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Sample records for level iii axilla

  1. Risk of node metastasis of sentinel lymph nodes detected in level II/III of the axilla by single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    SHIMA, HIROAKI; KUTOMI, GORO; SATOMI, FUKINO; MAEDA, HIDEKI; TAKAMARU, TOMOKO; KAMESHIMA, HIDEKAZU; OMURA, TOSEI; MORI, MITSURU; HATAKENAKA, MASAMITSU; HASEGAWA, TADASHI; HIRATA, KOICHI

    2014-01-01

    In breast cancer, single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) shows the exact anatomical location of sentinel nodes (SN). SPECT/CT mainly exposes axilla and partly exposes atypical sites of extra-axillary lymphatic drainage. The mechanism of how the atypical hot nodes are involved in lymphatic metastasis was retrospectively investigated in the present study, particularly at the level II/III region. SPECT/CT was performed in 92 clinical stage 0-IIA breast cancer patients. Sentinel lymph nodes are depicted as hot nodes in SPECT/CT. Patients were divided into two groups: With or without hot node in level II/III on SPECT/CT. The existence of metastasis in level II/III was investigated and the risk factors were identified. A total of 12 patients were sentinel lymph node biopsy metastasis positive and axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) was performed. These patients were divided into two groups: With and without SN in level II/III, and nodes in level II/III were pathologically proven. In 11 of the 92 patients, hot nodes were detected in level II/III. There was a significant difference in node metastasis depending on whether there were hot nodes in level II/III (P=0.0319). Multivariate analysis indicated that the hot nodes in level II/III and lymphatic invasion were independent factors associated with node metastasis. There were 12 SN-positive patients followed by ALND. In four of the 12 patients, hot nodes were observed in level II/III. Two of the four patients with hot nodes depicted by SPECT/CT and metastatic nodes were pathologically evident in the same lesion. Therefore, the present study indicated that the hot node in level II/III as depicted by SPECT/CT may be a risk of SN metastasis, including deeper nodes. PMID:25289038

  2. Stage III Melanoma in the Axilla: Patterns of Regional Recurrence After Surgery With and Without Adjuvant Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkham, Mark B.; Foote, Matthew C.; Burmeister, Elizabeth; Thomas, Janine; Meakin, Janelle; Smithers, B. Mark; Burmeister, Bryan H.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To describe the anatomic distribution of regionally recurrent disease in patients with stage III melanoma in the axilla after curative-intent surgery with and without adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A single-institution, retrospective analysis of a prospective database of 277 patients undergoing curative-intent treatment for stage III melanoma in the axilla between 1992 and 2012 was completed. For patients who received radiation therapy and those who did not, patterns of regional recurrence were analyzed, and univariate analyses were performed to assess for potential factors associated with location of recurrence. Results: There were 121 patients who received adjuvant radiation therapy because their clinicopathologic features conferred a greater risk of regional recurrence. There were 156 patients who received no radiation therapy. The overall axillary control rate was 87%. There were 37 patients with regional recurrence; 17 patients had received adjuvant radiation therapy (14%), and 20 patients (13%) had not. The likelihood of in-field nodal recurrence was significantly less in the adjuvant radiation therapy group (P=.01) and significantly greater in sites adjacent to the axilla (P=.02). Patients with high-risk clinicopathologic features who did not receive adjuvant radiation therapy also tended to experience in-field failure rather than adjacent-field failure. Conclusions: Patients who received adjuvant radiation therapy were more likely to experience recurrence in the adjacent-field regions rather than in the in-field regions. This may not simply reflect higher-risk pathology. Using this data, it may be possible to improve outcomes by reducing the number of adjacent-field recurrences after adjuvant radiation therapy.

  3. The design principles of axilla deodorant fragrances.

    PubMed

    McGee, T; Rankin, K M; Baydar, A

    1998-11-30

    There are a number of ways that deodorant products control malodor: a) by suppressing sweat, b) by inhibiting bacterial activity, and c) by covering malodor. The paper focuses on the Givaudan Roure methodology used to develop fragrances that effectively cover malodor. Several steps are involved in the development of a successful deodorant fragrance. First, we test for substantivity of the deodorant fragrance material in the axilla, using odor value technology. Second, using an in vitro test with reconstituted axilla odor, we determine the effectiveness of the substantive fragrance material with carefully screened panelists. Third, using a multichannel olfactive blender, the perfumer creates a fragrance heart with effective deodorant fragrance materials that cover malodor in the vapor phase. Finally, the hedonically pleasing heart is used to create the final fragrance, which is then optimized using our in vitro test method.

  4. Level III and IV Ecoregions by State

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information and links to downloadable maps and datasets for Level III and IV ecoregions, listed by state. Ecoregions are areas of general similarity in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources.

  5. Fibroadenoma in axilla: another manifestation of ectopic breast.

    PubMed

    Tiwary, Satyendra K; Kumar, Puneet; Khanna, Ajay Kumar

    2015-04-26

    Fibroadenoma of an accessory breast is a rare disease. The clinical significance lies in the fact that a number of cystic, inflammatory, neoplastic diseases similar to those of a normal breast have been reported in accessory breasts as well. Vigilant self-assessment and complete clinical examination are always encouraged to detect earliest malignancy in the axilla. We report two cases of ectopic breast fibroadenoma with the relevant literature.

  6. Level III and IV Ecoregions by EPA Region

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information and downloadable maps and datasets for Level III and IV ecoregions, listed by EPA region. Ecoregions are areas of general similarity in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources.

  7. Level III and IV Ecoregions of the Continental United States

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information and downloadable maps and datasets for Level III and IV ecoregions of the continental United States. Ecoregions are areas of general similarity in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources.

  8. Leptin Level and Skipping Breakfast: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III (NHANES III).

    PubMed

    Asao, Keiko; Marekani, Amandine Sambira; VanCleave, Jessica; Rothberg, Amy E

    2016-02-25

    Skipping breakfast is a common dietary habit considered to be unhealthy. However, the mechanisms underlying skipping breakfast have not been fully explored. Leptin is a hormone that regulates food intake and energy storage and secretes in a diurnal rhythm with lowest levels in the morning. We examined the association between the serum leptin level and skipping breakfast in 5714 adults in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, 1988-1994. We defined breakfast as any food or beverage consumed between 5:00 a.m. and 10:00 a.m. using a single 24-h recall. Skipped breakfast was seen in 13.1%. In the logistic regression models with and without adjusting for adiposity and sex, leptin levels were not associated with skipping breakfast. After adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, and time of venipuncture, the association remained insignificant. After further adjusting for potential confounders: physical activity, alcohol intake, smoking and diabetes and after further adjusting for: dietary factors, insulin and glucose levels, there was a 9% and 11%-12%, respectively, statistically significantly higher likelihood of skipping breakfast if the leptin level was more than 50% greater. Further investigation into the biological reasons for skipping breakfast may be useful for promoting healthy lifestyles.

  9. Leptin Level and Skipping Breakfast: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III (NHANES III)

    PubMed Central

    Asao, Keiko; Marekani, Amandine Sambira; VanCleave, Jessica; Rothberg, Amy E.

    2016-01-01

    Skipping breakfast is a common dietary habit considered to be unhealthy. However, the mechanisms underlying skipping breakfast have not been fully explored. Leptin is a hormone that regulates food intake and energy storage and secretes in a diurnal rhythm with lowest levels in the morning. We examined the association between the serum leptin level and skipping breakfast in 5714 adults in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III, 1988–1994. We defined breakfast as any food or beverage consumed between 5:00 a.m. and 10:00 a.m. using a single 24-h recall. Skipped breakfast was seen in 13.1%. In the logistic regression models with and without adjusting for adiposity and sex, leptin levels were not associated with skipping breakfast. After adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, and time of venipuncture, the association remained insignificant. After further adjusting for potential confounders: physical activity, alcohol intake, smoking and diabetes and after further adjusting for: dietary factors, insulin and glucose levels, there was a 9% and 11%–12%, respectively, statistically significantly higher likelihood of skipping breakfast if the leptin level was more than 50% greater. Further investigation into the biological reasons for skipping breakfast may be useful for promoting healthy lifestyles. PMID:26927164

  10. Measurement of paraben concentrations in human breast tissue at serial locations across the breast from axilla to sternum.

    PubMed

    Barr, L; Metaxas, G; Harbach, C A J; Savoy, L A; Darbre, P D

    2012-03-01

    The concentrations of five esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (parabens) were measured using HPLC-MS/MS at four serial locations across the human breast from axilla to sternum using human breast tissue collected from 40 mastectomies for primary breast cancer in England between 2005 and 2008. One or more paraben esters were quantifiable in 158/160 (99%) of the tissue samples and in 96/160 (60%) all five esters were measured. Variation was notable with respect to individual paraben esters, location within one breast and similar locations in different breasts. Overall median values in nanograms per gram tissue for the 160 tissue samples were highest for n-propylparaben [16.8 (range 0-2052.7)] and methylparaben [16.6 (range 0-5102.9)]; levels were lower for n-butylparaben [5.8 (range 0-95.4)], ethylparaben [3.4 (range 0-499.7)] and isobutylparaben 2.1 (range 0-802.9). The overall median value for total paraben was 85.5 ng g(-1) tissue (range 0-5134.5). The source of the paraben cannot be identified, but paraben was measured in the 7/40 patients who reported never having used underarm cosmetics in their lifetime. No correlations were found between paraben concentrations and age of patient (37-91 years), length of breast feeding (0-23 months), tumour location or tumour oestrogen receptor content. In view of the disproportionate incidence of breast cancer in the upper outer quadrant, paraben concentrations were compared across the four regions of the breast: n-propylparaben was found at significantly higher levels in the axilla than mid (P = 0.004 Wilcoxon matched pairs) or medial (P = 0.021 Wilcoxon matched pairs) regions (P = 0.010 Friedman ANOVA).

  11. Individualized Testing System: Performance Checks, ISCS Level III, WW-CP Form A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is one form of three performance checks booklets (A, B, and C) for two texts of Level III of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS). These two texts are Winds and Weather (WW), and Crusty Problems (CP). The 12 performance checks booklets for Level III are considered one of four major subdivisions of a set of individualized…

  12. Individualized Testing System: Performance Checks, ISCS Level III, WW-CP Form C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is one form of three performance checks booklets (A, B, and C) for two texts of Level III of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS). These two texts are Winds and Weather (WW), and Crusty Problems (CP). The 12 performance checks booklets for Level III are considered one of four subdivisions of a set of individualized evaluation…

  13. Individualized Testing System: Performance Checks, ISCS Level III, WW-CP Form B.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is one form of three performance checks booklets (A, B, and C) for two texts of Level III of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS). These two texts are Winds and Weather (WW), and Crusty Problems (CP). The 12 performance checks booklets for Level III are considered one of four major subdivisions of a set of individualized…

  14. Purification of swine carbonic anhydrase isoenzyme III and measurement of its levels in tissues and plasma.

    PubMed

    Nishita, T; Harada, T; Sakanoue, H; Arai, S; Itoh, S; Orito, K; Arishima, K

    2014-02-01

    The changes in the levels of carbonic anhydrase isozyme III (CA-III) in swine plasma and urine have not been previously determined or reported. CA-III is relatively specific to skeletal muscles, and should therefore be a useful diagnostic marker for muscle diseases. We isolated CA-III from swine muscle tissues and determined CA-III levels in the plasma and urine from both healthy and diseased pigs. The levels of CA-III in the tissues of female swine (age, 3 months) and plasma of young swine (age, 1-5 months) and adult female pigs (age, 2-3 years) were determined using the ELISA system for swine CA-III. The mean (± SD) levels of CA-III in the skeletal muscles were 3.8 ± 3.2 mg/g (wet tissue), and in the plasma, 230 ± 193 ng/ml at 1 month, 189 ± 208 ng/ml at 2 months, 141 ± 148 ng/ml at 3 months, 78 ± 142 ng/ml at 4 months and 53 ± 99 ng/ml at 5 months. The mean level of CA-III in the plasma samples from 2- to 3-year-old pigs was 18 ± 60 ng/ml. CA-III in the plasma samples was found to decrease from 1 month until 3 years of age (p < 0.01). We performed far-western blotting to clarify the cause of the observed decrease in CA-III in plasma. Our results demonstrated that CA-III is bound to the transferrin and albumin. In addition, we determined that the levels of CA-III in plasma and urine samples were higher in diseased swine compared with the healthy pigs.

  15. Emergent surgical and endovascular repair of a level III carotid arterial gunshot injury

    PubMed Central

    Ray, M. Jordan; Shaw, Cathryn J.; Layton, Kennith F.

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the level III internal carotid artery (ICA) is infrequently encountered; however, rapid and effective treatment is mandatory for the prevention of a neurological catastrophe. Many case reports have demonstrated decreased morbidity and mortality of endovascular repair of traumatic injury to large vessels using covered stents or endovascular coiling of posttraumatic pseudoaneurysms. We present the case of a transected level III ICA requiring emergent, complex sacrifice. PMID:21566754

  16. A Testing Instrument for High School Arabic, Level III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolowelsky, Joel B.

    The Arabic language examination was designed for Jewish immigrants from Syria wishing to satisfy New York State language requirements for high school graduation by indicating their proficiency in Arabic. The test is essentially a translation of a state test of Hebrew, and is intended to test Arabic at the third-year high school level. The…

  17. Fermi level stabilization energy in group III-nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.X.; Yu, K.M.; Wu, J.; Jones, R.E.; Walukiewicz, W.; AgerIII, J.W.; Shan, W.; Haller, E.E.; Lu, Hai; Schaff, William J.

    2005-01-07

    Energetic particle irradiation is used to systematically introduce point defects into In{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}N alloys over the entire composition range. Three types of energetic particles (electrons, protons, and {sup 4}He{sup +}) are used to produce a displacement damage dose spanning five decades. In InN and In-rich InGaN the free electron concentration increases with increasing irradiation dose but saturates at a sufficiently high dose. The saturation is due to Fermi level pinning at the Fermi Stabilization Energy (E{sub FS}), which is located at 4.9 eV below the vacuum level. Electrochemical capacitance-voltage (ECV) measurements show that the pinning of the surface Fermi energy at E{sub FS} is also responsible for the surface electron accumulation in as-grown InN and In-rich InGaN alloys. The results are in agreement with the amphoteric defect model that predicts that the same type of native defects are responsible for the Fermi level pinning in both cases.

  18. The level and nature of autistic intelligence III: Inspection time.

    PubMed

    Barbeau, Elise B; Soulières, Isabelle; Dawson, Michelle; Zeffiro, Thomas A; Mottron, Laurent

    2013-02-01

    Across the autism spectrum, level of intelligence is highly dependent on the psychometric instrument used for assessment, and there are conflicting views concerning which measures best estimate autistic cognitive abilities. Inspection time is a processing speed measure associated with general intelligence in typical individuals. We therefore investigated autism spectrum performance on inspection time in relation to two different general intelligence tests. Autism spectrum individuals were divided into autistic and Asperger subgroups according to speech development history. Compared to a typical control group, mean inspection time for the autistic subgroup but not the Asperger subgroup was significantly shorter (by 31%). However, the shorter mean autistic inspection time was evident only when groups were matched on Wechsler IQ and disappeared when they were matched using Raven's Progressive Matrices. When autism spectrum abilities are compared to typical abilities, results may be influenced by speech development history as well as by the instrument used for intelligence matching.

  19. Is the axilla the right site for temperature measurement in children by chemical thermometer?

    PubMed

    Kara, Ateş; Devrim, Ilker; Cengiz, Ali Bülent; Celik, Filiz; Tezer, Hasan; Uludağ, Ali Kerem; Seçmeer, Gülten

    2009-01-01

    Although each method has its own advantages and disadvantages compared with the conservative mercury-in-glass thermometers, there are conflicting opinions about the optimal anatomic site for measuring body temperature as well about the variations in measurements with different methods. In this study, we aimed to assess the accuracy and reliability of measurements obtained from the axilla with the chemical thermometer (Tempa DOT TM) compared with the classic mercury-in-glass instruments. Sixty randomly selected pediatric patients who were admitted to our hospital were enrolled. Simultaneous temperature axillary measurements (n: 1300) were performed with the chemical thermometer and mercury-in-glass instruments. The mean results of the axillary mercury-in-glass thermometers and axillary chemical thermometer were 36.8 +/- 0.6 and 37.2 +/- 0.7, respectively. The Bland-Altman plot of differences suggests that 95% of the chemical thermometer (Tempa.DOT TM) readings were within limits of agreement (+0.37 and -1.24 degrees C) when mercury-in-glass thermometer is considered as the standard. Our results showed that limits of agreement were wide (+0.37 and -1.24 degrees C) between readings of axillary mercury-in-glass thermometers and chemical thermometers. Since approximately 20% of febrile patients with mercury-in-glass temperature were misdiagnosed as afebrile with measurements via chemical thermometer, we suggest that the axilla is not a suitable anatomic site for screening of fever with Tempa.DOT. Further studies involving larger study groups with similar age should be done to more definitely assess its screening value in pediatrics.

  20. 77 FR 36292 - Proposed Collection, Comments Requested: FBI National Academy Level III Evaluation; FBI National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Proposed Collection, Comments Requested: FBI National Academy Level III Evaluation; FBI National Academy Post-Course Questionnaire for Graduates, FBI National Academy Post-Course... Department of Justice (DOJ), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Training Division's Office of...

