, clinical presentations to the ED, and medications were recorded. Of the total number of patients (415), most were of Mexican (52%), Filipino (15%), Vietnamese (14%), and Chinese (5%) origin. Leprosy was classified as lepromatous (56%), borderline (40%), and tuberculoid (4%). There were a total of 118 ED visits by 74 patients. The mean age was 46 years, with 51% male and 49% female. Dermatologic (68%), neurologic (23%), and ophthalmologic (9%) complaints were the most common reasons for ED presentation related to leprosy. The EP did not elicit a history of leprosy in 34% of those patients followed in the leprosy clinic. The ED diagnosis of leprosy was made in 3 of 15 (20%) undiagnosed cases. Of the 63 patients prescribed medications in the leprosy clinic at the time of their ED visits, 22 (35%) ED charts did not report leprosy drugs. Patients with leprosy present to U.S. EDs, and new cases can be identified. Early recognition is important given leprosy's devastating consequences, major drug side effects of medications used for treatment, and improved prognosis with multidrug therapy. A history of leprosy and associated medications are often not documented in the ED chart, which may reflect a continued fear of stigmatization among these patients.

  6. Spatial analysis of leprosy incidence and associated socioeconomic factors.

    PubMed

    Cury, Maria Rita de Cassia Oliveira; Paschoal, Vania Del'Arco; Nardi, Susilene Maria Tonelli; Chierotti, Ana Patrícia; Rodrigues Júnior, Antonio Luiz; Chiaravalloti-Neto, Francisco

    2012-02-01

    To identify clusters of the major occurrences of leprosy and their associated socioeconomic and demographic factors. Cases of leprosy that occurred between 1998 and 2007 in São José do Rio Preto (southeastern Brazil) were geocodified and the incidence rates were calculated by census tract. A socioeconomic classification score was obtained using principal component analysis of socioeconomic variables. Thematic maps to visualize the spatial distribution of the incidence of leprosy with respect to socioeconomic levels and demographic density were constructed using geostatistics. While the incidence rate for the entire city was 10.4 cases per 100,000 inhabitants annually between 1998 and 2007, the incidence rates of individual census tracts were heterogeneous, with values that ranged from 0 to 26.9 cases per 100,000 inhabitants per year. Areas with a high leprosy incidence were associated with lower socioeconomic levels. There were identified clusters of leprosy cases, however there was no association between disease incidence and demographic density. There was a disparity between the places where the majority of ill people lived and the location of healthcare services. The spatial analysis techniques utilized identified the poorer neighborhoods of the city as the areas with the highest risk for the disease. These data show that health departments must prioritize politico-administrative policies to minimize the effects of social inequality and improve the standards of living, hygiene, and education of the population in order to reduce the incidence of leprosy.

  7. Introduction of an isolation policy in paediatric wards.

    PubMed

    Hall, Joanna; Roopnarine, Sharmela; McLean, Jane

    2007-11-01

    Where and how to care for children with infections, or those requiring protection, is a daily debate in many paediatric settings. The practice of placing patients into single rooms for infection control purposes is well documented but there is little guidance on when to remove patients from isolation rooms. Unless the appropriateness of isolation for each patient is evaluated daily, the availability of cubicles falls, resulting in potentially unnecessary transfers to other hospitals where such facilities are available. A new isolation policy was introduced to improve the availability of isolation rooms on paediatric wards in a large inner city teaching hospital with over 100 paediatric inpatient beds. A change management framework was used that included empowering organisational action and consolidating improvements. A number of strategies were introduced to prompt daily review of children in isolation, including clear criteria for isolation and nursing staff in the emergency department challenging the decision to admit a child into an isolation room. Introduction of the policy and subsequent audits have resulted in improved staff awareness, more effective use of isolation rooms and reduced transfers to other hospitals.

  8. Ocular leprosy in Hawaii: the past.

    PubMed

    Brown, D H

    1975-08-01

    Leprosy in Hawaii dates back to about 1840. The first recorded ocular leprosy is from the 1880s. Robert Louis Stevenson and Jack London both wrote descriptions of the ocular signs of leprosy. Pinkerton in 1927 and Van Poole in 1934 reported large series of patients with ocular leprosy. In 1973 there were about 2,168 cases of leprosy in the 50 states. Most ophthalmologists practice in areas where there are leprosy patients.

  9. Nutritional aspects of leprosy.

    PubMed

    Mester de Parajd, L; Garnier, J P

    1984-01-01

    Desoxyfructo-serotonin (DFS) being a naturally occurring metabolite, which, like serotonin, has its origin in tryptophane in the food, one can ask about the role of nutrition in leprosy. The unique situation, that a human metabolite shows antileprosy activity, confirmed in vitro and in vivo, makes it possible to develop a "build in" antileprosy therapy. This is now realised through a so-called "Anti-Leprosy Nutriment" (NAL). The effectiveness of this diet was confirmed by the fact, that a daily dose of 0.5 g NAL per mouse has a similar effect, like 20 mg/kg body weight Dapsone per day in the conventionnal mouse foot-pad test. The biosynthesis of DFS in man has been demonstrated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), spectrofluorometry and mass spectrometry. The activity of NAL (rich in tryptophane, unsaturated fatty acids and glucose) is due to an increased biosynthesis of DSF. The latter may be considered as a "physiological protecting agent" against leprosy. This type of food may play a role in the prevention of leprosy in endemic area.

  10. [Nail involvement in leprosy].

    PubMed

    Belinchón Romero, I; Ramos Rincón, J M; Reyes Rabell, F

    2012-05-01

    Leprosy, a disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, primarily affects the skin and nerves, but the nails are also involved in as many as 3 out of 4 patients .The factors that trigger nail changes in leprosy are numerous and include repeated trauma, neuropathy, vascular impairment, infections, lepra reactions, and the drugs used to manage the disease. The changes most often reported include subungual hematomas, onycholysis, onychauxis, onychogryphosis, pterygium unguis, and onychoheterotopia, most of which can be attributed to nerve damage and trauma. Furthermore, the acro-osteolysis that occurs in the advanced stages of the disease may present with brachyonychia, racquet nails, or even anonychia. Infections of the nail bed leading to paronychia and onychomycosis should also be taken into account in leprosy. Other typical changes include longitudinal striae, pitting, macrolunula, Terry nails, leukonychia, hapalonychia, and Beau lines. In this review, we describe the principal nail changes associated with leprosy. These changes, which are highly varied and diverse in origin, are in fact a reflection of the significant morbidity caused by M. leprae infection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  11. Multidrug Resistant Mycobacterium leprae from Patients with Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Shinji; Matsuoka, Masanori; Nakata, Noboru; Kai, Masanori; Maeda, Yumi; Hashimoto, Ken; Kimura, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Kashiwabara, Yoshiko

    2001-01-01

    Sequences of the folP1, rpoB, and gyrA genes were analyzed for 88 isolates of Mycobacterium leprae from leprosy patients in Japan, Haiti, Indonesia, Pakistan, and the Philippines. Thirteen isolates (14.8%) showed representative mutations in more than two genes, suggesting the emergence of multidrug-resistant M. leprae. PMID:11709358

  12. Genetic, household and spatial clustering of leprosy on an island in Indonesia: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Bakker, Mirjam I; May, Linda; Hatta, Mochammad; Kwenang, Agnes; Klatser, Paul R; Oskam, Linda; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J

    2005-01-01

    Background It is generally accepted that genetic factors play a role in susceptibility to both leprosy per se and leprosy type, but only few studies have tempted to quantify this. Estimating the contribution of genetic factors to clustering of leprosy within families is difficult since these persons often share the same environment. The first aim of this study was to test which correlation structure (genetic, household or spatial) gives the best explanation for the distribution of leprosy patients and seropositive persons and second to quantify the role of genetic factors in the occurrence of leprosy and seropositivity. Methods The three correlation structures were proposed for population data (n = 560), collected on a geographically isolated island highly endemic for leprosy, to explain the distribution of leprosy per se, leprosy type and persons harbouring Mycobacterium leprae-specific antibodies. Heritability estimates and risk ratios for siblings were calculated to quantify the genetic effect. Leprosy was clinically diagnosed and specific anti-M. leprae antibodies were measured using ELISA. Results For leprosy per se in the total population the genetic correlation structure fitted best. In the population with relative stable household status (persons under 21 years and above 39 years) all structures were significant. For multibacillary leprosy (MB) genetic factors seemed more important than for paucibacillary leprosy. Seropositivity could be explained best by the spatial model, but the genetic model was also significant. Heritability was 57% for leprosy per se and 31% for seropositivity. Conclusion Genetic factors seem to play an important role in the clustering of patients with a more advanced form of leprosy, and they could explain more than half of the total phenotypic variance. PMID:16307680

  13. A historical overview of leprosy epidemiology and control activities in Amazonas, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Carolina; Pedrosa, Valderiza Lourenço; Dias, Luiz Carlos; Braga, Andréa; Chrusciak-Talhari, Anette; Santos, Mônica; Penna, Gerson Oliveira; Talhari, Sinésio; Talhari, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy is an ancient infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. According to comparative genomics studies, this disease originated in Eastern Africa or the Near East and spread with successive human migrations. The Europeans and North Africans introduced leprosy into West Africa and the Americas within the past 500 years. In Brazil, this disease arrived with the colonizers who disembarked at the first colonies, Rio de Janeiro, Salvador and Recife, at the end of the sixteenth century, after which it was spread to the other states. In 1854, the first leprosy cases were identified in State of Amazonas in the north of Brazil. The increasing number of leprosy cases and the need for treatment and disease control led to the creation of places to isolate patients, known as leprosaria. One of them, Colonia Antônio Aleixo was built in Amazonas in 1956 according to the most advanced recommendations for isolation at that time and was deactivated in 1979. The history of the Alfredo da Matta Center (AMC), which was the first leprosy dispensary created in 1955, parallels the history of leprosy in the state. Over the years, the AMC has become one of the best training centers for leprosy, general dermatology and sexually transmitted diseases in Brazil. In addition to being responsible for leprosy control programs in the state, the AMC has carried out training programs on leprosy diagnosis and treatment for health professionals in Manaus and other municipalities of the state, aiming to increase the coverage of leprosy control activities. This paper provides a historical overview of leprosy in State of Amazonas, which is an endemic state in Brazil.

  14. On the Age of Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiang Y.; Silva, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infection of the skin and nerves caused by Mycobacterium leprae and the newly discovered Mycobacterium lepromatosis. Human leprosy has been documented for millennia in ancient cultures. Recent genomic studies of worldwide M. leprae strains have further traced it along global human dispersals during the past ∼100,000 years. Because leprosy bacilli are strictly intracellular, we wonder how long humans have been affected by this disease-causing parasite. Based on recently published data on M. leprae genomes, M. lepromatosis discovery, leprosy bacilli evolution, and human evolution, it is most likely that the leprosy bacilli started parasitic evolution in humans or early hominids millions of years ago. This makes leprosy the oldest human-specific infection. The unique adaptive evolution has likely molded the indolent growth and evasion from human immune defense that may explain leprosy pathogenesis. Accordingly, leprosy can be viewed as a natural consequence of a long parasitism. The burden of leprosy may have affected minor selection on human genetic polymorphisms. PMID:24551248

  15. Newer Management Options in Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Rao, P Narasimha; Jain, Suman

    2013-01-01

    Newer management options are needed for leprosy control even at present, as it is predicted that new cases of leprosy will continue to appear for many more years in future. This article detail newer methods of clinical grading of peripheral nerve involvement (thickening, tenderness and nerve pain which are subjective in nature) and the advances made in the use of Ultrasonography and Colour Doppler as an objective imaging tool for nerves in leprosy. It also briefly discusses the newer drugs and alternative regimens as therapeutic management options which hold promise for leprosy in future. PMID:23372204

  16. Perceived social restriction in leprosy-affected inhabitants of a former leprosy colony in northeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lesshafft, Hannah; Heukelbach, Jörg; Barbosa, Jaqueline Caracas; Rieckmann, Nina; Liesenfeld, Oliver; Feldmeier, Hermann

    2010-03-01

    In Brazil, isolation of individuals affected with leprosy was compulsory by law from 1920 to 1962, but in reality, confinement of patients to leprosaria continued until the 1980s. The social participation restriction of people still living in these institutions has never been investigated systematically. To examine the extent and type of participation restriction perceived by former leprosy patients living in the Centro de Convivência Antônio Diogo (CCAD), a previous leprosy colony in rural Northeast Brazil, by using the Participation Scale. Forty (51-9%) out of 77 individuals reported significant participation restrictions, mainly related to work and mobility. Perceived participation restriction was significantly higher in people living in nursing units of the CCAD (P = 0-001), if diagnosis of leprosy was made before 1982 (P = 0.002), in the presence of walking limitation (P < 0.001) and visible physical alterations (P = 0-002), such as foot deformities (P = 0.002), saddle nose (P = 0.03) and blindness (P = 0.04), and in those individuals who did not receive visitors (P = 0.004). Social rehabilitation, especially in the areas of work and mobility, is strongly needed together with prevention of debilitating physical sequelae and reduction of stigmatisation.

  17. [Leprosy--a stigma in the 21st century].

    PubMed

    Falus, Orsolya

    2011-02-13

    For the initiation of the French journalist Raoul Follereau in 1954 the UNO inaugurated the Leprosy Day (Martyr's Day) that is celebrated on the last Sunday of January every year. Although the bacterium that causes leprosy was isolated by the Norwegian scientist Gerhard Henrik Armauer Hansen in 1873 and from 1982 this disease can be cured with a special pharmaceutical complex, still 219.826 new leprous are detected on Earth every year, according to the data published in August, 2010 by WHO-experts. Ancient Chinese and Hindu source-strings from 600 B. C. are referring to leprosy, however, the disease was imported by the army of Alexander the Great from India around 327-326 B. C. Even the Old and the New Testament from the Holy Bible are mentioning leprosy in several details. During the Middle Ages the Military and Hospitaller Order of St. Lazarus of Jerusalem, established in the Holy Land in 72 A. D., did pioneer work in nursing leprous. In the process of time the medical attendance concerning leprous was organized in special hospitals called "leprosoriums" built on river-banks. Special office and even services were organized for the treatment and isolation of the people infected. Although medical science has prevailed against leprosy, and almost simultaneously even jurisprudence defended the patients' rights via legislation, still mankind can regrettably not get rid of this disease that stigmatizes seriously.

  18. Curing the stigma of leprosy.

    PubMed

    Rafferty, Joy

    2005-06-01

    The stigma of leprosy is a real phenomenon in many people's lives that affects their physical, psychological, social and economical well-being. There are many causes for this damaging image of leprosy. There is no one easy answer to dispelling this image; it is something that has to be done in partnership with communities and patients. Many papers document the effects of stigma, but few discuss or trial solutions. Education and media campaigns counteract false beliefs about leprosy and raise awareness of new advances in the field. Leprosy care is increasingly provided in an integrated setting showing patients and their communities that leprosy is not a disease apart. Physical and socio-economic rehabilitation is worthwhile in restoring self worth and status in the community and helps patients to find employment. Group counselling can allow those with leprosy to talk about their feelings and experiences to empower one another. Gradually attitudes towards leprosy are changing, but there is still much to be done if the underlying menace of stigma is to be dealt with. We as health professionals must be prepared to make the first move and give that first touch. Certainly more research is needed. In the highly endemic countries the road to elimination may yet be long. Perhaps with effort we will one day be able not only to treat the disease, but also to cure the stigma of leprosy, and make that road an easier one.

  19. Histoid leprosy with ENL reaction.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suresh K; Rath, Namita; Gautam, R K; Sharma, P K; Jain, R K; Kar, H K

    2002-01-01

    A 23-year old man presented with firm cutaneous and subcutaneous nodules of histoid leprosy. Some of the nodules suppurated after multidrug therapy (MDT) and these nodules showed features of erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL) on histopathological examination. ENL is a rare phenomenon observed in histoid leprosy.

  20. Unusual Presentation of Multibacillary Nodular Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Raut, Shweta; Kanade, Swapna; Nataraj, Gita; Mehta, Preeti

    2017-01-01

    Despite India achieving the goal of elimination of leprosy as a public health problem, leprosy is still being transmitted in India. However, due to decreased clinical suspicion of leprosy and atypical case presentations, such cases may be not be diagnosed. We present a case report of an unusual presentation of multibacillary leprosy which presented as nodular lesions. This case report indicates that atypical presentations of leprosy may be missed out by primary care physicians. PMID:28042219

  1. Nuancing 'leprosy stigma' through ethnographic biography in South India.

    PubMed

    Staples, James

    2011-06-01

    Synoptic life history accounts and case studies of people with leprosy have tended to follow conventionalised narrative forms, with the onset of leprosy causing a violent rupture in otherwise positively construed life courses. Many of those I worked with in India, well-versed in relating their stories to donor agencies, were also aware of the power of such narratives to access funding. While case studies can be informative about the politics of representation, then, they often obscure as much as they reveal about the lives of those described within them, emphasising leprosy-related stigma at the expense of other forms or drivers of social exclusion. Drawing upon a series of interviews with a leprosy affected man I have known and worked with for 25 years, this paper demonstrates how more nuanced--and, from a policy perspective, more useful--accounts might be achieved through intensive biographical interviews carried out over time. In particular, analysis of such biographies, set against the wider backdrop of ethnographic research, allows for a more subtle reading of leprosy-related stigma, contextualised in relation to a range of intersecting socio-political, cultural and economic concerns.

  2. Global strategy for further reducing the leprosy burden and sustaining leprosy control activities 2006-2010. Operational guidelines.

    PubMed

    2006-09-01

    The Global Strategy for further reducing the leprosy burden and sustaining leprosy control activities (2006 - 2010) has been widely welcomed and endorsed. The overall goal is to provide access to quality leprosy services for all affected communities following the principles of equity and social justice. The purpose of these Operational Guidelines is to help managers of national health services to implement the new Global Strategy in their own countries. This will be done as they develop detailed policies applicable to their own situation, and revise their National Manual for Leprosy Control. Leprosy services are being integrated into the general health services throughout the world; a new emphasis is given here to the need for an effective referral system, as part of an integrated programme. Good communication between all involved in the management of a person with leprosy or leprosy- related complications is essential. These Guidelines should help managers to choose which activities can be carried out at the primary health care level and for which aspects of care patients will have to be referred. This will depend on the nature of the complication and the capacity of the health workers to provide appropriate care at different levels of the health system. The promotion of self-reporting is now crucial to case detection, as case- finding campaigns become less and less cost-effective. It is important to identify and remove barriers that may prevent new cases from coming forward. The procedures for establishing the diagnosis of leprosy remain firmly linked to the cardinal signs of the disease, but the accuracy of diagnosis must be monitored. The Guidelines suggest a greater emphasis on the assessment of disability at diagnosis, so that those at particular risk can be recognized and managed appropriately. The treatment of leprosy with MDT has been a continuing success; neither relapse nor drug-resistance are significant problems and the regimens are well- tolerated

  3. Women and leprosy in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Cakiner, T; Yüksel, A; Soydan, M; Saylan, T; Bahçeci, E

    1993-01-01

    Women in Turkey have many social, cultural and economical problems. Women with leprosy have problems in common with other women as well as those related to physical and social consequences of leprosy. There are 2,414 patients with leprosy in Turkey, registered to Istanbul Leprosy Hospital and 829 of them are females. The mean age and duration of disease of our female leprosy patients are high. Most women with leprosy were born in eastern part of Turkey where prevalence of leprosy is higher and most have moved to western regions. The proportion of women who have some kind of social security is very low. Their economic status is also not good and 79% of patients had stigma about their disease. Three fourths of these cases have been hospitalized some time, for different reasons. Most of them (97.2%) have inactive disease at present. Disability degrees of patients are high. Patients with disability degrees over one constitute 54% of total for eyes, 55% for hands and 51% for feet. High percentage of multibacillary form and long duration of disease, delayed diagnosis, insufficient self-care of patients due to low socio-economic and cultural status and failure of health personnel to control patients periodically may be among the reasons for such high ratios of moderate and severe disabilities. In the light of the data obtained in our study, some measures to alleviate the problems of patients resulting from their socio-economic, cultural and social status have been suggested.

  4. Nailfold capillaroscopy in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Lima, Adma Silva de; Pizzol, Vanessa Irusta Dal; Fritsch, Scheila; Fonseca, Gabriela Poglia; Mulinari-Brenner, Fabiane Andrade; Muller, Carolina de Souza; Ottoboni, Vanessa Cristhine Dalombo

    2016-01-01

    Due to mounting evidences of interaction between Hansen's bacilli with endothelial cells and the paucity of studies addressing the presence of nailfold capillaroscopic alterations in patients with Hansen's disease, a study was carried out in order to verify the presence of capillaroscopic alterations in patients with leprosy in its various forms and its correlation with clinical parameters. Ten patients were evaluated at a specialized university service. Sixty percent of those had some capillaroscopic change, such as micro-hemorrhages, ectatic, bushy and corkscrew capillaries. Such changes were unspecific, which suggests there is not a specific pattern for this disease.

  5. Nailfold capillaroscopy in leprosy*

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Adma Silva; Pizzol, Vanessa Irusta dal; Fritsch, Scheila; Fonseca, Gabriela Poglia; Mulinari-Brenner, Fabiane Andrade; Muller, Carolina de Souza; Ottoboni, Vanessa Cristhine Dalombo

    2016-01-01

    Due to mounting evidences of interaction between Hansen's bacilli with endothelial cells and the paucity of studies addressing the presence of nailfold capillaroscopic alterations in patients with Hansen's disease, a study was carried out in order to verify the presence of capillaroscopic alterations in patients with leprosy in its various forms and its correlation with clinical parameters. Ten patients were evaluated at a specialized university service. Sixty percent of those had some capillaroscopic change, such as micro-hemorrhages, ectatic, bushy and corkscrew capillaries. Such changes were unspecific, which suggests there is not a specific pattern for this disease. PMID:27828654

  6. On the origin of leprosy.

    PubMed

    Monot, Marc; Honoré, Nadine; Garnier, Thierry; Araoz, Romulo; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Lacroix, Céline; Sow, Samba; Spencer, John S; Truman, Richard W; Williams, Diana L; Gelber, Robert; Virmond, Marcos; Flageul, Béatrice; Cho, Sang-Nae; Ji, Baohong; Paniz-Mondolfi, Alberto; Convit, Jacinto; Young, Saroj; Fine, Paul E; Rasolofo, Voahangy; Brennan, Patrick J; Cole, Stewart T

    2005-05-13

    Leprosy, a chronic human disease with potentially debilitating neurological consequences, results from infection with Mycobacterium leprae. This unculturable pathogen has undergone extensive reductive evolution, with half of its genome now occupied by pseudogenes. Using comparative genomics, we demonstrated that all extant cases of leprosy are attributable to a single clone whose dissemination worldwide can be retraced from analysis of very rare single-nucleotide polymorphisms. The disease seems to have originated in Eastern Africa or the Near East and spread with successive human migrations. Europeans or North Africans introduced leprosy into West Africa and the Americas within the past 500 years.

  7. [Pathological diagnosis of leprosy in developing countries].

    PubMed

    Goto, Masamichi; Aung, Thida; Kitajima, Shinichi

    2005-09-01

    In the developing countries where leprosy is prevalent, diagnosis of leprosy is made from clinical signs and symptoms. However, when difficult and doubtful cases increase after the advance of leprosy control programs, definitive diagnosis of leprosy by histopathology become necessary. This report describes our experience of technical support to re-establish histopathology service and introduction of immunohistochemistry in the leprosy referral center of Myanmar, and we discuss the ideal way of international technical support. This activity was performed as a part of leprosy control and basic health services project of Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) since 2000 to 2005.

  8. Plastic footwear for leprosy.

    PubMed

    Antia, N H

    1990-03-01

    The anaesthetic foot in leprosy poses the most major problem in the rehabilitation of its patients. Various attempts have been made to produce protective footwear such as the microcellular rubber-car-tyre sandals. Unfortunately these attempts have had little success on a large scale because of the inability to produce them in large numbers and the stigma attached to such unusual footwear. While such footwear may be superior to the 'tennis' shoe in protecting the foot from injury by the penetration of sharp objects, it fails to distribute the weight-bearing forces which is the major cause of plantar damage and ulceration in the anaesthetic foot. This can be achieved by providing rigidity to the sole, as demonstrated by the healing of ulcers in plaster of paris casts or the rigid wooden clog. A new type of moulded plastic footwear has been evolved in conjunction with the plastic footwear industry which provides footwear that can be mass produced at a low price and which overcomes the stigma of leprosy. Controlled rigidity is provided by the incorporation of a spring steel shank between the sponge insole and the hard wearing plastic sole. Trials have demonstrated both the acceptability of the footwear and its protective effects as well as its hard wearing properties.

  9. Leprosy in wild armadillos.

    PubMed

    Truman, Richard

    2005-09-01

    Wild nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) in the south central United States are highly endemic natural hosts of Mycobacterium leprae. Surveys conducted over the last 30 years on more than 5000 animals confirm that the infection is present among armadillos in Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas. Highest prevalence rates are found among the animals in low-lying alluvial and coastal areas, primarily in Louisiana and Texas. Both animal density and local factors may contribute to the detectability of armadillo leprosy in those regions. Little evidence for M. leprae infection is found among armadillos elsewhere in the US range, and only a few reports relate finding the infection among animals in Central or South America. However, the issue has received only scant attention in other countries. Armadillos only recently expanded their range into the US, and leprosy was present in Texas and Louisiana prior to the arrival of armadillos. The ecological relationship between humans and armadillos with M. leprae in this region remains unclear. However, infected armadillos constitute a large reservoir of M. leprae and they may be a source of infection for some humans in this country, and perhaps in other locations across the animal's range.

  10. Leprosy--an imported disease.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Zhenli; Pailoor, Jayalakshmi; Tan, Leng Leng; Robinson, Suganthy; Wong, Su-Ming; Ismail, Rokiah

    2014-09-01

    Leprosy remains a public health concern in Malaysia and globally. We aim to review the characteristics of leprosy patients in a tertiary institution in urban Malaysia. This is a case series of 27 leprosy patients who presented between 2008 and 2013. The majority of our patients consisted of male (74.1%), Malaysian (63.0%), blue collar workers (51.9%) and married (59.3%) patients; 48.1% had lepromatous leprosy. All except one of the patients presented with skin lesions, 25.9% had nerve involvement and 33.3% developed lepra reactions. Forty-four point four percent (44.4%) of the cases seen initially in the primary care setup were misdiagnosed. Doctors need to have a high index of suspicion for leprosy when patients present with suggestive skin, nerve or musculoskeletal lesions. Immigrants accounted for 37% of cases and these patients may become a reservoir of infection, thus accounting for the rise in incidence. An increasing trend in multibacillary cases may be attributed to the spread from migrants from countries with a high burden of leprosy.

  11. WHO Expert Committee on Leprosy.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    Since the introduction of multidrug therapy for leprosy in 1981, an estimated 15 million patients have been cured of the disease and disabilities have been prevented in some 2-3 million individuals. These remarkable results have been brought about by the synergistic efforts of WHO, governmental and nongovernmental bodies, academia, industry and affected communities throughout the world. Nevertheless, much remains to be done--both to sustain this progress and to effect a further reduction in the impact of leprosy on patients and their families. This report presents the conclusions and recommendations of the WHO Expert Committee on Leprosy, whose eighth meeting reflected the recent shift in emphasis of leprosy elimination to reducing of the impairments and disabilities caused by the disease and ensuring the quality and sustainability of leprosy services. The Committee analysed the global leprosy situation, discussed elements of epidemiology, and reviewed developments in treatment of the disease and management of complications. Sociocultural issues were addressed, as was the need for community care, accessibility of health services, and effective referral systems. Indicators for monitoring and evaluation were outlined and research priorities were set out.

  12. A history of leprosy in Iran during the 19th and 20th centuries.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Mohammad Hossein; Bahadori, Moslem

    2011-11-01

    From ancient time leprosy has been regarded as a terrifying, stigmatized disease; nevertheless, its cause remained unidentified up to the late 19th century. For centuries numerous leprosy victims worldwide suffered from its morbidity and were socially isolated. The afflicted individuals were segregated because they were considered 'unclean' and had to live in leper colonies, generally under very poor conditions. Physicians believed that leprosy was an incurable, highly contagious, and hereditary disease. In 1873 the Norwegian physician, Gerhard Armauer Hansen (1841-1912), ended the myth of leprosy and discovered its causative agent, known as Mycobacterium leprae. Hansen's discovery was a great triumph in the fight against leprosy. In the 1930's, the first effective antileprosy drug, dapsone, was introduced and in the early 1980's multi-drug therapy was popularized because of high efficacy in resistant cases. Here, we have presented a brief look at the history of leprosy in the world with special focus on the historical account of leprosy in Iran, particularly during the 19th and 20th centuries.

  13. Multibacillary leprosy by population groups in Brazil: Lessons from an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Illarramendi, Ximena; Dupnik, Kathryn Margaret; Hacker, Mariana de Andrea; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Jerônimo, Selma Maria Bezerra; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes

    2017-01-01

    Background Leprosy remains an important public health problem in Brazil where 28,761 new cases were diagnosed in 2015, the second highest number of new cases detected globally. The disease is caused by Mycobacterium leprae, a pathogen spread by patients with multibacillary (MB) leprosy. This study was designed to identify population groups most at risk for MB disease in Brazil, contributing to new ideas for early diagnosis and leprosy control. Methods A national databank of cases reported in Brazil (2001–2013) was used to evaluate epidemiological characteristics of MB leprosy. Additionally, the databank of a leprosy reference center was used to determine factors associated with higher bacillary loads. Results A total of 541,090 cases were analyzed. New case detection rates (NCDRs) increased with age, especially for men with MB leprosy, reaching 44.8 new cases/100,000 population in 65–69 year olds. Males and subjects older than 59 years had twice the odds of MB leprosy than females and younger cases (OR = 2.36, CI95% = 2.33–2.38; OR = 1.99, CI95% = 1.96–2.02, respectively). Bacillary load was higher in male and in patients aged 20–39 and 40–59 years compared to females and other age groups. From 2003 to 2013, there was a progressive reduction in annual NCDRs and an increase in the percentage of MB cases and of elderly patients in Brazil. These data suggest reduction of leprosy transmission in the country. Conclusion Public health policies for leprosy control in endemic areas in Brazil should include activities especially addressed to men and to the elderly in order to further reduce M. leprae transmission. PMID:28192426

  14. Multibacillary leprosy by population groups in Brazil: Lessons from an observational study.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Mauricio Lisboa; Illarramendi, Ximena; Dupnik, Kathryn Margaret; Hacker, Mariana de Andrea; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Jerônimo, Selma Maria Bezerra; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes

    2017-02-01

    Leprosy remains an important public health problem in Brazil where 28,761 new cases were diagnosed in 2015, the second highest number of new cases detected globally. The disease is caused by Mycobacterium leprae, a pathogen spread by patients with multibacillary (MB) leprosy. This study was designed to identify population groups most at risk for MB disease in Brazil, contributing to new ideas for early diagnosis and leprosy control. A national databank of cases reported in Brazil (2001-2013) was used to evaluate epidemiological characteristics of MB leprosy. Additionally, the databank of a leprosy reference center was used to determine factors associated with higher bacillary loads. A total of 541,090 cases were analyzed. New case detection rates (NCDRs) increased with age, especially for men with MB leprosy, reaching 44.8 new cases/100,000 population in 65-69 year olds. Males and subjects older than 59 years had twice the odds of MB leprosy than females and younger cases (OR = 2.36, CI95% = 2.33-2.38; OR = 1.99, CI95% = 1.96-2.02, respectively). Bacillary load was higher in male and in patients aged 20-39 and 40-59 years compared to females and other age groups. From 2003 to 2013, there was a progressive reduction in annual NCDRs and an increase in the percentage of MB cases and of elderly patients in Brazil. These data suggest reduction of leprosy transmission in the country. Public health policies for leprosy control in endemic areas in Brazil should include activities especially addressed to men and to the elderly in order to further reduce M. leprae transmission.

  15. Manual for Training Leprosy Rehabilitation Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Itoh, Masayoshi; Eason, Alice L.

    The purpose of this manual is to introduce the general concepts and techniques in leprosy rehabilitation to physical therapy aides. Because of the lack of well-trained, qualified, physical therapists, the committee on leprosy rehabilitation considers it necessary to publish a teaching manual outlining leprosy rehabilitation for those who work with…

  16. Histoid leprosy: a rare exuberant case*

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Pedro Jose Secchin; Messias, Sulamita dos Santos Nascimento Dutra; Ferreira, Paola Cristina Brandão Oliveira; Sales, Anna Maria; Machado, Alice de Miranda; Nery, José Augusto da Costa

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy is a neglected disease. We point up the need of recognizing the unusual clinical presentations of the disease in order to make early diagnosis and proper treatment possible, and break the transmission chain. The authors report a rare type of multibacillary leprosy: histoid leprosy and present images of numerous well-circumscribed indurated papules and nodules distributed throughout the entire body. PMID:26560226

  17. Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Lepromatous Leprosy Coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Sendrasoa, F. A.; Ranaivo, I. M.; Raharolahy, O.; Andrianarison, M.; Ramarozatovo, L. S.; Rapelanoro Rabenja, F.

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous occurrence of leprosy and pulmonary tuberculosis is reported infrequently in the modern era. We report a case of pulmonary tuberculosis diagnosed in patient being treated with glucocorticoids for complications of leprosy (type II reaction). Physicians should recognize that the leprosy patients treated with glucocorticoid may develop tuberculosis. PMID:26504603

  18. Human Polymorphisms as Clinical Predictors in Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Prado Montes de Oca, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Genetic and serum markers in human host can predict leprosy susceptibility per se as well as be useful in classification and/or prediction of clinical variants and immunological responses in leprosy. Adequate and timely assessment of potential risks associated with these 38 host leprosy genes could diminish epidemiological burden and improve life quality of patients with this still prevalent mycobacterial disease. PMID:22220182

  19. [Leprosy and human rights: trends in Japan and in the world].

    PubMed

    Yokota, Yozo

    2014-12-01

    Leprosy, or Hansen's disease, has long been regarded as an incurable and dreadful contagious disease. The patients have been forcefully hospitalized and deprived of many basic human rights. Their family members have often been discriminated against due to stigma associated with this disease. Soon after the Second World War, a specific remedy called "multi-drug therapy" (MDT) was discovered and leprosy became a relatively easily curable disease. Despite this medical development, it took time to change the policy and legislation of forceful hospitalization of leprosy patients. The stigma surrounding leprosy and consequent discrimination have continued. In Japan, it was only in 1996 that the legislation requiring forceful hospitalization of leprosy patients was repealed. The Government decided to provide remedies to the former patients who had suffered from this policy. At the United Nations, the General Assembly adopted a resolution to eradicate discrimination against persons affected by leprosy and their family members. It is hoped that discrimination associated with Hansen's disease will soon be overcome by the efforts of all concerned, particularly doctors and nurses who are specialists of this disease.

  20. Spatial clustering and local risk of leprosy in São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Antônio Carlos Vieira; Yamamura, Mellina; Arroyo, Luiz Henrique; Popolin, Marcela Paschoal; Chiaravalloti Neto, Francisco; Palha, Pedro Fredemir; Uchoa, Severina Alice da Costa; Pieri, Flávia Meneguetti; Pinto, Ione Carvalho; Fiorati, Regina Célia; Queiroz, Ana Angélica Rêgo de; Belchior, Aylana de Souza; Dos Santos, Danielle Talita; Garcia, Maria Concebida da Cunha; Crispim, Juliane de Almeida; Alves, Luana Seles; Berra, Thaís Zamboni; Arcêncio, Ricardo Alexandre

    2017-02-01

    Although the detection rate is decreasing, the proportion of new cases with WHO grade 2 disability (G2D) is increasing, creating concern among policy makers and the Brazilian government. This study aimed to identify spatial clustering of leprosy and classify high-risk areas in a major leprosy cluster using the SatScan method. Data were obtained including all leprosy cases diagnosed between January 2006 and December 2013. In addition to the clinical variable, information was also gathered regarding the G2D of the patient at diagnosis and after treatment. The Scan Spatial statistic test, developed by Kulldorff e Nagarwalla, was used to identify spatial clustering and to measure the local risk (Relative Risk-RR) of leprosy. Maps considering these risks and their confidence intervals were constructed. A total of 434 cases were identified, including 188 (43.31%) borderline leprosy and 101 (23.28%) lepromatous leprosy cases. There was a predominance of males, with ages ranging from 15 to 59 years, and 51 patients (11.75%) presented G2D. Two significant spatial clusters and three significant spatial-temporal clusters were also observed. The main spatial cluster (p = 0.000) contained 90 census tracts, a population of approximately 58,438 inhabitants, detection rate of 22.6 cases per 100,000 people and RR of approximately 3.41 (95%CI = 2.721-4.267). Regarding the spatial-temporal clusters, two clusters were observed, with RR ranging between 24.35 (95%CI = 11.133-52.984) and 15.24 (95%CI = 10.114-22.919). These findings could contribute to improvements in policies and programming, aiming for the eradication of leprosy in Brazil. The Spatial Scan statistic test was found to be an interesting resource for health managers and healthcare professionals to map the vulnerability of areas in terms of leprosy transmission risk and areas of underreporting.

  1. The Continuing Challenges of Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Scollard, D. M.; Adams, L. B.; Gillis, T. P.; Krahenbuhl, J. L.; Truman, R. W.; Williams, D. L.

    2006-01-01

    Leprosy is best understood as two conjoined diseases. The first is a chronic mycobacterial infection that elicits an extraordinary range of cellular immune responses in humans. The second is a peripheral neuropathy that is initiated by the infection and the accompanying immunological events. The infection is curable but not preventable, and leprosy remains a major global health problem, especially in the developing world, publicity to the contrary notwithstanding. Mycobacterium leprae remains noncultivable, and for over a century leprosy has presented major challenges in the fields of microbiology, pathology, immunology, and genetics; it continues to do so today. This review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of M. leprae and the host response to it, especially concerning molecular identification of M. leprae, knowledge of its genome, transcriptome, and proteome, its mechanisms of microbial resistance, and recognition of strains by variable-number tandem repeat analysis. Advances in experimental models include studies in gene knockout mice and the development of molecular techniques to explore the armadillo model. In clinical studies, notable progress has been made concerning the immunology and immunopathology of leprosy, the genetics of human resistance, mechanisms of nerve injury, and chemotherapy. In nearly all of these areas, however, leprosy remains poorly understood compared to other major bacterial diseases. PMID:16614253

  2. [Characteristics of leprosy reactions in paucibacillary and multibacillary individuals attended at two reference centers in Recife, Pernambuco].

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Márcia Almeida Galvão; Silveira, Vera Magalhães da; França, Emmanuel Rodrigues de

    2010-01-01

    Significant reactions frequently occur among leprosy cases, and thus a significant proportion of leprosy patients present disabilities and undergo leprosy retreatment. Clinical-epidemiological characterization of reaction patterns is essential for managing such patients. Objective to describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of leprosy reactions among paucibacillary and multibacillary individuals. In this cross-sectional study, 201 patients with histories of reactions who were attended at two reference centers for leprosy treatment were evaluated. Variables such as initial bacilloscopy, sex, age, skin phototype, origin, clinical presentation, type of treatment, type of reaction, final bacilloscopy index and time of reaction onset in relation to the treatment were evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using simple frequencies. To calculate risk factors for multibacillary forms, univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Male sex, age between 30 and 44 years, phototype V, borderline clinical form, regular treatment, type I reaction, neuritis, presence of 10 to 20 nodules and onset of the leprosy reaction during the treatment were the most frequent findings. Male patients predominated and were associated with greater risk of developing the multibacillary forms. Leprosy reactions occurred most frequently during the treatment. Multibacillary patients were more likely to need leprosy retreatment, and those with type I and type II reactions presented greater frequency of neuritis, lymphadenopathy, arthritis and iritis than did those with isolated reactions.

  3. Teaching of leprosy: current challenges*

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Cynthia Rossetti Portela; Ribeiro, Maria Mônica Freitas; Melo, Elza Machado; Araújo, Marcelo Grossi

    2014-01-01

    In the context of declining leprosy endemicity worldwide, keeping the interest in knowledge and expertise in leprosy alive has been a matter of concern. Approaching the problem only in primary care, without the proper integration with other levels of care in the health system fails to account for the complexity of the disease. Training professionals to work at different levels of health care is a current challenge. The objective of this review was to look for experiences related to the teaching of leprosy both in undergraduate courses in the field of health sciences and in training programs for professionals who work in patient care. We highlight the role of the dermatologist in the management of control programs, diagnosis and treatment of the disease, as well as in the continuous education of other health professionals. PMID:24937820

  4. Effect of the Brazilian conditional cash transfer and primary health care programs on the new case detection rate of leprosy.

    PubMed

    Nery, Joilda Silva; Pereira, Susan Martins; Rasella, Davide; Penna, Maria Lúcia Fernandes; Aquino, Rosana; Rodrigues, Laura Cunha; Barreto, Mauricio Lima; Penna, Gerson Oliveira

    2014-11-01

    Social determinants can affect the transmission of leprosy and its progression to disease. Not much is known about the effectiveness of welfare and primary health care policies on the reduction of leprosy occurrence. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of the Brazilian cash transfer (Bolsa Família Program-BFP) and primary health care (Family Health Program-FHP) programs on new case detection rate of leprosy. We conducted the study with a mixed ecological design, a combination of an ecological multiple-group and time-trend design in the period 2004-2011 with the Brazilian municipalities as unit of analysis. The main independent variables were the BFP and FHP coverage at the municipal level and the outcome was new case detection rate of leprosy. Leprosy new cases, BFP and FHP coverage, population and other relevant socio-demographic covariates were obtained from national databases. We used fixed-effects negative binomial models for panel data adjusted for relevant socio-demographic covariates. A total of 1,358 municipalities were included in the analysis. In the studied period, while the municipal coverage of BFP and FHP increased, the new case detection rate of leprosy decreased. Leprosy new case detection rate was significantly reduced in municipalities with consolidated BFP coverage (Risk Ratio 0.79; 95% CI  =0.74-0.83) and significantly increased in municipalities with FHP coverage in the medium (72-95%) (Risk Ratio 1.05; 95% CI  =1.02-1.09) and higher coverage tertiles (>95%) (Risk Ratio 1.12; 95% CI  =1.08-1.17). At the same time the Family Health Program had been effective in increasing the new case detection rate of leprosy in Brazil, the Bolsa Família Program was associated with a reduction of the new case detection rate of leprosy that we propose reflects a reduction in leprosy incidence.

  5. Accentuation of ichthyosis vulgaris due to associated leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Shah, A. P.; Shah, S. S.; Doshi, H. V.

    1973-01-01

    A case of ichthyosis vulgaris associated with tuberculoid leprosy is reported. Ichthyotic scales were markedly accentuated within the anaesthetic patches of leprosy. The probable mechanism of the accentuation of ichthyosis by leprosy is discussed. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:4760727

  6. Lessons from the evolution of a CBR programme for people affected by leprosy in Northern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ebenso, Bassey; Idah, Michael; Anyor, Terver; Opakunmi, Femi

    2010-12-01

    This paper reviews the 13-year evolution of the social economic activities in Northern Nigeria from a welfare-oriented to a community-centred programme for people affected by leprosy. The review relied on the analysis of policy and strategy documents, programme guidelines and statistical and evaluation reports. Findings revealed that the transformation among other things, demanded formulation of new programme policies and guidelines; and staff training in CBR principles and practice. Findings also showed that adopting CBR principles and community development projects can stimulate improvements in living conditions, self-esteem and acceptance of people affected by leprosy into the community. Regardless of becoming a more inclusive and participatory programme wherein people affected by leprosy contribute to programme implementation and evaluation; groups affected by leprosy remain economically dependent on the programme and partnership mobilisation is weak. This explains why the priorities for sustaining the processes and impacts generated through CBR in northern Nigeria include: i) empowering groups to access mainline services; ii) working through partners to implement CBR and attract extra funding/ownership of interventions, and iii) promoting human rights of people affected by leprosy and working for a barrier free environment. In the absence of an agreeable understanding and method of assessing sustainability in CBR, we recommend the field-testing of a proposal for evaluating sustainability, to determine its utility in different contexts. Such field-tests have the potential of influencing policy and practice in the future.

  7. The involvement of endothelial mediators in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Maria Renata Sales; Latini, Ana Carla Pereira; Nogueira, Maria Esther Salles

    2016-10-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease that requires better understanding since it continues to be a significant health problem in many parts of the world. Leprosy reactions are acute inflammatory episodes regarded as the central etiology of nerve damage in the disease. The activation of endothelium is a relevant phenomenon to be investigated in leprosy reactions. The present study evaluated the expression of endothelial factors in skin lesions and serum samples of leprosy patients. Immunohistochemical analysis of skin samples and serum measurements of VCAM-1, VEGF, tissue factor and thrombomodulin were performed in 77 leprosy patients and 12 controls. We observed significant increase of VCAM-1 circulating levels in non-reactional leprosy (p = 0.0009). The immunostaining of VEGF and tissue factor was higher in endothelium of non-reactional leprosy (p = 0.02 for both) than healthy controls. Patients with type 1 reaction presented increased thrombomodulin serum levels, compared with non-reactional leprosy (p = 0.02). In type 2 reaction, no significant modifications were observed for the endothelial factors investigated. The anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activities of the endotfhelial factors may play key-roles in the pathogenesis of leprosy and should be enrolled in studies focusing on alternative targets to improve the management of leprosy and its reactions.

  8. Histoid leprosy: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sunil Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous inflammation primarily of the peripheral nervous system, skin, and reticuloendothelial system caused by Mycobacterium leprae. It presents clinically as an erythematous or hypopigmented anesthetic patch and a thickened and/or tender cutaneous nerve trunk. Leprosy is also called Hansen disease. Leprosy is a great imitator of other skin diseases, and it can present with different morphological lesions, which is why an expert eye is needed to diagnose it. One of the important clinical presentations of leprosy is histoid leprosy, which is very difficult to diagnose due to different clinical and histopathological findings that mimic, e.g., a fibromatous disorder. Histoid leprosy is a very rare clinicopathological variant of leprosy. It is clinically characterized by skin-colored, soft, succulent nodules, and plaques on apparently normal skin and histologically by a dense bundle of histiocytes arranged in storiform. Though histoid leprosy is a very rare type of leprosy, the higher load of lepra bacilli in these cases makes it a concern as a reservoir for leprosy. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  9. Leprosy trends in Zambia 1991-2009.

    PubMed

    Kapata, Nathan; Chanda-Kapata, Pascalina; Grobusch, Martin Peter; O'Grady, Justin; Bates, Matthew; Mwaba, Peter; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2012-10-01

    To document leprosy trends in Zambia over the past two decades to ascertain the importance of leprosy as a health problem in Zambia. Retrospective study covering the period 1991-2009 of routine national leprosy surveillance data, published national programme review reports and desk reviews of in-country TB reports. Data reports were available for all the years under study apart from years 2001, 2002 and 2006. The Leprosy case notification rates (CNR) declined from 2.73/10 000 population in 1991 to 0.43/10 000 population in 2009. The general leprosy burden showed a downward trend for both adults and children. Leprosy case burden dropped from approximately 18 000 cases in 1980 to only about 1000 cases in 1996, and by the year 2000, the prevalence rates had fallen to 0.67/10 000 population. There were more multibacillary cases of leprosy than pauci-bacillary cases. Several major gaps in data recording, entry and surveillance were identified. Data on disaggregation by gender, HIV status or geographical origin were not available. Whilst Zambia has achieved WHO targets for leprosy control, leprosy prevalence data from Zambia may not reflect real situation because of poor data recording and surveillance. Greater investment into infrastructure and training are required for more accurate surveillance of leprosy in Zambia. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. The involvement of endothelial mediators in leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Maria Renata Sales; Latini, Ana Carla Pereira; Nogueira, Maria Esther Salles

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease that requires better understanding since it continues to be a significant health problem in many parts of the world. Leprosy reactions are acute inflammatory episodes regarded as the central etiology of nerve damage in the disease. The activation of endothelium is a relevant phenomenon to be investigated in leprosy reactions. The present study evaluated the expression of endothelial factors in skin lesions and serum samples of leprosy patients. Immunohistochemical analysis of skin samples and serum measurements of VCAM-1, VEGF, tissue factor and thrombomodulin were performed in 77 leprosy patients and 12 controls. We observed significant increase of VCAM-1 circulating levels in non-reactional leprosy (p = 0.0009). The immunostaining of VEGF and tissue factor was higher in endothelium of non-reactional leprosy (p = 0.02 for both) than healthy controls. Patients with type 1 reaction presented increased thrombomodulin serum levels, compared with non-reactional leprosy (p = 0.02). In type 2 reaction, no significant modifications were observed for the endothelial factors investigated. The anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activities of the endotfhelial factors may play key-roles in the pathogenesis of leprosy and should be enrolled in studies focusing on alternative targets to improve the management of leprosy and its reactions. PMID:27706378

  11. Serological findings in leprosy and tuberculosis with the Wassermann, Meinicke, and VDRL tests

    PubMed Central

    Ruge, H.

    1955-01-01

    In the course of a venereal disease survey in Egypt, 820 cases of leprosy and 720 cases of tuberculosis were serologically examined with the Wassermann, Meinicke (MKR II), and VDRL tests; the results are reported in this paper. On serological and anamnestic evidence, 31 cases of syphilis were discovered among the leprosy cases and 37 among the tuberculosis cases. Apparently false positive reactions were seen in 203 cases of leprosy (25%) and in 38 cases of tuberculosis (5%). The author discusses the probability that a fairly high proportion of these reactions were in fact caused by otherwise undetected syphilis or were non-specific. The Meinicke test proved the most specific of the three, followed, in that order, by the Wassermann and the VDRL tests. It was found that syphilis was more frequent among males with tuberculosis than among those with leprosy; this is attributed to the fact that leprosy patients are kept in greater isolation. Less easily explicable is the fact that more females than males with leprosy were found to have syphilis, whereas in tuberculous persons the difference in syphilis incidence between male and female patients was not very great. PMID:13284561

  12. Building national medicine: leprosy and power in Colombia, 1870-1910.

    PubMed

    Obregón, Diana

    2002-04-01

    As imperialist nations rediscovered leprosy in their colonial world in the late nineteenth century, Colombian physicians found endemic leprosy in their own country. The medical community was interested in constructing a national medicine to conform to 'universal' science. To medicalize leprosy, doctors provoked fears through exaggerating the number of leprosy sufferers to demonstrate that charity was incapable of dealing with the problem. The government approved laws of compulsory segregation of leprosy patients in the 1890s, while the 1897 international conference on leprosy held in Berlin gave international sanction to isolation. Lepers actively resisted segregation as a violation of their individual rights. Dr Juan de Dios Carrasquilla studied the disease, experimented with sero-therapy to cure it, and claimed that the flea was its agent of transmission. He combatted segregation and proposed instead a hygienic programme to improve environmental living conditions, but his approach was defeated. When the early twentieth century saw the consolidation of the Colombian state, modernization of the country became a national priority. The government started to take control of lazarettos, enforcing segregation of lepers, who were confined within an area circumscribed by a sanitary cordon. This strategy was a failure, since patients resisted segregation.

  13. Historical Overview of Leprosy Control in Cuba.

    PubMed

    Beldarraín-Chaple, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Leprosy, an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, affects the nervous system, skin, internal organs, extremities and mucous membranes. Biological, social and environmental factors influence its occurrence and transmission. The first effective treatments appeared in 1930 with the development of dapsone, a sulfone. The main components of a control and elimination strategy are early case detection and timely administration of multidrug therapy. OBJECTIVES Review the history of leprosy control in Cuba, emphasizing particularly results of the National Leprosy Control Program, its modifications and influence on leprosy control. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION The historiological method was applied using document review, complemented by interviews with experts on leprosy and its control. Archived documents, medical records, disease prevalence censuses conducted since 1942, and incidence and prevalence statistics for 1960-2015 from the Ministry of Public Health's National Statistics Division were reviewed. Reports and scientific literature published on the Program and the history of leprosy in Cuba were also reviewed. DEVELOPMENT Leprosy has been documented in Cuba since 1613. In 1938, the Leprosy Foundation was created with ten dispensaries nationwide for diagnosis and treatment. The first National Leprosy Control Program was established in 1962, implemented in 1963 and revised five times. In 1972, leper colonies were closed and treatment became ambulatory. In 1977, rifampicin was introduced. In 1988, the Program instituted controlled, decentralized, community-based multidrug treatment and established the criteria for considering a patient cured. In 2003, it included actions aimed at early diagnosis and prophylactic treatment of contacts. Since 2008, it prioritizes actions directed toward the population at risk, maintaining five-year followup with dermatological and neurological examination. Primary health care carries out diagnostic and treatment

  14. History and Diversity of Citrus leprosis virus Recorded in Herbarium Specimens.

    PubMed

    Hartung, John S; Roy, Avijit; Fu, Shimin; Shao, Jonathan; Schneider, William L; Brlansky, Ronald H

    2015-09-01

    Leprosis refers to two diseases of citrus that present similar necrotic local lesions, often surrounded by chlorotic haloes on citrus. Two distinct viruses are associated with this disease, one that produces particles primarily in the nucleus of infected plant cells (Citrus leprosis virus nuclear type [CiLV-N]; Dichorhavirus) and another type that produces particles in the cytoplasm of infected plant cells (Citrus leprosis virus cytoplasmic type [CiLV-C]; Cilevirus). Both forms are transmitted by Brevipalpid mites and have bipartite, single-stranded, RNA genomes. CiLV-C and CiLV-N are present in South and Central America and as far north as parts of Mexico. Although leprosis disease was originally described from Florida, it disappeared from there in the 1960s. The United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service maintains preserved citrus specimens identified at inspection stations 50 or more years ago with symptoms of citrus leprosis. We isolated RNA from these samples and performed degradome sequencing. We obtained nearly full-length genome sequences of both a typical CiLV-C isolate intercepted from Argentina in 1967 and a distinct CiLV-N isolate obtained in Florida in 1948. The latter is a novel form of CiLV-N, not known to exist anywhere in the world today. We have also documented the previously unreported presence of CiLV-N in Mexico in the mid-20th century.

  15. Nocardia nova mycetoma over forehead in a lepromatous leprosy patient.

    PubMed

    Dhingra, M; Kaistha, N; Bansal, N; Solanki, L S; Chander, J; Thami, G P; van de Sande, W W

    2012-07-15

    We present a case of a 31-year-old male, a known patient with lepromatous leprosy with a type 2 lepra reaction, who presented with a slowly growing asymptomatic swelling with multiple discharging sinuses over the forehead that developed over 6 months. Smears of the serosanguinous discharge on Gram staining showed Gram-positive branching filamentous bacilli, which on culture on blood agar showed chalky-white colonies. Histology of the lesion showed suppurative granulomas with polymorphs surrounding characteristic grains. The isolate was identified as Nocardia nova by gene sequencing and the patient was started on combined antibiotic therapy that resulted in complete resolution of the infection in six months. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of mycetoma related to Nocardia nova in association with leprosy.

  16. Clinical Profile of Peripheral Neuropathy in Leprosy.

    PubMed

    Sarker, U K; Uddin, M J; Chowdhury, R; Roy, N; Bhattacharjee, M; Roy, J

    2015-10-01

    The objectives of the study were to see the association of peripheral neuropathy in leprosy and to find out the clinical profile of peripheral neuropathy and disability status in leprosy. It was descriptive type of cross sectional study was conducted among the cases of leprosy attended in the out-patient departments of neurology, Mymensingh Medical College Hospital (MMCH) and Mymensingh tuberculosis and leprosy hospital that fulfilled the inclusion criteria were included in this study, during the study period of January 2010 to December 2011.In this study of 62 cases revealed that leprosy is more common in male (71%) people and 21% leprosy patient had contact with known case of leprosy. Leprosy causes peripheral neuropathy (61.3%). Duration of occurrence of peripheral neuropathy was prolonged (>6 month) in most of the patients (47.4%) and the disease progression was also slow (63.2%). Numbness was complained by 89.4% patients and 65.8% subjects complained of weakness of limbs. Deformities and ulcers were present in 26.3% and 50% of patients respectively. Ulnar nerve (43.6%), Lateral popliteal nerve (41.9%), Posterior tibial nerve (41.9%) and Great auricular nerve (17.7%) were the most commonly involved thickened peripheral nerves. The rate of visible physical impairment (WHO Grade 2 disability) among people affected by leprosy in feet was 27.4% and in hands was 16.1%. The position and vibration sense was found to normal all patients of peripheral neuropathy.

  17. Leg ulcer in lepromatous leprosy - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Tania Rita Moreno de Oliveira; dos Santos, Talita Suzany Siqueira; Lopes, Ramon Rodrigues de Macedo

    2016-01-01

    In Brazil, leprosy is a widespread infectious and contagious disease. Clinicians and specialists view leprosy broadly as a systemic infection, since, in its manifestations, it mimics many conditions, such as rheumatic, vascular, ENT, neurological and dermatological diseases. There are few studies that characterize the factors associated with ulcers in leprosy. These injuries should be prevented and treated promptly to avoid serious problems like secondary infections, sepsis, carcinomatous degeneration and amputations. We describe a patient with ulcers on his legs, involving late diagnosis of lepromatous leprosy. PMID:27828650

  18. Leprosy mimicry of lupus vulgaris and misdiagnosis of leprosy--a case report.

    PubMed

    Mandal, B C; Bandyopadhyay, G

    2012-01-01

    Leprosy and tuberculosis (TB) both are still rampant in India. Leprosy predominantly presents through skin manifestations whereas cutaneous manifestations of TB though not so frequent but are not rare. Lupus vulgaris (LV), the commonest of all cutaneous manifestations of TB, mimics leprosy very closely and may prompt the examiner to misdiagnose leprosy, especially, by health workers (HW), in a field situation, where leprosy is diagnosed and treated on clinical basis alone as per NLEP guidelines. Because of existing stigmata, such wrong diagnosis can put the patient and the party under psychological stress and creates unnecessary complications.

  19. Integration of Leprosy Elimination into Primary Health Care in Orissa, India

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, M. Ruby; Velidi, Nageswara Rao; Pati, Surendra; Rath, Nilambar; Kanungo, Akshay K.; Bhanjadeo, Amiya K.; Rao, Bandaru Bhaskar; Ojha, Bijaya M.; Krishna Moorthy, Kodyur; Soutar, Douglas; Porter, John D. H.; Ranganadha Rao, Pemmaraju V.

    2009-01-01

    Background Leprosy was eliminated as a public health problem (<1 case per 10,000) in India by December 2005. With this target in sight the need for a separate vertical programme was diminished. The second phase of the National Leprosy Eradication Programme was therefore initiated: decentralisation of the vertical programme, integration of leprosy services into the primary health care (PHC) system and development of a surveillance system to monitor programme performance. Methodology/Principal Findings To study the process of integration a qualitative analysis of issues and perceptions of patients and providers, and a review of leprosy records and registers to evaluate programme performance was carried out in the state of Orissa, India. Program performance indicators such as a low mean defaulter rate of 3.83% and a low-misdiagnosis rate of 4.45% demonstrated no detrimental effect of integration on program success. PHC staff were generally found to be highly knowledgeable of diagnosis and management of leprosy cases due to frequent training and a support network of leprosy experts. However in urban hospitals district-level leprosy experts had assumed leprosy activities. The aim was to aid busy PHC staff but it also compromised their leprosy knowledge and management capacity. Inadequate monitoring of a policy of ‘new case validation,’ in which MDT was not initiated until primary diagnosis had been verified by a leprosy expert, may have led to approximately 26% of suspect cases awaiting confirmation of diagnosis 1–8 months after their initial PHC visit. Conclusions/Significance This study highlights the need for effective monitoring and evaluation of the integration process. Inadequate monitoring could lead to a reduction in early diagnosis, a delay in initiation of MDT and an increase in disability rates. This in turn could reverse some of the programme's achievements. These findings may help Andhra Pradesh and other states in India to improve their integration

  20. Household costs of leprosy reactions (ENL) in rural India.

    PubMed

    Chandler, David J; Hansen, Kristian S; Mahato, Bhabananda; Darlong, Joydeepa; John, Annamma; Lockwood, Diana N J

    2015-01-01

    Erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL) is a common immune-mediated complication of lepromatous (LL) and borderline lepromatous (BL) leprosy. Most patients experience chronic or multiple acute ENL over many years during an economically active period of their lives. Understanding the economic burden of ENL is essential to provide effective patient support, yet this area has not been investigated. Ninety-one patients with LL or BL leprosy attending a leprosy hospital in Purulia district of West Bengal, India, were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Cases (n = 53) were identified as those who had one or more episodes of ENL within the last 3 years. Controls (n = 38) had LL or BL leprosy but no history of ENL. Data were collected on household income, direct and indirect costs, and coping strategies. The total household cost was Rs 1543 per month or 27.9% (IQR 13.2-52.6) of monthly household income for cases, and Rs 237 per month or 4.9% (IQR 1.7-13.4) of monthly household income for controls. Indirect costs accounted for 65% of total household costs for cases. Direct costs accounted for the remaining 35% of household costs, and resulted almost entirely from treatment-seeking in the private sector. Total household costs exceeded 40% of household income for 37.7% of cases (n = 20) and 2.6% of controls (n = 1) [1 USD = 59 INR]. Households affected by ENL face significant economic burden and are at risk of being pushed further into poverty. Health policy should acknowledge the importance of private sector provision and the significant contribution to total household costs of lost productivity (indirect cost). Further work is needed to explore this area and identify solutions.

  1. Household Costs of Leprosy Reactions (ENL) in Rural India

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, David J.; Hansen, Kristian S.; Mahato, Bhabananda; Darlong, Joydeepa; John, Annamma; Lockwood, Diana N. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL) is a common immune-mediated complication of lepromatous (LL) and borderline lepromatous (BL) leprosy. Most patients experience chronic or multiple acute ENL over many years during an economically active period of their lives. Understanding the economic burden of ENL is essential to provide effective patient support, yet this area has not been investigated. Methods Ninety-one patients with LL or BL leprosy attending a leprosy hospital in Purulia district of West Bengal, India, were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Cases (n = 53) were identified as those who had one or more episodes of ENL within the last 3 years. Controls (n = 38) had LL or BL leprosy but no history of ENL. Data were collected on household income, direct and indirect costs, and coping strategies. Findings The total household cost was Rs 1543 per month or 27.9% (IQR 13.2-52.6) of monthly household income for cases, and Rs 237 per month or 4.9% (IQR 1.7-13.4) of monthly household income for controls. Indirect costs accounted for 65% of total household costs for cases. Direct costs accounted for the remaining 35% of household costs, and resulted almost entirely from treatment-seeking in the private sector. Total household costs exceeded 40% of household income for 37.7% of cases (n = 20) and 2.6% of controls (n = 1) [1 USD = 59 INR]. Interpretation Households affected by ENL face significant economic burden and are at risk of being pushed further into poverty. Health policy should acknowledge the importance of private sector provision and the significant contribution to total household costs of lost productivity (indirect cost). Further work is needed to explore this area and identify solutions. PMID:25590638

  2. History of leprosy in Rio de Janeiro*

    PubMed Central

    Avelleira, João Carlos Regazzi; Bernardes, Fred; Quaresma, Maria Victória; Vianna, Francisco Reis

    2014-01-01

    The record of the first cases of leprosy in Rio de Janeiro dates from the seventeenth century. The first local host of leprosy patients was created from 1741, and the first colonies hospitals were built in the early twentieth century, in order to avoid contagion of the population. The first structures dedicated to research also date from this time: the Leprosy International Institute, the Leprology Institute, and the Leprosy Laboratory of the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, where the most prestigious leprologists of Rio de Janeiro worked. Currently, investigations are focused on the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation; additionally, leprosy patients are treated at municipal health centers and state hospitals, and former colony hospitals only accept patients with severe disabilities. PMID:24937834

  3. Leprosy in New Zealand: an epidemiological update.

    PubMed

    Yu, Richard; Jarrett, Paul; Holland, David; Sherwood, Jill; Pikholz, Catherine

    2015-05-15

    To examine the current epidemiological trends of leprosy in New Zealand and raise awareness of this disease in the health professional community. Epidemiological data of leprosy, a notifiable disease in New Zealand, was accessed for the 10 year time period 2004 to 2013. Using an illustrative case as an introduction, all 38 case reports from the study period are summarised. Most cases of leprosy in New Zealand notified during the study period are immigrants from countries with endemic leprosy, reflecting the origin of disease. Delay to diagnosis is common. Leprosy remains a clinical problem in New Zealand. Cases are more likely to arise in geographical areas with higher numbers of immigrants from endemic countries.

  4. Pure neuritic leprosy: Current status and relevance.

    PubMed

    Rao, P Narasimha; Suneetha, Sujai

    2016-01-01

    Pure neuritic leprosy has always been an enigma due to its clinical and management ambiguities. Although only the Indian Association of Leprologist's classification recognizes 'pure neuritic leprosy' as a distinct sub group of leprosy, cases nonetheless are reported from various countries of Asia, Africa, South America and Europe, indicating its global relevance. It is important to maintain pure neuritic leprosy as a subgroup as it constitutes a good percentage of leprosy cases reported from India, which contributes to more than half of global leprosy numbers. Unfortunately, a high proportion of these patients present with Grade 2 disability at the time of initial reporting itself due to the early nerve involvement. Although skin lesions are absent by definition, when skin biopsies were performed from the skin along the distribution of the affected nerve, a proportion of patients demonstrated leprosy pathology, revealing sub-clinical skin involvement. In addition on follow-up, skin lesions are noted to develop in up to 20% of pure neuritic leprosy cases, indicating its progression to manifest cutaneous disease. Over the decades, the confirmation of diagnosis of pure neuritic leprosy has been subjective, however, with the arrival and use of high-resolution ultrasonography (HRUS) for nerve imaging, we have a tool not only to objectively measure and record the nerve thickening but also to assess the morphological alterations in the nerve including echo texture, fascicular pattern and vascularity. Management of pure neuritic leprosy requires multidrug therapy along with appropriate dose of systemic corticosteroids, for both acute and silent neuritis. Measures for pain relief, self-care of limbs and physiotherapy are important to prevent as well as manage disabilities in this group of patients.

  5. [Philanthropy, government, and the fight against leprosy (1920-1945)].

    PubMed

    Santos, Vicente Saul Moreira Dos

    2011-12-01

    The 1920s creation of Sociedades de Assistência aos Lázaros e Defesa Contra a Lepra under Brazil's First Republic (1889-1930) represented a milestone in relations between assistance organizations and the government. Although these organizations were at first autonomous decision-makers, their guidelines changed after they established closer relations with the government, which enacted reforms in policies to fight leprosy following the 1930 creation of the Ministry of Education and Public Health, especially during the long tenure of Minister Gustavo Capanema (1934-1945).

  6. Immunologic aspects of leprosy with reference to extravascular immunoglobulins: their excretion profile in urine.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, A K; Saha, K

    1976-01-01

    An aliquot of 24-hour urine collected from leprosy patients was concentrated and examined for the presence of albumin, transferrin, IgG, IgA, IgM, IgD, D3, kappa and lambda light chains by the gel diffusion technic using respective monospecific antisera. Urinary protein excretion profile in lepromatous leprosy patients showed that while excretion of transferrin in the urine was negligible; that of IgG molecules, a substance of higher molecular weight, was significant. It is suggested that the immunoglobulins excreted in the urine may not be plasma-derived, but extravascular in origin. They are probably synthesized in the urinary tract. In the present study, out of 25 leprosy patients, 2 female patients having severe lepra reactions developed urinary tract infections. E. coli and Klebsiella were isolated from their urine. The urinary IgG levels in those two cases were found to be the highest in the series.

  7. Leprosy: between acceptance and segregation. Community behaviour towards persons affected by leprosy in eastern Nepal.

    PubMed

    de Stigter, D H; de Geus, L; Heynders, M L

    2000-12-01

    This study describes community behaviour towards persons affected by leprosy in the eastern Terai districts of Nepal. The results show that 95% of the persons affected by leprosy recognized by the community have visible signs such as wounds, swellings and deformed feet or hands. Persons affected by leprosy still experience negative behaviour. Motives for negative community behaviour are mostly found in the fact that people fear infection by germs, but fear of a curse from God is also mentioned. This study shows that negative community behaviour is still present in eastern Nepal. Leprosy is more than a disease; the disease can nowadays be medically cured, but the sickness of leprosy still remains. Leprosy control programmes should focus on prevention of impairments and disabilities, because it seems that a visible sign is an important trigger for negative community behaviour.

  8. The demystification of leprosy: a multifactorial problem.

    PubMed

    Kato, L

    1990-01-01

    Abolishment of misbeliefs and misconceptions, unfounded fear and prejudice are factors as important in leprosy control as prevention, early detection and therapy. Concrete measures of demystification are proposed. Identify and divulge the absolute truth about leprosy. Calling leprosy "Hansen's disease" did not result in demystification. Patients know that the two terms are identical. Treating them as human beings attracts more patients to the healers than the Hansenologian ritual. Contrary to statements, no major advances are being made in the field of bacteriology, immunology, molecular biology, mode of transmission and epidemiology of leprosy. Not a single new drug has been discovered in 26 years. Vaccination is a dubious venture. The question arises as to whether the right priorities are promoted in leprosy research. Cultivation of the leprosy bacillus is the sine qua non of any further progress. This field of research is a lost and totally neglected priority. Consequently we have no pharmacological model for badly needed of ultrapotent antileprosy drugs. Syphilis is now cured with a single dose of penicillin. A drug as potent against leprosy should not be a mission impossible if an appropriate pharmacological model--the in vitro culture--is available. The multifactorial problem of demystification is a difficult but not an impossible task. Less sensationalism, more real progress in research, selecting the right priorities, achieving the "ultimate drug", shelter, food, shoes, soap and broom for every human on this planet constitute the road to demystification.

  9. Tuberculoid leprosy and Type 1 lepra reaction.

    PubMed

    Bongiorno, M R; Pistone, G; Noto, S; Aricò, M

    2008-09-01

    A patient is described with tuberculoid leprosy and Type 1 (lepra) reaction from Sicily a non-endemic region, who lived previously in Manila from 2000 to 2005. The skin lesions became acutely inflamed and edematous. The plaques were painless to touch or pinprick, and there was swelling of the nerves in the fibro-osseous tunnels under the surface of the skin, including both the ulnar nerve at the elbow, and the posterior tibial nerve (medial malleolus). During the course of electro-neurographic studies, conduction velocity in the motory nerves indicated a slowing-down. The diagnosis of leprosy was confirmed by residence in an endemic area for about 5 years, by simultaneous skin lesions and peripheral nerve abnormalities, and by skin biopsy. Outside of endemic areas, diagnosis remains a challenge for physicians for mainly two reasons. Firstly, the incubation period of leprosy is uniquely long among bacterial diseases and varies from a month to over 40 years. Secondly, outside leprosy-endemic areas, the diagnosis of leprosy is usually not considered, and patients are likely to be examined by a wide range of specialists. Physicians outside endemic areas should consider leprosy as a possible differential diagnosis if a patient from leprosy-endemic regions presents with painless skin lesions, nerve enlargement, or persistent skin lesions.

  10. Leprosy stigma: ironing out the creases.

    PubMed

    Kazeem, Omobolanle; Adegun, Temitayo

    2011-06-01

    Oft-cited as a deterrent to elimination of the disease, stigma is still a critical feature of the leprosy landscape leading to ostracism, loss of employment, loss of housing, ridicule and rejection from society. The reason for leprosy-stigma rests historically and culturally on the mythology about the disease's origin and transmission, and its aesthetic features such as the enigmatic physical disfigurement, and the distinctive ulcers consequent of untreated leprosy. While the literature on leprosy has been consistent in showing that stigma is a social complication of the condition worldwide, there is seldom recognition of processes of stigmatisation in broader contexts. Effective and sustainable interventions directed at curbing leprosy stigma and so improving its social course must, however, be informed by an appreciation of such contexts; particularly in the light of the goal to eliminate the disease worldwide. Examining stigma in the broader contexts of historical, social, economic, political contexts is the aim of this paper. The paper also has implications for broad ranging intervention efforts aimed at de-constructing leprosy-stigma in order to craft a more accommodating ambiance of acceptance, care and support for people affected by leprosy.

  11. [Combination drug therapy in leprosy].

    PubMed

    Terencio de las Aguas, J

    1983-01-01

    The importance of polichemotherapy in multibacilar leprosy (LL and LD) in patients without any previous therapy as in those diagnosticated and under monotherapy most of all in the resistance patients is presented. Sulphones, clofazimine and rifampicine are selected as first rate drugs and protionamide-etionamide as second rate drugs. The therapy plans with the association of two and three drugs and the convenience of continuing indefinitely with at least one of the drugs are presented insisting on the advantages of the clofazimine-sulphones and rifampicine-sulphones associations. The necessity of immunotherapy for recover of celular immunity against the bacilus, is the only form of preventing relapses and drug resistance.

  12. Leprosy in Pakistan: LEPRA elective study.

    PubMed

    Ladhani, S

    1998-06-01

    As part of the curriculum, medical students at the United Medical and Dental Schools of Guy's and St Thomas's Hospitals (UMDS), London, are encouraged to spend an elective period of 8 weeks in their final year anywhere in the world, studying any field of medicine they are interested in. Having lived in Tanzania for 10 years, I have had contact with people suffering from leprosy and my interest in leprosy continued after I moved to Europe to continue my education. I therefore decided to use my elective to gain hands-on experience with the disease so that I could understand and appreciate the impact of leprosy in developing countries such as Pakistan.

  13. Spatial clustering and local risk of leprosy in São Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Yamamura, Mellina; Arroyo, Luiz Henrique; Popolin, Marcela Paschoal; Chiaravalloti Neto, Francisco; Palha, Pedro Fredemir; Uchoa, Severina Alice da Costa; Pieri, Flávia Meneguetti; Pinto, Ione Carvalho; Fiorati, Regina Célia; de Queiroz, Ana Angélica Rêgo; Belchior, Aylana de Souza; dos Santos, Danielle Talita; Garcia, Maria Concebida da Cunha; Crispim, Juliane de Almeida; Alves, Luana Seles; Berra, Thaís Zamboni; Arcêncio, Ricardo Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    Background Although the detection rate is decreasing, the proportion of new cases with WHO grade 2 disability (G2D) is increasing, creating concern among policy makers and the Brazilian government. This study aimed to identify spatial clustering of leprosy and classify high-risk areas in a major leprosy cluster using the SatScan method. Methods Data were obtained including all leprosy cases diagnosed between January 2006 and December 2013. In addition to the clinical variable, information was also gathered regarding the G2D of the patient at diagnosis and after treatment. The Scan Spatial statistic test, developed by Kulldorff e Nagarwalla, was used to identify spatial clustering and to measure the local risk (Relative Risk—RR) of leprosy. Maps considering these risks and their confidence intervals were constructed. Results A total of 434 cases were identified, including 188 (43.31%) borderline leprosy and 101 (23.28%) lepromatous leprosy cases. There was a predominance of males, with ages ranging from 15 to 59 years, and 51 patients (11.75%) presented G2D. Two significant spatial clusters and three significant spatial-temporal clusters were also observed. The main spatial cluster (p = 0.000) contained 90 census tracts, a population of approximately 58,438 inhabitants, detection rate of 22.6 cases per 100,000 people and RR of approximately 3.41 (95%CI = 2.721–4.267). Regarding the spatial-temporal clusters, two clusters were observed, with RR ranging between 24.35 (95%CI = 11.133–52.984) and 15.24 (95%CI = 10.114–22.919). Conclusion These findings could contribute to improvements in policies and programming, aiming for the eradication of leprosy in Brazil. The Spatial Scan statistic test was found to be an interesting resource for health managers and healthcare professionals to map the vulnerability of areas in terms of leprosy transmission risk and areas of underreporting. PMID:28241038

  14. Leprosy control in the Republic of Yemen: co-operation between government and non-government organizations, 1989-2003.

    PubMed

    Al Samie, Abdul Rahim; Al Qubati, Yasin

    2004-06-01

    Although the prevalence rate of leprosy in the Republic of Yemen has dropped below the WHO elimination level of less than one case per 10,000 of the population, it is still regarded as a serious public health problem calling for continued vigilance, notably in the detection and treatment of hidden and undiagnosed cases. In the past, religious misinterpretation has generated adverse behaviour patterns towards people affected by leprosy, characterized by aggression, negligence and isolation. Until about 1982, following a visit of a leprologist (Dr S. K. Noordeen) from the World Health Organization, there was no leprosy control programme and attempts to establish one remained ineffective until in 1989, when an agreement was signed between the Ministry of Public Health and Population and the German Leprosy Relief Association. This led to the development of a leprosy control programme in four governorates, later extended to the rest of the country. This paper describes the progress made in the control of leprosy in the Yemen, 1989-2003, by the Ministry of Health and Population and the GLRA, in association with two local societies.

  15. Perceived Stigma towards Leprosy among Community Members Living Close to Nonsomboon Leprosy Colony in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Kaehler, Nils; Adhikar, Bipin; Raut, Shristi; Marahatta, Sujan Babu; Chapman, Robert Sedgwick

    2015-01-01

    Background Interpretation of Leprosy as a sickness differs among society. The set of beliefs, knowledge and perceptions towards a disease play a vital role in the construction of stigma towards a disease. The main purpose of this study was to explore the extent and correlates of the perceived stigma towards leprosy in the community living close to the leprosy colony in Non Somboon region of Khon Kaen Province of Thailand. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 257 leprosy unaffected community participants, above the age of 18 who were living close to the Leprosy colony in Non Somboon region of Thailand. Each participant was asked a questionnaire containing characteristics of the participants in terms of socio-demographic background and knowledge regarding the disease. In addition perceived stigma towards leprosy was measured using EMIC (Explanatory Model Interview Catalogue) questionnaire. Results Among EMIC items, shame or embarrassment in the community due to leprosy was felt by 54.5%, dislike to buy food from leprosy affected persons were 49.8% and difficulty to find work for leprosy affected persons were perceived by 47.1%. Higher total EMIC score was found in participants age 61 years or older (p = 0.021), staying longer in the community (p = 0.005), attending fewer years of education (p = 0.024) and who were unemployed (p = 0.08). Similarly, perceptions about leprosy such as difficult to treat (p = 0.015), severe disease (p = 0.004) and punishment by God (p = 0.011) were significantly associated with higher perceived stigma. Conclusions Perceived stigma towards leprosy was found highest among participants with age 61 years or older, longer duration of stay in community close to the leprosy colony, lower duration of education and participants who were unemployed had higher perceived stigma. Similarly, participants with perceptions of leprosy such as difficult to treat, severe disease and punishment by God had higher perceived stigma towards

  16. Citrus leprosis virus N: A New Dichorhavirus Causing Citrus Leprosis Disease.

    PubMed

    Ramos-González, Pedro Luis; Chabi-Jesus, Camila; Guerra-Peraza, Orlene; Tassi, Aline Daniele; Kitajima, Elliot Watanabe; Harakava, Ricardo; Salaroli, Renato Barbosa; Freitas-Astúa, Juliana

    2017-08-01

    Citrus leprosis (CL) is a viral disease endemic to the Western Hemisphere that produces local necrotic and chlorotic lesions on leaves, branches, and fruit and causes serious yield reduction in citrus orchards. Samples of sweet orange (Citrus × sinensis) trees showing CL symptoms were collected during a survey in noncommercial citrus areas in the southeast region of Brazil in 2013 to 2016. Transmission electron microscopy analyses of foliar lesions confirmed the presence of rod-like viral particles commonly associated with CL in the nucleus and cytoplasm of infected cells. However, every attempt to identify these particles by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction tests failed, even though all described primers for the detection of known CL-causing cileviruses and dichorhaviruses were used. Next-generation sequencing of total RNA extracts from three symptomatic samples revealed the genome of distinct, although highly related (>92% nucleotide sequence identity), viruses whose genetic organization is similar to that of dichorhaviruses. The genome sequence of these viruses showed <62% nucleotide sequence identity with those of orchid fleck virus and coffee ringspot virus. Globally, the deduced amino acid sequences of the open reading frames they encode share 32.7 to 63.8% identity with the proteins of the dichorhavirids. Mites collected from both the naturally infected citrus trees and those used for the transmission of one of the characterized isolates to Arabidopsis plants were anatomically recognized as Brevipalpus phoenicis sensu stricto. Molecular and biological features indicate that the identified viruses belong to a new species of CL-associated dichorhavirus, which we propose to call Citrus leprosis N dichorhavirus. Our results, while emphasizing the increasing diversity of viruses causing CL disease, lead to a reevaluation of the nomenclature of those viruses assigned to the genus Dichorhavirus. In this regard, a comprehensive discussion is

  17. Severe leprosy reactions due to Mycobacterium lepromatosis.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiang Y; Jessurun, Jose

    2013-01-01

    Leprosy is caused by the well-known Mycobacterium leprae and the newly discovered M lepromatosis. Here, the authors describe 2 cases of leprosy with unusual clinical presentation caused by M lepromatosis. The patients, a 32-year-old man and a 50-year-old woman, both of Mexican origin, manifested high fever, lymphadenopathy and florid skin lesions in the form of erythema nodosum and Lucio's phenomenon as the first clinical presentation. Heavy infiltration of acid-fast bacilli was identified in the tissues that led to the diagnosis of lepromatous leprosy or diffuse leprosy. The patients were treated with multidrug regimen and responded appropriately. From the lymph node tissue, the authors showed the bacillus to be M lepromatosis, not M leprae as presumed previously, by differential polymerase chain reactions and analysis of gene sequences. These cases add to the growing studies on this organism, expand its endemic regions in Mexico and provide more clinical insight.

  18. Community attitude to divorce in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Raju, M S; Reddy, J V

    1995-01-01

    Divorcing a leprosy afflicted spouse is one of the manifestations of social stigma attached to leprosy. It mostly depends on the community's decision resulting from the physical and social threat perceived. In order to find out who were prone to divorce their leprosy afflicted spouses, 1199 community members drawn from two States, Orissa and Andhra Pradesh, were asked what their advice would be if a spouse of leprosy patient approached them for advice. The responses were cross tabulated against their demographic characteristics. While, only a small proportion of respondents advised divorce in Andhra Pradesh, they were mainly females, above SSC educated, those who did cultivation, labourers and were from poor economic group. On the other hand, in Orissa, a high proportion of the respondents suggested divorce.

  19. Ocular morbidity in leprosy patients with lagophthalmos.

    PubMed

    Khandpur, S; Robertson, S J; Rao, P S S

    2009-01-01

    Lagophthalmos is a well known complication in leprosy due to the involvement of seventh cranial nerve resulting in incomplete closure of the eyelids. The real magnitude of ocular morbidity as a consequence of lagophthalmos is unknown, as several ocular complications can occur independently due to involvement of the fifth (trigeminal) nerve or due to secondary infection. Therefore, a study was designed to carefully examine the eyes of 100 consecutive leprosy patients with lagophthalmos seeking treatment at a leprosy referral centre in Delhi. Among the eyes examined, 145 had lagophthalmos. The symptomatology and anterior-posterior chamber morbidity in eyes with lagophthalmos were significantly higher as compared to unaffected eyes. Significantly, higher morbidity was seen regardless of sex or type of leprosy or deformity. Capacity building of the health professionals regarding ocular morbidity and increased emphasis on the importance of self care among patients can significantly reduce ocular morbidity.

  20. Leprosy: a problem solved by 2000?

    PubMed

    Stearns, A T

    2002-09-01

    It is now the year 2001, and in many endemic regions leprosy remains a public health problem by any definition. It is clear that defining leprosy purely by prevalence side-steps some of the real issues. There is still much to do to solve the problem of leprosy. Control programmes require better tests for early diagnosis if leprosy is to be reduced much further. Treatment of the infection and of reactions is still far from ideal, whilst an effective vaccine would be valuable in high-risk regions. Research into the true incidence in each endemic area is essential, and control programs of the future will need a more detailed understanding of the transmission of M. leprae to permit new logical interventions. Leprosy remains a devastating disease. Much of the damage that it inflicts is irreversible, and leads to disability and stigmatization. This is perhaps the greatest problem posed. It is easy to dwell on the successes of the elimination campaign, so diverting attention from those populations of 'cured' patients who still suffer from the consequences of infection. Leprosy should be regarded as a problem unsolved so long as patients continue to present with disabilities. WHO has carried out a highly successful campaign in reducing the prevalence of leprosy, and this needs to be acknowledged, but what is happening to the incidence in core endemic areas? Maintaining this success, however, may be an even greater struggle if funding is withdrawn and vertical programmes are absorbed into national health structures. We must take heed of the historian George Santayana, 'those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it'. We should take the example of tuberculosis as a warning of the dangers of ignoring a disease before it has been fully controlled, and strive to continue the leprosy elimination programmes until there are no new cases presenting with disability. The World Health Organisation has shown that leprosy is an eminently treatable disease, and has

  1. Genotyping of Mycobacterium leprae strains from a region of high endemic leprosy prevalence in India.

    PubMed

    Lavania, Mallika; Jadhav, Rupendra; Turankar, Ravindra P; Singh, Itu; Nigam, Astha; Sengupta, U

    2015-12-01

    Leprosy is still a major health problem in India which has the highest number of cases. Multiple locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) have been proposed as tools of strain typing for tracking the transmission of leprosy. However, empirical data for a defined population from scale and duration were lacking for studying the transmission chain of leprosy. Seventy slit skin scrapings were collected from Purulia (West Bengal), Miraj (Maharashtra), Shahdara (Delhi), and Naini (UP) hospitals of The Leprosy Mission (TLM). SNP subtyping and MLVA on 10 VNTR loci were applied for the strain typing of Mycobacterium leprae. Along with the strain typing conventional epidemiological investigation was also performed to trace the transmission chain. In addition, phylogenetic analysis was done on variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) data sets using sequence type analysis and recombinational tests (START) software. START software performs analyses to aid in the investigation of bacterial population structure using multilocus sequence data. These analyses include data summary, lineage assignment, and tests for recombination and selection. Diversity was observed in the cross-sectional survey of isolates obtained from 70 patients. Similarity in fingerprinting profiles observed in specimens of cases from the same family or neighborhood locations indicated a possible common source of infection. The data suggest that these VNTRs including subtyping of SNPs can be used to study the sources and transmission chain in leprosy, which could be very important in monitoring of the disease dynamics in high endemic foci. The present study strongly indicates that multi-case families might constitute epidemic foci and the main source of M. leprae in villages, causing the predominant strain or cluster infection leading to the spread of leprosy in the community. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Is soil an alternative source of leprosy infection?

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, A N; Dastidar, S G

    Leprosy is believed to be transmitted only through human contacts. However, many anomalous observations had gradually accumulated which had weakened such beliefs. These are: only 1/3 rd cases of leprosy give a definite history of being transmitted from other known cases; life-long spouses, in whom only one has leprosy, seldom lead to leprosy to others; while MDT applied intensively in most leprosy endemic countries, could successfully reduce incidence of leprosy, however, simultaneously new cases arise unabated. Besides, a close look at animal leprosies also suggested a mode of transmission other than human-type contact. Thus, a search for alternative hypothesis led to the findings that leprosy bacillus (LB) could be a soil chemoautotroph and could facultatively live both in the human body and the soil which could serve as an alternative source of infection. Evaluation of accumulated evidences points to this possibility.

  3. Leprosy in a University Hospital in Southern Brazil*

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Adma Silva; Pinto, Karin Cristine; Bona, Míryan Priscilla Santos; de Mattos, Suelen Mayara Lopes; Hoffmann, Marina Portiolli; Mulinari-Brenner, Fabiane Andrade; Ottoboni, Vanessa Cristhine Dallolmo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Leprosy is an infectious disease that may lead to irreversible nerve damage, compromising patient's quality of life and leading to loss of working years. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the epidemiological profile of patients followed at a University Hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a retrospective observational study, based on a review of medical records. We studied the clinical and epidemiological features of patients with leprosy monitored at the Hospital de Clínicas of the Federal University of Paraná between January 2005 and January 2010. RESULTS The mean age was 47.51, while 35.94% of patients were aged 41-60. The male:female rate was 1.8:1. The most prevalent occupations were: retired, students or rural workers. Patients came mainly from Curitiba or nearby areas, but there were also patients from the countryside. The mean diagnostic delay was 24.57 months. Multibacillary forms prevailed, with the lepromatous variety being the most common, closely followed by the borderline type. Neural enlargement was found in more than 50% of the patients and 48.44% of them developed reactional states. Hemolysis was the most commonly detected drug side effect. Initial functional evaluation was possible in 70% of patients, 55% of whom had disabilities upon diagnosis. The most prevalent associated disease was hypertension. CONCLUSIONS This study showed an important diagnostic delay and a high rate of sequelae in this specific population. Brazil is one of the few remaining countries that has not yet eradicated leprosy and it is important to improve health policies in order to prevent sequelae and achieve eradication. PMID:26560210

  4. Specific antigen serologic tests in leprosy: implications for epidemiological surveillance of leprosy cases and household contacts

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Ana Paula Mendes; Coelho, Angélica da Conceição Oliveira; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Lana, Francisco Carlos Félix

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is a lack of straightforward tests for field application and known biomarkers for predicting leprosy progression in infected individuals. OBJECTIVE The aim was to analyse the response to infection by Mycobacterium leprae based on the reactivity of specific antigens: natural disaccharide linked to human serum albumin via an octyl (NDOHSA), a semisynthetic phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I); Leprosy Infectious Disease Research Institute Diagnostic-1 (LID-1) and natural disaccharide octyl - Leprosy Infectious Disease Research Institute Diagnostic-1 (NDOLID). METHODS The study population consisted of 130 leprosy cases diagnosed between 2010 and 2015 and 277 household contacts. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to analyse the reactivity of antibodies against NDOHSA, LID-1 and NDOLID. The samples and controls were tested in duplicate, and the antibody titer was expressed as an ELISA index. Data collection was made by home visits with application of questionnaire and dermatological evaluation of all household contacts to identify signs and symptoms of leprosy. FINDINGS Significant differences in the median ELISA results were observed among leprosy cases in treatment, leprosy cases that had completed treatment and household contacts. Higher proportions of seropositivity were observed in leprosy cases in treatment. Seropositivity was also higher in multibacillary in relation to paucibacillary, with the difference reaching statistical significance. Lower titers were observed among cases with a longer treatment time or discharge. For household contacts, the differences according to the clinical characteristics of the leprosy index case were less pronounced than expected. Other factors, such as the endemicity of leprosy, exposure outside the residence and genetic characteristics, appeared to have a greater influence on the seropositivity. MAIN CONCLUSIONS Serologic tests could be used as auxiliary tools for determining the operational

  5. VNTR typing of Mycobacterium leprae in South Indian leprosy patients.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Vidyagouri; Newton, Hema; Sakamuri, Rama Murthy; Reddy, Venkateshwar; Jain, Suman; Joseph, Abraham; Gillis, Tom; Nath, Indira; Norman, Gift; Vissa, Varalakshmi

    2009-09-01

    To study the suitability, stability and diversity of short tandem repeat (STR) genomic markers to elicit strain variation in the Mycobacterium leprae isolates within leprosy patients from Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu states in South India. Slit skin smear (SSS) samples were collected from lesions and various body sites of newly diagnosed leprosy patients. The SSSs from each patient were pooled, except in the case of five patients. Total DNA was extracted from SSS samples. M. leprae STRs were amplified from the DNA either by multiplex PCR (MP) or single PCR methods. The number of repeats for each STR locus (the STR allele) was obtained either by fragment length analysis (FLA) or by DNA sequencing of the PCR amplicons. Multiplex PCR minimised the use of DNA and reagents, and together with FLA, was time and cost effective for STR strain typing. After examination of the isolates of South Indian origin at 13 STR loci, it was determined that the alleles for (AC)8b, (GGT)5, 6-3a (rpoT), 21-3, 27-5, and 23-3 were conserved in two study populations. In a family from Andhra Pradesh, the M. leprae STR patterns in two patients were identical in 16 of 18 loci which indicate a common source of infection. Fourteen of 15 STR loci showed no intra-patient variation in the five patients tested in Tamil Nadu. Altogether, these studies indicate the suitability of STR strain typing for assessing short-range transmission chains.

  6. Effect of the Brazilian Conditional Cash Transfer and Primary Health Care Programs on the New Case Detection Rate of Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Nery, Joilda Silva; Pereira, Susan Martins; Rasella, Davide; Penna, Maria Lúcia Fernandes; Aquino, Rosana; Rodrigues, Laura Cunha; Barreto, Mauricio Lima; Penna, Gerson Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Background Social determinants can affect the transmission of leprosy and its progression to disease. Not much is known about the effectiveness of welfare and primary health care policies on the reduction of leprosy occurrence. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of the Brazilian cash transfer (Bolsa Família Program-BFP) and primary health care (Family Health Program-FHP) programs on new case detection rate of leprosy. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted the study with a mixed ecological design, a combination of an ecological multiple-group and time-trend design in the period 2004–2011 with the Brazilian municipalities as unit of analysis. The main independent variables were the BFP and FHP coverage at the municipal level and the outcome was new case detection rate of leprosy. Leprosy new cases, BFP and FHP coverage, population and other relevant socio-demographic covariates were obtained from national databases. We used fixed-effects negative binomial models for panel data adjusted for relevant socio-demographic covariates. A total of 1,358 municipalities were included in the analysis. In the studied period, while the municipal coverage of BFP and FHP increased, the new case detection rate of leprosy decreased. Leprosy new case detection rate was significantly reduced in municipalities with consolidated BFP coverage (Risk Ratio 0.79; 95% CI  = 0.74–0.83) and significantly increased in municipalities with FHP coverage in the medium (72–95%) (Risk Ratio 1.05; 95% CI  = 1.02–1.09) and higher coverage tertiles (>95%) (Risk Ratio 1.12; 95% CI  = 1.08–1.17). Conclusions At the same time the Family Health Program had been effective in increasing the new case detection rate of leprosy in Brazil, the Bolsa Família Program was associated with a reduction of the new case detection rate of leprosy that we propose reflects a reduction in leprosy incidence. PMID:25412418

  7. Three indigenous cases of leprosy in the Mississippi delta.

    PubMed

    Abide, John M; Webb, Risa M; Jones, Harriet L; Young, LaFarra

    2008-06-01

    Three native-born patients from the Mississippi Delta presented with leprosy over a 13-month period. None had a history of foreign travel, contact with each other, or known leprosy patients. Two patients' lesions lacked anesthesia, and all had a history of armadillo exposure. These cases add to the association of armadillo exposure and the subsequent development of leprosy.

  8. IL-12 and IL-23 modulate plasticity of FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells in human Leprosy.

    PubMed

    Tarique, Mohd; Saini, Chaman; Naqvi, Raza Ali; Khanna, Neena; Sharma, Alpana; Rao, D N

    2017-03-01

    Leprosy is a bacterial disease caused by M. leprae. Its clinical spectrum reflects the host's immune response to the M. leprae and provide an ideal model to investigate the host pathogen interaction and immunological dysregulation. Tregs are high in leprosy patients and responsible for immune suppression of the host by producing IL-10 and TGF-β cytokines. In leprosy, plasticity of Tregs remain unstudied. This is the first study describing the conversion of Tregs into Th1-like and Th17-like cells using in vitro cytokine therapy in leprosy patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from leprosy patients were isolated and stimulated with M. leprae antigen (MLCwA), rIL-12 and rIL-23 for 48h. Expression of FoxP3 in CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs, intracellular cytokines IFN-γ, TGF-β, IL-10 and IL-17 in Tregs cells were evaluated by flow cytometry (FACS) after stimulation. rIL-12 treatment increases the levels of pStat4 in Tregs and IFN-γ production. In the presence of rIL-23, pStat3(+) and IL-17A(+) cells increase. rIL-12 and r-IL-23 treatment downregulated the FoxP3 expression, IL-10 and TGF-β production by Tregs and enhances the expression of co-stimulatory molecules (CD80, CD86). In conclusion rIL-12 converts Tregs into IFN-γ producing cells through STAT-4 signaling while rIL-23 converts Tregs into IL-17 producing cells through STAT-3 signaling in leprosy patients. This study may helpful to provide a new avenue to overcome the immunosuprression in leprosy patients using in vitro cytokine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Leprosy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kang G, Lalloo D, White NJ, eds. Manson's Tropical Diseases . 23rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 41. ... by: Jatin M. Vyas, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Assistant in Medicine, Division of ...

  10. Leprosy

    MedlinePlus

    ... SeniorsIn The NewsYour Health ResourcesHealthcare Management End-of-Life Issues Insurance & Bills Self Care Working With Your Doctor Drugs, Procedures & Devices Over-the-counter Products Procedures & Devices Prescription Medicines Health Tools Dictionary Symptom ...

  11. Leprosy in a patient infected with HIV.

    PubMed

    Galtrey, Clare M; Modarres, Hamid; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Brandner, Sebastian; Rossor, Alexander M; Lockwood, Diana Nj; Reilly, Mary M; Manji, Hadi; Schon, Fred

    2017-04-01

    A 60-year-old Nigerian man, who had lived in Europe for 30 years but had returned home frequently, presented with right frontalis muscle weakness and right ulnar nerve palsy, without skin lesions. Neurophysiology showed a generalised neuropathy with demyelinating features. Blood tests were positive for HIV, with a normal CD4 count. There was nerve thickening both clinically and on MRI. Nerve biopsy showed chronic endoneuritis and perineuritis (indicating leprosy) without visible mycobacteria. His neuropathy continued to deteriorate (lepra reaction) before starting treatment with WHO multidrug therapy, highly active antiretroviral therapy and corticosteroids. There are 10 new cases of leprosy diagnosed annually in the UK. Coinfection with HIV is rare but paradoxically does not usually adversely affect the outcome of leprosy or change treatment. However, permanent nerve damage in leprosy is common despite optimal therapy. Leprosy should be considered in patients from endemic areas who present with mononeuritis multiplex. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. A university extension course in leprosy: telemedicine in the Amazon for primary healthcare.

    PubMed

    Paixão, Maurício Pedreira; Miot, Hélio Amante; de Souza, Pedro Elias; Haddad, Ana Estela; Wen, Chao Lung

    2009-01-01

    There is a high prevalence of leprosy in the Amazon region of Brazil. We have developed a distance education course in leprosy for training staff of the Family Health Teams (FHTs). The course was made available through a web portal. Tele-educational resources were mediated by professors and coordinators, and included the use of theoretical content available through the web, discussion lists, Internet chat, activity diaries, 3-D video animations (Virtual Human on Leprosy), classes in video streaming and case simulation. Sixty-five FHT staff members were enrolled. All of them completed the course and 47 participants received a certificate at the end of the course. At the end of the course, 48 course-evaluation questionnaires were answered. A total of 47 participants (98%) considered the course as excellent. The results demonstrate the feasibility of an interactive, tele-education model as an educational resource for staff in isolated regions. Improvements in diagnostic skills should increase diagnostic suspicion of leprosy and may contribute to early detection.

  13. Schleswig: medieval leprosy on the boundary between Germany and Denmark.

    PubMed

    Boldsen, Jesper L; Rasmussen, Kaare Lund; Riis, Thomas; Dittmar, Manuela; Weise, Svenja

    2013-01-01

    Leprosy was a well-recognized and dreaded disease in medieval Europe. The disease is reported to have reached Germany with the Roman invasion and it was present in Scandinavia in the first centuries AD. This paper estimates and analyzes the frequency of leprosy among adult people buried in one of five medieval cemeteries in the city of Schleswig. Seven different dichotomous osteological lesions indicative of leprosy were analyzed, and it was possible to score at least one of these conditions on 350 adult skeletons (aged 15 or older). The scores were transformed to a statistic indicating the likelihood that the person to whom the skeleton belonged suffered from leprosy. It was found that the frequency of leprosy in the five cemeteries varied between 9 and 44%. Four of the five cemeteries showed frequencies ranging from 35 and 44% and with no statistically significant differences among them. The fifth cemetery showed a significantly lower frequency of leprosy (9%). The distribution of female age at death does not appear to be affected by leprosy status. This means that females experienced a considerably elevated risk of dying once they had contracted leprosy as the disease usually has a mid-adulthood age of onset. In four of the five cemeteries males with leprosy died in higher ages than men without leprosy--in two of the cemeteries the difference was statistically significant. This indicates that leprosy usually added less to the risk of dying among men than among women in medieval Schleswig.

  14. Ulnar nerve sonography in leprosy neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhu; Liu, Da-Yue; Lei, Yang-Yang; Yang, Zheng; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A 23-year-old woman presented with a half-year history of right forearm sensory and motor dysfunction. Ultrasound imaging revealed definite thickening of the right ulnar nerve trunk and inner epineurium, along with heterogeneous hypoechogenicity and unclear nerve fiber bundle. Color Doppler exhibited a rich blood supply, which was clearly different from the normal ulnar nerve presentation with a scarce blood supply. The patient subsequently underwent needle aspiration of the right ulnar nerve, and histopathological examination confirmed that granulomatous nodules had formed with a large number of infiltrating lymphocytes and a plurality of epithelioid cells in the fibrous connective tissues, with visible atypical foam cells and proliferous vascularization, consistent with leprosy. Our report will familiarize readers with the characteristic sonographic features of the ulnar nerve in leprosy, particularly because of the decreasing incidence of leprosy in recent years.

  15. Silent iritis in treated bacillary negative leprosy.

    PubMed

    Thompson, K; Job, C K

    1996-09-01

    Iridectomy specimens from 59 leprosy patients who had adequate medical records of whom 33 belong to the lepromatous (LL) leprosy variety and 16 normal controls were studied histopathologically. All patients were bacteriologically negative and had received dapsone followed by multidrug therapy (MDT), or MDT only, or only dapsone for varying periods. It was found that leprosy, particularly lepromatous disease, did not significantly decrease the age of formation of cataract. Of the 33 LL patients studied 60.6% had silent iritis. The duration of treatment had no obvious influence on the persistence of iritis. Treatment with only 2 years of MDT for LL patients did not significantly increase the prevalence of persistent silent iritis compared to those who received other types of antileprosy therapy for long periods. It is pointed out that chronic iritis is a serious complication that continues even after the patient is declared clinically and bacteriologically cured, especially in patients who had a history of chronic iritis clinically.

  16. Leprosy - evolution of the path to eradication

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, Sunil; Narang, Tarun; Kumar, Bhushan

    2013-01-01

    Leprosy is among the world's oldest and most dreaded diseases and it has been synonymous with stigma and discrimination due to the hideous deformities it produced, mystery around its aetiology and transmission and lack of any effective remedy till recently. Leprosy control started with the use of chaulmoogra oil and for the last three decades, multi drug therapy (MDT) has been our main tool against leprosy. In the last two decades, the reported global prevalence of active leprosy infection has dropped by almost 90 per cent by the combined efforts of the World Health Organization (WHO), local governments, health professionals, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), however, a parallel drop in the incidence or new case detection rate (NCDR) has not occurred. From 1994 through 2011, more than 100,000 new cases are being detected annually, of whom maximum case load is from India. There is need for research on tools for early diagnosis, short and effective treatment, and prevention of deformities and disabilities. Evaluating the role of immunotherapy and immunoprophylaxis will also lead us to better understanding of their mode of action. Further molecular analysis of Mycobacterium leprae genome may provide the requisite basis for all this. The current reality is that there is a need to sustain and provide quality leprosy services to all persons through general health services, including good referral system. All these provisions in the integrated health care approach will go a long way in further reducing the stigma. Efforts need to be made to reduce deformity through early detection, self care, physiotherapy and reconstructive surgery and developing sound surveillance systems. With all the remarkable achievements in the fight against leprosy, the stage is now set for the final assault. It is hoped that with the efforts of all the stake holders and strong political will, the disease will be eradicated in the near future. PMID:23481049

  17. Morphea Simulating Paucibacillary Leprosy Clinically and Histopathologically

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, José Saulo Torres; Cavalcanti, Marília Lopes; Kac, Bernard Kawa; Pires, Claudia Lopes

    2013-01-01

    Clinically and histopathologically paucibacillary leprosy shows similar features with initial morphea. In this case we report a 24 yr-old male patient who presented to our dermatology department with diagnosed paucibacillary leprosy by his local dermatologist, and confirmed by perineurovascular lymphocytic infiltrate in the histopathological exam. On physical examination we found new plaque lesions that were suggestive of morphea with alteration of sensitivity. A new biopsy was performed showing sclerotic superficial dermis with thickening of the collagen bundles in deep dermis and linear arrays lymphocytic infiltrate between the collagen bundles that confirm the diagnosis of morphea. PMID:23372229

  18. Bilateral facial synkinesis in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Goel, Madhu Mati; Jain, Amita; Gupta, Arvind; Lalla, Rakesh; Singh, Gyan Prakash

    2012-05-23

    Leprosy is an important cause of cranial nerve palsy in endemic areas where it may be seen in upto 17.6% patients. The authors herein describe a rare case of bilaterally symmetrical facial synkinesis with video documentation and modified blink reflex. A 35-year-old gentleman presented with numbness involving right half of his face for 8 months and abnormal stretching sensations over both sides of his nose for one and a half months. Sensory and motor involvement of the right trigeminal nerve was detected along with bilaterally symmetrical facial synkinesis involving orbicularis oculi and nasalis. R(1) and R(2) responses consistent with mis-reinnervation were recorded on the left-side using orbicularis oculi and nasalis muscles. Skin biopsy revealed acid-fast bacilli and sural nerve biopsy, the presence of granulomas. After 3 months of follow-up on WHO multi-drug therapy, an improvement in facial sensations was observed but without any change in facial synkinetic movements.

  19. Ophthalmic findings of newly diagnosed leprosy patients in Istanbul Leprosy Hospital, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Cakiner, T; Karaçorlu, M A

    1998-02-01

    The objective of this study was to detect ocular lesions of newly diagnosed leprosy cases admitted to Istanbul Leprosy Hospital. The patients were categorized according to sex, age, type of leprosy and duration of the disease. Their eyes were categorized as with or without ocular findings due to leprosy. The total number of patients was 21. The mean age was 22+/-4.6 years, the duration of the disease was 36.3+/-19.6 months. Madarosis was the most common finding in this group. It was found in 15 patients (71.4%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 47.8-88.7%). As a second common finding related to corneal alterations, 13 patients had nerve thickening (61.9%, 95% CI 38.4-81.8%). None of our patients had trichiasis, episcleritis, scleritis, cataract, iris atrophy, iris pearl, abnormal vitreous or retinal findings.

  20. Advances and hurdles on the way toward a leprosy vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Gillis, Thomas P.; Reed, Steven G.

    2011-01-01

    Prevalence rates for leprosy have declined sharply over the past 20 y, with this decline generally attributed to the WHO multi-drug therapy (MDT) campaign to provide free-of-charge treatment to all diagnosed leprosy patients. The success of this program appears to have reached its nadir, however, as evidenced by the stalled decreases in both global prevalence and new case detection rates of leprosy. Mass BCG vaccination for the prevention of tuberculosis (TB) at national levels has had a positive effect on leprosy decline and is often overlooked as an important factor in current leprosy control programs. Because BCG provides incomplete protection against both TB and leprosy, newer more effective TB vaccines are being developed. The impact that application of these vaccines will have on current leprosy control programs is unclear. In this review, we assess the need for vaccines within leprosy control programs. We summarize and discuss leprosy vaccine strategies that have been deployed previously and discuss those strategies that are currently being developed to augment recent breakthroughs in leprosy control. PMID:22048122

  1. Pauci- and Multibacillary Leprosy: Two Distinct, Genetically Neglected Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gaschignard, Jean; Grant, Audrey Virginia; Thuc, Nguyen Van; Orlova, Marianna; Cobat, Aurélie; Huong, Nguyen Thu; Ba, Nguyen Ngoc; Thai, Vu Hong; Abel, Laurent; Schurr, Erwin; Alcaïs, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    After sustained exposure to Mycobacterium leprae, only a subset of exposed individuals develops clinical leprosy. Moreover, leprosy patients show a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations that extend from the paucibacillary (PB) to the multibacillary (MB) form of the disease. This “polarization” of leprosy has long been a major focus of investigation for immunologists because of the different immune response in these two forms. But while leprosy per se has been shown to be under tight human genetic control, few epidemiological or genetic studies have focused on leprosy subtypes. Using PubMed, we collected available data in English on the epidemiology of leprosy polarization and the possible role of human genetics in its pathophysiology until September 2015. At the genetic level, we assembled a list of 28 genes from the literature that are associated with leprosy subtypes or implicated in the polarization process. Our bibliographical search revealed that improved study designs are needed to identify genes associated with leprosy polarization. Future investigations should not be restricted to a subanalysis of leprosy per se studies but should instead contrast MB to PB individuals. We show the latter approach to be the most powerful design for the identification of genetic polarization determinants. Finally, we bring to light the important resource represented by the nine-banded armadillo model, a unique animal model for leprosy. PMID:27219008

  2. Leprosy: too complex a disease for a simple elimination paradigm.

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, Diana N. J.; Suneetha, Sujai

    2005-01-01

    Can leprosy be eliminated? This paper considers the question against the background of the WHO programme to eliminate leprosy. In 1991 the World Health Assembly set a target of eliminating leprosy as a public health problem by 2000. Elimination was defined as reaching a prevalence of < 1 case per 10 000 people. The elimination programme has been successful in delivering highly effective antibiotic therapy worldwide. However, despite this advance, new-case detection rates remain stable in countries with the highest rates of endemic leprosy, such as Brazil and India. This suggests that infection has not been adequately controlled by antibiotics alone. Leprosy is perhaps more appropriately classed as a chronic stable disease than as an acute infectious disease responsive to elimination strategies. In many countries activities to control and treat leprosy are being integrated into the general health-care system. This reduces the stigma associated with leprosy. However, leprosy causes long-term immunological complications, disability and deformity. The health-care activities of treating and preventing disabilities need to be provided in an integrated setting. Detecting new cases and monitoring disability caused by leprosy will be a challenge. One solution is to implement long-term surveillance in selected countries with the highest rates of endemic disease so that an accurate estimate of the burden of leprosy can be determined. It is also critical that broad-based research into this challenging disease continues until the problems are truly solved. PMID:15798849

  3. Factors Contributing to the Delay in Diagnosis and Continued Transmission of Leprosy in Brazil--An Explorative, Quantitative, Questionnaire Based Study.

    PubMed

    Henry, Mary; GalAn, Noêmi; Teasdale, Katherine; Prado, Renata; Amar, Harpreet; Rays, Marina S; Roberts, Lesley; Siqueira, Pedro; de Wildt, Gilles; Virmond, Marcos; Das, Pranab K

    2016-03-01

    Leprosy is a leading cause of preventable disability worldwide. Delay in diagnosis of patients augments the transmission of infection, and allows progression of disease and more severe disability. Delays in diagnosis greater than ten years have been reported in Brazil. To reduce this delay, it is important to identify factors that hinder patients from presenting to doctors, and those that delay doctors from diagnosing patients once they have presented. This study aimed to explore factors associated with the delayed diagnosis of leprosy in Brazil. This is an exploratory study using a self-constructed questionnaire delivered to patients attending three leprosy referral clinics across three states in Brazil. Data were analysed to determine associations between variables and the time taken for participants to present to the health-service, and between variables and the time taken for doctors to diagnose participants once they had presented. Participants who suspected they had leprosy but feared community isolation were 10 times more likely to wait longer before consulting a doctor for their symptoms (OR 10.37, 95% CI 2.18-49.45, p = 0.003). Participants who thought their symptoms were not serious had a threefold greater chance of waiting longer before consulting than those who did (OR 3.114, 95% CI 1.235-7.856, p = 0.016). Forty-two point six per cent of participants reported initially receiving a diagnosis besides leprosy. These had a three times greater chance of receiving a later diagnosis of leprosy compared to those not misdiagnosed or not given a diagnosis (OR 2.867, 95% CI 1.288-6.384, p = 0.010). This study implies a need for patient education regarding leprosy symptoms and the reduction of stigma to encourage patients to present. The high rate of misdiagnosis reported suggests a need to increase clinician suspicion of leprosy. Further education regarding disease symptoms in medical school curriculums may be advisable.

  4. Job of the Bible: leprosy or scabies?

    PubMed

    Appelboom, Thierry; Cogan, Elie; Klastersky, Jean

    2007-04-01

    Proposing a medical diagnosis a posteriori of a person who died a long time ago is not as impossible as it sounds if sufficient medical history is available.A whole book of the Bible is devoted to Job and his trials. The diagnosis of leprosy has been generally accepted by medieval commentators because the verses of the Book speak of ulcers disseminated over the skin, and also because leprosy is an exemplary sanction imposed by way of example by God to punish those who have committed a sin. In this paper, we have taken the different verses with a medical content from the Book of Job, and reconstructed the clinical picture as if the patient had turned up in the 21st century in order to see if the diagnosis of leprosy may be called into question, and to discuss the limits of the medico-historic approach. The clinical picture of the disease consists of deterioration in the general condition, with widespread pain, confusion, skin eruptions, bilious vomiting, and so on. Under these conditions, if Job did exist, and if the retrospective medical history is reliable, the most likely diagnosis is that of scabies rather than leprosy.

  5. Realities of leprosy control: updating scenarios.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Aguinaldo

    2013-09-01

    In the light of successive therapeutical difficulties for leprosy control, the application of drug therapy combination over the last decades has brought about an expectation of cure for leprosy patients and also for the elimination of this illness as a Public Health problem. However, there has been a progressive reduction in the prevalence of leprosy, but without any apparent impact on transmission, which has led to recognized need for solid assessment of respective epidemiological evidence as grounds for interventions to solve the problem. In this regard, here we present a retroanalytical qualitative and quantitative study, combined with a prospective diachronic approach, based on the association of documental review techniques and analysis of content, involving the following phases in succession: assembly of an operational scheme, execution of search strategy, application of criteria, selection of studies, data extraction and processing, implementation of analysis plan and preparation of final text. The appropriate execution of the procedures, as applied, allows us to obtain and discuss the identification of three main scenarios: the elimination of the illness as a public health problem (Neglected Illness); therapeutic aspects (Resistance; Relapse; Non-Adherence; Persistence) and complexity (complications and physical incapacities). The conclusions that have been reached indicate,mainly, that the reality of leprosy control with the use of combination drug therapy, still needs to be handled with care, even more so as this is just a fragment of the set of people once under medical attention, which also correspond to a parcel of the set of people affected by the ailment.

  6. Ocular complications of leprosy in yemen.

    PubMed

    Salem, Raga A A

    2012-11-01

    This study was conducted to identify the main ocular- and vision-threatening complications of leprosy in Yemen. This is a cross-sectional observational study which took place from February to July 2010. Leprosy patients attending the Skin and Venereal Diseases Hospital in the City of Light in Taiz, Yemen, who consented to participate in the study, were enrolled. Detailed demographic and medical histories were taken and clinical examination findings were recorded. A detailed eye examination, including visual acuity (VA), slit-lamp, and fundus examinations, was conducted on each patient by a qualified ophthalmologist. A total of 192 patients (180 male, 12 female, with a male to female ratio of 15:1) were included in the study. The majority of the patients (157; 81.8%) were over 40 years. Over two-thirds of the patients (129; 67.2%) had had leprosy for more than 20 years. Ocular complications were found in 97% of cases; 150 (39.1%) of the patients' eyes had at least one pathology. Eyelid involvement was the most common problem observed in 102 (26.5%) patients. Half of the eyes (192; 50%) had a VA of <6/60. The main cause of blindness among these patients was corneal opacity detected in 69 out of 192 patients (35.9%). Ocular complications are frequent among leprosy patients in Yemen. They are true vision-threatening lesions. It is important to prevent these lesions through early diagnosis and adequate treatment.

  7. Jagged1 Instructs Macrophage Differentiation in Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Teles, Rosane M. B.; Wang, Zhiming; Hong, Patrick; Montoya, Dennis; Krutzik, Stephan; Lee, Seung; Kwon, Ohyun; Modlin, Robert L.; Cruz, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    As circulating monocytes enter the site of disease, the local microenvironment instructs their differentiation into tissue macrophages (MΦ). To identify mechanisms that regulate MΦ differentiation, we studied human leprosy as a model, since M1-type antimicrobial MΦ predominate in lesions in the self-limited form, whereas M2-type phagocytic MΦ are characteristic of the lesions in the progressive form. Using a heterotypic co-culture model, we found that unstimulated endothelial cells (EC) trigger monocytes to become M2 MΦ. However, biochemical screens identified that IFN-γ and two families of small molecules activated EC to induce monocytes to differentiate into M1 MΦ. The gene expression profiles induced in these activated EC, when overlapped with the transcriptomes of human leprosy lesions, identified Jagged1 (JAG1) as a potential regulator of MΦ differentiation. JAG1 protein was preferentially expressed in the lesions from the self-limited form of leprosy, and localized to the vascular endothelium. The ability of activated EC to induce M1 MΦ was JAG1-dependent and the addition of JAG1 to quiescent EC facilitated monocyte differentiation into M1 MΦ with antimicrobial activity against M. leprae. Our findings indicate a potential role for the IFN-γ-JAG1 axis in instructing MΦ differentiation as part of the host defense response at the site of disease in human leprosy. PMID:27532668

  8. T-Cell Regulation in Lepromatous Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Bobosha, Kidist; Wilson, Louis; van Meijgaarden, Krista E.; Bekele, Yonas; Zewdie, Martha; van der Ploeg- van Schip, Jolien J.; Abebe, Markos; Hussein, Jemal; Khadge, Saraswoti; Neupane, Kapil D.; Hagge, Deanna A.; Jordanova, Ekaterina S.; Aseffa, Abraham; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; Geluk, Annemieke

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells are known for their role in maintaining self-tolerance and balancing immune reactions in autoimmune diseases and chronic infections. However, regulatory mechanisms can also lead to prolonged survival of pathogens in chronic infections like leprosy and tuberculosis (TB). Despite high humoral responses against Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae), lepromatous leprosy (LL) patients have the characteristic inability to generate T helper 1 (Th1) responses against the bacterium. In this study, we investigated the unresponsiveness to M. leprae in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of LL patients by analysis of IFN-γ responses to M. leprae before and after depletion of CD25+ cells, by cell subsets analysis of PBMC and by immunohistochemistry of patients' skin lesions. Depletion of CD25+ cells from total PBMC identified two groups of LL patients: 7/18 (38.8%) gained in vitro responsiveness towards M. leprae after depletion of CD25+ cells, which was reversed to M. leprae-specific T-cell unresponsiveness by addition of autologous CD25+ cells. In contrast, 11/18 (61.1%) remained anergic in the absence of CD25+ T-cells. For both groups mitogen-induced IFN-γ was, however, not affected by depletion of CD25+ cells. In M. leprae responding healthy controls, treated lepromatous leprosy (LL) and borderline tuberculoid leprosy (BT) patients, depletion of CD25+ cells only slightly increased the IFN-γ response. Furthermore, cell subset analysis showed significantly higher (p = 0.02) numbers of FoxP3+ CD8+CD25+ T-cells in LL compared to BT patients, whereas confocal microscopy of skin biopsies revealed increased numbers of CD68+CD163+ as well as FoxP3+ cells in lesions of LL compared to tuberculoid and borderline tuberculoid leprosy (TT/BT) lesions. Thus, these data show that CD25+ Treg cells play a role in M. leprae-Th1 unresponsiveness in LL. PMID:24722473

  9. Quality of Life and Social Isolation Among Caregivers of Adults with Schizophrenia: Policy and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Laura; Hawthorne, Graeme; Farhall, John; O'Hanlon, Brendan; Harvey, Carol

    2015-07-01

    Services have been increasingly directed at supporting carers of people living with mental illness but it is difficult to evaluate the impact of service change where benchmarks for carer functioning are sparse. Sixty Australian carers were assessed regarding their quality of life, psychological distress, social isolation and caregiving experience. Their scores were compared with two matched community samples and previous studies. Carers were ten times more likely to be socially isolated and quality of life was significantly less than matched community samples. Over 40 % of the carer sample met criteria for probable psychiatric disorder. Comparison of caregiving experiences with a study 15 years ago showed no improvement in negative caregiving experiences. Carers still face considerable challenges to their wellbeing as they support people living with mental illness, in spite of progress in the development of policy and services.

  10. Childhood Leprosy in an Endemic Area of Central India.

    PubMed

    Gitte, Sunil Vilasrao; Sabat, Ramanath N; Kamble, K M

    2016-03-01

    To study clinical-epidemiological aspects of children affected with leprosy in a high-endemicity area. Hospital-based study (April 2010 to March 2015) of newly diagnosed children (=18 years) with leprosy, from a leprosy research institute in Chhattisgarh, India. 551 new childhood cases were diagnosed constituting 16% of the total newly leprosy cases examined; 221 (40.1%) were multibacillary cases with 11.2% smear positivity. 243 (44.1%) had known contact history of leprosy, 17.6% of children developed Lepra reaction, and 17.4% had visible deformity. 68% of subjects completed treatment within the prescribed time. Transmission of leprosy is still continuing in the area, and high disability and deformity rates are seen in children.

  11. Serum cholinesterase variants in African leprosy patients resident in Rhodesia.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, M; Lowe, R F; Ellis, B P

    1976-01-01

    Blood samples from 580 African leprosy patients living in Rhodesia have been phenotyped for the plasma cholinesterase variants. The Africans have been grouped according to country of origin and tribal affiliation. We have found no individual with an Ea1 gene and are unable to resolve the contradictory evidence for an association between this gene and leprosy. The frequency of the Ef1 gene is higher than that usually found in Caucasian populations, being 0.046 in lepromatous leprosy patients and similar to the 0.056 found in healthy African controls. In tuberculoid leprosy patients the frequency is, however, significantly lower at 0.019. On the other hand, the frequency of the C5+ variant is essentially the same for the tuberculoid leprosy patients and the healthy controls (4%) while for the lepromatous leprosy patients it is about 7% approaching the 10-15% found in many Caucasian populations.

  12. Pupil cycle time and early autonomic involvement in ocular leprosy.

    PubMed Central

    Karaçorlu, M A; Sürel, Z; Cakiner, T; Hanyaloğlu, E; Saylan, T; Mat, C

    1991-01-01

    Ocular complications of leprosy patients often develop insidiously and with few if any symptoms. This study involves measurement of the pupil cycle time (PCT) to evaluate the autonomic nerve system of the iris to determine the presence of subclinical intraocular involvement. The study included 19 lepromatous (LL), 19 borderline lepromatous (BL), and five borderline tuberculoid (BT) leprosy patients and involved 25 healthy volunteers, 10 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and eight with Duhring disease. The PCT was measured in these groups. In all leprosy groups included in the study the PCT was higher than in the control groups. Moreover, the PCT of the leprosy patients without any intraocular involvement was higher than in the controls. These results show that in the ophthalmic examination of leprosy patients without any symptoms the fact that autonomic nerve system of the eye is affected by the leprosy can often be determined by measuring the PCT. PMID:1991087

  13. Pupil cycle time and early autonomic involvement in ocular leprosy.

    PubMed

    Karaçorlu, M A; Sürel, Z; Cakiner, T; Hanyaloğlu, E; Saylan, T; Mat, C

    1991-01-01

    Ocular complications of leprosy patients often develop insidiously and with few if any symptoms. This study involves measurement of the pupil cycle time (PCT) to evaluate the autonomic nerve system of the iris to determine the presence of subclinical intraocular involvement. The study included 19 lepromatous (LL), 19 borderline lepromatous (BL), and five borderline tuberculoid (BT) leprosy patients and involved 25 healthy volunteers, 10 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and eight with Duhring disease. The PCT was measured in these groups. In all leprosy groups included in the study the PCT was higher than in the control groups. Moreover, the PCT of the leprosy patients without any intraocular involvement was higher than in the controls. These results show that in the ophthalmic examination of leprosy patients without any symptoms the fact that autonomic nerve system of the eye is affected by the leprosy can often be determined by measuring the PCT.

  14. How to improve early case detection in low endemic areas with pockets of leprosy: a study of newly detected leprosy patients in Guizhou Province, People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinlan; Yang, Lili; Wang, Ying; Liu, Hang; Liu, Jie; Cross, Hugh

    2016-03-01

    men with WHO DG2 was higher than that of females (38.2% compared with 28.8%). The proportion of Han Chinese new cases with WHO DG2 was significantly higher than that of the main minority group (41.5% compared with 29.2%). The proportion of new cases among the main minority group who self-reported (50%) was significantly higher than those detected through other detection approaches. Detecting leprosy early in low endemic situations where pockets persist was difficult to achieve. The authors suggest that if more early patients are to be detected earlier, the quality of suspect surveys and household contact examination should be improved. Professional training and supervision might affect that result. Greater emphasis should be given to the role of general skin clinics as surveillance sites and advocacy for new health policy that will enhance the detection leprosy should be sustained.

  15. Follicular mucinosis: an important differential diagnosis of leprosy in an endemic area*

    PubMed Central

    Westphal, Danielle Cristine; Pennini, Silmara Navarro; de Souza, Petra Pereira; Maquiné, Gustavo Ávila; Schettini, Antônio Pedro Mendes; Santos, Mônica

    2015-01-01

    Primary follicular mucinosis is a rare dermatosis characterized by the accumulation of mucin in the follicular epithelium and sebaceous glands. Clinically, it is characterized by the presence of papules or well-circumscribed and infiltrated plaques. In this paper, we report the case of a female patient, seven years old, evolving for three months with an asymptomatic, erythematous and infiltrated plaque located in the chin region. The research of thermal, pain and tactile sensitivity was inconclusive. Histological findings confirmed the diagnosis of follicular mucinosis. There was regression of the lesion with the use of medium potency topical corticosteroids for 20 days. The pathogenesis of follicular mucinosis remains unknown, being in some cases associated with lymphoproliferative disorders. In endemic areas of leprosy, isolated and infiltrated follicular mucinosis lesions should be further differentiated from leprosy. PMID:26312699

  16. The demographic and clinical characteristics of leprosy in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alotaibi, Mohammad H; Bahammam, Salman A; Ur Rahman, Saeed; Bahnassy, Ahmed A; Hassan, Imad S; Alothman, Adel F; Alkayal, Abdulkareem M

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. Although the occurrence of leprosy has declined in Saudi Arabia, it has not yet been eradicated. To our knowledge, this descriptive retrospective study is the first to assess the clinical presentation of leprosy at the time of diagnosis in Saudi Arabia. All study subjects were leprosy patients admitted to Ibn Sina hospital, the only referral hospital for leprosy in Saudi Arabia, between January 2000 and May 2012. A total of 164 subjects, the majority of whom (65%) were between 21 and 50 years of age, were included, and the male-to-female ratio was 2.8:1. Of these 164 patients, 63% were Saudis, and 77% of all admitted patients were from the western region. Lepromatous leprosy was observed most frequently (33%), and 31% of cases had a positive history of close contact with leprosy. At the time of diagnosis, 84% of all subjects presented with skin manifestation. The prevalence of neurological deficit at the time of diagnosis was 87%. Erythema nodosum leprosum (E.N.L.) developed in only 10% of all subjects. Further studies are needed to determine the clinical characteristics pertaining to each type of leprosy in the region, and training courses in caring for and diagnosing patients with leprosy should be organized for health workers. Copyright © 2016 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Abnormalities in Stratum Corneum Function in Patients Recovered from Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Song, S.-P.; Lv, C.-Z.; Feingold, K.R.; Hou, Q.-N.; Li, Z.-Y.; Guo, C.-Y.; Elias, P.M.; Man, M.Q.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objectives Leprosy involves both the skin and peripheral nervous system. Leprosy patients display an increased incidence of xerosis and altered sensory thresholds, which persist in previously active skin sites. We assessed here whether alterations in stratum corneum (SC) function persist in cured leprosy, and the relationship of epidermal functional abnormalities to each clinical subtype of leprosy. Methods A total of 43 cured leprosy subjects and 29 normal control subjects were enrolled in this study. Basal skin surface pH, SC hydration, permeability barrier function as well as barrier recovery rates were measured over previously involved skin sites with a skin physiology monitor. One-way ANOVA and two-tailed Student's t test were used to determine the significance between 2 groups and 3 or more groups, respectively. Results Competent barrier function was observed in all subtypes of cured leprosy subjects. All cured leprosy subjects except those with the borderline tuberculoid type exhibited a significantly lower SC hydration in comparison with normal subjects. Skin surface pH was significantly elevated in all cured leprosy subjects in comparison with normal subjects. Conclusions A varied spectrum of alterations in SC function remains in all subjects who have recovered from leprosy, but the spectrum of SC functional abnormalities varies with disease subtype. PMID:19136834

  18. People's perception of leprosy--a study in Delhi.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Harvinder; Gandhi, Anjali

    2003-01-01

    Leprosy is considered to cause more social than medical problems. The present study focussed on this aspect in order to investigate the level of awareness among people--about their attitude towards the disease and the afflicted. The results are based on interviews with 104 persons in Delhi. The sample data revealed that the level of knowledge of leprosy was inadequate. The cause of the disease was known to 44.2% of those interviewed, while 31.7% were completely ignorant; 6.7% believed it to be the consequence of an individual's past misdeeds, and 1.9% believed it to have been caused by divine curse. 63.1% were aware that the disease is curable. 73.1% of the persons interviewed sympathised with leprosy-afflicted beggars. 61.5% favoured leprosy patients to stay with their families and within their communities. 67.3% felt that the cured could marry, while 25% felt that the leprosy-afflicted should stay in leprosy colonies away from the society. 54.8% were reluctant to employ the leprosy-afflicted as domestic help, and 31.7% were reluctant to establish matrimonial relationship with a family having a leprosy-afflicted person. The data call for intensification ofpublic awareness regarding the aetiology of leprosy. Positive and scientific information should be disseminated to minimize the social prejudices associated with the disease.

  19. Leprosy in the 21st Century

    PubMed Central

    Franco-Paredes, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Despite significant improvements in leprosy (Hansen's disease) treatment and outlook for patients since the introduction of multidrug therapy (MDT) 3 decades ago, the global incidence remains high, and patients often have long-term complications associated with the disease. In this article, we discuss recent findings related to genetics, susceptibility, and disease reservoirs and the implications of these findings for Hansen's disease control and health outcomes for patients. We describe the continued difficulties associated with treatment of inflammatory episodes known as “leprosy reactions,” which cause much of the disability associated with the disease and can affect people for many years after MDT is complete. We also discuss some of the contemporary challenges for physicians and patients, including international and internal migration of people affected by the disease. We suggest some important areas of focus for future Hansen's disease research. PMID:25567223

  20. Type 1 lepra reaction in histoid leprosy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nidhi; Kumari, Rashmi; Gupta, Divya; Thappa, Devinder Mohan; Ganesh, Rajesh Nachiappa

    2015-01-01

    Lepra reaction in histoid leprosy (HL) is rare; there are few reports of type 2 lepra reaction in HL. We report a 42-year-old woman with HL in type 1 lepra reaction after 10 weeks of multibacillary multi-drug therapy (MBMDT). A 42-year-old woman presented with asymptomatic multiple papules, plaques, and nodules over the face, trunk, and extremities and no history of prior treatment with anti-leprosy drugs. A biopsy of a skin nodule on the forearm revealed spindle-shaped, non-vacuolated histiocytes in a whorled pattern with abundant acid-fast bacilli (AFB). The patient was diagnosed with HL and started on MBMDT. Ten weeks later, she developed pruritic, painful, erythematous, and edematous papules, plaques, and nodules over the face, trunk, and extremities, without constitutional symptoms. Histopathology revealed an atrophic epidermis, preserved grenz zone, and papillary dermal edema. Elongated AFB were visible on Fite's stain. The MBMDT was continued, along with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antihistamines, but pruritus, pain, erythema, and edema persisted, and new skin lesions appeared. The patient was started on prednisolone at 0.75 mg/kg body weight/day. Prednisolone resulted in symptomatic relief and the healing of ulcerated papules within four weeks. Treatment was tapered and stopped after 20 weeks. Histoid leprosy is considered a variant of lepromatous leprosy, which rarely involves a lepra reaction. Pruritus and ulceration of skin lesions as manifestations of type 1 lepra reaction in HL have not been reported previously. These symptoms manifested after 10 weeks of MBMDT and responded well to oral prednisolone. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  1. BCG vaccination of children against leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Bechelli, L. M.; Garbajosa, Gallego; Uemura, K.; Engler, V.; Domínguez, V. Martínez; Paredes, L.; Sundaresan, T.; Koch, G.; Matejka, M.

    1970-01-01

    The use of BCG vaccine in the prevention of leprosy has been one of the most important subjects of investigation in the field of leprology in the last 25 years. The action of the vaccine was for many years investigated by determining its effect on the lepromin reaction. Field studies were later considered essential to determine whether BCG vaccination would be useful to leprosy contacts, to the child population probably exposed to infection, or to persons persistently lepromin-negative. The interest of the World Health Organization in this matter began in 1952 and, following the recommendations of certain advisory committees, it was decided to institute a field trial in Singu township in Burma. The main purpose of the investigation was to observe, in a highly endemic area, the protective effect, if any, of BCG vaccine against leprosy in the child population not exposed to Mycobacterium leprae at home but possibly exposed to the infection elsewhere. Field operations began at the end of August 1964 and the preliminary findings obtained up to the end of June 1968 relate to 3 annual re-examinations. So far, from the material studied, it appears that, under the conditions prevailing in Singu township, no significant effect of BCG vaccine can be seen within a period of 3 years. When children in both trial groups are followed-up for much longer periods, mainly children aged 0-4 years at intake, it is possible that a significant difference may emerge. However, to be operationally desirable, a merely significant difference is not enough; the protective effect of BCG should be substantial to warrant its large-scale use as an immunization procedure against leprosy. PMID:4246110

  2. Zoonotic Leprosy in the Southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rahul; Singh, Pushpendra; Loughry, W J; Lockhart, J Mitchell; Inman, W Barry; Duthie, Malcolm S; Pena, Maria T; Marcos, Luis A; Scollard, David M; Cole, Stewart T; Truman, Richard W

    2015-12-01

    Nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) are naturally infected with Mycobacterium leprae and have been implicated in zoonotic transmission of leprosy. Early studies found this disease mainly in Texas and Louisiana, but armadillos in the southeastern United States appeared to be free of infection. We screened 645 armadillos from 8 locations in the southeastern United States not known to harbor enzootic leprosy for M. leprae DNA and antibodies. We found M. leprae-infected armadillos at each location, and 106 (16.4%) animals had serologic/PCR evidence of infection. Using single-nucleotide polymorphism variable number tandem repeat genotyping/genome sequencing, we detected M. leprae genotype 3I-2-v1 among 35 armadillos. Seven armadillos harbored a newly identified genotype (3I-2-v15). In comparison, 52 human patients from the same region were infected with 31 M. leprae types. However, 42.3% (22/52) of patients were infected with 1 of the 2 M. leprae genotype strains associated with armadillos. The geographic range and complexity of zoonotic leprosy is expanding.

  3. Zoonotic Leprosy in the Southeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rahul; Singh, Pushpendra; Loughry, W.J.; Lockhart, J. Mitchell; Inman, W. Barry; Duthie, Malcolm S.; Pena, Maria T.; Marcos, Luis A.; Scollard, David M.; Cole, Stewart T.

    2015-01-01

    Nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) are naturally infected with Mycobacterium leprae and have been implicated in zoonotic transmission of leprosy. Early studies found this disease mainly in Texas and Louisiana, but armadillos in the southeastern United States appeared to be free of infection. We screened 645 armadillos from 8 locations in the southeastern United States not known to harbor enzootic leprosy for M. leprae DNA and antibodies. We found M. leprae–infected armadillos at each location, and 106 (16.4%) animals had serologic/PCR evidence of infection. Using single-nucleotide polymorphism variable number tandem repeat genotyping/genome sequencing, we detected M. leprae genotype 3I-2-v1 among 35 armadillos. Seven armadillos harbored a newly identified genotype (3I-2-v15). In comparison, 52 human patients from the same region were infected with 31 M. leprae types. However, 42.3% (22/52) of patients were infected with 1 of the 2 M. leprae genotype strains associated with armadillos. The geographic range and complexity of zoonotic leprosy is expanding. PMID:26583204

  4. The leprosy problem in the world*

    PubMed Central

    Bechelli, L. M.; Domínguez, V. Martínez

    1966-01-01

    There is at present a lack of accurate data on the prevalence of leprosy in the different countries of the world, primarily because case-finding has not reached the desired level in many of them. The authors have attempted to provide more realistic figures, using information obtained from several sources and various criteria for calculating estimated prevalence rates. In all there are 2 831 775 registered patients and 10 786 000 estimated cases; the latter figure may well be an underestimate. The number of treated patients is about 1 928 000, some 68% of the registered cases and 18% of the estimated. About 2097 million people live in areas with prevalence rates of 0.5 per 1000 or higher; in these areas nearly one million new cases of leprosy can be expected within the next five years. The estimated number of disabled patients is 3 872 000, of whom 1 961 000 are in disability grades 2-5 (excluding anaesthesia to pain). The data represent an attempt, made with many reservations, to give an indication of the magnitude of the leprosy problem throughout the world. PMID:5296533

  5. The History, Biology and Medical Aspects of Leprosy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichman, Phillip

    1999-01-01

    Presents information about the history, biology, and medical aspects of leprosy, including its description in historical documents, its cause and effects, statistics on its prevalence, and various attempts at treatment. Notes that leprosy is one of the few infectious diseases that, although treatable with medication, remains incurable. Contains 30…

  6. The History, Biology and Medical Aspects of Leprosy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichman, Phillip

    1999-01-01

    Presents information about the history, biology, and medical aspects of leprosy, including its description in historical documents, its cause and effects, statistics on its prevalence, and various attempts at treatment. Notes that leprosy is one of the few infectious diseases that, although treatable with medication, remains incurable. Contains 30…

  7. First report of citrus leprosis virus nuclear type in Colombia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Citrus leprosis is a difficult viral disease causing significant damage to citrus fruit in South America and Central America. The disease is marked by dramatic lesions on fruit, leaves and stems resulting in unmarketable product. Citrus leprosis virus cytoplasmic types (CiLV-C and CiLV-C2) wer edete...

  8. Molecular origin of endemic leprosy in New York City.

    PubMed

    Keo, Thormika; Martiniuk, Frank; Latkowski, JoAnn; Cabrera, Aloys; Rom, William; Levis, William R

    2008-03-15

    We report an indigenous case of leprosy in New York City in an immunocompetent patient who was infected with a Mycobacterium leprae genotype that is consistent with an exogenous origin. Physicians in the eastern United States should be alerted that, although most patients who develop leprosy in the United States are foreign born, native-born Americans are also susceptible to the infection.

  9. Lepromatous leprosy with bilateral facial nerve palsy and hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Singal, A; Vij, A; Pandhi, D

    2006-01-01

    Bilateral lagophthalmos secondary to facial nerve is extremely uncommon. Further, the aetiology in most of these cases is of central origin unlike the peripheral involvement in leprosy. A patient of lepromatous leprosy (LL) may be euthyroid or hypothyroid on account of leprous involvement of the thyroid gland. A case of LL with bilateral lagophthalmos and hyperthyroidism is reported.

  10. Leprosy: a diagnostic trap for dermatopathologists in nonendemic area.

    PubMed

    Rongioletti, Franco; Gallo, Rosella; Cozzani, Emanuele; Parodi, Aurora

    2009-08-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, presenting with different clinicopathological forms. These great variety of presentations make the diagnosis of leprosy a difficult challenge in countries where the disease is not endemic. Moreover, a discordance between the clinical and histopathological diagnosis in classifying a case of leprosy can complicate the issue. We report a 43-year-old woman in whom the diagnosis of leprosy was challenging, especially, because the biopsy was sent without any clinical suspicion and Italy is a nonendemic area. The clinical informations described simply an annular lesion, and histopathology disclosed a superficial and deep moderate perivascular and periadnexal infiltrate in the dermis, predominantly made of lymphocytes with some histiocytes, in the absence of granuloma formation, foamy histiocytes, or giant cells. Only the clinicopathological correlation based upon the patient's family history, her Brazilian origin, and her anesthetic lesions led us to the suspicion of leprosy. We reviewed the slides with more serial cuts and with special stains that eventually revealed a slight perineural lymphohistiocytic infiltrate and the presence of rare bacilli in the nerves, more consistent with indeterminate leprosy. However, the clinical features and the detection of just few bacilli in the skin lesions and skin smears were more consistent with a borderline leprosy. The discordance between the clinical and histopathological diagnosis in the setting of leprosy is discussed.

  11. Inoculation indeterminate leprosy localised to a smallpox vaccination scar.

    PubMed

    Ghorpade, Ashok

    2007-12-01

    A single, indeterminate leprosy lesion localised exclusively to a smallpox vaccination scar in a 32-year old Indian male is reported. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathology. This is the second published report of a leprosy lesion occurring at the site of a smallpox vaccination.

  12. [JICA Leprosy Control and Basic Health Services Project in Myanmar].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yutaka; Hikita, Kazuo

    2005-09-01

    Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) implemented a 5-year long bilateral technical cooperation project, "Leprosy Control and Basic Health Services Project" in Myanmar. The project was implemented by National Leprosy Control Program, Department of Health with close technical collaboration of JICA experts mainly from International Medical Center of Japan (IMCJ) and National Sanatoriums of leprosy in Japan. It accelerated to achieve the elimination of leprosy at national level, which was declared in January 2003, and at sub-national level onward. It also developed the appropriate technologies for prevention of disability and prevention of worsening of disability (POD/POWD), which were introduced in 9 townships as a pilot service program. The Government stratified the POD/POWD services as a national program since 2005 by taking up the former pilot area to start with. The project also strengthened the function of referral system of leprosy control (Diagnosis and treatment), POD/POWD and physical rehabilitation. Beside leprosy, the project conducted a series of refresher trainings for primary health care givers, Basic Health Service Staff (BHS), of project areas (48 townships) to improve the services on tuberculosis, Malaria, Leprosy, Trachoma and HIV/AIDS for 3 years (2001-2003), which was evaluated in 2004. It contributed to improve the services at township level hospitals in procurement of audio-visual equipments and in conducting microscope training on leprosy, Malaria and tuberculosis at project areas.

  13. Controlled Clinical Trial of Clofazimine in Untreated Lepromatous Leprosy*

    PubMed Central

    Karat, A. B. A.; Jeevaratnam, Anbu; Karat, S.; Rao, P. S. S.

    1971-01-01

    A comparison of clofazimine and dapsone in the management of untreated lepromatous leprosy showed no significant differences between the two drugs in terms of morphological and bacterial indices. The incidence of erythema nodosum leprosum was similar in the two groups. Since dapsone is cheaper than clofazimine it remains the drug of choice for the routine management of untreated lepromatous leprosy. PMID:4942741

  14. Renal involvement in leprosy: evaluation of patients in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Savas; Ozturk, Tulin; Can, Ilkay

    2017-06-01

    Renal involvement in leprosy has previously been described in the literature and can include amyloidosis, glomerulonephritis, nephrosclerosis, tubulointerstitial nephritis, and granulomas. To evaluate renal involvement in Turkish patients with leprosy. In total, 32 patients with lepromatous leprosy but without any co-morbidities and 35 healthy control subjects were evaluated for renal involvement at the Elazig Training and Research Hospital in Turkey. The laboratory tests and radiological results concerning renal function were taken from both the patients' medical records and from current examinations. The levels of creatinine, urea, and leukocyturia in the lepromatous leprosy patients were significantly higher than in the controls (p < 0.001, p < 0.001; p = 0.001, p < 0.01; p = 0.036, p < 0.05, respectively). No significant differences in the proteinuria, hematuria, sodium, or potassium levels were found between the leprosy and control groups (p > 0.05). On ultrasonographic examination, the prevalence of renal cortical cysts and renal cortical echogenicity in the leprosy patients was significantly higher than in the controls (p = 0.020, p < 0.05, respectively). There were no significant differences in terms of nephrolithiasis, parapelvic cysts, or hydronephrosis between the leprosy and control groups (p > 0.05). Evaluating the renal function in all leprosy patients is important to detect abnormalities and to prevent renal failure, which remains a potential cause of death in this disease.

  15. Can social marketing be applied to leprosy programmes?

    PubMed

    Wong, Mee Lian

    2002-12-01

    The implementation of multidrug therapy (MDT) has been highly effective in curing patients and reducing leprosy prevalence. In some countries, however, a significant number of cases remain undetected or are detected late. Although compliance with drug therapy is generally good, a significant proportion still defaults treatment in countries where the leprosy burden is still high. This paper proposes that leprosy control or elimination efforts might be enhanced by the application of social marketing principles. It first outlines the principles of social marketing and then reviews a successful social marketing campaign in Sri Lanka to increase case detection and treatment. The paper concludes with a discussion of the opportunities for using social marketing principles to enhance the success of current leprosy community heath education programmes and leprosy treatment services.

  16. Pure neuritic leprosy in patients from a high endemic region of Colombia.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Gerzain; Pinto, Rafael; Gomez, Yenny; Rengifo, Maria Leonor; Estrada, Olga Lucia; Sarmiento, Marta; Lopez, Fernando; Beltran-Alzate, Juan Camilo; Cardona-Castro, Nora

    2013-03-01

    Agua de Dios was a leprosarium for leprosy patients' obligatory isolation (1872-1961). Its leprosy incidence is the highest in Colombia (1.5-7/10000). Relapses are common. Government grant of US$ 200 per month subsidy is available to patients with disabilities. Spontaneous consultation with neural symptoms is frequent and simulation to get the subsidy has to be considered. We studied 36 subjects (2007-2009), with ages from 29-78, 19 of them men, with neural symptoms of 6 months to 20 years evolution. All had clinical examination, bacteriological examination, skin and nerve biopsies, electromyography (EMG), PCR for M. leprae, IgM anti-PGL1, and lepromin A. All but two are household contacts of leprosy patients. Symptoms were hypoesthesia of the hands and feet, and difficulty using hands with loss of muscular strength. None had skin lesions. Three had thickening of ulnar nerve. Lepromin was positive in all; bacteriology and biopsies were negative in all. The speed and amplitude of neural conduction were altered in 34 patients; two women had normal EMG and were considered to be feigning the disease; 21 were diagnosed as PNL by clinical, epidemiological and EMG findings; five of them had a positive PCR and one, high titers for IgM anti PGL1. Nine other subjects had diabetes and six carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Slow progression of disease, the lack of neural enlargement and the neural biopsies without inflammation suggest that most of these patients could have spontaneously cured PNL, as happens with other cases of paucibacillary leprosy. Diabetes and CTS are important differential diagnoses of PNL. Patients were treated with MDT and received the state subsidy.

  17. Epidemiology of tuberculosis and leprosy, Sabah, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Dony, Jiloris F; Ahmad, Jamaliah; Khen Tiong, Yap

    2004-01-01

    The objectives in this epidemiology review are to measure and report the extent of morbidity and mortality due to tuberculosis (TB), the proportion of new sputum smear positive cases in districts and the status of cohort analysis as of 1999. As for leprosy, the main objective is to determine morbidity and the treatment outcomes of Multiple Drug Therapy (MDT). Based on the results obtained, a comprehensive action plan for prevention, control and monitoring of tuberculosis and leprosy cases and patients is being produced and implemented throughout the state. The analysis concentrated on patients diagnosed at all out-patient units and admitted in all of the state's hospitals. The patient particulars were recorded using a standardized format based on TB and Leprosy Health Management Information System (TB HMIS). TB was the second highest by notification of communicable diseases in Malaysia in 2001. 29% or about one-third of the national TB cases are from Sabah. However, it has been noted that there was an average decline of 2.6% in annual notification since 10 years ago to date. There was also a reduction of 11.4% in 2001 as compared to annual notification in 2000. Immigrants contribute more than 24% in detection of new cases since 1990. Treatment success rate in term of completion of treatment to date is 82%. Mortality rate has steadily declined from 14 deaths to 7 deaths per 100,000 population. Leprosy in Sabah also contributes to 30% of the yearly total caseload of Malaysia and has the highest notification rate of 2 per every 100,000 population as compared to other states. The average registered leprosy cases over the past 5 years are 239 cases and the prevalence rate is 0.7/10,000 population. The state has successfully achieved its goal to decrease leprosy as per the World Health Organization (WHO) goal of yearly overall prevalence rate of less than 1 case for every 10,000 population. However, the districts of Kudat, Tawau, Lahad Datu, Kota Kinabalu and Semporna

  18. Complex segregation analysis of leprosy in southern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Abel, L; Vu, D L; Oberti, J; Nguyen, V T; Van, V C; Guilloud-Bataille, M; Schurr, E; Lagrange, P H

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the nature of the genetic component controlling susceptibility to leprosy and its subtypes, 402 nuclear families were ascertained through a leprosy patient followed at the Dermatology Hospital in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam; 285 families were of Vietnamese origin and 117 were of Chinese origin with a higher proportion of lepromatous forms among Chinese patients. Segregation analyses were conducted using the model developed by Abel and Bonney [(1990) Genet Epidemiol 7:391-407], which accounted for variable age of onset and time-dependent covariates. Three phenotypes were considered: leprosy per se (all forms of leprosy together), nonlepromatous leprosy, and lepromatous leprosy. For each of this phenotype, analyses were performed on the whole sample and separately on the Vietnamese and the Chinese families. The results showed that a single Mendelian gene could not account for the familial distributions of leprosy per se and its two subtypes in the whole sample. However, these results were different according to the ethnic origin of the families. In the Vietnamese subsample, there was evidence for a codominant major gene with residual familial dependences for the leprosy per se phenotype, and borderline rejection of the Mendelian transmission hypothesis for the nonlepromatous phenotype. In Chinese families, strong rejection of Mendelian transmission was obtained in the analysis of leprosy per se, and no evidence for a familial component in the distribution of the nonlepromatous phenotype was observed. For the lepromatous phenotype, the discrimination between models was poor, and no definitive conclusion could be reached. Referring to immunological data, we suggest that these results could be explained by a heterogeneity in the definition of the lepromatous phenotype. It is likely that progress in the understanding of the genetic components involved in the expression of leprosy will come from a better definition of the phenotype under study, and

  19. The extent of leprosy-related disabilities in Istanbul Leprosy Hospital, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Cakiner, T; Yüksel, A; Eğït, A S; Cağri, G; Karaçorlu, M; Kültür, A

    1997-03-01

    This study was carried out between January and December 1992 at the Istanbul Leprosy Hospital. Seven hundred and eleven leprosy patients were evaluated according to their age, gender and type of disease and disability according to the WHO disability grading system (1980). There were 527 males (74.2%) and 184 females (25.8%) in the group. The average age was 50.0 +/- 13.5 years and the average duration of disease was 25.9 +/- 13.2 years. Six hundred and seventy-eight patients (95.4%) were in borderline (BL) and lepromatous (LL) leprosy. The extent of disabilities was very high in 711 leprosy patients. It was found that 539 of the patients (75.8%) had eye disabilities, 511 of them (71.8%) had hand disabilities, 521 of them (73.3%) had foot disabilities. The most frequent eye, hand and foot disabilities were a decrease of vision (52.7), acute or chronic iridocyclitis (48.8%), slightly-marked corneal sensory loss (43.2%), mobile claw hand (33.3%), palmar insensitivity (16.3%), plantar ulcer (37.2%) and plantar insensitivity (19.8%). Eye deformities were the most common of the three affected areas in this study.

  20. Study on differences and similarities in the concept and origin of leprosy stigma in relation to other health-related stigma.

    PubMed

    Rao, P S S

    2010-01-01

    While the experienced or enacted stigma may be the same for all health related stigma, in terms of isolation, discrimination and social participation restrictions of the affected persons; the concept and origin of stigma varies from one disease to another. An understanding of the cause of stigma is, therefore, essential to formulate effective strategies for its reduction/elimination. This is especially imperative in the case of leprosy where the basis of stigma is significantly different from other health related stigma. In this paper, a comparison is made between the concept and origin of leprosy stigma with that of other stigmatised diseases.

  1. “First and foremost the evangelist”? Mission and government priorities for the treatment of leprosy in Uganda, 1927-1948

    PubMed Central

    Vongsathorn, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Early historiography on medicine in British colonial Africa suggests that colonial government and missionary medicine occupied two relatively distinct spheres, and that government officials viewed medical missionaries with suspicion and distrust. Contrary to this paradigm, this article suggests that missionaries and colonial government officials collaborated extensively and amicably in the treatment of leprosy in Uganda. Mission, medical, and government correspondence and reports are drawn upon in order to demonstrate that the suspicion and tension that characterised so many other interactions between British colonial government officials and missionaries was largely absent in the treatment of leprosy in Uganda. The mutual social and cultural priorities of missionaries and government administrators led to a system of isolated, in-patient leprosy care that was limited in scope and reflective not of a goal for the public health of Uganda, but rather a vision for the future of Uganda as a “civilised” and Christian country. PMID:24949084

  2. Correlation between occurrence of leprosy and fossil fuels: role of fossil fuel bacteria in the origin and global epidemiology of leprosy.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, A N; Dastidar, S G

    1989-06-01

    On the basis of correlative data on the global distribution of leprosy, its bacteria metabolizing fossil fuels (FF), and the FF themselves, the origin of leprosy in the world as a whole, and in the leprosy-free countries, in particular, as indigenous cases, appeared to be primarily due to a soil-to-man, and secondarily due to a man-to-man infection. These findings helped to elucidate similar problems of animal leprosies and nocardial diseases.

  3. Isolated case of mucosal histoid Hansen's disease of the nasal cavity in a post-global elimination era.

    PubMed

    Swain, Santosh K; Jena, Ajay K; Panda, Maitreyee; Mohapatra, Debahuti; Patro, Nibedita; Sahu, Mahesh C

    2015-01-01

    Histoid Hansen's disease is a rare form of multibacillary leprosy with distinct clinical and histopathological features. This type of leprosy is a variant of lepromatous leprosy with a very high bacterial reserve. Of alarming concern is the discovery of an isolated mucosal histoid leprotic lesion inside the nasal cavity of a patient in the post-global leprosy elimination era. Our case had no history of leprosy or exposure to dapsone/multidrug therapy but had a heavy bacillary index. We are reporting this case to highlight the rarity of mucosal lesions due to histoid leprosy and involvement of the nasal cavity, as well as to create awareness and avoid misdiagnosis. This will help facilitate prompt treatment to minimize the complications and deformities of the patient and prevent its spread throughout the community. Copyright © 2015 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Disabled persons and HIV/AIDS prevention: a case study of deaf and leprosy persons in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Enwereji, Ezinna E; Enwereji, Kelechi O

    2008-08-01

    (i) To investigate factors and conditions that influence HIV/AIDS prevention among leprosy and deaf persons in leprosy settlements in Nigerian; (ii) to examine the extent to which the Government includes leprosy and deaf persons in HIV prevention programmes; (iii) To identify immediate needs of leprosy and deaf patients in settlements (iv) to determine possible areas for improving services so as to explore potential solutions. Total sample of 227 inmates and 34 Health Care Workers were studied in three purposively selected settlements. Two intervention concepts, participatory reservation approach (PRA) and planned action (PLA) were utilized in the study. The concepts enabled researchers to examine factors that influenced provision of HIV/AIDS prevention programmes to inmates in settlements. Data collection instruments were questionnaire and focus group discussions for inmates and interview guides for Health Workers. Data were analysed qualitatively and quantitatively with the help of Stat Pac Gold package. Findings showed that there were no reproductive health and and HIV prevention programmes in the settlements. There was lack of Governments' commitment to fund health programmes and to train Health Workers, as well as rejection, isolation, discrimination and discouragement of HIV/AIDS prevention programmes in settlements. There was poor knowledge of mode of transmission of HIV/AIDS among inmates. About 59 (53.6%) of inmates in Abia, and 60 (51.3%) in Oyo were not interested in voluntary counselling and sex education. Findings showed that inmates in the leprosy settlements were at risk of unprotected sex. About 99 (43.6%) in Oyo and 88 (38.8%) in Abia State, especially those who were single cohabited with opposite sexes to have babies in settlements (p = 003). Number of inmates that had babies in settlements justifies providing sex education, reproductive health and HIV/AIDS prevention programmes. This will assist in reducing HIV/AIDS prevalence among disabled

  5. Update on the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of leprosy.

    PubMed

    Reibel, F; Cambau, E; Aubry, A

    2015-09-01

    Leprosy is an infectious disease that has now been reported for more than 2000 years. The leprosy elimination goal set by the World Health Organization (WHO), i.e. a global prevalence rate <1 patient per 10,000 population, was achieved in the year 2000, but more than 200,000 new case patients are still reported each year, particularly in India, Brazil, and Indonesia. Leprosy is a specific infection: (i) it is a chronic infection primarily affecting the skin and peripheral nerves, (ii) Mycobacterium leprae is one of the last bacterial species of medical interest that cannot be cultured in vitro (mainly because of its reductive genome evolution), and (iii) transmission and pathophysiological data is still limited. The various presentations of the disease (Ridley-Jopling and WHO classifications) are correlated with the patient's immune response, bacillary load, and by the delay before diagnosis. Multidrug therapy (dapsone, rifampicin, with or without clofazimine) has been recommended since 1982 as the standard treatment of leprosy; 6 months for patients presenting with paucibacillary leprosy and 12 months for patients presenting with multibacillary leprosy. The worldwide use of leprosy drugs started in the 1980s and their free access since 1995 contributed to the drastic decline in the number of new case patients. Resistant strains are however emerging despite the use of multidrug therapy; identifying and monitoring resistance is still necessary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Epidemiologic trends of leprosy for the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Schreuder, Pieter A M; Noto, Salvatore; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Major gaps still exist in the knowledge about leprosy, particularly with regard to how it spreads. Leprosy epidemiology remains complicated due to the specific characteristics of Mycobacterium leprae. To describe epidemiologic trends for the 21st century, the first part of this paper gives an overview of the epidemiology of leprosy, followed by past trends and the present situation of new-case detection as a proxy of the incidence. The third part, regarding predicted epidemiologic trends for the 21st century, elaborates on the main topic of this paper. With limited diagnostic tools to detect infection with M leprae, other methods are necessary to estimate trends in incidence and transmission. A computer program has been developed for modeling the transmission and control of leprosy (SIMLEP). The effect of failure to sustain early case detection beyond 2005 on leprosy incidence and case detection is shown. Important unanswered questions are whether the incubation period is contagious and how rapid close contacts of leprosy patients are infected. As long as such key questions remain unanswered, it will be difficult to estimate the impact of control strategies on the transmission of M leprae on resulting disease incidence. In the meantime we can expect that the global new-case detection trends will stay more or less stable or only decrease slightly for many years to come. There is a need of new preventive interventions to change this situation and reduce the incidence of leprosy in the 21st century. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Can social marketing approaches change community attitudes towards leprosy?

    PubMed

    Brown, Wendy

    2006-06-01

    This essay explores how the concept of social marketing can be employed to change attitudes towards leprosy. Firstly, the concept of social marketing is discussed, then the attitudes that people have about leprosy, the stigma that people with leprosy and their families may face, and the detrimental effects that this can have on their lives. The effect of knowledge and education on attitudes towards leprosy is discussed, as this can be a key component of social marketing campaigns. Various methods of social marketing used to change attitudes and reduce stigma are examined, such as mass media campaigns, school based education, methods which involve community leaders, and the integration and improvement of leprosy services. Principles of social marketing which can lead to the success of campaigns such as incorporating local beliefs are emphasized. The success of the social marketing campaign in Sri Lanka is described, which aimed to remove the fear of leprosy, and to encourage patients to seek and comply with treatment. Finally, it is argued that social marketing, used correctly, can be highly effective at changing community attitudes towards leprosy, reducing stigma and improving the lives of patients, who become able to seek treatment sooner as they lose their fear of stigmatization.

  8. Is there a relation between hemicrania continua and leprosy?

    PubMed

    Ferreira, K S; Freitas, D J; Speciali, J G

    2012-01-01

    The association of hemicrania continua and leprosy has been described in 2008. This relation can be causal or casual. Hemicrania continua is a strictly unilateral, moderate to severe, continuous, indomethacin-responsive primary headache with autonomic cranial symptoms and leprosy is an usual cause of peripheral neuropathy. Prevalence has fallen in the past years, but transmission continues and leprosy remains a public health problem. The objective of this study is to report one case of headache fulfilling the IHS criteria for HC, presented during the course of leprosy. A 61 years old woman started hypo and hiperpigmented lesions with impaired sensation to touch on right side of face (malar). She had biopsy in facial lesion and histopathology compatible with a borderline leprosy form. At the same time, she reported new headaches, daily and continuous, without pain-free periods, unilateral (which were located in the same side of the leprosy lesion in face), throbbing and severe (VAS = 8) with ipsilateral conjuntival injection and lacrimation that improved with indomethacin. We hypothesize that the local injury on the face of this patient predisposes a mechanism of central sensitization, resulting in trigeminal autonomic cephalgia. Relation between trigemino-autonomic cephalalgias and leprosy provides insights into craniofacial pain mechanisms.

  9. Leprosy - one of the many forgotten tropical diseases.

    PubMed

    Zwolska, Zofia; Augustynowicz-Kopeć, Ewa

    2017-02-14

    Leprosy or Hansen disease is caused by an infection of Mycobacterium leprae. The large number of undetected cases (2000-2012 years 4 mln people) remains a threat to the elimination of leprosy. Leprosy is an unheard in Poland and generally is considered a condition so "exotic" that it is not worth to spend more attention to it. Forgotten disease in developed countries still thrives in an environment of poor and uneducated. Regardless of the conclusion that in the 21st century none infectious disease should not be treated as a disease on the designated regions of the world, other than our own, it should be recalled that the M. leprae was discovered in Europe, where for many years there were leprosaria and still infectious hospitals in Great Brittan, France or Spain get patients suspected of leprosy. The mobility of the inhabitants of the globe caused by wars, ethnic conflicts or a simple tourism causes that any infectious disease can not be treated as solely limited to distant us regions. The best proof of this were the viral diseases, formerly found in only in Asia or Africa, and currently transmitted to Europe [1]. At any moment, we can stand up against the problem of diagnostics of humans toward leprosy. Many medical reports indicate that leprosy as a disease with many symptoms encountered difficulties in its diagnosis. Only the experience of medical professionals and good microbiological diagnosis may speed up the diagnosis of leprosy.

  10. [Leprosy reactions in a Colombian national reference centre].

    PubMed

    Nova, John; Sánchez, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    Colombia is the country in America with the highest proportion of new cases leprosy with severe disability. To decrease such disability it is necessary to control these reactions, the main cause of nerve damage in leprosy. To describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics and the treatment of patients with type 1 and 2 leprosy reactions who consulted the Centro Dermatológico Federico Lleras Acosta. It is a descriptive study which included patients with clinical diagnoses of type 1 and 2 reactions who were seen in the center between 2003 and 2009. The town of origin of the patients, their age, clinical features and treatments were analysed. We studied 96 reactions in 87 patients, 35 type 1 and 61 type 2 reactions; 75% of the patients came from the departments of Tolima, Cundinamarca, Santander and Boyacá; 77% of type 1 reaction occurred before the beginning of multidrug therapy for leprosy. The reactions that started after stopping the multidrug therapy were considered as a leprosy relapse. Correct identification of type 1 reaction by the general practitioner will allow the diagnosis of leprosy in a large percentage of patients. The type 1 reaction that begins after stopping the leprosy multidrug therapy may be a manifestation of a relapse of the disease.

  11. Leprosy elimination campaign in Qazvin province, Islamic Republic of Iran (2006-07).

    PubMed

    Qasemi-Barqi, R; Bijani, B; Pahlevan, A A

    2011-12-01

    Multi-drug therapy (MDT) and Leprosy Elimination Campaigns (LEC) are the major strategies for eliminating leprosy. We report the results of a LEC conducted in 2006 in Qazvin. A total of 1987 individuals (1379 household contacts of 319 registered leprosy patients and 608 people from 3 endemic villages with a high prevalence of leprosy) were examined for detection of new cases of leprosy. All new cases were given MDT and were reviewed after a year. There were 256 suspected cases of leprosy, 13 of whom were confirmed as new cases (7 were classified as multibacillary leprosy). None had visible deformity nor was < 20 years old. All patients completed the recommended MDT course. The few cases detected suggest that in low prevalence areas, a long-term approach of integrated leprosy services and disability management may be more appropriate than LEC as a leprosy elimination strategy.

  12. Clinical Profile of Leprosy Patients: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Thakkar, Sejal; Patel, Sangita V

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Early diagnosis and early adequate drug treatment is very important aspect to reduce the load in cases of leprosy. So, correct labeling of paucibacillary and multibacillary cases is a prerequisite for the adequate treatment. Confirmation of diagnosis is an important indication for histopathological examination in doubtful cases. Objectives: The present study was carried out to know the clinical profile of leprosy patients, concordance between clinical and histopathological diagnosis in cases of leprosy, and to assess the therapeutic efficacy of antileprosy therapy. Study Design: Two hundred and fifty clinically diagnosed leprosy patients attending skin outdoor patient department (OPD) were included in the study. Slit skin smear was performed in all the cases. In that case concordance between clinical and histology can be determined only in 30 cases. All the patients were treated with MDT (multidrug therapy) as per WHO guideline. Results: A total of 250 patients attended the clinic with male to female ratio of 1.7:1. The highest incidence was noted in 17-40 years of age group. In the clinical disease spectrum, 40% patients were in the borderline spectrum followed by tuberculoid leprosy (TT) (29.2%), lepromatous leprosy (LL) (26.8%), and 3.9% of indeterminate leprosy (IL). A total of 18% of patients were of primary neuritic leprosy. A total of 8.3% patients had definite history of contact in the family or neighborhood. Clinicopathological correlation was noted in 60% of patients with maximum disparity (52.9%) in the borderline group of patients. A total of 52.8% were MB (Multibacillary) and 47.2% were PB (Paucibacillary) cases. Morphological index became negative after 6 months in all patients. Mean fall of bacteriological index after 6 months was 0.19, while after 1 year, it was 1.05. Conclusion: Timely diagnosis and adequate treatment of cases with MDT is most effective. Histopathological examination is must in doubtful cases of leprosy. PMID:24700934

  13. Treatment Behaviour of Leprosy Patients on Time Scale.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Pandey, S S; Kaur, P

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy is not a disease of modern civilization and industrialization, but its origin is as old as 4600 BC. Although the cure of leprosy is possible by MDT, there are certain misbelieves in the mind of leprosy patients leads to delay in disease reporting. Wandering of the patient from one healer to another healer also one of the cause that delays the start of MDT. It is known fact that the delayed response in getting medical treatment for leprosy causes permanent physical deformities in the patient. This study is aimed to identify the treatment behavior of leprosy patients on time scale. A total of 251 study subjects were selected randomly attending the Skin & VD OPD of S S Hospital of IMS, BHU, Varanasi. Questions related to treatment behavior on time scale were administered to leprosy patients aged 15 years or above by the interviewer himself. Time gap to start the initial treatment was significantly less in MB cases (5.3 months) as compared to PB cases (7.2 months). MB cases wasted significantly more time with allopathic treatment other than MDT. Urban patients (1.3 months) wasted more time with homeopathy than the rural patients (0.9 months). More than half the cases (51.4%) went for the treatment within three months of noticing symptoms of leprosy. There is a considerable delay in starting the MDT after noticing the first symptom of leprosy. As early as possible, measures to start the proper treatment i.e. MDT should be taken to avoid permanent disability due to leprosy.

  14. Tuberculosis and leprosy in Italy: new skeletal evidence.

    PubMed

    Rubini, Mauro; Zaio, Paola; Roberts, Charlotte

    2014-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) and leprosy are infections caused by Mycobacteria. This paper documents new skeletal evidence in Italy from the Iron Age site of Corvaro (Central Italy; 5th century BCE) and the Roman site of Palombara (Central Italy; 4th-5th century CE), and briefly reviews the extant evidence for these infections in Italy. The skeletal evidence for TB in Italy is more ancient than for leprosy, and is more common. The oldest evidence for both mycobacterial diseases is in the North of Italy, but this could be by chance, even if biomolecular models suggest a land route from the East to central Europe, especially for leprosy.

  15. [Leprosy in the French Polynesian archipelagoes from 1967 to 1987].

    PubMed

    Cartel, J L; Boutin, J P; Plichart, R; Roux, J; Grosset, J H

    1988-01-01

    Between 1967 and 1987, 255 new cases of leprosy were detected in French Polynesia (FP) that means on average a 8.6% detection rate. Average detection rate calculated in 7 three-year periods did not vary significantly during the 21 years studied period of time. In two remote archipelagoes of FP average detection rate of leprosy is specially high: Gambier archipelago and Southern Marquesas archipelago with respectively a 54.7 and a 48.9% detection rate. To control leprosy, the network of treatment and active case-finding should be strengthened in archipelagoes and chemoprophylaxis programmes could be planned in places where the problem is especially important.

  16. Development of Hodgkin's disease in a patient with leprosy.

    PubMed

    Weshler, Z; Leviatan, A; Gordon, R; Kopolovic, J

    1978-01-01

    We present a patient with leprosy who developed Hodgkin's disease of the nodular sclerosing type. There are two previous reports describing the combination of leprosy and Hodgkin's disease in a single patient [3, 9]. Hodgkin's disease was diagnosed 14 months after the complete disappearance of mycobacterium leprae from the skin lesions, under treatment with DDS (diamino-diphenyl-sulfone). Hodgkin's disease was treated by irradiation and chemotherapy. Obstructive jaundice developed which resolved under treatment by irradiation of the hilar area of the liver, chemotherapy and hormones. During two years of immuno-suppressive therapy, without DDS, no exacerbation of the leprosy occurred.

  17. Bilateral lagophthalmos in leprosy: is it a rare phenomenon?

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, A K; Subbarao, N T

    2010-01-01

    Lagophthalmos is one of the well known complications of leprosy due to involvement of the facial nerve. Herein, we report three cases of bilateral lagophthalmos due to leprosy which presented to us within a span of just three months. In all these cases, lagophthalmos was not the presenting complaint and it was detected by the treating doctor during examination. This report is being presented to highlight the importance of cranial nerve examination in all cases of leprosy as at times early changes of lagophthalmos may go unnoticed by the patient.

  18. Oropharyngeal leprosy in art, history, and medicine.

    PubMed

    Scollard, D M; Skinsnes, O K

    1999-04-01

    Advanced lesions of the face, nasopharynx, and oropharynx have played an important role in the medical and social history of Hansen's disease. Renaissance artists included detailed portrayals of these lesions in some of their paintings, a testimony not only to their artistic skill and powers of observation but also to the common presence of these patients in European cities and towns of the period. The disease is now understood as a broad immunologic spectrum of host responses to Mycobacterium leprae, with a variety of clinical and pathologic manifestations in nerve, soft tissues, and bone. This review incorporates the findings of 2 extraordinary studies (one from Europe and the other from Japan) of pharyngeal and facial lesions. In the 1950s, studies of skeletal remains from the churchyard of a Danish leprosarium revealed a triad of maxillofacial lesions unique to leprosy and designated facies leprosa. In pre-World War II Japan, before effective treatment had been discovered, a prominent otorhinolaryngologist studying oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal lesions prepared watercolor illustrations of the natural progression of untreated Hansen's disease. As a result of effective antimicrobial therapy, such advanced lesions are now rarely seen, but the presenting signs and symptoms of leprosy still occasionally arise in the nasal and oral mucosa. The nasopharynx and oropharynx may be important early sites of inoculation and infection by M leprae, and they require additional emphasis in worldwide efforts toward early diagnosis and treatment of Hansen's disease.

  19. Hansen's disease (leprosy) complicated by secondary mycobacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Scollard, David M; Stryjewska, Barbara M; Prestigiacomo, John F; Gillis, Thomas P; Waguespack-Labiche, Jennifer

    2011-03-01

    A patient with Hansen's disease received corticosteroids for a type 1 leprosy reaction and subsequently developed a new cutaneous lesion at the original biopsy site from which Mycobacterium fortuitum was cultured. A review of the literature found only two other cases of coinfection with atypical mycobacteria and Mycobacterium leprae, although there are many reports of pulmonary tuberculosis in patients with leprosy. This case highlights the diagnostic difficulties encountered when a patient has two different mycobacterial infections of the skin. The published experience emphasizes that such coinfection is remarkably uncommon in leprosy, despite the frequent use of high doses of corticosteroids for leprosy reactions. Copyright © 2009 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. LEPROSY NEPHROPATHY: A REVIEW OF CLINICAL AND HISTOPATHOLOGICAL FEATURES

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Geraldo Bezerra; Daher, Elizabeth De Francesco; Pires, Roberto da Justa; Pereira, Eanes Delgado Barros; Meneses, Gdayllon Cavalcante; Araújo, Sônia Maria Holanda Almeida; Barros, Elvino José Guardão

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, highly incapacitating, and with systemic involvement in some cases. Renal involvement has been reported in all forms of the disease, and it is more frequent in multibacillary forms. The clinical presentation is variable and is determined by the host immunologic system reaction to the bacilli. During the course of the disease there are the so called reactional states, in which the immune system reacts against the bacilli, exacerbating the clinical manifestations. Different renal lesions have been described in leprosy, including acute and chronic glomerulonephritis, interstitial nephritis, secondary amyloidosis and pyelonephritis. The exact mechanism that leads to glomerulonephritis in leprosy is not completely understood. Leprosy treatment includes rifampicin, dapsone and clofazimine. Prednisone and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may be used to control acute immunological episodes. PMID:25651321

  1. Gene Association with Leprosy: A Review of Published Data

    PubMed Central

    Mazini, Priscila Saamara; Alves, Hugo Vicentin; Reis, Pâmela Guimarães; Lopes, Ana Paula; Sell, Ana Maria; Santos-Rosa, Manuel; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila; Rodrigues-Santos, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by an obligate intracellular bacterium known as Mycobacterium leprae. Exposure to the bacillus is necessary, but this alone does not mean an individual will develop clinical symptoms of the disease. In recent years, several genes have been associated with leprosy and the innate immune response pathways converge on the main hypothesis that genes are involved in the susceptibility for the disease in two distinct steps: for leprosy per se and in the development of the different clinical forms. These genes participate in the sensing, main metabolic pathway of immune response activation and, subsequently, on the evolution of the disease into its clinical forms. The aim of this review is to highlight the role of innate immune response in the context of leprosy, stressing their participation in the signaling and targeting processes in response to bacillus infection and on the evolution to the clinical forms of the disease. PMID:26793196

  2. Leprosy: a review of laboratory and therapeutic aspects - Part 2*

    PubMed Central

    Lastória, Joel Carlos; de Abreu, Marilda Aparecida Milanez Morgado

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious condition caused by Mycobacterium leprae(M. leprae). It is endemic in many regions of the world and a public health problem in Brazil. Additionally, it presents a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, which are dependent on the interaction between M. leprae and host, and are related to the degree of immunity to the bacillus. The diagnosis of this disease is a clinical one. However, in some situations laboratory exams are necessary to confirm the diagnosis of leprosy or classify its clinical form. This article aims to update dermatologists on leprosy, through a review of complementary laboratory techniques that can be employed for the diagnosis of leprosy, including Mitsuda intradermal reaction, skin smear microscopy, histopathology, serology, immunohistochemistry, polymerase chain reaction, imaging tests, electromyography, and blood tests. It also aims to explain standard multidrug therapy regimens, the treatment of reactions and resistant cases, immunotherapy with bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine and chemoprophylaxis. PMID:24937811

  3. Recognizing and managing the immunologic reactions in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Sonia; Vaccaro, Seth A; Rea, Thomas H; Ochoa, Maria T

    2014-10-01

    Immunologic reactions are an important aspect of leprosy that significantly impacts the course of the disease and the associated disability. Reversal reaction (type 1), erythema nodosum leprosum (type 2), and Lucio phenomenon are the 3 leprosy reactions, and they are most commonly seen in patients with the lepromatous and borderline categories of the disease. Because these forms of leprosy are the most common types seen in the United States, it is particularly important for physicians to be able to recognize and treat them. The reactions may occur before, during, or after treatment with multidrug therapy. Reversal reactions are the most common cause of nerve damage in leprosy, and erythema nodosum leprosum may also lead to neuritis. Although there have not been enough studies to confirm the most effective management regimens, treatment of reversal reaction and Lucio phenomenon with prednisone and of erythema nodosum leprosum with thalidomide and/or prednisone may help improve symptoms and prevent further disability.

  4. [Diffuse lepromatous leprosy disclosed by cutaneous vasculitis. The Lucio phenomenon].

    PubMed

    Bernadat, J P; Faucher, J F; Huerre, M

    1996-01-01

    Lucio's phenomenon, also called necrotizing erythema, is a rare acute manifestation which sometimes introduces diffuse lepromatous leprosy, almost exclusively in Central American populations. A 76-year-old polynesian man of chinese ethnic origin had necrotizing erythema for several months before development of Lucio's leprosy. The patient had necrotizing lesions of the lower limbs with large polygonal scars and poor general health status. Diagnosis was based on the discovery of acid-fast bacilli at the pathology examination of skin biopsies. The necrotizing zones appeared as cutaneous vasculitis with angiogenesis of the superficial dermis and presence of Hansen bacilli within the endothelium. This case of diffuse lepromatous leprosy, the first reported in the South Pacific, emphasizes the polymorphism of leprosy and the importance of recognizing rare clinical forms, especially in the tropics. Anti-Hansen drugs are effective.

  5. Leprosy with Atypical Skin Lesions Masquerading as Relapsing Polychondritis

    PubMed Central

    Munganda, Hariharan; Bangia, Amit; Rani, Uma; Budhiraja, Rajesh; Brajpuriya, Swapnil

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy can present with a variety of clinical manifestations depending on the immune status of the individual. After dermatological and neurological involvement, rheumatic features specially various forms of arthritis are the third most common manifestation of the disease. We describe a unique case of a 22-year-old patient presenting with external ear involvement mimicking relapsing polychondritis along with inflammatory joint symptoms and skin lesions. Ear involvement in relapsing polychondritis characteristically is painful and spares the noncartilaginous ear lobules, in contrast to painless ear involvement in leprosy affecting the lobules as well. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis, although the ear and skin lesions were not classical of leprosy. Such a presentation of leprosy closely mimicking relapsing polychondritis has not been described previously. Tissue diagnosis should always be attempted whenever possible in patients presenting with autoimmune features, so that inappropriate therapy with immunosuppressants is avoided. PMID:28116186

  6. Integrative analyses of leprosy susceptibility genes indicate a common autoimmune profile.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Deng-Feng; Wang, Dong; Li, Yu-Ye; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2016-04-01

    Leprosy is an ancient chronic infection in the skin and peripheral nerves caused by Mycobacterium leprae. The development of leprosy depends on genetic background and the immune status of the host. However, there is no systematic view focusing on the biological pathways, interaction networks and overall expression pattern of leprosy-related immune and genetic factors. To identify the hub genes in the center of leprosy genetic network and to provide an insight into immune and genetic factors contributing to leprosy. We retrieved all reported leprosy-related genes and performed integrative analyses covering gene expression profiling, pathway analysis, protein-protein interaction network, and evolutionary analyses. A list of 123 differentially expressed leprosy related genes, which were enriched in activation and regulation of immune response, was obtained in our analyses. Cross-disorder analysis showed that the list of leprosy susceptibility genes was largely shared by typical autoimmune diseases such as lupus erythematosus and arthritis, suggesting that similar pathways might be affected in leprosy and autoimmune diseases. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) and positive selection analyses revealed a co-evolution network of leprosy risk genes. Our analyses showed that leprosy associated genes constituted a co-evolution network and might undergo positive selection driven by M. leprae. We suggested that leprosy may be a kind of autoimmune disease and the development of leprosy is a matter of defect or over-activation of body immunity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Induction and treatment of anergy in murine leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Juarez-Ortega, Mario; Hernandez, Víctor G; Arce-Paredes, Patricia; Villanueva, Enrique B; Aguilar-Santelises, Miguel; Rojas-Espinosa, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy is a disease consisting of a spectrum of clinical, bacteriological, histopathological and immunological manifestations. Tuberculoid leprosy is frequently recognized as the benign polar form of the disease, while lepromatous leprosy is regarded as the malignant form. The different forms of leprosy depend on the genetic and immunological characteristics of the patient and on the characteristics of the leprosy bacillus. The malignant manifestations of lepromatous leprosy result from the mycobacterial-specific anergy that develops in this form of the disease. Using murine leprosy as a model of anergy in this study, we first induced the development of anergy to Mycobacterium lepraemurium (MLM) in mice and then attempted to reverse it by the administration of dialysable leucocyte extracts (DLE) prepared from healthy (HLT), BCG-inoculated and MLM-inoculated mice. Mice inoculated with either MLM or BCG developed a robust cell-mediated immune response (CMI) that was temporary in the MLM-inoculated group and long-lasting in the BCG-inoculated group. DLE were prepared from the spleens of MLM- and BCG-inoculated mice at the peak of CMI. Independent MLM intradermally-inoculated groups were treated every other day with HLT-DLE, BCG-DLE or MLM-DLE, and the effect was documented for 98 days. DLE administered at a dose of 1.0 U (1 × 106 splenocytes) did not affect the evolution of leprosy, while DLE given at a dose of 0.1 U showed beneficial effects regardless of the DLE source. The dose but not the specificity of DLE was the determining factor for reversing anergy. PMID:25529580

  8. Leprosy in French Polynesia. Epidemiological trends between 1946 and 1987.

    PubMed

    Cartel, J L; Boutin, J P; Spiegel, A; Glaziou, P; Plichart, R; Cardines, R; Grosset, J H

    1992-09-01

    The analysis of computerized data (OMSLEP system) on patients from French Polynesia followed since 1940 has shown a decrease in the mean annual detection rates for leprosy, all forms combined, from 24.73 per 100,000 inhabitants in 1946 to 8.1 per 100,000 in 1987 (y = -0.49 x + 45.83; p < 0.05). In fact, the decrease was significant (y = -1.18 x + 83.54; p < 0.05) during the first half of the study period (1946-66), but not during the second half (1967-87). Similarly, a significant decrease in all of the specific mean annual detection rates (according to the form of leprosy and to the sex and age of patients), in the proportion of multibacillary patients among the total of newly detected cases, and in the proportion of all patients with disabilities at the onset of leprosy was observed only during the first half of the study period (1946-66). Nevertheless, when comparing age-specific cumulative detection rates, calculated by 10-year age groups over the period 1946-66, to those of the period 1967-87, an ageing of the leprosy population was noted. Finally, the decrease of mean annual detection rates was greater in the smaller populations of remote islands than in the population of Tahiti, the main island, where 70% of the total population were living during the study period. This decline was shown to correspond to an effective improvement of the leprosy situation which could be attributed, among other factors (such as economic development and systematic BCG vaccination), to the implementation of a control programme for leprosy in 1950. The introduction in 1982 of multidrug therapy for all patients suffering active leprosy has raised the hope of a subsequent decline of leprosy in French Polynesia in the near future.

  9. The Leprosy Agents Mycobacterium lepromatosis and Mycobacterium leprae in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiang Y.; Sizer, Kurt Clement; Velarde-Félix, Jesús S.; Frias-Castro, Luis O.; Vargas-Ocampo, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Mycobacterium leprae was the only known cause of leprosy until 2008, when a new species, named Mycobacterium lepromatosis, was found to cause diffuse lepromatous leprosy (DLL), a unique form of leprosy endemic in Mexico. Methods We sought to differentiate the leprosy agents among 120 Mexican patients with various clinical forms of leprosy and to compare their relative prevalence and disease features. Archived skin biopsy specimens from these patients were tested for both M. leprae and M. lepromatosis using polymerase chain reaction-based species-specific assays. Results Eighty-seven (72.5%) patients were confirmed for etiologic species, including 55 with M. lepromatosis, 18 with M. leprae, and 14 with both organisms. The endemic regions of each agent differed but overlapped. Patients with M. lepromatosis were younger and from more states, and their clinical diagnoses included 13 DLL, 34 lepromatous leprosy (LL), and eight other forms of leprosy. By contrast, the diagnoses of patients with M. leprae included none DLL, 15 LL and three other forms. Thus, M. lepromatosis caused DLL specifically (p=0.023). Patients with M. lepromatosis also showed more variable skin lesions and the extremities were the commonest biopsy sites. Finally, patients with dual infections manifested all clinical forms and accounted for 16.1% of all species-confirmed cases. Conclusions M. lepromatosis is another cause of leprosy and is probably more prevalent than M. leprae in Mexico. It mainly causes LL and also specifically DLL. Dual infections caused by both species may occur in endemic area. PMID:22788812

  10. Borderline tuberculoid leprosy in childhood onset systemic lupus erythematosus patient.

    PubMed

    Lopes, V A P; Lourenço, D M R; Guariento, A; Trindade, M A; Avancini, J; Silva, C A

    2015-11-01

    Leprosy is a contagious and chronic systemic granulomatous disease caused by the bacillus Mycobacterium leprae. To our knowledge, no case of leprosy in a childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (c-SLE) patient has been reported. For a period of 31 years, 312 c-SLE patients were followed at the Pediatric Rheumatology Unit of our University Hospital. One of them (0.3%) had tuberculoid leprosy skin lesions during the disease course and is here reported. A 10-year-old boy from Northwest of Brazil was diagnosed with c-SLE based on malar rash, photosensitivity, oral ulcers, lymphopenia, proteinuria, positive antinuclear antibodies, anti-double-stranded DNA, anti-Sm and anti-Ro/SSA autoantibodies. He was treated with prednisone, hydroxychloroquine and intravenous cyclophosphamide, followed by mycophenolate mofetil. At 12-years-old, he presented asymmetric skin lesions characterized by erythematous plaques with elevated external borders and hypochromic center with sensory loss. Peripheral nerve involvement was not evidenced. No history of familial cases of leprosy was reported, although the region where the patient resides is considered to be endemic for leprosy. Skin biopsy revealed a well-defined tuberculoid form. A marked thickening of nerves was observed, often destroyed by granulomas, without evidence of Mycobacterium leprae bacilli. At that time, the SLEDAI-2K score was 4 and he had been receiving prednisone 15 mg/day, hydroxychloroquine 200 mg/day and mycophenolate mofetil 3 g/day. Paucibacillary treatment for leprosy with dapsone and rifampicine was also introduced. In conclusion, we have reported a rare case of leprosy in the course of c-SLE. Leprosy should always be considered in children and adolescents with lupus who present skin abnormalities, particularly with hypoesthesic or anesthesic cutaneous lesions.

  11. Leprosy in Toronto: an analysis of 184 imported cases.

    PubMed

    Boggild, Andrea K; Correia, Jason D; Keystone, Jay S; Kain, Kevin C

    2004-01-06

    Leprosy is a rare but serious mycobacterial infection. Immigration from areas where the disease is endemic has resulted in the importation of leprosy into countries where it is not endemic and where physicians and health care workers have little or no experience in diagnosis and therapy. In this study we characterized leprosy patients seen in a tropical disease unit that manages most of the reported leprosy cases in Canada. We reviewed the clinical records of all 184 leprosy patients who were referred to the Tropical Disease Unit at Toronto General Hospital between 1979 and 2002 and abstracted demographic and clinical information. Patients were more likely to be male (122 or 66.3%) and of Indian (44 or 23.9%), Filipino (49 or 26.6%) or Vietnamese (37 or 20.1%) origin. Patients experienced symptoms for a mean of 4.8 years before referral to the Tropical Disease Unit. Most had no family history of leprosy (152/172 or 88.4%). Most patients presented with either borderline tuberculoid (80 or 43.5%) or borderline lepromatous (37 or 20.1%) disease. On average, patients presented with 5.8 skin lesions. Upper- and lower-extremity nerve dysfunction was common at presentation, with up to one-third of patients demonstrating either sensory or motor loss. A significantly greater lag time to presentation was observed in patients who emigrated from low-prevalence regions (p < 0.001). Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease that is associated with serious morbidity if left untreated. Leprosy is uncommon in developed countries, but it is important for physicians to have a high index of suspicion when a foreign-born patient presents with chronic dermatitis and peripheral nerve involvement.

  12. Leprosy in China: epidemiological trends between 1949 and 1998.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, X. S.; Li, W. Z.; Jiang, C.; Ye, G. Y.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report the epidemiological trends of leprosy in China from 1949 to 1998. METHOD: Data for the study were obtained from the computerized database of the National System of Leprosy Surveillance. FINDINGS: A total of 474,774 leprosy patients were detected during this 50-year period. Case detection rates per 100,000 population were highest in the 1950s and 1960s, with peaks appearing in 1957-58, 1963-66, 1969-70, and 1983-84, corresponding to mass surveys or screening surveys carried out in most areas or selected areas of the country. While the duration of the disease at the time of detection fell over the period, the disability rates, which were > 50% in the early 1950s, have decreased gradually to 20.8% by 1997-98 but are still too high. More than 50% of cases were found through active methods in the periods 1955-58, 1965-66, and 1969-76, but in recent years cases are mostly detected through dermatological clinics or by voluntary reporting. The peak prevalences of the 1960s (i.e. > 2 per 10,000 population) decreased annually from the 1970s onwards. By the end of 1998 the prevalence was 0.05 per 10,000 population. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that leprosy was well controlled in China and that the WHO goal of elimination of leprosy as a public health problem has been achieved at the national and subnational levels. However, leprosy is still unevenly distributed in the country. According to the criterion for leprosy elimination in China--defined as a prevalence of < 1 per 100,000 in county or city--there are still more than 10% of counties or cities where this target has not yet been reached. Special attention must therefore be given to achieve elimination and final eradication of leprosy in China. PMID:11357209

  13. Presence of an index case in households of newly registered leprosy patients: experience from a leprosy referral centre in South India.

    PubMed

    Anjum, Vaseem; Vijayakumaran, P

    2015-12-01

    The global leprosy burden in terms of new case detection does not seem to show a declining trend. India continues to be one of the major contributors to the leprosy burden. It is well known that the presence of an index case is a risk factor for leprosy among household contacts. The Blue Peter Health and Research centre (BPHRC), a leprosy referral centre in South India, observed the presence of an index case in 27.6% of leprosy patients newly diagnosed during 2009-2013. A majority of the index cases were either parents or siblings. Early case detection is recommended in global and national strategies, but active contact screening is not in the purview of integrated leprosy services in India. Active contact screening may be considered as one of the major activities to further reduce the leprosy burden.

  14. Exploratory urinary metabolomics of type 1 leprosy reactions.

    PubMed

    Mayboroda, Oleg A; van Hooij, Anouk; Derks, Rico; van den Eeden, Susan J F; Dijkman, Karin; Khadge, Saraswoti; Thapa, Pratibha; Kunwar, Chhatra B; Hagge, Deanna A; Geluk, Annemieke

    2016-04-01

    Leprosy is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae that affects the skin and nerves. Although curable with multidrug therapy, leprosy is complicated by acute inflammatory episodes called reactions, which are the major causes of irreversible neuropathy in leprosy that occur before, during, and even after treatment. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment of reactions reduces the risk of permanent disability. This exploratory study investigated whether urinary metabolic profiles could be identified that correlate with early signs of reversal reactions (RR). A prospective cohort of leprosy patients with and without reactions and endemic controls was recruited in Nepal. Urine-derived metabolic profiles were measured longitudinally. Thus, a conventional area of biomarker identification for leprosy was extended to non-invasive urine testing. It was found that the urinary metabolome could be used to discriminate endemic controls from untreated patients with mycobacterial disease. Moreover, metabolic signatures in the urine of patients developing RR were clearly different before RR onset compared to those at RR diagnosis. This study indicates that urinary metabolic profiles are promising host biomarkers for the detection of intra-individual changes during acute inflammation in leprosy and could contribute to early treatment and prevention of tissue damage. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Association of TNF, MBL, and VDR Polymorphisms with Leprosy Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Sapkota, Bishwa R.; Macdonald, Murdo; Berrington, William R.; Misch, E. Ann; Ranjit, Chaman; Siddiqui, M. Ruby; Kaplan, Gilla; Hawn, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Although genetic variants in tumor necrosis factor (TNF), mannose binding lectin (MBL), and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) have been associated with leprosy clinical outcomes these findings have not been extensively validated. Methods We used a case-control study design with 933 patients in Nepal, which included 240 patients with type I reversal reaction (RR), and 124 patients with erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL) reactions. We compared genotype frequencies in 933 cases and 101 controls of 7 polymorphisms, including a promoter region variant in TNF (G−308A), three polymorphisms in MBL (C154T, G161A and G170A), and three variants in VDR (FokI, BsmI, and TaqI). Results We observed an association between TNF −308A and protection from leprosy with an odds ratio (OR) of 0.52 (95% confidence interval (CI) of 0.29 to 0.95, P = 0.016). MBL polymorphism G161A was associated with protection from lepromatous leprosy (OR (95% CI) = 0.33 (0.12–0.85), P = 0.010). VDR polymorphisms were not associated with leprosy phenotypes. Conclusion These results confirm previous findings of an association of TNF −308A with protection from leprosy and MBL polymorphisms with protection from lepromatous leprosy. The statistical significance was modest and will require further study for conclusive validation. PMID:20650301

  16. A clinico-pathological study of primary neuritic leprosy.

    PubMed

    Pannikar, V K; Arunthathi, S; Chacko, C J; Fritschi, E P

    1983-04-01

    Normally neural involvement in leprosy is an ascending neuritis from the nerve involvement in the dermal lesions. However, in some cases neural involvement is seen in the absence of any dermal lesions. In some of these pure neuritic cases, dermal lesions appear sometime later. It is, therefore, more appropriate to designate such cases as 'primary neuritic' cases. This study is aimed at diagnosing primary neuritic leprosy among patients presenting with only neuritic symptoms. An attempt is also made to classify primary neuritic leprosy on a clinical and histopathological basis. During the period 1979-80, 30 patients reported to the out patient department of Schieffelin Leprosy Research and Training Centre, Karigiri with complaints of neuritic origin. In addition to clinical examination and routine skin smears, investigations such as skin, nerve and nasal biopsies, nerve conduction velocity and lepromin testing were carried out where feasible. 17 of these patients were diagnosed as primary neuritic leprosy and in 7 patients other neurological conditions were diagnosed. The remaining 6 patients were kept under observation and have not shown evidence of leprosy during a two year period of following-up. It is interesting that 4 of the 17 primary neuritic cases developed patches during follow-up period of two years. In the final analysis 7 patients (41.2%) were classified into the lepromatous group and 10 patients (58.8%) in the non-lepromatous group (Table-6). This classification will have a bearing on duration of treatment and for their subsequent release from control.

  17. [Conjugal leprosy infection in Japan--case report and review].

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Motoaki; Tomoda, Masakazu

    2012-04-01

    The authors reported a conjugal leprosy infection observed in Japan. The husband, index case, first noticed sensory disturbance at the lower right leg in his forties. He developed edematous swelling with redness of the right hand and forearm at the age of 72 (1989), and then developed multiple erythema and hypesthesia at the extremities. He was diagnosed as BL type leprosy (reactional stage) and treated with multi-drug therapy. His 71-year-old wife developed a few erythema at the right forearm in 1993. She was classified as BT type. The duration of their marriage life was over forty years. The couple did not have consanguinity. No other leprosy patients were found in their lineage. From their clinical courses the authors concluded that the husband infected his wife. According to Japanese literatures, the frequency of conjugal leprosy among new patients in Japan was approximately 1%. There were worldwide observations that the husband often infected the wife, and mostly the index case was multibacillary and the secondary case paucibacillary. The authors reviewed definition and frequency of conjugal leprosy, factors in conjugal infection and leprosy infection among the adults.

  18. Leprosy and stigma in the context of international migration.

    PubMed

    White, Cassandra

    2011-06-01

    If it can be argued that no single attribute or condition (leprosy included) is inherently or universally considered to be 'deeply discrediting,' to quote Goffman, then we must consider how external factors shape stigma associated with that condition in different cultural and socioeconomic contexts. Often, an analysis of what is perceived to be stigma towards people affected by leprosy uncovers other prejudices or stigmatising attitudes associated with class, gender, and/or ethnic inequalities in that society. The movement of people across international borders adds new dimensions to the experience of leprosy, as affected individuals confront different sets of understandings of the disease among healthcare professionals, friends, family, and employers in host and sending countries. Preconceptions of the immigrant 'other' in host countries may be bound up with notions of disease and danger, further complicating the experience of leprosy treatment for immigrants. Drawing on the work of others and on early stage qualitative research on leprosy among Brazilian immigrants to the United States, this paper will consider the ways in which immigration and transnational processes could affect the experience of stigma among immigrants affected by leprosy.

  19. Single nucleotide polymorphisms typing of Mycobacterium leprae reveals focal transmission of leprosy in high endemic regions of India.

    PubMed

    Lavania, M; Jadhav, R S; Turankar, R P; Chaitanya, V S; Singh, M; Sengupta, U

    2013-11-01

    Earlier studies indicate that genotyping of Mycobaterium leprae based on single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is useful for analysis of the global spread of leprosy. In the present study, we investigated the diversity of M. leprae at eight SNP loci using 180 clinical isolates obtained from patients with leprosy residing mainly in Delhi and Purulia (West Bengal) regions. It was observed that the frequency of SNP type 1 and subtype D was most predominant in the Indian population. Further, the SNP type 2 subtype E was noted only from East Delhi region and SNP type 2 subtype G was noted only from the nearby areas of Hoogly district of West Bengal. These results indicate the occurrence of focal transmission of M. leprae infection and demonstrate that analysis by SNP typing has great potential to help researchers in understanding the transmission of M. leprae infection in the community.

  20. Prevalence and Correlates of Leprosy in a High-Risk Community Setting in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Dabrera, Thushani Marie Elizabeth; Tillekeratne, L Gayani; Fernando, M S Nilanthi; Kasturiaratchi, S T Kaushlya; Østbye, Truls

    2016-10-01

    Leprosy is caused by the Mycobacterium leprae bacillus. Pockets of high endemicity remain in a number of countries including Sri Lanka, in spite of the fact that elimination has been achieved at the national level. In 2012, in a village in the Puttlam district, dermatologists reported an increase in individuals with leprosy. This village had been established in the 1990s for people displaced from Northern Sri Lanka during a civil war. A comprehensive household survey was conducted by district health officials from June to July 2012, and all household members present during the survey period were examined for leprosy lesions. Patients with suspected leprosy were referred to a dermatology clinic for clinical or pathological confirmation. The prevalence of leprosy was high (511 per 10 000 population). Household contact with another patient with leprosy increased the risk of leprosy (odds ratio = 6.69; P < .001). Continued vigilance is needed to keep leprosy at bay in high-risk communities.

  1. Concomittant pulmonary tuberculosis and borderline leprosy with type-II lepra reaction in single patient.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rajendra; Verma, Sanjay Kumar; Singh, Rajni; Hosmane, Giridhar

    2010-01-01

    The concommitant occurrence of both tuberculosis and leprosy in a single individual are not an uncommon clinical condition but is being reported infrequently in literature. We report a case of leprosy, diagnosed previously and also diagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis.

  2. An uncommon presentation of an uncommon disease: leprosy in a heart transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Gasink, Leanne B; Seymour, Christopher; Blumberg, Emily A; Goldberg, Lee R; Fishman, Neil O

    2006-07-01

    The effect of solid-organ transplantation on the acquisition, presentation and course of leprosy is unknown. We present a case of leprosy in a heart transplant recipient with multiple unique features possibly attributed to altered immune function.

  3. Peripheral neuropathy in leprosy and its consequences.

    PubMed

    Van Brakel, W H

    2000-12-01

    Leprosy causes a 'mononeuritis multiplex' of immunological origin that results in autonomic, sensory and motor neuropathy. When detected and treated early, primary impairments may be reversible. However, 11-51% of patients do not recover. In addition, 33-56% of newly registered patients already have clinically detectable impairments, often no longer amenable to drug treatment. Among new patients, 6-27% present with secondary impairments, such as wounds, contractures and shortening of digits. All patients with impairments should be taught methods to prevent further impairment and subsequent disability (POID). As the result of impairments, many people experience limitation of activities of daily living, which can be partially overcome with the help of assistive devices, training, and surgery. As a result of these limitations, because of visible impairments, or simply because of the diagnosis 'leprosy', many people are restricted in their participation in society. Many overcome activity limitations and participation restrictions without assistance, despite residual impairments. However, some require intervention, such as physical or occupational therapy, reconstructive surgery or temporary socioeconomic assistance. Information on these issues is not collected routinely, and the few tools that exist to measure the severity or extent of impairment have not been widely used, nor have they been used to generate cohort-based statistics. There are no agreed indicators for monitoring POID activities or rehabilitation interventions. Work in the general field of rehabilitation has resulted in the ICIDH-2, which provides a conceptual framework for rehabilitation and the entire area of 'consequences of health conditions'. Although experience to date is very limited, the conceptual framework appears appropriate to leprosy. Data on the prevalence and incidence of primary and secondary impairments have been reported from several countries, the link between impairments and activity

  4. Measurement of Change in the Knowledge and Attitude about Leprosy in Physiotherapy Students Undergoing Intensive One Week Training in Leprosy.

    PubMed

    Prakashkumar, M D; Ebenezer, M; Richard, J

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy is a disease that causes not only physical problems, but also mental and social problems. In the post integration era, every health care professional needs to understand about leprosy, to be able to diagnose and treat them. Physiotherapy students, in their usual syllabus, have minimal exposure to leprosy, in spite of the fact that they have a major role in preventing impairments and disabilities caused by leprosy, as well as treating such impairments. In order to educate physiotherapy students on leprosy, a one-week intensive training course was organised. This study was done to assess if the intensive training to physiotherapy students resulted in increase in their knowledge on leprosy and change their attitude positively. A batch consisting of 42 physiotherapy students went through the one-week training programme. The improvement in knowledge and attitude were assessed through a pre-test and a post-test design. Results showed that there was significant improvement in knowledge (53.05%) and brought positive change in attitude (75.0%). Such training programmes are recommended for all physiotherapy students.

  5. Leprosy in Brazilian counties bordering Paraguay: Mato Grosso do Sul State, 2001-2011.

    PubMed

    Ajalla, Maria Elizabeth Araújo; Oliveira De Andrade, Sonia Maria; Tamaki, Edson Mamoru; Waissmann, William; Deittrich, Sandra Helena Correia; Aragão Do Nascimento, Valter

    2016-03-01

    In Mato Grosso do Sul state, Brazil, the dry border shared with Paraguay is a territory marked by facilities in the flow of goods, services and people, bringing difficulties for surveillance of communicable diseases. The purpose of this study is to characterise leprosy epidemiologically in dry border municipalities of Mato Grosso do Sul in Brazil with contiguous urban areas with neighbouring Paraguayan counties, in the period 2001-2011. This is an exploratory descriptive investigation that includes the four dry border municipalities of Mato Grosso do Sul (Coronel Sapucaia, Paranhos, Ponta Porã, and Sete Quedas) in Brazil whose urban areas are contiguous with Paraguay. Data comprised the period 2001-2011. The rates of leprosy detection and prevalence oscillated along the study period, increasing in the last 2 years investigated. The detection rate was 3.3/10,000 in 2011, up from 1.7/10,000 in 2009. Prevalence was 5.3/10,000 in 2011, up from 2.5/10,000 in 2009. The Virchowian disease form was predominant in 8 of the 11 years investigated. Most patients were male, with limited formal education (44.2% with less than 4 years of study). In the border of Brazil, most (greater than 70%) of the cases detected were classified as multibacillary. The higher coefficient found in Brazilian municipalities was the Virchowian clinical form, which can influence the operational classification in multibacillary. The predominance of the Virchowian clinical form, larger number of patients in rural areas and children under 15 years of age provides new information on the manifestations of the disease in the border territories. The study revealed that municipalities with contiguous cross-border urban areas with Paraguay have unique epidemiological features that need to be addressed by policies focusing leprosy as a public health priority.

  6. Serum uric acid levels during leprosy reaction episodes

    PubMed Central

    Alves-Junior, Eduardo R.; Arruda, Talita A.; Lopes, Jose C.; Fontes, Cor J.F.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Leprosy reactions are acute inflammatory episodes that occur mainly in the multibacillary forms of the disease. The reactions are classified as type 1 (reverse reaction) or type 2 (erythema nodosum leprosum). Leprosy-associated oxidative stress has been widely demonstrated. Several recent studies have shown uric acid (UA) to have antioxidative effects under pathologic conditions. The objective of this study was to assess serum levels of UA in patients with leprosy reactions, with the aim of monitoring their levels before and after treatment, compared with levels in leprosy patients without reactions. Methods. The study included patients aged 18–69 years assisted at a leprosy treatment reference center in the Central Region of Brazil. Patients who were pregnant; were using immunosuppressant drugs or immunobiologicals; or had an autoimmune disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection, acquired immune deficiency syndrome, or tuberculosis were excluded. Upon recruitment, all individuals were clinically assessed for skin lesions and neural or systemic impairment. Some patients had already completed treatment for leprosy, while others were still undergoing treatment or had initiated treatment after being admitted. The treatment of the reactional episode was started only after the initial evaluation. Laboratory assessments were performed upon admission (baseline) and at approximately 30 and 60 days (time points 1 and 2, respectively). Results. A total of 123 leprosy patients were recruited between June 2012 and June 2015; among them, 56, 42, and 25 presented with type 1, type 2, and no reactions, respectively. Serum UA levels were significantly reduced in patients with type 2 leprosy reactions compared with patients in the control group and remained lower in the two subsequent assessments, after initiation of anti-reaction treatments, with similar values to those recorded before the treatment. Discussion. The decreased serum UA levels in patients with

  7. Factors Contributing to the Delay in Diagnosis and Continued Transmission of Leprosy in Brazil – An Explorative, Quantitative, Questionnaire Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Mary; GalAn, Noêmi; Teasdale, Katherine; Prado, Renata; Amar, Harpreet; Rays, Marina S.; Roberts, Lesley; Siqueira, Pedro; de Wildt, Gilles; Virmond, Marcos; Das, Pranab K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Leprosy is a leading cause of preventable disability worldwide. Delay in diagnosis of patients augments the transmission of infection, and allows progression of disease and more severe disability. Delays in diagnosis greater than ten years have been reported in Brazil. To reduce this delay, it is important to identify factors that hinder patients from presenting to doctors, and those that delay doctors from diagnosing patients once they have presented. This study aimed to explore factors associated with the delayed diagnosis of leprosy in Brazil. Methodology/ Principal Findings This is an exploratory study using a self-constructed questionnaire delivered to patients attending three leprosy referral clinics across three states in Brazil. Data were analysed to determine associations between variables and the time taken for participants to present to the health-service, and between variables and the time taken for doctors to diagnose participants once they had presented. Participants who suspected they had leprosy but feared community isolation were 10 times more likely to wait longer before consulting a doctor for their symptoms (OR 10.37, 95% CI 2.18–49.45, p = 0.003). Participants who thought their symptoms were not serious had a threefold greater chance of waiting longer before consulting than those who did (OR 3.114, 95% CI 1.235–7.856, p = 0.016). Forty-two point six per cent of participants reported initially receiving a diagnosis besides leprosy. These had a three times greater chance of receiving a later diagnosis of leprosy compared to those not misdiagnosed or not given a diagnosis (OR 2.867, 95% CI 1.288–6.384, p = 0.010). Conclusions/ Significance This study implies a need for patient education regarding leprosy symptoms and the reduction of stigma to encourage patients to present. The high rate of misdiagnosis reported suggests a need to increase clinician suspicion of leprosy. Further education regarding disease symptoms in medical

  8. Prevention of blindness in leprosy and the role of the Vision 2020 Programme.

    PubMed

    Hogeweg, M; Keunen, J E E

    2005-10-01

    Leprosy control programmes are highly successful. As a result, leprosy control will be more and more integrated into the general health services. The existing vertical, specialized control programmes will be dismantled. Eye complications in leprosy have decreased. This is a result of earlier diagnosis and highly effective multidrug treatment (MDT) of leprosy, combined with timely treatment of secondary nerve damage by steroids. Most ocular morbidity is now found among elderly and disabled leprosy patients who were diagnosed before effective MDT treatment became available. Many of these patients live in leprosy settlements. Age-related cataract has become the leading cause of blindness in leprosy. The second cause of blindness is corneal opacification, mainly as a result of neglected exposure keratitis and corneal anaesthesia. The miotic pupils in late multibacillary leprosy, in combination with small central lens opacities, may also lead to blindness. The Vision 2020 Initiative prioritises cataract surgery. Leprosy patients should be actively included. Disabled leprosy patients can also benefit from screening programmes for refractive errors and the provision of spectacles and low vision aids. Determining the most feasible surgical methods for lagophthalmos surgery remains a challenge. For all health and eye care staff, training in leprosy and its eye complications is needed, as well as a change in attitude towards leprosy patients. Staff must be prepared to welcome them in the general health services.

  9. Knowledge and attitude about leprosy in Delhi in post elimination phase.

    PubMed

    Grewal, I; Negi, Y; Kishore, J; Adhish, S V

    2013-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic communicable disease since age associated with stigma and suffering. India claims its elimination but in some districts it remains a public health problem. A cross sectional study was conducted and a total of 60 persons were interviewed with an objective to assess the knowledge and attitude about leprosy among sample of 30 adults each from leprosy colony dwellers and urban slum dwellers in South District of Delhi. Knowledge about the leprosy among leprosy colony dwellers was significantly lower than the slum dwellers. Both the groups still believed that leprosy could be due to curse of God, past misdeeds, and could spontaneously occur. Respondents of leprosy colony had significantly less adverse attitude such as leprosy patient should never get married (12% vs 57%), patient should be kept in leprosy colony (0 vs 30%) and should not be allowed to enter religious places (0 vs 23%). Surprisingly 73% of them had not heard about MDT and only (68%) knew that treatment is available free of cost in all Govt. hospitals. Only about half of the respondents knew that deformities could be corrected. This study reflects the poor awareness and negative attitudes towards leprosy particularly among leprosy patients themselves, which could be one of the reasons for slow progress in Leprosy Elimination Program in Delhi.

  10. Comparing the Clinical and Histological Diagnosis of Leprosy and Leprosy Reactions in the INFIR Cohort of Indian Patients with Multibacillary Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, Diana N. J.; Nicholls, Peter; Smith, W. Cairns S.; Das, Loretta; Barkataki, Pramila; van Brakel, Wim; Suneetha, Sujai

    2012-01-01

    Background The ILEP Nerve Function Impairment in Reaction (INFIR) is a cohort study designed to identify predictors of reactions and nerve function impairment in leprosy. The aim was to study correlations between clinical and histological diagnosis of reactions. Methodology/Principal Findings Three hundred and three newly diagnosed patients with World Health Organization multibacillary (MB) leprosy from two centres in India were enrolled in the study. Skin biopsies taken at enrolment were assessed using a standardised proforma to collect data on the histological diagnosis of leprosy, leprosy reactions and the certainty level of the diagnosis. The pathologist diagnosed definite or probable Type 1 Reactions (T1R) in 113 of 265 biopsies from patients at risk of developing reactions whereas clinicians diagnosed skin only reactions in 39 patients and 19 with skin and nerve involvement. Patients with Borderline Tuberculoid (BT) leprosy had a clinical diagnosis rate of reactions of 43% and a histological diagnosis rate of 61%; for patients with Borderline Lepromatous (BL) leprosy the clinical and histological diagnosis rates were 53.7% and 46.2% respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of clinical diagnosis for T1R was 53.1% and 61.9% for BT patients and 61.1% and 71.0% for BL patients. Erythema Nodosum Leprosum (ENL) was diagnosed clinically in two patients but histologically in 13 patients. The Ridley-Jopling classification of patients (n = 303) was 42.8% BT, 27.4% BL, 9.4% Lepromatous Leprosy (LL), 13.0% Indeterminate and 7.4% with non-specific inflammation. This data shows that MB classification is very heterogeneous and encompasses patients with no detectable bacteria and high immunological activity through to patients with high bacterial loads. Conclusions/Significance Leprosy reactions may be under-diagnosed by clinicians and increasing biopsy rates would help in the diagnosis of reactions. Future studies should look at sub-clinical T1R and ENL and whether

  11. Whole genome sequencing distinguishes between relapse and reinfection in recurrent leprosy cases

    PubMed Central

    Bührer-Sékula, Samira; Benjak, Andrej; Loiseau, Chloé; Singh, Pushpendra; Pontes, Maria A. A.; Gonçalves, Heitor S.; Hungria, Emerith M.; Busso, Philippe; Piton, Jérémie; Silveira, Maria I. S.; Cruz, Rossilene; Schetinni, Antônio; Costa, Maurício B.; Virmond, Marcos C. L.; Diorio, Suzana M.; Dias-Baptista, Ida M. F.; Rosa, Patricia S.; Matsuoka, Masanori; Penna, Maria L. F.; Cole, Stewart T.; Penna, Gerson O.

    2017-01-01

    Background Since leprosy is both treated and controlled by multidrug therapy (MDT) it is important to monitor recurrent cases for drug resistance and to distinguish between relapse and reinfection as a means of assessing therapeutic efficacy. All three objectives can be reached with single nucleotide resolution using next generation sequencing and bioinformatics analysis of Mycobacterium leprae DNA present in human skin. Methodology DNA was isolated by means of optimized extraction and enrichment methods from samples from three recurrent cases in leprosy patients participating in an open-label, randomized, controlled clinical trial of uniform MDT in Brazil (U-MDT/CT-BR). Genome-wide sequencing of M. leprae was performed and the resultant sequence assemblies analyzed in silico. Principal findings In all three cases, no mutations responsible for resistance to rifampicin, dapsone and ofloxacin were found, thus eliminating drug resistance as a possible cause of disease recurrence. However, sequence differences were detected between the strains from the first and second disease episodes in all three patients. In one case, clear evidence was obtained for reinfection with an unrelated strain whereas in the other two cases, relapse appeared more probable. Conclusions/Significance This is the first report of using M. leprae whole genome sequencing to reveal that treated and cured leprosy patients who remain in endemic areas can be reinfected by another strain. Next generation sequencing can be applied reliably to M. leprae DNA extracted from biopsies to discriminate between cases of relapse and reinfection, thereby providing a powerful tool for evaluating different outcomes of therapeutic regimens and for following disease transmission. PMID:28617800

  12. The epidemiological consequences of leprosy-tuberculosis co-infection.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, N; Voss-Böhme, A

    2013-02-01

    While in antiquity both leprosy and tuberculosis were prevalent in Europe, leprosy declined thereafter and, simultaneously, tuberculosis prevalence increased. Since both diseases are caused by mycobacterial infections, it has been suggested that there might be a causal relationship between both epidemics. Chaussinand observed the inverse prevalence of leprosy and tuberculosis and suggested that individuals with a latent tuberculosis infection are protected from acquiring leprosy. His cross-immunity hypothesis has been countered more recently by a co-infection hypothesis. The latter suggestion, proposed by Donoghue, states that people being infected with multi-bacillary leprosy are more susceptible to tuberculosis, which leads to increased mortality from the disease. This study utilizes mathematical modeling to explore the epidemiological consequences of the co-infection hypothesis for realistically confined parameter values. While the co-infection hypothesis appears plausible at first glance, a second thought reveals that it comprises also substantial consequences for tuberculosis epidemics: if co-infection raises the mortality rate above that of purely tuberculosis infected persons, then tuberculosis might as well be eradicated by leprosy. It is the specific interplay of both increased susceptibility towards tuberculosis and increased death rate when co-infected that determines the epidemiological fate. As a result of this analysis, it is shown that there is a large parameter region where the eventual disappearance of leprosy could indeed be explained by co-infection. This parameter region is considerably larger than that predicted by the cross-immunity hypothesis. This shows that the co-infection hypothesis should be considered a significant alternative to the cross-immunity hypothesis. The time scales at which the effects of co-infection are observed depend critically on the spatial distribution of the individuals but reach epidemiologically realistic values for

  13. Leprosy in Puerto Rico: insight into the new millennia.

    PubMed

    Valentín, Diana C; Candelario, Nicole; Carrasquillo, Osward Y; Figueroa, Luz; Sánchez, Jorge L

    2017-04-01

    Leprosy, or Hansen's disease, is a chronic infectious disease caused by the bacillus Mycobacterium leprae. In 2000, the World Health Organization (WHO) defined the elimination of the disease as a global prevalence of less than one case per 10,000 population. However, disease transmission is an ongoing worldwide public health concern, as evidenced by the more than 220,000 new cases diagnosed each year. This study is an update of the incidence and prevalence of leprosy in Puerto Rico for the period of 2000-2014. A retrospective analysis of data was obtained from the Tropical Disease Clinic (TDC) of the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine. Sixty-three new cases of leprosy are detailed in this study. Disease incidence and prevalence were 1.65 and 5.26 per 100,000 inhabitants (of the island of Puerto Rico), respectively, and an average of 4.2 new cases per year. Most of the male patients in the study suffered from lepromatous leprosy (P = 0.026). In all, 47 (74.6%) patients had been born in Puerto Rico, and 29 (46%) had an affected family member or were in close contact with someone with leprosy. Compared to those of previous studies, these results demonstrate a decrease in both the incidence and prevalence of leprosy in Puerto Rico over the past 15 years. The relatively high prevalence of leprosy in Puerto Rico means that it remains endemic on the island. Concerted efforts must be undertaken to achieve the goal of the elimination of this old and stigmatized disease. © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  14. Renal lesions in leprosy amongst north Indian patients.

    PubMed Central

    Chugh, K. S.; Damle, P. B.; Kaur, S.; Sharma, B. K.; Kumar, B.; Sakhuja, V.; Nath, I. V.; Datta, B. N.

    1983-01-01

    Sixty consecutive patients with leprosy were investigated for renal involvement. Clinically overt renal disease was present in 4 patients; 3 presented with a nephrotic state and one patient with progressive renal failure. Urinalysis showed daily protein loss ranging from 0.4 to 8.9 g in 8 patients and microscopic haematuria in 4 cases. Elevated levels of blood urea and creatinine were seen only in one patient with diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis. Of the 36 patients in whom distal tubular functions were evaluated, concentration and/or acidification defects were detected in 9 patients (25%). Renal histology revealed no abnormality in any of these patients. Serum C3 levels were decreased in 5 patients with lepromatous leprosy and 3 patients with borderline leprosy. Histological evidence of renal involvement was detected in 9 patients (15%). Amyloid deposits were seen in 3 (5%) patients of whom 2 had lepromatous leprosy and one had tuberculoid leprosy with chronic trophic ulcers. Mesangial proliferative lesions were seen in 5 (8.3%) and diffuse proliferative lesions (with crescents in more than 70% of glomeruli) in one patient. All of them had lepromatous leprosy. Three of the 5 patients with mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis had erythema nodosum leprosum at the time of biopsy. Immunofluorescence studies revealed granular deposits of IgA, IgM and C3 in one patient with mesangial proliferation and IgA/IgM with or without C3 in 3 more patients in whom renal histology was normal. Glomerulonephritis associated with leprosy appears to be immune mediated but confirmation requires identification of lepra antigen in the glomerular immune complex deposits. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:6647188

  15. Leprosy in Kuwait: an epidemiological study of new cases.

    PubMed

    al-Kandari, S; al-Anezi, A; Pugh, R N; al-Qasaf, F; al-Abyad, S

    1990-10-01

    The latency of infection in leprosy is long so that new cases may present several years after emigration from endemic areas. This is of concern to the health authorities in Kuwait, since there is a sizeable immigrant population. An epidemiological study of new cases was, therefore, conducted to assess the extent of the leprosy problem. A total of 121 (99 male, 22 female) consecutive new leprosy patients were diagnosed nationwide over a six-year period (1983-1988). Over 95% of the patients were foreign born, emphasizing that the problem in Kuwait is mainly a reflection of immigration patterns. There were 74 cases of Asio-Indian origin, 13 Oriental and 34 Arab (including two Kuwaiti). This represents a respective mean incidence of the disease in Kuwaitis and other nationalities of 0.49 and 18.92 per 100,000 per year. Polar lepromatous (LL) leprosy was the most frequent type in the Arab group (44.1%) and polar tuberculoid (TT) the most frequent in the Asio-Indian group (37.8%). LL and borderline lepromatous (BL) types of leprosy were significantly more frequent in patients over 45-years-old and in females (P less than 0.05), contributing to the higher rate of LL in the Arab cases. The mean lag time from symptoms onset to presentation to doctor was 9.4 (range 0-192) months, with lepromatous cases tending to present later than other types. The longest lag times occurred in Arab women with LL, suggesting that cultural influences may delay presentation of leprosy. The mean interval from presentation to diagnosis was 4.1 weeks. The mean latency from entry into Kuwait to diagnosis was 44.7 (range 0-180) months; which stresses the need for physicians to remain vigilant in considering leprosy, especially in any patient with dermatological, neurological or ophthalmic manifestations of disease.

  16. Indigenous Cases of Leprosy (Hansen's Disease) in Southern Mississippi.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Luis A; Dobbs, Thomas; Walker, Sue; Waller, William; Stryjewska, Barbara M

    2015-07-01

    Hansen's disease or leprosy is a chronic infection of the skin and peripheral nerves caused by Mycobacterium leprae. In the U.S., leprosy is mainly reported in immigrants, but indigenous leprosy cases have been also reported in this country, especially in semitropical southern states (i.e., Texas, Louisiana). The objective of this series of cases is to describe indigenous leprosy cases reported in southern Mississippi (MS) during the period 2012-2014. Information was collected from medical records at Hattiesburg Clinic and the MS Department of Health. Four cases were reported during the period of study (3 Caucasian males, 1 African-American woman). Non of visited endemic leprosy country. The age ranged from 60 to 83 years (median: 75.5 years). Of the four cases, three presented with a slowly progressive erythematous rash disseminated mainly on the thorax and abdomen, with a lesser degree on the extremities. The time between onset of rash until the diagnosis ranged from 5 to 16 months (median: 7 months). Only one case had direct contact with armadillos (blood exposure). Non of these patients had a history of immunosuppression. The most common symptoms were neuropathic pain (n=2), generalized pruritus (n=2) and loss of sensation in extremities (n=2). One case had severe peripheral neuropathy with muscle weakness, atrophy in left arm, and wasting on left hand. Skin biopsies showed diffuse granulomatous infiltrate with foamy histiocytes along with acid fast bacilli by Fite stain. By Ridley-Jopling classification system, three cases were diagnosis as lepromatous leprosy, and one, borderline lepromatous. Treatment included clofazimine, dapsone and rifampin that was offered free of charge by the National Hansen's Diseases Program, Baton Rouge, L.A. One patient did not tolerate therapy. In conclusion, a slowly progressive disseminated erythematous skin rash on the trunk should raise suspicion for leprosy in the elderly population in south MS.

  17. The Burden of Leprosy in Cameroon: Fifteen Years into the Post-elimination Era.

    PubMed

    Tabah, Earnest Njih; Nsagha, Dickson Shey; Bissek, Anne-Cecile Zoung-Kanyi; Bratschi, Martin W; Njamnshi, Theophilus Ngeh; Plushke, Gerd; Njamnshi, Alfred Kongnyu

    2016-10-01

    Cameroon achieved the elimination target of leprosy in 2000, and has maintained this status ever since. However, a number of health districts in the country continue to report significant numbers of leprosy cases. The aim of this study was to assess the burden of leprosy in Cameroon from 2000 to 2014. We obtained and analysed using the new leprosy burden concept of analysis, leprosy surveillance data collected between 2000 and 2014 from the National Leprosy Control Programme. Cameroon achieved leprosy elimination in 2000, registering a prevalence rate of 0.94/10,000 population. The prevalence rate dropped further to reach 0.20/10,000 population (78% reduction) in 2014. Similarly, the new case detection rate dropped from 4.88/100,000 population in 2000 to 1.46/100,000 population (85.3% reduction) in 2014. All 10 regions of the country achieved leprosy elimination between 2000 and 2014; however, 10 health districts were still to do so by 2014. The number of high-leprosy-burden regions decreased from 8 in 2000 to 1 in 2014. Seven and two regions were respectively medium and low-burdened at the end of 2014. At the health districts level, 18 remained at the high-leprosy-burdened level in 2014. The leprosy prevalence and detection rates as well as the overall leprosy burden in Cameroon have dropped significantly between 2000 and 2014. However, a good number of health districts remain high-leprosy-burdened. The National Leprosy Control Programme should focus efforts on these health districts in the next coming years in order to further reduce the burden of leprosy in the country.

  18. The Burden of Leprosy in Cameroon: Fifteen Years into the Post-elimination Era

    PubMed Central

    Tabah, Earnest Njih; Nsagha, Dickson Shey; Bissek, Anne-Cecile Zoung-Kanyi; Bratschi, Martin W.; Njamnshi, Theophilus Ngeh; Plushke, Gerd; Njamnshi, Alfred Kongnyu

    2016-01-01

    Background Cameroon achieved the elimination target of leprosy in 2000, and has maintained this status ever since. However, a number of health districts in the country continue to report significant numbers of leprosy cases. The aim of this study was to assess the burden of leprosy in Cameroon from 2000 to 2014. Methods We obtained and analysed using the new leprosy burden concept of analysis, leprosy surveillance data collected between 2000 and 2014 from the National Leprosy Control Programme. Principal findings Cameroon achieved leprosy elimination in 2000, registering a prevalence rate of 0.94/10,000 population. The prevalence rate dropped further to reach 0.20/10,000 population (78% reduction) in 2014. Similarly, the new case detection rate dropped from 4.88/100,000 population in 2000 to 1.46/100,000 population (85.3% reduction) in 2014. All 10 regions of the country achieved leprosy elimination between 2000 and 2014; however, 10 health districts were still to do so by 2014. The number of high-leprosy-burden regions decreased from 8 in 2000 to 1 in 2014. Seven and two regions were respectively medium and low-burdened at the end of 2014. At the health districts level, 18 remained at the high-leprosy-burdened level in 2014. Conclusion The leprosy prevalence and detection rates as well as the overall leprosy burden in Cameroon have dropped significantly between 2000 and 2014. However, a good number of health districts remain high-leprosy-burdened. The National Leprosy Control Programme should focus efforts on these health districts in the next coming years in order to further reduce the burden of leprosy in the country. PMID:27732603

  19. Disclosure of Leprosy by Health Care Providers in South-India: Patients' Perception and Relevance to Leprosy Control, Tamil Nadu.

    PubMed

    Thilakavathi, S; Manickam, P; Mehendale, S M

    2015-01-01

    Stigma, isoIation and discrimination are typically associated with diagnosis of leprosy and its disclosure. Health care providers (HCPs) find it challenging to disclose the diagnosis of leprosy to patients and their family members. A qualitative study was done in a rural community near Chennai in Tamil Nadu, from August 2011 to March 2012, covering 155 out of 648 (23.9%) purposively selected leprosy patients from 53 out of 148 panchayats, representing 264 villages in the study area; Out of these 155 patients, 59% were males; 30% were illiterates; 70% were married; 56% were living in nuclear families; half the leprosy patients were either agricultural labourers or skilled workers (50%).Thirty two percent were multibacillary (MB) cases and 68% were pauci bacillary (PB) cases; 77% were old patients and 23% were new patients; 22% had leprosy deformity 12% had disfiguration; 23% had anaesthesia and 3% were with lagophthalmous. Of the 155 patients, 31 (20%) reported that they were not informed about diagnosis of their disease by the concerned HCPs. They were informed to be having a skin disease or a skin patch. Of these 31 patients, 22 (71%) were women; all except one with PB leprosy. Seven patients (23%) had not yet started on treatment 3 patients (10%) were given treatment when they were young and neither, them nor their parents were informed about this disease. Seven (33%) of the married patients who had the disease during their child had or when they were young, were not informed of the diagnosis by the HCPs. Ten respondents (32%) were neither bothered nor concerned about non disclosure of the disease by HCPs. Now, after knowing the diagnosis of the disease 4 females (13%) mentioned that they were having some fear, worry or stigma. As non-disclosure of leprosy by HCPs may adversely affect acceptance and adherence, to treatment by the patients, appropriate communication strategies should be developed and implemented.

  20. Decreased Cutaneous Resonance Running Time in Cured Leprosy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Song, S.P.; Elias, P.M.; Lv, C.Z.; Shi, Y.J.; Guang, P.; Zhang, X.J.; Feingold, K.R.; Man, M.Q.

    2009-01-01

    Background/Objectives Leprosy prominently involves both the skin and peripheral neural tissues and some symptoms persist after microbial cure. Because alterations in the dermis also occur in leprosy, we assessed here whether there were changes in cutaneous resonance running time (CRRT), a parameter that is influenced by collagen properties, in cured leprosy subjects. Methods A reviscometer was used to measure the CRRT at various directions on the dorsal hand and the flexural forearms of 76 cured leprosy subjects aged 50–85 years and 68 age-matched normal subjects. Results In comparison to normal subjects, CRRTs on the hands and the forearms were significantly reduced in all directions in cured leprosy, except at the 1–7, 2–8 and 3–9 o'clock directions on the forearms. CRRTs were reduced significantly at both the 4–10 and 5–11 o'clock directions on the forearm in lepromatous (73.33 ± 4.19 at 4–10 o'clock and 67.44 ± 2.71 at 5–11 o'clock direction) and borderline lepromatous types (77.58 ± 5.84 at 4–10 o'clock and 79.85 ± 6.81 at 5–11 o'clock direction) as compared with normal (143.10 ± 7.75 at 4–10 o'clock and 125.18 ± 8.14 at 5–11 o'clock direction). On the hand, CRRTs at all directions, except that at 4–10 o'clock direction, were also significantly reduced in lepromatous and borderline lepromatous types in comparison with normal. Significant differences in CRRT at some directions were found among the various subtypes of leprosy. Conclusion CRRTs were abnormal in the cured leprosy subjects as a whole, but varied with leprosy subtypes, which suggested that the extent of reduction of CRRTs correlates with the severity of immune alteration. These results suggest that CRRT measurements could be a useful approach to quantify the extent of some residual abnormalities in cured leprosy and perhaps could also be used to evaluate the efficacy of treatment. PMID:19648783

  1. Atraumatic Main-En-Griffe due to Ulnar Nerve Leprosy.

    PubMed

    Aswani, Yashant; Saifi, Shenaz

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is the most common form of treatable peripheral neuropathy. However, in spite of effective chemotherapeutic agents, neuropathy and associated deformities are seldom ameliorated to a significant extent. This necessitates early diagnosis and treatment. Clinical examination of peripheral nerves is highly subjective and inaccurate. Electrophysiological studies are painful and expensive. Ultrasonography circumvents these demerits and has emerged as the preferred modality for probing peripheral nerves. We describe a 23-year-old male who presented with weakness and clawing of the medial digits of the right hand (main-en-griffe) and a few skin lesions since eighteen months. The right ulnar nerve was thickened and exquisitely tender on palpation. Ultrasonography revealed an extensive enlargement of the nerve with presence of intraneural color Doppler signals suggestive of acute neuritis. Skin biopsy was consistent with borderline tuberculoid leprosy with type 1 lepra reaction. The patient was started on WHO multidrug therapy for paucibacillary leprosy along with antiinflammatory drugs. Persistence of vascular signals at two months' follow-up has led to continuation of the steroid therapy. The patient is compliant with the treatment and is on monthly follow-up. In this manuscript, we review multitudinous roles of ultrasonography in examination of peripheral nerves in leprosy. Ultrasonography besides diagnosing enlargement of nerves in leprosy and acute neuritis due to lepra reactions, guides the duration of anti-inflammatory therapy in lepra reactions. Further, it is relatively inexpensive, non-invasive and easily available. All these features make ultrasonography a preferred modality for examination of peripheral nerves.

  2. Role of HLA, KIR, MICA, and cytokines genes in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Jarduli, Luciana Ribeiro; Sell, Ana Maria; Reis, Pâmela Guimarães; Sippert, Emília Ângela; Ayo, Christiane Maria; Mazini, Priscila Saamara; Alves, Hugo Vicentin; Teixeira, Jorge Juarez Vieira; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila

    2013-01-01

    Many genes including HLA, KIR, and MICA genes, as well as polymorphisms in cytokines have been investigated for their role in infectious disease. HLA alleles may influence not only susceptibility or resistance to leprosy, but also the course of the disease. Some combinations of HLA and KIR may result in negative as well as positive interactions between NK cells and infected host cells with M. leprae, resulting in activation or inhibition of NK cells and, consequently, in death of bacillus. In addition, studies have demonstrated the influence of MICA genes in the pathogenesis of leprosy. Specifically, they may play a role in the interaction between NK cells and infected cells. Finally, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines have been influencing the clinical course of leprosy. Data from a wide variety of sources support the existence of genetic factors influencing the leprosy pathogenesis. These sources include twin studies, segregation analyses, family-based linkage and association studies, candidate gene association studies, and, most recently, genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The purpose of this brief review was to highlight the importance of some immune response genes and their correlation with the clinical forms of leprosy, as well as their implications for disease resistance and susceptibility.

  3. Role of HLA, KIR, MICA, and Cytokines Genes in Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Jarduli, Luciana Ribeiro; Sell, Ana Maria; Reis, Pâmela Guimarães; Ayo, Christiane Maria; Mazini, Priscila Saamara; Alves, Hugo Vicentin; Teixeira, Jorge Juarez Vieira; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila

    2013-01-01

    Many genes including HLA, KIR, and MICA genes, as well as polymorphisms in cytokines have been investigated for their role in infectious disease. HLA alleles may influence not only susceptibility or resistance to leprosy, but also the course of the disease. Some combinations of HLA and KIR may result in negative as well as positive interactions between NK cells and infected host cells with M. leprae, resulting in activation or inhibition of NK cells and, consequently, in death of bacillus. In addition, studies have demonstrated the influence of MICA genes in the pathogenesis of leprosy. Specifically, they may play a role in the interaction between NK cells and infected cells. Finally, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines have been influencing the clinical course of leprosy. Data from a wide variety of sources support the existence of genetic factors influencing the leprosy pathogenesis. These sources include twin studies, segregation analyses, family-based linkage and association studies, candidate gene association studies, and, most recently, genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The purpose of this brief review was to highlight the importance of some immune response genes and their correlation with the clinical forms of leprosy, as well as their implications for disease resistance and susceptibility. PMID:23936864

  4. Brain involvement by leprosy presenting as a frontal cystic lesion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Moon, Kyung-Sub; Yun, Sook Jung; Won, Young Ho; Lee, Jae-Hyuk; Lee, Min-Cheol; Jung, Shin

    2014-07-01

    Leprosy has a predilection for peripheral nerves and is not considered to involve the CNS. The idea that the CNS is exempt from Mycobacterium leprae bacilli has been suspected from a clinical perspective or CSF study in leprosy patients. However, there has been no direct evidence for CNS involvement by leprosy in a living patient. To the best of the authors' knowledge, the present case is the first report providing histopathological and molecular evidence for CNS involvement by leprosy in a living patient. Brain MRI revealed a 2-cm cystic lesion in the right frontal lobe of the patient. The medical history revealed that the patient had been receiving multidrug therapy for borderline lepromatous leprosy. Neuronavigation-guided craniotomy and lesion removal were performed due to a presumptive diagnosis of low-grade glioma. The brain specimen demonstrated variably thickened blood vessels and densely scattered foamy macrophages in the perivascular spaces and parenchymal stroma. Fite acid-fast stain displayed red granular inclusions that were suggestive for fragmented M. leprae. M. leprae-specific nested polymerase chain reaction amplification showed positive bands, and DNA sequencing also demonstrated homology with the M. leprae genome. This case supports the notion that M. leprae can involve the cerebral cortex regardless of cranial nerve engagement.

  5. The armadillo as a model for peripheral neuropathy in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Truman, Richard W; Ebenezer, Gigi J; Pena, Maria T; Sharma, Rahul; Balamayooran, Gayathriy; Gillingwater, Thomas H; Scollard, David M; McArthur, Justin C; Rambukkana, Anura

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy (also known as Hansen's Disease) is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae that primarily targets the peripheral nervous system; skin, muscle, and other tissues are also affected. Other than humans, nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) are the only natural hosts of M. leprae, and they are the only laboratory animals that develop extensive neurological involvement with this bacterium. Infection in the armadillo closely recapitulates many of the structural, physiological, and functional aspects of leprosy seen in humans. Armadillos can be useful models of leprosy for basic scientific investigations into the pathogenesis of leprosy neuropathy and its associated myopathies, as well as for translational research studies in piloting new diagnostic methods or therapeutic interventions. Practical and ethical constraints often limit investigation into human neuropathies, but armadillos are an abundant source of leprotic neurologic fibers. Studies with these animals may provide new insights into the mechanisms involved in leprosy that also might benefit the understanding of other demyelinating neuropathies. Although there is only a limited supply of armadillo-specific reagents, the armadillo whole genomic sequence has been completed, and gene expression studies can be employed. Clinical procedures, such as electrophysiological nerve conduction testing, provide a functional assessment of armadillo nerves. A variety of standard histopathological and immunopathological procedures including Epidermal Nerve Fiber Density (ENFD) analysis, Schwann Cell Density, and analysis for other conserved cellular markers can be used effectively with armadillos and will be briefly reviewed in this text.

  6. The Armadillo as a Model for Peripheral Neuropathy in Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Truman, Richard W.; Ebenezer, Gigi J.; Pena, Maria T.; Sharma, Rahul; Balamayooran, Gayathriy; Gillingwater, Thomas H.; Scollard, David M.; McArthur, Justin C.; Rambukkana, Anura

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy (also known as Hansen's Disease) is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae that primarily targets the peripheral nervous system; skin, muscle, and other tissues are also affected. Other than humans, nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) are the only natural hosts of M. leprae, and they are the only laboratory animals that develop extensive neurological involvement with this bacterium. Infection in the armadillo closely recapitulates many of the structural, physiological, and functional aspects of leprosy seen in humans. Armadillos can be useful models of leprosy for basic scientific investigations into the pathogenesis of leprosy neuropathy and its associated myopathies, as well as for translational research studies in piloting new diagnostic methods or therapeutic interventions. Practical and ethical constraints often limit investigation into human neuropathies, but armadillos are an abundant source of leprotic neurologic fibers. Studies with these animals may provide new insights into the mechanisms involved in leprosy that also might benefit the understanding of other demyelinating neuropathies. Although there is only a limited supply of armadillo-specific reagents, the armadillo whole genomic sequence has been completed, and gene expression studies can be employed. Clinical procedures, such as electrophysiological nerve conduction testing, provide a functional assessment of armadillo nerves. A variety of standard histopathological and immunopathological procedures including Epidermal Nerve Fiber Density (ENFD) analysis, Schwann Cell Density, and analysis for other conserved cellular markers can be used effectively with armadillos and will be briefly reviewed in this text. PMID:24615444

  7. Microfasciculation: a morphological pattern in leprosy nerve damage.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Sérgio L G; Medeiros, Mildred F; Corte-Real, Suzana; Jardim, Márcia R; Nery, José A da Costa; Hacker, Mariana A V B; Valentim, Vânia da Costa; Amadeu, Thaís Porto; Sarno, Euzenir N

    2011-01-01

    To study Microfasciculation, a perineurial response found in neuropathies, emphasizing its frequency, detailed morphological characteristics and biological significance in pure neural leprosy (PNL), post-treatment leprosy neuropathy (PTLN) and non-leprosy neuropathies (NLN). Morphological characteristics of microfascicles were examined via histological staining methods, immunohistochemical expression of neural markers and transmission electronmicroscopy. The detection of microfasciculation in 18 nerve biopsy specimens [12 PNL, six PTLN but not in the NLN group, was associated strongly with perineurial damage and the presence of a multibacillary inflammatory process in the nerves, particularly in the perineurium. Immunoreactivity to anti-S100 protein, anti-neurofilament, anti-nerve growth receptor and anti-myelin basic protein immunoreactivity was found within microfascicles. Ultrastructural examination of three biopsies showed that fibroblast-perineurial cells were devoid of basement membrane despite perineurial-like NGFr immunoreactivity. Morphological evidence demonstrated that multipotent pericytes from inflammation-activated microvessels could be the origin of fibroblast-perineurial cells. A microfasciculation pattern was found in 10% of leprosy-affected nerves. The microfascicles were composed predominantly of unmyelinated fibres and denervated Schwann cells (SCs) surrounded by fibroblast-perineurial cells. This pattern was found more frequently in leprosy nerves with acid-fast bacilli (AFB) and perineurial damage while undergoing an inflammatory process. Further experimental studies are necessary to elucidate microfascicle formation. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Limited.

  8. Some aspects of the pathogenesis and pathomorphology of leprosy.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, N A

    1972-01-01

    The results of bacteriological and histological examinations of the organs of mice infected in the footpad with human leprosy bacilli by the Shepard method are summarized. The periods of observation ranged from a few days to 2 years. The disease developed in mice as a chronic infection with a lengthy "incubation" period of 3-4 months or more without symptoms. Usually about 2 years after inoculation, or in some cases after a shorter interval, the disease became generalized. Different types of tissue reaction occurred: simple inflammatory infiltration, tuberculoid granuloma, and leproma-like granuloma, similar to the clinical types of leprosy in man. When the infection became general, cells resembling lepra cells formed in the internal organs and at the site of infection. These cells contained massive intracellular aggregations of mycobacteria and compact globi with lipids and a vacuolized protoplasm, similar in origin and morphology to the lepra cells in human lesions. Changes were found in the neuroreceptor apparatus of the skin of the mice, with groups of leprosy bacilli in the endoneurium, the Schwann cells, and the perineural spaces. The length of the experiments and the histological examination of material from the sacrificed mice at different stages of the infective process revealed biological parallels with human leprosy and threw light on a number of aspects of the pathogenesis of leprosy.

  9. Crohn's disease susceptibility genes are associated with leprosy in the Vietnamese population.

    PubMed

    Grant, Audrey V; Alter, Andrea; Huong, Nguyen Thu; Orlova, Marianna; Van Thuc, Nguyen; Ba, Nguyen Ngoc; Thai, Vu Hong; Abel, Laurent; Schurr, Erwin; Alcais, Alexandre

    2012-12-01

    A genomewide association study in Chinese patients with leprosy detected association signals in 16 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) belonging to 6 loci, of which 4 are related to the NOD2 signaling pathway and are Crohn's disease susceptibility loci. Here, we studied these 16 SNPs as potential leprosy susceptibility factors in 474 Vietnamese leprosy simplex families. We replicated SNPs at HLA-DR-DQ, RIPK2, CCDC122-LACC1, and NOD2 as leprosy susceptibility factors in Vietnam. These results validated the striking overlap in the genetic control of Crohn's disease and leprosy.

  10. Towards leprosy elimination by 2020: forecasts of epidemiological indicators of leprosy in Corrientes, a province of northeastern Argentina that is a pioneer in leprosy elimination.

    PubMed

    Odriozola, Elisa Petri de; Quintana, Ana María; González, Victor; Pasetto, Roque Antonio; Utgés, María Eugenia; Bruzzone, Octavio Augusto; Arnaiz, María Rosa

    2017-06-01

    Corrientes, a province of northeastern Argentina with endemic leprosy, has improved its epidemiological indicators, however, a study of the dynamics over time is lacking. We analysed data of 1308 leprosy patients between 1991 to 2014, and the forecast for 2020. Descriptive statistics and stepwise Bayesian model selection were performed. Forecasts were made using the median of 100,000 projections using the parameters calculated via Monte Carlo methods. We found a decreasing number of new leprosy cases (-2.04 cases/year); this decrease is expected to continue by an estimated 20.28 +/- 10.00 cases by 2020, evidenced by a sustained decline in detection rate (from 11 to 2.9/100,000 inhabitants). Age groups that were most affected were 15-44 (40.13%) and 45-64 (38.83%) year olds. Multibacillary forms (MB) predominated (70.35%) and while gradually declining, between 10 and 30% developed disability grade 2 (DG2) (0.175 (0.110 - 0.337) DG2/MB cases), with a time delay between 0 to 15 years (median = 0). The proportion of MB clinic forms and DG2 increased and will continuously increase in the short term (0.036 +/- 0.018 logit (MB/total of cases). Corrientes is on the way to eliminating leprosy by 2020, however the increased proportion of MB clinical forms and DG2 signals a warning for disease control efforts.

  11. Chemical definition, cloning, and expression of the major protein of the leprosy bacillus.

    PubMed

    Rivoire, B; Pessolani, M C; Bozic, C M; Hunter, S W; Hefta, S A; Mehra, V; Brennan, P J

    1994-06-01

    The decline in prevalence of leprosy is not necessarily matched by a fall in incidence, emphasizing the need for new antigens to measure disease transmission and reservoirs of infection. Mycobacterium leprae obtained from armadillo tissues was disrupted and subjected to differential centrifugation to arrive at preparations of cell wall, cytoplasmic membrane, and cytosol. By committing 0.3 g of M. leprae to the task, it was possible to isolate from the cytosol and fully define the major cytosolic protein. Amino-terminus sequencing and chemical and enzymatic cleavage, followed by more sequencing and fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry of fragments, allowed description of the entire amino acid sequence of a protein of 10,675-Da molecular mass. The sequence derived by chemical means is identical to that deduced previously from DNA analysis of the gene of a 10-kDa protein, a GroES analog. The work represents the first complete chemical definition of an M. leprae protein. PCR amplification of the 10-kDa protein gene, when cloned into Escherichia coli with a pTRP expression vector, allowed production of the recombinant protein. Chemical analysis of the expressed protein demonstrated that it exactly reflected the native protein. The recombinant major cytosolic protein appears to be a promising reagent for skin testing, still probably the most appropriate and pragmatic means of measuring incidence of leprosy.

  12. Population-Based Molecular Epidemiology of Leprosy in Cebu, Philippines ▿

    PubMed Central

    Sakamuri, Rama Murthy; Kimura, Miyako; Li, Wei; Kim, Hyun-Chul; Lee, Hyeyoung; Kiran, Madanahally D.; Black, William C.; Balagon, Marivic; Gelber, Robert; Cho, Sang-Nae; Brennan, Patrick J.; Vissa, Varalakshmi

    2009-01-01

    To address the persisting problem of leprosy in Cebu, Philippines, we compiled a database of more than 200 patients who attend an established referral skin clinic. We described the patient characteristics in conventional demographic parameters and also applied multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing for Mycobacterium leprae in biopsied skin lesion samples. These combined approaches revealed that transmission is ongoing, with the affected including the young Cebuano population under 40 years of age in both crowded cities and rural areas of the island. The emergence of multicase families (MCF) is indicative of infection unconstrained by standard care measures. For the SNPs, we designed a low-cost PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism typing method. MLVA in M. leprae was highly discriminatory in this population yet could retain broad groups, as defined by the more stable SNPs, implying temporal marker stability suitable for interpreting population structures and evolution. The majority of isolates belong to an Asian lineage (SNP type 1), and the rest belong to a putative postcolonial lineage (SNP type 3). Specific alleles at two VNTR loci, (GGT)5 and 21-3, were highly associated with SNP type 3 in this population. MLVA identified M. leprae genotype associations for patients with known epidemiological links such as in MCFs and in some villages. These methods provide a molecular database and a rational framework for targeted approaches to search and confirm leprosy transmission in various scenarios. PMID:19571027

  13. Osteological, Biomolecular and Geochemical Examination of an Early Anglo-Saxon Case of Lepromatous Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Inskip, Sarah A.; Taylor, G. Michael; Zakrzewski, Sonia R.; Mays, Simon A.; Pike, Alistair W. G.; Llewellyn, Gareth; Williams, Christopher M.; Lee, Oona Y-C; Wu, Houdini H. T.; Minnikin, David E.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Stewart, Graham R.

    2015-01-01

    We have examined a 5th to 6th century inhumation from Great Chesterford, Essex, UK. The incomplete remains are those of a young male, aged around 21–35 years at death. The remains show osteological evidence of lepromatous leprosy (LL) and this was confirmed by lipid biomarker analysis and ancient DNA (aDNA) analysis, which provided evidence for both multi-copy and single copy loci from the Mycobacterium leprae genome. Genotyping showed the strain belonged to the 3I lineage, but the Great Chesterford isolate appeared to be ancestral to 3I strains found in later medieval cases in southern Britain and also continental Europe. While a number of contemporaneous cases exist, at present, this case of leprosy is the earliest radiocarbon dated case in Britain confirmed by both aDNA and lipid biomarkers. Importantly, Strontium and Oxygen isotope analysis suggest that the individual is likely to have originated from outside Britain. This potentially sheds light on the origins of the strain in Britain and its subsequent spread to other parts of the world, including the Americas where the 3I lineage of M. leprae is still found in some southern states of America. PMID:25970602

  14. [Some case reports which suggest correlation between biologics and leprosy, Mini-symposium on problems on leprosy].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Biologics are relatively new drugs developed through modern monoclonal antibody techniques and became more familiar to some disease treatments such as Rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, ankylosing spondylitis, ulcerative colitis, malignant lymphoma, SLE and lupus nephritis. Some case reports shows development of leprosy during/after biolo- gics treatment and success treatment of ENL with biologics. Collection of reports was done through web search by using document retrieval engine such as Pub-med and ProQuest. 7 cases of development of leprosy with biologics and 2 cases of ENL treatment with biologics and they were reported in the mini-symposium of Annual academic meeting of Japan Leprosy association. The widespread use of biologics reminds us of development of some infectious diseases as a side-effect and leprosy might be one of them. Because number of the reports was still very limited, we cannot go to further discussion at this moment. Accu- mulation of reported cases will lead the detailed information about correlation between biologics and leprosy, either on effectiveness or on adverse ones.

  15. Epidemiological trends of leprosy in an urban leprosy centre of Delhi: a retrospective study of 16 years.

    PubMed

    Tiwary, P K; Kar, H K; Sharma, P K; Gautam, R K; Arora, T C; Naik, H; Dhir, V

    2011-01-01

    This study was done by collecting the retrospective data from 1994 to 2009 of patients attending the urban leprosy centre attached to the department of dermatology, STD & leprosy of PGIMER & Dr. R M L Hospital, New Delhi. The data was analysed according to age, sex, type of leprosy, leprosy reactions, deformities and relapse and compared with the national figures by comparison of proportions after taking the national data per 10,000 population. A total of 3659 patients attended our ULC (Urban Leprosy Centre) among which 2741 were male and 945 females (M:F-3:1). 669 patients (18.2%) were children. The data analysed show a gradual decline in new case detection rate with a marginal rise in 2005 and 2008. Percentage of MB cases was falling consistently till 2005 after which it showed an abrupt rise. The incidence of type 1 reaction varied from 21% in 1994 to 10% in 2009 in PB patients and from 6% in 1994 to 8% in 2009 in MB patients. The trend of type 2 reactions in MB patients showed a slow declining trend. MDT completion rate showed an impressive improvement from 56% in 1994 to 90% in 2009. The number of patients revisiting the ULC with features of relapse also showed a decrease in number. The pattern of visible deformities showed an almost constant trend similar to national figures. Improved MDT completion rate helps in reducing the disease transmission, severity, reactions and disabilities.

  16. Leprosy Drug Resistance Surveillance in Colombia: The Experience of a Sentinel Country

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán-Alzate, Camilo; López Díaz, Fernando; Romero-Montoya, Marcela; Sakamuri, Rama; Li, Wei; Kimura, Miyako; Brennan, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    An active search for Mycobacterium leprae drug resistance was carried out, 243 multibacillary patients from endemic regions of Colombia were included from 2004 to 2013 in a surveillance program. This program was a World Health Organization initiative for drug resistance surveillance in leprosy, where Colombia is a sentinel country. M. leprae DNA from slit skin smear and/or skin biopsy samples was amplified and sequenced to identify mutations in the drug resistance determining region (DRDR) in rpoB, folP1, gyrA, and gyrB, the genes responsible for rifampicin, dapsone and ofloxacin drug-resistance, respectively. Three isolates exhibited mutations in the DRDR rpoB gene (Asp441Tyr, Ser456Leu, Ser458Met), two in the DRDR folP1 gene (Thr53Ala, Pro55Leu), and one isolate exhibited mutations in both DRDR rpoB (Ser456Met) and DRDR folP1 (Pro55Leu), suggesting multidrug resistance. One isolate had a double mutation in folP1 (Thr53Ala and Thr88Pro). Also, we detected mutations outside of DRDR that required in vivo evaluation of their association or not with drug resistance: rpoB Arg505Trp, folP1 Asp91His, Arg94Trp, and Thr88Pro, and gyrA Ala107Leu. Seventy percent of M. leprae mutations were related to drug resistance and were isolated from relapsed patients; the likelihood of relapse was significantly associated with the presence of confirmed resistance mutations (OR range 20.1–88.7, p < 0.05). Five of these relapsed patients received dapsone monotherapy as a primary treatment. In summary, the current study calls attention to M. leprae resistance in Colombia, especially the significant association between confirmed resistance mutations and relapse in leprosy patients. A high frequency of DRDR mutations for rifampicin was seen in a region where dapsone monotherapy was used extensively. PMID:27706165

  17. Leprosy Drug Resistance Surveillance in Colombia: The Experience of a Sentinel Country.

    PubMed

    Beltrán-Alzate, Camilo; López Díaz, Fernando; Romero-Montoya, Marcela; Sakamuri, Rama; Li, Wei; Kimura, Miyako; Brennan, Patrick; Cardona-Castro, Nora

    2016-10-01

    An active search for Mycobacterium leprae drug resistance was carried out, 243 multibacillary patients from endemic regions of Colombia were included from 2004 to 2013 in a surveillance program. This program was a World Health Organization initiative for drug resistance surveillance in leprosy, where Colombia is a sentinel country. M. leprae DNA from slit skin smear and/or skin biopsy samples was amplified and sequenced to identify mutations in the drug resistance determining region (DRDR) in rpoB, folP1, gyrA, and gyrB, the genes responsible for rifampicin, dapsone and ofloxacin drug-resistance, respectively. Three isolates exhibited mutations in the DRDR rpoB gene (Asp441Tyr, Ser456Leu, Ser458Met), two in the DRDR folP1 gene (Thr53Ala, Pro55Leu), and one isolate exhibited mutations in both DRDR rpoB (Ser456Met) and DRDR folP1 (Pro55Leu), suggesting multidrug resistance. One isolate had a double mutation in folP1 (Thr53Ala and Thr88Pro). Also, we detected mutations outside of DRDR that required in vivo evaluation of their association or not with drug resistance: rpoB Arg505Trp, folP1 Asp91His, Arg94Trp, and Thr88Pro, and gyrA Ala107Leu. Seventy percent of M. leprae mutations were related to drug resistance and were isolated from relapsed patients; the likelihood of relapse was significantly associated with the presence of confirmed resistance mutations (OR range 20.1-88.7, p < 0.05). Five of these relapsed patients received dapsone monotherapy as a primary treatment. In summary, the current study calls attention to M. leprae resistance in Colombia, especially the significant association between confirmed resistance mutations and relapse in leprosy patients. A high frequency of DRDR mutations for rifampicin was seen in a region where dapsone monotherapy was used extensively.

  18. [Study of leprosy at the "Emilio d'Audinot" polyclinic].

    PubMed

    Guerra Núñez, M; Mora Castillo, N; Abijana Damien, G

    1993-01-01

    A study on the prevalence of leprosy is performed in "Emilio Daudinot" polyclinics, Guantanamo. The behaviour of leprosy according to clinical manifestations and results showing that lepromatous leprosy is the most frequent form, as well as the number of positive patients and the ones who present reactional status, are reported. The clinical course according to skin and general manifestations is analyzed, and it was determined that the greatest number of cases improved with treatment. Likewise, it was found that the greatest number of positive patients require a 1-4 year period for becoming negative. The immunologic status of cases studied according to the different clinical forms is reported and it was observed that the greatest number of cases are immunologically depressed which agrees with the fact that most of patients have the lepromatous form. Nurses play a very important role for the control and treatment of these patients.

  19. Leprosy. An update: definition, pathogenesis, classification, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Eichelmann, K; González González, S E; Salas-Alanis, J C; Ocampo-Candiani, J

    2013-09-01

    Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous disease caused by the bacillus Mycobacterium leprae. It primarily affects the skin and peripheral nerves and is still endemic in various regions of the world. Clinical presentation depends on the patient's immune status at the time of infection and during the course of the disease. Leprosy is associated with disability and marginalization. Diagnosis is clinical and is made when the patient has at least 1 of the following cardinal signs specified by the World Health Organization: hypopigmented or erythematous macules with sensory loss; thickened peripheral nerves; or positive acid-fast skin smear or skin biopsy with loss of adnexa at affected sites. Leprosy is treated with a multidrug combination of rifampicin, clofazimine, and dapsone. Two main regimens are used depending on whether the patient has paucibacillary or multibacillary disease.

  20. Anti-PGL-1 Positivity as a Risk Marker for the Development of Leprosy among Contacts of Leprosy Cases: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Penna, Maria Lucia F; Penna, Gerson O; Iglesias, Paula C; Natal, Sonia; Rodrigues, Laura C

    2016-05-01

    There is no point of care diagnostic test for infection with M. Leprae or for leprosy, although ELISA anti PGL-1 has been considered and sometimes used as a means to identify infection. A systematic review of all cohort studies, which classified healthy leprosy contacts, at entry, according to anti-PGL1 positivity, and had at least one year follow up. The outcome was clinical diagnosis of leprosy by an experienced physician. The meta-analysis used a fixed model to estimated OR for the association of PGL-1 positivity and clinical leprosy. A fixed model also estimated the sensibility of PGL-1 positivity and positive predictive value. Contacts who were anti PGL-1 positive at baseline were 3 times as likely to develop leprosy; the proportion of cases of leprosy that were PGL-1 positive at baseline varied but was always under 50%. Although there is a clear and consistent association between positivity to anti PGL-1 and development of leprosy in healthy contacts, selection of contacts for prophylaxis based on anti PGL1 response would miss more than half future leprosy cases. Should chemoprophylaxis of controls be incorporated into leprosy control programmes, PGL1 appears not to be a useful test in the decision of which contacts should receive chemoprophylaxis.

  1. Anti-PGL-1 Positivity as a Risk Marker for the Development of Leprosy among Contacts of Leprosy Cases: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Penna, Maria Lucia F.; Penna, Gerson O.; Iglesias, Paula C.; Natal, Sonia; Rodrigues, Laura C.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is no point of care diagnostic test for infection with M. Leprae or for leprosy, although ELISA anti PGL-1 has been considered and sometimes used as a means to identify infection. Methods A systematic review of all cohort studies, which classified healthy leprosy contacts, at entry, according to anti-PGL1 positivity, and had at least one year follow up. The outcome was clinical diagnosis of leprosy by an experienced physician. The meta-analysis used a fixed model to estimated OR for the association of PGL-1 positivity and clinical leprosy. A fixed model also estimated the sensibility of PGL-1 positivity and positive predictive value. Results Contacts who were anti PGL-1 positive at baseline were 3 times as likely to develop leprosy; the proportion of cases of leprosy that were PGL-1 positive at baseline varied but was always under 50%. Conclusions Although there is a clear and consistent association between positivity to anti PGL-1 and development of leprosy in healthy contacts, selection of contacts for prophylaxis based on anti PGL1 response would miss more than half future leprosy cases. Should chemoprophylaxis of controls be incorporated into leprosy control programmes, PGL1 appears not to be a useful test in the decision of which contacts should receive chemoprophylaxis. PMID:27192199

  2. Epidemiological situation of leprosy in Salvador from 2001 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Shirlei Cristina; Batos, Claudilson José de Carvalho; Tawil, Lara

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae was first described as the bacillus that causes leprosy, a chronic granulomatous infectious disease, in 1873 by Amauer Hansen. Leprosy is part of a group of 10 neglected diseases and Bahia has endemic levels of this illness, varying between high and very high. The detection of 52 new cases of leprosy in children under 15 years old in Salvador in 2006 is alarming, and suggests an early contact with the disease. The aim of this review is to analyze the epidemiological situation, the detection rate and evaluate the clinical and epidemiological profile of leprosy in Salvador, in the period 2001-2009. A retrospective cross-sectional study was performed using secondary data collected at Notifiable Diseases Information System Database (SINAN) through the notification of patients with leprosy. Over these nine years 3,226 patients were reported, with a predominance of: females (51.5%), and clinical multibacillary forms in the general population (51.7%), but when we analyze those under 15 years old, paucibacillary forms (tuberculoid + indeterminate) prevailed. The tuberculoid form was the most diagnosed type of presentation. The annual detection rate in Salvador remained at a very high level of endemicity during the studied period and for those under 15 years old it ranged between high and very high. Grade 2 disabilities both at the time of diagnosis and at discharge after cure, varied between low and medium. Based on these data we conclude that the high levels of leprosy detection rates in the general population, plus the variation between high and very high levels in those under 15 years old, associated with the medium level of grade 2 disabilities at the time of diagnosis and discharge, demonstrate the need for improvement on the existing services, investment in active case finding and training of the healthcare professionals in Salvador.

  3. Investment case concepts in leprosy elimination: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Anuj; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2016-03-01

    Leprosy continues to be a global public health problem, but draws less attention because 'prevalence based elimination' has been misinterpreted as eradication. The ongoing transmission of M. leprae has renewed interest in complete elimination. The aim of our study is to review systematically the literature regarding the elimination of leprosy, and to assess this information on its applicability for defining a Leprosy Elimination Investment Case (LEIC) based on Eradication Investment Case guidelines. A literature search was conducted using the MeSH subheadings and synonyms of leprosy. A total of 1007 articles were considered and 112 were included in the final selection. The search focused on the literature covering leprosy elimination and its public health aspects. The LEIC framework was adapted from an existing "Guide to Preparing an Eradication Investment Case". The LEIC framework provided 11 topics under which information was synthesized from the literature. The fields were categorised under sections: 1) Proposed investment; 2) Rationale for investing; 3) Issues to consider when moving from control to eradication; 4) Management and governance. Scanty quantitative data are available for developing a LEIC, particularly regarding disease burden, and new interventions that could contribute to elimination are not yet applied routinely. For monitoring global elimination, it is necessary to measure disease burden comprehensively, and contact centered preventive interventions should be part of a global elimination strategy. The biological and technical feasibility of elimination is not certain and advanced microbiological and operational research is necessary to understand transmission better. The current WHO road map for leprosy elimination is too vague and needs further structuring through a thoroughly prepared LEIC.

  4. Elimination of Leprosy as a public health problem by 2000 AD: an epidemiological perspective

    PubMed Central

    Nsagha, Dickson Shey; Bamgboye, Elijah Afolabi; Assob, Jules Clement Nguedia; Njunda, Anna Longdoh; Kamga, Henri Lucien Foumou; Zoung-Kanyi Bissek, Anne-Cécile; Tabah, Earnest Nji; Oyediran, Alain Bankole OO; Njamnshi, Alfred Kongnyu

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Leprosy is caused by Mycobacterium leprae and manifests as damage to the skin and peripheral nerves. The disease is dreaded because it causes deformities, blindness and disfigurement. Worldwide, 2 million people are estimated to be disabled by leprosy. Multidrug therapy is highly effective in curing leprosy, but treating the nerve damage is much more difficult. The World Health Assembly targeted to eliminate leprosy as a public health problem from the world by 2000. The objective of the review was to assess the successes of the leprosy elimination strategy, elimination hurdles and the way forward for leprosy eradication. Methods A structured search was used to identify publications on the elimination strategy. The keywords used were leprosy, elimination and 2000. To identify potential publications, we included papers on leprosy elimination monitoring, special action projects for the elimination of leprosy, modified leprosy elimination campaigns, and the Global Alliance to eliminate leprosy from the following principal data bases: Cochrane data base of systematic reviews, PubMed, Medline, EMBASE, and the Leprosy data base. We also scanned reference lists for important citations. Key leprosy journals including WHO publications were also reviewed. Results The search identified 63 journal publications on leprosy-related terms that included a form of elimination of which 19 comprehensively tackled the keywords including a book on leprosy elimination. In 1991, the 44th World Health Assembly called for the elimination of leprosy as a public health problem in the world by 2000. Elimination was defined as less than one case of leprosy per 10000-population. Elimination has been made possible by a confluence of several orders of opportunities: the scientific (the natural history of leprosy at the present state of knowledge), technological (multi-drug therapy and the blister pack); political (commitment of governments) and financial (support from NGOs for example

  5. Elimination of leprosy as a public health problem by 2000 AD: an epidemiological perspective.

    PubMed

    Nsagha, Dickson Shey; Bamgboye, Elijah Afolabi; Assob, Jules Clement Nguedia; Njunda, Anna Longdoh; Kamga, Henri Lucien Foumou; Zoung-Kanyi Bissek, Anne-Cécile; Tabah, Earnest Nji; Oyediran, Alain Bankole O O; Njamnshi, Alfred Kongnyu

    2011-01-01

    Leprosy is caused by Mycobacterium leprae and manifests as damage to the skin and peripheral nerves. The disease is dreaded because it causes deformities, blindness and disfigurement. Worldwide, 2 million people are estimated to be disabled by leprosy. Multidrug therapy is highly effective in curing leprosy, but treating the nerve damage is much more difficult. The World Health Assembly targeted to eliminate leprosy as a public health problem from the world by 2000. The objective of the review was to assess the successes of the leprosy elimination strategy, elimination hurdles and the way forward for leprosy eradication. A structured search was used to identify publications on the elimination strategy. The keywords used were leprosy, elimination and 2000. To identify potential publications, we included papers on leprosy elimination monitoring, special action projects for the elimination of leprosy, modified leprosy elimination campaigns, and the Global Alliance to eliminate leprosy from the following principal data bases: Cochrane data base of systematic reviews, PubMed, Medline, EMBASE, and the Leprosy data base. We also scanned reference lists for important citations. Key leprosy journals including WHO publications were also reviewed. The search identified 63 journal publications on leprosy-related terms that included a form of elimination of which 19 comprehensively tackled the keywords including a book on leprosy elimination. In 1991, the 44th World Health Assembly called for the elimination of leprosy as a public health problem in the world by 2000. Elimination was defined as less than one case of leprosy per 10000-population. Elimination has been made possible by a confluence of several orders of opportunities: the scientific (the natural history of leprosy at the present state of knowledge), technological (multi-drug therapy and the blister pack); political (commitment of governments) and financial (support from NGOs for example the Nippon Foundation that

  6. Leprosy wound healing with ordinary adhesive tape. A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Stenström, S; Hallmans, G; De Jongh, A; De Wael, T

    1976-01-01

    The use of adhesive tape as wound treatment in leprosy cases is described and found to be superior to the classical dressing as regards security and facility of application, and for the rapidity and quality of healing. Its use as a "preventive" treatment is stressed. The results of this study seem to justify the following conclusions: The adhesive tape is easy to handle, it heals the leprosy wounds in about half the time necessary for the classical dressing and it costs about 50 times less.

  7. [Leprosy. Comparative study of old and new patients].

    PubMed

    Sequeira, J; Martins, C; Marques, C; Machado, A; Baptista, A P

    2000-01-01

    Leprosy represented, until a few decades ago, an important public health problem in mainland Portugal. According to the data of the General Directorate of Primary Health Care, the incidence and prevalence rates of the disease have been decreasing progressively and in a significant way during the last years. In view of the fact that it is an endemic disease in regression, we decided to estimate if there were significative changes in the clinical manifestations of the new cases. Therefore, we carried out a comparative study based on the clinical data of 18 patients (13 males and 5 females) with Leprosy who were being followed up in the Dermatology Clinics of Coimbra University Hospital. We differentiated two groups: patients with the diagnosis of the disease before 1990 (old patients), and those diagnosed after 1990 (new patients). The first group had only 8 subjects while the second group had the other 10. We recorded the patients' age, sex, nationality and residence, age at the onset of the disease, number of cases that began before the age of 20, clinical manifestations (according to Ridley and Jopling's classification), and the presence of incapacity determined by the consequences of the disease. We carried out the Student's-t test to appreciate some of the study parameters. We verified that the old patients were on average 11 years younger than the new patients. Leprosy in new patients occurred 11 years later than in the old patients and this difference was statistically significant after the Student's-t test (p < 0.05). Almost one half of the new cases (4 patients in 10) were possible cases of leprosy brought from Brazil, while all the old individuals had an autochthonous origin. The multibacillary forms were predominant in both groups, representing 89% of all patients. The frequency of handicaps was similar in both groups. Although it is based on a small number of patients, our study suggests that the clinical and epidemiological manifestations of leprosy have

  8. Leprosy: ancient disease remains a public health problem nowadays*

    PubMed Central

    Noriega, Leandro Fonseca; Chiacchio, Nilton Di; Noriega, Angélica Fonseca; Pereira, Gilmayara Alves Abreu Maciel; Vieira, Marina Lino

    2016-01-01

    Despite being an ancient disease, leprosy remains a public health problem in several countries - particularly in India, Brazil and Indonesia. The current operational guidelines emphasize the evaluation of disability from the time of diagnosis and stipulate as fundamental principles for disease control: early detection and proper treatment. Continued efforts are needed to establish and improve quality leprosy services. A qualified primary care network that is integrated into specialized service and the development of educational activities are part of the arsenal in the fight against the disease, considered neglected and stigmatizing. PMID:27579761

  9. Leprosy: ancient disease remains a public health problem nowadays.

    PubMed

    Noriega, Leandro Fonseca; Chiacchio, Nilton Di; Noriega, Angélica Fonseca; Pereira, Gilmayara Alves Abreu Maciel; Vieira, Marina Lino

    2016-01-01

    Despite being an ancient disease, leprosy remains a public health problem in several countries -particularly in India, Brazil and Indonesia. The current operational guidelines emphasize the evaluation of disability from the time of diagnosis and stipulate as fundamental principles for disease control: early detection and proper treatment. Continued efforts are needed to establish and improve quality leprosy services. A qualified primary care network that is integrated into specialized service and the development of educational activities are part of the arsenal in the fight against the disease, considered neglected and stigmatizing.

  10. Clinical trial of sparfloxacin for lepromatous leprosy.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, G P; Garcia-Ignacio, B Y; Chavez, V E; Livelo, J B; Jimenez, C L; Parrilla, M L; Franzblau, S G

    1994-01-01

    Nine previously untreated patients with lepromatous leprosy were treated with 200 mg of sparfloxacin daily for 12 weeks to determine whether this drug is bactericidal for Mycobacterium leprae in humans. The efficacy of therapy was monitored both clinically and by measuring changes in morphological index, mouse footpad infectivity, and the radiorespirometric activity of M. leprae organisms obtained from serial biopsy specimens and also by determining titers of phenolic glycolipid-I in serum. Most patients showed clinical improvement within 2 weeks of treatment; this was accompanied by significant reductions in the morphological index, mouse footpad infectivity, and bacillary radiorespirometric activity. After 4 weeks of treatment, all patients had a morphological index of zero and specimens from most patients were noninfectious for mice, while the median decrease in radiorespirometric activity was > 99%. Overall results by the rapid radiorespirometric assay paralleled those of the mouse footpad and morphological index assays. Sparfloxacin given at 200 mg once daily appears to be rapidly bactericidal in humans, with activity similar to that observed in a previous clinical trial with 400 mg of ofloxacin. PMID:8141581

  11. International open trial of uniform multidrug therapy regimen for leprosy patients: Findings & implications for national leprosy programmes.

    PubMed

    Manickam, Ponnaiah; Mehendale, Sanjay M; Nagaraju, Bathyala; Katoch, Kiran; Jamesh, Abdul; Kutaiyan, Ramalingam; Jianping, Shen; Mugudalabetta, Shivakumar; Jadhav, Vitthal; Rajkumar, Prabu; Padma, Jayasree; Kaliaperumal, Kanagasabai; Pannikar, Vijayakumar; Krishnamurthy, Padabettu; Gupte, Mohan D

    2016-10-01

    Uniform therapy for all leprosy patients will simplify leprosy treatment. In this context, we evaluated six-month multidrug therapy (MDT) currently recommended for multibacillary (MB) patients as uniform MDT (U-MDT) in a single-arm open trial under programme conditions. Primary objective was to determine efficacy to prevent five-year cumulative five per cent relapse. Secondary objectives were to assess acceptability, safety and compliance. Newly detected, treatment-naive leprosy patients were enrolled in India (six sites) and P. R. China (two sites). Primary outcome was clinically confirmed relapse of occurrence of one or more new skin patches consistent with leprosy, without evidence of reactions post-treatment. Event rates per 100 person years as well as five-year cumulative risk of relapse, were calculated. A total of 2091 paucibacillary (PB) and 1298 MB leprosy patients were recruited from the 3437 patients screened. Among PB, two relapsed (rate=0.023; risk=0.11%), eight had suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) (rate=0.79) and rate of new lesions due toreactions was 0.24 (n=23). Rates of neuritis, type 1 and type 2 reactions were 0.39 (n=37), 0.54 (n=51) and 0.03 (n=3), respectively. Among MB, four relapsed (rate=0.07; risk=0.37%) and 16 had suspected ADR (rate=2.64). Rate of new lesions due to reactions among MB was 1.34 (n=76) and rates of neuritis, type 1 and type 2 reactions were 1.37 (n=78), 2.01 (n=114) and 0.49 (n=28), respectively. Compliance to U-MDT was 99 per cent. Skin pigmentation due to clofazimine was of short duration and acceptable. We observed low relapse, minimal ADR and other adverse clinical events. Clofazimine-related pigmentation was acceptable. Evidence supports introduction of U-MDT in national leprosy programmes. [CTRI No: 2012/ 05/ 002696].

  12. Impacts of the diagnosis of leprosy and of visible impairments amongst people affected by leprosy in Cebu, the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Boku, Noriko; Lockwood, Diana N J; Balagon, Maria Victoria; Pardillo, Fe Eleanor F; Maghanoy, Armi A; Mallari, Irene B; Cross, Hugh

    2010-06-01

    To quantify the impact of the diagnosis of leprosy and of visible impairments in people affected by leprosy. Three interview-based questionnaires designed to measure activity limitation, participation restriction, and general self-efficacy were used to collect data from three Groups. Group 1: leprosy affected people with visible impairment, Group 2: newly diagnosed leprosy patients with no visible impairment, Group 3: patients with other skin diseases symptomatic for more than 1 month. One hundred and eight subjects were recruited. The subjects with visible impairments (Group 1) had higher levels of participation restriction than those with skin disease (P0.012), and participation restriction was similar between subjects in Groups 2 and 3 (P0-305). The people in Group 1 (35 subjects) also reported significantly more activity limitation compared to the people in either Group 2 (35 subjects) or Group 3 (38 subjects) (P 0-001, respectively). The subjects in Group 2 had no significant activity limitation compared with those in Group 3 (P0.338). A multivariate analysis showed that severe visible impairment was a risk factor for activity limitation (odds ratio 5.68, 95% CI: 1.09-297, P0.039) and a low level of self-efficacy (Odds ratio 6.38, 95% CI: 1.06-38.3, P0-043) among people affected by leprosy. Visible impairments affected the activities and attitudes of people affected by leprosy. However, others without visible impairment, had activity limitations, participation restrictions and levels of general self-efficacy that were similar to patients with other skin diseases. Prevention of visible impairments should be considered a key intervention for stigma reduction.

  13. Modeling both of the number of pausibacillary and multibacillary leprosy patients by using bivariate poisson regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winahju, W. S.; Mukarromah, A.; Putri, S.

    2015-03-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by bacteria of leprosy (Mycobacterium leprae). Leprosy has become an important thing in Indonesia because its morbidity is quite high. Based on WHO data in 2014, in 2012 Indonesia has the highest number of new leprosy patients after India and Brazil with a contribution of 18.994 people (8.7% of the world). This number makes Indonesia automatically placed as the country with the highest number of leprosy morbidity of ASEAN countries. The province that most contributes to the number of leprosy patients in Indonesia is East Java. There are two kind of leprosy. They consist of pausibacillary and multibacillary. The morbidity of multibacillary leprosy is higher than pausibacillary leprosy. This paper will discuss modeling both of the number of multibacillary and pausibacillary leprosy patients as responses variables. These responses are count variables, so modeling will be conducted by using bivariate poisson regression method. Unit experiment used is in East Java, and predictors involved are: environment, demography, and poverty. The model uses data in 2012, and the result indicates that all predictors influence significantly.

  14. The decline of leprosy in Japan: patterns and trends 1964-2008.

    PubMed

    Koba, Ai; Ishii, Norihisa; Mori, Shuichi; Fine, Paul E M

    2009-12-01

    Our purpose was to elucidate the patterns and trends of autochthonous leprosy in Japan from 1964 to 2008, to compare them with the findings from other studies of leprosy in decline, and to determine whether M. leprae transmission persists in Japan. Data on registered leprosy cases in Japan in the period 1964-2008 were analysed with reference to trends in case detection, geographical distribution, age at diagnosis, sex, classification, family history and broad correlation with socioeconomic conditions. A consistent decline in leprosy case detection was observed in all areas of the country over the period 1964-2008. Highest incidence was consistently in Okinawa, the southernmost part of Japan. Autochthonous leprosy has not been reported in anyone born in Japan since 1980. Increasing average age and a shift towards lower latitudes were demonstrated throughout the period. There was an inverse association between regional measures of wealth and leprosy incidence. Leprosy has declined throughout the past century in Japan. Autochthonous transmission has probably stopped in mainland Japan, but may still occur at a low level in Okinawa, the country's southernmost region. Analyses of data on autochthonous cases revealed patterns similar to those reported in other countries with declining leprosy. Detailed comparisons between countries with very low leprosy incidence may help us to better understand the epidemiology of leprosy.

  15. Fixed-Duration Therapy in Leprosy: Limitations and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Malathi, Munisamy; Thappa, Devinder Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Leprosy has been considered a curable disease after the implementation of multidrug therapy (MDT), which has been proven to be safe and effective, by bringing about a significant change in the global and national scenario of leprosy by upgrading the control of leprosy to the next stage of eradication. Since its introduction, the MDT regimens for the treatment of leprosy have undergone several changes especially with regard to the duration of treatment. The advantages of shortened duration of treatment need to be balanced against the risk of relapse and a lot of controversies exist pertaining to this aspect. The fixed-duration (FD) therapy is not popular among academicians and private practitioners who prefer precise diagnosis and treatment with superior MDT regimens and for a longer duration. On the contrary, from a public health-care point of view, precise diagnosis and a longer treatment schedule are not cost effective and not feasible to be implemented in elimination programs. Hence, a fine balance needs to be maintained between achieving a cure for the patient and protecting the society at risk, and this review discusses the various limitations and opportunities of FD therapy with a note on the newer MDT regimens. PMID:23716796

  16. PHA induced blastoid transformation of lymphocytes in leprosy contacts.

    PubMed

    Hardas, U D; Jalgaonkar, S V

    1982-04-01

    PHA-induced blastoid transformation of lymphocytes was studied in 29 contacts of leprosy patients. 21 contacts taking DDS as prophylaxis showed significant depression of lymphocyte transformation while 8 contacts not taking DDS showed no depression as compared to controls. DDS thus has an inhibitory effect on cell mediated immune response.

  17. Insights into ancient leprosy and tuberculosis using metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Donoghue, Helen D

    2013-09-01

    Leprosy and tuberculosis were widespread in the past and remain significant diseases today. Comparison of ancient and modern genomes of Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis gives insight into their evolution and a calibration of the timescale for observed changes. Recently, whole genome sequencing has revealed genotypes and mixed-strain infections. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification and molecular characterization of nuclear Citrus leprosis virus, an unassigned Dichorhavirus genus member associated with citrus leprosis disease in Mexico

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Citrus leprosis is a difficult viral disease causing significant damage to citrus fruit in South America and Central America. The disease is marked by dramatic lesions on fruit, leaves and stems resulting in unmarketable product. Citrus leprosis virus cytoplasmic type (CiLV-C) was detected in states...

  19. [Role of HLA-DR and HLA-DQ alleles in multibacillary leprosy and paucibacillary leprosy in the province of Chaco (Argentina)].

    PubMed

    Motta, Patricia María Fabiana; Cech, Norma; Fontan, Claudia; Giménez, Manuel Fernando; Lodeiro, Norma; Marinic, Karina; Molinari, María Laura; Sotelo, María Graciela; Habegger de Sorrentino, Alicia

    2007-12-01

    Segregation analyses in several populations have suggested a relationship between specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II alleles and the development of different types of leprosy. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of HLA class II DR and DQ alleles among leprosy patients in Chaco province, northeast Argentina, in an effort to determine whether these alleles might be involved in the development of the multibacillary (MB) and paucibacillary (PB) forms of leprosy. Samples from 89 leprosy patients (MB = 70, PB = 19) and 112 healthy control subjects were analyzed. The HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles were determined by PCR amplification and reverse hybridization with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes, and analyzed with the INNO-LiPA typing system and LiPA software. DQB1*0201/0202/0203 in patients with MB leprosy and DRB1*04 in patients with PB leprosy were detected at significantly lower frequencies as compared with the normal controls. These data indicate that DQB1* 0201/0202/0203 may be a protective factor in MB leprosy and DRB1*04 in PB leprosy. We attribute the differences between our findings and those of other authors to the fact that the Caucasian inhabitants of Chaco include a considerable mixture of South American natives (Guaraníes and Tobas).

  20. Complement activation in leprosy: a retrospective study shows elevated circulating terminal complement complex in reactional leprosy.

    PubMed

    Bahia El Idrissi, N; Hakobyan, S; Ramaglia, V; Geluk, A; Morgan, B Paul; Das, P Kumar; Baas, F

    2016-06-01

    Mycobacterium leprae infection gives rise to the immunologically and histopathologically classified spectrum of leprosy. At present, several tools for the stratification of patients are based on acquired immunity markers. However, the role of innate immunity, particularly the complement system, is largely unexplored. The present retrospective study was undertaken to explore whether the systemic levels of complement activation components and regulators can stratify leprosy patients, particularly in reference to the reactional state of the disease. Serum samples from two cohorts were analysed. The cohort from Bangladesh included multi-bacillary (MB) patients with (n = 12) or without (n = 46) reaction (R) at intake and endemic controls (n = 20). The cohort from Ethiopia included pauci-bacillary (PB) (n = 7) and MB (n = 23) patients without reaction and MB (n = 15) patients with reaction. The results showed that the activation products terminal complement complex (TCC) (P ≤ 0·01), C4d (P ≤ 0·05) and iC3b (P ≤ 0·05) were specifically elevated in Bangladeshi patients with reaction at intake compared to endemic controls. In addition, levels of the regulator clusterin (P ≤ 0·001 without R; P < 0·05 with R) were also elevated in MB patients, irrespective of a reaction. Similar analysis of the Ethiopian cohort confirmed that, irrespective of a reaction, serum TCC levels were increased significantly in patients with reactions compared to patients without reactions (P ≤ 0·05). Our findings suggests that serum TCC levels may prove to be a valuable tool in diagnosing patients at risk of developing reactions. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  1. Ultrasonography of Leprosy Neuropathy: A Longitudinal Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Lugão, Helena Barbosa; Frade, Marco Andrey Cipriani; Marques, Wilson; Foss, Norma Tiraboschi; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique

    2016-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that leprosy multi-drug therapy (MDT) does not stop the progression of nerve function impairment. There are no prospective studies investigating the evolution of nerve anatomic abnormalities after treatment. We examined leprosy patients aiming to investigate the evolution of nerve ultrasonography (US) abnormalities and the risk factors for poor outcomes after MDT. We performed bilateral US of the ulnar (U), median (M) and common fibular (CF) nerves in 9 paucibacillary (PB) and 64 multibacillary (MB) patients before and after MDT. Forty-two patients had leprosy reactions (type 1, type 2, acute neuritis) during the study. We analyzed nerve maximum cross-sectional areas (CSA), echogenicity and Doppler signal. Poor outcomes included a post-treatment CSA above normal limits with a reduction of less than 30% (U, M) or 40% (CF) from the baseline, echogenicity abnormalities or intraneural Doppler in the post-treatment study. We found that PB and patients without reactions showed significant increases in CSA at CF, whereas MB and patients with reactions had CSA reduction in some nerves after treatment (p<0.05). Despite this reduction, we observed a greater frequency of poor CSA outcomes in the MB compared to the PB (77.8% and 40.6%; p>0.05) and in the patients with reactions compared to those without (66.7% and 38.7%; p<0.05). There was significantly higher odds ratio (7.75; 95%CI: 1.56-38.45) for poor CSA outcomes only for M nerve in patients with reactions. Poor echogenicity outcomes were more frequent in MB (59.4%) compared to PB (22.2%) (p<0.05). There was significant association between poor Doppler outcomes and neuritis. Gender, disease duration, and leprosy classification were not significant risk factors for poor outcomes in CSA, echogenicity or Doppler. US nerve abnormalities can worsen after treatment despite the leprosy classification or the presence of reactions.

  2. Immunological aspects of leprosy with special reference to autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wager, O.

    1969-01-01

    Leprosy, particularly lepromatous leprosy, is associated with a multitude of (auto) immune aberrations, and its clinical features also have much in common with the collagen diseases. Immunopathological studies of the 2 groups of diseases may thus elucidate the basic mechanisms of both. The reported evidence for a genetically determined hyporeactivity of cell-mediated (CM) immunity in lepromatous subjects is reviewed; most, but not all, of the findings fit such a hypothesis well. The possibility remains that the observed hyporeactivities may be secondary to direct effects of Mycobacterium leprae. Evidence for a general hyperreactivity of the antibody-mediated (AM) immunity in lepromatous leprosy is then reviewed and considered to be fragmentary. The concept and general criteria of autoimmunity are discussed briefly and the high incidence in lepromatous leprosy of various (auto)immune aberrations, resembling those in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and in rheumatoid arthritis is reviewed. Although autoantibodies are not likely to be directly deleterious to the host, immune complexes containing autoantibodies may be pathogenic. Mixed cryoimmunoglobulins, consisting of 2 (IgG—IgM or IgG—IgA) or 3 immunoglobulins, and occasionally also containing measurable amounts of complement components, have recently been encountered in SLE and its variants and also in a number of microbial diseases with autoimmune features (syphilis, streptococcal nephritis and endocarditis, mononucleosis, Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia). They may represent circulating immune complexes, analogous to the IgM (IgA) rheumatoid factors in combination with their IgG reactants. In leprosy also, the existence of pathogenic immune complexes is indirectly suggested by mixed cryoglobulinemia and further by a number of other features reviewed in this article. PMID:5309531

  3. Evaluation of hearing impairment in leprosy patients taking multidrug therapy.

    PubMed

    Rawlani, S; Patil, C Y; Bhowte, R; Degwekar, S; Rawlani, S; Chandak, R; Rawlani, S

    2013-01-01

    Present descriptive study was carried out for the assessment of hearing capability in leprosy patients. After getting approval from Institutional ethical committee, the present descriptive study was carried out on 60 subjects. All the patients were indoor-patients at the Leprosy Rehabilitation Center Maharogi Sewa Samiti Anandvan Warora, and were on multidrug therapy described by World Health Organization from an average period of 6 months. Study Group I consisted of 30 diagnosed Leprosy patients taking multidrug therapy from an average period of 6 months. Group II (Control group) consisted of 30 normal healthy individuals of same age. Patients suffering from acute or chronic ear discharge, Presence of wax in external auditory canal, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, impaired renal function and patients having history of trauma were excluded from the study. All the subjects underwent Pure tone audiometry, Tuning Fork test to check the level of hearing loss and type of hearing loss and detailed clinical examination for cranial nerve function was done in all the patients of study group and control group. Audiometry findings in study group patients showed that 23 patients (76.66%; 45 ears) of the leprosy patients had sensory neural hearing impairment and 7 patients (23.33%) showed normal hearing. Out of these affected patients, 10 patients (43.47%; 19 ears) had mild sensory neural hearing impairment, 10 patients (43.47%; 20 ears) had moderate sensory neural hearing impairment. 2 patients (8.69%; 04 ears) had moderate to severe hearing impairment, 1 patient (4.34%; 02 ears) showed severe sensory neural hearing impairment. In the absence of any local or systemic disease or drugs likely to have side effects on the cochleovestibular function, leprosy affects the cochleovestibular system, and effect on cochlear function is seen more often than effect on the vestibular system. Thus hearing loss which is seen in patients suffering from Hansen's disease is of cochlear origin.

  4. Histoid leprosy with giant lesions of fingers and toes.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Gerzaín; Henríquez, Rafael; Gallo, Shirley; Panqueva, César

    2015-01-01

    This work was conducted at the Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de La Sabana, and at the Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Surcolombiana. Histoid leprosy, a clinical and histological variant of multibacillary leprosy, may offer a challenging diagnosis even for experts. An 83-year-old woman presented with papular, nodular and tumor-like lesions of 3 years of evolution, affecting fingers, toes, hands, thighs and knees, and wide superficial ulcers in her lower calves. Cutaneous lymphoma was suspected. A biopsy of a nodule of the knee showed a diffuse dermal infiltrate with microvacuolated histiocytes, moderate numbers of lymphocytes and plasma cells. Cutaneous lymphoma was suggested. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) showed prominent CD68-positive macrophages, as well as CD3, CD8 and CD20 positive cells. Additional sections suggested cutaneous leishmaniasis. New biopsies were sent with the clinical diagnoses of cutaneous lymphoma, Kaposi´s sarcoma or lepromatous leprosy, as the patient had madarosis. These biopsies showed atrophic epidermis, a thin Grenz zone and diffuse inflammation with fusiform cells and pale vacuolated macrophages. ZiehlNeelsen stain showed abundant solid phagocytized bacilli with no globii formation. Abundant bacilli were demonstrated in the first biopsy. Histoid leprosy was diagnosed. The patient received the WHO multidrug therapy with excellent results. We concluded that Ziehl Neelsen staining should be used in the presence of a diffuse dermal infiltrate with fusiform and vacuolated histiocytes, which suggests a tumor, and an IHC particularly rich in CD68-positive macrophages; this will reveal abundant bacilli if the lesion is leprosy. A good clinical pathological correlation is essential to establish a proper diagnosis and management of the patient.

  5. Leprosy: a review on elimination, reducing the disease burden, and future research.

    PubMed

    Chaptini, Casandra; Marshman, Gillian

    2015-12-01

    Leprosy, one of the oldest diseases known to man, is a stigmatising, potentially disabling disease. Throughout history, leprosy has been associated with fear, prejudice and immense social stigma. It remains one of the leading causes of deformity and physical disability from an infectious disease. Tremendous advances in leprosy control were made by the World Health Organization, and the 'elimination of leprosy', defined as a decrease of disease prevalence to less than 1 case per 10,000 population, was achieved by 2000. However, the reality is that true 'elimination' is yet to be achieved. Despite almost 30 years of effective multidrug treatment, the prevalence and incidence of leprosy have plateaued since 2005. Moreover, new cases with Grade 2 disability and new cases occurring in children remain unchanged since 2010, reflecting a failure in early leprosy detection, and indicating that transmission is clearly continuing. This review examines the challenges of elimination, and proposes further measures to reduce the disease burden, including future research possibilities.

  6. A Case of Leprosy in Italy: A Multifaceted Disease Which Continues to Challenge Medical Doctors.

    PubMed

    Maritati, Martina; Contini, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, characterized by a very long incubation period, confounding signs and symptoms and difficulty to establish the onset time. Considering the stigma associated with the diagnosis and the difficulties in detecting asymptomatic leprosy, the incidence and prevalence of this disease are underestimated. In Italy, leprosy is currently included among the rare diseases and can occur as an imported pathology in native individuals or extra-EU immigrants. Currently, given its exceptional appearance in Italy, leprosy is extremely difficult to recognize. In fact, the incomplete knowledge by the medical class of geographical epidemiology and aetiology of tropical diseases including leprosy, often delays the definitive diagnosis. Due to the increasing rate of the migration flows, in Italy and in Europe, leprosy should be considered among the differential diagnosis in patients with cutaneous and neurological signs, especially when originating from endemic countries.

  7. Multibacillary leprosy mimicking systemic lupus erythematosus: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Horta-Baas, G; Hernández-Cabrera, M F; Barile-Fabris, L A; Romero-Figueroa, M del S; Arenas-Guzmán, R

    2015-09-01

    Leprosy is an infectious chronic disease with a wide range of clinical and serological manifestations. We report a case of a woman presenting with a malar rash, painless oral ulcers, photosensitivity, arthritis, positive antinuclear antibodies test and leuko-lymphopenia. Our case illustrates an unusual presentation of leprosy initially diagnosed as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). After the confirmation of multibacillary leprosy and multidrug therapy recommended by the World Health Organization, a good clinical response was observed. Recognition of rheumatic manifestations in leprosy is important as they may be confused with SLE. A literature review is presented to encourage clinicians to consider leprosy as a differential diagnosis. Specifically in patients with unusual rheumatic manifestations and persistent skin lesions, and when neurological symptoms are present. Leprosy has not been eradicated, so misdiagnosis can be frequent. It is necessary to increase medical practitioner awareness in order start proper treatment.

  8. In Situ complement activation and T-cell immunity in leprosy spectrum: An immunohistological study on leprosy lesional skin.

    PubMed

    Bahia El Idrissi, Nawal; Iyer, Anand M; Ramaglia, Valeria; Rosa, Patricia S; Soares, Cleverson T; Baas, Frank; Das, Pranab K

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae) infection causes nerve damage and the condition worsens often during and long after treatment. Clearance of bacterial antigens including lipoarabinomannan (LAM) during and after treatment in leprosy patients is slow. We previously demonstrated that M. leprae LAM damages peripheral nerves by in situ generation of the membrane attack complex (MAC). Investigating the role of complement activation in skin lesions of leprosy patients might provide insight into the dynamics of in situ immune reactivity and the destructive pathology of M. leprae. In this study, we analyzed in skin lesions of leprosy patients, whether M. leprae antigen LAM deposition correlates with the deposition of complement activation products MAC and C3d on nerves and cells in the surrounding tissue. Skin biopsies of paucibacillary (n = 7), multibacillary leprosy patients (n = 7), and patients with erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL) (n = 6) or reversal reaction (RR) (n = 4) and controls (n = 5) were analyzed. The percentage of C3d, MAC and LAM deposition was significantly higher in the skin biopsies of multibacillary compared to paucibacillary patients (p = <0.05, p = <0.001 and p = <0.001 respectively), with a significant association between LAM and C3d or MAC in the skin biopsies of leprosy patients (r = 0.9578, p< 0.0001 and r = 0.8585, p<0.0001 respectively). In skin lesions of multibacillary patients, MAC deposition was found on axons and co-localizing with LAM. In skin lesions of paucibacillary patients, we found C3d positive T-cells in and surrounding granulomas, but hardly any MAC deposition. In addition, MAC immunoreactivity was increased in both ENL and RR skin lesions compared to non-reactional leprosy patients (p = <0.01 and p = <0.01 respectively). The present findings demonstrate that complement is deposited in skin lesions of leprosy patients, suggesting that inflammation driven by complement activation might contribute to nerve damage in the lesions of

  9. Identifying Leprosy and Those at Risk of Developing Leprosy by Detection of Antibodies against LID-1 and LID-NDO

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Francianne M.; Nobre, Maurício L.; Ferreira, Leonardo C.; Nascimento, Larissa S.; Miranda, Alesson M.; Monteiro, Glória R. G.; Dupnik, Kathryn M.; Duthie, Malcolm S.; Reed, Steven G.; Jeronimo, Selma M. B.

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is caused by Mycobacterium leprae infection and remains a major public health problem in many areas of the world. Challenges to its timely diagnosis result in delay in treatment, which is usually associated with severe disability. Although phenolic glycolipid (PGL)-I has been reported as auxiliary diagnostic tool, currently there is no serological assay routinely used in leprosy diagnosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of two related reagents, LID-1 and LID-NDO, for the detection of M. leprae infection. Sera from 98 leprosy patients, 365 household contacts (HHC) and 98 endemic controls from Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil, were evaluated. A subgroup of the HHC living in a hyperendemic area was followed for 7–10 years. Antigen-specific antibody responses were highest in multibacillary (MB) at the lepromatous pole (LL/BL) and lowest in paucibacillary (PB) at the tuberculoid pole (TT/BT). A positive correlation for both anti-LID-1 and anti-LID-NDO antibodies was found with bacterial burden (LID-1, r = 0.84, p<0.001; LID-NDO, r = 0.82, p<0.001), with higher sensitivity than bacilloscopy. According to Receiver Operating Curve, LID-1 and LID-NDO performed similarly. The sensitivity for MB cases was 89% for LID-1 and 95% for LID-NDO; the specificity was 96% for LID-1 and 88% for LID-NDO. Of the 332 HHC that were followed, 12 (3.6%) were diagnosed with leprosy in a median time of 31 (3–79) months after recruitment. A linear generalized model using LID-1 or LID-NDO as a predictor estimated that 8.3% and 10.4% of the HHC would become a leprosy case, respectively. Together, our findings support a role for the LID-1 and LID-NDO antigens in diagnosing MB leprosy and identifying people at greater risk of developing clinical disease. These assays have the potential to improve the diagnostic capacity at local health centers and aid development of strategies for the eventual control and elimination of leprosy from endemic areas. PMID:27658042

  10. Identifying Leprosy and Those at Risk of Developing Leprosy by Detection of Antibodies against LID-1 and LID-NDO.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Francianne M; Nobre, Maurício L; Ferreira, Leonardo C; Nascimento, Larissa S; Miranda, Alesson M; Monteiro, Glória R G; Dupnik, Kathryn M; Duthie, Malcolm S; Reed, Steven G; Jeronimo, Selma M B

    2016-09-01

    Leprosy is caused by Mycobacterium leprae infection and remains a major public health problem in many areas of the world. Challenges to its timely diagnosis result in delay in treatment, which is usually associated with severe disability. Although phenolic glycolipid (PGL)-I has been reported as auxiliary diagnostic tool, currently there is no serological assay routinely used in leprosy diagnosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of two related reagents, LID-1 and LID-NDO, for the detection of M. leprae infection. Sera from 98 leprosy patients, 365 household contacts (HHC) and 98 endemic controls from Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil, were evaluated. A subgroup of the HHC living in a hyperendemic area was followed for 7-10 years. Antigen-specific antibody responses were highest in multibacillary (MB) at the lepromatous pole (LL/BL) and lowest in paucibacillary (PB) at the tuberculoid pole (TT/BT). A positive correlation for both anti-LID-1 and anti-LID-NDO antibodies was found with bacterial burden (LID-1, r = 0.84, p<0.001; LID-NDO, r = 0.82, p<0.001), with higher sensitivity than bacilloscopy. According to Receiver Operating Curve, LID-1 and LID-NDO performed similarly. The sensitivity for MB cases was 89% for LID-1 and 95% for LID-NDO; the specificity was 96% for LID-1 and 88% for LID-NDO. Of the 332 HHC that were followed, 12 (3.6%) were diagnosed with leprosy in a median time of 31 (3-79) months after recruitment. A linear generalized model using LID-1 or LID-NDO as a predictor estimated that 8.3% and 10.4% of the HHC would become a leprosy case, respectively. Together, our findings support a role for the LID-1 and LID-NDO antigens in diagnosing MB leprosy and identifying people at greater risk of developing clinical disease. These assays have the potential to improve the diagnostic capacity at local health centers and aid development of strategies for the eventual control and elimination of leprosy from endemic areas.

  11. A Rare Case of Coexistence of Borderline Lepromatous Leprosy with Tuberculosis Verrucosa Cutis

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakaran, Nagendran; Chandrashekar, Laxmisha; Behera, Biswanath

    2016-01-01

    Occurrence of pulmonary tuberculosis with leprosy is known but association of cutaneous tuberculosis with leprosy is rare. We report a case of borderline lepromatous leprosy coexistent with tuberculosis verrucosa cutis in a 29-year-old male, who presented with multiple skin coloured nodules and hyperkeratotic scaly lesions of 3-month duration. Dual infections are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Therefore early diagnosis and management helps to reduce mortality and to mitigate the effects of morbidity. PMID:28003920

  12. Bullous Erythema Nodosum Leprosum as the First Manifestation of Multibacillary Leprosy: A Rare Phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Bakshi, Neha; Rao, Seema; Batra, Rohit

    2017-07-24

    Erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL) may uncommonly present before treatment in patients with multibacillary leprosy. Atypical manifestations are known in ENL and may be clinically misleading. Such wide variations in the clinical presentation of leprosy in reaction make histopathology an important tool for supporting clinical diagnosis. We report bullous ENL presenting as the first manifestation of leprosy in a 30-year-old Indian man diagnosed using histopathology.

  13. Laryngeal involvement causing dysphonia in a 29 year old nursing mother with lepromatous leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Fwoloshi, Sombo; Machona, Sharon Musonda; Mudenda, Victor; Ngalamika, Owen

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy is a granulomatous disease that mainly affects the skin and peripheral nerves. It is caused by infection with mycobacterium leprae or mycobacterium lepromatosus. In most instances, diagnosis of leprosy can easily be made based on the clinical signs and symptoms. However, when patients present with atypical features, clinical diagnosis can be a challenge. We report a case of a nursing mother with lepromatous leprosy who presented with dysphonia and skin lesions initially thought to be a deep cutaneous mycosis. PMID:26327983

  14. A Rare Case of Coexistence of Borderline Lepromatous Leprosy with Tuberculosis Verrucosa Cutis.

    PubMed

    Dey, Biswajit; Gochhait, Debasis; Prabhakaran, Nagendran; Chandrashekar, Laxmisha; Behera, Biswanath

    2016-01-01

    Occurrence of pulmonary tuberculosis with leprosy is known but association of cutaneous tuberculosis with leprosy is rare. We report a case of borderline lepromatous leprosy coexistent with tuberculosis verrucosa cutis in a 29-year-old male, who presented with multiple skin coloured nodules and hyperkeratotic scaly lesions of 3-month duration. Dual infections are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Therefore early diagnosis and management helps to reduce mortality and to mitigate the effects of morbidity.

  15. ALERT-India 1981-89: nine years' experience of leprosy control in the slums of Bombay.

    PubMed

    Samy, A A; Mancheril, J; Manek, K P; McDougall, A C

    1991-09-01

    Bombay has a population of about 8 million people, one-half of whom live in slums. In 1981, ALERT-India started its first leprosy control project in N, S and T Wards of Greater Bombay Municipal Corporation covering an area of 122 sq km in the north-eastern suburbs of Vidhyavihar, Ghatkopar, Vikhroli, Kanjurmarg, Bhandup and Mulund, with a total population of 1,100,000 according to the 1981 census. In the 9 years of operation, over 12,000 patients have been registered and treated and of these 7425 have been released from treatment, having satisfactorily completed courses of chemotherapy. However, over 1000 cases are still identified every year by house-to-house or school surveys, or by self-reporting, including a considerable percentage in children. The origin, development, staff structure, operational procedure, administration and recording system of ALERT-India are described in detail, with emphasis on what has been accomplished with purely outpatient facilities, using paramedical workers, all of whom have received inservice training from Government recognized training centres for their specific tasks. The account includes a brief description of an expansion of the organization's work into townships in New Bombay, where preliminary surveys in 1988 confirmed the presence of leprosy cases and the need for treatment facilities. The discussion addresses: 1, the better use of the large volume of statistical information which has been collected by ALERT-India during the past 9 years, with emphasis on its value in assessing the impact on the control programme and modifying future policy; 2, the need to radically examine the present policy of survey, versus an 'education campaign approach' with regard to increasing early case-detection and self-reporting; 3, the establishment of a central coordinating body for leprosy control in Bombay to exchange information, coordinate efforts and formulate a future plan of action, the latter in association with the National Leprosy

  16. Thermographic analysis and autonomic response in the hands of patients with leprosy.

    PubMed

    Cavalheiro, Aretusa Lopes; Costa, Debora Tacon da; Menezes, Ana Luiza Ferro de; Pereira, Janser Moura; Carvalho, Eliane Maria de

    2016-01-01

    Low temperatures and slow blood flow may result from peripheral neuropathy caused by leprosy, and the simple detection of cold fingers could already be a preliminary classification for these patients. To investigate whether infrared thermography would be able to measure this change in temperature in the hands of people with leprosy. The study assessed 17 leprosy patients who were under treatment at the National Reference Center for Sanitary Dermatology and Leprosy, Uberlândia/MG, and 15 people without leprosy for the control group. The infrared camera FLIR A325 and Therma CAM Researcher Professional 2.9 software were used to measure the temperature. The room was air-conditioned, maintaining the temperature at 25°C; the distance between the camera and the limb was 70 cm. The vasomotor reflex of patients was tested by a cold stress on the palm. The study showed a significant interaction between the clinical form of leprosy and temperature, where the control group and the borderline-borderline form revealed a higher initial temperature, while borderline-lepromatous and lepromatous leprosy showed a lower temperature. Regarding vasomotor reflex, lepromatous leprosy patients were unable to recover the initial temperature after cold stress, while those with the borderline-tuberculoid form not only recovered but exceeded the initial temperature. Thermography proved a potential tool to assist in the early detection of neuropathies, helping in the prevention of major nerve damage and the installation of deformities and disabilities that are characteristic of leprosy.

  17. HLA Alleles are Genetic Markers for Susceptibility and Resistance towards Leprosy in a Mexican Mestizo Population.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Medina, Maribel; Escamilla-Tilch, Monica; Frías-Castro, Luis Octavio; Romero-Quintana, Geovanni; Estrada-García, Iris; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Granados, Julio; Arambula Meraz, Eliakym; Sánchez-Schmitz, Guzman; Khader, Shabaana Abdul; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Ramos-Payán, Rosalío

    2017-01-01

    Despite the use of multidrug therapy, leprosy remains endemic in some countries. The association of several human leucocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and gene polymorphisms with leprosy has been demonstrated in many populations, but the major immune contributors associated to the spectrum of leprosy have not been defined yet. In this study, genotyping of HLA-A, -B, -DR, and -DQ alleles was performed in leprosy patients (n = 113) and control subjects (n = 117) from the region with the highest incidence for the disease in México. The odds of developing leprosy and lepromatous subtype were 2.12- and 2.74-fold higher in carriers of HLA-A*28, and 2.48- and 4.14-fold higher for leprosy and dimorphic subtype in carriers of DQB1*06. Interestingly, DQB1*07 was overrepresented in healthy individuals, compared to patients with leprosy (OR = 0.08) and the lepromatous subtype (OR = 0.06). These results suggest that HLA-A*28 is a marker for predisposition to leprosy and the lepromatous subtype and DQB1*06 to leprosy and the dimorphic subtype, while DQB1*07 might be a resistance marker in this Mestizo population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  18. Tuberculosis and Leprosy: Classical Granulomatous Diseases in the Twenty-First Century.

    PubMed

    Scollard, David M; Dacso, Mara M; Abad-Venida, Ma Luisa

    2015-07-01

    Leprosy and tuberculosis are chronic mycobacterial infections that elicit granulomatous inflammation. Both infections are curable, but granulomatous injury to cutaneous structures, including cutaneous nerves in leprosy, may cause permanent damage. Both diseases are major global concerns: tuberculosis for its high prevalence and mortality, and leprosy for its persistent global presence and high rate of neuropathic disability. Cutaneous manifestations of both leprosy and tuberculosis are frequently subtle and challenging in dermatologic practice and often require a careful travel and social history and a high index of suspicion.

  19. Leprosy trends at a tertiary care hospital in Mumbai, India, from 2008 to 2015

    PubMed Central

    Muthuvel, Thirumugam; Isaakidis, Petros; Shewade, Hemant Deepak; Kattuppara, Lucy; Singh, Rajbir; Govindarajulu, Srinivas

    2016-01-01

    Background Leprosy remains an important cause of preventable disabilities. After the advent of multidrug therapy, new leprosy cases have come down dramatically. Despite this achievement, India, which contributes 60% of the global leprosy burden, faces some challenges to eliminate the disease, including active transmission in the community and delayed diagnosis of leprosy patients. Objectives The objectives of the study were 1) to determine sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of newly diagnosed adults and children (less than 15 years) with leprosy and their trends over time (2008–2015) and 2) to describe the profile of surgical procedures among leprosy patients registered for reconstructive surgeries during 2006–2015. Design Retrospective descriptive study was conducted involving a record review of new patients with leprosy registered in Vimala Dermatological Centre, Mumbai. Results A total of 578 new leprosy cases were registered in the hospital during 2008–2015. There has been a steady increase in the trend of child cases (less than 15 years) registered in the facility (from 3% in 2008 to 18% in 2015), x2=12.11, p<0.01. The majority of the patients (68%) were migrants of Uttar Pradesh and Bihar. Conclusions Targeting children and migrants and ensuring early diagnosis and treatment initiation are essential components for leprosy elimination in an urban metropolis in India. PMID:27885973

  20. Selection of Antigens and Development of Prototype Tests for Point-of-Care Leprosy Diagnosis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Duthie, Malcolm S.; Ireton, Greg C.; Kanaujia, Ganga V.; Goto, Wakako; Liang, Hong; Bhatia, Ajay; Busceti, Jean Marie; Macdonald, Murdo; Neupane, Kapil Dev; Ranjit, Chaman; Sapkota, Bishwa Raj; Balagon, Marivic; Esfandiari, Javan; Carter, Darrick; Reed, Steven G.

    2008-01-01

    Leprosy can be a devastating chronic infection that causes nerve function impairment and associated disfigurement. Despite the recent reduction in the number of registered worldwide leprosy cases as a result of the widespread use of multidrug therapy, the number of new cases detected each year remains relatively stable. The diagnosis of leprosy is currently based on the appearance of clinical signs and requires expert clinical, as well as labor-intensive and time-consuming laboratory or histological, evaluation. For the purpose of developing an effective, simple, rapid, and low-cost diagnostic alternative, we have analyzed the serologic antibody response to identify Mycobacterium leprae proteins that are recognized by leprosy patients. More than 100 recombinant antigens were analyzed in a protein array format to select those with discriminatory properties for leprosy diagnosis. As expected, multibacillary leprosy patients recognized more antigens with stronger antibody responses than paucibacillary leprosy patients. Our data indicate, however, that multibacillary patients can be distinguished from paucibacillary patients, and both of these groups can be segregated from endemic control groups. We went on to confirm the diagnostic properties of antigens ML0405 and ML2331 and the LID-1 fusion construct of these two proteins by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We then demonstrated the performance of these antigens in rapid test formats with a goal of developing a point-of-care diagnostic test. A serological diagnostic test capable of identifying and allowing treatment of leprosy could reduce transmission, prevent functional disabilities and stigmatizing deformities, and facilitate leprosy eradication. PMID:18716007

  1. Diet-related risk factors for leprosy: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Wagenaar, Inge; van Muiden, Lisanne; Alam, Khorshed; Bowers, Robert; Hossain, Md Anwar; Kispotta, Kolpona; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2015-05-01

    Food shortage was associated with leprosy in two recent studies investigating the relation between socioeconomic factors and leprosy. Inadequate intake of nutrients due to food shortage may affect the immune system and influence the progression of infection to clinical leprosy. We aimed to identify possible differences in dietary intake between recently diagnosed leprosy patients and control subjects. In a leprosy endemic area of Bangladesh, newly diagnosed leprosy patients and control subjects were interviewed about their socioeconomic situation, health and diet. Dietary intakes were recorded with a 24-hour recall, from which a Dietary Diversity Score (DDS) was calculated. Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated and Household Food Insecurity Access Scale (HFIAS) was filled out for every participant. Using logistic regression, a univariate, block wise multivariate, and an integrated analysis were carried out. 52 leprosy cases and 100 control subjects were included. Food shortage was more common, dietary diversity was lower and household food insecurity was higher in the patient group. Patients consumed significantly less items from the DDS food groups 'Meat and fish' and 'Other fruits and vegetables.' Lower food expenditure per capita, lower BMI, lower DDS and absence of household food stocks are the main factors associated with an increased risk of having leprosy. Low income families have only little money to spend on food and consequently have a low intake of highly nutritious non-rice foods such as meat, fish, milk, eggs, fruits and vegetables. Development of clinical leprosy could be explained by deficiencies of the nutrients that these foods normally provide.

  2. Contact with armadillos increases the risk of leprosy in Brazil: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Deps, P D; Alves, B L; Gripp, C G; Aragao, R L; Guedes, Bvs; Filho, J B; Andreatta, M K; Marcari, R S; Prates, Ica; Rodrigues, L C

    2008-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae infection has recently been detected in wild armadillos in Brazil. Leprosy is still endemic in Brazil and although its transmission is mostly by person-to-person contact, many cases report no history of previously known leprosy contact. It has been suggested that other sources of M. leprae may contribute to the transmission of leprosy in some areas. Our objective was to investigate whether contact with armadillos is associated with leprosy. A case-control study was carried out in Brazil. Data was collected from 506 leprosy patients and 594 controls on exposure to armadillos and age, sex, place of birth and living conditions. Univariate analysis and unconditional logistic regression were conducted to investigate whether leprosy was associated with exposure to armadillos. Direct armadillo exposure was reported by 68% of leprosy cases and by 48% of controls (P < 0.001) roughly doubling the risk of leprosy, with odds ratio (OR) 2.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) [1.36-2.99]. The results of this study suggest that direct exposure to armadillos is a risk factor for leprosy in Brazil.

  3. Spatial patterns of leprosy in an urban area of central Brazil.

    PubMed Central

    Martelli, C. M.; Moraes Neto, O. L.; Andrade, A. L.; Silva, S. A.; Silva, I. M.; Zicker, F.

    1995-01-01

    Reported is the spatial variation of leprosy in an urban area of Brazil and its correlation with socioeconomic indicators. From November 1991 to October 1992 a total of 752 newly diagnosed leprosy patients who were attending all outpatient clinics in Goiânia city, central Brazil, were identified. A database o leprosy cases was set up linking patients' addresses to 64 urban districts. Leprosy cases were detected in 86% of the districts and three risk strata were identified. The highest-risk area for leprosy was in the outskirts of the city and detection rates increased on moving from more developed to poorer areas. The risk of detecting leprosy cases was 5.3-fold greater (95% CI: 3.8-7.4) in the outskirts of the town than in the central zone. Discussed are the methodological issues related to leprosy case ascertainment, completeness and reliability of information, and the interpretation of the spatial distribution of leprosy per unit area. Highlighted also are the lack of leprosy control activities in primary health care units and the usefulness of geographical analysis in planning health services. PMID:7614663

  4. The histopathology of lepromatous leprosy in the nose.

    PubMed

    McDougall, A C; Rees, R J; Weddell, A G; Kanan, M W

    1975-04-01

    On the basis of clinical, histological and bacteriological assessments, 31 patients in Central India were selected and classified as having active but early lepromatous leprosy and 4 patients as having early borderline leprosy. From the nose of each patient an average of 4 biopsies were taken from particular sites of the septum and turbinates either by punch biopsy or dissection with a scalpel. The nasal tissues from all the lepromatous patients contained many acid-fast bacilli; no bacilli or abnormalities were seen in nasal tissues from the borderline patients. The histopathology of these highly bacilliferous tissues is described. Bacilli were universally seen in macrophages, but they were also seen in blood monocytes and polymorphs, fibroblasts, squamous and pseudo-columnar epithelium, keratin, peri- and endo-neurial cells of tiny nerve bundles, erectile tissue, vascular plain muscle, perivascular histiocytes and frequently and abundantly in the cytoplasm of endothelial lining cells of lymphatics and of small blood vessels and free within the lumina of these vessels. Five basic mechanisms of escape of bacilli from the submucosa on to the surface, and thus into the external environment, are described. Secondary infection, in the presence of an expansile lepromatous infiltrate, together with simple trauma to the surface epithelium, are the main factors in the discharge of bacilli. These histopathological observations are consistent with the findings from other recent studies on the nose in leprosy regarding (1) the large numbers of morphologically intact and viable Myco. leprae excreted in the nasal mucus of lepromatous patients; (2) the clinical changes observed in the nose of such patients, and (3) the similar nasal involvement and excretion of Myco. leprae from the nose of mice inoculated with leprosy bacilli of human origin. Of particular interest was the frequency and intensity of bacilli within the endothelial lining cells of small blood and lymph vessels and

  5. Predominance of Mycobacterium fortuitum-chelonae complex in Ghatampur field area, endemic for leprosy.

    PubMed

    Lavania, M; Katoch, K; Parashar, D; Sharma, P; Das, R; Chauhan, D S; Sharma, V D; Katoch, V M

    2008-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are commonly found in the environment. As exposure to environmental mycobacteria has been reported to immunomodulatory in this study, the presence of environmental mycobacteria was investigated in soil, drinking water and drainage sample in Ghatampur, India, which is known for high endemicity for leprosy. Soil, drinking water from the hand pumps/wells and also drainage water collected in pools was collected in clean containers and cultured for environmental mycobacteria. Samples were processed according to the protocol established earlier. 69 soil, 62 drinking water and 31 drainage water samples were analysed from soil and water collected from 48 villages of this field area. After decontamination, cultures were set upon Lowenstein Jensen (LJ) medium. Mycobacteria were identified using biochemical tests and molecular techniques such as PCR-RFLP targeting hsp65 kD and rpoB region as well as 16S ribosomal sequencing in case of isolates showing variable biochemical features. NTM (non-tubercular mycobacteria) were isolated from 47.82% of soil samples, 20.69% of drinking water samples and 19.35% of the drainage water samples, overall mycobacteria could be isolated 52/162 of samples (32.09%). Among these mycobacteria, M. fortuitum-chelonae complex was predominant in this area; other species isolated were M. phlei, M. vaccae, M. terrae and M. flavescens. Relevance of exposure to these mycobacteria on endemicity needs to be studied by immunological and epidemiological parameters.

  6. First report of leprosy presenting as acute polyarthritis in the setting of type I downgrading lepra reaction.

    PubMed

    Al-Raqum, Haneen Adel; Uppal, S S; El Abdalghani, Rana Abdul Rahman; Lasheen, Ibrahim

    2006-02-01

    Leprosy is a rare cause of acute polyarthritis. We describe the occurrence of oedema of the hands and feet and acute polyarthritis in the setting of type I (downgrading) lepra reaction in an untreated patient with borderline leprosy. This case report further expands the range of articular manifestations that can occur in leprosy.

  7. Patterns of Migration and Risks Associated with Leprosy among Migrants in Maranhão, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Murto, Christine; Chammartin, Frédérique; Schwarz, Karolin; da Costa, Lea Marcia Melo; Kaplan, Charles; Heukelbach, Jorg

    2013-01-01

    Leprosy remains a public health problem in Brazil with new case incidence exceeding World Health Organization (WHO) goals in endemic clusters throughout the country. Migration can facilitate movement of disease between endemic and non-endemic areas, and has been considered a possible factor in continued leprosy incidence in Brazil. A study was conducted to investigate migration as a risk factor for leprosy. The study had three aims: (1) examine past five year migration as a risk factor for leprosy, (2) describe and compare geographic and temporal patterns of migration among past 5-year migrants with leprosy and a control group, and (3) examine social determinants of health associated with leprosy among past 5-year migrants. The study implemented a matched case-control design and analysis comparing individuals newly diagnosed with leprosy (n = 340) and a clinically unapparent control group (n = 340) without clinical signs of leprosy, matched for age, sex and location in four endemic municipalities in the state of Maranhão, northeastern Brazil. Fishers exact test was used to conduct bivariate analyses. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was employed to control for possible confounding variables. Eighty cases (23.5%) migrated 5-years prior to diagnosis, and 55 controls (16.2%) migrated 5-years prior to the corresponding case diagnosis. Past 5 year migration was found to be associated with leprosy (OR: 1.59; 95% CI 1.07–2.38; p = 0.02), and remained significantly associated with leprosy after controlling for leprosy contact in the family, household, and family/household contact. Poverty, as well as leprosy contact in the family, household and other leprosy contact, was associated with leprosy among past 5-year migrants in the bivariate analysis. Alcohol consumption was also associated with leprosy, a relevant risk factor in susceptibility to infection that should be explored in future research. Our findings provide insight into patterns of

  8. Patterns of migration and risks associated with leprosy among migrants in Maranhão, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Murto, Christine; Chammartin, Frédérique; Schwarz, Karolin; da Costa, Lea Marcia Melo; Kaplan, Charles; Heukelbach, Jorg

    2013-01-01

    Leprosy remains a public health problem in Brazil with new case incidence exceeding World Health Organization (WHO) goals in endemic clusters throughout the country. Migration can facilitate movement of disease between endemic and non-endemic areas, and has been considered a possible factor in continued leprosy incidence in Brazil. A study was conducted to investigate migration as a risk factor for leprosy. The study had three aims: (1) examine past five year migration as a risk factor for leprosy, (2) describe and compare geographic and temporal patterns of migration among past 5-year migrants with leprosy and a control group, and (3) examine social determinants of health associated with leprosy among past 5-year migrants. The study implemented a matched case-control design and analysis comparing individuals newly diagnosed with leprosy (n = 340) and a clinically unapparent control group (n = 340) without clinical signs of leprosy, matched for age, sex and location in four endemic municipalities in the state of Maranhão, northeastern Brazil. Fishers exact test was used to conduct bivariate analyses. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was employed to control for possible confounding variables. Eighty cases (23.5%) migrated 5-years prior to diagnosis, and 55 controls (16.2%) migrated 5-years prior to the corresponding case diagnosis. Past 5 year migration was found to be associated with leprosy (OR: 1.59; 95% CI 1.07-2.38; p = 0.02), and remained significantly associated with leprosy after controlling for leprosy contact in the family, household, and family/household contact. Poverty, as well as leprosy contact in the family, household and other leprosy contact, was associated with leprosy among past 5-year migrants in the bivariate analysis. Alcohol consumption was also associated with leprosy, a relevant risk factor in susceptibility to infection that should be explored in future research. Our findings provide insight into patterns of migration

  9. Leprosy-related mortality in Brazil: a neglected condition of a neglected disease.

    PubMed

    Martins-Melo, Francisco Rogerlândio; Assunção-Ramos, Adriana Valéria; Ramos, Alberto Novaes; Alencar, Carlos Henrique; Montenegro, Renan Magalhães; Wand-Del-Rey de Oliveira, Maria Leide; Heukelbach, Jorg

    2015-10-01

    Leprosy is a public health problem and a neglected condition of morbidity and mortality in several countries of the world. We analysed time trends and spatiotemporal patterns of leprosy-related mortality in Brazil. We performed a nationwide population-based study using secondary mortality data. We included all deaths that occurred in Brazil between 2000 and 2011, in which leprosy was mentioned in any field of death certificates. Leprosy was identified in 7732/12 491 280 deaths (0.1%). Average annual age-adjusted mortality rate was 0.43 deaths/100 000 inhabitants (95% CI 0.40-0.46). The burden of leprosy deaths was higher among males, elderly, black race/colour and in leprosy-endemic regions. Lepromatous leprosy was the most common clinical form mentioned. Mortality rates showed a significant nationwide decrease over the period (annual percent change [APC]: -2.8%; 95% CI -4.2 to -2.4). We observed decreasing mortality rates in the South, Southeast and Central-West regions, while the rates remained stable in North and Northeast regions. Spatial and spatiotemporal high-risk clusters for leprosy-related deaths were distributed mainly in highly endemic and socio-economically deprived regions. Leprosy is a neglected cause of death in Brazil since the disease is preventable, and a cost-effective treatment is available. Sustainable control measures should include appropriate management and systematic monitoring of leprosy-related complications, such as severe leprosy reactions and adverse effects to multidrug therapy. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Trends of main indicators of leprosy in Brazilian municipalities with high risk of leprosy transmission, 2001-2012.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Lucia R S; Duarte, Elisabeth C; Garcia, Leila P

    2016-09-05

    Leprosy incidence has reduced in recent years in Brazil, although the disease still persists as a public health problem in some regions. To investigate the trends of selected leprosy indicators in Brazilian municipalities with high risk of transmission is essential to provide effective control of the disease, yet this area has not been investigated. This is an ecological time-series study with multiple groups using Notifiable Diseases Information System (SINAN) data. All 692 municipalities of the states of Mato Grosso, Tocantins, Rondônia, Pará and Maranhão were included. The incidence rates of leprosy were calculated, as well as incidence rates in children under 15 years per 100,000 inhabitants and rates of new cases presenting grade-2 disabilities per 100,000 inhabitants. Joinpoint Regression was used to analyse the time trends of the different indicators studied. The spatial distribution of temporal variations of the indicators in the period was presented. Between 2001 and 2012, 176,929 leprosy cases were notified in the area studied, this being equivalent to 34.6 % of total cases in Brazil. In the aggregate of municipalities, there was a reduction in incidence rate of leprosy from 89.10 to 56.98 new cases per 100,000 inhabitants between 2001 and 2012, with a significant reduction between 2003 and 2012 (APC: - 6.2 %, 95 % CI: -7.2 % to -5.2 %). The incidence rate in <15 years also reduced significantly between 2003 and 2012 (APC: -5.6 %; 95 % CI: -7.2 % to -4.1 %). The rate of new cases with grade 2 disability remained stable between 2001 and 2012 (APC: -1.3 %; 95 % CI: -2.6 % to 0.1 %). Despite the reduction in the leprosy incidence rate, strategies for controlling this disease need to be enhanced to enable early case detection, especially in hyperendemic municipalities, in order to prevent disability.

  11. International open trial of uniform multidrug therapy regimen for leprosy patients: Findings & implications for national leprosy programmes

    PubMed Central

    Manickam, Ponnaiah; Mehendale, Sanjay M.; Nagaraju, Bathyala; Katoch, Kiran; Jamesh, Abdul; Kutaiyan, Ramalingam; Jianping, Shen; Mugudalabetta, Shivakumar; Jadhav, Vitthal; Rajkumar, Prabu; Padma, Jayasree; Kaliaperumal, Kanagasabai; Pannikar, Vijayakumar; Krishnamurthy, Padabettu; Gupte, Mohan D.

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Uniform therapy for all leprosy patients will simplify leprosy treatment. In this context, we evaluated six-month multidrug therapy (MDT) currently recommended for multibacillary (MB) patients as uniform MDT (U-MDT) in a single-arm open trial under programme conditions. Primary objective was to determine efficacy to prevent five-year cumulative five per cent relapse. Secondary objectives were to assess acceptability, safety and compliance. Methods: Newly detected, treatment-naive leprosy patients were enrolled in India (six sites) and P. R. China (two sites). Primary outcome was clinically confirmed relapse of occurrence of one or more new skin patches consistent with leprosy, without evidence of reactions post-treatment. Event rates per 100 person years as well as five-year cumulative risk of relapse, were calculated. Results: A total of 2091 paucibacillary (PB) and 1298 MB leprosy patients were recruited from the 3437 patients screened. Among PB, two relapsed (rate=0.023; risk=0.11%), eight had suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) (rate=0.79) and rate of new lesions due toreactions was 0.24 (n=23). Rates of neuritis, type 1 and type 2 reactions were 0.39 (n=37), 0.54 (n=51) and 0.03 (n=3), respectively. Among MB, four relapsed (rate=0.07; risk=0.37%) and 16 had suspected ADR (rate=2.64). Rate of new lesions due to reactions among MB was 1.34 (n=76) and rates of neuritis, type 1 and type 2 reactions were 1.37 (n=78), 2.01 (n=114) and 0.49 (n=28), respectively. Compliance to U-MDT was 99 per cent. Skin pigmentation due to clofazimine was of short duration and acceptable. Interpretation & conclusions: We observed low relapse, minimal ADR and other adverse clinical events. Clofazimine-related pigmentation was acceptable. Evidence supports introduction of U-MDT in national leprosy programmes. [CTRI No: 2012/ 05/ 002696] PMID:28256460

  12. Characterization of a virus infecting Citrus volkameriana with citrus leprosis-like symptoms.

    PubMed

    Melzer, Michael J; Sether, Diane M; Borth, Wayne B; Hu, John S

    2012-01-01

    A Citrus volkameriana tree displaying symptoms similar to citrus leprosis on its leaves and bark was found in Hawaii. Citrus leprosis virus C (CiLV-C)-specific detection assays, however, were negative for all tissues tested. Short, bacilliform virus-like particles were observed by transmission electron microscopy in the cytoplasm of symptomatic leaves but not in healthy controls. Double-stranded (ds) RNAs ≈8 and 3 kbp in size were present in symptomatic leaf tissue but not in healthy controls. Excluding poly(A) tails, the largest molecule, RNA1, was 8,354 bp in length. The ≈3 kbp dsRNA band was found to be composed of two distinct molecules, RNA2 and RNA3, which were 3,169 and 3,113 bp, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domain located in RNA1 was most closely related to the RdRp domain of CiLV-C. A reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction assay developed for the detection of this virus was used to screen nearby citrus trees as well as Hibiscus arnottianus plants with symptoms of hibiscus green spot, a disease associated with infection by Hibiscus green spot virus (HGSV). All nearby citrus trees tested negative with the assay; however, symptomatic H. arnottianus plants were positive. All three RNAs were present in symptomatic H. arnottianus and were >98% identical to the RNAs isolated from C. volkameriana. We contend that the virus described in this study is HGSV, and propose that it be the type member of a new virus genus, Higrevirus.

  13. Tele-education on leprosy: evaluation of an educational strategy.

    PubMed

    Paixão, Maurício Pedreira; Miot, Hélio Amante; Wen, Chao Lung

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate educational strategies applied to a tele-education leprosy course. The curriculum was for members of the Brazilian Family Health Team and was made available through the Sao Paulo Telehealth Portal. The course educational strategy was based on a constructivist learning model where interactivity was emphasized. Authors assessed motivational aspects of the course using the WebMAC Professional tool. Forty-eight healthcare professionals answered the evaluation questionnaire. Adequate internal consistency was achieved (Cronbach's alpha = 0.79). More than 95% of queried items received good evaluations. Multidimensional analysis according to motivational groups of questions (STIMULATING, MEANINGFUL, ORGANIZED, EASY-TO-USE) showed high agreement. According to WebMAC's criteria, it was considered an "awesome course." The tele-educational strategies implemented for leprosy disclosed high motivational scores.

  14. Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology in Diagnosis of Pure Neuritic Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Bipin; Pradhan, Anju

    2011-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infection affecting mainly the skin and peripheral nerve. Pure neuritic form of this disease manifests by involvement of the nerve in the absence of skin lesions. Therefore, it can sometimes create a diagnostic problem. It often requires a nerve biopsy for diagnosis, which is an invasive procedure and may lead to neural deficit. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of an affected nerve can be a valuable and less invasive procedure for the diagnosis of such cases. We report five suspected cases of pure neuritic Hansen's disease involving the common and superficial peroneal, ulnar, and median nerve, who underwent FNAC. Smears revealed nerve fibers infiltrated by chronic inflammatory cells in all cases, presence of epithelioid cells granulomas, and Langhans giant cells in three cases, and acid fast bacilli in two cases. In conclusion, FNAC is a safe, less invasive, and time saving procedure for the diagnosis of pure neuritic leprosy. PMID:21660285

  15. Probable Zoonotic Leprosy in the Southern United States

    PubMed Central

    Truman, Richard W.; Singh, Pushpendra; Sharma, Rahul; Busso, Philippe; Rougemont, Jacques; Paniz-Mondolfi, Alberto; Kapopoulou, Adamandia; Brisse, Sylvain; Scollard, David M.; Gillis, Thomas P.; Cole, Stewart T.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND In the southern region of the United States, such as in Louisiana and Texas, there are autochthonous cases of leprosy among native-born Americans with no history of foreign exposure. In the same region, as well as in Mexico, wild armadillos are infected with Mycobacterium leprae. METHODS Whole-genome resequencing of M. leprae from one wild armadillo and three U.S. patients with leprosy revealed that the infective strains were essentially identical. Comparative genomic analysis of these strains and M. leprae strains from Asia and Brazil identified 51 single-nucleotide polymorphisms and an 11-bp insertion–deletion. We genotyped these polymorphic sites, in combination with 10 variable-number tandem repeats, in M. leprae strains obtained from 33 wild armadillos from five southern states, 50 U.S. outpatients seen at a clinic in Louisiana, and 64 Venezuelan patients, as well as in four foreign reference strains. RESULTS The M. leprae genotype of patients with foreign exposure generally reflected their country of origin or travel history. However, a unique M. leprae genotype (3I-2-v1) was found in 28 of the 33 wild armadillos and 25 of the 39 U.S. patients who resided in areas where exposure to armadillo-borne M. leprae was possible. This genotype has not been reported elsewhere in the world. CONCLUSIONS Wild armadillos and many patients with leprosy in the southern United States are infected with the same strain of M. leprae. Armadillos are a large natural reservoir for M. leprae, and leprosy may be a zoonosis in the region. (Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and others.) PMID:21524213

  16. Probable zoonotic leprosy in the southern United States.

    PubMed

    Truman, Richard W; Singh, Pushpendra; Sharma, Rahul; Busso, Philippe; Rougemont, Jacques; Paniz-Mondolfi, Alberto; Kapopoulou, Adamandia; Brisse, Sylvain; Scollard, David M; Gillis, Thomas P; Cole, Stewart T

    2011-04-28

    In the southern region of the United States, such as in Louisiana and Texas, there are autochthonous cases of leprosy among native-born Americans with no history of foreign exposure. In the same region, as well as in Mexico, wild armadillos are infected with Mycobacterium leprae. Whole-genome resequencing of M. leprae from one wild armadillo and three U.S. patients with leprosy revealed that the infective strains were essentially identical. Comparative genomic analysis of these strains and M. leprae strains from Asia and Brazil identified 51 single-nucleotide polymorphisms and an 11-bp insertion-deletion. We genotyped these polymorphic sites, in combination with 10 variable-number tandem repeats, in M. leprae strains obtained from 33 wild armadillos from five southern states, 50 U.S. outpatients seen at a clinic in Louisiana, and 64 Venezuelan patients, as well as in four foreign reference strains. The M. leprae genotype of patients with foreign exposure generally reflected their country of origin or travel history. However, a unique M. leprae genotype (3I-2-v1) was found in 28 of the 33 wild armadillos and 25 of the 39 U.S. patients who resided in areas where exposure to armadillo-borne M. leprae was possible. This genotype has not been reported elsewhere in the world. Wild armadillos and many patients with leprosy in the southern United States are infected with the same strain of M. leprae. Armadillos are a large natural reservoir for M. leprae, and leprosy may be a zoonosis in the region. (Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and others.).

  17. Scabies Among Elderly Korean Patients with Histories of Leprosy.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyungcheol; Lee, Chaeyoung; Park, Seungkyu; Kwon, Hyeon; Kweon, Sun-Seog

    2016-07-06

    A scabies epidemic, traced by the hospital-based surveillance system, was reported in a Korean leprosarium. A total of 200 symptomatic cases were found during 2012-2014 among 570 elderly former leprosy patients. Most of cases were classic type scabies (87%) and aged 75 years and older (72%). Surveillance system for early diagnosis and prompt intervention was applied and the scabies epidemic was controlled effectively in this long-term care facility. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  18. New prospects for the study of leprosy in the laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Rees, R. J. W.

    1969-01-01

    Although Mycobacterium leprae was identified earlier than Myco. tuberculosis, it has still not been cultured in vitro and only in 1960 was an infection obtained in laboratory animals. However, important advances have been made in the field of experimental leprosy in the last decade due to the development of new techniques and models for studying Myco. leprae in vivo, thus overcoming the limitations imposed by a non-cultivable mycobacterium. Quantitative techniques using Myco. lepraemurium provided the first model for developing an indirect method for distinguishing dead (non-infectious) from living (infectious) bacilli, based on morphological differences in organisms stained by the Ziehl—Neelsen method. However, the most important advances resulted from the limited and localized growth of Myco. leprae when inoculated into the foot pads of mice and, later, the more substantial and generalized multiplication of Myco. leprae in immunologically deficient mice (thymectomized and irradiated with a dose of 900 r). Moreover, in the immunologically deficient animals, the infection eventually resulted in a disease replicating that of lepromatous type leprosy in man, including the involvement of peripheral nerves. The results from these studies and the future prospects for the study of leprosy in the laboratory are reviewed in this article. ImagesFIG. 5FIG. 6FIG. 4FIG. 7 PMID:4898388

  19. Recognition of mycobacterial antigens by sera from patients with leprosy.

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Lopez, F; Stoker, N G; Locniskar, M F; Dockrell, H M; Grant, K A; McAdam, K P

    1988-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae sonic extracts prepared from armadillo-derived bacteria were subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blotting (immunoblotting) procedures and probed with serum or plasma samples from 20 patients with lepromatous leprosy and 14 healthy endemic controls. Five proteins of 33, 25, 18, 15, and 12 kilodaltons (kDa) were frequently recognized; the 33- and 15-kDa proteins were, respectively, recognized with high intensity by 16 and 13 of the 20 samples from patients with leprosy, whereas only one healthy donor had antibodies that recognized the 15-kDa protein. By the use of M. leprae-specific murine monoclonal antibodies it was demonstrated that the 33-, 25-, and 15-kDa antigens were different from those bound by the available murine monoclonal antibodies. The 18- and 12-kDa proteins detected had molecular masses similar to those detected by the corresponding murine monoclonal antibodies. The serum and plasma samples from patients with leprosy were also used to probe Western blots of a soluble extract of M. tuberculosis. They recognized, among others, antigens with molecular weights similar to those detected in the M. leprae antigenic preparations, although with less intensity and at a lower frequency. Images PMID:3068245

  20. Therapeutic workshops and psychosocial rehabilitation for institutionalised leprosy patients.

    PubMed

    Leite, Soraia Cristina Coelho; Caldeira, Antônio Prates

    2015-06-01

    Leprosy is still a major public health problem and psychosocial rehabilitation services for patients suffering from the disease remain insufficient. This study aimed to assess the impact of therapeutic workshops on quality of life and symptoms of depression among institutionalised leprosy patients. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and generic World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire (WHOQOL-BREF) were used before and after the implementation of a series of therapeutic workshops over a period of six months. Sixty-two patients participated in the study. Almost all of the sample were elderly and had a low level of education. There was a significant reduction in the symptoms of depression scores after the intervention (p < 0,001) and a positive impact was shown for the psychological (p = 0,001), physical (p = 0,03) and environment (p < 0,001) domains, but not for the social relationships (p = 0,124) domain. Therapeutic workshops appear to a useful tool for psychosocial rehabilitation work with leprosy patients.

  1. Sub-polar lepromatous leprosy localized to the face.

    PubMed

    George, Mamatha; Rajan, Uma; George, Sandhya; Pakran, Jaheersha; Thomas, Sumi

    2010-09-15

    Leprosy is an infectious disease characterized by a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, ranging from tuberculoid to lepromatous disease with immunologically unstable borderline forms in between. In clinical practice cases often do not conform to a classical textbook description, which may lead to misdiagnosis if not properly investigated. A 22-year-old patient presented to us with erythematous plaques localized to the face. Slit skin smear for Mycobacterium leprae was positive from lesional as well as non-lesional skin. A biopsy from a plaque showed diffuse atrophy of the epidermis with a subepidermal cell free zone (grenz zone). The cellular infiltrate was composed of foamy macrophages admixed with lymphocytes in the dermis. Fite-Faraco staining revealed clumps of acid-fast bacilli within the macrophages. Based on the skin smear and histopathology findings, a diagnosis of sub-polar lepromatous leprosy was made and the patient was started on multidrug therapy. The exact pathogenesis of localized multibacillary disease is not known. Our case highlights the importance of skin smear and biopsy in all suspected cases of Hansen disease. We conclude that routine skin smear in all new leprosy cases is mandatory to differentiate localized multibacillary cases from paucibacillary cases for the purpose of accurate categorization and treatment.

  2. Common variants of OPA1 conferring genetic susceptibility to leprosy in Han Chinese from Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yang-Lin; Zhang, Deng-Feng; Wang, Dong; Li, Yu-Ye; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2015-11-01

    Leprosy is an ancient chronic infection caused by Mycobacterium leprae. Onset of leprosy was highly affected by host nutritional condition and energy production, (partially) due to genomic loss and parasitic life style of M. leprae. The optic atrophy 1 (OPA1) gene plays an essential role in mitochondria, which function in cellular energy supply and innate immunity. To investigate the potential involvement of OPA1 in leprosy. We analyzed 7 common genetic variants of OPA1 in 1110 Han Chinese subjects with and without leprosy, followed by mRNA expression profiling and protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analysis. We observed positive associations between OPA1 variants rs9838374 (Pgenotypic=0.003) and rs414237 (Pgenotypic=0.002) with lepromatous leprosy. expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis showed that the leprosy-related risk allele C of rs414237 is correlated with lower OPA1 mRNA expression level. Indeed, we identified a decrease of OPA1 mRNA expression in both with patients and cellular model of leprosy. In addition, the PPI analysis showed that OPA1 protein was actively involved in the interaction network of M. leprae induced differentially expressed genes. Our results indicated that OPA1 variants confer risk of leprosy and may affect OPA1 expression, mitochondrial function and antimicrobial pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Two Cases of Leprosy in Siblings Caused by Mycobacterium lepromatosis and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Sotiriou, Michael C.; Stryjewska, Barbara M.; Hill, Carlotta

    2016-01-01

    We describe two leprosy cases in Mexican siblings caused by a new species Mycobacterium lepromatosis. This is likely the first report of family clustering of this infection. The patients showed severe prolonged leprosy reactions after antimicrobial treatment, raising a challenge for clinical management. The current status of M. lepromatosis infection is reviewed. PMID:27402522

  4. Genome Assembly of Citrus Leprosis Virus Nuclear Type Reveals a Close Association with Orchid Fleck Virus

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Andrew; Otero-Colina, Gabriel; Wei, Gang; Choudhary, Nandlal; Achor, Diann; Shao, Jonathan; Levy, Laurene; Nakhla, Mark K.; Hollingsworth, Charla R.; Hartung, John S.; Schneider, William L.

    2013-01-01

    The complete genome of citrus leprosis virus nuclear type (CiLV-N) was identified by small RNA sequencing utilizing leprosis-affected citrus samples collected from the state of Querétaro, Mexico. The nucleotide identity and phylogenetic analysis indicate that CiLV-N is very closely related to orchid fleck virus, which typically infects Cymbidium species. PMID:23887919

  5. [Leprosy in Algeria. Apropos of an autochthonous case in the Wilaya de Tlemcen, Algeria].

    PubMed

    Boudghene-Stambouli, O; Merad-Boudia, A

    1989-01-01

    Leprosy is not a problem for public health in Algeria. For one century (from 1888 to 1987), a maximum of 250 cases were reported, only 75 of them were Algerians and 61 caught the disease in Algeria. Hence leprosy was mainly an imported disease. Will multiple exchanges with other countries increase the magnitude of the problem?

  6. Diffuse Lepromatous Leprosy Due to Mycobacterium lepromatosis in Quintana Roo, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiang Y; Quintanilla, Marco

    2015-11-01

    A 43-year-old woman of Mayan origin from Quintana Roo, Mexico, was diagnosed with diffuse lepromatous leprosy. The etiologic bacillus was determined to be Mycobacterium lepromatosis instead of Mycobacterium leprae. This case likely represents the first report of this leprosy form and its agent in the southeastern tip of Mexico. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Diffuse Lepromatous Leprosy Due to Mycobacterium lepromatosis in Quintana Roo, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Quintanilla, Marco

    2015-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman of Mayan origin from Quintana Roo, Mexico, was diagnosed with diffuse lepromatous leprosy. The etiologic bacillus was determined to be Mycobacterium lepromatosis instead of Mycobacterium leprae. This case likely represents the first report of this leprosy form and its agent in the southeastern tip of Mexico. PMID:26311856

  8. Genome assembly of citurs leprosis virus nuclear type reveals a close association with orchid fleck virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Citrus leprosis is a difficult viral disease causing significant damage to citrus fruit in South America and Central America. The disease is marked by dramatic lesions on fruit, leaves and stems resulting in unmarketable product. Citrus leprosis virus cytoplasmic type (CiLV-C) was detected in states...

  9. The meaning of leprosy and everyday experiences: an exploration in cirebon, indonesia.

    PubMed

    Peters, Ruth M H; Dadun; Lusli, Mimi; Miranda-Galarza, Beatriz; van Brakel, Wim H; Zweekhorst, Marjolein B M; Damayanti, Rita; Seda, Francisia S S E; Bunders, Joske F G; Irwanto

    2013-01-01

    It is imperative to consider the meaning of leprosy and everyday experiences of people affected by leprosy and key persons in the community if one aims to make leprosy services more effective, which appears necessary in Indonesia given the large numbers of new cases detected annually. However, little is written in the international literature about the experiences of people currently being treated for leprosy, those cured, or other key informants. This paper analyses the narratives of the people by drawing upon in-depth interviews with 53 participants and 20 focus groups discussions. The participants were purposively selected. We provide insights into the experiences of people and the meaning they give to leprosy and highlight aspect of aetiology, spirituality, religion, darkening of the skin, and sorcery. We also examine experiences of seeking care and focused on the impact of the disease in particular on the elderly and children. In conclusion, the continued need for implementation of leprosy services in Indonesia is very evident. The diversities in people's experiences with leprosy indicate a demand for responsive leprosy services to serve the diverse needs, including services for those formally declared to be "cured."

  10. Genome assembly of citrus leprosis virus nuclear type reveals a close association with orchid fleck virus.

    PubMed

    Roy, Avijit; Stone, Andrew; Otero-Colina, Gabriel; Wei, Gang; Choudhary, Nandlal; Achor, Diann; Shao, Jonathan; Levy, Laurene; Nakhla, Mark K; Hollingsworth, Charla R; Hartung, John S; Schneider, William L; Brlansky, Ronald H

    2013-07-25

    The complete genome of citrus leprosis virus nuclear type (CiLV-N) was identified by small RNA sequencing utilizing leprosis-affected citrus samples collected from the state of Querétaro, Mexico. The nucleotide identity and phylogenetic analysis indicate that CiLV-N is very closely related to orchid fleck virus, which typically infects Cymbidium species.

  11. Psychiatric Morbidity among Subjects with Leprosy and Albinism in South East Nigeria: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Attama, C M; Uwakwe, R; Onyeama, G M; Igwe, M N

    2015-01-01

    Skin, which is the largest organ in the body, carries immense psychological significance. Disfiguring skin disorders may impact negatively on the mental health of individuals. This study compared the psychiatric morbidity of subjects with leprosy and albinism. One hundred subjects with leprosy and 100 with albinism were interviewed. Sociodemographic questionnaire and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) assessed the sociodemographic characteristics and psychiatric morbidity, respectively. GHQ positive cases and 10% of noncases for each group were interviewed with Mini International Neuropsychiatric Inventory for specific ICD-10 diagnoses. Fifty-five percent (55/100) subjects with leprosy were GHQ positive cases while 41% (41/100) with albinism were GHQ positive cases. The risk of developing psychiatric morbidity was significantly higher in subjects with leprosy than in subjects with albinism (OR = 1.76, CI = 1.00 - 3.08, P = 0.04). The prevalence of specific psychiatric disorders among subjects with leprosy were depression 49% (49/100), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) 18% (18/100), alcohol/drug abuse 16% (16/100), whereas in albinism depression was 51% (51/100), GAD 27% (27/100), and alcohol/drug abuse 7% (7/100). Male, married and uneducated subjects with leprosy had significantly higher psychiatric morbidity than the male, married and uneducated subjects with albinism, respectively. Psychiatric morbidity was higher in subjects with leprosy than in subjects with albinism. Male, married and uneducated subjects with leprosy significantly had higher morbidity than male, married and uneducated subjects with albinism respectively.

  12. The Meaning of Leprosy and Everyday Experiences: An Exploration in Cirebon, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Ruth M. H.; Dadun; Lusli, Mimi; Miranda-Galarza, Beatriz; van Brakel, Wim H.; Zweekhorst, Marjolein B. M.; Damayanti, Rita; Seda, Francisia S. S. E.; Bunders, Joske F. G.; Irwanto

    2013-01-01

    It is imperative to consider the meaning of leprosy and everyday experiences of people affected by leprosy and key persons in the community if one aims to make leprosy services more effective, which appears necessary in Indonesia given the large numbers of new cases detected annually. However, little is written in the international literature about the experiences of people currently being treated for leprosy, those cured, or other key informants. This paper analyses the narratives of the people by drawing upon in-depth interviews with 53 participants and 20 focus groups discussions. The participants were purposively selected. We provide insights into the experiences of people and the meaning they give to leprosy and highlight aspect of aetiology, spirituality, religion, darkening of the skin, and sorcery. We also examine experiences of seeking care and focused on the impact of the disease in particular on the elderly and children. In conclusion, the continued need for implementation of leprosy services in Indonesia is very evident. The diversities in people's experiences with leprosy indicate a demand for responsive leprosy services to serve the diverse needs, including services for those formally declared to be “cured.” PMID:23577037

  13. Features of leprosy transmission in pocket villages at low endemic situation in China.

    PubMed

    Shen, J; Zhou, M; Li, W; Yang, R; Wang, J

    2010-01-01

    To study the characteristics of leprosy transmission at low endemic situation and to analyze the reason why transmission still existed. A retrospective study was carried out on transmission of leprosy in thirteen leprosy high endemic villages in Wenshan district, Yunnan Province, China. A special questionnaire was designed for collecting the data. A total of 47 patients have been registered in 13 villages since 1991. Among them, 25 (53.2%) were leprosy household patients. The proportion of BI positivity was 57.4% (27). The average delay time from disease onset to diagnosis of leprosy was 12 +/- 7.9 months with a range of 1-36 months. The interval between 2 cases being detected in each village was in a range of 0.5 to 5.5 years. Many secondary patients occurred continuously after an 'index case' and they developed leprosy within the delay time of the disease of former patients. The authors here also reviewed some literature on chemoprophylaxis and discussed the importance. Most patients could not be detected at the early stage. It may be necessary of considering the chemoprophylaxis strategy among close contacts of leprosy to stop transmission in leprosy pocket areas.

  14. [Active search for leprosy and other skin diseases in school children from Agua de Dios, Colombia].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Gerzaín; González, Rosalba; Gonzalez, Deysy; Granados, Carolina; Pinto, Rafael; Herrera, Hilda; Gutiérrez, Luisa F; Hernández, Elkin; López, Fernando; Gómez, Yenny

    2007-01-01

    Actively searching for leprosy, other skin diseases and BCG vaccination scars amongst school children from Agua de Dios, the municipality having the highest prevalence of leprosy in Colombia. A clinical examination of the children was carried out by nurses, interns, general practitioners and experts on leprosy. Skin smear tests and skin biopsies were performed when the clinical findings suggested leprosy. Anti-phenolic glycolipid antibodies in blood were determined in special cases. 86 % of the 2 844 school children were examined; 833 had skin diseases and 16 % of these required evaluation by specialists. Four new cases of paucibacillary leprosy, two indeterminate and two primary polyneuritic cases were found. Pediculosis capitis, pityriasis alba, tinea versicolor, hypopigmented nevus, insect bites and miliaria were frequently detected. BCG vaccination scars were absent in 387 children; following several logistical problems, they were vaccinated. Four children had signs of childhood abuse. An 11-year-old girl presented hypopigmented mycosis fungoides. All diseases and conditions found were treated. The community received information regarding the results, emphasising the importance of an early diagnosis of leprosy. The incidence of leprosy found (16/10,000) was 123 times higher than the rest of the country's incidence. It is advisable to continue clinical examinations in Agua de Dios and research into risk factors for acquiring leprosy.

  15. Fate of T cells and their secretary proteins during the progression of leprosy.

    PubMed

    Tarique, Mohd; Saini, Chaman; Naz, Huma; Naqvi, Raza Ali; Khan, Faez Iqbal; Sharma, Alpana

    2017-08-29

    Leprosy is an infectious disease caused by non-cultivable bacteria Mycobacterium leprae. Ridley and Jopling classified the disease into five polar forms, Tuberculoid (TT) and Lepromatous (LL), in between two forms of the disease Borderline tuberculoid (BT), Borderline (BB) and Borderline lepromatous (BL) are laid. The tuberculoid type (BT/TT) leprosy patients show good recall of cell-mediated immune (CMI) response and Th1 type of immune response, while lepromatous leprosy (LL) patients show defect in cell-mediated immunity to the causative agent and Th2 type of immune response. Due to distinct clinical and immunological spectra of the disease, leprosy attracted immunologists to consider an ideal model for the study of deregulations of various immune reactions. Recent studies show that Tregs, Th3 (TGF-β, IL-10), IL-35 producing Treg immune response associated with the immune suppressive environment, survival of bugs and associated with lepromatous leprosy. IL-17 producing Th17 immune response associated with tuberculoid leprosy and play protective role. γδ T cells also increased from tuberculoid to lepromatous pole of leprosy. In this review, we will discuss the role of various subtypes of T-cell and their cytokines in the pathogenesis of leprosy. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Post-traumatic inoculation tuberculoid leprosy after injury with a glass bangle.

    PubMed

    Ghorpade, Ashok

    2009-06-01

    A lesion of tuberculoid leprosy in an Indian lady presenting at the site of injury from a broken glass bangle is reported. The diagnosis was by classical clinical features and histopathology. The importance of the skin in leprosy transmission is emphasised.

  17. Needs assessment for income generation training of youths in leprosy families of a leprosy village in Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yutaka; Shwe, San; Win, Le Le; Myint, Kyaw

    2007-09-01

    After Myanmar eliminated leprosy in 2003, the prevention of disability (POD), as well as prevention of worsening disabilities (POWD) and rehabilitation became a new agenda, which is one of three national strategies of leprosy control beyond 2005. Since the training needs for income generation for youths living in leprosy villages were not well known, a small-scale survey was conducted in May 2005. This study found that the youths in Mayanchaung village, Yangon Division, were eager to receive training on income generation. After training they wanted to practice and improve their skills with the resources available, because they perceived that a short training course would not enable them to get a proper job. Although they were fully aware of income generation skills, they found it difficult to adequately consider issues such as resources for practicing skills after training, social marketing, and seeking job opportunities. They also felt that mediators could be helpful between villagers and external customers / retailers. On the other hand, the elders, most of whom had disabilities, wanted the youths to stay in the village to take care of them. A basic sewing and stitching training course that was planned to match the study results was produced in January 2006. After 11 months it was observed that a newly opened sewing workshop was busy operating 12 sewing machines because of a big order of making primary school uniforms. How effective the needs assessment was still unknown, but it was found that prior need assessment activities followed by a training course upon the real needs might promote the proper processes of social rehabilitation of youths in a leprosy village of Myanmar.

  18. Molecular, ethno-spatial epidemiology of leprosy in China: Novel insights for tracing leprosy in endemic and non endemic provinces

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Xiaoman; Xing, Yan; Liu, Jian; Wang, Yonghong; Ning, Yong; Li, Ming; Wu, Wenbin; Zhang, Lianhua; Li, Wei; Heiden, Jason Vander; Vissa, Varalakshmi

    2013-01-01

    Leprosy continues to be detected at near stable rates in China even with established control programs, necessitating new knowledge and alternative methods to interrupt transmission. A molecular epidemiology investigation of 190 patients was undertaken to define M. leprae strain types and discern genetic relationships and clusters in endemic and non-endemic regions spanning seventeen provinces and two autonomous regions. The findings support multiple locus variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis as a useful tool in uncovering characteristic patterns across the multiethnic and divergent geographic landscape of China. Several scenarios of clustering of leprosy from township to provincial to regional levels were recognized, while recent occupational or remote migration showed geographical separation of certain strains. First, prior studies indicated that of the four major M. leprae subtypes defined by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), only type 3 was present in China, purportedly entering from Europe/West/Central Asia via the Silk Road. However, this study revealed VNTR linked strains that are of type 1 in Guangdong, Fujian and Guangxi in southern China. Second, a subset of VNTR distinguishable strains of type 3, co-exist in these provinces. Third, type 3 strains with rpoT VNTR allele of 4, detected in Japan and Korea were discovered in Jiangsu and Anhui in the east and in western Sichuan bordering Tibet. Fourth, considering the overall genetic diversity, strains of endemic counties of Qiubei, Yunnan; Xing Yi, Guizhou; and across Sichuan in southwest were related. However, closer inspection showed distinct local strains and clusters. Altogether, these insights, primarily derived from VNTR typing, reveal multiple and overlooked paths for spread of leprosy into, within and out of China and invoke attention to historic maritime routes in the South and East China Sea. More importantly, new concepts and approaches for prospective case finding and tracking of

  19. Ultrasonography of Leprosy Neuropathy: A Longitudinal Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Frade, Marco Andrey Cipriani; Marques-Jr, Wilson; Foss, Norma Tiraboschi

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that leprosy multi-drug therapy (MDT) does not stop the progression of nerve function impairment. There are no prospective studies investigating the evolution of nerve anatomic abnormalities after treatment. We examined leprosy patients aiming to investigate the evolution of nerve ultrasonography (US) abnormalities and the risk factors for poor outcomes after MDT. Methodology/Principal findings We performed bilateral US of the ulnar (U), median (M) and common fibular (CF) nerves in 9 paucibacillary (PB) and 64 multibacillary (MB) patients before and after MDT. Forty-two patients had leprosy reactions (type 1, type 2, acute neuritis) during the study. We analyzed nerve maximum cross-sectional areas (CSA), echogenicity and Doppler signal. Poor outcomes included a post-treatment CSA above normal limits with a reduction of less than 30% (U, M) or 40% (CF) from the baseline, echogenicity abnormalities or intraneural Doppler in the post-treatment study. We found that PB and patients without reactions showed significant increases in CSA at CF, whereas MB and patients with reactions had CSA reduction in some nerves after treatment (p<0.05). Despite this reduction, we observed a greater frequency of poor CSA outcomes in the MB compared to the PB (77.8% and 40.6%; p>0.05) and in the patients with reactions compared to those without (66.7% and 38.7%; p<0.05). There was significantly higher odds ratio (7.75; 95%CI: 1.56–38.45) for poor CSA outcomes only for M nerve in patients with reactions. Poor echogenicity outcomes were more frequent in MB (59.4%) compared to PB (22.2%) (p<0.05). There was significant association between poor Doppler outcomes and neuritis. Gender, disease duration, and leprosy classification were not significant risk factors for poor outcomes in CSA, echogenicity or Doppler. Conclusions/Significance US nerve abnormalities can worsen after treatment despite the leprosy classification or the presence of reactions

  20. Association Analysis Suggests SOD2 as a Newly Identified Candidate Gene Associated With Leprosy Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Geovana Brotto; Salomão, Heloisa; Francio, Angela Schneider; Fava, Vinícius Medeiros; Werneck, Renata Iani; Mira, Marcelo Távora

    2016-08-01

    Genetic studies have identified several genes and genomic regions contributing to the control of host susceptibility to leprosy. Here, we test variants of the positional and functional candidate gene SOD2 for association with leprosy in 2 independent population samples. Family-based analysis revealed an association between leprosy and allele G of marker rs295340 (P = .042) and borderline evidence of an association between leprosy and alleles C and A of markers rs4880 (P = .077) and rs5746136 (P = .071), respectively. Findings were validated in an independent case-control sample for markers rs295340 (P = .049) and rs4880 (P = .038). These results suggest SOD2 as a newly identified gene conferring susceptibility to leprosy. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. The GATA3 gene is involved in leprosy susceptibility in Brazilian patients.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Priscila; da Silva, Weber Laurentino; de Oliveira Gimenez, Bruna Beatriz; Vallezi, Keren Bastos; Moraes, Milton Ozório; de Souza, Vânia Niéto Brito; Latini, Ana Carla Pereira

    2016-04-01

    Leprosy outcome is a complex trait and the host-pathogen-environment interaction defines the emergence of the disease. Host genetic risk factors have been successfully associated to leprosy. The 10p13 chromosomal region was linked to leprosy in familial studies and GATA3 gene is a strong candidate to be part of this association. Here, we tested tag single nucleotide polymorphisms at GATA3 in two case-control samples from Brazil comprising a total of 1633 individuals using stepwise strategy. The A allele of rs10905284 marker was associated with leprosy resistance. Then, a functional analysis was conducted and showed that individuals carrying AA genotype express higher levels of GATA-3 protein in lymphocytes. So, we confirmed that the rs10905284 is a locus associated to leprosy and influences the levels of this transcription factor in the Brazilian population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Squamous cell carcinoma in plantar ulcers in leprosy. A case control study.

    PubMed

    Richardus, J H; Smith, T C

    1993-09-01

    The objective of this case-control study was to identify factors associated with the development of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in plantar ulcers of leprosy patients. We examined 2 matched groups consisting of leprosy patients with and without SCC in a plantar ulcer. No correlations were found between the development of SCC and race, profession, place of origin, duration of leprosy, the type and duration of leprosy chemotherapy, presence of bone involvement and type of ulcer care treatment given. The only statistically valid finding was that the duration of the ulcer was significantly lower in the group with malignant change. In this group there was an apparently higher use of pesticides, the difference being not of statistical significance. It is concluded that factors other than ulcer duration need to be looked for, in order to identify factors influencing malignant change in plantar ulcers of leprosy patients.

  3. Tic douloureux as a presenting feature of facial leprosy: diagnostic enigma in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xh-Xiang; Chang, Ying-Jui; Tsai, Chien-Chen; Chuang, Yu-Ming

    2012-09-01

    Leprosy is rarely seen in Taiwan. We herein report a foreign worker concomitantly with facial borderline tuberculoid leprosy presenting with trigeminal neuralgia. A 26-year-old male foreign labor from Indonesia, presented with 1 year history of a hypoanaesthetic erythematous plaque of right face and subsequent 6 months constant, severe pain in the right side of his face over the nasolabial groove. Biopsies and histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of leprosy. We treated the patient with a multidrug regimen including dapsone, clofazimine, and rifampine since April of 2012 with a good response. We report a rare case of new-onset leprosy presenting with trigeminal neuralgia in Taiwan and suggest leprosy should be listed in the differential diagnosis of unusual skin manifestations and neuralgia.

  4. Erythema nodosum leprosum and reversal reaction in 2 cases of imported leprosy.

    PubMed

    Pulido-Pérez, A; Mendoza-Cembranos, M D; Avilés-Izquierdo, J A; Suárez-Fernández, R

    2013-12-01

    Leprosy reactions, which are abrupt changes in the clinical condition of patients with immunologically unstable forms of the disease, can mask the cardinal signs of leprosy, delaying both diagnosis and treatment. The main complications that arise from delayed diagnosis reflect the characteristic features of the disease, involving impaired nerve function and both local (ulcers, pyogenic infection, osteomyelitis) and systemic compromise. Through clinical examination, sensory testing, and, where necessary, histopathology and microbiology, are essential when leprosy is suspected. Rapid initiation of anti-inflammatory treatment reduces the risk of functional impairment, the main concern in leprosy. We describe type 1 and type 2 leprosy reactions in 2 patients who had not yet been diagnosed with the disease.

  5. 26th Kellersberger Memorial Lecture. Lessons from leprosy rehabilitation for general rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Brandsma, J Wim

    2003-01-01

    Leprosy is primarily a disease of skin and peripheral nerves. Because of nerve function impairment, leprosy patients may develop primary nerve related impairments such as, loss of sensation and weakness or paralysis. These primary impairments may lead to secondary impairments such as ulceration and contractures. Many other diseases and disorders present with similar impairments as seen in leprosy e.g. diabetes and peripheral nerve injuries. Nerve function assessment and ulcer prevention and treatment are areas that have been researched in leprosy but these research findings are not yet commonly known and adopted in diseases and disorders that 'relate' to leprosy. Rehabilitation is a relatively new field in medicine and not (well) developed in many developing countries. Rehabilitation requires an integrated approach from different disciplines and professionals. As for other medical specialty fields, rehabilitation demands evidence based practice.

  6. Analysis of Antigens of Mycobacterium leprae by Interaction to Sera IgG, IgM, and IgA Response to Improve Diagnosis of Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Avnish; Parkash, Om; Girdhar, Bhawneshwar K.

    2014-01-01

    Till 2010, several countries have declared less than one leprosy patient among population of 10,000 and themselves feeling as eliminated from leprosy cases. However, new leprosy cases are still appearing from all these countries. In this situation one has to be confident to diagnose leprosy. This review paper highlighted already explored antigens for diagnosis purposes and finally suggested better combinations of protein antigens of M. leprae versus immunoglobulin as detector antibody to be useful for leprosy diagnosis. PMID:25101267

  7. Epidemiology of Leprosy in Spain: The Role of the International Migration.

    PubMed

    Ramos, José M; Romero, David; Belinchón, Isabel

    2016-03-01

    Although incidence of leprosy in Spain has declined steadily over the years, the fivefold increase in immigration since the turn of the century--much of it from countries where leprosy is still prevalent--has been linked to an uptick in registered cases. To describe the epidemiologic trends of incident leprosy cases detected in Spain among Spanish- and foreign-born population groups. Observational, retrospective study of suspected leprosy cases in Spain, as reported through the System of Compulsory Notification of Diseases from 2003 to 2013, with results disaggregated by country of birth. We collected statistical data on leprosy burden for other countries from WHO to estimate the expected number of imported cases. Of the 168 leprosy cases registered during the study period, 40 (24.6%) were in Spanish patients, while 128 (76.2%) were detected in legally resident immigrants. We identified a significantly higher number of imported leprosy cases during the 2008-2010 and 2011-2013 trienniums compared to the reference biennium 2003-2004 (OR 5.38, 95% CI 1.83-14.88 and OR 4.80, 95% CI 1.41-16.33, respectively). Most imported cases were diagnosed in Latin American immigrants (71.9%), especially Brazilians, but also Paraguayans, Bolivians and other nationalities from South and Central America. However, registered incidence was lower than expected for each year. For example, in 2003, the expected new cases in immigrants was 47.12, compared to only four cases that were actually detected (a 91% difference). Likewise, we expected to find 49.6 incident cases among immigrants in 2009, but only 15 new cases were reported (60% fewer than expected). Imported cases of leprosy are responsible for most leprosy incidence in Spain, and we cannot rule out some under-diagnosis. Clinicians should be made more aware of the potential for leprosy incidence among patients from countries where the disease is endemic.

  8. Examining ERBB2 as a candidate gene for susceptibility to leprosy (Hansen's disease) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Sérgio Ricardo Fernandes; Jamieson, Sarra Elisabeth; Dupnik, Kathryn Margaret; Monteiro, Glória Regina; Nobre, Maurício Lisboa; Dias, Márcia Sousa; Trindade Neto, Pedro Bezerra; Queiroz, Maria do Carmo Palmeira; Gomes, Carlos Eduardo Maia; Blackwell, Jenefer Mary; Jeronimo, Selma Maria Bezerra

    2014-04-01

    Leprosy remains prevalent in Brazil. ErbB2 is a receptor for leprosy bacilli entering Schwann cells, which mediates Mycobacterium leprae-induced demyelination and the ERBB2 gene lies within a leprosy susceptibility locus on chromosome 17q11-q21. To determine whether polymorphisms at the ERBB2 locus contribute to this linkage peak, three haplotype tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tag-SNPs) (rs2517956, rs2952156, rs1058808) were genotyped in 72 families (208 cases; 372 individuals) from the state of Pará (PA). All three tag-SNPs were associated with leprosy per se [best SNP rs2517959 odds ratio (OR) = 2.22; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.37-3.59; p = 0.001]. Lepromatous (LL) (OR = 3.25; 95% CI 1.37-7.70; p = 0.007) and tuberculoid (TT) (OR = 1.79; 95% CI 1.04-3.05; p = 0.034) leprosy both contributed to the association, which is consistent with the previous linkage to chromosome 17q11-q21 in the population from PA and supports the functional role of ErbB2 in disease pathogenesis. To attempt to replicate these findings, six SNPs (rs2517955, rs2517956, rs1810132, rs2952156, rs1801200, rs1058808) were genotyped in a population-based sample of 570 leprosy cases and 370 controls from the state of Rio Grande do Norte (RN) and the results were analysed using logistic regression analysis. However, none of the associations were replicated in the RN sample, whether analysed for leprosy per se, LL leprosy, TT leprosy, erythema nodosum leprosum or reversal reaction conditions. The role of polymorphisms at ERBB2 in controlling susceptibility to leprosy in Brazil therefore remains unclear.

  9. Hidden leprosy cases in tribal population groups and how to reach them through a collaborative effort.

    PubMed

    Kumar, M Santhosh; Padmavathi, S; Shivakumar, M; Charles, U; Appalanaidu, M; Perumal, R; Thiagarajan, P N; Somasekhar, Y

    2015-12-01

    Tribal populations are an underserved population group and access to health services is a major challenge for them. Since leprosy treatment is integrated with the general health services, identifying leprosy cases is not be easy in these settings and they remain as endemic reservoirs, unless greater efforts are made to reach them. An active search operation was conducted in the tribal colonies in four pre-identified Health & Nutrition Clusters, Nellore district, Andhra Pradesh, India, in 2013. After a brief training, village health nurses and selected volunteers covered all the households, showing flash cards with photos of leprosy cases and enquiring if there was any resident with a similar condition. Suspects were listed and examined by the district leprosy supervisor and field coordinators from Damien Foundation. Follow up interviews were done after one year to assess the treatment completion rate. Village health workers covered 47,574 people living in the tribal colonies and identified 325 leprosy suspects. Among them, 70 were confirmed as new leprosy cases. The prevalence of previously undetected leprosy cases was found to be 14.7/10,000. Out of 70 cases, 19 (27%) were children, 35 (50%) were female, 32 (45.7%) were classified as MB leprosy, 6 (8.6%) had a leprosy reaction and 11 (15.7%) persons had Grade 2 disability at the time of diagnosis. The treatment completion rate was found to be 74% at the end of one year. The study reveals a very high burden of leprosy among the tribal population and demonstrates how resources can be mobilized from government, NGO and local community sources to promote early case detection among underserved population groups.

  10. High oral prevalence of Candida krusei in leprosy patients in northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Reichart, P A; Samaranayake, L P; Samaranayake, Y H; Grote, M; Pow, E; Cheung, B

    2002-12-01

    Although Candida albicans is the most common human yeast pathogen, other Candida species such as C. krusei are now recognized as emerging agents, especially in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. C. krusei is inherently resistant to the widely used triazole antifungal fluconazole and poses therapeutic problems, especially in systemic candidiasis. In a surveillance study of leprosy patients (with arrested or burnt-out disease) in a leprosarium in northern Thailand, we found a rate of oral carriage of C. krusei (36%) significantly (P < 0.05) higher than that for a healthy control group (10%). Among the Candida-positive patients, 16 of 35 (46%) carried C. krusei, while C. albicans was the second most common isolate (12 of 35 patients; 34%). The corresponding figures for the control group were 2 of 13 (15%) and 6 of 13 (46%), respectively. Studies of the antifungal resistance of the C. krusei isolates from patients indicated that all except one of the isolates were resistant to fluconazole, two isolates were resistant to ketoconazole, and all isolates were sensitive to amphotericin B. Evaluation of their genetic profiles by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis with three different primers and subsequent analysis of the gel profiles by computerized cluster-derived dendrograms revealed that the C. krusei isolates from patients belonged to 10 disparate clusters, despite the origin from a single locale. These nascent findings indicate an alarmingly high prevalence of a Candida species resistant to a widely used antifungal in a part of the world where HIV disease is endemic.

  11. Common variants in the PARL and PINK1 genes increase the risk to leprosy in Han Chinese from South China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong; Zhang, Deng-Feng; Feng, Jia-Qi; Li, Guo-Dong; Li, Xiao-An; Yu, Xiu-Feng; Long, Heng; Li, Yu-Ye; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious and neurological disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, an unculturable pathogen with massive genomic decay and dependence on host metabolism. We hypothesized that mitochondrial genes PARL and PINK1 would confer risk to leprosy. Thirteen tag SNPs of PARL and PINK1 were analyzed in 3620 individuals with or without leprosy from China. We also sequenced the entire exons of PARL, PINK1 and PARK2 in 80 patients with a family history of leprosy by using the next generation sequencing technology (NGS). We found that PARL SNP rs12631031 conferred a risk to leprosy (Padjusted = 0.019) and multibacillary leprosy (MB, Padjusted = 0.020) at the allelic level. rs12631031 and rs7653061 in PARL were associated with leprosy and MB (dominant model, Padjusted < 0.05) at the genotypic level. PINK1 SNP rs4704 was associated with leprosy at the genotypic level (Padjusted = 0.004). We confirmed that common variants in PARL and PINK1 were associated with leprosy in patients underwent NGS. Furthermore, PARL and PINK1 could physically interact with each other and were involved in the highly connected network formed by reported leprosy susceptibility genes. Together, our results showed that PARL and PINK1 genetic variants are associated with leprosy. PMID:27876828

  12. Meaning of leprosy for people who have experienced treatment during the sulfonic and multidrug therapy periods 1

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Karen da Silva; Fortuna, Cinira Magali; Santana, Fabiana Ribeiro; Gonçalves, Marlene Fagundes Carvalho; Marciano, Franciele Maia; Matumoto, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to analyze the meanings of leprosy for people treated during the sulfonic and multidrug therapy periods. Method: qualitative nature study based on the Vigotski's historical-cultural approach, which guided the production and analysis of data. It included eight respondents who have had leprosy and were submitted to sulfonic and multidrug therapy treatments. The participants are also members of the Movement for Reintegration of People Affected by Leprosy. Results: the meanings were organized into three meaning cores: spots on the body: something is out of order; leprosy or hanseniasis? and leprosy from the inclusion in the Movement for Reintegration of People Affected by Leprosy. Conclusion: the meanings of leprosy for people submitted to both regimens point to a complex construction thereof, indicating differences and similarities in both treatments. Health professionals may contribute to the change of the meanings, since these are socially constructed and the changes are continuous. PMID:26444163

  13. An epidemiological study on Mycobacterium leprae infection and prevalence of leprosy in endemic villages by molecular biological technique.

    PubMed

    Izumi, S; Budiawan, T; Saeki, K; Matsuoka, M; Kawatsu, K

    1999-01-01

    One of the most important unsolved questions in epidemiology of leprosy is the highly uneven geographic distribution of the disease. There are many hyperendemic "pockets" in endemic countries. Little is known about the reasons why leprosy is hyperendemic in these areas. We conducted, therefore, a series of epidemiological studies on Mycobacterium leprae infection and prevalence of leprosy in North Maluku district, Maluku Province, Indonesia where leprosy is highly endemic. It was found that considerable number of general inhabitants are seropositive to various mycobacterial antigens and 27% of the villagers were carrying leprosy bacilli on their surface of nasal cavity. These results suggested the importance of M. leprae in the residential environment in infection of the leprosy bacillus and the resulting transmission of the disease. Based on these observations, we conclude that new preventive measures are essential for global elimination of leprosy in addition to early diagnosis and multidrug therapy (MDT).

  14. Distinct Roles of Th17 and Th1 Cells in Inflammatory Responses Associated with the Presentation of Paucibacillary Leprosy and Leprosy Reactions.

    PubMed

    Santos, M B; de Oliveira, D T; Cazzaniga, R A; Varjão, C S; Dos Santos, P L; Santos, M L B; Correia, C B; Faria, D R; Simon, M do V; Silva, J S; Dutra, W O; Reed, S G; Duthie, M S; de Almeida, R P; de Jesus, A R

    2017-07-01

    It is well established that helper T cell responses influence resistance or susceptibility to Mycobacterium leprae infection, but the role of more recently described helper T cell subsets in determining severity is less clear. To investigate the involvement of Th17 cells in the pathogenesis of leprosy, we determined the immune profile with variant presentations of leprosy. Firstly, IL-17A, IFN-γ and IL-10 were evaluated in conjunction with CD4(+) T cell staining by confocal microscopy of lesion biopsies from tuberculoid (TT) and lepromatous leprosy (LL) patients. Secondly, inflammatory cytokines were measured by multiplex assay of serum samples from Multibacillary (MB, n = 28) and Paucibacillary (PB, n = 23) patients and household contacts (HHC, n = 23). Patients with leprosy were also evaluated for leprosy reaction occurrence: LR+ (n = 8) and LR- (n = 20). Finally, peripheral blood mononuclear cells were analysed by flow cytometry used to determine the phenotype of cytokine-producing cells. Lesions from TT patients were found to have more CD4(+) IL-17A(+) cells than those from LL patients. Higher concentrations of IL-17A and IL-1β were observed in serum from PB than MB patients. The highest serum IFN-γ concentrations were, however, detected in sera from MB patients that developed leprosy reactions (MB LR(+) ). Together, these results indicate that Th1 cells were associated with both the PB presentation and also with leprosy reactions. In contrast, Th17 cells were associated with an effective inflammatory response that is present in the PB forms but were not predictive of leprosy reactions in MB patients. © 2017 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  15. Prevalence of Disability and Associated Factors among Registered Leprosy Patients in All Africa Tb and Leprosy Rehabilitation and Training Centre (ALERT), Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Shumet, Tigist; Demissie, Meaza; Bekele, Yonas

    2015-10-01

    Delay in leprosy diagnosis and treatment causes disabilities due to nerve damage, immunological reactions and bacillary infiltration. Leprosy disability leads not only to physical dysfunction and activity limitation but also disrupts social interaction of affected individuals by creating stigma and discrimination. This study was aimed at assessing leprosy disability status in patients registered at All African TB and Leprosy Rehabilitation and Training Centre. Medical records of leprosy patients registered from September 11, 2010 to September 10, 2013 G.C were reviewed. Prevalence of disability calculated, bivariate and multiple logistic regressions were used to determine crude and adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence interval. The overall prevalence of disability was found to be 65.9% from all categories of patients (40.2% Grade I and 25.7% Grade II). The Prevalence among the new category was 62.8% (39.1% Grade 1 and 23.7% Grade 2). Those ageed above 30 years, with duration of symptoms 6-12 months and above 24 months, with sensory loss, nerve damage and reversal reaction were more likely to develop disability. In this study the prevalence of disability, both Grade I and II, is very high. Disability was associated with age, duration of symptom, sensory loss, signs of nerve damage and reversal reaction. These risk factors indicate the existence of delay in diagnosis and treatment of leprosy cases. Therefore, the national leprosy control program should investigate leprosy case detection and diagnosis system in the country and work on improving early case detection and prevention of disability.

  16. Comparative assessment of the leprosy antibody absorption test, Mycobacterium leprae extract enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and gelatin particle agglutination test for serodiagnosis of lepromatous leprosy.

    PubMed Central

    Escobar-Gutiérrez, A; Amezcua, M E; Pastén, S; Pallares, F; Cázares, J V; Pulido, R M; Flores, O; Castro, E; Rodríguez, O

    1993-01-01

    A comparative assessment of three serological methods for leprosy diagnosis (the fluorescent leprosy antibody absorption [FLA-ABS] test, the Mycobacterium leprae soluble-extract enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA], and the M. leprae particle agglutination [MLPA] test) was carried out. The objective was to identify their performance in clinical and epidemiological diagnosis of leprosy. The study group included 45 lepromatous leprosy patients under treatment. Specificity was > 95% for all three assays, and sensitivity was 95, 58, and 74% for the FLA-ABS test, the MLPA test, and the ELISA, respectively. The only cross-reactivity for M. tuberculosis-infected patients was with the soluble-extract ELISA. Although the FLA-ABS test displayed the highest specificity and sensitivity values, it can only be used in well-developed laboratories, and the patient's clinical and epidemiological background must be considered when results are interpreted because the test remains positive after therapeutic success and could be positive for some household contacts. The MLPA test is easier to perform and interpret, and it is adequate for small laboratories and epidemiological studies intended to detect active untreated or irregularly treated leprosy cases. Therefore, the FLA-ABS and MLPA tests are complementary, and both should be used for serodiagnosis of leprosy. PMID:8501238

  17. Kinship and Leprosy in the Contacts of Leprosy Patients: Cohort at the Souza Araújo Outpatient Clinic, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, 1987–2010

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Daiane Santos; Duppre, Nadia Cristina; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Hacker, Mariana Andréa

    2013-01-01

    A broad variety of factors have been associated with leprosy among contacts, including socioeconomic, epidemiological, and genetic characteristics. Data from 7,174 contacts of leprosy patients from a leprosy outpatient clinic in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1987–2010, were analyzed to investigate the effects of kinship, individual, and contextual factors on leprosy. Multivariate analyses were performed using a robust estimation method. In the prevalence analysis, close kinship (sibling OR = 2.75, offspring OR = 2.00, and other relatives OR = 1.70), socioeconomic factors, and the duration of exposure to the bacillus were associated to leprosy. In the incidence analysis, significant risks were found for all categories of kinship (parents RR = 10.93, spouse, boyfriend/girlfriend, and bride/groom RR = 7.53, sibling RR = 7.03, offspring RR = 5.34, and other relatives RR = 3.71). Once the treatment of the index case was initiated, other factors lost their significance, and the index case bacteriological index and BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine) protection had a greater impact. Our findings suggested that both genetic susceptibility and physical exposure play an important role in the epidemiology of leprosy, but it was not possible establishing the role of genetic factor. Analyses of other factors related to the genotype of individuals, such as genetic polymorphisms, are needed. PMID:23690793

  18. [Prevalence of disability among leprosy patients and effectiveness of leprosy reaction services with standard prednisolone treatment at field level in an endemic country--some data from joint leprosy research collaboration in Myanmar].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yutaka

    2009-09-01

    Prevalence of disability among leprosy patients and effectiveness of standard predonisolone treatment for leprosy reaction at field level in some place of Myanmar are shown in this paper as results of joint leprosy research collaboration. WHO disability grading was measured for all newly registered leprosy patients through 2007 in 5 selected townships of Ayeyarwaddy Division, with the results of G0 = 66.3%, GI = 18.9%, GII = 14.7% (N = 95). The cross-sectional disability survey at selected 9 townships in Mandalay, Sagaing and Magway Division for all registered patients who had completed WHO/MDT done by JICA project in 2003/4 showed G0 = 62.5%, GI = 2.4%, GII = 35.1% (N = 10,528). From these two data, it is supposed that considerable number of patients with G1 at registered time developed worsening of disability from G1 to G2. Proportion of G0 also reduced a little bit in patients who completed WHO/MDT. Early detection and proper treatment of leprosy reaction are one of the main issues of prevention of disability. Effectiveness of leprosy reaction services were evaluated at Mandalay Special Skin Clinic, where WHO fixed regimen of prednisolone were given as routine service. 100 cases were evaluated who developed leprosy reactions from 1st December 2007 to 31st December 2008 and identified severe reaction who needed oral prednisolone treatment. Evaluation criteria of "effective" was defined as "no more signs and symptoms of reactions were present after treatment. And "less effective" was defined as "more than one of signs and symptoms were still remained after treatment". Over all "effective" was 36 (36%) and "less effective" was 64 (64%). It was also found that rates of improvement of nerve functions, either in sensory or in motor, were little after the standard treatment.

  19. Phylogenetic and Molecular Variability Studies Reveal a New Genetic Clade of Citrus leprosis virus C.

    PubMed

    Ramos-González, Pedro Luis; Chabi-Jesus, Camila; Guerra-Peraza, Orlene; Breton, Michèle Claire; Arena, Gabriella Dias; Nunes, Maria Andreia; Kitajima, Elliot Watanabe; Machado, Marcos Antonio; Freitas-Astúa, Juliana

    2016-06-06

    Citrus leprosis virus C (CiLV-C) causes a severe disease affecting citrus orchards in the Western hemisphere. This study reveals the molecular variability of the virus by analyzing four genomic regions (p29, p15, MP and RNA2-intergenic region) distributed over its two RNAs. Nucleotide diversity (π) values were relatively low but statistically different over the analyzed genes and subpopulations, indicating their distinct evolutionary history. Values of πp29 and πMP were higher than those of πp15 and πRNA2-IR, whereas πMP was increased due to novel discovered isolates phylogenetically clustered in a divergent clade that we called SJP. Isolate BR_SP_SJP_01 RNA1 and RNA2 sequences, clade SJP, showed an identity of 85.6% and 88.4%, respectively, with those corresponding to CiLV-C, the type member of the genus Cilevirus, and its RNA2 5'-proximal region was revealed as a minor donor in a putative inter-clade recombination event. In addition to citrus, BR_SP_SJP_01 naturally infects the weed Commelina benghalensis and is efficiently transmitted by Brevipalpus yothersi mites. Our data demonstrated that negative selection was the major force operating in the evaluated viral coding regions and defined amino acids putatively relevant for the biological function of cilevirus proteins. This work provides molecular tools and sets up a framework for further epidemiological studies.

  20. Phylogenetic and Molecular Variability Studies Reveal a New Genetic Clade of Citrus leprosis virus C

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-González, Pedro Luis; Chabi-Jesus, Camila; Guerra-Peraza, Orlene; Breton, Michèle Claire; Arena, Gabriella Dias; Nunes, Maria Andreia; Kitajima, Elliot Watanabe; Machado, Marcos Antonio; Freitas-Astúa, Juliana

    2016-01-01

    Citrus leprosis virus C (CiLV-C) causes a severe disease affecting citrus orchards in the Western hemisphere. This study reveals the molecular variability of the virus by analyzing four genomic regions (p29, p15, MP and RNA2-intergenic region) distributed over its two RNAs. Nucleotide diversity (π) values were relatively low but statistically different over the analyzed genes and subpopulations, indicating their distinct evolutionary history. Values of πp29 and πMP were higher than those of πp15 and πRNA2–IR, whereas πMP was increased due to novel discovered isolates phylogenetically clustered in a divergent clade that we called SJP. Isolate BR_SP_SJP_01 RNA1 and RNA2 sequences, clade SJP, showed an identity of 85.6% and 88.4%, respectively, with those corresponding to CiLV-C, the type member of the genus Cilevirus, and its RNA2 5′-proximal region was revealed as a minor donor in a putative inter-clade recombination event. In addition to citrus, BR_SP_SJP_01 naturally infects the weed Commelina benghalensis and is efficiently transmitted by Brevipalpus yothersi mites. Our data demonstrated that negative selection was the major force operating in the evaluated viral coding regions and defined amino acids putatively relevant for the biological function of cilevirus proteins. This work provides molecular tools and sets up a framework for further epidemiological studies. PMID:27275832

  1. Tuberculosis risk-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms do not show association with leprosy in Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuan; Wang, Na; Yu, Yongxiang; Yu, Gongqi; Wang, Zhenzhen; Fu, Xi'an; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Furen

    2015-06-01

    Leprosy and tuberculosis (TB) are chronic granulomatous infectious diseases. As well as pathogen and environmental factors, host genetic factors make a substantial contribution to susceptibility to both diseases. More importantly, leprosy and TB also have pathogenic mechanisms and clinical features in common. In this study, the genetic association between leprosy and TB was investigated in a Chinese Han population. A genetic association study that included 46 TB susceptibility single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was performed, involving 1150 leprosy cases and 1150 controls from the Chinese Han population. The Sequenom MassARRAY system was used. No significant association was found between the 46 SNPs and leprosy. Therefore, according to the present study, there is no shared susceptibility locus between leprosy and TB in the Chinese Han population. Although leprosy and TB have a number of similar characteristics, no shared susceptibility loci were found in the Chinese Han population. Thus, this study demonstrated that the genetic basis of the pathogenesis of the two diseases may vary greatly. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Common polymorphisms in the NOD2 gene region are associated with leprosy and its reactive states

    PubMed Central

    Berrington, William Richard; Macdonald, Murdo; Khadge, Saraswoti; Sapkota, Bishwa Raj; Janer, Marta; Hagge, Deanna Alisa; Kaplan, Gilla; Hawn, Thomas Richard

    2010-01-01

    Background Because of the wide spectrum of clinical manifestations and well-defined immunologic complications, leprosy is a useful disease for studying genetic regulation of the host response to infection. We hypothesized that polymorphisms in NOD2, a cytosolic receptor known to detect mycobacteria, are associated with susceptibility to leprosy and its clinical outcomes. Methods We used a case-control study design with 933 patients in Nepal, which included 240 patients with type I (reversal) reaction (RR), and 124 patients with type 2 (erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL)) reactions. We compared 32 common NOD2 gene region polymorphism frequencies between the different clinical types of leprosy as well as 101 controls without leprosy. Results Four polymorphisms were associated with leprosy susceptibility when comparing allele frequencies and eight were associated when comparing genotype frequencies with a dominant model. Five polymorphisms were associated with protection from RR in an allelic analysis, and seven were associated with RR with a dominant model. Four polymorphisms were associated with increased susceptibility to ENL in an allelic analysis, while seven of 32 polymorphisms were associated with a dominant model. Conclusion These data suggest that NOD2 genetic variants are associated with leprosy susceptibility and the development of leprosy reactive states. PMID:20350193

  3. Association of genetic polymorphism of HLA-DRB1 antigens with the susceptibility to lepromatous leprosy

    PubMed Central

    ESCAMILLA-TILCH, MONICA; TORRES-CARRILLO, NORA MAGDALENA; PAYAN, ROSALIO RAMOS; AGUILAR-MEDINA, MARIBEL; SALAZAR, MA ISABEL; FAFUTIS-MORRIS, MARY; ARENAS-GUZMAN, ROBERTO; ESTRADA-PARRA, SERGIO; ESTRADA-GARCIA, IRIS; GRANADOS, JULIO

    2013-01-01

    Despite the introduction of multidrug therapy and the overall reduction of leprosy prevalence in Mexico, the disease remains endemic in certain regions of the country. A genetic basis for the immune susceptibility to Mycobacterium leprae has already been established in different populations worldwide. In this study, we investigated the possible association of the HLA-DRB1 alleles with leprosy in a Mexican Mestizo population. The results demonstrated that the HLA-DRB1*01 allele is associated with lepromatous and dimorphic leprosy [P<0.001, odds ratio (OR)=4.6, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.8–11.4; and P=0.03, OR=6.2, 95% CI: 1.1–31.6, respectively] and the frequency of the HLA-DRB1*08 allele was found to be significantly lower among leprosy patients compared to controls (P=0.046, OR=2.4, 95% CI: 1–5.8). In conclusion, although the association of the HLA-DR locus with leprosy has been established in different populations and several studies have demonstrated significant differences in the DR alleles, this study demonstrated an association of the HLA-DRB1*01 allele with susceptibility to lepromatous and dimorphic leprosy, as well as an association of the HLA-DRB1*08 allele with protection against leprosy in a Mexican Mestizo population. PMID:24649058

  4. Association of genetic polymorphism of HLA-DRB1 antigens with the susceptibility to lepromatous leprosy.

    PubMed

    Escamilla-Tilch, Monica; Torres-Carrillo, Nora Magdalena; Payan, Rosalio Ramos; Aguilar-Medina, Maribel; Salazar, Ma Isabel; Fafutis-Morris, Mary; Arenas-Guzman, Roberto; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Estrada-Garcia, Iris; Granados, Julio

    2013-11-01

    Despite the introduction of multidrug therapy and the overall reduction of leprosy prevalence in Mexico, the disease remains endemic in certain regions of the country. A genetic basis for the immune susceptibility to Mycobacterium leprae has already been established in different populations worldwide. In this study, we investigated the possible association of the HLA-DRB1 alleles with leprosy in a Mexican Mestizo population. The results demonstrated that the HLA-DRB1*01 allele is associated with lepromatous and dimorphic leprosy [P<0.001, odds ratio (OR)=4.6, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.8-11.4; and P=0.03, OR=6.2, 95% CI: 1.1-31.6, respectively] and the frequency of the HLA-DRB1*08 allele was found to be significantly lower among leprosy patients compared to controls (P=0.046, OR=2.4, 95% CI: 1-5.8). In conclusion, although the association of the HLA-DR locus with leprosy has been established in different populations and several studies have demonstrated significant differences in the DR alleles, this study demonstrated an association of the HLA-DRB1*01 allele with susceptibility to lepromatous and dimorphic leprosy, as well as an association of the HLA-DRB1*08 allele with protection against leprosy in a Mexican Mestizo population.

  5. Leprosy among children under 15 years of age: literature review.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marcela Bahia Barretto de; Diniz, Lucia Martins

    2016-04-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, representing a public health issue in some countries. Though more prevalent in adults, the detection of new cases in children under 15 years of age reveals an active circulation of bacillus, continued transmission and lack of disease control by the health system, as well as aiding in the monitoring of the endemic. Among patients under 15 years of age, the most affected age group is children between 10 and 14 years of age, although cases of patients of younger than 1 year of age have also been reported. Household contacts are the primary source of infection, given that caretakers, such as babysitters and others, must be considered in this scenario. Paucibacillary forms of the disease prevailed, especially borderline-tuberculoid leprosy, with a single lesion in exposed areas of the body representing the main clinical manifestation. Reactional states: Lepra reactions are rare, although some authors have reported high frequencies of this phenomenon, the most frequent of which is Type 1 Lepra Reaction. Peripheral nerve involvement has been described at alarming rates in some studies, which increases the chance of deformities, a serious problem, especially if one considers the age of these patients. The protective effect of BCG vaccination was found in some studies, but no consensus has been reached among different authors. Children must receive the same multidrug therapy regimen and the doses should, ideally, be calculated based on the child´s weight. Adverse reactions to this therapy are rare within this age group. This article aims to review epidemiological, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of leprosy in patients under 15 years of age.

  6. Diagnosis and medical treatment of neuropathic pain in leprosy 1

    PubMed Central

    Arco, Rogerio Del; Nardi, Susilene Maria Tonelli; Bassi, Thiago Gasperini; Paschoal, Vania Del Arco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to identify the difficulties in diagnosing and treating neuropathic pain caused by leprosy and to understand the main characteristics of this situation. Methods: 85 patients were treated in outpatient units with reference to leprosy and the accompanying pain. We used a questionnaire known as the Douleur Neuropathic 4 test and we conducted detailed neurological exams. As a result, 42 patients were excluded from the study for not having proved their pain. Results: Out of the 37 patients that experienced pain, 22 (59.5%) had neuropathic pain (or a mixture of this pain and their existing pain) and of these 90.8% considered this pain to be moderate or severe. 81.8% of the sample suffered with this pain for more than 6 months. Only 12 (54.5%) of the patients had been diagnosed with neuropathic pain and in almost half of these cases, this pain had not been diagnosed. With reference to medical treatment (n=12) for neuropathic pain, 5 (41.6%) responded that they became better. For the other 7 (58.4%) there were no changes in relation to the pain or in some cases the pain worsened in comparison to their previous state. Statistical analysis comparing improvements in relation to the pain amongst the patients that were treated (n=12) and those that were not, showed significant differences (value p=0.020). Conclusion: we noted difficulties in diagnosing neuropathic pain for leprosy in that almost half of the patients that were studied had not had their pain diagnosed. We attributed this to some factors such as the non-adoption of the appropriate protocols which led to inadequate diagnosis and treatment that overlooked the true picture. PMID:27508904

  7. Impact of leprosy on the quality of life.

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, G. A.; Rao, P. S.

    1999-01-01

    Leprosy is considered by many as not merely a medical condition, but as a condition encompassing psychological, socioeconomic and spiritual dimensions that dehabilitate an individual progressively, unless properly cared for. The present study was undertaken to document the nature and extent of decreases in the quality of life (QOL) of an affected person. The World Health Organization questionnaire on quality of life was given to a representative random sample of 50 leprosy-affected persons and 50 unaffected individuals in the Bommasamudram Taluk of Chittoor District, Andhra Pradesh, India. This questionnaire explores the following six domains; physical; psychological; level of independence; social relationships; spiritual; and environmental. The mean QOL score of the cases was significantly lower than that of the controls with the exception of the spiritual domain. The mean total score for women was higher than that of males in each domain and age group. Males with deformities had a significantly lower score than those with no visible deformities. Although the scores for females with deformities were also lower than those without deformities, the differences were not statistically significant. Analyses of economic status versus the QOL scores clearly showed that they were positively correlated. The study revealed that quality of life decreased progressively in leprosy-affected persons. Women had a better QOL score than men in almost every domain. Given the secondary role of women in Indian rural society, this may simply imply an acceptance of their situation. The findings are discussed in comparison with other diseases and in the context of a poor socioeconomic environment. With modern amenities, better education and higher expectations, the perception of an individual regarding his or her own quality of life is bound to change. The need for frequent assessments and further studies along these lines is emphasized. PMID:10427937

  8. Leprosy on Reunion Island, 2005-2013: Situation and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Camuset, Guillaume; Lafarge, Sophie; Borgherini, Gianandrea; Gerber, Anne; Pouderoux, Nicolas; Foucher, Aurélie; Poubeau, Patrice; Manaquin, Rodolphe; Larrieu, Sophie; Vilain, Pascal; Huiart, Laetitita

    2016-01-01

    Background Reunion Island is a French overseas territory located in the south-western of Indian Ocean, 700 km east of Madagascar. Leprosy first arrived on Reunion Island in the early 1700s with the African slaves and immigration from Madagascar. The disease was endemic until 1980 but improvement of health care and life conditions of inhabitants in the island have allowed a strong decrease in new cases of leprosy. However, the reintroduction of the disease by migrants from endemic neighbouring countries like Comoros and Madagascar is a real and continuing risk. This observational study was then conducted to measure the number of new cases detected annually on Reunion Island between 2005 and 2013, and to describe the clinical features of these patients. Methodology/Principal Findings Data were collected over two distinct periods. Incident cases between 2005 and 2010 come from a retrospective study conducted in 2010 by the regional Office of French Institute for Public Health Surveillance (CIRE of Indian Ocean), when no surveillance system exist. Cases between 2011 and 2013 come from a prospective collection of all new cases, following the implementation of systematic notification of all new cases. All patient data were anonymized. Among the 25 new cases, 12 are Reunion Island residents who never lived outside Reunion Island, and hence are considered to be confirmed autochthonous patients. Registered prevalence in 2014 was 0.05 /10 000 habitants, less than the WHO’s eradication goal (1/10 000). Conclusions/Significance Leprosy is no longer a major public health problem on Reunion Island, as its low prevalence rate indicates. However, the risk of recrudescence of the disease and of renewed autochthonous transmission remains real. In this context, active case detection must be pursued through the active declaration and rapid treatment of all new cases. PMID:27082879

  9. Leprosy among children under 15 years of age: literature review*

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Marcela Bahia Barretto; Diniz, Lucia Martins

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, representing a public health issue in some countries. Though more prevalent in adults, the detection of new cases in children under 15 years of age reveals an active circulation of bacillus, continued transmission and lack of disease control by the health system, as well as aiding in the monitoring of the endemic. Among patients under 15 years of age, the most affected age group is children between 10 and 14 years of age, although cases of patients of younger than 1 year of age have also been reported. Household contacts are the primary source of infection, given that caretakers, such as babysitters and others, must be considered in this scenario. Paucibacillary forms of the disease prevailed, especially borderline-tuberculoid leprosy, with a single lesion in exposed areas of the body representing the main clinical manifestation. Reactional states: Lepra reactions are rare, although some authors have reported high frequencies of this phenomenon, the most frequent of which is Type 1 Lepra Reaction. Peripheral nerve involvement has been described at alarming rates in some studies, which increases the chance of deformities, a serious problem, especially if one considers the age of these patients. The protective effect of BCG vaccination was found in some studies, but no consensus has been reached among different authors. Children must receive the same multidrug therapy regimen and the doses should, ideally, be calculated based on the child´s weight. Adverse reactions to this therapy are rare within this age group. This article aims to review epidemiological, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of leprosy in patients under 15 years of age. PMID:27192519

  10. Progression of leprosy disability after discharge: is multidrug therapy enough?

    PubMed Central

    Sales, Anna Maria; Campos, Dayse Pereira; Hacker, Mariana Andrea; da Costa Nery, José Augusto; Düppre, Nádia Cristina; Rangel, Emanuel; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Penna, Maria Lucia Fernandes

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the risk factors related to worsening of physical disabilities after treatment discharge among patients with leprosy administered 12 consecutive monthly doses of multidrug therapy (MDT/WHO). Methods Cohort study was carried out at the Leprosy Laboratory in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We evaluated patients with multibacillary leprosy treated (MDT/WHO) between 1997 and 2007. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the relationship between the onset of physical disabilities after release from treatment and epidemiological and clinical characteristics. Results The total observation time period for the 368 patients was 1 570 person-years (PY), averaging 4.3 years per patient. The overall incidence rate of worsening of disability was 6.5/100 PY. Among those who began treatment with no disability, the incidence rate of physical disability was 4.5/100 PY. Among those who started treatment with Grade 1 or 2 disabilities, the incidence rate of deterioration was 10.5/100 PY. The survival analysis evidenced that when disability grade was 1, the risk was 1.61 (95% CI: 1.02–2.56), when disability was 2, the risk was 2.37 (95% CI 1.35–4.16), and when the number of skin lesions was 15 or more, an HR = 1.97 (95% CI: 1.07–3.63). Patients with neuritis showed a 65% increased risk of worsening of disability (HR = 1.65 [95% CI: 1.08–2.52]). Conclusion Impairment at diagnosis was the main risk factor for neurological worsening after treatment/MDT. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment of reactional episodes remain the main means of preventing physical disabilities. PMID:23937704

  11. Association of a new FCN3 haplotype with high ficolin-3 levels in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Fabiana Antunes; Beltrame, Marcia Holsbach; Bini, Valéria Bumiller; Gonçalves, Letícia Boslooper; Boldt, Angelica Beate Winter; Messias-Reason, Iara Jose de

    2017-02-01

    Leprosy is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae that mainly affects the skin and peripheral nervous system, leading to a high disability rate and social stigma. Previous studies have shown a contribution of genes encoding products of the lectin pathway of complement in the modulation of the susceptibility to leprosy; however, the ficolin-3/FCN3 gene impact on leprosy is currently unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate if FCN3 polymorphisms (rs532781899: g.1637delC, rs28362807: g.3524_3532insTATTTGGCC and rs4494157: g.4473C>A) and ficolin-3 serum levels play a role in the susceptibility to leprosy. We genotyped up to 190 leprosy patients (being 114 (60%) lepromatous), and up to 245 controls with sequence-specific PCR. We also measured protein levels using ELISA in 61 leprosy and 73 controls. FCN3 polymorphisms were not associated with disease, but ficolin-3 levels were higher in patients with FCN3 *2B1 (CinsA) haplotype (p = 0.032). Median concentration of ficolin-3 was higher in leprosy per se (26034 ng/mL, p = 0.005) and lepromatous patients (28295 ng/mL, p = 0.016) than controls (18231 ng/mL). In addition, high ficolin-3 levels (>33362 ng/mL) were more common in leprosy per se (34.4%) and in lepromatous patients (35.5%) than controls (19.2%; p = 0.045 and p = 0.047, respectively). Our results lead us to suggest that polymorphisms in the FCN3 gene cooperate to increase ficolin-3 concentration and that it might contribute to leprosy susceptibility by favoring M. leprae infection.

  12. Rapid Quantitative Serological Test for Detection of Infection with Mycobacterium leprae, the Causative Agent of Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Balagon, Marivic F.; Maghanoy, Armi; Orcullo, Florenda M.; Cang, Marjorie; Dias, Ronaldo Ferreira; Collovati, Marco; Reed, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy remains an important health problem in a number of regions. Early detection of infection, followed by effective treatment, is critical to reduce disease progression. New sensitive and specific tools for early detection of infection will be a critical component of an effective leprosy elimination campaign. Diagnosis is made by recognizing clinical signs and symptoms, but few clinicians are able to confidently identify these. Simple tests to facilitate referral to leprosy experts are not widely available, and the correct diagnosis of leprosy is often delayed. In this report, we evaluate the performance of a new leprosy serological test (NDO-LID). As expected, the test readily detected clinically confirmed samples from patients with multibacillary (MB) leprosy, and the rate of positive results declined with bacterial burden. NDO-LID detected larger proportions of MB and paucibacillary (PB) leprosy than the alternative, the Standard Diagnostics leprosy test (87.0% versus 81.7% and 32.3% versus 6.5%, respectively), while also demonstrating improved specificity (97.4% versus 90.4%). Coupled with a new cell phone-based test reader platform (Smart Reader), the NDO-LID test provided consistent, objective test interpretation that could facilitate wider use in nonspecialized settings. In addition, results obtained from sera at the time of diagnosis, versus at the end of treatment, indicated that the quantifiable nature of this system can also be used to monitor treatment efficacy. Taken together, these data indicate that the NDO-LID/Smart Reader system can assist in the diagnosis and monitoring of MB leprosy and can detect a significant number of earlier-stage infections. PMID:24478496

  13. Recent Food Shortage Is Associated with Leprosy Disease in Bangladesh: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Feenstra, Sabiena G.; Nahar, Quamrun; Pahan, David; Oskam, Linda; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2011-01-01

    Background Leprosy is remaining prevalent in the poorest areas of the world. Intensive control programmes with multidrug therapy (MDT) reduced the number of registered cases in these areas, but transmission of Mycobacterium leprae continues in most endemic countries. Socio-economic circumstances are considered to be a major determinant, but uncertainty exists regarding the association between leprosy and poverty. We assessed the association between different socio-economic factors and the risk of acquiring clinical signs of leprosy. Methods and Findings We performed a case-control study in two leprosy endemic districts in northwest Bangladesh. Using interviews with structured questionnaires we compared the socio-economic circumstances of recently diagnosed leprosy patients with a control population from a random cluster sample in the same area. Logistic regression was used to compare cases and controls for their wealth score as calculated with an asset index and other socio-economic factors. The study included 90 patients and 199 controls. A recent period of food shortage and not poverty per se was identified as the only socio-economic factor significantly associated with clinical manifestation of leprosy disease (OR 1.79 (1.06–3.02); p = 0.030). A decreasing trend in leprosy prevalence with an increasing socio-economic status as measured with an asset index is apparent, but not statistically significant (test for a trend: OR 0.85 (0.71–1.02); p = 0.083). Conclusions Recent food shortage is an important poverty related predictor for the clinical manifestation of leprosy disease. Food shortage is seasonal and poverty related in northwest Bangladesh. Targeted nutritional support for high risk groups should be included in leprosy control programmes in endemic areas to reduce risk of disease. PMID:21572979

  14. Diet-Related Risk Factors for Leprosy: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Wagenaar, Inge; van Muiden, Lisanne; Alam, Khorshed; Bowers, Robert; Hossain, Md. Anwar; Kispotta, Kolpona; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Background Food shortage was associated with leprosy in two recent studies investigating the relation between socioeconomic factors and leprosy. Inadequate intake of nutrients due to food shortage may affect the immune system and influence the progression of infection to clinical leprosy. We aimed to identify possible differences in dietary intake between recently diagnosed leprosy patients and control subjects. Methods In a leprosy endemic area of Bangladesh, newly diagnosed leprosy patients and control subjects were interviewed about their socioeconomic situation, health and diet. Dietary intakes were recorded with a 24-hour recall, from which a Dietary Diversity Score (DDS) was calculated. Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated and Household Food Insecurity Access Scale (HFIAS) was filled out for every participant. Using logistic regression, a univariate, block wise multivariate, and an integrated analysis were carried out. Results 52 leprosy cases and 100 control subjects were included. Food shortage was more common, dietary diversity was lower and household food insecurity was higher in the patient group. Patients consumed significantly less items from the DDS food groups ‘Meat and fish’ and ‘Other fruits and vegetables.’ Lower food expenditure per capita, lower BMI, lower DDS and absence of household food stocks are the main factors associated with an increased risk of having leprosy. Conclusion Low income families have only little money to spend on food and consequently have a low intake of highly nutritious non-rice foods such as meat, fish, milk, eggs, fruits and vegetables. Development of clinical leprosy could be explained by deficiencies of the nutrients that these foods normally provide. PMID:25965879

  15. Rapid quantitative serological test for detection of infection with Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy.

    PubMed

    Duthie, Malcolm S; Balagon, Marivic F; Maghanoy, Armi; Orcullo, Florenda M; Cang, Marjorie; Dias, Ronaldo Ferreira; Collovati, Marco; Reed, Steven G

    2014-02-01

    Leprosy remains an important health problem in a number of regions. Early detection of infection, followed by effective treatment, is critical to reduce disease progression. New sensitive and specific tools for early detection of infection will be a critical component of an effective leprosy elimination campaign. Diagnosis is made by recognizing clinical signs and symptoms, but few clinicians are able to confidently identify these. Simple tests to facilitate referral to leprosy experts are not widely available, and the correct diagnosis of leprosy is often delayed. In this report, we evaluate the performance of a new leprosy serological test (NDO-LID). As expected, the test readily detected clinically confirmed samples from patients with multibacillary (MB) leprosy, and the rate of positive results declined with bacterial burden. NDO-LID detected larger proportions of MB and paucibacillary (PB) leprosy than the alternative, the Standard Diagnostics leprosy test (87.0% versus 81.7% and 32.3% versus 6.5%, respectively), while also demonstrating improved specificity (97.4% versus 90.4%). Coupled with a new cell phone-based test reader platform (Smart Reader), the NDO-LID test provided consistent, objective test interpretation that could facilitate wider use in nonspecialized settings. In addition, results obtained from sera at the time of diagnosis, versus at the end of treatment, indicated that the quantifiable nature of this system can also be used to monitor treatment efficacy. Taken together, these data indicate that the NDO-LID/Smart Reader system can assist in the diagnosis and monitoring of MB leprosy and can detect a significant number of earlier-stage infections.

  16. Knowledge and Attitude about Leprosy among Indian Dental Students in Faridabad

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ankur; Jain, Vishal; Virjee, Karim; Singh, Shilpi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Role of dentists in prevention and sustainable care of leprosy is known. Changing leprosy scenario has led to requirement of change in leprosy education. However, knowledge and attitude of dental students on leprosy remains unknown. Aim Hence a study was conducted to assess knowledge and attitude of dental students about Leprosy. Materials and Methods A questionnaire based, cross-sectional survey was conducted among 350 undergraduate and the postgraduate dental students of two dental colleges in Faridabad, India. The score for knowledge ranged from 0 to 16 and scores for attitude ranged from 0 to 26. These scores were further coded as poor, fair and good. Results Mean knowledge score for the sample was 7.64±3.23. A total of 32.29% participants were under poor knowledge category; 57.42% had fair knowledge about Leprosy while 10.29% had good knowledge. Mean attitude score was 15.5 ± 5.98. A total of 30.57% had poor attitude scores, 42.57% had fair scores while 26.86% had good attitude scores. Univariate analysis showed year of training to be a significant predictor for knowledge level (t=7.12; p<0.001). Conclusion The results indicate need for three important changes towards Leprosy in Dentistry. These changes are need for incorporation of leprosy education in Dentistry, need for incorporation of problem based as well as evidence based learning in Dentistry integrated with general health and need for reestablishing public health programs for Leprosy utilizing dental workforce. PMID:27135001

  17. Study of apoptosis in skin lesions of leprosy in relation to treatment and lepra reactions.

    PubMed

    Ajith, C; Gupta, Sachin; Radotra, Bishan D; Arora, Sunil K; Kumar, Bhushan; Dogra, Sunil; Kaur, Inderjeet

    2005-12-01

    In leprosy on treatment, one factor contributing to the healing of skin lesions with minimal fibrosis may be apoptosis of inflammatory cells, even though apoptosis is sparse in leprosy as compared to tuberculosis. The degree of apoptosis in skin lesions of leprosy was studied by histopathologic examination (HPE) and by DNA fragmentation and electrophoresis. The effect of various parameters on apoptosis was noted in untreated disease, during treatment at 3 and 6 months, and in lepra reactions in different parts of the spectrum of leprosy. Of the 31 patients, 13 had paucibacillary (PB) and 18 multibacillary (MB) disease. Twenty one patients were in reaction: 16 had type 1 reaction and 5 had type 2 reaction. The controls included patients with non-granulomatous skin diseases; there were no normal controls, and no separate controls for cases with reaction. Apoptosis occurred more frequently in patients with leprosy as compared to the controls. In both PB & MB lesions, apoptosis was observed to increase progressively with treatment at 3 and 6 months, and was more prominent in the MB cases at 6 months of treatment. When lesions in either type 1 or type 2 reaction were compared to lesions not in reaction, a significant increase in apoptosis (p = 0.014) was found only in lesions with type 2 reaction and those which were at 6 months of treatment. The type of treatment regimen, or oral steroids given for reactions, did not significantly alter the degree of apoptosis. Our observations indicate that increased apoptosis is present in leprosy lesions and that in leprosy it progressively increases with anti-leprosy treatment up to 6 months. If the process of apoptosis in skin lesions is followed up for a longer period of time, the degree of apoptosis may be expected to decline. The study of apoptosis may help to understand the mechanism of clearance of bacilli and resolution of granulomas in leprosy patients.

  18. Association of a new FCN3 haplotype with high ficolin-3 levels in leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Beltrame, Marcia Holsbach; Bini, Valéria Bumiller; Gonçalves, Letícia Boslooper; Boldt, Angelica Beate Winter; de Messias-Reason, Iara Jose

    2017-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae that mainly affects the skin and peripheral nervous system, leading to a high disability rate and social stigma. Previous studies have shown a contribution of genes encoding products of the lectin pathway of complement in the modulation of the susceptibility to leprosy; however, the ficolin-3/FCN3 gene impact on leprosy is currently unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate if FCN3 polymorphisms (rs532781899: g.1637delC, rs28362807: g.3524_3532insTATTTGGCC and rs4494157: g.4473C>A) and ficolin-3 serum levels play a role in the susceptibility to leprosy. We genotyped up to 190 leprosy patients (being 114 (60%) lepromatous), and up to 245 controls with sequence-specific PCR. We also measured protein levels using ELISA in 61 leprosy and 73 controls. FCN3 polymorphisms were not associated with disease, but ficolin-3 levels were higher in patients with FCN3 *2B1 (CinsA) haplotype (p = 0.032). Median concentration of ficolin-3 was higher in leprosy per se (26034 ng/mL, p = 0.005) and lepromatous patients (28295 ng/mL, p = 0.016) than controls (18231 ng/mL). In addition, high ficolin-3 levels (>33362 ng/mL) were more common in leprosy per se (34.4%) and in lepromatous patients (35.5%) than controls (19.2%; p = 0.045 and p = 0.047, respectively). Our results lead us to suggest that polymorphisms in the FCN3 gene cooperate to increase ficolin-3 concentration and that it might contribute to leprosy susceptibility by favoring M. leprae infection. PMID:28241035

  19. Recent food shortage is associated with leprosy disease in Bangladesh: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Feenstra, Sabiena G; Nahar, Quamrun; Pahan, David; Oskam, Linda; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2011-05-10

    Leprosy is remaining prevalent in the poorest areas of the world. Intensive control programmes with multidrug therapy (MDT) reduced the number of registered cases in these areas, but transmission of Mycobacterium leprae continues in most endemic countries. Socio-economic circumstances are considered to be a major determinant, but uncertainty exists regarding the association between leprosy and poverty. We assessed the association between different socio-economic factors and the risk of acquiring clinical signs of leprosy. We performed a case-control study in two leprosy endemic districts in northwest Bangladesh. Using interviews with structured questionnaires we compared the socio-economic circumstances of recently diagnosed leprosy patients with a control population from a random cluster sample in the same area. Logistic regression was used to compare cases and controls for their wealth score as calculated with an asset index and other socio-economic factors. The study included 90 patients and 199 controls. A recent period of food shortage and not poverty per se was identified as the only socio-economic factor significantly associated with clinical manifestation of leprosy disease (OR 1.79 (1.06-3.02); p = 0.030). A decreasing trend in leprosy prevalence with an increasing socio-economic status as measured with an asset index is apparent, but not statistically significant (test for a trend: OR 0.85 (0.71-1.02); p = 0.083). Recent food shortage is an important poverty related predictor for the clinical manifestation of leprosy disease. Food shortage is seasonal and poverty related in northwest Bangladesh. Targeted nutritional support for high risk groups should be included in leprosy control programmes in endemic areas to reduce risk of disease.

  20. Diagnosis and Treatment of Leprosy Reactions in Integrated Services - The Patients' Perspective in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Raffe, Sonia F.; Thapa, Min; Khadge, Saraswoti; Tamang, Krishna; Hagge, Deanna; Lockwood, Diana N. J.

    2013-01-01

    Leprosy care has been integrated with peripheral health services, away from vertical programmes. This includes the diagnosis and management of leprosy reactions, which cause significant morbidity. We surveyed patients with leprosy reactions at two leprosy hospitals in Nepal to assess their experience of leprosy reaction management following integration to identify any gaps in service delivery. Methods Direct and referral patients with leprosy reactions were interviewed in two of Nepal's leprosy hospitals. We also collected quantitative and qualitative data from clinical examination and case-note review to document the patient pathway. Results Seventy-five patients were interviewed. On development of reaction symptoms 39% presented directly to specialist services, 23% to a private doctor, 17% to a district hospital, 10% to a traditional healer, 7% to a health post and 4% elsewhere. Those who presented directly to specialist services were 6.6 times more likely to start appropriate treatment than those presenting elsewhere (95% CI: 3.01 to 14.45). The average delay between symptom onset to commencing corticosteroids was 2.9 months (range 0–24 months). Obstacles to early presentation and treatment included diagnostic challenge, patients' lack of knowledge and the patients' view of health as a low priority. 40% received corticosteroids for longer than 12 weeks and 72% required an inpatient stay. Treatment follow-up was conducted at locations ranging from health posts to specialist hospitals. Inconsistency in the availability of corticosteroids peripherally was identified and 41% of patients treated for leprosy and a reaction on an outpatient basis attended multiple sites for follow-up treatment. Conclusion This study demonstrates that specialist services are necessary and continue to provide significant critical support within an integrated health system approach towards the diagnosis and management of leprosy reactions. PMID:23505585

  1. Leprosy in Denmark 1980-2010: a review of 15 cases.

    PubMed

    Aftab, Huma; Nielsen, Susanne D; Bygbjerg, Ib C

    2016-01-05

    Leprosy, caused by Mycobacterium leprae, is a chronic and progressive granulomatous disease affecting mainly the skin and the peripheral nervous system. If left unrecognized, the infection can lead to permanent nerve damage and disability. The clinical presentation depends on the immune response of the patient and can result in a wide spectrum of symptoms. Leprosy is a rare encounter in Scandinavia but remains endemic in some parts of the world, with some areas reporting an increasing incidence. We performed a retrospective record review of leprosy cases in Denmark from 1980 to 2010 with the purpose of presenting the most common geographical, demographic and clinical findings and to discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges of patients with leprosy. In total 15 cases were reviewed. The majority (87%) of leprosy patients in Denmark were born in South- and Southeast Asia, and were presumed to have contracted the infection in their countries of origin. Patients were predominately young males (mean age: 28.6 years). Anaesthetic skin lesion with or without nerve enlargement were the most common clinical presentations (73%). Immunological leprosy reactions were seen in 40% of the cases. Diagnoses were based on clinical findings and skin biopsies. Treatment length varied but all patients received multidrug regimens. Leprosy should be kept in mind when encountering patients with suspicious skin lesions originating from leprosy endemic areas or with history of travel or work in the tropics. Due to the long incubation period with symptoms presenting long after immigration or return, clinicians often do not have the diagnosis in mind. The wide spectrum of symptoms and immunological reactions further complicates the diagnostic process. Treatment of leprosy and the complicated immunological reactions, which frequently accompanies the infection, should be performed in collaboration with a specialist.

  2. Association of Nitric Oxide Synthase2 gene polymorphisms with leprosy reactions in northern Indian population.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Amit; Biswas, Sanjay Kumar; Sinha, Ekata; Chakma, Joy Kumar; Kamal, Raj; Arora, Mamta; Sagar, Harish; Natarajan, Mohan; Bhagyawant, Sameer S; Mohanty, Keshar Kunja

    2017-07-01

    The pathogen Mycobacterium leprae causes leprosy that affects mainly skin and nerves. Polymorphisms of certain genes are substantiated to be associated with the susceptibility/resistance to leprosy. The present investigation addressed the association of Nitric Oxide Synthase2 gene polymorphisms and leprosy in a population from northern part of India. A total of 323 leprosy cases and 288 healthy controls were genotyped for four NOS2 promoter variants (rs1800482, rs2779249, rs8078340 and rs2301369) using FRET technology in Real Time PCR. None of these SNPs in promoter sites was associated with susceptibility/resistance to leprosy. NOS2 rs1800482 was found to be monomorphic with GG genotype. However, NOS2-1026T allele was observed to be in higher frequency with leprosy cases (BL and LL) who were not suffering from any reactional episodes compared to cases with ENL reaction {OR=0.30, 95% CI (0.10-0.86), p=0.024}. NOS2-1026GT genotype was more prevalent in cases without reaction (BT, BB and BL) compared to RR reactional patients {OR=0.38, 95% CI (0.17-0.86), p=0.02}. Although haplotype analysis revealed that no haplotype was associated with leprosy susceptibility/resistance with statistical significance, GTG haplotype was noted to be more frequent in healthy controls. These SNPs are observed to be in linkage disequilibrium. Although, these SNPs are not likely to influence leprosy vulnerability, -1026G>T SNP was indicated to have noteworthy role in leprosy reactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies and rheumatoid factor sera titers in leprosy patients from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Zavala-Cerna, María G; Fafutis-Morris, Mary; Guillen-Vargas, Cecilia; Salazar-Páramo, Mario; García-Cruz, Diana E; Riebeling, Carlos; Nava, Arnulfo

    2012-11-01

    Leprosy offers a broad spectrum of altered immunological sceneries, ranging from strong cell-mediated immune responses seen in tuberculoid leprosy (TT), through borderline leprosy (BB), to the virtual absence of T cell responses characteristic in lepromatous leprosy (LL). The exact mechanism of autoantibodies production remains unknown in leprosy and other chronic inflammatory diseases and also the contribution of these antibodies to the pathogenesis of the disease. The aim of this study is to evaluate the frequency and profiles of serum anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (a-CCP), rheumatoid factor (RF) and its relationship with leprosy spectrum. Serum samples from 67 leprosy patients (54 LL, 5 TT and 8 BB) and 46 clinically healthy subjects (CHS) from the same endemic region were investigated. The clinical chart and questionnaire were used to obtain clinical information. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (a-CCP) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas the rheumatoid factor (RF) levels were measured by nephelometric method. The mean age of patients was 51.5 ± 13 years. Sera levels of a-CCP where higher in leprosy patients than in CHS (5.9 ± 11.6 vs. 0.3 ± 0.29) (P < 0.0001); the same pattern was found for RF sera titers without reaching statistical significance (16.8 ± 22.5 vs. 9.9 ± 3) (P = NS). We did not find a correlation between a-CCP and RF Rho =0.02786 (IC 95%) P = 0.8229. However, LL patients had higher a-CCP and RF levels than TT patients. Although an absence in correlation was observed, the serum levels of a-CCP antibodies and RF appeared to be useful in distinguishing LL from TT patients with a limited significance in detecting reactional leprosy patients.

  4. Thermographic analysis and autonomic response in the hands of patients with leprosy*

    PubMed Central

    Cavalheiro, Aretusa Lopes; da Costa, Debora Tacon; de Menezes, Ana Luiza Ferro; Pereira, Janser Moura; de Carvalho, Eliane Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background Low temperatures and slow blood flow may result from peripheral neuropathy caused by leprosy, and the simple detection of cold fingers could already be a preliminary classification for these patients. Objective To investigate whether infrared thermography would be able to measure this change in temperature in the hands of people with leprosy. Method The study assessed 17 leprosy patients who were under treatment at the National Reference Center for Sanitary Dermatology and Leprosy, Uberlândia/MG, and 15 people without leprosy for the control group. The infrared camera FLIR A325 and Therma CAM Researcher Professional 2.9 software were used to measure the temperature. The room was air-conditioned, maintaining the temperature at 25°C; the distance between the camera and the limb was 70 cm. The vasomotor reflex of patients was tested by a cold stress on the palm. Results The study showed a significant interaction between the clinical form of leprosy and temperature, where the control group and the borderline-borderline form revealed a higher initial temperature, while borderline-lepromatous and lepromatous leprosy showed a lower temperature. Regarding vasomotor reflex, lepromatous leprosy patients were unable to recover the initial temperature after cold stress, while those with the borderline-tuberculoid form not only recovered but exceeded the initial temperature. Conclusion Thermography proved a potential tool to assist in the early detection of neuropathies, helping in the prevention of major nerve damage and the installation of deformities and disabilities that are characteristic of leprosy. PMID:27438192

  5. Protease inhibitors activity in lepromatous leprosy and lepra reaction.

    PubMed

    Yemul, V L; Sengupta, S R; Dhole, T N

    1983-01-01

    Serum alpha one antitrypsin levels were measured in 50 healthy age and sex matched controls with 45 lepromatous leprosy cases and 5 cases of lepra reaction. It was noted that the mean level in healthy controls was 281.00 mg%, while the mean levels in LL patients was 421.00 mg% and in LR 570.00 mg%. The elevation of Alpha one antitrypsin was statistically significant in LL patients. It is possible that the rise is a reaction to release of proteases and or higher complement activity, which are the results of a high bacillary loading to formation of immune complexes.

  6. Single lesion multibacillary leprosy, a treatment enigma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Leprosy exhibits a wide spectrum of presentation, varying from the tuberculoid to the lepromatous pole, with immunologically unstable borderline forms in-between, depending upon the immune status of the individual. The clinical system of classification for the purpose of treatment includes the number of skin lesions and nerves involved as the basis for classifying the patients into multibacillary and paucibacillary. Case presentation A 20-year-old man belonging to a moderately endemic leprosy area in the Terai region of Nepal reported a large single, hypopigmented, well defined anaesthetic lesion on his left thigh extending to his knee which had been present for 2 years. There was no other nerve involvement. Clinical diagnosis was tuberculoid leprosy and immunological lateral flow test for anti-Phenolic glycolipid-I antibody was positive. Six months of paucibacillary multidrug treatment was advised immediately. However, the patient was reclassified as multibacillary on the basis of a positive skin smear and appropriate treatment of 24 months multibacillary multidrug regimen was commenced after only 1 week. Slit skin smear examination for Mycobacterium leprae from the lesion revealed a bacterial index of 4+ while it was negative from the routine sites. Histopathological examination from skin biopsy of the lesion further supported the bacterial index of the lesion granuloma which was 2+ and the patient was diagnosed as borderline tuberculoid. Bacteriological, histological, and immunological findings of this patient were borderline tuberculoid leprosy and he should have been treated with multibacillary regimen from the beginning. Five months after commencement of treatment, the patient developed a leprae reaction of Type 1 or reversal reaction with some nerve function impairment and enlargement of the lateral popliteal nerve of the left leg. This reversal reaction was managed by standard oral prednisolone whilst continuing the multibacillary multidrug

  7. The discovery of the causes of leprosy: A computational analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Corruble, V.; Ganascia, J.G.

    1996-12-31

    The role played by the inductive inference has been studied extensively in the field of Scientific Discovery. The work presented here tackles the problem of induction in medical research. The discovery of the causes of leprosy is analyzed and simulated using computational means. An inductive algorithm is proposed, which is successful in simulating some essential steps in the progress of the understanding of the disease. It also allows us to simulate the false reasoning of previous centuries through the introduction of some medical a priori inherited form archaic medicine. Corroborating previous research, this problem illustrates the importance of the social and cultural environment on the way the inductive inference is performed in medicine.

  8. Otophyma: a rare benign clinical entity mimicking leprosy.

    PubMed

    Shuster, Marina; McWilliams, Ashley; Giambrone, Danielle; Noor, Omar; Cha, Jisun

    2014-12-16

    Otophyma is a rare condition characterized by edematous deformation of the ear that is considered to be the end-stage of an inflammatory process such as rosacea and eczema. This report illustrates a case in an elderly male, originally thought to have leprosy. Biopsy revealed a nodular infiltration of inflammatory cells around adnexal structures and an intraepidermal cyst. No acid-fast organisms were identified. We present a patient who is of a different ethnic group than usually seen with this disease and provide a review of the clinical presentation, histopathological features, and management of this rare condition.

  9. Biblical leprosy: an anachronism whose time has come.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, D L

    1993-03-01

    Although there is a growing consensus that biblical leprosy was indeed not Hansen's disease, there has been no agreement as to the disease or diseases described in the Bible. Biblical scholars have recently provided valuable insights regarding the interpretation of the original text on the cutaneous diseases described in Leviticus, chapter 13. It is suggested by the author that no particular cutaneous disease was meant to be implicated. Rather the passages were written to exonerate persons whose only "sin" was to have an obvious cutaneous disorder.

  10. Verrucous lepromatous leprosy: a rare form of presentation - Report on two cases*

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Marcelo Zanolli; Hans, Gunter; Takita, Luiz Carlos; Vicari, Carolina Faria Santos; Barbosa, Aline Blanco; Couto, Daíne Vargas

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy skin lesions are described as hypochromic or erythematous macules, pale erythematous or reddish-brown plaques, papules, nodules, and diffuse cutaneous infiltration, depending on the clinical form of the disease. They may be accompanied by hypo or anesthesia, alopecia, and hypo or anhidrosis. Verrucous lesions are now quite uncommon in leprosy. The literature is sparse, with only 25 reported cases of this association, especially in the lepromatous pole of the disease. This work is a report on two cases of lepromatous leprosy of long evolution, coursing with vegetant verrucous lesions. PMID:24937824

  11. Biological agents: investigation into leprosy and other infectious diseases before indication*

    PubMed Central

    Antônio, João Roberto; Soubhia, Rosa Maria Cordeiro; Paschoal, Vania Del Arco; Amarante, Carolina Forte; Travolo, Ana Regina Franchi

    2013-01-01

    Biological agents are widely used for various immune-mediated diseases, with remarkable effectiveness in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and Crohn's disease. However, attention needs to be drawn to the adverse effects of these therapies and the risk of reactivating underlying granulomatous infectious diseases such as tuberculosis, leprosy, syphilis, leishmaniasis, among others. The objective of this paper is to describe a case of leprosy in a patient with RA using anti-TNF alfa, demonstrating the need for systematic investigation of skin lesions suggestive of leprosy in patients who require rheumatoid arthritis therapeutic treatment, especially in endemic regions like Brazil. PMID:24346871

  12. Beliefs of leprosy patients about their illness. A study in the province of South Sulawesi, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Elissen, M C

    1991-10-01

    In Bone district, Province of South Sulawesi, Indonesia, a total of 50 randomly selected leprosy patients were interviewed about their beliefs about their illness with the help of a questionnaire. It became evident, that their knowledge about leprosy was generally satisfactory, but only few patients adopted the bacterial theory as cause of their disease. Besides it was found that leprosy patients tend to discriminate themselves, while more tolerance was found in their healthy contacts. Traditional beliefs and religious ideas played an important role. To overcome the stigma, more health education, based on a multidisciplinary approach is required. Beside the modern medical theory, cultural beliefs and religious views have to be taken into consideration.

  13. Gold weight implants in the management of lagophthalmos in leprosy patients.

    PubMed

    El Toukhy, Essam

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate the use of gold weights as upper lid implants in the management of lagophthalmos due to facial nerve affection in leprosy patients. Gold implants of various weights were inserted in the upper eyelids of 12 patients with leprosy. Pre- and post-operative lid closures were recorded and patients were followed up for 1 year. Despite early satisfactory results with good closure, six out of 12 implants were extruded within the first year. Two more implants had to be removed due to chronic inflammatory reaction. Long term result of gold weight implants in leprosy patient is unsatisfactory and needs further evaluation.

  14. Corneal sensitivity and correlations between decreased sensitivity and anterior segment pathology in ocular leprosy.

    PubMed

    Karaçorlu, M A; Cakiner, T; Saylan, T

    1991-02-01

    Leprosy is one of the leading causes of corneal hyposensitivity. In this article the corneal sensitivity of 143 leprosy patients was examined, and correlations between corneal hyposensitivity and anterior segment pathology were detected. Twenty four healthy volunteers were examined as controls. Various degrees of corneal loss of sensitivity were found in 46.2% of leprosy patients. Lagophthalmos, chronic lepromatous granulomatous uveitis, iris atrophy, and social blindness were found 4.5-16.6 times more frequently in eyes which developed severe corneal hyposensitivity.

  15. Corneal sensitivity and correlations between decreased sensitivity and anterior segment pathology in ocular leprosy.

    PubMed Central

    Karaçorlu, M A; Cakiner, T; Saylan, T

    1991-01-01

    Leprosy is one of the leading causes of corneal hyposensitivity. In this article the corneal sensitivity of 143 leprosy patients was examined, and correlations between corneal hyposensitivity and anterior segment pathology were detected. Twenty four healthy volunteers were examined as controls. Various degrees of corneal loss of sensitivity were found in 46.2% of leprosy patients. Lagophthalmos, chronic lepromatous granulomatous uveitis, iris atrophy, and social blindness were found 4.5-16.6 times more frequently in eyes which developed severe corneal hyposensitivity. PMID:1995039

  16. Knowledge of and attitudes to leprosy among patients and community members: a comparative study in Uttar Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Barkataki, Pramila; Kumar, Sheo; Rao, P S S

    2006-03-01

    The roles of literacy and gender in enhancing help seeking behaviour in leprosy need further research in order to maximize the effectiveness of health education programmes. A study on leprosy knowledge and attitudes was carried out in Uttar Pradesh, one of the hyper endemic states for leprosy in north India, on a random sample of 130 leprosy patients, 120 non-leprosy patients, and 150 community members. A questionnaire was prepared, tested and administered in Hindi, the local language, by a qualified interviewer. Statistical analyses were done in each group by gender and literacy, and compared. Almost everyone in the three groups knew of leprosy, but only a larger proportion of leprosy patients (60%) mentioned anaesthetic patch, as compared to about 20% or less in the other groups. A vast majority in all groups mentioned bad blood, or divine curse as the cause. Even among leprosy patients, less than 10% of illiterates and only about 40% of literates cited infection as the cause of leprosy. Literates had a better, though still quite a poor knowledge on the symptoms as well as the causation of leprosy. However, almost all stated that leprosy was curable, though they couldn't mention MDT specifically. They felt that not all patients need have deformity. About 20-30% of the leprosy affected, but nearly 50-60% in the other groups stated that there was discrimination. Nearly 70% felt that leprosy affected social participation, over 90% attributing this to adverse social stigma. Multivariate analyses, adjusted for sex, confirmed the significant association of literacy with both knowledge and attitudes. In the light of massive health education and IEC campaigns, the findings from this study are disappointing. Adult literacy programmes combined with more innovative focused approaches to suit various target audiences can impact knowledge and attitudes better.

  17. Current Perceptions and Practices (KAP) about Leprosy among Leprosy Patients: A Comparative Study between High Prevalent & Low Prevalent Districts of West Bengal.

    PubMed

    Saha, G; Mandal, N K; Dutta, R N

    2015-01-01

    A cross sectional observational study was conducted to assess knowledge, attitude and practices about leprosy among leprosy patients in six districts of West Bengal. Total patients selected for the study were 300; of them 185 patients were from three high prevalent districts and 115 from three low prevalent districts of West Bengal. 56.33% patients were male and 43.67% were female. Most of the patients (85.67%) belonged to Hindu community and 60% from socially backward group. 64.33% patients lived below poverty line. Thirty five percentage of patients had correct knowledge that leprosy is caused by a bacteria. Patients from high prevalent districts (41.62%) have better knowledge than those from low prevalent areas (26.09%). Difference was found to be statistically significant (p = 0.006). Correct knowledge about spread of leprosy through cough & sneezing, of the patients from high prevalent districts (30.81%) was more than those from low prevalent districts (14.78%) (p = 0.001). 74.05% patients from high prevalent districts could tell one or other forms of clinical presentation of a leprosy patients, while 56.52% from low prevalent areas could mention it correctly (p = 0.01). About infectiousness, duration of treatment, complications, patients from high prevalent districts showed better knowledge that those from low prevalent districts. Similarly, Attitude of the patients towards leprosy was found to be more adverse in low prevalent areas. 90% patients have idea that leprosy was curable, but only 51.67% patients heard about MDT. Place of residence (high prevalent districts) & level of education (secondary & above) attributed to better knowledge score of the patients, whereas Place of residence (high prevalent districts) & age (younger age group) attributed to better attitude score of the patients.

  18. Platelet Rich Plasma: Efficacy in Treating Trophic Ulcers in Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Anandan, V.; Jameela, W. Afthab; Saraswathy, P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Trophic ulcers secondary to leprosy pose a great stigma to the patients and remain a challenge to the treating dermatologists. The discovery of Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) with its favourable role in wound healing is a boon for the patients. PRP introduces the growth factors directly into the wound and aids in rapid healing. Aim To study the efficacy and safety of PRP in the healing of trophic ulcers secondary to Hansen’s disease in a tertiary care centre in Southern India. Materials and Methods Based on inclusion and exclusion criteria, 50 patients were enrolled in the study. PRP was prepared by manual double spin method. After wound bed preparation, activated PRP was sprayed over the ulcer and occlusive dressings were applied. Same procedure was repeated every week until complete re-epithelisation or up to six sittings whichever occurred earlier. Results In our study, 46 patients (92%) showed complete healing. In 4 patients (8%), there was marked reduction in wound size with partial re-epithelization. In 88%, complete healing was seen after the fourth sitting. Mean time for ulcer healing was around 4.38 weeks. Conclusion PRP therapy leads to faster rate of induction of granulation tissue with rapid healing. Healing had no direct statistical correlation with the size, site and duration of ulcer, the leprosy spectrum and associated motor deformities. It is a simple, safe and cost effective in-office procedure, albeit requiring an optimal set-up and expertise. PMID:27891436

  19. Combination chemoprophylaxis and immunoprophylaxis in reducing the incidence of leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Duthie, Malcolm S; Balagon, Marivic F

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is a complex infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae that is a leading cause of nontraumatic peripheral neuropathy. Current control strategies, with a goal of early diagnosis and treatment in the form of multidrug therapy, have maintained new case reports at ~225,000 per year. Diagnostic capabilities are limited and even with revisions to multidrug therapy regimen, treatment can still require up to a year of daily drug intake. Although alternate chemotherapies or adjunct immune therapies that could provide shorter or simpler treatment regimen appear possible, only a limited number of trials have been conducted. More proactive strategies appear necessary in the drive to elimination. As a prevention strategy, most chemoprophylaxis campaigns to date have provided about a 2-year protective window. Vaccination, in the form of a single bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) immunization, generally provides ~50% reduction in leprosy cases. Adapting control strategies to provide both chemoprophylaxis and immunoprophylaxis has distinct appeal, with chemoprophylaxis theoretically buttressed by vaccination to generate immediate protection that can be sustained in the long term. We also discuss simple assays measuring biomarkers as surrogates for disease development or replacements for invasive, but not particularly sensitive, direct measures of M. leprae infection. Such assays could facilitate the clinical trials required to develop these new chemoprophylaxis, immunoprophylaxis strategies, and transition into wider use. PMID:27175099

  20. Integrated pathways for neutrophil recruitment and inflammation in leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Delphine J.; Li, Huiying; Ochoa, Maria T.; Tanaka, Motoyuki; Carbone, Ryan J.; Damoiseaux, Robert; Burdick, Anne; Sarno, Euzenir N.; Rea, Thomas H.; Modlin, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophil recruitment is pivotal to host defense against microbial infection, but also contributes to the immunopathology of disease. We investigated the mechanism of neutrophil recruitment in human infectious disease by bioinformatic pathways analysis of the gene expression profiles in the skin lesions of leprosy. In erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL), which occurs in patients with lepromatous leprosy (L-lep), and is characterized by neutrophil infiltration in lesions, the most overrepresented biologic functional group was “cell movement” including E-selectin, which was coordinately regulated with IL-1β. In vitro activation of TLR2, upregulated in ENL lesions, triggered induction of IL-1β, which together with IFN-γ, induced E-selectin expression on, and neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells. Thalidomide, an effective treatment for ENL, inhibited this neutrophil recruitment pathway. The gene expression profile of ENL lesions comprised an integrated pathway of TLR2/FcR activation, neutrophil migration and inflammation, providing insight into mechanisms of neutrophil recruitment in human infectious disease. PMID:20070238

  1. Ultrasound elastography assessment of the median nerve in leprosy patients.

    PubMed

    Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H; Lugão, Helena B; Gregio-Júnior, Everaldo; Crema, Michel D; Kobayashi, Mariana T T; Frade, Marco A C; Pavan, Theo Z; Carneiro, Antonio A O

    2017-09-01

    We sought to compare median nerve elasticity between leprosy patients (LPs) and healthy volunteers (HVs) using ultrasound elastography (UE). Two radiologists independently measured the strain ratio of the median nerve/flexor digitorum superficialis muscle (MN/FDSM) of 18 LP and 18 HV using real-time freehand UE. Statistical analysis included intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) and Mann-Whitney test. The MN/FDSM strain ratios of the LP and HV were 2.66 ± 1.30 and 3.52 ± 0.93, respectively (P <  0.05). We observed a significantly lower MN/FDSM strain ratio in LP with reactions (types 1 and 2 cutaneous reactions associated with or without neuritis) (2.30 ± 0.91) compared with LP without reactions (3.60 ± 1.70). We found no significant differences between HV and LP without reactions. The intra- and inter-observer ICCs were 0.50 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.11-0.72) and 0.34 (95% CI, 0.28-0.52), respectively. MN/FDSM strain ratios were significantly lower in LP with reactions. UE may be useful for nerve elasticity evaluation in leprosy. Muscle Nerve 56: 393-398, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Risk Factors for Leprosy Reactions in Three Endemic Countries

    PubMed Central

    Scollard, David M.; Martelli, Celina M. T.; Stefani, Mariane M. A.; Maroja, Maria de Fatima; Villahermosa, Laarni; Pardillo, Fe; Tamang, Krishna B.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to ascertain risk factors for complications (reactions or neuritis) in leprosy patients at the time of diagnosis in three leprosy-endemic countries. Newly diagnosed patients were enrolled in Brazil, the Philippines, and Nepal, and risk factors for reactions and neuritis were assessed using a case-control approach: “cases” were patients with these complications, and controls were patients without complications. Of 1,972 patients enrolled in this study, 22% had complications before treatment. Type 1 reaction was diagnosed in 13.7% of patients, neuritis alone in 6.9.%, and type 2 reaction in 1.4%. The frequency of these complications was higher in Nepal, in lepromatous patients, in males, and in adults versus children. Reactions and neuritis were seen in patients at diagnosis, before treatment was started. Reactions were seen in adults and children, even in patients with only a single lesion. Neuritis was often present without other signs of reaction. Reactions and neuritis were more likely to occur in lepromatous patients, and were more likely to be seen in adults than in children. PMID:25448239

  3. Amyloid-related serum component (protein ASC) IN LEPROSY PATIENTS.

    PubMed Central

    Kronvall, G; Husby, G; Samuel, D; Bjune, G; Wheate, H

    1975-01-01

    The presence of amyloid-related serum component, protein ASC, in serum samples from 63 leprosy patients was investigated. Protein ASC was detected in 38% of the patients. A correlation to the disease spectrum of leprosy was apparent: polar lepromatous cases, 64% positive; borderline lepromatous, 50%; borderline tuberculoid, 36%; subpolar tuberculoid, 17%; and polar tuberculoid, negative. Antibody activity against the a antigen of Mycobacterium leprae was also determined, showing a similar correlation to the disease spectrum. Serum samples from 23 apparently healthy Ethiopians serving as controls showed a protein ASC incidence of 22%. This figure is significantly higher than the frequency found by others among healthy Norwegian blood donors. Immunoglobulin M levels among patients were elevated in the borderline lepromatous and poplar lepromatous groups. The three tuberculoid groups did not differ in this respect from the control group but were all elevated as compared to a normal Caucasian serum pool. Although raised immunoglobulin M levels seemed to parallel increased frequencies of protein ASC in the patient groups as well as in controls, this correlation might be only secondary to a primary derangement in T-cell function. PMID:804451

  4. Déjà vu: leprosy and immigration discourse in the twenty-first century United States.

    PubMed

    White, Cassandra

    2010-03-01

    Leprosy, or Hansen's disease, continues to be feared and poorly understood in the United States, where knowledge of the disease is limited and prevalence is low. The presence of leprosy among immigrants, however, provides fuel for those with an anti-immigration agenda. In recent years, there have been several examples of popular media distortions of statistics and of information on leprosy's properties and contagiousness. As in previous eras of U.S. history, public fears about leprosy seem to be related to anti-immigration or nativist sentiment, which often mask underlying concerns about the potential economic threat of immigrant populations. In this article, I analyse the role of the U.S. media and other stakeholders who may have an interest in generating public fear associated with leprosy, in presenting and at times manipulating data about the disease to create an association between leprosy and undocumented immigration.

  5. Book Review of "Leprosy in Premodern Medicine. A Malady of the Whole Body" by Luke Demaitre PhD

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Karin M

    2007-01-01

    Luke Demaitre's Leprosy in Premodern Medicine: A Malady of the Whole Body is a highly interesting study of the medical history of leprosy and the medical and social perceptions on leprosy that have been around for centuries. Remarkably, it is likely that leprosy will disappear from the face of the Earth in our generation, thanks to the development of a curative treatment and its increasing availability (although the battle has not yet been won completely). Demaitre's book is a very good read not only for its information about leprosy but also for all interested in or affected by the social phenomenon of stigma. In illnesses such as leprosy, HIV/AIDS, epilepsy, and mental disorders such as schizophrenia, the stigma attached to the condition may be worse than the condition itself.

  6. Leprosy neuropathy evaluated by NCS is independent of the patient's infectious state.

    PubMed

    Jardim, M R; Vital, R; Hacker, M A; Nascimento, M; Balassiano, S L; Sarno, E N; Illarramendi, X

    2015-04-01

    Leprosy causes nerve injury, which mimics clinical and neurophysiological conditions, rendering it an excellent model of peripheral neuropathy. A retrospective study including 822 nerve conduction studies (NCS) of 509 patients was developed to appraise the electrophysiological pattern of leprosy neuropathy. NCS of motor and sensory nerves performed before, during, and after multidrug therapy (MDT) were analyzed. During the three periods of MDT, while NCS alterations were similar regarding extension, topography, damage severity, and type of lesion, NCS showed that sensory was more frequent (sural nerve) (92-96%) than motor impairment (70-77%) (ulnar nerve). Once axonal loss has been installed, nerve function is little affected by inflammatory, immune and/or bacterial events since chronic neuropathy has been established, inevitably leading to the well-known leprosy sequelae occurring at any time before and/or after leprosy diagnosis. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Leprosy and its socio-cultural perception in Indian religions and ancient texts.

    PubMed

    Sinha, A K; Banerjee, B G; Singh, S

    2010-01-01

    Leprosy is one of the oldest ailments known to the mankind. Many of the ancient texts and scriptures reveal that leprosy was not categorised as a specified disease but was grouped along with other skin diseases. However, in certain texts categorical mention of this disease does exist. The prime objective of this article is to highlight the age old traditional line of perception about this disease. A literature review was done to up-date the socio-cultural perception of leprosy in Indian religions and ancient texts. References were obtained through examining relevant bibliographies and the views/suggestions of eminent scholars engaged in this field were also included. An analysis of the secondary sources of data, particularly the ancient texts reveals that in good old days, leprosy had been considered to be an infliction of wrong-doings and sins. This viewpoint has been significantly reflected in these texts.

  8. Incidence of late lepra reaction among multibacillary leprosy patients after MDT.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumaran, P; Manimozhi, N; Jesudasan, K

    1995-03-01

    Multidrug therapy (MDT) recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) had been administered in 1982 to a cohort of multibacillary (MB) leprosy patients. Treatment was administered for a minimum period of 2 years or until skin-smear negativity for acid-fast bacilli was achieved (whichever was later). Among 980 MB leprosy patients who completed treatment, 11 patients (1.1%) experienced lepra reactions during surveillance. Probable predictive factors are discussed. The incidence of lepra reaction seemed to be three times more common in borderline (BL) leprosy than in lepromatous (LL) leprosy. The majority of these events occurred during the first 3 years of surveillance. All of these episodes were treated with steroids without antileprosy chemotherapy. None of these patients was confirmed as experiencing a relapse during the subsequent period of surveillance.

  9. Experience of involvement of IMA members in leprosy elimination after CME conducted during 2004-2005.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jagjit; Singh, Charanjit

    2006-12-01

    Leprosy can affect all age groups. In 1991 the World Health Assembly took major initiative towards global elimination of the disease. It was possible to achieve 90% reduction in leprosy cases all over the world. India is not lagging behind to eliminate leprosy as Government of India, various NGOs and IMA have joined hands to fight the menace aggressively. During the year 2004-05 the IMA organised training workshops on leprosy for private practitioners, who are mostly members of IMA. After the completion of workshops a wrap-up workshop was organised in each state. It was a treat opportunity for the IMA to mobilise its resources to contribute to the national cause.

  10. Antibodies to diverse lipids in the serum of patients with clinically cured leprosy and tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Espinosa, O; Arenas, R; Arce-Parades, P; Miranda-Contreras, G

    2003-01-01

    In this study we looked for the presence of antibodies to cardiolipin, cerebrosides, and whole lipids extracted from M. leprae, M. tuberculosis and M. habana, in the serum of patients with clinically cured lepromatous leprosy (sixteen) or tuberculosis (sixteen), 8 to 12 months after arresting the corresponding multi-drug therapy (MDT). Compared to healthy controls (sixteen), both leprosy and tuberculosis ex-patients had still significant levels of antibodies to the three mycobacterial lipids but no detectable levels of antibodies to cardiolipin or cerebroside lipids. Although leprosy and tuberculosis sera recognized the homologous mycobacterial lipids in a preferential fashion, all of them, on the average, reacted more strongly with the lipids of M. habana. This observation backs up, in a certain way, the proposition of using M. habana as a prospective vaccine for leprosy and tuberculosis.

  11. Limited susceptibility of cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) to leprosy after experimental administration of Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Gerald P; Dela Cruz, Eduardo C; Abalos, Rodolfo M; Tan, Esterlina V; Fajardo, Tranquilino T; Villahermosa, Laarni G; Cellona, Roland V; Balagon, Maria V; White, Valerie A; Saunderson, Paul R; Walsh, Douglas S

    2012-08-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys are a useful model for human tuberculosis, but susceptibility to M. leprae is unknown. A cynomolgus model of leprosy could increase understanding of pathogenesis-importantly, neuritis and nerve-damaging reactions. We administered viable Mycobacterium leprae to 24 cynomolgus monkeys by three routes, with a median follow-up period of 6 years (range = 1-19 years) involving biopsies, nasal smears, antiphenolic glycolipid-1 (PGL-1) antibody serology, and lepromin skin testing. Most developed evanescent papules at intradermal M. leprae inoculation sites that, on biopsy, showed a robust cellular immune response akin to a lepromin skin test reaction; many produced PGL-1 antibodies. At necropsy, four monkeys, without cutaneous or gross neurological signs of leprosy but with elevated PGL-1 antibodies, including three with nasal smears (+) for acid fast bacilli (AFB), showed histological features, including AFB, suggestive of leprosy at several sites. Overall, however, cynomolgus monkeys seem minimally susceptible to leprosy after experimental M. leprae administration.

  12. Comparison and Contrast of the Elimination Campaigns for Poliomyelitis and Leprosy: Which is More Feasible?

    PubMed

    Malheiro, Luís; Pinto, Sofia Correia; Sarmento, Antonio; Santos, Lurdes

    2016-04-01

    As we approach the third decade since the WHO started addressing the eradication of poliomyelitis and leprosy, a reflection of the previous campaigns efficacy and an evaluation of further elimination feasibility is important to adapt and intensify the next steps. We performed a critical review of the poliomyelitis and leprosy eradication campaigns to evaluate their technical and operational feasibilities. Vaccination and active case search are highly effective tools against poliomyelitis. If political stability and good vaccination coverage is achieved, poliomyelitis will be an easy target for eradication. Leprosy, on the other hand, faces many barriers towards elimination. The lack of a high efficacy vaccine, the long asymptomatic but infective period, the lack of screening tests and a poorly established elimination target, prevents this disease from being eliminated. In a world where resources and funding are limited, it is apparent that poliomyelitis is a more feasible target for elimination than leprosy.

  13. A study on knowledge, beliefs and attitude towards leprosy in students of Jaipur, Rajasthan.

    PubMed

    Kanodia, S K; Dixit, A M; Shukla, S R; Seth, A K; Balothia, V; Gupta, R

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the knowledge, beliefs and attitudes regarding leprosy in school students of Jaipur district. A cross-sectional study was conducted from August 2010 to February 2011 on 1199 students (rural and urban) studying in class 10th and above. The findings of this study showed fair knowledge in students about cause, signs and symptoms of leprosy but less knowledge about prevention and treatment of the disease. Myths and beliefs were more prevalent in rural students as compared to urban ones. Both the groups showed positive attitude toward leprosy with 30-50% students showing neutral approach but negative reaction was more in rural students. In conclusion the study highlights to emphasize on health education in students and improving knowledge to develop positive attitude towards leprosy.

  14. Limited Susceptibility of Cynomolgus Monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) to Leprosy after Experimental Administration of Mycobacterium leprae

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Gerald P.; Dela Cruz, Eduardo C.; Abalos, Rodolfo M.; Tan, Esterlina V.; Fajardo, Tranquilino T.; Villahermosa, Laarni G.; Cellona, Roland V.; Balagon, Maria V.; White, Valerie A.; Saunderson, Paul R.; Walsh, Douglas S.

    2012-01-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys are a useful model for human tuberculosis, but susceptibility to M. leprae is unknown. A cynomolgus model of leprosy could increase understanding of pathogenesis—importantly, neuritis and nerve-damaging reactions. We administered viable Mycobacterium leprae to 24 cynomolgus monkeys by three routes, with a median follow-up period of 6 years (range = 1–19 years) involving biopsies, nasal smears, antiphenolic glycolipid-1 (PGL-1) antibody serology, and lepromin skin testing. Most developed evanescent papules at intradermal M. leprae inoculation sites that, on biopsy, showed a robust cellular immune response akin to a lepromin skin test reaction; many produced PGL-1 antibodies. At necropsy, four monkeys, without cutaneous or gross neurological signs of leprosy but with elevated PGL-1 antibodies, including three with nasal smears (+) for acid fast bacilli (AFB), showed histological features, including AFB, suggestive of leprosy at several sites. Overall, however, cynomolgus monkeys seem minimally susceptible to leprosy after experimental M. leprae administration. PMID:22855766

  15. Treatment outcome and impact of leprosy elimination campaign in Sokoto and Zamfara states, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ebenso, B E; Tureta, S M; Udo, S O

    2001-06-01

    A Leprosy Elimination Campaign (LEC) was implemented in 37 districts of Sokoto and Zamfara states, Nigeria from 13 August to 30 November 1998. The campaign utilized intensive community mobilization and training of local health personnel to detect hidden leprosy cases. During 8 weeks of case finding, 160,127 persons were screened; 353 new cases of leprosy were detected and placed on MDT; 236 (67%) of new cases detected were classified as MB, 64 cases (18%) suffered visible deformities and 24 patients (6.8%) were children. Follow-up in December 1999 of patients placed on MDT revealed 97% PB and 96% MB cure rates, respectively. Detection of cases in communities led some community leaders to ask for repeat surveys in their communities. Repeat surveys continue to yield new cases. The authors recommend that LECs be maintained for 3 years to accelerate leprosy elimination in the region. The cost effectiveness and impact of LEC in Sokoto-Zamfara are discussed.

  16. Citrus leprosis virus vectored by Brevipalpus phoenicis (Acari: Tenuipalpidae) on citrus in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, J C V; Kitajima, E W; Childers, C C; Chagas, C M

    2003-01-01

    Citrus leprosis is caused by Citrus leprosis virus (CiLV) that is transmitted by mites in the genus Brevipalpus (Acari: Tenuipalpidae). This disease directly reduces production and the life span of the citrus plant. The main symptoms of the disease include lesions on fruits, leaves, and twigs or small branches, causing premature fruit drop, defoliation, and death of the twigs or branches leading to serious tree decline. Leprosis is a highly destructive disease of citrus, wherever it occurs. The Brazilian citrus industry spends over 100 million US dollars annually on acaricides to control the vector, Brevipalpus phoenicis (Geijskes). This review contains information about the history of the etiology of citrus leprosis, its geographical distribution, host range, the role of the mite vectors, viral morphology and relationships with the infected cell, and transmissibility of the virus by the mite. In addition, data on the mite-virus-plant relationship, disease damage, and strategies for controlling disease spread are presented.

  17. A very common case become rare: Anesthetic considerations of lepromatous leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Sandeep; Goyal, Vipin; Dhiraaj, Sanjay; Kishore, Kamal; Singh, P. K.

    2011-01-01

    Leprosy or Hansen's disease is very uncommon in developed countries. More than 80% of the world's cases occurs and still reported from developing countries. But nowadays due to increase in international affairs, medical tourism, globalization and immigration, there is increasing possibility to find patients anywhere, which require anesthesia for surgical interventions. Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae and involves mainly skin, peripheral nervous system, upper respiratory tract, eyes and testes. Anesthetic consideration is focused mainly on complications related to leprosy like cardiac or respiratory dysautonomia, autonomic dysfunctions and side effects which are related to drug therapy and are challenging. There can be drug-related hepatitis and renal insufficiency in these patients. We report the anesthetic management of a patient with lepromatous leprosy who had undergone laparoscopic radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma under general anesthesia. PMID:25885391

  18. Feline Leprosy: A Review of Forty-four Cases from Western Canada

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    Forty-four files of cats diagnosed as having feline leprosy were reviewed. All except one were from along the Pacific coast in the Province of British Columbia. The majority of cats were between one and three years of age and there was an increase in the number of diagnosis during the winter months. Two types of granulomatous responses similar to the tuberculoid and lepromatous phases of human leprosy were recognized. In spite of the overall similarities in the cellular response to human leprosy there were, however, significant differences such as areas of caseous necrosis and constant lack of nerve involvement. Still as there is presently no way to prove that Mycobacterium leprae is not the cause of feline leprosy the public health significance remains uncertain The treatment of choice would appear to be surgical removal. ImagesFigure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5. PMID:17422188

  19. Leprosy presenting as a non-healing ulcer and associated unusual myth.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Pravesh; Verma, Prashant; Singal, Archana

    2015-09-01

    A case of a 70 year old lady with borderline tuberculoid leprosy who presented with a chronic ulcer and associated myth has been illustrated. The need for awareness programmes focusing on these types. of myths has been stressed.

  20. Leprosy and the elusive M. leprae: colonial and Imperial medical exchanges in the nineteenth century.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Jo

    2003-01-01

    In the 1800s, humoral understandings of leprosy successively give way to disease models based on morbid anatomy, physiopathology, and bacteriology. Linkages between these disease models were reinforced by the ubiquitous seed/soil metaphor deployed both before and after the identification of M.leprae. While this metaphor provided a continuous link between medical descriptions, Henry Vandyke Carter's On leprosy (1874) marks a convergence of different models of disease. Simultaneously, this metaphor can be traced in popular medical debates in the late nineteenth century, accompanying fears of a resurgence of leprosy in Europe. Later the mapping of the genome ushers in a new model of disease but, ironically, while leprosy research draws its logic from a view of the world in which a seed and soil metaphor expresses many different aspects of the activity of the disease, the bacillus itself continues to be unreceptive to cultivation.

  1. A Retrospective Study of the Epidemiology of Leprosy in Cebu: An Eleven-Year Profile

    PubMed Central

    Scheelbeek, Pauline F. D.; Balagon, Marivic V. F.; Orcullo, Florenda M.; Maghanoy, Armi A.; Abellana, Junie; Saunderson, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cebu has been one of the most leprosy endemic areas in the Philippines. Despite the high coverage rates of multiple drug therapy (MDT) and high BCG-vaccine coverage in children, leprosy control authorities believe that leprosy transmission and incidence (as evidence by continuing new case detection in both adults and children) have not declined as expected, once leprosy had been eliminated. In response to the concerns communicated by the authorities regarding ongoing leprosy transmission in Cebu, this study aims to examine the evidence for the hypothesized ongoing transmission, both in children and adults. Furthermore, it will be assessed which groups and areas are experiencing a continuing risk of leprosy infection; this can form a starting point for more targeted approaches to leprosy control. Methodology & Principal Findings Case records from 2000–2010 were retrospectively collected from the Leonard Wood Memorial Clinic archives, and all other clinics on the island where leprosy was treated. Between 2000 and 2010, 3288 leprosy cases were detected. The overall five year case notification rate (CNR) dropped significantly from 47.35 (2001–2005) to 29.21 cases (2006–2010) per 100.000 population. Smaller CNRs were reported for children; however the decline in child-CNR over the same period was minimal. Furthermore, no increase in median age of notification in children or adults was found between 2000 and 2010. Population-adjusted clustering of leprosy cases was mainly detected in urban and peri-urban areas. Conclusions & Significance Although the overall CNR declined significantly, CNR seems to be rather static in lower risk populations and areas. Cases are mainly found in urban areas, however CNRs in these areas decline at a much faster rate than in the lower endemic rural areas. A similar situation was found when comparing adults and children: CNRs observed in children were lower than in adults, but further decline (and elimination) of these

  2. A retrospective study of the epidemiology of leprosy in Cebu: an eleven-year profile.

    PubMed

    Scheelbeek, Pauline F D; Balagon, Marivic V F; Orcullo, Florenda M; Maghanoy, Armi A; Abellana, Junie; Saunderson, Paul R

    2013-01-01

    Cebu has been one of the most leprosy endemic areas in the Philippines. Despite the high coverage rates of multiple drug therapy (MDT) and high BCG-vaccine coverage in children, leprosy control authorities believe that leprosy transmission and incidence (as evidence by continuing new case detection in both adults and children) have not declined as expected, once leprosy had been eliminated. In response to the concerns communicated by the authorities regarding ongoing leprosy transmission in Cebu, this study aims to examine the evidence for the hypothesized ongoing transmission, both in children and adults. Furthermore, it will be assessed which groups and areas are experiencing a continuing risk of leprosy infection; this can form a starting point for more targeted approaches to leprosy control. Case records from 2000-2010 were retrospectively collected from the Leonard Wood Memorial Clinic archives, and all other clinics on the island where leprosy was treated. Between 2000 and 2010, 3288 leprosy cases were detected. The overall five year case notification rate (CNR) dropped significantly from 47.35 (2001-2005) to 29.21 cases (2006-2010) per 100.000 population. Smaller CNRs were reported for children; however the decline in child-CNR over the same period was minimal. Furthermore, no increase in median age of notification in children or adults was found between 2000 and 2010. Population-adjusted clustering of leprosy cases was mainly detected in urban and peri-urban areas. Although the overall CNR declined significantly, CNR seems to be rather static in lower risk populations and areas. Cases are mainly found in urban areas, however CNRs in these areas decline at a much faster rate than in the lower endemic rural areas. A similar situation was found when comparing adults and children: CNRs observed in children were lower than in adults, but further decline (and elimination) of these childhood CNRs was found to be difficult. Moreover, the median age of notification

  3. Spatial Analysis Spotlighting Early Childhood Leprosy Transmission in a Hyperendemic Municipality of the Brazilian Amazon Region

    PubMed Central

    Barreto, Josafá Gonçalves; Bisanzio, Donal; Guimarães, Layana de Souza; Spencer, John Stewart; Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M.; Kitron, Uriel; Salgado, Claudio Guedes

    2014-01-01

    Background More than 200,000 new cases of leprosy were reported by 105 countries in 2011. The disease is a public health problem in Brazil, particularly within high-burden pockets in the Amazon region where leprosy is hyperendemic among children. Methodology We applied geographic information systems and spatial analysis to determine the spatio-temporal pattern of leprosy cases in a hyperendemic municipality of the Brazilian Amazon region (Castanhal). Moreover, we performed active surveillance to collect clinical, epidemiological and serological data of the household contacts of people affected by leprosy and school children in the general population. The occurrence of subclinical infection and overt disease among the evaluated individuals was correlated with the spatio-temporal pattern of leprosy. Principal Findings The pattern of leprosy cases showed significant spatio-temporal heterogeneity (p<0.01). Considering 499 mapped cases, we found spatial clusters of high and low detection rates and spatial autocorrelation of individual cases at fine spatio-temporal scales. The relative risk of contracting leprosy in one specific cluster with a high detection rate is almost four times the risk in the areas of low detection rate (RR = 3.86; 95% CI = 2.26–6.59; p<0.0001). Eight new cases were detected among 302 evaluated household contacts: two living in areas of clusters of high detection rate and six in hyperendemic census tracts. Of 188 examined students, 134 (71.3%) lived in hyperendemic areas, 120 (63.8%) were dwelling less than 100 meters of at least one reported leprosy case, 125 (66.5%) showed immunological evidence (positive anti-PGL-I IgM titer) of subclinical infection, and 9 (4.8%) were diagnosed with leprosy (8 within 200 meters of a case living in the same area). Conclusions/Significance Spatial analysis provided a better understanding of the high rate of early childhood leprosy transmission in this region. These findings can be applied to guide

  4. Knowledge, attitude and practices about leprosy among medical officers of Hyderabad urban district of Andhra Pradesh.

    PubMed

    Rao, P V Ranganadha; Rao, S L Narasimha; Vijayakrishnan, B; Chaudhary, A B; Peril, S; Reddy, B Pratap; Reddy, G Swamy

    2007-01-01

    In India, MDT was implemented through vertical programme staff of the National Leprosy Eradication Programme till the year 2001, when it was integrated into general health services (GHS). Human resource development of GHS is a vital, preparatory action for successful integration of leprosy into GHS. District Technical Support Teams (DTST) have been formed with responsibility for building the capacity of medical and paramedical staff of urban health posts (UHPs). In this context, it is necessary to know the current levels of Knowledge, Attitude and Practices (KAP) about leprosy prevailing among health staff at a given point in time, so that required knowledge and skills can be imparted, if need be. The present study is an attempt in this direction for assessing the KAP status of health staff working in Hyderabad city. 402 staff members (352 females and 50 males) working in urban health posts, the Employees State Insurance Corporation and the Central Government Health Services dispensaries in Hyderabad urban district in Andhra Pradesh were included in the study carried out in 2004 in order to assess KAP, and some operational parameters. A questionnaire was used to elicit responses of 110 medical officers in urban Hyderabad and the data were analysed and discussed. Medical officers have shown consistent higher knowledge on leprosy, followed by nursing staff as compared to other paramedical workers Only 40% of the medical officers had the opportunity of seeing at least 1 case of leprosy in their practice. Medical Officers who received training in leprosy and possessed reference material on leprosy have shown higher knowledge and practice. More than half of the study subjects did not have specific training in leprosy. Two major operational problems expressed by the medical officers were managing big crowds in OPD and time lost in meetings. 96 (87.3%) of 110 medical officers felt integration of leprosy services into general health services can be effectively implemented

  5. Experimental lepromatous leprosy in the white-handed gibbon (Hylobatus lar): successful inoculation with leprosy bacilli of human origin.

    PubMed

    Waters, M F; Bakri, I B; Isa, H J; Rees, R J; McDougall, A C

    1978-12-01

    Leprosy bacilli of human origin were inoculated into a white-handed gibbon by the i.v. and i.p. routes, and also locally into ears, testis and around an ulnar nerve. The animal was observed closely during a period of nearly 15 years and did not exhibit any clinical evidence of cutaneous or neurological disease. At death, a wide range of tissues was taken for bacterial counts and histological examination, and a disseminated and progressive infection was demonstrated. Acid-fast bacilli were found in many sites; their morphological appearance distribution in nerves, and pattern of multiplication in mouse foot-pads, and also the presence of anti-mycobacterial antibody in the serum and the absence of specific lymphocyte transformation were all in keeping with an infection by Mycobacterium leprae, at an early lepromatous stage. This is probably the first fully documented report of experimental lepromatous infection in a primate. The findings are discussed in relation to the long incubation period of le promatous leprosy and the difficulties of diagnosing the disease at an early stage in man.

  6. Factors associated with seropositivity for APGL-Iamong household contacts of leprosy patients.

    PubMed

    Wambier, Carlos Gustavo; Wambier, Sarah Perillo de Farias; Furini, Renata Bazan; Simão, João Carlos Lopes; Frade, Marco Andrey Cipriani; Foss, Norma Tiraboschi

    2016-02-01

    Leprosy is mainly transmitted among family members who share genetic and ambient factors. The clinical form of leprosy in the index case and kinship could be risk factors for leprosy transmission. High antibody levels in household contacts (HC) in the absence of neural or skin lesions may characterize latent infection. This study aimed to evaluate the association between seropositivity for anti-phenolic glycolipid-I immunoglobulin M antibodies (APGL-I) in HC and the clinical classification of the index case and to analyze the association between APGL-I positivity with other factors such as age, kinship, and gender. We performed a survey among 320 HC of 120 leprosy patients who were evaluated and followed-up in a leprosy outpatient clinic of a university hospital. All HC underwent complete skin examination, peripheral nerve palpation, skin sensory tests, and serologic tests for the detection and quantification of APGL-I. The overall seropositivity rate was 20%, and was greatly affected by kinship. APGL-I seropositivity was higher in siblings (41%), followed by parents (28%), spouses (26%), other (19%), and offspring (14%). Independent risk factors for seropositivity were being siblings (OR 3.3) and being a HC of an index case with indeterminate leprosy (OR 5.3). APGL-I seropositivity was associated with index cases with a bacillary index of 4 (88%; p<.001). Seropositivity among HC was not significantly associated with their gender and age. There was no statistical difference in the seropositivity rates of HC of index patients with paucibacillary and multibacillary leprosy. Strict evaluation and follow-up of HC with positive results for APGL-I is recommended. Special attention should be paid during the screening of siblings of the index cases, HC of patients with a high bacillary index, and HC of patients with indeterminate leprosy.

  7. Outside St. Jørgen: leprosy in the medieval Danish city of Odense.

    PubMed

    Boldsen, Jesper L; Mollerup, Lene

    2006-07-01

    Leprosy was a common and dreaded disease in the Danish Middle Ages (AD 1050-1536). Starting in the second half of the 13th century, leprosaria were established in many Danish towns and cities. In the city of Odense (on the island of Funen, Denmark), the cemetery of the leprosarium was totally excavated, and four nonleprosarium medieval and early modern cemeteries have been partly excavated. This paper explores the frequency of leprosy in the nonleprosarium cemeteries in Odense, and looks for evidence of selective exclusion from the ordinary population. The analyses are based on 733 skeletons from four cemeteries in Odense: the Gray Friars monastery, St. Albani parish church, St. Knuds cathedral, and Black Friars monastery. Seven lesions are scored and, based on known epidemiological properties (i.e., specificity and sensitivity) of these lesions, scores were transformed to statistics characterizing an individual's risk of having suffered from leprosy. This statistical approach remains of primary theoretical value, pending confirmation by independent research groups at other sites. Prevalence of the skeletal manifestation of leprosy at death varied between 0-17% among the different cemeteries in Odense. The highest prevalence was seen in cemeteries with many burials before AD 1400. It is estimated that before AD 1400, between 14-17% of those buried in the nonleprosarium cemeteries suffered from leprosy. In all nonleprosarium cemeteries, there was evidence for selective exclusion of people with facial leprosy lesions. For a short period just up to AD 1300, the cemetery of the Odense leprosarium had, on average, more than 20 yearly burials. The establishment of the leprosarium was followed within a relatively short period by a dramatic decline in the number of sufferers of leprosy in the nonleprosarium cemeteries. The number of yearly burials in the leprosarium cemetery also declined rapidly during the 14th century. The present analyses do not permit conclusions about

  8. Oral coinfection can stress peripheral lymphocyte to inflammatory activity in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Motta, Ana Carolina Fragoso; Simão, João Carlos Lopes; Furini, Renata Bazan; Ferreira, Maria Aparecida Nunes; Palma, Patrícia Vianna Bonini; Komesu, Marilena Chinali; Foss, Norma Tiraboschi

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the intracellular profile of interleukin-2 (IL-2), interleukin-4 (IL-4), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from leprosy patients based on oral infections presence to determine whether these coinfections could be associated with pro-inflammatory activity in leprosy. Leprosy patients regardless of clinical form and specific leprosy treatment (n=38) were divided into two groups: Group I - leprosy patients with oral infections (n=19), and Group II - leprosy patients without oral infections (n=19). Non-leprosy patients presenting oral infections were assigned to the control Group (n=10). Intracellular IL-2, IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ production was evaluated by flow cytometry (FACS) before and 7 days after controlling the oral infection in the Group I, before and 7 days after dental prophylaxis in the Group II, and during oral infection process in control Group. Low percentages of CD3+ lymphocytes bearing IL-2, IL-10 and IFN-γ were observed in the Group I and Group II at baseline and 7 days after therapy or prophylaxis compared to controls. Group I showed reduced percentages of IL-4 at baseline and 7 days after therapy compared to controls, or at baseline of Group II, and the Group II showed reduced percentages of CD3+ cells bearing IL-4 compared to control. An increase of the percentages of CD3+cells bearing IL-4 was observed in the Group I after the oral infections treatment. The occurrence of oral infections favors the intracellular cytokines expression and, probably, the inflammatory reaction operating as a stimulatory signal triggering the leprosy reactions.

  9. Ancient Skeletal Evidence for Leprosy in India (2000 B.C.)

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Gwen; Tripathy, V. Mushrif; Misra, V. N.; Mohanty, R. K.; Shinde, V. S.; Gray, Kelsey M.; Schug, Malcolm D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae that affects almost 250,000 people worldwide. The timing of first infection, geographic origin, and pattern of transmission of the disease are still under investigation. Comparative genomics research has suggested M. leprae evolved either in East Africa or South Asia during the Late Pleistocene before spreading to Europe and the rest of the World. The earliest widely accepted evidence for leprosy is in Asian texts dated to 600 B.C. Methodology/Principal Findings We report an analysis of pathological conditions in skeletal remains from the second millennium B.C. in India. A middle aged adult male skeleton demonstrates pathological changes in the rhinomaxillary region, degenerative joint disease, infectious involvement of the tibia (periostitis), and injury to the peripheral skeleton. The presence and patterning of lesions was subject to a process of differential diagnosis for leprosy including treponemal disease, leishmaniasis, tuberculosis, osteomyelitis, and non-specific infection. Conclusions/Significance Results indicate that lepromatous leprosy was present in India by 2000 B.C. This evidence represents the oldest documented skeletal evidence for the disease. Our results indicate that Vedic burial traditions in cases of leprosy were present in northwest India prior to the first millennium B.C. Our results also support translations of early Vedic scriptures as the first textual reference to leprosy. The presence of leprosy in skeletal material dated to the post-urban phase of the Indus Age suggests that if M. leprae evolved in Africa, the disease migrated to India before the Late Holocene, possibly during the third millennium B.C. at a time when there was substantial interaction among the Indus Civilization, Mesopotamia, and Egypt. This evidence should be impetus to look for additional skeletal and molecular evidence of leprosy in India and Africa to confirm the African origin of

  10. Psychiatric Morbidity among Subjects with Leprosy and Albinism in South East Nigeria: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Attama, CM; Uwakwe, R; Onyeama, GM; Igwe, MN

    2015-01-01

    Background: Skin, which is the largest organ in the body, carries immense psychological significance. Disfiguring skin disorders may impact negatively on the mental health of individuals. Aim: This study compared the psychiatric morbidity of subjects with leprosy and albinism. Subjects and Methods: One hundred subjects with leprosy and 100 with albinism were interviewed. Sociodemographic questionnaire and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) assessed the sociodemographic characteristics and psychiatric morbidity, respectively. GHQ positive cases and 10% of noncases for each group were interviewed with Mini International Neuropsychiatric Inventory for specific ICD-10 diagnoses. Results: Fifty-five percent (55/100) subjects with leprosy were GHQ positive cases while 41% (41/100) with albinism were GHQ positive cases. The risk of developing psychiatric morbidity was significantly higher in subjects with leprosy than in subjects with albinism (OR = 1.76, CI = 1.00 – 3.08, P = 0.04). The prevalence of specific psychiatric disorders among subjects with leprosy were depression 49% (49/100), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) 18% (18/100), alcohol/drug abuse 16% (16/100), whereas in albinism depression was 51% (51/100), GAD 27% (27/100), and alcohol/drug abuse 7% (7/100). Male, married and uneducated subjects with leprosy had significantly higher psychiatric morbidity than the male, married and uneducated subjects with albinism, respectively. Conclusion: Psychiatric morbidity was higher in subjects with leprosy than in subjects with albinism. Male, married and uneducated subjects with leprosy significantly had higher morbidity than male, married and uneducated subjects with albinism respectively. PMID:26097762

  11. Ancient skeletal evidence for leprosy in India (2000 B.C.).

    PubMed

    Robbins, Gwen; Tripathy, V Mushrif; Misra, V N; Mohanty, R K; Shinde, V S; Gray, Kelsey M; Schug, Malcolm D

    2009-05-27

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae that affects almost 250,000 people worldwide. The timing of first infection, geographic origin, and pattern of transmission of the disease are still under investigation. Comparative genomics research has suggested M. leprae evolved either in East Africa or South Asia during the Late Pleistocene before spreading to Europe and the rest of the World. The earliest widely accepted evidence for leprosy is in Asian texts dated to 600 B.C. We report an analysis of pathological conditions in skeletal remains from the second millennium B.C. in India. A middle aged adult male skeleton demonstrates pathological changes in the rhinomaxillary region, degenerative joint disease, infectious involvement of the tibia (periostitis), and injury to the peripheral skeleton. The presence and patterning of lesions was subject to a process of differential diagnosis for leprosy including treponemal disease, leishmaniasis, tuberculosis, osteomyelitis, and non-specific infection. Results indicate that lepromatous leprosy was present in India by 2000 B.C. This evidence represents the oldest documented skeletal evidence for the disease. Our results indicate that Vedic burial traditions in cases of leprosy were present in northwest India prior to the first millennium B.C. Our results also support translations of early Vedic scriptures as the first textual reference to leprosy. The presence of leprosy in skeletal material dated to the post-urban phase of the Indus Age suggests that if M. leprae evolved in Africa, the disease migrated to India before the Late Holocene, possibly during the third millennium B.C. at a time when there was substantial interaction among the Indus Civilization, Mesopotamia, and Egypt. This evidence should be impetus to look for additional skeletal and molecular evidence of leprosy in India and Africa to confirm the African origin of the disease.

  12. Interleukin 1 production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from leprosy patients.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, S; Bullock, W; Nelson, K; Schauf, V; Gelber, R; Jacobson, R

    1984-01-01

    Quantitation of interleukin 1 production by adherent mononuclear cells from peripheral blood was performed in patients with tuberculoid and lepromatous forms of leprosy. Cells from patients with tuberculoid leprosy either secreted interleukin 1 spontaneously or produced amounts within the normal range in response to lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Conversely, stimulated cells from lepromatous patients failed to produce interleukin 1 in 5 of 13 (38.5%) cases. PMID:6332077

  13. Gynaecothelia--a common yet ignored sign of multibacillary leprosy in males: a case series with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Ashok Kumar; Subbarao, Nagesh Tumkur

    2012-12-01

    Leprosy is one of the causes of gynaecothelia (enlargement of nipples), however little has been published about this common but usually ignored sign. Herein, we report nine male patients with multibacillary leprosy who had gynaecothelia although only two of them had associated gynaecomastia. None of these patients was aware of gynaecothelia until it was detected by the treating doctor during examination. This study is presented to highlight this common but ignored sign, which may occur specifically in multibacillary leprosy.

  14. Psychosocial aspects of Hansen's disease (leprosy)

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gurvinder Pal

    2012-01-01

    In general, the prevalence of psychiatric disorders among people with Hansen's disease has greatly increased to date. However, inadequate psychiatric care of people with Hansen's disease is an area of increasing concern. Many studies have been conducted in India and abroad to find out the prevalence of comorbid psychiatric disorders in patients suffering from Hansen's disease. Although efforts have been made by the government and international organizations to solve the medical problems among this group of patients, this disease still carries a number of psychosocial issues. The social stigma connected to these patients makes this disease completely different from others. Even nowadays people affected by Hansen's disease have to leave their village and are socially isolated. Depression is the most common psychiatric disorder found in these patients. Early detection and treatment of psychiatric disorders among Hansen's disease patients is a powerful psychotherapeutic measure. Integrated healthcare strategy will be beneficial to these patients. A comprehensive MEDLINE search and review of relevant literature was carried out and the data extracted and studied with particular reference to psychosocial issues in Hansen's disease. The focus of this research work is related to psychiatric and social aspects vis-à-vis stigma in these patients with Hansen's disease. PMID:23189247

  15. Psychosocial aspects of Hansen's disease (leprosy).

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurvinder Pal

    2012-09-01

    In general, the prevalence of psychiatric disorders among people with Hansen's disease has greatly increased to date. However, inadequate psychiatric care of people with Hansen's disease is an area of increasing concern. Many studies have been conducted in India and abroad to find out the prevalence of comorbid psychiatric disorders in patients suffering from Hansen's disease. Although efforts have been made by the government and international organizations to solve the medical problems among this group of patients, this disease still carries a number of psychosocial issues. The social stigma connected to these patients makes this disease completely different from others. Even nowadays people affected by Hansen's disease have to leave their village and are socially isolated. Depression is the most common psychiatric disorder found in these patients. Early detection and treatment of psychiatric disorders among Hansen's disease patients is a powerful psychotherapeutic measure. Integrated healthcare strategy will be beneficial to these patients. A comprehensive MEDLINE search and review of relevant literature was carried out and the data extracted and studied with particular reference to psychosocial issues in Hansen's disease. The focus of this research work is related to psychiatric and social aspects vis-à-vis stigma in these patients with Hansen's disease.

  16. Detection and strain typing of ancient Mycobacterium leprae from a medieval leprosy hospital.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G Michael; Tucker, Katie; Butler, Rachel; Pike, Alistair W G; Lewis, Jamie; Roffey, Simon; Marter, Philip; Lee, Oona Y-C; Wu, Houdini H T; Minnikin, David E; Besra, Gurdyal S; Singh, Pushpendra; Cole, Stewart T; Stewart, Graham R

    2013-01-01

    Nine burials excavated from the Magdalen Hill Archaeological Research Project (MHARP) in Winchester, UK, showing skeletal signs of lepromatous leprosy (LL) have been studied using a multidisciplinary approach including osteological, geochemical and biomolecular techniques. DNA from Mycobacterium leprae was amplified from all nine skeletons but not from control skeletons devoid of indicative pathology. In several specimens we corroborated the identification of M. leprae with detection of mycolic acids specific to the cell wall of M. leprae and persistent in the skeletal samples. In five cases, the preservation of the material allowed detailed genotyping using single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and multiple locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). Three of the five cases proved to be infected with SNP type 3I-1, ancestral to contemporary M. leprae isolates found in southern states of America and likely carried by European migrants. From the remaining two burials we identified, for the first time in the British Isles, the occurrence of SNP type 2F. Stable isotope analysis conducted on tooth enamel taken from two of the type 3I-1 and one of the type 2F remains revealed that all three individuals had probably spent their formative years in the Winchester area. Previously, type 2F has been implicated as the precursor strain that migrated from the Middle East to India and South-East Asia, subsequently evolving to type 1 strains. Thus we show that type 2F had also spread westwards to Britain by the early medieval period.

  17. Detection and Strain Typing of Ancient Mycobacterium leprae from a Medieval Leprosy Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, G. Michael; Tucker, Katie; Butler, Rachel; Pike, Alistair W. G.; Lewis, Jamie; Roffey, Simon; Marter, Philip; Lee, Oona Y-C; Wu, Houdini H. T.; Minnikin, David E.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Singh, Pushpendra; Cole, Stewart T.; Stewart, Graham R.

    2013-01-01

    Nine burials excavated from the Magdalen Hill Archaeological Research Project (MHARP) in Winchester, UK, showing skeletal signs of lepromatous leprosy (LL) have been studied using a multidisciplinary approach including osteological, geochemical and biomolecular techniques. DNA from Mycobacterium leprae was amplified from all nine skeletons but not from control skeletons devoid of indicative pathology. In several specimens we corroborated the identification of M. leprae with detection of mycolic acids specific to the cell wall of M. leprae and persistent in the skeletal samples. In five cases, the preservation of the material allowed detailed genotyping using single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and multiple locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). Three of the five cases proved to be infected with SNP type 3I-1, ancestral to contemporary M. leprae isolates found in southern states of America and likely carried by European migrants. From the remaining two burials we identified, for the first time in the British Isles, the occurrence of SNP type 2F. Stable isotope analysis conducted on tooth enamel taken from two of the type 3I-1 and one of the type 2F remains revealed that all three individuals had probably spent their formative years in the Winchester area. Previously, type 2F has been implicated as the precursor strain that migrated from the Middle East to India and South-East Asia, subsequently evolving to type 1 strains. Thus we show that type 2F had also spread westwards to Britain by the early medieval period. PMID:23638071

  18. DENTISTS' KNOWLEDGE AND EXPERIENCE REGARDING LEPROSY IN AN ENDEMIC AREA IN BRAZIL.

    PubMed

    Martins, Ronald Jefferson; Carloni, Maria Emília Oliveira Gomes; Moimaz, Suzely Adas Saliba; Garbin, Cléa Adas Saliba; Garbin, Artênio José Ísper

    2016-11-03

    This study aims to analyze the dental surgeons' knowledge about leprosy and its ways of transmission, clinical characteristics and treatment, besides analyzing their experience with respect to diagnostic suspicion and case referrals. The study population comprised 242 dental surgeons working in the public dental service of the city of Cuiabá, Mato Grosso, Brazil. A self-applicable questionnaire containing questions about the dental surgeon's profile was used, including his/her knowledge on leprosy, as well as his/her practices concerning the disease. The results showed a predominance of female dental surgeons (65.7%), with ages ranging between 30 and 39 years old (43%) and professionals having six to 10 years of experience since graduation. Concerning their time working in the Unified Health System (SUS), the highest percentage of dental surgeons referred more than 10 years. Regarding the knowledge about the disease, 30.6% did not know the efficacy of the treatment of leprosy, 47% did not know the disease had to be notified compulsorily and only 8.3% had received information about leprosy at work. Besides that, most of them mentioned feeling little security when treating patients with leprosy (61.6%). Thus, dental surgeons' deficient knowledge on issues related to leprosy may be highlighted.

  19. The influence of innate and adaptative immune responses on the differential clinical outcomes of leprosy.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Adriana Barbosa de Lima; Simon, Marise do Vale; Cazzaniga, Rodrigo Anselmo; de Moura, Tatiana Rodrigues; de Almeida, Roque Pacheco; Duthie, Malcolm S; Reed, Steven G; de Jesus, Amelia Ribeiro

    2017-02-06

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. According to official reports from 121 countries across five WHO regions, there were 213 899 newly diagnosed cases in 2014. Although leprosy affects the skin and peripheral nerves, it can present across a spectrum of clinical and histopathological forms that are strongly influenced by the immune response of the infected individuals. These forms comprise the extremes of tuberculoid leprosy (TT), with a M. leprae-specific Th1, but also a Th17, response that limits M. leprae multiplication, through to lepromatous leprosy (LL), with M. leprae-specific Th2 and T regulatory responses that do not control M. leprae replication but rather allow bacterial dissemination. The interpolar borderline clinical forms present with similar, but less extreme, immune biases. Acute inflammatory episodes, known as leprosy reactions, are complications that may occur before, during or after treatment, and cause further neurological damages that can cause irreversible chronic disabilities. This review discusses the innate and adaptive immune responses, and their interactions, that are known to affect pathogenesis and influence the clinical outcome of leprosy.

  20. Correlation between nerve growth factor and tissue expression of IL-17 in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Aarão, Tinara Leila de Sousa; de Sousa, Jorge Rodrigues; Botelho, Beatriz Santos; Fuzii, Hellen Thais; Quaresma, Juarez Antonio Simões

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is a serious public health problem in peripheral and developing countries. Leprosy is a chronic infectious-contagious disease caused by the intracellular, bacillus Mycobacterium leprae, which causes tissue damage and demyelination of peripheral nerves. Recent studies have demonstrated the participation of new subtype's cytokines profile in the inflammatory response of leprosy. Since nerve functions are affected by inflammatory response during the course of leprosy, changes in the production of NGF and its receptor (NGF R) may be directly associated with disability and sensory loss. Skin biopsies were collected and submitted to immunohistochemistry using specific antibodies to IL-17, NGF and NGF R. Quantitative analysis of NGF, NGFR and IL-17 immunostaining showed a significant difference between the clinical forms, with higher expression of NGF and NGFR in lepromatous leprosy and IL-17 in tuberculoid leprosy. The present study showed that IL-17, in addition to stimulating an inflammatory response, negatively regulates the action of NGF and NGF R in the polar forms of the disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Impact of Leprosy on Marital Relationships and Sexual Health among Married Women in Eastern Nepal

    PubMed Central

    van 't Noordende, Anna T.; Banstola, Nandlal; Dhakal, Krishna P.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Leprosy is one of the most stigmatized diseases known today. The stigma surrounding leprosy can be a major burden and affects many dimensions of a person's life, including intimate relationships. We aimed to investigate the experiences of women affected by leprosy regarding marital life and sexuality, comparing these to the experiences of women with other physical disabilities and to those of able-bodied women in South-East Nepal. Methods. This study used a qualitative approach and a cross-sectional, nonrandom survey design. Thirty women underwent in-depth interviews about their marital and sexual relationship by means of a semi-structured interview guide. These thirty women included ten women affected by leprosy, ten women with other physical disabilities, and ten able-bodied women living in South-East Nepal. Results. We found that many women faced violence and abuse in their marriages. However, women affected by leprosy appeared to face more problems with regard to their marital and sexual relationships than women with physical disabilities and able-bodied women. Some of these related to the fear of leprosy. Conclusions. Further research is recommended to investigate the extent of this problem and ways to ameliorate the situation of the affected women. Education and counselling at diagnosis may help prevent many of the problems reported. PMID:27047548

  2. [Analysis of the geographical distribution of cases of leprosy. Rio de Janeiro, 2001-2012].

    PubMed

    Gracie, Renata; Peixoto, Julia Novaes de Barros; Soares, Fabiane Bertoni Dos Reis; Hacker, Mariana de Andrea Vilas-Boas

    2017-05-01

    Studies have demonstrated that the geographical distribution of leprosy is related to different socioeconomic factors. This article aims to study the geographical distribution of leprosy in the state of Rio de Janeiro. The cases of leprosy reported in the 2001-2012 period were mapped according to municipality. Epidemiological and socioeconomic indicators were calculated. The ArcMap program was used for the construction of maps and Earth View to calculate the Bayesian rate. It was observed that leprosy is presented in hyper-endemic levels especially in the metropolitan area. However, there is also a reduction of the detection rate in the most recent study period. In municipalities in the metropolitan region and the north western region detection in children under 15 is high, indicating an active transmission situation. In municipalities in the south-central region and especially in the coastal region, there was a high proportion of cases diagnosed with level II disability, reflecting late diagnosis. There was no linear correlation between socioeconomic indicators and leprosy rate. These results contribute to the analysis of the geographical distribution of leprosy, important for the identification of areas for resource allocation, aiming to control and eliminate the disease.

  3. Integrative literature review of the reported uses of serological tests in leprosy management.

    PubMed

    Fabri, Angélica da Conceição Oliveira Coelho; Carvalho, Ana Paula Mendes; Vieira, Nayara Figueiredo; Bueno, Isabela de Caux; Rodrigues, Rayssa Nogueira; Monteiro, Thayenne Barrozo Mota; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Duthie, Malcolm S; Lana, Francisco Carlos Félix

    2016-04-01

    An integrative literature review was conducted to synthesize available publications regarding the potential use of serological tests in leprosy programs. We searched the databases Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde, Índice Bibliográfico Espanhol em Ciências da Saúde, Acervo da Biblioteca da Organização Pan-Americana da Saúde, Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online, Hanseníase, National Library of Medicine, Scopus, Ovid, Cinahl, and Web of Science for articles investigating the use of serological tests for antibodies against phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I), ML0405, ML2331, leprosy IDRI diagnostic-1 (LID-1), and natural disaccharide octyl-leprosy IDRI diagnostic-1 (NDO-LID). From an initial pool of 3.514 articles, 40 full-length articles fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Based on these papers, we concluded that these antibodies can be used to assist in diagnosing leprosy, detecting neuritis, monitoring therapeutic efficacy, and monitoring household contacts or at-risk populations in leprosy-endemic areas. Thus, available data suggest that serological tests could contribute substantially to leprosy management.

  4. Postelimination Status of Childhood Leprosy: Report from a Tertiary-Care Hospital in South India

    PubMed Central

    Chaitra, P.; Bhat, Ramesh Marne

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Leprosy, a statistically “eliminated” disease from the globe, continues to linger around in its endemic countries including India. Objective. This study describes the epidemiological and clinicopathological pattern of the disease seen in children over a period of 8 years following its elimination in India. Materials and Methods. Medical records of all leprosy cases up to 14 years of age registered between April 2005 and March 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. Data were retrieved using a predesigned proforma and entered into the database system for analysis. Results. Child proportion of newly registered leprosy cases did not show a significant decline in the years following its elimination. The disease seemed to manifest frequently in older children with an insignificant gender predilection. More than half of child cases had a history of household contact. Paucibacillary leprosy dominated in them with a solitary skin lesion as the most frequent presentation. Although nerve thickening was seen in nearly half of these children, neuritis and lepra reactions were less common. Deformity at the time of diagnosis was noted in 13.89% of cases. Although smear positivity was not a common feature in children affected with leprosy, a good clinicohistopathological correlation was observed in those who underwent biopsy. Conclusion. Our study and reports from different parts of the country depict the unturned curves in the epidemiology of childhood leprosy which mirrors active transmission in the community, lacunae in diagnosis, and the need to strengthen contact screening activities in the pediatric population to sustain elimination. PMID:24089672

  5. Prevalence and etiologies of visual handicaps in leprosy patients in the south of Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Eballé, André Omgbwa; Owono, Didier; Book, Alphonse Um; Bella, Assumpta Lucienne; Mvogo, Come Ebana; Mba, Nsom

    2009-01-01

    We report on a prospective study undertaken in April 2008, in 11 leper villages of the Southern Cameroon. Our aim was to determine the prevalence and the causes of bilateral blindness, low vision and unilateral blindness in the population of leprosy patients, irrespective of the clinical aspects of the illness. Results: Two hundred thirty-five known and newly diagnosed leprosy patients were examined. These patients included 149 cases (63.4%) of multibacillary leprosy and 86 cases (36.6%) of paucibacillary leprosy. There were 111 case of visual handicap, representing 47.2% of the population. These visual handicap cases were subdivided into 45 cases (19%) of bilateral blindness, 35 cases (15%) of unilateral blindness and 31 cases (13.2%) of low vision. Discussion: The prevalence of visual handicap among leprosy patients in Cameroon is too high. Causes in the majority of cases are age-related degenerative pathologies, and one third of cases are linked to the leprosy mycobacterium. Conclusion: Discovering a cure for ophthalmic pathologies is important in order to provide a better quality of life for this particular population. PMID:19668565

  6. Prevalence and etiologies of visual handicaps in leprosy patients in the south of Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Eballé, André Omgbwa; Owono, Didier; Book, Alphonse Um; Bella, Assumpta Lucienne; Mvogo, Come Ebana; Mba, Nsom

    2009-01-01

    We report on a prospective study undertaken in April 2008, in 11 leper villages of the Southern Cameroon. Our aim was to determine the prevalence and the causes of bilateral blindness, low vision and unilateral blindness in the population of leprosy patients, irrespective of the clinical aspects of the illness. Two hundred thirty-five known and newly diagnosed leprosy patients were examined. These patients included 149 cases (63.4%) of multibacillary leprosy and 86 cases (36.6%) of paucibacillary leprosy. There were 111 case of visual handicap, representing 47.2% of the population. These visual handicap cases were subdivided into 45 cases (19%) of bilateral blindness, 35 cases (15%) of unilateral blindness and 31 cases (13.2%) of low vision. The prevalence of visual handicap among leprosy patients in Cameroon is too high. Causes in the majority of cases are age-related degenerative pathologies, and one third of cases are linked to the leprosy mycobacterium. Discovering a cure for ophthalmic pathologies is important in order to provide a better quality of life for this particular population.

  7. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Leprosy Coinfection: Challenges in Resource-Limited Setups

    PubMed Central

    Kwobah, Charles M.; Wools-Kaloustian, Kara K.; Gitau, Jane N.; Siika, Abraham M.

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacteria leprae(leprosy) and HIV coinfection are rare in Kenya. This is likely related to the low prevalence (1 per 10,000 of population) of leprosy. Because leprosy is no longer a public health challenge there is generally a low index of suspicion amongst clinicians for its diagnosis. Management of a HIV-1-leprosy-coinfected individual in a resource-constrained setting is challenging. Some of these challenges include difficulties in establishing a diagnosis of leprosy; the high pill burden of cotreatment with both antileprosy and antiretroviral drugs (ARVs); medications' side effects; drug interactions; scarcity of drug choices for both diseases. This challenge is more profound when managing a patient who requires second-line antiretroviral therapy (ART). We present an adult male patient coinfected with HIV and leprosy, who failed first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) and required second-line treatment. Due to limited choices in antileprosy drugs available, the patient received monthly rifampicin and daily lopinavir-/ritonavir-based antileprosy and ART regimens, respectively. Six months into his cotreatment, he seemed to have adequate virological control. This case report highlights the challenges of managing such a patient. PMID:22649458

  8. Genetics of leprosy: Expected-and unexpected-developments and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Monica E D; Salomão, Heloisa; Ramos, Geovana B; D'Espindula, Helena R S; Rodrigues, Rafael S A; Macedo, Wilian C; Sindeaux, Renata H M; Mira, Marcelo T

    2016-01-01

    A solid body of evidence produced over decades of intense research supports the hypothesis that leprosy phenotypes are largely dependent on the genetic characteristics of the host. The early evidence of a major gene effect controlling susceptibility to leprosy came from studies of familial aggregation, twins, and complex segregation analysis. Later, linkage and association analysis, first applied to the investigation of candidate genes and chromosomal regions and more recently, to genome-wide scans, have revealed several HLA and non-HLA gene variants as risk factors for leprosy phenotypes such as disease per se, its clinical forms, and leprosy reactions. In addition, powerful, hypothesis-free strategies such as genome-wide association studies have led to an exciting, unexpected development: Leprosy susceptibility genes seem to be shared with Crohn's and Parkinson's disease. Today, a major challenge is to find the exact variants causing the biological effect underlying the genetic associations. New technologies, such as Next Generation Sequencing-that allows, for the first time, the cost- and time-effective sequencing of a complete human genome-hold the promise to reveal such variants; thus, strategies can be developed to study the functional impact of these variants in the context of infection, hopefully leading to the development of new targets for leprosy treatment and prevention.

  9. Inflammatory Mediators of Leprosy Reactional Episodes and Dental Infections: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Cortela, D. C. B.; de Souza Junior, A. L.; Virmond, M. C. L.; Ignotti, E.

    2015-01-01

    Reactional episodes in leprosy are a result of complex interactions between the immune system, Mycobacterium leprae, and predisposing factors, including dental infections. To determine the main inflammatory mediators in the immunopathological process of dental infections and leprosy reactions, we conducted a systematic review of primary literature published between 1996 and 2013. A three-stage literature search was performed (Stage I, “leprosy reactions” and “inflammatory mediators”; Stage II, “dental infections” and “inflammatory mediators”; and Stage III, “leprosy reactions,” “dental infections,” and “inflammatory mediators”). Of the 911 eligible publications, 10 were selected in Stage I, 68 in Stage II, and 1 in Stage III. Of the 27 studied inflammatory mediators, the main proinflammatory mediators were IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-17; the main anti-inflammatory mediators were IL-10 and IL-4. Serum IL-6 and TNF-α concentrations were significant during periodontal and reactional lesion evolution; IFN-γ and IL-1β were associated with types 1 and 2 reactions and chronic periodontal disease. The proinflammatory mediators in dental infections and leprosy reactions, especially IL-6 and TNF-α, were similar across studies, regardless of the laboratory technique and sample type. IFN-γ and IL-1β were significant for leprosy reactions and periodontal diseases. This pattern was maintained in serum. PMID:26339136

  10. Is leprosy spreading among nine-banded armadillos in the southeastern United States?

    PubMed

    Loughry, W J; Truman, Richard W; McDonough, Colleen M; Tilak, Marie-Ka; Garnier, Stéphane; Delsuc, Frédéric

    2009-01-01

    In the United States, nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus) populations are derived from two sources: (1) a continuous range expansion from Mexico led to western populations, some of which, particularly along the western Gulf Coast and west side of the Mississippi River delta, exhibit persistently high rates of leprosy infection, and (2) a small group of animals released from captivity in Florida gave rise to eastern populations that were all considered leprosy free. Given that western and eastern populations have now merged, an important question becomes, to what extent is leprosy spreading into formerly uninfected populations? To answer this question, we sampled 500 animals from populations in Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia. Analyses of nuclear microsatellite DNA markers confirmed the historic link between source populations from Texas and Florida, but did not permit resolution of the extent to which these intermediate populations represented eastern versus western gene pools. Prevalence of leprosy was determined by screening blood samples for the presence of antibodies against Mycobacterium leprae and via polymerase chain reaction amplification of armadillo tissues to detect M. leprae DNA. The proportion of infected individuals within each population varied from 0% to 10%. Although rare, a number of positive individuals were identified in eastern sites previously considered uninfected. This indicates leprosy may be spreading eastward and calls into question hypotheses proposing leprosy infection is confined because of ecologic constraints to areas west of the Mississippi River.

  11. Experimental leprosy in monkeys. II. Longitudinal serological observations in sooty mangabey monkeys.

    PubMed

    Gormus, B J; Xu, K; Cho, S N; Baskin, G B; Bohm, R P; Martin, L N; Blanchard, J L; Mack, P A; Ratterree, M S; Meyers, W M

    1995-06-01

    In this study, 11 SMM were grouped and inoculated with differing doses of SMM-origin Mycobacterium leprae (ML) between 4.5 x 10(8) and 1 x 10(9) by either combined IV/IC routes or by IV or IC route alone. The combined route was the most effective in eliciting progressive, disseminated LL leprosy. In all, 6 of 7 SMM inoculated by the combined routes developed leprosy requiring treatment at some point. Only 1 of 4 inoculated by a single route developed persisting leprosy requiring chemotherapy. Either no disease or spontaneous regression of initial disease occurred in the other 3 animals inoculated by a single route. Doses in excess of 1 x 10(9) ML were more effective than lesser doses. An association was observed between the development of IgG anti-PGL-I ELISA OD values and resistance to leprosy and between IgM anti-PGL-I and leprosy progression or susceptibility. Serum PGL-I antigen levels, determined by dot ELISA, paralleled disease severity longitudinally. High positive OD values of anti-LAM IgG prior to ML inoculation were observed in the majority of leprosy-susceptible SMM in contrast to negative levels in more resistant animals. Anti-LAM IgG OD values exceeded the positive cut-off point after inoculation in 5 of 11 SMM; 3 of these 5 had concurrent detectable serum levels of PGL-I antigen.

  12. Experimental leprosy in monkeys. I. Sooty mangabey monkeys: transmission, susceptibility, clinical and pathological findings.

    PubMed

    Gormus, B J; Xu, K; Baskin, G B; Martin, L N; Bohm, R P; Blanchard, J L; Mack, P A; Ratterree, M S; McClure, H M; Meyers, W M

    1995-06-01

    A total of 31 sooty mangabey monkeys (SMM) (Cercocebus torquatus atys) inoculated by various routes with differing numbers of SMM-origin Mycobacterium leprae (ML) and 4 SMM inoculated with human-origin ML were observed for 4-12 years. SMM-origin ML was more pathogenic in SMM than human-origin ML. The spectrum of disease ranged from indeterminate to borderline and lepromatous in different animals. Some animals developed pure neural leprosy. Erythema nodosum leprosum (SNL) was also observed. Combined intravenous/intracutaneous (IV/IC) routes of inoculation more effectively induced advancing, disseminated lepromatous forms of leprosy; IV or IC routes alone were less effective at comparable doses. Total IV/IC doses of SMM-origin ML equal to or greater than 5 x 10(8), with morphologic indices (MIs) ranging from 5 to 10%, produced advancing, disseminated LL leprosy in 92% of SMM. Lower IV/IC doses and inoculations by a single IV or IC route produced fewer leprosy infections and more spontaneous regressions. As a species, captive SMM are highly susceptible to experimental leprosy and provide an excellent model for the longitudinal study of leprosy.

  13. Mycobacterium leprae–host-cell interactions and genetic determinants in leprosy: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Roberta Olmo; de Souza Salles, Jorgenilce; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Sampaio, Elizabeth Pereira

    2011-01-01

    Leprosy, also known as Hansen’s disease, is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae in which susceptibility to the mycobacteria and its clinical manifestations are attributed to the host immune response. Even though leprosy prevalence has decreased dramatically, the high number of new cases indicates active transmission. Owing to its singular features, M. leprae infection is an attractive model for investigating the regulation of human immune responses to pathogen-induced disease. Leprosy is one of the most common causes of nontraumatic peripheral neuropathy worldwide. The proportion of patients with disabilities is affected by the type of leprosy and delay in diagnosis. This article briefly reviews the clinical features as well as the immunopathological mechanisms related to the establishment of the different polar forms of leprosy, the mechanisms related to M. leprae–host cell interactions and prophylaxis and diagnosis of this complex disease. Host genetic factors are summarized and the impact of the development of interventions that prevent, reverse or limit leprosy-related nerve impairments are discussed. PMID:21366421

  14. Leprosy treatment during pregnancy and breastfeeding: A case report and brief review of literature.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Z; Tatliparmak, A

    2017-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic disease which primarily affects the skin, mucous membranes and peripheral nerves due to Mycobacterium leprae. It is now infrequent in Europe and is rarely reported during pregnancy. Leprosy can be exacerbated during pregnancy, and without treatment it can permanently damage the skin, nerves, limbs and eyes. Therefore, it is important to treat leprosy during pregnancy. This article describes a patient with multibacillary lepromatous leprosy who was treated with multidrug therapy during pregnancy and breastfeeding. The patient delivered a healthy baby girl without perinatal complications, and the infant's growth and development were normal during the 1-year follow-up period. Multidrug therapy consisting of dapsone, rifampicine, and clofazimine is highly effective for people with leprosy and considered safe, both for the mother and the child. Antileprosy drugs are excreted into human milk but there is no report of adverse effects except for skin discoloration of the infant due to clofazimine. Multidrug therapy for leprosy patients should be continued unchanged during pregnancy and breastfeeding.

  15. DENTISTS' KNOWLEDGE AND EXPERIENCE REGARDING LEPROSY IN AN ENDEMIC AREA IN BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    MARTINS, Ronald Jefferson; CARLONI, Maria Emília Oliveira Gomes; MOIMAZ, Suzely Adas Saliba; GARBIN, Cléa Adas Saliba; GARBIN, Artênio José Ísper

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY This study aims to analyze the dental surgeons' knowledge about leprosy and its ways of transmission, clinical characteristics and treatment, besides analyzing their experience with respect to diagnostic suspicion and case referrals. The study population comprised 242 dental surgeons working in the public dental service of the city of Cuiabá, Mato Grosso, Brazil. A self-applicable questionnaire containing questions about the dental surgeon's profile was used, including his/her knowledge on leprosy, as well as his/her practices concerning the disease. The results showed a predominance of female dental surgeons (65.7%), with ages ranging between 30 and 39 years old (43%) and professionals having six to 10 years of experience since graduation. Concerning their time working in the Unified Health System (SUS), the highest percentage of dental surgeons referred more than 10 years. Regarding the knowledge about the disease, 30.6% did not know the efficacy of the treatment of leprosy, 47% did not know the disease had to be notified compulsorily and only 8.3% had received information about leprosy at work. Besides that, most of them mentioned feeling little security when treating patients with leprosy (61.6%). Thus, dental surgeons' deficient knowledge on issues related to leprosy may be highlighted. PMID:27828617

  16. Role Bending: Complex Relationships Between Viruses, Hosts, and Vectors Related to Citrus Leprosis, an Emerging Disease.

    PubMed

    Roy, Avijit; Hartung, John S; Schneider, William L; Shao, Jonathan; Leon, Guillermo; Melzer, Michael J; Beard, Jennifer J; Otero-Colina, Gabriel; Bauchan, Gary R; Ochoa, Ronald; Brlansky, Ronald H

    2015-07-01

    Citrus leprosis complex is an emerging disease in the Americas, associated with two unrelated taxa of viruses distributed in South, Central, and North America. The cytoplasmic viruses are Citrus leprosis virus C (CiLV-C), Citrus leprosis virus C2 (CiLV-C2), and Hibiscus green spot virus 2, and the nuclear viruses are Citrus leprosis virus N (CiLV-N) and Citrus necrotic spot virus. These viruses cause local lesion infections in all known hosts, with no natural systemic host identified to date. All leprosis viruses were believed to be transmitted by one species of mite, Brevipalpus phoenicis. However, mites collected from CiLV-C and CiLV-N infected citrus groves in Mexico were identified as B. yothersi and B. californicus sensu lato, respectively, and only B. yothersi was detected from CiLV-C2 and CiLV-N mixed infections in the Orinoco regions of Colombia. Phylogenetic analysis of the helicase, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 2 domains and p24 gene amino acid sequences of cytoplasmic leprosis viruses showed a close relationship with recently deposited mosquito-borne negevirus sequences. Here, we present evidence that both cytoplasmic and nuclear viruses seem to replicate in viruliferous Brevipalpus species. The possible replication in the mite vector and the close relationship with mosquito borne negeviruses are consistent with the concept that members of the genus Cilevirus and Higrevirus originated in mites and citrus may play the role of mite virus vector.

  17. Human migration, railways and the geographic distribution of leprosy in Rio Grande do Norte State--Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Mauricio Lisboa; Dupnik, Kathryn Margaret; Nobre, Paulo José Lisboa; Freitas De Souza, Márcia Célia; Dűppre, Nádia Cristina; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Jerŏnimo, Selma Maria Bezerra

    2015-12-01

    Leprosy is a public health problem in Brazil where 31,044 new cases were detected in 2013. Rio Grande do Norte is a small Brazilian state with a rate of leprosy lower than other areas in the same region, for unknown reasons. We present here a review based on the analysis of a database of registered leprosy cases in Rio Grande do Norte state, comparing leprosy's geographic distribution among municipalities with local socio-economic and public health indicators and with historical documents about human migration in this Brazilian region. The current distribution of leprosy in Rio Grande do Norte did not show correlation with socio-economic or public health indicators at the municipal level, but it appears related to economically emerging municipalities 100 years ago, with spread facilitated by railroads and train stations. Drought-related migratory movements which occurred from this state to leprosy endemic areas within the same period may be involved in the introduction of leprosy and with its present distribution within Rio Grande do Norte. Leprosy may disseminate slowly, over many decades in certain circumstances, such as in small cities with few cases. This is a very unusual situation currently and a unique opportunity for epidemiologic studies of leprosy as an emerging disease.

  18. Human migration, railways and the geographic distribution of leprosy in Rio Grande do Norte State – Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Nobre, Mauricio Lisboa; Dupnik, Kathryn Margaret; Nobre, Paulo José Lisboa; De Souza, Márcia Célia Freitas; Dűppre, Nádia Cristina; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Jerŏnimo, Selma Maria Bezerra

    2016-01-01

    Summary Introduction Leprosy is a public health problem in Brazil where 31,044 new cases were detected in 2013. Rio Grande do Norte is a small Brazilian state with a rate of leprosy lower than other areas in the same region, for unknown reasons. Objectives We present here a review based on the analysis of a database of registered leprosy cases in Rio Grande do Norte state, comparing leprosy's geographic distribution among municipalities with local socio-economic and public health indicators and with historical documents about human migration in this Brazilian region. Results The current distribution of leprosy in Rio Grande do Norte did not show correlation with socio-economic or public health indicators at the municipal level, but it appears related to economically emerging municipalities 100 years ago, with spread facilitated by railroads and train stations. Drought-related migratory movements which occurred from this state to leprosy endemic areas within the same period may be involved in the introduction of leprosy and with its present distribution within Rio Grande do Norte. Conclusions Leprosy may disseminate slowly, over many decades in certain circumstances, such as in small cities with few cases. This is a very unusual situation currently and a unique opportunity for epidemiologic studies of leprosy as an emerging disease. PMID:26964429

  19. [Critical appraisal about control programs and elimination of leprosy in Peru, and its consequences for Peru and America].

    PubMed

    Burstein, Zuño

    2014-04-01

    A critical analysis of health control measures that historically took place in Peru to the present which has led Peru to officially consider leprosy as an "eliminated" public health problem. We will also discuss the validity of the status given the neglect of health surveillance, disbanded specialized control entities, health medical staff forgetting to account for leprosy in early stages, the presence of undiagnosed smear-positive leprosy in Lima and the undeniable hidden prevalence, suggest that there is a danger to the country and the region that a re-emergence of leprosy will occur, if relevant and appropriate sanitary measures are not taken.

  20. The Effectiveness of Age-Specific Isolation Policies on Epidemics of Influenza A (H1N1) in a Large City in Central South China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xixing; Chen, Faming; Chen, Shuilian; Zhao, Jin

    2015-01-01

    During the early stage of a pandemic, isolation is the most effective means of controlling transmission. However, the effectiveness of age-specific isolation policies is not clear; especially little information is available concerning their effectiveness in China. Epidemiological and serological survey data in the city of Changsha were employed to estimate key model parameters. The average infectious period (date of recovery – date of symptom onset) of influenza A (H1N1) was 5.2 days. Of all infected persons, 45.93% were asymptomatic. The basic reproduction number of the influenza A (H1N1) pandemic was 1.82. Based on the natural history of influenza A (H1N1), we built an extended susceptible-exposed-infectious/asymptomatic-removed model, taking age groups: 0–5, 6–14, 15–24, 25–59, and ≥60 years into consideration for isolation. Without interventions, the total attack rates (TARs) in each age group were 42.73%, 41.95%, 20.51%, 45.03%, and 37.49%, respectively. Although the isolation of 25–59 years-old persons was the most effective, the TAR of individuals of aged 0–5 and 6–14 could not be reduced. Paradoxically, isolating individuals ≥60 year olds was not predicted to be an effective way of reducing the TAR in this group but isolating the age-group 25–59 did, which implies inter-age-group transmission from the latter to the former is significant. Isolating multiple age groups increased effectiveness. The most effective combined isolation target groups were of 6–14 + 25–59 year olds, 6–14 + 15–24 + 25–59 year olds, and 0–5 + 6–14 + 25–59 + ≥60 year olds. The last of these isolation schemas reduced the TAR of the total population from 39.64% to 0.006%, which was exceptionally close to the effectiveness of isolating all five age groups (TAR = 0.004%). PMID:26161740

  1. Medical Rehabilitation of Leprosy Patients Discharged Home in Abia and Ebonyi States of Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Enwereji, Ezinne Ezinna; Ahuizi, Eke Reginald; Iheanocho, Okereke Chukwunenye; Enwereji, Kelechi Okechukwu

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To examine the extent to which medical coverage is available to discharged leprosy patients in communities. Evidence has shown that after care services, follow-up visits and national disease prevention programs are important components of medical rehabilitation to leprosy patients discharged home after treatment. Denying them accessibility to these services could expose them to multiple disabilities as well as several disease conditions including HIV/AIDS. These adverse health conditions could be averted if health workers extend healthcare services to discharged leprosy patients. This study was conducted to examine the extent to which discharged leprosy patients have access to healthcare services in the communities. Methods All 33 leprosy patients who were fully treated with multi-drug therapy (MDT) and discharged home in the two leprosy settlements in Abia and Ebonyi States of Nigeria were included in this study. The list of discharged leprosy patients studied and their addresses were provided by the leprosy settlements where they were treated. Also, snowball-sampling method was used to identify some of the leprosy patients whose addresses were difficult to locate in the communities. Instruments for data collection were questionnaire, interview guide and checklist. These were administered because respondents were essentially those with no formal education. Analysis of data was done quantitatively and qualitatively. Results Findings showed that 20 (60.6%) of discharged patients did not receive health programs like HIV/AIDS prevention or family planning. Also, follow-up visits and after-care services were poor. About 14 (42.4%) of the patients live in dirty and overcrowded houses. On the whole, discharged patients were poorly medically rehabilitated (mean score: 4.7±1.1 out of total score of 7). Conclusion Denying discharged leprosy patients opportunity of accessing health care services could increase prevalence of infectious diseases including HIV

  2. Epidemiology of Leprosy in Spain: The Role of the International Migration

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, José M.; Romero, David; Belinchón, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Background Although incidence of leprosy in Spain has declined steadily over the years, the fivefold increase in immigration since the turn of the century—much of it from countries where leprosy is still prevalent—has been linked to an uptick in registered cases. Objective To describe the epidemiologic trends of incident leprosy cases detected in Spain among Spanish- and foreign-born population groups. Methods Observational, retrospective study of suspected leprosy cases in Spain, as reported through the System of Compulsory Notification of Diseases from 2003 to 2013, with results disaggregated by country of birth. We collected statistical data on leprosy burden for other countries from WHO to estimate the expected number of imported cases. Results Of the 168 leprosy cases registered during the study period, 40 (24.6%) were in Spanish patients, while 128 (76.2%) were detected in legally resident immigrants. We identified a significantly higher number of imported leprosy cases during the 2008–2010 and 2011–2013 trienniums compared to the reference biennium 2003–2004 (OR 5.38, 95% CI 1.83–14.88 and OR 4.80, 95% CI 1.41–16.33, respectively). Most imported cases were diagnosed in Latin American immigrants (71.9%), especially Brazilians, but also Paraguayans, Bolivians and other nationalities from South and Central America. However, registered incidence was lower than expected for each year. For example, in 2003, the expected new cases in immigrants was 47.12, compared to only four cases that were actually detected (a 91% difference). Likewise, we expected to find 49.6 incident cases among immigrants in 2009, but only 15 new cases were reported (60% fewer than expected). Conclusion Imported cases of leprosy are responsible for most leprosy incidence in Spain, and we cannot rule out some under-diagnosis. Clinicians should be made more aware of the potential for leprosy incidence among patients from countries where the disease is endemic. PMID:26939132

  3. Granulomatous mycosis fungoides with hypohidrosis mimicking lepromatous leprosy.

    PubMed

    Gutte, Rameshwar; Kharkar, Vidya; Mahajan, Sunanda; Chikhalkar, Siddhi; Khopkar, Uday

    2010-01-01

    Granulomatous mycosis fungoides (GMF) is a rare type of cutaneous T cell lymphoma. A 38-year-old married male presented with decreased sweating all over the body for last 8 years, progressive redness and scaling over body for 2 years and multiple noduloulcerative lesions over the body for 1 year. Cutaneous examination revealed generalized erythema and scaling with poikilodermatous changes over chest and upper back along with multiple noduloulcerative lesions. Skin biopsy from a nodular lesion revealed dense granulomatous infiltrate of atypical lymphocytes with epidermotropism and sparing of appendages. Diagnosis of GMF was made. Computed tomographic scan of thorax, abdomen and pelvis revealed axillary and inguinal lymphadenopathy. Immunohistochemistry revealed leukocyte common antigen and CD3 positivity suggestive of T cell origin. Patient was started on CHOP (Cyclophosphamide, Hydroxydaunorubicin, Oncovin and Prednisolone) regimen of chemotherapy with marked improvement after three cycles of chemotherapy. This case had some clinical resemblance to lepromatous leprosy.

  4. Short-term leprosy forecasting from an expert opinion survey

    PubMed Central

    Deiner, Michael S.; Worden, Lee; Rittel, Alex; Ackley, Sarah F.; Liu, Fengchen; Blum, Laura; Scott, James C.; Lietman, Thomas M.

    2017-01-01

    We conducted an expert survey of leprosy (Hansen’s Disease) and neglected tropical disease experts in February 2016. Experts were asked to forecast the next year of reported cases for the world, for the top three countries, and for selected states and territories of India. A total of 103 respondents answered at least one forecasting question. We elicited lower and upper confidence bounds. Comparing these results to regression and exponential smoothing, we found no evidence that any forecasting method outperformed the others. We found evidence that experts who believed it was more likely to achieve global interruption of transmission goals and disability reduction goals had higher error scores for India and Indonesia, but lower for Brazil. Even for a disease whose epidemiology changes on a slow time scale, forecasting exercises such as we conducted are simple and practical. We believe they can be used on a routine basis in public health. PMID:28813531

  5. Rehabilitation engineering and leprosy in Nepal: a personal view.

    PubMed

    Meanley, S

    1992-01-01

    Green Pastures Hospital is a specialist leprosy hospital in Pokhara, Nepal. As part of its service it offers a range of appliances aimed to assist in the rehabilitation of patients. This paper outlines the different orthoses and prostheses made at the Orthopaedic Appliances Centre in the hospital, their various indications and some of the benefits and problems associated with their use. Specific reference is made to the requirements related to local conditions and customs. The terrain, communications, facilities and materials available in Nepal make the work of the few rehabilitation engineers in the country somewhat different from that of those in the West. Some of these differences are described, drawing out contrasts in technical requirements of appliances and in organizational structures in the field of rehabilitation in the UK and Nepal.

  6. Clinical presentation of tuberculoid leprosy in an epidermodysplasia verruciformis patient.

    PubMed

    Prestes-Carneiro, Luiz Euribel; Nai, Gisele Alborghetti; Silva, Márcia G; Cristofano, Carlos; Crivelin, Luciana Leite; Calabreta, Carmela Beatriz Ramos; Moliterno, Ricardo Alberto; Morgado de Abreu, Marilda Aparecida Milanez

    2012-06-15

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is triggered by a variety of mechanisms that at least partly include genetic background. We present a Brazilian man with a 30-year history of flat, wart-like lesions with clinical, histopathological, and evolutive aspects consistent with papillomavirus (HPV)-associated EV. Histological analysis of the wart lesions showed epidermis with hyperkeratosis, regular acanthosis, hypergranulosis, and cells with abundant basophilic cytoplasm. Moreover, a perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate was found in the superficial dermis, consistent with a viral wart. Type-2-HPV DNA was detected in various fragments of skin-wart lesions using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Two years after the EV diagnosis, the patient presented with an anesthetic well-demarcated, erythematous and mildly scaly plaque on his right forearm. A histopathological analysis of this lesion demonstrated the presence of a compact tuberculoid granuloma. Ziehl-Neelsen staining demonstrated the presence of rare acid-fast bacilli and confirmed the tuberculoid leprosy diagnosis. The patient's Mitsuda Intradermal Reaction was positive. To elucidate the possible mechanism involved in this case of EV, we genotyped the HLA genes of this patient. DQB genotyping showed the polymorphic HLA alleles DQB1*0301 and 0501. The patient was treated with a paucibacillary multi-drug therapy scheme, and the disease was cured in six months. This report describes an EV patient with an M. leprae infection, confirming that tuberculoid leprosy patients possess a relatively specific and efficient cell-mediated immunity against the bacillus and, therefore, localized forms of the disease. Moreover, we show the possible involvement of the polymorphic HLA alleles DQB1*0301 and 0501 in EV induction mechanisms.

  7. Cost-Effectiveness of a Chemoprophylactic Intervention with Single Dose Rifampicin in Contacts of New Leprosy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Idema, Willemijn J.; Majer, Istvan M.; Pahan, David; Oskam, Linda; Polinder, Suzanne; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2010-01-01

    Background With 249,007 new leprosy patients detected globally in 2008, it remains necessary to develop new and effective interventions to interrupt the transmission of M. leprae. We assessed the economic benefits of single dose rifampicin (SDR) for contacts as chemoprophylactic intervention in the control of leprosy. Methods We conducted a single centre, double blind, cluster randomised, placebo controlled trial in northwest Bangladesh between 2002 and 2007, including 21,711 close contacts of 1,037 patients with newly diagnosed leprosy. We gave a single dose of rifampicin or placebo to close contacts, with follow-up for four years. The main outcome measure was the development of clinical leprosy. We assessed the cost effectiveness by calculating the incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) between the standard multidrug therapy (MDT) program with the additional chemoprophylaxis intervention versus the standard MDT program only. The ICER was expressed in US dollars per prevented leprosy case. Findings Chemoprophylaxis with SDR for preventing leprosy among contacts of leprosy patients is cost-effective at all contact levels and thereby a cost-effective prevention strategy. In total, $6,009 incremental cost was invested and 38 incremental leprosy cases were prevented, resulting in an ICER of $158 per one additional prevented leprosy case. It was the most cost-effective in neighbours of neighbours and social contacts (ICER $214), slightly less cost-effective in next door neighbours (ICER $497) and least cost-effective among household contacts (ICER $856). Conclusion Chemoprophylaxis with single dose rifampicin given to contacts of newly diagnosed leprosy patients is a cost-effective intervention strategy. Implementation studies are necessary to establish whether this intervention is acceptable and feasible in other leprosy endemic areas of the world. PMID:21072235

  8. Introducing leprosy post-exposure prophylaxis into the health systems of India, Nepal and Indonesia: a case study.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, A; Mieras, L; Dhakal, K; Arif, M; Dandel, S; Richardus, J H

    2017-09-29

    Leprosy has a wide range of clinical and socio-economic consequences. India, Indonesia and Nepal contribute significantly to the global leprosy burden. After integration, the health systems are pivotal in leprosy service delivery. The Leprosy Post Exposure Prophylaxis (LPEP) program is ongoing to investigate the feasibility of providing single dose rifampicin (SDR) as post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) to the contacts of leprosy cases in various health systems. We aim to compare national leprosy control programs, and adapted LPEP strategies in India, Nepal and Indonesia. The purpose is to establish a baseline of the health system's situation and document the subsequent adjustment of LPEP, which will provide the context for interpreting the LPEP results in future. The study followed the multiple-case study design with single units of analysis. The data collection methods were direct observation, in-depth interviews and desk review. The study was divided into two phases, i.e. review of national leprosy programs and description of the LPEP program. The comparative analysis was performed using the WHO health system frameworks (2007). In all countries leprosy services including contact tracing is integrated into the health systems. The LPEP program is fully integrated into the established national leprosy programs, with SDR and increased documentation, which need major additions to standard procedures. PEP administration was widely perceived as well manageable, but the additional LPEP data collection was reported to increase workload in the first year. The findings of our study led to the recommendation that field-based leprosy research programs should keep health systems in focus. The national leprosy programs are diverse in terms of organizational hierarchy, human resource quantity and capacity. We conclude that PEP can be integrated into different health systems without major structural and personal changes, but provisions are necessary for the additional monitoring

  9. PCR-Based Techniques for Leprosy Diagnosis: From the Laboratory to the Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Alejandra Nóbrega; Talhari, Carolina; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Talhari, Sinésio

    2014-01-01

    In leprosy, classic diagnostic tools based on bacillary counts and histopathology have been facing hurdles, especially in distinguishing latent infection from active disease and diagnosing paucibacillary clinical forms. Serological tests and IFN-gamma releasing assays (IGRA) that employ humoral and cellular immune parameters, respectively, are also being used, but recent results indicate that quantitative PCR (qPCR) is a key technique due to its higher sensitivity and specificity. In fact, advances concerning the structure and function of the Mycobacterium leprae genome led to the development of specific PCR-based gene amplification assays for leprosy diagnosis and monitoring of household contacts. Also, based on the validation of point-of-care technologies for M. tuberculosis DNA detection, it is clear that the same advantages of rapid DNA detection could be observed in respect to leprosy. So far, PCR has proven useful in the determination of transmission routes, M. leprae viability, and drug resistance in leprosy. However, PCR has been ascertained to be especially valuable in diagnosing difficult cases like pure neural leprosy (PNL), paucibacillary (PB), and patients with atypical clinical presentation and histopathological features compatible with leprosy. Also, the detection of M. leprae DNA in different samples of the household contacts of leprosy patients is very promising. Although a positive PCR result is not sufficient to establish a causal relationship with disease outcome, quantitation provided by qPCR is clearly capable of indicating increased risk of developing the disease and could alert clinicians to follow these contacts more closely or even define rules for chemoprophylaxis. PMID:24722358

  10. [Epidemiological survey of leprosy conducted in metropolitan France between 2009 and 2010].

    PubMed

    Bret, S; Flageul, B; Girault, P-Y; Lightburne, E; Morand, J-J

    2013-05-01

    There is no official leprosy register in France. The last epidemiological survey on leprosy in metropolitan France was done between 1995 and 1998. We performed a new epidemiological study of leprosy in metropolitan France in 2009 and 2010. We contacted 85 dermatology and infectious disease units by e-mail or by telephone in order to determine the number of leprosy patients either being followed up or newly diagnosed in 2009 and 2010. The response rate was 87%. In 2010, 127 patients were being followed up in metropolitan France, mostly at dermatology units (78%). Seventy-five patients were on anti-bacillary treatment and the prevalence was 0.011/10,000. There were 39 new cases diagnosed in 2009 and 2010 (mean 19 cases/year) (low case-detection rate: 0.003 per 10,000 inhabitants). Among the new cases, seven patients (18%) were of French origin, with two from metropolitan France and five from French overseas territories. Our study confirms the persistence of imported leprosy in France and shows no significant decrease in the number of new cases since 1998 (19 vs. 18 new cases/year) or in disease prevalence (0.013 vs. 0.011 per 10,000 inhabitants). This prevalence is very far removed from the one per 10,000 inhabitants proposed by the World Health Organization as the criteria for endemic disease. Most patients in our survey were immigrants (82%). Lepromatous forms (46%) were more frequent than the tuberculoid forms (33%). All patients had either travelled to or lived in areas of high leprosy prevalence, including metropolitan subjects. Leprosy remains present in metropolitan France, and it is still important to continue teaching about it at medical faculties in order to ensure diagnosis of new patients as early as possible. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Description of leprosy classification at baseline among patients enrolled at the uniform multidrug therapy clinical trial for leprosy patients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Moura, Rodrigo Scaliante; Penna, Gerson Oliveira; Cardoso, Ludimila Paula Vaz; de Andrade Pontes, Maria Araci; Cruz, Rossilene; de Sá Gonçalves, Heitor; Fernandes Penna, Maria Lúcia; de Araújo Stefani, Mariane Martins; Bührer-Sékula, Samira

    2015-06-01

    The uniform multidrug therapy clinical trial, Brazil (U-MDT/CT-BR), database was used to describe and report the performance of available tools to classify 830 leprosy patients as paucibacillary (PB) and multibacillary (MB) at baseline. In a modified Ridley and Jopling (R&J) classification, considering clinical features, histopathological results of skin biopsies and the slit-skin smear bacterial load results were used as the gold standard method for classification. Anti-phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I) serology by ML Flow test, the slit skin smear bacterial load, and the number of skin lesions were evaluated. Considering the R&J classification system as gold standard, ML Flow tests correctly allocated 70% patients in the PB group and 87% in the MB group. The classification based on counting the number of skin lesions correctly allocated 46% PB patients and 99% MB leprosy cases. Slit skin smears properly classified 91% and 97% of PB and MB patients, respectively. Based on U-MDT/CT-BR results, classification of leprosy patients for treatment purposes is unnecessary because it does not impact clinical and laboratories outcomes. In this context, the identification of new biomarkers to detect patients at a higher risk to develop leprosy reactions or relapse remains an important research challenge.

  12. Negligible risk of inducing resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis with single-dose rifampicin as post-exposure prophylaxis for leprosy.

    PubMed

    Mieras, Liesbeth; Anthony, Richard; van Brakel, Wim; Bratschi, Martin W; van den Broek, Jacques; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Cavaliero, Arielle; Kasang, Christa; Perera, Geethal; Reichman, Lee; Richardus, Jan Hendrik; Saunderson, Paul; Steinmann, Peter; Yew, Wing Wai

    2016-06-08

    Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) for leprosy is administered as one single dose of rifampicin (SDR) to the contacts of newly diagnosed leprosy patients. SDR reduces the risk of developing leprosy among contacts by around 60 % in the first 2-3 years after receiving SDR. In countries where SDR is currently being implemented under routine programme conditions in defined areas, questions were raised by health authorities and professional bodies about the possible risk of inducing rifampicin resistance among the M. tuberculosis strains circulating in these areas. This issue has not been addressed in scientific literature to date. To produce an authoritative consensus statement about the risk that SDR would induce rifampicin-resistant tuberculosis, a meeting was convened with tuberculosis (TB) and leprosy experts. The experts carefully reviewed and discussed the available evidence regarding the mechanisms and risk factors for the development of (multi) drug-resistance in M. tuberculosis with a view to the special situation of the use of SDR as PEP for leprosy. They concluded that SDR given to contacts of leprosy patients, in the absence of symptoms of active TB, poses a negligible risk of generating resistance in M. tuberculosis in individuals and at the population level. Thus, the benefits of SDR prophylaxis in reducing the risk of developing leprosy in contacts of new leprosy patients far outweigh the risks of generating drug resistance in M. tuberculosis.

  13. Factors Associated with Migration in Individuals Affected by Leprosy, Maranhão, Brazil: An Exploratory Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Murto, C.; Kaplan, C.; Ariza, L.; Schwarz, K.; Alencar, C. H.; da Costa, L. M. M.; Heukelbach, J.

    2013-01-01

    In Brazil, leprosy is endemic and concentrated in high-risk clusters. Internal migration is common in the country and may influence leprosy transmission and hamper control efforts. We performed a cross-sectional study with two separate analyses evaluating factors associated with migration in Brazil's Northeast: one among individuals newly diagnosed with leprosy and the other among a clinically unapparent population with no symptoms of leprosy for comparison. We included 394 individuals newly diagnosed with leprosy and 391 from the clinically unapparent population. Of those with leprosy, 258 (65.5%) were birth migrants, 105 (26.6%) were past five-year migrants, and 43 (10.9%) were circular migrants. In multivariate logistic regression, three independent factors were found to be significantly associated with migration among those with leprosy: (1) alcohol consumption, (2) separation from family/friends, and (3) difficulty reaching the healthcare facility. Separation from family/friends was also associated with migration in the clinically unapparent population. The health sector may consider adapting services to meet the needs of migrating populations. Future research is needed to expl