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Sample records for leukocyte antigen antibody

  1. Development of novel monoclonal antibody 4G8 against swine leukocyte antigen class I alpha chain.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei-Ran; Kiyokawa, Nobutaka; Eguchi, Tomoko; Matsui, Jun; Takenouchi, Hisami; Honma, Daisuk; Yasue, Hiroshi; Enosawa, Shin; Mimori, Kenichi; Itagaki, Mitsuko; Taguchi, Tomoko; Katagiri, Yohko U; Okita, Hajime; Amemiya, Hiroshi; Fujimoto, Junichiro

    2004-06-01

    A mouse monoclonal antibody (MAb) was generated against swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) class I alpha chain. A newly developed series of MAb clones that react with pan leukocytes were selected and tested by immuno-histochemistry using SLA class I alpha chain expressing Cos-7 cells. Among them, MAb 4G8 was characterized by the following features: (1) 4G8 reacted with Cos-7 cells transfected with SLA class I alpha chain from the d haplotype, (2) 4G8 recognized epitopes that were different from those of commercially available anti-SLA class I MAbs 74-11-10 and PT85A, and (3) 4G8 could be used to immunostain frozen sections of thymus, spleen, lymph node, kidney, and liver tissues with good results.

  2. Induction of human complement activation without cytolysis by mouse monoclonal antibodies to human leukocyte antigens.

    PubMed

    Sugita, K; Majdic, O; Stockinger, H; Holter, W; Burger, R; Knapp, W

    1987-04-01

    Ten monoclonal antibodies to human leukocyte subsets that had previously been shown to lyse their respective target cells in the presence of rabbit serum as complement source were evaluated for their cytolytic capacity with human complement. Four of the ten were lytic with human complement. All were of IgM type. Antibodies were also evaluated for their capacity to induce C3 binding to target cells. With this method we could demonstrate that, indeed, 3 of the 6 noncytolytic antibodies had the capacity to initiate the human complement activation process and to induce C3 binding. Two of these 3 antibodies were of IgM class (VIT3 and VIM13), one of IgG3 (562). From the practical point of view the most interesting of these 3 antibodies is the nonmitogenic anti-CD3 pan-T cell antibody VIT3. Therefore, this antibody was analyzed in more detail. VIT3 antibody concentrations needed to induce detectable C3 binding to human T cells are very low (down to 1 ng VIT3/ml). Human serum as complement source can also be considerably (100X) diluted before C3 binding becomes undetectable. Activation of C3 is a prerequesite for VIT3-induced C3 binding, and bound C3 seems to lack the C3a fragment. Bound C3, in contrast to the quickly occuring antigenic modulation of the CD3 complex and the simultaneous disappearance of the antibody coat, remains expressed also after prolonged incubation at 37 degrees C. C3 fragments bound to T cells after activation with VIT3 are also recognized by cells bearing C3 receptors of types CR1 and CR2. PMID:3576673

  3. Progressive graft fibrosis and donor-specific human leukocyte antigen antibodies in pediatric late liver allografts.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa-Hayashino, Aya; Yoshizawa, Atushi; Uchida, Yoichiro; Egawa, Hiroto; Yurugi, Kimiko; Masuda, Satohiro; Minamiguchi, Sachiko; Maekawa, Taira; Uemoto, Shinji; Haga, Hironori

    2012-11-01

    The role of donor-specific anti-human leukocyte antigen antibodies (DSAs) that develop late after living donor liver transplantation is unknown. Seventy-nine pediatric recipients who had good graft function and underwent protocol liver biopsy more than 5 years after transplantation (median = 11 years, range = 5-20 years) were reviewed. DSAs were determined with the Luminex single-antigen bead assay at the time of the last biopsy, and complement component 4d (C4d) immunostaining was assessed at the times of the last biopsy and the previous biopsy. The donor specificity of antibodies could be identified in 67 patients: DSAs were detected in 32 patients (48%), and they were usually against human leukocyte antigen class II (30 cases) but were rarely against class I (2 cases). These patients had a higher frequency of bridging fibrosis or cirrhosis (28/32 or 88%) than DSA-negative patients (6/35 or 17%, P < 0.001). Fibrosis was likely to be centrilobular-based. DSA-positive patients, in comparison with DSA-negative patients, had higher frequencies of diffuse/focal endothelial C4d staining (P < 0.001) and mild/indeterminate acute rejection [15/32 (47%) versus 5/35 (14%), P = 0.004]. Four DSA-negative patients were off immunosuppression, whereas no patients in the DSA-positive group were (P = 0.048). In conclusion, the high prevalence of graft fibrosis and anti-class II DSAs in late protocol biopsy samples suggests that humoral alloreactivity may contribute to the process of unexplained graft fibrosis late after liver transplantation.

  4. Limited proteolysis of human leukocyte interferon-. cap alpha. 2 and localization of the monoclonal antibody-binding antigenic determinant

    SciTech Connect

    Kostrov, S.V.; Chernovskaya, T.V.; Khodova, O.M.; Borukhov, S.I.; Ryzhavskaya, A.S.; Izotova, L.S.; Strongin, A.Ya.

    1986-05-20

    Large peptide fragments of human leukocyte interferon-..cap alpha..2 (INF-..cap alpha..2) were produced by limited proteolysis with trypsin, pepsin, thermolysin, and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens serine proteinase, and the ability of the fragments to react with murine monoclonal antibodies NK2, directed toward INF-..cap alpha..2, was studied by the immunoblotting technique. The region of the sequence 110-149 is the most sensitive to proteinase attack and evidently is exposed on the surface of the INF-..cap alpha..2 molecule. The INF-..cap alpha..2 fragments 1-139, 1-147, and 1-149 react with antibodies, whereas the fragments 1-109 and 1-112 do not bind NK2 antibodies. A comparison of the primary structure of the families of human leukocyte and murine leukocyte INF in the region of the sequence 110-139 and an analysis of the ability of human INF differing in amino acid sequence to interact with NK2 antibodies suggested that the antigenic determinant that binds monoclonal antibodies NK2 is the sequence Glu/sub 114/-Asp/sub 115/-Ser/sub 116/-He/sub 117/ of the INF-..cap alpha..2 molecule.

  5. Antibody recognition of an immunogenic influenza hemagglutinin-human leukocyte antigen class II complex

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The A/Japan/57 influenza hemagglutin (HA) peptide HA 128-145, when bound by human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen-DRw11 cells, is recognized by the human CD4+ T cell clone V1. A rabbit antiserum has been raised against HA 128-145 which recognizes not only the free peptide, but also the HA 128-145/DRw11 complex on a solid matrix, in solution, or on the surface of viable cells. The detection of these complexes on viable cells was shown to be class II specific, DRw11 restricted, and commensurate with the level of DRw11 expression. The identity of DRw11 as the cell surface molecule binding HA 128-145 was confirmed by immunoprecipitation, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and tryptic peptide mapping. Using this antiserum HA 128-145/DRw11 complexes could be detected on the cell surface as soon as 30 min after the peptide was added, and increased up to 24 h. Dissociation kinetics showed these complexes were long-lived, with a half-life of approximately 14 h. This anti-HA peptide antiserum represents the first direct means of studying antigenic peptide-human leukocyte antigen class II complexes on the surface of living cells without the addition of a non-amino acid moiety to the peptide. The properties of this antiserum thus provide the potential to study naturally processed antigenic peptides as well as the mechanism of processing itself in a physiologically relevant system. PMID:2056278

  6. Anti-Human Leukocyte Antigen Antibody Induced Autoimmunity: Role In Chronic Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Nath, DS; Basha, H Ilias; Mohanakumar, T

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review We provide evidence for the role of de novo development of immune responses to self-antigens in the post-transplant period and its possible induction by alloimmunity in the pathogenesis of chronic rejection following lung, heart and kidney transplantation. This review details recent findings for the two distinct yet inter-dependent immune processes in the immune-pathogenesis of chronic rejection. Recent findings The contribution of both humoral and cell mediated allo-immune responses against mismatched donor histocompatibility antigens (HLA) in the pathogenesis of chronic rejection is well established. Recent studies have focused on development of immune responses to self-antigens during the post-transplant period and its correlation with chronic rejection. These self-antigens include myosin and vimentin in cardiac, K-alpha-1-tubulin and collagen-V in lung and angiotensin II type 1 receptor, collagen-IV and VI in kidney transplants. During the post-transplant period, the development of immune responses to self-antigens is facilitated by induction of a distinct subset of auto-reactive T-helper cells referred to as Th17 cells. Summary Following organ transplantation, tissue injury and remodeling inflicted by Abs to HLA antigens is conducive to develop autoimmunity. Antibodies (Abs) to HLA and self-antigens are detectable in the serum of transplant recipients who develop chronic rejection. Anti-HLA Abs are often present transiently but precede the development of Abs to self-antigens. PMID:19898237

  7. Single antigen flow beads for identification of human leukocyte antigen antibody specificities in hypersensitized patients with chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Kılıçaslan-Ayna, Tülay; Özkızılcık-Koçyiğit, Aslı; Güleç, Derya; Pirim, İbrahim

    2016-01-01

    Aims of this study Aims of this study were to identify class I and class II antibodies in highly sensitized patients by flow cytometry single antigen bead (FC-SAB) assay and to evaluate according to donor HLA type in order to increase their kidney transplantation chance. Material and methods We analyzed 60 hypersensitive patients of 351 individuals, who applied to our laboratory for PRA test in November 2013-December 2014. Flow cytometric PRA screening and single antigen bead commercial kits were used for these analyses. Results In our study group, 19 (31.7%) of these patients were male while 41 (68.3%) patients were female. The most common acceptable antigens were A*02 (10.11%), HLA-A*23 (10.11%), HLA-B*38 (8.79%) and HLA-DRB1*03 (7.83%) in hypersensitive patients. The highest antibody reactivity on SAB was observed against HLA-A*25, HLA-B*45, HLA-DRB1*04 and HLA-DRB1*08 antigens. Conclusions The determination of these acceptable and unacceptable antigens may increase their transplantation chance. Pre-transplant HLA antibody identifications provide prognostic information with respect to the determination of patients who are at increased risk of graft loss. PMID:27095928

  8. Demonstration of cross-reactivity between bacterial antigens and class I human leukocyte antigens by using monoclonal antibodies to Shigella flexneri.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, K M; Raybourne, R B

    1990-01-01

    Bacterial envelope proteins which share immunodeterminants with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I histocompatibility antigen HLA-B27 may invoke spondyloarthritic disease through the process of molecular mimicry in patients expressing this phenotype. Monoclonal antibodies generated by the immunization of BALB/c mice with envelope proteins of Shigella flexneri type 2a were tested for reactivity against cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines of defined HLA phenotype. As measured by flow microfluorometry, four immunoglobulin M monoclonal antibodies reacted preferentially with HLA-B27-positive lymphocytes (HOM-2, MM) as compared with a B27-loss mutant line (1065) or cells lacking major histocompatibility complex class I antigen (Daudi, K562). Monoclonal antibodies also reacted with mouse EL-4 cells transfected with and expressing the HLA-B7 gene. Western immunoblot analysis of isolated enterobacterial envelopes demonstrated that the reactive epitope was present on bacterial proteins with an apparent relative molecular mass of 36 and 19 kilodaltons. The structural basis for the cross-reactivity of bacterial antigen and HLA-B27 appeared to reside in the portion of the HLA molecule that is responsible for allotypic specificity (amino acids 63 through 83), since monoclonal antibodies were positive by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with synthetic polypeptides corresponding to this segment. Images PMID:2187807

  9. [Antibodies, human leukocyte antigens, and biomodulators in transfusion-related acute adverse effects].

    PubMed

    Martínez Álvarez, Julio César

    2013-01-01

    With the onset of the AIDS epidemic, major changes occurred in blood banking and transfusion medicine. These changes occurred mainly in donor selection and screening tests for infectious diseases, blood centers modified their organizational philosophy regarding quality. Transfusion of blood products are procedures that allow us to correct the haematology deficiencies for which was indicated. But today, despite the strict controls that precede transfusion,recipients may have undesirable effects, which are known as adverse effects or adverse reactions to transfusion. Antibodies and antigens of the HLA system plays a role in a series of events related to transfusion, such as immunological platelet refractoriness, febrile non-haemolytic transfusion reactions, transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease. The determination of anti-HLA antibodies is evidence that in most developed countries is used on a daily basis in the regular assessment of patients multitransfused or waiting lists for organs from deceased donors. The biomodulators are able to modify biological responses which act in sequence to lead to the differentiation of T lymphocytes. These agents may subcategorizes those which facilitate a normal immune response, those stimulates the immune response, those are capable of inducing immunosuppression not cytotoxic, and those enhancing the ability of the host to tolerate damage by cytotoxic treatment (transfusion or transplant).

  10. Human Leukocyte Antigen Class II Alleles Influence Levels of Antibodies to the Plasmodium falciparum Asexual-Stage Apical Membrane Antigen 1 but Not to Merozoite Surface Antigen 2 and Merozoite Surface Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Armead H.; Leke, Rose G. F.; Mendell, Nancy R.; Shon, Dewon; Suh, Young Ju; Bomba-Nkolo, Dennis; Tchinda, Viviane; Kouontchou, Samuel; Thuita, Lucy W.; van der Wel, Anne Marie; Thomas, Alan; Stowers, Anthony; Saul, Allan; Zhou, Ainong; Taylor, Diane W.; Quakyi, Isabella A.

    2004-01-01

    The apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1), merozoite surface antigen 2 (MSA2), and merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1) are asexual-stage proteins currently being evaluated for inclusion in a vaccine for Plasmodium falciparum. Accordingly, it is important to understand factors that control antibody responses to these antigens. Antibody levels in plasma from residents of Etoa, Cameroon, between the ages of 5 and 70 years, were determined using recombinant AMA1, MSA2, and the N-terminal region of MSP1 (MSP1-190L). In addition, antibody responses to four variants of the C-terminal region of MSP1 (MSP119) were assessed. Results showed that all individuals produced antibodies to AMA1, MSA2, and MSP1-190L; however, a proportion of individuals never produced antibodies to the MSP119 variants, although the percentage of nonresponders decreased with age. The influence of age and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1/DQB1 alleles on antibody levels was evaluated using two-way analysis of variance. Age was correlated with levels of antibodies to AMA1 and MSP119 but not with levels of antibodies to MSA2 and MSP1-190L. No association was found between a single HLA allele and levels of antibodies to MSA2, MSP1-190L, or any of the MSP119 variants. However, individuals positive for DRB1*1201 had higher levels of antibodies to the variant of recombinant AMA1 tested than did individuals of all other HLA types. Since the effect was seen across all age groups, HLA influenced the level but not the rate of antibody acquisition. This association for AMA1, combined with the previously reported association between HLA class II alleles and levels of antibodies to rhoptry-associated protein 1 (RAP1) and RAP2, indicates that HLA influences the levels of antibodies to three of the five vaccine candidate antigens that we have evaluated. PMID:15102786

  11. A randomized multicenter trial comparing leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 monoclonal antibody with rabbit antithymocyte globulin as induction treatment in first kidney transplantations.

    PubMed

    Hourmant, M; Bedrossian, J; Durand, D; Lebranchu, Y; Renoult, E; Caudrelier, P; Buffet, R; Soulillou, J P

    1996-12-15

    Adhesion molecules are involved in several steps in the immune response: leukocyte adhesion to the endothelium, transendothelial migration, cooperation between immunocompetent cells, and cytotoxicity. Leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 plays a central role among adhesion molecules. In a multicenter randomized open trial, we compared a monoclonal antibody directed against the alpha chain of LFA-1 (Oduli-momab; IMTIX/Pasteur Mérieux Sérums et Vaccins) with rabbit antithymocyte globulin (rATG; IMTIX/Pasteur Mérieux Sérums et Vaccins), as part of a quadruple sequential protocol in 101 patients receiving a first kidney transplant. Clinical tolerance of anti-LFA-1 mAb was better than that of rATG. Short-term rejection rates (< 15 days) were not significantly different (15% and 16% for anti-LFA-1 mAb and rATG, respectively). However, 11% of the anti-LFA-1 mAb patients experienced rejection during the first 10 days of the treatment course compared with none of the patients treated with rATG. The incidence and severity of acute rejection in the first 3 months was not significantly different between groups. Of the LFA-1 and rATG patients, 96% and 92% of the grafts, respectively, were functioning at 12 months. The incidence and severity of infection, whatever the origin, were comparable in both groups. In addition, it was observed that fewer patients required posttransplantation dialysis in the anti-LFA-1 mAb group (19%, vs. 35% for rATG), although the difference was not statistically significant. Altogether, the beneficial action of this monoclonal antibody on short-term renal function recovery makes it a useful tool in the management of renal patients undergoing kidney transplantation.

  12. Measles virus-induced changes in leukocyte function antigen 1 expression and leukocyte aggregation: possible role in measles virus pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Attibele, N; Wyde, P R; Trial, J; Smole, S C; Smith, C W; Rossen, R D

    1993-02-01

    Measles virus (MV) infection of U937 cell or peripheral blood leukocyte cultures was shown to induce changes in the expression of leukocyte function antigen 1 (LFA-1) and cause marked aggregation of these cells. Addition of selected monoclonal antibodies specific for LFA-1 epitopes that did not neutralize MV in standard neutralization assays were found to block both virus-induced leukocyte aggregation and virus dissemination. These data suggest that MV modulation of LFA-1 expression on leukocytes may be an important step in MV pathogenesis.

  13. Breed differences in development of anti-insulin antibodies in diabetic dogs and investigation of the role of dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) genes.

    PubMed

    Holder, Angela L; Kennedy, Lorna J; Ollier, William E R; Catchpole, Brian

    2015-10-15

    Administration of insulin for treatment of diabetes mellitus in dogs can stimulate an immune response, with a proportion of animals developing anti-insulin antibodies (AIA). For an IgG antibody response to occur, this would require B cell presentation of insulin peptides by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules, encoded by dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) genes, in order to receive T-cell help for class switching. DLA genes are highly polymorphic in the dog population and vary from breed to breed. The aim of the present study was to evaluate AIA reactivity in diabetic dogs of different breeds and to investigate whether DLA genes influence AIA status. Indirect ELISA was used to determine serological reactivity to insulin in diabetic dogs, treated with either a porcine or bovine insulin preparation. DLA haplotypes for diabetic dogs were determined by sequence-based typing of DLA-DRB1, -DQA1 and -DQB1 loci. Significantly greater insulin reactivity was seen in treated diabetic dogs (n=942) compared with non-diabetic dogs (n=100). Relatively few newly diagnosed diabetic dogs (3/109) were found to be AIA positive, although this provides evidence that insulin autoantibodies might be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease in some cases. Of the diabetic dogs treated with a bovine insulin preparation, 52.3% (182/348) were AIA positive, compared with 12.6% (75/594) of dogs treated with a porcine insulin preparation, suggesting that bovine insulin is more immunogenic. Breeds such as dachshund, Cairn terrier, miniature schnauzer and Tibetan terrier were more likely to develop AIA, whereas cocker spaniels were less likely to develop AIA, compared with crossbreed dogs. In diabetic dogs, DLA haplotype DRB1*0015--DQA1*006--DQB1*023 was associated with being AIA positive, whereas the haplotype DLA-DRB1*006--DQA1*005--DQB1*007 showed an association with being AIA negative. These research findings suggest that DLA genes influence AIA responses in treated diabetic

  14. Common leukocyte antigen staining of a primitive sarcoma.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, J M; Beschorner, W E; Kuhajda, F P; deMent, S H

    1987-04-15

    A 4-year-old boy presented with symptoms of tracheal obstruction and was found to have a polypoid tracheal mass, which was studied by biopsy. Light microscopy showed a tumor composed of small cells with round to oval dark nuclei, clumped chromatin, one to two nucleoli, and small, variable amounts of indistinct pink cytoplasm. In other areas the tumor had a loose, spindle appearance, with some cells showing more elongated nuclei, and fibrillar pink cytoplasm consistent with strap cells. Cross striations were not found. Electron microscopy showed desmosomes and 7 to 10 nm cytoplasmic filaments forming dense bodies. The findings are most consistent with a primitive sarcoma, probably rhabdomyosarcoma. Immunoperoxidase with three monoclonal antibodies for common leukocyte antigen showed diffuse membraneous staining with fresh-frozen tissue. All other lymphocyte and monocyte marker studies were negative. We believe that this case of anticommon leukocyte antigen staining, a rhabdomyosarcoma, represents the first report of a false positive reaction with monoclonal antibody to common leukocyte antigen.

  15. Mechanisms of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI): anti-leukocyte antibodies.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Brian R; McFarland, Janice G

    2006-05-01

    There is abundant evidence that leukocyte antibodies in blood donor products are somehow involved in transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I, HLA class II, and neutrophil-specific antibodies in the plasma of both blood donors and recipients have been implicated in the pathogenesis of TRALI. The case for a relationship between leukocyte antibodies and TRALI is more compelling if concordance between the antigen specificity of the leukocyte antibodies in the donor plasma and the corresponding antigen on the cells of the affected recipient is demonstrated. Such antibody-antigen concordance can be investigated by typing the recipient for the cognate leukocyte antigens or by cross-matching the donor plasma against the recipient's leukocytes. Two proposed pathophysiologic mechanisms for TRALI have received the most attention: the antibody hypothesis and the two-event hypothesis. The final common pathway in all of the proposed pathogenic mechanisms of TRALI is increased pulmonary capillary permeability, which results in movement of plasma into the alveolar space causing pulmonary edema. A typical TRALI serologic workup consists of tests for HLA class I and II and neutrophil-specific antibodies. The use of flow cytometry and HLA-coated microbeads is recommended for detection of HLA antibodies in plasma of implicated blood donors and a combination of the granulocyte agglutination test and granulocyte immunofluorescence test for detection of neutrophil-specific antibodies. Genotyping for class I and II HLA and for a limited number of neutrophil antigens may also be helpful in establishing antibody-antigen concordance. PMID:16617255

  16. T-cell-activating monoclonal antibodies, reacting with both leukocytes and erythrocytes, recognize the guinea pig Thy-1 differentiation antigen: characterization and cloning of guinea pig CD90.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, H; Bartels, T; Hahn, G; Otto, A; Burger, R

    1999-11-01

    A glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked differentiation antigen expressed on guinea pig T and B lymphocytes was identified by several monoclonal antibodies; it has been shown previously that this membrane protein induced strong polyclonal T cell proliferation upon antibody binding and costimulation by PMA. Purification by immunoadsorption and microsequencing revealed that this T-cell-activating protein is the homologue of Thy-1 or CD90. In contrast to the Thy-1 antigen of most other species, guinea pig Thy-1 has a much higher molecular weight, which is due to a more extensive N-linked glycosylation, bringing the molecular weight of the total antigen up to 36 kDa. Molecular cloning of guinea pig Thy-1 indicated that the deduced molecular weight of the protein backbone is 12,777 after removal of an N-terminal 19-amino-acid leader peptide and cleavage of the 31 amino acids for GPI anchoring the C-terminal end. Sequence comparison showed that guinea pig Thy-1 has an 82% homology to human and a 72% homology to mouse Thy-1 on the amino acid level. Immunohistological staining of cryostat sections revealed intensive staining with the monoclonal antibody H154 on fibroblasts, fibrocytes, Kupffer cells, alveolar macrophages, and mesangial cells. As observed in the human, mouse, and rat, Thy-1 is abundant in the guinea pig brain. Unlike Thy-1 expression in other species, guinea pig Thy-1 is strongly expressed on most resting, nonactivated B cells and, to a lesser extent, on erythrocytes. While treatment of erythrocytes and lymphocytes with GPI-specific phospholipase C largely decreased reactivity with mAb H154, T cells retained the proliferative response to antibody and phorbol esters.

  17. [Detection and typing for swine leukocyte antigen].

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Luo, Huai-Rong; Zhang, Ya-Ping; Qiu, Xiang-Pin; Ye, Chun

    2004-03-01

    Traditionally the cluster of swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) was typed by serological, cytological and biochemical methods. Many special molecular typing methods have been developed with the progress of molecular biological technology, such as PCR-RFLP, PCR-SSCP , MS and DNA sequencing. Here we discussed the advantages and disadvantages of each method based on the polymorphic and conservative (from the functional aspect, such as supertype and supermotif) characteristics of SLA, and illustrated the development of typing for SLA in the future. In addition, we pointed out the editorial mistakes about the serological haplotype of SLA in reference book and emphasized that the accurate polymorphism of SLA-DQB gene must be based on the cloning sequencing. PMID:15639990

  18. Production of antibodies which recognize opiate receptors on murine leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, D.J.J.; Bost, K.L.; Blalock, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    An antibody has been developed which recognizes opiate receptors on cells of the immune system. This antibody blocks specific binding of the radiolabeled opiate receptor ligand, /sup 3/H-dihydromorphine, to receptors on murine splenocytes. Additionally, the anti-receptor antibody competes with ..beta..-endorphin, meta-enkephalin, and naloxone for the same binding site on the leukocytes. Moreover, the anti-receptor antibody possesses agonist activity similar to ..beta..-endorphin in suppressing cAMP production by lymphocytes. These results suggest the development of an antibody which recognizes classical opiate receptors on cells of the immune system.

  19. Alloantibody Generation and Effector Function Following Sensitization to Human Leukocyte Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Michelle J.; Valenzuela, Nicole M.; Reed, Elaine F.

    2016-01-01

    Allorecognition is the activation of the adaptive immune system to foreign human leukocyte antigen (HLA) resulting in the generation of alloantibodies. Due to a high polymorphism, foreign HLA is recognized by the immune system following transplant, transfusion, or pregnancy resulting in the formation of the germinal center and the generation of long-lived alloantibody-producing memory B cells. Alloantibodies recognize antigenic epitopes displayed by the HLA molecule on the transplanted allograft and contribute to graft damage through multiple mechanisms, including (1) activation of the complement cascade resulting in the formation of the MAC complex and inflammatory anaphylatoxins, (2) transduction of intracellular signals leading to cytoskeletal rearrangement, growth, and proliferation of graft vasculature, and (3) immune cell infiltration into the allograft via FcγR interactions with the FC portion of the antibody. This review focuses on the generation of HLA alloantibody, routes of sensitization, alloantibody specificity, and mechanisms of antibody-mediated graft damage. PMID:26870045

  20. Human Leukocyte Antigen Diversity: A Southern African Perspective.

    PubMed

    Tshabalala, Mqondisi; Mellet, Juanita; Pepper, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasingly well-documented evidence of high genetic, ethnic, and linguistic diversity amongst African populations, there is limited data on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) diversity in these populations. HLA is part of the host defense mechanism mediated through antigen presentation to effector cells of the immune system. With the high disease burden in southern Africa, HLA diversity data is increasingly important in the design of population-specific vaccines and the improvement of transplantation therapeutic interventions. This review highlights the paucity of HLA diversity data amongst southern African populations and defines a need for information of this kind. This information will support disease association studies, provide guidance in vaccine design, and improve transplantation outcomes. PMID:26347896

  1. Human Leukocyte Antigen Diversity: A Southern African Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Tshabalala, Mqondisi; Mellet, Juanita; Pepper, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasingly well-documented evidence of high genetic, ethnic, and linguistic diversity amongst African populations, there is limited data on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) diversity in these populations. HLA is part of the host defense mechanism mediated through antigen presentation to effector cells of the immune system. With the high disease burden in southern Africa, HLA diversity data is increasingly important in the design of population-specific vaccines and the improvement of transplantation therapeutic interventions. This review highlights the paucity of HLA diversity data amongst southern African populations and defines a need for information of this kind. This information will support disease association studies, provide guidance in vaccine design, and improve transplantation outcomes. PMID:26347896

  2. Microscale purification of antigen-specific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Eric P.; Normandin, Erica; Osei-Owusu, Nana Yaw; Mahan, Alison E.; Chan, Ying N.; Lai, Jennifer I.; Vaccari, Monica; Rao, Mangala; Franchini, Genoveffa; Alter, Galit; Ackerman, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation of the Fc domain is an important driver of antibody effector function. While assessment of antibody glycoform compositions observed across total plasma IgG has identified differences associated with a variety of clinical conditions, in many cases it is the glycosylation state of only antibodies against a specific antigen or set of antigens that may be of interest, for example, in defining the potential effector function of antibodies produced during disease or after vaccination. Historically, glycoprofiling such antigen-specific antibodies in clinical samples has been challenging due to their low prevalence, the high sample requirement for most methods of glycan determination, and the lack of high-throughput purification methods. New methods of glycoprofiling with lower sample requirements and higher throughput have motivated the development of microscale and automatable methods for purification of antigen-specific antibodies from polyclonal sources such as clinical serum samples. In this work, we present a robot-compatible 96-well plate-based method for purification of antigen-specific antibodies, suitable for such population level glycosylation screening. We demonstrate the utility of this method across multiple antibody sources, using both purified plasma IgG and plasma, and across multiple different antigen types, with enrichment factors greater than 1000-fold observed. Using an on-column IdeS protease treatment, we further describe staged release of Fc and Fab domains, allowing for glycoprofiling of each domain. PMID:26078040

  3. Microscale purification of antigen-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Brown, Eric P; Normandin, Erica; Osei-Owusu, Nana Yaw; Mahan, Alison E; Chan, Ying N; Lai, Jennifer I; Vaccari, Monica; Rao, Mangala; Franchini, Genoveffa; Alter, Galit; Ackerman, Margaret E

    2015-10-01

    Glycosylation of the Fc domain is an important driver of antibody effector function. While assessment of antibody glycoform compositions observed across total plasma IgG has identified differences associated with a variety of clinical conditions, in many cases it is the glycosylation state of only antibodies against a specific antigen or set of antigens that may be of interest, for example, in defining the potential effector function of antibodies produced during disease or after vaccination. Historically, glycoprofiling such antigen-specific antibodies in clinical samples has been challenging due to their low prevalence, the high sample requirement for most methods of glycan determination, and the lack of high-throughput purification methods. New methods of glycoprofiling with lower sample requirements and higher throughput have motivated the development of microscale and automatable methods for purification of antigen-specific antibodies from polyclonal sources such as clinical serum samples. In this work, we present a robot-compatible 96-well plate-based method for purification of antigen-specific antibodies, suitable for such population level glycosylation screening. We demonstrate the utility of this method across multiple antibody sources, using both purified plasma IgG and plasma, and across multiple different antigen types, with enrichment factors greater than 1000-fold observed. Using an on-column IdeS protease treatment, we further describe staged release of Fc and Fab domains, allowing for glycoprofiling of each domain.

  4. HLA-Modeler: Automated Homology Modeling of Human Leukocyte Antigens.

    PubMed

    Amari, Shinji; Kataoka, Ryoichi; Ikegami, Takashi; Hirayama, Noriaki

    2013-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) structures of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules are indispensable for the studies on the functions at molecular level. We have developed a homology modeling system named HLA-modeler specialized in the HLA molecules. Segment matching algorithm is employed for modeling and the optimization of the model is carried out by use of the PFROSST force field considering the implicit solvent model. In order to efficiently construct the homology models, HLA-modeler uses a local database of the 3D structures of HLA molecules. The structure of the antigenic peptide-binding site is important for the function and the 3D structure is highly conserved between various alleles. HLA-modeler optimizes the use of this structural motif. The leave-one-out cross-validation using the crystal structures of class I and class II HLA molecules has demonstrated that the rmsds of nonhydrogen atoms of the sites between homology models and crystal structures are less than 1.0 Å in most cases. The results have indicated that the 3D structures of the antigenic peptide-binding sites can be reproduced by HLA-modeler at the level almost corresponding to the crystal structures.

  5. Thyrotropin Receptor Epitope and Human Leukocyte Antigen in Graves' Disease.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Hidefumi; De Groot, Leslie J; Akamizu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is an organ-specific autoimmune disease, and thyrotropin (TSH) receptor (TSHR) is a major autoantigen in this condition. Since the extracellular domain of human TSHR (TSHR-ECD) is shed into the circulation, TSHR-ECD is a preferentially immunogenic portion of TSHR. Both genetic factors and environmental factors contribute to development of GD. Inheritance of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes, especially HLA-DR3, is associated with GD. TSHR-ECD protein is endocytosed into antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and processed to TSHR-ECD peptides. These peptide epitopes bind to HLA-class II molecules, and subsequently the complex of HLA-class II and TSHR-ECD epitope is presented to CD4+ T cells. The activated CD4+ T cells secrete cytokines/chemokines that stimulate B-cells to produce TSAb, and in turn hyperthyroidism occurs. Numerous studies have been done to identify T- and B-cell epitopes in TSHR-ECD, including (1) in silico, (2) in vitro, (3) in vivo, and (4) clinical experiments. Murine models of GD and HLA-transgenic mice have played a pivotal role in elucidating the immunological mechanisms. To date, linear or conformational epitopes of TSHR-ECD, as well as the molecular structure of the epitope-binding groove in HLA-DR, were reported to be related to the pathogenesis in GD. Dysfunction of central tolerance in the thymus, or in peripheral tolerance, such as regulatory T cells, could allow development of GD. Novel treatments using TSHR antagonists or mutated TSHR peptides have been reported to be effective. We review and update the role of immunogenic TSHR epitopes and HLA in GD, and offer perspectives on TSHR epitope specific treatments. PMID:27602020

  6. Thyrotropin Receptor Epitope and Human Leukocyte Antigen in Graves’ Disease

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Hidefumi; De Groot, Leslie J.; Akamizu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Graves’ disease (GD) is an organ-specific autoimmune disease, and thyrotropin (TSH) receptor (TSHR) is a major autoantigen in this condition. Since the extracellular domain of human TSHR (TSHR-ECD) is shed into the circulation, TSHR-ECD is a preferentially immunogenic portion of TSHR. Both genetic factors and environmental factors contribute to development of GD. Inheritance of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes, especially HLA-DR3, is associated with GD. TSHR-ECD protein is endocytosed into antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and processed to TSHR-ECD peptides. These peptide epitopes bind to HLA-class II molecules, and subsequently the complex of HLA-class II and TSHR-ECD epitope is presented to CD4+ T cells. The activated CD4+ T cells secrete cytokines/chemokines that stimulate B-cells to produce TSAb, and in turn hyperthyroidism occurs. Numerous studies have been done to identify T- and B-cell epitopes in TSHR-ECD, including (1) in silico, (2) in vitro, (3) in vivo, and (4) clinical experiments. Murine models of GD and HLA-transgenic mice have played a pivotal role in elucidating the immunological mechanisms. To date, linear or conformational epitopes of TSHR-ECD, as well as the molecular structure of the epitope-binding groove in HLA-DR, were reported to be related to the pathogenesis in GD. Dysfunction of central tolerance in the thymus, or in peripheral tolerance, such as regulatory T cells, could allow development of GD. Novel treatments using TSHR antagonists or mutated TSHR peptides have been reported to be effective. We review and update the role of immunogenic TSHR epitopes and HLA in GD, and offer perspectives on TSHR epitope specific treatments.

  7. Thyrotropin Receptor Epitope and Human Leukocyte Antigen in Graves’ Disease

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Hidefumi; De Groot, Leslie J.; Akamizu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Graves’ disease (GD) is an organ-specific autoimmune disease, and thyrotropin (TSH) receptor (TSHR) is a major autoantigen in this condition. Since the extracellular domain of human TSHR (TSHR-ECD) is shed into the circulation, TSHR-ECD is a preferentially immunogenic portion of TSHR. Both genetic factors and environmental factors contribute to development of GD. Inheritance of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes, especially HLA-DR3, is associated with GD. TSHR-ECD protein is endocytosed into antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and processed to TSHR-ECD peptides. These peptide epitopes bind to HLA-class II molecules, and subsequently the complex of HLA-class II and TSHR-ECD epitope is presented to CD4+ T cells. The activated CD4+ T cells secrete cytokines/chemokines that stimulate B-cells to produce TSAb, and in turn hyperthyroidism occurs. Numerous studies have been done to identify T- and B-cell epitopes in TSHR-ECD, including (1) in silico, (2) in vitro, (3) in vivo, and (4) clinical experiments. Murine models of GD and HLA-transgenic mice have played a pivotal role in elucidating the immunological mechanisms. To date, linear or conformational epitopes of TSHR-ECD, as well as the molecular structure of the epitope-binding groove in HLA-DR, were reported to be related to the pathogenesis in GD. Dysfunction of central tolerance in the thymus, or in peripheral tolerance, such as regulatory T cells, could allow development of GD. Novel treatments using TSHR antagonists or mutated TSHR peptides have been reported to be effective. We review and update the role of immunogenic TSHR epitopes and HLA in GD, and offer perspectives on TSHR epitope specific treatments. PMID:27602020

  8. Swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) diversity in Sinclair and Hanford swine.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chak-Sum; Martens, Gregory W; Amoss, Max S; Gomez-Raya, Luis; Beattie, Craig W; Smith, Douglas M

    2010-03-01

    The swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) haplotype B is associated with increased penetrance of the tumor traits in Sinclair swine cutaneous melanoma (SSCM). We established a series of SinclairxHanford swine crosses to facilitate genetic mapping of the tumor-associated loci. In this study, the SLA diversity in the founding animals was characterized for effective selection of maximum tumor penetrance in the pedigrees. Using the sequence-based typing (SBT) method we identified a total of 29 alleles at five polymorphic SLA loci (SLA-1, SLA-3, SLA-2, DRB1 and DQB1) representing six class I and five class II haplotypes. We subsequently developed a rapid PCR-based typing assay using sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) to efficiently follow the SLA types of the crossbred progeny. In a total of 469 animals we identified three crossovers within the class I region and three between the class I and class II regions, which corresponded to recombination frequencies of 0.39% and 0.56%, respectively. We also confirmed the presence of two expressed SLA-1 loci in three of the class I haplotypes and were able to determine the relative chromosomal arrangement of the duplicated loci in two haplotypes. This study furthers our understanding of the allelic architecture and polymorphism of the SLA system and will facilitate the mapping of loci associated with the expression of SSCM.

  9. Association of human leukocyte antigen with postherpetic neuralgia in Koreans.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hye Yoon; Song, Eun Young; Yoon, Jung Ah; Suh, Dae Hun; Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Yong Chul; Park, Myoung Hee

    2016-10-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), the most frequent complication of varicella-zoster virus reactivation, is characterized by pain that persists for more than 3 months, often for years after healing of zoster rash. A few studies revealing the association of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) with PHN have been reported, but only in the Japanese. The aim of this study was to investigate the primary HLA locus associated with PHN susceptibility in Koreans. We compared HLA-A, -B, -C, and DRB1 genotypes of 66 PHN patients with those of 54 herpes zoster (HZ) patients without developing PHN and 235 healthy controls. Frequencies of HLA-B*13, B*44, B*15 (B75), DRB1*10:01, and DRB1*12:02 were increased, and those of HLA-C*01, C*12, and DRB1*01:01 were decreased in PHN patients compared to those in controls (each, p < 0.05). Among these alleles, only the frequency of HLA-B*44 was significantly increased in PHN patients compared to that in HZ patients and the change was due to HLA-B*44:03 (PHN vs controls, p = 0.043; PHN vs HZ, p = 0.012). The results suggest that HLA-B*44:03 or other closely linked gene of the major histocompatibility complex is associated with susceptibility to the development of PHN after HZ, but not with the onset of HZ. PMID:27457498

  10. Neutrophil elastase enhances antigen presentation by upregulating human leukocyte antigen class I expression on tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Akhil; Alatrash, Gheath; Philips, Anne V; Qiao, Na; Sukhumalchandra, Pariya; Kerros, Celine; Diaconu, Iulia; Gall, Victor; Neal, Samantha; Peters, Haley L; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Molldrem, Jeffrey J; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-01

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) is an innate immune cell-derived inflammatory mediator that we have shown increases the presentation of tumor-associated peptide antigens in breast cancer. In this study, we extend these observations to show that NE uptake has a broad effect on enhancing antigen presentation by breast cancer cells. We show that NE increases human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I expression on the surface of breast cancer cells in a concentration and time-dependent manner. HLA class I upregulation requires internalization of enzymatically active NE. Western blots of NE-treated breast cancer cells confirm that the expression of total HLA class I as well as the antigen-processing machinery proteins TAP1, LMP2, and calnexin does not change following NE treatment. This suggests that NE does not increase the efficiency of antigen processing; rather, it mediates the upregulation of HLA class I by stabilizing and reducing membrane recycling of HLA class I molecules. Furthermore, the effects of NE extend beyond breast cancer since the uptake of NE by EBV-LCL increases the presentation of HLA class I-restricted viral peptides, as shown by their increased sensitivity to lysis by EBV-specific CD8+ T cells. Together, our results show that NE uptake increases the responsiveness of breast cancer cells to adaptive immunity by broad upregulation of membrane HLA class I and support the conclusion that the innate inflammatory mediator NE enhances tumor cell recognition and increases tumor sensitivity to the host adaptive immune response.

  11. Antigen-Antibody Interaction Database (AgAbDb): a compendium of antigen-antibody interactions.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni-Kale, Urmila; Raskar-Renuse, Snehal; Natekar-Kalantre, Girija; Saxena, Smita A

    2014-01-01

    Antigen-Antibody Interaction Database (AgAbDb) is an immunoinformatics resource developed at the Bioinformatics Centre, University of Pune, and is available online at http://bioinfo.net.in/AgAbDb.htm. Antigen-antibody interactions are a special class of protein-protein interactions that are characterized by high affinity and strict specificity of antibodies towards their antigens. Several co-crystal structures of antigen-antibody complexes have been solved and are available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). AgAbDb is a derived knowledgebase developed with an objective to compile, curate, and analyze determinants of interactions between the respective antigen-antibody molecules. AgAbDb lists not only the residues of binding sites of antigens and antibodies, but also interacting residue pairs. It also helps in the identification of interacting residues and buried residues that constitute antibody-binding sites of protein and peptide antigens. The Antigen-Antibody Interaction Finder (AAIF), a program developed in-house, is used to compile the molecular interactions, viz. van der Waals interactions, salt bridges, and hydrogen bonds. A module for curating water-mediated interactions has also been developed. In addition, various residue-level features, viz. accessible surface area, data on epitope segment, and secondary structural state of binding site residues, are also compiled. Apart from the PDB numbering, Wu-Kabat numbering and explicit definitions of complementarity-determining regions are provided for residues of antibodies. The molecular interactions can be visualized using the program Jmol. AgAbDb can be used as a benchmark dataset to validate algorithms for prediction of B-cell epitopes. It can as well be used to improve accuracy of existing algorithms and to design new algorithms. AgAbDb can also be used to design mimotopes representing antigens as well as aid in designing processes leading to humanization of antibodies. PMID:25048123

  12. Introduction to Antigen and Antibody Assays.

    PubMed

    Day, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Serological tests are used widely in veterinary practice; most often in the diagnosis of infectious disease. Such tests may be used to detect antigen from an infectious agent within a biological sample or to detect the presence of serum antibody specific for the pathogen as evidence of immunological exposure. These tests are all based on the fundamental principles of interaction between antigenic epitopes and antibodies of either the immunoglobulin (Ig) G, IgM, IgA, or IgE classes. The relative concentration of specific antibody within a sample is traditionally determined by calculation of the titer of antibody. With few exceptions, the primary interaction between an antigen and antibody in vitro cannot be visualized and so serological tests generally employ a secondary indicator system based on the use of a polyclonal antiserum or monoclonal antibody. A range of such tests has been developed, but many in veterinary medicine are based on the principle of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, which is described in detail in this article. The interpretation of serological tests must be made carefully, taking into consideration the sensitivity and specificity of the test and the possible reasons for false-positive and false-negative outcomes. PMID:27154595

  13. Prospective study of cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to influenza and antibodies to human T lymphotropic virus-III in homosexual men. Selective loss of an influenza-specific, human leukocyte antigen-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte response in human T lymphotropic virus-III positive individuals with symptoms of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, G M; Salahuddin, S Z; Markham, P D; Joseph, L J; Payne, S M; Kriebel, P; Bernstein, D C; Biddison, W E; Sarngadharan, M G; Gallo, R C

    1985-01-01

    Peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) from 18 homosexual men who did not have acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and from 9 heterosexual men were repetitively tested for their ability to generate HLA self-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to influenza virus (flu-self) over a 2-yr period. The sera of the same donors were tested for antibodies to human T lymphotropic virus-III (HTLV-III). Six of the homosexual and none of the heterosexual donors consistently generated weak cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to flu-self. Seven of the homosexual and none of the heterosexual donors were seropositive for antibodies to HTLV-III. No obvious correlation was detected between weak flu-self cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses and antibodies to HTLV-III. However, one homosexual donor generated no detectable cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity to flu-self, although he was a strong responder to HLA-alloantigens. This donor had an OKT4:OKT8 ratio of 0.4 and was seropositive for HTLV-III antigens; HTLV-III virus was identified in his PBL; and he developed AIDS during the course of this study. A second donor with lymphadenopathy and who was seropositive for HTLV-III antigens exhibited marginal cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity to flu-self which he subsequently lost. PBL from two patients, one with Kaposi's sarcoma and one with generalized lymphadenopathy, were also tested for cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to flu-self and to alloantigens. Both donors failed to generate cytotoxic T lymphocyte to flu-self, but generated strong cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to alloantigens. The selective loss of an HLA-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte response without loss of HLA alloantigenic cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity may be an important functional immunologic characteristic in the development of AIDS. PMID:2997287

  14. Prior human leukocyte antigen-allosensitization and left ventricular assist device type affect degree of post-implantation human leukocyte antigen-allosensitization.

    PubMed

    Drakos, Stavros G; Kfoury, Abdallah G; Kotter, John R; Reid, Bruce B; Clayson, Stephen E; Selzman, Craig H; Stehlik, Josef; Fisher, Patrick W; Merida, Mario; Eckels, David D; Brunisholz, Kim; Horne, Benjamin D; Stoker, Sandi; Li, Dean Y; Renlund, Dale G

    2009-08-01

    Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation before heart transplantation has been associated with formation of antibodies directed against human leukocyte antigens (HLA), often referred to as sensitization. This study investigated whether prior sensitization or LVAD type affected the degree of post-implantation sensitization. The records of consecutive HeartMate (HM) I and HM II LVAD patients were reviewed. Panel reactive antibody (PRA) was assessed before LVAD implantation and biweekly thereafter. Sensitization was defined as PRA > 10%, and high-degree sensitization was defined as PRA > 90%. An HM LVAD was implanted in 64 patients, and 11 received a HM II LVAD as a bridge to transplant. Ten HM I patients (16%) were sensitized before LVAD implantation (HM I-S), and 54 (84%) were not (HM I-Non-S). Nine HM I-S patients (90%) became highly sensitized (PRA > 90%) compared with 9 HM I-Non-S patients (16.7%; p < 0.001). The PRA remained elevated (> 90%) in 8 of the 9 (88.9%) highly sensitized HM I-S patients vs 5 of the 9 (55.6%) HM I-Non-S highly sensitized patients. The PRA levels in the rest of the HM I-S highly sensitized patients declined from 93% +/- 4% to 55% +/- 15% (p = 0.01). Among the 11 HM II patients, 1 (9%) was sensitized before LVAD implantation (PRA, 40%) and the PRA moderately increased to 80%. No other HM II patient became sensitized after implantation. Thus, 1 of 11 (9%) HM II patients became sensitized compared with 29 of 64 (45%) HM I patients (p = 0.04). Pre-sensitized patients are at higher risk for becoming and remaining highly HLA-allosensitized after LVAD implantation. The HeartMate II LVAD appears to cause less sensitization than HeartMate I.

  15. Position 156 influences the peptide repertoire and tapasin dependency of human leukocyte antigen B*44 allotypes

    PubMed Central

    Badrinath, Soumya; Saunders, Philippa; Huyton, Trevor; Aufderbeck, Susanne; Hiller, Oliver; Blasczyk, Rainer; Bade-Doeding, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Background Polymorphic differences between donor and recipient human leukocyte antigen class I molecules can result in graft-versus-host disease due to distinct peptide presentation. As part of the peptide-loading complex, tapasin plays an important role in selecting peptides from the pool of potential ligands. Class I polymorphisms can significantly alter the tapasin-mediated interaction with the peptide-loading complex and although most class I allotypes are highly dependent upon tapasin, some are able to load peptides independently of tapasin. Several human leukocyte antigen B*44 allotypes differ exclusively at position 156 (B*44:02156Asp, 44:03156Leu, 44:28156Arg, 44:35156Glu). From these alleles, only the high tapasin-dependency of human leukocyte antigen B*44:02 has been reported. Design and Methods We investigated the influence of position 156 polymorphisms on both the requirement of tapasin for efficient surface expression of each allotype and their peptide features. Genes encoding human leukocyte antigen B*44 variants bearing all possible substitutions at position 156 were lentivirally transduced into human leukocyte antigen class I-negative LCL 721.221 cells and the tapasin-deficient cell line LCL 721.220. Results Exclusively human leukocyte antigen B*44:28156Arg was expressed on the surface of tapasin-deficient cells, suggesting that the remaining B*44/156 variants are highly tapasin-dependent. Our computational analysis suggests that the tapasin-independence of human leukocyte antigen B*44:28156Arg is a result of stabilization of the peptide binding region and generation of a more peptide receptive state. Sequencing of peptides eluted from human leukocyte antigen B*44 molecules by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LTQ-Orbitrap) demonstrated that both B*44:02 and B*44:28 share the same overall peptide motif and a certain percentage of their individual peptide repertoires in the presence and/or absence of tapasin

  16. Natural micropolymorphism in human leukocyte antigens provides a basis for genetic control of antigen recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Archbold, Julia K.; Macdonald, Whitney A.; Gras, Stephanie; Ely, Lauren K.; Miles, John J.; Bell, Melissa J.; Brennan, Rebekah M.; Beddoe, Travis; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Clements, Craig S.; Purcell, Anthony W.; McCluskey, James; Burrows, Scott R.; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2009-07-10

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene polymorphism plays a critical role in protective immunity, disease susceptibility, autoimmunity, and drug hypersensitivity, yet the basis of how HLA polymorphism influences T cell receptor (TCR) recognition is unclear. We examined how a natural micropolymorphism in HLA-B44, an important and large HLA allelic family, affected antigen recognition. T cell-mediated immunity to an Epstein-Barr virus determinant (EENLLDFVRF) is enhanced when HLA-B*4405 was the presenting allotype compared with HLA-B*4402 or HLA-B*4403, each of which differ by just one amino acid. The micropolymorphism in these HLA-B44 allotypes altered the mode of binding and dynamics of the bound viral epitope. The structure of the TCR-HLA-B*4405EENLLDFVRF complex revealed that peptide flexibility was a critical parameter in enabling preferential engagement with HLA-B*4405 in comparison to HLA-B*4402/03. Accordingly, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphism can alter the dynamics of the peptide-MHC landscape, resulting in fine-tuning of T cell responses between closely related allotypes.

  17. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Holers, V.M.; Kotzin, B.L.

    1985-09-01

    The authors used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases.

  18. Human leukocyte antigen-E alleles and expression in patients with serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui; Lu, Renquan; Xie, Suhong; Wen, Xuemei; Wang, Hongling; Gao, Xiang; Guo, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-E (HLA-E) is one of the most extensively studied non-classical MHC class I molecules that is almost non-polymorphic. Only two alleles (HLA-E*0101 and HLA-E*0103) are found in worldwide populations, and suggested to be functional differences between these variants. The HLA-E molecule can contribute to the escape of cancer cells from host immune surveillance. However, it is still unknown whether HLA-E gene polymorphisms might play a role in cancer immune escape. To explore the association between HLA-E alleles and the susceptibility to serous ovarian cancer (SOC), 85 primary SOC patients and 100 healthy women were enrolled. Here, we indicated that high frequency of HLA-E*0103 allele existed in SOC patients by the allele-specific quantitative real-time PCR method. The levels of HLA-E protein expression in SOC patients with the HLA-E*0103 allele were higher than those with the HLA-E*0101 allele using immunohistochemistry analysis. The cell surface expression and functional differences between the two alleles were verified by K562 cells transfected with HLA-E*0101 or HLA-E*0103 allelic heavy chains. The HLA-E*0103 allele made the transfer of the HLA-E molecule to the cell surface easier, and HLA-E/peptides complex more stable. These differences ultimately influenced the function of natural killer cells, showing that the cells transfected with HLA-E*0103 allele inhibited natural killer cells to lysis. This study reveals a novel mechanism regarding the susceptibility to SOC, which is correlated with the HLA-E*0103 allele. PMID:25711417

  19. Calcium-dependent antigen binding as a novel modality for antibody recycling by endosomal antigen dissociation.

    PubMed

    Hironiwa, N; Ishii, S; Kadono, S; Iwayanagi, Y; Mimoto, F; Habu, K; Igawa, T; Hattori, K

    2016-01-01

    The pH-dependent antigen binding antibody, termed a recycling antibody, has recently been reported as an attractive type of second-generation engineered therapeutic antibody. A recycling antibody can dissociate antigen in the acidic endosome, and thus bind to its antigen multiple times. As a consequence, a recycling antibody can neutralize large amounts of antigen in plasma. Because this approach relies on histidine residues to achieve pH-dependent antigen binding, which could limit the epitopes that can be targeted and affect the rate of antigen dissociation in the endosome, we explored an alternative approach for generating recycling antibodies. Since calcium ion concentration is known to be lower in endosome than in plasma, we hypothesized that an antibody with antigen-binding properties that are calcium-dependent could be used as recycling antibody. Here, we report a novel anti-interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R) antibody, identified from a phage library that binds to IL-6R only in the presence of a calcium ion. Thermal dynamics and a crystal structure study revealed that the calcium ion binds to the heavy chain CDR3 region (HCDR3), which changes and possibly stabilizes the structure of HCDR3 to make it bind to antigen calcium dependently (PDB 5AZE). In vitro and in vivo studies confirmed that this calcium-dependent antigen-binding antibody can dissociate its antigen in the endosome and accelerate antigen clearance from plasma, making it a novel approach for generating recycling antibody.

  20. Lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 is a receptor for Pasteurella haemolytica leukotoxin in bovine leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Jeyaseelan, S; Hsuan, S L; Kannan, M S; Walcheck, B; Wang, J F; Kehrli, M E; Lally, E T; Sieck, G C; Maheswaran, S K

    2000-01-01

    Pasteurella (Mannheimia) haemolytica leukotoxin (Lkt) causes cell type- and species-specific effects in ruminant leukocytes. Recent studies indicate that P. haemolytica Lkt binds to bovine CD18, the common subunit of all beta2 integrins. We designed experiments with the following objectives: to identify which member of the beta2 integrins is a receptor for Lkt; to determine whether Lkt binding to the receptor is target cell (bovine leukocytes) specific; to define the relationships between Lkt binding to the receptor, calcium elevation, and cytolysis; and to determine whether a correlation exists between Lkt receptor expression and the magnitude of target cell cytolysis. We compared Lkt-induced cytolysis in neutrophils from control calves and from calves with bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD), because neutrophils from BLAD-homozygous calves exhibit reduced beta2 integrin expression. The results demonstrate for the first time that Lkt binds to bovine CD11a and CD18 (lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 [LFA-1]). The binding was abolished by anti-CD11a or anti-CD18 monoclonal antibody (MAb). Lkt-induced calcium elevation in bovine alveolar macrophages (BAMs) was inhibited by anti-CD11a or anti-CD18 MAb (65 to 94% and 37 to 98%, respectively, at 5 and 50 Lkt units per ml; P < 0.05). Lkt-induced cytolysis in neutrophils and BAMs was also inhibited by anti-CD11a or anti-CD18 MAb in a concentration-dependent manner. Lkt bound to porcine LFA-1 but did not induce calcium elevation or cytolysis. In neutrophils from BLAD calves, Lkt-induced cytolysis was decreased by 44% compared to that of neutrophils from control calves (P < 0.05). These results indicate that LFA-1 is a Lkt receptor, Lkt binding to LFA-1 is not target cell specific, Lkt binding to bovine LFA-1 correlates with calcium elevation and cytolysis, and bovine LFA-1 expression correlates with the magnitude of Lkt-induced target cell cytolysis. PMID:10603370

  1. Molecular characterization of swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) class II genes in outbred pig populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The highly polymorphic swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) genes are one of the most important determinants in swine immune, disease and vaccine responses. Thus, understanding how SLA gene polymorphism affects immunity, especially in outbred pig populations with a diverse genetic background, requires accu...

  2. MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF SWINE LEUKOCYTE ANTIGEN (SLA) CLASS I GENES IN OUTBRED PIG POPULATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The highly polymorphic swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) genes are one of the most important determinants in swine immune responses to infectious diseases, vaccines, and in transplantation. Study of SLA influence requires accurate and effective typing methods. We developed a simple and rapid method to t...

  3. Mapping Epitopes on a Protein Antigen by the Proteolysis of Antigen-Antibody Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jemmerson, Ronald; Paterson, Yvonne

    1986-05-01

    A monoclonal antibody bound to a protein antigen decreases the rate of proteolytic cleavage of the antigen, having the greatest effect on those regions involved in antibody contact. Thus, an epitope can be identified by the ability of the antibody to protect one region of the antigen more than others from proteolysis. By means of this approach, two distinct epitopes, both conformationally well-ordered, were characterized on horse cytochrome c.

  4. Plasmodium falciparum: characterization of defined antigens by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, L H; Ramirez, E; Er-Hsiang, L; Lambert, P H

    1980-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed against Plasmodium falciparum detect stage-specific, species-specific and common antigenic determinants of Plasmodia. These antibodies provide new tools for purification and characterization of Plasmodium falciparum antigens in relation to future procedures for immunoprophylaxis. Images Fig. 2 PMID:6160002

  5. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Holers, V M; Kotzin, B L

    1985-01-01

    We used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. None of the monoclonal autoantibodies appeared to bind to a significant percentage of cells of relatively small cell size, either before or after culture. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Further experiments, including those using aggregated Ig to block antibody binding, strongly indicated that anti-histone antibody binding was not Fc receptor mediated. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations (0.25 micrograms/ml) of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases. Images PMID:3876357

  6. Human leukocyte Antigen-DM polymorphisms in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Alvaro-Benito, Miguel; Morrison, Eliot; Wieczorek, Marek; Sticht, Jana; Freund, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Classical MHC class II (MHCII) proteins present peptides for CD4(+) T-cell surveillance and are by far the most prominent risk factor for a number of autoimmune disorders. To date, many studies have shown that this link between particular MHCII alleles and disease depends on the MHCII's particular ability to bind and present certain peptides in specific physiological contexts. However, less attention has been paid to the non-classical MHCII molecule human leucocyte antigen-DM, which catalyses peptide exchange on classical MHCII proteins acting as a peptide editor. DM function impacts the presentation of both antigenic peptides in the periphery and key self-peptides during T-cell development in the thymus. In this way, DM activity directly influences the response to pathogens, as well as mechanisms of self-tolerance acquisition. While decreased DM editing of particular MHCII proteins has been proposed to be related to autoimmune disorders, no experimental evidence for different DM catalytic properties had been reported until recently. Biochemical and structural investigations, together with new animal models of loss of DM activity, have provided an attractive foundation for identifying different catalytic efficiencies for DM allotypes. Here, we revisit the current knowledge of DM function and discuss how DM function may impart autoimmunity at the organism level.

  7. Human leukocyte Antigen-DM polymorphisms in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Alvaro-Benito, Miguel; Morrison, Eliot; Wieczorek, Marek; Sticht, Jana; Freund, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Classical MHC class II (MHCII) proteins present peptides for CD4(+) T-cell surveillance and are by far the most prominent risk factor for a number of autoimmune disorders. To date, many studies have shown that this link between particular MHCII alleles and disease depends on the MHCII's particular ability to bind and present certain peptides in specific physiological contexts. However, less attention has been paid to the non-classical MHCII molecule human leucocyte antigen-DM, which catalyses peptide exchange on classical MHCII proteins acting as a peptide editor. DM function impacts the presentation of both antigenic peptides in the periphery and key self-peptides during T-cell development in the thymus. In this way, DM activity directly influences the response to pathogens, as well as mechanisms of self-tolerance acquisition. While decreased DM editing of particular MHCII proteins has been proposed to be related to autoimmune disorders, no experimental evidence for different DM catalytic properties had been reported until recently. Biochemical and structural investigations, together with new animal models of loss of DM activity, have provided an attractive foundation for identifying different catalytic efficiencies for DM allotypes. Here, we revisit the current knowledge of DM function and discuss how DM function may impart autoimmunity at the organism level. PMID:27534821

  8. Human leukocyte Antigen-DM polymorphisms in autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Eliot; Wieczorek, Marek; Sticht, Jana; Freund, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Classical MHC class II (MHCII) proteins present peptides for CD4+ T-cell surveillance and are by far the most prominent risk factor for a number of autoimmune disorders. To date, many studies have shown that this link between particular MHCII alleles and disease depends on the MHCII's particular ability to bind and present certain peptides in specific physiological contexts. However, less attention has been paid to the non-classical MHCII molecule human leucocyte antigen-DM, which catalyses peptide exchange on classical MHCII proteins acting as a peptide editor. DM function impacts the presentation of both antigenic peptides in the periphery and key self-peptides during T-cell development in the thymus. In this way, DM activity directly influences the response to pathogens, as well as mechanisms of self-tolerance acquisition. While decreased DM editing of particular MHCII proteins has been proposed to be related to autoimmune disorders, no experimental evidence for different DM catalytic properties had been reported until recently. Biochemical and structural investigations, together with new animal models of loss of DM activity, have provided an attractive foundation for identifying different catalytic efficiencies for DM allotypes. Here, we revisit the current knowledge of DM function and discuss how DM function may impart autoimmunity at the organism level. PMID:27534821

  9. CD Nomenclature 2015: Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigen Workshops as a Driving Force in Immunology.

    PubMed

    Engel, Pablo; Boumsell, Laurence; Balderas, Robert; Bensussan, Armand; Gattei, Valter; Horejsi, Vaclav; Jin, Bo-Quan; Malavasi, Fabio; Mortari, Frank; Schwartz-Albiez, Reinhard; Stockinger, Hannes; van Zelm, Menno C; Zola, Heddy; Clark, Georgina

    2015-11-15

    CD (cluster of differentiation) Ags are cell surface molecules expressed on leukocytes and other cells relevant for the immune system. CD nomenclature has been universally adopted by the scientific community and is officially approved by the International Union of Immunological Societies and sanctioned by the World Health Organization. It provides a unified designation system for mAbs, as well as for the cell surface molecules that they recognize. This nomenclature was established by the Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigens Workshops. In addition to defining the CD nomenclature, these workshops have been instrumental in identifying and determining the expression and function of cell surface molecules. Over the past 30 y, the data generated by the 10 Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigens Workshops have led to the characterization and formal designation of more than 400 molecules. CD molecules are commonly used as cell markers, allowing the identification and isolation of leukocyte populations, subsets, and differentiation stages. mAbs against these molecules have proven to be essential for biomedical research and diagnosis, as well as in biotechnology. More recently, they have been recognized as invaluable tools for the treatment of several malignancies and autoimmune diseases. In this article, we describe how the CD nomenclature was established, present the official updated list of CD molecules, and provide a rationale for their usefulness in the 21st century. PMID:26546687

  10. Secondary structure and 3D homology modeling of swine leukocyte antigen class 2 (SLA-2) molecules.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng-Shan; Xu, Chong-bo; Long, Yi-hou; Xia, Chun

    2009-01-01

    No information to date is available to elucidate the structure of swine leukocyte antigen class I (SLA-I) molecule which is comprised by a heavy chain of SLA-I non-covalently associated with a light chain, beta(2)-microglobulin (beta(2)m) proteins. Presently, one of SLA-I gene SLA-2 and beta(2)m gene were expressed as soluble maltose binding proteins (MBP-proteins) in a pMAL-p2X/Escherichia coli TB1 system and identified by western blotting with anti-MBP polyclonal antibodies. The expressed proteins MBP-SLA-2 and MBP-beta(2)m were purified on amylose affinity columns followed by DEAE-Sepharose. The purified products were cleaved by Factor Xa, respectively, and the interest of proteins SLA-2 and beta(2)m were purified on amylose affinity columns followed by separation from MBP on DEAE-Sepharose. The secondary structures of SLA-2 and beta(2)m were analyzed by circular dichroism (CD) spectrophotometry. The three-dimensional (3D) structure of their peptide-binding domain (PBD) was modeled-based sequence homology. The content of the alpha-helix, beta-sheet, turn, and random coil in the SLA-2 protein were 76, 95, 36, and 67aa, respectively. In the 98aa of beta(2)m, the contents of the alpha-helix, beta-sheet, turn, and random coil were 0, 45, 8, and 45aa, respectively. The SLA-2 protein displayed a typical alpha-helix structure while beta(2)m protein displayed a typical beta-sheet structure. Homology modeling of the SLA-2 and beta(2)m proteins demonstrated similarities with the structure of human and mouse MHC (major histocompatibility complex) class I proteins.

  11. Discovery of internalizing antibodies to tumor antigens from phage libraries

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu; Marks, James D

    2014-01-01

    Phage antibody technology can be used to generate human antibodies to essentially any antigen. Many therapeutic target antigens are cell surface receptors, which can be challenging targets for antibody generation. In addition, for many therapeutic applications, one needs antibodies that not only bind the cell surface receptor but that also are internalized into the cell upon binding. This allows use of the antibody to deliver a range of payloads into the cell to achieve a therapeutic effect. In this chapter we describe how human phage antibody libraries can be selected directly on tumor cell lines to generate antibodies that bind cell surface receptors and which upon binding are rapidly internalized into the cell. Specific protocols show how to: 1) directly select cell binding and internalizing antibodies from human phage antibody libraries; 2) screen the phage antibodies in a high throughput flow cytometry assay for binding to the tumor cell line used for selection; 3) identify the antigen bound by the phage antibody using immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry; and 4) direct cell binding and internalizing selections to a specific tumor antigen by sequential selection on a tumor cell line followed by selection on yeast displaying the target tumor antigen on the yeast surface. PMID:22208981

  12. A role for multiple chimeric antigen receptor-expressing leukocytes in antigen-specific responses to cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Carmen S.M.; John, Liza B.; Devaud, Christel; Prince, Miles H.; Johnstone, Ricky W.; Trapani, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    While adoptive immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells can induce remission of some tumors, the role of other CAR-modified leukocytes is not well characterized. In this study, we characterize the function of leukocytes including natural killer (NK) cells, macrophages and CAR T cells from transgenic mice expressing a CAR under the control of the pan-hematopoietic promoter, vav, and determine the ability of these mice to respond to ERB expressing tumors. We demonstrate the anti-tumor functions of leukocytes, including antigen specific cytotoxicity and cytokine secretion. The adoptive transfer of CAR T cells provided a greater survival advantage in the E0771ERB tumor model than their wildtype (WT) counterparts. In addition, CAR NK cells and CAR T cells also mediated increased survival in the RMAERB tumor model. When challenged with Her2 expressing tumors, F38 mice were shown to mount an effective immune response, resulting in tumor rejection and long-term survival. This was shown to be predominantly dependent on both CD8+ T cells and NK cells. However, macrophages and CD4+ T cells were also shown to contribute to this response. Overall, this study highlights the use of the vav-CAR mouse model as a unique tool to determine the anti-tumor function of various immune subsets, either alone or when acting alongside CAR T cells in adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:27153556

  13. Raman spectroscopy of HIV-1 antigen and antibody

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinin, Pavel V.; Hu, Ningjie; Kamemoto, Lori E.; Yu, Qigui; Misra, Anupam K.; Sharma, Shiv K.

    2011-05-01

    Raman spectra of anti-HIV-1 antibody, HIV-1 antigen (p24), and HIV-1 antibody-antigen complex have been measured in near-infrared and UV regions: 785 nm; 830 nm; and 244 nm laser excitations. The spectrum of the HIV-1 antigen was excited with an infrared laser and contains numerous Raman peaks. The most prominent peaks are broad bands at 1343, 1449, 1609 and 1655 cm-1, which are characteristic of the Raman spectra of biological cells. The UV Raman spectrum of the HIV-1 antigen has a completely different structure. It has two strong peaks at 1613 cm-1 and 1173 cm-1. The peak at 1613 cm-1 is associated with vibrations of the aromatic amino acids tyrosine (Tyr) and tryptophan (Try). The second strongest peak at 1173 cm-1 is associated with the vibration of Tyr. The Raman peak pattern of the HIV-1 antigen-antibody complex is very similar to that of the HIV-1 antigen. The only difference is that the peak at 1007 cm-1 of the Raman spectrum of the HIV-1 antigen-antibody complex is slightly enhanced compared to that of the HIV-1 antigen. This indicates that the peaks of the HIV-1 antigen dominate the Raman spectrum of the HIV-1 antigen-antibody complex.

  14. Antibody avidity in swine lymphocyte antigen-defined miniature pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Appleyard, G D; Mallard, B A; Kennedy, B W; Wilkie, B N

    1992-01-01

    Antibody avidity to hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) was measured by thiocyanate ion elution enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in swine lymphocyte antigen (SLA) defined miniature pigs. Serum antibody avidity was evaluated on day 14 and 30 after primary (day 0) and secondary (day 14) immunizations in eight to ten week old miniature pigs previously typed for swine lymphocyte antigen genotype. The effect of SLA genotype, litter, and gender on anti-HEWL antibody avidity was determined by least squares. Antibody avidity varied amongst individuals. Antibody avidity maturation was observed as a mean rise in antibody avidity from primary response (0.89 +/- 0.64) to secondary response (1.23 +/- 0.54) (p < 0.0005). Overall, SLA genotype did not significantly influence antibody avidity or avidity maturation, but pigs of dd genotype had greater avidity maturation between primary and secondary responses than other genotypes. Litter effects significantly affected antibody avidity and maturation. PMID:1477799

  15. Effects of cytokines and periodontopathic bacteria on the leukocyte function-associated antigen 1/intercellular adhesion molecule 1 pathway in gingival fibroblasts in adult periodontitis.

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, J; Saito, I; Ishikawa, I; Miyasaka, N

    1994-01-01

    We investigated the effects of inflammatory cytokines and periodontopathic bacteria on expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and E-selectin (endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule 1) in cultured human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). Cell surface ICAM-1 was upregulated on HGF under transcriptional control by exposure not only to interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and gamma interferon but also to sonic extracts prepared from Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia (nigrescens) and lipopolysaccharides from Escherichia coli. However, these stimuli induced only minimal expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and E-selectin on HGF. Binding assays using HGF and Molt 4, the human T-cell leukemia cell line, showed induced ICAM-1 to be functional, and the increased binding was blocked by a combination of monoclonal antibodies against ICAM-1 and leukocyte function-associated antigen 1. Furthermore, gingival tissues from adult periodontitis patients showed increased mRNA expression of ICAM-1 compared with that in tissues from normal healthy donors. In immunohistological analysis, we also observed in vivo that the expression of ICAM-1 on fibroblasts in adult periodontitis tissues was greater than that in normal gingiva. Thus, the overexpression of ICAM-1 on gingival fibroblasts induced by cytokines and periodontopathic bacteria is speculated to be deeply involved in the accumulation and retention of leukocyte function-associated antigen 1-bearing leukocytes in adult periodontitis lesions. Images PMID:7525481

  16. Effects of cytokines and periodontopathic bacteria on the leukocyte function-associated antigen 1/intercellular adhesion molecule 1 pathway in gingival fibroblasts in adult periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, J; Saito, I; Ishikawa, I; Miyasaka, N

    1994-12-01

    We investigated the effects of inflammatory cytokines and periodontopathic bacteria on expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and E-selectin (endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule 1) in cultured human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). Cell surface ICAM-1 was upregulated on HGF under transcriptional control by exposure not only to interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and gamma interferon but also to sonic extracts prepared from Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia (nigrescens) and lipopolysaccharides from Escherichia coli. However, these stimuli induced only minimal expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and E-selectin on HGF. Binding assays using HGF and Molt 4, the human T-cell leukemia cell line, showed induced ICAM-1 to be functional, and the increased binding was blocked by a combination of monoclonal antibodies against ICAM-1 and leukocyte function-associated antigen 1. Furthermore, gingival tissues from adult periodontitis patients showed increased mRNA expression of ICAM-1 compared with that in tissues from normal healthy donors. In immunohistological analysis, we also observed in vivo that the expression of ICAM-1 on fibroblasts in adult periodontitis tissues was greater than that in normal gingiva. Thus, the overexpression of ICAM-1 on gingival fibroblasts induced by cytokines and periodontopathic bacteria is speculated to be deeply involved in the accumulation and retention of leukocyte function-associated antigen 1-bearing leukocytes in adult periodontitis lesions. PMID:7525481

  17. Genetic variability in swine leukocyte antigen class II and Toll-like receptors affects immune responses to vaccination for bacterial infections in pigs.

    PubMed

    Shinkai, H; Arakawa, A; Tanaka-Matsuda, M; Ide-Okumura, H; Terada, K; Chikyu, M; Kawarasaki, T; Ando, A; Uenishi, H

    2012-12-01

    The genes encoding swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) are highly polymorphic in pig populations, and likely have influences on infection and the effects of vaccination. We explored the associations of different genotypes of SLA class II and of the genes TLR1, TLR4, TLR5, and TLR6 with antibody responses after vaccination against Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae (ER) and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (APP) serotypes 1, 2, and 5 in 191 Duroc pigs maintained under specific pathogen-free conditions. We demonstrated close relationships between SLA class II and ER antibody response and between TLR genes other than TLR4 and APP antibody responses. Pigs with specific haplotypes in SLA class II or TLR5 showed decreased antibody response to ER vaccination or increased responses to APP2 and APP5 vaccination, respectively. It might be possible to breed for responsiveness to vaccination and to implement new vaccine development strategies unaffected by genetic backgrounds of pigs.

  18. The use of antigen microarrays in antibody profiling.

    PubMed

    Papp, Krisztián; Prechl, József

    2012-01-01

    Technological advances in the field of microarray production and analysis lead to the development of protein microarrays. Of these, antigen microarrays are one particular format that allows the study of antigen-antibody interactions in a miniaturized and highly multiplexed fashion. Here, we describe the parallel detection of antibodies with different specificities in human serum, a procedure also called antibody profiling. Autoantigens printed on microarray slides are reacted with test sera and the bound antibodies are identified by fluorescently labeled secondary reagents. Reactivity patterns generated this way characterize individuals and can help design novel diagnostic tools.

