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Sample records for leukemia virus replication

  1. Inhibition of feline leukemia virus replication by human leukocyte interferon.

    PubMed

    Jameson, P; Essex, M

    1983-08-01

    The replication of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is inhibited by treatment of cat cell cultures with crude human leukocyte interferon (HuIFN-alpha) as evidenced by titration of the infectious progeny. The inhibition can be demonstrated in three different cell lines in which the production of hemagglutinin by encephalomyocarditis (EMC) virus, and plaque formation by vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) are also inhibited by the HuIFN-alpha. The dose dependency of the inhibition of EMC virus by the HuIFN-alpha is similar to that obtained with feline interferon in each of the three cell lines. VSV and EMC virus are less than 10 times more sensitive than FeLV to the inhibitory action of HuIFN-alpha if responses to a single interferon treatment are compared for each of the viruses tested in the most sensitive cell line, FEA. The interferon effect on FeLV is more pronounced when it is added within one day after the inoculation of the cells rather than applied before cell infection. The induction of focus formation by FeLV can also be inhibited by HuIFN-alpha in cat cells (CCC-81) which contain the murine sarcoma virus genome.

  2. Modes of Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Transmission, Replication and Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Carpentier, Alexandre; Barez, Pierre-Yves; Hamaidia, Malik; Gazon, Hélène; de Brogniez, Alix; Perike, Srikanth; Gillet, Nicolas; Willems, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus that causes cancer (Adult T cell Leukemia, ATL) and a spectrum of inflammatory diseases (mainly HTLV-associated myelopathy—tropical spastic paraparesis, HAM/TSP). Since virions are particularly unstable, HTLV-1 transmission primarily occurs by transfer of a cell carrying an integrated provirus. After transcription, the viral genomic RNA undergoes reverse transcription and integration into the chromosomal DNA of a cell from the newly infected host. The virus then replicates by either one of two modes: (i) an infectious cycle by virus budding and infection of new targets and (ii) mitotic division of cells harboring an integrated provirus. HTLV-1 replication initiates a series of mechanisms in the host including antiviral immunity and checkpoint control of cell proliferation. HTLV-1 has elaborated strategies to counteract these defense mechanisms allowing continuous persistence in humans. PMID:26198240

  3. Virus-Specific Messenger RNA and Nascent Polypeptides in Polyribosomes of Cells Replicating Murine Sarcoma-Leukemia Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Vecchio, G.; Tsuchida, N.; Shanmugam, G.; Green, M.

    1973-01-01

    We present evidence that virus-specific RNA is present in polyribosomes of transformed cells replicating the murine sarcoma-leukemia virus complex and that it serves as messenger RNA for the synthesis of viral-coded proteins. Both virus-specific RNA (detected by hybridization with the [3H]DNA product of the viral RNA-directed DNA polymerase) and nascent viral polypeptides (measured by precipitation with antiserum to purified virus) were found in membrane-bound and free polyribosomes. Membrane-bound polyribosomes contained a higher content of both virus-specific RNA and nascent viral polypeptides. From 60 to 70% of viral RNA sequences were released from polyribosomes with EDTA, consistent with a function as messenger RNA. Maximum amounts of both virus-specific RNA and nascent viral polypeptides were found in the polyribosome region sedimenting at about 350 S. PMID:4352969

  4. Productive nonlytic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication in a newly established human leukemia cell line.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, R; Bekesi, J G; Tarcsafalvi, A; Sperber, K; Deak, G; Choi, H S; Paronetto, F; Holland, J F; Acs, G

    1992-11-01

    We have isolated a lymphoid cell line, MDS, from the pleural exudate of a patient with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. The cells are biphenotypic, containing various T-cell and myeloid markers, and are surface negative for CD4 and CD8 but have low CD4 mRNA. The cells grow in suspension with a doubling time of 15 hr, have been karyotyped as trisomy 21, are negative for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and are tumorigenic in the nude mouse. We have isolated two stable HIV-1-producing cell lines, MDS-T, by transfecting MDS cells with pHXBc2, and MDS-I, by infecting MDS cells with HIV-1IIIB. In 24 hr, 1 x 10(5) MDS-T or MDS-I cells produce 46 ng of p24 per ml and reverse transcriptase that is capable of incorporating 0.2 pmol of [32P]TTP into oligo(dT).poly(A). Ultrastructural studies showed numerous mature viral particles in MDS-T and MDS-I cells that are capable of infecting T cells. HIV-1 infection could be inhibited by 25% in the MDS cells with the anti-CD4 antibody Leu 3a. For over a year MDS-T and MDS-I cells have been producing high concentrations of HIV-1 in culture. A subclone derived from the MDS cells behaves like the parent cells when transfected or infected with HIV-1. In contrast to other T-cell lines, neither phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate nor tumor necrosis factor alpha stimulated the replication of HIV-1, whereas bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate or interferon alpha caused 50% and 80% inhibition of reverse transcriptase production, respectively. These chronically infected T-cell lines are a useful model system to study the effect of anti-HIV agents and cellular factors required for HIV-1 replication.

  5. Modulation of Stop Codon Read-Through Efficiency and Its Effect on the Replication of Murine Leukemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Csibra, Eszter; Brierley, Ian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Translational readthrough—suppression of termination at a stop codon—is exploited in the replication cycles of several viruses and represents a potential target for antiviral intervention. In the gammaretroviruses, typified by Moloney murine leukemia virus (MuLV), gag and pol are in the same reading frame, separated by a UAG stop codon, and termination codon readthrough is required for expression of the viral Gag-Pol fusion protein. Here, we investigated the effect on MuLV replication of modulating readthrough efficiency. We began by manipulating the readthrough signal in the context of an infectious viral clone to generate a series of MuLV variants in which readthrough was stimulated or reduced. In carefully controlled infectivity assays, it was found that reducing the MuLV readthrough efficiency only 4-fold led to a marked defect and that a 10-fold reduction essentially abolished replication. However, up to an ∼8.5-fold stimulation of readthrough (up to 60% readthrough) was well tolerated by the virus. These high levels of readthrough were achieved using a two-plasmid system, with Gag and Gag-Pol expressed from separate infectious clones. We also modulated readthrough by silencing expression of eukaryotic release factors 1 and 3 (eRF1 and eRF3) or by introducing aminoglycosides into the cells. The data obtained indicate that gammaretroviruses tolerate a substantial excess of viral Gag-Pol synthesis but are very sensitive to a reduction in levels of this polyprotein. Thus, as is also the case for ribosomal frameshifting, antiviral therapies targeting readthrough with inhibitory agents are likely to be the most beneficial. IMPORTANCE Many pathogenic RNA viruses and retroviruses use ribosomal frameshifting or stop codon readthrough to regulate expression of their replicase enzymes. These translational “recoding” processes are potential targets for antiviral intervention, but we have only a limited understanding of the consequences to virus

  6. Effects of 3′ Untranslated Region Mutations on Plus-Strand Priming during Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Robson, Nicole D.; Telesnitsky, Alice

    1999-01-01

    A conserved purine-rich motif located near the 3′ end of retroviral genomes is involved in the initiation of plus-strand DNA synthesis. We mutated sequences both within and flanking the Moloney murine leukemia virus polypurine tract (PPT) and determined the effects of these alterations on viral DNA synthesis and replication. Our results demonstrated that both changes in highly conserved PPT positions and a mutation that left only the cleavage-proximal half of the PPT intact led to delayed replication and reduced the colony-forming titer of replication defective retroviral vectors. A mutation that altered the cleavage proximal half of the PPT and certain 3′ untranslated region mutations upstream of the PPT were incompatible with or severely impaired viral replication. To distinguish defects in plus-strand priming from other replication defects and to assess the relative use of mutant and wild-type PPTs, we examined plus-strand priming from an ectopic, secondary PPT inserted in U3. The results demonstrated that the analyzed mutations within the PPT primarily affected plus-strand priming whereas mutations upstream of the PPT appeared to affect both plus-strand priming and other stages of viral replication. PMID:9882295

  7. Bovine Leukemia Virus Small Noncoding RNAs Are Functional Elements That Regulate Replication and Contribute to Oncogenesis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hamaidia, Malik; de Brogniez, Alix; Gutiérrez, Gerónimo; Renotte, Nathalie; Reichert, Michal; Trono, Karina; Willems, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses are not expected to encode miRNAs because of the potential problem of self-cleavage of their genomic RNAs. This assumption has recently been challenged by experiments showing that bovine leukemia virus (BLV) encodes miRNAs from intragenomic Pol III promoters. The BLV miRNAs are abundantly expressed in B-cell tumors in the absence of significant levels of genomic and subgenomic viral RNAs. Using deep RNA sequencing and functional reporter assays, we show that miRNAs mediate the expression of genes involved in cell signaling, cancer and immunity. We further demonstrate that BLV miRNAs are essential to induce B-cell tumors in an experimental model and to promote efficient viral replication in the natural host. PMID:27123579

  8. Safety testing for replication-competent retrovirus associated with gibbon ape leukemia virus-pseudotyped retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Reeves, L; Cornetta, K

    2001-01-01

    The potential pathogenicity of replication-competent retroviruses (RCR) requires vigilant testing to exclude inadvertent contamination of clinical gene therapy vector products with RCR. Pseudotyped vectors using the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) envelope have entered into clinical trials but specific recommendations regarding methods for screening of vector product and analysis of clinical samples have not been set forth. Unfortunately, current screening assays used for detecting amphotropic RCR are not suitable for GALV-pseudotyped RCR. We modified the extended S+/L- assay for RCR detection by using human 293 cells for virus amplification. Of five cell lines tested, 293 cells were selected because they combined a high transduction efficiency and an ability to generate RCR at high titer. After optimizing the amplification assay, a dilution of GALV virus could consistently be detected at a dilution of 10(-6). In coculture experiments, one GALV-infected cell could be consistently detected in 10(6) uninfected cells. A PCR-based assay was developed that was capable of detecting 100 copies of a GALV envelope containing plasmid diluted in 1 microg of DNA obtained from uninfected cells. PCR was also able to detect one GALV-infected cell in 10(6) uninfected cells. These assays will be suitable for testing of vector preparations and for monitoring of clinical samples from patients treated in clinical gene therapy protocols. The assays developed are similar in methodology and sensitivity to those currently used for certification of amphotropic retroviral vectors. PMID:11177543

  9. miR-28-3p is a cellular restriction factor that inhibits human T cell leukemia virus, type 1 (HTLV-1) replication and virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue Tao; Nicot, Christophe

    2015-02-27

    Human T cell leukemia virus, type 1 (HTLV-1) replication and spread are controlled by different viral and cellular factors. Although several anti-HIV cellular microRNAs have been described, such a regulation for HTLV-1 has not been reported. In this study, we found that miR-28-3p inhibits HTLV-1 virus expression and its replication by targeting a specific site within the genomic gag/pol viral mRNA. Because miR-28-3p is highly expressed in resting T cells, which are resistant to HTLV-1 infection, we investigated a potential protective role of miR-28-3p against de novo HTLV-1 infection. To this end, we developed a new sensitive and quantitative assay on the basis of the detection of products of reverse transcription. We demonstrate that miR-28-3p does not prevent virus receptor interaction or virus entry but, instead, induces a post-entry block at the reverse transcription level. In addition, we found that HTLV-1, subtype 1A isolates corresponding to the Japanese strain ATK-1 present a natural, single-nucleotide polymorphism within the miR-28-3p target site. As a result of this polymorphism, the ATK-1 virus sequence was not inhibited by miR-28. Interestingly, genetic studies on the transmission of the virus has shown that the ATK-1 strain, which carries a Thr-to-Cys transition mutation, is transmitted efficiently between spouses, suggesting that miR-28 may play an important role in HTLV-1 transmission. PMID:25568327

  10. miR-28-3p is a cellular restriction factor that inhibits human T cell leukemia virus, type 1 (HTLV-1) replication and virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue Tao; Nicot, Christophe

    2015-02-27

    Human T cell leukemia virus, type 1 (HTLV-1) replication and spread are controlled by different viral and cellular factors. Although several anti-HIV cellular microRNAs have been described, such a regulation for HTLV-1 has not been reported. In this study, we found that miR-28-3p inhibits HTLV-1 virus expression and its replication by targeting a specific site within the genomic gag/pol viral mRNA. Because miR-28-3p is highly expressed in resting T cells, which are resistant to HTLV-1 infection, we investigated a potential protective role of miR-28-3p against de novo HTLV-1 infection. To this end, we developed a new sensitive and quantitative assay on the basis of the detection of products of reverse transcription. We demonstrate that miR-28-3p does not prevent virus receptor interaction or virus entry but, instead, induces a post-entry block at the reverse transcription level. In addition, we found that HTLV-1, subtype 1A isolates corresponding to the Japanese strain ATK-1 present a natural, single-nucleotide polymorphism within the miR-28-3p target site. As a result of this polymorphism, the ATK-1 virus sequence was not inhibited by miR-28. Interestingly, genetic studies on the transmission of the virus has shown that the ATK-1 strain, which carries a Thr-to-Cys transition mutation, is transmitted efficiently between spouses, suggesting that miR-28 may play an important role in HTLV-1 transmission.

  11. Selection of functional tRNA primers and primer binding site sequences from a retroviral combinatorial library: identification of new functional tRNA primers in murine leukemia virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Anders H.; Duch, Mogens; Pedersen, Finn Skou

    2000-01-01

    Retroviral reverse transcription is initiated from a cellular tRNA molecule and all known exogenous isolates of murine leukemia virus utilise a tRNAPro molecule. While several studies suggest flexibility in murine leukemia virus primer utilisation, studies on human immunodeficiency virus and avian retroviruses have revealed evidence of molecular adaptation towards the specific tRNA isoacceptor used as replication primer. In this study, murine leukemia virus tRNA utilisation is investigated by in vivo screening of a retroviral vector combinatorial library with randomised primer binding sites. While most of the selected primer binding sites are complementary to the 3′-end of tRNAPro, we also retrieved PBS sequences matching four other tRNA molecules and demonstrate that Akv murine leukemia virus vectors may efficiently replicate using tRNAArg(CCU), tRNAPhe(GAA) and a hitherto unknown human tRNASer(CGA). PMID:10637332

  12. Expression of chimeric tRNA-driven antisense transcripts renders NIH 3T3 cells highly resistant to Moloney murine leukemia virus replication.

    PubMed Central

    Sullenger, B A; Lee, T C; Smith, C A; Ungers, G E; Gilboa, E

    1990-01-01

    NIH 3T3 cells infected with Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) express high levels of virus-specific RNA. To inhibit replication of the virus, we stably introduced chimeric tRNA genes encoding antisense templates into NIH 3T3 cells via a retroviral vector. Efficient expression of hybrid tRNA-MoMLV antisense transcripts and inhibition of MoMLV replication were dependent on the use of a particular type of retroviral vector, the double-copy vector, in which the chimeric tRNA gene was inserted in the 3' long terminal repeat. MoMLV replication was inhibited up to 97% in cells expressing antisense RNA corresponding to the gag gene and less than twofold in cells expressing antisense RNA corresponding to the pol gene. RNA and protein analyses suggest that inhibition was exerted at the level of translation. These results suggest that RNA polymerase III-based antisense inhibition systems can be used to inhibit highly expressed viral genes and render cells resistant to viral replication via intracellular immunization strategies. Images PMID:2247070

  13. Development of leukemia in mice transgenic for the tax gene of human T-cell leukemia virus type I.

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, W J; Kimata, J T; Wong, F H; Zutter, M; Ley, T J; Ratner, L

    1995-01-01

    The human T-cell leukemia virus type I Tax protein trans-activates several cellular genes implicated in T-cell replication and activation. To investigate its leukemogenic potential, Tax was targeted to the mature T-lymphocyte compartment in transgenic mice by using the human granzyme B promoter. These mice developed large granular lymphocytic leukemia, demonstrating that expression of Tax in the lymphocyte compartment is sufficient for the development of leukemia. Furthermore, these observations suggest that human T-cell leukemia virus infection may be involved in the development of large granular lymphocytic leukemia. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7862633

  14. Defects in Moloney murine leukemia virus replication caused by a reverse transcriptase mutation modeled on the structure of Escherichia coli RNase H.

    PubMed Central

    Telesnitsky, A; Blain, S W; Goff, S P

    1992-01-01

    We have studied a mutant Moloney murine leukemia virus with a deletion in reverse transcriptase (RT) which is predicted to make its RNase H domain resemble structurally that of human immunodeficiency virus RT. This deletion was based on improved RNase H homology alignments made possible by the recently solved three-dimensional structure for Escherichia coli RNase H. This mutant Moloney murine leukemia virus RT was fully active in the oligo(dT)-poly(rA) DNA polymerase assay and retained nearly all of wild-type RT's RNase H activity in an in situ RNase H gel assay. However, proviruses reconstructed to include this deletion were noninfectious. Minus-strand strong-stop DNA was made by the deletion mutant, but the amount of minus-strand translocation was intermediate to the very low level measured with RNase H-null virions and the high level seen with wild-type RT. The average length of translocated minus-strand DNA was shorter for the deletion mutant than for wild type, suggesting that mutations in the RNase H domain of RT also affect DNA polymerase activity. Images PMID:1370551

  15. Inhibition of RNase H activity and viral replication by single mutations in the 3' region of Moloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed Central

    Repaske, R; Hartley, J W; Kavlick, M F; O'Neill, R R; Austin, J B

    1989-01-01

    Selected conserved amino acids in the putative RNase H domain of reverse transcriptase (RT) were modified in a molecularly cloned infectious provirus and in a Moloney murine leukemia virus RT expression vector by site-directed mutagenesis. Substitution of either of two conserved aspartic acid residues in proviral DNA prevented production of infectious particles in transfected NIH 3T3 cells, and the same modifications depressed RT-associated RNase H activity by more than 25-fold with little or no effect on polymerase activity. PMID:2464706

  16. HSP90 protects the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) tax oncoprotein from proteasomal degradation to support NF-κB activation and HTLV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Gao, Linlin; Harhaj, Edward William

    2013-12-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). The HTLV-1 genome encodes the Tax protein that plays essential regulatory roles in HTLV-1 replication and oncogenic transformation of T lymphocytes. Despite intensive study of Tax, how Tax interfaces with host signaling pathways to regulate virus replication and drive T-cell proliferation and immortalization remains poorly understood. To gain new insight into the mechanisms of Tax function and regulation, we used tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry to identify novel cellular Tax-interacting proteins. This screen identified heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) as a new binding partner of Tax. The interaction between HSP90 and Tax was validated by coimmunoprecipitation assays, and colocalization between the two proteins was observed by confocal microscopy. Treatment of HTLV-1-transformed cells with the HSP90 inhibitor 17-DMAG elicited proteasomal degradation of Tax in the nuclear matrix with concomitant inhibition of NF-κB and HTLV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) activation. Knockdown of HSP90 by lentiviral shRNAs similarly provoked a loss of Tax protein in HTLV-1-transformed cells. Finally, treatment of HTLV-1-transformed cell lines with 17-DMAG suppressed HTLV-1 replication and promoted apoptotic cell death. Taken together, our results reveal that Tax is a novel HSP90 client protein and HSP90 inhibitors may exert therapeutic benefits for ATL and HAM/TSP patients.

  17. Endogenous murine leukemia virus-encoded proteins in radiation leukemias of BALB/c mice

    SciTech Connect

    Tress, E.; Pierotti, M.; DeLeo, A.B.; O'Donnell, P.V.; Fleissner, E.

    1982-02-01

    To explore the role of endogenous retroviruses in radiation-induced leukemogenesis in the mouse, we have examined virus-encoded proteins in nine BALB/c leukemias by pulsechase labeling procedures and serological typing with monospecific and monoclonal antibodies. The major gag precursor protein, Pr65/sup gag/, was observed in all cases, but only three leukemias expressed detectable amounts of the glycosylated gag species, gP95/sup gag/, or its precursor, Pr75/sup gag/. No evidence was found for synthesis of gag-host fusion proteins. None of the leukemias released infectious xenotropic or dualtropic virus, but all nine expressed at least one env protein with xenotropic properties. In two instances a monoclonal antibody, 35/56, which is specific for the NuLV G/sub IX/ antigen, displayed a distinctive reactivity with this class of env protein, although this antibody is unreactive with replicating xenotropic viruses. An ecotropic/xenotropic recombinant env protein with the same 35/56 phenotype was observed in a leukemia induced by a strongly leukemogenic virus isolated from a BALB/c radiation leukemia.

  18. Amphotropic murine leukemia viruses induce spongiform encephalomyelopathy.

    PubMed

    Münk, C; Löhler, J; Prassolov, V; Just, U; Stockschläder, M; Stocking, C

    1997-05-27

    Recombinants of amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV) have found widespread use in retroviral vector systems due to their ability to efficiently and stably infect cells of several different species, including human. Previous work has shown that replication-competent recombinants containing the amphotropic env gene, encoding the major SU envelope glycoprotein that determines host tropism, induce lymphomas in vivo. We show here that these viruses also induce a spongiform encephalomyelopathy in mice inoculated perinatally. This fatal central nervous system disease is characterized by noninflammatory spongiform lesions of nerve and glial cells and their processes, and is associated with moderate astro- and microgliosis. The first clinical symptoms are ataxia, tremor, and spasticity, progressing to complete tetraparesis and incontinence, and finally death of the animal. Sequences within the amphotropic env gene are necessary for disease induction. Coinfection of A-MuLV recombinants with nonneuropathogenic ecotropic or polytropic MuLV drastically increases the incidence, degree, and distribution of the neurodegenerative disorder. The consequence of these results in view of the use of A-MuLV recombinants in the clinic is discussed.

  19. Redistribution and modulation of Gross murine leukemia virus antigens induced by specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ioachim, H L; Sabbath, M

    1979-01-01

    Gross murine leukemia virus (G-MuLV)-induced rat leukemia cells in tissue culture replicate G-MuLV, express strong virus-associated membrane antigenicity, and are consistently killed by specific antibodies and complement in cytotoxicity tests. To explore the effect of specific antibodies, rat anti-G-MuLV antisera were added to the cultures of leukemia cells for variable periods of time. Redistribution of virus particles as well as of membrane virus antigens in the form of polar patches and caps was observed by electron microscopy, indirect immunofluorescence, and immunoelectron microscopy. Substantial decreases in cytotoxicity indexes accompanied these changes. The antigen modulation induced by anti-G-MuLV antibodies in vitro paralleled similar changes obtained in vivo by transplanttion of leukemia cells in rats with high anti-G-MuLV antibody titers. The importance of antigen modulation in this system resides in its direct relationship with the malignant potential of the leukemia cells.

  20. Titration of murine leukemia viruses with rat cell line RFL.

    PubMed

    Koga, M

    1977-08-01

    Normal rat embryo cell (RFL) from syncytia after infection with murine leukemia virus. The assay for counting the number of syncytium foci produced in RFL cells is a sensitive method for a direct infectivity assay of murine leukemia virus.

  1. The IFITMs Inhibit Zika Virus Replication.

    PubMed

    Savidis, George; Perreira, Jill M; Portmann, Jocelyn M; Meraner, Paul; Guo, Zhiru; Green, Sharone; Brass, Abraham L

    2016-06-14

    Zika virus has emerged as a severe health threat with a rapidly expanding range. The IFITM family of restriction factors inhibits the replication of a broad range of viruses, including the closely related flaviruses West Nile virus and dengue virus. Here, we show that IFITM1 and IFITM3 inhibit Zika virus infection early in the viral life cycle. Moreover, IFITM3 can prevent Zika-virus-induced cell death. These results suggest that strategies to boost the actions and/or levels of the IFITMs might be useful for inhibiting a broad range of emerging viruses.

  2. Mechanisms of pathogenesis induced by bovine leukemia virus as a model for human T-cell leukemia virus

    PubMed Central

    Aida, Yoko; Murakami, Hironobu; Takahashi, Masahiko; Takeshima, Shin-Nosuke

    2013-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) make up a unique retrovirus family. Both viruses induce chronic lymphoproliferative diseases with BLV affecting the B-cell lineage and HTLV-1 affecting the T-cell lineage. The pathologies of BLV- and HTLV-induced infections are notably similar, with an absence of chronic viraemia and a long latency period. These viruses encode at least two regulatory proteins, namely, Tax and Rex, in the pX region located between the env gene and the 3′ long terminal repeat. The Tax protein is a key contributor to the oncogenic potential of the virus, and is also the key protein involved in viral replication. However, BLV infection is not sufficient for leukemogenesis, and additional events such as gene mutations must take place. In this review, we first summarize the similarities between the two viruses in terms of genomic organization, virology, and pathology. We then describe the current knowledge of the BLV model, which may also be relevant for the understanding of leukemogenesis caused by HTLV-1. In addition, we address our improved understanding of Tax functions through the newly identified BLV Tax mutants, which have a substitution between amino acids 240 and 265. PMID:24265629

  3. Replication-Competent Controlled Herpes Simplex Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, David C.; Feller, Joyce; McAnany, Peterjon; Vilaboa, Nuria

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We present the development and characterization of a replication-competent controlled herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). Replication-essential ICP4 and ICP8 genes of HSV-1 wild-type strain 17syn+ were brought under the control of a dually responsive gene switch. The gene switch comprises (i) a transactivator that is activated by a narrow class of antiprogestins, including mifepristone and ulipristal, and whose expression is mediated by a promoter cassette that comprises an HSP70B promoter and a transactivator-responsive promoter and (ii) transactivator-responsive promoters that drive the ICP4 and ICP8 genes. Single-step growth experiments in different cell lines demonstrated that replication of the recombinant virus, HSV-GS3, is strictly dependent on an activating treatment consisting of administration of a supraphysiological heat dose in the presence of an antiprogestin. The replication-competent controlled virus replicates with an efficiency approaching that of the wild-type virus from which it was derived. Essentially no replication occurs in the absence of activating treatment or if HSV-GS3-infected cells are exposed only to heat or antiprogestin. These findings were corroborated by measurements of amounts of viral DNA and transcripts of the regulated ICP4 gene and the glycoprotein C (gC) late gene, which was not regulated. Similar findings were made in experiments with a mouse footpad infection model. IMPORTANCE The alphaherpesviruses have long been considered vectors for recombinant vaccines and oncolytic therapies. The traditional approach uses vector backbones containing attenuating mutations that restrict replication to ensure safety. The shortcoming of this approach is that the attenuating mutations tend to limit both the immune presentation and oncolytic properties of these vectors. HSV-GS3 represents a novel type of vector that, when activated, replicates with the efficiency of a nonattenuated virus and whose safety is derived from deliberate

  4. The molecular biology of Bluetongue virus replication.

    PubMed

    Patel, Avnish; Roy, Polly

    2014-03-01

    The members of Orbivirus genus within the Reoviridae family are arthropod-borne viruses which are responsible for high morbidity and mortality in ruminants. Bluetongue virus (BTV) which causes disease in livestock (sheep, goat, cattle) has been in the forefront of molecular studies for the last three decades and now represents the best understood orbivirus at a molecular and structural level. The complex nature of the virion structure has been well characterised at high resolution along with the definition of the virus encoded enzymes required for RNA replication; the ordered assembly of the capsid shell as well as the protein and genome sequestration required for it; and the role of host proteins in virus entry and virus release. More recent developments of Reverse Genetics and Cell-Free Assembly systems have allowed integration of the accumulated structural and molecular knowledge to be tested at meticulous level, yielding higher insight into basic molecular virology, from which the rational design of safe efficacious vaccines has been possible. This article is centred on the molecular dissection of BTV with a view to understanding the role of each protein in the virus replication cycle. These areas are important in themselves for BTV replication but they also indicate the pathways that related viruses, which includes viruses that are pathogenic to man and animals, might also use providing an informed starting point for intervention or prevention.

  5. Radioimmunoassay for intact Gross mouse leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Yalow, R S; Gross, L

    1976-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay for intact Gross leukemia virus has been developed using 125I-labeled Gross virus grown in tissue culture and guinea pig antisera to Gross virus grown either in tissue culture or harvested from leukemic C3H(f) mice. Separation of bound from free labeled virus was effected using the double antibody method. The assay can detect fewer than 10(8) virus particles and has been used to measure the viral content of individual organs from inoculated leukemic C3H(f) mice and from Ak mice with spontaneous leukemia. Organs from noninoculated healthy C3H(f) mice crossreacted poorly in the system, virus generally being detectable only in the thymus and spleen and at low concentration. In some of the inoculated C3H(f) leukemic mice the viral content of as little as 0.5 mul of plasma is measurable. That this assay is for intact virus and not for soluble antigens of the viral envelope was proven by the observation that the immunoreactive material of plasma and extracts from thymus and liver of leukemic mice has a buoyant denisty in sucrose of 1.17-1.18 g/ml, corresponding to that of intact virus grown in tissue culture. With this sensitivity it may now be possible to quantitate viral concentrations in tissue and body fluids from the time of inoculation through the development of obvious pathology. PMID:1066697

  6. Methamphetamine reduces human influenza A virus replication.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Hsiang; Wu, Kuang-Lun; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine (meth) is a highly addictive psychostimulant that is among the most widely abused illicit drugs, with an estimated over 35 million users in the world. Several lines of evidence suggest that chronic meth abuse is a major factor for increased risk of infections with human immunodeficiency virus and possibly other pathogens, due to its immunosuppressive property. Influenza A virus infections frequently cause epidemics and pandemics of respiratory diseases among human populations. However, little is known about whether meth has the ability to enhance influenza A virus replication, thus increasing severity of influenza illness in meth abusers. Herein, we investigated the effects of meth on influenza A virus replication in human lung epithelial A549 cells. The cells were exposed to meth and infected with human influenza A/WSN/33 (H1N1) virus. The viral progenies were titrated by plaque assays, and the expression of viral proteins and cellular proteins involved in interferon responses was examined by Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining. We report the first evidence that meth significantly reduces, rather than increases, virus propagation and the susceptibility to influenza infection in the human lung epithelial cell line, consistent with a decrease in viral protein synthesis. These effects were apparently not caused by meth's effects on enhancing virus-induced interferon responses in the host cells, reducing viral biological activities, or reducing cell viability. Our results suggest that meth might not be a great risk factor for influenza A virus infection among meth abusers. Although the underlying mechanism responsible for the action of meth on attenuating virus replication requires further investigation, these findings prompt the study to examine whether other structurally similar compounds could be used as anti-influenza agents.

  7. The hepatitis delta virus: Replication and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sureau, Camille; Negro, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a defective virus and a satellite of the hepatitis B virus (HBV). Its RNA genome is unique among animal viruses, but it shares common features with some plant viroids, including a replication mechanism that uses a host RNA polymerase. In infected cells, HDV genome replication and formation of a nucleocapsid-like ribonucleoprotein (RNP) are independent of HBV. But the RNP cannot exit, and therefore propagate, in the absence of HBV, as the latter supplies the propagation mechanism, from coating the HDV RNP with the HBV envelope proteins for cell egress to delivery of the HDV virions to the human hepatocyte target. HDV is therefore an obligate satellite of HBV; it infects humans either concomitantly with HBV or after HBV infection. HDV affects an estimated 15 to 20 million individuals worldwide, and the clinical significance of HDV infection is more severe forms of viral hepatitis--acute or chronic--, and a higher risk of developing cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma in comparison to HBV monoinfection. This review covers molecular aspects of HDV replication cycle, including its interaction with the helper HBV and the pathogenesis of infection in humans. PMID:27084031

  8. Hepatitis C virus replication in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Niu, J; Kumar, U; Monjardino, J; Goldin, R; Rosin, D; Thomas, H C

    1995-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication is reported in both tumour and non-tumour tissue in a case of hepatocellular carcinoma. Viral replication was established by showing the presence of minus strand HCV RNA by PCR amplification, after excluding residual reverse transcriptase activity of Taq polymerase. No minus strand was found in serum derived virion RNA. PCR amplified products from both tumour and non-tumour parenchyma were sequenced in the 5' non-coding region and shown to be identical. The genotype of this Indonesian patient was found to be 1b (or II), the most prevalent type in the Far East. Images PMID:7490330

  9. Methylcellulose media for plaque assay of murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Horikawa, Y; Sato, K; Saito, H

    1982-09-01

    When ecotropic murine leukemia virus was assayed by a methylcellulose-XC cell procedure, plaque titers showed less test-to-test variation, more uniform dose-response curves, and larger plaque sizes, as compared with results of the conventional liquid overlay-XC cell test system. This assay therefore seems to be reliable and useful for the titration of ecotropic murine leukemia virus.

  10. Replication strategy of human hepatitis B virus

    SciTech Connect

    Will, H.; Reiser, W.; Weimer, T.; Pfaff, E.; Buescher, M.; Sprengel, R.; Cattaneo, R.; Schaller, H.

    1987-03-01

    To study the replication strategy of the human hepatitis B virus, the 5' end of the RNA pregenome and the initiation sites of DNA plus and minus strands have been mapped. The RNA pregenome was found to be terminally redundant by 120 nucleotides; it is initiated within the pre-C region and may also function as mRNA for synthesis of the major core protein and the hepatitis B virus reverse transcriptase. The hepatitis B virus DNA minus strand is initiated within the direct repeat sequence DR1, it contains a terminal redundancy of up to eight nucleotides, and its synthesis does not require any template switch. The DNA plus strand is primed by a short oligoribonucleotide probably derived from the 5' end of the RNA pregenome, and its synthesis is initiated close to the direct repeat sequence DR2. For its elongation to pass the discontinuity in the DNA minus strand an intramolecular template switch occurs using the terminal redundancy of this template. Thus, the route of reverse transcription and DNA replication of hepatitis B viruses is fundamentally different from that of retroviruses.

  11. Investigation of the bovine leukemia virus proviral DNA in human leukemias and lung cancers in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jehoon; Kim, Yonggoo; Kang, Chang Suk; Cho, Dae Hyun; Shin, Dong Hwan; Yum, Young Na; Oh, Jae Ho; Kim, Sheen Hee; Hwang, Myung Sil; Lim, Chul Joo; Yang, Ki Hwa; Han, Kyungja

    2005-08-01

    The bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine leucosis. This study investigated the presence of the BLV in leukemia (179 acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 292 acute myeloid leukemia and 46 chronic myelogenous leukemia cases) and 162 lung cancer patients (139 adenocarcinoma, 23 squamous cell carcinoma) to determine if the BLV is a causative organism of leukemia and lung cancer in Koreans. A BLV infection was confirmed in human cells by PCR using a BLV-8 primer combination. All 517 cases of human leukemia and 162 lung cancer were negative for a PCR of the BLV proviral DNA. In conclusion, although meat has been imported from BLV endemic areas, the BLV infection does not appear to be the cause of human leukemia or lung cancer in Koreans. These results can be used as a control for further studies on the BLV in Koreans. PMID:16100451

  12. Human Cytomegalovirus Induces JC Virus DNA Replication in Human Fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilbronn, Regine; Albrecht, Ingrid; Stephan, Sonja; Burkle, Alexander; Zur Hausen, Harald

    1993-12-01

    JC virus, a human papovavirus, is the causative agent of the demyelinating brain disease progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy (PML). PML is a rare but fatal disease which develops as a complication of severe immunosuppression. Latent JC virus is harbored by many asymptomatic carriers and is transiently reactivated from the latent state upon immunosuppression. JC virus has a very restricted host range, with human glial cells being the only tissue in which it can replicate at reasonable efficiency. Evidence that latent human cytomegalovirus is harbored in the kidney similar to latent JC virus led to the speculation that during episodes of impaired immunocompetence, cytomegalovirus might serve as helper virus for JC virus replication in otherwise nonpermissive cells. We show here that cytomegalovirus infection indeed leads to considerable JC virus DNA replication in cultured human fibroblasts that are nonpermissive for the replication of JC virus alone. Cytomegalovirus-mediated JC virus replication is dependent on the JC virus origin of replication and T antigen. Ganciclovir-induced inhibition of cytomegalovirus replication is associated with a concomitant inhibition of JC virus replication. These results suggest that reactivation of cytomegalovirus during episodes of immunosuppression might lead to activation of latent JC virus, which would enhance the probability of subsequent PML development. Ganciclovir-induced repression of both cytomegalovirus and JC virus replication may form the rational basis for the development of an approach toward treatment or prevention of PML.

  13. Autophagic machinery activated by dengue virus enhances virus replication

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.-R.; Lei, H.-Y.; Liu, M.-T.; Wang, J.-R.; Chen, S.-H.; Jiang-Shieh, Y.-F.; Lin, Y.-S.; Yeh, T.-M.; Liu, C.-C.; Liu, H.-S.

    2008-05-10

    Autophagy is a cellular response against stresses which include the infection of viruses and bacteria. We unravel that Dengue virus-2 (DV2) can trigger autophagic process in various infected cell lines demonstrated by GFP-LC3 dot formation and increased LC3-II formation. Autophagosome formation was also observed under the transmission electron microscope. DV2-induced autophagy further enhances the titers of extracellular and intracellular viruses indicating that autophagy can promote viral replication in the infected cells. Moreover, our data show that ATG5 protein is required to execute DV2-induced autophagy. All together, we are the first to demonstrate that DV can activate autophagic machinery that is favorable for viral replication.

  14. Dengue virus binding and replication by platelets.

    PubMed

    Simon, Ayo Y; Sutherland, Michael R; Pryzdial, Edward L G

    2015-07-16

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection causes ∼200 million cases of severe flulike illness annually, escalating to life-threatening hemorrhagic fever or shock syndrome in ∼500,000. Although thrombocytopenia is typical of both mild and severe diseases, the mechanism triggering platelet reduction is incompletely understood. As a probable initiating event, direct purified DENV-platelet binding was followed in the current study by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and confirmed antigenically. Approximately 800 viruses specifically bound per platelet at 37°C. Fewer sites were observed at 25°C, the blood bank storage temperature (∼350 sites), or 4°C, known to attenuate virus cell entry (∼200 sites). Dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) and heparan sulfate proteoglycan were implicated as coreceptors because only the combination of anti-DC-SIGN and low-molecular-weight heparin prevented binding. Interestingly, at 37°C and 25°C, platelets replicated the positive sense single-stranded RNA genome of DENV by up to ∼4-fold over 7 days. Further time course experiments demonstrated production of viral NS1 protein, which is known to be highly antigenic in patient serum. The infectivity of DENV intrinsically decayed in vitro, which was moderated by platelet-mediated generation of viable progeny. This was shown using a transcription inhibitor and confirmed by freeze-denatured platelets being incapable of replicating the DENV genome. For the first time, these data demonstrate that platelets directly bind DENV saturably and produce infectious virus. Thus, expression of antigen encoded by DENV is a novel consideration in the pathogen-induced thrombocytopenia mechanism. These results furthermore draw attention to the possibility that platelets may produce permissive RNA viruses in addition to DENV.

  15. Feline leukemia virus in a captive bobcat.

    PubMed

    Sleeman, J M; Keane, J M; Johnson, J S; Brown, R J; Woude, S V

    2001-01-01

    An 11-mo-old captive-bred male neutered bobcat (Felis rufus) presented with lethargy, anorexia, leukopenia, neutropenia, lymphopenia, and nonregenerative anemia. The animal was diagnosed as feline leukemia virus (FeLV) positive by immunofluorescent antibody and enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) testing. It died despite supportive care. Pathologic examination revealed multifocal non-suppurative encephalitis, diffuse interstitial pneumonia, multifocal hepatocellular necrosis, non-suppurative peritonitis, and lymphoid depletion. FeLV was isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells, bone marrow, spleen, and lymph node. FeLV-specific gag sequences were amplified by DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and aligned with known domestic cat FeLV's. The source of the virus was speculated to be a domestic cat that was a surrogate nurse. Case reports of FeLV in nondomestic felids are few, and FeLV does not appear to be enzootic in wild felids, except European wildcats (Felis silvestris) in France and Scotland. Introduction of FeLV into free-living and captive nondomestic felid populations could have serious consequences for their health and survival. Measures to prevent the introduction of this virus to nondomestic felids are warranted. PMID:11272497

  16. Interaction between Flavivirus and Cytoskeleton during Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Kar Yue; Chee, Hui-Yee

    2015-01-01

    Flaviviruses are potentially human pathogens that cause major epidemics worldwide. Flavivirus interacts with host cell factors to form a favourable virus replication site. Cell cytoskeletons have been observed to have close contact with flaviviruses, which expands the understanding of cytoskeleton functions during virus replication, although many detailed mechanisms are still unclear. The interactions between the virus and host cytoskeletons such as actin filaments, microtubules, and intermediate filaments have provided insight into molecular alterations during the virus infection, such as viral entry, in-cell transport, scaffold assembly, and egress. This review article focuses on the utilization of cytoskeleton by Flavivirus and the respective functions during virus replication. PMID:26347881

  17. Semliki Forest virus and Sindbis virus, but not vaccinia virus, require glycolysis for optimal replication.

    PubMed

    Findlay, James S; Ulaeto, David

    2015-09-01

    Viruses are obligate intracellular pathogens which rely on the cell's machinery to produce the energy and macromolecules required for replication. Infection is associated with a modified metabolic profile and one pathway which can be modified is glycolysis. In this study, we investigated if the glycolysis pathway is required for alphavirus replication. Pre-treatment of Vero cells with three different glycolysis inhibitors (2-deoxyglucose, lonidamine and oxamate) resulted in a significant reduction (but not abrogation) of Semliki Forest virus and Sindbis virus replication, but not of the unrelated virus, vaccinia virus. Reduced virus yield was not associated with any significant cytotoxic effect and delayed treatment up to 3 h post-infection still resulted in a significant reduction. This suggested that glycolysis is required for optimal replication of alphaviruses by supporting post-entry life cycle steps.

  18. Histopathology of spontaneous regression in virus-induced murine leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Russo, I.; Russo, J.; Baldwin, J.; Rich, M. A.

    1976-01-01

    The histopathology of the spontaneous regression of murine leukemia induced by a particular strain of Friend leukemia virus was studied in Swiss ICR/Ha mice. Animals inoculated with the regressing strain of Friend virus exhibited an initial pathologic response identical to that induced by conventional strains of Friend virus. Unlike the fatal leukemia produced by conventional Friend virus, the pathology of the disease induced by the regressing strain of Friend virus appeared to be self-limiting. The histopathology of the two diseases is compared in this report. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:970443

  19. Effects of exogenous, nonleukemogenic, ecotropic murine leukemia virus infections on the immune systems of adult C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J S; Giese, N A; Elkins, K L; Yetter, R A; Holmes, K L; Hartley, J W; Morse, H C

    1995-01-01

    Mouse AIDS (MAIDS) develops in mice infected with a mixture of replication-competent ecotropic and mink lung cell focus-inducing murine leukemia viruses and an etiologic replication-defective virus. Helper viruses are not required for induction of MAIDS, but the time course of disease is accelerated in their presence. To understand the possible contributions of ectropic murine leukemia viruses to MAIDS pathogenesis, we biologically cloned a series of viruses from the MAIDS-inducing LP-BM5 virus mixture. These viruses were examined for replication in tissues of infected mice and for effects on the immune system. All virus stocks replicated efficiently in mice. Infected animals showed slight lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly due primarily to B-cell proliferation associated with differentiation to immunoglobulin secretion resulting in twofold increases in serum immunoglobulin M levels; however, B-cell responses to helper T-cell-independent antigens were increased rather than decreased as in MAIDS. Analyses of CD8+ T-cell function showed that cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses to alloantigens were comparable in control and infected mice. Finally, we showed that infection resulted in enhanced expression of transcripts for interleukin-10, interleukin-4, and gamma interferon. These cytokines can all contribute to B-cell activation and may promote the expansion of a target cell population for the MAIDS defective virus. PMID:7769677

  20. Vaccination against δ-retroviruses: the bovine leukemia virus paradigm.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Gerónimo; Rodríguez, Sabrina M; de Brogniez, Alix; Gillet, Nicolas; Golime, Ramarao; Burny, Arsène; Jaworski, Juan-Pablo; Alvarez, Irene; Vagnoni, Lucas; Trono, Karina; Willems, Luc

    2014-06-20

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) and human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) are closely related d-retroviruses that induce hematological diseases. HTLV-1 infects about 15 million people worldwide, mainly in subtropical areas. HTLV-1 induces a wide spectrum of diseases (e.g., HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis) and leukemia/lymphoma (adult T-cell leukemia). Bovine leukemia virus is a major pathogen of cattle, causing important economic losses due to a reduction in production, export limitations and lymphoma-associated death. In the absence of satisfactory treatment for these diseases and besides the prevention of transmission, the best option to reduce the prevalence of d-retroviruses is vaccination. Here, we provide an overview of the different vaccination strategies in the BLV model and outline key parameters required for vaccine efficacy.

  1. Amphotropic murine leukemia viruses induce spongiform encephalomyelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Münk, Carsten; Löhler, Jürgen; Prassolov, Vladimir; Just, Ursula; Stockschläder, Marcus; Stocking, Carol

    1997-01-01

    Recombinants of amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV) have found widespread use in retroviral vector systems due to their ability to efficiently and stably infect cells of several different species, including human. Previous work has shown that replication-competent recombinants containing the amphotropic env gene, encoding the major SU envelope glycoprotein that determines host tropism, induce lymphomas in vivo. We show here that these viruses also induce a spongiform encephalomyelopathy in mice inoculated perinatally. This fatal central nervous system disease is characterized by noninflammatory spongiform lesions of nerve and glial cells and their processes, and is associated with moderate astro- and microgliosis. The first clinical symptoms are ataxia, tremor, and spasticity, progressing to complete tetraparesis and incontinence, and finally death of the animal. Sequences within the amphotropic env gene are necessary for disease induction. Coinfection of A-MuLV recombinants with nonneuropathogenic ecotropic or polytropic MuLV drastically increases the incidence, degree, and distribution of the neurodegenerative disorder. The consequence of these results in view of the use of A-MuLV recombinants in the clinic is discussed. PMID:9159161

  2. Feline Leukemia Virus Immunity Induced by Whole Inactivated Virus Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Andrea N.; O’Halloran, Kevin P.; Larson, Laurie J.; Schultz, Ronald D.; Hoover, Edward A.

    2009-01-01

    A fraction of cats exposed to feline leukemia virus (FeLV) effectively contain virus and resist persistent antigenemia/viremia. Using real-time PCR (qPCR) to quantitate circulating viral DNA levels, previously we detected persistent FeLV DNA in blood cells of non-antigenemic cats considered to have resisted FeLV challenge. In addition, previously we used RNA qPCR to quantitate circulating viral RNA levels and determined that the vast majority of viral DNA is transcriptionally active, even in the absence of antigenemia. A single comparison of all USDA-licensed commercially available FeLV vaccines using these modern sensitive methods has not been reported. To determine whether FeLV vaccination would prevent nucleic acid persistence, we assayed circulating viral DNA, RNA, antigen, infectious virus, and virus neutralizing (VN) antibody in vaccinated and unvaccinated cats challenged with infectious FeLV. We identified challenged vaccinates with undetectable antigenemia and viremia concomitant with persistent FeLV DNA and/or RNA. Moreover, these studies demonstrated that two whole inactivated virus (WIV) adjuvanted FeLV vaccines (Fort Dodge Animal Health’s Fel-O-Vax Lv-K® and Schering-Plough Animal Health’s FEVAXYN FeLV®) provided effective protection against FeLV challenge. In nearly every recipient of these vaccines, neither viral DNA, RNA, antigen, nor infectious virus could be detected in blood after FeLV challenge. Interestingly, this effective viral containment occurred despite a weak to undetectable VN antibody response. The above findings reinforce the precept of FeLV infection as a unique model of effective retroviral immunity elicited by WIV vaccination, and as such holds valuable insights into retroviral immunoprevention and therapy. PMID:20004483

  3. RNA virus replication depends on enrichment of phosphatidylethanolamine at replication sites in subcellular membranes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kai; Nagy, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular membranes are critical for replication of positive-strand RNA viruses. To dissect the roles of various lipids, we have developed an artificial phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) vesicle-based Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) replication assay. We demonstrate that the in vitro assembled viral replicase complexes (VRCs) in artificial PE vesicles can support a complete cycle of replication and asymmetrical RNA synthesis, which is a hallmark of (+)-strand RNA viruses. Vesicles containing ∼85% PE and ∼15% additional phospholipids are the most efficient, suggesting that TBSV replicates within membrane microdomains enriched for PE. Accordingly, lipidomics analyses show increased PE levels in yeast surrogate host and plant leaves replicating TBSV. In addition, efficient redistribution of PE leads to enrichment of PE at viral replication sites. Expression of the tombusvirus p33 replication protein in the absence of other viral compounds is sufficient to promote intracellular redistribution of PE. Increased PE level due to deletion of PE methyltransferase in yeast enhances replication of TBSV and other viruses, suggesting that abundant PE in subcellular membranes has a proviral function. In summary, various (+)RNA viruses might subvert PE to build membrane-bound VRCs for robust replication in PE-enriched membrane microdomains. PMID:25810252

  4. The Virus-Host Interplay: Biogenesis of +RNA Replication Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Colleen R.; Airo, Adriana M.; Hobman, Tom C.

    2015-01-01

    Positive-strand RNA (+RNA) viruses are an important group of human and animal pathogens that have significant global health and economic impacts. Notable members include West Nile virus, Dengue virus, Chikungunya, Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) Coronavirus and enteroviruses of the Picornaviridae family.Unfortunately, prophylactic and therapeutic treatments against these pathogens are limited. +RNA viruses have limited coding capacity and thus rely extensively on host factors for successful infection and propagation. A common feature among these viruses is their ability to dramatically modify cellular membranes to serve as platforms for genome replication and assembly of new virions. These viral replication complexes (VRCs) serve two main functions: To increase replication efficiency by concentrating critical factors and to protect the viral genome from host anti-viral systems. This review summarizes current knowledge of critical host factors recruited to or demonstrated to be involved in the biogenesis and stabilization of +RNA virus VRCs. PMID:26287230

  5. Frog Virus 3 DNA Replication Occurs in Two Stages

    PubMed Central

    Goorha, R.

    1982-01-01

    Viral DNA synthesis in frog virus 3 (FV3)-infected cells occurs both in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm (Goorha et al., Virology 84:32-51, 1978). Relationships between viral DNA molecules synthesized in these two compartments and their role in the virus replication were examined. The data presented here suggest that (i) FV3 DNA replicated in two stages and (ii) nucleus and cytoplasm were the sites of stages 1 and 2 of DNA replication, respectively. Stages 1 and 2 were further distinguished by their temporal appearance during infection and by the sizes of the replicating DNA as determined by sedimentation in neutral sucrose gradients. In stage 1, replicating molecules, between the size of unit and twice the unit length, were produced early in infection (2 h postinfection). In contrast, stage 2 of DNA replication occurred only after 3 h postinfection, and replicating molecules were large concatemers. Results of pulse-chase experiments showed that the concatemeric DNA served as the precursor for the production of mature FV3 DNA. Denaturation of concatemeric DNA with alkali or digestion with S1 nuclease reduced it to less than genome size molecules, indicating the presence of extensive single-stranded regions. Analysis of replicating DNA by equilibrium centrifugation in CsCl gradients after a pulse-chase suggested that these single-stranded regions were subsequently repaired. Based on these and previous data, a scheme of FV3 replication is presented. According to this scheme, FV3 utilizes the nucleus for early transcription and stage 1 of DNA replication. The viral DNA is then transported to the cytoplasm, where it participates in stage 2 DNA replication to form a concatemeric replication complex. The processing of concatemers to produce mature viral DNA and virus assembly also occurs in the cytoplasm. This mode of replication is strikingly different from any other known DNA virus. PMID:7109033

  6. NMR study of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus protease in a complex with amprenavir.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Ayako; Okamura, Hideyasu; Morishita, Ryo; Matsunaga, Satoko; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Ikegami, Takahisa; Kodaki, Tsutomu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Ryo, Akihide; Nagata, Takashi; Katahira, Masato

    2012-08-24

    Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a virus created through recombination of two murine leukemia proviruses under artificial conditions during the passage of human prostate cancer cells in athymic nude mice. The homodimeric protease (PR) of XMRV plays a critical role in the production of functional viral proteins and is a prerequisite for viral replication. We synthesized XMRV PR using the wheat germ cell-free expression system and carried out structural analysis of XMRV PR in a complex with an inhibitor, amprenavir (APV), by means of NMR. Five different combinatorially (15)N-labeled samples were prepared and backbone resonance assignments were made by applying Otting's method, with which the amino acid types of the [(1)H, (15)N] HSQC resonances were automatically identified using the five samples (Wu et al., 2006) [14]. A titration experiment involving APV revealed that one APV molecule binds to one XMRV PR dimer. For many residues, two distinct resonances were observed, which is thought to be due to the structural heterogeneity between the two protomers in the APV:XMRV PR=1:2 complex. PR residues at the interface with APV have been identified on the basis of chemical shift perturbation and identification of the intermolecular NOEs by means of filtered NOE experiments. Interestingly, chemical shift heterogeneity between the two protomers of XMRV PR has been observed not only at the interface with APV but also in regions apart from the interface. This indicates that the structural heterogeneity induced by the asymmetry of the binding of APV to the XMRV PR dimer is transmitted to distant regions. This is in contrast to the case of the APV:HIV-1 PR complex, in which the structural heterogeneity is only localized at the interface. Long-range transmission of the structural change identified for the XMRV PR complex might be utilized for the discovery of a new type of drug. PMID:22842568

  7. NMR study of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus protease in a complex with amprenavir.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Ayako; Okamura, Hideyasu; Morishita, Ryo; Matsunaga, Satoko; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Ikegami, Takahisa; Kodaki, Tsutomu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Ryo, Akihide; Nagata, Takashi; Katahira, Masato

    2012-08-24

    Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a virus created through recombination of two murine leukemia proviruses under artificial conditions during the passage of human prostate cancer cells in athymic nude mice. The homodimeric protease (PR) of XMRV plays a critical role in the production of functional viral proteins and is a prerequisite for viral replication. We synthesized XMRV PR using the wheat germ cell-free expression system and carried out structural analysis of XMRV PR in a complex with an inhibitor, amprenavir (APV), by means of NMR. Five different combinatorially (15)N-labeled samples were prepared and backbone resonance assignments were made by applying Otting's method, with which the amino acid types of the [(1)H, (15)N] HSQC resonances were automatically identified using the five samples (Wu et al., 2006) [14]. A titration experiment involving APV revealed that one APV molecule binds to one XMRV PR dimer. For many residues, two distinct resonances were observed, which is thought to be due to the structural heterogeneity between the two protomers in the APV:XMRV PR=1:2 complex. PR residues at the interface with APV have been identified on the basis of chemical shift perturbation and identification of the intermolecular NOEs by means of filtered NOE experiments. Interestingly, chemical shift heterogeneity between the two protomers of XMRV PR has been observed not only at the interface with APV but also in regions apart from the interface. This indicates that the structural heterogeneity induced by the asymmetry of the binding of APV to the XMRV PR dimer is transmitted to distant regions. This is in contrast to the case of the APV:HIV-1 PR complex, in which the structural heterogeneity is only localized at the interface. Long-range transmission of the structural change identified for the XMRV PR complex might be utilized for the discovery of a new type of drug.

  8. Specific Initiation Site for Simian Virus 40 Deoxyribonucleic Acid Replication

    PubMed Central

    Thoren, Marilyn M.; Sebring, Edwin D.; Salzman, Norman P.

    1972-01-01

    Replicating simian virus 40 (SV40) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules have been isolated under conditions in which the newly synthesized DNA is uniformly labeled with 3H-thymidine. These newly synthesized strands are released from the replicative intermediate molecules by alkaline treatment, and it has been possible to isolate single-stranded SV40 DNA which varies in size from 157,000 daltons (from molecules that are 10% replicated) to 1,360,000 daltons (85% replicated). The rates of duplex formation of newly synthesized DNA have been used to relate their genetic complexity to the extent of DNA replication. As DNA replication proceeds, the time required to effect 50% renaturation of the newly synthesized DNA increases at a proportional rate. The data establish that DNA replication is not initiated at random, but rather that there is a single specific initiation site for DNA replication. PMID:4342054

  9. Identification of a New Ribonucleoside Inhibitor of Ebola Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Reynard, Olivier; Nguyen, Xuan-Nhi; Alazard-Dany, Nathalie; Barateau, Véronique; Cimarelli, Andrea; Volchkov, Viktor E.

    2015-01-01

    The current outbreak of Ebola virus (EBOV) in West Africa has claimed the lives of more than 15,000 people and highlights an urgent need for therapeutics capable of preventing virus replication. In this study we screened known nucleoside analogues for their ability to interfere with EBOV replication. Among them, the cytidine analogue β-d-N4-hydroxycytidine (NHC) demonstrated potent inhibitory activities against EBOV replication and spread at non-cytotoxic concentrations. Thus, NHC constitutes an interesting candidate for the development of a suitable drug treatment against EBOV. PMID:26633464

  10. Human T cell lymphotropic virus-associated leukemia/lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ratner, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review This article summarizes the current pathophysiologic basis for human T cell lymphotropic virus-associated leukemia/lymphoma as well as past, present, and future therapeutic options. Recent findings New studies have been published on allogeneic stem cell transplantation, arsenic trioxide, and bortezomib for this condition. Summary Studies of the molecular biology of human T cell lymphotropic virus-1-induced T cell leukemia/lymphoma have defined a critical role for oncoprotein, Tax, and activation of nuclear factor κB transcription pathways, which have provided rational approaches to improved therapy for T cell leukemia/lymphoma as well as a model for other hematopoietic malignancies characterized by nuclear factor κB activation. PMID:16093798

  11. Replication-Competent Influenza A Viruses Expressing Reporter Genes

    PubMed Central

    Breen, Michael; Nogales, Aitor; Baker, Steven F.; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAV) cause annual seasonal human respiratory disease epidemics. In addition, IAV have been implicated in occasional pandemics with inordinate health and economic consequences. Studying IAV, in vitro or in vivo, requires the use of laborious secondary methodologies to identify virus-infected cells. To circumvent this requirement, replication-competent IAV expressing an easily traceable reporter protein can be used. Here we discuss the development and applications of recombinant replication-competent IAV harboring diverse fluorescent or bioluminescent reporter genes in different locations of the viral genome. These viruses have been employed for in vitro and in vivo studies, such as the screening of neutralizing antibodies or antiviral compounds, the identification of host factors involved in viral replication, cell tropism, the development of vaccines, or the assessment of viral infection dynamics. In summary, reporter-expressing, replicating-competent IAV represent a powerful tool for the study of IAV both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27347991

  12. p12 Tethers the Murine Leukemia Virus Pre-integration Complex to Mitotic Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Elis, Efrat; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Prizan-Ravid, Adi; Laham-Karam, Nihay; Bacharach, Eran

    2012-01-01

    The p12 protein of the murine leukemia virus (MLV) is a constituent of the pre-integration complex (PIC) but its function in this complex remains unknown. We developed an imaging system to monitor MLV PIC trafficking in live cells. This allowed the visualization of PIC docking to mitotic chromosomes and its release upon exit from mitosis. Docking occurred concomitantly with nuclear envelope breakdown and was impaired for PICs of viruses with lethal p12 mutations. Insertion of a heterologous chromatin binding module into p12 of one of these mutants restored PICs attachment to the chromosomes and partially rescued virus replication. Capsid dissociated from wild type PICs in mitotic cells but remained associated with PICs harboring tethering-negative p12 mutants. Altogether, these results explain, in part, MLV restriction to dividing cells and reveal a role for p12 as a factor that tethers MLV PIC to mitotic chromosomes. PMID:23300449

  13. Inhibitors of the interferon response enhance virus replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Claire E; Randall, Richard E; Adamson, Catherine S

    2014-01-01

    Virus replication efficiency is influenced by two conflicting factors, kinetics of the cellular interferon (IFN) response and induction of an antiviral state versus speed of virus replication and virus-induced inhibition of the IFN response. Disablement of a virus's capacity to circumvent the IFN response enables both basic research and various practical applications. However, such IFN-sensitive viruses can be difficult to grow to high-titer in cells that produce and respond to IFN. The current default option for growing IFN-sensitive viruses is restricted to a limited selection of cell-lines (e.g. Vero cells) that have lost their ability to produce IFN. This study demonstrates that supplementing tissue-culture medium with an IFN inhibitor provides a simple, effective and flexible approach to increase the growth of IFN-sensitive viruses in a cell-line of choice. We report that IFN inhibitors targeting components of the IFN response (TBK1, IKK2, JAK1) significantly increased virus replication. More specifically, the JAK1/2 inhibitor Ruxolitinib enhances the growth of viruses that are sensitive to IFN due to (i) loss of function of the viral IFN antagonist (due to mutation or species-specific constraints) or (ii) mutations/host cell constraints that slow virus spread such that it can be controlled by the IFN response. This was demonstrated for a variety of viruses, including, viruses with disabled IFN antagonists that represent live-attenuated vaccine candidates (Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV), Influenza Virus), traditionally attenuated vaccine strains (Measles, Mumps) and a slow-growing wild-type virus (RSV). In conclusion, supplementing tissue culture-medium with an IFN inhibitor to increase the growth of IFN-sensitive viruses in a cell-line of choice represents an approach, which is broadly applicable to research investigating the importance of the IFN response in controlling virus infections and has utility in a number of practical applications including

  14. Bortezomib inhibits hepatitis B virus replication in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Bandi, Prasanthi; Garcia, Mayra L; Booth, Carmen J; Chisari, Francis V; Robek, Michael D

    2010-02-01

    Pharmacological modulation of cellular proteins as a means to block virus replication has been proposed as an alternative antiviral strategy that may be less susceptible than others to the development of viral drug resistance. Recent evidence indicates that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway interacts with different aspects of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) life cycle in cell culture models of virus replication. We therefore examined the effect of proteasome inhibition on HBV replication in vivo using HBV transgenic mice. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (Velcade) inhibits proteasome activity in vivo and is used therapeutically for the clinical treatment of multiple myeloma. We found that a single intravenous dose of 1 mg of bortezomib/kg of body weight reduced virus replication for as long as 6 days. The inhibition of HBV by bortezomib was dose dependent and occurred at a step in replication subsequent to viral RNA and protein expression. The reduction in HBV replication did not result from nonspecific hepatocellular toxicity and was not mediated indirectly through the induction of an intrahepatic interferon response. Thus, pharmacological manipulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway may represent an alternative therapeutic approach for the treatment of chronic HBV infection.

  15. Bortezomib Inhibits Hepatitis B Virus Replication in Transgenic Mice▿

    PubMed Central

    Bandi, Prasanthi; Garcia, Mayra L.; Booth, Carmen J.; Chisari, Francis V.; Robek, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacological modulation of cellular proteins as a means to block virus replication has been proposed as an alternative antiviral strategy that may be less susceptible than others to the development of viral drug resistance. Recent evidence indicates that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway interacts with different aspects of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) life cycle in cell culture models of virus replication. We therefore examined the effect of proteasome inhibition on HBV replication in vivo using HBV transgenic mice. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (Velcade) inhibits proteasome activity in vivo and is used therapeutically for the clinical treatment of multiple myeloma. We found that a single intravenous dose of 1 mg of bortezomib/kg of body weight reduced virus replication for as long as 6 days. The inhibition of HBV by bortezomib was dose dependent and occurred at a step in replication subsequent to viral RNA and protein expression. The reduction in HBV replication did not result from nonspecific hepatocellular toxicity and was not mediated indirectly through the induction of an intrahepatic interferon response. Thus, pharmacological manipulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway may represent an alternative therapeutic approach for the treatment of chronic HBV infection. PMID:19949053

  16. Plasmid-like replicative intermediates of the Epstein-Barr virus lytic origin of DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Pfüller, R; Hammerschmidt, W

    1996-01-01

    During the lytic phase of herpesviruses, intermediates of viral DNA replication are found as large concatemeric molecules in the infected cells. It is not known, however, what the early events in viral DNA replication that yield these concatemers are. In an attempt to identify these early steps of DNA replication, replicative intermediates derived from the lytic origin of Epstein-Barr virus, oriLyt, were analyzed. As shown by density shift experiments with bromodeoxyuridine, oriLyt replicated semiconservatively soon after induction of the lytic cycle and oriLyt-containing DNA is amplified to yield monomeric plasmid progeny DNA (besides multimeric forms and high-molecular-weight DNA). A new class of plasmid progeny DNA which have far fewer negative supercoils than do plasmids extracted from uninduced cells is present only in cells undergoing the lytic cycle of Epstein-Barr virus. This finding is consistent with plasmid DNAs having fewer nucleosomes before extraction. The newly replicated plasmid DNAs are dependent on a functional oriLyt in cis and support an efficient marker transfer into Escherichia coli as monomeric plasmids. Multimeric forms of presumably circular progeny DNA of oriLyt, as well as detected recombination events, indicate that oriLyt-mediated DNA replication is biphasic: an early theta-like mode is followed by a complex pattern which could result from rolling-circle DNA replication. PMID:8648674

  17. Saikosaponin A inhibits influenza A virus replication and lung immunopathology

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yaqin; Ling, Fangfang; Xiao, Kun; Li, Qian; Li, Bin; Lu, Chunni; Qi, Wenbao; Zeng, Zhenling; Liao, Ming; Liu, Yahong; Chen, Weisan

    2015-01-01

    Fatal influenza outcomes result from a combination of rapid virus replication and collateral lung tissue damage caused by exaggerated pro-inflammatory host immune cell responses. There are few therapeutic agents that target both biological processes for the attenuation of influenza-induced lung pathology. We show that Saikosaponin A, a bioactive triterpene saponin with previouslyestablished anti-inflammatory effects, demonstrates both in vitro and in vivo anti-viral activity against influenza A virus infections. Saikosaponin A attenuated the replication of three different influenza A virus strains, including a highly pathogenic H5N1 strain, in human alveolar epithelial A549 cells. This anti-viral activity occurred through both downregulation of NF-κB signaling and caspase 3-dependent virus ribonucleoprotein nuclear export as demonstrated by NF-κB subunit p65 and influenza virus nucleoprotein nuclear translocation studies in influenza virus infected A549 cells. Critically, Saikosaponin A also attenuated viral replication, aberrant pro-inflammatory cytokine production and lung histopathology in the widely established H1N1 PR8 model of influenza A virus lethality in C57BL/6 mice. Flow cytometry studies of mouse bronchoalveolar lavage cells revealed that SSa exerted immunomodulatory effects through a selective attenuation of lung neutrophil and monocyte recruitment during the early peak of the innate immune response to PR8 infection. Altogether, our results indicate that Saikosaponin A possesses novel therapeutic potential for the treatment of pathological influenza virus infections. PMID:26637810

  18. Saikosaponin A inhibits influenza A virus replication and lung immunopathology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianxin; Duan, Mubing; Zhao, Yaqin; Ling, Fangfang; Xiao, Kun; Li, Qian; Li, Bin; Lu, Chunni; Qi, Wenbao; Zeng, Zhenling; Liao, Ming; Liu, Yahong; Chen, Weisan

    2015-12-15

    Fatal influenza outcomes result from a combination of rapid virus replication and collateral lung tissue damage caused by exaggerated pro-inflammatory host immune cell responses. There are few therapeutic agents that target both biological processes for the attenuation of influenza-induced lung pathology. We show that Saikosaponin A, a bioactive triterpene saponin with previouslyestablished anti-inflammatory effects, demonstrates both in vitro and in vivo anti-viral activity against influenza A virus infections. Saikosaponin A attenuated the replication of three different influenza A virus strains, including a highly pathogenic H5N1 strain, in human alveolar epithelial A549 cells. This anti-viral activity occurred through both downregulation of NF-κB signaling and caspase 3-dependent virus ribonucleoprotein nuclear export as demonstrated by NF-κB subunit p65 and influenza virus nucleoprotein nuclear translocation studies in influenza virus infected A549 cells. Critically, Saikosaponin A also attenuated viral replication, aberrant pro-inflammatory cytokine production and lung histopathology in the widely established H1N1 PR8 model of influenza A virus lethality in C57BL/6 mice. Flow cytometry studies of mouse bronchoalveolar lavage cells revealed that SSa exerted immunomodulatory effects through a selective attenuation of lung neutrophil and monocyte recruitment during the early peak of the innate immune response to PR8 infection. Altogether, our results indicate that Saikosaponin A possesses novel therapeutic potential for the treatment of pathological influenza virus infections.

  19. Origin and Direction of Simian Virus 40 Deoxyribonucleic Acid Replication

    PubMed Central

    Fareed, George C.; Garon, Claude F.; Salzman, Norman P.

    1972-01-01

    Double-branched, circular, replicating deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules of simian virus 40 (SV40) have been cleaved by the R1 restriction endonuclease from Escherichia coli. This enzyme introduces one double-strand break in SV40 DNA, at a specific site. The site of cleavage in the replicating molecules was used in this study to position the origin and the two branch points. Radioactively labeled molecules fractionated according to their extent of replication were evaluated after cleavage by sedimentation analysis and electron microscopy. The results demonstrate that the R1 cleavage site is 33% of the genome length from the origin of replication and that both branch points are growing points. These data indicate that SV40 DNA replication is bidirectional and confirm other reports which have shown a unique origin of replication. Images PMID:4342055

  20. Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors that potently and specifically block human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication.

    PubMed Central

    Romero, D L; Busso, M; Tan, C K; Reusser, F; Palmer, J R; Poppe, S M; Aristoff, P A; Downey, K M; So, A G; Resnick, L

    1991-01-01

    Certain bis(heteroaryl)piperazines (BHAPs) are potent inhibitors of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) at concentrations lower by 2-4 orders of magnitude than that which inhibits normal cellular DNA polymerase activity. Combination of a BHAP with nucleoside analog HIV-1 RT inhibitors suggested that together these compounds inhibited RT synergistically. In three human lymphocytic cell systems using several laboratory and clinical HIV-1 isolates, the BHAPs blocked HIV-1 replication with potencies nearly identical to those of 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine or 2',3'-dideoxyadenosine; in primary cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, concentrations of these antiviral agents were lower by at least 3-4 orders of magnitude than cytotoxic levels. The BHAPs do not inhibit replication of HIV-2, the simian or feline immunodeficiency virus, or Rauscher murine leukemia virus in culture. Evaluation of a BHAP in HIV-1-infected SCID-hu mice (severe combined immunodeficient mice implanted with human fetal lymph node) showed that the compound could block HIV-1 replication in vivo. The BHAPs are readily obtained synthetically and have been extensively characterized in preclinical evaluations. These compounds hold promise for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. Images PMID:1717988

  1. NMR study of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus protease in a complex with amprenavir

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Ayako; Okamura, Hideyasu; Morishita, Ryo; Matsunaga, Satoko; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Ikegami, Takahisa; Kodaki, Tsutomu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Ryo, Akihide; Nagata, Takashi; Katahira, Masato

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protease (PR) of XMR virus (XMRV) was successfully synthesized with cell-free system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interface of XMRV PR with an inhibitor, amprenavir (APV), was identified with NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural heterogeneity is induced for two PR protomers in the APV:PR = 1:2 complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural heterogeneity is transmitted even to distant regions from the interface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Long-range transmission of structural change may be utilized for drug discovery. -- Abstract: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a virus created through recombination of two murine leukemia proviruses under artificial conditions during the passage of human prostate cancer cells in athymic nude mice. The homodimeric protease (PR) of XMRV plays a critical role in the production of functional viral proteins and is a prerequisite for viral replication. We synthesized XMRV PR using the wheat germ cell-free expression system and carried out structural analysis of XMRV PR in a complex with an inhibitor, amprenavir (APV), by means of NMR. Five different combinatorially {sup 15}N-labeled samples were prepared and backbone resonance assignments were made by applying Otting's method, with which the amino acid types of the [{sup 1}H, {sup 15}N] HSQC resonances were automatically identified using the five samples (Wu et al., 2006) . A titration experiment involving APV revealed that one APV molecule binds to one XMRV PR dimer. For many residues, two distinct resonances were observed, which is thought to be due to the structural heterogeneity between the two protomers in the APV:XMRV PR = 1:2 complex. PR residues at the interface with APV have been identified on the basis of chemical shift perturbation and identification of the intermolecular NOEs by means of filtered NOE experiments. Interestingly, chemical shift heterogeneity between the two protomers of XMRV PR has

  2. Recent developments in understanding dengue virus replication.

    PubMed

    Urcuqui-Inchima, Silvio; Patiño, Claudia; Torres, Silvia; Haenni, Anne-Lise; Díaz, Francisco Javier

    2010-01-01

    Dengue is the most important cause of mosquito-borne virus diseases in tropical and subtropical regions in the world. Severe clinical outcomes such as dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome are potentially fatal. The epidemiology of dengue has undergone profound changes in recent years, due to several factors such as expansion of the geographical distribution of the insect vector, increase in traveling, and demographic pressure. As a consequence, the incidence of dengue has increased dramatically. Since mosquito control has not been successful and since no vaccine or antiviral treatment is available, new approaches to this problem are needed. Consequently, an in-depth understanding of the molecular and cellular biology of the virus should be helpful to design efficient strategies for the control of dengue. Here, we review the recently acquired knowledge on the molecular and cell biology of the dengue virus life cycle based on newly developed molecular biology technologies.

