Science.gov

Sample records for lethal factor mutant

  1. [Synthetic lethal genes to mutant p53].

    PubMed

    Tongyang, Liu; Haiqiang, Guo; Meiyan, Zhu; Yingze, Huang; Shuting, Jia; Ying, Luo; Jihong, Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Targeted therapy has become a powerful approach for cancer treatment. Better understanding of oncogenes as well as synthetic lethal interactions with oncogenes will lead to new strategies for tumor-specific treatment. It is well known that mutant p53 plays an important role in tumorigenesis and tumor development. Thus, understanding the synthetic lethal relationship between p53 mutations and interacting genes in tumor is critical for the personalized treatments of p53 mutant tumors. Synthetic lethal genes to mutant p53 can be divided into cell cycle regulators and non-cell cycle regulators. This paper review show these two types of target genes contribute to synthetic lethal interactions with p53 mutations and potential applications of these interactions in anticancer therapy.

  2. Characterization of Synthetic-Lethal Mutants Reveals a Role for the Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Guanine-Nucleotide Exchange Factor Cdc24p in Vacuole Function and Na(+) Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    White, W. H.; Johnson, D. I.

    1997-01-01

    Cdc24p is the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor for the Cdc42p GTPase, which controls cell polarity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To identify new genes that may affect cell polarity, we characterized six UV-induced csl (CDC24 synthetic-lethal) mutants that exhibited synthetic-lethality with cdc24-4(ts) at 23°. Five mutants were not complemented by plasmid-borne CDC42, RSR1, BUD5, BEM1, BEM2, BEM3 or CLA4 genes, which are known to play a role in cell polarity. The csl3 mutant displayed phenotypes similar to those observed with calcium-sensitive, Pet(-) vma mutants defective in vacuole function. CSL5 was allelic to VMA5, the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase subunit C, and one third of csl5 cdc24-4(ts) cells were elongated or had misshapen buds. A cdc24-4(ts) Δvma5::LEU2 double mutant did not exhibit synthetic lethality, suggesting that the csl5/vma5 cdc24-4(ts) synthetic-lethality was not simply due to altered vacuole function. The cdc24-4(ts) mutant, like Δvma5::LEU2 and csl3 mutants, was sensitive to high levels of Ca(2+) as well as Na(+) in the growth media, which did not appear to be a result of a fragile cell wall because the phenotypes were not remedied by 1 M sorbitol. Our results indicated that Cdc24p was required in one V-ATPase mutant and another mutant affecting vacuole morphology, and also implicated Cdc24p in Na(+) tolerance. PMID:9286667

  3. Resveratrol Antagonizes Antimicrobial Lethality and Stimulates Recovery of Bacterial Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuanli; Zhou, Jinan; Qu, Yilin; Yang, Xinguang; Shi, Guojing; Wang, Xiuhong; Hong, Yuzhi; Drlica, Karl; Zhao, Xilin

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS; superoxide, peroxide, and hydroxyl radical) are thought to contribute to the rapid bactericidal activity of diverse antimicrobial agents. The possibility has been raised that consumption of antioxidants in food may interfere with the lethal action of antimicrobials. Whether nutritional supplements containing antioxidant activity are also likely to interfere with antimicrobial lethality is unknown. To examine this possibility, resveratrol, a popular antioxidant dietary supplement, was added to cultures of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus that were then treated with antimicrobial and assayed for bacterial survival and the recovery of mutants resistant to an unrelated antimicrobial, rifampicin. Resveratrol, at concentrations likely to be present during human consumption, caused a 2- to 3-fold reduction in killing during a 2-hr treatment with moxifloxacin or kanamycin. At higher, but still subinhibitory concentrations, resveratrol reduced antimicrobial lethality by more than 3 orders of magnitude. Resveratrol also reduced the increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) characteristic of treatment with quinolone (oxolinic acid). These data support the general idea that the lethal activity of some antimicrobials involves ROS. Surprisingly, subinhibitory concentrations of resveratrol promoted (2- to 6-fold) the recovery of rifampicin-resistant mutants arising from the action of ciprofloxacin, kanamycin, or daptomycin. This result is consistent with resveratrol reducing ROS to sublethal levels that are still mutagenic, while the absence of resveratrol allows ROS levels to high enough to kill mutagenized cells. Suppression of antimicrobial lethality and promotion of mutant recovery by resveratrol suggests that the antioxidant may contribute to the emergence of resistance to several antimicrobials, especially if new derivatives and/or formulations of resveratrol markedly increase bioavailability. PMID:27045517

  4. Lethal infection by Bordetella pertussis mutants in the infant mouse model.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, A A; Goodwin, M S

    1989-01-01

    Different aspects of lethal infection of infant mice with Bordetella pertussis were examined. Mutants deficient in vir-regulated genes were tested for the ability to cause a lethal infection in the infant mouse model. Adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin and pertussis toxin were required to cause a lethal infection at low doses. Mixed infection caused by challenging the mice with an equal number of pertussis toxin and adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin mutants at a dose at which neither alone was lethal was also unable to cause a lethal infection. Production of the filamentous hemagglutinin and the dermonecrotic toxin was not required to cause a lethal infection. Nine other mutants in vir-regulated genes whose phenotypes have yet to be determined were also tested. Only two of these mutants were impaired in the ability to cause a lethal infection. Expression of fimbriae does not appear to affect the dose required to cause a lethal infection; however, fimbrial expression was correlated with the later stages of a nonlethal, persistent infection. Growth of the bacteria in MgSO4, a condition which reversibly suppresses expression of the genes required for virulence, did not alter the ability of the bacteria to cause a lethal infection. Auxotrophic mutants deficient in leucine biosynthesis were as virulent as the parental strain; however, mutants deficient in methionine biosynthesis were less virulent. A B. parapertussis strain was much less effective in promoting a lethal infection than any of the wild-type B. pertussis strains examined. A persistent infection in the lungs was observed for weeks after challenge for mice given a sublethal dose of B. pertussis, and transmission from infected infants to the mother was never observed. PMID:2572561

  5. A conditionally lethal mutant of Salmonella Typhimurium induces a protective response in mice.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Alejandro A; Villagra, Nicolás A; Jerez, Sebastián A; Fuentes, Juan A; Mora, Guido C

    2016-02-01

    Here we present the design of a conditionally lethal mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) which growth depends on tetracycline (Tet). Four mutants of S. Typhimurium, with Tet-conditional growth, were created by inserting the tetRA cassette. Three of the mutants presented a conditional-lethal phenotype in vitro. One mutant in the yabB gene remained conditional inside cells and did not persisted after 24 h in cell cultures. The capacity of S. Typhimurium yabB::tetRA to invade deep organs was investigated in intraperitoneally (IP) infected mice fed with or without chlortetracycline (CTet), a Tet analog with lower antibiotic activity. The yabB::tetRA mutant was undetectable in liver or spleen of animals under normal diet, while in mice under diet including CTet, yabB::tetRA invaded at a level comparable to the WT in mice under normal diet. Moreover, yabB::tetRA produced a strong humoral-immunoresponse after one IP immunization with 10(6) bacteria, measured as serum reactivity against S. Typhimurium whole cell extract. By contrast, oral immunization with 10(6) bacteria was weaker and variable on inducing antibodies. Consistently, IP infected mice were fully protected in a challenge with 10(4) oral S. Typhimurium, while protection was partial in orally immunized mice. Our data indicate that S. Typhimurium yabB::tetRA is a conditionally attenuated strain capable of inducing a protective response in mice in non-permissive conditions.

  6. Inhibitors of the Metalloproteinase Anthrax Lethal Factor.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Allison B; Turk, Benjamin E

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, a rod shaped, spore forming, gram positive bacteria, is the etiological agent of anthrax. B. anthracis virulence is partly attributable to two secreted bipartite protein toxins, which act inside host cells to disrupt signaling pathways important for host defense against infection. These toxins may also directly contribute to mortality in late stage infection. The zinc-dependent metalloproteinase anthrax lethal factor (LF) is a critical component of one of these protein toxins and a prime target for inhibitor development to produce anthrax therapeutics. Here, we describe recent efforts to identify specific and potent LF inhibitors. Derivatization of peptide substrate analogs bearing zinc-binding groups has produced potent and specific LF inhibitors, and X-ray crystallography of LFinhibitor complexes has provided insight into features required for high affinity binding. Novel inhibitor scaffolds have been identified through several approaches, including fragment-based drug discovery, virtual screening, and highthroughput screening of diverse compound libraries. Lastly, efforts to discover LF inhibitors have led to the development of new screening strategies, such as the use of full-length proteins as substrates, that may prove useful for other proteases as well. Overall, these efforts have led to a collection of chemically and mechanistically diverse molecules capable of inhibiting LF activity in vitro and in cells, as well as in animal models of anthrax infection. PMID:27072692

  7. CDK1 Is a Synthetic Lethal Target for KRAS Mutant Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Costa-Cabral, Sara; Brough, Rachel; Konde, Asha; Aarts, Marieke; Campbell, James; Marinari, Eliana; Riffell, Jenna; Bardelli, Alberto; Torrance, Christopher; Lord, Christopher J.; Ashworth, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Activating KRAS mutations are found in approximately 20% of human cancers but no RAS-directed therapies are currently available. Here we describe a novel, robust, KRAS synthetic lethal interaction with the cyclin dependent kinase, CDK1. This was discovered using parallel siRNA screens in KRAS mutant and wild type colorectal isogenic tumour cells and subsequently validated in a genetically diverse panel of 26 colorectal and pancreatic tumour cell models. This established that the KRAS/CDK1 synthetic lethality applies in tumour cells with either amino acid position 12 (p.G12V, pG12D, p.G12S) or amino acid position 13 (p.G13D) KRAS mutations and can also be replicated in vivo in a xenograft model using a small molecule CDK1 inhibitor. Mechanistically, CDK1 inhibition caused a reduction in the S-phase fraction of KRAS mutant cells, an effect also characterised by modulation of Rb, a master control of the G1/S checkpoint. Taken together, these observations suggest that the KRAS/CDK1 interaction is a robust synthetic lethal effect worthy of further investigation. PMID:26881434

  8. CDK1 Is a Synthetic Lethal Target for KRAS Mutant Tumours.

    PubMed

    Costa-Cabral, Sara; Brough, Rachel; Konde, Asha; Aarts, Marieke; Campbell, James; Marinari, Eliana; Riffell, Jenna; Bardelli, Alberto; Torrance, Christopher; Lord, Christopher J; Ashworth, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Activating KRAS mutations are found in approximately 20% of human cancers but no RAS-directed therapies are currently available. Here we describe a novel, robust, KRAS synthetic lethal interaction with the cyclin dependent kinase, CDK1. This was discovered using parallel siRNA screens in KRAS mutant and wild type colorectal isogenic tumour cells and subsequently validated in a genetically diverse panel of 26 colorectal and pancreatic tumour cell models. This established that the KRAS/CDK1 synthetic lethality applies in tumour cells with either amino acid position 12 (p.G12V, pG12D, p.G12S) or amino acid position 13 (p.G13D) KRAS mutations and can also be replicated in vivo in a xenograft model using a small molecule CDK1 inhibitor. Mechanistically, CDK1 inhibition caused a reduction in the S-phase fraction of KRAS mutant cells, an effect also characterised by modulation of Rb, a master control of the G1/S checkpoint. Taken together, these observations suggest that the KRAS/CDK1 interaction is a robust synthetic lethal effect worthy of further investigation. PMID:26881434

  9. A Coccidioides posadasii CPS1 Deletion Mutant Is Avirulent and Protects Mice from Lethal Infection.

    PubMed

    Narra, Hema P; Shubitz, Lisa F; Mandel, M Alejandra; Trinh, Hien T; Griffin, Kurt; Buntzman, Adam S; Frelinger, Jeffrey A; Galgiani, John N; Orbach, Marc J

    2016-10-01

    The CPS1 gene was identified as a virulence factor in the maize pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus Hypothesizing that the homologous gene in Coccidioides posadasii could be important for virulence, we created a Δcps1 deletion mutant which was unable to cause disease in three strains of mice (C57BL/6, BALB/c, or the severely immunodeficient NOD-scid,γc(null) [NSG]). Only a single colony was recovered from 1 of 60 C57BL/6 mice following intranasal infections of up to 4,400 spores. Following administration of very high doses (10,000 to 2.5 × 10(7) spores) to NSG and BALB/c mice, spherules were observed in lung sections at time points from day 3 to day 10 postinfection, but nearly all appeared degraded with infrequent endosporulation. Although the role of CPS1 in virulence is not understood, phenotypic alterations and transcription differences of at least 33 genes in the Δcps1 strain versus C. posadasii is consistent with both metabolic and regulatory functions for the gene. The in vitro phenotype of the Δcps1 strain showed slower growth of mycelia with delayed and lower spore production than C. posadasii, and in vitro spherules were smaller. Vaccination of C57BL/6 or BALB/c mice with live Δcps1 spores either intranasally, intraperitoneally, or subcutaneously resulted in over 95% survival with mean residual lung fungal burdens of <1,000 CFU from an otherwise lethal C. posadasii intranasal infection. Considering its apparently complete attenuation of virulence and the high degree of resistance to C. posadasii infection when used as a vaccine, the Δcps1 strain is a promising vaccine candidate for preventing coccidioidomycosis in humans or other animals. PMID:27481239

  10. Lethal factor, but not edema factor, is required to cause fatal anthrax in cynomolgus macaques after pulmonary spore challenge.

    PubMed

    Hutt, Julie A; Lovchik, Julie A; Drysdale, Melissa; Sherwood, Robert L; Brasel, Trevor; Lipscomb, Mary F; Lyons, C Rick

    2014-12-01

    Inhalational anthrax is caused by inhalation of Bacillus anthracis spores. The ability of B. anthracis to cause anthrax is attributed to the plasmid-encoded A/B-type toxins, edema toxin (edema factor and protective antigen) and lethal toxin (lethal factor and protective antigen), and a poly-d-glutamic acid capsule. To better understand the contribution of these toxins to the disease pathophysiology in vivo, we used B. anthracis Ames strain and isogenic toxin deletion mutants derived from the Ames strain to examine the role of lethal toxin and edema toxin after pulmonary spore challenge of cynomolgus macaques. Lethal toxin, but not edema toxin, was required to induce sustained bacteremia and death after pulmonary challenge with spores delivered via bronchoscopy. After intravenous challenge with bacilli to model the systemic phase of infection, lethal toxin contributed to bacterial proliferation and subsequent host death to a greater extent than edema toxin. Deletion of protective antigen resulted in greater loss of virulence after intravenous challenge with bacilli than deletion of lethal toxin or edema toxin alone. These findings are consistent with the ability of anti-protective antigen antibodies to prevent anthrax and suggest that lethal factor is the dominant toxin that contributes to the escape of significant numbers of bacilli from the thoracic cavity to cause anthrax after inhalation challenge with spores.

  11. Tissue-specific Expression of Dominant Negative Mutant Drosophila HSC70 Causes Developmental Defects and Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Elefant, Felice; Palter, Karen B.

    1999-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster HSC3 and HSC4 genes encode Hsc70 proteins homologous to the mammalian endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein BiP and the cytoplasmic clathrin uncoating ATPase, respectively. These proteins possess ATP binding/hydrolysis activities that mediate their ability to aid in protein folding by coordinating the sequential binding and release of misfolded proteins. To investigate the roles of HSC3 (Hsc3p) and HSC4 (Hsc4p) proteins during development, GAL4-targeted gene expression was used to analyze the effects of producing dominant negatively acting Hsc3p (D231S, K97S) and Hsc4p (D206S, K71S) proteins, containing single amino acid substitutions in their ATP-binding domains, in specific tissues of Drosophila throughout development. We show that the production of each mutant protein results in lethality over a range of developmental stages, depending on the levels of protein produced and which tissues are targeted. We demonstrate that the functions of both Hsc3p and Hsc4p are required for proper tissue establishment and maintenance. Production of mutant Hsc4p, but not Hsc3p, results in induction of the stress-inducible Hsp70 at normal temperatures. Evidence is presented that lethality is caused by tissue-specific defects that result from a global accumulation of misfolded protein caused by lack of functional Hsc70. We show that both mutant Hsc3ps are defective in ATP-induced substrate release, although Hsc3p(D231S) does undergo an ATP-induced conformational change. We believe that the amino acid substitutions in Hsc3p interfere with the structural coupling of ATP binding to substrate release, and this defect is the basis for the mutant proteins’ dominant negative effects in vivo. PMID:10397752

  12. Synthetic Lethal Targeting of ARID1A-Mutant Ovarian Clear Cell Tumors with Dasatinib.

    PubMed

    Miller, Rowan E; Brough, Rachel; Bajrami, Ilirjana; Williamson, Chris T; McDade, Simon; Campbell, James; Kigozi, Asha; Rafiq, Rumana; Pemberton, Helen; Natrajan, Rachel; Joel, Josephine; Astley, Holly; Mahoney, Claire; Moore, Jonathan D; Torrance, Chris; Gordan, John D; Webber, James T; Levin, Rebecca S; Shokat, Kevan M; Bandyopadhyay, Sourav; Lord, Christopher J; Ashworth, Alan

    2016-07-01

    New targeted approaches to ovarian clear cell carcinomas (OCCC) are needed, given the limited treatment options in this disease and the poor response to standard chemotherapy. Using a series of high-throughput cell-based drug screens in OCCC tumor cell models, we have identified a synthetic lethal (SL) interaction between the kinase inhibitor dasatinib and a key driver in OCCC, ARID1A mutation. Imposing ARID1A deficiency upon a variety of human or mouse cells induced dasatinib sensitivity, both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that this is a robust synthetic lethal interaction. The sensitivity of ARID1A-deficient cells to dasatinib was associated with G1-S cell-cycle arrest and was dependent upon both p21 and Rb. Using focused siRNA screens and kinase profiling, we showed that ARID1A-mutant OCCC tumor cells are addicted to the dasatinib target YES1. This suggests that dasatinib merits investigation for the treatment of patients with ARID1A-mutant OCCC. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1472-84. ©2016 AACR.

  13. Perinatal lethal osteogenesis imperfecta in transgenic mice bearing an engineered mutant pro-alpha 1(I) collagen gene.

    PubMed

    Stacey, A; Bateman, J; Choi, T; Mascara, T; Cole, W; Jaenisch, R

    1988-03-10

    Substitutions of single glycine residues of alpha 1(I) collagen have previously been associated with the inherited disease osteogenesis imperfecta type II. Transgenic mice bearing a mutant alpha 1(I) collagen gene into which specific glycine substitutions have been engineered show a dominant lethal phenotype characteristic of the human disease, and demonstrate that as little as 10% mutant gene expression can disrupt normal collagen function.

  14. Small Molecule Inhibitors of Anthrax Lethal Factor Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Williams, John D.; Khan, Atiyya R.; Cardinale, Steven C.; Butler, Michelle M.; Bowlin, Terry L.; Peet, Norton P.

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript describes the preparation of new small molecule inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis lethal factor. Our starting point was the symmetrical, bis-quinolinyl compound 1 (NSC 12155). Optimization of one half of this molecule led to new LF inhibitors that were desymmetrized to afford more drug-like compounds. PMID:24290062

  15. Histopathological effects of anthrax lethal factor on rat liver.

    PubMed

    Altunkaynak, Berrin Zuhal; Ozbek, Elvan

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, has become an increasingly important scientific topic due to its potential role in bioterrorism. The lethal toxin (LT) of B. anthracis consists of lethal factor (LF) and a protective antigen (PA). This study investigated whether only lethal factor was efficient as a hepatotoxin in the absence of the PA. To achieve this aim, LF (100 µg/kg body weight, dissolved in sterile distilled water) or distilled water vehicle were intraperitoneally injected once into adult rats. At 24 h post-injection, the hosts were euthanized and their livers removed and tissue samples examined under light and electron microscopes. As a result of LF application, hepatic injury - including cytoplasmic and nuclear damage in hepatocytes, sinusoidal dilatation, and hepatocellular lysis - became apparent. Further, light microscopic analyses of liver sections from the LF-injected rats revealed ballooning degeneration and cytoplasmic loss within hepatocytes, as well as peri-sinusoidal inflammation. Additionally, an increase in the numbers of Kupffer cells was evident. Common vascular injuries were also found in the liver samples; these injuries caused hypoxia and pathological changes. In addition, some cytoplasmic and nuclear changes were detected within the liver ultrastructure. The results of these studies allow one to suggest that LF could be an effective toxicant alone and that PA might act in situ to modify the effect of this agent (or the reverse situation wherein LF modifies effects of PA) such that lethality results.

  16. Developmental studies on an apparent cell-lethal mutant gene-ut-in the Mexican axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, R R; Malacinski, G M; Chung, H M

    1978-04-01

    The discovery of a new mutant gene in stocks of the Mexican axolotl derived from breeding stock of the Hubrecht Laboratory, the Netherlands, is described. The gene appears to be a simple recessive and displays complete penetrance. ut/ut larvae develop normally through hatching, but begin to lag in growth and display characteristics defects in gill and limb formation shortly thereafter. The results of parabiosis of normal and mutant embryos, as well as embryological transplants of mutant limb and branchial rudiments, support the conclusion that the gene ut is expressed as an 'autonomous-cell lethal'. Despite gross morphological defects in ut/ut larvae, comparisons between normal and mutant animals of the protein spectra of various tissues and organs revealed no substantial differences. A subtle change in the metabolism of ut/ut larvae apparently, therefore, leads to developmental arrest.

  17. Conditional lethality of cell shape mutations of Salmonella typhimurium: rodA and mre mutants are lethal on solid but not in liquid medium.

    PubMed

    Costa, C S; Antón, D N

    1999-03-01

    Round-cell (rodA, mre, divD) derivatives of a conditional alaS mutant of Salmonella typhimurium were studied under conditions allowing expression of tolerance to lethal cell shape mutations (41 degrees C), and under nontolerant conditions (30 degrees C). The rodA22::Tn10d(Kan) derivative grew normally (OD650 nm) in LB-broth at 30 degrees C; however, doubling of total cell count took much longer (130 min) than at 41 degrees C (57 min). Although the cells were able to divide in LB-broth at 30 degrees C, viable count on LB-agar at 30 degrees C was 10(3)-fold lower than on LB-agar at 41 degrees C. Phase-contrast microscopy of rodA cells incubated under different conditions showed that their size increased on LB-soft agar at 30 degrees C, but they failed to divide and finally lysed. In contrast, division occurred in LB-broth at 30 degrees C and also in LB-broth and LB-soft agar at 41 degrees C. The mre-17::Tn10d(Kan) derivative acted like the rodA strain whereas the divD135::Tn10d(Kan) mutant behaved normally both at 30 degrees C and 41 degrees C. It is concluded that rodA and mre mutations delay cell division, but are lethal only on solid medium. Mutations conferring tolerance to "lethal" rodA and mre mutations improve division performance both in liquid and solid media.

  18. Synthetic Lethal Therapy for KRAS Mutant Non-small-cell Lung Carcinoma with Nanoparticle-mediated CDK4 siRNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Cheng-Qiong; Xiong, Meng-Hua; Liu, Yang; Shen, Song; Du, Xiao-Jiao; Yang, Xian-Zhu; Dou, Shuang; Zhang, Pei-Zhuo; Wang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The KRAS mutation is present in ~20% of lung cancers and has not yet been effectively targeted for therapy. This mutation is associated with a poor prognosis in non-small-cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs) and confers resistance to standard anticancer treatment drugs, including epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In this study, we exploited a new therapeutic strategy based on the synthetic lethal interaction between cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) downregulation and the KRAS mutation to deliver micellar nanoparticles (MNPs) containing small interfering RNA targeting CDK4 (MNPsiCDK4) for treatment in NSCLCs harboring the oncogenic KRAS mutation. Following MNPsiCDK4 administration, CDK4 expression was decreased, accompanied by inhibited cell proliferation, specifically in KRAS mutant NSCLCs. However, this intervention was harmless to normal KRAS wild-type cells, confirming the proposed mechanism of synthetic lethality. Moreover, systemic delivery of MNPsiCDK4 significantly inhibited tumor growth in an A549 NSCLC xenograft murine model, with depressed expression of CDK4 and mutational KRAS status, suggesting the therapeutic promise of MNPsiCDK4 delivery in KRAS mutant NSCLCs via a synthetic lethal interaction between KRAS and CDK4. PMID:24496383

  19. Preparation and characterization of cobalt-substituted anthrax lethal factor

    SciTech Connect

    Saebel, Crystal E.; Carbone, Ryan; Dabous, John R.; Lo, Suet Y.; Siemann, Stefan

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt-substituted anthrax lethal factor (CoLF) is highly active. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CoLF can be prepared by bio-assimilation and direct exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lethal factor binds cobalt tightly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electronic spectrum of CoLF reveals penta-coordination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction of CoLF with thioglycolic acid follows a 2-step mechanism. -- Abstract: Anthrax lethal factor (LF) is a zinc-dependent endopeptidase involved in the cleavage of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases near their N-termini. The current report concerns the preparation of cobalt-substituted LF (CoLF) and its characterization by electronic spectroscopy. Two strategies to produce CoLF were explored, including (i) a bio-assimilation approach involving the cultivation of LF-expressing Bacillus megaterium cells in the presence of CoCl{sub 2}, and (ii) direct exchange by treatment of zinc-LF with CoCl{sub 2}. Independent of the method employed, the protein was found to contain one Co{sup 2+} per LF molecule, and was shown to be twice as active as its native zinc counterpart. The electronic spectrum of CoLF suggests the Co{sup 2+} ion to be five-coordinate, an observation similar to that reported for other Co{sup 2+}-substituted gluzincins, but distinct from that documented for the crystal structure of native LF. Furthermore, spectroscopic studies following the exposure of CoLF to thioglycolic acid (TGA) revealed a sequential mechanism of metal removal from LF, which likely involves the formation of an enzyme: Co{sup 2+}:TGA ternary complex prior to demetallation of the active site. CoLF reported herein constitutes the first spectroscopic probe of LF's active site, which may be utilized in future studies to gain further insight into the enzyme's mechanism and inhibitor interactions.

  20. Potent inhibitors of anthrax lethal factor from green tea

    PubMed Central

    Dell'Aica, Isabella; Donà, Massimo; Tonello, Fiorella; Piris, Alejandro; Mock, Michèle; Montecucco, Cesare; Garbisa, Spiridione

    2004-01-01

    The anthrax lethal factor (LF) has a major role in the development of anthrax. LF is delivered by the protective antigen (PA) inside the cell, where it exerts its metalloprotease activity on the N-terminus of MAPK-kinases. PA+LF are cytotoxic to macrophages in culture and kill the Fischer 344 rat when injected intravenously. We describe here the properties of some polyphenols contained in green tea as powerful inhibitors of LF metalloproteolytic activity, and how the main catechin of green tea, (−)epigallocatechin-3-gallate, prevents the LF-induced death of macrophages and Fischer 344 rats. PMID:15031715

  1. Construction of a conditional lethal Salmonella mutant via genetic recombination using the ara system and asd gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sam Woong; Kang, Ho Young; Hur, Jin; Gal, Sang Wan; Bang, Woo Young; Cho, Kwang-Keun; Kim, Chul Wook; Bahk, Jeong Dong; Lee, John Hwa

    2011-11-01

    In order to construct a conditional lethal Salmonella mutant, an arabinose-regulated recombinant genetic system was used. The Salmonella aspartate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (asd) gene was localized under the control of araC P(araBAD) in a plasmid to create the araC P(araBAD)::asd cassette. The cassette was cloned into a plasmid carrying a p15A replication origin to create the recombinant plasmid pMMP55. The growth of Salmonella MMP10 harboring pMMP55 was dependent on the presence of arabinose. In the presence of arabinose, the Asd deficiency due to chromosomal deletion of asd in the Salmonella host was complemented by the asd gene transcribed and translated under the P(araBAD) promoter and araBAD Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence in pMMP55. Growth inhibition of the strain was demonstrated by arabinose depletion in M9 minimal medium, indicating that the strain were unable to grow in an arabinose-limited environment. In addition, the analysis of a 50% lethal dose (LD50) using mice revealed that the strain MMP10 exhibited attenuation by approximately 100-fold relative to that of the unmodified strain. In conclusion, these data suggest that the araC P(araBAD)::asd system developed in this study can be used to construct conditional lethal Salmonella mutants for application as safe, live-attenuated Salmonella vaccines.

  2. Conditional Lethal Mutants of Adenovirus 2-Simian Virus 40 Hybrids I. Host Range Mutants of Ad2+ND1

    PubMed Central

    Grodzicker, Terri; Anderson, Carl; Sharp, Phillip A.; Sambrook, Joe

    1974-01-01

    Human adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) grows poorly in monkey cells, although this defect can be overcome by co-infection with simian virus 40 (SV40). The nondefective Ad2-SV40 hybrid virus, Ad2+ND1, replicates efficiently in both human and African green monkey kidney cells, presumably due to the insertion of SV40 sequences into the Ad2 DNA. Several mutants of Ad2+ND1 have been isolated that grow and plaque poorly in monkey cells, although they retain the ability to replicate and plaque efficiently in HeLa cells. One of these mutants (H39) has been examined in detail. Studies comparing the DNA of the mutant with Ad2+ND1 either by the cleavage patterns produced by Escherichia coli R·RI restriction endonuclease digestion or by heteroduplexing reveal no differences. The pattern of protein synthesis of Ad2+ND1 and H39 in monkey cells is quite different with the mutant resembling Ad2, which is defective in the synthesis of late proteins. However, in human cells, the proteins synthesized by H39 and the parent Ad2+ND1 are very similar. The production of SV40 U antigen in H39-infected cells is different from that in Ad2+ND1-infected cells. Finally, the growth of H39 in monkey cells can be complemented by SV40. Images PMID:4364898

  3. The Structural Variation Is Associated with the Embryonic Lethality of a Novel Red Egg Mutant Fuyin-lre of Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiongyan; Zhao, Qiaoling; Yang, Weike; Zhu, Shuifen; Wu, Fang; He, Rongfan; Dong, Zhanpeng; Huang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Bombyx mori presents several types of egg color mutations, all of which have been extensively discussed in sericulture. While the red egg mutation has been previously observed, lethal red-egg mutants have not been reported. In the present work, the red egg mutant Fuyin-lre (Fuyin-lethal red egg) was discovered from the Fuyin germplasm resource of B. mori. This mutant features red-colored eggs and embryonic lethality. Genetic analysis showed that Fuyin-lre follows recessive inheritance, with the red egg gene re governing the egg color, and the embryonic lethality of Fuyin-lre may be caused by mutations of other genes closely linked to re. Digital gene expression (DGE) was employed to compare the transcription profiles of Fuyin and Fuyin-lre eggs after 24 and 48 h of incubation. A total of 48 differentially expressed genes followed the same expression patterns in both groups at both time points (FDR < 0.01 and log 2 Ratio ≥ 1). Further analyses indicated that 8 out of the 48 genes (including re) were closely linked to re. These 8 genes were highly expressed in wild-type Fuyin and the red egg mutant re but showed nearly absent expression in Fuyin-lre. Sequencing of the re gene confirmed that the re gene itself does not induce embryonic lethality, and structure analysis showed that the structural variation of the region where the 8 genes were located may be associated with the embryonic lethality of Fuyin-lre. The present work provides a good foundation for future studies on the mechanism of embryonic lethality and embryonic development in Fuyin-lre. PMID:26030868

  4. The Structural Variation Is Associated with the Embryonic Lethality of a Novel Red Egg Mutant Fuyin-lre of Silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Chen, Anli; Liao, Pengfei; Li, Qiongyan; Zhao, Qiaoling; Yang, Weike; Zhu, Shuifen; Wu, Fang; He, Rongfan; Dong, Zhanpeng; Huang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Bombyx mori presents several types of egg color mutations, all of which have been extensively discussed in sericulture. While the red egg mutation has been previously observed, lethal red-egg mutants have not been reported. In the present work, the red egg mutant Fuyin-lre (Fuyin-lethal red egg) was discovered from the Fuyin germplasm resource of B. mori. This mutant features red-colored eggs and embryonic lethality. Genetic analysis showed that Fuyin-lre follows recessive inheritance, with the red egg gene re governing the egg color, and the embryonic lethality of Fuyin-lre may be caused by mutations of other genes closely linked to re. Digital gene expression (DGE) was employed to compare the transcription profiles of Fuyin and Fuyin-lre eggs after 24 and 48 h of incubation. A total of 48 differentially expressed genes followed the same expression patterns in both groups at both time points (FDR < 0.01 and log 2 Ratio ≥ 1). Further analyses indicated that 8 out of the 48 genes (including re) were closely linked to re. These 8 genes were highly expressed in wild-type Fuyin and the red egg mutant re but showed nearly absent expression in Fuyin-lre. Sequencing of the re gene confirmed that the re gene itself does not induce embryonic lethality, and structure analysis showed that the structural variation of the region where the 8 genes were located may be associated with the embryonic lethality of Fuyin-lre. The present work provides a good foundation for future studies on the mechanism of embryonic lethality and embryonic development in Fuyin-lre.

  5. Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells Transcription Factor Nfatp Controls Superantigen-Induced Lethal Shock

    PubMed Central

    Tsytsykova, Alla V.; Goldfeld, Anne E.

    2000-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) is the key mediator of superantigen-induced T cell lethal shock. Here, we show that nuclear factor of activated T cells transcription factor, NFATp, controls susceptibility to superantigen-induced lethal shock in mice through its activation of TNF-α gene transcription. In NFATp-deficient mice, T cell stimulation leads to delayed induction and attenuation of TNF-α mRNA levels, decreased TNF-α serum levels, and resistance to superantigen-induced lethal shock. By contrast, after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge, serum levels of TNF-α and susceptibility to shock are unaffected. These results demonstrate that NFATp is an essential activator of immediate early TNF-α gene expression in T cells and they present in vivo evidence of the inducer- and cell type–specific regulation of TNF-α gene expression. Furthermore, they suggest NFATp as a potential selective target in the treatment of superantigen-induced lethal shock. PMID:10952728

  6. Lethality in PARP-1/Ku80 double mutant mice reveals physiologicalsynergy during early embryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Henrie, Melinda S.; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Burma, Sandeep; Menissier-de Murcia, Josiane; de Murcia, Gilbert; Li, Gloria C.; Chen,David J.

    2002-09-24

    Ku is an abundant heterodimeric nuclear protein, consisting of 70-kDa and 86-kDa tightly associated subunits that comprise the DNA binding component of DNA-dependent protein kinase. Poly(ADP)ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a 113-kDa protein that catalyzes the synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) on target proteins. Both Ku and PARP-1 recognize and bind to DNA ends. Ku functions in the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair pathway whereas PARP-1 functions in the single strand break repair and base excision repair (BER) pathways. Recent studies have revealed that PARP-1 and Ku80 interact in vitro. To determine whether the association of PARP-1 and Ku80 has any physiological significance or synergistic function in vivo, mice lacking both PARP-1 and Ku80 were generated. The resulting offspring died during embryonic development displaying abnormalities around the gastrulation stage. In addition, PARP-1-/-Ku80-/- cultured blastocysts had an increased level of apoptosis. These data suggest that the functions of both Ku80 and PARP-1 are essential for normal embryogenesis and that a loss of genomic integrity leading to cell death through apoptosis is likely the cause of the embryonic lethality observed in these mice.

  7. Lethal Accumulation of Guanylic Nucleotides in Saccharomyces cerevisiae HPT1-Deregulated Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Breton, Annick; Pinson, Benoît; Coulpier, Fanny; Giraud, Marie-France; Dautant, Alain; Daignan-Fornier, Bertrand

    2008-01-01

    Guanylic nucleotide biosynthesis is a conserved and highly regulated process. Drugs reducing GMP synthesis affect the immunological response and mutations enabling guanylic-derivative recycling lead to severe mental retardation. While the effects of decreased GMP synthesis have been well documented, the consequences of GMP overproduction in eukaryotes are poorly understood. In this work, we selected and characterized several mutations making yeast hypoxanthine–guanine phosphoribosyltransferase insensitive to feedback inhibition by GMP. In these mutants, accumulation of guanylic nucleotides can be triggered by addition of extracellular guanine. We show that such an accumulation is highly toxic for yeast cells and results in arrest of proliferation and massive cell death. This growth defect could be partially suppressed by overexpression of Rfx1p, a transcriptional repressor of the DNA damage response pathway. Importantly, neither guanylic nucleotide toxicity nor its suppression by Rfx1p was associated with an alteration of forward mutation frequency. PMID:18245832

  8. Effects of metallothionein on zinc metabolism in lethal-milk mutant mice

    SciTech Connect

    Grider, A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The lethal-milk mice (C57BL/6J-Im) exhibit various pleiotropic effects, including a congenital otolith defect, production of zinc-deficient milk, and clinical signs of a systemic Zn deficiency by one year of age. The clinical signs include alopecia, dermatitis, and skin lesions. The systemic zinc deficiency may be due to increased levels of metallothionein (MT) in the intestine and/or liver of Im mice. The untreated Im mice contain twice as much intestinal MT as do C57BL/6J-(+/sup im//+ /sup Im/) (B6) controls. This was determined by a sulfhydryl assay, by the /sup 109/Cd-saturation/hemolysate method, and by the /sup 65/Zn-binding assay. Various concentrations of Cd or Zn were added to the drinking water three days before assaying for MT. Compared to B6 mice, the Im mice exhibited more MT in their liver by the /sup 65/Zn-MT binding assay (3-fold) and by the /sup 109/Cd-saturation/hemolysate method (18-fold). The effects of the two zinc treatments did not differ significantly between Im and B6 mice. The retention and excretion of /sup 65/Zn (administered intraperitoneally) were determined over a 14-day period, but the results did not different between the Im and B6 mice. The increased concentrations of MT within the Im mice was not significantly different for the intestine and liver. Based on these data and other studies, the Im mice may exhibit alterations in zinc homeostasis due to some deregulation of MT metabolism, including the inner ear of the fetus, the lactating mammary gland, and the intestine and liver of adults by one year of age.

  9. Pathogenesis of Lethal Cardiac Arrhythmias in Mecp2 Mutant Mice: Implication for Therapy in Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, Mark D.; Wang, Tiannan; Mike, Elise; Herrera, Jose; Beavers, David L.; Huang, Teng-Wei; Ward, Christopher S.; Skinner, Steven; Percy, Alan K.; Glaze, Daniel G.; Wehrens, Xander H. T.; Neul, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Rett Syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder typically caused by mutations in Methyl-CpG-Binding Protein 2 (MECP2) in which 26% of deaths are sudden and of unknown cause. To explore the hypothesis that these deaths may be due to cardiac dysfunction, we characterized the electrocardiograms (ECGs) in 379 people with Rett syndrome and found that 18.5% show prolongation of the corrected QT interval (QTc), indicating a repolarization abnormality that can predispose to the development of an unstable fatal cardiac rhythm. Male mice lacking MeCP2 function, Mecp2Null/Y, also have prolonged QTc and show increased susceptibility to induced ventricular tachycardia. Female heterozygous null mice, Mecp2Null/+, show an age-dependent prolongation of QTc associated with ventricular tachycardia and cardiac-related death. Genetic deletion of MeCP2 function in only the nervous system was sufficient to cause long QTc and ventricular tachycardia, implicating neuronally-mediated changes to cardiac electrical conduction as a potential cause of ventricular tachycardia in Rett syndrome. The standard therapy for prolonged QTc in Rett syndrome, β-adrenergic receptor blockers, did not prevent ventricular tachycardia in Mecp2Null/Y mice. To determine whether an alternative therapy would be more appropriate, we characterized cardiomyocytes from Mecp2Null/Y mice and found increased persistent sodium current, which was normalized when cells were treated with the sodium channel-blocking anti-seizure drug phenytoin. Treatment with phenytoin reduced both QTc and sustained ventricular tachycardia in Mecp2Null/Y mice. These results demonstrate that cardiac abnormalities in Rett syndrome are secondary to abnormal nervous system control, which leads to increased persistent sodium current. Our findings suggest that treatment in people with Rett syndrome would be more effective if it targeted the increased persistent sodium current in order to prevent lethal cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:22174313

  10. Wolbachia Protein TomO Targets nanos mRNA and Restores Germ Stem Cells in Drosophila Sex-lethal Mutants.

    PubMed

    Ote, Manabu; Ueyama, Morio; Yamamoto, Daisuke

    2016-09-12

    Wolbachia, endosymbiotic bacteria prevalent in invertebrates, manipulate their hosts in a variety of ways: they induce cytoplasmic incompatibility, male lethality, male-to-female transformation, and parthenogenesis. However, little is known about the molecular basis for host manipulation by these bacteria. In Drosophila melanogaster, Wolbachia infection makes otherwise sterile Sex-lethal (Sxl) mutant females capable of producing mature eggs. Through a functional genomic screen for Wolbachia genes with growth-inhibitory effects when expressed in cultured Drosophila cells, we identified the gene WD1278 encoding a novel protein we call toxic manipulator of oogenesis (TomO), which phenocopies some of the Wolbachia effects in Sxl mutant D. melanogaster females. We demonstrate that TomO enhances the maintenance of germ stem cells (GSCs) by elevating Nanos (Nos) expression via its interaction with nos mRNA, ultimately leading to the restoration of germ cell production in Sxl mutant females that are otherwise without GSCs. PMID:27498563

  11. Small-molecule inhibitors of lethal factor protease activity protect against anthrax infection.

    PubMed

    Moayeri, Mahtab; Crown, Devorah; Jiao, Guan-Sheng; Kim, Seongjin; Johnson, Alan; Leysath, Clinton; Leppla, Stephen H

    2013-09-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, manifests its pathogenesis through the action of two secreted toxins. The bipartite lethal and edema toxins, a combination of lethal factor or edema factor with the protein protective antigen, are important virulence factors for this bacterium. We previously developed small-molecule inhibitors of lethal factor proteolytic activity (LFIs) and demonstrated their in vivo efficacy in a rat lethal toxin challenge model. In this work, we show that these LFIs protect against lethality caused by anthrax infection in mice when combined with subprotective doses of either antibiotics or neutralizing monoclonal antibodies that target edema factor. Significantly, these inhibitors provided protection against lethal infection when administered as a monotherapy. As little as two doses (10 mg/kg) administered at 2 h and 8 h after spore infection was sufficient to provide a significant survival benefit in infected mice. Administration of LFIs early in the infection was found to inhibit dissemination of vegetative bacteria to the organs in the first 32 h following infection. In addition, neutralizing antibodies against edema factor also inhibited bacterial dissemination with similar efficacy. Together, our findings confirm the important roles that both anthrax toxins play in establishing anthrax infection and demonstrate the potential for small-molecule therapeutics targeting these proteins.

  12. Profiling lethal factor interacting proteins from human stomach using T7 phage display screening.

    PubMed

    Cardona-Correa, Albin; Rios-Velazquez, Carlos

    2016-05-01

    The anthrax lethal factor (LF) is a zinc dependent metalloproteinase that cleaves the majority of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases and a member of NOD-like receptor proteins, inducing cell apoptosis. Despite efforts to fully understand the Bacillus anthracis toxin components, the gastrointestinal (GI) anthrax mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Previous studies demonstrated gastric ulceration, and a substantial bacterial growth rate in Peyer's patches. However, the complete molecular pathways of the disease that results in tissue damage by LF proteolytic activity remains unclear. In the present study, to identify the profile of the proteins potentially involved in GI anthrax, protein‑protein interactions were investigated using human stomach T7 phage display (T7PD) cDNA libraries. T7PD is a high throughput technique that allows the expression of cloned DNA sequences as peptides on the phage surface, enabling the selection and identification of protein ligands. A wild type and mutant LF (E687A) were used to differentiate interaction sites. A total of 124 clones were identified from 194 interacting‑phages, at both the DNA and protein level, by in silico analysis. Databases revealed that the selected candidates were proteins from different families including lipase, peptidase‑A1 and cation transport families, among others. Furthermore, individual T7PD candidates were tested against LF in order to detect their specificity to the target molecule, resulting in 10 LF‑interacting peptides. With a minimum concentration of LF for interaction at 1 µg/ml, the T7PD isolated pepsin A3 pre‑protein (PAP) demonstrated affinity to both types of LF. In addition, PAP was isolated in various lengths for the same protein, exhibiting common regions following PRALINE alignment. These findings will help elucidate and improve the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of GI anthrax, and aid in the development of potential therapeutic agents. PMID

  13. Study of radiosensitive Drosophila lines. XI. Induction of recessive sex-linked lethal mutations in females of the mutant line rad(2)201/sup G1/

    SciTech Connect

    Varentsova, E.R.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have studied the frequency of occurrence of recessive sex-linked lethal mutations (RSLLM) after treatment of the females with ..gamma..-rays as a function of the dose (from 5 to 20 Gy) and oogenesis stage. They have shown that within the dose range used the oocytes of the 14th and 7th development stage are more sensitive in females of the mutant line than in those of the control. They detected significant differences in the frequency of occurrence of RSLLM between the 14th and 7th stages of development of oocytes for both Drosophila lines investigated.

  14. A fragment of anthrax lethal factor delivers proteins to the cytosol without requiring protective antigen

    PubMed Central

    Kushner, Nicholas; Zhang, Dong; Touzjian, Neal; Essex, Max; Lieberman, Judy; Lu, Yichen

    2003-01-01

    Anthrax protective antigen (PA) is a 735-aa polypeptide that facilitates the exit of anthrax lethal factor (LF) from the endosome to the cytosol where the toxin acts. We recently found, however, that a fusion protein of the detoxified N-terminal domain of lethal factor (LFn) with a foreign peptide could induce CD8 T cell immune responses in the absence of PA. Because CD8 T cells recognize peptides derived from proteins degraded in the cytosol, this result suggests that lethal factor may be capable of entering the cytosol independently of PA. To investigate this further, the intracellular trafficking of an LFn-enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion protein (LFn-GFP) in the presence or absence of PA was examined by using confocal microscopy. LFn-GFP is able to enter the cytosol without PA. Moreover, it efficiently colocalizes with the proteosome 20s subunit, which degrades proteins into peptides for presentation to CD8 T cells by the MHC class I pathway. We further demonstrate that in the presence of an immune adjuvant LFn fusion protein without PA is able to effectively elicit anti-HIV cytotoxic T lymphocyte in inbred mice. These results indicate that LFn may be used without PA in a protein vaccine as a carrier to deliver antigens into the cytosol for efficient induction of T lymphocyte responses. Furthermore, these results enable us to propose a modified molecular mechanism of anthrax lethal toxin. PMID:12740437

  15. GATA factor transgenes under GATA-1 locus control rescue germline GATA-1 mutant deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, S; Shimizu, R; Suwabe, N; Kuroha, T; Yoh, K; Ohta, J; Nishimura, S; Lim, K C; Engel, J D; Yamamoto, M

    2000-08-01

    GATA-1 germline mutation in mice results in embryonic lethality due to defective erythroid cell maturation, and thus other hematopoietic GATA factors do not compensate for the loss of GATA-1. To determine whether the obligate presence of GATA-1 in erythroid cells is due to its distinct biochemical properties or spatiotemporal patterning, we attempted to rescue GATA-1 mutant mice with hematopoietic GATA factor complementary DNAs (cDNAs) placed under the transcriptional control of the GATA-1 gene. We found that transgenic expression of a GATA-1 cDNA fully abrogated the GATA-1-deficient phenotype. Surprisingly, GATA-2 and GATA-3 factors expressed from the same regulatory cassette also rescued the embryonic lethal phenotype of the GATA-1 mutation. However, adult mice rescued with the latter transgenes developed anemia, while GATA-1 transgenic mice did not. These results demonstrate that the transcriptional control dictating proper GATA-1 accumulation is the most critical determinant of GATA-1 activity during erythropoiesis. The results also show that there are biochemical distinctions among the hematopoietic GATA proteins and that during adult hematopoiesis the hematopoietic GATA factors are not functionally equivalent. PMID:10910904

  16. New Infestin-4 Mutants with Increased Selectivity against Factor XIIa

    PubMed Central

    Vuimo, Tatiana A.; Surov, Stepan S.; Ovsepyan, Ruzanna A.; Korneeva, Vera A.; Vorobiev, Ivan I.; Orlova, Nadezhda A.; Minakhin, Leonid; Kuznedelov, Konstantin; Severinov, Konstantin V.; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I.; Panteleev, Mikhail A.

    2015-01-01

    Factor XIIa (fXIIa) is a serine protease that triggers the coagulation contact pathway and plays a role in thrombosis. Because it interferes with coagulation testing, the need to inhibit fXIIa exists in many cases. Infestin-4 (Inf4) is a Kazal-type inhibitor of fXIIa. Its specificity for fXIIa can be enhanced by point mutations in the protease-binding loop. We attempted to adapt Inf4 for the selective repression of the contact pathway under various in vitro conditions, e.g., during blood collection and in ‘global’ assays of tissue factor (TF)-dependent coagulation. First, we designed a set of new Inf4 mutants that, in contrast to wt-Inf4, had stabilized canonical conformations during molecular dynamics simulation. Off-target activities against factor Xa (fXa), plasmin, and other coagulation proteases were either reduced or eliminated in these recombinant mutants, as demonstrated by chromogenic assays. Interactions with fXIIa and fXa were also analyzed using protein-protein docking. Next, Mutant B, one of the most potent mutants (its Ki for fXIIa is 0.7 nM) was tested in plasma. At concentrations 5–20 μM, this mutant delayed the contact-activated generation of thrombin, as well as clotting in thromboelastography and thrombodynamics assays. In these assays, Mutant B did not affect coagulation initiated by TF, thus demonstrating sufficient selectivity and its potential practical significance as a reagent for coagulation diagnostics. PMID:26670620

  17. New Infestin-4 Mutants with Increased Selectivity against Factor XIIa.

    PubMed

    Kolyadko, Vladimir N; Lushchekina, Sofya V; Vuimo, Tatiana A; Surov, Stepan S; Ovsepyan, Ruzanna A; Korneeva, Vera A; Vorobiev, Ivan I; Orlova, Nadezhda A; Minakhin, Leonid; Kuznedelov, Konstantin; Severinov, Konstantin V; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I; Panteleev, Mikhail A

    2015-01-01

    Factor XIIa (fXIIa) is a serine protease that triggers the coagulation contact pathway and plays a role in thrombosis. Because it interferes with coagulation testing, the need to inhibit fXIIa exists in many cases. Infestin-4 (Inf4) is a Kazal-type inhibitor of fXIIa. Its specificity for fXIIa can be enhanced by point mutations in the protease-binding loop. We attempted to adapt Inf4 for the selective repression of the contact pathway under various in vitro conditions, e.g., during blood collection and in 'global' assays of tissue factor (TF)-dependent coagulation. First, we designed a set of new Inf4 mutants that, in contrast to wt-Inf4, had stabilized canonical conformations during molecular dynamics simulation. Off-target activities against factor Xa (fXa), plasmin, and other coagulation proteases were either reduced or eliminated in these recombinant mutants, as demonstrated by chromogenic assays. Interactions with fXIIa and fXa were also analyzed using protein-protein docking. Next, Mutant B, one of the most potent mutants (its Ki for fXIIa is 0.7 nM) was tested in plasma. At concentrations 5-20 μM, this mutant delayed the contact-activated generation of thrombin, as well as clotting in thromboelastography and thrombodynamics assays. In these assays, Mutant B did not affect coagulation initiated by TF, thus demonstrating sufficient selectivity and its potential practical significance as a reagent for coagulation diagnostics. PMID:26670620

  18. The cytotoxic activity of Bacillus anthracis lethal factor is inhibited by leukotriene A4 hydrolase and metallopeptidase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Menard, A; Papini, E; Mock, M; Montecucco, C

    1996-01-01

    The lethal factor of Bacillus anthracis is central to the pathogenesis of anthrax. Its mechanism of action is still unknown. Recently, on the basis of sequence similarities, we suggested that lethal factor might act similarly to leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4), a bifunctional enzyme also endowed with a metallopeptidase activity. Here we show that some inhibitors of the LTA4 hydrolase and metallopeptidase activities of LTA4 hydrolase also affect the cytotoxicity of the anthrax lethal factor on macrophage cell lines, without interfering with the ability of the lethal factor to enter cells. These results support the proposal that anthrax lethal factor might display in the cytosol of intoxicated cells a peptidase activity similar to that of LTA4 hydrolase. PMID:8973585

  19. Analysis of the endocardium and cardiac jelly in truncal development in the cardiac lethal mutant axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum.

    PubMed

    Lemanski, L F; Fitzharris, T P

    1989-05-01

    Recessive mutant gene c in axolotls results in a failure of the heart to function because of abnormal embryonic induction processes. The myocardium in this mutant lacks organized sarcomeric myofibrils. The present study was undertaken to determine if developmental abnormalities were evident in other areas of the heart besides the myocardium. A detailed comparative survey of the structure of developing normal and mutant hearts, including the endocardium, its cellular derivatives, and the extracellular matrix, known as cardiac jelly, showed that in the mutant there are fewer than the normal number of endocardial cells lining the heart lumen, the number of mesenchyme cells is reduced, and the cardiac jelly area is greatly enlarged in the posterior part of the truncus adjacent to the ventricle.

  20. Internal deletion mutants of Xenopus transcription factor IIIA.

    PubMed Central

    Hanas, J S; Littell, R M; Gaskins, C J; Zebrowski, R

    1989-01-01

    Xenopus transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA) or TFIIIA mutants with internal deletions were expressed in E. coli utilizing a bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase system. TFIIIA or deletion mutant TFIIIAs, isolated from E.coli cell extracts, were identified by SDS PAGE and immunoblotting with rabbit antiserum against native TFIIIA purified from Xenopus immature oocytes. Specific DNA binding of intact or internally deleted TFIIIA was compared by analyzing their abilities to protect the internal control gene (ICR) of the Xenopus 5S RNA gene from DNase I digestion. Intact protein, synthesized from a full-length TFIIIA cDNA, bound specifically to the entire ICR (+96 to +43) and promoted 5S RNA gene transcription in vitro. One TFIIIA deletion mutant, expressed from cDNA lacking the coding sequence for the putative fourth zinc finger (designated from the N-terminus, amino acids 103-132) protected the ICR from DNase I digestion from nucleotide positions +96 to +78. A second TFIIIA mutant resulting from fusion of putative zinc fingers 7 and 8 (deletion of amino acids 200-224) protected the 5S gene ICR from positions +96 to +63. The DNase I protection patterns of these mutant proteins are consistent with the formation of strong ICR contacts by those regions of the protein on the N-terminal side of the mutation but not by those regions on the C-terminal side of the mutation. The regions of the protein comprising the N-terminal 3 fingers and N-terminal six fingers appear to be in contact with approximately 18 and 33 bp of DNA respectively on the 3' side of the 5S gene ICR. These internal deletion mutants promoted 5S RNA synthesis in vitro and DNA renaturation. Images PMID:2690011

  1. Factors Associated with Increased Risk for Lethal Violence in Intimate Partner Relationships among Ethnically Diverse Black Women

    PubMed Central

    Sabri, Bushra; Stockman, Jamila K.; Campbell, Jacquelyn C.; O’Brien, Sharon; Campbell, Doris; Callwood, Gloria B.; Bertrand, Desiree; Sutton, Lorna W.; Hart-Hyndman, Greta

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with increased risk for lethal violence among ethnically diverse Black women in Baltimore, Maryland (MD) and the US Virgin Islands (USVI). Women with abuse experiences (n=456) were recruited from primary care, prenatal or family planning clinics in Baltimore, MD and St. Thomas and St. Croix, USVI. Logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with the risk for lethal violence among abused women. Factors independently related to increased risk of lethal violence included fear of abusive partners, PTSD symptoms, and use of legal resources. These factors must be considered in assessing safety needs of Black women in abusive relationships. PMID:25429191

  2. In vivo dynamics of active edema and lethal factors during anthrax.

    PubMed

    Rougeaux, Clémence; Becher, François; Ezan, Eric; Tournier, Jean-Nicolas; Goossens, Pierre L

    2016-01-01

    Lethal and edema toxins are critical virulence factors of Bacillus anthracis. However, little is known about their in vivo dynamics of production during anthrax. In this study, we unraveled for the first time the in vivo kinetics of production of the toxin components EF (edema factor) and LF (lethal factor) during cutaneous infection with a wild-type toxinogenic encapsulated strain in immuno-competent mice. We stratified the asynchronous infection process into defined stages through bioluminescence imaging (BLI), while exploiting sensitive quantitative methods by measuring the enzymatic activity of LF and EF. LF was produced in high amounts, while EF amounts steadily increased during the infectious process. This led to high LF/EF ratios throughout the infection, with variations between 50 to a few thousands. In the bloodstream, the early detection of active LF and EF despite the absence of bacteria suggests that they may exert long distance effects. Infection with a strain deficient in the protective antigen toxin component enabled to address its role in the diffusion of LF and EF within the host. Our data provide a picture of the in vivo complexity of the infectious process. PMID:26996161

  3. In vivo dynamics of active edema and lethal factors during anthrax

    PubMed Central

    Rougeaux, Clémence; Becher, François; Ezan, Eric; Tournier, Jean-Nicolas; Goossens, Pierre L.

    2016-01-01

    Lethal and edema toxins are critical virulence factors of Bacillus anthracis. However, little is known about their in vivo dynamics of production during anthrax. In this study, we unraveled for the first time the in vivo kinetics of production of the toxin components EF (edema factor) and LF (lethal factor) during cutaneous infection with a wild-type toxinogenic encapsulated strain in immuno-competent mice. We stratified the asynchronous infection process into defined stages through bioluminescence imaging (BLI), while exploiting sensitive quantitative methods by measuring the enzymatic activity of LF and EF. LF was produced in high amounts, while EF amounts steadily increased during the infectious process. This led to high LF/EF ratios throughout the infection, with variations between 50 to a few thousands. In the bloodstream, the early detection of active LF and EF despite the absence of bacteria suggests that they may exert long distance effects. Infection with a strain deficient in the protective antigen toxin component enabled to address its role in the diffusion of LF and EF within the host. Our data provide a picture of the in vivo complexity of the infectious process. PMID:26996161

  4. Purification and biophysical characterization of the core protease domain of anthrax lethal factor

    SciTech Connect

    Gkazonis, Petros V.; Dalkas, Georgios A.; Chasapis, Christos T.; Vlamis-Gardikas, Alexios; Bentrop, Detlef; Spyroulias, Georgios A.

    2010-06-04

    Anthrax lethal toxin (LeTx) stands for the major virulence factor of the anthrax disease. It comprises a 90 kDa highly specific metalloprotease, the anthrax lethal factor (LF). LF possesses a catalytic Zn{sup 2+} binding site and is highly specific against MAPK kinases, thus representing the most potent native biomolecule to alter and inactivate MKK [MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) kinases] signalling pathways. Given the importance of the interaction between LF and substrate for the development of anti-anthrax agents as well as the potential treatment of nascent tumours, the analysis of the structure and dynamic properties of the LF catalytic site are essential to elucidate its enzymatic properties. Here we report the recombinant expression and purification of a C-terminal part of LF (LF{sub 672-776}) that harbours the enzyme's core protease domain. The biophysical characterization and backbone assignments ({sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N) of the polypeptide revealed a stable, well folded structure even in the absence of Zn{sup 2+}, suitable for high resolution structural analysis by NMR.

  5. Lethal Factor Active-Site Mutations Affect Catalytic Activity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, S. E.; Hanna, P. C.

    1998-01-01

    The lethal factor (LF) protein of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin contains the thermolysin-like active-site and zinc-binding consensus motif HEXXH (K. R. Klimpel, N. Arora, and S. H. Leppla, Mol. Microbiol. 13:1093–1100, 1994). LF is hypothesized to act as a Zn2+ metalloprotease in the cytoplasm of macrophages, but no proteolytic activities have been previously shown on any target substrate. Here, synthetic peptides are hydrolyzed by LF in vitro. Mass spectroscopy and peptide sequencing of isolated cleavage products separated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography indicate that LF seems to prefer proline-containing substrates. Substitution mutations within the consensus active-site residues completely abolish all in vitro catalytic functions, as does addition of 1,10-phenanthroline, EDTA, and certain amino acid hydroxamates, including the novel zinc metalloprotease inhibitor ZINCOV. In contrast, the protease inhibitors bestatin and lysine CMK, previously shown to block LF activity on macrophages, did not block LF activity in vitro. These data provide the first direct evidence that LF may act as an endopeptidase. PMID:9573135

  6. Amplification of Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase Suppresses the Conditionally Lethal Growth and Virulence Phenotype of Leishmania donovani Mutants Lacking Both Hypoxanthine-guanine and Xanthine Phosphoribosyltransferases*

    PubMed Central

    Boitz, Jan M.; Ullman, Buddy

    2010-01-01

    Leishmania donovani cannot synthesize purines de novo and obligatorily scavenge purines from the host. Previously, we described a conditional lethal Δhgprt/Δxprt mutant of L. donovani (Boitz, J. M., and Ullman, B. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 16084–16089) that establishes that L. donovani salvages purines primarily through hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) and xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (XPRT). Unlike wild type L. donovani, the Δhgprt/Δxprt knock-out cannot grow on 6-oxypurines and displays an absolute requirement for adenine or adenosine and 2′-deoxycoformycin, an inhibitor of parasite adenine aminohydrolase activity. Here, we demonstrate that the ability of Δhgprt/Δxprt parasites to infect mice was profoundly compromised. Surprisingly, mutant parasites that survived the initial passage through mice partially regained their virulence properties, exhibiting a >10-fold increase in parasite burden in a subsequent mouse infection. To dissect the mechanism by which Δhgprt/Δxprt parasites persisted in vivo, suppressor strains that had regained their capacity to grow under restrictive conditions were cloned from cultured Δhgprt/Δxprt parasites. The ability of these suppressor clones to grow in and metabolize 6-oxypurines could be ascribed to a marked amplification and overexpression of the adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) gene. Moreover, transfection of Δhgprt/Δxprt cells with an APRT episome recapitulated the suppressor phenotype in vitro and enabled growth on 6-oxypurines. Biochemical studies further showed that hypoxanthine, unexpectedly, was an inefficient substrate for APRT, evidence that could account for the ability of the suppressors to metabolize hypoxanthine. Subsequent analysis implied that APRT amplification was also a potential contributory mechanism by which Δhgprt/Δxprt parasites displayed persistence and increased virulence in mice. PMID:20363738

  7. Incompatibility Between X Chromosome Factor and Pericentric Heterochromatic Region Causes Lethality in Hybrids Between Drosophila melanogaster and Its Sibling Species

    PubMed Central

    Cattani, M. Victoria; Presgraves, Daven C.

    2012-01-01

    The Dobzhansky–Muller model posits that postzygotic reproductive isolation results from the evolution of incompatible epistatic interactions between species: alleles that function in the genetic background of one species can cause sterility or lethality in the genetic background of another species. Progress in identifying and characterizing factors involved in postzygotic isolation in Drosophila has remained slow, mainly because Drosophila melanogaster, with all of its genetic tools, forms dead or sterile hybrids when crossed to its sister species, D. simulans, D. sechellia, and D. mauritiana. To circumvent this problem, we used chromosome deletions and duplications from D. melanogaster to map two hybrid incompatibility loci in F1 hybrids with its sister species. We mapped a recessive factor to the pericentromeric heterochromatin of the X chromosome in D. simulans and D. mauritiana, which we call heterochromatin hybrid lethal (hhl), which causes lethality in F1 hybrid females with D. melanogaster. As F1 hybrid males hemizygous for a D. mauritiana (or D. simulans) X chromosome are viable, the lethality of deficiency hybrid females implies that a dominant incompatible partner locus exists on the D. melanogaster X. Using small segments of the D. melanogaster X chromosome duplicated onto the Y chromosome, we mapped a dominant factor that causes hybrid lethality to a small 24-gene region of the D. melanogaster X. We provide evidence suggesting that it interacts with hhlmau. The location of hhl is consistent with the emerging theme that hybrid incompatibilities in Drosophila involve heterochromatic regions and factors that interact with the heterochromatin. PMID:22446316

  8. Assembly of anthrax toxin pore: Lethal-factor complexes into lipid nanodiscs

    PubMed Central

    Akkaladevi, N; Hinton-Chollet, L; Katayama, H; Mitchell, J; Szerszen, L; Mukherjee, S; Gogol, E P; Pentelute, B L; Collier, R J; Fisher, M T

    2013-01-01

    We have devised a procedure to incorporate the anthrax protective antigen (PA) pore complexed with the N-terminal domain of anthrax lethal factor (LFN) into lipid nanodiscs and analyzed the resulting complexes by negative-stain electron microscopy. Insertion into nanodiscs was performed without relying on primary and secondary detergent screens. The preparations were relatively pure, and the percentage of PA pore inserted into nanodiscs on EM grids was high (∼43%). Three-dimensional analysis of negatively stained single particles revealed the LFN-PA nanodisc complex mirroring the previous unliganded PA pore nanodisc structure, but with additional protein density consistent with multiple bound LFN molecules on the PA cap region. The assembly procedure will facilitate collection of higher resolution cryo-EM LFN-PA nanodisc structures and use of advanced automated particle selection methods. PMID:23389868

  9. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Mitigates Hematopoietic Toxicity after Lethal Total Body Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Dunhua; Deoliveira, Divino; Kang, Yubin; Choi, Seung S.; Li, Zhiguo; Chao, Nelson J.; Chen, Benny J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether and how insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) mitigates hematopoietic toxicity after total body irradiation. Methods and Materials BALB/c mice were irradiated with a lethal dose of radiation (7.5 Gy) and treated with IGF-1 at a dose of 100 μg/dose intravenously once a day for five consecutive days starting within one hour post exposure. Survival and hematopoietic recovery were monitored. The mechanisms by which IGF-1 promotes hematopoietic recovery were also studied using an in vitro culture system. Results IGF-1 protected 8 out of 20 mice (40%) from lethal irradiation while only 2 out of 20 mice (10%) in the saline control group survived for more than 100 days after irradiation. A single dose of IGF-1 (500 μg) was as effective as daily dosing for five days. Positive effects were noted even when the initiation of treatment was delayed up to six hours post irradiation. Compared with the saline control group, treatment with IGF-1 significantly accelerated the recovery of both platelets and red cells in peripheral blood, total cell numbers as well as hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors in the bone marrow when measured at day 14 post-irradiation. IGF-1 protected both hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors from radiation-induced apoptosis and cell death. In addition, IGF-1 was able to facilitate the proliferation and differentiation of non-irradiated and irradiated hematopoietic progenitors. Conclusions IGF-1 mitigates radiation-induced hematopoietic toxicity through protecting hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from apoptosis and enhancing proliferation and differentiation of the surviving hematopoietic progenitors. PMID:23021438

  10. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Mitigates Hematopoietic Toxicity After Lethal Total Body Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Dunhua; Deoliveira, Divino; Kang, Yubin; Choi, Seung S.; Li, Zhiguo; Chao, Nelson J.; Chen, Benny J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether and how insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) mitigates hematopoietic toxicity after total body irradiation. Methods and Materials: BALB/c mice were irradiated with a lethal dose of radiation (7.5 Gy) and treated with IGF-1 at a dose of 100 μg/dose intravenously once a day for 5 consecutive days starting within 1 hour after exposure. Survival and hematopoietic recovery were monitored. The mechanisms by which IGF-1 promotes hematopoietic recovery were also studied by use of an in vitro culture system. Results: IGF-1 protected 8 of 20 mice (40%) from lethal irradiation, whereas only 2 of 20 mice (10%) in the saline control group survived for more than 100 days after irradiation. A single dose of IGF-1 (500 μg) was as effective as daily dosing for 5 days. Positive effects were noted even when the initiation of treatment was delayed as long as 6 hours after irradiation. In comparison with the saline control group, treatment with IGF-1 significantly accelerated the recovery of both platelets and red blood cells in peripheral blood, total cell numbers, hematopoietic stem cells, and progenitor cells in the bone marrow when measured at day 14 after irradiation. IGF-1 protected both hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from radiation-induced apoptosis and cell death. In addition, IGF-1 was able to facilitate the proliferation and differentiation of nonirradiated and irradiated hematopoietic progenitor cells. Conclusions: IGF-1 mitigates radiation-induced hematopoietic toxicity through protecting hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from apoptosis and enhancing proliferation and differentiation of the surviving hematopoietic progenitor cells.

  11. Diminished but Not Abolished Effect of Two His351 Mutants of Anthrax Edema Factor in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Taoran; Zhao, Xinghui; Liu, Ju; Meng, Yingying; Feng, Yingying; Fang, Ting; Zhang, Jinlong; Yang, Xiuxu; Li, Jianmin; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Edema toxin (ET), which is composed of a potent adenylate cyclase (AC), edema factor (EF), and protective antigen (PA), is one of the major toxicity factors of Bacillus anthracis. In this study, we introduced mutations in full-length EF to generate alanine EF(H351A) and arginine EF(H351R) variants. In vitro activity analysis displayed that the adenylyl cyclase activity of both the mutants was significantly diminished compared with the wild-type EF. When the native and mutant toxins were administered subcutaneously in a mouse footpad edema model, severe acute swelling was evoked by wild-type ET, while the symptoms induced by mutant toxins were very minor. Systemic administration of these EF variants caused non-lethal hepatotoxicity. In addition, EF(H351R) exhibited slightly higher activity in causing more severe edema than EF(H351A). Our findings demonstrate that the toxicity of ET is not abolished by substitution of EF residue His351 by alanine or arginine. These results also indicate the potential of the mouse footpad edema model as a sensitive method for evaluating both ET toxicity and the efficacy of candidate therapeutic agents. PMID:26848687

  12. Anthrax toxin lethal factor domain 3 is highly mobile and responsive to ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Maize, Kimberly M.; Kurbanov, Elbek K.; De La Mora-Rey, Teresa; Geders, Todd W.; Hwang, Dong-Jin; Walters, Michael A.; Johnson, Rodney L.; Amin, Elizabeth A.; Finzel, Barry C.

    2014-01-01

    The secreted anthrax toxin consists of three components: the protective antigen (PA), edema factor (EF) and lethal factor (LF). LF, a zinc metalloproteinase, compromises the host immune system primarily by targeting mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases in macrophages. Peptide substrates and small-molecule inhibitors bind LF in the space between domains 3 and 4 of the hydrolase. Domain 3 is attached on a hinge to domain 2 via residues Ile300 and Pro385, and can move through an angular arc of greater than 35° in response to the binding of different ligands. Here, multiple LF structures including five new complexes with co-crystallized inhibitors are compared and three frequently populated LF conformational states termed ‘bioactive’, ‘open’ and ‘tight’ are identified. The bioactive position is observed with large substrate peptides and leaves all peptide-recognition subsites open and accessible. The tight state is seen in unliganded and small-molecule complex structures. In this state, domain 3 is clamped over certain substrate subsites, blocking access. The open position appears to be an intermediate state between these extremes and is observed owing to steric constraints imposed by specific bound ligands. The tight conformation may be the lowest-energy conformation among the reported structures, as it is the position observed with no bound ligand, while the open and bioactive conformations are likely to be ligand-induced. PMID:25372673

  13. Highly dynamic metal exchange in anthrax lethal factor involves the occupation of an inhibitory metal binding site.

    PubMed

    Young, Calvin J; Siemann, Stefan

    2016-10-11

    Metal exchange is a common strategy to replace the zinc ion of many zinc proteins with other transition metals amenable to spectroscopic investigations. We here demonstrate that in anthrax lethal factor (and likely other zinc proteases), metal exchange is a fast process, and involves the occupation of an inhibitory metal site by the incoming ion prior to the release of zinc. PMID:27517100

  14. [Detection of the functionally active domains in the molecule of the lethal factor of the anthrax exotoxin].

    PubMed

    Noskov, A N; Kravchenko, T B; Noskova, V P

    1996-01-01

    Three functional domains were revealed in the molecule of the lethal factor of B. anthracis. They are located in the linear structure of the molecula as follows: the associative domain occupies the area from Lys39 to Met242, the stabilizing domain from Leu517 to Lys614, and the effector domain still further to the COOH-terminal Lys mino acid.

  15. Substrate Recognition of Anthrax Lethal Factor Examined by Combinatorial and Pre-steady-state Kinetic Approaches*

    PubMed Central

    Zakharova, Maria Yu.; Kuznetsov, Nikita A.; Dubiley, Svetlana A.; Kozyr, Arina V.; Fedorova, Olga S.; Chudakov, Dmitry M.; Knorre, Dmitry G.; Shemyakin, Igor G.; Gabibov, Alexander G.; Kolesnikov, Alexander V.

    2009-01-01

    Lethal factor (LF), a zinc-dependent protease of high specificity produced by Bacillus anthracis, is the effector component of the binary toxin that causes death in anthrax. New therapeutics targeting the toxin are required to reduce systemic anthrax-related fatalities. In particular, new insights into the LF catalytic mechanism will be useful for the development of LF inhibitors. We evaluated the minimal length required for formation of bona fide LF substrates using substrate phage display. Phage-based selection yielded a substrate that is cleaved seven times more efficiently by LF than the peptide targeted in the protein kinase MKK6. Site-directed mutagenesis within the metal-binding site in the LF active center and within phage-selected substrates revealed a complex pattern of LF-substrate interactions. The elementary steps of LF-mediated proteolysis were resolved by the stopped-flow technique. Pre-steady-state kinetics of LF proteolysis followed a four-step mechanism as follows: initial substrate binding, rearrangement of the enzyme-substrate complex, a rate-limiting cleavage step, and product release. Examination of LF interactions with metal ions revealed an unexpected activation of the protease by Ca2+ and Mn2+. Based on the available structural and kinetic data, we propose a model for LF-substrate interaction. Resolution of the kinetic and structural parameters governing LF activity may be exploited to design new LF inhibitors. PMID:19359249

  16. Deficiency of the myogenic factor MyoD causes a perinatally lethal fetal akinesia

    PubMed Central

    Crinnion, Laura A; Murphy, Helen; Newbould, Melanie; Harrison, Sally M; Lascelles, Carolina; Antanaviciute, Agne; Carr, Ian M; Sheridan, Eamonn; Bonthron, David T; Smith, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Background Lethal fetal akinesia deformation sequence (FADS) describes a clinically and genetically heterogeneous phenotype that includes fetal akinesia, intrauterine growth retardation, arthrogryposis and developmental anomalies. Affected babies die as a result of pulmonary hypoplasia. We aimed to identify the underlying genetic cause of this disorder in a family in which there were three affected individuals from two sibships. Methods Autosomal-recessive inheritance was suggested by a family history of consanguinity and by recurrence of the phenotype between the two sibships. We performed exome sequencing of the affected individuals and their unaffected mother, followed by autozygosity mapping and variant filtering to identify the causative gene. Results Five autozygous regions were identified, spanning 31.7 Mb of genomic sequence and including 211 genes. Using standard variant filtering criteria, we excluded all variants as being the likely pathogenic cause, apart from a single novel nonsense mutation, c.188C>A p.(Ser63*) (NM_002478.4), in MYOD1. This gene encodes an extensively studied transcription factor involved in muscle development, which has nonetheless not hitherto been associated with a hereditary human disease phenotype. Conclusions We provide the first description of a human phenotype that appears to result from MYOD1 mutation. The presentation with FADS is consistent with a large body of data demonstrating that in the mouse, MyoD is a major controller of precursor cell commitment to the myogenic differentiation programme. PMID:26733463

  17. Characterization of the Two Maize Embryo-Lethal Defective Kernel Mutants Rgh*-1210 and Fl*-1253b: Effects on Embryo and Gametophyte Development

    PubMed Central

    Clark, J. K.; Sheridan, W. F.

    1988-01-01

    We have examined the effects on embryonic and gametophytic development of two nonallelic defective-kernel mutants of maize. Earlier studies indicated that both mutants are abnormal in embryonic morphogenesis as well as in the formation of their endosperm. Mutant rgh*-1210 embryos depart from the normal embryogenic pathway at the proembryo and transition stage, by developing meristematic lobes and losing bilateral symmetry. They continue growth as irregular cell masses that enlarge and become necrotic. Somatic embryos arising in rgh*-1210 callus cultures display the rgh*-1210 mutant phenotype. Mutant fl*-1253B embryos are variably blocked from the coleoptilar stage through stage 2. Following formation of the shoot apex in the mutant embryos the leaf primordia and tissues surrounding the embryonic axis continue growth and cell division, while the scutellum ceases development and becomes hypertrophied. Mutant fl*-1253B embryos are unable to germinate, either in mutant kernels or as immature embryos in culture, and the mutant scutellar tissue does not produce regenerable callus. Expression of the fl*-1253B locus during male gametophytic development is revealed by a marked reduction in pollen transmission as a result of mutant expression during the interval between meiosis and the initiation of pollen tube growth. In both mutants, there is considerable proliferation of the aleurone cells of the endosperm. Mutant expression of rgh*-1210 in the female gametophyte is revealed by the abnormal antipodal cells of the embryo sac. These results show that these two gene loci play unique and crucial roles in normal morphogenesis of the embryo. In addition, it is evident that both mutants are pleiotropic in affecting the development of the endosperm and gametophyte as well as the embryo. These pleiotropisms suggest some commonality in the gene regulation of development in these three tissues. PMID:17246478

  18. Studies on radiosensitive lines of Drosophila. IX. Analysis of fertility and frequency of dominant lethal mutations in the gamma-irradiated females of the mutant line rad(2)201/sup G1/

    SciTech Connect

    Varentsova, E.R.; Sharygin, V.I.; Khromykh, Yu.M.

    1986-03-01

    Fertility and frequency of dominant lethal mutations (DLM) induced by gamma rays in females at the age of 0-5 h and 5-7 days were studied in the radiosensitive mutant rad(2)201/sup G1/ of Drosophila. It has been found that the oocytes of mutant lines are more radiosensitive as compared to those of the wild type flies when compared on the basis of DLM frequency obtained through the entire maturation period. The early oocytes of stages 2-7, i.e., at the stages corresponding to the recombination-defective properties of mutation rad(2)201/sup g1/ are the most sensitive. It has also been demonstrated that the gamma-ray doses exceeding 10 Gy cause a strong sterilizing effect in the mutant females as a result of destruction and resorption of the egg chamber, irradiated at the stages of previtellogenic growth of oocytes. In the radiosensitive mutant females, the sensitivity of the oocytes for DLM induction does not correlate with the sensitivity of the ovarian follicles toward the resorbing effect of gamma rays. The possible involvement of the mutant locus in the genetic processes in different specialized cells of the sexual pathway in Drosophila is discussed.

  19. A targeted deletion/insertion in the mouse Pcsk1 locus is associated with homozygous embryo preimplantation lethality, mutant allele preferential transmission and heterozygous female susceptibility to dietary fat.