  19. Antigen-Specific Antibody Glycosylation Is Regulated via Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Suscovich, Todd; Dionne, Kendall; Tedesco, Jacquelynne; Chung, Amy W.; Streeck, Hendrik; Pau, Maria; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Francis, Don; Fast, Patricia; Laufer, Dagna; Walker, Bruce D.; Baden, Lindsey; Barouch, Dan H.; Alter, Galit

    2016-01-01

    Antibody effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, complement deposition, and antibody-dependent phagocytosis, play a critical role in immunity against multiple pathogens, particularly in the absence of neutralizing activity. Two modifications to the IgG constant domain (Fc domain) regulate antibody functionality: changes in antibody subclass and changes in a single N-linked glycan located in the CH2 domain of the IgG Fc. Together, these modifications provide a specific set of instructions to the innate immune system to direct the elimination of antibody-bound antigens. While it is clear that subclass selection is actively regulated during the course of natural infection, it is unclear whether antibody glycosylation can be tuned, in a signal-specific or pathogen-specific manner. Here, we show that antibody glycosylation is determined in an antigen- and pathogen-specific manner during HIV infection. Moreover, while dramatic differences exist in bulk IgG glycosylation among individuals in distinct geographical locations, immunization is able to overcome these differences and elicit antigen-specific antibodies with similar antibody glycosylation patterns. Additionally, distinct vaccine regimens induced different antigen-specific IgG glycosylation profiles, suggesting that antibody glycosylation is not only programmable but can be manipulated via the delivery of distinct inflammatory signals during B cell priming. These data strongly suggest that the immune system naturally drives antibody glycosylation in an antigen-specific manner and highlights a promising means by which next-generation therapeutics and vaccines can harness the antiviral activity of the innate immune system via directed alterations in antibody glycosylation in vivo.   PMID:26982805

  20. Induction of the Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 2 antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes using human leukocyte antigen tetramer-based artificial antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-Ling; Liang, Zhi-Hui; Zhang, Cai-E; Lu, Sheng-Jun; Weng, Xiu-Fang; Wu, Xiong-Wen

    2006-03-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) specific for the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent membrane protein 2 (LMP2) antigen are important reagents for the treatment of some EBV-associated malignancies, such as EBV-positive Hodgkin's disease and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. However, the therapeutic amount of CTLs is often hampered by the limited supply of antigen-presenting cells. To address this issue, an artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) was made by coating a human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-pLMP2 tetrameric complex, anti-CD28 antibody and CD54 molecule to a cell-sized latex bead, which provided the dual signals required for T cell activation. By co-culture of the HLA-A2-LMP2 bearing aAPC and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HLA-A2 positive healthy donors, LMP2 antigen-specific CTLs were induced and expanded in vitro. The specificity of the aAPC-induced CTLs was demonstrated by both HLA-A2-LMP2 tetramer staining and cytotoxicity against HLA-A2-LMP2 bearing T2 cell, the cytotoxicity was inhibited by the anti-HLA class I antibody (W6/32). These results showed that LMP2 antigen-specific CTLs could be induced and expanded in vitro by the HLA-A2-LMP2-bearing aAPC. Thus, aAPCs coated with an HLA-pLMP2 complex, anti-CD28 and CD54 might be promising tools for the enrichment of LMP2-specific CTLs for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:16518539

  1. Genome-wide genetic and transcriptomic investigation of variation in antibody response to dietary antigens.

    PubMed

    Rubicz, Rohina; Yolken, Robert; Alaedini, Armin; Drigalenko, Eugene; Charlesworth, Jac C; Carless, Melanie A; Severance, Emily G; Krivogorsky, Bogdana; Dyer, Thomas D; Kent, Jack W; Curran, Joanne E; Johnson, Matthew P; Cole, Shelley A; Almasy, Laura; Moses, Eric K; Blangero, John; Göring, Harald H H

    2014-07-01

    Increased immunoglobulin G (IgG) response to dietary antigens can be associated with gastrointestinal dysfunction and autoimmunity. The underlying processes contributing to these adverse reactions remain largely unknown, and it is likely that genetic factors play a role. Here, we estimate heritability and attempt to localize genetic factors influencing IgG antibody levels against food-derived antigens using an integrative genomics approach. IgG antibody levels were determined by ELISA in >1,300 Mexican Americans for the following food antigens: wheat gliadin; bovine casein; and two forms of bovine serum albumin (BSA-a and BSA-b). Pedigree-based variance components methods were used to estimate additive genetic heritability (h(2) ), perform genome-wide association analyses, and identify transcriptional signatures (based on 19,858 transcripts from peripheral blood lymphocytes). Heritability estimates were significant for all traits (0.15-0.53), and shared environment (based on shared residency among study participants) was significant for casein (0.09) and BSA-a (0.33). Genome-wide significant evidence of association was obtained only for antibody to gliadin (P = 8.57 × 10(-8) ), mapping to the human leukocyte antigen II region, with HLA-DRA and BTNL2 as the best candidate genes. Lack of association of known celiac disease risk alleles HLA-DQ2.5 and -DQ8 with antigliadin antibodies in the studied population suggests a separate genetic etiology. Significant transcriptional signatures were found for all IgG levels except BSA-b. These results demonstrate that individual genetic differences contribute to food antigen antibody measures in this population. Further investigations may elucidate the underlying immunological processes involved.

  2. Genome-wide genetic and transcriptomic investigation of variation in antibody response to dietary antigens

    PubMed Central

    Rubicz, Rohina; Yolken, Robert; Alaedini, Armin; Drigalenko, Eugene; Charlesworth, Jac C.; Carless, Melanie A.; Severance, Emily G.; Krivogorsky, Bogdana; Dyer, Thomas D.; Kent, Jack W.; Curran, Joanne E.; Johnson, Matthew P.; Cole, Shelley A.; Almasy, Laura; Moses, Eric K.; Blangero, John; Göring, Harald H.H.

    2014-01-01

    Increased immunoglobulin G (IgG) response to dietary antigens can be associated with gastrointestinal dysfunction and autoimmunity. The underlying processes contributing to these adverse reactions remain largely unknown, and it is likely that genetic factors play a role. Here we estimate heritability and attempt to localize genetic factors influencing IgG antibody levels against food-derived antigens using an integrative genomics approach. IgG antibody levels were determined by ELISA in >1300 Mexican Americans for the following food antigens: wheat gliadin; bovine casein; and two forms of bovine serum albumin (BSA-a and BSA-b). Pedigree-based variance components methods were used to estimate additive genetic heritability (h2), perform genome-wide association analyses, and identify transcriptional signatures (based on 19,858 transcripts from peripheral blood lymphocytes). Heritability estimates were significant for all traits (0.15-0.53), and shared environment (based on shared residency among study participants) was significant for casein (0.09) and BSA-a (0.33). Genome-wide significant evidence of association was obtained only for antibody to gliadin (p=8.57×10-8), mapping to the human leukocyte antigen II region, with HLA-DRA and BTNL2 as the best candidate genes. Lack of association of known celiac disease risk alleles HLA-DQ2.5 and -DQ8 with anti-gliadin antibodies in the studied population suggests a separate genetic etiology. Significant transcriptional signatures were found for all IgG levels except BSA-b. These results demonstrate that individual genetic differences contribute to food antigen antibody measures in this population. Further investigations may elucidate the underlying immunological processes involved. PMID:24962563

  3. Appropriate clinical use of human leukocyte antigen typing for coeliac disease: an Australasian perspective.

    PubMed

    Tye-Din, J A; Cameron, D J S; Daveson, A J; Day, A S; Dellsperger, P; Hogan, C; Newnham, E D; Shepherd, S J; Steele, R H; Wienholt, L; Varney, M D

    2015-04-01

    The past decade has seen human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing emerge as a remarkably popular test for the diagnostic work-up of coeliac disease with high patient acceptance. Although limited in its positive predictive value for coeliac disease, the strong disease association with specific HLA genes imparts exceptional negative predictive value to HLA typing, enabling a negative result to exclude coeliac disease confidently. In response to mounting evidence that the clinical use and interpretation of HLA typing often deviates from best practice, this article outlines an evidence-based approach to guide clinically appropriate use of HLA typing, and establishes a reporting template for pathology providers to improve communication of results.

  4. Fetal leukocyte trafficking as a stimulus for the production of maternal antibodies in the goat.

    PubMed

    Oppenheim, S M; Moyer, A L; BonDurant, R H; Rowe, J D; Anderson, G B

    2001-04-15

    The production of antibodies during pregnancy or after parturition is a natural occurrence in many mammalian species. Fetal cells have been detected in the peripheral blood of women and mice and are thought to be the immune stimulus for antibody production. The aim of this study was to investigate if the production of maternal anti-fetal antibodies during ruminant pregnancy is the result of fetal leukocyte trafficking across the placenta. Maternal pregnancy serum was collected from 94 does whose fetuses received sheep hematopoietic stem cells via in utero transplantation at 49 to 62 d of gestation. Serum samples were collected before surgery and at weekly intervals throughout gestation. A lymphocyte microcytotoxicity assay was used to screen the serum samples from does that carried chimeric fetuses to term (n = 75). Of these 75 does, 28 parous does had presurgery serum that contained alloreactive antibodies. Nine of the 75 does had nonreactive presurgery serum, but they produced alloreactive antibody titers during gestation. Xenoreactive antibodies were detected in the pregnancy sera from 2 of the 75 does tested. Hemolytic assays confirmed the species-specificity of the xenoreactive serum from these 2 does. In view of the fact that hematopoietic cells were the only source of anti-sheep antibody stimulation in this model, we propose that fetal leukocyte trafficking does take place across the caprine placenta. PMID:11354716

  5. Antibody and blood leukocyte response in Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806) tick-infested dogs and guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Matias P J; Aoki, Vanessa L; Sanches, Françoise P S; Aquino, Lúcia P T C T; Garcia, Marcos V; Machado, Rosângela Z; Bechara, Gervásio H

    2003-07-10

    The dog is considered to be the natural host of Rhipicephalus sanguineus and is unable to develop appreciable resistance even after repeated feedings. The guinea pig develops strong resistance after one infestation with adult ticks. Antibody (IgG) titres against tick salivary gland antigens (SGAs) and blood leukocyte numbers in dogs and guinea pigs undergoing experimental R. sanguineus tick infestations were measured to detect a possible correlation with susceptibility or resistance of hosts. Since infested dogs develop an immediate hypersensitivity reaction to R. sanguineus antigens, total and anti-R. sanguineus SGA IgE levels were also measured in this host species. IgG and IgE antibody levels were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) along three consecutive infestations of both hosts. Most dogs and guinea pigs displayed low IgG levels against R. sanguineus SGAs, though marked differences in individual response were observed. Although dog's total serum IgE levels increased significantly after infestations, no change in the amount of anti-salivary gland IgE was detected. Total and differential blood cell counts were determined in dogs and guinea pigs during primary and secondary infestation. In dogs, a tertiary infestation and a subsequent higher infestation level were also evaluated. Infested dogs did not display any alteration in blood leukocyte counts throughout the experiment. Guinea pigs, on the other hand, developed a significant basophilia during primary infestation which increased further during secondary infestation. These data reveal similarities and differences in the reactions of resistant and non-resistant hosts to ticks. They contribute for the understanding of such host-parasite relationships and will hopefully aid in the development of immune control of ticks. PMID:12860067

  6. Evidence that measles virus hemagglutinin initiates modulation of leukocyte function-associated antigen 1 expression.

    PubMed

    Nagendra, A R; Smith, C W; Wyde, P R

    1995-07-01

    Measles virus (MV), human immunodeficiency virus, Epstein-Barr virus, and other leukotropic viruses can modulate the expression of leukocyte function antigen 1 (LFA-1) on the surface of infected and nearby leukocytes. This ability to induce changes in LFA-1 expression may play an important role in the pathogenesis of these viruses. However, the mechanism(s) involved in virus-mediated regulation of LFA-1 is unknown. Evidence is presented in this report that it is the MV hemagglutinin (H) protein that initiates up-regulation of LFA-1 expression in leukocyte cultures infected with this virus. Indeed, comparison of the abilities of different MV strains to modulate LFA-1 expression, examination of published nucleotide sequences for the H proteins of different vaccine strains, and competitive inhibition assays using oligopeptides homologous or heterologous to a region of the H protein gene encompassing amino acid 116 (from the amino terminus) all suggest that it is this portion of the H protein that is responsible for MV-induced alteration of LFA-1. These comparisons also support the hypothesis that there is a relationship between the abilities of different MV strains to alter LFA-1 expression and their pathogenic potentials.

  7. Human cysticercosis: antigens, antibodies and non-responders.

    PubMed Central

    Flisser, A; Woodhouse, E; Larralde, C

    1980-01-01

    Immunoelectrophoresis of sera from patients with brain cysticercosis against a crude antigenic extract from Cysticercus cellulosae indicates that nearly 50% of the patients do not make sufficient antibodies to ostensively precipitate. The other 50% of the patients who do make precipitating antibodies show a very heterogeneous response in the number of antigens they recognize as well as in the type of antigen--as classified by their electrophoretic mobilities. The most favoured, called antigen B, is recognized by 84% of positive sera and corresponds to one or a limited number of antigens isoelectric at pH 8.6. Indirect immunofluorescence with monospecific anti-human immunoglobulins, performed upon the immunoelectrophoretic preparations, reveal that all cysticercus antigens induced the synthesis of antibodies in the immunoglobulin classes in the order G greater than M greater than E greater than A greater than D. Finally, antigen H (an anodic component) seems to favour IgE relative to its ability to induce IgG. Thus, although in natural infection a good proportion of cysticercotic patients do not seem to mount an energetic antibody response against the parasite, giving rise to some speculations about immunosuppression, the fact that 50% do synthesize antibodies allows for some optimistic expectations from vaccination of humans--in view of the good results of vaccination in experimental animals mediated by IgG antibodies. A likely prospect for a human vaccine would be antigen B because it is the most frequently detected by humans, although its immunizing and toxic properties remain to be properly studied. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 3 FIG. 6 PMID:7389197

  8. Human cysticercosis: antigens, antibodies and non-responders.

    PubMed

    Flisser, A; Woodhouse, E; Larralde, C

    1980-01-01

    Immunoelectrophoresis of sera from patients with brain cysticercosis against a crude antigenic extract from Cysticercus cellulosae indicates that nearly 50% of the patients do not make sufficient antibodies to ostensively precipitate. The other 50% of the patients who do make precipitating antibodies show a very heterogeneous response in the number of antigens they recognize as well as in the type of antigen--as classified by their electrophoretic mobilities. The most favoured, called antigen B, is recognized by 84% of positive sera and corresponds to one or a limited number of antigens isoelectric at pH 8.6. Indirect immunofluorescence with monospecific anti-human immunoglobulins, performed upon the immunoelectrophoretic preparations, reveal that all cysticercus antigens induced the synthesis of antibodies in the immunoglobulin classes in the order G greater than M greater than E greater than A greater than D. Finally, antigen H (an anodic component) seems to favour IgE relative to its ability to induce IgG. Thus, although in natural infection a good proportion of cysticercotic patients do not seem to mount an energetic antibody response against the parasite, giving rise to some speculations about immunosuppression, the fact that 50% do synthesize antibodies allows for some optimistic expectations from vaccination of humans--in view of the good results of vaccination in experimental animals mediated by IgG antibodies. A likely prospect for a human vaccine would be antigen B because it is the most frequently detected by humans, although its immunizing and toxic properties remain to be properly studied.

  9. Serum Antibody Repertoire Profiling Using In Silico Antigen Screen

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinyue; Hu, Qiang; Liu, Song; Tallo, Luke J.; Sadzewicz, Lisa; Schettine, Cassandra A.; Nikiforov, Mikhail; Klyushnenkova, Elena N.; Ionov, Yurij

    2013-01-01

    Serum antibodies are valuable source of information on the health state of an organism. The profiles of serum antibody reactivity can be generated by using a high throughput sequencing of peptide-coding DNA from combinatorial random peptide phage display libraries selected for binding to serum antibodies. Here we demonstrate that the targets of immune response, which are recognized by serum antibodies directed against sequential epitopes, can be identified using the serum antibody repertoire profiles generated by high throughput sequencing. We developed an algorithm to filter the results of the protein database BLAST search for selected peptides to distinguish real antigens recognized by serum antibodies from irrelevant proteins retrieved randomly. When we used this algorithm to analyze serum antibodies from mice immunized with human protein, we were able to identify the protein used for immunizations among the top candidate antigens. When we analyzed human serum sample from the metastatic melanoma patient, the recombinant protein, corresponding to the top candidate from the list generated using the algorithm, was recognized by antibodies from metastatic melanoma serum on the western blot, thus confirming that the method can identify autoantigens recognized by serum antibodies. We demonstrated also that our unbiased method of looking at the repertoire of serum antibodies reveals quantitative information on the epitope composition of the targets of immune response. A method for deciphering information contained in the serum antibody repertoire profiles may help to identify autoantibodies that can be used for diagnosing and monitoring autoimmune diseases or malignancies. PMID:23826227

  10. Serum Antibody Repertoire Profiling Using In Silico Antigen Screen.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyue; Hu, Qiang; Liu, Song; Tallo, Luke J; Sadzewicz, Lisa; Schettine, Cassandra A; Nikiforov, Mikhail; Klyushnenkova, Elena N; Ionov, Yurij

    2013-01-01

    Serum antibodies are valuable source of information on the health state of an organism. The profiles of serum antibody reactivity can be generated by using a high throughput sequencing of peptide-coding DNA from combinatorial random peptide phage display libraries selected for binding to serum antibodies. Here we demonstrate that the targets of immune response, which are recognized by serum antibodies directed against sequential epitopes, can be identified using the serum antibody repertoire profiles generated by high throughput sequencing. We developed an algorithm to filter the results of the protein database BLAST search for selected peptides to distinguish real antigens recognized by serum antibodies from irrelevant proteins retrieved randomly. When we used this algorithm to analyze serum antibodies from mice immunized with human protein, we were able to identify the protein used for immunizations among the top candidate antigens. When we analyzed human serum sample from the metastatic melanoma patient, the recombinant protein, corresponding to the top candidate from the list generated using the algorithm, was recognized by antibodies from metastatic melanoma serum on the western blot, thus confirming that the method can identify autoantigens recognized by serum antibodies. We demonstrated also that our unbiased method of looking at the repertoire of serum antibodies reveals quantitative information on the epitope composition of the targets of immune response. A method for deciphering information contained in the serum antibody repertoire profiles may help to identify autoantibodies that can be used for diagnosing and monitoring autoimmune diseases or malignancies. PMID:23826227

  11. Association between human leukocyte antigen-DR and demylinating Guillain-Barré syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Zaki N.; Zalzala, Haider H.; Mohammedsalih, Hyam R.; Mahdi, Batool M.; Abid, Laheeb A.; Shakir, Zena N.; Fadhel, Maithem J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To find an association between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II DRB1, DRB3, DRB4, and DRB5 alleles frequencies in a sample of Iraqi patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and compare with a healthy control group. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study consisting of 30 Iraqi Arab patients with GBS attending the Neurological Department in the Neuroscience Hospital, Baghdad, Iraq between September 2012 and June 2013. The control group comprised 42 apparently healthy volunteers. Human leukocyte antigen genotyping for HLA DRB1, DRB3, DRB4, and DRB5 was performed using the polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primers method. The allele frequencies were compared across both groups. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-class II HLA-DR genotyping and serotyping were performed by software analysis. Results: We found increased frequencies of HLA genotype DRB1*03:01 (p=0.0009), DRB1*07:01 (p=0.0015), and DRB4*01:01 (p<0.0001) in patients with GBS compared with healthy controls. The HLA DR6 was increased in the control group (p<0.0001). Conclusions: Our results suggest an association between HLA-DRB1*03:01, DRB1*07:01, DRB4*01:01, and HLA DR3, DR7 and a susceptibility to GBS. PMID:25274590

  12. Monoclonal antibody-defined human pancreatic cancer-associated antigens.

    PubMed

    Schmiegel, W H; Kalthoff, H; Arndt, R; Gieseking, J; Greten, H; Klöppel, G; Kreiker, C; Ladak, A; Lampe, V; Ulrich, S

    1985-03-01

    Three pancreatic cancer-associated antigens were characterized by use of monoclonal antibodies in immunobinding studies with various cellular and soluble target antigens, in immunoprecipitation, and in immunoperoxidase staining. C54-0 represents a tumor-associated Mr 122,000 antigen, which appears to be widely distributed on various epithelial tumors and to a lower extent on normal tissue. C1-N3 antigen exhibited a more restricted distribution, reacting with pancreatic and various gastrointestinal tract tumors as well as with chronically inflamed pancreatic tissue. The most specific antigen expression was observed for C1-P83 antigen, found on all exocrine tumors of the pancreas, but not on normal or chronically inflamed pancreatic tissue.

  13. PK/PD analysis of a novel pH-dependent antigen-binding antibody using a dynamic antibody-antigen binding model.

    PubMed

    Haraya, Kenta; Tachibana, Tatsuhiko; Iwayanagi, Yuki; Maeda, Atsuhiko; Ozeki, Kazuhisa; Nezu, Junichi; Ishigai, Masaki; Igawa, Tomoyuki

    2016-04-01

    Previously, we have reported novel engineered antibody with pH-dependent antigen-binding (recycling antibody), and with both pH-dependent antigen-binding and increased FcRn-binding at neutral pH (sweeping antibody). The purpose of this study is to perform PK/PD predictions to better understand the potential applications of the antibodies as therapeutics. To demonstrate the applicability of recycling and sweeping antibodies over conventional antibodies, PK/PD analyses were performed. PK/PD parameters for antibody and antigen dynamics were estimated from the results of a pharmacokinetic study in human FcRn transgenic mice. A simulation study was performed using the estimated PK/PD parameters with various target antigen profiles. In comparison to conventional antibody, recycling antibody enhanced antibody-antigen complex clearance by 3 folds, while sweeping antibody accelerated antigen clearance by 10 folds in a pharmacokinetic study. Simulation results showed that recycling and sweeping antibodies can improve dosage frequency and reduce the required dose for target antigens with various clearances, plasma concentrations or binding kinetics. Moreover, importance of the association rate constant to enhance the beneficial effect of antibodies was shown. These results support the conclusion that recycling and sweeping antibodies can be applied to various target antigens with different profiles, and expand the number of antigens that antibodies can target. PMID:26944099

  14. An evaluation of the utility of anti-granulocyte and anti-leukocyte monoclonal antibodies in the diagnosis of Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Dorfman, R. F.; Gatter, K. C.; Pulford, K. A.; Mason, D. Y.

    1986-01-01

    The immunoreactivity of six different monoclonal antigranulocyte antibodies (Leu M1, TG1, 3C4, BY/87a, BY/37a, and 3CD1) has been evaluated in 23 cases of Hodgkin's disease (7 lymphocyte predominant, 12 nodular sclerosing, and 5 mixed cellularity); in a variety of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and in a series of reactive and benign lesions of lymph nodes. Applying a monoclonal antibody (PD7/26) to leukocyte common antigen (T200), we have also investigated reports that the L&H variants in nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin's disease are strongly immunoreactive for leukocyte common antigen in contrast to the lack of reactivity of Reed-Sternberg (RS) cells and variants thereof in other forms of Hodgkin's disease. All six monoclonal anti-granulocyte antibodies reacted against RS cells and "Hodgkin's cells" in the nodular sclerosing (NSHD) and mixed cellularity (MCHD) types, with strong cell membrane and juxtanuclear (Golgi) staining. In contrast an anti-leukocyte antibody PD7/26 was unreactive with RS cells and variants thereof in NSHD and MCHD. On the other hand, RS cells and L&H variants thereof in the nodular L&H form of Hodgkin's disease (nodular lymphocyte predominant type) showed reactivity with PD7/26 but not with the anti-granulocyte markers. Rare L&H cells in 2 cases of diffuse lymphocyte predominant type showed reactivity with some, but not all, of the anti-granulocyte antibodies. These findings provide further support for the concept that the nodular L&H type of Hodgkin's disease represents an entity distinct from other forms of this disorder. Our studies also demonstrate the usefulness of these immunoperoxidase techniques when applied to formalinfixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5A and B Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:3717303

  15. 21 CFR 660.1 - Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.1... Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.1 Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. The product...

  16. 21 CFR 660.1 - Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.1... Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.1 Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. The product...

  17. 21 CFR 660.1 - Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.1... Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.1 Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. The product...

  18. 21 CFR 660.1 - Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.1... Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.1 Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. The product...

  19. 21 CFR 660.1 - Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.1... Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.1 Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. The product...

  20. Characterization of human sperm surface antigens with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Wolf, D P; Sokoloski, J E; Dandekar, P; Bechtol, K B

    1983-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (McAb) against human ejaculated sperm were developed from mice immunized with sperm membrane preparations. A solid-phase radioimmunoassay, with dried sperm as antigen, was employed in McAb screening. The tissue and species specificity of monoclonal antibodies HS 2, 4 and 6 were evaluated after absorption of antibody preparations with heterologous sperm, human serum or seminal plasma or cells from other human organs. The sensitivity of HS 2, 4 and 6 antigens to trypsin exposure was determined: HS 4 antigen was highly sensitive while HS 2 and 6 were not. The regional distribution of McAb 4 on intact sperm cells was determined by immunofluorescence staining. HS 4 may be a sperm-coating antigen based on its presence on sperm and in seminal plasma. This possibility led to an investigation of its role in sperm capacitation. HS 4 antibody binding was reduced when capacitated sperm were compared with noncapacitated cells. HS 4 antibody, when present during capacitation and insemination, was without effect on sperm motility or fusion with zona-free hamster eggs. Trypsin removal of as much as 60% of HS 4 antigen from the cell population also did not impact on sperm function. To identify the molecular correlate of HS 4 antigen, membrane components were extracted from washed sperm with Nonidet P-40, concentrated by acetone precipitation and analyzed electrophoretically in SDS-urea on 10% polyacrylamide slab gels. Immunoassays on protein blots with peroxidase-coupled second antibody identified a single reactive species in the molecular weight range of 130,000. Multiple reactive components were detected in blot transfers of seminal plasma.

  1. Diagnostic significance of soluble human leukocyte antigen-G for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ying-Qiu; Ruan, Yan-Yun; Peng, Jin-Bang; Han, Qiu-Yue; Zhang, Xia; Lin, Aifen; Yan, Wei-Hua

    2016-04-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a novel tumor marker. Increased level of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) in various tumor types has been reported. However, the potential diagnostic value of sHLA-G with other tumor markers in gastric cancer (GC) diagnosis is yet to be explored. In this study, plasma level of sHLA-G was measured in 81 GC patients, 53 benign gastric disease patients and 77 normal controls by ELISA. The serum levels of alpha fetoprotein (AFP), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cancer antigen 125 (CA125), cancer antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) and cancer antigen 72-4 (CA72-4) were also determined. Data showed that plasma level of sHLA-G in GC was dramatically increased compared with normal controls and benign gastric disease patients (both p<0.001). The AUC for sHLA-G was 0.730 (p<0.001), superior to serum AFP, CEA, CA125, CA19-9 and CA72-4. After evaluating three cut-offs of sHLA-G, we concluded sHLA-G (cut-off at 128U/ml) plus CA125 in two-biomarker panel test and CA125 plus CA199 plus sHLA-G or CA125 plus CA724 plus sHLA-G in three-biomarker panel test were better choices for GC discrimination. Our findings indicated that sHLA-G was a potential biomarker for GC diagnosis and the combination of sHLA-G with CA125, CA19-9 and CA72-4 can improve the clinical screening and diagnosis for GC.

  2. Search for CEA-like molecules in polymorphonuclear leukocytes of non-human primates using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Jantscheff, P; Indzhiia, L V; Micheel, B

    1986-01-01

    The monoclonal anti-CEA antibody ZIK-A42-A/C1 which reacts with NCA of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes was found to bind also to polymorphonuclear blood leukocytes of the following non-human primates tested: hamadryas baboon (Papio hamadryas), stump-tailed monkey (Macaca arctoides), pig-tailed monkey (Macaca nemestrina), and rhesus monkey (Macaca mulata). No binding was observed to mononuclear blood leukocytes. It was concluded that non-human primates contain CEA-like substances in their polymorphonuclear leukocytes as humans do and that these substances carry some identical epitopes.

  3. Epitope analysis of immunoglobulins against gp20, a GPI-anchored protein of the human sperm surface homologous to leukocyte antigen CD52.

    PubMed

    Flori, F; Giovampaola, C Della; Focarelli, R; Secciani, F; La Sala, G B; Nicoli, A; Hale, G; Rosati, F

    2005-09-01

    Gp20 is a sialylglycoprotein of the human sperm surface related to maturation and capacitation and is homologous to CD52, a glycosyl- phosphatidyl-inositol (GPI)-anchored protein highly expressed in lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, and epididymal cells, described by the monoclonal antibody family CAMPATH. The CAMPATH antigen is characterized by a very short peptide (12 amino acids) and an N-linked oligosaccharide chain bound to the asparagine located in the third position and a GPI anchor bound to the C-terminal serine. The CAMPATH epitope includes three amino acids at the C-terminus and part of the GPI anchor. It has been suggested that anti-gp20 interacts with the same peptide recognized by CAMPATH antibodies but with a different epitope, since it describes the corresponding antigen in a different way. For example, it localizes the corresponding antigen in the equatorial region of the sperm head when sperm are capacitated, whereas CAMPATH antibodies bind all over the sperm surface. Our results indicate that the anti-gp20 epitope does not include the peptide backbone, the GPI anchor, or the N-glycans but consists of O-linked oligosaccharide chains bound to a unique CD52 glycoform present both in sperm and leukocytes. This is suggested by results obtained using many different approaches, such as immunoblot analysis of gp20 after removal of N- and O-glycans and after jacalin (Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin)-affinity chromatography.

  4. Peptide-dependent Conformational Fluctuation Determines the Stability of the Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Yanaka, Saeko; Ueno, Takamasa; Shi, Yi; Qi, Jianxun; Gao, George F.; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Sugase, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    In immune-mediated control of pathogens, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I presents various antigenic peptides to CD8+ T-cells. Long-lived peptide presentation is important for efficient antigen-specific T-cell activation. Presentation time depends on the peptide sequence and the stability of the peptide-HLA complex (pHLA). However, the determinant of peptide-dependent pHLA stability remains elusive. Here, to reveal the pHLA stabilization mechanism, we examined the crystal structures of an HLA class I allomorph in complex with HIV-derived peptides and evaluated site-specific conformational fluctuations using NMR. Although the crystal structures of various pHLAs were almost identical independent of the peptides, fluctuation analyses identified a peptide-dependent minor state that would be more tightly packed toward the peptide. The minor population correlated well with the thermostability and cell surface presentation of pHLA, indicating that this newly identified minor state is important for stabilizing the pHLA and facilitating T-cell recognition. PMID:25028510

  5. Study of human leukocyte antigen-cw in Egyptian patients with vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Hassab El Naby, Hussein M; Alnaggar, Mohamed R; Abdelhamid, Mahmoud F; Alsaid, Khadiga; Al Shawadfy, Eslam M; Elsaie, Mohamed L

    2015-04-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antigens vary considerably in different racial groups, and an analysis of results from several geographical locations suggests that vitiligo appears to be associated with different HLA antigens in different groups. The aim of this work was to assess the association of HLA-Cw with vitiligo in the Egyptian population. Forty unrelated patients with nonsegmental vitiligo and 20 matched controls were selected. A polymerase chain reaction sequence specific primer (PCR-SSP) method was used to determine HLA DNA typing. There was a statistically significant difference in the association of HLA-Cw6 with vitiligo in the 2 studied groups. A comparatively increased number of patients showed HLA-Cw2 and HLA-Cw7 (13.64%). However, there were no statistically significant differences. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first molecular study of HLA typing in Egyptian patients with vitiligo. Our findings are in agreement with earlier studies that reported statistically increased frequencies for allele of HLA-Cw6 in Northern Italian, Kuwaiti, Chinese Han, and Saudi populations (45.45%, P<.05).

  6. [Pharmacogenetic research in the association between human leukocyte antigen and adverse drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiaoping

    2014-07-01

    With the rapid development of pharmacogenetics, more and more studies have shown evidence in the association between polymorphisms at the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loci and severe adverse drug reactions (SADRs). Several HLA-B alleles proved to be associated with SADRs for drugs such as carbamazepine, allopurinol, lamotrigine, and flucloxacillin. The USA Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has even recommended routine screening for HLA-B allele before the use of abacavir and carbamazepine. With the completion of human genome project and the Hapmap project, several new pharmacogenetics approaches such as genome-wide association study (GWAS) have emerged. These newly developed methods will undoubtedly accelerate the identification and clinical utilization of the pharmacogenetic biomakers. In addition, the immunogenetic mechanisms by which the HLA alleles cause SADRs are explored at the cellular and molecular level. This review focuses on the recent progresses in HLA alleles and ADRs regarding both the clinical translation and modern pharmacogenetic methods. PMID:25080918

  7. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DR4. Positive association with rapidly progressing periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Katz, J; Goultschin, J; Benoliel, R; Brautbar, C

    1987-09-01

    The relationship between human leukocyte antigens (HLA) determinants and periodontitis has been examined by several authors without showing any particular pattern. However, no study has investigated the HLA-D determinants, which are generally associated with immune disorders, and rapidly progressive periodontitis (RPP). The HLA profile of 10 RPP patients was compared with that of a healthy control population (n = 120). Although no significant difference was found for HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C, HLA-DR4 of the HLA-D group was found in 80% of patients but only in 38.3% of controls. A high frequency of HLA-DR4 has been reported in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. This finding may be significant in light of previous reports highlighting similarities between RA and periodontal disease. PMID:3498813

  8. Expression of a Chimeric Antigen Receptor in Multiple Leukocyte Lineages in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Carmen S. M.; Westwood, Jennifer A.; Schröder, Jan; Papenfuss, Anthony T.; von Scheidt, Bianca; Moeller, Maria; Devaud, Christel

    2015-01-01

    Genetically modified CD8+ T lymphocytes have shown significant anti-tumor effects in the adoptive immunotherapy of cancer, with recent studies highlighting a potential role for a combination of other immune subsets to enhance these results. However, limitations in present genetic modification techniques impose difficulties in our ability to fully explore the potential of various T cell subsets and assess the potential of other leukocytes armed with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). To address this issue, we generated a transgenic mouse model using a pan-hematopoietic promoter (vav) to drive the expression of a CAR specific for a tumor antigen. Here we present a characterization of the immune cell compartment in two unique vav-CAR transgenic mice models, Founder 9 (F9) and Founder 38 (F38). We demonstrate the vav promoter is indeed capable of driving the expression of a CAR in cells from both myeloid and lymphoid lineage, however the highest level of expression was observed in T lymphocytes from F38 mice. Lymphoid organs in vav-CAR mice were smaller and had reduced cell numbers compared to the wild type (WT) controls. Furthermore, the immune composition of F9 mice differed greatly with a significant reduction in lymphocytes found in the thymus, lymph node and spleen of these mice. To gain insight into the altered immune phenotype of F9 mice, we determined the chromosomal integration site of the transgene in both mouse strains using whole genome sequencing (WGS). We demonstrated that compared to the 7 copies found in F38 mice, F9 mice harbored almost 270 copies. These novel vav-CAR models provide a ready source of CAR expressing myeloid and lymphoid cells and will aid in facilitating future experiments to delineate the role for other leukocytes for adoptive immunotherapy against cancer. PMID:26505904

  9. Restricted diversity of antigen binding residues of antibodies revealed by computational alanine scanning of 227 antibody-antigen complexes.

    PubMed

    Robin, Gautier; Sato, Yoshiteru; Desplancq, Dominique; Rochel, Natacha; Weiss, Etienne; Martineau, Pierre

    2014-11-11

    Antibody molecules are able to recognize any antigen with high affinity and specificity. To get insight into the molecular diversity at the source of this functional diversity, we compiled and analyzed a non-redundant aligned collection of 227 structures of antibody-antigen complexes. Free energy of binding of all the residue side chains was quantified by computational alanine scanning, allowing the first large-scale quantitative description of antibody paratopes. This demonstrated that as few as 8 residues among 30 key positions are sufficient to explain 80% of the binding free energy in most complexes. At these positions, the residue distribution is not only different from that of other surface residues but also dependent on the role played by the side chain in the interaction, residues participating in the binding energy being mainly aromatic residues, and Gly or Ser otherwise. To question the generality of these binding characteristics, we isolated an antibody fragment by phage display using a biased synthetic repertoire with only two diversified complementarity-determining regions and solved its structure in complex with its antigen. Despite this restricted diversity, the structure demonstrated that all complementarity-determining regions were involved in the interaction with the antigen and that the rules derived from the natural antibody repertoire apply to this synthetic binder, thus demonstrating the robustness and universality of our results.

  10. [Immunoglobulin genes encoding antibodies directed to oncodevelopmental carbohydrate antigens].

    PubMed

    Zenita, K; Yago, K; Fujimoto, E; Kannagi, R

    1990-07-01

    We investigated the immunoglobulin genes which encode the variable region of the monoclonal antibodies directed to the onco-developmental carbohydrate antigens such SSEA-1, fucosyl SSEA-1, SSEA-3 and SSEA-4. The VH region of these antibodies was preferentially encoded by the gene members of the X24, VH7183 and Q52 families, the families which are known to be located at the 3'-end region of the murine germ line VH gene. This result is interesting particularly when considering that the members of the 3'-end VH families are known to be preferentially expressed in embryonic B lymphocytes by an intrinsic genetic program. The comparative study of the nucleic acid sequences of mRNAs encoding these antibodies and the sequences of the corresponding germ line VH genes disclosed that the sequences encoding the antibodies contain no mutation from the germ line VH genes, or contain only a few somatic mutations, which are thought to be insignificant for the reactivity of the antibodies to the nominal antigens. These results imply that some of the embryonic B lymphocytes that express the unmutated germ line VH genes of the 3'-end families can be reactive with embryonic carbohydrate antigens, albeit rearranged with appropriate D-JH gene segments, and coupled with proper light chains. The VH region of the syngenic monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies directed to these anti-carbohydrate antibodies were also encoded preferentially by the members of the 3'-end VH families. We propose here that a part of the virgin embryonic B lymphocytes, which express the antibody encoded by the gene members of the 3'-end VH families at the cell surface, will be stimulated by the embryonic carbohydrate antigens which are abundantly present in the internal milieu of the embryo. The clonally expanded B lymphocytes, in turn, will facilitate the proliferation of other populations of embryonic B lymphocytes expressing the corresponding anti-idiotypic antibodies, which are also encoded by the gene members

  11. Thermodynamics of antibody-antigen interaction revealed by mutation analysis of antibody variable regions.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Hiroki; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-07-01

    Antibodies (immunoglobulins) bind specific molecules (i.e. antigens) with high affinity and specificity. In order to understand their mechanisms of recognition, interaction analysis based on thermodynamic and kinetic parameters, as well as structure determination is crucial. In this review, we focus on mutational analysis which gives information about the role of each amino acid residue in antibody-antigen interaction. Taking anti-hen egg lysozyme antibodies and several anti-small molecule antibodies, the energetic contribution of hot-spot and non-hot-spot residues is discussed in terms of thermodynamics. Here, thermodynamics of the contribution from aromatic, charged and hydrogen bond-forming amino acids are discussed, and their different characteristics have been elucidated. The information gives fundamental understanding of the antibody-antigen interaction. Furthermore, the consequences of antibody engineering are analysed from thermodynamic viewpoints: humanization to reduce immunogenicity and rational design to improve affinity. Amino acid residues outside hot-spots in the interface play important roles in these cases, and thus thermodynamic and kinetic parameters give much information about the antigen recognition. Thermodynamic analysis of mutant antibodies thus should lead to advanced strategies to design and select antibodies with high affinity.

  12. Focused antibody response to influenza linked to antigenic drift

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kuan-Ying A.; Rijal, Pramila; Schimanski, Lisa; Powell, Timothy J.; Lin, Tzou-Yien; McCauley, John W.; Daniels, Rodney S.; Townsend, Alain R.

    2015-01-01

    The selective pressure that drives antigenic changes in influenza viruses is thought to originate from the human immune response. Here, we have characterized the B cell repertoire from a previously vaccinated donor whose serum had reduced neutralizing activity against the recently evolved clade 6B H1N1pdm09 viruses. While the response was markedly polyclonal, 88% of clones failed to recognize clade 6B viruses; however, the ability to neutralize A/USSR/90/1977 influenza, to which the donor would have been exposed in childhood, was retained. In vitro selection of virus variants with representative monoclonal antibodies revealed that a single amino acid replacement at residue K163 in the Sa antigenic site, which is characteristic of the clade 6B viruses, was responsible for resistance to neutralization by multiple monoclonal antibodies and the donor serum. The K163 residue lies in a part of a conserved surface that is common to the hemagglutinins of the 1977 and 2009 H1N1 viruses. Vaccination with the 2009 hemagglutinin induced an antibody response tightly focused on this common surface that is capable of selecting current antigenic drift variants in H1N1pdm09 influenza viruses. Moreover, amino acid replacement at K163 was not highlighted by standard ferret antisera. Human monoclonal antibodies may be a useful adjunct to ferret antisera for detecting antigenic drift in influenza viruses. PMID:26011643

  13. Focused antibody response to influenza linked to antigenic drift.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuan-Ying A; Rijal, Pramila; Schimanski, Lisa; Powell, Timothy J; Lin, Tzou-Yien; McCauley, John W; Daniels, Rodney S; Townsend, Alain R

    2015-07-01

    The selective pressure that drives antigenic changes in influenza viruses is thought to originate from the human immune response. Here, we have characterized the B cell repertoire from a previously vaccinated donor whose serum had reduced neutralizing activity against the recently evolved clade 6B H1N1pdm09 viruses. While the response was markedly polyclonal, 88% of clones failed to recognize clade 6B viruses; however, the ability to neutralize A/USSR/90/1977 influenza, to which the donor would have been exposed in childhood, was retained. In vitro selection of virus variants with representative monoclonal antibodies revealed that a single amino acid replacement at residue K163 in the Sa antigenic site, which is characteristic of the clade 6B viruses, was responsible for resistance to neutralization by multiple monoclonal antibodies and the donor serum. The K163 residue lies in a part of a conserved surface that is common to the hemagglutinins of the 1977 and 2009 H1N1 viruses. Vaccination with the 2009 hemagglutinin induced an antibody response tightly focused on this common surface that is capable of selecting current antigenic drift variants in H1N1pdm09 influenza viruses. Moreover, amino acid replacement at K163 was not highlighted by standard ferret antisera. Human monoclonal antibodies may be a useful adjunct to ferret antisera for detecting antigenic drift in influenza viruses. PMID:26011643

  14. Focused antibody response to influenza linked to antigenic drift.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuan-Ying A; Rijal, Pramila; Schimanski, Lisa; Powell, Timothy J; Lin, Tzou-Yien; McCauley, John W; Daniels, Rodney S; Townsend, Alain R

    2015-07-01

    The selective pressure that drives antigenic changes in influenza viruses is thought to originate from the human immune response. Here, we have characterized the B cell repertoire from a previously vaccinated donor whose serum had reduced neutralizing activity against the recently evolved clade 6B H1N1pdm09 viruses. While the response was markedly polyclonal, 88% of clones failed to recognize clade 6B viruses; however, the ability to neutralize A/USSR/90/1977 influenza, to which the donor would have been exposed in childhood, was retained. In vitro selection of virus variants with representative monoclonal antibodies revealed that a single amino acid replacement at residue K163 in the Sa antigenic site, which is characteristic of the clade 6B viruses, was responsible for resistance to neutralization by multiple monoclonal antibodies and the donor serum. The K163 residue lies in a part of a conserved surface that is common to the hemagglutinins of the 1977 and 2009 H1N1 viruses. Vaccination with the 2009 hemagglutinin induced an antibody response tightly focused on this common surface that is capable of selecting current antigenic drift variants in H1N1pdm09 influenza viruses. Moreover, amino acid replacement at K163 was not highlighted by standard ferret antisera. Human monoclonal antibodies may be a useful adjunct to ferret antisera for detecting antigenic drift in influenza viruses.

  15. Transformation-Related Antigens Identified by Monoclonal Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strand, Mette

    1980-06-01

    Tumor-cell proteins that were antigenic in a syngeneic animal were identified by immunoprecipitation with monoclonal antibodies. Spleen cells of BALB/c mice immunized with plasma membranes of Kirsten RNA sarcoma virus-transformed BALB/3T3 cells were fused with NS-l myeloma cells. Antibodies secreted into the culture fluid from these hybridomas were distinguished by their reactivity against proteins of different target cells. A total of 191 cultures were established; 143 produced antibodies that bound to BALB/3T3 cells transformed by the RNA sarcoma virus, of which antibodies from 82 bound to BALB/3T3 transformed with simian virus 40, and antibodies from 56 bound to BALB/3T3 cells. Thus, more than 50% of the cultures produced antibodies that possibly were specific to antigens of the transformed cell. Twenty different hybridomas have been cloned, and antibodies from eight of these were found to immunoprecipitate five different proteins. A protein of approximately 32,000 daltons was precipitated from BALB/3T3 cells transformed by the RNA sarcoma virus, simian virus 40, or methylcholanthrene but not from untransformed BALB/3T3 cells. A protein of about 300,000 daltons was precipitated from all four cell lines; precipitation was enhanced in the viral transformed cells. Proteins of approximately 57,000, 54,000, and 8500 daltons were immunoprecipitated from all four cell lines.

  16. Idiotype and antigen-specific T cell responses in mice on immunization with antigen, antibody, and anti-idiotypic antibody.

    PubMed

    Mitra-Kaushik, S; Shaila, M S; Karande, A K; Nayak, R

    2001-05-01

    Idiotypic determinants of immunoglobulin molecules can evoke both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T responses and exist not only as the integral components of a bona fide antigen binding receptor but also as distinct molecular entities in the processed forms on the cell surface of B lymphocytes. The present work provides experimental evidence for the concept that regulation of memory B cell populations can be achieved through the presentation of idiotypic and anti-idiotypic determinants to helper and cytotoxic cell. The potential of B cells to present antigens to helper and cytotoxic T cells through class II and class I MHC suggests a mechanism by which both B and T cell homeostasis can be maintained. We provide evidence for the generation of idiotype- and antigen-specific Th and Tc cells upon immunization of syngenic mice with antigen or idiotypic antibody (Ab1) or anti-idiotypic antibody (Ab2). The selective activation and proliferation of the antigen-specific Th and Tc cells mediated by idiotypic stimulation observed in these experiments suggests a B-cell-driven mechanism for the maintenance of antigen-specific T cell memory in the absence of antigenic stimulation, under certain conditions.

  17. Allele-Independent Turnover of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class Ia Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Prevosto, Claudia; Usmani, M. Farooq; McDonald, Sarah; Gumienny, Aleksandra M.; Key, Tim; Goodman, Reyna S.; Gaston, J. S. Hill; Deery, Michael J.; Busch, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) glycoproteins present cytosolic peptides to CD8+ T cells and regulate NK cell activity. Their heavy chains (HC) are expressed from up to three MHC gene loci (human leukocyte antigen [HLA]-A, -B, and -C in humans), whose extensive polymorphism maps predominantly to the antigen-binding groove, diversifying the bound peptide repertoire. Codominant expression of MHCI alleles is thus functionally critical, but how it is regulated is not fully understood. Here, we have examined the effect of polymorphism on the turnover rates of MHCI molecules in cell lines with functional MHCI peptide loading pathways and in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs). Proteins were labeled biosynthetically with heavy water (2H2O), folded MHCI molecules immunoprecipitated, and tryptic digests analysed by mass spectrometry. MHCI-derived peptides were assigned to specific alleles and isotypes, and turnover rates quantified by 2H incorporation, after correcting for cell growth. MHCI turnover half-lives ranged from undetectable to a few hours, depending on cell type, activation state, donor, and MHCI isotype. However, in all settings, the turnover half-lives of alleles of the same isotype were similar. Thus, MHCI protein turnover rates appear to be allele-independent in normal human cells. We propose that this is an important feature enabling the normal function and codominant expression of MHCI alleles. PMID:27529174

  18. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-E and HLA-F expression in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Ishigami, Sumiya; Arigami, Takaaki; Okumura, Hiroshi; Uchikado, Yasuto; Kita, Yoshiaki; Kurahara, Hiroshi; Maemura, Kosei; Kijima, Yuko; Ishihara, Yuka; Sasaki, Ken; Uenosono, Yoshikazu; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2015-04-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-E and HLA-F are classified as non-classical HLA class Ib antigens. Ectopic HLA-E and HLA-F expression was recently detected in cancer cells; however, the clinical implication of their expression remains unknown. A total of 209 patients with gastric cancer were enrolled in this study. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the expression of HLA-E and HLA-F in gastric cancer specimens. HLA-E and HLA-F expression were seen in the cell membrane. HLA-E and HLA-F expression significantly correlated with depth of invasion, nodal involvement, lymphatic invasion, and venous invasion. No significant correlation between HLA-E and HLA-F expression was found (p<0.05, r=0.24). The five-year survival rate of the HLA-E-positive group and HLA-F-positive group were significantly poorer than that of their respective negative groups. Combination of HLA-E and HLA-F made the p-value smaller than single analysis (p<0.009). This is the first report detailing a clinical implication of HLA-E and HLA-F expression simultaneously in gastric cancer. We identified that the HLA-E and HLA-F in gastric cancer independently affected clinical factors, including postoperative outcome. For HLA-E- or HLA-F-positive gastric cancer, we should settle on a treatment strategy that reinforces the host immune response.

  19. Allele-Independent Turnover of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class Ia Molecules.

    PubMed

    Prevosto, Claudia; Usmani, M Farooq; McDonald, Sarah; Gumienny, Aleksandra M; Key, Tim; Goodman, Reyna S; Gaston, J S Hill; Deery, Michael J; Busch, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) glycoproteins present cytosolic peptides to CD8+ T cells and regulate NK cell activity. Their heavy chains (HC) are expressed from up to three MHC gene loci (human leukocyte antigen [HLA]-A, -B, and -C in humans), whose extensive polymorphism maps predominantly to the antigen-binding groove, diversifying the bound peptide repertoire. Codominant expression of MHCI alleles is thus functionally critical, but how it is regulated is not fully understood. Here, we have examined the effect of polymorphism on the turnover rates of MHCI molecules in cell lines with functional MHCI peptide loading pathways and in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs). Proteins were labeled biosynthetically with heavy water (2H2O), folded MHCI molecules immunoprecipitated, and tryptic digests analysed by mass spectrometry. MHCI-derived peptides were assigned to specific alleles and isotypes, and turnover rates quantified by 2H incorporation, after correcting for cell growth. MHCI turnover half-lives ranged from undetectable to a few hours, depending on cell type, activation state, donor, and MHCI isotype. However, in all settings, the turnover half-lives of alleles of the same isotype were similar. Thus, MHCI protein turnover rates appear to be allele-independent in normal human cells. We propose that this is an important feature enabling the normal function and codominant expression of MHCI alleles. PMID:27529174

  20. A study of human leukocyte D locus related antigens in Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Farid, N R; Sampson, L; Noel, E P; Barnard, J M; Mandeville, R; Larsen, B; Marshall, W H; Carter, N D

    1979-01-01

    An association between Graves' disease and the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system has previously been reported. The disease was more strongly associated with the HLA D locus antigen Dw3 than with HLA B8. Products of the HLA D locus are determined by the interaction of test cells with standard typing lymphocytes, a technically difficult procedure. Recently, it has been possible to type serologically for D locus related (DRw) specificities on peripheral bone marrow-derived (B) lymphocytes. Blood B lymphocytes from 50 unrelated controls and 41 patients with Graves' disease were typed for seven HLA DRw specificities. 28 patients with Graves' disease (68%) were positive for DRw3, in contrast to 14 controls (28%); whereas only 21 patients (50%) were HLA B8 positive, compared with 13 (26%) controls. Thus, positivity for DRw3 afforded a relative risk for Graves' disease of 5.5, whereas that for HLA B8 amounted to 3.0. Additionally, a family with multiple cases of Graves' disease in which the disease was previously shown to be inherited with the haplotype, was linked to DRw2, which suggests that the susceptibility to the disease was inherited in association with that antigen. Two HLA B/glyoxalase recombination events were observed in this family; in both instances HLA DRw followed HLA B. This study thus demonstrates that the disease susceptibility gene for Graves' disease is in strong linkage disequilibrium with DRw3; however, it may be associated with other DRw specificities and inherited within family units in association with them.

  1. Antigenic heterogeneity in Mycoplasma iowae demonstrated with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Panangala, V S; Gresham, M M; Morsy, M A

    1992-01-01

    Western blots of proteins of 14 Mycoplasma iowae strains and isolates resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were probed with three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), MI6, MI7, and MI8. MAb MI6 reacted with one or more antigens with apparent molecular weights of 60,000, 70,000, and 94,000. In three strains (N-PHN-D13, R-D2497, and K 1805), antigens located on a single peptide band were recognized, while in others additional epitopes at different molecular-weight positions were revealed. A similar pattern was observed with MAb MI7, although it reacted with fewer antigens than did MAb MI6 and failed to recognize antigens in strains N-PHN-D13 and R-D2497. MAb MI8 reacted with an antigen at an apparent molecular-weight position of 28,000 in four of the 14 strains and isolates. The diverse reaction patterns observed with the MAbs in the 14 M. iowae strains and isolates confirms the occurrence of antigenic variation within this species. Antigenic variation in M. iowae may be pivotal in determining host-parasite interactions, pathogenesis, and the outcome of disease. PMID:1373600

  2. Acoustic micromixing increases antibody-antigen binding in immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Tran, Phong; Petkovic-Duran, Karolina; Swallow, Tony; Zhu, Yonggang

    2015-08-01

    Sound wave-assisted acoustic micromixing has been shown to increase the binding of molecules in small volumes (10-100 μL) where effective mixing is difficult to achieve through conventional techniques. The aim of this work is to study whether acoustic micromixing can increase the binding efficiency of antibodies to their antigens, a reaction that forms the basis of immunoassays, including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Using a procedure from a general ELISA and immobilizing an antigen on wells of 96-well plates, it was found that acoustic micromixing at 125-150 Hz increased the initial rate of antibody-antigen binding by over 80 % and the total binding at the end point (i.e., 45 min) by over 50 %. As a result, acoustic micromixing achieved a binding level in 9 min that would otherwise take 45 min on a standard platform rocking mixer. Therefore acoustic micromixing has the potential to increase the detection sensitivity of ELISA as well as shorten the antigen-antibody binding times from typically 45-60 min to 15 min.

  3. Dendritic Cells Take up and Present Antigens from Viable and Apoptotic Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Alfaro, Carlos; Suarez, Natalia; Oñate, Carmen; Perez-Gracia, Jose L.; Martinez-Forero, Ivan; Hervas-Stubbs, Sandra; Rodriguez, Inmaculada; Perez, Guiomar; Bolaños, Elixabet; Palazon, Asis; de Sanmamed, Miguel Fernandez; Morales-Kastresana, Aizea; Gonzalez, Alvaro; Melero, Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are endowed with the ability to cross-present antigens from other cell types to cognate T cells. DC are poised to meet polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) as a result of being co-attracted by interleukin-8 (IL-8), for instance as produced by tumor cells or infected tissue. Human monocyte-derived and mouse bone marrow-derived DC can readily internalize viable or UV-irradiated PMNs. Such internalization was abrogated at 4°C and partly inhibited by anti-CD18 mAb. In mice, DC which had internalized PMNs containing electroporated ovalbumin (OVA) protein, were able to cross-present the antigen to CD8 (OT-1) and CD4 (OT-2) TCR-transgenic T cells. Moreover, in humans, tumor cell debris is internalized by PMNs and the tumor-cell material can be subsequently taken up from the immunomagnetically re-isolated PMNs by DC. Importantly, if human neutrophils had endocytosed bacteria, they were able to trigger the maturation program of the DC. Moreover, when mouse PMNs with E. coli in their interior are co-injected in the foot pad with DC, many DC loaded with fluorescent material from the PMNs reach draining lymph nodes. Using CT26 (H-2d) mouse tumor cells, it was observed that if tumor cells are intracellularly loaded with OVA protein and UV-irradiated, they become phagocytic prey of H-2d PMNs. If such PMNs, that cannot present antigens to OT-1 T cells, are immunomagnetically re-isolated and phagocytosed by H-2b DC, such DC productively cross-present OVA antigen determinants to OT-1 T cells. Cross-presentation to adoptively transferred OT-1 lymphocytes at draining lymph nodes also take place when OVA-loaded PMNs (H-2d) are coinjected in the footpad of mice with autologous DC (H-2b). In summary, our results indicate that antigens phagocytosed by short-lived PMNs can be in turn internalized and productively cross-presented by DC. PMID:22206007

  4. Approach for Identifying Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-DR Bound Peptides from Scarce Clinical Samples.

    PubMed

    Heyder, Tina; Kohler, Maxie; Tarasova, Nataliya K; Haag, Sabrina; Rutishauser, Dorothea; Rivera, Natalia V; Sandin, Charlotta; Mia, Sohel; Malmström, Vivianne; Wheelock, Åsa M; Wahlström, Jan; Holmdahl, Rikard; Eklund, Anders; Zubarev, Roman A; Grunewald, Johan; Ytterberg, A Jimmy

    2016-09-01

    Immune-mediated diseases strongly associating with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles are likely linked to specific antigens. These antigens are presented to T cells in the form of peptides bound to HLA molecules on antigen presenting cells, e.g. dendritic cells, macrophages or B cells. The identification of HLA-DR-bound peptides presents a valuable tool to investigate the human immunopeptidome. The lung is likely a key player in the activation of potentially auto-aggressive T cells prior to entering target tissues and inducing autoimmune disease. This makes the lung of exceptional interest and presents an ideal paradigm to study the human immunopeptidome and to identify antigenic peptides.Our previous investigation of HLA-DR peptide presentation in the lung required high numbers of cells (800 × 10(6) bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells). Because BAL from healthy nonsmokers typically contains 10-15 × 10(6) cells, there is a need for a highly sensitive approach to study immunopeptides in the lungs of individual patients and controls.In this work, we analyzed the HLA-DR immunopeptidome in the lung by an optimized methodology to identify HLA-DR-bound peptides from low cell numbers. We used an Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) immortalized B cell line and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells obtained from patients with sarcoidosis, an inflammatory T cell driven disease mainly occurring in the lung. Specifically, membrane complexes were isolated prior to immunoprecipitation, eluted peptides were identified by nanoLC-MS/MS and processed using the in-house developed ClusterMHCII software. With the optimized procedure we were able to identify peptides from 10 × 10(6) cells, which on average correspond to 10.9 peptides/million cells in EBV-B cells and 9.4 peptides/million cells in BAL cells. This work presents an optimized approach designed to identify HLA-DR-bound peptides from low numbers of cells, enabling the investigation of the BAL immunopeptidome from individual patients

  5. Defining specificities, genes, antigens, and antibodies- A matrix approach.

    PubMed

    Wohlgemuth, A

    1978-12-01

    We study the consequences of assigning single letter symbols to operationally defined entities such as genes, antigens, specificities, and antibodies. If this is to be done and if reagents are not specific in recognizing the products of single genes or single antigens, then these entities must be defined by a 'definition matrix' to avoid mislabeling a matrix of data. A method is given whereby for a given matrix of data all possible definition matrices consistent with this data can be obtained. In particular, all the ways of labeling by the complex-complex code of Hirschfeld can be so obtained.

  6. Circulating Candida antigens and antibodies: useful markers of candidemia.

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, J; Maroto, C; Piédrola, G; Martín, E; Perez, J A

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the utility of the 48-kDa antigen from Candida albicans in its commercial form (Directigen; Becton Dickinson) and three other serodiagnostic methods (detection of one antigen by Pastorex Candida [Sanofi Diagnostics Pasteur] and detection of immunoglobulin G [IgG] and IgM antibodies to C. albicans blastoconidia [bioMerieux]) for diagnosis of invasive Candida infection, we conducted a prospective clinical trial among 10 patients with candidemia (group 1), 30 patients colonized by C. albicans (group 2), 20 patients with bacteremia (group 3), and 20 subjects without clinical or microbiological evidence of infection. The Directigen system was positive for at least one serum sample each from eight patients in group 1. In groups 2, 3, and 4, it was positive for only three patients. There was no reaction to the Pastorex system in any of the patients infected with or colonized by C. albicans or in the non-Candida-carrying controls. The IgG antibody concentration oscillated between 100 and 800 (mean, 510 +/- 268) IU/ml for the patients in group 1. In this group, eight patients had IgG antibody levels of > 400 IU/ml. The percentages of persons with IgG antibody levels of > 400 IU/ml in groups 2, 3, and 4 were 43.3, 0, and 0, respectively. Specific IgM antibody was present in all group 1 patients but not in those in groups 2, 3, and 4. The sensitivity and specificity of the Directigen test were 65 and 97.1%, respectively. For the Pastorex test, the sensitivity was 0%. The sensitivity of IgG antibodies was 80%, with a specificity of 81.4%, while the IgM antibodies were 100% specific and sensitive. Both the positive and negative predictive values of specific IgM antibodies appeared to be superior to those of the other three tests. PMID:8408589

  7. Demonstration of two distinct antigenic determinants on hepatitis B e antigen by monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, M.; Nomura, M.; Gotanda, T.; Sano, T.; Tachibana, K.; Miyamoto, H.; Takahashi, K.; Toyama, S.; Miyakawa, Y.; Mayumi, M.

    1982-01-01

    Mice were immunized against hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) isolated from sera of asymptomatic carriers of hepatitis B virus. Their spleen cells were fused with mouse myeloma (NS-1) cells, and 5 clones of hybridoma cells secreting antibody against HBeAg (anti-HBe) were isolated. For the production of anti-HBe in large scale, cells were cultivated both in vitro and in the peritoneal cavity of ascitic mice. Although monoclonal antibodies produced by these clones showed a strong reactivity of anti-HBe in hemagglutination tests, individual monoclonal anti-HBe did not reveal any precipitin line in immunodiffusion. When 2 of the 5 monoclonal antibodies were mixed together, however, some combinations showed a precipitin line against HBeAg, whereas others did not. Utilizing solid-phase radioimmunoassay involving a number of combinations of monoclonal antibodies used for solid-phase and radiolabeling, the 5 antibodies were classified into 2 groups. Three of the anti-HBe antibodies were found to be directed to 1 determinant of HBeAg (determinant a); the remaining 2 to the other determinant (determinant b). Determinants a and b were detected on HBeAg in the serum, as well as on the polypeptide of 19,000 daltons (P19) derived from the nucleocapsid of hepatitis B virus. Monoclonal anti-HBe antibodies with different specificities may provide useful tools in delineating the antigenic structure of HBeAg and also in evaluating immune responses of the host directed to its subdeterminants.

  8. Antibodies to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Potentiate the Response of Human T Lymphocyte Clones to the Same Antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celis, Esteban; Chang, Tse Wen

    1984-04-01

    Human T-helper lymphocyte clones specific for hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) proliferate on stimulation with HBsAg in vitro. Antibodies specific for HBsAg, but no other antibodies, augment this proliferative response. In the presence of antibodies to HBsAg, the maximum response could be achieved at HBsAg concentrations that were 1 percent of those required in the absence of the antibodies. These findings suggest that antigen-specific antibodies exert regulatory controls on T cells that recognize the same antigens.

  9. Recombinant anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibodies for targeting cancer.

    PubMed

    Chester, K A; Mayer, A; Bhatia, J; Robson, L; Spencer, D I; Cooke, S P; Flynn, A A; Sharma, S K; Boxer, G; Pedley, R B; Begent, R H

    2000-01-01

    Antibodies can be used to target cancer therapies to malignant tissue; the approach is attractive because conventional treatments such as chemo- and radiotherapy are dose limited due to toxicity in normal tissues. Effective targeting relies on appropriate pharmacokinetics of antibody-based therapeutics, ideally showing maximum uptake and retention in tumor and rapid clearance from normal tissue. We have studied the factors influencing these dynamics for antibodies against carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Protein engineering of anti-CEA antibodies, in vivo biodistribution models, and mathematical models have been employed to improve understanding of targeting parameters, define optimal characteristics for the antibody-based molecules employed, and develop new therapies for the clinic. Engineering antibodies to obtain the desired therapeutic characteristics is most readily achieved using recombinant antibody technology, and we have taken the approach of immunizing mice to provide high-affinity anti-CEA single-chain Fv antibodies (sFvs) from filamentous bacteriophage libraries. MFE-23, the most characterized of these sFvs, has been expressed in bacteria and purified in our laboratory for two clinical trials: a gamma camera imaging trial using 123I-MFE-23 and a radioimmunoguided surgery trial using 125I-MFE-23, where tumor deposits are detected by a hand-held probe during surgery. Both these trials showed that MFE-23 is safe and effective in localizing tumor deposits in patients with cancer. We are now developing fusion proteins that use the MFE-23 antibody to deliver a therapeutic moiety; MFE-23:: carboxypeptidase G2 (CPG2) targets the enzyme CPG2 for use in the antibody-directed enzyme prodrug therapy system and MFE::tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) aims to reduce sequestration and increase tumor concentrations of systemically administered TNFalpha.

  10. Association of human leukocyte antigen DQB1 and DRB1 alleles with chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Doganay, Levent; Fejzullahu, Arta; Katrinli, Seyma; Yilmaz Enc, Feruze; Ozturk, Oguzhan; Colak, Yasar; Ulasoglu, Celal; Tuncer, Ilyas; Dinler Doganay, Gizem

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DRB1 and DQB1 alleles on the inactive and advanced stages of chronic hepatitis B. METHODS: Patient records at a single institution’s hepatology clinic were reviewed. Demographic data, laboratory results, endoscopy results, virological parameters, biopsy scores and treatment statuses were recorded. In total, 355 patients were eligible for the study, of whom 226 (63.7%) were male. Overall, 82 (23.1%) were hepatitis B early antigen (HBeAg) positive, 87 (24.5%) had cirrhosis, and 66 (18.6%) had inactive disease. The presence of DQB1 and DRB1 alleles was determined by polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers. The distribution of the genotyped alleles among patients with cirrhosis and patients with chronic active hepatitis was analyzed. RESULTS: The most frequent HLA DQB1 allele was DQB1*03:01 (48.2%), and the most frequent HLA DRB1 allele was DRB1*13/14 (51.8%). DQB1*05:01 was more frequent in patients with active disease than in inactive patients (27% vs 9.1%; P = 0.002, Pc = 0.026). DRB1*07 was rare in patients with cirrhosis compared with non-cirrhotics (3.4% vs 16%; P = 0.002, Pc = 0.022). Older age (P < 0.001) and male gender (P = 0.008) were the other factors that affected the presence of cirrhosis. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, DRB1*07 remained a significant negative predictor of cirrhosis (P = 0.015). A bioinformatics analysis revealed that a polymorphic amino acid sequence in DRB1*07 may alter interaction with the T-cell recognition site. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that HLA alleles may influence cirrhosis development and disease activity in Turkish chronic hepatitis B patients. PMID:25009391

  11. Analysis of Swine Leukocyte Antigen Haplotypes in Yucatan Miniature Pigs Used as Biomedical Model Animal

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Nu-Ri; Seo, Dong-Won; Choi, Ki-Myung; Ko, Na-Young; Kim, Ji-Ho; Kim, Hyun-Il; Jung, Woo-Young; Lee, Jun-Heon

    2016-01-01

    The porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is called swine leukocyte antigen (SLA), which controls immune responses and transplantation reactions. The SLA is mapped on pig chromosome 7 (SSC7) near the centromere. In this study, 3 class I (SLA-1, SLA-3, and SLA-2) and 3 class II (DRB1, DQB1, and DQA) genes were used for investigation of SLA haplotypes in Yucatan miniature pigs in Korea. This pig breed is a well-known model organism for biomedical research worldwide. The current study indicated that Korean Yucatan pig population had 3 Class I haplotypes (Lr-4.0, Lr-6.0, and Lr-25.0) and 3 class II haplotypes (Lr-0.5, Lr-0.7, and Lr-0.25). The combinations of SLA class I and II haplotype together, 2 homozygous (Lr-4.5/4.5 and Lr-6.7/6.7) and 3 heterozygous (Lr-4.5/6.7, Lr-4.5/25.25, and Lr-6.7/25.25) haplotypes were identified, including previously unidentified new heterozygous haplotypes (Lr-4.5/4.7). In addition, a new SLA allele typing method using Agilent 2100 bioanalyzer was developed that permitted more rapid identification of SLA haplotypes. These results will facilitate the breeding of SLA homozygous Yucatan pigs and will expedite the possible use of these pigs for the biomedical research, especially xenotransplantation research. PMID:26950861

  12. Effect of Genetic Diversity in Swine Leukocyte Antigen-DRA Gene on Piglet Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoyu; Yang, Qiaoli; Yuan, Junhu; Liu, Lixia; Sun, Wenyang; Jiang, Yingdi; Zhao, Shengguo; Zhang, Shengwei; Huang, Wangzhou; Gun, Shuangbao

    2016-07-15

    The swine leukocyte antigens (SLAs) are the multigene families related to immune responses. Little is known about the effect of the DRA gene on diarrheal disease. This study reported the genetic diversity of the DRA gene in exons 1, 3 and 4 in 290 Chinese Yantai black pigs. No variation was identified in exon 3. In exon 1, three genotypes and two alleles were identified, generated by two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In exon 4, there were eight genotypes and five alleles containing seven SNPs were detected with four SNPs being novel SNPs. The low polymorphism found in swine DRA is consistent with the concept that the DRA gene is highly conserved among all mammalian species. Statistical analyses indicated that the genotypes of exon 1 were not significantly associated with piglet diarrhea (p > 0.05); however, genotypes C₄C₄ (1.80 ± 0.33) and A₄E₄ (1.66 ± 0.25) of exon 4 were significantly susceptible to diarrhea (p < 0.01). These indicate that the particular genotypes of the DRA gene are susceptible to diarrheal disease, which provides valuable information for disease-resistance breeding in swine.

  13. Meta-Analysis of the Association between Vitiligo and Human Leukocyte Antigen-A

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jianwen; Niu, Xinwu; Xu, Qingqiang; Wang, Xiaopeng; Liu, Yale

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to systematically evaluate the association between vitiligo and human leukocyte antigen- (HLA-) A. Methods. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, and reference lists were searched for relevant original articles. Results. Nineteen case-control studies comprising 3042 patients and 5614 controls were included, in which 33 HLA-A alleles were reported. Overall, three alleles (HLA-A⁎02, A⁎33, and Aw⁎31) were significantly associated with increased risk of vitiligo, two (HLA-A⁎09 and Aw⁎19) were associated with decreased risk, and the remaining 28 were unassociated. Twelve alleles, seven alleles, and 19 alleles were common to three ethnicities, both types of vitiligo, and both typing methods, respectively. In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity and typing methods, the association of six alleles and five alleles was inconsistent in three populations and both typing methods, respectively. In the subgroup analysis by clinical type, the association of all seven alleles was consistent in both types of vitiligo. Conclusion. The meta-analysis suggests that HLA-A⁎02, A⁎33, and Aw⁎31 are associated with increased risk of vitiligo, while HLA-A⁎09 and Aw⁎19 are associated with decreased risk of vitiligo. The association of some alleles varies in terms of ethnicity and typing methods.

  14. Human Leukocyte Antigen-G Within the Male Reproductive System: Implications for Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F

    2015-01-01

    In sexual reproduction in humans, a man has a clear interest in ensuring that the immune system of his female partner accepts the semi-allogenic fetus. Increasing attention has been given to soluble immunomodulatory molecules in the seminal fluid as one mechanism of ensuring this, possibly by "priming" the woman's immune system before conception and at conception. Recent studies have demonstrated the presence of the immunoregulatory and tolerance-inducible human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G in the male reproductive organs. The expression of HLA-G in the blastocyst and by extravillous trophoblast cells in the placenta during pregnancy has been well described. Highly variable amounts of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) in seminal plasma from different men have been reported, and the concentration of sHLA-G is associated with HLA-G genotype. A first pilot study indicates that the level of sHLA-G in seminal plasma may even be associated with the chance of pregnancy in couples, where the male partner has reduced semen quality. More studies are needed to verify these preliminary findings.

  15. Origins and relatedness of human leukocyte antigen class I allele supertypes.

    PubMed

    Naugler, Christopher

    2010-09-01

    Class I human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles can be classified into supertypes based on the epitope specificity of their peptide binding grooves. The evolutionary origin of these supertypes has been the topic of prior research and remains an important question because of the increasing interest in HLA supertypes in the contexts of infection and cancer epidemiology and vaccine development. Here I re-examine the origins of HLA class I supertypes using the nucleotide sequences of 88 HLA-A alleles and 117 HLA-B alleles. Phylogenetic trees with ancestral character state reconstruction show that the HLA-A02, A03, and A24 supertypes largely form clades with a single ancestral origin while HLA-A01 shows multiple independent origins all from HLA-A03 ancestors. HLA-B supertypes show multiple origins for the B07, B08, and B27 supertypes, while the B44, B58, and B62 supertypes largely form clades with a single ancestor. Supertypes arising multiple times show different amino acid substitutions in each clade. These findings suggest that convergent evolution has occurred in only a few HLA allele supertypes and may indicate different evolutionary pressures shaping certain supertypes.

  16. Inhibition of host immune response in colorectal cancer: Human leukocyte antigen-G and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Garziera, Marica; Toffoli, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most diffuse cancers worldwide and is still a clinical burden. Increasing evidences associate CRC clinical outcome to immune contexture represented by adaptive immune cells. Their type, density and location are summarized in the Immune Score that has been shown to improve prognostic prediction of CRC patients. The non-classical MHC class I human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G), is a crucial tumor-driven immune escape molecule involved in immune tolerance. HLA-G and soluble counterparts are able to exert inhibitory functions by direct interactions with inhibitory receptors present on both innate cells such as natural killer cells, and adaptive immune cells as cytotoxic T and B lymphocytes. HLA-G may play a prominent role in CRC strategies to avoid host immunosurveillance. This review highlights the current knowledge on HLA-G contribution in CRC, in related inflammatory diseases and in other type of cancers and disorders. HLA-G genetic setting (specific haplotypes, genotypes and alleles frequencies) and association with circulating/soluble profiles was highlighted. HLA G prognostic and predictive value in CRC was investigated in order to define a novel prognostic immune biomarker in CRC. PMID:24744572

  17. Effect of Genetic Diversity in Swine Leukocyte Antigen-DRA Gene on Piglet Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoyu; Yang, Qiaoli; Yuan, Junhu; Liu, Lixia; Sun, Wenyang; Jiang, Yingdi; Zhao, Shengguo; Zhang, Shengwei; Huang, Wangzhou; Gun, Shuangbao

    2016-01-01

    The swine leukocyte antigens (SLAs) are the multigene families related to immune responses. Little is known about the effect of the DRA gene on diarrheal disease. This study reported the genetic diversity of the DRA gene in exons 1, 3 and 4 in 290 Chinese Yantai black pigs. No variation was identified in exon 3. In exon 1, three genotypes and two alleles were identified, generated by two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In exon 4, there were eight genotypes and five alleles containing seven SNPs were detected with four SNPs being novel SNPs. The low polymorphism found in swine DRA is consistent with the concept that the DRA gene is highly conserved among all mammalian species. Statistical analyses indicated that the genotypes of exon 1 were not significantly associated with piglet diarrhea (p > 0.05); however, genotypes C₄C₄ (1.80 ± 0.33) and A₄E₄ (1.66 ± 0.25) of exon 4 were significantly susceptible to diarrhea (p < 0.01). These indicate that the particular genotypes of the DRA gene are susceptible to diarrheal disease, which provides valuable information for disease-resistance breeding in swine. PMID:27429004

  18. Meta-Analysis of the Association between Vitiligo and Human Leukocyte Antigen-A

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jianwen; Niu, Xinwu; Xu, Qingqiang; Wang, Xiaopeng; Liu, Yale

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to systematically evaluate the association between vitiligo and human leukocyte antigen- (HLA-) A. Methods. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, and reference lists were searched for relevant original articles. Results. Nineteen case-control studies comprising 3042 patients and 5614 controls were included, in which 33 HLA-A alleles were reported. Overall, three alleles (HLA-A⁎02, A⁎33, and Aw⁎31) were significantly associated with increased risk of vitiligo, two (HLA-A⁎09 and Aw⁎19) were associated with decreased risk, and the remaining 28 were unassociated. Twelve alleles, seven alleles, and 19 alleles were common to three ethnicities, both types of vitiligo, and both typing methods, respectively. In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity and typing methods, the association of six alleles and five alleles was inconsistent in three populations and both typing methods, respectively. In the subgroup analysis by clinical type, the association of all seven alleles was consistent in both types of vitiligo. Conclusion. The meta-analysis suggests that HLA-A⁎02, A⁎33, and Aw⁎31 are associated with increased risk of vitiligo, while HLA-A⁎09 and Aw⁎19 are associated with decreased risk of vitiligo. The association of some alleles varies in terms of ethnicity and typing methods. PMID:27689083

  19. Genetic screening for human leukocyte antigen alleles prior to carbamazepine treatment.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jeremy C K; Murrell, Dedee F; Hersch, Mark I

    2015-12-01

    We describe a 28-year-old Malaysian Australian man of Han Chinese descent with toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), occurring 2 weeks after commencing carbamazepine. He was subsequently found to be positive for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B*1502. Carbamazepine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome/TEN is strongly associated with the HLA-B*1502 allele, which is highly prevalent in Han Chinese, Malay, Thai and Indian populations. Prospective screening for the allele may prevent this cutaneous adverse drug reaction from occurring, but many neurologists and other medical practitioners are still unaware of the medico-legal risks of prescribing carbamazepine in susceptible populations and the availability of HLA-B*1502 testing. Performing HLA-B*1502 genotyping and avoiding carbamazepine in at-risk individuals has been proven to decrease incidences of drug-induced TEN. This test is widely available at most large pathology services in Australia, with results available within 2 weeks. The recommendation by regulatory bodies should be strengthened to ensure that the broad medical community is made more aware of this pertinent issue.

  20. Impact of killer immunoglobulin-like receptor-human leukocyte antigens ligand incompatibility among renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Alam, S.; Rangaswamy, D.; Prakash, S.; Sharma, R. K.; Khan, M. I.; Sonawane, A.; Agrawal, S.