  1. Level III Apprenticeship in Portugal--Notes on a Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saboga, Ana Rute

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the results of research into how young trainees in the level III apprenticeship system formulate their educational and professional plans, what expectations they have of obtaining socially and professionally recognised qualifications, and in what way enterprises see such training as a strategy for providing human resources…

  2. Probing the Natural World, Level III, Teacher's Edition: Environmental Science. Intermediate Science Curriculum Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonar, John R., Ed.; Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is the teacher's edition of one of the eight units of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS) for level III students (grade 9). This unit and its activities focuses on environmental pollution and hazards. Optional excursions are suggested for students who wish to study an area in greater depth. An introduction describes the problem…

  3. Probing the Natural World, Level III, Teacher's Edition: In Orbit. Intermediate Science Curriculum Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonar, John R., Ed.; Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is the teacher's edition of one of the eight units of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS) for level III students (grade 9). This unit focuses on the properties of sunlight, the use of spectrums and spectroscopes, the heat and energy of the sun, the measurement of astronomical distances, and the size of the sun. Optimal…

  4. Probing the Natural World, Level III, Student Guide: In Orbit. Intermediate Science Curriculum Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonar, John R., Ed.; Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is the student's text of one unit of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS) for level III students (grade 9). This unit focuses on the properties of sunlight, the use of spectrums and spectroscopes, the heat and energy of the sun, the measurement of astronomical distances, and the size of the sun. Activities are student-centered and…

  5. Probing the Natural World, Level III, Record Book, Student Guide: In Orbit. Intermediate Science Curriculum Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonar, John R., Ed.; Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is the student's edition of the Record Book which accompanies the unit "In Orbit" of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS) for level III students (grade 9). Space is provided for answers to the questions from the student text as well as for the optional excursions and the self evaluation. An introductory note to the…

  6. Probing the Natural World, Level III, Record Book, Teacher's Edition: In Orbit. Intermediate Science Curriculum Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonar, John R., Ed.; Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is the teacher's edition of the Record Book for the unit "In Orbit" of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS) for level III students (grade 9). The correct answers to the questions from the text are recorded. An introductory note to the student explains how to use the book and is followed by the notes to the teacher.…

  7. Probing the Natural World, Level III, Teacher's Edition: Well-Being. Intermediate Science Curriculum Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonar, John R., Ed.; Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is the teacher's edition of one of the eight units of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS) for level III students (grade 9). This unit focuses on hazards to the body from drug use. Activities are given that relate to the topic. Optional excursions are suggested for students who wish to study an area in greater depth. An…

  8. Probing the Natural World, Level III, Student Guide: What's Up? Intermediate Science Curriculum Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonar, John R., Ed.; Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is the student's text of one unit of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS) for level III students (grade 9). The chapters contain basic information about rockets, space, and principles of physics, as well as activities related to the subject and optional excursions. A section of introductory notes to the student discusses how the…

  9. PATHWAYS: An Adult Basic Skills Writing Workbook, Level III. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barabe, Rosemeri; And Others

    Part of an adult basic education series utilizing Southwestern American Indian cultural material, this level III (fifth grade equivalent, 4.5-6.0 readability) teacher's guide contains concise explanations of the various skills presented, suggested teaching strategies, answers to workbook exercises, and a list of available supplementary commercial…

  10. 78 FR 21980 - Aging Management of Internal Surfaces, Service Level III and Other Coatings, Atmospheric Storage...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-12

    ... Tanks, and Corrosion Under Insulation AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft license... Storage Tanks, and Corrosion under Insulation.'' The draft LR-ISG proposes to revise NRC staff-recommended... address Service Level III and Other coatings and corrosion under insulation. DATES: Submit comments...

  11. Guide for the Training and Qualification of Welding Personnel. Level III - Expert Welders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Welding Society, Miami, FL.

    This guide is designed to help education and training facilities develop and administer competency-based training programs to qualify and certify trainees in accordance with American Welding Society (AWS) requirements for level III (expert) welders. Presented first are the scope/objectives/requirements of the AWS qualification/certification…

  12. Probing the Natural World, Level III, Teacher's Edition: Crusty Problems. Intermediate Science Curriculum Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonar, John R., Ed.; Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is the teacher's edition of one of the eight units of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS) for level III students (grade 9). This unit focuses on processes that shape the earth. Optional excursions, in addition to the activities, are suggested for students who wish to study an area in greater depth on an individualized basis. An…

  13. Bilateral Simultaneous Pseudoangiomatous Stromal Hyperplasia of the Breasts and Axillae: Imaging Findings with Pathological and Clinical Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Ensani, Fereshteh; Omranipour, Ramesh; Abdollahi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) of the breast is a pathology that is usually diagnosed by accident during pathological examination of other breast lesions. PASH is an uncommon and benign tumoral lesion of the mammary stroma that can be pathologically mistaken for other tumours, such as phyllodes, fibroadenoma, and sometimes even angiosarcoma. We report the case of a 45-year-old woman with complaints of huge bilateral breast enlargement. This is a rare case of PASH presenting with gigantomastia and involving bilateral breasts and axillae simultaneously. Mammography, ultrasonography, and MRI features are illustrated with histopathological correlation. PMID:27867677

  14. Can the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III (NHANES III) data help resolve the controversy over low blood lead levels and neuropsychological development in children?

    PubMed

    Stone, Brice M; Reynolds, Cecil R

    2003-04-01

    The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III (NHANES III) was designed to provide national estimates of the health and nutritional status of the United States population aged 2 months and above. A Youth data subset includes individuals from ages 2 months to 16 years totaling 13,944 individuals. Lanphear, Dietrich, Auinger, and Cox [U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Reports, Public Health Report 2000, Vol. 115, p. 521] examined these data and concluded that deficits in cognitive and academic skills associated with lead exposure occur at blood lead concentrations of less than 5microg/dl. Attempts to replicate and extend these findings reveal serious shortcomings in the NHANES III data that center around missing data, odd distributions of blood lead levels as well as cognitive and academic scores, and potential inaccuracies in the data collection itself. A review of these issues is presented along with a series of empirical analyses of the data under multiple sets of assumptions leading to the conclusion that the NHANES III data are inherently inadequate for use in addressing neurodevelopmental issues. Policy issues and scientific issues related to cognitive and other neurodevelopmental phenomena should not be considered on the basis of the NHANES III Youth dataset.

  15. Energy Levels and Oscillator Strengths for Allowed Transitions in S III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    1995-01-01

    We have calculated energy levels and oscillator strengths for dipole-allowed transitions between the terms belonging to the 3s(sup 2)3p(sup 2), 3s3p(sup 3), 3S(sup 2)3p3d, 3S(sup 2)3p4s, 3S(sup 2)3p4p and 3s(sup 2)3p4d configurations of S iii in the LS-coupling scheme. We used flexible radial functions and included a large number of configurations in the configuration-interaction expansions to ensure convergence. The calculated energy levels are in close agreement with the recent laboratory measurement. The present oscillator strengths are compared with other calculations and experiments and most of the existing discrepancies between the available calculations are resolved.

  16. Recent progress in III-V based ferromagnetic semiconductors: Band structure, Fermi level, and tunneling transport

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Ohya, Shinobu Nam Hai, Pham

    2014-03-15

    Spin-based electronics or spintronics is an emerging field, in which we try to utilize spin degrees of freedom as well as charge transport in materials and devices. While metal-based spin-devices, such as magnetic-field sensors and magnetoresistive random access memory using giant magnetoresistance and tunneling magnetoresistance, are already put to practical use, semiconductor-based spintronics has greater potential for expansion because of good compatibility with existing semiconductor technology. Many semiconductor-based spintronics devices with useful functionalities have been proposed and explored so far. To realize those devices and functionalities, we definitely need appropriate materials which have both the properties of semiconductors and ferromagnets. Ferromagnetic semiconductors (FMSs), which are alloy semiconductors containing magnetic atoms such as Mn and Fe, are one of the most promising classes of materials for this purpose and thus have been intensively studied for the past two decades. Here, we review the recent progress in the studies of the most prototypical III-V based FMS, p-type (GaMn)As and its heterostructures with focus on tunneling transport, Fermi level, and bandstructure. Furthermore, we cover the properties of a new n-type FMS, (In,Fe)As, which shows electron-induced ferromagnetism. These FMS materials having zinc-blende crystal structure show excellent compatibility with well-developed III-V heterostructures and devices.

  17. U.S. Level III and IV Ecoregions (U.S. EPA)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This map service displays Level III and Level IV Ecoregions of the United States and was created from ecoregion data obtained from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Research and Development's Western Ecology Division. The original ecoregion data was projected from Albers to Web Mercator for this map service. To download shapefiles of ecoregion data (in Albers), please go to: ftp://newftp.epa.gov/EPADataCommons/ORD/Ecoregions/. IMPORTANT NOTE ABOUT LEVEL IV POLYGON LEGEND DISPLAY IN ARCMAP: Due to the limitations of Graphical Device Interface (GDI) resources per application on Windows, ArcMap does not display the legend in the Table of Contents for the ArcGIS Server service layer if the legend has more than 100 items. As of December 2011, there are 968 unique legend items in the Level IV Ecoregion Polygon legend. Follow this link (http://support.esri.com/en/knowledgebase/techarticles/detail/33741) for instructions about how to increase the maximum number of ArcGIS Server service layer legend items allowed for display in ArcMap. Note the instructions at this link provide a slightly incorrect path to Maximum Legend Count. The correct path is HKEY_CURRENT_USER > Software > ESRI > ArcMap > Server > MapServerLayer > Maximum Legend Count. When editing the Maximum Legend Count, update the field, Value data to 1000. To download a PDF version of the Level IV ecoregion map and legend, go to ftp://newftp.epa.gov/EPADataCommons/ORD/Ecoregions/us/Eco_Level_IV

  18. Chemical analysis of simulated high level waste glasses to support stage III sulfate solubility modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K. M.

    2016-03-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is sponsoring an international, collaborative project to develop a fundamental model for sulfate solubility in nuclear waste glass. The solubility of sulfate has a significant impact on the achievable waste loading for nuclear waste forms within the DOE complex. These wastes can contain relatively high concentrations of sulfate, which has low solubility in borosilicate glass. This is a significant issue for low-activity waste (LAW) glass and is projected to have a major impact on the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Sulfate solubility has also been a limiting factor for recent high level waste (HLW) sludge processed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The low solubility of sulfate in glass, along with melter and off-gas corrosion constraints, dictate that the waste be blended with lower sulfate concentration waste sources or washed to remove sulfate prior to vitrification. The development of enhanced borosilicate glass compositions with improved sulfate solubility will allow for higher waste loadings and accelerate mission completion.The objective of the current scope being pursued by SHU is to mature the sulfate solubility model to the point where it can be used to guide glass composition development for DWPF and WTP, allowing for enhanced waste loadings and waste throughput at these facilities. A series of targeted glass compositions was selected to resolve data gaps in the model and is identified as Stage III. SHU fabricated these glasses and sent samples to SRNL for chemical composition analysis. SHU will use the resulting data to enhance the sulfate solubility model and resolve any deficiencies. In this report, SRNL provides chemical analyses for the Stage III, simulated HLW glasses fabricated by SHU in support of the sulfate solubility model development.

  19. Dosimetric comparison of axilla and groin radiotherapy techniques for high-risk and locally advanced skin cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mattes, Malcolm D.; Zhou, Ying; Berry, Sean L.; Barker, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy targeting axilla and groin lymph nodes improves regional disease control in locally advanced and high-risk skin cancers. However, trials generally used conventional two-dimensional radiotherapy (2D-RT), contributing towards relatively high rates of side effects from treatment. The goal of this study is to determine if three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) may improve radiation delivery to the target while avoiding organs at risk in the clinical context of skin cancer regional nodal irradiation. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients with locally advanced/high-risk skin cancers underwent computed tomography simulation. The relevant axilla or groin planning target volumes and organs at risk were delineated using standard definitions. Paired t-tests were used to compare the mean values of several dose-volumetric parameters for each of the 4 techniques. Results: In the axilla, the largest improvement for 3D-CRT compared to 2D-RT was for homogeneity index (13.9 vs. 54.3), at the expense of higher lung V20 (28.0% vs. 12.6%). In the groin, the largest improvements for 3D-CRT compared to 2D-RT were for anorectum Dmax (13.6 vs. 38.9 Gy), bowel D200cc (7.3 vs. 23.1 Gy), femur D50 (34.6 vs. 57.2 Gy), and genitalia Dmax (37.6 vs. 51.1 Gy). IMRT had further improvements compared to 3D-CRT for humerus Dmean (16.9 vs. 22.4 Gy), brachial plexus D5 (57.4 vs. 61.3 Gy), bladder D5 (26.8 vs. 36.5 Gy), and femur D50 (18.7 vs. 34.6 Gy). Fewer differences were observed between IMRT and VMAT. Conclusion: Compared to 2D-RT and 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT had dosimetric advantages in the treatment of nodal regions of skin cancer patients. PMID:27306779

  20. BEIR-III report and the health effects of low-level radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1980-01-01

    The present BEIR-III Committee has not highlighted any controversy over the health effects of low-level radiation. In its evaluation of the experimental data and epidemiological surveys, the Committee has carefully reviewed and assessed the value of all the available scientific evidence for estimating numerical risk coefficients for the health hazards to human populations exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation. Responsible public awareness of the possible health effects of ionizing radiations from medical and industrial radiation exposure, centers on three important matters of societal concern: (1) to place into perspective the extent of harm to the health of man and his descendants to be expected in the present and in the future from those societal activities involving ionizing radiation; (2) to develop quantitative indices of harm based on dose-effect relationships; such indices could then be used with prudent caution to introduce concepts of the regulation of population doses on the basis of somatic and genetic risks; and (3) to identify the magnitude and extent of radiation activities which could cause harm, to assess their relative significance, and to provide a framework for recommendations on how to reduce unnecessary radiation exposure to human populations. The main difference of the BEIR Committee Report is not so much from new data or new interpretations of existing data, but rather from a philosophical approach and appraisal of existing and future radiation protection resulting from an atmosphere of constantly changing societal conditions and public attitudes. (PCS)

  1. German, Austrian and Swiss consensus conference on the diagnosis and local treatment of the axilla in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Jürgen; Souchon, Rainer; Lebeau, Annette; Öhlschlegel, Christian; Gruber, Günther; Rageth, Christoph; Weber, Walter; Harbeck, Nadia; Janni, Wolfgang; Kreipe, Hans; Fitzal, Florian; Resch, Alexandra; Bago-Horvath, Zsuzsanna; Peintinger, Florentia

    2013-07-01

    The German, Austrian and Swiss (D.A.CH) Societies of Senology gathered together in 2012 to address dwelling questions regarding axillary clearance in breast cancer patients. The Consensus Panel consisted of 14 members of these societies and included surgical oncologists, gynaecologists, pathologists and radiotherapists. With regard to omitting axillary lymph node dissection in sentinel lymph node macrometastases, the Panel consensually accepted this option for low-risk patients only. A simple majority voted against extending radiotherapy to the axilla after omitting axillary dissection in N1 disease. Consensus was yielded for the use of axillary ultrasound and prospective registers for such patients in the course of follow-up. The questions regarding neoadjuvant therapy and the timing of sentinel lymph node biopsy failed to yield consensus, yet both options (before or after) are possible in clinically node-negative disease.

  2. Successful Intra-Arterial Chemotherapy for Extramammary Paget's Disease of the Axilla in a Patient with Parkinson's Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Damascelli, Bruno; Ticha, Vladimira

    2011-02-15

    Extramammary Paget's disease (EMPD) is a rare intraepithelial neoplasm occurring less frequently in men and even more rarely in the axilla. A 59-year-old man with severe Parkinson's disease presented with axillary EMPD. The neurological comorbidity made treatment of the EMPD problematical and prompted us to propose locoregional intra-arterial chemotherapy in single short sessions. Two innovative chemotherapeutic macrocomplexes were used: doxorubicin incorporated in large liposomes and the taxane paclitaxel incorporated in albumin nanoparticles. A therapeutic response was seen right from the first treatment and was macroscopically close to complete after four cycles. Five months after the end of treatment the patient had minimal visible disease and had enjoyed a distinct improvement in quality of life, with no noteworthy complications related to the intra-arterial chemotherapy with percutaneous transfemoral catheterization.

  3. Endoscopic excision of branchial cleft cyst in the neck using mammary areolae and axilla approach: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ming, Jia; Fan, Ziyi; Gong, Yu; Yuan, Qiaoying; Zhong, Ling; Fan, Linjun

    2012-10-01

    Branchial cleft cysts are prone to recurrence and secondary infections, and hence, surgical resection is necessary. These masses are traditionally removed through an overlying incision; however, the resulting scar can be considered aesthetically displeasing. We accomplished a case of endoscopic resection of branchial cleft cyst in the right side of the neck of an 18-year-old female patient. Incisions were made in the bilateral mammary areolae and right axilla of the patient. We completely resected the mass using an ultrasonic scalpel and electrocoagulation hook within 45 minutes. All of the procedures were finished on the deep face of platysma muscle, which was not severed. There was no significant bleeding during the operation and the postoperative recovery was smooth, without recurrence for 6 months. The endoscopic resection of the neck mass through bilateral areolae and axillary incisions is simple, safe, and feasible, because there were covert incisions and fewer complications.