  3. Inhibitors of nucleotidyltransferase superfamily enzymes suppress herpes simplex virus replication.

    PubMed

    Tavis, John E; Wang, Hong; Tollefson, Ann E; Ying, Baoling; Korom, Maria; Cheng, Xiaohong; Cao, Feng; Davis, Katie L; Wold, William S M; Morrison, Lynda A

    2014-12-01

    Herpesviruses are large double-stranded DNA viruses that cause serious human diseases. Herpesvirus DNA replication depends on multiple processes typically catalyzed by nucleotidyltransferase superfamily (NTS) enzymes. Therefore, we investigated whether inhibitors of NTS enzymes would suppress replication of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2. Eight of 42 NTS inhibitors suppressed HSV-1 and/or HSV-2 replication by >10-fold at 5 μM, with suppression at 50 μM reaching ∼1 million-fold. Five compounds in two chemical families inhibited HSV replication in Vero and human foreskin fibroblast cells as well as the approved drug acyclovir did. The compounds had 50% effective concentration values as low as 0.22 μM with negligible cytotoxicity in the assays employed. The inhibitors suppressed accumulation of viral genomes and infectious particles and blocked events in the viral replication cycle before and during viral DNA replication. Acyclovir-resistant mutants of HSV-1 and HSV-2 remained highly sensitive to the NTS inhibitors. Five of six NTS inhibitors of the HSVs also blocked replication of another herpesvirus pathogen, human cytomegalovirus. Therefore, NTS enzyme inhibitors are promising candidates for new herpesvirus treatments that may have broad efficacy against members of the herpesvirus family.

  4. Pyrimidine dimers block simian virus 40 replication forks

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.A.; Edenberg, H.J.

    1986-10-01

    UV light produces lesions, predominantly pyrimidine dimers, which inhibit DNA replication in mammalian cells. The mechanism of inhibition is controversial: is synthesis of a daughter strand halted at a lesion while the replication fork moves on and reinitiates downstream, or is fork progression itself blocked for some time at the site of a lesion. We directly addressed this question by using electron microscopy to examine the distances of replication forks from the origin in unirradiated and UV-irradiated simian virus 40 chromosomes. If UV lesions block replication fork progression, the forks should be asymmetrically located in a large fraction of the irradiated molecules; if replication forks move rapidly past lesions, the forks should be symmetrically located. A large fraction of the simian virus 40 replication forks in irradiated molecules were asymmetrically located, demonstrating that UV lesions present at the frequency of pyrimidine dimers block replication forks. As a mechanism for this fork blockage, we propose that polymerization of the leading strand makes a significant contribution to the energetics of fork movement, so any lesion in the template for the leading strand which blocks polymerization should also block fork movement.

  5. Inhibition of influenza virus replication by plant-derived isoquercetin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yunjeong; Narayanan, Sanjeev; Chang, Kyeong-Ok

    2010-11-01

    Influenza virus infects the respiratory system of human and animals causing mild to severe illness which could lead to death. Although vaccines are available, there is still a great need for influenza antiviral drugs to reduce disease progression and virus transmission. Currently two classes (M2 channel blockers and neuraminidase inhibitors) of FDA-approved influenza antiviral drugs are available, but there are great concerns of emergence of viral resistance. Therefore, timely development of new antiviral drugs against influenza viruses is crucial. Plant-derived polyphenols have been studied for antioxidant activity, anti-carcinogenic, and cardio- and neuroprotective actions. Recently, some polyphenols, such as resveratrol and epigallocatechin gallate, showed significant anti-influenza activity in vitro and/or in vivo. Therefore we investigated selected polyphenols for their antiviral activity against influenza A and B viruses. Among the polyphenols we tested, isoquercetin inhibited the replication of both influenza A and B viruses at the lowest effective concentration. In a double treatment of isoquercetin and amantadine, synergistic effects were observed on the reduction of viral replication in vitro. The serial passages of virus in the presence of isoquercetin did not lead to the emergence of resistant virus, and the addition of isoquercetin to amantadine or oseltamivir treatment suppressed the emergence of amantadine- or oseltamivir-resistant virus. In a mouse model of influenza virus infection, isoquercetin administered intraperitoneally to mice inoculated with human influenza A virus significantly decreased the virus titers and pathological changes in the lung. Our results suggest that isoquercetin may have the potential to be developed as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of influenza virus infection and for the suppression of resistance in combination therapy with existing drugs.

  6. Discordance between bovine leukemia virus tax immortalization in vitro and oncogenicity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Twizere, J C; Kerkhofs, P; Burny, A; Portetelle, D; Kettmann, R; Willems, L

    2000-11-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) Tax protein, a transcriptional activator of viral expression, is essential for viral replication in vivo. Tax is believed to be involved in leukemogenesis because of its second function, immortalization of primary cells in vitro. These activities of Tax can be dissociated on the basis of point mutations within specific regions of the protein. For example, mutation of the phosphorylation sites at serines 106 and 293 abrogates immortalization potential in vitro but maintains transcriptional activity. This type of mutant is thus particularly useful for unraveling the role of Tax immortalization activity during leukemogenesis independently of viral replication. In this report, we describe the biological properties of BLV recombinant proviruses mutated in the Tax phosphorylation sites (BLVTax106+293). Titration of the proviral loads by semiquantitative PCR revealed that the BLV mutants propagated at wild-type levels in vivo. Furthermore, two animals (sheep 480 and 296) infected with BLVTax106+293 developed leukemia or lymphosarcoma after 16 and 36 months, respectively. These periods of time are within the normal range of latencies preceding the onset of pathogenesis induced by wild-type viruses. The phenotype of the mutant-infected cells was characteristic of a B lymphocyte (immunoglobulin M positive) expressing CD11b and CD5 (except at the final stage for the latter marker), a pattern that is typical of wild-type virus-infected target cells. Interestingly, the transformed B lymphocytes from sheep 480 also coexpressed the CD8 marker, a phenotype rarely observed in tumor biopsies from chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients. Finally, direct sequencing of the tax gene demonstrated that the leukemic cells did not harbor revertant proviruses. We conclude that viruses expressing a Tax mutant unable to transform primary cells in culture are still pathogenic in the sheep animal model. Our data thus provide a clear example of the discordant conclusions

  7. Role of Mitochondrial Membrane Spherules in Flock House Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Short, James R.; Speir, Jeffrey A.; Gopal, Radhika; Pankratz, Logan M.; Lanman, Jason

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses that generate double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) during replication must overcome host defense systems designed to detect this infection intermediate. All positive-sense RNA viruses studied to date modify host membranes to help facilitate the sequestration of dsRNA from host defenses and concentrate replication factors to enhance RNA production. Flock House virus (FHV) is an attractive model for the study of these processes since it is well characterized and infects Drosophila cells, which are known to have a highly effective RNA silencing system. During infection, FHV modifies the outer membrane of host mitochondria to form numerous membrane invaginations, called spherules, that are ∼50 nm in diameter and known to be the site of viral RNA replication. While previous studies have outlined basic structural features of these invaginations, very little is known about the mechanism underlying their formation. Here we describe the optimization of an experimental system for the analysis of FHV host membrane modifications using crude mitochondrial preparations from infected Drosophila cells. These preparations can be programmed to synthesize both single- and double-stranded FHV RNA. The system was used to demonstrate that dsRNA is protected from nuclease digestion by virus-induced membrane invaginations and that spherules play an important role in stimulating RNA replication. Finally, we show that spherules generated during FHV infection appear to be dynamic as evidenced by their ability to form or disperse based on the presence or absence of RNA synthesis. IMPORTANCE It is well established that positive-sense RNA viruses induce significant membrane rearrangements in infected cells. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these rearrangements, particularly membrane invagination and spherule formation, remain essentially unknown. How the formation of spherules enhances viral RNA synthesis is also not understood, although it is assumed to be partly a result

  8. Bovine Leukemia Virus DNA in Human Breast Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hua Min; Jensen, Hanne M.; Choi, K. Yeon; Sun, Dejun; Nuovo, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV), a deltaretrovirus, causes B-cell leukemia/lymphoma in cattle and is prevalent in herds globally. A previous finding of antibodies against BLV in humans led us to examine the possibility of human infection with BLV. We focused on breast tissue because, in cattle, BLV DNA and protein have been found to be more abundant in mammary epithelium than in lymphocytes. In human breast tissue specimens, we identified BLV DNA by using nested liquid-phase PCR and DNA sequencing. Variations from the bovine reference sequence were infrequent and limited to base substitutions. In situ PCR and immunohistochemical testing localized BLV to the secretory epithelium of the breast. Our finding of BLV in human tissues indicates a risk for the acquisition and proliferation of this virus in humans. Further research is needed to determine whether BLV may play a direct role in human disease. PMID:24750974

  9. Serum-dependent expression of promyelocytic leukemia protein suppresses propagation of influenza virus

    SciTech Connect

    Iki, Shigeo; Yokota, Shin-ichi; Okabayashi, Tamaki; Yokosawa, Noriko; Nagata, Kyosuke; Fujii, Nobuhiro . E-mail: fujii@sapmed.ac.jp

    2005-12-05

    The rate of propagation of influenza virus in human adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells was found to negatively correlate with the concentration of fetal bovine serum (FBS) in the culture medium. Virus replicated more rapidly at lower FBS concentrations (0 or 2%) than at higher concentrations (10 or 20%) during an early stage of infection. Basal and interferon (IFN)-induced levels of typical IFN-inducible anti-viral proteins, such as 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase, dsRNA-activated protein kinase and MxA, were unaffected by variation in FBS concentrations. But promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) was expressed in a serum-dependent manner. In particular, the 65 to 70 kDa isoform of PML was markedly upregulated following the addition of serum. In contrast, other isoforms were induced by IFN treatment, and weakly induced by FBS concentrations. Immunofluorescence microscopy indicated that PML was mainly formed nuclear bodies in Caco-2 cells at various FBS concentrations, and the levels of the PML-nuclear bodies were upregulated by FBS. Overexpression of PML isoform consisting of 560 or 633 amino acid residues by transfection of expression plasmid results in significantly delayed viral replication rate in Caco-2 cells. On the other hand, downregulation of PML expression by RNAi enhanced viral replication. These results indicate that PML isoforms which are expressed in a serum-dependent manner suppress the propagation of influenza virus at an early stage of infection.

  10. Novel Polyanions Inhibiting Replication of Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ciejka, Justyna; Milewska, Aleksandra; Wytrwal, Magdalena; Wojarski, Jacek; Golda, Anna; Ochman, Marek; Nowakowska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Novel sulfonated derivatives of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (NSPAHs) and N-sulfonated chitosan (NSCH) have been synthesized, and their activity against influenza A and B viruses has been studied and compared with that of a series of carrageenans, marine polysaccharides of well-documented anti-influenza activity. NSPAHs were found to be nontoxic and very soluble in water, in contrast to gel-forming and thus generally poorly soluble carrageenans. In vitro and ex vivo studies using susceptible cells (Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells and fully differentiated human airway epithelial cultures) demonstrated the antiviral effectiveness of NSPAHs. The activity of NSPAHs was proportional to the molecular mass of the chain and the degree of substitution of amino groups with sulfonate groups. Mechanistic studies showed that the NSPAHs and carrageenans inhibit influenza A and B virus assembly in the cell. PMID:26729490

  11. Theiler's virus replication in brain macrophages cultured in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, M; Aubert, C; Brahic, M

    1992-01-01

    Infection of the mouse with Theiler's virus is one of the best animal models for the study of multiple sclerosis, a chronic demyelinating disease of the human central nervous system. The identification of the virus target cell(s) is fundamental to an understanding of the viral persistence as well as the inflammation and demyelination observed in the chronic phase of the disease. This paper reports that a small fraction of brain macrophages grown in vitro can be efficiently infected with Theiler's virus without significant cytolytic effect. Viral replication as well as continuous production of infectivity were observed in these cultures. Images PMID:1560544

  12. Theiler's virus replication in brain macrophages cultured in vitro.

    PubMed

    Levy, M; Aubert, C; Brahic, M

    1992-05-01

    Infection of the mouse with Theiler's virus is one of the best animal models for the study of multiple sclerosis, a chronic demyelinating disease of the human central nervous system. The identification of the virus target cell(s) is fundamental to an understanding of the viral persistence as well as the inflammation and demyelination observed in the chronic phase of the disease. This paper reports that a small fraction of brain macrophages grown in vitro can be efficiently infected with Theiler's virus without significant cytolytic effect. Viral replication as well as continuous production of infectivity were observed in these cultures.

  13. Lytic Replication of Epstein-Barr Virus During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowe, R. P.; Pierson, D. L.; Barrett, A. D. T.

    1999-01-01

    Reactivation of latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) may be an important threat to crew health during extended space missions. Cellular immunity, which is decreased during and after space flight, is responsible for controlling EBV replication in vivo. In this study, we investigated the effects of short-term space flight on latent EBV reactivation.

  14. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Leukemia What Is Leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer of the blood cells. ... diagnosed with leukemia are over 50 years old. Leukemia Starts in Bone Marrow Click for more information ...

  15. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Replication by Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodchild, John; Agrawal, Sudhir; Civeira, Maria P.; Sarin, Prem S.; Sun, Daisy; Zamecnik, Paul C.

    1988-08-01

    Twenty different target sites within human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA were selected for studies of inhibition of HIV replication by antisense oligonucleotides. Target sites were selected based on their potential capacity to block recognition functions during viral replication. Antisense oligomers complementary to sites within or near the sequence repeated at the ends of retrovirus RNA (R region) and to certain splice sites were most effective. The effect of antisense oligomer length on inhibiting virus replication was also investigated, and preliminary toxicity studies in mice show that these compounds are toxic only at high levels. The results indicate potential usefulness for these oligomers in the treatment of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex either alone or in combination with other drugs.

  16. Horizontal transmission of feline leukemia virus under natural conditions in a feline leukemia cluster household.

    PubMed

    Essex, M; Cotter, S M; Sliski, A H; Hardy, W D; Stephenson, J R; Aaronson, S A; Jarrett, O

    1977-01-01

    Ten post-weanling 4-month-old cats, designated "tracers", were placed in a feline leukemia cluster household to determine the efficiency of horizontal transmission of feline leukemia virus (FeLV). The tracer cats were confirmed as negative for prior exposure to FeLV. Following the placement in the leukemia cluster environment, the tracer cats were serologically monitored at intervals of 3-6 weeks for a total period of 1 year. The tests employed included the detection of FeLV using fixed-cell immunofluorescence and the detection and titration of antibody to : (1) the feline oncornavirus-associated cell membrane antigen (FOCMA), as detected by membrane immunofluorescence; (2) viable FeLV, using serum neutralization; (3) virion core protein p30, using radioimmunoprecipitation; and (4) virion glycoprotein gp70, using radioimmunoprecipitation. All of the tracers had evidence of horizontal infection by FeLV, by several criteria. Seven of the 10 had virus that could be isolated from plasma. All of these 7 developed a terminal illness within 18 months; 3 developed aplastic anemia, 3 infectious peritonitis, and 1 lymphoma. The remaining 3 were negative for FeLV by both virus isolation and fixed-cell immunofluorescence. These 3 did, however, develop high antibody titers by all four criteria and they remained healthy throughout the examination period. These results clearly indicate that unprotected pros-weanling cats brought into a leukemia exposure household environment have a high risk of becoming infected with FeLV. Furthermore, a large proportion of the cats are at risk for development of persistent viremia and FeLV-related diseases.

  17. Replication of clinical measles virus strains in hispid cotton rats.

    PubMed

    Wyde, P R; Moore-Poveda, D K; Daley, N J; Oshitani, H

    1999-05-01

    An alternative model to nonhuman primates to study measles virus (MV) pathogenesis, to evaluate potential MV vaccines, or to screen for potential antivirals effective against this virus is highly desirable. The laboratory-adapted Edmonston strain of MV has been reported to replicate in the lungs of hispid cotton rats following intranasal inoculation, immunosuppress infected animals, and disseminate widely from the lungs, making these animals a candidate model. However, clinical MV strains have generally not been found to grow in these animals, limiting the utility and acceptance of this model. In the present studies we demonstrate reproducible replication of several clinical MV strains in hispid cotton rats. As with the Edmonston strain, leukocytes appear to be the primary target cells of these viruses following intranasal inoculation, and extrapulmonary dissemination is common. It is also demonstrated that prior MV infection or immunization of test animals with MV vaccine prevents pulmonary tract infection. These findings should make the MV-cotton rat model more acceptable.

  18. Delayed-onset enzootic bovine leukosis possibly caused by superinfection with bovine leukemia virus mutated in the pol gene.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tadaaki; Inoue, Emi; Mori, Hiroshi; Osawa, Yoshiaki; Okazaki, Katsunori

    2015-08-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine leucosis (EBL), to which animals are most susceptible at 4-8 years of age. In this study, we examined tumor cells associated with EBL in an 18-year-old cow to reveal that the cells carried at least two different copies of the virus, one of which was predicted to encode a reverse transcriptase (RT) lacking ribonuclease H activity and no integrase. Such a deficient enzyme may exhibit a dominant negative effect on the wild-type RT and cause insufficient viral replication, resulting in delayed tumor development in this cow. PMID:26025155

  19. Replication-competent fluorescent-expressing influenza B virus

    PubMed Central

    Nogales, Aitor; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Irene; Monte, Kristen; Lenschow, Deborah J.; Perez, Daniel R.; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Influenza B viruses (IBVs) cause annual outbreaks of respiratory illness in humans and are increasingly recognized as a major cause of influenza-associated morbidity and mortality. Studying influenza viruses requires the use of secondary methodologies to identify virus-infected cells. To this end, replication-competent influenza A viruses (IAVs) expressing easily traceable fluorescent proteins have been recently developed. In contrast, similar approaches for IBV are mostly lacking. In this report, we describe the generation and characterization of replication-competent influenza B/Brisbane/60/2008 viruses expressing fluorescent mCherry or GFP fused to the C-terminal of the viral non-structural 1 (NS1) protein. Fluorescent-expressing IBVs display similar growth kinetics and plaque phenotype to wild-type IBV, while fluorescent protein expression allows for the easy identification of virus-infected cells. Without the need of secondary approaches to monitor viral infection, fluorescent-expressing IBVs represent an ideal approach to study the biology of IBV and an excellent platform for the rapid identification and characterization of antiviral therapeutics or neutralizing antibodies using high-throughput screening approaches. Lastly, fluorescent-expressing IBVs can be combined with the recently described reporter-expressing IAVs for the identification of novel therapeutics to combat these two important human respiratory pathogens. PMID:26590325

  20. Comparative analysis of radiation- and virus-induced leukemias in BALB/c mice

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomb, E.W.; Binari, R.; Fleissner, E.

    1985-01-15

    Endogenous murine leukemia virus (MuLV) proviral copies were analyzed in thymomas induced in normal BALB/c (Fv-1b) and in Fv-1n congenic mice by X-irradiation. Both strains of mice developed leukemia with similar kinetics, indicating that N-tropism of endogenous MuLV was not a rate-limiting factor in development of disease. Southern blot analysis, using a probe specific for ecotropic virus and for ecotropic-specific sequences retained in pathogenic, env-recombinant viruses, showed that the majority of radiation leukemias lacked newly acquired, clonally integrated, proviruses. This was in contrast to virus-induced leukemias, which routinely exhibited several new proviral integration sites. When an internal proviral DNA restriction fragment was monitored, some radiation leukemias showed evidence of nonclonal infection, accounting for more frequent isolation of infectious virus from such leukemias. Differences in expression of T-cell surface antigens were found in X-ray-induced and virus-induced leukemias. All radiation leukemias were TL positive, whereas virus-induced leukemias were primarily negative for TL. Some differences were also found in Lyt-1 and Lyt-2 expression. The data as a whole suggest that, in the majority of cases, radiation leukemogenesis is not initiated by a viral route--that is, the sort of viral mechanism for which exogenous infection by known pathogenic MuLV is the paradigm.

  1. Beet yellows virus replicase and replicative compartments: parallels with other RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Gushchin, Vladimir A; Solovyev, Andrey G; Erokhina, Tatyana N; Morozov, Sergey Y; Agranovsky, Alexey A

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotic virus systems, infection leads to induction of membranous compartments in which replication occurs. Virus-encoded subunits of the replication complex mediate its interaction with membranes. As replication platforms, RNA viruses use the cytoplasmic surfaces of different membrane compartments, e.g., endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Golgi, endo/lysosomes, mitochondria, chloroplasts, and peroxisomes. Closterovirus infections are accompanied by formation of multivesicular complexes from cell membranes of ER or mitochondrial origin. So far the mechanisms for vesicles formation have been obscure. In the replication-associated 1a polyprotein of Beet yellows virus (BYV) and other closteroviruses, the region between the methyltransferase and helicase domains (1a central region (CR), 1a CR) is marginally conserved. Computer-assisted analysis predicts several putative membrane-binding domains in the BYV 1a CR. Transient expression of a hydrophobic segment (referred to here as CR-2) of the BYV 1a in Nicotiana benthamiana led to reorganization of the ER and formation of ~1-μm mobile globules. We propose that the CR-2 may be involved in the formation of multivesicular complexes in BYV-infected cells. This provides analogy with membrane-associated proteins mediating the build-up of "virus factories" in cells infected with diverse positive-strand RNA viruses (alpha-like viruses, picorna-like viruses, flaviviruses, and nidoviruses) and negative-strand RNA viruses (bunyaviruses).

  2. Protection of cats against progressive fibrosarcomas and persistent leukemia virus infection by vaccination with feline leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Grant, C K; de Noronha, F; Tusch, C; Michalek, M T; McLane, M F

    1980-12-01

    Young cats (3-6 mo old) were challenged with oncogenic Snyder-Theilen feline sarcoma virus (FeSV) after vaccination with live or killed FL74 cat lymphoma cells. Compared with controls immunized with normal cat fibroblasts, the FL74-vaccinated cats exhibited increased resistance to FeSV-induced progressive primary and disseminated secondary tumors. Maximum protection was achieved by vaccination with live FL74 cells or with a low dose of freeze-thawed cells, but tumor cells inactivated by glutaraldehyde or paraformaldehyde were also effective. Infectious helper feline leukemia virus (FeLV) was detected in the blood of all cats after FeSV challenge, but the duration and magnitude of this viremia were reduced in animals that had been previously vaccinated with live, freeze-thawed, or paraformaldehyde-fixed cells. Although immunized cats were resistant to FeSV-induced tumors and FeLV viremia, no evidence was obtained to suggest that vaccination with dead cells induced detectable circulating antibody prior to challenge with oncogenic virus. After FeSV challenge, complement-dependent antibody to feline oncornavirus-associated cell membrane antigen (CDA-FOCMA) appeared at high titer in cats that were destined either to survive tumor-free or to develop small, localized, and eventually regressing tumors. Cats immunized with live FL74 cells developed CDA-FOCMA prior to challenge, and antibody appeared in these cats following an episode of transient FeLV viremia induced by virus replicating from the injected tumor cells. Therefore, apparently, a state of transient or persistent FeLV viremia regularly preceded detection of CDA-FOCMA activity. Several individually derived feline lymphoma cell lines were used as targets for CDA-FOCMA, and the results suggested that lytic activity is directed to multiple antigen determinants expressed differently by individual feline lymphomas.

  3. Mutant of B-tropic murine leukemia virus synthesizing an altered polymerase molecule.

    PubMed Central

    Gerwin, B I; Rein, A; Levin, J G; Bassin, R H; Benjers, B M; Kashmiri, S V; Hopkins, D; O'Neill, B J

    1979-01-01

    A nonconditional mutant of B-tropic murine leukemia virus (MuLV), defective in polymerase, has been isolated by cloning chronically infected cells. The cell clone containing the mutant produced virus particles which were noninfectious. However, superinfection of the cells by replication-competent XC-negative viruses resulted in the rescue of virus capable of forming plaques in a modified XC test, termed the "complementation plaque assay" (A. Rein and R. H. Bassin, J. Virol. 28:656-660, 1978). Analysis of the noninfectious virions produced without superinfection demonstrated that they contained only 2 to 5% of the wild-type level of reverse transcriptase activity. Purification of this activity indicated that it was associated with a smaller molecule than that produced by wild-type virus. Cells producing the mutant virions did not contain the gag-pol precursor, Pr180gag-pol; however the cells contained proteins of 147K and 114K daltons precipitable with anti-pol serum. All of the normal structural proteins as well as 70S genomic RNA could be detected in the mutant particles. An interference test indicated that a functional ecotropic glycoprotein was synthesized by the mutant. These results indicate that the mutant has a unique defect in the pol gene. Images PMID:92571

  4. Extract of Scutellaria baicalensis inhibits dengue virus replication

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Scutellaria baicalensis (S. baicalensis) is one of the traditional Chinese medicinal herbs that have been shown to possess many health benefits. In the present study, we evaluated the in vitro antiviral activity of aqueous extract of the roots of S. baicalensis against all the four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes. Methods Aqueous extract of S. baicalensis was prepared by microwave energy steam evaporation method (MEGHE™), and the anti-dengue virus replication activity was evaluated using the foci forming unit reduction assay (FFURA) in Vero cells. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay was used to determine the actual dengue virus RNA copy number. The presence of baicalein, a flavonoid known to inhibit dengue virus replication was determined by mass spectrometry. Results The IC50 values for the S. baicalensis extract on Vero cells following DENV adsorption ranged from 86.59 to 95.19 μg/mL for the different DENV serotypes. The IC50 values decreased to 56.02 to 77.41 μg/mL when cells were treated with the extract at the time of virus adsorption for the different DENV serotypes. The extract showed potent direct virucidal activity against extracellular infectious virus particles with IC50 that ranged from 74.33 to 95.83 μg/mL for all DENV serotypes. Weak prophylactic effects with IC50 values that ranged from 269.9 to 369.8 μg/mL were noticed when the cells were pre-treated 2 hours prior to virus inoculation. The concentration of baicalein in the S. baicalensis extract was ~1% (1.03 μg/gm dried extract). Conclusions Our study demonstrates the in vitro anti-dengue virus replication property of S. baicalensis against all the four DENV serotypes investigated. The extract reduced DENV infectivity and replication in Vero cells. The extract was rich in baicalein, and could be considered for potential development of anti-DENV therapeutics. PMID:23627436

  5. Depression of Rauscher leukemia virus envelope glycoprotein gp71 binding by lymphoid cells during leukemogenesis in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, A K; Reed, C D; Riggs, C W; Twardzik, D R; Weislow, O S; Hellman, A

    1979-01-01

    The availability of membrane receptors for the 71,000-dalton envelope glycoprotein (gp71) of Rauscher murine leukemia virus on splenic and thymic cells from BALB/c mice during Rauscher murine leukemia virus-induced leukemogenesis was determined utilizing a radiolabeled gp71 binding assay. Shortly after infection, the relative cellular [125I]gp71 binding level decreased, first with splenic cells (at day 7 to 10 after infection) and later with thymic cells (at day 10 to 20 after infection). The dependency of the reduction of binding on the replication of the inoculated virus was demonstrated by regression analyses using cellular gp71 binding level as the dependent variable and infectious virus titer, as well as viral gp71 and p30 levels, of spleens and thymuses from infected mice as independent variables. With each independent variable, the reduction of gp71 binding for both cell types was highly dependent (P less than 0.01) on the level of virus detected in their respective organ. In the early stages of leukemogenesis, the [125I]gp71 binding level declined to approximately 20 to 30% of control values. During this period the rate of reduction of binding was very rapid and, in general was similar for both splenic and thymic cells. Further progression of the disease resulted in little or no further reduction in binding. The application of this technique to monitor host ecotropic virus synthesis and to study cell surface virus receptor control mechanisms in vivo is discussed. PMID:468372

  6. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase regulates hepatitis C virus replication.

    PubMed

    Jung, Gwon-Soo; Jeon, Jae-Han; Choi, Yeon-Kyung; Jang, Se Young; Park, Soo Young; Kim, Sung-Woo; Byun, Jun-Kyu; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Lee, Sungwoo; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Lee, In-Kyu; Kang, Yu Na; Park, Keun-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    During replication, hepatitis C virus (HCV) utilizes macromolecules produced by its host cell. This process requires host cellular metabolic reprogramming to favor elevated levels of aerobic glycolysis. Therefore, we evaluated whether pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK), a mitochondrial enzyme that promotes aerobic glycolysis, can regulate HCV replication. Levels of c-Myc, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), PDK1, PDK3, glucokinase, and serine biosynthetic enzymes were compared between HCV-infected and uninfected human liver and Huh-7.5 cells infected with or without HCV. Protein and mRNA expression of c-Myc, HIF-1α, and glycolytic enzymes were significantly higher in HCV-infected human liver and hepatocytes than in uninfected controls. This increase was accompanied by upregulation of serine biosynthetic enzymes, suggesting cellular metabolism was altered toward facilitated nucleotide synthesis essential for HCV replication. JQ1, a c-Myc inhibitor, and dichloroacetate (DCA), a PDK inhibitor, decreased the expression of glycolytic and serine synthetic enzymes in HCV-infected hepatocytes, resulting in suppressed viral replication. Furthermore, when co-administered with IFN-α or ribavirin, DCA further inhibited viral replication. In summary, HCV reprograms host cell metabolism to favor glycolysis and serine biosynthesis; this is mediated, at least in part, by increased PDK activity, which provides a surplus of nucleotide precursors. Therefore, blocking PDK activity might have therapeutic benefits against HCV replication. PMID:27471054

  7. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase regulates hepatitis C virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Gwon-Soo; Jeon, Jae-Han; Choi, Yeon-Kyung; Jang, Se Young; Park, Soo Young; Kim, Sung-Woo; Byun, Jun-Kyu; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Lee, Sungwoo; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Lee, In-Kyu; Kang, Yu Na; Park, Keun-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    During replication, hepatitis C virus (HCV) utilizes macromolecules produced by its host cell. This process requires host cellular metabolic reprogramming to favor elevated levels of aerobic glycolysis. Therefore, we evaluated whether pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK), a mitochondrial enzyme that promotes aerobic glycolysis, can regulate HCV replication. Levels of c-Myc, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), PDK1, PDK3, glucokinase, and serine biosynthetic enzymes were compared between HCV-infected and uninfected human liver and Huh-7.5 cells infected with or without HCV. Protein and mRNA expression of c-Myc, HIF-1α, and glycolytic enzymes were significantly higher in HCV-infected human liver and hepatocytes than in uninfected controls. This increase was accompanied by upregulation of serine biosynthetic enzymes, suggesting cellular metabolism was altered toward facilitated nucleotide synthesis essential for HCV replication. JQ1, a c-Myc inhibitor, and dichloroacetate (DCA), a PDK inhibitor, decreased the expression of glycolytic and serine synthetic enzymes in HCV-infected hepatocytes, resulting in suppressed viral replication. Furthermore, when co-administered with IFN-α or ribavirin, DCA further inhibited viral replication. In summary, HCV reprograms host cell metabolism to favor glycolysis and serine biosynthesis; this is mediated, at least in part, by increased PDK activity, which provides a surplus of nucleotide precursors. Therefore, blocking PDK activity might have therapeutic benefits against HCV replication. PMID:27471054

  8. Structure of Replicating Simian Virus 40 Deoxyribonucleic Acid Molecules 1

    PubMed Central

    Sebring, E. D.; Kelly, T. J.; Thoren, M. M.; Salzman, N. P.

    1971-01-01

    Properties of replicating simian virus 40 (SV40) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) have been examined by sedimentation analysis and by direct observation during a lytic cycle of infection of African green monkey kidney cells. Two types of replicating DNA molecules were observed in the electron microscope. One was an open structure containing two branch points, three branches, and no free ends whose length measurements were consistent with those expected for replicating SV40 DNA molecules. A second species had the same features as the open structure, but in addition it contained a superhelix in the unreplicated portion of the molecule. Eighty to ninety per cent of the replicative intermediates (RI) were in this latter configuration, and length measurements of these molecules also were consistent with replicating SV40 DNA. Replicating DNA molecules with this configuration have not been described previously. RI, when examined in ethidium bromide-cesium chloride (EB-CsCl) isopycnic gradients, banded in a heterogeneous manner. A fraction of the RI banded at the same density as circular SV40 DNA containing one or more single-strand nicks (component II). The remaining radioactive RI banded at densities higher than that of component II, and material was present at all densities between that of supercoiled double-stranded DNA (component I) and component II. When RI that banded at different densities in EB-CsCl were examined in alkaline gradients, cosedimentation of parental DNA and newly replicated DNA did not occur. All newly replicated DNA sedimented more slowly than did intact single-stranded SV40 DNA, a finding that is inconsistent with the rolling circle model of DNA replication. An inverse correlation exists between the extent of replication of the SV40 DNA and the banding density in EB-CsCl. Under alkaline conditions, the parental DNA strands that were contained in the RI sedimented as covalently closed structures. The sedimentation rates in alkali of the covalently closed

  9. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii and concurrent Bartonella spp., feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia virus, and Dirofilaria immitis infections in Egyptian cats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii and Bartonella spp. are zoonotic pathogens of cats. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV), and Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLv) are related to Human Immunodeficiency Virus, and Human Leukemia Virus, respectively, and these viruses are immunosuppressive. In the present study, the prevalen...

  10. Cellular microRNAs Repress Vesicular Stomatitis Virus but Not Theiler’s Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    De Cock, Aurélie; Michiels, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Picornavirus’ genomic RNA is a positive-stranded RNA sequence that also serves as a template for translation and replication. Cellular microRNAs were reported to interfere to different extents with the replication of specific picornaviruses, mostly acting as inhibitors. However, owing to the high error rate of their RNA-dependent RNA-polymerases, picornavirus quasi-species are expected to evolve rapidly in order to lose any detrimental microRNA target sequence. We examined the genome of Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) for the presence of under-represented microRNA target sequences that could have been selected against during virus evolution. However, little evidence for such sequences was found in the genome of TMEV and introduction of the most under-represented microRNA target (miR-770-3p) in TMEV did not significantly affect viral replication in cells expressing this microRNA. To test the global impact of cellular microRNAs on viral replication, we designed a strategy based on short-term Dicer inactivation in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Short-term Dicer inactivation led to a >10-fold decrease in microRNA abundance and strongly increased replication of Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), which was used as a microRNA-sensitive control virus. In contrast, Dicer inactivation did not increase TMEV replication. In conclusion, cellular microRNAs appear to exert little influence on Theiler’s virus fitness. PMID:26978386

  11. Cellular microRNAs Repress Vesicular Stomatitis Virus but Not Theiler's Virus Replication.

    PubMed

    De Cock, Aurélie; Michiels, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Picornavirus' genomic RNA is a positive-stranded RNA sequence that also serves as a template for translation and replication. Cellular microRNAs were reported to interfere to different extents with the replication of specific picornaviruses, mostly acting as inhibitors. However, owing to the high error rate of their RNA-dependent RNA-polymerases, picornavirus quasi-species are expected to evolve rapidly in order to lose any detrimental microRNA target sequence. We examined the genome of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) for the presence of under-represented microRNA target sequences that could have been selected against during virus evolution. However, little evidence for such sequences was found in the genome of TMEV and introduction of the most under-represented microRNA target (miR-770-3p) in TMEV did not significantly affect viral replication in cells expressing this microRNA. To test the global impact of cellular microRNAs on viral replication, we designed a strategy based on short-term Dicer inactivation in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Short-term Dicer inactivation led to a >10-fold decrease in microRNA abundance and strongly increased replication of Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), which was used as a microRNA-sensitive control virus. In contrast, Dicer inactivation did not increase TMEV replication. In conclusion, cellular microRNAs appear to exert little influence on Theiler's virus fitness. PMID:26978386

  12. Glycosphingolipid GM3 is Indispensable for Dengue Virus Genome Replication

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kezhen; Wang, Juanjuan; Sun, Ta; Bian, Gang; Pan, Wen; Feng, Tingting; Wang, Penghua; Li, Yunsen; Dai, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) causes the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral disease of humans worldwide. Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are involved in virus infection by regulating various steps of viral-host interaction. However, the distinct role of GSLs during DENV infection remains unclear. In this study, we used mouse melanoma B16 cells and their GSL-deficient mutant counterpart GM95 cells to study the influence of GSLs on DENV infection. Surprisingly, GM95 cells were highly resistant to DENV infection compared with B16 cells. Pretreatment of B16 cells with synthetase inhibitor of GM3, the most abundant GSLs in B16 cells, or silencing GM3 synthetase T3GAL5, significantly inhibited DENV infection. DENV attachment and endocytosis were not impaired in GM95 cells, but DENV genome replication was obviously inhibited in GM95 cells compared to B16 cells. Furthermore, GM3 was colocalized with DENV viral replication complex on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) inside the B16 cells. Finally, GM3 synthetase inhibitor significantly reduced the mortality rate of suckling mice that challenged with DENV by impairing the viral replication in mouse brain. Taken together, these data indicated that GM3 was not required for DENV attachment and endocytosis, however, essential for viral genome replication. Targeting GM3 could be a novel strategy to inhibit DENV infection. PMID:27313500

  13. Monkey Viperin Restricts Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jianyu; Wang, Haiyan; Bai, Juan; Zhang, Qiaoya; Li, Yufeng; Liu, Fei; Jiang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an important pathogen which causes huge economic damage globally in the swine industry. Current vaccination strategies provide only limited protection against PRRSV infection. Viperin is an interferon (IFN) stimulated protein that inhibits some virus infections via IFN-dependent or IFN-independent pathways. However, the role of viperin in PRRSV infection is not well understood. In this study, we cloned the full-length monkey viperin (mViperin) complementary DNA (cDNA) from IFN-α-treated African green monkey Marc-145 cells. It was found that the mViperin is up-regulated following PRRSV infection in Marc-145 cells along with elevated IRF-1 gene levels. IFN-α induced mViperin expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner and strongly inhibits PRRSV replication in Marc-145 cells. Overexpression of mViperin suppresses PRRSV replication by blocking the early steps of PRRSV entry and genome replication and translation but not inhibiting assembly and release. And mViperin co-localized with PRRSV GP5 and N protein, but only interacted with N protein in distinct cytoplasmic loci. Furthermore, it was found that the 13–16 amino acids of mViperin were essential for inhibiting PRRSV replication, by disrupting the distribution of mViperin protein from the granular distribution to a homogeneous distribution in the cytoplasm. These results could be helpful in the future development of novel antiviral therapies against PRRSV infection. PMID:27232627

  14. Inhibition of West Nile Virus Replication by Retrovirus-Delivered Small Interfering RNA in Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongbo; Wu, Chengxiang; Wu, Jianguo; Nerurkar, Vivek R.; Yanagihara, Richard; Lu, Yuanan

    2010-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) has been responsible for the largest outbreaks of arboviral encephalitis in U.S. history. No specific drug is currently available for the effective treatment of WNV infection. To exploit RNA interference as a potential therapeutic approach, a Moloney murine leukemia virus-based retrovirus vector was used to effectively deliver WNV-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) into human neuroblastoma HTB-11 cells. Viral plaque assays demonstrated that transduced cells were significantly refractory to WNV replication, as compared to untransduced control cells (P< 0.05), which correlated with the reduced expression of target viral genes and respective viral proteins. Therefore, retrovirus-mediated delivery of siRNA for gene silencing can be used to study the specific functions of viral genes associated with replication and may have potential therapeutic applications. PMID:18360908

  15. Human cytomegalovirus function inhibits replication of herpes simplex virus

    SciTech Connect

    Cockley, K.D.; Shiraki, K.; Rapp, F.

    1988-01-01

    Human embryonic lung (HEL) cells infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) restricted the replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). A delay in HSV replication of 15 h as well as a consistent, almost 3 log inhibition of HSV replication in HCMV-infected cell cultures harvested 24 to 72 h after superinfection were observed compared with controls infected with HSV alone. Treatment of HCMV-infected HEL cells with cycloheximide (100 ..mu..g/ml) for 3 or 24 h was demonstrated effective in blocking HCMV protein synthesis, as shown by immunoprecipitation with HCMV antibody-positive polyvalent serum. Cycloheximide treatment of HCMV-infected HEL cells and removal of the cycloheximide block before superinfection inhibited HSV-1 replication more efficiently than non-drug-treated superinfected controls. HCMV DNA-negative temperature-sensitive mutants restricted HSV as efficiently as wild-type HCMV suggesting that immediate-early and/or early events which occur before viral DNA synthesis are sufficient for inhibition of HSV. Inhibition of HSV-1 in HCMV-infected HEL cells was unaffected by elevated temperature (40.5/sup 0/C). However, prior UV irradiation of HCMV removed the block to HSV replication, demonstrating the requirement for an active HCMV genome. HSV-2 replication was similarly inhibited in HCMV-infected HEL cells. Superinfection of HCMV-infected HEL cells with HSV-1 labeled with (/sup 3/H)thymidine provided evidence that the labeled virus could penetrate to the nucleus of cells after superinfection. Evidence for penetration of superinfecting HSV into HCMV-infected cells was also provided by blot hybridization of HSV DNA synthesized in cells infected with HSV alone versus superinfected cell cultures at 0 and 48 h after superinfection.

  16. Charged Assembly Helix Motif in Murine Leukemia Virus Capsid: an Important Region for Virus Assembly and Particle Size Determination

    PubMed Central

    Cheslock, Sara Rasmussen; Poon, Dexter T. K.; Fu, William; Rhodes, Terence D.; Henderson, Louis E.; Nagashima, Kunio; McGrath, Connor F.; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2003-01-01

    We have identified a region near the C terminus of capsid (CA) of murine leukemia virus (MLV) that contains many charged residues. This motif is conserved in various lengths in most MLV-like viruses. One exception is that spleen necrosis virus (SNV) does not contain a well-defined domain of charged residues. When 33 amino acids of the MLV motif were deleted to mimic SNV CA, the resulting mutant produced drastically reduced amounts of virions and the virions were noninfectious. Furthermore, these viruses had abnormal sizes, often contained punctate structures resembling those in the cell cytoplasm, and packaged both ribosomal and viral RNA. When 11 or 15 amino acids were deleted to modify the MLV CA to resemble those from other gammaretroviruses, the deletion mutants produced virions at levels comparable to those of the wild-type virus and were able to complete one round of virus replication without detectable defects. We generated 10 more mutants that displayed either the wild-type or mutant phenotype. The distribution of the wild-type or mutant phenotype did not directly correlate with the number of amino acids deleted, suggesting that the function of the motif is determined not simply by its length but also by its structure. Structural modeling of the wild-type and mutant proteins suggested that this region forms α-helices; thus, we termed this motif the “charged assembly helix.” This is the first description of the charged assembly helix motif in MLV CA and demonstration of its role in virus budding and assembly. PMID:12768025

  17. Receptor tyrosine kinase signaling regulates replication of the peste des petits ruminants virus.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, K; Chaubey, K K; Singh, S V; Kumar, N

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we found out that blocking the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling in Vero cells by tryphostin AG879 impairs the in vitro replication of the peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV). A reduced virus replication in Trk1-knockdown (siRNA) Vero cells confirmed the essential role of RTK in the virus replication, in particular a specific regulation of viral RNA synthesis. These data represent the first evidence that the RTK signaling regulates replication of a morbillivirus. PMID:25790054

  18. The tax gene of human T-cell leukemia virus type 2 is essential for transformation of human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, T M; Pettiford, S M; Green, P L

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV)-mediated transformation and induction of malignancy is unknown; however, several studies have implicated the viral gene product, Tax. Conclusive evidence for the role of Tax in the HTLV malignant process has been impeded by the inability to mutate tax in the context of an infectious virus and dissociate viral replication from cellular transformation. To circumvent this problem we constructed a mutant of HTLV type 2 (HTLV-2) that replicates by a Tax-independent mechanism. For these studies, the Tax response element in the viral long terminal repeat was replaced with the cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter enhancer (C-enh). Transcription of the chimeric HTLV-2 (HTLVC-enh) was efficiently directed by this heterologous promoter. Also, the chimeric virus transformed primary human T lymphocytes with an efficiency similar to that of wild-type HTLV-2. A tax-knockout virus, termed HTLVC-enhDeltaTax, was constructed to directly assess the importance of Tax in cellular transformation. Transfection and infection studies indicated that HTLVC-enhDeltaTax was replication competent; however, HTLVC-enhDeltaTax failed to transform primary human T lymphocytes. We conclude that Tax is essential for HTLV-mediated transformation of human T lymphocytes. Furthermore, this chimeric HTLV, that replicates in the absence of Tax, should facilitate studies to determine the precise mechanism of T-lymphocyte transformation by HTLV. PMID:8764028

  19. Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-related Virus (XMRV) Backgrounder

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have not found evidence that XMRV causes any diseases in humans or in animals. The presence of an infectious agent, such as a virus, in diseased tissue does not mean that the agent causes the disease.

  20. Promotion of Hendra virus replication by microRNA 146a.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Cameron R; Marsh, Glenn A; Jenkins, Kristie A; Gantier, Michael P; Tizard, Mark L; Middleton, Deborah; Lowenthal, John W; Haining, Jessica; Izzard, Leonard; Gough, Tamara J; Deffrasnes, Celine; Stambas, John; Robinson, Rachel; Heine, Hans G; Pallister, Jackie A; Foord, Adam J; Bean, Andrew G; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2013-04-01

    Hendra virus is a highly pathogenic zoonotic paramyxovirus in the genus Henipavirus. Thirty-nine outbreaks of Hendra virus have been reported since its initial identification in Queensland, Australia, resulting in seven human infections and four fatalities. Little is known about cellular host factors impacting Hendra virus replication. In this work, we demonstrate that Hendra virus makes use of a microRNA (miRNA) designated miR-146a, an NF-κB-responsive miRNA upregulated by several innate immune ligands, to favor its replication. miR-146a is elevated in the blood of ferrets and horses infected with Hendra virus and is upregulated by Hendra virus in human cells in vitro. Blocking miR-146a reduces Hendra virus replication in vitro, suggesting a role for this miRNA in Hendra virus replication. In silico analysis of miR-146a targets identified ring finger protein (RNF)11, a member of the A20 ubiquitin editing complex that negatively regulates NF-κB activity, as a novel component of Hendra virus replication. RNA interference-mediated silencing of RNF11 promotes Hendra virus replication in vitro, suggesting that increased NF-κB activity aids Hendra virus replication. Furthermore, overexpression of the IκB superrepressor inhibits Hendra virus replication. These studies are the first to demonstrate a host miRNA response to Hendra virus infection and suggest an important role for host miRNAs in Hendra virus disease.

  1. High-level hepatitis B virus replication in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Guidotti, L G; Matzke, B; Schaller, H; Chisari, F V

    1995-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) transgenic mice whose hepatocytes replicate the virus at levels comparable to that in the infected livers of patients with chronic hepatitis have been produced, without any evidence of cytopathology. High-level viral gene expression was obtained in the liver and kidney tissues in three independent lineages. These animals were produced with a terminally redundant viral DNA construct (HBV 1.3) that starts just upstream of HBV enhancer I, extends completely around the circular viral genome, and ends just downstream of the unique polyadenylation site in HBV. In these animals, the viral mRNA is more abundant in centrilobular hepatocytes than elsewhere in the hepatic lobule. High-level viral DNA replication occurs inside viral nucleocapsid particles that preferentially form in the cytoplasm of these centrilobular hepatocytes, suggesting that an expression threshold must be reached for nucleocapsid assembly and viral replication to occur. Despite the restricted distribution of the viral replication machinery in centrilobular cytoplasmic nucleocapsids, nucleocapsid particles are detectable in the vast majority of hepatocyte nuclei throughout the hepatic lobule. The intranuclear nucleocapsid particles are empty, however, suggesting that viral nucleocapsid particle assembly occurs independently in the nucleus and the cytoplasm of the hepatocyte and implying that cytoplasmic nucleocapsid particles do not transport the viral genome across the nuclear membrane into the nucleus during the viral life cycle. This model creates the opportunity to examine the influence of viral and host factors on HBV pathogenesis and replication and to assess the antiviral potential of pharmacological agents and physiological processes, including the immune response. PMID:7666518

  2. A Multicenter Blinded Analysis Indicates No Association between Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis and either Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus or Polytropic Murine Leukemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Alter, Harvey J.; Mikovits, Judy A.; Switzer, William M.; Ruscetti, Francis W.; Lo, Shyh-Ching; Klimas, Nancy; Komaroff, Anthony L.; Montoya, Jose G.; Bateman, Lucinda; Levine, Susan; Peterson, Daniel; Levin, Bruce; Hanson, Maureen R.; Genfi, Afia; Bhat, Meera; Zheng, HaoQiang; Wang, Richard; Li, Bingjie; Hung, Guo-Chiuan; Lee, Li Ling; Sameroff, Stephen; Heneine, Walid; Coffin, John; Hornig, Mady; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The disabling disorder known as chronic fatigue syndrome or myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) has been linked in two independent studies to infection with xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) and polytropic murine leukemia virus (pMLV). Although the associations were not confirmed in subsequent studies by other investigators, patients continue to question the consensus of the scientific community in rejecting the validity of the association. Here we report blinded analysis of peripheral blood from a rigorously characterized, geographically diverse population of 147 patients with CFS/ME and 146 healthy subjects by the investigators describing the original association. This analysis reveals no evidence of either XMRV or pMLV infection. PMID:22991430

  3. Characterization of uncultivable bat influenza virus using a replicative synthetic virus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bin; Ma, Jingjiao; Liu, Qinfang; Bawa, Bhupinder; Wang, Wei; Shabman, Reed S; Duff, Michael; Lee, Jinhwa; Lang, Yuekun; Cao, Nan; Nagy, Abdou; Lin, Xudong; Stockwell, Timothy B; Richt, Juergen A; Wentworth, David E; Ma, Wenjun

    2014-10-01

    Bats harbor many viruses, which are periodically transmitted to humans resulting in outbreaks of disease (e.g., Ebola, SARS-CoV). Recently, influenza virus-like sequences were identified in bats; however, the viruses could not be cultured. This discovery aroused great interest in understanding the evolutionary history and pandemic potential of bat-influenza. Using synthetic genomics, we were unable to rescue the wild type bat virus, but could rescue a modified bat-influenza virus that had the HA and NA coding regions replaced with those of A/PR/8/1934 (H1N1). This modified bat-influenza virus replicated efficiently in vitro and in mice, resulting in severe disease. Additional studies using a bat-influenza virus that had the HA and NA of A/swine/Texas/4199-2/1998 (H3N2) showed that the PR8 HA and NA contributed to the pathogenicity in mice. Unlike other influenza viruses, engineering truncations hypothesized to reduce interferon antagonism into the NS1 protein didn't attenuate bat-influenza. In contrast, substitution of a putative virulence mutation from the bat-influenza PB2 significantly attenuated the virus in mice and introduction of a putative virulence mutation increased its pathogenicity. Mini-genome replication studies and virus reassortment experiments demonstrated that bat-influenza has very limited genetic and protein compatibility with Type A or Type B influenza viruses, yet it readily reassorts with another divergent bat-influenza virus, suggesting that the bat-influenza lineage may represent a new Genus/Species within the Orthomyxoviridae family. Collectively, our data indicate that the bat-influenza viruses recently identified are authentic viruses that pose little, if any, pandemic threat to humans; however, they provide new insights into the evolution and basic biology of influenza viruses.

  4. Correlation between Virus Replication and Antibody Responses in Macaques following Infection with Pandemic Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Koopman, Gerrit; Dekking, Liesbeth; Mortier, Daniëlla; Nieuwenhuis, Ivonne G.; van Heteren, Melanie; Kuipers, Harmjan; Remarque, Edmond J.; Radošević, Katarina; Bogers, Willy M. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza virus infection of nonhuman primates is a well-established animal model for studying pathogenesis and for evaluating prophylactic and therapeutic intervention strategies. However, usually a standard dose is used for the infection, and there is no information on the relation between challenge dose and virus replication or the induction of immune responses. Such information is also very scarce for humans and largely confined to evaluation of attenuated virus strains. Here, we have compared the effect of a commonly used dose (4 × 106 50% tissue culture infective doses) versus a 100-fold-higher dose, administered by intrabronchial installation, to two groups of 6 cynomolgus macaques. Animals infected with the high virus dose showed more fever and had higher peak levels of gamma interferon in the blood. However, virus replication in the trachea was not significantly different between the groups, although in 2 out of 6 animals from the high-dose group it was present at higher levels and for a longer duration. The virus-specific antibody response was not significantly different between the groups. However, antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, virus neutralization, and hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers correlated with cumulative virus production in the trachea. In conclusion, using influenza virus infection in cynomolgus macaques as a model, we demonstrated a relationship between the level of virus production upon infection and induction of functional antibody responses against the virus. IMPORTANCE There is only very limited information on the effect of virus inoculation dose on the level of virus production and the induction of adaptive immune responses in humans or nonhuman primates. We found only a marginal and variable effect of virus dose on virus production in the trachea but a significant effect on body temperature. The induction of functional antibody responses, including virus neutralization titer, hemagglutination inhibition

  5. Inhibition of Tulane Virus Replication in vitro with RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Qiang; Wei, Chao; Xia, Ming; Jiang, Xi

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi), a conserved mechanism triggered by small interfering RNA (siRNA), has been used for suppressing gene expression through RNA degradation. The replication of caliciviruses (CVs) with RNAi was studied using the Tulane virus (TV) as a model. Five siRNAs targeting the non-structural, the major (VP1) and minor (VP2) structural genes of the TV were developed and the viruses were quantified using qPCR and TCID50 assay. Treatment of the cells with siRNA 4 hours before viral inoculation significantly reduced viral titer by up to 2.6 logs and dramatically decreased viral RNA copy numbers and viral titers 48 hours post infection in four of the five siRNAs studied. The results were confirmed by Western blot, in which the major structural protein VP1 was markedly reduced in both the cells and the culture medium. Two small protein bands of the S and P domains of the viral capsid protein were also detected in the cell lysates, although their role in viral replication remains unknown. Since the TV shares many biological properties with human noroviruses (NoVs), the successful demonstration of RNAi in TV replication would provide valuable information in control of acute gastroenteritis caused by human NoVs. PMID:23154881

  6. Mutation of a Single Envelope N-Linked Glycosylation Site Enhances the Pathogenicity of Bovine Leukemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bouzar, Amel Baya; Jacques, Jean-Rock; Cosse, Jean-Philippe; Gillet, Nicolas; Callebaut, Isabelle; Reichert, Michal

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses have coevolved with their host to ensure efficient replication and transmission without inducing excessive pathogenicity that would indirectly impair their persistence. This is exemplified by the bovine leukemia virus (BLV) system in which lymphoproliferative disorders develop in ruminants after latency periods of several years. In principle, the equilibrium reached between the virus and its host could be disrupted by emergence of more pathogenic strains. Intriguingly but fortunately, such a hyperpathogenic BLV strain was never observed in the field or designed in vitro. In this study, we sought to understand the role of envelope N-linked glycosylation with the hypothesis that this posttranslational modification could either favor BLV infection by allowing viral entry or allow immune escape by using glycans as a shield. Using reverse genetics of an infectious molecular provirus, we identified a N-linked envelope glycosylation site (N230) that limits viral replication and pathogenicity. Indeed, mutation N230E unexpectedly leads to enhanced fusogenicity and protein stability. IMPORTANCE Infection by retroviruses requires the interaction of the viral envelope protein (SU) with a membrane-associated receptor allowing fusion and release of the viral genomic RNA into the cell. We show that N-linked glycosylation of the bovine leukemia virus (BLV) SU protein is, as expected, essential for cell infection in vitro. Consistently, mutation of all glycosylation sites of a BLV provirus destroys infectivity in vivo. However, single mutations do not significantly modify replication in vivo. Instead, a particular mutation at SU codon 230 increases replication and accelerates pathogenesis. This unexpected observation has important consequences in terms of disease control and managing. PMID:26085161

  7. Slowly Replicating Lytic Viruses: Pseudolysogenic Persistence and Within-Host Competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingshan; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2009-05-01

    We study the population dynamics of lytic viruses which replicate slowly in dividing host cells within an organism or cell culture, and find a range of viral replication rates that allows viruses to persist, avoiding extinction of host cells or dilution of viruses at too rapid or too slow viral replication. For the within-host competition between viral strains with different replication rates, a strain with a “stable” replication rate in the persistence range could outcompete another strain. However, when strains with higher and lower than the stable value replication rates are both present, competition between strains does not result in the dominance of one strain, but in their coexistence.

  8. Effect of temperature on replication of epizootic hemorrhagic disease viruses in Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Replication of many arboviruses, including some orbiviruses, within the vector has been shown to be temperature-dependent. In general, cooler ambient temperatures slow virus replication in arthropod vectors, whereas viruses replicate faster and to higher titers at warmer ambient temperatures. Prev...

  9. Caffeine inhibits hepatitis C virus replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Batista, Mariana N; Carneiro, Bruno M; Braga, Ana Cláudia S; Rahal, Paula

    2015-02-01

    Hepatitis C is considered the major cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Conventional treatment is not effective against some hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes; therefore, new treatments are needed. Coffee and, more recently, caffeine, have been found to have a beneficial effect in several disorders of the liver, including those manifesting abnormal liver biochemistry, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Caffeine acts directly by delaying fibrosis, thereby improving the function of liver cellular pathways and interfering with pathways used by the HCV replication cycle. In the current study, the direct relationship between caffeine and viral replication was evaluated. The Huh-7.5 cell line was used for transient infections with FL-J6/JFH-5'C19Rluc2AUbi and to establish a cell line stably expressing SGR-Feo JFH-1. Caffeine efficiently inhibited HCV replication in a dose-dependent manner at non-cytotoxic concentrations and demonstrated an IC50 value of 0.7263 mM after 48 h of incubation. These data demonstrate that caffeine may be an important new agent for anti-HCV therapies due to its efficient inhibition of HCV replication at non-toxic concentrations.

  10. Restricted virus replication in the spinal cords of nude mice infected with a Theiler's virus variant.

    PubMed

    Zurbriggen, A; Yamada, M; Thomas, C; Fujinami, R S

    1991-02-01

    The Daniels strain of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis produces a chronic disease which is an animal model for human demyelinating disorders. Previously, we selected a neutralization-resistant virus variant producing an altered and diminished central nervous system disease in immunocompetent mice which was evident during the later stage of infection (after 4 weeks) (A. Zurbriggen and R. S. Fujinami, J. Virol. 63:1505-1513, 1989). The exact epitope determining neurovirulence was precisely mapped to a capsid protein, VP-1, and represents a neutralizing region (A. Zurbriggen, J. M. Hogle, and R. S. Fujinami, J. Exp. Med. 170:2037-2049, 1989). Here, we present experiments with immunoincompetent animals to determine viral replication, spread, and targeting to the central nervous system in the absence of detectable antibodies or functional T cells. Nude mice were infected orally, and the virus was monitored by plaque assay, immunohistochemistry, and in situ hybridization. Early during the infection (1 week), the variant virus induced an acute disease comparable to that induced by the wild-type virus in these nude mice. Alterations in tropism in the central nervous system were not apparent when wild-type parental Daniels strain virus was compared with the variant virus. Moreover, variant virus replicated in tissue culture (BHK-21 cells) to similarly high titers in a time course identical to that of the wild-type virus (A. Zurbriggen and R. S. Fujinami, J. Virol. 63:1505-1513, 1989). However, replication of the variant virus versus the wild-type virus within the spinal cord of athymic nude mice infected per os was substantially restricted by 6 weeks postinfection. Therefore, the reduced neurovirulence in the later stage (6 weeks) of the disease is most likely due to a diminished growth rate or spread of the variant virus in the central nervous system rather than to marked differences in viral tropism.

  11. Restricted virus replication in the spinal cords of nude mice infected with a Theiler's virus variant.

    PubMed Central

    Zurbriggen, A; Yamada, M; Thomas, C; Fujinami, R S

    1991-01-01

    The Daniels strain of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis produces a chronic disease which is an animal model for human demyelinating disorders. Previously, we selected a neutralization-resistant virus variant producing an altered and diminished central nervous system disease in immunocompetent mice which was evident during the later stage of infection (after 4 weeks) (A. Zurbriggen and R. S. Fujinami, J. Virol. 63:1505-1513, 1989). The exact epitope determining neurovirulence was precisely mapped to a capsid protein, VP-1, and represents a neutralizing region (A. Zurbriggen, J. M. Hogle, and R. S. Fujinami, J. Exp. Med. 170:2037-2049, 1989). Here, we present experiments with immunoincompetent animals to determine viral replication, spread, and targeting to the central nervous system in the absence of detectable antibodies or functional T cells. Nude mice were infected orally, and the virus was monitored by plaque assay, immunohistochemistry, and in situ hybridization. Early during the infection (1 week), the variant virus induced an acute disease comparable to that induced by the wild-type virus in these nude mice. Alterations in tropism in the central nervous system were not apparent when wild-type parental Daniels strain virus was compared with the variant virus. Moreover, variant virus replicated in tissue culture (BHK-21 cells) to similarly high titers in a time course identical to that of the wild-type virus (A. Zurbriggen and R. S. Fujinami, J. Virol. 63:1505-1513, 1989). However, replication of the variant virus versus the wild-type virus within the spinal cord of athymic nude mice infected per os was substantially restricted by 6 weeks postinfection. Therefore, the reduced neurovirulence in the later stage (6 weeks) of the disease is most likely due to a diminished growth rate or spread of the variant virus in the central nervous system rather than to marked differences in viral tropism. Images PMID:1987366

  12. Curcumin Inhibits Rift Valley Fever Virus Replication in Human Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Aarthi; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Senina, Svetlana; Lundberg, Lindsay; Van Duyne, Rachel; Guendel, Irene; Das, Ravi; Baer, Alan; Bethel, Laura; Turell, Michael; Hartman, Amy Lynn; Das, Bhaskar; Bailey, Charles; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2012-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an arbovirus that is classified as a select agent, an emerging infectious virus, and an agricultural pathogen. Understanding RVFV-host interactions is imperative to the design of novel therapeutics. Here, we report that an infection by the MP-12 strain of RVFV induces phosphorylation of the p65 component of the NFκB cascade. We demonstrate that phosphorylation of p65 (serine 536) involves phosphorylation of IκBα and occurs through the classical NFκB cascade. A unique, low molecular weight complex of the IKK-β subunit can be observed in MP-12-infected cells, which we have labeled IKK-β2. The IKK-β2 complex retains kinase activity and phosphorylates an IκBα substrate. Inhibition of the IKK complex using inhibitors impairs viral replication, thus alluding to the requirement of an active IKK complex to the viral life cycle. Curcumin strongly down-regulates levels of extracellular infectious virus. Our data demonstrated that curcumin binds to and inhibits kinase activity of the IKK-β2 complex in infected cells. Curcumin partially exerts its inhibitory influence on RVFV replication by interfering with IKK-β2-mediated phosphorylation of the viral protein NSs and by altering the cell cycle of treated cells. Curcumin also demonstrated efficacy against ZH501, the fully virulent version of RVFV. Curcumin treatment down-regulated viral replication in the liver of infected animals. Our data point to the possibility that RVFV infection may result in the generation of novel versions of host components (such as IKK-β2) that, by virtue of altered protein interaction and function, qualify as unique therapeutic targets. PMID:22847000

  13. Interleukin-12 inhibits hepatitis B virus replication in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Cavanaugh, V J; Guidotti, L G; Chisari, F V

    1997-01-01

    Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is a heterodimeric cytokine produced by antigen-presenting cells that has the ability to induce gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) secretion by T and natural killer cells and to generate normal Th1 responses. These properties suggest that IL-12 may play an important role in the immune response to many viruses, including hepatitis B virus (HBV). Recently, we have shown that HBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes inhibit HBV replication in the livers of transgenic mice by a noncytolytic process that is mediated in part by IFN-gamma. In the current study, we demonstrated that the same antiviral response can be initiated by recombinant murine IL-12 and we showed that the antiviral effect of IL-12 extends to extrahepatic sites such as the kidney. Southern blot analyses revealed the complete disappearance of HBV replicative intermediates from liver and kidney tissues at IL-12 doses that induce little or no inflammation in these tissues. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated the disappearance of cytoplasmic hepatitis B core antigen from both tissues after IL-12 treatment, suggesting that IL-12 either prevents the assembly or triggers the degradation of the nucleocapsid particles within which HBV replication occurs. Importantly, we demonstrated that although IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and IFN-alpha/beta mRNA are induced in the liver and kidney after IL-12 administration, the antiviral effect of IL-12 is mediated principally by its ability to induce IFN-gamma production in this model. These results suggest that IL-12, through its ability to induce IFN-gamma, probably plays an important role in the antiviral immune response to HBV during natural infection. Further, since relatively nontoxic doses of recombinant IL-12 profoundly inhibit HBV replication in the liver and extrahepatic sites in this model, IL-12 may have therapeutic value as an antiviral agent for the treatment of chronic HBV infection. PMID:9060687

  14. Characterization of a novel baboon virus closely resembling human T-cell leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Vincent, M J; Novembre, F J; Yamshchikov, V F; McClure, H M; Compans, R W

    1996-12-01

    We report the isolation of a virus from a baboon imported from Kenya and the analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the env gene. Comparison of the complete nucleotide sequence of the env gene of different HTLV-1 strains and the baboon T-cell leukemia virus (designated BTLV) indicated similarities ranging from 92.5 to 97.4%. In contrast, only 89.1% similarity was observed between the BTLV env sequence and that of simian T-cell leukemia virus (PtM3). The sequences corresponding to the glycosylation sites, endoproteolytic processing site, and major immunological determinants were strictly conserved between BTLV and HTLV-1. To characterize the expressed protein we used a vaccinia expression system, which indicated that a protein of 62 kDa is encoded by the envelope gene. The protein acquired mostly high mannose modifications and was localized predominantly in the endoplasmic reticulum. A fraction of the protein was expressed at the cell surface, where it could induce membrane fusion of target cells. The existence of HTLV-1-like viruses in baboons indicates the potential risk of transmission of such virus from these nonhuman primates to humans, thus highlighting the need for specific screening for such viruses during xenotransplantation.

  15. Expression of Bovine Leukemia Virus Genome is Blocked by a Nonimmunoglobulin Protein in Plasma from Infected Cattle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, P.; Ferrer, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    Plasma of cattle infected with bovine leukemia virus contains a soluble factor that blocks the expression of the viral genome in cultured lymphocytes. The blocking factor is not present in plasma of bovine leukemia virus-free cattle or of cattle infected with common bovine viruses. Blocking of bovine leukemia virus expression by the plasma factor is reversible, and seems to be mediated by a nonimmunoglobulin protein molecule.

  16. Cyclophilin function in Cancer; lessons from virus replication.

    PubMed

    Lavin, Paul T M; Mc Gee, Margaret M

    2015-01-01

    Cyclophilins belong to a group of proteins that possess peptidyl prolyl isomerase activity and catalyse the cis-trans conversion of proline peptide bonds. Cyclophilin members play important roles in protein folding and as molecular chaperones, in addition to a well-established role as host factors required for completion of the virus life cycle. Members of the cyclophilin family are overexpressed in a range of human malignancies including hepatocellular cancer, pancreatic cancer, nonsmall cell lung cancer, gastric cancer, colorectal cancer and glioblastoma multiforme, however, their precise role in tumourigenesis remains unclear. In recent years, mounting evidence supports a role for prolyl isomerisation during mammalian cell division; a process with striking similarity to plasma membrane remodelling during virus replication. Here, we summarise our current understanding of the role of cyclophilins in cancer. We review the function of cyclophilins during mammalian cell division and during HIV-1 infection, and highlight common processes involving members of the ESCRT and Rab GTPase families.

  17. Suramin inhibits chikungunya virus replication through multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Albulescu, Irina C; van Hoolwerff, Marcella; Wolters, Laura A; Bottaro, Elisabetta; Nastruzzi, Claudio; Yang, Shih Chi; Tsay, Shwu-Chen; Hwu, Jih Ru; Snijder, Eric J; van Hemert, Martijn J

    2015-09-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes severe and often persistent arthritis. In recent years, millions of people have been infected with this virus for which registered antivirals are still lacking. Using our recently established in vitro assay, we discovered that the approved anti-parasitic drug suramin inhibits CHIKV RNA synthesis (IC50 of ∼5μM). The compound inhibited replication of various CHIKV isolates in cell culture with an EC50 of ∼80μM (CC50>5mM) and was also active against Sindbis virus and Semliki Forest virus. In vitro studies hinted that suramin interferes with (re)initiation of RNA synthesis, whereas time-of-addition studies suggested it to also interfere with a post-attachment early step in infection, possibly entry. CHIKV (nsP4) mutants resistant against favipiravir or ribavirin, which target the viral RNA polymerase, did not exhibit cross-resistance to suramin, suggesting a different mode of action. The assessment of the activity of a variety of suramin-related compounds in cell culture and the in vitro assay for RNA synthesis provided more insight into the moieties required for antiviral activity. The antiviral effect of suramin-containing liposomes was also analyzed. Its approved status makes it worthwhile to explore the use of suramin to prevent and/or treat CHIKV infections.

  18. Mus cervicolor Murine Leukemia Virus Isolate M813 Belongs to a Unique Receptor Interference Group

    PubMed Central

    Prassolov, Vladimir; Hein, Sibyll; Ziegler, Marion; Ivanov, Dmitry; Münk, Carsten; Löhler, Jürgen; Stocking, Carol

    2001-01-01

    Murine leukemia virus (MuLV) M813 was originally isolated from the Southeast Asian rodent Mus cervicolor. As with the ecotropic MuLVs derived from Mus musculus, its host range is limited to rodent cells. Earlier studies have mapped its receptor to chromosome 2, but it has not been established whether M813 shares a common receptor with any other MuLVs. In this study, we have performed interference assays with M813 and viruses from four interference groups of MuLV. The infection efficiency of M813 was not compromised in cells expressing any one of the other MuLVs, demonstrating that M813 must use a distinct receptor for cell entry. The entire M813 env coding region was molecularly cloned. Sequence analysis revealed high similarity with other MuLVs but with a unique receptor-binding domain. Substitution of M813 env sequences in Moloney MuLV resulted in a replication-competent virus with a host range and interference profile similar to those of the biological clone M813. M813 thus defines a novel receptor interference group of type C MuLVs. PMID:11312319

  19. Mus cervicolor murine leukemia virus isolate M813 belongs to a unique receptor interference group.

    PubMed

    Prassolov, V; Hein, S; Ziegler, M; Ivanov, D; Münk, C; Löhler, J; Stocking, C

    2001-05-01

    Murine leukemia virus (MuLV) M813 was originally isolated from the Southeast Asian rodent Mus cervicolor. As with the ecotropic MuLVs derived from Mus musculus, its host range is limited to rodent cells. Earlier studies have mapped its receptor to chromosome 2, but it has not been established whether M813 shares a common receptor with any other MuLVs. In this study, we have performed interference assays with M813 and viruses from four interference groups of MuLV. The infection efficiency of M813 was not compromised in cells expressing any one of the other MuLVs, demonstrating that M813 must use a distinct receptor for cell entry. The entire M813 env coding region was molecularly cloned. Sequence analysis revealed high similarity with other MuLVs but with a unique receptor-binding domain. Substitution of M813 env sequences in Moloney MuLV resulted in a replication-competent virus with a host range and interference profile similar to those of the biological clone M813. M813 thus defines a novel receptor interference group of type C MuLVs.

  20. Presence of Gumprecht shadows (smudge cells) in bovine leukemia virus-positive cattle.

    PubMed

    Panei, Carlos Javier; Larsen, Alejandra; González, Ester Teresa; Echeverría, María Gabriela

    2013-11-01

    Enzootic Bovine Leukosis is a chronic disease caused by the bovine leukemia virus (BLV). Smudge cells, also known as Gumprecht shadows, are not simple artifacts of slide preparation, but ragged lymphoid cells found mainly in peripheral blood smears from human patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. In this study, we report the presence of Gumprecht shadows in peripheral blood from BLV-positive cattle.

  1. Genetic diversity in the feline leukemia virus gag gene.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Maki; Watanabe, Shinya; Odahara, Yuka; Nakagawa, So; Endo, Yasuyuki; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Nishigaki, Kazuo

    2015-06-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) belongs to the Gammaretrovirus genus and is horizontally transmitted among cats. FeLV is known to undergo recombination with endogenous retroviruses already present in the host during FeLV-subgroup A infection. Such recombinant FeLVs, designated FeLV-subgroup B or FeLV-subgroup D, can be generated by transduced endogenous retroviral env sequences encoding the viral envelope. These recombinant viruses have biologically distinct properties and may mediate different disease outcomes. The generation of such recombinant viruses resulted in structural diversity of the FeLV particle and genetic diversity of the virus itself. FeLV env diversity through mutation and recombination has been studied, while gag diversity and its possible effects are less well understood. In this study, we investigated recombination events in the gag genes of FeLVs isolated from naturally infected cats and reference isolates. Recombination and phylogenetic analyses indicated that the gag genes often contain endogenous FeLV sequences and were occasionally replaced by entire endogenous FeLV gag genes. Phylogenetic reconstructions of FeLV gag sequences allowed for classification into three distinct clusters, similar to those previously established for the env gene. Analysis of the recombination junctions in FeLV gag indicated that these variants have similar recombination patterns within the same genotypes, indicating that the recombinant viruses were horizontally transmitted among cats. It remains to be investigated whether the recombinant sequences affect the molecular mechanism of FeLV transmission. These findings extend our understanding of gammaretrovirus evolutionary patterns in the field.

  2. Genetic Characterization of Feline Leukemia Virus from Florida Panthers

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Meredith A.; Cunningham, Mark W.; Roca, Alfred L.; Troyer, Jennifer L.; Johnson, Warren E.