    2015-01-01

    Killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene shows a high degree of polymorphism. Natural killer cell receptor gets activated once they bind to self-human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) with specific ligand. KIR gene and HLA ligand incompatibility due to the presence/absence of KIR in the recipient and the corresponding HLA ligand in the allograft may impact graft survival in solid organ transplantation. This study evaluates the effect of matches between KIR genes and known HLA ligands. KIR genotypes were determined using sequence specific primer polymerase chain reaction. Presence of certain KIR in a recipient, where the donor lacked the corresponding HLA ligand was considered a mismatch. The allograft was considered matched when both KIR receptor and HLA alloantigen reveald compatibility among recipient and donor. The data revealed better survival among individuals with matched inhibitory KIR receptors and their corresponding HLA ligands (KIR2DL2/DL3-HLAC2, KIR3DL1-HLABw4). On the contrary, no adverse effect was seen for matched activating KIR receptors and their corresponding HLA ligands. One of the activating gene KIR2DS4 showed risk (P = 0.0413, odds ratio = 1.91, 95% confidence interval = 1.02-3.57) association with renal allograft rejection. We conclude that the presence of inhibitory KIR gene leads to better survival; whereas activating motifs show no significant role in renal allograft survival. PMID:25684869

  1. Impact of killer immunoglobulin-like receptor-human leukocyte antigens ligand incompatibility among renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Alam, S; Rangaswamy, D; Prakash, S; Sharma, R K; Khan, M I; Sonawane, A; Agrawal, S

    2015-01-01

    Killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene shows a high degree of polymorphism. Natural killer cell receptor gets activated once they bind to self-human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) with specific ligand. KIR gene and HLA ligand incompatibility due to the presence/absence of KIR in the recipient and the corresponding HLA ligand in the allograft may impact graft survival in solid organ transplantation. This study evaluates the effect of matches between KIR genes and known HLA ligands. KIR genotypes were determined using sequence specific primer polymerase chain reaction. Presence of certain KIR in a recipient, where the donor lacked the corresponding HLA ligand was considered a mismatch. The allograft was considered matched when both KIR receptor and HLA alloantigen reveald compatibility among recipient and donor. The data revealed better survival among individuals with matched inhibitory KIR receptors and their corresponding HLA ligands (KIR2DL2/DL3-HLAC2, KIR3DL1-HLABw4). On the contrary, no adverse effect was seen for matched activating KIR receptors and their corresponding HLA ligands. One of the activating gene KIR2DS4 showed risk (P = 0.0413, odds ratio = 1.91, 95% confidence interval = 1.02-3.57) association with renal allograft rejection. We conclude that the presence of inhibitory KIR gene leads to better survival; whereas activating motifs show no significant role in renal allograft survival.

  2. Loss of heterozygosity at the human leukocyte antigen locus in thymic epithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuan; Wang, Guojin; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Yimei; Yao, Yuanyuan; Wang, Hai; Wang, Yuanguo

    2015-01-01

    Background To study the relationship between loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) locus and the pathogenicity and clinicopathological features of thymic epithelial tumors (TET). Methods Tumor and adjacent normal tissues were isolated from 36 TET patients. Five microsatellite loci (D6S1666, D6S265, D6S273, DS6276, and D6S291) within the HLA locus were amplified by polymerase chain reaction. DNA sequencing was used to measure the frequency of microsatellite LOH. Results LOH was identified in at least one locus in 83.6% of TET patients. LOH frequency at D6S1666, D6S265, D6S273, D6S276, and D6S291 was 44.4%, 16.7%, 30.5%, 38.9%, and 36.1% respectively. There was no significant association between LOH frequency in TET with tumor severity, or in the presence or absence of myasthenia gravis. Conclusions D6S1666, D6S265, D6S273, DS6S276, and D6S29 are sensitive loci for studying microsatellite LOH in TET. LOH within the HLA complex is implicated in the occurrence and development of TET, with the HLA-DQA1 gene likely involved. However, an understanding of the relationship between LOH and the clinicopathological features of TET requires a larger sample size than that of the present study. PMID:26557913

  3. Difference in number of loci of swine leukocyte antigen classical class I genes among haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Tanaka-Matsuda, Maiko; Ando, Asako; Rogel-Gaillard, Claire; Chardon, Patrick; Uenishi, Hirohide

    2009-03-01

    The structure of the entire genomic region of swine leukocyte antigen (SLA)-the porcine major histocompatibility complex--was recently elucidated in a particular haplotype named Hp-1.0 (H01). However, it has been suggested that there are differences in the number of loci of SLA genes, particularly classical class I genes, among haplotypes. To clarify the between-haplotype copy number variance in genes of the SLA region, we sequenced the genomic region carrying SLA classical class I genes on two different haplotypes, revealing increments of up to six in the number of classical class I genes in a single haplotype. All of the SLA-1(-like) (SLA-1 and newly designated SLA-12) and SLA-3 genes detected in the haplotypes thus analyzed were transcribed in the individual. The process by which duplication of SLA classical class I genes was likely to have occurred was interpreted from an analysis of repetitive sequences adjacent to the duplicated class I genes.

  4. Characterization of swine leukocyte antigen alleles and haplotypes on a novel miniature pig line, Microminipig.

    PubMed

    Ando, A; Imaeda, N; Ohshima, S; Miyamoto, A; Kaneko, N; Takasu, M; Shiina, T; Kulski, J K; Inoko, H; Kitagawa, H

    2014-12-01

    Microminipigs are extremely small-sized, novel miniature pigs that were recently developed for medical research. The inbred Microminipigs with defined swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) haplotypes are expected to be useful for allo- and xenotransplantation studies and also for association analyses between SLA haplotypes and immunological traits. To establish SLA-defined Microminipig lines, we characterized the polymorphic SLA alleles for three class I (SLA-1, SLA-2 and SLA-3) and two class II (SLA-DRB1 and SLA-DQB1) genes of 14 parental Microminipigs using a high-resolution nucleotide sequence-based typing method. Eleven class I and II haplotypes, including three recombinant haplotypes, were found in the offspring of the parental Microminipigs. Two class I and class II haplotypes, Hp-31.0 (SLA-1*1502-SLA-3*070102-SLA-2*1601) and Hp-0.37 (SLA-DRB1*0701-SLA-DQB1*0502), are novel and have not so far been reported in other pig breeds. Crossover regions were defined by the analysis of 22 microsatellite markers within the SLA class III region of three recombinant haplotypes. The SLA allele and haplotype information of Microminipigs in this study will be useful to establish SLA homozygous lines including three recombinants for transplantation and immunological studies.

  5. Leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 deficiency impairs responses to polymicrobial sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia-Ren; Han, Xiaohui; Soriano, Sulpicio G; Yuki, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the role of leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) in polymicrobial sepsis model in mice. METHODS: Cecal ligation and puncture model was used to study polymicrobial sepsis in wild type and LFA-1 knockout (KO) (= CD11a KO) mice. Their survivals were examined. Neutrophil recruitment to the abdominal cavity, bacterial tissue load and bacterial killing by neutrophils, tissue cytokine profiles, and serum cytokines were examined. Apoptosis of tissues was assessed using cleaved-caspase 3 and TUNNEL staining. The recruitment of neutrophils to various tissues was assessed using myeloperoxidase staining or measuring myeloperoxidase activity. RESULTS: LFA-1 deficiency significantly decreased survival (P = 0.0024) with the reduction of neutrophil recruitment to the abdominal cavity and higher bacterial load in blood. It was also associated with increased apoptosis in spleen and more organ injuries probed by interleukin-6 mRNA level. However, the deficiency of LFA-1 did not prevent neutrophil recruitment to lung, liver, spleen or kidney, which suggested the existence of LFA-1 independent recruitment mechanism in these organs. CONCLUSION: LFA-1 deficiency did not attenuate neutrophil recruitment to various organs to adequately mitigate secondary tissue injury in sepsis. It was associated with decreased neutrophil recruitment to the abdominal cavity, higher bacterial load, leading to increased mortality in an abdominal, polymicrobial sepsis. PMID:26380827

  6. Effect of Genetic Diversity in Swine Leukocyte Antigen-DRA Gene on Piglet Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaoyu; Yang, Qiaoli; Yuan, Junhu; Liu, Lixia; Sun, Wenyang; Jiang, Yingdi; Zhao, Shengguo; Zhang, Shengwei; Huang, Wangzhou; Gun, Shuangbao

    2016-01-01

    The swine leukocyte antigens (SLAs) are the multigene families related to immune responses. Little is known about the effect of the DRA gene on diarrheal disease. This study reported the genetic diversity of the DRA gene in exons 1, 3 and 4 in 290 Chinese Yantai black pigs. No variation was identified in exon 3. In exon 1, three genotypes and two alleles were identified, generated by two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In exon 4, there were eight genotypes and five alleles containing seven SNPs were detected with four SNPs being novel SNPs. The low polymorphism found in swine DRA is consistent with the concept that the DRA gene is highly conserved among all mammalian species. Statistical analyses indicated that the genotypes of exon 1 were not significantly associated with piglet diarrhea (p > 0.05); however, genotypes C4C4 (1.80 ± 0.33) and A4E4 (1.66 ± 0.25) of exon 4 were significantly susceptible to diarrhea (p < 0.01). These indicate that the particular genotypes of the DRA gene are susceptible to diarrheal disease, which provides valuable information for disease-resistance breeding in swine. PMID:27429004

  7. Human leukocyte antigen-G in the male reproductive system and in seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Margit Hørup; Bzorek, Michael; Pass, Malene B; Larsen, Lise Grupe; Nielsen, Mette Weidinger; Svendsen, Signe Goul; Lindhard, Anette; Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F

    2011-12-01

    One of the non-classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class Ib proteins, HLA-G, is believed to exert important immunoregulatory functions, especially during pregnancy. The presence of HLA protein in paternal seminal fluid has been suggested to have an influence on the risk of developing pre-eclampsia. We have investigated whether HLA-G protein is present in human seminal plasma and in different tissue samples of the male reproductive system. Western blot technique and a soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) assay were used to detect sHLA-G in human seminal plasma samples. Immunohistochemical staining was performed on paraffin-embedded tissue samples. We detected sHLA-G protein in seminal plasma, and HLA-G expression in normal testis and in epididymal tissue of the male reproductive system but not in the seminal vesicle. Furthermore, the results indicated a weak expression of HLA-G in hyperplastic prostatic tissue. In summary, several of the findings reported in this study suggest an immunoregulatory role of HLA-G in the male reproductive system and in seminal plasma.

  8. Analysis of Swine Leukocyte Antigen Haplotypes in Yucatan Miniature Pigs Used as Biomedical Model Animal.

    PubMed

    Choi, Nu-Ri; Seo, Dong-Won; Choi, Ki-Myung; Ko, Na-Young; Kim, Ji-Ho; Kim, Hyun-Il; Jung, Woo-Young; Lee, Jun-Heon

    2016-03-01

    The porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is called swine leukocyte antigen (SLA), which controls immune responses and transplantation reactions. The SLA is mapped on pig chromosome 7 (SSC7) near the centromere. In this study, 3 class I (SLA-1, SLA-3, and SLA-2) and 3 class II (DRB1, DQB1, and DQA) genes were used for investigation of SLA haplotypes in Yucatan miniature pigs in Korea. This pig breed is a well-known model organism for biomedical research worldwide. The current study indicated that Korean Yucatan pig population had 3 Class I haplotypes (Lr-4.0, Lr-6.0, and Lr-25.0) and 3 class II haplotypes (Lr-0.5, Lr-0.7, and Lr-0.25). The combinations of SLA class I and II haplotype together, 2 homozygous (Lr-4.5/4.5 and Lr-6.7/6.7) and 3 heterozygous (Lr-4.5/6.7, Lr-4.5/25.25, and Lr-6.7/25.25) haplotypes were identified, including previously unidentified new heterozygous haplotypes (Lr-4.5/4.7). In addition, a new SLA allele typing method using Agilent 2100 bioanalyzer was developed that permitted more rapid identification of SLA haplotypes. These results will facilitate the breeding of SLA homozygous Yucatan pigs and will expedite the possible use of these pigs for the biomedical research, especially xenotransplantation research. PMID:26950861

  9. Clinical implication of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-F expression in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Harada, Aya; Ishigami, Sumiya; Kijima, Yuko; Nakajo, Akihiro; Arigami, Takaaki; Kurahara, Hiroshi; Kita, Yoshiaki; Yoshinaka, Heiji; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2015-11-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-F is one of the non-classical HLA class I molecules that protects the fetus in pregnancy. HLA-F expression was immunohistochemically examined and the association between clinical parameters and HLA-F expression was analyzed. Cancerous HLA-F and stromal HLA-F-positive infiltrating cells were detected in 91 (40.0%) and 186 (81.6%) cases, respectively. HLA-F positivity in cancer cells was significantly associated with tumor size (P < 0.05). There was a weak correlation between HLA-F positivity of cancer cells and HLA-F positive infiltrative cells (P < 0.01, r = 0.11). HLA-F positivity did not affect patients' survival in 209 breast cancer. However, confined to stage II breast cancer, the HLA-F positive group showed significantly poorer outcomes than the HLA-F negative group (P < 0.05). The present study provides the first evidence that HLA-F positivity in breast carcinoma affects clinicopathological factors and could be selected as a prognostic marker for limited clinical stage.

  10. [METHODS FOR DETECTION OF ANTIBODIES TO HLA ANTIGENS IN PATIENTS AWAITING KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION AND COMBINED PANCREAS-KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION].

    PubMed

    Ančić, Mirela; Maravić, Blaženko; Radman, Maja; Kovačić, Vedran

    2014-12-01

    The best possibility to treat chronic renal disease is renal transplantation. Especially important fact in transplantation is the percentage of so-called panel reactive antibody (PRA) that is focused on the human leukocyte antigen. There are several methods to determine the percentage of PRA in sensitized patients awaiting kidney transplants. The most important is the complement-dependent cytotoxicity. A higher value of PRA implies greater likelihood of positive cross-match with random donor and lower probability of receiving a transplant. Comparing the sensitivity of laboratory tests for determination of PRA percentage in patient serum, it is concluded that ELISA and flow cytometry proved to be more sensitive and specific.

  11. Current trends in platelet transfusions practice: The role of ABO-RhD and human leukocyte antigen incompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Valsami, Serena; Dimitroulis, Dimitrios; Gialeraki, Argyri; Chimonidou, Maria; Politou, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusions have contributed to the revolutionary modern treatment of hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia. Despite the long-term application of platelet transfusion in therapeutics, all aspects of their optimal use (i.e., in cases of ABO and/or Rh (D incompatibility) have not been definitively determined yet. We reviewed the available data on transfusion practices and outcome in ABO and RhD incompatibility and platelet refractoriness due to anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies. Transfusion of platelets with major ABO-incompatibility is related to reduced posttransfusion platelet (PLT) count increments, compared to ABO-identical and minor, but still are equally effective in preventing clinical bleeding. ABO-minor incompatible transfusions pose the risk of an acute hemolytic reaction of the recipient that is not always related to high anti-A, B donor titers. ABO-identical PLT transfusion seems to be the most effective and safest therapeutic strategy. Exclusive ABO-identical platelet transfusion policy could be feasible, but alternative approaches could facilitate platelet inventory management. Transfusion of platelets from RhD positive donors to RhD negative patients is considered to be effective and safe though is associated with low rate of anti-D alloimmunization due to contaminating red blood cells. The prevention of D alloimmunization is recommended only for women of childbearing age. HLA alloimmunization is a major cause of platelet refractoriness. Managing patients with refractoriness with cross-matched or HLA-matched platelets is the current practice although data are still lacking for the efficacy of this practice in terms of clinical outcome. Leukoreduction contributes to the reduction of both HLA and anti-D alloimmunization. PMID:26420927

  12. Transcription analysis of class II human leukocyte antigen genes from normal and immunodeficient B lymphocytes, using polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Bull, M; van Hoef, A; Gorski, J

    1990-01-01

    The RNA transcript levels of all human leukocyte antigen class II loci were determined from class II congenital immunodeficient B cells by polymerase chain reaction amplification of cDNA. No mRNA was observed under conditions in which 0.01% normal levels could be visualized. Pre-mRNA could be amplified from normal B cells but not from immunodeficient B cells, indicating a transcription defect. Images PMID:2113177

  13. [Complex immunochemical analysis of the proteinogram and the system of soluble leukocytic antigens in children with chronic and recurrent infections].

    PubMed

    Petrunin, D D; Khakhalin, L N; Porkhovatyĭ, S Ia; Olefirenko, G A

    1985-09-01

    The immunochemical study of the blood sera of children with chronic and relapsing infections has shown an increase in the content of alpha 2-macroglobulin and alpha 1-antitrypsin in the absence of significant changes in the concentration of immunoglobulins and complement components. The immunochemical analysis of the system of soluble leukocytic antigens (SLA) has revealed a decrease in the level of SLA-1 simultaneously with the presence of redundant amounts of SLA-5 and SLA-8.

  14. Antibodies against papillomavirus antigens in cervical secretions from condyloma patients.

    PubMed Central

    Dillner, L; Fredriksson, A; Persson, E; Forslund, O; Hansson, B G; Dillner, J

    1993-01-01

    Samples of cervical secretions and serum from 30 women with genital condylomas and 30 age-matched controls were tested for the presence of immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG antibodies against a panel of papillomavirus-derived antigens. The same cervical samples were also analyzed for presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA by Southern blotting and polymerase chain reaction. By Southern blotting HPV DNA was detected in 8 of 30 patients with condylomas and 2 of 30 controls, and by the polymerase chain reaction HPV DNA was detected in 14 of 30 patients with condylomas and 5 of 30 controls. A total of 18 of 29 patients with condylomas and 8 of 28 controls had IgA antibodies in cervical secretions to an E2 synthetic peptide, and 17 of 29 patients with condylomas and 5 of 28 controls had local IgA antibodies to an E7 peptide (P < 0.025 and P < 0.005, respectively). The results suggest that measurement of local antibody production against selected HPV antigens may be useful in the study of HPV immunology and, possibly, for the diagnosis of HPV infection. PMID:8381807

  15. Identification of antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies using high-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ju; Li, Ruihua; Liu, Kun; Li, Liangliang; Zai, Xiaodong; Chi, Xiangyang; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-04-22

    High-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire provides a large number of antibody variable region sequences that can be used to generate human monoclonal antibodies. However, current screening methods for identifying antigen-specific antibodies are inefficient. In the present study, we developed an antibody clone screening strategy based on clone dynamics and relative frequency, and used it to identify antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that at least 52% of putative positive immunoglobulin heavy chains composed antigen-specific antibodies. Combining information on dynamics and relative frequency improved identification of positive clones and elimination of negative clones. and increase the credibility of putative positive clones. Therefore the screening strategy could simplify the subsequent experimental screening and may facilitate the generation of antigen-specific antibodies.

  16. Influence of HLA-DRB1 Alleles on the Variations of Antibody Response to Tuberculosis Serodiagnostic Antigens in Active Tuberculosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fangbin; Xu, Xindong; Wu, Sijia; Cui, Xiaobing; Fan, Lin; Pan, Weiqing

    2016-01-01

    Serology-based tests for tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis, though rapid, efficient and easily implemented, have so far shown unsatisfactory levels of sensitivity and specificity, probably due to variations of the antibody response in TB patients. The number and types of seropositive antigens vary from individual to individual. The person-to-person variations of antigen recognition may be linked to genetic polymorphisms of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II alleles. In the present study, we find that there is a significant increase in the frequency of HLA-DRB1*14 (P = 2.5×10−4) among subjects with high antibody response levels compared to those with low antibody levels. HLA-DRB1*15, the most frequent allelic group in the studied active TB population, positively correlates with subjects with low antibody response levels rather than subjects with high antibody response levels (P = 0.005), which indicates the loss of relevant antigens for screening of patients with this allelic group. The potential association between HLA-DRB1 allelic group and individual antigens implies that TB diagnostic yield could be improved by the addition of antigens screened at the proteome scale in infected subjects from the HLA-DRB1*15 allelic group. PMID:27788190

  17. Human leukocyte antigens and alloimmunization in heart transplantation: an open debate.

    PubMed

    Picascia, Antonietta; Grimaldi, Vincenzo; Casamassimi, Amelia; De Pascale, Maria Rosaria; Schiano, Concetta; Napoli, Claudio

    2014-10-01

    Considerable advances in heart transplantation outcome have been achieved through the improvement of donor-recipient selection, better organ preservation, lower rates of perioperative mortality and the use of innovative immunosuppressive protocols. Nevertheless, long-term survival is still influenced by late complications. We support the introduction of HLA matching as an additional criterion in the heart allocation. Indeed, allosensitization is an important factor affecting heart transplantation and the presence of anti-HLA antibodies causes an increased risk of antibody-mediated rejection and graft failure. On the other hand, the rate of heart-immunized patients awaiting transplantation is steadily increasing due to the limited availability of organs and an increased use of ventricular assist devices. Significant benefits may result from virtual crossmatch approach that prevents transplantation in the presence of unacceptable donor antigens. A combination of both virtual crossmatch and a tailored desensitization therapy could be a good compromise for a favorable outcome in highly sensitized patients. Here, we discuss the unresolved issue on the clinical immunology of heart transplantation.

  18. A computational method for identification of vaccine targets from protein regions of conserved human leukocyte antigen binding

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Computational methods for T cell-based vaccine target discovery focus on selection of highly conserved peptides identified across pathogen variants, followed by prediction of their binding of human leukocyte antigen molecules. However, experimental studies have shown that T cells often target diverse regions in highly variable viral pathogens and this diversity may need to be addressed through redefinition of suitable peptide targets. Methods We have developed a method for antigen assessment and target selection for polyvalent vaccines, with which we identified immune epitopes from variable regions, where all variants bind HLA. These regions, although variable, can thus be considered stable in terms of HLA binding and represent valuable vaccine targets. Results We applied this method to predict CD8+ T-cell targets in influenza A H7N9 hemagglutinin and significantly increased the number of potential vaccine targets compared to the number of targets discovered using the traditional approach where low-frequency peptides are excluded. Conclusions We developed a webserver with an intuitive visualization scheme for summarizing the T cell-based antigenic potential of any given protein or proteome using human leukocyte antigen binding predictions and made a web-accessible software implementation freely available at http://met-hilab.cbs.dtu.dk/blockcons/. PMID:26679766

  19. Genetic epistasis between killer immunoglobulin-like receptors and human leukocyte antigens in Kawasaki disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Bossi, G; Mannarino, S; Pietrogrande, M C; Salice, P; Dellepiane, R M; Cremaschi, A L; Corana, G; Tozzo, A; Capittini, C; De Silvestri, A; Tinelli, C; Pasi, A; Martinetti, M

    2015-10-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a pediatric acute multisystemic vasculitis complicated by development of coronary artery lesions. The breakthrough theory on KD etiopathogenesis points to pathogens/environmental factors triggered by northeastern wind coming from China. Natural Killer cells and T lymphocytes express the inhibitory/activating Killer Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIR) to elicit an immune response against pathogens by binding to human leukocyte antigens (HLA) class I epitopes. We first report on the role of KIR/HLA genetic epistasis in a sample of 100 Italian KD children. We genotyped KIR, HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-C polymorphisms, and compared KD data with those from 270 Italian healthy donors. The HLA-A*11 ligand for KIR2DS2/2DS4/3DL2 was a KD susceptibility marker by itself (odds ratio (OR)=3.85, confidence interval (CI)=1.55-9.53, P=0.004). Although no epistasis between HLA-A*11 and KIR2DS2/S4 emerged, HLA-A*11 also engages KIR3DL2, a framework gene encoding for a pathogen sensor of CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN), and KD blood mononuclear cells are actually prone to pathogen CpG-ODN activation in the acute phase. Moreover, carriers of KIR2DS2/HLA-C1 and KIR2DL2/HLA-C1 were more frequent among KD, in keeping with data demonstrating the involvement of these HLA/KIR couples in autoimmune endothelial damage. The highest KD risk factor was observed among carriers of KIR2DL2 and two or more HLA ligands (OR=10.24, CI=1.87-56.28; P=0.007). PMID:26335810

  20. Human leukocyte antigen-B27 alleles in Xinjiang Uygur patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Zou, H-Y; Yu, W-Z; Wang, Z; He, J; Jiao, M

    2015-05-25

    We investigated the distribution of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 subtypes in Uygur ankylosing spondylitis patients in Xinjiang. B27-positive patients with ankylosing spondylitis were subtyped by using polymerase chain reaction-sequence-based typing. The HLA-B27 subtype frequencies of Uygur patients were compared with those in Han patients in Xinjiang and the other areas of China. B*2705 was the predominant subtype in Uygur patients with a frequency of 58.95%, which was much higher than that in Han patients in Xinjiang (31.58%, P < 0.05) and the other areas of China (excluding the Shandong region, which was 63.89%). The frequency of B*2704 (27.37%) in Uygur patients was the lowest and significantly lower than that in Han patients (61.18%, P < 0.05) and in 8 other areas of China. B*2710 has not been previously reported in Uygur ankylosing spondylitis patients; B*2704 was the main (61.18%) subtype in Han patients in Xinjiang, followed by B*2705 (31.58%) and was similar to the characteristics of Han patients in the other areas of China. B*2724 in Han ankylosing spondylitis patients has not been previously reported. Additionally, the B*2702/B*2705 homozygote was identified in Uygur patients. B*2702/B*2704, B*2704/B*2705, and B*2705/B*2705 homozygotes were identified in 3 Han patients. The distribution of HLAB27 subtypes in Uygur ankylosing spondylitis patients in Xinjiang significantly differed from that in Han patients. Understanding the distribution of HLAB27 subtypes in ethnic minority populations of Xinjiang is important for anthropological genetic studies and for analyzing the impact of genetic background on ankylosing spondylitis susceptibility.

  1. Prevalence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DRB1 alleles in Kuwaiti children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Alsaeid, Khaled; Haider, M Z; Kamal, H; Srivastva, B S; Ayoub, E M

    2002-02-01

    The prevalence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DR alleles has been determined in 69 Kuwaiti Arab children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) and compared to that in 212 ethnically matched normal healthy controls using a PCR-sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP) method. A very high incidence of DR3 was detected in JRA patients compared to the controls (P < 0.0001, RR = 2.235). The high incidence of HLA-DR3 in JRA patients was accounted for mainly by an excess of DRB1*0307 (P < 0.05, RR = 3.072) and DRB1*0308 (P < 0.009, RR = 2.663) compared to the controls. Moreover, DR3 was more prevalent when patients with ANA-positive JRA were analysed separately; 73% compared to 58% for the whole JRA patient group. The frequency of DR1 was also higher in the JRA group compared to controls (P = 0.019, RR = 3.585). Although the incidence of some alleles was higher in the control group (DR13 and DR7), none reached a statistically significant level. All the patients with iridocyclitis had either a DR1 or DR3 allele, except for one child. The frequency of DRB1*03 was found to be much higher in the polyarticular subtype of Kuwaiti JRA cases compared to the oligoarticular subgroup and the controls. Also, a non-significant increase in the frequency of the DRB1*04, *11 and *15 alleles was detected in the polyarticular subtype of the Kuwaiti JRA cases compared to the controls.

  2. Stereoselectivity of Isoflurane in Adhesion Molecule Leukocyte Function-Associated Antigen-1

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Weiming; Pereira, Luis M.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Yuki, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Background Isoflurane in clinical use is a racemate of S- and R-isoflurane. Previous studies have demonstrated that the effects of S-isoflurane on relevant anesthetic targets might be modestly stronger (less than 2-fold) than R-isoflurane. The X-ray crystallographic structure of the immunological target, leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) with racemic isoflurane suggested that only S-isoflurane bound specifically to this protein. If so, the use of specific isoflurane enantiomers may have advantage in the surgical settings where a wide range of inflammatory responses is expected to occur. Here, we have further tested the hypothesis that isoflurane enantioselectivity is apparent in solution binding and functional studies. Methods First, binding of isoflurane enantiomers to LFA-1 was studied using 1-aminoanthracene (1-AMA) displacement assays. The binding site of each enantiomer on LFA-1 was studied using the docking program GLIDE. Functional studies employed the flow-cytometry based ICAM binding assay. Results Both enantiomers decreased 1-AMA fluorescence signal (at 520 nm), indicating that both competed with 1-AMA and bound to the αL I domain. The docking simulation demonstrated that both enantiomers bound to the LFA-1 “lovastatin site.” ICAM binding assays showed that S-isoflurane inhibited more potently than R-isoflurane, consistent with the result of 1-AMA competition assay. Conclusions In contrast with the x-ray crystallography, both enantiomers bound to and inhibited LFA-1. S-isoflurane showed slight preference over R-isoflurane. PMID:24801074

  3. Associations of human leukocyte antigens with autoimmune diseases: challenges in identifying the mechanism.

    PubMed

    Miyadera, Hiroko; Tokunaga, Katsushi

    2015-11-01

    The mechanism of genetic associations between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and susceptibility to autoimmune disorders has remained elusive for most of the diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and type 1 diabetes (T1D), for which both the genetic associations and pathogenic mechanisms have been extensively analyzed. In this review, we summarize what are currently known about the mechanisms of HLA associations with RA and T1D, and elucidate the potential mechanistic basis of the HLA-autoimmunity associations. In RA, the established association between the shared epitope (SE) and RA risk has been explained, at least in part, by the involvement of SE in the presentation of citrullinated peptides, as confirmed by the structural analysis of DR4-citrullinated peptide complex. Self-peptide(s) that might explain the predispositions of variants at 11β and 13β in DRB1 to RA risk have not currently been identified. Regarding the mechanism of T1D, pancreatic self-peptides that are presented weakly on the susceptible HLA allele products are recognized by self-reactive T cells. Other studies have revealed that DQ proteins encoded by the T1D susceptible DQ haplotypes are intrinsically unstable. These findings indicate that the T1D susceptible DQ haplotypes might confer risk for T1D by facilitating the formation of unstable HLA-self-peptide complex. The studies of RA and T1D reveal the two distinct mechanistic basis that might operate in the HLA-autoimmunity associations. Combination of these mechanisms, together with other functional variations among the DR and DQ alleles, may generate the complex patterns of DR-DQ haplotype associations with autoimmunity. PMID:26290149

  4. Characterization and phylogenetic analysis of the swine leukocyte antigen 3 gene from Korean native pigs.

    PubMed

    Chung, H Y; Choi, Y C; Park, H N

    2015-05-18

    We investigated the phylogenetic relationships between pig breeds, compared the genetic similarity between humans and pigs, and provided basic genetic information on Korean native pigs (KNPs), using genetic variants of the swine leukocyte antigen 3 (SLA-3) gene. Primers were based on sequences from GenBank (accession Nos. AF464010 and AF464009). Polymerase chain reaction analysis amplified approximately 1727 bp of segments, which contained 1086 bp of coding regions and 641 bp of the 3'- and 5'-untranslated regions. Bacterial artificial chromosome clones of miniature pigs were used for sequencing the SLA-3 genomic region, which was 3114 bp in total length, including the coding (1086 bp) and non-coding (2028 bp) regions. Sequence analysis detected 53 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), based on a minor allele frequency greater than 0.01, which is low compared with other pig breeds, and the results suggest that there is low genetic variability in KNPs. Comparative analysis revealed that humans possess approximately three times more genetic variation than do pigs. Approximately 71% of SNPs in exons 2 and 3 were detected in KNPs, and exon 5 in humans is a highly polymorphic region. Newly identified sequences of SLA-3 using KNPs were submitted to GenBank (accession No. DQ992512-18). Cluster analysis revealed that KNPs were grouped according to three major alleles: SLA-3*0502 (DQ992518), SLA-3*0302 (DQ992513 and DQ992516), and SLA-3*0303 (DQ992512, DQ992514, DQ992515, and DQ992517). Alignments revealed that humans have a relatively close genetic relationship with pigs and chimpanzees. The information provided by this study may be useful in KNP management.

  5. Specificity of monoclonal antibodies to Campylobacter jejuni lipopolysaccharide antigens.

    PubMed

    Brooks, B W; Mihowich, J G; Blais, B W; Yamazaki, H

    1998-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) were produced to the lipopolysaccharide antigens of Campylobacter jejuni strain 1249 (Penner serotype O:2/63). A polymyxin-cloth based enzyme immunoassay (pCEIA) was used for initial screening and for evaluating the specificity of these antibodies. Seven Mabs reacted with at least 11 and as many as 14 of 15 C. jejuni strains (representing 8 different Penner serotypes). These seven Mabs did not cross-react with any of 16 non-Campylobacter bacteria commonly encountered in food, with only two exceptions. Several combinations of these Mabs in pairs reacted with all 15 C. jejuni strains. These results suggest that pCEIA employing two of these Mabs in combination is potentially useful for detection of Campylobacter jejuni in foods and other samples.

  6. Biological bottom-up assembly of antibody nanotubes on patterned antigen arrays.

    PubMed

    Nuraje, Nurxat; Banerjee, Ipsita A; MacCuspie, Robert I; Yu, Lingtao; Matsui, Hiroshi

    2004-07-01

    Application of biotechnology in nanofabrication has an advantage to produce functional building-block materials that may not have synthetic counterparts. Here we introduced a new type of building block, antibody nanotubes, and demonstrated anchoring them on complementary antigen arrays via antibody-antigen recognition. Biological recognition between the antibody nanotubes and the antigen arrays permitted recognition-driven assembly of ordered nanotube arrays. The array of antigens was written by using the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) on alkylthiol self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-coated Au substrates via nanografting. After antigens were immobilized onto the shaved regions of the alkylthiol SAMs with the AFM tip, antibody nanotubes, produced by incubating antibodies in template nanotube solutions, were selectively attached onto the antigen regions. This technique is very useful when multiple building blocks are necessary to address specific locations on substrates because simultaneous immobilization of multiple antibody nanotubes at specific complementary binding positions can be achieved in a single process.

  7. Carbohydrate Biopolymers Enhance Antibody Responses to Mucosally Delivered Vaccine Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, A.; Makin, J.; Sizer, P. J.; Jabbal-Gill, I.; Hinchcliffe, M.; Illum, L.; Chatfield, S.; Roberts, M.

    2000-01-01

    We have evaluated the ability of two carbohydrate biopolymers, chitosan and gellan, to enhance antibody responses to subunit influenza virus vaccines delivered to the respiratory tracts of mice. Groups of mice were vaccinated three times intranasally (i.n.) with 10 μg of purified influenza B/Panama virus surface antigens (PSAs), which consist of hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), either alone or admixed with chitosan or gellan solutions. Separate groups were vaccinated subcutaneously (s.c.) with PSAs adsorbed to Alhydrogel or chitosan or gellan alone i.n. Serum antibody responses were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for influenza virus-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and by HA inhibition (HAI) and NA inhibition (NAI) assays. The local respiratory immune response was measured by assaying for influenza virus-specific IgA antibody in nasal secretions and by enumerating nasal and pulmonary lymphocytes secreting IgA, IgG, and IgM anti-influenza virus-specific antibodies by enzyme-linked immunospotting (ELISPOT). When administered alone i.n., B/Panama PSA was poorly immunogenic. Parenteral immunization with B/Panama PSA with Alhydrogel elicited high titers of anti-B/Panama antibodies in serum but a very poor respiratory anti-B/Panama IgA response. In contrast, i.n. immunization with PSA plus chitosan stimulated very strong local and systemic anti-B/Panama responses. Gellan also enhanced the local and serum antibody responses to i.n. PSA but not to the same extent as chitosan. The ability of chitosan to augment the immunogenicity of influenza vaccines given i.n. was confirmed using PSA prepared from an influenza A virus (A/Texas H1N1). PMID:10992483

  8. Bacterial surface antigens defined by monoclonal antibodies: the methanogens

    SciTech Connect

    Conway de Macario, E.; Macario, A.J.L.; Magarinos, M.C.; Jovell, R.J.; Kandler, O.

    1982-01-01

    The methanogens (MB) are unique microbes of great evolutionary interest with applications in biotechnology-bioengineerings and are important in digestive processes. Their cell-wall composition is distinctively different from that of Eubacteria, e.g. the Methanobacteriaceae possess the peptidoglycan pseudomurein rather than murein. The range of cell-wall compositions among MB and their evolutionary and functional significance is not well known. The authors undertook a systematic study of the MB's surface structure using monoclonal antibodies through the following steps: (1) generation of hybridomas that produce antibody to several MB from 3 of their 4 families; (2) development of immunoenzymatic assays for MB's antigens and antibodies; (3) determination of the fine specificity of monoclonal antibodies by inhibition-blocking tests using cell-wall extracts and compounds of known structure; thus a set of monoclonal probes of predetermined specificity was assembled; and (4) resolution of surface determinants of MB representative of the Methanobacteriaceae using the monoclonal probes. Specific markers of MB strains were characterized. Two epitopes were identified within the pseudomurein molecule.

  9. Novel Antibodies Reactive with Sialyl Lewis X in Both Humans and Mice Define Its Critical Role in Leukocyte Trafficking and Contact Hypersensitivity Responses.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Ryuji; Hirakawa, Jotaro; Sato, Kaori; Ikeda, Toshiaki; Nagai, Motoe; Fukuda, Minoru; Imai, Yasuyuki; Kawashima, Hiroto

    2015-06-12

    Sialyl Lewis X (sLe(x)) antigen functions as a common carbohydrate determinant recognized by all three members of the selectin family. However, its expression and function in mice remain undefined due to the poor reactivity of conventional anti-sLe(x) monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with mouse tissues. Here, we developed novel anti-sLe(x) mAbs, termed F1 and F2, which react well with both human and mouse sLe(x), by immunizing fucosyltransferase (FucT)-IV and FucT-VII doubly deficient mice with 6-sulfo-sLe(x)-expressing cells transiently transfected with an expression vector encoding CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase. F1 and F2 specifically bound both the N-acetyl and the N-glycolyl forms of sLe(x) as well as 6-sulfo-sLe(x), a major ligand for L-selectin expressed in high endothelial venules, and efficiently blocked physiological lymphocyte homing to lymph nodes in mice. Importantly, both of the mAbs inhibited contact hypersensitivity responses not only when administered in the L-selectin-dependent sensitization phase but also when administered in the elicitation phase in mice. When administered in the latter phase, F1 and F2 efficiently blocked rolling of mouse leukocytes along blood vessels expressing P- and E-selectin in the auricular skin in vivo. Consistent with these findings, the mAbs blocked P- and E-selectin-dependent leukocyte rolling in a flow chamber assay. Taken together, these results indicate that novel anti-sLe(x) mAbs reactive with both human and mouse tissues, with the blocking ability against leukocyte trafficking mediated by all three selectins, have been established. These mAbs should be useful in determining the role of sLe(x) antigen under physiological and pathological conditions.

  10. Sequencing Antibody Repertoires Provides Evidence for Original Antigenic Sin Shaping the Antibody Response to Influenza Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yann-Chong; Scalfone, Lisa K.; Kongpachith, Sarah; Ju, Chia-Hsin; Cai, Xiaoyong; Lindstrom, Tamsin M.; Sokolove, Jeremy; Robinson, William H.

    2014-01-01

    We used a DNA barcoding method to enable high-throughput sequencing of the cognate heavy- and light-chain pairs of expressed antibodies. We used this approach to elucidate the plasmablast antibody response to influenza vaccination. We show that >75% of the rationally selected plasmablast antibodies bind and neutralize influenza, and that antibodies from clonal families, defined by sharing both heavy chain VJ and light chain VJ sequence usage, do so most effectively. Vaccine-induced heavy chain VJ regions contained on average >20 nucleotide mutations as compared to their predicted germline gene sequences, and some vaccine-induced antibodies exhibited higher binding affinities for hemagglutinins derived from prior years’ seasonal influenza as compared to their affinities for the immunization strains. Our results show that influenza vaccination induces the recall of memory B cells that express antibodies that previously underwent affinity maturation against prior years’ seasonal influenza, suggesting that ‘original antigenic sin’ shapes the antibody response to influenza vaccination. PMID:24525048

  11. Antigen-specific human polyclonal antibodies from hyperimmunized cattle.

    PubMed

    Kuroiwa, Yoshimi; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Sathiyaseelan, Thillainayagen; Jiao, Jin-an; Matsushita, Hiroaki; Sathiyaseelan, Janaki; Wu, Hua; Mellquist, Jenny; Hammitt, Melissa; Koster, Julie; Kamoda, Satoru; Tachibana, Katsumi; Ishida, Isao; Robl, James M

    2009-02-01

    Antigen-specific human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs), produced by hyperimmunization, could be useful for treating many human diseases. However, yields from available transgenic mice and transchromosomic (Tc) cattle carrying human immunoglobulin loci are too low for therapeutic applications. We report a Tc bovine system that produces large yields of hpAbs. Tc cattle were generated by transferring a human artificial chromosome vector carrying the entire unrearranged, human immunoglobulin heavy (hIGH) and kappa-light (hIGK) chain loci to bovine fibroblasts in which two endogenous bovine IgH chain loci were inactivated. Plasma from the oldest animal contained >2 g/l of hIgG, paired with either human kappa-light chain (up to approximately 650 microg/ml, fully human) or with bovine kappa- or lambda-light chain (chimeric), with a normal hIgG subclass distribution. Hyperimmunization with anthrax protective antigen triggered a hIgG-mediated humoral immune response comprising a high proportion of antigen-specific hIgG. Purified, fully human and chimeric hIgGs were highly active in an in vitro toxin neutralization assay and protective in an in vivo mouse challenge assay.

  12. Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I and II Alleles and Cervical Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Johnson, Lisa G.; Yu, Kai; Wang, Sophia S.; Gravitt, Patti E.; Hansen, John A.; Carrington, Mary; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Gao, Xiaojiang; Hildesheim, Allan; Madeleine, Margaret M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Associations between human leukocyte antigens (HLA) alleles and cervical cancer are largely representative of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), the major histologic subtype. We evaluated the association between HLA class I (A, B, and C) and class II (DRB1 and DQB1) loci and risk of cervical adenocarcinoma (ADC), a less common but aggressive histologic subtype. Methods: We pooled data from the Eastern and Western US Cervical Cancer studies, and evaluated the association between individual alleles and allele combinations and ADC (n = 630 ADC; n = 775 controls). Risk estimates were calculated for 11 a priori (based on known associations with cervical cancer regardless of histologic type) and 38 non a priori common alleles, as odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusted for age and study. In exploratory analysis, we compared the risk associations between subgroups with HPV16 or HPV18 DNA in ADC tumor tissues in the Western US study cases and controls. Results: Three of the a priori alleles were significantly associated with decreased risk of ADC [DRB1*13:01 (OR = 0.61; 95% CI: 0.41–0.93), DRB1*13:02 (OR = 0.49; 95% CI: 0.31–0.77), and DQB1*06:03 (OR = 0.64; 95% CI: 0.42–0.95)]; one was associated with increased risk [B*07:02 (OR = 1.39; 95% CI: 1.07–1.79)]. Among alleles not previously reported, DQB1*06:04 (OR = 0.46; 95% CI: 0.27–0.78) was associated with decreased risk of ADC and remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons, and C*07:02 (OR = 1.41; 95% CI: 1.09–1.81) was associated with increased risk. We did not observe a difference by histologic subtype. ADC was most strongly associated with increased risk with B*07:02/C*07:02 alleles (OR = 1.33; 95% CI: 1.01–1.76) and decreased risk with DRB1*13:02/DQB1*06:04 (OR = 0.41; 95% CI: 0.21–0.80). Conclusion: Results suggest that HLA allele associations with cervical ADC are similar to those for cervical SCC. An intriguing

  13. Association of Human Leukocyte Antigen Alleles and Nevirapine Hypersensitivity in a Malawian HIV-Infected Population

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Daniel F.; Chaponda, Mas; Jorgensen, Andrea L.; Castro, Elena Cornejo; van Oosterhout, Joep J.; Khoo, Saye H.; Lalloo, David G.; Heyderman, Robert S.; Alfirevic, Ana; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2013-01-01

    Background. The nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor nevirapine is the cornerstone of treatment for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in many sub-Saharan African countries. However, nevirapine is associated with a 6%–10% risk of developing a hypersensitivity reaction, with different phenotypes, including the blistering conditions Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). Our aim was to identify predictive human leukocyte antigen (HLA) markers that are associated with nevirapine hypersensitivity. Methods. We identified 117 HIV-infected Malawian adults with nevirapine hypersensitivity (15 drug-induced liver injury [DILI], 33 SJS/TEN, 20 hypersensitivity syndrome, and 46 nevirapine-induced rash plus 3 with both DILI and SJS phenotype) and 155 age-, sex- and ethnicity-matched nevirapine-exposed controls. HLA typing for 5 loci (A, B, C, DRB1, and DQB1) was undertaken using a sequence-based high-resolution protocol. Logistic regression analysis included CD4+ cell count as a covariate. Results. HLA-C*04:01 was found to markedly increase the risk for SJS (odds ratio [OR] = 17.52; 95% confidence interval, 3.31–92.80) and all hypersensitivity phenotypes (OR = 2.64; 95% CI, 1.13–6.18) when compared to the baseline rare allele group in a binary logistic regression model. The OR for absolute risk of SJS/TEN associated with carriage of HLA-C*04:01 was 5.17 (95% CI, 2.39–11.18). Positive predictive value was 2.6% and negative predictive value was 99.2%. In addition, a number of alleles within the HLA-DQB1 loci protected against nevirapine-induced hypersensitivity phenotypes. Conclusions. Our study has identified HLA-C*04:01 carriage as a risk factor for nevirapine-induced SJS/TEN in a Malawian HIV cohort. Validation of these findings in a larger cohort of patients and mechanistic investigation of the pathogenesis are required. PMID:23362284

  14. Human leukocyte antigen-G overexpression predicts poor clinical outcomes in low-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xing; Wang, Yinyan; Zhang, Chuanbao; Liu, Xing; Qian, Zenghui; Jiang, Tao

    2016-05-15

    Overexpression of human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G), a non-classical major histocompatibility complex class-I molecule associated with immunosuppression, has been reported in various human malignancies. In the present study, we examined the role of HLA-G in gliomas. Clinical characteristics, mRNA expression microarrays and follow-up data pertaining to 293 patients with histologically confirmed gliomas were analyzed. The expression levels of HLA-G were compared between different grades of gliomas and correlated with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) to evaluate its prognostic value. We found that HLA-G was overexpressed in gliomas as compared to that in normal brain tissue samples (-1.288±0.265). The highest expression levels were in glioblastomas (GBMs), anaplastic gliomas (AGs) and low-grade gliomas (LGGs), in that order (0.328±0.778, 0.176±0.881, -0.388±0.686, respectively). Significant inter-group differences were observed between low-grade and high-grade glioma tissues (p<0.001 and p<0.001, t-test, AGs and GBMs, respectively). More astrocytoma patients exhibited increased HLA-G expression as compared to other LGG patients (p=0.004, Chi-square test). Significant differences were observed with respect to PFS and OS (p=0.009 and 0.032, log-rank test, for PFS and OS, respectively) between the high- and low-expression subgroups in patients with LGGs. On Cox regression analysis, overexpression of HLA-G appeared to be an independent predictor of clinical outcomes (p=0.007 and 0.026, for PFS and OS, respectively). Our results suggest that HLA-G expression may serve as a potential biomarker for predicting aggressive tumor grades of gliomas and for histological subtype of LGGs. Elevated HLA-G expression could serve as an independent predictor of poor clinical outcomes in patients with low-grade gliomas.

  15. Radioimmunoassay for detecting antibodies against murine malarial parasite antigens: monoclonal antibodies recognizing Plasmodium yoelii antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.; Taylor, D.W.; Evans, C.B.; Asofsky, R.

    1980-12-01

    A solid-phase radioimmunoassay (SPRIA) in microtiter wells was established for detecting antibodies against Plasmodium yoelii Ag. The SPRIA was found (1) to require as little as 5 ..mu..g of crude parasite Ag per well, (2) to be able to detect 0.5 ng of monoclonal Ab, and (3) to be 10/sup 4/ times more sensitive than the indirect fluorescent Ab staining technique. In a modification of the above assay using intact RBC as an Ag, hyperimmune serum showed significant binding to the surface of erythrocytes of mice infected with P. yoelii parasites but not to RBC of normal mice. Hybridomas were prepared by fusing infected mouse spleen cells with myeloma cells. Using the SPRIA, hybrids secreting Ab against P. yoelii 17XL Ag were detected.

  16. Prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis B e antigen and antibody, and antigen subtypes in atomic bomb survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Neriishi, K.; Kodama, K.; Akiba, S. |

    1995-11-01

    On the basis of previous studies showing an association between hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positivity and radiation exposure in atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors, we investigated further the active state of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection by incorporating tests of hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and hepatitis B e antibody (anti-HBe) and HBsAg subtypes into our biennial health examinations. Among 6548 A-bomb survivors for whom HBsAg was assayed between July 1979 and July 1981, 129 persons were HBsAg positive. HBeAg and anti-HBe were measured in 104 of these persons and subtypes of HBsAg in 98 persons. Among those exposed to radiation (average liver dose 0.58 Sv), the odds ratio of HBsAg positivity tended to increase with radiation dose (P for trend = 0.024). The P values for association between the prevalence of HB e antigen and radiation dose were 0.094 and 0.17, respectively. The HB antigen subtype adr was predominant over other subtypes in both Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but the distribution of subtypes did not seem to differ in relation to radiation dose. These results suggested that A-bomb survivors remain in active state of HBV infection and that the mechanism(s) of seroconversion may be impaired. 29 refs., 6 tabs.

  17. Development of monoclonal antibodies suitable for rabies virus antibody and antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Chander, Vishal; Singh, R P; Verma, P C

    2012-12-01

    The control of an infectious viral disease as rabies is made easier by rapid and accurate diagnosis. Successful rabies prophylaxis is dependent upon the active immunization with vaccine along with passive administration of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies which together clear the virus before widespread infection of central nervous system occurs. The present study aimed at the development of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) suitable for rabies virus antibody and antigen detection. For the production of rabies specific MAbs, immunization of Swiss albino mice with a commercially available vaccine was done and Polyethylene glycol mediated fusion of spleenocytes with myeloma cells was performed. The positive clones were selected on the basis of distinct reactivity by cell Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and fluorescence in Indirect Fluorescent antibody test. The positive clones obtained were subjected to single cell cloning by limiting dilution method. The reactive clones were further titrated and employed for virus titration and virus neutralization. The neutralizing activity was evaluated using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorter technique. Three MAb clones showed a distinct percent inhibition in the presence of positive serum. One of the MAb clone No. 5C3 was relatively more specific in detecting rabies antibodies and also found suitable for competitive ELISA to assess the antibody level in vaccinated subjects.

  18. Anti-CD antibody microarray for human leukocyte morphology examination allows analyzing rare cell populations and suggesting preliminary diagnosis in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Khvastunova, Alina N; Kuznetsova, Sofya A; Al-Radi, Liubov S; Vylegzhanina, Alexandra V; Zakirova, Anna O; Fedyanina, Olga S; Filatov, Alexander V; Vorobjev, Ivan A; Ataullakhanov, Fazly

    2015-07-27

    We describe a method for leukocyte sorting by a microarray of anti-cluster-of-differentiation (anti-CD) antibodies and for preparation of the bound cells for morphological or cytochemical examination. The procedure results in a "sorted" smear with cells positive for certain surface antigens localised in predefined areas. The morphology and cytochemistry of the microarray-captured normal and neoplastic peripheral blood mononuclear cells are identical to the same characteristics in a smear. The microarray permits to determine the proportions of cells positive for the CD antigens on the microarray panel with high correlation with flow cytometry. Using the anti-CD microarray we show that normal granular lymphocytes and lymphocytes with radial segmentation of the nuclei are positive for CD3, CD8, CD16 or CD56 but not for CD4 or CD19. We also show that the described technique permits to obtain a pure leukemic cell population or to separate two leukemic cell populations on different antibody spots and to study their morphology or cytochemistry directly on the microarray. In cases of leukemias/lymphomas when circulating neoplastic cells are morphologically distinct, preliminary diagnosis can be suggested from full analysis of cell morphology, cytochemistry and their binding pattern on the microarray.

  19. High-resolution, three-dimensional modeling of human leukocyte antigen class I structure and surface electrostatic potential reveals the molecular basis for alloantibody binding epitopes.

    PubMed

    Kosmoliaptsis, Vasilis; Dafforn, Timothy R; Chaudhry, Afzal N; Halsall, David J; Bradley, J Andrew; Taylor, Craig J

    2011-11-01

    The potential of human leukocyte antigens (HLA) to stimulate humoral alloimmunity depends on the orientation, accessibility and physiochemical properties of polymorphic amino acids. We have generated high-resolution structural and physiochemical models of all common HLA class I alleles and analyzed the impact of amino acid polymorphisms on surface electrostatic potential. Atomic resolution three-dimensional structural models of HLA class I molecules were generated using the MODELLER computer algorithm. The molecular surface electrostatic potential was calculated using the DelPhi program. To confirm that electrostatic surface topography reflects known HLA B cell epitopes, we examined Bw4 and Bw6 and ascertained the impact of amino acid polymorphisms on their tertiary and physiochemical composition. The HLA protein structures generated performed well when subjected to stereochemical and energy-based testing for structural integrity. The electrostatic pattern and conformation of Bw4 and Bw6 epitopes are maintained among HLA molecules even when expressed in a different structural context. Importantly, variation in epitope amino acid composition does not always translate into a different electrostatic motif, providing an explanation for serologic cross-reactivity. Mutations of critical amino acids that abrogate antibody binding also induce distinct changes in epitope electrostatic properties. In conclusion, high-resolution structural modeling provides a physiochemical explanation for serologic patterns of antibody binding and provides novel insights into HLA immunogenicity. PMID:21840357

  20. Activation of antibody Fc function by antigen-induced conformational changes.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J C; Koshland, M E

    1975-01-01

    IgM antibody directed against the pheny-beta-lactoside hapten was examined for its capacity to fix complement in the presence of the hapten, monohapten-substituted antigen, and multihapten-substituted antigen. Hapten was found to have no effect; monovalent antigen induced an excellent response which could be inhibited by hapten; and multivalent antigen also induced an excellent response which was related to the number of determinants added and not to the formation of antigen-antibody aggregates. The difference between the activities of hapten and monovalent antigen was reflected in their affinities for the IgM antibody. The monovalent antigen had a lower Ka, indicating that energy from binding was used to activate the Fc complement binding sites. These data show that the expression of IgM Fc function depends on a change in Fc conformation produced by the binding of antigen at the distant Fab combining sites. PMID:1061094

  1. Activation of antibody Fc function by antigen-induced conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Brown, J C; Koshland, M E

    1975-12-01

    IgM antibody directed against the pheny-beta-lactoside hapten was examined for its capacity to fix complement in the presence of the hapten, monohapten-substituted antigen, and multihapten-substituted antigen. Hapten was found to have no effect; monovalent antigen induced an excellent response which could be inhibited by hapten; and multivalent antigen also induced an excellent response which was related to the number of determinants added and not to the formation of antigen-antibody aggregates. The difference between the activities of hapten and monovalent antigen was reflected in their affinities for the IgM antibody. The monovalent antigen had a lower Ka, indicating that energy from binding was used to activate the Fc complement binding sites. These data show that the expression of IgM Fc function depends on a change in Fc conformation produced by the binding of antigen at the distant Fab combining sites.

  2. Improved Diagnosis of Acute Pulmonary Histoplasmosis by Combining Antigen and Antibody Detection

    PubMed Central

    Richer, Sarah M.; Smedema, Melinda L.; Durkin, Michelle M.; Herman, Katie M.; Hage, Chadi A.; Fuller, Deanna; Wheat, L. Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute pulmonary histoplasmosis can be severe, especially following heavy inoculum exposure. Rapid diagnosis is critical and often possible by detection of antigen, but this test may be falsely negative in 17% of such cases. Antibody detection by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) may increase sensitivity and permit the measurement of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) classes of antibodies separately. Methods. Microplates coated with Histoplasma antigen were used for testing of serum from patients with acute pulmonary histoplasmosis and controls in the MVista Histoplasma antibody EIA. Results for IgG and IgM were reported independently. Results. IgG antibodies were detected in 87.5%, IgM antibodies in 67.5%, and IgG and/or IgM antibodies in 88.8% of patients with acute pulmonary histoplasmosis in this assay, while immunodiffusion, complement fixation, and antigen testing showed sensitivities of 55.0%, 73.1%, and 67.5%, respectively (n = 80). Combining antigen and antibody detection increased the sensitivity to 96.3%. Conclusions. The MVista Histoplasma antibody EIA offers increased sensitivity over current antibody tests while also allowing separate detection of IgG and IgM antibodies and complementing antigen detection. Combining antigen and EIA antibody testing provides an optimal method for diagnosis of acute pulmonary histoplasmosis. PMID:26797210

  3. The effect of pH dependence of antibody-antigen interactions on subcellular trafficking dynamics.

    PubMed

    Devanaboyina, Siva Charan; Lynch, Sandra M; Ober, Raimund J; Ram, Sripad; Kim, Dongyoung; Puig-Canto, Alberto; Breen, Shannon; Kasturirangan, Srinath; Fowler, Susan; Peng, Li; Zhong, Haihong; Jermutus, Lutz; Wu, Herren; Webster, Carl; Ward, E Sally; Gao, Changshou

    2013-01-01

    A drawback of targeting soluble antigens such as cytokines or toxins with long-lived antibodies is that such antibodies can prolong the half-life of the target antigen by a "buffering" effect. This has motivated the design of antibodies that bind to target with higher affinity at near neutral pH relative to acidic endosomal pH (~pH 6.0). Such antibodies are expected to release antigen within endosomes following uptake into cells, whereas antibody will be recycled and exocytosed in FcRn-expressing cells. To understand how the pH dependence of antibody-antigen interactions affects intracellular trafficking, we generated three antibodies that bind IL-6 with different pH dependencies in the range pH 6.0-7.4. The behavior of antigen in the presence of these antibodies has been characterized using a combination of fixed and live cell fluorescence microscopy. As the affinity of the antibody:IL-6 interaction at pH 6.0 decreases, an increasing amount of antigen dissociates from FcRn-bound antibody in early and late endosomes, and then enters lysosomes. Segregation of antibody and FcRn from endosomes in tubulovesicular transport carriers (TCs) into the recycling pathway can also be observed in live cells, and the extent of IL-6 association with TCs correlates with increasing affinity of the antibody:IL-6 interaction at acidic pH. These analyses result in an understanding, in spatiotemporal terms, of the effect of pH dependence of antibody-antigen interactions on subcellular trafficking and inform the design of antibodies with optimized binding properties for antigen elimination. PMID:24492341

  4. The effect of pH dependence of antibody-antigen interactions on subcellular trafficking dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Devanaboyina, Siva Charan; Lynch, Sandra M; Ober, Raimund J; Ram, Sripad; Kim, Dongyoung; Puig-Canto, Alberto; Breen, Shannon; Kasturirangan, Srinath; Fowler, Susan; Peng, Li; Zhong, Haihong; Jermutus, Lutz; Wu, Herren; Webster, Carl; Ward, E Sally; Gao, Changshou

    2013-01-01

    A drawback of targeting soluble antigens such as cytokines or toxins with long-lived antibodies is that such antibodies can prolong the half-life of the target antigen by a “buffering” effect. This has motivated the design of antibodies that bind to target with higher affinity at near neutral pH relative to acidic endosomal pH (~pH 6.0). Such antibodies are expected to release antigen within endosomes following uptake into cells, whereas antibody will be recycled and exocytosed in FcRn-expressing cells. To understand how the pH dependence of antibody-antigen interactions affects intracellular trafficking, we generated three antibodies that bind IL-6 with different pH dependencies in the range pH 6.0–7.4. The behavior of antigen in the presence of these antibodies has been characterized using a combination of fixed and live cell fluorescence microscopy. As the affinity of the antibody:IL-6 interaction at pH 6.0 decreases, an increasing amount of antigen dissociates from FcRn-bound antibody in early and late endosomes, and then enters lysosomes. Segregation of antibody and FcRn from endosomes in tubulovesicular transport carriers (TCs) into the recycling pathway can also be observed in live cells, and the extent of IL-6 association with TCs correlates with increasing affinity of the antibody:IL-6 interaction at acidic pH. These analyses result in an understanding, in spatiotemporal terms, of the effect of pH dependence of antibody-antigen interactions on subcellular trafficking and inform the design of antibodies with optimized binding properties for antigen elimination. PMID:24492341

  5. PULSED ELECTROCHEMICAL TECHNIQUE FOR MONITORING ANTIBODY-ANTIGEN REACTIONS AT INTERFACES. (R825323)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The mechanism of pulsed potential waveform for monitoring antibody¯antigen interactions at immunosensor interfaces is discussed. Some examples of antibody¯antigen interactions at quartz crystal microbalance and polymer-modified ...

  6. Experimental radioimmunotherapy with I-131-antibody against a differentiation antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Badger, C.C.; Krohn, K.A.; Bernstein, I.D.

    1985-05-01

    The authors have previously shown that I-131-labeled antibodies (Ab) against the Thyl.l antigen can care AKR/Cu (Thyl.2+) mice bearing the AKR/J (Thy 1l.1+) SL2 T-cell lymphoma. The authors have now extended these studies to therapy with I-131-anti-Thyl.1 of SL2 lymphoma in AKR/J mice where Ab reacts with both tumor and normal cells. A 25 ..mu..g bolus was rapidly cleared from serum by binding to spleen cells (75% with Tl/2 <60 min.) and only low concentrations of Ab(<2% ID/gm) were present in tumor after infusion. Therapy of AKR/J mice bearing established s.c. lymphoma nodules with 1500 ..mu..Ci I-131-anti-Thyl.1 resulted in complete regression of the nodule in 6/6 animals although tumor eventually regrew and all animals died of metastatic lymphoma. In contrast, I-131-irrelevant Ab given to produce the same amount of whole body radiation (750 ..mu..Ci) did not affect tumor growth. These studies suggest that radiolabeled-AB against differentiation antigens may be useful for therapy in spite of binding to normal cell populations.

  7. Gravimetric antigen detection utilizing antibody-modified lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Charlotte; Bramfeldt, Hanna; Wingren, Christer; Borrebaeck, Carl; Höök, Fredrik

    2005-10-01

    Lipid bilayers containing 5% nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) lipids supported on SiO2 have been used as a template for immobilization of oligohistidine-tagged single-chained antibody fragments (scFvs) directed against cholera toxin. It was demonstrated that histidine-tagged scFvs could be equally efficiently coupled to an NTA-Ni2+-containing lipid bilayer from a purified sample as from an expression supernatant, thereby providing a coupling method that eliminates time-consuming protein prepurification steps. Irrespective of whether the coupling was made from the unpurified or purified antibody preparation, the template proved to be efficient for antigen (cholera toxin) detection, verified using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. In addition, via a secondary amplification step using lipid vesicles containing GM1 (the natural membrane receptor for cholera toxin), the detection limit of cholera toxin was less than 750 pM. To further strengthen the coupling of scFvs to the lipid bilayer, scFvs containing two histidine tags, instead of just one tag, were also evaluated. The increased coupling strength provided via the bivalent anchoring significantly reduced scFv displacement in complex solutions containing large amounts of histidine-containing proteins, verified via cholera toxin detection in serum.

  8. Antigenicity and Immunogenicity in HIV-1 Antibody-Based Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Leopold; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2012-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies can protect from infection by immunodeficiency viruses. However, the induction by active vaccination of antibodies that can potently neutralize a broad range of circulating virus strains is a goal not yet achieved, despite more than 2 decades of research. Here we review progress made in the field, from early empirical studies to today’s rational structure-based vaccine antigen design. We discuss the existence of broadly neutralizing antibodies, their implications for epitope discovery and recent progress made in antigen design. Finally, we consider the relationship between antigenicity and immunogenicity for B cell recognition and antibody production, a major hurdle for rational vaccine design to overcome. PMID:23227445

  9. Novel use of a radiolabelled antibody against stage specific embryonic antigen for the detection of occult abscesses in mammals

    DOEpatents

    Thakur, Madhukar L.

    1990-01-01

    The invention discloses improved reagents containing antibodies against stage specific embryonic antigen-1 antibodies and improved methods for detection of occult abscess and inflammation using the improved reagents.

  10. Lung injury mediated by antibodies to endothelium. II. Study of the effect of repeated antigen-antibody interactions in rabbits tolerant to heterologous antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Camussi, G.; Caldwell, P. R.; Andres, G.; Brentjens, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of repeated interactions of antibodies with cell surface antigens have been examined in in vitro, but not in in vivo systems. In this study are described the results of multiple antibody-cell surface antigen interactions in vivo. Rabbits were given repeated intravenous injections of goat antibodies to angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), an antigen expressed on the surface of lung endothelial cells. For prevention of anaphylactic reactions, which would have been induced by multiple injections of heterologous immune or nonimmune IgG, the rabbits were made neonatally tolerant to goat IgG. Divalent immune IgG given daily for 21 days induced chronic antigenic modulation (antigen disappearance) with resistance to antibody-mediated inflammatory lesions. The rabbits, however, developed degenerative changes of alveolar endothelial and epithelial cells. Administration of immune IgG every other day for 43 days allowed partial reexpression of ACE and was associated with intravascular, but not interstitial, inflammatory changes. In contrast, repeated administration of monovalent immune Fab did not induce antigenic modulation but caused severe, lethal, interstitial pneumonitis. Thus, in this experimental model the development of acute interstitial inflammatory changes correlates with persistence of antigen and is abrogated by disappearance of antigen induced by divalent antibodies. Further, repeated endothelial antigen antibody interactions fail to induce chronic inflammatory or sclerosing lung lesions. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 7 Figure 7 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:3034065

  11. Inhibition of immune opsonin-independent phagocytosis by antibody to a pulmonary macrophage cell surface antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Parod, R.J.; Godleski, J.J.; Brain J.D.

    1986-03-15

    Unlike other hamster phagoycytes, hamster pulmonary macrophages (PM) avidly ingest albumin-coated latex particles in the absence of serum. They also possess a highly specific cell surface antigen. To evaluate the relationship between these two characteristics, PM were incubated with mouse monoclonal antibody directed against the PM antigen. After unbound antibody was removed, the amount of bound antibody and the phagocytic capability of PM were measured by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Maximum antibody binding produced a 25% inhibition of ingestion. Particle attachment was not affected. This effect was antigen specific, since neither a nonspecific mouse myeloma protein of the same subclass nor a mouse antibody that bound to another hamster surface antigen had any effect on binding or ingestion. If antigen-specific F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments were introduced both before and during the period of phagocytosis, the inhibition of particle ingestion approached 100%. Particle binding increased at low F(ab')/sub 2/ concentrations but declined at higher concentrations. Because calcium may play a role in the ingestion process, the effect of antibody on /sup 45/Ca uptake was evaluated. It was observed that antigen-specific F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments stimulated /sup 45/Ca uptake, whereas control antibodies did not. These results suggest that the antigen reacting with the anti-hamster PM monoclonal antibody is involved in immune opsonin-independent phagocytosis and that calcium participates in this phagocytic process.

  12. Quantitative Assessment of the Effects of Oxidants on Antigen-Antibody Binding In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shuang; Wang, Guanyu; Xu, Naijin; Liu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We quantitatively assessed the influence of oxidants on antigen-antibody-binding activity. Methods. We used several immunological detection methods, including precipitation reactions, agglutination reactions, and enzyme immunoassays, to determine antibody activity. The oxidation-reduction potential was measured in order to determine total serum antioxidant capacity. Results. Certain concentrations of oxidants resulted in significant inhibition of antibody activity but had little influence on total serum antioxidant capacity. Conclusions. Oxidants had a significant influence on interactions between antigen and antibody, but minimal effect on the peptide of the antibody molecule. PMID:27313823

  13. [Target antigens for therapeutic antibodies in oncology: many candidates, few successes].

    PubMed

    Ceze, Nicolas; Probst, Alicia; Lecomte, Thierry; Ohresser, Marc; Paintaud, Gilles; Watier, Hervé

    2007-01-01

    Targeted therapies, especially monoclonal antibodies, have reached an increasing importance in oncology. High-throughput techniques have allowed the identification of numerous transcripts, proteins, or non-protein antigens, which have generated the concept of immunome. This epitope library constitutes a huge reservoir of candidate antigens susceptible to become some say the target of an antibody for passive immunotherapy. However, the conception and development of a therapeutic antibody represent a very important investment, both in terms of human power and finance, such that there is a requirement for an early identification of the best candidates among the potential target antigens. Among multiple criteria, the function of the antigen is crucial when it has been identified. A receptor antigen can be targeted by an agonistic or an antagonistic antibody, according to what is sought. When the antigen function is unknown, a therapeutic antibody can be useful, for instance through induction of apoptosis or through accrual of immuno-competent cells, via its Fc portion (complement-dependent cytotoxicity or antibody-dependent cytotoxicity). Other antibody features, unrelated to its function, can also be exploited, such as its internalisation or its translocation in membrane lipid rafts. The expression of the target antigen may also be crucial, in terms of localisation and levels, as is its tumour specificity, which can influence the efficacy and toxicity of the targeting antibody. The multiplicity of the factors to be taken into account and the complexity of the mechanism of action of therapeutic antibodies renders the choice of a target antigen a hazardous bet. Very often, this is only when the clinical efficacy of a targeting antibody is demonstrated that the antigen can be considered as a good target. PMID:17964990

  14. Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia caused by human leucocyte antigen-B27 antibody.

    PubMed

    Thude, H; Schorner, U; Helfricht, C; Loth, M; Maak, B; Barz, D

    2006-04-01

    Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT) occurs when maternal alloantibodies to antigens presented on foetal platelets cause their immune destruction. Whether human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies can cause NAIT is controversial. Here, a patient was described who suffered from a NAIT caused by an HLA-B27 antibody. Sera from the mother and the newborn were tested for human platelet antigen antibodies and HLA antibodies by monoclonal antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigens (MAIPA) assay, solid phase-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), lymphocytotoxicity assay (LCT) and flow cytometric analysis. No antibodies against cluster designation (CD)109 and platelet glycoproteins of the father were found in patient's and mother's serum. However, HLA ELISA was used to identify HLA antibody in both sera. The antibody was specified as HLA-B27 antibody. Typing results showed that the father descended HLA-B27 antigen on patient and his brother. The mother was HLA-B27 negative. It is most conceivable that the previous pregnancy of the mother induced the production of anti-HLA-B27 antibody, which crossed the placenta and subsequently caused an NAIT in the case presented. PMID:16623921

  15. Preventing the infiltration of leukocytes by monoclonal antibody blocks the development of progressive ischemia in rat burns.

    PubMed

    Choi, M; Rabb, H; Arnaout, M A; Ehrlich, H P

    1995-10-01

    Tissue loss as a consequence of thermal trauma occurs in two stages. There is immediate necrosis in tissues directly killed by the thermal energy, followed by a delayed secondary necrosis in neighboring tissues. The infiltration of neutrophils into traumatized tissues is a hallmark of the inflammatory response. Neutrophils have the machinery to kill invading microorganisms, but these same weapons have the capacity to destroy the host's viable tissues as well. Leukocyte infiltration requires their adherence to the vascular endothelial cell surface. Masking these adhesion sites on neutrophils will block the adhesion of neutrophils to the endothelium. A monoclonal antibody (mAb) was developed to guinea pig leukocyte adhesion sites CD11b/ CD18, and this mAb cross-reacts with rat leukocytes, blocking their adherence. Rats received a "comb burn" composed of four rectangular full-thickness burns placed in a row and separated by three areas left unburned. The four individual burns convert into a single large wound because the blood flow to the interspaces was terminated, blood vessels were occluded, and leukocytes were present in the extravascular space. The systemic administration of the mAb (50 to 150 microliters) immediately following a comb burn promoted the survival of the interspace, demonstrated by the prevention of loss of blood flow by laser Doppler monitoring, maintained patent vessels by latex vascular casts, blocked extravascular migration of neutrophils histologically at 2 hours, and limited the tissue loss to the original four burns. PMID:7568496

  16. A multiplex method for the detection of serum antibodies against in silico-predicted tumor antigens.

    PubMed

    Reuschenbach, Miriam; Dörre, Jonathan; Waterboer, Tim; Kopitz, Jürgen; Schneider, Martin; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jäger, Elke; Kloor, Matthias; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus

    2014-12-01

    Humoral immune responses against tumor antigens are studied as indirect markers of antigen exposure and in cancer vaccine studies. An increasing number of tumor antigens potentially translated from mutant genes is identified by advances in genomic sequencing. They represent an interesting source for yet unknown immunogenic epitopes. We here describe a multiplex method using the Luminex technology allowing for the detection of antibodies against multiple in silico-predicted linear neo-antigens in large sets of sera. The approach included 32 synthetic biotinylated peptides comprising a predicted set of frameshift mutation-induced neo-antigens. The antigens were fused to a FLAG epitope to ensure monitoring antigen binding to avidin-linked microspheres in the absence of monoclonal antibodies. Analytical specificity of measured serum antibody reactivity was proven by the detection of immune responses in immunized rabbits and a colorectal cancer patient vaccinated with peptides included in the assay. The measured antibody responses were comparable to peptide ELISA, and inter-assay reproducibility of the multiplex approach was excellent (R (2) > 0.98) for 20 sera tested against all antigens. Our methodic approach represents a valuable platform to monitor antibody responses against predicted antigens. It may be used in individualized cancer vaccine studies, thereby extending the relevance beyond the model system in the presented approach.

  17. Association of human leukocyte antigen class II alleles with severe Middle East respiratory syndrome-coronavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Hajeer, Ali H.; Balkhy, Hanan; Johani, Sameera; Yousef, Mohammed Z.; Arabi, Yaseen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is a disease of the lower respiratory tract and is characterized by high mortality. It is caused by a beta coronavirus (CoV) referred to as MERS-CoV. Majority of MERS-CoV cases have been reported from Saudi Arabia. AIM: We investigated the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) Class II alleles in patients with severe MERS who were admitted in our Intensive Care Unit. METHODS: A total of 23 Saudi patients with severe MERS-CoV infection were typed for HLA class II, results were compared with those of 161 healthy controls. RESULTS: Two HLA class II alleles were associated with the disease; HLA-DRB1*11:01 and DQB1*02:02, but not with the disease outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the HLA-DRB1*11:01 and DQB1*02:02 may be associated with susceptibility to MERS. PMID:27512511

  18. Human Leukocyte Antigen Typing Using a Knowledge Base Coupled with a High-Throughput Oligonucleotide Probe Array Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guang Lan; Keskin, Derin B.; Lin, Hsin-Nan; Lin, Hong Huang; DeLuca, David S.; Leppanen, Scott; Milford, Edgar L.; Reinherz, Ellis L.; Brusic, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigens (HLA) are important biomarkers because multiple diseases, drug toxicity, and vaccine responses reveal strong HLA associations. Current clinical HLA typing is an elimination process requiring serial testing. We present an alternative in situ synthesized DNA-based microarray method that contains hundreds of thousands of probes representing a complete overlapping set covering 1,610 clinically relevant HLA class I alleles accompanied by computational tools for assigning HLA type to 4-digit resolution. Our proof-of-concept experiment included 21 blood samples, 18 cell lines, and multiple controls. The method is accurate, robust, and amenable to automation. Typing errors were restricted to homozygous samples or those with very closely related alleles from the same locus, but readily resolved by targeted DNA sequencing validation of flagged samples. High-throughput HLA typing technologies that are effective, yet inexpensive, can be used to analyze the world’s populations, benefiting both global public health and personalized health care. PMID:25505899

  19. Discordance at human leukocyte antigen-DRB3 and protection from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmission.

    PubMed

    Hader, Shannon L; Hodge, Thomas W; Buchacz, Kate A; Bray, Robert A; Padian, Nancy S; Rausa, Alfio; Slaviniski, Sally A; Holmberg, Scott D

    2002-06-15

    Host human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) integrated into the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 envelope could theoretically determine, as in tissue transplants, whether HIV-1 is "rejected" by exposed susceptible persons, preventing transmission. HLA discordance (mismatch) was examined among 45 heterosexual partner pairs in which at least 1 partner was HIV-1 infected and exposure or transmission between partners had occurred. Immunologic discordance at class II HLA-DRB3 (present in the HIV donor partner but absent in the recipient partner) was associated with lack of transmission of HIV-1. Eight (35%) of 23 partner pairs in which HIV-1 transmission did not occur were immunologically discordant at HLA-DRB3, compared with 0 of 11 partner pairs in which HIV-1 transmission did occur (P=.027). Further investigation of the roles of class II HLAs in HIV-1 transmission and as possible components of HIV-1 vaccines should be pursued. PMID:12085318

  20. Development of an antigen microarray for high throughput monoclonal antibody selection

    PubMed Central

    Staudt, Nicole; Müller-Sienerth, Nicole; Wright, Gavin J.