    PubMed

    Mbikay, Majambu; Croissandeau, Gilles; Sirois, Francine; Anini, Younes; Mayne, Janice; Seidah, Nabil G; Chrétien, Michel

    2007-06-15

    Proprotein convertase 1 (PC1) is a neuroendocrine proteinase involved in the proteolytic activation of precursors to hormones and neuropeptides. To determine the physiological importance of PC1, we produced a mutant mouse from embryonic stem cells in which its locus (Pcsk1) had been inactivated by homologous recombination. The inactivating mutation consisted of a 32.7-kb internal deletion and a 1.8 kb insertion of the bacterial neomycin resistance gene (neo) under the mouse phosphoglycerate kinase 1 protein (PGKneo). Intercross of Pcsk1(+/-) mice produced no Pcsk1(-/-) offspring or blastocysts; in addition, more than 80% of the offspring were Pcsk1(+/-). These observations suggested that the mutation caused preimplantation lethality of homozygous embryos and preferential transmission of the mutant allele. Interestingly, RT-PCR analysis on RNA from endocrine tissues from Pcsk1(+/-) mice revealed the presence of aberrant transcripts specifying the N-terminal half of the PC1 propeptide fused to neo gene product. Mass spectrometric profiles of proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides in the anterior pituitary were similar between Pcsk1(+/-) and Pcsk1(+/+) mice, but significantly different between male and female mice of the same genotype. Relative to their wild-type counterparts, female mutant mice exhibited stunted growth under a low fat diet, and catch-up growth under a high-fat diet. The complex phenotype exhibited by this Pcsk1 mutant mouse model may be due to PC1 deficiency aggravated by expression of aberrant gene products from the mutant allele. PMID:17490633

  20. CD4+ T Cells Targeting Dominant and Cryptic Epitopes from Bacillus anthracis Lethal Factor.

    PubMed

    Ascough, Stephanie; Ingram, Rebecca J; Chu, Karen K Y; Musson, Julie A; Moore, Stephen J; Gallagher, Theresa; Baillie, Les; Williamson, Ethel D; Robinson, John H; Maillere, Bernard; Boyton, Rosemary J; Altmann, Daniel M

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax is an endemic infection in many countries, particularly in the developing world. The causative agent, Bacillus anthracis, mediates disease through the secretion of binary exotoxins. Until recently, research into adaptive immunity targeting this bacterial pathogen has largely focused on the humoral response to these toxins. There is, however, growing recognition that cellular immune responses involving IFNγ producing CD4+ T cells also contribute significantly to a protective memory response. An established concept in adaptive immunity to infection is that during infection of host cells, new microbial epitopes may be revealed, leading to immune recognition of so called 'cryptic' or 'subdominant' epitopes. We analyzed the response to both cryptic and immunodominant T cell epitopes derived from the toxin component lethal factor and presented by a range of HLA-DR alleles. Using IFNγ-ELISpot assays we characterized epitopes that elicited a response following immunization with synthetic peptide and the whole protein and tested their capacities to bind purified HLA-DR molecules in vitro. We found that DR1 transgenics demonstrated T cell responses to a greater number of domain III cryptic epitopes than other HLA-DR transgenics, and that this pattern was repeated with the immunodominant epitopes, as a greater proportion of these epitopes induced a T cell response when presented within the context of the whole protein. Immunodominant epitopes LF457-476 and LF467-487 were found to induce a T cell response to the peptide, as well as to the whole native LF protein in DR1 and DR15, but not in DR4 transgenics. The analysis of Domain I revealed the presence of several unique cryptic epitopes all of which showed a strong to moderate relative binding affinity to HLA-DR4 molecules. However, none of the cryptic epitopes from either domain III or I displayed notably high binding affinities across all HLA-DR alleles assayed. These responses were influenced by the specific HLA

  1. The Live Attenuated Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Triple-Deletion Mutant ΔapxIC ΔapxIIC ΔapxIV-ORF1 Strain, SLW05, Immunizes Pigs against Lethal Challenge with Haemophilus parasuis

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shulin; Ou, Jiwen; Zhang, Minmin; Xu, Juan; Liu, Huazhen; Liu, Jinlin; Yuan, Fangyan; Chen, Huanchun

    2013-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae both belong to the family Pasteurellaceae and are major respiratory pathogens that cause large economic losses in the pig industry worldwide. We previously constructed an attenuated A. pleuropneumoniae serovar 1 live vaccine prototype, SLW05 (ΔapxIC ΔapxIIC ΔapxIV-ORF1), which is able to produce nontoxic but immunogenic ApxIA, ApxIIA, and ApxIVA. This triple-deletion mutant strain was shown to elicit protective immunity against virulent A. pleuropneumoniae. In the present study, we investigated whether immunization with SLW05 could also protect against lethal challenge with virulent H. parasuis SH0165 (serovar 5) or MD0322 (serovar 4). The SLW05 strain was found to elicit a strong humoral antibody response in pigs and to confer significant protection against challenge with a lethal dose of H. parasuis SH0165 or MD0322. IgG subtype analysis revealed that SLW05 induces a bias toward a Th1-type immune response and stimulates interleukin 2 (IL-2) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production. Moreover, antisera from SLW05-vaccinated pigs efficiently inhibited both A. pleuropneumoniae and H. parasuis growth in a whole-blood assay. This is the first report that a live attenuated A. pleuropneumoniae vaccine with SLW05 can protect against lethal H. parasuis infection, which provides a novel approach for developing an attenuated H. parasuis vaccine. PMID:23220998

  2. Biochip for the Detection of Bacillus anthracis Lethal Factor and Therapeutic Agents against Anthrax Toxins.

    PubMed

    Silin, Vitalii; Kasianowicz, John J; Michelman-Ribeiro, Ariel; Panchal, Rekha G; Bavari, Sina; Robertson, Joseph W F

    2016-01-01

    Tethered lipid bilayer membranes (tBLMs) have been used in many applications, including biosensing and membrane protein structure studies. This report describes a biosensor for anthrax toxins that was fabricated through the self-assembly of a tBLM with B. anthracis protective antigen ion channels that are both the recognition element and electrochemical transducer. We characterize the sensor and its properties with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. The sensor shows a sensitivity similar to ELISA and can also be used to rapidly screen for molecules that bind to the toxins and potentially inhibit their lethal effects. PMID:27348008

  3. Biochip for the Detection of Bacillus anthracis Lethal Factor and Therapeutic Agents against Anthrax Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Silin, Vitalii; Kasianowicz, John J.; Michelman-Ribeiro, Ariel; Panchal, Rekha G.; Bavari, Sina; Robertson, Joseph W. F.

    2016-01-01

    Tethered lipid bilayer membranes (tBLMs) have been used in many applications, including biosensing and membrane protein structure studies. This report describes a biosensor for anthrax toxins that was fabricated through the self-assembly of a tBLM with B. anthracis protective antigen ion channels that are both the recognition element and electrochemical transducer. We characterize the sensor and its properties with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. The sensor shows a sensitivity similar to ELISA and can also be used to rapidly screen for molecules that bind to the toxins and potentially inhibit their lethal effects. PMID:27348008

  4. A Mutant Library Approach to Identify Improved Meningococcal Factor H Binding Protein Vaccine Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Konar, Monica; Rossi, Raffaella; Walter, Helen; Pajon, Rolando; Beernink, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Factor H binding protein (FHbp) is a virulence factor used by meningococci to evade the host complement system. FHbp elicits bactericidal antibodies in humans and is part of two recently licensed vaccines. Using human complement Factor H (FH) transgenic mice, we previously showed that binding of FH decreased the protective antibody responses to FHbp vaccination. Therefore, in the present study we devised a library-based method to identify mutant FHbp antigens with very low binding of FH. Using an FHbp sequence variant in one of the two licensed vaccines, we displayed an error-prone PCR mutant FHbp library on the surface of Escherichia coli. We used fluorescence-activated cell sorting to isolate FHbp mutants with very low binding of human FH and preserved binding of control anti-FHbp monoclonal antibodies. We sequenced the gene encoding FHbp from selected clones and introduced the mutations into a soluble FHbp construct. Using this approach, we identified several new mutant FHbp vaccine antigens that had very low binding of FH as measured by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance. The new mutant FHbp antigens elicited protective antibody responses in human FH transgenic mice that were up to 20-fold higher than those elicited by the wild-type FHbp antigen. This approach offers the potential to discover mutant antigens that might not be predictable even with protein structural information and potentially can be applied to other microbial vaccine antigens that bind host proteins. PMID:26057742

  5. Zymogenic and enzymatic properties of the 70-80 loop mutants of factor X/Xa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Manithody, Chandrashekhara; Yang, Likui; Rezaie, Alireza R

    2004-02-01

    The Ca(2+) binding 70-80 loop of factor X (fX) contains one basic (Arg(71)) and three acidic (Glu(74), Glu(76), and Glu(77)) residues whose contributions to the zymogenic and enzymatic properties of the protein have not been evaluated. We prepared four Ala substitution mutants of fX (R71A, E74A, E76A, and E77A) and characterized their activation kinetics by the factor VIIa and factor IXa in both the absence and presence of cofactors. Factor VIIa exhibited normal activity toward E74A and E76A and less than a twofold impaired activity toward R71A and E77A in both the absence and presence of tissue factor. Similarly, factor IXa in the absence of factor VIIIa exhibited normal activity toward both E74A and E76A; however, its activity toward R71A and E77A was impaired approximately two- to threefold. In the presence of factor VIIIa, factor IX activated all mutants with approximately two- to fivefold impaired catalytic efficiency. In contrast to changes in their zymogenic properties, all mutant enzymes exhibited normal affinities for factor Va, and catalyzed the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin with normal catalytic efficiencies. However, further studies revealed that the affinity of mutant enzymes for interaction with metal ions Na(+) and Ca(2+) was impaired. These results suggest that although charged residues of the 70-80 loop play an insignificant role in fX recognition by the factor VIIa-tissue factor complex, they are critical for the substrate recognition by factor IXa in the intrinsic Xase complex. The results further suggest that mutant residues do not play a specific role in the catalytic function of fXa in the prothrombinase complex. PMID:14739327

  6. CHEMOSENSITIZATION BY A NON-APOPTOGENIC HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70-BINDING APOPTOSIS INDUCING FACTOR MUTANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemosensitization by a non-apoptogenic heat shock protein 70-binding apoptosis inducing factor mutant

    Abstract
    HSP70 inhibits apoptosis by neutralizing the caspase activator Apaf-1 and by interacting with apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), a mitochondrial flavoprotein wh...

  7. Structures of the DfsB Protein Family Suggest a Cationic, Helical Sibling Lethal Factor Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jonathan D.; Taylor, Gabrielle; Hare, Stephen A.; Matthews, Steve J.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria have developed a variety of mechanisms for surviving harsh environmental conditions, nutrient stress and overpopulation. Paenibacillus dendritiformis produces a lethal protein (Slf) that is able to induce cell death in neighbouring colonies and a phenotypic switch in more distant ones. Slf is derived from the secreted precursor protein, DfsB, after proteolytic processing. Here, we present new crystal structures of DfsB homologues from a variety of bacterial species and a surprising version present in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Adopting a four-helix bundle decorated with a further three short helices within intervening loops, DfsB belongs to a non-enzymatic class of the DinB fold. The structure suggests that the biologically active Slf fragment may possess a C-terminal helix rich in basic and aromatic residues that suggest a functional mechanism akin to that for cationic antimicrobial peptides. PMID:26804569

  8. Physiological characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants supersensitive to G1 arrest by a factor and. cap alpha. factor pheromones

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, R.K.; Otte, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae MATa cells carrying mutations in either sst1 or sst2 are supersensitive to the G1 arrest induced by ..cap alpha.. factor pheromone. When sst1 mutants were mixed with normal SST/sup +/ cells, the entire population recovered together from ..cap alpha.. factor arrest, suggesting that SST/sup +/ cells helped sst1 mutants to recover. Complementation tests and linkage analysis showed that sst1 and bar1, a mutation which eliminates the ability of MATa cells to act as a ''barrier'' to the diffusion of ..cap alpha.. factor, were lesions in the same genes. These findings suggest that sst1 mutants are defective in recovery from ..cap alpha.. factor arrest because they are unable to degrade the pheromone. In contrast, recovery of sst2 mutants was not potentiated by the presence of SST/sup +/ cells in mixing experiments. When either normal MATa cells or mutant cells carrying defects in sst1 or sst2 were exposed to ..cap alpha.. factor for 1 h and then washed free of the pheromone, the sst2 cells subsequently remained arrested in the absence of ..cap alpha.. factor for a much longer time than SST/sup +/ or sst1 cells. These observations suggest that the defect in sst2 mutants is intrinsic to the cell and is involved in the mechanism of ..cap alpha.. factor action at some step after the initial interaction of the pheromone with the cell. The presence of an sst2 mutation appears to cause a growth debility, since repeated serial subculture of haploid sst2-1 strains led to the accumulation of faster-growing revertants that were pheromone resistant and were mating defective (''sterile'').

  9. Enhanced dimerization drives ligand-independent activity of mutant epidermal growth factor receptor in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Christopher C.; Arndt-Jovin, Donna J.; Karedla, Narain; Steinkamp, Mara P.; Chizhik, Alexey I.; Hlavacek, William S.; Wilson, Bridget S.; Lidke, Keith A.; Lidke, Diane S.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations within the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/erbB1/Her1) are often associated with tumorigenesis. In particular, a number of EGFR mutants that demonstrate ligand-independent signaling are common in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), including kinase domain mutations L858R (also called L834R) and exon 19 deletions (e.g., ΔL747-P753insS), which collectively make up nearly 90% of mutations in NSCLC. The molecular mechanisms by which these mutations confer constitutive activity remain unresolved. Using multiple subdiffraction-limit imaging modalities, we reveal the altered receptor structure and interaction kinetics of NSCLC-associated EGFR mutants. We applied two-color single quantum dot tracking to quantify receptor dimerization kinetics on living cells and show that, in contrast to wild-type EGFR, mutants are capable of forming stable, ligand-independent dimers. Two-color superresolution localization microscopy confirmed ligand-independent aggregation of EGFR mutants. Live-cell Förster resonance energy transfer measurements revealed that the L858R kinase mutation alters ectodomain structure such that unliganded mutant EGFR adopts an extended, dimerization-competent conformation. Finally, mutation of the putative dimerization arm confirmed a critical role for ectodomain engagement in ligand-independent signaling. These data support a model in which dysregulated activity of NSCLC-associated kinase mutants is driven by coordinated interactions involving both the kinase and extracellular domains that lead to enhanced dimerization. PMID:26337388

  10. Development of synthetic lethality anticancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Fang, Bingliang

    2014-10-01

    The concept of synthetic lethality (the creation of a lethal phenotype from the combined effects of mutations in two or more genes) has recently been exploited in various efforts to develop new genotype-selective anticancer therapeutics. These efforts include screening for novel anticancer agents, identifying novel therapeutic targets, characterizing mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapy, and improving efficacies through the rational design of combination therapy. This review discusses recent developments in synthetic lethality anticancer therapeutics, including poly ADP-ribose polymerase inhibitors for BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutant cancers, checkpoint inhibitors for p53 mutant cancers, and small molecule agents targeting RAS gene mutant cancers. Because cancers are caused by mutations in multiple genes and abnormalities in multiple signaling pathways, synthetic lethality for a specific tumor suppressor gene or oncogene is likely cell context-dependent. Delineation of the mechanisms underlying synthetic lethality and identification of treatment response biomarkers will be critical for the success of synthetic lethality anticancer therapy.

  11. An anthrax subunit vaccine candidate based on protective regions of Bacillus anthracis protective antigen and lethal factor.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Les W; Huwar, Theresa B; Moore, Stephen; Mellado-Sanchez, Gabriela; Rodriguez, Liliana; Neeson, Brendan N; Flick-Smith, Helen C; Jenner, Dominic C; Atkins, Helen S; Ingram, Rebecca J; Altmann, Danny M; Nataro, James P; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2010-09-24

    Studies have confirmed the key role of Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) in the US and UK human anthrax vaccines. However, given the tripartite nature of the toxin, other components, including lethal factor (LF), are also likely to contribute to protection. We examined the antibody and T cell responses to PA and LF in human volunteers immunized with the UK anthrax vaccine (AVP). Individual LF domains were assessed for immunogenicity in mice when given alone or with PA. Based on the results obtained, a novel fusion protein comprising D1 of LF and the host cell-binding domain of PA (D4) was assessed for protective efficacy. Murine protection studies demonstrated that both full-length LF and D1 of LF conferred complete protection against a lethal intraperitoneal challenge with B. anthracis STI spores. Subsequent studies with the LFD1-PAD4 fusion protein showed a similar level of protection. LF is immunogenic in humans and is likely to contribute to the protection stimulated by AVP. A single vaccine comprising protective regions from LF and PA would simplify production and confer a broader spectrum of protection than that seen with PA alone. PMID:20691267

  12. An anthrax subunit vaccine candidate based on protective regions of Bacillus anthracis protective antigen and lethal factor.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Les W; Huwar, Theresa B; Moore, Stephen; Mellado-Sanchez, Gabriela; Rodriguez, Liliana; Neeson, Brendan N; Flick-Smith, Helen C; Jenner, Dominic C; Atkins, Helen S; Ingram, Rebecca J; Altmann, Danny M; Nataro, James P; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2010-09-24

    Studies have confirmed the key role of Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) in the US and UK human anthrax vaccines. However, given the tripartite nature of the toxin, other components, including lethal factor (LF), are also likely to contribute to protection. We examined the antibody and T cell responses to PA and LF in human volunteers immunized with the UK anthrax vaccine (AVP). Individual LF domains were assessed for immunogenicity in mice when given alone or with PA. Based on the results obtained, a novel fusion protein comprising D1 of LF and the host cell-binding domain of PA (D4) was assessed for protective efficacy. Murine protection studies demonstrated that both full-length LF and D1 of LF conferred complete protection against a lethal intraperitoneal challenge with B. anthracis STI spores. Subsequent studies with the LFD1-PAD4 fusion protein showed a similar level of protection. LF is immunogenic in humans and is likely to contribute to the protection stimulated by AVP. A single vaccine comprising protective regions from LF and PA would simplify production and confer a broader spectrum of protection than that seen with PA alone.

  13. GUY1 confers complete female lethality and is a strong candidate for a male-determining factor in Anopheles stephensi

    PubMed Central

    Criscione, Frank; Qi, Yumin; Tu, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    Despite their importance in sexual differentiation and reproduction, Y chromosome genes are rarely described because they reside in repeat-rich regions that are difficult to study. Here, we show that Guy1, a unique Y chromosome gene of a major urban malaria mosquito Anopheles stephensi, confers 100% female lethality when placed on the autosomes. We show that the small GUY1 protein (56 amino acids in length) causes female lethality and that males carrying the transgene are reproductively more competitive than their non-transgenic siblings under laboratory conditions. The GUY1 protein is a primary signal from the Y chromosome that affects embryonic development in a sex-specific manner. Our results have demonstrated, for the first time in mosquitoes, the feasibility of stable transgenic manipulation of sex ratios using an endogenous gene from the male-determining chromosome. These results provide insights into the elusive M factor and suggest exciting opportunities to reduce mosquito populations and disease transmission. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19281.001 PMID:27644420

  14. Prediction of protein-peptide interactions: application of the XPairIt API to anthrax lethal factor and substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Margaret M.; Sellers, Michael S.

    2013-05-01

    As software and methodology develop, key aspects of molecular interactions such as detailed energetics and flexibility are continuously better represented in docking simulations. In the latest iteration of the XPairIt API and Docking Protocol, we perform a blind dock of a peptide into the cleavage site of the Anthrax lethal factor (LF) metalloprotein. Molecular structures are prepared from RCSB:1JKY and we demonstrate a reasonably accurate docked peptide through analysis of protein motion and, using NCI Plot, visualize and characterize the forces leading to binding. We compare our docked structure to the 1JKY crystal structure and the more recent 1PWV structure, and discuss both captured and overlooked interactions. Our results offer a more detailed look at secondary contact and show that both van der Waals and electrostatic interactions from peptide residues further from the enzyme's catalytic site are significant.

  15. Probing the S2' Subsite of the Anthrax Toxin Lethal Factor Using Novel N-Alkylated Hydroxamates.

    PubMed

    Kurbanov, Elbek K; Chiu, Ting-Lan; Solberg, Jonathan; Francis, Subhashree; Maize, Kimberly M; Fernandez, Jenna; Johnson, Rodney L; Hawkinson, Jon E; Walters, Michael A; Finzel, Barry C; Amin, Elizabeth Ambrose

    2015-11-12

    The lethal factor (LF) enzyme secreted by Bacillus anthracis is a zinc hydrolase that is chiefly responsible for anthrax-related cell death. Although many studies of the design of small molecule LF inhibitors have been conducted, no LF inhibitor is yet available as a therapeutic agent. Inhibitors with considerable chemical diversity have been developed and investigated; however, the LF S2' subsite has not yet been systematically explored as a potential target for lead optimization. Here we present synthesis, experimental evaluation, modeling, and structural biology for a novel series of sulfonamide hydroxamate LF inhibitor analogues specifically designed to extend into, and probe chemical preferences of, this S2' subsite. We discovered that this region accommodates a wide variety of chemical functionalities and that a broad selection of ligand structural modifications directed to this area can be incorporated without significant deleterious alterations in biological activity. We also identified key residues in this subsite that can potentially be targeted to improve inhibitor binding.

  16. Engineered epidermal growth factor mutants with faster binding on-rates correlate with enhanced receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Lahti, Jennifer L.; Lui, Bertrand H.; Beck, Stayce E.; Lee, Stephen S.; Ly, Daphne P.; Longaker, Michael T.; Yang, George P.; Cochran, Jennifer R.

    2011-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) regulate critical cell signaling pathways, yet the properties of their cognate ligands that influence receptor activation are not fully understood. There is great interest in parsing these complex ligand-receptor relationships using engineered proteins with altered binding properties. Here we focus on the interaction between two engineered epidermal growth factor (EGF) mutants and the EGF receptor (EGFR), a model member of the RTK superfamily. We found that EGF mutants with faster kinetic on-rates stimulate increased EGFR activation compared to wild-type EGF. These findings support previous predictions that faster association rates correlate with enhanced receptor activity. PMID:21439278

  17. [The screening of mutants induced by physical and chemical factors and construction of mutant population for Brassica napus L].

    PubMed

    Sun, Jia-Yan; Tu, Jin-Dong; Fan, Shu-Wei; Wu, Jian-Guo; Shi, Chun-Hai

    2007-04-01

    The mature seeds of rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) from variety Gaoyou 605 were treated with g-rays and Ethyl Methan Sulfonate (EMS). 152 mutants (12.67% of M2 population) with mutative traits, including the mutation of leaf color, leaf shape, plant height, number and angle of branches, diameter of main stalk, color of stalk and flower, number and size of petals, pistil shape, male sterility, bud death and date of bloom were found in screened M2 progenies, which have been identified in M3. The mutants of cotyledon and root traits were also screened by hydroponics culture and their total mutant frequency were estimated at 12.78% and 7.07% in M3, respectively. Identification of M4 showed that these mutations could be inherited stably. The mutant library including the mutants of leaf, plant-type, flower, cotyledon, root and physiological traits had been built in present experiment. These mutants might be used as important germplasm for rapeseed breeding and functional genomics study.

  18. Enhanced protective antibody to a mutant meningococcal factor H-binding protein with low-factor H binding.

    PubMed

    Granoff, Dan M; Giuntini, Serena; Gowans, Flor A; Lujan, Eduardo; Sharkey, Kelsey; Beernink, Peter T

    2016-01-01

    Meningococcal factor H-binding protein (FHbp) is an antigen in 2 serogroup B meningococcal vaccines. FHbp specifically binds human and some nonhuman primate complement FH. To investigate the effect of binding of FH to FHbp on protective antibody responses, we immunized infant rhesus macaques with either a control recombinant FHbp antigen that bound macaque FH or a mutant antigen with 2 amino acid substitutions and >250-fold lower affinity for FH. The mutant antigen elicited 3-fold higher serum IgG anti-FHbp titers and up to 15-fold higher serum bactericidal titers than the control FHbp vaccine. When comparing sera with similar IgG anti-FHbp titers, the antibodies elicited by the mutant antigen gave greater deposition of complement component C4b on live meningococci (classical complement pathway) and inhibited binding of FH, while the anti-FHbp antibodies elicited by the control vaccine enhanced FH binding. Thus, the mutant FHbp vaccine elicited an anti-FHbp antibody repertoire directed at FHbp epitopes within the FH binding site, which resulted in greater protective activity than the antibodies elicited by the control vaccine, which targeted FHbp epitopes outside of the FH combining site. Binding of a host protein to a vaccine antigen impairs protective antibody responses, which can be overcome with low-binding mutant antigens. PMID:27668287

  19. Enhanced protective antibody to a mutant meningococcal factor H-binding protein with low-factor H binding

    PubMed Central

    Granoff, Dan M.; Giuntini, Serena; Gowans, Flor A.; Lujan, Eduardo; Sharkey, Kelsey; Beernink, Peter T.

    2016-01-01

    Meningococcal factor H-binding protein (FHbp) is an antigen in 2 serogroup B meningococcal vaccines. FHbp specifically binds human and some nonhuman primate complement FH. To investigate the effect of binding of FH to FHbp on protective antibody responses, we immunized infant rhesus macaques with either a control recombinant FHbp antigen that bound macaque FH or a mutant antigen with 2 amino acid substitutions and >250-fold lower affinity for FH. The mutant antigen elicited 3-fold higher serum IgG anti-FHbp titers and up to 15-fold higher serum bactericidal titers than the control FHbp vaccine. When comparing sera with similar IgG anti-FHbp titers, the antibodies elicited by the mutant antigen gave greater deposition of complement component C4b on live meningococci (classical complement pathway) and inhibited binding of FH, while the anti-FHbp antibodies elicited by the control vaccine enhanced FH binding. Thus, the mutant FHbp vaccine elicited an anti-FHbp antibody repertoire directed at FHbp epitopes within the FH binding site, which resulted in greater protective activity than the antibodies elicited by the control vaccine, which targeted FHbp epitopes outside of the FH combining site. Binding of a host protein to a vaccine antigen impairs protective antibody responses, which can be overcome with low-binding mutant antigens. PMID:27668287

  20. Enhanced protective antibody to a mutant meningococcal factor H-binding protein with low-factor H binding

    PubMed Central

    Granoff, Dan M.; Giuntini, Serena; Gowans, Flor A.; Lujan, Eduardo; Sharkey, Kelsey; Beernink, Peter T.

    2016-01-01

    Meningococcal factor H-binding protein (FHbp) is an antigen in 2 serogroup B meningococcal vaccines. FHbp specifically binds human and some nonhuman primate complement FH. To investigate the effect of binding of FH to FHbp on protective antibody responses, we immunized infant rhesus macaques with either a control recombinant FHbp antigen that bound macaque FH or a mutant antigen with 2 amino acid substitutions and >250-fold lower affinity for FH. The mutant antigen elicited 3-fold higher serum IgG anti-FHbp titers and up to 15-fold higher serum bactericidal titers than the control FHbp vaccine. When comparing sera with similar IgG anti-FHbp titers, the antibodies elicited by the mutant antigen gave greater deposition of complement component C4b on live meningococci (classical complement pathway) and inhibited binding of FH, while the anti-FHbp antibodies elicited by the control vaccine enhanced FH binding. Thus, the mutant FHbp vaccine elicited an anti-FHbp antibody repertoire directed at FHbp epitopes within the FH binding site, which resulted in greater protective activity than the antibodies elicited by the control vaccine, which targeted FHbp epitopes outside of the FH combining site. Binding of a host protein to a vaccine antigen impairs protective antibody responses, which can be overcome with low-binding mutant antigens.

  1. Structure, expression, and chromosome location of the gene for the beta subunit of brain-specific Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II identified by transgene integration in an embryonic lethal mouse mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Karls, U; Müller, U; Gilbert, D J; Copeland, N G; Jenkins, N A; Harbers, K

    1992-01-01

    The transgenic mouse strain CAT40 carries in its germ line one copy of a DNA construct consisting of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene and the immunoglobulin heavy-chain enhancer. We show that transgene integration has resulted in a recessive lethal mutation that leads to death of homozygous CAT40 embryos shortly after implantation. The transgene has integrated adjacent to the 3' end of the gene coding for the beta subunit of the brain-specific Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (Camk-2). The complete cDNA sequence of the Camk-2 gene and most of its exon/intron structure was determined. The deduced amino acid sequence is highly homologous to the previously described rat protein. The chromosomal location of the Camk-2 locus was mapped by interspecific backcross analysis to the proximal region of mouse chromosome 11. This region lacks previously identified recessive embryonic lethal mutations. During embryonic development, Camk-2-specific transcripts are first seen in the head section of 12.5-day-old embryos, and in adult mice the gene is expressed almost exclusively in the brain. Although transcription of the Camk-2 gene in heterozygous CAT40 mice is affected by transgene integration, it is unlikely that this gene is responsible for the mutant phenotype, since it is not expressed in blastocysts and the first transcripts during normal development are detected after the death of homozygous CAT40 embryos. Transgene integration is accompanied by a large deletion of cellular DNA; death is therefore most likely caused by the loss of a gene or genes that are important for early postimplantation development. Images PMID:1321343

  2. Constitutive asymmetric dimerization drives oncogenic activation of epidermal growth factor receptor carboxyl-terminal deletion mutants

    PubMed Central

    Park, Angela K.J.; Francis, Joshua M.; Park, Woong-Yang; Park, Joon-Oh; Cho, Jeonghee

    2015-01-01

    Genomic alterations targeting the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) gene have been strongly associated with cancer pathogenesis. The clinical effectiveness of EGFR targeted therapies, including small molecules directed against the kinase domain such as gefitinib, erlotinib and afatinib, have been proven successful in treating non-small cell lung cancer patients with tumors harboring EGFR kinase domain mutations. Recent large-scale genomic studies in glioblastoma and lung cancer have identified an additional class of oncogenic mutations caused by the intragenic deletion of carboxy-terminal coding regions. Here, we report that combinations of exonic deletions of exon 25 to 28 lead to the oncogenic activation of EGF receptor in the absence of ligand and consequent cellular transformation, indicating a significant role of C-terminal domain in modulating EGFR activation. Furthermore, we show that the oncogenic activity of the resulting C-terminal deletion mutants are efficiently inhibited by EGFR-targeted drugs including erlotinib, afatinib, dacomitinib as well as cetuximab, expanding the therapeutic rationale of cancer genome-based EGFR targeted approaches. Finally, in vivo and in vitro preclinical studies demonstrate that constitutive asymmetric dimerization in mutant EGFR is a key mechanism for oncogenic activation and tumorigenesis by C-terminal deletion mutants. Therefore, our data provide compelling evidence for oncogenic activation of C-terminal deletion mutants at the molecular level and we propose that C-terminal deletion status of EGFR can be considered as a potential genomic marker for EGFR-targeted therapy. PMID:25826094

  3. Non-lethal assessment of freshwater mussel physiological response to changes in environmental factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fritts, Andrea K.; Peterson, James T.; Wisniewski, Jason M.; Bringolf, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    The development of effective nonlethal biomonitoring techniques is imperative for the preservation of imperiled freshwater mussel populations. Changes in hemolymph chemistry profiles and tissue glycogen are potential biomarkers for nonlethally monitoring stress in mussels. We sampled three species in the Flint River Basin over 2 years to evaluate how these hemolymph and tissue biomarkers responded to environmental changes. We used hierarchical linear models to evaluate the relationships between variation in the biomarkers and environmental factors and found that the responses of the hemolymph and tissue parameters were strongly related to stream discharge. Shifts in alanine aminotransferase and glycogen showed the largest relations with discharge at the time of sampling, while magnesium levels were most explained by the discharge for 5 days prior to sampling. Aspartate aminotransferase, bicarbonate, and calcium showed the strongest relations with mean discharge for 15 days prior to sampling. The modeling results indicated that biomarker responses varied substantially among individuals of different size, sex, and species and illustrated the value of hierarchical modeling techniques to account for the inherent complexity of aquatic ecosystems.

  4. Development of a Cell-Based Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Reporter for Bacillus anthracis Lethal Factor Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, R H; Steenblock, E R; Camarero, J A

    2007-03-22

    We report the construction of a cell-based fluorescent reporter for anthrax lethal factor (LF) protease activity using the principle of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). This was accomplished by engineering an Escherichia coli cell line to express a genetically encoded FRET reporter and LF protease. Both proteins were encoded in two different expression plasmids under the control of different tightly controlled inducible promoters. The FRET-based reporter was designed to contain a LF recognition sequence flanked by the FRET pair formed by CyPet and YPet fluorescent proteins. The length of the linker between both fluorescent proteins was optimized using a flexible peptide linker containing several Gly-Gly-Ser repeats. Our results indicate that this FRET-based LF reporter was readily expressed in E. coli cells showing high levels of FRET in vivo in the absence of LF. The FRET signal, however, decreased 5 times after inducing LF expression in the same cell. These results suggest that this cell-based LF FRET reporter may be used to screen genetically encoded libraries in vivo against LF.

  5. NMR conformational properties of an Anthrax Lethal Factor domain studied by multiple amino acid-selective labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Vourtsis, Dionysios J.; Chasapis, Christos T.; Pairas, George; Bentrop, Detlef; Spyroulias, Georgios A.

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • A polypeptide, N-ALF{sub 233}, was overexpressed in E. coli and successfully isolated. • We produced {sup 2}H/{sup 15}N/{sup 13}C labeled protein samples. • Amino acid selective approaches were applied. • We acquired several heteronuclear NMR spectra, to complete the backbone assignment. • Prediction of the secondary structure was performed. - Abstract: NMR-based structural biology urgently needs cost- and time-effective methods to assist both in the process of acquiring high-resolution NMR spectra and their subsequent analysis. Especially for bigger proteins (>20 kDa) selective labeling is a frequently used means of sequence-specific assignment. In this work we present the successful overexpression of a polypeptide of 233 residues, corresponding to the structured part of the N-terminal domain of Anthrax Lethal Factor, using Escherichia coli expression system. The polypeptide was subsequently isolated in pure, soluble form and analyzed structurally by solution NMR spectroscopy. Due to the non-satisfying quality and resolution of the spectra of this 27 kDa protein, an almost complete backbone assignment became feasible only by the combination of uniform and novel amino acid-selective labeling schemes. Moreover, amino acid-type selective triple-resonance NMR experiments proved to be very helpful.

  6. The cooperative effects of TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma are determining factors in the ability of IL-10 to protect mice from lethal endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Smith, S R; Terminelli, C; Kenworthy-Bott, L; Calzetta, A; Donkin, J

    1994-06-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that interleukin-10 (IL-10) has the capacity to protect mice from the lethal effects of endotoxin. In this investigation, we have examined the ability of IL-10 to protect both normal mice and Corynebacterium parvum-primed mice against endotoxin lethality. In the overwhelming majority of experiments, recombinant murine IL-10 (rMuIL-10) and recombinant human IL-10 (rHuIL-10) did not protect normal BALB/cJ mice from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lethality at doses up to 10 micrograms/mouse. Despite their inability to protect, both IL-10 preparations were highly effective in preventing the increase in serum tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) that occurred in response to the lethal dose of LPS. Moreover, a neutralizing antibody against TNF-alpha gave only partial protection when administered alone to BALB/cJ mice. Treatment with a combination of neutralizing antibodies against TNF-alpha and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) resulted in complete protection. In contrast to BALB/cJ mice, normal BDF1 mice were protected from lethal endotoxemia by treatment with both rMuIL-10 and rHuIL-10. However, IL-10 did not protect C. parvum-primed BDF1 against LPS lethality even though it caused a reduction in the LPS-induced serum TNF-alpha response in C. parvum-primed mice as well as in normal BDF1 mice. Neutralizing antibodies against TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma were protective when administered alone to normal BDF1 mice, as previously demonstrated in C. parvum-primed mice. These findings suggest that lethal endotoxemia is a result of the cooperative activities of TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma in normal mice of the BALB/cJ and BDF1 strains as well as in C. parvum-primed BDF1 mice. IL-10 appears to be less effective in protecting mice from lethal endotoxemia when cooperation between IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha is facilitated by high-level production of the cytokines as in C. parvum-primed mice or when there is evidence of strong synergy between them as in normal

  7. A mutant epidermal growth factor receptor common in human glioma confers enhanced tumorigenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, R; Ji, X D; Harmon, R C; Lazar, C S; Gill, G N; Cavenee, W K; Huang, H J

    1994-01-01

    The development and neoplastic progression of human astrocytic tumors appears to result through an accumulation of genetic alterations occurring in a relatively defined order. One such alteration is amplification of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene. This episomal amplification occurs in 40-50% of glioblastomas, which also normally express endogenous receptors. Moreover, a significant fraction of amplified genes are rearranged to specifically eliminate a DNA fragment containing exons 2-7 of the gene, resulting in an in-frame deletion of 801 bp of the coding sequence of the extracellular domain. Here we used retroviral transfer of such a mutant receptor (de 2-7 EGFR) into glioblastoma cells expressing normal endogenous receptors to test whether the mutant receptor was able to augment their growth and malignancy. Western blotting analysis showed that these cells expressed endogenous EGFR of 170 kDa as well as the exogenous de 2-7 EGFR of 140-155 kDa. Although holo-EGFRs were phosphorylated on tyrosine residues only after exposure of the cells to ligand, de 2-7 EGFRs were constitutively phosphorylated. In tissue culture neither addition of EGF nor expression of the mutant EGFR affected the rate of cell growth. However, when cells expressing mutant EGFR were implanted into nude mice subcutaneously or intracerebrally, tumorigenic capacity was greatly enhanced. These results suggest that a tumor-specific alteration of the EGFR plays a significant role in tumor progression perhaps by influencing interactions of tumor cells with their microenvironment in ways not easily assayed in vitro. Images PMID:8052651

  8. Three dimensional structure of the anthrax toxin translocon–lethal factor complex by cryo-electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gogol, E P; Akkaladevi, N; Szerszen, L; Mukherjee, S; Chollet-Hinton, L; Katayama, H; Pentelute, B L; Collier, R J; Fisher, M T

    2013-01-01

    We have visualized by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) the complex of the anthrax protective antigen (PA) translocon and the N-terminal domain of anthrax lethal factor (LFN) inserted into a nanodisc model lipid bilayer. We have determined the structure of this complex at a nominal resolution of 16 Å by single-particle analysis and three-dimensional reconstruction. Consistent with our previous analysis of negatively stained unliganded PA, the translocon comprises a globular structure (cap) separated from the nanodisc bilayer by a narrow stalk that terminates in a transmembrane channel (incompletely distinguished in this reconstruction). The globular cap is larger than the unliganded PA pore, probably due to distortions introduced in the previous negatively stained structures. The cap exhibits larger, more distinct radial protrusions, previously identified with PA domain three, fitted by elements of the NMFF PA prepore crystal structure. The presence of LFN, though not distinguished due to the seven-fold averaging used in the reconstruction, contributes to the distinct protrusions on the cap rim volume distal to the membrane. Furthermore, the lumen of the cap region is less resolved than the unliganded negatively stained PA, due to the low contrast obtained in our images of this specimen. Presence of the LFN extended helix and N terminal unstructured regions may also contribute to this additional internal density within the interior of the cap. Initial NMFF fitting of the cryoEM-defined PA pore cap region positions the Phe clamp region of the PA pore translocon directly above an internal vestibule, consistent with its role in toxin translocation. PMID:23494942

  9. Type I interferon mimetics bypass vaccinia virus decoy receptor virulence factor for protection of mice against lethal infection.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Chulbul M; Johnson, Howard M

    2014-08-01

    The canonical model of interferon (IFN) signaling focuses solely on the activation of STAT transcription factors which, according to the model, are initiated by the singular event of cross-linkage of the receptor extracellular domain by the IFN. The IFN has no further function beyond this. The model thus provides no approach to circumventing poxviruses decoy receptors that compete with the IFN receptors for IFNs. This simple event has allowed smallpox virus to decimate human populations throughout the ages. We have developed a noncanonical model of IFN signaling that has resulted in the development of small peptide mimetics to both types I and II IFNs. In this report, we focus on a type I IFN mimetic at positions 152 to 189, IFN-α1(152-189), which corresponds to the C terminus of human IFN-α1. This mimetic functions intracellularly and is thus not recognized by the B18R vaccinia virus decoy receptor. Mimetic synthesized with an attached palmitate (lipo-) for cell penetration protects mice from a lethal dose of vaccinia virus, while the parent IFN-α1 is ineffective. Unlike IFN-α1, the mimetic does not bind to the B18R decoy receptor. It further differs from the parent IFN in that it lacks the toxicity of weight loss and bone marrow suppression in mice while at the same time possessing a strong adjuvant effect on the immune system. The mimetic is thus an innate and adaptive immune regulator that is evidence of the dynamic nature of the noncanonical model of IFN signaling, in stark contrast to the canonical or classical model of signaling.

  10. Mutagenesis of Propionibacterium acnes and analysis of two CAMP factor knock-out mutants.

    PubMed

    Sörensen, Meike; Mak, Tim N; Hurwitz, Robert; Ogilvie, Lesley A; Mollenkopf, Hans J; Meyer, Thomas F; Brüggemann, Holger

    2010-11-01

    P. acnes is a skin commensal that is frequently associated with inflammatory diseases such as acne vulgaris. Despite the availability of the genome sequence functional studies on P. acnes are scarce due to a lack of methods for genetic manipulation of this bacterium. Here we present an insertional mutagenesis approach for the inactivation of specific P. acnes genes. The gene of interest can be disrupted and replaced with an erythromycin-resistance cassette by employing homologous recombination. We used this method to generate knock-out mutants of camp2 (PPA0687) and camp4 (PPA1231), encoding CAMP factor homologs with predicted co-hemolytic activities. The successful inactivation of the two genes was confirmed by PCR and Western blotting experiments using specific anti-CAMP2/CAMP4 sera. The Δcamp2 but not the Δcamp4 mutant exhibited reduced hemolytic activity in the CAMP reaction with sheep erythrocytes, indicating that CAMP2 is the major active co-hemolytic factor of P. acnes. The biological relevance of the CAMP factors remains unclear as disruption of camp2 or camp4 did not significantly alter the transcriptome response of HaCaT cells to P. acnes. The here presented insertional mutagenesis approach will facilitate future studies on P. acnes.

  11. Programmed Cell Death in the Leaves of the Arabidopsis Spontaneous Necrotic Spots (sns-D) Mutant Correlates with Increased Expression of the Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor eIF4B2

    PubMed Central

    Gaussand, Gwénaël M. D. J.-M.; Jia, Qi; van der Graaff, Eric; Lamers, Gerda E. M.; Fransz, Paul F.; Hooykaas, Paul J. J.; de Pater, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    From a pool of transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants harboring an activator T-DNA construct, one mutant was identified that developed spontaneous necrotic spots (sns-D) on the rosette leaves under aseptic conditions. The sns-D mutation is dominant and homozygous plants are embryo lethal. The mutant produced smaller rosettes with a different number of stomata than the wild-type. DNA fragmentation in the nuclei of cells in the necrotic spots and a significant increase of caspase-3 and caspase-6 like activities in sns-D leaf extracts indicated that the sns-D mutation caused programmed cell death (PCD). The integration of the activator T-DNA caused an increase of the expression level of At1g13020, which encodes the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4B2. The expression level of eIF4B2 was positively correlated with the severity of sns-D mutant phenotype. Overexpression of the eIF4B2 cDNA mimicked phenotypic traits of the sns-D mutant indicating that the sns-D mutant phenotype is indeed caused by activation tagging of eIF4B2. Thus, incorrect regulation of translation initiation may result in PCD. PMID:22639576

  12. Staphylococcus aureus Formyl-Methionyl Transferase Mutants Demonstrate Reduced Virulence Factor Production and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Thomas; Huang, Jianzhong; Fan, Frank; Rogers, Shannon; Gentry, Daniel; Holland, Reannon; DeMarsh, Peter; Zalacain, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitors of peptide deformylase (PDF) represent a new class of antibacterial agents with a novel mechanism of action. Mutations that inactivate formyl methionyl transferase (FMT), the enzyme that formylates initiator methionyl-tRNA, lead to an alternative initiation of protein synthesis that does not require deformylation and are the predominant cause of resistance to PDF inhibitors in Staphylococcus aureus. Here, we report that loss-of-function mutations in FMT impart pleiotropic effects that include a reduced growth rate, a nonhemolytic phenotype, and a drastic reduction in production of multiple extracellular proteins, including key virulence factors, such as α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), that have been associated with S. aureus pathogenicity. Consequently, S. aureus FMT mutants are greatly attenuated in neutropenic and nonneutropenic murine pyelonephritis infection models and show very high survival rates compared with wild-type S. aureus. These newly discovered effects on extracellular virulence factor production demonstrate that FMT-null mutants have a more severe fitness cost than previously anticipated, leading to a substantial loss of pathogenicity and a restricted ability to produce an invasive infection. PMID:23571548

  13. Staphylococcus aureus formyl-methionyl transferase mutants demonstrate reduced virulence factor production and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Thomas; Huang, Jianzhong; Fan, Frank; Rogers, Shannon; Gentry, Daniel; Holland, Reannon; Demarsh, Peter; Aubart, Kelly; Zalacain, Magdalena

    2013-07-01

    Inhibitors of peptide deformylase (PDF) represent a new class of antibacterial agents with a novel mechanism of action. Mutations that inactivate formyl methionyl transferase (FMT), the enzyme that formylates initiator methionyl-tRNA, lead to an alternative initiation of protein synthesis that does not require deformylation and are the predominant cause of resistance to PDF inhibitors in Staphylococcus aureus. Here, we report that loss-of-function mutations in FMT impart pleiotropic effects that include a reduced growth rate, a nonhemolytic phenotype, and a drastic reduction in production of multiple extracellular proteins, including key virulence factors, such as α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), that have been associated with S. aureus pathogenicity. Consequently, S. aureus FMT mutants are greatly attenuated in neutropenic and nonneutropenic murine pyelonephritis infection models and show very high survival rates compared with wild-type S. aureus. These newly discovered effects on extracellular virulence factor production demonstrate that FMT-null mutants have a more severe fitness cost than previously anticipated, leading to a substantial loss of pathogenicity and a restricted ability to produce an invasive infection.

  14. T cell-mediated lethal shock triggered in mice by the superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin B: critical role of tumor necrosis factor

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Because mice are more resistant than humans to the pathogenic effects of bacterial toxins, we used D-Galactosamine- (D-Gal) sensitized mice as a model system to evaluate potential toxic shock symptoms triggered by the superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB). We show that similar to endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) [LPS], the exotoxin SEB causes lethal shock within 8 h in D-Gal-sensitized mice, inducing 100% and about 50% lethality with 20 and 2 micrograms SEB, respectively. The lethal shock triggered by the superantigen SEB is mediated by T cells, a conclusion based on the observation that T cell repopulation of SCID mice conferred sensitivity to SEB. Since CSA also conferred protection, the role of T cell-derived lymphokines in mediating lethal shock was evaluated. Within 30-60 min after SEB injection, serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF) levels peaked, followed immediately by interleukin-2 (IL- 2). Serum-borne lymphokines were detected well in advance of signs of T cell activation, as assessed by IL-2 receptor expression of SEB- reactive V beta 8+ T cells. Passive immunization with anti-TNF- alpha/beta-neutralizing monoclonal antibody also conferred protection, indicating that it is TNF which is critical for initiating toxic shock symptoms. Taken together, this study defines basic differences between endotoxin (LPS)- and exotoxin (SEB)-mediated lethal shock, in that the former is mediated by macrophages and the latter by T cells. Yet the pathogenesis distal to the lymphokine/cytokine-producing cells appears surprisingly similar in that TNF represents a key mediator in inducing shock. PMID:1730929

  15. The Activating Transcription Factor 3 Protein Suppresses the Oncogenic Function of Mutant p53 Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Saisai; Wang, Hongbo; Lu, Chunwan; Malmut, Sarah; Zhang, Jianqiao; Ren, Shumei; Yu, Guohua; Wang, Wei; Tang, Dale D.; Yan, Chunhong

    2014-01-01

    Mutant p53 proteins (mutp53) often acquire oncogenic activities, conferring drug resistance and/or promoting cancer cell migration and invasion. Although it has been well established that such a gain of function is mainly achieved through interaction with transcriptional regulators, thereby modulating cancer-associated gene expression, how the mutp53 function is regulated remains elusive. Here we report that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) bound common mutp53 (e.g. R175H and R273H) and, subsequently, suppressed their oncogenic activities. ATF3 repressed mutp53-induced NFKB2 expression and sensitized R175H-expressing cancer cells to cisplatin and etoposide treatments. Moreover, ATF3 appeared to suppress R175H- and R273H-mediated cancer cell migration and invasion as a consequence of preventing the transcription factor p63 from inactivation by mutp53. Accordingly, ATF3 promoted the expression of the metastasis suppressor SHARP1 in mutp53-expressing cells. An ATF3 mutant devoid of the mutp53-binding domain failed to disrupt the mutp53-p63 binding and, thus, lost the activity to suppress mutp53-mediated migration, suggesting that ATF3 binds to mutp53 to suppress its oncogenic function. In line with these results, we found that down-regulation of ATF3 expression correlated with lymph node metastasis in TP53-mutated human lung cancer. We conclude that ATF3 can suppress mutp53 oncogenic function, thereby contributing to tumor suppression in TP53-mutated cancer. PMID:24554706

  16. Enzymic degradation of plasma arginine using arginine deiminase inhibits nitric oxide production and protects mice from the lethal effects of tumour necrosis factor alpha and endotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, J Brandon; Holtsberg, Frederick W; Ensor, C Mark; Bomalaski, John S; Clark, Mike A

    2002-01-01

    Septic shock is mediated in part by nitric oxide (NO) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha). NO is synthesized primarily from extracellular arginine. We tested the ability of an arginine-degrading enzyme to inhibit NO production in mice and to protect mice from the hypotension and lethality that occur after the administration of TNFalpha or endotoxin. Treatment of BALB/c mice with arginine deiminase (ADI) formulated with succinimidyl succinimide polyethylene glycol of M(r) 20000 (ADI-SS PEG(20000)) eliminated all measurable plasma arginine (from normal levels of approximately 155 microM arginine to 2 microM). In addition, ADI-SS PEG(20000) also inhibited the production of NO, as quantified by plasma nitrate+nitrite. Treatment of mice with TNFalpha or endotoxin resulted in a dose-dependent increase in NO production and lethality. Pretreatment of mice with ADI-SS PEG(20000) resulted in increased resistance to the lethal effects of TNFalpha and endotoxin. These observations are consistent with NO production resulting, to some extent, from the metabolism of extracellular arginine. The toxic effects of TNFalpha and endotoxin may be partially inhibited by enzymic degradation of plasma arginine by ADI-SS PEG(20000). Interestingly, pretreatment with ADI-SS PEG(20000) did not inhibit the anti-tumour activity of TNFalpha in vitro or in vivo. This treatment may allow greater amounts of TNFalpha, as well as other cytokines, to be administered while abrogating side effects such as hypotension and death. PMID:11964159

  17. Mutant SOD1-expressing astrocytes release toxic factors that trigger motoneuron death by inducing hyperexcitability.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Elsa; Izaurieta, Pamela; Weiss, Alexandra; Mir, Franco R; Rojas, Patricio; Gonzalez, David; Rojas, Fabiola; Brown, Robert H; Madrid, Rodolfo; van Zundert, Brigitte

    2013-06-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating paralytic disorder caused by dysfunction and degeneration of motoneurons starting in adulthood. Recent studies using cell or animal models document that astrocytes expressing disease-causing mutations of human superoxide dismutase 1 (hSOD1) contribute to the pathogenesis of ALS by releasing a neurotoxic factor(s). Neither the mechanism by which this neurotoxic factor induces motoneuron death nor its cellular site of action has been elucidated. Here we show that acute exposure of primary wild-type spinal cord cultures to conditioned medium derived from astrocytes expressing mutant SOD1 (ACM-hSOD1(G93A)) increases persistent sodium inward currents (PC(Na)), repetitive firing, and intracellular calcium transients, leading to specific motoneuron death days later. In contrast to TTX, which paradoxically increased twofold the amplitude of calcium transients and killed motoneurons, reduction of hyperexcitability by other specific (mexiletine) and nonspecific (spermidine and riluzole) blockers of voltage-sensitive sodium (Na(v)) channels restored basal calcium transients and prevented motoneuron death induced by ACM-hSOD1(G93A). These findings suggest that riluzole, the only FDA-approved drug with known benefits for ALS patients, acts by inhibiting hyperexcitability. Together, our data document that a critical element mediating the non-cell-autonomous toxicity of ACM-hSOD1(G93A) on motoneurons is increased excitability, an observation with direct implications for therapy of ALS. PMID:23486205

  18. Perinatal lethal osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, W G; Dalgleish, R

    1995-01-01

    Perinatal lethal osteogenesis imperfecta is the result of heterozygous mutations of the COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes that encode the alpha 1(I) and alpha 2(I) chains of type I collagen, respectively. Point mutations resulting in the substitution of Gly residues in Gly-X-Y amino acid triplets of the triple helical domain of the alpha 1(I) or alpha 2(I) chains are the most frequent mutations. They interrupt the repetitive Gly-X-Y structure that is mandatory for the formation of a stable triple helix. Most babies have their own private de novo mutation. However, the recurrence rate is about 7% owing to germline mosaicism in one parent. The mutations act in a dominant negative manner as the mutant pro alpha chains are incorporated into type I procollagen molecules that also contain normal pro alpha chains. The abnormal molecules are poorly secreted, more susceptible to degradation, and impair the formation of the extracellular matrix. The collagen fibres are abnormally organised and mineralisation is impaired. The severity of the clinical phenotype appears to be related to the type of mutation, its location in the alpha chain, the surrounding amino acid sequences, and the level of expression of the mutant allele. Images PMID:7643358

  19. RAI1 Transcription Factor Activity Is Impaired in Mutants Associated with Smith-Magenis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Mora, Paulina; Canales, Cesar P.; Cao, Lei; Perez, Irene C.; Srivastava, Anand K.; Young, Juan I.; Walz, Katherina

    2012-01-01

    Smith-Magenis Syndrome (SMS) is a complex genomic disorder mostly caused by the haploinsufficiency of the Retinoic Acid Induced 1 gene (RAI1), located in the chromosomal region 17p11.2. In a subset of SMS patients, heterozygous mutations in RAI1 are found. Here we investigate the molecular properties of these mutated forms and their relationship with the resulting phenotype. We compared the clinical phenotype of SMS patients carrying a mutation in RAI1 coding region either in the N-terminal or the C-terminal half of the protein and no significant differences were found. In order to study the molecular mechanism related to these two groups of RAI1 mutations first we analyzed those mutations that result in the truncated protein corresponding to the N-terminal half of RAI1 finding that they have cytoplasmic localization (in contrast to full length RAI1) and no ability to activate the transcription through an endogenous target: the BDNF enhancer. Similar results were found in lymphoblastoid cells derived from a SMS patient carrying RAI1 c.3103insC, where both mutant and wild type products of RAI1 were detected. The wild type form of RAI1 was found in the chromatin bound and nuclear matrix subcellular fractions while the mutant product was mainly cytoplasmic. In addition, missense mutations at the C-terminal half of RAI1 presented a correct nuclear localization but no activation of the endogenous target. Our results showed for the first time a correlation between RAI1 mutations and abnormal protein function plus they suggest that a reduction of total RAI1 transcription factor activity is at the heart of the SMS clinical presentation. PMID:23028815

  20. Theories of Lethal Mutagenesis: From Error Catastrophe to Lethal Defection.

    PubMed

    Tejero, Héctor; Montero, Francisco; Nuño, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses get extinct in a process called lethal mutagenesis when subjected to an increase in their mutation rate, for instance, by the action of mutagenic drugs. Several approaches have been proposed to understand this phenomenon. The extinction of RNA viruses by increased mutational pressure was inspired by the concept of the error threshold. The now classic quasispecies model predicts the existence of a limit to the mutation rate beyond which the genetic information of the wild type could not be efficiently transmitted to the next generation. This limit was called the error threshold, and for mutation rates larger than this threshold, the quasispecies was said to enter into error catastrophe. This transition has been assumed to foster the extinction of the whole population. Alternative explanations of lethal mutagenesis have been proposed recently. In the first place, a distinction is made between the error threshold and the extinction threshold, the mutation rate beyond which a population gets extinct. Extinction is explained from the effect the mutation rate has, throughout the mutational load, on the reproductive ability of the whole population. Secondly, lethal defection takes also into account the effect of interactions within mutant spectra, which have been shown to be determinant for the understanding the extinction of RNA virus due to an augmented mutational pressure. Nonetheless, some relevant issues concerning lethal mutagenesis are not completely understood yet, as so survival of the flattest, i.e. the development of resistance to lethal mutagenesis by evolving towards mutationally more robust regions of sequence space, or sublethal mutagenesis, i.e., the increase of the mutation rate below the extinction threshold which may boost the adaptability of RNA virus, increasing their ability to develop resistance to drugs (including mutagens). A better design of antiviral therapies will still require an improvement of our knowledge about lethal

  1. Titration of cellular export factors, but not heteromultimerization, is the molecular mechanism of trans-dominant HTLV-1 rex mutants.

    PubMed

    Heger, P; Rosorius, O; Hauber, J; Stauber, R H

    1999-07-15

    The HTLV-1 Rex protein is an essential shuttle protein required for nuclear export of unspliced and incompletely-spliced viral RNAs. Several trans-dominant (TD) mutant Rex proteins have been reported, however, the mechanism of trans-dominance is not known. We compared TD Rex mutants and found that a natural occurring Rex mutant, Rexp21, lacking the RNA binding domain, was highly TD and inhibited also HIV-1 Rev function. Using fusions to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) we observed that Rexp21-GFP displayed a cytoplasmic localization but was actively shuttling between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in live human cells. The presence of Rexp21-GFP inhibited the nuclear export of Rex and HIV-1 Rev as assayed by cotransfection and microinjection experiments. However, Rex-GFP or Rexp21-GFP did not form heteromultimers with nuclear Rex mutants in vivo. In contrast, shuttling was essential for trans-dominance. Thus, we propose that TD Rex mutants do not function by retaining WT Rex in the nucleus by protein-protein interactions, as demonstrated for Rev, but to titrate factors essential for Rex/Rev export. Our findings demonstrate differences between the regulatory proteins Rex and Rev and implicate a novel strategy to generate highly TD Rex mutants also applicable to other proteins.

  2. Thiamine-auxotrophic mutants of Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0 are defective in cell-cell signaling and biocontrol factor expression.

    PubMed

    Dubuis, Christophe; Rolli, Joëlle; Lutz, Matthias; Défago, Geneviève; Haas, Dieter

    2006-04-01

    In the biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0, the Gac/Rsm signal transduction pathway positively controls the synthesis of antifungal secondary metabolites and exoenzymes. In this way, the GacS/GacA two-component system determines the expression of three small regulatory RNAs (RsmX, RsmY, and RsmZ) in a process activated by the strain's own signal molecules, which are not related to N-acyl-homoserine lactones. Transposon Tn5 was used to isolate P. fluorescens CHA0 insertion mutants that expressed an rsmZ-gfp fusion at reduced levels. Five of these mutants were gacS negative, and in them the gacS mutation could be complemented for exoproduct and signal synthesis by the gacS wild-type allele. Furthermore, two thiamine-auxotrophic (thiC) mutants that exhibited decreased signal synthesis in the presence of 5 x 10(-8) M thiamine were found. Under these conditions, a thiC mutant grew normally but showed reduced expression of the three small RNAs, the exoprotease AprA, and the antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol. In a gnotobiotic system, a thiC mutant was impaired for biological control of Pythium ultimum on cress. Addition of excess exogenous thiamine restored all deficiencies of the mutant. Thus, thiamine appears to be an important factor in the expression of biological control by P. fluorescens.

  3. Investigation of a panel of monoclonal antibodies and polyclonal sera against anthrax toxins resulted in identification of an anti-lethal factor antibody with disease-enhancing characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kulshreshtha, Parul; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Priyanka; Joon, Shikha; Sinha, Subrata; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2015-12-01

    Hybridomas were created using spleen of mice that were actively immunized with rLFn (recombinant N-terminal domain of lethal factor). Later on, separate group of mice were immunized with rLFn to obtain a polyclonal control for passive immunization studies of monoclonal antibodies. This led to the identification of one cohort of rLFn-immnized mice that harboured disease-enhancing polyclonal antibodies. At the same time, the monoclonal antibodies secreted by all the hybridomas were being tested. Two hybridomas secreted monoclonal antibodies (H10 and H8) that were cross-reactive with EF (edema factor) and LF (lethal factor), while the other two hybridomas secreted LF-specific antibodies (H7 and H11). Single chain variable fragment (LETscFv) was derived from H10 hybridoma. H11 was found to have disease-enhancing property. Combination of H11 with protective monoclonal antibodies (H8 and H10) reduced its disease enhancing nature. This in vitro abrogation of disease-enhancement provides the proof of concept that in polyclonal sera the disease enhancing character of a fraction of antibodies is overshadowed by the protective nature of the rest of the antibodies generated on active immunization.

  4. Factors influencing maternal behavior in the hubb/hubb mutant mouse.

    PubMed

    Alston-Mills, B; Parker, A C; Eisen, E J; Wilson, R; Fletcher, S

    We examined the maternal behavior of hubb/hubb mutant mice and normal control (+/hubb) siblings. From previous observations we noted that mutants groom their pups less, suckle less than normal, and often cannibalize the young. To date, these observations had not been quantified. Although prolactin (PRL) is linked to maternal behavior, it was difficult to measure because of the hyperirratibility of the mutant mice. Consequently, dopamine (DA) and its metabolite, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), were measured in the median eminence in brains of both normal and mutant mice. Tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-determining step in dopamine synthesis, was localized in the brain by immunohistochemistry. Five mutant and nine normal dams were observed for pup retrieval and crouching. Mean time for pup retrieval was slower (p < 0.06) for mutants (28.09 s) than for normal dams (18.49 s). Crouching was the same for both strains. Mutant pups were cold to the touch, and not well groomed. Brains from both strains were examined at Day 11 and Day 18 of gestation and Day 2 and Day 11 of lactation. Qualitatively, tyrosine hydroxylase localization in the arcuate nucleus and median eminence was the same in both strains for the gestation samples. The decrease in staining observed from gestation to lactation in the normal mice was increased in the mutants. Dopamine was similar in both strains at all stages, but DOPAC was significantly higher at early lactation in the mutants. We do not assume an absolute inverse relationship between dopaminergic activities and prolactin, but it is likely that the increase in DOPAC in the mutant reflects a decrease in prolactin, which could contribute to the diminished maternal care in the mutants. PMID:10627055

  5. GRP78(BiP) facilitates the cytosolic delivery of anthrax lethal factor (LF) in vivo and functions as an unfoldase in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tamayo, Alfred G; Slater, Louise; Taylor-Parker, Julian; Bharti, Ajit; Harrison, Robert; Hung, Deborah T; Murphy, John R

    2011-09-01

    Anthrax toxin is an A/B bacterial protein toxin which is composed of the enzymatically active Lethal Factor (LF) and/or Oedema Factor (EF) bound to Protective Antigen 63 (PA63) which functions as both the receptor binding and transmembrane domains. Once the toxin binds to its cell surface receptors it is internalized into the cell and traffics through Rab5- and Rab7-associated endosomal vesicles. Following acidification of the vesicle lumen, PA63 undergoes a dynamic change forming a beta-barrel that inserts into and forms a pore through the endosomal membrane. It is widely recognized that LF, and the related fusion protein LFnDTA, must be completely denatured in order to transit through the PA63 formed pore and enter the eukaryotic cell cytosol. We demonstrate by protease protection assays that the molecular chaperone GRP78 mediates the unfolding of LFnDTA and LF at neutral pH and thereby converts these proteins from a trypsin resistant to sensitive conformation. We have used immunoelectron microscopy and gold-labelled antibodies to demonstrate that both GRP78 and GRP94 chaperones are present in the lumen of endosomal vesicles. Finally, we have used siRNA to demonstrate that knock-down of GRP78 results in the emergence of resistance to anthrax lethal toxin and oedema toxin action. PMID:21797942

  6. Transcription of viral late genes is dependent on expression of the viral intermediate gene G8R in cells infected with an inducible conditional-lethal mutant vaccinia virus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Keck, J G; Moss, B

    1992-11-01

    There are three temporal classes of vaccinia virus genes: early, intermediate, and late. The object of this study was to determine the effects on virus replication of regulating the expression of G8R, an intermediate gene that encodes a late transcription factor. We inserted the lac operator adjacent to the RNA start site of the G8R gene in a recombinant vaccinia virus that constitutively expresses the Escherichia coli lac repressor to make expression of the G8R gene dependent on the inducer isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). In case repression would not be complete, we also weakened the promoter of the G8R gene by making a single-nucleotide substitution designed to reduce its basal level of transcription. The mutant virus replicated well in the presence of the inducer, although synthesis of the G8R-encoded 30,000-M(r) protein was only 10% of that of the wild-type virus. In the absence of IPTG, (i) synthesis of the G8R protein was inhibited by more than 99% relative to that of the wild-type virus, (ii) synthesis of early and intermediate mRNAs appeared to be unaffected, (iii) intermediate proteins accumulated to higher than normal levels, (iv) synthesis of late mRNA and protein was reduced by about 90%, (v) viral DNA was replicated but incompletely resolved concatemeric molecules accumulated, (vi) not even the earliest stages of virion assembly were detectable by transmission electron microscopy, and (vii) virus yield under one-step growth conditions and plaque formation were 10(-3) and 10(-4) times the wild-type values, respectively. The defect in late gene expression could be overcome by transfection of a G8R gene that was not under lac operator control, as well as by addition of IPTG, further demonstrating the specificity of the repression. The correlation between decreased expression of the G8R intermediate gene and inhibition of late mRNA synthesis is consistent with the notion that the G8R product serves as an essential late transcription factor

  7. Quorum sensing control of Type VI secretion factors restricts the proliferation of quorum-sensing mutants

    PubMed Central

    Majerczyk, Charlotte; Schneider, Emily; Greenberg, E Peter

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia thailandensis uses acyl-homoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing systems to regulate hundreds of genes. Here we show that cell-cell contact-dependent type VI secretion (T6S) toxin-immunity systems are among those activated by quorum sensing in B. thailandensis. We also demonstrate that T6S is required to constrain proliferation of quorum sensing mutants in colony cocultures of a BtaR1 quorum-sensing signal receptor mutant and its parent. However, the BtaR1 mutant is not constrained by and outcompetes its parent in broth coculture, presumably because no cell contact occurs and there is a metabolic cost associated with quorum sensing gene activation. The increased fitness of the wild type over the BtaR1 mutant during agar surface growth is dependent on an intact T6SS-1 apparatus. Thus, quorum sensing activates B. thailandensis T6SS-1 growth inhibition and this control serves to police and constrain quorum-sensing mutants. This work defines a novel role for T6SSs in intraspecies mutant control. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14712.001 PMID:27183270

  8. Quorum sensing control of Type VI secretion factors restricts the proliferation of quorum-sensing mutants.

    PubMed

    Majerczyk, Charlotte; Schneider, Emily; Greenberg, E Peter

    2016-05-16

    Burkholderia thailandensis uses acyl-homoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing systems to regulate hundreds of genes. Here we show that cell-cell contact-dependent type VI secretion (T6S) toxin-immunity systems are among those activated by quorum sensing in B. thailandensis. We also demonstrate that T6S is required to constrain proliferation of quorum sensing mutants in colony cocultures of a BtaR1 quorum-sensing signal receptor mutant and its parent. However, the BtaR1 mutant is not constrained by and outcompetes its parent in broth coculture, presumably because no cell contact occurs and there is a metabolic cost associated with quorum sensing gene activation. The increased fitness of the wild type over the BtaR1 mutant during agar surface growth is dependent on an intact T6SS-1 apparatus. Thus, quorum sensing activates B. thailandensis T6SS-1 growth inhibition and this control serves to police and constrain quorum-sensing mutants. This work defines a novel role for T6SSs in intraspecies mutant control.

  9. Factors Altering Pyruvate Excretion in a Glycogen Storage Mutant of the Cyanobacterium, Synechococcus PCC7942

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Phoebe J.; Purcell-Meyerink, Diane; Hocart, Charles H.; Truong, Thy T.; James, Gabriel O.; Rourke, Loraine; Djordjevic, Michael A.; Blackburn, Susan I.; Price, G. D.

    2016-01-01

    Interest in the production of carbon commodities from photosynthetically fixed CO2 has focused attention on cyanobacteria as a target for metabolic engineering and pathway investigation. We investigated the redirection of carbon flux in the model cyanobacterial species, Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, under nitrogen deprivation, for optimized production of the industrially desirable compound, pyruvate. Under nitrogen limited conditions, excess carbon is naturally stored as the multi-branched polysaccharide, glycogen, but a block in glycogen synthesis, via knockout mutation in the gene encoding ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (glgC), results in the accumulation of the organic acids, pyruvate and 2-oxoglutarate, as overflow excretions into the extracellular media. The ΔglgC strain, under 48 h of N-deprivation was shown to excrete pyruvate for the first time in this strain. Additionally, by increasing culture pH, to pH 10, it was possible to substantially elevate excretion of pyruvate, suggesting the involvement of an unknown substrate/proton symporter for export. The ΔglgC mutant was also engineered to express foreign transporters for glucose and sucrose, and then grown photomixotrophically with exogenous organic carbon supply, as added 5 mM glucose or sucrose during N- deprivation. Under these conditions we observed a fourfold increase in extracellular pyruvate excretion when glucose was added, and a smaller increase with added sucrose. Although the magnitude of pyruvate excretion did not correlate with the capacity of the ΔglgC strain for bicarbonate-dependent photosynthetic O2 evolution, or with light intensity, there was, however, a positive correlation observed between the density of the starter culture prior to N-deprivation and the final extracellular pyruvate concentration. The factors that contribute to enhancement of pyruvate excretion are discussed, as well as consideration of whether the source of carbon for pyruvate excretion might be derived from

  10. ETV/Pea3 family transcription factor-encoding genes are overexpressed in CIC-mutant oligodendrogliomas.

    PubMed

    Padul, Vijay; Epari, Sridhar; Moiyadi, Aliasgar; Shetty, Prakash; Shirsat, Neelam Vishwanath

    2015-12-01

    Oligodendrogliomas with combined loss of chromosome arms 1p and 19q are known to be particularly sensitive to chemotherapy, and the CIC gene located on 19q is known to be mutated in over 50% of the 1p/19q codeleted oligodendrogliomas. However, the role of CIC in the oligodendroglioma pathogenesis is not known. Exome sequencing of 11 oligodendroglial tumors identified 9 tumors with combined loss of 1p and 19q. Somatic mutations were found in the CIC and FUBP1 genes. Recurrent somatic mutations were also identified in the Notch signaling pathway genes NOTCH1 and MAML3, the chromatin modifying gene ARID1A and in KRAS. Comparison of the transcriptome profiles of CIC-mutant and CIC-wild type oligodendrogliomas from the study cohort as well as 65 1p/19q codeleted oligodendrogliomas from the TCGA cohort identified genes encoding the ETV transcription factor family to be significantly upregulated in the CIC-mutant tumors. Upregulation of a number of negative regulators of the receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathway like Sprouty and SPRED family members in the CIC-mutant oligodendrogliomas is likely due to the constitutive activation of the pathway resulting from inactive CIC protein. Higher expression of the oncogenic ETV transcription factors in the CIC-mutant oligodendrogliomas may make these tumors more aggressive than the CIC-wild type tumors.

  11. Lon Mutant of Brucella abortus Induces Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha in Murine J774.A1 Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sungdo; Choi, Young-Sill; Park, Sang-Hee; Kim, Young-Rok; Chu, Hyuk; Hwang, Kyu-Jam; Park, Mi-Yeoun

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to isolate a Brucella lon mutant and to analyze the cytokine response of B. lon mutant during macrophage infection. Methods A wild-type Brucella abortus strain was mutagenized by Tn5 transposition. From the mouse macrophage J774.A1 cells, total RNA was isolated at 0 hours, 6 hours, 12 hours, and 24 hours after infection with Brucella. Using mouse cytokine microarrays, we measured transcriptional levels of the cytokine response, and validated our results with a reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay to confirm the induction of cytokine messenger RNA (mRNA). Results In host J774.A1 macrophages, mRNA levels of T helper 1 (Th1)-type cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), interleukin-2 (IL-2), and IL-3, were significantly higher in the lon mutant compared to wild-type Brucella and the negative control. TNF-α levels in cell culture media were induced as high as 2 μg/mL after infection with the lon mutant, a greater than sixfold change. Conclusion In order to understand the role of the lon protein in virulence, we identified and characterized a novel B. lon mutant. We compared the immune response it generates to the wild-type Brucella response in a mouse macrophage cell line. We demonstrated that the B. lon mutants induce TNF-α expression from the host J774.A1 macrophage. PMID:24524018

  12. Anthrax lethal factor as an immune target in humans and transgenic mice and the impact of HLA polymorphism on CD4+ T cell immunity.

    PubMed

    Ascough, Stephanie; Ingram, Rebecca J; Chu, Karen K; Reynolds, Catherine J; Musson, Julie A; Doganay, Mehmet; Metan, Gökhan; Ozkul, Yusuf; Baillie, Les; Sriskandan, Shiranee; Moore, Stephen J; Gallagher, Theresa B; Dyson, Hugh; Williamson, E Diane; Robinson, John H; Maillere, Bernard; Boyton, Rosemary J; Altmann, Daniel M

    2014-05-01

    Bacillus anthracis produces a binary toxin composed of protective antigen (PA) and one of two subunits, lethal factor (LF) or edema factor (EF). Most studies have concentrated on induction of toxin-specific antibodies as the correlate of protective immunity, in contrast to which understanding of cellular immunity to these toxins and its impact on infection is limited. We characterized CD4+ T cell immunity to LF in a panel of humanized HLA-DR and DQ transgenic mice and in naturally exposed patients. As the variation in antigen presentation governed by HLA polymorphism has a major impact on protective immunity to specific epitopes, we examined relative binding affinities of LF peptides to purified HLA class II molecules, identifying those regions likely to be of broad applicability to human immune studies through their ability to bind multiple alleles. Transgenics differing only in their expression of human HLA class II alleles showed a marked hierarchy of immunity to LF. Immunogenicity in HLA transgenics was primarily restricted to epitopes from domains II and IV of LF and promiscuous, dominant epitopes, common to all HLA types, were identified in domain II. The relevance of this model was further demonstrated by the fact that a number of the immunodominant epitopes identified in mice were recognized by T cells from humans previously infected with cutaneous anthrax and from vaccinated individuals. The ability of the identified epitopes to confer protective immunity was demonstrated by lethal anthrax challenge of HLA transgenic mice immunized with a peptide subunit vaccine comprising the immunodominant epitopes that we identified.

  13. The zebrafish early arrest mutants.

    PubMed

    Kane, D A; Maischein, H M; Brand, M; van Eeden, F J; Furutani-Seiki, M; Granato, M; Haffter, P; Hammerschmidt, M; Heisenberg, C P; Jiang, Y J; Kelsh, R N; Mullins, M C; Odenthal, J; Warga, R M; Nüsslein-Volhard, C

    1996-12-01

    This report describes mutants of the zebrafish having phenotypes causing a general arrest in early morphogenesis. These mutants identify a group of loci making up about 20% of the loci identified by mutants with visible morphological phenotypes within the first day of development. There are 12 Class I mutants, which fall into 5 complementation groups and have cells that lyse before morphological defects are observed. Mutants at three loci, speed bump, ogre and zombie, display abnormal nuclei. The 8 Class II mutants, which fall into 6 complementation groups, arrest development before cell lysis is observed. These mutants seemingly stop development in the late segmentation stages, and maintain a body shape similar to a 20 hour embryo. Mutations in speed bump, ogre, zombie, specter, poltergeist and troll were tested for cell lethality by transplanting mutant cells into wild-type hosts. With poltergeist, transplanted mutant cells all survive. The remainder of the mutants tested were autonomously but conditionally lethal: mutant cells, most of which lyse, sometimes survive to become notochord, muscles, or, in rare cases, large neurons, all cell types which become postmitotic in the gastrula. Some of the genes of the early arrest group may be necessary for progression though the cell cycle; if so, the survival of early differentiating cells may be based on having their terminal mitosis before the zygotic requirement for these genes. PMID:9007229

  14. Synthesis, purification, and characterization of an Arg sub 152 yields Glu site-directed mutant of recombinant human blood clotting factor VII

    SciTech Connect

    Wildgoose, P.; Kisiel, W. ); Berkner, K.L. )

    1990-04-03

    Coagulation factor VII circulates in blood as a single-chain zymogen of a serine protease and is converted to its activated two-chain form, factor VIIa, by cleavage of an internal peptide bond located at Arg{sub 152}-Ile{sub 153}. Previous studies using serine protease active-site inhibitors suggest that zymogen factor VII may possess sufficient proteolytic activity to initiate the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. In order to assess the putative intrinsic proteolytic activity of single-chain factor VII, the authors have constructed a site-specific mutant of recombinant human factor VII in which arginine-152 has been replaced with a glutamic acid residue. Mutant factor VII was purified in a single step from culture supernatants of baby hamster kidney cells transfected with a plasmid containing the sequence for Arg{sub 152} {yields} Glu factor VII using a calcium-dependent, murine anti-factor VII monoclonal antibody column. The clotting activity of mutant factor VII was completely inhibited following incubation with dansyl-Glu-Gly-Arg chloromethyl ketone, suggesting that the apparent clotting activity of mutant factor VII was due to a contaminating serine protease. Immunoblots of mutant factor VII with human factor IXa revealed no cleavage, whereas incubation of mutant factor VII with human factor Xa resulted in cleavage of mutant factor VII and the formation of a lower molecular weight degradation product migrating at M{sup r}{approx}40 000. The results are consistent with the proposal that zymogen factor VII possesses no intrinsic proteolytic activity toward factor X or factor IX.

  15. Genomic and immunologic factors associated with viral pathogenesis in a lethal EV71 infected neonatal mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yingying; Li, Peng; Song, Nannan; Li, Bingqing; Li, Zhihui; Guo, Yuqi; Zhang, Weidong; Wei, Ming Q; Gai, Zhongtao; Meng, Hong; Wang, Jiwen; Qin, Lizeng

    2016-05-01

    Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) caused by enterovirus 71 (EV71) has emerged as a major health problem in China and worldwide. The present study aimed to understand the virological features of EV71 and host responses resulting from EV71 infection. Six different EV71 strains were isolated from HFMD patients with severe or mild clinical symptoms, and were analyzed for pathogenicity in vitro and in vivo. The results demonstrated that the six virus strains exhibited similar cytopathogenic effects on susceptible MA104 cells. However, marked differences in histological and immunopathological changes were observed when mice were inoculated with the different virus strains. Thus, the viruses studied were divided into two groups, highly or weakly pathogenic. Two representative virus strains, JN200804 and JN200803 (highly and weakly pathogenic, respectively) were studied further to investigate pathogenicity-associated factors, including genetic mutations and immunopathogenesis. The present study has demonstrated that highly pathogenic strains have stable genome and amino acid sequences. Notably, the present study demonstrated that a highly pathogenic strain induced a significant increase of the bulk CD4 T cell levels at 3 days post‑inoculation. In conclusion, the current study demonstrates that genomic and immunologic factors may be responsible for the multiple tissue damage caused by highly pathogenic EV71 infection. PMID:27035332

  16. Genomic and immunologic factors associated with viral pathogenesis in a lethal EV71 infected neonatal mouse model

    PubMed Central

    YUE, YINGYING; LI, PENG; SONG, NANNAN; LI, BINGQING; LI, ZHIHUI; GUO, YUQI; ZHANG, WEIDONG; WEI, MING Q.; GAI, ZHONGTAO; MENG, HONG; WANG, JIWEN; QIN, LIZENG

    2016-01-01

    Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) caused by enterovirus 71 (EV71) has emerged as a major health problem in China and worldwide. The present study aimed to understand the virological features of EV71 and host responses resulting from EV71 infection. Six different EV71 strains were isolated from HFMD patients with severe or mild clinical symptoms, and were analyzed for pathogenicity in vitro and in vivo. The results demonstrated that the six virus strains exhibited similar cytopathogenic effects on susceptible MA104 cells. However, marked differences in histological and immunopathological changes were observed when mice were inoculated with the different virus strains. Thus, the viruses studied were divided into two groups, highly or weakly pathogenic. Two representative virus strains, JN200804 and JN200803 (highly and weakly pathogenic, respectively) were studied further to investigate pathogenicity-associated factors, including genetic mutations and immunopathogenesis. The present study has demonstrated that highly pathogenic strains have stable genome and amino acid sequences. Notably, the present study demonstrated that a highly pathogenic strain induced a significant increase of the bulk CD4 T cell levels at 3 days post-inoculation. In conclusion, the current study demonstrates that genomic and immunologic factors may be responsible for the multiple tissue damage caused by highly pathogenic EV71 infection. PMID:27035332

  17. Genomic and immunologic factors associated with viral pathogenesis in a lethal EV71 infected neonatal mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yingying; Li, Peng; Song, Nannan; Li, Bingqing; Li, Zhihui; Guo, Yuqi; Zhang, Weidong; Wei, Ming Q; Gai, Zhongtao; Meng, Hong; Wang, Jiwen; Qin, Lizeng

    2016-05-01

    Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) caused by enterovirus 71 (EV71) has emerged as a major health problem in China and worldwide. The present study aimed to understand the virological features of EV71 and host responses resulting from EV71 infection. Six different EV71 strains were isolated from HFMD patients with severe or mild clinical symptoms, and were analyzed for pathogenicity in vitro and in vivo. The results demonstrated that the six virus strains exhibited similar cytopathogenic effects on susceptible MA104 cells. However, marked differences in histological and immunopathological changes were observed when mice were inoculated with the different virus strains. Thus, the viruses studied were divided into two groups, highly or weakly pathogenic. Two representative virus strains, JN200804 and JN200803 (highly and weakly pathogenic, respectively) were studied further to investigate pathogenicity-associated factors, including genetic mutations and immunopathogenesis. The present study has demonstrated that highly pathogenic strains have stable genome and amino acid sequences. Notably, the present study demonstrated that a highly pathogenic strain induced a significant increase of the bulk CD4 T cell levels at 3 days post‑inoculation. In conclusion, the current study demonstrates that genomic and immunologic factors may be responsible for the multiple tissue damage caused by highly pathogenic EV71 infection.

  18. Functional interaction of CCAAT/enhancer-binding-protein-α basic region mutants with E2F transcription factors and DNA.

    PubMed

    Kowenz-Leutz, Elisabeth; Schuetz, Anja; Liu, Qingbin; Knoblich, Maria; Heinemann, Udo; Leutz, Achim

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα) regulates cell cycle arrest and terminal differentiation of neutrophils and adipocytes. Mutations in the basic leucine zipper domain (bZip) of C/EBPα are associated with acute myeloid leukemia. A widely used murine transforming C/EBPα basic region mutant (BRM2) entails two bZip point mutations (I294A/R297A). BRM2 has been discordantly described as defective for DNA binding or defective for interaction with E2F. We have separated the two BRM2 mutations to shed light on the intertwined reciprocity between C/EBPα-E2F-DNA interactions. Both, C/EBPα I294A and R297A retain transactivation capacity and interaction with E2F-DP. The C/EBPα R297A mutation destabilized DNA binding, whereas the C/EBPα I294A mutation enhanced binding to DNA. The C/EBPα R297A mutant, like BRM2, displayed enhanced interaction with E2F-DP but failed to repress E2F-dependent transactivation although both mutants were readily suppressed by E2F1 for transcription through C/EBP cis-regulatory sites. In contrast, the DNA binding enhanced C/EBPα I294A mutant displayed increased repression of E2F-DP mediated transactivation and resisted E2F-DP mediated repression. Thus, the efficient repression of E2F dependent S-phase genes and the activation of differentiation genes reside in the balanced DNA binding capacity of C/EBPα.

  19. Bid Promotes K63-Linked Polyubiquitination of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Associated Factor 6 (TRAF6) and Sensitizes to Mutant SOD1-Induced Proinflammatory Signaling in Microglia123

    PubMed Central

    Kinsella, Sinéad

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene contribute to motoneuron degeneration and are evident in 20% of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cases. Mutant SOD1 induces microglial activation through a stimulation of Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 (TLR2 and TLR4). In the present study, we identified the proapoptotic Bcl-2 family protein Bid as a positive regulator of mutant SOD1-induced TLR-nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling in microglia. bid-deficient primary mouse microglia showed reduced NF-κB signaling in response to TLR4 activation or exposure to conditioned medium derived from SOD1 G93A expressing NSC-34 cells. Attenuation of NF-κB signaling in bid-deficient microglia was associated with lower levels of phosphorylated IKKα/β and p65, with a delayed degradation of IκBα and enhanced degradation of Peli1. Upstream of IKK, we found that Bid interacted with, and promoted, the K63-linked polyubiquitination of the E3 ubiquitin ligase tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6) in microglia. Our study suggests a key role for Bid in the regulation of TLR4-NF-κB proinflammatory signaling during mutant SOD1-induced disease pathology. Bid promotes TLR4-NF-κB signaling by interacting with TRAF6 and promoting TRAF6 K63-linked polyubiquitination in microglia. PMID:27257617

  20. Complementation of the embryo-lethal T-DNA insertion mutant of AUXIN-BINDING-PROTEIN 1 (ABP1) with abp1 point mutated versions reveals crosstalk of ABP1 and phytochromes

    PubMed Central

    Effendi, Yunus; Ferro, Noel; Labusch, Corinna; Geisler, Markus; Scherer, Günther F. E.

    2015-01-01

    The function of the extracytoplasmic AUXIN-BINDING-PROTEIN1 (ABP1) is largely enigmatic. We complemented a homozygous T-DNA insertion null mutant of ABP1 in Arabidopsis thaliana Wassilewskia with three mutated and one wild-type (wt) ABP1 cDNA, all tagged C-terminally with a strepII–FLAG tag upstream the KDEL signal. Based on in silico modelling, the abp1 mutants were predicted to have altered geometries of the auxin binding pocket and calculated auxin binding energies lower than the wt. Phenotypes linked to auxin transport were compromised in these three complemented abp1 mutants. Red light effects, such as elongation of hypocotyls in constant red (R) and far-red (FR) light, in white light supplemented by FR light simulating shade, and inhibition of gravitropism by R or FR, were all compromised in the complemented lines. Using auxin- or light-induced expression of marker genes, we showed that auxin-induced expression was delayed already after 10min, and light-induced expression within 60min, even though TIR1/AFB or phyB are thought to act as receptors relevant for gene expression regulation. The expression of marker genes in seedlings responding to both auxin and shade showed that for both stimuli regulation of marker gene expression was altered after 10–20min in the wild type and phyB mutant. The rapidity of expression responses provides a framework for the mechanics of functional interaction of ABP1 and phyB to trigger interwoven signalling pathways. PMID:25392478

  1. Protection from genital herpes disease, seroconversion and latent infection in a non-lethal murine genital infection model by immunization with an HSV-2 replication-defective mutant virus.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Fernando M; Knipe, David M

    2016-01-15

    Viral vaccines have traditionally protected against disease, but for viruses that establish latent infection, it is desirable for the vaccine to reduce infection to reduce latent infection and reactivation. While seroconversion has been used in clinical trials of herpes simplex virus (HSV) vaccines to measure protection from infection, this has not been modeled in animal infection systems. To measure the ability of a genital herpes vaccine candidate to protect against various aspects of infection, we established a non-lethal murine model of genital HSV-2 infection, an ELISA assay to measure antibodies specific for infected cell protein 8 (ICP8), and a very sensitive qPCR assay. Using these assays, we observed that immunization with HSV-2 dl5-29 virus reduced disease, viral shedding, seroconversion, and latent infection by the HSV-2 challenge virus. Therefore, it may be feasible to obtain protection against genital disease, seroconversion and latent infection by immunization, even if sterilizing immunity is not achieved.

  2. Pretreatment with a 55-kDa tumor necrosis factor receptor-immunoglobulin fusion protein attenuates activation of coagulation, but not of fibrinolysis, during lethal bacteremia in baboons.

    PubMed

    van der Poll, T; Jansen, P M; Van Zee, K J; Hack, C E; Oldenburg, H A; Loetscher, H; Lesslauer, W; Lowry, S F; Moldawer, L L

    1997-07-01

    Baboons (Papio anubis) receiving a lethal intravenous infusion with live Escherichia coli were pretreated with either a 55-kDa tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-IgG fusion protein (TNFR55:IgG) (n = 4, 4.6 mg/kg) or placebo (n = 4). Neutralization of TNF activity in TNFR55:IgG-treated animals was associated with a complete prevention of mortality and a strong attenuation of coagulation activation as reflected by the plasma concentrations of thrombin-antithrombin III complexes (P < .05). Activation of fibrinolysis was not influenced by TNFR55:IgG (plasma tissue-type plasminogen activator and plasmin-alpha2-antiplasmin complexes), whereas TNFR55:IgG did inhibit the release of plasminogen activator inhibitor type I (P < .05). Furthermore, TNFR55:IgG inhibited neutrophil degranulation (plasma levels of elastase-alpha1-antitrypsin complexes, P < .05) and modestly reduced release of secretory phospholipase A2. These data suggest that endogenous TNF contributes to activation of coagulation, but not to stimulation of fibrinolysis, during severe bacteremia.

  3. A Neutralizing Monoclonal IgG1 Antibody of Platelet-Activating Factor Acetylhydrolase SsE Protects Mice against Lethal Subcutaneous Group A Streptococcus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mengyao; Feng, Wenchao; Zhu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) can cause life-threatening invasive infections, including necrotizing fasciitis. There are no effective treatments for severe invasive GAS infections. The platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase SsE produced by GAS is required for invasive GAS to evade innate immune responses and to invade soft tissues. This study determined whether the enzymatic activity of SsE is critical for its function in GAS skin invasion and inhibition of neutrophil recruitment and whether SsE is a viable target for immunotherapy for severe invasive GAS infections. An isogenic derivative of M1T1 strain MGAS5005 producing SsE with an S178A substitution (SsES178A), an enzymatically inactive SsE mutant protein, was generated. This strain induced higher levels of neutrophil infiltration and caused smaller lesions than MGAS5005 in subcutaneous infections of mice. This phenotype is similar to that of MGAS5005 sse deletion mutants, indicating that the enzymatic activity of SsE is critical for its function. An anti-SsE IgG1 monoclonal antibody (MAb), 2B11, neutralized the PAF acetylhydrolase activity of SsE. Passive immunization with 2B11 increased neutrophil infiltration, reduced skin invasion, and protected mice against MGAS5005 infection. However, 2B11 did not protect mice when it was administered after MGAS5005 inoculation. MGAS5005 induced vascular effusion at infection sites at early hours after GAS inoculation, suggesting that 2B11 did not always have access to infection sites. Thus, the enzymatic activity of SsE mediates its function, and SsE has the potential to be included in a vaccine but is not a therapeutic target. An effective MAb-based immunotherapy for severe invasive GAS infections may need to target virulence factors that are critical for systemic survival of GAS. PMID:25916987

  4. Amphitrite ornata Dehaloperoxidase (DHP): Investigations of Structural Factors That Influence the Mechanism of Halophenol Dehalogenation Using ;Peroxidase-like; Myoglobin Mutants and ;Myoglobin-like; DHP Mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Jing; Huang, Xiao; Sun, Shengfang; Wang, Chunxue; Lebioda, Lukasz; Dawson, John H.

    2012-05-14

    Dehaloperoxidase (DHP), discovered in the marine terebellid polychaete Amphitrite ornata, is the first heme-containing globin with a peroxidase activity. The sequence and crystal structure of DHP argue that it evolved from an ancient O{sub 2} transport and storage globin. Thus, DHP retains an oxygen carrier function but also has the ability to degrade halophenol toxicants in its living environment. Sperm whale myoglobin (Mb) in the ferric state has a peroxidase activity {approx}10 times lower than that of DHP. The catalytic activity enhancement observed in DHP appears to have been generated mainly by subtle changes in the positions of the proximal and distal histidine residues that appeared during DHP evolution. Herein, we report investigations into the mechanism of action of DHP derived from examination of 'peroxidase-like' Mb mutants and 'Mb-like' DHP mutants. The dehalogenation ability of wild-type Mb is augmented in the peroxidase-like Mb mutants (F43H/H64L, G65T, and G65I Mb) but attenuated in the Mb-like T56G DHP variant. X-ray crystallographic data show that the distal His residues in G65T Mb and G65I are positioned {approx}0.3 and {approx}0.8 {angstrom}, respectively, farther from the heme iron compared to that in the wild-type protein. The H93K/T95H double mutant Mb with the proximal His shifted to the 'DHP-like' position has an increased peroxidase activity. In addition, a better dehaloperoxidase (M86E DHP) was generated by introducing a negative charge near His89 to enhance the imidazolate character of the proximal His. Finally, only minimal differences in dehalogenation activities are seen among the exogenous ligand-free DHP, the acetate-bound DHP, and the distal site blocker L100F DHP mutant. Thus, we conclude that binding of halophenols in the internal binding site (i.e., distal cavity) is not essential for catalysis. This work provides a foundation for a new structure-function paradigm for peroxidases and for the molecular evolution of the dual

  5. Increased Expression of Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF) in Multiple Organs After Exposure of Non-Human Primates (NHP) to Lethal Doses of Radiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pei; Cui, Wanchang; Hankey, Kim G; Gibbs, Allison M; Smith, Cassandra P; Taylor-Howell, Cheryl; Kearney, Sean R; MacVittie, Thomas J

    2015-11-01

    Exposure to sufficiently high doses of ionizing radiation is known to cause fibrosis in many different organs and tissues. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2), a member of the CCN family of matricellular proteins, plays an important role in the development of fibrosis in multiple organs. The aim of the present study was to quantify the gene and protein expression of CTGF in a variety of organs from non-human primates (NHP) that were previously exposed to potentially lethal doses of radiation. Tissues from non-irradiated NHP and NHP exposed to whole thoracic lung irradiation (WTLI) or partial-body irradiation with 5% bone marrow sparing (PBI/BM5) were examined by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR, western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Expression of CTGF was elevated in the lung tissues of NHP exposed to WTLI relative to the lung tissues of the non-irradiated NHP. Increased expression of CTGF was also observed in multiple organs from NHP exposed to PBI/BM5 compared to non-irradiated NHP; these included the lung, kidney, spleen, thymus, and liver. These irradiated organs also exhibited histological evidence of increased collagen deposition compared to the control tissues. There was significant correlation of CTGF expression with collagen deposition in the lung and spleen of NHP exposed to PBI/BM5. Significant correlations were observed between spleen and multiple organs on CTGF expression and collagen deposition, respectively, suggesting possible crosstalk between spleen and other organs. These data suggest that CTGF levels are increased in multiple organs after radiation exposure and that inflammatory cell infiltration may contribute to the elevated levels of CTGF in multiple organs.

  6. Biomass digestibility is predominantly affected by three factors of wall polymer features distinctive in wheat accessions and rice mutants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Wheat and rice are important food crops with enormous biomass residues for biofuels. However, lignocellulosic recalcitrance becomes a crucial factor on biomass process. Plant cell walls greatly determine biomass recalcitrance, thus it is essential to identify their key factors on lignocellulose saccharification. Despite it has been reported about cell wall factors on biomass digestions, little is known in wheat and rice. In this study, we analyzed nine typical pairs of wheat and rice samples that exhibited distinct cell wall compositions, and identified three major factors of wall polymer features that affected biomass digestibility. Results Based on cell wall compositions, ten wheat accessions and three rice mutants were classified into three distinct groups each with three typical pairs. In terms of group I that displayed single wall polymer alternations in wheat, we found that three wall polymer levels (cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin) each had a negative effect on biomass digestibility at similar rates under pretreatments of NaOH and H2SO4 with three concentrations. However, analysis of six pairs of wheat and rice samples in groups II and III that each exhibited a similar cell wall composition, indicated that three wall polymer levels were not the major factors on biomass saccharification. Furthermore, in-depth detection of the wall polymer features distinctive in rice mutants, demonstrated that biomass digestibility was remarkably affected either negatively by cellulose crystallinity (CrI) of raw biomass materials, or positively by both Ara substitution degree of non-KOH-extractable hemicelluloses (reverse Xyl/Ara) and p-coumaryl alcohol relative proportion of KOH-extractable lignin (H/G). Correlation analysis indicated that Ara substitution degree and H/G ratio negatively affected cellulose crystallinity for high biomass enzymatic digestion. It was also suggested to determine whether Ara and H monomer have an interlinking with cellulose chains

  7. Isolation and genetic analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants supersensitive to G1 arrest by a factor and. cap alpha. factor pheromones

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, R.K.; Otte, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    Eight independently isolated mutants which are supersensitive (Sst/sup -/) to the G1 arrest induced by the tridecapeptide pheromone ..cap alpha.. factor were identified by screening mutagenized Saccharomyces cerevisiae MATa cells on solid medium for increased growth inhibition by ..cap alpha.. factor. These mutants carries lesions in two complementation groups, sst1 and sst2. Mutations at the sst1 locus were mating type specific: MATa sst1 cells were supersensitive to ..cap alpha.. factor, but MAT..cap alpha.. sst1 cells were not supersensitive to a factor. In contrast, mutations at the sst2 locus conferred supersensitivity to the pheromones of the opposite mating type on both MATa and MAT..cap alpha.. cells. Even in the absence of added ..cap alpha.. pheromone, about 10% of the cells in exponentially growing cultures of MATa strains carrying any of three different alleles of sst2 (including the ochre mutation sst2-4) had the aberrant morphology (''shmoo'' shape) that normally develops only after MATa cells are exposed to ..cap alpha.. factor. This ''self-shmooing'' phenotype was genetically linked to the sst2 mutations, although the leakiest allele isolated (sst2-3) did not display this characteristic. Normal MATa/MAT..cap alpha.. diploids do not respond to pheromones; diploids homozygous for an sst2 mutation (MATa/MAT..cap alpha.. sst2-1/sst2-1) were still insensitive to ..cap alpha.. factor. The sst1 gene was mapped to within 6.9 centimorgans of his6 on chromosome IX. The sst2 gene was unlinked to sst1, was not centromere linked, and was shown to be neither linked nor centromere distal to MAT on the right arm of chromosome III.

  8. Mutant p53-R273H mediates cancer cell survival and anoikis resistance through AKT-dependent suppression of BCL2-modifying factor (BMF).

    PubMed

    Tan, B S; Tiong, K H; Choo, H L; Chung, F Fei-Lei; Hii, L-W; Tan, S H; Yap, I K S; Pani, S; Khor, N T W; Wong, S F; Rosli, R; Cheong, S-K; Leong, C-O

    2015-07-16

    p53 is the most frequently mutated tumor-suppressor gene in human cancers. Unlike other tumor-suppressor genes, p53 mutations mainly occur as missense mutations within the DNA-binding domain, leading to the expression of full-length mutant p53 protein. Mutant p53 proteins not only lose their tumor-suppressor function, but may also gain new oncogenic functions and promote tumorigenesis. Here, we showed that silencing of endogenous p53-R273H contact mutant, but not p53-R175H conformational mutant, reduced AKT phosphorylation, induced BCL2-modifying factor (BMF) expression, sensitized BIM dissociation from BCL-XL and induced mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in cancer cells. Importantly, cancer cells harboring endogenous p53-R273H mutant were also found to be inherently resistant to anoikis and lack BMF induction following culture in suspension. Underlying these activities is the ability of p53-R273H mutant to suppress BMF expression that is dependent on constitutively active PI3K/AKT signaling. Collectively, these findings suggest that p53-R273H can specifically drive AKT signaling and suppress BMF expression, resulting in enhanced cell survivability and anoikis resistance. These findings open the possibility that blocking of PI3K/AKT will have therapeutic benefit in mutant p53-R273H expressing cancers.

  9. Mutant p53-R273H mediates cancer cell survival and anoikis resistance through AKT-dependent suppression of BCL2-modifying factor (BMF)

    PubMed Central

    Tan, B S; Tiong, K H; Choo, H L; Fei-Lei Chung, F; Hii, L-W; Tan, S H; Yap, I KS; Pani, S; Khor, N TW; Wong, S F; Rosli, R; Cheong, S-K; Leong, C-O

    2015-01-01

    p53 is the most frequently mutated tumor-suppressor gene in human cancers. Unlike other tumor-suppressor genes, p53 mutations mainly occur as missense mutations within the DNA-binding domain, leading to the expression of full-length mutant p53 protein. Mutant p53 proteins not only lose their tumor-suppressor function, but may also gain new oncogenic functions and promote tumorigenesis. Here, we showed that silencing of endogenous p53-R273H contact mutant, but not p53-R175H conformational mutant, reduced AKT phosphorylation, induced BCL2-modifying factor (BMF) expression, sensitized BIM dissociation from BCL-XL and induced mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in cancer cells. Importantly, cancer cells harboring endogenous p53-R273H mutant were also found to be inherently resistant to anoikis and lack BMF induction following culture in suspension. Underlying these activities is the ability of p53-R273H mutant to suppress BMF expression that is dependent on constitutively active PI3K/AKT signaling. Collectively, these findings suggest that p53-R273H can specifically drive AKT signaling and suppress BMF expression, resulting in enhanced cell survivability and anoikis resistance. These findings open the possibility that blocking of PI3K/AKT will have therapeutic benefit in mutant p53-R273H expressing cancers. PMID:26181206

  10. Mutant p53-R273H mediates cancer cell survival and anoikis resistance through AKT-dependent suppression of BCL2-modifying factor (BMF).

    PubMed

    Tan, B S; Tiong, K H; Choo, H L; Chung, F Fei-Lei; Hii, L-W; Tan, S H; Yap, I K S; Pani, S; Khor, N T W; Wong, S F; Rosli, R; Cheong, S-K; Leong, C-O

    2015-01-01

    p53 is the most frequently mutated tumor-suppressor gene in human cancers. Unlike other tumor-suppressor genes, p53 mutations mainly occur as missense mutations within the DNA-binding domain, leading to the expression of full-length mutant p53 protein. Mutant p53 proteins not only lose their tumor-suppressor function, but may also gain new oncogenic functions and promote tumorigenesis. Here, we showed that silencing of endogenous p53-R273H contact mutant, but not p53-R175H conformational mutant, reduced AKT phosphorylation, induced BCL2-modifying factor (BMF) expression, sensitized BIM dissociation from BCL-XL and induced mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in cancer cells. Importantly, cancer cells harboring endogenous p53-R273H mutant were also found to be inherently resistant to anoikis and lack BMF induction following culture in suspension. Underlying these activities is the ability of p53-R273H mutant to suppress BMF expression that is dependent on constitutively active PI3K/AKT signaling. Collectively, these findings suggest that p53-R273H can specifically drive AKT signaling and suppress BMF expression, resulting in enhanced cell survivability and anoikis resistance. These findings open the possibility that blocking of PI3K/AKT will have therapeutic benefit in mutant p53-R273H expressing cancers. PMID:26181206

  11. A Genome-Wide Screen for Bacterial Envelope Biogenesis Mutants Identifies a Novel Factor Involved in Cell Wall Precursor Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Paradis-Bleau, Catherine; Kritikos, George; Orlova, Katya; Typas, Athanasios; Bernhardt, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    The cell envelope of Gram-negative bacteria is a formidable barrier that is difficult for antimicrobial drugs to penetrate. Thus, the list of treatments effective against these organisms is small and with the rise of new resistance mechanisms is shrinking rapidly. New therapies to treat Gram-negative bacterial infections are therefore sorely needed. This goal will be greatly aided by a detailed mechanistic understanding of envelope assembly. Although excellent progress in the identification of essential envelope biogenesis systems has been made in recent years, many aspects of the process remain to be elucidated. We therefore developed a simple, quantitative, and high-throughput assay for mutants with envelope biogenesis defects and used it to screen an ordered single-gene deletion library of Escherichia coli. The screen was robust and correctly identified numerous mutants known to be involved in envelope assembly. Importantly, the screen also implicated 102 genes of unknown function as encoding factors that likely impact envelope biogenesis. As a proof of principle, one of these factors, ElyC (YcbC), was characterized further and shown to play a critical role in the metabolism of the essential lipid carrier used for the biogenesis of cell wall and other bacterial surface polysaccharides. Further analysis of the function of ElyC and other hits identified in our screen is likely to uncover a wealth of new information about the biogenesis of the Gram-negative envelope and the vulnerabilities in the system suitable for drug targeting. Moreover, the screening assay described here should be readily adaptable to other organisms to study the biogenesis of different envelope architectures. PMID:24391520

  12. Selective inhibition of the prothrombinase complex: factor Va alters macromolecular recognition of a tick anticoagulant peptide mutant by factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Betz, A; Vlasuk, G P; Bergum, P W; Krishnaswamy, S

    1997-01-01

    The prothrombinase complex assembles through reversible interactions between the protease, factor Xa, the cofactor, factor Va, and acidic phospholipid membranes in the presence of calcium ions. Changes in macromolecular recognition by factor Xa which may result from its interaction with factor Va in the prothrombinase complex have been probed using a recombinant derivative of tick anticoagulant peptide where Arg3 has been replaced with Ala (R3A-TAP). In contrast to the wild type inhibitor, R3A-TAP was a weak competitive inhibitor of factor Xa (Ki = 794 nM). The inhibition of the prothrombinase complex by R3A-TAP was characterized by slow, tight-binding kinetics with an increased affinity of approximately 4000-fold (Ki* = 0.195 nM) relative to that of solution-phase factor Xa. Stopped-flow measurements using p-aminobenzamidine (PAB) demonstrated that the reaction between solution-phase factor Xa and R3A-TAP could be adequately described by a single reversible step with rate constants that were consistent with equilibrium binding measurements. The rate-limiting bimolecular combination of R3A-TAP and factor Xa was competitive with PAB binding of the protease. In contrast, the reaction of R3A-TAP with prothrombinase measured using PAB yielded biphasic stopped-flow traces, indicating a multistep pathway for the reaction of the inhibitor with the enzyme complex. The kinetic measurements were consistent with the initial formation of a ternary complex between R3A-TAP, prothrombinase, and PAB followed by two unimolecular steps which lead to PAB dissociation from the enzyme. In this case, prior occupation of the active site by PAB had no effect on the bimolecular reaction between R3A-TAP and prothrombinase. Thus, the interaction of factor Xa with factor Va on the membrane surface alters recognition of R3A-TAP by the protease, leading to changes in the thermodynamics as well as in the observed kinetic mechanism for the reaction. Therefore, a single amino acid substitution in

  13. Lethality of sortase depletion in Actinomyces oris caused by excessive membrane accumulation of a surface glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chenggang; Huang, I-Hsiu; Chang, Chungyu; Reardon-Robinson, Melissa Elizabeth; Das, Asis; Ton-That, Hung

    2014-12-01

    Sortase, a cysteine-transpeptidase conserved in Gram-positive bacteria, anchors on the cell wall many surface proteins that facilitate bacterial pathogenesis and fitness. Genetic disruption of the housekeeping sortase in several Gram-positive pathogens reported thus far attenuates virulence, but not bacterial growth. Paradoxically, we discovered that depletion of the housekeeping sortase SrtA was lethal for Actinomyces oris; yet, all of its predicted cell wall-anchored protein substrates (AcaA-N) were individually dispensable for cell viability. Using Tn5-transposon mutagenesis to identify factors that upend lethality of srtA deletion, we uncovered a set of genetic suppressors harbouring transposon insertions within genes of a locus encoding AcaC and a LytR-CpsA-Psr (LCP)-like protein. AcaC was shown to be highly glycosylated and dependent on LCP for its glycosylation. Upon SrtA depletion, the glycosylated form of AcaC, hereby renamed GspA, was accumulated in the membrane. Overexpression of GspA in a mutant lacking gspA and srtA was lethal; conversely, cells overexpressing a GspA mutant missing a membrane-localization domain were viable. The results reveal a unique glycosylation pathway in A. oris that is coupled to cell wall anchoring catalysed by sortase SrtA. Significantly, this novel phenomenon of glyco-stress provides convenient cell-based assays for developing a new class of inhibitors against Gram-positive pathogens.

  14. Lethality of Sortase Depletion in Actinomyces oris Caused by Excessive Membrane Accumulation of a Surface Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chenggang; Huang, I-Hsiu; Chang, Chungyu; Reardon-Robinson, Melissa Elizabeth; Das, Asis; Ton-That, Hung

    2014-01-01

    Sortase, a cysteine-transpeptidase conserved in Gram-positive bacteria, anchors on the cell wall many surface proteins that facilitate bacterial pathogenesis and fitness. Genetic disruption of the housekeeping sortase in several Gram-positive pathogens reported thus far attenuates virulence, but not bacterial growth. Paradoxically, we discovered that depletion of the housekeeping sortase SrtA was lethal for Actinomyces oris; yet, all of its predicted cell wall-anchored protein substrates (AcaA-N) were individually dispensable for cell viability. Using Tn5-transposon mutagenesis to identify factors that upend lethality of srtA deletion, we uncovered a set of genetic suppressors harboring transposon insertions within genes of a locus encoding AcaC and a LytR-CpsA-Psr (LCP)-like protein. AcaC was shown to be highly glycosylated and dependent on LCP for its glycosylation. Upon SrtA depletion, the glycosylated form of AcaC, hereby renamed GspA, was accumulated in the membrane. Overexpression of GspA in a mutant lacking gspA and srtA was lethal; conversely, cells overexpressing a GspA mutant missing a membrane-localization domain were viable. The results reveal a unique glycosylation pathway in A. oris that is coupled to cell wall anchoring catalyzed by sortase SrtA. Significantly, this novel phenomenon of glyco-stress provides convenient cell-based assays for developing a new class of inhibitors against Gram-positive pathogens. PMID:25230351

  15. Epidermal growth factor impairs palatal shelf adhesion and fusion in the Tgf-β 3 null mutant.

    PubMed

    Barrio, M Carmen; Del Río, Aurora; Murillo, Jorge; Maldonado, Estela; López-Gordillo, Yamila; Paradas-Lara, Irene; Hernandes, Luzmarina; Catón, Javier; Martínez-Álvarez, Concepción

    2014-01-01

    The cleft palate presented by transforming growth factor-β3 (Tgf-β3) null mutant mice is caused by altered palatal shelf adhesion, cell proliferation, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation and cell death. The expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor-β1 (Tgf-β1) and muscle segment homeobox-1 (Msx-1) is modified in the palates of these knockout mice, and the cell proliferation defect is caused by the change in EGF expression. In this study, we aimed to determine whether this change in EGF expression has any effect on the other mechanisms altered in Tgf-β3 knockout mouse palates. We tested the effect of inhibiting EGF activity in vitro in the knockout palates via the addition of Tyrphostin AG 1478. We also investigated possible interactions between EGF, Tgf-β1 and Msx-1 in Tgf-β3 null mouse palate cultures. The results show that the inhibition of EGF activity in Tgf-β3 null mouse palate cultures improves palatal shelf adhesion and fusion, with a particular effect on cell death, and restores the normal distribution pattern of Msx-1 in the palatal mesenchyme. Inhibition of TGF-β1 does not affect either EGF or Msx-1 expression.

  16. Asymmetric processing of mutant factor X Arg386Cys reveals differences between intrinsic and extrinsic pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Baroni, M; Pavani, G; Pinotti, M; Branchini, A; Bernardi, F; Camire, R M

    2015-10-01

    Alterations in coagulation factor X (FX) activation, mediated by the extrinsic VIIa/tissue factor (FVIIa/TF) or the intrinsic factor IXa/factor VIIIa (FIXa/FVIIIa) complexes, can result in hemorrhagic/prothrombotic tendencies. However, the molecular determinants involved in substrate recognition by these enzymes are poorly defined. Here, we investigated the role of arginine 386 (chymotrypsin numbering c202), a surface-exposed residue on the FX catalytic domain. The naturally occurring FX386Cys mutant and FX386Ala variant were characterized. Despite the unpaired cysteine, recombinant (r)FX386Cys was efficiently secreted (88.6±21.3% of rFXwt) and possessed normal clearance in mice. rFX386Cys was also normally activated by FVIIa/TF and displayed intact amidolytic activity. In contrast, rFX386Cys activation by the FIXa/FVIIIa complex was 4.5-fold reduced, which was driven by a decrease in the kcat (1.6∗10(-4) s(-1) vs 5.8∗10(-4) s(-1), rFXwt). The virtually unaltered Km (70.6 nM vs 55.6nM, rFXwt) suggested no major alterations in the FX substrate exosite. Functional assays in plasma supplemented with rFX386Cys indicated a remarkable reduction in the thrombin generation rate and thus in coagulation efficiency. Consistently, the rFX386Ala variant displayed similar biochemical features suggesting that global changes at position 386 impact the intrinsic pathway activation. These data indicate that the FXArg386 is involved in FIXa/FVIIIa-mediated FX activation and help in elucidating the bleeding tendency associated with the FX386Cys in a rare FX deficiency case. Taking advantage of the unpaired cysteine, the rFX386Cys mutant may be efficiently targeted by thiol-specific ligands and represent a valuable tool to study FX structure-function relationships both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26012870

  17. Structural and functional influences of coagulation factor XIII subunit B heterozygous missense mutants

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Anne; Biswas, Arijit; Ivaskevicius, Vytautas; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The coagulation factor XIII(FXIII) is a plasma circulating heterotetrameric protransglutaminase that acts at the end of the coagulation cascade by covalently cross-linking preformed fibrin clots (to themselves and to fibrinolytic inhibitors) in order to stabilize them against fibrinolysis. It circulates in the plasma as a heterotetramer composed of two homomeric catalytic Factor XIIIA2 (FXIIIA2) and two homomeric protective/carrier Factor XIIIB2 subunit (FXIIIB2). Congenital deficiency of FXIII is of two types: severe homozygous/compound heterozygous FXIII deficiency which results in severe bleeding symptoms and mild heterozygous FXIII deficiency which is associated with mild bleeding (only upon trauma) or an asymptomatic phenotype. Defects in the F13B gene (Factor XIIIB subunit) occur more frequently in mild FXIII deficiency patients than in severe FXIII deficiency. We had recently reported secretion-related defects for seven previously reported F13B missense mutations. In the present study we further analyze the underlying molecular pathological mechanisms as well as the heterozygous expression phenotype for these mutations using a combination of in vitro heterologous expression (in HEK293T cells) and confocal microscopy. In combination with the in vitro work we have also performed an in silico solvated molecular dynamic simulation study on previously reported FXIIIB subunit sushi domain homology models in order to predict the putative structure-functional impact of these mutations. We were able to categorize the mutations into the following functional groups that: (1) affect antigenic stability as well as binding to FXIIIA subunit, that is, Cys5Arg, Cys316Phe, and Pro428Ser (2) affect binding to FXIIIA subunit with little or no influence on antigenic stability, that is, Ile81Asn and Val401Gln c) influence neither aspects and are most likely causality linked polymorphisms or functional polymorphisms, that is, Leu116Phe and Val217Ile. The Cys5Arg mutation was the

  18. Structural and functional influences of coagulation factor XIII subunit B heterozygous missense mutants.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Anne; Biswas, Arijit; Ivaskevicius, Vytautas; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2015-07-01

    The coagulation factor XIII(FXIII) is a plasma circulating heterotetrameric protransglutaminase that acts at the end of the coagulation cascade by covalently cross-linking preformed fibrin clots (to themselves and to fibrinolytic inhibitors) in order to stabilize them against fibrinolysis. It circulates in the plasma as a heterotetramer composed of two homomeric catalytic Factor XIIIA2 (FXIIIA2) and two homomeric protective/carrier Factor XIIIB2 subunit (FXIIIB2). Congenital deficiency of FXIII is of two types: severe homozygous/compound heterozygous FXIII deficiency which results in severe bleeding symptoms and mild heterozygous FXIII deficiency which is associated with mild bleeding (only upon trauma) or an asymptomatic phenotype. Defects in the F13B gene (Factor XIIIB subunit) occur more frequently in mild FXIII deficiency patients than in severe FXIII deficiency. We had recently reported secretion-related defects for seven previously reported F13B missense mutations. In the present study we further analyze the underlying molecular pathological mechanisms as well as the heterozygous expression phenotype for these mutations using a combination of in vitro heterologous expression (in HEK293T cells) and confocal microscopy. In combination with the in vitro work we have also performed an in silico solvated molecular dynamic simulation study on previously reported FXIIIB subunit sushi domain homology models in order to predict the putative structure-functional impact of these mutations. We were able to categorize the mutations into the following functional groups that: (1) affect antigenic stability as well as binding to FXIIIA subunit, that is, Cys5Arg, Cys316Phe, and Pro428Ser (2) affect binding to FXIIIA subunit with little or no influence on antigenic stability, that is, Ile81Asn and Val401Gln c) influence neither aspects and are most likely causality linked polymorphisms or functional polymorphisms, that is, Leu116Phe and Val217Ile. The Cys5Arg mutation was the

  19. Mutant hypoxia inducible factor-1α improves angiogenesis and tissue perfusion in ischemic rabbit skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingyan; Liu, Cheng; Bin, Jianping; Wang, Yuegang; Chen, Jianwei; Xiu, Jiancheng; Pei, Jingxian; Lai, Yanxian; Chen, Dongdong; Fan, Caixia; Xie, Jiajia; Tao, Yu; Wu, Pingsheng

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is one of the most potent angiogenic growth factors. It regulates genes involved in angiogenesis, but is inactivated rapidly by normoxia. Ad-HIF-1α-Trip was constructed by transforming Pro402, Pro564, and Asn803 in HIF-1α to alanine in order to delay degradation and create a constitutive transcriptional activator. In this study, we investigated whether Ad-HIF-1α-Trip could induce functional mature angiogenesis and the possible mechanisms involved. We found that Ad-HIF-1α-Trip increased the expression of multiple angiogenic genes in cultured HMVEC-Ls, including VEGF, PLGF, PAI-1, and PDGF. In a rabbit model of acute hind limb ischemia, Ad-HIF-1α-Trip improved tissue perfusion and collateral vessels, as measured by contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEU), CT angiography, and vascular casting. Ad-HIF-1α-Trip also produced more histologically identifiable capillaries, which were verified by immunostaining, compared with controls. Interestingly, inhibition of CBP/p300 by curcumin prevented HIF-1α from inducing the expression of several angiogenic genes. The present study suggests that Ad-HIF-1α-Trip can induce mature angiogenesis and improve tissue perfusion in ischemic rabbit skeletal muscle. CBP/p300, which interacts with the transactivation domains of HIF-1α, is important for HIF-1α-induced transcription of angiogenic genes. PMID:20937289

  20. The tomato mutant ars1 (altered response to salt stress 1) identifies an R1-type MYB transcription factor involved in stomatal closure under salt acclimation.

    PubMed

    Campos, Juan F; Cara, Beatriz; Pérez-Martín, Fernando; Pineda, Benito; Egea, Isabel; Flores, Francisco B; Fernandez-Garcia, Nieves; Capel, Juan; Moreno, Vicente; Angosto, Trinidad; Lozano, Rafael; Bolarin, Maria C

    2016-06-01

    A screening under salt stress conditions of a T-DNA mutant collection of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) led to the identification of the altered response to salt stress 1 (ars1) mutant, which showed a salt-sensitive phenotype. Genetic analysis of the ars1 mutation revealed that a single T-DNA insertion in the ARS1 gene was responsible of the mutant phenotype. ARS1 coded for an R1-MYB type transcription factor and its expression was induced by salinity in leaves. The mutant reduced fruit yield under salt acclimation while in the absence of stress the disruption of ARS1 did not affect this agronomic trait. The stomatal behaviour of ars1 mutant leaves induced higher Na(+) accumulation via the transpiration stream, as the decreases of stomatal conductance and transpiration rate induced by salt stress were markedly lower in the mutant plants. Moreover, the mutation affected stomatal closure in a response mediated by abscisic acid (ABA). The characterization of tomato transgenic lines silencing and overexpressing ARS1 corroborates the role of the gene in regulating the water loss via transpiration under salinity. Together, our results show that ARS1 tomato gene contributes to reduce transpirational water loss under salt stress. Finally, this gene could be interesting for tomato molecular breeding, because its manipulation could lead to improved stress tolerance without yield penalty under optimal culture conditions. PMID:26578112

  1. Functional characterization of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus mutant lacking late expression factor 9.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Shi, Y; Yu, H; Li, J; Quan, Y; Shu, T; Nie, Z; Zhang, Y; Yu, W

    2016-01-01

    Baculoviridae is a family of invertebrate viruses with large double-stranded DNA genomes. Proteins encoded by some late expression factor (lef ) genes are involved in the regulation of viral gene expression. Lef-9 is one of four transcription-specific Lefs, which are components of the virus-encoded RNA polymerase, and can initiate and transcribe late and very late genes. As a multifunctional protein encoded by the Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV), Lef-9 may be involved in the regulation of viral propagation. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. To determine the role of lef-9 in baculovirus infection, lef-9-knockout virus (lef-9-KO-Bacmid virus) was constructed using the Red recombination system, and the Bac-to-Bac system was used to prepare lef-9-repaired virus (lef-9-Re-Bacmid virus). The lef-9-KO virus did not produce infectious viruses or show infection activity, while the lef-9-repaired virus recovered both. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis of the transcription levels in wild-type-Bacmid, lef-9-KO-Bacmid, and lef-9-Re-Bacmid viruses showed that the lef-9-KO bacmid had little effect on viral genome replication. However, the transcription levels of the early and late viral genes, lef-3, ie-1, vp39, and p10, were significantly lower in BmN cells transfected with lef-9-KO-Bacmids than in the controls. Electron microscopy showed no visible enveloped virions in cells transfected with lef-9-KO-Bacmids, while many mature virions in cells transfected with lef-9-Re-Bacmid and wt-Bacmid were present. Thus, lef-9 was not essential for viral genome replication, but significantly affected viral gene transcription and expression in all periods of cell life cycle. PMID:27640438

  2. EGFR and mutant p53 expand esophageal cellular subpopulation capable of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition through ZEB transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Shinya; Natsuizaka, Mitsuteru; Wong, Gabrielle S.; Michaylira, Carmen Z.; Grugan, Katharine D.; Stairs, Douglas B.; Kalabis, Jiri; Vega, Maria E.; Kalman, Ross A.; Nakagawa, Momo; Klein-Szanto, Andres J; Herlyn, Meenhard; Diehl, J. Alan; Rustgi, Anil K.; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β is a potent inducer of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, it remains elusive as to which molecular mechanisms determine the cellular capacity to undergo EMT in response to TGF-β. We have found that both epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpression and mutant p53 tumor suppressor genes contribute to enrichment of an EMT-competent cellular subpopulation amongst telomerase-immortalized human esophageal epithelial cells during malignant transformation. EGFR overexpression triggers oncogene-induced senescence, accompanied by induction of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p15INK4B, p16INK4A and p21. Interestingly, a subpopulation of cells emerges by negating senescence without loss of EGFR overexpression. Such cell populations express increased levels of zinc finger E-box binding (ZEB) transcription factors ZEB1 and ZEB2, and undergo EMT upon TGF-β stimulation. Enrichment of EMT-competent cells was more evident in the presence of p53 mutation, which diminished EGFR-induced senescence. RNA interference directed against ZEB resulted in induction of p15INK4B and p16INK4A, reactivating the EGFR-dependent senescence program. Importantly, TGF-β-mediated EMT did not take place when cellular senescence programs were activated by either ZEB knockdown or activation of wild-type p53 function. Thus, senescence checkpoint functions activated by EGFR and p53 may be evaded through the induction of ZEB, thereby allowing expansion of an EMT-competent unique cellular subpopulation, providing novel mechanistic insights into the role of ZEB in esophageal carcinogenesis. PMID:20424117

  3. Crystal Structure of the C-terminal Domain of Splicing Factor Prp8 Carrying Retinitis Pigmentosa Mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,L.; Shen, J.; Guarnieri, M.; Heroux, A.; Yang, K.; Zhao, R.

    2007-01-01

    Prp8 is a critical pre-mRNA splicing factor. Prp8 is proposed to help form and stabilize the spliceosome catalytic core and to be an important regulator of spliceosome activation. Mutations in human Prp8 (hPrp8) cause a severe form of the genetic disorder retinitis pigmentosa, RP13. Understanding the molecular mechanism of Prp8's function in pre-mRNA splicing and RP13 has been hindered by its large size (over 2000 amino acids) and remarkably low-sequence similarity with other proteins. Here we present the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain (the last 273 residues) of Caenorhabditis elegans Prp8 (cPrp8). The core of the C-terminal domain is an / structure that forms the MPN (Mpr1, Pad1 N-terminal) fold but without Zn{sup 2+} coordination. We propose that the C-terminal domain is a protein interaction domain instead of a Zn{sup 2+}-dependent metalloenzyme as proposed for some MPN proteins. Mapping of RP13 mutants on the Prp8 structure suggests that these residues constitute a binding surface between Prp8 and other partner(s), and the disruption of this interaction provides a plausible molecular mechanism for RP13.

  4. Macrophage cytotoxicity in lethal and non-lethal murine malaria and the effect of vaccination.

    PubMed Central

    Taverne, J; Treagust, J D; Playfair, J H

    1986-01-01

    We investigated the development of cell-mediated immunity in lethal and non-lethal malarial infections by assaying the cytotoxic activity of spleen cells for L929 tumour cells at different times after infection of mice with the lethal P. berghei, a lethal variant of Plasmodium yoelii and the non-lethal P. yoelii and P. chabaudi. In all cases the cytotoxicity increased to a peak during the first week and then diminished but the time of the peak varied with the infection; its activity was lowest with P. berghei. A second peak occurred in the non-lethal infections at the time of recovery. A protective vaccine accelerated and enhanced the early peak of cytotoxicity. The activity was mediated by adherent phagocytic cells, probably through the release of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) by macrophages since it was inhibited by antiserum against recombinant mouse TNF and did not destroy TNF-resistant L929 cells. Its induction was not dependent on T cells since it occurred in T cell-deficient mice infected with non-lethal P. yoelii. However, the accelerated increase associated with vaccination could be adoptively transferred by spleen lymphocytes from vaccinated mice. PMID:3542317

  5. Rab7 Mutants Associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease Cause Delayed Growth Factor Receptor Transport and Altered Endosomal and Nuclear Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    BasuRay, Soumik; Mukherjee, Sanchita; Romero, Elsa G.; Seaman, Matthew N. J.; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Rab7 belongs to the Ras superfamily of small GTPases and is a master regulator of early to late endocytic membrane transport. Four missense mutations in the late endosomal Rab7 GTPase (L129F, K157N, N161T, and V162M) cause the autosomal dominant peripheral neuropathy Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2B (CMT2B) disease. As yet, the pathological mechanisms connecting mutant Rab7 protein expression to altered neuronal function are undefined. Here, we analyze the effects of Rab7 CMT2B mutants on epidermal growth factor (EGF)-dependent intracellular signaling and trafficking. Three different cell lines expressing Rab7 CMT2B mutants and stimulated with EGF exhibited delayed trafficking of EGF to LAMP1-positive late endosomes and lysosomes and slowed EGF receptor (EGFR) degradation. Expression of all Rab7 CMT2B mutants altered the Rab7 activation cycle, leading to enhanced and prolonged EGFR signaling as well as variable increases in p38 and ERK1/2 activation. However, due to reduced nuclear translocation of p38 and ERK1/2, the downstream nuclear activation of Elk-1 was decreased along with the expression of immediate early genes like c-fos and Egr-1 by the disease mutants. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that Rab7 CMT2B mutants impair growth factor receptor trafficking and, in turn, alter p38 and ERK1/2 signaling from perinuclear, clustered signaling endosomes. The resulting down-regulation of EGFR-dependent nuclear transcription that is crucial for normal axon outgrowth and peripheral innervation offers a crucial new mechanistic insight into disease pathogenesis that is relevant to other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23188822

  6. Bacillus anthracis Lethal Toxin Reduces Human Alveolar Epithelial Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Marybeth; Duggan, Elizabeth Stewart; Booth, John Leland; Patel, Vineet Indrajit; Zander, Ryan A.; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Ramani, Vijay; Veres, Tibor Zoltan; Prenzler, Frauke; Sewald, Katherina; Williams, Daniel M.; Coggeshall, Kenneth Mark; Awasthi, Shanjana; Lupu, Florea; Burian, Dennis; Ballard, Jimmy Dale; Braun, Armin

    2012-01-01

    The lung is the site of entry for Bacillus anthracis in inhalation anthrax, the deadliest form of the disease. Bacillus anthracis produces virulence toxins required for disease. Alveolar macrophages were considered the primary target of the Bacillus anthracis virulence factor lethal toxin because lethal toxin inhibits mouse macrophages through cleavage of MEK signaling pathway components, but we have reported that human alveolar macrophages are not a target of lethal toxin. Our current results suggest that, unlike human alveolar macrophages, the cells lining the respiratory units of the lung, alveolar epithelial cells, are a target of lethal toxin in humans. Alveolar epithelial cells expressed lethal toxin receptor protein, bound the protective antigen component of lethal toxin, and were subject to lethal-toxin-induced cleavage of multiple MEKs. These findings suggest that human alveolar epithelial cells are a target of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin. Further, no reduction in alveolar epithelial cell viability was observed, but lethal toxin caused actin rearrangement and impaired desmosome formation, consistent with impaired barrier function as well as reduced surfactant production. Therefore, by compromising epithelial barrier function, lethal toxin may play a role in the pathogenesis of inhalation anthrax by facilitating the dissemination of Bacillus anthracis from the lung in early disease and promoting edema in late stages of the illness. PMID:23027535

  7. Deadly Lessons: Understanding Lethal School Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Mark H., Ed.; Petrie, Carol V., Ed.; Braga, Anthony A., Ed.; McLaughlin, Brenda L., Ed.

    This collection of papers is the outcome of the National Academies' effort to glean information from six different case studies of student-perpetrated school shootings. Part 1, "Case Studies of Lethal School Violence," includes: "The Copycat Factor: Mental Illness, Guns, and the Shooting Incident at Heritage High School, Rockdale County, Georgia"…

  8. Radiation-induced mouse chimeras: a cellular analysis of the major lymphoid compartments, factors affecting lethal graft versus host disease and host-tumor interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Almaraz, R.

    1981-01-01

    The major lymphoid compartments of allogeneic bone marrow chimeras were evaluated for the extent of cell chimerism and distribution of Thy 1 and la bearing cells. These chimeras contained lymphoid cell primarily of donor origin. The bone marrow compartment was a mixture of host and donor origin cells. The distribution of Thy 1 and la bearing cells was similar as in normal mice. The effect of adult thymectomy alone or followed by whole-body irradiation and bone marrow reconstitution on the distribution of the Thy 1 positive cells was also investigated. Thymectomy with or without WBI and bone marrow reconstitution significantly lowered the number of Thy 1 bearing cells in the blood and spleen. The number of la bearing cells did not appear to be affected by thymectomy. The role of circulating lymphoid cells in the incidence of lethal graft versus host disease (GVHD) in radiation induced fully allogeneic mouse chimeras was studied. Mice reconstituted with allogeneic bone marrow from bled donors had a statistically lower incidence of GVHD than those reconstituted with bone marrow from unbled donors. Addition of mature peripheral lymphocytes from blood to the reconstituting bone marrow cells from bled donors reduplicated the high incidence of lethal GVHD. It was demonstrated that the bone marrow of mice not exsanguinated prior to harvesting of bone marrow contained significant numbers of peripheral contaminating cells in the harvested bone marrow. The role of suppressor cell elimination in resisting tumor growth was investigated using radiation induced mouse chimeras. Local effects of irradiation alone at the site of tumor inoculation could account for this lack of growth.

  9. The anthrax protective antigen (PA63) bound conformation of a peptide inhibitor of the binding of lethal factor to PA63: as determined by trNOESY NMR and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Rickey P; Bhattacharjee, Apurba K; Koser, Brandon W; Traficante, Daniel D

    2004-10-21

    Anthrax protective antigen (PA) is one of the three proteins produced by the gram positive bacteria Bacillus anthracis collectively known as the "anthrax toxin" (Ascenzi, P.; Visca, P.; Ippolito, G.; Spallarossa, A.; Bolognesi, M.; et al. Anthrax toxin: a tripartite lethal combination. FEBS Lett. 2002, 531, 384-388). The role played by PA in anthrax intoxication is to transport the two enzymes lethal factor (LF) and edema factor (EF) into the cell. Collier and co-workers (Mourez, M.; Kane, R. S.; Mogridge, J.; Metallo, S.; Deschatelets, P.; et al. Designing a polyvalent inhibitor of anthrax toxin. Nat. Biotechnol. 2001, 958). reported the isolation of two peptides via phage display that bind to the PA63 heptamer and inhibit its interaction with LF and EF, and thereby prevent the transport of LF and EF into the cell. One of these peptides, His-Thr-Ser-Thr-Try-Trp-Trp-Leu-Asp-Gly-Ala-Pro (P1), was selected for structural investigation on the basis of its ability to prevent the binding of LF to the PA63 heptamer bundle. Two-dimensional trNOESY experiments coupled with NOE restrained simulated annealing calculations were used to determine the PA63-bound conformation of P1. On binding to PA63, P1 adopts a helical conformation involving residues 3-9 while the C- and N-terminal residues exhibit dynamic fraying.

  10. Effects of Deletion of Mutant Huntingtin in Steroidogenic Factor 1 Neurons on the Psychiatric and Metabolic Phenotype in the BACHD Mouse Model of Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Petersén, Åsa

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric and metabolic features appear several years before motor disturbances in the neurodegenerative Huntington’s disease (HD), caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the huntingtin (HTT) gene. Although the mechanisms leading to these aspects are unknown, dysfunction in the hypothalamus, a brain region controlling emotion and metabolism, has been suggested. A direct link between the expression of the disease causing protein, huntingtin (HTT), in the hypothalamus and the development of metabolic and psychiatric-like features have been shown in the BACHD mouse model of HD. However, precisely which circuitry in the hypothalamus is critical for these features is not known. We hypothesized that expression of mutant HTT in the ventromedial hypothalamus, an area involved in the regulation of metabolism and emotion would be important for the development of these non-motor aspects. Therefore, we inactivated mutant HTT in a specific neuronal population of the ventromedial hypothalamus expressing the transcription factor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1) in the BACHD mouse using cross-breeding based on a Cre-loxP system. Effects on anxiety-like behavior were assessed using the elevated plus maze and novelty-induced suppressed feeding test. Depressive-like behavior was assessed using the Porsolt forced swim test. Effects on the metabolic phenotype were analyzed using measurements of body weight and body fat, as well as serum insulin and leptin levels. Interestingly, the inactivation of mutant HTT in SF1-expressing neurons exerted a partial positive effect on the depressive-like behavior in female BACHD mice at 4 months of age. In this cohort of mice, no anxiety-like behavior was detected. The deletion of mutant HTT in SF1 neurons did not have any effect on the development of metabolic features in BACHD mice. Taken together, our results indicate that mutant HTT regulates metabolic networks by affecting hypothalamic circuitries that do not involve the SF1 neurons of the

  11. Evidence that the premature death mutation (p) in the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) is not an autonomous cell lethal.

    PubMed

    Mes-Hartree, M; Armstrong, J B

    1980-12-01

    Cell-lethal developmental mutations, which are presumed to affect the viability of all cells in a mutant embryo, have been distinguished from other development lethals on the basis of the results of parabiosis and transplant experiments. Premature death (p), previously classified as a cell lethal, does not survive parabiosis. However, transplants involving mutant eye, flank epidermis and primordial limb tissue all survived on a normal recipient. The mutant, therefore, cannot be considered a true cell lethal, though it suffers from serious and widespread abnormalities that cannot be corrected by parabiosis. In addition, transplants of mutant branchial mound tissue did not develop into normal gills on a normal recipient. These transplants were the only ones involving mutant endoderm, and their failure supports our hypothesis that the mutation leads to a specific endoderm defect.

  12. pH Induced Conformational Transitions in the Transforming Growth Factor β-Induced Protein (TGFβIp) Associated Corneal Dystrophy Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Murugan, Elavazhagan; Venkatraman, Anandalakshmi; Lei, Zhou; Mouvet, Victoria; Rui Yi Lim, Rayne; Muruganantham, Nandhakumar; Goh, Eunice; Swee Lim Peh, Gary; Beuerman, Roger W.; Chaurasia, Shyam S.; Rajamani, Lakshminarayanan; Mehta, Jodhbir S.

    2016-01-01

    Most stromal corneal dystrophies are associated with aggregation and deposition of the mutated transforming growth factor-β induced protein (TGFβIp). The 4th_FAS1 domain of TGFβIp harbors ~80% of the mutations that forms amyloidogenic and non-amyloidogenic aggregates. To understand the mechanism of aggregation and the differences between the amyloidogenic and non-amyloidogenic phenotypes, we expressed the 4th_FAS1 domains of TGFβIp carrying the mutations R555W (non-amyloidogenic) and H572R (amyloidogenic) along with the wild-type (WT). R555W was more susceptible to acidic pH compared to H572R and displayed varying chemical stabilities with decreasing pH. Thermal denaturation studies at acidic pH showed that while WT did not undergo any conformational transition, the mutants exhibited a clear pH-dependent irreversible conversion from αβ conformation to β-sheet oligomers. The β-oligomers of both mutants were stable at physiological temperature and pH. Electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering studies showed that β-oligomers of H572R were larger compared to R555W. The β-oligomers of both mutants were cytotoxic to primary human corneal stromal fibroblast (pHCSF) cells. The β-oligomers of both mutants exhibit variations in their morphologies, sizes, thermal and chemical stabilities, aggregation patterns and cytotoxicities. PMID:27030015

  13. A new mutant of Arabidopsis disturbed in its roots, right-handed slanting, and gravitropism defines a gene that encodes a heat-shock factor.

    PubMed

    Fortunati, A; Piconese, S; Tassone, P; Ferrari, S; Migliaccio, F

    2008-01-01

    A new mutant of Arabidopsis named rha1 is characterized and the gene involved cloned. In roots, the mutant shows minimal right-handed slanting, reduced gravitropic response, notable resistance to 2,4-D, but scarce resistance to IAA and NAA. The roots also show a clear resistance to the auxin transport inhibitors TIBA and NPA, and to ethylene. Other characteristics are a reduced number of lateral roots and reduced size of shoot and root in the seedlings. The gene, cloned through TAIL-PCR, was found to be a heat-shock factor that maps on chromosome 5, close to and above the RFLP marker m61. The rha1 structure, mRNA, and translation product are reported. Since, so far, no other gravitropic mutant has been described as mutated in a heat-shock factor, rha1 belongs to a new group of mutants disturbed in slanting, gravitropism, and auxin physiology. As shown through the RT-PCR analyses of its expression, the gene retains the function connected with heat shock. If the characteristics connected with auxin physiology are considered, however, it is also likely that the gene, as a transcription factor, could be involved in root circumnutation, gravitropic response, and hormonal control of differentiation. Since GUS staining under the gene promoter was localized mainly in the mature tissues, rha1 does not seem to be involved in the first steps of gravitropism, but is rather related to the general response to auxin. The alterations in slanting (mainly due to reduced chiral circumnutation) and gravitropism lead to the supposition that the two processes may have, at least in part, common origins.

  14. Rapid depletion of mutant eukaryotic initiation factor 5A at restrictive temperature reveals connections to actin cytoskeleton and cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Ishita; Gross, Stephane R; Kinzy, Terri Goss; Chen, Kuang Yu

    2006-03-01

    Eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) is the only protein in nature that contains hypusine, an unusual amino acid derived from the modification of lysine by spermidine. Two genes, TIF51A and TIF51B, encode eIF5A in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In an effort to understand the structure-function relationship of eIF5A, we have generated yeast mutants by introducing plasmid-borne tif51A into a double null strain where both TIF51A and TIF51B have been disrupted. One of the mutants, tsL102A strain (tif51A L102A tif51aDelta tif51bDelta) exhibits a strong temperature-sensitive growth phenotype. At the restrictive temperature, tsL102A strain also exhibits a cell shape change, a lack of volume change in response to temperature increase and becomes more sensitive to ethanol, a hallmark of defects in the PKC/WSC cell wall integrity pathway. In addition, a striking change in actin dynamics and a complete cell cycle arrest at G1 phase occur in tsL102A cells at restrictive temperature. The temperature-sensitivity of tsL102A strain is due to a rapid loss of mutant eIF5A with the half-life reduced from 6 h at permissive temperature to 20 min at restrictive temperature. Phenylmethyl sulfonylfluoride (PMSF), an irreversible inhibitor of serine protease, inhibited the degradation of mutant eIF5A and suppressed the temperature-sensitive growth arrest. Sorbitol, an osmotic stabilizer that complement defects in PKC/WSC pathways, stabilizes the mutant eIF5A and suppresses all the observed temperature-sensitive phenotypes. PMID:16408210

  15. Subfunctionalization of sigma factors during the evolution of land plants based on mutant analysis of liverwort (Marchantia polymorpha L.) MpSIG1.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Minoru; Takami, Tsuneaki; Peng, Lianwei; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Kohchi, Takayuki; Shikanai, Toshiharu; Nishimura, Yoshiki

    2013-01-01

    Sigma factor is a subunit of plastid-encoded RNA polymerase that regulates the transcription of plastid-encoded genes by recognizing a set of promoters. Sigma factors have increased in copy number and have diversified during the evolution of land plants, but details of this process remain unknown. Liverworts represent the basal group of embryophytes and are expected to retain the ancestral features of land plants. In liverwort (Marchantia polymorpha L.), we isolated and characterized a T-DNA-tagged mutant (Mpsig1) of sigma factor 1 (MpSIG1). The mutant did not show any visible phenotypes, implying that MpSIG1 function is redundant with that of other sigma factors. However, quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and RNA gel blot analysis revealed that genes related to photosynthesis were downregulated, resulting in the minor reduction of some protein complexes. The transcript levels of genes clustered in the petL, psaA, psbB, psbK, and psbE operons of liverwort were lower than those in the wild type, a result similar to that in the SIG1 defective mutant in rice (Oryza sativa). Overexpression analysis revealed primitive functional divergence between the SIG1 and SIG2 proteins in bryophytes, whereas these proteins still retain functional redundancy. We also discovered that the predominant sigma factor for ndhF mRNA expression has been diversified in liverwort, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and rice. Our study shows the ancestral function of SIG1 and the process of functional partitioning (subfunctionalization) of sigma factors during the evolution of land plants.

  16. Recapitulation of the ovum mutant (Om) phenotype and loss of Om locus polarity in cloned mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shaorong; Wu, Guangming; Han, Zhiming; de la Casa-Esperón, Elena; Sapienza, Carmen; Latham, Keith E

    2005-02-01

    The ovum mutant (Om) locus in mice affects early interactions between sperm and egg that in turn affect viability of embryos beyond the morula stage. Crosses of DDK females to males of many other inbred strains are 95% lethal around the morula stage, whereas reciprocal crosses are fully viable. Available data indicate that the early lethality is the result of an interaction between a factor in the ooplasm and the paternal genome. In this study, we examined whether this lethal interaction would likewise occur in cloned embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. We find that the Om effect is recapitulated but that the parental origin effect at the Om locus is no longer evident in cloned embryos.

  17. Identification of a GCC transcription factor responding to fruit colour change events in citrus through the transcriptomic analyses of two mutants

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background External ripening in Citrus fruits is morphologically characterized by a colour shift from green to orange due to the degradation of chlorophylls and the accumulation of carotenoid pigments. Although numerous genes coding for enzymes involved in such biochemical pathways have been identified, the molecular control of this process has been scarcely studied. In this work we used the Citrus clementina mutants 39B3 and 39E7, showing delayed colour break, to isolate genes potentially related to the regulation of peel ripening and its physiological or biochemical effects. Results Pigment analyses revealed different profiles of carotenoid and chlorophyll modification in 39B3 and 39E7 mutants. Flavedo from 39B3 fruits showed an overall delay in carotenoid accumulation and chlorophyll degradation, while the flavedo of 39E7 was devoid of the apocarotenoid β-citraurin among other carotenoid alterations. A Citrus microarray containing about 20,000 cDNA fragments was used to identify genes that were differentially expressed during colour change in the flavedo of 39B3 and 39E7 mutants respect to the parental variety. The results highlighted 73 and 90 genes that were respectively up- and down-regulated in both mutants. CcGCC1 gene, coding for a GCC type transcriptional factor, was found to be down-regulated. CcGCC1 expression was strongly induced at the onset of colour change in the flavedo of parental clementine fruit. Moreover, treatment of fruits with gibberellins, a retardant of external ripening, delayed both colour break and CcGCC1 overexpression. Conclusions In this work, the citrus fruit ripening mutants 39B3 and 39E7 have been characterized at the phenotypic, biochemical and transcriptomic level. A defective synthesis of the apocarotenoid β-citraurin has been proposed to cause the yellowish colour of fully ripe 39E7 flavedo. The analyses of the mutant transcriptomes revealed that colour change during peel ripening was strongly associated with a major

  18. Role of macrophage oxidative burst in the action of anthrax lethal toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, P. C.; Kruskal, B. A.; Ezekowitz, R. A.; Bloom, B. R.; Collier, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Major symptoms and death from systemic Bacillus anthracis infections are mediated by the action of the pathogen's lethal toxin on host macrophages. High levels of the toxin are cytolytic to macrophages, whereas low levels stimulate these cells to produce cytokines (interleukin-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha), which induce systemic shock and death. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Experiments were performed to assess the possibility that the oxidative burst may be involved in one or both of lethal toxin's effects on macrophages. Toximediated cell lysis, superoxide anion and cytokine production were measured. Effects of antioxidants and macrophage mutations were examined. RESULTS: RAW264.7 murine macrophages treated with high levels of toxin released large amounts of superoxide anion, beginning at about 1 hr, which correlates with the onset of cytolysis. Cytolysis could be blocked with various exogenous antioxidants or with N-acetyl-L-cysteine and methionine, which promote production of the endogenous antioxidant, glutathione. Mutant murine macrophage lines deficient in production of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) were relatively insensitive to the lytic effects of the toxin, whereas a line with increased oxidative burst potential showed elevated sensitivity. Also, cultured blood monocyte-derived macrophages from a patient with Chronic Granulomatous Disease, a disorder in which the phagocyte's oxidative burst is disabled, were totally resistant to toxin, in contrast to control monocytes. CONCLUSIONS: These results imply that the cytolytic effect of the toxin is mediated by ROIs. Additionally, cytokine production and consequent pathologies showed partial dependence on macrophage ROIs. Antioxidants moderately inhibited toxin-induced cytokine production in vitro, and BALB/c mice pretreated with N-acetyl-L-cysteine or mepacrine showed partial protection against lethal toxin. Thus ROIs are involved in both the cytolytic action of anthrax lethal toxin and

  19. Cumulative Mutations Affecting Sterol Biosynthesis in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Result in Synthetic Lethality That Is Suppressed by Alterations in Sphingolipid Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Valachovic, Martin; Bareither, Bart M.; Bhuiyan, M. Shah Alam; Eckstein, James; Barbuch, Robert; Balderes, Dina; Wilcox, Lisa; Sturley, Stephen L.; Dickson, Robert C.; Bard, Martin

    2006-01-01

    UPC2 and ECM22 belong to a Zn(2)–Cys(6) family of fungal transcription factors and have been implicated in the regulation of sterol synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans. Previous reports suggest that double deletion of these genes in S. cerevisiae is lethal depending on the genetic background of the strain. In this investigation we demonstrate that lethality of upc2Δ ecm22Δ in the S288c genetic background is attributable to a mutation in the HAP1 transcription factor. In addition we demonstrate that strains containing upc2Δ ecm22Δ are also inviable when carrying deletions of ERG6 and ERG28 but not when carrying deletions of ERG3, ERG4, or ERG5. It has previously been demonstrated that UPC2 and ECM22 regulate S. cerevisiae ERG2 and ERG3 and that the erg2Δ upc2Δ ecm22Δ triple mutant is also synthetically lethal. We used transposon mutagenesis to isolate viable suppressors of hap1Δ, erg2Δ, erg6Δ, and erg28Δ in the upc2Δ ecm22Δ genetic background. Mutations in two genes (YND1 and GDA1) encoding apyrases were found to suppress the synthetic lethality of three of these triple mutants but not erg2Δ upc2Δ ecm22Δ. We show that deletion of YND1, like deletion of GDA1, alters the sphingolipid profiles, suggesting that changes in sphingolipids compensate for lethality produced by changes in sterol composition and abundance. PMID:16702413

  20. Structure-Based Systematic Isolation of Conditional-Lethal Mutations in the Single Yeast Calmodulin Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ohya, Y.; Botstein, D.

    1994-01-01

    Conditional-lethal mutations of the single calmodulin gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been very difficult to isolate by random and systematic methods, despite the fact that deletions cause recessive lethality. We report here the isolation of numerous conditional-lethal mutants that were recovered by systematically altering phenylalanine residues. The phenylalanine residues of calmodulin were implicated in function both by structural studies of calmodulin bound to target peptides and by their extraordinary conservation in evolution. Seven single and 26 multiple Phe -> Ala mutations were constructed. Mutant phenotypes were examined in a haploid cmd1 disrupted strain under three conditions: single copy, low copy, and overexpressed. Whereas all but one of the single mutations caused no obvious phenotype, most of the multiple mutations caused obvious growth phenotypes. Five were lethal, 6 were lethal only in synthetic medium, 13 were temperature-sensitive lethal and 2 had no discernible phenotypic consequences. Overexpression of some of the mutant genes restored the phenotype to nearly wild type. Several temperature-sensitive calmodulin mutations were suppressed by elevated concentration of CaCl(2) in the medium. Mutant calmodulin protein was detected at normal levels in extracts of most of the lethal mutant cells, suggesting that the deleterious phenotypes were due to loss of the calmodulin function and not protein instability. Analysis of diploid strains heterozygous for all combinations of cmd1-ts alleles revealed four intragenic complementation groups. The contributions of individual phe->ala changes to mutant phenotypes support the idea of internal functional redundancy in the symmetrical calmodulin protein molecule. These results suggest that the several phenylalanine residues in calmodulin are required to different extents in different combinations in order to carry out each of the several essential tasks. PMID:7896089

  1. Protruding vulva mutants identify novel loci and Wnt signaling factors that function during Caenorhabditis elegans vulva development.

    PubMed

    Eisenmann, D M; Kim, S K

    2000-11-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans vulva develops from the progeny of three vulval precursor cells (VPCs) induced to divide and differentiate by a signal from the somatic gonad. Evolutionarily conserved Ras and Notch extracellular signaling pathways are known to function during this process. To identify novel loci acting in vulval development, we carried out a genetic screen for mutants having a protruding-vulva (Pvl) mutant phenotype. Here we report the initial genetic characterization of several novel loci: bar-1, pvl-4, pvl-5, and pvl-6. In addition, on the basis of their Pvl phenotypes, we show that the previously identified genes lin-26, mom-3/mig-14, egl-18, and sem-4 also function during vulval development. Our characterization indicates that (1) pvl-4 and pvl-5 are required for generation/survival of the VPCs; (2) bar-1, mom-3/mig-14, egl-18, and sem-4 play a role in VPC fate specification; (3) lin-26 is required for proper VPC fate execution; and (4) pvl-6 acts during vulval morphogenesis. In addition, two of these genes, bar-1 and mom-3/mig-14, are known to function in processes regulated by Wnt signaling, suggesting that a Wnt signaling pathway is acting during vulval development. PMID:11063687

  2. Anti-synthetic peptide antibody reacting at the fusion junction of deletion-mutant epidermal growth factor receptors in human glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, P.A.; Zalutsky, M.R.; Fuller, G.N.; Archer, G.E.; Friedman, H.S.; Kwatra, M.M.; Bigner, S.H.; Bigner, D.D. ); Wong, A.J. ); Vogelstein, B. )

    1990-06-01

    The authors have investigated human gliomas that amplify and rearrange the epidermal growth factor receptor gene, with generation of an in-frame deletion mutation of 802 nucleotides in the external domain. This in-frame deletion mutation generates a local amino acid sequence at the fusion junction of what normally were distant polypeptide sequences in the intact epidermal growth factor receptor. This 14-amino acid peptide was chemically synthesized, coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin, and used as an immunogen in rabbits. The elicited antibody reacted specifically with the fusion peptide in ELISA. The anti-fusion junction peptide antibody was purified by passage of the antiserum over a peptide affinity column with acidic elution. The purified antibody selectively bound the glioma deletion mutant as compared to the intact epidermal growth factor receptor as assessed by immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation with gel electrophoresis, and binding experiments using radioiodinated antibody. These data indicate that it is feasible to generate site-specific anti-peptide antibodies that are highly selective for mutant proteins in human tumors. The anti-peptide antibody described here, and other mutation site-specific antibodies, should be ideal candidates for tumor immunoimaging and immunotherapy.

  3. Genetic relationships among three chlorophyll-deficient mutants in peanut, Arachis hypogaea L.

    PubMed

    Tai, P Y; Hammons, R O; Matlock, R S

    1977-01-01

    The genetic relationships of three chlorophyll-deficient mutant peanuts, lutescens (lu), aureus (au), and virescent (v) were studied under field and greenhouse conditions. The F1 plants from crosses between these mutants produced phenotypically normal green. In F2, aureus X virescent segregated 675 normal green : 225 virescent : 45 aureus : 15 virescent aureus : 64 seedling lethal, and lutescens X virescent segregated 45 normal green : 15 virescent : 3 lutescens : 1 seedling lethal. (Lutescens peanuts were seedling lethal in the field.) As previously reported, the F2 of aureus X lutescens gave 225 normal green : 15 aureus :15 lutescens : 1 seedling lethal. The three chlorophyll-deficient factors (au, lu, and v) show independent inheritance. The recessive combinations from the parental types between aureus and virescent and between aureus and lutescens would produce plants with a combination of their respective parental characteristics, but the recessive combination between lutescens and virescent was nearly albino. The v-au and lu-au seedlings have a longer life span than the v-lu seedling has. The genotypes for the three mutants are tentatively identified as lutescens VV Au 1 Au 1 Au 2 Au 2 lu 1 lu 1 lu 2 lu 2 L 1 L 1 L 2 L 2, aureus VV au1au1 au2au2 Lu1Lu1 Lu2Lu2 L1L1 l2l2, and virescent vv Au1Au1 Au2Au2 lu1lu1 Lu2Lu2 l1l1 L2L2.

  4. A Sall4 Mutant Mouse Model Useful for Studying the Role of Sall4 in Early Embryonic Development and Organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Madhuri; Wang, Wei; Spiden, Sarah; Chen-Murchie, Dongrong; Tannahill, David; Steel, Karen P.; Bradley, Allan

    2008-01-01

    Summary SALL4 is a homologue of the Drosophila homeotic gene spalt, a zinc finger transcription factor, required for inner cell mass proliferation in early embryonic development. It also interacts with other transcription factors to control the development of the anorectal region, kidney, heart, limbs, and brain. Truncating mutations in SALL4 cause Okihiro syndrome, manifest as Duane anomaly, radial ray defects and sensorineural and conductive deafness. We report the characterization of a novel murine Sall4 null allele created by bacterial recombineering in ES cells. Homozygous mutant mice exhibit early embryonic lethality. Heterozygous mutant mice recapitulate phenotypic features of Okihiro syndrome including deafness, lower anogenital tract abnormalities, renal hypoplasia, anencephaly, Hirschprung’s disease, and skeletal defects. This phenotype shows important differences in cardiac and ear manifestations to previously characterized Sall4 mutant alleles and should prove useful for the investigation of the influence of modifier alleles and protein interactions on the transcriptional regulatory function of Sall4. PMID:17216607

  5. Abrogation of both short and long forms of Latent Transforming Growth Factor-β Binding Protein-1 causes defective cardiovascular development and is perinatally lethal

    PubMed Central

    Horiguchi, Masahito; Todorovic, Vesna; Hadjiolova, Krassimira; Weiskirchen, Ralf; Rifkin, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Latent transforming growth factor-β binding protein-1 (LTBP-1) is an extracellular protein that is structurally similar to fibrillin and has an important role in controlling transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling by storing the cytokine in the extracellular matrix and by being involved in the conversion of the latent growth factor to its active form. LTBP-1 is found as both a short (LTBP-1S) and long (LTBP-1L) forms, which are derived though the use of separate promoters. There is controversy regarding the importance of LTBP-1L, as Ltbp1L knockout mice showed multiple cardiovascular defects but the complete null mice did not. Here, we describe a third line of Ltbp1 knockout mice generated utilizing a conditional knockout strategy that ablated expression of both L and S forms of LTBP-1. These mice show severe developmental cardiovascular abnormalities and die perinatally; thus these animals display a phenotype similar to previously reported Ltbp1L knockout mice. We reinvestigated the other “complete” knockout line, and found that these mice express a splice variant of LTBP-1L and, therefore, are not complete Ltbp1 knockouts. Our results clarify the phenotypes of Ltbp1 null mice and re-emphasize the importance of LTBP-1 in vivo. PMID:25805620

  6. Baseline, Trend, and Normalization of Carcinoembryonic Antigen as Prognostic Factors in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Mutant Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With First-Line Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Mu; Lai, Chien-Hao; Chang, Huang-Chih; Chao, Tung-Ying; Tseng, Chia-Cheng; Fang, Wen-Feng; Wang, Chin-Chou; Chung, Yu-Hsiu; Huang, Kuo-Tung; Chen, Hung-Cheng; Chang, Ya-Chun; Lin, Meng-Chih

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Among epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status unknown nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, those with higher carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level are more likely to response to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) because they tend to have mutant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). However, patients with higher CEA also have more tumor burden. With the above paradoxical evidence, it is prudent to understand the prognostic significance of baseline CEA in patients with EGFR-mutant NSCLC treated with first-line EGFR-TKIs. The clinical significance of the trend in CEA after treatment and the impact of CEA normalization during EGFR-TKI therapy are also unknown and potentially important. A total of 241 patients who received first-line EGFR-TKIs were included. As to baseline CEA, patients were divided into normal, low, and high baseline CEA by cut point determined by receiver operating characteristic curves. As to CEA responses, patients were divided into 3 groups accordingly to their amount of CEA change after taking TKIs. In group A, 1-month follow-up CEA level decreased more than 35% with nadir CEA normalization; in group B, 1-month follow-up CEA level decreased more than 35% without nadir CEA normalization; and in group C, 1-month follow-up CEA level decreased less than 35% or increased. Patients with higher baseline CEA levels had shorter progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) (CEA > 32 vs 5–32 vs <5 ng/mL, PFS = 8.8 vs 11.3 vs 14.4 months, respectively, P < 0.001; OS = 17.8 vs 22.0 vs 27.9 months, respectively, P = 0.01). For trend and CEA normalization in groups A, B, and C, PFS was 14.3, 10.6, and 7.1 months, respectively (P < 0.001); OS was 29.7, 20.0, and 16.2 months, respectively (P < 0.001). Baseline, trend, and normalization of CEA levels are potential prognostic markers for patients with EGFR-mutant advanced NSCLC treated with first line EGFR-TKIs. PMID:26683939

  7. Increased Viral Dissemination in the Brain and Lethality in MCMV-Infected, Dicer-Deficient Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Ostermann, Eleonore; Macquin, Cécile; Krezel, Wojciech; Bahram, Seiamak; Georgel, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Among Herpesviruses, Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV or HHV-5) represents a major threat during congenital or neonatal infections, which may lead to encephalitis with serious neurological consequences. However, as opposed to other less prevalent pathogens, the mechanisms and genetic susceptibility factors for CMV encephalitis are poorly understood. This lack of information considerably reduces the prognostic and/or therapeutic possibilities. To easily monitor the effects of genetic defects on brain dissemination following CMV infection we used a recently developed in vivo mouse model based on the neonatal inoculation of a MCMV genetically engineered to express Luciferase. Here, we further validate this protocol for live imaging, and demonstrate increased lethality associated with viral infection and encephalitis in mutant mice lacking Dicer activity. Our data indicate that miRNAs are important players in the control of MCMV pathogenesis and suggest that miRNA-based endothelial functions and integrity are crucial for CMV encephalitis. PMID:25955106

  8. Increased Viral Dissemination in the Brain and Lethality in MCMV-Infected, Dicer-Deficient Neonates.

    PubMed

    Ostermann, Eleonore; Macquin, Cécile; Krezel, Wojciech; Bahram, Seiamak; Georgel, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    Among Herpesviruses, Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV or HHV-5) represents a major threat during congenital or neonatal infections, which may lead to encephalitis with serious neurological consequences. However, as opposed to other less prevalent pathogens, the mechanisms and genetic susceptibility factors for CMV encephalitis are poorly understood. This lack of information considerably reduces the prognostic and/or therapeutic possibilities. To easily monitor the effects of genetic defects on brain dissemination following CMV infection we used a recently developed in vivo mouse model based on the neonatal inoculation of a MCMV genetically engineered to express Luciferase. Here, we further validate this protocol for live imaging, and demonstrate increased lethality associated with viral infection and encephalitis in mutant mice lacking Dicer activity. Our data indicate that miRNAs are important players in the control of MCMV pathogenesis and suggest that miRNA-based endothelial functions and integrity are crucial for CMV encephalitis. PMID:25955106

  9. Listeria monocytogenes (delta-actA mutant) infection in tumor necrosis factor receptor p55-deficient neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Sonje, Marina Bubonja; Abram, Maja; Stenzel, Werner; Deckert, Martina

    2010-10-01

    Using TNF receptor 1 knock out (TNFR1KO) mice, we investigated the role played by TNFR1 in immune regulation during neonatal listeriosis. Induction of protective immune response in wild type pups resulted in the prompt control of infection with an attenuated DeltaactA mutant Listeria monocytogenes, accompanied by enhanced hepatic expression of mRNA for IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, and IL-10. Conversely, the lack of TNFR1 signalling in TNFR1KO neonatal mice resulted in substantial changes in the profile of inflammatory mediators and ultimately fatal outcome of the infected pups. Despite remarkable increase in indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA detected in the liver of TNFR1KO mice, bacterial proliferation was unrestrained. Increased mRNA expression of IDO, iNOS, TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, MCP-1, and MIP-1alpha was found in the spleens of infected KO mice, and in the brains mRNA encoding iNOS, IDO, IFN-gamma, IL-12p40, IL-10, and RANTES was also upregulated. Large necrotic lesions consisting of granulocytes and macrophages were scattered throughout the liver of these mice. TNFR1KO neonates were unable to clear neutrophils and switch from the innate immune response to a specific reaction mediated by T cells. These results prove that TNF-alpha signalling is crucial and irreplaceable in antilisterial protection during the neonatal period. PMID:20685289

  10. Clostridium sordellii Lethal-Toxin Autoprocessing and Membrane Localization Activities Drive GTPase Glucosylation Profiles in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Craven, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium sordellii infections cause gangrene and edema in humans and gastrointestinal infections in livestock. One of the principle virulence factors is TcsL, a large protein toxin which glucosylates host GTPases to cause cytopathic and cytotoxic effects. TcsL has two enzymatic domains, an N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain (GTD) and an autoprocessing domain responsible for release of the GTD within the cell. The GTD can then use its N-terminal membrane localization domain (MLD) for orientation on membranes and modification of GTPases. This study describes the use of conditionally immortalized murine pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells as a model for the study of TcsL functional activities. Point mutations that disrupt the glucosyltransferase, autoprocessing, or membrane localization activities were introduced into a recombinant version of TcsL, and the activities of these mutants were compared to those of wild-type toxin. We observed that all mutants are defective or impaired in cytotoxicity but differ in their modification of Rac1 and Ras. The data suggest a model where differences in GTPase localization dictate cellular responses to intoxication and highlight the importance of autoprocessing in the function of TcsL. IMPORTANCE Clostridium sordellii is a bacterium that can infect humans and cause serious disease and death. The principle virulence factor associated with clinical symptoms is a large protein toxin known as lethal toxin. The mechanism of lethal-toxin intoxication is assumed to be similar to that of the homologous toxins from C. difficile, but very few studies have been done in the context of endothelial cells, a relevant target in C. sordellii infections. This study was designed to test the role of the lethal-toxin enzymatic activities and membrane localization in endothelial cell toxicity and host substrate modification. PMID:27303685

  11. Computational modeling of the bHLH domain of the transcription factor TWIST1 and R118C, S144R and K145E mutants

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Human TWIST1 is a highly conserved member of the regulatory basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors. TWIST1 forms homo- or heterodimers with E-box proteins, such as E2A (isoforms E12 and E47), MYOD and HAND2. Haploinsufficiency germ-line mutations of the twist1 gene in humans are the main cause of Saethre-Chotzen syndrome (SCS), which is characterized by limb abnormalities and premature fusion of cranial sutures. Because of the importance of TWIST1 in the regulation of embryonic development and its relationship with SCS, along with the lack of an experimentally solved 3D structure, we performed comparative modeling for the TWIST1 bHLH region arranged into wild-type homodimers and heterodimers with E47. In addition, three mutations that promote DNA binding failure (R118C, S144R and K145E) were studied on the TWIST1 monomer. We also explored the behavior of the mutant forms in aqueous solution using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, focusing on the structural changes of the wild-type versus mutant dimers. Results The solvent-accessible surface area of the homodimers was smaller on wild-type dimers, which indicates that the cleft between the monomers remained more open on the mutant homodimers. RMSD and RMSF analyses indicated that mutated dimers presented values that were higher than those for the wild-type dimers. For a more careful investigation, the monomer was subdivided into four regions: basic, helix I, loop and helix II. The basic domain presented a higher flexibility in all of the parameters that were analyzed, and the mutant dimer basic domains presented values that were higher than the wild-type dimers. The essential dynamic analysis also indicated a higher collective motion for the basic domain. Conclusions Our results suggest the mutations studied turned the dimers into more unstable structures with a wider cleft, which may be a reason for the loss of DNA binding capacity observed for in vitro circumstances. PMID:22839202

  12. Differential regulation of insulin-like growth factor-I receptor gene expression by wild type and mutant androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Schayek, Hagit; Seti, Hila; Greenberg, Norman M; Sun, Shihua; Werner, Haim; Plymate, Stephen R

    2010-07-29

    The progression of prostate cancer from an organ-confined, androgen-sensitive disease to a metastatic one is associated with dysregulation of androgen receptor (AR)-regulated target genes and with a decrease in insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) expression. To investigate the differential effects of wild type (wt) and mutant AR on IGF-IR levels we employed a series of isogenic prostate-derived cell lines and human xenografts. We show that basal and phosphorylated IGF-IR levels progressively decreased as prostate cancer cells became more tumorigenic and metastatic. In addition, we show that wt, but not mutant, AR along with dihydrotestosterone treatment increased IGF-IR promoter activity and endogenous IGF-IR levels. ChIP analysis show enhanced AR binding to the IGF-IR promoter in AR-overexpressing cells. Finally, wt AR-overexpressing cells display an enhanced proliferation rate. In summary, we provide evidence that activated wt AR enhances IGF-IR transcription in prostate cancer cells via a mechanism that involves AR binding to the IGF-IR promoter. AR mutations alter the ability of the mutated protein to regulate IGF-IR expression. Our results suggest that prostate cancer progression is associated with a decrease in IGF-IR expression that could be the result of impaired ability of AR to stimulate IGF-IR gene expression. PMID:20417685

  13. Role of insulin-like growth factors and myogenin in the altered program of proliferation and differentiation in the NFB4 mutant muscle cell line.

    PubMed

    Sarbassov, D D; Stefanova, R; Grigoriev, V G; Peterson, C A

    1995-11-21

    In the present study we used the mutant muscle cell line NFB4 to study the balance between proliferation and myogenic differentiation. We show that removal of serum, which induced the parental C2C12 cells to withdraw from the cell cycle and differentiate, had little effect on NFB4 cells. Gene products characteristic of the proliferation state, such as c-Jun, continued to accumulate in the mutant cells in low serum, whereas those involved in differentiation, like myogenin, insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II), and IGF-binding protein 5 (IGFBP-5) were undetectable. Moreover, NFB4 cells displayed a unique pattern of tyrosine phosphorylated proteins, especially in low serum, suggesting that the signal transduction pathway(s) that controls differentiation is not properly regulated in these cells. Treatment of NFB4 cells with exogenous IGF-I or IGF-II at concentrations shown to promote myogenic differentiation in wild-type cells resulted in activation of myogenin but not MyoD gene expression, secretion of IG-FBP-5, changes in tyrosine phosphorylation, and enhanced myogenic differentiation. Similarly, transfection of myogenin expression constructs also enhanced differentiation and resulted in activation of IGF-II expression, showing that myogenin and IGF-II cross-activate each other's expression. However, in both cases, the expression of Jun mRNA remained elevated, suggesting that IGFs and myogenin cannot overcome all aspects of the block to differentiation in NFB4 cells.

  14. Expression of the CTCFL Gene during Mouse Embryogenesis Causes Growth Retardation, Postnatal Lethality, and Dysregulation of the Transforming Growth Factor β Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sati, Leyla; Zeiss, Caroline; Yekkala, Krishna; Demir, Ramazan

    2015-01-01

    CTCFL, a paralog of CTCF, also known as BORIS (brother of regulator of imprinted sites), is a testis-expressed gene whose function is largely unknown. Its product is a cancer testis antigen (CTA), and it is often expressed in tumor cells and also seen in two benign human vascular malformations, juvenile angiofibromas and infantile hemangiomas. To understand the function of Ctcfl, we created tetracycline-inducible Ctcfl transgenic mice. We show that Ctcfl expression during embryogenesis results in growth retardation, eye malformations, multiorgan pathologies, vascular defects, and neonatal death. This phenotype resembles prior mouse models that perturb the transforming growth factor β (TGFB) pathway. Embryonic stem (ES) cells with the Ctcfl transgene reproduce the phenotype in ES cell-tetraploid chimeras. Transcriptome sequencing of the Ctcfl ES cells revealed 14 genes deregulated by Ctcfl expression. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the TGFB pathway as most affected by embryonic Ctcfl expression. Understanding the consequence of Ctcfl expression in nontesticular cells and elucidating downstream targets of Ctcfl could explain the role of its product as a CTA and its involvement in two, if not more, human vascular malformations. PMID:26169830

  15. Human tumor necrosis factor receptor (p55) and interleukin 10 gene transfer in the mouse reduces mortality to lethal endotoxemia and also attenuates local inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Anticytokine therapies have been promulgated in gram-negative sepsis as a means of preventing or neutralizing excessive production of proinflammatory cytokines. However, systemic administration of cytokine inhibitors is an inefficient means of targeting excessive production in individual tissue compartments. In the present study, human gene transfer was used to deliver to organs of the reticuloendothelial system antagonists that either inhibit tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF- alpha) synthesis or block its interactions with cellular receptors. Mice were treated intraperitoneally with cationic liposomes containing 200 micrograms of either a pCMV (cytomegalovirus)/p55 expression plasmid that contains the extracellular domain and transmembrane region of the human p55 TNF receptor, or a pcD-SR-alpha/hIL-10 expression plasmid containing the DNA for human interleukin 10. 48 h later, mice were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and D-galactosamine. Pretreatment of mice with p55 or IL-10 cDNA-liposome complexes improved survival (p < 0.01) to LPS-D-galactosamine. In additional studies, intratracheal administration of IL-10 DNA-liposome complexes 48 h before an intratracheal LPS challenge reduced pulmonary TNF-alpha levels by 62% and decreased neutrophil infiltration in the lung by 55% as measured by myeloperoxidase activity (both p < 0.05). Gene transfer with cytokine inhibitors is a promising option for the treatment of both the systemic and local sequelae of septic shock. PMID:7760015

  16. Isolation and characterization of type III group B streptococcal mutants defective in biosynthesis of the type-specific antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, M K; Mattingly, S J

    1983-01-01

    Four classes of mutants of type III group B streptococcus were isolated by serial subculture of the wild-type strain in the presence of type III-specific rabbit antiserum. Class I mutants no longer synthesized sialic acid but still elaborated the core antigen. Class II mutants maintained the ability to synthesize sialic acid but could not attach it to the core antigen. Class III mutants did not produce the core antigen but still synthesized intracellular sialic acid. Class IV mutants synthesized the complete antigen; however, only approximately 4% of the antigen synthesized was found associated with the cell wall peptidoglycan (in the wild-type strain greater than 85% of the antigen synthesized is covalently attached to the cell wall peptidoglycan), whereas greater than 90% of the antigen was secreted into the growth medium. Production of other components (CAMP factor, group B antigen, beta-hemolysin, neuraminidase) by these mutants appeared similar to those of the wild-type strain. Mouse lethality studies of these strains indicated that all four classes have greater than 3 log10-higher 50% lethal dose values than that of the wild-type strain. To understand the basis for this variation, the invasive ability of the wild-type strain and the sialic acid-deficient mutant strain M-10 (class I) was examined. Mice received 10(5) CFU of each organism; they were then sacrificed at various times postinoculation, and viable group B streptococci from different organs were enumerated. Mice were able to clear M-10 more efficiently, with greater than 80% of M-10 cells being phagocytized by macrophages within 1 h, whereas the wild-type strain was able to evade phagocytic killing and disseminate to other tissues. These data, therefore, strongly indicate that the sialic acid moiety greatly enhances the virulence of the type III antigen. In addition, the level of cell-associated type-specific antigen appears to contribute significantly to the pathogenicity of the organism. PMID

  17. Structural basis for a lethal mutation in U6 RNA.

    PubMed

    Sashital, Dipali G; Allmann, Anne M; Van Doren, Steven R; Butcher, Samuel E

    2003-02-18

    U6 RNA is essential for nuclear pre-mRNA splicing and has been implicated directly in catalysis of intron removal. The U80G mutation at the essential magnesium binding site of the U6 3' intramolecular stem-loop region (ISL) is lethal in yeast. To further understand the structure and function of the U6 ISL, we have investigated the structural basis for the lethal U80G mutation by NMR and optical spectroscopy. The NMR structure reveals that the U80G mutation causes a structural rearrangement within the ISL resulting in the formation of a new Watson-Crick base pair (C67 x G80), and disrupts a protonated C67 x A79 wobble pair that forms in the wild-type structure. Despite the structural change, the accessibility of the metal binding site is unperturbed, and cadmium titration produces similar phosphorus chemical shift changes for both the U80G mutant and wild-type RNAs. The thermodynamic stability of the U80G mutant is significantly increased (Delta Delta G(fold) = -3.6 +/- 1.9 kcal/mol), consistent with formation of the Watson-Crick pair. Our structural and thermodynamic data, in combination with previous genetic data, suggest that the lethal basis for the U80G mutation is stem-loop hyperstabilization. This hyperstabilization may prevent the U6 ISL melting and rearrangement necessary for association with U4. PMID:12578359

  18. Evaluation of the ability of N-terminal fragment of lethal factor of Bacillus anthracis for delivery of Mycobacterium T cell antigen ESAT-6 into cytosol of antigen presenting cells to elicit effective cytotoxic T lymphocyte response

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Subhash; Kaur, Manpreet; Midha, Shuchi; Bhatnagar, Rakesh . E-mail: rakbhat01@yahoo.com; Banerjee-Bhatnagar, Nirupama . E-mail: nirupama@icgeb.res.in

    2006-12-22

    We report the ability of N-terminal fragment of lethal factor of Bacillus anthracis to deliver genetically fused ESAT-6 (early secretory antigen target), a potent T cell antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, into cytosol to elicit Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response. In vitro Th1 cytokines data and CTL assay proved that efficient delivery of LFn.ESAT-6 occurs in cytosol, in the presence of protective antigen (PA), and leads to generation of effective CTL response. Since CTL response is essential for protection against intracellular pathogens and, it is well known that only single T cell epitope or single antigenic protein is not sufficient to elicit protective CTL response due to variation or polymorphism in MHC-I alleles among the individuals, we suggest that as a fusion protein LFn can be used to deliver multiepitopes of T cells or multiproteins which can generate effective CTLs against intracellular pathogens like M. tuberculosis. It can be used to enhance the protective efficacy of BCG vaccine.

  19. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction of wild-type and mutant recombinant human transforming growth factor β-induced protein (TGFBIp)

    PubMed Central

    Runager, Kasper; García-Castellanos, Raquel; Valnickova, Zuzana; Kristensen, Torsten; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Klintworth, Gordon K.; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier; Enghild, Jan J.

    2009-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β-induced protein (TGFBIp) has been linked to several corneal dystrophies as certain point mutations in the protein may give rise to a progressive accumulation of insoluble protein material in the human cornea. Little is known about the biological functions of this extracellular protein, which is expressed in various tissues throughout the human body. However, it has been found to interact with a number of extracellular matrix macromolecules such as collagens and proteoglycans. Structural information about TGFBIp might prove to be a valuable tool in the elucidation of its function and its role in corneal dystrophies caused by mutations in the TGFBI gene. A simple method for the purification of wild-type and mutant forms of recombinant human TGFBIp from human cells under native conditions is presented here. Moreover, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of TGFBIp are reported. PMID:19255489

  20. A relaxed (rel) mutant of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) with a missing ribosomal protein lacks the ability to accumulate ppGpp, A-factor and prodigiosin.

    PubMed

    Ochi, K

    1990-12-01

    A relaxed (rel) mutant was found among 70 thiopeptin-resistant isolates of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) which arose spontaneously. The ability of the rel mutant to accumulate ppGpp during Casamino acid deprivation was reduced 10-fold compared to the wild-type. Analysis of the ribosomal proteins by two-dimensional PAGE revealed that the mutant lacked a ribosomal protein, tentatively designated ST-L11. It was therefore classified as a relC mutant. The mutant was defective in producing A-factor and the pigmented antibiotic prodigiosin, in both liquid and agar cultures, but produced agarase normally. Production of actinorhodin, another pigmented antibiotic, was also abnormal; it appeared suddenly in agar cultures after 10 d incubation. Although aerial mycelium still formed, its appearance was markedly delayed. Whereas liquid cultures of the parent strain accumulated ppGpp, agar cultures accumulated only trace amounts. Instead, a substance characterized only as an unidentified HPLC peak accumulated intracellularly in the late growth phase, just before aerial mycelium formation and antibiotic production. This substance did not accumulate in mutant cells. It was found in S. lividans 66 and S. parvulus, but not in seven other Streptomyces species tested. The significance of these observations, and the relationship of the mutant to earlier rel isolates of Streptomyces is discussed.

  1. Compound mouse mutants of bZIP transcription factors Mafg and Mafk reveal a regulatory network of non-crystallin genes associated with cataract.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Smriti A; Anand, Deepti; Siddam, Archana D; Kakrana, Atul; Dash, Soma; Scheiblin, David A; Dang, Christine A; Terrell, Anne M; Waters, Stephanie M; Singh, Abhyudai; Motohashi, Hozumi; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Lachke, Salil A

    2015-07-01

    Although majority of the genes linked to early-onset cataract exhibit lens fiber cell-enriched expression, our understanding of gene regulation in these cells is limited to function of just eight transcription factors and largely in the context of crystallins. We report on small Maf transcription factors Mafg and Mafk as regulators of several non-crystallin human cataract-associated genes in fiber cells and establish their significance to this disease. We applied a bioinformatics tool for cataract gene discovery iSyTE to identify Mafg and its co-regulators in the lens, and generated various null-allelic combinations of Mafg:Mafk mouse mutants for phenotypic and molecular analysis. By age 4 months, Mafg-/-:Mafk+/- mutants exhibit lens defects that progressively develop into cataract. High-resolution phenotypic characterization of Mafg-/-:Mafk+/- mouse lens reveals severely disorganized fiber cells, while microarray-based expression profiling identifies 97 differentially regulated genes (DRGs). Integrative analysis of Mafg-/-:Mafk+/- lens-DRGs with (1) binding motifs and genomic targets of small Mafs and their regulatory partners, (2) iSyTE lens expression data, and (3) interactions between DRGs in the String database, unravel a detailed small Maf regulatory network in the lens, several nodes of which are linked to cataract. This approach identifies 36 high-priority candidates from the original 97 DRGs. Significantly, 8/36 (22%) DRGs are associated with cataracts in human (GSTO1, MGST1, SC4MOL, UCHL1) or mouse (Aldh3a1, Crygf, Hspb1, Pcbd1), suggesting a multifactorial etiology that includes oxidative stress and misregulation of sterol synthesis. These data identify Mafg and Mafk as new cataract-associated candidates and define their function in regulating largely non-crystallin genes linked to human cataract. PMID:25896808

  2. Toxin-induced resistance in Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin-treated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Salles, Isabelle I.; Tucker, Amy E.; Voth, Daniel E.; Ballard, Jimmy D.

    2003-01-01

    In the current study, we show that macrophages adaptively resist anthrax lethal toxin (LT) through a toxin-activated process termed toxin-induced resistance (TIR). TIR was triggered by pretreatment of RAW 264.7 or J774A.1 macrophages with a low dose of LT for at least 6 h, which resulted in resistance to high doses of LT for 96 h. Activation of TIR required functional toxin, because LT subunits, mutants, and heat-inactivated toxin were unable to trigger resistance. TIR macrophages were not altered in toxin receptor levels or cell cycle profiles. Treatment of TIR macrophages with high doses of LT resulted in a sustained decline in full-length mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 2, a known target of lethal factor, and a marked reduction in diphosphorylated extracellular response kinases 1,2 for 24 h. However, despite the sustained loss of full-length mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 2, by 48 h, TIR macrophages regained diphosphorylated extracellular response kinases 1,2, suggesting an adaptation led to recovery of this signaling pathway. TIR macrophages were also able to maintain normal levels of ubiquitinylated proteins, whereas sensitive cells show a rapid reduction in ubiquitin-modified proteins before cell death, indicating a possible alteration in proteasome activity contributed to resistance. These results provide a paradigm for toxin-cell interactions and suggest macrophages are capable of adapting to and tolerating toxic doses of LT. PMID:14519843

  3. Structure and novel functional mechanism of Drosophila SNF in sex-lethal splicing.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jicheng; Cui, Gaofeng; Li, Congmin; Liu, Cong; Shang, Erchang; Lai, Luhua; Jin, Changwen; Wang, Jiwu; Xia, Bin

    2009-09-03

    Sans-fille (SNF) is the Drosophila homologue of mammalian general splicing factors U1A and U2B'', and it is essential in Drosophila sex determination. We found that, besides its ability to bind U1 snRNA, SNF can also bind polyuridine RNA tracts flanking the male-specific exon of the master switch gene Sex-lethal (Sxl) pre-mRNA specifically, similar to Sex-lethal protein (SXL). The polyuridine RNA binding enables SNF directly inhibit Sxl exon 3 splicing, as the dominant negative mutant SNF(1621) binds U1 snRNA but not polyuridine RNA. Unlike U1A, both RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) of SNF can recognize polyuridine RNA tracts independently, even though SNF and U1A share very high sequence identity and overall structure similarity. As SNF RRM1 tends to self-associate on the opposite side of the RNA binding surface, it is possible for SNF to bridge the formation of super-complexes between two introns flanking Sxl exon 3 or between a intron and U1 snRNP, which serves the molecular basis for SNF to directly regulate Sxl splicing. Taken together, a new functional model for SNF in Drosophila sex determination is proposed. The key of the new model is that SXL and SNF function similarly in promoting Sxl male-specific exon skipping with SNF being an auxiliary or backup to SXL, and it is the combined dose of SXL and SNF governs Drosophila sex determination.

  4. Attenuated virulence of a Francisella mutant lacking the lipid A 4′-phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoyuan; Ribeiro, Anthony A.; Guan, Ziqiang; Abraham, Soman N.; Raetz, Christian R. H.

    2007-01-01

    Francisella tularensis causes tularemia, a highly contagious disease of animals and humans, but the virulence features of F. tularensis are poorly defined. F. tularensis and the related mouse pathogen Francisella novicida synthesize unusual lipid A molecules lacking the 4′-monophosphate group typically found in the lipid A of Gram-negative bacteria. LpxF, a selective phosphatase located on the periplasmic surface of the inner membrane, removes the 4′-phosphate moiety in the late stages of F. novicida lipid A assembly. To evaluate the relevance of the 4′-phosphatase to pathogenesis, we constructed a deletion mutant of lpxF and compared its virulence with wild-type F. novicida. Intradermal injection of 106 wild-type but not 108 mutant F. novicida cells is lethal to mice. The rapid clearance of the lpxF mutant is associated with a stronger local cytokine response and a greater influx of neutrophils compared with wild-type. The F. novicida mutant was highly susceptible to the cationic antimicrobial peptide polymyxin. LpxF therefore represents a kind of virulence factor that confers a distinct lipid A phenotype, preventing Francisella from activating the host innate immune response and preventing the bactericidal actions of cationic peptides. Francisella lpxF mutants may be useful for immunization against tularemia. PMID:17360489

  5. [The "lethal white foal" syndrome].

    PubMed

    Blendinger, C; Müller, G; Bostedt, H

    1994-06-01

    The lethal white foal syndrome (congenital intestinal aganglionosis) was diagnosed by history, clinical signs and pathological findings in a female foal, born in March 1992, that was an offspring of two overo-spotted paint horses. The syndrome is a congenital innervation defect of the gastrointestinal tract. A literature review of this condition, relatively unknown in Germany, is given.

  6. High-throughput simultaneous screen and counterscreen identifies homoharringtonine as synthetic lethal with von Hippel-Lindau loss in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Nicholas C.; Pavía-Jiménez, Andrea; Tcheuyap, Vanina T.; Alexander, Shane; Vishwanath, Mridula; Christie, Alana; Xie, Xian-Jin; Williams, Noelle S.; Kapur, Payal; Posner, Bruce; McKay, Renée M.; Brugarolas, James

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for 85% of primary renal neoplasms, and is rarely curable when metastatic. Approximately 70% of RCCs are clear-cell type (ccRCC), and in >80% the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene is mutated or silenced. We developed a novel, high-content, screening strategy for the identification of small molecules that are synthetic lethal with genes mutated in cancer. In this strategy, the screen and counterscreen are conducted simultaneously by differentially labeling mutant and reconstituted isogenic tumor cell line pairs with different fluorochromes and using a highly sensitive high-throughput imaging-based platform. This approach minimizes confounding factors from sequential screening, and more accurately replicates the in vivo cancer setting where cancer cells are adjacent to normal cells. A screen of ~12,800 small molecules identified homoharringtonine (HHT), an FDA-approved drug for treating chronic myeloid leukemia, as a VHL-synthetic lethal agent in ccRCC. HHT induced apoptosis in VHL-mutant, but not VHL-reconstituted, ccRCC cells, and inhibited tumor growth in 30% of VHL-mutant patient-derived ccRCC tumorgraft lines tested. Building on a novel screening strategy and utilizing a validated RCC tumorgraft model recapitulating the genetics and drug responsiveness of human RCC, these studies identify HHT as a potential therapeutic agent for a subset of VHL-deficient ccRCCs. PMID:26219258

  7. Arabidopsis genes essential for seedling viability: isolation of insertional mutants and molecular cloning.

    PubMed Central

    Budziszewski, G J; Lewis, S P; Glover, L W; Reineke, J; Jones, G; Ziemnik, L S; Lonowski, J; Nyfeler, B; Aux, G; Zhou, Q; McElver, J; Patton, D A; Martienssen, R; Grossniklaus, U; Ma, H; Law, M; Levin, J Z

    2001-01-01

    We have undertaken a large-scale genetic screen to identify genes with a seedling-lethal mutant phenotype. From screening approximately 38,000 insertional mutant lines, we identified >500 seedling-lethal mutants, completed cosegregation analysis of the insertion and the lethal phenotype for >200 mutants, molecularly characterized 54 mutants, and provided a detailed description for 22 of them. Most of the seedling-lethal mutants seem to affect chloroplast function because they display altered pigmentation and affect genes encoding proteins predicted to have chloroplast localization. Although a high level of functional redundancy in Arabidopsis might be expected because 65% of genes are members of gene families, we found that 41% of the essential genes found in this study are members of Arabidopsis gene families. In addition, we isolated several interesting classes of mutants and genes. We found three mutants in the recently discovered nonmevalonate isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway and mutants disrupting genes similar to Tic40 and tatC, which are likely to be involved in chloroplast protein translocation. Finally, we directly compared T-DNA and Ac/Ds transposon mutagenesis methods in Arabidopsis on a genome scale. In each population, we found only about one-third of the insertion mutations cosegregated with a mutant phenotype. PMID:11779813

  8. Systematic annotation and analysis of "virmugens"-virulence factors whose mutants can be used as live attenuated vaccines.

    PubMed

    Racz, Rebecca; Chung, Monica; Xiang, Zuoshuang; He, Yongqun

    2013-01-21

    Live attenuated vaccines are usually generated by mutation of genes encoding virulence factors. "Virmugen" is coined here to represent a gene that encodes for a virulent factor of a pathogen and has been proven feasible in animal models to make a live attenuated vaccine by knocking out this gene. Not all virulence factors are virmugens. VirmugenDB is a web-based virmugen database (http://www.violinet.org/virmugendb). Currently, VirmugenDB includes 225 virmugens that have been verified to be valuable for vaccine development against 57 bacterial, viral, and protozoan pathogens. Bioinformatics analysis has revealed significant patterns in virmugens. For example, 10 Gram-negative and 1 Gram-positive bacterial aroA genes are virmugens. A sequence analysis has revealed at least 50% of identities in the protein sequences of the 10 Gram-negative bacterial aroA virmugens. As a pathogen case study, Brucella virmugens were analyzed. Out of 15 verified Brucella virmugens, 6 are related to carbohydrate or nucleotide transport and metabolism, and 2 involving cell membrane biogenesis. In addition, 54 virmugens from 24 viruses and 12 virmugens from 4 parasites are also stored in VirmugenDB. Virmugens tend to involve metabolism of nutrients (e.g., amino acids, carbohydrates, and nucleotides) and cell membrane formation. Host genes whose expressions were regulated by virmugen mutation vaccines or wild type virulent pathogens have also been annotated and systematically compared. The bioinformatics annotation and analysis of virmugens helps to elucidate enriched virmugen profiles and the mechanisms of protective immunity, and further supports rational vaccine design.

  9. Genome-Wide Identification of the Transcription Factors Involved in Citrus Fruit Ripening from the Transcriptomes of a Late-Ripening Sweet Orange Mutant and Its Wild Type

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Juxun; Fu, Lili; Yi, Hualin

    2016-01-01

    Fruit ripening is a genetically programmed process. Transcription factors (TFs) play key roles in plant development and ripening by temporarily and spatially regulating the transcription of their target genes. In this study, a total of 159 TFs were identified from a spontaneous late-ripening mutant 'Fengwan' (C. sinensis L. Osbeck) sweet orange (MT) and its wild-type counterpart ('Fengjie 72–1', WT) along the ripening period via the Transcription Factor Prediction of PlantTFDB 3.0. Fifty-two differentially expressed TFs were identified between MT and WT; 92 and 120 differentially expressed TFs were identified in WT and MT, respectively. The Venn diagram analysis showed that 16 differentially expressed TFs were identified between MT and WT and during the ripening of WT and MT. These TFs were primarily assigned to the families of C2H2, Dof, bHLH, ERF, MYB, NAC and LBD. Particularly, the number of TFs of the ERF family was the greatest between MT and WT. According to the results of the WGCNA analysis, a weighted correlation network analysis tool, several important TFs correlated to abscisic acid (ABA), citric acid, fructose, glucose and sucrose were identified, such as RD26, NTT, GATA7 and MYB21/62/77. Hierarchical cluster analysis and the expression analysis conducted at five fruit ripening stages further validated the pivotal TFs that potentially function during orange fruit development and ripening. PMID:27104786

  10. Genome-Wide Identification of the Transcription Factors Involved in Citrus Fruit Ripening from the Transcriptomes of a Late-Ripening Sweet Orange Mutant and Its Wild Type.

    PubMed

    Wu, Juxun; Fu, Lili; Yi, Hualin

    2016-01-01

    Fruit ripening is a genetically programmed process. Transcription factors (TFs) play key roles in plant development and ripening by temporarily and spatially regulating the transcription of their target genes. In this study, a total of 159 TFs were identified from a spontaneous late-ripening mutant 'Fengwan' (C. sinensis L. Osbeck) sweet orange (MT) and its wild-type counterpart ('Fengjie 72-1', WT) along the ripening period via the Transcription Factor Prediction of PlantTFDB 3.0. Fifty-two differentially expressed TFs were identified between MT and WT; 92 and 120 differentially expressed TFs were identified in WT and MT, respectively. The Venn diagram analysis showed that 16 differentially expressed TFs were identified between MT and WT and during the ripening of WT and MT. These TFs were primarily assigned to the families of C2H2, Dof, bHLH, ERF, MYB, NAC and LBD. Particularly, the number of TFs of the ERF family was the greatest between MT and WT. According to the results of the WGCNA analysis, a weighted correlation network analysis tool, several important TFs correlated to abscisic acid (ABA), citric acid, fructose, glucose and sucrose were identified, such as RD26, NTT, GATA7 and MYB21/62/77. Hierarchical cluster analysis and the expression analysis conducted at five fruit ripening stages further validated the pivotal TFs that potentially function during orange fruit development and ripening. PMID:27104786

  11. In vitro secretion deficits are common among human coagulation factor XIII subunit B missense mutants: correlations with patient phenotypes and molecular models.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Arijit; Thomas, Anne; Bevans, Carville G; Ivaskevicius, Vytautas; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2013-11-01

    Coagulation factor XIII (FXIII) proenzyme circulates in plasma as a heterotetramer composed of two each of A and B subunits. Upon activation, the B subunits dissociate from the A subunit dimer, which gains transglutaminase activity to cross-link preformed fibrin clots increasing mechanical strength and resistance to degradation. The B subunits are thought to possess a carrier/protective function before FXIII activation. Mutations in either A or B subunits are associated with pathological patient phenotypes characterized by mild to severe bleeding. In vitro expression of FXIII B subunit (FXIIIB) missense variants in HEK293T cells revealed impaired secretion for all seven variants studied. To investigate the likely molecular environments of the missense residues, we created molecular models of individual FXIIIB Sushi domains using phylogenetically similar complement factor H Sushi domain structural templates. Assessment of the local molecular environments for the models suggested surface or buried positions for each mutant residue and possible pathological mechanisms. The in vitro expression system and in silico analytical methods and models we developed can be used to further investigate the molecular basis of FXIIIB mutation pathologies. PMID:23913518

  12. Synthetic Lethality Reveals Mechanisms of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Resistance to β-Lactams

    PubMed Central

    Lun, Shichun; Miranda, David; Kubler, Andre; Guo, Haidan; Maiga, Mariama C.; Winglee, Kathryn; Pelly, Shaaretha

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most β-lactam antibiotics are ineffective against Mycobacterium tuberculosis due to the microbe’s innate resistance. The emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains has prompted interest to repurpose this class of drugs. To identify the genetic determinants of innate β-lactam resistance, we carried out a synthetic lethality screen on a transposon mutant library for susceptibility to imipenem, a carbapenem β-lactam antibiotic. Mutations in 74 unique genes demonstrated synthetic lethality. The majority of mutations were in genes associated with cell wall biosynthesis. A second quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR)-based synthetic lethality screen of randomly selected mutants confirmed the role of cell wall biosynthesis in β-lactam resistance. The global transcriptional response of the bacterium to β-lactams was investigated, and changes in levels of expression of cell wall biosynthetic genes were identified. Finally, we validated these screens in vivo using the MT1616 transposon mutant, which lacks a functional acyl-transferase gene. Mice infected with the mutant responded to β-lactam treatment with a 100-fold decrease in bacillary lung burden over 4 weeks, while the numbers of organisms in the lungs of mice infected with wild-type bacilli proliferated. These findings reveal a road map of genes required for β-lactam resistance and validate synthetic lethality screening as a promising tool for repurposing existing classes of licensed, safe, well-characterized antimicrobials against tuberculosis. PMID:25227469

  13. Stem cell expansion during carcinogenesis in stem cell-depleted conditional telomeric repeat factor 2 null mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Bojovic, B; Ho, H-Y; Wu, J; Crowe, D L

    2013-10-24

    To examine the role of telomeric repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2) in epithelial tumorigenesis, we characterized conditional loss of TRF2 expression in the basal layer of mouse epidermis. These mice exhibit some characteristics of dyskeratosis congenita, a human stem cell depletion syndrome caused by telomere dysfunction. The epidermis in conditional TRF2 null mice exhibited DNA damage response and apoptosis, which correlated with stem cell depletion. The stem cell population in conditional TRF2 null epidermis exhibited shorter telomeres than those in control mice. Squamous cell carcinomas induced in conditional TRF2 null mice developed with increased latency and slower growth due to reduced numbers of proliferating cells as the result of increased apoptosis. TRF2 null epidermal stem cells were found in both primary and metastatic tumors. Despite the low-grade phenotype of the conditional TRF2 null primary tumors, the number of metastatic lesions was similar to control cancers. Basal cells from TRF2 null tumors demonstrated extreme telomere shortening and dramatically increased numbers of telomeric signals by fluorescence in situ hybridization due to increased genomic instability and aneuploidy in these cancers. DNA damage response signals were detected at telomeres in TRF2 null tumor cells from these mice. The increased genomic instability in these tumors correlated with eightfold expansion of the transformed stem cell population compared with that in control cancers. We concluded that genomic instability resulting from loss of TRF2 expression provides biological advantages to the cancer stem cell population.

  14. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor heterozygous mutant rats show selective cognitive changes and vulnerability to chronic corticosterone treatment.

    PubMed

    Gururajan, A; Hill, R A; van den Buuse, M

    2015-01-22

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a widely expressed neurotrophin involved in neurodevelopment, neuroprotection and synaptic plasticity. It is also implicated in a range of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. Stress during adolescence/young adulthood can have long-term psychiatric and cognitive consequences, however it is unknown how altered BDNF signaling is involved in such effects. Here we investigated whether a congenital deficit in BDNF availability in rats increases vulnerability to the long-term effects of the stress hormone, corticosterone (CORT). Compared to wildtype (WT) littermates, BDNF heterozygous (HET) rats showed higher body weights and minor developmental changes, such as reduced relative brain and pituitary weight. These animals furthermore showed deficits in short-term spatial memory in the Y-maze and in prepulse inhibition and startle, but not in object-recognition memory. CORT treatment induced impairments in novel-object recognition memory in both genotypes but disrupted fear conditioning extinction learning in BDNF HET rats only. These results show selective behavioral changes in BDNF HET rats, at baseline or after chronic CORT treatment and add to our understanding of the role of BDNF and its interaction with stress. Importantly, this study demonstrates the utility of the BDNF HET rat in investigations into the pathophysiology of various psychiatric disorders.

  15. Human ARF4 expression rescues sec7 mutant yeast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Deitz, S B; Wu, C; Silve, S; Howell, K E; Melançon, P; Kahn, R A; Franzusoff, A

    1996-01-01

    Vesicle-mediated traffic between compartments of the yeast secretory pathway involves recruitment of multiple cytosolic proteins for budding, targeting, and membrane fusion events. The SEC7 gene product (Sec7p) is a constituent of coat structures on transport vesicles en route to the Golgi complex in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To identify mammalian homologs of Sec7p and its interacting proteins, we used a genetic selection strategy in which a human HepG2 cDNA library was transformed into conditional-lethal yeast sec7 mutants. We isolated several clones capable of rescuing sec7 mutant growth at the restrictive temperature. The cDNA encoding the most effective suppressor was identified as human ADP ribosylation factor 4 (hARF4), a member of the GTPase family proposed to regulate recruitment of vesicle coat proteins in mammalian cells. Having identified a Sec7p-interacting protein rather than the mammalian Sec7p homolog, we provide evidence that hARF4 suppressed the sec7 mutation by restoring secretory pathway function. Shifting sec7 strains to the restrictive temperature results in the disappearance of the mutant Sec7p cytosolic pool without apparent changes in the membrane-associated fraction. The introduction of hARF4 to the cells maintained the balance between cytosolic and membrane-associated Sec7p pools. These results suggest a requirement for Sec7p cycling on and off of the membranes for cell growth and vesicular traffic. In addition, overexpression of the yeast GTPase-encoding genes ARF1 and ARF2, but not that of YPT1, suppressed the sec7 mutant growth phenotype in an allele-specific manner. This allele specificity indicates that individual ARFs are recruited to perform two different Sec7p-related functions in vesicle coat dynamics. PMID:8668142

  16. Lethal mutagenesis and evolutionary epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Martin, Guillaume; Gandon, Sylvain

    2010-06-27

    The lethal mutagenesis hypothesis states that within-host populations of pathogens can be driven to extinction when the load of deleterious mutations is artificially increased with a mutagen, and becomes too high for the population to be maintained. Although chemical mutagens have been shown to lead to important reductions in viral titres for a wide variety of RNA viruses, the theoretical underpinnings of this process are still not clearly established. A few recent models sought to describe lethal mutagenesis but they often relied on restrictive assumptions. We extend this earlier work in two novel directions. First, we derive the dynamics of the genetic load in a multivariate Gaussian fitness landscape akin to classical quantitative genetics models. This fitness landscape yields a continuous distribution of mutation effects on fitness, ranging from deleterious to beneficial (i.e. compensatory) mutations. We also include an additional class of lethal mutations. Second, we couple this evolutionary model with an epidemiological model accounting for the within-host dynamics of the pathogen. We derive the epidemiological and evolutionary equilibrium of the system. At this equilibrium, the density of the pathogen is expected to decrease linearly with the genomic mutation rate U. We also provide a simple expression for the critical mutation rate leading to extinction. Stochastic simulations show that these predictions are accurate for a broad range of parameter values. As they depend on a small set of measurable epidemiological and evolutionary parameters, we used available information on several viruses to make quantitative and testable predictions on critical mutation rates. In the light of this model, we discuss the feasibility of lethal mutagenesis as an efficient therapeutic strategy.

  17. Targeting Oncogenic Mutant p53 for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Parrales, Alejandro; Iwakuma, Tomoo

    2015-01-01

    Among genetic alterations in human cancers, mutations in the tumor suppressor p53 gene are the most common, occurring in over 50% of human cancers. The majority of p53 mutations are missense mutations and result in the accumulation of dysfunctional p53 protein in tumors. These mutants frequently have oncogenic gain-of-function activities and exacerbate malignant properties of cancer cells, such as metastasis and drug resistance. Increasing evidence reveals that stabilization of mutant p53 in tumors is crucial for its oncogenic activities, while depletion of mutant p53 attenuates malignant properties of cancer cells. Thus, mutant p53 is an attractive druggable target for cancer therapy. Different approaches have been taken to develop small-molecule compounds that specifically target mutant p53. These include compounds that restore wild-type conformation and transcriptional activity of mutant p53, induce depletion of mutant p53, inhibit downstream pathways of oncogenic mutant p53, and induce synthetic lethality to mutant p53. In this review article, we comprehensively discuss the current strategies targeting oncogenic mutant p53 in cancers, with special focus on compounds that restore wild-type p53 transcriptional activity of mutant p53 and those reducing mutant p53 levels. PMID:26732534

  18. An Allele of Sequoia Dominantly Enhances a Trio Mutant Phenotype to Influence Drosophila Larval Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Liebl, Eric C.

    2013-01-01

    The transition of Drosophila third instar larvae from feeding, photo-phobic foragers to non-feeding, photo-neutral wanderers is a classic behavioral switch that precedes pupariation. The neuronal network responsible for this behavior has recently begun to be defined. Previous genetic analyses have identified signaling components for food and light sensory inputs and neuropeptide hormonal outputs as being critical for the forager to wanderer transition. Trio is a Rho-Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor integrated into a variety of signaling networks including those governing axon pathfinding in early development. Sequoia is a pan-neuronally expressed zinc-finger transcription factor that governs dendrite and axon outgrowth. Using pre-pupal lethality as an endpoint, we have screened for dominant second-site enhancers of a weakly lethal trio mutant background. In these screens, an allele of sequoia has been identified. While these mutants have no obvious disruption of embryonic central nervous system architecture and survive to third instar larvae similar to controls, they retain forager behavior and thus fail to pupariate at high frequency. PMID:24376789

  19. Mutants resistant to anti-microtubule herbicides map to a locus on the uni linkage group in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    James, S.W.; Ranum, L.P.W.; Silflow, C.D.; Lefebvre, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have used genetic analysis to study the mode of action of two anti-microtubule herbicides, amiprophos-methyl (APM) and oryzaline (ORY). Over 200 resistant mutants were selected by growth on APM- or ORY-containing plates. The 21 independently isolated mutants examined in this study are 3- to 8-fold resistant to APM and are strongly cross-resistant to ORY and butamiphos, a close analog of APM. Two Mendelian genes, apm1 and apm2, are defined by linkage and complementation analysis. There are 20 alleles of apm1 and one temperature-sensitive lethal (33/sup 0/) allele of apm2. Mapping by two-factor crosses places apm1 6.5 cM centromere proximal to uni1 and within 4 cM of pf7 on the uni linkage group, a genetically circular linkage group comprising genes which affect flagellar assembly or function; apm2 maps near the centromere of linkage group VIII. Allele-specific synthetic lethality is observed in crosses between amp2 and alleles of apm1. Also, self crosses of apm2 are zygotic lethal, whereas crosses of nine apm1 alleles inter se result in normal germination and tetrad viability. The mutants are recessive to their wild-type alleles but doubly heterozygous diploids (apm1 +/+ apm2) made with apm2 and any of 15 apm1 alleles display partial intergenic noncomplementation, expressed as intermediate resistance. Diploids homozygous for mutant alleles of apm1 are 4-6-fold resistant to APM and ORY; diploids homozygous for apm2 are ts/sup -/ and 2-fold resistant to the herbicides. From the results described the authors suggest that the gene products of apm1 and apm2 may interact directly or function in the same structure or process.

  20. Starch mutants of Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Berry-Lowe, S.L.; Schmidt, G.W. )

    1990-05-01

    Wild type Chlamydomonas accumulates starch and triglycerides when grown under nitrogen limiting conditions. Toward elucidation of the mechanisms for control of starch biosynthesis, we isolated mutants impaired int he accumulation of storage carbohydrates. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (strain ya-12) was mutagenized by UV irradiation and colonies were screened by iodine staining after growth in darkness. Mutants, denoted ais for altered in iodine staining, have been characterized by electron microscopy and assays for starch synthease, ADPG-pyrophosphorylase, phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI), phosphoglucomutase and fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase, and amylase activities. Transcript analysis of wild type and mutant RNAs with PGI, ADPG-pyrophosphorylase, and waxy probes have also been carried out. No deficiencies of any of these components have been detected. Furthermore, long-term cultures of ya-12 and ais-1d in nitrogen-limited chemostats have been studied; starch also does not accumulate in ais-1d under these conditions. Thus, the lesion affects an essential factor of unknown identity that is required for starch synthesis.

  1. Xenopus mutant reveals necessity of rax for specifying the eye field which otherwise forms tissue with telencephalic and diencephalic character

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Marilyn; Hirsch, Nicolas; Cox, Amanda; Reeder, Rollin; Carruthers, Samantha; Hall, Amanda; Stemple, Derek L.; Grainger, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The retinal anterior homeobox (rax) gene encodes a transcription factor necessary for vertebrate eye development. rax transcription is initiated at the end of gastrulation in Xenopus, and is a key part of the regulatory network specifying anterior neural plate and retina. We describe here a Xenopus tropicalis rax mutant, the first mutant analyzed in detail from a reverse genetic screen. As in other vertebrates, this nonsense mutation results in eyeless animals, and is lethal peri-metamorphosis. Tissue normally fated to form retina in these mutants instead forms tissue with characteristics of diencephalon and telencephalon. This implies that a key role of rax, in addition to defining the eye field, is in preventing alternative forebrain identities. Our data highlight that brain and retina regions are not determined by the mid-gastrula stage but are by the neural plate stage. An RNA-Seq analysis and in situ hybridization assays for early gene expression in the mutant revealed that several key eye field transcription factors (e.g. pax6, lhx2 and six6) are not dependent on rax activity through neurulation. However, these analyses identified other genes either up- or down-regulated in mutant presumptive retinal tissue. Two neural patterning genes of particular interest that appear up-regulated in the rax mutant RNA-seq analysis are hesx1 and fezf2. These genes were not previously known to be regulated by rax. The normal function of rax is to partially repress their expression by an indirect mechanism in the presumptive retina region in wildtype embryos, thus accounting for the apparent up-regulation in the rax mutant. Knock-down experiments using antisense morpholino oligonucleotides directed against hesx1 and fezf2 show that failure to repress these two genes contributes to transformation of presumptive retinal tissue into non-retinal forebrain identities in the rax mutant. PMID:25224223

  2. Xenopus mutant reveals necessity of rax for specifying the eye field which otherwise forms tissue with telencephalic and diencephalic character.

    PubMed

    Fish, Margaret B; Nakayama, Takuya; Fisher, Marilyn; Hirsch, Nicolas; Cox, Amanda; Reeder, Rollin; Carruthers, Samantha; Hall, Amanda; Stemple, Derek L; Grainger, Robert M

    2014-11-15

    The retinal anterior homeobox (rax) gene encodes a transcription factor necessary for vertebrate eye development. rax transcription is initiated at the end of gastrulation in Xenopus, and is a key part of the regulatory network specifying anterior neural plate and retina. We describe here a Xenopus tropicalis rax mutant, the first mutant analyzed in detail from a reverse genetic screen. As in other vertebrates, this nonsense mutation results in eyeless animals, and is lethal peri-metamorphosis. Tissue normally fated to form retina in these mutants instead forms tissue with characteristics of diencephalon and telencephalon. This implies that a key role of rax, in addition to defining the eye field, is in preventing alternative forebrain identities. Our data highlight that brain and retina regions are not determined by the mid-gastrula stage but are by the neural plate stage. An RNA-Seq analysis and in situ hybridization assays for early gene expression in the mutant revealed that several key eye field transcription factors (e.g. pax6, lhx2 and six6) are not dependent on rax activity through neurulation. However, these analyses identified other genes either up- or down-regulated in mutant presumptive retinal tissue. Two neural patterning genes of particular interest that appear up-regulated in the rax mutant RNA-seq analysis are hesx1 and fezf2. These genes were not previously known to be regulated by rax. The normal function of rax is to partially repress their expression by an indirect mechanism in the presumptive retina region in wildtype embryos, thus accounting for the apparent up-regulation in the rax mutant. Knock-down experiments using antisense morpholino oligonucleotides directed against hesx1 and fezf2 show that failure to repress these two genes contributes to transformation of presumptive retinal tissue into non-retinal forebrain identities in the rax mutant.

  3. trans-dominant mutants of E1A provide genetic evidence that the zinc finger of the trans-activating domain binds a transcription factor.

    PubMed Central

    Webster, L C; Ricciardi, R P

    1991-01-01

    The 289R E1A protein of adenovirus stimulates transcription of early viral and certain cellular genes. trans-Activation requires residues 140 to 188, which encompass a zinc finger. Several studies have indicated that trans-activation by E1A is mediated through cellular transcription factors. In particular, the ability of the trans-dominant E1A point mutant hr5 (Ser-185 to Asn) to inhibit wild-type E1A trans-activation was proposed to result from the sequestration of a cellular factor. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we individually replaced every residue within and flanking the trans-activating domain with a conservative amino acid, revealing 16 critical residues. Six of the individual substitutions lying in a contiguous stretch C terminal to the zinc finger (carboxyl region183-188) imparted a trans-dominant phenotype. trans-Dominance was even produced by deletion of the entire carboxyl region183-188. Conversely, an intact finger region147-177 was absolutely required for trans-dominance, since second-site substitution of every critical residue in this region abrogated the trans-dominant phenotype of the hr5 protein. These data indicate that the finger region147-177 bind a limiting cellular transcription factor and that the carboxyl region183-188 provides a separate and essential function. In addition, we show that four negatively charged residues within the trans-activating domain do not comprise a distinct acidic activating region. We present a model in which the trans-activating domain of E1A binds to two different cellular protein targets through the finger and carboxyl regions. Images PMID:1831535

  4. Adenoviral delivery of truncated MMP-8 fused with the hepatocyte growth factor mutant 1K1 ameliorates liver cirrhosis and promotes hepatocyte proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinghua; Li, Jianbo; Fu, Weiwei; Tang, Jiacheng; Feng, Xu; Chen, Jiang; Liang, Yuelong; Jin, Ren’an; Xie, Anyong; Cai, Xiujun

    2015-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a chronic liver disease caused by chronic liver injury, which activates hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and the secretion of extracellular matrix (ECM). Cirrhosis accounts for an extensive level of morbidity and mortality worldwide, largely due to lack of effective treatment options. In this study, we have constructed a fusion protein containing matrix metal-loproteinase 8 (MMP-8) and the human growth factor mutant 1K1 (designated cMMP8-1K1) and delivered it into hepatocytes and in vivo and in cell culture via intravenous injection of fusion protein-harboring adenovirus. In doing so, we found that the cMMP8-1K1 fusion protein promotes the proliferation of hepatocytes, likely resulting from the combined inhibition of type I collagen secretion and the degradation of the ECM in the HSCs. This fusion protein was also observed to ameliorate liver cirrhosis in our mouse model. These changes appear to be linked to changes in downstream gene expression. Taken together, these results suggest a possible strategy for the treatment of liver cirrhosis and additional work is warranted. PMID:26527860

  5. Purification and analysis of proteinase-resistant mutants of recombinant platelet-derived growth factor-BB exhibiting improved biological activity.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, A L; Kirwin, P M; Craig, S; Bawden, L J; Green, D R; Price, M J; Richardson, S J; Fallon, A; Drummond, A H; Edwards, R M

    1992-01-01

    Recombinant platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB was expressed and secreted from yeast in order to study the structure-function relationships of this mitogen. A simple purification scheme has been developed which yields greater than 95% pure PDGF-BB. Analysis of this recombinant PDGF-BB shows partial proteolysis after arginine-32. Substitution of this arginine residue, or arginine-28 [a potential KEX2 (lysine-arginine endopeptidase) cleavage site], prevents or reduces cleavage of PDGF-BB respectively. These mutations result in a 5-fold increase in expression levels of PDGF-BB, and the resulting mutant proteins show higher activity in a number of biological assays than the cleaved wildtype PDGF-BB. These data are in accord with previous work by Giese, LaRochelle, May-Siroff, Robbins & Aaronson [(1990) Mol. Cell Biol. 10, 5496-5501] suggesting that the region isoleucine-25-phenylalanine-37 is involved in PDGF-receptor binding. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:1731768

  6. Dominant Rio1 kinase/ATPase catalytic mutant induces trapping of late pre-40S biogenesis factors in 80S-like ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Cerca, Sébastien; Kiburu, Irene; Thomson, Emma; LaRonde, Nicole; Hurt, Ed

    2014-07-01

    During eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis, members of the conserved atypical serine/threonine protein kinase family, the RIO kinases (Rio1, Rio2 and Rio3) function in small ribosomal subunit biogenesis. Structural analysis of Rio2 indicated a role as a conformation-sensing ATPase rather than a kinase to regulate its dynamic association with the pre-40S subunit. However, it remained elusive at which step and by which mechanism the other RIO kinase members act. Here, we have determined the crystal structure of the human Rio1-ATP-Mg(2+) complex carrying a phosphoaspartate in the active site indicative of ATPase activity. Structure-based mutations in yeast showed that Rio1's catalytic activity regulates its pre-40S association. Furthermore, we provide evidence that Rio1 associates with a very late pre-40S via its conserved C-terminal domain. Moreover, a rio1 dominant-negative mutant defective in ATP hydrolysis induced trapping of late biogenesis factors in pre-ribosomal particles, which turned out not to be pre-40S but 80S-like ribosomes. Thus, the RIO kinase fold generates a versatile ATPase enzyme, which in the case of Rio1 is activated following the Rio2 step to regulate one of the final 40S maturation events, at which time the 60S subunit is recruited for final quality control check.

  7. Mutant p53 is a transcriptional co-factor that binds to G-rich regulatory regions of active genes and generates transcriptional plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Quante, Timo; Otto, Benjamin; Brázdová, Marie; Kejnovská, Iva; Deppert, Wolfgang; Tolstonog, Genrich V.

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying mutant p53 (mutp53) “gain-of-function” (GOF) are still insufficiently understood, but there is evidence that mutp53 is a transcriptional regulator that is recruited by specialized transcription factors. Here we analyzed the binding sites of mutp53 and the epigenetic status of mutp53-regulated genes that had been identified by global expression profiling upon depletion of endogenous mutp53 (R273H) expression in U251 glioblastoma cells. We found that mutp53 preferentially and autonomously binds to G/C-rich DNA around transcription start sites (TSS) of many genes characterized by active chromatin marks (H3K4me3) and frequently associated with transcription-competent RNA polymerase II. Mutp53-bound regions overlap predominantly with CpG islands and are enriched in G4-motifs that are prone to form G-quadruplex structures. In line, mutp53 binds and stabilizes a well-characterized G-quadruplex structure in vitro. Hence, we assume that binding of mutp53 to G/C-rich DNA regions associated with a large set of cancer-relevant genes is an initial step in their regulation by mutp53. Using GAS1 and HTR2A as model genes, we show that mutp53 affects several parameters of active transcription. Finally, we discuss a dual mode model of mutp53 GOF, which includes both stochastic and deterministic components. PMID:22894900

  8. Adenoviral delivery of truncated MMP-8 fused with the hepatocyte growth factor mutant 1K1 ameliorates liver cirrhosis and promotes hepatocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinghua; Li, Jianbo; Fu, Weiwei; Tang, Jiacheng; Feng, Xu; Chen, Jiang; Liang, Yuelong; Jin, Ren'an; Xie, Anyong; Cai, Xiujun

    2015-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a chronic liver disease caused by chronic liver injury, which activates hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and the secretion of extracellular matrix (ECM). Cirrhosis accounts for an extensive level of morbidity and mortality worldwide, largely due to lack of effective treatment options. In this study, we have constructed a fusion protein containing matrix metal-loproteinase 8 (MMP-8) and the human growth factor mutant 1K1 (designated cMMP8-1K1) and delivered it into hepatocytes and in vivo and in cell culture via intravenous injection of fusion protein-harboring adenovirus. In doing so, we found that the cMMP8-1K1 fusion protein promotes the proliferation of hepatocytes, likely resulting from the combined inhibition of type I collagen secretion and the degradation of the ECM in the HSCs. This fusion protein was also observed to ameliorate liver cirrhosis in our mouse model. These changes appear to be linked to changes in downstream gene expression. Taken together, these results suggest a possible strategy for the treatment of liver cirrhosis and additional work is warranted.

  9. Arabidopsis hot mutants define multiple functions required for acclimation to high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Hong, Suk-Whan; Lee, Ung; Vierling, Elizabeth

    2003-06-01

    Plants acquire thermotolerance to lethal high temperatures if first exposed to moderately high temperature or if temperature is increased gradually to an otherwise lethal temperature. We have taken a genetic approach to dissecting acquired thermotolerance by characterizing loss-of-function thermotolerance mutants in Arabidopsis. In previous work, we identified single recessive alleles of four loci required for thermotolerance of hypocotyl elongation, hot1-1, hot2-1, hot3-1, and hot4-1. Completed screening of M2 progeny from approximately 2500 M1 plants has now identified new alleles of three of these original loci, along with three new loci. The low mutant frequency suggests that a relatively small number of genes make a major contribution to this phenotype or that other thermotolerance genes encode essential or redundant functions. Further analysis of the original four loci was performed to define the nature of their thermotolerance defects. Although the HOT1 locus was shown previously to encode a major heat shock protein (Hsp), Hsp101, chromosomal map positions indicate that HOT2, 3, and 4 do not correspond to major Hsp or heat shock transcription factor genes. Measurement of thermotolerance at different growth stages reveals that the mutants have growth stage-specific heat sensitivity. Analysis of Hsp accumulation shows that hot2 and hot4 produce normal levels of Hsps, whereas hot3 shows reduced accumulation. Thermotolerance of luciferase activity and of ion leakage also varies in the mutants. These data provide the first direct genetic evidence, to our knowledge, that distinct functions, independent of Hsp synthesis, are required for thermotolerance, including protection of membrane integrity and recovery of protein activity/synthesis. PMID:12805605

  10. AAV-mediated delivery of the transcription factor XBP1s into the striatum reduces mutant Huntingtin aggregation in a mouse model of Huntington's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Zuleta, Amparo; Vidal, Rene L.; Armentano, Donna; Parsons, Geoffrey; Hetz, Claudio

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The contribution of ER stress to HD has not been directly addressed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of XBP1s using AAVs decreases Huntingtin aggregation in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We describe a new in vivo model of HD based on the expression of a large fragment of mHtt-RFP. -- Abstract: Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by mutations that expand a polyglutamine region in the amino-terminal domain of Huntingtin (Htt), leading to the accumulation of intracellular inclusions and progressive neurodegeneration. Recent reports indicate the engagement of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses in human HD post mortem samples and animal models of the disease. Adaptation to ER stress is mediated by the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), an integrated signal transduction pathway that attenuates protein folding stress by controlling the expression of distinct transcription factors including X-Box binding protein 1 (XBP1). Here we targeted the expression of XBP1 on a novel viral-based model of HD. We delivered an active form of XBP1 locally into the striatum of adult mice using adeno-associated vectors (AAVs) and co-expressed this factor with a large fragment of mutant Htt as a fusion protein with RFP (Htt588{sup Q95}-mRFP) to directly visualize the accumulation of Htt inclusions in the brain. Using this approach, we observed a significant reduction in the accumulation of Htt588{sup Q95}-mRFP intracellular inclusion when XBP1 was co-expressed in the striatum. These results contrast with recent findings indicating a protective effect of XBP1 deficiency in neurodegeneration using knockout mice, and suggest a potential use of gene therapy strategies to manipulate the UPR in the context of HD.

  11. sigE facilitates the adaptation of Bordetella bronchiseptica to stress conditions and lethal infection in immunocompromised mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The cell envelope of a bacterial pathogen can be damaged by harsh conditions in the environment outside a host and by immune factors during infection. Cell envelope stress responses preserve the integrity of this essential compartment and are often required for virulence. Bordetella species are important respiratory pathogens that possess a large number of putative transcription factors. However, no cell envelope stress responses have been described in these species. Among the putative Bordetella transcription factors are a number of genes belonging to the extracytoplasmic function (ECF) group of alternative sigma factors, some of which are known to mediate cell envelope stress responses in other bacteria. Here we investigate the role of one such gene, sigE, in stress survival and pathogenesis of Bordetella bronchiseptica. Results We demonstrate that sigE encodes a functional sigma factor that mediates a cell envelope stress response. Mutants of B. bronchiseptica strain RB50 lacking sigE are more sensitive to high temperature, ethanol, and perturbation of the envelope by SDS-EDTA and certain β-lactam antibiotics. Using a series of immunocompromised mice deficient in different components of the innate and adaptive immune responses, we show that SigE plays an important role in evading the innate immune response during lethal infections of mice lacking B cells and T cells. SigE is not required, however, for colonization of the respiratory tract of immunocompetent mice. The sigE mutant is more efficiently phagocytosed and killed by peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) than RB50, and exhibits decreased cytotoxicity toward macrophages. These altered interactions with phagocytes could contribute to the defects observed during lethal infection. Conclusions Much of the work on transcriptional regulation during infection in B. bronchiseptica has focused on the BvgAS two-component system. This study reveals that the SigE regulon also mediates a

  12. Genome-wide screen identifies Escherichia coli TCA cycle-related mutants with extended chronological lifespan dependent on acetate metabolism and the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor ArcA

    PubMed Central

    Gonidakis, Stavros; Finkel, Steven E.; Longo, Valter D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Single-gene mutants with extended lifespan have been described in several model organisms. We performed a genome-wide screen for long-lived mutants in Escherichia coli which revealed strains lacking TCA cycle-related genes that exhibit longer stationary phase survival and increased resistance to heat stress compared to wild-type. Extended lifespan in the sdhA mutant, lacking subunit A of succinate dehydrogenase, is associated with reduced production of superoxide and increased stress resistance. On the other hand, the longer lifespan of the lipoic acid synthase mutant (lipA) is associated with reduced oxygen consumption and requires the acetate-producing enzyme pyruvate oxidase, as well as acetyl-CoA synthetase, the enzyme that converts extracellular acetate to acetyl-CoA. The hypoxia-inducible transcription factor ArcA, acting independently of acetate metabolism, is also required for maximum lifespan extension in the lipA and lpdA mutants, indicating that these mutations promote entry into a mode normally associated with a low-oxygen environment. Since analogous changes from respiration to fermentation have been observed in long-lived Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Caenorhabditis elegans strains, such metabolic alterations may represent an evolutionarily conserved strategy to extend lifespan. PMID:20707865

  13. Characterization of a New Pink-Fruited Tomato Mutant Results in the Identification of a Null Allele of the SlMYB12 Transcription Factor.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Moreno, Josefina-Patricia; Tzfadia, Oren; Forment, Javier; Presa, Silvia; Rogachev, Ilana; Meir, Sagit; Orzaez, Diego; Aharoni, Aspah; Granell, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    The identification and characterization of new tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) mutants affected in fruit pigmentation and nutritional content can provide valuable insights into the underlying biology, as well as a source of new alleles for breeding programs. To date, all characterized pink-pigmented tomato fruit mutants appear to result from low SlMYB12 transcript levels in the fruit skin. Two new mutant lines displaying a pink fruit phenotype (pf1 and pf2) were characterized in this study. In the pf mutants, SlMYB12 transcripts accumulated to wild-type levels but exhibited the same truncation, which resulted in the absence of the essential MYB activation domain coding region. Allelism and complementation tests revealed that both pf mutants were allelic to the y locus and showed the same recessive null allele in homozygosis: Δy A set of molecular and metabolic effects, reminiscent of those observed in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) myb11 myb12 myb111 triple mutant, were found in the tomato Δy mutants. To our knowledge, these have not been described previously, and our data support the idea of their being null mutants, in contrast to previously described transcriptional hypomorphic pink fruit lines. We detected a reduction in the expression of several flavonol glycosides and some associated glycosyl transferases. Transcriptome analysis further revealed that the effects of the pf mutations extended beyond the flavonoid pathway into the interface between primary and secondary metabolism. Finally, screening for Myb-binding sites in the candidate gene promoter sequences revealed that 141 of the 152 co-down-regulated genes may be direct targets of SlMYB12 regulation. PMID:27208285

  14. Characterization of a New Pink-Fruited Tomato Mutant Results in the Identification of a Null Allele of the SlMYB12 Transcription Factor.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Moreno, Josefina-Patricia; Tzfadia, Oren; Forment, Javier; Presa, Silvia; Rogachev, Ilana; Meir, Sagit; Orzaez, Diego; Aharoni, Aspah; Granell, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    The identification and characterization of new tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) mutants affected in fruit pigmentation and nutritional content can provide valuable insights into the underlying biology, as well as a source of new alleles for breeding programs. To date, all characterized pink-pigmented tomato fruit mutants appear to result from low SlMYB12 transcript levels in the fruit skin. Two new mutant lines displaying a pink fruit phenotype (pf1 and pf2) were characterized in this study. In the pf mutants, SlMYB12 transcripts accumulated to wild-type levels but exhibited the same truncation, which resulted in the absence of the essential MYB activation domain coding region. Allelism and complementation tests revealed that both pf mutants were allelic to the y locus and showed the same recessive null allele in homozygosis: Δy A set of molecular and metabolic effects, reminiscent of those observed in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) myb11 myb12 myb111 triple mutant, were found in the tomato Δy mutants. To our knowledge, these have not been described previously, and our data support the idea of their being null mutants, in contrast to previously described transcriptional hypomorphic pink fruit lines. We detected a reduction in the expression of several flavonol glycosides and some associated glycosyl transferases. Transcriptome analysis further revealed that the effects of the pf mutations extended beyond the flavonoid pathway into the interface between primary and secondary metabolism. Finally, screening for Myb-binding sites in the candidate gene promoter sequences revealed that 141 of the 152 co-down-regulated genes may be direct targets of SlMYB12 regulation.

  15. Electroshock weapons can be lethal!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Marjorie

    2008-03-01

    Electroshock weapons (EWs)-stun guns, tasers, riot shields-are electroconductive devices designed to safely incapacitate healthy men neuromuscularly, so they are called nonlethal or less-lethal. EW firms seeking large nonmilitary markets targeted law enforcement and corrections personnel, who began using EWs in prisons/jails and on public patrol in 1980 in the USA. This shifted the EW-shocked population from healthy soldiers to a heterogeneous mix of both sexes, ages 6-92, in a wide variety of health conditions! An EW operates by disrupting normal physiological processes, producing transient effects in healthy people. But if a person's health is sufficiently compromised, the margin of safety can be lost, resulting in death or permanent health problems. 325 people have died after EW shock since 1980. Did the EW cause these deaths? Evidence indicates that EWs do play a causal role in most such deaths. EWs can be lethal for people in diabetic shock^1 (hypoglycemia), which may be why Robert Dziekanski-a Polish immigrant to Canada-died so quickly after he was tasered at Vancouver Airport: not having eaten for over 10 hours, he likely was severely hypoglycemic. The EW death rate in North America is 30 times higher than need be, because EW users have not been properly trained to use EWs on a heterogeneous population safely! ^1J. Clinical Engineering 30(3):111(2005).

  16. Arenavirus extinction through lethal mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Juan Carlos

    2005-02-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers represent serious human public health problems causing devastating and often lethal disease. Several hemorrhagic fevers are caused by arenaviruses including Lassa fever virus (LFV) and the South American viral hemorrhagic fevers (SAHF). In recent years, increased air travel between Africa and other areas has led to the importation of LFV into the US, Europe, Japan, and Canada. This has raised awareness about arenaviruses as potential emerging viruses. Moreover, because of its severe morbidity and high mortality, and transmissibility from human to human, weaponized forms of LFV poses a real threat as agent of bioterrorism. No licensed vaccine is available in the US, and currently there is not efficacious therapy to treat these infections. Therefore, the importance of developing novel effective antiviral drugs to combat HF arenaviruses, for which the prototypic Arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) provides us with an excellent model system. Recent findings have shown that LCMV multiplication both in cultured cells and in vivo is highly susceptible to the mutagenic agent 5-fluorouracil (FU). FU-mediated extinction of LCMV was associated with only modest increases in virus mutation frequencies, but did not significantly affect virus replication and transcription, or virus particle formation. These findings indicate that, as with other riboviruses, lethal mutagenesis is effective also against LCMV raising the possibility of using this novel antiviral strategy to combat pathogenic arenaviruses. PMID:15649566

  17. A West Nile virus NS4B-P38G mutant strain induces adaptive immunity via TLR7-MyD88-dependent and independent signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guorui; Welte, Thomas; Wang, Jia; Whiteman, Melissa C; Wicker, Jason A; Saxena, Vandana; Cong, Yingzi; Barrett, Alan D T; Wang, Tian

    2013-08-28

    Prior work shows that an attenuated West Nile virus (WNV), the nonstructural (NS)4B-P38G mutant infection in mice induced strong immune responses and protected host from subsequent lethal wild-type WNV infection. Here, we investigated NS4B-P38G mutant infection in myeloid differentiation factor 88-deficient (MyD88(-/-)) and Toll-like receptor 7-deficient (TLR7(-/-)) mice and found they had enhanced susceptibility compared to wild-type mice. Both groups had lower WNV-specific IgM response and reduced effector T cell functions. Dendritic cells (DCs) also exhibited a reduced maturation and impaired antigen-presenting functions compared to wild-type DCs. Moreover, infection with NS4B-P38G mutant in TLR7(-/-) and MyD88(-/-) mice provided full and partial protection respectively from subsequent challenge with lethal wild-type WNV. There were reduced T cell responses in MyD88(-/-) and interleukin-1 receptor deficient (IL-1R(-/-)) mice during secondary challenge with wild-type WNV. In contrast, TLR7(-/-) mice displayed normal T cell functions. Collectively, these results suggest that TLR7-dependent MyD88 signaling is required for T cell priming during NS4B-P38G mutant infection, whereas the TLR7-independent MyD88 signaling pathways are involved in memory T cell development, which may contribute to host protection during secondary challenge with wild-type WNV. PMID:23845800

  18. Cardiac-Specific Activation of IKK2 Leads to Defects in Heart Development and Embryonic Lethality.

    PubMed

    Kraut, Bärbel; Maier, Harald J; Kókai, Enikö; Fiedler, Katja; Boettger, Thomas; Illing, Annett; Kostin, Sawa; Walther, Paul; Braun, Thomas; Wirth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor NF-κB has been associated with a range of pathological conditions of the heart, mainly based on its function as a master regulator of inflammation and pro-survival factor. Here, we addressed the question what effects activation of NF-κB can have during murine heart development. We expressed a constitutively active (CA) mutant of IKK2, the kinase activating canonical NF-κB signaling, specifically in cardiomyocytes under the control of the α-myosin heavy chain promoter. Expression of IKK2-CA resulted in embryonic lethality around E13. Embryos showed defects in compact zone formation and the contractile apparatus, and overall were characterized by widespread inflammation with infiltration of myeloid cells. Gene expression analysis suggested an interferon type I signature, with increased expression of interferon regulatory factors. While apoptosis of cardiomyocytes was only increased at later stages, their proliferation was decreased early on, providing an explanation for the disturbed compact zone formation. Mechanistically, this could be explained by activation of the JAK/STAT axis and increased expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21. A rescue experiment with an IκBα superrepressor demonstrated that the phenotype was dependent on NF-κB. We conclude that activation of NF-κB is detrimental during normal heart development due to excessive activation of pro-inflammatory pathways.

  19. Smad-binding defective mutant of transforming growth factor beta type I receptor enhances tumorigenesis but suppresses metastasis of breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fang; Byfield, Stacey DaCosta; Parks, W Tony; Stuelten, Christina H; Nemani, Deepa; Zhang, Ying E; Roberts, Anita B

    2004-07-01

    The role of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) in carcinogenesis is complex, with tumor suppressor and pro-oncogenic activities depending on the particular tumor cell and its stage in malignant progression. We previously have demonstrated in breast cancer cell lines that Smad2/3 signaling played a dominant role in mediating tumor suppressor effects on well-differentiated breast cancer cell lines grown as xenografts and prometastatic effects on a more invasive, metastatic cell line. Our present data based on selective interference with activation of endogenous Smad2 and Smad3 by stable expression of a mutant form of the TGF-beta type I receptor (RImL45) unable to bind Smad2/3 but with a functional kinase again show that reduction in Smad2/3 signaling by expression of RImL45 enhanced the malignancy of xenografted tumors of the well-differentiated MCF10A-derived tumor cell line MCF10CA1h, resulting in formation of larger tumors with a higher proliferative index and more malignant histologic features. In contrast, expression of RImL45 in the more aggressive MCF10CA1a cell line strongly suppressed formation of lung metastases following tail vein injection. These results suggest a causal, dominant role for the endogenous Smad2/3 signaling pathway in the tumor suppressor and prometastatic activities of TGF-beta in these cells. Using an in vitro assay, we further show that non-Smad signaling pathways, including p38 and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase, cooperate with TGF-beta/Smads in enhancing migration of metastatic MCF10CA1a cells, but that, although necessary for migration, these other pathways are not sufficient for metastasis.

  20. Environments of the four tryptophans in the extracellular domain of human tissue factor: comparison of results from absorption and fluorescence difference spectra of tryptophan replacement mutants with the crystal structure of the wild-type protein.

    PubMed Central

    Hasselbacher, C A; Rusinova, E; Waxman, E; Rusinova, R; Kohanski, R A; Lam, W; Guha, A; Du, J; Lin, T C; Polikarpov, I

    1995-01-01

    The local environments of the four tryptophan residues of the extracellular domain of human tissue factor (sTF) were assessed from difference absorption and fluorescence spectra. The difference spectra were derived by subtracting spectra from single Trp-to-Phe or Trp-to-Tyr replacement mutants from the corresponding spectrum of the wild-type protein. Each of the mutants was capable of enhancing the proteolytic activity of factor VIIa showing that the mutations did not introduce major structural changes, although the mutants were more susceptible to denaturation by guanidinium chloride. The difference spectra indicate that the Trp residues are buried to different extents within the protein matrix. This evaluation was compared with the x-ray crystal structure of sTF. There is excellent agreement between predictions from the difference spectra and the environments of the Trp residues observed in the x-ray crystal structure, demonstrating that difference absorption and particularly fluorescence spectra derived from functional single-Trp replacement mutants can be used to obtain information about the local environments of individual Trp residues in multi-tryptophan proteins. Images FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:7669897

  1. TT Mutant Homozygote of Kruppel-like Factor 5 Is a Key Factor for Increasing Basal Metabolic Rate and Resting Metabolic Rate in Korean Elementary School Children.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung Ran; Kwon, In-Su; Kwon, Dae Young; Kim, Myung-Sunny; Lee, Myoungsook

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the contribution of genetic variations of KLF5 to basal metabolic rate (BMR) and resting metabolic rate (RMR) and the inhibition of obesity in Korean children. A variation of KLF5 (rs3782933) was genotyped in 62 Korean children. Using multiple linear regression analysis, we developed a model to predict BMR in children. We divided them into several groups; normal versus overweight by body mass index (BMI) and low BMR versus high BMR by BMR. There were no differences in the distributions of alleles and genotypes between each group. The genetic variation of KLF5 gene showed a significant correlation with several clinical factors, such as BMR, muscle, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and insulin. Children with the TT had significantly higher BMR than those with CC (p = 0.030). The highest muscle was observed in the children with TT compared with CC (p = 0.032). The insulin and C-peptide values were higher in children with TT than those with CC (p= 0.029 vs. p = 0.004, respectively). In linear regression analysis, BMI and muscle mass were correlated with BMR, whereas insulin and C-peptide were not associated with BMR. In the high-BMR group, we observed that higher muscle, fat mass, and C-peptide affect the increase of BMR in children with TT (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, and p = 0.018, respectively), while Rohrer's index could explain the usual decrease in BMR (adjust r(2) = 1.000, p < 0.001, respectively). We identified a novel association between TT of KLF5 rs3782933 and BMR in Korean children. We could make better use of the variation within KLF5 in a future clinical intervention study of obesity.

  2. [Hormone-dependent insertional Arabidopsis thaliana mutants with decreased viability and fertility].

    PubMed

    Tomilova, N B; Tomilov, A A; Ogarkova, O A; Soldatova, O P; Tarasov, V A

    2001-09-01

    We present data on the phenotype identification and genetic analysis of offspring in three lines of dominant morphological mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana having drastically reduced fertility (a sterile calluslike mutant, a flower mutant, and a dwarf mutant) and in five lines of recessive morphological mutants (four mutants with lethal seedlings and one pigmentation mutant). The mutants were selected from a collection of transgenic plants that had genomes carrying a T-DNA insertion of plasmid vectors pLD3 and pPCVRN4; the collection was created earlier via agrobacterial transformation of germinating seeds. The results presented here were obtained using compensation of hormonal imbalance in the insertional morphological mutants of A. thaliana by exogenous hormones. PMID:11642128

  3. The Identification of Zebrafish Mutants Showing Alterations in Senescence-Associated Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Junzo; Koshimizu, Eriko; Qi, Jie; Nanjappa, Purushothama; Imamura, Shintaro; Islam, Asiful; Neuberg, Donna; Amsterdam, Adam; Roberts, Thomas M.

    2008-01-01

    There is an interesting overlap of function in a wide range of organisms between genes that modulate the stress responses and those that regulate aging phenotypes and, in some cases, lifespan. We have therefore screened mutagenized zebrafish embryos for the altered expression of a stress biomarker, senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) in our current study. We validated the use of embryonic SA-β-gal production as a screening tool by analyzing a collection of retrovirus-insertional mutants. From a pool of 306 such mutants, we identified 11 candidates that showed higher embryonic SA-β-gal activity, two of which were selected for further study. One of these mutants is null for a homologue of Drosophila spinster, a gene known to regulate lifespan in flies, whereas the other harbors a mutation in a homologue of the human telomeric repeat binding factor 2 (terf2) gene, which plays roles in telomere protection and telomere-length regulation. Although the homozygous spinster and terf2 mutants are embryonic lethal, heterozygous adult fish are viable and show an accelerated appearance of aging symptoms including lipofuscin accumulation, which is another biomarker, and shorter lifespan. We next used the same SA-β-gal assay to screen chemically mutagenized zebrafish, each of which was heterozygous for lesions in multiple genes, under the sensitizing conditions of oxidative stress. We obtained eight additional mutants from this screen that, when bred to homozygosity, showed enhanced SA-β-gal activity even in the absence of stress, and further displayed embryonic neural and muscular degenerative phenotypes. Adult fish that are heterozygous for these mutations also showed the premature expression of aging biomarkers and the accelerated onset of aging phenotypes. Our current strategy of mutant screening for a senescence-associated biomarker in zebrafish embryos may thus prove to be a useful new tool for the genetic dissection of vertebrate stress response and

  4. DNA polymerase I is crucial for the repair of potentially lethal damage caused by the indirect effects of X irradiation in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Billen, D.

    1985-07-01

    The radiosensitivity of an Escherichia coli mutant deficient in DNA polymerase I was measured in the presence of OH radical scavengers. The extreme X-ray sensitivity of the mutant could be abolished by OH radical scavengers if a sufficiently high level of radioprotector was present. There was a direct correlation between the OH radical scavenging activity of the chemicals tested (NO/sub 2//sup -/, n-butanol, glycerol, t-amyl alcohol, and t-butanol) and their protective ability. The author interprets the data as showing that the indirect actions of X rays (primarily OH radicals) result in major damage to the bacterial DNA which in large part consists of potentially lethal lesions. This potentially lethal damage is repaired through an enzymatic pathway requiring DNA polymerase I. I. In the mutant lacking DNA polymerase I, these potentially lethal lesions are expressed as cell lethality.

  5. Identification of essential genes and synthetic lethal gene combinations in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Mori, Hirotada; Baba, Tomoya; Yokoyama, Katsushi; Takeuchi, Rikiya; Nomura, Wataru; Makishi, Kazuichi; Otsuka, Yuta; Dose, Hitomi; Wanner, Barry L

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe the systematic identification of single genes and gene pairs, whose knockout causes lethality in Escherichia coli K-12. During construction of precise single-gene knockout library of E. coli K-12, we identified 328 essential gene candidates for growth in complex (LB) medium. Upon establishment of the Keio single-gene deletion library, we undertook the development of the ASKA single-gene deletion library carrying a different antibiotic resistance. In addition, we developed tools for identification of synthetic lethal gene combinations by systematic construction of double-gene knockout mutants. We introduce these methods herein.

  6. Identification of essential genes and synthetic lethal gene combinations in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Mori, Hirotada; Baba, Tomoya; Yokoyama, Katsushi; Takeuchi, Rikiya; Nomura, Wataru; Makishi, Kazuichi; Otsuka, Yuta; Dose, Hitomi; Wanner, Barry L

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe the systematic identification of single genes and gene pairs, whose knockout causes lethality in Escherichia coli K-12. During construction of precise single-gene knockout library of E. coli K-12, we identified 328 essential gene candidates for growth in complex (LB) medium. Upon establishment of the Keio single-gene deletion library, we undertook the development of the ASKA single-gene deletion library carrying a different antibiotic resistance. In addition, we developed tools for identification of synthetic lethal gene combinations by systematic construction of double-gene knockout mutants. We introduce these methods herein. PMID:25636612

  7. rRNA suppressor of a eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5B/initiation factor 2 mutant reveals a binding site for translational GTPases on the small ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Shin, Byung-Sik; Kim, Joo-Ran; Acker, Michael G; Maher, Kathryn N; Lorsch, Jon R; Dever, Thomas E

    2009-02-01

    The translational GTPases promote initiation, elongation, and termination of protein synthesis by interacting with the ribosome. Mutations that impair GTP hydrolysis by eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5B/initiation factor 2 (eIF5B/IF2) impair yeast cell growth due to failure to dissociate from the ribosome following subunit joining. A mutation in helix h5 of the 18S rRNA in the 40S ribosomal subunit and intragenic mutations in domain II of eIF5B suppress the toxic effects associated with expression of the eIF5B-H480I GTPase-deficient mutant in yeast by lowering the ribosome binding affinity of eIF5B. Hydroxyl radical mapping experiments reveal that the domain II suppressors interface with the body of the 40S subunit in the vicinity of helix h5. As the helix h5 mutation also impairs elongation factor function, the rRNA and eIF5B suppressor mutations provide in vivo evidence supporting a functionally important docking of domain II of the translational GTPases on the body of the small ribosomal subunit.

  8. Synthetic lethal interaction between the pel1 and op1 mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Dzugasová, V; Subík, J

    2005-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strain containing the op1 mutation affecting the function of a mitochondrial ATP/ADP translocator has been crossed to the pel1 and crd1 mutants deficient in the biosynthesis of mitochondrial phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and cardiolipin (CL). Using tetrad analysis of diploids issued from corresponding crosses a synthetic lethal interaction has been observed between the op1 and pel1 mutations resulting in the lack of growth of a corresponding double mutant on minimal medium containing glucose. The op1 pel1 double mutant also displayed a decreased susceptibility to fluconazole and a compromised growth even in complex medium containing glucose. The viability of mutant cells was strongly reduced, corresponding to <30 % and 10 % of colony-forming units observed after growth in complex and minimal medium, respectively. A lower viability of the double mutant in minimal medium was accompanied by an increased formation of mitochondrial petite mutants (as determined by mtDNA rescue into diploid cells). The results indicate that in the simultaneous absence of mitochondrial anionic phospholipids (PG plus CL) and ATP/ADP exchange across the inner mitochondrial membrane the yeast mitochondrial functions are severely limited, leading to a strongly compromised cell multiplication. Since under similar conditions the op1 crd1 double mutant was able to grow on minimal medium this deleterious effect of anionic phospholipid deficiency could be at least partially substituted by PG accumulated in the cardiolipin deficient delta crd1 mutant cells.

  9. RAS Synthetic Lethal Screens Revisited: Still Seeking the Elusive Prize?

    PubMed

    Downward, Julian

    2015-04-15

    The RAS genes are critical oncogenic drivers activated by point mutation in some 20% of human malignancies. However, no pharmacologic approaches to targeting RAS proteins directly have yet succeeded, leading to suggestions that these proteins may be "undruggable." This has led to two alternative indirect approaches to targeting RAS function in cancer. One has been to target RAS signaling pathways downstream at tractable enzymes such as kinases, particularly in combination. The other, which is the focus of this review, has been to seek targets that are essential in cells bearing an activated RAS oncogene, but not those without. This synthetic lethal approach, while rooted in ideas from invertebrate genetics, has been inspired most strongly by the successful use of PARP inhibitors, such as olaparib, in the clinic to treat BRCA defective cancers. Several large-scale screens have been carried out using RNA interference-mediated expression silencing to find genes that are uniquely essential to RAS-mutant but not wild-type cells. These screens have been notable for the low degree of overlap between their results, with the possible exception of proteasome components, and have yet to lead to successful new clinical approaches to the treatment of RAS-mutant cancers. Possible reasons for these disappointing results are discussed here, along with a reevaluation of the approaches taken. On the basis of experience to date, RAS synthetic lethality has so far fallen some way short of its original promise and remains unproven as an approach to finding effective new ways of tackling RAS-mutant cancers. Clin Cancer Res; 21(8); 1802-9. ©2015 AACR. See all articles in this CCR Focus section, "Targeting RAS-Driven Cancers." PMID:25878361

  10. RAS Synthetic Lethal Screens Revisited: Still Seeking the Elusive Prize?

    PubMed Central

    Downward, Julian

    2015-01-01

    The RAS genes are critical oncogenic drivers activated by point mutation in some 20% of human malignancies. However, no pharmacological approaches to targeting RAS proteins directly have yet succeeded, leading to suggestions that these proteins may be “undruggable.” This has led to two alternative indirect approaches to targeting RAS function in cancer. One has been to target RAS signaling pathways downstream at tractable enzymes such as kinases, particularly in combination. The other, which is the focus of this review, has been to seek targets that are essential in cells bearing an activated RAS oncogene, but not those without. This synthetic lethal approach, while rooted in ideas from invertebrate genetics, has been inspired most strongly by the successful use of PARP inhibitors, such as olaparib, in the clinic to treat BRCA defective cancers. Several large-scale screens have been carried out using RNA interference-mediated expression silencing to find genes that are uniquely essential to RAS mutant but not wild type cells. These screens have been notable for the low degree of overlap between their results, with the possible exception of proteasome components, and have yet to lead to successful new clinical approaches to the treatment of RAS mutant cancers. Possible reasons for these disappointing results are discussed here, along with a re-evaluation of the approaches taken. Based on experience to date, RAS synthetic lethality has so far fallen some way short of its original promise and remains unproven as an approach to finding effective new ways of tackling RAS mutant cancers. PMID:25878361

  11. Inhibition of transcription factor nuclear factor-κB by a mutant inhibitor-κBα attenuates resistance of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma to TNF-α caspase-mediated cell death

    PubMed Central

    Duffey, D C; Crowl-Bancroft, C V; Chen, Z; Ondrey, F G; Nejad-Sattari, M; Dong, G; Van Waes, C

    2000-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a cytokine that can induce cell death of different cancers via a cellular cascade of proteases, the caspases. However, TNF-α has been detected in tumour and serum of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), and tumour cell lines derived from this environment often exhibit resistance to TNF-α-induced cell death. Cell death mediated by TNF-α and caspases may be inhibited by cytoprotective genes regulated by transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). We recently showed that NF-κB is constitutively activated in HNSCC, and that inhibition of NF-κB by expression of a nondegradable mutant inhibitor of NF-κB, IκBαM, markedly decreased survival and growth of HNSCC cells in vivo. In the present study, we examined the TNF-α sensitivity and response of HNSCC with constitutively active NF-κB, and of HNSCC cells in which NF-κB is inhibited by stable expression of a dominant negative mutant inhibitor, IκBαM. Human lines UM-SCC-9, 11B and 38, previously shown to exhibit constitutive activation of NF-κB, were found to be highly resistant to growth inhibition by up to 104U/ml of TNF-α in 5 day MTT assay. These TNF-α resistant HNSCC lines expressed TNF receptor I, and exhibited constitutive and TNF-α-inducible activation of NF-κB as demonstrated by nuclear localization of NF-κB p65 by immunohistochemistry. UM-SCC-9 I11 cells which stably expressed an inhibitor of NF-κB, IκBαm, were susceptible to TNF-α-induced growth inhibition. DNA cell cycle analysis revealed that TNF-α induced growth inhibition was associated with accumulation of cells with sub-G0/G1 DNA content. Cell death was demonstrated by trypan blue staining, and was blocked by caspase inhibitor. We conclude that HNSCC that exhibit constitutive and TNF-α-inducible activation of transcription factor NF-κB are resistant to TNF-α, and that inhibition of NF-κB sensitizes HNSCC to TNF-α caspase-mediated cytotoxicity. The demonstration of

  12. Misonidazole and potentially lethal damage

    SciTech Connect

    Korbelik, M.; Palcic, B.; Skov, K.; Skarsgard, L.

    1982-03-01

    The existence of potentially lethal damage (PLD) is demonstrated in exponentially growing CHO cells exposed to misonidazole in hypoxia. The method of hypertonic post-treatment of cells was used in these studies. Misonidazole-induced PLD differs in many characteristics from radiation-induced PLD.The repair kinetics of misonidazole-induced PLD are much slower than for the repair of radiation-induced PLD (hours vs. minutes). No significant repair of misonidazole-induced PLD took place at 25/sup 0/C. Other differences are discussed. Hypertonic post-treatment of irradiated cells which had been pre-incubated with misonidazole to non-toxic levels, gave survival data consistent with the interpretation that no radiation PLD can be induced in such cells.

  13. Mutations in the RNA Polymerase II Transcription Machinery Suppress the Hyperrecombination Mutant Hpr1Δ of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Fan, H. Y.; Cheng, K. K.; Klein, H. L.

    1996-01-01

    The soh1, soh2 and soh4 mutants were isolated as suppressors of the temperature-dependent growth of the hyperrecombination mutant hpr1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cloning and sequence analysis of these suppressor genes has unexpectedly shown them to code for components of the RNA polymerase II transcription complex. SOH2 is identical to RPB2, which encodes the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, and SOH4 is the same as SUA7, encoding the yeast transcription initiation factor TFIIB. SOH1 encodes a novel 14-kD protein with limited sequence similarity to RNA polymerases. Interestingly, SOH1 not only interacts with factors involved in DNA repair, but transcription as well. Thus, the Soh1 protein may serve to couple these two processes. The Soh1 protein interacts with a DNA repair protein, Rad5p, in a two-hybrid system assay. Soh1p may functionally interact with components of the RNA polymerase II complex as suggested from the synthetic lethality observed in soh1 rpb1Δ104, soh1 soh2-1 (rpb2), and soh1 soh4 (sua7) double mutants. Because mutations in SOH1, RPB2 and SUA7 suppress the hyperrecombination phenotype of hpr1 mutants, this suggests a link between recombination in direct repeats and transcription. PMID:8849885

  14. Alcohol Consumption and Nearly Lethal Suicide Attempts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Kenneth E.; Kresnow, Marcie-jo; Mercy, James A.; Potter, Lloyd B.; Swann, Alan C.; Frankowski, Ralph F.; Lee, Roberta K.; Bayer, Timothy L.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a case-control study of the association between nearly lethal suicide attempts and facets of alcohol consumption; namely, drinking frequency, drinking quantity, binge drinking, alcoholism, drinking within 3 hours of suicide attempt, and age began drinking. In bivariate analyses, all measures were associated with nearly lethal suicide…

  15. Mutant p53 Promotes Tumor Cell Malignancy by Both Positive and Negative Regulation of the Transforming Growth Factor β (TGF-β) Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Lei; Xu, Jinjin; Liu, Jian; Amjad, Ali; Zhang, Kun; Liu, Qingwu; Zhou, Lei; Xiao, Jianru; Li, Xiaotao

    2015-01-01

    Specific p53 mutations abrogate tumor-suppressive functions by gaining new abilities to promote tumorigenesis. Inactivation of p53 is known to distort TGF-β signaling, which paradoxically displays both tumor-suppressive and pro-oncogenic functions. The molecular mechanisms of how mutant p53 simultaneously antagonizes the tumor-suppressive and synergizes the tumor-promoting function of the TGF-β pathway remain elusive. Here we demonstrate that mutant p53 differentially regulates subsets of TGF-β target genes by enhanced binding to the MH2 domain in Smad3 upon the integration of ERK signaling, therefore disrupting Smad3/Smad4 complex formation. Silencing Smad2, inhibition of ERK, or introducing a phosphorylation-defective mutation at Ser-392 in p53 abrogates the R175H mutant p53-dependent regulation of these TGF-β target genes. Our study shows a mechanism to reconcile the seemingly contradictory observations that mutant p53 can both attenuate and cooperate with the TGF-β pathway to promote cancer cell malignancy in the same cell type. PMID:25767119

  16. c-Myc and Transforming Growth Factor α Enhance the Development of Hepatic Lesions Due to Mutant β-Catenin in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jochem, Adam S; Holmes, Katie E; Stein, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in the Wnt signaling pathway are associated with diverse cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The development of HCC is thought to be a multistage process in which multiple genetic alterations are necessary. Few studies have assessed the effect of aberrant Wnt signaling activity in association with other molecular alterations in HCC. Here we sought to determine whether co-overexpression of c-Myc or TGFα, 2 signaling molecules known to contribute to HCC development, enhanced the development of hepatic lesions associated with a stabilized β-catenin. The coexpression of mutant β-catenin with either c-Myc or TGFα within hepatocytes increased the severity of hepatic lesions compared with that associated with any of the transgenes expressed individually. The coexpression of mutant β-catenin with c-Myc or TGFα resulted in severe hepatomegaly necessitating the euthanasia of mice by an average of 156 and 128 d, respectively, after the cessation of doxycycline. The expression of mutant β-catenin alone resulted in mild to moderate hepatomegaly that prompted the euthanasia of mice by an average of 75 d after the cessation of doxycycline. Collectively, these findings indicate that coexpression of c-Myc or TGFα delays the onset of endstage hepatic disease yet enhances the severity of hepatic lesions due to mutant β-catenin. PMID:25402175

  17. Isolation and characterization of mutants defective in the localization of LCIB, an essential factor for the carbon-concentrating mechanism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Yamano, Takashi; Asada, Atsuko; Sato, Emi; Fukuzawa, Hideya

    2014-09-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii acclimates to low-CO2 (LC) conditions by actively transporting inorganic carbon (Ci) into the cell, resulting in an increase in photosynthetic efficiency. This mechanism is called the carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM), and soluble protein LCIB is essential for the CCM. LCIB is localized in the vicinity of pyrenoid, a prominent structure in the chloroplast, under LC conditions in the light. In contrast, in the dark or in high-CO2 conditions, where the CCM is inactive, LCIB diffuses away from the pyrenoid. Although the functional importance of LCIB for the CCM has been shown, the significance and mechanism of the change in suborganellar localization of LCIB remain to be elucidated. In this study, we screened 13,000 DNA-tagged mutants and isolated twelve aberrant LCIB localization (abl) mutants under LC conditions. abl-1 and abl-3 with dispersed and speckled localization of LCIB in the chloroplast showed significant decreases in Ci affinity, Ci accumulation, and CO2 fixation. Ten abl mutants (abl-1, abl-3, abl-4, abl-5, abl-6, abl-7, abl-8, abl-9, abl-11, and abl-12) showed not only aberrant LCIB localization but also reduced pyrenoid sizes. Moreover, three abl mutants (abl-10, abl-11, and abl-12) showed the increased numbers of pyrenoids per cell. These results suggested that the specific LCIB localization could be related to pyrenoid development.

  18. Down-Regulation of Key Virulence Factors Makes the Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium rfaH Mutant a Promising Live-Attenuated Vaccine Candidate†

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Gábor; Danino, Vittoria; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Pallen, Mark; Chaudhuri, Roy; Emödy, Levente; Hinton, Jay C.; Hacker, Jörg

    2006-01-01

    Mutants of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium that lack the transcriptional regulator RfaH are efficient as live oral vaccines against salmonellosis in mice. We show that the attenuation of the vaccine candidate strain is associated with reduced net growth in epithelial and macrophage cells. In order to identify the relevant RfaH-dependent genes, the RfaH regulon was determined with S. enterica serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium using whole-genome Salmonella microarrays. As well as impacting the expression of genes involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) core and O-antigen synthesis, the loss of RfaH results in a marked down-regulation of SPI-4 genes, the flagellum/chemotaxis system, and type III secretion system 1. However, a proportion of these effects could have been the indirect consequence of the altered expression of genes required for LPS biosynthesis. Direct and indirect effects of the rfaH mutation were dissociated by genome-wide transcriptional profiling of a structural deep-rough LPS mutant (waaG). We show that truncation of LPS itself is responsible for the decreased intracellular yield observed for ΔrfaH strains. LPS mutants do not differ in replication ability; rather, they show increased susceptibility to antimicrobial peptides in the intracellular milieu. On the other hand, evidence that deletion of rfaH, as well as some other genes involved in LPS biosynthesis, results in enhanced invasion of various mammalian cells is shown. Exposure of common minor antigens in the absence of serovar-specific antigens might be responsible for the observed cross-reactive nature of the elicited immune response upon vaccination. Increased invasiveness of the Salmonella rfaH mutant into antigen-presenting cells, combined with increased intracellular killing and the potential for raising a cross-protective immune response, renders the rfaH mutant an ideal vaccine candidate. PMID:16988271

  19. A system to efficiently maintain embryonic lethal mutations in the flour beetle Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Berghammer, A; Bucher, G; Maderspacher, F; Klingler, M

    1999-06-01

    Due to its small size, short life cycle, and easy maintenance, the flour beetle Tribolium castaneum is well suited for the genetic analysis of development. One drawback of Tribolium as a genetic system is, however, the difficulty of keeping embryonic lethal lines. Presently, only few lethal mutations can be kept as balanced stocks. Therefore, heterozygous carriers must be identified anew in every generation in order to maintain a recessive embryonic mutation. To alleviate this problem we have devised a block system that allows the simultaneous processing of many mutant lines or test crosses for visual inspection of larval cuticle phenotypes. Using this technique, one person can maintain about 100 embryonic lethal stocks, which makes feasible the thorough genetic analysis of embryogenesis in this species.

  20. Lethal entanglement in baleen whales.

    PubMed

    Cassoff, Rachel M; Moore, Kathleen M; McLellan, William A; Barco, Susan G; Rotsteins, David S; Moore, Michael J

    2011-10-01

    Understanding the scenarios whereby fishing gear entanglement of large whales induces mortality is important for the development of mitigation strategies. Here we present a series of 21 cases involving 4 species of baleen whales in the NW Atlantic, describing the available sighting history, necropsy observations, and subsequent data analyses that enabled the compilation of the manners in which entanglement can be lethal. The single acute cause of entanglement mortality identified was drowning from entanglement involving multiple body parts, with the animal's inability to surface. More protracted causes of death included impaired foraging during entanglement, resulting in starvation after many months; systemic infection arising from open, unresolved entanglement wounds; and hemorrhage or debilitation due to severe gear-related damage to tissues. Serious gear-induced injury can include laceration of large vessels, occlusion of the nares, embedding of line in growing bone, and massive periosteal proliferation of new bone in an attempt to wall off constricting, encircling lines. These data show that baleen whale entanglement is not only a major issue for the conservation of some baleen whale populations, but is also a major concern for the welfare of each affected individual.

  1. Lethal outcome in xanthogranulomatous endometritis.

    PubMed

    Noack, Frank; Briese, Juliane; Stellmacher, Florian; Hornung, Daniela; Horny, Hans-Peter

    2006-05-01

    Xanthogranulomatous inflammation is rare, mainly involving the kidneys, while primary xanthogranulomatous endometritis (XE) is a very unusual finding, histologically characterized by partial or complete replacement of the mucosa by granulation tissue with an abundance of foamy histiocytes, siderophages and multinucleated giant cells. We present the case of a 69-year-old woman with a short history of abdominal pain and a palpable mass in the pouch of Douglas. Dilatation of the cervix drained a pyometra. Histological examination of the curettage rendered the diagnosis of XE. Microbiological studies revealed enterococcus spp. and Peptostreptococcus magnus. Despite antibiotic treatment the patient died of heart failure due to systemic inflammation. Autopsy confirmed the diagnosis of XE with transmural extension into the peritoneal cavity. Such a lethal course of XE is extraordinary. Proposed causes of XE include obstruction, infection and hemorrhage. Demonstration of enterococcus spp. and P. magnus supports the probable significance of bacteria in the development of XE. Because this condition may mimic malignant disease macroscopically and histologically, knowledge of XE is of major importance for both pathologists and gynecologists. PMID:16725016

  2. Lethal photosensitization of Helicobacter species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millson, Charles E.; Wilson, Michael; MacRobert, Alexander J.; Thurrell, Wendy; Mlkvy, Peter; Davies, Claire; Bown, Stephen G.

    1995-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is associated with a large number of gastroduodenal disorders. Clearance of the bacteria has been shown to benefit patients with duodenal ulcers, gastric ulcers, and certain rare types of gastric tumors. Broad-spectrum antibiotics are the mainstay of current treatment strategies but side-effects, poor compliance, and drug resistance limit their usefulness. We sensitized H. pylori with toluidine blue, haematoporphyrin derivative, aluminum disulphonated phthalocyanine, methylene blue or protoporphyrin IX prior to exposure to low-power laser light from either a gallium aluminum arsenide laser or a helium neon gas laser. All 5 sensitizers caused reductions of greater than 1000-fold in the number of viable bacteria. Light alone had no effect and only HpD caused a significant decrease in bacterial numbers without laser light. Next, we sensitized H. mustelae on explanted ferret gastric mucosa (ex vivo) with the same sensitizers and exposed them to light from a copper vapor pumped dye laser tuned appropriately. MB caused significant reductions in bacterial counts. Successful lethal photosensitization of Helicobacter pylori both in vitro and ex vivo raises the possibility of a local method for eradicating the bacteria, especially as the bacteria are only found in those parts of the upper gastrointestinal tract that are accessible to the endoscope.

  3. Gibberella fujikuroi mutants obtained with UV radiation and N-methyl-N'-nitro-nitrosoguanidine

    SciTech Connect

    Avalos, J.; Casadesus, J.; Cerda-Olmedo, E.

    1985-01-01

    N-methyl-N'-nitrosoguanidine and to a lesser extent UV radiation are very mutagenic for Gibberella microconidia. The recommended nitrosoguanidine doses lead to much higher frequencies of mutants than are found in other microorganisms. The frequency of mutants among the survivors increases linearly with the nitrosoguanidine dose (molar concentration x time); the absolute number of viable mutants in a given population reaches a maximum for a dose of ca. 0.7 M x s. The microconidia are uninucleate. The onset of germination brings about increased lethality of nitrosoguanidine, but it does not modify the action of UV radiation. Mycelia are more resistant than spores to both agents. Visible illumination effectively prevents lethality when given immediately after UV irradiation. Auxotrophs and color mutants are very easily obtained. Pink adenine auxotrophs and several classes of color mutants are affected in the biosynthesis of the carotenoid pigment, neurosporaxanthin.

  4. Loss of vps54 function leads to vesicle traffic impairment, protein mis-sorting and embryonic lethality.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Páll; Droce, Aida; Moser, Jakob M; Cuhlmann, Simon; Padilla, Carolina Ortiz; Heimann, Peter; Bartsch, Jörg W; Füchtbauer, Annette; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; Schmitt-John, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The identification of the mutation causing the phenotype of the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) model mouse, wobbler, has linked motor neuron degeneration with retrograde vesicle traffic. The wobbler mutation affects protein stability of Vps54, a ubiquitously expressed vesicle-tethering factor and leads to partial loss of Vps54 function. Moreover, the Vps54 null mutation causes embryonic lethality, which is associated with extensive membrane blebbing in the neural tube and is most likely a consequence of impaired vesicle transport. Investigation of cells derived from wobbler and Vps54 null mutant embryos demonstrates impaired retrograde transport of the Cholera-toxin B subunit to the trans-Golgi network and mis-sorting of mannose-6-phosphate receptors and cargo proteins dependent on retrograde vesicle transport. Endocytosis assays demonstrate no difference between wobbler and wild type cells, indicating that the retrograde vesicle traffic to the trans-Golgi network, but not endocytosis, is affected in Vps54 mutant cells. The results obtained on wobbler cells were extended to test the use of cultured skin fibroblasts from human ALS patients to investigate the retrograde vesicle traffic. Analysis of skin fibroblasts of ALS patients will support the investigation of the critical role of the retrograde vesicle transport in ALS pathogenesis and might yield a diagnostic prospect.

  5. Lethal Mutagenesis of Hepatitis C Virus Induced by Favipiravir

    PubMed Central

    de Ávila, Ana I.; Gallego, Isabel; Soria, Maria Eugenia; Gregori, Josep; Quer, Josep; Esteban, Juan Ignacio; Rice, Charles M.; Domingo, Esteban; Perales, Celia

    2016-01-01

    Lethal mutagenesis is an antiviral approach that consists in extinguishing a virus by an excess of mutations acquired during replication in the presence of a mutagen. Here we show that favipiravir (T-705) is a potent mutagenic agent for hepatitis C virus (HCV) during its replication in human hepatoma cells. T-705 leads to an excess of G → A and C → U transitions in the mutant spectrum of preextinction HCV populations. Infectivity decreased significantly in the presence of concentrations of T-705 which are 2- to 8-fold lower than its cytotoxic concentration 50 (CC50). Passaging the virus five times in the presence of 400 μM T-705 resulted in virus extinction. Since T-705 has undergone advanced clinical trials for approval for human use, the results open a new approach based on lethal mutagenesis to treat hepatitis C virus infections. If proven effective for HCV in vivo, this new anti-HCV agent may be useful in patient groups that fail current therapeutic regimens. PMID:27755573

  6. Dominant lethal phenotype of a mutation in the -35 recognition region of Escherichia coli sigma 70.

    PubMed Central

    Keener, J; Nomura, M

    1993-01-01

    A dominant lethal mutation in the Escherichia coli rpoD gene, which encodes sigma 70, the promoter recognition subunit of RNA polymerase, was isolated after random mutagenesis. The lethal gene was maintained under control of the lac repressor on a low copy plasmid. An amount of lethal sigma 70 that was nearly equimolar with the chromosomally encoded sigma 70 was sufficient to cause cessation of growth. RNA synthesis per unit cell mass was unaffected, but protein synthesis was inhibited by the mutant sigma 70. The amino acid change (Glu-585 to Gln) was in a region of sigma 70 thought to bind the -35 hexamer of the promoter, and the mutant sigma 70 caused increased expression from promoters with nonconsensus bases in the third position of the -35 hexamer. A null mutation of the fis gene could partially suppress the mutant phenotype. These properties are consistent with those expected of a sigma 70 insensitive to growth rate control of rRNA and tRNA promoters. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7680477

  7. Variations in dysfunction of sister chromatid cohesion in esco2 mutant zebrafish reflect the phenotypic diversity of Roberts syndrome.

    PubMed

    Percival, Stefanie M; Thomas, Holly R; Amsterdam, Adam; Carroll, Andrew J; Lees, Jacqueline A; Yost, H Joseph; Parant, John M

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in ESCO2, one of two establishment of cohesion factors necessary for proper sister chromatid cohesion (SCC), cause a spectrum of developmental defects in the autosomal-recessive disorder Roberts syndrome (RBS), warranting in vivo analysis of the consequence of cohesion dysfunction. Through a genetic screen in zebrafish targeting embryonic-lethal mutants that have increased genomic instability, we have identified an esco2 mutant zebrafish. Utilizing the natural transparency of zebrafish embryos, we have developed a novel technique to observe chromosome dynamics within a single cell during mitosis in a live vertebrate embryo. Within esco2 mutant embryos, we observed premature chromatid separation, a unique chromosome scattering, prolonged mitotic delay, and genomic instability in the form of anaphase bridges and micronuclei formation. Cytogenetic studies indicated complete chromatid separation and high levels of aneuploidy within mutant embryos. Amongst aneuploid spreads, we predominantly observed decreases in chromosome number, suggesting that either cells with micronuclei or micronuclei themselves are eliminated. We also demonstrated that the genomic instability leads to p53-dependent neural tube apoptosis. Surprisingly, although many cells required Esco2 to establish cohesion, 10-20% of cells had only weakened cohesion in the absence of Esco2, suggesting that compensatory cohesion mechanisms exist in these cells that undergo a normal mitotic division. These studies provide a unique in vivo vertebrate view of the mitotic defects and consequences of cohesion establishment loss, and they provide a compensation-based model to explain the RBS phenotypes.

  8. Variations in dysfunction of sister chromatid cohesion in esco2 mutant zebrafish reflect the phenotypic diversity of Roberts syndrome.

    PubMed

    Percival, Stefanie M; Thomas, Holly R; Amsterdam, Adam; Carroll, Andrew J; Lees, Jacqueline A; Yost, H Joseph; Parant, John M

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in ESCO2, one of two establishment of cohesion factors necessary for proper sister chromatid cohesion (SCC), cause a spectrum of developmental defects in the autosomal-recessive disorder Roberts syndrome (RBS), warranting in vivo analysis of the consequence of cohesion dysfunction. Through a genetic screen in zebrafish targeting embryonic-lethal mutants that have increased genomic instability, we have identified an esco2 mutant zebrafish. Utilizing the natural transparency of zebrafish embryos, we have developed a novel technique to observe chromosome dynamics within a single cell during mitosis in a live vertebrate embryo. Within esco2 mutant embryos, we observed premature chromatid separation, a unique chromosome scattering, prolonged mitotic delay, and genomic instability in the form of anaphase bridges and micronuclei formation. Cytogenetic studies indicated complete chromatid separation and high levels of aneuploidy within mutant embryos. Amongst aneuploid spreads, we predominantly observed decreases in chromosome number, suggesting that either cells with micronuclei or micronuclei themselves are eliminated. We also demonstrated that the genomic instability leads to p53-dependent neural tube apoptosis. Surprisingly, although many cells required Esco2 to establish cohesion, 10-20% of cells had only weakened cohesion in the absence of Esco2, suggesting that compensatory cohesion mechanisms exist in these cells that undergo a normal mitotic division. These studies provide a unique in vivo vertebrate view of the mitotic defects and consequences of cohesion establishment loss, and they provide a compensation-based model to explain the RBS phenotypes. PMID:26044958

  9. Variations in dysfunction of sister chromatid cohesion in esco2 mutant zebrafish reflect the phenotypic diversity of Roberts syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Percival, Stefanie M.; Thomas, Holly R.; Amsterdam, Adam; Carroll, Andrew J.; Lees, Jacqueline A.; Yost, H. Joseph; Parant, John M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mutations in ESCO2, one of two establishment of cohesion factors necessary for proper sister chromatid cohesion (SCC), cause a spectrum of developmental defects in the autosomal-recessive disorder Roberts syndrome (RBS), warranting in vivo analysis of the consequence of cohesion dysfunction. Through a genetic screen in zebrafish targeting embryonic-lethal mutants that have increased genomic instability, we have identified an esco2 mutant zebrafish. Utilizing the natural transparency of zebrafish embryos, we have developed a novel technique to observe chromosome dynamics within a single cell during mitosis in a live vertebrate embryo. Within esco2 mutant embryos, we observed premature chromatid separation, a unique chromosome scattering, prolonged mitotic delay, and genomic instability in the form of anaphase bridges and micronuclei formation. Cytogenetic studies indicated complete chromatid separation and high levels of aneuploidy within mutant embryos. Amongst aneuploid spreads, we predominantly observed decreases in chromosome number, suggesting that either cells with micronuclei or micronuclei themselves are eliminated. We also demonstrated that the genomic instability leads to p53-dependent neural tube apoptosis. Surprisingly, although many cells required Esco2 to establish cohesion, 10-20% of cells had only weakened cohesion in the absence of Esco2, suggesting that compensatory cohesion mechanisms exist in these cells that undergo a normal mitotic division. These studies provide a unique in vivo vertebrate view of the mitotic defects and consequences of cohesion establishment loss, and they provide a compensation-based model to explain the RBS phenotypes. PMID:26044958

  10. Lens Extrusion from Laminin Alpha 1 Mutant Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Semina, Elena V.; Duncan, Melinda K.

    2014-01-01

    We report analysis of the ocular lens phenotype of the recessive, larval lethal zebrafish mutant, lama1a69/a69. Previous work revealed that this mutant has a shortened body axis and eye defects including a defective hyaloid vasculature, focal corneal dysplasia, and loss of the crystalline lens. While these studies highlight the importance of laminin α1 in lens development, a detailed analysis of the lens defects seen in these mutants was not reported. In the present study, we analyze the lenticular anomalies seen in the lama1a69/a69 mutants and show that the lens defects result from the anterior extrusion of lens material from the eye secondary to structural defects in the lens capsule and developing corneal epithelium associated with basement membrane loss. Our analysis provides further insights into the role of the lens capsule and corneal basement membrane in the structural integrity of the developing eye. PMID:24526906

  11. On lethal injections and the death penalty.

    PubMed

    1982-10-01

    A brief account is given of the recent adoption by several states of capital punishment by lethal injection and the objections that this move has aroused. Critics argue that, because of difficulties in administering the drugs and in determining the proper dosage, this method may actually be less humane than other means of execution. Articles in medical journals have forcefully expressed the profession's opposition to lethal injections and to physician involvement in their administration.

  12. Lethality of First Contact Dysentery Epidemics on Pacific Islands.

    PubMed

    Shanks, G Dennis

    2016-08-01

    Infectious diseases depopulated many isolated Pacific islands when they were first exposed to global pathogen circulation from the 18th century. Although the mortality was great, the lack of medical observers makes determination of what happened during these historical epidemics largely speculative. Bacillary dysentery caused by Shigella is the most likely infection causing some of the most lethal island epidemics. The fragmentary historical record is reviewed to gain insight into the possible causes of the extreme lethality that was observed during first-contact epidemics in the Pacific. Immune aspects of the early dysentery epidemics and postmeasles infection resulting in subacute inflammatory enteric disease suggest that epidemiologic isolation was the major lethality risk factor on Pacific islands in the 19th century. Other possible risk factors include human leukocyte antigen homogeneity from a founder effect and pathogen-induced derangement of immune tolerance to gut flora. If this analysis is correct, then Pacific islands are currently at no greater risk of emerging disease epidemics than other developing countries despite their dark history. PMID:27185765

  13. Lethality of First Contact Dysentery Epidemics on Pacific Islands.

    PubMed

    Shanks, G Dennis

    2016-08-01

    Infectious diseases depopulated many isolated Pacific islands when they were first exposed to global pathogen circulation from the 18th century. Although the mortality was great, the lack of medical observers makes determination of what happened during these historical epidemics largely speculative. Bacillary dysentery caused by Shigella is the most likely infection causing some of the most lethal island epidemics. The fragmentary historical record is reviewed to gain insight into the possible causes of the extreme lethality that was observed during first-contact epidemics in the Pacific. Immune aspects of the early dysentery epidemics and postmeasles infection resulting in subacute inflammatory enteric disease suggest that epidemiologic isolation was the major lethality risk factor on Pacific islands in the 19th century. Other possible risk factors include human leukocyte antigen homogeneity from a founder effect and pathogen-induced derangement of immune tolerance to gut flora. If this analysis is correct, then Pacific islands are currently at no greater risk of emerging disease epidemics than other developing countries despite their dark history.

  14. Impact of maternal lifestyle factors on newborn HPRT mutant frequencies and molecular spectrum--initial results from the Prenatal Exposures and Preeclampsia Prevention (PEPP) Study.

    PubMed

    Bigbee, W L; Day, R D; Grant, S G; Keohavong, P; Xi, L; Zhang, L; Ness, R B

    1999-12-17

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated associations between maternal tobacco smoke exposure and consumption of alcohol during pregnancy and increased risk of pediatric malignancies, particularly infant leukemias. Molecular evidence also suggests that somatic mutational events occurring during fetal hematopoiesis in utero can contribute to this process. As part of an ongoing multi-endpoint biomarker study of 2000 mothers and newborns, the HPRT T-lymphocyte cloning assay was used to determine mutant frequencies (Mf) in umbilical cord blood samples from an initial group of 60 neonates born to a sociodemographically diverse cohort of mothers characterized with respect to age, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and cigarette smoke and alcohol exposure. Non-zero Mf (N = 47) ranged from 0.19 to 5.62 x 10(-6), median 0.70 x 10(-6), mean +/- SD 0.98 +/- 0.95 x 10(-6). No significant difference in Mf was observed between female and male newborns. Multivariable Poisson regression analysis revealed that increased HPRT Mf were significantly associated with maternal consumption of alcohol at the beginning [Relative Rate (RR) = 1.84, 95% CI = 0.99-3.40, P = 0.052) and during pregnancy (RR = 2.99, 95% CI = 1.14-7.84, P = 0.026). No independent effect of self-reported active maternal cigarette smoking, either at the beginning or throughout pregnancy, nor maternal passive exposure to cigarette smoke was observed. Although based on limited initial data, this is the first report of a positive association between maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy and HPRT Mf in human newborns. In addition, the spectrum of mutations at the HPRT locus was determined in 33 mutant clones derived from 19 newborns of mothers with no self-reported exposure to tobacco smoke and 14 newborns of mothers exposed passively or actively to cigarette smoke. In the unexposed group, alterations leading to specific exon 2-3 deletions, presumably as a result of illegitimate V(D)J recombinase activity, were

  15. Isolation and functional characterization of a temperature-sensitive mutant of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in translation initiation factor eIF5: an eIF5-dependent cell-free translation system.

    PubMed

    Maiti, T; Das, S; Maitra, U

    2000-02-22

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5 (eIF5) interacts with the 40S ribosomal initiation complex (40S.eIF3.AUG.Met-tRNA(f).eIF2.GTP) to promote the hydrolysis of bound GTP. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, eIF5, a protein of 45346Da, is encoded by a single-copy essential gene, TIF5. In this paper, we have isolated a temperature-sensitive S. cerevisiae strain, TMY5-1, by replacing the wild-type chromosomal copy of TIF5 with one mutagenized in vitro. The mutant yeast cells rapidly cease protein synthesis when grown under non-permissive conditions, lose polyribosomes and accumulate free 80S ribosomes. Further characterization of mutant eIF5 showed that the mutant protein, expressed in Escherichia coli, is defective both in its interaction with eIF2 as well as in mediating the hydrolysis of GTP bound to the 40S initiation complex and consequently in the formation of the 80S initiation complex. Additionally, the availability of a yeast strain containing temperature-sensitive mutation in the eIF5 gene allowed us to construct a cell-free translation system that was dependent on exogenously added eIF5 for translation of mRNAs in vitro. PMID:10689193

  16. Theory of lethal mutagenesis for viruses.

    PubMed

    Bull, J J; Sanjuán, R; Wilke, C O

    2007-03-01

    Mutation is the basis of adaptation. Yet, most mutations are detrimental, and elevating mutation rates will impair a population's fitness in the short term. The latter realization has led to the concept of lethal mutagenesis for curing viral infections, and work with drugs such as ribavirin has supported this perspective. As yet, there is no formal theory of lethal mutagenesis, although reference is commonly made to Eigen's error catastrophe theory. Here, we propose a theory of lethal mutagenesis. With an obvious parallel to the epidemiological threshold for eradication of a disease, a sufficient condition for lethal mutagenesis is that each viral genotype produces, on average, less than one progeny virus that goes on to infect a new cell. The extinction threshold involves an evolutionary component based on the mutation rate, but it also includes an ecological component, so the threshold cannot be calculated from the mutation rate alone. The genetic evolution of a large population undergoing mutagenesis is independent of whether the population is declining or stable, so there is no runaway accumulation of mutations or genetic signature for lethal mutagenesis that distinguishes it from a level of mutagenesis under which the population is maintained. To detect lethal mutagenesis, accurate measurements of the genome-wide mutation rate and the number of progeny per infected cell that go on to infect new cells are needed. We discuss three methods for estimating the former. Estimating the latter is more challenging, but broad limits to this estimate may be feasible.

  17. Phytoalexin-Deficient Mutants of Arabidopsis Reveal That Pad4 Encodes a Regulatory Factor and That Four Pad Genes Contribute to Downy Mildew Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Glazebrook, J.; Zook, M.; Mert, F.; Kagan, I.; Rogers, E. E.; Crute, I. R.; Holub, E. B.; Hammerschmidt, R.; Ausubel, F. M.

    1997-01-01

    We are working to determine the role of the Arabidopsis phytoalexin, camalexin, in protecting the plant from pathogen attack by isolating phytoalexin-deficient (pad) mutants in the accession Columbia (Col-0) and examining their response to pathogens. Mutations in PAD1, PAD2, and PAD4 caused enhanced susceptibility to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola strain ES4326 (PsmES4326), while mutations in PAD3 or PAD5 did not. Camalexin was not detected in any of the double mutants pad1-1 pad2-1, pad1-1 pad3-1 or pad2-1 pad3-1. Growth of PsmES4326 in pad1-1 pad2-1 was greater than that in pad1-1 or pad2-1 plants, while growth in pad1-1 pad3-1 and pad2-1 pad3-1 plants was similar to that in pad1-1 and pad2-1 plants, respectively. The pad4-1 mutation caused reduced camalexin synthesis in response to PsmES4326 infection, but not in response to Cochliobolus carbonum infection, indicating that PAD4 has a regulatory function. PAD1, PAD2, PAD3 and PAD4 are all required for resistance to the eukaryotic biotroph Peronospora parasitica. The pad4-1 mutation caused the most dramatic change, exhibiting full susceptibility to four of six Col-incompatible parasite isolates. Interestingly, each combination of double mutants between pad1-1, pad2-1 and pad3-1 exhibited additive shifts to moderate or full susceptibility to most of the isolates. PMID:9136026

  18. Early Events in the Amyloid Formation of the A546T Mutant of Transforming Growth Factor β-Induced Protein in Corneal Dystrophies Compared to the Nonfibrillating R555W and R555Q Mutants.

    PubMed

    Koldsø, Heidi; Andersen, Ole Juul; Nikolajsen, Camilla Lund; Scavenius, Carsten; Sørensen, Charlotte S; Underhaug, Jarl; Runager, Kasper; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Enghild, Jan J; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2015-09-15

    The human transforming growth factor β-induced protein (TGFBIp) is involved in several types of corneal dystrophies where protein aggregation and amyloid fibril formation severely impair vision. Most disease-causing mutations are located in the last of four homologous fasciclin-1 (FAS1) domains of the protein, and it has been shown that when isolated, the fourth FAS1 domain (FAS1-4) mimics the behavior of full-length TGFBIp. In this study, we use molecular dynamics simulations and principal component analysis to study the wild-type FAS1-4 domain along with three disease-causing mutations (R555W, R555Q, and A546T) to decipher any internal difference in dynamical properties of the domains that may explain their varied stabilities and aggregation properties. In addition, we use a protein-protein docking method in combination with chemical cross-linking experiments and mass spectrometry of the cross-linked species to obtain information about interaction faces between identical FAS1-4 domains. The results show that the pathogenic mutations A546T and R555W affect the packing in the hydrophobic core of FAS1-4 in different directions. We further show that the FAS1-4 monomers associate using their β-rich regions, consistent with peptides observed to be part of the amyloid fibril core in lattice corneal dystrophy patients.

  19. Neonatal lethality of neural crest cell-specific Rest knockout mice is associated with gastrointestinal distension caused by aberrations of myenteric plexus.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Hitomi; Hara, Akira; Oomori, Yoshiyuki; Shimizu, Yasutake; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Kunisada, Takahiro

    2014-10-01

    RE1-silencing transcription factor (REST), also known as NRSF (neuron-restrictive silencer factor), is a well-known transcriptional repressor of neural genes. Rest null mice have embryonic lethality which prevents further investigations of the functions of the Rest gene in vivo. We studied neonatal but not embryonic lethality that was characterized by gastrointestinal tract dilation in the neural crest cell (NCC)-specific Rest conditional knockout (CKO) mice. While no histological abnormalities except the thinning of the digestive tract as a consequence of the gas accumulation were found in the digestive tract of the mutant mice, they do not have proper gastric retention after oral dye administration and the reduction of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in NCC-derived myenteric plexus in the stomach was detected. High CO2 concentration in the dilated digestive tract of the Rest CKO mice indicates a failure of gut function by underdeveloped cholinergic transmission in the enteric nervous system. The observed gastrointestinal distension phenotype provides a model for understanding the genetic and molecular basis of NCC defects in humans. PMID:25135772

  20. Intimate partner homicide: new insights for understanding lethality and risks.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Brynn E; Murphy, Sharon B; Moynihan, Mary M; Dudley-Fennessey, Erin; Stapleton, Jane G

    2015-02-01

    Research on covictims, family members, and close friends who have lost loved ones to intimate partner homicide (IPH) is a neglected area of study. We conducted phenomenological interviews with covictims to gain insights into risk and lethality, examined affidavits from criminal case files, and reviewed news releases. The data uncovered acute risk factors prior to the homicide, identified changes in the perpetrators' behavior and the perpetrators' perceived loss of control over the victim, and described barriers that victims faced when attempting to gain safety. Findings suggest that recognizing acute risk factors is an important area for future IPH research.

  1. Effect of acute alcohol use on the lethality of suicide attempts in patients with mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Sher, Leo; Oquendo, Maria A; Richardson-Vejlgaard, Randall; Makhija, Nita M; Posner, Kelly; Mann, J John; Stanley, Barbara H

    2009-07-01

    Acute alcohol use is an important risk factor for attempted and completed suicide. We evaluated the effect of acute alcohol intake on the lethality of suicide attempts to test the hypothesis that acute alcohol intoxication is associated with more lethal suicide attempts. This retrospective study included 317 suicide attempters enrolled in mood disorders protocols. Demographic and clinical parameters were assessed. The use of alcohol at the time of the most lethal suicide attempt was determined. On the basis of their responses participants were classified into three groups: participants who reported "Enough alcohol intake to impair judgment, reality testing and diminish responsibility" or "Intentional intake of alcohol in order to facilitate implementation of attempt" were included in the group "Alcohol" (A); participants who reported "Some alcohol intake prior to but not related to attempt, reportedly not enough to impair judgment, reality testing" were included in the group "Some Alcohol" (SA); and participants who reported "No alcohol intake immediately prior to attempt" were included in the group "No Alcohol" (NA). Lethality of the most lethal suicide attempts was higher in the A group compared to the SA and NA groups. Prevalence of patients with alcohol use disorders was higher in the A group compared to the SA and NA groups. SA participants reported more reasons for living and lower suicide intent scores at the time of their most lethal suicide attempt compared to the A and NA groups. Acute alcohol use increases the lethality of suicide attempts in individuals with mood disorders.

  2. Crystallographic studies of the Anthrax lethal toxin. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick, C.A.

    1996-07-01

    The lethal form of Anthrax results from the inhalation of anthrax spores. Death is primarily due to the effects of the lethal toxin (Protective Antigen (PA) + Lethal Factor) from the causative agent, Bacillus anthracis. All the Anthrax vaccines currently in use or under development contain or produce PA, the major antigenic component of anthrax toxin, and there is a clear need for an improved vaccine for human use. In the previous report we described the first atomic resolution structure of PA, revealing that the molecule is composed largely of beta-sheets organized into four domains. This information can be used in the design. of recombinant PA vaccines. In this report we describe additional features of the full-length PA molecule derived from further crystallographic refinement and careful examination of the structure. We compare two crystal forms of PA grown at different pH values and discuss the functional implications. A complete definition of the function of each domain must await the crystal structure of the PA63 heptamer. We have grown crystals of the heptamer under both detergent and detergent-free conditions, and made substantial progress towards the crystal structure. The mechanism of anthrax intoxication in the light of our results is reviewed.

  3. Oxopyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidines as Covalent L858R/T790M Mutant Selective Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the threonine790–methionine790 (T790M) point mutation of EGFR kinase is one of the leading causes of acquired resistance to the first generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), such as gefitinib and erlotinib. Herein, we describe the optimization of a series of 7-oxopyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidinyl-derived irreversible inhibitors of EGFR kinase. This led to the discovery of compound 24 which potently inhibits gefitinib-resistant EGFRL858R,T790M with 100-fold selectivity over wild-type EGFR. Compound 24 displays strong antiproliferative activity against the H1975 nonsmall cell lung cancer cell line, the first line mutant HCC827 cell line, and promising antitumor activity in an EGFRL858R,T790M driven H1975 xenograft model sparing the side effects associated with the inhibition of wild-type EGFR. PMID:26396685

  4. New form of platyspondylic lethal chondrodysplasia.

    PubMed

    Akaba, K; Nishimura, G; Hashimoto, M; Wakabayashi, T; Kanasugi, H; Hayasaka, K

    1996-12-30

    We report on a sporadic case of hitherto unknown lethal skeletal dysplasia. The cardinal clinical manifestations consisted of frontal bossing, cloudy corneae, low nasal ridge, and micrognathia, hypoplastic thorax, and rhizomelic micromelia. Laryngoscopy and neck CT disclosed laryngeal stenosis, and brain CT demonstrated hypoplasia of the corpus callosum. Skeletal survey demonstrated hypoplasia of facial bones and short skull base, extremely severe platyspondyly, hypoplastic ilia, and delayed epiphyseal ossification and rhizomelic shortness of tubular bones. The long bones appeared overtubulated with exaggerated metaphyseal flaring. The humeri were particularly short and bowed. Bowing of the radii and ulnae with subluxation of radial heads presented as a Madelung-like deformity. Unlike the long bones, the short tubular bones were not short and normally modeled. The skeletal changes were superficially similar to those in a group of lethal platyspondylic chondrodysplasias, but were inconsistent with any known subtypes of this group or other lethal skeletal dysplasias. PMID:8989469

  5. Inadequate anaesthesia in lethal injection for execution.

    PubMed

    Koniaris, Leonidas G; Zimmers, Teresa A; Lubarsky, David A; Sheldon, Jonathan P

    Anaesthesia during lethal injection is essential to minimise suffering and to maintain public acceptance of the practice. Lethal injection is usually done by sequential administration of thiopental, pancuronium, and potassium chloride. Protocol information from Texas and Virginia showed that executioners had no anaesthesia training, drugs were administered remotely with no monitoring for anaesthesia, data were not recorded and no peer-review was done. Toxicology reports from Arizona, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina showed that post-mortem concentrations of thiopental in the blood were lower than that required for surgery in 43 of 49 executed inmates (88%); 21 (43%) inmates had concentrations consistent with awareness. Methods of lethal injection anaesthesia are flawed and some inmates might experience awareness and suffering during execution.

  6. Lethal and mutagenic effects of ion beams and γ-rays in Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Akemi; Tanaka, Hisaki; Watanabe, Jun; Mogi, Yoshinobu; Yamazaki, Tatsuo; Hamada, Ryoko; Iwashita, Kazuhiro; Satoh, Katsuya; Narumi, Issay

    2012-12-01

    Aspergillus oryzae is a fungus that is used widely in traditional Japanese fermentation industries. In this study, the lethal and mutagenic effects of different linear energy transfer (LET) radiation in freeze-dried conidia of A. oryzae were investigated. The lethal effect, which was evaluated by a 90% lethal dose, was dependent on the LET value of the ionizing radiation. The most lethal ionizing radiation among that tested was (12)C(5+) ion beams with an LET of 121keV/μm. The (12)C(5+) ion beams had a 3.6-times higher lethal effect than low-LET (0.2keV/μm) γ-rays. The mutagenic effect was evaluated by the frequency of selenate resistant mutants. (12)C(6+) ion beams with an LET of 86keV/μm were the most effective in inducing selenate resistance. The mutant frequency following exposure to (12)C(6+) ion beams increased with an increase in dose and reached 3.47×10(-3) at 700Gy. In the dose range from 0 to 700Gy, (12)C(5+) ion beams were the second most effective in inducing selenate resistance, the mutant frequency of which reached a maximum peak (1.67×10(-3)) at 400Gy. To elucidate the characteristics of mutation induced by ionizing radiation, mutations in the sulphate permease gene (sB) and ATP sulfurylase gene (sC) loci, the loss of function of which results in a selenate resistant phenotype, were compared between (12)C(5+) ion beams and γ-rays. We detected all types of transversions and transitions. For frameshifts, the frequency of a +1 frameshift was the highest in all cases. Although the incidence of deletions >2bp was generally low, deletions >20bp were characteristic for (12)C(5+) ion beams. γ-rays had a tendency to generate mutants carrying a multitude of mutations in the same locus. Both forms of radiation also induced genome-wide large-scale mutations including chromosome rearrangements and large deletions. These results provide new basic insights into the mutation breeding of A. oryzae using ionizing radiation.

  7. Live deaths online: internet suicide and lethality.

    PubMed

    Klein, Carolina A

    2012-01-01

    The Internet provides an infinite platform for the portrayal of lethal events. Beyond mere display, however, it dispenses information, allows for participation and sharing of content, and constitutes a virtual interactive forum. The Internet may ultimately shape society's approach to perceiving and dealing with death. Thus, psychiatrists may wish to be aware of these matters so that they may be considered in assessments and clinical care. In this article, the author attempts to identify key online locations where lethality is portrayed and how it may affect the individual patient and practitioner and the population at large.

  8. Therapeutically targeting RNA viruses via lethal mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Graci, Jason D; Cameron, Craig E

    2008-11-01

    RNA viruses exhibit increased mutation frequencies relative to other organisms. Recent work has attempted to exploit this unique feature by increasing the viral mutation frequency beyond an extinction threshold, an antiviral strategy known as lethal mutagenesis. A number of novel nucleoside analogs have been designed around this premise. Herein, we review the quasispecies nature of RNA viruses and survey the antiviral, biological and biochemical characteristics of mutagenic nucleoside analogs, including clinically-used ribavirin. Biological implications of modulating viral replication fidelity are discussed in the context of translating lethal mutagenesis into a clinically-useful antiviral strategy.

  9. Appearance of recessive lethal mutations in derivatives of an unstable X{sup Z} chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Yurchenko, N.N.; Koryakov, D.E.; Zakharov, I.K.

    1995-09-01

    An X{sup Z} chromosome isolated from a natural population of Drosophila melanogaster is characterized by spontaneous mutability of the genes yellow, white, and singed and the appearance of chromosomal rearrangements. In mutant lines derived from the line carrying the X{sup Z} chromosome that had one, two, or three unstable vision mutations (markers), the rate of appearance of sex-linked lethal mutations was analyzed. This rate was shown to increase with an increase in the number of markers in a line. This phenomenon, termed {open_quotes}marker induction,{close_quotes} might explain the phenotypic homogeneity of natural Drosophila populations. Spontaneous lethal mutations were mapped, and their nonrandom distribution along the X{sup Z} chromosome was shown. Along with common {open_quotes}hot spot{close_quotes} sites of lethal mutations, the derivatives of the X{sup Z} chromosomes had their own specific sites for lethal mutations. In some cases, the appearance of lethal mutations was accompanied by the formation of inversions in the X{sup Z} chromosome. The lethal destabilization of the X{sup Z} derivatives, caused by selection for accumulation of visible mutations, is associated with an increase in the number of hot spots for nuclear mutations. Presumably, these hot spots are hot sites for the transposition of mobile genetic elements. 18 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Detection of epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in plasma by mutant-enriched PCR assay for prediction of the response to gefitinib in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Chen; Liu, Ming; Zhou, Chengzhi; Zhang, Jiexia; Ouyang, Ming; Zhong, Nanshan; Xu, Jun

    2009-11-15

    The high frequency of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in tyrosine kinase inhibitor-responsive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases is now well established, highlighting the predictive value of activating EGFR mutations in guiding the clinical use of EGFR-targeted therapies. However, specimen source and methods for EGFR mutation analysis are limited by tissue availability and technical feasibility in clinical application. Therefore, the current study is designed to establish a blood-based approach for the assessment of EGFR mutations in NSCLC patients, in particular the advanced stage, and to test its clinical application. Plasma samples were obtained from the enrolled 134 NSCLC patients. The detection rate of the EGFR exon19 deletions and exon21 L858R was 49.3% (66/134) by the blood-based, mutant-enriched polymerase chain reaction. In the paired tumor and plasma samples, the detected mutant types of each pair respectively by direct sequencing and mutant-enriched polymerase chain reaction were concordant in 17 of 18 (94.4%). In the patients treated with gefitinib as a second-line therapy, those with plasma EGFR mutation have a prolonged median progression-free survival compared with those with EGFR wild type (7.609 vs. 2.877 months, p = 0.002). On comparing the efficacy of gefitinib with that of docetaxel, it was found that the median progression-free survival was significantly longer for patients treated with gefitinib than those with docetaxel in those harboring plasma EGFR mutation (7.609 vs. 3.192 months, p = 0.006). These results suggest that the blood-based EGFR mutations test has the ability to provide a reliable guidance for clinical decision making for the treatment of the advanced NSCLC patients.

  11. Expression of a dominant-negative mutant inhibitor-kappaBalpha of nuclear factor-kappaB in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma inhibits survival, proinflammatory cytokine expression, and tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Duffey, D C; Chen, Z; Dong, G; Ondrey, F G; Wolf, J S; Brown, K; Siebenlist, U; Van Waes, C

    1999-07-15

    We demonstrated recently that constitutive expression of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1alpha, IL-6, IL-8, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is correlated with activation of transcription factor nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB/Rel A (p50/p65), which binds the promoter region within each of the genes encoding this repertoire of cytokines. NF-kappaB can be activated after signal-dependent phosphorylation and degradation of inhibitor-kappaBalpha and has been reported to promote cell survival and growth. In the present study, we expressed a phosphorylation site mutant of inhibitor-kappaBalpha (IkappaBalphaM) in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma lines UM-SCC-9, -11B, and -38 to determine the effect of inhibition of NF-kappaB on cytokine expression, cell survival in vitro, and growth in vivo. After transfection with IKBalphaM, only a few UM-SCC-9 clones were obtained that stably expressed the mutant IkappaB, suggesting that expression of a mutant IkappaBalpha may affect survival of the transfected UM-SCC cell lines. After cotransfection of IkappaBalphaM with a Lac-Z reporter, we found that the number of surviving beta-galactosidase-positive cells in the three cell lines was reduced by 70-90% when compared with controls transfected with vector lacking the insert. In UM-SCC-9 cells that stably expressed IkappaBalphaM, inhibition of constitutive and tumor necrosis factor-a induced NF-kappaB activation, and production of all four cytokines was observed. Although UM-SCC-9 IkappaBalphaM-transfected cells proliferated at the same rate as vector-transfected cells in vitro, a significant reduction in growth of tumor xenografts was observed in SCID mice in vivo. The decreased growth of UM-SCC-9 IkappaBalphaM-transfected tumor cells accompanied decreased immunohistochemical detection of the activated form of NF-kappaB in situ. These results provide evidence that NF-KB and IkappaBalpha play an important role in

  12. A small heat shock protein enables Escherichia coli to grow at a lethal temperature of 50°C conceivably by maintaining cell envelope integrity.

    PubMed

    Ezemaduka, Anastasia N; Yu, Jiayu; Shi, Xiaodong; Zhang, Kaiming; Yin, Chang-Cheng; Fu, Xinmiao; Chang, Zengyi

    2014-06-01

    It is essential for organisms to adapt to fluctuating growth temperatures. Escherichia coli, a model bacterium commonly used in research and industry, has been reported to grow at a temperature lower than 46.5°C. Here we report that the heterologous expression of the 17-kDa small heat shock protein from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, CeHSP17, enables E. coli cells to grow at 50°C, which is their highest growth temperature ever reported. Strikingly, CeHSP17 also rescues the thermal lethality of an E. coli mutant deficient in degP, which encodes a protein quality control factor localized in the periplasmic space. Mechanistically, we show that CeHSP17 is partially localized in the periplasmic space and associated with the inner membrane of E. coli, and it helps to maintain the cell envelope integrity of the E. coli cells at the lethal temperatures. Together, our data indicate that maintaining the cell envelope integrity is crucial for the E. coli cells to grow at high temperatures and also shed new light on the development of thermophilic bacteria for industrial application.

  13. Suicide intent and accurate expectations of lethality: predictors of medical lethality of suicide attempts.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gregory K; Henriques, Gregg R; Sosdjan, Daniella; Beck, Aaron T

    2004-12-01

    The degree of intent to commit suicide and the severity of self-injury were examined in individuals (N = 180) who had recently attempted suicide. Although a minimal association was found between the degree of suicide intent and the degree of lethality of the attempt, the accuracy of expectations about the likelihood of dying was found to moderate the relationship between suicide intent and lethality. Specifically, higher levels of suicide intent were associated with more lethal attempts but only for those individuals who had more accurate expectations about the likelihood of dying from their attempts.

  14. The evolution of lethal intergroup violence

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Raymond C.

    2005-01-01

    Recent findings and analyses in evolutionary biology, archaeology, and ethnology provide a favorable conjuncture for examining the evolution of lethal intergroup violence among hominids during the 2.9-million-year Paleolithic time span. Here, I seek to identify and investigate the main turning points in this evolutionary trajectory and to delineate the periodization that follows from this inquiry. PMID:16129826

  15. Inhibition of Myo6 gene expression by co‑expression of a mutant of transcription factor POU4F3 (BRN‑3C) in hair cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Deng-Bin; Chen, Jie; Xia, Yang; Zhu, Guang-Jie; Ma, Xiao-Feng; Zhou, Han; Gu, Ya-Jun; Yu, Chen-Jie; Zhu, Min-Sheng; Qian, Xiao-Yun; Gao, Xia

    2014-04-01

    An eight‑base pair (bp) deletion in the Pou4f3 gene in hair cells is associated with DFNA15, a hereditary form of hearing loss. To explore the pathological mechanisms underlying the development of DFNA15, the effect of the mutation in Pou4f3 on the activity of the myosin VI (Myo6) promoter, was investigated. The upstream regulatory sequence of Myo6 (2625 bp), consisting of an 1899 bp upstream sequence and a 727 bp intron 1 sequence, was amplified using polymerase chain reaction and subcloned into the pGL3‑Basic vector expressing firefly luciferase. For verification of inserted fragments, plasmids were subjected to restriction analysis and then sequenced. HEK293T human embryonic kidney cells were transiently transfected with renilla luciferase‑thymidine kinase vectors expressing Renilla luciferase and the Myo6 promoter‑driven firefly luciferase expressing vectors along with pIRES2‑enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)‑Pou4f3 (expressing wild‑type Pou4f3) or pIRES2‑EGFP‑Pou4f3 (expressing the truncation mutant of Pou4f3). The relative luciferase activities were measured to determine the activity of the Myo6 promoter. The Myo6 promoter activity was not affected by co‑expression of wild‑type Pou4f3, as indicated by the comparable relative luciferase activities in the presence of the pIRES2‑EGFP‑Pou4f3 and the empty control vectors. However, co‑expression of mutated Pou4f3 significantly inhibited the activity of the Myo6 promoter to almost half of that of the control (P<0.001). The data suggests that mutated Pou4f3 has a negative role in the promoter activity of Myo6, and by extension, the expression of myosin VI, and this may be an underlying mechanism of DFNA15 hearing loss.

  16. Cholesterol Metabolism and Prostate Cancer Lethality.

    PubMed

    Stopsack, Konrad H; Gerke, Travis A; Sinnott, Jennifer A; Penney, Kathryn L; Tyekucheva, Svitlana; Sesso, Howard D; Andersson, Swen-Olof; Andrén, Ove; Cerhan, James R; Giovannucci, Edward L; Mucci, Lorelei A; Rider, Jennifer R

    2016-08-15

    Cholesterol metabolism has been implicated in prostate cancer pathogenesis. Here, we assessed the association of intratumoral mRNA expression of cholesterol synthesis enzymes, transporters, and regulators in tumor specimen at diagnosis and lethal prostate cancer, defined as mortality or metastases from prostate cancer in contrast to nonlethal disease without evidence of metastases after at least 8 years of follow-up. We analyzed the prospective prostate cancer cohorts within the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (n = 249) and the Physicians' Health Study (n = 153) as well as expectantly managed patients in the Swedish Watchful Waiting Study (n = 338). The expression of squalene monooxygenase (SQLE) was associated with lethal cancer in all three cohorts. Men with high SQLE expression (>1 standard deviation above the mean) were 8.3 times (95% confidence interval, 3.5 to 19.7) more likely to have lethal cancer despite therapy compared with men with the mean level of SQLE expression. Absolute SQLE expression was associated with lethal cancer independently from Gleason grade and stage, as was a SQLE expression ratio in tumor versus surrounding benign prostate tissue. Higher SQLE expression was tightly associated with increased histologic markers of angiogenesis. Collectively, this study establishes the prognostic value of intratumoral cholesterol synthesis as measured via SQLE, its second rate-limiting enzyme. SQLE expression at cancer diagnosis is prognostic for lethal prostate cancer both after curative-intent prostatectomy and in a watchful waiting setting, possibly by facilitating micrometastatic disease. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4785-90. ©2016 AACR.

  17. Differential expression of the lethal gene Luteus-Pa in cacao of the Parinari series.

    PubMed

    Rehem, B C; Almeida, A-A F; Figueiredo, G S F; Gesteira, A S; Santos, S C; Corrêa, R X; Yamada, M M; Valle, R R

    2016-01-01

    The recessive lethal character Luteus-Pa is found in cacao (Theobroma cacao) genotypes of the Parinari series (Pa) and is characterized by expression of leaf chlorosis and seedling death. Several genotypes of the Pa series are bearers of the gene responsible for the expression of the Luteus-Pa character, which can be used as a tool for determining relationships between genotypes of this group. To evaluate this phenomenon, we analyzed the differential expression of genes between mutant seedlings and wild-type hybrid Pa 30 x 169 seedlings, with the aim of elucidating the possible lethal mechanisms of the homozygous recessive character Luteus-Pa. Plant material was harvested from leaves of wild and mutant seedlings at different periods to construct a subtractive library and perform quantitative analysis using real-time PCR. The 649 sequences obtained from the subtractive library had an average length of 500 bp, forming 409 contigs. The probable proteins encoded were grouped into 10 functional categories. Data from ESTs identified genes associated with Rubisco, peroxidases, and other proteins and enzymes related to carbon assimilation, respiration, and photosystem 2. Mutant seedlings were characterized by synthesizing defective PsbO and PsbA proteins, which were overexpressed from 15 to 20 days after seedling emergence. PMID:26910005

  18. [A mutant allele gam18, participating in the RecF repair path in Escherichia coli K-12].

    PubMed

    Verbenko, V N; Krup'ian, E P; Kuznetsova, L V; Kalinin, V L

    1999-03-01

    Plasmid pGam18 carrying one of the cloned mutant loci, responsible for enhanced radiation resistance in the strain Escherichia coli Gamr444, was shown to increase resistance to the lethal effect of gamma-rays with a dose modification factor DMF = 2. Enhanced resistance was observed in wild-type cells and in the mutant recBC sbcB, but not recFBC sbcA. This indicates the involvement of a product of the gam18 locus in the RecF pathway of recombinational repair. The protective effect of plasmid pGam18 against radiation was completely abolished by mutations in the most RecF pathway genes (recF, recJ, recR, recO, recQ, recN, and ruvB). However, three mutations in the uvrD gene, which encodes DNA helicase II and belongs to the RecF pathway, can be partially complemented by plasmid pGam18. These data suggest that the mutant allele gam18 affects the DNA helicase II activity at the presynaptic stage of the RecF pathway-mediated repair of DNA double-stranded breaks induced by gamma-irradiation. PMID:10368783

  19. Staphylococcus aureus β-Toxin Mutants Are Defective in Biofilm Ligase and Sphingomyelinase Activity, and Causation of Infective Endocarditis and Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Alfa; Vu, Bao G; Stach, Christopher S; Merriman, Joseph A; Horswill, Alexander R; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2016-05-01

    β-Toxin is an important virulence factor of Staphylococcus aureus, contributing to colonization and development of disease [Salgado-Pabon, W., et al. (2014) J. Infect. Dis. 210, 784-792; Huseby, M. J., et al. (2010) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 14407-14412; Katayama, Y., et al. (2013) J. Bacteriol. 195, 1194-1203]. This cytotoxin has two distinct mechanisms of action: sphingomyelinase activity and DNA biofilm ligase activity. However, the distinct mechanism that is most important for its role in infective endocarditis is unknown. We characterized the active site of β-toxin DNA biofilm ligase activity by examining deficiencies in site-directed mutants through in vitro DNA precipitation and biofilm formation assays. Possible conformational changes in mutant structure compared to that of wild-type toxin were assessed preliminarily by trypsin digestion analysis, retention of sphingomyelinase activity, and predicted structures based on the native toxin structure. We addressed the contribution of each mechanism of action to producing infective endocarditis and sepsis in vivo in a rabbit model. The H289N β-toxin mutant, lacking sphingomyelinase activity, exhibited lower sepsis lethality and infective endocarditis vegetation formation compared to those of the wild-type toxin. β-Toxin mutants with disrupted biofilm ligase activity did not exhibit decreased sepsis lethality but were deficient in infective endocarditis vegetation formation compared to the wild-type protein. Our study begins to characterize the DNA biofilm ligase active site of β-toxin and suggests β-toxin functions importantly in infective endocarditis through both of its mechanisms of action. PMID:27015018

  20. Staphylococcus aureus β-Toxin Mutants Are Defective in Biofilm Ligase and Sphingomyelinase Activity, and Causation of Infective Endocarditis and Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Alfa; Vu, Bao G; Stach, Christopher S; Merriman, Joseph A; Horswill, Alexander R; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2016-05-01

    β-Toxin is an important virulence factor of Staphylococcus aureus, contributing to colonization and development of disease [Salgado-Pabon, W., et al. (2014) J. Infect. Dis. 210, 784-792; Huseby, M. J., et al. (2010) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 14407-14412; Katayama, Y., et al. (2013) J. Bacteriol. 195, 1194-1203]. This cytotoxin has two distinct mechanisms of action: sphingomyelinase activity and DNA biofilm ligase activity. However, the distinct mechanism that is most important for its role in infective endocarditis is unknown. We characterized the active site of β-toxin DNA biofilm ligase activity by examining deficiencies in site-directed mutants through in vitro DNA precipitation and biofilm formation assays. Possible conformational changes in mutant structure compared to that of wild-type toxin were assessed preliminarily by trypsin digestion analysis, retention of sphingomyelinase activity, and predicted structures based on the native toxin structure. We addressed the contribution of each mechanism of action to producing infective endocarditis and sepsis in vivo in a rabbit model. The H289N β-toxin mutant, lacking sphingomyelinase activity, exhibited lower sepsis lethality and infective endocarditis vegetation formation compared to those of the wild-type toxin. β-Toxin mutants with disrupted biofilm ligase activity did not exhibit decreased sepsis lethality but were deficient in infective endocarditis vegetation formation compared to the wild-type protein. Our study begins to characterize the DNA biofilm ligase active site of β-toxin and suggests β-toxin functions importantly in infective endocarditis through both of its mechanisms of action.

  1. Lesion mimic mutants

    PubMed Central

    Moeder, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Over the last decade a substantial number of lesion mimic mutants (LMM) have been isolated and a growing number of the genes have been cloned. It is now becoming clear that these mutants are valuable tools to dissect various aspects of programmed cell death (PCD) and pathogen resistance pathways in plants. Together with other forward genetics approaches LMMs shed light on the PCD machinery in plant cells and revealed important roles for sphingolipids, Ca2+ and chloroplast-derived porphyrin-metabolites during cell death development. PMID:19513227

  2. Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Inhibits an Activated FGFR3 Mutant, and Blocks Downstream Signaling in Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, April N.; McAndrew, Christopher W.; Donoghue, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Activating mutations within Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 3 (FGFR3), a receptor tyrosine kinase, are responsible for human skeletal dysplasias including achondroplasia and the neonatal lethal syndromes, Thanatophoric Dysplasia (TD) type I and II. Several of these same FGFR3 mutations have also been identified somatically in human cancers, including multiple myeloma, bladder carcinoma and cervical cancer. Based on reports that strongly activated mutants of FGFR3 such as the TDII (K650E) mutant signal preferentially from within the secretory pathway, the inhibitory properties of nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), which blocks protein transport through the Golgi, were investigated. NDGA was able to inhibit FGFR3 autophosphorylation both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, signaling molecules downstream of FGFR3 activation such as STAT1, STAT3 and MAPK were inhibited by NDGA treatment. Using HEK293 cells expressing activated FGFR3-TDII, together with several multiple myeloma cell lines expressing activated forms of FGFR3, NDGA generally resulted in a decrease in MAPK activation by 1 hour, and resulted in increased apoptosis over 24 hours. The effects of NDGA on activated FGFR3 derivatives targeted either to the plasma membrane or the cytoplasm were also examined. These results suggest that inhibitory small molecules such as NDGA that target a specific subcellular compartment may be beneficial in the inhibition of activated receptors such as FGFR3 that signal from the same compartment. PMID:18794123

  3. Structure/function analysis of human factor XII using recombinant deletion mutants. Evidence for an additional region involved in the binding to negatively charged surfaces.

    PubMed

    Citarella, F; Ravon, D M; Pascucci, B; Felici, A; Fantoni, A; Hack, C E

    1996-05-15

    The binding site of human factor XII (FXII) for negatively charged surfaces has been proposed to be localized in the N-terminal region of factor XII. We have generated two recombinant factor XII proteins that lack this region: one protein consisting of the second growth-factor-like domain, the kringle domain, the proline-rich region and the catalytic domain of FXII (rFXII-U-like), and another consisting of only 16 amino acids of the proline-rich region of the heavy-chain region and the catalytic domain (rFXII-1pc). Each recombinant truncated protein, as well as recombinant full-length FXII (rFXII), were produced in HepG2 cells and purified by immunoaffinity chromatography. The capability of these recombinant proteins to bind to negatively charged surfaces and to initiate contact activation was studied. Radiolabeled rFXII-U-like and, to a lesser extent, rFXII-lpc bound to glass in a concentration-dependent manner, yet with lower efficiency than rFXII. The binding of the recombinant proteins was inhibited by a 100-fold molar excess of non-labeled native factor XII. On native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, both truncated proteins appeared to bind also to dextran sulfate, a soluble negatively charged compound. Glass-bound rFXII-U-like was able to activate prekallikrein in FXII-deficient plasma (assessed by measuring the generation of kallikrein-C1-inhibitor complexes), but less efficiently than rFXII, rFXII-U-like and rFXII-lpc exhibited coagulant activity, but this activity was significantly lower than that of rFXII. These data confirm that the N-terminal part of the heavy-chain region of factor XII contains a binding site for negatively charged activating surfaces, and indicate that other sequences, possibly located on the second epidermal-growth-factor-like domain and/or the kringle domain, contribute to the binding of factor XII to these surfaces.

  4. Disruption of the Rice Plastid Ribosomal Protein S20 Leads to Chloroplast Developmental Defects and Seedling Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xiaodi; Jiang, Quan; Xu, Jianlong; Zhang, Jianhui; Teng, Sheng; Lin, Dongzhi; Dong, Yanjun

    2013-01-01

    Plastid ribosomal proteins (PRPs) are essential for ribosome biogenesis, plastid protein biosynthesis, chloroplast differentiation, and early chloroplast development. This study identifies the first rice PRP mutant, asl1 (albino seedling lethality1), which exhibits an albino lethal phenotype at the seedling stage. This albino phenotype was associated with altered chlorophyll (Chl) content and chloroplast development. Map-based cloning revealed that ASL1 encodes PRP S20 (PRPS20), which localizes to the chloroplast. ASL1 showed tissue-specific expression, as it was highly expressed in plumule and young seedlings but expressed at much lower levels in other tissues. In addition, ASL1 expression was regulated by light. The transcript levels of nuclear genes for Chl biosynthesis and chloroplast development were strongly affected in asl1 mutants; transcripts of some plastid genes for photosynthesis were undetectable. Our findings indicate that nuclear-encoded PRPS20 plays an important role in chloroplast development in rice. PMID:23979931

  5. Mutant fatty acid desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention relates to a method for producing mutants of a fatty acid desaturase having a substantially increased activity towards fatty acid substrates with chains containing fewer than 18 carbons relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon atom chain length substrate specificity. The method involves inducing one or more mutations in the nucleic acid sequence encoding the precursor desaturase, transforming the mutated sequence into an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph cell such as MH13 E. coli, culturing the cells in the absence of supplemental unsaturated fatty acids, thereby selecting for recipient cells which have received and which express a mutant fatty acid desaturase with an elevated specificity for fatty acid substrates having chain lengths of less than 18 carbon atoms. A variety of mutants having 16 or fewer carbon atom chain length substrate specificities are produced by this method. Mutant desaturases produced by this method can be introduced via expression vectors into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and can also be used in the production of transgenic plants which may be used to produce specific fatty acid products.

  6. Chemogenetic profiling identifies RAD17 as synthetically lethal with checkpoint kinase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Shen, John Paul; Srivas, Rohith; Gross, Andrew; Li, Jianfeng; Jaehnig, Eric J; Sun, Su Ming; Bojorquez-Gomez, Ana; Licon, Katherine; Sivaganesh, Vignesh; Xu, Jia L; Klepper, Kristin; Yeerna, Huwate; Pekin, Daniel; Qiu, Chu Ping; van Attikum, Haico; Sobol, Robert W; Ideker, Trey

    2015-11-01

    Chemical inhibitors of the checkpoint kinases have shown promise in the treatment of cancer, yet their clinical utility may be limited by a lack of molecular biomarkers to identify specific patients most likely to respond to therapy. To this end, we screened 112 known tumor suppressor genes for synthetic lethal interactions with inhibitors of the CHEK1 and CHEK2 checkpoint kinases. We identified eight interactions, including the Replication Factor C (RFC)-related protein RAD17. Clonogenic assays in RAD17 knockdown cell lines identified a substantial shift in sensitivity to checkpoint kinase inhibition (3.5-fold) as compared to RAD17 wild-type. Additional evidence for this interaction was found in a large-scale functional shRNA screen of over 100 genotyped cancer cell lines, in which CHEK1/2 mutant cell lines were unexpectedly sensitive to RAD17 knockdown. This interaction was widely conserved, as we found that RAD17 interacts strongly with checkpoint kinases in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the setting of RAD17 knockdown, CHEK1/2 inhibition was found to be synergistic with inhibition of WEE1, another pharmacologically relevant checkpoint kinase. Accumulation of the DNA damage marker γH2AX following chemical inhibition or transient knockdown of CHEK1, CHEK2 or WEE1 was magnified by knockdown of RAD17. Taken together, our data suggest that CHEK1 or WEE1 inhibitors are likely to have greater clinical efficacy in tumors with RAD17 loss-of-function. PMID:26437225

  7. Tgfbeta2 -/- Tgfbeta3 -/- double knockout mice display severe midline fusion defects and early embryonic lethality.

    PubMed

    Dünker, Nicole; Krieglstein, Kerstin

    2002-12-01

    Given all known biological activities, it is anticipated that transforming growth factors beta (TGF-betas) play important roles in many different developmental processes. As all three TGF-beta isoforms display overlapping expression patterns, deletion of one TGF-beta isoform might be compensated for by another. In the present study, targeted disruption of both Tgfbeta2 and Tgfbeta3 genes was undertaken to circumvent this problem and determine the essential roles of TGF-beta2 and TGF-beta3 in vivo. Tgfbeta2(-/-) Tgfbeta3(-/-) double knockout mice and their three-allelic Tgfbeta2(-/-) Tgfbeta3(+/-) littermates display a lack of distal parts of the rib, a lack of sternal primordia, and failure in ventral body wall closure, leading to an extrathoracic position of the heart and extrusion of the liver. In addition, abnormalities in connective tissue composition and an early embryonic lethality [around embryonic day (E) 15.5] are seen. In contrast, Tgfbeta2 (+/-) Tgfbeta3 (-/-) littermates show normal rib and sternum development, normal anterior body wall fusion, and are still alive on E18.5. TGF-beta2 is already known to play a role in skeletal and craniofacial development. The results presented here show that beyond this: (a). TGF-betas obviously play a fundamental role in midline fusion and (b). the Tgfbeta2 gene seems to play a more important role in mediating developmental processes than the Tgfbeta3 gene, since Tgfbeta2 (+/-) Tgfbeta3 (-/-) mutants - in contrast to their Tgfbeta2(-/-) Tgfbeta3 (+)(/-) littermates - do not display severe malformations.

  8. Escherichia coli K-12 Suppressor-free Mutants Lacking Early Glycosyltransferases and Late Acyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Gracjana; Lindner, Buko; Brabetz, Werner; Brade, Helmut; Raina, Satish

    2009-01-01

    To elucidate the minimal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure needed for the viability of Escherichia coli, suppressor-free strains lacking either the 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid transferase waaA gene or derivatives of the heptosyltransferase I waaC deletion with lack of one or all late acyltransferases (lpxL/M/P) and/or various outer membrane biogenesis factors were constructed. Δ(waaC lpxL lpxM lpxP) and waaA mutants exhibited highly attenuated growth, whereas simultaneous deletion of waaC and surA was lethal. Analyses of LPS of suppressor-free waaA mutants grown at 21 °C, besides showing accumulation of free lipid IVA precursor, also revealed the presence of its pentaacylated and hexaacylated derivatives, indicating in vivo late acylation can occur without Kdo. In contrast, LPS of Δ(waaC lpxL lpxM lpxP) strains showed primarily Kdo2-lipid IVA, indicating that these minimal LPS structures are sufficient to support growth of E. coli under slow-growth conditions at 21/23 °C. These lipid IVA derivatives could be modified biosynthetically by phosphoethanolamine, but not by 4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose, indicating export defects of such minimal LPS. ΔwaaA and Δ(waaC lpxL lpxM lpxP) exhibited cell-division defects with a decrease in the levels of FtsZ and OMP-folding factor PpiD. These mutations led to strong constitutive additive induction of envelope responsive CpxR/A and σE signal transduction pathways. Δ(lpxL lpxM lpxP) mutant, with intact waaC, synthesized tetraacylated lipid A and constitutively incorporated a third Kdo in growth medium inducing synthesis of P-EtN and l-Ara4N. Overexpression of msbA restored growth of Δ(lpxL lpxM lpxP) under fast-growing conditions, but only partially that of the Δ(waaC lpxL lpxM lpxP) mutant. This suppression could be alleviated by overexpression of certain mutant msbA alleles or the single-copy chromosomal MsbA-498V variant in the vicinity of Walker-box II. PMID:19346244

  9. Prevalence of lethal osteochondrodysplasias in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Andersen, P E

    1989-04-01

    The point prevalence at birth of lethal osteochondrodysplasias in a subregion of Denmark was estimated by a study of all children born January 1970 through December 1983. Two cases of thanatophoric dysplasia, one case of thanatophoric dysplasia with cloverleaf skull, two cases of micromelic bone dysplasia with cloverleaf skull, two cases of achondrogenesis type III, and three cases of achondrogenesis type IV were found. Two cases were unclassifiable due to lack of radiographs. In total, the point prevalence at birth was 15.4 per 100,000. Thus lethal osteochondrodysplasias seem to be more common than is generally assumed. The clinical and radiographic findings in micromelic bone dysplasia with cloverleaf skull are discussed in relation to thanatophoric dysplasia and achondrogenesis type IV. PMID:2789000

  10. High-resolution mapping of epitopes on the C2 domain of factor VIII by analysis of point mutants using surface plasmon resonance

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Phuong-Cac T.; Lewis, Kenneth B.; Ettinger, Ruth A.; Schuman, Jason T.; Lin, Jasper C.; Healey, John F.; Meeks, Shannon L.; Lollar, Pete

    2014-01-01

    Neutralizing anti-factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies that develop in patients with hemophilia A and in murine hemophilia A models, clinically termed “inhibitors,” bind to several distinct surfaces on the FVIII-C2 domain. To map these epitopes at high resolution, 60 recombinant FVIII-C2 proteins were generated, each having a single surface-exposed residue mutated to alanine or a conservative substitution. The binding kinetics of these muteins to 11 monoclonal, inhibitory anti-FVIII-C2 antibodies were evaluated by surface plasmon resonance and the results compared with those obtained for wild-type FVIII-C2. Clusters of residues with significantly altered binding kinetics identified “functional” B-cell epitopes, defined as those residues contributing appreciable antigen–antibody avidity. These antibodies were previously shown to neutralize FVIII activity by interfering with proteolytic activation of FVIII by thrombin or factor Xa, or with its binding to phospholipid surfaces, von Willebrand factor, or other components of the intrinsic tenase complex. Fine mapping of epitopes by surface plasmon resonance also indicated surfaces through which FVIII interacts with proteins and phospholipids as it participates in coagulation. Mutations that significantly altered the dissociation times/half-lives identified functionally important interactions within antigen–antibody interfaces and suggested specific sequence modifications to generate novel, less antigenic FVIII proteins with possible therapeutic potential for treatment of inhibitor patients. PMID:24591205

  11. Rescue of Progeria in Trichothiodystrophy by Homozygous Lethal Xpd Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Andressoo, Jaan-Olle; Jans, Judith; de Wit, Jan; Coin, Frederic; Hoogstraten, Deborah; van de Ven, Marieke; Toussaint, Wendy; Huijmans, Jan; Thio, H. Bing; van Leeuwen, Wibeke J; de Boer, Jan; Egly, Jean-Marc; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J; Mitchell, James R

    2006-01-01

    Although compound heterozygosity, or the presence of two different mutant alleles of the same gene, is common in human recessive disease, its potential to impact disease outcome has not been well documented. This is most likely because of the inherent difficulty in distinguishing specific biallelic effects from differences in environment or genetic background. We addressed the potential of different recessive alleles to contribute to the enigmatic pleiotropy associated with XPD recessive disorders in compound heterozygous mouse models. Alterations in this essential helicase, with functions in both DNA repair and basal transcription, result in diverse pathologies ranging from elevated UV sensitivity and cancer predisposition to accelerated segmental progeria. We report a variety of biallelic effects on organismal phenotype attributable to combinations of recessive Xpd alleles, including the following: (i) the ability of homozygous lethal Xpd alleles to ameliorate a variety of disease symptoms when their essential basal transcription function is supplied by a different disease-causing allele, (ii) differential developmental and tissue-specific functions of distinct Xpd allele products, and (iii) interallelic complementation, a phenomenon rarely reported at clinically relevant loci in mammals. Our data suggest a re-evaluation of the contribution of “null” alleles to XPD disorders and highlight the potential of combinations of recessive alleles to affect both normal and pathological phenotypic plasticity in mammals. PMID:17020410

  12. Left ventricular function during lethal and sublethal endotoxemia in swine

    SciTech Connect

    Goldfarb, R.D.; Nightingale, L.M.; Kish, P.; Weber, P.B.; Loegering, D.J.

    1986-08-01

    Previous studies suggested that after a median lethal dose (LD50) of endotoxin, cardiac contractility was depressed in nonsurviving dogs. The canine cardiovascular system is unlike humans in that dogs have a hepatic vein sphincter that is susceptible to adrenergic stimulation capable of raising hepatic and splanchnic venous pressures. The authors retested the hypothesis that lethality after endotoxin administration is associated with cardiac contractile depression in pigs, because of the hepatic circulation in this species is similar to that of humans. They compared cardiac mechanical function of pigs administered a high dose (250 g/kg) or a low dose (100 g/kg) endotoxin by use of the slope of the end-systolic pressure-diameter relationship (ESPDR) as well as other measurements of cardiac performance. In all the pigs administered a high dose, ESPDR demonstrated a marked, time-dependent depression whereas we observed no significant ESPDR changes after low endotoxin doses. The other cardiodynamic variables were uninterpretable, due to the significant changes in heart rate, end-diastolic diameter (preload), and aortic diastolic pressure (afterload). Plasma myocardia depressant factor activity accumulated in all endotoxin-administered animals, tending to be greater in the high-dose group. In this group, both subendocardial blood flow and global function were depressed, whereas pigs administered the low dose endotoxin demonstrated slight, but nonsignificant, increases in flow and function. These observations indicate that myocardial contractile depression is associated with a lethal outcome to high doses of endotoxin. Myocardial perfusion was measured using radiolabeled microspheres infused into the left atria.

  13. Brine shrimp lethality assay of Bacopa monnieri.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Prashanth; Deepak, Mundkinajeddu; Rani, Padmaja; Kadamboor, Sandhya; Mathew, Anjana; Chandrashekar, Arun P; Agarwal, Amit

    2002-03-01

    Successive petroleum ether, chloroform, ethanol and water extracts, a saponin rich fraction (SRF) and bacoside A isolated from Bacopa monnieri were tested for brine shrimp lethality. Successive ethanol extracts and SRF showed potent activity. Bacoside A showed the maximum activity with a LC(50) of 38.3 microg/mL. The results confirmed the previous reports of an anticancer effect of Bacopa monnieri and suggest bacoside A as the active constituent. PMID:11933129

  14. Brine shrimp lethality assay of Bacopa monnieri.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Prashanth; Deepak, Mundkinajeddu; Rani, Padmaja; Kadamboor, Sandhya; Mathew, Anjana; Chandrashekar, Arun P; Agarwal, Amit

    2002-03-01

    Successive petroleum ether, chloroform, ethanol and water extracts, a saponin rich fraction (SRF) and bacoside A isolated from Bacopa monnieri were tested for brine shrimp lethality. Successive ethanol extracts and SRF showed potent activity. Bacoside A showed the maximum activity with a LC(50) of 38.3 microg/mL. The results confirmed the previous reports of an anticancer effect of Bacopa monnieri and suggest bacoside A as the active constituent.

  15. Specific ultrasonographic features of perinatal lethal hypophosphatasia.

    PubMed

    Zankl, Andreas; Mornet, Etienne; Wong, Shell

    2008-05-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of perinatal lethal hypophosphatasia (PL-HPH) by ultrasonography is difficult as PL-HPH must be differentiated from other skeletal dysplasias with short long bones and poor mineralization of the skeleton, such as osteogenesis imperfecta type II and achondrogenesis/hypochondrogenesis. Here we present a case of molecularly confirmed PL-HPH and illustrate specific ultrasonographic findings that help to distinguish PL-HPH from similar conditions. PMID:18386808

  16. Establishment of permanent chimerism in a lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mouse mutant with hemolytic anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, T.; Doermer, P.

    1987-12-01

    Pluripotent hemopoietic stem cell function was investigated in the homozygous muscle type lactate dehydrogenase (LDH-A) mutant mouse using bone marrow transplantation experiments. Hemopoietic tissues of LDH-A mutants showed a marked decreased in enzyme activity that was associated with severe hemolytic anemia. This condition proved to be transplantable into wild type mice (+/+) through total body irradiation (TBI) at a lethal dose of 8.0 Gy followed by engraftment of mutant bone marrow cells. Since the mutants are extremely radiosensitive (lethal dose50/30 4.4 Gy vs 7.3 Gy in +/+ mice), 8.0-Gy TBI followed by injection of even high numbers of normal bone marrow cells did not prevent death within 5-6 days. After a nonlethal dose of 4.0 Gy and grafting of normal bone marrow cells, a transient chimerism showing peripheral blood characteristics of the wild type was produced that returned to the mutant condition within 12 weeks. The transfusion of wild type red blood cells prior to and following 8.0-Gy TBI and reconstitution with wild type bone marrow cells prevented the early death of the mutants and permanent chimerism was achieved. The chimeras showed all hematological parameters of wild type mice, and radiosensitivity returned to normal. It is concluded that the mutant pluripotent stem cells are functionally comparable to normal stem cells, emphasizing the significance of this mouse model for studies of stem cell regulation.

  17. Mice Expressing Mutant Trpv4 Recapitulate the Human TRPV4 Disorders††

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuqing; Lee, Brendan; Cohn, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Activating mutations in TRPV4 are known to cause a spectrum of skeletal dysplasias ranging from autosomal dominant brachyolmia to lethal metatropic dysplasia. To develop an animal model of these disorders, we created transgenic mice expressing either wild-type or mutant TRPV4. Mice transgenic for wild-type Trpv4 showed no morphological changes at embryonic day 16.5, but did have a delay in bone mineralization. Overexpression of a mutant TRPV4 caused a lethal skeletal dysplasia that phenocopied many abnormalities associated with metatropic dysplasia in humans, including dumbbell-shaped long bones, a small ribcage, abnormalities in the autopod, and abnormal ossification in the vertebrae. The difference in phenotype between embryos transgenic for wild-type or mutant Trpv4 demonstrates that an increased amount of wild-type protein can be tolerated and that an activating mutation of this protein is required to produce a skeletal dysplasia phenotype. PMID:24644033

  18. Deletion and Interallelic Complementation Analysis of Steel Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bedell, M. A.; Cleveland, L. S.; O'Sullivan, T. N.; Copeland, N. G.; Jenkins, N. A.

    1996-01-01

    Mutations at the Steel (St) locus produce pleiotropic effects on viability as well as hematopoiesis, pigmentation and fertility. Several homozygous viable Sl alleles have previously been shown to contain either structural alterations in mast cell growth factor (Mgf) or regulatory mutations that affect expression of the Mgf gene. More severe Sl alleles cause lethality to homozygous embryos and all lethal Sl alleles examined to data contain deletions that remove the entire Mgf coding region. As the timing of the lethality varies from early to late in gestation, it is possible that some deletions may affect other closely linked genes in addition to Mgf. We have analyzed the extent of deleted sequences in seven homozygous lethal Sl alleles. The results of this analysis suggest that late gestation lethality represents the Sl null phenotype and that peri-implantation lethality results from the deletion of at least one essential gene that maps proximal to Sl. We have also examined gene dosage effects of Sl by comparing the phenotypes of mice homozygous and hemizygous for each of four viable Sl alleles. Lastly, we show that certain combinations of the viable Sl alleles exhibit interallelic complementation. Possible mechanisms by which such complementation could occur are discussed. PMID:8849899

  19. Lethal interpersonal violence in the Middle Pleistocene.

    PubMed

    Sala, Nohemi; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Pantoja-Pérez, Ana; Pablos, Adrián; Martínez, Ignacio; Quam, Rolf M; Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Bermúdez de Castro, José María; Carbonell, Eudald

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of interpersonal violence has been documented previously in Pleistocene members of the genus Homo, but only very rarely has this been posited as the possible manner of death. Here we report the earliest evidence of lethal interpersonal violence in the hominin fossil record. Cranium 17 recovered from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site shows two clear perimortem depression fractures on the frontal bone, interpreted as being produced by two episodes of localized blunt force trauma. The type of injuries, their location, the strong similarity of the fractures in shape and size, and the different orientations and implied trajectories of the two fractures suggest they were produced with the same object in face-to-face interpersonal conflict. Given that either of the two traumatic events was likely lethal, the presence of multiple blows implies an intention to kill. This finding shows that the lethal interpersonal violence is an ancient human behavior and has important implications for the accumulation of bodies at the site, supporting an anthropic origin. PMID:26018668

  20. Lethal Interpersonal Violence in the Middle Pleistocene

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Nohemi; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Pantoja-Pérez, Ana; Pablos, Adrián; Martínez, Ignacio; Quam, Rolf M.; Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Bermúdez de Castro, José María; Carbonell, Eudald

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of interpersonal violence has been documented previously in Pleistocene members of the genus Homo, but only very rarely has this been posited as the possible manner of death. Here we report the earliest evidence of lethal interpersonal violence in the hominin fossil record. Cranium 17 recovered from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site shows two clear perimortem depression fractures on the frontal bone, interpreted as being produced by two episodes of localized blunt force trauma. The type of injuries, their location, the strong similarity of the fractures in shape and size, and the different orientations and implied trajectories of the two fractures suggest they were produced with the same object in face-to-face interpersonal conflict. Given that either of the two traumatic events was likely lethal, the presence of multiple blows implies an intention to kill. This finding shows that the lethal interpersonal violence is an ancient human behavior and has important implications for the accumulation of bodies at the site, supporting an anthropic origin. PMID:26018668

  1. Lethal interpersonal violence in the Middle Pleistocene.

    PubMed

    Sala, Nohemi; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Pantoja-Pérez, Ana; Pablos, Adrián; Martínez, Ignacio; Quam, Rolf M; Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Bermúdez de Castro, José María; Carbonell, Eudald

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of interpersonal violence has been documented previously in Pleistocene members of the genus Homo, but only very rarely has this been posited as the possible manner of death. Here we report the earliest evidence of lethal interpersonal violence in the hominin fossil record. Cranium 17 recovered from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site shows two clear perimortem depression fractures on the frontal bone, interpreted as being produced by two episodes of localized blunt force trauma. The type of injuries, their location, the strong similarity of the fractures in shape and size, and the different orientations and implied trajectories of the two fractures suggest they were produced with the same object in face-to-face interpersonal conflict. Given that either of the two traumatic events was likely lethal, the presence of multiple blows implies an intention to kill. This finding shows that the lethal interpersonal violence is an ancient human behavior and has important implications for the accumulation of bodies at the site, supporting an anthropic origin.

  2. Lethal and sub-lethal effects of UVB on juvenile Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca: Pulmonata).

    PubMed

    Ruelas, Debbie S; Karentz, Deneb; Sullivan, John T

    2006-11-01

    Although Schistosoma mansoni occurs mainly in the tropics, where intense levels of solar radiation are present, the impact of ultraviolet (UV) light on schistosome transmission is not known. The purpose of this study was to investigate potential effects of UVB (290-320nm) on juvenile Biomphalaria glabrata, the snail intermediate host of S. mansoni. Albino and wild-type snails were exposed to doses of UVB from UV-fluorescent lamps, and the following were measured: survival, photoreactivation (light-mediated DNA repair), effects on feeding behavior, and morphological tissue abnormalities. Irradiation with UVB is lethal to B. glabrata in a dose-dependent manner. Exposure to white light subsequent to UVB irradiation enhances survival, probably by photoreactivation. The shell offers some, but not complete, protection. Experiments in which UVB transmittance through the shell was blocked with black nail polish suggest that injury to both exposed (headfoot) and shell-enclosed (mantle and visceral mass) tissues contributes to mortality in lethally irradiated snails. Wild-type (pigmented) snails are less susceptible to lethal effects of UVB than albino snails, and they may be more capable of photoreactivation. UVB exposure inhibits snail feeding behavior, and causes tentacle forks and growths on the headfoot. Thus, UVB may influence the life cycle of S. mansoni by both lethal and sub-lethal damage to the snail intermediate host. However, the ability of snails to photoreactivate may mitigate these effects. PMID:16996081

  3. Lethal and sub-lethal effects of UVB on juvenile Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca: Pulmonata).

    PubMed

    Ruelas, Debbie S; Karentz, Deneb; Sullivan, John T

    2006-11-01

    Although Schistosoma mansoni occurs mainly in the tropics, where intense levels of solar radiation are present, the impact of ultraviolet (UV) light on schistosome transmission is not known. The purpose of this study was to investigate potential effects of UVB (290-320nm) on juvenile Biomphalaria glabrata, the snail intermediate host of S. mansoni. Albino and wild-type snails were exposed to doses of UVB from UV-fluorescent lamps, and the following were measured: survival, photoreactivation (light-mediated DNA repair), effects on feeding behavior, and morphological tissue abnormalities. Irradiation with UVB is lethal to B. glabrata in a dose-dependent manner. Exposure to white light subsequent to UVB irradiation enhances survival, probably by photoreactivation. The shell offers some, but not complete, protection. Experiments in which UVB transmittance through the shell was blocked with black nail polish suggest that injury to both exposed (headfoot) and shell-enclosed (mantle and visceral mass) tissues contributes to mortality in lethally irradiated snails. Wild-type (pigmented) snails are less susceptible to lethal effects of UVB than albino snails, and they may be more capable of photoreactivation. UVB exposure inhibits snail feeding behavior, and causes tentacle forks and growths on the headfoot. Thus, UVB may influence the life cycle of S. mansoni by both lethal and sub-lethal damage to the snail intermediate host. However, the ability of snails to photoreactivate may mitigate these effects.

  4. Reduced LPS phosphorylation in Escherichia coli lowers the elevated ori/ter ratio in seqA mutants

    PubMed Central

    Rotman, Ella; Bratcher, Preston; Kuzminov, Andrei

    2009-01-01

    Summary The seqA defect in E. coli increases the ori/ter ratio and causes chromosomal fragmentation, making seqA mutants dependent on recombinational repair (the seqA recA co-lethality). To understand the nature of this chromosomal fragmentation, we characterized ΔseqA mutants and isolated suppressors of the ΔseqA recA lethality. We demonstrate that our ΔseqA alleles have normal function of the downstream pgm gene and normal ratios of the major phospholipids in the membranes, but increased surface lipopolysaccharide (LPS) phosphorylation. The predominant class of ΔseqA recA suppressors disrupts the rfaQGP genes, reducing phosphorylation of the inner core region of LPS. The rfaQGP suppressors also reduce the elevated ori/ter ratio of the ΔseqA mutants, but, unexpectedly, the suppressed mutants still exhibit the high levels of chromosomal fragmentation and SOS induction, characteristic of the ΔseqA mutants. We also found that co-lethality of rfaP with defects in the production of acidic phospholipids is suppressed by alternative initiation of chromosomal replication, suggesting that LPS phosphorylation stimulates replication initiation. The rfaQGP suppression of the seqA recA lethality provides genetic support for the surprising physical evidence that the oriC DNA forms complexes with the outer membrane. PMID:19432803

  5. Molecular markers in prostate cancer. Part I: predicting lethality

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Sachin; Dunsmuir, William D.

    2009-01-01

    Assessing the lethality of 'early,' potentially organ-confined prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the central controversies in modern-day urological clinical practice. Such cases are often considered for radical 'curative' treatment, although active surveillance may be equally appropriate for many men. Moreover, the balance between judicious intervention and overtreatment can be difficult to judge. The patient's age, comorbidities, family history and philosophy of self-health care can be weighed against clinical features such as the palpability of disease, the number and percentage of biopsy cores involved with the disease, histological grade, presenting prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and possible previous PSA kinetics. For many years, scientists and physicians have sought additional molecular factors that may be predictive for disease stage, progression and lethality. Usually, claims for a 'new' unique marker fall short of true clinical value. More often than not, such molecular markers are useful only in multivariate models. This review summarizes relevant molecular markers and models reported up to and including 2008. PMID:19050690

  6. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies on anthrax lethal toxin.

    PubMed

    Croney, John C; Cunningham, Kristina M; Collier, R John; Jameson, David M

    2003-08-28

    Anthrax lethal toxin is a binary bacterial toxin consisting of two proteins, protective antigen (PA) and lethal factor (LF), that self-assemble on receptor-bearing eukaryotic cells to form toxic, non-covalent complexes. PA(63), a proteolytically activated form of PA, spontaneously oligomerizes to form ring-shaped heptamers that bind LF and translocate it into the cell. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to substitute cysteine for each of three residues (N209, E614 and E733) at various levels on the lateral face of the PA(63) heptamer and for one residue (E126) on LF(N), the 30 kDa N-terminal PA binding domain of LF. Cysteine residues in PA were labeled with IAEDANS and that in LF(N) was labeled with Alexa 488 maleimide. The mutagenesis and labeling did not significantly affect function. Time-resolved fluorescence methods were used to study fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the AEDANS and Alexa 488 probes after the complex assembled in solution. The results clearly indicate energy transfer between AEDANS labeled at residue N209C on PA and the Alexa 488-labeled LF(N), whereas transfer from residue E614C on PA was slight, and none was observed from residue E733C. These results support a model in which LF(N) binds near the top of the ring-shaped (PA(63))(7) heptamer.

  7. The Gottingen Minipig Is a Model of the Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome: G-Colony Stimulating Factor Stimulates Hematopoiesis and Enhances Survival From Lethal Total-Body γ-Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Moroni, Maria; Ngudiankama, Barbara F.; Christensen, Christine; Olsen, Cara H.; Owens, Rossitsa; Lombardini, Eric D.; Holt, Rebecca K.; Whitnall, Mark H.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: We are characterizing the Gottingen minipig as an additional large animal model for advanced drug testing for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to enhance the discovery and development of novel radiation countermeasures. Among the advantages provided by this model, the similarities to human hematologic parameters and dynamics of cell loss/recovery after irradiation provide a convenient means to compare the efficacy of drugs known to affect bone marrow cellularity and hematopoiesis. Methods and Materials: Male Gottingen minipigs, 4 to 5 months old and weighing 9 to 11 kg, were used for this study. We tested the standard off-label treatment for ARS, rhG-CSF (Neupogen, 10 μg/kg/day for 17 days), at the estimated LD70/30 total-body γ-irradiation (TBI) radiation dose for the hematopoietic syndrome, starting 24 hours after irradiation. Results: The results indicated that granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced survival, stimulated recovery from neutropenia, and induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, the administration of G-CSF resulted in maturation of monocytes/macrophages. Conclusions: These results support continuing efforts toward validation of the minipig as a large animal model for advanced testing of radiation countermeasures and characterization of the pathophysiology of ARS, and they suggest that the efficacy of G-CSF in improving survival after total body irradiation may involve mechanisms other than increasing the numbers of circulating granulocytes.

  8. Down-regulation of RpS21, a putative translation initiation factor interacting with P40, produces viable minute imagos and larval lethality with overgrown hematopoietic organs and imaginal discs.

    PubMed

    Török, I; Herrmann-Horle, D; Kiss, I; Tick, G; Speer, G; Schmitt, R; Mechler, B M

    1999-03-01

    Down-regulation of the Drosophila ribosomal protein S21 gene (rpS21) causes a dominant weak Minute phenotype and recessively produces massive hyperplasia of the hematopoietic organs and moderate overgrowth of the imaginal discs during larval development. Here, we show that the S21 protein (RpS21) is bound to native 40S ribosomal subunits in a salt-labile association and is absent from polysomes, indicating that it acts as a translation initiation factor rather than as a core ribosomal protein. RpS21 can interact strongly with P40, a ribosomal peripheral protein encoded by the stubarista (sta) gene. Genetic studies reveal that P40 underexpression drastically enhances imaginal disc overgrowth in rpS21-deficient larvae, whereas viable combinations between rpS21 and sta affect the morphology of bristles, antennae, and aristae. These data demonstrate a strong interaction between components of the translation machinery and showed that their underexpression impairs the control of cell proliferation in both hematopoietic organs and imaginal discs.

  9. Overexpression of members of the AP-1 transcriptional factor family from an early stage of renal carcinogenesis and inhibition of cell growth by AP-1 gene antisense oligonucleotides in the Tsc2 gene mutant (Eker) rat model.

    PubMed

    Urakami, S; Tsuchiya, H; Orimoto, K; Kobayashi, T; Igawa, M; Hino, O

    1997-12-01

    We previously isolated subtracted cDNA clones for genes having increased expression in Tsc2 gene mutant (Eker) rat renal carcinomas (RCs). Among them, fra-1 encoding a transcriptional factor activator protein 1 (AP-1) was identified. We have therefore investigated whether other members of the AP-1 transcription factor family might also be involved in renal carcinogenesis in the Eker rat model. In the present study, overexpression of fra-1, fra-2, c-jun, junB, and junD mRNAs was demonstrated in RCs by Northern blot analysis. Interestingly, AP-1 proteins were highly expressed even in the earliest preneoplastic lesions (e.g., phenotypically altered tubules) as suggested by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-responsive element (TRE)-binding activity of AP-1 proteins was observed in RC cell extracts by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. As a next step, we transfected antisense oligonucleotides targeting AP-1 genes into RC cells and demonstrated that their growth was strongly inhibited. Thus, the data suggest that overexpression of AP-1 genes might play a crucial role in renal carcinogenesis in the Eker rat model. PMID:9405228

  10. Gata3 Hypomorphic Mutant Mice Rescued with a Yeast Artificial Chromosome Transgene Suffer a Glomerular Mesangial Cell Defect.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Takashi; Yu, Lei; Otsuki, Akihito; Ainoya, Keiko; Lim, Kim-Chew; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Engel, James Douglas

    2016-09-01

    GATA3 is a zinc finger transcription factor that plays a crucial role in embryonic kidney development, while its precise functions in the adult kidney remain largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that GATA3 is specifically expressed in glomerular mesangial cells and plays a critical role in the maintenance of renal glomerular function. Newly generated Gata3 hypomorphic mutant mice exhibited neonatal lethality associated with severe renal hypoplasia. Normal kidney size was restored by breeding the hypomorphic mutant with a rescuing transgenic mouse line bearing a 662-kb Gata3 yeast artificial chromosome (YAC), and these animals (termed G3YR mice) survived to adulthood. However, most of the G3YR mice showed degenerative changes in glomerular mesangial cells, which deteriorated progressively during postnatal development. Consequently, the G3YR adult mice suffered severe renal failure. We found that the 662-kb Gata3 YAC transgene recapitulated Gata3 expression in the renal tubules but failed to direct sufficient GATA3 activity to mesangial cells. Renal glomeruli of the G3YR mice had significantly reduced amounts of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), which is known to participate in the development and maintenance of glomerular mesangial cells. These results demonstrate a critical role for GATA3 in the maintenance of mesangial cells and its absolute requirement for prevention of glomerular disease. PMID:27296697

  11. Combination of opium smoking and hypercholesterolemia augments susceptibility for lethal cardiac arrhythmia and atherogenesis in rabbit.

    PubMed

    Najafipour, Hamid; Joukar, Siyavash

    2012-09-01

    Opium consumption is increasing in some eastern societies, where it is grown. We investigated the effect of opium smoking on plasma atherogenic index and incidence of lethal cardiac arrhythmia, i.e. ventricular tachycardia (VT) and ventricular fibrillation (VF) in rabbits. Animals were divided into two-, normo- and hyper-cholesterolemic main groups fed with normal or high cholesterol diet prior and during short-term and long-term exposure to opium smoke. Then, isoproterenol (3mg/kg, i.p.) was injected to induce cardiac ischemia and animals were followed for 3h for counting of lethal arrhythmia incidence. Long-term opium smoking significantly increased the plasma atherogenic index. In ischemic hearts, opium smoking along with hypercholesterolemia significantly enhanced the incidence of fatal arrhythmia. This vulnerability was not mediated by changes in QT interval. These data suggest that opium smoking, especially in hypercholesterolemic conditions, can be a predisposing factor for atherogenesis and lethal arrhythmia.

  12. Lethal exposure: An integrated approach to pathogen transmission via environmental reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Wendy C.; Kausrud, Kyrre L.; Beyer, Wolfgang; Easterday, W. Ryan; Barandongo, Zoë R.; Blaschke, Elisabeth; Cloete, Claudine C.; Lazak, Judith; Van Ert, Matthew N.; Ganz, Holly H.; Turnbull, Peter C. B.; Stenseth, Nils Chr.; Getz, Wayne M.

    2016-01-01

    To mitigate the effects of zoonotic diseases on human and animal populations, it is critical to understand what factors alter transmission dynamics. Here we assess the risk of exposure to lethal concentrations of the anthrax bacterium, Bacillus anthracis, for grazing animals in a natural system over time through different transmission mechanisms. We follow pathogen concentrations at anthrax carcass sites and waterholes for five years and estimate infection risk as a function of grass, soil or water intake, age of carcass sites, and the exposure required for a lethal infection. Grazing, not drinking, seems the dominant transmission route, and transmission is more probable from grazing at carcass sites 1–2 years of age. Unlike most studies of virulent pathogens that are conducted under controlled conditions for extrapolation to real situations, we evaluate exposure risk under field conditions to estimate the probability of a lethal dose, showing that not all reservoirs with detectable pathogens are significant transmission pathways. PMID:27265371

  13. Lethal exposure: An integrated approach to pathogen transmission via environmental reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Turner, Wendy C; Kausrud, Kyrre L; Beyer, Wolfgang; Easterday, W Ryan; Barandongo, Zoë R; Blaschke, Elisabeth; Cloete, Claudine C; Lazak, Judith; Van Ert, Matthew N; Ganz, Holly H; Turnbull, Peter C B; Stenseth, Nils Chr; Getz, Wayne M

    2016-01-01

    To mitigate the effects of zoonotic diseases on human and animal populations, it is critical to understand what factors alter transmission dynamics. Here we assess the risk of exposure to lethal concentrations of the anthrax bacterium, Bacillus anthracis, for grazing animals in a natural system over time through different transmission mechanisms. We follow pathogen concentrations at anthrax carcass sites and waterholes for five years and estimate infection risk as a function of grass, soil or water intake, age of carcass sites, and the exposure required for a lethal infection. Grazing, not drinking, seems the dominant transmission route, and transmission is more probable from grazing at carcass sites 1-2 years of age. Unlike most studies of virulent pathogens that are conducted under controlled conditions for extrapolation to real situations, we evaluate exposure risk under field conditions to estimate the probability of a lethal dose, showing that not all reservoirs with detectable pathogens are significant transmission pathways. PMID:27265371

  14. Structural role of Gly(193) in serine proteases: investigations of a G555E (GLY193 in chymotrypsin) mutant of blood coagulation factor XI.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Amy E; Ogawa, Taketoshi; Gailani, David; Bajaj, S Paul

    2004-07-01

    In serine proteases, Gly(193) is highly conserved with few exceptions. A patient with inherited deficiency of the coagulation serine protease factor XI (FXI) was reported to be homozygous for a Gly(555) --> Glu substitution. Gly(555) in FXI corresponds to Gly(193) in chymotrypsin, which is the numbering system used subsequently. To investigate the abnormality in FXI(G193E), we expressed and purified recombinant FXIa(G193E), activated it to FXIa(G193E), and compared its activity to wild type-activated FXI (FXIa(WT)). FXIa(G193E) activated FIX with approximately 300-fold reduced k(cat) and similar K(m), and hydrolyzed synthetic substrate with approximately 10-fold reduced K(m) and modestly reduced k(cat). Binding of antithrombin and the amyloid beta-precursor protein Kunitz domain inhibitor (APPI) to FXIa(G193E) was impaired approximately 8000- and approximately 100000-fold, respectively. FXIa(G193E) inhibition by diisopropyl fluoro-phosphate was approximately 30-fold slower and affinity for p-aminobenzamidine (S1 site probe) was 6-fold weaker than for FXIa(WT). The rate of carbamylation of NH(2)-Ile(16), which forms a salt bridge with Asp(194) in active serine proteases, was 4-fold faster for FXIa(G193E). These data indicate that the unoccupied active site of FXIa(G193E) is incompletely formed, and the amide N of Glu(193) may not point toward the oxyanion hole. Inclusion of saturating amounts of p-aminobenzamidine resulted in comparable rates of carbamylation for FXIa(WT) and FXIa(G193E), suggesting that the occupied active site has near normal conformation. Thus, binding of small synthetic substrates or inhibitors provides sufficient energy to allow the amide N of Glu(193) to point correctly toward the oxyanion hole. Homology modeling also indicates that the inability of FXIa(G193E) to bind antithrombin/APPI or activate FIX is caused, in part, by impaired accessibility of the S2' site because of a steric clash with Glu(193). Such arguments will apply to other

  15. Mutants of Cercospora kikuchii Altered in Cercosporin Synthesis and Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Upchurch, R G; Walker, D C; Rollins, J A; Ehrenshaft, M; Daub, M E

    1991-10-01

    We have obtained spontaneous and UV-induced stable mutants, altered in the synthesis of cercosporin, of the fungal soybean pathogen Cercospora kikuchii. The mutants were isolated on the basis of colony color on minimal medium. The UV-induced mutants accumulated, at most, 2% of wild-type cercosporin levels on all media tested. In contrast, cercosporin accumulation by the spontaneous mutants was strongly medium regulated, occurring only on potato dextrose medium but at concentrations comparable to those produced by the wild-type strain. UV-induced mutants unable to synthesize cercosporin on any medium were unable to incite lesions when inoculated onto the soybean host. Cercosporin was reproducibly isolated from all inoculated leaves showing lesions. Although cercosporin involvement in disease has been indirectly suggested by many previous studies, this is the first report in which mutants blocked in cercosporin synthesis have been used to demonstrate that cercosporin is a crucial pathogenicity factor for this fungal genus.

  16. Mutants of Cercospora kikuchii Altered in Cercosporin Synthesis and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Upchurch, R. G.; Walker, D. C.; Rollins, J. A.; Ehrenshaft, M.; Daub, M. E.

    1991-01-01

    We have obtained spontaneous and UV-induced stable mutants, altered in the synthesis of cercosporin, of the fungal soybean pathogen Cercospora kikuchii. The mutants were isolated on the basis of colony color on minimal medium. The UV-induced mutants accumulated, at most, 2% of wild-type cercosporin levels on all media tested. In contrast, cercosporin accumulation by the spontaneous mutants was strongly medium regulated, occurring only on potato dextrose medium but at concentrations comparable to those produced by the wild-type strain. UV-induced mutants unable to synthesize cercosporin on any medium were unable to incite lesions when inoculated onto the soybean host. Cercosporin was reproducibly isolated from all inoculated leaves showing lesions. Although cercosporin involvement in disease has been indirectly suggested by many previous studies, this is the first report in which mutants blocked in cercosporin synthesis have been used to demonstrate that cercosporin is a crucial pathogenicity factor for this fungal genus. Images PMID:16348567

  17. [Lethal intoxication with arsenic using prepared butter].

    PubMed

    Weller, Jens-Peter; Larsch, Klaus-Peter; Teske, Jörg; Tröger, Hans Dieter

    2008-01-01

    The present case report deals with a lethal intoxication with arsenic mixed into butter. It describes the course of events over about two days on the basis of the statements by the persons involved, the clinical findings after the belated hospitalisation of the victim, the results of the first pathological autopsy, the forensic autopsy performed after exhumation and the results of the chemical-toxicological investigations. The results are discussed in relation to the later confession of the female perpetrator and her statements regarding a previous unsuccessful murder attempt by poisoning. It also presents the judgement pronounced by the court and the reasons given for it.

  18. Lethal predators: psychopathic, sadistic, and sane.

    PubMed

    Ochberg, Frank M; Brantley, Alan C; Hare, R D; Houk, Peter D; Ianni, Robert; James, Earl; O'Toole, Mary Ellen; Saathoff, Gregory

    2003-01-01

    The violent criminals defined in this article are a small, exceptionally dangerous group of offenders designated by the authors as "lethal predators." They have a history of sexual predation, have killed at least once, and are mentally abnormal but legally sane. They are highly likely to keep killing as long as they are free. Laws permitting civil commitment of dangerous and mentally abnormal sexual predators after they have completed criminal prison sentences have been upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court. Such laws can provide a legal means of keeping these highly dangerous killers confined so they cannot kill again.

  19. Lethal mobilization of DDT by cowbirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Velzen, A.C.; Stiles, W.B.; Stickel, L.F.

    1972-01-01

    This study is an experimental demonstration of lethal mobilization of DDT by brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) and the effects of food deprivation on the distribution and loss of DDT, DDD, and DDE. The principal experimental group consisted of 20 birds fed a dietary dosage of 100 ppm of DDT for 13 days. After 2 days of full rations of untreated food, they were subjected to food restriction. Food was reduced to 43 percent of normal. Seven of the 20 birds died within 4 days. No birds died in the three control groups, treated as follows: ( 1 ) 20 birds fed 100 ppm DDT for 13 days and full rations of untreated food thereafter, (2) 20 birds fed only untreated food but subjected to food restriction, and (3) 20 birds fed full rations of untreated food throughout. In a pilot study, birds were fed 100, 200, or 300 ppm of DDT and subjected to two periods of food restriction, the first of these immediately after dosage ceased and the second 4 months later. DDT-dosed birds from all dosage levels died in each period of food restriction. Before the weight loss that accompanied food restriction, the brains of DDT-dosed birds had concentrations of DDT and DDD that were far below the lethal range. Concentrations increased rapidly to lethal levels. In these birds, DDT in carcasses decreased while DDD increased. DDT-dosed birds that died during food restriction lost 16 percent of their total body burden of DDT + DDD + DDE, 21 percent of their weight, and 81 percent of their fat. The DDT-dosed birds that were subjected to food restriction but survived lost a significantly greater proportion of their body burden of residues than similarly dosed birds not subjected to weight loss. Brain levels of DDT and DDD in birds that died during food restriction soon after dosage did not differ significantly from brain levels of birds that died in a period of food restriction 4 months after dosage. Concentrations of DDE were significantly higher in the latter group, although they were lower

  20. Direct selection of cloned DNA in Bacillus subtilis based on sucrose-induced lethality.

    PubMed Central

    Bramucci, M G; Nagarajan, V

    1996-01-01

    Expression of the Bacillus subtilis or Bacillus amyloliquefaciens sacB gene in the presence of sucrose is lethal for a variety of bacteria. Sucrose-induced lethality can be used to select for inactivation of sacB by insertion of heterologous DNA in sensitive bacteria. This procedure has not been applicable to B. subtilis heretofore because expression of wild-type sacB is not detrimental to B. subtilis. The W29 mutation in the B. amyloliquefaciens sacB gene interferes with processing of the levansucrase signal peptide. The W29 mutation does not affect growth of B. subtilis in media lacking sucrose. However, this mutation inhibited growth of B. subtilis in media containing sucrose. Inactivation of the fructose polymerase activity encoded by sacB indicated that levan production was essential for sucrose-induced lethality. As a result, it was possible to select for cloned DNA in B. subtilis by insertional inactivation of the mutant sacB gene located on a multicopy plasmid vector in medium containing sucrose. PMID:8899981

  1. Deciphering the Mechanisms of Developmental Disorders (DMDD): a new programme for phenotyping embryonic lethal mice.

    PubMed

    Mohun, Timothy; Adams, David J; Baldock, Richard; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Copp, Andrew J; Hemberger, Myriam; Houart, Corinne; Hurles, Matt E; Robertson, Elizabeth; Smith, James C; Weaver, Tom; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2013-05-01

    International efforts to test gene function in the mouse by the systematic knockout of each gene are creating many lines in which embryonic development is compromised. These homozygous lethal mutants represent a potential treasure trove for the biomedical community. Developmental biologists could exploit them in their studies of tissue differentiation and organogenesis; for clinical researchers they offer a powerful resource for investigating the origins of developmental diseases that affect newborns. Here, we outline a new programme of research in the UK aiming to kick-start research with embryonic lethal mouse lines. The 'Deciphering the Mechanisms of Developmental Disorders' (DMDD) programme has the ambitious goal of identifying all embryonic lethal knockout lines made in the UK over the next 5 years, and will use a combination of comprehensive imaging and transcriptomics to identify abnormalities in embryo structure and development. All data will be made freely available, enabling individual researchers to identify lines relevant to their research. The DMDD programme will coordinate its work with similar international efforts through the umbrella of the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium [see accompanying Special Article (Adams et al., 2013)] and, together, these programmes will provide a novel database for embryonic development, linking gene identity with molecular profiles and morphology phenotypes. PMID:23519034

  2. Enhancement of Overgrowth by Gene Interactions in Lethal(2)giant Discs Imaginal Discs from Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Buratovich, M. A.; Bryant, P. J.

    1997-01-01

    Recessive lethal mutations of the lethal(2)giant discs (l(2)gd) and lethal(2)fat (l(2)ft) loci of Drosophila melanogaster cause imaginal disc hyperplasia during a prolonged larval stage. Imaginal discs from l(2)ft l(2)gd or Gl(2)gd double homozygotes show more extensive overgrowth than in either single homozygote, and double homozygous l(2)ft l(2)gd mitotic clones in adult flies show much more overgrowth than is seen in clones homozygous for either l(2)gd or l(2)ft alone. dachsous (ds) also acts as an enhancer of l(2)gd, producing dramatically overgrown discs and causing failure to pupariate in double homozygotes. The comb gap (cg) mutation, which also interacts with ds, greatly enhances the tendency of imaginal discs from l(2)gd larvae to duplicate as they overgrow. If l(2)gd homozygotes are made heterozygous for l(2)ft, then several discs duplicate, indicating that l(2)ft acts as a dominant enhancer of l(2)gd. l(2)ft also acts as a dominant enhancer of l(2)gd, and conversely l(2)gd acts as a dominant modifier of l(2)ft. The enhancement of overgrowth caused by various mutant combinations is accompanied by changes in expression of Decapentaplegic and Wingless. These results show that tumor suppressor genes act in combination to control cell proliferation, and that tissue hyperplasia can be associated with ectopic expression of genes involved in pattern formation. PMID:9335602

  3. Activation patterns of coagulation and fibrinolysis in baboons following infusion with lethal or sublethal dose of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    de Boer, J P; Creasy, A A; Chang, A; Roem, D; Brouwer, M C; Eerenberg, A J; Hack, C E; Taylor, F B

    1993-01-01

    Administration of low doses endotoxin or tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in human experimental models for sepsis results in transient activation of both coagulation and fibrinolysis and subsequent inhibition of the fibrinolytic system by plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1). We have investigated in a baboon model for sepsis, whether administration of a lethal or sublethal dose of living E. coli could induce similar activation patterns. Levels of thrombin-antithrombin III (TAT) complexes increased significantly to zeniths of 425 and 33 times the baseline values at t+360 in the lethal and sublethal group, respectively. Activation of fibrinolysis, as reflected by plasmin-alpha 2 antiplasmin (PAP) complexes, in the sublethal group was maximal at t+60 and was increasingly inhibited thereafter in spite of a sustained increase of tissue type plasminogen activator (t-PA) levels. In the lethal group PAP complexes increased to a zenith of 38 times the baseline values at t+240. PAI-1 levels increased to 15 times the baseline values at t+360 in the sublethal group, whereas in the lethal group they increased almost linearly to 20 times the baseline values at t+360. Despite high levels of PAI-1, effective inhibition of the fibrinolysis was not established until at T+240 in the lethal group. The difference in activation patterns of both mediator systems in the sublethal and lethal group of baboons indicate that extensive activation of coagulation contributes to the lethal complications in sepsis.

  4. Lethal mutagenesis of foot-and-mouth disease virus involves shifts in sequence space.

    PubMed

    Perales, Celia; Henry, Michel; Domingo, Esteban; Wain-Hobson, Simon; Vartanian, Jean-Pierre

    2011-12-01

    Lethal mutagenesis or virus transition into error catastrophe is an antiviral strategy that aims at extinguishing a virus by increasing the viral mutation rates during replication. The molecular basis of lethal mutagenesis is largely unknown. Previous studies showed that a critical substitution in the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) polymerase was sufficient to allow the virus to escape extinction through modulation of the transition types induced by the purine nucleoside analogue ribavirin. This substitution was not detected in mutant spectra of FMDV populations that had not replicated in the presence of ribavirin, using standard molecular cloning and nucleotide sequencing. Here we selectively amplify and analyze low-melting-temperature cDNA duplexes copied from FMDV genome populations passaged in the absence or presence of ribovirin Hypermutated genomes with high frequencies of A and U were present in both ribavirin -treated and untreated populations, but the major effect of ribavirin mutagenesis was to accelerate the occurrence of AU-rich mutant clouds during the early replication rounds of the virus. The standard FMDV quasispecies passaged in the absence of ribavirin included the salient transition-modulating, ribavirin resistance mutation, whose frequency increased in populations treated with ribavirin. Thus, even nonmutagenized FMDV quasispecies include a deep, mutationally biased portion of sequence space, in support of the view that the virus replicates close to the error threshold for maintenance of genetic information.

  5. Generation and characterisation of stable ethanol-tolerant mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Dragana; Fraser, Sarah; Chambers, Paul J; Rogers, Peter; Stanley, Grant A

    2010-02-01

    Saccharomyces spp. are widely used for ethanologenic fermentations, however yeast metabolic rate and viability decrease as ethanol accumulates during fermentation, compromising ethanol yield. Improving ethanol tolerance in yeast should, therefore, reduce the impact of ethanol toxicity on fermentation performance. The purpose of the current work was to generate and characterise ethanol-tolerant yeast mutants by subjecting mutagenised and non-mutagenised populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae W303-1A to adaptive evolution using ethanol stress as a selection pressure. Mutants CM1 (chemically mutagenised) and SM1 (spontaneous) had increased acclimation and growth rates when cultivated in sub-lethal ethanol concentrations, and their survivability in lethal ethanol concentrations was considerably improved compared with the parent strain. The mutants utilised glucose at a higher rate than the parent in the presence of ethanol and an initial glucose concentration of 20 g l(-1). At a glucose concentration of 100 g l(-1), SM1 had the highest glucose utilisation rate in the presence or absence of ethanol. The mutants produced substantially more glycerol than the parent and, although acetate was only detectable in ethanol-stressed cultures, both mutants produced more acetate than the parent. It is suggested that the increased ethanol tolerance of the mutants is due to their elevated glycerol production rates and the potential of this to increase the ratio of oxidised and reduced forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)/NADH) in an ethanol-compromised cell, stimulating glycolytic activity.

  6. Growth-dependent DNA breakage and cell death in a gyrase mutant of Salmonella.

    PubMed Central

    Garí, E; Bossi, L; Figueroa-Bossi, N

    2001-01-01

    A class of gyrase mutants of Salmonella enterica mimics the properties of bacteria exposed to quinolones. These mutants suffer spontaneous DNA breakage during normal growth and depend on recombinational repair for viability. Unlike quinolone-treated bacteria, however, they do not show accumulation of cleavable gyrase-DNA complexes. In recA or recB mutant backgrounds, the temperature-sensitive (ts) allele gyrA208 causes rapid cell death at 43 degrees. Here, we isolated "suppressor-of-death" mutations, that is, secondary changes that allow a gyrA208 recB double mutant to survive a prolonged exposure to 43 degrees and subsequently to form colonies at 28 degrees. In most isolates, the secondary change was itself a ts mutation. Three ts alleles were mapped in genes coding for amino acyl tRNA synthetases (alaS, glnS, and lysS). Allele alaS216 completely abolished DNA breakage in a gyrA208 recA double mutant. Likewise, treating this mutant with chloramphenicol prevented death and DNA damage at 43 degrees. Additional suppressors of gyrA208 lethality include rpoB mutations and, surprisingly, icd mutations inactivating isocitrate dehydrogenase. We postulate that the primary effect of the gyrase alteration is to hamper replication fork movement. Inhibiting DNA replication under conditions of continuing macromolecular synthesis ("unbalanced growth") activates a mechanism that causes DNA breakage and cell death, reminiscent of "thymineless" lethality. PMID:11779784

  7. Issues surrounding lethal injection as a means of capital punishment.

    PubMed

    Romanelli, Frank; Whisman, Tyler; Fink, Joseph L

    2008-12-01

    Lethal injection as a method of state-sanctioned capital punishment was initially proposed in the United States in 1977 and used for the first time in 1982. Most lethal injection protocols use a sequential drug combination of sodium thiopental, pancuronium bromide, and potassium chloride. Lethal injection was originally introduced as a more humane form of execution compared with existing mechanical methods such as electrocution, toxic gassing, hanging, or firing squad. Lethal injection has not, however, been without controversy. Several states are considering whether lethal injection meets constitutional scrutiny forbidding cruel and unusual punishment. Recently in the case of Ralph Baze and Thomas C. Bowling, Petitioners, v John D. Rees, Commissioner, Kentucky Department of Corrections et al, the United States Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of the lethal injection protocol as carried out in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Most of the debate has surrounded the dosing and procedures used in lethal injection and whether the drug combinations and measures for administering the drugs truly produce a timely, pain-free, and fail-safe death. Many have also raised issues regarding the "medicalization" of execution and the ethics of health care professionals' participation in any part of the lethal injection process. As a result of all these issues, the future of lethal injection as a means of execution in the United States is under significant scrutiny. Outcomes of ongoing legislative and judicial reviews might result in cessation of lethal injection in totality or in alterations involving specific drug combinations or administration procedures.

  8. Antenatal diagnosis of lethal skeletal dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Tretter, A E; Saunders, R C; Meyers, C M; Dungan, J S; Grumbach, K; Sun, C C; Campbell, A B; Wulfsberg, E A

    1998-02-17

    Lethal skeletal dysplasias (LSD) are a heterogeneous group of rare but important genetic disorders characterized by abnormal growth and development of bone and cartilage. We describe the diagnosis and outcome of 29 cases of lethal skeletal dysplasias evaluated between January 1989 and December 1996 at the University of Maryland Medical Center and the Ultrasound Institute of Baltimore. Two cases presented at delivery with no prenatal care while the remaining 27 cases were identified by antenatal sonography. Final diagnoses included thanatophoric dysplasia (14), osteogenesis imperfecta, type II (6), achondrogenesis (2), short rib syndromes (3), campomelic syndrome (2), atelosteogenesis (1), and no evidence of a skeletal dysplasia (1). Twenty out of 27 pregnancies were terminated with an average at detection of 21.6 weeks. The other 7 pregnancies that went on to deliver had an average age at detection of 29.2 weeks. Fetal abnormalities in the terminated pregnancies were identified at a significantly earlier gestational age (P = 0.0016) than the pregnancies that continued. While the identification of LSD by sonography was excellent (26/27), only 13/27 (48%) were given an accurate specific antenatal diagnosis. In 8/14 (57%) cases with an inaccurate or nonspecific diagnosis there was a significant or crucial change in the genetic counseling. Thus, while antenatal sonography is an excellent method for discovering LSD, clinical examination, radiographs, and autopsy are mandatory for making a specific diagnosis. PMID:9489797

  9. Potential lethal and non-lethal effects of predators on dispersal of spider mites.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Hatsune; Yano, Shuichi

    2014-11-01

    Predators can affect prey dispersal lethally by direct consumption or non-lethally by making prey hesitate to disperse. These lethal and non-lethal effects are detectable only in systems where prey can disperse between multiple patches. However, most studies have drawn their conclusions concerning the ability of predatory mites to suppress spider mites based on observations of their interactions on a single patch or on heavily infested host plants where spider mites could hardly disperse toward intact patches. In these systems, specialist predatory mites that penetrate protective webs produced by spider mites quickly suppress the spider mites, whereas generalist predators that cannot penetrate the webs were ineffective. By using a connected patch system, we revealed that a generalist ant, Pristomyrmex punctatus Mayr (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), effectively prevented dispersal of spider mites, Tetranychus kanzawai Kishida (Acari: Tetranychidae), by directly consuming dispersing individuals. We also revealed that a generalist predatory mite, Euseius sojaensis Ehara (Acari: Phytoseiidae), prevented between-patch dispersal of T. kanzawai by making them hesitate to disperse. In contrast, a specialist phytoseiid predatory mite, Neoseiulus womersleyi Schicha, allowed spider mites to escape an initial patch, increasing the number of colonized patches within the system. Our results suggest that ants and generalist predatory mites can effectively suppress Tetranychus species under some conditions, and should receive more attention as agents for conservation biological control in agroecosystems.

  10. Suicide Intent and Accurate Expectations of Lethality: Predictors of Medical Lethality of Suicide Attempts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Gregory K.; Henriques, Gregg R.; Sosdjan, Daniella; Beck, Aaron T.

    2004-01-01

    The degree of intent to commit suicide and the severity of self-injury were examined in individuals (N = 180) who had recently attempted suicide. Although a minimal association was found between the degree of suicide intent and the degree of lethality of the attempt, the accuracy of expectations about the likelihood of dying was found to moderate…

  11. Gonadosomatic mosaicism for lethal mutations in Drosophila lethal mutations disturbing larval development

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A.I.; Sakharova, N.Yu.

    1988-11-01

    Phenogenetic analysis of autonomous lethal mutations obtained by the method of gonadosomatic mosaicism which manifested during larval stages, established that the nuclei of hypodermal cells, salivary glands suprapharyngeal ganglion, pharynx, esophagus, gizzard, and hindgut are the derivatives of the same nucleus (from the first two nuclei of cleavage) as the nuclei of the cells of the imaginal-somatic tissues.

  12. Synthetic Lethality of Drosophila in the Absence of the MUS81 Endonuclease and the DmBlm Helicase Is Associated With Elevated Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Trowbridge, Kirsten; McKim, Kim; Brill, Steven J.; Sekelsky, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Mus81-Mms4 (Mus81-Eme1 in some species) is a heterodimeric DNA structure-specific endonuclease that has been implicated in meiotic recombination and processing of damaged replication forks in fungi. We generated and characterized mutations in Drosophila melanogaster mus81 and mms4. Unlike the case in fungi, we did not find any role for MUS81-MMS4 in meiotic crossing over. A possible role for this endonuclease in repairing double-strand breaks that arise during DNA replication is suggested by the finding that mus81 and mms4 mutants are hypersensitive to camptothecin; however, these mutants are not hypersensitive to other agents that generate lesions that slow or block DNA replication. In fungi, mus81, mms4, and eme1 mutations are synthetically lethal with mutations in genes encoding RecQ helicase homologs. Similarly, we found that mutations in Drosophila mus81 and mms4 are synthetically lethal with null mutations in mus309, which encodes the ortholog of the Bloom Syndrome helicase. Synthetic lethality is associated with high levels of apoptosis in proliferating tissues. Lethality and elevated apoptosis were partially suppressed by a mutation in spn-A, which encodes the ortholog of the strand invasion protein Rad51. These findings provide insights into the causes of synthetic lethality. PMID:17603121

  13. Synthetic lethal approaches for assessing combinatorial efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Rebecca A; Chen, Ee Sin

    2016-06-01

    The recent advances in pharmacogenomics have made personalized medicine no longer a pipedream but a precise and powerful way to tailor individualized cancer treatment strategies. Cancer is a devastating disease, and contemporary chemotherapeutic strategies now integrate several agents in the treatment of some types of cancer, with the intent to block more than one target simultaneously. This constitutes the premise of synthetic lethality, an attractive therapeutic strategy already demonstrating clinical success in patients with breast and ovarian cancers. Synthetic lethal combinations offer the potential to also target the hitherto "undruggable" mutations that have challenged the cancer field for decades. However, synthetic lethality in clinical cancer therapy is very much still in its infancy, and selecting the most appropriate combinations-or synthetic lethal pairs-is not always an intuitive process. Here, we review some of the recent progress in identifying synthetic lethal combinations and their potential for therapy and highlight some of the tools through which synthetic lethal pairs are identified.

  14. Factors affecting growth and antibiotic susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori: effect of pH and urea on the survival of a wild-type strain and a urease-deficient mutant.

    PubMed

    Sjöström, J E; Larsson, H

    1996-06-01

    This study investigated how pH and the presence of urea affect the survival and growth of Helicobacter pylori and whether these factors affect susceptibility to antibiotics in vitro. The viability of a wild-type strain and a urease-deficient mutant of H. pylori was studied after incubation for 1 h in buffers at different pH values at 37 degrees C under microaerophilic conditions. Viable counts were not affected at pH 5 and pH 7. In buffer at pH 3, there were no viable organisms, but urea (6.25 mM) protected the wild-type strain, which survived well. At pH 9, urea further reduced the viability of H. pylori and flurofamide almost abolished the effect of urea on the wild-type strain. Neither urea nor flurofamide affected the viability of the urease-deficient mutant under the same conditions. Growth was also pH dependent and was enhanced in shake-cultures. At pH 5, urea supported growth of the wild-type strain, but at pH 7 a toxic effect on the bacteria was observed. Growth of H. pylori at pH 5.9 was poor, and susceptibility to amoxycillin, erythromycin and clarithromycin was markedly less than at pH 7.2 and 7.9. The bactericidal activities of metronidazole and tetracycline were similar at the different pH values studied. At neutral pH the killing rates of amoxycillin and clarithromycin were growth rate dependent. Susceptibility to metronidazole was enhanced in stationary cultures. The interaction obtained between the proton pump inhibitor, omeprazole, and amoxycillin at pH 7 was of additive type. These results suggest that pH and growth conditions may be important in the antibacterial efficacy of different antibiotics in vivo and also provide a possible explanation for the potentiating effect of omeprazole with antibiotics in the treatment of H. pylori infections.

  15. Francisella tularensis Schu S4 Lipopolysaccharide Core Sugar and O-Antigen Mutants Are Attenuated in a Mouse Model of Tularemia

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Jed A.; Post, Deborah M. B.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Apicella, Michael A.; Meyerholz, David K.

    2014-01-01

    The virulence factors mediating Francisella pathogenesis are being investigated, with an emphasis on understanding how the organism evades innate immunity mechanisms. Francisella tularensis produces a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that is essentially inert and a polysaccharide capsule that helps the organism to evade detection by components of innate immunity. Using an F. tularensis Schu S4 mutant library, we identified strains that are disrupted for capsule and O-antigen production. These serum-sensitive strains lack both capsule production and O-antigen laddering. Analysis of the predicted protein sequences for the disrupted genes (FTT1236 and FTT1238c) revealed similarity to those for waa (rfa) biosynthetic genes in other bacteria. Mass spectrometry further revealed that these proteins are involved in LPS core sugar biosynthesis and the ligation of O antigen to the LPS core sugars. The 50% lethal dose (LD50) values of these strains are increased 100- to 1,000-fold for mice. Histopathology revealed that the immune response to the F. tularensis mutant strains was significantly different from that observed with wild-type-infected mice. The lung tissue from mutant-infected mice had widespread necrotic debris, but the spleens lacked necrosis and displayed neutrophilia. In contrast, the lungs of wild-type-infected mice had nominal necrosis, but the spleens had widespread necrosis. These data indicate that murine death caused by wild-type strains occurs by a mechanism different from that by which the mutant strains kill mice. Mice immunized with these mutant strains displayed >10-fold protective effects against virulent type A F. tularensis challenge. PMID:24452684

  16. Rest mutant zebrafish swim erratically and display atypical spatial preferences.

    PubMed

    Moravec, Cara E; Li, Edward; Maaswinkel, Hans; Kritzer, Mary F; Weng, Wei; Sirotkin, Howard I

    2015-05-01

    The Rest/Nrsf transcriptional repressor modulates expression of a large set of neural specific genes. Many of these target genes have well characterized roles in nervous system processes including development, plasticity and synaptogenesis. However, the impact of Rest-mediated transcriptional regulation on behavior has been understudied due in part to the embryonic lethality of the mouse knockout. To investigate the requirement for Rest in behavior, we employed the zebrafish rest mutant to explore a range of behaviors in adults and larva. Adult rest mutants of both sexes showed abnormal behaviors in a novel environment including increased vertical swimming, erratic swimming patterns and a proclivity for the tank walls. Adult males also had diminished reproductive success. At 6 days post fertilization (dpf), rest mutant larva were hypoactive, but displayed normal evoked responses to light and sound stimuli. Overall, these results provide evidence that rest dysfunction produces atypical swimming patterns and preferences in adults, and reduced locomotor activity in larvae. This study provides the first behavioral analysis of rest mutants and reveals specific behaviors that are modulated by Rest. PMID:25712696

  17. Functional analysis of an Orc6 mutant in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Balasov, Maxim; Huijbregts, Richard P H; Chesnokov, Igor

    2009-06-30

    The origin recognition complex (ORC) is a 6-subunit complex required for the initiation of DNA replication in eukaryotic organisms. ORC is also involved in other cell functions. The smallest Drosophila ORC subunit, Orc6, is important for both DNA replication and cytokinesis. To study the role of Orc6 in vivo, the orc6 gene was deleted by imprecise excision of P element. Lethal alleles of orc6 are defective in DNA replication and also show abnormal chromosome condensation and segregation. The analysis of cells containing the orc6 deletion revealed that they arrest in both the G(1) and mitotic stages of the cell cycle. Orc6 deletion can be rescued to viability by a full-length Orc6 transgene. The expression of mutant transgenes of Orc6 with deleted or mutated C-terminal domain results in a release of mutant cells from G(1) arrest and restoration of DNA replication, indicating that the DNA replication function of Orc6 is associated with its N-terminal domain. However, these mutant cells accumulate at mitosis, suggesting that the C-terminal domain of Orc6 is important for the passage through the M phase. In a cross-species complementation experiment, the expression of human Orc6 in Drosophila Orc6 mutant cells rescued DNA replication, suggesting that this function of the protein is conserved among metazoans. PMID:19541634

  18. Rest Mutant zebrafish swim erratically and display atypical spatial preferences

    PubMed Central

    Moravec, Cara E.; Li, Edward; Maaswinkel, Hans; Kritzer, Mary F.; Weng, Wei; Sirotkin, Howard I.

    2015-01-01

    The Rest/Nrsf transcriptional repressor modulates expression of a large set of neural specific genes. Many of these target genes have well characterized roles in nervous system processes including development, plasticity and synaptogenesis. However, the impact of Rest-mediated transcriptional regulation on behavior has been understudied due in part to the embryonic lethality of the mouse knockout. To investigate the requirement for Rest in behavior, we employed the zebrafish rest mutant to explore a range of behaviors in adults and larva. Adult rest mutants of both sexes showed abnormal behaviors in a novel environment including increased vertical swimming, erratic swimming patterns and a proclivity for the tank walls. Adult males also had diminished reproductive success. At 6 days post fertilization (dpf), rest mutant larva were hypoactive, but displayed normal evoked responses to light and sound stimuli. Overall, these results provide evidence that rest dysfunction produces atypical swimming patterns and preferences in adults, and reduced locomotor activity in larvae. This study provides the first behavioral analysis of rest mutants and reveals specific behaviors that are modulated by Rest. PMID:25712696

  19. Rest mutant zebrafish swim erratically and display atypical spatial preferences.

    PubMed

    Moravec, Cara E; Li, Edward; Maaswinkel, Hans; Kritzer, Mary F; Weng, Wei; Sirotkin, Howard I

    2015-05-01

    The Rest/Nrsf transcriptional repressor modulates expression of a large set of neural specific genes. Many of these target genes have well characterized roles in nervous system processes including development, plasticity and synaptogenesis. However, the impact of Rest-mediated transcriptional regulation on behavior has been understudied due in part to the embryonic lethality of the mouse knockout. To investigate the requirement for Rest in behavior, we employed the zebrafish rest mutant to explore a range of behaviors in adults and larva. Adult rest mutants of both sexes showed abnormal behaviors in a novel environment including increased vertical swimming, erratic swimming patterns and a proclivity for the tank walls. Adult males also had diminished reproductive success. At 6 days post fertilization (dpf), rest mutant larva were hypoactive, but displayed normal evoked responses to light and sound stimuli. Overall, these results provide evidence that rest dysfunction produces atypical swimming patterns and preferences in adults, and reduced locomotor activity in larvae. This study provides the first behavioral analysis of rest mutants and reveals specific behaviors that are modulated by Rest.

  20. XPO1-dependent nuclear export is a druggable vulnerability in KRAS-mutant lung cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The common participation of oncogenic KRAS proteins in many of the most lethal human cancers, together with the ease of detecting somatic KRAS mutant alleles in patient samples, has spurred persistent and intensive efforts to develop drugs that inhibit KRAS activity.

  1. A synthetic lethal screen identifies a role for the cortical actin patch/endocytosis complex in the response to nutrient deprivation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Care, Alison; Vousden, Katherine A; Binley, Katie M; Radcliffe, Pippa; Trevethick, Janet; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Sudbery, Peter E

    2004-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae whi2Delta cells are unable to halt cell division in response to nutrient limitation and are sensitive to a wide variety of stresses. A synthetic lethal screen resulted in the isolation of siw mutants that had a phenotype similar to that of whi2Delta. Among these were mutations affecting SIW14, FEN2, SLT2, and THR4. Fluid-phase endocytosis is severely reduced or abolished in whi2Delta, siw14Delta, fen2Delta, and thr4Delta mutants. Furthermore, whi2Delta and siw14Delta mutants produce large actin clumps in stationary phase similar to those seen in prk1Delta ark1Delta mutants defective in protein kinases that regulate the actin cytoskeleton. Overexpression of SIW14 in a prk1Delta strain resulted in a loss of cortical actin patches and cables and was lethal. Overexpression of SIW14 also rescued the caffeine sensitivity of the slt2 mutant isolated in the screen, but this was not due to alteration of the phosphorylation state of Slt2. These observations suggest that endocytosis and the organization of the actin cytoskeleton are required for the proper response to nutrient limitation. This hypothesis is supported by the observation that rvs161Delta, sla1Delta, sla2Delta, vrp1Delta, ypt51Delta, ypt52Delta, and end3Delta mutations, which disrupt the organization of the actin cytoskeleton and/or reduce endocytosis, have a phenotype similar to that of whi2Delta mutants. PMID:15020461

  2. Early Cytokine Dysregulation and Viral Replication Are Associated with Mortality During Lethal Influenza Infection

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Alexander J.; Harris, Seth; Marsteller, Nathan; Condon, Shirley A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Infection with influenza A virus (IAV) leads to acute lung injury and possibly fatal complications, especially in immunocompromised, elderly, or chronically infected individuals. Therefore, it is important to study the factors that lead to pathology and mortality in infected hosts. In this report, we analyze immune responses to infection at a sublethal (0.1 LD50) and lethal (1 LD50) dose of the highly pathogenic IAV A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8). Our experiments revealed that infection with a 1 LD50 dose induced peak viral titers at day 2 compared to day 4 in the 0.1 LD50 dose. Moreover, early cytokine dysregulation was observed in the lethal dose with significantly elevated levels of IFN-α, TNF-α, CXCL9, IL-6, and MCP-1 produced at day 2. Early inflammatory responses following infection with 1 LD50 correlated with a greater influx of neutrophils into the lung. However, depletion of neutrophils enhanced morbidity following IAV infection. Though no differences in CD8+ cell function were observed, CD4+ effector responses were impaired in the lungs 8 days after infection with 1 LD50. Histological analysis revealed significant pathology in lethally infected mice at day 2 and day 6 postinfection, when viral titers remained high. Treating lethally infected mice with oseltamivir inhibited viral titers to sublethal levels, and abrogated the pathology associated with the lethal dose. Together, these results suggest that early cytokine dysregulation and viral replication play a role in pulmonary damage and high mortality in lethally infected mice. PMID:24787235

  3. Altered cytoskeletal organization characterized lethal but not surviving Brtl+/- mice: insight on phenotypic variability in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Laura; Gagliardi, Assunta; Maruelli, Silvia; Besio, Roberta; Landi, Claudia; Gioia, Roberta; Kozloff, Kenneth M; Khoury, Basma M; Coucke, Paul J; Symoens, Sofie; Marini, Joan C; Rossi, Antonio; Bini, Luca; Forlino, Antonella

    2015-11-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable bone disease with dominant and recessive transmission. It is characterized by a wide spectrum of clinical outcomes ranging from very mild to lethal in the perinatal period. The intra- and inter-familiar OI phenotypic variability in the presence of an identical molecular defect is still puzzling to the research field. We used the OI murine model Brtl(+/-) to investigate the molecular basis of OI phenotypic variability. Brtl(+/-) resembles classical dominant OI and shows either a moderately severe or a lethal outcome associated with the same Gly349Cys substitution in the α1 chain of type I collagen. A systems biology approach was used. We took advantage of proteomic pathway analysis to functionally link proteins differentially expressed in bone and skin of Brtl(+/-) mice with different outcomes to define possible phenotype modulators. The skin/bone and bone/skin hybrid networks highlighted three focal proteins: vimentin, stathmin and cofilin-1, belonging to or involved in cytoskeletal organization. Abnormal cytoskeleton was indeed demonstrated by immunohistochemistry to occur only in tissues from Brtl(+/-) lethal mice. The aberrant cytoskeleton affected osteoblast proliferation, collagen deposition, integrin and TGF-β signaling with impairment of bone structural properties. Finally, aberrant cytoskeletal assembly was detected in fibroblasts obtained from lethal, but not from non-lethal, OI patients carrying an identical glycine substitution. Our data demonstrated that compromised cytoskeletal assembly impaired both cell signaling and cellular trafficking in mutant lethal mice, altering bone properties. These results point to the cytoskeleton as a phenotypic modulator and potential novel target for OI treatment.

  4. Adiposity induces lethal cytokine storm after systemic administration of stimulatory immunotherapy regimens in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Mirsoian, Annie; Bouchlaka, Myriam N.; Sckisel, Gail D.; Chen, Mingyi; Pai, Chien-Chun Steven; Maverakis, Emanuel; Spencer, Richard G.; Fishbein, Kenneth W.; Siddiqui, Sana; Monjazeb, Arta M.; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart; Hesdorffer, Charles; Ferrucci, Luigi; Longo, Dan L.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Wiltrout, Robert H.; Taub, Dennis D.

    2014-01-01

    Aging is a contributing factor in cancer occurrence. We recently demonstrated that systemic immunotherapy (IT) administration in aged, but not young, mice resulted in induction of rapid and lethal cytokine storm. We found that aging was accompanied by increases in visceral fat similar to that seen in young obese (ob/ob or diet-induced obese [DIO]) mice. Yet, the effects of aging and obesity on inflammatory responses to immunotherapeutics are not well defined. We determine the effects of adiposity on systemic IT tolerance in aged compared with young obese mice. Both young ob/ob- and DIO-generated proinflammatory cytokine levels and organ pathologies are comparable to those in aged ad libitum mice after IT, culminating in lethality. Young obese mice exhibited greater ratios of M1/M2 macrophages within the peritoneal and visceral adipose tissues and higher percentages of TNF+ macrophages in response to αCD40/IL-2 as compared with young lean mice. Macrophage depletion or TNF blockade in conjunction with αCD40/IL-2 prevented cytokine storms in young obese mice and protected from lethality. Calorie-restricted aged mice contain less visceral fat and displayed reduced cytokine levels, protection from organ pathology, and protection from lethality upon αCD40/IL-2 administration. Our data demonstrate that adiposity is a critical factor in the age-associated pathological responses to systemic anti-cancer IT. PMID:25366964

  5. Identification of Arabidopsis rat Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yanmin; Nam, Jaesung; Humara, Jaime M.; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Lee, Lan-Ying; Cao, Hongbin; Valentine, Lisa; Li, Jingling; Kaiser, Anthony D.; Kopecky, Andrea L.; Hwang, Hau-Hsuan; Bhattacharjee, Saikat; Rao, Praveen K.; Tzfira, Tzvi; Rajagopal, Jyothi; Yi, HoChul; Veena; Yadav, Badam S.; Crane, Yan M.; Lin, Kui; Larcher, Yves; Gelvin, Matthew J.K.; Knue, Marnie; Ramos, Cynthia; Zhao, Xiaowen; Davis, Susan J.; Kim, Sang-Ic; Ranjith-Kumar, C.T.; Choi, Yoo-Jin; Hallan, Vipin K.; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Sui, Xiangzhen; Ziemienowicz, Alicja; Matthysse, Ann G.; Citovsky, Vitaly; Hohn, Barbara; Gelvin, Stanton B.

    2003-01-01

    Limited knowledge currently exists regarding the roles of plant genes and proteins in the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation process. To understand the host contribution to transformation, we carried out root-based transformation assays to identify Arabidopsis mutants that are resistant to Agrobacterium transformation (rat mutants). To date, we have identified 126 rat mutants by screening libraries of T-DNA insertion mutants and by using various “reverse genetic” approaches. These mutants disrupt expression of genes of numerous categories, including chromatin structural and remodeling genes, and genes encoding proteins implicated in nuclear targeting, cell wall structure and metabolism, cytoskeleton structure and function, and signal transduction. Here, we present an update on the identification and characterization of these rat mutants. PMID:12805582

  6. ECB deacylase mutants

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Frances H.; Shao, Zhixin; Zhao, Huimin; Giver, Lorraine J.

    2002-01-01

    A method for in vitro mutagenesis and recombination of polynucleotide sequences based on polymerase-catalyzed extension of primer oligonucleotides is disclosed. The method involves priming template polynucleotide(s) with random-sequences or defined-sequence primers to generate a pool of short DNA fragments with a low level of point mutations. The DNA fragments are subjected to denaturization followed by annealing and further enzyme-catalyzed DNA polymerization. This procedure is repeated a sufficient number of times to produce full-length genes which comprise mutants of the original template polynucleotides. These genes can be further amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and cloned into a vector for expression of the encoded proteins.

  7. The Wiggle Index: An Open Source Bioassay to Assess Sub-Lethal Insecticide Response in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Denecke, Shane; Nowell, Cameron J; Fournier-Level, Alexandre; Perry, Trent; Batterham, Phil

    2015-01-01

    Toxicological assays measuring mortality are routinely used to describe insecticide response, but sub-lethal exposures to insecticides can select for resistance and yield additional biological information describing the ways in which an insecticide impacts the insect. Here we present the Wiggle Index (WI), a high-throughput method to quantify insecticide response by measuring the reduction in motility during sub-lethal exposures in larvae of the vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster. A susceptible wild type strain was exposed to the insecticides chlorantraniliprole, imidacloprid, spinosad, and ivermectin. Each insecticide reduced larval motility, but response times and profiles differed among insecticides. Two sets of target site mutants previously identified in mortality studies on the basis of imidacloprid or spinosad resistance phenotypes were tested. In each case the resistant mutant responded significantly less than the control. The WI was also able to detect a spinosad response in the absence of the primary spinosad target site. This response was not detected in mortality assays suggesting that spinosad, like many other insecticides, may have secondary targets affecting behaviour. The ability of the WI to detect changes in insecticide metabolism was confirmed by overexpressing the imidacloprid metabolizing Cyp6g1 gene in digestive tissues or the central nervous system. The data presented here validate the WI as an inexpensive, generic, sub-lethal assay that can complement information gained from mortality assays, extending our understanding of the genetic basis of insecticide response in D. melanogaster.

  8. The Wiggle Index: An Open Source Bioassay to Assess Sub-Lethal Insecticide Response in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Denecke, Shane; Nowell, Cameron J.; Fournier-Level, Alexandre; Perry, Trent; Batterham, Phil

    2015-01-01

    Toxicological assays measuring mortality are routinely used to describe insecticide response, but sub-lethal exposures to insecticides can select for resistance and yield additional biological information describing the ways in which an insecticide impacts the insect. Here we present the Wiggle Index (WI), a high-throughput method to quantify insecticide response by measuring the reduction in motility during sub-lethal exposures in larvae of the vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster. A susceptible wild type strain was exposed to the insecticides chlorantraniliprole, imidacloprid, spinosad, and ivermectin. Each insecticide reduced larval motility, but response times and profiles differed among insecticides. Two sets of target site mutants previously identified in mortality studies on the basis of imidacloprid or spinosad resistance phenotypes were tested. In each case the resistant mutant responded significantly less than the control. The WI was also able to detect a spinosad response in the absence of the primary spinosad target site. This response was not detected in mortality assays suggesting that spinosad, like many other insecticides, may have secondary targets affecting behaviour. The ability of the WI to detect changes in insecticide metabolism was confirmed by overexpressing the imidacloprid metabolizing Cyp6g1 gene in digestive tissues or the central nervous system. The data presented here validate the WI as an inexpensive, generic, sub-lethal assay that can complement information gained from mortality assays, extending our understanding of the genetic basis of insecticide response in D. melanogaster. PMID:26684454

  9. Lethal photosensitization of biofilm-grown bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Michael

    1997-12-01

    Antibacterial agents are increasingly being used for the prophylaxis and treatment of oral diseases. As these agents can be rendered ineffective by resistance development in the target organisms there is a need to develop alternative antimicrobial approaches. Light-activated antimicrobial agents release singlet oxygen and free radicals which can kill adjacent bacteria and a wide range of cariogenic and periodontopathogenic bacteria has been shown to be susceptible to such agents. In the oral cavity these organisms are present as biofilms (dental plaques) which are less susceptible to traditional antimicrobial agents than bacterial suspensions. The results of these studies have shown that biofilm-grown oral bacteria are also susceptible to lethal photosensitization although the light energy doses required are grater than those needed to kill the organisms when they are grown as aqueous suspensions.

  10. Alleged lethal sorcery in East Timor.

    PubMed

    Pollanen, Michael S

    2004-01-01

    A wide range of cultural and social perspectives exists on the concept of sudden and unexpected death. In countries, without a formal system of death investigation, sudden death is shrouded in mysticism often based on traditional belief systems. This cultural perspective on sudden death is often at variance with medical and forensic concepts and may include explanations such as sorcery, magic, and voodoo. In this case report, the postmortem findings in an alleged victim of lethal 'black magic', known as ema halo by the indigenous people of East Timor, is described. The alleged victim died suddenly in front of witnesses. At autopsy, marked dilation of a bicuspid aortic valve with annuloaortic ectasia and a sinus of Valsalva aneurysm was found after exhumation of the body. The findings mitigated the local belief in witchcraft and established a natural manner of death.

  11. Ants defend aphids against lethal disease.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Charlotte; Agrawal, Anurag A; Hajek, Ann E

    2010-04-23

    Social insects defend their own colonies and some species also protect their mutualist partners. In mutualisms with aphids, ants typically feed on honeydew produced by aphids and, in turn guard and shelter aphid colonies from insect natural enemies. Here we report that Formica podzolica ants tending milkweed aphids, Aphis asclepiadis, protect aphid colonies from lethal fungal infections caused by an obligate aphid pathogen, Pandora neoaphidis. In field experiments, bodies of fungal-killed aphids were quickly removed from ant-tended aphid colonies. Ant workers were also able to detect infective conidia on the cuticle of living aphids and responded by either removing or grooming these aphids. Our results extend the long-standing view of ants as mutualists and protectors of aphids by demonstrating focused sanitizing and quarantining behaviour that may lead to reduced disease transmission in aphid colonies.

  12. Collagen defects in lethal perinatal osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Bateman, J F; Chan, D; Mascara, T; Rogers, J G; Cole, W G

    1986-12-15

    Quantitative and qualitative abnormalities of collagen were observed in tissues and fibroblast cultures from 17 consecutive cases of lethal perinatal osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). The content of type I collagen was reduced in OI dermis and bone and the content of type III collagen was also reduced in the dermis. Normal bone contained 99.3% type I and 0.7% type V collagen whereas OI bone contained a lower proportion of type I, a greater proportion of type V and a significant amount of type III collagen. The type III and V collagens appeared to be structurally normal. In contrast, abnormal type I collagen chains, which migrated slowly on electrophoresis, were observed in all babies with OI. Cultured fibroblasts from five babies produced a mixture of normal and abnormal type I collagens; the abnormal collagen was not secreted in two cases and was slowly secreted in the others. Fibroblasts from 12 babies produced only abnormal type I collagens and they were also secreted slowly. The slower electrophoretic migration of the abnormal chains was due to enzymic overmodification of the lysine residues. The distribution of the cyanogen bromide peptides containing the overmodified residues was used to localize the underlying structural abnormalities to three regions of the type I procollagen chains. These regions included the carboxy-propeptide of the pro alpha 1(I)-chain, the helical alpha 1(I) CB7 peptide and the helical alpha 1(I) CB8 and CB3 peptides. In one baby a basic charge mutation was observed in the alpha 1(I) CB7 peptide and in another baby a basic charge mutation was observed in the alpha 1(I) CB8 peptide. The primary defects in lethal perinatal OI appear to reside in the type I collagen chains. Type III and V collagens did not appear to compensate for the deficiency of type I collagen in the tissues.

  13. Identification of the Abundant Hydroxyproline-Rich Glycoproteins in the Root Walls of Wild-Type Arabidopsis, an ext3 Mutant Line, and Its Phenotypic Revertant

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuning; Ye, Dening; Held, Michael A.; Cannon, Maura C.; Ray, Tui; Saha, Prasenjit; Frye, Alexandra N.; Mort, Andrew J.; Kieliszewski, Marcia J.

    2015-01-01

    Extensins are members of the cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein (HRGP) superfamily that form covalently cross-linked networks in primary cell walls. A knockout mutation in EXT3 (AT1G21310), the gene coding EXTENSIN 3 (EXT3) in Arabidopsis Landsberg erecta resulted in a lethal phenotype, although about 20% of the knockout plants have an apparently normal phenotype (ANP). In this study the root cell wall HRGP components of wild-type, ANP and the ext3 mutant seedlings were characterized by peptide fractionation of trypsin digested anhydrous hydrogen fluoride deglycosylated wall residues and by sequencing using LC-MS/MS. Several HRGPs, including EXT3, were identified in the wild-type root walls but not in walls of the ANP and lethal mutant. Indeed the ANP walls and walls of mutants displaying the lethal phenotype possessed HRGPs, but the profiles suggest that changes in the amount and perhaps type may account for the corresponding phenotypes. PMID:27135319

  14. Nondisjunction Mutants of the Nematode CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkin, Jonathan; Horvitz, H. Robert; Brenner, Sydney

    1979-01-01

    The frequency of males (5AA; XO) among the self progeny of wild-type Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodites (5AA; XX) is about one in 500. Fifteen him (for "high incidence of males") mutations have been identified that increase this frequency by a factor of ten to 150, as a result of increased X-chromosome nondisjunction. The mutations define ten complementation groups, which have been mapped: nine are autosomal, and one sex linked. Most of the mutants are superficially wild type in anatomy and behavior; however, him-4 mutants display gonadal abnormalities, and unc-86 mutants, which have a Him phenotype, exhibit a variety of anatomical and behavioral abnormalities. All the mutants segregate fertile 3X hermaphrodite progeny as well as XO male progeny. Some produce large numbers of inviable zygotes. Mutants in all ten genes produce diplo-X and nullo-X exceptional ova, and in the four strains tested, diplo-X and nullo-X exceptional sperm are produced by 2X "transformed" males. It appears likely that most of the mutants have defects in both gamete lines of the hermaphrodite. XO males of him strains other than him-4 and unc-86 are similar to wild-type males in anatomy and behavior, and all produce equal or almost equal numbers of haplo-X and nullo-X sperm, and no diplo-X sperm. Male fertility is reduced to varying extents in all him mutants. In four of the strains, nondisjunction during oogenesis has been shown to occur at a reductional division, and in three of these strains, abnormalities in recombination have been demonstrated. One mutant also exhibits autosomal nondisjunction, but many of the others probably do not. Therefore, the X chromosome of C. elegans may differ from the autosomes in the mechanisms controlling its meiotic behavior.——3X hermaphrodites are shorter and less fertile than 2X hermaphrodites, and they produce many inviable zygotes among their self progeny: these are probably 4X zygotes. Haplo-X and diplo-X ova are produced in 2:1 ratio by 3X

  15. Characterization of New Punch Mutations: Identification of Two Additional Mutant Classes

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, E. R.; O'Donnell, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    The Punch locus of Drosophila melanogaster which encodes the pteridine biosynthetic enzyme, GTP cyclohydrolase, is genetically complex. Lethal alleles of the locus resolve into an array of interallelic complementation groups, and at least one class of mutations is developmentally specific, affecting GTP cyclohydrolase activity only in the heads of adults. All previously isolated Punch alleles were identified on the basis of a mutant eye color phenotype. By screening mutagenized chromosomes over Punch region deficiencies, we have now isolated new alleles on the basis of lethal and visible phenotypes. Most of these alleles fall into previously identified genetic classes, but two new classes of mutations were also found. One class contains two alleles that behave as dominant lethal mutations in some genetic backgrounds. The other class represents a second developmentally specific set of alleles that affect the function of the Punch locus only during embryogenesis. PMID:3136053

  16. Syn-lethality: an integrative knowledge base of synthetic lethality towards discovery of selective anticancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-juan; Mishra, Shital K; Wu, Min; Zhang, Fan; Zheng, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic lethality (SL) is a novel strategy for anticancer therapies, whereby mutations of two genes will kill a cell but mutation of a single gene will not. Therefore, a cancer-specific mutation combined with a drug-induced mutation, if they have SL interactions, will selectively kill cancer cells. While numerous SL interactions have been identified in yeast, only a few have been known in human. There is a pressing need to systematically discover and understand SL interactions specific to human cancer. In this paper, we present Syn-Lethality, the first integrative knowledge base of SL that is dedicated to human cancer. It integrates experimentally discovered and verified human SL gene pairs into a network, associated with annotations of gene function, pathway, and molecular mechanisms. It also includes yeast SL genes from high-throughput screenings which are mapped to orthologous human genes. Such an integrative knowledge base, organized as a relational database with user interface for searching and network visualization, will greatly expedite the discovery of novel anticancer drug targets based on synthetic lethality interactions. The database can be downloaded as a stand-alone Java application.

  17. Chronic exposure of corals to fine sediments: lethal and sub-lethal impacts.

    PubMed

    Flores, Florita; Hoogenboom, Mia O; Smith, Luke D; Cooper, Timothy F; Abrego, David; Negri, Andrew P

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the sedimentation and turbidity thresholds for corals is critical in assessing the potential impacts of dredging projects in tropical marine systems. In this study, we exposed two species of coral sampled from offshore locations to six levels of total suspended solids (TSS) for 16 weeks in the laboratory, including a 4 week recovery period. Dose-response relationships were developed to quantify the lethal and sub-lethal thresholds of sedimentation and turbidity for the corals. The sediment treatments affected the horizontal foliaceous species (Montipora aequituberculata) more than the upright branching species (Acropora millepora). The lowest sediment treatments that caused full colony mortality were 30 mg l(-1) TSS (25 mg cm(-2) day(-1)) for M. aequituberculata and 100 mg l(-1) TSS (83 mg cm(-2) day(-1)) for A. millepora after 12 weeks. Coral mortality generally took longer than 4 weeks and was closely related to sediment accumulation on the surface of the corals. While measurements of damage to photosystem II in the symbionts and reductions in lipid content and growth indicated sub-lethal responses in surviving corals, the most reliable predictor of coral mortality in this experiment was long-term sediment accumulation on coral tissue. PMID:22662225

  18. Syn-Lethality: An Integrative Knowledge Base of Synthetic Lethality towards Discovery of Selective Anticancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-juan; Mishra, Shital K.; Wu, Min; Zhang, Fan

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic lethality (SL) is a novel strategy for anticancer therapies, whereby mutations of two genes will kill a cell but mutation of a single gene will not. Therefore, a cancer-specific mutation combined with a drug-induced mutation, if they have SL interactions, will selectively kill cancer cells. While numerous SL interactions have been identified in yeast, only a few have been known in human. There is a pressing need to systematically discover and understand SL interactions specific to human cancer. In this paper, we present Syn-Lethality, the first integrative knowledge base of SL that is dedicated to human cancer. It integrates experimentally discovered and verified human SL gene pairs into a network, associated with annotations of gene function, pathway, and molecular mechanisms. It also includes yeast SL genes from high-throughput screenings which are mapped to orthologous human genes. Such an integrative knowledge base, organized as a relational database with user interface for searching and network visualization, will greatly expedite the discovery of novel anticancer drug targets based on synthetic lethality interactions. The database can be downloaded as a stand-alone Java application. PMID:24864230

  19. Chronic Exposure of Corals to Fine Sediments: Lethal and Sub-Lethal Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Florita; Hoogenboom, Mia O.; Smith, Luke D.; Cooper, Timothy F.; Abrego, David; Negri, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the sedimentation and turbidity thresholds for corals is critical in assessing the potential impacts of dredging projects in tropical marine systems. In this study, we exposed two species of coral sampled from offshore locations to six levels of total suspended solids (TSS) for 16 weeks in the laboratory, including a 4 week recovery period. Dose-response relationships were developed to quantify the lethal and sub-lethal thresholds of sedimentation and turbidity for the corals. The sediment treatments affected the horizontal foliaceous species (Montipora aequituberculata) more than the upright branching species (Acropora millepora). The lowest sediment treatments that caused full colony mortality were 30 mg l−1 TSS (25 mg cm−2 day−1) for M. aequituberculata and 100 mg l−1 TSS (83 mg cm−2 day−1) for A. millepora after 12 weeks. Coral mortality generally took longer than 4 weeks and was closely related to sediment accumulation on the surface of the corals. While measurements of damage to photosystem II in the symbionts and reductions in lipid content and growth indicated sub-lethal responses in surviving corals, the most reliable predictor of coral mortality in this experiment was long-term sediment accumulation on coral tissue. PMID:22662225

  20. A novel histone H4 mutant defective in nuclear division and mitotic chromosome transmission.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M M; Yang, P; Santisteban, M S; Boone, P W; Goldstein, A T; Megee, P C

    1996-01-01

    The histone proteins are essential for the assembly and function of th e eukaryotic chromosome. Here we report the first isolation of a temperature-sensitive lethal histone H4 mutant defective in mitotic chromosome transmission Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The mutant requires two amino acid substitutions in histone H4: a lethal Thr-to-Ile change at position 82, which lies within one of the DNA-binding surfaces of the protein, and a substitution of Ala to Val at position 89 that is an intragenic suppressor. Genetic and biochemical evidence shows that the mutant histone H4 is temperature sensitive for function but not for synthesis, deposition, or stability. The chromatin structure of 2 micrometer circle minichromosomes is temperature sensitive in vivo, consistent with a defect in H4-DNA interactions. The mutant also has defects in transcription, displaying weak Spt- phenotypes. At the restrictive temperature, mutant cells arrest in the cell cycle at nuclear division, with a large bud, a single nucleus with 2C DNA content, and a short bipolar spindle. At semipermissive temperatures, the frequency of chromosome loss is elevated 60-fold in the mutant while DNA recombination frequencies are unaffected. High-copy CSE4, encoding an H3 variant related to the mammalian CENP-A kinetochore antigen, was found to suppress the temperature sensitivity of the mutant without suppressing the Spt- transcription defect. These genetic, biochemical, and phenotypic results indicate that this novel histone H4 mutant defines one or more chromatin-dependent steps in chromosome segregation. PMID:8622646

  1. Characterization of Francisella tularensis Schu S4 defined mutants as live-attenuated vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Araceli E; Mann, Barbara J; Qin, Aiping; Cunningham, Aimee L; Cole, Leah E; Grassel, Christen; Vogel, Stefanie N; Levine, Myron M; Barry, Eileen M

    2015-08-01

    Francisella tularensis (Ft), the etiological agent of tularemia and a Tier 1 select agent, has been previously weaponized and remains a high priority for vaccine development. Ft tularensis (type A) and Ft holarctica (type B) cause most human disease. We selected six attenuating genes from the live vaccine strain (LVS; type B), F. novicida and other intracellular bacteria: FTT0507, FTT0584, FTT0742, FTT1019c (guaA), FTT1043 (mip) and FTT1317c (guaB) and created unmarked deletion mutants of each in the highly human virulent Ft strain Schu S4 (Type A) background. FTT0507, FTT0584, FTT0742 and FTT1043 Schu S4 mutants were not attenuated for virulence in vitro or in vivo. In contrast, Schu S4 gua mutants were unable to replicate in murine macrophages and were attenuated in vivo, with an i.n. LD50 > 10(5) CFU in C57BL/6 mice. However, the gua mutants failed to protect mice against lethal challenge with WT Schu S4, despite demonstrating partial protection in rabbits in a previous study. These results contrast with the highly protective capacity of LVS gua mutants against a lethal LVS challenge in mice, and underscore differences between these strains and the animal models in which they are evaluated, and therefore have important implications for vaccine development.

  2. A genetic screen for zygotic embryonic lethal mutations affecting cuticular morphology in the wasp Nasonia vitripennis.

    PubMed Central

    Pultz, M A; Zimmerman, K K; Alto, N M; Kaeberlein, M; Lange, S K; Pitt, J N; Reeves, N L; Zehrung, D L

    2000-01-01

    We have screened for zygotic embryonic lethal mutations affecting cuticular morphology in Nasonia vitripennis (Hymenoptera; Chalcidoidea). Our broad goal was to investigate the use of Nasonia for genetically surveying conservation and change in regulatory gene systems, as a means to understand the diversity of developmental strategies that have arisen during the course of evolution. Specifically, we aim to compare anteroposterior patterning gene functions in two long germ band insects, Nasonia and Drosophila. In Nasonia, unfertilized eggs develop as haploid males while fertilized eggs develop as diploid females, so the entire genome can be screened for recessive zygotic mutations by examining the progeny of F1 females. We describe 74 of >100 lines with embryonic cuticular mutant phenotypes, including representatives of coordinate, gap, pair-rule, segment polarity, homeotic, and Polycomb group functions, as well as mutants with novel phenotypes not directly comparable to those of known Drosophila genes. We conclude that Nasonia is a tractable experimental organism for comparative developmental genetic study. The mutants isolated here have begun to outline the extent of conservation and change in the genetic programs controlling embryonic patterning in Nasonia and Drosophila. PMID:10866651

  3. Mutations in KIAA0586 Cause Lethal Ciliopathies Ranging from a Hydrolethalus Phenotype to Short-Rib Polydactyly Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Alby, Caroline; Piquand, Kevin; Huber, Céline; Megarbané, André; Ichkou, Amale; Legendre, Marine; Pelluard, Fanny; Encha-Ravazi, Ferechté; Abi-Tayeh, Georges; Bessières, Bettina; El Chehadeh-Djebbar, Salima; Laurent, Nicole; Faivre, Laurence; Sztriha, László; Zombor, Melinda; Szabó, Hajnalka; Failler, Marion; Garfa-Traore, Meriem; Bole, Christine; Nitschké, Patrick; Nizon, Mathilde; Elkhartoufi, Nadia; Clerget-Darpoux, Françoise; Munnich, Arnold; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Vekemans, Michel; Saunier, Sophie; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Thomas, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    KIAA0586, the human ortholog of chicken TALPID3, is a centrosomal protein that is essential for primary ciliogenesis. Its disruption in animal models causes defects attributed to abnormal hedgehog signaling; these defects include polydactyly and abnormal dorsoventral patterning of the neural tube. Here, we report homozygous mutations of KIAA0586 in four families affected by lethal ciliopathies ranging from a hydrolethalus phenotype to short-rib polydactyly. We show defective ciliogenesis, as well as abnormal response to SHH-signaling activation in cells derived from affected individuals, consistent with a role of KIAA0586 in primary cilia biogenesis. Whereas centriolar maturation seemed unaffected in mutant cells, we observed an abnormal extended pattern of CEP290, a centriolar satellite protein previously associated with ciliopathies. Our data show the crucial role of KIAA0586 in human primary ciliogenesis and subsequent abnormal hedgehog signaling through abnormal GLI3 processing. Our results thus establish that KIAA0586 mutations cause lethal ciliopathies. PMID:26166481

  4. Mutations in KIAA0586 Cause Lethal Ciliopathies Ranging from a Hydrolethalus Phenotype to Short-Rib Polydactyly Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alby, Caroline; Piquand, Kevin; Huber, Céline; Megarbané, André; Ichkou, Amale; Legendre, Marine; Pelluard, Fanny; Encha-Ravazi, Ferechté; Abi-Tayeh, Georges; Bessières, Bettina; El Chehadeh-Djebbar, Salima; Laurent, Nicole; Faivre, Laurence; Sztriha, László; Zombor, Melinda; Szabó, Hajnalka; Failler, Marion; Garfa-Traore, Meriem; Bole, Christine; Nitschké, Patrick; Nizon, Mathilde; Elkhartoufi, Nadia; Clerget-Darpoux, Françoise; Munnich, Arnold; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Vekemans, Michel; Saunier, Sophie; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Thomas, Sophie

    2015-08-01

    KIAA0586, the human ortholog of chicken TALPID3, is a centrosomal protein that is essential for primary ciliogenesis. Its disruption in animal models causes defects attributed to abnormal hedgehog signaling; these defects include polydactyly and abnormal dorsoventral patterning of the neural tube. Here, we report homozygous mutations of KIAA0586 in four families affected by lethal ciliopathies ranging from a hydrolethalus phenotype to short-rib polydactyly. We show defective ciliogenesis, as well as abnormal response to SHH-signaling activation in cells derived from affected individuals, consistent with a role of KIAA0586 in primary cilia biogenesis. Whereas centriolar maturation seemed unaffected in mutant cells, we observed an abnormal extended pattern of CEP290, a centriolar satellite protein previously associated with ciliopathies. Our data show the crucial role of KIAA0586 in human primary ciliogenesis and subsequent abnormal hedgehog signaling through abnormal GLI3 processing. Our results thus establish that KIAA0586 mutations cause lethal ciliopathies. PMID:26166481

  5. Molybdenum cofactor deficiency causes translucent integument, male-biased lethality, and flaccid paralysis in the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Tsuguru; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Banno, Yutaka

    2016-06-01

    Uric acid accumulates in the epidermis of Bombyx mori larvae and renders the larval integument opaque and white. Yamamoto translucent (oya) is a novel spontaneous mutant with a translucent larval integument and unique phenotypic characteristics, such as male-biased lethality and flaccid larval paralysis. Xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) that requires a molybdenum cofactor (MoCo) for its activity is a key enzyme for uric acid synthesis. It has been observed that injection of a bovine xanthine oxidase, which corresponds functionally to XDH and contains its own MoCo activity, changes the integuments of oya mutants from translucent to opaque and white. This finding suggests that XDH/MoCo activity might be defective in oya mutants. Our linkage analysis identified an association between the oya locus and chromosome 23. Because XDH is not linked to chromosome 23 in B. mori, MoCo appears to be defective in oya mutants. In eukaryotes, MoCo is synthesized by a conserved biosynthesis pathway governed by four loci (MOCS1, MOCS2, MOCS3, and GEPH). Through a candidate gene approach followed by sequence analysis, a 6-bp deletion was detected in an exon of the B. mori molybdenum cofactor synthesis-step 1 gene (BmMOCS1) in the oya strain. Moreover, recombination was not observed between the oya and BmMOCS1 loci. These results indicate that the BmMOCS1 locus is responsible for the oya locus. Finally, we discuss the potential cause of male-biased lethality and flaccid paralysis observed in the oya mutants.

  6. Chinese hamster ovary cell mutants defective in heparan sulfate biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bame, K.J.; Kiser, C.S.; Esko, J.D.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have isolated Chinese hamster ovary cell mutants defective in proteoglycan synthesis by radiographic screening for cells unable to incorporate TVSO4 into acid-precipitable material. Some mutants did not incorporate TVSO4 into acid-precipitable material, whereas others incorporated about 3-fold less radioactivity. HPLC anion exchange chromatographic analysis of radiolabelled glycosaminoglycans isolated from these mutants revealed many are defective in heparan sulfate biosynthesis. Mutants 803 and 677 do not synthesize heparan sulfate, although they produce chondroitin sulfate: strain 803 makes chondroitin sulfate normally, whereas 677 overaccumulates chondroitin sulfate by a factor of three. These mutants fall into the same complementation group, suggesting that the mutations are allelic. A second group of heparan sulfate biosynthetic mutants, consisting of cell lines 625, 668 and 679, produce undersulfated heparan sulfate and normal chondroitin sulfate. Treatment of the chains with nitrous acid should determine the position of the sulfate groups along the chain. These mutants may define a complementation group that is defective in the enzymes which modify the heparan sulfate chain. To increase the authors repertoire of heparan sulfate mutants, they are presently developing an in situ enzyme assay to screen colonies replica plated on filter discs for sulfotransferase defects.

  7. An Autopsy Case of Two Distinct, Acquired Drug Resistance Mechanisms in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-mutant Lung Adenocarcinoma: Small Cell Carcinoma Transformation and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor T790M Mutation.

    PubMed

    Furugen, Makoto; Uechi, Kayoko; Hirai, Jun; Aoyama, Hajime; Saio, Masanao; Yoshimi, Naoki; Kinjo, Takeshi; Miyagi, Kazuya; Haranaga, Shusaku; Higa, Futoshi; Tateyama, Masao; Fujita, Jiro

    2015-01-01

    We herein describe the case of a 63-year-old man who died from relapsed epidermal growth factor receptor gene (EGFR) exon 19 deletion lung adenocarcinoma treated with erlotinib. According to the autopsy results, he was confirmed to have small cell carcinoma without the EGFR T790M mutation in his pancreas and left kidney metastatic specimens, while the adenocarcinoma metastatic lesion in his right kidney had the EGFR T790M mutation; both retained the somatic EGFR exon 19 deletion. We herein report an autopsy case of resistance to an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor via small cell carcinoma transformation and the EGFRT790M mutation in separate metastatic organs. PMID:26424310

  8. Elucidation of the Photorhabdus temperata Genome and Generation of a Transposon Mutant Library To Identify Motility Mutants Altered in Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Sheldon; Rowedder, Holli; Michaels, Brandye; Bullock, Hannah; Jackobeck, Ryan; Abebe-Akele, Feseha; Durakovic, Umjia; Gately, Jon; Janicki, Erik

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis bacteriophora forms a specific mutualistic association with its bacterial partner Photorhabdus temperata. The microbial symbiont is required for nematode growth and development, and symbiont recognition is strain specific. The aim of this study was to sequence the genome of P. temperata and identify genes that plays a role in the pathogenesis of the Photorhabdus-Heterorhabditis symbiosis. A draft genome sequence of P. temperata strain NC19 was generated. The 5.2-Mb genome was organized into 17 scaffolds and contained 4,808 coding sequences (CDS). A genetic approach was also pursued to identify mutants with altered motility. A bank of 10,000 P. temperata transposon mutants was generated and screened for altered motility patterns. Five classes of motility mutants were identified: (i) nonmotile mutants, (ii) mutants with defective or aberrant swimming motility, (iii) mutant swimmers that do not require NaCl or KCl, (iv) hyperswimmer mutants that swim at an accelerated rate, and (v) hyperswarmer mutants that are able to swarm on the surface of 1.25% agar. The transposon insertion sites for these mutants were identified and used to investigate other physiological properties, including insect pathogenesis. The motility-defective mutant P13-7 had an insertion in the RNase II gene and showed reduced virulence and production of extracellular factors. Genetic complementation of this mutant restored wild-type activity. These results demonstrate a role for RNA turnover in insect pathogenesis and other physiological functions. IMPORTANCE The relationship between Photorhabdus and entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis represents a well-known mutualistic system that has potential as a biological control agent. The elucidation of the genome of the bacterial partner and role that RNase II plays in its life cycle has provided a greater understanding of Photorhabdus as both an insect pathogen and a nematode symbiont. PMID

  9. Lethal body burdens of polar narcotics: Chlorophenols

    SciTech Connect

    Wezel, A.P. van; Punte, S.S.; Opperhuizen, A.

    1995-09-01

    The goal of the present study was to measure in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) the lethal body burden (LBB) of three chlorophenols that are known as polar narcotic chemicals. The LBBs of the chlorophenols were compared to LBBs of nonpolar narcotic chemicals to consider if the two classes of narcotic chemicals differ on a body burden level. The LBB of the most acidic chlorophenol was measured at two different levels of pH exposure to determine the influence of the degree of ionization on the magnitude of the LBB. Both n-octanol/water partition coefficients and n-hexane/water partition coefficients of the chlorophenols were determined at different pH levels to consider the influence of ionization on the partition coefficient and to determine the importance of a polar group in the organic phase on the partitioning behavior. Partitioning to n-octanol and n-hexane was used as input in a model to simulate the equilibrium partitioning between hydrophobic and nonhydrophobic and target and nontarget compartments in the fish.

  10. Tumor clone dynamics in lethal prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Suzanne; Romanel, Alessandro; Goodall, Jane; Grist, Emily; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Miranda, Susana; Prandi, Davide; Lorente, David; Frenel, Jean-Sebastien; Pezaro, Carmel; Omlin, Aurelius; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Flohr, Penelope; Tunariu, Nina; S de Bono, Johann; Demichelis, Francesca; Attard, Gerhardt

    2014-09-17

    It is unclear whether a single clone metastasizes and remains dominant over the course of lethal prostate cancer. We describe the clonal architectural heterogeneity at different stages of disease progression by sequencing serial plasma and tumor samples from 16 ERG-positive patients. By characterizing the clonality of commonly occurring deletions at 21q22, 8p21, and 10q23, we identified multiple independent clones in metastatic disease that are differentially represented in tissue and circulation. To exemplify the clinical utility of our studies, we then showed a temporal association between clinical progression and emergence of androgen receptor (AR) mutations activated by glucocorticoids in about 20% of patients progressing on abiraterone and prednisolone or dexamethasone. Resistant clones showed a complex dynamic with temporal and spatial heterogeneity, suggesting distinct mechanisms of resistance at different sites that emerged and regressed depending on treatment selection pressure. This introduces a management paradigm requiring sequential monitoring of advanced prostate cancer patients with plasma and tumor biopsies to ensure early discontinuation of agents when they become potential disease drivers.

  11. Predictors of Lethality in Severe Leptospirosis in Urban Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Spichler, Anne S.; Vilaça, Pedro J.; Athanazio, Daniel A.; Albuquerque, Jose O. M.; Buzzar, Marcia; Castro, Bronislawa; Seguro, Antonio; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2009-01-01

    To ascertain prognostic factors associated with fatal outcomes in severe leptospirosis, a retrospective case-control study was done using population-based surveillance data. Centralized death certificate reporting of leptospirosis mortality was combined with details of patients’ hospitalizations, which were obtained from hospitals representing all sectors of São Paulo city. Among identified leptospirosis cases, 89 lethal cases and 281 survivor cases were analyzed. Predictors of death included age > 40 years, development of oliguria, platelet count < 70,000/µL, creatinine > 3 mg/dL, and pulmonary involvement. The latter was the strongest risk factor with an estimated odds ratio of 6.0 (95% confidence interval: 3.0–12.0). Serologic findings with highest titer against Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni did not show significant differences between survivors and non-survivors. Lung involvement was an important predictor of death in leptospirosis in São Paulo, of relevance in leptospirosis-endemic regions where this complication is common. PMID:19052303

  12. Precursors of lethal violence: a death row sample.

    PubMed

    Freedman, D; Hemenway, D

    2000-06-01

    A qualitative methodology based on the standards of criminal defense investigation was used to analyze the social and family histories of 16 men sentenced to death in California. Using a multisource cross-validation methodology, we assessed patterns of impairment, injury and deficit at each of four ecological levels: family, individual, community and social institutions. Investigation documented consistent and pervasive patterns of serious impairment, injury and deficit across the cases and levels. The men share numerous risk factors and few resiliency factors associated with violence. We found family violence in all 16 cases, including severe physical and/or sexual abuse in 14 cases; individual impairments in 16, including 14 with post-traumatic stress disorder, 13 with severe depression and 12 with histories of traumatic brain injury; community isolation and violence in 12; and institutional failure in 15, including 13 cases of severe physical and/or sexual abuse while in foster care or under state youth authority jurisdiction. Appropriate interventions might have made a difference in reducing lethal violence and its precursor conditions.

  13. Parent-of-Origin-Effect rough endosperm Mutants in Maize.

    PubMed

    Bai, Fang; Daliberti, Mary; Bagadion, Alyssa; Xu, Miaoyun; Li, Yubing; Baier, John; Tseung, Chi-Wah; Evans, Matthew M S; Settles, A Mark

    2016-09-01

    Parent-of-origin-effect loci have non-Mendelian inheritance in which phenotypes are determined by either the maternal or paternal allele alone. In angiosperms, parent-of-origin effects can be caused by loci required for gametophyte development or by imprinted genes needed for seed development. Few parent-of-origin-effect loci have been identified in maize (Zea mays) even though there are a large number of imprinted genes known from transcriptomics. We screened rough endosperm (rgh) mutants for parent-of-origin effects using reciprocal crosses with inbred parents. Six maternal rough endosperm (mre) and three paternal rough endosperm (pre) mutants were identified with three mre loci mapped. When inherited from the female parent, mre/+ seeds reduce grain fill with a rough, etched, or pitted endosperm surface. Pollen transmission of pre mutants results in rgh endosperm as well as embryo lethality. Eight of the mutants had significant distortion from the expected one-to-one ratio for parent-of-origin effects. Linked markers for mre1, mre2, and mre3 indicated that the mutant alleles have no bias in transmission. Histological analysis of mre1, mre2, mre3, and pre*-949 showed altered timing of starch grain accumulation and basal endosperm transfer cell layer (BETL) development. The mre1 locus delays BETL and starchy endosperm development, while mre2 and pre*-949 cause ectopic starchy endosperm differentiation. We conclude that many parent-of-origin effects in maize have incomplete penetrance of kernel phenotypes and that there is a large diversity of endosperm developmental roles for parent-of-origin-effect loci.

  14. Zebrafish Mutants calamity and catastrophe Define Critical Pathways of Gene–Nutrient Interactions in Developmental Copper Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Erik C.; Gitlin, Jonathan D.

    2008-01-01

    Nutrient availability is an important environmental variable during development that has significant effects on the metabolism, health, and viability of an organism. To understand these interactions for the nutrient copper, we used a chemical genetic screen for zebrafish mutants sensitive to developmental copper deficiency. In this screen, we isolated two mutants that define subtleties of copper metabolism. The first contains a viable hypomorphic allele of atp7a and results in a loss of pigmentation when exposed to mild nutritional copper deficiency. This mutant displays incompletely penetrant skeletal defects affected by developmental copper availability. The second carries an inactivating mutation in the vacuolar ATPase that causes punctate melanocytes and embryonic lethality. This mutant, catastrophe, is sensitive to copper deprivation revealing overlap between ion metabolic pathways. Together, the two mutants illustrate the utility of chemical genetic screens in zebrafish to elucidate the interaction of nutrient availability and genetic polymorphisms in cellular metabolism. PMID:19008952

  15. Analysis of p53 mutants for transcriptional activity.

    PubMed Central

    Raycroft, L; Schmidt, J R; Yoas, K; Hao, M M; Lozano, G

    1991-01-01

    The wild-type p53 protein functions to suppress transformation, but numerous mutant p53 proteins are transformation competent. To examine the role of p53 as a transcription factor, we made fusion proteins containing human or mouse p53 sequences fused to the DNA binding domain of a known transcription factor, GAL4. Human and mouse wild-type p53/GAL4 specifically transactivated expression of a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter in HeLa, CHO, and NIH 3T3 cells. Several mutant p53 proteins, including a mouse p53 mutant which is temperature sensitive for suppression, were also analyzed. A p53/GAL4 fusion protein with this mutation was also transcriptionally active only at the permissive temperature. Another mutant p53/GAL4 fusion protein analyzed mimics the mutation inherited in Li-Fraumeni patients. This fusion protein was as active as wild-type p53/GAL4 in our assay. Two human p53 mutants that arose from alterations of the p53 gene in colorectal carcinomas were 30- to 40-fold less effective at activating transcription than wild-type p53/GAL4 fusion proteins. Thus, functional wild-type p53/GAL4 fusion proteins activate transcription, while several transformation competent mutants do so poorly or not at all. Only one mutant p53/GAL4 fusion protein remained transcriptionally active. Images PMID:1944276

  16. Selective targeting of KRAS-Mutant cells by miR-126 through repression of multiple genes essential for the survival of KRAS-Mutant cells

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Toshifumi; Jones, Matthew F.; Subramanian, Murugan; Li, Xiao Ling; Ou, Oliver; Zhu, Yuelin; Yang, Yuan; Wakefield, Lalage M.; Hussain, S. Perwez; Gaedcke, Jochen; Ried, Thomas; Luo, Ji; Caplen, Natasha J.; Lal, Ashish

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate the expression of hundreds of genes. However, identifying the critical targets within a miRNA-regulated gene network is challenging. One approach is to identify miRNAs that exert a context-dependent effect, followed by expression profiling to determine how specific targets contribute to this selective effect. In this study, we performed miRNA mimic screens in isogenic KRAS-Wild-type (WT) and KRAS-Mutant colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines to identify miRNAs selectively targeting KRAS-Mutant cells. One of the miRNAs we identified as a selective inhibitor of the survival of multiple KRAS-Mutant CRC lines was miR-126. In KRAS-Mutant cells, miR-126 over-expression increased the G1 compartment, inhibited clonogenicity and tumorigenicity, while exerting no effect on KRAS-WT cells. Unexpectedly, the miR-126-regulated transcriptome of KRAS-WT and KRAS-Mutant cells showed no significant differences. However, by analyzing the overlap between miR-126 targets with the synthetic lethal genes identified by RNAi in KRAS-Mutant cells, we identified and validated a subset of miR-126-regulated genes selectively required for the survival and clonogenicity of KRAS-Mutant cells. Our strategy therefore identified critical target genes within the miR-126-regulated gene network. We propose that the selective effect of miR-126 on KRAS-Mutant cells could be utilized for the development of targeted therapy for KRAS mutant tumors. PMID:25245095

  17. Bacillus anthracis cell wall produces injurious inflammation but paradoxically decreases the lethality of anthrax lethal toxin in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xizhong; Su, Junwu; Li, Yan; Shiloach, Joseph; Solomon, Steven; Kaufman, Jeanne B.; Mani, Haresh; Fitz, Yvonne; Weng, Jia; Altaweel, Laith; Besch, Virginia; Eichacker, Peter Q.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The in vivo inflammatory effects of the Bacillus anthracis cell wall are unknown. We therefore investigated these effects in rats and, for comparison, those of known inflammatory stimulants, Staphylococcus aureus cell wall or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Method and Results Sprague–Dawley rats (n = 103) were challenged with increasing B. anthracis cell wall doses (10, 20, 40, 80, or 160 mg/kg) or diluent (control) as a bolus or 24-h infusion. The three highest bolus doses were lethal (20–64% lethality rates) as were the two highest infused doses (13% with each). Comparisons among lethal or nonlethal doses on other measured parameters were not significantly different, and these were combined for analysis. Over the 24 h after challenge initiation with lethal bolus or infusion, compared to controls, ten inflammatory cytokines and NO levels were increased and circulating neutrophils and platelets decreased (P ≤ 0.05). Changes with lethal doses were greater than changes with nonlethal doses (P ≤ 0.01). Lethal bolus or infusion doses produced hypotension or hypoxemia, respectively (P ≤ 0.05). The effects with B. anthracis cell wall were similar to those of S. aureus cell wall or LPS. However, paradoxically administration of B. anthracis cell wall or LPS decreased the lethality of concurrently administered B. anthracis lethal toxin (P < 0.0001 and 0.04, respectively). Conclusion B. anthracis cell wall has the potential to produce inflammatory injury during anthrax infection clinically. However, understanding why cell wall or LPS paradoxically reduced lethality with lethal toxin may help understand this toxin’s pathogenic effects. PMID:19756496

  18. Ectopic expression of Cripto-1 in transgenic mouse embryos causes hemorrhages, fatal cardiac defects and embryonic lethality

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiaolin; Zhao, Wentao; Jia, Junshuang; Lin, Taoyan; Xiao, Gaofang; Wang, Shengchun; Lin, Xia; Liu, Yu; Chen, Li; Qin, Yujuan; Li, Jing; Zhang, Tingting; Hao, Weichao; Chen, Bangzhu; Xie, Raoying; Cheng, Yushuang; Xu, Kang; Yao, Kaitai; Huang, Wenhua; Xiao, Dong; Sun, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Targeted disruption of Cripto-1 in mice caused embryonic lethality at E7.5, whereas we unexpectedly found that ectopic Cripto-1 expression in mouse embryos also led to embryonic lethality, which prompted us to characterize the causes and mechanisms underlying embryonic death due to ectopic Cripto-1 expression. RCLG/EIIa-Cre embryos displayed complex phenotypes between embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5) and E17.5, including fatal hemorrhages (E14.5-E15.5), embryo resorption (E14.5-E17.5), pale body surface (E14.5-E16.5) and no abnormal appearance (E14.5-E16.5). Macroscopic and histological examination revealed that ectopic expression of Cripto-1 transgene in RCLG/EIIa-Cre embryos resulted in lethal cardiac defects, as evidenced by cardiac malformations, myocardial thinning, failed assembly of striated myofibrils and lack of heartbeat. In addition, Cripto-1 transgene activation beginning after E8.5 also caused the aforementioned lethal cardiac defects in mouse embryos. Furthermore, ectopic Cripto-1 expression in embryonic hearts reduced the expression of cardiac transcription factors, which is at least partially responsible for the aforementioned lethal cardiac defects. Our results suggest that hemorrhages and cardiac abnormalities are two important lethal factors in Cripto-1 transgenic mice. Taken together, these findings are the first to demonstrate that sustained Cripto-1 transgene expression after E11.5 causes fatal hemorrhages and lethal cardiac defects, leading to embryonic death at E14.5-17.5. PMID:27687577

  19. Are high-lethality suicide attempters with bipolar disorder a distinct phenotype?

    PubMed

    Oquendo, Maria A; Carballo, Juan Jose; Rajouria, Namita; Currier, Dianne; Tin, Adrienne; Merville, Jessica; Galfalvy, Hanga C; Sher, Leo; Grunebaum, Michael F; Burke, Ainsley K; Mann, J John

    2009-01-01

    Because Bipolar Disorder (BD) individuals making highly lethal suicide attempts have greater injury burden and risk for suicide, early identification is critical. BD patients were classified as high- or low-lethality attempters. High-lethality attempts required inpatient medical treatment. Mixed effects logistic regression models and permutation analyses examined correlations between lethality, number, and order of attempts. High-lethality attempters reported greater suicidal intent and more previous attempts. Multiple attempters showed no pattern of incremental lethality increase with subsequent attempts, but individuals with early high-lethality attempts more often made high-lethality attempts later. A subset of high-lethality attempters make only high-lethality attempts. However, presence of previous low-lethality attempts does not indicate that risk for more lethal, possibly successful, attempts is reduced.

  20. Bloomsbury report on mouse embryo phenotyping: recommendations from the IMPC workshop on embryonic lethal screening

    PubMed Central

    Adams, David; Baldock, Richard; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Copp, Andrew J.; Dickinson, Mary; Greene, Nicholas D. E.; Henkelman, Mark; Justice, Monica; Mohun, Timothy; Murray, Stephen A.; Pauws, Erwin; Raess, Michael; Rossant, Janet; Weaver, Tom; West, David

    2013-01-01

    Identifying genes that are important for embryo development is a crucial first step towards understanding their many functions in driving the ordered growth, differentiation and organogenesis of embryos. It can also shed light on the origins of developmental disease and congenital abnormalities. Current international efforts to examine gene function in the mouse provide a unique opportunity to pinpoint genes that are involved in embryogenesis, owing to the emergence of embryonic lethal knockout mutants. Through internationally coordinated efforts, the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) has generated a public resource of mouse knockout strains and, in April 2012, the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC), supported by the EU InfraCoMP programme, convened a workshop to discuss developing a phenotyping pipeline for the investigation of embryonic lethal knockout lines. This workshop brought together over 100 scientists, from 13 countries, who are working in the academic and commercial research sectors, including experts and opinion leaders in the fields of embryology, animal imaging, data capture, quality control and annotation, high-throughput mouse production, phenotyping, and reporter gene analysis. This article summarises the outcome of the workshop, including (1) the vital scientific importance of phenotyping embryonic lethal mouse strains for basic and translational research; (2) a common framework to harmonise international efforts within this context; (3) the types of phenotyping that are likely to be most appropriate for systematic use, with a focus on 3D embryo imaging; (4) the importance of centralising data in a standardised form to facilitate data mining; and (5) the development of online tools to allow open access to and dissemination of the phenotyping data. PMID:23519032

  1. Human cathepsin L rescues the neurodegeneration and lethality incathepsin B/L double deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Sevenich, Lisa; Pennacchio, Len A.; Peters, Christoph; Reinheckel, Thomas

    2006-01-09

    Cathepsin B (CTSB) and cathepsin L (CTSL) are two widelyexpressed cysteine proteases thought to predominantly reside withinlysosomes. Functional analysis of CTSL in humans is complicated by theexistence of two CTSL-like homologues (CTSL and CTSL2), in contrast tomice which contain only one CTSL enzyme. Thus transgenic expression ofhuman CTSL in CTSL deficient mice provides an opportunity to study the invivo functions of this human protease without interference by its highlyrelated homologue. While mice with single gene deficiencies for murineCTSB or CTSL survive without apparent neuromuscular impairment, murineCTSB/CTSL double deficient mice display degeneration of cerebellarPurkinje cells and neurons of the cerebral cortex, resulting in severehypotrophy, motility defects, and lethality during their third to fourthweek of life. Here we show that expression of human CTSL through agenomic transgene results in widespread expression of human CTSL in themouse which is capable of rescuing the lethality found in CTSB/CTSLdouble-deficient animals. Human CTSL is expressed in the brain of thesecompound mutants predominantly in neurons of the cerebral cortex and inPurkinje cells of the cerebellum, where it appears to prevent neuronalcell death.

  2. A strong loss-of-function mutation in RAN1 results in constitutive activation of the ethylene response pathway as well as a rosette-lethal phenotype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeste, K. E.; Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    A recessive mutation was identified that constitutively activated the ethylene response pathway in Arabidopsis and resulted in a rosette-lethal phenotype. Positional cloning of the gene corresponding to this mutation revealed that it was allelic to responsive to antagonist1 (ran1), a mutation that causes seedlings to respond in a positive manner to what is normally a competitive inhibitor of ethylene binding. In contrast to the previously identified ran1-1 and ran1-2 alleles that are morphologically indistinguishable from wild-type plants, this ran1-3 allele results in a rosette-lethal phenotype. The predicted protein encoded by the RAN1 gene is similar to the Wilson and Menkes disease proteins and yeast Ccc2 protein, which are integral membrane cation-transporting P-type ATPases involved in copper trafficking. Genetic epistasis analysis indicated that RAN1 acts upstream of mutations in the ethylene receptor gene family. However, the rosette-lethal phenotype of ran1-3 was not suppressed by ethylene-insensitive mutants, suggesting that this mutation also affects a non-ethylene-dependent pathway regulating cell expansion. The phenotype of ran1-3 mutants is similar to loss-of-function ethylene receptor mutants, suggesting that RAN1 may be required to form functional ethylene receptors. Furthermore, these results suggest that copper is required not only for ethylene binding but also for the signaling function of the ethylene receptors.

  3. Nonchemotactic Mutants of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, John B.; Adler, Julius; Dahl, Margaret M.

    1967-01-01

    We have isolated 40 mutants of Escherichia coli which are nonchemotactic as judged by their failure to swarm on semisolid tryptone plates or to make bands in capillary tubes containing tryptone broth. All the mutants have normal flagella, a fact shown by their shape and reaction with antiflagella serum. All are fully motile under the microscope and all are sensitive to the phage chi. Unlike its parent, one of the mutants, studied in greater detail, failed to show chemotaxis toward oxygen, glucose, serine, threonine, or aspartic acid. The failure to exhibit chemotaxis does not result from a failure to use the chemicals. The swimming of this mutant was shown to be random. The growth rate was normal under several conditions, and the growth requirements were unchanged. Images PMID:5335897

  4. A case of a novel mutant vasopressin receptor-dependent nephrogenic diabetes insipidus with bilateral non-obstructive hydronephrosis in a middle aged man: differentiation from aquaporin-dependent nephrogenic diabetes insipidus by response of factor VII and von Willebrand factor to 1-diamino-8-arginine vasopressin administration.

    PubMed

    Miyakoshi, Masashi; Kamoi, Kyuzi; Uchida, Shinichi; Sasaki, Sei

    2003-12-01

    We describe a case of a novel mutant vasopressin 2 receptor (V2R)-dependent nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) with bilateral non-obstructive hydronephrosis in a middle aged man. This could be distinguished from aquaporin 2 (AQP2)-dependent NDI by the response of factor VIII and von Willebrand factor (vWF) to 1-deamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP) administration. A 47-year-old man was admitted to hospital because of polyuria, which had been present from infancy and was suspected of causing non-obstructive hydronephrosis. His mother's father, the older brother of his mother and his second daughter also all had polyuria. Sodium concentration, osmolality and vasopressin in blood were high, while sodium concentration and osmolality in urine were low. There were no changes in urine osmolality, factor VIII and vWF in response to DDAVP infusion. Neither was heart rate, diastolic blood pressure nor facial flushing affected. These findings suggested this case was V2R-dependent NDI rather than AQP2-dependent NDI. Molecular genetic analysis demonstrated that the patient had a V2R missense mutation involving a substitution of cysteine for arginine at position 104 (R104C) located in the first extracellular loop of the V2R. It was also found that the patient's mother and his second daughter were heterozygous for this R104C mutation. PMID:14709855

  5. Suppression of KRas-mutant cancer through the combined inhibition of KRAS with PLK1 and ROCK

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jieqiong; Hu, Kewen; Guo, Jiawei; Cheng, Feixiong; Lv, Jing; Jiang, Wenhao; Lu, Weiqiang; Liu, Jinsong; Pang, Xiufeng; Liu, Mingyao

    2016-01-01

    No effective targeted therapies exist for cancers with somatic KRAS mutations. Here we develop a synthetic lethal chemical screen in isogenic KRAS-mutant and wild-type cells to identify clinical drug pairs. Our results show that dual inhibition of polo-like kinase 1 and RhoA/Rho kinase (ROCK) leads to the synergistic effects in KRAS-mutant cancers. Microarray analysis reveals that this combinatory inhibition significantly increases transcription and activity of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1, leading to specific G2/M phase blockade in KRAS-mutant cells. Overexpression of p21WAF1/CIP1, either by cDNA transfection or clinical drugs, preferentially impairs the growth of KRAS-mutant cells, suggesting a druggable synthetic lethal interaction between KRAS and p21WAF1/CIP1. Co-administration of BI-2536 and fasudil either in the LSL-KRASG12D mouse model or in a patient tumour explant mouse model of KRAS-mutant lung cancer suppresses tumour growth and significantly prolongs mouse survival, suggesting a strong synergy in vivo and a potential avenue for therapeutic treatment of KRAS-mutant cancers. PMID:27193833

  6. Protection of mouse jejunum against lethal irradiation by Podophyllum hexandrum.

    PubMed

    Salin, C A; Samanta, N; Goel, H C

    2001-11-01

    Radiation induced gastrointestinal damage occurs due to the destruction of the clonogenic crypt cells and eventual depopulation and denudation of the villi. P. hexandrum, a plant, known for its antitumour activity, has been shown to protect the mice against whole body lethal (10 Gy) irradiation. Present study was undertaken to investigate the radioprotective effect of P. hexandrum on jejunal villi cells, crypt cells, their proliferative capacity and mitigation of apoptosis. In an in vivo micro colony survival assay, pre-irradiation administration of P. hexandrum (-2 h) increased the number of surviving crypts in the jejunum by a factor of 3.0 (P < 0.05) and villi cellularity by 2.7 (P < 0.05) fold in comparison to irradiated control. Pre-irradiation administration of P. hexandrum reduced the incidence of apoptotic bodies in the crypts (P < 0.05) in a time dependent manner and depicted a mitotic arrest till the 24 h. However, after 84 h the percentage of mitosis was observed to be nearly similar to that of unirradiated control. This study suggests that arrest of cell division may help in protecting the clonogenic cells against radiation. It would be interesting to investigate further the role of P hexandrum in influencing various cell cycle regulators like bcl-2, TGF-beta, Cyclin-E etc.

  7. Lethal Lullabies: A History of Opium Use in Infants.

    PubMed

    Obladen, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Poppy extract accompanied the human infant for more than 3 millenia. Motives for its use included excessive crying, suspected pain, and diarrhea. In antiquity, infantile sleeplessness was regarded as a disease. When treatment with opium was recommended by Galen, Rhazes, and Avicenna, baby sedation made its way into early medical treatises and pediatric instructions. Dabbing maternal nipples with bitter substances and drugging the infant with opium were used to hasten weaning. A freerider of gum lancing, opiates joined the treatment of difficult teething in the 17th century. Foundling hospitals and wet-nurses used them extensively. With industrialization, private use was rampant among the working class. In German-speaking countries, poppy extracts were administered in soups and pacifiers. In English-speaking countries, proprietary drugs containing opium were marketed under names such as soothers, nostrums, anodynes, cordials, preservatives, and specifics and sold at the doorstep or in grocery stores. Opium's toxicity for infants was common knowledge; thousands of cases of lethal intoxication had been reported from antiquity. What is remarkable is that the willingness to use it in infants persisted and that physicians continued to prescribe it for babies. Unregulated trade, and even that protected by governments, led to greatly increased private use of opiates during the 19th century. Intoxication became a significant factor in infant mortality. As late as 1912, the International Hague Convention forced governments to implement legislation that effectively curtailed access to opium and broke the dangerous habit of sedating infants.

  8. Lethal Lullabies: A History of Opium Use in Infants.

    PubMed

    Obladen, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Poppy extract accompanied the human infant for more than 3 millenia. Motives for its use included excessive crying, suspected pain, and diarrhea. In antiquity, infantile sleeplessness was regarded as a disease. When treatment with opium was recommended by Galen, Rhazes, and Avicenna, baby sedation made its way into early medical treatises and pediatric instructions. Dabbing maternal nipples with bitter substances and drugging the infant with opium were used to hasten weaning. A freerider of gum lancing, opiates joined the treatment of difficult teething in the 17th century. Foundling hospitals and wet-nurses used them extensively. With industrialization, private use was rampant among the working class. In German-speaking countries, poppy extracts were administered in soups and pacifiers. In English-speaking countries, proprietary drugs containing opium were marketed under names such as soothers, nostrums, anodynes, cordials, preservatives, and specifics and sold at the doorstep or in grocery stores. Opium's toxicity for infants was common knowledge; thousands of cases of lethal intoxication had been reported from antiquity. What is remarkable is that the willingness to use it in infants persisted and that physicians continued to prescribe it for babies. Unregulated trade, and even that protected by governments, led to greatly increased private use of opiates during the 19th century. Intoxication became a significant factor in infant mortality. As late as 1912, the International Hague Convention forced governments to implement legislation that effectively curtailed access to opium and broke the dangerous habit of sedating infants. PMID:26163533

  9. Genetically engineered phage harbouring the lethal catabolite gene activator protein gene with an inducer-independent promoter for biocontrol of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Moradpour, Zahra; Sepehrizadeh, Zargham; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Ghasemian, Abdollah; Yazdi, Mojtaba Tabatabaei; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza

    2009-07-01

    Complications of chemotherapy, such as appearance of multidrug resistance, have persuaded researchers to consider phage therapy as a new method to combat bacterial infections. In vitro experiments were performed to assess the therapeutic value of genetically modified phages for controlling gastrointestinal Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells in Luria-Bertani (LB) media and contaminated cow milk. We constructed a modified nonreplicating M13-derived phage expressing a lethal catabolite gene activator protein (CAP) that is a Glu181Gln mutant of CAP. The modified phagemid was propagated in the lethal CAP-resistant strain XA3DII. Time-kill assay experiments showed a considerable reduction in the number of surviving bacteria in both LB media and contaminated cow milk. Our further study using other test strains demonstrated that the host range of lethal phage is limited to E. coli strains that produce pili. This study provides a possible strategy for the exploitation of genetically engineered nonlytic phages as bactericidal agents by minimizing the risk of release of progeny phages and endotoxins into the environment. The phage was engineered to remain lethal to its bacterial target, but incapable of replicating therein. Furthermore, the addition of an inducer to express the lethal protein is not required. PMID:19459966

  10. The cost of social punishment and high-lethality suicide attempts in the second half of life.

    PubMed

    Szanto, Katalin; Clark, Luke; Hallquist, Michael; Vanyukov, Polina; Crockett, Molly; Dombrovski, Alexandre Y

    2014-03-01

    Age-related cognitive changes may contribute to impairments in making complex social decisions. Interpersonal conflict is a key factor behind suicidal behavior in old age, with suicidal motivations ranging from escape to revenge. Such conflicts may prove catastrophic for people prone to suicide, in part because of their tendency to make disadvantageous decisions. Yet, little is known about social decision making in older suicidal individuals. We assessed economic bargaining behavior using the Ultimatum Game, where players decide whether to accept or punish (reject) unfair monetary offers from another player. Our sample included depressed older adults with a history of high-medical-lethality suicide attempts, low-medical-lethality suicide attempts, nonsuicidal depressed older adults, and those with no psychiatric history who served as control groups. Participants in all groups punished their counterparts in response to unfair offers. However, low-lethality attempters, nonsuicidal depressed, and nonpsychiatric controls punished less as the cost of punishment increased, accepting more unfair offers as the stakes grew large. High-lethality attempters did not adjust their choices based on stake magnitude, punishing unfair offers without regard to the cost. Two thirds of the difference between the high-lethality attempters and nonpsychiatric controls was explained by individual differences in fairness judgments: the comparison group judged offer fairness as a joint function of inequality and magnitude, whereas the high-lethality attempter participants judged offer fairness on the basis of inequality. In real life, high-lethality attempters' relative insensitivity to the cost of retaliation may lead to uncompromising, catastrophic responses to conflict. PMID:24660798

  11. The cost of social punishment and high-lethality suicide attempts in the second half of life

    PubMed Central

    Szanto, Katalin; Clark, Luke; Hallquist, Michael; Vanyukov, Polina; Crockett, Molly; Dombrovski, Alexandre Y.

    2014-01-01

    Age-related cognitive changes may contribute to impairments in making complex social decisions. Interpersonal conflict is a key factor behind suicidal behavior in old age, with suicidal motivations ranging from escape to revenge. Such conflicts may prove catastrophic for people prone to suicide, in part because of their tendency to make disadvantageous decisions. Yet, little is known about social decision-making in older suicidal individuals. We assessed economic bargaining behavior using the Ultimatum Game, where players decide whether to accept or punish (reject) unfair monetary offers from another player. Our sample included depressed older adults with a history of high-medical lethality suicide attempts, low- medical lethality suicide attempts, non-suicidal depressed older adults, and those with no psychiatric history, who served as control groups. Participants in all groups punished their counterparts in response to unfair offers. However, low-lethality attempters, non-suicidal depressed, and non-psychiatric controls punished less as the cost of punishment increased, accepting more unfair offers as the stakes grew large. High-lethality attempters did not adjust their choices based on stake magnitude, punishing unfair offers without regard to the cost. Two-thirds of the difference between the high-lethality attempters and non-psychiatric controls was explained by individual differences in fairness judgments: the comparison group judged offer fairness as a joint function of inequality and magnitude, whereas the high-lethality attempter participants judged offer fairness on the basis of inequality. In real life, high-lethality attempters' relative insensitivity to the cost of retaliation may lead to uncompromising, catastrophic responses to conflict. PMID:24660798

  12. Suppression of viral infectivity through lethal defection

    PubMed Central

    Grande-Pérez, Ana; Lázaro, Ester; Lowenstein, Pedro; Domingo, Esteban; Manrubia, Susanna C.

    2005-01-01

    RNA viruses replicate with a very high error rate and give rise to heterogeneous, highly plastic populations able to adapt very rapidly to changing environments. Viral diseases are thus difficult to control because of the appearance of drug-resistant mutants, and it becomes essential to seek mechanisms able to force the extinction of the quasispecies before adaptation emerges. An alternative to the use of conventional drugs consists in increasing the replication error rate through the use of mutagens. Here, we report about persistent infections of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus treated with fluorouracil, where a progressive debilitation of infectivity leading to eventual extinction occurs. The transition to extinction is accompanied by the production of large amounts of RNA, indicating that the replicative ability of the quasispecies is not strongly impaired by the mutagen. By means of experimental and theoretical approaches, we propose that a fraction of the RNA molecules synthesized can behave as a defective subpopulation able to drive the viable class extinct. Our results lead to the identification of two extinction pathways, one at high amounts of mutagen, where the quasispecies completely loses its ability to infect and replicate, and a second one, at lower amounts of mutagen, where replication continues while the infective class gets extinct because of the action of defectors. The results bear on a potential application of increased mutagenesis as an antiviral strategy in that low doses of a mutagenic agent may suffice to drive persistent virus to extinction. PMID:15767582

  13. Isolation of Pasteurella haemolytica leukotoxin mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Chidambaram, M; Sharma, B; Petras, S F; Reese, C P; Froshauer, S; Weinstock, G M

    1995-01-01

    Two mutants of Pasteurella haemolytica A1 that do not produce leukotoxin were isolated. Following mutagenesis, colonies were screened with antiserum by a filter assay for absence of the secreted leukotoxin. The two mutants both appeared to produce normal amounts of other antigens, as judged by reactivity with polyclonal serum from an animal with pasteurellosis, and were not altered in beta-hemolytic activity as seen on blood agar plates. There was no evidence of either cell-associated or secreted leukotoxin protein when Western blots (immunoblots) were carried out with the polyclonal serum or with a monoclonal antibody directed against the leukotoxin. Southern blots revealed that both mutants show the wild-type restriction pattern at the leukotoxin locus, although the strain with the lktA2 mutation showed differences in other regions of the chromosome on analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The strain with the lktA2 mutation grew more slowly than did the wild-type strain, while the strain with the lktA1 mutation was indistinguishable from the wild-type strain in its growth properties. The strain with the lktA1 mutation should be valuable in determining the role of the leukotoxin in virulence as well as in identifying other virulence factors of P. haemolytica. PMID:7868223

  14. Loss of apolipoprotein E exacerbates the neonatal lethality of the Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome mouse

    PubMed Central

    Solcà, Curzio; Pandit, Bhaswati; Yu, Hongwei; Tint, G. Stephen; Patel, Shailendra B.

    2007-01-01

    The Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is caused by a genetic defect in cholesterol biosynthesis; mutations in the enzyme 3ß-hydroxysterol Δ7 reductase (Dhcr7) lead to a failure of cholesterol (and desmosterol) synthesis, with an accumulation of precursor sterols, such as 7-dehydrocholesterol. Extensive genotype–phenotype analyses have indicated that there is considerable variation in the severity of the disease, much of which is not explained by defects in the Dhcr7 gene alone. Factors ranging from variations in maternal–fetal cholesterol transfer during pregnancy, to other genetic factors have been proposed to account for this variability. Variations at the APOE locus affect plasma cholesterol levels in humans and this polymorphic gene has been found to be associated with cardiovascular as well as neurological disorders. This locus has recently been implicated in accounting for some of the variations in SLOS. To address whether maternal hypercholesterolemia can affect fetal outcome, we tested the ability of maternal hypercholesterolemia to rescue the neonatal lethality in a mouse model of SLOS. Maternal hypercholesterolemia, induced by ApoE or Ldl-r deficiency not only failed to ameliorate the postnatal lethality, it increased the prenatal mortality of Dhcr7 deficient pups. Thus the murine data suggest that maternal loss of ApoE or Ldl-r function further exacerbates the neonatal lethality, suggesting they may play a role in maternal transfer of cholesterol to the embryo. PMID:17197219

  15. Factor Composition of the Suicide Intent Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mieczkowski, Tammy A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Analyzed Suicide Intent Scale using data from 98 psychiatric inpatients who had attempted suicide. Analysis resulted in two-factor solution: Lethal Intent factor contained items pertaining to subjective level of lethal intent; Planning factor contained items related to objective planning for attempt. Findings suggest that Suicide Intent Scale can…

  16. Protective effect of picolinic acid on mice intracerebrally infected with lethal doses of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Blasi, E; Mazzolla, R; Pitzurra, L; Barluzzi, R; Bistoni, F

    1993-01-01

    We have studied the effects of picolinic acid (PLA), a product of tryptophan degradation, on mouse susceptibility to intracerebral infection with Candida albicans. We show that intraperitoneal administration of PLA significantly enhances the median survival time of mice inoculated with the lethal challenge. Furthermore, intracerebral administration of this agent induces a protective state against the local lethal infection, the phenomenon depending upon the administration schedule and doses of PLA employed. According to survival data, yeast growth in the brain as well as yeast colonization of the kidneys are drastically reduced in PLA-treated mice compared with those for untreated controls. Northern (RNA) blot analysis of brain tissues demonstrates that mRNA levels specific for tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1 are augmented and induced, respectively, after inoculation of PLA. These results indicate that PLA has a protective effect likely involving elicitation of a cytokine response in vivo against fungal infections. Images PMID:7506894

  17. Clear Plaque Mutants of Lactococcal Phage TP901-1

    PubMed Central

    Kot, Witold; Kilstrup, Mogens; Vogensen, Finn K.; Hammer, Karin

    2016-01-01

    We report a method for obtaining turbid plaques of the lactococcal bacteriophage TP901-1 and its derivative TP901-BC1034. We have further used the method to isolate clear plaque mutants of this phage. Analysis of 8 such mutants that were unable to lysogenize the host included whole genome resequencing. Four of the mutants had different mutations in structural genes with no relation to the genetic switch. However all 8 mutants had a mutation in the cI repressor gene region. Three of these were located in the promoter and Shine-Dalgarno sequences and five in the N-terminal part of the encoded CI protein involved in the DNA binding. The conclusion is that cI is the only gene involved in clear plaque formation i.e. the CI protein is the determining factor for the lysogenic pathway and its maintenance in the lactococcal phage TP901-1. PMID:27258092

  18. Metabolic Disruption in Drosophila Bang-Sensitive Seizure Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Fergestad, Tim; Bostwick, Bret; Ganetzky, Barry

    2006-01-01

    We examined a number of Drosophila mutants with increased susceptibility to seizures following mechanical or electrical stimulation to better understand the underlying factors that predispose neurons to aberrant activity. Several mutations in this class have been molecularly identified and suggest metabolic disruption as a possible source for increased seizure susceptibility. We mapped the bang-sensitive seizure mutation knockdown (kdn) to cytological position 5F3 and identified citrate synthase as the affected gene. These results further support a role for mitochondrial metabolism in controlling neuronal activity and seizure susceptibility. Biochemical analysis in bang-sensitive mutants revealed reductions in ATP levels consistent with disruption of mitochondrial energy production in these mutants. Electrophysiological analysis of mutants affecting mitochondrial proteins revealed an increased likelihood for a specific pattern of seizure activity. Our data implicate cellular metabolism in regulating seizure susceptibility and suggest that differential sensitivity of neuronal subtypes to metabolic changes underlies distinct types of seizure activity. PMID:16648587

  19. Embryonic Lethality of Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier 1 Deficient Mouse Can Be Rescued by a Ketogenic Diet

    PubMed Central

    Krznar, Petra; Hörl, Manuel; Ammar, Zeinab; Montessuit, Sylvie; Pierredon, Sandra; Zamboni, Nicola; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial import of pyruvate by the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC) is a central step which links cytosolic and mitochondrial intermediary metabolism. To investigate the role of the MPC in mammalian physiology and development, we generated a mouse strain with complete loss of MPC1 expression. This resulted in embryonic lethality at around E13.5. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from mutant mice displayed defective pyruvate-driven respiration as well as perturbed metabolic profiles, and both defects could be restored by reexpression of MPC1. Labeling experiments using 13C-labeled glucose and glutamine demonstrated that MPC deficiency causes increased glutaminolysis and reduced contribution of glucose-derived pyruvate to the TCA cycle. Morphological defects were observed in mutant embryonic brains, together with major alterations of their metabolome including lactic acidosis, diminished TCA cycle intermediates, energy deficit and a perturbed balance of neurotransmitters. Strikingly, these changes were reversed when the pregnant dams were fed a ketogenic diet, which provides acetyl-CoA directly to the TCA cycle and bypasses the need for a functional MPC. This allowed the normal gestation and development of MPC deficient pups, even though they all died within a few minutes post-delivery. This study establishes the MPC as a key player in regulating the metabolic state necessary for embryonic development, neurotransmitter balance and post-natal survival. PMID:27176894

  20. Embryonic Lethality of Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier 1 Deficient Mouse Can Be Rescued by a Ketogenic Diet.

    PubMed

    Vanderperre, Benoît; Herzig, Sébastien; Krznar, Petra; Hörl, Manuel; Ammar, Zeinab; Montessuit, Sylvie; Pierredon, Sandra; Zamboni, Nicola; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial import of pyruvate by the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC) is a central step which links cytosolic and mitochondrial intermediary metabolism. To investigate the role of the MPC in mammalian physiology and development, we generated a mouse strain with complete loss of MPC1 expression. This resulted in embryonic lethality at around E13.5. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from mutant mice displayed defective pyruvate-driven respiration as well as perturbed metabolic profiles, and both defects could be restored by reexpression of MPC1. Labeling experiments using 13C-labeled glucose and glutamine demonstrated that MPC deficiency causes increased glutaminolysis and reduced contribution of glucose-derived pyruvate to the TCA cycle. Morphological defects were observed in mutant embryonic brains, together with major alterations of their metabolome including lactic acidosis, diminished TCA cycle intermediates, energy deficit and a perturbed balance of neurotransmitters. Strikingly, these changes were reversed when the pregnant dams were fed a ketogenic diet, which provides acetyl-CoA directly to the TCA cycle and bypasses the need for a functional MPC. This allowed the normal gestation and development of MPC deficient pups, even though they all died within a few minutes post-delivery. This study establishes the MPC as a key player in regulating the metabolic state necessary for embryonic development, neurotransmitter balance and post-natal survival. PMID:27176894

  1. Calreticulin mutants in mice induce an MPL-dependent thrombocytosis with frequent progression to myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Marty, Caroline; Pecquet, Christian; Nivarthi, Harini; El-Khoury, Mira; Chachoua, Ilyas; Tulliez, Micheline; Villeval, Jean-Luc; Raslova, Hana; Kralovics, Robert; Constantinescu, Stefan N; Plo, Isabelle; Vainchenker, William

    2016-03-10

    Frameshift mutations in the calreticulin (CALR) gene are seen in about 30% of essential thrombocythemia and myelofibrosis patients. To address the contribution of the CALR mutants to the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms, we engrafted lethally irradiated recipient mice with bone marrow cells transduced with retroviruses expressing these mutants. In contrast to wild-type CALR, CALRdel52 (type I) and, to a lesser extent, CALRins5 (type II) induced thrombocytosis due to a megakaryocyte (MK) hyperplasia. Disease was transplantable into secondary recipients. After 6 months, CALRdel52-, in contrast to rare CALRins5-, transduced mice developed a myelofibrosis associated with a splenomegaly and a marked osteosclerosis. Monitoring of virus-transduced populations indicated that CALRdel52 leads to expansion at earlier stages of hematopoiesis than CALRins5. However, both mutants still specifically amplified the MK lineage and platelet production. Moreover, a mutant deleted of the entire exon 9 (CALRdelex9) did not induce a disease, suggesting that the oncogenic property of CALR mutants was related to the new C-terminus peptide. To understand how the CALR mutants target the MK lineage, we used a cell-line model and demonstrated that the CALR mutants, but not CALRdelex9, specifically activate the thrombopoietin (TPO) receptor (MPL) to induce constitutive activation of Janus kinase 2 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5/3/1. We confirmed in c-mpl- and tpo-deficient mice that expression of Mpl, but not of Tpo, was essential for the CALR mutants to induce thrombocytosis in vivo, although Tpo contributes to disease penetrance. Thus, CALR mutants are sufficient to induce thrombocytosis through MPL activation. PMID:26608331

  2. Targeting the mTOR Complex by Everolimus in NRAS Mutant Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, Michael K; Curioni-Fontecedro, Alessandra; Samaras, Panagiotis; Lang, Silvia; Scharl, Michael; Aguzzi, Adriano; Oldrige, Derek A; Maris, John M; Rogler, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    High-risk neuroblastoma remains lethal in about 50% of patients despite multimodal treatment. Recent attempts to identify molecular targets for specific therapies have shown that Neuroblastoma RAS (NRAS) is significantly mutated in a small number of patients. However, few inhibitors for the potential treatment for NRAS mutant neuroblastoma have been investigated so far. In this in-vitro study, we show that MEK inhibitors AZD6244, MEK162 and PD0325901 block cell growth in NRAS mutant neuroblastoma cell lines but not in NRAS wild-type cell lines. Several studies show that mutant NRAS leads to PI3K pathway activation and combined inhibitors of PI3K/mTOR effectively block cell growth. However, we observed the combination of MEK inhibitors with PI3K or AKT inhibitors did not show synergestic effects on cell growth. Thus, we tested single mTOR inhibitors Everolimus and AZD8055. Interestingly, Everolimus and AZD8055 alone were sufficient to block cell growth in NRAS mutant cell lines but not in wild-type cell lines. We found that Everolimus alone induced apoptosis in NRAS mutant neuroblastoma. Furthermore, the combination of mTOR and MEK inhibitors resulted in synergistic growth inhibition. Taken together, our results show that NRAS mutant neuroblastoma can be targeted by clinically available Everolimus alone or in combination with MEK inhibitors which could impact future clinical studies. PMID:26821351

  3. Targeting the mTOR Complex by Everolimus in NRAS Mutant Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kiessling, Michael K.; Curioni-Fontecedro, Alessandra; Samaras, Panagiotis; Lang, Silvia; Scharl, Michael; Aguzzi, Adriano; Oldrige, Derek A.; Maris, John M.; Rogler, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    High-risk neuroblastoma remains lethal in about 50% of patients despite multimodal treatment. Recent attempts to identify molecular targets for specific therapies have shown that Neuroblastoma RAS (NRAS) is significantly mutated in a small number of patients. However, few inhibitors for the potential treatment for NRAS mutant neuroblastoma have been investigated so far. In this in-vitro study, we show that MEK inhibitors AZD6244, MEK162 and PD0325901 block cell growth in NRAS mutant neuroblastoma cell lines but not in NRAS wild-type cell lines. Several studies show that mutant NRAS leads to PI3K pathway activation and combined inhibitors of PI3K/mTOR effectively block cell growth. However, we observed the combination of MEK inhibitors with PI3K or AKT inhibitors did not show synergestic effects on cell growth. Thus, we tested single mTOR inhibitors Everolimus and AZD8055. Interestingly, Everolimus and AZD8055 alone were sufficient to block cell growth in NRAS mutant cell lines but not in wild-type cell lines. We found that Everolimus alone induced apoptosis in NRAS mutant neuroblastoma. Furthermore, the combination of mTOR and MEK inhibitors resulted in synergistic growth inhibition. Taken together, our results show that NRAS mutant neuroblastoma can be targeted by clinically available Everolimus alone or in combination with MEK inhibitors which could impact future clinical studies. PMID:26821351

  4. UvrD and UvrD252 counteract RecQ, RecJ, and RecFOR in a rep mutant of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lestini, Roxane; Michel, Bénédicte

    2008-09-01

    Rep and UvrD are two related Escherichia coli helicases, and inactivating both is lethal. Based on the observation that the synthetic lethality of rep and uvrD inactivation is suppressed in the absence of the recombination presynaptic proteins RecF, RecO, or RecR, it was proposed that UvrD is essential in the rep mutant to counteract a deleterious RecFOR-dependent RecA binding. We show here that the synthetic lethality of rep and uvrD mutations is also suppressed by recQ and recJ inactivation but not by rarA inactivation. Furthermore, it is independent of the action of UvrD in nucleotide excision repair and mismatch repair. These observations support the idea that UvrD counteracts a deleterious RecA binding to forks blocked in the rep mutant. An ATPase-deficient mutant of UvrD [uvrD(R284A)] is dominant negative in a rep mutant, but only in the presence of all RecQJFOR proteins, suggesting that the UvrD(R284A) mutant protein is deleterious when it counteracts one of these proteins. In contrast, the uvrD252 mutant (G30D), which exhibits a strongly decreased ATPase activity, is viable in a rep mutant, where it allows replication fork reversal. We conclude that the residual ATPase activity of UvrD252 prevents a negative effect on the viability of the rep mutant and allows UvrD to counteract the action of RecQ, RecJ, and RecFOR at forks blocked in the rep mutant. Models for the action of UvrD at blocked forks are proposed. PMID:18567657

  5. Selective reconstitution of liver cholesterol biosynthesis promotes lung maturation but does not prevent neonatal lethality in Dhcr7 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongwei; Li, Man; Tint, G Stephen; Chen, Jianliang; Xu, Guorong; Patel, Shailendra B

    2007-01-01

    Background Targeted disruption of the murine 3β-hydroxysterol-Δ7-reductase gene (Dhcr7), an animal model of Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, leads to loss of cholesterol synthesis and neonatal death that can be partially rescued by transgenic replacement of DHCR7 expression in brain during embryogenesis. To gain further insight into the role of non-brain tissue cholesterol deficiency in the pathophysiology, we tested whether the lethal phenotype could be abrogated by selective transgenic complementation with DHCR7 expression in the liver. Results We generated mice that carried a liver-specific human DHCR7 transgene whose expression was driven by the human apolipoprotein E (ApoE) promoter and its associated liver-specific enhancer. These mice were then crossed with Dhcr7+/- mutants to generate Dhcr7-/- mice bearing a human DHCR7 transgene. Robust hepatic transgene expression resulted in significant improvement of cholesterol homeostasis with cholesterol concentrations increasing to 80~90 % of normal levels in liver and lung. Significantly, cholesterol deficiency in brain was not altered. Although late gestational lung sacculation defect reported previously was significantly improved, there was no parallel increase in postnatal survival in the transgenic mutant mice. Conclusion The reconstitution of DHCR7 function selectively in liver induced a significant improvement of cholesterol homeostasis in non-brain tissues, but failed to rescue the neonatal lethality of Dhcr7 null mice. These results provided further evidence that CNS defects caused by Dhcr7 null likely play a major role in the lethal pathogenesis of Dhcr7-/- mice, with the peripheral organs contributing the morbidity. PMID:17408495

  6. A novel balanced-lethal host-vector system based on glmS.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwangsoo; Jeong, Jae Ho; Lim, Daejin; Hong, Yeongjin; Yun, Misun; Min, Jung-Joon; Kwak, Sahng-June; Choy, Hyon E

    2013-01-01

    During the last decade, an increasing number of papers have described the use of various genera of bacteria, including E. coli and S. typhimurium, in the treatment of cancer. This is primarily due to the facts that not only are these bacteria capable of accumulating in the tumor mass, but they can also be engineered to deliver specific therapeutic proteins directly to the tumor site. However, a major obstacle exists in that bacteria because the plasmid carrying the therapeutic gene is not needed for bacterial survival, these plasmids are often lost from the bacteria. Here, we report the development of a balanced-lethal host-vector system based on deletion of the glmS gene in E. coli and S. typhimurium. This system takes advantage of the phenotype of the GlmS(-) mutant, which undergoes lysis in animal systems that lack the nutrients required for proliferation of the mutant bacteria, D-glucosamine (GlcN) or N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc), components necessary for peptidoglycan synthesis. We demonstrate that plasmids carrying a glmS gene (GlmS(+)p) complemented the phenotype of the GlmS(-) mutant, and that GlmS(+) p was maintained faithfully both in vitro and in an animal system in the absence of selection pressure. This was further verified by bioluminescent signals from GlmS (+)pLux carried in bacteria that accumulated in grafted tumor tissue in a mouse model. The signal was up to several hundred-fold stronger than that from the control plasmid, pLux, due to faithful maintenance of the plasmid. We believe this system will allow to package a therapeutic gene onto an expression plasmid for bacterial delivery to the tumor site without subsequent loss of plasmid expression as well as to quantify bioluminescent bacteria using in vivo imaging by providing a direct correlation between photon flux and bacterial number.

  7. A synthetic lethal screen identifies SLK1, a novel protein kinase homolog implicated in yeast cell morphogenesis and cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    Costigan, C; Gehrung, S; Snyder, M

    1992-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae SPA2 protein localizes at sites involved in polarized cell growth in budding cells and mating cells. spa2 mutants have defects in projection formation during mating but are healthy during vegetative growth. A synthetic lethal screen was devised to identify mutants that require the SPA2 gene for vegetative growth. One mutant, called slk-1 (for synthetic lethal kinase), has been characterized extensively. The SLK1 gene has been cloned, and sequence analysis predicts that the SLK1 protein is 1,478 amino acid residues in length. Approximately 300 amino acids at the carboxy terminus exhibit sequence similarity with the catalytic domains of protein kinases. Disruption mutations have been constructed in the SLK1 gene. slk1 null mutants cannot grow at 37 degrees C, but many cells can grow at 30, 24, and 17 degrees C. Dead slk1 mutant cells usually have aberrant cell morphologies, and many cells are very small, approximately one-half the diameter of wild-type cells. Surviving slk1 cells also exhibit morphogenic defects; these cells are impaired in their ability to form projections upon exposure to mating pheromones. During vegetative growth, a higher fraction of slk1 cells are unbudded compared with wild-type cells, and under nutrient limiting conditions, slk1 cells exhibit defects in cell cycle arrest. The different slk1 mutant defects are partially rescued by an extra copy of the SSD1/SRK1 gene. SSD1/SRK1 has been independently isolated as a suppressor of mutations in genes involved in growth control, sit4, pde2, bcy1, and ins1 (A. Sutton, D. Immanuel, and K.T. Arnat, Mol. Cell. Biol. 11:2133-2148, 1991; R.B. Wilson, A.A. Brenner, T.B. White, M.J. Engler, J.P. Gaughran, and K. Tatchell, Mol. Cell. Biol. 11:3369-3373, 1991). These data suggest that SLK1 plays a role in both cell morphogenesis and the control of cell growth. We speculate that SLK1 may be a regulatory link for these two cellular processes. Images PMID:1545797

  8. Internalization and processing of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin by toxin-sensitive and -resistant cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Y; Leppla, S H; Bhatnagar, R; Friedlander, A M

    1989-07-01

    Anthrax lethal toxin consists of two separate proteins, protective antigen and lethal factor (LF). Certain macrophages and a mouse macrophage-like cell line, J774A.1, are lysed by low concentrations of lethal toxin. In contrast, another macrophage cell line, IC-21, and all other cell types tested were resistant to this toxin. To discover the basis for this difference, each step in the intoxication process was examined. No differences between sensitive and resistant cells were found in receptor binding or proteolytic activation of protective antigen, steps that are required prior to LF binding. To determine whether resistance results from a defect in translocation to the cytosol, we introduced LF into J774A.1 and IC-21 cells and a nonmacrophage cell line (L6 myoblast) by osmotic lysis of pinocytic vesicles. Only J774A.1 cells were lysed; no effect was observed in IC-21 and L6 cells. These results suggest that resistant cells either lack the intracellular target of LF or fail to process LF to an active form. The relatively low potency of LF introduced into J774A.1 cells by osmotic lysis suggests that protective antigen may also be required at a stage subsequent to endocytosis. PMID:2500434

  9. Lethal Toxin is a Critical Determinant of Rapid Mortality in Rodent Models of Clostridium sordellii Endometritis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yibai; Senn, Tennille; Opp, Judy; Young, Vincent B.; Thiele, Teri; Srinivas, Geetha; Huang, Steven K.; Aronoff, David M.

    2009-01-01

    The toxigenic anaerobe Clostridium sordellii is an uncommon but highly lethal cause of human infection and toxic shock syndrome, yet few studies have addressed its pathogenetic mechanisms. To better characterize the microbial determinants of rapid death from infection both in vitro and in vivo studies were performed to compare a clinical strain of C. sordellii strain (DA-108), isolated from a patient who survived a disseminated infection unaccompanied by toxic shock syndrome, to a virulent reference strain (ATCC9714). Rodent models of endometrial and peritoneal infection with C. sordellii ATCC9714 were rapidly lethal, while infections with DA-108 were not. Extensive genetic and functional comparisons of virulence factor and toxin expression between these two bacterial strains yielded many similarities, with the noted exception that strain DA-108 lacked the tcsL gene, which encodes the large clostridial glucosyltransferase enzyme lethal toxin (TcsL). The targeted removal by immunoprecipitation of TcsL protected animals from death following injection of crude culture supernatants from strain ATCC9714. Injections of a monoclonal anti-TcsL IgG protected animals from death during C. sordellii ATCC9714 infection, suggesting that such an approach might improve the treatment of patients with C. sordellii-induced toxic shock syndrome. PMID:19527792

  10. Metabolic Response of Escherichia coli upon Treatment with Hypochlorite at Sub-Lethal Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Jeannette; Eisenreich, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Hypochlorite is a reactive oxygen species that is worldwide as an antibacterial disinfectant. Hypochlorite exposure is known to cause oxidative damage to DNA and proteins. As a response to these effects, the metabolite profiles of organisms treated with sub-lethal doses of hypochlorite are assumed to be severely modified; however, the nature of these changes is hardly understood. Therefore, using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and gas chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry, we analyzed the time-dependent impact of hypochlorite exposure with a sub-lethal concentration (50 µM) on the metabolite profile of the Escherichia coli strain MG1655. Principle component analysis clearly distinguished between the metabolite profiles of bacteria treated for 0, 5,10, 20, 40, or 60 min. Major changes in the relative amounts of fatty acids, acetic acid, and formic acid occurred within the first 5 min. Comparative gas chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry analyses revealed that the amounts of free methionine and alanine were significantly decreased in the treated cells, demonstrating their susceptibility to hypochlorite exposure. The concentrations of succinate, urea, orotic acid, 2-aminobutyric acid, and 2-hydroxybutyric acid were also severely affected, indicating general changes in the metabolic network by hypochlorite. However, most metabolite levels relaxed to the reference values of untreated cells after 40–60 min, reflecting the capability of E. coli to rapidly adapt to environmental stress factors such as the presence of sub-lethal oxidant levels. PMID:25932918

  11. A screen for F1 hybrid male rescue reveals no major-effect hybrid lethality loci in the Drosophila melanogaster autosomal genome.

    PubMed

    Cuykendall, Tawny N; Satyaki, P; Ji, Shuqing; Clay, Derek M; Edelman, Nathaniel B; Kimchy, Alexandra; Li, Ling-Hei; Nuzzo, Erin A; Parekh, Neil; Park, Suna; Barbash, Daniel A

    2014-12-01

    Hybrid sons between Drosophila melanogaster females and D. simulans males die as 3rd instar larvae. Two genes, D. melanogaster Hybrid male rescue (Hmr) on the X chromosome, and D. simulans Lethal hybrid rescue (Lhr) on chromosome II, interact to cause this lethality. Loss-of-function mutations in either gene suppress lethality, but several pieces of evidence suggest that additional factors are required for hybrid lethality. Here we screen the D. melanogaster autosomal genome by using the Bloomington Stock Center Deficiency kit to search for additional regions that can rescue hybrid male lethality. Our screen is designed to identify putative hybrid incompatibility (HI) genes similar to Hmr and Lhr which, when removed, are dominant suppressors of lethality. After screening 89% of the autosomal genome, we found no regions that rescue males to the adult stage. We did, however, identify several regions that rescue up to 13% of males to the pharate adult stage. This weak rescue suggests the presence of multiple minor-effect HI loci, but we were unable to map these loci to high resolution, presumably because weak rescue can be masked by genetic background effects. We attempted to test one candidate, the dosage compensation gene male specific lethal-3 (msl-3), by using RNA interference with short hairpin microRNA constructs targeted specifically against D. simulans msl-3 but failed to achieve knockdown, in part due to off-target effects. We conclude that the D. melanogaster autosomal genome likely does not contain additional major-effect HI loci. We also show that Hmr is insufficient to fully account for the lethality associated with the D. melanogaster X chromosome, suggesting that additional X-linked genes contribute to hybrid lethality.

  12. A Screen for F1 Hybrid Male Rescue Reveals No Major-Effect Hybrid Lethality Loci in the Drosophila melanogaster Autosomal Genome

    PubMed Central

    Cuykendall, Tawny N.; Satyaki, P.; Ji, Shuqing; Clay, Derek M.; Edelman, Nathaniel B.; Kimchy, Alexandra; Li, Ling-Hei; Nuzzo, Erin A.; Parekh, Neil; Park, Suna; Barbash, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid sons between Drosophila melanogaster females and D. simulans males die as 3rd instar larvae. Two genes, D. melanogaster Hybrid male rescue (Hmr) on the X chromosome, and D. simulans Lethal hybrid rescue (Lhr) on chromosome II, interact to cause this lethality. Loss-of-function mutations in either gene suppress lethality, but several pieces of evidence suggest that additional factors are required for hybrid lethality. Here we screen the D. melanogaster autosomal genome by using the Bloomington Stock Center Deficiency kit to search for additional regions that can rescue hybrid male lethality. Our screen is designed to identify putative hybrid incompatibility (HI) genes similar to Hmr and Lhr which, when removed, are dominant suppressors of lethality. After screening 89% of the autosomal genome, we found no regions that rescue males to the adult stage. We did, however, identify several regions that rescue up to 13% of males to the pharate adult stage. This weak rescue suggests the presence of multiple minor-effect HI loci, but we were unable to map these loci to high resolution, presumably because weak rescue can be masked by genetic background effects. We attempted to test one candidate, the dosage compensation gene male specific lethal-3 (msl-3), by using RNA interference with short hairpin microRNA constructs targeted specifically against D. simulans msl-3 but failed to achieve knockdown, in part due to off-target effects. We conclude that the D. melanogaster autosomal genome likely does not contain additional major-effect HI loci. We also show that Hmr is insufficient to fully account for the lethality associated with the D. melanogaster X chromosome, suggesting that additional X-linked genes contribute to hybrid lethality. PMID:25352540

  13. Empirical complexities in the genetic foundations of lethal mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Bull, James J; Joyce, Paul; Gladstone, Eric; Molineux, Ian J

    2013-10-01

    From population genetics theory, elevating the mutation rate of a large population should progressively reduce average fitness. If the fitness decline is large enough, the population will go extinct in a process known as lethal mutagenesis. Lethal mutagenesis has been endorsed in the virology literature as a promising approach to viral treatment, and several in vitro studies have forced viral extinction with high doses of mutagenic drugs. Yet only one empirical study has tested the genetic models underlying lethal mutagenesis, and the theory failed on even a qualitative level. Here we provide a new level of analysis of lethal mutagenesis by developing and evaluating models specifically tailored to empirical systems that may be used to test the theory. We first quantify a bias in the estimation of a critical parameter and consider whether that bias underlies the previously observed lack of concordance between theory and experiment. We then consider a seemingly ideal protocol that avoids this bias-mutagenesis of virions-but find that it is hampered by other problems. Finally, results that reveal difficulties in the mere interpretation of mutations assayed from double-strand genomes are derived. Our analyses expose unanticipated complexities in testing the theory. Nevertheless, the previous failure of the theory to predict experimental outcomes appears to reside in evolutionary mechanisms neglected by the theory (e.g., beneficial mutations) rather than from a mismatch between the empirical setup and model assumptions. This interpretation raises the specter that naive attempts at lethal mutagenesis may augment adaptation rather than retard it.

  14. Chemotherapy agents and the induction of late lethal defects.

    PubMed

    Seymour, C B; Mothersill, C

    1991-01-01

    Radiation is now known to be capable of producing both lethal and non lethal lesions in a variety of mammalian cells which may not be expressed for several cell divisions after the initial insult. The mechanism by which such an effect occurs is unknown. Because of the possible implications for cancer treatment, if such an effect also occurred following chemotherapy exposure, cells were exposed to various cytotoxic chemotherapy agents with known and well characterised effects on DNA or other areas of cell function or structure. The results indicate that late lethal defects are not detectable after treatment with appropriate ranges of doses of cisplatinum, vincristine, BCNU or adriamycin, but that they are induced by Bleomycin and to a lesser extent by 5-Fluorouracil. Bleomycin is known to cause strand breaks and is regarded as a radiomimetic agent. 5-Fluorouracil may act by preventing efficient and faithful synthesis of DNA, allowing mutations to become integrated into the genome. The occurrence of lethal mutations with both these agents supports previous suggestions that error-prone repair of DNA base sequence abnormalities may be fundamental to the process of late lethal damage production in mammalian cells. The cloning efficiency of cells which survived exposure to Vincristine or BCNU over a wide dose range was found to be significantly increased; this may represent an adaptive response to the drugs.

  15. The Rorschach Suicide Constellation: assessing various degrees of lethality.

    PubMed

    Fowler, J C; Piers, C; Hilsenroth, M J; Holdwick, D J; Padawer, J R

    2001-04-01

    In this article we examine the relation between the Rorschach Comprehensive System's Suicide Constellation (S-CON; Exner, 1993; Exner & Wiley, 1977) and lethality of suicide attempts during the course of patients' hospitalization at the Austen Riggs Center (Stockbridge, MA). Patient records were rated as nonsuicidal (n = 37), parasuicidal (n = 37), or near-lethal (n = 30) based on the presence and lethality of self-destructive acts. Diagnostic efficiency statistics utilizing a cutoff score of 7 or more positive indicators successfully predicted which patients would engage in near-lethal suicidal activity relative to parasuicidal patients (overall correct classification rate [OCC] = .79), nonsuicidal inpatients (OCC = .79), and college students (OCC = .89). Although these predictions were influenced by relatively high base rates in the hospital population (14.5%), base rate estimates were calculated for other hypothetical populations revealing different prediction estimates that should be considered when judging the relative efficacy of the S-CON. Logistic regression analysis revealed that an S-CON score of 7 or more was the sole predictor of near-lethal suicide attempts among 9 psychiatric and demographic variables.

  16. The Rorschach Suicide Constellation: assessing various degrees of lethality.

    PubMed

    Fowler, J C; Piers, C; Hilsenroth, M J; Holdwick, D J; Padawer, J R

    2001-04-01

    In this article we examine the relation between the Rorschach Comprehensive System's Suicide Constellation (S-CON; Exner, 1993; Exner & Wiley, 1977) and lethality of suicide attempts during the course of patients' hospitalization at the Austen Riggs Center (Stockbridge, MA). Patient records were rated as nonsuicidal (n = 37), parasuicidal (n = 37), or near-lethal (n = 30) based on the presence and lethality of self-destructive acts. Diagnostic efficiency statistics utilizing a cutoff score of 7 or more positive indicators successfully predicted which patients would engage in near-lethal suicidal activity relative to parasuicidal patients (overall correct classification rate [OCC] = .79), nonsuicidal inpatients (OCC = .79), and college students (OCC = .89). Although these predictions were influenced by relatively high base rates in the hospital population (14.5%), base rate estimates were calculated for other hypothetical populations revealing different prediction estimates that should be considered when judging the relative efficacy of the S-CON. Logistic regression analysis revealed that an S-CON score of 7 or more was the sole predictor of near-lethal suicide attempts among 9 psychiatric and demographic variables. PMID:11393464

  17. Species-specific heterochromatin prevents mitotic chromosome segregation to cause hybrid lethality in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ferree, Patrick M; Barbash, Daniel A

    2009-10-01

    Postzygotic reproductive barriers such as sterility and lethality of hybrids are important for establishing and maintaining reproductive isolation between species. Identifying the causal loci and discerning how they interfere with the development of hybrids is essential for understanding how hybrid incompatibilities (HIs) evolve, but little is known about the mechanisms of how HI genes cause hybrid dysfunctions. A previously discovered Drosophila melanogaster locus called Zhr causes lethality in F1 daughters from crosses between Drosophila simulans females and D. melanogaster males. Zhr maps to a heterochromatic region of the D. melanogaster X that contains 359-bp satellite repeats, suggesting either that Zhr is a rare protein-coding gene embedded within heterochromatin, or is a locus consisting of the noncoding repetitive DNA that forms heterochromatin. The latter possibility raises the question of how heterochromatic DNA can induce lethality in hybrids. Here we show that hybrid females die because of widespread mitotic defects induced by lagging chromatin at the time during early embryogenesis when heterochromatin is first established. The lagging chromatin is confined solely to the paternally inherited D. melanogaster X chromatids, and consists predominantly of DNA from the 359-bp satellite block. We further found that a rearranged X chromosome carrying a deletion of the entire 359-bp satellite block segregated normally, while a translocation of the 359-bp satellite block to the Y chromosome resulted in defective Y segregation in males, strongly suggesting that the 359-bp satellite block specifically and directly inhibits chromatid separation. In hybrids produced from wild-type parents, the 359-bp satellite block was highly stretched and abnormally enriched with Topoisomerase II throughout mitosis. The 359-bp satellite block is not present in D. simulans, suggesting that lethality is caused by the absence or divergence of factors in the D. simulans maternal

  18. XRCC1 and CYP2E1 polymorphisms as susceptibility factors of plasma mutant p53 protein and anti-p53 antibody expression in vinyl chloride monomer-exposed polyvinyl chloride workers.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ruey-Hong; Du, Chung-Li; Wang, Jung-Der; Chan, Chang-Chuan; Luo, Jiin-Chyuan J; Cheng, Tsun-Jen

    2002-05-01

    Mutant p53 protein and anti-p53 antibody in circulating blood can be detectedamong individuals with mutations of the p53 tumor suppressor gene. Plasma mutant p53 protein and anti-p53 antibody have also been associated with vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) exposure, although the mechanism of VCM-related carcinogenesis remains unclear. Polymorphisms of metabolic and DNA repair genes have been implicated in chemical exposure-related carcinogenesis. The aim of this study is to explore the association between polymorphisms of metabolic and DNA repair genes with mutant p53 protein and anti-p53 antibody expression induced by VCM. Study subjects comprised 333 male workers occupationally exposed to VCM. Plasma mutant p53 protein and anti-p53 antibody detected with ELISA were grouped together as p53 overexpression. Genotypes of cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1), and X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1, exon 10) genes were identified by the PCR. High VCM exposure group had significantly higher p53 overexpression as compared with low exposure group [odds ratio (OR), 2.1; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.1-3.8]. Individuals having experienced a high VCM exposure and displaying a XRCC1 Gln-Gln genotype had a highest risk of p53 overexpression among those having different combinations of VCM exposure and XRCC1 genotypes (OR, 6.5; 95% CI, 1.7-24.2). Interestingly, those subjects reflecting a CYP2E1 c2c2 genotype among the low VCM-exposure group demonstrated a greater risk of p53 overexpression (OR, 9.8; 95% CI, 1.2-81.6) as compared with those experiencing a low VCM exposure and CYP2E1 c1c1/c1c2 genotypes. Additional analysis revealed that individuals possessing more susceptible XRCC1 Gln-Gln, CYP2E1 c2c2, ALDH2 1-2/2-2, and non-null GSTT1 genotypes were more likely to reveal p53 overexpression. Our results suggest that susceptible XRCC1 and CYP2E1 genotypes may modulate the mutation of the p53 gene among

  19. Proteomic analysis of the flooding tolerance mechanism in mutant soybean.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Setsuko; Nanjo, Yohei; Nishimura, Minoru

    2013-02-21

    Flooding stress of soybean is a serious problem because it reduces growth; however, flooding-tolerant cultivars have not been identified. To analyze the flooding tolerance mechanism of soybean, the flooding-tolerant mutant was isolated and analyzed using a proteomic technique. Flooding-tolerance tests were repeated five times using gamma-ray irradiated soybeans, whose root growth (M6 stage) was not suppressed even under flooding stress. Two-day-old wild-type and mutant plants were subjected to flooding stress for 2days, and proteins were identified using a gel-based proteomic technique. In wild-type under flooding stress, levels of proteins related to development, protein synthesis/degradation, secondary metabolism, and the cell wall changed; however, these proteins did not markedly differ in the mutant. In contrast, an increased number of fermentation-related proteins were identified in the mutant under flooding stress. The root tips of mutant plants were not affected by flooding stress, even though the wild-type plants had damaged root. Alcohol dehydrogenase activity in the mutant increased at an early stage of flooding stress compared with that of the wild-type. Taken together, these results suggest that activation of the fermentation system in the early stages of flooding may be an important factor for the acquisition of flooding tolerance in soybean.

  20. Escherichia coli K-12 Suppressor-free Mutants Lacking Early Glycosyltransferases and Late Acyltransferases: minimal lipopolysaccharide structure and induction of envelope stress response.

    PubMed

    Klein, Gracjana; Lindner, Buko; Brabetz, Werner; Brade, Helmut; Raina, Satish

    2009-06-01

    To elucidate the minimal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure needed for the viability of Escherichia coli, suppressor-free strains lacking either the 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid transferase waaA gene or derivatives of the heptosyltransferase I waaC deletion with lack of one or all late acyltransferases (lpxL/M/P) and/or various outer membrane biogenesis factors were constructed. Delta(waaC lpxL lpxM lpxP) and waaA mutants exhibited highly attenuated growth, whereas simultaneous deletion of waaC and surA was lethal. Analyses of LPS of suppressor-free waaA mutants grown at 21 degrees C, besides showing accumulation of free lipid IV(A) precursor, also revealed the presence of its pentaacylated and hexaacylated derivatives, indicating in vivo late acylation can occur without Kdo. In contrast, LPS of Delta(waaC lpxL lpxM lpxP) strains showed primarily Kdo(2)-lipid IV(A), indicating that these minimal LPS structures are sufficient to support growth of E. coli under slow-growth conditions at 21/23 degrees C. These lipid IV(A) derivatives could be modified biosynthetically by phosphoethanolamine, but not by 4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose, indicating export defects of such minimal LPS. DeltawaaA and Delta(waaC lpxL lpxM lpxP) exhibited cell-division defects with a decrease in the levels of FtsZ and OMP-folding factor PpiD. These mutations led to strong constitutive additive induction of envelope responsive CpxR/A and sigma(E) signal transduction pathways. Delta(lpxL lpxM lpxP) mutant, with intact waaC, synthesized tetraacylated lipid A and constitutively incorporated a third Kdo in growth medium inducing synthesis of P-EtN and l-Ara4N. Overexpression of msbA restored growth of Delta(lpxL lpxM lpxP) under fast-growing conditions, but only partially that of the Delta(waaC lpxL lpxM lpxP) mutant. This suppression could be alleviated by overexpression of certain mutant msbA alleles or the single-copy chromosomal MsbA-498V variant in the vicinity of Walker-box II.

  1. Lethal effects of short-wavelength visible light on insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Masatoshi; Shibuya, Kazuki; Sato, Mitsunari; Saito, Yoshino

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the lethal effects of visible light on insects by using light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The toxic effects of ultraviolet (UV) light, particularly shortwave (i.e., UVB and UVC) light, on organisms are well known. However, the effects of irradiation with visible light remain unclear, although shorter wavelengths are known to be more lethal. Irradiation with visible light is not thought to cause mortality in complex animals including insects. Here, however, we found that irradiation with short-wavelength visible (blue) light killed eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults of Drosophila melanogaster. Blue light was also lethal to mosquitoes and flour beetles, but the effective wavelength at which mortality occurred differed among the insect species. Our findings suggest that highly toxic wavelengths of visible light are species-specific in insects, and that shorter wavelengths are not always more toxic. For some animals, such as insects, blue light is more harmful than UV light.

  2. Lethal effects of short-wavelength visible light on insects.

    PubMed

    Hori, Masatoshi; Shibuya, Kazuki; Sato, Mitsunari; Saito, Yoshino

    2014-12-09

    We investigated the lethal effects of visible light on insects by using light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The toxic effects of ultraviolet (UV) light, particularly shortwave (i.e., UVB and UVC) light, on organisms are well known. However, the effects of irradiation with visible light remain unclear, although shorter wavelengths are known to be more lethal. Irradiation with visible light is not thought to cause mortality in complex animals including insects. Here, however, we found that irradiation with short-wavelength visible (blue) light killed eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults of Drosophila melanogaster. Blue light was also lethal to mosquitoes and flour beetles, but the effective wavelength at which mortality occurred differed among the insect species. Our findings suggest that highly toxic wavelengths of visible light are species-specific in insects, and that shorter wavelengths are not always more toxic. For some animals, such as insects, blue light is more harmful than UV light.

  3. Candida albicans mutant construction and characterization of selected virulence determinants.

    PubMed

    Motaung, T E; Albertyn, J; Pohl, C H; Köhler, Gerwald

    2015-08-01

    Candida albicans is a diploid, polymorphic yeast, associated with humans, where it mostly causes no harm. However, under certain conditions it can cause infections ranging from superficial to life threatening. This ability to become pathogenic is often linked to the immune status of the host as well as the expression of certain virulence factors by the yeast. Due to the importance of C. albicans as a pathogen, determination of the molecular mechanisms that allow this yeast to cause disease is important. These studies rely on the ability of researchers to create deletion mutants of specific genes in order to study their function. This article provides a critical review of the important techniques used to create deletion mutants in C. albicans and highlights how these deletion mutants can be used to determine the role of genes in the expression of virulence factors in vitro.

  4. Cyclopeptide toxins of lethal amanitas: Compositions, distribution and phylogenetic implication.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shanshan; Zhou, Qian; He, Zhengmi; Luo, Tao; Zhang, Ping; Cai, Qing; Yang, Zhuliang; Chen, Jia; Chen, Zuohong

    2016-09-15

    Lethal amanitas (Amanita sect. Phalloideae) are responsible for 90% of all fatal mushroom poisonings. Since 2000, more than ten new lethal Amanita species have been discovered and some of them had caused severe mushroom poisonings in China. However, the contents and distribution of cyclopeptides in these lethal mushrooms remain poorly known. In this study, the diversity of major cyclopeptide toxins in seven Amanita species from Eastern Asia and three species from Europe and North America were systematically analyzed, and a new approach to inferring phylogenetic relationships using cyclopeptide profile was evaluated for the first time. The results showed that there were diversities of the cyclopeptides among lethal Amanita species, and cyclopeptides from Amanita rimosa and Amanita fuligineoides were reported for the first time. The amounts of amatoxins in East Asian Amanita species were significantly higher than those in European and North American species. The analysis of distribution of amatoxins and phallotoxins in various Amanita species demonstrated that the content of phallotoxins was higher than that of amatoxins in Amanita phalloides and Amanita virosa. In contrast, the content of phallotoxins was significantly lower than that of amatoxins in all East Asian lethal Amanita species tested. However, the distribution of amatoxins and phallotoxins in different tissues showed the same tendency. Eight cyclopeptides and three unknown compounds were identified using cyclopeptide standards and high-resolution MS. Based on the cyclopeptide profiles, phylogenetic relationships of lethal amanitas were inferred through a dendrogram generated by UPGMA method. The results showed high similarity to the phylogeny established previously based on the multi-locus DNA sequences. PMID:27476461

  5. Determinants of the lethality of climate-related disasters in the Caribbean Community (CARICOM): a cross-country analysis.

    PubMed

    Andrewin, Aisha N; Rodriguez-Llanes, Jose M; Guha-Sapir, Debarati

    2015-07-08

    Floods and storms are climate-related hazards posing high mortality risk to Caribbean Community (CARICOM) nations. However risk factors for their lethality remain untested. We conducted an ecological study investigating risk factors for flood and storm lethality in CARICOM nations for the period 1980-2012. Lethality--deaths versus no deaths per disaster event- was the outcome. We examined biophysical and social vulnerability proxies and a decadal effect as predictors. We developed our regression model via multivariate analysis using a generalized logistic regression model with quasi-binomial distribution; removal of multi-collinear variables and backward elimination. Robustness was checked through subset analysis. We found significant positive associations between lethality, percentage of total land dedicated to agriculture (odds ratio [OR] 1.032; 95% CI: 1.013-1.053) and percentage urban population (OR 1.029, 95% CI 1.003-1.057). Deaths were more likely in the 2000-2012 period versus 1980-1989 (OR 3.708, 95% CI 1.615-8.737). Robustness checks revealed similar coefficients and directions of association. Population health in CARICOM nations is being increasingly impacted by climate-related disasters connected to increasing urbanization and land use patterns. Our findings support the evidence base for setting sustainable development goals (SDG).

  6. Determinants of the lethality of climate-related disasters in the Caribbean Community (CARICOM): a cross-country analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrewin, Aisha N.; Rodriguez-Llanes, Jose M.; Guha-Sapir, Debarati

    2015-07-01

    Floods and storms are climate-related hazards posing high mortality risk to Caribbean Community (CARICOM) nations. However risk factors for their lethality remain untested. We conducted an ecological study investigating risk factors for flood and storm lethality in CARICOM nations for the period 1980-2012. Lethality - deaths versus no deaths per disaster event- was the outcome. We examined biophysical and social vulnerability proxies and a decadal effect as predictors. We developed our regression model via multivariate analysis using a generalized logistic regression model with quasi-binomial distribution; removal of multi-collinear variables and backward elimination. Robustness was checked through subset analysis. We found significant positive associations between lethality, percentage of total land dedicated to agriculture (odds ratio [OR] 1.032; 95% CI: 1.013-1.053) and percentage urban population (OR 1.029, 95% CI 1.003-1.057). Deaths were more likely in the 2000-2012 period versus 1980-1989 (OR 3.708, 95% CI 1.615-8.737). Robustness checks revealed similar coefficients and directions of association. Population health in CARICOM nations is being increasingly impacted by climate-related disasters connected to increasing urbanization and land use patterns. Our findings support the evidence base for setting sustainable development goals (SDG).

  7. Determinants of the lethality of climate-related disasters in the Caribbean Community (CARICOM): a cross-country analysis

    PubMed Central

    Andrewin, Aisha N.; Rodriguez-Llanes, Jose M.; Guha-Sapir, Debarati

    2015-01-01

    Floods and storms are climate-related hazards posing high mortality risk to Caribbean Community (CARICOM) nations. However risk factors for their lethality remain untested. We conducted an ecological study investigating risk factors for flood and storm lethality in CARICOM nations for the period 1980–2012. Lethality - deaths versus no deaths per disaster event- was the outcome. We examined biophysical and social vulnerability proxies and a decadal effect as predictors. We developed our regression model via multivariate analysis using a generalized logistic regression model with quasi-binomial distribution; removal of multi-collinear variables and backward elimination. Robustness was checked through subset analysis. We found significant positive associations between lethality, percentage of total land dedicated to agriculture (odds ratio [OR] 1.032; 95% CI: 1.013–1.053) and percentage urban population (OR 1.029, 95% CI 1.003–1.057). Deaths were more likely in the 2000–2012 period versus 1980–1989 (OR 3.708, 95% CI 1.615–8.737). Robustness checks revealed similar coefficients and directions of association. Population health in CARICOM nations is being increasingly impacted by climate-related disasters connected to increasing urbanization and land use patterns. Our findings support the evidence base for setting sustainable development goals (SDG). PMID:26153115

  8. Lethal toxicity of cadmium to Cyprinus carpio and Tilapia aurea

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-01

    There have been several studies of the lethal toxicity of cadmium to freshwater fishes, but further information is required on a number of points. For example, the shallow slope which is characteristic of the cadmium toxicity curve makes interspecific comparisons difficult. There also is a paucity of information on cadmium toxicity to non-Salmonid European species. As part of a study of the water quality requirements of cultured fish species in the Mediterranean, the authors report on the lethal toxicity of cadmium to two such species, the common carp Cyprinus carpio, and Tilapia aurea, for which little information has previously been reported.

  9. Approaches to Identifying Synthetic Lethal Interactions in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Jordan M.; Nguyen, Quy H.; Singh, Manpreet; Razorenova, Olga V.

    2015-01-01

    Targeting synthetic lethal interactions is a promising new therapeutic approach to exploit specific changes that occur within cancer cells. Multiple approaches to investigate these interactions have been developed and successfully implemented, including chemical, siRNA, shRNA, and CRISPR library screens. Genome-wide computational approaches, such as DAISY, also have been successful in predicting synthetic lethal interactions from both cancer cell lines and patient samples. Each approach has its advantages and disadvantages that need to be considered depending on the cancer type and its molecular alterations. This review discusses these approaches and examines case studies that highlight their use. PMID:26029013

  10. [Attenuation in the virulence of a mutant of Junin virus in suckling mice].

    PubMed

    Scolaro, L A; Mersich, S E; Damonte, E B

    1987-01-01

    The virulence in neonatal mice of a temperature-sensitive mutant of Junin virus, named C167, was studied. The thermosensitive properties of this mutant were tested by titration on Vero cells at 37 and 40 degrees C. The ratio of infectivity 40/37 was approximately 100-fold lower for C167 with respect to XJC13 (Table 1). The attenuation of C167 was determined by measurement of mean survival time and 50% lethal dose after intracerebral injection of 2 and 11 day old mice. For C167 the lethality index (expressed ad the ratio TCID50/LD50) was greater than 580, while for XJC13 the index was 4.4 (Table 2). The lack of virulence of C167 was correlated with a restricted ability to replicate in suckling mouse brains. By contrast, the mutant and the parental virus grew to a similar titre in Vero cells (Figure 2). Both viruses were indistinguishable in cross-neutralization tests using hyperimmune antisera.

  11. Deciphering the mechanisms of developmental disorders: phenotype analysis of embryos from mutant mouse lines

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Robert; McGuire, Christina; Mohun, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The Deciphering the Mechanisms of Developmental Disorders (DMDD) consortium is a research programme set up to identify genes in the mouse, which if mutated (or knocked-out) result in embryonic lethality when homozygous, and initiate the study of why disruption of their function has such profound effects on embryo development and survival. The project uses a combination of comprehensive high resolution 3D imaging and tissue histology to identify abnormalities in embryo and placental structures of embryonic lethal lines. The image data we have collected and the phenotypes scored are freely available through the project website (http://dmdd.org.uk). In this article we describe the web interface to the images that allows the embryo data to be viewed at full resolution in different planes, discuss how to search the database for a phenotype, and our approach to organising the data for an embryo and a mutant line so it is easy to comprehend and intuitive to navigate. PMID:26519470

  12. Deciphering the mechanisms of developmental disorders: phenotype analysis of embryos from mutant mouse lines.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robert; McGuire, Christina; Mohun, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The Deciphering the Mechanisms of Developmental Disorders (DMDD) consortium is a research programme set up to identify genes in the mouse, which if mutated (or knocked-out) result in embryonic lethality when homozygous, and initiate the study of why disruption of their function has such profound effects on embryo development and survival. The project uses a combination of comprehensive high resolution 3D imaging and tissue histology to identify abnormalities in embryo and placental structures of embryonic lethal lines. The image data we have collected and the phenotypes scored are freely available through the project website (http://dmdd.org.uk). In this article we describe the web interface to the images that allows the embryo data to be viewed at full resolution in different planes, discuss how to search the database for a phenotype, and our approach to organising the data for an embryo and a mutant line so it is easy to comprehend and intuitive to navigate.

  13. Design, overexpression, and purification of polymerization-blocked yeast αβ-tubulin mutants.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Vinu; Ayaz, Pelin; Huddleston, Patrick; Rice, Luke M

    2011-10-11

    Microtubule dynamics play essential roles in intracellular organization and cell division. They result from structural and biochemical properties of αβ-tubulin heterodimers and how these polymerizing subunits interact with themselves and with regulatory proteins. A broad understanding of the underlying mechanisms has been established, but fundamental questions remain unresolved. The lack of routine access to recombinant αβ-tubulin represents an obstacle to deeper insight into αβ-tubulin structure, biochemistry, and recognition. Indeed, the widespread reliance on animal brain αβ-tubulin means that very few in vitro studies have taken advantage of powerful and ordinarily routine techniques like site-directed mutagenesis. Here we report new methods for purifying wild-type or mutant yeast αβ-tubulin from inducibly overexpressing strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Inducible overexpression is an improvement over existing approaches that rely on constitutive expression: it provides higher yields while also allowing otherwise lethal mutants to be purified. We also designed and purified polymerization-blocked αβ-tubulin mutants. These "blocked" forms of αβ-tubulin give a dominant lethal phenotype when expressed in cells; they cannot form microtubules in vitro and when present in mixtures inhibit the polymerization of wild-type αβ-tubulin. The effects of blocking mutations are very specific, because purified mutants exhibit normal hydrodynamic properties, bind GTP, and interact with a tubulin-binding domain. The ability to overexpress and purify wild-type αβ-tubulin, or mutants like the ones we report here, creates new opportunities for structural studies of αβ-tubulin and its complexes with regulatory proteins, and for biochemical and functional studies of microtubule dynamics and its regulation. PMID:21888381

  14. Generation of point-mutant FAK knockin mice.

    PubMed

    Tavora, B; Batista, S; Alexopoulou, A N; Kostourou, V; Fernandez, I; Robinson, S D; Lees, D M; Serrels, B; Hodivala-Dilke, K

    2014-11-01

    Focal adhesion kinase is a non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase with signaling functions downstream of integrins and growth factor receptors. In addition to its role in adhesion, migration, and proliferation it also has non-kinase scaffolding functions in the nucleus. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation involves the following: (1) ligand bound growth factors or clustered integrins activate FAK kinase domain; (2) FAK autophosphorylates tyrosine (Y) 397; (3) Src binds pY397 and phosphorylates FAK at various other sites including Y861; (4) downstream signaling of activated FAK elicits changes in cellular behavior. Although many studies have demonstrated roles for the kinase domain, Y397 and Y861 sites, in vitro much less is known about their functions in vivo. Here, we report the generation of a series of FAK-mutant knockin mice where mutant FAK, either kinase dead, non-phosphorylatable mutants Y397F and Y861F, or mutant Y397E-containing a phosphomimetic site that results in a constitutive active Y397, can be expressed in a Cre inducible fashion driven by the ROSA26 promoter. In future studies, intercrossing these mice with FAKflox/flox mice and inducible cre-expressing mice will enable the in vivo study of mutant FAK function in the absence of endogenous FAK in a spatially and temporally regulated fashion within the whole organism. PMID:25242698

  15. MYC, Metabolic Synthetic Lethality, and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Annie L; Dang, Chi V

    2016-01-01

    The MYC oncogene plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of human cancers. It encodes a transcription factor that has broad reaching effects on many cellular functions, most importantly in driving cell growth through regulation of genes involved in ribosome biogenesis, metabolism, and cell cycle. Upon binding DNA with its partner MAX, MYC recruits factors that release paused RNA polymerases to drive transcription and amplify gene expression. At physiologic levels of MYC, occupancy of high-affinity DNA-binding sites drives 'house-keeping' metabolic genes and those involved in ribosome and mitochondrial biogenesis for biomass accumulation. At high oncogenic levels of MYC, invasion of low-affinity sites and enhancer sequences alter the transcriptome and cause metabolic imbalances, which activates stress response and checkpoints such as p53. Loss of checkpoints unleashes MYC's full oncogenic potential to couple metabolism with neoplastic cell growth and division. Cells that overexpress MYC, however, are vulnerable to metabolic perturbations that provide potential new avenues for cancer therapy. PMID:27557535

  16. Secretory pathway retention of mutant prion protein induces p38-MAPK activation and lethal disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Berta; Altmeppen, Hermann C.; Ulbrich, Sarah; Linsenmeier, Luise; Krasemann, Susanne; Chakroun, Karima; Acevedo-Morantes, Claudia Y.; Wille, Holger; Tatzelt, Jörg; Glatzel, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Misfolding of proteins in the biosynthetic pathway in neurons may cause disturbed protein homeostasis and neurodegeneration. The prion protein (PrPC) is a GPI-anchored protein that resides at the plasma membrane and may be misfolded to PrPSc leading to prion diseases. We show that a deletion in the C-terminal domain of PrPC (PrPΔ214–229) leads to partial retention in the secretory pathway causing a fatal neurodegenerative disease in mice that is partially rescued by co-expression of PrPC. Transgenic (Tg(PrPΔ214–229)) mice show extensive neuronal loss in hippocampus and cerebellum and activation of p38-MAPK. In cell culture under stress conditions, PrPΔ214–229 accumulates in the Golgi apparatus possibly representing transit to the Rapid ER Stress-induced ExporT (RESET) pathway together with p38-MAPK activation. Here we describe a novel pathway linking retention of a GPI-anchored protein in the early secretory pathway to p38-MAPK activation and a neurodegenerative phenotype in transgenic mice. PMID:27117504

  17. Transcriptional activation by TFIIB mutants that are severely impaired in interaction with promoter DNA and acidic activation domains.

    PubMed Central

    Chou, S; Struhl, K

    1997-01-01

    Biochemical experiments indicate that the general transcription factor IIB (TFIIB) can interact directly with acidic activation domains and that activators can stimulate transcription by increasing recruitment of TFIIB to promoters. For promoters at which recruitment of TFIIB to promoters is limiting in vivo, one would predict that transcriptional activity should be particularly sensitive to TFIIB mutations that decrease the association of TFIIB with promoter DNA and/or with activation domains; i.e., such TFIIB mutations should exacerbate a limiting step that occurs in wild-type cells. Here, we describe mutations on the DNA-binding surface of TFIIB that severely affect both TATA-binding protein (TBP)-TFIIB-TATA complex formation and interaction with the VP16 activation domain in vitro. These TFIIB mutations affect the stability of the TBP-TFIIB-TATA complex in vivo because they are synthetically lethal in combination with TBP mutants impaired for TFIIB binding. Interestingly, these TFIIB derivatives support viability, and they efficiently respond to Gal4-VP16 and natural acidic activators in different promoter contexts. These results suggest that in vivo, recruitment of TFIIB is not generally a limiting step for acidic activators. However, one TFIIB derivative shows reduced transcription of GAL4, suggesting that TFIIB may be limiting at a subset of promoters in vivo. PMID:9372910

  18. Directed Synthesis of a Segmental Chromosomal Transposition: An Approach to the Study of Chromosomes Lethal to the Gametophyte Generation of Maize

    PubMed Central

    Birchler, J. A.; Levin, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    Because of the haploid nature of the gametophyte generation of plants, most mutations that are lethal or detrimental to the gametophytes cannot be recovered. Our laboratory is currently developing several techniques to overcome this situation. In this paper, a procedure is described to generate directed segmental chromosomal transpositions. The method involves recovery of recombinants between reciprocal translocation overlaps such that one region of the genome is inserted into a nonhomologous chromosome in a predetermined and directed manner. This duplicated segment then could serve to cover deficiencies or mutations, lethal to the gametophytes, in the region from whence it originated. The manipulation of segmental chromosomal transpositions for analyzing mutants lethal or detrimental to the gametophyte generation is discussed. The procedure to generate transpositions, the translocations between normal A and supernumerary B chromosomes that generate deficiencies in the male gametes, the r-X1 chromosome that generates deficiencies in the female gametes and other techniques available in maize form a system to analyze gametophyte lethal mutations. PMID:2016056

  19. Defective intracellular transport of tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase with an Ala162-->Thr mutation associated with lethal hypophosphatasia.

    PubMed

    Shibata, H; Fukushi, M; Igarashi, A; Misumi, Y; Ikehara, Y; Ohashi, Y; Oda, K

    1998-05-01

    We have studied the biosynthesis and intracellular transport of tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNSALP) transiently expressed in COS-1 cells. Mutations were introduced into TNSALP to examine the effects of a single amino acid substitution on the activity and biosynthesis of TNSALP. The cells expressing wild-type TNSALP exhibited more than 200-fold higher alkaline phosphatase activity than untransfected ones. Pulse-chase experiments showed that TNSALP was synthesized as a 66-kDa endoglucosaminidase H (Endo H)-sensitive form and converted to EndoH-resistant forms with heterogenous molecular masses ( approximately 80 kDa), which finally appeared on the cell surface as judged by digestion with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). In contrast, a TNSALP with a Glu218-->Gly mutation exhibited no phosphatase activity at all and the 66-kDa Endo H-sensitive form was the only molecular species throughout the chase in the transfected cells. In accordance with this finding, digestion with PI-PLC and immunofluorescence observation confirmed that this mutant was never expressed on the cell surface. Another mutant with a Ala162-->Thr substitution, which naturally occurs in association with a lethal hypophosphatasia, exhibited a low activity and only a small fraction of the 66-kDa form acquired Endo-H resistance and reached the cell surface. Since the wild-type and the mutant TNSALPs were labeled with [3H]ethanolamine, a component of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI), it is unlikely that the impaired intracellular transport of the two mutants is due to a failure in their modification by GPI. Interestingly, the 66-kDa Endo H-sensitive form of the TNSALP mutants but not that of the wild-type, was found to form an interchain disulfide-bonded high-molecular-mass aggregate within the cells. These results suggest that impaired intracellular transport of the TNSALP (Ala162-->Thr) molecule caused by its aggregation is the molecular basis for the lethal

  20. Long-term Aβ exposure augments mCa2+-independent mROS-mediated depletion of cardiolipin for the shift of a lethal transient mitochondrial permeability transition to its permanent mode in NARP cybrids: a protective targeting of melatonin.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Chia-Wei; Peng, Tsung-I; Peng, Alexander C; Reiter, Russel J; Tanaka, Masashi; Lai, Yiu-Kay; Jou, Mei-Jie

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ)-induced neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study investigated whether mtDNA T8993G mutation-induced complex V inhibition, clinically associated with neurological muscle weakness, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP), is a potential risk factor for AD and the pathological link for long-term exposure of Aβ-induced mitochondrial toxicity and apoptosis in NARP cybrids. Using noninvasive fluorescence probe-coupled laser scanning imaging microscopy and NARP cybrids harboring 98% mutant genes along with its parental 143B osteosarcoma cells, we demonstrated that Aβ-augmented mitochondrial Ca(2+) (mCa(2+))-independent mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) formation for a cardiolipin (CL, a major mitochondrial protective phospholipid)-dependent lethal modulation of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). Aβ augmented not only the amount but also the propagation rate of mROS-induced mROS formation to significantly depolarize mitochondrial membrane potential (∆Ψ(m)) and reduce mCa(2+) stress. Aβ-augmented mROS oxidized and depleted CL, thereby enhances mitochondrial fission and movement retardation, which promoted the NARP-augmented lethal transient-MPT (t-MPT) to switch to its irreversible mode of permanent-MPT (p-MPT). Interestingly, melatonin, a multiple mitochondrial protector, markedly reduced Aβ-augmented mROS formation and therefore significantly reduced mROS-mediated depolarization of ∆Ψ(m), fission of mitochondria and retardation of mitochondrial movement to stabilize CL and hence the MPT. In the presence of melatonin, Aβ-promoted p-MPT was reversed to a protective t-MPT, which preserved ∆Ψ(m) and lowered elevated mCa(2+) to sublethal levels for an enhanced mCa(2+)-dependent O(2) consumption. Thus, melatonin may potentially rescue AD patients associated with NARP symptoms. PMID:24446866

  1. Dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Generoso, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations are a major component of radiation or chemically induced genetic damage in mammalian germ cells. The types of aberration produced are dependent upon the mutagen used and the germ-cell stage treated. For example, in male meiotic and postmeiotic germ cells certain alkylating chemicals induce both dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations while others induce primarily dominant-lethal mutations. Production of these two endpoints appears to be determined by the stability of alkylation products with the chromosomes. If the reaction products are intact in the male chromosomes at the time of sperm entry, they may be repaired in fertilized eggs. If repair is not effected and the alkylation products persist to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication, they lead to chromatid-type aberrations and eventually to dominant-lethality. The production of heritable translocations, on the other hand, requires a transformation of unstable alkylation products into suitable intermediate lesions. The process by which these lesions are converted into chromosome exchange within the male genome takes place after sperm enters the egg but prior to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication (i.e., chromosome-type). Thus, dominant-lethal mutations result from both chromatid- and chromosome-type aberrations while heritable translocations result primarily from the latter type. DNA target sites associated with the production of these two endpoints are discussed.

  2. Subcutaneous wounding postirradiation reduces radiation lethality in mice.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Joy; Orschell, Christie M; Mendonca, Marc S; Bigsby, Robert M; Dynlacht, Joseph R

    2014-06-01

    The detonation of an improvised nuclear device during a radiological terrorist attack could result in the exposure of thousands of civilians and first responders to lethal or potentially lethal doses of ionizing radiation (IR). There is a major effort in the United States to develop phamacological mitigators of radiation lethality that would be effective particularly if administered after irradiation. We show here that giving female C57BL/6 mice a subcutaneous surgical incision after whole body exposure to an LD50/30 X-ray dose protects against radiation lethality and increases survival from 50% to over 90% (P = 0.0001). The increase in survival, at least in part, appears to be due to enhanced recovery of hematopoiesis, notably red blood cells, neutrophils and platelets. While a definitive mechanism has yet to be elucidated, we propose that this approach may be used to identify potentially novel mechanisms and pathways that could aid in the development of novel pharmacological radiation countermeasures. PMID:24811864

  3. The "Lethal Chamber": Further Evidence of the Euthanasia Option.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elks, Martin A.

    1993-01-01

    Historical discussions of the euthanasia or "lethal chamber" option in relation to people with mental retardation are presented. The paper concludes that eugenic beliefs in the primacy of heredity over environment and the positive role of natural selection may have condoned the poor conditions characteristic of large, segregated institutions and…

  4. The Prevalence, Lethality and Intent of Suicide Attempts among Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Judy A.; Lewinsohn, Peter M.

    Although suicide is the second leading cause of death among adolescents in the United States, little is known about the prevalence or characteristics of suicide attempts among adolescents. Data from 1,710 adolescents attending 9 high schools in 5 communities were examined to determine the prevalence of suicide attempts and the lethality and intent…

  5. An overview of the future of non-lethal weapons.

    PubMed

    Alexander, J B

    2001-01-01

    During the past decade, vast changes have occurred in the geopolitical landscape and the nature of the types of conflicts in which technologically developed countries have been involved. While the threat of conventional war remains, forces have been more frequently deployed in situations that require great restraint. Adversaries are often likely to be elusive and commingled with noncombatants. There has been some shift in public opinion away from tolerance of collateral casualties. Therefore there is a need to be able to apply force while limiting casualties. Non-lethal weapons provide part of the solution. Among the changes that will influence the future have been studies by the US and NATO concerning the use of non-lethal weapons, coincidental with increased funding for their development and testing. New concepts and policies have recently been formalized. Surprisingly, the most strident objections to the implementation of non-lethal weapons have come from organizations that are ostensibly designed to protect non-combatants. These arguments are specious and, while technically and academically challenging, actually serve to foster an environment that will result in the deaths of many more innocent civilians. They misconstrue technology with human intent. The reasons for use of force will not abate. Alternatives to bombs, missiles, tanks and artillery must therefore be found. Non-lethal weapons are not a panacea but do offer the best hope of minimizing casualties while allowing nations or alliances the means to use force in protection of national or regional interests.

  6. Moving ahead on harnessing synthetic lethality to fight cancer.

    PubMed

    Jerby-Arnon, Livnat; Ruppin, Eytan

    2015-01-01

    We have recently developed a data-mining pipeline that comprehensively identifies cancer unique susceptibilities, following the concept of Synthetic Lethality (SL). The approach enables, for the first time, to identify and harness genome-scale SL-networks to accurately predict gene essentiality, drug response, and clinical prognosis in cancer.

  7. An overview of the future of non-lethal weapons.

    PubMed

    Alexander, J B

    2001-01-01

    During the past decade, vast changes have occurred in the geopolitical landscape and the nature of the types of conflicts in which technologically developed countries have been involved. While the threat of conventional war remains, forces have been more frequently deployed in situations that require great restraint. Adversaries are often likely to be elusive and commingled with noncombatants. There has been some shift in public opinion away from tolerance of collateral casualties. Therefore there is a need to be able to apply force while limiting casualties. Non-lethal weapons provide part of the solution. Among the changes that will influence the future have been studies by the US and NATO concerning the use of non-lethal weapons, coincidental with increased funding for their development and testing. New concepts and policies have recently been formalized. Surprisingly, the most strident objections to the implementation of non-lethal weapons have come from organizations that are ostensibly designed to protect non-combatants. These arguments are specious and, while technically and academically challenging, actually serve to foster an environment that will result in the deaths of many more innocent civilians. They misconstrue technology with human intent. The reasons for use of force will not abate. Alternatives to bombs, missiles, tanks and artillery must therefore be found. Non-lethal weapons are not a panacea but do offer the best hope of minimizing casualties while allowing nations or alliances the means to use force in protection of national or regional interests. PMID:11578037

  8. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... result, one of which is a statistically significant dose-related increase in the number of dominant... a statistically significant dose-related increase in the number of dominant lethals or a... of the uteri are examined to determine the numbers of implants and live and dead embryos....

  9. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... result, one of which is a statistically significant dose-related increase in the number of dominant... a statistically significant dose-related increase in the number of dominant lethals or a... of the uteri are examined to determine the numbers of implants and live and dead embryos....

  10. The Lethal "Femme Fatale" in the Noir Tradition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boozer, Jack

    2000-01-01

    Traces the lethal seductress through Hollywood's "noir" history from "Double Indemnity" (1944) to "The Last Seduction" (1996). Examines how this figure largely abjures traditional romance and passive domesticity, choosing instead to apply her sexuality to homicidal plots toward greed. Argues that her narrative positioning serves as a barometer of…

  11. Conditional lethality strains for the biological control of Anastrepha species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pro-apoptotic cell death genes are promising candidates for biologically-based autocidal control of pest insects as demonstrated by tetracycline (tet)-suppressible systems for conditional embryonic lethality in Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) and the medfly, Ceratitis capitata (Cc). However, for medfly...

  12. Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with altered phototropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khurana, J. P.; Poff, K. L.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty five strains of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. have been identified with altered phototropic responses to 450-nm light. Four of these mutants have been more thoroughly characterized. Strain JK224 shows normal gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. However, while the amplitude for "first positive" phototropism is the same as that in the wild-type, the threshold and fluence for the maximum response in "first positive" phototropism are shifted to higher fluence by a factor of 20-30. This mutant may represent an alteration in the photoreceptor pigment for phototropism. Strain JK218 exhibits no curvature to light at any fluence from 1 micromole m-2 to 2700 micromoles m-2, but shows normal gravitropism. Strain JK345 shows no "first positive" phototropism, and reduced gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. Strain JK229 shows no measurable "first positive" phototropism, but normal gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. Based on these data, it is suggested that: 1. gravitropism and phototropism contain at least one common element; 2. "first positive" and "second positive" phototropism contain at least one common element; and 3. "first positive" phototropism can be substantially altered without any apparent alteration of "second positive" phototropism.

  13. A novel method to generate unmarked gene deletions in the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi using 5-fluorocytosine conditional lethality

    PubMed Central

    van der Geize, R.; de Jong, W.; Hessels, G. I.; Grommen, A. W. F.; Jacobs, A. A. C.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    2008-01-01

    A novel method to efficiently generate unmarked in-frame gene deletions in Rhodococcus equi was developed, exploiting the cytotoxic effect of 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) by the action of cytosine deaminase (CD) and uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT) enzymes. The opportunistic, intracellular pathogen R. equi is resistant to high concentrations of 5-FC. Introduction of Escherichia coli genes encoding CD and UPRT conferred conditional lethality to R. equi cells incubated with 5-FC. To exemplify the use of the codA::upp cassette as counter-selectable marker, an unmarked in-frame gene deletion mutant of R. equi was constructed. The supA and supB genes, part of a putative cholesterol catabolic gene cluster, were efficiently deleted from the R. equi wild-type genome. Phenotypic analysis of the generated ΔsupAB mutant confirmed that supAB are essential for growth of R. equi on cholesterol. Macrophage survival assays revealed that the ΔsupAB mutant is able to survive and proliferate in macrophages comparable to wild type. Thus, cholesterol metabolism does not appear to be essential for macrophage survival of R. equi. The CD-UPRT based 5-FC counter-selection may become a useful asset in the generation of unmarked in-frame gene deletions in other actinobacteria as well, as actinobacteria generally appear to be 5-FC resistant and 5-FU sensitive. PMID:18984616

  14. A multivariate model of stakeholder preference for lethal cat management.

    PubMed

    Wald, Dara M; Jacobson, Susan K

    2014-01-01

    Identifying stakeholder beliefs and attitudes is critical for resolving management conflicts. Debate over outdoor cat management is often described as a conflict between two groups, environmental advocates and animal welfare advocates, but little is known about the variables predicting differences among these critical stakeholder groups. We administered a mail survey to randomly selected stakeholders representing both of these groups (n=1,596) in Florida, where contention over the management of outdoor cats has been widespread. We used a structural equation model to evaluate stakeholder intention to support non-lethal management. The cognitive hierarchy model predicted that values influenced beliefs, which predicted general and specific attitudes, which in turn, influenced behavioral intentions. We posited that specific attitudes would mediate the effect of general attitudes, beliefs, and values on management support. Model fit statistics suggested that the final model fit the data well (CFI=0.94, RMSEA=0.062). The final model explained 74% of the variance in management support, and positive attitudes toward lethal management (humaneness) had the largest direct effect on management support. Specific attitudes toward lethal management and general attitudes toward outdoor cats mediated the relationship between positive (p<0.05) and negative cat-related impact beliefs (p<0.05) and support for management. These results supported the specificity hypothesis and the use of the cognitive hierarchy to assess stakeholder intention to support non-lethal cat management. Our findings suggest that stakeholders can simultaneously perceive both positive and negative beliefs about outdoor cats, which influence attitudes toward and support for non-lethal management.

  15. A Multivariate Model of Stakeholder Preference for Lethal Cat Management

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Dara M.; Jacobson, Susan K.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying stakeholder beliefs and attitudes is critical for resolving management conflicts. Debate over outdoor cat management is often described as a conflict between two groups, environmental advocates and animal welfare advocates, but little is known about the variables predicting differences among these critical stakeholder groups. We administered a mail survey to randomly selected stakeholders representing both of these groups (n = 1,596) in Florida, where contention over the management of outdoor cats has been widespread. We used a structural equation model to evaluate stakeholder intention to support non-lethal management. The cognitive hierarchy model predicted that values influenced beliefs, which predicted general and specific attitudes, which in turn, influenced behavioral intentions. We posited that specific attitudes would mediate the effect of general attitudes, beliefs, and values on management support. Model fit statistics suggested that the final model fit the data well (CFI = 0.94, RMSEA = 0.062). The final model explained 74% of the variance in management support, and positive attitudes toward lethal management (humaneness) had the largest direct effect on management support. Specific attitudes toward lethal management and general attitudes toward outdoor cats mediated the relationship between positive (p<0.05) and negative cat-related impact beliefs (p<0.05) and support for management. These results supported the specificity hypothesis and the use of the cognitive hierarchy to assess stakeholder intention to support non-lethal cat management. Our findings suggest that stakeholders can simultaneously perceive both positive and negative beliefs about outdoor cats, which influence attitudes toward and support for non-lethal management. PMID:24736744

  16. Altered expression of neuropeptides in FoxG1-null heterozygous mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Frullanti, Elisa; Amabile, Sonia; Lolli, Maria Grazia; Bartolini, Anna; Livide, Gabriella; Landucci, Elisa; Mari, Francesca; Vaccarino, Flora M; Ariani, Francesca; Massimino, Luca; Renieri, Alessandra; Meloni, Ilaria

    2016-02-01

    Foxg1 gene encodes for a transcription factor essential for telencephalon development in the embryonic mammalian forebrain. Its complete absence is embryonic lethal while Foxg1 heterozygous mice are viable but display microcephaly, altered hippocampal neurogenesis and behavioral and cognitive deficiencies. In order to evaluate the effects of Foxg1 alteration in adult brain, we performed expression profiling in total brains from Foxg1+/- heterozygous mutants and wild-type littermates. We identified statistically significant differences in expression levels for 466 transcripts (P<0.001), 29 of which showed a fold change ≥ 1.5. Among the differentially expressed genes was found a group of genes expressed in the basal ganglia and involved in the control of movements. A relevant (three to sevenfold changes) and statistically significant increase of expression, confirmed by qRT-PCR, was found in two highly correlated genes with expression restricted to the hypothalamus: Oxytocin (Oxt) and Arginine vasopressin (Avp). These neuropeptides have an important role in maternal and social behavior, and their alteration is associated with impaired social interaction and autistic behavior. In addition, Neuronatin (Nnat) levels appear significantly higher both in Foxg1+/- whole brain and in hippocampal neurons after silencing Foxg1, strongly suggesting that it is directly or indirectly repressed by Foxg1. During fetal and neonatal brain development, Nnat may regulate neuronal excitability, receptor trafficking and calcium-dependent signaling and, in the adult brain, it is predominantly expressed in parvalbumin-positive GABAergic interneurons. Overall, these results implicate the overexpression of a group of neuropeptides in the basal ganglia, hypothalamus, cortex and hippocampus in the pathogenesis FOXG1 behavioral impairments.

  17. Problem-Solving Test: Tryptophan Operon Mutants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a problem-solving test that deals with the regulation of the "trp" operon of "Escherichia coli." Two mutants of this operon are described: in mutant A, the operator region of the operon carries a point mutation so that it is unable to carry out its function; mutant B expresses a "trp" repressor protein unable to bind…

  18. The repair of sub-lethal damage and the stimulated repair of potentially lethal damage in Saintpaulia.

    PubMed

    Leenhouts, H P; Sijsma, M J; Litwiniszyn, M; Chadwick, K H

    1981-10-01

    The repair of sublethal and potentially lethal damage in stationary resting epidermal cells of Saintpaulia has been investigated. Fractionation experiments reveal an efficient repair of sublethal damage with a half-life of 1.9 hours. No repair of potentially lethal damage was noted when cultivation of the leaves was delayed for 24 hours after irradiation. At delay times of 2, 3 and 4 days some repair of potentially lethal damage has been found. A small pre-dose given 24 hours before a challenging dose improved the cells' chance to regenerate and the improvement has been shown to be compatible with an improved repair of potentially lethal damage induced by X-rays and fast neutrons. It hs been shown that the stimulated repair process takes 12 to 24 hours to develop, is dependent on the size of the pre-dose, has single-hit dose kinetics, and an r.b.e. of 1 for neutrons. With delayed cultivation of 2 days the stimulated repair process leads to an alteration in the shape of the regeneration (survival)-dose relationship which increases the low dose r.b.e. for neutrons from 10 to 35. PMID:6975252

  19. Inhibition of DNA Methyltransferases Blocks Mutant Huntingtin-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yanchun; Daito, Takuji; Sasaki, Yo; Chung, Yong Hee; Xing, Xiaoyun; Pondugula, Santhi; Swamidass, S. Joshua; Wang, Ting; Kim, Albert H.; Yano, Hiroko

    2016-01-01

    Although epigenetic abnormalities have been described in Huntington’s disease (HD), the causal epigenetic mechanisms driving neurodegeneration in HD cortex and striatum remain undefined. Using an epigenetic pathway-targeted drug screen, we report that inhibitors of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs), decitabine and FdCyd, block mutant huntingtin (Htt)-induced toxicity in primary cortical and striatal neurons. In addition, knockdown of DNMT3A or DNMT1 protected neurons against mutant Htt-induced toxicity, together demonstrating a requirement for DNMTs in mutant Htt-triggered neuronal death and suggesting a neurodegenerative mechanism based on DNA methylation-mediated transcriptional repression. Inhibition of DNMTs in HD model primary cortical or striatal neurons restored the expression of several key genes, including Bdnf, an important neurotrophic factor implicated in HD. Accordingly, the Bdnf promoter exhibited aberrant cytosine methylation in mutant Htt-expressing cortical neurons. In vivo, pharmacological inhibition of DNMTs in HD mouse brains restored the mRNA levels of key striatal genes known to be downregulated in HD. Thus, disturbances in DNA methylation play a critical role in mutant Htt-induced neuronal dysfunction and death, raising the possibility that epigenetic strategies targeting abnormal DNA methylation may have therapeutic utility in HD. PMID:27516062

  20. Mutants of Arabidopsis with altered regulation of starch degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Caspar, T.; Lin, Tsanpiao; Kakefuda, G.; Benbow, L.; Preiss, J.; Somerville, C. )

    1991-04-01

    Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. with altered regulation of starch degradation were identified by screening for plants that retained high levels of leaf starch after a period of extended darkness. The mutant phenotype was also expressed in seeds, flowers, and roots, indicating that the same pathway of starch degradation is used in these tissues. In many respects, the physiological consequences of the mutations were equivalent to the effects observed in previously characterized mutants of Arabidopsis that are unable to synthesize starch. One mutant line, which was characterized in detail, had normal levels of activity of the starch degradative enzymes {alpha}-amylase, {beta}-amylase, phosphorylase, D-enzyme, and debranching enzyme. Thus, it was not possible to establish a biochemical basis for the phenotype, which was due to a recessive mutant at a locus designated sex 1 at position 12.2 on chromosome 1. This raises the possibility that hitherto unidentified factors, altered by the mutation, play a key role in regulating or catalyzing starch degradation.

  1. Constitutively cellulose-producing mutant of trichoderma reesei

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, S.; Gopalkrishnan, K.S.; Ghose, T.K.

    1982-01-01

    The single major factor limiting the economy of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose is the cost of the cellulase enzymes. Most of the work to date in reducing this cost has centered around selection of hyperproducing strains using the standard cellulose medium. Cellulose is an insoluble substrate with obvious design disadvantages in bioreactors. It is often indicated that another reasonable approach to the problem would be the isolation of constitutive mutants which require no inducer to form cellulase. In fact, the goal of several laboratories around the world working on the hydrolysis of cellulosic substances has been to isolate a constitutive mutant. Reported here is the isolation of a constitutively cellulase producing mutant in T. reesei that produces high levels of all of the component enzymes in the cellulase complex in the presence of glucose or sucrose. With this constitutive mutant, it is hoped that a major hurdle of working with an insoluble substrate will be overcome. The mutant will allow easier operation and control of cellulose bioreactors and can be used for continuous enzyme production, as opposed to the present batch production system. Also, a number of other unusable susbtrates like whey and molasses can be used for commercial preparations of cellulases. (Refs. 2).

  2. Complete blockage of the mevalonate pathway results in male gametophyte lethality.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masashi; Nakagawa, Shoko; Kamide, Yukiko; Kobayashi, Keiko; Ohyama, Kiyoshi; Hashinokuchi, Hiromi; Kiuchi, Reiko; Saito, Kazuki; Muranaka, Toshiya; Nagata, Noriko

    2009-01-01

    Plants have two isoprenoid biosynthetic pathways: the cytosolic mevalonate (MVA) pathway and the plastidic 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. Since the discovery of the MEP pathway, possible metabolic cross-talk between these pathways has prompted intense research. Although many studies have shown the existence of such cross-talk using feeding experiments, it remains to be determined if native cross-talk, rather than exogenously applied metabolites, can compensate for complete blockage of the MVA pathway. Previously, Arabidopsis mutants for HMG1 and HMG2 encoding HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR) were isolated. Although it was shown that HMGR1 is a functional HMGR, the enzyme activity of HMGR2 has not been confirmed. It is demonstrated here that HMG2 encodes a functional reductase with similar activity to HMGR1, using enzyme assays and complementation experiments. To estimate the contribution of native cross-talk, an attempt was made to block the MVA pathway by making double mutants lacking both HMG1 and HMG2, but no double homozygotes were detected in the progeny of self-pollinated HMG1/hmg1 hmg2/hmg2 plants. hmg1 hmg2 male gametophytes appeared to be lethal based on crossing experiments, and microscopy indicated that approximately 50% of the microspores from the HMG1/hmg1 hmg2/hmg2 plant appeared shrunken and exhibited poorly defined endoplasmic reticulum membranes. In situ hybridization showed that HMG1 transcripts were expressed in both the tapetum and microspores, while HMG2 mRNA appeared only in microspores. It is concluded that native cross-talk from the plastid cannot compensate for complete blockage of the MVA pathway, at least during male gametophyte development, because either HMG1 or HMG2 is required for male gametophyte development.

  3. Burkholderia pseudomallei known siderophores and hemin uptake are dispensable for lethal murine melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Kvitko, Brian H; Goodyear, Andrew; Propst, Katie L; Dow, Steven W; Schweizer, Herbert P

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a mostly saprophytic bacterium, but can infect humans where it causes the difficult-to-manage disease melioidosis. Even with proper diagnosis and prompt therapeutic interventions mortality rates still range from >20% in Northern Australia to over 40% in Thailand. Surprisingly little is yet known about how B. pseudomallei infects, invades and survives within its hosts, and virtually nothing is known about the contribution of critical nutrients such as iron to the bacterium's pathogenesis. It was previously assumed that B. pseudomallei used iron-acquisition systems commonly found in other bacteria, for example siderophores. However, our previous discovery of a clinical isolate carrying a large chromosomal deletion missing the entire malleobactin gene cluster encoding the bacterium's major high-affinity siderophore while still being fully virulent in a murine melioidosis model suggested that other iron-acquisition systems might make contributions to virulence. Here, we deleted the major siderophore malleobactin (mba) and pyochelin (pch) gene clusters in strain 1710b and revealed a residual siderophore activity which was unrelated to other known Burkholderia siderophores such as cepabactin and cepaciachelin, and not due to increased secretion of chelators such as citrate. Deletion of the two hemin uptake loci, hmu and hem, showed that Hmu is required for utilization of hemin and hemoglobin and that Hem cannot complement a Hmu deficiency. Prolonged incubation of a hmu hem mutant in hemoglobin-containing minimal medium yielded variants able to utilize hemoglobin and hemin suggesting alternate pathways for utilization of these two host iron sources. Lactoferrin utilization was dependent on malleobactin, but not pyochelin synthesis and/or uptake. A mba pch hmu hem quadruple mutant could use ferritin as an iron source and upon intranasal infection was lethal in an acute murine melioidosis model. These data suggest that B. pseudomallei may employ

  4. Protein sorting in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: isolation of mutants defective in the delivery and processing of multiple vacuolar hydrolases.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, J S; Klionsky, D J; Banta, L M; Emr, S D

    1988-01-01

    Using a selection for spontaneous mutants that mislocalize a vacuolar carboxypeptidase Y (CPY)-invertase fusion protein to the cell surface, we identified vacuolar protein targeting (vpt) mutants in 25 new vpt complementation groups. Additional alleles in each of the eight previously identified vpt complementation groups (vpt1 through vpt8) were also obtained. Representative alleles from each of the 33 vpt complementation groups (vpt1 through vpt33) were shown to exhibit defects in the sorting and processing of several native vacuolar proteins, including the soluble hydrolases CPY, proteinase A, and proteinase B. Of the 33 complementation groups, 19 were found to contain mutant alleles that led to extreme defects. In these mutants, CPY accumulated in its Golgi complex-modified precursor form which was secreted by the mutant cells. Normal protein secretion appeared to be unaffected in the vpt mutants. The lack of significant leakage of cytosolic markers from the vpt mutant cells indicated that the vacuolar protein-sorting defects associated with these mutants do not result from cell lysis. In addition, the observation that the precursor rather than the mature forms of CPY, proteinase A, proteinase B were secreted from the vpt mutants was consistent with the fact that mislocalization occurred at a stage after Golgi complex-specific modification, but before final vacuolar sorting of these enzymes. Vacuolar membrane protein sorting appeared to be unaffected in the majority of the vpt mutants. However, a subset of the vpt mutants (vpt11, vpt16, vpt18, and vpt33) was found to exhibit defects in the sorting of a vacuolar membrane marker enzyme, alpha-mannosidase. Up to 50% of the alpha-mannosidase enzyme activity was found to be mislocalized to the cell surface in these vpt mutants. Seven of the vpt complementation groups (vpt3, vpt11, vpt15, vpt16, vpt18, vpt29, and vpt33) contained alleles that led to a conditional lethal phenotype; the mutants were temperature

  5. Differential repair of potentially lethal damage in exponentially growing and quiescent 9L cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mendonca, M.S.; Rodriguez, A.; Alpen, E.L. )

    1990-04-01

    The alteration of potentially lethal damage repair by postirradiation treatment with hypertonic saline (0.5 M PBS) was investigated in exponentially growing and quiescent 9L cells in vitro. A single dose of X rays (8.5 Gy) immediately followed by a 30-min treatment with hypertonic PBS at 37 degrees C reduced the survival of exponentially growing 9L cells by a factor of 13-18 compared to survival of irradiated immediately and delayed-plated cells, while the survival of quiescent cells was reduced by only a factor of 5-8. Survival curves confirmed the relative resistance of the quiescent 9L cells versus exponentially growing 9L cells to X rays plus hypertonic treatment. Both the slope and the shoulder of the survival curve were reduced to a greater extent in exponentially growing cells than in the quiescent cells by hypertonic treatment. The response of quiescent cells cannot be explained by either the duration of hypertonic treatment or the redistribution of the cells into G1 phase. We show that quiescent 9L cells can recover from hypertonically induced potentially lethal damage when incubated under conditions which have been found to delay progression through the cell cycle, and postulate that an altered chromatin structure or an enhanced repair capacity of quiescent 9L cells may be responsible for their resistance.

  6. Strategy for enhanced transgenic strain development for embryonic conditionnal lethality in Anastrepha suspensa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here the first reproductive sterility system for the tephritid pest, Anastrepha suspensa, is presented, based on lethality primarily in embryos heterozygous for a lethal conditional transgene combination. The tetracycline-suppressible system uses the cellularization-specific A. suspensa serendipity...

  7. Human autoantibodies specific for neurotrophin receptors TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC protect against lethal Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bo; Alroy, Joseph; Luquetti, Alejandro O; PereiraPerrin, Mercio

    2008-11-01

    Patients with Chagas' disease remain asymptomatic for many years, presumably by keeping the etiological agent Trypanosoma cruzi in check through protective immunity against. Recently, we found that T. cruzi uses TrkA, a receptor tyrosine kinase responsive to neurotrophin nerve growth factor in vertebrate nervous systems, to invade cells. We also found that TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC, but not T. cruzi, are targets of specific autoantibodies present in the sera of patients with chronic Chagas' disease. Here we show that TrkA-, TrkB-, and TrkC-specific autoantibodies isolated from the sera of four individuals with chronic indeterminate (asymptomatic) Chagas' disease potently blocked invasion of Trk-bearing neuronal PC12 cells, neuroglial astrocytes, enteroglial cells, and Schwann cells and Trk-expressing non-neural smooth muscle and dendritic cells. However, these autoantibodies did not inhibit T. cruzi invasion of mutant PC12 cells lacking TrkA or of normal cells lacking Trk receptors, suggesting that autoantibodies interfered with parasite/Trk cross talk to access the intracellular milieu. Passive immunization of susceptible and resistant mouse strains with very small doses of these autoantibodies reduced parasitemia and transferred resistance to an otherwise lethal trypanosome infection. Hence, this exquisitely sensitive and unique regulatory immunity against the host (instead of parasite) could benefit infected individuals by blocking cellular invasion of the obligatory intracellular pathogen, resulting in attenuation of tissue infection and clinical manifestations. Such action is contrary to the horror autotoxicus frequently associated with microbe-related autoimmune responses. PMID:18832578

  8. TTSS2-deficient hha mutant of Salmonella Typhimurium exhibits significant systemic attenuation in immunocompromised hosts

    PubMed Central

    Vishwakarma, Vikalp; Pati, Niladri Bhusan; Ray, Shilpa; Das, Susmita; Suar, Mrutyunjay

    2014-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) infections are emerging as leading problem worldwide and the variations in host immune status append to the concern of NTS. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is one of the causative agents of NTS infections and has been extensively studied. The inactivation of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI2) encoded type-III secretion system 2 (TTSS2) has been reported rendering the strain incapable for systemic dissemination to host sites and has also been proposed as live-attenuated vaccine. However, infections from TTSS2-deficient Salmonella have also been reported. In this study, mutant strain MT15 was developed by inactivation of the hemolysin expression modulating protein (hha) in TTSS2-deficient S. Typhimurium background. The MT15 strain showed significant level of attenuation in immune-deprived murine colitis model when tested in iNos−/−, IL10−/−, and CD40L−/− mice groups in C57BL/6 background. Further, the mutation in hha does not implicate any defect in bacterial colonization to the host gut. The long-term infection of developed mutant strain conferred protective immune responses to suitably immunized streptomycin pre-treated C57BL/6 mice. The immunization enhanced the CD4+ and CD8+ cell types involved in bacterial clearance. The serum IgG and luminal secretory IgA (sIgA) was also found to be elevated after the due course of infection. Additionally, the immunized C57BL/6 mice were protected from the subsequent lethal infection of Salmonella Typhimurium. Collectively, these findings implicate the involvement of hemolysin expression modulating protein (Hha) in establishment of bacterial infection. In light of the observed attenuation of the developed mutant strain, this study proposes the possible significance of SPI2-deficient hha mutant as an alternative live-attenuated vaccine strain for use against lethal Salmonella infections. PMID:24401482

  9. The Bicoid class homeodomain factors ceh-36/OTX and unc-30/PITX cooperate in C. elegans embryonic progenitor cells to regulate robust development.

    PubMed

    Walton, Travis; Preston, Elicia; Nair, Gautham; Zacharias, Amanda L; Raj, Arjun; Murray, John Isaac

    2015-03-01

    While many transcriptional regulators of pluripotent and terminally differentiated states have been identified, regulation of intermediate progenitor states is less well understood. Previous high throughput cellular resolution expression studies identified dozens of transcription factors with lineage-specific expression patterns in C. elegans embryos that could regulate progenitor identity. In this study we identified a broad embryonic role for the C. elegans OTX transcription factor ceh-36, which was previously shown to be required for the terminal specification of four neurons. ceh-36 is expressed in progenitors of over 30% of embryonic cells, yet is not required for embryonic viability. Quantitative phenotyping by computational analysis of time-lapse movies of ceh-36 mutant embryos identified cell cycle or cell migration defects in over 100 of these cells, but most defects were low-penetrance, suggesting redundancy. Expression of ceh-36 partially overlaps with that of the PITX transcription factor unc-30. unc-30 single mutants are viable but loss of both ceh-36 and unc-30 causes 100% lethality, and double mutants have significantly higher frequencies of cellular developmental defects in the cells where their expression normally overlaps. These factors are also required for robust expression of the downstream developmental regulator mls-2/HMX. This work provides the first example of genetic redundancy between the related yet evolutionarily distant OTX and PITX families of bicoid class homeodomain factors and demonstrates the power of quantitative developmental phenotyping in C. elegans to identify developmental regulators acting in progenitor cells.

  10. The Bicoid Class Homeodomain Factors ceh-36/OTX and unc-30/PITX Cooperate in C. elegans Embryonic Progenitor Cells to Regulate Robust Development

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Travis; Preston, Elicia; Nair, Gautham; Zacharias, Amanda L.; Raj, Arjun; Murray, John Isaac

    2015-01-01

    While many transcriptional regulators of pluripotent and terminally differentiated states have been identified, regulation of intermediate progenitor states is less well understood. Previous high throughput cellular resolution expression studies identified dozens of transcription factors with lineage-specific expression patterns in C. elegans embryos that could regulate progenitor identity. In this study we identified a broad embryonic role for the C. elegans OTX transcription factor ceh-36, which was previously shown to be required for the terminal specification of four neurons. ceh-36 is expressed in progenitors of over 30% of embryonic cells, yet is not required for embryonic viability. Quantitative phenotyping by computational analysis of time-lapse movies of ceh-36 mutant embryos identified cell cycle or cell migration defects in over 100 of these cells, but most defects were low-penetrance, suggesting redundancy. Expression of ceh-36 partially overlaps with that of the PITX transcription