    2008-01-01

    From 2002 through 2005, an outbreak of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) occurred in Florida panthers (Puma concolor coryi). Clinical signs included lymphadenopathy, anemia, septicemia, and weight loss; 5 panthers died. Not associated with FeLV outcome were the genetic heritage of the panthers (pure Florida vs. Texas/Florida crosses) and co-infection with feline immunodeficiency virus. Genetic analysis of panther FeLV, designated FeLV-Pco, determined that the outbreak likely came from 1 cross-species transmission from a domestic cat. The FeLV-Pco virus was closely related to the domestic cat exogenous FeLV-A subgroup in lacking recombinant segments derived from endogenous FeLV. FeLV-Pco sequences were most similar to the well-characterized FeLV-945 strain, which is highly virulent and strongly pathogenic in domestic cats because of unique long terminal repeat and envelope sequences. These unique features may also account for the severity of the outbreak after cross-species transmission to the panther. PMID:18258118

  3. Cellular Chaperonin CCTγ Contributes to Rabies Virus Replication during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinyang; Wu, Xiaopeng; Zan, Jie; Wu, Yongping; Ye, Chengjin; Ruan, Xizhen

    2013-01-01

    Rabies, as the oldest known infectious disease, remains a serious threat to public health worldwide. The eukaryotic cytosolic chaperonin TRiC/CCT complex facilitates the folding of proteins through ATP hydrolysis. Here, we investigated the expression, cellular localization, and function of neuronal CCTγ during neurotropic rabies virus (RABV) infection using mouse N2a cells as a model. Following RABV infection, 24 altered proteins were identified by using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, including 20 upregulated proteins and 4 downregulated proteins. In mouse N2a cells infected with RABV or cotransfected with RABV genes encoding nucleoprotein (N) and phosphoprotein (P), confocal microscopy demonstrated that upregulated cellular CCTγ was colocalized with viral proteins N and P, which formed a hollow cricoid inclusion within the region around the nucleus. These inclusions, which correspond to Negri bodies (NBs), did not form in mouse N2a cells only expressing the viral protein N or P. Knockdown of CCTγ by lentivirus-mediated RNA interference led to significant inhibition of RABV replication. These results demonstrate that the complex consisting of viral proteins N and P recruits CCTγ to NBs and identify the chaperonin CCTγ as a host factor that facilitates intracellular RABV replication. This work illustrates how viruses can utilize cellular chaperonins and compartmentalization for their own benefit. PMID:23637400

  4. Detection of a unique antigen on radiation leukemia virus-induced leukemia B6RV2

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, E.; Uenaka, A.; Stockert, E.; Obata, Y.

    1984-11-01

    Radiation leukemia virus-induced leukemia of a male C57BL/6 mouse, B6RV2, is immunogenic to female BALB/c X C57BL/6 F1 mice. In these mice, B6RV2 tumors regressed after initial growth, and after tumor regression the mice were resistant to repeated inocula of up to 10(8) B6RV2 cells. Serum from these mice reacted with B6RV2 in mixed hemadsorption or protein A assays, and absorption analysis indicated that the antigen was restricted to B6RV2; it could not be detected in normal thymocytes or spleen concanavalin A blasts from different inbred strains, nor in 16 C57BL/6 or BALB/c leukemias. Spleen cells from mice in which the tumor had regressed were cytotoxic to B6RV2 after in vitro stimulation with B6RV2, as shown by /sup 51/chromium release assay. This cytotoxicity was eliminated by pretreatment of the cells with anti-Thy-1.2, anti-Lyt-2.2, anti-Lyt-3.2, and complement, indicating that the effector cells were T-cells. The specificity of T-cell killing of B6RV2 was examined by competitive inhibition assays with unlabeled cells; only B6RV2 inhibited killing, while eight other C57BL/6 leukemias did not inhibit. Thus, the antigen on B6RV2 defined serologically and by cytotoxic T-cells is a unique antigen. However, it was not revealed by antibody-blocking test whether the unique determinant defined serologically was related to that recognized by T-cells; B6RV2 antiserum did not block lytic activity in the absence of added complement, irrespective of whether the target cells were untreated or anti-H-2b-treated B6RV2. H-2Kb antisera, but not H-2Db antisera, blocked lysis. This indicated that the H-2Kb molecule was exclusively involved in recognition of B6RV2 by cytotoxic T-cell.

  5. Titration patterns of a murine sarcoma-leukemia virus complex: evidence for existence of competent sarcoma virions.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, T E; Fischinger, P J

    1968-01-19

    Stocks of inurine sarcoma virus show titration patterns ranging from one-to two-hit kinetics. The comparison of various titrations of this virus, both with and without added helper virus, to theoretical model systems composed of defined constituents, suggests the existence of a sarcoma virus that does not need coinfectinig murine leukemia virus to be manifested as a focus-forming unit. The behavior of such nondefective particles is compatible with a postulated leukemia-sarcoma virus hybrid.

  6. Bovine leukemia virus infection in Taiwan: epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Wang, C T

    1991-06-01

    We conducted a seroepidemiological survey for antibodies to bovine leukemia virus (BLV), by using agar gel immunodiffusion technique, in dairy cows, water buffaloes, and yellow cattle throughout Taiwan. The positive reactors were 8.4% (376/4,459) in 1985 and 5.8% (1,277/22,190) in 1986, in 15 prefectures and 7 cities. Relatively high infection rate appeared in the northern and southern areas of Taiwan. Positive reactors increased gradually with age. The incidence of positive antibodies was 2 to 3 times higher in pasture-style farms than in housed-style farms. Among the 6,313 imported cattle, 302 (4.8%) showed positive reaction. Between 1985 and 1987, 5 cattle showed enzootic bovine leukosis among 351 sero-positive reactors in four highly positive prefectures. Survey of 134 water buffaloes and yellow cattle showed no positive reactors. This survey demonstrated that BLV-infection has increased over the years and spread throughout Taiwan.

  7. Host mTORC1 Signaling Regulates Andes Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    McNulty, Shannon; Flint, Mike; Nichol, Stuart T.

    2013-01-01

    Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a severe respiratory disease characterized by pulmonary edema, with fatality rates of 35 to 45%. Disease occurs following infection with pathogenic New World hantaviruses, such as Andes virus (ANDV), which targets lung microvascular endothelial cells. During replication, the virus scavenges 5′-m7G caps from cellular mRNA to ensure efficient translation of viral proteins by the host cell cap-dependent translation machinery. In cells, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates the activity of host cap-dependent translation by integrating amino acid, energy, and oxygen availability signals. Since there is no approved pharmacological treatment for HPS, we investigated whether inhibitors of the mTOR pathway could reduce hantavirus infection. Here, we demonstrate that treatment with the FDA-approved rapamycin analogue temsirolimus (CCI-779) blocks ANDV protein expression and virion release but not entry into primary human microvascular endothelial cells. This effect was specific to viral proteins, as temsirolimus treatment did not block host protein synthesis. We confirmed that temsirolimus targeted host mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and not a viral protein, as knockdown of mTORC1 and mTORC1 activators but not mTOR complex 2 components reduced ANDV replication. Additionally, primary fibroblasts from a patient with tuberous sclerosis exhibited increased mTORC1 activity and increased ANDV protein expression, which were blocked following temsirolimus treatment. Finally, we show that ANDV glycoprotein Gn colocalized with mTOR and lysosomes in infected cells. Together, these data demonstrate that mTORC1 signaling regulates ANDV replication and suggest that the hantavirus Gn protein may modulate mTOR and lysosomal signaling during infection, thus bypassing the cellular regulation of translation. PMID:23135723

  8. Hepatitis C Virus Translation Preferentially Depends on Active RNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Helene Minyi; Aizaki, Hideki; Machida, Keigo; Ou, J.-H. James; Lai, Michael M. C.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA initiates its replication on a detergent-resistant membrane structure derived from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in the HCV replicon cells. By performing a pulse-chase study of BrU-labeled HCV RNA, we found that the newly-synthesized HCV RNA traveled along the anterograde-membrane traffic and moved away from the ER. Presumably, the RNA moved to the site of translation or virion assembly in the later steps of viral life cycle. In this study, we further addressed how HCV RNA translation was regulated by HCV RNA trafficking. When the movement of HCV RNA from the site of RNA synthesis to the Golgi complex was blocked by nocodazole, an inhibitor of ER-Golgi transport, HCV protein translation was surprisingly enhanced, suggesting that the translation of viral proteins occurred near the site of RNA synthesis. We also found that the translation of HCV proteins was dependent on active RNA synthesis: inhibition of viral RNA synthesis by an NS5B inhibitor resulted in decreased HCV viral protein synthesis even when the total amount of intracellular HCV RNA remained unchanged. Furthermore, the translation activity of the replication-defective HCV replicons or viral RNA with an NS5B mutation was greatly reduced as compared to that of the corresponding wildtype RNA. By performing live cell labeling of newly synthesized HCV RNA and proteins, we further showed that the newly synthesized HCV proteins colocalized with the newly synthesized viral RNA, suggesting that HCV RNA replication and protein translation take place at or near the same site. Our findings together indicate that the translation of HCV RNA is coupled to RNA replication and that the both processes may occur at the same subcellular membrane compartments, which we term the replicasome. PMID:22937067

  9. Genetic evidence for a product of the Fv-1 locus that transfers resistance to mouse leukemia viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, R W; Schluter, B; Myer, F E; Otten, J A; Yang, W K; Brown, A

    1976-01-01

    Extracts of mouse cells have been shown to transfer to N- or B-trophic host range types of mouse leukemia viruses. The genetic specificity of the inhibition was tested in two ways: (i) by correlating the Fv-1 genotype of a number of mouse strains with the restriction-transferring activity of extracts of the respective embryo cell cultures, and (ii) by correlating the Fv-1 genotype of BLC3F2 (C57BL/6 female [Fv-1bb] by C3H male [Fv-1nn] parental strains) mouse embryos, which segregate the Fv-1 alleles in a 12:1 ratio, with the inhibitor activity of extracts of the cells from each embryo. Five independent matings, totaling 45 individual embryos, were tested. Each embryo was cultured, and the Fv-1 genotype was determined independently by titration of N- and B-tropic viruses; the extracts of replicate secondary cultures were tested for their effect on infection of permissive cells by N- and B-tropic viruses. The specific-restriction-transferring activity of the embryos was found to segregate with the appropriate Fv-1 genotype. These res-lts confirm the suggestion that the inhibitor of the leukemia virus host range types in the cellular extracts is a product of the Fv-1 locus. PMID:186636

  10. Virus-specific RNA synthesis in interferon-treated mouse cells productively infected with Moloney murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Fan, H; MacIsaac, P

    1978-01-01

    Mouse cells productively infected with Moloney murine leukemia virus were treated with interferon, and intracellular virus-specific RNA was studied by hybridization with complementary DNA. The steady-state concentration of virus-specific RNA in interferon-treated cells was somewhat greater than that in untreated cells, and the rates of virus-specific RNA synthesis were approximately equal in treated and untreated cells. PMID:691118

  11. The Acyclic Retinoid Peretinoin Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Replication and Infectious Virus Release in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimakami, Tetsuro; Honda, Masao; Shirasaki, Takayoshi; Takabatake, Riuta; Liu, Fanwei; Murai, Kazuhisa; Shiomoto, Takayuki; Funaki, Masaya; Yamane, Daisuke; Murakami, Seishi; Lemon, Stanley M.; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2014-04-01

    Clinical studies suggest that the oral acyclic retinoid Peretinoin may reduce the recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) following surgical ablation of primary tumours. Since hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of HCC, we assessed whether Peretinoin and other retinoids have any effect on HCV infection. For this purpose, we measured the effects of several retinoids on the replication of genotype 1a, 1b, and 2a HCV in vitro. Peretinoin inhibited RNA replication for all genotypes and showed the strongest antiviral effect among the retinoids tested. Furthermore, it reduced infectious virus release by 80-90% without affecting virus assembly. These effects could be due to reduced signalling from lipid droplets, triglyceride abundance, and the expression of mature sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c and fatty acid synthase. These negative effects of Peretinoin on HCV infection may be beneficial in addition to its potential for HCC chemoprevention in HCV-infected patients.

  12. Hypoxia inhibits Moloney murine leukemia virus expression in activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Puppo, Maura; Bosco, Maria Carla; Federico, Maurizio; Pastorino, Sandra; Varesio, Luigi

    2007-02-01

    Hypoxia, a local decrease in oxygen tension, occurring in many pathological processes, modifies macrophage (Mphi) gene expression and function. Here, we provide the first evidence that hypoxia inhibits transgene expression driven by the Moloney murine leukemia virus-long terminal repeats (MoMLV-LTR) in IFN-gamma-activated Mphi. Hypoxia silenced the expression of several MoMLV-LTR-driven genes, including v-myc, enhanced green fluorescence protein, and env, and was effective in different mouse Mphi cell lines and on distinct MoMLV backbone-based viruses. Down-regulation of MoMLV mRNA occurred at the transcriptional level and was associated with decreased retrovirus production, as determined by titration experiments, suggesting that hypoxia may control MoMLV retroviral spread through the suppression of LTR activity. In contrast, genes driven by the CMV or the SV40 promoter were up-regulated or unchanged by hypoxia, indicating a selective inhibitory activity on the MoMLV promoter. It is interesting that hypoxia was ineffective in suppressing MoMLV-LTR-controlled gene expression in T or fibroblast cell lines, suggesting a Mphi lineage-selective action. Finally, we found that MoMLV-mediated gene expression in Mphi was also inhibited by picolinic acid, a tryptophan catabolite with hypoxia-like activity and Mphi-activating properties, suggesting a pathophysiological role of this molecule in viral resistance and its possible use as an antiviral agent.

  13. Human APOBEC3G incorporation into murine leukemia virus particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, Melanie; Schnierle, Barbara S. . E-mail: schba@pei.de

    2005-06-20

    The human APOBEC3G protein exhibits broad antiretroviral activity against a variety of retroviruses. It is packaged into viral particles and executes its antiviral function in the target cell. The packaging of APOBEC3G into different viral particles requires a mechanism that confers this promiscuity. Here, APOBEC3G incorporation into murine leukemia virus (MLV) was studied using retroviral vectors. APOBEC3G uptake did not require either its cytidine deaminase activity or the presence of a retroviral vector genome. Results from immunoprecipitation and co-localization studies of APOBEC3G with a MLV Gag-CFP (cyan fluorescent protein) fusion protein imply an interaction between both proteins. RNase A treatment did not inhibit the co-precipitation of Gag-CFP and APOBEC3G, suggesting that the interaction is RNA independent. Like human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Gag, the MLV Gag precursor protein appears to interact with APOBEC3G, indicating that Gag contains conserved structures which are used to encapsidate APOBEC3G into different retroviral particles.

  14. Fate of viral RNA of murine leukemia virus after infection.

    PubMed Central

    Takano, T; Hatanaka, M

    1975-01-01

    [3H]Uridine-labeled Rauscher leukemia virus was used to infect mouse embryo fibroblasts. After the infected cells were separated into nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions nucleic acid was extracted by sodium dodecyl sulfate-phenol-chloroform treatment and analyzed by Cs2SO4 and sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Between 45 and 70 min after infection a transient and synchronized shift of the acid-insoluble radioactive peak toward the RNA-DNA hybrid region occurred in both the nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. The density of the cytoplasmic hybrid shifted to 1.56 g/ml (RNA equals about 50%), while the sedimentation rate decreased from 36 S to 14 S; however, the density of the nuclear hybrid shifted to 1.58-1.48 g/ml (RNA equals 57-17%, respectively), while its sedimentation rate remained about 65 S. The hybrids in both the nuclear and the cytoplasmic fractions still showed hybrid density after heat denaturation. The processes of the early stages of RNA tumor virus infection are discussed with regard to the functions of viral RNA-dependent DNA polymerase (reverse transcriptase) and a possible integration of viral genetic information into the host chromosome. PMID:164022

  15. Foot and mouth disease virus non structural protein 2C interacts with Beclin1 modulating virus replication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), the causative agent of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), is an Apthovirus within the Picornaviridae family. Replication of the virus occurs in association with replication complexes that are formed by host cell membrane rearrangements. The largest viral protein in th...

  16. Effects of long terminal repeat mutations on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y; Stenzel, M; Sodroski, J G; Haseltine, W A

    1989-01-01

    The effects of deletions within three functional regions of the long terminal repeat of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 upon the ability of the long terminal repeat to direct production of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene product and upon the ability of viruses that carry the mutations to replicate in human cell lines was investigated. The results show that the enhancer and TATAA sequences were required for efficient virus replication. Deletion of the negative regulatory element (NRE) yielded a virus that replicated more rapidly than did an otherwise isogeneic NRE-positive virus. The suppressive effect of the NRE did not depend upon the negative regulatory gene (nef), as both NRE-positive and NRE-negative viruses were defective for nef. We conclude that factors specified by the cell interact with the NRE sequences to retard human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication. PMID:2760991

  17. Replication of type 2 herpes simplex virus in human endocervical tissue in organ culture.

    PubMed Central

    Birch, J.; Fink, C. G.; Skinner, G. R.; Thomas, G. H.; Jordan, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The replication of type 2 herpes simplex virus in human endocervical tissue in organ culture was investigated. The temporal profile of virus replication was related to the initial virus inoculum; high input inocula induced a rapid increase in virus titre while lower multiplicities induced a more slow-rising increase in virus titre. Our evidence suggested that explants were capable of initiating and supporting virus replication for at least 2 weeks following establishment of the culture. Virus yields were optimal when explants were cultured at 37 degrees and in serum-supplemented medium. Explants also supported the replication of type 1 herpes simplex virus and a "non-human" herpes simplex virus (pseudo-rabies virus). The optimal conditions for replication of type 2 herpes simplex virus in human endocervical explants have been established and will provide a model permitting precise investigation of lytic or other virus-cervical cell interactions and their possible relationship to herpes virus-induced pre-invasive carcinoma of this organ. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:183806

  18. Seroprevalence of feline leukemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus infection among cats in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Little, Susan; Sears, William; Lachtara, Jessica; Bienzle, Dorothee

    2009-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the seroprevalence of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection among cats in Canada and to identify risk factors for seropositivity. Signalment, lifestyle factors, and test results for FeLV antigen and FIV antibody were analyzed for 11 144 cats from the 10 Canadian provinces. Seroprevalence for FIV antibody was 4.3% and seroprevalence for FeLV antigen was 3.4%. Fifty-eight cats (0.5%) were seropositive for both viruses. Seroprevalence varied geographically. Factors such as age, gender, health status, and lifestyle were significantly associated with risk of FeLV and FIV seropositivity. The results suggest that cats in Canada are at risk of retrovirus infection and support current recommendations that the retrovirus status of all cats should be known. PMID:19721785

  19. Novel antiviral activity of bromocriptine against dengue virus replication.

    PubMed

    Kato, Fumihiro; Ishida, Yuki; Oishi, Shinya; Fujii, Nobutaka; Watanabe, Satoru; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Tajima, Shigeru; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Suzuki, Youichi; Ichiyama, Koji; Yamamoto, Naoki; Yoshii, Kentaro; Takashima, Ikuo; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Miura, Tomoyuki; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Hishiki, Takayuki

    2016-07-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infectious disease is a major public health problem worldwide; however, licensed vaccines or specific antiviral drugs against this infection are not available. To identify novel anti-DENV compounds, we screened 1280 pharmacologically active compounds using focus reduction assay. Bromocriptine (BRC) was found to have potent anti-DENV activity and low cytotoxicity (half maximal effective concentration [EC50], 0.8-1.6 μM; and half maximal cytotoxicity concentration [CC50], 53.6 μM). Time-of-drug-addition and time-of-drug-elimination assays suggested that BRC inhibits translation and/or replication steps in the DENV life cycle. A subgenomic replicon system was used to verify that BRC restricts RNA replication step. Furthermore, a single amino acid substitution (N374H) was detected in the NS3 protein that conferred resistance to BRC. In summary, BRC was found to be a novel DENV inhibitor and a potential candidate for the treatment of DENV infectious disease.

  20. Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Juliusson, Gunnar; Hough, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    Leukemias are a group of life threatening malignant disorders of the blood and bone marrow. In the adolescent and young adult (AYA) population, the acute leukemias are most prevalent, with chronic myeloid leukemia being infrequently seen. Factors associated with more aggressive disease biology tend to increase in frequency with increasing age, whilst tolerability of treatment strategies decreases. There are also challenges regarding the effective delivery of therapy specific to the AYA group, consequences on the unique psychosocial needs of this age group, including compliance. This chapter reviews the current status of epidemiology, pathophysiology, treatment strategies and outcomes of AYA leukemia, with a focus on acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27595359

  1. Replication of many human viruses is refractory to inhibition by endogenous cellular microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Bogerd, Hal P; Skalsky, Rebecca L; Kennedy, Edward M; Furuse, Yuki; Whisnant, Adam W; Flores, Omar; Schultz, Kimberly L W; Putnam, Nicole; Barrows, Nicholas J; Sherry, Barbara; Scholle, Frank; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A; Griffin, Diane E; Cullen, Bryan R

    2014-07-01

    The issue of whether viruses are subject to restriction by endogenous microRNAs (miRNAs) and/or by virus-induced small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in infected human somatic cells has been controversial. Here, we address this question in two ways. First, using deep sequencing, we demonstrate that infection of human cells by the RNA virus dengue virus (DENV) or West Nile virus (WNV) does not result in the production of any virus-derived siRNAs or viral miRNAs. Second, to more globally assess the potential of small regulatory RNAs to inhibit virus replication, we used gene editing to derive human cell lines that lack a functional Dicer enzyme and that therefore are unable to produce miRNAs or siRNAs. Infection of these cells with a wide range of viruses, including DENV, WNV, yellow fever virus, Sindbis virus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, measles virus, influenza A virus, reovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, human immunodeficiency virus type 1, or herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), failed to reveal any enhancement in the replication of any of these viruses, although HSV-1, which encodes at least eight Dicer-dependent viral miRNAs, did replicate somewhat more slowly in the absence of Dicer. We conclude that most, and perhaps all, human viruses have evolved to be resistant to inhibition by endogenous human miRNAs during productive replication and that dependence on a cellular miRNA, as seen with hepatitis C virus, is rare. How viruses have evolved to avoid inhibition by endogenous cellular miRNAs, which are generally highly conserved during metazoan evolution, remains to be determined. Importance: Eukaryotic cells express a wide range of small regulatory RNAs, including miRNAs, that have the potential to inhibit the expression of mRNAs that show sequence complementarity. Indeed, previous work has suggested that endogenous miRNAs have the potential to inhibit viral gene expression and replication. Here, we demonstrate that the replication of a wide range of

  2. Replication of Many Human Viruses Is Refractory to Inhibition by Endogenous Cellular MicroRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Bogerd, Hal P.; Skalsky, Rebecca L.; Kennedy, Edward M.; Furuse, Yuki; Whisnant, Adam W.; Flores, Omar; Schultz, Kimberly L. W.; Putnam, Nicole; Barrows, Nicholas J.; Sherry, Barbara; Scholle, Frank; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A.; Griffin, Diane E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The issue of whether viruses are subject to restriction by endogenous microRNAs (miRNAs) and/or by virus-induced small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in infected human somatic cells has been controversial. Here, we address this question in two ways. First, using deep sequencing, we demonstrate that infection of human cells by the RNA virus dengue virus (DENV) or West Nile virus (WNV) does not result in the production of any virus-derived siRNAs or viral miRNAs. Second, to more globally assess the potential of small regulatory RNAs to inhibit virus replication, we used gene editing to derive human cell lines that lack a functional Dicer enzyme and that therefore are unable to produce miRNAs or siRNAs. Infection of these cells with a wide range of viruses, including DENV, WNV, yellow fever virus, Sindbis virus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, measles virus, influenza A virus, reovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, human immunodeficiency virus type 1, or herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), failed to reveal any enhancement in the replication of any of these viruses, although HSV-1, which encodes at least eight Dicer-dependent viral miRNAs, did replicate somewhat more slowly in the absence of Dicer. We conclude that most, and perhaps all, human viruses have evolved to be resistant to inhibition by endogenous human miRNAs during productive replication and that dependence on a cellular miRNA, as seen with hepatitis C virus, is rare. How viruses have evolved to avoid inhibition by endogenous cellular miRNAs, which are generally highly conserved during metazoan evolution, remains to be determined. IMPORTANCE Eukaryotic cells express a wide range of small regulatory RNAs, including miRNAs, that have the potential to inhibit the expression of mRNAs that show sequence complementarity. Indeed, previous work has suggested that endogenous miRNAs have the potential to inhibit viral gene expression and replication. Here, we demonstrate that the replication of a wide range of

  3. Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Utilizes an Autophagic Pathway During Viral Replication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection with positive-strand RNA viruses results in the rearrangement of intracellular membranes into viral replication complexes (VRC) which are the sites of viral RNA replication. Cellular autophagy has been proposed to be a mechanism of VRC formation for a number of positive-stranded RNA viruse...

  4. Enhancement of Virus Replication in An Influenza A Virus NS1-Expresssing 293 Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wu Yang; Tao, Xiao Yan; Lyu, Xin Jun; Yu, Peng Cheng; Lu, Zhuo Zhuang

    2016-03-01

    The nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of influenza A virus, which is absent from the viral particle, but highly expressed in infected cells, strongly antagonizes the interferon (IFN)-mediated antiviral response. We engineered an NS1-expressing 293 (293-NS1) cell line with no response to IFN stimulation. Compared with the parental 293 cells, the IFN-nonresponsive 293-NS1 cells improved the growth capacity of various viruses, but the introduction of NS1 barely enhanced the propagation of Tahyna virus, a negative-strand RNA virus. In particular, fastidious enteric adenovirus that replicates poorly in 293 cells may grow more efficiently in 293-NS1 cells; thus, IFN-nonresponsive 293-NS1 cells might be of great value in diagnostic laboratories for the cultivation and isolation of human enteric adenoviruses.

  5. Enhancement of Virus Replication in An Influenza A Virus NS1-Expresssing 293 Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wu Yang; Tao, Xiao Yan; Lyu, Xin Jun; Yu, Peng Cheng; Lu, Zhuo Zhuang

    2016-03-01

    The nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of influenza A virus, which is absent from the viral particle, but highly expressed in infected cells, strongly antagonizes the interferon (IFN)-mediated antiviral response. We engineered an NS1-expressing 293 (293-NS1) cell line with no response to IFN stimulation. Compared with the parental 293 cells, the IFN-nonresponsive 293-NS1 cells improved the growth capacity of various viruses, but the introduction of NS1 barely enhanced the propagation of Tahyna virus, a negative-strand RNA virus. In particular, fastidious enteric adenovirus that replicates poorly in 293 cells may grow more efficiently in 293-NS1 cells; thus, IFN-nonresponsive 293-NS1 cells might be of great value in diagnostic laboratories for the cultivation and isolation of human enteric adenoviruses. PMID:27109134

  6. CD8+ Lymphocytes Can Control HIV Infection in vitro by Suppressing Virus Replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Christopher M.; Moody, Dewey J.; Stites, Daniel P.; Levy, Jay A.

    1986-12-01

    Lymphocytes bearing the CD8 marker were shown to suppress replication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The effect was dose-dependent and most apparent with autologous lymphocytes; it did not appear to be mediated by a cytotoxic response. This suppression of HIV replication could be demonstrated by the addition of CD8+ cells at the initiation of virus production as well as after several weeks of virus replication by cultured cells. The observations suggest a potential approach to therapy in which autologous CD8 lymphocytes could be administered to individuals to inhibit HIV replication and perhaps progression of disease.

  7. Limited hepatitis B virus replication space in the chronically hepatitis C virus-infected liver.

    PubMed

    Wieland, S F; Asabe, S; Engle, R E; Purcell, R H; Chisari, F V

    2014-05-01

    We compared the kinetics and magnitude of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-naive and chronically HCV-infected chimpanzees in whose livers type I interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) expression is strongly induced. HBV infection was delayed and attenuated in the HCV-infected animals, and the number of HBV-infected hepatocytes was drastically reduced. These results suggest that establishment of HBV infection and its replication space is limited by the antiviral effects of type I interferon in the chronically HCV-infected liver.

  8. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  9. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute leukemia in adults. In: Niederhuber JE, Armitage JO, Doroshow JH, Kastan MB, Tepper JE, eds. Abeloff's ... Pui CH. Childhood leukemia. In: Niederhuber JE, Armitage JO, Doroshow JH, Kastan MB, Tepper JE, eds. Abeloff's ...

  10. Effects of dimethyl prostaglandin A1 on herpes simplex virus and human immunodeficiency virus replication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; McGrath, M. S.; Hanks, D.; Erickson, S.; Pulliam, L.

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the direct effect of dimethyl prostaglandin A1 (dmPGA1) on the replication of herpes simplex virus (HSV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). dmPGA1 significantly inhibited viral replication in both HSV and HIV infection systems at concentrations of dmPGA1 that did not adversely alter cellular DNA synthesis. The 50% inhibitory concentration (ID50) for several HSV type 1 (HSV-1) strains ranged from 3.8 to 5.6 micrograms/ml for Vero cells and from 4.6 to 7.3 micrograms/ml for human foreskin fibroblasts. The ID50s for two HSV-2 strains varied from 3.8 to 4.5 micrograms/ml for Vero cells; the ID50 was 5.7 micrograms/ml for human foreskin fibroblasts. We found that closely related prostaglandins did not have the same effect on the replication of HSV; dmPGE2 and dmPGA2 caused up to a 60% increase in HSV replication compared with that in untreated virus-infected cells. HIV-1 replication in acutely infected T cells (VB line) and chronically infected macrophages was assessed by quantitative decreases in p24 concentration. The effective ID50s were 2.5 micrograms/ml for VB cells acutely infected with HIV-1 and 5.2 micrograms/m for chronically infected macrophages. dmPGA1 has an unusual broad-spectrum antiviral activity against both HSV and HIV-1 in vitro and offers a new class of potential therapeutic agents for in vivo use.

  11. Bagaza virus inhibits Japanese encephalitis & West Nile virus replication in Culex tritaeniorhynchus & Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Sudeep, A.B.; Bondre, V.P.; George, R.; Ghodke, Y.S.; Aher, R.V.; Gokhale, M.D.

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Studies have shown that certain flaviviruses influence susceptibility of mosquitoes by inhibiting/enhancing replication of important flaviviruses. Hence, a study was designed to determine whether Bagaza virus (BAGV), a flavivirus isolated from Culex tritaeniorhynchus mosquitoes in India, alters susceptibility of Cx. tritaeniorhynchus and Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes to Japanese encephalitis (JEV) and West Nile viruses (WNV). Methods: JEV and WNV infection in Cx. tritaeniorhynchus and Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes in the presence of BAGV was carried out by intrathoracic (IT) inoculation and oral feeding methods. Mosquitoes were infected with BAGV and WNV/JEV either simultaneously or in a phased manner, in which mosquitoes were infected with BAGV by IT inoculation followed by super-infection with JEV/WNV after eight days post-infection (PI). JEV and WNV yield on 7th and 14th day PI after super-infection was determined by 50 per cent tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) method. Results: In Cx. tritaeniorhynchus mosquitoes, prior infection with BAGV significantly reduced JEV and WNV replication while in Cx. quinquefasciatus, BAGV influence was only seen with WNV. Reduction in virus titre was observed in IT inoculated and oral fed mosquitoes irrespective of the infection mode. JEV replication was also found reduced in Cx. tritaeniorhynchus mosquitoes persistently infected with BAGV at passage four. Interpretation & conclusions: BAGV infection in Cx. tritaeniorhynchus and Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes altered their susceptibility to JEV and WNV producing low virus yield. However, the role of BAGV in inhibiting JEV/WNV replication in field mosquitoes needs further investigations. PMID:26905241

  12. Inhibition of respiratory syncytial virus replication and virus-induced p38 kinase activity by berberine.

    PubMed

    Shin, Han-Bo; Choi, Myung-Soo; Yi, Chae-Min; Lee, Jun; Kim, Nam-Jung; Inn, Kyung-Soo

    2015-07-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes severe lower respiratory tract infection and poses a major public health threat worldwide. No effective vaccines or therapeutics are currently available; berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid from various medicinal plants, has been shown to exert antiviral and several other biological effects. Recent studies have shown that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity is implicated in infection by and replication of viruses such as RSV and the influenza virus. Because berberine has previously been implicated in modulating the activity of p38 MAPK, its effects on RSV infection and RSV-mediated p38 MAPK activation were examined. Replication of RSV in epithelial cells was significantly reduced by treatment with berberine. Berberine treatment caused decrease in viral protein and mRNA syntheses. Similar to previously reported findings, RSV infection caused phosphorylation of p38 MAPK at a very early time point of infection, and phosphorylation was dramatically reduced by berberine treatment. In addition, production of interleukin-6 mRNA upon RSV infection was significantly suppressed by treatment with berberine, suggesting the anti-inflammatory role of berberine during RSV infection. Taken together, we showed that berberine, a natural compound already proven to be safe for human consumption, suppresses the replication of RSV. In addition, the current study suggests that inhibition of RSV-mediated early p38 MAPK activation, which has been implicated as an early step in viral infection, as a potential molecular mechanism.

  13. Replication of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus in Its Whitefly Vector, Bemisia tabaci

    PubMed Central

    Pakkianathan, Britto Cathrin; Kontsedalov, Svetlana; Lebedev, Galina; Mahadav, Assaf; Zeidan, Muhammad; Czosnek, Henryk

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is a begomovirus transmitted exclusively by the whitefly Bemisia tabaci in a persistent, circulative manner. Replication of TYLCV in its vector remains controversial, and thus far, the virus has been considered to be nonpropagative. Following 8 h of acquisition on TYLCV-infected tomato plants or purified virions and then transfer to non-TYLCV-host cotton plants, the amounts of virus inside whitefly adults significantly increased (>2-fold) during the first few days and then continuously decreased, as measured by the amounts of genes on both virus DNA strands. Reported alterations in insect immune and defense responses upon virus retention led us to hypothesize a role for the immune response in suppressing virus replication. After virus acquisition, stress conditions were imposed on whiteflies, and the levels of three viral gene sequences were measured over time. When whiteflies were exposed to TYLCV and treatment with two different pesticides, the virus levels continuously increased. Upon exposure to heat stress, the virus levels gradually decreased, without any initial accumulation. Switching of whiteflies between pesticide, heat stress, and control treatments caused fluctuating increases and decreases in virus levels. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis confirmed these results and showed virus signals inside midgut epithelial cell nuclei. Combining the pesticide and heat treatments with virus acquisition had significant effects on fecundity. Altogether, our results demonstrate for the first time that a single-stranded DNA plant virus can replicate in its hemipteran vector. IMPORTANCE Plant viruses in agricultural crops are of great concern worldwide. Many of them are transmitted from infected to healthy plants by insects. Persistently transmitted viruses often have a complex association with their vectors; however, most are believed not to replicate within these vectors. Such replication is important, as it

  14. Syncytia infectivity of assay of bovine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Itohara, S; Takatori, I

    1982-01-01

    Bovine embryonic spleen cell cultures were examined to find several factors influencing the specificity, sensitivity and reproducibility of the syncytia infectivity assay of bovine leukemia virus (BLV). The highest sensitivity of the assay were observed when cell sheets of 30 to 50% confluence were inoculated with a stock of BLV, and when cells containing 4 or more nuclei were counted as syncytial cells. Treatment of the cell sheets with a diethylamino-ethyl-dextran solution (25 micrograms/ml) prior to BLV inoculation was found to be essential for the optimal induction of syncytia. Low-passage cultures were found to be more susceptible to the induction of syncytia by BLV than high-passage cultures. Cell-free BLV preparations decreased in syncytia-inducing ability to some extent by the first cycle of freezing (at -70 degrees C) and thawing. No further decrease, however, was caused by repeated cycles of freezing and thawing or by prolonged incuvation at -80 degrees C. The syncytia-inducing activity of BLV was inhibited by all the BLV-precipitating antibody-positive sera originated from both cases of the adult form of bovine leukosis and cases of persistent lymphocytosis. It was not inhibited by the sera of 16 of 17 cattle apparently healthy and negative for BLV-precipitating antibody. These results indicate that the syncytia infectivity assay and syncytia inhibition test are specific for BLV.

  15. Feline lymphoma in the post-feline leukemia virus era.

    PubMed

    Louwerens, Mathilde; London, Cheryl A; Pedersen, Niels C; Lyons, Leslie A

    2005-01-01

    Lymphoma (lymphosarcoma or malignant lymphoma) is the most common neoplasm of the hematopoietic system of cats and reportedly the cat has the highest incidence for lymphoma of any species. A 21-year retrospective survey of feline lymphoma covering the period 1983-2003 was conducted with the patient database at the Veterinary Medicine Teaching Hospital (VMTH) at the University of California, Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine. This period comprises the post-feline leukemia virus (FeLV) era. Feline lymphoma historically has been highly associated with retrovirus infection. Mass testing and elimination and quarantine programs beginning in the 1970s and vaccination programs in the 1980s dramatically reduced the subsequent FeLV infection rate among pet cats. The results of this survey confirm a significant decrease in the importance of FeLV-associated types of lymphoma in cats. In spite of this decrease in FeLV infection, the incidence of lymphoma in cats treated at the VMTH actually increased from 1982 to 2003. This increase was due largely to a rise in the incidence of intestinal lymphoma, and to a lesser degree, of atypical lymphoma. A high incidence of mediastinal lymphomas in young Siamese or Oriental breeds also was observed, supporting previous studies. Associations of intestinal lymphoma and inflammatory bowel disease and diet should be further considered.

  16. Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus (XMRV) and the Safety of the Blood Supply.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Andrew D; Cohn, Claudia S

    2016-10-01

    In 2006, a new virus, xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV), was discovered in a cohort of U.S. men with prostate cancer. Soon after this initial finding, XMRV was also detected in samples from patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). The blood community, which is highly sensitive to the threat of emerging infectious diseases since the HIV/AIDS crisis, recommended indefinite deferral of all blood donors with a history of CFS. As XMRV research progressed, conflicting results emerged regarding the importance of this virus in the pathophysiology of prostate cancer and/or CFS. Molecular biologists traced the development of XMRV to a recombination event in a laboratory mouse that likely occurred circa 1993. The virus was propagated via cell lines derived from a tumor present in this mouse and spread through contamination of laboratory samples. Well-controlled experiments showed that detection of XMRV was due to contaminated samples and was not a marker of or a causal factor in prostate cancer or CFS. This paper traces the development of XMRV in the prostate and CFS scientific communities and explores the effect it had on the blood community. PMID:27358491

  17. A replication-deficient rabies virus vaccine expressing Ebola virus glycoprotein is highly attenuated for neurovirulence

    SciTech Connect

    Papaneri, Amy B.; Wirblich, Christoph; Cann, Jennifer A.; Cooper, Kurt; Jahrling, Peter B.; Schnell, Matthias J.; Blaney, Joseph E.

    2012-12-05

    We are developing inactivated and live-attenuated rabies virus (RABV) vaccines expressing Ebola virus (EBOV) glycoprotein for use in humans and endangered wildlife, respectively. Here, we further characterize the pathogenesis of the live-attenuated RABV/EBOV vaccine candidates in mice in an effort to define their growth properties and potential for safety. RABV vaccines expressing GP (RV-GP) or a replication-deficient derivative with a deletion of the RABV G gene (RV{Delta}G-GP) are both avirulent after intracerebral inoculation of adult mice. Furthermore, RV{Delta}G-GP is completely avirulent upon intracerebral inoculation of suckling mice unlike parental RABV vaccine or RV-GP. Analysis of RV{Delta}G-GP in the brain by quantitative PCR, determination of virus titer, and immunohistochemistry indicated greatly restricted virus replication. In summary, our findings indicate that RV-GP retains the attenuation phenotype of the live-attenuated RABV vaccine, and RV{Delta}G-GP would appear to be an even safer alternative for use in wildlife or consideration for human use.

  18. Managing the future: the Special Virus Leukemia Program and the acceleration of biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Scheffler, Robin Wolfe

    2014-12-01

    After the end of the Second World War, cancer virus research experienced a remarkable revival, culminating in the creation in 1964 of the United States National Cancer Institute's Special Virus Leukemia Program (SVLP), an ambitious program of directed biomedical research to accelerate the development of a leukemia vaccine. Studies of cancer viruses soon became the second most highly funded area of research at the Institute, and by far the most generously funded area of biological research. Remarkably, this vast infrastructure for cancer vaccine production came into being before a human leukemia virus was shown to exist. The origins of the SVLP were rooted in as much as shifts in American society as laboratory science. The revival of cancer virus studies was a function of the success advocates and administrators achieved in associating cancer viruses with campaigns against childhood diseases such as polio and leukemia. To address the urgency borne of this new association, the SVLP's architects sought to lessen the power of peer review in favor of centralized Cold War management methods, fashioning viruses as "administrative objects" in order to accelerate the tempo of biomedical research and discovery.

  19. Managing the future: the Special Virus Leukemia Program and the acceleration of biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Scheffler, Robin Wolfe

    2014-12-01

    After the end of the Second World War, cancer virus research experienced a remarkable revival, culminating in the creation in 1964 of the United States National Cancer Institute's Special Virus Leukemia Program (SVLP), an ambitious program of directed biomedical research to accelerate the development of a leukemia vaccine. Studies of cancer viruses soon became the second most highly funded area of research at the Institute, and by far the most generously funded area of biological research. Remarkably, this vast infrastructure for cancer vaccine production came into being before a human leukemia virus was shown to exist. The origins of the SVLP were rooted in as much as shifts in American society as laboratory science. The revival of cancer virus studies was a function of the success advocates and administrators achieved in associating cancer viruses with campaigns against childhood diseases such as polio and leukemia. To address the urgency borne of this new association, the SVLP's architects sought to lessen the power of peer review in favor of centralized Cold War management methods, fashioning viruses as "administrative objects" in order to accelerate the tempo of biomedical research and discovery. PMID:25459347

  20. Development of an Equine-Tropic Replication-Competent Lentivirus Assay for Equine Infectious Anemia Virus-Based Lentiviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Bannister, Richard; Leroux-Carlucci, Marie A.; Evans, Nerys E.; Miskin, James E.; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The release of lentiviral vectors for clinical use requires the testing of vector material, production cells, and, if applicable, ex vivo-transduced cells for the presence of replication-competent lentivirus (RCL). Vectors derived from the nonprimate lentivirus equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) have been directly administered to patients in several clinical trials, with no toxicity observed to date. Because EIAV does not replicate in human cells, and because putative RCLs derived from vector components within human vector production cells would most likely be human cell-tropic, we previously developed an RCL assay using amphotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV) as a surrogate positive control and human cells as RCL amplification/indicator cells. Here we report an additional RCL assay that tests for the presence of theoretical “equine-tropic” RCLs. This approach provides further assurance of safety by detecting putative RCLs with an equine cell-specific tropism that might not be efficiently amplified by the human cell-based RCL assay. We tested the ability of accessory gene-deficient EIAV mutant viruses to replicate in a highly permissive equine cell line to direct our choice of a suitable EIAV-derived positive control. In addition, we report for the first time the mathematical rationale for use of the Poisson distribution to calculate minimal infectious dose of positive control virus and for use in monitoring assay positive/spike control failures in accumulating data sets. No RCLs have been detected in Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-compliant RCL assays to date, further demonstrating that RCL formation is highly unlikely in contemporary minimal lentiviral vector systems. PMID:23121195

  1. IFITMs restrict the replication of multiple pathogenic viruses

    PubMed Central

    Perreira, Jill M.; Chin, Christopher R.; Feeley, Eric M.; Brass, Abraham L.

    2014-01-01

    The IFITM family of proteins inhibit a growing number of pathogenic viruses, among them influenza A virus, dengue virus, hepatitis C virus, and Ebola virus. This review covers recent developments in our understanding of the IFITM’s molecular determinants, potential mechanisms of action, and impact on pathogenesis. PMID:24076421

  2. Less Grease, Please. Phosphatidylethanolamine Is the Only Lipid Required for Replication of a (+)RNA Virus

    PubMed Central

    Belov, George A.

    2015-01-01

    All positive strand RNA viruses of eukaryotes replicate their genomes in association with membranes. These viruses actively change cellular lipid metabolism to build replication membranes enriched in specific lipids. The ubiquitous use of membranes by positive strand RNA viruses apparently holds major evolutionary advantages; however our understanding of the mechanistic role of membranes, let alone of specific lipid components of the membrane bilayer, in the viral replication cycle is minimal. The replication complexes that can be isolated from infected cells, or reconstituted in vitro from crude cell lysates, do not allow controlled manipulation of the membrane constituents thus limiting their usefulness for understanding how exactly membranes support the replication reaction. Recent work from Peter Nagy group demonstrates that replication of a model positive strand RNA virus can be reconstituted in the in vitro reaction with liposomes of chemically defined composition and reveals an exclusive role of phosphatidylethanolamine in sustaining efficient viral RNA replication. This study opens new possibilities for investigation of membrane contribution in the replication process that may ultimately lead to development of novel broad spectrum antiviral compounds targeting the membrane-dependent elements of the replication cycle conserved among diverse groups of viruses. PMID:26131959

  3. Positive-strand RNA viruses stimulate host phosphatidylcholine synthesis at viral replication sites

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiantao; Zhang, Zhenlu; Chukkapalli, Vineela; Nchoutmboube, Jules A.; Li, Jianhui; Randall, Glenn; Belov, George A.; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    All positive-strand RNA viruses reorganize host intracellular membranes to assemble their viral replication complexes (VRCs); however, how these viruses modulate host lipid metabolism to accommodate such membrane proliferation and rearrangements is not well defined. We show that a significantly increased phosphatidylcholine (PC) content is associated with brome mosaic virus (BMV) replication in both natural host barley and alternate host yeast based on a lipidomic analysis. Enhanced PC levels are primarily associated with the perinuclear ER membrane, where BMV replication takes place. More specifically, BMV replication protein 1a interacts with and recruits Cho2p (choline requiring 2), a host enzyme involved in PC synthesis, to the site of viral replication. These results suggest that PC synthesized at the site of VRC assembly, not the transport of existing PC, is responsible for the enhanced accumulation. Blocking PC synthesis by deleting the CHO2 gene resulted in VRCs with wider diameters than those in wild-type cells; however, BMV replication was significantly inhibited, highlighting the critical role of PC in VRC formation and viral replication. We further show that enhanced PC levels also accumulate at the replication sites of hepatitis C virus and poliovirus, revealing a conserved feature among a group of positive-strand RNA viruses. Our work also highlights a potential broad-spectrum antiviral strategy that would disrupt PC synthesis at the sites of viral replication but would not alter cellular processes. PMID:26858414

  4. Fc receptors do not mediate African swine fever virus replication in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Alcamí, A; Viñuela, E

    1991-04-01

    Titration experiments in swine macrophages have shown that African swine fever virus infectivity was not enhanced in the presence of antiviral antibodies. The early viral protein synthesis and the viral DNA replication in swine macrophages infected with virus-antibody complexes were inhibited in the presence of high doses of uv-inactivated virus, which saturated specific virus receptors, but not when Fc receptors were saturated with antibodies. These results indicate that African swine fever virus does not infect swine macrophages through Fc receptors and that the normal entry pathway through virus receptors is not bypassed by the virus-antibody complexes.

  5. Fc receptors do not mediate African swine fever virus replication in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Alcami, A.; Vinuela, E. )

    1991-04-01

    Titration experiments in swine macrophages have shown that African swine fever virus infectivity was not enhanced in the presence of antiviral antibodies. The early viral protein synthesis and the viral DNA replication in swine macrophages infected with virus-antibody complexes were inhibited in the presence of high doses of uv-inactivated virus, which saturated specific virus receptors, but not when Fc receptors were saturated with antibodies. These results indicate that African swine fever virus does not infect swine macrophages through Fc receptors and that the normal entry pathway through virus receptors is not bypassed by the virus-antibody complexes.

  6. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii and concurrent bartonella spp., feline immunodeficiency virus, and feline leukemia infections in cats from Grenada, West Indies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii and Bartonella spp. are zoonotic pathogens of cats. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV), and Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLv) are related to Human Iimmunodeficiency Virus, and Human Leukemia Virus, respectively, and these viruses are immunosuppressive. In the present study, the prevale...

  7. Phenotypic characterization in mice of thymus target cells susceptible to productive infection by the radiation leukemia virus

    SciTech Connect

    Boniver, J.; Decleve, A.; Honsik, C.; Libermann, M.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1981-11-01

    The spread of virus repliction was studied by electron microscopy in the thymuses of inbred C57BL/Ka mice after intrathymic inoculation of the radiation leukemia virus (RadLV). The first type C-budding virus particles appeared in scarce blast cells of the subcapsular zone. Most of these blast cells were ''X-cells,'' i.e., the thymus lymphoid cells most actively engaged in DNA synthesis. Virus replication spread to the entire cortical blast cell population and, from day 7 on, to the small cortical lymphocytes. The first virus-producing cells were derived from a very few target cells (approx. =0.001-0.003% of thymocytes) susceptible to RadLV infection. For determination of the phenotypes of these target cells, various thymocyte subpopulations obtained through a battery of cell separation methods were tested for their ability to support the replication of RadLV/VL/sub 3/ virus in short-term culture. Most of these target cells were sensitive to the lytic effect of hydrocortisone and migrated in the fastest fraction of a 1Xg sedimentation gradient, together with the majority of (/sup 3/H)thymidine-incorporating blast cells. They exhibited an intermediate density and expressed H-2 and Thy 1.2 cell surface antigens, although they were not found preferentially among the high Thy 1.2 population to which most of the cortical blast cells belonged. The spread of RadLV within the thymus and the surface phenotype characteristics of target cells indicate that these cells correspond to a thymocyte subset at the earliest stage of thymic lymphopoiesis and may be transitional between the prothymocytes and the subcapsular blast cell population.

  8. Molecular cloning of covalently closed circular DNA of bovine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Kashmiri, S V; Mehdi, R; Ferrer, J F

    1984-01-01

    The two species of covalently closed circular DNA molecules of bovine leukemia virus were cloned in the lambda phage vector lambda gtWES X lambda B. Of the nine independent recombinant lambda-bovine leukemia virus clones that were analyzed, three were derived from the small and six were derived from the large circular molecules carrying, respectively, one and two copies of the long terminal repeat sequences. Comprehensive restriction endonuclease mapping of the unintegrated bovine leukemia virus and the cloned DNA molecules showed that eight of the nine clones carried viral information without any detectable deletions or insertions of more than ca. 50 base pairs. One of the nine clones, which carries a retroviral insert with one copy of the long terminal repeat, had a deletion of ca. 150 base pairs. Images PMID:6319758

  9. Unstable resistance of G mouse fibroblasts to ecotropic murine leukemia virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikura, H; Naito, Y; Moriwaki, K

    1979-01-01

    G mouse cells were resistant to N- and NB-tropic Friend leukemia viruses and to B-tropic WN 1802B. Though the cells were resistant to focus formation by the Moloney isolate of murine sarcoma virus, they were relatively sensitive to helper component murine leukemia virus. To amphotropic murine leukemia virus and to focus formation by amphotropic murine sarcoma virus, G mouse cells were fully permissive. When the cell lines were established starting from the individual embryos, most cell lines were not resistant to the murine leukemia viruses. Only one resistant line was established. Cloning of this cell line indicated that the resistant cells constantly segregated sensitive cells during the culture; i.e., the G mouse cell cultures were probably always mixtures of sensitive and resistant cells. Among the sensitive cell clones, some were devoid of Fv-1 restriction. Such dually permissive cells, and also feral mouse-derived SC-1 cells, retained glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-1 and apparently normal number 4 chromosomes. The loss of Fv-1 restriction in these mouse cells was not brought about by any gross structural changes in the vicinity of Fv-1 on number 4 chromosomes. Images PMID:221667

  10. Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a γ retrovirus that has been associated with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and prostate cancer. The search for viral causes of these syndromes was reignited by the finding that RNase L activity was low in hereditary prostate cancer and some CFS patients. The six strains of XMRV that have been sequenced have greater than 99% identity, indicating a new human infection rather than laboratory contamination. DNA, RNA, and proteins from XMRV have been detected in 50% to 67% of CFS patients and in about 3.7% of healthy controls. XMRV infections could be transmitted to permissive cell lines from CFS plasma, suggesting the potential for communicable and blood-borne spread of the virus and potentially CFS. This troubling concept is currently under intense evaluation. The most important steps now are to independently confirm the initial findings; develop reliable assays of biomarkers; and to move on to investigations of XMRV pathophysiology and treatment in CFS, prostate cancer, and potentially other virus-related syndromes, if they exist. PMID:20425007

  11. Replication and Transmission of H9N2 Influenza Viruses in Ferrets: Evaluation of Pandemic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Song, Haichen; Hossain, Md Jaber; Ramirez-Nieto, Gloria; Monne, Isabella; Stevens, James; Cattoli, Giovanni; Capua, Ilaria; Chen, Li-Mei; Donis, Ruben O.; Busch, Julia; Paulson, James C.; Brockwell, Christy; Webby, Richard; Blanco, Jorge; Al-Natour, Mohammad Q.; Perez, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    H9N2 avian influenza A viruses are endemic in poultry of many Eurasian countries and have caused repeated human infections in Asia since 1998. To evaluate the potential threat of H9N2 viruses to humans, we investigated the replication and transmission efficiency of H9N2 viruses in the ferret model. Five wild-type (WT) H9N2 viruses, isolated from different avian species from 1988 through 2003, were tested in vivo and found to replicate in ferrets. However these viruses achieved mild peak viral titers in nasal washes when compared to those observed with a human H3N2 virus. Two of these H9N2 viruses transmitted to direct contact ferrets, however no aerosol transmission was detected in the virus displaying the most efficient direct contact transmission. A leucine (Leu) residue at amino acid position 226 in the hemagglutinin (HA) receptor-binding site (RBS), responsible for human virus-like receptor specificity, was found to be important for the transmission of the H9N2 viruses in ferrets. In addition, an H9N2 avian-human reassortant virus, which contains the surface glycoprotein genes from an H9N2 virus and the six internal genes of a human H3N2 virus, showed enhanced replication and efficient transmission to direct contacts. Although no aerosol transmission was observed, the virus replicated in multiple respiratory tissues and induced clinical signs similar to those observed with the parental human H3N2 virus. Our results suggest that the establishment and prevalence of H9N2 viruses in poultry pose a significant threat for humans. PMID:18698430

  12. Salicylic Acid Inhibits the Replication of Tomato bushy stunt virus by Directly Targeting a Host Component in the Replication Complex.

    PubMed

    Tian, Miaoying; Sasvari, Zsuzsanna; Gonzalez, Paulina Alatriste; Friso, Giulia; Rowland, Elden; Liu, Xiao-Min; van Wijk, Klaas J; Nagy, Peter D; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-04-01

    Although the plant hormone salicylic acid (SA) plays a central role in signaling resistance to viral infection, the underlying mechanisms are only partially understood. Identification and characterization of SA's direct targets have been shown to be an effective strategy for dissecting the complex SA-mediated defense signaling network. In search of additional SA targets, we previously developed two sensitive approaches that utilize SA analogs in conjunction with either a photoaffinity labeling technique or surface plasmon resonance-based technology to identify and evaluate candidate SA-binding proteins (SABPs) from Arabidopsis. Using these approaches, we have now identified several members of the Arabidopsis glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) protein family, including two chloroplast-localized and two cytosolic isoforms, as SABPs. Cytosolic GAPDH is a well-known glycolytic enzyme; it also is an important host factor involved in the replication of Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV), a single-stranded RNA virus. Using a yeast cell-free extract, an in vivo yeast replication system, and plant protoplasts, we demonstrate that SA inhibits TBSV replication. SA does so by inhibiting the binding of cytosolic GAPDH to the negative (-)RNA strand of TBSV. Thus, this study reveals a novel molecular mechanism through which SA regulates virus replication. PMID:25584724

  13. Cyclophilin A Restricts Influenza A Virus Replication through Degradation of the M1 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chongfeng; Sun, Lei; Chen, Jilong; Zhang, Lianfeng; Liu, Wenjun

    2012-01-01

    Cyclophilin A (CypA) is a typical member of the cyclophilin family of peptidyl-prolyl isomerases and is involved in the replication of several viruses. Previous studies indicate that CypA interacts with influenza virus M1 protein and impairs the early stage of the viral replication. To further understand the molecular mechanism by which CypA impairs influenza virus replication, a 293T cell line depleted for endogenous CypA was established. The results indicated that CypA inhibited the initiation of virus replication. In addition, the infectivity of influenza virus increased in the absence of CypA. Further studies indicated that CypA had no effect on the stages of virus genome replication or transcription and also did not impair the nuclear export of the viral mRNA. However, CypA decreased the viral protein level. Additional studies indicated that CypA enhanced the degradation of M1 through the ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent pathway. Our results suggest that CypA restricts influenza virus replication through accelerating degradation of the M1 protein. PMID:22347431

  14. Host Protein Moloney Leukemia Virus 10 (MOV10) Acts as a Restriction Factor of Influenza A Virus by Inhibiting the Nuclear Import of the Viral Nucleoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junsong; Huang, Feng; Tan, Likai; Bai, Chuan; Chen, Bing; Liu, Jun; Liang, Juanran; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Shaoying; Lu, Gen; Chen, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) complex of influenza A viruses (IAVs) contains an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex (RdRp) and nucleoprotein (NP) and is the functional unit for viral RNA transcription and replication. The vRNP complex is an important determinant of virus pathogenicity and host adaptation, implying that its function can be affected by host factors. In our study, we identified host protein Moloney leukemia virus 10 (MOV10) as an inhibitor of IAV replication, since depletion of MOV10 resulted in a significant increase in virus yield. MOV10 inhibited the polymerase activity in a minigenome system through RNA-mediated interaction with the NP subunit of vRNP complex. Importantly, we found that the interaction between MOV10 and NP prevented the binding of NP to importin-α, resulting in the retention of NP in the cytoplasm. Both the binding of MOV10 to NP and its inhibitory effect on polymerase activity were independent of its helicase activity. These results suggest that MOV10 acts as an anti-influenza virus factor through specifically inhibiting the nuclear transportation of NP and subsequently inhibiting the function of the vRNP complex. IMPORTANCE The interaction between the influenza virus vRNP complex and host factors is a major determinant of viral tropism and pathogenicity. Our study identified MOV10 as a novel host restriction factor for the influenza virus life cycle since it inhibited the viral growth rate. Conversely, importin-α has been shown as a determinant for influenza tropism and a positive regulator for viral polymerase activity in mammalian cells but not in avian cells. MOV10 disrupted the interaction between NP and importin-α, suggesting that MOV10 could also be an important host factor for influenza virus transmission and pathogenicity. Importantly, as an interferon (IFN)-inducible protein, MOV10 exerted a novel mechanism for IFNs to inhibit the replication of influenza viruses. Furthermore, our study potentially

  15. Dissection of Cauliflower Mosaic Virus Transactivator/Viroplasmin Reveals Distinct Essential Functions in Basic Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Kappei; Hohn, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) transactivator/viroplasmin (Tav) is an essential multifunctional viral protein. Dissection of Tav by deletion mutagenesis revealed that the central region is essential for CaMV replication in single cells but that the N- and C-terminal parts are not. Strains with mutations in the central region were defective in the translational transactivator function and could be complemented by coexpressing Gag (capsid protein precursor) and Pol (polyprotein with protease, reverse transcriptase, and RNase H activity) from separate monocistronic plasmids. In contrast, total omission of Tav was only partially complemented by Gag and Pol overexpression from separate plasmids. These results indicate that CaMV basic replication requires both Tav-activated polycistronic translation and some posttranslational function(s) of Tav that is not affected by the deletions in the central region of Tav. PMID:12857928

  16. Replication-incompetent influenza A viruses that stably express a foreign gene.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Makoto; Victor, Sylvia T; Taft, Andrew S; Yamada, Shinya; Li, Chengjun; Hatta, Masato; Das, Subash C; Takashita, Emi; Kakugawa, Satoshi; Maher, Eileen A; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2011-12-01

    A biologically contained influenza A virus that stably expresses a foreign gene can be effectively traced, used to generate a novel multivalent vaccine and have its replication easily assessed, all while satisfying safety concerns regarding pathogenicity or reversion. This study generated a PB2-knockout (PB2-KO) influenza virus that harboured the GFP reporter gene in the coding region of its PB2 viral RNA (vRNA). Replication of the PB2-KO virus was restricted to a cell line stably expressing the PB2 protein. The GFP gene-encoding PB2 vRNA was stably incorporated into progeny viruses during replication in PB2-expressing cells. The GFP gene was expressed in virus-infected cells with no evidence of recombination between the recombinant PB2 vRNA and the PB2 protein mRNA. Furthermore, other reporter genes and the haemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of different virus strains were accommodated by the PB2-KO virus. Finally, the PB2-KO virus was used to establish an improved assay to screen neutralizing antibodies against influenza viruses by using reporter gene expression as an indicator of virus infection rather than by observing cytopathic effect. These results indicate that the PB2-KO virus has the potential to be a valuable tool for basic and applied influenza virus research. PMID:21880840

  17. p53-Mediated Cellular Response to DNA Damage in Cells with Replicative Hepatitis B Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puisieux, Alain; Ji, Jingwei; Guillot, Celine; Legros, Yann; Soussi, Thierry; Isselbacher, Kurt; Ozturk, Mehmet

    1995-02-01

    Wild-type p53 acts as a tumor suppressor gene by protecting cells from deleterious effects of genotoxic agents through the induction of a G_1/S arrest or apoptosis as a response to DNA damage. Transforming proteins of several oncogenic DNA viruses inactivate tumor suppressor activity of p53 by blocking this cellular response. To test whether hepatitis B virus displays a similar effect, we studied the p53-mediated cellular response to DNA damage in 2215 hepatoma cells with replicative hepatitis B virus. We demonstrate that hepatitis B virus replication does not interfere with known cellular functions of p53 protein.

  18. Ascorbic acid inhibits replication and infectivity of avian RNA tumor virus.

    PubMed Central

    Bissell, M J; Hatie, C; Farson, D A; Schwarz, R I; Soo, W J

    1980-01-01

    Ascorbic acid, at nontoxic concentrations, causes a substantial reduction in the ability of avian tumor viruses to replicate in both primary avian tendon cells and chicken embryo fibroblasts. The virus-infected cultures appear to be less transformed in the presence of ascorbic acid by the criteria of morphology, reduced glucose uptake, and increased collagen synthesis. The vitamin does not act by altering the susceptibility of the cells to initial infection and transformation, but instead appears to interfere with the spread of infection through a reduction in virus replication and virus infectivity. The effect is reversible and requires the continuous presence of the vitamin in the culture medium. Images PMID:6248860

  19. Ascorbic acid inhibits replication and infectivity of avian RNA tumor virus

    SciTech Connect

    BISSELL, MINA J; HATIE, CARROLL; FARSON, DEBORAH A.; SCHWARZ, RICHARD I.; SOO, WHAI-JEN

    1980-04-01

    Ascorbic acid, at nontoxic concentrations, causes a substantial reduction in the ability of avian tumor viruses to replicate in both primary avian tendon cells and chicken embryo fibroblasts. The virus-infected cultures appear to be less transformed in the presence of ascorbic acid by the criteria of morphology, reduced glucose uptake, and increased collagen synthesis. The vitamin does not act by altering the susceptibility of the cells to initial infection and transformation, but instead appears to interfere with the spread of infection through a reduction in virus replication and virus infectivity. The effect is reversible and requires the continuous presence of the vitamin in the culture medium.

  20. Structural and biochemical characterization of the inhibitor complexes of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus protease

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Mi; Gustchina, Alla; Matúz, Krisztina; Tözsér, Jozsef; Namwong, Sirilak; Goldfarb, Nathan E.; Dunn, Ben M.; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2012-10-23

    Interactions between the protease (PR) encoded by the xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus and a number of potential inhibitors have been investigated by biochemical and structural techniques. It was observed that several inhibitors used clinically against HIV PR exhibit nanomolar or even subnanomolar values of K{sub i}, depending on the exact experimental conditions. Both TL-3, a universal inhibitor of retroviral PRs, and some inhibitors originally shown to inhibit plasmepsins were also quite potent, whereas inhibition by pepstatin A was considerably weaker. Crystal structures of the complexes of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus PR with TL-3, amprenavir and pepstatin A were solved at high resolution and compared with the structures of complexes of these inhibitors with other retropepsins. Whereas TL-3 and amprenavir bound in a predictable manner, spanning the substrate-binding site of the enzyme, two molecules of pepstatin A bound simultaneously in an unprecedented manner, leaving the catalytic water molecule in place.

  1. Replication of swine and human influenza viruses in juvenile and layer turkey hens.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ahmed; Yassine, Hadi; Awe, Olusegun O; Ibrahim, Mahmoud; Saif, Yehia M; Lee, Chang-Won

    2013-04-12

    Since the first reported isolation of swine influenza viruses (SIVs) in turkeys in the 1980s, transmission of SIVs to turkeys was frequently documented. Recently, the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus, that was thought to be of swine origin, was detected in turkeys with a severe drop in egg production. In this study, we assessed the infectivity of different mammalian influenza viruses including swine, pandemic H1N1 and seasonal human influenza viruses in both juvenile and layer turkeys. In addition, we investigated the potential influenza virus dissemination in the semen of experimentally infected turkey toms. Results showed that all mammalian origin influenza viruses tested can infect turkeys. SIVs were detected in respiratory and digestive tracts of both juvenile and layer turkeys. Variations in replication efficiencies among SIVs were observed especially in the reproductive tract of layer turkeys. Compared to SIVs, limited replication of seasonal human H1N1 and no detectable replication of recent human-like swine H1N2, pandemic H1N1 and seasonal human H3N2 viruses was noticed. All birds seroconverted to all tested viruses regardless of their replication level. In turkey toms, we were able to detect swine H3N2 virus in semen and reproductive tract of infected toms by real-time RT-PCR although virus isolation was not successful. These data suggest that turkey hens could be affected by diverse influenza strains especially SIVs. Moreover, the differences in the replication efficiency we demonstrated among SIVs and between SIV and human influenza viruses in layer turkeys suggest a possible use of turkeys as an animal model to study host tropism and pathogenesis of influenza viruses. Our results also indicate a potential risk of venereal transmission of influenza viruses in turkeys.

  2. Adeno-associated virus type 2 enhances goose parvovirus replication in embryonated goose eggs

    SciTech Connect

    Malkinson, Mertyn . E-mail: malkins@agri.huji.ac.il; Winocour, Ernest . E-mail: ernest.winocour@weizmann.ac.il

    2005-06-05

    The autonomous goose parvovirus (GPV) and the human helper-dependent adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) share a high degree of homology. To determine if this evolutionary relationship has a biological impact, we studied viral replication in human 293 cells and in embryonated goose eggs coinfected with both viruses. Similar experiments were performed with the minute virus of mice (MVM), an autonomous murine parvovirus with less homology to AAV2. In human 293 cells, both GPV and MVM augmented AAV2 replication. In contrast, AAV2 markedly enhanced GPV replication in embryonated goose eggs under conditions where a similar effect was not observed with MVM. AAV2 did not replicate in embryonated goose eggs and AAV2 inactivated by UV-irradiation also enhanced GPV replication. To our knowledge, this is the first report that a human helper-dependent member of the Parvoviridae can provide helper activity for an autonomous parvovirus in a natural host.

  3. Hemagglutinin Stalk Immunity Reduces Influenza Virus Replication and Transmission in Ferrets.

    PubMed

    Nachbagauer, Raffael; Miller, Matthew S; Hai, Rong; Ryder, Alex B; Rose, John K; Palese, Peter; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Krammer, Florian; Albrecht, Randy A

    2015-12-30

    We assessed whether influenza virus hemagglutinin stalk-based immunity protects ferrets against aerosol-transmitted H1N1 influenza virus infection. Immunization of ferrets by a universal influenza virus vaccine strategy based on viral vectors expressing chimeric hemagglutinin constructs induced stalk-specific antibody responses. Stalk-immunized ferrets were cohoused with H1N1-infected ferrets under conditions that permitted virus transmission. Hemagglutinin stalk-immunized ferrets had lower viral titers and delayed or no virus replication at all following natural exposure to influenza virus.

  4. Hemagglutinin Stalk Immunity Reduces Influenza Virus Replication and Transmission in Ferrets.

    PubMed

    Nachbagauer, Raffael; Miller, Matthew S; Hai, Rong; Ryder, Alex B; Rose, John K; Palese, Peter; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Krammer, Florian; Albrecht, Randy A

    2016-03-01

    We assessed whether influenza virus hemagglutinin stalk-based immunity protects ferrets against aerosol-transmitted H1N1 influenza virus infection. Immunization of ferrets by a universal influenza virus vaccine strategy based on viral vectors expressing chimeric hemagglutinin constructs induced stalk-specific antibody responses. Stalk-immunized ferrets were cohoused with H1N1-infected ferrets under conditions that permitted virus transmission. Hemagglutinin stalk-immunized ferrets had lower viral titers and delayed or no virus replication at all following natural exposure to influenza virus. PMID:26719251

  5. Hemagglutinin Stalk Immunity Reduces Influenza Virus Replication and Transmission in Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Nachbagauer, Raffael; Miller, Matthew S.; Hai, Rong; Ryder, Alex B.; Rose, John K.; Palese, Peter; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    We assessed whether influenza virus hemagglutinin stalk-based immunity protects ferrets against aerosol-transmitted H1N1 influenza virus infection. Immunization of ferrets by a universal influenza virus vaccine strategy based on viral vectors expressing chimeric hemagglutinin constructs induced stalk-specific antibody responses. Stalk-immunized ferrets were cohoused with H1N1-infected ferrets under conditions that permitted virus transmission. Hemagglutinin stalk-immunized ferrets had lower viral titers and delayed or no virus replication at all following natural exposure to influenza virus. PMID:26719251

  6. Cutthroat trout virus as a surrogate in vitro infection model for testing inhibitors of hepatitis E virus replication

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Debing, Yannick; Winton, James; Neyts, Johan; Dallmeier, Kai

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of the most important causes of acute hepatitis worldwide. Although most infections are self-limiting, mortality is particularly high in pregnant women. Chronic infections can occur in transplant and other immune-compromised patients. Successful treatment of chronic hepatitis E has been reported with ribavirin and pegylated interferon-alpha, however severe side effects were observed. We employed the cutthroat trout virus (CTV), a non-pathogenic fish virus with remarkable similarities to HEV, as a potential surrogate for HEV and established an antiviral assay against this virus using the Chinook salmon embryo (CHSE-214) cell line. Ribavirin and the respective trout interferon were found to efficiently inhibit CTV replication. Other known broad-spectrum inhibitors of RNA virus replication such as the nucleoside analog 2′-C-methylcytidine resulted only in a moderate antiviral activity. In its natural fish host, CTV levels largely fluctuate during the reproductive cycle with the virus detected mainly during spawning. We wondered whether this aspect of CTV infection may serve as a surrogate model for the peculiar pathogenesis of HEV in pregnant women. To that end the effect of three sex steroids on in vitro CTV replication was evaluated. Whereas progesterone resulted in marked inhibition of virus replication, testosterone and 17β-estradiol stimulated viral growth. Our data thus indicate that CTV may serve as a surrogate model for HEV, both for antiviral experiments and studies on the replication biology of the Hepeviridae.

  7. Induction of acute thrombocytopenia and infection of megakaryocytes by Rauscher murine leukemia virus reflect the genetic susceptibility to leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Acute thrombocytopenia and megakaryocyte infection have been investigated during the preleukemic phase of the disease induced by the Rauscher murine leukemia virus (RMuLV) in mice. Injection of RMuLV, either intravenously or intraperitoneally, rapidly induced thrombocytopenia, possibly as a result of direct interaction between platelets and viral particles. The susceptibility to this acute thrombocytopenia was genetically controlled and was inherited as a dominant trait. Murine strains with H-2d or H-2k haplotype, which are susceptible to the induction of leukemia by RMuLV, developed thrombocytopenia, whereas leukemia-resistant H-2b and H-2q strains of mice failed to develop thrombocytopenia. Using B10 H-2-congenic and intra-H-2-recombinant mice, it was shown that the susceptibility to RMuLV-induced thrombocytopenia was controlled by gene(s) in or closely linked to the D region of the H-2 complex. Megakaryocytes may be one of the first sites for the replication of RMuLV. Indeed, among bone marrow cells, only megakaryocytes expressed viral antigens gp70 and p30 during the initial phase of RMuLV infection. In addition, megakaryocytes from infected mice were able to transfer preleukemic thrombocytopenia as well as leukemia in syngeneic mice. The infection of megakaryocytes by RMuLV appears to be genetically controlled in a manner similar to the induction of thrombocytopenia, since only the megakaryocytes from mice developing thrombocytopenia were infected by RMuLV. These results indicate that the gene(s) governing the induction of thrombocytopenia by RMuLV may be the same gene(s) (or closely linked to the gene) that controls the susceptibility to leukemogenesis, and would be consistent with the expression of the gene product, presumably a receptor-like molecule for RMuLV, on platelet and megakaryocyte membranes. PMID:6833948

  8. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Disease Course Is Predicted by the Extent of Virus Replication during Primary Infection

    PubMed Central

    Staprans, Silvija I.; Dailey, Peter J.; Rosenthal, Ann; Horton, Chris; Grant, Robert M.; Lerche, Nicholas; Feinberg, Mark B.