  4. Epidemiological Study of Hospital-Acquired Bacterial Conjunctivitis in a Level III Neonatal Unit

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Catarina; Gonçalves, Márcia; João, Anabela

    2013-01-01

    Background. Conjunctivitis is one of the most frequently occurring hospital-acquired infections among neonates, although it is less studied than potentially life-threatening infections, such as sepsis and pneumonia. Objectives. The aims of our work were to identify epidemiologic characteristics, pathogens, and susceptibility patterns of bacterial hospital-acquired conjunctivitis (HAC) in a level III neonatal unit. Materials and Methods. Data were collected retrospectively from patient charts and laboratory databases. Hospital-acquired conjunctivitis was defined in accordance with the Centers for Disease Control/National Healthcare Safety Network (CDC/NHSN) diagnostic criteria. Results. One or more episodes of HAC were diagnosed in 4,0% (n = 60) of 1492 neonates admitted during the study period. Most of the episodes involved premature (75,4%) and low birth weight (75,4%) neonates. Infection rates were higher among patients undergoing noninvasive mechanical ventilation (46,7%), parenteral nutrition (13,6%), and phototherapy (6,8%). Predominant pathogens included Serratia marcescens (27,9%), Escherichia coli (23%), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (18%). Susceptibility patterns revealed bacterial resistances to several antibiotic classes. Gentamicin remains the adequate choice for empirical treatment of HAC in our NICU. Conclusion. It is important to know the local patterns of the disease in order to adjust prevention strategies. Our work contributes to the epidemiological characterization of a sometimes overlooked disease. PMID:23766676

  5. Perinatal ischemic stroke: a five-year retrospective study in a level-III maternity

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Virgínia; Pimentel, Sónia; Pinto, Filomena; Nona, José

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the incidence, clinical presentation, risk factors, imaging diagnosis, and clinical outcome of perinatal stroke. Methods Data was retrospectively collected from full-term newborns admitted to the neonatal unit of a level III maternity in Lisbon with cerebral stroke, from January 2007 to December 2011. Results There were 11 cases of stroke: nine were arterial ischemic stroke and two were cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. We estimated an incidence of arterial ischemic stroke of 1.6/5,000 births and of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis of 7.2/100,000 births. There were two cases of recurrent stroke. Eight patients presented with symptoms while the remaining three were asymptomatic and incidentally diagnosed. The most frequently registered symptoms (8/11) were seizures; in that, generalized clonic (3/8) and focal clonic (5/8). Strokes were more commonly left-sided (9/11), and the most affected artery was the left middle cerebral artery (8/11). Transfontanelle ultrasound was positive in most of the patients (10/11), and stroke was confirmed by cerebral magnetic resonance in all patients. Electroencephalographic recordings were carried out in five patients and were abnormal in three (focal abnormalities n=2, burst-suppression pattern n=1). Eight patients had previously identified risk factors for neonatal stroke which included obstetric and neonatal causes. Ten patients were followed up at outpatients setting; four patients developed motor deficits and one presented with epilepsy. Conclusions Although a modest and heterogeneous sample, this study emphasizes the need for a high level of suspicion when it comes to neonatal stroke, primarily in the presence of risk factors. The prevalence of neurological sequelae in our series supports the need of long-term follow-up and early intervention strategies. PMID:25993071

  6. Reduction in lipoprotein-associated apoC-III levels following volanesorsen therapy: phase 2 randomized trial results.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaohong; Lee, Sang-Rok; Choi, Yun-Seok; Alexander, Veronica J; Digenio, Andres; Yang, Qingqing; Miller, Yury I; Witztum, Joseph L; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2016-04-01

    Elevated apoC-III levels predict increased cardiovascular risk when present on LDL and HDL particles. We developed novel high-throughput chemiluminescent ELISAs that capture apoB, lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)], and apoA-I in plasma and then detect apoC-III on these individual lipoproteins as apoCIII-apoB, apoCIII-Lp(a), and apoCIII-apoAI complexes, respectively. We assessed the effects on these complexes of placebo or 100-300 mg volanesorsen, a generation 2.0+ antisense drug that targets apoC3 mRNA in patients with hypertriglyceridemia, including familial chylomicronemia syndrome (n = 3), volanesorsen monotherapy (n = 51), and as add-on to fibrate (n = 26), treated for 85 days and followed for 176 days. Compared with placebo, volanesorsen was associated with an 82.3 ± 11.7%, 81.3 ± 15.7%, and 80.8 ± 13.6% reduction in apoCIII-apoB, apoCIII-Lp(a), and apoCIII-apoA-I, respectively (300 mg dose;P< 0.001 for all), at day 92. Strong correlations in all assay measures were noted with total plasma apoC-III, chylomicron-apoC-III, and VLDL-apoC-III. In conclusion, novel high-throughput ELISAs were developed to detect lipoprotein-associated apoC-III, including for the first time on Lp(a). Volanesorsen uniformly lowers apoC-III on apoB-100, Lp(a), and apoA-I lipoproteins, and may be a potent agent to reduce triglycerides and cardiovascular risk mediated by apoC-III.

  7. Probing the Natural World, Level III, Teacher's Edition: Why You're You. Intermediate Science Curriculum Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonar, John R., Ed.; Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is the teacher's edition of one of the eight units of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS) for level III students (grade 9). The chapters include basic information about heredity, activities, and optional "excursions." The answers to all activities are included. An introduction describes the work of Gregor Mendel and his…

  8. A Population-Based Survival Assessment of Categorizing Level III and IV Rural Hospitals as Trauma Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Melanie; Newgard, Craig D.; Mullins, Richard J.; Diggs, Brian S.; Stone, Judith V.; Adams, Annette L.; Hedges, Jerris R.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Patients injured in rural areas are hypothesized to have improved outcomes if statewide trauma systems categorize rural hospitals as Level III and IV trauma centers, though evidence to support this belief is sparse. Purpose: To determine if there is improved survival among injured patients hospitalized in states that categorize rural…

  9. Level III baseline risk evaluation for Building 3505 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Mostella, W.B. Jr.

    1994-12-01

    The Level III Baseline Risk Evaluation (BRE) for Building 3505, the ORNL Metal Recovery Facility, provides an analysis of the potential for adverse health effects, current or future, associated with the presence of hazardous substances in the building. The Metal Recovery Facility was used from 1952 through 1960 to process large quantities of radioactive material using the PUREX process for the recovery of uranium-238, plutonium-239, neptunium-237, and americium-241. The facility consists of seven process cells (A through G), a canal, a dissolver room, a dissolver pit, an office, locker room, storage area, control room, electrical gallery, shop, and makeup area. The cells were used to house the nuclear fuel reprocessing equipment, and the canal was constructed to be used as a water-shielded transfer canal. Currently, there are no known releases of radioactive contaminants from Building 3505. To perform the BRE, historical radiological survey data were used to estimate the concentration of alpha- and beta/gamma emitting radionuclides in the various cells, rooms, and other areas in Building 3505. Data from smear surveys were used to estimate the amount of transferable contamination (to which receptors can be exposed via inhalation and ingestion), and data from probe surveys were used to estimate the amount of both fixed and transferable contamination (from which receptors can receive external exposure). Two land use scenarios, current and future, and their subsequent exposure scenarios were explored in the BRE. Under the current land use scenario, two exposure scenarios were evaluated. The first was a worst-case industrial exposure scenario in which the receptor is a maintenance worker who works 8 hours/day, 350 days/year in the building for 25 years. In the second, more realistic exposure scenario, the receptor is a surveillance and maintenance (S&M) worker who spends two 8-hour days/year in the building for 25 years.

  10. E1, E2 and M1 transition parameters for some levels over ionization limit of Ne III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eser, Selda; Özdemir, Leyla

    2016-07-01

    We have reported the level energies and radiative transition ( E1 , E2 and M1 parameters, such as wavelengths, transition rates, oscillator strengths and line strengths for some levels over the ionization limit of Ne III (oxygen-like). The calculations have been performed using the general-purpose relativistic atomic structure package (GRASP) based on the fully relativistic multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method. The results obtained have been compared with the available theoretical and experimental values in the literature.

  11. Multimedia level-III partitioning and residence times of xenobiotics in water-rich and water-poor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Breitkopf, C.; Kuehne, R.; Schueuermann, G.

    2000-05-01

    The environmental fate of 10 compounds covering a wide range of intrinsic persistence and volatility is studied with a multimedia level-III fugacity model at two system temperatures (293 and 282 K) using water-rich and water-poor model environments and standard emission scenarios to air and water, respectively. The resultant level-III partitionings depend significantly on the entry mode and on the relative compartment sizes, and the variation with system temperature is more pronounced for polar compounds and when air is the primary discharge compartment. For example, the steady-state portion in soil of airborne phenol varies from 21 to 89%, whereas waterborne phenol resides in water at a rate of 100% in both water-rich and water-poor environments. For some compounds, the residence time (considering both advection and degradation) is substantially affected by intermedia transport processes such as rainfall. With airborne atrazine, the regional residence time is comparable to that of DDT and significantly greater than the ones of hexachlorobenzene, polychlorinated biphenyl 28, and lindane, although the latter have much longer media-specific half-lives and much greater hydrophobicity. The discussion includes detailed analyses of the compound properties and their impact on the level-III environmental fate.

  12. Precise control of caval and hepatic vessels: Surgical technique to treat level III caval thrombus concomitant to renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming; Xu, Bin; Liu, Ning; Jiang, Hua; Wang, Yiduo; Yang, Yu; Zhang, Xiaowen; Sun, Chao; Liu, Jing; Zhu, Weidong; Chen, Shuqiu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We investigated the surgical techniques, safety, and prevention of complications of nephrectomy and removal of tumour thrombus for treating level III inferior vena cava (IVC) concomitant to renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We did this by precise controlling IVC and hepatic vessels without a vascular bypass. Methods: In this series, we included 5 patients with level III IVC tumour thrombus below the hepatic vein concomitant to RCC. After precisely controlling the IVC and hepatic vessels, we then removed the thrombus en bloc with the renal vein. Blood loss volume, IVC clamping time, hypotension time, resuscitation, cardiocerebrovascular complications, and postoperative organ dysfunction were observed. Results: Surgery was successfully performed without perioperative death. Blood loss volume was 900 to 1500 mL, operation time was 165 to 250 minutes, vascular clamping time was 8 to 12 minutes, and intraoperative hypotension time was 9 to 12 minutes. Serious perioperative complications were not observed. Local recurrence was not observed during the 9 to 24 months of follow-up. One patient exhibited disease-free survival, 3 developed lung or liver metastasis, and 1 died 11 months after surgery. Conclusion: Precise control of IVC and hepatic pedicle vessels, without vascular bypass, is a safe and effective surgical treatment for level III tumor thrombus below the hepatic vein concomitant to RCC. The procedure was conducted without increased risks of intraoperative hypotensive shock, difficult resuscitation, pulmonary embolism, and multiple organ dysfunctions. PMID:26600890

  13. 'Junction-Level' Heterogeneous Integration of III-V Materials with Si CMOS for Novel Asymmetric Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yoon Jung

    Driven by Moore's law, semiconductor chips have become faster, denser and cheaper through aggressive dimension scaling. The continued scaling not only led to dramatic performance improvements in digital logic applications but also in mixed-mode and/or communication applications. Moreover, size/weight/power (SWAP) restrictions on all high-performance system components have resulted in multi-functional integration of multiple integrated circuits (ICs)/dies in 3D packages/ICs by various system-level approaches. However, these approaches still possess shortcomings and in order to truly benefit from the most advanced digital technologies, the future high-speed/high power devices for communication applications need to be fully integrated into a single CMOS chip. Due to limitations in Si device performance in high-frequency/power applications as well as expensive III-V compound semiconductor devices with low integration density, heterogeneous integration of compound semiconductor materials/devices with Si CMOS platform has emerged as a viable solution to low-cost high-performance ICs. In this study, we first discuss on channel and drain engineering approaches in the state-of-the-art multiple-gate field-effect transistor to integrate III-V compound semiconductor materials with Si CMOS for improved device performance in mixed-mode and/or communication applications. Then, growth, characterization and electrical analysis on small-area (diameter < 100nm) complete selective-area epitaxy of GaAs/GaN will be demonstrated for achieving 'dislocation-free' III-V compound semiconductor film on a Si(001) substrate. Based on a success in dislocation-free heterogeneous III-V film growth, we propose a novel ultra-scaled 'junction-level' heterogeneous integration onto mainstream Si CMOS platform. Device architecture and its key features to overcome aforementioned challenges will be given to demonstrate the potential to improve the overall system performance with diverse functionality.

  14. Time trends in axilla management among early breast cancer patients: Persisting major variation in clinical practice across European centers.

    PubMed

    Gondos, Adam; Jansen, Lina; Heil, Jörg; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Voogd, Adri C; Frisell, Jan; Fredriksson, Irma; Johansson, Ulla; Tvedskov, Tove Filtenborg; Jensen, Maj-Britt; Balslev, Eva; Hartmann-Johnsen, Olaf Johan; Sant, Milena; Baili, Paolo; Agresti, Roberto; van de Velde, Tony; Broeks, Annegien; Nogaret, Jean-Marie; Bourgeois, Pierre; Moreau, Michel; Mátrai, Zoltán; Sávolt, Ákos; Nagy, Péter; Kásler, Miklós; Schrotz-King, Petra; Ulrich, Cornelia; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-06-01

    Background We examined time trends in axilla management among patients with early breast cancer in European clinical settings. Material and methods EUROCANPlatform partners, including population-based and cancer center-specific registries, provided routinely available clinical cancer registry data for a comparative study of axillary management trends among patients with first non-metastatic breast cancer who were not selected for neoadjuvant therapy during the last decade. We used an additional short questionnaire to compare clinical care patterns in 2014. Results Patients treated in cancer centers were younger than population-based registry populations. Tumor size and lymph node status distributions varied little between settings or over time. In 2003, sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) use varied between 26% and 81% for pT1 tumors, and between 2% and 68% for pT2 tumors. By 2010, SLNB use increased to 79-96% and 49-92% for pT1 and pT2 tumors, respectively. Axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) use for pT1 tumors decreased from between 75% and 27% in 2003 to 47% and 12% in 2010, and from between 90% and 55% to 79% and 19% for pT2 tumors, respectively. In 2014, important differences in axillary management existed for patients with micrometastases only, and for patients fulfilling the ACOSOG Z0011 criteria for omitting ALND. Conclusion This study demonstrates persisting differences in important aspects of axillary management throughout the recent decade. The results highlight the need for international comparative patterns of care studies in oncology, which may help to identify areas where further studies and consensus building may be necessary.

  15. Identification of Children with Language Impairment: Investigating the Classification Accuracy of the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories, Level III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skarakis-Doyle, Elizabeth; Campbell, Wenonah; Dempsey, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study tested the accuracy with which the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories, Level III (CDI-III), a parent report measure of language ability, discriminated children with language impairment from those developing language typically. Method: Parents of 58 children, 49 with typically developing language (age 30 to 42…

  16. An evidence-based approach to nipple feeding in a level III NICU: nurse autonomy, developmental care, and teamwork.

    PubMed

    Shaker, Catherine S; Woida, Amy Marie Werner

    2007-01-01

    Historically, nipple feeding in the NICU has been initiated and advanced by physician order based on nursing observation and suggestions. The growing evidence base regarding nipple feeding readiness and progression, contingent caregiving, and nurse autonomy in decision making prompted our Level III NICU to reconsider our process. A literature review and discussions resulted in new protocols for initiating and advancing nipple feedings for three distinct groups: healthy preterm infants, preterm infants with complicated medical courses, and sick term or posttcrm infants. Through incorporating contingent earegiving, greater autonomy for the bedside nurse, developmental support, and collaboration, we expect to improve outcomes, comnuinication, and problem solving.

  17. The Indian Reading Series: Stories and Legends of the Northwest. Level III. Books 1-20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    Designed as supplementary reading materials for Indian and non-Indian children in the primary grades, this series of 20 booklets presents legends and stories of Northwest tribes. Stories in this third level of the six-level series were developed cooperatively by people of the Blackfeet, Kootenai, Jamestown-Clallam, Assiniboine, Sioux,…

  18. 36 CFR Appendix A to Part 1234 - Minimum Security Standards for Level III Federal Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... OEPs in place, updated annually, periodic testing exercise Required. Assign & train OEP officials... barriers in Level IV and V facilities. (Reproduced from Appendix C, Classification Table, U.S....

  19. Analysis of environmental issues related to small-scale hydroelectric development. III. Water level fluctuation

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrand, S.G.

    1980-10-01

    Potential environmental impacts in reservoirs and downstream river reaches below dams that may be caused by the water level fluctuation resulting from development and operation of small scale (under 25MW) hydroelectric projects are identified. The impacts discussed will be of potential concern at only those small-scale hydroelectric projects that are operated in a store and release (peaking) mode. Potential impacts on physical and chemical characteristics in reservoirs resulting from water level fluctuation include resuspension and redistribution of bank and bed sediment; leaching of soluble organic matter from sediment in the littoral zone; and changes in water quality resulting from changes in sediment and nutrient trap efficiency. Potential impacts on reservoir biota as a result of water level fluctuation include habitat destruction and the resulting partial or total loss of aquatic species; changes in habitat quality, which result in reduced standing crop and production of aquatic biota; and possible shifts in species diversity. The potential physical effects of water level fluctuation on downstream systems below dams are streambed and bank erosion and water quality problems related to resuspension and redistribution of these materials. Potential biological impacts of water level fluctuation on downstream systems below dams result from changes in current velocity, habitat reduction, and alteration in food supply. These alterations, either singly or in combination, can adversely affect aquatic populations below dams. The nature and potential significance of adverse impacts resulting from water level fluctuation are discussed. Recommendations for site-specific evaluation of water level fluctuation at small-scale hydroelectric projects are presented.

  20. Protein C and procollagen III peptide levels in patients with hepatic dysfunction after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pihusch, M; Wegner, H; Goehring, P; Salat, C; Pihusch, V; Andreesen, R; Kolb, H-J; Holler, E; Pihusch, R

    2005-10-01

    Veno-occlusive disease (VOD) is one of the most serious complications following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and is associated with a high mortality. We conducted a large trial on the clinical significance of protein C (PC) and procollagen III peptide (PNPIII) levels, which have been described as possible diagnostic markers of VOD. In total, 350 patients undergoing allogeneic HSCT were included. PC and PNPIII levels were analyzed prior to conditioning and weekly until 8 weeks after the HSCT. Signs of VOD and other transplantation-related complications (graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), toxicity, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, infection) were recorded weekly throughout the trial. Patients showed a significant drop of the PC levels in VOD (70.3 vs 96.3%, P<0.001) and with increasing severity of aGVHD. Steroids increased the PC levels (69.4% vs 109.4%, P<0.001). The highest PNPIII levels were registered in patients with VOD (mean 6.3 IU/ml). Patients with aGVHD showed an elevation of PNPIII, especially patients with hepatic aGVHD. PC levels during conditioning do not predict VOD (98.5 vs 76.5%, NS). Although PC and PNPIII may play a role in the pathogenesis of VOD they cannot discriminate between complications with jaundice and are only of limited help in the differential diagnosis of VOD.

  1. Blood levels of the heavy metal, lead, and caries in children aged 24-72 months: NHANES III.

    PubMed

    Wiener, R Constance; Long, D Leann; Jurevic, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Lead remains a significant pollutant. It has acute toxic and chronic effects on many tissues and accumulates in teeth and bones. The researchers for this study investigated the association of blood lead levels with the extent/severity of caries as measured by the number of decayed/filled teeth of children aged 24-72 months using data from NHANES III (the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey), accounting for the excess zero caries in the analysis and using less than 2 µg/dl as the reference blood lead level (n = 3,127). Zero-inflated negative binomial regression models indicated unadjusted extent/severity mean ratios of 1.79, 1.88 and 1.94 for the number of decayed/filled teeth in children whose blood lead levels were 2-5, 5-10 and >10 µg/dl, respectively, compared with children having <2 µg/dl blood lead levels. The results did not attenuate when other variables were added to the model for the 5-10 and >10 µg/dl levels of exposure. The adjusted extent/severity mean ratios were 1.84, 2.14 and 1.91, respectively, for the categories. This study indicated a strong association of blood lead levels with increasing numbers of carious teeth in children aged 24-72 months. These findings support other studies in an innovative analysis handling cases of children with no caries. The findings may inform caries risk assessment.