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are valuable laboratory reagents and are increasingly being exploited as therapeutics to treat a range of diseases. Selecting new monoclonal antibodies that are validated to work in particular applications, despite the availability of several different techniques, can be resource intensive with uncertain outcomes. To address this, we have developed an approach that enables early screening of hybridoma supernatants generated from an animal immunised with up to five different antigens followed by cloning of the antibody into a single expression plasmid. While this approach relieved the cellular cloning bottleneck and had the desirable ability to screen antibody function prior to cloning, the small volume of hybridoma supernatant available for screening limited the number of antigens for pooled immunisation. Here, we report the development of an antigen microarray that significantly reduces the volume of supernatant required for functional screening. This approach permits a significant increase in the number of antigens for parallel monoclonal antibody selection from a single animal. Finally, we show the successful use of a convenient small-scale transfection method to rapidly identify plasmids that encode functional cloned antibodies, addressing another bottleneck in this approach. In summary, we show that a hybrid approach of combining established hybridoma antibody technology with refined screening and antibody cloning methods can be used to select monoclonal antibodies of desired functional properties against many different antigens from a single immunised host. PMID:24472540

  1. [Genetic diversity based on swine leukocyte antigen complex mi-crosatellites(SLA-MS) in five pig populations].

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Liu, Rong-Hui; Li, Hua; Zuo, Qi-Zhen; Li, Yan; Wu, Zhen-Fang

    2012-11-01

    The genetic diversity of swine leukocyte antigen complex (SLA) was studied among Guangdong local pigs, Huanan wild boars (S.s. chirodontus) and introduced pigs, which aimed at providing a theoretical foundation for further pig anti-disease resistance breeding. Pietrain pigs, Duroc pigs, Large black-white pigs, Lantang pigs, and Huanan wild boars were genotyped by employing 18 microsatellites in swine leukocyte antigen complex (SLA-MS). The result showed that the average diversity in SLA II was higher (He=0.628, PIC=0.581) than that in SLA I (He=0.530, PIC=0.474) and in SLA III (He=0.526, PIC=0.458). The molecular diversity indices (MDI) of Huanan wild boars was the highest(0.716), followed by Lantang pigs (0.614), Large black-white pigs (0.559), Pietrain pigs (0.550) and Duroc pigs (0.507). As a whole, the genetic diversity of Huanan wild boars was the highest over Guangdong native pigs and introduced pigs. Large black-white pigs and Duroc pigs had ever happened a severe bottleneck by comparison with the Garza-Williamson index (GWI) in Huanan wild boar. From the genetic distance, one clade was that Lantang pigs were first clustered with Huanan wild boar, and then grouped together with Large black-white pigs; another clade was that Pietrain pigs were independently clustered with Duroc pigs in the NJ tree. The results would establish the foundation for pig conservation of germplasm resource, disease resistance breeding, and multiplicative strains.

  2. Construction and Screening of Antigen Targeted Immune Yeast Surface Display Antibody Libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Keith D.; Pefaur, Noah B.; Baird, Cheryl L.

    2008-07-01

    These protocols describe a yeast surface display-based process for the rapid selection of antibodies from immunized mice, eliminating the need for creating and screening hybridoma fusions. A yeast surface display library of single-chain antibody fragments (scFvs) is created from antigen-binding B cells from the splenocytes of immunized mice. The antigen targeted library is then screened for antigen specific scFv by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Library construction and screening can be accomplished in as little as 2 weeks resulting in a panel of scFvs specific for the target antigen.

  3. Construction and Screening of Antigen Targeted Immune Yeast Surface Display Antibody Libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Keith D.; Pefaur, Noah B.; Baird, Cheryl L.

    2009-08-02

    These protocols describe a yeast surface display-based process for the rapid selection of antibodies from immunized mice, eliminating the need for creating and screening hybridoma fusions. A yeast surface display library of single-chain antibody fragments (scFvs) is created from antigen-binding B cells from the splenocytes of immunized mice. The antigen targeted library is then screened for antigen specific scFv by magneticactivated cell sorting (MACS) and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Library construction and screening can be accomplished in as little as 2 weeks, resulting in a panel of scFvs specific for the target antigen.

  4. Association of the bovine leukocyte antigen major histocompatibility complex class II DRB3*4401 allele with host resistance to the Lone Star Tick, Amblyomma americanum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The MHC of cattle, known as the bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) complex, plays an integral role in disease and parasite susceptibility, and immune responsiveness of the host. While susceptibility to tick infestation in cattle is believed to be heritable, genes that may be responsible for the manife...

  5. Monoclonal antibody recognizing human melanoma-carcinoma cross-reacting oncofetal antigen epitopically associated with carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Liao, S K; Kwong, P C; Clarke, B J; Dent, P B; Ryan, E D; Khosravi, M J; Laferte, S; Krantz, M J

    1985-05-01

    By fusion of mouse NS1 myeloma cells with splenocytes from a BALB/c mouse immunized with human melanoma cells, an IgG1 monoclonal antibody, designated as 140.72, was produced. By the mixed hemadsorption antibody binding assay, 140.72 was shown to react with 17 of 20 melanoma cell lines and with 5 of 14 carcinoma cell lines. This antibody also reacted with 3 of 3 normal melanocyte cultures in much lower titers. It did not react with any of 35 other normal and malignant lines, including neuroblastoma, glioblastoma, sarcoma, teratoma, fibroblast, and lymphoid cell lines. Absorption with fresh melanoma and carcinoma homogenates confirmed the results of direct tests. Fetal reactivity of antibody 140.72 was determined by positive absorption with 10 of 11 tissue homogenates derived from different fetuses of 10-16 weeks' gestation. The reactivity of this antibody was completely removed by absorption with a highly purified preparation of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) derived from a colon carcinoma. The antigenic activity was detected in the culture medium of reactive cell lines. Immunoprecipitation analyses of melanoma and carcinoma cells indicated that the antigenic determinant recognized by antibody 140.72 is on a glycoprotein with an apparent molecular weight of 95,000-150,000 common to both serologically reactive cell types. Additionally, a 200,000-molecular-weight glycoprotein corresponding to the CEA molecule was detected only on the reactive carcinoma cells. These data confirmed previous findings obtained with polyclonal anti-CEA antisera for the existence of shared CEA-related antigenic determinants on human carcinomas and melanomas and provided additional molecular characterization of these glycoproteins. Further characterization of the molecules bearing the antigenic determinant recognized by antibody 140.72 should be performed with a view to exploring its potential in the immunodiagnosis and immunotherapy of patients with melanoma.

  6. Hepatitis B Virus DNA in Blood Samples Positive for Antibodies to Core Antigen and Negative for Surface Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, C.; León, G.; Loureiro, C. L.; Uzcátegui, N.; Liprandi, F.; Pujol, F. H.

    1999-01-01

    Anti-hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg)-positive hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative plasma samples from blood donors were tested by nested PCR. DNA positivity was more significantly associated with high levels of anti-HBcAg than with low levels of anti-HBsAg antibodies. Analysis of a dilution of anti-HBcAg antibodies might result in a more rational exclusion of anti-HBcAg-positive HBsAg-negative samples, reducing the number of donations discarded and enabling more countries to incorporate anti-HBcAg testing. PMID:10473534

  7. Antibody

    MedlinePlus

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  8. Prognostic impact of human leukocyte antigen class I expression and association of platinum resistance with immunologic profiles in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Mariya, Tasuku; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Torigoe, Toshihiko; Asano, Takuya; Kuroda, Takafumi; Yasuda, Kazuyo; Mizuuchi, Masahito; Sonoda, Tomoko; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Noriyuki

    2014-12-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is one of the most deadly carcinomas in females. Immune systems can recognize EOCs; however, a defect of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I expression is known to be a major mechanism for escape from immune systems, resulting in poor prognosis. The purpose of this study is to identify novel correlations between immunologic responses and other clinical factors. We investigated the expression of immunologic components in 122 cases of EOCs for which surgical operations were performed between 2001 and 2011. We immunohistochemically stained EOC specimens using an anti-pan HLA class I monoclonal antibody (EMR8-5) and anti-CD3, -CD4, and -CD8 antibodies, and we analyzed correlations between immunologic parameters and clinical factors. In multivariate analysis that used the Cox proportional hazards model, independent prognostic factors for overall survival in advanced EOCs included low expression level of HLA class I [risk ratio (RR), 1.97; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01-3.83; P = 0.046] and loss of intraepithelial cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) infiltration (RR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.06-4.20; P = 0.033). Interestingly, almost all platinum-resistant cases showed a significantly low rate of intraepithelial CTL infiltration in the χ(2) test (positive vs. negative: 9.0% vs. 97.7%; P < 0.001). Results from a logistic regression model revealed that low CTL infiltration rate was an independent factor of platinum resistance in multivariate analysis (OR, 3.77; 95% CI, 1.08-13.12; P = 0.037). Platinum-resistant EOCs show poor immunologic responses. The immune escape system of EOCs may be one of the mechanisms of platinum resistance.

  9. Prognostic Implications of Antibodies to Soluble Liver Antigen in Autoimmune Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi-Xian; Shao, Jian-Guo; Shen, Yi; Zhang, Jian; Hua, Yu; Wang, Lu-Jun; Qin, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Prognostic evaluation is important for the management of patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). Although some autoantibodies have been associated with disease activity and outcomes, the implication of antibodies to soluble liver antigen (anti-SLA) remains controversial. To conduct a meta-analysis of observational studies which addressed differences in clinical characteristics by anti-SLA status in patients with AIH. Three databases PUBMED, EMBASE, and OVID were systemically searched up to January 2015 using the terms “soluble liver antigen” or “liver-pancreas antigen” and “autoimmune hepatitis” with restriction to English-language. Studies were included if at least 50 patients with objective diagnosis of AIH were enrolled, anti-SLA detection was performed for the patients, and prognostic outcomes and/or disease severity were reported. Two investigators independently reviewed retrieved literature and evaluated eligibility. Discrepancy was resolved by discussion and a third investigator. Quality of included studies was evaluated using Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale (NOS). Data were pooled using fixed-effect or random-effect models. Prognostic outcomes included death from hepatic failure or requirement for liver transplantation, and responses to immunosuppressive therapy regarding remission or relapse. Results were combined on the odds ratio (OR) or standardized mean difference (SMD) scales. Eight studies were enrolled in this study, involving a total of 1297 AIH patients among whom 195 with anti-SLA. Pooled serum AST levels tended to be lower in anti-SLA seropositive patients. The presence of anti-SLA conferred 3.1-fold increased risk of hepatic death in AIH patients. The remission rates were comparable between anti-SLA seropositive and seronegative AIH patients, while anti-SLA positivity was associated with nearly 2-fold increased risk of relapse after drug withdrawal. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allotype DR3 was positively

  10. Sodium ethylmercurithiosalicylate (Merthiolate) inhibition of antigen-antibody interactions in radioimmunoassay systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, M.; Wilber, J.F.

    1984-02-01

    Sodium ethylmercurithiosalicylate (Merthiolate), used for preservation of buffer solutions, was found to inhibit the antigen-antibody binding reactions in radioimmunoassay systems in a noncompetitive manner. This effect is attributable to mercury ion per se. 10 references. 2 figures.

  11. Redistribution and modulation of Gross murine leukemia virus antigens induced by specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ioachim, H L; Sabbath, M

    1979-01-01

    Gross murine leukemia virus (G-MuLV)-induced rat leukemia cells in tissue culture replicate G-MuLV, express strong virus-associated membrane antigenicity, and are consistently killed by specific antibodies and complement in cytotoxicity tests. To explore the effect of specific antibodies, rat anti-G-MuLV antisera were added to the cultures of leukemia cells for variable periods of time. Redistribution of virus particles as well as of membrane virus antigens in the form of polar patches and caps was observed by electron microscopy, indirect immunofluorescence, and immunoelectron microscopy. Substantial decreases in cytotoxicity indexes accompanied these changes. The antigen modulation induced by anti-G-MuLV antibodies in vitro paralleled similar changes obtained in vivo by transplanttion of leukemia cells in rats with high anti-G-MuLV antibody titers. The importance of antigen modulation in this system resides in its direct relationship with the malignant potential of the leukemia cells.

  12. Monitoring human leukocyte antigen class I molecules by micro-Raman spectroscopy at single-cell level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Gobind; La Rocca, Rosanna; Lakshmikanth, Tadepally; Gentile, Francesco; Tallerico, Rossana; Zambetti, Lia P.; Devitt, J.; Candeloro, Patrizio; de Angelis, Francesco; Carbone, Ennio; di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2010-03-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules are formed by three immunoglobulin-like domains (α1, α2, and α3) once folded by peptide and β2-microglobulin show the presence of two α-helix streams and one β-sheet limiting the pocket for the antigenic peptide. The loss of HLA class I expression in tumors and virus-infected cells, on one hand, prevents T cell recognition, while on the other hand, it leads to natural killer (NK) cell mediated cytotoxicity. We propose the possibility of using Raman spectroscopy to measure the relative expression of HLA class I molecules at the single-cell level. Raman spectra are recorded for three cell lines (K562, T2, and T3) and monomers (HLA class I folded, unfolded and peptide+β2-microlobulin refolded) using 830 nm laser line. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that in the Raman spectra, ranging from 1600 to 1800 cm-1, the intensity variation of cells associated with HLA class I molecules could be measured.

  13. Monitoring human leukocyte antigen class I molecules by micro-Raman spectroscopy at single-cell level.

    PubMed

    Das, Gobind; La Rocca, Rosanna; Lakshmikanth, Tadepally; Gentile, Francesco; Tallerico, Rossana; Zambetti, Lia P; Devitt, J; Candeloro, Patrizio; De Angelis, Francesco; Carbone, Ennio; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2010-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules are formed by three immunoglobulin-like domains (alpha1, alpha2, and alpha3) once folded by peptide and beta(2)-microglobulin show the presence of two alpha-helix streams and one beta-sheet limiting the pocket for the antigenic peptide. The loss of HLA class I expression in tumors and virus-infected cells, on one hand, prevents T cell recognition, while on the other hand, it leads to natural killer (NK) cell mediated cytotoxicity. We propose the possibility of using Raman spectroscopy to measure the relative expression of HLA class I molecules at the single-cell level. Raman spectra are recorded for three cell lines (K562, T2, and T3) and monomers (HLA class I folded, unfolded and peptide+beta(2)-microlobulin refolded) using 830 nm laser line. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that in the Raman spectra, ranging from 1600 to 1800 cm(-1), the intensity variation of cells associated with HLA class I molecules could be measured.

  14. A combined approach of human leukocyte antigen ligandomics and immunogenicity analysis to improve peptide-based cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Peper, Janet Kerstin; Stevanović, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    The breakthrough development of immune checkpoint inhibitors as clinically effective novel therapies demonstrates the potential of cancer immunotherapy. The identification of suitable targets for specific immunotherapy, however, remains a challenging task. Most peptides previously used for vaccination in clinical trials were able to elicit strong immunological responses but failed with regard to clinical benefit. This might, at least partly, be caused by an inadequate peptide selection, usually derived from established tumor-associated antigens which are not necessarily presented as human leukocyte antigen (HLA) ligands. Recently, HLA ligandome analysis revealed cancer-associated peptides, which have been used in clinical trials showing encouraging impact on survival. To improve peptide-based cancer immunotherapy, our group established a combined approach of HLA ligandomics and immunogenicity analysis for the identification of vaccine peptides. This approach is based on the identification of naturally presented HLA ligands on tumor samples, the selection of tumor-associated/tumor-specific HLA ligands and their subsequent testing for immunogenicity in vitro. In this review, we want to present our pipeline for the identification of vaccine peptides, focusing on ovarian cancer, and want to discuss differences to other approaches. Furthermore, we want to give a short outlook of a potential multi-peptide vaccination trial using the novel identified peptides.

  15. Loss of enzyme-sensitive antigens due to the presence of leukocytes, neomycin sulfate, and LISS.

    PubMed

    Velliquette, R W; Howard, P; Malyska, H; Reid, M E

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that RBCs with residual WBCs stored in LISS and neomycin sulfate develop characteristics associated with enzyme-treated RBCs. During a mass screening program to antigen type donor RBCs, we observed that the Fya antigens on a RBC sample from an in-house panel became non-detectable with anti-Fya after incubation overnight in Diluent 2 from Micro Typing Systems, Inc. (MTS, Pompano Beach, FL). In response to this observation, we initiated an investigation to determine the cause. Tests were performed according to the manfacturer's instructions in MTS neutral gel cards or gel cards containing anti-IgG. We found that a reduction or loss of the Fya, Fyb, and M antigens occurs when RBCs were prepared from samples containing residual WBCs (as a source of enzymes) and subsequently incubated in media containing neomycin sulfate and LISS. We showed that the effect did not occur in the absence of neomycin sulfate. RBC antigens can be altered in LISS if they have first been exposed to neomycin. We recommend restricting the use of RBCs suspended in MTS Diluent 2 to the day of dilution (as indicated in the package insert) if preparing reagent RBCs from sources that were not leukoreduced and were stored in the presence of neomycin.

  16. Serological survey of normal humans for natural antibody to cell surface antigens of melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, A N; Taormina, M C; Ikeda, H; Watanabe, T; Oettgen, H F; Old, L J

    1980-01-01

    Sera of 106 normal adult men were tested for antibodies reacting with cell surface antigens of three established lines of cultured malignant melanoma. Positive reactions with a protein A assay for IgG antibodies were extremely rare (1-2%). The frequency of positive reactions with assays for IgM antibodies was higher: 5-15% in immune adherence assays and 55-82% in anti-C3 mixed hemadsorption assays. After low-titered sera and sera reacting with fetal calf serum components, conventional alloantigens, and widely distributed class 3 antigens were excluded, sera from seven individuals (one with IgG antibody and six with IgM antibodies) were selected for detailed analysis. The serum containing the IgG antibody came from a healthy 65-year-old Caucasian man; titers of antibody in his serum ranged from < 1/10 to 1/40,000 in tests with different melanoma cell lines. This IgG antibody identifies a differentiation antigen of melanocytes, provisionally designated Mel 1, that distinguishes two classes of melanomas: 22 melanoma cell lines typed Mel 1+ and 17 types Mel 1-. Mel 1 is expressed by fetal fibroblasts but not adult fibroblasts and can be found on a proportion of cultured epithelial cancer cell lines (5 out of 23) but not on glioma or B-cell lines. The melanoma antigens detected by the naturally occurring IgM antibodies are serologically unrelated to Mel 1 but, like Mel 1, appear to be differentiation antigens that distinguish subsets of melanoma. These IgM antibodies detect antigens that are identical or closely related to the AH antigen, a melanoma surface antigen that was initially defined by autologous antibody in a patient with melanoma. In view of the immunogenicity of both Mel 1 and the AH antigens in humans and their occurrence on more than 50% of melanomas, it remains to be seen whether antibody to these antigens can be elicited by specific vaccination of seronegative melanoma patients and whether this will have an influence on the clinical course of the disease

  17. Challenges in Antibody Development against Tn and Sialyl-Tn Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Loureiro, Liliana R.; Carrascal, Mylène A.; Barbas, Ana; Ramalho, José S.; Novo, Carlos; Delannoy, Philippe; Videira, Paula A.

    2015-01-01

    The carbohydrate antigens Tn and sialyl-Tn (STn) are expressed in most carcinomas and usually absent in healthy tissues. These antigens have been correlated with cancer progression and poor prognosis, and associated with immunosuppressive microenvironment. Presently they are used in clinical trials as therapeutic vaccination, but with limited success due to their low immunogenicity. Alternatively, anti-Tn and/or STn antibodies may be used to harness the immune system against tumor cells. Whilst the development of antibodies against these antigens had a boost two decades ago for diagnostic use, so far no such antibody entered into clinical trials. Possible limitations are the low specificity and efficiency of existing antibodies and that novel antibodies are still necessary. The vast array of methodologies available today will allow rapid antibody development and novel formats. Following the advent of hybridoma technology, the immortalization of human B cells became a methodology to obtain human monoclonal antibodies with better specificity. Advances in molecular biology including phage display technology for high throughput screening, transgenic mice and more recently molecularly engineered antibodies enhanced the field of antibody production. The development of novel antibodies against Tn and STn taking advantage of innovative technologies and engineering techniques may result in innovative therapeutic antibodies for cancer treatment. PMID:26270678

  18. The constant region affects antigen binding of antibodies to DNA by altering secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yumin; Janda, Alena; Eryilmaz, Ertan; Casadevall, Arturo; Putterman, Chaim

    2013-11-01

    We previously demonstrated an important role of the constant region in the pathogenicity of anti-DNA antibodies. To determine the mechanisms by which the constant region affects autoantibody binding, a panel of isotype-switch variants (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b) was generated from the murine PL9-11 IgG3 autoantibody. The affinity of the PL9-11 antibody panel for histone was measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Tryptophan fluorescence was used to determine wavelength shifts of the antibody panel upon binding to DNA and histone. Finally, circular dichroism spectroscopy was used to measure changes in secondary structure. SPR analysis revealed significant differences in histone binding affinity between members of the PL9-11 panel. The wavelength shifts of tryptophan fluorescence emission were found to be dependent on the antibody isotype, while circular dichroism analysis determined that changes in antibody secondary structure content differed between isotypes upon antigen binding. Thus, the antigen binding affinity is dependent on the particular constant region expressed. Moreover, the effects of antibody binding to antigen were also constant region dependent. Alteration of secondary structures influenced by constant regions may explain differences in fine specificity of anti-DNA antibodies between antibodies with similar variable regions, as well as cross-reactivity of anti-DNA antibodies with non-DNA antigens.

  19. The Structural Basis of Antibody-Antigen Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Sela-Culang, Inbal; Kunik, Vered; Ofran, Yanay

    2013-01-01

    The function of antibodies (Abs) involves specific binding to antigens (Ags) and activation of other components of the immune system to fight pathogens. The six hypervariable loops within the variable domains of Abs, commonly termed complementarity determining regions (CDRs), are widely assumed to be responsible for Ag recognition, while the constant domains are believed to mediate effector activation. Recent studies and analyses of the growing number of available Ab structures, indicate that this clear functional separation between the two regions may be an oversimplification. Some positions within the CDRs have been shown to never participate in Ag binding and some off-CDRs residues often contribute critically to the interaction with the Ag. Moreover, there is now growing evidence for non-local and even allosteric effects in Ab-Ag interaction in which Ag binding affects the constant region and vice versa. This review summarizes and discusses the structural basis of Ag recognition, elaborating on the contribution of different structural determinants of the Ab to Ag binding and recognition. We discuss the CDRs, the different approaches for their identification and their relationship to the Ag interface. We also review what is currently known about the contribution of non-CDRs regions to Ag recognition, namely the framework regions (FRs) and the constant domains. The suggested mechanisms by which these regions contribute to Ag binding are discussed. On the Ag side of the interaction, we discuss attempts to predict B-cell epitopes and the suggested idea to incorporate Ab information into B-cell epitope prediction schemes. Beyond improving the understanding of immunity, characterization of the functional role of different parts of the Ab molecule may help in Ab engineering, design of CDR-derived peptides, and epitope prediction. PMID:24115948

  20. Synthetic oligonucleotide antigens modified with locked nucleic acids detect disease specific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Samuelsen, Simone V.; Solov’yov, Ilia A.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Mellins, Elizabeth; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup; Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-01-01

    New techniques to detect and quantify antibodies to nucleic acids would provide a significant advance over current methods, which often lack specificity. We investigate the potential of novel antigens containing locked nucleic acids (LNAs) as targets for antibodies. Particularly, employing molecular dynamics we predict optimal nucleotide composition for targeting DNA-binding antibodies. As a proof of concept, we address a problem of detecting anti-DNA antibodies that are characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus, a chronic autoimmune disease with multiple manifestations. We test the best oligonucleotide binders in surface plasmon resonance studies to analyze binding and kinetic aspects of interactions between antigens and target DNA. These DNA and LNA/DNA sequences showed improved binding in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using human samples of pediatric lupus patients. Our results suggest that the novel method is a promising tool to create antigens for research and point-of-care monitoring of anti-DNA antibodies. PMID:27775006

  1. Artificial antigen-presenting cells transduced with telomerase efficiently expand epitope-specific, human leukocyte antigen-restricted cytotoxic T cells.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Jakob; Latouche, Jean-Baptiste; Ma, Chia; Sadelain, Michel

    2005-06-15

    Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is overexpressed in most human tumors, making it a potential target for cancer immunotherapy. hTERT-derived CTL epitopes have been identified previously, including p865 (RLVDDFLLV) and p540 (ILAKFLHWL), which are restricted by the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I A*0201 allele. However, it remains a major challenge to efficiently and consistently expand hTERT-specific CTLs from donor peripheral blood T lymphocytes. To bypass the need for generating conventional antigen-presenting cells (APC) on an autologous basis, we investigated the potential ability of fibroblast-derived artificial APCs (AAPC) to activate and expand HLA-A*0201-restricted CTLs. We show here that AAPCs stably expressing HLA-A*0201, human beta(2)-microglobulin, B7.1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and LFA-3, together with either p540 and p865 minigenes or the full-length hTERT, effectively stimulate tumoricidal, hTERT-specific CTLs. hTERT-expressing AAPCs stimulated both p540 and p865 CTLs as shown by peptide-specific cytolysis and tetramer staining, indicating that hTERT is processed by the AAPCs and that the two peptides are presented as codominant epitopes. The level of cytotoxic activity against a panel of tumors comprising hematologic and epithelial malignancies varied, correlating overall with the level of HLA-A2 and hTERT expression by the target cell. Starting from 100 mL blood, approximately 100 million hTERT-specific CTLs could be generated over the course of five sequential stimulations, representing an expansion of approximately 1 x 10(5). Our data show that AAPCs process hTERT antigen and efficiently stimulate hTERT-specific CTLs from human peripheral blood T lymphocytes and suggest that sufficient expansion could be achieved to be clinically useful for adoptive cell therapy.

  2. Immune response of sheep to Haemonchus contortus: serum antibodies against cross reacting antigens between parasites.

    PubMed

    Charley, J; Bourdieu, C; Luffau, G; Pery, P

    1981-01-01

    Normal and H. contortus infected sera were studied by ELISA technique against different stages of the parasites. In all cases antibody activity was detected. This activity in serum is partially eliminated after absorption with an adult worm extract of N brasiliensis. N. brasiliensis and H. contortus antigens were analysed by TCIEP with a rabbit anti-N. brasiliensis serum to examine shared antigens of H. contortus. A minimum of seven cross reacting antigens were detected. H. contortus adult worm extract was absorbed by the rabbit anti-N. brasiliensis serum. After absorption all cross reacting antigens were removed but at least one antigen reacting with a rabbit serum anti-H. Contortus is maintained. When this antigen is tested in elisa technique only a weak antibody activity is found in normal serum.

  3. Immunodiagnosis of human cysticercosis (Taenia solium) with antigens purified by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, E; Tavares, C A; Lopes, J D

    1987-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were generated from mice immunized with scolex protein antigen of Cysticercus cellulosae. Three monoclonal antibodies specific for cysticercal antigens, which did not show any cross-reactivity with Taenia solium or Taenia saginata antigens, were selected. Each monoclonal antibody coupled to Sepharose could purify one antigen, which appeared as a single band on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. When antigens purified by monoclonal antibodies were used to detect antibody in serum samples taken from patients with cysticercosis, taeniasis, and other parasitic infections in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, cross-reactivity was observed until a serum dilution of 1:128 was reached. Since serum samples from unexposed subjects showed positive reactions until a dilution of 1:64 was reached, we chose a discriminative dilution (1:128) above which no cross-reaction was observed. The percent positive serum samples from cysticercosis patients was 100% by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with any of the antigens purified by monoclonal antibodies. Images PMID:3611310

  4. Common antigenic determinants on human melanoma, glioma, neuroblastoma, and sarcoma cells defined with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Seeger, R C; Rosenblatt, H M; Imai, K; Ferrone, S

    1981-07-01

    Antigenic determinants that are common to melanomas, gliomas, neuroblastomas, and sarcomas but that are minimally or not detectably expressed by adult tissues were defined with monoclonal antibodies. Quantitative absorption of monoclonal antibody (Ab 165) with adult tissues followed by testing on antigen-positive UCLA-SO-M14 melanoma cells did not demonstrate antigenic determinant (Ag 165) in brain, lung, liver, kidney, intestine, adrenal, and muscle, Absorption of Ab 376 demonstrated Ag 376 in adult lung but minimal or no antigen in other tissues. Both antigens were associated with a variety of fetal tissues. Assessment of 28 human tumor cell lines with the 131I-staphylococcal Protein A-binding test demonstrated that Ab 165 reacted strongly with melanomas and gliomas and weakly with sarcomas. Ab 376 reacted strongly with melanomas, gliomas, neuroblastomas, and sarcomas. Neither of these antibodies reacted appreciably with carcinoma or teratoma cell lines. Absorption of Ab 165 and Ab 376 with noncultured tumors demonstrated that melanomas, sarcomas, and neuroblastomas can have greater quantities of these antigens in vivo than do normal adult tissues. Qualitative and quantitative antigenic heterogeneity within positive classes of tumors was demonstrated for both cultured and noncultured tumors. The differences in antigen expression in vivo between normal and neoplastic cells suggest potential value for these antibodies in immunodiagnosis and possibly immunotherapy.

  5. The Dynamics of the Human Leukocyte Antigen Head Domain Modulates Its Recognition by the T-Cell Receptor

    PubMed Central

    García-Guerrero, Estefanía; Pérez-Simón, José Antonio; Sánchez-Abarca, Luis Ignacio; Díaz-Moreno, Irene; De la Rosa, Miguel A.; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Generating the immune response requires the discrimination of peptides presented by the human leukocyte antigen complex (HLA) through the T-cell receptor (TCR). However, how a single amino acid substitution in the antigen bonded to HLA affects the response of T cells remains uncertain. Hence, we used molecular dynamics computations to analyze the molecular interactions between peptides, HLA and TCR. We compared immunologically reactive complexes with non-reactive and weakly reactive complexes. MD trajectories were produced to simulate the behavior of isolated components of the various p-HLA-TCR complexes. Analysis of the fluctuations showed that p-HLA binding barely restrains TCR motions, and mainly affects the CDR3 loops. Conversely, inactive p-HLA complexes displayed significant drop in their dynamics when compared with its free versus ternary forms (p-HLA-TCR). In agreement, the free non-reactive p-HLA complexes showed a lower amount of salt bridges than the responsive ones. This resulted in differences between the electrostatic potentials of reactive and inactive p-HLA species and larger vibrational entropies in non-elicitor complexes. Analysis of the ternary p-HLA-TCR complexes also revealed a larger number of salt bridges in the responsive complexes. To summarize, our computations indicate that the affinity of each p-HLA complex towards TCR is intimately linked to both, the dynamics of its free species and its ability to form specific intermolecular salt-bridges in the ternary complexes. Of outstanding interest is the emerging concept of antigen reactivity involving its interplay with the HLA head sidechain dynamics by rearranging its salt-bridges. PMID:27124285

  6. The Dynamics of the Human Leukocyte Antigen Head Domain Modulates Its Recognition by the T-Cell Receptor.

    PubMed

    García-Guerrero, Estefanía; Pérez-Simón, José Antonio; Sánchez-Abarca, Luis Ignacio; Díaz-Moreno, Irene; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Generating the immune response requires the discrimination of peptides presented by the human leukocyte antigen complex (HLA) through the T-cell receptor (TCR). However, how a single amino acid substitution in the antigen bonded to HLA affects the response of T cells remains uncertain. Hence, we used molecular dynamics computations to analyze the molecular interactions between peptides, HLA and TCR. We compared immunologically reactive complexes with non-reactive and weakly reactive complexes. MD trajectories were produced to simulate the behavior of isolated components of the various p-HLA-TCR complexes. Analysis of the fluctuations showed that p-HLA binding barely restrains TCR motions, and mainly affects the CDR3 loops. Conversely, inactive p-HLA complexes displayed significant drop in their dynamics when compared with its free versus ternary forms (p-HLA-TCR). In agreement, the free non-reactive p-HLA complexes showed a lower amount of salt bridges than the responsive ones. This resulted in differences between the electrostatic potentials of reactive and inactive p-HLA species and larger vibrational entropies in non-elicitor complexes. Analysis of the ternary p-HLA-TCR complexes also revealed a larger number of salt bridges in the responsive complexes. To summarize, our computations indicate that the affinity of each p-HLA complex towards TCR is intimately linked to both, the dynamics of its free species and its ability to form specific intermolecular salt-bridges in the ternary complexes. Of outstanding interest is the emerging concept of antigen reactivity involving its interplay with the HLA head sidechain dynamics by rearranging its salt-bridges.

  7. The Dynamics of the Human Leukocyte Antigen Head Domain Modulates Its Recognition by the T-Cell Receptor.

    PubMed

    García-Guerrero, Estefanía; Pérez-Simón, José Antonio; Sánchez-Abarca, Luis Ignacio; Díaz-Moreno, Irene; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Generating the immune response requires the discrimination of peptides presented by the human leukocyte antigen complex (HLA) through the T-cell receptor (TCR). However, how a single amino acid substitution in the antigen bonded to HLA affects the response of T cells remains uncertain. Hence, we used molecular dynamics computations to analyze the molecular interactions between peptides, HLA and TCR. We compared immunologically reactive complexes with non-reactive and weakly reactive complexes. MD trajectories were produced to simulate the behavior of isolated components of the various p-HLA-TCR complexes. Analysis of the fluctuations showed that p-HLA binding barely restrains TCR motions, and mainly affects the CDR3 loops. Conversely, inactive p-HLA complexes displayed significant drop in their dynamics when compared with its free versus ternary forms (p-HLA-TCR). In agreement, the free non-reactive p-HLA complexes showed a lower amount of salt bridges than the responsive ones. This resulted in differences between the electrostatic potentials of reactive and inactive p-HLA species and larger vibrational entropies in non-elicitor complexes. Analysis of the ternary p-HLA-TCR complexes also revealed a larger number of salt bridges in the responsive complexes. To summarize, our computations indicate that the affinity of each p-HLA complex towards TCR is intimately linked to both, the dynamics of its free species and its ability to form specific intermolecular salt-bridges in the ternary complexes. Of outstanding interest is the emerging concept of antigen reactivity involving its interplay with the HLA head sidechain dynamics by rearranging its salt-bridges. PMID:27124285

  8. Immunization of rabbits with nematode Ascaris lumbricoides antigens induces antibodies cross-reactive to house dust mite Dermatophagoides farinae antigens.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Takuya; Khan, Al Fazal; Yasueda, Hiroshi; Saito, Akemi; Fukutomi, Yuma; Takai, Toshiro; Zaman, Khalequz; Yunus, Md; Takeuchi, Haruko; Iwata, Tsutomu; Akiyama, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    There are controversial reports on the relationship between helminthic infection and allergic diseases. Although IgE cross-reactivity between nematode Ascaris antigens and house dust-mite allergens in allergic patients have been reported, whether Ascaris or the mite is the primary sensitizer remains unknown. Here we found that immunization of naïve animals with Ascaris lumbricoides (Al) antigens induced production of antibodies cross-reactive to mite antigens from Dermatophagoides farinae (Df). Sera from Bangladeshi children showed IgE reactivity to Ascaris and mite extracts. IgG from rabbits immunized with Al extract exhibited reactivity to Df antigens. Treatment of the anti-Al antibody with Df antigen-coupled beads eliminated the reactivity to Df antigens. In immunoblot analysis, an approximately 100-kDa Df band was the most reactive to anti-Al IgG. The present study is the first step towards the establishment of animal models to study the relationship between Ascaris infection and mite-induced allergic diseases.

  9. Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase 65 and Islet Cell Antigen 512/IA-2 Autoantibodies in Relation to Human Leukocyte Antigen Class II DR and DQ Alleles and Haplotypes in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus ▿

    PubMed Central

    Stayoussef, Mouna; Benmansour, Jihen; Al-Jenaidi, Fayza A.; Said, Hichem B.; Rayana, Chiheb B.; Mahjoub, Touhami; Almawi, Wassim Y.

    2011-01-01

    The frequencies of autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) and islet cell antigen (ICA) 512/IA-2 (512/IA-2) are functions of the specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). We investigated the association of HLA class II (DR and DQ) alleles and haplotypes with the presence of GAD and IA-2 autoantibodies in T1D. Autoantibodies were tested in 88 Tunisian T1D patients and 112 age- and gender-matched normoglycemic control subjects by enzyme immunoassay. Among T1D patients, mean anti-GAD antibody titers were higher in the DRB1*030101 allele (P < 0.001), together with the DRB1*030101/DQB1*0201 (P < 0.001) and DRB1*040101/DQB1*0302 (P = 0.002) haplotypes, while lower anti-GAD titers were associated with the DRB1*070101 (P = 0.001) and DRB1*110101 (P < 0.001) alleles and DRB1*070101/DQB1*0201 (P = 0.001) and DRB1*110101/DQB1*030101 (P = 0.001) haplotypes. Mean anti-IA-2 antibody titers were higher in the DRB1*040101 allele (P = 0.007) and DRB1*040101/DQB1*0302 (P = 0.001) haplotypes but were lower in the DRB1*110101 allele (P = 0.010) and the DRB1*110101 (P < 0.001) and DRB1*110101/DQB1*030101 (P = 0.025) haplotypes. Multinomial regression analysis confirmed the positive association of DRB1*030101 and the negative association of DRB1*110101 and DQB1*030101, along with the DRB1*070101/DQB1*0201 and DRB1*110101/DQB1*030101 haplotypes, with anti-GAD levels. In contrast, only the DRB1*040101/DQB1*0302 haplotype was positively associated with altered anti-IA-2 titers. Increased GAD65 and IA-2 antibody positivity is differentially associated with select HLA class II alleles and haplotypes, confirming the heterogeneous nature of T1D. PMID:21490167

  10. Development of immunoglobulin and antibody-synthesizing cells after immunization with different doses of antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Antoine, J C; Petit, C; Avrameas, S

    1976-01-01

    The kinetics of development of antibody-synthesizing cells and of cells synthesizing immunoglobulins without detectable antibody function were studied in rats immunized with different doses (0-1, 1, 10, 100 mg) of horse radish peroxidase, bovine serum albumin, human serum albumin, hen ovalbumin, or human IgG, which had been deaggregated or heat-aggregated. Each antigen was injected once or twice as a solution in saline. Antibody and immunoglobulin-producing cells were detected in draining lymph nodes by immunohistochemical staining. In the primary response a few antibody-synthesizing cells were found whatever the dose injected. No increase or some increase was found with the amount of antigen injected, according to the protein used, but with all doses of antigen injected, the population of cells remained small, except with human IgG where a relatively high number of positive cells was detected even after injection of 1 mg of antigen. In the secondary response a few antibody-forming cells were also detected with the lower doses of antigen, but this population increased after boosting with 100 mg of antigen. With human IgG a greater number of positive cells was induced withall the doses tested. A correlation between the number of cells synthesizing immunoglobulins without antibody function and the amount of antigen injected was observed in the primary and secondary responses. The relative size of these two populations varied with the stage of immunity of the animals. In the primary response, the population of cells synthesizing immunoglobulins without antibody function was larger than the population of antibody-forming cells. The same was true in the secondary response, but if after a booster injection the level of antibody-synthesizing cells exceeded that reached in the primary response, the increase of cells synthesizing Ig without antibody function was smaller than the increase in antibody-forming cells. In general the more immunogenic an antigen was, the smaller

  11. Characterization of membrane antigens on human cytomegalovirus-infected fibroblasts recognized by human antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    van der Voort, L.H.M.; de Leij, L.F.M.H.; The T.H.

    1989-03-01

    The antigens on the surface of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-infected fibroblasts which are recognized by human HCMV antibody-positive sera were characterized. Three HCMV-induced polypeptides, with apparent molecular masses of 53 to 63, 94, and 94 to 120 kilodaltons, were precipitated from /sup 125/I-surface-labeled cell extracts with different sera obtained from healthy individuals. Renal transplant recipients who were suffering from active HCMV infections recognized the same set of antigens. By the use of monoclonal antibodies, these antigens were identified as polypeptides belonging to the gcI and gcIII families of HCMV glycoproteins.

  12. Antibodies elicited by pneumococcal antigens bear an anti-DNA--associated idiotype.

    PubMed Central

    Grayzel, A; Solomon, A; Aranow, C; Diamond, B

    1991-01-01

    There is evidence in both murine and human lupus that the production of anti-DNA antibodies may be triggered by environmental antigens. To explore this further, we studied the serum of 10 nonautoimmune individuals immunized with a polyvalent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. All 10 patients showed a rise in the titer of antipneumococcal antibodies bearing an anti-DNA-associated idiotype. The antipneumococcal response was specific as no idiotypic antitetanus antibodies were detected. Furthermore, no anti-DNA antibodies were present in postvaccination sera. The molecular analysis of antipneumococcal and anti-DNA antibodies bearing a common idiotype will help elucidate how foreign antigen might lead to the production of anti-DNA antibodies in susceptible individuals. PMID:1999497

  13. Immunohistochemical characterization of 53 monoclonal antibodies to prostate-specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Nap, M; van der Kwast, T M

    1999-01-01

    Fifty-three antibodies submitted to the ISOBM TD-3 Workshop on the prostate specific antigen (PSA) were evaluated for their reactivity in frozen and formalin fixed tissue from benign hyperplastic prostate and salivary gland tissue. Only 13/53 antibodies showed clear reactivity in both frozen and paraffin sections, while some antibodies appeared to react only in formalin-fixed paraffin sections. Many antibodies showed extensive nonspecific reactivity in tissue sections. These results highlight the fact that the number of monoclonal antibodies suitable for immunohistochemical detection of PSA is still relatively limited.

  14. A novel agglutination test for antigen-specific detection of platelet antibodies.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Oliver; Agaylan, Ashraf; Borchert, Hans-Hubert; Aslan, Tunay; Bombard, Stéphane; Kiesewetter, Holger; Salama, Abdulgabar

    2006-10-15

    A simple and rapid antigen-specific assay for the identification antibodies to platelets is lacking, yet. Red-dyed polystyrene microbeads were coated with monoclonal antibodies to various platelet glycoprotein complexes, and used for the detection of platelet autoantibodies and alloantibodies. The results were largely identical with those obtained by monoclonal antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigen assay (MAIPA). The new test is reliable yet less complex and time-consuming than the currently available assays, and it can be implemented in any routine laboratory. PMID:16933262

  15. Switching assay as a novel approach for specific antigen- antibody interaction analysis using magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parr, M.; Illarionov, R.; Marchenko, Y.; Yakovleva, L.; Nikolaev, B.; Ischenko, A.; Shevtsov, M.

    2016-08-01

    Switching assay was applied for the detection of antigen-antibody interaction between 70-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp70) and anti-Hsp70 monoclonal antibodies in water solutions using conjugates with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs). Hsp70 is a ubiquitous intracellular protein that plays a crucial role in cancerogenesis and many other pathologies. Detection of the Hsp70 level in the biological fluids might have a prognostic and diagnostic value in clinic. The developed switch assay for the detection of Hsp70 demonstrated high sensitivity for antigen-antibody interaction analysis thus proving its potential for further preclinical and clinical studies.

  16. Bacterial surface antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies used to detect beer spoilage pediococci.

    PubMed

    Whiting, M S; Ingledew, W M; Lee, S Y; Ziola, B

    1999-08-01

    Fourteen monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) were isolated that react with surface antigens of Pediococcus beer spoilage organisms, including P. damnosus, P. pentosaceous, P. acidilactici, and unspeciated isolates. Immunoblotting, enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) of protease- and neuraminidase-treated surface antigen extracts, carbohydrate competition EIAs, and cardiolipin EIAs were used to characterize the bacterial antigens involved in Mab binding. Antigen stability in situ was tested by protease treatment or surface antigen extraction of washed bacteria. In most cases, the Mabs bind to Pediococcus surface antigens that appear to be covalently bound cell wall polymers resistant to alteration or removal from the bacterial surface. These bacterial surface antigen reactive Mabs show good potential for rapid, sensitive, and specific immunoassay detection of Pediococcus beer spoilage organisms.

  17. The case to abandon human leukocyte antigen matching for kidney allocation: would it be wise to throw out the baby with the bathwater?

    PubMed

    Hiesse, Christian; Pessione, Fabienne; Houssin, Didier

    2004-02-27

    Since major histocompatibility (MHC) antigen matching was introduced in the early 1970s as the key factor determining kidney transplant allocation, several studies, mainly arising from organ-sharing organizations in the United States and Europe, have debated this complex issue. The first fundamental concern is the interaction of human leukocyte antigen matching with other transplant outcome risk factors, for example, prolongation of ischemia and matching for age. Much concordant data advocate restraining MHC antigen-based allocation in terms of space and time limits. The second fundamental concern is the balancing of the advantages of better antigen matching in terms of improved graft survival and the improved transplantation rate in immunologically high-risk patients with the major drawback of inequitable access for ethnic minorities and patients with rare MHC haplotypes. These issues have led to considering renewed kidney allocation rules, discarding human leukocyte antigen matching from algorithms, or modifying the specificity allocation level by using cross-reactive group matching or class II MHC antigen matching. The evolving concepts in the field of histocompatibility support the need for periodically updated, flexible, and hybrid allocation systems, as designed in France by the Etablissement français des Greffes.

  18. Establishment and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to carbohydrate antigens on peanut agglutinin receptor glycoprotein of gastric cancer KATO-III.

    PubMed

    Uetsuki, S; Kato, A; Nagakura, H; Fujimoto, K; Kato, Y; Itsuki, Y; Adachi, M; Nakayama, Y

    1992-08-01

    Eight mouse monoclonal antibodies, GOM-1, GOM-2, GOM-3, GOM-5, GOM-6, GOM-7, GOM-8 and GOM-9 were established that recognized carbohydrate antigens on the human gastric cancer cell line KATO-III. Their binding specificities were studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, cellular enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, flow cytometry analysis and thin layer chromatography immunostaining. All these monoclonal antibodies bound to peanut agglutinin receptor glycoproteins and neutral glycolipids extracted from KATO-III cells, but they could be divided into three groups, namely GOM-1, -3, -9 group, GOM-5 and GOM-2, -6, -7, -8 group. GOM-3 specifically bound to the Le(a) structure, Gal beta 1-3 (Fuc alpha 1-4) GlcNAc beta 1-, and GOM-5 specifically bound to the Lec structure, Gal beta 1-3GlcNAc beta-. GOM-2 showed specific binding to KATO-III, but little or no binding to various other cell lines examined or to normal human leukocytic cells. It also did not bind to the synthetic glycoconjugates tested, carrying 10 different terminal sugar chains including T, Tn, Le(a), Lec and Le(x) structures. The binding specificity of GOM-2 was also different from those of the monoclonal antibodies anti-Le(x), anti-Leb and anti-Ley. These results suggest that GOM-2 recognizes a new carbohydrate antigen on KATO-III cells that is distinct from Le(a), Leb, Lec, Le(x), Ley, T and Tn structures. PMID:1398682

  19. Low expression of human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen-DR is associated with hypermethylation of human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen-DR alpha gene regions in B cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Sano, H; Compton, L J; Shiomi, N; Steinberg, A D; Jackson, R A; Sasaki, T

    1985-01-01

    The relationship between the expression of HLA-DR antigens and the HLA-DR alpha gene methylation was examined in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Using permanent B cell lines, we found reduced DR expression in SLE. The low DR expression was correlated with high anti-DNA antibody titers in patients' sera. The amounts of DR alpha message were lower in SLE cells than in normal controls, suggesting that the low expression of DR antigens is associated with gene functions. The extent of DNA methylation was examined at five CCGG sites in the HLA-DR alpha locus. DNA from both SLE and normal cells showed variable methylation patterns. Since the DR alpha gene is a single-copy gene, such a variability is the result of assaying a mixture of transformed clones containing methylated DR alpha gene, with other clones containing unmethylated DR alpha gene. A distinctive feature of normal cells was a consistent methylation pattern: 12 normal cell lines showed exactly the same pattern. In contrast, 28 SLE cell lines showed a cell-line-specific methylation, and hypermethylation at the DR alpha locus. The hypermethylation is often associated with transcriptionally inactive genes. Thus, our results suggest that (a) B cells with hypermethylated DR genes might express no or few DR antigens; (b) the ratio of cells with differently methylated DR genes is consistent in normal individuals, while, in SLE patients, cells with hypermethylated DR genes predominate, resulting in apparently reduced DR antigen expression; and (c) the aberrant DR expression could be associated directly with immunoregulatory dysfunctions in SLE disease. Images PMID:2997276

  20. Characterization of anti-anti-idiotypic antibodies that bind antigen and an anti-idiotype

    PubMed Central

    Goldbaum, Fernando A.; Velikovsky, C. Alejandro; Dall’Acqua, William; Fossati, Carlos A.; Fields, Barry A.; Braden, Bradford C.; Poljak, Roberto J.; Mariuzza, Roy A.

    1997-01-01

    Two mouse monoclonal anti-anti-idiotopic antibodies (anti-anti-Id, Ab3), AF14 and AF52, were prepared by immunizing BALB/c mice with rabbit polyclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies (anti-Id, Ab2) raised against antibody D1.3 (Ab1) specific for the antigen hen egg lysozyme. AF14 and AF52 react with an “internal image” monoclonal mouse anti-Id antibody E5.2 (Ab2), previously raised against D1.3, with affinity constants (1.0 × 109 M−1 and 2.4 × 107 M−1, respectively) usually observed in secondary responses against protein antigens. They also react with the antigen but with lower affinity (1.8 × 106 M−1 and 3.8 × 106 M−1). This pattern of affinities for the anti-Id and for the antigen also was displayed by the sera of the immunized mice. The amino acid sequences of AF14 and AF52 are very close to that of D1.3. In particular, the amino acid side chains that contribute to contacts with both antigen and anti-Id are largely conserved in AF14 and AF52 compared with D1.3. Therapeutic immunizations against different pathogenic antigens using anti-Id antibodies have been proposed. Our experiments show that a response to an anti-Id immunogen elicits anti-anti-Id antibodies that are optimized for binding the anti-Id antibodies rather than the antigen. PMID:9238040

  1. Detection of antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus capsid antigen by immune adherence hemagglutination.

    PubMed

    Lennette, E T; Ward, E; Henle, G; Henle, W

    1982-01-01

    The immune adherence hemagglutination assay was found to be as sensitive and specific as the indirect immunofluorescence technique for titration of antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus capsid antigen. Satisfactory virus capsid antigen-specific and negative control antigens for the immune adherence hemagglutination assay were prepared from cell extracts of the Epstein-Barr virus producer P3HR-1 and the Epstein-Barr virus genome-negative BJAB lymphoblastoid cell lines, respectively. As the immune adherence hemagglutination assay can be used to titrate antibodies to both the heterophil antigen of the Paul-Bunnell type and to virus capsid antigen, it offers a promising alternative to the immunofluorescence methods in the serodiagnosis of Epstein-Barr virus infections which can be performed by most diagnostic laboratories.

  2. Goat serums for fluorescent antibody conjugates to chlamydial antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Tessler, J

    1984-01-01

    Serums from goats hyperimmunized with Chlamydia psittaci consistently produce antichlamydial fluorescent antibody conjugate of high titer. The titer of the fluorescent antibody conjugate prepared from a given serum correlated well with the titer obtained by agar gel precipitin, but not with the complement fixation. The agar gel precipitin test can be used to predict whether a given serum is satisfactory for use in production of a conjugate for direct fluorescent antibody tests. Serums with an agar gel precipitin titer of 1/8 or higher generally produce a usable fluorescent antibody conjugate. Labeling gamma globulins with fluorescein isothiocyanate at a ratio of 1/150 resulted in satisfactory fluorescent antibody conjugates. Cultures of Vero cells infected with chlamydiae were found to be suitable for titration of the fluorescent antibody conjugates. PMID:6372973

  3. Sampling From the Proteome to the Human Leukocyte Antigen-DR (HLA-DR) Ligandome Proceeds Via High Specificity.

    PubMed

    Mommen, Geert P M; Marino, Fabio; Meiring, Hugo D; Poelen, Martien C M; van Gaans-van den Brink, Jacqueline A M; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J R; van Els, Cécile A C M

    2016-04-01

    Comprehensive analysis of the complex nature of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class II ligandome is of utmost importance to understand the basis for CD4(+)T cell mediated immunity and tolerance. Here, we implemented important improvements in the analysis of the repertoire of HLA-DR-presented peptides, using hybrid mass spectrometry-based peptide fragmentation techniques on a ligandome sample isolated from matured human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). The reported data set constitutes nearly 14 thousand unique high-confident peptides,i.e.the largest single inventory of human DC derived HLA-DR ligands to date. From a technical viewpoint the most prominent finding is that no single peptide fragmentation technique could elucidate the majority of HLA-DR ligands, because of the wide range of physical chemical properties displayed by the HLA-DR ligandome. Our in-depth profiling allowed us to reveal a strikingly poor correlation between the source proteins identified in the HLA class II ligandome and the DC cellular proteome. Important selective sieving from the sampled proteome to the ligandome was evidenced by specificity in the sequences of the core regions both at their N- and C- termini, hence not only reflecting binding motifs but also dominant protease activity associated to the endolysosomal compartments. Moreover, we demonstrate that the HLA-DR ligandome reflects a surface representation of cell-compartments specific for biological events linked to the maturation of monocytes into antigen presenting cells. Our results present new perspectives into the complex nature of the HLA class II system and will aid future immunological studies in characterizing the full breadth of potential CD4(+)T cell epitopes relevant in health and disease.

  4. Expressional time phase of leukocyte molecules induced by allogenic cardiac antigen and cyclosporin A in rats’ in vitro model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiu-Fang; Xin, Yi; Zhang, Ying; Huang, Yi-Min; Gu, Yun; Li, Na; Li, Wen-Bin; Zhou, Yu-Jie; Zhang, Zhao-Guang

    2013-01-01

    The immunosuppressive agent cyclosporin A has been proven to reduce the rejection rate and prolong the survival time of transplanted hearts. But some reports showed that cyclosporine A did not completely suppress the rejection. We performed in vitro studies to model a time course to observe the effect of cyclosporin A. Methods: The experiment was divided into a control group (group I), an antigen group (group II), a cyclosporin A group (group III) and an antigen + cyclosporin A group (group IV). After transplantation, at 2 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, 48 h and 72 h, leukocyte molecules were monitored. Results: The expression of IL-2R peaked at 12 h in group II and at 6 h in group III. There was a gradual decline in the expression of the P59 gene in group I, positive expression at 2 h and between 12 h and 24 h in group II, in group IV, there was a decrease at 48 h. The expression of the CD4 gene was lowest at 2 h in group I and at 6 h in group II. CD4 expression then quickly increased to a maximum at 48 h in group III, at 2 h in group IV. There was a minimal expression was reached at 12 h in group I and IV and at 6 h in group III in the expression of the CD8 gene. Conclusions: Alloantigen induced lymphocytes to release IL-2R and P59 and stimulated the induction of the CD4 gene’ transcription for 6 h. Cyclosporin A stimulated the release of IL-2R for 2 h. These results provide an in vitro basis for describing the time phases of rejection inhibited by cyclosporin A. PMID:23724161

  5. Human Leukocyte Antigen Class II Alleles Are Associated with Hepatitis C Virus Natural Susceptibility in the Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Ming; Xu, Ke; Wu, Meng-Ping; Han, Ya-Ping; Huang, Peng; Peng, Zhi-Hang; Wang, Jie; Su, Jing; Yu, Rong-Bin; Li, Jun; Zhang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II molecule influences host antigen presentation and anti-viral immune response. The aim of this study was to investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within HLA class II gene were associated with different clinical outcomes of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Three HLA class II SNPs (rs3077, rs2395309 and rs2856718) were genotyped by TaqMan assay among Chinese population, including 350 persistent HCV infection patients, 194 spontaneous viral clearance subjects and 973 HCV-uninfected control subjects. After logistic regression analysis, the results indicated that the rs2856718 TC genotype was significantly associated with the protective effect of the HCV natural susceptibility (adjusted OR: 0.712, 95% CI: 0.554–0.914) when compared with reference TT genotype, and this remained significant after false discovery rate (FDR) correction (p = 0.024). Moreover, the protective effect of rs2856718 was observed in dominant genetic models (adjusted OR: 0.726, 95% CI: 0.574–0.920), and this remained significant after FDR correction (p = 0.024). In stratified analysis, a significant decreased risk was found in rs2856718C allele in the male subgroup (adjusted OR: 0.778, 95% CI: 0.627–0.966) and hemodialysis subgroup (adjusted OR: 0.713, 95% CI: 0.552–0.921). Our results indicated that the genetic variations of rs2856718 within the HLA-DQ gene are associated with the natural susceptibility to HCV infection among the Chinese population. PMID:26213920

  6. Sampling From the Proteome to the Human Leukocyte Antigen-DR (HLA-DR) Ligandome Proceeds Via High Specificity*

    PubMed Central

    Mommen, Geert P. M.; Marino, Fabio; Meiring, Hugo D.; Poelen, Martien C. M.; van Gaans-van den Brink, Jacqueline A. M.; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J. R.; van Els, Cécile A. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of the complex nature of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class II ligandome is of utmost importance to understand the basis for CD4+ T cell mediated immunity and tolerance. Here, we implemented important improvements in the analysis of the repertoire of HLA-DR-presented peptides, using hybrid mass spectrometry-based peptide fragmentation techniques on a ligandome sample isolated from matured human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). The reported data set constitutes nearly 14 thousand unique high-confident peptides, i.e. the largest single inventory of human DC derived HLA-DR ligands to date. From a technical viewpoint the most prominent finding is that no single peptide fragmentation technique could elucidate the majority of HLA-DR ligands, because of the wide range of physical chemical properties displayed by the HLA-DR ligandome. Our in-depth profiling allowed us to reveal a strikingly poor correlation between the source proteins identified in the HLA class II ligandome and the DC cellular proteome. Important selective sieving from the sampled proteome to the ligandome was evidenced by specificity in the sequences of the core regions both at their N- and C- termini, hence not only reflecting binding motifs but also dominant protease activity associated to the endolysosomal compartments. Moreover, we demonstrate that the HLA-DR ligandome reflects a surface representation of cell-compartments specific for biological events linked to the maturation of monocytes into antigen presenting cells. Our results present new perspectives into the complex nature of the HLA class II system and will aid future immunological studies in characterizing the full breadth of potential CD4+ T cell epitopes relevant in health and disease. PMID:26764012

  7. Crystallographic Structure of the Human Leukocyte Antigen DRA, DRB3*0101: Models of a Directional Alloimmune Respone and Autoimmunity

    SciTech Connect

    Parry,C.; Gorski, J.; Stern, L.

    2007-01-01

    We describe structural studies of the human leukocyte antigen DR52a, HLA-DRA/DRB3*0101, in complex with an N-terminal human platelet integrin {alpha}II{sub B}{beta}III glycoprotein peptide which contains a Leu/Pro dimorphism. The 33:Leu dimorphism is the epitope for the T cell directed response in neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia and post-transfusion purpura in individuals with the {alpha}II{sub B}{beta}III 33:Pro allele, and defines the unidirectional alloimmune response. This condition is always associated with DR52a. The crystallographic structure has been refined to 2.25 {angstrom}. There are two {alpha}{beta} heterodimers to the asymmetric unit in space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2. The molecule is characterized by two prominent hydrophobic pockets at either end of the peptide binding cleft and a deep, narrower and highly charged P4 opening underneath the beta 1 chain. Further, the peptide in the second molecule displays a sharp upward turn after pocket P9. The structure reveals the role of pockets and the distinctive basic P4 pocket, shared by DR52a and DR3, in selecting their respective binding peptide repertoire. We observe an interesting switch in a residue from the canonically assigned pocket 6 seen in prior class II structures to pocket 4. This occludes the P6 pocket helping to explain the distinctive '1-4-9' peptide binding motif. A {beta}57 Asp {yields} Val substitution abrogates the salt-bridge to {alpha}76 Arg and along with a hydrophobic {beta}37 is important in shaping the P9 pocket. DRB3*0101 and DRB1*0301 belong to an ancestral haplotype and are associated with many autoimmune diseases linked to antigen presentation, but whereas DR3 is susceptible to type 1 diabetes DR52a is not. This dichotomy is explored for clues to the disease.

  8. Molecular docking to identify associations between drugs and class I human leukocyte antigens for predicting idiosyncratic drug reactions

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Heng; Du, Tingting; Zhou, Peng; Yang, Lun; Mei, Hu; Ng, Huiwen; Zhang, Wenqian; Shu, Mao; Tong, Weida; Shi, Leming; Mendrick, Donna L.; Hong, Huixiao

    2015-01-01

    Idiosyncratic drug reactions (IDRs) are rare, somewhat dose-independent, patient-specific and hard to predict. Human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) are the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in humans, are highly polymorphic and are associated with specific IDRs. Therefore, it is important to identify potential drug-HLA associations so that individuals who would develop IDRs can be identified before drug exposure. We harvested the associations between drugs and class I HLAs from the literature. Molecular docking was used to explore the known associations. From the analysis of docking scores between the 17 drugs and 74 class I HLAs, it was observed that the significantly associated drug-HLA pairs had statistically lower docking scores than those not reported to be significantly associated (t-test p < 0.05). This indicates that molecular docking can be utilized for screening drug-HLA interactions and predicting potential IDRs. Examining the binding modes of drugs in the docked HLAs suggested several distinct binding sites inside class I HLAs, expanding our knowledge of the underlying interaction mechanisms between drugs and HLAs. PMID:25747444

  9. Swine Leukocyte Antigen-DQA Gene Variation and Its Association with Piglet Diarrhea in Large White, Landrace and Duroc.

    PubMed

    Yang, Q L; Kong, J J; Wang, D W; Zhao, S G; Gun, S B

    2013-08-01

    The swine leukocyte antigen class II molecules are possibly associated with the induction of protective immunity. The study described here was to investigate the relationship between polymorphisms in exon 2 of the swine DQA gene and piglet diarrhea. This study was carried out on 425 suckling piglets from three purebred pig strains (Large White, Landrace and Duroc). The genetic diversity of exon 2 in swine DQA was detected by PCR-SSCP and sequencing analysis, eight unique SSCP patterns (AB, BB, BC, CC, CD, BD, BE and DD) representing five specific allele (A to E) sequences were detected. Sequence analysis revealed 21 nucleotide variable sites and resulting in 12 amino acid substitutions in the populations. A moderate level polymorphism and significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium of the genotypes distribution were observed in the populations (p<0.01). The association analysis indicated that there was a statistically significant difference in the score of piglet diarrhea between different genotypes, individuals with genotype CC showed a lower diarrhea score than genotypes AB (0.98±0.09), BB (0.85±0.77) and BC (1.25±0.23) (p<0.05), and significantly low than genotype BE (1.19±0.19) (p<0.01), CC genotype may be a most resistance genotype for piglet diarrhea.

  10. Balancing selection and heterogeneity across the classical human leukocyte antigen loci: a meta-analytic review of 497 population studies

    PubMed Central

    Solberg, Owen D.; Mack, Steven J.; Lancaster, Alex K.; Single, Richard M.; Tsai, Yingssu; Sanchez-Mazas, Alicia; Thomson, Glenys

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a meta-analysis of high-resolution human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele frequency data describing 497 population samples. Most of the datasets were compiled from studies published in eight journals from 1990 to 2007; additional datasets came from the International Histocompatibility Workshops and from the AlleleFrequencies.net database. In all, these data represent approximately 66,800 individuals from throughout the world, providing an opportunity to observe trends that may not have been evident at the time the data were originally analyzed, especially with regard to the relative importance of balancing selection among the HLA loci. Population genetic measures of allele frequency distributions were summarized across populations by locus and geographic region. A role for balancing selection maintaining much of HLA variation was confirmed. Further, the breadth of this meta-analysis allowed the ranking of the HLA loci, with DQA1 and HLA-C showing strongest balancing selection and DPB1 being compatible with neutrality. Comparisons of the allelic spectra reported by studies since 1990 suggest that most of the HLA alleles identified since 2000 are very-low-frequency alleles. The literature-based allele-count data, as well as maps summarizing the geographic distributions for each allele, are available online. PMID:18638659

  11. Human Leukocyte Antigen Profiles of Latin American Populations: Differential Admixture and Its Potential Impact on Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Arrieta-Bolaños, Esteban; Madrigal, J. Alejandro; Shaw, Bronwen E.

    2012-01-01

    The outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is shaped by both clinical and genetic factors that determine its success. Genetic factors including human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and non-HLA genetic variants are believed to influence the risk of potentially fatal complications after the transplant. Moreover, ethnicity has been proposed as a factor modifying the risk of graft-versus-host disease. The populations of Latin America are a complex array of different admixture processes with varying degrees of ancestral population proportions that came in different migration waves. This complexity makes the study of genetic risks in this region complicated unless the extent of this variation is thoroughly characterized. In this study we compared the HLA-A and HLA-B allele group profiles for 31 Latin American populations and 61 ancestral populations from Iberia, Italy, Sub-Saharan Africa, and America. Results from population genetics comparisons show a wide variation in the HLA profiles from the Latin American populations that correlate with different admixture proportions. Populations in Latin America seem to be organized in at least three groups with (1) strong Amerindian admixture, (2) strong Caucasian component, and (3) a Caucasian-African gradient. These results imply that genetic risk assessment for HSCT in Latin America has to be adapted for different population subgroups rather than as a pan-Hispanic/Latino analysis. PMID:23213535

  12. Genetic determinants of antithyroid drug-induced agranulocytosis by human leukocyte antigen genotyping and genome-wide association study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pei-Lung; Shih, Shyang-Rong; Wang, Pei-Wen; Lin, Ying-Chao; Chu, Chen-Chung; Lin, Jung-Hsin; Chen, Szu-Chi; Chang, Ching-Chung; Huang, Tien-Shang; Tsai, Keh Sung; Tseng, Fen-Yu; Wang, Chih-Yuan; Lu, Jin-Ying; Chiu, Wei-Yih; Chang, Chien-Ching; Chen, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Fann, Cathy Shen-Jang; Yang, Wei-Shiung; Chang, Tien-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Graves' disease is the leading cause of hyperthyroidism affecting 1.0–1.6% of the population. Antithyroid drugs are the treatment cornerstone, but may cause life-threatening agranulocytosis. Here we conduct a two-stage association study on two separate subject sets (in total 42 agranulocytosis cases and 1,208 Graves' disease controls), using direct human leukocyte antigen genotyping and SNP-based genome-wide association study. We demonstrate HLA-B*38:02 (Armitage trend Pcombined=6.75 × 10−32) and HLA-DRB1*08:03 (Pcombined=1.83 × 10−9) as independent susceptibility loci. The genome-wide association study identifies the same signals. Estimated odds ratios for these two loci comparing effective allele carriers to non-carriers are 21.48 (95% confidence interval=11.13–41.48) and 6.13 (95% confidence interval=3.28–11.46), respectively. Carrying both HLA-B*38:02 and HLA-DRB1*08:03 increases odds ratio to 48.41 (Pcombined=3.32 × 10−21, 95% confidence interval=21.66–108.22). Our results could be useful for antithyroid-induced agranulocytosis and potentially for agranulocytosis caused by other chemicals. PMID:26151496

  13. Necrotizing meningoencephalitis of Pug dogs associates with dog leukocyte antigen class II and resembles acute variant forms of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Greer, K A; Wong, A K; Liu, H; Famula, T R; Pedersen, N C; Ruhe, A; Wallace, M; Neff, M W

    2010-08-01

    Necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME) is a disorder of Pug Dogs that appears to have an immune etiology and high heritability based on population studies. The present study was undertaken to identify a genetic basis for the disease. A genome-wide association scan with single tandem repeat (STR) markers showed a single strong association near the dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) complex on CFA12. Fine resolution mapping with 27 STR markers on CFA12 further narrowed association to the region containing DLA-DRB1, -DQA1 and, -DQB1 genes. Sequencing confirmed that affected dogs were more likely to be homozygous for specific alleles at each locus and that these alleles were linked, forming a single high risk haplotype. The strong DLA class II association of NME in Pug Dogs resembles that of human multiple sclerosis (MS). Like MS, NME appears to have an autoimmune basis, involves genetic and nongenetic factors, has a relatively low incidence, is more frequent in females than males, and is associated with a vascularly orientated nonsuppurative inflammation. However, NME of Pug Dogs is more aggressive in disease course than classical human MS, appears to be relatively earlier in onset, and involves necrosis rather than demyelination as the central pathobiologic feature. Thus, Pug Dog encephalitis (PDE) shares clinical features with the less common acute variant forms of MS. Accordingly, NME of Pug Dogs may represent a naturally occurring canine model of certain idiopathic inflammatory disorders of the human central nervous system.

  14. Role of human leukocyte antigen, killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors, and cytokine gene polymorphisms in leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Fialho, Raquel Nunes; Martins, Luís; Pinheiro, João Paulo; Bettencourt, Bruno Filipe; Couto, Ana Rita; Santos, Margarida Rodrigues; Peixoto, Maria José; Garrett, Francisco; Leal, João; Tomás, Ana Maria; Bruges-Armas, Jácome

    2009-11-01

    Leptospirosis is an emerging zoonotic disease caused by pathogenic species of the genus Leptospira. It has a broad range of clinical presentations in humans. Although progress has been made in the characterization of the host immune system factors that may affect disease progression and outcome, to date few reports have addressed the role of genetic polymorphisms in the susceptibility to leptospirosis. In this work a group of patients with a history of leptospiral infection and a control group were compared for polymorphisms in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA), in killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR), and in cytokine genes. Alleles in the HLA-A and -B loci were associated with susceptibility, as were the class I haplotype A*01-B*08-Cw*07 and the 8.1 ancestral haplotype (A*01-B*08-Cw*07-DRB1*03-DQB1*02). Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-4Ralpha genes also had significantly higher frequencies in the patient group. No association was reported between KIR gene profile and leptospirosis. This work highlights the importance of using genetic polymorphisms to better understand the mechanisms involved in the immune response to leptospirosis.

  15. Effect of human leukocyte antigen class II genes on Hashimoto's thyroiditis requiring replacement therapy with levothyroxine in the Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Katahira, Masahito; Hanakita, Mizuki; Ito, Tatsuo; Suzuki, Mari

    2013-05-01

    Contribution of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) subtype to Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) that requires replacement therapy with levothyroxine remains unclear in the Japanese population. The frequencies of HLA DR-DQ haplotypes were compared between patients with HT requiring levothyroxine replacement therapy and the control individuals. We studied 82 patients with HT requiring levothyroxine replacement therapy. The frequencies of DRB1*08:03-DQB1*06:01 and DRB1*09:01-DQB1*03:03 haplotypes were significantly higher in HT patients, whereas those of DRB1*13:02-DQB1*06:04 and DRB1*15:01-DQB1*06:02 haplotypes were significantly lower in these patients than in the controls. Deduced from known linkage disequilibria, DRB1*13:02-DQB1*06:04 and DRB1*15:01-DQB1*06:02 haplotypes share the same DQA1*01:02 allele. Since DQB1*06:02 and DQB1*06:04 molecules differ in the beta chain by 7 residues, these DQB1 genes are very similar. The DQA1*01:02-DQB1*06 (DQB1*06:02 or DQB1*06:04) haplotype might play a pivotal role in the resistance to HT.

  16. A crypto-Dravidian origin for the nontribal communities of South India based on human leukocyte antigen class I diversity.

    PubMed

    Thomas, R; Nair, S B; Banerjee, M

    2006-09-01

    The Dravidian communities are considered to be the original inhabitants of India, now restricted to South India. The southern most state, Kerala, is socio-culturally stratified into Hindus, Muslims and Christians on the basis of religion. The origin of these religious communities in Kerala is considered to be unique in comparison with that in other parts of the country. These communities were later influenced by the hierarchical caste structure established by the Hindu Brahmins. In the present study, we compared six nontribal (Namboothiri, Nair, Ezhava, Pulaya, Malabar Muslim and Syrian Christian) communities belonging to the major religious groups in Kerala (Hindu, Muslim and Christian) based on the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A, -B and -C diversity. Our aim was to understand the genomic substructuring associated with the changing social scenario in various caste and religious groups and compare it with the Dravidian tribal and other world populations. The present study reveals that the HLA diversity of the Dravidian communities is very distinct from that in the other world populations. It is obvious that the nontribal communities of Kerala display a greater Dravidian influence, but traces of genetic admixture with the Mediterranean, western European, central Asian and East Asian populations can be observed. This characterizes the crypto-Dravidian features of the nontribal communities of Kerala. Demic diffusion of the local progressive communities with the migrant communities may have given rise to crypto-Dravidian features among the nontribal communities of Kerala.

  17. sNebula, a network-based algorithm to predict binding between human leukocyte antigens and peptides

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Heng; Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui Wen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Mendrick, Donna L.; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the binding between human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) and peptides is important to understand the functioning of the immune system. Since it is time-consuming and costly to measure the binding between large numbers of HLAs and peptides, computational methods including machine learning models and network approaches have been developed to predict HLA-peptide binding. However, there are several limitations for the existing methods. We developed a network-based algorithm called sNebula to address these limitations. We curated qualitative Class I HLA-peptide binding data and demonstrated the prediction performance of sNebula on this dataset using leave-one-out cross-validation and five-fold cross-validations. This algorithm can predict not only peptides of different lengths and different types of HLAs, but also the peptides or HLAs that have no existing binding data. We believe sNebula is an effective method to predict HLA-peptide binding and thus improve our understanding of the immune system. PMID:27558848

  18. sNebula, a network-based algorithm to predict binding between human leukocyte antigens and peptides.

    PubMed

    Luo, Heng; Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui Wen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Mendrick, Donna L; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the binding between human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) and peptides is important to understand the functioning of the immune system. Since it is time-consuming and costly to measure the binding between large numbers of HLAs and peptides, computational methods including machine learning models and network approaches have been developed to predict HLA-peptide binding. However, there are several limitations for the existing methods. We developed a network-based algorithm called sNebula to address these limitations. We curated qualitative Class I HLA-peptide binding data and demonstrated the prediction performance of sNebula on this dataset using leave-one-out cross-validation and five-fold cross-validations. This algorithm can predict not only peptides of different lengths and different types of HLAs, but also the peptides or HLAs that have no existing binding data. We believe sNebula is an effective method to predict HLA-peptide binding and thus improve our understanding of the immune system. PMID:27558848

  19. Kinetics of anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody internalization: effects of affinity, bivalency, and stability

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Michael M.; Thurber, Greg M.

    2010-01-01

    Theoretical analyses suggest that the cellular internalization and catabolism of bound antibodies contribute significantly to poor penetration into tumors. Here we quantitatively assess the internalization of antibodies and antibody fragments against the commonly targeted antigen carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Although CEA is often referred to as a non-internalizing or shed antigen, anti-CEA antibodies and antibody fragments are shown to be slowly endocytosed by LS174T cells with a half-time of 10–16 h, a time scale consistent with the metabolic turnover rate of CEA in the absence of antibody. Anti-CEA single chain variable fragments (scFvs) with significant differences in affinity, stability against protease digestion, and valency exhibit similar uptake rates of bound antibody. In contrast, one anti-CEA IgG exhibits unique binding and trafficking properties with twice as many molecules bound per cell at saturation and significantly faster cellular internalization after binding. The internalization rates measured herein can be used in simple computational models to predict the microdistribution of these antibodies in tumor spheroids. PMID:18408925

  20. Specific Antibodies Reacting with SV40 Large T Antigen Mimotopes in Serum Samples of Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Tognon, Mauro; Corallini, Alfredo; Manfrini, Marco; Taronna, Angelo; Butel, Janet S.; Pietrobon, Silvia; Trevisiol, Lorenzo; Bononi, Ilaria; Vaccher, Emanuela; Barbanti-Brodano, Giuseppe; Martini, Fernanda; Mazzoni, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Simian Virus 40, experimentally assayed in vitro in different animal and human cells and in vivo in rodents, was classified as a small DNA tumor virus. In previous studies, many groups identified Simian Virus 40 sequences in healthy individuals and cancer patients using PCR techniques, whereas others failed to detect the viral sequences in human specimens. These conflicting results prompted us to develop a novel indirect ELISA with synthetic peptides, mimicking Simian Virus 40 capsid viral protein antigens, named mimotopes. This immunologic assay allowed us to investigate the presence of serum antibodies against Simian Virus 40 and to verify whether Simian Virus 40 is circulating in humans. In this investigation two mimotopes from Simian Virus 40 large T antigen, the viral replication protein and oncoprotein, were employed to analyze for specific reactions to human sera antibodies. This indirect ELISA with synthetic peptides from Simian Virus 40 large T antigen was used to assay a new collection of serum samples from healthy subjects. This novel assay revealed that serum antibodies against Simian Virus 40 large T antigen mimotopes are detectable, at low titer, in healthy subjects aged from 18–65 years old. The overall prevalence of reactivity with the two Simian Virus 40 large T antigen peptides was 20%. This new ELISA with two mimotopes of the early viral regions is able to detect in a specific manner Simian Virus 40 large T antigen-antibody responses. PMID:26731525

  1. Specific Antibodies Reacting with SV40 Large T Antigen Mimotopes in Serum Samples of Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Tognon, Mauro; Corallini, Alfredo; Manfrini, Marco; Taronna, Angelo; Butel, Janet S; Pietrobon, Silvia; Trevisiol, Lorenzo; Bononi, Ilaria; Vaccher, Emanuela; Barbanti-Brodano, Giuseppe; Martini, Fernanda; Mazzoni, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Simian Virus 40, experimentally assayed in vitro in different animal and human cells and in vivo in rodents, was classified as a small DNA tumor virus. In previous studies, many groups identified Simian Virus 40 sequences in healthy individuals and cancer patients using PCR techniques, whereas others failed to detect the viral sequences in human specimens. These conflicting results prompted us to develop a novel indirect ELISA with synthetic peptides, mimicking Simian Virus 40 capsid viral protein antigens, named mimotopes. This immunologic assay allowed us to investigate the presence of serum antibodies against Simian Virus 40 and to verify whether Simian Virus 40 is circulating in humans. In this investigation two mimotopes from Simian Virus 40 large T antigen, the viral replication protein and oncoprotein, were employed to analyze for specific reactions to human sera antibodies. This indirect ELISA with synthetic peptides from Simian Virus 40 large T antigen was used to assay a new collection of serum samples from healthy subjects. This novel assay revealed that serum antibodies against Simian Virus 40 large T antigen mimotopes are detectable, at low titer, in healthy subjects aged from 18-65 years old. The overall prevalence of reactivity with the two Simian Virus 40 large T antigen peptides was 20%. This new ELISA with two mimotopes of the early viral regions is able to detect in a specific manner Simian Virus 40 large T antigen-antibody responses. PMID:26731525

  2. Antibodies to new beta cell antigen ICA12 in Latvian diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Shtauvere-Brameus, A; Hagopian, W; Rumba, I; Sanjeevi, C B

    2002-04-01

    In Latvia diabetes mellitus is diagnosed using the WHO's clinical criteria, and assays for the detection of autoantibodies are not available. In consequence, slowly progressive autoimmune diabetes or LADA is likely to be missed. Antibodies to GAD65 and IA-2 are the major immunological markers in autoimmune diabetes. Recently, a new beta cell antigen, called ICA12, has been identified, which has a homology to the SOX family of transcription factors. The aim of the study was to analyze the prevalence of ICA12 antibodies in diabetes mellitus patients and controls from Latvia and to see whether this antigen is important in revealing autoimmunity when antibodies against major antigens are not present. We studied 88 IDDM patients and 100 NIDDM patients as well as controls for the prevalence of GAD65, IA-2, and ICA12 antibodies by radioligand binding assay (RIA) using (35)S-labeled islet antigens. We found ICA12Abs in 26 of 88 IDDM patients (30%) vs. 4% in healthy controls (4/100) and in 9 of 100 NIDDM patients (9%) vs. 2% controls (2/100). ICA12Abs alone are present in only 3% (3/88) of the patients with IDDM and 1% (1/100) of the NIDDM patients. We conclude that ICA12 represents the minor antigens in autoimmune diabetes and that, as a minor antigen, ICA12 alone does not contribute significantly in revealing new cases of autoimmunity.

  3. Internalization and re-expression of antigens of human melanoma cells following exposure to monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.S.; Lumanglas, A.L.; Silva, J.; Ruszala-Mallon, V.; Durr, F.E.

    1987-04-15

    Modulation of the surface membrane of human Sk-Mel-28 melanoma cells by monoclonal antibody (MoAb) 96.5 recognizing p97 determinants was examined using direct radioimmunoassay and indirect fluorescent antibody-staining techniques. It was determined that the majority of /sup 111/In-labeled antibody that remained associated with cells after a 24-hr incubation at 37 degrees C had been internalized because MoAb 96.5 was no longer visible on the cell surface. A second treatment of these cells with the same antibody 24 hr later not only increased the cell-associated radioactivity, reflecting an increase of total antibody bound, but also rendered these cells membrane immunofluorescent again, indicating the re-expression of surface antigens. Autoradiographs of the electrophoretically analyzed membrane components of Sk-Mel-28 cells further demonstrated the appearance of newly synthesized 97-kDa proteins that were immunoprecipitable with MoAb 96.5. Taken together, the present findings suggest that p97 antigens undergo endocytosis in Sk-Mel-28 cells following exposure to MoAb 96.5. However, the same antigens were regenerated and expressed on the cell surface within a period of 24 hr. The re-expression of tumor cell surface antigen following initial internalization of the MoAb-antigen complex may have implications for diagnosis and therapy.

  4. Development and Characterization of a New Antipeptide Monoclonal Antibody Directed to Human CD20 Antigen.

    PubMed

    Habibi-Anbouhi, Mahdi; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Behdani, Mahdi; Hajizadeh-Saffar, Ensiyeh; Vahabpour, Rouhollah; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali

    2015-09-01

    The rapid expansion of immunotherapeutic approaches for treatment of various diseases, including cancers, has been greatly facilitated by the invention of new generation of antibodies. Clinical studies have indicated that anti-CD20 mAb-based therapies represent an effective treatment for various diseases with overexpression of CD20 on their cell surface, such as non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, hemolytic anemia, as well as autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis. Technically, due to a short extra membrane domain, the recombinant CD20 protein is a difficult antigen to raise immune responses. In search for new monoclonal antibodies, the authors used an antigenic polypeptide, which yielded numbers of new binders that may lead to production of anti-CD20 antibodies, with improved diagnostic or clinical attributes. Mice were immunized with extra membrane loop of human CD20 (exCD20) polypeptide. The exCD20 antigen showed a desired immune response and was able to develop a monoclonal antibody, 3B4C10, which reacted well with peptide antigen as well as native antigen on the surface of Raji B-cell line. The antibody 3B4C10 with a balanced K(on) and K(off) may be applicable in the construction of affinity columns or beads for isolation and purification of CD20-positive cells and cancer stem cells. PMID:26352927

  5. Chemical force titrations of antigen- and antibody-modified poly(methylmethacrylate).

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Oleschuk, Richard D; Petkovich, P Martin; Horton, J Hugh

    2007-03-15

    Poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) is a versatile polymer that displays desirable properties for development of cheap and disposable microfluidic devices for sensing biomolecular interactions. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and chemical force titrations were used to determine the efficacy of surface modifications made to accommodate protein-substrate linkage. AFM images show the effects on surface morphology of carboxylated-, amine-, hCG antigen- and anti-hCG antibody-modified PMMA substrates. Confocal microscopy was used to determine the fluorescent intensity of labeled antibody species on the PMMA substrate, confirming the success of surface antigen/antibody immobilization. Surface pK(1/2) value for carboxylic acid and amine species grafted on PMMA were determined. When carboxylic acid or amine-terminated tips were titrated against PMMA samples terminated with the hCG antigen and anti-hCG antibody, peaks appeared in the force titration curve consistent with the pI range of the antigen or antibody species. Strong adhesive forces were present at pH values above 7.0 when the antigen was present on the PMMA substrate, and these were attributed to hydrophobic interactions between the antigen and the alkane "linker" chain attaching the amine or carboxylate group to the AFM tip. Such hydrophobic interactions were not observed with the carboxylic acid or amine/antibody combinations suggesting that the surface-linked antibody was more resistant to denaturation under higher pH. The results demonstrated the feasibility of using AFM approaches for interrogating protein grafting strategies in the fabrication of PMMA-based microsystems.

  6. The impact of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) micropolymorphism on ligand specificity within the HLA-B*41 allotypic family

    SciTech Connect

    Bade-Döding, Christina; Theodossis, Alex; Gras, Stephanie; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Eiz-Vesper, Britta; Seltsam, Axel; Huyton, Trevor; Rossjohn, Jamie; McCluskey, James; Blasczyk, Rainer

    2011-09-28

    Polymorphic differences between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules affect the specificity and conformation of their bound peptides and lead to differential selection of the T-cell repertoire. Mismatching during allogeneic transplantation can, therefore, lead to immunological reactions. We investigated the structure-function relationships of six members of the HLA-B*41 allelic group that differ by six polymorphic amino acids, including positions 80, 95, 97 and 114 within the antigen-binding cleft. Peptide-binding motifs for B*41:01, *41:02, *41:03, *41:04, *41:05 and *41:06 were determined by sequencing self-peptides from recombinant B*41 molecules by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The crystal structures of HLA-B*41:03 bound to a natural 16-mer self-ligand (AEMYGSVTEHPSPSPL) and HLA-B*41:04 bound to a natural 11-mer self-ligand (HEEAVSVDRVL) were solved. Peptide analysis revealed that all B*41 alleles have an identical anchor motif at peptide position 2 (glutamic acid), but differ in their choice of C-terminal p{Omega} anchor (proline, valine, leucine). Additionally, B*41:04 displayed a greater preference for long peptides (>10 residues) when compared to the other B*41 allomorphs, while the longest peptide to be eluted from the allelic group (a 16mer) was obtained from B*41:03. The crystal structures of HLA-B*41:03 and HLA-B*41:04 revealed that both alleles interact in a highly conserved manner with the terminal regions of their respective ligands, while micropolymorphism-induced changes in the steric and electrostatic properties of the antigen-binding cleft account for differences in peptide repertoire and auxiliary anchoring. Differences in peptide repertoire, and peptide length specificity reflect the significant functional evolution of these closely related allotypes and signal their importance in allogeneic transplantation, especially B*41:03 and B*41:04, which accommodate longer peptides, creating structurally distinct peptide

  7. Regulatory effects of antigen and antibody on the reagin response in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Strannegård, Ö

    1971-01-01

    The influence of antigen dosage on reagin formation to haemocyanin in rabbits was studied. Using large doses of antigen, reagin formation was more readily elicited, the induction period was shorter and the persistence of reagins in serum was longer than when low antigen doses were employed. Reagin synthesis was readily induced after intravenous administration of antigen. Immunization with antigen mixed with varying doses of IgG antibody resulted in a suppressed formation of antibodies reactive in passive haemagglutination and in a total inhibition of reagin formation. The inhibition of reagin synthesis was long-lasting and booster injections of antigen did not result in the appearance of reagins. `Hyposensitization' with series of injections of antigen or antigen–antibody mixtures resulted in an initial decrease of the reagin titres, but restoration of reagin levels was observed already about 2 weeks following cessation of the treatment. The possible implications of the results for the specific immunologic therapy of allergic disorders are discussed. PMID:5091619

  8. Monoclonal antibodies to hepatitis B surface antigen: production and characterization.

    PubMed

    Hlozánek, I; Dostálová, V; Korec, E; Zelený, V; König, J; Nĕmecek, V

    1986-01-01

    Hybridomas secreting anti-HBsAg antibodies were produced by fusion of the mouse myeloma cell line SP2/0 with lymphocytes from mice immunized with purified HBsAg. All clones produced antibodies of the IgG1 idiotype that react with the subtype a determinant of HBsAg. An enzyme immunoassay for detection of HBsAg in human sera using monoclonal antibodies was developed and compared with commercial Sevatest ELISA HBsAg/micro I kit for detection of HBsAg in clinical serum samples. PMID:3527770

  9. Novel use of a radiolabelled antibody against stage specific embryonic antigen for the detection of occult abscesses in mammals

    DOEpatents

    Thakur, M.L.

    1990-04-17

    The invention discloses improved reagents containing antibodies against stage specific embryonic antigen-1 antibodies and improved methods for detection of occult abscess and inflammation using the improved reagents. No Drawings

  10. Transcription analysis, physical mapping, and molecular characterization of a nonclassical human leukocyte antigen class I gene.

    PubMed Central

    Chorney, M J; Sawada, I; Gillespie, G A; Srivastava, R; Pan, J; Weissman, S M

    1990-01-01

    The human major histocompatibility complex contains approximately 20 class I genes, pseudogenes, and gene fragments. These include the genes for the three major transplantation antigens, HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C, as well as a number of other genes or pseudogenes of unknown biological significance. Most of the latter have C + G-rich sequences in their 5' ends that are unmethylated in the B-lymphoblastoid cell line 3.1.0. We investigated one of these genes, HLA-H, in more detail. The gene is, overall, strongly homologous in sequence to HLA-A but differs in several potentially significant ways, including changes in conserved promoter sequences, a single-base deletion producing a translation termination codon in exon 4, and a region of sequence divergence downstream of the transcribed portion of the gene. Nevertheless, mouse L cells transfected with the gene accumulated small amounts of apparently full-length polyadenylated RNA. A portion of this RNA begins at the transcription site predicted by analogy to certain class I cDNA clones, while another portion appears to begin shortly upstream. L cells transfected with a hybrid gene containing the first three exons of HLA-H and the last five exons of HLA-B27 accumulated full-length HLA transcripts at the same level as cells transfected with an HLA-B27 gene; both levels are at least 15- to 20-fold higher than that directed by HLA-H alone. In addition, we isolated a cDNA clone for HLA-H that contains a portion of intron 3 attached to a normally spliced sequence comprising exons 4 through 8. These results suggest that low levels of translatable mRNA for the truncated class I heavy chain encoded by HLA-H are produced under physiologic circumstances and that sequences 3' of intron 3 decrease the levels of stable transcripts. Images PMID:2294403

  11. Antibodies: At The Nexus of Antigens and Cancer Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Steplewski, Zenon; Thurin, Magdalena; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2015-07-15

    This review describes the development of monoclonal antibodies and the inception of their use in cancer therapy, their impact on defining cancer biomarkers, and their structural utility in new cancer vaccine development.

  12. Uterine Natural Killer Cell and Human Leukocyte Antigen-G1 and Human Leukocyte Antigen-G5 Expression in Vaginal Discharge of Threatened-Abortion Women: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Shobeiri, Saeideh Sadat; Rahmani, Zahra; Hossein Nataj, Hadi; Ranjbaran, Hossein; Mohammadi, Masoud; Abediankenari, Saeid

    2015-01-01

    The immunotolerant human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) molecules have a major role in fetal-maternal tolerance during pregnancy. Interaction between these molecules and uterine natural killer (uNK) cells inhibitory receptors prevents NK cell invasion against fetus trophoblast cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the percentages of uNK cells and HLA-G1 and HLA-G5 isoforms expression in vaginal discharge of threatened-abortion women in comparison with control. In a case-control study, we investigated 30 threatened-abortion women with bleeding or spotting less than 20 weeks of pregnancy as compared to 30 normal pregnant women. uNK cells percentage was assessed by flow cytometry. Furthermore, we evaluated HLA-G1 and HLA-G5 isoforms expression by Real-Time PCR in these groups. The results of this study showed that threatened-abortion women had increased uNK cells and decreased T cells percentage in vaginal discharge in comparison with normal pregnant women (p = 0.01, p = 0.003, resp.). In addition, HLA-G1 isoform had lower expression in threatened-abortion women in comparison with control group (p = 0.0001). The increase of uNK cells level with the decrease of HLA-G expression in vaginal discharge of threatened-abortion pregnant women is an indicator of mother's immune dysregulation. It is concluded that HLA-G expression level with uNK cells percentage can be determined as a diagnostic marker for threatened-abortion women. PMID:26509178

  13. Uterine Natural Killer Cell and Human Leukocyte Antigen-G1 and Human Leukocyte Antigen-G5 Expression in Vaginal Discharge of Threatened-Abortion Women: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Shobeiri, Saeideh Sadat; Rahmani, Zahra; Hossein Nataj, Hadi; Ranjbaran, Hossein; Mohammadi, Masoud; Abediankenari, Saeid

    2015-01-01

    The immunotolerant human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) molecules have a major role in fetal-maternal tolerance during pregnancy. Interaction between these molecules and uterine natural killer (uNK) cells inhibitory receptors prevents NK cell invasion against fetus trophoblast cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the percentages of uNK cells and HLA-G1 and HLA-G5 isoforms expression in vaginal discharge of threatened-abortion women in comparison with control. In a case-control study, we investigated 30 threatened-abortion women with bleeding or spotting less than 20 weeks of pregnancy as compared to 30 normal pregnant women. uNK cells percentage was assessed by flow cytometry. Furthermore, we evaluated HLA-G1 and HLA-G5 isoforms expression by Real-Time PCR in these groups. The results of this study showed that threatened-abortion women had increased uNK cells and decreased T cells percentage in vaginal discharge in comparison with normal pregnant women (p = 0.01, p = 0.003, resp.). In addition, HLA-G1 isoform had lower expression in threatened-abortion women in comparison with control group (p = 0.0001). The increase of uNK cells level with the decrease of HLA-G expression in vaginal discharge of threatened-abortion pregnant women is an indicator of mother's immune dysregulation. It is concluded that HLA-G expression level with uNK cells percentage can be determined as a diagnostic marker for threatened-abortion women. PMID:26509178

  14. Directed evolution of antibody fragments with monovalent femtomolar antigen-binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Boder, E T; Midelfort, K S; Wittrup, K D

    2000-09-26

    Single-chain antibody mutants have been evolved in vitro with antigen-binding equilibrium dissociation constant K(d) = 48 fM and slower dissociation kinetics (half-time > 5 days) than those for the streptavidin-biotin complex. These mutants possess the highest monovalent ligand-binding affinity yet reported for an engineered protein by over two orders of magnitude. Optimal kinetic screening of randomly mutagenized libraries of 10(5)-10(7) yeast surface-displayed antibodies enabled a >1,000-fold decrease in the rate of dissociation after four cycles of affinity mutagenesis and screening. The consensus mutations are generally nonconservative by comparison with naturally occurring mouse Fv sequences and with residues that do not contact the fluorescein antigen in the wild-type complex. The existence of these mutants demonstrates that the antibody Fv architecture is not intrinsically responsible for an antigen-binding affinity ceiling during in vivo affinity maturation.

  15. Detection and identification of platelet antibodies and antigens in the clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Curtis, B R; McFarland, J G

    2009-01-01

    As a result of the unique functional properties of platelets, more-robust methods were required for detection of antibodies raised against them. Immunofluorescence detection by flow cytometry, solid-phase red cell adherence, and antigen capture ELISAs are some of the current tests that have been developed to meet the challenges of platelet antibody detection and identification and antigen phenotyping. Recently developed protein liquid bead arrays are becoming the next-generation platelet antibody tests. Fueled by development of PCR and determination of the molecular basis of the PlA1 human platelet antigen (HPA), serologic platelet typing has now been replaced by genotyping of DNA. Allele-specific PCR, melting curve analysis, and 5'-nuclease assays are now evolving into more high-throughput molecular tests. Laboratory testing for the diagnosis of immune platelet disorders has advanced considerably from its humble beginnings.

  16. The effect of circulating antigen and radiolabel stability on the biodistribution of an indium labelled antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, B. R.; Babich, J.; Young, H.; Waddington, W.; Clarke, G.; Short, M.; Boulos, P.; Styles, J.; Dean, C.

    1991-01-01

    This study has investigated two of the main problems with radiolabelled antibody imaging, the formation of circulating immune complexes (I.C.) and the non specific binding of radiolabel to the antibody molecule. Patients undergoing immunoscintigraphy with 111In labelled monoclonal antibody ICR2 were divided into three groups who received either the radiolabelled antibody alone (control, n = 12), the radiolabelled antibody which was incubated with the chelating agent diethylene triamine pentacetic acid (DTPA) prior to size exclusion chromatography (n = 6) or whose injectate was treated with DTPA and cold MAb administered intravenously prior to radiolabelled MAb administration (n = 6). Radiolabelled antibody uptake in abdominal organs was measured by region of interest analysis using a gamma camera with online computer and that in tumour and normal tissues by gamma well counting of biopsies. Circulating antigen and immune complex was measured by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The sensitivity of tumour imaging and the tumour uptake of radiolabelled antibody was not significantly different between the groups. Patients with high circulating antigen levels developed high levels of circulating immune complex but also had high tumour uptakes of radiolabelled antibody. Administration of cold MAb increased the splenic, but did not effect the tumour uptake of radiolabelled antibody and only minimally reduced levels of circulating immune complex. Chelate administration reduced the urinary excretion of radioactivity but increased the liver uptake of radioactivity. These results have shown that successful antibody imaging can be carried out despite high levels of circulating antigen, that large doses of unlabelled antibody are required to prevent immune complex formation and that removal of non specifically bound 111In does not reduce the liver uptake of radioactivity. PMID:1931605

  17. Antigen nature and complexity influence human antibody light chain usage and specificity.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kenneth; Shah, Hemangi; Muther, Jennifer J; Duke, Angie L; Haley, Kathleen; James, Judith A

    2016-05-27

    Human antibodies consist of a heavy chain and one of two possible light chains, kappa (κ) or lambda (λ). Here we tested how these two possible light chains influence the overall antibody response to polysaccharide and protein antigens by measuring light chain usage in human monoclonal antibodies from antibody secreting cells obtained following vaccination with Pneumovax23. Remarkably, we found that individuals displayed restricted light chain usage to certain serotypes and that lambda antibodies have different specificities and modes of cross-reactivity than kappa antibodies. Thus, at both the monoclonal (7 kappa, no lambda) and serum levels (145μg/mL kappa, 2.82μg/mL lambda), antibodies to cell wall polysaccharide were nearly always kappa. The pneumococcal reference serum 007sp was analyzed for light chain usage to 12 pneumococcal serotypes for which it is well characterized. Similar to results at the monoclonal level, certain serotypes tended to favor one of the light chains (14 and 19A, lambda; 6A and 23F, kappa). We also explored differences in light chain usage at the serum level to a variety of antigens. We examined serum antibodies to diphtheria toxin mutant CRM197 and Epstein-Barr virus protein EBNA-1. These responses tended to be kappa dominant (average kappa-to-lambda ratios of 4.52 and 9.72 respectively). Responses to the influenza vaccine were more balanced with kappa-to-lambda ratio averages having slight strain variations: seasonal H1N1, 1.1; H3N2, 0.96; B, 0.91. We conclude that antigens with limited epitopes tend to produce antibodies with restricted light chain usage and that in most individuals, antibodies with lambda light chains have specificities different and complementary to kappa-containing antibodies.

  18. Antigen nature and complexity influence human antibody light chain usage and specificity.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kenneth; Shah, Hemangi; Muther, Jennifer J; Duke, Angie L; Haley, Kathleen; James, Judith A

    2016-05-27

    Human antibodies consist of a heavy chain and one of two possible light chains, kappa (κ) or lambda (λ). Here we tested how these two possible light chains influence the overall antibody response to polysaccharide and protein antigens by measuring light chain usage in human monoclonal antibodies from antibody secreting cells obtained following vaccination with Pneumovax23. Remarkably, we found that individuals displayed restricted light chain usage to certain serotypes and that lambda antibodies have different specificities and modes of cross-reactivity than kappa antibodies. Thus, at both the monoclonal (7 kappa, no lambda) and serum levels (145μg/mL kappa, 2.82μg/mL lambda), antibodies to cell wall polysaccharide were nearly always kappa. The pneumococcal reference serum 007sp was analyzed for light chain usage to 12 pneumococcal serotypes for which it is well characterized. Similar to results at the monoclonal level, certain serotypes tended to favor one of the light chains (14 and 19A, lambda; 6A and 23F, kappa). We also explored differences in light chain usage at the serum level to a variety of antigens. We examined serum antibodies to diphtheria toxin mutant CRM197 and Epstein-Barr virus protein EBNA-1. These responses tended to be kappa dominant (average kappa-to-lambda ratios of 4.52 and 9.72 respectively). Responses to the influenza vaccine were more balanced with kappa-to-lambda ratio averages having slight strain variations: seasonal H1N1, 1.1; H3N2, 0.96; B, 0.91. We conclude that antigens with limited epitopes tend to produce antibodies with restricted light chain usage and that in most individuals, antibodies with lambda light chains have specificities different and complementary to kappa-containing antibodies. PMID:27113164

  19. Enhancing Blockade of Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Invasion: Assessing Combinations of Antibodies against PfRH5 and Other Merozoite Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Kazutoyo; Illingworth, Joseph J.; Choudhary, Prateek; Murungi, Linda M.; Furze, Julie M.; Diouf, Ababacar; Miotto, Olivo; Crosnier, Cécile; Wright, Gavin J.; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Long, Carole A.; Draper, Simon J.

    2012-01-01

    No vaccine has yet proven effective against the blood-stages of Plasmodium falciparum, which cause the symptoms and severe manifestations of malaria. We recently found that PfRH5, a P. falciparum-specific protein expressed in merozoites, is efficiently targeted by broadly-neutralizing, vaccine-induced antibodies. Here we show that antibodies against PfRH5 efficiently inhibit the in vitro growth of short-term-adapted parasite isolates from Cambodia, and that the EC50 values of antigen-specific antibodies against PfRH5 are lower than those against PfAMA1. Since antibody responses elicited by multiple antigens are speculated to improve the efficacy of blood-stage vaccines, we conducted detailed assessments of parasite growth inhibition by antibodies against PfRH5 in combination with antibodies against seven other merozoite antigens. We found that antibodies against PfRH5 act synergistically with antibodies against certain other merozoite antigens, most notably with antibodies against other erythrocyte-binding antigens such as PfRH4, to inhibit the growth of a homologous P. falciparum clone. A combination of antibodies against PfRH4 and basigin, the erythrocyte receptor for PfRH5, also potently inhibited parasite growth. This methodology provides the first quantitative evidence that polyclonal vaccine-induced antibodies can act synergistically against P. falciparum antigens and should help to guide the rational development of future multi-antigen vaccines. PMID:23144611

  20. Recent investigations into pig antigen and anti-pig antibody expression.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Guerard W; McGregor, Christopher G A; Breimer, Michael E

    2015-11-01

    Genetic engineering of donor pigs to eliminate expression of the dominant xenogeneic antigen galactose α1,3 galactose (Gal) has created a sea change in the immunobiology of xenograft rejection. Antibody mediated xenograft rejection of GGTA-1 α-galactosyltransferase (GTKO) deficient organs is now directed to a combination of non-Gal pig protein and carbohydrate antigens. Glycan analysis of GTKO tissues identified no new neo-antigens but detected high levels of N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) modified glycoproteins and glycolipids. Humans produce anti-Neu5Gc antibody and in very limited clinical studies sometimes show an induced anti-Neu5Gc antibody response after challenge with pig tissue. The pathogenicity of anti-Neu5Gc antibody in xenotransplantation is not clear however as non-human transplant models, critical for modelling anti-Gal immunity, do not produce anti-Neu5Gc antibody. Antibody induced after xenotransplantation in non-human primates is directed to an array of pig endothelial cells proteins and to a glycan produced by the pig B4GALNT2 gene. We anticipate that immune suppression will significantly affect the T-cell dependent and independent specificity of an induced antibody response and that donor pigs deficient in synthesis of multiple xenogeneic glycans will be important to future studies.

  1. Reactivity of monoclonal antibodies to species-specific antigens of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, H; Kobayashi, S; Nagakura, K; Kaneda, Y; Takeuchi, T

    1991-01-01

    Twenty monoclonal antibodies were produced against trophozoites of Entamoeba histolytica strains HK-9 and HM-1: IMSS. When reactivity to various enteric protozoa was examined by an indirect fluorescence antibody test, 15 of the monoclonal antibodies were strongly reactive with E. histolytica trophozoites. Species-specific antigens recognized by these monoclonal antibodies were located on the plasma membrane, nucleus, cytoplasm, and cytoskeletal structures of the trophozoites. Two of the remaining five monoclonals reacted strongly with trophozoites of the E. histolytica-like Laredo strain. The determinant antigen was located in the cytoplasm. The three remaining monoclonal antibodies were found to recognize cross-reactive antigens between E. histolytica and E. histolytica-like Laredo, E. hartmanni, E. coli, Dientamoeba fragilis, Giardia lamblia, and Trichomonas hominis. These three antibodies were also reactive with T. vaginalis and mammalian cells such as HeLa cells. Thus, the combined use of monoclonal antibodies seems capable of distinguishing E. histolytica and/or E. histolytica-like Laredo from other enteric protozoa. PMID:1724012

  2. A peptide mimic blocks the cross-reaction of anti-DNA antibodies with glomerular antigens.

    PubMed

    Xia, Y; Eryilmaz, E; Der, E; Pawar, R D; Guo, X; Cowburn, D; Putterman, C

    2016-03-01

    Anti-DNA antibodies play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis by cross-reacting with renal antigens. Previously, we demonstrated that the binding affinity of anti-DNA antibodies to self-antigens is isotype-dependent. Furthermore, significant variability in renal pathogenicity was seen among a panel of anti-DNA isotypes [derived from a single murine immunoglobulin (Ig)G3 monoclonal antibody, PL9-11] that share identical variable regions. In this study, we sought to select peptide mimics that effectively inhibit the binding of all murine and human anti-DNA IgG isotypes to glomerular antigens. The PL9-11 panel of IgG anti-DNA antibodies (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b and IgG3) was used for screening a 12-mer phage display library. Binding affinity was determined by surface plasmon resonance. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), flow cytometry and glomerular binding assays were used for the assessment of peptide inhibition of antibody binding to nuclear and kidney antigens. We identified a 12 amino acid peptide (ALWPPNLHAWVP, or 'ALW') which binds to all PL9-11 IgG isotypes. Preincubation with the ALW peptide reduced the binding of the PL9-11 anti-DNA antibodies to DNA, laminin, mesangial cells and isolated glomeruli significantly. Furthermore, we confirmed the specificity of the amino acid sequence in the binding of ALW to anti-DNA antibodies by alanine scanning. Finally, ALW inhibited the binding of murine and human lupus sera to dsDNA and glomeruli significantly. In conclusion, by inhibiting the binding of polyclonal anti-DNA antibodies to autoantigens in vivo, the ALW peptide (or its derivatives) may potentially be a useful approach to block anti-DNA antibody binding to renal tissue.

  3. Production of monoclonal antibodies recognizing cancer-associated antigens expressed on mucin-type sugar chains.

    PubMed

    Kurosaka, A; Ikeda, K; Sakuragi, N; Fujimoto, S

    1994-09-30

    To obtain monoclonal antibodies directed to mucin-type sugar chains, mice were immunized with bovine submaxillary mucin (BSM) that had been conjugated with ovalbumin. Conjugation of BSM with ovalbumin enhanced the antigenicity of BSM to about five to ten times that of intact BSM and resulted in the establishment of ten hybridomas, all of which secreted monoclonal antibodies toward BSM. Most of the antibodies secreted by these hybridomas did not react with glycolipids but did react with glycoproteins. Several antibodies lost their reactivity when sialic acid residues were removed from BSM, indicating that these antibodies recognize carbohydrate moieties of mucins. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that three of the antibodies recognized human ovarian cancer-associated carbohydrate antigens. In addition, one of these three antibodies reacted with a human cultured colonic cancer cell line. The protocol described in this paper was effective in producing monoclonal antibodies that recognize mucin-carbohydrates and some of the generated antibodies can be applied to the detection of cancers.

  4. Immunoglobulin A antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi antigens in digestive forms of Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Primavera, K S; Hoshino-Shimizu, S; Umezawa, E S; Peres, B A; Manigot, D A; Camargo, M E

    1988-01-01

    In an attempt to find a serological marker for the diagnosis of chronic digestive forms of Chagas' disease, we compared amastigote and trypomastigote antigens obtained from immunosuppressed mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi (Y strain) with conventional epimastigote antigens to search for immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies. A total of 255 serum samples from patients with acute and chronic (indeterminate, digestive, and cardiac) forms of Chagas' disease and with nonchagasic diseases and from healthy individuals were studied. Amastigote antigens proved to be the most adequate for our purpose, since IgA antibodies could be detected in 23 of 25 serum samples from patients with digestive forms, with relative indices of sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency of 0.920, 0.911, and 0.912, respectively. These antigens also showed high reactivity with IgA antibodies, with a geometric mean titer of 16,635 (12.7 log2). IgA antibodies were detected in 16 of 28 serum samples from patients with the acute form as well, but this clinical form is easily distinguished from the chronic form by the demonstration of IgM antibodies. Poor results were seen with trypomastigote and epimastigote antigens. The finding of IgA antibodies in about 20% of indeterminate forms and 20% of cardiac forms, although in low titers, requires further investigation to ascertain their role as an early signal of gastrointestinal lesions. In addition, the amastigote antigens described here seem more convenient for use in endemic areas than those obtained from cell cultures because of their lower cost. PMID:3141458

  5. Feasibility of measuring antigen-antibody interaction forces using a scanning force microscope.

    PubMed

    Stuart, J K; Hlady, V

    1999-08-31

    The molecular affinity scanning force microscopy (MASFM) described in this study was developed in an effort to test the possibility of antigen-antibody binding measurement using force-separation distance profiles. The MASFM configuration was comprised of a spherical glass bead as an MASFM probe, to which the fluorescein antigen has been covalently attached, and a silicon dioxide-based substrate, to which the antifluorescyl IgG antibody was covalently bound. The bead was glued to the tip of a commercial SFM cantilever. Adhesion forces have been measured between two different specific antigen-antibody pairs and between nonspecific surfaces bearing only glycidoxypropylsilane immobilization chemistry. In force-separation (F-s) measurements, nonspecific forces displayed relatively few force discontinuities and mean adhesion forces lower than those found for specific antigen-antibody measurements. Force-separation profiles measured between specific antigen-antibody pairs showed many discontinuities and had higher mean forces. Positive controls revealed that the mean forces were slightly reduced by the addition of free ligand. The magnitude of mean forces did not correlate with the respective activation enthalpies of the proteins, as would be expected. At lower force values the force histograms for the specific pairs and for positive controls were indistinguishable. None of the force-separation data sets could fit a Poisson discrete-force model. This statistical analysis showed a large relative contribution from nonspecific interactions. It is concluded that the use of the large sphere as an SFM probe is counterproductive: while the large sphere does sample a larger number of specific interactions during each measurement, it also samples at the same time a large proportion of nonspecific forces. The presence of the nonspecific force contributions is likely due to the deformation of the polymerized GPS spacer layer which is thought to be delaminated from the surface upon

  6. Use of antibody gene library for the isolation of specific single chain antibodies by ampicillin-antigen conjugates.

    PubMed

    Neumann-Schaal, Meina; Messerschmidt, Katrin; Grenz, Nicole; Heilmann, Katja

    2013-03-01

    Isolation of recombinant antibodies from antibody libraries is commonly performed by different molecular display formats including phage display and ribosome display or different cell-surface display formats. We describe a new method which allows the selection of Escherichia coli cells producing the required single chain antibody by cultivation in presence of ampicillin conjugated to the antigen of interest. The method utilizes the neutralization of the conjugate by the produced single chain antibody which is secreted to the periplasm. Therefore, a new expression system based on the pET26b vector was designed and a library was constructed. The method was successfully established first for the selection of E. coli BL21 Star (DE3) cells expressing a model single chain antibody (anti-fluorescein) by a simple selection assay on LB-agar plates. Using this selection assay, we could identify a new single chain antibody binding biotin by growing E. coli BL21 Star (DE3) containing the library in presence of a biotin-ampicillin conjugate. In contrast to methods as molecular or cell surface display our selection system applies the soluble single chain antibody molecule and thereby avoids undesired effects, e.g. by the phage particle or the yeast fusion protein. By selecting directly in an expression strain, production and characterization of the selected single chain antibody is possible without any further cloning or transformation steps.

  7. Green tea polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate treatment to mouse skin prevents UVB-induced infiltration of leukocytes, depletion of antigen-presenting cells, and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, S K; Mukhtar, H

    2001-05-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced infiltrating leukocytes, depletion of antigen-presenting cells, and oxidative stress in the skin play an important role in the induction of immune suppression and photocarcinogenesis. Earlier we have shown that topical application of polyphenols from green tea or its major chemopreventive constituent (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) prevents UV-B-induced immunosuppression in mice. To define the mechanism of prevention, we found that topical application of EGCG (3 mg/mouse/3 cm(2) of skin area) to C3H/HeN mice before a single dose of UV-B (90 mJ/cm(2)) exposure inhibited UV-B-induced infiltration of leukocytes, specifically the CD11b+ cell type, and myeloperoxidase activity, a marker of tissue infiltration of leukocytes. EGCG treatment was also found to prevent UV-B-induced depletion in the number of antigen-presenting cells when immunohistochemically detected as class II MHC+ Ia+ cells. UV-B-induced infiltrating cell production of H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO) was determined as a marker of oxidative stress. We found that pretreatment of EGCG decreased the number of UV-B-induced increases in H2O2-producing cells and inducible nitric oxide synthase-expressing cells and the production of H2O2 and NO in both epidermis and dermis at a UV-B-irradiated site. Together, these data suggest that prevention of UV-B-induced infiltrating leukocytes, antigen-presenting cells, and oxidative stress by EGCG treatment of mouse skin may be associated with the prevention of UV-B-induced immunosuppression and photocarcinogenesis.

  8. Antigenic characterization of influenza A virus matrix protein with monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    van Wyke, K.L.; Yewdell, J.W.; Reck, L.J.; Murphy, B.R.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were used to study antigenic variation in three distinct epitopes on the matrix protein of influenza A viruses. The authors found that two of these epitopes underwent antigenic variation, but in a very limited number of virus strains. A third epitope appeared to be an invariant type-specific determinant for influenza A viruses. Competitive antibody binding assays and Western blot analysis of proteolytically digested matrix protein indicated that at least two of three epitopes are located in nonoverlapping domains on the matrix protein molecule.

  9. Immunochemistry of sea anemone toxins: structure-antigenicity relationships and toxin-receptor interactions probed by antibodies specific for one antigenic

    SciTech Connect

    Ayeb, M.E.; Bahraoui, E.M.; Granier, C.; Beress, L.; Rochat, H.

    1986-11-04

    Two antibody subpopulations directed against Anemonia sulcata toxin I or II have been purified by immunoaffinity chromatography. These antibodies are specific for a single antigenic region and were used in a structure-antigenicity relationship study using homologous toxins and chemically modified derivatives of A. sulcata toxin II. Asp-7 and/or Asp=9 and Gln-47 of toxin II were found to be implicated in the antigenic region recognized by the two antibody subpopulations. On the contrary, Arg-14, Lys-35, -36, and -46, and ..cap alpha..-NH/sub 2/ of the glycine residue of A. sulcata toxin II are not involved in the corresponding antigenic region. When assayed for interaction with the sodium channel, the antigenic region of toxin II, including Asp-9 and Gln-47, appeared fully accessible to its specific antibodies, suggesting that it is not involved in the binding of the toxin to its receptor.

  10. Antibody response to Helicobacter pylori excretory antigen and the cross reaction study.

    PubMed

    Sasidharan, S; Uyub, A M

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is recognized as a major case of gastritis and peptic ulcer and a key factor in the development of gastric cancer, gastric lymphoma, and non-ulcerative dyspepsia in man. The detection of antibodies specific for strains of H. pylori has demonstrated the value of serology for providing evidence of infection. The present study was conducted to detect the antigenic proteins of excretory antigen of H. pylori with Western blotting and examine whether anti-H. pylori IgG and IgA antibodies from H. pylori positive patients cross-react with antigens from other common bacterial pathogens. By using SDS-PAGE, 20 different proteins were found in the excretory antigen. By Western blotting and absorption studies, there were indications that anti-H. pylori IgA antibodies directed against 54 kDa, 50 kDa and 27 kDa cross-reacted with antigens from other bacteria, and that H. pylori proteins of 99 kDa, 88 kDa and 81 kDa possibly shared similar epitope with antigens of other pathogens not tested in the absorption studies. The cross-reactivity occurred in this study was not significantly affect the performance of the in-house ELISA.

  11. Antibodies to a nuclear/nucleolar antigen in patients with polymyositis overlap syndromes.

    PubMed

    Reichlin, M; Maddison, P J; Targoff, I; Bunch, T; Arnett, F; Sharp, G; Treadwell, E; Tan, E M

    1984-01-01

    A precipitating antigen-antibody system has been characterized that occurs in patients with polymyositis. At least half of the patients not only have polymyositis but also have scleroderma. The proposed name for this antigen found in calf thymus extract (CTE) is PM-Scl, to indicate the almost universal presence of polymyositis and the frequent occurrence of scleroderma in the patients who make antibodies to this antigen. The antigen is probably nucleolar since all sera which precipitate with the PM-Scl antigen stain the nucleoli of Hep2 cells by indirect immunofluorescence. The PM-Scl immune system is a distinctive one different from the other known precipitins that occur in patients with polymyositis and dermatomyositis including Jo1, nRNP, and Mi. This PM-Scl antigen and its antibody represent one system which constitutes part of the reactions previously designated as PM1. Interlaboratory exchange of sera and extracts have established the unique nature of this reaction which occurs in patients with inflammatory myopathy. PMID:6699138

  12. Antibodies for Growth Hormone and Prolactin Using Multiple Antigen Peptide Immunogens.

    PubMed

    González-Villaseñor; Chen

    1999-05-01

    : Antibodies elicited by novel synthetic peptide antigens derived from a highly conserved domain of the growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) of vertebrates were developed using the multiple antigen peptide approach. The sequence of the antigens is located near the carboxy-terminus in the D domain of the GH and PRL in a cluster of 11 and 10 conserved amino acids, respectively, within a sequence of 18 residues. The synthetic peptides were manually synthesized, purified by high-performance liquid chromatography, and the corresponding antibodies, elicited in rabbits, were cross-reacted with the GH and PRL of a variety of mammalian (human, bovine, ovine, pig, and equine) and nonmammalian (chicken, coho salmon, chum salmon, rainbow trout, catfish and striped bass) vertebrates. The cross-reactivity between the immunogen and its corresponding antigen was tested by immunobloting using either GH or PRL. The GH and PRL of the organisms tested cross-reacted specifically with the corresponding antibody. Chicken and fish GH and PRL showed stronger antibody cross-reactivity than that observed in mammalian sources. These results demonstrate the utility of peptide-derived polyclonal antibodies in the detection of native and recombinant GH and PRL of a variety of vertebrates.

  13. [Renal histology in 44 patients with specific antibodies of soluble nuclear antigens].

    PubMed

    Meyer, O; Gaudreau, A; Peltier, A P

    1980-10-01

    The authors studied the correlations between renal histology and specific antinuclear antibodies of soluble nuclear antigens (anti-Sm, anti-RNP, anti-protein) in 44 patients with such auto-antibodies. They were mostly patients with lupus erythematosus (35/44), more rarely mixed collagen disease or Sjögren's disease. The presence of any one of the specific antibodies of nuclear antigens is not associated with any special renal prognosis; thus the presence of anti-RNP does not mean that there are no histological renal lesions. The renal prognosis depends in fact on the presence of anti-ADN native antibodies. Among the other laboratory parameters (rheumatoid factors, complement levels, cryoglobulinemia) only hypocomplementemia seems to be associated with a poor renal prognosis, the presence of rheumatoid factor has perhaps a protective role.

  14. Complex preimplantation genetic diagnosis for beta-thalassaemia, sideroblastic anaemia, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-typing.

    PubMed

    Kakourou, Georgia; Vrettou, Christina; Kattamis, Antonis; Destouni, Aspasia; Poulou, Myrto; Moutafi, Maria; Kokkali, Georgia; Pantos, Konstantinos; Davies, Stephen; Kitsiou-Tzeli, Sophia; Kanavakis, Emmanuel; Traeger-Synodinos, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) to select histocompatible siblings to facilitate curative haematopoeitic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) is now an acceptable option in the absence of an available human leukocyte antigen (HLA) compatible donor. We describe a case where the couple who requested HLA-PGD, were both carriers of two serious haematological diseases, beta-thalassaemia and sideroblastic anaemia. Their daughter, affected with sideroblastic anaemia, was programmed to have HSCT. A multiplex-fluorescent-touchdown-PCR protocol was optimized for the simultaneous amplification of: the two HBB-gene mutated regions (c.118C> T, c.25-26delAA), four short tandem repeats (STRs) in chr11p15.5 linked to the HBB gene, the SLC25A38 gene mutation (c.726C > T), two STRs in chr3p22.1 linked to the SLC25A38 gene, plus eleven informative STRs for HLA-haplotyping (chr6p22.1-21.3). This was followed by real-time nested PCR and high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA) for the detection of HBB and SLC25A38 gene mutations, as well as the analysis of all STRs on an automatic genetic analyzer (sequencer). The couple completed four clinical in vitro fertilization (IVF)/PGD cycles. At least one matched unaffected embryo was identified and transferred in each cycle. A twin pregnancy was established in the fourth PGD cycle and genotyping results at all loci were confirmed by prenatal diagnosis. Two healthy baby girls were delivered at week 38 of pregnancy. The need to exclude two familial disorders for HLA-PGD is rarely encountered. The methodological approach described here is fast, accurate, clinically-validated, and of relatively low cost. PMID:26636621

  15. Frequency of null allele of Human Leukocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G) locus in subjects to recurrent miscarriage

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Nazila; Mosaferi, Elnaz; Farzadi, Laya; Majidi, Jafar; Monfaredan, Amir; Yousefi, Bahman; Baradaran, Behzad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a non-classical class I molecule highly expressed by extravillous cytotrophoblast cells. Due to a single base pair deletion, its function can be compensated by other isoforms. Investigating the frequency of null allele in Recurrent Miscarriage (RM) subjects could be useful in understanding the relationship between frequency of this allele and RM in a given population. Objective: This study aimed to determine the frequency of HLA-G*0105N null allele and its potential association with down-regulation of HLA-G in subjects with RM. Materials and Methods: Western blotting was used to assess the level of HLA-G protein expression. For investigating the frequency of HLA-G*0105N null allele in RM subjects, PCR-RFLP method was used. Exon 3 of HLA-G gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Subsequently, PpuM-1 enzyme was employed to digest the PCR products and fragments were analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Results: Digestion using restriction enzyme showed the presence of heterozygous HLA-G*0105N null allele in 10% of the test population. Western blotting results confirmed the decrease in expression of HLA-G in the placental tissue of subjects with RM compared to subjects who could give normal birth. Conclusion: The frequency of heterozygous HLA-G*0105N null allele was high to some extent in subjects with RM. The mutation rate in subjects suggested that there is a significant association between RM and frequency of mutations in this allele. PMID:27525330

  16. Polymorphisms and Tissue Expression of the Feline Leukocyte Antigen Class I Loci FLAI-E, -H and -K

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Jennifer C.; Holmer, Savannah G.; Ross, Peter; Buntzman, Adam S.; Frelinger, Jeffrey A.; Hess, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Cytotoxic CD8+ T-cell immunosurveillance for intracellular pathogens, such as viruses, is controlled by classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class Ia molecules, and ideally, these antiviral T-cell populations are defined by the specific peptide and restricting MHC allele. Surprisingly, despite the utility of the cat in modeling human viral immunity, little is known about the Feline Leukocyte Antigen class I complex (FLAI). Only a few coding sequences with uncertain locus origin and expression patterns have been reported. Of 19 class I genes, 3 loci - FLAI-E, -H and -K – are predicted to encode classical molecules, and our objective was to evaluate their status by analyzing polymorphisms and tissue expression. Using locus-specific, PCR-based genotyping, we amplified 33 FLAI-E, -H, and -K alleles from 12 cats of various breeds, identifying, for the first time, alleles across 3 distinct loci in a feline species. Alleles shared the expected polymorphic and invariant sites in the α1/α2 domains, and full-length cDNA clones possessed all characteristic class Ia exons. Alleles could be assigned to a specific locus with reasonable confidence, although there was evidence of potentially confounding interlocus recombination between FLAI-E and -K. Only FLAI-E, -H and -K-origin alleles were amplified from cDNAs of multiple tissue types. We also defined hypervariable regions across these genes, which permitted the assignment of names to both novel and established alleles. As predicted, FLAI-E, -H, and -K fulfill the major criteria of class Ia genes. These data represent a necessary prerequisite for studying epitope-specific antiviral CD8+ T-cell responses in cats. PMID:23812210

  17. Human leukocyte antigen class II DRB1*1302 allele protects against cervical cancer: At which step of multistage carcinogenesis?

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Koji; Maeda, Hiroo; Oki, Akinori; Takatsuka, Naoyoshi; Yasugi, Toshiharu; Furuta, Reiko; Hirata, Ranko; Mitsuhashi, Akira; Kawana, Kei; Fujii, Takuma; Iwata, Takashi; Hirai, Yasuo; Yokoyama, Masatoshi; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Watanabe, Yoh; Nagai, Yutaka; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II alleles in multistage cervical carcinogenesis. Cross-sectional analysis for HLA association with cervical cancer included 1253 Japanese women: normal cytology (NL, n = 341), cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1 (CIN1, n = 505), CIN grade 2 or 3 (CIN2/3, n = 96), or invasive cervical cancer (ICC, n = 311). The HLA class II allele frequencies were compared by Fisher’s exact test or the χ2-test. The Bonferroni adjustment corrected for multiple comparisons. Among the study subjects, 454 women with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion cytology were prospectively monitored by cytology and colposcopy every 3–4 months to analyze cumulative risk of CIN3 within the next 10 years in relation to HLA class II alleles. HLA class II DRB1*1302 allele frequency was similar between women with NL (11.7%) and CIN1 (11.9%), but significantly decreased to 5.2% for CIN2/3 and 5.8% for ICC (P = 0.0003). Correction for multiple testing did not change this finding. In women with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion cytology, the cumulative risk of CIN3 diagnosed within 10 years was significantly reduced among DRB1*1302-positive women (3.2% vs. 23.7%, P = 0.03). In conclusion, the two different types of analysis in this single study showed the protective effect of the DRB1*1302 allele against progression from CIN1 to CIN2/3. PMID:26235935

  18. Human leukocyte antigen polymorphisms in Italian primary biliary cirrhosis: a multicenter study of 664 patients and 1992 healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Invernizzi, Pietro; Selmi, Carlo; Poli, Francesca; Frison, Sara; Floreani, Annarosa; Alvaro, Domenico; Almasio, Piero; Rosina, Floriano; Marzioni, Marco; Fabris, Luca; Muratori, Luigi; Qi, Lihong; Seldin, Michael F.; Gershwin, M. Eric; Podda, Mauro

    2008-01-01

    Genetic factors are critical in determining susceptibility to primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), but there has not been a clear association with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes. We performed a multi-center case-control study and analyzed HLA class II DRB1 associations using a large cohort of 664 well-defined cases of PBC and 1,992 controls of Italian ancestry. Importantly, healthy controls were rigorously matched not only by age and gender, but also for the geographical origin of the proband four grandparents (Northern, Central, and Southern Italy). Following correction for multiple testing, DRB1*08 (Odds Ratio–OR, 3.3; 95% Confidence Interval–CI, 2.4−4.5) and DRB1*02 (OR 0.9; 95% CI 0.8−1.2) were significantly associated with PBC while alleles DRB1*11 (OR 0.4; 95% CI 0.3−0.4) and DRB1*13 (OR 0.7; 95% CI 0.6−0.9) were protective. When subjects were stratified according to their grandparental geographical origin, only the associations with DRB1*08 and DRB1*11 were common to all three areas. Associated DRB1 alleles were found only in a minority of patients while an additive genetic model is supported by the gene dosage effect for DRB1*11 allele and the interaction of DRB1*11,*13, and *08. Lastly, no significant associations were detected between specific DRB1 alleles and relevant clinical features represented by the presence of cirrhosis or serum autoantibodies. In conclusion, we confirm the role for HLA to determine PBC susceptibility and suggest that the effect of HLA is limited to patient subgroups. We suggest that a large whole-genome approach is required to identify further genetic elements contributing to the loss of tolerance in this disease. PMID:19003916

  19. Lesion human leukocyte antigen-F expression is associated with a poor prognosis in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yongfu; Han, Haixiong; Zhang, Fabiao; Lv, Shangdong; Li, Zhengyu; Fang, Zheping

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-F, a non-classical HLA-class I molecule, has attracted attention as an important immunosuppressive molecule in recent years, although the clinical relevance of HLA-F expression in cancer patients remains unclear. In the present study, HLA-F expression in 90 primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesions and 55 corresponding adjacent normal liver tissues was analyzed by immunohistochemistry, and the associations between HLA-F expression and clinicopathological parameters and patient survival times were analyzed. Positive HLA-F expression was observed in 47.8% (43/90) of the HCC lesions and in 10.9% (6/55) of the normal liver tissues. HLA-F expression in HCC lesions was significantly correlated with patient gender (P=0.02), and venous or lymphatic invasion (P=0.02). Patients who were HLA-F-positive had worse survival times than those who were HLA-F-negative (P=0.04). The mean overall survival times for HLA-F-negative and -positive patients were 44.2 months [95% confidence interval (CI), 37.7-50.7] and 33.0 months (95% CI, 25.1-40.8), respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that HLA-F was an independent prognostic factor for HCC patients with a hazard ratio of 2.1 (95% CI, 1.0-4.4). In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that HLA-F expression was associated with poor survival in HCC patients, and is correlated with tumor cell invasion and metastasis.

  20. Association between Genetic Polymorphism in the Swine Leukocyte Antigen-DRA Gene and Piglet Diarrhea in Three Chinese Pig Breeds.

    PubMed

    Yang, Q L; Zhao, S G; Wang, D W; Feng, Y; Jiang, T T; Huang, X Y; Gun, S B

    2014-09-01

    The swine leukocyte antigen (SLA)-DRA locus is noteworthy among other SLA class II loci for its limited variation and has not been investigated in depth. This study was investigated to detect polymorphisms of four exons of SLA-DRA gene and its association with piglet diarrhea in Landrace, Large White and Duroc pigs. No polymorphisms were detected in exon 3, while 2 SNPs (c.178G>A and c.211T>C), 2 SNPs (c.3093A>C and c.3104C>T) and 5 SNPs (c.4167A>G, c.4184A>G, c.4194A>G, c.4246A>G and c.4293G>A) were detected in exon 1, exon 2 and exon 4 respectively, and 1 SNP (c.4081T>C) in intron 3. Statistical results showed that genotype had significant effect on piglet diarrhea, individuals with genotype BC had a higher diarrhea score when compared with the genotypes AA, AB, AC and CC. Futhermore, genotype AC had a higher diarrhea score than the genotype CC in exon 1 (p<0.05); diarrhea scores of genotype AA and BB were higher than those of genotypes AC and CC in exon 2 (p<0.05); individuals with genotype AA had a higher diarrhea score than individuals with genotype AB and BB in exon 4 (p<0.05). Fourteen common haplotypes were founded by haplotype constructing of all SNPs in the three exons, its association with piglet diarrhea appeared that Hap2, 5, 8, 10, and 14 may be the susceptible haplotypes and Hap9 may be the resistant haplotype to piglet diarrhea. The genetic variations identified of the SLA-DRA gene may potentially be functional mutations related to piglet diarrhea.

  1. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I restricted epitope discovery in yellow fewer and dengue viruses: importance of HLA binding strength.

    PubMed

    Lund, Ole; Nascimento, Eduardo J M; Maciel, Milton; Nielsen, Morten; Larsen, Mette Voldby; Lundegaard, Claus; Harndahl, Mikkel; Lamberth, Kasper; Buus, Søren; Salmon, Jérôme; August, Thomas J; Marques, Ernesto T A

    2011-01-01

    Epitopes from all available full-length sequences of yellow fever virus (YFV) and dengue fever virus (DENV) restricted by Human Leukocyte Antigen class I (HLA-I) alleles covering 12 HLA-I supertypes were predicted using the NetCTL algorithm. A subset of 179 predicted YFV and 158 predicted DENV epitopes were selected using the EpiSelect algorithm to allow for optimal coverage of viral strains. The selected predicted epitopes were synthesized and approximately 75% were found to bind the predicted restricting HLA molecule with an affinity, K(D), stronger than 500 nM. The immunogenicity of 25 HLA-A*02:01, 28 HLA-A*24:02 and 28 HLA-B*07:02 binding peptides was tested in three HLA-transgenic mice models and led to the identification of 17 HLA-A*02:01, 4 HLA-A*2402 and 4 HLA-B*07:02 immunogenic peptides. The immunogenic peptides bound HLA significantly stronger than the non-immunogenic peptides. All except one of the immunogenic peptides had K(D) below 100 nM and the peptides with K(D) below 5 nM were more likely to be immunogenic. In addition, all the immunogenic peptides that were identified as having a high functional avidity had K(D) below 20 nM. A*02:01 transgenic mice were also inoculated twice with the 17DD YFV vaccine strain. Three of the YFV A*02:01 restricted peptides activated T-cells from the infected mice in vitro. All three peptides that elicited responses had an HLA binding affinity of 2 nM or less. The results indicate the importance of the strength of HLA binding in shaping the immune response.

  2. A human monoclonal antibody to high-frequency red cell antigen Jra.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, T; Kwon, K W; Yamamoto, K; Tone, Y; Ihara, H; Kato, T; Ikeda, H; Sekiguchi, S

    1994-01-01

    A human-mouse heterohybridoma (HMR0921) secreting human monoclonal IgG3, lambda antibody was produced from peripheral blood lymphocytes of a healthy blood donor with serum antibody to Jra, by EBV transformation and hybridization with mouse myeloma cell line P3X63Ag8.653. The reactivity of HMR0921 antibody was assessed by antiglobulin test with a panel of red cells including 14 different rare blood types. Only Jr(a-) red cells were negative. The strict specificity of this antibody to Jra antigen was further confirmed by absorption test with fluorescence flow cytometry. On screening of 28,744 blood donor samples by HMR0921 antibody, we detected 19 agglutination-negative samples, which were confirmed as Jr(a-) by conventional anti-Jra antisera. Therefore, our HMR0921 antibody is extremely useful for detecting rare Jr(a-) blood.

  3. Lack of radioimmunodetection and complications associated with monoclonal anticarcinoembryonic antigen antibody cross-reactivity with an antigen on circulating cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dillman, R.O.; Beauregard, J.C.; Sobol, R.E.; Royston, I.; Bartholomew, R.M.; Hagan, P.S.; Halpern, S.E.

    1984-05-01

    Characterization of several high-affinity murine monoclonal anticarcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) antibodies suggested good specificity except for cross-reactivity with an antigen on granulocytes and erythrocytes which was different from the previously described normal cross-reacting antigen of granulocytes. In vivo studies in athymic mice using an indium conjugate of an anti-CEA monoclonal antibody (MoAb) revealed excellent specific uptake in colorectal carcinoma xenografts. Studies were conducted in humans to determine the limitations produced by the cross-reactivity with granulocytes and erythrocytes. Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer received 3 to 6 mg of anti-CEA MoAb over 10 min or 2 hr. In five of six trials, the MoAb infusion was associated with a 40 to 90% decrease in circulating granulocytes and systemic toxicity including fever, rigors, and emesis. One patient had no change in cell count and had no toxicity. Radionuclide scans with /sup 111/In-anti-CEA MoAb showed marked uptake in the spleen when cells were eliminated, and in the liver, especially when pretreatment CEA levels were high. Metastatic tumor sites failed to concentrate the isotope. This study emphasizes the potential limitations for radioimmunodetection and/or radioimmunotherapy imposed by reactivity with circulating cells, and suggests that certain toxic reactions associated with MoAb infusions are related to destruction of circulating cells rather than allergic reactions to mouse protein. It also emphasizes how variables such as dose and binding affinity of antibody, radioisotope used, and assessment at different observation points can obscure lack of antibody specificity.

  4. Detection of antibodies to Helicobacter pylori cell surface antigens.

    PubMed

    Guruge, J L; Schalén, C; Nilsson, I; Ljungh, A; Tyszkiewicz, T; Wikander, M; Wadström, T

    1990-01-01

    Serum IgG antibodies of Helicobacter pylori were detected in single-dilution ELISA using glycine extracted material. Among 148 endoscopy patients 59% displayed antibodies; as expected, a higher occurrence (90%) was found in patients with positive gastric culture for H. pylori than in culture negative patients (37%). Among 68 blood donors the frequency of H. pylori antibodies was 28%. In 73 children less than 15 years of age examined for unrelated disorders the occurrence was 4%. By immunoblotting using the same extract, 3 prominent bands, 29K, 54K and 60K and several weak bands were identified. These were formed by 57%, 92%, and 65%, respectively, of the ELISA positive patient sera. Comparing culture positive and negative patients, the 3 bands occurred more often among the culture positive subjects though between 18 and 61% of the sera from culture negative patients gave either of the bands. When comparing the glycine extracts of 4 different H. pylori strains with separate haemagglutinating patterns no differences in the position of the major bands emerged. By absorption experiments no immunological cross-reactivity with components of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Campylobacter jejuni or C. fetus was found. Thus, the glycine extract seemed specific for the detection of antibodies to H. pylori.

  5. Development of specific scFv antibodies to detect neurocysticercosis antigens and potential applications in immunodiagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Vanessa da Silva; Araújo, Thaise Gonçalves; Gonzaga, Henrique Tomaz; Nascimento, Rafael; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Costa-Cruz, Julia Maria

    2013-01-01

    We have shown previously that detection of circulating antibodies against mimotopes selected by phage display were useful in neurocysticercosis diagnosis. However, circulating antigens may also be useful in patients' clinical follow-up. Therefore, we aimed to select novel combinatorial antibodies, single-chain variable fragment (scFv), which can be used for specific antigens with pre-defined affinity and specificity without prior immunization. A phage scFv antibody library was selected against Taenia solium mimotopes displayed on phages coupled in beads and total saline extract of T. solium metacestodes (S) immobilized on microtiter plate wells. After two rounds of selection, 96 phage clones were evolved and validated against each target by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and dot-blot, and three specific antibodies (B6, G10 and A4) were further characterized by sequencing and indirect immunofluorescence (IFI) assays. IFI revealed tegument staining for the B6, while the others showed a non-uniform staining in the whole parasite. The selected scFvs were used to capture their antigen targets that were elucidated through mass spectrometry, and used for antibody detection in NC patients' sera by ELISA, which achieved sensitivities greater than 97% and specificities above 95%. We have successfully developed scFv antibodies against important mimotopes used in NC diagnosis, and can be further explored to detect circulating antigens for clinical follow-up of patients with NC. Our strategy also highlighted the possibility of using this combinatorial approach to select, capture and characterize specific antigens to better understand this intriguing parasite infection and disease evolution.

  6. Affinity chromatography of human leukocyte and diploid cell interferons on sepharose-bound antibodies.

    PubMed

    Berg, K; Ogburn, C A; Paucker, K; Mogensen, K E; Cantell, K

    1975-02-01

    Interferons produced in human peripheral leukocytes (LE) and foreskin fibroblast (FS-4) cells were subjected to affinity chromatography on Sepharose-bound globulins from rabbits immunized with these interferons. Anti-LE interferon sera neutralized both interferons, but titers against FS-4 interferon were consistently lower than those against LE interferon. Anti-FS-4 interferon sera neutralized only FS-4 but not LE interferon. Accordingly, affinity columns constructed with anti-FS-4 globulin excluded LE but not FS-4 interferon, whereas those prepared with anti-LE interferon globulin bound and eluted both LE and FS-4 interferons. Purification of native interferons of both types on anti-LE interferon-Sepharose ranged from 680- to 3,600-fold and recoveries from 72 to 126%. Specific activities of eluate pools varied from 4 to 30 times 10-6 reference (B, 69/19) units per milligram protien.

  7. Detection of serum anti-melanocyte antibodies and identification of related antigens in patients with vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Zhu, M C; Liu, C G; Wang, D X; Zhan, Z

    2015-12-07

    We detected autoantibodies against melanocytes in serum samples obtained from 50 patients, including 4 with HBV, with vitiligo and identified the associated membrane antigens. Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and anti-tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TRP-1) antibody levels were analyzed. The associated antigens in normal human melanocyte were identified by immunofluorescence. Autoantibodies against melanocyte membrane and cytoplasmic proteins were detected by western blot. Membrane antigens with higher frequencies were identified by protein mass spectrometry. The HSP70 and anti-TRP-1 antibody levels (N = 70; 10 with HBV) were detected by ELISA. The specific antigens were detected in melanocyte cytoplasm and membrane (40/50; 80% incidence; western blot). The autoantibodies reacted with several membrane antigens with approximate molecular weights (Mr) of 86,000, 75,000, 60,000, 52,000, and 44,000 (strip positive rates: 36, 58, 22, 2, and 2%, respectively). Thirty percent of the patients showed the presence of cytoplasmic antigens (Mr: 110,000, 90,000, 75,000, 50,000, and 400,000; strip positive rates: 12, 4, 12, 10, and 2%, respectively). Fifteen and 5% of the healthy subjects showed positive expression of membrane and cytoplasmic antigens, respectively. Protein mass spectrometry predicted membrane proteins with Mr of 86,000 and 75,000 and 60,000 to be Lamin A /C and Vimentin X1, respective. High titers of anti-TRP-1 antibody were detected and showed positive correlation with HSP70 (r = 0. 927, P < 0. 01). This study identified a novel membrane antigen associated with vitiligo, which might assist future investigations into autoimmune pathogenesis of vitiligo and formation of autoantibodies. HBV infection was correlated to vitiligo.

  8. Differential Killing of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi by Antibodies Targeting Vi and Lipopolysaccharide O:9 Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Peter J.; O’Shaughnessy, Colette M.; Siggins, Matthew K.; Bobat, Saeeda; Kingsley, Robert A.; Goulding, David A.; Crump, John A.; Reyburn, Hugh; Micoli, Francesca; Dougan, Gordon; Cunningham, Adam F.; MacLennan, Calman A.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi expresses a capsule of Vi polysaccharide, while most Salmonella serovars, including S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium, do not. Both S. Typhi and S. Enteritidis express the lipopolysaccharide O:9 antigen, yet there is little evidence of cross-protection from anti-O:9 antibodies. Vaccines based on Vi polysaccharide have efficacy against typhoid fever, indicating that antibodies against Vi confer protection. Here we investigate the role of Vi capsule and antibodies against Vi and O:9 in antibody-dependent complement- and phagocyte-mediated killing of Salmonella. Using isogenic Vi-expressing and non-Vi-expressing derivatives of S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium, we show that S. Typhi is inherently more sensitive to serum and blood than S. Typhimurium. Vi expression confers increased resistance to both complement- and phagocyte-mediated modalities of antibody-dependent killing in human blood. The Vi capsule is associated with reduced C3 and C5b-9 deposition, and decreased overall antibody binding to S. Typhi. However, purified human anti-Vi antibodies in the presence of complement are able to kill Vi-expressing Salmonella, while killing by anti-O:9 antibodies is inversely related to Vi expression. Human serum depleted of antibodies to antigens other than Vi retains the ability to kill Vi-expressing bacteria. Our findings support a protective role for Vi capsule in preventing complement and phagocyte killing of Salmonella that can be overcome by specific anti-Vi antibodies, but only to a limited extent by anti-O:9 antibodies. PMID:26741681

  9. Differential Killing of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi by Antibodies Targeting Vi and Lipopolysaccharide O:9 Antigen.

    PubMed

    Hart, Peter J; O'Shaughnessy, Colette M; Siggins, Matthew K; Bobat, Saeeda; Kingsley, Robert A; Goulding, David A; Crump, John A; Reyburn, Hugh; Micoli, Francesca; Dougan, Gordon; Cunningham, Adam F; MacLennan, Calman A

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi expresses a capsule of Vi polysaccharide, while most Salmonella serovars, including S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium, do not. Both S. Typhi and S. Enteritidis express the lipopolysaccharide O:9 antigen, yet there is little evidence of cross-protection from anti-O:9 antibodies. Vaccines based on Vi polysaccharide have efficacy against typhoid fever, indicating that antibodies against Vi confer protection. Here we investigate the role of Vi capsule and antibodies against Vi and O:9 in antibody-dependent complement- and phagocyte-mediated killing of Salmonella. Using isogenic Vi-expressing and non-Vi-expressing derivatives of S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium, we show that S. Typhi is inherently more sensitive to serum and blood than S. Typhimurium. Vi expression confers increased resistance to both complement- and phagocyte-mediated modalities of antibody-dependent killing in human blood. The Vi capsule is associated with reduced C3 and C5b-9 deposition, and decreased overall antibody binding to S. Typhi. However, purified human anti-Vi antibodies in the presence of complement are able to kill Vi-expressing Salmonella, while killing by anti-O:9 antibodies is inversely related to Vi expression. Human serum depleted of antibodies to antigens other than Vi retains the ability to kill Vi-expressing bacteria. Our findings support a protective role for Vi capsule in preventing complement and phagocyte killing of Salmonella that can be overcome by specific anti-Vi antibodies, but only to a limited extent by anti-O:9 antibodies.

  10. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies recognize antigenic variants among isolates of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winton, J.R.; Arakawa, C.N.; Lannan, C.N.; Fryer, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    eutralizing monoclonal antibodies were developed against strains of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) from steelhead trout Salmo gairdneri in the Deschutes River of Oregon, chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in the Sacramento River of California, and rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri reared in the Hagerman Valley of Idaho, USA. These antibodies were tested for neutralization of 12 IHNV isolates obtained from salmonids in Japan, Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, and Idaho. The antibodies recognized antigenic variants among the isolates and could be used to separate the viruses into 4 groups. The members of each group tended to be related by geographic area rather than by source host species, virulence, or date of isolation.

  11. Cell-surface antigens of melanoma recognized by human monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, H; Furukawa, K; Fortunato, S R; Livingston, P O; Lloyd, K O; Oettgen, H F; Old, L J

    1987-01-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were derived from lymph node lymphocytes and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from patients with melanoma. Four methods for generating human mAbs were compared: fusion with human [LICR-LON-HMy-2 (LICR-2)] or mouse (NS-1) cells; transformation by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV); and EBV transformation followed by NS-1 fusion. NS-1 fusion with lymph node lymphocytes resulted in a higher number of growing hybrids than LICR-2 fusion. Virtually no hybrids were obtained from NS-1 or LICR-2 fusions with PBL. EBV transformed lymphocytes from lymph node and peripheral blood with equal efficiency, and the yield of proliferating cultures for antibody screening was more than 10- to 30-fold greater than that obtained by fusion techniques. However, once antibody-producing cultures had been identified, stability and clonability of EBV-transformed cells were poorer than that of NS-1 hybrid cells. To combine the strengths of both methods, cultures of EBV-transformed cells were fused with NS-1; and hybrid clones were isolated that showed vigorous growth, clonability, and stable antibody secretion. Detailed specificity analysis of the mAbs produced by six of these clones indicated detection of a class 1 (unique) melanoma antigen, a class 3 melanoma antigen, and four ganglioside antigens (GD3, GM3, and two other, as yet uncharacterized, heterophile antigens). Images PMID:3031684

  12. MONITORING ANTIBODY-ANTIGEN REACTIONS AT CONDUCTING POLYMER-BASED IMMUNOSENSORS USING IMPEDANCE SPECTROSCOPY. (R825323)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The mechanisms of antibody¯antigen (Ab¯Ag) interactions at conducting polypyrrole electrodes have been investigated using impedance spectroscopy techniques. The effects of the variation in ion exchange, solution composition, and...

  13. Percoll-purified Treponema pallidum, an improved fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorbed antigen.

    PubMed

    Hanff, P A; Fernandez, C; Folds, J D

    1986-05-01

    Percoll-purified Treponema pallidum was evaluated as a fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorbed antigen. Borderline and false-positive reactions were essentially eliminated, resulting in sensitivity and specificity of 100 and 95.5%, respectively. The lack of background debris improved the ease and speed of reading the test.

  14. Performance Assessment of Four Chimeric Trypanosoma cruzi Antigens Based on Antigen-Antibody Detection for Diagnosis of Chronic Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zanchin, Nilson Ivo Tonin; Brasil, Tatiana de Arruda Campos; Foti, Leonardo; de Souza, Wayner Vieira; Silva, Edmilson Domingos; Gomes, Yara de Miranda; Krieger, Marco Aurélio

    2016-01-01

    The performance of serologic tests in chronic Chagas disease diagnosis largely depends on the type and quality of the antigen preparations that are used for detection of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies. Whole-cell T. cruzi extracts or recombinant proteins have shown variation in the performance and cross-reactivity. Synthetic chimeric proteins comprising fragments of repetitive amino acids of several different proteins have been shown to improve assay performances to detect Chagasic infections. Here, we describe the production of four chimeric T. cruzi proteins and the assessment of their performance for diagnostic purposes. Circular Dichroism spectra indicated the absence of well-defined secondary structures, while polydispersity evaluated by Dynamic Light Scattering revealed only minor aggregates in 50 mM carbonate-bicarbonate (pH 9.6), demonstrating that it is an appropriate buffering system for sensitizing microplates. Serum samples from T. cruzi-infected and non-infected individuals were used to assess the performance of these antigens for detecting antibodies against T. cruzi, using both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a liquid bead array platform. Performance parameters (AUC, sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and J index) showed high diagnostic accuracy for all chimeric proteins for detection of specific anti-T. cruzi antibodies and differentiated seropositive individuals from those who were seronegative. Our data suggest that these four chimeric proteins are eligible for phase II studies. PMID:27517281

  15. Performance Assessment of Four Chimeric Trypanosoma cruzi Antigens Based on Antigen-Antibody Detection for Diagnosis of Chronic Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Santos, Fred Luciano Neves; Celedon, Paola Alejandra Fiorani; Zanchin, Nilson Ivo Tonin; Brasil, Tatiana de Arruda Campos; Foti, Leonardo; Souza, Wayner Vieira de; Silva, Edmilson Domingos; Gomes, Yara de Miranda; Krieger, Marco Aurélio

    2016-01-01

    The performance of serologic tests in chronic Chagas disease diagnosis largely depends on the type and quality of the antigen preparations that are used for detection of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies. Whole-cell T. cruzi extracts or recombinant proteins have shown variation in the performance and cross-reactivity. Synthetic chimeric proteins comprising fragments of repetitive amino acids of several different proteins have been shown to improve assay performances to detect Chagasic infections. Here, we describe the production of four chimeric T. cruzi proteins and the assessment of their performance for diagnostic purposes. Circular Dichroism spectra indicated the absence of well-defined secondary structures, while polydispersity evaluated by Dynamic Light Scattering revealed only minor aggregates in 50 mM carbonate-bicarbonate (pH 9.6), demonstrating that it is an appropriate buffering system for sensitizing microplates. Serum samples from T. cruzi-infected and non-infected individuals were used to assess the performance of these antigens for detecting antibodies against T. cruzi, using both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a liquid bead array platform. Performance parameters (AUC, sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and J index) showed high diagnostic accuracy for all chimeric proteins for detection of specific anti-T. cruzi antibodies and differentiated seropositive individuals from those who were seronegative. Our data suggest that these four chimeric proteins are eligible for phase II studies. PMID:27517281

  16. CARbodies: Human Antibodies Against Cell Surface Tumor Antigens Selected From Repertoires Displayed on T Cell Chimeric Antigen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Sánchez-Martín, David; Compte, Marta; Nuñez-Prado, Natalia; Diaz, Rosa M; Vile, Richard; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2013-01-01

    A human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody library was expressed on the surface of human T cells after transduction with lentiviral vectors (LVs). The repertoire was fused to a first-generation T cell receptor ζ (TCRζ)-based chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). We used this library to isolate antibodies termed CARbodies that recognize antigens expressed on the tumor cell surface in a proof-of-principle system. After three rounds of activation-selection there was a clear repertoire restriction, with the emergence dominant clones. The CARbodies were purified from bacterial cultures as soluble and active proteins. Furthermore, to validate its potential application for adoptive cell therapy, human T cells were transduced with a LV encoding a second-generation costimulatory CAR (CARv2) bearing the selected CARbodies. Transduced human primary T cells expressed significant levels of the CARbodies-based CARv2 fusion protein on the cell surface, and importantly could be specifically activated, after stimulation with tumor cells. This approach is a promising tool for the generation of antibodies fully adapted to the display format (CAR) and the selection context (cell synapse), which could extend the scope of current adoptive cell therapy strategies with CAR-redirected T cells. PMID:23695536

  17. Antigen-specific suppression of anti-influenza antibody production in man. Possible role of a membrane-antigen complex.