    1999-01-01

    To elucidate the relationship between early viral infection events and immunodeficiency virus disease progression, quantitative-competitive and branched-DNA methods of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) RNA quantitation were cross-validated and used to measure viremia following infection of rhesus macaques with the pathogenic SIVmac251 virus isolate. Excellent correlation between the methods suggests that both accurately approximate SIV copy number. Plasma viremia was evident 4 days postinfection, and rapid viral expansion led to peak viremia levels of 107 to 109 SIV RNA copies/ml by days 8 to 17. Limited resolution of primary viremia was accompanied by relatively short, though variable, times to the development of AIDS (81 to 630 days). The persistent high-level viremia observed following intravenous inoculation of SIVmac251 explains the aggressive disease course in this model. Survival analyses demonstrated that the disease course is established 8 to 17 days postinfection, when peak viremia is observed. The most significant predictor of disease progression was the extent of viral decline following peak viremia; larger decrements in viremia were associated with both lower steady-state viremia (P = 0.0005) and a reduced hazard of AIDS (P = 0.004). The data also unexpectedly suggested that following SIVmac251 infection, animals with the highest peak viremia were better able to control virus replication rather than more rapidly developing disease. Analysis of early viral replication dynamics should help define host responses that protect from disease progression and should provide quantitative measures to assess the extent to which protective responses may be induced by prophylactic vaccination. PMID:10233944

  9. Biochemical, inhibition and inhibitor resistance studies of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Ndongwe, Tanyaradzwa P; Adedeji, Adeyemi O; Michailidis, Eleftherios; Ong, Yee Tsuey; Hachiya, Atsuko; Marchand, Bruno; Ryan, Emily M; Rai, Devendra K; Kirby, Karen A; Whatley, Angela S; Burke, Donald H; Johnson, Marc; Ding, Shilei; Zheng, Yi-Min; Liu, Shan-Lu; Kodama, Ei-Ichi; Delviks-Frankenberry, Krista A; Pathak, Vinay K; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Parniak, Michael A; Singh, Kamalendra; Sarafianos, Stefan G

    2012-01-01

    We report key mechanistic differences between the reverse transcriptases (RT) of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) and of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV), a gammaretrovirus that can infect human cells. Steady and pre-steady state kinetics demonstrated that XMRV RT is significantly less efficient in DNA synthesis and in unblocking chain-terminated primers. Surface plasmon resonance experiments showed that the gammaretroviral enzyme has a remarkably higher dissociation rate (k(off)) from DNA, which also results in lower processivity than HIV-1 RT. Transient kinetics of mismatch incorporation revealed that XMRV RT has higher fidelity than HIV-1 RT. We identified RNA aptamers that potently inhibit XMRV, but not HIV-1 RT. XMRV RT is highly susceptible to some nucleoside RT inhibitors, including Translocation Deficient RT inhibitors, but not to non-nucleoside RT inhibitors. We demonstrated that XMRV RT mutants K103R and Q190M, which are equivalent to HIV-1 mutants that are resistant to tenofovir (K65R) and AZT (Q151M), are also resistant to the respective drugs, suggesting that XMRV can acquire resistance to these compounds through the decreased incorporation mechanism reported in HIV-1. PMID:21908397

  10. Biochemical, inhibition and inhibitor resistance studies of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Ndongwe, Tanyaradzwa P.; Adedeji, Adeyemi O.; Michailidis, Eleftherios; Ong, Yee Tsuey; Hachiya, Atsuko; Marchand, Bruno; Ryan, Emily M.; Rai, Devendra K.; Kirby, Karen A.; Whatley, Angela S.; Burke, Donald H.; Johnson, Marc; Ding, Shilei; Zheng, Yi-Min; Liu, Shan-Lu; Kodama, Ei-Ichi; Delviks-Frankenberry, Krista A.; Pathak, Vinay K.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Parniak, Michael A.; Singh, Kamalendra; Sarafianos, Stefan G.

    2012-01-01

    We report key mechanistic differences between the reverse transcriptases (RT) of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) and of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV), a gammaretrovirus that can infect human cells. Steady and pre-steady state kinetics demonstrated that XMRV RT is significantly less efficient in DNA synthesis and in unblocking chain-terminated primers. Surface plasmon resonance experiments showed that the gammaretroviral enzyme has a remarkably higher dissociation rate (koff) from DNA, which also results in lower processivity than HIV-1 RT. Transient kinetics of mismatch incorporation revealed that XMRV RT has higher fidelity than HIV-1 RT. We identified RNA aptamers that potently inhibit XMRV, but not HIV-1 RT. XMRV RT is highly susceptible to some nucleoside RT inhibitors, including Translocation Deficient RT inhibitors, but not to non-nucleoside RT inhibitors. We demonstrated that XMRV RT mutants K103R and Q190M, which are equivalent to HIV-1 mutants that are resistant to tenofovir (K65R) and AZT (Q151M), are also resistant to the respective drugs, suggesting that XMRV can acquire resistance to these compounds through the decreased incorporation mechanism reported in HIV-1. PMID:21908397

  11. Ultrastructure of the replication sites of positive-strand RNA viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Harak, Christian; Lohmann, Volker

    2015-05-15

    Positive strand RNA viruses replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells and induce intracellular membranous compartments harboring the sites of viral RNA synthesis. These replication factories are supposed to concentrate the components of the replicase and to shield replication intermediates from the host cell innate immune defense. Virus induced membrane alterations are often generated in coordination with host factors and can be grouped into different morphotypes. Recent advances in conventional and electron microscopy have contributed greatly to our understanding of their biogenesis, but still many questions remain how viral proteins capture membranes and subvert host factors for their need. In this review, we will discuss different representatives of positive strand RNA viruses and their ways of hijacking cellular membranes to establish replication complexes. We will further focus on host cell factors that are critically involved in formation of these membranes and how they contribute to viral replication. - Highlights: • Positive strand RNA viruses induce massive membrane alterations. • Despite the great diversity, replication complexes share many similarities. • Host factors play a pivotal role in replication complex biogenesis. • Use of the same host factors by several viruses hints to similar functions.

  12. Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Nonstructural Protein 2C Interacts with Beclin1, Modulating Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Gladue, D. P.; O'Donnell, V.; Baker-Branstetter, R.; Holinka, L. G.; Pacheco, J. M.; Fernandez-Sainz, I.; Lu, Z.; Brocchi, E.; Baxt, B.; Piccone, M. E.; Rodriguez, L.

    2012-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), the causative agent of foot-and-mouth disease, is an Apthovirus within the Picornaviridae family. Replication of the virus occurs in association with replication complexes that are formed by host cell membrane rearrangements. The largest viral protein in the replication complex, 2C, is thought to have multiple roles during virus replication. However, studies examining the function of FMDV 2C have been rather limited. To better understand the role of 2C in the process of virus replication, we used a yeast two-hybrid approach to identify host proteins that interact with 2C. We report here that cellular Beclin1 is a specific host binding partner for 2C. Beclin1 is a regulator of the autophagy pathway, a metabolic pathway required for efficient FMDV replication. The 2C-Beclin1 interaction was further confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy to actually occur in FMDV-infected cells. Overexpression of either Beclin1 or Bcl-2, another important autophagy factor, strongly affects virus yield in cell culture. The fusion of lysosomes to autophagosomes containing viral proteins is not seen during FMDV infection, a process that is stimulated by Beclin1; however, in FMDV-infected cells overexpressing Beclin1 this fusion occurs, suggesting that 2C would bind to Beclin1 to prevent the fusion of lysosomes to autophagosomes, allowing for virus survival. Using reverse genetics, we demonstrate here that modifications to the amino acids in 2C that are critical for interaction with Beclin1 are also critical for virus growth. These results suggest that interaction between FMDV 2C and host protein Beclin1 could be essential for virus replication. PMID:22933281

  13. Architecture and biogenesis of plus-strand RNA virus replication factories

    PubMed Central

    Paul, David; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Plus-strand RNA virus replication occurs in tight association with cytoplasmic host cell membranes. Both, viral and cellular factors cooperatively generate distinct organelle-like structures, designated viral replication factories. This compartmentalization allows coordination of the different steps of the viral replication cycle, highly efficient genome replication and protection of the viral RNA from cellular defense mechanisms. Electron tomography studies conducted during the last couple of years revealed the three dimensional structure of numerous plus-strand RNA virus replication compartments and highlight morphological analogies between different virus families. Based on the morphology of virus-induced membrane rearrangements, we propose two separate subclasses: the invaginated vesicle/spherule type and the double membrane vesicle type. This review discusses common themes and distinct differences in the architecture of plus-strand RNA virus-induced membrane alterations and summarizes recent progress that has been made in understanding the complex interplay between viral and co-opted cellular factors in biogenesis and maintenance of plus-strand RNA virus replication factories. PMID:24175228

  14. Phosphatidic Acid Produced by Phospholipase D Promotes RNA Replication of a Plant RNA Virus

    PubMed Central

    Hyodo, Kiwamu; Taniguchi, Takako; Manabe, Yuki; Kaido, Masanori; Mise, Kazuyuki; Sugawara, Tatsuya; Taniguchi, Hisaaki; Okuno, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic positive-strand RNA [(+)RNA] viruses are intracellular obligate parasites replicate using the membrane-bound replicase complexes that contain multiple viral and host components. To replicate, (+)RNA viruses exploit host resources and modify host metabolism and membrane organization. Phospholipase D (PLD) is a phosphatidylcholine- and phosphatidylethanolamine-hydrolyzing enzyme that catalyzes the production of phosphatidic acid (PA), a lipid second messenger that modulates diverse intracellular signaling in various organisms. PA is normally present in small amounts (less than 1% of total phospholipids), but rapidly and transiently accumulates in lipid bilayers in response to different environmental cues such as biotic and abiotic stresses in plants. However, the precise functions of PLD and PA remain unknown. Here, we report the roles of PLD and PA in genomic RNA replication of a plant (+)RNA virus, Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV). We found that RCNMV RNA replication complexes formed in Nicotiana benthamiana contained PLDα and PLDβ. Gene-silencing and pharmacological inhibition approaches showed that PLDs and PLDs-derived PA are required for viral RNA replication. Consistent with this, exogenous application of PA enhanced viral RNA replication in plant cells and plant-derived cell-free extracts. We also found that a viral auxiliary replication protein bound to PA in vitro, and that the amount of PA increased in RCNMV-infected plant leaves. Together, our findings suggest that RCNMV hijacks host PA-producing enzymes to replicate. PMID:26020241

  15. Enhanced replication of UV-damaged Simian virus 40 DNA in carcinogen-treated mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Maga, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    The replication of UV-damaged Simian virus 40 (SV40) in carcinogen-treated monkey cells has been studied to elucidate the mechanism of carcinogen-enhanced reactivation. Carcinogen enhanced reactivation is the observed increase in UV-irradiated virus survival in host cells treated with low doses of carcinogen compared to UV-irradiated virus survival in untreated hosts. Carcinogen treatment of monkey kidney cells with either N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene (AAAF) or UV radiation leads to an enhanced capacity to replicate UV-damaged virus during the first round of infection. To further define the mechanism leading to enhanced replication, a detailed biochemical analysis of replication intermediates in carcinogen-treated cells was performed. Several conclusions can be drawn. First enhanced replication can be observed in the first four rounds of replication after UV irradiation of viral templates. The second major finding is that the relaxed circular intermediate model proposed for the replication of UV-damaged templates in untreated cells appears valid for replication of UV-damaged templates in carcinogen-treated cells. Possible mechanisms and the supporting evidence are discussed and future experiments outlined.

  16. Are viruses alive? The replicator paradigm sheds decisive light on an old but misguided question.

    PubMed

    Koonin, Eugene V; Starokadomskyy, Petro

    2016-10-01

    The question whether or not "viruses are alive" has caused considerable debate over many years. Yet, the question is effectively without substance because the answer depends entirely on the definition of life or the state of "being alive" that is bound to be arbitrary. In contrast, the status of viruses among biological entities is readily defined within the replicator paradigm. All biological replicators form a continuum along the selfishness-cooperativity axis, from the completely selfish to fully cooperative forms. Within this range, typical, lytic viruses represent the selfish extreme whereas temperate viruses and various mobile elements occupy positions closer to the middle of the range. Selfish replicators not only belong to the biological realm but are intrinsic to any evolving system of replicators. No such system can evolve without the emergence of parasites, and moreover, parasites drive the evolution of biological complexity at multiple levels. The history of life is a story of parasite-host coevolution that includes both the incessant arms race and various forms of cooperation. All organisms are communities of interacting, coevolving replicators of different classes. A complete theory of replicator coevolution remains to be developed, but it appears likely that not only the differentiation between selfish and cooperative replicators but the emergence of the entire range of replication strategies, from selfish to cooperative, is intrinsic to biological evolution.

  17. Dissociation between lymphoproliferative responses and virus replication in mice with different sensitivities to retrovirus-induced immunodeficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Pozsgay, J M; Reid, S; Pitha, P M

    1993-01-01

    Murine AIDS (MAIDS) is induced by a replication-defective virus (BM5d). In susceptible mice (C57BL/6J), inoculation with LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus, which consists of the BM5d virus and replication-competent B-tropic ecotropic (BM5e) and milk cell focus-inducing (BM5-MCF) helper viruses results in the polyclonal proliferation of T and B cells, immunodeficiency, and the expansion of B cells containing the BM5d provirus followed by the development of B-cell lymphomas. Several strains of mice that are resistant to LP-BM5-induced murine AIDS have been identified, and major histocompatibility complex genes as well as non-major histocompatibility complex genes were shown to play a role in this resistance. In the present study, we have examined and compared the replication of the BM5d and BM5e viruses after inoculation of LP-BM5 into sensitive (C57BL/6J) and resistant (C57BL/KSJ) mice. Using a specific polymerase chain reaction, we could detect the BM5d and BM5e proviruses as early as 1 week postinfection in the sensitive mice, and the levels of both viruses increased significantly with the progression of the disease. In contrast, in the resistant C57BL/KSJ mice, replication of BM5d and BM5e was restricted and no BM5d and only very low levels of the BM5e provirus could be detected either at early or late times postinoculation with the LP-BM5 virus mixture. Inoculation with LP-BM5 did not lead to the production of antibodies that could recognize the BM5d-encoded Pr60gag in either the sensitive or resistant mice; however, production of antibodies recognizing the env-related proteins of the helper virus was detected in the resistant but not in the sensitive mice at late times postinfection. Interestingly, inoculation with LP-BM5 increased polyclonal stimulation of spleen cells and decreased mitogen stimulation in both strains of mice. This stimulation of splenocytes persisted in the sensitive mice but decreased after a few weeks in the resistant mice. These results show an

  18. MicroRNA-23b Promotes Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J (ALV-J) Replication by Targeting IRF1.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhui; Chen, Biao; Feng, Min; Ouyang, Hongjia; Zheng, Ming; Ye, Qiao; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2015-05-18

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) can cause several different leukemia-like proliferative diseases in the hemopoietic system of chickens. Here, we investigated the transcriptome profiles and miRNA expression profiles of ALV-J-infected and uninfected chicken spleens to identify the genes and miRNAs related to ALV-J invasion. In total, 252 genes and 167 miRNAs were differentially expressed in ALV-J-infected spleens compared to control uninfected spleens. miR-23b expression was up-regulated in ALV-J-infected spleens compared with the control spleens, and transcriptome analysis revealed that the expression of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) was down-regulated in ALV-J-infected spleens compared to uninfected spleens. A dual-luciferase reporter assay showed that IRF1 was a direct target of miR-23b. miR-23b overexpression significantly (P = 0.0022) decreased IRF1 mRNA levels and repressed IRF1-3'-UTR reporter activity. In vitro experiments revealed that miR-23b overexpression strengthened ALV-J replication, whereas miR-23b loss of function inhibited ALV-J replication. IRF1 overexpression inhibited ALV-J replication, and IRF1 knockdown enhanced ALV-J replication. Moreover, IRF1 overexpression significantly (P = 0.0014) increased IFN-β expression. In conclusion, these results suggested that miR-23b may play an important role in ALV-J replication by targeting IRF1.

  19. MicroRNA-23b Promotes Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J (ALV-J) Replication by Targeting IRF1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenhui; Chen, Biao; Feng, Min; Ouyang, Hongjia; Zheng, Ming; Ye, Qiao; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2015-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) can cause several different leukemia-like proliferative diseases in the hemopoietic system of chickens. Here, we investigated the transcriptome profiles and miRNA expression profiles of ALV-J-infected and uninfected chicken spleens to identify the genes and miRNAs related to ALV-J invasion. In total, 252 genes and 167 miRNAs were differentially expressed in ALV-J-infected spleens compared to control uninfected spleens. miR-23b expression was up-regulated in ALV-J-infected spleens compared with the control spleens, and transcriptome analysis revealed that the expression of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) was down-regulated in ALV-J-infected spleens compared to uninfected spleens. A dual-luciferase reporter assay showed that IRF1 was a direct target of miR-23b. miR-23b overexpression significantly (P = 0.0022) decreased IRF1 mRNA levels and repressed IRF1-3′-UTR reporter activity. In vitro experiments revealed that miR-23b overexpression strengthened ALV-J replication, whereas miR-23b loss of function inhibited ALV-J replication. IRF1 overexpression inhibited ALV-J replication, and IRF1 knockdown enhanced ALV-J replication. Moreover, IRF1 overexpression significantly (P = 0.0014) increased IFN-β expression. In conclusion, these results suggested that miR-23b may play an important role in ALV-J replication by targeting IRF1. PMID:25980475

  20. DNA tumor viruses: Control of gene expression and replication

    SciTech Connect

    Botchan, M.; Grodzicker, T.; Sharp, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains eight sections, each consisting of several papers. The sections are: Introduction, Transcription; Regulation of Transcription; RNA Processing and Translation; Transformation; Transforming Proteins; Replication; and Papillomaviruses.

  1. Development of an in vitro infectivity assay for the C-type bovine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, J F; Diglio, C A

    1976-03-01

    The ability of the bovine C-type leukemia virus to induce syncytia formation in monolayer cell cultures has been used to develop a specific and simple infectivity assay for the virus. Using bovine embryonic spleen cells or human diploid embryonic lung cells as indicator cells, the results of the assay can be evaluated in 4 to 6 or 6 to 8 days, respectively. Pretreatment of the indicator cells with DEAE-dextran greatly increases the sensitivity of the assay. The assay is quantitative and can be applied as a direct method for the identification of bovine C-type leukemia virus-infected animals; it also provides a simple, and sensitive procedure for the detection and titration of virus-neutralizing antibodies.

  2. Frequency and significance of feline leukemia virus infection in necropsied cats.

    PubMed

    Reinacher, M; Theilen, G

    1987-06-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection was diagnosed immunohistologically on paraffin-embedded tissues obtained from 1,095 necropsied cats. Significant association of FeLV infection was demonstrated by chi 2 and Fisher's tests with various conditions and diseases (ie, anemia, tumors of the leukemia/lymphoma complex, feline infectious peritonitis, bacterial infections, emaciation, FeLV-associated enteritis, lymphatic hyperplasia, and hemorrhage). Unexpected findings associated with FeLV infection were icterus, several types of hepatitis, and liver degeneration. A negative association with FeLV infection was found for most parasitic and viral infections, including feline panleukopenia. Neither positive nor negative associations were established for FeLV infection and most forms of nephritis, including severe glomerulonephritis. Feline leukemia virus-infected cats were significantly (Kruskal-Wallis test) older than were FeLV-negative cats with the same nonneoplastic FeLV-associated diseases. PMID:3037951

  3. Further Evidence that Human Endogenous Retrovirus K102 is a Replication Competent Foamy Virus that may Antagonize HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Laderoute, Marian P.; Larocque, Louise J.; Giulivi, Antonio; Diaz-Mitoma, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The goals of the research were to determine if a foamy effect on macrophages was due to human endogenous retrovirus K102 (HERV-K102) replication, and to further address its potential significance in HIV-1 infection. Methods: An RT-PCR HERV-K HML-2 pol method was used to screen the unknown HERV, and isolated bands were sent for sequencing. Confirmation of RNA expression was performed by a real time quantitative PCR (qPCR) pol ddCt method. Rabbit antibodies to Env peptides were used to assess expression by immunohistology and processing of Env by western blots. A qPCR pol ddCt method to ascertain genomic copy number was performed on genomic DNA isolated from plasma comparing HIV-1 exposed seronegative (HESN) commercial sex workers (CSW) to normal controls and contrasted with HIV-1 patients. Results: HERV-K102 expression, particle production and replication were associated with foamy macrophage generation in the cultures of cord blood mononuclear cells under permissive conditions. A five-fold increased HERV-K102 pol genomic copy number was found in the HESN cohort over normal which was not found in HIV-1 positive patients (p=0.0005). Conclusions: This work extends the evidence that HERV-K102 has foamy virus attributes, is replication competent, and is capable of high replication rate in vivo and in vitro. This may be the first characterization of a replication-competent, foamy-like virus of humans. High particle production inferred by increased integration in the HESN cohort over HIV-1 patients raises the issue of the clinical importance of HERV-K102 particle production as an early protective innate immune response against HIV-1 replication. PMID:26793281

  4. Influenza virus neuraminidase contributes to the dextran sulfate-dependent suppressive replication of some influenza A virus strains.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hiroshi; Moriishi, Eiko; Haredy, Ahmad M; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Mori, Yasuko; Yamanishi, Koichi; Okamoto, Shigefumi

    2012-12-01

    Dextran sulfate (DS), a negatively charged, sulfated polysaccharide, suppresses the replication of an influenza A virus strain, and this suppression is associated with inhibition of the hemagglutinin (HA)-dependent fusion activity. However, it remains unknown whether the replication of all or just some influenza A virus strains is suppressed by DS, or whether HA is the only target for the replication suppression. In the present study, we found that DS inhibited the replication of some, but not all influenza A virus strains. The suppression in the DS-sensitive strains was dose-dependent and neutralized by diethylaminoethyl-dextran (DD), which has a positive charge. The suppression by DS was observed not only at the initial stage of viral infection, which includes viral attachment and entry, but also at the late stage, which includes virus assembly and release from infected cells. Electron microscopy revealed that the DS induced viral aggregation at the cell surface. The neuraminidase (NA) activity of the strains whose viral replication was inhibited at the late stage was also more suppressed by DS than that of the strains whose replication was not inhibited, and this inhibition of NA activity was also neutralized by adding positively charged DD. Furthermore, we found that replacing the NA gene of a strain in which viral replication was inhibited by DS at the late stage with the NA gene from a strain in which viral replication was not inhibited, eliminated the DS-dependent suppression. These results suggest that the influenza virus NA contributes to the DS-suppressible virus release from infected cells at the late stage, and the suppression may involve the inhibition of NA activity by DS's negative charge.

  5. Bovine Leukemia Virus Seroprevalence Among Cattle Presented for Slaughter in the United States of America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection with bovine leukemia virus (BLV) results in economic loss due reduced productivity, especially the reduction of milk production and early culling. In the USA.,USA, previous studies in 1996, 1999 and 2007 showed BLV infections widespread, especially in the dairy herds. The goal of this stud...

  6. A chimeric measles virus with a lentiviral envelope replicates exclusively in CD4+/CCR5+ cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mourez, Thomas; Mesel-Lemoine, Mariana; Combredet, Chantal; Najburg, Valerie; Cayet, Nadege; Tangy, Frederic

    2011-10-25

    We generated a replicating chimeric measles virus in which the hemagglutinin and fusion surface glycoproteins were replaced with the gp160 envelope glycoprotein of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac239). Based on a previously cloned live-attenuated Schwarz vaccine strain of measles virus (MV), this chimera was rescued at high titers using reverse genetics in CD4+ target cells. Cytopathic effect consisted in the presence of large cell aggregates evolving to form syncytia, as observed during SIV infection. The morphology of the chimeric virus was identical to that of the parent MV particles. The presence of SIV gp160 as the only envelope protein on chimeric particles surface altered the cell tropism of the new virus from CD46+ to CD4+ cells. Used as an HIV candidate vaccine, this MV/SIVenv chimeric virus would mimic transient HIV-like infection, benefiting both from HIV-like tropism and the capacity of MV to replicate in dendritic cells, macrophages and lymphocytes.

  7. Identification and characterization of the role of c-terminal Src kinase in dengue virus replication.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rinki; Agrawal, Tanvi; Khan, Naseem Ahmed; Nakayama, Yuji; Medigeshi, Guruprasad R

    2016-01-01

    We screened a siRNA library targeting human tyrosine kinases in Huh-7 cells and identified c-terminal Src kinase (Csk) as one of the kinases involved in dengue virus replication. Knock-down of Csk expression by siRNAs or inhibition of Csk by an inhibitor reduced dengue virus RNA levels but did not affect viral entry. Csk partially colocalized with viral replication compartments. Dengue infection was drastically reduced in cells lacking the three ubiquitous src family kinases, Src, Fyn and Yes. Csk knock-down in these cells failed to block dengue virus replication suggesting that the effect of Csk is via regulation of Src family kinases. Csk was found to be hyper-phosphorylated during dengue infection and inhibition of protein kinase A led to a block in Csk phosphorylation and dengue virus replication. Overexpression studies suggest an important role for the kinase and SH3 domains in this process. Our results identified a novel role for Csk as a host tyrosine kinase involved in dengue virus replication and provide further insights into the role of host factors in dengue replication. PMID:27457684

  8. Identification and characterization of the role of c-terminal Src kinase in dengue virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rinki; Agrawal, Tanvi; Khan, Naseem Ahmed; Nakayama, Yuji; Medigeshi, Guruprasad R.

    2016-01-01

    We screened a siRNA library targeting human tyrosine kinases in Huh-7 cells and identified c-terminal Src kinase (Csk) as one of the kinases involved in dengue virus replication. Knock-down of Csk expression by siRNAs or inhibition of Csk by an inhibitor reduced dengue virus RNA levels but did not affect viral entry. Csk partially colocalized with viral replication compartments. Dengue infection was drastically reduced in cells lacking the three ubiquitous src family kinases, Src, Fyn and Yes. Csk knock-down in these cells failed to block dengue virus replication suggesting that the effect of Csk is via regulation of Src family kinases. Csk was found to be hyper-phosphorylated during dengue infection and inhibition of protein kinase A led to a block in Csk phosphorylation and dengue virus replication. Overexpression studies suggest an important role for the kinase and SH3 domains in this process. Our results identified a novel role for Csk as a host tyrosine kinase involved in dengue virus replication and provide further insights into the role of host factors in dengue replication. PMID:27457684

  9. Detection, purification, and characterization of two species of covalently closed circular proviral DNA molecules of bovine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Kashmiri, S V; Mehdi, R; Ferrer, J F

    1983-01-01

    Cocultivation of uninfected and bovine leukemia virus-producing bat cells yielded, in addition to the unintegrated linear DNA duplex, DNA molecules that migrated as 4.4- and 4.8-kilobase-pair DNA fragments in gel electrophoresis. These DNA molecules were purified by acid-phenol extraction and cleaved with restriction endonucleases EcoRI, and HindIII, which have one recognition site each on the bovine leukemia virus proviral DNA. Such cleavage generated DNA molecules of approximately 10.0 and 9.4 kilobase pairs, thus indicating the existence of two species of covalently closed circular molecules of bovine leukemia virus proviral DNA. Images PMID:6300454

  10. Identification of Epstein-Barr Virus Replication Proteins in Burkitt's Lymphoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Traylen, Chris; Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Zuo, Jianmin; Rowe, Martin; Almohammad, Rajaei; Heesom, Kate; Sweet, Steve M M; Matthews, David A; Sinclair, Alison J

    2015-01-01

    The working model to describe the mechanisms used to replicate the cancer-associated virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is partly derived from comparisons with other members of the Herpes virus family. Many genes within the EBV genome are homologous across the herpes virus family. Published transcriptome data for the EBV genome during its lytic replication cycle show extensive transcription, but the identification of the proteins is limited. We have taken a global proteomics approach to identify viral proteins that are expressed during the EBV lytic replication cycle. We combined an enrichment method to isolate cells undergoing EBV lytic replication with SILAC-labeling coupled to mass-spectrometry and identified viral and host proteins expressed during the OPEN ACCESS Pathogens 2015, 4 740 EBV lytic replication cycle. Amongst the most frequently identified viral proteins are two components of the DNA replication machinery, the single strand DNA binding protein BALF2, DNA polymerase accessory protein BMRF1 and both subunits of the viral ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase enzyme (BORF2 and BaRF1). An additional 42 EBV lytic cycle proteins were also detected. This provides proteomic identification for many EBV lytic replication cycle proteins and also identifies post-translational modifications. PMID:26529022

  11. Tomato yellow leaf curl virus: No evidence for replication in the insect vector Bemisia tabaci

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Campos, Sonia; Rodríguez-Negrete, Edgar A.; Cruzado, Lucía; Grande-Pérez, Ana; Bejarano, Eduardo R.; Navas-Castillo, Jesús; Moriones, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Begomovirus ssDNA plant virus (family Geminiviridae) replication within the Bemisia tabaci vector is controversial. Transovarial transmission, alteration to whitefly biology, or detection of viral transcripts in the vector are proposed as indirect evidence of replication of tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV). Recently, contrasting direct evidence has been reported regarding the capacity of TYLCV to replicate within individuals of B. tabaci based on quantitave PCR approaches. Time-course experiments to quantify complementary and virion sense viral nucleic acid accumulation within B. tabaci using a recently implemented two step qPCR procedure revealed that viral DNA quantities did not increase for time points up to 96 hours after acquisition of the virus. Our findings do not support a recent report claiming TYLCV replication in individuals of B. tabaci. PMID:27476582

  12. Tomato yellow leaf curl virus: No evidence for replication in the insect vector Bemisia tabaci.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Campos, Sonia; Rodríguez-Negrete, Edgar A; Cruzado, Lucía; Grande-Pérez, Ana; Bejarano, Eduardo R; Navas-Castillo, Jesús; Moriones, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Begomovirus ssDNA plant virus (family Geminiviridae) replication within the Bemisia tabaci vector is controversial. Transovarial transmission, alteration to whitefly biology, or detection of viral transcripts in the vector are proposed as indirect evidence of replication of tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV). Recently, contrasting direct evidence has been reported regarding the capacity of TYLCV to replicate within individuals of B. tabaci based on quantitave PCR approaches. Time-course experiments to quantify complementary and virion sense viral nucleic acid accumulation within B. tabaci using a recently implemented two step qPCR procedure revealed that viral DNA quantities did not increase for time points up to 96 hours after acquisition of the virus. Our findings do not support a recent report claiming TYLCV replication in individuals of B. tabaci. PMID:27476582

  13. Flexibility of NS5 Methyltransferase-Polymerase Linker Region Is Essential for Dengue Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yongqian; Soh, Tingjin Sherryl; Chan, Kitti Wing Ki; Fung, Sarah Suet Yin; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Lim, Siew Pheng; Shi, Pei-Yong; Huber, Thomas; Lescar, Julien

    2015-01-01

    We examined the function of the conserved Val/Ile residue within the dengue virus NS5 interdomain linker (residues 263 to 272) by site-directed mutagenesis. Gly substitution or Gly/Pro insertion after the conserved residue increased the linker flexibility and created slightly attenuated viruses. In contrast, Pro substitution abolished virus replication by imposing rigidity in the linker and restricting NS5's conformational plasticity. Our biochemical and reverse genetics experiments demonstrate that NS5 utilizes conformational regulation to achieve optimum viral replication. PMID:26269182

  14. Enhanced replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.S.; Smith, K.O. )

    1991-02-01

    The effects of DNA-damaging agents on the replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) were assessed in vitro. Monolayers of human lung fibroblast cell lines were exposed to DNA-damaging agents (methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), methyl methanethiosulfonate (MMTS), ultraviolet light (UV), or gamma radiation (GR)) at specific intervals, before or after inoculation with low levels of HSV-1. The ability of cell monolayers to support HSV-1 replication was measured by direct plaque assay and was compared with that of untreated control samples. In this system, monolayers of different cell lines infected with identical HSV-1 strains demonstrated dissimilar levels of recovery of the infectious virus. Exposure of DNA-repair-competent cell cultures to DNA-damaging agents produced time-dependent enhanced virus replication. Treatment with agent before virus inoculation significantly (p less than 0.025) increased the number of plaques by 10 to 68%, compared with untreated control cultures, while treatment with agent after virus adsorption significantly increased (p less than 0.025) the number of plaques by 7 to 15%. In a parallel series of experiments, cells deficient in DNA repair (xeroderma pigmentosum) failed to support enhanced virus replication. These results suggest that after exposure to DNA-damaging agents, fibroblasts competent in DNA repair amplify the replication of HSV-1, and that DNA-repair mechanisms that act on a variety of chromosomal lesions may be involved in the repair and biological activation of HSV-1 genomes.

  15. Targeting Cell Division Cycle 25 Homolog B To Regulate Influenza Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Perwitasari, Olivia; Torrecilhas, Ana Claudia; Yan, Xiuzhen; Johnson, Scott; White, Caleb; Tompkins, S. Mark

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus is a worldwide global health concern causing seasonal morbidity mortality and economic burden. Chemotherapeutics is available; however, rapid emergence of drug-resistant influenza virus strains has reduced its efficacy. Thus, there is a need to discover novel antiviral agents. In this study, RNA interference (RNAi) was used to screen host genes required for influenza virus replication. One pro-influenza virus host gene identified was dual-specificity phosphatase cell division cycle 25 B (CDC25B). RNAi screening of CDC25B resulted in reduced influenza A virus replication, and a CDC25B small-molecule inhibitor (NSC95397) inhibited influenza A virus replication in a dose-dependent fashion. Viral RNA synthesis was reduced by NSC95397 in favor of increased beta interferon (IFN-β) expression, and NSC95397 was found to interfere with nuclear localization and chromatin association of NS1, an influenza virus protein. As NS1 has been shown to be chromatin associated and to suppress host transcription, it is likely that CDC25B supports NS1 nuclear function to hijack host transcription machinery in favor of viral RNA synthesis, a process that is blocked by NSC95397. Importantly, NSC95397 treatment protects mice against lethal influenza virus challenge. The findings establish CDC25B as a pro-influenza A virus host factor that may be targeted as a novel influenza A therapeutic strategy. PMID:24109234

  16. Targeting cell division cycle 25 homolog B to regulate influenza virus replication.

    PubMed

    Perwitasari, Olivia; Torrecilhas, Ana Claudia; Yan, Xiuzhen; Johnson, Scott; White, Caleb; Tompkins, S Mark; Tripp, Ralph A

    2013-12-01

    Influenza virus is a worldwide global health concern causing seasonal morbidity mortality and economic burden. Chemotherapeutics is available; however, rapid emergence of drug-resistant influenza virus strains has reduced its efficacy. Thus, there is a need to discover novel antiviral agents. In this study, RNA interference (RNAi) was used to screen host genes required for influenza virus replication. One pro-influenza virus host gene identified was dual-specificity phosphatase cell division cycle 25 B (CDC25B). RNAi screening of CDC25B resulted in reduced influenza A virus replication, and a CDC25B small-molecule inhibitor (NSC95397) inhibited influenza A virus replication in a dose-dependent fashion. Viral RNA synthesis was reduced by NSC95397 in favor of increased beta interferon (IFN-β) expression, and NSC95397 was found to interfere with nuclear localization and chromatin association of NS1, an influenza virus protein. As NS1 has been shown to be chromatin associated and to suppress host transcription, it is likely that CDC25B supports NS1 nuclear function to hijack host transcription machinery in favor of viral RNA synthesis, a process that is blocked by NSC95397. Importantly, NSC95397 treatment protects mice against lethal influenza virus challenge. The findings establish CDC25B as a pro-influenza A virus host factor that may be targeted as a novel influenza A therapeutic strategy.

  17. Ebola virus VP40 late domains are not essential for viral replication in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Gabriele; Ebihara, Hideki; Takada, Ayato; Noda, Takeshi; Kobasa, Darwyn; Jasenosky, Luke D; Watanabe, Shinji; Kim, Jin H; Feldmann, Heinz; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2005-08-01

    Ebola virus particle formation and budding are mediated by the VP40 protein, which possesses overlapping PTAP and PPXY late domain motifs (7-PTAPPXY-13). These late domain motifs have also been found in the Gag proteins of retroviruses and the matrix proteins of rhabdo- and arenaviruses. While in vitro studies suggest a critical role for late domain motifs in the budding of these viruses, including Ebola virus, it remains unclear as to whether the VP40 late domains play a role in Ebola virus replication. Alteration of both late domain motifs drastically reduced VP40 particle formation in vitro. However, using reverse genetics, we were able to generate recombinant Ebola virus containing mutations in either or both of the late domains. Viruses containing mutations in one or both of their late domain motifs were attenuated by one log unit. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy did not reveal appreciable differences between the mutant and wild-type viruses released from infected cells. These findings indicate that the Ebola VP40 late domain motifs enhance virus replication but are not absolutely required for virus replication in cell culture. PMID:16051823

  18. Prevalence of feline leukemia virus and antibodies to feline immunodeficiency virus in cats in Norway.

    PubMed

    Ueland, K; Lutz, H

    1992-02-01

    Serum samples from 224 Norwegian cats were analyzed for the presence of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) p27 common core antigen, and for antibodies to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). Ninety specimens originated from the serum bank at the central referral clinic at the Norwegian College of Veterinary Medicine, which had been collected during the years 1983-1989; 67 sera were submitted from veterinarian practitioners; while 67 sera originated from cats presented for euthanasia. The cats were classified into one "healthy" and one "sick" group. Only 2.2% of sick cats and 1.2% of healthy cats showed FeLV antigenemia, a finding which is lower than which has been reported from many other countries. The prevalence of FIV antibodies was 10.1% in sick cats and 5.9% in healthy cats. Antibodies to FIV was most prevalent in male cats (14.7%) than in female cats (2.1%), and more prevalent among domestic cats (12.0%) compared to pedigree cats (2.4%). Antibodies to FIV in the cats demonstrated increasing prevalence with increasing age. It may be concluded that FeLV causes minor problems in Norwegian cats, while FIV is present in a similar prevalence to what is reported from other countries. PMID:1316024

  19. Seroprevalence of bovine immunodeficiency virus and bovine leukemia virus in draught animals in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Meas, S; Ohashi, K; Tum, S; Chhin, M; Te, K; Miura, K; Sugimoto, C; Onuma, M

    2000-07-01

    Since bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV), known as bovine lentivirus, has been detected in dairy and beef cattle in various countries around the world, a prevalence study of antibodies to BIV and bovine leukemia virus (BLV) was conducted in draught animals in five provinces in Cambodia, where protozoan parasite infections were suspected in some animals. To clarify the status of draught animals including Haryana, Brahman, mixed-breed, local breed cattle and muscle water buffaloes, a total of 544 cattle and 42 buffaloes were tested, and 26.3 and 16.7%, respectively, were found positive for anti-BIV p26 antibodies determined by Western blotting. There were 5.3% positive for anti-BLV antibodies detected by immunodiffusion test among the cattle, but no reactors among buffaloes and no dual infection for both BIV and BLV was determined in this study. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from BIV-seropositive cattle were found to have BIV-provirus DNA, as detected by polymerase chain reaction and subsequent Southern blot hybridization. This is the first evidence for the presence of BIV and BLV infections in draught animals in tropical countries such as Cambodia. This wide distribution of BIV suggests its association with problems in animal health as reported worldwide, and that a primary BIV infection can predispose death of affected animals by other aggressive pathogens or stresses.

  20. Modulation of Hepatitis C Virus Genome Replication by Glycosphingolipids and Four-Phosphate Adaptor Protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Irfan; Katikaneni, Divya S.; Han, Qingxia; Sanchez-Felipe, Lorena; Hanada, Kentaro; Ambrose, Rebecca L.; Mackenzie, Jason M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) assembles its replication complex on cytosolic membrane vesicles often clustered in a membranous web (MW). During infection, HCV NS5A protein activates PI4KIIIα enzyme, causing massive production and redistribution of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P) lipid to the replication complex. However, the role of PI4P in the HCV life cycle is not well understood. We postulated that PI4P recruits host effectors to modulate HCV genome replication or virus particle production. To test this hypothesis, we generated cell lines for doxycycline-inducible expression of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) targeting the PI4P effector, four-phosphate adaptor protein 2 (FAPP2). FAPP2 depletion attenuated HCV infectivity and impeded HCV RNA synthesis. Indeed, FAPP2 has two functional lipid-binding domains specific for PI4P and glycosphingolipids. While expression of the PI4P-binding mutant protein was expected to inhibit HCV replication, a marked drop in replication efficiency was observed unexpectedly with the glycosphingolipid-binding mutant protein. These data suggest that both domains are crucial for the role of FAPP2 in HCV genome replication. We also found that HCV significantly increases the level of some glycosphingolipids, whereas adding these lipids to FAPP2-depleted cells partially rescued replication, further arguing for the importance of glycosphingolipids in HCV RNA synthesis. Interestingly, FAPP2 is redistributed to the replication complex (RC) characterized by HCV NS5A, NS4B, or double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) foci. Additionally, FAPP2 depletion disrupts the RC and alters the colocalization of HCV replicase proteins. Altogether, our study implies that HCV coopts FAPP2 for virus genome replication via PI4P binding and glycosphingolipid transport to the HCV RC. IMPORTANCE Like most viruses with a positive-sense RNA genome, HCV replicates its RNA on remodeled host membranes composed of lipids hijacked from various internal membrane compartments

  1. Early apoptosis of porcine alveolar macrophages limits avian influenza virus replication and pro-inflammatory dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pengxiang; Kuchipudi, Suresh V; Mellits, Kenneth H; Sebastian, Sujith; James, Joe; Liu, Jinhua; Shelton, Holly; Chang, Kin-Chow

    2015-01-01

    Pigs are evidently more resistant to avian than swine influenza A viruses, mediated in part through frontline epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages (AM). Although porcine AM (PAM) are crucial in influenza virus control, their mode of control is unclear. To gain insight into the possible role of PAM in the mediation of avian influenza virus resistance, we compared the host effects and replication of two avian (H2N3 and H6N1) and three mammalian (swine H1N1, human H1N1 and pandemic H1N1) influenza viruses in PAM. We found that PAM were readily susceptible to initial infection with all five avian and mammalian influenza viruses but only avian viruses caused early and extensive apoptosis (by 6 h of infection) resulting in reduced virus progeny and moderated pro-inflammation. Full length viral PB1-F2 present only in avian influenza viruses is a virulence factor that targets AM for mitochondrial-associated apoptotic cell death. With the use of reverse genetics on an avian H5N1 virus, we found that full length PB1-F2 contributed to increased apoptosis and pro-inflammation but not to reduced virus replication. Taken together, we propose that early apoptosis of PAM limits the spread of avian influenza viruses and that PB1-F2 could play a contributory role in the process. PMID:26642934

  2. Early apoptosis of porcine alveolar macrophages limits avian influenza virus replication and pro-inflammatory dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pengxiang; Kuchipudi, Suresh V.; Mellits, Kenneth H.; Sebastian, Sujith; James, Joe; Liu, Jinhua; Shelton, Holly; Chang, Kin-Chow

    2015-01-01

    Pigs are evidently more resistant to avian than swine influenza A viruses, mediated in part through frontline epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages (AM). Although porcine AM (PAM) are crucial in influenza virus control, their mode of control is unclear. To gain insight into the possible role of PAM in the mediation of avian influenza virus resistance, we compared the host effects and replication of two avian (H2N3 and H6N1) and three mammalian (swine H1N1, human H1N1 and pandemic H1N1) influenza viruses in PAM. We found that PAM were readily susceptible to initial infection with all five avian and mammalian influenza viruses but only avian viruses caused early and extensive apoptosis (by 6 h of infection) resulting in reduced virus progeny and moderated pro-inflammation. Full length viral PB1-F2 present only in avian influenza viruses is a virulence factor that targets AM for mitochondrial-associated apoptotic cell death. With the use of reverse genetics on an avian H5N1 virus, we found that full length PB1-F2 contributed to increased apoptosis and pro-inflammation but not to reduced virus replication. Taken together, we propose that early apoptosis of PAM limits the spread of avian influenza viruses and that PB1-F2 could play a contributory role in the process. PMID:26642934

  3. Interactome Analysis of the Influenza A Virus Transcription/Replication Machinery Identifies Protein Phosphatase 6 as a Cellular Factor Required for Efficient Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    York, Ashley; Hutchinson, Edward C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The negative-sense RNA genome of influenza A virus is transcribed and replicated by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP). The viral RdRP is an important host range determinant, indicating that its function is affected by interactions with cellular factors. However, the identities and the roles of most of these factors remain unknown. Here, we employed affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry to identify cellular proteins that interact with the influenza A virus RdRP in infected human cells. We purified RdRPs using a recombinant influenza virus in which the PB2 subunit of the RdRP is fused to a Strep-tag. When this tagged subunit was purified from infected cells, copurifying proteins included the other RdRP subunits (PB1 and PA) and the viral nucleoprotein and neuraminidase, as well as 171 cellular proteins. Label-free quantitative mass spectrometry revealed that the most abundant of these host proteins were chaperones, cytoskeletal proteins, importins, proteins involved in ubiquitination, kinases and phosphatases, and mitochondrial and ribosomal proteins. Among the phosphatases, we identified three subunits of the cellular serine/threonine protein phosphatase 6 (PP6), including the catalytic subunit PPP6C and regulatory subunits PPP6R1 and PPP6R3. PP6 was found to interact directly with the PB1 and PB2 subunits of the viral RdRP, and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of the catalytic subunit of PP6 in infected cells resulted in the reduction of viral RNA accumulation and the attenuation of virus growth. These results suggest that PP6 interacts with and positively regulates the activity of the influenza virus RdRP. IMPORTANCE Influenza A viruses are serious clinical and veterinary pathogens, causing substantial health and economic impacts. In addition to annual seasonal epidemics, occasional global pandemics occur when viral strains adapt to humans from other species. To replicate efficiently and cause disease, influenza

  4. Detection of virus-specific RNA in simian sarcoma-leukemia virus-infected cells in in situ hybridization to viral complementary DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, S L; Gallo, R C; Miller, N R

    1979-01-01

    An in situ molecular hybridization system which will detect retrovirus RNA in the cytoplasm of individual virus-infected cells has been developed. The technique was applied to cells infected with simian sarcoma-leukemia virus, where the virus-specific RNA was detected by hybridization to simian sarcoma-leukemia virus 3H-labeled complementary DNA. The system is useful for detecting viral RNA-containing cells in the presence of an excess of virus-negative cells and for determining which type of cell in a heterogenous population is expressing viral RNA. Images PMID:224220

  5. The cell biology of Tobacco mosaic virus replication and movement.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengke; Nelson, Richard S

    2013-01-01

    Successful systemic infection of a plant by Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) requires three processes that repeat over time: initial establishment and accumulation in invaded cells, intercellular movement, and systemic transport. Accumulation and intercellular movement of TMV necessarily involves intracellular transport by complexes containing virus and host proteins and virus RNA during a dynamic process that can be visualized. Multiple membranes appear to assist TMV accumulation, while membranes, microfilaments and microtubules appear to assist TMV movement. Here we review cell biological studies that describe TMV-membrane, -cytoskeleton, and -other host protein interactions which influence virus accumulation and movement in leaves and callus tissue. The importance of understanding the developmental phase of the infection in relationship to the observed virus-membrane or -host protein interaction is emphasized. Utilizing the latest observations of TMV-membrane and -host protein interactions within our evolving understanding of the infection ontogeny, a model for TMV accumulation and intracellular spread in a cell biological context is provided.

  6. Virus and Cell RNAs Expressed during Epstein-Barr Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jing; Cahir-McFarland, Ellen; Zhao, Bo; Kieff, Elliott

    2006-01-01

    Changes in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cell RNA levels were assayed following immunoglobulin G (IgG) cross-linking-induced replication in latency 1-infected Akata Burkitt B lymphoblasts. EBV replication as assayed by membrane gp350 expression was ∼5% before IgG cross-linking and increased to more than 50% 48 h after induction. Seventy-two hours after IgG cross-linking, gp350-positive cells excluded propidium iodide as well as gp350-negative cells. EBV RNA levels changed temporally in parallel with previously defined sensitivity to inhibitors of protein or viral DNA synthesis. BZLF1 immediate-early RNA levels doubled by 2 h and reached a peak at 4 h, whereas BMLF1 doubled by 4 h with a peak at 8 h, and BRLF1 doubled by 8 h with peak at 12 h. Early RNAs peaked at 8 to 12 h, and late RNAs peaked at 24 h. Hybridization to intergenic sequences resulted in evidence for new EBV RNAs. Surprisingly, latency III (LTIII) RNAs for LMP1, LMP2, EBNALP, EBNA2, EBNA3A, EBNA3C, and BARTs were detected at 8 to 12 h and reached maxima at 24 to 48 h. EBNA2 and LMP1 were at full LTIII levels by 48 h and localized to gp350-positive cells. Thus, LTIII expression is a characteristic of late EBV replication in both B lymphoblasts and epithelial cells in immune-comprised people (J. Webster-Cyriaque, J. Middeldorp, and N. Raab-Traub, J. Virol. 74:7610-7618, 2000). EBV replication significantly altered levels of 401 Akata cell RNAs, of which 122 RNAs changed twofold or more relative to uninfected Akata cells. Mitogen-activated protein kinase levels were significantly affected. Late expression of LTIII was associated with induction of NF-κB responsive genes including IκBα and A20. The exclusion of propidium, expression of EBV LTIII RNAs and proteins, and up-regulation of specific cell RNAs are indicative of vital cell function late in EBV replication. PMID:16474161

  7. Effects of chemical carcinogens on the susceptibility of C57BL/10 and (SJL/J x C57BL/10) F/sub 1/ hybrids to Friend leukemia virus

    SciTech Connect

    Raikow, R.B.; OKunewick, J.P.; Magliere, K.C.; Brozovich, B.J.; Seeman, P.R.

    1980-01-01

    Under normal circumstances cells of C57BL/10 mice are resistant to infection by Friend leukemia virus (FLV). Pre-treatment by chemical carcinogens does not affect the susceptibility of C57BL/10 mice to FLV leukemogenesis. However, immunosuppression by cyclophosphamide or a congenitally athymic condition allows the replication of the LLV component of FLV to take place in these mice. F1 hybrids between C57BL/10 and SJL/J mice are also resistant to virus, although about twenty percent of these hybrids develop leukemia after massive doses of FLV. Unexpectedly, the F1 hybrid with the virus-sensitive SJL/J mother was more resistant than the F1 hybrid from the reciprocal cross. Pre-treatment of the F1 hybrid or SJL/J mice with chemical carcinogens, such as methyl methane sulfonate and benzo(a)pyrene, but not cyclophosphamide, increased the incidence of leukemia with a peak of increased susceptibility developing at a specific time after treatment. A chemical carcinogen-caused depression of the viability of hematopoietic cells in the spleen, which cells are the major target for FLV oncogenesis, was also temporally related with the increase in susceptibility to the virus. Our data correlated with information on the alleles known to affect resistance to murine leukemia viruses.

  8. Replication of parainfluenza (Sendai) virus in isolated rat pulmonary type II alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Castleman, W. L.; Northrop, P. J.; McAllister, P. K.

    1989-01-01

    The major objectives of this study were to determine whether alveolar type II epithelial cells isolated from rat lung and maintained in tissue culture would support productive replication of parainfluenza type 1 (Sendai) virus and to determine whether isolated type II cells from neonatal (5-day-old) rats that are more susceptible to viral-induced alveolar dysplasia supported viral replication to a greater extent than those from weanling (25-day-old) rats. Isolated and cultured type II cells from neonatal and weanling rats that were inoculated with Sendai virus supported productive replication as indicated by ultrastructural identification of budding virions and viral nucleocapsids in type II cells and by demonstration of rising titers of infectious virus from inoculated type II cell cultures. Alveolar macrophages from neonatal and weanling rats also supported viral replication, although infectious viral titers in macrophage cultures were lower than those from type II cell cultures. Only minor differences were detected between viral titers from neonatal and weanling type II epithelial cell cultures. Higher densities of viral nucleocapsids were observed in neonatal type II cells than in those from weanling rats. The results indicate that isolated type II alveolar epithelial cells support productive replication of parainfluenza virus and that type II cells are probably more efficient in supporting productive viral replication than are alveolar macrophages. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2541612

  9. Influenza Virus Induces Inflammatory Response in Mouse Primary Cortical Neurons with Limited Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhiwu; Gu, Liming; Chen, Yanxia

    2016-01-01

    Unlike stereotypical neurotropic viruses, influenza A viruses have been detected in the brain tissues of human and animal models. To investigate the interaction between neurons and influenza A viruses, mouse cortical neurons were isolated, infected with human H1N1 influenza virus, and then examined for the production of various inflammatory molecules involved in immune response. We found that replication of the influenza virus in neurons was limited, although early viral transcription was not affected. Virus-induced neuron viability decreased at 6 h postinfection (p.i.) but increased at 24 h p.i. depending upon the viral strain. Virus-induced apoptosis and cytopathy in primary cortical neurons were not apparent at 24 h p.i. The mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and type I interferons were upregulated at 6 h and 24 h p.i. These results indicate that the influenza virus induces inflammatory response in mouse primary cortical neurons with limited viral replication. The cytokines released in viral infection-induced neuroinflammation might play critical roles in influenza encephalopathy, rather than in viral replication-induced cytopathy. PMID:27525278

  10. Influenza Virus Induces Inflammatory Response in Mouse Primary Cortical Neurons with Limited Viral Replication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gefei; Li, Rui; Jiang, Zhiwu; Gu, Liming; Chen, Yanxia; Dai, Jianping; Li, Kangsheng

    2016-01-01

    Unlike stereotypical neurotropic viruses, influenza A viruses have been detected in the brain tissues of human and animal models. To investigate the interaction between neurons and influenza A viruses, mouse cortical neurons were isolated, infected with human H1N1 influenza virus, and then examined for the production of various inflammatory molecules involved in immune response. We found that replication of the influenza virus in neurons was limited, although early viral transcription was not affected. Virus-induced neuron viability decreased at 6 h postinfection (p.i.) but increased at 24 h p.i. depending upon the viral strain. Virus-induced apoptosis and cytopathy in primary cortical neurons were not apparent at 24 h p.i. The mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and type I interferons were upregulated at 6 h and 24 h p.i. These results indicate that the influenza virus induces inflammatory response in mouse primary cortical neurons with limited viral replication. The cytokines released in viral infection-induced neuroinflammation might play critical roles in influenza encephalopathy, rather than in viral replication-induced cytopathy. PMID:27525278

  11. Use of simian virus 40 replication to amplify Epstein-Barr virus shuttle vectors in human cells.

    PubMed Central

    Heinzel, S S; Krysan, P J; Calos, M P; DuBridge, R B

    1988-01-01

    We have increased the copy number of Epstein-Barr virus vectors that also carry the origin of replication of simian virus 40 (SV40) by providing a transient dose of SV40 T antigen. T antigen was supplied in trans by transfection of a nonreplicating plasmid which expresses T antigen into cells carrying Epstein-Barr virus-SV40 vectors. A significant increase in vector copy number occurred over the next few days. We also observed a high frequency of intramolecular recombination when the vector carried a repeat segment in direct orientation, but not when the repeat was in inverted orientation or absent. Furthermore, by following the mutation frequency for a marker on the vector after induction of SV40 replication, it was determined that SV40 replication generates a detectable increase in the deletion frequency but no measurable increase in the frequency of point mutations. Images PMID:2843671

  12. Neuraminidase hemadsorption activity, conserved in avian influenza A viruses, does not influence viral replication in ducks.

    PubMed Central

    Kobasa, D; Rodgers, M E; Wells, K; Kawaoka, Y

    1997-01-01

    The N1 and N9 neuraminidase (NA) subtypes of influenza A viruses exhibit significant hemadsorption activity that localizes to a site distinct from that of the enzymatic active site. To determine the conservation of hemadsorption activity among different NAs, we have examined most of the NA subtypes from avian, swine, equine, and human virus isolates. All subtypes of avian virus NAs examined and one equine virus N8 NA possessed high levels of hemadsorption activity. A swine virus N1 NA exhibited only weak hemadsorption activity, while in human virus N1 and N2 NAs, the activity was detected at a much lower level than in avian virus NAs. NAs which possessed hemadsorption activity for chicken erythrocytes (RBCs) were similarly able to adsorb human RBCs. However, none of the hemadsorption-positive NAs could bind equine, swine, or bovine RBCs, suggesting that RBCs from these species lack molecules, recognized by the NA hemadsorption site, present on human and chicken RBCs. Mutagenesis of the putative hemadsorption site of A/duck/Hong Kong/7/75 N2 NA abolished the high level of hemadsorption activity exhibited by the wild-type protein but also resulted in a 50% reduction of the NA enzymatic activity. A transfectant virus, generated by reverse genetics, containing this mutated NA replicated 10-fold less efficiently in chicken embryo fibroblast cultures than did a transfectant virus expressing the wild-type NA. However, both viruses replicated equally well in Peking ducks. Although conservation of NA hemadsorption activity among avian virus NAs suggests the maintenance of a required function of NA, loss of the activity does not preclude the replication of the virus in an avian host. PMID:9261394

  13. Nigericin is a potent inhibitor of the early stage of vaccinia virus replication.

    PubMed

    Myskiw, Chad; Piper, Jessica; Huzarewich, Rhiannon; Booth, Tim F; Cao, Jingxin; He, Runtao

    2010-12-01

    Poxviruses remain a significant public health concern due to their potential use as bioterrorist agents and the spread of animal borne poxviruses, such as monkeypox virus, to humans. Thus, the identification of small molecule inhibitors of poxvirus replication is warranted. Vaccinia virus is the prototypic member of the Orthopoxvirus genus, which also includes variola and monkeypox virus. In this study, we demonstrate that the carboxylic ionophore nigericin is a potent inhibitor of vaccinia virus replication in several human cell lines. In HeLa cells, we found that the 50% inhibitory concentration of nigericin against vaccinia virus was 7.9 nM, with a selectivity index of 1038. We present data demonstrating that nigericin targets vaccinia virus replication at a post-entry stage. While nigericin moderately inhibits both early vaccinia gene transcription and translation, viral DNA replication and intermediate and late gene expression are severely compromised in the presence of nigericin. Our results demonstrate that nigericin has the potential to be further developed into an effective antiviral to treat poxvirus infections. PMID:20951746

  14. Multiple effects of mutations in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase on viral replication.

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, A; Englund, G; Orenstein, J M; Martin, M A; Craigie, R

    1995-01-01

    The integration of a DNA copy of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genome into a chromosome of an infected cell is a pivotal step in virus replication. Integration requires the activity of the virus-encoded integrase, which enters the cell as a component of the virion. Results of numerous mutagenesis studies have identified amino acid residues and protein domains of HIV-1 integrase critical for in vitro activity, but only a few of these mutants have been studied for their effects on HIV replication. We have introduced site-directed changes into an infectious DNA clone of HIV-1 and show that integrase mutations can affect virus replication at a variety of steps. We identified mutations that altered virion morphology, levels of particle-associated integrase and reverse transcriptase, and viral DNA synthesis. One replication-defective mutant virus which had normal morphology and protein composition displayed increased levels of circular viral DNA following infection of a T-cell line. This virus also had a significant titer in a CD4-positive indicator cell assay, which requires the viral Tat protein. Although unintegrated viral DNA can serve as a template for Tat expression in infected indicator cells, this level of expression is insufficient to support a spreading viral infection in CD4-positive lymphocytes. PMID:7535863

  15. Heme Oxygenase-1 Suppresses Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus Replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chong; Pu, Fengxing; Zhang, Angke; Xu, Lele; Li, Na; Yan, Yunhuan; Gao, Jiming; Liu, Hongliang; Zhang, Gaiping; Goodfellow, Ian G; Zhou, En-Min; Xiao, Shuqi

    2015-10-29

    Viral cycle progression depends upon host-cell processes in infected cells, and this is true for bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV), the causative agent of BVD that is a worldwide threat to the bovine industry. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a ubiquitously expressed inducible isoform of the first and rate-limiting enzyme for heme degradation. Recent studies have demonstrated that HO-1 has significant antiviral properties, inhibiting the replication of viruses such as ebola virus, human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus, and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus. However, the function of HO-1 in BVDV infection is unclear. In the present study, the relationship between HO-1 and BVDV was investigated. In vitro analysis of HO-1 expression in BVDV-infected MDBK cells demonstrated that a decrease in HO-1 as BVDV replication increased. Increasing HO-1 expression through adenoviral-mediated overexpression or induction with cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP, a potent HO-1 inducer), pre- and postinfection, effectively inhibited BVDV replication. In contrast, HO-1 siRNA knockdown in BVDV-infected cells increased BVDV replication. Therefore, the data were consistent with HO-1 acting as an anti-viral factor and these findings suggested that induction of HO-1 may be a useful prevention and treatment strategy against BVDV infection.

  16. Heme Oxygenase-1 Suppresses Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus Replication in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chong; Pu, Fengxing; Zhang, Angke; Xu, Lele; Li, Na; Yan, Yunhuan; Gao, Jiming; Liu, Hongliang; Zhang, Gaiping; Goodfellow, Ian G.; Zhou, En-Min; Xiao, Shuqi

    2015-01-01

    Viral cycle progression depends upon host-cell processes in infected cells, and this is true for bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV), the causative agent of BVD that is a worldwide threat to the bovine industry. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a ubiquitously expressed inducible isoform of the first and rate-limiting enzyme for heme degradation. Recent studies have demonstrated that HO-1 has significant antiviral properties, inhibiting the replication of viruses such as ebola virus, human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus, and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus. However, the function of HO-1 in BVDV infection is unclear. In the present study, the relationship between HO-1 and BVDV was investigated. In vitro analysis of HO-1 expression in BVDV-infected MDBK cells demonstrated that a decrease in HO-1 as BVDV replication increased. Increasing HO-1 expression through adenoviral-mediated overexpression or induction with cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP, a potent HO-1 inducer), pre- and postinfection, effectively inhibited BVDV replication. In contrast, HO-1 siRNA knockdown in BVDV-infected cells increased BVDV replication. Therefore, the data were consistent with HO-1 acting as an anti-viral factor and these findings suggested that induction of HO-1 may be a useful prevention and treatment strategy against BVDV infection. PMID:26510767

  17. Inhibitory effects of quercetin 3-rhamnoside on influenza A virus replication.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hwa Jung; Song, Jae Hyoung; Park, Kwi Sung; Kwon, Dur Han

    2009-06-28

    Influenza viruses cause significant morbidity and mortality in humans through epidemics or pandemics. The lack of effective therapeutical treatment underlines the importance of research for new antiviral compounds. Flavonoids widely exist in the plant kingdom, and their antiviral activities against various viruses have been recently reported. In this study, the anti-influenza A/WS/33 virus of quercetin 3-rhamnoside (Q3R) from Houttuynia cordata was evaluated using a cytopathic effect (CPE) reduction method, the assay results demonstrated that Q3R possessed strong anti-influenza A/WS/33 virus reducing the formation of a visible CPE. Q3R also did inhibit virus replication in the initial stage of virus infection by indirect interaction with virus particles. However, oseltamivir has relative weaker efficacy compared to Q3R. Therefore, these findings provide important information for the utilization of Q3R for influenza treatment.

  18. Inhibition of influenza A virus replication by rifampicin and selenocystamine

    SciTech Connect

    Hamzehei, M.; Ledinko, N.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of selenocystamine, an inhibitor of influenza virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase in vitro activity, in the antibiotic rifampicin were studied on influenza A/PR/8/34 (HON1) infection in embryonated eggs. Both drugs completely inhibited hemagglutinating and infective virus yields when added at relatively early times postinfection. Maximal inhibition was produced by apparently noncytotoxic concentrations of 50 microgram of selenocystamine, or of 400 microgram of rifampicin, per egg.

  19. High fidelity simian immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase mutants have impaired replication in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Sarah B; Lichtfuss, Marit; Amarasena, Thakshila H; Alcantara, Sheilajen; De Rose, Robert; Tachedjian, Gilda; Alinejad-Rokny, Hamid; Venturi, Vanessa; Davenport, Miles P; Winnall, Wendy R; Kent, Stephen J

    2016-05-01

    The low fidelity of HIV replication facilitates immune and drug escape. Some reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor drug-resistance mutations increase RT fidelity in biochemical assays but their effect during viral replication is unclear. We investigated the effect of RT mutations K65R, Q151N and V148I on SIV replication and fidelity in vitro, along with SIV replication in pigtailed macaques. SIVmac239-K65R and SIVmac239-V148I viruses had reduced replication capacity compared to wild-type SIVmac239. Direct virus competition assays demonstrated a rank order of wild-type>K65R>V148I mutants in terms of viral fitness. In single round in vitro-replication assays, SIVmac239-K65R demonstrated significantly higher fidelity than wild-type, and rapidly reverted to wild-type following infection of macaques. In contrast, SIVmac239-Q151N was replication incompetent in vitro and in pigtailed macaques. Thus, we showed that RT mutants, and specifically the common K65R drug-resistance mutation, had impaired replication capacity and higher fidelity. These results have implications for the pathogenesis of drug-resistant HIV. PMID:26896929

  20. The effect of avian influenza virus NS1 allele on virus replication and innate gene expression in avian cells.

    PubMed

    Adams, Sean; Xing, Zheng; Li, Jinling; Mendoza, Kristelle; Perez, Daniel; Reed, Kent; Cardona, Carol

    2013-12-01

    The NS1 gene encoded by Type A influenza virus circulates as two alleles, the A and B allele. The immunomodulatory properties of the NS1 A allele have been thoroughly examined; however, comparisons of allele function have been predominantly made in mammalian systems. Here we show that counter to the current understanding of allele function in mammals, the two alleles similarly regulate elements of the type I interferon (IFN) signaling pathway, including the interferon-inducible genes Mx and 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthase (2'-5' OAS), and IL-6, which share the same induction pathway as the interferons in embryo fibroblasts from chickens, turkeys or ducks. Replication of two reassortant viruses demonstrated that the B allele virus replicates more and to higher titers than the A allele virus in duck cells; however, the A allele virus replicates more in the cells from chickens and turkeys. Finally, chimeric constructs were used to identify a region of the NS1 gene that conferred the statistically significant differences in expression and replication observed between the alleles.

  1. Analysis of JC virus DNA replication using a quantitative and high-throughput assay

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Jong; Phelan, Paul J.; Chhum, Panharith; Bashkenova, Nazym; Yim, Sung; Parker, Robert; Gagnon, David; Gjoerup, Ole; Archambault, Jacques; Bullock, Peter A.

    2014-11-15

    Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) is caused by lytic replication of JC virus (JCV) in specific cells of the central nervous system. Like other polyomaviruses, JCV encodes a large T-antigen helicase needed for replication of the viral DNA. Here, we report the development of a luciferase-based, quantitative and high-throughput assay of JCV DNA replication in C33A cells, which, unlike the glial cell lines Hs 683 and U87, accumulate high levels of nuclear T-ag needed for robust replication. Using this assay, we investigated the requirement for different domains of T-ag, and for specific sequences within and flanking the viral origin, in JCV DNA replication. Beyond providing validation of the assay, these studies revealed an important stimulatory role of the transcription factor NF1 in JCV DNA replication. Finally, we show that the assay can be used for inhibitor testing, highlighting its value for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting JCV DNA replication. - Highlights: • Development of a high-throughput screening assay for JCV DNA replication using C33A cells. • Evidence that T-ag fails to accumulate in the nuclei of established glioma cell lines. • Evidence that NF-1 directly promotes JCV DNA replication in C33A cells. • Proof-of-concept that the HTS assay can be used to identify pharmacological inhibitor of JCV DNA replication.

  2. Ultrastructural studies on the replication of herpes simplex virus in PK and XTC-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Ciampor, F; Szántó, J

    1982-01-01

    Ultrastructural changes showed the following characteristics of restricted replication of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV 1) strains MA and HSZP in PK and XTC-2 cells: 1) minimal cytopathic changes in PK cells as compared to more pronounced alterations in XTC-2 cells; 2) formation of single nucleocapsids or their absence in the nuclei of PK cells infected with the HSZP strain; 3) lack of budding and envelopment and absence of reduplication of the nuclear membrane; 4) persistence of partially uncoated virions within the endocytic vacuoles in the cytoplasm of PK cells; and 5) formation of dense inclusion bodies in addition to the presence of defective virions in the cytoplasm of XTC-2 cells and vacuolation of their cytoplasmic membranes. The replication of HSV 1 in PK and XTC-2 cells seemed to be blocked at both early and late stages of virus replication. At low multiplicity of infection, no virus particles were formed.

  3. Evaluation of the minimal replication time of Cauliflower mosaic virus in different hosts

    SciTech Connect

    Khelifa, Mounia; Masse, Delphine; Blanc, Stephane; Drucker, Martin

    2010-01-20

    Though the duration of a single round of replication is an important biological parameter, it has been determined for only few viruses. Here, this parameter was determined for Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) in transfected protoplasts from different hosts: the highly susceptible Arabidopsis and turnip, and Nicotiana benthamiana, where CaMV accumulates only slowly. Four methods of differing sensitivity were employed: labelling of (1) progeny DNA and (2) capsid protein, (3) immunocapture PCR,, and (4) progeny-specific PCR. The first progeny virus was detected about 21 h after transfection. This value was confirmed by all methods, indicating that our estimate was not biased by the sensitivity of the detection method, and approximated the actual time required for one round of CaMV replication. Unexpectedly, the replication kinetics were similar in the three hosts; suggesting that slow accumulation of CaMV in Nicotiana plants is determined by non-optimal interactions in other steps of the infection cycle.

  4. Potent and Specific Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication by RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Coburn, Glen A.; Cullen, Bryan R.

    2002-01-01

    Synthetic small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have been shown to induce the degradation of specific mRNA targets in human cells by inducing RNA interference (RNAi). Here, we demonstrate that siRNA duplexes targeted against the essential Tat and Rev regulatory proteins encoded by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can specifically block Tat and Rev expression and function. More importantly, we show that these same siRNAs can effectively inhibit HIV-1 gene expression and replication in cell cultures, including those of human T-cell lines and primary lymphocytes. These observations demonstrate that RNAi can effectively block virus replication in human cells and raise the possibility that RNAi could provide an important innate protective response, particularly against viruses that express double-stranded RNAs as part of their replication cycle. PMID:12186906

  5. Replicative RNA synthesis and nucleocapsid assembly in vesicular stomatitis virus-infected permeable cells.

    PubMed Central

    Condra, J H; Lazzarini, R A

    1980-01-01

    A permeable-cell system has been developed to study the replication of vesicular stomatitis virus. When vesicular stomatitis virus-infected BHK cells were permeabilized by lysolecithin treatment, they incorporated nucleoside triphosphates into RNA and amino acids into proteins at nearly normal rates. The viral mRNA's synthesized appeared normal in polarity, size distribution, and polyadenylation, and all five viral proteins were synthesized. Replication of the viral genome proceeded, and full-length RNA strands were synthesized in amounts and polarities resembling those found in intact cells. These full-length RNAs associated with viral N proteins to form RNase-resistant nucleocapsids of normal buoyant density. Permeable cells appear to represent ideal hosts for studying vesicular stomatitis virus replication since they closely mimic in vivo conditions while retaining much of the experimental flexibility of current in vitro systems. Images PMID:6257927

  6. Mechanisms of Cellular Membrane Reorganization to Support Hepatitis C Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongliang; Tai, Andrew W.

    2016-01-01

    Like all positive-sense RNA viruses, hepatitis C virus (HCV) induces host membrane alterations for its replication termed the membranous web (MW). Assembling replication factors at a membranous structure might facilitate the processes necessary for genome replication and packaging and shield viral components from host innate immune defenses. The biogenesis of the HCV MW is a complex process involving a concerted effort of HCV nonstructural proteins with a growing list of host factors. Although a comprehensive understanding of MW formation is still missing, a number of important viral and host determinants have been identified. This review will summarize the recent studies that have led to our current knowledge of the role of viral and host factors in the biogenesis of the MWs and discuss how HCV uses this specialized membrane structure for its replication. PMID:27213428

  7. Replication cycle of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 in duck embryonic hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Yao, Fangke; Chen, Yun; Shi, Jintong; Ming, Ke; Liu, Jiaguo; Xiong, Wen; Song, Meiyun; Du, Hongxu; Wang, Yixuan; Zhang, Shuaibin; Wu, Yi; Wang, Deyun; Hu, Yuanliang

    2016-04-01

    Duck hepatitis A virus type 1 (DHAV-1) is an important agent of duck viral hepatitis. Until recently, the replication cycle of DHAV-1 is still unknown. Here duck embryonic hepatocytes infected with DHAV-1 were collected at different time points, and dynamic changes of the relative DHAV-1 gene expression during replication were detected by real-time PCR. And the morphology of hepatocytes infected with DHAV was evaluated by electron microscope. The result suggested that the adsorption of DHAV-1 saturated at 90 min post-infection, and the virus particles with size of about 50 nm including more than 20 nm of vacuum drying gold were observed on the infected cells surface. What's more, the replication lasted around 13 h after the early protein synthesis for about 5h, and the release of DHAV-1 was in steady state after 32 h. The replication cycle will enrich the data for DVH control and provide the foundation for future studies.