  2. Electrochemiluminescent chemodosimeter based on iridium(III) complex for point-of-care detection of homocysteine levels.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoon Jun; Lee, Kyung-Sik; Jeon, Yong-Jun; Shin, Ik-Soo; Hong, Jong-In

    2017-05-15

    Elevated levels of plasma homocysteine (Hcy) are an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Although a routine, rapid, and simple determination of Hcy levels is highly desired, the existing methods are practically limited because of complicated sample preparation and bulky instrumentation. Herein, we report a chemodosimetric approach for one-step analysis of Hcy levels based on the electrochemiluminescence (ECL). A rationally designed cyclometalated iridium(III) complex possessing a phenylisoquinoline main ligand underwent a selective ring-formation reaction with Hcy to generate a binding adduct, which enabled producing highly luminescent excited states, and yielded strong ECL signals on the surface of electrode without any use of enzymes or antibodies. The level of Hcy was successfully monitored by the ECL increment with a linear correlation between 0 and 40µM in 99.9% aqueous media. The approach required neither sample preparation nor bulky instrument, suggesting the point-of-care testing of Hcy levels, and is potentially useful for routine, cost-effective, and precautionary diagnosis of various cardiovascular diseases.

  3. Dose to level I and II axillary lymph nodes and lung by tangential field radiation in patients undergoing postmastectomy radiation with tissue expander reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To define the dosimetric coverage of level I/II axillary volumes and the lung volume irradiated in postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) following tissue expander placement. Methods and Materials Twenty-three patients were identified who had undergone postmastectomy radiotherapy with tangent only fields. All patients had pre-radiation tissue expander placement and expansion. Thirteen patients had bilateral expander reconstruction. The level I/II axillary volumes were contoured using the RTOG contouring atlas. The patient-specific variables of expander volume, superior-to-inferior location of expander, distance between expanders, expander angle and axillary volume were analyzed to determine their relationship to the axillary volume and lung volume dose. Results The mean coverage of the level I/II axillary volume by the 95% isodose line (VD95%) was 23.9% (range 0.3 - 65.4%). The mean Ipsilateral Lung VD50% was 8.8% (2.2-20.9). Ipsilateral and contralateral expander volume correlated to Axillary VD95% in patients with bilateral reconstruction (p = 0.01 and 0.006, respectively) but not those with ipsilateral only reconstruction (p = 0.60). Ipsilateral Lung VD50% correlated with angle of the expander from midline (p = 0.05). Conclusions In patients undergoing PMRT with tissue expanders, incidental doses delivered by tangents to the axilla, as defined by the RTOG contouring atlas, do not provide adequate coverage. The posterior-superior region of level I and II is the region most commonly underdosed. Axillary volume coverage increased with increasing expander volumes in patients with bilateral reconstruction. Lung dose increased with increasing expander angle from midline. This information should be considered both when placing expanders and when designing PMRT tangent only treatment plans by contouring and targeting the axilla volume when axillary treatment is indicated. PMID:22204504

  4. Absolute pressure derivatives of deep level defects in III-V semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Nolte, D.D.; Walukiewicz, W.; Haller, E.E.

    1987-11-01

    Based on transition metal reference levels, we present absolute pressure derivatives for band-edges in GaAs and InP and defects in GaAs. The defect deformation potentials are directly related to the electron-lattice coupling which drives lattice relaxation around the defects. We find an exceedingly large inward lattice relaxation of the EL2 defect in GaAs upon electron emission. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  5. The Relationship between Serum Carbonic Anhydrase I-II Autoantibody Levels and Diabetic Retinopathy in Type 1 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Türk, Adem; Mollamehmetoğlu, Süleyman; Alver, Ahmet; Menteşe, Ahmet; Nuhoğlu, İrfan; Erem, Cihangir; İmamoğlu, Halil İbrahim

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the relationship between serum carbonic anhydrase I-II (CA-I and II) autoantibody levels and diabetic retinopathy (DRP) in cases with type 1 diabetes. Materials and Methods: A total of 37 type-1 diabetic patients, 17 with DRP (group 1) and 20 without (group 2), and 38 healthy control subjects (group 3) were included. CA-I and CA-II autoantibody levels were measured in serum samples obtained from each of the three groups and compared statistically. Additionally, the correlation between CA-I and CA-II autoantibody levels and the presence of diabetic macular edema was examined. Results: Mean measured CA-I autoantibody levels were 0.145±0.072, 0.117±0.047, and 0.138±0.061 ABSU in group 1, group 2, and group 3, respectively (p=0.327). The average CA-II autoantibody levels achieved in the same groups were 0.253±0.174, 0.155±0.137, and 0.131±0.085 ABSU, respectively (p=0.005). No significant difference was obtained between the subgroups of group 1, with macular edema (n=8) and without (n=9), in terms of both CA-I and CA-II autoantibody levels (p=0.501, p=0.178, respectively). Conclusion: A significant correlation was observed between the development of DRP and serum CA-II autoantibody levels in type 1 diabetic cases. However, there was no correlation between the autoantibody levels and the presence of diabetic macular edema in cases with DRP.

  6. Energy-level matching of Fe(III) ions grafted at surface and doped in bulk for efficient visible-light photocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Qiu, Xiaoqing; Miyauchi, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Kazuhito

    2013-07-10

    Photocatalytic reaction rate (R) is determined by the multiplication of light absorption capability (α) and quantum efficiency (QE); however, these two parameters generally have trade-off relations. Thus, increasing α without decreasing QE remains a challenging issue for developing efficient photocatalysts with high R. Herein, using Fe(III) ions grafted Fe(III) doped TiO2 as a model system, we present a novel method for developing visible-light photocatalysts with efficient R, utilizing the concept of energy level matching between surface-grafted Fe(III) ions as co-catalysts and bulk-doped Fe(III) ions as visible-light absorbers. Photogenerated electrons in the doped Fe(III) states under visible-light efficiently transfer to the surface grafted Fe(III) ions co-catalysts, as the doped Fe(III) ions in bulk produced energy levels below the conduction band of TiO2, which match well with the potential of Fe(3+)/Fe(2+) redox couple in the surface grafted Fe(III) ions. Electrons in the surface grafted Fe(III) ions efficiently cause multielectron reduction of adsorbed oxygen molecules to achieve high QE value. Consequently, the present Fe(III)-FexTi1-xO2 nanocomposites exhibited the highest visible-light R among the previously reported photocatalysts for decomposition of gaseous organic compounds. The high R can proceed even under commercial white-light emission diode irradiation and is very stable for long-term use, making it practically useful. Further, this efficient method could be applied in other wide-band gap semiconductors, including ZnO or SrTiO3, and may be potentially applicable for other photocatalysis systems, such as water splitting, CO2 reduction, NOx removal, and dye decomposition. Thus, this method represents a strategic approach to develop new visible-light active photocatalysts for practical uses.

  7. The effect of polarity and surface states on the Fermi level at III-nitride surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, P; Bryan, I; Bryan, Z; Guo, W; Hussey, L; Collazo, R; Sitar, Z

    2014-09-28

    Surface states and their influence on the Fermi level at the surface of GaN and AlN are studied using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The effect of polarity on surface electronic properties was studied. Accurate modeling of the valence band edge and comparison with XPS data revealed the presence of donor surface states at 1.4 eV and acceptor states at energies > 2.7 eV from the valence band in GaN. Al polar AlN showed acceptor states at energies > 3.3 eV. Density of acceptor surface states was estimated to be between 10(13) and 10(14) eV(-1) cm(-2) in both GaN and AlN. The shift in charge neutrality levels and barrier heights due to polarity and the density of surface states on AlN and GaN were estimated from XPS measurements. Theoretical modeling and comparison with XPS data implied full compensation of spontaneous polarization charge by charged surface states. Barrier height measurements also reveal a dependence on polarity with phi(metal-polar)>phi(non-polar)>phi(nitrogen-polar) suggesting that the N-polar surface is the most suitable for Ohmic contacts. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  8. Diagnostic efficiency of demographically corrected Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III and Wechsler Memory Scale-III indices in moderate to severe traumatic brain injury and lower education levels.

    PubMed

    Walker, Alexandra J; Batchelor, Jennifer; Shores, E Arthur; Jones, Mike

    2009-11-01

    Despite the sensitivity of neuropsychological tests to educational level, improved diagnostic accuracy for demographically corrected scores has yet to be established. Diagnostic efficiency statistics of Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (WAIS-III) and Wechsler Memory Scale-III (WMS-III) indices that were corrected for education, sex, and age (demographically corrected) were compared with age corrected indices in individuals aged 16 to 75 years with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and 12 years or less education. TBI participants (n = 100) were consecutive referrals to an outpatient rehabilitation service and met careful selection criteria. Controls (n = 100) were obtained from the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample. Demographically corrected indices did not provide higher diagnostic efficiency than age corrected indices and this result was supported by reanalysis of the TBI group against a larger and unmatched control group. Processing Speed Index provided comparable diagnostic accuracy to that of combined indices. Demographically corrected indices were associated with higher cut-scores to maximize overall classification, reflecting the upward adjustment of those scores in a lower education sample. This suggests that, in clinical practice, the test results of individuals with limited education may be more accurately interpreted with the application of demographic corrections. Diagnostic efficiency statistics are presented, and future research directions are discussed.

  9. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for the K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator Operations, Level III

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    A Level III pollution prevention opportunity assessment (PPOA) was performed for the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator to evaluate pollution prevention (P2) options for various waste streams: The main objective of this study was to identify and evaluate options to reduce the quantities of each waste stream generated by the TSCA Incinerator operations to realize significant environmental and/or economic benefits from P2. For each of the waste streams, P2 options were evaluated following the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) hierarchy to (1) reduce the quantity of waste generated, (2) recycle the waste, and/or (3) use alternate waste treatment or segregation methods. This report provides process descriptions, identification and evaluation of P2 options, and final recommendations.

  10. Assessment of mental health nursing competence using level III academic marking criteria: the Eastbourne assessment of practice scale.

    PubMed

    Hardcastle, M

    1999-02-01

    The assessment of clinical competence in nursing represents a challenge to the profession. There is a need for assessment of practice skills through evaluative observation of performance but unfortunately such methods are not regularly used as a basis for assessment within most academic nursing institutions. Instead there is still a reliance upon more traditional types of academic assessment usually done through a written medium. Such methods whilst academically rigorous do not easily assess actual real life competence. This paper will describe how this tension was addressed through the development of a tool that combines observation of real life practice and viva style questioning with an assessment marking grid whose descriptors represent level III practice. Its inter rater reliability (rs = 0.88, P < 0.01) was established by 14 clinical nurse specialists in cognitive behaviour therapy who assessed a single video taped recording of a post-registration students performance whilst undergoing training in cognitive behaviour therapy.

  11. Two Dimensional Effective Electron Mass at the Fermi Level in Quantum Wells of III-V, Ternary and Quaternary Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, S; Chatterjee, B; Debbarma, S; Ghatak, K P

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we study the influence of strong electric field on the two dimensional (2D)effective electron mass (EEM) at the Fermi level in quantum wells of III-V, ternary and quaternary semiconductors within the framework of k x p formalism by formulating a new 2D electron energy spectrum. It appears taking quantum wells of InSb, InAs, Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te and In(1-x)Ga(x)As(1-y)P(y) lattice matched to InP as examples that the EEM increases with decreasing film thickness, increasing electric field and increases with increasing surface electron concentration exhibiting spikey oscillations because of the crossing over of the Fermi level by the quantized level in quantum wells and the quantized oscillation occurs when the Fermi energy touches the sub-band energy. The electric field makes the mass quantum number dependent and the oscillatory mass introduces quantum number dependent mass anisotropy in addition to energy. The EEM increases with decreasing alloy composition where the variations are totally band structure dependent. Under certain limiting conditions all the results for all the cases get simplified into the well-known parabolic energy bands and thus confirming the compatibility test. The content of this paper finds three applications in the fields of nano-science and technology.

  12. Pharmacoproteomic study of the natural product Ebenfuran III in DU-145 prostate cancer cells: the quantitative and temporal interrogation of chemically induced cell death at the protein level.

    PubMed

    Roumeliotis, Theodoros I; Halabalaki, Maria; Alexi, Xanthippi; Ankrett, Dyan; Giannopoulou, Eugenia G; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Sayan, Berna S; Alexis, Michael N; Townsend, Paul A; Garbis, Spiros D

    2013-04-05

    A naturally occurring benzofuran derivative, Ebenfuran III (Eb III), was investigated for its antiproliferative effects using the DU-145 prostate cell line. Eb III was isolated from Onobrychis ebenoides of the Leguminosae family, a plant endemic in Central and Southern Greece. We have previously reported that Eb III exerts significant cytotoxic effects on certain cancer cell lines. This effect is thought to occur via the isoprenyl moiety at the C-5 position of the molecule. The study aim was to gain a deeper understanding of the pharmacological effect of Eb III on DU-145 cell death at the translational level using a relative quantitative and temporal proteomics approach. Proteins extracted from the cell pellets were subjected to solution phase trypsin proteolysis followed by iTRAQ-labeling. The labeled tryptic peptide extracts were then fractionated using strong cation exchange chromatography and the fractions were analyzed by nanoflow reverse phase ultraperformance liquid chromatography-nanoelectrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry analysis using a hybrid QqTOF platform. Using this approach, we compared the expression levels of 1360 proteins analyzed at ≤ 1% global protein false discovery rate (FDR), commonly present in untreated (control, vehicle only) and Eb III-treated cells at the different exposure time points. Through the iterative use of Ingenuity Pathway Analysis with hierarchical clustering of protein expression patterns, followed by bibliographic research, the temporal regulation of the Calpain-1, ERK2, PAR-4, RAB-7, and Bap31 proteins were identified as potential nodes of multipathway convergence to Eb III induced DU-145 cell death. These proteins were further verified with Western blot analysis. This gel-free, quantitative 2DLC-MS/MS proteomics method effectively captured novel modulated proteins in the DU-145 cell line as a response to Eb III treatment. This approach also provided greater insight to the multifocal and combinatorial signaling

  13. Bis-diglycol-amides (Bis-DGA) as new extractants for An(III) and Ln(III) from aqueous high-level wastes issued from the Purex process

    SciTech Connect

    Espartero, A.G.; Murillo, M.T.; Almaraz, M.; Sanchez-Quesada, J.; Iglesias-Sanchez, J.C.; Prados, P.; Segura, M.; Mendoza, J. de

    2008-07-01

    A new family of compounds with two diglycolamide moieties in their molecule have been synthesized and studied as suitable extractants for trivalent actinides (An(III)) and trivalent lanthanides (Ln(III)) present in high-level wastes (HLW) issued from the PUREX process. Although the obtained distribution ratios are comparable with those from TODGA under similar experimental conditions, the bis-DGA compounds showed higher selectivity towards Ln(III). The number of bis-DGA molecules involved in the formation of the dominant complex is two, and it is possible to recover more than 99% of the extracted An and Ln with 0.01 M nitric acid in order to recycle the solvent in subsequent extraction cycles. (authors)

  14. High level of depressive symptoms as a barrier to reach an ideal cardiovascular health. The Paris Prospective Study III.

    PubMed

    Gaye, B; Prugger, C; Perier, M C; Thomas, F; Plichart, M; Guibout, C; Lemogne, C; Pannier, B; Boutouyrie, P; Jouven, X; Empana, J P

    2016-01-08

    We hypothesized that depression might represent a barrier to reach an ideal cardiovascular health (CVH) as estimated by the 7-item tool proposed by the American Heart Association. Between 2008 and 2012, 9,417 subjects 50-75 years of age were examined in a large health center and enrolled in the Paris Prospective Study III (PPS3). Participants with 0-2, 3-4 and 5-7 health metrics at the ideal level were categorized as having poor, intermediate and ideal CVH, respectively. Participants with a score ≥ 7 on the 13-item Questionnaire of Depression 2nd version, Abridged or who were on antidepressants were referred as having high level of depressive symptoms (HLDS). The mean age of the 9417 study participants was 59.57 (SD 6.28) years and 61.16% were males. A total of 9.55% had HLDS. Poor, intermediate and ideal CVH was present in 40.38%, 49.52% and 10.10% of the participants. In multivariate polytomous logistic regression analysis, HLDS was inversely associated with ideal CVH (odds ratio = 0.70; 95% CI: 0.55;0.90). This was driven by an association with the behavioural component of the CVH. Participants with HLDS had a substantial reduced chance of reaching an ideal CVH.

  15. Low Incidence along with Low mRNA Levels of EGFRvIII in Prostate and Colorectal Cancers Compared to Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Peciak, Joanna; Stec, Wojciech J; Treda, Cezary; Ksiazkiewicz, Magdalena; Janik, Karolina; Popeda, Marta; Smolarz, Maciej; Rosiak, Kamila; Hulas-Bigoszewska, Krystyna; Och, Waldemar; Rieske, Piotr; Stoczynska-Fidelus, Ewelina

    2017-01-01

    Background: The presence as well as the potential role of EGFRvIII in tumors other than glioblastoma still remains a controversial subject with many contradictory data published. Previous analyses, however, did not consider the level of EGFRvIII mRNA expression in different tumor types. Methods: Appropriately designed protocol for Real-time quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (Real-time qRT-PCR) was applied to analyze EGFRvIII and EGFRWT mRNA expression in 155 tumor specimens. Additionally, Western Blot (WB) analysis was performed for selected samples. Stable cell lines showing EGFRvIII expression (CAS-1 and DK-MG) were analyzed by means of WB, immunocytochemistry (ICC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Results: Our analyses revealed EGFRvIII expression in 27.59% of glioblastomas (8/29), 8.11% of colorectal cancers (3/37), 6.52% of prostate cancers (3/46) and none of breast cancers (0/43). Despite the average relative expression of EGFRvIII varying greatly among tumors of different tissues (approximately 800-fold) or even within the same tissue group (up to 8000-fold for GB), even the marginal expression of EGFRvIII mRNA can be detrimental to cancer progression, as determined by the analysis of stable cell lines endogenously expressing the oncogene. Conclusion: EGFRvIII plays an unquestionable role in glioblastomas with high expression of this oncogene. Our data suggests that EGFRvIII importance should not be underestimated even in tumors with relatively low expression of this oncogene. PMID:28123609

  16. Low Incidence along with Low mRNA Levels of EGFR(vIII) in Prostate and Colorectal Cancers Compared to Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Peciak, Joanna; Stec, Wojciech J; Treda, Cezary; Ksiazkiewicz, Magdalena; Janik, Karolina; Popeda, Marta; Smolarz, Maciej; Rosiak, Kamila; Hulas-Bigoszewska, Krystyna; Och, Waldemar; Rieske, Piotr; Stoczynska-Fidelus, Ewelina

    2017-01-01

    Background: The presence as well as the potential role of EGFR(vIII) in tumors other than glioblastoma still remains a controversial subject with many contradictory data published. Previous analyses, however, did not consider the level of EGFR(vIII) mRNA expression in different tumor types. Methods: Appropriately designed protocol for Real-time quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (Real-time qRT-PCR) was applied to analyze EGFR(vIII) and EGFR(WT) mRNA expression in 155 tumor specimens. Additionally, Western Blot (WB) analysis was performed for selected samples. Stable cell lines showing EGFR(vIII) expression (CAS-1 and DK-MG) were analyzed by means of WB, immunocytochemistry (ICC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Results: Our analyses revealed EGFR(vIII) expression in 27.59% of glioblastomas (8/29), 8.11% of colorectal cancers (3/37), 6.52% of prostate cancers (3/46) and none of breast cancers (0/43). Despite the average relative expression of EGFR(vIII) varying greatly among tumors of different tissues (approximately 800-fold) or even within the same tissue group (up to 8000-fold for GB), even the marginal expression of EGFR(vIII) mRNA can be detrimental to cancer progression, as determined by the analysis of stable cell lines endogenously expressing the oncogene. Conclusion: EGFR(vIII) plays an unquestionable role in glioblastomas with high expression of this oncogene. Our data suggests that EGFR(vIII) importance should not be underestimated even in tumors with relatively low expression of this oncogene.

  17. Expression of N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferase III Suppresses α2,3-Sialylation, and Its Distinctive Functions in Cell Migration Are Attributed to α2,6-Sialylation Levels*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jishun; Isaji, Tomoya; Im, Sanghun; Fukuda, Tomohiko; Kameyama, Akihiko; Gu, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferase III (GnT-III), which catalyzes the addition of the bisecting GlcNAc branch on N-glycans, is usually described as a metastasis suppressor. Overexpression of GnT-III inhibited migration in multiple types of tumor cells. However, these results seem controversial to the clinical observations for the increased expression of GnT-III in human hepatomas, glioma, and ovarian cancers. Here, we present evidence that these inconsistencies are mainly attributed to the different expression pattern of cell sialylation. In detail, we show that overexpression of GnT-III significantly inhibits α2,3-sialylation but not α2,6-sialylation. The migratory ability of cells without or with a low level of α2,6-sialylation is consistently suppressed after GnT-III overexpression. In contrast, the effects of GnT-III overexpression are variable in tumor cells that are highly α2,6-sialylated. Overexpression of GnT-III promotes the cell migration in glioma cells U-251 and hepatoma cells HepG2, although it has little influence in human breast cancer cell MDA-MB-231 and gastric cancer cell MKN-45. Interestingly, up-regulation of α2,6-sialylation by overexpressing β-galactoside α2,6-sialyltranferase 1 in the α2,6-hyposialylated HeLa-S3 cells abolishes the anti-migratory effects of GnT-III. Conversely, depletion of α2,6-sialylation by knock-out of β-galactoside α2,6-sialyltranferase 1 in α2,6-hypersialylated HepG2 cells endows GnT-III with the anti-migratory ability. Taken together, our data clearly demonstrate that high expression of α2,6-sialylation on the cell surface could affect the anti-migratory role of GnT-III, which provides an insight into the mechanistic roles of GnT-III in tumor metastasis. PMID:26801611

  18. Evaluating the environmental fate of pharmaceuticals using a level III model based on poly-parameter linear free energy relationships.

    PubMed

    Zukowska, Barbara; Breivik, Knut; Wania, Frank

    2006-04-15

    We recently proposed how to expand the applicability of multimedia models towards polar organic chemicals by expressing environmental phase partitioning with the help of poly-parameter linear free energy relationships (PP-LFERs). Here we elaborate on this approach by applying it to three pharmaceutical substances. A PP-LFER-based version of a Level III fugacity model calculates overall persistence, concentrations and intermedia fluxes of polar and non-polar organic chemicals between air, water, soil and sediments at steady-state. Illustrative modeling results for the pharmaceuticals within a defined coastal region are presented and discussed. The model results are highly sensitive to the degradation rate in water and the equilibrium partitioning between organic carbon and water, suggesting that an accurate description of this particular partitioning equilibrium is essential in order to obtain reliable predictions of environmental fate. The PP-LFER based modeling approach furthermore illustrates that the greatest mobility in aqueous phases may be experienced by pharmaceuticals that combines a small molecular size with strong H-acceptor properties.

  19. Auditing of Monitoring and Respiratory Support Equipment in a Level III-C Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Bergon-Sendin, Elena; Perez-Grande, Carmen; Lora-Pablos, David; De la Cruz Bertolo, Javier; Moral-Pumarega, María Teresa; Bustos-Lozano, Gerardo; Pallas-Alonso, Carmen Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Background. Random safety audits (RSAs) are a safety tool but have not been widely used in hospitals. Objectives. To determine the frequency of proper use of equipment safety mechanisms in relation to monitoring and mechanical ventilation by performing RSAs. The study also determined whether factors related to the patient, time period, or characteristics of the area of admission influenced how the device safety systems were used. Methods. A prospective observational study was conducted in a level III-C Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) during 2012. 87 days were randomly selected. Appropriate overall use was defined when all evaluated variables were correctly programmed in the audited device. Results. A total of 383 monitor and ventilator audits were performed. The Kappa coefficient of interobserver agreement was 0.93. The rate of appropriate overall use of the monitors and respiratory support equipment was 33.68%. Significant differences were found with improved usage during weekends, OR 1.85 (1.12–3.06, p = 0.01), and during the late shift (3 pm to 10 pm), OR 1.59 (1.03–2.4, p = 0.03). Conclusions. Equipment safety systems of monitors and ventilators are not properly used. To improve patient safety, we should identify which alarms are really needed and where the difficulties lie for the correct alarm programming. PMID:26558277

  20. Parental social support, coping strategies, resilience factors, stress, anxiety and depression levels in parents of children with MPS III (Sanfilippo syndrome) or children with intellectual disabilities (ID).

    PubMed

    Grant, Sheena; Cross, Elaine; Wraith, James Edmond; Jones, Simon; Mahon, Louise; Lomax, Michelle; Bigger, Brian; Hare, Dougal

    2013-03-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (MPS III, Sanfilippo syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disorder, caused by a deficiency in one of four enzymes involved in the catabolism of the glycosaminoglycan heparan sulphate. It is a degenerative disorder, with a progressive decline in children's intellectual and physical functioning. There is currently no cure for the disorder. To date there is a paucity of research on how this disorder impacts parents psychological functioning. Specifically, research in the area has failed to employ adequate control groups to assess if the impact of this disorder on parents psychological functioning differs from parenting a child with intellectual disability (ID). The current study examined child behaviour and parental psychological functioning in 23 parents of children with MPS III and 23 parents of children with ID. Parents completed postal questionnaires about their child's behaviour and abilities and their own psychological functioning. Parents of children with MPS III reported fewer behavioural difficulties as their child aged, more severe level of intellectual disability, and similar levels of perceived social support, coping techniques, stress, anxiety and depression levels as parents of children with ID. Both groups of parents scored above the clinical cut off for anxiety and depression. Parents of children with MPS III rated themselves as significantly less future-orientated and goal directed than parents of children with ID. Services should develop support packages for parents of children with MPS III that incorporate an understanding of the unique stressors and current-difficulty approach of this population. Future research should examine gender differences between parental psychological functioning, using mixed qualitative and quantitative approaches, and utilise matched developmental level and typically developing control groups.

  1. Active Center Control of Termination by RNA Polymerase III and tRNA Gene Transcription Levels In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rijal, Keshab; Maraia, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of RNA polymerase (RNAP) III to efficiently recycle from termination to reinitiation is critical for abundant tRNA production during cellular proliferation, development and cancer. Yet understanding of the unique termination mechanisms used by RNAP III is incomplete, as is its link to high transcription output. We used two tRNA-mediated suppression systems to screen for Rpc1 mutants with gain- and loss- of termination phenotypes in S. pombe. 122 point mutation mutants were mapped to a recently solved 3.9 Å structure of yeast RNAP III elongation complex (EC); they cluster in the active center bridge helix and trigger loop, as well as the pore and funnel, the latter of which indicate involvement of the RNA cleavage domain of the C11 subunit in termination. Purified RNAP III from a readthrough (RT) mutant exhibits increased elongation rate. The data strongly support a kinetic coupling model in which elongation rate is inversely related to termination efficiency. The mutants exhibit good correlations of terminator RT in vitro and in vivo, and surprisingly, amounts of transcription in vivo. Because assessing in vivo transcription can be confounded by various parameters, we used a tRNA reporter with a processing defect and a strong terminator. By ruling out differences in RNA decay rates, the data indicate that mutants with the RT phenotype synthesize more RNA than wild type cells, and than can be accounted for by their increased elongation rate. Finally, increased activity by the mutants appears unrelated to the RNAP III repressor, Maf1. The results show that the mobile elements of the RNAP III active center, including C11, are key determinants of termination, and that some of the mutations activate RNAP III for overall transcription. Similar mutations in spontaneous cancer suggest this as an unforeseen mechanism of RNAP III activation in disease. PMID:27518095

  2. Femtomolar level sensing of inorganic arsenic(III) in water and in living-systems using a non-toxic fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Dey, Biswajit; Mukherjee, Priyanka; Mondal, Ranjan Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Asoke Prasun; Hauli, Ipsit; Mukhopadhyay, Subhra Kanti; Fleck, Michel

    2014-12-14

    A highly selective femtomolar level sensing of inorganic arsenic(III) as arsenious acid has been accomplished in water medium and in living-systems (on pollen grains of Tecoma stans; Candida albicans cells (IMTECH No. 3018) and Peperomia pellucida stem section) using a non-toxic fluorescent probe of a Cu(II)-complex.

  3. Reliability of a Shuttle Run Test for Children with Cerebral Palsy Who Are Classified at Gross Motor Function Classification System Level III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verschuren, Olaf; Bosma, Liesbeth; Takken, Tim

    2011-01-01

    For children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) classified as Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level III there is no running-based field test available to assess their cardiorespiratory fitness. The current study investigated whether a shuttle run test can be reliably (test-retest) performed in a group of children with…

  4. Assessing the potential hydrological impact of the Gibe III Dam on Lake Turkana water level using multi-source satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velpuri, N. M.; Senay, G. B.

    2012-10-01

    Lake Turkana, the largest desert lake in the world, is fed by ungauged or poorly gauged river systems. To meet the demand of electricity in the East African region, Ethiopia is currently building the Gibe III hydroelectric dam on the Omo River, which supplies more than 80% of the inflows to Lake Turkana. On completion, the Gibe III dam will be the tallest dam in Africa with a height of 241 m. However, the nature of interactions and potential impacts of regulated inflows to Lake Turkana are not well understood due to its remote location and unavailability of reliable in situ datasets. In this study, we used 12 yr (1998-2009) of existing multi-source satellite and model-assimilated global weather data. We used a calibrated multi-source satellite data-driven water balance model for Lake Turkana that takes into account model routed runoff, lake/reservoir evapotranspiration, direct rain on lakes/reservoirs and releases from the dam to compute lake water levels. The model evaluates the impact of the Gibe III dam using three different approaches - a historical approach, a rainfall based approach, and a statistical approach to generate rainfall-runoff scenarios. All the approaches provided comparable and consistent results. Model results indicated that the hydrological impact of the Gibe III dam on Lake Turkana would vary with the magnitude and distribution of rainfall post-dam commencement. On average, the reservoir would take up to 8-10 months, after commencement, to reach a minimum operation level of 201 m depth of water. During the dam filling period, the lake level would drop up to 1-2 m (95% confidence) compared to the lake level modeled without the dam. The lake level variability caused by regulated inflows after the dam commissioning were found to be within the natural variability of the lake of 4.8 m. Moreover, modeling results indicated that the hydrological impact of the Gibe III dam would depend on the initial lake level at the time of dam commencement. Areas

  5. Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) has no significant impact on survival in patients undergoing nephrectomy and level III-IV inferior vena cava thrombectomy; a multi-institutional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dall'Era, Marc A.; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Carballido, Joaquín A.; Chandrasekar, Thenappan; Chromecki, Thomas; Ciancio, Gaetano; Daneshmand, Siamak; Gontero, Paolo; Gonzalez, Javier; Haferkamp, Axel; Hohenfellner, Markus; Huang, William C.; Espinós, Estefania Linares; Mandel, Philipp; Martinez-Salamanca, Juan I.; Master, Viraj A.; McKiernan, James M.; Montorsi, Francesco; Novara, Giacomo; Pahernik, Sascha; Palou, Juan; Pruthi, Raj S.; Rodriguez-Faba, Oscar; Russo, Paul; Scherr, Douglas S.; Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Spahn, Martin; Terrone, Carlo; Vergho, Daniel; Wallen, Eric M.; Xylinas, Evanguelos; Zigeuner, Richard; Libertino, John A.; Evans, Christopher P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The impact of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) usage in level III-IV tumor thrombectomy on surgical and oncologic outcomes is unknown. We sought to determine the impact of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) on overall and cancer specific survival, as well as surgical complication rates, and immediate outcomes in patients undergoing nephrectomy and level III-IV tumor thrombectomy with or without CPB. Patients and Methods We retrospectively analyzed 362 patients with RCC and with level III or IV tumor thrombus from 1992 to 2012 in 22 US and European centers. Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare overall and cancer-specific survival between patients with and without CPB. Perioperative mortality and complications rates were assessed using logistic regression analyses. Results The median overall survival was 24.6 months in non-CPB patients and 26.6 months in CPB patients. Overall survival and cancer-specific survival (CSS) did not differ significantly in both groups, neither in univariate analysis nor when adjusting for known risk factors. In multivariate analysis, no significant differences were seen in hospital LOS, Clavien 1-4 complication rate, intraoperative or 30 day mortality, and CSS between both groups. Limitations include the retrospective nature of the study. Conclusions In our multi-institutional analysis, the use of cardiopulmonary bypass did not significantly impact cancer specific survival or overall survival in patients undergoing nephrectomy and level III or IV tumor thrombectomy. Neither approach was independently associated with increased mortality in the multivariate analysis. Higher surgical complications were not independently associated with the use of CPB. PMID:25797392

  6. Cytological features of malignant eccrine acrospiroma presenting as a soft tissue mass axilla: A rare sweat gland tumor with histologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Pinki; Dixit, Alok; Chandra, Subrat; Tanwar, Aparna

    2015-01-01

    Malignant eccrine acrospiroma is an infrequent, highly malignant primary skin tumor derived from eccrine sweat glands. Though fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) is a well-established diagnostic tool, but if a skin adnexal tumor or primary skin lesion is suspected clinically, the usual approach is biopsy due to easy accessibility. Being itself rare, cytologic features of this lesion is hardly encountered in case reports. As a result, very little is known about the appearance of adnexal tumors like malignant eccrine acrospiroma on fine-needle aspiration samples. A 50-year-old man presented with swelling in the left axilla, clinically suspected to be a soft tissue sarcoma. Fine-needle aspiration was advised, and a cytological diagnosis of malignant eccrine acrospiroma was rendered which was later confirmed on histological examination. Rapid, accurate diagnosis of these tumors is imperative as they have very poor prognosis and an aggressive course with recurrence and/or metastasis. FNAC plays a decisive and easy diagnostic modality in these unusual, rare cases of highly malignant primary skin tumor, and awareness of the lesions is indispensable in their management.

  7. Laboratory determination of migration of Eu(III) in compacted bentonite-sand mixtures as buffer/backfill material for high-level waste disposal.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lang; Zhang, Huyuan; Yan, Ming; Chen, Hang; Zhang, Ming

    2013-12-01

    For the safety assessment of geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW), the migration of Eu(III) through compacted bentonite-sand mixtures was measured under expected repository conditions. Under the evaluated conditions, advection and dispersion is the dominant migration mechanism. The role of sorption on the retardation of migration was also evaluated. The hydraulic conductivities of compacted bentonite-sand mixtures were K=2.07×10(-10)-5.23×10(-10)cm/s, The sorption and diffusion of Eu(III) were examined using a flexible wall permeameter for a solute concentration of 2.0×10(-5)mol/l. The effective diffusion coefficients and apparent diffusion coefficients of Eu(III) in compacted bentonite-sand mixtures were in the range of 1.62×10(-12)-4.87×10(-12)m(2)/s, 1.44×10(-14)-9.41×10(-14)m(2)/s, respectively, which has a very important significance to forecast the relationship between migration length of Eu(III) in buffer/backfill material and time and provide a reference for the design of buffer/backfill material for HLW disposal in China.

  8. Assessing bioavailability levels of metals in effluent-affected rivers: effect of Fe(III) and chelating agents on the distribution of metal speciation.

    PubMed

    Han, Shuping; Naito, Wataru; Masunaga, Shigeki

    To assess the effects of Fe(III) and anthropogenic ligands on the bioavailability of Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb, concentrations of bioavailable metals were measured by the DGT (diffusive gradients in thin films) method in some urban rivers, and were compared with concentrations calculated by a chemical equilibrium model (WHAM 7.0). Assuming that dissolved Fe(III) (<0.45 μm membrane filtered) was in equilibrium with colloidal iron oxide, the WHAM 7.0 model estimated that bioavailable concentrations of Ni, Cu, and Zn were slightly higher than the corresponding values estimated assuming that dissolved Fe(III) was absent. In contrast, lower levels of free Pb were predicted by the WHAM 7.0 model when dissolved Fe(III) was included. Estimates showed that most of the dissolved Pb was present as colloidal iron-Pb complex. Ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) concentrations at sampling sites were predicted from the relationship between EDTA and the calculated bioavailable concentration of Zn. When both colloidal iron and predicted EDTA concentrations were included in the WHAM 7.0 calculations, dissolved metals showed a strong tendency to form EDTA complexes, in the order Ni > Cu > Zn > Pb. With the inclusion of EDTA, bioavailable concentrations of Ni, Cu, and Zn predicted by WHAM 7.0 were different from those predicted considering only humic substances and colloidal iron.

  9. Hepatoprotective effect of juglone on dimethylnitrosamine-induced liver fibrosis and its effect on hepatic antioxidant defence and the expression levels of α-SMA and collagen III.

    PubMed

    Zhou, De-Jiang; Mu, Dong; Jiang, Ming-De; Zheng, Shu-Mei; Zhang, Yong; He, Sheng; Weng, Min; Zeng, Wei-Zheng

    2015-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the antifibrotic effects of juglone on dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)‑induced fibrosis in rats. Juglone, which is a quinone, significantly decreased DMN‑induced rat hepatic fibrosis, which was associated with increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, decreased oxidative stress and reduced levels of α‑smooth muscle actin (α‑SMA) and collagen (Col) III in the liver. Serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, hyaluronic acid, laminin, type III precollagen and type IV collagen were significantly reduced by treatment with juglone. Liver fibrosis was induced in male Sprague‑Dawley rats by subcutaneous injections of DMN solution and hepatic fibrosis was assessed using Massons trichome staining. The expression levels of α‑SMA and Col III were determined using immunohistochemical techniques. The activities of SOD and malondialdehyde in liver homogenates were also determined. The results suggested that juglone augmented the antioxidative capability of the liver, possibly by stimulating the activity of SOD, which promoted the inactivation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and decreased the accumulation of extracellular matrix collagen in the liver, thereby alleviating hepatic fibrosis. Silymarin was used as a positive control for liver fibrosis protection. It was hypothesized that juglone alleviates or mitigates oxidative stress‑mediated hepatic fibrosis by upregulating the expression of peroxisome proliferator‑activated receptor γ and inhibiting the activation of HSC.

  10. The impact of synapsin III gene on the neurometabolite level alterations after single-dose methylphenidate in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder patients

    PubMed Central

    Başay, Ömer; Kabukcu Basay, Burge; Alacam, Huseyin; Ozturk, Onder; Buber, Ahmet; Gorucu Yilmaz, Senay; Kıroğlu, Yılmaz; Erdal, Mehmet Emin; Herken, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the neurometabolite level changes according to synapsin III gene rs133945G>A and rs133946C>G polymorphisms by using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in patients with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methods Fifty-seven adults diagnosed with ADHD were recruited for the study. The participants were examined by single-voxel 1H MRS when medication naïve and 30 minutes after oral administration of 10 mg methylphenidate (Mph). Those who had been on a stimulant discontinued the medication 48 hours before MRS imaging. Spectra were taken from the anterior cingulate cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, striatum, and cerebellum, and N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline, and creatine levels were examined. For genotyping of the synapsin III gene polymorphisms, DNA was isolated from peripheral blood leukocytes. The effects of age, sex, and ADHD subtypes were controlled in the analyses. Results After a single dose of Mph, choline levels increased significantly in the striatum of rs133945G>A polymorphism-GG genotypes (P=0.020) and NAA levels rose in the anterior cingulate cortex of rs133946C>G polymorphism-CG genotypes (P=0.014). Both rs133945G>A and rs133946C>G polymorphisms were found to statistically significantly affect the alteration of NAA levels in response to Mph in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex with two-way repeated measure of analysis of variance. Post hoc comparisons revealed a significant difference between CG and GG genotypes of rs133946C>G polymorphisms after Bonferroni adjustment (P=0.016). Conclusion Synapsin III gene polymorphisms may be affecting the changes in neurometabolite levels in response to Mph in adult ADHD patients. Future studies are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:27274248

  11. Conference Report: ESF-COST High-Level Research Conference Natural Products Chemistry, Biology and Medicine III.

    PubMed

    Catino, Arthur

    2010-12-01

    Natural Products Chemistry, Biology and Medicine III was the third conference in a series of events sponsored by the European Science Foundation (ESF) and the European Cooperation in the field of Scientific and Technical Research (COST). Scientists came together from within and outside the EU to present cutting-edge developments in chemical synthesis. Research areas included the synthesis of natural products, methods development, isolation/structural elucidation and chemical biology. As our capacity to produce new chemotherapeutic agents relies on chemical synthesis, this year's conference has never been so timely. This report highlights several of the scientific contributions presented during the meeting.

  12. Computerized self-assessment of automated lesion segmentation in breast ultrasound: implication for CADx applied to findings in the axilla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drukker, K.; Giger, M. L.

    2008-03-01

    We developed a self-assessment method in which the CADx system provided a confidence level for its lesion segmentations. The self-assessment was performed by a fuzzy-inference system based on 4 computer-extracted features of the computer-segmented lesions in a leave-one-case-out evaluation protocol. In instances where the initial segmentation received a low assessment rating, lesions were re-segmented using the same segmentation method but based on a user-defined region-of-interest. A total of 542 cases with 1133 lesions were collected in this study, and we focused here on the 97 normal lymph nodes in this dataset since these pose challenges for automated segmentation due to their inhomogeneous appearance. The percentage of all lesions with satisfactory segmentation (i.e., normalized overlap with the radiologist-delineated lesion >=0.3) was 85%. For normal lymph nodes, however, this percentage was only 36%. Of the lymph nodes, 53 received a low confidence rating (<0.3) for their initial segmentation. When those lymph nodes were re-segmented, the percentage with a satisfactory segmentation improved to 80.0%. Computerassessed confidence levels demonstrated potential to 1) help radiologists decide whether to use or disregard CADx output, and 2) provide a guide for improvement of lesion segmentation.

  13. Assessing the Potential Hydrological Impact of the Gibe III Dam on Lake Turkana Water Level Using Multi-Source Satellite Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; Senai, G.B.

    2012-01-01

    Lake Turkana, the largest desert lake in the world, is fed by ungauged or poorly gauged river systems. To meet the demand of electricity in the East African region, Ethiopia is currently building the Gibe III hydroelectric dam on the Omo River, which supplies more than 80% of the inflows to Lake Turkana. On completion, the Gibe III dam will be the tallest dam in Africa with a height of 241 m. However, the nature of interactions and potential impacts of regulated inflows to Lake Turkana are not well understood due to its remote location and unavailability of reliable in-situ datasets. In this study, we used 12 years (1998–2009) of existing multi-source satellite and model-assimilated global weather data. We use calibrated multi-source satellite data-driven water balance model for Lake Turkana that takes into account model routed runoff, lake/reservoir evapotranspiration, direct rain on lakes/reservoirs and releases from the dam to compute lake water levels. The model evaluates the impact of Gibe III dam using three different approaches such as (a historical approach, a knowledge-based approach, and a nonparametric bootstrap resampling approach) to generate rainfall-runoff scenarios. All the approaches provided comparable and consistent results. Model results indicated that the hydrological impact of the dam on Lake Turkana would vary with the magnitude and distribution of rainfall post-dam commencement. On average, the reservoir would take up to 8–10 months, after commencement, to reach a minimum operation level of 201 m depth of water. During the dam filling period, the lake level would drop up to 2 m (95% confidence) compared to the lake level modelled without the dam. The lake level variability caused by regulated inflows after the dam commissioning were found to be within the natural variability of the lake of 4.8 m. Moreover, modelling results indicated that the hydrological impact of the Gibe III dam would depend on the initial lake level at the time of

  14. Assessing the potential hydrological impact of the Gibe III Dam on Lake Turkana water level using multi-source satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velpuri, N. M.; Senay, G. B.

    2012-03-01

    Lake Turkana, the largest desert lake in the world, is fed by ungauged or poorly gauged river systems. To meet the demand of electricity in the East African region, Ethiopia is currently building the Gibe III hydroelectric dam on the Omo River, which supplies more than 80% of the inflows to Lake Turkana. On completion, the Gibe III dam will be the tallest dam in Africa with a height of 241 m. However, the nature of interactions and potential impacts of regulated inflows to Lake Turkana are not well understood due to its remote location and unavailability of reliable in-situ datasets. In this study, we used 12 years (1998-2009) of existing multi-source satellite and model-assimilated global weather data. We use calibrated multi-source satellite data-driven water balance model for Lake Turkana that takes into account model routed runoff, lake/reservoir evapotranspiration, direct rain on lakes/reservoirs and releases from the dam to compute lake water levels. The model evaluates the impact of Gibe III dam using three different approaches such as (a historical approach, a knowledge-based approach, and a nonparametric bootstrap resampling approach) to generate rainfall-runoff scenarios. All the approaches provided comparable and consistent results. Model results indicated that the hydrological impact of the dam on Lake Turkana would vary with the magnitude and distribution of rainfall post-dam commencement. On average, the reservoir would take up to 8-10 months, after commencement, to reach a minimum operation level of 201 m depth of water. During the dam filling period, the lake level would drop up to 2 m (95% confidence) compared to the lake level modelled without the dam. The lake level variability caused by regulated inflows after the dam commissioning were found to be within the natural variability of the lake of 4.8 m. Moreover, modelling results indicated that the hydrological impact of the Gibe III dam would depend on the initial lake level at the time of dam

  15. An unusual case of isolated, serial metastases of gallbladder carcinoma involving the chest wall, axilla, breast and lung parenchyma

    PubMed Central

    Jeyaraj, Pamela; Sio, Terence T.; Iott, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    In the English literature, only 9 cases of adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder with cutaneous metastasis have been reported so far. One case of multiple cutaneous metastases along with deposits in the breast tissue has been reported. We present a case of incidental metastatic gallbladder carcinoma with no intra-abdominal disease presenting as a series of four isolated cutaneous right chest wall, axillary nodal, breast, and pulmonary metastases following resection and adjuvant chemoradiation for her primary tumor. In spite of the metastatic disease coupled with the aggressive nature of the cancer, this patient reported that her energy level had returned to baseline with a good appetite and a stable weight indicating a good performance status and now is alive at 25 months since diagnosis. Her serially-presented, oligometastatic diseases were well-controlled by concurrent chemoradiotherapy and stereotactic radiation therapy. We report this case study because of its rarity and for the purpose of complementing current literature with an additional example of cutaneous metastasis from adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder. PMID:23772306

  16. Radiative lifetimes of the 2s2p2(4P) metastable levels of N III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Z.; Kwong, Victor H. S.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1993-01-01

    The radiative decay rates of N III 175 nm intersystem lines were measured in the laboratory by recording the time dependence of photon intensities emitted as the 2s2p2(4P) metastable term of N(2+) ions decay to the 2s22p(2P0) ground term. A cylindrical radio frequency ion trap was used to store the electron impact-produced N(2+) ions. The radiative decay signals were analyzed by multiexponential least-squares fits to the data. The measured radiative decay rates to the ground term are 1019(+/- 64)/s for 4P sub 1/2, 74.5(+/- 5.4)/s for 4P sub 3/2, and 308( +/- 22)/s for 4P sub 5/2. Comparisons of the measured values with theoretical values are presented.

  17. The dependence of C IV broad absorption line properties on accompanying Si IV and Al III absorption: relating quasar-wind ionization levels, kinematics, and column densities

    SciTech Connect

    Filiz Ak, N.; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, D. P.; Trump, J. R.; Hall, P. B.; Anderson, S. F.; Hamann, F.; Myers, Adam D.; Pâris, I.; Petitjean, P.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Shen, Yue; York, Don

    2014-08-20

    We consider how the profile and multi-year variability properties of a large sample of C IV Broad Absorption Line (BAL) troughs change when BALs from Si IV and/or Al III are present at corresponding velocities, indicating that the line of sight intercepts at least some lower ionization gas. We derive a number of observational results for C IV BALs separated according to the presence or absence of accompanying lower ionization transitions, including measurements of composite profile shapes, equivalent width (EW), characteristic velocities, composite variation profiles, and EW variability. We also measure the correlations between EW and fractional-EW variability for C IV, Si IV, and Al III. Our measurements reveal the basic correlated changes between ionization level, kinematics, and column density expected in accretion-disk wind models; e.g., lines of sight including lower ionization material generally show deeper and broader C IV troughs that have smaller minimum velocities and that are less variable. Many C IV BALs with no accompanying Si IV or Al III BALs may have only mild or no saturation.

  18. Low-level light-emitting diode therapy increases mRNA expressions of IL-10 and type I and III collagens on Achilles tendinitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Murilo; de Souza, Renato Aparecido; Pires, Viviane Araújo; Santos, Ana Paula; Aimbire, Flávio; Silva, José Antônio; Albertini, Regiane; Villaverde, Antonio Balbin

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of low-level light-emitting diode (LED) therapy (880 ± 10 nm) on interleukin (IL)-10 and type I and III collagen in an experimental model of Achilles tendinitis. Thirty male Wistar rats were separated into six groups (n = 5), three groups in the experimental period of 7 days, control group, tendinitis-induced group, and LED therapy group, and three groups in the experimental period of 14 days, tendinitis group, LED therapy group, and LED group with the therapy starting at the 7th day after tendinitis induction (LEDT delay). Tendinitis was induced in the right Achilles tendon using an intratendinous injection of 100 μL of collagenase. The LED parameters were: optical power of 22 mW, spot area size of 0.5 cm(2), and irradiation time of 170 s, corresponding to 7.5 J/cm(2) of energy density. The therapy was initiated 12 h after the tendinitis induction, with a 48-h interval between irradiations. The IL-10 and type I and III collagen mRNA expression were evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction at the 7th and 14th days after tendinitis induction. The results showed that LED irradiation increased IL-10 (p < 0.001) in treated group on 7-day experimental period and increased type I and III collagen mRNA expression in both treated groups of 7- and 14-day experimental periods (p < 0.05), except by type I collagen mRNA expression in LEDT delay group. LED (880 nm) was effective in increasing mRNA expression of IL-10 and type I and III collagen. Therefore, LED therapy may have potentially therapeutic effects on Achilles tendon injuries.

  19. Modeling Lake Turkana Hydrology: Evaluating the potential hydrological impact of Gibe III reservoir on the Lake Turkana water levels using multi-source satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velpuri, N.; Senay, G. B.

    2012-12-01

    Ethiopia is currently building the Gibe III hydroelectric dam on the Omo River, which supplies >80% of the inflows to Lake Turkana, Kenya. On completion, the Gibe III dam will be the tallest dam in Africa (height of 241 m) with a storage capacity of 14.5 billion m3. Arguably, this is one of the most controversial hydro-power projects in the region because the nature of interactions and potential impacts of the dam regulated flows on Lake Turkana are not well understood due to its remote location and unavailability of reliable in situ hydrological datasets. In this research, we used a calibrated multi-source satellite data-driven water balance model for Lake Turkana that takes into account 12 years (1998-2009) of satellite rainfall, model routed runoff, lake/reservoir evapotranspiration, direct rain on lakes/reservoirs and releases from the dam to compute lake water levels. The model was used to evaluate the impact of the Gibe III dam using three different simple but robust approaches - a historical approach; a rainfall based sampling approach; and a non-parametric bootstrap resampling approach to generate rainfall-runoff scenarios. Modelling results indicate that, on average, the reservoir would take up to 8-10 months to reach minimum operation level of 201 m (initial impoundment period). During this period, the dam would regulate the lake inflows up to 50% and as a result the lake level would drop up to 2 m. However, after the initial impoundment period, due to releases from the dam, the rate of lake inflows would be around 10 m3/s less when compared to the rate without Gibe III (650 m3/s). Due to this, the lake levels will decline on average 1.5 m (<1 m to >3 m). Over the entire modeling period including the initial period of impoundment, the average rate of lake inflows due to Gibe III dam was estimated to be 500 m3/s. Results indicated that dam would also moderate the seasonal fluctuations in the lake. Areas along the Lake Turkana shoreline that are vulnerable

  20. Molecular-level spectroscopic investigations of the complexation and photodegradation of catechol to/by iron(III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Abadleh, Hind; Tofan-Lazar, Julia; Situm, Arthur; Slikboer, Samantha

    2014-05-01

    Surface water plays a crucial role in facilitating or inhibiting surface reactions in atmospheric aerosols. Little is known about the role of surface water in the complexation of organic molecules to transition metals in multicomponent aerosol systems. We will show results from real time diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) experiments for the in situ complexation of catechol to Fe(III) and its photosensitized degradation under dry and humid conditions. Catechol was chosen as a simple model for humic-like substances (HULIS) in aerosols and aged polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). It has also been detected in secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed from the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with benzene. Given the importance of the iron content in aerosols and its biogeochemistry, our studies were conducted using FeCl3. For comparison, these surface-sensitive studies were complemented with bulk aqueous ATR-FTIR, UV-vis, and HPLC measurements for structural, quantitative and qualitative information about complexes in the bulk, and potential degradation products. The implications of our studies on understanding interfacial and condensed phase chemistry relevant to multicomponent aerosols, water thin islands on buildings, and ocean surfaces containing transition metals will be discussed.

  1. Higher Education and Development in South-East Asia. Volume III, Part 1, High-level Manpower for Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Guy

    This document, the first part of the third volume of a study concerned with the role of institutions of higher education in the development of countries in South-East Asia, appraises the high-level manpower needs of the region. The report is divided into two sections: the first includes the major comments on the position of high-level manpower in…

  2. Effect of Teduglutide, a Glucagon-like Peptide 2 Analog, on Citrulline Levels in Patients With Short Bowel Syndrome in Two Phase III Randomized Trials

    PubMed Central

    Seidner, Douglas L; Joly, Francisca; Youssef, Nader N

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In clinical trials, treatment with the glucagon-like peptide 2 analog teduglutide was associated with improved fluid and nutrient absorption and increased intestinal villus height and crypt depth in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS). Plasma citrulline, an amino acid produced by enterocytes, is considered a measure of enterocyte mass. This analysis assessed changes in plasma citrulline levels in patients with SBS in 2 phase III clinical studies of teduglutide. Methods: Both teduglutide studies (0.05 or 0.10 mg/kg/day in CL0600-004 and 0.05 mg/kg/day in CL0600-020) were phase III, 24-week, double-blind, and placebo controlled. Plasma citrulline levels were analyzed and validated by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Results: In both the CL0600-004 and CL0600-020 studies, change in mean plasma citrulline concentrations at Week 24 vs. baseline was significantly greater with teduglutide compared with placebo (10.9 (0.05-mg/kg/day dose) and 15.7 (0.10-mg/kg/day dose) vs. 2.0 μmol/L and 20.6 vs. 0.7 μmol/L, respectively, for each study (P≤0.0001 for each comparison with placebo)). Teduglutide treatment was associated with reductions from baseline in PS (parenteral support) volume requirements; however, a significant correlation between PS reduction and increase in plasma citrulline at Week 24 was observed in only one out of the three teduglutide treatment groups. Conclusions: In 2 phase III studies, patients receiving teduglutide had significant increases in plasma citrulline at Week 24 compared with patients receiving placebo. Increases in plasma citrulline concentrations likely reflect enterocyte mass expansion, but no clear correlation was detected between change in plasma citrulline and change in weekly PS volume. PMID:26111125

  3. Fibrin glue reduces the duration of lymphatic drainage after lumpectomy and level II or III axillary lymph node dissection for breast cancer: a prospective randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Ko, Eunyoung; Han, Wonshik; Cho, Jihyoung; Lee, Jong Won; Kang, So Young; Jung, So-Youn; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Hwang, Ki-Tae; Noh, Dong-Young

    2009-02-01

    This randomized prospective study investigated the effect of fibrin glue use on drainage duration and overall drain output after lumpectomy and axillary dissection in breast cancer patients. A total of 100 patients undergoing breast lumpectomy and axillary dissection were randomized to a fibrin glue group (N=50; glue sprayed onto the axillary dissection site) or a control group (N=50). Outcome measures were drainage duration, overall drain output, and incidence of seroma. Overall, the fibrin glue and control groups were similar in terms of drainage duration, overall drain output, and incidence of seroma. However, subgroup analysis showed that fibrin glue use resulted in a shorter drainage duration (3.5 vs. 4.7 days; p=0.0006) and overall drain output (196 vs. 278 mL; p=0.0255) in patients undergoing level II or III axillary dissection. Fibrin glue use reduced drainage duration and overall drain output in breast cancer patients undergoing a lumpectomy and level II or III axillary dissection.

  4. Effects of combined dietary chromium(III) propionate complex and thiamine supplementation on insulin sensitivity, blood biochemical indices, and mineral levels in high-fructose-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Król, Ewelina; Krejpcio, Zbigniew; Michalak, Sławomir; Wójciak, Rafał W; Bogdański, Paweł

    2012-12-01

    Insulin resistance is the first step in glucose intolerance and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus, thus effective prevention strategies should also include dietary interventions to enhance insulin sensitivity. Nutrients, such as microelement chromium(III) and thiamine, play regulatory roles in carbohydrate metabolism. The objective of this study was to evaluate the insulin-sensitizing potential of the combined supplementary chromium(III) propionate complex (CrProp) and thiamine in insulin resistance animal model (rats fed a high-fructose diet). The experiment was carried out on 40 nine-week-old male Wistar rats divided into five groups (eight animals each). Animals were fed ad libitum: the control diet (AIN-93 M) and high-fructose diets with and without a combination of two levels of CrProp (0.1 and 1 mg Cr/kg body mass/day) and two levels of thiamine (0.5 and 10 mg/kg body mass/day) for 8 weeks. At the end of the experiment rats were sacrificed to collect blood and internal organs for analyses of blood biochemical and hematologic indices as well as tissular microelement levels that were measured using appropriate methods. It was found that both supplementary CrProp and thiamine (given alone) have significant insulin-sensitizing and moderate blood-lipid-lowering properties, while the combined supplementation with these agents does not give synergistic effects in insulin-resistant rats. CrProp given separately increased kidney Cu and Cr levels, while thiamine alone increased hepatic Cu contents and decreased renal Zn and Cu contents.

  5. Comprehensive Study of Educational Technology Programs Authorized from 1989-1992. Volume III: Level II Model Technology School Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Far West Lab. for Educational Research and Development, San Francisco, CA.

    This report, the third in a series of six, evaluates the 10 school districts that received grants from the California Department of Education to develop Level II Model Technology School (MTS) Projects intended to enhance instruction and student learning through a combination of curriculum improvement and integration of technology within a single…

  6. Serum asymmetric dimethylarginine levels are independently associated with procollagen III N-terminal peptide in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients.

    PubMed

    Hyogo, Hideyuki; Yamagishi, Sho-Ichi; Maeda, Sayaka; Fukami, Kei; Ueda, Seiji; Okuda, Seiya; Nakahara, Takashi; Kimura, Yuki; Ishitobi, Tomokazu; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2014-02-01

    Although impaired synthesis and/or bioavailability of nitric oxide are considered to contribute to insulin resistance and the progression of liver disease in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, role of asymmetric dimethylarginine, an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, has not been examined. We examined retrospectively which anthropometric and metabolic parameters were independently associated with serum levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. A total of 194 consecutive biopsy-proven nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients with or without type 2 diabetes were enrolled. Serum asymmetric dimethylarginine levels in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients were significantly higher, irrespective of the presence or absence of diabetes, than those in healthy control. Multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that decreased total protein and procollagen N-terminal peptide levels, markers of advanced liver disease and hepatic fibrosis, respectively, were independently associated with asymmetric dimethylarginine levels in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease subjects without diabetes, whereas soluble form of receptor for advanced glycation end products and density ratio of liver to spleen in computed tomography were independent correlates of asymmetric dimethylarginine in diabetic patients. The present study suggests that asymmetric dimethylarginine may be associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, especially subjects without diabetes.

  7. The relationship between blood lead levels and neurobehavioral test performance in NHANES III and related occupational studies.

    PubMed Central

    Krieg, Edward F.; Chrislip, David W.; Crespo, Carlos J.; Brightwell, W. Stephen; Ehrenberg, Richard L.; Otto, David A.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The goals of this study were two-fold: (1) to assess the relationship between blood lead levels and neurobehavioral test performance in a nationally sample of adults from the third National Health and Nutrition Evaluation Survey and (2) to analyze the results from previously published studies of occupational lead exposure that used the same neurobehavioral tests as those included in the survey. METHODS: Regression models were used to test and estimate the relationships between measurements of blood lead and performance on a simple reaction time, a symbol-digit substitution, and a serial digit learning test in adults aged 20-59 years who participated the survey. Mixed models were used to analyze the data from the occupational studies. RESULTS: The blood lead levels of those participating in the survey ranged from 0.7 to 41.8 microg/dl. The estimated geometric mean was 2.51 microg/dl, and the estimated arithmetic mean was 3.30 microg/dl. In the survey, no statistically significant relationships were found between blood lead concentration and performance on the three neurobehavioral tests when adjusted for covariates. In the occupational studies, the groups exposed to lead consistently performed worse than control groups on the simple reaction time and digit-symbol substitution tests. CONCLUSIONS: The results from the survey and the occupational studies do not provide evidence for impairment of neurobehavioral test performance at levels below 25 microg/dl, the concentration that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention define as elevated in adults. The average blood lead level of the exposed groups in the occupational studies was 41.07 microg/dl, less than 50 microg/dl, the minimum concentration that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration requires for medical removal from the workplace. Given the evidence of impaired neurobehavioral performance in these groups, the 50 microg/dl limit should be reevaluated. PMID:16134563

  8. SU-E-J-88: Margin Reduction of Level II/III Planning Target Volume for Image-Guided Simultaneous Integrated Boost Head-And-Neck Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Can, S; Neylon, J; Qi, S; Santhanam, A; Low, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of improved normal tissue sparing for head-and-neck (H'N) image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) by employing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for target level II/III though a GPU-based deformable image registration and dose accumulation framework. Methods: Ten H'N simultaneous integrated boost cases treated on TomoTherapy were retrospectively analyzed. Weekly kVCT scans in addition to daily MVCT scans were acquired for each patient. Reduced margin plans were generated with 0- mm margin for level II and III PTV (while 3-5 mm margin for PTV1) and compared with the standard margin plan using 3-5mm margin to all CTV1-3 (reference plan). An in-house developed GPU-based 3D image deformation tool was used to register and deform the weekly KVCTs with the planning CT and determine the delivered mean/minimum/maximum dose, dose volume histograms (DVHs), etc. Results: Compared with the reference plans, the averaged cord maximum, the right and left parotid doses reduced by 22.7 %, 16.5 %, and 9 % respectively in the reduced margin plans. The V95 for PTV2 and PTV3 were found within 2 and 5% between the reference and tighter margin plans. For the reduced margin plans, the averaged cumulative mean doses were consistent with the planned dose for PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 within 1.5%, 1.7% and 1.4%. Similar dose variations of the delivered dose were seen for the reference and tighter margin plans. The delivered maximum and mean doses for the cord were 3.55 % and 2.37% higher than the planned doses; a 5 % higher cumulative mean dose for the parotids was also observed for the delivered dose than the planned doses in both plans. Conclusion: By imposing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for level II and III targets for H'N irradiation, acceptable cumulative doses were achievable when coupled with weekly kVCT guidance while improving normal structure sparing.

  9. Placental antibody transfer efficiency and maternal levels: specific for measles, coxsackievirus A16, enterovirus 71, poliomyelitis I-III and HIV-1 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chuanxi; Lu, Long; Wu, Hao; Shaman, Jeffrey; Cao, Yimin; Fang, Fang; Yang, Qiongying; He, Qing; Yang, Zhicong; Wang, Ming

    2016-12-09

    Maternal antibodies transported across the placenta can provide vital immunity against infectious pathogens for infants. We here examine maternal antibody (MA) levels and their association with neonatal antibody levels. Pregnant women of gestational age ≥35 weeks were enrolled at a Guangzhou China hospital and mother-infant paired sera were collected. Measles IgG antibody was detected using ELISA assay, neutralizing antibodies titers against coxsackievirus A16 (CA16), enterovirus 71 (EV71), PV I-III and HIV-1 were performed. 711 mother-infant pairs were enrolled and positive relationships for paired serums were found (r: 0.683-0.918). 81.6%, 87.0%, and 82.3% of mothers, and 87.3%, 72.7%, and 72.2% of newborns were positive for measles, CA16 and EV71 antibodies respectively. The highest Neonatal: maternal ratio (NMR) was found in measles (1.042) and the ratios for the other pathogens ranged from 0.84 to 1.00. Linear regressions showed that log(NMR) decreased by a factor of 0.04-15.43 as log(MA) levels increased. A second analysis restricted to maternal positive measles sera revealed that MA measles of was still inversely associated with NMR. Low NMR was found in high MA HIV + serums among 22 paired sera. MA levels appear to play a role determining transplacental antibody transfer; further study is needed to reveal the mechanism.

  10. Placental antibody transfer efficiency and maternal levels: specific for measles, coxsackievirus A16, enterovirus 71, poliomyelitis I-III and HIV-1 antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chuanxi; Lu, Long; Wu, Hao; Shaman, Jeffrey; Cao, Yimin; Fang, Fang; Yang, Qiongying; He, Qing; Yang, Zhicong; Wang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Maternal antibodies transported across the placenta can provide vital immunity against infectious pathogens for infants. We here examine maternal antibody (MA) levels and their association with neonatal antibody levels. Pregnant women of gestational age ≥35 weeks were enrolled at a Guangzhou China hospital and mother-infant paired sera were collected. Measles IgG antibody was detected using ELISA assay, neutralizing antibodies titers against coxsackievirus A16 (CA16), enterovirus 71 (EV71), PV I-III and HIV-1 were performed. 711 mother-infant pairs were enrolled and positive relationships for paired serums were found (r: 0.683–0.918). 81.6%, 87.0%, and 82.3% of mothers, and 87.3%, 72.7%, and 72.2% of newborns were positive for measles, CA16 and EV71 antibodies respectively. The highest Neonatal: maternal ratio (NMR) was found in measles (1.042) and the ratios for the other pathogens ranged from 0.84 to 1.00. Linear regressions showed that log(NMR) decreased by a factor of 0.04–15.43 as log(MA) levels increased. A second analysis restricted to maternal positive measles sera revealed that MA measles of was still inversely associated with NMR. Low NMR was found in high MA HIV + serums among 22 paired sera. MA levels appear to play a role determining transplacental antibody transfer; further study is needed to reveal the mechanism. PMID:27934956

  11. Low-level detection and quantification of Plutonium(III, IV, V,and VI) using a liquid core waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Richard E.; Hu, Yung-Jin; Nitsche, Heino

    2003-06-28

    Understanding the aqueous chemistry of plutonium, in particular in environmental conditions, is often complicated by plutonium's complex redox chemistry. Because plutonium possesses four oxidation states, all of which can coexist in solution, a reliable method for the identification of these oxidation states is needed. The identification of plutonium oxidation states at low levels in aqueous solution is often accomplished through an indirect determination using series of liquid-liquid extraction procedures using oxidation state specific reagents such as HDEHP and TTA. While these methods, coupled with radioactive counting techniques provide superior limits of detection they may influence the plutonium redox equilibrium, are time consuming, waste intensive and costly. Other analytical methods such as mass spectrometry and radioactive counting as stand alone methods provide excellent detection limits but lack the ability to discriminate between the oxidation states of the plutonium ions in solution.

  12. Electronic energy level and intensity correlations in the spectra of the trivalent actinide aquo ions. III. Bk/sup 3 +/

    SciTech Connect

    Carnall, W.T.; Beitz, J.V.; Crosswhite, H.

    1984-03-15

    The solution absorption spectrum of Bk/sup 3 +/(aquo) was measured and the observed band structure interpreted in terms of a free-ion energy level model. The band intensities were successfully analyzed using the Judd--Ofelt theory for transitions within the f/sup tsN/ configuration. Parameters of the theory were then used to compute fluorescence branching ratios from most probable fluorescing states, and an experimental search was successful in yielding evidence for a transition from one excited state to the ground state in D/sub 2/O solvent. Absorption bands attributed to f ..-->.. d transitions were observed and an interpretation of the electronic structure is presented. Band intensities were compared to those observed for Tb/sup 3 +/(aquo).

  13. Nucleation, propagation, electronic levels and elimination of misfit dislocations in III-V semiconductor interfaces. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, G.P.; Matragrano, M.

    1995-03-01

    This report discusses the following topics: strained layer defects; the structural and electronic characteristics of misfit dislocations; requirements for the growth of high quality, low defect density InGaAs strained epitaxial layers; the isolation and nucleation of misfit dislocations in strained epitaxial layers grown on patterned, ion-damaged GaAs; the effect of pattern substrate trench depth on misfit dislocation density; the thermal stability of lattice mismatched InGaAs grown on patterned GaAs; misfit dislocations in ZnSe strained epitaxial layers grown on patterned GaAs; and the measurement of deep level states caused by misfit dislocations in InGaAs/GaAs grown on patterned GaAs substrates.

  14. Low-level laser therapy in chemo- and radiation-induced mucositis: results of multicenter phase III studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensadoun, Rene-Jean

    2001-04-01

    Low of middle energy irradiation with helium-neon laser (LLLT) appears to be a simple atraumatic technique for the prevention and treatment of mucositis of various origins. Preliminary findings obtained by Ciais et al prompted randomized multi-center, double-blind trials to evaluate LLLT for the prevention of a acute chemo- and radiation- induced stomatitis. Irradiation by LLLT corresponds to local application of a high photon density monochromatic light source. Activation of epithelial healing on LLL-treated surfaces, the most commonly recognized effect, has been confirmed by numerous in vitro studies, and is a function of cell type, wavelength, and energy dose. The mechanism of action at a molecular and enzymatic level is currently being studied (detoxification of free-radicals).

  15. Association of global levels of histone modifications with recurrence-free survival in stage IIB and III esophageal squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    I, Hoseok; Ko, Eunkyung; Kim, Yujin; Cho, Eun Yoon; Han, Joungho; Park, Joobae; Kim, Kwhanmien; Kim, Duk-Hwan; Shim, Young Mog

    2010-02-01

    This study was aimed at understanding the effects of histone modifications on recurrence-free survival (RFS) after esophagectomy in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). The acetylation of histone H3 lysine (H3K9Ac), histone H3 lysine 18 (H3K18Ac), and histone H4 lysine 12 (H4K12Ac), and the dimethylation of histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9diMe) and histone H4 arginine 3 (H4R3diMe) were analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 237 ESCCs. The K-means clustering algorithm was used to identify unique patterns of histone modifications. At a median follow-up of 5.1 years, 109 (46%) of 237 patients had developed recurrence of disease. Mean global levels of H3K9Ac, H3K18Ac, H3K9diMe, H4K12Ac, and H4R3diMe were 81.5%, 65.1%, 80.3%, 45.9%, and 27.4%, respectively. In the analysis of individual histones, a 1% increase in the global level of H3K18Ac in pathologic stage III worsened RFS at 1.009 times [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.001-1.016; P = 0.03], after adjusting for age, sex, and operative method. Cluster analysis also showed significant effects of histone modifications on RFS. For stage IIB cancers, Cox proportional hazards analysis showed that RFS of cluster 1, with high global levels of H3K18Ac and H4R3diMe, was 2.79 times poorer (95% CI, 1.14-6.27; P = 0.008) than that of cluster 2, with low levels. RFS for stage III cancers was also poorer in cluster 1 than cluster 2 (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.42; 95% CI, 1.10-5.34; P = 0.02). In conclusion, the present study suggests that global levels of histone modifications in ESCC may be an independent prognostic factor of RFS.

  16. Energy levels, oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for Si-like P II, S III, Cl IV, Ar V and K VI

    SciTech Connect

    Abou El-Maaref, A.; Uosif, M.A.M.; Allam, S.H.; El-Sherbini, Th.M.

    2012-07-15

    Fine-structure calculations of energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities for transitions among the terms belonging to 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 2}, 3s3p{sup 3}, 3s{sup 2}3p3d, 3s{sup 2}3p4s, 3s{sup 2}3p4p, 3s{sup 2}3p4d, 3s{sup 2}3p5s and 3s{sup 2}3p5p configurations of silicon-like ions P II, S III, Cl IV, Ar V and K VI have been calculated using configuration-interaction version 3 (CIV3). We compared our data with the available experimental data and other theoretical calculations. Most of our calculations of energy levels and oscillator strengths (in length form) show good agreement with both experimental and theoretical data. Lifetimes of the excited levels are also given.

  17. Systematic defect donor levels in III-V and II-VI semiconductors revealed by hybrid functional density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petretto, Guido; Bruneval, Fabien

    2015-12-01

    The identification of defect levels from photoluminescence spectroscopy is a useful but challenging task. Density-functional theory (DFT) is a highly valuable tool to this aim. However, the semilocal approximations of DFT that are affected by a band gap underestimation are not reliable to evaluate defect properties, such as charge transition levels. It is now established that hybrid functional approximations to DFT improve the defect description in semiconductors. Here we demonstrate that the use of hybrid functionals systematically stabilizes donor defect states in the lower part of the band gap for many defects, impurities or vacancies, in III-V and in II-VI semiconductors, even though these defects are usually considered as acceptors. These donor defect states are a very general feature and, to the best of our knowledge, have been overlooked in previous studies. The states we identify here may challenge the older assignments to photoluminescent peaks. Though appealing to screen quickly through the possible stable charge states of a defect, semilocal approximations should not be trusted for that purpose.

  18. [Optimal treatment of the axilla after positive sentinel lymph node biopsy in early invasive breast cancer. Early results of the OTOASOR trial].

    PubMed

    Sávolt, Akos; Musonda, Patrick; Mátrai, Zoltán; Polgár, Csaba; Rényi-Vámos, Ferenc; Rubovszky, Gábor; Kovács, Eszter; Sinkovics, István; Udvarhelyi, Nóra; Török, Klára; Kásler, Miklós; Péley, Gábor

    2013-12-08

    Bevezetés: Az emlőrákok regionális nyirokcsomóstátuszának meghatározásában az őrszemnyirokcsomó-biopszia mára rutin emlősebészeti eljárássá vált. A magas szintű bizonyítékon alapuló, minimál invazív sebészi módszer a klinikailag negatív hónalji nyirokcsomók esetén sikerrel váltja ki a diagnosztikus axillaris lymphadenectomiát. Az eljárás fontossága abban rejlik, hogy negatív nyirokcsomóstátusz esetén elkerüli az akár 70%-os morbiditással járó (hónalji fájdalom, vállmerevség, lymphoedema és paraesthesia) teljes hónaljárki lymphadenectomiát. Célkitűzés: Jelenleg az elfogadott eljárás pozitív őrszemnyirokcsomó esetén a teljes komplettáló axillaris blokkdisszekció. Eközben több randomizált klinikai vizsgálat bizonyította, hogy a hónalji nyirokcsomók besugárzása és az elektív axillaris blokkdisszekció között nincs különbség a túlélés tekintetében az emlőrákos betegeknél. Az Országos Onkológiai Intézet Emlősebészeti Osztálya ebben a témában kezdett előretekintő, randomizált, kétkarú összehasonlító klinikai vizsgálatot. Az OTOASOR vizsgálat (Optimal Treatment of The Axilla – Surgery or Radiotherapy) célja korai emlőrákos esetekben, pozitív hónalji őrszemnyirokcsomó-státusz esetén az axilla két különböző kezelési lehetőségének, a hagyományos axillaris lymphadenectomiának és a régió további műtét nélküli célzott besugárzásának hosszú távú eredményeinek összehasonlítása volt. Módszer: A tanulmányba korai stádiumú primer, invazív emlőrákos nőbetegeket vontak be, akiknél a tumor 3 cm-nél kisebb volt és a műtét előtt nem volt klinikai gyanújel axillaris nyirokcsomó-propagációra. A betegeket a műtét előtt két karra randomizálták, vagy hagyományos komplettáló axillaris blokkdisszekció („A” kar – hagyományos kezeléses kar), vagy hónalji nyirokcsomó-besugárzás („B” kar – vizsgálati kar). Az

  19. Farm Level--Setting Up and Using the Tripod Level, Staking Out Foundations, Differential Leveling, and Staking Out Fence Lines. Student Materials. V.A. III. V-E-1, V-E-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    Designed for use by individuals enrolled in vocational agricultural classes, these student materials deal with setting up and using a tripod level, staking out foundations, differential leveling, and staking out fence lines. Topics covered in the unit are different kinds of tripod levels, the parts of a tripod level, transporting a tripod level,…

  20. The hepatitis B virus X protein increases the cellular level of TATA-binding protein, which mediates transactivation of RNA polymerase III genes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Horng-Dar; Johnson, D.L.; Yuh, Chio-Hwa

    1995-12-01

    This report decribes the mechanism by which the hepatitis B virus X gene product induces RNA polymerase III genes. The RNA pol III transcription system serves as model for understanding the mechanism of X in the transactivation of cellular genes in both Drosophila and rat cell lines. 53 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  1. BIOPLUME III

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    BIOPLUME III is a two-dimensional finite difference model for simulating the natural attenuation of organic contaminants in groundwater due to the processes of advection, dispersion, sorption, and biodegradation.

  2. Application for a Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site Area 5 Asbestiform Low-Level Solid Waste Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-09-14

    The NTS solid waste disposal sites must be permitted by the state of Nevada Solid Waste Management Authority (SWMA). The SWMA for the NTS is the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Federal Facilities (NDEP/BFF). The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) as land manager (owner), and National Security Technologies (NSTec), as operator, will store, collect, process, and dispose all solid waste by means that do not create a health hazard, a public nuisance, or cause impairment of the environment. NTS disposal sites will not be included in the Nye County Solid Waste Management Plan. The NTS is located approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the federal lands management authority for the NTS, and NSTec is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS has signs posted along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NTS. The Area 5 RWMS is the location of the permitted facility for the Solid Waste Disposal Site (SWDS). The Area 5 RWMS is located near the eastern edge of the NTS (Figure 2), approximately 26 km (16 mi) north of Mercury, Nevada. The Area 5 RWMS is used for the disposal of low-level waste (LLW) and mixed low-level waste. Many areas surrounding the RWMS have been used in conducting nuclear tests. A Notice of Intent to operate the disposal site as a Class III site was submitted to the state of Nevada on January 28, 1994, and was acknowledged as being received in a letter to the NNSA/NSO on August 30, 1994. Interim approval to operate a Class III SWDS for regulated asbestiform low-level waste (ALLW) was authorized on August 12, 1996 (in letter from Paul Liebendorfer to Runore Wycoff), with operations to be conducted in accordance with the ''Management Plan

  3. Determination of μmol l-1 level of iron (III) in natural waters and total iron in drugs by flow injection spectrophotometry

    PubMed Central

    Sahasrabuddhey, B.; Mishra, S.; Jain, A.; Verma, K. K.

    1999-01-01

    The equilibrium problems, characterized by recurring end-points, involved in the reaction of iron (III) with iodide make the batch iodometric determination of iron (III) unsuitable. Since the flow injection determination does not require attainment of steady state either for mixing of reagents or for the chemical reaction, the iodometric determination has been accurately and precisely performed using this technique in the present work. This method does not require any special reagent, including chelating agents or those which are loxic, and has a limit of detection of 0.2 μmol l-1 (11 μg l-1) of iron (III). The interference of fluoride has been avoided by adding zirconyl nitrate to the test sample solution, and of copper (II) by complex formation with 2-mercaptobenzoxazole. The method has been applied to determine iron (III) in natural waters, and total iron in drugs. PMID:18924838

  4. Global Positioning System III (GPS III)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    Global Positioning System III ( GPS III) As of FY 2015 President’s Budget...00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Global Positioning System III ( GPS III) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...Responsible Office References Program Name Global Positioning System III ( GPS III) DoD Component Air Force

  5. Welding III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding III, an advanced course in arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with the proficiency necessary for industrial certification. The course objectives, which are outlined first, specify that students will…

  6. Oral Mucositis Prevention By Low-Level Laser Therapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy: A Phase III Randomized Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gouvea de Lima, Aline; Villar, Rosangela Correa; Castro, Gilberto de; Antequera, Reynaldo; Gil, Erlon; Rosalmeida, Mauro Cabral; Federico, Miriam Hatsue Honda; Snitcovsky, Igor Moises Longo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Oral mucositis is a major complication of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in head-and-neck cancer patients. Low-level laser (LLL) therapy is a promising preventive therapy. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of LLL therapy to decrease severe oral mucositis and its effect on RT interruptions. Methods and Materials: In the present randomized, double-blind, Phase III study, patients received either gallium-aluminum-arsenide LLL therapy 2.5 J/cm{sup 2} or placebo laser, before each radiation fraction. Eligible patients had to have been diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, or metastases to the neck with an unknown primary site. They were treated with adjuvant or definitive CRT, consisting of conventional RT 60-70 Gy (range, 1.8-2.0 Gy/d, 5 times/wk) and concurrent cisplatin. The primary endpoints were the oral mucositis severity in Weeks 2, 4, and 6 and the number of RT interruptions because of mucositis. The secondary endpoints included patient-reported pain scores. To detect a decrease in the incidence of Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis from 80% to 50%, we planned to enroll 74 patients. Results: A total of 75 patients were included, and 37 patients received preventive LLL therapy. The mean delivered radiation dose was greater in the patients treated with LLL (69.4 vs. 67.9 Gy, p = .03). During CRT, the number of patients diagnosed with Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis treated with LLL vs. placebo was 4 vs. 5 (Week 2, p = 1.0), 4 vs. 12 (Week 4, p = .08), and 8 vs. 9 (Week 6, p = 1.0), respectively. More of the patients treated with placebo had RT interruptions because of mucositis (6 vs. 0, p = .02). No difference was detected between the treatment arms in the incidence of severe pain. Conclusions: LLL therapy was not effective in reducing severe oral mucositis, although a marginal benefit could not be excluded. It reduced RT interruptions in these head-and-neck cancer patients, which might

  7. Correlating levels of type III secretion and secreted proteins with fecal shedding of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) encodes a type III secretion system (T3SS) for secreting factors that enable Escherichia coli O157:H7 to produce attaching and effacing lesions (A/E) on epithelial cells. The importance of LEE-encoded proteins in intestinal colonization of cattle is well-stud...

  8. Leveling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1966-01-01

    Geodetic leveling by the U.S. Geological Survey provides a framework of accurate elevations for topographic mapping. Elevations are referred to the Sea Level Datum of 1929. Lines of leveling may be run either with automatic or with precise spirit levels, by either the center-wire or the three-wire method. For future use, the surveys are monumented with bench marks, using standard metal tablets or other marking devices. The elevations are adjusted by least squares or other suitable method and are published in lists of control.

  9. Nano-level monitoring of Er(III) by fabrication of coated graphite electrode based on newly synthesized Schiff base as neutral carrier.

    PubMed

    Bandi, Koteswara Rao; Upadhyay, Anjali; Singh, Ashok K; Jain, A K

    2016-05-01

    Plasticized membranes using N-(-3-((thiazol-2-ylimino)methyl)benzylidene)thiazol-2-amine (S1) and 5-((-3-((5-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-ylimino)methyl)benzylidene)amino)-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-thiol (S2) have been prepared and explored as Er (III) selective electrodes. Effect of various plasticizers viz. dibutylphthalate, tri-n-butylphosphate, dioctylphthalate, acetophenone, 1-chloronapthalene, o-nitrophenyloctylether, and anion excluders viz. sodium tetraphenylborate and potassium tetrakis-p-(chlorophenyl)borate was studied in detail and improved performance was observed. Optimum performance was observed for the membrane electrode having a composition of S2: PVC: o-NPOE: KTpClPB in the ratio of 4: 38: 55: 3 (w/w, mg). The performance of the PME based on S2 was compared with CGE. The electrodes exhibit Nernstian slope for Er (III) ion with detection limit 5.4 × 10(-8)mol L(-1) for PME and 6.1 × 10(-9)mol L(-1) for CGE. The response time for PME and CGE was found to be 12s and 9s respectively. The practical utility of the CGE has been demonstrated by its usage as an indicator electrode in potentiometric titration of EDTA with Er (III) solution and determination of fluoride ions in mouthwash solution. The proposed electrode was also applied to the determination of added Er(3+) ion in water and binary mixtures. It is found that the electrode could be able to recover the Er(3+) ion in 96.2-99.5%.

  10. Detection of the nanomolar level of total Cr[(iii) and (vi)] by functionalized gold nanoparticles and a smartphone with the assistance of theoretical calculation models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenwen; Cao, Fengjing; Zheng, Wenshu; Tian, Yue; Xianyu, Yunlei; Xu, Peng; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Zhuo; Deng, Ke; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-02-07

    We report a method for rapid, effective detection of both Cr(iii) and Cr(vi) (in the form of Cr(3+) and Cr2O7(2-), the main species of chromium in the natural environment) by making use of meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA)-functionalized gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). The limit of detection (LOD) is 10 nM with the naked eye and the assay can be applied in detecting chromium in polluted soil from Yun-Nan Province in Southwest China. We use density functional theory to calculate the change of the Gibbs free energy (ΔG) of the interactions between the DMSA-Au NP system and various metal ions, which shows that DMSA-Au NPs have high specificity for both Cr(3+) and Cr2O7(2-).

  11. Randomized Control Trial: Evaluating Aluminum-Based Antiperspirant Use, Axilla Skin Toxicity, and Reported Quality of Life in Women Receiving External Beam Radiotherapy for Treatment of Stage 0, I, and II Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Linda C.; Gies, Donna; Thompson, Emmanuel; Thomas, Bejoy

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Standard skin care instructions regarding the use of antiperspirants during radiotherapy to the breast varies across North America. Women have articulated that when instructed to not use antiperspirant, the potential for body odor is distressing. Historical practices and individual opinions have often guided practice in this field. The present study had 2 purposes. To evaluate whether the use of aluminum-based antiperspirant while receiving external beam radiotherapy for stage 0, I, or II breast cancer will increase axilla skin toxicity and to evaluate whether the use of antiperspirant during external beam radiotherapy improves quality of life. Methods: A total of 198 participants were randomized to either the experimental group (antiperspirant) or control group (standard care-wash only). The skin reactions in both groups were measured weekly and 2 weeks after treatment using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Events, version 3, toxicity grading criteria. Both groups completed the Functional Assessment for Chronic Illness Therapy's questionnaire for the breast population quality of life assessment tool, with additional questions evaluating the effect of underarm antiperspirant use on quality of life before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 2 weeks after treatment during the study. Results: The skin reaction data were analyzed using the generalized estimating equation. No statistically significant difference was seen in the skin reaction between the 2 groups over time. The quality of life data also revealed no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups over time. Conclusions: Data analysis indicates that using antiperspirant routinely during external beam radiotherapy for Stage 0, I, or II breast cancer does not affect the intensity of the skin reaction or the self-reported quality of life. This evidence supports that in this particular population, there is no purpose to restrict these women from using

  12. Detection of the nanomolar level of total Cr[(iii) and (vi)] by functionalized gold nanoparticles and a smartphone with the assistance of theoretical calculation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wenwen; Cao, Fengjing; Zheng, Wenshu; Tian, Yue; Xianyu, Yunlei; Xu, Peng; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Zhuo; Deng, Ke; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-01-01

    We report a method for rapid, effective detection of both Cr(iii) and Cr(vi) (in the form of Cr3+ and Cr2O72-, the main species of chromium in the natural environment) by making use of meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA)-functionalized gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). The limit of detection (LOD) is 10 nM with the naked eye and the assay can be applied in detecting chromium in polluted soil from Yun-Nan Province in Southwest China. We use density functional theory to calculate the change of the Gibbs free energy (ΔG) of the interactions between the DMSA-Au NP system and various metal ions, which shows that DMSA-Au NPs have high specificity for both Cr3+ and Cr2O72-.We report a method for rapid, effective detection of both Cr(iii) and Cr(vi) (in the form of Cr3+ and Cr2O72-, the main species of chromium in the natural environment) by making use of meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA)-functionalized gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). The limit of detection (LOD) is 10 nM with the naked eye and the assay can be applied in detecting chromium in polluted soil from Yun-Nan Province in Southwest China. We use density functional theory to calculate the change of the Gibbs free energy (ΔG) of the interactions between the DMSA-Au NP system and various metal ions, which shows that DMSA-Au NPs have high specificity for both Cr3+ and Cr2O72-. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: ΔG of the interactions between the DMSA-AuNPs and various metal ions, models of the metal ions (Mn+) and six water molecules, DLS results for DMSA-Au NPs before and after adding Cr3+, Cr2O72-, Cr3+ and Cr2O72- mixtures, comparison of the performance of different sensors. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06726f

  13. Changes in Men's Salivary Testosterone and Cortisol Levels, and in Sexual Desire after Smelling Female Axillary and Vulvar Scents.

    PubMed

    Cerda-Molina, Ana Lilia; Hernández-López, Leonor; de la O, Claudio E; Chavira-Ramírez, Roberto; Mondragón-Ceballos, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have shown that a woman's vaginal or axillary odors convey information on her attractivity. Yet, whether such scents induce psychoneuroendocrinological changes in perceivers is still controversial. We studied if smelling axillary and vulvar odors collected in the periovulatory and late luteal phases of young women modify salivary testosterone and cortisol levels, as well as sexual desire in men. Forty-five women and 115 men, all of them college students and unacquainted with each other, participated in the study. Female odors were collected on pads affixed to the axilla and on panty protectors both worn the entire night before experiments. Men provided five saliva samples, a basal one before the smelling procedure, and four more 15, 30, 60, and 75 min after exposure to odors. Immediately after smelling the odor source, men answered a questionnaire rating hedonic qualities of scents, and after providing the last saliva sample they answered questionnaire on sexual desire. We found that periovulatory axillary and vulvar odors increased testosterone and cortisol levels, with vulvar scents producing a more prolonged effect. Luteal axilla odors decreased testosterone and cortisol levels, while luteal vulva odors increased cortisol. