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Sample records for leptonic cp phases

  1. Probing leptonic CP phases in LFV processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajc, Borut; Nemevšek, Miha; Senjanović, Goran

    2010-02-01

    We study a CP and T violating triple (spin) correlation in the muon to electron conversion in nuclei in the context of the seesaw mechanism. After concluding that the results are negative for all three seesaw types, we turn to the left-right symmetric theories as the original source of seesaw. We find that in general this correlation is of order one which offers a hope of observing CP violation in lepton flavor violating processes for a L-R scale below around 10-30 TeV. We discuss the conditions that could render to (unlikely) conspiracies as to suppress the CP violating effects.

  2. The leptonic CP phase from T2(H)K and μ+ decay at rest

    DOE PAGES

    Evslin, Jarah; Ge, Shao-Feng; Hagiwara, Kaoru

    2016-02-22

    Combining v oscillations at T2K or T2HK withmore » $$\\bar{v}$$ oscillations from μ+ decay at rest (DAR) allows a determination of the leptonic CP-violating phase . The degeneracies of this phase with θ13 and θ23 are broken and δ can be reliably distinguished from 180° - δ. In this study, we present the sensitivity to δ of T2(H)K together with a μ+ DAR experiment using Super-K as a near detector and Hyper-K at the Tochibora site as a far detector.« less

  3. Leptonic CP phase determined by an equation involving PMNS matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Hong-Wei; Zhou, Jia-Hui; Li, Xue-Qian

    2017-04-01

    Several approximate equalities among the matrix elements of the Cabibbo–Kobayashi–Maskawa (CKM) and Pontecorvo–Maki–Nakagawa–Sakata (PMNS) matrices imply that hidden symmetries may exist and be common for both quark and neutrino sectors. The charge parity (CP) phase of the CKM matrix ({δ }{CKM}) is involved in these equalities and can be investigated when these equalities turn into several equations. As we substitute those experimentally measured values of the three mixing angles into the equations for quarks, it is noted that one of the equations which holds exactly has a solution {δ }{CKM}=({68.95}-1.15+1.15)^\\circ . That value accords with ({69.1}-3.85+2.02)^\\circ determined from available data. Generalizing the scenario to the lepton sector, the same equality determines the leptonic CP phase {δ }{PMNS} to be ({275.20}-1.15+1.15)^\\circ . Thus we predict the value of {δ }{PMNS} from the equation. So far there is no direct measurement on {δ }{PMNS}, but a recent analysis based on the neutrino oscillation data prefers a phase close to 270°.

  4. Non-zero θ _{13} and leptonic CP phase with A_4 symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sruthilaya, M.; Mohanta, R.

    2017-03-01

    We consider a model based on A_4 symmetry to explain the phenomenon of neutrino mixing. The spontaneous symmetry breaking of A_4 symmetry leads to a co-bimaximal mixing matrix at leading order. We consider the effect of higher order corrections in neutrino sector and find that the mixing angles thus obtained, come well within the 3σ ranges of their experimental values. We study the implications of this formalism on the other phenomenological observables, such as CP violating phase, Jarlskog invariant and the effective Majorana mass |M_{ee}|. We also obtain the branching ratio of the lepton flavour violating decay μ → e γ in the context of this model and find that it can be less than its present experimental upper bound.

  5. Evidence for leptonic CP phase from NOνA, T2K and ICAL: A chronological progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Monojit; Ghoshal, Pomita; Goswami, Srubabati; Raut, Sushant K.

    2014-07-01

    We study the synergy between the long-baseline (LBL) experiments NOνA and T2K and the atmospheric neutrino experiment ICAL@INO for obtaining the first hint of CP violation in the lepton sector. We also discuss how precisely the leptonic CP phaseCP) can be measured by these experiments. The CP sensitivity is first described at the level of oscillation probabilities, discussing its dependence on the parameters - θ13, mass hierarchy and θ23. In particular, we discuss how the precise knowledge or lack thereof of these parameters can affect the CP sensitivity of LBL experiments. We follow a staged approach and analyze the δCP sensitivity that can be achieved at different points of time over the next 15 years from these LBL experiments alone and/or in conjunction with ICAL@INO. We find that the CP sensitivity of NOνA/T2K is enhanced due to the synergies between the different channels and between the two experiments. On the other hand the lack of knowledge of hierarchy and octant makes the CP sensitivity poorer for some parameter ranges. Addition of ICAL data to T2K and NOνA can exclude these spurious wrong-hierarchy and/or wrong-octant solutions and cause a significant increase in the range of δCP values for which a hint of CP violation can be achieved. In fact in parameter regions unfavourable for NOνA/T2K, we may get the first evidence of CP violation by adding the ICAL data to these. Similarly the precision with which δCP can be measured also improves with inclusion of ICAL data.

  6. The leptonic CP phase from T2(H)K and μ+ decay at rest

    SciTech Connect

    Evslin, Jarah; Ge, Shao-Feng; Hagiwara, Kaoru

    2016-02-22

    Combining v oscillations at T2K or T2HK with $\\bar{v}$ oscillations from μ+ decay at rest (DAR) allows a determination of the leptonic CP-violating phase . The degeneracies of this phase with θ13 and θ23 are broken and δ can be reliably distinguished from 180° - δ. In this study, we present the sensitivity to δ of T2(H)K together with a μ+ DAR experiment using Super-K as a near detector and Hyper-K at the Tochibora site as a far detector.

  7. Global analysis of neutrino masses, mixings, and phases: Entering the era of leptonic CP violation searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogli, G. L.; Lisi, E.; Marrone, A.; Montanino, D.; Palazzo, A.; Rotunno, A. M.

    2012-07-01

    We perform a global analysis of neutrino oscillation data, including high-precision measurements of the neutrino mixing angle θ13 at reactor experiments, which have confirmed previous indications in favor of θ13>0. Recent data presented at the Neutrino 2012 conference are also included. We focus on the correlations between θ13 and the mixing angle θ23, as well as between θ13 and the neutrino CP-violation phase δ. We find interesting indications for θ23<π/4 and possible hints for δ˜π, with no significant difference between normal and inverted mass hierarchy.

  8. Information on Cp-Violating Phases as a Bonus in the Searches for the Lepton Flavor Violating Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzan, Y.

    Although in the framework of the Standard Model (SM) of particles, Lepton Flavor Violating (LFV) processes such as µ → eγ, µ → eee and µN → eN are strictly forbidden, in various beyond SM scenarios such as Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), new sources of LFV appear that can lead to sizeable rates for these processes. There are on-going experiments that search for the LFV processes. If the rates of these processes are close to the present bound, these experiments will collect abundant amount of data which makes precision measurement of LFV parameters a close possibility. We show that by studying the polarization of the final particles, information on the CP-violating phases of the underlying theory can be also derived. We discuss the possibility to reduce the degeneracy of parameters by combining information from various experiments.

  9. A window on the CP-violating phases of MSSM from lepton flavor violating processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaser Ayazi, S.; Farzan, Yasaman

    2009-01-01

    It has recently been shown that by measuring the transverse polarization of the final particles in the LFV processes μ → eγ, μ → eee and μN → eN, one can derive information on the CP-violating phases of the underlying theory. We derive formulas for the transverse polarization of the final particles in terms of the couplings of the effective potential leading to these processes. We then study the dependence of the polarizations of e and γ in the μ → eγ and μN → eN on the parameters of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). We show that combining the information on various observables in the μ → eγ and μN → eN search experiments with the information on the electric dipole moment of the electron can help us to solve the degeneracies in parameter space and to determine the values of certain phases.

  10. Partial Quark-Lepton Universality and Neutrino CP Violation

    DOE PAGES

    Liao, Jiajun; Marfatia, D.; Whisnant, K.

    2015-01-01

    We smore » tudy a model with partial quark-lepton universality that can naturally arise in grand unified theories. We find that constraints on the model can be reduced to a single condition on the Dirac CP phase δ in the neutrino sector. Using our current knowledge of the CKM and PMNS mixing matrices, we predict - 32 . 4 ° ≤ δ ≤ 32 . 0 ° at 2 σ .« less

  11. CP violation in semileptonic tau lepton decays

    SciTech Connect

    Delepine, D.; Castro, G. Lopez; Lozano, L.-T. Lopez

    2005-08-01

    The leading order contribution to the direct CP asymmetry in {tau}{sup {+-}}{yields}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay rates is evaluated within the standard model. The weak phase required for CP violation is introduced through an interesting mechanism involving second order weak interactions, which is also responsible for tiny violations of the {delta}S={delta}Q rule in K{sub l3} decays. The calculated CP asymmetry turns out to be of order 10{sup -12}, leaving a large window for studying effects of nonstandard sources of CP violation in this observable.

  12. SUSY CP phases and asymmetries at colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittel, Olaf

    2009-06-01

    In the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, physical phases of complex parameters lead to CP violation. We show how triple products of particle momenta or spins can be used to construct asymmetries, that allow us to probe these CP phases. To give specific examples, we discuss the production of neutralinos at the International Linear Collider (ILC). For the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), we discuss CP asymmetries in squark decays, and in the tri-lepton signal. We find that the CP asymmetries can be as large as 60%.

  13. CP violation in Semi-Leptonic {tau} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Delepine, David

    2007-06-19

    We study CP violation in semi-leptonic {tau} decays and we determine the conditions necessary to be able to define a observable CP asymmetry. We apply these conditions in both models, the standard model for the electroweak interactions and its supersymmetric extensions. In the first case, the leading order contribution to the direct CP asymmetry in {tau}{+-} {yields} K{+-}{pi}0{nu}{tau} decay rates is evaluated. In the second case,we compute the SUSY effective hamiltonian that describes the |{delta}S| = 1 semileptonic decays of tau leptons. We show that SUSY contributions may enhance the CP asymmetry of {tau} {yields} K{pi}{nu}{tau} decays by several orders of magnitude compared to the standard model expectations.

  14. Leptonic CP violation induced by approximately {mu}-{tau} symmetric seesaw mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Teppei; Yasue, Masaki

    2008-04-01

    Assuming a minimal seesaw model with two heavy neutrinos (N), we examine effects of leptonic CP violation induced by approximate {mu}-{tau} symmetric interactions. As long as N is subject to the {mu}-{tau} symmetry, we can choose CP phases of Dirac mass terms without loss of generality in such a way that these phases arise from {mu}-{tau} symmetry breaking interactions. In the case that no phase is present in heavy neutrino mass terms, leptonic CP phases are controlled by two phases {alpha} and {beta}. The similar consideration is extended to N blind to the {mu}-{tau} symmetry. It is argued that N subject (blind) to the {mu}-{tau} symmetry necessarily describes the normal (inverted) mass hierarchy. We restrict ourselves to {mu}-{tau} symmetric textures giving the tribimaximal mixing and calculate flavor neutrino masses to estimate CP-violating Dirac and Majorana phases as well as neutrino mixing angles as functions of {alpha} and {beta}. Since {alpha} and {beta} are generated by {mu}-{tau} symmetry breaking interactions, the CP-violating Majorana phase tends to be suppressed and is found to be at most O(0.1) radian. On the other hand, the CP-violating Dirac phase tends to show a proportionality to {alpha} or to {beta}.

  15. Impact of CP-violation on neutrino lepton number asymmetries revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barenboim, Gabriela; Park, Wan-Il

    2017-02-01

    We revisit the effect of the (Dirac) CP-violating phase on neutrino lepton number asymmetries in both mass- and flavor-basis. We found that, even if there are sizable effects on muon- and tau-neutrino asymmetries, the effect on the asymmetry of electron-neutrinos is at most similar to the upper bound set by BBN for initial neutrino degeneracy parameters smaller than order unity. We also found that, for the asymmetries in mass-basis, the changes caused by CP-violation is of sub-% level which is unlikely to be accessible neither in the current nor in the forthcoming experiments.

  16. Insensitivity of leptogenesis with flavor effects to low energy leptonic CP violation.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Sacha; Garayoa, Julia; Palorini, Federica; Rius, Nuria

    2007-10-19

    If the baryon asymmetry of the Universe is produced by leptogenesis, CP violation is required in the lepton sector. In the seesaw extension of the standard model with three hierarchical right-handed neutrinos, we show that the baryon asymmetry is insensitive to the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nagakawa-Sakata phases: thermal leptogenesis can work for any value of the observable phases. This result was well known when there were no flavor effects in leptogenesis; we show that it remains true when flavor effects are included.

  17. Insensitivity of Leptogenesis with Flavor Effects to Low Energy Leptonic CP Violation

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Sacha; Palorini, Federica; Garayoa, Julia; Rius, Nuria

    2007-10-19

    If the baryon asymmetry of the Universe is produced by leptogenesis, CP violation is required in the lepton sector. In the seesaw extension of the standard model with three hierarchical right-handed neutrinos, we show that the baryon asymmetry is insensitive to the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nagakawa-Sakata phases: thermal leptogenesis can work for any value of the observable phases. This result was well known when there were no flavor effects in leptogenesis; we show that it remains true when flavor effects are included.

  18. Prospects of Measuring Lepton CP-violation with LBNE at DUSEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maricic, Jelena; Lbne Collaboration

    2010-11-01

    Excellent measurement of the neutrino oscillation parameters achieved in recent years has set the scene for probing the size of the leptonic CP-violation angle. The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will have an unprecedented sensitivity to CP-violation angle and a range of other physics questions. LBNE will be a massive neutrino detector located at the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) in the Homestake mine in the town of Lead, South Dakota, USA. Two independent detector technologies have been utilized for detector design: water Cherenkov and liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) type of detector and both technologies have similar sensitivity to the main physics questions to be answered. The experiment will measure the value of CP-violation phase δ in lepton sector, ordering of neutrino masses and value of the angle θ13. In addition, the LBNE will be able to search for proton decay, get a detailed energy spectrum in the case of galactic supernovae, detect solar and atmospheric neutrinos, possibly geoneutrinos and even measure the relic supernovae neutrino flux. In order to address most of the aforementioned physics questions, the detector will be placed at large depth of 1480 m (WC). The scientific goals require a minimal size of 2×100 kton equivalent water Cherenkov fiducial volume or 2×17 kton LArTPC, or the combination of the both. The LBNE will obtain 3σ C.L. measurement of θ13 at the 0.001 level, for any value of CPphase. In addition LBNE will resolve the neutrino mass hierarchy at 3σ C.L. measurement of the neutrino mass hierarchy if sin22θ13 >= 0.01 for any value of CPphase and measure about 50% of all CPphases with 3σ C.L. for sin2 2θ13 >= 0.01. The experiment will make these measurements using an electron neutrino appearance signal in the muon neutrino beam sent to LBNE from Fermilab, 1300 km away. The beam will be 700 kW and then 2 MW. The experiment will run in both neutrino and anti

  19. A very intense neutrino super beam experiment for leptonic CP violation discovery based on the European spallation source linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baussan, E.; Blennow, M.; Bogomilov, M.; Bouquerel, E.; Caretta, O.; Cederkäll, J.; Christiansen, P.; Coloma, P.; Cupial, P.; Danared, H.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C.; Dracos, M.; Ekelöf, T.; Eshraqi, M.; Fernandez Martinez, E.; Gaudiot, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Koutchouk, J.-P.; Lindroos, M.; Loveridge, P.; Matev, R.; McGinnis, D.; Mezzetto, M.; Miyamoto, R.; Mosca, L.; Ohlsson, T.; Öhman, H.; Osswald, F.; Peggs, S.; Poussot, P.; Ruber, R.; Tang, J. Y.; Tsenov, R.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Vassilopoulos, N.; Wilcox, D.; Wildner, E.; Wurtz, J.

    2014-08-01

    Very intense neutrino beams and large neutrino detectors will be needed in order to enable the discovery of CP violation in the leptonic sector. We propose to use the proton linac of the European Spallation Source currently under construction in Lund, Sweden, to deliver, in parallel with the spallation neutron production, a very intense, cost effective and high performance neutrino beam. The baseline program for the European Spallation Source linac is that it will be fully operational at 5 MW average power by 2022, producing 2 GeV 2.86 ms long proton pulses at a rate of 14 Hz. Our proposal is to upgrade the linac to 10 MW average power and 28 Hz, producing 14 pulses/s for neutron production and 14 pulses/s for neutrino production. Furthermore, because of the high current required in the pulsed neutrino horn, the length of the pulses used for neutrino production needs to be compressed to a few μs with the aid of an accumulator ring. A long baseline experiment using this Super Beam and a megaton underground Water Cherenkov detector located in existing mines 300-600 km from Lund will make it possible to discover leptonic CP violation at 5 σ significance level in up to 50% of the leptonic Dirac CP-violating phase range. This experiment could also determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at a significance level of more than 3 σ if this issue will not already have been settled by other experiments by then. The mass hierarchy performance could be increased by combining the neutrino beam results with those obtained from atmospheric neutrinos detected by the same large volume detector. This detector will also be used to measure the proton lifetime, detect cosmological neutrinos and neutrinos from supernova explosions. Results on the sensitivity to leptonic CP violation and the neutrino mass hierarchy are presented.

  20. Predicting the CP-Phase for Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takasugi, Eiichi

    In view of recent observation of neutrino mixing angles and also the CP-phase, the model to predict the CP phase becomes more interesting. In 2000, we proposed the neutrino mass matrix that predicts the maximal CP violation and the 2-3 mixing angle. I revisit this model and explore this model further to investigate Majorana phases and the possible extension that allows the deviation of the CP phase and the 2-3 mixing from the maximal.

  1. Measuring CP-violating phases through studying the polarization of the final particles in μ → eee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzan, Yasaman

    2009-06-01

    It is shown that the polarizations of the final particles in μ+ →e+e-e+ provide us with information on the CP-violating phases of the effective Lagrangian leading to this Lepton Flavor Violating (LFV) decay.

  2. Seesaw scale and CP phases in a minimal model of leptogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siyeon, Kim

    2016-12-01

    The seesaw mechanism to derive the light masses of left-handed neutrinos using heavy masses of right-handed neutrinos gives rise to a connection between low-energy measurables and Grand Unified Theory (GUT)-scale mechanism. We express the neutrino mixing angles in terms of a single variable sin θ 13, whose size was measured recently. The lepton asymmetry from the decays of heavy neutrinos via Yukawa coupling is described by CP phases in both Dirac and Majorana type. It is shown that the seesaw scale relevant to the lepton asymmetry can be constrained by CP phase in this minimal model.

  3. Revisiting the sensitivity studies for leptonic CP-violation and mass hierarchy with T2K, NOνA and LBNE experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepthi, K. N.; C, Soumya; Mohanta, R.

    2015-02-01

    Precision measurement of neutrino mixing parameters and the determination of mass hierarchy are the primary goals of present and upcoming neutrino experiments. In this work, we study the sensitivity of T2K, NOνA and LBNE experiments to discover leptonic charge parity (CP)-violation and the determination of neutrino mass hierarchy. We obtain the correlation between the CP-violating phase {{δ }CP} and the mixing angles {{θ }13}, {{θ }23}, and the sensitivity to determine the octant of atmospheric mixing angle {{θ }23}. The entire analysis is performed for a total of ten years (5ν + 5 \\bar{ν }) of the running of T2K, NOνA and LBNE experiments. Furthermore, we also consider the impact of cross section uncertainties on the CP-violation sensitivity of the LBNE experiment.

  4. Direct CP, Lepton Flavor and Isospin Asymmetries in the Decays B->K(*)l+l-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, R.N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-03-03

    We measure rate asymmetries for the rare decays B {yields} K{sup (*)}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}, where {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} is either e{sup +}e{sup -} or {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, using a sample of 384 million B{bar B} events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. We find no evidence for direct CP or lepton-flavor asymmetries. For dilepton masses below the J/{psi} resonance, we find evidence for unexpectedly large isospin asymmetries in both B {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} and B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} which differ respectively by 3.2{sigma} and 2.7{sigma}, including systematic uncertainties, from the Standard Model expectations.

  5. Superbeams plus neutrino factory: the golden path to leptonic CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burguet-Castell, J.; Gavela, M. B.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; Hernández, P.; Mena, O.

    2002-12-01

    Superbeams (SB) and neutrino factories (NF) are not alternative facilities for exploring neutrino oscillation physics, but successive steps. The correct strategy is to contemplate the combination of their expected physics results. We show its important potential on the disappearance of fake degenerate solutions in the simultaneous measurement of θ13 and leptonic CP violation. Intrinsic, sign( Δm132) and θ23 degeneracies are shown to be extensively eliminated when the results from one NF baseline and a SB facility are combined. A key point is the different average neutrino energy and baseline of the facilities. For values of θ13 near its present limit, the short NF baseline, e.g., L=732 km, becomes, after such a combination, a very interesting distance. For smaller θ13, an intermediate NF baseline of O(3000 km) is still required.

  6. Direct CP, lepton flavor, and isospin asymmetries in the decays B-->K(*)l+l-.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Cahn, R N; Jacobsen, R G; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Zhang, L; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Nash, J A; Panduro Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Li, X; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Esteve, L; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Gabareen, A M; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Miyashita, T S; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-03-06

    We measure branching fractions and integrated rate asymmetries for the rare decays B-->K(*)l+l-, where l+l- is either e+e- or micro+micro-, using a sample of 384x10(6) BB events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- collider. We find no evidence for direct CP or lepton-flavor asymmetries. However, for dilepton masses below the J/psi resonance, we find evidence for unexpectedly large isospin asymmetries in both B-->Kl+l- and B-->K*l+l- which differ, respectively, by 3.2sigma and 2.7sigma, including systematic uncertainties, from the standard model expectations.

  7. CP-conserving unparticle phase effects on the unpolarized and polarized direct CP asymmetry in b{yields}dl{sup +}l{sup -} transition

    SciTech Connect

    Bashiry, V.

    2008-05-01

    We examine the unparticle CP-conserving phase effects on the direct CP asymmetry for both polarized and unpolarized leptons in the inclusive b{yields}dl{sup +}l{sup -} transition, where the flavor-changing neutral currents are forbidden at tree level but are induced by one-loop penguin diagrams. The averaged polarized and unpolarized CP asymmetries depict strong dependency on the unparticle parameters. In particular, a sizable discrepancy corresponding to the standard model is achieved when the scale dimension value is 1CP asymmetry depending on the definite value of the scaling dimension d{sub U}. Especially, when d{sub U}{approx}1.1 the CP asymmetries vanish.

  8. Leptons, Quarks, and Their Antiparticles: A Phase-Space View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żenczykowski, Piotr

    2010-09-01

    Recently, a correspondence has been shown to exist between the structure of a single Standard Model generation of elementary particles and the properties of the Clifford algebra of nonrelativistic phase space. Here, this correspondence is spelled out in terms of phase-space variables. Thus, a phase-space interpretation of the connections between leptons, quarks and their antiparticles is proposed, in particular providing a timeless alternative to the standard Stückelberg-Feynman interpretation. The issue of the additivity of canonical momenta is raised and argued to be intimately related to the unobservability of free quarks and the emergence of mesons and baryons.

  9. Resolving Standard and Nonstandard CP Violation Phases in Neutrino Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Gago, A. M.; Minakata, H.; Uchinami, S.; Nunokawa, H.; Zukanovich Funchal, R.

    2010-03-30

    Neutrino oscillations can exhibit extra CP violation effects, beyond those expected from the standard Kobayashi-Maskawa phase delta, if non-standard neutrino interactions are at play. We show that it is possible to disentangle the two CP violating effects by measuring muon neutrino appearance using a near-far two detector setting in a neutrino factory experiment.

  10. Measuring the 13 neutrino mixing angle and the CP phase with neutrino telescopes.

    PubMed

    Serpico, P D; Kachelriess, M

    2005-06-03

    The observed excess of high-energy cosmic rays from the Galactic plane in the energy range around 10(18) eV may be explained by neutron primaries generated in the photodissociation of heavy nuclei. In this scenario, lower-energy neutrons decay before reaching the Earth and produce a detectable flux in a 1 km(3) neutrino telescope. The initial flavor composition of the neutrino flux, phi(nu(e)):phi(nu(mu)):phi(nu(tau))=1:0:0, permits a combined nu(mu)/nu(tau) appearance and nu(e) disappearance experiment. The observable flux ratio phi(nu(mu))/phi(nu(e)+nu(tau) at Earth depends on the 13 mixing angle theta(13) and the leptonic CP phase delta(CP), thus opening a new way to measure these two quantities.

  11. Leptonic CP violation search and the ambiguity of {delta}m{sub 31}{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Masafumi; Saito, Masako; Takeuchi, Tatsu; Okamura, Naotoshi

    2006-03-01

    We consider a search for the CP-violating angle {delta}{sub CP} in long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that the subleading {delta}{sub CP}-dependent terms in the {nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub e} oscillation probability can be easily obscured by the ambiguity of the leading term which depends on |{delta}m{sub 31}{sup 2}|. It is thus necessary to determine the value of {delta}m{sub 31}{sup 2} with a sufficient accuracy. The {nu}{sub {mu}} survival events, which can be accumulated simultaneously with the {nu}{sub e} appearance events, can serve for this purpose owing to its large statistics. Therefore, the combined analysis of {nu}{sub e} appearance and {nu}{sub {mu}} survival events is crucial to provide a restrictive constraint on {delta}{sub CP}. Taking a test experimental setup, we demonstrate in the {delta}{sub CP}-{delta}m{sub 31}{sup 2} plane that the analysis of {nu}{sub e} appearance events leads to less restrictive constraints on the value of {delta}{sub CP} due to the ambiguity of {delta}m{sub 31}{sup 2} and that the combined analysis efficiently improves the constraints.

  12. Neutrino Experiments: Hierarchy, CP, CPT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Manmohan; Randhawa, Monika; Singh, Mandip

    We present an overview of our recent investigations regarding the prospects of ongoing neutrino experiments as well as future experiments in determining few of the most important unknowns in the field of neutrino physics, specifically the neutrino mass ordering and leptonic CP-violation phase. The effect of matter oscillations on the neutrino oscillation probabilities has been exploited in resolving the degeneracy between the neutrino mass ordering and the CP violation phase in the leptonic sector. Further, we estimate the extent of extrinsic CP and CPT violation in the experiments with superbeams as well as neutrino factories.

  13. A method for determining the {ital CP} violating phase {gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, N.G.; He, X.

    1995-10-23

    A new way of determining the phases of weak amplitudes in charged {ital B} decays based on SU(3) symmetry is proposed. The {ital CP} violating phase {gamma} can now be determined without the previous difficulty associated with electroweak penguins. Copyright {ital 1995} {ital The} {ital American} {ital Physical} {ital Society}.

  14. CP violating phase from minimal texture neutrino mass matrix: Test of the phase relevant to leptogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukugita, Masataka; Kaneta, Yuya; Shimizu, Yusuke; Tanimoto, Morimitsu; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2017-01-01

    The model of neutrino mass matrix with minimal texture is now tightly constrained by experiment so that it can yield a prediction for the phase of CP violation. This phase is predicted to lie in the range δCP = 0.77 π- 1.24 π. If neutrino oscillation experiment would find the CP violation phase outside this range, this means that the minimal-texture neutrino mass matrix, the element of which is all real, fails and the neutrino mass matrix must be complex, i.e., the phase must be present that is responsible for leptogenesis.

  15. A4 and CP symmetry and a model with maximal CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cai-Chang; Lu, Jun-Nan; Ding, Gui-Jun

    2016-12-01

    We study a second CP symmetry compatible with the A4 flavor group, which interchanges the representations 1‧ and 1″. We analyze the lepton mixing patterns arising from the A4 and CP symmetry broken to residual subgroups Z3 and Z2 × CP in the charged lepton and neutrino sectors respectively. One phenomenologically viable mixing pattern is found, and it predicts maximal atmospheric mixing angle as well as maximal Dirac CP phase, trivial Majorana phases and the correlation sin2 ⁡θ12cos2 ⁡θ13 = 1 / 3. We construct a concrete model based on the A4 and CP symmetry, the above interesting mixing pattern is achieved, the observed charged lepton mass hierarchy is reproduced, and the reactor mixing angle θ13 is of the correct order.

  16. Generalized Friedberg-Lee Model for Neutrino Masses and Leptonic CP Violation from μ-τ Symmetry Breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Zhi-Zhong; Zhang, He; Zhou, Shun

    Assuming the Majorana nature of massive neutrinos, we generalize the Friedberg-Lee neutrino mass model to include CP violation in the neutrino mass matrix Mν. The most general case with all the free parameters of Mν being complex is discussed. We show that a favorable neutrino mixing pattern (with θ12 ≈ 35.3°, θ23 = 45°, θ13 ≠ 0° and δ = 90°) can naturally be derived from Mν, if it has an approximate or softly-broken μ-τ symmetry. We also point out a different way to obtain the nearly tri-bimaximal neutrino mixing pattern with δ = 0° and non-vanishing Majorana phases.

  17. Leptogenesis and CP violation in SU(5) models with lepton flavor mixing originating from the right-handed sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Päs, H.; Schumacher, E.

    2014-05-01

    We discuss neutrino masses and mixing in the context of seesaw type I models with three right-handed Majorana neutrinos and an approximately diagonal Dirac sector. This ansatz is motivated by the idea that the flavor structure in the right-handed Majorana masses is responsible for the large mixing angles, whereas the small mixing angle θ13 originates from the Dirac Yukawa couplings in analogy to the quark sector. To obtain θ13≈0.15 we study a possible SU(5) grand unified theory realization with a U(1)×Z2'×Z2''×Z2''' flavor symmetry and include a complex perturbation parameter in the Dirac mass matrix. The consequences for CP violating phases and effects on leptogenesis are investigated.

  18. Cosmic ΔB from lepton violating interactions at the electroweak phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiero, Antonio; Riotto, Antonio

    1992-09-01

    We propose a new mechanism for late cosmological baryon asymmetry in models with first order electroweak phase transition. Lepton asymmetry arises through the decay of particles produced out of equilibrium in bubble collision and is converted into baryon asymmetry by sphalerons. Supersymmetric models with explicitly broken R-parity may provide a suitable framework for the implementation of this mechanism.

  19. Probing nonunitary mixing and CP violation at a neutrino factory

    SciTech Connect

    Antusch, Stefan; Blennow, Mattias; Fernandez-Martinez, Enrique; Lopez-Pavon, Jacobo

    2009-08-01

    A low-energy nonunitary leptonic mixing matrix is a generic feature of many extensions of the standard model. In such a case, the task of future precision neutrino oscillation experiments is more ambitious than measuring the three mixing angles and the leptonic (Dirac) CP phase, i.e., the accessible parameters of a unitary leptonic mixing matrix. A nonunitary mixing matrix has 13 parameters that affect neutrino oscillations, out of which four are CP violating. In the scheme of minimal unitarity violation we analyze the potential of a neutrino factory for determining or constraining the parameters of the nonunitary leptonic mixing matrix, thereby testing the origin of CP violation in the lepton sector.

  20. Prospect for measuring the CP phase in the $h\\tau\\tau$ coupling at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Askew, Andrew; Jaiswal, Prerit; Okui, Takemichi; Prosper, Harrison B.; Sato, Nobuo

    2015-04-01

    The search for a new source of CP violation is one of the most important endeavors in particle physics. A particularly interesting way to perform this search is to probe the CP phase in the $h\\tau\\tau$ coupling, as the phase is currently completely unconstrained by all existing data. Recently, a novel variable $\\Theta$ was proposed for measuring the CP phase in the $h\\tau\\tau$ coupling through the $\\tau^\\pm \\to \\pi^\\pm \\pi^0 \

  1. Impact of lepton flavor universality violation on CP-violation sensitivity of long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soumya, C.; Mohanta, R.

    2017-01-01

    The observation of neutrino oscillation as well as the recent experimental results on lepton flavor universality (LFU) violation in B meson decays are indications of new physics beyond the standard model. Many theoretical models, which are introduced in the literature as an extension of SM to explain these observed deviations in LFU, lead to a new kind of interactions, the so-called non-standard interaction (NSI) between the elementary particles. In this paper, we consider a model with an additional Z' boson (which is quite successful in explaining the observed LFU anomalies) and analyze its effect in the lepton flavor violating (LFV) B_d→ τ ^± e^∓ decay modes. From the present upper bound of the B_d→ τ ^± e^∓ branching ratio, we obtain the constraints on the new physics parameters, which are related to the corresponding NSI parameters in the neutrino sector by SU(2)_L symmetry. These new parameters are expected to have potential implications in the neutrino oscillation studies and in this work we investigate the possibility of observing the effects of these interactions in the currently running and upcoming long-baseline experiments, i.e., NOν A and DUNE, respectively.

  2. Disentangling CP phases in nearly degenerate resonances: neutralino production via Higgs at a muon collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreiner, Herbi K.; Kittel, Olaf; von der Pahlen, Federico

    2008-01-01

    In the CP-violating Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, we study the pair production of neutralinos at center-of-mass energies around the heavy neutral Higgs boson resonances. For longitudinally polarized muon beams, we analyze CP asymmetries which are sensitive to the interference of the two heavy neutral Higgs bosons. Due to radiatively induced scalar-pseudoscalar transitions, the CP asymmetries can be strongly enhanced when the resonances are nearly degenerate, as in the Higgs decoupling limit. The Higgs couplings to the neutralino sector can then be analyzed in the presence of CP violating phases. We present a detailed numerical analysis of the cross sections, neutralino branching ratios, and the CP observables. We find that radiatively induced CP violation in the Higgs sector leads to sizable CP-asymmetries, which are accessible in future measurements at a muon collider. However, we expect that our proposed method should be applicable to other processes with nearly degenerate scalar resonances, even at hadron colliders.

  3. Prospect for measuring the CP phase in the $$h\\tau\\tau$$ coupling at the LHC

    DOE PAGES

    Askew, Andrew; Jaiswal, Prerit; Okui, Takemichi; ...

    2015-04-01

    The search for a new source of CP violation is one of the most important endeavors in particle physics. A particularly interesting way to perform this search is to probe the CP phase in themore » $$h\\tau\\tau$$ coupling, as the phase is currently completely unconstrained by all existing data. Recently, a novel variable $$\\Theta$$ was proposed for measuring the CP phase in the $$h\\tau\\tau$$ coupling through the $$\\tau^\\pm \\to \\pi^\\pm \\pi^0 \

  4. First measurement of the CP-violating phase in Bs(0) → ϕϕ decays.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellan Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; 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    2013-06-14

    A first flavor-tagged measurement of the time-dependent CP-violating asymmetry in B(s)(0) → ϕϕ decays is presented. In this decay channel, the CP-violating weak phase arises due to CP violation in the interference between B(s)(0)-B(s)(0) mixing and the b → sss gluonic penguin decay amplitude. Using a sample of pp collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb(-1) and collected at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the LHCb detector, 880 B(s)(0) → ϕϕ signal decays are obtained. The CP-violating phase is measured to be in the interval [-2.46,-0.76] rad at a 68% confidence level. The p value of the standard model prediction is 16%.

  5. Measuring the leptonic C P phase in neutrino oscillations with nonunitary mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Shao-Feng; Pasquini, Pedro; Tórtola, M.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2017-02-01

    Non-unitary neutrino mixing implies an extra C P violating phase that can fake the leptonic Dirac C P phase δC P of the simplest three-neutrino mixing benchmark scheme. This would hinder the possibility of probing for C P violation in accelerator-type experiments. We take T2K and T2HK as examples to demonstrate the degeneracy between the "standard" (or "unitary") and "nonunitary" C P phases. We find, under the assumption of nonunitary mixing, that their C P sensitivities severely deteriorate. Fortunately, the TNT2K proposal of supplementing T2(H)K with a μ DAR source for better measurement of δC P can partially break the C P degeneracy by probing both cos δC P and sin δC P dependences in the wide spectrum of the μ DAR flux. We also show that the further addition of a near detector to the μ DAR setup can eliminate the degeneracy completely.

  6. CP Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigi, I. I.; Sanda, A. I.

    2016-10-01

    Foreword; Part I. Basics of CP Violation: 1. Prologue; 2. Prelude: C, P and T in classical dynamics; 3. C, P and T in non-relativistic quantum mechanics; 4. C, P and T in relativistic quantum theories; 5. The arrival of strange particles; 6. Quantum mechanics of neutral particles; Part II. Theory and Experiments: 7. The quest for CP violation in K decays - a marathon; 8. The KM implementation of CP violation; 9. The theory of KL → ππ decays; 10. Paradigmatic discoveries in B physics; 11. Let the drama unfold - B CP phenomenology; 12. Rare K and B decays - almost perfect laboratories; 13. CPT violation - could it be in K and B decays?; 14. CP violation in charm decays - the dark horse; 15. The strong CP problem; Part III. Looking Beyond the Standard Model: 16. Quest for CP violation in the neutrino sector; 17. Possible corrections to the KM ansatz: right-handed currents and non-minimal Higgs dynamics; 18. CP violation without nonperturbative dynamics - top quarks and charged leptons; 19. SUSY - providing shelter for Higgs dynamics; 20. Minimal flavour violation and extra dimensions; 21. Baryogenesis in the universe; Part IV. Summary: 22. Summary and perspectives; References; Index.

  7. Predictions for the Majorana CP violation phases in the neutrino mixing matrix and neutrinoless double beta decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girardi, I.; Petcov, S. T.; Titov, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    We obtain predictions for the Majorana phases α21 / 2 and α31 / 2 of the 3 × 3 unitary neutrino mixing matrix U = Ue† Uν, Ue and Uν being the 3 × 3 unitary matrices resulting from the diagonalisation of the charged lepton and neutrino Majorana mass matrices, respectively. We focus on forms of Ue and Uν permitting to express α21 / 2 and α31 / 2 in terms of the Dirac phase δ and the three neutrino mixing angles of the standard parametrisation of U, and the angles and the two Majorana-like phases ξ21 / 2 and ξ31 / 2 present, in general, in Uν. The concrete forms of Uν considered are fixed by, or associated with, symmetries (tri-bimaximal, bimaximal, etc.), so that the angles in Uν are fixed. For each of these forms and forms of Ue that allow to reproduce the measured values of the three neutrino mixing angles θ12, θ23 and θ13, we derive predictions for phase differences (α21 / 2 -ξ21 / 2), (α31 / 2 -ξ31 / 2), etc., which are completely determined by the values of the mixing angles. We show that the requirement of generalised CP invariance of the neutrino Majorana mass term implies ξ21 = 0 or π and ξ31 = 0 or π. For these values of ξ21 and ξ31 and the best fit values of θ12, θ23 and θ13, we present predictions for the effective Majorana mass in neutrinoless double beta decay for both neutrino mass spectra with normal and inverted ordering.

  8. Prospects for reconstruction of leptonic unitarity quadrangle and neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Surender; Bhardwaj, Shankita

    2016-06-01

    After the observation of non-zero θ13 the goal has shifted to observe CP violation in the leptonic sector. Neutrino oscillation experiments can, directly, probe the Dirac CP phases. Alternatively, one can measure CP violation in the leptonic sector using Leptonic Unitarity Quadrangle (LUQ). The existence of Standard Model (SM) gauge singlets - sterile neutrinos - will provide additional sources of CP violation. We investigate the connection between neutrino survival probability and rephasing invariants of the 4 × 4 neutrino mixing matrix. In general, LUQ contain eight geometrical parameters out of which five are independent. We obtain CP asymmetry (Pνf→νf‧ -Pνbarf→νbarf‧) in terms of these independent parameters of the LUQ and search for the possibilities of extracting information on these independent geometrical parameters in short baseline (SBL) and long baseline (LBL) experiments, thus, looking for constructing LUQ and possible measurement of CP violation. We find that it is not possible to construct LUQ using data from LBL experiments because CP asymmetry is sensitive to only three of the five independent parameters of LUQ. However, for SBL experiments, CP asymmetry is found to be sensitive to all five independent parameters making it possible to construct LUQ and measure CP violation.

  9. Lifetime difference and CP-violating phase in the Bs0 system.

    PubMed

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Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-03-23

    From an analysis of the decay Bs0-->J/psi phi, we obtain the width difference between the light and heavy mass eigenstates DeltaGamma identical with (GammaL-GammaH)=0.17+/-0.09(stat)+/-0.02(syst) ps-1 and the CP-violating phase phis=-0.79+/-0.56(stat)(-0.01)(+0.14)(syst). Under the hypothesis of no CP violation (phis identical with 0), we obtain 1/Gamma=tau(Bs0)=1.52+/-0.08(stat)(-0.03)(+0.01)(syst) ps and DeltaGamma=0.12(-0.10)(+0.08)(stat)+/-0.02(syst) ps-1. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of about 1.1 fb-1 accumulated with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. This is the first direct measurement of the CP-violating mixing phase in the Bs0 system.

  10. Phase I study of oral CP-4126, a gemcitabine derivative, in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Stuurman, F E; Voest, E E; Awada, A; Witteveen, P O; Bergeland, T; Hals, P-A; Rasch, W; Schellens, J H M; Hendlisz, A

    2013-08-01

    CP-4126 is a gemcitabine (2',2'-difluorodeoxycytidine; dFdC) 5' elaidic acid ester. The purpose of this dose-escalating study was to assess safety, pharmacokinetics (PK) and preliminary antitumor activity of the oral formulation and to determine the recommended dose (RD) for phase II studies. The study had a two-step design: a non-randomized dose-escalating step I with oral CP-4126 alone, followed by a randomized, cross-over step II that compared oral CP-4126 with dFdC i.v.. CP-4126 was given on days 1,8,15 in a 4-week schedule with increasing doses until the RD was established. 26 patients with different solid tumours were enrolled in step I at seven dose levels (100-3,000 mg/day). The most frequent drug-related AEs were fatigue and dysgeusia, the majority being grade 1-2. One patient experienced a dose limiting toxicity after one dose of CP-4126 at 1,300 mg/day (ASAT grade 3). PK of CP-4126 could not be determined. The metabolites dFdC and dFdU obeyed dose-dependent pharmacokinetics. Exposures to dFdC were about ten-fold lower compared to exposures after comparable doses of dFdC i.v.. Nine patients reached stable disease as best response, whereby in one patient with vaginal carcinoma a 25 % reduction of tumor volume was reached. This study demonstrates that CP-4126 can be safely administered orally to patients up to 3,000 mg/day in a d1,8,15 q4w schedule with a tolerable safety profile. CP-4126 acts as a prodrug for dFdC when given orally, but because of the poor absorption and the rapid pre-systemic metabolism the study was terminated early and no RD could be determined.

  11. CP asymmetries in the supersymmetric trilepton signal at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornhauser, S.; Drees, M.; Dreiner, H.; Éboli, O. J. P.; Kim, J. S.; Kittel, O.

    2012-03-01

    In the CP-violating Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, we study the production of a neutralino-chargino pair at the LHC. For their decays into three leptons, we analyze CP asymmetries which are sensitive to the CP phases of the neutralino and chargino sector. We present analytical formulas for the entire production and decay process, and identify the CP-violating contributions in the spin correlation terms. This allows us to define the optimal CP asymmetries. We present a detailed numerical analysis of the cross sections, branching ratios, and the CP observables. For light neutralinos, charginos, and squarks, the asymmetries can reach several 10%. We estimate the discovery potential for the LHC to observe CP violation in the trilepton channel.

  12. Missing energy and the measurement of the CP-violating phase in neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Ankowski, Artur M.; Coloma, Pilar; Huber, Patrick; Mariani, Camillo; Vagnoni, Erica

    2015-11-30

    In the next generation of long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments aiming to determine the charge-parity-violating phase δCP in the appearance channel, fine-grained time-projection chambers are expected to play an important role. In this study, we analyze an influence of realistic detector capabilities on the δCP sensitivity for a setup similar to that of the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. We find that the effect of the missing energy carried out by undetected particles is sizable. Although the reconstructed neutrino energy can be corrected for the missing energy, the accuracy of such procedure has to exceed 20%, to avoid a sizable bias in the extracted δCP value.

  13. Missing energy and the measurement of the CP-violating phase in neutrino oscillations

    DOE PAGES

    Ankowski, Artur M.; Coloma, Pilar; Huber, Patrick; ...

    2015-11-30

    In the next generation of long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments aiming to determine the charge-parity-violating phase δCP in the appearance channel, fine-grained time-projection chambers are expected to play an important role. In this study, we analyze an influence of realistic detector capabilities on the δCP sensitivity for a setup similar to that of the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. We find that the effect of the missing energy carried out by undetected particles is sizable. Although the reconstructed neutrino energy can be corrected for the missing energy, the accuracy of such procedure has to exceed 20%, to avoid a sizable bias inmore » the extracted δCP value.« less

  14. Electroweak baryogenesis with lepton flavor violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Cheng-Wei; Fuyuto, Kaori; Senaha, Eibun

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the feasibility of electroweak baryogenesis in a two-Higgs doublet model with lepton flavor violation. By scrutinizing the heavy Higgs boson mass spectrum, regions satisfying both strong first-order electroweak phase transition and the muon g - 2 anomaly are identified. We also estimate the baryon number density by exploiting extra Yukawa couplings in the μ-τ sector. It is found that a CP-violating source term can be enhanced by the μ-τ flavor-violating coupling together with the extra τ coupling. With O (1) Yukawa couplings and CP-violating phases, the observed baryon number density is marginally produced under a generous assumption for the bubble wall profile.

  15. Immunotherapy with CpG-ODN in neoplastic meningitis: A phase I trial

    PubMed Central

    Ursu, Renata; Taillibert, Sophie; Banissi, Claire; Vicaut, Eric; Bailon, Olivier; Le Rhun, Emilie; Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien; Psimaras, Dimitri; Tibi, Annick; Sacko, Adama; Marantidou, Athina; Belin, Catherine; Carpentier, Antoine F

    2015-01-01

    TLR-9 agonists are immunostimulating agents that have antitumor effects in animal models. A phase I trial was conducted to define the safety profile of subcutaneous injections, combined with intrathecally administration of CpG-28, a TRL 9 agonist, in patients with neoplastic meningitis (NM). Cohorts of 3–6 patients with NM were treated for 5 weeks with escalating doses of CpG-28. The primary endpoint was tolerance. Secondary endpoints were progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Twenty-nine patients were treated with CpG-28. The primary cancers were malignant glioma, lung carcinoma, breast cancer, melanoma or melanocytoma, ependymoma, and colorectal cancer. The median age was 56 years and median Karnovsky Performance status (KPS) was 70%. The treatment was well tolerated. Adverse effects that were possibly or probably related to the studied drug were grade 2 lymphopenia, anemia and neutropenia, local erythema at injection sites, fever and seizure. There were five serious adverse events: two confusions, two infections of ventricular devices and one grade 4 thrombopenia and neutropenia. The median PFS was 7 weeks and median OS was 15 weeks. Interestingly, the median survival was slightly (but not significantly) higher in the eight patients who were concomitantly treated with bevacizumab (19 weeks vs 15 weeks; P = 0.11). CpG-28 was well tolerated at doses up to 0.3 mg/kg subcutaneously and 18 mg intrathecally. Additional trials are warranted. PMID:26094710

  16. Comparison of analytical protein separation characteristics for three amine-based capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liuwei; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2016-02-01

    Capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) fiber stationary phases are finding utility in the realms of protein analytics as well as downstream processing. We have recently described the modification of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) C-CP fibers to affect amine-rich phases for the weak anion-exchange (WAX) separation of proteins. Polyethylenimine (PEI) is covalently coupled to the PET surface, with subsequent cross-linking imparted by treatment with 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (BUDGE). These modifications yield vastly improved dynamic binding capacities over the unmodified fibers. We have also previously employed native (unmodified) nylon 6 C-CP fibers as weak anion/cation-exchange (mixed-mode) and hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) phases for protein separations. Polyamide, nylon 6, consists of amide groups along the polymer backbone, with primary amines and carboxylic acid end groups. The analytical separation characteristics of these three amine-based C-CP fiber phases are compared here. Each of the C-CP fiber columns in this study was shown to be able to separate a bovine serum albumin/hemoglobin/lysozyme mixture at high mobile phase linear velocity (∼70 mm s(-1)) but with different elution characteristics. These differences reflect the types of protein-surface interactions that are occurring, based on the active group composition of the fiber surfaces. This study provides important fundamental understanding for the development of surface-modified C-CP fiber columns for protein separation.

  17. Strong first order electroweak phase transition in the CP-conserving 2HDM revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basler, P.; Krause, M.; Mühlleitner, M.; Wittbrodt, J.; Wlotzka, A.

    2017-02-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson by the LHC experiments ATLAS and CMS has marked a milestone for particle physics. Yet, there are still many open questions that cannot be answered within the Standard Model (SM). For example, the generation of the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe through baryogenesis can only be explained qualitatively in the SM. A simple extension of the SM compatible with the current theoretical and experimental constraints is given by the 2-Higgs-Doublet Model (2HDM) where a second Higgs doublet is added to the Higgs sector. We investigate the possibility of a strong first order electroweak phase transition in the CP-conserving 2HDM type I and type II where either of the CP-even Higgs bosons is identified with the SM-like Higgs boson. The renormalisation that we apply on the loop-corrected Higgs potential allows us to efficiently scan the 2HDM parameter space and simultaneously take into account all relevant theoretical and up-to-date experimental constraints. The 2HDM parameter regions found to be compatible with the applied constraints and a strong electroweak phase transition are analysed systematically. Our results show that there is a strong interplay between the requirement of a strong phase transition and collider phenomenology with testable implications for searches at the LHC.

  18. Lepton electric and magnetic dipole moments via lepton flavor-violating spin-1 unparticle interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Moyotl, A.; Rosado, A.; Tavares-Velasco, G.

    2011-10-01

    The magnetic dipole moment and the electric dipole moment of leptons are calculated under the assumption of lepton flavor violation (LFV) induced by spin-1 unparticles with both vector and axial-vector couplings to leptons, including a CP-violating phase. The experimental limits on the muon magnetic dipole moment and LFV process, such as the decay l{sub i}{sup -}{yields}l{sub j}{sup -}l{sub k}{sup -}l{sub k}{sup +}, are then used to constrain the LFV couplings for particular values of the unparticle operator dimension d{sub U} and the unparticle scale {Lambda}{sub U}, assuming that LFV transitions between the tau and muon leptons are dominant. It is found that the current experimental constraints favor a scenario with dominance of the vector couplings over the axial-vector couplings. We also obtain estimates for the electric dipole moments of the electron and the muon, which are well below the experimental values.

  19. Phase I clinical trial of CpG oligonucleotide 7909 (PF-03512676) in patients with previously treated chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zent, Clive S; Smith, Brian J; Ballas, Zuhair K; Wooldridge, James E; Link, Brian K; Call, Timothy G; Shanafelt, Tait D; Bowen, Deborah A; Kay, Neil E; Witzig, Thomas E; Weiner, George J

    2012-02-01

    CpG oligonucleotide 7909 (CpG 7909, PF-03512676), a synthetic 24mer single stranded agonist of TLR9 expressed by B cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, is immunomodulatory and can cause activation-induced death of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells. We report a phase I study of CpG 7909 in 41 patients with early relapsed CLL. A single intravenous dose of CpG 7909 was well tolerated with no clinical effects and no significant toxicity up to 1.05 mg/kg. Single dose subcutaneous CpG 7909 had a maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of 0.45 mg/kg with dose limiting toxicity of myalgia and constitutional effects. Multiple weekly subcutaneous doses at the MTD were well tolerated. CpG 7909 administration induced immunologic changes in CLL and non-malignant cells that were dose and route dependent. We conclude that multidose therapy with subcutaneous CpG 7909 (0.45 mg/kg) could be used in future phase II combination clinical trials for CLL.