  8. A Functional Genomic Screen Identifies Cellular Cofactors of Hepatitis C Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Andrew W.; Benita, Yair; Peng, Lee F.; Kim, Sun-Suk; Sakamoto, Naoya; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Chung, Raymond T.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Hepatitis C virus (HCV) chronically infects 3% of the world’s population, and complications from HCV are the leading indication for liver transplantation. Given the need for better anti-HCV therapies, one strategy is to identify and target cellular cofactors of the virus lifecycle. Using a genome-wide siRNA library, we identified 96 human genes that support HCV replication, with a significant number of them being involved in vesicle organization and biogenesis. Phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase PI4KA and multiple subunits of the COPI vesicle coat complex were among the genes identified. Consistent with this, pharmacologic inhibitors of COPI and PI4KA blocked HCV replication. Targeting hepcidin, a peptide critical for iron homeostasis, also affected HCV replication, which may explain the known dysregulation of iron homeostasis in HCV infection. The host cofactors for HCV replication identified in this study should serve as a useful resource in delineating new targets for anti-HCV therapies. PMID:19286138

  9. ADENO-ASSOCIATED SATELLITE VIRUS INTERFERENCE WITH THE REPLICATION OF ITS HELPER ADENOVIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Wade P.; Casazza, Anna M.; Alcott, Judith; Melnick, Joseph L.

    1968-01-01

    Adeno-associated satellite virus type 4 interferes with the replication of its helper adenovirus. No interferon-like soluble substance could be detected in satellite-infected cultures and other DNA- and RNA-containing viruses were not inhibited by coinfection with satellite virus under conditions which reduced adenovirus yields by more than 90% in monkey cells. Altering the concentration of adenovirus in the presence of constant amounts of satellite resulted in a constant degree of interference over a wide range of adenovirus inocula and suggested that adenovirus concentration was not a significant factor in the observed interference. The interference with adenovirus replication was abolished by pretreating satellite preparations with specific antiserum, ultraviolet light or heating at 80°C for 30 min. This suggested that infectious satellite virus mediated the interference. Satellite virus concentration was found to be a determinant of interference and studies indicated that the amount of interference with adenovirus was directly proportional to the concentration of satellite virus. 8 hr after adenovirus infection, the replication of adenovirus was no longer sensitive to satellite interference. This was true even though the satellite virus was enhanced as effectively as if the cells were infected simultaneously with both viruses. Interference with adenovirus infectivity was accompanied by reduced yields of complement-fixing antigen and of virus particles which suggested that satellite virus interfered with the formation and not the function of adenovirus products. When cells were infected either with adenovirus alone or with adenovirus plus satellite, the same proportion of cells plated as adenovirus infectious centers. However, the number of plaque-forming units of adenovirus formed per cell in the satellite-infected cultures was reduced by approximately 90%, the same magnitude of reduction noted in whole cultures coinfected with satellite and adenovirus. This

  10. Epstein-Barr virus infection and replication in a human epithelial cell system.

    PubMed

    Li, Q X; Young, L S; Niedobitek, G; Dawson, C W; Birkenbach, M; Wang, F; Rickinson, A B

    1992-03-26

    Epstein-Barr virus, a human herpesvirus with oncogenic potential, infects two target tissues in vivo: B lymphocytes, where the infection is largely non-productive, and stratified squamous epithelium in which virus replication occurs. The interaction with B cells, initiated through virus binding to the B-cell surface molecule CR2 (ref. 4), has been studied in vitro and the virus 'latent' genes associated with B-cell growth transformation defined. By comparison, viral infection of epithelium remains poorly understood, reflecting the lack of an appropriate cell-culture model. Here we describe the development of such a model using as targets CR2-expressing transfected cells of two independent human epithelial lines. A high proportion of these cells bind virus and become actively infected, expressing the small EBER RNAs (small non-polyadenylated virus-coded RNAs) and the Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 but not other latent proteins; thereafter, under conditions favouring epithelial differentiation, up to 30% of the cells can be induced to enter virus productive cycle with some progressing to full virus replication. We find significant differences between laboratory virus strains in their ability to infect epithelium that do not correlate with their B-cell growth-transforming activity. PMID:1312681

  11. Replication-competent influenza A viruses expressing a red fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Nogales, Aitor; Baker, Steven F; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2015-02-01

    Like most animal viruses, studying influenza A in model systems requires secondary methodologies to identify infected cells. To circumvent this requirement, we describe the generation of replication-competent influenza A red fluorescent viruses. These influenza A viruses encode mCherry fused to the viral non-structural 1 (NS1) protein and display comparable growth kinetics to wild-type viruses in vitro. Infection of cells with influenza A mCherry viruses was neutralized with monoclonal antibodies and inhibited with antivirals to levels similar to wild-type virus. Influenza A mCherry viruses were also able to lethally infect mice, and strikingly, dose- and time-dependent kinetics of viral replication were monitored in whole excised mouse lungs using an in vivo imaging system (IVIS). By eliminating the need for secondary labeling of infected cells, influenza A mCherry viruses provide an ideal tool in the ongoing struggle to better characterize the virus and identify new therapeutics against influenza A viral infections.

  12. Chikungunya Virus Replication in Salivary Glands of the Mosquito Aedes albopictus.

    PubMed

    Vega-Rúa, Anubis; Schmitt, Christine; Bonne, Isabelle; Krijnse Locker, Jacomine; Failloux, Anna-Bella

    2015-11-17

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an emerging arbovirus transmitted to humans by mosquitoes such as Aedes albopictus. To be transmitted, CHIKV must replicate in the mosquito midgut, then disseminate in the hemocele and infect the salivary glands before being released in saliva. We have developed a standardized protocol to visualize viral particles in the mosquito salivary glands using transmission electron microscopy. Here we provide direct evidence for CHIKV replication and storage in Ae. albopictus salivary glands.

  13. Heparin octasaccharide decoy liposomes inhibit replication of multiple viruses

    PubMed Central

    Hendricks, Gabriel L.; Velazquez, Lourdes; Pham, Serena; Qaisar, Natasha; Delaney, James C.; Viswanathan, Karthik; Albers, Leila; Comolli, James C.; Shriver, Zachary; Knipe, David M.; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A.; Fygenson, Deborah K.; Trevejo, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) is a ubiquitous glycosaminoglycan that serves as a cellular attachment site for a number of significant human pathogens, including respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human parainfluenza virus 3 (hPIV3), and herpes simplex virus (HSV). Decoy receptors can target pathogens by binding to the receptor pocket on viral attachment proteins, acting as ‘molecular sinks’ and preventing the pathogen from binding to susceptible host cells. Decoy receptors functionalized with HS could bind to pathogens and prevent infection, so we generated decoy liposomes displaying HS-octasaccharide (HS-octa). These decoy liposomes significantly inhibited RSV, hPIV3, and HSV infectivity in vitro to a greater degree than the original HS-octa building block. The degree of inhibition correlated with the density of HS-octa displayed on the liposome surface. Decoy liposomes with HS-octa inhibited infection of viruses to a greater extent than either full-length heparin or HS-octa alone. Decoy liposomes were effective when added prior to infection or following the initial infection of cells in vitro. By targeting the well-conserved receptor-binding sites of HS-binding viruses, decoy liposomes functionalized with HS-octa are a promising therapeutic antiviral agent and illustrate the utility of the liposome delivery platform. PMID:25637710

  14. West Nile virus replication requires fatty acid synthesis but is independent on phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate lipids.

    PubMed

    Martín-Acebes, Miguel A; Blázquez, Ana-Belén; Jiménez de Oya, Nereida; Escribano-Romero, Estela; Saiz, Juan-Carlos

    2011-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a neurovirulent mosquito-borne flavivirus, which main natural hosts are birds but it also infects equines and humans, among other mammals. As in the case of other plus-stranded RNA viruses, WNV replication is associated to intracellular membrane rearrangements. Based on results obtained with a variety of viruses, different cellular processes have been shown to play important roles on these membrane rearrangements for efficient viral replication. As these processes are related to lipid metabolism, fatty acid synthesis, as well as generation of a specific lipid microenvironment enriched in phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI4P), has been associated to it in other viral models. In this study, intracellular membrane rearrangements following infection with a highly neurovirulent strain of WNV were addressed by means of electron and confocal microscopy. Infection of WNV, and specifically viral RNA replication, were dependent on fatty acid synthesis, as revealed by the inhibitory effect of cerulenin and C75, two pharmacological inhibitors of fatty acid synthase, a key enzyme of this process. However, WNV infection did not induce redistribution of PI4P lipids, and PI4P did not localize at viral replication complex. Even more, WNV multiplication was not inhibited by the use of the phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase inhibitor PIK93, while infection by the enterovirus Coxsackievirus B5 was reduced. Similar features were found when infection by other flavivirus, the Usutu virus (USUV), was analyzed. These features of WNV replication could help to design specific antiviral approaches against WNV and other related flaviviruses.

  15. Ludwik Gross, Sarah Stewart, and the 1950s discoveries of Gross murine leukemia virus and polyoma virus.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Gregory J

    2014-12-01

    The Polish-American scientist Ludwik Gross made two important discoveries in the early 1950s. He showed that two viruses - murine leukemia virus and parotid tumor virus - could cause cancer when they were injected into susceptible animals. At first, Gross's discoveries were greeted with skepticism: it seemed implausible that viruses could cause a disease as complex as cancer. Inspired by Gross's initial experiments, similar results were obtained by Sarah Stewart and Bernice Eddy who later renamed the parotid tumor virus SE polyoma virus after finding it could cause many different types of tumors in mice, hamsters, and rats. Eventually the "SE" was dropped and virologists adopted the name "polyoma virus." After Gross's work was published, additional viruses capable of causing solid tumors or blood-borne tumors in mice were described by Arnold Graffi, Charlotte Friend, John Moloney and others. By 1961, sufficient data had been accumulated for Gross to confidently publish an extensive monograph--Oncogenic Viruses--the first history of tumor virology, which became a standard reference work and marked the emergence of tumor virology as a distinct, legitimate field of study.

  16. Ludwik Gross, Sarah Stewart, and the 1950s discoveries of Gross murine leukemia virus and polyoma virus.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Gregory J

    2014-12-01

    The Polish-American scientist Ludwik Gross made two important discoveries in the early 1950s. He showed that two viruses - murine leukemia virus and parotid tumor virus - could cause cancer when they were injected into susceptible animals. At first, Gross's discoveries were greeted with skepticism: it seemed implausible that viruses could cause a disease as complex as cancer. Inspired by Gross's initial experiments, similar results were obtained by Sarah Stewart and Bernice Eddy who later renamed the parotid tumor virus SE polyoma virus after finding it could cause many different types of tumors in mice, hamsters, and rats. Eventually the "SE" was dropped and virologists adopted the name "polyoma virus." After Gross's work was published, additional viruses capable of causing solid tumors or blood-borne tumors in mice were described by Arnold Graffi, Charlotte Friend, John Moloney and others. By 1961, sufficient data had been accumulated for Gross to confidently publish an extensive monograph--Oncogenic Viruses--the first history of tumor virology, which became a standard reference work and marked the emergence of tumor virology as a distinct, legitimate field of study. PMID:25223721

  17. Replication of latent Epstein-Barr virus genomes in Raji cells.

    PubMed

    Adams, A

    1987-05-01

    The replication of the 50 to 60 latent, predominantly extrachromosomal, Epstein-Barr virus genomes maintained by the Burkitt-lymphoma-derived Raji cell line was investigated by using a Meselson-Stahl density transfer approach. Samples of DNA isolated from cells cultivated for different periods in bromodeoxyuridine-supplemented medium were fractionated according to density, and the distribution of viral and cellular DNAs among the heavy-, hybrid-, and light-density species was quantitated. The results indicate that the majority of latent Epstein-Barr virus DNA plasmids each replicate once during the cell cycle.

  18. Favipiravir elicits antiviral mutagenesis during virus replication in vivo.

    PubMed

    Arias, Armando; Thorne, Lucy; Goodfellow, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Lethal mutagenesis has emerged as a novel potential therapeutic approach to treat viral infections. Several studies have demonstrated that increases in the high mutation rates inherent to RNA viruses lead to viral extinction in cell culture, but evidence during infections in vivo is limited. In this study, we show that the broad-range antiviral nucleoside favipiravir reduces viral load in vivo by exerting antiviral mutagenesis in a mouse model for norovirus infection. Increased mutation frequencies were observed in samples from treated mice and were accompanied with lower or in some cases undetectable levels of infectious virus in faeces and tissues. Viral RNA isolated from treated animals showed reduced infectivity, a feature of populations approaching extinction during antiviral mutagenesis. These results suggest that favipiravir can induce norovirus mutagenesis in vivo, which in some cases leads to virus extinction, providing a proof-of-principle for the use of favipiravir derivatives or mutagenic nucleosides in the clinical treatment of noroviruses.

  19. Hsp90 inhibitors reduce influenza virus replication in cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, Geoffrey; Deng, Tao; Fodor, Ervin; Leung, B.W.; Mayer, Daniel; Schwemmle, Martin Brownlee, George

    2008-08-01

    The viral RNA polymerase complex of influenza A virus consists of three subunits PB1, PB2 and PA. Recently, the cellular chaperone Hsp90 was shown to play a role in nuclear import and assembly of the trimeric polymerase complex by binding to PB1 and PB2. Here we show that Hsp90 inhibitors, geldanamycin or its derivative 17-AAG, delay the growth of influenza virus in cell culture resulting in a 1-2 log reduction in viral titre early in infection. We suggest that this is caused by the reduced half-life of PB1 and PB2 and inhibition of nuclear import of PB1 and PA which lead to reduction in viral RNP assembly. Hsp90 inhibitors may represent a new class of antiviral compounds against influenza viruses.

  20. In vitro production and titration assays of B-tropic retroviruses isolated from C57BL mouse tumors induced by radiation leukemia virus (RadLV-Rs): effect of dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Guillemain, B; Astier, T; Mamoun, R; Duplan, J F

    1980-01-01

    The effect of dexamethasone (DXM) on the replication and titration assays of B-ecotropic radiation leukemia virus (RadLV-Rs) isolates was examined. The drug was shown to enhance in vitro virus release by otherwise low producer permissive cells. DXM also stimulated infectivity and focus formation in murine S+L--permissive cells and shortened the time-appearance of virus-induced foci. In contrast to foci observed in nontreated cultures, which are generally abortive and composed of only a few morphologically transformed cells, those obtained with DXM were comparable to those induced by ecotropic retroviruses with a potent helper activity for murine sarcoma virus. In addition, DXM increased virus-induced XC cell fusion. These fundamental data allowed a more abundant in vitro production of the B-ecotropic RadLV-Rs virus isolates as well as precise infectivity titration assays.

  1. Cellular Casein Kinase 2 and Protein Phosphatase 2A Modulate Replication Site Assembly of Bluetongue Virus*

    PubMed Central

    Mohl, Bjorn-Patrick; Roy, Polly

    2016-01-01

    A number of cytoplasmic replicating viruses produce cytoplasmic inclusion bodies or protein aggregates; however, a hallmark of viruses of the Reoviridae family is that they utilize these sites for purposes of replication and capsid assembly, functioning as viral assembly factories. Here we have used bluetongue virus (BTV) as a model system for this broad family of important viruses to understand the mechanisms regulating inclusion body assembly. Newly synthesized viral proteins interact with sequestered viral RNA molecules prior to capsid assembly and double-stranded RNA synthesis within viral inclusion bodies (VIBs). VIBs are predominantly comprised of a BTV-encoded non-structural protein 2 (NS2). Previous in vitro studies indicated that casein kinase 2 (CK2) mediated the phosphorylation of NS2, which regulated the propensity of NS2 to form larger aggregates. Using targeted pharmacological reagents, specific mutation in the viral genome by reverse genetics and confocal microscopy, here we demonstrate that CK2 activity is important for BTV replication. Furthermore, we show that a novel host cell factor, protein phosphatase 2A, is involved in NS2 dephosphorylation and that, together with CK2, it regulates VIB morphology and virus replication. Thus, these two host enzymes influence the dynamic nature of VIB assembly/disassembly, and these concerted activities may be relevant to the assembly and the release of these cores from VIBs. PMID:27226558

  2. Increased amounts of the influenza virus nucleoprotein do not promote higher levels of viral genome replication.

    PubMed

    Mullin, Anne E; Dalton, Rosa M; Amorim, Maria Joao; Elton, Debra; Digard, Paul

    2004-12-01

    Influenza virus genome replication requires the virus-encoded nucleoprotein (NP), partly because it is necessary to encapsidate the viral genomic RNA (vRNA) and antigenomic cRNA segments into ribonucleoproteins (RNPs). However, there is also evidence that NP actively regulates viral RNA synthesis and there is a long-standing hypothesis that increased concentrations of NP in the cell are responsible for a switch from genome transcription to replication. Here, this hypothesis is tested in a recombinant setting and in the context of virus infection. In a plasmid-based system for reconstituting active viral RNPs in cells, titration of increasing amounts of NP did not promote higher levels of genome replication relative to transcription, but in fact caused the opposite effect. An approximately fourfold reduction in the ratio of genomic and antigenomic RNAs to mRNA was seen across an 80-fold range of NP plasmid concentrations. When cells were transfected with the same amounts of NP plasmid to establish a concentration gradient of NP prior to virus superinfection, no change in the ratio of cRNA to mRNA was seen for segments 5 and 7, or for the ratio of segment 5 vRNA to mRNA. A slight reduction in the ratio of segment 7 vRNA to mRNA was seen. These findings do not support the simple hypothesis that increased intracellular concentrations of NP promote influenza virus genome replication.

  3. Effect of Temperature on Replication of Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease Viruses in Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Ruder, Mark G; Stallknecht, David E; Howerth, Elizabeth W; Carter, Deborah L; Pfannenstiel, Robert S; Allison, Andrew B; Mead, Daniel G

    2015-09-01

    Replication of arboviruses, including orbiviruses, within the vector has been shown to be temperature dependent. Cooler ambient temperatures slow virus replication in arthropod vectors, whereas viruses replicate faster and to higher titers at warmer ambient temperatures. Previous research with epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) serotype 1 demonstrated that higher temperatures were associated with shorter extrinsic incubation periods in Culicoides sonorensis Wirth & Jones, a confirmed vector of EHDV in North America. To further our understanding of the effect of temperature on replication of EHDV within the vector, C. sonorensis were experimentally infected with one of three EHDV strains representing three serotypes (1, 2, and 7). Midges were fed defibrinated white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) blood spiked with EHDV (≥10(6.5) TCID(50)/ml) through a parafilm membrane using an artificial feeding device and were then held at 20, 25, or 30°C. In addition to this in vitro method, a white-tailed deer experimentally infected with EHDV-7 was used to provide an infectious bloodmeal to determine if the results were comparable with those from the in vitro feeding method. Whole midges were processed for virus isolation and titration at regular intervals following feeding; midges with ≥10(2.7) TCID(50) were considered potentially competent to transmit virus. The virus recovery rates were high throughout the study and all three viruses replicated within C. sonorensis to high titer (≥ 10(2.7) TCID(50)/midge). Across all virus strains, the time to detection of potentially competent midges decreased with increasing temperature: 12-16 d postfeeding (dpf) at 20°C, 4-6 dpf at 25°C, and 2-4 dpf at 30°C. Significant differences in replication of the three viruses in C. sonorensis were observed, with EHDV-2 replicating to a high titer in a smaller proportion of midges and with lower peak titers. The findings are consistent with previous studies of related

  4. Effect of Temperature on Replication of Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease Viruses in Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Ruder, Mark G; Stallknecht, David E; Howerth, Elizabeth W; Carter, Deborah L; Pfannenstiel, Robert S; Allison, Andrew B; Mead, Daniel G

    2015-09-01

    Replication of arboviruses, including orbiviruses, within the vector has been shown to be temperature dependent. Cooler ambient temperatures slow virus replication in arthropod vectors, whereas viruses replicate faster and to higher titers at warmer ambient temperatures. Previous research with epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) serotype 1 demonstrated that higher temperatures were associated with shorter extrinsic incubation periods in Culicoides sonorensis Wirth & Jones, a confirmed vector of EHDV in North America. To further our understanding of the effect of temperature on replication of EHDV within the vector, C. sonorensis were experimentally infected with one of three EHDV strains representing three serotypes (1, 2, and 7). Midges were fed defibrinated white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) blood spiked with EHDV (≥10(6.5) TCID(50)/ml) through a parafilm membrane using an artificial feeding device and were then held at 20, 25, or 30°C. In addition to this in vitro method, a white-tailed deer experimentally infected with EHDV-7 was used to provide an infectious bloodmeal to determine if the results were comparable with those from the in vitro feeding method. Whole midges were processed for virus isolation and titration at regular intervals following feeding; midges with ≥10(2.7) TCID(50) were considered potentially competent to transmit virus. The virus recovery rates were high throughout the study and all three viruses replicated within C. sonorensis to high titer (≥ 10(2.7) TCID(50)/midge). Across all virus strains, the time to detection of potentially competent midges decreased with increasing temperature: 12-16 d postfeeding (dpf) at 20°C, 4-6 dpf at 25°C, and 2-4 dpf at 30°C. Significant differences in replication of the three viruses in C. sonorensis were observed, with EHDV-2 replicating to a high titer in a smaller proportion of midges and with lower peak titers. The findings are consistent with previous studies of related

  5. Relevance of signaling molecules for apoptosis induction on influenza A virus replication.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Atsushi; Shiozaki, Takuya; Miyazaki, Tadaaki

    2013-11-22

    Apoptosis is an important mechanism to maintain homeostasis in mammals, and disruption of the apoptosis regulation mechanism triggers a range of diseases, such as cancer, autoimmune diseases, and developmental disorders. The severity of influenza A virus (IAV) infection is also closely related to dysfunction of apoptosis regulation. In the virus infected cells, the functions of various host cellular molecules involved in regulation of induction of apoptosis are modulated by IAV proteins to enable effective virus replication. The modulation of the intracellular signaling pathway inducing apoptosis by the IAV infection also affects extracellular mechanisms controlling apoptosis, and triggers abnormal host responses related to the disease severity of IAV infections. This review focuses on apoptosis related molecules involved in IAV replication and pathogenicity, the strategy of the virus propagation through the regulation of apoptosis is also discussed.

  6. Effect of human alpha A interferon on influenza virus replication in MDBK cells.

    PubMed

    Ransohoff, R M; Maroney, P A; Nayak, D P; Chambers, T M; Nilsen, T W

    1985-12-01

    To determine the molecular mechanism whereby interferon induces resistance to influenza virus, we began an investigation of influenza virus replication in MDBK cells treated with recombinant human alpha A interferon. Negative- and positive-strand virus-specific RNA accumulation was monitored by blot hybridization with cloned probes. Primary transcription (transcription of infecting viral negative strands by the virion-associated polymerase) was inhibited by interferon treatment of MDBK cells. At moderate levels of interferon treatment (10 U/ml), this inhibition was restricted to transcripts of polymerase genes, whereas at higher levels of interferon treatment (50 U/ml), accumulation of all primary transcripts was markedly inhibited. Secondary transcripts and viral negative strands did not accumulate to any significant extent in interferon-treated MDBK cells. These results suggest that interferon-induced mechanisms which inhibit influenza virus replication in MDBK cells act at the level of primary transcription.

  7. Abortive reverse transcription by mutants of Moloney murine leukemia virus deficient in the reverse transcriptase-associated RNase H function.

    PubMed Central

    Tanese, N; Telesnitsky, A; Goff, S P

    1991-01-01

    The reverse transcriptase enzymes of retroviruses are multifunctional proteins containing both DNA polymerase activity and a nuclease activity, termed RNase H, specific for RNA in RNA-DNA hybrid form. To determine the role of RNase H activity in retroviral replication, we constructed a series of mutant genomes of Moloney murine leukemia virus that encoded reverse transcriptase enzymes that were specifically altered to retain polymerase function but lack RNase H activity. The mutant genomes were all replication defective. Analysis of in vitro reverse transcription reactions carried out by mutant virions showed that minus-strand strong-stop DNA was formed but did not efficiently translocate to the 3' end of the genome; rather, the DNA was stably retained in RNA-DNA hybrid form. Plus-strand strong-stop DNA was not detected. These results suggest that RNase H normally promotes strong-stop translocation, perhaps by exposing single-stranded DNA sequences for base pairing. Four new DNA species were also detected among the reaction products. Analysis of these DNAs suggested that they were minus-strand DNAs formed from VL30 RNAs encoded by the mouse genome. We suggest that reverse transcriptase can initiate DNA synthesis at any one of four alternate tRNA primer-binding sites near the 5' ends of VL30 RNAs. Images PMID:1712862

  8. Characterization of mpl cytoplasmic domain sequences required for myeloproliferative leukemia virus pathogenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Bénit, L; Courtois, G; Charon, M; Varlet, P; Dusanter-Fourt, I; Gisselbrecht, S

    1994-01-01

    v-mpl is a truncated form of a receptor-like chain which belongs to the cytokine receptor superfamily. This sequence has been transduced in the myeloproliferative leukemia virus as an env-mpl fusion gene responsible for an acute myeloproliferative disorder in mice. We constructed a series of viral mutants in the mpl sequence. Analysis of their oncogenic potential in vivo indicated that a critical 69-amino-acid-long cytoplasmic domain of v-Mpl is required for myoproliferative leukemia virus pathogenicity. We also developed an in vitro assay and showed that expression of the env-mpl gene confers growth factor independence to murine as well as to human hematopoietic growth factor-dependent cell lines. These findings strongly suggest that v-Mpl delivers a constitutive proliferative signal through a limited region of its cytoplasmic domain. Images PMID:8035524

  9. Rosettes from Friend leukemia virus envelope: preparation and physicochemical and partial biological characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, J; Schwarz, H; Hunsmann, G

    1979-01-01

    Rosette-shaped particles mainly containing gp85 were isolated from Friend leukemia virus. The isolation procedure comprised lysis of the virion by Triton X-100, affinity chromatography on concanavalin A-Sepharose, and velocity sedimentation. The rosettes displayed a mean sedimentation constant of 32S and a buoyant density of 1.21 g/ml. They contained 1% Triton X-100 and about 2% phospholipid. gp85 was identified by polyacrylamide electrophoresis, staining with periodic acid-Schiff reagent, and immunoprecipitation with antisera against Friend leukemia virus gp71 and p15(E). Rosettes completely blocked the cytotoxicity of the gp71 antiserum. The ability to hemagglutinate was inhibited by antibodies to gp71. Images PMID:85724

  10. Differential human immunodeficiency virus expression in CD4+ cloned lymphocytes: from viral latency to replication.

    PubMed Central

    Chapel, A; Bensussan, A; Vilmer, E; Dormont, D

    1992-01-01

    By using cloning methodology, 13 CD4+, CD8-, CD45RO+, and CD29+ clones, isolated from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative donors, have been characterized and tested regarding their susceptibility to two strains of HIV type 1 (HIV-1). Infected clones possess integrated provirus. Only six are able to replicate HIV-1, while seven may normally grow without cytopathic effect and without viral replication. These results argue that all CD4+ lymphocyte clones may be infectable but that a heterogeneity exists regarding their abilities to replicate HIV-1. Images PMID:1374814

  11. Differential human immunodeficiency virus expression in CD4+ cloned lymphocytes: from viral latency to replication.

    PubMed

    Chapel, A; Bensussan, A; Vilmer, E; Dormont, D

    1992-06-01

    By using cloning methodology, 13 CD4+, CD8-, CD45RO+, and CD29+ clones, isolated from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative donors, have been characterized and tested regarding their susceptibility to two strains of HIV type 1 (HIV-1). Infected clones possess integrated provirus. Only six are able to replicate HIV-1, while seven may normally grow without cytopathic effect and without viral replication. These results argue that all CD4+ lymphocyte clones may be infectable but that a heterogeneity exists regarding their abilities to replicate HIV-1.

  12. A Hepatitis C Virus NS5A Phosphorylation Site That Regulates RNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    LeMay, K. L.; Treadaway, J.; Angulo, I.

    2013-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus NS5A protein is essential for RNA replication and virion assembly. NS5A is phosphorylated on multiple residues during infections, but these sites remain uncharacterized. Here we identify serine 222 of genotype 2a NS5A as a phosphorylation site that functions as a negative regulator of RNA replication. This site is a component of the hyperphosphorylated form of NS5A, which is in good agreement with previous observations that hyperphosphorylation negatively affects replication. PMID:23115292

  13. Immunotherapy of murine leukemia. Efficacy of passive serum therapy of Friend leukemia virus-induced disease in immunocompromised mice

    SciTech Connect

    Genovesi, E.V.; Livnat, D.; Collins, J.J.

    1983-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the passive therapy of Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MuLV)-induced disease with chimpanzee anti-F-MuLV serum is accompanied by the development of host antiviral humoral and cellular immunity, the latter measurable in adoptive transfer protocols and by the ability of serum-protected mice to resist virus rechallenge. The present study was designed to further examine the contribution of various compartments of the host immune system to serum therapy itself, as well as to the acquired antiviral immunity that develops in serum-protected mice, through the use of naturally immunocompromised animals (e.g., nude athymic mice and natural killer (NK)-deficient beige mutant mice) or mice treated with immunoabrogating agents such as sublethal irradiation, cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan (Cy)), cortisone, and /sup 89/Sr. The studies in nude mice indicate that while mature T-cells are not needed for effective serum therapy, they do appear to be necessary for the long-term resistance of serum-protected mice to virus rechallenge and for the generation of the cell population(s) responsible for adoptive transfer of antiviral immunity. Furthermore, this acquired resistance is not due to virus neutralization by serum antibodies since antibody-negative, Cy-treated, serum-protected mice still reject the secondary virus infection. Lastly, while the immunocompromise systems examined did effect various host antiviral immune responses, none of them, including the NK-deficient beige mutation, significantly diminished the efficacy of the passive serum therapy of F-MuLV-induced disease.

  14. Clinicopathologic responses in cats with feline leukemia virus-associated leukemia-lymphoma treated with staphylococcal protein A.

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, R. W.; Tyler, R. D.; Trang, L. Q.; Liu, W. T.; Good, R. A.; Day, N. K.

    1985-01-01

    Purified protein A from Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I was injected intraperitoneally or was incorporated in filters ex vivo through which plasma from cats with feline leukemia virus (FeLV)-associated leukemia-lymphoma was passed. Before treatment, 65% of the FeLV-infected cats were anemic, and 70% were thrombocytopenic. Concomitant infections, or immune-mediated disease, was common. During treatment 50% of the cats with FeLV-associated disease improved objectively with normal posttreatment hematocrits, thrombocyte and leukocyte counts, disappearance of dysplastic hematologic elements, and correction of marrow dyscrasias. A 33% response to treatment occurred in cats with unequivocal manifestations of malignant disease and was characterized by reductions in tumor size and marrow and peripheral blood neoplastic cell populations. Clearance of FeLV viremia was documented in 28% of the treated cats. The several possible mechanisms by which treatment with staphylococcal protein A causes reduction in the extent of malignant disease are considered. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 PMID:2983560

  15. Polyamine biosynthesis and the replication of turnip yellow mosaic virus

    SciTech Connect

    Balint, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    Turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) contains large amounts of nonexchangeable spermidine and induces an accumulation of spermidine in infected Chinese cabbage. By seven days after inoculation, a majority of protoplasts isolated from newly-emerging leaves stain with fluorescent antibody to the virus. These protoplasts contain 1-2 x 10/sup 6/ virions per cell and continue to produce virus in culture for at least 48 hours. (/sup 14/C)-Spermidine (10 ..mu..M) was taken up by these cells in amounts comparable to the original endogenous pool within 24 hours. However, the spermidine content of the cell was only marginally affected, implying considerable regulation of the endogenous pool(s). Putrescine and spermine were major products of the metabolism of exogenous spermidine. Radioactivity from exogenous (/sup 14/C)-spermidine was also readily incorporated into the nucleic acid-containing component of the virus, where it appeared as both spermidine and spermine. Thus, newly-formed virions contained predominantly newly-synthesized spermidine and spermine. However, inhibition of spermidine synthesis by dicyclohexylamine (DCHA) led to incorporation of pre-existing spermidine and increased amounts of spermine into newly-formed virions. The latter results were tested and confirmed in a second cellular system, consisting of health protoplasts infected with TYMC in vitro.

  16. Plant virus DNA replication processes in Agrobacterium: insight into the origins of geminiviruses?

    PubMed Central

    Rigden, J E; Dry, I B; Krake, L R; Rezaian, M A

    1996-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens, a bacterial plant pathogen, when transformed with plasmid constructs containing greater than unit length DNA of tomato leaf curl geminivirus accumulates viral replicative form DNAs indistinguishable from those produced in infected plants. The accumulation of the viral DNA species depends on the presence of two origins of replication in the DNA constructs and is drastically reduced by introducing mutations into the viral replication-associated protein (Rep or C1) ORF, indicating that an active viral replication process is occurring in the bacterial cell. The accumulation of these viral DNA species is not affected by mutations or deletions in the other viral open reading frames. The observation that geminivirus DNA replication functions are supported by the bacterial cellular machinery provides evidence for the theory that these circular single-stranded DNA viruses have evolved from prokaryotic episomal replicons. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8816791

  17. Human cytomegalovirus renders cells non-permissive for replication of herpes simplex viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Cockley, K.D.

    1988-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus (HSV) genome during production infection in vitro may be subject to negative regulation which results in modification of the cascade of expression of herpes virus macromolecular synthesis leading to establishment of HSV latency. In the present study, human embryonic lung (HEL) cells infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) restricted the replication of HSV type-1 (HSV-1). A delay in HSV replication of 15 hr as well as a consistent, almost 1000-fold inhibition of HSV replication in HCMV-infected cell cultures harvested 24 to 72 hr after superinfection were observed compared with controls infected with HSV alone. HSV type-2 (HSV-2) replication was similarly inhibited in HCMV-infected HEL cells. Prior ultraviolet-irradiation (UV) of HCMV removed the block to HSV replication, demonstrating the requirement for an active HCMV genome. HCMV deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) negative temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants inhibited HSV replications as efficiently as wild-type (wt) HCMV at the non-permissive temperature. Evidence for penetration and replication of superinfecting HSV into HCMV-infected cells was provided by blot hybridization of HSV DNA synthesized in HSV-superinfected cell cultures and by cesium chloride density gradient analysis of ({sup 3}H)-labeled HSV-1-superinfected cells.

  18. West Nile virus infection in a teenage boy with acute lymphocytic leukemia in remission.

    PubMed

    Hindo, Heather; Buescher, E Stephen; Frank, L Matthew; Pettit, Dee; Dory, Christopher; Byrd, Rebecca

    2005-12-01

    West Nile Virus (WNV) infection is an important cause of encephalitis. Although the medical literature contains examples of WNV encephalitis in susceptible, mainly elderly, immunocompromised hosts, few case reports have described pediatric cases. The authors describe an adolescent with acute lymphocytic leukemia and WNV encephalitis. Surveillance studies indicate an increase in WNV activity. Physicians need to be aware of WNV activity in their community and consider WNV as a potential source of infection.

  19. Expression of Factor X in BHK-21 Cells Promotes Low Pathogenic Influenza Viruses Replication.

    PubMed

    Shahsavandi, Shahla; Ebrahimi, Mohammad Majid; Masoudi, Shahin; Izadi, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    A cDNA clone for factor 10 (FX) isolated from chicken embryo inserted into the mammalian cell expression vector pCDNA3.1 was transfected into the baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cell line. The generated BHK-21 cells with inducible expression of FX were used to investigate the efficacy of the serine transmembrane protease to proteolytic activation of influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) with monobasic cleavage site. Data showed that the BHK-21/FX stably expressed FX after ten serial passages. The cells could proteolytically cleave the HA of low pathogenic avian influenza virus at multiplicity of infection 0.01. Growth kinetics of the virus on BHK-21/FX, BHK-21, and MDCK cells were evaluated by titrations of virus particles in each culture supernatant. Efficient multicycle viral replication was markedly detected in the cell at subsequent passages. Virus titration demonstrated that BHK-21/FX cell supported high-titer growth of the virus in which the viral titer is comparable to the virus grown in BHK-21 or MDCK cells with TPCK-trypsin. The results indicate potential application for the BHK-21/FX in influenza virus replication procedure and related studies.

  20. FKBP8 interact with classical swine fever virus NS5A protein and promote virus RNA replication.

    PubMed

    Li, Helin; Zhang, Chengcheng; Cui, Hongjie; Guo, Kangkang; Wang, Fang; Zhao, Tianyue; Liang, Wulong; Lv, Qizhuang; Zhang, Yanming

    2016-02-01

    The non-structural 5A (NS5A) protein of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is proven to be involved in viral replication and can also modulate cellular signaling and host cellular responses via to its ability to interact with various cellular proteins. FKBP8 is also reported to promote virus replication. Here, we show that NS5A specifically interacts with FKBP8 through coimmunoprecipitation and GST-pulldown studies. Additionally, confocal microscopy study showed that NS5A and FKBP8 colocalized in the cytoplasm. Overexpression of FKBP8 via the eukaryotic expression plasmid pDsRED N1 significantly promoted viral RNA synthesis. The cells knockdown of FKBP8 by lentivirus-mediated shRNA markedly decreased the virus replication when infected with CSFV. These data suggest that FKBP8 plays a critical role in the viral life cycle, particularly during the virus RNA replication period. The investigation of FKBP8 protein functions may be beneficial for developing new strategies to treat CSFV infection. PMID:26748656

  1. Hepatocyte Factor JMJD5 Regulates Hepatitis B Virus Replication through Interaction with HBx

    PubMed Central

    Kouwaki, Takahisa; Okamoto, Toru; Ito, Ayano; Sugiyama, Yukari; Yamashita, Kazuo; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Kusakabe, Shinji; Hirano, Junki; Fukuhara, Takasuke; Yamashita, Atsuya; Saito, Kazunobu; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Watashi, Koichi; Sugiyama, Masaya; Yoshio, Sachiyo; Standley, Daron M.; Kanto, Tatsuya; Mizokami, Masashi; Moriishi, Kohji

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a causative agent for chronic liver diseases such as hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HBx protein encoded by the HBV genome plays crucial roles not only in pathogenesis but also in replication of HBV. Although HBx has been shown to bind to a number of host proteins, the molecular mechanisms by which HBx regulates HBV replication are largely unknown. In this study, we identified jumonji C-domain-containing 5 (JMJD5) as a novel binding partner of HBx interacting in the cytoplasm. DNA microarray analysis revealed that JMJD5-knockout (JMJD5KO) Huh7 cells exhibited a significant reduction in the expression of transcriptional factors involved in hepatocyte differentiation, such as HNF4A, CEBPA, and FOXA3. We found that hydroxylase activity of JMJD5 participates in the regulation of these transcriptional factors. Moreover, JMJD5KO Huh7 cells exhibited a severe reduction in HBV replication, and complementation of HBx expression failed to rescue replication of a mutant HBV deficient in HBx, suggesting that JMJD5 participates in HBV replication through an interaction with HBx. We also found that replacing Gly135 with Glu in JMJD5 abrogates binding with HBx and replication of HBV. Moreover, the hydroxylase activity of JMJD5 was crucial for HBV replication. Collectively, these results suggest that direct interaction of JMJD5 with HBx facilitates HBV replication through the hydroxylase activity of JMJD5. IMPORTANCE HBx protein encoded by hepatitis B virus (HBV) plays important roles in pathogenesis and replication of HBV. We identified jumonji C-domain-containing 5 (JMJD5) as a novel binding partner to HBx. JMJD5 was shown to regulate several transcriptional factors to maintain hepatocyte function. Although HBx had been shown to support HBV replication, deficiency of JMJD5 abolished contribution of HBx in HBV replication, suggesting that HBx-mediated HBV replication is largely dependent on JMJD5. We showed that

  2. Preclinical activity of the novel B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 inhibitor PTC-209 in acute myeloid leukemia: Implications for leukemia therapy.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Yuki; Maeda, Aya; Chachad, Dhruv; Ishizawa, Jo; Qiu, Yi Hua; Kornblau, Steven M; Kimura, Shinya; Andreeff, Michael; Kojima, Kensuke

    2015-12-01

    Curing patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains a therapeutic challenge. The polycomb complex protein B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 (BMI-1) is required for the self-renewal and maintenance of leukemia stem cells. We investigated the prognostic significance of BMI-1 in AML and the effects of a novel small molecule selective inhibitor of BMI-1, PTC-209. BMI-1 protein expression was determined in 511 newly diagnosed AML patients together with 207 other proteins using reverse-phase protein array technology. Patients with unfavorable cytogenetics according to Southwest Oncology Group criteria had higher levels of BMI-1 compared to those with favorable (P = 0.0006) or intermediate cytogenetics (P = 0.0061), and patients with higher levels of BMI-1 had worse overall survival (55.3 weeks vs. 42.8 weeks, P = 0.046). Treatment with PTC-209 reduced protein level of BMI-1 and its downstream target mono-ubiquitinated histone H2A and triggered several molecular events consistent with the induction of apoptosis, this is, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, caspase-3 cleavage, BAX activation, and phosphatidylserine externalization. PTC-209 induced apoptosis in patient-derived CD34(+)CD38(low/-) AML cells and, less prominently, in CD34(-) differentiated AML cells. BMI-1 reduction by PTC-209 directly correlated with apoptosis induction in CD34(+) primary AML cells (r = 0.71, P = 0.022). However, basal BMI-1 expression was not a determinant of AML sensitivity. BMI-1 inhibition, which targets a primitive AML cell population, might offer a novel therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:26450753

  3. Detection of bovine leukemia virus and identification of its genotype in Mongolian cattle.

    PubMed

    Ochirkhuu, Nyamsuren; Konnai, Satoru; Odbileg, Raadan; Nishimori, Asami; Okagawa, Tomohiro; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2016-04-01

    Epidemiological studies have indicated that bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection is globally distributed. However, no information regarding the disease and genetic diversity of the virus in the cattle of Mongolia is currently available. In this study, the prevalence of BLV was assessed using PCR, and the genetic diversity was analyzed through DNA sequencing. Of the 517 samples tested, 20 positives were identified. Phylogenetic analysis showed that six, one, and four isolates were classified into genotype 4, 7, and 1, respectively. Most isolates were clustered with isolates from Eastern Europe and Russia. This study is the first to investigate the BLV genotype in Mongolia. PMID:26711456

  4. Detection of bovine leukemia virus and identification of its genotype in Mongolian cattle.

    PubMed

    Ochirkhuu, Nyamsuren; Konnai, Satoru; Odbileg, Raadan; Nishimori, Asami; Okagawa, Tomohiro; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2016-04-01

    Epidemiological studies have indicated that bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection is globally distributed. However, no information regarding the disease and genetic diversity of the virus in the cattle of Mongolia is currently available. In this study, the prevalence of BLV was assessed using PCR, and the genetic diversity was analyzed through DNA sequencing. Of the 517 samples tested, 20 positives were identified. Phylogenetic analysis showed that six, one, and four isolates were classified into genotype 4, 7, and 1, respectively. Most isolates were clustered with isolates from Eastern Europe and Russia. This study is the first to investigate the BLV genotype in Mongolia.

  5. Novel Feline Leukemia Virus Interference Group Based on the env Gene

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Ariko; Watanabe, Shinya; Hiratsuka, Takahiro; Ito, Jumpei; Ngo, Minh Ha; Makundi, Isaac; Kawasaki, Junna; Endo, Yasuyuki; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) subgroups have emerged in infected cats via the mutation or recombination of the env gene of subgroup A FeLV (FeLV-A), the primary virus. We report the isolation and characterization of a novel env gene, TG35-2, and report that the TG35-2 pseudotype can be categorized as a novel FeLV subgroup. The TG35-2 envelope protein displays strong sequence identity to FeLV-A Env, suggesting that selection pressure in cats causes novel FeLV subgroups to emerge. PMID:26889025

  6. [Culture and control of cells producing bovine leukemia virus].

    PubMed

    Granátová, M

    1987-10-01

    In the field surveys of the occurrence of enzootic bovine leucosis caused by the bovine leucosis virus (BLV), the identification of positive animals is based on the detection of specific antiviral antibodies by serological methods. The reliability of these tests (particularly their sensitivity and specificity) depends on the quality of the virus antigen. The preparation of the antigen is based on the cultivation of BLV virus in cultures of the FLS cell line. A modified procedure of preparing the BLV antigen in the FLS cell culture is described, along with the control of its production by the immunoperoxidase test. PMID:2827363

  7. NB protein does not affect influenza B virus replication in vitro and is not required for replication in or transmission between ferrets.

    PubMed

    Elderfield, Ruth A; Koutsakos, Marios; Frise, Rebecca; Bradley, Konrad; Ashcroft, Jonathan; Miah, Shanhjahan; Lackenby, Angie; Barclay, Wendy S

    2016-03-01

    The influenza B virus encodes a unique protein, NB, a membrane protein whose function in the replication cycle is not, as yet, understood. We engineered a recombinant influenza B virus lacking NB expression, with no concomitant difference in expression or activity of viral neuraminidase (NA) protein, an important caveat since NA is encoded on the same segment and initiated from a start codon just 4 nt downstream of NB. Replication of the virus lacking NB was not different to wild-type virus with full-length NB in clonal immortalized or complex primary cell cultures. In the mouse model, virus lacking NB induced slightly lower IFN-α levels in infected lungs, but this did not affect virus titres or weight loss. In ferrets infected with a mixture of viruses that did or did not express NB, there was no fitness advantage for the virus that retained NB. Moreover, virus lacking NB protein was transmitted following respiratory droplet exposure of sentinel animals. These data suggest no role for NB in supporting replication or transmission in vivo in this animal model. The role of NB and the nature of selection to retain it in all natural influenza B viruses remain unclear. PMID:26703440

  8. Temporal replication of the Pullman strain of Aleutian disease virus in royal pastel mink.

    PubMed

    Hadlow, W J; Race, R E; Kennedy, R C

    1985-09-01

    Information was sought on the temporal replication of Aleutian disease virus in 27 royal pastel mink. Groups of three were examined 8 to 126 days after they were inoculated subcutaneously with 10(3) 50% lethal doses of the Pullman strain. Much individual variation was noted in the onset of infection, occurrence of viremia, and extent of virus replication in the tissues. Thus, virus was detected in lymph nodes regional to the site of inoculation in only some mink during the first 14 days after inoculation. During this period, virus was often present as well in the mesenteric lymph node and spleen. First detected on day 10, viremia was present in all mink examined on day 28 but occurred irregularly thereafter, even when virus was widespread in the tissues. Except in five mink succumbing to the disease, the tissue distribution of virus after day 28 tended to be more limited, and the titers were generally lower than they had been earlier. Even though present in the lymph nodes and spleen, virus was often absent from the kidney, liver, and intestine after day 28. Specific antibody was detected on day 28 and was present in all mink thereafter, ostensibly without any adverse effect on virus replication. In most mink, the infection was considered subclinical, for it was usually not accompanied by a rise in serum gamma globulin or by morphologic evidence of the disease. The virologic findings in this study have a bearing on the relationship of subclinical infections to both horizontal and vertical transmission of the virus.

  9. Mutational analysis of the envelope gene of Moloney murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, K D; Roth, M J

    1993-01-01

    The env gene products of Moloney murine leukemia virus are required for binding and entry of the virus into the target cell. Thirty-three linker insertion mutations were constructed throughout the env gene of Moloney murine leukemia virus. Twenty of the mutations were located in the surface protein (SU), and the remaining thirteen were located in the transmembrane protein (TM). The viability of the viruses containing these env gene mutations was determined by performing transient transfections and screening for the release of reverse transcriptase. Eleven viable mutants were isolated, nine in SU and two in TM. Three of the viable mutants were temperature sensitive. Four of the viable mutants were clustered in the carboxy terminus of SU. The env gene products of transfected cell lines which produced viable virus were analyzed. Our results indicated two regions of SU important for the stability of the SU/TM heteropolymer and one region important for the interaction of the env gene products with the viral core. Images PMID:7684467

  10. Favipiravir elicits antiviral mutagenesis during virus replication in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Armando; Thorne, Lucy; Goodfellow, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Lethal mutagenesis has emerged as a novel potential therapeutic approach to treat viral infections. Several studies have demonstrated that increases in the high mutation rates inherent to RNA viruses lead to viral extinction in cell culture, but evidence during infections in vivo is limited. In this study, we show that the broad-range antiviral nucleoside favipiravir reduces viral load in vivo by exerting antiviral mutagenesis in a mouse model for norovirus infection. Increased mutation frequencies were observed in samples from treated mice and were accompanied with lower or in some cases undetectable levels of infectious virus in faeces and tissues. Viral RNA isolated from treated animals showed reduced infectivity, a feature of populations approaching extinction during antiviral mutagenesis. These results suggest that favipiravir can induce norovirus mutagenesis in vivo, which in some cases leads to virus extinction, providing a proof-of-principle for the use of favipiravir derivatives or mutagenic nucleosides in the clinical treatment of noroviruses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03679.001 PMID:25333492

  11. Dengue Virus Reporter Replicon is a Valuable Tool for Antiviral Drug Discovery and Analysis of Virus Replication Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Fumihiro; Hishiki, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Dengue, the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral disease, is caused by the dengue virus (DENV), a member of the Flaviviridae family, and is a considerable public health threat in over 100 countries, with 2.5 billion people living in high-risk areas. However, no specific antiviral drug or licensed vaccine currently targets DENV infection. The replicon system has all the factors needed for viral replication in cells. Since the development of replicon systems, transient and stable reporter replicons, as well as reporter viruses, have been used in the study of various virological aspects of DENV and in the identification of DENV inhibitors. In this review, we summarize the DENV reporter replicon system and its applications in high-throughput screening (HTS) for identification of anti-DENV inhibitors. We also describe the use of this system in elucidation of the mechanisms of virus replication and viral dynamics in vivo and in vitro. PMID:27164125

  12. Programmed Ribosomal Frameshift Alters Expression of West Nile Virus Genes and Facilitates Virus Replication in Birds and Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Du, Fangyao; Owens, Nick; Bosco-Lauth, Angela M.; Nagasaki, Tomoko; Rudd, Stephen; Brault, Aaron C.; Bowen, Richard A.; Hall, Roy A.; van den Hurk, Andrew F.; Khromykh, Alexander A.

    2014-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a human pathogen of significant medical importance with close to 40,000 cases of encephalitis and more than 1,600 deaths reported in the US alone since its first emergence in New York in 1999. Previous studies identified a motif in the beginning of non-structural gene NS2A of encephalitic flaviviruses including WNV which induces programmed −1 ribosomal frameshift (PRF) resulting in production of an additional NS protein NS1′. We have previously demonstrated that mutant WNV with abolished PRF was attenuated in mice. Here we have extended our previous observations by showing that PRF does not appear to have a significant role in virus replication, virion formation, and viral spread in several cell lines in vitro. However, we have also shown that PRF induces an over production of structural proteins over non-structural proteins in virus-infected cells and that mutation abolishing PRF is present in ∼11% of the wild type virus population. In vivo experiments in house sparrows using wild type and PRF mutant of New York 99 strain of WNV viruses showed some attenuation for the PRF mutant virus. Moreover, PRF mutant of Kunjin strain of WNV showed significant decrease compared to wild type virus infection in dissemination of the virus from the midgut through the haemocoel, and ultimately the capacity of infected mosquitoes to transmit virus. Thus our results demonstrate an important role for PRF in regulating expression of viral genes and consequently virus replication in avian and mosquito hosts. PMID:25375107

  13. Impaired antiviral response of adenovirus-transformed cell lines supports virus replication.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Mandy; Breitwieser, Theresa; Lipps, Christoph; Wirth, Dagmar; Jordan, Ingo; Reichl, Udo; Frensing, Timo

    2016-02-01

    Activation of the innate immune response represents one of the most important cellular mechanisms to limit virus replication and spread in cell culture. Here, we examined the effect of adenoviral gene expression on the antiviral response in adenovirus-transformed cell lines; HEK293, HEK293SF and AGE1.HN. We demonstrate that the expression of the early region protein 1A in these cell lines impairs their ability to activate antiviral genes by the IFN pathway. This property may help in the isolation of newly emerging viruses and the propagation of interferon-sensitive virus strains.

  14. Generation of replication-proficient influenza virus NS1 point mutants with interferon-hyperinducer phenotype.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cidoncha, Maite; Killip, Marian J; Asensio, Víctor J; Fernández, Yolanda; Bengoechea, José A; Randall, Richard E; Ortín, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The NS1 protein of influenza A viruses is the dedicated viral interferon (IFN)-antagonist. Viruses lacking NS1 protein expression cannot multiply in normal cells but are viable in cells deficient in their ability to produce or respond to IFN. Here we report an unbiased mutagenesis approach to identify positions in the influenza A NS1 protein that modulate the IFN response upon infection. A random library of virus ribonucleoproteins containing circa 40 000 point mutants in NS1 were transferred to infectious virus and amplified in MDCK cells unable to respond to interferon. Viruses that activated the interferon (IFN) response were subsequently selected by their ability to induce expression of green-fluorescent protein (GFP) following infection of A549 cells bearing an IFN promoter-dependent GFP gene. Using this approach we isolated individual mutant viruses that replicate to high titers in IFN-compromised cells but, compared to wild type viruses, induced higher levels of IFN in IFN-competent cells and had a reduced capacity to counteract exogenous IFN. Most of these viruses contained not previously reported NS1 mutations within either the RNA-binding domain, the effector domain or the linker region between them. These results indicate that subtle alterations in NS1 can reduce its effectiveness as an IFN antagonist without affecting the intrinsic capacity of the virus to multiply. The general approach reported here may facilitate the generation of replication-proficient, IFN-inducing virus mutants, that potentially could be developed as attenuated vaccines against a variety of viruses.

  15. Generation of Replication-Proficient Influenza Virus NS1 Point Mutants with Interferon-Hyperinducer Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Cidoncha, Maite; Killip, Marian J.; Asensio, Víctor J.; Fernández, Yolanda; Bengoechea, José A.; Randall, Richard E.; Ortín, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The NS1 protein of influenza A viruses is the dedicated viral interferon (IFN)-antagonist. Viruses lacking NS1 protein expression cannot multiply in normal cells but are viable in cells deficient in their ability to produce or respond to IFN. Here we report an unbiased mutagenesis approach to identify positions in the influenza A NS1 protein that modulate the IFN response upon infection. A random library of virus ribonucleoproteins containing circa 40 000 point mutants in NS1 were transferred to infectious virus and amplified in MDCK cells unable to respond to interferon. Viruses that activated the interferon (IFN) response were subsequently selected by their ability to induce expression of green-fluorescent protein (GFP) following infection of A549 cells bearing an IFN promoter-dependent GFP gene. Using this approach we isolated individual mutant viruses that replicate to high titers in IFN-compromised cells but, compared to wild type viruses, induced higher levels of IFN in IFN-competent cells and had a reduced capacity to counteract exogenous IFN. Most of these viruses contained not previously reported NS1 mutations within either the RNA-binding domain, the effector domain or the linker region between them. These results indicate that subtle alterations in NS1 can reduce its effectiveness as an IFN antagonist without affecting the intrinsic capacity of the virus to multiply. The general approach reported here may facilitate the generation of replication-proficient, IFN-inducing virus mutants, that potentially could be developed as attenuated vaccines against a variety of viruses. PMID:24887174

  16. A Unique Role for the Host ESCRT Proteins in Replication of Tomato bushy stunt virus

    PubMed Central

    Barajas, Daniel; Jiang, Yi; Nagy, Peter D.

    2009-01-01

    Plus-stranded RNA viruses replicate in infected cells by assembling viral replicase complexes consisting of viral- and host-coded proteins. Previous genome-wide screens with Tomato bushy stunt tombusvirus (TBSV) in a yeast model host revealed the involvement of seven ESCRT (endosomal sorting complexes required for transport) proteins in viral replication. In this paper, we show that the expression of dominant negative Vps23p, Vps24p, Snf7p, and Vps4p ESCRT factors inhibited virus replication in the plant host, suggesting that tombusviruses co-opt selected ESCRT proteins for the assembly of the viral replicase complex. We also show that TBSV p33 replication protein interacts with Vps23p ESCRT-I and Bro1p accessory ESCRT factors. The interaction with p33 leads to the recruitment of Vps23p to the peroxisomes, the sites of TBSV replication. The viral replicase showed reduced activity and the minus-stranded viral RNA in the replicase became more accessible to ribonuclease when derived from vps23Δ or vps24Δ yeast, suggesting that the protection of the viral RNA is compromised within the replicase complex assembled in the absence of ESCRT proteins. The recruitment of ESCRT proteins is needed for the precise assembly of the replicase complex, which might help the virus evade recognition by the host defense surveillance system and/or prevent viral RNA destruction by the gene silencing machinery. PMID:20041173

  17. Role of human GRP75 in miRNA mediated regulation of dengue virus replication.

    PubMed

    Kakumani, Pavan Kumar; Medigeshi, Guruprasad R; Kaur, Inderjeet; Malhotra, Pawan; Mukherjee, Sunil K; Bhatnagar, Raj K

    2016-07-15

    In recent times, RNAi has emerged as an important defence system that regulates replication of pathogens in host cells. Many RNAi related host factors especially the host miRNAs play important roles in all intrinsic cellular functions, including viral infection. We have been working on identification of mammalian host factors involved in Dengue virus infection. In the present study, we identified Glucose Regulated Protein 75kDa (GRP75), as a host factor that is associated with dicer complex, in particular with HADHA (trifunctional enzyme subunit alpha, mitochondrial), an auxiliary component of dicer complex. Knockdown of GRP75 by respective siRNAs in Huh-7 cells resulted in the accumulation of dengue viral genomic RNA suggesting a role of GRP75 in regulating dengue virus replication in human cell lines. To elucidate the mode of action of GRP75, we over expressed the protein in Huh-7 cells and analysed the host miRNAs processing. The results revealed that, GRP75 is involved in processing of host miRNA, hsa-mir-126, that down regulates dengue virus replication. These findings suggest a regulatory role of human miRNA pathway especially GRP75 protein and hsa-mir-126 in dengue virus replication. These results thus provide insights into the role of miRNAs and RNAi machinery in dengue life cycle. PMID:27039024

  18. Flock house virus replicates and expresses green fluorescent protein in mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Ranjit; Cheng, Li-Lin; Bartholomay, Lyric C; Christensen, Bruce M

    2003-07-01

    Flock house virus (FHV) is a non-enveloped, positive-sense RNA virus of insect origin that belongs to the family Nodaviridae. FHV has been shown to overcome the kingdom barrier and to replicate in plants, insects, yeast and mammalian cells. Although of insect origin, FHV has not previously been shown to replicate in mosquitoes. We have tested FHV replication in vitro in C6/36 cells (derived from neonatal Aedes albopictus) and in vivo in four different genera of mosquitoes, Aedes, Culex, Anopheles and Armigeres. FHV replicated to high titres in C6/36 cells that had been subcloned to support maximum growth of FHV. When adult mosquitoes were orally fed or injected with the virus, FHV antigen was detected in various tissues and infectious virus was recovered. Vectors developed from an infectious cDNA clone of a defective-interfering RNA, derived from FHV genomic RNA2, expressed green fluorescent protein in Drosophila cells and adult mosquitoes. This demonstrates the potential of FHV-based vectors for expression of foreign genes in mosquitoes and possibly other insects.

  19. Applications of Replicating-Competent Reporter-Expressing Viruses in Diagnostic and Molecular Virology.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongfeng; Li, Lian-Feng; Yu, Shaoxiong; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Lingkai; Yu, Jiahui; Xie, Libao; Li, Weike; Ali, Razim; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2016-05-06

    Commonly used tests based on wild-type viruses, such as immunostaining, cannot meet the demands for rapid detection of viral replication, high-throughput screening for antivirals, as well as for tracking viral proteins or virus transport in real time. Notably, the development of replicating-competent reporter-expressing viruses (RCREVs) has provided an excellent option to detect directly viral replication without the use of secondary labeling, which represents a significant advance in virology. This article reviews the applications of RCREVs in diagnostic and molecular virology, including rapid neutralization tests, high-throughput screening systems, identification of viral receptors and virus-host interactions, dynamics of viral infections in vitro and in vivo, vaccination approaches and others. However, there remain various challenges associated with RCREVs, including pathogenicity alterations due to the insertion of a reporter gene, instability or loss of the reporter gene expression, or attenuation of reporter signals in vivo. Despite all these limitations, RCREVs have become powerful tools for both basic and applied virology with the development of new technologies for generating RCREVs, the inventions of novel reporters and the better understanding of regulation of viral replication.

  20. Applications of Replicating-Competent Reporter-Expressing Viruses in Diagnostic and Molecular Virology

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongfeng; Li, Lian-Feng; Yu, Shaoxiong; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Lingkai; Yu, Jiahui; Xie, Libao; Li, Weike; Ali, Razim; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2016-01-01

    Commonly used tests based on wild-type viruses, such as immunostaining, cannot meet the demands for rapid detection of viral replication, high-throughput screening for antivirals, as well as for tracking viral proteins or virus transport in real time. Notably, the development of replicating-competent reporter-expressing viruses (RCREVs) has provided an excellent option to detect directly viral replication without the use of secondary labeling, which represents a significant advance in virology. This article reviews the applications of RCREVs in diagnostic and molecular virology, including rapid neutralization tests, high-throughput screening systems, identification of viral receptors and virus-host interactions, dynamics of viral infections in vitro and in vivo, vaccination approaches and others. However, there remain various challenges associated with RCREVs, including pathogenicity alterations due to the insertion of a reporter gene, instability or loss of the reporter gene expression, or attenuation of reporter signals in vivo. Despite all these limitations, RCREVs have become powerful tools for both basic and applied virology with the development of new technologies for generating RCREVs, the inventions of novel reporters and the better understanding of regulation of viral replication. PMID:27164126

  1. Viperin: a multifunctional, interferon-inducible protein that regulates virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jun-Young; Yaneva, Rakina; Cresswell, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Summary Viperin is an interferon-inducible protein that inhibits the replication of a variety of viruses by apparently diverse mechanisms. In some circumstances it also plays a role in intracellular signaling pathways. Its expression in mitochondria, revealed by infection with human cytomegalovirus, also affects cellular metabolic pathways. We review here the current status of our understanding of this unusual molecule. PMID:22177558

  2. Polyoma virus early-late switch: regulation of late RNA accumulation by DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Carmichael, G G

    1993-09-15

    Early in infection of permissive mouse cells, messages from the early region of the polyoma virus genome accumulate preferentially over those from the late region. After initiation of DNA replication, the balance between early and late gene expression is reversed in favor of the late products. In previous work from our laboratory, we showed that viral early proteins do not activate the polyoma late promoter in the absence of DNA replication. Here we show that activation of the late genes in replication-incompetent viral genomes can occur if actively replicating genomes are present in the same cell. A low level of DNA replication, however, is insufficient to induce the early-late switch. Furthermore, replication-competent genomes that fail to accumulate late RNA molecules are defective in the transactivation of replication-incompetent genomes. We suggest that titration of an unknown diffusible factor(s) after DNA replication relieves the block to late RNA accumulation seen in the early phase, with most of this titration being attributable to late-strand RNA molecules themselves.

  3. Productive replication of Ebola virus is regulated by the c-Abl1 tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    García, Mayra; Cooper, Arik; Shi, Wei; Bornmann, William; Carrion, Ricardo; Kalman, Daniel; Nabel, Gary J

    2012-02-29

    Ebola virus causes a fulminant infection in humans resulting in diffuse bleeding, vascular instability, hypotensive shock, and often death. Because of its high mortality and ease of transmission from human to human, Ebola virus remains a biological threat for which effective preventive and therapeutic interventions are needed. An understanding of the mechanisms of Ebola virus pathogenesis is critical for developing antiviral therapeutics. Here, we report that productive replication of Ebola virus is modulated by the c-Abl1 tyrosine kinase. Release of Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs) in a cell culture cotransfection system was inhibited by c-Abl1-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) or by Abl-specific kinase inhibitors and required tyrosine phosphorylation of the Ebola matrix protein VP40. Expression of c-Abl1 stimulated an increase in phosphorylation of tyrosine 13 (Y(13)) of VP40, and mutation of Y(13) to alanine decreased the release of Ebola VLPs. Productive replication of the highly pathogenic Ebola virus Zaire strain was inhibited by c-Abl1-specific siRNAs or by the Abl-family inhibitor nilotinib by up to four orders of magnitude. These data indicate that c-Abl1 regulates budding or release of filoviruses through a mechanism involving phosphorylation of VP40. This step of the virus life cycle therefore may represent a target for antiviral therapy.

  4. FAT10 Is Critical in Influenza A Virus Replication by Inhibiting Type I IFN.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanli; Tang, Jun; Yang, Ning; Liu, Qiang; Zhang, Qingchao; Zhang, Yanxu; Li, Ning; Zhao, Yan; Li, Shunwang; Liu, Song; Zhou, Huandi; Li, Xiao; Tian, Mingyao; Deng, Jiejie; Xie, Peng; Sun, Yang; Lu, Huijun; Zhang, Michael Q; Jin, Ningyi; Jiang, Chengyu

    2016-08-01

    The H5N1 avian influenza virus causes severe disease and high mortality, making it a major public health concern worldwide. The virus uses the host cellular machinery for several steps of its life cycle. In this report, we observed overexpression of the ubiquitin-like protein FAT10 following live H5N1 virus infection in BALB/c mice and in the human respiratory epithelial cell lines A549 and BEAS-2B. Further experiments demonstrated that FAT10 increased H5N1 virus replication and decreased the viability of infected cells. Total RNA extracted from H5N1 virus-infected cells, but not other H5N1 viral components, upregulated FAT10, and this process was mediated by the retinoic acid-induced protein I-NF-κB signaling pathway. FAT10 knockdown in A549 cells upregulated type I IFN mRNA expression and enhanced STAT1 phosphorylation during live H5N1 virus infection. Taken together, our data suggest that FAT10 was upregulated via retinoic acid-induced protein I and NF-κB during H5N1 avian influenza virus infection. And the upregulated FAT10 promoted H5N1 viral replication by inhibiting type I IFN. PMID:27354218

  5. A comprehensive map of the influenza A virus replication cycle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Influenza is a common infectious disease caused by influenza viruses. Annual epidemics cause severe illnesses, deaths, and economic loss around the world. To better defend against influenza viral infection, it is essential to understand its mechanisms and associated host responses. Many studies have been conducted to elucidate these mechanisms, however, the overall picture remains incompletely understood. A systematic understanding of influenza viral infection in host cells is needed to facilitate the identification of influential host response mechanisms and potential drug targets. Description We constructed a comprehensive map of the influenza A virus (‘IAV’) life cycle (‘FluMap’) by undertaking a literature-based, manual curation approach. Based on information obtained from publicly available pathway databases, updated with literature-based information and input from expert virologists and immunologists, FluMap is currently composed of 960 factors (i.e., proteins, mRNAs etc.) and 456 reactions, and is annotated with ~500 papers and curation comments. In addition to detailing the type of molecular interactions, isolate/strain specific data are also available. The FluMap was built with the pathway editor CellDesigner in standard SBML (Systems Biology Markup Language) format and visualized as an SBGN (Systems Biology Graphical Notation) diagram. It is also available as a web service (online map) based on the iPathways+ system to enable community discussion by influenza researchers. We also demonstrate computational network analyses to identify targets using the FluMap. Conclusion The FluMap is a comprehensive pathway map that can serve as a graphically presented knowledge-base and as a platform to analyze functional interactions between IAV and host factors. Publicly available webtools will allow continuous updating to ensure the most reliable representation of the host-virus interaction network. The FluMap is available at http

  6. Essential Role of Cyclophilin A for Hepatitis C Virus Replication and Virus Production and Possible Link to Polyprotein Cleavage Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, Artur; Pertel, Thomas; Schmitt, Jennifer; Kallis, Stephanie; Zayas Lopez, Margarita; Lohmann, Volker; Luban, Jeremy; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites and therefore their replication completely depends on host cell factors. In case of the hepatitis C virus (HCV), a positive-strand RNA virus that in the majority of infections establishes persistence, cyclophilins are considered to play an important role in RNA replication. Subsequent to the observation that cyclosporines, known to sequester cyclophilins by direct binding, profoundly block HCV replication in cultured human hepatoma cells, conflicting results were obtained as to the particular cyclophilin (Cyp) required for viral RNA replication and the underlying possible mode of action. By using a set of cell lines with stable knock-down of CypA or CypB, we demonstrate in the present work that replication of subgenomic HCV replicons of different genotypes is reduced by CypA depletion up to 1,000-fold whereas knock-down of CypB had no effect. Inhibition of replication was rescued by over-expression of wild type CypA, but not by a mutant lacking isomerase activity. Replication of JFH1-derived full length genomes was even more sensitive to CypA depletion as compared to subgenomic replicons and virus production was completely blocked. These results argue that CypA may target an additional viral factor outside of the minimal replicase contributing to RNA amplification and assembly, presumably nonstructural protein 2. By selecting for resistance against the cyclosporine analogue DEBIO-025 that targets CypA in a dose-dependent manner, we identified two mutations (V2440A and V2440L) close to the cleavage site between nonstructural protein 5A and the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase in nonstructural protein 5B that slow down cleavage kinetics at this site and reduce CypA dependence of viral replication. Further amino acid substitutions at the same cleavage site accelerating processing increase CypA dependence. Our results thus identify an unexpected correlation between HCV polyprotein processing and CypA dependence of HCV

  7. Replication and Transmission of the Novel Bovine Influenza D Virus in a Guinea Pig Model

    PubMed Central

    Sreenivasan, Chithra; Thomas, Milton; Sheng, Zizhang; Hause, Ben M.; Collin, Emily A.; Knudsen, David E. B.; Pillatzki, Angela; Nelson, Eric; Wang, Dan; Kaushik, Radhey S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza D virus (FLUDV) is a novel influenza virus that infects cattle and swine. The goal of this study was to investigate the replication and transmission of bovine FLUDV in guinea pigs. Following direct intranasal inoculation of animals, the virus was detected in nasal washes of infected animals during the first 7 days postinfection. High viral titers were obtained from nasal turbinates and lung tissues of directly inoculated animals. Further, bovine FLUDV was able to transmit from the infected guinea pigs to sentinel animals by means of contact and not by aerosol dissemination under the experimental conditions tested in this study. Despite exhibiting no clinical signs, infected guinea pigs developed seroconversion and the viral antigen was detected in lungs of animals by immunohistochemistry. The observation that bovine FLUDV replicated in the respiratory tract of guinea pigs was similar to observations described previously in studies of gnotobiotic calves and pigs experimentally infected with bovine FLUDV but different from those described previously in experimental infections in ferrets and swine with a swine FLUDV, which supported virus replication only in the upper respiratory tract and not in the lower respiratory tract, including lung. Our study established that guinea pigs could be used as an animal model for studying this newly emerging influenza virus. IMPORTANCE Influenza D virus (FLUDV) is a novel emerging pathogen with bovine as its primary host. The epidemiology and pathogenicity of the virus are not yet known. FLUDV also spreads to swine, and the presence of FLUDV-specific antibodies in humans could indicate that there is a potential for zoonosis. Our results showed that bovine FLUDV replicated in the nasal turbinate and lungs of guinea pigs at high titers and was also able to transmit from an infected animal to sentinel animals by contact. The fact that bovine FLUDV replicated productively in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts

  8. In vitro inhibition of the replication of classical swine fever virus by porcine Mx1 protein.

    PubMed

    He, Dan-ni; Zhang, Xiao-min; Liu, Ke; Pang, Ran; Zhao, Jin; Zhou, Bin; Chen, Pu-yan

    2014-04-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the causative pathogen of classical swine fever (CSF), a highly contagious disease of swine. Mx proteins are interferon-induced dynamin-like GTPases present in all vertebrates with a wide range of antiviral activities. Although Zhao et al. (2011) have reported that human MxA can inhibit CSFV replication, whether porcine Mx1 (poMx1) has anti-CSFV activity remains unknown. In this study, we generated a cell line designated PK-15/EGFP-poMx1 which expressed porcine Mx1 protein constitutively, and we observed that the proliferation of progeny virus in this cell line was significantly inhibited as measured by virus titration, indirect immune fluorescence assay, Q-PCR and Western blot. Furthermore, when PTD-poMx1 fusion protein expressed in Escherichia coli (Zhang et al., 2013) was used to treat CSFV-infected PK-15 cells, the results showed that PTD-poMx1 inhibited CSFV replication in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, the proliferation of progeny virus was inhibited as measured by virus titration and Q-PCR. Overall, the results demonstrated that poMx1 effectively inhibited CSFV replication, suggesting that poMx1 may be a valuable therapeutic agent against CSFV infection.

  9. Phosphorylation at the Homotypic Interface Regulates Nucleoprotein Oligomerization and Assembly of the Influenza Virus Replication Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Arindam; Potts, Gregory K.; Dawson, Anthony R.; Coon, Joshua J.; Mehle, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Negative-sense RNA viruses assemble large ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes that direct replication and transcription of the viral genome. Influenza virus RNPs contain the polymerase, genomic RNA and multiple copies of nucleoprotein (NP). During RNP assembly, monomeric NP oligomerizes along the length of the genomic RNA. Regulated assembly of the RNP is essential for virus replication, but how NP is maintained as a monomer that subsequently oligomerizes to form RNPs is poorly understood. Here we elucidate a mechanism whereby NP phosphorylation regulates oligomerization. We identified new evolutionarily conserved phosphorylation sites on NP and demonstrated that phosphorylation of NP decreased formation of higher-order complexes. Two phosphorylation sites were located on opposite sides of the NP:NP interface. In both influenza A and B virus, mutating or mimicking phosphorylation at these residues blocked homotypic interactions and drove NP towards a monomeric form. Highlighting the central role of this process during infection, these mutations impaired RNP formation, polymerase activity and virus replication. Thus, dynamic phosphorylation of NP regulates RNP assembly and modulates progression through the viral life cycle. PMID:25867750

  10. Human Choline Kinase-α Promotes Hepatitis C Virus RNA Replication through Modulation of Membranous Viral Replication Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Mun-Teng

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection reorganizes cellular membranes to create an active viral replication site named the membranous web (MW). The role that human choline kinase-α (hCKα) plays in HCV replication remains elusive. Here, we first showed that hCKα activity, not the CDP-choline pathway, promoted viral RNA replication. Confocal microscopy and subcellular fractionation of HCV-infected cells revealed that a small fraction of hCKα colocalized with the viral replication complex (RC) on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and that HCV infection increased hCKα localization to the ER. In the pTM-NS3-NS5B model, NS3-NS5B expression increased the localization of the wild-type, not the inactive D288A mutant, hCKα on the ER, and hCKα activity was required for effective trafficking of hCKα and NS5A to the ER. Coimmunoprecipitation showed that hCKα was recruited onto the viral RC presumably through its binding to NS5A domain 1 (D1). hCKα silencing or treatment with CK37, an hCKα activity inhibitor, abolished HCV-induced MW formation. In addition, hCKα depletion hindered NS5A localization on the ER, interfered with NS5A and NS5B colocalization, and mitigated NS5A-NS5B interactions but had no apparent effect on NS5A-NS4B and NS4B-NS5B interactions. Nevertheless, hCKα activity was not essential for the binding of NS5A to hCKα or NS5B. These findings demonstrate that hCKα forms a complex with NS5A and that hCKα activity enhances the targeting of the complex to the ER, where hCKα protein, not activity, mediates NS5A binding to NS5B, thereby promoting functional membranous viral RC assembly and viral RNA replication. IMPORTANCE HCV infection reorganizes the cellular membrane to create an active viral replication site named the membranous web (MW). Here, we report that human choline kinase-α (hCKα) acts as an essential host factor for HCV RNA replication. A fraction of hCKα colocalizes with the viral replication complex (RC) on the endoplasmic reticulum

  11. Human MxA protein inhibits the replication of classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yicheng; Pang, Daxin; Wang, Tiedong; Yang, Xin; Wu, Rong; Ren, Linzhu; Yuan, Ting; Huang, Yongye; Ouyang, Hongsheng

    2011-03-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) has a spherical enveloped particle with a single stranded RNA genome, the virus belonging to a pestivirus of the family Flaviviridae is the causative agent of an acute contagious disease classical swine fever (CSF). The interferon-induced MxA protein has been widely shown to inhibit the life cycle of certain RNA viruses as members of the Bunyaviridae family and others. Interestingly, it has been reported that expression of MxA in infected cells was blocked by CSFV and whether MxA has an inhibitory effect against CSFV remains unknown to date until present. Here, we report that CSFV replicated poorly in cells stably transfected with human MxA. The proliferation of progeny virus in both PK-15 cell lines and swine fetal fibroblasts (PEF) continuously expressing MxA was shown significantly inhibited as measured by virus titration, indirect immune fluorescence assay and real-time PCR.

  12. Novel influenza virus NS1 antagonists block replication and restore innate immune function.

    PubMed

    Basu, Dipanwita; Walkiewicz, Marcin P; Frieman, Matthew; Baric, Ralph S; Auble, David T; Engel, Daniel A

    2009-02-01

    The innate immune system guards against virus infection through a variety of mechanisms including mobilization of the host interferon system, which attacks viral products mainly at a posttranscriptional level. The influenza virus NS1 protein is a multifunctional facilitator of virus replication, one of whose actions is to antagonize the interferon response. Since NS1 is required for efficient virus replication, it was reasoned that chemical inhibitors of this protein could be used to further understand virus-host interactions and also serve as potential new antiviral agents. A yeast-based assay was developed to identify compounds that phenotypically suppress NS1 function. Several such compounds exhibited significant activity specifically against influenza A virus in cell culture but had no effect on the replication of another RNA virus, respiratory syncytial virus. Interestingly, cells lacking an interferon response were drug resistant, suggesting that the compounds block interactions between NS1 and the interferon system. Accordingly, the compounds reversed the inhibition of beta interferon mRNA induction during infection, which is known to be caused by NS1. In addition, the compounds blocked the ability of NS1 protein to inhibit double-stranded RNA-dependent activation of a transfected beta interferon promoter construct. The effects of the compounds were specific to NS1, because they had no effect on the ability of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus papainlike protease protein to block beta interferon promoter activation. These data demonstrate that the function of NS1 can be modulated by chemical inhibitors and that such inhibitors will be useful as probes of biological function and as starting points for clinical drug development.

  13. Endogenous hepatitis C virus homolog fragments in European rabbit and hare genomes replicate in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Silva, Eliane; Marques, Sara; Osório, Hugo; Carvalheira, Júlio; Thompson, Gertrude

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses, non-retroviral RNA viruses and DNA viruses have been found in the mammalian genomes. The origin of Hepatitis C virus (HCV), the major cause of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma in humans, remains unclear since its discovery. Here we show that fragments homologous to HCV structural and non-structural (NS) proteins present in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and hare (Lepus europaeus) genomes replicate in bovine cell cultures. The HCV genomic homolog fragments were demonstrated by RT-PCR, PCR, mass spectrometry, and replication in bovine cell cultures by immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and immunogold electron microscopy (IEM) using specific MAbs for HCV NS3, NS4A, and NS5 proteins. These findings may lead to novel research approaches on the HCV origin, genesis, evolution and diversity.

  14. Human keratinocytes restrict chikungunya virus replication at a post-fusion step.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Eric; Hamel, Rodolphe; Neyret, Aymeric; Ekchariyawat, Peeraya; Molès, Jean-Pierre; Simmons, Graham; Chazal, Nathalie; Desprès, Philippe; Missé, Dorothée; Briant, Laurence

    2015-02-01

    Transmission of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) to humans is initiated by puncture of the skin by a blood-feeding Aedes mosquito. Despite the growing knowledge accumulated on CHIKV, the interplay between skin cells and CHIKV following inoculation still remains unclear. In this study we questioned the behavior of human keratinocytes, the predominant cell population in the skin, following viral challenge. We report that CHIKV rapidly elicits an innate immune response in these cells leading to the enhanced transcription of type I/II and type III interferon genes. Concomitantly, we show that despite viral particles internalization into Rab5-positive endosomes and efficient fusion of virus and cell membranes, keratinocytes poorly replicate CHIKV as attested by absence of nonstructural proteins and genomic RNA synthesis. Accordingly, human keratinocytes behave as an antiviral defense against CHIKV infection rather than as a primary targets for initial replication. This picture significantly differs from that reported for Dengue and West Nile mosquito-borne viruses.

  15. Inhibition of Influenza Virus Replication by α-Amanitin: Mode of Action

    PubMed Central

    Mahy, B. W. J.; Hastie, N. D.; Armstrong, Sylvia J.

    1972-01-01

    The replication of influenza virus in chick embryo fibroblast cells is inhibited by α-amanitin added during the first 2 hr of infection at concentrations similar to those required to inhibit cellular DNA-dependent RNA polymerase form II in vivo. Of two periods of increased RNA synthesis observed in cells infected with influenza virus, only the first, occurring from 0 to 2 hr after infection, is sensitive to α-amanitin. During this early period, there is a stimulation of the activity of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II of nuclei isolated from infected cells. The data suggest that DNA transcription mediated by polymerase II is essential for influenza virus replication. PMID:4504353

  16. Small interfering RNAs inhibit infectious bursal disease virus replication in Vero cells.

    PubMed

    Sajjanar, B K; Mishra, A; Sonawane, A; Patel, C L; Saxena, A; Dash, B B; Rai, A; Raut, A A

    2011-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules are considered to be a promising antiviral therapeutics. This study was performed to analyze the application of siRNA against infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) replication. Two siRNAs were designed to target common coding sequences of four IBDV proteins. Corresponding vectors were constructed to express anti-IBDV short hairpin RNAs (shRNA) that were tested for their antiviral effect in Vero cells. The results showed that expressed shRNA inhibited the virus replication to a significant extent (92%) as determined by the virus titration in cell culture. This outcome demonstrated the effectiveness of RNA interference (RNAi) based mechanism against the IBDV in vitro.

  17. Endogenous Hepatitis C Virus Homolog Fragments in European Rabbit and Hare Genomes Replicate in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Eliane; Marques, Sara; Osório, Hugo; Carvalheira, Júlio; Thompson, Gertrude

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses, non-retroviral RNA viruses and DNA viruses have been found in the mammalian genomes. The origin of Hepatitis C virus (HCV), the major cause of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma in humans, remains unclear since its discovery. Here we show that fragments homologous to HCV structural and non-structural (NS) proteins present in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and hare (Lepus europaeus) genomes replicate in bovine cell cultures. The HCV genomic homolog fragments were demonstrated by RT-PCR, PCR, mass spectrometry, and replication in bovine cell cultures by immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and immunogold electron microscopy (IEM) using specific MAbs for HCV NS3, NS4A, and NS5 proteins. These findings may lead to novel research approaches on the HCV origin, genesis, evolution and diversity. PMID:23185448

  18. NF90 Binds the Dengue Virus RNA 3′ Terminus and Is a Positive Regulator of Dengue Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Gehrke, Lee

    2011-01-01

    Background Viral RNA translation and replication are regulated by sequence and structural elements in the 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions (UTR) and by host cell and/or viral proteins that bind them. Dengue virus has a single-stranded RNA genome with positive polarity, a 5′ m7GpppG cap, and a conserved 3′-terminal stem loop (SL) that is linked to proposed functions in viral RNA transcription and translation. Mechanisms explaining the contributions of host proteins to viral RNA translation and replication are poorly defined, yet understanding host protein-viral RNA interactions may identify new targets for therapeutic intervention. This study was directed at identifying functionally significant host proteins that bind the conserved dengue virus RNA 3′ terminus. Methodology/Principal Findings Proteins eluted from a dengue 3′ SL RNA affinity column at increasing ionic strength included two with double-strand RNA binding motifs (NF90/DRBP76 and DEAH box polypeptide 9/RNA helicase A (RHA)), in addition to NF45, which forms a heterodimer with NF90. Although detectable NF90 and RHA proteins localized to the nucleus of uninfected cells, immunofluorescence revealed cytoplasmic NF90 in dengue virus-infected cells, leading us to hypothesize that NF90 has a functional role(s) in dengue infections. Cells depleted of NF90 were used to quantify viral RNA transcript levels and production of infectious dengue virus. NF90 depletion was accompanied by a 50%-70% decrease in dengue RNA levels and in production of infectious viral progeny. Conclusions/Significance The results indicate that NF90 interacts with the 3′ SL structure of the dengue RNA and is a positive regulator of dengue virus replication. NF90 depletion diminished the production of infectious dengue virus by more than 50%, which may have important significance for identifying therapeutic targets to limit a virus that threatens more than a billion people worldwide. PMID:21386893

  19. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) replication by Warscewiczia coccinea (Vahl) Kl. (Rubiaceae) ethanol extract.

    PubMed

    Quintero, A; Fabbro, R; Maillo, M; Barrios, M; Milano, M B; Fernández, A; Williams, B; Michelangeli, F; Rangel, H R; Pujol, F H

    2011-09-01

    The primary objective of this study was to search for natural products capable of inhibiting hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication. The research design, methods and procedures included testing hydro-alcoholic extracts (n = 66) of 31 species from the Venezuelan Amazonian rain forest on the cell line HepG2 2.2.15, which constitutively produces HBV. The main outcomes and results were as follows: the species Euterpe precatoria, Jacaranda copaia, Jacaranda obtusifolia, Senna silvestris, Warscewiczia coccinea and Vochysia glaberrima exerted some degree of inhibition on HBV replication. The leaves of W. coccinea showed a significant antiviral activity: 80% inhibition with 100 µg mL⁻¹ of extract. This extract also exerted inhibition on covalently closed circular deoxyribonucleic acid (cccDNA) production and on HIV-1 replication in MT4 cells (more than 90% inhibition with 50 µg mL⁻¹ of extract). Initial fractionation using organic solvents of increasing polarity and water showed that the ethanol fraction was responsible for most of the antiviral inhibitory activities of both the viruses. It was concluded that Warscewiczia coccinea extract showed inhibition of HBV and HIV-1 replication. Bioassay-guided purification of this fraction may allow the isolation of an antiviral compound with inhibitory activity against both viruses. PMID:21827337

  20. Azathioprine inhibits vaccinia virus replication in both BSC-40 and RAG cell lines acting on different stages of virus cycle.

    PubMed

    Damaso, Clarissa R A; Oliveira, Marcus F; Massarani, Susana M; Moussatché, Nissin

    2002-08-15

    In the present study we demonstrate that azathioprine (AZA) inhibits vaccinia virus (VV) replication in both BSC-40 and RAG cell lines, acting on different stages of virus cycle. In BSC-40 cells, early protein synthesis was not significantly affected, but late gene expression was severely impaired. In RAG cells all stages of gene expression were completed during synchronous infection in the presence of the drug. The onset of DNA replication was not affected in RAG cells, but a severe inhibition was observed in BSC-40 cells. Electron microscopic analysis of VV-infected RAG cells treated with AZA revealed brick-shaped particles presenting abnormal definition of the internal structure. Purified virions from AZA-treated RAG cells presented several modifications of the protein content, a lesser amount of DNA, and a lower PFU:particle ratio. Our results suggest that in VV-infected RAG cells AZA interfered with virus morphogenesis, whereas in BSC-40 cells the replicative cycle was inhibited at the DNA replication stage.

  1. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) replication by Warscewiczia coccinea (Vahl) Kl. (Rubiaceae) ethanol extract.

    PubMed

    Quintero, A; Fabbro, R; Maillo, M; Barrios, M; Milano, M B; Fernández, A; Williams, B; Michelangeli, F; Rangel, H R; Pujol, F H

    2011-09-01

    The primary objective of this study was to search for natural products capable of inhibiting hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication. The research design, methods and procedures included testing hydro-alcoholic extracts (n = 66) of 31 species from the Venezuelan Amazonian rain forest on the cell line HepG2 2.2.15, which constitutively produces HBV. The main outcomes and results were as follows: the species Euterpe precatoria, Jacaranda copaia, Jacaranda obtusifolia, Senna silvestris, Warscewiczia coccinea and Vochysia glaberrima exerted some degree of inhibition on HBV replication. The leaves of W. coccinea showed a significant antiviral activity: 80% inhibition with 100 µg mL⁻¹ of extract. This extract also exerted inhibition on covalently closed circular deoxyribonucleic acid (cccDNA) production and on HIV-1 replication in MT4 cells (more than 90% inhibition with 50 µg mL⁻¹ of extract). Initial fractionation using organic solvents of increasing polarity and water showed that the ethanol fraction was responsible for most of the antiviral inhibitory activities of both the viruses. It was concluded that Warscewiczia coccinea extract showed inhibition of HBV and HIV-1 replication. Bioassay-guided purification of this fraction may allow the isolation of an antiviral compound with inhibitory activity against both viruses.

  2. ICP8 Filament Formation Is Essential for Replication Compartment Formation during Herpes Simplex Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Darwish, Anthar S.; Grady, Lorry M.; Bai, Ping

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus (HSV) dramatically reorganizes the infected-cell nucleus, leading to the formation of prereplicative sites and replication compartments. This process is driven by the essential viral single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein ICP8, which can form double-helical filaments in the absence of DNA. In this paper, we show that two conserved motifs, FNF (F1142, N1143, and F1144) and FW (F843 and W844), are essential for ICP8 self-interactions, and we propose that the FNF motif docks into the FW region during filament formation. Mammalian expression plasmids bearing mutations in these motifs (FNF and FW) were unable to complement an ICP8-null mutant for growth and replication compartment formation. Furthermore, FNF and FW mutants were able to inhibit wild-type (WT) virus plaque formation and filament formation, whereas a double mutant (FNF-FW) was not. These results suggest that single mutant proteins are incorporated into nonproductive ICP8 filaments, while the double mutant is unable to interact with WT ICP8 and does not interfere with WT growth. Cells transfected with WT ICP8 and the helicase-primase (H/P) complex exhibited punctate nuclear structures that resemble prereplicative sites; however, the FNF and FW mutants failed to do so. Taken together, these results suggest that the FNF and FW motifs are required for ICP8 self-interactions and that these interactions may be important for the formation of prereplicative sites and replication compartments. We propose that filaments or other higher-order structures of ICP8 may provide a scaffold onto which other proteins can be recruited to form prereplicative sites and replication compartments. IMPORTANCE For nuclear viruses such as HSV, efficient DNA replication requires the formation of discrete compartments within the infected-cell nucleus in which replication proteins are concentrated and assembled into the HSV replisome. In this paper, we characterize the role of filament formation by the

  3. Serological survey of Toxoplasma gondii, Dirofilaria immitis, Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) and Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) infections in pet cats in Bangkok and vicinities, Thailand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii, Dirofilaria immitis (heartworm), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infections was examined using serum or plasma samples from 746 pet cats collected between May and July 2009 from clinics and hospitals located in and around ...

  4. An avian leukosis virus subgroup J isolate with a Rous sarcoma virus-like 5'-LTR shows enhanced replication capability.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanni; Guan, Xiaolu; Liu, Yongzhen; Li, Xiaofei; Yun, Bingling; Qi, Xiaole; Wang, Yongqiang; Gao, Honglei; Cui, Hongyu; Liu, Changjun; Zhang, Yanping; Wang, Xiaomei; Gao, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) was first isolated from meat-producing chickens that had developed myeloid leukosis. However, ALV-J infections associated with hemangiomas have occurred in egg-producing (layer) flocks in China. In this study, we identified an ALV-J layer isolate (HLJ13SH01) as a recombinant of ALV-J and a Rous sarcoma virus Schmidt-Ruppin B strain (RSV-SRB), which contained the RSV-SRB 5'-LTR and the other genes of ALV-J. Replication kinetic testing indicated that the HLJ13SH01 strain replicated faster than other ALV-J layer isolates in vitro. Sequence analysis indicated that the main difference between the two isolates was the 5'-LTR sequences, particularly the U3 sequences. A 19 nt insertion was uniquely found in the U3 region of the HLJ13SH01 strain. The results of a Dual-Glo luciferase assay revealed that the 19 nt insertion in the HLJ13SH01 strain increased the enhancer activity of the U3 region. Moreover, an additional CCAAT/enhancer element was found in the 19 nt insertion and the luciferase assay indicated that this element played a key role in increasing the enhancer activity of the 5'-U3 region. To confirm the potentiation effect of the 19 nt insertion and the CCAAT/enhancer element on virus replication, three infectious clones with 5'-U3 region variations were constructed and rescued. Replication kinetic testing of the rescued viruses demonstrated that the CCAAT/enhancer element in the 19 nt insertion enhanced the replication capacity of the ALV-J recombinant in vitro.

  5. The Isomerase Active Site of Cyclophilin A Is Critical for Hepatitis C Virus Replication*

    PubMed Central

    Chatterji, Udayan; Bobardt, Michael; Selvarajah, Suganya; Yang, Feng; Tang, Hengli; Sakamoto, Noayo; Vuagniaux, Gregoire; Parkinson, Tanya; Gallay, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Cyclosporine A and nonimmunosuppressive cyclophilin (Cyp) inhibitors such as Debio 025, NIM811, and SCY-635 block hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication in vitro. This effect was recently confirmed in HCV-infected patients where Debio 025 treatment dramatically decreased HCV viral load, suggesting that Cyps inhibitors represent a novel class of anti-HCV agents. However, it remains unclear how these compounds control HCV replication. Recent studies suggest that Cyps are important for HCV replication. However, a profound disagreement currently exists as to the respective roles of Cyp members in HCV replication. In this study, we analyzed the respective contribution of Cyp members to HCV replication by specifically knocking down their expression by both transient and stable small RNA interference. Only the CypA knockdown drastically decreased HCV replication. The re-expression of an exogenous CypA escape protein, which contains escape mutations at the small RNA interference recognition site, restored HCV replication, demonstrating the specificity for the CypA requirement. We then mutated residues that reside in the hydrophobic pocket of CypA where proline-containing peptide substrates and cyclosporine A bind and that are vital for the enzymatic or the hydrophobic pocket binding activity of CypA. Remarkably, these CypA mutants fail to restore HCV replication, suggesting for the first time that HCV exploits either the isomerase or the chaperone activity of CypA to replicate in hepatocytes and that CypA is the principal mediator of the Cyp inhibitor anti-HCV activity. Moreover, we demonstrated that the HCV NS5B polymerase associates with CypA via its enzymatic pocket. The study of the roles of Cyps in HCV replication should lead to the identification of new targets for the development of alternate anti-HCV therapies. PMID:19380579

  6. Coat Protein Activation of Alfalfa Mosaic Virus Replication Is Concentration Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Guogas, Laura M.; Laforest, Siana M.; Gehrke, Lee

    2005-01-01

    Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) and ilarvirus RNAs are infectious only in the presence of the viral coat protein; therefore, an understanding of coat protein's function is important for defining viral replication mechanisms. Based on in vitro replication experiments, the conformational switch model states that AMV coat protein blocks minus-strand RNA synthesis (R. C. Olsthoorn, S. Mertens, F. T. Brederode, and J. F. Bol, EMBO J. 18:4856-4864, 1999), while another report states that coat protein present in an inoculum is required to permit minus-strand synthesis (L. Neeleman and J. F. Bol, Virology 254:324-333, 1999). Here, we report on experiments that address these contrasting results with a goal of defining coat protein′s function in the earliest stages of AMV replication. To detect coat-protein-activated AMV RNA replication, we designed and characterized a subgenomic luciferase reporter construct. We demonstrate that activation of viral RNA replication by coat protein is concentration dependent; that is, replication was strongly stimulated at low coat protein concentrations but decreased progressively at higher concentrations. Genomic RNA3 mutations preventing coat protein mRNA translation or disrupting coat protein's RNA binding domain diminished replication. The data indicate that RNA binding and an ongoing supply of coat protein are required to initiate replication on progeny genomic RNA transcripts. The data do not support the conformational switch model's claim that coat protein inhibits the initial stages of viral RNA replication. Replication activation may correlate with low local coat protein concentrations and low coat protein occupancy on the multiple binding sites present in the 3′ untranslated regions of the viral RNAs. PMID:15827190

  7. Dissecting virus entry: replication-independent analysis of virus binding, internalization, and penetration using minimal complementation of β-galactosidase.

    PubMed

    Burkard, Christine; Bloyet, Louis-Marie; Wicht, Oliver; van Kuppeveld, Frank J; Rottier, Peter J M; de Haan, Cornelis A M; Bosch, Berend Jan

    2014-01-01

    Studies of viral entry into host cells often rely on the detection of post-entry parameters, such as viral replication or the expression of a reporter gene, rather than on measuring entry per se. The lack of assays to easily detect the different steps of entry severely hampers the analysis of this key process in virus infection. Here we describe novel, highly adaptable viral entry assays making use of minimal complementation of the E. coli β-galactosidase in mammalian cells. Enzyme activity is reconstituted when a small intravirion peptide (α-peptide) is complementing the inactive mutant form ΔM15 of β-galactosidase. The method allows to dissect and to independently detect binding, internalization, and fusion of viruses during host cell entry. Here we use it to confirm and extend current knowledge on the entry process of two enveloped viruses: vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and murine hepatitis coronavirus (MHV).

  8. Identification of a Cluster of HIV-1 Controllers Infected with Low Replicating Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Casado, Concepción; Pernas, Maria; Sandonis, Virginia; Alvaro-Cifuentes, Tamara; Olivares, Isabel; Fuentes, Rosa; Martínez-Prats, Lorena; Grau, Eulalia; Ruiz, Lidia; Delgado, Rafael; Rodríguez, Carmen; del Romero, Jorge; López-Galíndez, Cecilio

    2013-01-01

    Long term non-progressor patients (LTNPs) are characterized by the natural control of HIV-1 infection. This control is related to host genetic, immunological and virological factors. In this work, phylogenetic analysis of the proviral nucleotide sequences in env gene from a Spanish HIV-1 LTNPs cohort identified a cluster of 6 HIV-1 controllers infected with closely-related viruses. The patients of the cluster showed common clinical and epidemiological features: drug user practices, infection in the same city (Madrid, Spain) and at the same time (late 70’s-early 80’s). All cluster patients displayed distinct host alleles associated with HIV control. Analysis of the virus envelope nucleotide sequences showed ancestral characteristic, lack of evolution and presence of rare amino-acids. Biological characterization of recombinant viruses with the envelope proteins from the cluster viruses showed very low replicative capacity in TZMbl and U87-CD4/CCR5 cells. The lack of clinical progression in the viral cluster patients with distinct combinations of protective host genotypes, but infected by low replicating viruses, indicate the important role of the virus in the non-progressor phenotype in these patients. PMID:24204910

  9. Identification of a cluster of HIV-1 controllers infected with low replicating viruses.

    PubMed

    Casado, Concepción; Pernas, Maria; Sandonis, Virginia; Alvaro-Cifuentes, Tamara; Olivares, Isabel; Fuentes, Rosa; Martínez-Prats, Lorena; Grau, Eulalia; Ruiz, Lidia; Delgado, Rafael; Rodríguez, Carmen; del Romero, Jorge; López-Galíndez, Cecilio

    2013-01-01

    Long term non-progressor patients (LTNPs) are characterized by the natural control of HIV-1 infection. This control is related to host genetic, immunological and virological factors. In this work, phylogenetic analysis of the proviral nucleotide sequences in env gene from a Spanish HIV-1 LTNPs cohort identified a cluster of 6 HIV-1 controllers infected with closely-related viruses. The patients of the cluster showed common clinical and epidemiological features: drug user practices, infection in the same city (Madrid, Spain) and at the same time (late 70's-early 80's). All cluster patients displayed distinct host alleles associated with HIV control. Analysis of the virus envelope nucleotide sequences showed ancestral characteristic, lack of evolution and presence of rare amino-acids. Biological characterization of recombinant viruses with the envelope proteins from the cluster viruses showed very low replicative capacity in TZMbl and U87-CD4/CCR5 cells. The lack of clinical progression in the viral cluster patients with distinct combinations of protective host genotypes, but infected by low replicating viruses, indicate the important role of the virus in the non-progressor phenotype in these patients.

  10. Relationship between RNA polymerase II and efficiency of vaccinia virus replication.

    PubMed Central

    Wilton, S; Dales, S

    1989-01-01

    It is clear from previous studies that host transcriptase or RNA polymerase II (pol II) has a role in poxvirus replication. To elucidate the participation of this enzyme further, in this study we examined several parameters related to pol II during the cycle of vaccinia virus infection in L-strain fibroblasts, HeLa cells, and L6H9 rat myoblasts. Nucleocytoplasmic transposition of pol II into virus factories and virions was assessed by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting by using anti-pol II immunoglobulin G. RNA polymerase activities were compared in nuclear extracts containing crude enzyme preparations. Rates of translation into cellular or viral polypeptides were ascertained by labeling with [35S]methionine. In L and HeLa cells, which produced vaccinia virus more abundantly, the rates of RNA polymerase and translation in controls and following infection were higher than in myoblasts. The data on synthesis and virus formation could be correlated with observations on transmigration of pol II, which was more efficient and complete in L and HeLa cells. The stimulus for pol II to leave the nucleus required the expression of both early and late viral functions. On the basis of current and past information, we suggest that mobilization of pol II depends on the efficiency of vaccina virus replication and furthermore that control over vaccinia virus production by the host is related to the content or availability (or both) of pol II in different cell types. Images PMID:2648021

  11. Relationship between RNA polymerase II and efficiency of vaccinia virus replication

    SciTech Connect

    Wilton, S.; Dales, S.

    1989-04-01

    It is clear from previous studies that host transcriptase or RNA polymerase II (pol II) has a role in poxvirus replication. To elucidate the participation of this enzyme further, in this study the authors examined several parameters related to pol II during the cycle of vaccinia virus infection in L-strain fibroblasts, HeLa cells, and L/sub 6/H/sub 9/ rat myoblasts. Nucleocytoplasmic transposition of pol II into virus factories and virions was assessed by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting by using anti-pol II immunoglobulin G. RNA polymerase activities were compared in nuclear extracts containing cured enzyme preparations. Rates of translation into cellular or viral polypeptides were ascertained by labeling with (/sup 35/S)methionine. In L and HeLa cells, which produced vaccinia virus more abundantly, the rate of RNA polymerase and translation in controls and following infection were higher than in myoblasts. The data on synthesis and virus formation could be correlated with observations on transmigration of pol II, which was more efficient and complete in L and HeLa cells. The stimulus for pol II to leave the nucleus required the expression of both early and late viral functions. On the basis of current and past information, the authors suggest that mobilization of pol II depends on the efficiency of vaccinia virus replication and furthermore that control over vaccinia virus production by the host is related to the content or availability (or both) of pol II in different cell types.

  12. Intrinsic Innate Immunity Fails To Control Herpes Simplex Virus and Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Replication in Sensory Neurons and Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Rosato, Pamela C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) establishes lifelong latent infections in the sensory neurons of the trigeminal ganglia (TG), wherein it retains the capacity to reactivate. The interferon (IFN)-driven antiviral response is critical for the control of HSV-1 acute replication. We therefore sought to further investigate this response in TG neurons cultured from adult mice deficient in a variety of IFN signaling components. Parallel experiments were also performed in fibroblasts isolated concurrently. We showed that HSV-1 replication was comparable in wild-type (WT) and IFN signaling-deficient neurons and fibroblasts. Unexpectedly, a similar pattern was observed for the IFN-sensitive vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Despite these findings, TG neurons responded to IFN-β pretreatment with STAT1 nuclear localization and restricted replication of both VSV and an HSV-1 strain deficient in γ34.5, while wild-type HSV-1 replication was unaffected. This was in contrast to fibroblasts in which all viruses were restricted by the addition of IFN-β. Taken together, these data show that adult TG neurons can mount an effective antiviral response only if provided with an exogenous source of IFN-β, and HSV-1 combats this response through γ34.5. These results further our understanding of the antiviral response of neurons and highlight the importance of paracrine IFN-β signaling in establishing an antiviral state. IMPORTANCE Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a ubiquitous virus that establishes a lifelong latent infection in neurons. Reactivation from latency can cause cold sores, blindness, and death from encephalitis. Humans with deficiencies in innate immunity have significant problems controlling HSV infections. In this study, we therefore sought to elucidate the role of neuronal innate immunity in the control of viral infection. Using neurons isolated from mice, we found that the intrinsic capacity of neurons to restrict virus replication was unaffected by the presence

  13. HIV-protease inhibitors block the replication of both vesicular stomatitis and influenza viruses at an early post-entry replication step

    SciTech Connect

    Federico, Maurizio

    2011-08-15

    The inhibitors of HIV-1 protease (PIs) have been designed to block the activity of the viral aspartyl-protease. However, it is now accepted that this family of inhibitors can also affect the activity of cell proteases. Since the replication of many virus species requires the activity of host cell proteases, investigating the effects of PIs on the life cycle of viruses other than HIV would be of interest. Here, the potent inhibition induced by saquinavir and nelfinavir on the replication of both vesicular stomatitis and influenza viruses is described. These are unrelated enveloped RNA viruses infecting target cells upon endocytosis and intracellular fusion. The PI-induced inhibition was apparently a consequence of a block at the level of the fusion between viral envelope and endosomal membranes. These findings would open the way towards the therapeutic use of PIs against enveloped RNA viruses other than HIV.

  14. Inhibition of Anatid Herpes Virus-1 replication by small interfering RNAs in cell culture system.

    PubMed

    Mallanna, Sunil Kumar; Rasool, T J; Sahay, Bikash; Aleyas, Abi George; Ram, Hira; Mondal, Bimalendu; Nautiyal, Binita; Premraj, Avinash; Sreekumar, E; Yadav, M P

    2006-02-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) mediated by double stranded small interfering RNA (siRNA) is a novel mechanism of post-transcriptional gene silencing. It is projected as a potential tool to inhibit viral replication. In the present paper, we demonstrate the suppression of replication of an avian herpes virus (Anatid Herpes Virus-1, AHV-1) by siRNA mediated gene silencing in avian cells. The UL-6 gene of AHV-1 that codes for a protein involved in viral packaging was targeted. Both cocktail and unique siRNAs were attempted to evaluate the inhibitory potential of AHV-1 replication in duck embryo fibroblast (DEF) cell line. DEF cells were chemically transfected with different siRNAs in separate experiments followed by viral infection. The observed reduction in virus replication was evaluated by cytopathic effect, viral titration and quantitative real time PCR (QRT-PCR). Among the three siRNA targets used the unique siRNA UL-B sequence was found to be more potent in antiviral activity than the cocktail and UL6-A-siRNA sequences.

  15. Derivation of a biologically contained replication system for human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, H; Boyle, T J; Malim, M H; Cullen, B R; Lyerly, H K

    1992-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) proviral mutants that lack viral regulatory genes are unable to replicate unless rescued by complementation in trans. Structurally intact virus can be produced by infecting recombinant cell lines expressing the deficient genes. A HIV-1 mutant functionally defective in tat and rev (vIIIB delta Tat/Rev), which replicates only in a recombinant T-cell line expressing tat and rev (CEMTART), is described in this report. Infection of the CEMTART cell line with vIIIB delta Tat/Rev permits the complete HIV-1 life cycle, including cytopathology, decreased expression of CD4, and production of viral structural proteins, to be biologically contained. Culture supernatants from infected CEMTART contain virus that is able to replicate only in uninfected CEMTART. No reversion of vIIIB delta Tat/Rev to wild-type HIV-1 was observed as measured either by sequencing proviral vIIIB delta Tat/Rev or by detecting the ability of vIIIB delta Tat/Rev to replicate in CEM or activated CD4-bearing T lymphocytes. Defective HIV-1 mutants produced by trans complementation of essential genes permit infection and analysis of defined genotypes on cellular function and phenotype. Authentic HIV-1 structural proteins and infected cells can be prepared in mass, and agents that interfere with the HIV-1 life cycle can be studied on a large scale with minimum risk of exposing workers to virulent HIV-1. PMID:1502183

  16. RAB1A promotes Vaccinia virus replication by facilitating the production of intracellular enveloped virions

    SciTech Connect

    Pechenick Jowers, Tali; Featherstone, Rebecca J.; Reynolds, Danielle K.; Brown, Helen K.; James, John; Prescott, Alan; Haga, Ismar R.; Beard, Philippa M.

    2015-01-15

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is a large double-stranded DNA virus with a complex cytoplasmic replication cycle that exploits numerous cellular proteins. This work characterises the role of a proviral cellular protein, the small GTPase RAB1A, in VACV replication. Using siRNA, we identified RAB1A as required for the production of extracellular enveloped virions (EEVs), but not intracellular mature virions (IMVs). Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy further refined the role of RAB1A as facilitating the wrapping of IMVs to become intracellular enveloped virions (IEVs). This is consistent with the known function of RAB1A in maintenance of ER to Golgi transport. VACV can therefore be added to the growing list of viruses which require RAB1A for optimal replication, highlighting this protein as a broadly proviral host factor. - Highlights: • Characterisation of the role of the small GTPase RAB1A in VACV replication. • RAB1A is not required for production of the primary virion form (IMV). • RAB1A is required for production of processed virion forms (IEVs, CEVs and EEVs). • Consistent with known role of RAB1A in ER to Golgi transport.

  17. Replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in primary dendritic cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Langhoff, E; Terwilliger, E F; Bos, H J; Kalland, K H; Poznansky, M C; Bacon, O M; Haseltine, W A

    1991-01-01

    The ability of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to replicate in primary blood dendritic cells was investigated. Dendritic cells compose less than 1% of the circulating leukocytes and are nondividing cells. Highly purified preparations of dendritic cells were obtained using recent advances in cell fractionation. The results of these experiments show that dendritic cells, in contrast to monocytes and T cells, support the active replication of all strains of HIV-1 tested, including T-cell tropic and monocyte/macrophage tropic isolates. The dendritic cell cultures supported much more virus production than did cultures of primary unseparated T cells, CD4+ T cells, and adherent as well as nonadherent monocytes. Replication of HIV-1 in dendritic cells produces no noticeable cytopathic effect nor does it decrease total cell number. The ability of the nonreplicating dendritic cells to support high levels of replication of HIV-1 suggests that this antigen-presenting cell population, which is also capable of supporting clonal T-cell growth, may play a central role in HIV pathogenesis, serving as a source of continued infection of CD4+ T cells and as a reservoir of virus infection. Images PMID:1910172

  18. Flavivirus NS4A-induced autophagy protects cells against death and enhances virus replication.

    PubMed

    McLean, Jeffrey E; Wudzinska, Aleksandra; Datan, Emmanuel; Quaglino, Daniela; Zakeri, Zahra

    2011-06-24

    Flaviviruses include the most prevalent and medically challenging viruses. Persistent infection with flaviviruses of epithelial cells and hepatocytes that do not undergo cell death is common. Here, we report that, in epithelial cells, up-regulation of autophagy following flavivirus infection markedly enhances virus replication and that one flavivirus gene, NS4A, uniquely determines the up-regulation of autophagy. Dengue-2 and Modoc (a murine flavivirus) kill primary murine macrophages but protect epithelial cells and fibroblasts against death provoked by several insults. The flavivirus-induced protection derives from the up-regulation of autophagy, as up-regulation of autophagy by starvation or inactivation of mammalian target of rapamycin also protects the cells against insult, whereas inhibition of autophagy via inactivation of PI3K nullifies the protection conferred by flavivirus. Inhibition of autophagy also limits replication of both Dengue-2 and Modoc virus in epithelial cells. Expression of flavivirus NS4A is sufficient to induce PI3K-dependent autophagy and to protect cells against death; expression of other viral genes, including NS2A and NS4B, fails to protect cells against several stressors. Flavivirus NS4A protein induces autophagy in epithelial cells and thus protects them from death during infection. As autophagy is vital to flavivirus replication in these cells, NS4A is therefore also identified as a critical determinant of flavivirus replication. PMID:21511946

  19. Androgen-independent proliferation of LNCaP prostate cancer cells infected by xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus

    SciTech Connect

    Kakoki, Katsura; Kamiyama, Haruka; Izumida, Mai; Yashima, Yuka; Hayashi, Hideki; Yamamoto, Naoki; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Igawa, Tsukasa; Sakai, Hideki; Kubo, Yoshinao

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • XMRV infection induces androgen-independent growth in LNCaP cells. • XMRV infection reduces expression of androgen receptor. • XMRV promotes appearance of androgen blocker-resistant prostate cancer cells. - Abstract: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a novel gammaretrovirus that was originally isolated from human prostate cancer. It is now believed that XMRV is not the etiologic agent of prostate cancer. An analysis of murine leukemia virus (MLV) infection in various human cell lines revealed that prostate cancer cell lines are preferentially infected by XMRV, and this suggested that XMRV infection may confer some sort of growth advantage to prostate cancer cell lines. To examine this hypothesis, androgen-dependent LNCaP cells were infected with XMRV and tested for changes in certain cell growth properties. We found that XMRV-infected LNCaP cells can proliferate in the absence of the androgen dihydrotestosterone. Moreover, androgen receptor expression is significantly reduced in XMRV-infected LNCaP cells. Such alterations were not observed in uninfected and amphotropic MLV-infected LNCaP cells. This finding explains why prostate cancer cell lines are preferentially infected with XMRV.

  20. A nuclear export signal in the matrix protein of Influenza A virus is required for efficient virus replication.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shuai; Liu, Xiaoling; Yu, Maorong; Li, Jing; Jia, Xiaojuan; Bi, Yuhai; Sun, Lei; Gao, George F; Liu, Wenjun

    2012-05-01

    The influenza A virus matrix 1 protein (M1) shuttles between the cytoplasm and the nucleus during the viral life cycle and plays an important role in the replication, assembly, and budding of viruses. Here, a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) was identified specifically for the nuclear export of the M1 protein. The predicted NES, designated the Flu-A-M1 NES, is highly conserved among all sequences from the influenza A virus subtype, but no similar NES motifs are found in the M1 sequences of influenza B or C viruses. The biological function of the Flu-A-M1 NES was demonstrated by its ability to translocate an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-NES fusion protein from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in transfected cells, compared to the even nuclear and cytoplasmic distribution of EGFP. The translocation of EGFP-NES from the nucleus to the cytoplasm was not inhibited by leptomycin B. NES mutations in M1 caused a nuclear retention of the protein and an increased nuclear accumulation of NEP during transfection. Indeed, as shown by rescued recombinant viruses, the mutation of the NES impaired the nuclear export of M1 and significantly reduced the virus titer compared to titers of wild-type viruses. The NES-defective M1 protein was retained in the nucleus during infection, accompanied by a lowered efficiency of the nuclear export of viral RNPs (vRNPs). In conclusion, M1 nuclear export was specifically dependent on the Flu-A-M1 NES and critical for influenza A virus replication.

  1. Cocaine-mediated enhancement of virus replication in macrophages: implications for human immunodeficiency virus-associated dementia.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Navneet K; Williams, Rachel; Peng, Fuwang; Tsai, Yi-Jou; Dhillon, Sukhbir; Nicolay, Brandon; Gadgil, Milind; Kumar, Anil; Buch, Shilpa J

    2007-12-01

    Injection drug use has been recognized as a major risk factor for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) from the outset of the epidemic. Cocaine, one of the most widely abused drugs in the United States, can both impair the functions of macrophages and CD4(+) lymphocytes and also activate human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 expression in these cells. Because the brain is the target organ for both cocaine and HIV, the objective of the present study was to explore the effects of cocaine on virus replication in macrophages, the target cells for the virus in the central nervous system (CNS). Cocaine markedly enhanced virus production in simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-infected monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) and in U1 cells, a chronically infected promonocytic cell line as monitored by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunocytochemistry. Cocaine treatment also resulted in the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-kappa B and transcriptional activation of the HIV-LTR (long terminal repeat) gag-GFP (green fluorescent protein). Analyses of chemokines in cocaine-treated macrophages by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Luminex assays suggested increased expression of interleukin (IL)-10, a cytokine that is known to promote HIV replication in MDMs. In addition to enhancing IL-10 expression, cocaine also caused an up-regulation of the macrophage activation marker, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR, in MDMs. The synergistic effect of cocaine on virus replication and its enhancement of host activation markers suggest that cocaine functions at multiple pathways to accelerate HIV-associated dementia (HAD). PMID:18097880

  2. West Nile Virus Replication Requires Fatty Acid Synthesis but Is Independent on Phosphatidylinositol-4-Phosphate Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Acebes, Miguel A.; Blázquez, Ana-Belén; Jiménez de Oya, Nereida; Escribano-Romero, Estela; Saiz, Juan-Carlos

    2011-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a neurovirulent mosquito-borne flavivirus, which main natural hosts are birds but it also infects equines and humans, among other mammals. As in the case of other plus-stranded RNA viruses, WNV replication is associated to intracellular membrane rearrangements. Based on results obtained with a variety of viruses, different cellular processes have been shown to play important roles on these membrane rearrangements for efficient viral replication. As these processes are related to lipid metabolism, fatty acid synthesis, as well as generation of a specific lipid microenvironment enriched in phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI4P), has been associated to it in other viral models. In this study, intracellular membrane rearrangements following infection with a highly neurovirulent strain of WNV were addressed by means of electron and confocal microscopy. Infection of WNV, and specifically viral RNA replication, were dependent on fatty acid synthesis, as revealed by the inhibitory effect of cerulenin and C75, two pharmacological inhibitors of fatty acid synthase, a key enzyme of this process. However, WNV infection did not induce redistribution of PI4P lipids, and PI4P did not localize at viral replication complex. Even more, WNV multiplication was not inhibited by the use of the phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase inhibitor PIK93, while infection by the enterovirus Coxsackievirus B5 was reduced. Similar features were found when infection by other flavivirus, the Usutu virus (USUV), was analyzed. These features of WNV replication could help to design specific antiviral approaches against WNV and other related flaviviruses. PMID:21949814

  3. Preventive and Therapeutic Strategies for Bovine Leukemia Virus: Lessons for HTLV

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Sabrina M.; Florins, Arnaud; Gillet, Nicolas; de Brogniez, Alix; Sánchez-Alcaraz, María Teresa; Boxus, Mathieu; Boulanger, Fanny; Gutiérrez, Gerónimo; Trono, Karina; Alvarez, Irene; Vagnoni, Lucas; Willems, Luc

    2011-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is a retrovirus closely related to the human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). BLV is a major animal health problem worldwide causing important economic losses. A series of attempts were developed to reduce prevalence, chiefly by eradication of infected cattle, segregation of BLV-free animals and vaccination. Although having been instrumental in regions such as the EU, these strategies were unsuccessful elsewhere mainly due to economic costs, management restrictions and lack of an efficient vaccine. This review, which summarizes the different attempts previously developed to decrease seroprevalence of BLV, may be informative for management of HTLV-1 infection. We also propose a new approach based on competitive infection with virus deletants aiming at reducing proviral loads. PMID:21994777

  4. Sensitivity to. gamma. rays of avian sarcoma and murine leukemia viruses. [/sup 60/Co, uv

    SciTech Connect

    Toyoshima, K.; Niwa, O.; Yutsudo, M.; Sugiyama, H.; Tahara, S.; Sugahara, T.

    1980-09-01

    The direct inactivation of avian and murine oncoviruses by ..gamma.. rays was examined using /sup 60/Co as a ..gamma..-ray source. The inactivation of murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) followed single-hit kinetics while the subgroup D Schmidt-Ruppin strain of avian sarcoma virus (SR-RSV D) showed multihit inactivation kinetics with an extrapolation number of 5. The two viruses showed similar uv-inactivation kinetics. The genomic RNA of the SR-RSV D strain was degraded by ..gamma.. irradiation faster than its infectivity, but viral clones isolated from the foci formed after ..gamma.. irradiation had a complete genome. These results suggest that SR-RSV D has a strong repair function, possibly connected with reverse transcriptase activity.

  5. Molecular genetic analysis of a vaccinia virus gene with an essential role in DNA replication

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, E.V.A.

    1989-01-01

    The poxvirus, vaccinia, is large DNA virus which replicates in the cytoplasma of the host cell. The virus is believed to encode most or all of the functions required for the temporally regulated transcription and replication of its 186 kilobase genome. Physical and genetic autonomy from the host make vaccinia a useful eukaryotic organism in which to study replication genes and proteins, using a combination of biochemical and genetic techniques. Essential viral functions for replication are identified by conditional lethal mutants that fail to synthesize DNA at the non-permissive temperatures. One such group contains the non-complementing alleles ts17, ts24, ts69 (WR strain). Studies were undertaken to define the phenotype of ts mutants, and to identify and characterize the affected gene and protein. Mutant infection was essentially normal at 32{degree}C, but at 39{degree}C the mutants did not incorporate {sup 3}H-thymidine into nascent viral DNA or synthesize late viral proteins. If mutant cultures were shifted to non-permissive conditions at the height of replication, DNA synthesis was halted rapidly, implying that the mutants are defective in DNA elongation. The gene affected in the WR mutants and in ts6389, a DNA-minus mutant of the IHD strain, was mapped by marker rescue and corresponds to open reading frame 5 (orfD5) of the viral HindIII D fragment.

  6. MYC-induced reprogramming of glutamine catabolism supports optimal virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Thai, Minh; Thaker, Shivani K.; Feng, Jun; Du, Yushen; Hu, Hailiang; Ting Wu, Ting; Graeber, Thomas G.; Braas, Daniel; Christofk, Heather R.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses rewire host cell glucose and glutamine metabolism to meet the bioenergetic and biosynthetic demands of viral propagation. However, the mechanism by which viruses reprogram glutamine metabolism and the metabolic fate of glutamine during adenovirus infection have remained elusive. Here, we show MYC activation is necessary for adenovirus-induced upregulation of host cell glutamine utilization and increased expression of glutamine transporters and glutamine catabolism enzymes. Adenovirus-induced MYC activation promotes increased glutamine uptake, increased use of glutamine in reductive carboxylation and increased use of glutamine in generating hexosamine pathway intermediates and specific amino acids. We identify glutaminase (GLS) as a critical enzyme for optimal adenovirus replication and demonstrate that GLS inhibition decreases replication of adenovirus, herpes simplex virus 1 and influenza A in cultured primary cells. Our findings show that adenovirus-induced reprogramming of glutamine metabolism through MYC activation promotes optimal progeny virion generation, and suggest that GLS inhibitors may be useful therapeutically to reduce replication of diverse viruses. PMID:26561297

  7. Cell Carriage, Delivery, and Selective Replication of an Oncolytic Virus in Tumor in Patients

    PubMed Central

    Adair, Robert A.; Roulstone, Victoria; Scott, Karen J.; Morgan, Ruth; Nuovo, Gerard J.; Fuller, Martin; Beirne, Deborah; West, Emma J.; Jennings, Victoria A.; Rose, Ailsa; Kyula, Joan; Fraser, Sheila; Dave, Rajiv; Anthoney, David A.; Merrick, Alison; Prestwich, Robin; Aldouri, Amer; Donnelly, Oliver; Pandha, Hardev; Coffey, Matt; Selby, Peter; Vile, Richard; Toogood, Giles; Harrington, Kevin; Melcher, Alan A.

    2013-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses, which preferentially lyse cancer cells and stimulate an antitumor immune response, represent a promising approach to the treatment of cancer. However, how they evade the antiviral immune response and their selective delivery to, and replication in, tumor over normal tissue has not been investigated in humans. Here,we treated patients with a single cycle of intravenous reovirus before planned surgery to resect colorectal cancer metastases in the liver. Tracking the viral genome in the circulation showed that reovirus could be detected in plasma and blood mononuclear, granulocyte, and platelet cell compartments after infusion. Despite the presence of neutralizing antibodies before viral infusion in all patients, replication-competent reovirus that retained cytotoxicity was recovered from blood cells but not plasma, suggesting that transport by cells could protect virus for potential delivery to tumors. Analysis of surgical specimens demonstrated greater, preferential expression of reovirus protein in malignant cells compared to either tumor stroma or surrounding normal liver tissue. There was evidence of viral factories within tumor, and recovery of replicating virus from tumor (but not normal liver)was achieved in all four patients from whom fresh tissue was available. Hence, reovirus could be protected from neutralizing antibodies after systemic administration by immune cell carriage, which delivered reovirus to tumor.These findings suggest new preclinical and clinical scheduling and treatment combination strategies to enhance in vivo immune evasion and effective intravenous delivery of oncolytic viruses to patients in vivo. PMID:22700953

  8. Cell carriage, delivery, and selective replication of an oncolytic virus in tumor in patients.

    PubMed

    Adair, Robert A; Roulstone, Victoria; Scott, Karen J; Morgan, Ruth; Nuovo, Gerard J; Fuller, Martin; Beirne, Deborah; West, Emma J; Jennings, Victoria A; Rose, Ailsa; Kyula, Joan; Fraser, Sheila; Dave, Rajiv; Anthoney, David A; Merrick, Alison; Prestwich, Robin; Aldouri, Amer; Donnelly, Oliver; Pandha, Hardev; Coffey, Matt; Selby, Peter; Vile, Richard; Toogood, Giles; Harrington, Kevin; Melcher, Alan A

    2012-06-13

    Oncolytic viruses, which preferentially lyse cancer cells and stimulate an antitumor immune response, represent a promising approach to the treatment of cancer. However, how they evade the antiviral immune response and their selective delivery to, and replication in, tumor over normal tissue has not been investigated in humans. Here, we treated patients with a single cycle of intravenous reovirus before planned surgery to resect colorectal cancer metastases in the liver. Tracking the viral genome in the circulation showed that reovirus could be detected in plasma and blood mononuclear, granulocyte, and platelet cell compartments after infusion. Despite the presence of neutralizing antibodies before viral infusion in all patients, replication-competent reovirus that retained cytotoxicity was recovered from blood cells but not plasma, suggesting that transport by cells could protect virus for potential delivery to tumors. Analysis of surgical specimens demonstrated greater, preferential expression of reovirus protein in malignant cells compared to either tumor stroma or surrounding normal liver tissue. There was evidence of viral factories within tumor, and recovery of replicating virus from tumor (but not normal liver) was achieved in all four patients from whom fresh tissue was available. Hence, reovirus could be protected from neutralizing antibodies after systemic administration by immune cell carriage, which delivered reovirus to tumor. These findings suggest new preclinical and clinical scheduling and treatment combination strategies to enhance in vivo immune evasion and effective intravenous delivery of oncolytic viruses to patients in vivo. PMID:22700953

  9. Defining Hsp70 Subnetworks in Dengue Virus Replication Reveals Key Vulnerability in Flavivirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Taguwa, Shuhei; Maringer, Kevin; Li, Xiaokai; Bernal-Rubio, Dabeiba; Rauch, Jennifer N; Gestwicki, Jason E; Andino, Raul; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Frydman, Judith

    2015-11-19

    Viral protein homeostasis depends entirely on the machinery of the infected cell. Accordingly, viruses can illuminate the interplay between cellular proteostasis components and their distinct substrates. Here, we define how the Hsp70 chaperone network mediates the dengue virus life cycle. Cytosolic Hsp70 isoforms are required at distinct steps of the viral cycle, including entry, RNA replication, and virion biogenesis. Hsp70 function at each step is specified by nine distinct DNAJ cofactors. Of these, DnaJB11 relocalizes to virus-induced replication complexes to promote RNA synthesis, while DnaJB6 associates with capsid protein and facilitates virion biogenesis. Importantly, an allosteric Hsp70 inhibitor, JG40, potently blocks infection of different dengue serotypes in human primary blood cells without eliciting viral resistance or exerting toxicity to the host cells. JG40 also blocks replication of other medically-important flaviviruses including yellow fever, West Nile and Japanese encephalitis viruses. Thus, targeting host Hsp70 subnetworks provides a path for broad-spectrum antivirals. PMID:26582131

  10. Melon necrotic spot virus Replication Occurs in Association with Altered Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Aix, Cristina; García-García, María; Aranda, Miguel A; Sánchez-Pina, María Amelia

    2015-04-01

    Melon necrotic spot virus (MNSV) (genus Carmovirus, family Tombusviridae) is a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA virus that has become an experimental model for the analysis of cell-to-cell virus movement and translation of uncapped viral RNAs, whereas little is known about its replication. Analysis of the cytopathology after MNSV infection showed the specific presence of modified organelles that resemble mitochondria. Immunolocalization of the glycine decarboxylase complex (GDC) P protein in these organelles confirmed their mitochondrial origin. In situ hybridization and immunolocalization experiments showed the specific localization of positive-sense viral RNA, capsid protein (CP), and double-stranded (ds)RNA in these organelles meaning that replication of the virus takes place in association with them. The three-dimensional reconstructions of the altered mitochondria showed the presence of large, interconnected, internal dilations which appeared to be linked to the outside cytoplasmic environment through pores and/or complex structures, and with lipid bodies. Transient expression of MNSV p29 revealed that its specific target is mitochondria. Our data document the extensive reorganization of host mitochondria induced by MNSV, which provides a protected environment to viral replication, and show that the MNSV p29 protein is the primary determinant of this effect in the host.

  11. Defining Hsp70 Subnetworks in Dengue Virus Replication Reveals Key Vulnerability in Flavivirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Taguwa, Shuhei; Maringer, Kevin; Li, Xiaokai; Bernal-Rubio, Dabeiba; Rauch, Jennifer N; Gestwicki, Jason E; Andino, Raul; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Frydman, Judith

    2015-11-19

    Viral protein homeostasis depends entirely on the machinery of the infected cell. Accordingly, viruses can illuminate the interplay between cellular proteostasis components and their distinct substrates. Here, we define how the Hsp70 chaperone network mediates the dengue virus life cycle. Cytosolic Hsp70 isoforms are required at distinct steps of the viral cycle, including entry, RNA replication, and virion biogenesis. Hsp70 function at each step is specified by nine distinct DNAJ cofactors. Of these, DnaJB11 relocalizes to virus-induced replication complexes to promote RNA synthesis, while DnaJB6 associates with capsid protein and facilitates virion biogenesis. Importantly, an allosteric Hsp70 inhibitor, JG40, potently blocks infection of different dengue serotypes in human primary blood cells without eliciting viral resistance or exerting toxicity to the host cells. JG40 also blocks replication of other medically-important flaviviruses including yellow fever, West Nile and Japanese encephalitis viruses. Thus, targeting host Hsp70 subnetworks provides a path for broad-spectrum antivirals.

  12. Animal virus replication and RNAi-mediated antiviral silencing in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Lu, R; Maduro, M; Li, F; Li, H W; Broitman-Maduro, G; Li, W X; Ding, S W

    2005-08-18

    The worm Caenorhabditis elegans is a model system for studying many aspects of biology, including host responses to bacterial pathogens, but it is not known to support replication of any virus. Plants and insects encode multiple Dicer enzymes that recognize distinct precursors of small RNAs and may act cooperatively. However, it is not known whether the single Dicer of worms and mammals is able to initiate the small RNA-guided RNA interference (RNAi) antiviral immunity as occurs in plants and insects. Here we show complete replication of the Flock house virus (FHV) bipartite, plus-strand RNA genome in C. elegans. We show that FHV replication in C. elegans triggers potent antiviral silencing that requires RDE-1, an Argonaute protein essential for RNAi mediated by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) but not by microRNAs. This immunity system is capable of rapid virus clearance in the absence of FHV B2 protein, which acts as a broad-spectrum RNAi inhibitor upstream of rde-1 by targeting the siRNA precursor. This work establishes a C. elegans model for genetic studies of animal virus-host interactions and indicates that mammals might use a siRNA pathway as an antiviral response.

  13. Gene 5 of the avian coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus is not essential for replication.

    PubMed

    Casais, Rosa; Davies, Marc; Cavanagh, David; Britton, Paul

    2005-07-01

    The avian coronavirus Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), like other coronaviruses, expresses several small nonstructural (ns) proteins in addition to those from gene 1 (replicase) and the structural proteins. These coronavirus ns genes differ both in number and in amino acid similarity between the coronavirus groups but show some concordance within a group or subgroup. The functions and requirements of the small ns gene products remain to be elucidated. With the advent of reverse genetics for coronaviruses, the first steps in elucidating their role can be investigated. We have used our reverse genetics system for IBV (R. Casais, V. Thiel, S. G. Siddell, D. Cavanagh, and P. Britton, J. Virol. 75:12359-12369, 2001) to investigate the requirement of IBV gene 5 for replication in vivo, in ovo, and ex vivo. We produced a series of recombinant viruses, with an isogenic background, in which complete expression of gene 5 products was prevented by the inactivation of gene 5 following scrambling of the transcription-associated sequence, thereby preventing the expression of IBV subgenomic mRNA 5, or scrambling either separately or together of the translation initiation codons for the two gene 5 products. As all of the recombinant viruses replicated very similarly to the wild-type virus, Beau-R, we conclude that the IBV gene 5 products are not essential for IBV replication per se and that they are accessory proteins.

  14. Crystal structures of inhibitor complexes of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-1) protease

    SciTech Connect

    Satoh, Tadashi; Li, Mi; Nguyen, Jeffrey-Tri; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Gustchina, Alla; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2010-09-28

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus associated with several serious diseases, such as adult T-cell leukemia and tropical spastic paraparesis/myelopathy. For a number of years, the protease (PR) encoded by HTLV-1 has been a target for designing antiviral drugs, but that effort was hampered by limited available structural information. We report a high-resolution crystal structure of HTLV-1 PR complexed with a statine-containing inhibitor, a significant improvement over the previously available moderate-resolution structure. We also report crystal structures of the complexes of HTLV-1 PR with five different inhibitors that are more compact and more potent. A detailed study of structure-activity relationships was performed to interpret in detail the influence of the polar and hydrophobic interactions between the inhibitors and the protease.

  15. Crystal Structures of Inhibitir Complexes of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus (HTLV-1) Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Satoh, Tadashi; Li, Mi; Nguyen, Jeffrey-Tri; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Gustchina, Alla; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2010-09-17

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus associated with several serious diseases, such as adult T-cell leukemia and tropical spastic paraparesis/myelopathy. For a number of years, the protease (PR) encoded by HTLV-1 has been a target for designing antiviral drugs, but that effort was hampered by limited available structural information. We report a high-resolution crystal structure of HTLV-1 PR complexed with a statine-containing inhibitor, a significant improvement over the previously available moderate-resolution structure. We also report crystal structures of the complexes of HTLV-1 PR with five different inhibitors that are more compact and more potent. A detailed study of structure-activity relationships was performed to interpret in detail the influence of the polar and hydrophobic interactions between the inhibitors and the protease.

  16. Requirement of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4F complex in hepatitis E virus replication.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xinying; Xu, Lei; Wang, Yijin; Wang, Wenshi; Sprengers, Dave; Metselaar, Herold J; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Pan, Qiuwei

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection, one of the foremost causes of acute hepatitis, is becoming a health problem of increasing magnitude. As other viruses, HEV exploits elements from host cell biochemistry, but we understand little as to which components of the human hepatocellular machinery are perverted for HEV multiplication. It is, however, known that the eukaryotic translation initiation factors 4F (eIF4F) complex, the key regulator of the mRNA-ribosome recruitment phase of translation initiation, serves as an important component for the translation and replication of many viruses. Here we aim to investigate the role of three subunits of the eIF4F complex: eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4A (eIF4A), eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in HEV replication. We found that efficient replication of HEV requires eIF4A, eIF4G and eIF4E. Consistently, the negative regulatory factors of this complex: programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) and eIF4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) exert anti-HEV activities, which further illustrates the requirement for eIF4A and eIF4E in supporting HEV replication. Notably, phosphorylation of eIF4E induced by MNK1/2 activation is not involved in HEV replication. Although ribavirin and interferon-α (IFN-α), the most often-used off-label drugs for treating hepatitis E, interact with this complex, their antiviral activities are independent of eIF4E. In contrast, eIF4E silencing provokes enhanced anti-HEV activity of these compounds. Thus, HEV replication requires eIF4F complex and targeting essential elements of this complex provides important clues for the development of novel antiviral therapy against HEV.

  17. Study on the pathogenesis of bluetongue: replication of the virus in the organs of infected sheep.

    PubMed

    Pini, A

    1976-12-01

    The pathogenesis of bluetongue infection was studied by the titration of the virus in tissue samples taken from sheep inoculated subcutaneously in the auricula of the ear with 76 TC ID50 of the plaque-purified type 10 bluetongue virus. Tissue samples were taken from individual animals killed at daily intervals over a period of 11 days. The mean incubation time was 6.9 days and the first clinical sign was pyrexia. On the 4th day, bluetongue virus was demonstrated in the lymph nodes of the cephalic area, tonsils and spleen; viraemia became demonstrable on the 6th day post-inoculation and typical macroscopic lesions due to the virus were first observed on the 8th day. It was concluded that, post-infection, the virus entered the regional lymph nodes. From there it was disseminated via the lymph and/or the blood stream to the lymphoid tissues in other parts of the body where further replication occurred. From these primary sites the virus was carried via the blood stream and infected the majority of tissues. Humoral antibody, as detected by immunofluorescence, did not appear to have a direct influence on the concentration of virus in solid tissues. Persistence of the virus in infected sheep was not demonstrated when tissues were taken 6, 8 and 16 weeks after infection.

  18. Ribavirin Causes Error Catastrophe during Hantaan Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Severson, William E.; Schmaljohn, Connie S.; Javadian, Ali; Jonsson, Colleen B.

    2003-01-01

    Except for ribavirin, no other antiviral drugs for treating hantaviral diseases have been identified. It is well established that ribavirin will inhibit the production of infectious Hantaan virus (HTNV); however, its mechanism of action is unknown. To characterize the inhibitory effect of ribavirin on HTNV, the levels of viral RNAs, proteins, and infectious particles were measured for 3 days posttreatment of HTNV-infected Vero E6 cells. HTNV-infected cells treated with ribavirin showed a slight reduction in the levels of cRNA, viral RNA, and mRNA populations on the first day postinfection. The amount of cRNA and viral RNA increased to that observed for untreated HTNV-infected cells on day 2, whereas mRNA levels were more greatly reduced on days 2 and 3. Despite the finding of S-segment mRNA, albeit low, three of the viral proteins—nucleocapsid (N) protein and glycoproteins G1 and G2—could not be detected by immunohistochemistry in ribavirin-treated cells. To test the hypothesis that these effects were caused by incorporation of ribavirin into nascent RNA and a resultant “error catastrophe” was occurring, we cloned and sequenced the S-segment cRNA/mRNA from ribavirin-treated or untreated cells from day 3. We found a high mutation frequency (9.5/1,000 nucleotides) in viral RNA synthesized in the presence of ribavirin. Hence, the transcripts produced in the presence of the drug were not functional. These results suggest that ribavirin's mechanism of action lies in challenging the fidelity of the hantavirus polymerase, which causes error catastrophe. PMID:12477853

  19. Tombusviruses upregulate phospholipid biosynthesis via interaction between p33 replication protein and yeast lipid sensor proteins during virus replication in yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Barajas, Daniel; Xu, Kai; Sharma, Monika; Wu, Cheng-Yu; Nagy, Peter D.

    2014-12-15

    Positive-stranded RNA viruses induce new membranous structures and promote membrane proliferation in infected cells to facilitate viral replication. In this paper, the authors show that a plant-infecting tombusvirus upregulates transcription of phospholipid biosynthesis genes, such as INO1, OPI3 and CHO1, and increases phospholipid levels in yeast model host. This is accomplished by the viral p33 replication protein, which interacts with Opi1p FFAT domain protein and Scs2p VAP protein. Opi1p and Scs2p are phospholipid sensor proteins and they repress the expression of phospholipid genes. Accordingly, deletion of OPI1 transcription repressor in yeast has a stimulatory effect on TBSV RNA accumulation and enhanced tombusvirus replicase activity in an in vitro assay. Altogether, the presented data convincingly demonstrate that de novo lipid biosynthesis is required for optimal TBSV replication. Overall, this work reveals that a (+)RNA virus reprograms the phospholipid biosynthesis pathway in a unique way to facilitate its replication in yeast cells. - Highlights: • Tombusvirus p33 replication protein interacts with FFAT-domain host protein. • Tombusvirus replication leads to upregulation of phospholipids. • Tombusvirus replication depends on de novo lipid synthesis. • Deletion of FFAT-domain host protein enhances TBSV replication. • TBSV rewires host phospholipid synthesis.

  20. Replication of an acutely lethal simian immunodeficiency virus activates and induces proliferation of lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Fultz, P N

    1991-01-01

    A variant of simian immunodeficiency virus from sooty mangabey monkeys (SIVsmm), termed SIVsmmPBj14, was previously identified and shown to induce acute disease and death within 1 to 2 weeks of inoculation of pig-tailed macaques and mangabey monkeys (P. N. Fultz, H. M. McClure, D. C. Anderson, and W. M. Switzer, AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses 5:397-409, 1989). SIVsmmPBj14 differed from its parent virus, SIVsmm9, not only in pathogenicity but also in multiple in vitro properties. As a first approach to understanding the biological and molecular mechanisms responsible for the acute disease and death induced by this variant, virus-host cell interactions of SIVsmmPBj14 and SIVsmm9 were studied. Initial rates of replication of the two viruses were identical in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from normal pig-tailed macaques and mangabey monkeys, but SIVsmmPBj14 infection always resulted in higher yields of virus than did SIVsmm9 infection, as assessed by levels of reverse transcriptase activity in culture supernatants. Surprisingly, despite its cytopathicity for macaque and mangabey CD4+ cells, replication of SIVsmmPBj14 was accompanied by up to 10-fold increases in number of viable cells compared with cell numbers in uninfected or SIVsmm9-infected cultures. Furthermore, SIVsmmPBj14 was shown to infect and replicate in resting PBMC just as efficiently as in mitogen-stimulated PBMC, irrespective of whether exogenous interleukin-2 (IL-2) or antibodies that neutralized IL-2 were added to culture media. Accumulation of virus in culture supernatants of resting PBMC preceded by several days the appearance of activated cells which expressed the IL-2 receptor alpha subunit (CD25), suggesting that activation of cells was not essential for replication. The ability to activate and to induce simian PBMC to proliferate appeared specific for the acutely lethal variant because incorporation of [3H]thymidine by PBMC from naive animals was observed only upon incubation

  1. Stimulation of the Replication of ICP0-Null Mutant Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and pp71-Deficient Human Cytomegalovirus by Epstein-Barr Virus Tegument Protein BNRF1

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yongxu; Orr, Anne

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT It is now well established that several cellular proteins that are components of promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML NBs, also known as ND10) have restrictive effects on herpesvirus infections that are countered by viral proteins that are either present in the virion particle or are expressed during the earliest stages of infection. For example, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) immediate early (IE) protein ICP0 overcomes the restrictive effects of PML-NB components PML, Sp100, hDaxx, and ATRX while human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) IE protein IE1 targets PML and Sp100, and its tegument protein pp71 targets hDaxx and ATRX. The functions of these viral regulatory proteins are in part interchangeable; thus, both IE1 and pp71 stimulate the replication of ICP0-null mutant HSV-1, while ICP0 increases plaque formation by pp71-deficient HCMV. Here, we extend these studies by examining proteins that are expressed by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). We report that EBV tegument protein BNRF1, discovered by other investigators to target the hDaxx/ATRX complex, increases the replication of both ICP0-null mutant HSV-1 and pp71-deficient HCMV. In addition, EBV protein EBNA-LP, which targets Sp100, also augments ICP0-null mutant HSV-1 replication. The combination of these two EBV regulatory proteins had a greater effect than each one individually. These findings reinforce the concept that disruption of the functions of PML-NB proteins is important for efficient herpesvirus infections. IMPORTANCE Whether a herpesvirus initiates a lytic infection in a host cell or establishes quiescence or latency is influenced by events that occur soon after the viral genome has entered the host cell nucleus. Certain cellular proteins respond in a restrictive manner to the invading pathogen's DNA, while viral functions are expressed that counteract the cell-mediated repression. One aspect of cellular restriction of herpesvirus infections is mediated by components of nuclear structures known as

  2. The logic of DNA replication in double-stranded DNA viruses: insights from global analysis of viral genomes

    PubMed Central

    Kazlauskas, Darius; Krupovic, Mart; Venclovas, Česlovas

    2016-01-01

    Genomic DNA replication is a complex process that involves multiple proteins. Cellular DNA replication systems are broadly classified into only two types, bacterial and archaeo-eukaryotic. In contrast, double-stranded (ds) DNA viruses feature a much broader diversity of DNA replication machineries. Viruses differ greatly in both completeness and composition of their sets of DNA replication proteins. In this study, we explored whether there are common patterns underlying this extreme diversity. We identified and analyzed all major functional groups of DNA replication proteins in all available proteomes of dsDNA viruses. Our results show that some proteins are common to viruses infecting all domains of life and likely represent components of the ancestral core set. These include B-family polymerases, SF3 helicases, archaeo-eukaryotic primases, clamps and clamp loaders of the archaeo-eukaryotic type, RNase H and ATP-dependent DNA ligases. We also discovered a clear correlation between genome size and self-sufficiency of viral DNA replication, the unanticipated dominance of replicative helicases and pervasive functional associations among certain groups of DNA replication proteins. Altogether, our results provide a comprehensive view on the diversity and evolution of replication systems in the DNA virome and uncover fundamental principles underlying the orchestration of viral DNA replication. PMID:27112572

  3. The logic of DNA replication in double-stranded DNA viruses: insights from global analysis of viral genomes.

    PubMed

    Kazlauskas, Darius; Krupovic, Mart; Venclovas, Česlovas

    2016-06-01

    Genomic DNA replication is a complex process that involves multiple proteins. Cellular DNA replication systems are broadly classified into only two types, bacterial and archaeo-eukaryotic. In contrast, double-stranded (ds) DNA viruses feature a much broader diversity of DNA replication machineries. Viruses differ greatly in both completeness and composition of their sets of DNA replication proteins. In this study, we explored whether there are common patterns underlying this extreme diversity. We identified and analyzed all major functional groups of DNA replication proteins in all available proteomes of dsDNA viruses. Our results show that some proteins are common to viruses infecting all domains of life and likely represent components of the ancestral core set. These include B-family polymerases, SF3 helicases, archaeo-eukaryotic primases, clamps and clamp loaders of the archaeo-eukaryotic type, RNase H and ATP-dependent DNA ligases. We also discovered a clear correlation between genome size and self-sufficiency of viral DNA replication, the unanticipated dominance of replicative helicases and pervasive functional associations among certain groups of DNA replication proteins. Altogether, our results provide a comprehensive view on the diversity and evolution of replication systems in the DNA virome and uncover fundamental principles underlying the orchestration of viral DNA replication. PMID:27112572

  4. Overexpression of Promyelocytic Leukemia Protein Precludes the Dispersal of ND10 Structures and Has No Effect on Accumulation of Infectious Herpes Simplex Virus 1 or Its Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Pascal; Jacob, Robert J.; Roizman, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    A key early event in the replication of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is the localization of infected-cell protein no. 0 (ICP0) in nuclear structures knows as ND10 or promyelocytic leukemia oncogenic domains (PODs). This is followed by dispersal of ND10 constituents such as the promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML), CREB-binding protein (CBP), and Daxx. Numerous experiments have shown that this dispersal is mediated by ICP0. PML is thought to be the organizing structural component of ND10. To determine whether the virus targets PML because it is inimical to viral replication, telomerase-immortalized human foreskin fibroblasts and HEp-2 cells were transduced with wild-type baculovirus or a baculovirus expressing the Mr 69,000 form of PML. The transduced cultures were examined for expression and localization of PML in mock-infected and HSV-1-infected cells. The results obtained from studies of cells overexpressing PML were as follows. (i) Transduced cells accumulate large amounts of unmodified and SUMO-I-modified PML. (ii) Mock-infected cells exhibited enlarged ND10 structures containing CBP and Daxx in addition to PML. (iii) In infected cells, ICP0 colocalized with PML in ND10 early in infection, but the two proteins did not overlap or were juxtaposed in orderly structures. (iv) The enlarged ND10 structures remained intact at least until 12 h after infection and retained CBP and Daxx in addition to PML. (v) Overexpression of PML had no effect on the accumulation of viral proteins representative of α, β, or γ groups and had no effect on the accumulation of infectious virus in cells infected with wild-type virus or a mutant (R7910) from which the α0 genes had been deleted. These results indicate the following: (i) PML overexpressed in transduced cells cannot be differentiated from endogenous PML with respect to sumoylation and localization in ND10 structures. (ii) PML does not affect viral replication or the changes in the localization of ICP0 through infection

  5. Non-replicating recombinant vaccinia virus expressing CD80 to enhance T-cell stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zajac, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The following method describes the generation of a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing a costimulatory molecule (human CD80 or B7.1).The procedure first requires the cloning, by classical methods not described here, of the gene of interest, e.g. CD80, into a vaccinia shuttle plasmid under the control of a virus-specific promoter enabling a transcription during the early phase of infection. Flanking the insert, the plasmid contains viral sequences and a selection maker needed for the insertion into the viral genome. The successive plaque isolation of recombinant virus on cell monolayer described here is based on the transient "gpt" selection system which enables other insertions in different loci of the same virus. Finally, after verification amplification and titration of the recombinant vector, replication will be impaired by a psoralen-UV treatment in order to produce a non-replicating virus. Expression and function of inserts, following infection of cells, are verified by specific phenotypic and functional assays.

  6. Structure, origin, and transforming activity of feline leukemia virus-myc recombinant provirus FTT.

    PubMed Central

    Doggett, D L; Drake, A L; Hirsch, V; Rowe, M E; Stallard, V; Mullins, J I

    1989-01-01

    A myc-containing recombinant feline leukemia provirus, designated FTT, was molecularly cloned from the cat T-cell lymphoma line F422. Its transforming activity, as well as the nucleotide sequence of the 3' 2.7 kilobases of FTT, including v-myc, was determined. The predicted v-myc protein differs from feline c-myc by three amino acid changes and is truncated by two amino acids at the carboxyl terminus. Comparison with feline leukemia virus (FeLV), feline c-myc, and other FeLV proviruses indicates that recombination junctions involved in the generation of FeLV-onc viruses occur at preferred locations within the virus. They usually follow or occur within the sequence ACCCC at 5' junctions and may result from homologous recombination between sequences of marked purine-pyrimidine strand bias, especially at 3' junctions. Some recombination sites also resemble recombinase recognition sequences utilized in immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor variable-region joining. Transfection of primary rat embryo fibroblasts and subsequent in vivo analysis revealed that morphologic and tumorigenic transformation require cotransfection of FTT with human EJ-ras DNA; neither gene alone is sufficient. FTT v-myc is expressed in these transformed rat cells as a 3.0-kilobase subgenomic RNA; however, in contrast to the depressed level of c-myc expression in v-myc-involved feline tumors, steady-state levels of rat c-myc RNA and protein are apparently unaltered. Images PMID:2539507

  7. Mechanism of leukemogenesis induced by mink cell focus-forming murine leukemia viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Li, J P; Baltimore, D

    1991-01-01

    The Friend or Moloney mink cell focus-forming (MCF) virus encodes a recombinant-type envelope glycoprotein, gp70, that is closely related to the membrane glycoprotein, gp55, of Friend spleen focus-forming virus (SFFV). We have shown previously that gp55 has the ability to activate cell growth by binding to the cellular receptor for erythropoietin. Here we show that gp70 encoded by either the Friend or Moloney MCF virus also binds to the erythropoietin receptor and that coexpression of the receptor and gp70 in an interleukin-3 (IL-3)-dependent cell line can activate IL-3-independent growth. Furthermore, when the cDNA for the human IL-2 receptor beta chain, which is related by sequence to the erythropoietin receptor, was introduced into this cell line, it became growth factor independent after infection either with SFFV or with one of the two MCF viruses but not with an ecotropic virus. Based on these observations, we propose a mechanism for the early stage of leukemogenesis induced by the MCF-type murine leukemia viruses. Images PMID:1850020

  8. In vivo replication of pathogenic and attenuated strains of Junin virus in different cell populations of lymphatic tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Laguens, M; Chambó, J G; Laguens, R P

    1983-01-01

    Lymphatic tissue is one of the main sites for replication of Junin virus. To characterize which cells are involved in that replication, the presence of Junin virus in purified populations of macrophages and dendritic cells from the spleens of guinea pigs infected with pathogenic and attenuated strains was investigated by immunofluorescence and intracerebral inoculation into newborn mice. The pathogenic strain was present both in macrophages and in dendritic cells, but the attenuated strain selectively infected dendritic cells. These observations suggest that the pathogenic behavior and replication efficiency of these two strains of Junin virus may be related to a difference in cell targets. Images PMID:6309667

  9. Replication of a chronic hepatitis B virus genotype F1b construct.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Sergio; Jiménez, Gustavo; Alarcón, Valentina; Prieto, Cristian; Muñoz, Francisca; Riquelme, Constanza; Venegas, Mauricio; Brahm, Javier; Loyola, Alejandra; Villanueva, Rodrigo A

    2016-03-01

    Genotype F is one of the less-studied genotypes of human hepatitis B virus, although it is widely distributed in regions of Central and South American. Our previous studies have shown that HBV genotype F is prevalent in Chile, and phylogenetic analysis of its full-length sequence amplified from the sera of chronically infected patients identified it as HBV subgenotype F1b. We have previously reported the full-length sequence of a HBV molecular clone obtained from a patient chronically infected with genotype F1b. In this report, we established a system to study HBV replication based on hepatoma cell lines transfected with full-length monomers of the HBV genome. Culture supernatants were analyzed after transfection and found to contain both HBsAg and HBeAg viral antigens. Consistently, fractionated cell extracts revealed the presence of viral replication, with both cytoplasmic and nuclear DNA intermediates. Analysis of HBV-transfected cells by indirect immunofluorescence or immunoelectron microscopy revealed the expression of viral antigens and cytoplasmic viral particles, respectively. To test the functionality of the ongoing viral replication further at the level of chromatinized cccDNA, transfected cells were treated with a histone deacetylase inhibitor, and this resulted in increased viral replication. This correlated with changes posttranslational modifications of histones at viral promoters. Thus, the development of this viral replication system for HBV genotype F will facilitate studies on the regulation of viral replication and the identification of new antiviral drugs.

  10. Analysis of classical swine fever virus RNA replication determinants using replicons.

    PubMed

    Risager, Peter Christian; Fahnøe, Ulrik; Gullberg, Maria; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Belsham, Graham J

    2013-08-01

    Self-replicating RNAs (replicons), with or without reporter gene sequences, derived from the genome of the Paderborn strain of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) have been produced. The full-length viral cDNA, propagated within a bacterial artificial chromosome, was modified by targeted recombination within Escherichia coli. RNA transcripts were produced in vitro and introduced into cells by electroporation. The translation and replication of the replicon RNAs could be followed by the accumulation of luciferase (from Renilla reniformis or Gaussia princeps) protein expression (where appropriate), as well as by detection of CSFV NS3 protein production within the cells. Inclusion of the viral E2 coding region within the replicon was advantageous for replication efficiency. Production of chimeric RNAs, substituting the NS2 and NS3 coding regions (as a unit) from the Paderborn strain with the equivalent sequences from the highly virulent Koslov strain or the vaccine strain Riems, blocked replication. However, replacing the Paderborn NS5B coding sequence with the RNA polymerase coding sequence from the Koslov strain greatly enhanced expression of the reporter protein from the replicon. In contrast, replacement with the Riems NS5B sequence significantly impaired replication efficiency. Thus, these replicons provide a system for determining specific regions of the CSFV genome required for genome replication without the constraints of maintaining infectivity. PMID:23580431

  11. Further studies on the replication of rabies and rabies-like viruses in organized cultures of mammalian neural tissues.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, S; Schneider, L G; Kawai, A; Yonezawa, T

    1974-10-01

    Organized cultures of mammalian spinal and dorsal root ganglions were used for a comparative study of the neurocytopathology caused by rabies and so-called rabies-like viruses. Electron microscopy and titration of infectivity revised earlier data in which no difference could be demonstrated between street and fixed-virus infection. In the present study, fixed virus produced inclusion bodies without apparent virus assembly. Sequential electron microscopy revealed that the main sites of virus assembly were the membranes of the Golgi complex. In contrast, rabies-like viruses freshly isolated from wild rodents produced inclusion bodies all of which were associated with virus replication. Electron microscopic evidence has led us to classify these strains as street virus. Nonneural cell elements from cultivated ganglions were susceptible to fixed virus and the cultures yielded higher titers of infectivity as compared to those of rabies-like viruses. Virus budding was shown to occur at the cell surface as well as at intracytoplasmic membranes.

  12. Autophagy sustains the replication of porcine reproductive and respiratory virus in host cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qinghao; Qin, Yixian; Zhou, Lei; Kou, Qiuwen; Guo, Xin; Ge, Xinna; Yang, Hanchun; Hu, Hongbo

    2012-08-01

    In this study, we confirmed the autophagy induced by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) in permissive cells and investigated the role of autophagy in the replication of PRRSV. We first demonstrated that PRRSV infection significantly results in the increased double-membrane vesicles, the accumulation of LC3 fluorescence puncta, and the raised ratio of LC3-II/{beta}-actin, in MARC-145 cells. Then we discovered that induction of autophagy by rapamycin significantly enhances the viral titers of PRRSV, while inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA and silencing of LC3 gene by siRNA reduces the yield of PRRSV. The results showed functional autolysosomes can be formed after PRRSV infection and the autophagosome-lysosome-fusion inhibitor decreases the virus titers. We also examined the induction of autophagy by PRRSV infection in pulmonary alveolar macrophages. These findings indicate that autophagy induced by PRRSV infection plays a role in sustaining the replication of PRRSV in host cells.

  13. Wheat dwarf virus, a geminivirus of graminaceous plants needs splicing for replication.

    PubMed Central

    Schalk, H J; Matzeit, V; Schiller, B; Schell, J; Gronenborn, B

    1989-01-01

    By analysing mRNAs with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and by studying in vitro generated mutants we have identified an intron in the genome of wheat dwarf virus (WDV), a geminivirus of cereals. Polypeptides whose expression is essential for the replication of the viral DNA have been defined. They are encoded by two distinct overlapping open reading frames (ORFs). The joining of these two ORFs by deletion of the intron as well as the introduction of a frameshift mutation within the intron do not prevent replication of the viral genome in suspension culture cells. In contrast to WDV, the geminiviruses of dicotyledonous plants possess a single continuous ORF, highly homologous to the two individual ones of WDV. We propose that mRNA splicing is a common feature of all geminiviruses of the Gramineae and might contribute to their host class specificity. The existence of a functional intron is a novel finding for the plant viruses. Images PMID:2721484

  14. Experimentally guided models reveal replication principles that shape the mutation distribution of RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Michael B; Draghi, Jeremy A; Plotkin, Joshua B; Andino, Raul

    2015-01-01

    Life history theory posits that the sequence and timing of events in an organism's lifespan are fine-tuned by evolution to maximize the production of viable offspring. In a virus, a life history strategy is largely manifested in its replication mode. Here, we develop a stochastic mathematical model to infer the replication mode shaping the structure and mutation distribution of a poliovirus population in an intact single infected cell. We measure production of RNA and poliovirus particles through the infection cycle, and use these data to infer the parameters of our model. We find that on average the viral progeny produced from each cell are approximately five generations removed from the infecting virus. Multiple generations within a single cell infection provide opportunities for significant accumulation of mutations per viral genome and for intracellular selection.

  15. [Inhibition of replication and transcription of WSN influenza A virus by IFIT family genes].

    PubMed

    Hou, Lidan; Li, Jing; Qu, Hongren; Yang, Limin; Chen, Yajun; Du, Qianqian; Liu, Wenjun

    2015-01-01

    IFIT family genes are a kind of interferon stimulated genes (ISGs), and play important roles in antiviral sector and immunity regulation. To study the regulatory effect of IFIT family genes during influenza A virus (IAV) infection, we used RNA-sequencing analysis (RNA-Seq) technique and found that when 293T cells were infected by A/WSN/33 (WSN), the concentration of IFIT family genes were increased. Further study reveals that overexpression of IFIT2 or IFIT3 could inhibit IAV replication and transcription, and cause the dose-dependent inhibition of polymerase activity of vRNP. In addition, IFIT2 and IFIT3 encoding protein could colocalize with NS1 in 293T cells infected by WSN, indicating that they might interact with each other. The results suggest that IFIT family genes can inhibit the replication and transcription of IAV, which contributes to our understanding of the regulatory effect of host factors during influenza virus infection.

  16. Recombinant Turkey Herpesvirus-AI Vaccine Virus Replication in Different Species of Waterfowl.

    PubMed

    Palya, Vilmos; Kovács, Edit Walkóné; Tatár-Kis, Tímea; Felföldi, Balázs; Homonnay, Zalán G; Mató, Tamás; Sato, Takanori; Gardin, Yannick

    2016-05-01

    Waterfowl play a key role in the epidemiology of the H5N1 subtype of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus; therefore, efficient immunization of domesticated ducks and geese to maximize the impact of other control measures is of great importance. A recombinant (r)HVT-AI, expressing the HA gene of a clade 2.2 H5N1 HPAI strain had been developed and proved to be efficient against different clades of H5N1 HPAI virus in chickens after a single vaccination at 1 day old and could provide long-term immunity. We investigated whether rHVT-AI applied at 1 day old is able to replicate in different species and crossbreeds of ducks and in geese with the aim of collecting data on the possible application of rHVT-AI vaccine in different species of waterfowl for the control of H5N1 HPAI. We tested the possible differences among different waterfowl species, i.e., between geese (Anser anser, domesticated greylag goose), Muscovy ducks (Cairina moschata forma domestica), Pekin ducks (Anas platyrhynchos forma domestica), and mule ducks (Muscovy duck × Pekin duck), in their susceptibility to support the replication of rHVT-AI. Vaccine virus replication was followed by real-time PCR in spleen, bursa, and feather tip samples. Humoral immune response to vaccination was tested using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test and H5-specific commercial ELISA. Significant differences among the different waterfowl species regarding the rate of rHVT-AI replication was detected that were not reflected by the same difference in the immune response to vaccination. Replication of the rHVT-AI vaccine was very limited in Pekin ducks, somewhat better in mule ducks, and the vaccine virus was replicating significantly better in Muscovy ducks and geese, reaching 100% detectability at certain time points after administration at 1 day old. Results indicated that the vaccine virus could establish different levels of persistent infection in these species of waterfowl. No humoral immune response

  17. A Dimeric Rep Protein Initiates Replication of a Linear Archaeal Virus Genome: Implications for the Rep Mechanism and Viral Replication ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Oke, Muse; Kerou, Melina; Liu, Huanting; Peng, Xu; Garrett, Roger A.; Prangishvili, David; Naismith, James H.; White, Malcolm F.

    2011-01-01

    The Rudiviridae are a family of rod-shaped archaeal viruses with covalently closed, linear double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genomes. Their replication mechanisms remain obscure, although parallels have been drawn to the Poxviridae and other large cytoplasmic eukaryotic viruses. Here we report that a protein encoded in the 34-kbp genome of the rudivirus SIRV1 is a member of the replication initiator (Rep) superfamily of proteins, which initiate rolling-circle replication (RCR) of diverse viruses and plasmids. We show that SIRV Rep nicks the viral hairpin terminus, forming a covalent adduct between an active-site tyrosine and the 5′ end of the DNA, releasing a 3′ DNA end as a primer for DNA synthesis. The enzyme can also catalyze the joining reaction that is necessary to reseal the DNA hairpin and terminate replication. The dimeric structure points to a simple mechanism through which two closely positioned active sites, each with a single tyrosine residue, work in tandem to catalyze DNA nicking and joining. We propose a novel mechanism for rudivirus DNA replication, incorporating the first known example of a Rep protein that is not linked to RCR. The implications for Rep protein function and viral replication are discussed. PMID:21068244

  18. Evidence of feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia virus, and Toxoplasma gondii in feral cats on Mauna Kea, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Danner, R.M.; Goltz, Dan M.; Hess, S.C.; Banko, P.C.

    2007-01-01

    We determined prevalence to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) antibodies, feline leukemia virus (FeLV) antigen, and Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in feral cats (Felis catus) on Mauna Kea Hawaii from April 2002 to May 2004. Six of 68 (8.8%) and 11 of 68 (16.2%) cats were antibody positive to FIV and antigen positive for FeLV, respectively; 25 of 67 (37.3%) cats were seropositive to T. gondii. Antibodies to FeLV and T. gondii occurred in all age and sex classes, but FIV occurred only in adult males. Evidence of current or previous infections with two of these infectious agents was detected in eight of 64 cats (12.5%). Despite exposure to these infectious agents, feral cats remain abundant throughout the Hawaiian Islands. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2007.

  19. Evidence of feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia virus, and Toxoplasma gondii in feral cats on Mauna Kea, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Danner, Raymond M; Goltz, Daniel M; Hess, Steven C; Banko, Paul C

    2007-04-01

    We determined prevalence to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) antibodies, feline leukemia virus (FeLV) antigen, and Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in feral cats (Felis catus) on Mauna Kea Hawaii from April 2002 to May 2004. Six of 68 (8.8%) and 11 of 68 (16.2%) cats were antibody positive to FIV and antigen positive for FeLV, respectively; 25 of 67 (37.3%) cats were seropositive to T. gondii. Antibodies to FeLV and T. gondii occurred in all age and sex classes, but FIV occurred only in adult males. Evidence of current or previous infections with two of these infectious agents was detected in eight of 64 cats (12.5%). Despite exposure to these infectious agents, feral cats remain abundant throughout the Hawaiian Islands.

  20. Evidence of feline immunodeficiency virus, feline leukemia virus, and Toxoplasma gondii in feral cats on Mauna Kea, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Danner, Raymond M; Goltz, Daniel M; Hess, Steven C; Banko, Paul C

    2007-04-01

    We determined prevalence to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) antibodies, feline leukemia virus (FeLV) antigen, and Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in feral cats (Felis catus) on Mauna Kea Hawaii from April 2002 to May 2004. Six of 68 (8.8%) and 11 of 68 (16.2%) cats were antibody positive to FIV and antigen positive for FeLV, respectively; 25 of 67 (37.3%) cats were seropositive to T. gondii. Antibodies to FeLV and T. gondii occurred in all age and sex classes, but FIV occurred only in adult males. Evidence of current or previous infections with two of these infectious agents was detected in eight of 64 cats (12.5%). Despite exposure to these infectious agents, feral cats remain abundant throughout the Hawaiian Islands. PMID:17495320

  1. Infection of bovine immunodeficiency virus and bovine leukemia virus in water buffalo and cattle populations in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Meas, S; Seto, J; Sugimoto, C; Bakhsh, M; Riaz, M; Sato, T; Naeem, K; Ohashi, K; Onuma, M

    2000-03-01

    A survey of antibodies to bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) known as bovine lentivirus and bovine leukemia virus (BLV) was conducted with samples from water buffalo and cattle populations in Pakistan. A total of 370 water buffaloes and 76 cattle were tested, and 10.3% and 15.8%, respectively, were found positive for anti-BIV p26 antibodies determined by Western blotting, while 0.8% of water buffaloes and no cattle were positive for anti-BLV antibodies determined by immunodiffusion test. BIV-seropositive water buffaloes and cattle were found to have BIV proviral DNA in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells determined by nested polymerase chain reaction. This is the first report of BIV infections in water buffaloes.

  2. Characterisation of env and gag gene fragments of bovine leukemia viruses (BLVs) from cattle in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Feray; Oğuzoğlu, Tuba Çiğdem; Timurkan, Mehmet Ozkan; Karapınar, Zeynep

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the molecular characteristics of bovine leukemia viruses (BLVs) in Turkey. The variability of env and gag fragments of BLVs was examined using DNA from blood samples obtained for sequence analysis of BLVs in four cattle herds from three different geographical areas in Turkey. The env gene sequences were highly similar to those of Brasilian, Argentine, and Japanese BLV strains, while gag genes from Turkish BLV isolates showed greatest similarity to those of Iranian isolates. This paper is the first report on the partial characterisation of env and gag genetic fragments of BLVs from Turkey.

  3. Bovine leukemia virus becomes established in dairy herds before the first lactation.

    PubMed

    Merlini, Ramiro; Gutiérrez, Gerónimo; Alvarez, Irene; Jaworski, Juan Pablo; Carignano, Hugo; Poli, Mario; Willems, Luc; Trono, Karina

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we studied seven groups of pregnant heifers from a consortium of dairy farms heavily infected with bovine leukemia virus (BLV). ELISA testing showed that the seroprevalence ranges of BLV in heifers between 36.1 and 66.5 %. No significant differences in proviral load were found when comparing heifers with adult cattle. Before their first delivery, more than 9.8 % of heifers show a high proviral load. Because BLV infection can occur during the first two years of life, the rationale of any strategy should be to take action as early as possible after birth.

  4. A loss of function analysis of host factors influencing Vaccinia virus replication by RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Beard, Philippa M; Griffiths, Samantha J; Gonzalez, Orland; Haga, Ismar R; Pechenick Jowers, Tali; Reynolds, Danielle K; Wildenhain, Jan; Tekotte, Hille; Auer, Manfred; Tyers, Mike; Ghazal, Peter; Zimmer, Ralf; Haas, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is a large, cytoplasmic, double-stranded DNA virus that requires complex interactions with host proteins in order to replicate. To explore these interactions a functional high throughput small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen targeting 6719 druggable cellular genes was undertaken to identify host factors (HF) influencing the replication and spread of an eGFP-tagged VACV. The experimental design incorporated a low multiplicity of infection, thereby enhancing detection of cellular proteins involved in cell-to-cell spread of VACV. The screen revealed 153 pro- and 149 anti-viral HFs that strongly influenced VACV replication. These HFs were investigated further by comparisons with transcriptional profiling data sets and HFs identified in RNAi screens of other viruses. In addition, functional and pathway analysis of the entire screen was carried out to highlight cellular mechanisms involved in VACV replication. This revealed, as anticipated, that many pro-viral HFs are involved in translation of mRNA and, unexpectedly, suggested that a range of proteins involved in cellular transcriptional processes and several DNA repair pathways possess anti-viral activity. Multiple components of the AMPK complex were found to act as pro-viral HFs, while several septins, a group of highly conserved GTP binding proteins with a role in sequestering intracellular bacteria, were identified as strong anti-viral VACV HFs. This screen has identified novel and previously unexplored roles for cellular factors in poxvirus replication. This advancement in our understanding of the VACV life cycle provides a reliable knowledge base for the improvement of poxvirus-based vaccine vectors and development of anti-viral theraputics.

  5. Autophagy Benefits the Replication of Newcastle Disease Virus in Chicken Cells and Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yingjie; Yu, Shengqing; Ding, Na; Meng, Chunchun; Meng, Songshu; Zhang, Shilei; Zhan, Yuan; Qiu, Xusheng; Tan, Lei; Chen, Hongjun; Song, Cuiping

    2014-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is an important avian pathogen. We previously reported that NDV triggers autophagy in U251 glioma cells, resulting in enhanced virus replication. In this study, we investigated whether NDV triggers autophagy in chicken cells and tissues to enhance virus replication. We demonstrated that NDV infection induced steady-state autophagy in chicken-derived DF-1 cells and in primary chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells, evident through increased double- or single-membrane vesicles, the accumulation of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-LC3 dots, and the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II. In addition, we measured autophagic flux by monitoring p62/SQSTM1 degradation, LC3-II turnover, and GFP-LC3 lysosomal delivery and proteolysis, to confirm that NDV infection induced the complete autophagic process. Inhibition of autophagy by pharmacological inhibitors and RNA interference reduced virus replication, indicating an important role for autophagy in NDV infection. Furthermore, we conducted in vivo experiments and observed the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II in heart, liver, spleen, lung, and kidney of NDV-infected chickens. Regulation of the induction of autophagy with wortmannin, chloroquine, or starvation treatment affects NDV production and pathogenesis in tissues of both lung and intestine; however, treatment with rapamycin, an autophagy inducer of mammalian cells, showed no detectable changes in chicken cells and tissues. Moreover, administration of the autophagy inhibitor wortmannin increased the survival rate of NDV-infected chickens. Our studies provide strong evidence that NDV infection induces autophagy which benefits NDV replication in chicken cells and tissues. PMID:24173218

  6. Visualization of the structures of the hepatitis C virus replication complex

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Shih-Ching; Lo, Shih-Yen; Liou, Je-Wen; Lin, Min-Ching; Syu, Ciao-Ling; Lai, Meng-Jiun; Chen, Yi- Cheng; Li, Hui-Chun

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Lipid rafts are known to play an important role in virus entry and virus assembly of many viruses. {yields} However, HCV is the first example of the association of lipid raft with viral RNA replication. {yields} Our results in this manuscript demonstrate that purified HCV RCs with associated lipid raft membrane appeared as distinct particles of around 0.7 um under EM and AFM. {yields} Knockdown of proteins associated with lipid raft suppressed the HCV replication and reduced the number of these particles. {yields} To our knowledge, structures of HCV RCs were demonstrated at its first time in this manuscript. -- Abstract: Hepatitis C viral RNA synthesis has been demonstrated to occur on a lipid raft membrane structure. Lipid raft membrane fraction purified by membrane flotation analysis was observed using transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Particles around 0.7 um in size were found in lipid raft membrane fraction purified from hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicon but not their parental HuH7 cells. HCV NS5A protein was associated with these specialized particles. After several cycles of freezing-thawing, these particles would fuse into larger sizes up to 10 um. Knockdown of seven proteins associated with lipid raft (VAPA, COPG, RAB18, COMT, CDC42, DPP4, and KDELR2) of HCV replicon cells reduced the observed number of these particles and suppressed the HCV replication. Results in this study indicated that HCV replication complexes with associated lipid raft membrane form distinct particle structures of around 0.7 um as observed from transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy.

  7. Single-cycle replicable Rift Valley fever virus mutants as safe vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Kaori; Tercero, Breanna R; Makino, Shinji

    2016-05-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an arbovirus circulating between ruminants and mosquitoes to maintain its enzootic cycle. Humans are infected with RVFV through mosquito bites or direct contact with materials of infected animals. The virus causes Rift Valley fever (RVF), which was first recognized in the Great Rift Valley of Kenya in 1931. RVF is characterized by a febrile illness resulting in a high rate of abortions in ruminants and an acute febrile illness, followed by fatal hemorrhagic fever and encephalitis in humans. Initially, the virus was restricted to the eastern region of Africa, but the disease has now spread to southern and western Africa, as well as outside of the African continent, e.g., Madagascar, Saudi Arabia and Yemen. There is a serious concern that the virus may spread to other areas, such as North America and Europe. As vaccination is an effective tool to control RVFV epidemics, formalin-inactivated vaccines and live-attenuated RVFV vaccines have been used in endemic areas. The formalin-inactivated vaccines require boosters for effective protection, whereas the live-attenuated vaccines enable the induction of protective immunity by a single vaccination. However, the use of live-attenuated RVFV vaccines for large human populations having a varied health status is of concern, because of these vaccines' residual neuro-invasiveness and neurovirulence. Recently, novel vaccine candidates have been developed using replication-defective RVFV that can undergo only a single round of replication in infected cells. The single-cycle replicable RVFV does not cause systemic infection in immunized hosts, but enables the conferring of protective immunity. This review summarizes the properties of various RVFV vaccines and recent progress on the development of the single-cycle replicable RVFV vaccines. PMID:26022573

  8. Construction of self-replicating subgenomic dengue virus 4 (DENV4) replicon.

    PubMed

    Alcaraz-Estrada, Sofia L; Del Angel, Rosa; Padmanabhan, Radhakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus serotypes 1-4 are members of mosquito-borne flavivirus genus of Flaviviridae family that encode one long open reading frame (ORF) that is translated to a polyprotein. Both host and virally encoded proteases function in the processing of the polyprotein by co-translational and posttranslational mechanisms to yield 10 mature proteins prior to viral RNA replication. To study cis- and trans-acting factors involved in viral RNA replication, many groups [1-8] have constructed cDNAs encoding West Nile virus (WNV), DENV, or yellow fever virus reporter replicon RNAs. The replicon plasmids constructed in our laboratory for WNV [9] and the DENV4 replicon described here are arranged in the order of 5'-untranslated region (UTR), the N-terminal coding sequence of capsid (C), Renilla luciferase (Rluc) reporter gene with a translation termination codon, and an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) element from encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) for cap-independent translation of the downstream ORF that codes for a polyprotein precursor, CterE-NS1-NS2A-NS2B-NS3-NS4A-NS4B-NS5, followed by the 3'-UTR. In the second DENV4 replicon, the Rluc gene is fused sequentially downstream to the 20 amino acid (aa) FMDV 2A protease coding sequence, neomycin resistance gene (Neo(r)), a termination codon, and the EMCV leader followed by the same polyprotein coding sequence and 3'-UTR as in the first replicon. The first replicon is useful to study by transient transfection experiments the cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors involved in viral RNA replication. The second DENV4 replicon is used to establish a stable monkey kidney (Vero) cell line by transfection of replicon RNA and selection in the presence of the G418, an analog of neomycin. This replicon is useful for screening and identifying antiviral compounds that are potential inhibitors of viral replication.

  9. Differential virulence mechanisms of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) include host entry and virus replication kinetics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Penaranda, M.M.D.; Purcell, M.K.; Kurath, G.

    2009-01-01

    Host specificity is a phenomenon exhibited by all viruses. For the fish rhabdovirus infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), differential specificity of virus strains from the U and M genogroups has been established both in the field and in experimental challenges. In rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), M IHNV strains are consistently more prevalent and more virulent than U IHNV. The basis of the differential ability of these two IHNV genogroups to cause disease in rainbow trout was investigated in live infection challenges with representative U and M IHNV strains. When IHNV was delivered by intraperitoneal injection, the mortality caused by U IHNV increased, indicating that the low virulence of U IHNV is partly due to inefficiency in entering the trout host. Analyses of in vivo replication showed that U IHNV consistently had lower prevalence and lower viral load than M IHNV during the course of infection. In analyses of the host immune response, M IHNV-infected fish consistently had higher and longer expression of innate immune-related genes such as Mx-1. This suggests that the higher virulence of M IHNV is not due to suppression of the immune response in rainbow trout. Taken together, the results support a kinetics hypothesis wherein faster replication enables M IHNV to rapidly achieve a threshold level of virus necessary to override the strong host innate immune response. ?? 2009 SGM.

  10. Iron inactivates the RNA polymerase NS5B and suppresses subgenomic replication of hepatitis C Virus.

    PubMed

    Fillebeen, Carine; Rivas-Estilla, Ana Maria; Bisaillon, Martin; Ponka, Prem; Muckenthaler, Martina; Hentze, Matthias W; Koromilas, Antonis E; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2005-03-11

    Clinical data suggest that iron is a negative factor in chronic hepatitis C; however, the molecular mechanisms by which iron modulates the infectious cycle of hepatitis C virus (HCV) remain elusive. To explore this, we utilized cells expressing a HCV replicon as a well-established model for viral replication. We demonstrate that iron administration dramatically inhibits the expression of viral proteins and RNA, without significantly affecting its translation or stability. Experiments with purified recombinant HCV RNA polymerase (NS5B) revealed that iron binds specifically and with high affinity (apparent Kd: 6 and 60 microM for Fe2+ and Fe3+, respectively) to the protein's Mg2+-binding pocket, thereby inhibiting its enzymatic activity. We propose that iron impairs HCV replication by inactivating NS5B and that its negative effects in chronic hepatitis C may be primarily due to attenuation of antiviral immune responses. Our data provide a direct molecular link between iron and HCV replication.

  11. Deformed wing virus: replication and viral load in mites (Varroa destructor).

    PubMed

    Gisder, Sebastian; Aumeier, Pia; Genersch, Elke

    2009-02-01

    Deformed wing virus (DWV) normally causes covert infections but can have devastating effects on bees by inducing morphological deformity or even death when transmitted by the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor. In order to determine the role of V. destructor in the development of crippled wings, we analysed individual mites for the presence and replication of DWV. The results supported the correlation between viral replication in mites and morphologically deformed bees. Quantification of viral genome equivalents revealed that mites capable of inducing an overt DWV infection contained 10(10)-10(12) genome equivalents per mite. In contrast, mites which could not induce crippled wings contained a maximum of only 10(8) viral genome equivalents per mite. We conclude that the development of crippled wings not only depends on DWV transmission by V. destructor but also on viral replication in V. destructor and on the DWV titre in the parasitizing mites.

  12. Frog virus 3 ORF 53R, a putative myristoylated membrane protein, is essential for virus replication in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Whitley, Dexter S.; Yu, Kwang; Sample, Robert C.; Sinning, Allan; Henegar, Jeffrey; Norcross, Erin; Chinchar, V. Gregory

    2010-09-30

    Although previous work identified 12 complementation groups with possible roles in virus assembly, currently only one frog virus 3 protein, the major capsid protein (MCP), has been linked with virion formation. To identify other proteins required for assembly, we used an antisense morpholino oligonucleotide to target 53R, a putative myristoylated membrane protein, and showed that treatment resulted in marked reductions in 53R levels and a 60% drop in virus titers. Immunofluorescence assays confirmed knock down and showed that 53R was found primarily within viral assembly sites, whereas transmission electron microscopy detected fewer mature virions and, in some cells, dense granular bodies that may represent unencapsidated DNA-protein complexes. Treatment with a myristoylation inhibitor (2-hydroxymyristic acid) resulted in an 80% reduction in viral titers. Collectively, these data indicate that 53R is an essential viral protein that is required for replication in vitro and suggest it plays a critical role in virion formation.

  13. Quantitative RT-PCR for titration of replication-defective recombinant Semliki Forest virus.

    PubMed

    Puglia, Ana L P; Rezende, Alexandre G; Jorge, Soraia A C; Wagner, Renaud; Pereira, Carlos A; Astray, Renato M

    2013-11-01

    Virus titration may constitute a drawback in the development and use of replication-defective viral vectors like Semliki Forest virus (SFV). The standardization and validation of a reverse transcription quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) method for SFV titration is presented here. The qRT-PCR target is located within the nsp1 gene of the non-structural polyprotein SFV region (SFV RNA), which allows the strategy to be used for several different recombinant SFV constructs. Titer determinations were carried out by performing virus titration and infection assays with SFVs containing an RNA coding region for the rabies virus glycoprotein (RVGP) or green fluorescent protein (GFP). Results showed that the standardized qRT-PCR is applicable for different SFV constructs, and showed good reproducibility. To evaluate the correlation between the amount of functional SFV RNA in a virus lot and its infectivity in BHK-21 cell cultures, a temperature mediated titer decrease was performed and successfully quantitated by qRT-PCR. When used for cell infection at the same multiplicity of infection (MOI), the temperature treated SFV-RVGP samples induced the same levels of RVGP expression. Similarly, when different SFV-GFP lots with different virus titers, as accessed by qRT-PCR, were used for cell infection at the same MOI, the cultures showed comparable amounts of fluorescent cells. The data demonstrate a good correlation between the amount of virus used for infection, as measured by its SFV RNA, and the protein synthesis in the cells. In conclusion, the qRT-PCR method developed here is accurate and enables the titration of replication-defective SFV vectors, an essential aid for viral vector development as well as for establishment of production bioprocesses.

  14. In vitro effect of deoxynivalenol (DON) mycotoxin on porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus replication.

    PubMed

    Savard, Christian; Pinilla, Vicente; Provost, Chantale; Segura, Mariela; Gagnon, Carl A; Chorfi, Younes

    2014-03-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium spp. Among monogastric farm animals, swine are the most susceptible to DON as it markedly reduces feed intake and decreases weight gain. DON has also been shown to increase susceptibility to viral infections; therefore the objective of this study was to investigate in vitro impact of DON on porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). Permissive cells were infected or not with PRRSV and were treated with increasing concentrations of DON. Cell survival and mortality were evaluated by determining the number of viable cells with a tetrazolium compound and by measuring lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, respectively. Virus titration and antiviral cytokines mRNA expression were evaluated by quantitative PCR. DON significantly affected the survival of noninfected cells in a dose dependent manner. However, DON concentrations between 140 and 280 significantly increased the survival of cells infected with PRRSV. These concentrations significantly decreased PRRSV replication by inducing a pro-inflammatory cytokines environment and an early activation of apoptosis, which in turn seem to interrupt viral replication. For the first time, this study showed that DON had significant effects on the survival of PRRSV infected cells and on virus replication, in a dose dependent manner.

  15. The influenza A virus PB2 polymerase subunit is required for the replication of viral RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Perales, B; Ortín, J

    1997-01-01

    The transcription and replication of influenza virus RNA (vRNA) were reconstituted in vivo. The experimental approach involved the transfection of plasmids encoding the viral subunits of the polymerase and the nucleoprotein into cells infected with a vaccinia virus recombinant virus expressing the T7 RNA polymerase. As templates, one of two model RNAs was transfected: vNSZ or cNSZ RNA. The RNAs were 240 nucleotides in length, contained the terminal sequences of the NS viral segment, and were of negative or positive polarity, respectively. The accumulation of cRNA and mRNA in cells transfected with vNSZ RNA and the accumulation of vRNA and mRNA in cells transfected with cNSZ RNA were determined by RNase protection assays with labeled vNSZ-L or cNSZ-L probes. The patterns of protected bands obtained indicated that both cRNA replication intermediate and mRNA accumulated when the system was reconstituted with vNSZ RNA. Likewise, both vRNA and mRNA accumulated after reconstitution with cNSZ RNA. The reconstitution of incomplete systems in which any of the subunits of the polymerase or the model RNA were omitted was completely negative for the accumulation of cRNA or vRNA, indicating that the presence of the PB2 subunit in the polymerase is required for replication of vRNA. PMID:8995663

  16. Human keratinocytes restrict chikungunya virus replication at a post-fusion step

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Eric; Simmons, Graham; Chazal, Nathalie; and others

    2015-02-15

    Transmission of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) to humans is initiated by puncture of the skin by a blood-feeding Aedes mosquito. Despite the growing knowledge accumulated on CHIKV, the interplay between skin cells and CHIKV following inoculation still remains unclear. In this study we questioned the behavior of human keratinocytes, the predominant cell population in the skin, following viral challenge. We report that CHIKV rapidly elicits an innate immune response in these cells leading to the enhanced transcription of type I/II and type III interferon genes. Concomitantly, we show that despite viral particles internalization into Rab5-positive endosomes and efficient fusion of virus and cell membranes, keratinocytes poorly replicate CHIKV as attested by absence of nonstructural proteins and genomic RNA synthesis. Accordingly, human keratinocytes behave as an antiviral defense against CHIKV infection rather than as a primary targets for initial replication. This picture significantly differs from that reported for Dengue and West Nile mosquito-borne viruses. - Highlights: • Human keratinocytes support endocytosis of CHIKV and fusion of viral membranes. • CHIKV replication is blocked at a post entry step in these cells. • Infection upregulates type-I, –II and –III IFN genes expression. • Keratinocytes behave as immune sentinels against CHIKV.

  17. Hepatitis C virus replication kinetics in chimpanzees with self-limited and chronic infections.

    PubMed

    Prince, A M; Pawlotsky, J-M; Soulier, A; Tobler, L; Brotman, B; Pfahler, W; Lee, D-H; Li, Liping; Shata, M T

    2004-05-01

    The availability of molecular beacon-based, real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and a semi-automated sample extraction procedure have made it possible for us to retrospectively examine HCV replication kinetics in HCV naive chimpanzees infected during the past 20 years. We compared these in 17 animals that developed chronic infection, and in 21 that developed self-limited infection. No differences were found in infecting dose, or replication kinetics in the acute phase between these two types of infection. An unanticipated finding was the fact that 10 of 17 animals developing chronic infection partially controlled virus replication for 48 +/- 48 weeks after typical acute phase viraemia, and prior to development of chronic infection. Twenty-nine out of 30 (29/30) sera, which were negative by quantitative PCR during the downregulated period, were, however, positive by the more sensitive Genprobe isothermal transcription-mediated amplification (TMA) assay. Thus, downregulation was not complete. Ten animals showing self-limited infection showed complete resolution of viraemia by TMA assay. Quasispecies analysis revealed that in all, except one case, the virus reappearing after downregulation was essentially identical to that of the originally infecting virus.

  18. Antiviral mode of action of a synthetic brassinosteroid against Junin virus replication.

    PubMed

    Castilla, Viviana; Larzábal, Mariano; Sgalippa, Natalia Aguirre; Wachsman, Mónica B; Coto, Celia E

    2005-11-01

    The antiviral mode of action of the synthetic brassinosteroid (22S,23S)-3beta-bromo-5alpha,22,23-trihydroxystigmastan-6-one (6b) against Junin virus replication in Vero cells was investigated. Time-related experiments showed that 6b mainly affects an early event of virus growth cycle. Neither adsorption nor internalization of viral particles was the target of the inhibitory action. The analysis of the effect of 6b on viral RNA synthesis demonstrated that the presence of the compound adversely affects virus RNA replication by preventing the synthesis of full length antigenomic RNA. Although 6b was most effective the earlier it was added to the cells after infection with JV, a high level of inhibition of JV yield and fusion activity of newly synthesized viral glycoproteins was still detected when the compound was present during the last hours of infection. Therefore, we cannot rule out an inhibitory action of 6b on later events of JV replicative cycle. PMID:16171877

  19. Infectious linear DNA sequences replicating in simian virus 40-infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gruss, P; Sauer, G

    1977-01-01

    A new class of linear duplex DNA structures that contain simian virus 40 (SV40) DNA sequences and that are replicated during productive infection of cells with SV40 is described. These structures comprise up to 35% of the radioactively labeled DNA molecules that can be isolated by selective extraction. These molecules represent a unique size class corresponding to the length of an open SV40 DNA molecule (FO III), and they contain a heterogeneous population of DNA sequences either of host or of viral origin, as shown by restriction endonuclease analysis and nucleic acid hybridization. Part of the FO III DNA molecules contain viral-host DNA sequences covalently linked with each other. They start to replicate with the onset of SV40 superhelix replication 1 day after infection. Their rate of synthesis is most pronounced 3 days after infection when superhelix replication is already declining. Furthermore, they cannot be chased into other structures. At least a fraction of these molecules is infectious when administered together with DEAE-dextran to permissive cells. After intracellular circularization, superhelical DNA FO I with an aberrant cleavage pattern accumulates. In addition, tumor and viral capsid antigen are induced, and infectious viral progeny is obtained. Infection of cells with purified SV40 FO I DNA does not result in FO III DNA molecules in the infected cells or in the viral progeny. It is suggested, therefore, that these FO III DNA molecules are perpetuated within SV40 virus pools by encapsidation into pseudovirions. Images PMID:189087

  20. Human heme oxygenase 1 is a potential host cell factor against dengue virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chin-Kai; Lin, Chun-Kuang; Wu, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Chen, Wei-Chun; Young, Kung-Chia; Lee, Jin-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection and replication induces oxidative stress, which further contributes to the progression and pathogenesis of the DENV infection. Modulation of host antioxidant molecules may be a useful strategy for interfering with DENV replication. In this study, we showed that induction or exogenous overexpression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an antioxidant enzyme, effectively inhibited DENV replication in DENV-infected Huh-7 cells. This antiviral effect of HO-1 was attenuated by its inhibitor tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), suggesting that HO-1 was an important cellular factor against DENV replication. Biliverdin but not carbon monoxide and ferrous ions, which are products of the HO-1 on heme, mediated the HO-1-induced anti-DENV effect by non-competitively inhibiting DENV protease, with an inhibition constant (Ki) of 8.55 ± 0.38 μM. Moreover, HO-1 induction or its exogenous overexpression, rescued DENV-suppressed antiviral interferon response. Moreover, we showed that HO-1 induction by cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) and andrographolide, a natural product, as evidenced by a significant delay in the onset of disease and mortality, and virus load in the infected mice’s brains. These findings clearly revealed that a drug or therapy that induced the HO-1 signal pathway was a promising strategy for treating DENV infection. PMID:27553177

  1. Human heme oxygenase 1 is a potential host cell factor against dengue virus replication.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chin-Kai; Lin, Chun-Kuang; Wu, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Chen, Wei-Chun; Young, Kung-Chia; Lee, Jin-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection and replication induces oxidative stress, which further contributes to the progression and pathogenesis of the DENV infection. Modulation of host antioxidant molecules may be a useful strategy for interfering with DENV replication. In this study, we showed that induction or exogenous overexpression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an antioxidant enzyme, effectively inhibited DENV replication in DENV-infected Huh-7 cells. This antiviral effect of HO-1 was attenuated by its inhibitor tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), suggesting that HO-1 was an important cellular factor against DENV replication. Biliverdin but not carbon monoxide and ferrous ions, which are products of the HO-1 on heme, mediated the HO-1-induced anti-DENV effect by non-competitively inhibiting DENV protease, with an inhibition constant (Ki) of 8.55 ± 0.38 μM. Moreover, HO-1 induction or its exogenous overexpression, rescued DENV-suppressed antiviral interferon response. Moreover, we showed that HO-1 induction by cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) and andrographolide, a natural product, as evidenced by a significant delay in the onset of disease and mortality, and virus load in the infected mice's brains. These findings clearly revealed that a drug or therapy that induced the HO-1 signal pathway was a promising strategy for treating DENV infection. PMID:27553177

  2. Inhibition of intracellular hepatitis C virus replication by nelfinavir and synergistic effect with interferon-alpha.

    PubMed

    Toma, S; Yamashiro, T; Arakaki, S; Shiroma, J; Maeshiro, T; Hibiya, K; Sakamoto, N; Kinjo, F; Tateyama, M; Fujita, J

    2009-07-01

    Liver diseases associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection have become the major cause of mortality in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection since the introduction of highly active anti-retroviral therapy. HCV-related liver disease is more severe in HIV-infected patients than in non-HIV-infected patients, but the standard therapies used to treat chronic hepatitis C in HCV/HIV coinfected patients are the same as those for patients infected with HCV alone. HIV protease inhibitors might have potential to down-regulate HCV load of HCV/HIV coinfected patients. In this study, we evaluated the effects of nelfinavir on intracellular HCV replication using the HCV replicon system. We constructed an HCV replicon expressing a neomycin-selectable chimeric firefly luciferase reporter protein. Cytotoxicity and apoptosis induced by nelfinavir were assessed and synergism between nelfinavir and interferon (IFN) was calculated using CalcuSyn analysis. Nelfinavir dose-dependently repressed HCV replication at low concentrations (IC(50), 9.88 micromol/L). Nelfinavir failed to induce cytotoxicity or apoptosis at concentrations that inhibited HCV replication. Clinical concentrations of nelfinavir (5 micromol/L) combined with IFN showed synergistic inhibition of HCV replication in our replicon model. Our results suggest that the direct effects of nelfinavir on the HCV subgenome and its synergism with IFN could improve clinical responses to IFN therapy in HCV/HIV coinfected patients.

  3. Autophagy during early stages contributes to bovine viral diarrhea virus replication in MDBK cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Shi, Huijun; Zhang, Hui; Ren, Yan; Guo, Fei; Qiao, Jun; Jia, Bin; Wang, Pengyan; Chen, Chuangfu

    2014-10-01

    Autophagy (or autophagocytosis) is an essential and precise control process by which cells degrade unnecessary or dysfunctional cellular components or organelles in the cytoplasm in response to nutrient depletion, exogenous pathogens, or other stimuli. This process results in the removal of damaged or surplus organelles and macromolecular complexes via a lysosome-dependent mechanism. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a ssRNA virus of the Flaviviridae family (genus Pestivirus). BVDV infection results in major economic losses due to poor reproductive performance and poor calf performance in cattle herds. In our previous studies, we have shown that BVDV NADL infection significantly increases autophagy in MDBK cells. To further define the interactions between autophagy and BVDV infection, we investigated the effects of autophagy on the replication of BVDV NADL. The findings showed that autophagy was inhibited by treatment with 3-methyladenine (3-MA) or wortmannin and that the knockdown of LC3 and Beclin1 using lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) suppressed BVDV NADL replication. In contrast, the findings showed the replication of BVDV NADL was significantly increased by treatment with the autophagy inducer rapamycin within 18 h post-infection (pi). However, the mRNA levels of BVDV NADL 5'UTRs showed a downward trend after 18 h pi, and this effect was reversed by chloroquine treatment. Therefore, we inferred that infection with BVDV NADL increases autophagy, which in turn favors BVDV NADL replication at early stages.

  4. Replication of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus is restricted in terminally differentiated neurons.

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre, J C; Rall, G; Oldstone, C; Sanna, P P; Borrow, P; Oldstone, M B

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the replication of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) before and after the nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced transdifferentiation of PC12 cells from the chromaffin to the neuron-like phenotype. Untreated and NGF-treated cells were equally susceptible to LCMV infection; however, the viral yield was found to be 1,000-fold lower in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells. The reduced viral yield correlated with restricted LCMV replication and transcription within the infected cell, which was not caused by the lack of cell proliferation in the NGF-treated cells but rather was related to the induction or changes in expression levels of specific gene product(s) associated with the cell commitment to a neuronal phenotype. The return to the chromaffin phenotype after withdrawal of NGF restored normal LCMV yields as well as levels of viral replication and transcription. The finding of reduced viral replication in terminally differentiated neuronal cells has important implications for understanding the mechanism by which neurotropic viruses, such as LCMV, are able to establish a long-term persistent infection in the central nervous system in the absence of severe pathological changes. Images PMID:8230458

  5. Evaluation of the Conformational Switch Model for Alfalfa Mosaic Virus RNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Petrillo, Jessica E.; Rocheleau, Gail; Kelley-Clarke, Brenna; Gehrke, Lee

    2005-01-01

    Key elements of the conformational switch model describing regulation of alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) replication (R. C. Olsthoorn, S. Mertens, F. T. Brederode, and J. F. Bol, EMBO J. 18:4856-4864, 1999) have been tested using biochemical assays and functional studies in nontransgenic protoplasts. Although comparative sequence analysis suggests that the 3′ untranslated regions of AMV and ilarvirus RNAs have the potential to fold into pseudoknots, we were unable to confirm that a proposed pseudoknot forms or has a functional role in regulating coat protein-RNA binding or viral RNA replication. Published work has suggested that the pseudoknot is part of a tRNA-like structure (TLS); however, we argue that the canonical sequence and functional features that define the TLS are absent. We suggest here that the absence of the TLS correlates directly with the distinctive requirement for coat protein to activate replication in these viruses. Experimental data are evidence that elevated magnesium concentrations proposed to stabilize the pseudoknot structure do not block coat protein binding. Additionally, covarying nucleotide changes proposed to reestablish pseudoknot pairings do not rescue replication. Furthermore, as described in the accompanying paper (L. M. Guogas, S. M. Laforest, and L. Gehrke, J. Virol. 79:5752-5761, 2005), coat protein is not, by definition, inhibitory to minus-strand RNA synthesis. Rather, the activation of viral RNA replication by coat protein is shown to be concentration dependent. We describe the 3′ organization model as an alternate model of AMV replication that offers an improved fit to the available data. PMID:15827189

  6. MINIGENOMES, TRANSCRIPTION AND REPLICATION COMPETENT VIRUS-LIKE PARTICLES AND BEYOND: REVERSE GENETICS SYSTEMS FOR FILOVIRUSES AND OTHER NEGATIVE STRANDED HEMORRHAGIC FEVER VIRUSES

    PubMed Central

    Hoenen, Thomas; Groseth, Allison; de Kok-Mercado, Fabian; Kuhn, Jens H.; Wahl-Jensen, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Reverse-genetics systems are powerful tools enabling researchers to study the replication cycle of RNA viruses, including filoviruses and other hemorrhagic fever viruses, as well as to discover new antivirals. They include full-length clone systems as well as a number of life cycle modeling systems. Full-length clone systems allow for the generation of infectious, recombinant viruses, and thus are an important tool for studying the virus replication cycle in its entirety. In contrast, life cycle modeling systems such as minigenome and transcription and replication competent virus-like particle systems can be used to simulate and dissect parts of the virus life cycle outside of containment facilities. Minigenome systems are used to model viral genome replication and transcription, whereas transcription and replication competent virus-like particle systems also model morphogenesis and budding as well as infection of target cells. As such, these modeling systems have tremendous potential to further the discovery and screening of new antivirals targeting hemorrhagic fever viruses. This review provides an overview of currently established reverse genetics systems for hemorrhagic fever-causing negative-sense RNA viruses, with a particular emphasis on filoviruses, and the potential application of these systems for antiviral research. PMID:21699921

  7. Heparin binds to murine leukemia virus and inhibits Env-independent attachment and infection.

    PubMed

    Walker, Simon J; Pizzato, Massimo; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Devereux, Stephen

    2002-07-01

    Certain glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), including heparin, inhibit infection by murine leukemia virus (MLV). We now show that this is due to inhibition of virus attachment independent of the interaction between viral envelope proteins (Env) and their cellular receptors. Heparin blocked the binding of both Env-deficient and amphotropic MLV (MLV-A) particles to NIH 3T3 fibroblasts, CHO cells which lack the amphotropic retroviral receptor Pit-2, and CHO cells transfected with Pit-2 (CHO-Pit-2). Heparin also inhibited the transduction of NIH 3T3 cells by MLV-A over a similar concentration range. This effect was observed within 15 min of exposure to retrovirus. Preloading target cells with heparin had no effect on transduction and both MLV-A and Env-deficient retrovirus bound efficiently to heparin-coated agarose beads, suggesting that heparin interacts with the virus rather than the target cell. This requires both a strong negative charge and a specific structure since GAGs with different charge and carbohydrate composition inhibited virus infection variably. The specificity of GAG-virus interaction also depends on the producer cells, since virus packaged by murine GP+EnvAM12 cells was 1,000-fold more sensitive to inhibition by chondroitin sulfate A than was virus packaged by human FLYA13 packaging cells. No evidence for an interaction between MLV and cell surface proteoglycans was found, however, since the attachment of MLV-A and envelope-defective virus to proteoglycan-deficient CHOpgsA-745 cells was similar to that seen with both wild-type and CHO-Pit-2 cells. Although the molecular mechanism is unclear, this study presents evidence that Env receptor-independent attachment is an important step in MLV infection.

  8. Multiple isolates and characteristics of human T-cell leukemia virus type II.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, W W; Takahashi, H; Liu, C; Kaplan, M H; Scheewind, O; Ijichi, S; Nagashima, K; Gallo, R C

    1992-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia (or lymphotropic) virus type II (HTLV-II) was isolated from eight HTLV-seropositive patients, six of whom were also infected with human immunodeficiency virus, by cocultivation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with BJAB, a continuous B-cell line. Restriction endonuclease mapping of the proviruses demonstrated consistent differences among isolates, and two distinct physical map patterns were observed. The results suggest the existence of two closely related molecular subtypes of HTLV-II, which are tentatively designated HTLV-IIa and HTLV-IIb. This finding was supported by preliminary nucleotide sequence analysis of the env gene region encoding the transmembrane glycoprotein gp21, which showed consistent differences between the two proposed virus subtypes. Exploitation of differences in restriction endonuclease sites allowed polymerase chain reaction amplification to detect and differentiate the two subtypes in fresh PBMCs of HTLV-seropositive intravenous drug abusers (IVDAs). The results of these studies confirm that HTLV-II infection is the prominent HTLV infection in seropositive IVDAs and also show that infection with both subtypes occurs. The finding of genetic heterogeneity in the HTLV-II group of viruses may have important implications for studies on its role in human disease and will be useful in characterizing the viruses present in newly discovered endemic foci in New World indigenous populations. Images PMID:1347796

  9. Effect of the Fv-1 locus on the titration of murine leukemia viruses.

    PubMed

    Jolicoeur, P; Baltimore, D

    1975-12-01

    Titration of N- and B-tropic murine leukemia viruses on sensitive and resistant cell lines has been studied by direct XC plaque assay and infective center assay. The titration of cloned B-tropic virus by infective center assay on BALB/3T3 (Fv-1b/b) and NIH/3T3 (Fv-1n/n) cells gave one-hit patterns, with 100-fold less infected NIH/3T3 cells than BALB/3T3 cells. The titration of B-tropic virus on DBA/2 cells (Fv-1n/n) was also a one-hit. The titration of a one-hit curve, and there were about 100-fold less infected BALB/3T3 cells than NIH/3T3 cells. Comparable results were obtained by titrating the cloned N-tropic virus on congenic SIM (Fv-1n/n) and SIM.R (Fv-1b/b) cells or the Gross N-tropic virus on BALB/3T3 cells. Therefore, our data indicate that the multiple-hit phenomenon described previously may not be an essential part of the Fv-1 gene restriction.

  10. Effective inhibition of infectious bursal disease virus replication by recombinant avian adeno-associated virus-delivered microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongjuan; Sun, Huaichang; Shen, Pengpeng; Zhang, Xinyu; Xia, Xiaoli

    2009-06-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a novel antiviral strategy against a variety of virus infections. Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) causes an economically important disease in young chickens. This study demonstrated efficient inhibition of IBDV replication by recombinant avian adeno-associated virus (rAAAV)-delivered anti-VP1 and anti-VP2 microRNAs (miRNAs). In the viral vector-transduced cells, sequence-specific miRNA expression was detected by poly(A)-tailed RT-PCR. Reporter assays using a pVP2-EGFP vector showed significant and long-lasting inhibition of VP2-EGFP expression in cells transduced with anti-VP2 miRNA-expressing rAAAV-RFPmiVP2E, but not with the control miRNA-expressing rAAAV-RFPmiVP2con or anti-VP1 miRNA-expressing rAAAV-RFPmiVP1. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR and/or virus titration assays showed a significant inhibitory effect on homologous IBDV replication in cells transduced with rAAAV-RFPmiVP1 or rAAAV-RFPmiVP2E. For two heterologous IBDV isolates, transduction with rAAAV-RFPmiVP1 led to slightly weaker but similar inhibitory effects, whereas transduction with rAAAV-RFPmiVP2E resulted in significantly weaker and different inhibitory effects. These results suggest that rAAAV could act as an efficient vector for miRNA delivery into avian cells and that VP1 is the more suitable target for interfering with IBDV replication using RNAi technology.

  11. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication by SDZ NIM 811, a nonimmunosuppressive cyclosporine analog.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenwirth, B; Billich, A; Datema, R; Donatsch, P; Hammerschmid, F; Harrison, R; Hiestand, P; Jaksche, H; Mayer, P; Peichl, P

    1994-01-01

    (Me-Ile-4)cyclosporin (SDZ NIM 811) is a 4-substituted cyclosporin which is devoid of immunosuppressive activity but retains full capacity for binding to cyclophilin and exhibits potent anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) activity. SDZ NIM 811 selectively inhibits HIV-1 replication in T4 lymphocyte cell lines, in a monocytic cell line, and in HeLa T4 cells. Furthermore, its antiviral activity against laboratory strains and against clinical isolates from geographically distinct regions in primary T4 lymphocytes and in primary monocytes (50% inhibitory concentration = 0.011 to 0.057 micrograms/ml) was demonstrated. SDZ NIM 811 does not inhibit proviral gene expression or virus-specific enzyme functions, either free or bound to cyclophilin. The compound does not influence CD4 expression or inhibit fusion between virus-infected and uninfected cells. SDZ NIM 811 was, however, found to block formation of infectious particles from chronically infected cells. Oral administration to mice, rats, dogs, and monkeys resulted in levels in blood considerably exceeding the drug concentration, which completely blocked virus replication in primary cells. SDZ NIM 811 caused changes of toxicity parameters in rats to a smaller degree than cyclosporine (formerly cyclosporin A). Thus, the potent and selective anti-HIV-1 activity of SDZ NIM 811 and its favorable pharmacokinetic behavior together with its lower nephrotoxicity than that of cyclosporine make this compound a promising candidate for development as an anti-HIV drug. PMID:7527198

  12. Infectious bronchitis virus replication in the chicken embryo related cell line.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Helena L; Pilz, Daniela; Mesquita, Lígia G; Cardoso, Tereza

    2003-08-01

    The susceptibility of the chicken embryo related (CER) cell line to infectious bronchitis virus (IBV M41) was characterized after five consecutive passages in CER cells. Virus replication was monitored by cytopathic effect observation, electron microscopy, indirect immunofluorescence, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). At 96 h post-infection (p.i.), the cytopathic effect was graded 75% by cell fusion, rounding up of cells and monolayer detachment, and the electron microscopy image characterized by coronavirus morphology. Cytoplasmic fluorescence was readily observed by from 24 h p.i. onwards, and at all times the respective viral RNA from IBV-infected monolayers was demonstrated by RT-PCR. Extra-cellular virus was measured by virus titration performed on chicken kidney cells and embryonated chicken eggs, and respective titres ranged from 4.0 to 6.0 log10 EID50/ml on embryonated chicken eggs, and from 2.0 to 6.0 log10 TCID50/ml on both CER cells and chicken kidney cells studied from 24 to 120 h p.i. These results confirmed that the M41 strain replicated well in the CER cell line.

  13. Membrane-associated virus replication complexes locate to plant conducting tubes

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Juan; Laliberté, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    It is generally accepted that in order to establish a systemic infection in a plant, viruses move from the initially infected cell to the vascular tissues by cell-to-cell movement through plasmodesmata (PD), and load into the vascular conducting tubes (i.e. phloem sieve elements and xylem vessel elements) for long-distance movement. The viral unit in these movements can be a virion or a yet-to-be-defined ribonucleic protein (RNP) complex. Using live-cell imaging, our laboratory has previously demonstrated that membrane-bound replication complexes move cell-to-cell during turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) infection. Our recent study shows that these membrane-bound replication complexes end up in the vascular conducting tubes, which is likely the case for potato virus X (PVX) also. The presence of TuMV-induced membrane complexes in xylem vessels suggests that viral components could also be found in other apoplastic regions of the plant, such as the intercellular space. This possibility may have implications regarding how we approach the study of plant innate immune responses against viruses. PMID:25955489

  14. Replication and transmission of mammalian-adapted H9 subtype influenza virus in pigs and quail

    PubMed Central

    Obadan, Adebimpe O.; Kimble, Brian J.; Rajao, Daniela; Lager, Kelly; Santos, Jefferson J. S.; Vincent, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus is a major pathogen of birds, swine and humans. Strains can jump between species in a process often requiring mutations and reassortment, resulting in outbreaks and, potentially, pandemics. H9N2 avian influenza is predominant in poultry across Asia and occasionally infects humans and swine. Pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) is endemic in humans and swine and has a history of reassortment in pigs. Previous studies have shown the compatibility of H9N2 and H1N1pdm for reassortment in ferrets, a model for human infection and transmission. Here, the effects of ferret adaptation of H9 surface gene segments on the infectivity and transmission in at-risk natural hosts, specifically swine and quail, were analysed. Reassortant H9N1 and H9N2 viruses, carrying seven or six gene segments from H1N1pdm, showed infectivity and transmissibility in swine, unlike the wholly avian H9N2 virus with ferret-adapted surface genes. In quail, only the reassortant H9N2 with the six internal gene segments from the H1N1pdm strain was able to infect and transmit, although less efficiently than the wholly avian H9N2 virus with ferret-adapted surface genes. These results highlight that ferret-adapted mutations on the haemagglutinin of H9 subtype virus do not restrict the ability of the virus to infect swine and quail, and that the ability to transmit in these species depends on the context of the whole virus. As such, this study emphasizes the threat that H9N2 reassortant viruses pose to humans and agricultural species and the importance of the genetic constellation of the virus to its ability to replicate and transmit in natural hosts of influenza. PMID:25986634

  15. Effect of freezing treatment on colostrum to prevent the transmission of bovine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Toru; Ishihara, Ryoko; Hatama, Shinichi; Oue, Yasuhiro; Edamatsu, Hiroki; Konno, Yasuhiro; Tachibana, Satoshi; Murakami, Kenji

    2014-03-01

    Here, we used a sheep bioassay to determine the effect of freezing colostrum to prevent the transmission of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) among neonatal calves. Leukocytes were isolated from the colostrum of a BLV-infected Holstein cow and were then either left untreated (control) or freeze-thawed. A sheep inoculated intraperitoneally with the untreated leukocytes was infected with BLV at 3 weeks after inoculation, whereas the sheep inoculated with treated leukocytes did not become infected. The uninfected sheep was inoculated again with leukocytes isolated from the colostrum of another BLV-infected Holstein cow after freezing treatment, and again it did not become infected with BLV. Finally, this sheep was inoculated with the leukocytes isolated from the colostrum of another virus-infected cow without freezing treatment, and it became infected with BLV at 4 weeks after inoculation. The results indicate that colostrum should be frozen as a useful means of inactivating the infectivity of BLV-infected lymphocytes. PMID:24067450

  16. Altering murine leukemia virus integration through disruption of the integrase and BET protein family interaction.

    PubMed

    Aiyer, Sriram; Swapna, G V T; Malani, Nirav; Aramini, James M; Schneider, William M; Plumb, Matthew R; Ghanem, Mustafa; Larue, Ross C; Sharma, Amit; Studamire, Barbara; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Bushman, Frederic D; Montelione, Gaetano T; Roth, Monica J

    2014-05-01

    We report alterations to the murine leukemia virus (MLV) integrase (IN) protein that successfully result in decreasing its integration frequency at transcription start sites and CpG islands, thereby reducing the potential for insertional activation. The host bromo and extraterminal (BET) proteins Brd2, 3 and 4 interact with the MLV IN protein primarily through the BET protein ET domain. Using solution NMR, protein interaction studies, and next generation sequencing, we show that the C-terminal tail peptide region of MLV IN is important for the interaction with BET proteins and that disruption of this interaction through truncation mutations affects the global targeting profile of MLV vectors. The use of the unstructured tails of gammaretroviral INs to direct association with complexes at active promoters parallels that used by histones and RNA polymerase II. Viruses bearing MLV IN C-terminal truncations can provide new avenues to improve the safety profile of gammaretroviral vectors for human gene therapy. PMID:24623816

  17. Altering murine leukemia virus integration through disruption of the integrase and BET protein family interaction

    PubMed Central

    Aiyer, Sriram; Swapna, G.V.T.; Malani, Nirav; Aramini, James M.; Schneider, William M.; Plumb, Matthew R.; Ghanem, Mustafa; Larue, Ross C.; Sharma, Amit; Studamire, Barbara; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Bushman, Frederic D.; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Roth, Monica J.

    2014-01-01

    We report alterations to the murine leukemia virus (MLV) integrase (IN) protein that successfully result in decreasing its integration frequency at transcription start sites and CpG islands, thereby reducing the potential for insertional activation. The host bromo and extraterminal (BET) proteins Brd2, 3 and 4 interact with the MLV IN protein primarily through the BET protein ET domain. Using solution NMR, protein interaction studies, and next generation sequencing, we show that the C-terminal tail peptide region of MLV IN is important for the interaction with BET proteins and that disruption of this interaction through truncation mutations affects the global targeting profile of MLV vectors. The use of the unstructured tails of gammaretroviral INs to direct association with complexes at active promoters parallels that used by histones and RNA polymerase II. Viruses bearing MLV IN C-terminal truncations can provide new avenues to improve the safety profile of gammaretroviral vectors for human gene therapy. PMID:24623816

  18. Removal of xenotropic murine leukemia virus by nanocellulose based filter paper.

    PubMed

    Asper, M; Hanrieder, T; Quellmalz, A; Mihranyan, A

    2015-11-01

    The removal of xenotrpic murine leukemia virus (xMuLV) by size-exclusion filter paper composed of 100% naturally derived cellulose was validated. The filter paper was produced using cellulose nanofibers derived from Cladophora sp. algae. The filter paper was characterized using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, helium pycnometry, and model tracer (100 nm latex beads and 50 nm gold nanoparticles) retention tests. Following the filtration of xMuLV spiked solutions, LRV ≥5.25 log10 TCID50 was observed, as limited by the virus titre in the feed solution and sensitivity of the tissue infectivity test. The results of the validation study suggest that the nanocellulose filter paper is useful for removal of endogenous rodent retroviruses and retrovirus-like particles during the production of recombinant proteins.

  19. Extent of Transcription of Mouse Sarcoma-Leukemia Virus by RNA-Directed DNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Tavitian, A.; Hamelin, R.; Tchen, P.; Olofsson, B.; Boiron, M.

    1974-01-01

    The DNA product obtained from the endogenous RNA-directed DNA polymerase (deoxynucleosidetriphosphate:DNA deoxynucleotidyltransferase, EC 2.7.7.7) reaction of the Moloney sarcoma:leukemia viruses produced by the 78 A-1 cell line was analyzed and characterized. The extent of transcription of viral 70S RNA was measured by RNA·DNA hybridization (32P-viral RNA-3H product DNA). No double-stranded DNA was obtained. The product consisted of 95-99% single-stranded DNA with an average length of 200 nucleotides. In contrast to the results reported with avian and other RNA oncogenic viruses, it was found that the entire 70S viral RNA genome was transcribed into DNA pieces and that a small excess of the product DNA was sufficient to anneal the 70S RNA and render it totally resistant to single-stranded-specific enzyme digestion. PMID:4132533

  20. Influenza virus NS1 protein interacts with viral transcription-replication complexes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Marión, R M; Zürcher, T; de la Luna, S; Ortín, J

    1997-10-01

    The interaction of influenza virus NS1 protein with other viral products in the infected cell was analysed by co-immunoprecipitation studies. The three subunits of the polymerase and the nucleoprotein, but not M1 protein, were co-immunoprecipitated by NS1-specific serum but not when control serum was used. Such co-immunoprecipitation was not sensitive to RNase treatment of the immunoprecipitates. Co-immunoprecipitation was also obtained when the viral transcription-replication system was reconstituted in vivo by transfection of cDNAs and model vRNA template into vaccinia virus-T7-infected cells. Analysis of the RNA pulled-down in the NS1-specific precipitates indicated the presence of both vRNA and mRNA. These results are discussed in the context of the phenotype of virus temperature-sensitive mutants affected in the NS1 gene.

  1. [Typing of cattle leukemia virus circulating in the Ukraine].

    PubMed

    Limanskiĭ, A P; Geue, L; Limanskaia, O Iu; Beier, D

    2004-01-01

    Bovine leucosis virus (BLV), circulating in the Ukrainian territory, was characterized through the definition of its subspecies affiliation. The pro-viral BLV DNA was isolated from peripheral-blood lymphocytes of naturally-HIV-infected black-variegate animals taken from leucosis-affected farms in the Kharkov Region. The env-gene fragment of pro-viral DNA was amplified, sequenced and analyzed after the amplicon had been treated by three restriction enzymes, i.e. BamH I, Bcl I and Pvu II. According to the analysis of restriction-fragments' length polymorphism, the Ukrainian BLV isolate can be classified as belonging to the Australian subspecies, i.e. to one of the 3 known subspecies. Multiple alignment and phylogenetic analysis of the env-gene fragment of BLV isolates from the EMBL database showed that evolutionally the Ukrainian isolate is distantly located from the isolates' clusters of the Belgian, Japanese and Australian subspecie and has the biggest quantity (4) of non-coinciding nucleotides for the analyzed highly conservative locus of the BLV env-gene with a length of 444 pair of nucleotides. PMID:15017853

  2. Systematic, genome-wide identification of host genes affecting replication of a positive-strand RNA virus.

    PubMed

    Kushner, David B; Lindenbach, Brett D; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z; Noueiry, Amine O; Paul, Scott M; Ahlquist, Paul

    2003-12-23

    Positive-strand RNA viruses are the largest virus class and include many pathogens such as hepatitis C virus and the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS). Brome mosaic virus (BMV) is a representative positive-strand RNA virus whose RNA replication, gene expression, and encapsidation have been reproduced in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By using traditional yeast genetics, host genes have been identified that function in controlling BMV translation, selecting BMV RNAs as replication templates, activating the replication complex, maintaining a lipid composition required for membrane-associated RNA replication, and other steps. To more globally and systematically identify such host factors, we used engineered BMV derivatives to assay viral RNA replication in each strain of an ordered, genome-wide set of yeast single-gene deletion mutants. Each deletion strain was transformed to express BMV replicase proteins and a BMV RNA replication template with the capsid gene replaced by a luciferase reporter. Luciferase expression, which is dependent on viral RNA replication and RNA-dependent mRNA synthesis, was measured in intact yeast cells. Approximately 4500 yeast deletion strains ( approximately 80% of yeast genes) were screened in duplicate and selected strains analyzed further. This functional genomics approach revealed nearly 100 genes whose absence inhibited or stimulated BMV RNA replication and/or gene expression by 3- to >25-fold. Several of these genes were shown previously to function in BMV replication, validating the approach. Newly identified genes include some in RNA, protein, or membrane modification pathways and genes of unknown function. The results further illuminate virus and cell pathways. Further refinement of virus screening likely will reveal contributions from additional host genes.