    PubMed

    McCaughan, G W; Brown, M H; Basten, A

    1985-03-01

    E rosette-forming (E+) cells from human secondary lymphoid tissue were incubated with high dose influenza A virus (Mem-Bel) in an attempt to generate suppressor T cells. Suppression was assayed by transferring the antigen-pulsed E+ cells into effector cultures consisting of E+ and E- cells stimulated with immunogenic amounts of either the inducing virus Mem-Bel) or the non-cross-reacting influenza B virus (B/HK). The transfer resulted in marked inhibition of IgG, IgA and IgM antibody production to Mem-Bel but not to the control antigen, B/HK virus. The suppressive effect was specific at the level of induction as well as expression since E+ cells exposed to high dose Mem-Bel could provide help to an effector culture containing E- cells and optimal dose of B/HK virus. However, metabolically active cells did not appear to be required for suppression. Thus, it could be elicited (a) after only 15 min incubation of E+ cells with high-dose virus and (b) by E+ cells exposed to irradiation, incubated in the presence of metabolic inhibitors, or disrupted by repeated freeze thawing. In contrast, treatment of E+ cells with pronase reversed the suppressive effect. Interestingly, virus heated to 70 degree C failed to induced suppression, while retailing the ability to elicit a normal helper response. Suppression induced by exposure to standard amounts of high-dose antigen was mediated by T cells of both helper/inducer (Leu-3a+) and suppressor/cytotoxic subsets (Leu-2a+), but not by B cells. Two groups of observations pointed to the B cell as the target of suppression. First, suppression could still be transferred to effector cultures in which helper T cells had been replaced by T cell-replacing factor or suppressor T cells removed by irradiation. Second, significant inhibition of antibody production was obtained when the transfer of antigen-pulsed E+ cells was delayed for up to 120 h after initiation of the effector culture. Taken together the results suggest that suppression in

  18. Diagnosis of hypersensitivity pneumonitis by measurement of antibodies against environmental antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Dewair, M. )

    1989-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP), an immunologically mediated chronic pulmonary disease, is the result of an inflammatory response of the lung initiated by the inhalation of environmental organic dusts. These organic dusts usually contain substances (antigens) capable of eliciting immune responses in humans. The symptoms of HP generally present as recurrent flu-like episodes which makes it difficult to establish the proper diagnosis. However, detection in patients' sera of high-titer antibodies against the environmental antigens could be of great help in identifying those materials causing the disease and which must be avoided. A highly specific and sensitive serodiagnostic test, a radioimmuno assay (RIA), was developed for measurement of antibodies against antigens relevant to Farmer's Lung Disease (FLD), a type of HP affecting farmers.

  19. Antigen mobility in the combining site of an anti-peptide antibody.

    PubMed

    Cheetham, J C; Raleigh, D P; Griest, R E; Redfield, C; Dobson, C M; Rees, A R

    1991-09-15

    The interaction between a high-affinity antibody, raised against a peptide incorporating the loop region of hen egg lysozyme (residues 57-84), and a peptide antigen corresponding to this sequence, has been probed by proton NMR. The two-dimensional correlated spectroscopy spectrum of the antibody-antigen complex shows sharp, well-resolved resonances from at least half of the bound peptide residues, indicating that the peptide retains considerable mobility when bound to the antibody. The strongly immobilized residues (which include Arg-61, Trp-62, Trp-63, and Ile-78) do not correspond to a contiguous region in the sequence of the peptide. Examination of the crystal structure of the protein shows that these residues, although remote in sequence, are grouped together in the protein structure, forming a hydrophobic projection on the surface of the molecule. The antibody binds hen egg lysozyme with only a 10-fold lower affinity than the peptide antigen. We propose that the peptide could bind to the antibody in a conformation that brings these groups together in a manner related to that found in the native protein, accounting for the high crossreactivity. PMID:1716767

  20. Antigen mobility in the combining site of an anti-peptide antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Cheetham, J C; Raleigh, D P; Griest, R E; Redfield, C; Dobson, C M; Rees, A R

    1991-01-01

    The interaction between a high-affinity antibody, raised against a peptide incorporating the loop region of hen egg lysozyme (residues 57-84), and a peptide antigen corresponding to this sequence, has been probed by proton NMR. The two-dimensional correlated spectroscopy spectrum of the antibody-antigen complex shows sharp, well-resolved resonances from at least half of the bound peptide residues, indicating that the peptide retains considerable mobility when bound to the antibody. The strongly immobilized residues (which include Arg-61, Trp-62, Trp-63, and Ile-78) do not correspond to a contiguous region in the sequence of the peptide. Examination of the crystal structure of the protein shows that these residues, although remote in sequence, are grouped together in the protein structure, forming a hydrophobic projection on the surface of the molecule. The antibody binds hen egg lysozyme with only a 10-fold lower affinity than the peptide antigen. We propose that the peptide could bind to the antibody in a conformation that brings these groups together in a manner related to that found in the native protein, accounting for the high crossreactivity. PMID:1716767

  1. Comparative efficacy of antigen and antibody detection tests for human trichinellosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanoska, D.; Cuperlovic, K.; Gamble, H.R.; Murrell, K.D.

    1989-02-01

    Sera collected from patients with suspected or confirmed exposure to Trichinella spiralis were tested for circulating parasite antigens and antiparasite antibodies. Using an immunoradiometric assay, excretory--secretory antigens from muscle-stage larvae of T. spiralis were detected in the sera of 47% of 62 patients with clinical trichinellosis and 13% of 39 patients without clinical signs but suspected of exposure to infected meat. In comparison, antibodies were detected using an indirect immunofluorescent test in the circulation of 100% of the 62 patients with clinical trichinellosis and 46% of the 39 patients with suspected exposure. The presence of antibodies specific to excretory-secretory products of T. spiralis muscle larvae was confirmed in the majority of the samples tested by a monoclonal antibody-based competitive inhibition assay. These results indicate that antibody detection is a more sensitive diagnostic method for human trichinellosis, but that antigen detection might be a useful confirmatory test because it is a direct demonstration of parasite products in the circulation.

  2. Inducible co-stimulator (ICOS) up-regulation on activated T-cells in chronic graft-vs.-host disease following dog-leukocyte-antigen-nonidentical hematopoietic cell transplantation: A potential therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Masahiko; Storb, Rainer; Loretz, Carol; Stone, Diane; Mielcarek, Marco; Sale, George E.; Rezvani, Andrew R.; Graves, Scott S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Inducible co-stimulator (ICOS), a member of the CD28 family of costimulatory molecules, is induced on CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells following their activation. ICOS functions as an essential immune regulator and ICOS blockade is a potential approach to immune modulation in allogeneic transplantation. Here, we describe the expression profile of ICOS in dogs and determine whether ICOS expression is up-regulated during chronic graft versus host disease (GVHD) and host versus graft (HVG) reactions in the canine hematopoietic cell transplantation model. Methods Monoclonal antibodies against cell surface-expressed ICOS were produced and tested in vitro for suppression of canine mixed leukocyte reactions (MLR). Expression of ICOS on CD3+ cells was evaluated by flow cytometry using peripheral blood, lymph nodes and splenocytes obtained from dogs undergoing GVH and HVG reactions. Results Canine ICOS was expressed in an inducible pattern on T-cells activated by Con A, anti-CD3 mAb in combination with anti-CD28 mAb, and alloantigen stimulation. Immunosuppressive effects of ICOS blockade were observed in MLR using peripheral blood mononuclear cells from dog-leukocyte-antigen-nonidentical dogs. Immunosuppressive effects of ICOS blockade were observed in MLR when anti-ICOS was combined with suboptimal concentrations of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4-Ig (CTLA4-Ig) or cyclosporine. ICOS expression was significantly up-regulated on T-cells in dogs undergoing graft rejection or chronic GVHD after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Conclusion These studies suggest that ICOS plays a role in graft rejection and GVHD in an out-bred animal model, and ICOS blockade may be an approach to prevention and treatment of chronic GVHD. PMID:23694952

  3. Specific antibodies induced by inactivated parapoxvirus ovis potently enhance oxidative burst in canine blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Schütze, Nicole; Raue, Rüdiger; Büttner, Mathias; Köhler, Gabriele; McInnes, Colin J; Alber, Gottfried

    2010-01-01

    We have recently shown that inactivated parapoxvirus ovis (iPPVO) effectively stimulates canine blood phagocytes. However, a potential link between innate and adaptive immunity induced by iPPVO remained open. The objective of this study was to define the effects of repeated iPPVO treatment of dogs to evaluate (i) iPPVO-specific antibody production, and (ii) modulation of iPPVO-induced oxidative burst by anti-iPPVO antibodies. Serum analysis of dogs treated repeatedly with iPPVO (Zylexis) showed transient production of non-neutralising iPPVO-specific IgG. There was a correlation between iPPVO-specific IgG levels and enhanced oxidative burst rates in vitro upon transfer of immune sera. Even four years after Zylexis treatment considerably stronger oxidative burst rates in response to iPPVO were observed in monocytes and PMN, whereas only moderate burst rates were detected in monocytes, but not in PMN, from dogs treated with a placebo. Depletion of serum IgG by protein A-sepharose or by parapoxvirus ovis coupled to sepharose abolished the increase of oxidative burst responses and resulted in burst rates similar to blood leukocytes from control dogs. However, uptake of viral particles was found to be independent of iPPVO-specific IgG and restricted to cells with dendritic and monocytic morphology. These data demonstrate that non-neutralising iPPVO-specific IgG is produced during treatment with Zylexis. Moreover, for the first time the interaction of iPPVO with antibodies is shown to enhance oxidative burst.

  4. Characterisation of antibody responses in pigs induced by recombinant oncosphere antigens from Taenia solium.

    PubMed

    Jayashi, César M; Gonzalez, Armando E; Castillo Neyra, Ricardo; Kyngdon, Craig T; Gauci, Charles G; Lightowlers, Marshall W

    2012-12-14

    Recombinant antigens cloned from the oncosphere life cycle stage of the cestode parasite Taenia solium (T. solium) have been proven to be effective as vaccines for protecting pigs against infections with T. solium. Previous studies have defined three different host protective oncosphere antigens, TSOL18, TSOL16 and TSOL45. In this study, we evaluated the potential for combining the antigens TSOL16 and TSOL18 as a practical vaccine. Firstly, in a laboratory trial, we compared the immunogenicity of the combined antigens (TSOL16/18) versus the immunogenicity of the antigens separately. Secondly, in a field trial, we tested the ability of the TSOL16/18 vaccine to induce detectable antibody responses in animals living under environmental stress and traditionally reared in areas where T. solium cysticercosis is endemic; and finally, we characterised the immune response of the study population. Pigs of 8-16 weeks of age were vaccinated with 200 μg each of TSOL16 and TSOL18, plus 5mg of Quil-A. Specific total IgG, IgG(1) and IgG(2) antibody responses induced by TSOL16 and TSOL18 were determined with ELISA. The immunogenicity of both antigens was retained in the combined TSOL16/18 vaccine. The combined vaccine TSOL16/18 induced detectable specific anti-TSOL18 antibody responses in 100% (113/113) and specific anti-TSOL16 in 99% (112/113) of the vaccinated animals measured at 2 weeks following the booster vaccination. From the two IgG antibody subtypes analysed we found there was stronger response to IgG(2).

  5. Specific Fluorine Labeling of the HyHEL10 Antibody Affects Antigen Binding and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Acchione, Mauro; Lee, Yi-Chien; DeSantis, Morgan E.; Lipschultz, Claudia A.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Li, Mi; Shanmuganathan, Aranganathan; Walter, Richard L.; Smith-Gill, Sandra; Barchi, Jr., Joseph J.

    2012-10-16

    To more fully understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for variations in binding affinity with antibody maturation, we explored the use of site specific fluorine labeling and {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Several single-chain (scFv) antibodies, derived from an affinity-matured series of anti-hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) mouse IgG1, were constructed with either complete or individual replacement of tryptophan residues with 5-fluorotryptophan ({sup 5F}W). An array of biophysical techniques was used to gain insight into the impact of fluorine substitution on the overall protein structure and antigen binding. SPR measurements indicated that {sup 5F}W incorporation lowered binding affinity for the HEL antigen. The degree of analogue impact was residue-dependent, and the greatest decrease in affinity was observed when {sup 5F}W was substituted for residues near the binding interface. In contrast, corresponding crystal structures in complex with HEL were essentially indistinguishable from the unsubstituted antibody. {sup 19}F NMR analysis showed severe overlap of signals in the free fluorinated protein that was resolved upon binding to antigen, suggesting very distinct chemical environments for each {sup 5F}W in the complex. Preliminary relaxation analysis suggested the presence of chemical exchange in the antibody-antigen complex that could not be observed by X-ray crystallography. These data demonstrate that fluorine NMR can be an extremely useful tool for discerning structural changes in scFv antibody-antigen complexes with altered function that may not be discernible by other biophysical techniques.

  6. Major histocompatibility complex markers and red cell antibodies to the Rh (D) antigen. Absence of association.

    PubMed

    Kruskall, M S; Yunis, E J; Watson, A; Awdeh, Z; Alper, C A

    1990-01-01

    Between 20 and 35 percent of Rh(D) antigen-negative individuals do not develop antibodies to D even after multiple transfusions of Rh-positive red cells. To evaluate the possibility that antibody production after exposure to the D antigen was related to a major histocompatibility complex immune response gene, analysis of the HLA genotypes of 38 Rh-sensitized women and their families was performed. No significant deviations were found in the frequency of any individual HLA class I, II, or III allele or of any extended haplotype (fixed allelic combinations of HLA-B, HLA-DR, and the complement components BF, C2, C4A, and C4B). Type 1 errors due to the extreme allelic polymorphism of the HLA system, as well as the ethnic variation in patient groups, may have contributed to HLA allele-antibody responder relationships reported in earlier studies.

  7. Monoclonal antibodies against the K99 antigen of Escherichia coli for diagnostic purposes.

    PubMed

    Angulo, A F; Jansen, W H; Osterhaus, A D; Uytdehaag, F G; Maas, H M; Guinée, P A

    1986-04-01

    Hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies against the K99 antigen of Escherichia coli were produced by the fusion of spleen cells from immunized BALB/c mice with P3/X63-Ag8.653 myeloma cells. The seven hybridomas which produced the highest antibody titers in vitro, as detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Perma slide agglutination test (PSAT), were chosen for antibody production in vivo. No cross reaction was observed with K88ab, F41 and P987 antigens in the ELISA. The titer of each ascitic fluid was established by the ELISA and the slide agglutination (SAT) tests. The two ascitic fluids with the highest titer in the SAT were incorporated into the set of antisera used for serotyping at our laboratory. The results were satisfactory both in terms of stability and specificity.

  8. Antibodies to myofibril antigens in cosmonauts after spaceflights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tashpulatov, R. Y.; Danilova, T. A.; Lesnyak, A. T.; Legenkov, V. I.; Znamenskiy, V. S.; Dedyuyeva, Y. Y.

    1980-01-01

    Serum samples obtained from 15 astronauts before and after spaceflights were studied with the use of the indirect immunofluorescent method. In seven astronauts antibodies to different elements of the human heart muscle appeared after flights. Strong and very strong luminescence of the elements of heart muscle tissue was detected in the astronauts after the third space flight. In a study of the sera on sections of bovine heart muscle tissue the reactions of the sera taken before and after flight were found to show no essential differences.

  9. Generation of equine TSLP-specific antibodies and their use for detection of TSLP produced by equine keratinocytes and leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Janda, Jozef; Plattet, Philippe; Torsteinsdottir, Sigurbjörg; Jonsdottir, Sigridur; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Marti, Eliane

    2012-06-30

    Allergic horses react to innocuous environmental substances by activation of Th2 cells and production of allergen-specific IgE antibodies. The mechanisms leading to Th2 differentiation are not well understood. In humans and mice, epithelial cell-derived thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) plays a central role in this process. Little is known about equine TSLP (eqTSLP) and its role in allergic diseases and our current knowledge is limited to the assessment of TSLP mRNA expression. In order to be able to study eqTSLP at the protein level, the aim of the present study was to produce recombinant eqTSLP protein and generate TSLP-specific antibodies. EqTSLP was cloned from a skin biopsy sample from a horse with chronic urticaria and eqTSLP protein was expressed in E.coli and in mammalian cells. Recombinant proteins were designed to include C-terminal Histag, which allowed subsequent purification and detection by Histag-specific Ab. Polyclonal and monoclonal eqTSLP-specific Ab were generated after immunization of mice with E.coli-expressed TSLP. Their specificity was tested by western blotting and ELISA. In addition, a commercially available polyclonal human TSLP-specific antibody was tested for cross-reactivity with eqTSLP. Expression of TSLP protein was confirmed by western blotting using Histag-specific Ab. E.coli-expressed TSLP appears as a band of ∼13 kDa, whereas mammalian cell-expressed TSLP showed several bands at 20-25 kDa, probably representing several glycosylation forms. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies generated in this study, as well as commercially available human TSLP-specific Ab reacted with both E.coli- and mammalian cell-expressed TSLP in western blotting and ELISA. A capture ELISA was established to quantitate TSLP in cell supernatants and validated using supernatants from primary equine keratinocytes and peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL). Increased TSLP concentrations were found after stimulation of keratinocytes with PMA+ionomycine and with

  10. Functional and Structural Characterization of Francisella tularensis O-Antigen Antibodies at the Low End of Antigen Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhaohua; Rynkiewicz, Michael J.; Yang, Chiou-Ying; Madico, Guillermo; Perkins, Hillary M.; Roche, Marly I.; Seaton, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    The O-antigen (OAg) of the Gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis (Ft), which is both a capsular polysaccharide and a component of lipopolysaccharide, is comprised of tetrasaccharide repeats and induces antibodies mainly against repeating internal epitopes. We previously reported on several BALB/c mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that bind to internal Ft OAg epitopes and are protective in mouse models of respiratory tularemia. We now characterize three new internal Ft OAg IgG2a MAbs, N203, N77, and N24, with 10- to 100-fold lower binding potency than previously characterized internal-OAg IgG2a MAbs, despite sharing one or more variable region germline genes with some of them. In a mouse model of respiratory tularemia with the highly virulent Ft type A strain SchuS4, the three new MAbs reduced blood bacterial burden with potencies that mirror their antigen-binding strength; the best binder of the new MAbs, N203, prolonged survival in a dose-dependent manner, but was at least 10-fold less potent than the best previously characterized IgG2a MAb, Ab52. X-ray crystallographic studies of N203 Fab showed a flexible binding site in the form of a partitioned groove, which cannot provide as many contacts to OAg as does the Ab52 binding site. These results reveal structural features of antibodies at the low end of reactivity with multi-repeat microbial carbohydrates and demonstrate that such antibodies still have substantial protective effects against infection. PMID:25171003

  11. Triple bridge-to-transplant in a case of giant cell myocarditis complicated by human leukocyte antigen sensitization and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia type II.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Soren; Arusoglu, Latif; Morshuis, Michiel; Minami, Kazutomo; Sarnowski, Peter; Koerfer, Reiner; El-Banayosy, Aly

    2006-03-01

    Bridge-to-bridge experience has documented the feasibility of a switch from short-term to long-term mechanical circulatory support until heart transplant. We describe a case of irreversible cardiogenic shock due to giant cell myocarditis treated consecutively with extracorporal membrane oxygenation, bi-ventricular assist device, and total artificial heart. The postoperative course was complicated by human leukocyte antigen sensitization and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia type II. Our patient successfully underwent heart transplant after 10 months of support and was discharged in good condition. This case illustrates suitable device selection for myocarditis and represents two treatable immunological complications.

  12. Maximum-Entropy Models of Sequenced Immune Repertoires Predict Antigen-Antibody Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Marcatili, Paolo; Pagnani, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The immune system has developed a number of distinct complex mechanisms to shape and control the antibody repertoire. One of these mechanisms, the affinity maturation process, works in an evolutionary-like fashion: after binding to a foreign molecule, the antibody-producing B-cells exhibit a high-frequency mutation rate in the genome region that codes for the antibody active site. Eventually, cells that produce antibodies with higher affinity for their cognate antigen are selected and clonally expanded. Here, we propose a new statistical approach based on maximum entropy modeling in which a scoring function related to the binding affinity of antibodies against a specific antigen is inferred from a sample of sequences of the immune repertoire of an individual. We use our inference strategy to infer a statistical model on a data set obtained by sequencing a fairly large portion of the immune repertoire of an HIV-1 infected patient. The Pearson correlation coefficient between our scoring function and the IC50 neutralization titer measured on 30 different antibodies of known sequence is as high as 0.77 (p-value 10−6), outperforming other sequence- and structure-based models. PMID:27074145

  13. A LAIR1 insertion generates broadly reactive antibodies against malaria variant antigens.

    PubMed

    Tan, Joshua; Pieper, Kathrin; Piccoli, Luca; Abdi, Abdirahman; Foglierini, Mathilde; Geiger, Roger; Tully, Claire Maria; Jarrossay, David; Ndungu, Francis Maina; Wambua, Juliana; Bejon, Philip; Fregni, Chiara Silacci; Fernandez-Rodriguez, Blanca; Barbieri, Sonia; Bianchi, Siro; Marsh, Kevin; Thathy, Vandana; Corti, Davide; Sallusto, Federica; Bull, Peter; Lanzavecchia, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum antigens expressed on the surface of infected erythrocytes are important targets of naturally acquired immunity against malaria, but their high number and variability provide the pathogen with a powerful means of escape from host antibodies. Although broadly reactive antibodies against these antigens could be useful as therapeutics and in vaccine design, their identification has proven elusive. Here we report the isolation of human monoclonal antibodies that recognize erythrocytes infected by different P. falciparum isolates and opsonize these cells by binding to members of the RIFIN family. These antibodies acquired broad reactivity through a novel mechanism of insertion of a large DNA fragment between the V and DJ segments. The insert, which is both necessary and sufficient for binding to RIFINs, encodes the entire 98 amino acid collagen-binding domain of LAIR1, an immunoglobulin superfamily inhibitory receptor encoded on chromosome 19. In each of the two donors studied, the antibodies are produced by a single expanded B-cell clone and carry distinct somatic mutations in the LAIR1 domain that abolish binding to collagen and increase binding to infected erythrocytes. These findings illustrate, with a biologically relevant example, a novel mechanism of antibody diversification by interchromosomal DNA transposition and demonstrate the existence of conserved epitopes that may be suitable candidates for the development of a malaria vaccine.

  14. Monoclonal antibodies directed against human Rh antigens in tests with the red cells of nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Socha, W W; Ruffie, J

    1990-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against Rh related antigens on human red cells often crossreact with the red cells of the highest subhuman primate species. Depending on specificity of antibody, the species tested, and technique used, these reactions can be either species-specific or type specific. In tests with chimpanzee red cells, some of the latter type reactions have specificities related to the R antigen of the R-C-E-F blood group system of chimpanzee; specificities of some others seem to be unrelated to any known chimpanzee blood groups. Monoclonal anti-D reagents that give uniformly positive reactions with human D-positive (common and rare types) red cells, display wide individual differences in tests with chimpanzee blood. This indicates that there are minute structural variations of antibody molecules from one monoclonal anti-D antibodies apparently have no bearing on recognition of the D combining site on the human red cells, but come into play when in contact with chimpanzee rbcs. Some of the monoclonal antibodies directed against Rh and LW molecules are distinguished by unusually strong reactions with the red cells of the Old World monkeys (macaques and baboons), which is in contrast with negative or weak reactions of the same antibodies with the red cells of anthropoid apes and human bloods. One may recall, that polyclonal anti-Rh sera do not react with the blood of rhesus monkeys, the phenomenon that was the source of controversy surrounding the discovery of the rhesus factor of the human blood.

  15. A LAIR1 insertion generates broadly reactive antibodies against malaria variant antigens.

    PubMed

    Tan, Joshua; Pieper, Kathrin; Piccoli, Luca; Abdi, Abdirahman; Foglierini, Mathilde; Geiger, Roger; Tully, Claire Maria; Jarrossay, David; Ndungu, Francis Maina; Wambua, Juliana; Bejon, Philip; Fregni, Chiara Silacci; Fernandez-Rodriguez, Blanca; Barbieri, Sonia; Bianchi, Siro; Marsh, Kevin; Thathy, Vandana; Corti, Davide; Sallusto, Federica; Bull, Peter; Lanzavecchia, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum antigens expressed on the surface of infected erythrocytes are important targets of naturally acquired immunity against malaria, but their high number and variability provide the pathogen with a powerful means of escape from host antibodies. Although broadly reactive antibodies against these antigens could be useful as therapeutics and in vaccine design, their identification has proven elusive. Here we report the isolation of human monoclonal antibodies that recognize erythrocytes infected by different P. falciparum isolates and opsonize these cells by binding to members of the RIFIN family. These antibodies acquired broad reactivity through a novel mechanism of insertion of a large DNA fragment between the V and DJ segments. The insert, which is both necessary and sufficient for binding to RIFINs, encodes the entire 98 amino acid collagen-binding domain of LAIR1, an immunoglobulin superfamily inhibitory receptor encoded on chromosome 19. In each of the two donors studied, the antibodies are produced by a single expanded B-cell clone and carry distinct somatic mutations in the LAIR1 domain that abolish binding to collagen and increase binding to infected erythrocytes. These findings illustrate, with a biologically relevant example, a novel mechanism of antibody diversification by interchromosomal DNA transposition and demonstrate the existence of conserved epitopes that may be suitable candidates for the development of a malaria vaccine. PMID:26700814

  16. A LAIR-1 insertion generates broadly reactive antibodies against malaria variant antigens

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Abdirahman; Perez, Mathilde Foglierini; Geiger, Roger; Tully, Claire Maria; Jarrossay, David; Maina Ndungu, Francis; Wambua, Juliana; Bejon, Philip; Fregni, Chiara Silacci; Fernandez-Rodriguez, Blanca; Barbieri, Sonia; Bianchi, Siro; Marsh, Kevin; Thathy, Vandana; Corti, Davide; Sallusto, Federica

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum antigens expressed on the surface of infected erythrocytes are important targets of naturally acquired immunity against malaria, but their high number and variability provide the pathogen with a powerful means of escape from host antibodies1–4. Although broadly reactive antibodies against these antigens could be useful as therapeutics and in vaccine design, their identification has proven elusive. Here, we report the isolation of human monoclonal antibodies that recognize erythrocytes infected by different P. falciparum isolates and opsonize these cells by binding to members of the RIFIN family. These antibodies acquired broad reactivity through a novel mechanism of insertion of a large DNA fragment between the V and DJ segments. The insert, which is both necessary and sufficient for binding to RIFINs, encodes the entire 100 amino acid collagen-binding domain of LAIR-1, an Ig superfamily inhibitory receptor encoded on chromosome 19. In each of the two donors studied, the antibodies are produced by a single expanded B cell clone and carry distinct somatic mutations in the LAIR-1 domain that abolish binding to collagen and increase binding to infected erythrocytes. These findings illustrate, with a biologically relevant example, a novel mechanism of antibody diversification by interchromosomal DNA transposition and demonstrate the existence of conserved epitopes that may be suitable candidates for the development of a malaria vaccine. PMID:26700814

  17. Quantitating Antibody Uptake In Vivo: Conditional Dependence on Antigen Expression Levels

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg M.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Antibodies form an important class of cancer therapeutics, and there is intense interest in using them for imaging applications in diagnosis and monitoring of cancer treatment. Despite the expanding body of knowledge describing pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions of antibodies in vivo, discrepancies remain over the effect of antigen expression level on tumoral uptake with some reports indicating a relationship between uptake and expression and others showing no correlation. Procedures Using a cell line with high EpCAM expression and moderate EGFR expression, fluorescent antibodies with similar plasma clearance were imaged in vivo. A mathematical model and mouse xenograft experiments were used to describe the effect of antigen expression on uptake of these high affinity antibodies. Results As predicted by the theoretical model, under subsaturating conditions, uptake of the antibodies in such tumors is similar because localization of both probes is limited by delivery from the vasculature. In a separate experiment, when the tumor is saturated, the uptake becomes dependent on the number of available binding sites. In addition, targeting of small micrometastases is shown to be higher than larger vascularized tumors. Conclusions These results are consistent with the prediction that high affinity antibody uptake is dependent on antigen expression levels for saturating doses and delivery for subsaturating doses. It is imperative for any probe to understand whether quantitative uptake is a measure of biomarker expression or transport to the region of interest. The data provide support for a predictive theoretical model of antibody uptake, enabling it to be used as a starting point for the design of more efficacious therapies and timely quantitative imaging probes. PMID:20809210

  18. The natural antibody repertoire of sharks and humans recognizes the potential universe of antigens.

    PubMed

    Adelman, Miranda K; Schluter, Samuel F; Marchalonis, John J

    2004-02-01

    In ancestral sharks, a rapid emergence in the evolution of the immune system occurred, giving jawed-vertebrates the necessary components for the combinatorial immune response (CIR). To compare the natural antibody (NAb) repertoires of the most divergent vertebrates with the capacity to produce antibodies, we isolated NAbs to the same set of antigens by affinity chromatography from two species of Carcharhine sharks and from human polyclonal IgG and IgM antibody preparations. The activities of the affinity-purified anti-T-cell receptor (anti-TCR) NAbs were compared with those of monoclonal anti-TCR NAbs that were generated from a systemic lupus erythematosus patient. We report that sharks and humans, representing the evolutionary extremes of vertebrate species sharing the CIR, have NAbs to human TCRs, Igs, the human senescent cell antigen, and to numerous retroviral antigens, indicating that essential features of the combinatorial repertoire and the capacity to recognize the potential universe of antigens is shared among all jawed-vertebrates.

  19. Structure of the Malaria Antigen AMA1 in Complex with a Growth-Inhibitory Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Tao; Kim, Hanna; Anders, Robin F; Foley, Michael; Batchelor, Adrian H

    2007-01-01

    Identifying functionally critical regions of the malaria antigen AMA1 (apical membrane antigen 1) is necessary to understand the significance of the polymorphisms within this antigen for vaccine development. The crystal structure of AMA1 in complex with the Fab fragment of inhibitory monoclonal antibody 1F9 reveals that 1F9 binds to the AMA1 solvent-exposed hydrophobic trough, confirming its importance. 1F9 uses the heavy and light chain complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) to wrap around the polymorphic loops adjacent to the trough, but uses a ridge of framework residues to bind to the hydrophobic trough. The resulting 1F9-AMA1–combined buried surface of 2,470 Å2 is considerably larger than previously reported Fab–antigen interfaces. Mutations of polymorphic AMA1 residues within the 1F9 epitope disrupt 1F9 binding and dramatically reduce the binding of affinity-purified human antibodies. Moreover, 1F9 binding to AMA1 is competed by naturally acquired human antibodies, confirming that the 1F9 epitope is a frequent target of immunological attack. PMID:17907804

  20. Exploring the Dynamic Range of the Kinetic Exclusion Assay in Characterizing Antigen-Antibody Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bee, Christine; Abdiche, Yasmina N.; Stone, Donna M.; Collier, Sierra; Lindquist, Kevin C.; Pinkerton, Alanna C.; Pons, Jaume; Rajpal, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic antibodies are often engineered or selected to have high on-target binding affinities that can be challenging to determine precisely by most biophysical methods. Here, we explore the dynamic range of the kinetic exclusion assay (KinExA) by exploiting the interactions of an anti-DKK antibody with a panel of DKK antigens as a model system. By tailoring the KinExA to each studied antigen, we obtained apparent equilibrium dissociation constants (KD values) spanning six orders of magnitude, from approximately 100 fM to 100 nM. Using a previously calibrated antibody concentration and working in a suitable concentration range, we show that a single experiment can yield accurate and precise values for both the apparent KD and the apparent active concentration of the antigen, thereby increasing the information content of an assay and decreasing sample consumption. Orthogonal measurements obtained on Biacore and Octet label-free biosensor platforms further validated our KinExA-derived affinity and active concentration determinations. We obtained excellent agreement in the apparent affinities obtained across platforms and within the KinExA method irrespective of the assay orientation employed or the purity of the recombinant or native antigens. PMID:22558410

  1. Anti-soluble liver antigen (SLA) antibodies in chronic HCV infection.

    PubMed

    Vitozzi, Susana; Lapierre, Pascal; Djilali-Saiah, Idriss; Marceau, Gabriel; Beland, Kathie; Alvarez, Fernando

    2004-05-01

    Hepatitis C infection is associated with autoimmune disorders, such as the production of autoantibodies. Anti-LKM1 and anti-LC1, immunomarkers of type 2 autoimmune hepatitis, have been previously associated with a HCV infection. Anti-Soluble-Liver-Antigen autoantibodies (SLA) are specifically associated with type 1 and type 2 autoimmune hepatitis and more closely related to patients who relapse after steroid therapy. The recent molecular cloning of the soluble liver antigen provides the opportunity to develop more specific tests for the detection of antibodies against it. The aim of this work is to characterize anti-soluble-liver autoantibodies in sera from patients chronically infected by HCV. A recombinant cDNA from activated Jurkat cells coding for the full length tRNP(Ser)Sec/SLA antigen was obtained. ELISA, Western Blot and immunoprecipitation tests were developed and used to search for linear and conformational epitopes recognized by anti-SLA antibodies in sera from patients chronically infected by HCV. Anti-soluble liver antigen antibodies were found in sera from 10.4% of HCV-infected patients. The prevalence was significantly increased to 27% when anti-LKM1 was also present. Most anti-SLA reactivity was directed against conformational epitopes on the antigen. The means titers by ELISA were lower than those obtained in type 2 AIH. The result of autoantibody isotyping showed a subclass restriction to IgG1 and also IgG4. This study shows the presence of anti-SLA antibodies in approximately 10% of HCV infected patients. The prevalence of SLA autoantibodies in HCV infected patients increases when LKM1 autoantibodies are also present. The relationship between the prevalence of this characteristic autoimmune hepatitis autoantibody and the implication of an autoimmune phenomenon in the liver injury of patients chronically infected by HCV needs further investigation.

  2. The influence of diisocyanate antigen preparation methodology on monoclonal and serum antibody recognition.

    PubMed

    Hagerman, Lauren M; Law, Brandon F; Bledsoe, Toni A; Hettick, Justin M; Kashon, Michael L; Lemons, Angela R; Wisnewski, Adam V; Siegel, Paul D

    2016-11-01

    Exposure to diisocyanates (dNCOs), such as methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) can cause occupational asthma (OA). Currently, lab tests for dNCO specific IgE are specific, but not sensitive, which limits their utility in diagnosing dNCO asthma. This may be due to variable preparation and poor characterization of the standard antigens utilized in these assays. The aim of this study was to produce and characterize a panel of antigens prepared using three different commonly employed methods and one novel method. The conjugates were examined for recognition by anti-MDI monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in varying enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) formats, extent of crosslinking, total amount of MDI, the sites of MDI conjugation, relative shape/charge, and reactivity with human serum with antibodies from sensitized, exposed workers. Results indicate that while there are minimal differences in the total amount of MDI conjugated, the extent of crosslinking, and the conjugation sites, there are significant differences in the recognition of differently prepared conjugates by mAbs. Native and denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrate differences in the mobility of different conjugates, indicative of structural changes that are likely important for antigenicity. While mAbs exhibited differential binding to different conjugates, polyclonal serum antibodies from MDI exposed workers exhibited equivalent binding to different conjugates by ELISA. While differences in the recognition of the different conjugates exist by mAb detection, differences in antigenicity could not be detected using human serum from MDI-sensitized individuals. Thus, although dNCO conjugate preparation can, depending on the immunoassay platform, influence binding of specific antibody clones, serologic detection of the dNCO-exposure-induced polyclonal antibody response may be less sensitive to these differences.

  3. Antigens of monoclonal antibody NB3C4 are novel markers for oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, K; Kametani, F; Shimoda, Y; Fujimaki, K; Sakurai, Y; Kitamura, K; Asou, H; Nomura, M

    2001-02-12

    We produced NB3C4, a novel monoclonal antibody specific for oligodendrocytes, using human neuroblastoma IMR-32 cells. NB3C4 specifically recognized oligodendrocytes in the CNS, although it bound to neuroblastoma IMR-32 cells and oligodendrocytes in vitro. Double immunofluorescence staining of rat brain using NB3C4 and anti-GST-pi, anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), or anti-neurofilament 200 (NF) antibody revealed that anti-GST-pi antibody identified an oligodendrocyte marker recognizing NB3C4-positive cells, while both anti-GFAP and anti-NF antibody did not. Western blotting of rat brain homogenates showed that NB3C4 bound three proteins of 22-28 kDa, while the anti-GST-pi recognized a 27 kDa protein. Therefore, antigens recognized by NB3C4 could be novel markers for oligodendrocytes.

  4. Clinically effective monoclonal antibody 3F8 mediates nonoxidative lysis of human neuroectodermal tumor cells by polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Kushner, B H; Cheung, N K

    1991-09-15

    Most studies of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) have supported oxidative lytic processes. This may be because the studies used nonhuman or nonneoplastic cells that were highly sensitive to reactive oxygen species or were small enough to be phagocytosed by PMN. We therefore investigated whether oxygen radicals participate in PMN cytotoxicity toward human neuroectodermal solid tumor cells sensitized by 3F8, which is an anti-ganglioside GD2 murine IgG3 monoclonal antibody with documented anticancer activity in humans. A 4-h 51Cr release assay was used to assess tumor cell lysis by hydrogen peroxide, superoxide, and hypochlorite. Nine of 11 GD2(+) human melanoma and neuroblastoma cell lines had equal or greater resistance to these oxidants as compared to a GD2(-) human carcinoma line (SKBr1-III) found by others (and confirmed by us) to be significantly more resistant to oxidative lysis than a murine cell line (P388D1) representative of those commonly used in cytotoxicity assays. To facilitate detection of oxidant-mediated lysis, subsequent studies of 3F8-mediated ADCC used GD2(+) targets that were relatively sensitive and others that were relatively resistant to oxygen radicals. Normal PMN and PMN obtained from children with chronic granulomatous disease, which do not generate reactive oxygen species, were equally effective in ADCC. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, which primes oxidative responses of normal but not of chronic granulomatous disease PMN, enhanced ADCC by both kinds of PMN. During ADCC of 3F8-sensitized targets, with or without granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, GD2(-) "innocent bystander" tumor cells (including P388D1) were not lysed, a finding consistent with unimportant extracellular release of cytotoxic mediators. Finally, antioxidant and antimyeloperoxidase moieties did not block ADCC. We conclude that oxidants are not key factors in 3F8-mediated lysis by PMN of

  5. Intracellular localization of antigens with backscatter mode of SEM using peroxidase-labeled antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, A.L.; Nakane, P.K.

    1981-01-01

    The peroxidase-labeled antibody method was employed for immunohistochemical localization of intracellular and extracellular antigens with SEM. With this method, the antigenic sites may be localized with high sensitivity on tissue sections mounted on carbon-coated glass slides by detecting 0s04-DAB complexes using the backscatter mode. The sections may be fresh frozen fixed on slide, frozen sections of fixed tissue, or sections of immunostained tissue embedded in epon. The method introduces another utilization of SEM and the immunoenzyme histochemistry.

  6. Hepatitis C Virus Subtype 3a Envelope Protein 1 Binding with Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I Types of Pakistani Population: Candidate Epitopes for Synthetic Peptide Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Nawaz-Tipu, Hamid

    2015-10-01

    The object of this cross sectional study was to determine the HCV subtype 3a envelope protein binding affinity with Human Leukocyte Antigen. Envelope 1 (E1) protein is one of the structural proteins responsible for entering the cells through the receptors. The binding affinity of E1 protein epitopes to the selected Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class I alleles was investigated using the computer-based tools. These prediction tools were also used to design the synthetic vaccine's candidate epitopes and to identify the individuals/populations who are likely to be responder to those vaccines.The mean frequency of HLA I antigens in Pakistani population was calculated. Three alleles each from HLA A and B were selected. E1 protein sequence extracted from HCV 3a isolates was retrieved and twenty-four sequences of it were selected. NetMHCcons 1.0 server was used to determine the binding affinities of HLA alleles to the epitope sequences of 10 amino acids in length.A02, A03, A11, A24, A33, B08, B13, B15, B35 and B40 were the first five antigens more prevalent in Pakistan each from HLA A and HLA B.. We did not find any binding affinity between HLA A*201, B*1501 and B*4001 and epitopes from E1 sequences in a threshold of 50 nM. Totally five various epitopes derived from different isolates were characterized.The prediction of HLA-E1 epitope specific bindings and the forthcoming response can be a useful bioinformatics tool to uncover the right synthetic peptides for vaccine design purposes.

  7. Variations in the Electrostatic Landscape of Class II Human Leukocyte Antigen Molecule Induced by Modifications in the Myelin Basic Protein Peptide: A Theoretical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Agudelo, William A.; Galindo, Johan F.; Ortiz, Marysol; Villaveces, José L.; Daza, Edgar E.; Patarroyo, Manuel E.

    2009-01-01

    The receptor-ligand interactions involved in the formation of the complex between Class II Major Histocompatibility Complex molecules and antigenic peptides, which are essential for establishing an adaptive immunological response, were analyzed in the Class II Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) - Myelin Basic Protein (MBP) peptide complex (HLA-DRβ1*1501-MBP) using a multipolar molecular electrostatic potential approach. The Human Leukocyte Antigen - peptide complex system was divided into four pockets together with their respective peptide fragment and the corresponding occupying amino acid was replaced by each of the remaining 19 amino acids. Partial atomic charges were calculated by a quantum chemistry approach at the Hatree Fock/3-21*G level, to study the behavior of monopole, dipole and quadrupole electrostatic multipolar moments. Two types of electrostatic behavior were distinguished in the pockets' amino acids: “anchoring” located in Pocket 1 and 4, and “recognition” located in Pocket 4 and 7. According to variations in the electrostatic landscape, pockets were ordered as: Pocket 1>Pocket 9≫Pocket 4≈Pocket 7 which is in agreement with the binding ability reported for Class II Major Histocompatibility Complex pockets. In the same way, amino acids occupying the polymorphic positions β13R, β26F, β28D, β9W, β74A, β47F and β57D were shown to be key for this Receptor-Ligand interaction. The results show that the multipolar molecular electrostatic potential approach is appropriate for characterizing receptor-ligand interactions in the MHC–antigenic peptide complex, which could have potential implications for synthetic vaccine design. PMID:19132105

  8. High Titer and Avidity of Nonneutralizing Antibodies against Influenza Vaccine Antigen Are Associated with Severe Influenza

    PubMed Central

    To, Kelvin K. W.; Zhang, Anna J. X.; Hung, Ivan F. N.; Xu, Ting; Ip, Whitney C. T.; Wong, Rebecca T. Y.; Ng, Joseph C. K.; Chan, Jasper F. W.; Chan, Kwok-Hung

    2012-01-01

    The importance of neutralizing antibody in protection against influenza virus is well established, but the role of the early antibody response during the initial stage of infection in affecting the severity of disease is unknown. The 2009 influenza pandemic provided a unique opportunity for study because most patients lacked preexisting neutralizing antibody. In this study, we compared the antibody responses of 52 patients with severe or mild disease, using sera collected at admission. A microneutralization (MN) assay was used to detect neutralizing antibody. We also developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) which detects both neutralizing and nonneutralizing antibodies against viral antigens from a split-virion inactivated monovalent influenza virus vaccine. While the MN titers were not significantly different between the two groups (P = 0.764), the ELISA titer and ELISA/MN titer ratio were significantly higher for patients with severe disease than for those with mild disease (P = 0.004 and P = 0.011, respectively). This finding suggested that in patients with severe disease, a larger proportion of serum antibodies were antibodies with no detectable neutralizing activity. The antibody avidity was also significantly higher in patients with severe disease than in those with mild disease (P < 0.05). Among patients with severe disease, those who required positive pressure ventilation (PPV) had significantly higher ELISA titers than those who did not require PPV (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that the ELISA titer and antibody avidity were independently associated with severe disease. Higher titers of nonneutralizing antibody with higher avidity at the early stage of influenza virus infection may be associated with worse clinical severity and poorer outcomes. PMID:22573737

  9. Generation of a human anti-idiotypic antibody that mimics the GD2 antigen.

    PubMed

    Saleh, M N; Stapleton, J D; Khazaeli, M B; LoBuglio, A F

    1993-09-15

    In a phase 1 trial, patients with metastatic melanoma received the anti-GD2 murine mAb 14G2a. All patients developed human anti-14G2a antibodies including anti-Id antibodies. Peripheral blood MNCs from one such patient were fused with the murine myeloma cell line Ag8. Four human anti-14G2a secreting hybridomas were generated and the mAb product of one of the hybridomas was characterized. The human mAb 4B5 (hu-IgG, lambda) binds to the variable region of murine 14G2a (anti-Id). The 4B5 binds to the antigen-combining site of 14G2a and inhibits its binding to GD2 expressing Mel-21 cells. Rabbits were immunized with the human anti-Id 4B5. Sera from the immunized rabbits demonstrated anti-4B5 antibodies and anti-Mel-21 and anti-GD2 reactivity. Furthermore, rabbit sera competitively inhibited binding of 14G2a to Mel-21 cells. Rabbits immunized with 4B5 developed a DTH response when challenged with 4B5 antibody and Mel-21 cells. These studies demonstrate that the human anti-Id 4B5 mimics the GD2 antigen and is capable of eliciting both a humoral and cellular anti-GD2 immune response. This antibody could be potentially used as a human anti-Id vaccine in patients with malignant melanoma. PMID:8376782

  10. Domain specificity of the human antibody response to Bacillus anthracis protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Reason, Donald C; Ullal, Anuska; Liberato, Justine; Sun, Jinying; Keitel, Wendy; Zhou, Jianhui

    2008-07-29

    Protective antigen (PA) is the cell surface recognition moiety of the Bacillus anthracis A-B toxin system, and the active immunogenic component in the currently licensed human anthrax vaccine (BioThrax, or AVA). The serum antibody response to the PA protein is polyclonal and complex both in terms of the antibody combining sites utilized to bind PA and the PA-associated epitopes recognized. We have cloned, sequenced, and expressed a large panel of PA-specific human monoclonal antibodies from seven AVA-immunized donors. Dot blots, Western blots, and radiolabeled antigen capture assays employing both proteolytic fragments of PA and engineered PA sub-domain fusion proteins were used to determine the region (domain) of the PA monomer to which each of the cloned human antibodies bound. The domain specificity of the isolated monoclonals was highly biased towards the amino-terminal 20kDa fragment of PA (PA(20)), with the majority (62%) of independently arising antibody clones reacting with determinants located on this PA fragment. A similar bias in domain specificity was also demonstrated in the serum response of AVA-vaccinated donors. Since PA(20) is cleaved from the remainder of the monomer rapidly following cell surface binding and has no known role in the intoxication process, the immunodominance of PA(20)-associated epitopes may directly affect the efficacy of PA-based anthrax vaccines.

  11. Repeated spurious elevation of serum prostate-specific antigen values solved by chemiluminescence analysis: A possible interference by heterophilic antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Bayó, Miquel; Muñoz-Rodríguez, Jesús; Bellido, Jose Antonio; Abascal-Junquera, Jose María; Hannaoui, Naim; Banús, Josep Maria

    2015-01-01

    Heterophilic antibodies are human immunoglobulins directed against various animal antigens. They can produce false-positive results in the analysis of different tumor markers, including prostate-specific antigen. This interference can lead to misdiagnosis, unnecessary tests, and overtreatment in some cases. We present herein the case of a 52-year-old man with repeated spurious elevation of prostate-specific antigen, reaching levels of 108.7 ng/mL, that were suspected to be caused by heterophilic antibodies. The interference was solved by changing the analysis technique. Real values of prostate-specific antigen were less than 1 ng/mL. PMID:26568798

  12. Direct radiolabeling of antibody against stage specific embryonic antigen for diagnostic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, Buck A.

    1994-01-01

    Antibody against stage specific embryonic antigen-1 is radiolabeled by direct means with a radionuclide for use in detection of occult abscess and inflammation. Radiolabeling is accomplished by partial reduction of the disulfide bonds of the antibody using Sn(II), or using other reducing agents followed by the addition of Sn(II), removal of excess reducing agent and reduction by-products, and addition of a specified amount of radionuclide reducing agent, such as stannous tartrate. The resulting product may be store frozen or lyophilized, with radiolabeling accomplished by the addition of the radionuclide.

  13. Direct radiolabeling of antibody against stage specific embryonic antigen for diagnostic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, B.A.

    1994-09-13

    Antibodies against stage specific embryonic antigen-1 is radiolabeled by direct means with a radionuclide for use in detection of occult abscess and inflammation. Radiolabeling is accomplished by partial reduction of the disulfide bonds of the antibody using Sn(II), or using other reducing agents followed by the addition of Sn(II), removal of excess reducing agent and reduction by-products, and addition of a specified amount of radionuclide reducing agent, such as stannous tartrate. The resulting product may be stored frozen or lyophilized, with radiolabeling accomplished by the addition of the radionuclide. No Drawings

  14. Antigen-antibody binding in reverse micelles: interaction of monoclonal antibodies with a myelin basic protein peptide.

    PubMed

    Groome, N P; Vacher, M; Nicot, C; Waks, M

    1990-01-01

    Reverse micelles can be used to mimic biological processes occurring at interfaces. To investigate antigen-antibody binding in a membrane-like environment, we first obtained Fab fragments from monoclonal antibodies against bovine myelin basic protein (MBP), an encephalitogenic protein. The binding of the fragments to a dansylated synthetic human MBP peptide gly(119)-gly(131), presenting sequence homologies with a viral protein, was measured in buffer and for the first time in reverse micelles of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate, in isooctane. Analysis of the fluorescence polarisation titration curves discloses that the Fab fragments in reverse micelles have retained the high affinity for the peptide found in buffer, and similar to that for intact MBP.

  15. Murine carcinoma expressing carcinoembryonic antigen-like protein is restricted by antibody against neem leaf glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Das, Arnab; Barik, Subhasis; Bose, Anamika; Roy, Soumyabrata; Biswas, Jaydip; Baral, Rathindranath; Pal, Smarajit

    2014-11-01

    We have generated a polyclonal antibody against a novel immunomodulator, neem leaf glycoprotein (NLGP) that can react to a specific 47 kDa subunit of NLGP. Generated anti-NLGP antibody (primarily IgG2a) was tested for its anti-tumor activity in murine carcinoma (EC, CT-26), sarcoma (S180) and melanoma (B16Mel) tumor models. Surprisingly, tumor growth restriction was only observed in CT-26 carcinoma models, without any alteration in other tumor systems. Comparative examination of antigenicity between four different tumor models revealed high expression of CEA-like protein on the surface of CT-26 tumors. Subsequent examination of the cross-reactivity of anti-NLGP antibody with purified or cell bound CEA revealed prominent recognition of CEA by anti-NLGP antibody, as detected by ELISA, Western Blotting and immunohistochemistry. This recognition seems to be responsible for anti-tumor function of anti-NLGP antibody only on CEA-like protein expressing CT-26 tumor models, as confirmed by ADCC reaction in CEA(+) tumor systems where dependency to anti-NLGP antibody is equivalent to anti-CEA antibody. Obtained result with enormous therapeutic potential for CEA(+) tumors may be explained in view of the epitope spreading concept, however, further investigation is crucial.

  16. Stapled HIV-1 Peptides Recapitulate Antigenic Structures and Engage Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Gregory H.; Irimia, Adriana; Ofek, Gilad; Kwong, Peter D.; Wilson, Ian A.; Walensky, Loren D.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrocarbon stapling can restore bioactive, α-helical structure to natural peptides, yielding research tools and prototype therapeutics to dissect and target protein interactions. Here, we explore the capacity of peptide stapling to generate high fidelity, protease-resistant mimics of antigenic structures for vaccine development. HIV-1 has been refractory to vaccine technologies thus far, although select human antibodies can broadly neutralize HIV-1 by targeting sequences of the gp41 juxtamembrane fusion apparatus. To develop candidate HIV-1 immunogens, we generated and characterized stabilized α-helices of the membrane proximal external region (SAH-MPER) of gp41. SAH-MPER peptides were remarkably protease-resistant and bound to the broadly neutralizing 4E10 and 10E8 antibodies with high affinity, recapitulating the structure of the MPER epitope when differentially engaged by the two anti-HIV Fabs. Thus, stapled peptides may provide a new opportunity to develop chemically-stabilized antigens for vaccination. PMID:25420104

  17. Study of H-Y antigen in abnormal sex determination with monoclonal antibody and an ELISA.

    PubMed

    Moreira-Filho, C A; Wachtel, S S

    1985-03-01

    A newly developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has been applied to the study of H-Y antigen in cases of XY, XYY, and X,dicY gonadal dysgenesis, testicular feminization syndrome, XXXXY syndrome, and XX true hermaphroditism. Monoclonal H-Y antibody was absorbed with cells from each of eight patients and from normal male and female controls, and then reacted with a plated antigen source in a system subsuming the addition of biotinylated secondary antibody, avidin-biotin-enzyme complex and substrate, and thereby the generation of a color. Positive absorption decreased the reaction, and this allowed sensitive measurement of H-Y phenotype in an electronic optical density reader. The ELISA obviates many of the technical difficulties encountered in complement-mediated cytotoxicity systems and can be used in the study of clinical cases of aberrant sex determination and in the evaluation of current models of the genetics of sex determination.

  18. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) A*1101-Restricted Epstein-Barr Virus-Specific T-cell Receptor Gene Transfer to Target Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yong; Parsonage, Greg; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Machado, Lee R; James, Christine H; Salman, Asmaa; Searle, Peter F; Hui, Edwin P; Chan, Anthony T C; Lee, Steven P

    2015-10-01

    Infusing virus-specific T cells is effective treatment for rare Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated posttransplant lymphomas, and more limited success has been reported using this approach to treat a far more common EBV-associated malignancy, nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, current approaches using EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines to reactivate EBV-specific T cells for infusion take 2 to 3 months of in vitro culture and favor outgrowth of T cells targeting viral antigens expressed within EBV(+) lymphomas, but not in NPC. Here, we explore T-cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer to rapidly and reliably generate T cells specific for the NPC-associated viral protein LMP2. We cloned a human leukocyte antigen (HLA) A*1101-restricted TCR, which would be widely applicable because 40% of NPC patients carry this HLA allele. Studying both the wild-type and modified forms, we have optimized expression of the TCR and demonstrated high-avidity antigen-specific function (proliferation, cytotoxicity, and cytokine release) in both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. The engineered T cells also inhibited LMP2(+) epithelial tumor growth in a mouse model. Furthermore, transduced T cells from patients with advanced NPC lysed LMP2-expressing NPC cell lines. Using this approach, within a few days large numbers of high-avidity LMP2-specific T cells can be generated reliably to treat NPC, thus providing an ideal clinical setting to test TCR gene transfer without the risk of autoimmunity through targeting self-antigens.

  19. An Integrated Peptide-Antigen Microarray on Plasmonic Gold Films for Sensitive Human Antibody Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Price, Jordan V.; Tabakman, Scott M.; Li, Yanguang; Gong, Ming; Hong, Guosong; Feng, Ju; Utz, Paul J.; Dai, Hongjie

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput screening for interactions of peptides with a variety of antibody targets could greatly facilitate proteomic analysis for epitope mapping, enzyme profiling, drug discovery and biomarker identification. Peptide microarrays are suited for such undertaking because of their high-throughput capability. However, existing peptide microarrays lack the sensitivity needed for detecting low abundance proteins or low affinity peptide-protein interactions. This work presents a new peptide microarray platform constructed on nanostructured plasmonic gold substrates capable of metal enhanced NIR fluorescence enhancement (NIR-FE) by hundreds of folds for screening peptide-antibody interactions with ultrahigh sensitivity. Further, an integrated histone peptide and whole antigen array is developed on the same plasmonic gold chip for profiling human antibodies in the sera of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, revealing that collectively a panel of biomarkers against unmodified and post-translationally modified histone peptides and several whole antigens allow more accurate differentiation of SLE patients from healthy individuals than profiling biomarkers against peptides or whole antigens alone. PMID:23923050

  20. Novel Ricin Subunit Antigens With Enhanced Capacity to Elicit Toxin-Neutralizing Antibody Responses in Mice.

    PubMed

    Wahome, Newton; Sully, Erin; Singer, Christopher; Thomas, Justin C; Hu, Lei; Joshi, Sangeeta B; Volkin, David B; Fang, Jianwen; Karanicolas, John; Jacobs, Donald J; Mantis, Nicholas J; Middaugh, C Russell

    2016-05-01

    RiVax is a candidate ricin toxin subunit vaccine antigen that has proven to be safe in human phase I clinical trials. In this study, we introduced double and triple cavity-filling point mutations into the RiVax antigen with the expectation that stability-enhancing modifications would have a beneficial effect on overall immunogenicity of the recombinant proteins. We demonstrate that 2 RiVax triple mutant derivatives, RB (V81L/C171L/V204I) and RC (V81I/C171L/V204I), when adsorbed to aluminum salts adjuvant and tested in a mouse prime-boost-boost regimen were 5- to 10-fold more effective than RiVax at eliciting toxin-neutralizing serum IgG antibody titers. Increased toxin neutralizing antibody values and seroconversion rates were evident at different antigen dosages and within 7 days after the first booster. Quantitative stability/flexibility relationships analysis revealed that the RB and RC mutations affect rigidification of regions spanning residues 98-103, which constitutes a known immunodominant neutralizing B-cell epitope. A more detailed understanding of the immunogenic nature of RB and RC may provide insight into the fundamental relationship between local protein stability and antibody reactivity. PMID:26987947

  1. An analytical solution to the characterization of antigen-antibody interactions by kinetic exclusion assay.

    PubMed

    Winzor, Donald J

    2013-07-01

    A simpler derivation of the basic expression for the dependence of fluorimetric response ratio (R(Ag)/Ro) on free antigen concentration has demonstrated the universal invalidity of the analysis that is incorporated into the manufacturer's software for determining immunoaffinities by kinetic exclusion assay, and traced the error to inadequate allowance for antibody bivalence in the solution phase of the assay. An analytical solution to the quantitative characterization of antigen-antibody interactions from the dependence of R(Ag)/Ro on total antigen concentration is also described, thereby eliminating the necessity for the extensive simulative procedures employed in current determinations of dissociation constants by kinetic exclusion assay. In the illustrative application of this analytical approach to published results on the interaction between a metal chelate (cadmium-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, Cd-EDTA) and an elicited monoclonal antibody, the analytical processing of the data has been performed on a calculator. However, there is no need to replace the more sophisticated procedure that is incorporated into the Sapidyne software provided that programming changes are made to rectify the erroneous equation on which the simulative analysis is based. PMID:23535275

  2. Antibody Responses to Mycobacterial Antigens in Children with Tuberculosis: Challenges and Potential Diagnostic Value

    PubMed Central

    Ziegenbalg, Anke

    2012-01-01

    The identification of easily detectable biomarkers for active tuberculosis (TB) is a global health priority. Such biomarkers would be of particular value in childhood TB, which poses greater diagnostic challenges than adult TB. Serum antibodies can be detected by simple formats that provide extremely rapid results. However, attempts to develop accurate serodiagnostic tests for TB have been unsuccessful. Whereas antibody responses to mycobacterial antigens in adult TB have been studied extensively and reviewed, the same cannot be said for serologic data in pediatric populations. Here we appraise studies on serological responses in childhood TB and discuss findings and limitations in the context of the developing immune system, the age range, and the spectrum of TB manifestations. We found that the antibody responses to mycobacterial antigens in childhood TB can vary widely, with sensitivities and specificities ranging from 14% to 85% and from 86% to 100%, respectively. We conclude that the limitations in serodiagnostic studies of childhood TB are manifold, thereby restricting the interpretation of currently available data. Concerns about the methodology used in published studies suggest that conclusions about the eventual value of serodiagnosis cannot be made at this time. However, the available data suggest a potential adjunctive value for serology in the diagnosis of childhood TB. Despite the difficulties noted in this field, there is optimism that the application of novel antigens and the integration of those factors which contribute to the serological responses in childhood TB can lead to useful future diagnostics. PMID:23100476

  3. Kinetics of antigen binding to arrays of antibodies in different sized spots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sapsford, K. E.; Liron, Z.; Shubin, Y. S.; Ligler, F. S.

    2001-01-01

    A fluorescence-based array biosensor has been developed which can measure the binding kinetics of an antigen to an immobilized antibody in real time. A patterned array of antibodies immobilized on the surface of a planar waveguide was used to capture a Cy5-labeled antigen present in a solution that was continuously flowed over the surface. The CCD image of the waveguide was monitored continuously for 25 min. The resulting exponential rise in fluorescence signal was determined by image analysis software and fitted to a reaction-limited kinetics model, giving a kf of 3.6 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1). Different spot sizes were then patterned on the surface of the waveguide using either a PDMS flow cell or laser exposure, producing width sizes ranging from 80 to 1145 microm. It was demonstrated that under flow conditions, the reduction of spot size did not alter the association rate of the antigen with immobilized antibody; however, as the spot width decreased to < 200 nm, the signal intensity also decreased.

  4. Validation of ELISA for the detection of African horse sickness virus antigens and antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rubio, C; Cubillo, M A; Hooghuis, H; Sanchez-Vizcaino, J M; Diaz-Laviada, M; Plateau, E; Zientara, S; Crucière, C; Hamblin, C

    1998-01-01

    The mortality rate in susceptible populations of horses during an epizootic of African horse sickness (AHS) may be in excess of 90%. Rapid and reliable assays are therefore essential for the confirmation of clinical diagnoses and to enable control strategies to be implemented without undue delay. One of the major objectives of a recent European Union funded project was the validation of newly developed diagnostic assays which are rapid, sensitive, highly reproducible and inexpensive, for the detection of African horse sickness virus (AHSV) antigens and antibodies. The Laboratorio de Sanidad y Produccion Animal (LSPA) in Algete, Spain was charged with the responsibility of co-ordinating and supplying samples of viruses and antisera to the participating laboratories in Spain, France and the United Kingdom. The panels comprised 76 antigen samples for assay by indirect sandwich ELISAs and 53 serum samples for antibody detection by either indirect or competitive ELISAs. Results generated by ELISA for each laboratory were analysed in LSPA in terms of their relative sensitivities and specificities. There was a good agreement between the ELISAs used for either antigen or antibody detection. The participating groups agreed that any field sample giving a doubtful result would always be retested by ELISA and an alternative assay.

  5. Enhanced antigen-antibody binding affinity mediated by an anti-idiotypic antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Sawutz, D.G.; Koury, R.; Homcy, C.J.

    1987-08-25

    The authors previously described the production of four monoclonal antibodies to the ..beta..-adrenergic receptor antagonist alprenolol. One of these antibodies, 5B7 (IgG/sub 2a/, kappa), was used to raise anti-idiotypic antisera in rabbits. In contrast to the expected results, one of the anti-idiotypic antisera (R9) promotes (/sup 125/I)iodocyanopinodolol (ICYP) binding to antibody 5B7. In the presence of R9, the dissociation constant decreases 100-fold from 20 to 0.3 nM. This increase in binding affinity of antibody 5B7 for ICYP is not observed in the presence of preimmune, rabbit anti-mouse or anti-idiotypic antisera generated to a monoclonal antibody of a different specificity. Furthermore, R9 in the absence of 5B7 does not bind ICYP. The F(ab) fragments of 5B7 and T9 behaved in a similar manner, and the soluble complex responsible for the high-affinity interaction with ICYP can be identified by gel filtration chromatography. The elution position of the complex is consistent with a 5B7 F(ab)-R9 F(ab) dimer, indicating that polyvalency is not responsible for the enhanced ligand binding. Kinetic analysis of ICYP-5B7 binding revealed that the rate of ICYP dissociation from 5B7 in the presence of R9 is approximately 100 times slower than in the absence of R9, consistent with the 100-fold change in binding affinity of 5B7 for ICYP. The available data best fit a model in which an anti-idiotypic antibody binds at or near the binding site of the idiotype participating in the formation of a hybrid ligand binding site. This would allow increased contact of the ligand with the idiotype-anti-idiotype complex and result in an enhanced affinity of the ligand interaction.

  6. Polymorphic Expression of a Human Superficial Bladder Tumor Antigen Defined by Mouse Monoclonal Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fradet, Yves; Islam, Nazrul; Boucher, Lucie; Parent-Vaugeois, Carmen; Tardif, Marc

    1987-10-01

    Three mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which define a highly restricted antigen, were obtained by simultaneous immunizations with superficial papillary bladder tumor cells and mouse polyclonal serum against normal urothelium. The antigen was detected by the avidin/biotin/peroxidase method in 30/44 superficial bladder tumors (68%) but in only 4/27 infiltrating urothelial cancers (with much less intensity). No normal adult or fetal tissues tested expressed the antigen, including normal urothelium from 40 individuals, 13 of whom had a bladder tumor positive for the antigen. Only 1 of 45 nonbladder tumors showed some reactivity with one of the three mAbs. Serological tests on a large panel of human cancer cell lines and normal cultured cells were negative. The antigen is highly stable and well preserved on paraffin-embedded tissues. Electrophoretic transfer blot experiments with fresh tumor extracts showed that all three mAbs react with a determinant on a component of 300,000 Mr (pI 9.5) and 62,000 Mr (pI 6.5). The antigen shows polymorphic expression at the cellular level on tissue sections and also at a molecular level on immunoblots where the two bands are differentially detected on extracts of a series of tumors but are not visualized on normal urothelium extracts. The characteristics of this antigenic system suggest that it may provide some insights about the biology of bladder cancer. Specific detection of the antigen on 70% of superficial bladder tumors with normal cytology may be useful for their diagnosis and follow-up.

  7. Optimizing Production of Antigens and Fabs in the Context of Generating Recombinant Antibodies to Human Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Nan; Loppnau, Peter; Seitova, Alma; Ravichandran, Mani; Fenner, Maria; Jain, Harshika; Bhattacharya, Anandi; Hutchinson, Ashley; Paduch, Marcin; Lu, Vincent; Olszewski, Michal; Kossiakoff, Anthony A; Dowdell, Evan; Koide, Akiko; Koide, Shohei; Huang, Haiming; Nadeem, Vincent; Sidhu, Sachdev S; Greenblatt, Jack F; Marcon, Edyta; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Edwards, Aled M; Gräslund, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    We developed and optimized a high-throughput project workflow to generate renewable recombinant antibodies to human proteins involved in epigenetic signalling. Three different strategies to produce phage display compatible protein antigens in bacterial systems were compared, and we found that in vivo biotinylation through the use of an Avi tag was the most productive method. Phage display selections were performed on 265 in vivo biotinylated antigen domains. High-affinity Fabs (<20nM) were obtained for 196. We constructed and optimized a new expression vector to produce in vivo biotinylated Fabs in E. coli. This increased average yields up to 10-fold, with an average yield of 4 mg/L. For 118 antigens, we identified Fabs that could immunoprecipitate their full-length endogenous targets from mammalian cell lysates. One Fab for each antigen was converted to a recombinant IgG and produced in mammalian cells, with an average yield of 15 mg/L. In summary, we have optimized each step of the pipeline to produce recombinant antibodies, significantly increasing both efficiency and yield, and also showed that these Fabs and IgGs can be generally useful for chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) protocols. PMID:26437229

  8. Sperm-related antigens, antibodies, and circulating immune complexes in sera of recently vasectomized men.

    PubMed Central

    Witkin, S S; Zelikovsky, G; Bongiovanni, A M; Geller, N; Good, R A; Day, N K

    1982-01-01

    Sera from 35 men were collected before and at timed intervals subsequent to vasectomy and examined for the presence of (a) antibody reactive with human spermatozoa, (b) sperm-related antigen, and (c) circulating immune complexes (CIC). Fewer than 10% of the men examined were ever positive for antisperm antibodies. However, sperm-related antigens were elevated in the sera of 18, 18, and 26% of the mean at 2 wk, 2 mo, and 4 mo postvasectomy, respectively. CIC were detected in the sera of some vasectomized men by three different assays. The CIC in patients' sera were precipitated with polyethylene glycol, dissociated, and the individual CIC components identified by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Most, but not all, of the CIC contained antigen reactive with antisperm immunoglobulin (Ig)G and some also contained complement components C3 and/or Clq. IgA was identified in some of the CIC positive for IgG and sperm antigen and two men had IgM-containing CIC. Analysis of the CIC by sucrose gradient centrifugation revealed them to be heterogeneous in size. PMID:7085887

  9. Optimizing Production of Antigens and Fabs in the Context of Generating Recombinant Antibodies to Human Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Nan; Loppnau, Peter; Seitova, Alma; Ravichandran, Mani; Fenner, Maria; Jain, Harshika; Bhattacharya, Anandi; Hutchinson, Ashley; Paduch, Marcin; Lu, Vincent; Olszewski, Michal; Kossiakoff, Anthony A.; Dowdell, Evan; Koide, Akiko; Koide, Shohei; Huang, Haiming; Nadeem, Vincent; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Greenblatt, Jack F.; Marcon, Edyta; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Edwards, Aled M.; Gräslund, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    We developed and optimized a high-throughput project workflow to generate renewable recombinant antibodies to human proteins involved in epigenetic signalling. Three different strategies to produce phage display compatible protein antigens in bacterial systems were compared, and we found that in vivo biotinylation through the use of an Avi tag was the most productive method. Phage display selections were performed on 265 in vivo biotinylated antigen domains. High-affinity Fabs (<20nM) were obtained for 196. We constructed and optimized a new expression vector to produce in vivo biotinylated Fabs in E. coli. This increased average yields up to 10-fold, with an average yield of 4 mg/L. For 118 antigens, we identified Fabs that could immunoprecipitate their full-length endogenous targets from mammalian cell lysates. One Fab for each antigen was converted to a recombinant IgG and produced in mammalian cells, with an average yield of 15 mg/L. In summary, we have optimized each step of the pipeline to produce recombinant antibodies, significantly increasing both efficiency and yield, and also showed that these Fabs and IgGs can be generally useful for chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) protocols. PMID:26437229

  10. Identification of Toxoplasma gondii antigens associated with different types of infection by serum antibody profiling.

    PubMed

    Felgner, Jiin; Juarez, Silvia; Hung, Chris; Liang, L I; Jain, Aarti; Döşkaya, Mert; Felgner, Philip L; Caner, Ayşe; Gürüz, Yüksel; Davies, D Huw

    2015-05-01

    Acquisition of acute toxoplasmosis during the first trimester of pregnancy can have catastrophic consequences for the foetus. Diagnosis is routinely based on the detection of maternal Toxoplasma gondii--antibodies using whole parasite extracts as detection antigen. While such assays are sensitive, they show no specificity for the stage of infection. We hypothesized diagnosis might be improved using recombinant antigens for detection, particularly if antibodies to certain antigen(s) were associated with early or late stages of infection. To address this, protein microarrays comprising 1513 T. gondii exon products were probed with well-characterized sera from seronegative ('N') controls, and acute ('A'), chronic/IgM-persisting ('C/M') and chronic ('C') toxoplasmosis cases from Turkey. Three reactive exon products recognized preferentially in A infections, and three recognized preferentially in C/M infections, were expressed in Escherichia coli and tested for discrimination in IgG ELISAs. The best discriminators were exon 1 of TGME49_086450 (GRA5) which detected C/M infections with 70.6% sensitivity and 81.8% specificity, and exon 6 of TGME49_095700 (ubiquitin transferase domain-containing protein) which detected A infections with 84.8% sensitivity and 82.4% specificity. Overall, the data support a recombinant protein approach for the development of improved serodiagnostic tests for toxoplasmosis. PMID:25586591

  11. Human Antibodies to a Mr 155,000 Plasmodium falciparum Antigen Efficiently Inhibit Merozoite Invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlin, Birgitta; Wahlgren, Mats; Perlmann, Hedvig; Berzins, Klavs; Bjorkman, Anders; Patarroyo, Manuel E.; Perlmann, Peter

    1984-12-01

    IgG from a donor clinically immune to Plasmodium falciparum malaria strongly inhibited reinvasion in vitro of human erythrocytes by the parasite. When added to monolayers of glutaraldehyde-fixed and air-dried erythrocytes infected with the parasite, this IgG also displayed a characteristic immunofluorescence restricted to the surface of infected erythrocytes. Elution of the IgG adsorbed to such monolayers gave an antibody fraction that was 40 times more efficient in the reinvasion inhibition assay (50% inhibition titer, <1 μ g/ml) than the original IgG preparation. The major antibody in this eluate was directed against a parasite-derived antigen of Mr 155,000 (Pf 155) deposited by the parasite in the erythrocyte membrane in the course of invasion. A detailed study of IgG fractions from 11 donors with acute P. falciparum malaria or clinical immunity revealed the existence of an excellent correlation between their capacities to stain the surface of infected erythrocytes, their titers in reinvasion inhibition, and the presence of antibodies to Pf 155 as detected by immunoblotting. No such correlations were seen when the IgG fractions were analyzed for immunofluorescence of intracellular parasites or for the presence of antibodies to other parasite antigens as detected by immunoprecipitation of [35S]methionine-labeled and NaDodSO4/PAGE-separated parasite extracts. The results suggest that Pf 155 has an important role in the process of erythrocyte infection and that host antibodies to this antigen may efficiently interfere with this process.

  12. An impedance biosensor array for label-free detection of multiple antigen-antibody reactions.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaobo; Xu, Dawei; Xu, Danke; Lv, Renjie; Liu, Zhihong

    2006-01-01

    An electrochemical impedance biosensor array with protein-modified electrodes was designed and fabricated in this report. To demonstrate its feasibility of the detection of multiple antigen-antibody binding reactions based on a label-free approach, human IgG (hIgG), rat IgG (rIgG), human globin and bovine serum albumin were immobilized, respectively, on the gold electrodes and then the resultant array was incubated with goat anti-hIgG, goat anti-rIgG, anti-human globin antibody and the mixture of three antibodies, respectively. The results indicated that the electron transfer resistance of the electrodes was significantly changed due to formation of the antigen-antibody conjugated layer. In addition, experimental conditions such as the protein concentration for the immobilization and screen were studied and optimized. Furthermore, the surface of various protein-modified electrodes was imaged with atomic force microscopy and the height distribution of protein particles was obtained with the Particle Analysis Software. The relative results were fully in accordance with the ones from the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  13. Paratope diversity in the human antibody response to Bacillus anthracis protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianhui; Ullal, Anuska; Liberato, Justine; Sun, Jinying; Keitel, Wendy; Reason, Donald C

    2008-01-01

    The active component of the licensed human anthrax vaccine (BioThrax, or AVA) is a Bacillus anthracis toxin known as protective antigen (PA). Second generation anthrax vaccines currently under development are also based on a recombinant form of PA. Since the current and future anthrax vaccines are based on this toxin, it is important that the immunobiology of this protein in vaccinated humans be understood in detail. We have isolated and analyzed the PA-specific antibody repertoire from an AVA-vaccinated individual. When examined at the clonal level, we find an antibody response that is complex in terms of the combinatorial elements and immunoglobulin variable genes employed. All PA-specific antibodies had undergone somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination, both signs of affinity maturation. Although the antigenic epitopes recognized by the response were distributed throughout the PA monomer, the majority of antibodies arising in this individual following vaccination recognize determinants located on the amino-terminal (PA20) sub-domain of the molecule. This latter finding may have implications for the rational design of future PA-based anthrax vaccines.

  14. Single-dilution enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for quantification of antigen-specific salmonid antibody

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alcorn, S.W.; Pascho, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed on the basis of testing a single dilution of serum to quantify the level of antibody to the p57 protein of Renibaclerium salmoninarum in sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka). The levels of antibody were interpolated from a standard curve constructed by relating the optical densities (OD) produced by several dilutions of a high-titer rainbow trout (O. mykiss) antiserum to the p57 protein. The ELISA OD values produced by as many as 36 test sera on each microplate were compared with the standard curve to calculate the antigen-specific antibody activity. Repeated measurements of 36 samples on 3 microplates on each of 6 assay dates indicated that the mean intraassay coefficient of variation (CV) was 6.68% (range, 0-23%) and the mean interassay CV was 8.29% (range, 4-16%). The antibody levels determined for the serum sample from 24 sockeye salmon vaccinated with a recombinant p57 protein generally were correlated with the levels determined by endpoint titration (r2 = 0.936) and with results from another ELISA that was based on extrapolation of antibody levels from a standard curve (r2 = 0.956). The single-dilution antibody ELISA described here increases the number of samples that can be tested on each microplate compared with immunoassays based on analysis of several dilutions of each test serum. It includes controls for interassay standardization and can be used to test fish weighing <3 g.

  15. Antibodies Against Conserved Antigens Provide Opportunities for Reform in Influenza Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Denise A.; Lee, F. Eun-Hyung

    2011-01-01

    High-performance neutralizing antibody against influenza virus typically recognizes the globular head region of its hemagglutinin (HA) envelope glycoprotein. To-date, approved human vaccination strategies have been designed to induce such antibodies as a sole means of preventing the consequences of this infection. However, frequent amino-acid changes in the HA globular head allow for efficient immune evasion. Consequently, vaccines inducing such neutralizing antibodies need to be annually re-designed and re-administered at a great expense. These vaccines furthermore provide little-to-no immunity against antigenic-shift strains, which arise from complete replacement of HA or of neuraminidase genes, and pose pandemic risks. To address these issues, laboratory research has focused on inducing immunity effective against all strains, regardless of changes in the HA globular head. Despite prior dogma that such cross-protection needs to be induced by cellular immunity alone, several advances in recent years demonstrate that antibodies of other specificities are capable of cross-strain protection in mice. This review discusses the reactivity, induction, efficacy, and mechanisms of antibodies that react with poorly accessible epitopes in the HA stalk, with the matrix 2 membrane ion channel, and even with the internal nucleoprotein. These advances warrant further investigation of the inducibility and efficacy of such revolutionary antibody strategies in humans. PMID:22566865

  16. Human monoclonal antibody to a neuroectodermal tumor antigen (OFA-I-2).

    PubMed

    Katano, M; Sidell, N; Irie, R F

    1983-01-01

    Human IgM kappa monoclonal antibody to human tumors of neuroectodermal origin was produced in the spent medium of an Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B-lymphoblastoid cell line, L72. Chemically, the antigen was identified as ganglioside GD2 [Gal NAc beta 1----4 (Neu Ac alpha 2----8 Neu Ac alpha 2---3) Gal beta 1----4 Glc----ceramide]. Twenty-seven mg of pure human IgM were obtained from 10 liters of L72 spent medium using salt and hypotonic precipitation, ultracentrifugation, and Sephacryl-S 300 superfine gel filtration. The monoclonal origin of the antibody was determined by agarose isoelectrofocusing. This human monoclonal antibody may be a particularly useful reagent for immunotherapy trials in cancer patients.

  17. Antibodies reactive with Ehrlichia canis, Ehrlichia phagocytophila genogroup antigens and the spotted fever group rickettsial antigens, in free-ranging jackals (Canis aureus syriacus) from Israel.

    PubMed

    Waner, T; Baneth, G; Strenger, C; Keysary, A; King, R; Harrus, S

    1999-03-31

    A seroepidemiological survey was conducted to investigate the prevalence of antibodies reactive with the Ehrlichia canis and Ehrlichia phagocytophila genogroup antigens, and the spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsiae antigens in jackals in Israel (Canis aureus syriacus), to assess the possible role of the jackal in the epidemiology of these diseases. Fifty-three serum samples from jackals were assayed by the indirect immunofluorescence antibody test. Antibodies to E. canis were detected in 35.8% serum samples while 26.4% of the samples tested were positive to Ehrlichia chaffeensis. Twenty-six percent of the jackals tested were seropositive to E. phagocytophila, of which 5.7% were seropositive to E. phagocytophila alone without any seroreactivity to either E. canis or E. chaffeensis. Fifty-five percent of the jackals were seropositive to the SFG-rickettsiae antigens. The results suggest a high exposure rate of jackals in Israel to E. canis. Positive reactivity to E. chaffeensis was considered to be due to antigenic cross-reactions with E. canis. The study demonstrated for the first time the presence of E. phagocytophila antibodies in free-range jackals. The high incidence of antibodies to the SFG-rickettsiae and their relatively high antibody titers was suggestive of either recent or persistent infection. The possibility that jackals may play a role in the transmission of E. canis, E. phagocytophila and the SFG-rickettsiae for human and canine infections is discussed. PMID:10321583

  18. Antibodies reactive with Ehrlichia canis, Ehrlichia phagocytophila genogroup antigens and the spotted fever group rickettsial antigens, in free-ranging jackals (Canis aureus syriacus) from Israel.

    PubMed

    Waner, T; Baneth, G; Strenger, C; Keysary, A; King, R; Harrus, S

    1999-03-31

    A seroepidemiological survey was conducted to investigate the prevalence of antibodies reactive with the Ehrlichia canis and Ehrlichia phagocytophila genogroup antigens, and the spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsiae antigens in jackals in Israel (Canis aureus syriacus), to assess the possible role of the jackal in the epidemiology of these diseases. Fifty-three serum samples from jackals were assayed by the indirect immunofluorescence antibody test. Antibodies to E. canis were detected in 35.8% serum samples while 26.4% of the samples tested were positive to Ehrlichia chaffeensis. Twenty-six percent of the jackals tested were seropositive to E. phagocytophila, of which 5.7% were seropositive to E. phagocytophila alone without any seroreactivity to either E. canis or E. chaffeensis. Fifty-five percent of the jackals were seropositive to the SFG-rickettsiae antigens. The results suggest a high exposure rate of jackals in Israel to E. canis. Positive reactivity to E. chaffeensis was considered to be due to antigenic cross-reactions with E. canis. The study demonstrated for the first time the presence of E. phagocytophila antibodies in free-range jackals. The high incidence of antibodies to the SFG-rickettsiae and their relatively high antibody titers was suggestive of either recent or persistent infection. The possibility that jackals may play a role in the transmission of E. canis, E. phagocytophila and the SFG-rickettsiae for human and canine infections is discussed.

  19. Technique of leukocyte harvesting and labeling: problems and perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    McAfee, J.G.; Subramanian, G.; Gagne, G.

    1984-04-01

    Mixed leukocyte suspensions obtained after gravity sedimentation of red cells and labeled with /sup 111/In lipophilic chelates are now widely used clinically for abscess localization at many medical centers. So far, labeling with /sup 111/In-oxine or tropolone has been more successful than any /sup 99/mTc method. More sophisticated approaches are available for isolation and labeling of specific leukocyte cell types, to study their migration in vivo. The most significant advances in cell harvesting include newer density gradients for isopyknic centrifugation, centrifugal elutriation, and flow cytometry. Unlike current radioactive agents which label many cell types indiscriminately, more selective ligands are being developed which bind to specific cell surface receptors. These will label certain leukocyte populations or subtypes while not reacting with others, thereby avoiding laborious separation techniques. Monoclonal antibodies against leukocyte cell-surface antigens appear particularly promising as agents for selective cell labeling.

  20. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with a monoclonal antibody for detecting group A meningococcal antigens in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Sugasawara, R J; Prato, C M; Sippel, J E

    1984-02-01

    Hybridomas were produced from spleen cells of BALB/c mice immunized with a membrane preparation from Neisseria meningitidis group A strain 4402 and S194/5.XXOBU.14 myeloma cells. The hybridomas were screened for secretion of antibodies suitable for an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) diagnostic for group A meningococcal meningitis. One hybridoma antibody, 3G7, was directed against the pilus protein. This antibody bound to all six lipopolysaccharide and protein group A meningococcal serotyping strains, as well as to meningococcal strains from serogroups C, W135, and Y, but not to a strain of Escherichia coli, Haemophilus influenzae type b, or to two or more strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Salmonella typhi. The ELISA used on antibody, antigen, antibody-conjugate sandwich. Rabbit anti-meningococcal serum was the coating antibody for the antibody sandwich, cerebrospinal fluids contained the bacterial antigens, and 3G7-alkaline phosphatase conjugate was the detecting antibody. The monoclonal antibody conjugate ELISA system was able to detect group A meningococcal antigens in 21 of 25 cerebrospinal fluid specimens that were positive in an immune rabbit serum conjugate ELISA; cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients with Haemophilus meningitis served as the controls. Counterimmunoelectrophoresis detected meningococcal antigens in 16 of the same 25 cerebrospinal fluid samples.

  1. Contrasting Patterns of Serologic and Functional Antibody Dynamics to Plasmodium falciparum Antigens in a Kenyan Birth Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Indu; Wang, Xuelie; Babineau, Denise; Yeo, Kee Thai; Anderson, Timothy; Kimmel, Rhonda J.; Angov, Evelina; Lanar, David E.; Narum, David; Dutta, Sheetij; Richards, Jack; Beeson, James G.; Crabb, Brendan S.; Cowman, Alan F.; Horii, Toshihiro; Muchiri, Eric; Mungai, Peter L.; King, Christopher L.; Kazura, James W.

    2015-01-01

    IgG antibodies to Plasmodium falciparum are transferred from the maternal to fetal circulation during pregnancy, wane after birth, and are subsequently acquired in response to natural infection. We examined the dynamics of malaria antibody responses of 84 Kenyan infants from birth to 36 months of age by (i) serology, (ii) variant surface antigen (VSA) assay, (iii) growth inhibitory activity (GIA), and (iv) invasion inhibition assays (IIA) specific for merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1) and sialic acid-dependent invasion pathway. Maternal antibodies in each of these four categories were detected in cord blood and decreased to their lowest level by approximately 6 months of age. Serologic antibodies to 3 preerythrocytic and 10 blood-stage antigens subsequently increased, reaching peak prevalence by 36 months. In contrast, antibodies measured by VSA, GIA, and IIA remained low even up to 36 months. Infants sensitized to P. falciparum in utero, defined by cord blood lymphocyte recall responses to malaria antigens, acquired antimalarial antibodies at the same rate as those who were not sensitized in utero, indicating that fetal exposure to malaria antigens did not affect subsequent infant antimalarial responses. Infants with detectable serologic antibodies at 12 months of age had an increased risk of P. falciparum infection during the subsequent 24 months. We conclude that serologic measures of antimalarial antibodies in children 36 months of age or younger represent biomarkers of malaria exposure rather than protection and that functional antibodies develop after 36 months of age in this population. PMID:26656119

  2. Profound specific suppression by antigen of persistent IgM, IgG, and IgE antibody production.

    PubMed Central

    Dintzis, H M; Dintzis, R Z

    1992-01-01

    Ongoing, high-titer T-cell-dependent immune responses in adult mice, consisting of IgM, IgG, and IgE anti-fluorescein antibodies, can be specifically and substantially reduced (90-99%) when the mice are injected with appropriate doses of fluoresceinated dextran of defined molecular weight and hapten valence. This suppressive form of the antigen is nontoxic and specific, as responses to other antigens are unaffected. The suppression is long lasting and reduces high-affinity antibodies most markedly. Moreover, plasma cell secretion of specific antibody is virtually eliminated. This demonstrates that the reduction in antibody titer is not simply due to masking of serum antibody by the suppressive polymer. The results are discussed with reference to proposed models of B-cell and T-cell tolerance. Extension of these findings to disease-related immunogens may yield effective antigen-specific treatments of human allergy and autoimmune diseases. PMID:1736295

  3. Assembly and antigenicity of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae pilus mapped with antibodies.

    PubMed

    Forest, K T; Bernstein, S L; Getzoff, E D; So, M; Tribbick, G; Geysen, H M; Deal, C D; Tainer, J A

    1996-02-01

    The relationship between the sequence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae pilin and its quaternary assembly into pilus fibers was studied with a set of site-directed antibody probes and by mapping the specificities of antipilus antisera with peptides. Buried and exposed peptides in assembled pili were identified by competitive immunoassays and immunoelectron microscopy with polyclonal antibodies raised against 11 peptides spanning the pilin sequence. Pili did not compete significantly with pilin subunits for binding to antibodies against residues 13 to 31 (13-31) and 18-36. Pilus fibers competed well with pilin protein subunits for binding to antibodies raised against peptides 37-56, 58-78, 110-120, 115-127, 122-139, and 140-159 and competed weakly for antibodies against residues 79-93 and 94-108. Antibodies to sequence-conserved residues 37-56 and to semiconserved residues 94-108 preferentially bound pilus ends as shown by immunoelectron microscopy. The exposure of pilus regions to the immune system was tested by peptide mapping of antiserum specificities against sets of overlapping peptides representing all possible hexameric or octameric peptides from the N. gonorrhoeae MS11 pilin sequence. The immunogenicity of exposed peptides incorporating semiconserved residues 49-56 and 121-126 was revealed by strong, consistent antigenic reactivity to these regions measured in antipilus sera from rabbits, mice, and human and in sera from human volunteers with gonorrhea. The conservation and variation of antigenic responses among these three species clarify the relevance of immunological studies of other species to the human immune response against pathogens. Overall, our results explain the extreme conservation of the entire N-terminal one-third of the pilin protein by its dominant role in pilus assembly: hydrophobic residues 1-36 are implicated in buried lateral contacts, and polar residues 37-56 are implicated in longitudinal contacts within the pilus fiber.

  4. Antibody production in vitamin A-depleted rats is impaired after immunization with bacterial polysaccharide or protein antigens.

    PubMed

    Pasatiempo, A M; Kinoshita, M; Taylor, C E; Ross, A C

    1990-05-01

    Vitamin A nutritional status has been implicated as important in maintaining the integrity of immune functions. We have determined the effect of vitamin A (retinol) depletion on the ability of young animals to produce antibodies after challenge with various bacterial antigens. Male Lewis rats raised on vitamin A-free or adequate diets were immunized either near 40 days of age, before signs of vitamin A deficiency were apparent, or near 47 days of age when symptoms of deficiency were beginning to be manifest. For rats immunized with polysaccharide antigens from Streptococcus pneumoniae or Neisseria meningitidis, antibody production did not exceed 0-19% of the response of control rats. Vitamin A depletion also severely compromised the response to two T cell-dependent antigens, tetanus toxoid and sheep red blood cells. In striking contrast, retinol-depleted rats immunized with lipopolysaccharides from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcesens produced an antibody response indistinguishable from retinol-sufficient animals. These lipopolysaccharides could elicit antibodies in rat pups, whereas the capsular polysaccharide antigens could not. This is consistent with the characteristics of type 1 and type 2 antigens, respectively. These studies indicate that retinol status is an important determinant of the humoral immune response to certain types of antigen and suggest that antibody production to capsular polysaccharides and T cell-dependent antigens is particularly dependent on adequate retinol status.

  5. Preparation of respiratory syncytial virus subgroup A and B antigens for enzyme immunoassay antibody detection.

    PubMed

    Mlinarić-Galinović, G; Chonmaintree, T; Abraham, R; Garofalo, R; Patel, J A; Ogra, P L

    1994-01-01

    A simplified method was described for purification of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) subgroup A and B aimed to be used as antigens in enzyme immunoassay (EIA). The titer of each RSV subgroup and the amount of protein was determined from the visible band in 45% sucrose gradient. The quality of prepared RSV subgroup antigens for EIA was described in terms of the achievable final titer, the amount of protein, and EIA criss-cross titration. The RSV subgroup A and B antigens, diluted as 1:100 (low opalescent band in 45% sucrose layer) or 1:800 (high opalescent band in 45% sucrose layer) produced a positive reaction in EIA criss-cross titration with IgG antibodies from the patient's serum (convalescent phase) diluted as 1:25,600 (for RSV A) and 1:6,400 (for RSV B). This method offers shorter and more simplified steps of viral antigen purification, and provides acceptable quantity and quality of viral antigens appropriate for use in EIA.

  6. Immuno-PCR: Very sensitive antigen detection by means of specific antibody-DNA conjugates

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, T.; Smith, C.L.; Cantor, C.R. )

    1992-10-02

    An antigen detection system, termed immuno-polymerase chain reaction (immuno-PCR), was developed in which a specific DNA molecule is used as the marker. A streptavidin-protein A chimera that possesses tight and specific binding affinity both for biotin and immunoglobulin G was used to attach a biotinylated DNA specifically to antigen-monoclonal antibody complexes that had been immobilized on microtiter plate wells. Then, a segment of the attached DNA was amplified by PCR. Analysis of the PCR products by agarose gel electrophoresis after staining with ethidium bromide allowed as few as 580 antigen molecules to be readily and reproducibly detected. Direct comparison with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with the use of a chimera-alkaline phosphatase conjugate demonstrates that enhancement in detection sensitivity was obtained with the use of immuno-PCR. Given the enormous amplification capability and specificity of PCR, this immuno-PCR technology has a sensitivity greater than any existing antigen detection system and, in principle, could be applied to the detection of single antigen molecules.

  7. Use of monoclonal antibodies in diagnosis of paracoccidioidomycosis: new strategies for detection of circulating antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, B L; Figueroa, J I; Hamilton, A J; Ortiz, B; Robledo, M A; Hay, R J; Restrepo, A

    1997-01-01

    The precise diagnosis of paracoccidioidomycosis, in most cases, is established by direct methods and indirect immunological tests. The latter method is reliant on the identification of the host's humoral responses, which are usually impaired or absent in patients with severe juvenile forms of the disease and in immunocompromised patients. Determining disease activity or assessing treatment responses by measuring antibody levels is difficult, since antibody titer may remain elevated or persist at stationary levels, even in the presence of clinical improvement. Consequently, there is a need for alternative tests aimed at the identification of circulating antigens. A modification of the standard hybridoma production method was used to raise a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the yeast form of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. Of these, MAb PIB, directed against an 87-kDa determinant, was used to develop an inhibition ELISA (inh-ELISA) capable of detecting as little as 5.8 ng of circulating antigen per ml of serum. Sera from 46 patients with paracoccidioidomycosis or other mycoses and sera from healthy individuals were evaluated by the inh-ELISA; overall sensitivity was 80.4% (37 of 46 paracoccidioidomycosis patients tested positive), and specificity compared with that of normal controls from areas of endemicity was 81.4%. The inh-ELISA detected circulating antigen in 100% of patients with the acute form of paracoccidioidomycosis and in 83.3 and 60% of patients with the chronic multifocal and unifocal forms of paracoccidioidomycosis according to the patients' clinical presentation. These results indicate that the inh-ELISA with MAb PIB is effective in the detection of circulating antigen and that this test may be useful for monitoring responses to treatment and establishing disease prognoses. PMID:9399534

  8. Genetic control of antibody responses induced by recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG expressing a foreign antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Lagranderie, M; Lo-Man, R; Dériaud, E; Gicquel, B; Gheorghiu, M; Leclerc, C

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG expressing foreign antigens represents a promising candidate for the development of future vaccines and was shown in several experimental models to induce protective immunity against bacterial or parasitic infections. Innate resistance to BCG infection is under genetic control and could modify the immune responses induced against an antigen delivered by such engineered microorganisms. To investigate this question, we analyzed the immune responses of various inbred strains of mice to recombinant BCG expressing beta-galactosidase. These experiments demonstrated that BALB/c mice developed strong antibody responses against BCG expressing beta-galactosidase under the control of two different promoters. In contrast, C57BL/6, C3H, and CBA mice produced high anti-beta-galactosidase antibody titers only when immunized with recombinant BCG expressing beta-galactosidase under the control of the pblaF* promoter, which induced the production of high levels of this antigen. This difference in mouse responsiveness to recombinant BCG was not due to innate resistance to BCG infection, since similar immune responses were induced in Ity(r) and Ity(s) congenic strains of mice. In contrast, the analysis of anti-beta-galactosidase antibody responses of H-2 congenic mice in two different genetic backgrounds demonstrated that H-2 genes are involved in the immune responsiveness to beta-galactosidase delivered by recombinant BCG. Together, these results demonstrate that immune responses to an antigen delivered by recombinant BCG are under complex genetic influences which could play a crucial role in the efficiency of future recombinant BCG vaccines. PMID:9234754

  9. INTERACTION OF THE RHEUMATOID FACTOR WITH ANTIGEN-ANTIBODY COMPLEXES AND AGGREGATED GAMMA GLOBULIN

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, G. M.; Kunkel, H. G.; Franklin, E. C.

    1958-01-01

    The effect of highly purified rheumatoid factor on the precipitin reactions of various antigen-antibody systems was determined. The amount of nitrogen precipitated was increased over a broad range when the factor was added to ovalbumin, human albumin, or human gamma globulin, and the corresponding rabbit antibodies. In the zone of antigen excess, soluble antigen-antibody complexes were precipitated by rheumatoid factor. Soluble aggregates of human and rabbit gamma globulin, produced by heating at 63°C., treatment with urea plus mercaptoethanol or treatment with guanidine, also precipitated with rheumatoid factor. Ultracentrifugal analysis of dissolved specific precipitates showed the presence of aggregated gamma globulin. The sedimentation rate of reactive aggregates was greater than 20 S, and concentrated preparations free of the non-reactive 7 S gamma globulin could be prepared by various procedures of zone centrifugation. These aggregates showed a high inhibitory capacity in the sensitized sheep cell agglutination reaction. Solid gamma globulin, prepared by heat denaturation, also selectively adsorbed the rheumatoid factor, and removed or decreased the activity in the various precipitation and agglutination reactions. Elution of highly purified active preparations from the solid gamma globulin could be carried out with urea or acid buffers. Evidence for interaction between rheumatoid factor and low molecular weight gamma globulin without precipitation, was also obtained. This interaction appears to occur in the circulation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The question of whether the rheumatoid factor represents an antibody to gamma globulin was discussed. Points of similarity to the behavior of complement also were cited. PMID:13549644

  10. Antibodies reactive to Plasmodium falciparum serine repeat antigen in children with Burkitt lymphoma from Ghana.

    PubMed

    Guech-Ongey, Mercy; Yagi, Masanori; Palacpac, Nirianne Marie Q; Emmanuel, Benjamin; Talisuna, Ambrose O; Bhatia, Kishor; Stefan, D Cristina; Biggar, Robert J; Nkrumah, Francis; Neequaye, Janet; Tougan, Takahiro; Horii, Toshihiro; Mbulaiteye, Sam M

    2012-04-15

    The role of protective immunity to Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) malaria in Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is unknown. We investigated the association between BL and antibodies reactive to SE36 antigen, a recombinant protein based on P. falciparum serine repeat antigen 5 gene, targeted by protective malaria immune responses. Cases were children (0-14 years) enrolled at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana, during 1965-1994 with BL confirmed by histology or cytology (92% of cases). Controls were apparently healthy children enrolled contemporaneous to the cases from the nearest neighbor house to the case house and were age,- sex-frequency-matched to the cases. Anti-SE36 IgG antibodies were measured using enzyme-linked absorbent immunoassays (ELISAs). SE36 titers were estimated by extrapolating ELISA optical density readings to a standard fitting curve. Anti-SE36 titers were log-transformed for analysis. Odds ratios (ORs) and two-sided 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. The mean log endpoint dilution titers were 0.63 logs lower in cases than in controls (8.26 [SD 1.68] vs. 8.89 [SD 1.75], Student's t-test, p = 0.019). Lower titers were observed in cases than controls aged 0-4 years (p = 0.05) and in those aged 5-14 years (p = 0.06). Low and medium tertiles of anti-SE36 IgG antibodies were associated with increased OR for BL ([OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.21-2.31] and [OR 1.33, 95% CI 0.96-1.86], respectively, p(trend) = 0.002) in analyses adjusting for age, sex, calendar period and test plate. Our findings suggest that compared to similarly aged children enrolled from the same community, children with BL in Ghana have lower antibodies to SE36 antigen. PMID:21630256

  11. Simulation and Theory of Antibody Binding to Crowded Antigen-Covered Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    De Michele, Cristiano; De Los Rios, Paolo; Foffi, Giuseppe; Piazza, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a fully flexible coarse-grained model of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies parametrized directly on cryo-EM data and simulate the binding dynamics of many IgGs to antigens adsorbed on a surface at increasing densities. Moreover, we work out a theoretical model that allows to explain all the features observed in the simulations. Our combined computational and theoretical framework is in excellent agreement with surface-plasmon resonance data and allows us to establish a number of important results. (i) Internal flexibility is key to maximize bivalent binding, flexible IgGs being able to explore the surface with their second arm in search for an available hapten. This is made clear by the strongly reduced ability to bind with both arms displayed by artificial IgGs designed to rigidly keep a prescribed shape. (ii) The large size of IgGs is instrumental to keep neighboring molecules at a certain distance (surface repulsion), which essentially makes antigens within reach of the second Fab always unoccupied on average. (iii) One needs to account independently for the thermodynamic and geometric factors that regulate the binding equilibrium. The key geometrical parameters, besides excluded-volume repulsion, describe the screening of free haptens by neighboring bound antibodies. We prove that the thermodynamic parameters govern the low-antigen-concentration regime, while the surface screening and repulsion only affect the binding at high hapten densities. Importantly, we prove that screening effects are concealed in relative measures, such as the fraction of bivalently bound antibodies. Overall, our model provides a valuable, accurate theoretical paradigm beyond existing frameworks to interpret experimental profiles of antibodies binding to multi-valent surfaces of different sorts in many contexts. PMID:26967624

  12. Reaction of antibodies to rheumatoid arthritis nuclear antigen with a synthetic peptide corresponding to part of Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1.

    PubMed Central

    Venables, P J; Pawlowski, T; Mumford, P A; Brown, C; Crawford, D H; Maini, R N

    1988-01-01

    Antibodies to rheumatoid arthritis nuclear antigen (RANA) are detected by immunodiffusion (ID) and immunofluorescence (IF), though reports of the identity of the antigen(s) have been conflicting. In this study it is shown conclusively that ID and IF anti-RANA react with epitopes on Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1) and that the major epitope detected by immunofluorescence is represented by a synthetic peptide, P62, corresponding to part of EBNA-1. In an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) anti-P62 antibodies in 35 rheumatoid arthritis sera were threefold higher than those of 35 age and sex matched controls, with the highest levels occurring in young patients with active joint disease. Images PMID:2452607

  13. Comparison of corticosteroid- and L3T4+ antibody-immunosuppressed mouse models of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia for evaluation of drugs and leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, M S; Current, W L; Orazi, A; Bauer, N L; Neiman, R S; Queener, S F; Smith, J W

    1994-01-01

    An immunologically immunosuppressed mouse model of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia using antibody developed by Dialynas et al. (Immunol. Rev. 74:29-55, 1983) directed to L3T4+ T cells (referred to as L3T4+ antibody) was compared with a corticosteroid-immunosuppressed mouse model. Corticosteroid- or L3T4+ antibody-immunosuppressed BALB/c mice transtracheally inoculated with P. carinii developed severe infections within 5 weeks after inoculation and responded to treatments with an echinocandin B analog, LY302146, or trimethoprim plus sulfamethoxazole so that they had decreased numbers of P. carinii cysts and trophozoites. LY302146 appeared to be more effective in L3T4+ antibody-immunosuppressed mice than in dexamethasone-immunosuppressed mice. Leukocyte populations in lungs of both mouse models during development of infection and during treatment were compared by using immune cell-specific staining. Lungs of L3T4+ antibody-immunosuppressed mice had many more cells detected with pan-B antibody and pan-T antibody than dexamethasone-immunosuppressed mice and the lungs of successfully treated mice had about the same numbers of macrophages as those of nonimmunosuppressed uninfected mice. The immunologically immunosuppressed model will allow study of cytokines and other immune modulators alone and in combination with drugs. PMID:8556494

  14. Antibody response to a T-dependent antigen requires B cell expression of complement receptors

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that antibody responses to T- dependent antigens require complement receptors expressed on either B lymphocytes or follicular dendritic cells. We have used RAG-2 deficient blastocyst complementation to create mice specifically lacking B cell complement receptors. Despite normal expression of complement receptor 1 (CR1[CD35]) and CR2 (CD21) on follicular dendritic cells, these mice have a profound defect in their capacity to mount a T-dependent antibody response. This is the first direct demonstration in vivo that B cell expression of complement receptors is required for a humoral immune response. This is the first direct demonstration in vivo that B cell expression of complement receptors is required for a humoral immune response. This suggests that CD21 and/or CD35 on B lymphocytes may be required for cellular activation, adsorptive endocytosis of antigen, recruitment to germinal centers, and/or protection from apoptosis during the humoral response to T-dependent antigens. PMID:8666942

  15. Heterologous Antigen Selection of Camelid Heavy Chain Single Domain Antibodies against Tetrabromobisphenol A

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is a ubiquitous flame retardant. A high-throughput immunoassay would allow for monitoring of human and environmental exposures as a part of risk assessment. Naturally occurring antibodies in camelids that are devoid of light chain, show great promise as an efficient tool in monitoring environmental contaminants, but they have been rarely used for small molecules. An alpaca was immunized with a TBBPA hapten coupled to thyroglobulin and a variable domain of heavy chain antibody (VHH) T3–15 highly selective for TBBPA was isolated from a phage displayed VHH library using heterologous coating antigens. Compared to the VHHs isolated using homologous antigens, VHH T3–15 had about a 10-fold improvement in sensitivity in an immunoassay. This assay, under the optimized conditions of 10% methanol in the assay buffer (pH 7.4), had an IC50 for TBBPA of 0.40 ng mL–1 and negligible cross reactivity (<0.1%) with other tested analogues. After heating the VHH at 90 °C for 90 min about 20% of the affinity for coating antigen T3-BSA remained. The recoveries of TBBPA from spiked soil and fetal bovine serum samples ranged from 90.3% to 110.7% by ELISA and agreed well with a liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry method. We conclude the many advantages of VHH make them attractive for the development of immunoassays to small molecules. PMID:25068372

  16. Effect of tumor mass and antigenic nature on the biodistribution of labeled monoclonal antibodies in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Y.; Endo, K.; Koizumi, M.; Kawamura, Y.; Saga, T.; Sakahara, H.; Kuroki, M.; Matsuoka, Y.; Konishi, J.

    1989-06-01

    The effect of tumor mass and antigenic nature on the biodistribution of 111In- and 125I-labeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) was studied using F(ab')2 fragments of three representative anti-tumor MoAbs and SW1116 human colorectal carcinoma grown in nude mice. The 19-9, F33-104 anti-CEA, and 17-1A MoAbs showed specific binding to SW1116 cells. The former two MoAbs recognize circulating CA 19-9 with molecular weights of more than 5,000,000 and CEA of Mr 170,000-180,000, respectively, whereas 17-1A reacts with a nonshedding antigen. Both percentage injected dose per gram tumor and tumor-to-blood ratios were inversely proportional to the tumor mass in nude mice administered 111In- and 125I-labeled 19-9, but liver uptake increased as tumor size increased. Analysis of serum samples and tumor homogenates demonstrated the presence of a high-molecular-weight species, probably due to the antibody binding to CA 19-9. In the case of 111In-labeled anti-CEA MoAb, tumor uptake also decreased and liver uptake increased with tumor size, but this effect was less obvious than that of 19-9. In contrast, tumor and liver uptake of 125I-labeled anti-CEA MoAb, 111In- and 125I-labeled 17-1A and control antibodies were independent of tumor mass. The absolute tumor uptake and tumor-to-blood ratios of all 125I-labeled antibodies were lower than those of the 111In-labeled ones. And the effect of tumor mass was also weaker with 125I-labeled antibodies, probably due to in vivo dehalogenation. These results indicate that the effect of tumor size on the incorporation of labeled MoAb into tumors is dependent on the antigenic nature to be targeted and/or radionuclides used for labeling and that high concentrations of circulating high molecular weight antigens may limit in vivo use of MoAb conjugates.

  17. Idiotypic expression of antibodies to retinal S-antigen in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis.

    PubMed Central

    Suleyman, S; Dumonde, D C; Banga, J P

    1987-01-01

    Retinal S-antigen (S-ag), found in the rod photoreceptors of the eye, is a potent autoantigen that is commonly involved in inflammatory eye disease leading to blindness in man. Antibodies, induced in the experimental model by immunizing rats with S-ag purified from porcine retina, were used to prepare heterologous rabbit anti-idiotypic antibodies. The binding of the four rabbit anti-idiotypes to S-ag antibodies was partially inhibitable by porcine S-ag but not by ovalbumin. The idiotypic determinants were localized to the heavy chains by Western blotting with the anti-idiotypes. The presence of the idiotype recognized by the rabbit anti-idiotype was assessed in antisera from various species containing antibodies to S-ag. All rat sera from animals undergoing experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis by immunization with S-ag from porcine or bovine retina contained antibodies that react to varying degrees with the rabbit anti-idiotype. The intraspecies nature of the idiotypic determinants recognized was demonstrated by the fact that none of the anti-idiotypes showed any reactivity with rabbit or murine antisera to S-ag from porcine, bovine or human retina or to human autoantibodies to S-ag from patients with inflammatory eye disease. Thus, all private and recurrent idiotypic determinants induced in rats by immunization with S-ag appear to be restricted to that species. Images Figure 5 PMID:2448224

  18. Association of swine leukocyte antigen class II haplotypes and immune-related traits in a swine line selected for resistance to mycoplasmal pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Ando, Asako; Shigenari, Atsuko; Kojima-Shibata, Chihiro; Nakajoh, Mitsuru; Suzuki, Keiichi; Kitagawa, Hitoshi; Shiina, Takashi; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Uenishi, Hirohide

    2016-10-01

    By selective breeding for five generations, a Landrace line has been recently established to improve resistance to mycoplasmal pneumonia of swine (MPS), daily gain (DG), back fat thickness (BF), and plasma cortisol concentrations (COR). To clarify the involvement of swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) polymorphisms in the selection process, we investigated possible associations of 11 SLA-class II haplotypes with selected traits or immune parameters. Pigs with the low-resolution SLA haplotype Lr-0.23 or Lr-0.13, which increased in frequency with the passage of generations, had less severe pathological lesions of MPS, increased leukocyte phagocytic activity, and higher white blood cell counts. In contrast, Lr-0.12 and Lr-0.2, which decreased in subsequent generations, were weakly associated with more severe pathological lesions of MPS. Therefore, in the studied Landrace line, the Lr-0.23 and Lr-0.13 haplotypes are potentially useful genetic markers for selecting and breeding animals with less severe pathological lesions of MPS. PMID:27638117

  19. FRET Based Quantification and Screening Technology Platform for the Interactions of Leukocyte Function-Associated Antigen-1 (LFA-1) with InterCellular Adhesion Molecule-1 (ICAM-1)

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Núñez, David; Hu, Shih-Yang; Domingo, María Pilar; Pardo, Julian; Karmenyan, Artashes; Chiou, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between leukocyte function-associated antigen-1(LFA-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) plays a pivotal role in cellular adhesion including the extravasation and inflammatory response of leukocytes, and also in the formation of immunological synapse. However, irregular expressions of LFA-1 or ICAM-1 or both may lead to autoimmune diseases, metastasis cancer, etc. Thus, the LFA-1/ICAM-1 interaction may serve as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of these diseases. Here, we developed one simple ‘in solution’ steady state fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique to obtain the dissociation constant (Kd) of the interaction between LFA-1 and ICAM-1. Moreover, we developed the assay into a screening platform to identify peptides and small molecules that inhibit the LFA-1/ICAM-1 interaction. For the FRET pair, we used Alexa Fluor 488-LFA-1 conjugate as donor and Alexa Fluor 555-human recombinant ICAM-1 (D1-D2-Fc) as acceptor. From our quantitative FRET analysis, the Kd between LFA-1 and D1-D2-Fc was determined to be 17.93±1.34 nM. Both the Kd determination and screening assay were performed in a 96-well plate platform, providing the opportunity to develop it into a high-throughput assay. This is the first reported work which applies FRET based technique to determine Kd as well as classifying inhibitors of the LFA-1/ICAM-1 interaction. PMID:25032811

  20. Association of swine leukocyte antigen class II haplotypes and immune-related traits in a swine line selected for resistance to mycoplasmal pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Ando, Asako; Shigenari, Atsuko; Kojima-Shibata, Chihiro; Nakajoh, Mitsuru; Suzuki, Keiichi; Kitagawa, Hitoshi; Shiina, Takashi; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Uenishi, Hirohide

    2016-10-01

    By selective breeding for five generations, a Landrace line has been recently established to improve resistance to mycoplasmal pneumonia of swine (MPS), daily gain (DG), back fat thickness (BF), and plasma cortisol concentrations (COR). To clarify the involvement of swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) polymorphisms in the selection process, we investigated possible associations of 11 SLA-class II haplotypes with selected traits or immune parameters. Pigs with the low-resolution SLA haplotype Lr-0.23 or Lr-0.13, which increased in frequency with the passage of generations, had less severe pathological lesions of MPS, increased leukocyte phagocytic activity, and higher white blood cell counts. In contrast, Lr-0.12 and Lr-0.2, which decreased in subsequent generations, were weakly associated with more severe pathological lesions of MPS. Therefore, in the studied Landrace line, the Lr-0.23 and Lr-0.13 haplotypes are potentially useful genetic markers for selecting and breeding animals with less severe pathological lesions of MPS.

  1. Purification of antibodies to O antigen of Salmonella Typhimurium from human serum by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Colette M; Micoli, Francesca; Gavini, Massimiliano; Goodall, Margaret; Cobbold, Mark; Saul, Allan; Maclennan, Calman A

    2013-01-31

    Nontyphoidal Salmonellae (NTS) are a common cause of bacteraemia in children and HIV-infected adults in Sub-Saharan Africa. We have previously shown that antibodies play a key role in both bactericidal and cellular mechanisms of immunity to NTS, but found that high concentrations of antibody to Salmonella Typhimurium O antigen (OAg) in the serum of some HIV-infected African adults is associated with impaired killing of NTS. To further investigate the function of antibodies to the OAg of NTS, we developed a method to purify these antibodies from human serum by affinity chromatography. Purified Salmonella Typhimurium OAg was activated with adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) via two different chemistries before linking to N-hydroxysuccinamide-Sepharose resin: one ADH molecule was introduced per OAg chain on its terminal 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid sugar (OAg-ADH), or multiple ADH molecules were attached along the OAg chain after oxidation with sodium periodate (OAgoxADH). Both resulting columns worked well when tested with commercial polyclonal anti-O:4,5 antibodies from rabbit serum. Over 90% of the applied antibodies bound to the resin and 89% of these antibodies were then eluted as detected by ELISA. OAg-ADH was preferred as the method for OAg derivatisation as it does not modify the saccharide chain and can be applied to OAg from different bacteria. Both columns were able to bind OAg-specific antibodies in human serum, but antibody recovery was initially low. Different elution buffers were tested and different amounts of OAg-ADH were linked to the resin to improve the yield. Optimal recovery (51%) was obtained by loading 1mg of activated OAg per ml of resin and eluting with 0.1M glycine, 0.1M NaCl pH2.4. The column matrix could be regenerated following elution with no detectable loss in performance for over ten uses. This method offers the potential to purify antibodies to Salmonella OAg from polyclonal serum following vaccination or natural exposure to Salmonella

  2. Immunization with functionalized carbon nanotubes enhances the antibody response against mode antigen ovalbumin.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinfeng; Sun, Jiadi; Zhang, Yinzhi; Sun, Xiulan

    2016-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted considerable attention because of their potential application as a new nonvehicle. We have covalently conjugated the mode antigen ovalbumin (OVA) to functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Herein, we explored the underlying theoretical mechanisms of CNTs' immunological adjuvant characterization. In vitro, the efficiency of cellular uptake of MWCNT-OVA into DC2.4 cells was improved over that of pure-antigen OVA. The costimulators (CD40/86), the major histocompatibility complex MHCII molecules, and the CD11c molecules were found to be upregulated. Further in vivo experiments established that the MWCNT-OVA group enhanced the IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6 cytokine secretion, suggesting that MWCNT reinforced the immune response using different cytokine pathways. Anti-OVA antibodies after inoculation of MWCNT-OVA into mice were measured. The medium dose of MWCNTs conjugated with OVA induced the highest level of OVA-specific antibodies at day 82 and have a synergistic effect with the commercial Freund's adjuvant. MWCNTs-KLH-MC-LR also induced higher levels of MC-LR-specific antibody than did KLH-MC-LR. MWCNTs also could activate the complement system which is closely related with humoral immunity. These results suggested that MWCNTs enhance the immune response and show excellent inherent characteristics to be applied as an adjuvant.

  3. Influence of ions on the antigen-antibody complex formation as measured by radioimmunoassay.

    PubMed

    Vader, H L; Geuskens, L M; Vink, C L

    1977-10-15

    In this study, using radioimmunoassay techniques, we found that ions at concentrations in the order of 0.1 molar influence the antigen-antibody complex formation. The angiotensin I/anti-angiotensin I reaction was studied in detail. Particularly bivalent cations and anions with a strong chaotropic effect (SCN-, I- and ClO4-) were found to influence strongly the specific immunological reaction. However, NO3- had also a remarkably strong influence. We found that the equilibrium constant, rather than the number of binding sites of the antibody, is influenced by the ions. It should be borne in mind that relatively high concentrations of electrolyte (as compared with the concentrations of antigen and antibody) show this effect. Consequently, this effect is of less practical importance for routine radioimmunoassay than is, for example, the effect of pH. However, this phenomenon shows that the radioimmunoassay technique might be valuable not only for quantization of very low hormone concentrations in biological fluids, but has also important potential applications in physical and protein chemistry. Particularly, the high sensitivity of this technique and the possibility of studying a homogeneous reaction system might give it advantages over other techniques.

  4. Immunization with functionalized carbon nanotubes enhances the antibody response against mode antigen ovalbumin.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinfeng; Sun, Jiadi; Zhang, Yinzhi; Sun, Xiulan

    2016-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted considerable attention because of their potential application as a new nonvehicle. We have covalently conjugated the mode antigen ovalbumin (OVA) to functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Herein, we explored the underlying theoretical mechanisms of CNTs' immunological adjuvant characterization. In vitro, the efficiency of cellular uptake of MWCNT-OVA into DC2.4 cells was improved over that of pure-antigen OVA. The costimulators (CD40/86), the major histocompatibility complex MHCII molecules, and the CD11c molecules were found to be upregulated. Further in vivo experiments established that the MWCNT-OVA group enhanced the IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6 cytokine secretion, suggesting that MWCNT reinforced the immune response using different cytokine pathways. Anti-OVA antibodies after inoculation of MWCNT-OVA into mice were measured. The medium dose of MWCNTs conjugated with OVA induced the highest level of OVA-specific antibodies at day 82 and have a synergistic effect with the commercial Freund's adjuvant. MWCNTs-KLH-MC-LR also induced higher levels of MC-LR-specific antibody than did KLH-MC-LR. MWCNTs also could activate the complement system which is closely related with humoral immunity. These results suggested that MWCNTs enhance the immune response and show excellent inherent characteristics to be applied as an adjuvant. PMID:27520072

  5. Feasibility and constraints of particle targeting using the antigen-antibody interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokárová, Viola; Pittermannová, Anna; Král, Vlastimil; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Štěpánek, František

    2013-11-01

    This work is concerned with the surface modification of fluorescent silica nanoparticles by a monoclonal antibody (M75) and the specific bioadhesion of such particles to surfaces containing the PG domain of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX), which is a trans-membrane protein specifically expressed on the surfaces of several tumor cell lines. The adhesion strength of antibody-bearing silica nanoparticles to antigen-bearing surfaces was investigated under laminar flow conditions in a microfluidic cell and compared to the adhesion of unmodified silica nanoparticles and nanoparticles coupled with an unspecific antibody. Adhesion to cancer cells using flow cytometry was also investigated and in all cases the adhesion strength of M75-modified nanoparticles was significantly stronger than for the unmodified or unspecific nanoparticles, up to several orders of magnitude in some cases. The specific modification of nano- and microparticles by an antibody-like protein therefore appears to be a feasible approach for the targeting of tumor cells.This work is concerned with the surface modification of fluorescent silica nanoparticles by a monoclonal antibody (M75) and the specific bioadhesion of such particles to surfaces containing the PG domain of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX), which is a trans-membrane protein specifically expressed on the surfaces of several tumor cell lines. The adhesion strength of antibody-bearing silica nanoparticles to antigen-bearing surfaces was investigated under laminar flow conditions in a microfluidic cell and compared to the adhesion of unmodified silica nanoparticles and nanoparticles coupled with an unspecific antibody. Adhesion to cancer cells using flow cytometry was also investigated and in all cases the adhesion strength of M75-modified nanoparticles was significantly stronger than for the unmodified or unspecific nanoparticles, up to several orders of magnitude in some cases. The specific modification of nano- and microparticles by an antibody

  6. Evaluation of Human Leukocyte Antigen-A (HLA-A), Other Non-HLA Markers on Chromosome 6p21 and Risk of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wan-Lun; Tse, Ka-Po; Liang, Sharon; Chien, Yin-Chu; Su, Wen-Hui; Yu, Kelly J.; Cheng, Yu-Juen; Tsang, Ngan-Ming; Hsu, Mow-Ming; Chang, Kai-Ping; Chen, I-How; Chen, Tzu-I; Yang, Czau-Siung; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chang, Yu-Sun; Hildesheim, Allan

    2012-01-01

    Background The association between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes (located in the Major Histocompatibility Complex [MHC] region of chromosome 6p21) and NPC has been known for some time. Recently, two genome-wide association studies (GWAS) conducted in Taiwan and China confirmed that the strongest evidence for NPC association was mapped to the MHC region. It is still unclear, however, whether these findings reflect direct associations with Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) genes and/or to other genes in this gene-rich region. Methods To better understand genetic associations for NPC within the MHC region of chromosome 6, we conducted an evaluation that pooled two previously conducted NPC case-control studies in Taiwan (N = 591 cases and N = 521 controls). PCR-based genotyping was performed for 12 significant SNPs identified within 6p21 in the Taiwan NPC GWAS and for the HLA-A gene (exons 2 and 3). Findings After confirming homogeneity between the two studies, pooled odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by logistic regression. We found that HLA-A (p-trend = 0.0006) and rs29232 (within the GABBR1 gene; p-trend = 0.005) were independent risk factors for NPC after adjustment for age, gender, study and each other. NPC risk was highest among individuals who were homozygous for the HLA-A*0207 risk allele and carriers of the rs29232 risk allele (A). Conclusion Our study suggests that most of the SNPs significantly associated with NPC from GWAS reflect previously identified HLA-A associations. An independent effect of rs29232 (GABBR1), however, remained, suggesting that additional genes within this region might be associated with NPC risk. PMID:22880099

  7. Prevalence of antibody to hepatitits B surface antigen among staff in an Edinburgh hospital.

    PubMed

    Burrell, C J; Tonkin, R W; Proudfoot, E; Leadbetter, G; Cowan, P; Lockerbie, L; Gore, S; Lutz, W; Marmion, B P

    1977-02-01

    Antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen was detected by radioimmunoprecipitation in 74 (5-5%) of 1336 staff members in a large general hospital in Edinburgh, in 14 (2-9%) of 480 volunteer blood donors in the area, and in 12 (6-1%) of 197 pregnant women attending for the first time at the ante-natal clinic in the hospital. Rates of antibody prevalence rose with age in the sample of hospital staff and in that of the blood donors, particularly among males. On the other hand, in the ante-natal patients antibody prevalence declined with age. The rates in hospital staff were higher than those in blood donors of comparable age and sex, and high titres of antibody were more common in the staff group. However, no association was found between antibody prevalence and a history of clinical hepatitis, blood transfusion, or recognized contact with cases of hepatitis. Staff who had previously worked in an infectious disease hospital did not show increased antibody prevalence, indicating that simple isolation measures have been adequate to minimize exposure to hepatitis B. No particular prevalence of infection was seen in physicians and surgeons, in the nursing staff, or in workers in clinical diagnostic laboratories, hospital administration or other areas. One group clearly showing increased antibody prevalence was staff currently working, or who had worked, in the Haemodialysis Unit; this correlated with the outbreak of dialysis-associated hepatitis in 1969--70. However, no evidence suggested that significant dissemination of infection had occurred to other defined groups of hospital staff. Elevated rates were also observed in a small sample of kitchen and portering staff, and in obstetric medical and nursing staff; the latter observation indicate a need for further investigation to identify unsuspected exposure to hepatitis B virus.

  8. Assessment of Solvated Interaction Energy Function for Ranking Antibody-Antigen Binding Affinities.

    PubMed

    Sulea, Traian; Vivcharuk, Victor; Corbeil, Christopher R; Deprez, Christophe; Purisima, Enrico O

    2016-07-25

    Affinity modulation of antibodies and antibody fragments of therapeutic value is often required in order to improve their clinical efficacies. Virtual affinity maturation has the potential to quickly focus on the critical hotspot residues without the combinatorial explosion problem of conventional display and library approaches. However, this requires a binding affinity scoring function that is capable of ranking single-point mutations of a starting antibody. We focus here on assessing the solvated interaction energy (SIE) function that was originally developed for and is widely applied to scoring of protein-ligand binding affinities. To this end, we assembled a structure-function data set called Single-Point Mutant Antibody Binding (SiPMAB) comprising several antibody-antigen systems suitable for this assessment, i.e., based on high-resolution crystal structures for the parent antibodies and coupled with high-quality binding affinity measurements for sets of single-point antibody mutants in each system. Using this data set, we tested the SIE function with several mutation protocols based on the popular methods SCWRL, Rosetta, and FoldX. We found that the SIE function coupled with a protocol limited to sampling only the mutated side chain can reasonably predict relative binding affinities with a Spearman rank-order correlation coefficient of about 0.6, outperforming more aggressive sampling protocols. Importantly, this performance is maintained for each of the seven system-specific component subsets as well as for other relevant subsets including non-alanine and charge-altering mutations. The transferability and enrichment in affinity-improving mutants can be further enhanced using consensus ranking over multiple methods, including the SIE, Talaris, and FOLDEF energy functions. The knowledge gained from this study can lead to successful prospective applications of virtual affinity maturation. PMID:27367467

  9. Assessment of Solvated Interaction Energy Function for Ranking Antibody-Antigen Binding Affinities.

    PubMed

    Sulea, Traian; Vivcharuk, Victor; Corbeil, Christopher R; Deprez, Christophe; Purisima, Enrico O

    2016-07-25

    Affinity modulation of antibodies and antibody fragments of therapeutic value is often required in order to improve their clinical efficacies. Virtual affinity maturation has the potential to quickly focus on the critical hotspot residues without the combinatorial explosion problem of conventional display and library approaches. However, this requires a binding affinity scoring function that is capable of ranking single-point mutations of a starting antibody. We focus here on assessing the solvated interaction energy (SIE) function that was originally developed for and is widely applied to scoring of protein-ligand binding affinities. To this end, we assembled a structure-function data set called Single-Point Mutant Antibody Binding (SiPMAB) comprising several antibody-antigen systems suitable for this assessment, i.e., based on high-resolution crystal structures for the parent antibodies and coupled with high-quality binding affinity measurements for sets of single-point antibody mutants in each system. Using this data set, we tested the SIE function with several mutation protocols based on the popular methods SCWRL, Rosetta, and FoldX. We found that the SIE function coupled with a protocol limited to sampling only the mutated side chain can reasonably predict relative binding affinities with a Spearman rank-order correlation coefficient of about 0.6, outperforming more aggressive sampling protocols. Importantly, this performance is maintained for each of the seven system-specific component subsets as well as for other relevant subsets including non-alanine and charge-altering mutations. The transferability and enrichment in affinity-improving mutants can be further enhanced using consensus ranking over multiple methods, including the SIE, Talaris, and FOLDEF energy functions. The knowledge gained from this study can lead to successful prospective applications of virtual affinity maturation.

  10. Monoclonal Antibodies as Probes for Unique Antigens in Secretory Cells of Mixed Exocrine Organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basbaum, C. B.; Mann, J. K.; Chow, A. W.; Finkbeiner, W. E.

    1984-07-01

    In the past, it has been difficult to identify the secretory product and control mechanisms associated with individual cell types making up mixed exocrine organs. This report establishes the feasibility of using immunological methods to characterize both the biochemical constituents and regulatory mechanisms associated with secretory cells in the trachea. Monoclonal antibodies directed against components of tracheal mucus were produced by immunizing mice with dialyzed, desiccated secretions harvested from tracheal organ culture. An immunofluorescence assay revealed that of the total 337 hybridomas screened, 100 produced antibodies recognizing goblet cell granules; 64, gland cell granules; and 3, antigen confined to the ciliated apical surface of the epithelium. The tracheal goblet cell antibody described in this report was strongly cross-reactive with intestinal goblet cells, as well as with a subpopulation of submandibular gland cells, but not with cells of Brunner's glands or the ciliated cell apical membrane. The serous cell antibody was not cross-reactive with goblet, Brunner's gland, or submandibular cells, or the ciliated cell apical membrane. The antibody directed against the apical membrane of ciliated cells did not cross-react with gland or goblet cells or the apical membrane of epithelial cells in the duodenum. Monoclonal antibodies, therefore, represent probes by which products unique to specific cells or parts of cells in the trachea can be distinguished. The antibodies, when used in enzyme immunoassays, can be used to quantitatively monitor secretion by individual cell types under a variety of physiological and pathological conditions. They also provide the means for purification and characterization of cell-specific products by immunoaffinity chromatography.

  11. A Genome-Wide Integrative Genomic Study Localizes Genetic Factors Influencing Antibodies against Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 1 (EBNA-1)

    PubMed Central

    Rubicz, Rohina; Yolken, Robert; Drigalenko, Eugene; Carless, Melanie A.; Dyer, Thomas D.; Bauman, Lara; Melton, Phillip E.; Kent, Jack W.; Harley, John B.; Curran, Joanne E.; Johnson, Matthew P.; Cole, Shelley A.; Almasy, Laura; Moses, Eric K.; Dhurandhar, Nikhil V.; Kraig, Ellen; Blangero, John; Leach, Charles T.; Göring, Harald H. H.

    2013-01-01

    Infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is highly prevalent worldwide, and it has been associated with infectious mononucleosis and severe diseases including Burkitt lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, nasopharyngeal lymphoma, and lymphoproliferative disorders. Although EBV has been the focus of extensive research, much still remains unknown concerning what makes some individuals more sensitive to infection and to adverse outcomes as a result of infection. Here we use an integrative genomics approach in order to localize genetic factors influencing levels of Epstein Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) IgG antibodies, as a measure of history of infection with this pathogen, in large Mexican American families. Genome-wide evidence of both significant linkage and association was obtained on chromosome 6 in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region and replicated in an independent Mexican American sample of large families (minimum p-value in combined analysis of both datasets is 1.4×10−15 for SNPs rs477515 and rs2516049). Conditional association analyses indicate the presence of at least two separate loci within MHC class II, and along with lymphocyte expression data suggest genes HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 as the best candidates. The association signals are specific to EBV and are not found with IgG antibodies to 12 other pathogens examined, and therefore do not simply reveal a general HLA effect. We investigated whether SNPs significantly associated with diseases in which EBV is known or suspected to play a role (namely nasopharyngeal lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, systemic lupus erythematosus, and multiple sclerosis) also show evidence of associated with EBNA-1 antibody levels, finding an overlap only for the HLA locus, but none elsewhere in the genome. The significance of this work is that a major locus related to EBV infection has been identified, which may ultimately reveal the underlying mechanisms by which the immune system regulates infection with this pathogen

  12. Adenovirus-mediated delivery of an anti-V antigen monoclonal antibody protects mice against a lethal Yersinia pestis challenge.

    PubMed

    Sofer-Podesta, Carolina; Ang, John; Hackett, Neil R; Senina, Svetlana; Perlin, David; Crystal, Ronald G; Boyer, Julie L

    2009-04-01

    Pneumonic plague, caused by inhalation of Yersinia pestis, represents a major bioterrorism threat for which no vaccine is available. Based on the knowledge that genetic delivery of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with adenovirus (Ad) gene transfer vectors results in rapid, high-level antibody expression, we evaluated the hypothesis that Ad-mediated delivery of a neutralizing antibody directed against the Y. pestis V antigen would protect mice against a Y. pestis challenge. MAbs specific for the Y. pestis V antigen were generated, and the most effective in protecting mice against a lethal intranasal Y. pestis challenge was chosen for further study. The coding sequences for the heavy and light chains were isolated from the corresponding hybridoma and inserted into a replication-defective serotype 5 human Ad gene transfer vector (AdalphaV). Western analysis of AdalphaV-infected cell supernatants demonstrated completely assembled antibodies reactive with V antigen. Following AdalphaV administration to mice, high levels of anti-V antigen antibody titers were detectable as early as 1 day postadministration, peaked by day 3, and remained detectable through a 12-week time course. When animals that received AdalphaV were challenged with Y. pestis at day 4 post-AdalphaV administration, 80% of the animals were protected, while 0% of control animals survived (P < 0.01). Ad-mediated delivery of a V antigen-neutralizing antibody is an effective therapy against plague in experimental animals and could be developed as a rapidly acting antiplague therapeutic.

  13. Antibodies to Antigenic Site A of Influenza H7 Hemagglutinin Provide Protection against H7N9 Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Schmeisser, Falko; Vasudevan, Anupama; Verma, Swati; Wang, Wei; Alvarado, Esmeralda; Weiss, Carol; Atukorale, Vajini; Meseda, Clement; Weir, Jerry P.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying major antigenic and protective epitopes of the H7 hemagglutinin (HA) will be important for understanding the antibody response to vaccines developed against the novel influenza H7N9 viruses that emerged in China in 2013. To facilitate antigenic characterization of the H7N9 HA and to develop reagents for evaluation of H7N9 candidate vaccines, we generated a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to the HA of A/Shanghai/2/2013 using mammalian cell-derived virus-like particles (VLP) containing the H7 HA. Neutralizing antibodies identified an HA epitope corresponding to antigenic site A on the structurally similar influenza H3 hemagglutinin. Importantly, the neutralizing antibodies protect against A/Shanghai/2/2013 challenge. This antigenic site is conserved among many H7 viruses, including strains of both Eurasian and North American lineage, and the isolated neutralizing antibodies are cross-reactive with older H7 vaccine strains. The results indicate that the identified antigenic site is a potentially important protective epitope and suggest the potential benefit of cross-reactive antibody responses to vaccination with H7 candidate vaccines. PMID:25629172

  14. Surface plasmon resonance measurements of plasma antibody avidity during primary and secondary responses to anthrax protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Heather E; Stewart, Shelley M; Kepler, Thomas B; Sempowski, Gregory D; Alam, S Munir

    2014-02-01

    Establishment of humoral immunity against pathogens is dependent on events that occur in the germinal center and the subsequent induction of high-affinity neutralizing antibodies. Quantitative assays that allow monitoring of affinity maturation and duration of antibody responses can provide useful information regarding the efficacy of vaccines and adjuvants. Using an anthrax protective antigen (rPA) and alum model antigen/adjuvant system, we describe a methodology for monitoring antigen-specific serum antibody concentration and avidity by surface plasmon resonance during primary and secondary immune responses. Our analyses showed that following a priming dose in mice, rPA-specific antibody concentration and avidity increases over time and reaches a maximal response in about six weeks, but gradually declines in the absence of antigenic boost. Germinal center reactions were observed early with maximal development achieved during the primary response, which coincided with peak antibody avidity responses to primary immunization. Boosting with antigen resulted in a rapid increase in rPA-specific antibody concentration and five-fold increase in avidity, which was not dependent on sustained GC development. The described methodology couples surface plasmon resonance-based plasma avidity measurements with germinal center analysis and provides a novel way to monitor humoral responses that can play a role in facilitating vaccine and adjuvant development.

  15. Advances in alloimmune thrombocytopenia: perspectives on current concepts of human platelet antigens, antibody detection strategies, and genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Tomoya; Hirayama, Fumiya

    2015-01-01

    Alloimmunisation to platelets leads to the production of antibodies against platelet antigens and consequently to thrombocytopenia. Numerous molecules located on the platelet surface are antigenic and induce immune-mediated platelet destruction with symptoms that can be serious. Human platelet antigens (HPA) cause thrombocytopenias, such as neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, post-transfusion purpura, and platelet transfusion refractoriness. Thirty-four HPA are classified into 28 systems. Assays to identify HPA and anti-HPA antibodies are critically important for preventing and treating thrombocytopenia caused by anti-HPA antibodies. Significant progress in furthering our understanding of HPA has been made in the last decade: new HPA have been discovered, antibody-detection methods have improved, and new genotyping methods have been developed. We review these advances and discuss issues that remain to be resolved as well as future prospects for preventing and treating immune thrombocytopenia. PMID:26057488

  16. Antigen capture ELISA system for henipaviruses using polyclonal antibodies obtained by DNA immunization.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Yoshihiro; Noguchi, Akira; Marsh, Glenn A; Barr, Jennifer A; Okutani, Akiko; Hotta, Kozue; Bazartseren, Boldbaatar; Broder, Christopher C; Yamada, Akio; Inoue, Satoshi; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2012-08-01

    A novel antigen-capture sandwich ELISA system targeting the glycoproteins of the henipaviruses Nipah virus (NiV) and Hendra virus (HeV) was developed. Utilizing purified polyclonal antibodies derived from NiV glycoprotein-encoding DNA-immunized rabbits, we established a system that can detect the native antigenic structures of the henipavirus surface glycoproteins using simplified and inexpensive methods. The lowest detection limit against live viruses was achieved for NiV Bangladesh strain, 2.5 × 10(4) TCID(50). Considering the recent emergence of genetic variants of henipaviruses and the resultant problems that arise for PCR-based detection, this system could serve as an alternative rapid diagnostic and detection assay. PMID:22585045

  17. Monoclonal antibodies (MT1, MT2, MB1, MB2, MB3) reactive with leukocyte subsets in paraffin-embedded tissue sections.

    PubMed Central

    Poppema, S.; Hollema, H.; Visser, L.; Vos, H.

    1987-01-01

    The absence of reactivity on routinely prepared tissue sections has hampered the use of monoclonal antileukocyte antibodies in diagnostic histopathology. Here we describe five new antibodies reactive with leukocyte subsets in formaldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections. Antibody MT1 is reactive with mature and immature T cells and not with mature B cells. MT2 is reactive with mature T cells and B cells, but not with immature T cells, activated T cells, and germinal center B cells. Antibody MB1 is reactive with all B cells, with about 50% of mature T cells, and not with immature T cells. MB2 is reactive with all B cells and not with T cells. However, MB2 also stains endothelial cells and several types of epithelial cells. MB3 is reactive with B cells and histiocytes, but not with T cells. The antibodies were tested on a series of lymphomas that were also immunophenotyped with a panel of well-established reagents on frozen tissue sections. The results indicate that the MB and MT antibodies are useful tools in the study of reactive and neoplastic disorders of the lymphoid system. Images Figure 1 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:3296769

  18. Toxocara canis glycans influence antigen recognition by mouse IgG1 and IgM antibodies.

    PubMed

    Długosz, Ewa; Wiśniewski, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    The impact of sugar moieties of Toxocara canis glycoprotein antigens on their recognition by infected mouse antibodies was investigated in this study. Native TES and recombinant Toxocara mucins generated in Pichia pastoris yeast as well as their deglycosylated forms were used in ELISA. TES and recombinant mucins were equally recognized by T. canis infected mouse IgG1 antibodies. IgM immunoglobulins predominantly recognized TES antigens. Among mucins recognition of Tc-MUC-4 was the most significant. Deglycosylation of antigens resulted in significant loss of IgM and IgG1 reactivity to TES, mucins, Tc-MUC-3 and Tc-MUC-4. The presence of sugar moieties had no influence on IgE binding to native or recombinant T. canis antigens. Our results suggest that glycans are involved in epitope formation what should be taken into consideration in production of recombinant helminth antigens for diagnostic purposes. PMID:26751891

  19. Visualization of molecule interaction between antigen and antibody: one of the ellipsometric imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Gang; Meng, Yonghong; Xing, Jianhua; Zhao, Ziyan

    1998-08-01

    It is to investigate molecule interactions between antigen and antibody with ellipsometric imaging technique and demonstrate some features and possibilities offered by applications of the technique. Molecule interaction is an important interest for molecule biologist and immunologist. They have used some established methods such as immunofluorescence, radioimmunoassay and surface plasma resonance, etc. to study the molecule interaction. At the same time, experimentalists hope to use some updated technique with more direct visual results. Ellipsometric imaging is non-destructive and exhibits a high sensitivity to phase transitions with thin layers. It is capable of imaging local variations in the optical properties such as thickness due to the presence of different surface concentration of molecule or different deposited molecules. If a molecular mono-layer (such as antigen) with bio-activity were deposited on a surface to form a sensing surface and then incubated in a solution with other molecules (such as antibody), a variation of the layer thickness when the molecules on the sensing surface reacted with the others in the solution could be observed with ellipsometric imaging. Every point on the surface was measured at the same time with a high sensitivity to distinguish the variation between mono- layer and molecular complexes. Ellipsometric imaging is based on conventional ellipsometry with charge coupled device (CCD) as detector and images are caught with computer with image processing technique. It has advantages of high sensitivity to thickness variation (resolution in the order of angstrom), big field of view (in square centimeter), high sampling speed (a picture taken within one second), and high lateral resolution (in the order of micrometer). Here it has just shown one application in study of antigen-antibody interaction, and it is possible to observe molecule interaction process with an in-situ technique.

  20. Application of an enzyme-labeled antigen method for visualizing plasma cells producing antibodies against Strep A, a carbohydrate antigen of Streptococcus pyogenes, in recurrent tonsillitis.

    PubMed

    Onouchi, Takanori; Mizutani, Yasuyoshi; Shiogama, Kazuya; Inada, Ken-ichi; Okada, Tatsuyoshi; Naito, Kensei; Tsutsumi, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is the main causative pathogen of recurrent tonsillitis. Histologically, lesions of recurrent tonsillitis contain numerous plasma cells. Strep A is an antigenic carbohydrate molecule on the cell wall of S. pyogenes. As expected, plasma cells in subjects with recurrent tonsillitis secrete antibodies against Strep A. The enzyme-labeled antigen method is a novel histochemical technique that visualizes specific antibody-producing cells in tissue sections by employing a biotin-labeled antigen as a probe. The purpose of the present study was to visualize plasma cells producing antibodies reactive with Strep A in recurrent tonsillitis. Firstly, the lymph nodes of rats immunized with boiled S. pyogenes were paraformaldehyde-fixed and specific plasma cells localized in frozen sections with biotinylated Strep A. Secondly, an enzyme-labeled antigen method was used on human tonsil surgically removed from 12 patients with recurrent tonsillitis. S. pyogenes genomes were PCR-detected in all 12 specimens. The emm genotypes belonged to emm12 in nine specimens and emm1 in three. Plasma cells producing anti-Strep A antibodies were demonstrated in prefixed frozen sections of rat lymph nodes, 8/12 human specimens from patients with recurrent tonsillitis but not in two control tonsils. In human tonsils, Strep A-reactive plasma cells were observed within the reticular squamous mucosa and just below the mucosa, and the specific antibodies belonged to either IgA or IgG classes. Our technique is effective in visualizing immunocytes producing specific antibodies against the bacterial carbohydrate antigen, and is thus a novel histochemical tool for analyzing immune reactions in infectious disorders.

  1. Detection of antibodies to Anisakis simplex larvae by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoelectrophoresis using crude or purified antigens.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez Ramos, R; Tsuji, M

    1994-12-01

    The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoelectrophoresis (IEP) were used for the serodiagnosis of larval Anisakis simplex infections in man and immunized rabbits. Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration was used for separating crude antigen. Four fractions were obtained. Sera from patients with other helminth infections sometimes cross reacted with Anisakis larval antigens. With IEP, crude antigen is more sensitive than purified antigens. With ELISA, the third fraction is the most sensitive for detecting antibodies to Anisakis larvae in the sera of humans and immunized rabbits.

  2. Label-free kinetic analysis of an antibody-antigen interaction using biolayer interferometry.

    PubMed

    Kumaraswamy, Sriram; Tobias, Renee

    2015-01-01

    Biolayer Interferometry (BLI) is a powerful technique that enables direct measurement of biomolecular interactions in real time without the need for labeled reagents. Here we describe the analysis of a high-affinity binding interaction between a monoclonal antibody and purified antigen using BLI. A simple Dip-and-Read™ format in which biosensors are dipped into microplate wells containing purified or complex samples provides a highly parallel, user-friendly technique to study molecular interactions. A rapid rise in publications citing the use of BLI technology in a wide range of applications, from biopharmaceutical discovery to infectious diseases monitoring, suggests broad utility of this technology in the life sciences.

  3. Prevalence of antibodies against heat-stable antigens from Helicobacter pylori in patients with dyspeptic symptoms and normal persons.

    PubMed

    Andersen, L P; Raskov, H; Elsborg, L; Holck, S; Justesen, T; Fischer Hansen, B; Møller Nielsen, C; Gaarslev, K

    1992-09-01

    Heat-stable antigens from Helicobacter pylori were investigated for the detection of serum IgG, IgA and IgM antibodies against H. pylori by an ELISA technique. Antibody titers against H. pylori were measured in 167 dyspeptic patients, of whom 96 were H. pylori positive confirmed by culture or microscopy, and in 482 controls (0-98 years). Increased IgG antibody titers were found significantly more often in dyspeptic patients with active chronic gastritis than in patients with normal morphology, as well as in H. pylori-positive patients as compared to H. pylori-negative patients, independent of the endoscopic findings. The heat-stable antigens were compared with acid glycine-extracted antigens and a high degree of concordance was found in the results obtained with the two antigen preparations. The differences in the IgA antibody titers against H. pylori between H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative dyspeptic patients were significant and may be useful to confirm a borderline IgG result. No differences were found in IgM antibody titer between H. pylori-positive and -negative patients. The greatest age-dependent increase in IgG and IgA antibody titers was found in children, and if a lower cut-off level is used for children than for adults, as has been proposed, the proportion of people with increased antibody titers against H. pylori would be almost constant from the age of between five and 10 years until the time between 61 and 80 years. Comparison of H. pylori IgG antibodies with IgG antibodies against Campylobacter jejuni and total antibodies against cytomegalovirus (CMV) showed a greater similarity between H. pylori and C. jejuni (R = 0.51) than between H. pylori and CMV (R = 0.22). This may possibly be caused by cross-reactions between H. pylori and C. jejuni. The H. pylori heat-stabile antigen seems not to be very different from other crude H. pylori antigens like acid glycine-extracted antigens, but purification and characterization of the antigens are

  4. Prevalence of Dirofilaria immitis antigen and antibodies to Leishmania infantum in cats from southern Portugal.

    PubMed

    Maia, Carla; Ramos, Cláudia; Coimbra, Mónica; Cardoso, Luís; Campino, Lenea

    2015-04-01

    Vector-borne diseases (VBD) are caused by a range of pathogens transmitted by arthropods and have emerged in recent years, showing a wider geographic distribution and increased global prevalence. In addition to their veterinary medical importance, cats play a central role in the transmission cycles of some VBD agents by acting as reservoirs, amplifying hosts or sentinels. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Dirofilaria immitis antigen and of antibodies to Leishmania infantum in a sample of 271 cats from southern Portugal. Thirteen (4.8%) cats were positive to D. immitis, while antibodies to L. infantum were detected in 10 (3.7%) animals. The prevalence of D. immitis and L. infantum in the feline population from southern Portugal should alert for the need to implement control measures to protect animals and people from these zoonotic parasites. Furthermore, both parasitoses must be included in the differential diagnosis in feline clinical practice.

  5. Influence of ionization states of antigen on anti-fluorescein antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukunishi, Hiroaki

    2012-10-01

    Ratios of anion and di-anion states of fluorescein (FLU(-1) and FLU(-2)) are 21.2% and 78.8%, respectively, in the neutral pH. We investigated the influence of ionization states of antigen on anti-fluorescein antibodies. For this purpose, steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations were performed. Potential of mean forces (PMF) based on Jarzynski equality showed that wild-type (4-4-20) more strongly binds to FLU(-1) than FLU(-2), whereas its femtomolar-affinity mutant (4M5.3) more strongly binds to FLU(-2) than FLU(-1). It was speculated that the environment or the process of in vivo antibody production had been different from those of the protein engineering.

  6. Antibodies to ribosomal ribonucleoprotein. Prevalence in systemic rheumatic diseases and partial characterization of the antigen.

    PubMed

    Cortés, J J; Mendoza, F; Reyes, P A

    1987-08-01

    The prevalence of antibodies to ribosomal ribonucleoproteins (rRNP) was studied in patients with rheumatic diseases. Seven patients had precipitating antibodies against rRNP, 6 had systemic lupus erythematosus, one had primary Sjögren's syndrome. Anti-rRNP was not present in mixed connective tissue disease, rheumatoid arthritis, progressive systemic sclerosis, CREST, primary Raynaud's or normal control sera. A partial immunological identity precipitin line was present between (U1) nRNP and rRNP, but these were distinct in physicochemical properties. Western blot analysis of ribosomal extract using anti-rRNP IgG revealed 2 polypeptides called rA and rB which appear to be the important antigenic determinants.

  7. A single Alal 39-to-Glu substitution in the Renibacterium salmoninarum virulence-associated protein p57 results in antigenic variation and is associated with enhanced p57 binding to Chinook salmon leukocytes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiens, Gregory D.; Pascho, Ron; Winton, James R.

    2002-01-01

    The gram-positive bacterium Renibacterium salmoninarum produces relatively large amounts of a 57-kDa protein (p57) implicated in the pathogenesis of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Antigenic variation in p57 was identified by using monoclonal antibody 4C11, which exhibited severely decreased binding to R. salmoninarum strain 684 p57 and bound robustly to the p57 proteins of seven other R. salmoninarum strains. This difference in binding was not due to alterations in p57 synthesis, secretion, or bacterial cell association. The molecular basis of the 4C11 epitope loss was determined by amplifying and sequencing the two identical genes encoding p57, msa1 and msa2. The 5′ and coding sequences of the 684 msa1 and msa2 genes were identical to those of the ATCC 33209 msa1and msa2 genes except for a single C-to-A nucleotide mutation. This mutation was identified in both the msa1 and msa2 genes of strain 684 and resulted in an Ala139-to-Glu substitution in the amino-terminal region of p57. We examined whether this mutation in p57 altered salmonid leukocyte and rabbit erythrocyte binding activities. R. salmoninarum strain 684 extracellular protein exhibited a twofold increase in agglutinating activity for chinook salmon leukocytes and rabbit erythrocytes compared to the activity of the ATCC 33209 extracellular protein. A specific and quantitative p57 binding assay confirmed the increased binding activity of 684 p57. Monoclonal antibody 4C11 blocked the agglutinating activity of the ATCC 33209 extracellular protein but not the agglutinating activity of the 684 extracellular protein. These results indicate that the Ala139-to-Glu substitution altered immune recognition and was associated with enhanced biological activity of R. salmoninarum 684 p57.

  8. The Use of Splenectomy to Manage Platelet Transfusion Refractoriness due to Anti-Human Leukocyte Antibodies in Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Margherita; Camoglio, Francesco; Piccoli, Pierluigi; De Bortoli, Massimiliano; Balter, Rita; Pegoraro, Anna; Cesaro, Simone

    2016-01-01

    In patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), refractoriness to platelet transfusion has been associated with graft failure, delayed engraftment, early mortality and decreased overall survival. Therapeutic strategies include plasma exchange, immunoglobulins, rituximab, and splenectomy. We describe here three patients with refractoriness to platelet transfusion due to anti-human leukocyte antibodies who were splenectomized before HSCT (two cases) and after HSCT (one case) due to the lack of efficacy of other therapies. Splenectomy was uneventful. All three patients achieved a full donor engraftment. We suggest that splenectomy is feasible and effective in HSCT patients to reduce the risk of graft failure or delayed engraftment. PMID:27114815

  9. Antibodies reactive to Plasmodium falciparum serine repeat antigen in children with Burkitt lymphoma from Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Guech-Ongey, Mercy; Yagi, Masanori; Palacpac, Nirianne Marie Q.; Emmanuel, Benjamin; Talisuna, Ambrose O.; Bhatia, Kishor; Stefan, D. Cristina; Biggar, Robert J.; Nkrumah, Francis; Neequaye, Janet; Tougan, Takahiro; Horii, Toshihiro; Mbulaiteye, Sam M.

    2011-01-01

    The role of protective immunity to Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) malaria in Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is unknown. We investigated the association between BL and antibodies reactive to SE36 antigen, a recombinant protein based on Pf-SERA5 gene, targeted by protective malaria immune responses. Cases were children (0–14 years) enrolled at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana, during 1965–1994 with BL confirmed by histology or cytology (92% of cases). Controls were healthy appearing children enrolled contemporaneous to the cases from the nearest neighbor house to the case house age- and sex-frequency matched to the cases. Anti-SE36 IgG antibodies were measured using enzyme-linked absorbent immunoassays (ELISA). SE36 titers were estimated by extrapolating ELISA optical density (OD) readings to a standard fitting curve. Anti-SE36 titers were log-transformed for analysis. Odds ratios (OR) and 2-sided 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. The mean log endpoint dilution titers were 0.63 logs lower in cases than in controls (8.26 [SD 1.68] versus 8.89 [SD 1.75], Student’s t-test, P=0.019). Lower titers were observed in cases than controls aged 0–4 years (P=0.05) and in those aged 5–14 years (P=0.06). Low and medium tertiles of anti-SE36 IgG antibodies were associated with increased OR for BL ([OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.21–2.31] and [OR 1.33, 95% CI 0.96– 1.86], respectively, Ptrend =0.002) in analyses adjusting for age, sex, calendar period, and test plate. Our findings suggest that compared to similarly aged children enrolled from the same community, children with BL in Ghana have lower antibodies to SE36 antigen. PMID:21630256

  10. Preparation and characterization of human monoclonal antibodies directed against the hepatitis B virus surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Colucci, G; Kohtz, D S; Waksal, S D

    1986-06-01

    The hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) is highly immunogenic and induces an antibody response which is protective in vivo against hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Human monoclonal antibodies specific for HBsAg were produced, which could have potential therapeutic applications. Lymphocytes obtained from a vaccinated donor were stimulated in vitro and fused with the human myeloma cell line GM 4672, and eight hybridomas were obtained. Three of these clones, which reacted in an ELISA against the HBsAg vaccine, were expanded, subcloned and further analyzed. The subclones E7C2, C4C10, and D5B2 were able to bind to different HBsAg preparations, which express various subtypes, and recognized the major HBsAg peptides in Western blot analysis. Cross-inhibition experiments showed that E7C2, C4C10 and D5B2 are directed against the same epitope and have an affinity constant ranging from 5 X 10(7) to 3.3 X 10(9) M. Furthermore, these antibodies stained the surface and cytoplasm of the HBsAg-secreting cell lines PLC/PRF/5 and 4.10. The production of immunoglobulins varies from 0.3 to 1.3 micrograms/ml/10(6) and has remained stable over a period of 8 months. These human monoclonal antibodies, which appear to be directed against an antigenic determinant common to all HBsAg subtypes, could be useful in the study of HBV-related liver diseases as well as in their diagnosis and experimental therapy.

  11. Delivery of Antibody Mimics into Mammalian Cells via Anthrax Toxin Protective Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Xiaoli; Rabideau, Amy E; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2014-01-01

    Antibody mimics have significant scientific and therapeutic utility for the disruption of protein–protein interactions inside cells; however, their delivery to the cell cytosol remains a major challenge. Here we show that protective antigen (PA), a component of anthrax toxin, efficiently transports commonly used antibody mimics to the cytosol of mammalian cells when conjugated to the N-terminal domain of LF (LFN). In contrast, a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) was not able to deliver any of these antibody mimics into the cell cytosol. The refolding and binding of a transported tandem monobody to Bcr-Abl (its protein target) in chronic myeloid leukemia cells were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. We also observed inhibition of Bcr-Abl kinase activity and induction of apoptosis caused by the monobody. In a separate case, we show disruption of key interactions in the MAPK signaling pathway after PA-mediated delivery of an affibody binder that targets hRaf-1. We show for the first time that PA can deliver bioactive antibody mimics to disrupt intracellular protein–protein interactions. This technology adds a useful tool to expand the applications of these modern agents to the intracellular milieu. PMID:25250705

  12. CD301b+ dendritic cells suppress T follicular helper cells and antibody responses to protein antigens

    PubMed Central

    Kumamoto, Yosuke; Hirai, Toshiro; Wong, Patrick W; Kaplan, Daniel H; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    Strong antibody response is considered a hallmark of a successful vaccine. While dendritic cells (DCs) are important for T follicular helper (Tfh) cell priming, how this process is regulated in vivo is unclear. We show here that the depletion of CD301b+ DCs specifically enhanced the development of Tfh cells, germinal center B cells and antibody responses against protein antigens. Exaggerated antibody responses in mice depleted of CD301b+ DCs occurred in the absence of any adjuvants, and resulting antibodies had broader specificity and higher affinity to the immunogen. CD301b+ DCs express high levels of PD-1 ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2. Blocking PD-1 or PD-L1 during priming in wild-type mice partially mimicked the phenotype of CD301b+ DC-depleted animals, suggesting their role in Tfh suppression. Transient depletion of CD301b+ DC results in the generation of autoreactive IgG responses. These results revealed a novel regulatory mechanism and a key role of CD301b+ DCs in blocking autoantibody generation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17979.001 PMID:27657168

  13. Antibody response in silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen) immunized with a model antigen associated with different adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Pavan, T R; Di Domenico, J; Kirsten, K S; Nied, C O; Frandoloso, R; Kreutz, L C

    2016-07-25

    Adjuvants are essential to boost the immune response to inoculated antigen and play a central role in vaccine development. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of several adjuvants in the production of anti-bovine serum albumin (BSA) antibodies in silver catfish. Two hundred and seventy juvenile silver catfish (60-80 g) of both sexes were intraperitoneally vaccinated with BSA (200 µg/fish) alone or mixed to the following adjuvants: Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA), Freund's incomplete adjuvant (FIA), aluminum hydroxide (AlOH), Montanide, four types of cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) and three concentrations of β-glucan, and the immune enhancing property was evaluated by measuring anti-BSA antibodies in blood samples at biweekly intervals. Our results demonstrated that CpGs ODNs and β-glucan were as effective as classical adjuvants (FCA, FIA, AlOH and Montanide) in promoting anti-BSA antibodies and that the kinetics of antibody production induced by all adjuvants used in our study had a similar trend to that observed in other fish species, with a peak at 28 days post-vaccination. These results may be useful for the selection of adjuvants for vaccine formulation intended for silver catfish and for the development of vaccine and vaccination strategies to other fish species. PMID:27464022

  14. Radioimmunoassay of circulating schistosome antigen with a radiation-immobilized monoclonal antibody : Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessaint, J. P.; Nogueira-Queiroz, J. A.; Capron, A.

    A two-site immunoradiometric assay with a mouse monoclonal antibody to a circulating schistosome antigen was comparatively investigated using the monoclonal antibody either absorbed to microtiter plates (reference IRMA) or immobilized by several techniques. Radiation polymerization methods were carried out at Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment, Takasaki, Gunma (I. Kaetsu, M. Kumakura), using 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate monomers and 1 Mrad irradiation. A significant correlation was obtained with the reference IRMA and the assay using radiation polymerization-immobilized antibody ( r = 0.94), although non-specific binding to the polymer discs was higher (x 10) than with microtiter plates. Immobilization of the monoclonal antibody onto polypropylene/polyethylene copolymer films grafted with methacrylic acid irradiated at 0.68 Mrads and treated with carbodiimide/N-hydroxysuccinimide, was carried out at the Dept of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (A.S. Hoffman, W.R. Gombotz, S. Uenoyama). A significant correlation ( r = 0.90) was obtained with the reference IRMA. Non-specific binding was also higher than with microtiter plates (x 6). An important result was the increased shelf life of the immobilized reagent.

  15. Antibody response in silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen) immunized with a model antigen associated with different adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Pavan, T.R.; Di Domenico, J.; Kirsten, K.S.; Nied, C.O.; Frandoloso, R.; Kreutz, L.C.

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvants are essential to boost the immune response to inoculated antigen and play a central role in vaccine development. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of several adjuvants in the production of anti-bovine serum albumin (BSA) antibodies in silver catfish. Two hundred and seventy juvenile silver catfish (60–80 g) of both sexes were intraperitoneally vaccinated with BSA (200 µg/fish) alone or mixed to the following adjuvants: Freund’s complete adjuvant (FCA), Freund’s incomplete adjuvant (FIA), aluminum hydroxide (AlOH), Montanide, four types of cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) and three concentrations of β-glucan, and the immune enhancing property was evaluated by measuring anti-BSA antibodies in blood samples at biweekly intervals. Our results demonstrated that CpGs ODNs and β-glucan were as effective as classical adjuvants (FCA, FIA, AlOH and Montanide) in promoting anti-BSA antibodies and that the kinetics of antibody production induced by all adjuvants used in our study had a similar trend to that observed in other fish species, with a peak at 28 days post-vaccination. These results may be useful for the selection of adjuvants for vaccine formulation intended for silver catfish and for the development of vaccine and vaccination strategies to other fish species. PMID:27464022

  16. Development of an enzyme immunoassay using recombinant expressed antigen to detect hepatitis delta virus antibodies.

    PubMed

    Puig, J; Fields, H A

    1989-10-01

    Two generic enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) were developed for detection of anti-hepatitis delta virus antibodies (anti-HD) and compared with a commercially available radioimmunoassay. Both generic assays were configured as blocking assays and used hepatitis delta antigen (HDAg) derived from infected chimpanzee liver (EIA-1) or from Escherichia coli transformed with a plasmid containing an insert from within an open reading frame encoding HDAg (EIA-2). Absolute sensitivity was ascertained by endpoint titration, which demonstrated essentially identical endpoints for EIA-1 and EIA-2. The absolute sensitivities of the EIAs were approximately four times greater than that of the radioimmunoassay. Specificity and sensitivity were ascertained by testing a panel of 176 serum specimens by each assay. The specimens were selected to represent a panel composed of sera from individuals with or without markers of viral hepatitis as follows: (i) serologically confirmed by exclusion as posttransfusion non-A, non-B hepatitis; (ii) acute or chronic hepatitis B virus infection, positive for hepatitis B surface antigen; (iii) resolved hepatitis B virus infection, positive for anti-hepatitis B surface antigen; (iv) acute hepatitis A virus infection, positive for anti-hepatitis A virus immunoglobulin M; and (v) normal human sera. All three assays for anti-HD gave similar specificity and sensitivity values. In conclusion, the recombinant expressed HDAg can replace antigen derived from infected liver tissue as a diagnostic reagent used to configure an EIA for detection of anti-HD. Furthermore, the results suggest that the expressed antigen contains the important immunodominant epitope(s).

  17. Analysis of leukocyte populations in Canadian Holsteins classified as high or low immune responders for antibody- or cell-mediated immune response

    PubMed Central

    Hine, Brad C.; Cartwright, Shannon L.; Mallard, Bonnie A.

    2012-01-01

    Selection of dairy cattle for increased milk production with little or no emphasis on health traits leads to an increased prevalence of disease. A possible genetic solution to this problem is to combine production and immune response traits in a weighted selection index. In the current study, leukocyte populations in heifers identified as having a high antibody-mediated immune response (HiAMIR) or high cell-mediated immune response (HiCMIR) phenotype were compared before and after immunization in order to identify leukocyte population profiles associated with these phenotypes. The results demonstrated that the HiCMIR-phenotype animals had a higher baseline proportion of gamma-delta T-cells in peripheral blood. Also, the observed increase in the proportion of B-cells in peripheral blood in response to immunization was greater in the HiAMIR-phenotype animals. It is expected that identifying leukocyte population profiles associated with immune response phenotypes will improve our ability to identify animals with enhanced overall immune responsiveness. PMID:23024458

  18. ELISA for herpes simplex virus (HSV) type-specific antibodies in human sera using HSV type 1 and type 2 polyspecific antigens blocked with type-heterologous rabbit antibodies.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, B F; Grauballe, P C

    1979-08-01

    Crude antigenic preparations made from rabbit cornea cells infected with either HSV type 1 or type 2 could be used in ELISA for titration of HSV type-specific antibodies in human sera. After immunochemical binding of the crude HSV antigens in microtitre wells by use of type-homologous rabbit antibodies, type-common antigenic sties were blocked with type-heterologous rabbit antibodies. Titration of human sera in this system showed that high concentrations of type heterologous rabbit antibodies were capable of completely blocking type-common antigenic sites, while leaving type-specific antigenic sites unblocked and capable of reacting with human antibodies. Thus HSV type-specific antibodies in human sera could be measured in ELISA without the use of purified typespecific antigens.

  19. The constant region contributes to the antigenic specificity and renal pathogenicity of murine anti-DNA antibodies.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yumin; Pawar, Rahul D; Nakouzi, Antonio S; Herlitz, Leal; Broder, Anna; Liu, Kui; Goilav, Beatrice; Fan, Manxia; Wang, Ling; Li, Quan-Zhen; Casadevall, Arturo; Putterman, Chaim

    2012-12-01

    Affinity for DNA and cross-reactivity with renal antigens are associated with enhanced renal pathogenicity of lupus autoantibodies. In addition, certain IgG subclasses are enriched in nephritic kidneys, suggesting that isotype may determine the outcome of antibody binding to renal antigens. To investigate if the isotype of DNA antibodies affects renal pathogenicity by influencing antigen binding, we derived IgM, IgG1, IgG2b and IgG2a forms of the PL9-11 antibody (IgG3 anti-DNA) by in vitro class switching or PCR cloning. The affinity and specificity of PL9-11 antibodies for nuclear and renal antigens were analyzed using ELISA, Western blotting, surface plasmon resonance (SPR), binding to mesangial cells, and glomerular proteome arrays. Renal deposition and pathogenicity were assayed in mice injected with PL9-11 hybridomas. We found that PL9-11 and its isotype-switched variants had differential binding to DNA and chromatin (IgG3>IgG2a>IgG1>IgG2b>IgM) by direct and competition ELISA, and SPR. In contrast, in binding to laminin and collagen IV the IgG2a isotype actually had the highest affinity. Differences in affinity of PL9-11 antibodies for renal antigens were mirrored in analysis of specificity for glomeruli, and were associated with significant differences in renal pathogenicity in vivo and survival. Our novel findings indicate that the constant region plays an important role in the nephritogenicity of antibodies to DNA by affecting immunoglobulin affinity and specificity. Increased binding to multiple glomerular and/or nuclear antigens may contribute to the renal pathogenicity of anti-DNA antibodies of the IgG2a and IgG3 isotype. Finally, class switch recombination may be another mechanism by which B cell autoreactivity is generated.

  20. Site-selective in situ growth of fluorescent polymer-antibody conjugates with enhanced antigen detection by signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Libin; Zhao, Wenguo; Liu, Xinyu; Wang, Guilin; Wang, Yang; Li, Dong; Xie, Liangzhi; Gao, Yan; Deng, Haiteng; Gao, Weiping

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports a new and general in situ methodology to grow fluorescent polymer conjugates from the interchain disulfide bridging sites of a monoclonal antibody. Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiators were attached to a monoclonal antibody at its interchain disulfide bridging sites by disulfide re-bridging to yield a macroinitiator. Subsequent in situ ATRP of PEG-like monomers with dye-functionalized monomers from the macroinitiator formed antibody-polymer-dye conjugates with site-selectivity and tunable dye-to-antibody ratios. Notably, these conjugates can amplify antigen detection signal by reducing label-density dependent fluorescence quenching and by increasing dye-to-antibody ratios. The method developed may be applicable to a variety of antibodies, dyes and drugs to create a number of antibody-polymer-dye/drug conjugates for advanced diagnosis and therapy of diseases. PMID:26102329

  1. A Rough Energy Landscape to Describe Surface-Linked Antibody and Antigen Bond Formation

    PubMed Central

    Limozin, Laurent; Bongrand, Pierre; Robert, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies and B cell receptors often bind their antigen at cell-cell interface while both molecular species are surface-bound, which impacts bond kinetics and function. Despite the description of complex energy landscapes for dissociation kinetics which may also result in significantly different association kinetics, surface-bound molecule (2D) association kinetics usually remain described by an on-rate due to crossing of a single free energy barrier, and few experimental works have measured association kinetics under conditions implying force and two-dimensional relative ligand-receptor motion. We use a new laminar flow chamber to measure 2D bond formation with systematic variation of the distribution of encounter durations between antigen and antibody, in a range from 0.1 to 10 ms. Under physiologically relevant forces, 2D association is 100-fold slower than 3D association as studied by surface plasmon resonance assays. Supported by brownian dynamics simulations, our results show that a minimal encounter duration is required for 2D association; an energy landscape featuring a rough initial part might be a reasonable way of accounting for this. By systematically varying the temperature of our experiments, we evaluate roughness at 2kBT, in the range of previously proposed rough parts of landscapes models during dissociation. PMID:27731375

  2. Antibody produced against isolated Rh(D) polypeptide reacts with other Rh-related antigens.

    PubMed

    Suyama, K; Goldstein, J

    1988-11-01

    Rh(D) antigen-containing polypeptide was prepared by immune precipitation of intact cDE/cDE erythrocytes by using a high-titer preparation of polyclonal anti-D. when isolated Rh(D) polypeptide was administered to rabbits, antibody was produced that was unresponsive toward Rh-positive and -negative cells but reacted strongly with the immunogen in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-type immunobinding and Western blot immunostaining assays. Rabbit antibody also immunostains isolated Rh(c) polypeptide as well as the Rh antigen-containing components of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis-separated membrane proteins from Rh(D)-positive (cDE/cDE,CDe/CDe), Rh(D)-negative (cde/cde,Cde/Cde), and -D-/-D- cells. It does not react with any membrane protein from Rh-null regulator type cells, thus indicating a specificity for Rh-related proteins. We have also been able to demonstrate that polyclonal and monoclonal anti-D preparations that do not immunostain isolated Rh(D) polypeptide will react with it in our immunobinding assay.

  3. Antibodies to porin antigens of Salmonella typhi induced during typhoid infection in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Calderón, I; Lobos, S R; Rojas, H A; Palomino, C; Rodríguez, L H; Mora, G C

    1986-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG)- and IgM-specific antibody titers against Salmonella typhi Ty2 porins have been measured in 30 paired typhoid sera by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. These studies have found that IgG serum titers of acute and convalescent sera were 625 and 5,000 times higher, respectively than the control serum titers. The same typhoid sera were titrated with S. typhi Ty2 flagellin and S. typhi lipopolysaccharide. The titers against these antigens were considerably lower than those against the porins. The highest IgM-specific titer has also been found against porins in convalescent-phase sera. However, the largest increase in IgM-specific titer compared with the control group titer was obtained against flagellin during the acute phase of typhoid. The lowest increases in antibody titer were obtained with the IgM-specific anti-lipopolysaccharide in both types of sera. This may be because many normal individuals in endemic areas already have IgM titers against lipopolysaccharide. This study has provided good evidence that porins are excellent antigens and that IgG-specific antiporin titers may be of diagnostic value in typhoid infections in endemic areas. PMID:3007360

  4. Induction of antisporozoite antibodies by biting of transgenic Anopheles stephensi delivering malarial antigen via blood feeding.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, D S; Sumitani, M; Nagumo, H; Yoshida, S; Matsuoka, H

    2012-01-01

    We produced a transgenic mosquito expressing a rodent malaria vaccine candidate antigen in the salivary gland. Three tandemly repeated amino acid units from the repeat region of circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium berghei (PbCS3R) fused to red fluorescent protein (monomeric DsRed) was chosen as a vaccine candidate antigen. Immunoblot and fluorescence microscopic analyses showed the transgene expression in the female salivary gland. The transgene product was released from the proboscis as a component of saliva. The monomeric DsRed-fusion expression system could be suitable for transgene secretion in the saliva of female mosquitoes. Mice repeatedly bitten by transgenic mosquitoes raised antibodies against P. berghei sporozoites, and the sera had protective ability against sporozoite invasion of human hepatoma HepG2 cells. These results suggest that transgene products are immunogenically active in saliva, and induce the antibodies to malaria parasite. These findings indicate that this technology has the potential for production of a 'flying vaccinator' for rodent malaria parasites. PMID:22787718

  5. Antibody response to Plasmodium vivax antigens in Fy-negative individuals from the Colombian Pacific coast.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Sócrates; Gómez, Andrés; Vera, Omaira; Vergara, Juana; Valderrama-Aguirre, Augusto; Maestre, Amanda; Méndez, Fabián; Wang, Ruobing; Chitnis, Chetan E; Yazdani, Syed S; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam

    2005-11-01

    The Duffy antigen (Fy) is necessary for Plasmodium vivax invasion of human erythrocytes. Some populations have a highly prevalent Fy-negative phenotype; such persons are naturally protected from P. vivax blood infection but are expected to completely support the P. vivax pre-erythrocytic cycle, representing a valuable model for studying the immune response during these parasitic stages. We typed 214 individuals, mostly Afro-Colombians, from a P. vivax-endemic area for Fy expression and determined the antibody response to P. vivax pre-erythrocytic (sporozoites and CS) and blood-stage antigens (blood forms, P. vivax merozoite surface protein 1, and P. vivax Duffy binding protein [PvDBP]). Antibody titers to P. vivax circumsporozoite protein, P11, and N-terminal peptides and the number of responders were similar in Fy-negative and Fy-positive individuals. The number of responders to sporozoites, blood forms, and PvDBP were different between these groups. Thus, Fy-negative individuals from malaria-endemic areas can be used to study the immune response to the P. vivax liver phase without interference of the erythrocytic cycle.

  6. Detection of Q Fever Specific Antibodies Using Recombinant Antigen in ELISA with Peroxidase Based Signal Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua-Wei; Zhang, Zhiwen; Glennon, Erin; Ching, Wei-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the accepted method for Q fever serodiagnosis is indirect immunofluorescent antibody assay (IFA) using the whole cell antigen. In this study, we prepared the recombinant antigen of the 27-kDa outer membrane protein (Com1) which has been shown to be recognized by Q fever patient sera. The performance of recombinant Com1 was evaluated in ELISA by IFA confirmed serum samples. Due to the low titers of IgG and IgM in Q fever patients, the standard ELISA signals were further amplified by using biotinylated anti-human IgG or IgM plus streptavidin-HRP polymer. The modified ELISA can detect 88% (29 out of 33) of Q fever patient sera collected from Marines deployed to Iraq. Less than 5% (5 out of 156) of the sera from patients with other febrile diseases reacted with the Com1. These results suggest that the modified ELISA using Com1 may have the potential to improve the detection of Q fever specific antibodies. PMID:26904739

  7. Detection of antibody-antigen reaction by silicon nitride slot-ring biosensors using protein G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Tomoya; Hirowatari, Anna; Ikeda, Takeshi; Fukuyama, Masataka; Amemiya, Yoshiteru; Kuroda, Akio; Yokoyama, Shin

    2016-04-01

    Biosensors using ring resonators with silicon nitride (SiN) slot waveguides have been fabricated. The temperature coefficient of the resonance wavelength of the SiN resonator is 0.006 nm/°C, which is one order of magnitude smaller than that of Si. The sensitivity of the biosensor has been improved by using slot waveguide together with Si-binding protein (designated as Si-tag), which bonds to SiN or SiO2 surface, as an anchoring molecule to immobilize bioreceptors on the SiN rings in an oriented manner. Furthermore, the protein G, which strongly bonds to many kinds of mammalian antibodies only by mixing the antibody solution, is used to efficiently immobilize the antigen on the sensor surface. By means of these devises the sensitivity of the biosensor has been improved by factor of 10-100 compared with that of normal Si ring resonator sensors without slot. Then the detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA) with the sensitivity of ~1×10-8 g/ml, which is the concentration of strongly suspicious for the prostate cancer, has been achieved.

  8. Tracking serum antibody response to viral antigens with arrayed imaging reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mace, Charles R.; Rose, Robert C.; Miller, Benjamin L.

    2009-02-01

    Arrayed Imaging Reflectometry, or "AIR", is a new label-free technique for detecting proteins that relies on bindinginduced changes in the response of an antireflective coating on the surface of a silicon ship. Because the technique provides high sensitivity, excellent dynamic range, and readily integrates with standard silicon wafer processing technology, it is an exceptionally attractive platform on which to build systems for detecting proteins in complex solutions. In our early research, we used AIR chips bearing secreted receptor proteins from enteropathogenic E. coli to develop sensors for this pathogen. Recently, we have been exploring an alternative strategy: Rather than detecting the pathogen directly, can one immobilize antigens from a pathogen, and employ AIR to detect antibody responses to those antigens? Such a strategy would provide enhanced sensitivity for pathogen detection (as the immune system essentially amplifies the "signal" caused by the presence of an organism to which it responds), and would also potentially prove useful in the process of vaccine development. We describe herein preliminary results in the application of such a strategy to the detection of antibodies to human papillomavirus (HPV).

  9. Hypervariable antigenic region 1 of classical swine fever virus E2 protein impacts antibody neutralization.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xun; Wang, Zuohuan; Cao, Tong; Tong, Chao; Geng, Shichao; Gu, Yuanxing; Zhou, Yingshan; Li, Xiaoliang; Fang, Weihuan

    2016-07-19

    Envelope glycoprotein E2 of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the major antigen that induces neutralizing antibodies and confers protection against CSFV infection. There are three hypervariable antigenic regions (HAR1, HAR2 and HAR3) of E2 that are different between the group 1 vaccine C-strain and group 2 clinical isolates. This study was aimed to characterize the antigenic epitope region recognized by monoclonal antibody 4F4 (mAb-4F4) that is present in the group 2 field isolate HZ1-08, but not in the C-strain, and examine its impact on neutralization titers when antisera from different recombinant viruses were cross-examined. Indirect ELISA with C-strain E2-based chimeric proteins carrying the three HAR regions showed that the mAb-4F4 bound to HAR1 from HZ1-08 E2, but not to HAR2 or HAR3, indicating that the specific epitope is located in the HAR1 region. Of the 6 major residues differences between C-strain and field isolates, Glu713 in the HAR1 region of strain HZ1-08 is critical for mAb-4F4 binding either at the recombinant protein level or using intact recombinant viruses carrying single mutations. C-strain-based recombinant viruses carrying the most antigenic part of E2 or HAR1 from strain HZ1-08 remained non-pathogenic to pigs and induced good antibody responses. By cross-neutralization assay, we observed that the anti-C-strain serum lost most of its neutralization capacity to RecC-HZ-E2 and QZ-14 (subgroup 2.1d field isolate in 2014), and vice versa. More importantly, the RecC-HAR1 virus remained competent in neutralizing ReC-HZ-E2 and QZ-14 strains without compromising the neutralization capability to the recombinant C-strain. Thus, we propose that chimeric C-strain carrying the HAR1 region of field isolates is a good vaccine candidate for classical swine fever.

  10. Hypervariable antigenic region 1 of classical swine fever virus E2 protein impacts antibody neutralization.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xun; Wang, Zuohuan; Cao, Tong; Tong, Chao; Geng, Shichao; Gu, Yuanxing; Zhou, Yingshan; Li, Xiaoliang; Fang, Weihuan

    2016-07-19

    Envelope glycoprotein E2 of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the major antigen that induces neutralizing antibodies and confers protection against CSFV infection. There are three hypervariable antigenic regions (HAR1, HAR2 and HAR3) of E2 that are different between the group 1 vaccine C-strain and group 2 clinical isolates. This study was aimed to characterize the antigenic epitope region recognized by monoclonal antibody 4F4 (mAb-4F4) that is present in the group 2 field isolate HZ1-08, but not in the C-strain, and examine its impact on neutralization titers when antisera from different recombinant viruses were cross-examined. Indirect ELISA with C-strain E2-based chimeric proteins carrying the three HAR regions showed that the mAb-4F4 bound to HAR1 from HZ1-08 E2, but not to HAR2 or HAR3, indicating that the specific epitope is located in the HAR1 region. Of the 6 major residues differences between C-strain and field isolates, Glu713 in the HAR1 region of strain HZ1-08 is critical for mAb-4F4 binding either at the recombinant protein level or using intact recombinant viruses carrying single mutations. C-strain-based recombinant viruses carrying the most antigenic part of E2 or HAR1 from strain HZ1-08 remained non-pathogenic to pigs and induced good antibody responses. By cross-neutralization assay, we observed that the anti-C-strain serum lost most of its neutralization capacity to RecC-HZ-E2 and QZ-14 (subgroup 2.1d field isolate in 2014), and vice versa. More importantly, the RecC-HAR1 virus remained competent in neutralizing ReC-HZ-E2 and QZ-14 strains without compromising the neutralization capability to the recombinant C-strain. Thus, we propose that chimeric C-strain carrying the HAR1 region of field isolates is a good vaccine candidate for classical swine fever. PMID:27317266

  11. Influenza virus titration, antigenic characterization, and serological methods for antibody detection.

    PubMed

    Klimov, Alexander; Balish, Amanda; Veguilla, Vic; Sun, Hong; Schiffer, Jarad; Lu, Xiuhua; Katz, Jacqueline M; Hancock, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes some commonly used methods of influenza virus titration, antigenic characterization, and serological methods by antibody detection. These methods are essential not only for virus characterization but also for identifying new antigenic variants, vaccine strain selection, and sero-epidemiologic studies of influenza virus transmission and prevalence. Virus titration methods such as the hemagglutination assay, 50% egg or tissue culture infectious dose, and plaque assay are employed to determine the amount of virus particles in a sample. The hemagglutination inhibition assay is a reliable, relatively simple and inexpensive technique to antigenically characterize isolates of influenza viruses. Serological methods such as virus neutralization and hemagglutination inhibition are the fundamental tools used in sero-epidemiologic studies of influenza virus transmission and prevalence and in the evaluation of vaccine immunogenicity. While serological methods rarely yield an early diagnosis of acute influenza virus infection, well-timed, paired acute, and convalescent serum samples may establish the diagnosis of a recent influenza infection even when attempts to detect the virus are negative.

  12. Antibodies with 'Original Antigenic Sin' Properties Are Valuable Components of Secondary Immune Responses to Influenza Viruses.

    PubMed

    Linderman, Susanne L; Hensley, Scott E

    2016-08-01

    Human antibodies (Abs) elicited by influenza viruses often bind with a high affinity to past influenza virus strains, but paradoxically, do not bind to the viral strain actually eliciting the response. This phenomena is called 'original antigenic sin' (OAS) since this can occur at the expense of generating new de novo Abs. Here, we characterized the specificity and functionality of Abs elicited in mice that were sequentially exposed to two antigenically distinct H1N1 influenza virus strains. Many Abs elicited under these conditions had an OAS phenotype, in that they bound strongly to the viral strain used for the first exposure and very weakly to the viral strain used for the second exposure. We found that OAS and non-OAS Abs target the same general region of the influenza hemagglutinin protein and that B cells expressing these two types of Abs can be clonally-related. Surprisingly, although OAS Abs bound with very low affinities, some were able to effectively protect against an antigenically drifted viral strain following passive transfer in vivo. Taken together, our data indicate that OAS Abs share some level of cross-reactivity between priming and recall viral strains and that B cells producing these Abs can be protective when recalled into secondary immune responses. PMID:27537358

  13. A comparison of antibody responses to veterinary vaccine antigens potentiated by different adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Usinger, W R

    1997-12-01

    Six adjuvant formulations were compared for their ability to potentiate the primary and memory antibody responses in mice to three companion animal vaccine immunogens--feline leukemia virus (FeLV), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), and a recombinantly-derived heartworm antigen. The combination of a novel bacterial immunostimulator, gliding bacterial adjuvant (GBA), either adsorbed onto an aluminum hydroxide gel (Rehydragel HPA), or emulsified with a vehicle of polyalcohol and detergent, elicited the strongest memory responses to both virus preparations. Both forms of aluminum hydroxide gels administered without GBA gave similar levels of adjuvant effects, on par with or greater than those generated by incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA). The Acemannan immunostimulant was not effective in increasing the responses to the virus antigens, but increased the primary response to the heart-worm antigen over tenfold from control levels. All preparations appeared to be well tolerated, with no detectable adverse reactions observed in any of the 250 mice used. The proven safety of aluminum hydroxide adjuvants and the apparent absence of adverse reactions seen with GBA make this vehicle/adjuvant formulation worthy of additional study. PMID:9413100

  14. Discrimination of rat Brunner's gland carbohydrate antigens by site-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Chimuro, Tomoyuki; Kuroyama, Hiroyuki; Goso, Yukinobu; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Kurihara, Makoto

    2016-09-01

    Mucus produced and secreted by gastrointestinal mucosa contains various types of mucins equipped with unique sugar chains considered to play critical roles in protecting mucous membranes; therefore, the identification and verification of mucin sugar chains is important for understanding the underlying mechanisms. In our previous work, we generated three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), RGM22, RGM26, and RGM42, which recognize sugar chains in rat gastric mucin. Here, we immunohistochemically analyzed the rat gastrointestinal mucosa and found that the antigens recognized by RGM22 and RGM42 were expressed in the rat antrum and Brunner's glands, whereas that recognized by RGM26 was detected in the antrum, but rarely in Brunner's glands. We found that these antibodies reacted with porcine gastric mucin-derived oligosaccharides bearing a common structure: GalNAcα1-3(Fucα1-2)Galβ1-4GlcNAcβ1-6GalNAc-ol. Moreover, epitope analysis revealed that RGM42 and RGM22 recognized α-linked GalNAc and GalNAcα1-3Gal, respectively, on the GalNAcα1-3(Fucα1-2)Gal structure, whereas RGM26 was specific for GalNAcα1-3(Fucα1-2)Gal. These results indicate that rat Brunner's glands express specific antigens bearing GalNAcα1-3Gal that are recognized by RGM22 and RGM42. Thus, RGM22, RGM26, and RGM42 with their unique antigen specificities could be useful tools for investigation of oligosaccharide diversity among mucins. PMID:27454489

  15. Multi-antibody composition in lupus nephritis: isotype and antigen specificity make the difference.

    PubMed

    Bonanni, Alice; Vaglio, Augusto; Bruschi, Maurizio; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Cavagna, Lorenzo; Moroni, Gabriella; Franceschini, Franco; Allegri, Landino; Pratesi, Federico; Migliorini, Paola; Candiano, Giovanni; Pesce, Giampaola; Ravelli, Angelo; Puppo, Francesco; Martini, Alberto; Tincani, Angela; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2015-08-01

    Research on autoimmune processes involved in glomerulonephritis has been for years based on experimental models. Recent progress in proteomics has radically modified perspectives: laser microdissection and proteomics were crucial for an in vivo analysis of autoantibodies eluted from human biopsies. Lupus nephritis has been the subject of recent independent researches. Main topics have been the definition of renal autoimmune components in human lupus biopsies; methods were laser capture of glomeruli and/or of single cells (CD38+ or Ki-67+) from tubulointerstitial areas as starting step followed by elution and characterization of renal antibodies by proteomics. The innovative approach highlighted different panels of autoantibodies deposited in glomeruli and in tubulo-interstitial areas that actually represented the unique autoimmune components in these patients. IgG2 was the major isotype; new podocyte proteins (αenolase, annexin AI) and already known implanted molecules (DNA, histone 3, C1q) were their target antigens in glomeruli. Vimentin was the antigen in tubulo-interstitial areas. Matching renal autoantibodies with serum allowed the definition of a typical autoantibody serum map that included the same anti-αenolase, anti-annexin AI, anti-DNA, and anti-histone 3 IgG2 already detected in renal tissue. Serum levels of specific autoantibodies were tenfold increased in patients with lupus nephritis allowing a clear differentiation from both rheumatoid arthritis and other glomerulonephritis. In all cases, targeted antigens were characterized as components of lupus NETosis. Matching renal/serum autoantibody composition in vivo furnishes new insights on human lupus nephritis and allows to refine composition of circulating antibodies in patients with lupus. A thoughtful passage from bench to bedside of new knowledge would expand our clinical and therapeutic opportunities.

  16. Localization of immunodominant epitopes within the "a" determinant of hepatitis B surface antigen using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Golsaz-Shirazi, Forough; Mohammadi, Hamed; Amiri, Mohammad Mehdi; Khoshnoodi, Jalal; Kardar, Gholam Ali; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Shokri, Fazel

    2016-10-01

    The common "a" determinant is the major immunodominant region of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) shared by all serotypes and genotypes of hepatitis B virus (HBV). Antibodies against this region are thought to confer protection against HBV and are essential for viral clearance. Mutations within the "a" determinant may lead to conformational changes in this region, which can affect the binding of neutralizing antibodies. There is an increasing concern about identification and control of mutant viruses which is possible by comprehensive structural investigation of the epitopes located within this region. Anti-HBs monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against different epitopes of HBsAg are a promising tool to meet this goal. In the present study, 19 anti-HBs mAbs were employed to map epitopes localized within the "a" determinant, using a panel of recombinant mutant HBsAgs. The topology of the epitopes was analyzed by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Our results indicate that all of the mAbs seem to recognize epitopes within or in the vicinity of the "a" determinant of HBsAg. Different patterns of binding with mutant forms were observed with different mAbs. Amino acid substitutions at positions 123, 126, 129, 144, and 145 dramatically reduced the reactivity of antibodies with HBsAg. The T123N mutation had the largest impact on antibody binding to HBsAg. The reactivity pattern of our panel of mAbs with mutant forms of HBsAg could have important clinical implications for immunoscreening, diagnosis of HBV infection, design of a new generation of recombinant HB vaccines, and immunoprophylaxis of HBV infection as an alternative to therapy with hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG). PMID:27439498

  17. Antiphospholipid antibodies promote leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion and thrombosis in mice by antagonizing eNOS via β2GPI and apoER2.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Sangeetha; Morrell, Craig N; Tarango, Cristina; Thomas, Gail D; Yuhanna, Ivan S; Girardi, Guillermina; Herz, Joachim; Urbanus, Rolf T; de Groot, Philip G; Thorpe, Philip E; Salmon, Jane E; Shaul, Philip W; Mineo, Chieko

    2011-01-01

    In antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) binding to β2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI) induce endothelial cell-leukocyte adhesion and thrombus formation via unknown mechanisms. Here we show that in mice both of these processes are caused by the inhibition of eNOS. In studies of cultured human, bovine, and mouse endothelial cells, the promotion of monocyte adhesion by aPL entailed decreased bioavailable NO, and aPL fully antagonized eNOS activation by diverse agonists. Similarly, NO-dependent, acetylcholine-induced increases in carotid vascular conductance were impaired in aPL-treated mice. The inhibition of eNOS was caused by antibody recognition of domain I of β2GPI and β2GPI dimerization, and it was due to attenuated eNOS S1179 phosphorylation mediated by protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Furthermore, LDL receptor family member antagonism with receptor-associated protein (RAP) prevented aPL inhibition of eNOS in cell culture, and ApoER2-/- mice were protected from aPL inhibition of eNOS in vivo. Moreover, both aPL-induced increases in leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion and thrombus formation were absent in eNOS-/- and in ApoER2-/- mice. Thus, aPL-induced leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion and thrombosis are caused by eNOS antagonism, which is due to impaired S1179 phosphorylation mediated by β2GPI, apoER2, and PP2A. Our results suggest that novel therapies for APS can now be developed targeting these mechanisms. PMID:21123944

  18. Plaque/focus immunoassay: a simple method for detecting antiviral monoclonal or other antibodies and viral antigens in cells.

    PubMed

    Pauli, G; Gregersen, J P; Ludwig, H

    1984-11-30

    A new, simple enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is described which is performed directly on infected and fixed cell cultures in microtitre plates. It permits large scale screening of antiviral monoclonal antibodies and differentiation of specific antibodies from those usually responsible for high background reactions in other ELISA techniques. Time consuming purification of antigens is thus avoided. The plaque/focus immunoassay is also applicable to titration of antibodies in patients' sera and antigens in lytically or non-lytically virus-infected cells. It may also be used to localize antigens in different cell compartments. This immunoassay requires no special equipment and results may be evaluated either with the naked eye or using a light microscope.

  19. Do antibodies to myelin basic protein isolated from multiple sclerosis cross-react with measles and other common virus antigens?

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, C C; Townsend, E; Randell, V B; Williamson, H G

    1983-01-01

    Immunological activity to various antigens, including brain components, measles and other viruses, has been associated with IgG in multiple sclerosis (MS). One possible explanation for the presence of anti-viral antibodies and antibody to myelin basic protein (MBP) in MS patients is that there are antigenic determinants common to certain viruses and MBP. To assess this possibility, IgG from individual brains and sera from patients with MS, subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) and controls was isolated by protein A and MBP-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Antibody to MBP was measured with a solid phase radioimmunoassay and antibody to measles and other viruses by immunofluorescence and/or complement fixation. Anti-MBP activity was detected in brain extracts and sera of all MS patients tested. In contrast to the low levels of antibody to MBP in control brains, high levels of anti-MBP antibodies were found in most of the normal sera. There was no correlation between the presence and levels of serum anti-measles antibodies and the anti-MBP activity. None of the anti-MBP antibodies affinity purified from brain and serum of MS patients reacted with any of the viruses tested, including measles. IgG purified from SSPE patients or from a rabbit hyperimmunized with measles antigen had no reactivity to MBP, despite high levels of anti-measles antibody. It is concluded that there is not direct link between the presence of antibody to MBP and antibody to measles and other viruses in MS patients. PMID:6190599

  20. Development of a Recombinant Antigen for Antibody-Based Diagnosis of Mycoplasma bovis Infection in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Brank, Marion; Le Grand, Dominique; Poumarat, François; Bezille, Pierre; Rosengarten, Renate; Citti, Christine

    1999-01-01

    Mycoplasma bovis induces various clinical manifestations in cattle, such as mastitis, arthritis, and pneumonia. We have evaluated the immunoreactivity of three variable surface proteins (Vsps) of M. bovis, namely VspA, VspB, and VspC, with sera collected from herds with mycoplasmosis or from cattle experimentally infected with M. bovis. Western blot analysis revealed that the Vsps are the predominant antigens recognized by the host humoral response during M. bovis infection. The immunoreactivity of VspA, VspB, and VspC with host antibodies was independent of the clinical manifestations, the geographical origin of the M. bovis isolates, the mode of infection, and the animal’s history. Moreover, the results showed that Vsp-specific host antibodies can be detected about 10 days after experimental infection and for up to several months. The full-length or truncated versions of the VspA product were overexpressed in Escherichia coli as fusion proteins (FP-VspA). Recombinant products showed strong immunoreactivity with the Vsp-specific monoclonal antibodies 1A1 and 1E5, with the corresponding epitopes localized at the VspA N-terminal and C-terminal ends, respectively. Anti-M. bovis sera of cattle naturally or experimentally infected also strongly recognized the full-length FP-VspA. The seroreactivity of sera collected from cattle between 6 and 10 days after experimental infection was weaker with truncated versions of VspA lacking the 1E5 epitope than with the full-length VspA or the truncated versions lacking the 1A1 epitope. Overall, the results indicate that the Vsps, despite their inter- and intraclonal variability, may be applied as target antigens in serodiagnostic assays for epidemiological studies. PMID:10548577

  1. King cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) bites in Myanmar: venom antigen levels and development of venom antibodies.

    PubMed

    Tun-Pe; Aye-Aye-Myint; Warrell, D A; Tin-Myint

    1995-03-01

    Venom, venom IgG and IgM antibody and total serum IgG levels following king cobra bites in two reptile handlers were measured by enzyme immunoassay. The patient in case 1 received antivenom while the patient in case 2 did not. Case 1 made a complete recovery following the bite and produced a high titre short-lived antibody. Venom antigen was not detected in the sample taken 11 hr after antivenom. Case 2 had experienced two recent minor king cobra bites and had received traditional immunization 4 weeks before the accident reported here. He had developed only local swelling and suffered no neurological symptoms. Venom antigen measured at 1.45 hr after the bite was 132 ng/ml; this rapidly fell to 45 ng/ml over the next 30 min, and was no longer detectable 14 hr after the bite. The pattern of venom IgG and IgM antibody responses in both cases was comparable, except that in case 2 the venom IgG peak was maintained for 13 days, compared with 1 day in case 1; in case 2 it subsequently fell to low levels 8 weeks after the bite. Venom IgM appeared 1 day after the bite, peaked at day 7-9, rapidly tailed off on day 12-16 and was then undetectable from day 20 onwards in both. Total IgG level remained within normal limits in both. It is possible that previous bites and recent immunization contributed to the boosting of the venom IgG response in case 2.

  2. Prevalence of antibodies interactive with HTLV-I antigens in selected Solomon Islands populations.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, M Y; Hrdy, D B; Carlson, J R; Friedlaender, J S

    1990-04-01

    Serum samples obtained in 1986 from healthy individuals in three distinct Solomon Islands populations were screened for antibodies to human lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I). One of the populations tested lives on the remote Polynesian outlier atoll, Ontong Java. The other two groups, the Baegu and the Lau, are Melanesians living on Malaita, the most populous of the larger Solomon Islands. Eighty-eight of a total of 601 (14.6%) sera tested were repeatably reactive in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that uses as antigen a lysate of HTLV-I viral particles. The prevalence of antibodies interactive with HTLV-I viral particles. The prevalence of antibodies interactive with HTLV-I antigens varied among the three groups, ranging from 8.5% (16/188) in the Baegu, through 13% (7/54) in the Lau, to 18.1% (65/359) among the Ontong Java population. The specificity of the screening ELISA was confirmed by protein immunoblot. No serum samples were obtained from children under 9 years of age. Although 121 of the 601 sera came from children between the ages of 9 and 19, none of these were reactive in the HTLV-I ELISA. Starting in the third decade, the prevalence of HTLV-I seropositivity increased with age, from 8.8% (10/113) between the ages of 20 and 29 to a peak of 25.9% (15/58) and 25% (15/60) in the sixth and seventh decade, respectively. This age-specific prevalence pattern is strikingly similar to that which is seen in populations where HTLV-I infection is endemic. PMID:2333936

  3. Kinetic analysis of a high-affinity antibody/antigen interaction performed by multiple Biacore users.

    PubMed

    Katsamba, Phinikoula S; Navratilova, Iva; Calderon-Cacia, Maria; Fan, Linsey; Thornton, Kevin; Zhu, Mingde; Bos, Tim Vanden; Forte, Carla; Friend, Della; Laird-Offringa, Ite; Tavares, Gisele; Whatley, John; Shi, Ergang; Widom, Angela; Lindquist, Kevin C; Klakamp, Scott; Drake, Andrew; Bohmann, David; Roell, Marina; Rose, Larry; Dorocke, Jill; Roth, Bruce; Luginbühl, Béatrice; Myszka, David G

    2006-05-15

    To explore the reliability of Biacore-based assays, 22 study participants measured the binding of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) to a monoclonal antibody (mAb). Each participant was provided with the same reagents and a detailed experimental protocol. The mAb was immobilized on the sensor chip at three different densities and a two-step assay was used to determine the kinetic and affinity parameters of the PSA/mAb complex. First, PSA was tested over a concentration range of 2.5-600 nM to obtain k(a) information. Second, to define the k(d) of this stable antigen/antibody complex accurately, the highest PSA concentration was retested with the dissociation phase of each binding cycle monitored for 1h. All participants collected data that could be analyzed to obtain kinetic parameters for the interaction. The association and the extended-dissociation data derived from the three antibody surfaces were globally fit using a simple 1:1 interaction model. The average k(a) and k(d) for the PSA/mAb interaction as calculated from the 22 analyses were (4.1+/-0.6) x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) and (4.5+/-0.6) x 10(-5) s(-1), respectively. Overall, the experimental standard errors in the rate constants were only approximately 14%. Based on the kinetic rate constants, the affinity (K(D)) of the PSA/mAb interaction was 1.1+/-0.2 nM.

  4. Crystal structure of human prostate-specific antigen in a sandwich antibody complex.

    PubMed

    Stura, Enrico A; Muller, Bruno H; Bossus, Marc; Michel, Sandrine; Jolivet-Reynaud, Colette; Ducancel, Frédéric

    2011-12-01

    Human prostate-specific antigen (PSA or human kallikrein-related peptidase 3) present in small quantities in the sera of healthy men becomes elevated in prostate cancer (PCa) and other prostate disorders. The ability to identify the free PSA fraction associated with PCa could increase the reliability of the PSA diagnostic test. Here we present the crystal structure of human PSA from seminal fluid in a sandwich complex with two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). MAb 5D5A5 captures total PSA with exceptionally high affinity, and mAb 5D3D11 selectively discriminates between free PSA subforms that are more abundant in sera from patients with PCa. Although the antigen is not of seric origin, several insights into cancer diagnosis can be discerned from this complex. MAb 5D3D11 recognizes a PSA conformation different from that previously reported. Interacting with the kallikrein loop, the PSA N-linked glycan attached to asparagine 61 is an uncommonly complex sialated triantennary chain. O-linked glycosylation is observed at threonine 125. The description of how PSA subforms in prostatic fluid can be discriminated using pairs of antibodies is a first step in the design of new strategies that are capable of real discrimination among PSA subforms, which will lead to the formulation of more reliable diagnostic tests. In a companion article [Muller, B. H., Savatier, A., L'Hostis, G., Costa, N., Bossus, M., Michel, S., et al. (2011). In vitro affinity maturation of an anti-PSA antibody for prostate cancer diagnostic assay. J. Mol. Biol.], we describe engineering efforts to improve the affinity of mAb 5D3D11, a first step towards such goal. PMID:22037582

  5. Detection of Leptospira-Specific Antibodies Using a Recombinant Antigen-Based Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua-Wei; Zhang, Zhiwen; Halsey, Eric S.; Guevara, Carolina; Canal, Enrique; Hall, Eric; Maves, Ryan; Tilley, Drake H.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.; Ching, Wei-Mei

    2013-01-01

    We produced three highly purified recombinant antigens rLipL32, rLipL41, and rLigA-Rep (leptospiral immunoglobulin-like A repeat region) for the detection of Leptospira-specific antibodies in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The performance of these recombinant antigens was evaluated using 121 human sera. Among them, 63 sera were microscopic agglutination test (MAT)-confirmed positive sera from febrile patients in Peru, 22 sera were indigenous MAT-negative febrile patient sera, and 36 sera were from patients with other febrile diseases from Southeast Asia, where leptospirosis is also endemic. Combining the results of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG detection from these three antigens, the overall sensitivity is close to 90% based on the MAT. These results suggest that an ELISA using multiple recombinant antigens may be used as an alternative method for the detection of Leptospira-specific antibodies. PMID:24166046

  6. Differential regulation of leukocyte function-associated antigen-1/ intercellular adhesion molecules-1-dependent adhesion and aggregation in HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, K; Kinashi, T; Irie, S; Katagiri, T

    1996-05-15

    Activation of integrin and organization of cytoskeletal proteins are highly regulated in cell adhesion and aggregation. The interaction of leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) and intercellular adhesion molecules-1 (ICAM-1) mediates cell adhesion and aggregation, which facilitate leukocyte trafficking to inflamed tissues and augment effector functions. We investigated how LFA-1/ICAM-1-mediated adhesion and aggregation are regulated in HL-60 cells induced to differentiate into neutrophils by retinoic acid (RA). Uninduced HL-60 cells did not bind to ICAM-1 even with stimulation by 12-0-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate, although they express LFA-1 on the cell surface. When cultured with RA for 24 hours, HL-60 cells were able to adhere to ICAM-1 constitutively. The induction of adhesion did not accompany any change in surface density of LFA-1, indicating that the avidity of LFA-1 was increased. The change in its avidity required de novo synthesis of proteins. Although ICAM-1 was intensely expressed on RA-induced HL-60 cells, these cells did not show any cellular aggregation. The HL-60 cells transfected with the active form of Ras (Val12) exhibited LFA-1/ICAM-1-dependent aggregation by RA stimulation without change in the avidity of LFA-1. In these Ras-transfectants, a cytoskeletal protein, paxillin, was tyrosine-phosphorylated, and the level of F-actin increased. Transforming growth factor (TGF) beta, as well as cytochalasin D, prevented both the tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin and the aggregation without any effects on the avidity of LFA-1. Thus, an increase in the avidity of LFA-1 was not sufficient for the induction of aggregation, which required activation of Ras and reorganization of cytoskeletal proteins. These results suggest that distinct regulatory mechanisms control LFA-1/ICAM-1-dependent adhesion and aggregation in HL-60 cells differentiating into neutrophils.

  7. Hantavirus antigen detection using human serum immunoglobulin M as the capturing antibody in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Alexeyev, O A; Elgh, F; Ahlm, C; Stigbrand, T; Settergren, B; Wadell, G; Juto, P

    1996-04-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed to detect different hantavirus antigens in cell culture; i.e. Puumala (PUU), Hantaan (HTN), and Dobrava (DOB) viruses. The assay was based on binding human serum immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies to the solid phase by use of goat anti-IgM antibodies. The captured IgM antibodies were present in the acute phase serum from two patients: one infected in Sweden and the other in Bosnia. Antigens being bound to the solid phase by the human anti-PUU and anti-DOB/HTN IgM antibodies were detected by a broadly reacting polyclonal rabbit anti PUU-recombinant nucleocapsid protein antiserum. The IgM isotype was proven to be at least five times more efficient than IgG when used as the capturing antibody. The sensitivity of the PUU antigen ELISA was approximately 0.5 ng/ml, as measured by titration with a PUU recombinant nucleoprotein antigen. Cell-associated PUU antigen in tissue culture was seen after 48 hr by the PUU-ELISA and after 96 hr by immunofluorescent assay. When tested for capacity to discriminate between PUU, DOB, and HTN viruses, significant differences were found: the Swedish serum detected PUU antigen at high titers, whereas no reactivity was found against DOB and HTN; the Bosnian serum detected both DOB and HTN at high titers but had a low reactivity to PUU. The method was also tested for its usefulness in detecting PUU antigen in bank vole (clethrionomys glareolus) lungs. Of 59 animals captured from the surroundings of patients with nephropathia epidemica, three became positive with a high activity in the PUU-ELISA, but with low reactivity in the DOB/HTN-ELISA. It is concluded that a sensitive ELISA has been developed to detect different hantaviruses in cell culture and lungs of bank voles.

  8. Candidate vaccine antigens identified by antibodies from mice vaccinated with 15- or 50-kilorad-irradiated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed Central

    Richter, D; Harn, D A

    1993-01-01

    In murine schistosomiasis, the highest levels of resistance to cercarial challenge are obtained by vaccination with radiation-attenuated cercariae. To identify candidate vaccine antigens relevant to the vaccine model, we examined parasite antigens recognized by antibodies from mice vaccinated with irradiated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni. To optimize recognition of a wide spectrum of antigens, several factors that influence the level of protection in this model were varied; specifically, we examined the effect of (i) single versus multiple vaccinations with irradiated cercariae, (ii) the dose of irradiation (15 or 50 kilorads) administered to the cercariae, and (iii) the genetic background of mouse strains, high-responder (C57BL/6J) versus moderate-responder (CBA/J) mice. We found that the number of vaccinations did not alter antibody specificity but modified the relative antibody titers against particular antigens. The dose of irradiation used to attenuate the immunizing cercariae had a similar effect on antibody titers but in addition influenced antibody specificity. Only mice that had been vaccinated with moderately irradiated cercariae recognized cathepsin B (Sm31) and Sm32. Interestingly, when vaccinated mice of the two strains, C57BL/6J and CBA/J, were compared, differences in antibody responses to particular antigens were observed. Both strains recognized the integral membrane protein Sm23, glutathione S-transferase, and cathepsin B, whereas Sm32 and paramyosin were recognized only by CBA/J mice, and heat shock protein 70 was recognized exclusively by C57BL/6J mice. In this study, we conclusively identified six distinct antigens that are specifically recognized by the humoral immune response of vaccinated mice. Images PMID:8418037

  9. Development of dual-function ELISA for effective antigen and antibody detection against H7 avian influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Outbreaks in poultry involving influenza virus from H7 subtype have resulted in human infections, thus causing a major concern for public health, as well as for the poultry industry. Currently, no efficient rapid test is available for large-scale detection of either antigen or antibody of H7 avian influenza viruses. Results In the present study, a dual function ELISA was developed for the effective detection of antigen and antibody against H7 AIVs. The test was established based on antigen-capture-ELISA and epitope blocking ELISA. The two Mabs 62 and 98 which were exploited in the assay were identified to recognize two conformational neutralizing epitopes on H7 HA1. Both of the epitopes exist in all of the human H7 strains, including the recent H7N9 strain from China and > 96.6% of avian H7 strains. The dual ELISA was able to detect all of the five H7 antigens tested without any cross reaction to other influenza subtypes. The antigen detection limit was less than 1 HA unit of H7. For antibody detection, the sensitivity and specificity of the dual ELISA was evaluated and compared to HI and microneutralization using immunized animal sera to different H7 strains and different subtypes of AIVs. Results indicated that antibodies to H7 were readily detected in immunized animal sera by the dual ELISA whereas specimens with antibodies to other AIVs yielded negative results. Conclusions This is the first dual-function ELISA reported for either antigen or antibody detection against H7 AIVs. The assay was highly sensitive and 100% specific in both functions rendering it effective for H7 diagnosis. PMID:24083616

  10. Sequential Infection in Ferrets with Antigenically Distinct Seasonal H1N1 Influenza Viruses Boosts Hemagglutinin Stalk-Specific Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Kirchenbaum, Greg A.; Carter, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Broadly reactive antibodies targeting the conserved hemagglutinin (HA) stalk region are elicited following sequential infection or vaccination with influenza viruses belonging to divergent subtypes and/or expressing antigenically distinct HA globular head domains. Here, we demonstrate, through the use of novel chimeric HA proteins and competitive binding assays, that sequential infection of ferrets with antigenically distinct seasonal H1N1 (sH1N1) influenza virus isolates induced an HA stalk-specific antibody response. Additionally, stalk-specific antibody titers were boosted following sequential infection with antigenically distinct sH1N1 isolates in spite of preexisting, cross-reactive, HA-specific antibody titers. Despite a decline in stalk-specific serum antibody titers, sequential sH1N1 influenza virus-infected ferrets were protected from challenge with a novel H1N1 influenza virus (A/California/07/2009), and these ferrets poorly transmitted the virus to naive contacts. Collectively, these findings indicate that HA stalk-specific antibodies are commonly elicited in ferrets following sequential infection with antigenically distinct sH1N1 influenza virus isolates lacking HA receptor-binding site cross-reactivity and can protect ferrets against a pathogenic novel H1N1 virus. IMPORTANCE The influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) is a major target of the humoral immune response following infection and/or seasonal vaccination. While antibodies targeting the receptor-binding pocket of HA possess strong neutralization capacities, these antibodies are largely strain specific and do not confer protection against antigenic drift variant or novel HA subtype-expressing viruses. In contrast, antibodies targeting the conserved stalk region of HA exhibit broader reactivity among viruses within and among influenza virus subtypes. Here, we show that sequential infection of ferrets with antigenically distinct seasonal H1N1 influenza viruses boosts the antibody responses

  11. Effective antitumor therapy based on a novel antibody-drug conjugate targeting the Tn carbohydrate antigen.

    PubMed

    Sedlik, Christine; Heitzmann, Adèle; Viel, Sophie; Ait Sarkouh, Rafik; Batisse, Cornélie; Schmidt, Frédéric; De La Rochere, Philippe; Amzallag, Nathalie; Osinaga, Eduardo; Oppezzo, Pablo; Pritsch, Otto; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Hubert, Pascale; Amigorena, Sebastian; Piaggio, Eliane

    2016-07-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADC), combining the specificity of tumor recognition by monoclonal antibodies (mAb) and the powerful cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs, are currently under growing interest and development. Here, we studied the potential of Chi-Tn, a mAb directed to a glyco-peptidic tumor-associated antigen, to be used as an ADC for cancer treatment. First, we demonstrated that Chi-Tn specifically targeted tumor cells in vivo. Also, using flow cytometry and deconvolution microscopy, we showed that the Chi-Tn mAb is rapidly internalized - condition necessary to ensure the delivery of conjugated cytotoxic drugs in an active form, and targeted to early and recycling endosomes. When conjugated to saporin (SAP) or to auristatin F, the Chi-Tn ADC exhibited effective cytotoxicity to Tn-positive tumor cells in vitro, which correlated with the level of tumoral Tn expression. Furthermore, the Chi-Tn mAb conjugated to auristatin F also exhibited efficient antitumor activity in vivo, validating for the first time the use of an anti-Tn antibody as an effective ADC. PMID:27622021

  12. Immunoscintigraphy of colorectal cancer with an antibody to epithelial membrane antigen (EMA)

    SciTech Connect

    Yiu, C.Y.; Baker, L.A.; Davidson, B.R.; Ward, M.; Roberts, K.; Clarke, G.; Ward, C.; Westwood, J.; Boulos, P.B.; Clark, C.G. )

    1990-02-01

    Immunoperoxidase staining of LICR-LON M8, a mouse monoclonal antibody reactive with epithelial membrane antigen, showed a strong reaction with colorectal cancer. This finding prompted an immunoscintigraphic study of colorectal cancer patients using this antibody. Sixteen patients had external gamma scintigraphy after intravenous injection of indium 111-labeled M8. Positive scans were obtained in 11 of the 13 patients with primary colorectal cancers, and 2 of the 3 patients with recurrent tumors. The high indium 111 background in the liver prevented the detection of hepatic metastases in 5 patients. Twelve patients had samples taken of tumor, normal colon, and venous blood at the time of surgery. The ratio of labeled antibody uptake in tumor to that of blood was 5.1 (+/- 3.6 S.D.), which was significantly different (P = 0.001) to that of the similar ratio for normal colon (2.0 +/- 1.6 S.D.). The tumor to normal colon uptake ratio was 2.6 (+/- 1.3 S.D.). These results suggest a specific uptake of indium 111-labeled M8 by colorectal cancer.

  13. Immunogenicity of methanococcaceae and monoclonal antibody survey of their antigenic markers and relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Macario, A.J.L.; de Macario, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    Methanococcus vannielii and M. voltae are two known species of Methanococcaceae of which strains SB and PSv respectively, were studied. They are methanogenic bacteria (MB). These are heterogeneous and inhabit a variety of ecological niches including the human gut. Their role in health and disease and immunological properties need elucidation. Using antibody probes from rabbit antisera, 4 clusters of antigenically related MB were found. They differ in cell-wall composition, each having a typical constituent:pseudomurein, protein, glycoprotein and heteropolysaccharide. SB and PSv are remarkable; chemical analyses indicate that they have a cell-wall made only of protein. This makes SB and PSv unique targets for immunology in areas such as evolution, taxonomy and modulation of the immune system. Both were immunogenic in rabbits and mice and serologically related with each other but not with the rest of MB, or other bacteria. A panel of monoclonal antibodies against SB was generated; 47% reacted only with SB and 53% reacted also with PSv; none bound sugars or aminosugars. Multiple testing of all MB with these antibodies indicated that some of the determinants recognized by them are markers of species, while others are of higher taxa.

  14. Analysis of antibody response in human dengue patients from the Mexican coast using recombinant antigens.

    PubMed

    Lazaro-Olán, L; Mellado-Sánchez, G; García-Cordero, J; Escobar-Gutiérrez, A; Santos-Argumedo, L; Gutiérrez-Castañeda, B; Cedillo-Barrón, L

    2008-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of using recombinant dengue proteins to discriminate between acute dengue infections versus uninfected dengue samples. Dengue virus proteins E, NS1, NS3, and NS4B were cloned as fusion proteins and expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant products were tested in 100 serum samples obtained from acute dengue fever cases collected from 3 states of Mexico where dengue is endemic. Sera from 75 healthy individuals living in nonendemic areas for dengue were used as a control group. In sera from the dengue patients group, antibody responses to E protein were demonstrated in 91% of cases and NS1 protein was recognized to various extents (99%) within the first 7 days of infection. The antibody responses to NS3 and NS4B were frequently of low magnitude. Consistent negative antibody responses to all proteins were found in sera from the control group. These data suggest that the glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-dengue fusion proteins may be feasible antigens for a sensitive and specific serological assay.

  15. Determination of immunoglobulin M antibodies for hepatitis B core antigen with a capture enzyme immunoassay and biotin-labeled core antigen produced in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Vilja, P; Turunen, H J; Leinikki, P O

    1985-01-01

    A new capture enzyme immunoassay for the determination of immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies against hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) is described. Core antigen produced in Escherichia coli was labeled with biotin and subsequently detected by an avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex. The biotin-labeled core antigen was effective at concentrations as low as 20 ng/ml. Of 561 serum samples from different groups of patients that were tested, 465 samples were negative for other hepatitis B virus markers and also for anti-HBcAg IgM. Sera from the early stages of hepatitis B infection had high levels of anti-HBcAg IgM, and a clear correlation with the acuteness of the disease was observed in 45 follow-up sera from 23 patients with acute or recent hepatitis B. Sera from 21 patients with past hepatitis B were all negative for anti-HBcAg IgM. Twenty serum samples from chronic carriers of hepatitis B surface antigen showed slightly elevated antibody levels for anti-HBcAg IgM. Ten sera which were positive for anti-HBcAg IgG antibodies and had high levels of rheumatoid factor were negative for anti-HBcAg IgM. PMID:3908476

  16. [Detection of antibodies to Campylobacter jejuni in pediatrics patients with Gullain-Barré syndrome using different antigen preparations].

    PubMed

    Rokosz, Natalia; Rastawicki, Waldemar; Jagielski, Marek; Hetkowska-Abramczyk, Zofia

    2011-01-01

    Diagnosis of previous C. jejuni infections in GBS patients are mostly based on serological findings. However, there are not consensus what kind of antigen should be used in the serological assays. In our study we used ELISA with four different antigen preparations for investigation of specific antibodies to C. jejuni in serum samples obtained from 6 children with GBS. In all patients the high level of IgA and IgG antibodies to LPS were diagnosed. The antibodies in particular classes of immunoglobulins to recombinant proteins (Mikrogen), termostabile antigen and whole-cell antigen (Virion/Serion) of C. jejuni were diagnosed only in some of the children with GBS. However, in comparison to the control groups, the ELISA with recombinant proteins was most specific. Moreover, in two of the patients a characteristic decline of the level of antibodies to recombinant proteins in sera obtained in acute and chronic phase of disease have been observed. The results of this study showed that serodiagnosis, specially based on recombinant antigens, may be a reliable marker of recent or previous infection caused by C. jejuni in patients with GBS.

  17. Enzyme-labeled Antigen Method: Development and Application of the Novel Approach for Identifying Plasma Cells Locally Producing Disease-specific Antibodies in Inflammatory Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Yasuyoshi; Shiogama, Kazuya; Onouchi, Takanori; Sakurai, Kouhei; Inada, Ken-ichi; Tsutsumi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    In chronic inflammatory lesions of autoimmune and infectious diseases, plasma cells are frequently observed. Antigens recognized by antibodies produced by the plasma cells mostly remain unclear. A new technique identifying these corresponding antigens may give us a breakthrough for understanding the disease from a pathophysiological viewpoint, simply because the immunocytes are seen within the lesion. We have developed an enzyme-labeled antigen method for microscopic identification of the antigen recognized by specific antibodies locally produced in plasma cells in inflammatory lesions. Firstly, target biotinylated antigens were constructed by the wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system or through chemical biotinylation. Next, proteins reactive to antibodies in tissue extracts were screened and antibody titers were evaluated by the AlphaScreen method. Finally, with the enzyme-labeled antigen method using the biotinylated antigens as probes, plasma cells producing specific antibodies were microscopically localized in fixed frozen sections. Our novel approach visualized tissue plasma cells that produced 1) autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis, 2) antibodies against major antigens of Porphyromonas gingivalis in periodontitis or radicular cyst, and 3) antibodies against a carbohydrate antigen, Strep A, of Streptococcus pyogenes in recurrent tonsillitis. Evaluation of local specific antibody responses expectedly contributes to clarifying previously unknown processes in inflammatory disorders. PMID:27006517

  18. Fluorescence Evaluation of Antigen-Antibody Reactivity on Surface of Proteinaceous Occlusion Body: Toward Application in Reusable Protein Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Hosokawa, Yoichiroh; Suzuki, Kenji; Ikeda, Keiko; Mori, Hajime; Masuhara, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    A proteinaceous occlusion body, which is produced by insect viruses and consists of polyhedrin protein, has attracted much attention as a capsule for occluding an antigen protein. The occlusion body is called polyhedron. Its shape is cubic and its size is a few μm. Because several antigen proteins will be on the surface of polyhedra and several chemically active sites will be exposed, the polyhedra can be used as elements of protein chips to monitor antigen-antibody reactions. This idea is demonstrated by fixing a single polyhedron on a glass substrate and inducing an antigen-antibody reaction individually, and confirmed using relevant fluorescence microscopic images. Furthermore, a technique of cleaning the reacted surface is developed on the basis of the solubility of the polyhedrin matrix in an alkaline solution. The antigen-antibody complex on the surface can be removed by washing with the alkaline solution, and the antigen inside the polyhedron is exposed to the surface. On the basis of these results, the possibility of developing a “reusable protein chip” using the polyhedron is proposed.

  19. Glycosylation of a VH residue of a monoclonal antibody against alpha (1- ---6) dextran increases its affinity for antigen

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have observed that antidextran hybridomas with potential N-linked glycosylation sites in VH have higher affinity for polymeric dextran and for isomaltoheptaose than those lacking potential glycosylation sites. In these studies we have used gene transfection and expression techniques to verify that the carbohydrate addition sites in VH were used. The carbohydrate of the VH region was accessible for binding by the lectin Con A. By ELISA analysis it was demonstrated that the aKa of the antibody for dextran was influenced by the presence of carbohydrate in VH, with the aglycosylated antibody having an aKa 15-fold lower than its untreated counterpart. The aKa for antigen of antibodies that contain carbohydrate only in their constant region was unaffected by lack of carbohydrate. Thus, not only the amino acid sequence of the variable region but also its carbohydrate moieties can determine the magnitude of the antigen-antibody interaction. PMID:2459288

  20. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Peptides Derived from Tumor Antigens Induced by Inhibition of DNA Methylation for Development of Drug-facilitated Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shraibman, Bracha; Kadosh, Dganit Melamed; Barnea, Eilon; Admon, Arie

    2016-09-01

    Treatment of cancer cells with anticancer drugs often fails to achieve complete remission. Yet, such drug treatments may induce alteration in the tumor's gene expression patterns, including those of Cancer/Testis Antigens (CTA). The degradation products of such antigens can be presented as HLA peptides on the surface of the tumor cells and be developed into anticancer immunotherapeutics. For example, the DNA methyl transferase inhibitor, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (Decitabine) has limited antitumor efficacy, yet it induces the expression of many genes, including CTAs that are normally silenced in the healthy adult tissues. In this study, the presentation of many new HLA peptides derived from CTAs and induced by Decitabine was demonstrated in three human Glioblastoma cell lines. Such presentation of CTA-derived HLA peptides can be exploited for development of new treatment modalities, combining drug treatment with anti-CTA targeted immunotherapy. The Decitabine-induced HLA peptidomes include many CTAs that are not normally detected in healthy tissues or in cancer cells, unless treated with the drug. In addition, the study included large-scale analyses of the simultaneous effects of Decitabine on the transcriptomes, proteomes and HLA peptidomes of the human Glioblastoma cells. It demonstrates the poor correlations between these three levels of gene expression, both in their total levels and in their response to the drug. The proteomics and HLA peptidomics data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003790 and the transcriptomics data are available via GEO with identifier GSE80137.

  1. Measurement of antibodies to varicella-zoster virus using a virus-free fluorescent-antibody-to-membrane-antigen (FAMA) test.

    PubMed

    Park, Rackhyun; Hwang, Ji Young; Lee, Kang Il; Namkoong, Sim; Choi, Seuk-Keun; Park, Songyong; Park, Hosun; Park, Junsoo

    2015-02-01

    The fluorescent-antibody-to-membrane-antigen (FAMA) test is regarded as the "gold standard" to detect protective antibodies to varicella-zoster virus (VZV) because of its high sensitivity and specificity. Because the classic FAMA test uses an infectious virus for detection of antibodies to VZV, it is labor-intensive, and also requires special equipment for handling the virus. For this reason, we attempted to develop a simple and safe FAMA assay. Because VZV glycoprotein E (gE) is one of the major VZV glycoproteins, we used the gE protein for the FAMA test (gE FAMA). Here, we demonstrate that overexpression of gE in HEK293T cells can be used to measure antibodies in human serum, and that gE FAMA titers are closely correlated with gpEIA ELISA data. These results indicate that our gE FAMA test has the potential to measure antibodies to VZV.

  2. Affinity improvement of a therapeutic antibody by structure-based computational design: generation of electrostatic interactions in the transition state stabilizes the antibody-antigen complex.

    PubMed

    Kiyoshi, Masato; Caaveiro, Jose M M; Miura, Eri; Nagatoishi, Satoru; Nakakido, Makoto; Soga, Shinji; Shirai, Hiroki; Kawabata, Shigeki; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2014-01-01

    The optimization of antibodies is a desirable goal towards the development of better therapeutic strategies. The antibody 11K2 was previously developed as a therapeutic tool for inflammatory diseases, and displays very high affinity (4.6 pM) for its antigen the chemokine MCP-1 (monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1). We have employed a virtual library of mutations of 11K2 to identify antibody variants of potentially higher affinity, and to establish benchmarks in the engineering of a mature therapeutic antibody. The most promising candidates identified in the virtual screening were examined by surface plasmon resonance to validate the computational predictions, and to characterize their binding affinity and key thermodynamic properties in detail. Only mutations in the light-chain of the antibody are effective at enhancing its affinity for the antigen in vitro, suggesting that the interaction surface of the heavy-chain (dominated by the hot-spot residue Phe101) is not amenable to optimization. The single-mutation with the highest affinity is L-N31R (4.6-fold higher affinity than wild-type antibody). Importantly, all the single-mutations showing increase affinity incorporate a charged residue (Arg, Asp, or Glu). The characterization of the relevant thermodynamic parameters clarifies the energetic mechanism. Essentially, the formation of new electrostatic interactions early in the binding reaction coordinate (transition state or earlier) benefits the durability of the antibody-antigen complex. The combination of in silico calculations and thermodynamic analysis is an effective strategy to improve the affinity of a matured therapeutic antibody. PMID:24475232

  3. [Preparation of monoclonal antibodies to gp51 antigen and their use for early diagnosis of bovine leukemia].

    PubMed

    Mikalauskene, G I; Vaĭchiunene, V V; Peshkus, Iu K; Tamoshiunas, V I

    1996-01-01

    A strain BLV-gp51-V7 of hybrid cells has been obtained that is characterised by high specificity as to antigen (glycoprotein gp51). Ascitic tumour appear in syngenic mice inoculated with hybrid cells of strain BLV-gp51-V7. Monoclonal antibodies were isolated from the ascitic fluid of mice. These antibodies were used with the purpose of early diagnosis of cattle leucosis. PMID:9273735

  4. New broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies against hepatitis B virus surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Kucinskaite-Kodze, Indre; Pleckaityte, Milda; Bremer, Corinna M; Seiz, Pia L; Zilnyte, Milda; Bulavaite, Aiste; Mickiene, Gitana; Zvirblis, Gintautas; Sasnauskas, Kestutis; Glebe, Dieter; Zvirbliene, Aurelija

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen (HBsAg) is considered to be the most important target for the diagnosis and immune prophylaxis of HBV infection. HBsAg-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are extensively used for studying the complex structure of the HBsAg, mapping the neutralizing epitopes and development of HBV diagnostic tests. However, the efficiency of anti-HBV binding strongly depends on the epitope structure and MAb capability to recognize different HBV variants. In the current study, 9 MAbs against yeast-expressed HBsAg of ayw2 serotype were generated and 7 of them were shown to recognize a linear epitope comprising amino acid (aa) residues 119-GPCRTCT-125 within the main antigenic "a" determinant of HBsAg. One MAb of the highest affinity (clone HB1) was selected for detailed cross-reactivity studies, generation of recombinant single-chain antibody (scFv) and molecular modelling of antibody-epitope interaction. The importance of each aa residue within the identified MAb epitope was determined by alanine substitution study that revealed aa residues C(121), T(123), C(124) and T(125) as essential for binding. These aa residues are highly conserved among HBV variants. In contrast, alanine substitution of G119, P120 and R122 had no or minor influence on the reactivity with the MAb. Certain aa residues at position 122 (either R or K) define different HBV serotypes (either d or y), therefore, the affinity of the MAb HB1 for the epitope with R122K substitution was determined to evaluate its diagnostic potential. The MAb recognized both epitope variants with high affinity. Sequence alignment of the MAb epitope within different HBV strains demonstrated that the shortest peptide recognized by the MAb 121-CR(K)TCT-125 is identical among different human HBV genotypes (HBV A-F, H) and monkey HBV species (HBVCP, HBVGO, HBVGB, WMHBV). In line with these data, the MAb HB1 was cross-reactive in Western blot with a large panel of antigens derived from different HBV

  5. High Resolution Mapping of Bactericidal Monoclonal Antibody<