  20. CP violation with an unbroken CP transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratz, Michael; Trautner, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    A CP conserving SU(3) gauge theory is spontaneously broken to T7 by the vacuum expectation value (VEV) of a 15-plet. Even though the SU(3)- CP transformation is not broken by the VEV, the theory exhibits physical CP violation in the broken phase. This is because the SU(3)- CP transformation corresponds to the unique order-two outer automorphism of T7, which is not a physical CP transformation for the T7 states, and there is no other possible CP transformation. We explicitly demonstrate that CP is violated by calculating a CP odd decay asymmetry in the broken phase. This scenario provides us with a natural protection for topological vacuum terms, ensuring that θ {G}_{μ ν }{tilde{G}}^{μ ν } is absent even though CP is violated for the physical states of the model.

  1. Rephasing-invariant CP violating parameters with Majorana neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves, José F.; Pal, Palash B.

    2001-10-01

    We analyze the dependence of the squared amplitudes on the rephasing-invariant CP-violating parameters of the lepton sector, involving Majorana neutrinos, for various lepton-conserving and lepton-violating processes. We analyze the conditions under which the CP-violating effects in such processes vanish, in terms of the minimal set of rephasing invariants, giving special attention to the dependence on the extra CP-violating parameters that are due to the Majorana nature of the neutrinos.

  2. Quark lepton complementarity and renormalization group effects

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Michael A.; Smirnov, Alexei Yu.

    2006-12-01

    We consider a scenario for the quark-lepton complementarity relations between mixing angles in which the bimaximal mixing follows from the neutrino mass matrix. According to this scenario in the lowest order the angle {theta}{sub 12} is {approx}1{sigma} (1.5 degree sign -2 degree sign ) above the best fit point coinciding practically with the tribimaximal mixing prediction. Realization of this scenario in the context of the seesaw type-I mechanism with leptonic Dirac mass matrices approximately equal to the quark mass matrices is studied. We calculate the renormalization group corrections to {theta}{sub 12} as well as to {theta}{sub 13} in the standard model (SM) and minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). We find that in a large part of the parameter space corrections {delta}{theta}{sub 12} are small or negligible. In the MSSM version of the scenario, the correction {delta}{theta}{sub 12} is in general positive. Small negative corrections appear in the case of an inverted mass hierarchy and opposite CP parities of {nu}{sub 1} and {nu}{sub 2} when leading contributions to {theta}{sub 12} running are strongly suppressed. The corrections are negative in the SM version in a large part of the parameter space for values of the relative CP phase of {nu}{sub 1} and {nu}{sub 2}: {phi}>{pi}/2.

  3. Flavor mixing democracy and minimal CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerard, Jean-Marc; Xing, Zhi-zhong

    2012-06-01

    We point out that there is a unique parametrization of quark flavor mixing in which every angle is close to the Cabibbo angle θC≃13° with the CP-violating phase ϕq around 1°, implying that they might all be related to the strong hierarchy among quark masses. Applying the same parametrization to lepton flavor mixing, we find that all three mixing angles are comparably large (around π/4) and the Dirac CP-violating phase ϕl is also minimal as compared with its values in the other eight possible parametrizations. In this spirit, we propose a simple neutrino mixing ansatz which is equivalent to the tri-bimaximal flavor mixing pattern in the ϕl→0 limit and predicts sin θ13=1/√{2}sin(ϕl/2) for reactor antineutrino oscillations. Hence the Jarlskog invariant of leptonic CP violation Jl=(sin ϕl)/12 can reach a few percent if θ13 lies in the range 7°⩽θ13⩽10°.

  4. Probing the CP violation signal at DUNE in the presence of non-standard neutrino interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masud, Mehedi; Chatterjee, Animesh; Mehta, Poonam

    2016-09-01

    We discuss the impact of non-standard neutrino matter interactions (NSIs) in propagation on the determination of the CP phase in the context of long baseline accelerator experiments such as the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE). DUNE will mainly address the issue of CP violation in the leptonic sector. Here we study the role of NSI and its impact on observing the CP violation signal at DUNE. We consider two scenarios of oscillation with three active neutrinos in the absence and presence of NSI. We elucidate the importance of ruling out subdominant new physics effects introduced by NSI in inferring the CP violation signal at DUNE by considering NSI terms collectively as well as by exploiting the non-trivial interplay of moduli and phases of the NSI terms. We demonstrate the existence of NSI-SI degeneracies which need to be eliminated in reliable manner in order to make conclusive statements about the CP phase.

  5. Self-sustained Asymmetry of Lepton-number Emission: A New Phenomenon during the Supernova Shock-accretion Phase in Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamborra, Irene; Hanke, Florian; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Müller, Bernhard; Raffelt, Georg G.; Marek, Andreas

    2014-09-01

    During the stalled-shock phase of our three-dimensional, hydrodynamical core-collapse simulations with energy-dependent, three-flavor neutrino transport, the lepton-number flux (ν e minus \\bar{ν }_e) emerges predominantly in one hemisphere. This novel, spherical-symmetry breaking neutrino-hydrodynamical instability is termed LESA for "Lepton-number Emission Self-sustained Asymmetry." While the individual ν e and \\bar{ν }_e fluxes show a pronounced dipole pattern, the heavy-flavor neutrino fluxes and the overall luminosity are almost spherically symmetric. Initially, LESA seems to develop stochastically from convective fluctuations. It exists for hundreds of milliseconds or more and persists during violent shock sloshing associated with the standing accretion shock instability. The ν e minus \\bar{ν }_e flux asymmetry originates predominantly below the neutrinosphere in a region of pronounced proto-neutron star (PNS) convection, which is stronger in the hemisphere of enhanced lepton-number flux. On this side of the PNS, the mass accretion rate of lepton-rich matter is larger, amplifying the lepton-emission asymmetry, because the spherical stellar infall deflects on a dipolar deformation of the stalled shock. The increased shock radius in the hemisphere of less mass accretion and minimal lepton-number flux (\\bar{ν }_e flux maximum) is sustained by stronger convection on this side, which is boosted by stronger neutrino heating due to < ε \\bar{ν _e}> \\gt < ε ν _e>. Asymmetric heating thus supports the global deformation despite extremely nonstationary convective overturn behind the shock. While these different elements of the LESA phenomenon form a consistent picture, a full understanding remains elusive at present. There may be important implications for neutrino-flavor oscillations, the neutron-to-proton ratio in the neutrino-heated supernova ejecta, and neutron-star kicks, which remain to be explored.

  6. Primordial lepton oscillations and baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Yuta; Kitano, Ryuichiro

    2016-11-01

    The baryon asymmetry of the Universe should have been produced after the inflation era. We consider the possibility that the asymmetry is generated by the flavor oscillations in the reheating process after inflation, so that the baryon asymmetry is realized already at the beginning of the radiation dominated era. In the seesaw model, we show that the propagators of the left-handed leptons generically have flavor mixings in the thermal background, that can generate flavor-dependent lepton asymmetry through the CP violation in the oscillation phenomena. The flavor dependent rates for the wash-out process can leave the net asymmetry today.

  7. New simple A{sub 4} neutrino model for nonzero {theta}{sub 13} and large {delta}{sub CP}

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimori, Hajime

    2013-05-23

    In a new simple application of the non-Abelian discrete symmetry A{sub 4} to charged-lepton and neutrino mass matrices, we show that for the current experimental central value of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} Asymptotically-Equal-To 0.1, leptonic CP violation is necessarily large, i.e. Double-Vertical-Line tan{delta}{sub CP} Double-Vertical-Line > 1.3. We also consider T{sub 7} model with one parameter to be complex, thus allowing for one Dirac CP phase {delta}{sub CP} and two Majorana CP phases {alpha}{sub 1,2}. We find a slight modification to this correlation as a function of {delta}{sub CP}. For a given set of input values of {Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 21}, {Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 32}, {theta}{sub 12}, and {theta}{sub 13}, we obtain sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 23} and m{sub ee} (the effective Majorana neutrino mass in neutrinoless double beta decay) as functions of tan {delta}{sub CP}. We find that the structure of this model always yields small Double-Vertical-Line tan {delta}{sub CP} Double-Vertical-Line .

  8. Self-sustained asymmetry of lepton-number emission: a new phenomenon during the supernova shock-accretion phase in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Tamborra, Irene; Raffelt, Georg G.; Hanke, Florian; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Müller, Bernhard; Marek, Andreas

    2014-09-10

    During the stalled-shock phase of our three-dimensional, hydrodynamical core-collapse simulations with energy-dependent, three-flavor neutrino transport, the lepton-number flux (ν {sub e} minus ν-bar {sub e}) emerges predominantly in one hemisphere. This novel, spherical-symmetry breaking neutrino-hydrodynamical instability is termed LESA for 'Lepton-number Emission Self-sustained Asymmetry'. While the individual ν {sub e} and ν-bar {sub e} fluxes show a pronounced dipole pattern, the heavy-flavor neutrino fluxes and the overall luminosity are almost spherically symmetric. Initially, LESA seems to develop stochastically from convective fluctuations. It exists for hundreds of milliseconds or more and persists during violent shock sloshing associated with the standing accretion shock instability. The ν {sub e} minus ν-bar {sub e} flux asymmetry originates predominantly below the neutrinosphere in a region of pronounced proto-neutron star (PNS) convection, which is stronger in the hemisphere of enhanced lepton-number flux. On this side of the PNS, the mass accretion rate of lepton-rich matter is larger, amplifying the lepton-emission asymmetry, because the spherical stellar infall deflects on a dipolar deformation of the stalled shock. The increased shock radius in the hemisphere of less mass accretion and minimal lepton-number flux ( ν-bar {sub e} flux maximum) is sustained by stronger convection on this side, which is boosted by stronger neutrino heating due to 〈ϵ{sub ν-bar{sub e}}〉>〈ϵ{sub ν{sub e}}〉. Asymmetric heating thus supports the global deformation despite extremely nonstationary convective overturn behind the shock. While these different elements of the LESA phenomenon form a consistent picture, a full understanding remains elusive at present. There may be important implications for neutrino-flavor oscillations, the neutron-to-proton ratio in the neutrino-heated supernova ejecta, and neutron-star kicks, which remain to be explored.

  9. The one-loop contributions to c( t) electric dipole moment in the CP-violating BLMSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shu-Min; Feng, Tai-Fu; Yang, Zhong-Jun; Zhang, Hai-Bin; Dong, Xing-Xing; Guo, Tao

    2017-02-01

    In the CP-violating supersymmetric extension of the standard model with local gauged baryon and lepton symmetries (BLMSSM), there are new CP-violating sources which can give new contributions to the quark electric dipole moment (EDM). Considering the CP-violating phases, we analyze the EDMs of the quarks c and t. We take into account the contributions from the one-loop diagrams. The numerical results are analyzed with some assumptions on the relevant parameter space. The numerical results for the c and t EDMs can reach large values.

  10. Extracting the CP-violating phases of trilinear R-parity violating couplings from μ→eee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzan, Yasaman; Najjari, Saereh

    2010-06-01

    It has recently been shown that by measuring the transverse polarizations of the final particles in μ→eee, it is possible to extract information on the phases of the effective couplings leading to this decay. We examine this possibility within the context of R-parity violating Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) in which the μ→eee process can take place at a tree level. We demonstrate how a combined analysis of the angular distribution of the emitted electrons and their transverse polarization can determine the CP-violating phases of the trilinear R-parity violating Yukawa couplings.

  11. Occam's razor in lepton mass matrices: The sign of the universe's baryon asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneta, Yuya; Shimizu, Yusuke; Tanimoto, Morimitsu; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the neutrino mass matrix based on the Occam's-razor approach in the framework of the seesaw mechanism. We impose four zeros in the Dirac neutrino mass matrix, which give the minimum number of parameters needed for the observed neutrino masses and lepton mixing angles, while the charged lepton mass matrix and the right-handed Majorana neutrino mass matrix are taken as real diagonal ones. The low-energy neutrino mass matrix has only seven physical parameters. We show successful predictions for the mixing angle θ_{13} and the CP-violating phase δ_CP with the normal mass hierarchy of neutrinos by using the experimental data on the neutrino mass-squared differences, the mixing angles θ_{12} and θ_{23}. The most favored region of sinθ_{13} is around 0.13-0.15, which is completely consistent with the observed value. The CP-violating phase δ_CP is favored to be close to ± π/2. We also discuss the Majorana phases as well as the effective neutrino mass for the neutrinoless double-beta decay m_{ee}, which is around 7-8 meV. It is extremely remarkable that we can perform a "complete experiment" to determine the low-energy neutrino mass matrix, since we have only seven physical parameters in the neutrino mass matrix. In particular, two CP-violating phases in the neutrino mass matrix are directly given by two CP-violating phases at high energy. Thus, assuming leptogenesis, we can determine the sign of the cosmic baryon in the universe from the low-energy experiments for the neutrino mass matrix.

  12. Measurement of the CP-violating phase ϕs in Bs(0)→Ds(+)Ds(-) decays.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellán Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elena, E; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R F; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fol, P; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gavrilov, G; Geraci, A; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Moggi, N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A-B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skillicorn, I; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Todd, J; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilschut, H W; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L

    2014-11-21

    We present a measurement of the CP-violating weak mixing phase ϕs using the decay Bs(0)→Ds(+)Ds(-) in a data sample corresponding to 3.0 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity collected with the LHCb detector in pp collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. An analysis of the time evolution of the system, which does not use the constraint |λ|=1 to allow for the presence of CP violation in decay, yields ϕs=0.02±0.17(stat)±0.02(syst)  rad, |λ|=0.91(-0.15)(+0.18)(stat)±0.02(syst). This result is consistent with the standard model expectation.

  13. CP violation in K decays

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, F.J.

    1989-05-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental progress on the manifestation of CP violation in K decays, and toward understanding whether CP violation originates in a phase, or phases, in the weak mixing matrix of quarks is reviewed. 23 refs., 10 figs.

  14. CP violation in sbottom decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deppisch, Frank F.; Kittel, Olaf

    2010-06-01

    We study CP asymmetries in two-body decays of bottom squarks into charginos and top quarks. These asymmetries probe the SUSY CP phases of the sbottom and the chargino sector in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). We identify the MSSM parameter space where the CP asymmetries are sizeable. As a result, potentially detectable CP asymmetries in sbottom decays are found, which motivates further detailed experimental studies for probing the SUSY CP phases at the LHC.

  15. Precision Measurements of Lifetime and $\\bf CP$ Violation Phase in the $\\bf B^{0}_{s}$ Meson with the DØ Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez Ortega, Jorge

    2012-10-01

    The Standard Model of Partice Physics (SM) is probably the most successful theory, regarding to his predictions. The SM prediction for $CP$ violation is not enough to explain the overwhelming asymmetry among the matter and anti-matter abundance. Measuring some process where $CP$ violation is different to the one predicted by the SM would be a clear signal for Physics Beyond the Standard Model. The SM prediction for the $CP$ violation phase, $\\phi_{s}$, in the $B^{0}_{s}$ meson is practically equal to zero for the current experiments. This means that measuring a deviation from zero in $\\phi_{s}$ could be an indication for Physics Beyond the SM. On the other hand, the approximation based on the ``heavy quark symmetry'' let approximated calculations of the fundamental quantities of those hadrons containing a heavy quark, $c,b,t$. These calculations are expressed as expansions on inverse powers of the heavy quark mass in such hadron. This formalism is called `` Heavy Quark Effective Theory'' (HQET), and has been successful predicting some properties of the heavy hadrons. The HQET prediction for the lifetime ratio the $B^{0}_{d}$ and $B^{0}_{s}$ is practically equal to one. So, measuring with good precision the $B^{0}_{s}$ lifetime is also a way to test an approximation based on the SM. In this thesis it is detailed presented the method to measure the $\\phi_{s}$ and the lifetime ratio of the $B^{0}_{d}$ and $B^{0}_{s}$, among other quantities, with the DØ located in the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, in the United States.

  16. G1/S phase progression is regulated by PLK1 degradation through the CDK1/βTrCP axis.

    PubMed

    Giráldez, Servando; Galindo-Moreno, María; Limón-Mortés, M Cristina; Rivas, A Cristina; Herrero-Ruiz, Joaquín; Mora-Santos, Mar; Sáez, Carmen; Japón, Miguel Á; Tortolero, Maria; Romero, Francisco

    2017-03-30

    Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is a serine/threonine kinase involved in several stages of the cell cycle, including the entry and exit from mitosis, and cytokinesis. Furthermore, it has an essential role in the regulation of DNA replication. Together with cyclin A, PLK1 also promotes CDH1 phosphorylation to trigger its ubiquitination and degradation, allowing cell cycle progression. The PLK1 levels in different type of tumors are very high compared to normal tissues, which is consistent with its role in promoting proliferation. Therefore, several PLK1 inhibitors have been developed and tested for the treatment of cancer. Here, we further analyzed PLK1 degradation and found that cytoplasmic PLK1 is ubiquitinated and subsequently degraded by the SCF(βTrCP)/proteasome. This procedure is triggered when heat shock protein (HSP) 90 is inhibited with geldanamycin, which results in misfolding of PLK1. We also identified CDK1 as the major kinase involved in this degradation. Our work shows for the first time that HSP90 inhibition arrests cell cycle progression at the G1/S transition. This novel mechanism inhibits CDH1 degradation through CDK1-dependent PLK1 destruction by the SCF(βTrCP)/proteasome. In these conditions, CDH1 substrates do not accumulate and cell cycle arrests, providing a novel pathway for regulation of the cell cycle at the G1-to-S boundary.-Giráldez, S., Galindo-Moreno, M., Limón-Mortés, M. C., Rivas, A. C., Herrero-Ruiz, J., Mora-Santos, M., Sáez, C., Japón, M. Á., Tortolero, M., Romero, F. G1/S phase progression is regulated by PLK1 degradation through the CDK1/βTrCP axis.

  17. Solving structure in the CP29 light harvesting complex with polarization-phased 2D electronic spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Naomi S.; Davis, Jeffrey A.; Ballottari, Matteo; Cheng, Yuan-Chung; Bassi, Roberto; Fleming, Graham R.

    2011-01-01

    The CP29 light harvesting complex from green plants is a pigment-protein complex believed to collect, conduct, and quench electronic excitation energy in photosynthesis. We have spectroscopically determined the relative angle between electronic transition dipole moments of its chlorophyll excitation energy transfer pairs in their local protein environments without relying on simulations or an X-ray crystal structure. To do so, we measure a basis set of polarized 2D electronic spectra and isolate their absorptive components on account of the tensor relation between the light polarization sequences used to obtain them. This broadly applicable advance further enhances the acuity of polarized 2D electronic spectroscopy and provides a general means to initiate or feed back on the structural modeling of electronically-coupled chromophores in condensed phase systems, tightening the inferred relations between the spatial and electronic landscapes of ultrafast energy flow. We also discuss the pigment composition of CP29 in the context of light harvesting, energy channeling, and photoprotection within photosystem II. PMID:21321222

  18. Electroweak Penguins, Final State Interaction Phases, and {ital CP} Violation in B {r_arrow} K {pi} Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, N.G.; He, X.; Hou, W.; He, X.; Hou, W.; Pakvasa, S.

    1999-03-01

    The recently observed B{sup {minus}} {r_arrow} K{sup {minus}} {pi} {sup 0}, {bar K}{sup 0} {pi} {sup {minus}} and {bar B} {sup 0} {r_arrow} K{sup {minus}} {pi} {sup +} decay modes appear to have nearly equal branching ratios. This suggests that tree and electroweak penguins play an important role, and inclusion of the latter improves agreement between factorization calculation and experimental data. The value of {gamma} in the range of 90{degree} {endash} 130{degree} and 220{degree} {endash} 260{degree} is favored, while the {bar B} {sup 0} {r_arrow} {bar K} {sup 0} {pi} {sup 0} rate is suppressed. Direct CP violation for B{r_arrow} K{pi} modes can be large if final state interaction phases are large. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Exotic Leptons. Higgs, Flavor and Collider Phenomenology

    DOE PAGES

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Bauer, Martin; Carena, Marcela

    2014-01-15

    We study extensions of the standard model by one generation of vector-like leptons with non-standard hypercharges, which allow for a sizable modification of the h → γγ decay rate for new lepton masses in the 300 GeV-1 TeV range. We also analyze vacuum stability implications for different hypercharges. Effects in h → Zγ are typically much smaller than in h → γγ, but distinct among the considered hypercharge assignments. Non-standard hypercharges constrain or entirely forbid possible mixing operators with standard model leptons. As a consequence, the leading contributions to the experimentally strongly constrained electric dipole moments of standard model fermionsmore » are only generated at the two loop level by the new CP violating sources of the considered setups. Furthermore, we derive the bounds from dipole moments, electro-weak precision observables and lepton flavor violating processes, and discuss their implications. Finally, we examine the production and decay channels of the vector-like leptons at the LHC, and find that signatures with multiple light leptons or taus are already probing interesting regions of parameter space.« less

  20. Exotic Leptons. Higgs, Flavor and Collider Phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Bauer, Martin; Carena, Marcela

    2014-01-15

    We study extensions of the standard model by one generation of vector-like leptons with non-standard hypercharges, which allow for a sizable modification of the h → γγ decay rate for new lepton masses in the 300 GeV-1 TeV range. We also analyze vacuum stability implications for different hypercharges. Effects in h → Zγ are typically much smaller than in h → γγ, but distinct among the considered hypercharge assignments. Non-standard hypercharges constrain or entirely forbid possible mixing operators with standard model leptons. As a consequence, the leading contributions to the experimentally strongly constrained electric dipole moments of standard model fermions are only generated at the two loop level by the new CP violating sources of the considered setups. Furthermore, we derive the bounds from dipole moments, electro-weak precision observables and lepton flavor violating processes, and discuss their implications. Finally, we examine the production and decay channels of the vector-like leptons at the LHC, and find that signatures with multiple light leptons or taus are already probing interesting regions of parameter space.

  1. Towards new frontiers in the exploration of charmless non-leptonic B decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischer, Robert; Jaarsma, Ruben; Vos, K. Keri

    2017-03-01

    Non-leptonic B decays into charmless final states offer an important laboratory to study CP violation and the dynamics of strong interactions. Particularly interesting are B s 0 → K - K + and B d 0 → π - π + decays, which are related by the U-spin symmetry of strong interactions, and allow for the extraction of CP-violating phases and tests of the Standard Model. The theoretical precision is limited by U-spin-breaking corrections and innovative methods are needed in view of the impressive future experimental precision expected in the era of Belle II and the LHCb upgrade. We have recently proposed a novel method to determine the {B}_s^0-{\\overline{B}}_s^0 mixing phase ϕ s from the B s 0 → K - K +, B d 0 → π - π + system, where semileptonic B s 0 → K - ℓ + ν ℓ , B d 0 → π - ℓ + ν ℓ decays are a new ingredient and the theoretical situation is very favourable. We discuss this strategy in detail, with a focus on penguin contributions as well as exchange and penguin-annihilation topologies which can be probed by a variety of non-leptonic B decays into charmless final states. We show that a theoretical precision as high as O(0.5°) for ϕ s can be attained in the future, thereby offering unprecedented prospects for the search for new sources of CP violation.

  2. Radiative Leptonic B Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Edward Tann

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of a search for B+ meson decays into γℓ+v, where ℓ = e,μ. We use a sample of 232 million B$\\bar{B}$ meson pairs recorded at the Υ(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory. We measure a partial branching fraction Δβ in a restricted region of phase space that reduces the effect of theoretical uncertainties, requiring the lepton energy to be in the range 1.875 and 2.850 GeV, the photon energy to be in the range 0.45 and 2.35 GeV, and the cosine of the angle between the lepton and photon momenta to be less than -0.36, with all quantities computed in the Υ(4S) center-of-mass frame. We find Δβ(B+ → γℓ+v) = (-0.31.5+1.3(statistical) -0.6+0.6(systematic) ± 0.1(theoretical)) x 10-6, under the assumption of lepton universality. Interpreted as a 90% confidence-level Bayesian upper limit, the result corresponds to 1.7 x 10-6 for a prior at in amplitude, and 2.3 x 10-6 for a prior at in branching fraction.

  3. The Δ(27) flavor 3-3-1 model with neutral leptons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vien, V. V.; Cárcamo Hernández, A. E.; Long, H. N.

    2016-12-01

    We build the first 3-3-1 model based on the Δ (27) discrete group symmetry, consistent with fermion masses and mixings. In the model under consideration, the neutrino masses are generated from a combination of type-I and type-II seesaw mechanisms mediated by three heavy right-handed Majorana neutrinos and three SU (3)L scalar antisextets, respectively. Furthermore, from the consistency of the leptonic mixing angles with their experimental values, we obtain a non-vanishing leptonic Dirac CP violating phase of -π/2. Our model features an effective Majorana neutrino mass parameter of neutrinoless double beta decay, with values mββ = 10 and 18 meV for the normal and the inverted neutrino mass hierarchies, respectively.

  4. Phase I study of the CD40 agonist antibody CP-870,893 combined with carboplatin and paclitaxel in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Vonderheide, Robert H; Burg, Jennifer M; Mick, Rosemarie; Trosko, Jennifer A; Li, Dongguang; Shaik, M Naveed; Tolcher, Anthony W; Hamid, Omid

    2013-01-01

    CD40 is a cell-surface molecule that critically regulates immune responses. CP-870,893 is a fully human, CD40-specific agonist monoclonal antibody (mAb) exerting clinical antineoplastic activity. Here, the safety of CP-870,893 combined with carboplatin and paclitaxel was assessed in a Phase I study. Patients with advanced solid tumors received standard doses of paclitaxel and carboplatin on day 1 followed by either 0.1 mg/Kg or 0.2 mg/Kg CP-870,893 on day 3 (Schedule A) or day 8 (Schedule B), repeated every 21 d. The primary objective was to determine safety and maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) of CP-870,893. Secondary objectives included the evaluation of antitumor responses, pharmacokinetics and immune modulation. Thirty-two patients were treated with CP-870,893, 16 patients on each schedule. Two dose-limiting toxicities were observed (grade 3 cytokine release and transient ischemic attack), each at the 0.2 mg/Kg dose level, which was estimated to be the MTD. The most common treatment-related adverse event was fatigue (81%). Of 30 evaluable patients, 6 (20%) exhibited partial responses constituting best responses as defined by RECIST. Following CP-870,893 infusion, the peripheral blood manifested an acute depletion of B cells associated with upregulation of immune co-stimulatory molecules. T-cell numbers did not change significantly from baseline, but transient tumor-specific T-cell responses were observed in a small number of evaluable patients. The CD40 agonist mAb CP-870,893, given on either of two schedules in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatin, was safe for patients affected with advanced solid tumors. Biological and clinical responses were observed, providing a rationale for Phase II studies.

  5. Sum rules for leptons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinrath, Martin

    2016-06-01

    There is a wide class of models which give a dynamical description of the origin of flavor in terms of spontaneous symmetry breaking of an underlying symmetry. Many of these models exhibit sum rules which relate on the one hand mixing angles and the Dirac CP phase with each other and/or on the other hand neutrino masses and Majorana phases with each other. We will briefly sketch how this happens and discuss briefly the impact of renormalization group corrections to the mass sum rules.

  6. Sum Rules for Leptons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinrath, Martin

    There is a wide class of models which give a dynamical description of the origin of avor in terms of spontaneous symmetry breaking of an underlying symmetry. Many of these models exhibit sum rules which relate on the one hand mixing angles and the Dirac CP phase with each other and/or on the other hand neutrino masses and Majorana phases with each other. We will briey sketch how this happens and discuss briey the impact of renormalization group corrections to the mass sum rules.

  7. Can the observed CP asymmetry in τ→Kπντ be due to nonstandard tensor interactions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, H. Zeen; Dhargyal, L.; Sinha, Nita

    2014-07-01

    An intriguing opposite sign of the CP-violating asymmetry from that expected within the Standard Model was recently measured in the tau decay modes τ±→Ksπ±ν(-)τ by the BABAR collaboration. If this result is confirmed with higher precision, the observed decay rate asymmetry ACP can only arise from some nonstandard interactions occurring possibly in both the hadronic as well as in the leptonic sectors. We illustrate that, while a simple charged scalar interaction cannot yield this rate asymmetry, it will be possible to generate this in the presence of a tensor interaction. Parametrizing the strength and weak phase of this nonstandard interaction contribution, the observed branching ratio and the decay-rate CP asymmetry for the particular mode τ±→Ksπ±ν(-)τ are used to determine the CP-violating weak phase and the coupling of a tensorial interaction that can give a consistent sign and magnitude of the asymmetry.

  8. Solid phase extraction of proteins from buffer solutions employing capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) fibers as the stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Burdette, Carolyn Q; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2013-02-21

    Polypropylene (PP) capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) fibers are applied for solid phase extraction (SPE) of proteins from aqueous buffer solutions using a micropipette tip-based format. A process was developed in which centrifugation is used as the moving force for solution passage in the loading/washing steps instead of the previously employed manual aspiration. The complete procedure requires ~15 minutes, with the number of samples run in parallel limited only by the capacity of the centrifuge. The method performance was evaluated based on adsorption and elution characteristics of several proteins (cytochrome c, lysozyme, myoglobin, and glucose oxidase) from 150 mM phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solutions. Protein concentration ranges of ~2 to 100 μg mL(-1) were employed and the recovery characteristics determined through UV-Vis absorbance spectrophotometry for protein quantification. The protein loading capacities across the range of proteins was ~1.5 μg for the 5 mg fiber tips. Average recoveries from PBS were determined for each protein sample; cytochrome c ~86%, lysozyme ~80%, myoglobin ~86%, and glucose oxidase ~89%. Recoveries from more complex matrices, synthetic urine and synthetic saliva, were determined to be ~90%. A 10× dilution study for a fixed 1 μg protein application yielded 94 ± 3.2% recoveries. The C-CP tips provided significantly higher recoveries for myoglobin in a 150 mM PBS matrix in comparison to a commercially available protein SPE product, with the added advantages of low cost, rapid processing, and reusability.

  9. Probing exotic phenomena at the interface of nuclear and particle physics with the electric dipole moments of diamagnetic atoms: A unique window to hadronic and semi-leptonic CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, N.; Sahoo, B. K.; Yoshinaga, N.; Sato, T.; Asahi, K.; Das, B. P.

    2017-03-01

    The current status of electric dipole moments of diamagnetic atoms which involves the synergy between atomic experiments and three different theoretical areas, i.e. particle, nuclear and atomic, is reviewed. Various models of particle physics that predict CP violation, which is necessary for the existence of such electric dipole moments, are presented. These include the standard model of particle physics and various extensions of it. Effective hadron level combined charge conjugation (C) and parity (P) symmetry violating interactions are derived taking into consideration different ways in which a nucleon interacts with other nucleons as well as with electrons. Nuclear structure calculations of the CP-odd nuclear Schiff moment are discussed using the shell model and other theoretical approaches. Results of the calculations of atomic electric dipole moments due to the interaction of the nuclear Schiff moment with the electrons and the P and time-reversal (T) symmetry violating tensor-pseudotensor electron-nucleus are elucidated using different relativistic many-body theories. The principles of the measurement of the electric dipole moments of diamagnetic atoms are outlined. Upper limits for the nuclear Schiff moment and tensor-pseudotensor coupling constant are obtained combining the results of atomic experiments and relativistic many-body theories. The coefficients for the different sources of CP violation have been estimated at the elementary particle level for all the diamagnetic atoms of current experimental interest and their implications for physics beyond the standard model is discussed. Possible improvements of the current results of the measurements as well as quantum chromodynamics, nuclear and atomic calculations are suggested.

  10. Measurement of CP violation in the phase space of B± → K+ K- π± and B± → π+ π- π± decays.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2014-01-10

    The charmless decays B± → K+ K- π± and B± → π+ π- π± are reconstructed in a data set of pp collisions with an integrated luminosity of 1.0  fb(-1) and center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, collected by LHCb in 2011. The inclusive charge asymmetries of these modes are measured to be A(CP)(B± → K+ K- π±) = -0.141±0.040  (stat)±0.018 (syst)±0.007(J/ψ K±) and A(CP)(B± → π+ π- π±) = 0.117±0.021 (stat)±0.009 (syst)±0.007(J/ψ K±), where the third uncertainty is due to the CP asymmetry of the B± → J/ψK± reference mode. In addition to the inclusive CP asymmetries, larger asymmetries are observed in localized regions of phase space.

  11. Gas phase low energy electron induced decomposition of the focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) precursor trimethyl (methylcyclopentadienyl) platinum(IV) (MeCpPtMe3).

    PubMed

    Engmann, Sarah; Stano, Michal; Matejčík, Stefan; Ingólfsson, Oddur

    2012-11-14

    Relative cross sections for dissociative electron attachment (DEA) and dissociative ionization (DI) of the FEBID precursor, trimethyl (methylcyclopentadienyl) platinum(iv), MeCpPtMe(3), are presented. The most pronounced DEA process is the loss of one methyl radical, while the loss of two or three methyl groups along with hydrogen is the main pathway in DI. Further fragments are formed in DEA and through DI by more complex rearrangement reactions but complete dissociation to bare Pt(-) in DEA or Pt(+) in DI is minor. The transient negative ion (TNI) formation in DEA is discussed and fragmentation mechanisms are proposed for individual processes. From the thermodynamics of the DEA processes we derive a lower limit for the electron affinity of the MeCpPtMe(2) radical (1.7 eV). Appearance energies (AE) of MeCpPtMe(3)(+) (7.7 eV) and Pt(+) (18.6 eV) formation through electron impact ionisation (EI) and through DI, respectively, are determined. Finally, the current DEA and DI results are compared and brought into context with earlier surface science studies on electron-induced decomposition of adsorbed MeCpPtMe(3) as well as gas phase and surface science studies on the FEBID precursors [Co(CO)(3)NO] and [Pt(PF(3))(4)]. These comparisons strongly indicate that DEA is an important process in the electron-induced decomposition of these molecules in FEBID.

  12. The physics of antineutrinos in DUNE and determination of octant and δCP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Newton; Ghosh, Monojit; Goswami, Srubabati

    2016-12-01

    The octant of the leptonic mixing angle θ23 and the CP phase δCP are the two major unknowns (apart from neutrino mass hierarchy) in neutrino oscillation physics. It is well known that the precise determination of octant and δCP is interlinked through the octant-δCP degeneracy. In this paper we study the proficiency of the DUNE experiment to determine these parameters scrutinizing, in particular, the role played by the antineutrinos, the broadband nature of the beam and the matter effect. It is well known that for Pμe and P μ bar e bar the octant-δCP degeneracy occurs at different values of δCP, combination of neutrino and antineutrino runs help to resolve this. However, in regions where neutrinos do not have octant degeneracy adding antineutrino data is expected to decrease the sensitivity because of the degeneracy and reduced statistics. However we find that in case of DUNE baseline, the antineutrino runs help even in parameter space where the antineutrino probabilities suffer from degeneracies. We explore this point in detail and point out that this happens because of the (i) broad-band nature of the beam so that even if there is degeneracy at a particular energy bin, over the whole spectrum the degeneracy may not be there; (ii) the enhanced matter effect due to the comparatively longer baseline which creates an increased tension between the neutrino and the antineutrino probabilities which raises the overall χ2 in case of combined runs. This feature is more prominent for IH since the antineutrino probabilities in this case are much higher than the neutrino probabilities due to matter effects. The main role of antineutrinos in enhancing CP sensitivity is their ability to remove the octant-δCP degeneracy. However even if one assumes octant to be known the addition of antineutrinos can give enhanced CP sensitivity in some parameter regions due to the tension between the neutrino and antineutrino χ2s.

  13. Weak interactions of quarks and leptons: experimental status

    SciTech Connect

    Wojcicki, S.

    1984-09-01

    The present experimental status of weak interactions is discussed with emphasis on the problems and questions and on the possible lines of future investigations. Major topics include; (1) the quark mixing matrix, (2) CP violation, (3) rare decays, (4) the lepton sector, and (5) right handed currents. 118 references. (WHK)

  14. MFV and the SUSY CP Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, David M.

    2010-02-10

    The principle of Minimal Flavour Violation (MFV) provides a natural solution to the SUSY flavour problem, but does not solve the SUSY CP problem as it allows for the presence of new CP-violating phases. If the MFV principle is generalized by the assumption of CP conservation in the limit of flavour blindness, the SUSY CP problem can be solved, predicting at the same time interesting CP violating phenomenology.

  15. A phase I trial of immunostimulatory CpG 7909 oligodeoxynucleotide and 90 yttrium ibritumomab tiuxetan radioimmunotherapy for relapsed B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Witzig, Thomas E; Wiseman, Gregory A; Maurer, Matthew J; Habermann, Thomas M; Micallef, Ivana N M; Nowakowski, Grzegorz S; Ansell, Stephen M; Colgan, Joseph P; Inwards, David J; Porrata, Luis F; Link, Brian K; Zent, Clive S; Johnston, Patrick B; Shanafelt, Tait D; Allmer, Cristine; Asmann, Yan W; Gupta, Mamta; Ballas, Zuhair K; Smith, Brian J; Weiner, George J

    2013-07-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) for relapsed indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma produces overall response rates (ORR) of 80% with mostly partial remissions. Synthetic CpG oligonucleotides change the phenotype of malignant B-cells, are immunostimulatory, and can produce responses when injected intratumorally and combined with conventional radiation. In this phase I trial, we tested systemic administration of both CpG and RIT. Eligible patients had biopsy-proven previously treated CD20+ B-cell NHL and met criteria for RIT. Patients received rituximab 250 mg/m(2) days 1,8, and 15; (111) In-ibritumomab tiuxetan days 1, 8; CpG 7909 days 6, 13, 20, 27; and 0.4 mCi/kg of (90) Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan day 15. The doses of CpG 7909 tested were 0.08, 0.16, 0.32 (six patients each) and 0.48 mg/kg (12 patients) IV over 2 hr without dose limiting toxicity. The ORR was 93% (28/30) with 63% (19/30) complete remission (CR); median progression free survival of 42.7 months (95% CI 18-NR); and median duration of response (DR) of 35 months (4.6-76+). Correlative studies demonstrated a decrease in IL10 and TNFα, and an increase in IL1β, in response to therapy. CpG 7909 at a dose of 0.48 mg/kg is safe with standard RIT and produces a high CR rate and long DR; these results warrant confirmation.

  16. A Phase I Trial of Immunostimulatory CpG 7909 Oligodeoxynucleotide and 90Yttrium Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Radioimmunotherapy for Relapsed B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Witzig, Thomas E.; Wiseman, Gregory A.; Maurer, Matthew J.; Habermann, Thomas M.; Micallef, Ivana N. M.; Nowakowski, Grzegorz S.; Ansell, Stephen M.; Colgan, Joseph P.; Inwards, David J.; Porrata, Luis F.; Link, Brian K.; Zent, Clive S.; Johnston, Patrick B.; Shanafelt, Tait D.; Allmer, Cristine; Asmann, Yan W.; Gupta, Mamta; Ballas, Zuhair K.; Smith, Brian J.; Weiner, George J.

    2014-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) for relapsed indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma produces overall response rates (ORR) of 80% with mostly partial remissions. Synthetic CpG oligonucleotides change the phenotype of malignant B-cells, are immunostimulatory, and can produce responses when injected intratumorally and combined with conventional radiation. In this phase I trial we tested systemic administration of both CpG and RIT. Eligible patients had biopsy-proven previously treated CD20+ B-cell NHL and met criteria for RIT. Patients received rituximab 250 mg/m2 days 1,8, and 15; 111In-ibritumomab tiuxetan days 1, 8; CpG 7909 days 6, 13, 20, 27; and 0.4 mCi/kg of 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan day 15. The doses of CpG 7909 tested were 0.08, 0.16, 0.32 (six patients each) and 0.48 mg/kg (12 patients) IV over 2 hours without dose limiting toxicity. The ORR was 93% (28/30) with 63% (19/30) complete remission (CR); median progression free survival of 42.7 months (95% CI 18-NR); and median duration of response (DR) of 35 months (4.6-76+). Correlative studies demonstrated a decrease in IL10 and TNFα, and an increase in IL1β, in response to therapy. CpG 7909 at a dose of 0.48 mg/kg is safe with standard RIT and produces a high CR rate and long DR; these results warrant confirmation. PMID:23619698

  17. Quark lepton universality and large leptonic mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshipura, Anjan S.; Smirnov, A. Yu.

    2006-08-01

    A unified description of fermionic mixing is proposed which assumes that in certain basis (i) a single complex unitary matrix V diagonalizes mass matrices of all fermions to the leading order, (ii) the SU(5) relation M=MlT exists between the mass matrices of the down quarks and the charged leptons, and (iii) Md†=M. These assumptions automatically lead to different mixing patterns for quarks and leptons: Quarks remain unmixed to leading order (i.e. V=1) while leptons have non-trivial mixing given by a symmetric unitary matrix VPMNS0=VV. V depends on two physical mixing angles and for values of these angles ˜20°-25° it reproduces the observed mixing patterns rather well. We identify conditions under which the universal mixing V follows from the universal mass matrices of fermions. Relatively small perturbations to the leading order structure lead to the CKM mixing and corrections to VPMNS0. We find that if the correction matrix equals the CKM matrix, the resulting lepton mixing agrees well with data and predicts ()e3>0.08.

  18. CP Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigi, I. I.; Sanda, A. I.

    1999-11-01

    Why did the matter in our Universe not annihilate itself with antimatter immediately after its creation? The discovery of CP violation may answer this fundamental question. From the basics to the front line of research, this timely account presents background information and theoretical tools necessary for understanding this phenomenon. Early chapters explore charge conjugation, parity, and time reversal symmetries before introducing the Kobayashi-Maskawa ansatz for CP violation and examining the theoretical understanding of CP violating K meson decays. Following chapters reveal how the discovery of B mesons provides a new laboratory in which to study CP violation and predict CP violation in B meson decays and rare K meson decays. Later chapters continue the search for a new fundamental theory and address the problem of baryogenesis in the big bang universe. The importance of close links with experiment is stressed throughout. Each chapter concludes with problems. Detailed references are included. This book is suitable for graduate students and researchers in particle physics, atomic and nuclear physics and the history and philosophy of science.

  19. Particle physics: CP violation in hyperon decays

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, Michael J.

    2000-10-31

    The primary research activities under this grant were in E871 (HyperCP) at Fermilab, a search for CP violation in hyperon decays which completed data taking in January, 2000. HyperCP is an experiment designed to perform a sensitive search for direct CP violation in the decays of cascade ({Xi}) and {Lambda} hyperons by looking for an asymmetry between particle and antiparticle decay parameters. The experiment is expected to achieve a sensitivity {approx}10{sup -4} in the decay parameters. Standard model predictions for this CP-violating asymmetry range from 0.3 to 5 x 10{sup -4}. A difference between the decay parameters for particle and antiparticle is direct evidence that CP symmetry is violated. A non-zero asymmetry would be the first evidence for CP violation outside of the K{sup o} system. Recent results from KTeV indicate a direct CP violation in K{sup o} decays, which suggests that CP violation will appear in other decays. In addition, we will look at a number of rare hyperon decays involving muons. These probe important new physics topics such as Majorana neutrinos and lepton number violating processes. The latter are of great current interest because new evidence for neutrino oscillations indicate lepton flavor violation does occur. Our data will lead to an improvement in the limits on branching ratios for these processes typically by three to four orders-of-magnitude. The muon detector construction and data resulting from it have been the responsibility of the Michigan group. We are now leading the analysis of the rare muon-related decay modes, and were responsible for the muon system and beam monitor upgrades for the 1999 run.

  20. Measurement of CP violation in the phase space of B±→K± π+ π- and B±→K± K+ K- decays.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruscio, F; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Holtrop, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; Mc Skelly, B; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-09-06

    The charmless decays B±→K± π+ π- and B±→K± K+ K- are reconstructed using data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0  fb(-1), collected by LHCb in 2011. The inclusive charge asymmetries of these modes are measured as ACP(B±→K± π+ π-)=0.032±0.008 (stat)±0.004 (syst)±0.007(J/ψK±) and ACP(B±→K± K+ K-)=-0.043±0.009 (stat)±0.003 (syst)±0.007(J/ψK±), where the third uncertainty is due to the CP asymmetry of the B±→J/ψK± reference mode. The significance of ACP(B±→K± K+ K-) exceeds three standard deviations and is the first evidence of an inclusive CP asymmetry in charmless three-body B decays. In addition to the inclusive CP asymmetries, larger asymmetries are observed in localized regions of phase space.

  1. Models of neutrino mass, mixing and CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Stephen F.

    2015-12-01

    In this topical review we argue that neutrino mass and mixing data motivates extending the Standard Model (SM) to include a non-Abelian discrete flavour symmetry in order to accurately predict the large leptonic mixing angles and {C}{P} violation. We begin with an overview of the SM puzzles, followed by a description of some classic lepton mixing patterns. Lepton mixing may be regarded as a deviation from tri-bimaximal mixing, with charged lepton corrections leading to solar mixing sum rules, or tri-maximal lepton mixing leading to atmospheric mixing rules. We survey neutrino mass models, using a roadmap based on the open questions in neutrino physics. We then focus on the seesaw mechanism with right-handed neutrinos, where sequential dominance (SD) can account for large lepton mixing angles and {C}{P} violation, with precise predictions emerging from constrained SD (CSD). We define the flavour problem and discuss progress towards a theory of favour using GUTs and discrete family symmetry. We classify models as direct, semidirect or indirect, according to the relation between the Klein symmetry of the mass matrices and the discrete family symmetry, in all cases focussing on spontaneous {C}{P} violation. Finally we give two examples of realistic and highly predictive indirect models with CSD, namely an A to Z of flavour with Pati-Salam and a fairly complete A 4 × SU(5) SUSY GUT of flavour, where both models have interesting implications for leptogenesis.

  2. Initial evaluation of protein throughput and yield characteristics on nylon 6 capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) fiber stationary phases by frontal analysis.

    PubMed

    Randunu, K Manoj; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Nylon 6 capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) fibers are investigated as an alternative support/stationary phase for downstream processing of macromolecules. Ionizable amine and carboxylic acid end groups on the native fiber surface allow for ion exchange chromatography (IEC). The low cost and ability to operate at high linear velocities and low back pressures are practical advantages of C-CP fibers for preparative-scale macromolecule separations. The lack of fiber porosity ensures facile adsorption/desorption that is conducive to high throughput and recoveries/yields. Described here is a preliminary investigation of the processing characteristics of lysozyme on nylon 6 fibers with an eye toward downstream processing applications. Fibers were packed into microbore (0.8 mm i.d.) and analytical-size (2.1 mm i.d.) columns for the evaluation of the role of linear velocity on pressure drop, frontal throughput, and yield. Protein isolation by frontal development involved three steps: loading of the column to breakthrough, an aqueous wash, and a salt wash to recover the protein. Frontal throughput was evaluated with different salt concentrations (0-1000 mM NaCl) and different linear velocities (6-24 mm s(-1)). The observed throughput values are in the range of 0.12-0.20 mg min(-1) when 0.25 mg mL(-1) lysozyme (in 20 mM Tris-HCl) is loaded onto 78 mg of C-CP fiber in 0.52 mL volume analytical columns. Increased throughput and yield were found when protein was loaded and eluted at high linear velocity. Results of this study lend credence to the further development of C-CP fibers for biomacromolecule processing on larger scales.

  3. CP VIOLATION HIGHLIGHTS: CIRCA 2005

    SciTech Connect

    SONI A.

    2005-02-27

    Recent highlights in CP violation phenomena, are reviewed. B-factory results imply that, CP-violation phase in the CKM matrix is the dominant contributor to the observed CP violation in K and B-physics. Deviations from the predictions of the CKM-paradigm due to beyond the Standard Model CP-odd phase are likely to be a small perturbation. Therefore, large data sample of clean B's will be needed. Precise determination of the unitarity triangle, along with time dependent CP in penguin dominated hadronic and radiative modes are discussed. Null tests in B, K and top-physics and separate determination of the K-unitarity triangle are also emphasized.

  4. Tevatron results on the discovery of sigma^(*)_b, b_s oscillations and the measurement of delta m_s, the lifetime difference delta gamma_s and the cp-violating phase phi

    SciTech Connect

    Heijboer, Aart; /Pennsylvania U.

    2007-10-01

    The author discusses results from the Tevatron experiments on mixing and CP-violation in B{sub s} mesons, including the observation of B{sub s} oscillations and the first precision measurement of the mixing frequency, as well as a measurement of the lifetime difference {Delta}{Lambda}{sub s} and the first measurement of the CP-violating phase {delta}{sub s}. The author also briefly reports on the observation of four new bottom baryons at CDF.

  5. Measurement of the CP violating phase βs in B0s J/ΨΦ decays

    SciTech Connect

    Oakes, Louise Beth

    2010-01-01

    The CP violating phase β j/ΨΦs is measured in decays of B0s → J/ΨΦ. This measurement uses 5.2 fb-1 of data collected in √s = 1.96 TeV p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with the CDF Run-II detector. CP violation in the Bs0-$\\bar{B}$s0 system is predicted to be very small in the Standard Model. However, several theories beyond the Standard Model allow enhancements to this quantity by heavier, New Physics particles entering second order weak mixing box diagrams. Previous measurements have hinted at a deviation from the Standard Model expectation value for βsJ/ΨΦ with a significance of approximately 2σ. The measurement described in this thesis uses the highest statistics sample available to date in the Bs0 → J/ΨΦ decay channel, where J/Ψ → μ+μ- and Φ → K+K-. Furthermore, it contains several improvements over previous analyses, such as enhanced signal selection, fully calibrated particle ID and flavour tagging, and the inclusion of an additional decay component in the likelihood function. The added decay component considers S-wave states of KK pairs in the Bs0 → J/Ψ K+K- channel. The results are presented as 2-dimensional frequentist confidence regions for βsJ/ΨΦ and ΔΓ (the width difference between the Bs0 mass eigenstates), and as a confidence interval for βsJ/ΨΦ of [0.02,0.52] U [1.08, 1.55] at the 68% confidence level. The measurement of the CP violating phase obtained in this thesis is complemented by the world's most precise measurement of the lifetime τs = 1.53 ± 0.025 (stat.) ± 0.012 (syst.) ps and decay width difference ΔΓ = 0.075 ± 0.035 (stat.) ± 0.01 (syst.) ps-1 of the B

  6. Flavor Physics & CP Violation 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    "Flavor Physics & CP violation 2015" (FPCP 2015) was held in Nagoya, Japan, at Nagoya University, from May 25 to May 29 2015. This is the 13th meeting of the series of annual conferences started in Philadelphia, PA, USA in 2002. The aim of the conference is to review developments in flavor physics and CP violation, in both theory and experiment, exploiting the potential to study new physics at the LHC and future facilities. The topics include CP violation, rare decays, CKM elements with heavy quark decays, flavor phenomena in charged leptons and neutrinos, and also interplay between flavor and LHC high Pt physics. The FPCP2015 conference had more than 140 participants, including researchers from abroad and many young researchers (postdocs and students). The conference consisted of plenary talks and poster presentations. The plenary talks include 2 overview talks, 48 review talks, and 2 talks for outlook in theories and experiments, given by world leading researchers. There was also a special lecture by Prof. Makoto Kobayashi, one of the Nobel laureates in 2008. The poster session had 41 contributions. Many young researchers presented their works. These proceedings contain written documents for these plenary and poster presentations. The full scientific program and presentation materials can be found at http://fpcp2015.hepl.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp/. We would like to thank the International Advisory Committee for their invaluable assistance in coordinating the scientific program and in helping to identifying many speakers. Thanks are also due to the Local Organizing Committee for tireless efforts for smooth running of the conference and very enjoyable social activities. We also thank the financial supports provided by Japanese Scociety for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) unfer the Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (S) "Probing New Physics with Tau-Lepton" (No. 26220706), by Nagoya University under the Program for Promoting the Enhancement of Research Universities, and

  7. Technology evaluation: CpG-7909, Coley.

    PubMed

    Paul, Stéphane

    2003-10-01

    Coley Pharmaceutical (formerly CpG ImmunoPharmaceuticals) is developing CpG-7909 (ProMune) for use in the potential treatment of cancer and as a vaccine adjuvant. By April 2000, CpG-7909 had entered phase I/II trials for cancer and in March 2002, Coley initiated a phase I trial in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in combination with rituximab (Rituxan). By October 2002, CpG-7909 was in phase II trials as a vaccine adjuvant. Cpg-7909 is currently also undergoing phase II trials for melanoma.

  8. Leptons Masses and Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Terrence; Stephenson, Gerard J., Jr.

    2016-03-01

    We apply our successful modest revision of the quark mass sector of the Standard Model to leptons. We include the effects of the possibility of dark matter fermions, which appear as a number of sterile neutrinos. Email: tjgoldman@post.harvard.edu.

  9. Measurement of the CP-violating phase ϕ(s) in the decay B(s)(0) → J/ψϕ.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellan Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Arrabito, L; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Bailey, D S; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chiapolini, N; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Constantin, F; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Cowan, G A; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Lorenzi, F; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Bonal, F; Domingo Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Estève, L; Falabella, A; Fanchini, E; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauvin, N; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harji, R; Harnew, N; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Holubyev, K; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; 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Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, A C; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urquijo, P; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Voss, H; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yushchenko, O; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zverev, E; Zvyagin, A

    2012-03-09

    We present a measurement of the time-dependent CP-violating asymmetry in B(s)(0) → J/ψϕ decays, using data collected with the LHCb detector at the LHC. The decay time distribution of B(s)(0) → J/ψϕ is characterized by the decay widths Γ(H) and Γ(L) of the heavy and light mass eigenstates, respectively, of the B(s)(0) - B(s)(0) system and by a CP-violating phase ϕ(s). In a sample of about 8500 B(s)(0) → J/ψϕ events isolated from 0.37  fb(-1) of pp collisions at sqrt[s] = 7  TeV, we measure ϕ(s) = 0.15 ± 0.18(stat) ± 0.06(syst)  rad. We also find an average B(s)(0) decay width Γ(s) ≡ (Γ(L) + Γ(H))/2 = 0.657 ± 0.009(stat) ± 0.008(syst)  ps(-1) and a decay width difference ΔΓ(s) ≡ Γ(L) - Γ(H) = 0.123 ± 0.029(stat) ± 0.011(syst)  ps(-1). Our measurement is insensitive to the transformation (ϕ(s),ΔΓ(s)) ↦ (π - ϕ(s), -ΔΓ(s)).

  10. Measurement of the CP-Violating Phase beta_s in B0s -> J/Psi Phi Decays with the CDF II Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; et al.

    2012-04-01

    We present a measurement of the \\CP-violating parameter \\betas using approximately 6500 $\\BsJpsiPhi$ decays reconstructed with the CDF\\,II detector in a sample of $p\\bar p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV corresponding to 5.2 fb$^{-1}$ integrated luminosity produced by the Tevatron Collider at Fermilab. We find the \\CP-violating phase to be within the range $\\betas \\in [0.02, 0.52] \\cup [1.08, 1.55]$ at 68% confidence level where the coverage property of the quoted interval is guaranteed using a frequentist statistical analysis. This result is in agreement with the standard model expectation at the level of about one Gaussian standard deviation. We consider the inclusion of a potential $S$-wave contribution to the $\\Bs\\to J/\\psi K^+K^-$ final state which is found to be negligible over the mass interval $1.009 < m(K^+K^-)<1.028 \\gevcc$. Assuming the standard model prediction for the \\CP-violating phase \\betas, we find the \\Bs decay width difference to be $\\deltaG = 0.075 \\pm 0.035\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.006\\,\\textrm{(syst)} \\ps$. We also present the most precise measurements of the \\Bs mean lifetime $\\tau(\\Bs) = 1.529 \\pm 0.025\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.012\\,\\textrm{(syst)}$ ps, the polarization fractions $|A_0(0)|^2 = 0.524 \\pm 0.013\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.015\\,\\textrm{(syst)}$ and $|A_{\\parallel}(0)|^2 = 0.231 \\pm 0.014\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.015\\,\\textrm{(syst)}$, as well as the strong phase $\\delta_{\\perp}= 2.95 \\pm 0.64\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.07\\,\\textrm{(syst)} \\textrm{rad}$. In addition, we report an alternative Bayesian analysis that gives results consistent with the frequentist approach.

  11. Non-thermal leptogenesis with distinct CP violation and minimal dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hang; Gu, Pei-Hong

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate a unified scenario for neutrino mass, baryon asymmetry, dark matter and inflation. In addition to a fermion triplet for the so-called minimal dark matter, we extend the standard model by three heavy fields including a scalar singlet, a fermion triplet and a fermion singlet/Higgs triplet. The heavy scalar singlet, which is expected to drive an inflation, and the dark matter fermion triplet are odd under an unbroken Z2 discrete symmetry, while the other fields are all even. The heavy fermion triplet offers a tree-level type-III seesaw and then mediates a three-body decay of the inflaton into the standard model lepton and Higgs doublets with the dark matter fermion triplet. The heavy fermion singlet/Higgs triplet not only results in a type-I/II seesaw at tree level but also contributes to the inflaton decay at one-loop level. In this scenario, the type-I/II seesaw contains all of the physical CP phases in the lepton sector and hence the CP violation for the non-thermal leptogenesis by the inflaton decay exactly comes from the imaginary part of the neutrino mass matrix.

  12. CP violation in neutrino oscillations in Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model

    SciTech Connect

    Delepine, David; Gonzalez Macias, Vannia

    2008-07-02

    In this talk, we estimate the size of lepton flavor and CP violation in neutrino oscillations in the framework of Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM). We find that we may have significant CP-violating contributions up to an order of magnitude ({approx}10{sup -2}) smaller than the standard four-Fermi couplings.

  13. First study of the CP-violating phase and decay-width difference in Bs0 → ψ (2 S) ϕ decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

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C.; Remon Alepuz, C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Romanovskiy, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rudolph, M. S.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sadykhov, E.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schellenberg, M.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubert, K.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Simone, S.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefko, P.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stemmle, S.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tilley, M. J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Toriello, F.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tully, A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Venkateswaran, A.; Vernet, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voneki, B.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Wark, H. M.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zarebski, K. A.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhu, X.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.

    2016-11-01

    A time-dependent angular analysis of Bs0 → ψ (2 S) ϕ decays is performed using data recorded by the LHCb experiment. The data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 3.0fb-1 collected during Run 1 of the LHC. The CP-violating phase and decay-width difference of the Bs0 system are measured to be ϕs =0.23-0.28+0.29 ± 0.02rad and ΔΓs =0.066-0.044+0.041 ± 0.007ps-1, respectively, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. This is the first time that ϕs and ΔΓs have been measured in a decay containing the ψ (2 S) resonance.

  14. Measurement of the CP-violating phase βsJ/ψΦ in Bs0→J/ψΦ decays with the CDF II detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; ...

    2012-04-23

    We present a measurement of the CP-violating parameter βsJ/ψΦ using approximately 6500 B0s→J/ψΦ decays reconstructed with the CDF II detector in a sample of pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV corresponding to 5.2 fb⁻¹ integrated luminosity produced by the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. We find the CP-violating phase to be within the range βsJ/ψΦϵ [0.02,0.52]∪[1.08,1.55] at 68% confidence level where the coverage property of the quoted interval is guaranteed using a frequentist statistical analysis. This result is in agreement with the standard model expectation at the level of about one Gaussian standard deviation. We consider the inclusion of a potential S-wavemore » contribution to the B0s→J/ψK⁺K⁻ final state which is found to be negligible over the mass interval 1.009sJ/ψΦ, we find the B0s decay width difference to be ΔΓs=0.075±0.035(stat)±0.006(syst) ps⁻¹. We also present the most precise measurements of the B0s mean lifetime τ(B0s)=1.529±0.025(stat)±0.012(syst) ps, the polarization fractions |A0(0)|²=0.524±0.013(stat)±0.015(syst) and |A II (0)|²=0.231±0.014(stat)±0.015(syst), as well as the strong phase δ⊥=2.95±0.64(stat)±0.07(syst) rad. In addition, we report an alternative Bayesian analysis that gives results consistent with the frequentist approach.« less

  15. On the energy and baseline optimization to study effects related to the /δ-phase (CP-/T-violation) in neutrino oscillations at a neutrino factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, A.; Campanelli, M.; Navas-Concha, S.; Rubbia, A.

    2002-06-01

    In this paper we discuss the detection of CP- and T-violation effects in the framework of a neutrino factory. We introduce three quantities, which are good discriminants for a non-vanishing complex phase ( δ) in the 3×3 neutrino mixing matrix: Δδ, ΔCP and ΔT. We find that these three discriminants (in vacuum) all scale with L/ Eν, where L is the baseline and Eν the neutrino energy. Matter effects modify the scaling, but these effects are large enough to spoil the sensitivity only for baselines larger than 5000 km. So, in the hypothesis of constant neutrino factory power (i.e., number of muons inversely proportional to muon energy), the sensitivity on the δ-phase is independent of the baseline chosen. Specially interesting is the direct measurement of T-violation from the "wrong-sign" electron channel (i.e., the ΔT discriminant), which involves a comparison of the νe→ νμ and νμ→ νe oscillation rates. However, the νμ→ νe measurement requires magnetic discrimination of the electron charge, experimentally very challenging in a neutrino detector. Since the direction of the electron curvature has to be estimated before the start of the electromagnetic shower, low-energy neutrino beams and hence short baselines, are preferred. In this paper we show, as an example, the exclusion regions in the Δm212- δ plane using the ΔCP and ΔT discriminants for two concrete cases keeping the same L/ Eν ratio (730 km/7.5 GeV and 2900 km/30 GeV). We obtain a similar excluded region provided that the electron detection efficiency is ˜20% and the charge confusion 0.1%. The Δm212 compatible with the LMA solar data can be tested with a flux of 5×10 21 muons. We compare these results with the fit of the visible energy distributions.

  16. Low scale seesaw, electron EDM and leptogenesis in a model with spontaneous CP violation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Mu-Chun; Mahanthappa, K.T.; /Colorado U.

    2006-09-01

    Strong correlations between leptogenesis and low energy CP violating leptonic processes have been shown by us to exist fin the minimal left-right symmetric model with spontaneous CP violation. In this note, they investigate the implications of this model for the electric dipole moment of the electron. With an additional broken U(1){sub H} symmetry, the seesaw scale can be lowered to close to the electroweak scale. This additional symmetry also makes the connection between CP violation in quark sector to that in the lepton sector possible.

  17. Gauged lepton flavour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, R.; Fernandez Martinez, E.; Gavela, M. B.; Grinstein, B.; Merlo, L.; Quilez, P.

    2016-12-01

    The gauging of the lepton flavour group is considered in the Standard Model context and in its extension with three right-handed neutrinos. The anomaly cancellation conditions lead to a Seesaw mechanism as underlying dynamics for all leptons; requiring in addition a phenomenologically viable setup leads to Majorana masses for the neutral sector: the type I Seesaw Lagrangian in the Standard Model case and the inverse Seesaw in the extended model. Within the minimal extension of the scalar sector, the Yukawa couplings are promoted to scalar fields in the bifundamental of the flavour group. The resulting low-energy Yukawa couplings are proportional to inverse powers of the vacuum expectation values of those scalars; the protection against flavour changing neutral currents differs from that of Minimal Flavour Violation. In all cases, the μ- τ flavour sector exhibits rich and promising phenomenological signals.

  18. CP observables with spin spin correlations in chargino production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartl, A.; Hohenwarter-Sodek, K.; Kernreiter, T.; Kittel, O.; Terwort, M.

    2008-10-01

    We study the CP-violating terms of the spin-spin correlations in chargino production ee→χ˜1±χ˜2∓, and their subsequent two-body decays into sneutrinos plus leptons. We propose novel CP-sensitive observables with the help of T-odd products of the spin-spin terms. These terms depend on the polarizations of both charginos, with one polarization perpendicular to the production plane. We identify two classes of CP-sensitive observables; one requires the reconstruction of the production plane, the other not. Our framework is the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model with complex parameters.

  19. Supersymmetric Contributions to CP Asymmetry in τ-DECAYS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delepine, D.; Faisel, G.; Khalil, S.; Shalaby, M.

    We review the CP violation in the semileptonic |ΔS| = 1 τ-decays in supersymmetric extensions of the standard model (SM). We show that Within SUSY models with conserved R parity, the CP asymmetry of τ → kπν is below the current experimental limits, although it is enhanced by several order of magnitude than the SM results. We also study the impact of the lepton violation terms in SUSY models with R parity violation. We show that the CP asymmetry of τ-decay is enhanced significantly and the current experimental limits obtained by CLEO collaborations can be easily accommodated.

  20. Primordial quark bubbles with leptonic component

    SciTech Connect

    Orsaria, Milva; Duarte, S.B.; Goncalves, H.R.

    2004-12-02

    We introduce the leptonic component to discuss macroscopic bulk properties of primordial bubble quark matter which survived the confinement phase transition in the universe at high temperature. Considering quark matter in equilibrium with the weak interactions, we analyze the boundaries in the {mu} - {mu}e plane for which betha equilibrium and charge neutrality can be valid, being {mu} and {mu}e the chemical potential associated to the baryonic density and the electrons, respectively.

  1. Dark matter and vectorlike leptons from gauged lepton number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaller, Pedro; Tait, Tim M. P.; Vega-Morales, Roberto

    2013-08-01

    We investigate a simple model where lepton number is promoted to a local U(1)L gauge symmetry which is then spontaneously broken, leading to a viable thermal dark matter (DM) candidate and vectorlike leptons as a byproduct. The dark matter arises as part of the exotic lepton sector required by the need to satisfy anomaly cancellation and is a Dirac electroweak (mostly) singlet neutrino. It is stabilized by an accidental global symmetry of the renormalizable Lagrangian which is preserved even after the gauged lepton number is spontaneously broken and can annihilate efficiently to give the correct thermal relic abundance. We examine the ability of this model to give a viable DM candidate and discuss both direct and indirect detection implications. We also examine some of the LHC phenomenology of the associated exotic lepton sector and in particular its effects on Higgs decays.

  2. Improved Measurement of CP Observables in B- to D0_CP K- Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, Marcella; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, Marco; Brown, D.N.; Button-Shafer, Janice; Cahn, Robert N.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-07-01

    We present a study of the decay B{sup -} {yields} D{sub (CP)}{sup 0}K{sup -} and its charge conjugate, where D{sub (CP)}{sup 0} is reconstructed in both a non-CP flavor eigenstate and in CP (CP-even and CP-odd) eigenstates, based on a sample of 382 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. We measure the direct CP asymmetries A{sub CP{+-}} and the ratios of the branching fractions R{sub CP{+-}}: A{sub CP+} = 0.27 {+-} 0.09(stat) {+-} 0.04(syst), A{sub CP-} = -0.09 {+-} 0.09(stat) {+-} 0.02(syst), R{sub CP+} = 1.06 {+-} 0.10(stat) {+-} 0.05(syst), R{sub CP-} = 1.03 {+-} 0.10(stat) {+-} 0.05(syst). These results will help to better constrain the gamma phase parameter of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix.

  3. Extraction of the CP-violating phase γ using B→Kππ and B→KKK¯ decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Bhubanjyoti; Imbeault, Maxime; London, David

    2014-01-01

    Using the BABAR measurements of the Dalitz plots for B0→K+π0π-, B0→K0π+π-, B+→K+π+π-, B0→K+K0K-, and B0→K0K0K decays, we demonstrate that it is possible to cleanly extract the weak phase γ. We find four possible solutions. Three of these - 32°, 259°, and 315° - are in disagreement with the SM, while one - 77° - is consistent with the SM. An advantage of this Dalitz-plot method is that one can obtain many independent measurements of γ, thereby reducing its statistical error. An accurate determination of the errors, however, requires detailed knowledge of the data.

  4. Synthesis of protein-loaded hydrogel particles in an aqueous two-phase system for coincident antigen and CpG oligonucleotide delivery to antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Jain, Siddhartha; Yap, Woon Teck; Irvine, Darrell J

    2005-01-01

    Materials that effectively deliver protein antigens together with activating ligands to antigen-presenting cells are sought for improved nonviral vaccines. To this end, we synthesized protein-loaded poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogel particles by cross-linking PEG within the polymer-rich phase of an emulsion formed by a poly(ethylene oxide-b-propylene oxide-b-ethylene oxide) triblock copolymer in saturated aqueous salt solution. These particles (500-nm diameter) contained high levels of encapsulated protein (approximately 75% of dry mass), which was selectively released by proteolytic enzymes normally present in the phagosomal/endosomal compartments of dendritic cells (DCs). For co-delivery of cellular activation signals, gel particles were surface-modified by sequential adsorption of poly(l-arginine) and CpG oligonucleotides. DCs pulsed with protein-loaded particles activated naïve T cells in vitro approximately 10-fold more efficiently than DCs incubated with soluble protein. This organic solvent-free strategy for protein encapsulation within submicron-sized hydrophilic particles is attractive for macromolecule delivery to a variety of phagocytic and nonphagocytic cells.

  5. On fast CP violating interactions in leptogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, Chee Sheng; Racker, J. E-mail: racker@ecm.ub.es

    2010-07-01

    We show that when the relevant CP violating interactions in leptogenesis are fast, the different matter density asymmetries are determined at each instant by a balance condition between the amount of asymmetry being created and destroyed. This fact allows to understand in a simple way many features of leptogenesis in the strong washout regime. In particular, we find some non-trivial effects of flavour changing interactions that conserve lepton number, which are specially relevant in models for leptogenesis that rely heavily on flavour effects.

  6. Measurement of the CP Violating Phase $\\boldsymbol{\\sin(2\\beta_{s})}$ using $\\boldsymbol{B^{0}_{s}\\rightarrow J/\\psi\\phi}$ Decays at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Pueschel, Elisa

    2010-05-01

    A B0 s meson can oscillate into its anti-particle, the $\\bar{B}$0 s meson, before decaying. CP violation in this system is made possible by the presence of amplitudes from both mixed and unmixed B0 s meson decays. The CP violating phase βs appears in the interference between the decay amplitudes. The quantity sin(2βs) is expected to be small in the standard model. Thus, measuring a large value for sin(2βs) would be an unequivocal sign of new physics participation in the B0 s mixing loop diagram. In this thesis, we present a latest measurement of sin(2βs), using 5.2 fb-1 of data collected at CDF from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center of mass energy of √s=1.96 TeV. A time-dependent angular analysis, with the production flavor of the B0 s meson identified with flavor tagging methods, is used to extract sin(2βs) from ~6500 B0 s→ J/ψφ decays. Other parameters of interest, such as the B0 s lifetime and the decay width difference between the heavy and light B0 s mass eigenstates are determined to high precision. Also, the effect of potential contributions to the final state from B0 s → J/ψf0 and B0 s→ J/ψK+K- decays is considered for the first time. We present 68% and 95% confidence regions in the βs plane. The probability that the observed central value is a fluctuation of the data from the standard model expected value of βs is calculated to be 44%. The observed confidence region shows better agreement with the standard model prediction than previous measurements.

  7. An Experimental Investigation of Effects of Fluxes (Na3AlF6 and K2TiF6), Element Alloys (Mg), and Composite Powders ((Al + TiC)CP and (Al + B4C)CP) on Distribution of Particles and Phases in Al-B4C and Al-TiC Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaheri, Younes; Emadi, Rahmatollah; Meratian, Mahmood; Zarchi, Mehdi Karimi

    2017-04-01

    The wettability, incorporation, and gravity segregation of TiC and B4C particles into molten aluminum are important problems in the production of Al-TiC and Al-B4C composites by the casting techniques. In order to solve these problems, different methods consisting of adding the Na3AlF6 and K2TiF6 fluxes and Mg (as the alloying element) into the molten aluminum and injection of the (Al + TiC)CP and (Al + B4C)CP composite powders instead of B4C and TiC particles are evaluated. In this work, the conditions of sample preparation, such as particle addition temperature, stirring speed, and stirring time, are determined after many studies and tests. Microstructural characterizations of samples are investigated by scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffractometry. The results show better distribution and incorporation of TiCp and B4Cp in aluminum matrix when the fluxes are used, as well as EDS analysis of the interface between the matrix and reinforcement-strengthened formation of the different phases such as Al4C3 in the Al-TiC composites and Al3BC, TiB2 in the Al-B4C composites.

  8. An Experimental Investigation of Effects of Fluxes (Na3AlF6 and K2TiF6), Element Alloys (Mg), and Composite Powders ((Al + TiC)CP and (Al + B4C)CP) on Distribution of Particles and Phases in Al-B4C and Al-TiC Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaheri, Younes; Emadi, Rahmatollah; Meratian, Mahmood; Zarchi, Mehdi Karimi

    2017-01-01

    The wettability, incorporation, and gravity segregation of TiC and B4C particles into molten aluminum are important problems in the production of Al-TiC and Al-B4C composites by the casting techniques. In order to solve these problems, different methods consisting of adding the Na3AlF6 and K2TiF6 fluxes and Mg (as the alloying element) into the molten aluminum and injection of the (Al + TiC)CP and (Al + B4C)CP composite powders instead of B4C and TiC particles are evaluated. In this work, the conditions of sample preparation, such as particle addition temperature, stirring speed, and stirring time, are determined after many studies and tests. Microstructural characterizations of samples are investigated by scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffractometry. The results show better distribution and incorporation of TiCp and B4Cp in aluminum matrix when the fluxes are used, as well as EDS analysis of the interface between the matrix and reinforcement-strengthened formation of the different phases such as Al4C3 in the Al-TiC composites and Al3BC, TiB2 in the Al-B4C composites.

  9. Summary of Lepton Photon 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Peskin, Michael E.; /SLAC

    2012-03-14

    In this lecture, I summarize developments presented at the Lepton Photon 2011 conference and give my perspective on the current situation in high-energy physics. I am grateful to the organizers of Lepton Photon 2011 for providing us a very pleasant and simulating week in Mumbai. This year's Lepton Photon conference has covered the full range of subjects that fall within the scope of high-energy physics, including connections to cosmology, nuclear physics, and atomic physics. The experiments that were discussed detect particles ranging in energy from radio frequencies to EeV.

  10. Dark matter annihilation through a lepton-specific Higgs boson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, Heather E.

    2011-02-01

    It was recently argued by Hooper and Goodenough [arXiv:1010.2752] that the excess gamma-ray emission from within 1°-2° of the Galactic center can be well described by annihilation of ˜8GeV dark matter particles into tau pairs. I show that such a dark matter signal can be obtained naturally in the lepton-specific two-Higgs-doublet model extended by a stable singlet scalar dark matter candidate. The favored parameter region prefers a light Higgs state (below 200 GeV) with enhanced couplings to leptons and a sizable invisible branching fraction. Part of the favored region leads to invisible decays of both of the CP-even neutral Higgs states.

  11. Revisiting the quark-lepton complementarity and triminimal parametrization of neutrino mixing matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Sin Kyu

    2011-05-01

    We examine how a parametrization of neutrino mixing matrix reflecting quark-lepton complementarity can be probed by considering phase-averaged oscillation probabilities, flavor composition of neutrino fluxes coming from atmospheric and astrophysical neutrinos and lepton flavor violating radiative decays. We discuss some distinct features of the parametrization by comparing the triminimal parametrization of perturbations to the tribimaximal neutrino mixing matrix.

  12. Hard-thermal-loop corrections in leptogenesis I: CP-asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Kießig, Clemens P.; Plümacher, Michael E-mail: pluemi@mpp.mpg.de

    2012-07-01

    We investigate hard-thermal-loop (HTL) corrections to the CP-asymmetries in neutrino and, at high temperature, Higgs boson decays in leptogenesis. We pay special attention to the two leptonic quasiparticles that arise at non-zero temperature and find that there are four contributions to the CP-asymmetries, which correspond to the four combinations of the two leptonic quasiparticles in the loop and in the final states. In two additional cases, we approximate the full HTL-lepton propagator with a zero-temperature propagator that employs the thermal lepton mass m{sub l}(T), or the asymptotic thermal lepton mass (2){sup 1/2} m{sub l}(T). We find that the CP-asymmetries in the one-mode approaches differ by up to one order of magnitude from the full two-mode treatment in the interesting temperature regime T ∼ M{sub 1}. The asymmetry in Higgs boson decays turns out to be two orders of magnitude larger than the asymmetry in neutrino decays in the zero-temperature treatment. The effect of HTL corrections on the final lepton asymmetry are investigated in paper II of this series.

  13. Measurement of the CP-violating phase Φs and the Bs0 meson decay width difference with Bs0 → J/ψΦ decays in ATLAS

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; ...

    2016-08-24

    Here, a measurement of the Bs0 decay parameters in the Bs0 → J/ψΦ channel using an integrated luminosity of 14.3 fb–1 collected by the ATLAS detector from 8 TeV pp collisions at the LHC is presented. The measured parameters include the CP -violating phase Φs, the decay width Γs and the width difference between the mass eigenstates ΔΓs.

  14. Implications of Lepton Nonuniversality in the Beauty Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, A.; Mohanta, R.; Sahoo, S.

    2016-11-01

    The phenomenon of CP violation in the standard model (SM) framework and the decay dynamics have been established from the data obtained from the B factories and so far we have not seen anything new. Nevertheless, there have been instances of deviations in many measured observables in the flavor sector, as far as the data and predictions are concerned. Here we will mention some deviations obtained in measurements related to lepton universality, as seen from the data, and try to understand their implications. To accommodate the observed data we will consider a leptoquark model, which seems to be one interesting model beyond the SM.

  15. Gravitating lepton bag model

    SciTech Connect

    Burinskii, A.

    2015-08-15

    The Kerr–Newman (KN) black hole (BH) solution exhibits the external gravitational and electromagnetic field corresponding to that of the Dirac electron. For the large spin/mass ratio, a ≫ m, the BH loses horizons and acquires a naked singular ring creating two-sheeted topology. This space is regularized by the Higgs mechanism of symmetry breaking, leading to an extended particle that has a regular spinning core compatible with the external KN solution. We show that this core has much in common with the known MIT and SLAC bag models, but has the important advantage of being in accordance with the external gravitational and electromagnetic fields of the KN solution. A peculiar two-sheeted structure of Kerr’s gravity provides a framework for the implementation of the Higgs mechanism of symmetry breaking in configuration space in accordance with the concept of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model. Similar to other bag models, the KN bag is flexible and pliant to deformations. For parameters of a spinning electron, the bag takes the shape of a thin rotating disk of the Compton radius, with a ring–string structure and a quark-like singular pole formed at the sharp edge of this disk, indicating that the considered lepton bag forms a single bag–string–quark system.

  16. Hints for Leptonic C P Violation or New Physics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forero, David V.; Huber, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    One of the major open questions in the neutrino sector is the issue of leptonic C P violation. Current global oscillation data show a mild preference for a large, potentially maximal value for the Dirac C P phase in the neutrino mixing matrix. In this Letter, we point out that new physics in the form of neutral-current-like nonstandard interactions with real couplings would likely yield a similar conclusion even if C P in the neutrino sector were conserved. Therefore, the claim for a discovery of leptonic C P violation will require a robust ability to test new physics scenarios.

  17. Capillary-Channeled Polymer (C-CP) Fibers as a Stationary Phase for Sample Clean-Up of Protein Solutions for Matrix-Assisted Laser/Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manard, Benjamin T.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    2012-08-01

    Capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) fibers are employed in a micropipette tip format to affect a stationary phase for the solid phase extraction (SPE) of proteins from buffer solutions prior to MALDI-MS analysis. Proteins readily adsorb to the polypropylene (PP) C-CP fibers while buffer species are easily washed off the tips using DI-H2O. Elution of the solutes is achieved with an aliquot of 50:50 ACN:H2O, which is compatible with the subsequent spotting on the MALDI target with the matrix solution. Lysozyme and cytochrome c are used as test species, with a primary buffer composition of 100 mM Tris-HCl. In this case, direct MALDI-MS produces no discernible protein signals. SPE on the C-CP fibers yields high fidelity mass spectra for 1 μL sample volumes. Limits of detection for cytochrome c in 100 mM Tris-HCl are on the order of 40 nM. Extraction of cytochrome c from buffer concentrations of up to 1 M Tris-HCl, provides signal recoveries that are suppressed by only ~50 % versus neat protein solutions. Finally, extraction of 3.1 μM cytochrome c from a synthetic urine matrix exhibits excellent recovery.

  18. Flavor violating leptonic decays of the Higgs boson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathy, Seham; Ibrahim, Tarek; Itani, Ahmad; Nath, Pran

    2016-12-01

    Recent data from the ATLAS and CMS detectors at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN give a hint of possible violation of flavor in the leptonic decays of the Higgs boson. In this work we analyze the flavor violating leptonic decays H10→lil¯j (i ≠j ) within the framework of a minimal supersymmetric standard model extension with a vectorlike leptonic generation. Specifically we focus on the decay mode H10→μ τ . The analysis is done including tree and loop contributions involving exchange of W , Z , charged and neutral Higgs bosons and leptons and mirror leptons, charginos and neutralinos and sleptons and mirror sleptons. It is found that a substantial branching ratio of H10→μ τ , i.e., of as much as O (1 )%, can be achieved in this model, the size hinted by the ATLAS and CMS data. The flavor violating decays H10→e μ , e τ are also analyzed and found to be consistent with the current experimental limits. An analysis of the dependence of flavor violating decays on C P phases is given. The analysis is extended to include flavor decays of the heavier Higgs bosons. A confirmation of the flavor violation in Higgs boson decays with more data that is expected from LHC at √{s }=13 TeV will be evidence of new physics beyond the standard model.

  19. Measurement of the leptonic branching ratios of the τ lepton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akers, R.; Alexander, G.; Allison, J.; Ametewee, K.; Anderson, K. J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A. H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J. R.; Beaudoin, G.; Beck, A.; Beck, G. A.; Beeston, C.; Behnke, T.; Bell, K. W.; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berlich, P.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I. J.; Bock, P.; Bosch, H. M.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brown, R. M.; Buijs, A.; Burckhart, H. J.; Bürgin, R.; Burgard, C.; Capdevielle, N.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R. K.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Chang, C. Y.; Charlesworth, C.; Charlton, D. G.; Chu, S. L.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clayton, J. C.; Clowes, S. G.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J. E.; Cooke, O. C.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Darling, C.; de Jong, S.; Del Pozo, L. A.; Deng, H.; Dittmar, M.; Dixit, M. S.; Do Couto E Silva, E.; Duboscq, J. E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Dunwoody, U. C.; Edwards, J. E. G.; Elcombe, P. A.; Estabrooks, P. G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H. G.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbro, B.; Fanti, M.; Fath, P.; Fierro, M.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fischer, H. M.; Fischer, P.; Folman, R.; Fong, D. G.; Foucher, M.; Fukui, H.; Fürtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gaidot, A.; Gary, J. W.; Gascon, J.; Geddes, N. I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Gensler, S. W.; Gentit, F. X.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W. R.; Gillies, J. D.; Goldberg, J.; Gingrich, D. M.; Goodrick, M. J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Hagemann, J.; Hanson, G. G.; Hansroul, M.; Hargrove, C. K.; Hart, P. A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Heflin, E.; Hemingway, R. J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R. D.; Hill, J. C.; Hillier, S. J.; Hilse, T.; Hobson, P. R.; Hochman, D.; Homer, R. J.; Honma, A. K.; Howard, R.; Hughes-Jones, R. E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D. C.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P. W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, M.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jovanovic, P.; Jui, C.; Karlen, D.; Kanzaki, J.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R. K.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kennedy, B. W.; King, B.; King, J.; Kirk, J.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D. S.; Kokott, T. P.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, R.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lafoux, H.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W. P.; Lauber, J.; Layter, J. G.; Leblanc, P.; Lee, A. M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Leroy, C.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lloyd, S. L.; Loebinger, F. K.; Long, G. D.; Lorazo, B.; Losty, M. J.; Lou, X. C.; Ludwig, J.; Luig, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markus, C.; Martin, A. J.; Martin, J. P.; Mashimo, T.; Matthews, W.; Mättig, P.; Maur, U.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T. J.; McNab, A. I.; Meijers, F.; Merritt, F. S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Middleton, R. P.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D. J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Müller, U.; Nellen, B.; Nijjhar, B.; O'Neale, S. W.; Oakham, F. G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H. O.; Oldershaw, N. J.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Orito, S.; Palmonari, F.; Pansart, J. P.; Patrick, G. N.; Pearce, M. J.; Phillips, P. D.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, D. E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Pritchard, T. W.; Przysiezniak, H.; Redmond, M. W.; Rees, D. L.; Rigby, D.; Rison, M. G.; Robins, S. A.; Robinson, D.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J. M.; Ros, E.; Rossi, A. M.; Rosvick, M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D. R.; Sasaki, M.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A. D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schenk, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schröder, M.; Schultz-Coulon, H. C.; Schütz, P.; Schulz, M.; Schwick, C.; Schwiening, J.; Scott, W. G.; Settles, M.; Shears, T. G.; Shen, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G. P.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A. M.; Smith, T. J.; Snow, G. A.; Sobie, R.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, R. W.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Starks, M.; Stegmann, C.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Strom, D.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Tecchio, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Tesch, N.; Thomson, M. A.; Tousignant, O.; Towers, S.; Tscheulin, M.; Tsukamoto, T.; Turcot, A. S.; Turner-Watson, M. F.; Utzat, P.; van Kooten, R.; Vasseur, G.; Vikas, P.; Vincter, M.; Wagner, A.; Wagner, D. L.; Ward, C. P.; Ward, D. R.; Ward, J. J.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Weber, P.; Wells, P. S.; Wermes, N.; Wilkens, B.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, J. A.; Winterer, V.-H.; Wlodek, T.; Wolf, G.; Wotton, S.; Wyatt, T. R.; Yeaman, A.; Yekutieli, G.; Yurko, M.; Zacek, V.; Zeuner, W.; Zorn, G. T.

    1995-12-01

    The leptonic branching ratios of the tau lepton have been determined from data collected by the OPAL detector in 1991 and 1992. From a sample of 27196 e+e-→τ+τ- candidates we find 7322tau to eν bar ν and 7941tau to μ ν bar ν candidates. Using efficiency and background estimates determined from a study of Monte Carlo events and control samples of data, the branching ratiosB(tau to eν bar ν )=(18.14±0.20±0.28)% andB(tau to μ ν bar ν )=(17.48±0.18±0.23)% have been obtained. These new results have been combined with the published results for the 1990 OPAL data to yield the following branching ratios for data taken between 1990 and 1992: 10052_2005_Article_BF01579629_TeX2GIFE1.gif begin{gathered} B(tau to eν bar ν ) = (18.04 ± 0.33)% , \\ B(tau to μ ν bar ν ) = (17.36 ± 0.27)% . \\ These leptonic branching ratios are used with other properties of the muon and tau-lepton to test the universality of charged current leptonic couplings in these decays. The ratioR_tau = B(tau to hadrons + ν _tau )/B(tau to ebar ν _e ν _tau ) is calculated using our measured values of the leptonic branching fractions of the tau and tau lifetime from which a value of α s ( Q 2= M {τ/2}) is extracted. The value of α s ( Q 2= M {Z/2}) is obtained by Q 2 evolution and agrees with the value from the Z0 line shape analysis.

  20. Lepton asymmetry, neutrino spectral distortions, and big bang nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grohs, E.; Fuller, George M.; Kishimoto, C. T.; Paris, Mark W.

    2017-03-01

    We calculate Boltzmann neutrino energy transport with self-consistently coupled nuclear reactions through the weak-decoupling-nucleosynthesis epoch in an early universe with significant lepton numbers. We find that the presence of lepton asymmetry enhances processes which give rise to nonthermal neutrino spectral distortions. Our results reveal how asymmetries in energy and entropy density uniquely evolve for different transport processes and neutrino flavors. The enhanced distortions in the neutrino spectra alter the expected big bang nucleosynthesis light element abundance yields relative to those in the standard Fermi-Dirac neutrino distribution cases. These yields, sensitive to the shapes of the neutrino energy spectra, are also sensitive to the phasing of the growth of distortions and entropy flow with time/scale factor. We analyze these issues and speculate on new sensitivity limits of deuterium and helium to lepton number.

  1. Oligonuclear molecular models of intermetallic phases: a case study on [Pd2Zn6Ga2(Cp*)5(CH3)3].

    PubMed

    Bollermann, Timo; Molon, Mariusz; Gemel, Christian; Freitag, Kerstin; Seidel, Rüdiger W; von Hopffgarten, Moritz; Jerabek, Paul; Frenking, Gernot; Fischer, Roland A

    2012-04-16

    The synthesis, characterization, and theoretical investigation by means of quantum-chemical calculations of an oligonuclear metal-rich compound are presented. The reaction of homoleptic dinuclear palladium compound [Pd(2)(μ-GaCp*)(3)(GaCp*)(2)] with ZnMe(2) resulted in the formation of unprecedented ternary Pd/Ga/Zn compound [Pd(2)Zn(6)Ga(2)(Cp*)(5)(CH(3))(3)] (1), which was analyzed by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, MS, elemental analysis, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 consisted of two C(s)-symmetric molecular isomers, as revealed by NMR spectroscopy, at which distinct site-preferences related to the Ga and Zn positions were observed by quantum-chemical calculations. Structural characterization of compound 1 showed significantly different coordination environments for both palladium centers. Whilst one Pd atom sat in the central of a bi-capped trigonal prism, thereby resulting in a formal 18-valence electron fragment, {Pd(ZnMe)(2)(ZnCp*)(4)(GaMe)}, the other Pd atom occupied one capping unit, thereby resulting in a highly unsaturated 12-valence electron fragment, {Pd(GaCp*)}. The bonding situation, as determined by atoms-in-molecules analysis (AIM), NBO partial charges, and molecular orbital (MO) analysis, pointed out that significant Pd-Pd interactions had a large stake in the stabilization of this unusual molecule. The characterization and quantum-chemical calculations of compound 1 revealed distinct similarities to related M/Zn/Ga Hume-Rothery intermetallic solid-state compounds, such as Ga/Zn-exchange reactions, the site-preferences of the Zn/Ga positions, and direct M-M bonding, which contributes to the overall stability of the metal-rich compound.

  2. Semileptonic and leptonic B decays, circa 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricciardi, Giulia

    2017-02-01

    We summarize the status of semileptonic and leptonic B decays, including |Vcb| and |Vub| exclusive and inclusive determinations, decays to excited states of the charm meson spectrum and decays into τ leptons.

  3. Status of Heavy-lepton Searches

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Perl, M. L.

    1981-06-01

    Searches for heavy leptons using e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation, lepton-hadron collisions, photon-hadron collisions, hadron-hadron collisions, and studies of macroscopic matter are reviewed. The present experimental status and future possibilities are summarized.

  4. Status of heavy-lepton searches

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1981-06-01

    Searches for heavy leptons using e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation, lepton-hadron collisions, photon-hadron collisions, hadron-hadron collisions, and studies of macroscopic matter are reviewed. The present experimental status and future possibilities are summarized.

  5. Exploring CP violation in the MSSM.

    PubMed

    Arbey, Alexandre; Ellis, John; Godbole, Rohini M; Mahmoudi, Farvah

    We explore the prospects for observing CP violation in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM) with six CP-violating parameters, three gaugino mass phases and three phases in trilinear soft supersymmetry-breaking parameters, using the CPsuperH code combined with a geometric approach to maximise CP-violating observables subject to the experimental upper bounds on electric dipole moments. We also implement CP-conserving constraints from Higgs physics, flavour physics and the upper limits on the cosmological dark matter density and spin-independent scattering. We study possible values of observables within the constrained MSSM (CMSSM), the non-universal Higgs model (NUHM), the CPX scenario and a variant of the phenomenological MSSM (pMSSM). We find values of the CP-violating asymmetry [Formula: see text] in [Formula: see text] decay that may be as large as 3 %, so future measurements of [Formula: see text] may provide independent information about CP violation in the MSSM. We find that CP-violating MSSM contributions to the [Formula: see text] meson mass mixing term [Formula: see text] are in general below the present upper limit, which is dominated by theoretical uncertainties. If these could be reduced, [Formula: see text] could also provide an interesting and complementary constraint on the six CP-violating MSSM phases, enabling them all to be determined experimentally, in principle. We also find that CP violation in the [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] couplings can be quite large, and so may offer interesting prospects for future [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] colliders.

  6. Lepton and quark mixing patterns from finite flavor symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Chang-Yuan; Ding, Gui-Jun

    2015-11-01

    We perform a systematical and analytical study of lepton mixing which can be derived from the subgroups of S U (3 ) under the assumption that neutrinos are Dirac particles. We find that type D groups can predict lepton mixing patterns compatible with the experimental data at the 3 σ level. The lepton mixing matrix turns out to be of the trimaximal form, and the Dirac C P violating phase is trivial. Moreover, we extend the flavor symmetry to the quark sector. The Cabibbo mixing between the first two generations of quarks can be generated by type D groups. Since all the finite subgroups of U (3 ) that are not the subgroups of S U (3 ) have not been classified, an exhaustive scan over all finite discrete groups up to order 2000 is performed with the help of the computer algebra system gap. We find that only 90 (10) groups for Dirac (Majorana) neutrinos can generate the lepton mixing angles in the experimentally preferred ranges. The lepton mixing matrix is still the trimaximal pattern and the Dirac C P phase remains trivial. The smallest groups that lead to viable mixing angles are [162, 10], [162, 12], and [162, 14]. For quark flavor mixing, the correct order of magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements cannot be generated. Only the Cabibbo mixing is allowed even if we impose very loose constraints 0.1 ≤|Vu s|≤0.3 and |Vu b|≤|Vc b|<|Vu s|. The group Δ (6 ×72) can predict a Cabibbo angle θq=π /14 in good agreement with the best fit value. The observed Cabibbo mixing angle can easily be accommodated if the first two left-handed quark fields are assigned to a doublet. The groups that can give rise to both phenomenologically viable lepton mixing angles and acceptable Cabibbo angles are discussed, and the groups Δ (6 ×92), [648, 259], [648, 260], [648, 266], and Δ (6 ×142) are especially promising in the case of the triplet assignment for both quark and lepton sectors. The three groups [496, 19], [496, 21], and [496, 23] are interesting

  7. A novel experiment searching for the lepton flavour violating decay μ → eee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Niklaus

    2013-02-01

    Since the discovery of neutrino oscillations it is known that lepton flavour is not conserved. Lepton flavour violating processes in the charged lepton sector have so far however eluded detection; as they are heavily suppressed in the standard model of particle physics, an observation would be a clear signal for new physics and help to understand the source of neutrino masses and CP violation. We propose a novel experiment searching for the decay μ → eee with the aim of ultimately reaching a sensitivity of 10-16, an improvement by four orders of magnitude compared to previous experiments. The technologies enabling this step are thin high-voltage monolithic active pixel sensors for precise tracking at high rates with a minimum of material and scintillating fibres for high resolution time measurements.

  8. Lepton forward-backward asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Pain, R. ); DELPHI Collaboration,

    1992-02-01

    Results of Forward-Backward Asymmetries with Leptons measured at [ital Z][sup 0] energies are presented. Details of the analysis by the DELPHI Collaboration are given together with the most recent values of the peak Asymmetries for electrons, muons, and taus obtained by ALEPH, DELPHI, L3, and OPAL Collaborations at LEP.

  9. Review of tau lepton decays

    SciTech Connect

    Stoker, D.P.

    1991-07-01

    Measurements of the {tau} decay modes are reviewed and compared with the predictions of the Standard Model. While the agreement is generally good, the status of the 1-prong puzzle'' remains controversial and a discrepancy between the measured leptonic branching fractions and the {tau} lifetime persists. Prospects for precision measurements at a Tau-Charm Factory are also reviewed. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  10. Asymmetric dark matter and CP violating scatterings in a UV complete model

    SciTech Connect

    Baldes, Iason; Bell, Nicole F.; Millar, Alexander J.; Volkas, Raymond R.

    2015-10-21

    We explore possible asymmetric dark matter models using CP violating scatterings to generate an asymmetry. In particular, we introduce a new model, based on DM fields coupling to the SM Higgs and lepton doublets, a neutrino portal, and explore its UV completions. We study the CP violation and asymmetry formation of this model, to demonstrate that it is capable of producing the correct abundance of dark matter and the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry. Crucial to achieving this is the introduction of interactions which violate CP with a T{sup 2} dependence.

  11. Asymmetric dark matter and CP violating scatterings in a UV complete model

    SciTech Connect

    Baldes, Iason; Bell, Nicole F.; Millar, Alexander J.; Volkas, Raymond R. E-mail: n.bell@unimelb.edu.au E-mail: raymondv@unimelb.edu.au

    2015-10-01

    We explore possible asymmetric dark matter models using CP violating scatterings to generate an asymmetry. In particular, we introduce a new model, based on DM fields coupling to the SM Higgs and lepton doublets, a neutrino portal, and explore its UV completions. We study the CP violation and asymmetry formation of this model, to demonstrate that it is capable of producing the correct abundance of dark matter and the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry. Crucial to achieving this is the introduction of interactions which violate CP with a T{sup 2} dependence.

  12. CP-sensitive spin-spin correlations in neutralino production at the ILC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartl, A.; Hohenwarter-Sodek, K.; Kernreiter, T.; Kittel, O.; Terwort, M.

    2009-07-01

    We study the CP-violating terms of the spin-spin correlations in neutralino production and their subsequent two-body decays into sleptons plus leptons at the ILC. We analyze CP-sensitive observables with the help of T-odd products of the spin-spin terms. These terms depend on the polarizations of both neutralinos, with one polarization perpendicular to the production plane. We present a detailed numerical study of the CP-sensitive observables, cross sections, and neutralino branching ratios in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model with complex parameters.

  13. Implications of δCP = ‑90∘ towards determining hierarchy and octant at T2K and T2K-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Monojit; Goswami, Srubabati; Raut, Sushant K.

    2017-02-01

    The T2K experiment has provided the first hint for the best-fit value for the leptonic CP phase δCP ˜‑ 90∘ from neutrino data. This is now corroborated by the NOνA neutrino runs. We study the implications for neutrino mass hierarchy and octant of 𝜃23 in the context of this data assuming that the true value of δCP in nature is ‑ 90∘. Based on simple arguments on degeneracies in the probabilities, we show that a clear signal of δCP = ‑90∘ coming from T2K neutrino (antineutrino) data is only possible if the true hierarchy is normal and the true octant is higher (lower). Thus, if the T2K neutrino and antineutrino data are fitted separately and both give the true value of δCP = ‑90∘, this will imply that nature has chosen the true hierarchy to be normal and 𝜃23 ≈ 45∘. However, we find that the combined fit of neutrino and antineutrino data will still point to true hierarchy as normal but the octant of 𝜃23 will remain undetermined. We do our analysis for both, the current projected exposure (7.8 × 1021 pot) and planned extended exposure (20 × 1021 pot). We also present the CP discovery potential of T2K emphasizing on the role of antineutrinos. We find that one of the main contributions of the antineutrino data is to remove the degenerate solutions with the wrong octant. Thus, the antineutrino run plays a more significant role for those hierarchy-octant combinations for which this degeneracy is present. If this degeneracy is absent, then only neutrino run gives a better result for fixed 𝜃13. However, if we marginalize over 𝜃13 then, sensitivity corresponding to mixed run can be better than pure neutrino run.

  14. Lepton-flavor violating mediators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galon, Iftah; Kwa, Anna; Tanedo, Philip

    2017-03-01

    We present a framework where dark matter interacts with the Standard Model through a light, spin-0 mediator that couples chirally to pairs of different-flavor leptons. This flavor violating final state weakens bounds on new physics coupled to leptons from terrestrial experiments and cosmic-ray measurements. As an example, we apply this framework to construct a model for the Fermi-LAT excess of GeV γ-rays from the galactic center. We comment on the viability of this portal for self-interacting dark matter explanations of small scale structure anomalies and embeddings in flavor models. Models of this type are shown to be compatible with the muon anomalous magnetic moment anomaly. We review current experimental constraints and identify possible future theoretical and experimental directions.

  15. Lepton flavor violating quarkonium decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazard, Derek E.; Petrov, Alexey A.

    2016-10-01

    We argue that lepton flavor violating (LFV) decays M →ℓ1ℓ¯ 2 of quarkonium states M with different quantum numbers could be used to put constraints on the Wilson coefficients of effective operators describing LFV interactions at low energy scales. We note that restricted kinematics of the two-body quarkonium decays allows us to select operators with particular quantum numbers, significantly reducing the reliance on the single operator dominance assumption that is prevalent in constraining parameters of the effective LFV Lagrangian. We shall also argue that studies of radiative lepton flavor violating M →γ ℓ1ℓ¯ 2 decays could provide important complementary access to those effective operators.

  16. CP Violation in B Meson Decays: Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Lanceri, Livio; /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste

    2005-08-30

    CP violation is intimately connected with the puzzle of matter-antimatter asymmetry and baryogenesis. In the Standard Model of particle physics, the observed CP violation phenomena are accounted for by the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa mechanism involving a phase in the quark mixing matrix. This paper is devoted to a review of the experimental status of CP violation in the decays of B mesons.

  17. New observables for $CP$ violation in Higgs decays

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Yi; Falkowski, Adam; Low, Ian; ...

    2014-12-09

    Current experimental data on the 125 GeV Higgs boson still allow room for large $CP$ violation. The observables usually considered in this context are triple product asymmetries, which require an input of four visible particles after imposing momentum conservation. Here, we point out a new class of $CP$ -violating observables in Higgs physics which require only three reconstructed momenta. They may arise if the process involves an interference of amplitudes with different intermediate particles, which provide distinct “strong phases” in the form of the Breit-Wigner widths, in addition to possible “weak phases” that arise from $CP$ -violating couplings of themore » Higgs in the Lagrangian. As an example, we propose a forward-backward asymmetry of the charged lepton in the three-body Higgs decay, h → ℓ $-$ ℓ + γ , as a probe for $CP$ -violating Higgs couplings to Zγ and γγ pairs. In conclusion, we also discuss other processes exhibiting this type of $CP$ violation.« less

  18. New observables for $CP$ violation in Higgs decays

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yi; Falkowski, Adam; Low, Ian; Vega-Morales, Roberto O.

    2014-12-09

    Current experimental data on the 125 GeV Higgs boson still allow room for large $CP$ violation. The observables usually considered in this context are triple product asymmetries, which require an input of four visible particles after imposing momentum conservation. Here, we point out a new class of $CP$ -violating observables in Higgs physics which require only three reconstructed momenta. They may arise if the process involves an interference of amplitudes with different intermediate particles, which provide distinct “strong phases” in the form of the Breit-Wigner widths, in addition to possible “weak phases” that arise from $CP$ -violating couplings of the Higgs in the Lagrangian. As an example, we propose a forward-backward asymmetry of the charged lepton in the three-body Higgs decay, h → ℓ $-$+ γ , as a probe for $CP$ -violating Higgs couplings to Zγ and γγ pairs. In conclusion, we also discuss other processes exhibiting this type of $CP$ violation.

  19. Measurement of the CP-violating phase βsJ/ψΦ in Bs0→J/ψΦ decays with the CDF II detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Dell’Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Soha, A.; Sorin, V.; Song, H.; Squillacioti, P.; Stancari, M.; Denis, R. St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Varganov, A.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. L.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Wick, F.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2012-04-23

    We present a measurement of the CP-violating parameter βsJ/ψΦ using approximately 6500 B0s→J/ψΦ decays reconstructed with the CDF II detector in a sample of pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV corresponding to 5.2 fb⁻¹ integrated luminosity produced by the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. We find the CP-violating phase to be within the range βsJ/ψΦϵ [0.02,0.52]∪[1.08,1.55] at 68% confidence level where the coverage property of the quoted interval is guaranteed using a frequentist statistical analysis. This result is in agreement with the standard model expectation at the level of about one Gaussian standard deviation. We consider the inclusion of a potential S-wave contribution to the B0s→J/ψK⁺K⁻ final state which is found to be negligible over the mass interval 1.009CP-violating phase βsJ/ψΦ, we find the B0s decay width difference to be ΔΓs=0.075±0.035(stat)±0.006(syst) ps⁻¹. We also present the most precise measurements of the B0s mean lifetime τ(B0s)=1.529±0.025(stat)±0.012(syst) ps, the polarization fractions |A0(0)|²=0.524±0.013(stat)±0.015(syst) and |A II (0)|²=0.231±0.014(stat)±0.015(syst), as well as the strong phase δ=2.95±0.64(stat)±0.07(syst) rad. In addition, we report an alternative Bayesian analysis that gives results consistent with the frequentist approach.

  20. Measurement of the CP-violating phase phi sJ/psi phi using the flavor-tagged decay Bs(0) -> J/psi phi in 8 fb(-1) of p(p)over-bar collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; et al.

    2012-02-22

    We report an updated measurement of the CP-violating phase, {phi}{sub s}{sup J/{psi}{phi}} and the decay-width difference for the two mass eigenstates, {Delta}{Gamma}{sub s}, from the flavor-tagged decay B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 8.0 fb{sup -1} accumulated with the D0 detector using p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The 68% Bayesian credibility intervals, including systematic uncertainties, are {Delta}{Gamma}{sub s} = 0.163{sub -0.064}{sup +0.065} ps{sup -1} and {phi}{sub s}{sup J}/{psi}{phi} = -0.55{sub -0.36}{sup +0.38}. The p-value for the Standard Model point is 29.8%.

  1. Measurement of the CP-violating phase ΦsJ/ψΦ using the flavor-tagged decay Bs0→J/ ψΦ in 8 fb⁻¹ of pp̄ collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; ...

    2012-02-22

    We report an updated measurement of the CP-violating phase, ΦsJ/ψΦ, and the decay-width difference for the two mass eigenstates, ΔΓs, from the flavor-tagged decay B0s→J/ψΦ. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 8.0 fb⁻¹ accumulated with the D0 detector using pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The 68% Bayesian credibility intervals, including systematic uncertainties, are ΔΓs=0.163+0.065₋0.064 ps⁻¹ and ΦsJ/ψΦ=₋0.55+0.38₋0.36. The p-value for the Standard Model point is 29.8%.

  2. Measurement of the CP-violating phase ϕ s and the B s 0 meson decay width difference with B s 0 → J/ ψϕ decays in ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.

    2016-08-01

    A measurement of the B s 0 decay parameters in the B s 0 → J/ ψϕ channel using an integrated luminosity of 14.3 fb-1 collected by the ATLAS detector from 8 TeV pp collisions at the LHC is presented. The measured parameters include the CP -violating phase ϕ s , the decay width Γ s and the width difference between the mass eigenstates ΔΓ s . The values measured for the physical parameters are statistically combined with those from 4.9 fb-1 of 7 TeV data, leading to the following: {φ}_s=-0.090± 0.078(stat.)± 0.041(syst.)rad Δ {Γ}_s=0.085± 0.011(stat.)± 0.007(syst.){ps}^{-1} {Γ}_s=0.675± 0.003(stat.)± 0.003(syst.){ps}^{-1}.

  3. TOPOLOGICAL ELECTROMAGNETISM FOR QUARKS AND LEPTONS

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, G.F.; Poenaru, V.

    1980-04-01

    As outgrowth of a topological bootstrap theory of strong interactions and precursor to a corresponding theory of weak interactions, we propose a representation of electromagnetic interactions for "elementary" hadrons and leptons through combinatorial topology. The representation supports the prediction of four lepton doublets.

  4. Baryon and lepton violation in astrophysics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, E. W.

    The cosmological and astrophysical significance of baryon and lepton number violating process is the subject of this paper. The possibility of baryon-number violating processes in the electroweak transition in the early universe is reviewed. The implications of lepton-number violation via Nambu-Goldstone bosons are discussed in detail.

  5. Physics with tau leptons at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, C.P.; /Oxford U.

    2007-04-01

    The {radical}s = 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collisions produced by the Tevatron result in many processes with tau leptons in the final state. The CDF Collaboration has studied these final states in Z and t{bar t} production, and has used tau leptons to search for evidence of Higgs, sparticle, and Z{prime} production.

  6. Quantum dissipation and CP violation in MINOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, R. L. N.; Guzzo, M. M.; de Holanda, P. C.

    2014-03-01

    We use the open quantum systems framework to analyze the MINOS data and perform this analysis considering two different dissipative models. In the first model, the dissipative parameter describes the decoherence effect and in the second, the dissipative parameter describes other dissipative effects including decoherence. With the second model it is possible to study CP violation since we consider Majorana neutrinos. The analysis from the muon neutrino and antineutrino beam assigns different values to all the parameters of the models, but is consistent between them. Assuming that neutrinos are equivalent to antineutrinos, the global analysis presents a nonvanishing Majorana CP phase depending on the energetic parametrization of the dissipative parameter.

  7. CP Violation Measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Mark .R.J.; /Lancaster U.

    2010-07-09

    The two colliding beam experiments at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, CDF and D0, continue to publish world-leading measurements of CP Violation parameters in the B meson sector. I will present several recent results from both experiments, including measurements of direct CP violating parameters in decays of B{sup +}{sub u}, B{sup 0}{sub d} and B{sup 0}{sub s} mesons; a new D0 measurement of a{sup s}{sub sl} using time-dependent analysis of B{sub s} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu}D{sup -}{sub s}X decays; and the latest Tevatron combination of the CP violating phase {beta}{sub s}, measured in the 'golden mode' B{sub s} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}.

  8. CP-safe gravity mediation and muon g - 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Sho; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.; Yokozaki, Norimi

    2015-07-01

    We propose a CP-safe minimal supersymmetric (SUSY) standard model in gravity mediation, where the phases of the Higgs B parameter, scalar trilinear couplings, and gaugino mass parameters are all aligned. Since all dangerous CP-violating phases are suppressed, we are now safe to consider low-energy SUSY scenarios under the assumption that the SUSY flavor-changing neutral current problem is solved. As an application, we consider a gravity mediation model explaining the observed muon g-2 anomaly. The CP-safe property originates in two simple assumptions: SUSY breaking in the Kähler potential and the shift symmetry of a SUSY-breaking field Z. As a result of the shift symmetry, the imaginary part of Z behaves as a QCD (quantum chromodynamics) axion, leading to an intriguing possibility: the strong CP problem in QCD and the SUSY CP problem are solved simultaneously.

  9. Alternative schemes of predicting lepton mixing parameters from discrete flavor and C P symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jun-Nan; Ding, Gui-Jun

    2017-01-01

    We suggest two alternative schemes to predict lepton mixing angles as well as C P violating phases from a discrete flavor symmetry group combined with C P symmetry. In the first scenario, the flavor and C P symmetry is broken to the residual groups of the structure Z2×C P in the neutrino and charged lepton sectors. The resulting lepton mixing matrix depends on two free parameters θν and θl. This type of breaking pattern is extended to the quark sector. In the second scenario, an Abelian subgroup of the flavor group is preserved by the charged lepton mass matrix and the neutrino mass matrix is invariant under a single remnant C P transformation, all lepton mixing parameters are determined in terms of three free parameters θ1 ,2 ,3. We derive the most general criterion to determine whether two distinct residual symmetries lead to the same mixing pattern if the redefinition of the free parameters θν ,l and θ1 ,2 ,3 is taken into account. We have studied the lepton mixing patterns arising from the flavor group S4 and C P symmetry which are subsequently broken to all of the possible residual symmetries discussed in this work.

  10. Electroweak baryogenesis and standard model CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huet, Patrick; Sather, Eric

    1995-01-01

    We analyze the mechanism of electroweak baryogenesis proposed by Farrar and Shaposhnikov in which the phase of the CKM mixing matrix is the only source of CP violation. This mechanism is based on a phase separation of baryons via the scattering of quasiparticles by the wall of an expanding bubble produced at the electroweak phase transition. In agreement with the recent work of Gavela, Hernández, Orloff, and Pène, we conclude the QCD damping effects reduce the asymmetry produced to a negligible amount. We interpret the damping as quantum decoherence. We compute the asymmetry analytically. Our analysis reflects the observation that only a thin, outer layer of the bubble contributes to the coherent scattering of the quasiparticles. The generality of our arguments rules out any mechanism of electroweak baryogenesis that does not make use of a new source of CP violation.

  11. Lepton mixing patterns from combinations of elementary correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Shu-jun

    2016-01-01

    Recent data of reactor neutrino experiments set more stringent constraints on leptonic mixing patterns. We examine all possible patterns on the basis of combinations of elementary correlations of elements of leptonic mixing matrix. We obtain 62 viable mixing patters at 3 σ level of mixing parameters. Most of these patterns can be paired via the μ -τ interchange which changes the octant of θ23 and the sign of cos δ . All viable patterns can be classified into two groups: the perturbative patterns and nonperturbative patterns. The former can be obtained from perturbing tri-bimaximal mixing. The latter cannot be obtained from perturbing any mixing pattern whose θ13 is zero. Different predictions of Dirac C P phase δ of these two types of mixing patterns are discussed. Evolutions of mass matrices of neutrinos with small mixing parameters are discussed via special mixing patterns on the basis of flavor groups. In general cases, a small variation of sin θ13 may bring about large modifications to alignment of vacuum expectation values in a mixing model. Therefore, small but nonzero sin θ13 brings a severer challenge to leptonic mixing models on the basis of flavor groups than usual views.

  12. Design of a Novel Electromagnet for an Experimental Search for CP Violation in ortho-Positronium Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Gulden; Henning, Reyco; Bartram, Chelsea; Murphy, Jake

    2016-09-01

    Observation of CP-violation in the lepton sector can help explain the matter-antimatter asymmetry in our universe. CALIOPE, or CP Aberrant Leptons in ortho-Positronium Experiment, is a proposed experiment which aims to measure CP violating angular correlations in the gamma-rays emitted in the decay of ortho-Positronium. This experiment will use an existing barrel array of NaI detectors located at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL). It will improve over previous searches by increasing angular coverage and systematics. In this talk we will focus the design of the novel electromagnet that will be used in this experiment. This electromagnet design is one of several proposed improvements to decrease the systematics effects of earlier experiments. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1144081.

  13. Lepton number violation in 331 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, Renato M.; Hirsch, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Different models based on the extended S U (3 )C×S U (3 )L×U (1 )X (331) gauge group have been proposed over the past four decades. Yet, despite being an active research topic, the status of lepton number in 331 models has not been fully addressed in the literature, and furthermore many of the original proposals can not explain the observed neutrino masses. In this paper we review the basic features of various 331 models, focusing on potential sources of lepton number violation. We then describe different modifications which can be made to the original models in order to accommodate neutrino (and charged lepton) masses.

  14. New Ambiguity in Probing CP Violation in Neutrino Oscillations.

    PubMed

    Miranda, O G; Tórtola, M; Valle, J W F

    2016-08-05

    If neutrinos get mass via the seesaw mechanism the mixing matrix describing neutrino oscillations can be effectively nonunitary. We show that in this case the neutrino appearance probabilities involve a new CP phase ϕ associated with nonunitarity. This leads to an ambiguity in extracting the "standard" three-neutrino phase δ_{CP}, which can survive even after neutrino and antineutrino channels are combined. Its existence should be taken into account in the planning of any oscillation experiment aiming at a robust measurement of δ_{CP}.

  15. Averages of $b$-hadron, $c$-hadron, and $\\tau$-lepton properties as of summer 2016

    SciTech Connect

    Amhis, Y.; et al.

    2016-12-21

    This article reports world averages of measurements of $b$-hadron, $c$-hadron, and $\\tau$-lepton properties obtained by the Heavy Flavor Averaging Group (HFAG) using results available through summer 2016. For the averaging, common input parameters used in the various analyses are adjusted (rescaled) to common values, and known correlations are taken into account. The averages include branching fractions, lifetimes, neutral meson mixing parameters, \\CP~violation parameters, parameters of semileptonic decays and CKM matrix elements.

  16. Averages of $b$-hadron, $c$-hadron, and $\\tau$-lepton properties as of summer 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Amhis, Y.; et al.

    2014-12-23

    This article reports world averages of measurements of $b$-hadron, $c$-hadron, and $\\tau$-lepton properties obtained by the Heavy Flavor Averaging Group (HFAG) using results available through summer 2014. For the averaging, common input parameters used in the various analyses are adjusted (rescaled) to common values, and known correlations are taken into account. The averages include branching fractions, lifetimes, neutral meson mixing parameters, $CP$ violation parameters, parameters of semileptonic decays and CKM matrix elements.

  17. CP violation in h → ττ and LFV h → μτ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayreter, Alper; He, Xiao-Gang; Valencia, German

    2016-09-01

    The CMS Collaboration has reported a possible lepton flavor violating (LFV) signal h → μτ. Whereas this does not happen in the standard model (SM), we point out that new physics responsible for this type of decay would, in general, also produce charge-parity (CP) violation in h → ττ. We estimate the size of this effect in a model independent manner and find that a large asymmetry, of order 25%, is allowed by current constraints.

  18. Search for Lepton-Flavor and Lepton-Number Violation in the Decay tau to lhh'

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U. /Yale U. /Yale U.

    2005-06-29

    A search for lepton-flavor and lepton-number violation in the decay of the tau lepton into one charged lepton and two charged hadrons is performed using 221.4 fb{sup -1} of data collected at an e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage ring. In all 14 decay modes considered, the observed data are compatible with background expectations, and upper limits are set in the range {Beta}({tau} {yields} {ell}hh') < (0.7-4.8) x 10{sup -7} at 90% confidence level.

  19. Revisiting Lepton Flavor Universality in B Decays.

    PubMed

    Feruglio, Ferruccio; Paradisi, Paride; Pattori, Andrea

    2017-01-06

    Lepton flavor universality (LFU) in B decays is revisited by considering a class of semileptonic operators defined at a scale Λ above the electroweak scale v. The importance of quantum effects, so far neglected in the literature, is emphasized. We construct the low-energy effective Lagrangian taking into account the running effects from Λ down to v through the one-loop renormalization group equations (RGEs) in the limit of exact electroweak symmetry and QED RGEs from v down to the 1 GeV scale. The most important quantum effects turn out to be the modification of the leptonic couplings of the vector boson Z and the generation of a purely leptonic effective Lagrangian. Large LFU breaking effects in Z and τ decays and visible lepton flavor violating effects in the processes τ→μℓℓ, τ→μρ, τ→μπ, and τ→μη^{(')} are induced.

  20. Fourth lepton family is natural in technicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Frandsen, Mads T.; Masina, Isabella; Sannino, Francesco

    2010-02-01

    Imagine discovering a new fourth family of leptons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) but no signs of an associated fourth family of quarks. What would that imply? An intriguing possibility is that the new fermions needed to compensate for the new leptons gauge anomalies simultaneously address the big hierarchy problem of the standard model. A natural way to accomplish such a scenario is to have the Higgs itself be a composite of these new fermions. This is the setup we are going to investigate in this paper using as a template minimal walking technicolor. We analyze a general heavy neutrino mass structure with and without mixing with the standard model families. We also analyze the LHC potential to observe the fourth lepton family in tandem with the new composite Higgs dynamics. We finally introduce a model uniting the fourth lepton family and the technifermion sector at higher energies.

  1. The. tau. -lepton and its associated neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Pich, A. )

    1990-10-10

    This paper discusses the {tau}-lepton and the prospects for future improvements. It is shown how a better understanding of the {tau} properties could be used for testing fundamental aspects of the electroweak and strong interactions.

  2. Revisiting Lepton Flavor Universality in B Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feruglio, Ferruccio; Paradisi, Paride; Pattori, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Lepton flavor universality (LFU) in B decays is revisited by considering a class of semileptonic operators defined at a scale Λ above the electroweak scale v . The importance of quantum effects, so far neglected in the literature, is emphasized. We construct the low-energy effective Lagrangian taking into account the running effects from Λ down to v through the one-loop renormalization group equations (RGEs) in the limit of exact electroweak symmetry and QED RGEs from v down to the 1 GeV scale. The most important quantum effects turn out to be the modification of the leptonic couplings of the vector boson Z and the generation of a purely leptonic effective Lagrangian. Large LFU breaking effects in Z and τ decays and visible lepton flavor violating effects in the processes τ →μ ℓℓ, τ →μ ρ , τ →μ π , and τ →μ η(') are induced.

  3. Leptophilic Dark Matter from the Lepton Asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Timothy; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2010-03-01

    We present a model of weak scale dark matter (DM) where the thermal DM density is set by the lepton asymmetry due to the presence of higher dimension lepton violating operators. In these models there is generically a separation between the annihilation cross section responsible for the relic abundance (through lepton violating operators) and the annihilation cross section that is relevant for the indirect detection of DM (through lepton preserving operators). This implies a perceived boost in the annihilation cross section in the Galaxy today relative to that derived for canonical thermal freeze-out, giving a natural explanation for the observed cosmic ray electron and positron excesses, without resorting to a Sommerfeld enhancement. These models motivate continued searches for DM with apparently nonthermal annihilation cross sections. The DM may also play a role in radiatively generating Majorana neutrino masses.

  4. Quarkonia production with leptons and hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    V. Papadimitriou

    2004-06-09

    We discuss current issues and present the latest measurements on quarkonia production from experiments monitoring hadron-hadron and lepton-hadron collisions. These measurements include cross section and polarization results for charmonium and bottomonium states.

  5. Liposomal SLA co-incorporated with PO CpG ODNs or PS CpG ODNs induce the same protection against the murine model of leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Shargh, Vahid Heravi; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza; Khamesipour, Ali; Jaafari, Iman; Jalali, Seyed Amir; Abbasi, Azam; Badiee, Ali

    2012-06-06

    First generation Leishmania vaccines consisting of whole killed parasites with or without adjuvants have reached phase 3 trial and failed to show enough efficacy mainly due to the lack of an appropriate adjuvant. In this study, the nuclease-resistant phosphorothioate CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (PS CpG) or nuclease-sensitive phosphodiester CpG ODNs (PO CpG) were used as adjuvants to enhance immunogenicity and rate of protection against leishmaniasis. Due to the susceptibility of PO CpG to nuclease degradation, an efficient liposomal delivery system was developed to protect them from degradation. 1, 2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) as a cationic lipid was used because of its unique adjuvanticity and electrostatic interaction with negatively charged CpG ODNs. To evaluate the role of liposomal formulation in protection rate and enhanced immune response, BALB/c mice were immunized subcutaneously with liposomal soluble Leishmania antigens (SLA) co-incorporated with PO CpG (Lip-SLA-PO CpG), Lip-SLA-PS CpG, SLA+PO CpG, SLA+PS CpG, SLA or buffer. As criteria for protection, footpad swelling at the site of challenge, parasite loads, the levels of IFN-γ and IL-4, and the IgG subtypes were evaluated. The groups of mice receiving Lip-SLA-PO CpG or Lip-SLA-PS CpG showed a high protection rate compared with the control groups. In addition, there was no significant difference in immune response generation between mice immunized with PS CpG and the group receiving PO CpG when incorporated into the liposomes. The results suggested that liposomal form of PO CpG might be used instead of PS CpG in future vaccine formulations as an efficient adjuvant.

  6. CP Violation and the Matter Anti-Matter Asymmetry of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahn, Robert

    2012-02-01

    There is no scientific question more fundamental than ``Why are we here?'' or as we physicists might phrase it ``Why is there more matter than anti-matter?'' Because, as Andrei Sakharov first showed, CP violation is necessary to any explanation of the matter anti-matter asymmetry, CP violation is the focus of much of the international experimental program in particle physics. CP conservation was what could be salvaged after parity was overthrown in 1956, but it survived only until 1964 when K mesons were found not to respect it. While parity violation was a large effect in weak interactions, CP violation seemed small and confined to the kaons. When the Standard Model of particle physics emerged in early 1970's, Kobayashi and Maskawa observed that if there were three families of quarks, CP violation would arise quite naturally. The Standard Model suggested that CP violation could be large in decays of B mesons. Nonetheless, no matter what parameters are used in the Standard Model, CP violation among quarks cannot be large enough to explain the matter anti-matter asymmetry. Major experiments in the U.S. and Japan were undertaken to explore CP violation in B mesons to search for signs of CP violation outside the Standard Model, which might explain the dominance of matter over anti-matter. Neither experiment found such a discrepancy, but new programs will continue this search with much higher statistics. While the three families of leptons are in many ways analogous to the three families of quarks, the neutrinos have a unique character. As neutral particles, it is possible that they are their own antiparticles. If this is so, there may be additional, very heavy, neutrinos beyond those we know already. If they violate CP they may be the source of the matter anti-matter asymmetry. But do neutrinos experience CP violation? Experiments around the world are just now setting out to answer this question.

  7. Probing SUSY CP violation in two-body stop decays at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deppisch, Frank F.; Kittel, Olaf

    2009-09-01

    We study CP asymmetries in two-body decays of top squarks into neutralinos and sleptons at the LHC. These asymmetries are used to probe the CP phases possibly present in the stop and neutralino sector of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. Taking into account bounds from experimental electric dipole moment searches, we identify areas in the mSUGRA parameter space where CP asymmetries can be sizeable and discuss the feasibility of their observation at the LHC. As a result, potentially detectable CP asymmetries in stop decays at the LHC are found, motivating further detailed experimental studies for probing SUSY CP phases.

  8. The Tau Lepton and the Search for New Elementary Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, Martin L.

    1998-11-18

    This Fifth International WEIN Symposium is devoted to physics beyond the standard model. This talk is about tau lepton physics, but I begin with the question: do we know how to find new physics in the world of elementary particles? This question is interwoven with the various tau physics topics. These topics are: searching for unexpected tau decay modes; searching for additional tau decay mechanisms; radiative tau decays; tau decay modes of the W, B, and D; decay of the Z{sup 0} to tau pairs; searching for CP violation in tau decay; the tau neutrino, dreams and odd ideas in tau physics; and tau research facilities in the next decades.

  9. The MOMENT to search for CP violation

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias; Coloma, Pilar; Fernández-Martinez, Enrique

    2016-03-30

    In this letter, we analyze for the first time the physics reach in terms of sensitivity to leptonic CP violation of the proposed MuOn-decay MEdium baseline NeuTrino beam (MOMENT) experiment, a novel neutrino oscillation facility that would operate with neutrinos from muon decay. Apart from obtaining a sufficiently intense flux, the bottlenecks to the physics reach of this experiment will be achieving a high enough suppression of the atmospheric background and, particularly, attaining a sufficient level of charge identification. We thus present our results as a function of these two factors. We consider a very massive Gd-doped Water Cherenkov detector. We also find that MOMENT will be competitive with other currently planned future oscillation experiments if a charge identification of at least 80 % can be achieved at the same time that the atmospheric background can be suppressed by at least a factor of ten. We also find a large synergy of MOMENT with the current generation of neutrino oscillation experiments, T2K and NOvA, which significantly enhances its final sensitivity.

  10. The MOMENT to search for CP violation

    DOE PAGES

    Blennow, Mattias; Coloma, Pilar; Fernández-Martinez, Enrique

    2016-03-30

    In this letter, we analyze for the first time the physics reach in terms of sensitivity to leptonic CP violation of the proposed MuOn-decay MEdium baseline NeuTrino beam (MOMENT) experiment, a novel neutrino oscillation facility that would operate with neutrinos from muon decay. Apart from obtaining a sufficiently intense flux, the bottlenecks to the physics reach of this experiment will be achieving a high enough suppression of the atmospheric background and, particularly, attaining a sufficient level of charge identification. We thus present our results as a function of these two factors. We consider a very massive Gd-doped Water Cherenkov detector.more » We also find that MOMENT will be competitive with other currently planned future oscillation experiments if a charge identification of at least 80 % can be achieved at the same time that the atmospheric background can be suppressed by at least a factor of ten. We also find a large synergy of MOMENT with the current generation of neutrino oscillation experiments, T2K and NOvA, which significantly enhances its final sensitivity.« less

  11. Phase I study of tremelimumab (CP-675 206) plus PF-3512676 (CPG 7909) in patients with melanoma or advanced solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Millward, M; Underhill, C; Lobb, S; McBurnie, J; Meech, S J; Gomez-Navarro, J; Marshall, M A; Huang, B; Mather, C B

    2013-01-01

    Background: Tremelimumab, a fully human cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 monoclonal antibody, and PF-3512676, a Toll-like receptor-9 agonist, are targeted immune modulators that elicit durable single-agent antitumour activity in advanced cancer. Methods: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of these agents combined during this phase I study, patients received intravenous tremelimumab (6.0, 10.0, or 15.0 mg kg−1) every 12 weeks plus subcutaneous PF-3512676 (0.05, 0.10, or 0.15 mg kg−1) weekly. Primary end points were safety and tolerability; secondary end points included pharmacokinetics and antitumour activity. Results: Twenty-one patients with stage IV melanoma (n=17) or advanced solid tumours (n=4) were enrolled. Injection-site reactions (n=21; 100%), influenza-like illness (n=18; 86%), and diarrhoea (n=13; 62%) were the most common treatment-related adverse events (TAEs). Grade ⩾3 TAEs were reported (n=7; 33%). Dose-limiting toxicities (prespecified 6-week observation) occurred in one of the six patients in the 10 mg kg−1 tremelimumab plus 0.05 mg kg−1 PF-3512676 cohort (grade 3 hypothalamopituitary disorder) and two of the six patients in the 15 mg kg−1 tremelimumab plus 0.05 mg kg−1 PF-3512676 cohort (grade 3 diarrhoea). Consequently, 15 mg kg−1 tremelimumab plus 0.05 mg kg−1 PF-3512676 exceeded the MTD. Two melanoma patients achieved durable (⩾170 days) partial response. No human antihuman antibody responses to tremelimumab were observed. Conclusion: Weekly PF-3512676 (⩽0.15 mg kg−1) plus tremelimumab (⩽10 mg kg−1 every 12 weeks) was tolerable. PMID:23652314

  12. CP violating scalar Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero-Cid, A.; Hernández-Sánchez, J.; Keus, V.; King, S. F.; Moretti, S.; Rojas, D.; Sokołowska, D.

    2016-12-01

    We study an extension of the Standard Model (SM) in which two copies of the SM scalar SU(2) doublet which do not acquire a Vacuum Expectation Value (VEV), and hence are inert, are added to the scalar sector. We allow for CP-violation in the inert sector, where the lightest inert state is protected from decaying to SM particles through the conservation of a Z 2 symmetry. The lightest neutral particle from the inert sector, which has a mixed CP-charge due to CP-violation, is hence a Dark Matter (DM) candidate. We discuss the new regions of DM relic density opened up by CP-violation, and compare our results to the CP-conserving limit and the Inert Doublet Model (IDM). We constrain the parameter space of the CP-violating model using recent results from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and DM direct and indirect detection experiments.

  13. CP violation in heavy MSSM Higgs scenarios

    DOE PAGES

    Carena, M.; Ellis, J.; Lee, J. S.; ...

    2016-02-18

    We introduce and explore new heavy Higgs scenarios in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) with explicit CP violation, which have important phenomenological implications that may be testable at the LHC. For soft supersymmetry-breaking scales MS above a few TeV and a charged Higgs boson mass MH+ above a few hundred GeV, new physics effects including those from explicit CP violation decouple from the light Higgs boson sector. However, such effects can significantly alter the phenomenology of the heavy Higgs bosons while still being consistent with constraints from low-energy observables, for instance electric dipole moments. To consider scenarios with amore » charged Higgs boson much heavier than the Standard Model (SM) particles but much lighter than the supersymmetric particles, we revisit previous calculations of the MSSM Higgs sector. We compute the Higgs boson masses in the presence of CP violating phases, implementing improved matching and renormalization-group (RG) effects, as well as two-loop RG effects from the effective two-Higgs Doublet Model (2HDM) scale MH± to the scale MS. Here, we illustrate the possibility of non-decoupling CP-violating effects in the heavy Higgs sector using new benchmark scenarios named.« less

  14. CP violation in heavy MSSM Higgs scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Carena, M.; Ellis, J.; Lee, J. S.; Pilaftsis, A.; Wagner, C. E. M.

    2016-02-18

    We introduce and explore new heavy Higgs scenarios in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) with explicit CP violation, which have important phenomenological implications that may be testable at the LHC. For soft supersymmetry-breaking scales MS above a few TeV and a charged Higgs boson mass MH+ above a few hundred GeV, new physics effects including those from explicit CP violation decouple from the light Higgs boson sector. However, such effects can significantly alter the phenomenology of the heavy Higgs bosons while still being consistent with constraints from low-energy observables, for instance electric dipole moments. To consider scenarios with a charged Higgs boson much heavier than the Standard Model (SM) particles but much lighter than the supersymmetric particles, we revisit previous calculations of the MSSM Higgs sector. We compute the Higgs boson masses in the presence of CP violating phases, implementing improved matching and renormalization-group (RG) effects, as well as two-loop RG effects from the effective two-Higgs Doublet Model (2HDM) scale MH± to the scale MS. Here, we illustrate the possibility of non-decoupling CP-violating effects in the heavy Higgs sector using new benchmark scenarios named.

  15. Observation of Z decays to four leptons with the CMS detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Wagner, P.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Gonzalez, J. Suarez; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Mohammadi, A.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Rios, A. A. Ocampo; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Garcia, J. M. Vizan; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Junior, M. Correa Martins; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Júnior, W. L. Aldá; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; De Souza, S. Fonseca; Figueiredo, D. Matos; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Da Silva, W. L. Prado; Santoro, A.; Jorge, L. Soares; Sznajder, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Moreno, B. Gomez; Oliveros, A. F. Osorio; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Kamel, A. Ellithi; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; de Monchenault, G. 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C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tosi, S.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Anagnostou, G.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Sprenger, D.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Caudron, J.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Kreuzer, P.; Lingemann, J.; Magass, C.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Olschewski, M.; Papacz, P.; Pieta, H.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Steggemann, J.; Teyssier, D.; Weber, M.; Bontenackels, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Ahmad, W. Haj; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Nowack, A.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Rennefeld, J.; Sauerland, P.; Stahl, A.; Martin, M. Aldaya; Behr, J.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Castro, E.; Costanza, F.; Dammann, D.; Pardos, C. Diez; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Flucke, G.; Geiser, A.; Glushkov, I.; Gunnellini, P.; Habib, S.; Hauk, J.; Hellwig, G.; Jung, H.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, H.; Knutsson, A.; Krämer, M.; Krücker, D.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lange, W.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Marienfeld, M.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Olzem, J.; Perrey, H.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Raspereza, A.; Cipriano, P. M. Ribeiro; Riedl, C.; Ron, E.; Rosin, M.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Sen, N.; Spiridonov, A.; Stein, M.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Autermann, C.; Blobel, V.; Draeger, J.; Enderle, H.; Erfle, J.; Gebbert, U.; Görner, M.; Hermanns, T.; Höing, R. S.; Kaschube, K.; Kaussen, G.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Lange, J.; Mura, B.; Nowak, F.; Peiffer, T.; Pietsch, N.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schröder, M.; Schum, T.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Thomsen, J.; Vanelderen, L.; Barth, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Guthoff, M.; Hackstein, C.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Heinrich, M.; Held, H.; Hoffmann, K. H.; Honc, S.; Katkov, I.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Pardo, P. Lobelle; Martschei, D.; Mueller, S.; Müller, Th.; Niegel, M.; Nürnberg, A.; Oberst, O.; Oehler, A.; Ott, J.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Ratnikova, N.; Röcker, S.; Scheurer, A.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schott, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Troendle, D.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Zeise, M.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Kesisoglou, S.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Manolakos, I.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Mavrommatis, C.; Ntomari, E.; Gouskos, L.; Mertzimekis, T. J.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Evangelou, I.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Patras, V.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Karancsi, J.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Bansal, M.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Dhingra, N.; Gupta, R.; Kaur, M.; Mehta, M. Z.; Nishu, N.; Saini, L. K.; Sharma, A.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Choudhury, R. K.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kumar, V.; Mehta, P.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Aziz, T.; Ganguly, S.; Guchait, M.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.; Arfaei, H.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Hashemi, M.; Hesari, H.; Jafari, A.; Khakzad, M.; Najafabadi, M. Mohammadi; Mehdiabadi, S. Paktinat; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Lusito, L.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pacifico, N.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Singh, G.; Venditti, R.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Meneghelli, M.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Odorici, F.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Frosali, S.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Colafranceschi, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Fabbricatore, P.; Musenich, R.; Benaglia, A.; De Guio, F.; Di Matteo, L.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Massironi, A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Sala, S.; de Fatis, T. Tabarelli; Buontempo, S.; Montoya, C. A. Carrillo; Cavallo, N.; De Cosa, A.; Dogangun, O.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellato, M.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dorigo, T.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Lazzizzera, I.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.; Zumerle, G.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Lucaroni, A.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Nappi, A.; Romeo, F.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Taroni, S.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Kraan, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Grassi, M.; Longo, E.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Sigamani, M.; Soffi, L.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Costa, M.; Demaria, N.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Mazza, G.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Pereira, A. Vilela; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; Marone, M.; Montanino, D.; Penzo, A.; Schizzi, A.; Heo, S. G.; Kim, T. Y.; Nam, S. K.; Chang, S.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kong, D. J.; Park, H.; Ro, S. R.; Son, D. C.; Son, T.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Zero J.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Lee, K. S.; Moon, D. H.; Park, S. K.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, C.; Park, I. C.; Park, S.; Ryu, G.; Cho, Y.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, M. S.; Kwon, E.; Lee, B.; Lee, J.; Lee, S.; Seo, H.; Yu, I.; Bilinskas, M. J.; Grigelionis, I.; Janulis, M.; Juodagalvis, A.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; La Cruz, I. Heredia-de; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Villalba, R. Magaña; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Villasenor-Cendejas, L. M.; Moreno, S. Carrillo; Valencia, F. Vazquez; Ibarguen, H. A. Salazar; Linares, E. Casimiro; Pineda, A. Morelos; Reyes-Santos, M. A.; Krofcheck, D.; Bell, A. J.; Butler, P. H.; Doesburg, R.; Reucroft, S.; Silverwood, H.; Ahmad, M.; Asghar, M. I.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khalid, S.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Qazi, S.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Gokieli, R.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Wrochna, G.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Almeida, N.; Bargassa, P.; David, A.; Faccioli, P.; Parracho, P. G. Ferreira; Gallinaro, M.; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Belotelov, I.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Kozlov, G.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Savina, M.; Shmatov, S.; Smirnov, V.; Volodko, A.; Zarubin, A.; Evstyukhin, S.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Matveev, V.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Erofeeva, M.; Gavrilov, V.; Kossov, M.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Markina, A.; Obraztsov, S.; Perfilov, M.; Petrushanko, S.; Popov, A.; Sarycheva, L.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Grishin, V.; Kachanov, V.; Konstantinov, D.; Korablev, A.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Djordjevic, M.; Ekmedzic, M.; Krpic, D.; Milosevic, J.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Maestre, J. Alcaraz; Arce, P.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Llatas, M. Chamizo; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Peris, A. Delgado; Vázquez, D. Domínguez; Bedoya, C. Fernandez; Ramos, J. P. Fernández; Ferrando, A.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Lopez, O. Gonzalez; Lopez, S. Goy; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Merino, G.; Pelayo, J. Puerta; Olmeda, A. Quintario; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Willmott, C.; Albajar, C.; Codispoti, G.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Menendez, J. Fernandez; Folgueras, S.; Caballero, I. Gonzalez; Iglesias, L. Lloret; Gomez, J. Piedra; Cifuentes, J. A. Brochero; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Chuang, S. H.; Campderros, J. Duarte; Felcini, M.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Sanchez, J. Gonzalez; Graziano, A.; Jorda, C.; Virto, A. Lopez; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Rivero, C. Martinez; Matorras, F.; Sanchez, F. J. Munoz; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Sanudo, M. Sobron; Vila, I.; Cortabitarte, R. Vilar; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benitez, J. F.; Bernet, C.; Bianchi, G.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Christiansen, T.; Perez, J. A. Coarasa; D'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; De Roeck, A.; Di Guida, S.; Dobson, M.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Frisch, B.; Funk, W.; Georgiou, G.; Giffels, M.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Giunta, M.; Glege, F.; Garrido, R. Gomez-Reino; Govoni, P.; Gowdy, S.; Guida, R.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hartl, C.; Harvey, J.; Hegner, B.; Hinzmann, A.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kaadze, K.; Karavakis, E.; Kousouris, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lee, Y.-J.; Lenzi, P.; Lourenço, C.; Mäki, T.; Malberti, M.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moser, R.; Mozer, M. U.; Mulders, M.; Musella, P.; Nesvold, E.; Orimoto, T.; Orsini, L.; Cortezon, E. Palencia; Perez, E.; Perrozzi, L.; Petrilli, A.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Polese, G.; Quertenmont, L.; Racz, A.; Reece, W.; Antunes, J. Rodrigues; Rolandi, G.; Rommerskirchen, T.; Rovelli, C.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Santanastasio, F.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Segoni, I.; Sekmen, S.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wöhri, H. K.; Worm, S. D.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Gabathuler, K.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; König, S.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Meier, F.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Sibille, J.; Bäni, L.; Bortignon, P.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Deisher, A.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Dünser, M.; Eugster, J.; Freudenreich, K.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Marini, A. C.; del Arbol, P. Martinez Ruiz; Mohr, N.; Moortgat, F.; Nägeli, C.; Nef, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pape, L.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Ronga, F. J.; Rossini, M.; Sala, L.; Sanchez, A. K.; Starodumov, A.; Stieger, B.; Takahashi, M.; Tauscher, L.; Thea, A.; Theofilatos, K.; Treille, D.; Urscheler, C.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Wehrli, L.; Amsler, C.; Chiochia, V.; De Visscher, S.; Favaro, C.; Rikova, M. Ivova; Mejias, B. Millan; Otiougova, P.; Robmann, P.; Snoek, H.; Tupputi, S.; Verzetti, M.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, K. H.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, S. W.; Lin, W.; Liu, Z. K.; Lu, Y. J.; Mekterovic, D.; Singh, A. P.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Bartalini, P.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Lu, R.-S.; Majumder, D.; Petrakou, E.; Shi, X.; Shiu, J. G.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wan, X.; Wang, M.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Karaman, T.; Karapinar, G.; Topaksu, A. Kayis; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sogut, K.; Cerci, D. Sunar; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, L. N.; Vergili, M.; Akin, I. V.; Aliev, T.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Deniz, M.; Gamsizkan, H.; Guler, A. M.; Ocalan, K.; Ozpineci, A.; Serin, M.; Sever, R.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Yildirim, E.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Isildak, B.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Sonmez, N.; Cankocak, K.; Levchuk, L.; Bostock, F.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Frazier, R.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Kreczko, L.; Metson, S.; Newbold, D. M.; Nirunpong, K.; Poll, A.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Basso, L.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Jackson, J.; Kennedy, B. W.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; RadburnSmith, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Bainbridge, R.; Ball, G.; Beuselinck, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Bryer, A. Guneratne; Hall, G.; Hatherell, Z.; Hays, J.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Marrouche, J.; Mathias, B.; Nandi, R.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Papageorgiou, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Pioppi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Ryan, M. J.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Sparrow, A.; Stoye, M.; Tapper, A.; Acosta, M. Vazquez; Virdee, T.; Wakefield, S.; Wardle, N.; Whyntie, T.; Chadwick, M.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Charaf, O.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Heister, A.; John, J. St.; Lawson, P.; Lazic, D.; Rohlf, J.; Sperka, D.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Cutts, D.; Ferapontov, A.; Heintz, U.; Jabeen, S.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Nguyen, D.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Tsang, K. V.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; De La Barca Sanchez, M. Calderon; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Dolen, J.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Houtz, R.; Ko, W.; Kopecky, A.; Lander, R.; Miceli, T.; Pellett, D.; Rutherford, B.; Searle, M.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Tripathi, M.; Sierra, R. Vasquez; Andreev, V.; Cline, D.; Cousins, R.; Duris, J.; Erhan, S.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Jarvis, C.; Plager, C.; Rakness, G.; Schlein, P.; Tucker, J.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Babb, J.; Clare, R.; Dinardo, M. E.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Giordano, F.; Hanson, G.; Jeng, G. Y.; Liu, H.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Nguyen, H.; Paramesvaran, S.; Sturdy, J.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wilken, R.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; Evans, D.; Golf, F.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Mangano, B.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Petrucciani, G.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yoo, J.; Barge, D.; Bellan, R.; Campagnari, C.; D'Alfonso, M.; Danielson, T.; Flowers, K.; Geffert, P.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Kalavase, P.; Koay, S. A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Lowette, S.; Mccoll, N.; Pavlunin, V.; Rebassoo, F.; Ribnik, J.; Richman, J.; Rossin, R.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Chen, Y.; Di Marco, E.; Duarte, J.; Gataullin, M.; Ma, Y.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Rogan, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Timciuc, V.; Traczyk, P.; Veverka, J.; Wilkinson, R.; Yang, Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Akgun, B.; Azzolini, V.; Carroll, R.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Jang, D. W.; Liu, Y. F.; Paulini, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Drell, B. R.; Edelmaier, C. J.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Heyburn, B.; Lopez, E. Luiggi; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Eggert, N.; Gibbons, L. K.; Heltsley, B.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Kreis, B.; Mirman, N.; Kaufman, G. Nicolas; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Vaughan, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bloch, I.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Chetluru, V.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Green, D.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kilminster, B.; Klima, B.; Kunori, S.; Kwan, S.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Tan, P.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, W.; Yang, F.; Yumiceva, F.; Yun, J. C.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Dobur, D.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Fu, Y.; Furic, I. K.; Gartner, J.; Hugon, J.; Kim, B.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Remington, R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Sellers, P.; Skhirtladze, N.; Snowball, M.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Gaultney, V.; Lebolo, L. M.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Chen, J.; Diamond, B.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Jenkins, M.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Dorney, B.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Vodopiyanov, I.; Adams, M. R.; Anghel, I. M.; Apanasevich, L.; Bai, Y.; Bazterra, V. E.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Callner, J.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dragoiu, C.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Lacroix, F.; Malek, M.; O'Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Strom, D.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Duru, F.; Griffiths, S.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Newsom, C. R.; Norbeck, E.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Sen, S.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Giurgiu, G.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Hu, G.; Maksimovic, P.; Rappoccio, S.; Swartz, M.; Whitbeck, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Grachov, O.; Kenny, R. P.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Tinti, G.; Wood, J. S.; Zhukova, V.; Barfuss, A. F.; Bolton, T.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Boutemeur, M.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kirn, M.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Peterman, A.; Skuja, A.; Temple, J.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Twedt, E.; Apyan, A.; Bauer, G.; Bendavid, J.; Busza, W.; Butz, E.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Dutta, V.; Ceballos, G. Gomez; Goncharov, M.; Hahn, K. A.; Kim, Y.; Klute, M.; Krajczar, K.; Li, W.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Nahn, S.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rudolph, M.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Sung, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wenger, E. A.; Wolf, R.; Wyslouch, B.; Xie, S.; Yang, M.; Yilmaz, Y.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Cooper, S. I.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Franzoni, G.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Sasseville, M.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Kroeger, R.; Perera, L.; Rahmat, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Butt, J.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Keller, J.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malbouisson, H.; Malik, S.; Snow, G. R.; Baur, U.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Shipkowski, S. P.; Smith, K.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Nash, D.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Ofierzynski, R. A.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Antonelli, L.; Berry, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Pearson, T.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Vuosalo, C.; Williams, G.; Winer, B. L.; Adam, N.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Gerbaudo, D.; Halyo, V.; Hebda, P.; Hegeman, J.; Hunt, A.; Jindal, P.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Raval, A.; Safdi, B.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Acosta, J. G.; Brownson, E.; Huang, X. T.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Oliveros, S.; Vargas, J. E. Ramirez; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Alagoz, E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Hu, Z.; Jones, M.; Koybasi, O.; Kress, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Leonardo, N.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Marono, M. Vidal; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Guragain, S.; Parashar, N.; Adair, A.; Boulahouache, C.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Chung, Y. S.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Miner, D. C.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Malik, S.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Rekovic, V.; Robles, J.; Rose, K.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Seitz, C.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Sengupta, S.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Toback, D.; Akchurin, N.; Damgov, J.; Dudero, P. R.; Jeong, C.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Roh, Y.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Florez, C.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Johnston, C.; Kurt, P.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Balazs, M.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Yohay, R.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Don, C. Kottachchi Kankanamge; Lamichhane, P.; Sakharov, A.; Anderson, M.; Bachtis, M.; Belknap, D.; Borrello, L.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Friis, E.; Gray, L.; Grogg, K. S.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Leonard, J.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Palmonari, F.; Pierro, G. A.; Ross, I.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.

    2012-12-01

    The first observation of the Z boson decaying to four leptons in proton-proton collisions is presented. The analyzed data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.02 fb-1 at sqrt{s}=7 TeV collected by the CMS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. A pronounced resonance peak, with a statistical significance of 9.7 σ, is observed in the distribution of the invariant mass of four leptons (electrons and/or muons) with mass and width consistent with expectations for Z boson decays. The branching fraction and cross section reported here are defined by phase space restrictions on the leptons, namely, 80 < m 4ℓ < 100 GeV, where m 4ℓ is the invariant mass of the four leptons, and m ℓℓ > 4 GeV for all pairs of leptons, where m ℓℓ is the two-lepton invariant mass. The measured branching fraction is {B}( {Zto 4ell } )=( {4.2_{-0.8}^{+0.9}( {stat.} )± 0.2( {syst.} )} )× {10^{-6 }} and agrees with the standard model prediction of 4.45 × 10-6. The measured cross section times branching fraction is σ ( {ppto Z} ){B}( {Zto 4ell } )=112_{-20}^{+23}( {stat.} )_{-5}^{+7}( {syst.} )_{-2}^{+3}( {lumi.} ) fb, also consistent with the standard model prediction of 120 fb. The four-lepton mass peak arising from Z → 4 ℓ decays provides a calibration channel for the Higgs boson search in the H → ZZ → 4 ℓ decay mode.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Lepton Universality and Lepton Flavour Violation tests at the B-factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusiani, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    We review the experimental status of the lepton universality tests and lepton flavour violation searches after the completion of the data-taking and most of the data analysis of the B-factories BABAR and Belle. The universality of the Standard Model charged weak couplings has been confirmed and moderately improved in precision by the B-factories results. Lepton Flavour violation in the τ lepton decays has been searched in several decay modes and no evidence has been found. We set 90% confidence level upper limits on the Lepton Flavour violating branching ratios in the 10-7-10-8 range, greatly extending the previous limits set mainly by CLEO in the 10-6 range.

  17. CP violation in multibody decays of beauty baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durieux, Gauthier

    2016-10-01

    Beauty baryons are being observed in large numbers in the LHCb detector. The rich kinematic distributions of their multibody decays are therefore becoming accessible and provide us with new opportunities to search for CP violation. We analyse the angular distributions of some three- and four-body decays of spin-1/2 baryons using the Jacob-Wick helicity formalism. The asymmetries that provide access to small differences of CP-odd phases between decay amplitudes of identical CP-even phases are notably discussed. The understanding gained on processes featuring specific resonant intermediate states allows us to establish which asymmetries are relevant for what purpose. It is for instance shown that some CP-odd angular asymmetries measured by the LHCb collaboration in the Λ b → Λ φ → p π K + K - decay are expected to vanish identically.

  18. Quark flavor mixing, CP violation, and all that

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, F.J.

    1988-04-01

    We review the present state of knowledge of the mixing of quark flavors under weak interactions and the associated explanation of CP violation inherent in the single nontrivial phase present in the three-generation mixing matrix. In this context we present the phenomenological basis for the increasing possibility that large CP violation asymmetries can be experimentally observed in the B meson system. 39 refs., 11 figs.,

  19. Unity of quark and lepton interactions with symplectic gauge symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Rajpoot, S.

    1982-07-01

    Properties of symplectic groups are reviewed and the gauge structure of Sp(2n) derived. The electroweak unification of leptons within Sp(8) gauge symmetry and grand unification of quarks and leptons within Sp(10) gauge symmetry are discussed.

  20. Probing lepton asymmetry with 21 cm fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Kohri, Kazunori; Oyama, Yoshihiko; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: oyamayo@post.kek.jp E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the issue of how accurately we can constrain the lepton number asymmetry ξ{sub ν}=μ{sub ν}/T{sub ν} in the Universe by using future observations of 21 cm line fluctuations and cosmic microwave background (CMB). We find that combinations of the 21 cm line and the CMB observations can constrain the lepton asymmetry better than big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). Additionally, we also discuss constraints on ξ{sub ν} in the presence of some extra radiation, and show that the 21 cm line observations can substantially improve the constraints obtained by CMB alone, and allow us to distinguish the effects of the lepton asymmetry from the ones of extra radiation.

  1. Lepton flavor violation with light vector bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeck, Julian

    2016-07-01

    New sub-GeV vector bosons with couplings to muons but not electrons have been discussed in order to explain the muon's magnetic moment, the gap of high-energy neutrinos in IceCube or the proton radius puzzle. If such a light Z‧ not only violates lepton universality but also lepton flavor, as expected for example from the recent hint for h → μτ at CMS, the two-body decay mode τ → μZ‧ opens up and for MZ‧ < 2mμ gives better constraints than τ → 3 μ already with 20-year-old ARGUS limits. We discuss the general prospects and motivation of light vector bosons with lepton-flavor-violating couplings.

  2. Limits on tau lepton flavor violating decays in three charged leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Cervelli, Alberto

    2010-04-29

    A search for the neutrinoless, lepton-flavor violating decay of the {tau} lepton into three charged leptons has been performed using an integrated luminosity of 468 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II collider. In all six decay modes considered, the numbers of events found in data are compatible with the background expectations. Upper limits on the branching fractions are set in the range (1.8-3.3) x 10{sup -8} at 90% confidence level.

  3. Supersymmetric lepton flavor violation at the NLC

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Hsin-Chia

    1997-04-01

    Supersymmetric theories generally have new flavor violation sources in the squark and slepton mass matrices. If significant lepton flavor violation exists, selectron and smuon should be nearly degenerate. This leads to the phenomenon of slepton oscillations, which is analogous to neutrino oscillations, if sleptons are produced at the Next Linear Collider. The direct slepton production at the Next Linear Collider provides a much more powerful probe of lepton flavor violation than the current bounds from rare processes, such as {mu} {yields} e{gamma}.

  4. Supersymmetric lepton flavor violation at the NLC

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Hsin-Chia

    1997-04-01

    Supersymmetric theories generally have new flavor violation sources in the squark and slepton mass matrices. If significant lepton flavor violation exists, selectron and smuon should be nearly degenerate. This leads to the phenomenon of slepton oscillations, which is analogous to neutrino oscillations, if sleptons are produced at the Next Linear Collider. The direct slepton production at the Next Linear Collider provides a much more powerful probe of lepton flavor violation than the current bounds from rare processes, such as {mu} {r_arrow} e{gamma}. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Lepton mass hierarchy and neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsch, Harald; Zhi-Zhong, Xing

    1996-02-01

    Starting from the symmetry of lepton flavor democracy, we propose and discuss a simple pattern for the mass generation and flavor mixing of the charged leptons and neutrinos. The three neutrino masses are nearly degenerate, and the flavor mixing angles can be calculated. The observed deficit of solar and atmospheric neutrinos can be interpreted as a consequence of the near degeneracy and large oscillations of νe, νμ and ντ in the vacuum. Our ansatz can also accommodate the cosmological requirement for hot dark matter and the current data on neutrinoless ββ-decay.

  6. Lepton masses and mixing without Yukawa hierarchies

    SciTech Connect

    Ponce, William A.; Zapata, Oscar

    2006-11-01

    We investigate the neutrino masses and mixing pattern in a version of the SU(3){sub c}(multiply-in-circle sign)SU(3){sub L}(multiply-in-circle sign)U(1){sub X} model with one extra exotic charged lepton per family as introduced by Ozer. It is shown that an extended scalar sector, together with a discrete Z{sub 2} symmetry, is able to reproduce a consistent lepton mass spectrum without a hierarchy in the Yukawa coupling constants, the former as a consequence of a carefull balance between one universal see-saw and two radiative mechanisms.

  7. Finding the strong CP problem at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Hook, Anson

    2016-11-01

    We show that a class of parity based solutions to the strong CP problem predicts new colored particles with mass at the TeV scale, due to constraints from Planck suppressed operators. The new particles are copies of the Standard Model quarks and leptons. The new quarks can be produced at the LHC and are either collider stable or decay into Standard Model quarks through a Higgs, a W or a Z boson. We discuss some simple but generic predictions of the models for the LHC and find signatures not related to the traditional solutions of the hierarchy problem. We thus provide alternative motivation for new physics searches at the weak scale. We also briefly discuss the cosmological history of these models and how to obtain successful baryogenesis.

  8. Preclinical pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, radiation dosimetry and toxicity studies required for regulatory approval of a phase I clinical trial with 111In-CP04 in medullary thyroid carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Maina, Theodosia; Konijnenberg, Mark W.; KolencPeitl, Petra; Garnuszek, Piotr; Nock, Berthold A.; Kaloudi, Aikaterini; Kroselj, Marko; Zaletel, Katja; Maecke, Helmut; Mansi, Rosalba; Erba, Paola; von Guggenberg, Elisabeth; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja; Mikolajczak, Renata; Decristoforo, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    Introduction From a series of radiolabelled cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin analogues, 111In-CP04 (111In-DOTA-(DGlu)6-Ala-Tyr-Gly-Trp-Met-Asp-Phe-NH2) was selected for further translation as a diagnostic radiopharmaceutical towards a first-in-man study in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). A freeze-dried kit formulation for multicentre application has been developed. We herein report on biosafety, in vivo stability, biodistribution and dosimetry aspects of 111In-CP04 in animal models, essential for the regulatory approval of the clinical trial. Materials and methods Acute and extended single dose toxicity of CP04 was tested in rodents, while the in vivo stability of 111In-CP04 was assessed by HPLC analysis of mouse blood samples. The biodistribution of 111In-CP04 prepared from a freeze-dried kit was studied in SCID mice bearing double A431-CCK2R(±) xenografts at 1, 4 and 24 h pi. Further 4-h animal groups were either additionally treated with the plasma expander gelofusine or injected with 111In-CP04 prepared by wet-labelling. Pharmacokinetics in healthy mice included the 30 min, 1, 4, 24, 48 and 72 h time points pi. Dosimetric calculations were based on extrapolation of mice data to humans adopting two scaling models. Results CP04 was well-tolerated by both mice and rats, with an LD50 > 178.5 μg/kg body weight for mice and a NOAEL (no-observed-adverse-effect-level) of 89 μg/kg body weight for rats. After labelling, 111In-CP04 remained >70% intact in peripheral mouse blood at 5 min pi. The uptake of 111In-CP04 prepared from the freeze-dried kit and by wet-labelling were comparable in the A431-CCK2R(+)-xenografts (9.24 ± 1.35%ID/g and 8.49 ± 0.39%ID/g, respectively; P > 0.05). Gelofusine-treated mice exhibited significantly reduced kidneys values (1.69 ± 0.15%ID/g vs. 5.55 ± 0.94%ID/g in controls, P < 0.001). Dosimetry data revealed very comparable effective tumour doses for the two scaling models applied, of 0.045 and 0.044 m

  9. Search for CP Violation in the Decay tau- \\to pi- K^0_S (>= 0 pi0) nu_tau

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2012-02-16

    We report a search for CP violation in the decay {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}K{sub S}{sup 0}({>=} 0{pi}{sup 0}){nu}{sub {tau}} using a dataset of 437 million {tau} lepton pairs, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 476 fb{sup -1}, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings. The CP-violating decay-rate asymmetry is determined to be (-0.45 {+-} 0.24 {+-} 0.11)%, approximately three standard deviations from the Standard Model prediction of (0.33 {+-} 0.01)%.

  10. Tutorial guide to the tau lepton and close-mass lepton pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1988-10-01

    This is a tutorial guide to present knowledge of the tau lepton, to the tau decay mode puzzle, and to present searches for close-mass lepton pairs. The test is minimal; the emphasis is on figures, tables and literature references. It is based on a lecture given at the 1988 International School of Subnuclear Physics: The Super World III. 54 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. Three doublet lepton-specific model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merchand, Marco; Sher, Marc

    2017-03-01

    In the lepton-specific version of two Higgs doublet models, a discrete symmetry is used to couple one Higgs boson, Φ2, to quarks and the other, Φ1, to leptons. The symmetry eliminates tree level flavor changing neutral currents. Motivated by strong constraints on such currents in the quark sector from meson-antimeson mixing, and by hints of h →μ τ in the lepton sector, we study a simple three Higgs doublet model in which one doublet couples to quarks and the other two to leptons. Unlike most other studies of three Higgs doublet models, we impose no flavor symmetry and just use a Z2 symmetry to constrain the Yukawa couplings. We present the model and discuss the various mixing angles. Constraining the parameters to be consistent with observations of the Higgs boson at the LHC, we study the properties of the charged Higgs boson(s) in the model, focusing on the case in which the charged Higgs boson is above the top threshold. It is found that one can have the branching fraction of the charged Higgs boson into τ ντ comparable to t b ¯ decay without needing very large values for the ratios of vacuum expectation values. One can also get a large branching fraction for the much more easily observable μ ντ decay.

  12. CP violation at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreau, J.

    2001-04-16

    A major goal of experimental particle physics over the next decade is to measure the sides and angles of the Unitarity triangle redundantly, and as precisely as possible. Overconstraining the triangle will test the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa model of quark mixing. The CDF collaboration, due to begin a second run in March 2001 with major upgrades to both the accelerator and the detector, will study the angle {beta} using B{sup 0} decays, the angle {gamma} using B{sup 0} and B{sub s}{sup 0} decays, and a side of the triangle through the observation of B{sub s}{sup 0}--{bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} mixing. Projected sensitivities are driven mostly by previous measurements using data from the first run. One highlight of the Run I B physics program is a measurement of the CP violating parameter sin 2{beta} = 0.79{sub {minus}0.44}{sup +0.41}, based on a tagged sample of 400 B{sup 0} decays in the mode B{sub 0}/{bar B}{sup 0} {r_arrow} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0}. The technology of flavor tagging, used here as well as in numerous B{sup 0}-{bar B}{sup 0} mixing analyses in run I, is crucial and will be augmented in Run II with better particle identification capabilities. Exclusive all-hadronic final states will enter the data sample in Run II through a new displaced track trigger.

  13. B Physics, CP Violation, and the CKM Fit

    SciTech Connect

    Hocker, Andreas

    2005-05-18

    For half a decade, the asymmetric-energy B Factory experiments BABAR and Belle have been greatly improving our knowledge of CP violation in the quark sector of the electroweak interaction. These experiments are part of a vast effort that is being undertaken to study the enigma of CP violation, and related physics questions, within and possibly beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. The present results confirm our understanding of CP violation as being due to a single observable phase in the CKM quark-mixing matrix. However, there also exist signs that we may be witnessing something unknown that goes beyond that picture. The colloquium reviews the current status of the CKM matrix with emphasis on the most recent B physics results on CP violation.

  14. Beyond minimal lepton-flavored Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Mu-Chun; Huang, Jinrui; Takhistov, Volodymyr

    2016-02-09

    In this paper ,we consider a class of flavored dark matter (DM) theories where dark matter interacts with the Standard Model lepton fields at the renormalizable level. We allow for a general coupling matrix between the dark matter and leptons whose structure is beyond the one permitted by the minimal flavor violation (MFV) assumption. It is assumed that this is the only new source of flavor violation in addition to the Standard Model (SM) Yukawa interactions. The setup can be described by augmenting the SM flavor symmetry by an additional SU(3)χ, under which the dark matter χ transforms. This framework is especially phenomenologically rich, due to possible novel flavor-changing interactions which are not present within the more restrictive MFV framework. As a representative case study of this setting, which we call “beyond MFV” (BMFV), we consider Dirac fermion dark matter which transforms as a singlet under the SM gauge group and a triplet under SU(3)χ. The DM fermion couples to the SM lepton sector through a scalar mediator Φ. Unlike the case of quark-flavored DM, we show that there is no Z3 symmetry within either the MFV or BMFV settings which automatically stabilizes the lepton-flavored DM. We discuss constraints on this setup from flavor-changing processes, DM relic abundance as well as direct and indirect detections. We find that relatively large flavor-changing couplings are possible, while the dark matter mass is still within the phenomenologically interesting region below the TeV scale. Collider signatures which can be potentially searched for at the lepton and hadron colliders are discussed. Finally, we discuss the implications for decaying dark matter, which can appear if an additional stabilizing symmetry is not imposed.

  15. Beyond minimal lepton-flavored Dark Matter

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Mu-Chun; Huang, Jinrui; Takhistov, Volodymyr

    2016-02-09

    In this paper ,we consider a class of flavored dark matter (DM) theories where dark matter interacts with the Standard Model lepton fields at the renormalizable level. We allow for a general coupling matrix between the dark matter and leptons whose structure is beyond the one permitted by the minimal flavor violation (MFV) assumption. It is assumed that this is the only new source of flavor violation in addition to the Standard Model (SM) Yukawa interactions. The setup can be described by augmenting the SM flavor symmetry by an additional SU(3)χ, under which the dark matter χ transforms. This frameworkmore » is especially phenomenologically rich, due to possible novel flavor-changing interactions which are not present within the more restrictive MFV framework. As a representative case study of this setting, which we call “beyond MFV” (BMFV), we consider Dirac fermion dark matter which transforms as a singlet under the SM gauge group and a triplet under SU(3)χ. The DM fermion couples to the SM lepton sector through a scalar mediator Φ. Unlike the case of quark-flavored DM, we show that there is no Z3 symmetry within either the MFV or BMFV settings which automatically stabilizes the lepton-flavored DM. We discuss constraints on this setup from flavor-changing processes, DM relic abundance as well as direct and indirect detections. We find that relatively large flavor-changing couplings are possible, while the dark matter mass is still within the phenomenologically interesting region below the TeV scale. Collider signatures which can be potentially searched for at the lepton and hadron colliders are discussed. Finally, we discuss the implications for decaying dark matter, which can appear if an additional stabilizing symmetry is not imposed.« less

  16. Understanding the factors affecting the activation of alkane by Cp'Rh(CO)2 (Cp' = Cp or Cp*).

    PubMed

    George, Michael W; Hall, Michael B; Jina, Omar S; Portius, Peter; Sun, Xue-Zhong; Towrie, Michael; Wu, Hong; Yang, Xinzheng; Zaric, Snezana D

    2010-11-23

    Fast time-resolved infrared spectroscopic measurements have allowed precise determination of the rates of activation of alkanes by Cp'Rh(CO) (Cp(') = η(5)-C(5)H(5) or η(5)-C(5)Me(5)). We have monitored the kinetics of C─H activation in solution at room temperature and determined how the change in rate of oxidative cleavage varies from methane to decane. The lifetime of CpRh(CO)(alkane) shows a nearly linear behavior with respect to the length of the alkane chain, whereas the related Cp*Rh(CO)(alkane) has clear oscillatory behavior upon changing the alkane. Coupled cluster and density functional theory calculations on these complexes, transition states, and intermediates provide the insight into the mechanism and barriers in order to develop a kinetic simulation of the experimental results. The observed behavior is a subtle interplay between the rates of activation and migration. Unexpectedly, the calculations predict that the most rapid process in these Cp'Rh(CO)(alkane) systems is the 1,3-migration along the alkane chain. The linear behavior in the observed lifetime of CpRh(CO)(alkane) results from a mechanism in which the next most rapid process is the activation of primary C─H bonds (─CH(3) groups), while the third key step in this system is 1,2-migration with a slightly slower rate. The oscillatory behavior in the lifetime of Cp*Rh(CO)(alkane) with respect to the alkane's chain length follows from subtle interplay between more rapid migrations and less rapid primary C─H activation, with respect to CpRh(CO)(alkane), especially when the CH(3) group is near a gauche turn. This interplay results in the activation being controlled by the percentage of alkane conformers.

  17. CP Violation in B Mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roe, Natalie A.

    2001-04-01

    Our world manifestly violates CP, the symmetry between matter and antimatter; there is no observational evidence for any significant amount of antimatter in the Universe. Andrei Sakharov was the first to point out that, in the context of Big Bang theory, a matter-dominated universe requires CP violation at the quantum level. Indeed, CP violation was subsequently observed as a tiny effect in K-meson decays, and it can be naturally accommodated in the Standard Model of fundamental particles with 3 generations of quarks. However, to produce the observed baryon asymmetry, baryogenesis calculations require more CP violation than the Standard Model affords. This is an intriguing puzzle whose solution will require input from both particle physics and cosmology, and it has inspired particle physicists to study CP violation with greater precision in a new generation of experiments. We are now entering this exciting new era in CP violation studies. Several new or upgraded experiments plan a program of detailed measurements of CP violating effects in B mesons. The predicted asymmetries are large, observable in a variety of decay channels, and the theoretical uncertainties are small for the best modes. Some interesting experimental results have recently been announced, and more precise measurements will soon follow. Future experiments are already planned to make even more definitive measurements. In this talk I will review the theoretical predictions and the connection to cosmology, survey the experimental scene, and describe how the study of CP violation in B mesons will allow us to make stringent tests of the Standard Model.

  18. CP asymmetry in heavy Majorana neutrino decays at finite temperature: the hierarchical case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondini, S.; Brambilla, N.; Vairo, A.

    2016-09-01

    We consider the simplest realization of leptogenesis with one heavy Majorana neutrino species much lighter than the other ones. In this scenario, when the temperature of the early universe is smaller than the lightest Majorana neutrino mass, we compute at first order in the Standard Model couplings and, for each coupling, at leading order in the termperature the CP asymmetry in the decays of the lightest neutrino into leptons and anti-leptons. We perform the calculation using a hierarchy of two effective field theories organized as expansions in the inverse of the heavy-neutrino masses. In the ultimate effective field theory, leading thermal corrections proportional to the Higgs self coupling and the gauge couplings are encoded in one single operator of dimension five, whereas corrections proportional to the top Yukawa coupling are encoded in four operators of dimension seven, which we compute.

  19. Vacuum orientations in strong CP violation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zheng; Viswanathan, K.S.; Wu, Dan-di

    1991-12-01

    We study the QCD vacuum orientation angles in correlation with the strong CP phases. A vacuum alignment equation of the dynamical chiral symmetry breaking is derived based on the anomalous Ward identity. It is emphasized that a chiral rotation of the quark field causes a change of the vacuum orientation and a change in the definition of the light pseudoscalar generators. As an illustration of the idea, {eta} {yields} 2{pi} decays are carefully studied in different chiral frames and shown to be independent of. chiral rotations.

  20. CP violation in fourth generation quark decays

    SciTech Connect

    Arhrib, Abdesslam; Hou Weishu

    2009-10-01

    We show that, if a fourth generation is discovered at the Tevatron or LHC, one could study CP violation (CPV) in b{sup '}{yields}s decays. Asymmetries could reach 30% for b{sup '}{yields}sZ for m{sub b{sup '}} < or approx. 350 GeV, while it could be greater than 50% for b{sup '}{yields}s{gamma} and extend to higher m{sub b{sup '}}. Branching ratios are 10{sup -3}-10{sup -5}, and CPV measurement requires tagging. Once measured, however, the CPV phase can be extracted with little theoretical uncertainty.

  1. CP asymmetries with longitudinal and transverse beam polarizations in neutralino production and decay into the Z0 boson at the ILC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartl, Alfred; Hohenwarter-Sodek, Karl; Kernreiter, Thomas; Kittel, Olaf

    2007-09-01

    We study neutralino production at the linear collider with the subsequent two-body decays tilde chi0i → tilde chi0nZ0 and Z0 → ell bar-ell, with ell = e, μ, τ, or Z0 → qbar q with q = c, b. We show that transverse electron and positron beam polarizations allow the definition of unique CP observables. These are azimuthal asymmetries in the distributions of the final leptons or quarks. We calculate these CP asymmetries and the cross sections in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model with complex higgsino and gaugino parameters μ and M1. For final quark pairs, we find CP asymmetries as large as 30%. We discuss the significances for observing the CP asymmetries at the International Linear Collider (ILC). Finally we compare the CP asymmetries with those asymmetries which require unpolarized and/or longitudinally polarized beams only.

  2. Improved measurement of CP observables in B{sup {+-}}{yields}D{sub CP}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.

    2008-06-01

    We present a study of the decay B{sup -}{yields}D{sub (CP)}{sup 0}K{sup -} and its charge conjugate, where D{sub (CP)}{sup 0} is reconstructed in both a non-CP flavor eigenstate and in CP (CP-even and CP-odd) eigenstates, based on a sample of 382 million {upsilon}(4S){yields}BB decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. We measure the direct CP asymmetries A{sub CP{+-}} and the ratios of the branching fractions R{sub CP{+-}}: A{sub CP+}=0.27{+-}0.09(stat){+-}0.04(syst), A{sub CP-}=-0.09{+-}0.09(stat){+-}0.02(syst), R{sub CP+}=1.06{+-}0.10(stat){+-}0.05(syst), R{sub CP-}=1.03{+-}0.10(stat){+-}0.05(syst). We also express the results in terms of the so-called Cartesian coordinates x{sub +}, x{sub -}, and r{sup 2}: x{sub +}=-0.09{+-}0.05(stat){+-}0.02(syst), x{sub -}=0.10{+-}0.05(stat){+-}0.03(syst), r{sup 2}=0.05{+-}0.07(stat){+-}0.03(syst). These results will help to better constrain the phase parameter {gamma}=arg(-V{sub ud}V{sub ub}*/V{sub cd}V{sub cb}*) of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix.

  3. Gamow-Teller strength and lepton captures rates on 66‑71Ni in stellar matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Majid, Muhammad

    Charge-changing transitions play a significant role in stellar weak-decay processes. The fate of the massive stars is decided by these weak-decay rates including lepton (positron and electron) captures rates, which play a consequential role in the dynamics of core collapse. As per previous simulation results, weak interaction rates on nickel (Ni) isotopes have significant influence on the stellar core vis-à-vis controlling the lepton content of stellar matter throughout the silicon shell burning phases of high mass stars up to the presupernova stages. In this paper, we perform a microscopic calculation of Gamow-Teller (GT) charge-changing transitions, in the β-decay and electron capture (EC) directions, for neutron-rich Ni isotopes (66‑71Ni). We further compute the associated weak-decay rates for these selected Ni isotopes in stellar environment. The computations are accomplished by employing the deformed proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) model. A recent study showed that the deformed pn-QRPA theory is well suited for the estimation of GT transitions. The astral weak-decay rates are determined over densities in the range of 10-1011g/cm3 and temperatures in the range of 0.01 × 109-30 × 109K. The calculated lepton capture rates are compared with the previous calculation of Pruet and Fuller (PF). The overall comparison demonstrates that, at low stellar densities and high temperatures, our EC rates are bigger by as much as two orders of magnitude. Our results show that, at higher temperatures, the lepton capture rates are the dominant mode for the stellar weak rates and the corresponding lepton emission rates may be neglected.

  4. Neutrino mass models and CP violation

    SciTech Connect

    Joshipura, Anjan S.

    2011-10-06

    Theoretical ideas on the origin of (a) neutrino masses (b) neutrino mass hierarchies and (c) leptonic mixing angles are reviewed. Topics discussed include (1) symmetries of neutrino mass matrix and their origin (2) ways to understand the observed patterns of leptonic mixing angles and (3)unified description of neutrino masses and mixing angles in grand unified theories.

  5. Measurement of the Branching Fraction And Search for Direct CP-Violation in the B+- --> J/Psi Pi+- Decay Mode at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Fobozzi, Francesco; /Naples U.

    2006-08-22

    The phenomenon of CP-violation in weak interactions, discovered in 1964 in decays of neutral kaons, receives a simple and elegant explanation in the Standard Model with three generations of quarks. Indeed, in this model the common source of CP-asymmetry phenomena is represented by a simple complex phase in the unitary matrix (the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix) describing the charged weak couplings of the quarks. This simple scheme has never received an accurate validation, because the phenomenological parameters determined from measurements of CP-violation in kaons decays are related to the fundamental parameters of the theory in a complex way, sensitive to large theoretical uncertainties. On the contrary, decays of neutral B mesons like B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi} K{sub S}{sup 0} represent a unique laboratory to test the predictions of the theory because they are expected to show significant CP-violation effects, the magnitude of which is cleanly related to the Standard Model parameters. Thus experimental facilities have been built with the purpose of performing extensive studies of B decays. The BABAR experiment is operating at one of these facilities, at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. It is collecting data at the PEP-II asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider (E{sub e{sup -}} = 9.0 GeV; E{sub e{sup +}} = 3.1 GeV), a high-luminosity accelerator machine (L = 3 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}). The center-of-mass energy (10.58 GeV) of the e{sup +}e{sup -} system at PEP-II allows resonant production of the {Upsilon}(4S), a b{bar b} bound state, which decays almost exclusively in a B{sup 0}{bar B}{sup 0} or a B{sup +}B{sup -} pair. A high-acceptance detector, projected and built by a wide international collaboration, detects and characterizes the decay products of the B mesons. From the analysis of the data collected during the first two years of operation, the BABAR collaboration has established CP-violation in decays of neutral B mesons at the 4.1{sigma

  6. Measurement of CP asymmetries in neutralino production at the ILC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittel, O.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Rolbiecki, K.; Schade, P.; Terwort, M.

    2012-01-01

    We study the prospects to measure the CP-sensitive triple-product asymmetries in neutralino production e+ e- totilde{χ}0itilde{χ}01 and subsequent leptonic two-body decays tilde{χ}0i to tilde{ell}R ell, tilde{ell}R to tilde{χ}01 ell, for ℓ= e, μ, within the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. We include a full detector simulation of the International Large Detector for the International Linear Collider. The simulation was performed at a center-of-mass energy of sqrt{s}=500 GeV, including the relevant Standard Model background processes, a realistic beam energy spectrum, beam backgrounds and a beam polarization of 80% and -60% for the electron and positron beams, respectively. In order to effectively disentangle different signal samples and reduce SM and SUSY backgrounds we apply a method of kinematic reconstruction. Assuming an integrated luminosity of 500 fb-1 collected by the experiment and the performance of the current ILD detector, we arrive at a relative measurement accuracy of 10% for the CP-sensitive asymmetry in our scenario. We demonstrate that our method of signal selection using kinematic reconstruction can be applied to a broad class of scenarios and it allows disentangling processes with similar kinematic properties.

  7. Tests of CP and CPT symmetry with positronium

    SciTech Connect

    Namba, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Nishihara, K.; Yamazaki, T.; Asai, S.

    2008-08-08

    The 3{gamma} decay of spin-aligned triplet positronium can be used to test CP (C = charge conjugation, and P = parity operation) invariance in the lepton sector. The angular correlation (s-circumflex {center_dot}k-circumflex {sub 1})(s-circumflex {center_dot}k-circumflex {sub 1}xk-circumflex {sub 2}) is used for this test, where s is the positronium spin and |k{sub 1}|>|k{sub 2}|>|k{sub 3}| are the {gamma} momenta.We designed a new detector to test this symmetry at the 10{sup -3} level. This detector consists of a magnet, a {beta}{sup +} tagging and o-Ps creation system, {gamma}-ray detectors, and a turntable. The detector construction is almost finished and data acquisition will begin in this spring.With a similar detector, the CPT (T = time reversal) symmetry can be also tested. In this case, the angular correlation (s-circumflex {center_dot}k-circumflex {sub 1}xk-circumflex {sub 2}) is used. This test will be started after the CP test is finished.

  8. New results of the spectral observations of CP stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polosukhina, N. S.; Shavrina, A. V.; Drake, N. A.; Kudryavtsev, D. O.; Smirnova, M. A.

    2010-04-01

    The lithium problem in Ap-CP stars has been, for a long time, a subject of debate. Individual characteristics of CP stars, such as high abundance of the rare-earth elements presence of magnetic fields, complicate structure of the surface distribution of chemical elements, rapid oscillations of some CP-stars, make the detection of the lithium lines and the determination of the lithium abundance, a difficult task. During the International Meeting in Slovakia in 1996, the lithium problem in Ap-CP stars was discussed. The results of the Li study carried out in CrAO Polosukhina (1973-1976), the works of Hack & Faraggiana (1963), Wallerstein & Hack (1964), Faraggiana et al. (1992-1996) formed the basis of the International project ‘Lithium in the cool CP-stars with magnetic fields’. The main goal of the project was, using systematical observations of Ap-CP stars with phase rotation in the spectral regions of the resonance doublet Li I 6708 Å and subordinate 6104 Å lithium lines with different telescopes, to create a database, which will permit to explain the physical origin of anomalous Li abundance in the atmospheres of these stars.

  9. Towards new frontiers in CP violation in B decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischer, Robert

    2014-11-01

    CP-violating effects in decays of B mesons offer a wide spectrum of probes for testing the phase structure of the quark-flavour sector of the Standard Model. After a brief discussion of the picture emerging from the current LHC data, the focus will be put on two specific topics: hadronic uncertainties from penguin topologies on measurements of the B0q-bar B0q mixing phases (q in {d,s}), and the U-spin-related decays B0s → K+K- and B0d → π+π-. Valuable new insights are expected from future studies of CP violation in B decays. For the detection of possible new sources of CP violation, it will be crucial to match the experimental and theoretical precisions and to have a careful look at the underlying assumptions.

  10. Recherche de leptons lourds au LEP 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafirout, Reda

    En 1989, la mise en opération de la première phase du LEP (le LEP 1), au CERN, a une Energie correspondant a la résonance du boson Z0, a permis d'étudier et de confirmer avec une grande précision le Modèle Standard des interactions électrofaibles. Malgré le succès remarquable de ce modèle à décrire toutes les données expérimentales recueillies jusqu'à ce jour en physique des hautes énergies, ce dernier laisse plusieurs questions sans réponse. Il n'explique pas entre autres pourquoi il n'y a que trois familles de particules dont le neutrino associé est léger et la hiérarchie des masses observées des fermions reste une énigme. Ici, nous nous intéressons à l'existence éventuelle de nouveaux fermions, tels que prédits par des extensions du Modèle Standard. Ces nouveaux fermions ont été recherches au LEP 1, mais en vain, et une limite inférieure sur leur masse d'environ MZ/2 a pu être imposée. La deuxième phase du LEP (le LEP 2) qui a débuté dans l'automne 1995 avec une énergie disponible de √s = 130, et 136 GeV, puis dans l'été 1996 a √s = 161 GeV a permis d'améliorer ces limites. Nous présentons ici la recherche de leptons lourds, neutres (N) et chargés (L+/-), effectuée à partir des données recueillies dans l'automne 1996 avec le détecteur de la collaboration OPAL au LEP 2, à des énergies au centre de masse de √s = 170 et 172 GeV. La luminosité totale intégrée fut de 10.3 pb-1. Un nouveau générateur, EXOTIC, conçu et développé a cette fin, a été utilise pour la simulation des échantillons d'événements Monte Carlo qui ont servi à comparer les données obtenues avec les prédictions théoriques. Plus spécifiquement, nous avons recherché le processus e+e- --> NN où N, pouvant être de type Dirac ou Majorana, se désintègre en un lepton léger standard (e, μ, ou τ) et un boson W+/- virtuel (W+/-*). Pour un N de type Dirac, une limite inférieure sur la masse à 95% de niveau de confiance est obtenue

  11. The impact of sterile neutrinos on CP measurements at long baselines

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, Raj; Kayser, Boris; Masud, Mehedi; Prakash, Suprabh

    2015-09-01

    With the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) as an example, we show that the presence of even one sterile neutrino of mass ~1 eV can significantly impact the measurements of CP violation in long baseline experiments. Using a probability level analysis and neutrino-antineutrino asymmetry calculations, we discuss the large magnitude of these effects, and show how they translate into significant event rate deviations at DUNE. These results demonstrate that measurements which, when interpreted in the context of the standard three family paradigm, indicate CP conservation at long baselines, may, in fact hide large CP violation if there is a sterile state. Similarly, any data indicating the violation of CP cannot be properly interpreted within the standard paradigm unless the presence of sterile states of mass O(1 eV) can be conclusively ruled out. Our work underscores the need for a parallel and linked short baseline oscillation program and a highly capable near detector for DUNE, but in order that its highly anticipated results on CP violation in the lepton sector may be correctly interpreted.

  12. The impact of sterile neutrinos on CP measurements at long baselines

    DOE PAGES

    Gandhi, Raj; Kayser, Boris; Masud, Mehedi; ...

    2015-09-01

    With the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) as an example, we show that the presence of even one sterile neutrino of mass ~1 eV can significantly impact the measurements of CP violation in long baseline experiments. Using a probability level analysis and neutrino-antineutrino asymmetry calculations, we discuss the large magnitude of these effects, and show how they translate into significant event rate deviations at DUNE. These results demonstrate that measurements which, when interpreted in the context of the standard three family paradigm, indicate CP conservation at long baselines, may, in fact hide large CP violation if there is a sterilemore » state. Similarly, any data indicating the violation of CP cannot be properly interpreted within the standard paradigm unless the presence of sterile states of mass O(1 eV) can be conclusively ruled out. Our work underscores the need for a parallel and linked short baseline oscillation program and a highly capable near detector for DUNE, but in order that its highly anticipated results on CP violation in the lepton sector may be correctly interpreted.« less

  13. Backtracking algorithm for lepton reconstruction with HADES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellheim, P.; HADES Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The High Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer (HADES) at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung investigates dilepton and strangeness production in elementary and heavy-ion collisions. In April - May 2012 HADES recorded 7 billion Au+Au events at a beam energy of 1.23 GeV/u with the highest multiplicities measured so far. The track reconstruction and particle identification in the high track density environment are challenging. The most important detector component for lepton identification is the Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector. Its main purpose is the separation of electrons and positrons from large background of charged hadrons produced in heavy-ion collisions. In order to improve lepton identification this backtracking algorithm was developed. In this contribution we will show the results of the algorithm compared to the currently applied method for e+/-identification. Efficiency and purity of a reconstructed e+/- sample will be discussed as well.

  14. Mass scaling of leptons and quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, G.

    1992-10-01

    The mass scaling of leptons and quarks is associated with a dynamical symmetry Lie group G and considered to be regulated in a two-dimensional subgroup parameter space S{sub 1}{sup (1)} x S{sub 1}{sup (2)}, a torus that is half-integer Fibonacci. By postregulating simple conditions on the mass dilatation pathways in S{sub 1}{sup (1)} x S{sub 1}{sup (2)}, one obtains mass values consistent with experiment for all twelve leptons and quarks. In particular, the neutrinos {nu}{sub e}, {nu}{sub {mu}}, {nu}{sub {tau}} are predicted to have masses 4.932731 eV, 1.019932 keV and 17.20978 keV, respectively, while the top quark t is predicted to have the mass 145.0027 GeV. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Leptonic Decays of Charged Pseudoscalar Mesons - 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, Jonathan L.; Stone, Sheldon; Van de Water, Ruth S.

    2015-09-07

    We review the physics of purely leptonic decays of $\\pi^\\pm$, $K^\\pm$, $D^{\\pm}$, $D_s^\\pm$, and $B^\\pm$ pseudoscalar mesons. The measured decay rates are related to the product of the relevant weak-interaction-based CKM matrix element of the constituent quarks and a strong interaction parameter related to the overlap of the quark and antiquark wave-functions in the meson, called the decay constant $f_P$. The leptonic decay constants for $\\pi^\\pm$, $K^\\pm$, $D^{\\pm}$, $D_s^\\pm$, and $B^\\pm$ mesons can be obtained with controlled theoretical uncertainties and high precision from {\\it ab initio} lattice-QCD simulations. The combination of experimental leptonic decay-rate measurements and theoretical decay-constant calculations enables the determination of several elements of the CKM matrix within the standard model. These determinations are competitive with those obtained from semileptonic decays, and also complementary because they are sensitive to different quark flavor-changing currents. They can also be used to test the unitarity of the first and second rows of the CKM matrix. Conversely, taking the CKM elements predicted by unitarity, one can infer "experimental" values for $f_P$ that can be compared with theory. These provide tests of lattice-QCD methods, provided new-physics contributions to leptonic decays are negligible at the current level of precision. This review is the basis of the article in the Particle Data Group's 2016 edition, updating the versions in Refs. [1-3].

  16. Leptonic mixing, family symmetries, and neutrino phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Medeiros Varzielas, I. de; Gonzalez Felipe, R.; Serodio, H.

    2011-02-01

    Tribimaximal leptonic mixing is a mass-independent mixing scheme consistent with the present solar and atmospheric neutrino data. By conveniently decomposing the effective neutrino mass matrix associated to it, we derive generic predictions in terms of the parameters governing the neutrino masses. We extend this phenomenological analysis to other mass-independent mixing schemes which are related to the tribimaximal form by a unitary transformation. We classify models that produce tribimaximal leptonic mixing through the group structure of their family symmetries in order to point out that there is often a direct connection between the group structure and the phenomenological analysis. The type of seesaw mechanism responsible for neutrino masses plays a role here, as it restricts the choices of family representations and affects the viability of leptogenesis. We also present a recipe to generalize a given tribimaximal model to an associated model with a different mass-independent mixing scheme, which preserves the connection between the group structure and phenomenology as in the original model. This procedure is explicitly illustrated by constructing toy models with the transpose tribimaximal, bimaximal, golden ratio, and hexagonal leptonic mixing patterns.

  17. Averages of B-Hadron, C-Hadron, and tau-lepton properties as of early 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Amhis, Y.; et al.

    2012-07-01

    This article reports world averages of measurements of b-hadron, c-hadron, and tau-lepton properties obtained by the Heavy Flavor Averaging Group (HFAG) using results available through the end of 2011. In some cases results available in the early part of 2012 are included. For the averaging, common input parameters used in the various analyses are adjusted (rescaled) to common values, and known correlations are taken into account. The averages include branching fractions, lifetimes, neutral meson mixing parameters, CP violation parameters, parameters of semileptonic decays and CKM matrix elements.

  18. Leptophobic Boson Signals with Leptons, Jets and Missing Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.

    2015-06-14

    Color-singlet gauge bosons with renormalizable couplings to quarks but not to leptons must interact with additional fermions (''anomalons'') required to cancel the gauge anomalies. Analyzing the decays of such leptophobic bosons into anomalons, I show that they produce final states involving leptons at the LHC. Resonant production of a flavor-universal leptophobic Z' boson leads to cascade decays via anomalons, whose signatures include a leptonically decaying Z, missing energy and several jets. A Z' boson that couples to the right-handed quarks of the first and second generations undergoes cascade decays that violate lepton universality and include signals with two leptons and jets, or with a Higgs boson, a lepton, a W and missing energy.

  19. B meson decays in leptons: powerful probes of new physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotondo, Marcello

    2014-11-01

    We review some recent measurements of B meson decays that involve leptons in the final states and that are sensitive to physics beyond the Standard Model, such as the electroweak penguin decays B → Xsℓ+ℓ-, the Lepton Number Violating process B → Xℓ±ℓ'± and the tree-level dominated decay with τ leptons: B → τντ and B → D(∗)τντ.

  20. Beam normal spin asymmetry in elastic lepton-nucleon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    M. Gorchtein; P.A.M. Guichon; M. Vanderhaeghen

    2004-04-01

    We discuss the two-photon exchange contribution to observables which involve lepton helicity flip in elastic lepton-nucleon scattering. This contribution is accessed through the spin asymmetry for a lepton beam polarized normal to the scattering plane. We estimate this beam normal spin asymmetry at large momentum transfer using a parton model and we express the corresponding amplitude in terms of generalized parton distributions.

  1. CT-1-CP-induced ventricular electrical remodeling in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-fen; Wei, Tao-zhi; Rao, Li-ya; Xu, Ming-guang; Dong, Zhan-ling

    2015-02-01

    . The QRS complex had no significant change in control group, one-week and three-week CT-1-CP-treated groups, but prolonged significantly in two-week and four-week CT-1-CP-treated groups. Interestingly, the QTd after chest-opening was significantly greater than that before chest-opening in control group (t=5.242, P<0.01), but decreased along with the time in CT-1-CP-treated groups. The mean MAP amplitude, Vmax and APD were greater in CT-1-CP-treated groups than those in control group, and became more obvious along with the time. The APD in four CT-1-CP-treat groups was prolonged mainly in middle to final repolarization phase. The difference among these groups became significant in middle phase (APD50) (F=6.076, P<0.01) and increased furthermore in late and final phases (APD70: F=10.054; APD90: F=18.691, P<0.01) along with the time of injection of CT-1-CP. The chronic action of CT-1-CP might induce the adapting alteration in cardiac conductivity and ventricular repolarization. The amplitude and the Vmax of the anterior LV epicardial MAP increased obviously, and the APD prolonged mainly in late and final phase of repolarization.

  2. Model-independent analysis of CP violation in charmed meson decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-06-01

    We present a model-independent analysis of CP violation, inspired by recent experimental observations, in charmed meson decays. The topological diagram approach is used to study direct CP asymmetries for singly Cabibbo-suppressed two-body hadronic decays of charmed mesons. We extract the magnitudes and relative phases of the corresponding topological amplitudes from available experimental information. In order to get more precise and reliable estimates of direct CP asymmetries, we take into account contributions from all possible strong penguin amplitudes, including the internal b-quark penguin contributions. We also study flavor SU(3) symmetry breaking effects in these decay modes and consequently predict direct CP asymmetries of unmeasured modes.

  3. Quark flavour conserving violations of the lepton number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binétruy, P.; Dudas, E.; Lavignac, S.; Savoy, C. A.

    1998-03-01

    We study supersymmetric models of lepton and baryon number violation based on an abelian family gauge group. Due to possible lepton-Higgs mixing, the lepton violating couplings are related to the Yukawa couplings and may be generated by them even if they were absent in the original theory. Such terms may be dominant and are not given by the naive family charge counting rules. This enhancement mechanism can provide an alignment between lepton-number violating terms and Yukawa couplings: as a result they conserve quark flavour. A natural way of suppressing baryon number violation in this class of models is also proposed.

  4. Measurement of the CP-violating phase Φs and the Bs0 meson decay width difference with Bs0 → J/ψΦ decays in ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Childers, J. T.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell’Acqua, A.; Dell’Asta, L.; Dell’Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. 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S.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, J-P.; Meyer, J.; Middleton, R. P.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mijović, L.; Mikenberg, G.; Mikestikova, M.; Mikuž, M.; Milesi, M.; Milic, A.; Miller, D. W.; Mills, C.; Milov, A.; Milstead, D. A.; Minaenko, A. A.; Minami, Y.; Minashvili, I. A.; Mincer, A. I.; Mindur, B.; Mineev, M.; Ming, Y.; Mir, L. M.; Mitani, T.; Mitrevski, J.; Mitsou, V. A.; Miucci, A.; Miyagawa, P. S.; Mjörnmark, J. U.; Moa, T.; Mochizuki, K.; Mohapatra, S.; Mohr, W.; Molander, S.; Moles-Valls, R.; Mönig, K.; Monini, C.; Monk, J.; Monnier, E.; Montejo Berlingen, J.; Monticelli, F.; Monzani, S.; Moore, R. W.; Morange, N.; Moreno, D.; Moreno Llácer, M.; Morettini, P.; Morgenstern, M.; Mori, D.; Morii, M.; Morinaga, M.; Morisbak, V.; Moritz, S.; Morley, A. K.; Mornacchi, G.; Morris, J. D.; Mortensen, S. S.; Morton, A.; Morvaj, L.; Mosidze, M.; Moss, J.; Motohashi, K.; Mount, R.; Mountricha, E.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Moyse, E. J. W.; Muanza, S.; Mudd, R. D.; Mueller, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, R. S. P.; Mueller, T.; Muenstermann, D.; Mullen, P.; Mullier, G. A.; Murillo Quijada, J. A.; Murray, W. J.; Musheghyan, H.; Musto, E.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nachman, B. P.; Nackenhorst, O.; Nadal, J.; Nagai, K.; Nagai, R.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, K.; Nagarkar, A.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nagata, K.; Nagel, M.; Nagy, E.; Nairz, A. M.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, I.; Namasivayam, H.; Naranjo Garcia, R. F.; Narayan, R.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Nechaeva, P. Yu.; Neep, T. J.; Nef, P. D.; Negri, A.; Negrini, M.; Nektarijevic, S.; Nellist, C.; Nelson, A.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neumann, M.; Neves, R. M.; Nevski, P.; Newman, P. R.; Nguyen, D. H.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nicquevert, B.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforou, N.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsen, J. K.; Nilsson, P.; Ninomiya, Y.; Nisati, A.; Nisius, R.; Nobe, T.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Nooney, T.; Norberg, S.; Nordberg, M.; Novgorodova, O.; Nowak, S.; Nozaki, M.; Nozka, L.; Ntekas, K.; Nunes Hanninger, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurse, E.; Nuti, F.; O’Brien, B. J.; O’grady, F.; O’Neil, D. C.; O’Shea, V.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Obermann, T.; Ocariz, J.; Ochi, A.; Ochoa, I.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Ogren, H.; Oh, A.; Oh, S. H.; Ohm, C. C.; Ohman, H.; Oide, H.; Okamura, W.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Olariu, A.; Olivares Pino, S. A.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Oliver Garcia, E.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlando, N.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Otero y Garzon, G.; Otono, H.; Ouchrif, M.; Ouellette, E. A.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Ovcharova, A.; Owen, M.; Owen, R. E.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagáčová, M.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paganis, E.; Paige, F.; Pais, P.; Pajchel, K.; Palacino, G.; Palestini, S.; Palka, M.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Pan, Y. B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Pandini, C. E.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Paolozzi, L.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, K. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N. D.; Pater, J. R.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pearson, B.; Pedersen, L. E.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Penc, O.; Peng, C.; Peng, H.; Penning, B.; Penwell, J.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petroff, P.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pignotti, D. T.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pinto, B.; Pires, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitt, M.; Pizio, C.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M. -A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Pluth, D.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Poley, A.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, L. 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D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simoniello, R.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Denis, R. D. St.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. 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M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-08-24

    Here, a measurement of the Bs0 decay parameters in the Bs0 → J/ψΦ channel using an integrated luminosity of 14.3 fb–1 collected by the ATLAS detector from 8 TeV pp collisions at the LHC is presented. The measured parameters include the CP -violating phase Φs, the decay width Γs and the width difference between the mass eigenstates ΔΓs.

  5. On the Role of Low-Energy CP Violation in Leptogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchet, Steve; Pérez, Pavel Fileviez

    The link between low-energy CP violation and leptogenesis became more accessible with the understanding of flavor effects. However, a definite well-motivated model where such a link occurs was still lacking. Adjoint SU(5) is a simple grand unified theory where neutrino masses are generated through the Type I and Type III seesaw mechanisms, and the lepton asymmetry is generated by the fermionic triplet responsible for the Type III seesaw. We focus exclusively on the case of inverted hierarchy for neutrinos, and we show that successful flavored leptogenesis in this theory strongly points towards low-energy CP violation. Moreover, since the range of allowed masses for the triplet is very restricted, we find that the discovery at the LHC of new states present in the theory, together with proton decay and unification of gauge couplings, can conspire to provide a hint in favor of leptogenesis.

  6. Supersymmetry and CP violation in {delta}S=1 {tau} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Delepine, D.; Faisel, G.; Khalil, S.; Lopez Castro, G.

    2006-09-01

    We compute the supersymmetry (SUSY) effective Hamiltonian that describes the {delta}S=1 semileptonic decays of tau leptons. We provide analytical expressions for supersymmetric contribution to {tau}{yields}us{nu}{sub {tau}} transition in mass insertion approximation. We show that SUSY contributions may enhance the CP asymmetry of {tau}{yields}K{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays by several orders of magnitude with respect to the standard model expectations. However, the resulting asymmetry is still well below the current experimental limits obtained by CLEO Collaborations. We emphasize that measuring CP rate asymmetry in this decay larger than 10{sup -6} would be a clear evidence of physics beyond the supersymmetric extensions of the standard model.

  7. Probing the CP nature of Higgs couplings in tth events at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiolhais, Miguel; Pease, Christopher; Onofre, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    The CP nature of the Higgs coupling to top quarks (tth) is studied in proton-proton collision events at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV at the LHC. Pure scalar and pseudo-scalar Higgs boson signal events are generated with MadGraph5_aMC@NLO, and analysed in dileptonic final states with two oppositely charged leptons and four jets. These events are fully reconstructed by applying a kinematic fit. As a result, new angular distributions of the decay products as well as CP angular asymmetries are explored to separate the scalar from the pseudo-scalar components of the Higgs boson, which allows to reduce the contribution from the dominant irreducible background, ttbb. In addition, significant differences between the angular distributions and asymmetries are observed, providing new observables for a global fit of the Higgs couplings parameters.

  8. Neutral B-meson Mixing and CP Violation at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; LHCb Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    The LHCb detector is a single-arm forward spectrometer that collects data at the LHC, designed for studies of flavour physics with high precision. We present a selection of recent measurements of mixing and CP-violating parameters, including sin 2β and weak phase ϕ s, using several decays. A good understanding of the pollution from sub-leading penguin to pologies in these measurements can be achieved by measuring CP violation and polarization in the decay Bs 0→Jψ⁄K 0* and B 0→Jψ⁄ ρ 0. All results here presented are obtained using the full Run I dataset.

  9. Search for lepton-flavor and lepton-number violation in the decay tau(-) -->l-(+)h+(-)h'(-).

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Vazquez, W P; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2005-11-04

    A search for lepton-flavor and lepton-number violation in the decay of the tau lepton into one charged lepton and two charged hadrons is performed using 221.4 fb(-1) of data collected at an e+e- center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II storage ring. In all 14 decay modes considered, the observed data are compatible with background expectations, and upper limits are set in the range B(tau-->lhh')<(0.7 - 4.8) x 10(-7) at 90% confidence level.

  10. Why Quarks are Different from Leptons - An Explanation by a Fermionic Substructure of Leptons and Quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpf, H.

    2004-11-01

    To explain the difference between leptons and quarks, it is assumed that electroweak gauge bosons, leptons and quarks are composites of elementary fermionic constituents denoted by partons (not to be identified with quarks) or subfermions, respectively. The dynamical law of these constituents is assumed to be given by a relativistically invariant nonlinear spinor field theory with local interaction, canonical quantization, selfregularization and probability interpretation. According to the general requirements of field operator algebraic theory, this model is formulated in algebraic Schroedinger representation referred to generating functionals in functional state spaces. The derivation of the corresponding effective dynamics for the composite particles is studied by the construction of a map between the spinor field state functionals and the state functionals of the effective theory for gauge bosons, leptons and quarks. A closer examination of this map shows that it is then and then only selfconsistent if certain boundary conditions are satisfied. The latter enforce in the case of electroweak symmetry breaking the difference between lepton and quark states. This difference can be analytically expressed as conditions to be imposed on the wave functions of these composite particles and leads ultimately to the introduction and interpretation of color for quarks, i.e., the characteristic of their strong interaction

  11. Leptonic and semileptonic decays of B mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingfelder, Jochen; Mannel, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Semileptonic decays are ideally suited to study the weak interaction as well as strong interaction effects in B -meson decays. In the last decade, precision studies of semileptonic B decays have been made possible by the large samples of B mesons collected at the B factories KEKB in Japan and PEP-II in the USA. Measurements of the charged-current semileptonic transitions b →q ℓν (q =u , c ) allow for a determination of the magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements Vc b and Vu b and the masses of the b and c quarks, which are fundamental parameters of the standard model of particle physics. The values of |Vc b| and |Vu b| are determined from measurements of inclusive B decays in combination with calculations of partial decay rates or from exclusive decays combined with theoretical predictions of hadronic form factors. Purely leptonic B decays B →ℓν (ℓ=e , μ , τ ) also provide access to |Vu b|. They are theoretically simpler, but the available signal samples are still small. Decays involving a τ lepton, B →τ ν and B →D(*)τ ν , are sensitive to new physics, in particular, to charged Higgs bosons in models with an extended Higgs sector, and provide a window to the physics of the third generation. In this article, the measurements and theoretical descriptions of charged-current leptonic and semileptonic B decays and the status of |Vc b| and |Vu b| determinations are reviewed. An overview of the theoretical approaches and the experimental techniques used in the study of these decays is also provided.

  12. Studies of discrete symmetries in a purely leptonic system using the Jagiellonian Positron Emission Tomograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskal, P.; Alfs, D.; Bednarski, T.; Białas, P.; Curceanu, C.; Czerwiński, E.; Dulski, K.; Gajos, A.; Głowacz, B.; Gupta-Sharma, N.; Gorgol, M.; Hiesmayr, B. C.; Jasińska, B.; Kamińska, D.; Khreptak, O.; Korcyl, G.; Kowalski, P.; Krzemień, W.; Krawczyk, N.; Kubicz, E.; Mohammed, M.; Niedźwiecki, Sz.; Pawlik-Niedńwiecka, M.; Raczyński, L.; Rudy, Z.; Silarski, M.; Smyrski, J.; Wieczorek, A.; Wiślicki, W.; Zgardzińska, B.; Zieliński, M.

    2016-11-01

    Discrete symmetries such as parity (P), charge-conjugation (C) and time reversal (T) are of fundamental importance in physics and cosmology. Breaking of charge conjugation symmetry (C) and its combination with parity (CP) constitute necessary conditions for the existence of the asymmetry between matter and antimatter in the observed Universe. The presently known sources of discrete symmetries violations can account for only a tiny fraction of the excess of matter over antimatter. So far CP and T symmetries violations were observed only for systems involving quarks and they were never reported for the purely leptonic objects. In this article we describe briefly an experimental proposal for the test of discrete symmetries in the decays of positronium atom which is made exclusively of leptons. The experiments are conducted by means of the Jagiellonian Positron Emission Tomograph (J-PET) which is constructed from strips of plastic scintillators enabling registration of photons from the positronium annihilation. J-PET tomograph together with the positronium target system enable to measure expectation values for the discrete symmetries odd operators constructed from (i) spin vector of the ortho-positronium atom, (ii) momentum vectors of photons originating from the decay of positronium, and (iii) linear polarization direction of annihilation photons. Linearly polarized positronium will be produced in the highly porous aerogel or polymer targets, exploiting longitudinally polarized positrons emitted by the sodium 22Na isotope. Information about the polarization vector of orthopositronium will be available on the event by event basis and will be reconstructed from the known position of the positron source and the reconstructed position of the orthopositronium annihilation. In 2016 the first tests and calibration runs are planned, and the data collection with high statistics will commence in the year 2017.

  13. Supersymmetric dark matter and lepton flavor violation

    SciTech Connect

    Barger, Vernon; Marfatia, Danny; Mustafayev, Azar; Soleimani, Ali

    2009-10-01

    We study lepton flavor-violating (LFV) processes within a supersymmetric type-I seesaw framework with flavor-blind universal boundary conditions, properly accounting for the effect of the neutrino sector on the dark matter relic abundance. We consider several possibilities for the neutrino Yukawa coupling matrix and show that in regions of SUSY parameter space that yield the correct neutralino relic density, LFV rates can differ from naive estimates by up to 2 orders of magnitude. Contrary to common belief, we find that current LFV limits do not exclude neutrino Yukawa couplings larger than top Yukawa couplings. We introduce the ISAJET-M program that was used for the computations.

  14. New results on the tau lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, K.K.

    1987-11-01

    This is a review of new results on the tau lepton. The results include precise measurements of the lifetime, measurements of the decay tau/sup -/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/2..pi../sup 0/nu/sub tau/ with much improved precision, and limits on decay modes containing eta mesons, including the second-class-current decay tau/sup -/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/eta nu/sub tau/. The implications of these new results on the discrepancy in the one-charged-particle decay modes are discussed. 52 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Constraining new interactions with leptonic {tau} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Pich, A.; Silva, J.P.

    1995-10-01

    The recent measurements of the Michel parameters in {tau} decays enable, for the first time, a thorough analysis of the leptonic sector. In general, in models beyond the standard model, these parameters will be altered through changes in the {ital W} and {ital Z} couplings, and/or through interactions mediated by new gauge bosons. We perform a complete, model-independent analysis of the constraints imposed by the present data on such boson-mediated interactions, and point out the existence of useful relations among the couplings.

  16. LEPTON AND PHOTON PHYSICS AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    TANNENBAUM,M.J.

    2003-01-06

    Results on physics at RHIC using outgoing leptons and photons will be presented from Au+Au collisions at nucleon-nucleon c.m. energies {radical}(sNN) = 130 GeV and 200 GeV, and from p-p collisions at {radical}(sNN) = 200 GeV. Introduction and motivation will be presented both from the theoretical and experimental perspectives. Topics include open charm production via single e{sup {+-}}, J/{Psi} {yields} e{sup +} + e{sup -}, {mu}{sup +} + {mu}{sup -} and inclusive photon production.

  17. Lepton Flavor Violation. — Experimental —

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, M.

    2005-06-01

    Lepton flavor violation (LFV) in the charged sector has been gaining great interests these days. Experimental researches looking for muon LFV such as MEG and MECO are in preparation, and aiming to discover the muon LFV signal within this decade. There is also another activity called PRISM/PRIME project underway, which aims to expand muon LFV research furthermore. The status of those experimental studies will be described. The idea of building Muon Factory and its relevance to the future of neutrino physics is also commented upon.

  18. Leptonic decays of the Ds meson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Heister, A.; Schael, S.; Barate, R.; De Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Boix, G.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Graugés, E.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Buchmüller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Greening, T. C.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schneider, O.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Ward, J.; Badaud, F.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J.-C.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Swynghedauw, M.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Spagnolo, P.; Halley, A.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Thompson, A. S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Marinelli, N.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Thompson, J. C.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C. K.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Pearson, M. R.; Robertson, N. A.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Leroy, O.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Hüttmann, K.; Lütjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Settles, R.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacholkowska, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Veillet, J.-J.; Yuan, C.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Foà, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Cowan, G.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Norton, P. R.; Tomalin, I. R.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S. R.; Berkelman, K.; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P. A.; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y. B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.

    2002-02-01

    The purely leptonic decays Ds-->τν and Ds-->μν are studied in a sample of four million hadronic /Z decays collected with the ALEPH detector at the LEP e+e- collider from 1991 to 1995. The branching fractions are extracted from a combination of two analyses, one optimized to select Ds-->τν decays with /τ-->eνν¯ or /μνν¯, and the other optimized for Ds-->μν decays. The results are used to evaluate the Ds decay constant, within the Standard Model: fDs=[285+/-19(stat)+/-40(syst)] MeV.

  19. Tensor mesons produced in tau lepton decays

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez Castro, G.; Munoz, J. H.

    2011-05-01

    Light tensor mesons (T=a{sub 2}, f{sub 2} and K{sub 2}*) can be produced in decays of {tau} leptons. In this paper we compute the branching ratios of {tau}{yields}T{pi}{nu} decays by assuming the dominance of intermediate virtual states to model the form factors involved in the relevant hadronic matrix elements. The exclusive f{sub 2}(1270){pi}{sup -} decay mode turns out to have the largest branching ratio, of O(10{sup -4}). Our results indicate that the contribution of tensor meson intermediate states to the three-pseudoscalar channels of {tau} decays are rather small.

  20. Testing the CP-violating MSSM in stau decays at the LHC and ILC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreiner, Herbi; Kittel, Olaf; Kulkarni, Suchita; Marold, Anja

    2011-05-01

    We study CP violation in the two-body decay of a scalar tau into a neutralino and a tau, which should be probed at the LHC and ILC. From the normal tau polarization, a CP asymmetry is defined which is sensitive to the CP phases of the trilinear scalar coupling parameter Aτ, the gaugino mass parameter M1, and the Higgsino mass parameter μ, in the stau-neutralino sector of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. Asymmetries of more than 70% are obtained in scenarios with strong stau mixing. As a result, detectable CP asymmetries in stau decays at the LHC are found, motivating further detailed experimental studies for probing the supersymmetry CP phases.

  1. Gauge-Higgs unification and quark-lepton phenomenology in the warped spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Hosotani, Y.; Noda, S.; Sakamura, Y.; Shimasaki, S.

    2006-05-01

    In the dynamical gauge-Higgs unification of electroweak interactions in the Randall-Sundrum warped spacetime, the Higgs boson mass is predicted in the range 120-290 GeV, provided that the spacetime structure is determined at the Planck scale. Couplings of quarks and leptons to gauge bosons and their Kaluza-Klein excited states are determined by the masses of quarks and leptons. All quarks and leptons other than top quarks have very small couplings to the Kaluza-Klein excited states of gauge bosons. The universality of weak interactions is slightly broken by magnitudes of 10{sup -8}, 10{sup -6}, and 10{sup -2} for {mu}-e, {tau}-e and t-e, respectively. Yukawa couplings become substantially smaller than those in the standard model, by a factor cos(1/2){theta}{sub W} where {theta}{sub W} is the non-Abelian Aharonov-Bohm phase (the Wilson line phase) associated with dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking.

  2. Impact of a CP-violating Higgs sector: from LHC to baryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jing; Zhang, Yue

    2013-08-30

    We observe a generic connection between LHC Higgs data and electroweak baryogenesis: the particle that contributes to the CP-odd hgg or hγγ vertex would provide the CP-violating source during a first-order phase transition. It is illustrated in the two Higgs doublet model that a common complex phase controls the lightest Higgs properties at the LHC, electric dipole moments, and the CP-violating source for electroweak baryogenesis. We perform a general parametrization of Higgs effective couplings and a global fit to the LHC Higgs data. Current LHC measurements prefer a nonzero phase for tanβ≲1 and electric dipole moment constraints still allow an order-one phase for tanβ∼1, which gives sufficient room to generate the correct cosmic baryon asymmetry. We also give some prospects in the direct measurements of CP violation in the Higgs sector at the LHC.

  3. Change of Electroweak Nuclear Reaction Rates by CP- and Isospin Symmetry Breaking - A Model Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpf, Harald

    2006-09-01

    Based on the assumption that electroweak bosons, leptons and quarks possess a substructure of elementary fermionic constituents, in previous papers the effect of CP-symmetry breaking on the effective dynamics of these particles was calculated. Motivated by the phenomenological procedure in this paper, isospin symmetry breaking will be added and the physical consequences of these calculations will be discussed. The dynamical law of the fermionic constituents is given by a relativistically invariant nonlinear spinor field equation with local interaction, canonical quantization, selfregularization and probability interpretation. The corresponding effective dynamics is derived by algebraic weak mapping theorems. In contrast to the commonly applied modifications of the quark mass matrices, CP-symmetry breaking is introduced into this algebraic formalism by an inequivalent vacuum with respect to the CP-invariant case, represented by a modified spinor field propagator. This leads to an extension of the standard model as effective theory which contains besides the "electric" electroweak bosons additional "magnetic" electroweak bosons and corresponding interactions. If furthermore the isospin invariance of the propagator is broken too, it will be demonstrated in detail that in combination with CP-symmetry breaking this induces a considerable modification of electroweak nuclear reaction rates.

  4. A search for close-mass lepton doublet

    SciTech Connect

    Riles, J.K.

    1989-04-01

    Described is a search for a heavy charged lepton with an associated neutrino of nearly the same mass, together known as a close-mass lepton doublet. The search is conducted in e/sup +/e/sup/minus// annihilation data taken with the Mark II detector at a center-of-mass energy of 29 GeV. In order to suppress contamination from conventional two-photon reactions, the search applies a novel, radiative-tagging technique. Requiring the presence of an isolated, energetic photon allows exploration for lepton doublets with a mass splitting smaller than that previously accessible to experiment. No evidence for such a new lepton has been found, enabling limits to be placed on allowed mass combinations. Mass differences as low as 250-300 MeV are excluded for charged lepton masses up to 10 GeV. 78 refs., 64 figs., 8 tabs.

  5. B decays and lepton flavour (universality) violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crivellin, A.

    2016-07-01

    LHCb found hints for physics beyond the standard model in Bto K^*μ^+μ^- , Bto K^*μ^+μ^-/Bto K^*e^+e^- and B_stoφμ^+μ^- . In addition, the BABAR results for Bto D^{(*)}τν and the CMS excess in htoτ^±μ^∓ also point towards lepton flavour (universality) violating new physics. While Bto D^{(*)}τν and htoτ^±μ^∓ can be naturally explained by an extended Higgs sector, the probably most promising explanation for the bto sμμ anomalies is a Z' boson. Furthermore, combining a 2HDM with a gauged L_μ-L_τ symmetry allows for explaining the bto sμ^+μ^- anomalies and htoτ^±μ^∓ simultaneously, with interesting correlations to τto3μ . In the light of these deviations from the SM we also discuss the possibilities of observing lepton flavour violating B decays ( e.g. Bto K^{(*)}τ^±μ^∓ and B_stoτ^±μ^∓ in Z^' models.

  6. Measurement of tau lepton branching fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, Neil Allen

    1993-09-30

    We present τ- lepton branching fraction measurements based on data from the TPC/Two-Gamma detector at PEP. Using a sample of τ- → vτK-π+π- events, we examine the resonance structure of the K-π+π- system and obtain the first measurements of branching fractions for τ- → vτK$-\\atop{1}$(1270) and τ- → vτK$-\\atop{1}$(1400). We also describe a complete set of branching fraction measurements in which all the decays of the τ- lepton are separated into classes defined by the identities of the charged particles and an estimate of the number of neutrals. This is the first such global measurement with decay classes defined by the four possible charged particle species, e, μ, π, and K.

  7. Measurements of heavy quark and lepton lifetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1985-02-01

    The PEP/PETRA energy range has proved to be well-suited for the study of the lifetimes of hadrons containing the b and c quarks and the tau lepton for several reasons. First, these states comprise a large fraction of the total interaction rate in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation and can be cleanly identified. Second, the storage rings have operated at high luminosity and so produced these exotic states copiously. And finally, thanks to the interplay of the Fermi coupling strength, the quark and lepton masses, and the beam energy, the expected decay lengths are in the 1/2 mm range and so are comparatively easy to measure. This pleasant coincidence of cleanly identified and abundant signal with potentially large effects has made possible the first measurements of two fundamental weak couplings, tau ..-->.. nu/sub tau/W and b ..-->.. cW. These measurements have provided a sharp test of the standard model and allowed, for the first time, the full determination of the magnitudes of the quark mixing matrix. This paper reviews the lifetime studies made at PEP during the past year. It begins with a brief review of the three detectors, DELCO, MAC and MARK II, which have reported lifetime measurements. Next it discusses two new measurements of the tau lifetime, and briefly reviews a measurement of the D/sup 0/ lifetime. Finally, it turns to measurements of the B lifetime, which are discussed in some detail. 18 references, 14 figures, 1 table.

  8. Decays of the heavy lepton, tau (1785)

    SciTech Connect

    Blocker, C.A.

    1980-04-01

    The structure of the weak hadronic current coupled to the tau is investigated via some of the hadronic decays of the tau. The vector current coupling is determined by measuring the tau ..-->.. rho ..nu../sub tau/ branching ratio. The axial-vector coupling is determined by measuring the tau ..-->.. ..pi.. ..nu../sub tau/ branching ratio. The Cabibbo structure of the hadronic current is established by observing the decay tau ..-->.. K*(890)..nu../sub tau/ and measuring its branching ratio. The branching ratios for the decays tau ..-->.. e anti ..nu../sub e/..nu../sub tau/ and tau ..-->.. ..mu.. anti ..nu../sub ..mu../..nu../sub tau/ are measured as a normalization for the hadronic decays and as a check on the validity of the measurements. The leptonic branching ratios agree well with previous experiments. From a kinematic fit to the pion energy spectrum in the decay tau ..-->.. ..pi.. ..nu../sub tau/, an upper limit (95% confidence level) of 245 MeV is placed on the tau neutrino mass. From a simultaneous fit of the center of mass energy dependence of the tau production cross section and the pion energy spectrum in the decay tau ..-->.. ..pi.. ..nu../sub tau/, the tau mass is determined to be 1.787 +- .010 GeV/c. All properties of the tau measured here are consistent with it being a sequential lepton coupled to the ordinary weak hadronic current.

  9. The discovery reach of CP violation in neutrino oscillation with non-standard interaction effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Zini; Dasgupta, Arnab; Adhikari, Rathin

    2015-06-01

    We have studied the CP violation discovery reach in a neutrino oscillation experiment with superbeam, neutrino factory and monoenergetic neutrino beam from the electron capture process. For NSI satisfying model-dependent bound for shorter baselines (like CERN-Fréjus set-up) there is insignificant effect of NSI on the the discovery reach of CP violation due to δ. Particularly, for the superbeam and neutrino factory we have also considered relatively longer baselines for which there could be significant NSI effects on CP violation discovery reach for higher allowed values of NSI. For the monoenergetic beam only shorter baselines are considered to study CP violation with different nuclei as neutrino sources. Interestingly for non-standard interactions—{{\\varepsilon }eμ } and {{\\varepsilon }eτ } of neutrinos with matter during propagation in longer baselines in the superbeam, there is the possibility of better discovery reach of CP violation than that with only Standard Model interactions of neutrinos with matter. For complex NSI we have shown the CP violation discovery reach in the plane of Dirac phase δ and NSI phase {{φ }ij}. The CP violation due to some values of δ remain unobservable with present and near future experimental facilities in the superbeam and neutrino factory. However, in the presence of some ranges of off-diagonal NSI phase values there are some possibilities of discovering total CP violation for any {{δ }CP} value even at 5σ confidence level for neutrino factory. Our analysis indicates that for some values of NSI phases total CP violation may not be at all observable for any values of δ. Combination of shorter and longer baselines could indicate in some cases the presence of NSI. However, in general for NSIs ≲ 1 the CP violation discovery reach is better in neutrino factory set-ups. Using a neutrino beam from the electron capture process for nuclei 50110Sn and 152Yb, we have shown the discovery reach of CP violation in a neutrino

  10. CpG 7909: PF 3512676, PF-3512676.

    PubMed

    2006-01-01

    's proprietary line of TLR Therapeutic products. Together with prior awards, the new contract brings the total committed biodefense funding for Coley to 35 million US dollars. During the first quater of 2006, Pfizer disclosed its intention to develop CpG 7909 for breast cancer. A phase I/II trial in patients with NHL has also been conducted in 24 patients with relapsed or refractory disease at the University of Iowa. Pfizer initiated two international phase III trials under the special protocol assessment (SPA) procedure of the US FDA. These trials are evaluating CpG 7909 in combination with chemotherapy versus chemotherapy alone as a first-line treatment for patients with advanced (stage IIIb or IV) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Approximately 800 patients will be enrolled in each trial. The primary endpoint is overall survival time. In 2005, Coley completed a multinational phase IIb trial of CpG 7909 in combination with chemotherapy in 112 patients with NSCLC. The goal of the study was to improve the outcome of standard first-line chemotherapeutic regimens (taxane and platinum) for NSCLC by adding CpG 7909. Coley has been granted 11 US patents, covering key aspects of the company's CpG TLR9 antagonist technologies. Three US patents relating to CpG 7909 and the use of certain oligonucleotides for treating cancer are due to expire in 2014. Coley also has pending US patent applications covering the specific sequence of CpG 7909 and its use to treat cancer, which, if issued, would be expected to expire between 2014 and 2017. In April 2004, Coley received US Patent No. 6,727,230 covering the use of oligonucleotides containing at least one phosphorothioate linkage to stimulate cellular immune responses. In November 2003, Coley received US Patent No. 6,653,292, which protects the use of TLR9-containing oligonucleotides to treat or prevent cancer or to enhance multimodal cancer treatment regimens. In July 2002, Coley received US Patent No. 6,406,705 covering its Cp

  11. The comparison of antioxidative and hepatoprotective activities of Codonopsis pilosula polysaccharide (CP) and sulfated CP.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cui; Chen, Jin; Li, Entao; Fan, Qiang; Wang, Deyun; Li, Peng; Li, Xiuping; Chen, Xingying; Qiu, Shulei; Gao, Zhenzhen; Li, Hongquan; Hu, Yuanliang

    2015-02-01

    Codonopsis pilosula polysaccharide (CP) was extracted, purified and modified by chlorosulfonic acid-pyridine method to obtain a sulfated CP (sCP). Their antioxidative activities in vitro were compared through the free radical-scavenging test. The results demonstrated that the scavenging capabilities of sCP were significantly stronger than those of CP. In vivo test, the mice hepatic injury model was prepared by BCG/LPS method, then administrated respectively with sCP and CP at three dosages, the biochemical indexes in serum, antioxidative indexes in liver homogenate and histopathological change in liver of the mice were compared. The results showed that in high (200mg/kg) and middle (150mg/kg) dosages of sCP groups, the contents of ALT, AST and TNF-α in serum and MDA in liver homogenate were significantly lower than those in the model group and numerically lower than those in the CP groups, the activities of SOD and GSH-Px in liver homogenate were significantly higher than those in the model group and numerically higher than those in the CP groups. In the model group there were obvious pathological changes in the liver, while in the sCP groups were near normal. These results indicate that sCP and CP possess antioxidative activity in vitro and in vivo, the activity of sCP is stronger than that of CP and sulfation modification can enhance the antioxidative and hepatoprotective activities of Codonopsis pilosula polysaccharide.

  12. CP violation in top physics at the NLC

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, D.; Soni, A.

    1996-09-18

    Top quark is extremely sensitive to non-standard CP violating phases. General strategies for exposing different types of phases at the NLC are outlined. SUSY phase(s) cause PRA in t {yields} Wb. The transverse polarization of the {tau} in the reaction t {yields} b{tau}{nu} is extremely sensitive to a phase from the charged Higgs sector. Phase(s) from the neutral Higgs sector cause appreciable dipole moment effects and lead to sizable asymmetries in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} t{anti t}H{sup 0} and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} t{anti t}{nu}{sub e}{anti {nu}}{sub e}.

  13. Search for fourth generation neutral heavy leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Abachi, S.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; D0 Collaboration

    1995-07-01

    A search for fourth generation neutral heavy leptons ({nu}{sub 4}) in W decays was carried out the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}{bar s} = 1.8 TeV. The {nu}{sub 4} is assumed to be produced via mixing with the first generation neutrino only. We looked for a three electron final state event topology. The data used in this analysis represent 12.2 pb{sup {minus}1} taken during the 1992--1993 run. No candidates were found. We set a preliminary limit beyond the LEP limit for the considered mixing case on the {vert_bar}U{sub e4}{vert_bar}{sup 2} {minus} m{sub {nu}4} plane.

  14. Lepton asymmetry and neutrino oscillations interplay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirilova, Daniela

    2013-03-01

    We discuss the interplay between lepton asymmetry L and ν oscillations in the early Universe. Neutrino oscillations may suppress or enhance previously existing L. On the other hand L is capable to suppress or enhance neutrino oscillations. The mechanism of L enhancement in MSW resonant ν oscillations in the early Universe is numerically analyzed. L cosmological effects through ν oscillations are discussed. We discuss how L may change the cosmological BBN constraints on neutrino and show that BBN model with ν_e leftrightarrow ν_s oscillations is extremely sensitive to L - it allows to obtain the most stringent constraints on L value. We discuss also the cosmological role of active-sterile ν mixing and L in connection with the indications about additional relativistic density in the early Universe, pointed out by BBN, CMB and LSS data and the analysis of global ν data.

  15. Vector Unparticle Contributions to Lepton g-2

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, John A.; Gainer, James S.

    2009-02-02

    The generic unparticle propagator may be modified in two ways. Breaking the conformal symmetry effectively adds a mass term to the propagator, while considering vacuum polarization corrections adds a width-like term. Both of these modifications result naturally from the coupling of the unparticle to standard model (SM) fields. We explore how these modifications to the propagator affect the calculation of the lepton anomalous magnetic moment using an integral approximation of the propagator that is accurate for d {approx}< 1.5, where d is the unparticle dimension. We find that for this range of d and various values of the conformal breaking scale {mu}, the value of g-2 calculated when allowing various SM fermions to run in the unparticle self-energy loops does not significantly deviate from the value of g-2 when the width term is ignored. We also investigate the limits on a characteristic mass scale for the unparticle sector as a function of {mu} and d.

  16. Lepton flavor violation in extra dimension models

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, W.-F.; Ng, John N.

    2005-03-01

    Models involving large extra spatial dimension(s) have interesting predictions on lepton flavor violating processes. We consider some five-dimensional (5D) models which are related to neutrino mass generation or address the fermion masses hierarchy problem. We study the signatures in low energy experiments that can discriminate the different models. The focus is on muon-electron conversion in nuclei {mu}{yields}e{gamma} and {mu}{yields}3e processes and their {tau} counterparts. Their links with the active neutrino mass matrix are investigated. We show that in the models we discussed the branching ratio of {mu}{yields}e{gamma} like rare process is much smaller than the ones of {mu}{yields}3e like processes. This is in sharp contrast to most of the traditional wisdom based on four-dimensional (4D) gauge models. Moreover, some rare tau decays are more promising than the rare muon decays.

  17. Renormalization group invariant of lepton Yukawa couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuyuki, Takanao

    2015-04-01

    By using quark Yukawa matrices only, we can construct renormalization invariants that are exact at the one-loop level in the standard model. One of them, Iq, is accidentally consistent with unity, even though quark masses are strongly hierarchical. We calculate a lepton version of the invariant Il for Dirac and Majorana neutrino cases and find that Il can also be close to unity. For the Dirac neutrino and inverted hierarchy case, if the lightest neutrino mass is 3.0 meV to 8.8 meV, an equality Iq=Il can be satisfied. These invariants are not changed even if new particles couple to the standard model particles, as long as those couplings are generation independent.

  18. Approximate flavor symmetries in the lepton sector

    SciTech Connect

    Rasin, A. ); Silva, J.P. )

    1994-01-01

    Approximate flavor symmetries in the quark sector have been used as a handle on physics beyond the standard model. Because of the great interest in neutrino masses and mixings and the wealth of existing and proposed neutrino experiments it is important to extend this analysis to the leptonic sector. We show that in the seesaw mechanism the neutrino masses and mixing angles do not depend on the details of the right-handed neutrino flavor symmetry breaking, and are related by a simple formula. We propose several [ital Ansa]$[ital uml]---[ital tze] which relate different flavor symmetry-breaking parameters and find that the MSW solution to the solar neutrino problem is always easily fit. Further, the [nu][sub [mu]-][nu][sub [tau

  19. A perspective on lepton-photon physics

    SciTech Connect

    Panofsky, W.K.H.

    1989-11-01

    This paper reviews some key experiments of the past in which the same basic physical processes are attacked both through lepton-photon interaction and by using hadron machines as primary tools. Not surprisingly, it is concluded that the basic distinction between lepton-photon physics and elementary particle physics in general is unreal but that the tools and methodology can be very different indeed. A look is then taken into the expected future evolution of particle accelerators. Existing accelerator technologies both for proton and electron colliders are approaching basic limits as the collision energy in the constituent frame is raised. At this time no clear path exists for electron-positron colliders to compete with the SSC as far as energy reach is concerned, but the superior clarity and coverage of phenomena not accessible to hadron colliders makes it absolutely essential that the development of both electron-positron and hadron colliders be pursued vigorously. It is concluded that accelerator R D effort underway is insufficient if a large hiatus in productivity in particle physics is to be avoided. Electron-positron linear colliders are the most promising approach for the extension of knowledge beyond LEP and beyond the SSC, but the difficulties to reach an electron-positron energy of 15 TeV or beyond in the constituent frame look formidable. Both electron-positron and proton colliders appear to face severe future detector limitations, the former due to electron-positron pair creation during the collision and the latter due to the enormous hadronic background event rates. 6 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Heavy-neutrino effects on tau-lepton decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilaftsis, A.

    1994-11-01

    Minimal extensions of the Standard Model that are motivated by grand unified theories or superstring models with an E(6) symmetry can naturally predict heavy neutrinos of a Dirac or Majorana nature. Such heavy neutral leptons violate the decoupling theorem at the one-loop electroweak order and hence offer a unique chance for possible lepton-flavor decays of the tau lepton, e.g. tau to eee or tau to (mu)(mu)(mu), to be seen in LEP experiments. We analyze such decays in models with three and four generations.

  1. Heavy-Neutrino Effects on τ-LEPTON Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilaftsis, A.

    Minimal extensions of the standard model that are motivated by grand unified theories or superstring models with an E6 symmetry can naturally predict heavy neutrinos of Dirac or Majorana nature. Such heavy neutral leptons violate the decoupling theorem at the one-loop electroweak order and hence offer a unique chance for possible lepton-flavor decays of the τ-lepton, e.g. τ→eee or τ→μμμ, to be seen in LEP experiments. We analyze such decays in models with three and four generations.

  2. Enhanced lepton flavour violation in the supersymmetric inverse seesaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, C.

    2013-07-01

    In minimal supersymmetric seesaw models, the contribution to lepton flavour violation from Z-penguins is usually negligible. In this study, we consider the supersymmetric inverse seesaw and show that, in this case, the Z-penguin contribution dominates in several lepton flavour violating observables due to the low scale of the inverse seesaw mechanism. Among the observables considered, we find that the most constraining one is the μ-e conversion rate which is already restricting the otherwise allowed parameter space of the model. Moreover, in this framework, the Z-penguins exhibit a non-decoupling behaviour, which has previously been noticed in lepton flavour violating Higgs decays.

  3. Symmetries, Large Leptonic Mixing and a Fourth Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Marcos, Joaquim I.

    2002-12-01

    We show that large leptonic mixing occurs most naturally in the framework of the Sandard Model just by adding a fourth generation. One can then construct a small Z4 discrete symmetry, instead of the large S4L × S4R, which requires that the neutrino as well as the charged lepton mass matrices be proportional to a 4 × 4 democratic mass matrix, where all entries are equal to unity. Without considering the see-saw mechanism, or other more elaborate extensions of the SM, and contrary to the case with only 3 generations, large leptonic mixing is obtained when the symmetry is broken.

  4. CDF top results in the lepton + jets channel

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, G.; CDF Collaboration

    1994-08-01

    Results from the 1992--1993 Tevatron run (ran IA) top search at CDF in the lepton+jets channel are reported. The jet-vertexing algorithm tags 6 events on a background of 2.3 {plus_minus} 0.3 events in the W+ {ge} 3 jets data sample, and the soft lepton analysis finds T events on a background of 3.1 {plus_minus} 0.3 events in the same data sample. Jet-vertex and soft-lepton tag correlations are described. Also given are the expected and observed number of tags in the Z+mulitjet control sample.

  5. Lepton asymmetry in the primordial gravitational wave spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Yamaguchi, Masahide; Yokoyama, Jun'Ichi

    2007-04-15

    Effects of neutrino free streaming are evaluated on the primordial spectrum of gravitational radiation taking both neutrino chemical potential and masses into account. The former or the lepton asymmetry induces two competitive effects, namely, to increase anisotropic stress, which damps the gravitational wave more, and to delay the matter-radiation equality time, which reduces the damping. The latter effect is more prominent and a large lepton asymmetry would reduce the damping. We may thereby be able to measure the magnitude of lepton asymmetry from the primordial gravitational wave spectrum.

  6. Initiation of DNA replication at CpG islands in mammalian chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, S; Gómez, M; Bird, A; Antequera, F

    1998-01-01

    CpG islands are G+C-rich regions approximately 1 kb long that are free of methylation and contain the promoters of many mammalian genes. Analysis of in vivo replication intermediates at three hamster genes and one human gene showed that the CpG island regions, but not their flanks, were present in very short nascent strands, suggesting that they are replication origins (ORIs). CpG island-like fragments were enriched in a population of short nascent strands from human erythroleukaemic cells, suggesting that islands constitute a significant fraction of endogenous ORIs. Correspondingly, bulk CpG islands were found to replicate coordinately early in S phase. Our results imply that CpG islands are initiation sites for both transcription and DNA replication, and may represent genomic footprints of replication initiation. PMID:9545253

  7. Spontaneous CP Violation in E6 GUT with horizontal symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekawa, Nobuhiro

    2010-02-01

    We consider spontaneous CP violation in E6 grand unified theory (GUT) with horizontal symmetry and anomalous U(1)A gauge symmetry in order to solve the SUSY CP problem. To realize the sufficiently small phases of SUSY Higgs mass μ and mixing parameter B, an additional discrete symmetry is introduced. The discrete symmetry plays multiple roles in explaining various things. By the symmetry, the up-type Yukawa couplings become real, which is important in satisfying the Chromo-EDM constraints to the imaginary part of the off-diagonal elements of squark mass matrices, and the down-type Yukawa couplings become complex, which is important in obtaining the Kobayashi-Maskawa phase. Moreover, this symmetry improves the smallness of up quark mass, and reduces the number of O(1) coefficients. One of the interesting predictions is Vub˜γ4, which is quite good agreement with the measured value. This talk is based on the works in Ref. [1].

  8. Activation of SO2 by [Zn(Cp*)2] and [(Cp*)Zn(I)-Zn(I)(Cp*)].

    PubMed

    Kelly, Rory P; Kazeminejad, Neda; Lamsfus, Carlos A; Maron, Laurent; Roesky, Peter W

    2016-11-18

    Interesting reactivity was observed in reactions of SO2 with [Zn(Cp*)2] and [(Cp*)Zn(I)-Zn(I)(Cp*)]. These reactions proceeded with insertion of SO2 into the Zn-C bonds. Spectacularly, the lability of the C-S bond in the O2SCp* ligands led to the thermal decomposition of [Zn(O2SCp*)2(tmeda)] to afford [Zn2(μ-SO3)(μ-S2O4)(tmeda)2].

  9. Time-Dependent CP Asymmetries in b {yields} s Penguins

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, H.

    2006-07-11

    We present measurements of time-dependent CP asymmetry parameters in B{sup 0} {yields} {phi}(1020)K{sup 0}, {eta}'K{sup 0}, K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0} K{sub S}{sup 0}, K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, f{sub 0}(980)K{sub S}{sup 0}, {omega}(782)K{sub S}{sup 0} and K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sub S}{sup 0} decays based on a sample of 386 x 106BB(bar sign) pairs collected at the {upsilon}(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB energy asymmetric e+e- collider. These decays are dominated by the b {yields} s gluonic penguin transition and are sensitive to new CP-violating phases from physics beyond the standard model. One neutral meson is fully reconstructed in one of the specified decay channels, and the flavor of the accompanying B meson is identified from its decay products. CP-violation parameters are obtained from the asymmetries in the distributions of the proper-time intervals between the two B decays. We also perform measurement of time-dependent CP asymmetry parameters in B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{gamma} decay that is dominated by the b {yields} s radiative penguin.

  10. Kubo relations and radiative corrections for lepton number washout

    SciTech Connect

    Bödeker, Dietrich; Laine, M. E-mail: laine@itp.unibe.ch

    2014-05-01

    The rates for lepton number washout in extensions of the Standard Model containing right-handed neutrinos are key ingredients in scenarios for baryogenesis through leptogenesis. We relate these rates to real-time correlation functions at finite temperature, without making use of any particle approximations. The relations are valid to quadratic order in neutrino Yukawa couplings and to all orders in Standard Model couplings. They take into account all spectator processes, and apply both in the symmetric and in the Higgs phase of the electroweak theory. We use the relations to compute washout rates at next-to-leading order in g, where g denotes a Standard Model gauge or Yukawa coupling, both in the non-relativistic and in the relativistic regime. Even in the non-relativistic regime the parametrically dominant radiative corrections are only suppressed by a single power of g. In the non-relativistic regime radiative corrections increase the washout rate by a few percent at high temperatures, but they are of order unity around the weak scale and in the relativistic regime.

  11. CP violation in the B system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershon, T.; Gligorov, V. V.

    2017-04-01

    The phenomenon of CP violation is crucial to understand the asymmetry between matter and antimatter that exists in the Universe. Dramatic experimental progress has been made, in particular in measurements of the behaviour of particles containing the b quark, where CP violation effects are predicted by the Kobayashi–Maskawa mechanism that is embedded in the standard model. The status of these measurements and future prospects for an understanding of CP violation beyond the standard model are reviewed.

  12. Measurements of the Branching Fractions and CP Asymmetries of B -> D0_CP K Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G.S.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Clermont-Ferrand U. /Basilicata U., Potenza

    2006-01-05

    We present a study of the decay B{sup -} {yields} D{sub (CP)}{sup 0} K{sup -} and its charge conjugate, where D{sub (CP)}{sup 0} is reconstructed in CP-even, CP-odd, and non-CP flavor eigenstates, based on a sample of 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. We measure the partial-rate charge asymmetries AC{sub CP{+-}} and the ratios R{sub CP{+-}} of the B {yields} D{sup 0} K decay branching fractions as measured in CP{+-} and non-CP D{sup 0} decays: A{sub CP+} = 0.35 {+-} 0.13(stat) {+-} 0.04(syst), A{sub CP-} = -0.06 {+-} 0.13(stat) {+-} 0.04(syst), R{sub CP+} = 0.90 {+-} 0.12(stat) {+-} 0.04(syst), R{sub CP-} = 0.86 {+-} 0.10(stat) {+-} 0.05(syst).

  13. CpGcluster: a distance-based algorithm for CpG-island detection

    PubMed Central

    Hackenberg, Michael; Previti, Christopher; Luque-Escamilla, Pedro Luis; Carpena, Pedro; Martínez-Aroza, José; Oliver, José L

    2006-01-01

    Background Despite their involvement in the regulation of gene expression and their importance as genomic markers for promoter prediction, no objective standard exists for defining CpG islands (CGIs), since all current approaches rely on a large parameter space formed by the thresholds of length, CpG fraction and G+C content. Results Given the higher frequency of CpG dinucleotides at CGIs, as compared to bulk DNA, the distance distributions between neighboring CpGs should differ for bulk and island CpGs. A new algorithm (CpGcluster) is presented, based on the physical distance between neighboring CpGs on the chromosome and able to predict directly clusters of CpGs, while not depending on the subjective criteria mentioned above. By assigning a p-value to each of these clusters, the most statistically significant ones can be predicted as CGIs. CpGcluster was benchmarked against five other CGI finders by using a test sequence set assembled from an experimental CGI library. CpGcluster reached the highest overall accuracy values, while showing the lowest rate of false-positive predictions. Since a minimum-length threshold is not required, CpGcluster can find short but fully functional CGIs usually missed by other algorithms. The CGIs predicted by CpGcluster present the lowest degree of overlap with Alu retrotransposons and, simultaneously, the highest overlap with vertebrate Phylogenetic Conserved Elements (PhastCons). CpGcluster's CGIs overlapping with the Transcription Start Site (TSS) show the highest statistical significance, as compared to the islands in other genome locations, thus qualifying CpGcluster as a valuable tool in discriminating functional CGIs from the remaining islands in the bulk genome. Conclusion CpGcluster uses only integer arithmetic, thus being a fast and computationally efficient algorithm able to predict statistically significant clusters of CpG dinucleotides. Another outstanding feature is that all predicted CGIs start and end with a Cp

  14. Derivation of Dark Matter Parity from Lepton Parity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ernest

    2015-07-03

    It is shown that in extensions of the standard model of quarks and leptons where the additive lepton number L is broken by two units, so that Z_{2} lepton parity, i.e., (-1)L which is either even or odd, remains exactly conserved, there is the possibility of stable dark matter without additional symmetry. This applies to many existing simple models of Majorana neutrino mass with dark matter, including some radiative models. Several well-known examples are discussed. This new insight leads to the construction of a radiative type II seesaw model of neutrino mass with dark matter where the dominant decay of the doubly charged Higgs boson ξ++ is into W+W+ instead of the expected li+lj+ lepton pairs for the well-known tree-level model.

  15. Resurrection of large lepton number asymmetries from neutrino flavor oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barenboim, Gabriela; Kinney, William H.; Park, Wan-Il

    2017-02-01

    We numerically solve the evolution equations of neutrino three-flavor density matrices, and show that, even if neutrino oscillations mix neutrino flavors, large lepton number asymmetries are still allowed in certain limits by big bang nucleosynthesis.

  16. Search for lepton flavor violation in upsilon decays.

    PubMed

    Love, W; Savinov, V; Lopez, A; Mehrabyan, S; Mendez, H; Ramirez, J; Huang, G S; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Sanghi, B; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Horwitz, N; Khalil, S; Li, J; Menaa, N; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Sia, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Naik, P; Briere, R A; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Berkelman, K; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Pivarski, J; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Schwarthoff, H; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Cawlfield, C; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Kim, D; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Smith, A; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Ecklund, K M

    2008-11-14

    In this Letter, we describe a search for lepton flavor violation (LFV) in the bottomonium system. We search for leptonic decays Upsilon(nS)-->mutau (n=1, 2, and 3) using the data collected with the CLEO III detector. We identify the tau lepton using its leptonic decay nu_{tau}nu[over ]_{e}e and utilize multidimensional likelihood fitting with probability density function shapes measured from independent data samples. We report our estimates of 95% C.L. upper limits on LFV branching fractions of Upsilon mesons. We interpret our results in terms of the exclusion plot for the energy scale of a hypothetical new interaction versus its effective LFV coupling in the framework of effective field theory.

  17. Lepton violating double β decay in modern gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergados, J. D.

    1981-08-01

    The neutrinoless lepton violating double β decay is investigated in the context of modern gauge theories, whereby it is mediated by a Majorana neutrino. Transition operators appropriate for calculations of the relevant nuclear matrix elements are constructed. In addition, some of the approximations of the pregauge theories of double β decay are investigated. Explicit shell model calculations are performed in the case of the A=48 system. [RADIOACTIVITY Double β decay. Gauge theories. Majorana neutrinos. Lepton nonconservation. Shell model calculations.

  18. Lepton nonconserving (μ-,e+) reaction to individual nuclear states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittel, S.; Vergados, J. D.

    1981-11-01

    Branching ratios for the lepton-violating 40Ca(μ-,e+)40Ar(g.s.) reaction are calculated using a gauge model in which it is mediated by a Majorana neutrino. The predicted branching ratios to the ground state are fairly insensitive to the relevant nuclear structure information and are much smaller than previously calculated total rates. NUCLEAR REACTIONS 40Ca (μ-,e+)40Ar(g.s.) calculated branching ratio. Lepton conversion.

  19. Low mass lepton pair production at large transverse momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jianwei; Kang, Zhongbo; Vogelsang, Werner

    2008-10-01

    PHENIX collaboration has recently measured the transverse momentum distribution of lepton pair production at RHIC with the pair's invariant mass as low as 120 < Q < 300 MeV. We will show that the distribution of low mass lepton pair production at large transverse momentum QTQ can be systematically calculated in terms of the perturbative QCD factorization approach. All factorized short-distance parotnic hard parts are evaluated at a distance scale ˜1/QT, while all long-distance non-perturbative physics are factorized into the universal parton-to-lepton pair fragmentation functions. We introduce a model for the input lepton pair fragmentation functions at a scale μ˜ 1 GeV, which are then evolved perturbatively to scales relevant at RHIC. Using the evolved fragmentation functions, we calculate the transverse momentum distributions of low mass lepton pair production in hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus collisions. We demonstrate that the transverse momentum distribution of low mass lepton pairs is extremely sensitive to the shape of gluon distribution.

  20. The Sharp Lepton Quandary: Reasonable cautions

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, J.J.

    1996-02-01

    Surprisingly, the new APEX experiment designed to measure a definitive invariant mass distribution of the sharp pairs previously reported in similar heavy ion studies reports null results. Although it asserts no direct conflict with any data reported by EPOS/I, the APEX report nevertheless seems to have encouraged the view that the earlier (EPOS/I) observations were erroneous, and by extrapolation, that the whole (e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}) Puzzle data set can be dismissed as an unfortunate set of physically meaningless statistical fluctuations. We wish here to argue that such sweeping judgments should be postponed, on the grounds that (1) the published APEX analysis of their data is self-inconsistent, and can therefore sustain no valid inference about the EPOS/I data; (2) the data which supports the occurrence of sharp (e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}) pairs is much more extensive than the EPOS/I data, so that the APEX surprise must be considered as one episode in a much longer struggle finally to settle the question of whether these weak signals are significant or not; (3) a qualitative phenomenology exists which can organize the whole range of data of the Sharp Lepton Problem, and which suggests that (4) certain low energy (and low cost) experiments ought to be explored for their creation of sharp pairs; as follows: the study of pairs emitted following scattering of few MeV electron and positron beams from neutral U and Th atoms, and the study of pairs emitted following the resonant absorption of photons of 1.5 to 2.0 MeV on U and Th atoms. We first present a brief data-oriented history of the Sharp Lepton Problem, to show that no single unexpected null result can provide an adequate basis for rejecting the great range and quantity of data which evidences the occurrence of sharp pairs. We then consider the Quadronium Composite Particle Scenario for these processes, and its Quantum Electrodynamical implications, in support of the above recommendations.

  1. Boosting the Direct CP Measurement of the Higgs-Top Coupling.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Matthew R; Gonçalves, Dorival

    2016-03-04

    Characterizing the 125 GeV Higgs boson is a critical component of the physics program at the LHC Run II. In this Letter, we consider tt[over ¯]H associated production in the dileptonic mode. We demonstrate that the difference in azimuthal angle between the leptons from top decays can directly reveal the CP structure of the top-Higgs coupling with the sensitivity of the measurement substantially enhanced in the boosted Higgs regime. We first show how to access this channel via H→bb[over ¯] jet-substructure tagging, then demonstrate the ability of the new variable to measure CP. Our analysis includes all signal and background samples simulated via the MC@NLO algorithm including hadronization and underlying-event effects. Using a boosted Higgs substructure with dileptonic tops, we find that the top-Higgs coupling strength and the CP structure can be directly probed with achievable luminosity at the 13 TeV LHC.

  2. ESTIMATE OF CP VIOLATION FOR THE LBNE PROJECT AND δCP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisslinger, Leonard S.

    2012-08-01

    Measurements of CP violation (CPV) and the basic δCP parameter are the goals of the LBNE Project, which is being planned. Using the expected energy and baseline parameters for the LBNE Project, CPV and the dependence of CPV on δCP are estimated, to help in the planning of this project.

  3. Search for doubly charged Higgs bosons with lepton-flavor-violating decays involving tau leptons.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giakoumopolou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2008-09-19

    We search for pair production of doubly charged Higgs particles (H+/- +/-) followed by decays into electron-tau (etau) and muon-tau (mutau) pairs using data (350 pb(-1) collected from [over]pp collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV by the CDF II experiment. We search separately for cases where three or four final-state leptons are detected, and combine results for exclusive decays to left-handed etau (mutau) pairs. We set an H+/- +/- lower mass limit of 114(112) GeV/c(2) at the 95% confidence level.

  4. Search for Doubly Charged Higgs Bosons with Lepton-Flavor-Violating Decays Involving τ Leptons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M. G.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Azzurri, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Baroiant, S.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Bednar, P.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Belloni, A.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Berry, T.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bolshov, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cooper, B.; Copic, K.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lentdecker, G.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; de Pedis, D.; Derwent, P. F.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Forrester, S.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Genser, K.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopolou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamilton, A.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Handler, R.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauser, J.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; Iyutin, B.; James, E.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeans, D.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Kerzel, U.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Klute, M.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Koay, S. A.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhlmann, S. E.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kusakabe, Y.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lai, S.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, J.; Lee, J.; Lee, Y. J.; Lee, S. W.; Lefèvre, R.; Leonardo, N.; Leone, S.; Levy, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.; Lin, C. S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lu, R.-S.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Luci, C.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Mack, P.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, M.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzemer, S.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Messina, A.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miles, J.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Oldeman, R.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Piedra, J.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Portell, X.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Reisert, B.; Rekovic, V.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Salamanna, G.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Scheidle, T.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scott, A. L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shapiro, M. D.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Sherman, D.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sidoti, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soderberg, M.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spalding, J.; Spinella, F.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Stuart, D.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Sun, H.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Tiwari, V.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Tourneur, S.; Trischuk, W.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Veszpremi, V.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Würthwein, F.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wagner, W.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wynne, S. M.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, T.; Yang, C.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zaw, I.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2008-09-01

    We search for pair production of doubly charged Higgs particles (H±±) followed by decays into electron-tau (eτ) and muon-tau (μτ) pairs using data (350pb-1) collected from pmacr p collisions at s=1.96TeV by the CDF II experiment. We search separately for cases where three or four final-state leptons are detected, and combine results for exclusive decays to left-handed eτ (μτ) pairs. We set an H±± lower mass limit of 114(112)GeV/c2 at the 95% confidence level.

  5. Accurate quartic and sextic centrifugal distortion constants of CH3CP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzocchi, L.; Cludi, L.; Degli Esposti, C.

    2003-03-01

    1-Phosphapropyne has been produced in the gas phase by pyrolysis of a mixture of ethane and phosphorus trichloride. The ground state rotational spectra of the most abundant isotopomer and of the isotopic variants 13CH3CP and CH313CP have been investigated in the millimeter and submillimeter wave regions obtaining very accurate values of the quartic centrifugal distortion constants DJ and DJK and of the sextic distortion constants HJK and HKJ.

  6. B Decay and CP Violation: CKM Angles and Sides at the BABAR and BELLE B-Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Verderi, Marc; /Ecole Polytechnique

    2011-11-28

    A remarkable success has been achieved by the B-Factories, going beyond expectation in some field, like the measurement of {gamma}. BABAR has now finished its data taking, leaving BELLE alone in the 'race', but still many analyses are going on. The CKM UT is constrained by both measurements of CP-conserving and CP-violating quantities, leading to a picture of the CKM sector consistent with the SM. Measurements of semi-leptonic decays benefit from improving experimental techniques and more precise theoretical computations. The angle {beta} is a precision measurement, reaching accuracy of SM calculation. The angle {alpha} will ultimatly be limited by penguin pollution. The measurement of {gamma} is reaching the 13{sup o} precision.

  7. Leptonic B Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Baracchini, Elisabetta; /Rome U. /INFN, Rome

    2011-11-10

    We will present the most recent results on leptonic B decays B{sup {+-}(0)} {yields} K*{sup {+-}(0)}{nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}, based on the data collected by the BaBar detector at PEP-II, an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the center of mass energy of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Rare B decays have always been a standard probe for New Physics (NP) searches. The very low Standard Model (SM) rate of these decays often make them unaccessible with the present experimental datasets, unless NP effects enhance the rate up to the current experimental sensitivity. Moreover, as NP effects can modify the decay kinematic, particular attention must be paid in order to perform a model independent analysis. A B-Factory provides an unique environment to investigate these processes. The high number of B{bar B} pairs produced by a B-Factory often allows to approach the needed experimental sensitivity. Moreover, the clean environment and the closed kinematic of the initial state enable to obtaining a very pure sample where to look for these decays.

  8. Cp Violation from the Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Kuang-Chao

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * PARAMETRIZATION OF THE K-M MATRIX * PHYSICS OF ɛ AND ɛ' IN KAON SYSTEMS * NEUTRAL PARTICLE-ANTIPARTICLE MIXING AND CP VIOLATION IN B^{0}-{barB^{0}} SYSTEM * CP VIOLATION IN PARTIAL DECAY RATES OF PARTICLES AND ANTIPARTICLES * CONCLUDING REMARKS * ACKNOWLEDGEMENT * REFERENCES * DISCUSSION

  9. Time-dependent CP asymmetries in D and B decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevan, A. J.; Inguglia, G.; Meadows, B.

    2011-12-01

    We examine measurements of time-dependent CP asymmetries that could be made in new and future flavour facilities. In charm decays, where they can provide a unique insight into the flavor changing structure of the Standard Model, we examine a number of decays to CP eigenstates and describe a framework that can be used to interpret the measurements. Such measurements can provide a precise determination of the charm mixing phase, as well as constraints on the Standard Model description of CP violation an possible new physics contributions. We make a preliminary assessment, based on statistical considerations, of the relative capabilities of LHCb with data from pp collisions, with Belle II and Super B using data from Bd, Bs and charm thresholds. We discuss the measurements required to perform direct and indirect tests of the charm unitarity triangle and its relationship with the usual Bd triangle. We find that, while theoretical and experimental systematic uncertainties may limit their interpretation, useful information on the unknown charm mixing phase, and on the possible existence of new physics can be obtained. We point out that, for Bd decays, current experimental bounds on ΔΓBd will translate into a significant systematic uncertainty on future measurements of sin⁡2β from b→cc¯s decays. The possibilities for simplified Bs decay asymmetry measurements at Super B and Belle II are also reviewed.

  10. Baryogenesis from strong CP violation and the QCD axion.

    PubMed

    Servant, Géraldine

    2014-10-24

    We show that strong CP violation from the QCD axion can be responsible for the matter antimatter asymmetry of the Universe in the context of cold electroweak baryogenesis if the electroweak phase transition is delayed below the GeV scale. This can occur naturally if the Higgs couples to a O(100)  GeV dilaton, as expected in some models where the Higgs is a pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson of a new strongly interacting sector at the TeV scale. The existence of such a second scalar resonance with a mass and properties similar to the Higgs boson will soon be tested at the LHC. In this context, the QCD axion would not only solve the strong CP problem, but also the matter antimatter asymmetry and dark matter.

  11. CP-Violating solitons in the early universe

    SciTech Connect

    Tornkvist, O., Riotto, A.

    1997-07-01

    Solitons in extensions of the Standard Model can serve as localized sources of CP violation. Depending on their stability properties, they may serve either to create or to deplete the baryon asymmetry. The conditions for existence of a particular soliton candidate, the membrane solution of the two-Higgs model, are presented. In the generic case, investigated by Bachas and Tomaras, membranes exist and are metastable for a wide range of parameters. For the more viable supersymmetric case, it is shown that the present-day existence of CP-violating membranes is experimentally excluded, but preliminary studies suggest that they may have existed in the early universe soon after the electroweak phase transition, with important consequences for the baryon asymmetry of the universe.

  12. Measurement of CP Asymmetries for the Decays B^+/- --> D^0_CP K*^+/-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-07-06

    Using a sample of 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B Factory in 1999-2004, they study B{sup -} {yields} K{sup 0}K*(892){sup -} decays where K*{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0} {pi}{sup -} and D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}, K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} (non-CP final states); K{sup +}K{sup -}, {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} (CP+ eigenstates); K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, K{sub S}{sup 0}{phi} and K{sub S}{sup 0}{omega} (CP- eigenstates). They measure four observables that are sensitive to the angle {gamma} of the CKM unitarity triangle; the partial-rate charge asymmetries A{sub CP{+-}} and the ratios of the B-decay branching fraction in CP{+-} and non-CP decays R{sub CP{+-}}: A{sub CP+} = -0.08 {+-} 0.19 (stat.) {+-} 0.08 (syst.); A{sub CP-} = -0.26 {+-} 0.40 (stat.) {+-} 0.12 (syst.); R{sub CP+} = 1.96 {+-} 0.40 (stat.) {+-} 0.11 (syst.); R{sub CP-} = 0.65 {+-} 0.26 (stat.) {+-} 0.08 (syst.).

  13. 40 CFR 174.523 - CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase in all plants; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate... CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of the CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase...

  14. 40 CFR 174.523 - CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase in all plants; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate... CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of the CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase...

  15. 40 CFR 174.523 - CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase in all plants; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate... CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of the CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase...

  16. 40 CFR 174.523 - CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase in all plants; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate... CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of the CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase...

  17. 40 CFR 174.523 - CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase in all plants; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate... CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of the CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase...

  18. Prediction of CpG-island function: CpG clustering vs. sliding-window methods

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Unmethylated stretches of CpG dinucleotides (CpG islands) are an outstanding property of mammal genomes. Conventionally, these regions are detected by sliding window approaches using %G + C, CpG observed/expected ratio and length thresholds as main parameters. Recently, clustering methods directly detect clusters of CpG dinucleotides as a statistical property of the genome sequence. Results We compare sliding-window to clustering (i.e. CpGcluster) predictions by applying new ways to detect putative functionality of CpG islands. Analyzing the co-localization with several genomic regions as a function of window size vs. statistical significance (p-value), CpGcluster shows a higher overlap with promoter regions and highly conserved elements, at the same time showing less overlap with Alu retrotransposons. The major difference in the prediction was found for short islands (CpG islets), often exclusively predicted by CpGcluster. Many of these islets seem to be functional, as they are unmethylated, highly conserved and/or located within the promoter region. Finally, we show that window-based islands can spuriously overlap several, differentially regulated promoters as well as different methylation domains, which might indicate a wrong merge of several CpG islands into a single, very long island. The shorter CpGcluster islands seem to be much more specific when concerning the overlap with alternative transcription start sites or the detection of homogenous methylation domains. Conclusions The main difference between sliding-window approaches and clustering methods is the length of the predicted islands. Short islands, often differentially methylated, are almost exclusively predicted by CpGcluster. This suggests that CpGcluster may be the algorithm of choice to explore the function of these short, but putatively functional CpG islands. PMID:20500903

  19. Test of CP invariance in vector-boson fusion production of the Higgs boson using the Optimal Observable method in the ditau decay channel with the ATLAS detector.

    PubMed

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    2016-01-01

    A test of CP invariance in Higgs boson production via vector-boson fusion using the method of the Optimal Observable is presented. The analysis exploits the decay mode of the Higgs boson into a pair of [Formula: see text] leptons and is based on 20.3 [Formula: see text] of proton-proton collision data at [Formula: see text] = 8 [Formula: see text] collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Contributions from CP-violating interactions between the Higgs boson and electroweak gauge bosons are described in an effective field theory framework, in which the strength of CP violation is governed by a single parameter [Formula: see text]. The mean values and distributions of CP-odd observables agree with the expectation in the Standard Model and show no sign of CP violation. The CP-mixing parameter [Formula: see text] is constrained to the interval [Formula: see text] at 68% confidence level, consistent with the Standard Model expectation of [Formula: see text].

  20. Test of CP invariance in vector-boson fusion production of the Higgs boson using the Optimal Observable method in the ditau decay channel with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

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Torró; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tyndel, M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Santurio, E. Valdes; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Ferrer, J. A. Valls; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vazeille, F.; Schroeder, T. Vazquez; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Boeriu, O. E. Vickey; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Perez, M. Villaplana; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Milosavljevic, M. Vranjes; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Wong, K. H. Yau; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Nedden, M. zur; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-12-01

    A test of CP invariance in Higgs boson production via vector-boson fusion using the method of the Optimal Observable is presented. The analysis exploits the decay mode of the Higgs boson into a pair of τ leptons and is based on 20.3 fb^{-1} of proton-proton collision data at √{s} = 8 TeV collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Contributions from CP-violating interactions between the Higgs boson and electroweak gauge bosons are described in an effective field theory framework, in which the strength of CP violation is governed by a single parameter tilde{d}. The mean values and distributions of CP-odd observables agree with the expectation in the Standard Model and show no sign of CP violation. The CP-mixing parameter tilde{d} is constrained to the interval (-0.11,0.05) at 68% confidence level, consistent with the Standard Model expectation of tilde{d}=0.

  1. Measurement of the CP-violating weak phase ϕs and the decay width difference ΔΓs using the Bs0 → J / ψ ϕ (1020) decay channel in pp collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; El Sawy, M.; El-Khateeb, E.; Elkafrawy, T.; Mohamed, A.; Radi, A.; Salama, E.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Jarvinen, T.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.

    2016-06-01

    The CP-violating weak phase ϕs of the Bs0 meson and the decay width difference ΔΓs of the Bs0 light and heavy mass eigenstates are measured with the CMS detector at the LHC using a data sample of Bs0 → J / ψ ϕ (1020) →μ+μ-K+K- decays. The analysed data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb-1 collected in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8TeV. A total of 49 200 reconstructed Bs0 decays are used to extract the values of ϕs and ΔΓs by performing a time-dependent and flavour-tagged angular analysis of the μ+μ-K+K- final state. The weak phase is measured to be ϕs = - 0.075 ± 0.097 (stat) ± 0.031 (syst) rad, and the decay width difference is ΔΓs = 0.095 ± 0.013 (stat) ± 0.007 (syst) ps-1.

  2. Charm CP violation and mixing at Belle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rok Ko, Byeong; Belle Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    We present charm CP violation and mixing measurements at Belle. They are the first observation of D0 - bar D0 mixing in e+e- collisions from D0 → K+π- decays, the most precise mixing and indirect CP violation parameters from D0 → K0Sπ+π- decays, and the timeintegrated CP asymmetries in D0 → π0π0 and D0 → K0Sπ0 decays. Our mixing measurement in D0 → K+π- decays excludes the no-mixing hypothesis at the 5.1 standard deviation level. The mixing parameters x = (0.56 ± 0.19+0.03+0.06-0.09-0.09)%, y = (0.30 ± 0.15+0.04+0.03-0.05-0.06)% and indirect CP violation parameters |q/p| = (0.90+0.16+0.05+0.06-0.15-0.04-0.05)%, arg(q/p) = (-6 ± 11 ± 3+3-4)° measured from D0 → K0Sπ+π- decays, and the time-integrated CP asymmetries AD0→π0π0CP = (-0.03 ± 0.64 ± 0.10)% and AD0→K0Sπ0CP = (-0.21 ± 0.16 ± 0.07)% are the most precisemeasurements to date. Our measurements here are consistent with predictions of the standard model.

  3. Strong CP problem, up-quark mass, and the Randall-Sundrum microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Soni, Amarjit

    2007-11-01

    In the Randall-Sundrum model, setting the ratio of up- and down-quark masses m{sub u}/m{sub d}<<1, relevant to the strong CP problem, does not require chiral symmetry or fine-tuning, due to exponential bulk fermion profiles. We point out that such geometric suppression of the mass of a fermion magnifies the masses of its corresponding Kaluza-Klein (KK) states. In this sense, these KK states act as 'microscopes' for probing light quark and lepton masses. In simple realizations, this hypothesis can be testable at future colliders, like the LHC, by measuring the spectrum of level-1 KK fermions. The microscope can then provide an experimental test for the vanishing of m{sub u} in the ultraviolet, independently of nonperturbative determinations, by lattice simulations or other means, at hadronic scales. We also briefly comment on application of our microscope idea to other fermions, such as the electron and neutrinos.

  4. CP violating Two-Higgs-Doublet Model: constraints and LHC predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keus, Venus; King, Stephen F.; Moretti, Stefano; Yagyu, Kei

    2016-04-01

    Two-Higgs-Doublet Models (2HDMs) are amongst the simplest extensions of the Standard Model. Such models allow for tree-level CP Violation (CPV) in the Higgs sector. We analyse a class of CPV 2HDM (of Type-I) in which only one of the two Higgs doublets couples to quarks and leptons, avoiding dangerous Flavour Changing Neutral Currents. We provide an up to date and comprehensive analysis of the constraints and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) predictions of such a model. Of immediate interest to the LHC Run 2 is the golden channel where all three neutral Higgs bosons are observed to decay into gauge boson pairs, WW and ZZ, providing a smoking gun signature of the CPV 2HDM.

  5. Phenomena related to CP violation at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Squillacioti, Paola; /Siena U. /INFN, Pisa

    2009-10-01

    We report recent CDF results on CP violation in B{sup -} {yields} DK{sup -} modes, where D goes to Cabibbo suppressed ({pi}{pi}, KK) or doubly cabibbo suppressed (K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) modes, which are related to CKM angle gamma. We also describe direct CP violation measurements in charmless two-body decays of B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{pi} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} pK, p{pi} modes, which are unique to the CDF experiment. We also report on CP violation measurements in D{sup 0} {yields} h{sup +}h{sup -} modes.

  6. CP Violation in Single Top Quark Production

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Weigang

    2012-01-01

    We present a search for CP violation in single top quark production with the DØ experiment at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. CP violation in the top electroweak interaction results in different single top quark production cross sections for top and antitop quarks. We perform the search in the single top quark final state using 5.4 fb-1 of data, in the s-channel, t-channel, and for both combined. At this time, we do not see an observable CP asymmetry.

  7. Pseudoscalar top-Higgs coupling: exploration of CP-odd observables to resolve the sign ambiguity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mileo, Nicolas; Kiers, Ken; Szynkman, Alejandro; Crane, Daniel; Gegner, Ethan

    2016-07-01

    We present a collection of CP-odd observables for the process ppto t(to b{ℓ}+{ν}_{ℓ})overline{t}(to overline{b}{ℓ}-{overline{ν}}_{ℓ}) H that are linearly dependent on the scalar ( k t ) and pseudoscalar ({tilde{k}}_t) top-Higgs coupling and hence sensitive to the corresponding relative sign. The proposed observables are based on triple product (TP) correlations that we extract from the expression for the differential cross section in terms of the spin vectors of the top and antitop quarks. In order to explore other possibilities, we progressively modify these TPs, first by combining them, and then by replacing the spin vectors by the lepton momenta or the t and overline{t} momenta by their visible parts. We generate Monte Carlo data sets for several benchmark scenarios, including the Standard Model ({k}_t = 1, {tilde{k}}_t = 0) and two scenarios with mixed CP properties ({k}_t = 1, {tilde{k}}_t=± 1) . Assuming an integrated luminosity that is consistent with that envisioned for the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider, using Monte Carlo-truth and taking into account only statistical uncertainties, we find that the most promising observable can disentangle the "CP-mixed" scenarios with an effective separation of ˜ 19 σ. In the case of observables that do not require the reconstruction of the t and t momenta, the power of discrimination is up to ˜ 13σ for the same number of events. We also show that the most promising observables can still disentangle the CP-mixed scenarios when the number of events is reduced to values consistent with expectations for the Large Hadron Collider in the near term.

  8. Density functional theory study of the interaction of CP2*ZrCH{3/+} (Cp* = C5H5, C5Me5, and C13H9) with ethylene molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustynyuk, L. Yu.; Fushman, E. A.; Lalayan, S. S.

    2009-08-01

    Density functional theory was used to study gas-phase reactions between the Cp2*ZrMe+ cations, where Cp* = C5H5 ( 1), Me5Cp = C5Me5 ( 2), and Flu = C13H9 ( 3), and the ethylene molecule, Cp2*ZrMe+ + C2H4 → Cp2*ZrPr+ → Cp2*ZrAllyl+ + H2. The reactivity of the Cp2*ZrMe+ cations with respect to the ethylene molecule decreased in the series 1 > 3 ≈ 2. Substitution in the Cp ring decreased the reactivity of the Cp2*ZrMe+ cations toward ethylene, in agreement with the experimental data on the comparative reactivities of complexes 1 and 3. The two main energy barriers along the reaction path (the formation of the C-C bond leading to the primary product Cp2*ZrPr+ and hydride shift leading to the secondary product Cp2*Zr(H2)Allyl+) vary in opposite directions in the series of the compounds studied. For Flu ( 3), these barriers are close to each other, and for the other compounds, the formation of the C-C bond requires the overcoming of a higher energy barrier. A comparison of the results obtained with the data on the activity of zirconocene catalysts in real catalytic systems for the polymerization of ethylene led us to conclude that the properties of the catalytic center changed drastically in the passage from the model reaction in the gas phase to real catalytic systems.

  9. Measurement of the inclusive leptonic asymmetry in top-quark pairs that decay to two charged leptons at CDF.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; D'Errico, M; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Fernández Ramos, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Henry, S; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, S B; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lucà, A; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Marchese, L; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Martínez, M; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Pranko, A; Prokoshin, F; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Ranjan, N; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Song, H; Sorin, V; St Denis, R; Stancari, M; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2014-07-25

    We measure the inclusive forward-backward asymmetry of the charged-lepton pseudorapidities from top-quark pairs produced in proton-antiproton collisions and decaying to final states that contain two charged leptons (electrons or muons). The data are collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 9.1 fb(-1). We measure the leptonic forward-backward asymmetry, A(FB)(ℓ), to be 0.072 ± 0.060 and the leptonic pair forward-backward asymmetry, A(FB)(ℓℓ), to be 0.076 ± 0.082. The measured values can be compared with the standard model predictions of A(FB)(ℓ) = 0.038 ± 0.003 and A(FB)(ℓℓ) = 0.048 ± 0.004, respectively. Additionally, we combine the A(FB)(ℓ) result with a previous determination from a final state with a single lepton and hadronic jets and obtain A(FB)(ℓ) = 0.090(-0.026)(+0.028).

  10. Lepton flavor violating higgs decays in supersymmetric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ün, Cem Salih; Hammad, Ahmed; Khalil, Shaaban

    2017-02-01

    The ATLAS and CMS collaborations reported the first signal of Lepton Flavor Violating (LFV) Higgs decay into τ and µ leptons. Standard Model forbids such processes at the renormalizable level because of lepton flavor symmetry. On the other hand, many extensions of the Standard Model do not exhibit such a symmetry and the models beyond the Standard Model (BSM) yield such processes. Hence, any signal for LFV processes can be interpreted as a direct probe for the BSM models. In this work, we consider LFV Higgs boson decays in a class of supersymmetric models including minimal supersymmetric extension of the SM (MSSM), Supersymmetric Type I Seesaw, and U(1)B-L extended MSSM supplied with the inverse seesaw mechanism for non-zero neutrino masses.

  11. Higgs-Thomson-Fibonacci generation of lepton and quark masses

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, G.

    1996-02-01

    Lepton-quark mass may derive from the primary Higgs-mechanism fermion mass by a fundamental law for fermion mass modification, without extension of the minimal standard model. Accurate mass values are obtained for all charged leptons and quarks if the fundamental law for fermion mass modification is given by m = m{sub e}Q{sup 2}(exp {lambda}{sub n}), where m{sub e} is the Higgs-generated electron mass, Q is the charge number of the lepton or quark and {lambda}{sub n}, a linearly additive parameter that depends on the fermion principal quantum number n, is simply related to the small Fibonacci numbers. The three neutrino masses are zero, and the top mass is close to m{sub t} = 163.6 GeV.

  12. Neutrino flavor transformation in the lepton-asymmetric universe

    DOE PAGES

    Johns, Lucas Andrew; Mina, Mattia; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; ...

    2016-10-01

    We investigate neutrino flavor transformation in the early Universe in the presence of a lepton asymmetry, focusing on a two-flavor system with 1–3 mixing parameters. We identify five distinct regimes that emerge in an approximate treatment neglecting collisions as the initial lepton asymmetry at high temperature is varied from values comparable to current constraints on the lepton number down to values at which the neutrino-neutrino forward-scattering potential is negligible. The characteristic phenomena occurring in these regimes are (1) large synchronized oscillations, (2) minimal flavor transformation, (3) asymmetric (ν- or ν¯-only) MSW, (4) partial MSW, and (5) symmetric MSW. We examinemore » our numerical results in the framework of adiabaticity, and we illustrate how they are modified by collisional damping. Lastly, we point out the existence of matter-neutrino resonances in the early Universe and show that they suffer from nonadiabaticity.« less

  13. Democratic (s)fermions and lepton flavor violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, K.; Kakizaki, Mitsuru; Yamaguchi, Masahiro

    2003-09-01

    The democratic approach to account for fermion masses and mixing is known to be successful not only in the quark sector but also in the lepton sector. Here we extend this ansatz to supersymmetric standard models, in which the Kähler potential obeys the underlying S3 flavor symmetries. The requirement of neutrino bi-large mixing angles constrains the form of the Kähler potential for left-handed lepton multiplets. We find that right-handed sleptons can have nondegenerate masses and flavor mixing, while left-handed sleptons are argued to have universal and hence flavor-blind masses. This mass pattern is testable in future collider experiments when superparticle masses will be measured precisely. Lepton flavor violation arises in this scenario. In particular, μ→eγ is expected to be observed in a planned future experiment if supersymmetry breaking scale is close to the weak scale.

  14. Sizes and couplings of composite leptons, quarks and W bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, F. M.

    1984-08-01

    We assume that leptons and quarks are much smaller objects than W bosons (Λl, q≅3.6 TeV; ΛW≅MW). This expl ains the weakness of W couplings to leptons and quarks (as opposed to strong couplings required by radiative Z0 decays), the strength of sin2θW and the present absence of direct lepton and quark substructure effects. We also define a relativistic description of W substructure which should replace the usual non-relativistic wave function and allow better estimates of several processes. Physique Mathématique et Théorique, Equipe de Recherche Associée au CNRS.

  15. Constraining astrophysical neutrino flavor composition from leptonic unitarity

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xun-Jie; He, Hong-Jian; Rodejohann, Werner E-mail: hjhe@tsinghua.edu.cn

    2014-12-01

    The recent IceCube observation of ultra-high-energy astrophysical neutrinos has begun the era of neutrino astronomy. In this work, using the unitarity of leptonic mixing matrix, we derive nontrivial unitarity constraints on the flavor composition of astrophysical neutrinos detected by IceCube. Applying leptonic unitarity triangles, we deduce these unitarity bounds from geometrical conditions, such as triangular inequalities. These new bounds generally hold for three flavor neutrinos, and are independent of any experimental input or the pattern of lepton mixing. We apply our unitarity bounds to derive general constraints on the flavor compositions for three types of astrophysical neutrino sources (and their general mixture), and compare them with the IceCube measurements. Furthermore, we prove that for any sources without ν{sub τ} neutrinos, a detected ν{sub μ} flux ratio < 1/4 will require the initial flavor composition with more ν{sub e} neutrinos than ν{sub μ} neutrinos.

  16. Displaced vertex searches for sterile neutrinos at future lepton colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antusch, Stefan; Cazzato, Eros; Fischer, Oliver

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of future lepton colliders to displaced vertices from the decays of long-lived heavy (almost sterile) neutrinos with electroweak scale masses and detectable time of flight. As future lepton colliders we consider the FCC-ee, the CEPC, and the ILC, searching at the Z-pole and at the center-of-mass energies of 240, 350 and 500 GeV. For a realistic discussion of the detector response to the displaced vertex signal and the Standard Model background we consider the ILC's Silicon Detector (SiD) as benchmark for the future lepton collider detectors. We find that displaced vertices constitute a powerful search channel for sterile neutrinos, sensitive to squared active-sterile mixing angles as small as 10-11.

  17. Neutrino flavor transformation in the lepton-asymmetric universe

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, Lucas Andrew; Mina, Mattia; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Paris, Mark W.; Fuller, George M.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate neutrino flavor transformation in the early Universe in the presence of a lepton asymmetry, focusing on a two-flavor system with 1–3 mixing parameters. We identify five distinct regimes that emerge in an approximate treatment neglecting collisions as the initial lepton asymmetry at high temperature is varied from values comparable to current constraints on the lepton number down to values at which the neutrino-neutrino forward-scattering potential is negligible. The characteristic phenomena occurring in these regimes are (1) large synchronized oscillations, (2) minimal flavor transformation, (3) asymmetric (ν- or ν¯-only) MSW, (4) partial MSW, and (5) symmetric MSW. We examine our numerical results in the framework of adiabaticity, and we illustrate how they are modified by collisional damping. Lastly, we point out the existence of matter-neutrino resonances in the early Universe and show that they suffer from nonadiabaticity.

  18. Neutrino flavor transformation in the lepton-asymmetric universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns, Lucas; Mina, Mattia; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Paris, Mark W.; Fuller, George M.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate neutrino flavor transformation in the early Universe in the presence of a lepton asymmetry, focusing on a two-flavor system with 1-3 mixing parameters. We identify five distinct regimes that emerge in an approximate treatment neglecting collisions as the initial lepton asymmetry at high temperature is varied from values comparable to current constraints on the lepton number down to values at which the neutrino-neutrino forward-scattering potential is negligible. The characteristic phenomena occurring in these regimes are (1) large synchronized oscillations, (2) minimal flavor transformation, (3) asymmetric (ν - or ν ¯-only) MSW, (4) partial MSW, and (5) symmetric MSW. We examine our numerical results in the framework of adiabaticity, and we illustrate how they are modified by collisional damping. Finally, we point out the existence of matter-neutrino resonances in the early Universe and show that they suffer from nonadiabaticity.

  19. Search for Lepton Flavor Violating Decays Tau+- to L+- Omega

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, S.; /Heidelberg U.

    2011-11-30

    This paper reports on a search for lepton flavor violating decays of a {tau} lepton to a lighter-mass charged lepton and an {omega} vector meson. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 384 fb{sup -1} recorded by the BaBar experiment at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory. No evidence for a signal is found and the upper limits on the branching ratios are determined to be B({tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} e{sup {+-}}{omega}) < 1.1 x 10{sup -7} and B({tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{omega}) < 1.0 x 10{sup -7} at 90% confidence level.

  20. Neutralino relic density from ILC measurements in the CP-violating MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bélanger, G.; Kittel, O.; Kraml, S.; Martyn, H.-U.; Pukhov, A.

    2008-07-01

    We discuss ILC measurements for a specific MSSM scenario with CP phases, where the lightest neutralino is a good candidate for dark matter, annihilating efficiently through t-channel exchange of light staus. These prospective (CP-even) ILC measurements are then used to fit the underlying model parameters. A collider prediction of the relic density of the neutralino from this fit gives 0.116<Ωh2<0.19 at 95% C.L. CP-odd observables, while being a direct signal of CP violation, do not help in further constraining Ωh2. The interplay with (in)direct detection of dark matter and with measurements of electric dipole moments is also discussed. Finally we comment on collider measurements at higher energies for refining the prediction of Ωh2.

  1. CP violation in the B system: Physics at a high luminosity B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Lueth, V.

    1991-06-01

    CP Violation remains one of the unsolved puzzles in particle physics. Measurements of CP violating asymmetries in {beta} meson decay will test the Standard Model of electro-weak interactions and tell whether this phenomenon can be explained simply through the non-zero angles and phase in the CKM matrix. A high luminosity, energy asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} storage ring provides the most versatile and best opportunity to measure CP violating effects and to test the consistency of the Standard Model, and should discrepancies occur, information will be available to establish the origin of CP violation outside the model. Such a machine is a very challenging, though technically achievable device, that when complemented with a suitable detector will represent a very exiting laboratory for studies of many aspects of beauty, charm, and {tau}{sup +-} physics in the coming decade. 26 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Roles of Cell Division and Gene Transcription in the Methylation of CpG Islands

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Christina M.; Gonzalgo, Mark L.; Gonzales, Felicidad A.; Nguyen, Carvell T.; Robertson, Keith D.; Jones, Peter A.

    1999-01-01

    De novo methylation of CpG islands within the promoters of eukaryotic genes is often associated with their transcriptional repression, yet the methylation of CpG islands located downstream of promoters does not block transcription. We investigated the kinetics of mRNA induction, demethylation, and remethylation of the p16 promoter and second-exon CpG islands in T24 cells after 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-CdR) treatment to explore the relationship between CpG island methylation and gene transcription. The rates of remethylation of both CpG islands were associated with time but not with the rate of cell division, and remethylation of the p16 exon 2 CpG island occurred at a higher rate than that of the p16 promoter. We also examined the relationship between the remethylation of coding sequence CpG islands and gene transcription. The kinetics of remethylation of the p16 exon 2, PAX-6 exon 5, c-ABL exon 11, and MYF-3 exon 3 loci were examined following 5-Aza-CdR treatment because these genes contain exonic CpG islands which are hypermethylated in T24 cells. Remethylation occurred most rapidly in the p16, PAX-6, and c-ABL genes, shown to be transcribed prior to drug treatment. These regions also exhibited higher levels of remethylation in single-cell clones and subclones derived from 5-Aza-CdR-treated T24 cells. Our data suggest that de novo methylation is not restricted to the S phase of the cell cycle and that transcription through CpG islands does not inhibit their remethylation. PMID:10490608

  3. The symmetry behind extended flavour democracy and large leptonic mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branco, G. C.; Silva-Marcos, J. I.

    2002-01-01

    We show that there is a minimal discrete symmetry which leads to the extended flavour democracy scenario constraining the Dirac neutrino, the charged lepton and the Majorana neutrino mass term (MR) to be all proportional to the democratic matrix, with all elements equal. In particular, this discreet symmetry forbids other large contributions to MR, such as a term proportional to the unit matrix, which would normally be allowed by a S3L×S3R permutation symmetry. This feature is crucial in order to obtain large leptonic mixing, without violating 't Hooft's naturalness principle.

  4. Lepton Number Violation in Higgs Decay at LHC.

    PubMed

    Maiezza, Alessio; Nemevšek, Miha; Nesti, Fabrizio

    2015-08-21

    We show that within the left-right symmetric model, lepton number violating decays of the Higgs boson can be discovered at the LHC. The process is due to the mixing of the Higgs boson with the triplet that breaks parity. As a result, the Higgs boson can act as a gateway to the origin of the heavy Majorana neutrino mass. To assess the LHC reach, a detailed collider study of the same-sign dileptons plus jets channel is provided. This process is complementary to the existing nuclear and collider searches for lepton number violation and can probe the scale of parity restoration even beyond other direct searches.

  5. A Search for Neutrinoless Tau Decays to Three Leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, Jeffrey A.

    2008-06-01

    Using approximately 350 million τ+τ- pair events recorded with the BaBar detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center between 1999 and 2006, a search has been made for neutrinoless, lepton-flavor violating tau decays to three lighter leptons. All six decay modes consistent with conservation of electric charge and energy have been considered. With signal selection efficiencies of 5-12%, we obtain 90% confidence level upper limits on the branching fraction β}(τ → ℓℓℓ) in the range (4-8) x 10-8.

  6. Study of Lepton Flavor Universality in Semileptonic decays with LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Brian; LHCb Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Semileptonic b-hadron decays to tau leptons provide a powerful probe for a class of new physics models that may have Higgs-like non-universal couplings to the charged leptons. Recent improvements in the measured decay rates in these channels hint at an excess relative to the expected rates in Standard Model calculations. A new development in this area is the emergence of hadron collider measurements with different systematics and backgrounds providing complimentary probes of the same or similar processes. We present the latest progress in these measurements using the LHCb 7 and 8 TeV datasets. National Science Foundation.

  7. Search for lepton flavor violating decays tau+/--->l+/-omega.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Orimoto, T J; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Ayad, R; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Watson, J E; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Nash, J A; Panduro Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Biesiada, J; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Miyashita, T S; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Neal, H

    2008-02-22

    A search for lepton flavor violating decays of a tau to a lighter-mass charged lepton and an omega vector meson is performed using 384.1 fb(-1) of e(+)e(-) annihilation data collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center PEP-II storage ring. No signal is found, and the upper limits on the branching ratios are determined to be B(tau(+/-)-->e;{+/-}omega)<1.1 x10 (-7) and B(tau(+/-)-->micro(+/-)omega)<1.0 x 10(-7) at 90% confidence level.

  8. Generalized gauge U(1) family symmetry for quarks and leptons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kownacki, Corey; Ma, Ernest; Pollard, Nicholas; Zakeri, Mohammadreza

    2017-03-01

    If the standard model of quarks and leptons is extended to include three singlet right-handed neutrinos, then the resulting fermion structure admits an infinite number of anomaly-free solutions with just one simple constraint. Well-known examples satisfying this constraint are B- L, Lμ-Lτ, B- 3Lτ, etc. We derive this simple constraint, and discuss two new examples which offer some insights to the structure of mixing among quark and lepton families, together with their possible verification at the Large Hadron Collider.

  9. Leptonic Decays of the Charged B Meson

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, Luke A.

    2008-01-01

    We present a search for the decay B+ → ℓ+ν ( = τ, μ, or e) in (458.9±5.1)×106 Υ(4S) decays recorded with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B-Factory. A sample of events with one reconstructed exclusive semi-leptonic B decay (B- → D0-$\\bar{v}$X) is selected, and in the recoil a search for B+ →ℓ +ν signal is performed. The τ is identified in the following channels: τ+ → e+νe$\\bar{v}$τ , τ+ → μ+νμ$\\bar{v}$τ , τ+ → π+$\\bar{v}$τ , and τ+ → π+π0$\\bar{v}$τ . The analysis strategy and the statistical procedure is set up for branching fraction extraction or upper limit determination. We determine from the dataset a preliminary measurement of B(B+ → τ+ντ) = (1.8 ± 0.8 ± 0.1) × 10-4, which excludes zero at 2.4σ, and fB = 255 ± 58 MeV. Combination with the hadronically tagged measurement yields B(B+ → τ+ντ) = (1.8 ± 0.6) × 10-4. We also set preliminary limits on the branching fractions at B(B+ → e+νe) < 7.7 × 10-6 (90% C.L.), B(B+ → μ+νμ) < 11 × 10-6 (90% C.L.), and B(B+ → τ+ντ ) < 3.2 × 10-4(90% C.L.).

  10. Results on CP violation from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    S. Giagu

    2003-12-11

    The CDF experiment at the Tevatron collider is collecting a large sample of fully hadronic decays of Bottom and Charm mesons. First CP Violation measurements have been performed using the initial data, achieving results which clearly state the CDF ability in extracting significant CKM information from p{bar p} collisions. The first results on direct CP asymmetries on Charm and Bottom decays and future plans from the CDF experiment are discussed in this paper.

  11. Two current experimental problems in heavy lepton physics: tau decay modes and close mass pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1987-08-01

    This paper investigates tau lepton decay modes and close-mass lepton pairs. The major part of the paper discusses branching functions from experimental and theoretical viewpoints. Finally, the lack of experimental signatures of close-mass lepton pairs are reviewed. 15 refs., 2 figs., 11 tabs. (JDH)

  12. Precision Measurements of Tau Lepton Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Nugent, Ian M.

    2008-01-01

    charged current lepton universality, gμ ge =1.0036 ± 0.0020. The branching ratios B(τ-→K-ντ ) /B(τ-→e-ντ $\\bar{v}$e) =(3.882 ± 0.032 ± 0.057) × 10-2, and B(τ-→π-ντ ) /B(τ-→e-ντ $\\bar{v}$e) =(5.945 ± 0.014 ± 0.061) × 10-1 are measured which provide additional tests of charged current lepton universality, gτ/gμ π = 0.9856 ± 0.0057 and gτ/gμ K = 0.9827 ± 0.0086 which can be combined to give gτ/gμ π/K = 0.9850 ± 0.0054 . Any deviation of these measurements from the expected Standard Model values would be an indication of new physics.

  13. CKM-UT Angles: Mixing And CP Violation at the B Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Finocchiaro, Giuseppe; /Frascati

    2011-11-07

    We review the experimental status of the angles of the Unitarity Triangle of the CKM matrix, as measured by the BABAR and Belle experiments. The B Factories have demonstrated since the beginning of this decade that CP violation in the B meson system is consistent with the Standard Model (SM) description in terms of the complex phase in the three-by-three Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix. With one single phase, the SM predicts clear patterns for quark mixing and CP violations, to be satisfied by all processes.

  14. Implications of charmless B decays with large direct CP violation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yueliang; Zhou Yufeng

    2005-01-15

    Based on the most recent data in charmless B decays including the very recently reported large direct CP violations, it is shown that the weak phase {gamma} can well be extracted without twofold ambiguity even only from two decay modes {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {pi}{sup +}K{sup -}, and its value is remarkably consistent with the global standard model fit at a compatible accuracy. A fit to all the {pi}{pi},{pi}K data favor both large electroweak penguin and color-suppressed tree amplitude with large strong phases. It is demonstrated that the inclusion of SU(3) symmetry breaking effects of strong phases and the inelastic rescattering effects can well improve the consistency of the data, while both effects may not be sufficient to arrive at a small electroweak penguin amplitude in the standard model. It is of interest to notice that large or small electroweak penguin amplitude becomes a testable prediction as they lead to significantly different predictions for the direct CP violations for {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, {pi}{sup 0}K{sup 0} modes. Clearly, precise measurements on charmless B decays will provide a window for probing new physics.

  15. Measurement of the CP-violating phase ΦsJ/ψΦ using the flavor-tagged decay Bs0→J/ ψΦ in 8 fb⁻¹ of pp̄ collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzón, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Strom, D.; Stutte, L.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Tanasijczuk, A.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verdier, P.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weber, M.; Welty-Rieger, L.; White, A.; Wicke, D.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Xu, C.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, R.; Yang, W.-C.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J.; Zelitch, S.; Zhao, T.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2012-02-22

    We report an updated measurement of the CP-violating phase, ΦsJ/ψΦ, and the decay-width difference for the two mass eigenstates, ΔΓs, from the flavor-tagged decay B0s→J/ψΦ. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 8.0 fb⁻¹ accumulated with the D0 detector using pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The 68% Bayesian credibility intervals, including systematic uncertainties, are ΔΓs=0.163+0.065₋0.064 ps⁻¹ and ΦsJ/ψΦ=₋0.55+0.38₋0.36. The p-value for the Standard Model point is 29.8%.

  16. Registration of "HoCP 00-950" Sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    HoCP 00-950 sugarcane was selected from progeny of the cross HoCP 93-750 x HoCP 92-676 made at Canal Point, Florida. HoCP 00-950 was developed through cooperative research by the Agricultural Research Service of the United States Department of Agriculture, the Louisiana Agricultural Experiment Stati...

  17. Lepton flavor violating processes at the International Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, P. M.; Guedes, R. B.; Santos, R.

    2007-03-01

    We study the effects of dimension-six effective operators on the flavor violating production and decay of leptons at the International Linear Collider. Analytic expressions for the cross sections, decay widths, and asymmetries of all flavor changing processes will be presented, as well as an analysis of the feasibility of their observation at the ILC.

  18. Primary versus Secondary Leptons in the EGRET Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatuzzo, Marco; Melia, Fulvio

    2005-09-01

    The EGRET supernova remnants (SNRs) are all expanding into nearby dense molecular clouds, powering a shock at the interface where protons and electrons accelerate to relativistic energies. A viable mechanism for the emission of γ-rays in these sources is the decay of neutral pions created in collisions between the relativistic hadrons and protons in the ambient medium. But neutral pion decay alone cannot reproduce the whole high-energy spectrum, particularly below 100 MeV. A pion decay scenario thus requires a lepton population to fill in the lower part of the spectrum via bremsstrahlung emission. This population, however, is constrained by the SNR radio spectrum. Taking our cue from the behavior of Sgr A East, an energetic EGRET SNR at the Galactic center, we here examine the role played in these sources by secondary leptons-electrons and positrons produced in proton-proton scattering events and the ensuing particle cascades. We show that, while secondary leptons cannot account for the γ-rays below 100 MeV, they can account for the hard radio spectra observed from the EGRET SNRs. Thus, it appears that both primary and secondary leptons may be important contributors to the overall broadband emission from these sources, but if so, they must radiate most of their energy in different parts of the SNR-cloud environment. We show that shock acceleration in dense cores being overtaken by the expanding SNR shell can naturally lead to such a scenario.

  19. Doubly charged vector leptons and the Higgs portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen Jun; Ng, J. N.

    2016-11-01

    Using a bottom up phenomenological approach we constructed a simple doubly charged vector lepton E±± model for the possible 750 GeV diphoton resonance Φ at the LHC assuming it to be a scalar particle. Since no stable doubly charged leptons are seen, to facilitate their decays we complete the model by adding a charged standard model (SM) electroweak scalar S± . Φ is a SM singlet and can be either an inert scalar or a Higgs field. In the inert case more than one vector lepton is required to account for the photon fusion production of the resonance if the model is to remain perturbative. For a Higgs boson case S± can assist the production mechanism without using more than one such lepton. We also found that precision measurements constrain the couplings of E±± and S± to SM particles to be small. This raises the possibility that they can be fairly long lived and can give rise to displaced vertices if produced at the LHC.

  20. Higgs production from sterile neutrinos at future lepton colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antusch, Stefan; Cazzato, Eros; Fischer, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    In scenarios with sterile (right-handed) neutrinos that are subject to an approximate "lepton-number-like" symmetry, the heavy neutrinos (i.e. the mass eigenstates) can have masses around the electroweak scale and couple to the Higgs boson with, in principle, unsuppressed Yukawa couplings while accounting for the smallness of the light neutrinos' masses. In these scenarios, the on-shell production of heavy neutrinos and their subsequent decays into a light neutrino and a Higgs boson constitutes a hitherto unstudied resonant contribution to the Higgs production mechanism. We investigate the relevance of this resonant mono-Higgs production mechanism in leptonic collisions, including thepresent experimental constraints on the neutrino Yukawa couplings, and we determine the sensitivity of future lepton colliders to the heavy neutrinos. With Monte Carlo event sampling and a simulation of the detector response we find that, at future lepton colliders, neutrino Yukawa couplings below the percent level can lead to observable deviations from the SM and, furthermore, the sensitivity improves with higher center-of-mass energies (for identical integrated luminosities).

  1. Measurement of Z0 lepton coupling asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Smy, Michael Burghard

    1997-07-01

    Polarized Z0`s from e+e- collisions at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) have been used to determine the asymmetry parameters Ae, Aμ and Aτ from the leptonic decay channels. This is the first direct measurement of Aμ. The data have been gathered by the SLC Large Detector (SLD) with the electron polarization averaging 63% during the 1993 data taking period and 77% in 1994-95. A maximum likelihood procedure as well as cross section asymmetries was used to measure the asymmetry parameters from the differential cross sections for equal luminosities of left- and right-handed electron beams. The polarization-dependent muon-pair distributions give Aμ = 0.102 ±0.034 and the tau-pairs give Aτ = 0.195 ±0.034. The initial state electronic couplings in all three leptonic channels as well as the final state angular distribution in the e+e- final state measure Ae to be Ae = 0.152±0.012. Assuming lepton universality and defining a global leptonic asymmetry parameter Ae-μ-τ = 0.151±0.011. This global leptonic asymmetry value translates directly into sin2θWeff=0.2310v0.0014 at the Z0 pole.

  2. Normal tau polarization as a sensitive probe of CP violation in chargino decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreiner, Herbi K.; Kittel, Olaf; Marold, Anja

    2010-12-01

    CP violation in the spin-spin correlations in chargino production and subsequent two-body decay into a tau and a tau-sneutrino is studied at the ILC. From the normal polarization of the tau, an asymmetry is defined to test the CP-violating phase of the higgsino mass parameter μ. Asymmetries of more than ±70% are obtained, also in scenarios with heavy first and second generation sfermions. Bounds on the statistical significances of the CP asymmetries are estimated. As a result, the normal tau polarization in the chargino decay is one of the most sensitive probes to constrain or measure the phase φμ at the ILC, motivating further detailed experimental studies.

  3. Antisense Inhibition of the Photosynthetic Antenna Proteins CP29 and CP26

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Jenny; Walters, Robin G.; Horton, Peter; Jansson, Stefan

    2001-01-01

    The specific roles of the chlorophyll a/b binding proteins CP29 and CP26 in light harvesting and energy dissipation within the photosynthetic apparatus have been investigated. Arabidopsis was transformed with antisense constructs against the genes encoding the CP29 or CP26 apoprotein, which gave rise to several transgenic lines with remarkably low amounts of the antisense target proteins. The decrease in the level of CP24 protein in the CP29 antisense lines indicates a physical interaction between these complexes. Analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence showed that removal of the proteins affected photosystem II function, probably as a result of changes in the organization of the light-harvesting antenna. However, whole plant measurements showed that overall photosynthetic rates were similar to those in the wild type. Both antisense lines were capable of the qE type of nonphotochemical fluorescence quenching, although there were minor changes in the capacity for quenching and in its induction kinetics. High-light-induced violaxanthin deepoxidation to zeaxanthin was not affected, although the pool size of these pigments was decreased slightly. We conclude that CP29 and CP26 are unlikely to be sites for nonphotochemical quenching. PMID:11340191

  4. Lepton mass effects in elastic lepton-proton scattering beyond the leading order of QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshchii, Oleksandr; Afanasev, Andrei

    2017-01-01

    The future MUSE experiment is devised to solve the ``Proton Radius Puzzle'' by considering simultaneously elastic e+/- p and μ+/- p scattering. This experiment requires a per cent level accuracy in comparison of electron-proton and muon-proton scattering. Our goal is to provide all the relevant radiative corrections calculations for MUSE without using ultrarelativistic (ml -> 0) approximation. This approximation is not applicable for the scattering of muons in kinematics of MUSE. In this talk, we will present our up-to-date results on radiative corrections calculations obtained by using a Monte Carlo generator ELRADGEN modified to treat the lepton mass effects with no ultra-relativistic approximation. Next, we will discuss our estimations of the important helicity-flip contribution represented by a scalar σ meson exchange in the t-channel. This term vanishes in the ultra-relativistic and/or one-photon exchange approximation, and makes a difference in comparison of electron vs muon scattering in MUSE. This work was supported by the NSF under Grants Nos. PHY-1404342, PHY-1309130 and by The George Washington University through the Gus Weiss endowment.

  5. CP violating anomalous top-quark coupling in p$\\bar{p}$ collision at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sehwook

    2011-01-01

    We conduct the first study of the T-odd correlations in tt events produced in p$\\bar{p}$ collision at the Fermilab Tevatron collider that can be used to search for CP violation. We select events which have lepton+jets final states to identify t$\\bar{t}$ events and measure counting asymmetries of several physics observables. Based on the result, we search the top quark anomalous couplings at the production vertex at the Tevatron. In addition, Geant4 development, photon identification, the discrimination of a single photon and a photon doublet from π0 decay are discussed in this thesis.

  6. CP asymmetries in semiinclusive B0 decays

    SciTech Connect

    Dunietz, I.

    1999-02-01

    It was recently pointed out that inclusive B^0(t) decays could show CP violation. The totally inclusive asymmetry is expected to be tiny [O(10^{-3})] because of large cancellations among the asymmetries in the charmless, single charm and double charm final states. Enriching particular final state configurations could significantly increase the CP-asymmetry and observability. Such studies can extract fundamental CKM (Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa) parameters, and (perhaps) even Delta m(B_s). A superb vertex detector could see CP violation with 10^5 (10^6) flavor-tagged B_s (B_d) mesons within the CKM model. Because the effects could be significantly larger due to new physics, they should be searched for in existing or soon available data samples.

  7. Search for CP violation in hyperon decays.

    SciTech Connect

    Zyla, Piotr; Chan, A.; Chen, Y.C.; Ho, C.; Teng, P.K.; Choong, W.S.; Gidal, G.; Fu, Y.; Gu, P.; Jones, T.D.; Luk, K.B.; Turko, B.; James, C.; Volk, J.; Felix, J.; Burnstein, R.A.; Chakrovorty, A.; Kaplan, D.M.; Lederman, L.M.; Luebke, W.; Rajaram, D.; Rubin, H.A.; Solomey, N.; Torun, Y.; White, C.G.; White, S.L.; Leros, N.; Perroud, J.P.; Gustafson, H.R.; Longo, M.J.; Lopez, F.; Park H.K.; Clark, K.; Jenkins, M.; Dukes, E.C.; Durandet, C.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, M.; Lu, L.; Nelson, K.S.

    2002-10-25

    Direct CP violation in nonleptonic hyperon decays can be established by comparing the decays of hyperons and anti-hyperons. For {Xi} decay to {Lambda} {pi} followed by {Lambda} to p{pi}, the proton distribution in the rest frame of Lambda is governed by the product of the decay parameters {alpha}{sub {Xi}} {alpha}{sub {Lambda}}. The asymmetry A{sub {Xi}{Lambda}}, proportional to the difference of {alpha}{sub {Xi}}{alpha}{sub {Lambda}} of the hyperon and anti-hyperon decays, vanishes if CP is conserved. We report on an analysis of a fraction of 1997 and 1999 data collected by the Hyper CP (E871) collaboration during the fixed-target runs at Fermilab. The preliminary measurement of the asymmetry is {Alpha}{sub {Xi}{Lambda}} = [-7 {+-} 12(stat) {+-} 6.2(sys)] x 10{sup -4}, an order of magnitude better than the present limit.

  8. Temperature dependence of standard model CP violation.

    PubMed

    Brauner, Tomáš; Taanila, Olli; Tranberg, Anders; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2012-01-27

    We analyze the temperature dependence of CP violation effects in the standard model by determining the effective action of its bosonic fields, obtained after integrating out the fermions from the theory and performing a covariant gradient expansion. We find nonvanishing CP violating terms starting at the sixth order of the expansion, albeit only in the C-odd-P-even sector, with coefficients that depend on quark masses, Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements, temperature and the magnitude of the Higgs field. The CP violating effects are observed to decrease rapidly with temperature, which has important implications for the generation of a matter-antimatter asymmetry in the early Universe. Our results suggest that the cold electroweak baryogenesis scenario may be viable within the standard model, provided the electroweak transition temperature is at most of order 1 GeV.

  9. CP symmetry in optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dana, Brenda; Bahabad, Alon; Malomed, Boris A.

    2015-04-01

    We introduce a model of a dual-core optical waveguide with opposite signs of the group-velocity dispersion in the two cores, and a phase-velocity mismatch between them. The coupler is embedded into an active host medium, which provides for the linear coupling of a gain-loss type between the two cores. The same system can be derived, without phenomenological assumptions, by considering the three-wave propagation in a medium with the quadratic nonlinearity, provided that the depletion of the second-harmonic pump is negligible. This linear system offers an optical realization of the charge-parity symmetry, while the addition of the intracore cubic nonlinearity breaks the symmetry. By means of direct simulations and analytical approximations, it is demonstrated that the linear system generates expanding Gaussian states, while the nonlinear one gives rise to broad oscillating solitons, as well as a general family of stable stationary gap solitons.

  10. Therapeutic administration of a synthetic CpG oligodeoxynucleotide triggers formation of anti-CpG antibodies.

    PubMed

    Karbach, Julia; Neumann, Antje; Wahle, Claudia; Brand, Kathrin; Gnjatic, Sacha; Jäger, Elke

    2012-09-01

    The synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide CpG 7909, which contains unmethylated cytosine/guanine (CpG) motifs, has potent immunostimulatory effects when coadministered with NY-ESO-1 peptides or recombinant NY-ESO-1 protein, resulting in an enhanced cellular and humoral immune response against the vaccine antigen. In this study, we report the development of anti-CpG-ODN antibodies in 21 of 37 patients who received CpG 7909 either alone or as a vaccine adjuvant. Specific anti-CpG immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody titers ranged from 1:400 to 1:100,000. The anti-CpG antibodies cross-reacted with other synthetic CpG-ODNs but not with the DNA of mixed bacterial vaccine and were shown to be phosphorothioate backbone specific. Vaccine-related severe side effects observed in some patients were most likely not related to the development of anti-CpG antibodies. In addition, anti-CpG antibodies did not have negative effects on the vaccine immune response. These results show that anti-CpG antibodies develop in humans against short unmethylated CpG dinucleotide sequences after administration of CpG 7909. Our data therefore substantiate the potency of CpG 7909 to directly stimulate human B-cells and suggest that anti-CpG antibody monitoring should be a part of ongoing and planned clinical trials with CpG-ODNs.

  11. Two Complementary Strategies for New Physics Searches at Lepton Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Hooberman, Benjamin Henry

    2009-07-06

    In this thesis I present two complementary strategies for probing beyond-the-Standard Model physics using data collected in e+e- collisions at lepton colliders. One strategy involves searching for effects at low energy mediated by new particles at the TeV mass scale, at which new physics is expected to manifest. Several new physics scenarios, including Supersymmetry and models with leptoquarks or compositeness, may lead to observable rates for charged lepton-flavor violating processes, which are forbidden in the Standard Model. I present a search for lepton-flavor violating decays of the Υ(3S) using data collected with the BABAR detector. This study establishes the 90% confidence level upper limits BF(Υ(3S) → eτ) < 5.0 x 10-6 and BF(Υ(3S) → μτ) < 4.1 x 10-6 which are used to place constraints on new physics contributing to lepton-flavor violation at the TeV mass scale. An alternative strategy is to increase the collision energy above the threshold for new particles and produce them directly. I discuss research and development efforts aimed at producing a vertex tracker which achieves the physics performance required of a high energy lepton collider. A small-scale vertex tracker prototype is constructed using Silicon sensors of 50 μm thickness and tested using charged particle beams. This tracker achieves the targeted impact parameter resolution of σLP = (5⊕10 GeV/pT) as well as a longitudinal vertex resolution of (260 ± 10) μm, which is consistent with the requirements of a TeV-scale lepton collider. This detector research and development effort must be motivated and directed by simulation studies of physics processes. Investigation of a dark matter-motivated Supersymmetry scenario is presented, in which the dark matter is composed of Supersymmetric neutralinos. In this scenario, studies of the e+e- → H0A0 production process allow for

  12. Restoration of CpG Methylation in The Egf Promoter Region during Rat Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Deming, Li; Ziwei, Li; Xueqiang, Guo; Cunshuan, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is an important factor for healing after tissue damage in diverse experimental models. It plays an important role in liver regeneration (LR). The objective of this experiment is to investigate the methylation variation of 10 CpG sites in the Egf promoter region and their relevance to Egf expression during rat liver regenera- tion. As a follow up of our previous study, rat liver tissue was collected after rat 2/3 partial hepatectomy (PH) during the re-organization phase (from days 14 to days 28). Liver DNA was extracted and modified by sodium bisulfate. The methylation status of 10 CpG sites in Egf promoter region was determined using bisulfite sequencing polymerase chain reaction (PCR), as BSP method. The results showed that 3 (sites 3, 4 and 9) out of 10 CpG sites have strikingly methylation changes during the re-organization phase compared to the regeneration phase (from 2 hours to 168 hours, P=0.002, 0.048 and 0.018, respectively). Our results showed that methylation modification of CpGs in the Egf promoter region could be restored to the status before PH operation and changes of methylation didn’t affect Egf mRNA expression during the re-organization phase. PMID:26464832

  13. Structural Minimality, CP and the Initial State in Second Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatt, Rakesh M.; Hancin-Bhatt, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    Considers the current debate on the initial state of second language (L2) acquisition and presents critical empirical evidence from Hindi learners of English-as-a-Second-Language that supports the claim that the complementizer phase (CP) is initially absent from the grammar of L2 speakers.(Author/VWL)

  14. Characterization of bacteriophages Cp1 and Cp2, the strain-typing agents for Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Abdelmonim Ali; Ogawa, Megumi; Kawasaki, Takeru; Fujie, Makoto; Yamada, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The strains of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri, the causative agent of citrus canker, are historically classified based on bacteriophage (phage) sensitivity. Nearly all X. axonopodis pv. citri strains isolated from different regions in Japan are lysed by either phage Cp1 or Cp2; Cp1-sensitive (Cp1(s)) strains have been observed to be resistant to Cp2 (Cp2(r)) and vice versa. In this study, genomic and molecular characterization was performed for the typing agents Cp1 and Cp2. Morphologically, Cp1 belongs to the Siphoviridae. Genomic analysis revealed that its genome comprises 43,870-bp double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), with 10-bp 3'-extruding cohesive ends, and contains 48 open reading frames. The genomic organization was similar to that of Xanthomonas phage phiL7, but it lacked a group I intron in the DNA polymerase gene. Cp2 resembles morphologically Escherichia coli T7-like phages of Podoviridae. The 42,963-bp linear dsDNA genome of Cp2 contained terminal repeats. The Cp2 genomic sequence has 40 open reading frames, many of which did not show detectable homologs in the current databases. By proteomic analysis, a gene cluster encoding structural proteins corresponding to the class III module of T7-like phages was identified on the Cp2 genome. Therefore, Cp1 and Cp2 were found to belong to completely different virus groups. In addition, we found that Cp1 and Cp2 use different molecules on the host cell surface as phage receptors and that host selection of X. axonopodis pv. citri strains by Cp1 and Cp2 is not determined at the initial stage by binding to receptors.

  15. Stability of the lepton bag model based on the Kerr–Newman solution

    SciTech Connect

    Burinskii, A.

    2015-11-15

    We show that the lepton bag model considered in our previous paper [10], generating the external gravitational and electromagnetic fields of the Kerr–Newman (KN) solution, is supersymmetric and represents a BPS-saturated soliton interpolating between the internal vacuum state and the external KN solution. We obtain Bogomolnyi equations for this phase transition and show that the Bogomolnyi bound determines all important features of this bag model, including its stable shape. In particular, for the stationary KN solution, the BPS bound provides stability of the ellipsoidal form of the bag and the formation of the ring–string structure at its border, while for the periodic electromagnetic excitations of the KN solution, the BPS bound controls the deformation of the surface of the bag, reproducing the known flexibility of bag models.

  16. SuperLFV: An SLHA tool for lepton flavor violating observables in supersymmetric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Brandon

    2014-02-01

    We introduce SuperLFV, a numerical tool for calculating low-energy observables that exhibit charged lepton flavor violation (LFV) in the context of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). As the Large Hadron Collider and MEG, a dedicated μ+→e+γ experiment, are presently acquiring data, there is need for tools that provide rapid discrimination of models that exhibit LFV. SuperLFV accepts a spectrum file compliant with the SUSY Les Houches Accord (SLHA), containing the MSSM couplings and masses with complex phases at the supersymmetry breaking scale. In this manner, SuperLFV is compatible with but divorced from existing SLHA spectrum calculators that provide the low energy spectrum. Hence, input spectra are not confined to the LFV sources provided by established SLHA spectrum calculators. Input spectra may be generated by personal code or by hand, allowing for arbitrary models not supported by existing spectrum calculators.

  17. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides as mucosal adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Iho, Sumiko; Maeyama, Jun-ichi; Suzuki, Fumiko

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial DNA comprising palindromic sequences and containing unmethylated CpG is recognized by toll-like receptor 9 of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and induces the production of interferon-α and chemokines, leading to the activation of a Th1 immune response. Therefore, synthetic equivalents of bacterial DNA (CpG oligodeoxynucleotides) have been developed for clinical applications. They are usually phosphorothioated for in vivo use; this approach also leads to adverse effects as reported in mouse models.Mucosal vaccines that induce both mucosal and systemic immunity received substantial attention in recent years. For their development, phosphodiester-linked oligodeoxynucleotides, including the sequence of a palindromic CpG DNA may be advantageous as adjuvants because their target pDCs are present right there, in the mucosa of the vaccination site. In addition, the probability of adverse effects is believed to be low. Here, we review the discovery of such CpG oligodeoxynucleotides and their possible use as mucosal adjuvants. PMID:25751765

  18. CP and B Physics: Progress and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1997-06-01

    This summary of the 2nd International Conference on B Physics and CP Violation (Honolulu, 24--27 March, 1997) contains, in addition to what is implied in the title, some extended remarks on the limitations of theory as well as speculations regarding nonperturbative enhancement of decay modes of the class b {yields} s+ charmless hadrons.

  19. CP Violation, Neutral Currents, and Weak Equivalence

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Fitch, V. L.

    1972-03-23

    Within the past few months two excellent summaries of the state of our knowledge of the weak interactions have been presented. Correspondingly, we will not attempt a comprehensive review but instead concentrate this discussion on the status of CP violation, the question of the neutral currents, and the weak equivalence principle.

  20. CP and charge asymmetries at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Morello, Michael; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

    2007-11-01

    We present CDF results on the branching fractions and time-integrated direct CP asymmetries for B0 and B0s decay modes into pairs of charmless charged hadrons (pions or kaons). We report also the first observation of B0s->DsK mode and the measurement of its branching fraction.

  1. Higgs CP properties from early LHC data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, A.; Schwaller, P.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we constrain CP violation in the Higgs sector using the measured signal strengths in the various Higgs search channels. To this end, we introduce a general parametrization for a resonance which is an admixture of a CP-even Higgs-like state and a CP-odd scalar. By performing a fit to the available data from the Tevatron and LHC experiments, one obtains constraints on the mixing angle and the couplings of the resonance to Standard Model fields. Depending on the couplings, sizable mixing angles are still compatible with the data, but small mixing is in general preferred by the fit. In particular, we find that a pure CP-odd state is disfavored by the current data at the 3σ level. Additionally, we consider a mixed fermiophobic resonance and a model with two degenerate mixed resonances and find that both scenarios can successfully fit the data within current errors. Finally, we estimate that the mixing angle can be constrained to α<1.1 (0.7) in the full 8 TeV (14 TeV) run of the LHC.

  2. SPONTANEOUS CP VIOLATION AND QUARK MASS AMBIGUITIES.

    SciTech Connect

    CREUTZ,M.

    2004-09-21

    I explore the regions of quark masses where CP will be spontaneously broken in the strong interactions. The boundaries of these regions are controlled by the chiral anomaly, which manifests itself in ambiguities in the definition of non-degenerate quark masses. In particular, the concept of a single massless quark is ill defined.

  3. Sigma decomposition: the CP-odd Lagrangian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hierro, I. M.; Merlo, L.; Rigolin, S.

    2016-04-01

    In Alonso et al., JHEP 12 (2014) 034, the CP-even sector of the effective chiral Lagrangian for a generic composite Higgs model with a symmetric coset has been constructed, up to four momenta. In this paper, the CP-odd couplings are studied within the same context. If only the Standard Model bosonic sources of custodial symmetry breaking are considered, then at most six independent operators form a basis. One of them is the weak- θ term linked to non-perturbative sources of CP violation, while the others describe CP-odd perturbative couplings between the Standard Model gauge bosons and an Higgs-like scalar belonging to the Goldstone boson sector. The procedure is then applied to three distinct exemplifying frameworks: the original SU(5)/SO(5) Georgi-Kaplan model, the minimal custodial-preserving SO(5)/SO(4) model and the minimal SU(3)/(SU(2) × U(1)) model, which intrinsically breaks custodial symmetry. Moreover, the projection of the high-energy electroweak effective theory to the low-energy chiral effective Lagrangian for a dynamical Higgs is performed, uncovering strong relations between the operator coefficients and pinpointing the differences with the elementary Higgs scenario.

  4. CP corrosion control of municipal infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Gummow, R.A.

    2000-02-01

    Since its introduction in 1824, cathodic protection (CP) technology has developed to become a fundamental tool for preventing corrosion on municipal infrastructure. Potable water storage tanks and piping, prestressed concrete cylinder pipe, reinforced concrete structures, bridges, parking structures, underground fuel tanks, and effluent treatment clarifiers now benefit from this technology.

  5. Developing disease resistance in CP-Cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disease resistance is an important selection criterion in the Canal Point (CP) Sugarcane Cultivar Development Program. Ratoon stunt (RSD, caused by Leifsonia xyli subsp. Xyli Evtsuhenko et al.), leaf scald (caused by Xanthomonas albilineans Ashby, Dowson), mosaic (caused by Sugarcane mosaic virus st...

  6. Search for Charged Lepton Violation in Narrow Upsilon Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C.M.; /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Columbus Supercond., Genova /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-19

    Charged lepton flavor violating processes are unobservable in the standard model, but they are predicted to be enhanced in several extensions to the standard model, including supersymmetry and models with leptoquarks or compositeness. We present a search for such processes in a sample of 99 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(2S) decays and 117 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) decays collected with the BABAR detector. We place upper limits on the branching fractions {Beta}({Upsilon}(nS) {yields} e{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {-+}}) and {Beta}({Upsilon}(nS) {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {-+}}) (n = 2, 3) at the 10{sup -6} level and use these results to place lower limits of order 1 TeV on the mass scale of charged lepton flavor violating effective operators.

  7. A supersymmetric theory of vector-like leptons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, Aniket; Schwaller, Pedro; Wagner, Carlos E. M.

    2013-07-01

    We study a supersymmetric extension of the vector-like lepton scenario, such that the vacuum instability induced by large lepton Yukawa couplings is lifted by the presence of superpartners at or below the TeV scale. In order to preserve the unification of gauge couplings, we introduce a full 16+overline{16} of SO(10), and determine the maximal possible values for the Yukawa couplings consistent with perturbativity at the GUT scale. We find that the Higgs to diphoton decay rate can be enhanced by up to 50% while maintaining vacuum stability and keeping the new particle masses above 100 GeV, while larger enhancements are possible if the masses of the new particles are lowered further.

  8. Radiative Leptonic Decay of Ds and D Mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barik, N.; Naimuddin, Sk.; Dash, P. C.

    The radiative leptonic decays Ds → μνμγ and D → μνμγ are investigated at the tree level within the relativistic independent quark model based on the confining potential in the scalar-vector harmonic form. The branching ratios for these decays in the vanishing lepton mass limit are obtained as ℬr(Ds → μνμγ) = 4.94×10-4 and ℬr(D → μνμγ) = 3.34×10-5, which includes the contributions of the internal bremsstrahlung and structure dependent diagrams at the level of the quark constituents. Finally, the photon energy spectra as predicted here is found to be symmetric about the peak value of the photon energy at Eγ = MD_(s)/4.

  9. Radiative leptonic Bc decay in the relativistic independent quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barik, N.; Naimuddin, Sk.; Dash, P. C.; Kar, Susmita

    2008-12-01

    The radiative leptonic decay Bc-→μ-ν¯μγ is analyzed in its leading order in a relativistic independent quark model based on a confining potential in an equally mixed scalar-vector harmonic form. The branching ratio for this decay in the vanishing lepton mass limit is obtained as Br(Bc→μνμγ)=6.83×10-5, which includes the contributions of the internal bremsstrahlung and structure-dependent diagrams at the level of the quark constituents. The contributions of the bremsstrahlung and the structure-dependent diagrams, as well as their additive interference parts, are compared and found to be of the same order of magnitude. Finally, the predicted photon energy spectrum is observed here to be almost symmetrical about the peak value of the photon energy at Ẽγ≃(MBc)/(4), which may be quite accessible experimentally at LHC in near future.

  10. Supersymmetric lepton flavor violation in low-scale seesaw models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilakovac, Amon; Pilaftsis, Apostolos

    2009-11-01

    We study a new supersymmetric mechanism for lepton flavor violation in μ and τ decays and μ→e conversion in nuclei, within a minimal extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model with low-mass heavy singlet neutrinos and sneutrinos. We find that the decays μ→eγ, τ→eγ and τ→μγ are forbidden in the supersymmetric limit of the theory, whereas other processes, such as μ→eee, μ→e conversion, τ→eee and τ→eμμ, are allowed and can be dramatically enhanced several orders of magnitude above the observable level by potentially large neutrino Yukawa coupling effects. The profound implications of supersymmetric lepton flavor violation for present and future experiments are discussed.

  11. Reconstruction and identification of tau leptons in CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    Tau leptons constitute an important experimental signature for analyses at the CERN LHC related to Higgs boson, Standard Model, and beyond the Standard Model measurements. We describe the algorithm used by the CMS experiment to reconstruct and identify decays of tau leptons into hadrons and a neutrino during Run 1 of the CERN LHC. The performance of the algorithm is studied in proton-proton collisions recorded at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. The algorithm achieves an identification efficiency of typically 50-60%, with misidentification rates for quark and gluon jets, electrons and muons that vary between per mille and percent levels.

  12. W Lepton Charge Asymmetry - Test of Structure Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Qun

    1996-05-01

    The lepton charge asymmetry as a function of lepton rapidity |y_l| has been measured at √s=1.8 TeV, using the W decays to electrons and muons recorded by the CDF detector during the 1992-93 run (≈ 20 pb-1 of integrated luminosity), and the 1994-95 run (≈ 90 pb-1). The asymmetry is sensitive to the ratio of the d to u quark momentum distributions in the proton. The measurement probes the quark distributions to x<0.01 at Q^2 ≈ M_W^2, where nonperturbative effects are minimal. These precise data provide discrimination between sets of modern parton distributions. It is found that the most recent parton distributions, which included the 1992-93 W asymmetry data in their fits (MRSA and CTEQ3M) are in better agreement with the more precise data from the 1994-95 run.

  13. Efficacy and safety of CP-945,598, a selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, on weight loss and maintenance.

    PubMed

    Aronne, Louis J; Finer, Nick; Hollander, Priscilla A; England, Richard D; Klioze, Solomon S; Chew, Robert D; Fountaine, Robert J; Powell, Coralie M; Obourn, John D

    2011-07-01

    Three double-blind, placebo-controlled, three-parallel-group, multicenter phase 3 trials were conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of CP-945,598 for weight loss and weight-loss maintenance. Two trials were designed to be 2 years in duration (in obese and overweight patients) and one as a 1-year study (in obese and overweight patients with type 2 diabetes). However, the 2-year trials and the CP-945,598 development program were terminated before completion due to changing regulatory perspectives of CB1 receptor-related drugs. In total, 1,253 and 2,536 participants in the two 2-year multinational and North American studies were randomized to 10-mg CP-945,598 (n = 360; 718); 20-mg CP-945,598 (n = 534, 1,084) and placebo (n = 359, 734), respectively; and 975 participants were randomized to 10-mg CP-945,598 (n = 318); 20-mg CP-945,598 (n = 320); and placebo (n = 337) in the 1-year multinational diabetes trial. Baseline demographics were similar between treatment groups within each trial. One year of treatment with CP-945,598 resulted in a dose-related mean percentage reduction from baseline body-weight in all trials. A significant proportion of all participants also achieved 5% and 10% weight loss after 1 year. In participants with mainly well-controlled type 2 diabetes, the combination of lifestyle and CP-945,598 induced substantial improvements in glycemic control. The most frequent adverse events (AEs) for CP-945,598 were: diarrhea, nausea, nasopharyngitis, and headache. Self-reported experiences of anxiety and suicidal thoughts were higher with CP-945,598 than placebo, as were the incidence of depression and depressed mood. However, the reported increases in psychiatric symptoms were not consistently dose dependent.

  14. B(s) Mixing, Delta Gamma(s) and CP Violation at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; /Paris U., VI-VII

    2008-05-01

    The authors discuss the results from the Tevatron experiments on mixing and CP violation in the B{sub s}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} system, with particular emphasis to the updated measurements of the decay-width difference {Delta}{Lambda}{sub s} and the first measurement of the CP-violating phase {beta}{sub s} using flavor tagging information. They also briefly review the charge asymmetry measurements in semileptonic B{sub s}{sup 0} decays and in B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}} decays.

  15. Lepton Flavour Violation in Tau Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, F.F.; /Rutherford

    2011-11-07

    Recent results from {tau} physics studies at BABAR are presented with an emphasis on Lepton Flavour Violation measurements. The results from the current generation of B-meson Factories are already beginning to constrain the parameter space of models that go beyond the Standard Model. By the end of their data-taking, the current generation of B-meson factories will have produced nearly 2 billion {tau} pair decays. The physics potential of this legacy has only just begun to be exploited.

  16. Dirac neutrinos and dark matter stability from lepton quarticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centelles Chuliá, Salvador; Ma, Ernest; Srivastava, Rahul; Valle, José W. F.

    2017-04-01

    We propose to relate dark matter stability to the possible Dirac nature of neutrinos. The idea is illustrated in a simple scheme where small Dirac neutrino masses arise from a type-I seesaw mechanism as a result of a Z4 discrete lepton number symmetry. The latter implies the existence of a viable WIMP dark matter candidate, whose stability arises from the same symmetry which ensures the Diracness of neutrinos.

  17. The vertex detector for the Lepton/Photon collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, J.P.; Boissevain, J.G.; Fox, D.; Hecke, H. van; Jacak, B.V.; Kapustinsky, J.S.; Leitch, M.J.; McGaughey, P.L.; Moss, J.M.; Sondheim, W.E.

    1991-12-31

    The conceptual design of the vertex detector for the Lepton/Photon Collaboration at RHIC is described, including simulations of its expected performance. The design consists of two con- centric layers of single-sided Si strips. The expected performance as a multiplicity detector and in measuring the pseudo-rapidity ({nu}) distribution is discussed as well as the expected vertex finding efficiency and accuracy. Various options which could be used to reduce the cost of the detector are also discussed.

  18. Measurement of the tau lepton polarisation at LEP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G. J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; Dedovich, D.; Ricca, G. Della; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Santo, M. C. Espirito; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kerzel, U.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Nulty, R. Mc; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.; Delphi Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    A first measurement of the average polarisation Pτ of tau leptons produced in e+e- annihilation at energies significantly above the Z resonance is presented. The polarisation is determined from the kinematic spectra of tau hadronic decays. The measured value Pτ = - 0.164 ± 0.125 is consistent with the Standard Model prediction for the mean LEP energy of 197 GeV.

  19. Measurement of the tau lepton polarisation at LEP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DELPHI Collaboration; Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G. J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; Dedovich, D.; Ricca, G. Della; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Santo, M. C. Espirito; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kerzel, U.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Nulty, R. Mc; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.

    2008-01-01

    A first measurement of the average polarisation P of tau leptons produced in e+e- annihilation at energies significantly above the Z resonance is presented. The polarisation is determined from the kinematic spectra of tau hadronic decays. The measured value P=-0.164±0.125 is consistent with the Standard Model prediction for the mean LEP energy of 197 GeV.

  20. Electroweak Penguin and Leptonic Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Bucci, F.; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

    2005-08-26

    Recent BABAR results on electroweak penguin and leptonic decays are reviewed. In particular, the measurements of B {yields} K{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -} and the preliminary results on B {yields} X{sub s}l{sup +}l{sup -} are presented. Also summarized are the preliminary limits on B{sup +} {yields} l{sup +}{nu} (l = e,{mu}) and B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}.

  1. More lepton flavor violating observables for LHCb's run 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadagnoli, Diego; Melikhov, Dmitri; Reboud, Méril

    2016-09-01

    The RK measurement by LHCb suggests non-standard lepton non-universality (LNU) to occur in b → sℓ+ℓ- transitions, with effects in muons rather than electrons. A number of other measurements of b → sℓ+ℓ- transitions by LHCb and B-factories display disagreement with the SM predictions and, remarkably, these discrepancies are consistent in magnitude and sign with the RK effect. Non-standard LNU suggests non-standard lepton flavor violation (LFV) as well, for example in B → Kℓℓ‧ and Bs → ℓℓ‧. There are good reasons to expect that the new effects may be larger for generations closer to the third one. In this case, the Bs → μe decay may be the most difficult to reach experimentally. We propose and study in detail the radiative counterpart of this decay, namely Bs → μeγ, whereby the chiral-suppression factor is replaced by a factor of order α / π. A measurement of this mode would be sensitive to the same physics as the purely leptonic LFV decay and, depending on experimental efficiencies, it may be more accessible. A realistic expectation is a factor of two improvement in statistics for either of the Bd,s modes.

  2. Lepton mixing, residual symmetries, and trigonometric Diophantine equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we study residual symmetries in the lepton sector. Our first concern is the symmetry of the charged lepton mass matrix in the basis where the Majorana neutrino mass matrix is diagonal, which is strongly constrained by the requirement that the symmetry group generated by residual symmetries is finite. In a recent work, R. M. Fonseca and W. Grimus found that there exists a set of constraint equations that can be completely solved, which is essential in their approach to the classification of lepton mixing matrices that are fully determined by residual symmetries. In this paper, a method to handle trigonometric Diophantine equations is introduced. We will show that the constraint equations found by Fonseca and Grimus can also be solved by this method. Detailed derivation and discussion will be presented in a self-contained way. In addition, we will also show that, in the case where residual symmetries satisfy a reality condition, this method can be used to solve the equation constraining parameters in the symmetry assignment that controls the group structure generated by residual symmetries and is directly related to mixing matrix elements.

  3. Entropy production in a lepton-photon universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husdal, Lars; Brevik, Iver

    2017-02-01

    We look at the entropy production during the lepton era in the early universe by using a model where we exclude all particles except the leptons and photons. We assume a temperature dependent viscosity as calculated recently by one of us (Husdal in Astrophys. Space Sci. 361(8):1, 2016b) with the use of relativistic kinetic theory. We consider only the bulk viscosity, the shear viscosity being omitted because of spatial isotropy. The rate of entropy production is highest just before the neutrinos decouple. Our results show that the increase in entropy during the lepton era is quite small, about 0.071 % at a decoupling temperature of T=10^{10} K. This result is slightly smaller than that obtained earlier by Caderni and Fabbri (Phys. Lett. B 69:508, 1977). After the neutrino decoupling, when the Universe has entered the photon era, kinetic theory arguments no longer support the appearance of a bulk viscosity. At high temperatures and a stable particle ratio, entropy production (d{σ }/d{T}) goes as T^{-8}, with the total entropy (Δ σ) increasing as T^{-7}. These rates go slightly down just before the neutrinos decouple, where Δσ∝ T^{-6.2}.

  4. Light Vector Meson Photoproduction off of H at Jefferson Lab and rho-omega Interference in the Leptonic Decay Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Chaden Djalali

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies of light vector meson production in heavy nuclear targets has generated interest in {rho}-{omega} interference in the leptonic e{sup +}e{sup -} decay channel. An experimental study of the elementary process provides valuable input for theoretical models and calculations. In experiment E04-005 (g12), high statistics photoproduction data has been taken in Jefferson Lab's Hall B with the Cebaf Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). The invariant mass spectrum is fitted with two interfering relativistic Breit-Wigner functions to determine the interference phase. Preliminary analysis indicate a measurable {rho}-{omega} interference.

  5. Measurement of CP-violating asymmetries in B0 decays to CP eigenstates.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; De Bonis, I; Gaillard, J M; Jeremie, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Palano, A; Chen, G P; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Reinertsen, P L; Stugu, B; Abbott, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Clark, A R; Dardin, S; Day, C; Dow, S F; Elioff, T; Fan, Q; Gaponenko, I; Gill, M S; Goozen, F R; Gowdy, S J; Gritsan, A; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Jared, R C; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Karcher, A; Kerth, L T; Kipnis, I; Kluth, S; Kolomensky, Y G; Kral, J F; Lafever, R; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lewis, S A; Lionberger, C; Liu, T; Long, M; Lynch, G; Marino, M; Marks, K; Meyer, A B; Mokhtarani, A; Momayezi, M; Nyman, M; Oddone, P J; Ohnemus, J; Oshatz, D; Patton, S; Perazzo, A; Peters, C; Pope, W; Pripstein, M; Quarrie, D R; Rasson, J E; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Stone, R; Telnov, A V; von der Lippe, H; Weber, T; Wenzel, W A; Zisman, M S; Bright-Thomas, P G; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Kirk, A; Knowles, D J; O'Neale, S W; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Koch, H; Krug, J; Kunze, M; Lewandowski, B; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Andress, J C; Barlow, N R; Bhimji, W; Chevalier, N; Clark, P J; Cottingham, W N; De Groot, N; Dyce, N; Foster, B; Mass, A; McFall, J D; Wallom, D; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Camanzi, B; Jolly, S; McKemey, A K; Tinslay, J; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Bukin, D A; Buzykaev, A R; Dubrovin, M S; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kolachev, G M; Korol, A A; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Salnikov, A A; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Y I; Telnov, V I; Yushkov, A N; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Stoker, D P; Ahsan, A; Buchanan, C; Chun, S; MacFarlane, D B; Prell, S; Rahatlou, S; Raven, G; Sharma, V; Burke, S; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Hale, D; Hart, P A; Kuznetsova, N; Kyre, S; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Witherell, M; Yellin, S; Beringer, J; Dorfan, D E; Eisner, A M; Frey, A; Grillo, A A; Grothe, M; Heusch, C A; Johnson, R P; Kroeger, W; Lockman, W S; Pulliam, T; Sadrozinski, H; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spencer, E N; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hanson, J E; Hitlin, D G; Metzler, S; Oyang, J; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Weaver, M; Yang, S; Zhu, R Y; Devmal, S; Geld, T L; Jayatilleke, S; Jayatilleke, S M; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P; Fahey, S; Ford, W T; Gaede, F; van Hoek, W C; Johnson, D R; Michael, A K; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Park, H; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Sen, S; Smith, J G; Wagner, D L; Blouw, J; Harton, J L; Krishnamurthy, M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Warner, D W; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dahlinger, G; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Eckstein, P; Futterschneider, H; Krause, R; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Behr, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Ferrag, S; Fouque, G; Gastaldi, F; Matricon, P; Mora de Freitas, P; Renard, C; Roussot, E; T'Jampens, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Anjomshoaa, A; Bernet, R; Di Lodovico, F; Khan, A; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Falbo, M; Bozzi, C; Dittongo, S; Folegani, M; Piemontese, L; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Xie, Y; Zallo, A; Bagnasco, S; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Pallavicini, M; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Pia, M G; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Morii, M; Bartoldus, R; Dignan, T; Hamilton, R; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Fischer, P A; Lamsa, J; McKay, R; Meyer, W T; Rosenberg, E I; Albert, J N; Beigbeder, C; Benkebil, M; Breton, D; Cizeron, R; Du, S; Grosdidier, G; Hast, C; Höcker, A; LePeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Truong, K; Valassi, A; Wormser, G; Bionta, R M; Brigljević, V; Brooks, A; Fackler, O; Fujino, D; Lange, D J; Mugge, M; O'Connor, T G; Pedrotti, B; Shi, X; van Bibber, K; Wenaus, T J; Wright, D M; Wuest, C R; Yamamoto, B; Carroll, M; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, M; Kay, M; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Aspinwall, M L; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gunawardane, N J; Martin, R; Nash, J A; Price, D R; Sanders, P; Smith, D; Azzopardi, D E; Back, J J; Dixon, P; Harrison, P F; Newman-Coburn, D; Potter, R J; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Williams, M I; Cowan, G; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McGrath, P; McMahon, T R; Salvatore, F; Scott, I; Vaitsas, G; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Ford, K; Li, Y; Pavlovich, J; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Boyd, J T; Fullwood, J; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Savvas, N; Simopoulos, E T; Thompson, R J; Weatherall, J H; Bard, R; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Lillard, V; Olsen, J; Roberts, D A; Schieck, J R; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Lin, C S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Wittlin, J; Brau, B; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Britton, D I; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Trischuk, J; Lanni, F; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Booke, M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenberg, V; Kroeger, R; Reep, M; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Beaulieu, M; Martin, J P; Nief, J Y; Seitz, R; Taras, P; Zacek, V; Nicholson, H; Sutton, C S; Cavallo, N; Cartaro, C; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; LoSecco, J M; Alsmiller, J R; Gabriel, T A; Handler, T; Heck, J; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Iwasaki, M; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Borsato, E; Colecchia, F; Dal Corso, F; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Marzolla, M; Michelon, G; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Torassa, E; Voci, C; Bailly, P; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; De La Vaissière, C; Del Buono, L; Genat, J F; Hamon, O; Le Diberder, F; Lebbolo, H; Leruste, P; Lory, J; Martin, L; Roos, L; Stark, J; Versillé, S; Zhang, B; Manfredi, P F; Ratti, L; Re, V; Speziali, V; Frank, E D; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J H; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bosi, F; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Simi, G; Triggiani, G; Walsh, J; Hairre, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Turnbull, L; Wagoner, D E; Albert, J; Bula, C; Fernholz, R; Lu, C; McDonald, K T; Miftakov, V; Sands, B; Schaffner, S F; Smith, A J; Tumanov, A; Varnes, E W; Bronzini, F; Buccheri, A; Bulfon, C; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Fratini, K; Lamanna, E; Leonardi, E; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Serra, M; Voena, C; Waldi, R; Jacques, P F; Kalelkar, M; Plano, R J; Adye, T; Claxton, B; Franek, B; Galagedera, S; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Lidbury, J; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Besson, P; Bourgeois, P; De Domenico, G; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Gosset, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; 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von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Zobernig, H; Kordich, T M; Moore, T B; Neal, H

    2001-03-19

    We present measurements of time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries in neutral B decays to several CP eigenstates. The measurement uses a data sample of 23x10(6) Upsilon(4S)-->BbarB decays collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B Factory at SLAC. In this sample, we find events in which one neutral B meson is fully reconstructed in a CP eigenstate containing charmonium and the flavor of the other neutral B meson is determined from its decay products. The amplitude of the CP-violating asymmetry, which in the standard model is proportional to sin2beta, is derived from the decay time distributions in such events. The result is sin2beta = 0.34+/-0.20 (stat)+/-0.05 (syst).

  6. Measurement of CP-Violating Asymmetries in B0 Decays to CP Eigenstates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Boutigny, D.; de Bonis, I.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Jeremie, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Palano, A.; Chen, G. P.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Reinertsen, P. L.; Stugu, B.; Abbott, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Clark, A. R.; Dardin, S.; Day, C.; Dow, S. F.; Elioff, T.; Fan, Q.; Gaponenko, I.; Gill, M. S.; Goozen, F. R.; Gowdy, S. J.; Gritsan, A.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Jared, R. C.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Karcher, A.; Kerth, L. T.; Kipnis, I.; Kluth, S.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kral, J. F.; Lafever, R.; Leclerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lewis, S. A.; Lionberger, C.; Liu, T.; Long, M.; Lynch, G.; Marino, M.; Marks, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Mokhtarani, A.; Momayezi, M.; Nyman, M.; Oddone, P. J.; Ohnemus, J.; Oshatz, D.; Patton, S.; Perazzo, A.; Peters, C.; Pope, W.; Pripstein, M.; Quarrie, D. R.; Rasson, J. E.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Stone, R.; Telnov, A. V.; von der Lippe, H.; Weber, T.; Wenzel, W. A.; Zisman, M. S.; Bright-Thomas, P. G.; Harrison, T. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Kirk, A.; Knowles, D. J.; O'Neale, S. W.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Deppermann, T.; Koch, H.; Krug, J.; Kunze, M.; Lewandowski, B.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Andress, J. C.; Barlow, N. R.; Bhimji, W.; Chevalier, N.; Clark, P. J.; Cottingham, W. N.; de Groot, N.; Dyce, N.; Foster, B.; Mass, A.; McFall, J. D.; Wallom, D.; Wilson, F. F.; Abe, K.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Camanzi, B.; Jolly, S.; McKemey, A. K.; Tinslay, J.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Bukin, D. A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Kolachev, G. M.; Korol, A. A.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Salnikov, A. A.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Telnov, V. I.; Yushkov, A. N.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; McMahon, S.; Stoker, D. P.; Ahsan, A.; Buchanan, C.; Chun, S.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Prell, S.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Raven, G.; Sharma, V.; Burke, S.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Hale, D.; Hart, P. A.; Kuznetsova, N.; Kyre, S.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Witherell, M.; Yellin, S.; Beringer, J.; Dorfan, D. E.; Eisner, A. M.; Frey, A.; Grillo, A. A.; Grothe, M.; Heusch, C. A.; Johnson, R. P.; Kroeger, W.; Lockman, W. S.; Pulliam, T.; Sadrozinski, H.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E. N.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Williams, D. C.; Chen, E.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Hanson, J. E.; Hitlin, D. G.; Metzler, S.; Oyang, J.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Weaver, M.; Yang, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Devmal, S.; Geld, T. L.; Jayatilleke, S.; Jayatilleke, S. M.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P.; Fahey, S.; Ford, W. T.; Gaede, F.; van Hoek, W. C.; Johnson, D. R.; Michael, A. K.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Park, H.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Sen, S.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, D. L.; Blouw, J.; Harton, J. L.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Warner, D. W.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Colberg, T.; Dahlinger, G.; Dickopp, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Eckstein, P.; Futterschneider, H.; Krause, R.; Maly, E.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Otto, S.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wilden, L.; Behr, L.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Ferrag, S.; Fouque, G.; Gastaldi, F.; Matricon, P.; Mora de Freitas, P.; Renard, C.; Roussot, E.; T'jampens, S.; Thiebaux, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Anjomshoaa, A.; Bernet, R.; di Lodovico, F.; Khan, A.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Swain, J. E.; Falbo, M.; Bozzi, C.; Dittongo, S.; Folegani, M.; Piemontese, L.; Treadwell, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Falciai, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Xie, Y.; Zallo, A.; Bagnasco, S.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Monge, M. R.; Pallavicini, M.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F. C.; Patrignani, C.; Pia, M. G.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Morii, M.; Bartoldus, R.; Dignan, T.; Hamilton, R.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Fischer, P. A.; Lamsa, J.; McKay, R.; Meyer, W. T.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Albert, J. N.; Beigbeder, C.; Benkebil, M.; Breton, D.; Cizeron, R.; Du, S.; Grosdidier, G.; Hast, C.; Höcker, A.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Plaszczynski, S.; Schune, M. H.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Truong, K.; Valassi, A.; Wormser, G.; Bionta, R. M.; Brigljević, V.; Brooks, A.; Fackler, O.; Fujino, D.; Lange, D. J.; Mugge, M.; O'Connor, T. G.; Pedrotti, B.; Shi, X.; van Bibber, K.; Wenaus, T. J.; Wright, D. M.; Wuest, C. R.; Yamamoto, B.; Carroll, M.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; George, M.; Kay, M.; Payne, D. J.; Sloane, R. J.; Touramanis, C.; Aspinwall, M. L.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Eschrich, I.; Gunawardane, N. J.; Martin, R.; Nash, J. A.; Price, D. R.; Sanders, P.; Smith, D.; Azzopardi, D. E.; Back, J. J.; Dixon, P.; Harrison, P. F.; Newman-Coburn, D.; Potter, R. J.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Strother, P.; Vidal, P. B.; Williams, M. I.; Cowan, G.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McGrath, P.; McMahon, T. R.; Salvatore, F.; Scott, I.; Vaitsas, G.; Brown, D.; Davis, C. L.; Ford, K.; Li, Y.; Pavlovich, J.; Allison, J.; Barlow, R. J.; Boyd, J. T.; Fullwood, J.; Jackson, F.; Lafferty, G. D.; Savvas, N.; Simopoulos, E. T.; Thompson, R. J.; Weatherall, J. H.; Bard, R.; Farbin, A.; Jawahery, A.; Lillard, V.; Olsen, J.; Roberts, D. A.; Schieck, J. R.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Flood, K. T.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Lin, C. S.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S.; Wittlin, J.; Brau, B.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Britton, D. I.; Milek, M.; Patel, P. M.; Trischuk, J.; Lanni, F.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Booke, M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenberg, V.; Kroeger, R.; Reep, M.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Beaulieu, M.; Martin, J. P.; Nief, J. Y.; Seitz, R.; Taras, P.; Zacek, V.; Nicholson, H.; Sutton, C. S.; Cavallo, N.; Cartaro, C.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Losecco, J. M.; Alsmiller, J. R.; Gabriel, T. A.; Handler, T.; Heck, J.; Brau, J. E.; Frey, R.; Iwasaki, M.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Borsato, E.; Colecchia, F.; dal Corso, F.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Marzolla, M.; Michelon, G.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Torassa, E.; Voci, C.; Bailly, P.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; de La Vaissière, C.; del Buono, L.; Genat, J. F.; Hamon, O.; Le Diberder, F.; Lebbolo, H.; Leruste, Ph.; Lory, J.; Martin, L.; Roos, L.; Stark, J.; Versillé, S.; Zhang, B.; Manfredi, P. F.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Speziali, V.; Frank, E. D.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J. H.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Bosi, F.; Carpinelli, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Simi, G.; Triggiani, G.; Walsh, J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Paick, K.; Turnbull, L.; Wagoner, D. E.; Albert, J.; Bula, C.; Fernholz, R.; Lu, C.; McDonald, K. T.; Miftakov, V.; Sands, B.; Schaffner, S. F.; Smith, A. J.; Tumanov, A.; Varnes, E. W.; Bronzini, F.; Buccheri, A.; Bulfon, C.; Cavoto, G.; del Re, D.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Fratini, K.; Lamanna, E.; Leonardi, E.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Serra, M.; Voena, C.; Waldi, R.; Jacques, P. F.; Kalelkar, M.; Plano, R. J.; Adye, T.; Claxton, B.; Franek, B.; Galagedera, S.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Lidbury, J.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Besson, P.; Bourgeois, P.; de Domenico, G.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Gosset, L.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Serfass, B.; Vasseur, G.; Yeche, C.; Zito, M.; Copty, N.; Purohit, M. V.; Singh, H.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Adam, I.; Anthony, P. L.; Aston, D.; Baird, K.; Bartelt, J.; Becla, J.; Bell, R.; Bloom, E.; Boeheim, C. T.; Boyarski, A. M.; Boyce, R. F.; Bulos, F.; Burgess, W.; Byers, B.; Calderini, G.; Claus, R.; Convery, M. R.; Coombes, R.; Cottrell, L.; Coupal, D. P.; Coward, D. H.; Craddock, W. W.; Destaebler, H.; Dorfan, J.; Doser, M.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ecklund, S.; Fieguth, T. H.; Field, R. C.; Freytag, D. R.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G. L.; Grosso, P.; Haller, G.; Hanushevsky, A.; Harris, J.; Hasan, A.; Hewett, J. L.; Himel, T.; Huffer, M. E.; Innes, W. R.; Jessop, C. P.; Kawahara, H.; Keller, L.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Klaisner, L. A.; Kocian, M. L.; Krebs, H. J.; Kunz, P. F.; Langenegger, U.; Langeveld, W.; Leith, D. W.; Louie, S. K.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacDonald, J.; Manzin, G.; Marsiske, H.; McCulloch, M.; McShurley, D.; Menke, S.; Messner, R.; Metcalfe, S.; Moffeit, K. C.; Mount, R.; Muller, D. R.; Nelson, D.; Nordby, M.; O'Grady, C. P.; O'Neill, F. G.; Oxoby, G.; Pavel, T.; Perl, J.; Petrak, S.; Putallaz, G.; Quinn, H.; Raines, P. E.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Reif, R.; Robertson, S. H.; Rochester, L. S.; Roodman, A.; Russell, J. J.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Saxton, O. H.; Schietinger, T.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Seeman, J. T.; Serbo, V. V.; Skarpass, K.; Snyder, A.; Soha, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Stahl, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Talby, M.; Tanaka, H. A.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, S. R.; Weinstein, A. J.; White, J. L.; Wienands, U.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Young, C. C.; Zioulas, G.; Burchat, P. R.; Cheng, C. H.; Kirkby, D.; Meyer, T. I.; Roat, C.; de Silva, A.; Henderson, R.; Berridge, S.; Bugg, W.; Cohn, H.; Hart, E.; Weidemann, A. W.; Benninger, T.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Turcotte, M.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; di Girolamo, B.; Gamba, D.; Smol, A.; Zanin, D.; Bosisio, L.; della Ricca, G.; Lanceri, L.; Pompili, A.; Poropat, P.; Vuagnin, G.; Panvini, R. S.; Brown, C. M.; Kowalewski, R.; Roney, J. M.; Band, H. R.; Charles, E.; Dasu, S.; Elmer, P.; Hu, H.; Johnson, J. R.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Scott, I. J.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Zobernig, H.; Kordich, T. M.; Moore, T. B.; Neal, H.

    2001-03-01

    We present measurements of time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries in neutral B decays to several CP eigenstates. The measurement uses a data sample of 23×106 ϒ\\(4S\\)-->BB¯ decays collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B Factory at SLAC. In this sample, we find events in which one neutral B meson is fully reconstructed in a CP eigenstate containing charmonium and the flavor of the other neutral B meson is determined from its decay products. The amplitude of the CP-violating asymmetry, which in the standard model is proportional to sin2β, is derived from the decay time distributions in such events. The result is sin2β = 0.34+/-0.20 \\(stat\\)+/-0.05 \\(syst\\).

  7. CpG Type A Induction of an Early Protective Environment in Experimental Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Crooks, James; Gargaro, Marco; Vacca, Carmine; Pirro, Matteo; Scalisi, Giulia; Turco, Antonella; Romani, Rita; Matino, Davide; Rostami, Abdolmohamad; Gran, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the CNS that mimics human multiple sclerosis (MS), and it is thought to be driven by Th1 and Th17 myelin-reactive cells. Although adaptive immunity is clearly pivotal in the pathogenesis of EAE, with an essential role of CD4+ T cells, little is known of early, innate responses in this experimental setting. CpG-rich oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs), typically found in microbial genomes, are potent activators of TLR9 in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). In this study, we compared the effects of two types of CpG, namely, type A and type B, on EAE. We found that treatment with CpG type A ODN (CpG-A), known to induce high amounts of IFN-α in pDCs, significantly reduced disease severity in EAE, relative to controls (12.63 ± 1.86 versus 23.49 ± 1.46, resp.; p = 0.001). Treatment also delayed onset of neurological deficits and reduced spinal cord demyelination, while increasing the percentage of splenic regulatory (Foxp3+ CD4+) T cells. CpG-A likewise reduced the levels of IL-17 and IFN-γ in the CNS. Mechanistic insight into those events showed that CpG-A promoted a regulatory phenotype in pDCs. Moreover, adoptive transfer of pDCs isolated from CpG-A-treated mice inhibited CNS inflammation and induced disease remission in acute-phase EAE. Our data thus identify a link between TLR9 activation by specific ligands and the induction of tolerance via innate immunity mechanisms. PMID:28356656

  8. Confronting lepton flavor universality violation in B decays with high-pT tau lepton searches at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faroughy, Darius A.; Greljo, Admir; Kamenik, Jernej F.

    2017-01-01

    We confront the indications of lepton flavor universality (LFU) violation observed in semi-tauonic B meson decays with new physics (NP) searches using high pT tau leptons at the LHC. Using effective field theory arguments we correlate possible non-standard contributions to semi-tauonic charged currents with the τ+τ- signature at high energy hadron colliders. Several representative standard model extensions put forward to explain the anomaly are examined in detail: (i) weak triplet of color-neutral vector resonances, (ii) second Higgs doublet and (iii) scalar or (iv) vector leptoquark. We find that, in general, τ+τ- searches pose a serious challenge to NP explanations of the LFU anomaly. Recasting existing 8 TeV and 13 TeV LHC analyses, stringent limits are set on all considered simplified models. Future projections of the τ+τ- constraints as well as caveats in interpreting them within more elaborate models are also discussed.

  9. The cosmic gamma-ray background from the annihilation of primordial stable neutral heavy leptons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1978-01-01

    The spectra and intensities of gamma radiation from (1) a homogeneous cosmic lepton background (2) a possible lepton halo around the Galaxy, and (3) integrated background radiation from possible lepton halos around other galaxies and from rich galaxy clusters are examined. Heavy-lepton annihilation radiation from the halos of other galaxies accounts for at most 0.005 of the background intensity, and the radiation from rich clusters account for at most 0.00005 of the background intensity. It is suggested that lepton annihilation fluxes from a galactic halo would be confused with cosmic-ray produced radiation and would therefore be difficult to observe. Radiation from a homogeneous cosmological lepton background might account for approximately 0.0001 of the observed cosmic gamma ray background. Energy spectrum and isotropy are considered.

  10. Supersymmetric Explanation of CP Violation in K→ππ Decays.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, Teppei; Nierste, Ulrich; Tremper, Paul

    2016-08-26

    Recent progress in the determination of hadronic matrix elements has revealed a tension between the measured value of ε_{K}^{'}/ε_{K}, which quantifies direct CP violation in K→ππ decays, and the standard-model prediction. The well-understood indirect CP violation encoded in the quantity ε_{K} typically precludes large new-physics contributions to ε_{K}^{'}/ε_{K} and challenges such an explanation of the discrepancy. We show that it is possible to cure the ε_{K}^{'}/ε_{K} anomaly in the minimal supersymmetric standard model with squark masses above 3 TeV without overshooting ε_{K}. This solution exploits two features of supersymmetry: the possibility of large isospin-breaking contributions (enhancing ε_{K}^{'}) and the Majorana nature of gluinos (permitting a suppression of ε_{K}). Our solution involves no fine-tuning of CP phases or other parameters.

  11. Direct CP violation in two-body hadronic charmed meson decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hai-Yang; Chiang, Cheng-Wei

    2012-02-01

    Motivated by the recent observation of CP violation in the charm sector by LHCb, we study direct CP asymmetries in the standard model (SM) for the singly Cabibbo-suppressed two-body hadronic decays of charmed mesons using the topological-diagram approach. In this approach, the magnitude and the phase of topological weak annihilation amplitudes, which arise mainly from final-state rescattering, can be extracted from the data. Consequently, direct CP asymmetry adir(tree) at tree level can be reliably estimated. In general, it lies in the range 10-4CP violation in the decays D0→K+K- and D0→π+π-, in which adir(tree) is absent. The maximal ΔaCPdir, the direct CP asymmetry difference between the above-mentioned two modes, allowed in the SM is around -0.25%, more than 2σ away from the current world average of -(0.645±0.180)%.

  12. Enhancement of radiosensitivity by CpG-oligodeoxyribonucleotide-7909 in human non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Zha, Lin; Qiao, Tiankui; Yuan, Sujuan; Lei, Linjie

    2010-04-01

    CpG-oligodeoxyribonucleotides (CpG-ODNs), which induce signaling through the toll-like receptor 9, are currently under investigation as immunity stimulators against cancer. It has recently been suggested that CpG-ODNs may also enhance sensitivity to traditional therapies including chemotherapy in certain cancer-cell lines. The purpose of this study was to define the activity of CpG-ODN7909 in increasing radiosensitivity of the human non-small cell lung cancer cell line A549 in vitro. First, a dose- and time-dependent inhibitory effect on cell viability was observed after A549 cells were treated with different concentrations of CpG-ODN7909 (5, 10, 30, and 60 microg/mL). Second, decreased cell clonogenic survival, enhanced cell apoptotic index, accumulated percentage of cells in the G2/M phase, and increased tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha secretion were found after combined treatments with 10 microg/mL of CpG-ODN7909 and radiation compared to either treatment alone (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the toll-like receptor 9 mRNA was found to express in A549. The results suggest that CpG-ODN7909 can increase the radiosensitivity of human non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells, which may be associated with reduced cell clonogenic survival, enhanced apoptosis, prolonged cell-cycle arrest in G2/M, and stimulation of TNF-alpha secretion.

  13. Determining the CP nature of spin-0 mediators in associated production of dark matter and toverline{t} pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haisch, Ulrich; Pani, Priscilla; Polesello, Giacomo

    2017-02-01

    In the framework of spin-0 s-channel simplified models, we explore the possibility of assessing the structure of dark matter interactions through the associate production of dark matter and toverline{t} pairs. To this purpose, final states with two leptons are considered and the kinematic properties of the dilepton system is studied. We develop a realistic analysis strategy and provide a detailed evaluation of the achievable sensitivity for the dark matter signal