  3. Replication of Varroa destructor virus 1 (VDV-1) and a Varroa destructor virus 1-deformed wing virus recombinant (VDV-1-DWV) in the head of the honey bee.

    PubMed

    Zioni, Naama; Soroker, Victoria; Chejanovsky, Nor

    2011-08-15

    A country-wide screen for viral pathogens in Israeli apiaries revealed significant incidence of deformed wing virus (DWV) and Varroa destructor-1 virus (VDV-1). To understand these viruses' possible involvement in deformed wing syndrome of honey bees, we studied their replication in symptomatically and asymptomatically infected bees qualitatively and quantitatively, using RT-PCR, quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and immunodetection of the major viral capsid protein VP1. We found, for the first time, replication of VDV-1 and/or a VDV-1-DWV recombinant virus in the heads of recently emerged symptomatic bees. These viruses replicated to high copy numbers, yielding the major viral capsid VP1 processed for subsequent assembly of viral particles. Our results clearly distinguished between symptomatic and asymptomatic bees infected with VDV-1 and VDV-1-DWV and suggest the hypothesis that VDV-1, in addition to DWV, may be involved in inducing the deformed wing pathology. Thus VDV-1-DWV recombination may yield virulent strains able to cause overt infections in Varroa-infested bee colonies.

  4. Replication of hepatitis delta virus RNA in mice after intramuscular injection of plasmid DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Polo, J M; Lim, B; Govindarajan, S; Lai, M M

    1995-01-01

    To establish a readily manipulable small-animal system for the study of human hepatitis delta virus (HDV) replication in vivo, plasmid DNAs containing head-to-tail cDNA dimers of HDV were inoculated intramuscularly into mice. Genomic-sense HDV RNA was detected in the injected muscle within 1 week and increased to substantial levels by week 7 postinjection. The intramuscular accumulation of HDV RNA was determined to be the direct result of viral RNA replication by three lines of evidence: (i) injected tissues also accumulated antigenomic-sense HDV RNA, (ii) plasmid DNA that synthesized primary transcripts of antigenomic sense also led to the accumulation of genomic-sense HDV RNA, and (iii) injection of a cDNA dimer defective in antigenomic RNA cleavage failed to produce detectable HDV RNA in muscle. Immunohistochemical analysis of injected muscle demonstrated the presence and nuclear localization of hepatitis delta antigen in myocytes. Finally, sera from DNA-injected mice contained antibodies specific for delta antigen, indicating the induction of an immunological response to the intracellularly expressed antigen. These findings demonstrated the ability of HDV RNA to replicate in skeletal muscle and provide a useful system for the study of HDV replication, delta antigen processing, and its presentation to the immune system in vivo. Furthermore, this system offers an efficiently replicating RNA as a potential vehicle for in vivo gene transfer. PMID:7609095

  5. Evidence for antiviral effect of nitric oxide. Inhibition of herpes simplex virus type 1 replication.

    PubMed Central

    Croen, K D

    1993-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has antimicrobial activity against a wide spectrum of infectious pathogens, but an antiviral effect has not been reported. The impact of NO, from endogenous and exogenous sources, on herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV 1) replication was studied in vitro. HSV 1 replication in RAW 264.7 macrophages was reduced 1,806-fold in monolayers induced to make NO by activation with gamma IFN and LPS. A competitive and a noncompetitive inhibitor of nitric oxide synthetase substantially reduced the antiviral effect of activated RAW macrophages. S-nitroso-L-acetyl penicillamine (SNAP) is a donor of NO and was added to the media of infected monolayers to assess the antiviral properties of NO in the absence of gamma IFN and LPS. A single dose of S-nitroso-L-acetyl penicillamine 3 h after infection inhibited HSV 1 replication in Vero, HEp2, and RAW 264.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Neither virucidal nor cytocidal effects of NO were observed under conditions that inhibited HSV 1 replication. Nitric oxide had inhibitory effects, comparable to that of gamma IFN/LPS, on protein and DNA synthesis as well as on cell replication. This report demonstrates that, among its diverse properties, NO has an antiviral effect. PMID:8390481

  6. Suppression of human T-cell leukemia virus I gene expression by pokeweed antiviral protein.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Sheila; Choudhary, Gunjan; Sarzala, Paulina M; Ratner, Lee; Hudak, Katalin A

    2009-11-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus I (HTLV-I) is a deltaretrovirus that is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia and the neurological disorder HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. Currently, no effective antiretroviral treatment options are available to restrict the development of diseases associated with the virus. In this work, we investigated the activity of pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP) on HTLV-I, when expressed from a proviral clone in 293T cells or in an HTLV-I immortalized cell line. PAP is a plant-derived N-glycosidase that exhibits antiviral activity against a number of viruses; however, its mode of action has not been clearly defined. Here, we describe the mechanism by which PAP inhibited production of HTLV-I. We show that PAP depurinated nucleotides within the gag open reading frame and suppressed the synthesis of viral proteins in part by decreasing the translational efficiency of HTLV-I gag/pol mRNA. Observed reduction in levels of viral mRNAs were not due to enhanced degradation; rather, decreased amounts of viral transactivator protein, Tax, led to feed-back inhibition of transcription from the viral promoter. Therefore, PAP efficiently suppressed HTLV-I gene expression at both translational and transcriptional levels, resulting in substantially diminished virus production. Significantly, no changes in viability or rates of cellular transcription or translation were observed in cells expressing PAP, indicating that this protein was not toxic. Antiviral activity, together with the absence of cytotoxicity, supports further investigation of this enzyme as a novel therapeutic agent against the progression of HTLV-I infection.

  7. Episodic Diversifying Selection Shaped the Genomes of Gibbon Ape Leukemia Virus and Related Gammaretroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Alfano, Niccolò; Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis; Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Roca, Alfred L.; Xu, Wenqin; Eiden, Maribeth V.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gibbon ape leukemia viruses (GALVs) are part of a larger group of pathogenic gammaretroviruses present across phylogenetically diverse host species of Australasian mammals. Despite the biomedical utility of GALVs as viral vectors and in cancer gene therapy, full genome sequences have not been determined for all of the five identified GALV strains, nor has a comprehensive evolutionary analysis been performed. We therefore generated complete genomic sequences for each GALV strain using hybridization capture and high-throughput sequencing. The four strains of GALV isolated from gibbons formed a monophyletic clade that was closely related to the woolly monkey virus (WMV), which is a GALV strain that likely originated in a gibbon host. The GALV-WMV clade in turn formed a sister group to the koala retroviruses (KoRVs). Genomic signatures of episodic diversifying selection were detected among the gammaretroviruses with concentration in the env gene across the GALV strains that were particularly oncogenic and KoRV strains that were potentially exogenous, likely reflecting their adaptation to the host immune system. In vitro studies involving vectors chimeric between GALV and KoRV-B established that variable regions A and B of the surface unit of the envelope determine which receptor is used by a viral strain to enter host cells. IMPORTANCE The gibbon ape leukemia viruses (GALVs) are among the most medically relevant retroviruses due to their use as viral vectors for gene transfer and in cancer gene therapy. Despite their importance, full genome sequences have not been determined for the majority of primate isolates, nor has comprehensive evolutionary analysis been performed, despite evidence that the viruses are facing complex selective pressures associated with cross-species transmission. Using hybridization capture and high-throughput sequencing, we report here the full genome sequences of all the GALV strains and demonstrate that diversifying selection is

  8. A tale of two HSV-1 helicases: roles of phage and animal virus helicases in DNA replication and recombination.

    PubMed

    Marintcheva, B; Weller, S K

    2001-01-01

    Helicases play essential roles in many important biological processes such as DNA replication, repair, recombination, transcription, splicing, and translation. Many bacteriophages and plant and animal viruses encode one or more helicases, and these enzymes have been shown to play many roles in their respective viral life cycles. In this review we concentrate primarily on the roles of helicases in DNA replication and recombination with special emphasis on the bacteriophages T4, T7, and A as model systems. We explore comparisons between these model systems and the herpesviruses--primarily herpes simplex virus. Bacteriophage utilize various pathways of recombination-dependent DNA replication during the replication of their genomes. In fact the study of recombination in the phage systems has greatly enhanced our understanding of the importance of recombination in the replication strategies of bacteria, yeast, and higher eukaryotes. The ability to "restart" the replication process after a replication fork has stalled or has become disrupted for other reasons is a critical feature in the replication of all organisms studied. Phage helicases and other recombination proteins play critical roles in the "restart" process. Parallels between DNA replication and recombination in phage and in the herpesviruses is explored. We and others have proposed that recombination plays an important role in the life cycle of the herpesviruses, and in this review, we discuss models for herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) DNA replication. HSV-1 encodes two helicases. UL9 binds specifically to the origins of replication and is believed to initiate HSV DNA replication by unwinding at the origin; the heterotrimeric helicase-primase complex, encoded by UL5, UL8, and UL52 genes, is believed to unwind duplex viral DNA at replication forks. Structure-function analyses of UL9 and the helicase-primase are discussed with attention to the roles these proteins might play during HSV replication. PMID

  9. Transgenic mice support replication of hepatitis delta virus RNA in multiple tissues, particularly in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Polo, J M; Jeng, K S; Lim, B; Govindarajan, S; Hofman, F; Sangiorgi, F; Lai, M M

    1995-01-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is hepatotropic and frequently causes fulminant hepatitis in both human and nonhuman primate hosts. To understand the molecular basis of HDV tissue tropism and the mechanism of pathogenesis, transgenic mice in which replication-competent HDV dimeric RNA is expressed under the control of either liver-specific or universal transcriptional promoters were developed. The expressed RNA replicated efficiently in the liver and several tissues of nonhepatic origin. Surprisingly, maximal replication of HDV RNA occurred in skeletal muscle and was almost 100-fold greater than in the liver. These findings suggest that the hepatotropism of HDV is most likely a receptor-mediated restriction and that muscle-specific factors may facilitate HDV RNA replication. No evidence of cytopathology was apparent in most of the tissues examined, including the liver, supporting the contention that hepatocellular disease is not mediated by direct cytopathological effects associated with HDV RNA replication and gene expression. However, mild muscle atrophy in some of the transgenic mice was noted. Delta antigen was detected in the nuclei of myocytes. Only the small form, not the large form, of delta antigen was detected, suggesting that the RNA editing event which causes the conversion of delta antigen did not occur in transgenic mice. Furthermore, the 0.8-kb antigenomic RNA species, which is postulated to be the mRNA for delta antigen, was not detected in mice. The preferential replication of HDV RNA in skeletal muscle suggests that HDV RNA replication can be facilitated by certain muscle-specific factors. PMID:7609056

  10. Human T-cell leukemia virus types I and II exhibit different DNase I protection patterns.

    PubMed

    Altman, R; Harrich, D; Garcia, J A; Gaynor, R B

    1988-04-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus types I (HTLV-I) and II (HTLV-II) are human retroviruses which normally infect T-lymphoid cells. HTLV-I infection is associated with adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma, and HTLV-II is associated with an indolent form of hairy-cell leukemia. To identify potential transcriptional regulatory elements of these two related human retroviruses, we performed DNase I footprinting of both the HTLV-I and HTLV-II long terminal repeats (LTRs) by using extracts prepared from uninfected T cells, HTLV-I and HTLV-II transformed T cells, and HeLa cells. Five regions of the HTLV-I LTR and three regions of the HTLV-II LTR showed protection by DNase I footprinting. All three of the 21-base-pair repeats previously shown to be important in HTLV transcriptional regulation were protected in the HTLV-I LTR, whereas only one of these repeats was protected in the HTLV-II LTR. Several regions exhibited altered protection in extracts prepared from lymphoid cells as compared with HeLa cells, but there were minimal differences in the protection patterns between HTLV-infected and uninfected lymphoid extracts. A number of HTLV-I and HTLV-II LTR fragments which contained regions showing protection in DNase I footprinting were able to function as inducible enhancer elements in transient CAT gene expression assays in the presence of the HTLV-II tat protein. The alterations in the pattern of the cellular proteins which bind to the HTLV-I and HTLV-II LTRs may in part be responsible for differences in the transcriptional regulation of these two related viruses.

  11. Identification of a high affinity nucleocapsid protein binding element from the bovine leukemia virus genome.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, F Zehra; Babalola, Kathlene; Summers, Michael F

    2013-02-01

    Retroviral genome recognition is mediated by interactions between the nucleocapsid (NC) domain of the virally encoded Gag polyprotein and cognate RNA packaging elements that, for most retroviruses, appear to reside primarily within the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of the genome. Recent studies suggest that a major packaging determinant of bovine leukemia virus (BLV), a member of the human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV)/BLV family and a non-primate animal model for HTLV-induced leukemogenesis, resides within the gag open reading frame. We have prepared and purified the recombinant BLV NC protein and conducted electrophoretic mobility shift and isothermal titration calorimetry studies with RNA fragments corresponding to these proposed packaging elements. The gag-derived RNAs did not exhibit significant affinity for NC, suggesting an alternate role in packaging. However, an 83-nucleotide fragment of the 5'-UTR that resides just upstream of the gag start codon binds NC stoichiometrically and with high affinity (K(d)=136±21 nM). These nucleotides were predicted to form tandem hairpin structures, and studies with smaller fragments indicate that the NC binding site resides exclusively within the distal hairpin (residues G369-U399, K(d)=67±8 nM at physiological ionic strength). Unlike all other structurally characterized retroviral NC binding RNAs, this fragment is not expected to contain exposed guanosines, suggesting that RNA binding may be mediated by a previously uncharacterized mechanism.

  12. WILD-TYPE GROSS LEUKEMIA VIRUS AND THE PATHOGENESIS OF THE GLOMERULONEPHRITIS OF NEW ZEALAND MICE

    PubMed Central

    Mellors, Robert C.; Shirai, Toshikazu; Aoki, Tadao; Huebner, Robert J.; Krawczynski, Krzysztof

    1971-01-01

    The pathogenesis of the spontaneous glomerulonephritis of NZB and (NZB x NZW) F1 hybrid mice is related at least in part to the formation of natural antibody against antigens of the G (Gross) system, and apparently to the deposition in the glomeruli of immune complexes of G natural antibody with G soluble antigen (GSA), type-specific antigen specified by wild-type Gross leukemia virus. G natural antibody and GSA are detectable in the acid-buffer eluate of the kidneys of NZB mice during the course of the glomerulonephritis. (NZB x NZW) F1 hybrid mice develop glomerulonephritis and produce GSA and free G natural antibody earlier in life than do NZB mice. The proteinuria manifestation of the gomerulonephritis of (NZB x NZW) F1 hybrid mice becomes increasingly prevalent as GSA undergoes immune elimination from the circulation. Gross leukemia virus-specified antigens together with bound immunoglobulins are located in the glomerular lesions of (NZB x NZW) F1 hybrid mice, both in the mesangium as observed in NZB mice and also in the wall of the peripheral capillary loops of the glomeruli. PMID:4924198

  13. Early Function of the Abutilon Mosaic Virus AC2 Gene as a Replication Brake

    PubMed Central

    Krenz, Björn; Deuschle, Kathrin; Deigner, Tobias; Unseld, Sigrid; Kepp, Gabi; Wege, Christina; Kleinow, Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The C2/AC2 genes of monopartite/bipartite geminiviruses of the genera Begomovirus and Curtovirus encode important pathogenicity factors with multiple functions described so far. A novel function of Abutilon mosaic virus (AbMV) AC2 as a replication brake is described, utilizing transgenic plants with dimeric inserts of DNA B or with a reporter construct to express green fluorescent protein (GFP). Their replicational release upon AbMV superinfection or the individual and combined expression of epitope-tagged AbMV AC1, AC2, and AC3 was studied. In addition, the effects were compared in the presence and in the absence of an unrelated tombusvirus suppressor of silencing (P19). The results show that AC2 suppresses replication reproducibly in all assays and that AC3 counteracts this effect. Examination of the topoisomer distribution of supercoiled DNA, which indicates changes in the viral minichromosome structure, did not support any influence of AC2 on transcriptional gene silencing and DNA methylation. The geminiviral AC2 protein has been detected here for the first time in plants. The experiments revealed an extremely low level of AC2, which was slightly increased if constructs with an intron and a hemagglutinin (HA) tag in addition to P19 expression were used. AbMV AC2 properties are discussed with reference to those of other geminiviruses with respect to charge, modification, and size in order to delimit possible reasons for the different behaviors. IMPORTANCE The (A)C2 genes encode a key pathogenicity factor of begomoviruses and curtoviruses in the plant virus family Geminiviridae. This factor has been implicated in the resistance breaking observed in agricultural cotton production. AC2 is a multifunctional protein involved in transcriptional control, gene silencing, and regulation of basal biosynthesis. Here, a new function of Abutilon mosaic virus AC2 in replication control is added as a feature of this protein in viral multiplication, providing a novel

  14. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus replication by the host zinc finger antiviral protein.

    PubMed

    Mao, Richeng; Nie, Hui; Cai, Dawei; Zhang, Jiming; Liu, Hongyan; Yan, Ran; Cuconati, Andrea; Block, Timothy M; Guo, Ju-Tao; Guo, Haitao

    2013-01-01

    The zinc finger antiviral protein (ZAP) is a mammalian host restriction factor that inhibits the replication of a variety of RNA viruses, including retroviruses, alphaviruses and filoviruses, through interaction with the ZAP-responsive elements (ZRE) in viral RNA, and recruiting the exosome to degrade RNA substrate. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a pararetrovirus that replicates its genomic DNA via reverse transcription of a viral pregenomic (pg) RNA precursor. Here, we demonstrate that the two isoforms of human ZAP (hZAP-L and -S) inhibit HBV replication in human hepatocyte-derived cells through posttranscriptional down-regulation of viral pgRNA. Mechanistically, the zinc finger motif-containing N-terminus of hZAP is responsible for the reduction of HBV RNA, and the integrity of the four zinc finger motifs is essential for ZAP to bind to HBV RNA and fulfill its antiviral function. The ZRE sequences conferring the susceptibility of viral RNA to ZAP-mediated RNA decay were mapped to the terminal redundant region (nt 1820-1918) of HBV pgRNA. In agreement with its role as a host restriction factor and as an innate immune mediator for HBV infection, ZAP was upregulated in cultured primary human hepatocytes and hepatocyte-derived cells upon IFN-α treatment or IPS-1 activation, and in the livers of hepatitis B patients during immune active phase. Knock down of ZAP expression increased the level of HBV RNA and partially attenuated the antiviral effect elicited by IPS-1 in cell cultures. In summary, we demonstrated that ZAP is an intrinsic host antiviral factor with activity against HBV through down-regulation of viral RNA, and that ZAP plays a role in the innate control of HBV replication. Our findings thus shed light on virus-host interaction, viral pathogenesis, and antiviral approaches.

  15. Oncolytic Herpes simplex virus expressing yeast cytosine deaminase: relationship between viral replication, transgene expression, prodrug bioactivation

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Suguru; Kuroda, Toshihiko; Fuchs, Bryan C.; He, Xiaoying; Supko, Jeffrey G.; Schmitt, Anthony; McGinn, Christopher M.; Lanuti, Michael; Tanabe, Kenneth K.

    2011-01-01

    Yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD) is a well-characterized prodrug/enzyme system that converts 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and has been combined with oncolytic viruses. However, in vivo studies of the interactions between 5-FC bioactivation and viral replication have not been previously reported, nor have the kinetics of transgene expression and the pharmacokinetics of 5-FC and 5-FU. We constructed a replication-conditional HSV-1 expressing yCD and examined cytotoxicity when 5-FC was initiated at different times after viral infection, and observed that earlier 5-FC administration led to greater cytotoxicity than later 5-FC administration in vitro and in vivo. Twelve days of 5-FC administration was superior to 6 days in animal models, but dosing beyond 12 days did not further enhance efficacy. Consistent with the dosing schedule results, both viral genomic DNA copy number and viral titers were observed to peak on Day 3 after viral injection and gradually decrease thereafter. The virus is replication-conditional and was detected in tumors for as long as 2 weeks after viral injection. The maximum relative extent of yCD conversion of 5-FC to 5-FU in tumors was observed on Day 6 after viral injection and it decreased progressively thereafter. The observation that 5-FU generation within tumors did not lead to appreciable levels of systemic 5-FU (<10 ng/ml) is important and has not been previously reported. The approaches used in these studies of the relationship between the viral replication kinetics, transgene expression, prodrug administration and anti-tumor efficacy are useful in the design of clinical trials of armed, oncolytic viruses. PMID:22076044

  16. Structural and Inhibition Studies of the RNase H Function of Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus Reverse Transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Karen A.; Marchand, Bruno; Ong, Yee Tsuey; Ndongwe, Tanyaradzwa P.; Hachiya, Atsuko; Michailidis, Eleftherios; Leslie, Maxwell D.; Sietsema, Daniel V.; Fetterly, Tracy L.; Dorst, Christopher A.; Singh, Kamalendra; Wang, Zhengqiang; Parniak, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    RNase H inhibitors (RNHIs) have gained attention as potential HIV-1 therapeutics. Although several RNHIs have been studied in the context of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) RNase H, there is no information on inhibitors that might affect the RNase H activity of other RTs. We performed biochemical, virological, crystallographic, and molecular modeling studies to compare the RNase H function and inhibition profiles of the gammaretroviral xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) and Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) RTs to those of HIV-1 RT. The RNase H activity of XMRV RT is significantly lower than that of HIV-1 RT and comparable to that of MoMLV RT. XMRV and MoMLV, but not HIV-1 RT, had optimal RNase H activities in the presence of Mn2+ and not Mg2+. Using hydroxyl-radical footprinting assays, we demonstrated that the distance between the polymerase and RNase H domains in the MoMLV and XMRV RTs is longer than that in the HIV-1 RT by ∼3.4 Å. We identified one naphthyridinone and one hydroxyisoquinolinedione as potent inhibitors of HIV-1 and XMRV RT RNases H with 50% inhibitory concentrations ranging from ∼0.8 to 0.02 μM. Two acylhydrazones effective against HIV-1 RT RNase H were less potent against the XMRV enzyme. We also solved the crystal structure of an XMRV RNase H fragment at high resolution (1.5 Å) and determined the molecular details of the XMRV RNase H active site, thus providing a framework that would be useful for the design of antivirals that target RNase H. PMID:22252812

  17. Structural and inhibition studies of the RNase H function of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Karen A; Marchand, Bruno; Ong, Yee Tsuey; Ndongwe, Tanyaradzwa P; Hachiya, Atsuko; Michailidis, Eleftherios; Leslie, Maxwell D; Sietsema, Daniel V; Fetterly, Tracy L; Dorst, Christopher A; Singh, Kamalendra; Wang, Zhengqiang; Parniak, Michael A; Sarafianos, Stefan G

    2012-04-01

    RNase H inhibitors (RNHIs) have gained attention as potential HIV-1 therapeutics. Although several RNHIs have been studied in the context of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) RNase H, there is no information on inhibitors that might affect the RNase H activity of other RTs. We performed biochemical, virological, crystallographic, and molecular modeling studies to compare the RNase H function and inhibition profiles of the gammaretroviral xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) and Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) RTs to those of HIV-1 RT. The RNase H activity of XMRV RT is significantly lower than that of HIV-1 RT and comparable to that of MoMLV RT. XMRV and MoMLV, but not HIV-1 RT, had optimal RNase H activities in the presence of Mn²⁺ and not Mg²⁺. Using hydroxyl-radical footprinting assays, we demonstrated that the distance between the polymerase and RNase H domains in the MoMLV and XMRV RTs is longer than that in the HIV-1 RT by ∼3.4 Å. We identified one naphthyridinone and one hydroxyisoquinolinedione as potent inhibitors of HIV-1 and XMRV RT RNases H with 50% inhibitory concentrations ranging from ∼0.8 to 0.02 μM. Two acylhydrazones effective against HIV-1 RT RNase H were less potent against the XMRV enzyme. We also solved the crystal structure of an XMRV RNase H fragment at high resolution (1.5 Å) and determined the molecular details of the XMRV RNase H active site, thus providing a framework that would be useful for the design of antivirals that target RNase H. PMID:22252812

  18. Development of viable TAP-tagged dengue virus for investigation of host-virus interactions in viral replication.

    PubMed

    Poyomtip, Teera; Hodge, Kenneth; Matangkasombut, Ponpan; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Pisitkun, Trairak; Jirawatnotai, Siwanon; Chimnaronk, Sarin

    2016-03-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus responsible for life-threatening dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). The viral replication machinery containing the core non-structural protein 5 (NS5) is implicated in severe dengue symptoms but molecular details remain obscure. To date, studies seeking to catalogue and characterize interaction networks between viral NS5 and host proteins have been limited to the yeast two-hybrid system, computational prediction and co-immunoprecipitation (IP) of ectopically expressed NS5. However, these traditional approaches do not reproduce a natural course of infection in which a number of DENV NS proteins colocalize and tightly associate during the replication process. Here, we demonstrate the development of a recombinant DENV that harbours a TAP tag in NS5 to study host-virus interactions in vivo. We show that our engineered DENV was infective in several human cell lines and that the tags were stable over multiple viral passages, suggesting negligible structural and functional disturbance of NS5. We further provide proof-of-concept for the use of rationally tagged virus by revealing a high confidence NS5 interaction network in human hepatic cells. Our analysis uncovered previously unrecognized hnRNP complexes and several low-abundance fatty acid metabolism genes, which have been implicated in the viral life cycle. This study sets a new standard for investigation of host-flavivirus interactions.

  19. Macrophages as target cells for Mayaro virus infection: involvement of reactive oxygen species in the inflammatory response during virus replication.

    PubMed

    Cavalheiro, Mariana G; Costa, Leandro Silva DA; Campos, Holmes S; Alves, Letícia S; Assunção-Miranda, Iranaia; Poian, Andrea T DA

    2016-09-01

    Alphaviruses among the viruses that cause arthritis, consisting in a public health problem worldwide by causing localized outbreaks, as well as large epidemics in humans. Interestingly, while the Old World alphaviruses are arthritogenic, the New World alphaviruses cause encephalitis. One exception is Mayaro virus (MAYV), which circulates exclusively in South America but causes arthralgia and is phylogenetically related to the Old World alphaviruses. Although MAYV-induced arthritis in humans is well documented, the molecular and cellular factors that contribute to its pathogenesis are completely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that macrophages, key players in arthritis development, are target cells for MAYV infection, which leads to cell death through apoptosis. We showed that MAYV replication in macrophage induced the expression of TNF, a cytokine that would contribute to pathogenesis of MAYV fever, since TNF promotes an inflammatory profile characteristic of arthritis. We also found a significant increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at early times of infection, which coincides with the peak of virus replication and precedes TNF secretion. Treatment of the cells with antioxidant agents just after infection completely abolished TNF secretion, indicating an involvement of ROS in inflammation induced during MAYV infection.

  20. Macrophages as target cells for Mayaro virus infection: involvement of reactive oxygen species in the inflammatory response during virus replication.

    PubMed

    Cavalheiro, Mariana G; Costa, Leandro Silva DA; Campos, Holmes S; Alves, Letícia S; Assunção-Miranda, Iranaia; Poian, Andrea T DA

    2016-09-01

    Alphaviruses among the viruses that cause arthritis, consisting in a public health problem worldwide by causing localized outbreaks, as well as large epidemics in humans. Interestingly, while the Old World alphaviruses are arthritogenic, the New World alphaviruses cause encephalitis. One exception is Mayaro virus (MAYV), which circulates exclusively in South America but causes arthralgia and is phylogenetically related to the Old World alphaviruses. Although MAYV-induced arthritis in humans is well documented, the molecular and cellular factors that contribute to its pathogenesis are completely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that macrophages, key players in arthritis development, are target cells for MAYV infection, which leads to cell death through apoptosis. We showed that MAYV replication in macrophage induced the expression of TNF, a cytokine that would contribute to pathogenesis of MAYV fever, since TNF promotes an inflammatory profile characteristic of arthritis. We also found a significant increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at early times of infection, which coincides with the peak of virus replication and precedes TNF secretion. Treatment of the cells with antioxidant agents just after infection completely abolished TNF secretion, indicating an involvement of ROS in inflammation induced during MAYV infection. PMID:27627069

  1. Ubiquitination of tombusvirus p33 replication protein plays a role in virus replication and binding to the host Vps23p ESCRT protein

    PubMed Central

    Barajas, Daniel; Nagy, Peter D.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Post-translational modifications of viral replication proteins could be widespread phenomena during the replication of plus-stranded RNA viruses. In this paper, we identify two lysines in the tombusvirus p33 replication co-factor involved in ubiquitination and show that the same lysines are also important for the p33 to interact with the host Vps23p ESCRT-I factor. We find that the interaction of p33 with Vps23p is also affected by a "late-domain"-like sequence in p33. The combined mutations of the two lysines and the late-domain-like sequences in p33 reduced replication of a replicon RNA of Tomato bushy stunt virus in yeast model host, in plant protoplasts and plant leaves, suggesting that p33-Vps23p ESCRT protein interaction affects tombusvirus replication. Using ubiquitin-mimicking p33 chimeras, we demonstrate that high level of p33 ubiquitination is inhibitory for TBSV replication. These findings argue that optimal level of p33 ubiquitination plays a regulatory role during tombusvirus infections. PMID:20004458

  2. Modulating Innate Immunity Improves Hepatitis C Virus Infection and Replication in Stem Cell-Derived Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoling; Sun, Pingnan; Lucendo-Villarin, Baltasar; Angus, Allan G.N.; Szkolnicka, Dagmara; Cameron, Kate; Farnworth, Sarah L.; Patel, Arvind H.; Hay, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary In this study, human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatocytes (hESC-Heps) were investigated for their ability to support hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and replication. hESC-Heps were capable of supporting the full viral life cycle, including the release of infectious virions. Although supportive, hESC-Hep viral infection levels were not as great as those observed in Huh7 cells. We reasoned that innate immune responses in hESC-Heps may lead to the low level of infection and replication. Upon further investigation, we identified a strong type III interferon response in hESC-Heps that was triggered by HCV. Interestingly, specific inhibition of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway led to an increase in HCV infection and replication in hESC-Heps. Of note, the interferon response was not evident in Huh7 cells. In summary, we have established a robust cell-based system that allows the in-depth study of virus-host interactions in vitro. PMID:25068132

  3. Herpes simplex virus-1 replication in histiotypic rotation-mediated reaggregated murine brain.

    PubMed

    Fowler, S L; Forbes, R A

    1995-04-01

    Inbred mouse strains exhibit varying susceptibilities to severe herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1-related neurologic disease. HSV-1 replication was examined in neural tissue obtained from mouse strains susceptible (A/J, SJL), moderately resistant (Balb/c), or resistant (C57BL/6) to severe HSV-1 disease. Reaggregated brain cultures were prepared from mechanically dissociated fetal mouse brains maintained with constant rotation. The resulting aggregates each contain neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and microglia. These were inoculated with 10(-2)-10(4) plaque-forming units (pfu) HSV-1 MacIntyre/aggregate. Aggregates and media were harvested at 24, 48, 72, and 96 hr post-inoculation (p.i.) and assayed for virus production by plaque titration. Brain cultures prepared from A/J, SJL, Balb/c, and C57BL/6 mice supported HSV-1 replication equally well: by 96 hr p.i., titers of 10(6) pfu/ml were produced by each strain at each inoculum. ID50s were similar for A/J and C57BL/6 cultures. There was no increased capacity for HSV-1 replication or for permissiveness for HSV-1 infection in histiotypic brain cultures from mouse strains susceptible to severe HSV-1 disease.

  4. [Replicative kinetics of classical swine fever virus in PK-15 cells].

    PubMed

    Xu, Xing-Ran; Guo, Huan-Cheng; Shi, Zi-Xue; Xia, Xian-Zhu; Tu, Chang-Chun

    2007-10-01

    In order to understand the replication kinetics of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) in in vitro cells PK-15 cells were seeded in 96-well tissues culture plates. After overnight incubation at 37 degrees C in 5% CO2 environment when growing to 80% confluence, the cells were infected with CSFV strain Shimen at 100 TCID50 per well. At various time post infection (p.i.) the replication of the virus in the cells were analyzed repectively by detection of viral antigen using indirect immunofluorescent assay (IFA), RNA replication using reverse transcription real-time PCR and viral production using titration of TCID50. In the results of the IFA the viral antigen could be detected as early as 8hrs p.i. and at 72h hrs p.i. almost all cells showed positive staining, the real-time PCR showed that the synthesis of viral genomic RNA was gradually increased between 8-24 hrs p.i. and reached its peak at 72 hrs p.i.. However, the synthesis of negative strand RNA was maintained at a low level for a whole period of culture although it could be detected at 8hrs p.i.. Titration of TCID50 demonstrated that the production of live virions increased at 8h and peaked between 48 - 72 hrs p.i. without significant lose of titer.

  5. Temporal SILAC-based quantitative proteomics identifies host factors involved in chikungunya virus replication.

    PubMed

    Treffers, Emmely E; Tas, Ali; Scholte, Florine E M; Van, Myrthe N; Heemskerk, Matthias T; de Ru, Arnoud H; Snijder, Eric J; van Hemert, Martijn J; van Veelen, Peter A

    2015-07-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthropod-borne reemerging human pathogen that generally causes a severe persisting arthritis. Since 2005, the virus has infected millions of people during outbreaks in Africa, Indian Ocean Islands, Asia, and South/Central America. Many steps of the replication and expression of CHIKV's 12-kb RNA genome are highly dependent on cellular factors, which thus constitute potential therapeutic targets. SILAC and LC-MS/MS were used to define the temporal dynamics of the cellular response to infection. Using samples harvested at 8, 10, and 12 h postinfection, over 4700 proteins were identified and per time point 2800-3500 proteins could be quantified in both biological replicates. At 8, 10, and 12 h postinfection, 13, 38, and 106 proteins, respectively, were differentially expressed. The majority of these proteins showed decreased abundance. Most subunits of the RNA polymerase II complex were progressively degraded, which likely contributes to the transcriptional host shut-off observed during CHIKV infection. Overexpression of four proteins that were significantly downregulated (Rho family GTPase 3 (Rnd3), DEAD box helicase 56 (DDX56), polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1), and ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2C (UbcH10) reduced susceptibility of cells to CHIKV infection, suggesting that infection-induced downregulation of these proteins is beneficial for CHIKV replication. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001330 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001330).

  6. Autophagy Activated by Bluetongue Virus Infection Plays a Positive Role in Its Replication.

    PubMed

    Lv, Shuang; Xu, Qingyuan; Sun, Encheng; Yang, Tao; Li, Junping; Feng, Yufei; Zhang, Qin; Wang, Haixiu; Zhang, Jikai; Wu, Donglai

    2015-08-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is an important pathogen of wild and domestic ruminants. Despite extensive study in recent decades, the interplay between BTV and host cells is not clearly understood. Autophagy as a cellular adaptive response plays a part in many viral infections. In our study, we found that BTV1 infection triggers the complete autophagic process in host cells, as demonstrated by the appearance of obvious double-membrane autophagosome-like vesicles, GFP-LC3 dots accumulation, the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and increased levels of autophagic flux in BSR cells (baby hamster kidney cell clones) and primary lamb lingual epithelial cells upon BTV1 infection. Moreover, the results of a UV-inactivated BTV1 infection assay suggested that the induction of autophagy was dependent on BTV1 replication. Therefore, we investigated the role of autophagy in BTV1 replication. The inhibition of autophagy by pharmacological inhibitors (3-MA, CQ) and RNA interference (siBeclin1) significantly decreased viral protein synthesis and virus yields. In contrast, treating BSR cells with rapamycin, an inducer of autophagy, promoted viral protein expression and the production of infectious BTV1. These findings lead us to conclude that autophagy is activated by BTV1 and contributes to its replication, and provide novel insights into BTV-host interactions.

  7. High-Throughput Minigenome System for Identifying Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Ebola Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Megan R.; Pietzsch, Colette; Vausselin, Thibaut; Shaw, Megan L.; Bukreyev, Alexander; Basler, Christopher F.

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV), a member of the family Filoviridae, is a nonsegmented negative-sense RNA virus that causes severe, often lethal, disease in humans. EBOV RNA synthesis is carried out by a complex that includes several viral proteins. The function of this machinery is essential for viral gene expression and viral replication and is therefore a potential target for antivirals. We developed and optimized a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay based on an EBOV minigenome assay, which assesses the function of the polymerase complex. The assay is robust in 384-well format and displays a large signal to background ratio and high Z-factor values. We performed a pilot screen of 2080 bioactive compounds, identifying 31 hits (1.5% of the library) with >70% inhibition of EBOV minigenome activity. We further identified eight compounds with 50% inhibitory concentrations below their 50% cytotoxic concentrations, five of which had selectivity index (SI) values >10, suggesting specificity against the EBOV polymerase complex. These included an inhibitor of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase, a target known to modulate the EBOV replication complex. They also included novel classes of inhibitors, including inhibitors of protein synthesis and hypoxia inducible factor-1. Five compounds were tested for their ability to inhibit replication of a recombinant EBOV that expresses GFP (EBOV-GFP), and four inhibited EBOV-GFP growth at sub-cytotoxic concentrations. These data demonstrate the utility of the HTS minigenome assay for drug discovery and suggest potential directions for antifiloviral drug development. PMID:26284260

  8. Simultaneous neutralization and innate immune detection of a replicating virus by TRIM21.

    PubMed

    Watkinson, R E; Tam, J C H; Vaysburd, M J; James, L C

    2013-07-01

    Tripartite motif-containing 21 (TRIM21) is a cytosolic immunoglobulin receptor that mediates antibody-dependent intracellular neutralization (ADIN). Here we show that TRIM21 potently inhibits the spreading infection of a replicating cytopathic virus and activates innate immunity. We used a quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based assay to measure in vitro replication of mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1), a virus that causes dose-dependent hemorrhagic encephalitis in mice. Using this assay, we show that genetic ablation of TRIM21 or chemical inhibition of either the AAA ATPase p97/valosin-containing protein (VCP) or the proteasome results in a >1,000-fold increase in the relative level of infection in the presence of immune serum. Moreover, the TRIM21-mediated ability of antisera to block replication was a consistent feature of the humoral immune response in immunized mice. In the presence of immune sera and upon infection, TRIM21 also activates a proinflammatory response, resulting in secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). These results demonstrate that TRIM21 provides a potent block to spreading infection and induces an antiviral state. PMID:23596308

  9. The replication of Bangladeshi H9N2 avian influenza viruses carrying genes from H7N3 in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Shanmuganatham, Karthik K; Jones, Jeremy C; Marathe, Bindumadhav M; Feeroz, Mohammed M; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Walker, David; Turner, Jasmine; Rabiul Alam, S M; Kamrul Hasan, M; Akhtar, Sharmin; Seiler, Patrick; McKenzie, Pamela; Krauss, Scott; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    H9N2 avian influenza viruses are continuously monitored by the World Health Organization because they are endemic; they continually reassort with H5N1, H7N9 and H10N8 viruses; and they periodically cause human infections. We characterized H9N2 influenza viruses carrying internal genes from highly pathogenic H7N3 viruses, which were isolated from chickens or quail from live-bird markets in Bangladesh between 2010 and 2013. All of the H9N2 viruses used in this study carried mammalian host-specific mutations. We studied their replication kinetics in normal human bronchoepithelial cells and swine tracheal and lung explants, which exhibit many features of the mammalian airway epithelium and serve as a mammalian host model. All H9N2 viruses replicated to moderate-to-high titers in the normal human bronchoepithelial cells and swine lung explants, but replication was limited in the swine tracheal explants. In Balb/c mice, the H9N2 viruses were nonlethal, replicated to moderately high titers and the infection was confined to the lungs. In the ferret model of human influenza infection and transmission, H9N2 viruses possessing the Q226L substitution in hemagglutinin replicated well without clinical signs and spread via direct contact but not by aerosol. None of the H9N2 viruses tested were resistant to the neuraminidase inhibitors. Our study shows that the Bangladeshi H9N2 viruses have the potential to infect humans and highlights the importance of monitoring and characterizing this influenza subtype to better understand the potential risk these viruses pose to humans. PMID:27094903

  10. The replication of Bangladeshi H9N2 avian influenza viruses carrying genes from H7N3 in mammals.

    PubMed

    Shanmuganatham, Karthik K; Jones, Jeremy C; Marathe, Bindumadhav M; Feeroz, Mohammed M; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Walker, David; Turner, Jasmine; Rabiul Alam, S M; Kamrul Hasan, M; Akhtar, Sharmin; Seiler, Patrick; McKenzie, Pamela; Krauss, Scott; Webby, Richard J; Webster, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    H9N2 avian influenza viruses are continuously monitored by the World Health Organization because they are endemic; they continually reassort with H5N1, H7N9 and H10N8 viruses; and they periodically cause human infections. We characterized H9N2 influenza viruses carrying internal genes from highly pathogenic H7N3 viruses, which were isolated from chickens or quail from live-bird markets in Bangladesh between 2010 and 2013. All of the H9N2 viruses used in this study carried mammalian host-specific mutations. We studied their replication kinetics in normal human bronchoepithelial cells and swine tracheal and lung explants, which exhibit many features of the mammalian airway epithelium and serve as a mammalian host model. All H9N2 viruses replicated to moderate-to-high titers in the normal human bronchoepithelial cells and swine lung explants, but replication was limited in the swine tracheal explants. In Balb/c mice, the H9N2 viruses were nonlethal, replicated to moderately high titers and the infection was confined to the lungs. In the ferret model of human influenza infection and transmission, H9N2 viruses possessing the Q226L substitution in hemagglutinin replicated well without clinical signs and spread via direct contact but not by aerosol. None of the H9N2 viruses tested were resistant to the neuraminidase inhibitors. Our study shows that the Bangladeshi H9N2 viruses have the potential to infect humans and highlights the importance of monitoring and characterizing this influenza subtype to better understand the potential risk these viruses pose to humans. PMID:27094903

  11. Molecular Studies of HTLV-1 Replication: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jessica L.; Maldonado, José O.; Mueller, Joachim D.; Zhang, Wei; Mansky, Louis M.

    2016-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) was the first human retrovirus discovered. Studies on HTLV-1 have been instrumental for our understanding of the molecular pathology of virus-induced cancers. HTLV-1 is the etiological agent of an adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and can lead to a variety of neurological pathologies, including HTLV-1-associated-myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). The ability to treat the aggressive ATL subtypes remains inadequate. HTLV-1 replicates by (1) an infectious cycle involving virus budding and infection of new permissive target cells and (2) mitotic division of cells harboring an integrated provirus. Virus replication initiates host antiviral immunity and the checkpoint control of cell proliferation, but HTLV-1 has evolved elegant strategies to counteract these host defense mechanisms to allow for virus persistence. The study of the molecular biology of HTLV-1 replication has provided crucial information for understanding HTLV-1 replication as well as aspects of viral replication that are shared between HTLV-1 and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Here in this review, we discuss the various stages of the virus replication cycle—both foundational knowledge as well as current updates of ongoing research that is important for understanding HTLV-1 molecular pathogenesis as well as in developing novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26828513

  12. Replication Capacity of Avian Influenza A(H9N2) Virus in Pet Birds and Mammals, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Lenny, Brian J; Shanmuganatham, Karthik; Sonnberg, Stephanie; Feeroz, Mohammed M; Alam, S M Rabiul; Hasan, M Kamrul; Jones-Engel, Lisa; McKenzie, Pamela; Krauss, Scott; Webster, Robert G; Jones, Jeremy C

    2015-12-01

    Avian influenza A(H9N2) is an agricultural and public health threat. We characterized an H9N2 virus from a pet market in Bangladesh and demonstrated replication in samples from pet birds, swine tissues, human airway and ocular cells, and ferrets. Results implicated pet birds in the potential dissemination and zoonotic transmission of this virus.

  13. Well begun is half done: Rubella virus perturbs autophagy signaling, thereby facilitating the construction of viral replication compartments.

    PubMed

    Orosz, László; Megyeri, Klára

    2016-04-01

    The rubella virus is the causative agent of postnatal German measles and the congenital rubella syndrome. The majority of the rubella virus replication complexes originate from the endomembrane system. The rubella virus perturbs the signaling pathways regulating the formation of autophagic membranes in the infected cells, including the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK and PI3K/Akt pathways. It is widely accepted that these pathways inhibit autophagy. In contrast, the class III PI3K enzymes are essential for autophagy initiation. By manipulating the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK, class I PI3K/Akt and class III PI3K axes of signal transduction, the rubella virus may differentially regulate the autophagic cascade, with consequent stimulation of the initiation and strong suppression of the later phases. Dysregulation of autophagy by this virus can have a significant impact on the construction of replication compartments by regulating membrane trafficking. We hypothesize that the rubella virus perturbs the autophagic process in order to prevent the degradation of the virus progeny, and to ensure its replication by hijacking omegasomes for the construction of the replication complexes. The virus is therefore able to utilize an antiviral mechanism to its own advantage. Therapeutic modalities targeting the autophagic process may help to ameliorate the serious consequences of the congenital rubella syndrome. PMID:26968901

  14. Replication Capacity of Avian Influenza A(H9N2) Virus in Pet Birds and Mammals, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Lenny, Brian J.; Shanmuganatham, Karthik; Sonnberg, Stephanie; Feeroz, Mohammed M.; Alam, S.M. Rabiul; Hasan, M. Kamrul; Jones-Engel, Lisa; McKenzie, Pamela; Krauss, Scott; Webster, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Avian influenza A(H9N2) is an agricultural and public health threat. We characterized an H9N2 virus from a pet market in Bangladesh and demonstrated replication in samples from pet birds, swine tissues, human airway and ocular cells, and ferrets. Results implicated pet birds in the potential dissemination and zoonotic transmission of this virus. PMID:26583371

  15. Replication Capacity of Avian Influenza A(H9N2) Virus in Pet Birds and Mammals, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Lenny, Brian J; Shanmuganatham, Karthik; Sonnberg, Stephanie; Feeroz, Mohammed M; Alam, S M Rabiul; Hasan, M Kamrul; Jones-Engel, Lisa; McKenzie, Pamela; Krauss, Scott; Webster, Robert G; Jones, Jeremy C

    2015-12-01

    Avian influenza A(H9N2) is an agricultural and public health threat. We characterized an H9N2 virus from a pet market in Bangladesh and demonstrated replication in samples from pet birds, swine tissues, human airway and ocular cells, and ferrets. Results implicated pet birds in the potential dissemination and zoonotic transmission of this virus. PMID:26583371

  16. Structure-activity relationship study of arbidol derivatives as inhibitors of chikungunya virus replication.

    PubMed

    Di Mola, Antonia; Peduto, Antonella; La Gatta, Annalisa; Delang, Leen; Pastorino, Boris; Neyts, Johan; Leyssen, Pieter; de Rosa, Mario; Filosa, Rosanna

    2014-11-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), a mosquito-borne arthrogenic Alphavirus, causes an acute febrile illness in humans, that is, accompanied by severe joint pains. In many cases, the infection leads to persistent arthralgia, which may last for weeks to several years. The re-emergence of this infection in the early 2000s was exemplified by numerous outbreaks in the eastern hemisphere. Since then, the virus is rapidly spreading. Currently, no drugs have been approved or are in development for the treatment of CHIKV, which makes this viral infection particularly interesting for academic medicinal chemistry efforts. Several molecules have already been identified that inhibit CHIKV replication in phenotypic virus-cell-based assays. One of these is arbidol, a molecule that already has been licensed for the treatment of influenza A and B virus infections. For structural optimization, a dedicated libraries of 43 indole-based derivatives were evaluated leading to more potent analogues (IIIe and IIIf) with anti-chikungunya virus (CHIKV) activities higher than those of the other derivatives, including the lead compound, and with a selective index of inhibition 13.2 and 14.6, respectively, higher than that of ARB (4.6).

  17. Dengue Virus Type 2: Protein Binding and Active Replication in Human Central Nervous System Cells

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Ma Isabel; Pérez-García, Marissa; Terreros-Tinoco, Marisol; Castro-Mussot, María Eugenia; Diegopérez-Ramírez, Jaime; Ramírez-Reyes, Alma Griselda; Aguilera, Penélope; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; García-Flores, María Martha

    2013-01-01

    An increased number of dengue cases with neurological complications have been reported in recent years. The lack of reliable animal models for dengue has hindered studies on dengue virus (DENV) pathogenesis and cellular tropism in vivo. We further investigate the tropism of DENV for the human central nervous system (CNS), characterizing DENV interactions with cell surface proteins in human CNS cells by virus overlay protein binding assays (VOPBA) and coimmunoprecipitations. In VOPBA, three membrane proteins (60, 70, and 130 kDa) from the gray matter bound the entire virus particle, whereas only a 70 kDa protein bound in white matter. The coimmunoprecipitation assays revealed three proteins from gray matter consistently binding virus particles, one clearly distinguishable protein (~32 kDa) and two less apparent proteins (100 and 130 kDa). Monoclonal anti-NS3 targeted the virus protein in primary cell cultures of human CNS treated with DENV-2, which also stained positive for NeuH, a neuron-specific marker. Thus, our results indicate (1) that DENV-2 exhibited a direct tropism for human neurons and (2) that human neurons sustain an active DENV replication as was demonstrated by the presence of the NS3 viral antigen in primary cultures of these cells treated with DENV-2. PMID:24302878

  18. PKR Activation Favors Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis Virus Replication in Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gamil, Amr A.A.; Xu, Cheng; Mutoloki, Stephen; Evensen, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    The double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase R (PKR) is a Type I interferon (IFN) stimulated gene that has important biological and immunological functions. In viral infections, in general, PKR inhibits or promotes viral replication, but PKR-IPNV interaction has not been previously studied. We investigated the involvement of PKR during infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) infection using a custom-made rabbit antiserum and the PKR inhibitor C16. Reactivity of the antiserum to PKR in CHSE-214 cells was confirmed after IFNα treatment giving an increased protein level. IPNV infection alone did not give increased PKR levels by Western blot, while pre-treatment with PKR inhibitor before IPNV infection gave decreased eukaryotic initiation factor 2-alpha (eIF2α) phosphorylation. This suggests that PKR, despite not being upregulated, is involved in eIF2α phosphorylation during IPNV infection. PKR inhibitor pre-treatment resulted in decreased virus titers, extra- and intracellularly, concomitant with reduction of cells with compromised membranes in IPNV-permissive cell lines. These findings suggest that IPNV uses PKR activation to promote virus replication in infected cells. PMID:27338445

  19. PKR Activation Favors Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis Virus Replication in Infected Cells.

    PubMed

    Gamil, Amr A A; Xu, Cheng; Mutoloki, Stephen; Evensen, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    The double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase R (PKR) is a Type I interferon (IFN) stimulated gene that has important biological and immunological functions. In viral infections, in general, PKR inhibits or promotes viral replication, but PKR-IPNV interaction has not been previously studied. We investigated the involvement of PKR during infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) infection using a custom-made rabbit antiserum and the PKR inhibitor C16. Reactivity of the antiserum to PKR in CHSE-214 cells was confirmed after IFNα treatment giving an increased protein level. IPNV infection alone did not give increased PKR levels by Western blot, while pre-treatment with PKR inhibitor before IPNV infection gave decreased eukaryotic initiation factor 2-alpha (eIF2α) phosphorylation. This suggests that PKR, despite not being upregulated, is involved in eIF2α phosphorylation during IPNV infection. PKR inhibitor pre-treatment resulted in decreased virus titers, extra- and intracellularly, concomitant with reduction of cells with compromised membranes in IPNV-permissive cell lines. These findings suggest that IPNV uses PKR activation to promote virus replication in infected cells. PMID:27338445

  20. MDA7/IL-24 is an anti-viral factor that inhibits influenza virus replication.

    PubMed

    Seong, Rak-Kyun; Choi, Young-Ki; Shin, Ok Sarah

    2016-10-01

    Melanoma differentiation associated gene-7 (mda-7)/interleukin- 24 (IL-24) is a secreted cytokine, which plays an essential role in tumor suppression. Although its role as a multifunctional protein affecting broad types of cancers is well described, functions of IL-24 in host defense against virus infection are yet to be determined. In this study, we explored the anti-viral effect of recombinant IL-24 treatment during influenza infection. Infection of human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549) with the influenza A virus up-regulated IL-24 mRNA and protein expression in a time-dependent manner. Pre-treatment of A549 cells with recombinant IL-24 protein effectively suppressed viral plaque formation. Furthermore, IL-24 treatment of A549 cells reduced viral non-structural protein 1 (NS1) synthesis, whereas IL-24 knockdown resulted in increased viral replication. Interestingly, IL-24 treatment following influenza A virus infection led to up-regulation of interferon (IFN)-induced antiviral signaling. Taken together, our results suggest that IL-24 exerts a potent suppressive effect on influenza viral replication and can be used in the treatment of influenza infection. PMID:27687232

  1. MDA7/IL-24 is an anti-viral factor that inhibits influenza virus replication.

    PubMed

    Seong, Rak-Kyun; Choi, Young-Ki; Shin, Ok Sarah

    2016-10-01

    Melanoma differentiation associated gene-7 (mda-7)/interleukin- 24 (IL-24) is a secreted cytokine, which plays an essential role in tumor suppression. Although its role as a multifunctional protein affecting broad types of cancers is well described, functions of IL-24 in host defense against virus infection are yet to be determined. In this study, we explored the anti-viral effect of recombinant IL-24 treatment during influenza infection. Infection of human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549) with the influenza A virus up-regulated IL-24 mRNA and protein expression in a time-dependent manner. Pre-treatment of A549 cells with recombinant IL-24 protein effectively suppressed viral plaque formation. Furthermore, IL-24 treatment of A549 cells reduced viral non-structural protein 1 (NS1) synthesis, whereas IL-24 knockdown resulted in increased viral replication. Interestingly, IL-24 treatment following influenza A virus infection led to up-regulation of interferon (IFN)-induced antiviral signaling. Taken together, our results suggest that IL-24 exerts a potent suppressive effect on influenza viral replication and can be used in the treatment of influenza infection.

  2. Pairwise growth competition assay for determining the replication fitness of human immunodeficiency viruses.

    PubMed

    Manocheewa, Siriphan; Lanxon-Cookson, Erinn C; Liu, Yi; Swain, J Victor; McClure, Jan; Rao, Ushnal; Maust, Brandon; Deng, Wenjie; Sunshine, Justine E; Kim, Moon; Rolland, Morgane; Mullins, James I

    2015-05-04

    In vitro fitness assays are essential tools for determining viral replication fitness for viruses such as HIV-1. Various measurements have been used to extrapolate viral replication fitness, ranging from the number of viral particles per infectious unit, growth rate in cell culture, and relative fitness derived from multiple-cycle growth competition assays. Growth competition assays provide a particularly sensitive measurement of fitness since the viruses are competing for cellular targets under identical growth conditions. There are several experimental factors to consider when conducting growth competition assays, including the multiplicity of infection (MOI), sampling times, and viral detection and fitness calculation methods. Each factor can affect the end result and hence must be considered carefully during the experimental design. The protocol presented here includes steps from constructing a new recombinant HIV-1 clone to performing growth competition assays and analyzing the experimental results. This protocol utilizes experimental parameter values previously shown to yield consistent and robust results. Alternatives are discussed, as some parameters need to be adjusted according to the cell type and viruses being studied. The protocol contains two alternative viral detection methods to provide flexibility as the availability of instruments, reagents and expertise varies between laboratories.

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication within cystic lymphoepithelial lesion of the salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Labouyrie, E; Merlio, J P; Beylot-Barry, M; Delord, B; Vergier, B; Brossard, G; Lacoste, D; Beylot, J; Leng, B; Fleury, H

    1993-07-01

    Cystic lymphoepithelial lesions of salivary glands (CLLSG) are nodular or diffuse salivary gland enlargements that are observed in patients who tested positive for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Two cases of CLLSG are reported. Particular emphasis is placed on the presence of HIV-1 major-core protein (P24), HIV-1 RNA sequences, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA sequences, and lymphocyte receptor gene rearrangement. Lymphoid alterations consisted of explosive hyperplasia with a prominent follicular reticular dendritic cell (DRC) network and numerous intrafollicular CD8+ lymphocytes. Intrafollicular DRC strongly expressed HIV-1 major-core protein and HIV-1 RNA, indicating that most DRCs actively replicated the HIV-1 virus. The presence of active HIV-1 replication within DRC and the absence of clonal EBV infected lymphoid population strongly suggest that CLLSG pathogenesis is primarily induced by HIV-1. The presence of oligoclonal immunoglobulin gene rearrangements in our cases, however, suggest the need of long-term follow-up of such patients to determine whether CLLSG could be a benign prelymphomatous disease.

  4. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in infants with acute leukemia: a retrospective survey of the Japanese Pediatric Leukemia/Lymphoma Study Group.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Michiki; Miyamura, Takako; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Taga, Takashi; Tawa, Akio; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Kajihara, Ryosuke; Adachi, Souichi; Ishii, Eiichi; Tomizawa, Daisuke

    2015-12-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) can cause life-threatening complications of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) in young children with malignancies, but reports remain limited. We performed a retrospective nationwide survey to clarify the current status of RSV disease among infants with hematological malignancies. Clinical course, treatment, and outcome of patients with hematological malignancies who suffered from RSV infections at the age of <24 months during anti-tumor therapy from April 2006 to March 2009 were investigated by sending a questionnaire to all member institutions of the Japanese Pediatric Leukemia/Lymphoma Study Group (JPLSG). Twelve patients with acute leukemia were identified as having experienced RSV disease. The primary diseases were acute myeloid leukemia (n = 8) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n = 4). RSV infection occurred pre- or during induction therapy (n = 8) and during consolidation therapy (n = 4). Eight patients developed LRTI, four of whom had severe pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome; these four patients died despite receiving intensive care. In our survey, the prognosis of RSV disease in pediatric hematological malignancies was poor, and progression of LRTI in particular was associated with high mortality. In the absence of RSV-specific therapy, effective prevention and treatment strategies for severe RSV disease must be investigated.

  5. Molecular approaches to the analysis of deformed wing virus replication and pathogenesis in the honey bee, Apis mellifera

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background For years, the understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms that underlie honey bee viral diseases has been severely hindered because of the lack of a cell culture system for virus propagation. As a result, it is very imperative to develop new methods that would permit the in vitro pathogenesis study of honey bee viruses. The identification of virus replication is an important step towards the understanding of the pathogenesis process of viruses in their respective hosts. In the present study, we developed a strand-specific RT-PCR-based method for analysis of Deformed Wing Virus (DWV) replication in honey bees and in honey bee parasitic mites, Varroa Destructor. Results The results shows that the method developed in our study allows reliable identification of the virus replication and solves the problem of falsely-primed cDNA amplifications that commonly exists in the current system. Using TaqMan real-time quantitative RT-PCR incorporated with biotinylated primers and magnetic beads purification step, we characterized the replication and tissue tropism of DWV infection in honey bees. We provide evidence for DWV replication in the tissues of wings, head, thorax, legs, hemolymph, and gut of honey bees and also in Varroa mites. Conclusion The strategy reported in the present study forms a model system for studying bee virus replication, pathogenesis and immunity. This study should be a significant contribution to the goal of achieving a better understanding of virus pathogenesis in honey bees and to the design of appropriate control measures for bee populations at risk to virus infections. PMID:20003360

  6. Bovine leukemia virus nucleocapsid protein is an efficient nucleic acid chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Qualley, Dominic F. Sokolove, Victoria L.; Ross, James L.

    2015-03-13

    Nucleocapsid proteins (NCs) direct the rearrangement of nucleic acids to form the most thermodynamically stable structure, and facilitate many steps throughout the life cycle of retroviruses. NCs bind strongly to nucleic acids (NAs) and promote NA aggregation by virtue of their cationic nature; they also destabilize the NA duplex via highly structured zinc-binding motifs. Thus, they are considered to be NA chaperones. While most retroviral NCs are structurally similar, differences are observed both within and between retroviral genera. In this work, we compare the NA binding and chaperone activity of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) NC to that of two other retroviral NCs: human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC, which is structurally similar to BLV NC but from a different retrovirus genus, and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC, which possesses several key structural differences from BLV NC but is from the same genus. Our data show that BLV and HIV-1 NCs bind to NAs with stronger affinity in relation to HTLV-1 NC, and that they also accelerate the annealing of complementary stem-loop structures to a greater extent. Analysis of kinetic parameters derived from the annealing data suggests that while all three NCs stimulate annealing by a two-step mechanism as previously reported, the relative contributions of each step to the overall annealing equilibrium are conserved between BLV and HIV-1 NCs but are different for HTLV-1 NC. It is concluded that while BLV and HTLV-1 belong to the same genus of retroviruses, processes that rely on NC may not be directly comparable. - Highlights: • BLV NC binds strongly to DNA and RNA. • BLV NC promotes mini-TAR annealing as well as HIV-1 NC. • Annealing kinetics suggest a low degree of similarity between BLV NC and HTLV-1 NC.

  7. Longitudinal analysis of feline leukemia virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes: correlation with recovery from infection.

    PubMed

    Flynn, J Norman; Dunham, Stephen P; Watson, Vivien; Jarrett, Oswald

    2002-03-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is a common naturally occurring gammaretrovirus of domestic cats that is associated with degenerative diseases of the hematopoietic system, immunodeficiency, and neoplasia. Although the majority of cats exposed to FeLV develop a transient infection and recover, a proportion of cats become persistently viremic and many subsequently develop fatal diseases. To define the dominant host immune effector mechanisms responsible for the outcome of infection, we studied the longitudinal changes in FeLV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in a group of naïve cats following oronasal exposure to FeLV. Using (51)Cr release assays to measure ex vivo virus-specific cytotoxicity, the emerging virus-specific CTL response was correlated with modulations in viral burden as assessed by detection of infectious virus, FeLV p27 capsid antigen, and proviral DNA in the blood. High levels of circulating FeLV-specific effector CTLs appeared before virus neutralizing antibodies in cats that recovered from exposure to FeLV. In contrast, persistent viremia was associated with a silencing of virus-specific humoral and cell-mediated host immune effector mechanisms. A single transfer of between 2 x 10(7) and 1 x 10(8) autologous, antigen-activated lymphoblasts was associated with a downmodulation in viral burden in vivo. The results suggest an important role for FeLV-specific CTLs in retroviral immunity and demonstrate the potential to modulate disease outcome by the adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T cells in vivo.

  8. Arrest of replication fork progression at sites of topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage in human leukemia CEM cells incubated with VM-26.

    PubMed

    Catapano, C V; Carbone, G M; Pisani, F; Qiu, J; Fernandes, D J

    1997-05-13

    Recent studies have shown that the anticancer drugs VM-26 and mitoxantrone stabilize preferentially the binding of topoisomerase IIalpha to replicating compared to nonreplicating DNA. To further understand the mechanisms by which cleavable complex-forming topoisomerase II inhibitors interfere with DNA replication, we examined the effects of VM-26 on this process in human leukemia CEM cells. Both the inhibition of DNA synthesis and cell survival were directly related to the total amount of drug-stabilized cleavable complexes formed in VM-26-treated cells. DNA chain elongation was also inhibited in a concentration-dependent fashion in these cells, which suggested that VM-26-stabilized cleavable complexes interfered with the movement of DNA replication forks. To test this hypothesis directly, we monitored replication fork progression at a specific site of VM-26-induced DNA cleavage. A topoisomerase II-mediated cleavage site was detected in the first exon of the c-myc gene in VM-26-treated cells. This cleavage site was downstream of a putative replication origin located in the 5' flanking region of the gene. Replication forks, which moved through this region of the c-myc gene in the 5' to 3' direction, were specifically arrested at this site in VM-26-treated cells, but not in untreated or aphidicolin-treated cells. These studies provide the first direct evidence that a VM-26-stabilized topoisomerase II-DNA cleavable complex acts as a replication fork barrier at a specific genomic site in mammalian cells. Furthermore, the data support the hypothesis that the replication fork arrest induced by cleavable complex-forming topoisomerase II inhibitors leads to the generation of irreversible DNA damage and cytotoxicity in proliferating cells.

  9. Prevention of contamination by xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus: susceptibility to alcohol-based disinfectants and environmental stability.

    PubMed

    Palesch, David; Khalid, Mohammad; Stürzel, Christina M; Münch, Jan

    2014-04-01

    Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) represents a novel γ-retrovirus that is capable of infecting human cells and has been classified as a biosafety level 2 (BSL-2) organism. Hence, XMRV represents a potential risk for personnel in laboratories worldwide. Here, we measured the stability of XMRV and its susceptibility to alcohol-based disinfectants. To this end, we exposed an infectious XMRV reporter virus encoding a secretable luciferase to different temperatures, pH values, and disinfectants and infected XMRV-permissive Raji B cells to measure residual viral infectivity. We found that 1 min treatment of XMRV particles at 60°C is sufficient to reduce infectivity by 99.9%. XMRV infectivity was maximal at a neutral pH but was reduced by 86% at pH 4 and 99.9% at pH 10. The common hand and surface disinfectants ethanol and isopropanol as well as the cell fixation reagent paraformaldehyde abrogated XMRV infectivity entirely, as indicated by a reduction of infectivity exceeding 99.99%. Our findings provide evidence of specific means to inactivate XMRV. Their application will help to prevent unintended XMRV contamination of cell cultures in laboratories and minimize the risk for laboratory personnel and health care workers to become infected with this biosafety level 2 organism.

  10. Replication and encapsidation of the viroid-like satellite RNA of lucerne transient streak virus are supported in divergent hosts by cocksfoot mottle virus and turnip rosette virus.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, O P; Sinha, R C; Gellatly, D L; Ivanov, I; AbouHaidar, M G

    1993-04-01

    Cocksfoot mottle sobemovirus supports replication and encapsidation of the viroid-like satellite RNA (sat-RNA) of lucerne transient streak virus (LTSV) in two monocotyledonous species, Triticum aestivum and Dactylis glomerata. Additionally, LTSV sat-RNA replicates effectively in the presence of turnip rosette sobemovirus in Brassica rapa, Raphanus raphanistrum and Sinapsis arvensis, but not in Thlaspi arvense or Nicotiana bigelovii, indicating that host species markedly influence this interaction. Previous reports of the association between LTSV sat-RNA and helper sobemoviruses were limited to dicotyledonous hosts. Our results demonstrate that the biological interaction between these two entities spans divergent dicotyledonous and monocotyledonous species.

  11. Enhanced Replication of Hepatitis E Virus Strain 47832c in an A549-Derived Subclonal Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Schemmerer, Mathias; Apelt, Silke; Trojnar, Eva; Ulrich, Rainer G.; Wenzel, Jürgen J.; Johne, Reimar

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a human pathogen with increasing importance. The lack of efficient cell culture systems hampers systematic studies on its replication cycle, virus neutralization and inactivation. Here, several cell lines were inoculated with the HEV genotype 3c strain 47832c, previously isolated from a chronically infected transplant patient. At 14 days after inoculation the highest HEV genome copy numbers were found in A549 cells, followed by PLC/PRF/5 cells, whereas HepG2/C3A, Huh-7 Lunet BLR and MRC-5 cells only weakly supported virus replication. Inoculation of A549-derived subclone cell lines resulted in most cases in reduced HEV replication. However, the subclone A549/D3 was susceptible to lower virus concentrations and resulted in higher virus yields as compared to parental A549 cells. Transcriptome analysis indicated a downregulation of genes for carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAM) 5 and 6, and an upregulation of the syndecan 2 (SDC2) gene in A549/D3 cells compared to A549 cells. However, treatment of A549/D3 cells or A549 cells with CEACAM- or syndecan 2-specific antisera did not influence HEV replication. The results show that cells supporting more efficient HEV replication can be selected from the A549 cell line. The specific mechanisms responsible for the enhanced replication remain unknown. PMID:27690085

  12. Antiviral Activity of Diterpene Esters on Chikungunya Virus and HIV Replication.

    PubMed

    Nothias-Scaglia, Louis-Félix; Pannecouque, Christophe; Renucci, Franck; Delang, Leen; Neyts, Johan; Roussi, Fanny; Costa, Jean; Leyssen, Pieter; Litaudon, Marc; Paolini, Julien

    2015-06-26

    Recently, new daphnane, tigliane, and jatrophane diterpenoids have been isolated from various Euphorbiaceae species, of which some have been shown to be potent inhibitors of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) replication. To further explore this type of compound, the antiviral activity of a series of 29 commercially available natural diterpenoids was evaluated. Phorbol-12,13-didecanoate (11) proved to be the most potent inhibitor, with an EC50 value of 6.0 ± 0.9 nM and a selectivity index (SI) of 686, which is in line with the previously reported anti-CHIKV potency for the structurally related 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (13). Most of the other compounds exhibited low to moderate activity, including an ingenane-type diterpene ester, compound 28, with an EC50 value of 1.2 ± 0.1 μM and SI = 6.4. Diterpene compounds are known also to inhibit HIV replication, so the antiviral activities of compounds 1-29 were evaluated also against HIV-1 and HIV-2. Tigliane- (4β-hydroxyphorbol analogues 10, 11, 13, 15, 16, and 18) and ingenane-type (27 and 28) diterpene esters were shown to inhibit HIV replication in vitro at the nanomolar level. A Pearson analysis performed with the anti-CHIKV and anti-HIV data sets demonstrated a linear relationship, which supported the hypothesis made that PKC may be an important target in CHIKV replication.

  13. Differential host response, rather than early viral replication efficiency, correlates with pathogenicity caused by influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Askovich, Peter S; Sanders, Catherine J; Rosenberger, Carrie M; Diercks, Alan H; Dash, Pradyot; Navarro, Garnet; Vogel, Peter; Doherty, Peter C; Thomas, Paul G; Aderem, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Influenza viruses exhibit large, strain-dependent differences in pathogenicity in mammalian hosts. Although the characteristics of severe disease, including uncontrolled viral replication, infection of the lower airway, and highly inflammatory cytokine responses have been extensively documented, the specific virulence mechanisms that distinguish highly pathogenic strains remain elusive. In this study, we focused on the early events in influenza infection, measuring the growth rate of three strains of varying pathogenicity in the mouse airway epithelium and simultaneously examining the global host transcriptional response over the first 24 hours. Although all strains replicated equally rapidly over the first viral life-cycle, their growth rates in both lung and tracheal tissue strongly diverged at later times, resulting in nearly 10-fold differences in viral load by 24 hours following infection. We identified separate networks of genes in both the lung and tracheal tissues whose rapid up-regulation at early time points by specific strains correlated with a reduced viral replication rate of those strains. The set of early-induced genes in the lung that led to viral growth restriction is enriched for both NF-κB binding site motifs and members of the TREM1 and IL-17 signaling pathways, suggesting that rapid, NF-κB -mediated activation of these pathways may contribute to control of viral replication. Because influenza infection extending into the lung generally results in severe disease, early activation of these pathways may be one factor distinguishing high- and low-pathogenicity strains.

  14. Structural and Functional Studies of the Promoter Element for Dengue Virus RNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Lodeiro, María F.; Filomatori, Claudia V.; Gamarnik, Andrea V.

    2009-01-01

    The 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR) of the dengue virus (DENV) genome contains two defined elements essential for viral replication. At the 5′ end, a large stem-loop (SLA) structure functions as the promoter for viral polymerase activity. Next to the SLA, there is a short stem-loop that contains a cyclization sequence known as the 5′ upstream AUG region (5′UAR). Here, we analyzed the secondary structure of the SLA in solution and the structural requirements of this element for viral replication. Using infectious DENV clones, viral replicons, and in vitro polymerase assays, we defined two helical regions, a side stem-loop, a top loop, and a U bulge within SLA as crucial elements for viral replication. The determinants for SLA-polymerase recognition were found to be common in different DENV serotypes. In addition, structural elements within the SLA required for DENV RNA replication were also conserved among different mosquito- and tick-borne flavivirus genomes, suggesting possible common strategies for polymerase-promoter recognition in flaviviruses. Furthermore, a conserved oligo(U) track present downstream of the SLA was found to modulate RNA synthesis in transfected cells. In vitro polymerase assays indicated that a sequence of at least 10 residues following the SLA, upstream of the 5′UAR, was necessary for efficient RNA synthesis using the viral 3′UTR as template. PMID:19004935

  15. Effects of mutagenesis of murine hepatitis virus nsp1 and nsp14 on replication in culture.

    PubMed

    Eckerle, Lance D; Brockway, Sarah M; Sperry, Steven M; Lu, Xiaotao; Denison, Mark R

    2006-01-01

    For nsp1, the fact that the carboxy-terminal but not the amino-terminal half of the protein can be deleted suggests that there may be specific and distinct domains within the protein or that the entire protein is dispensable but that the RNA encodi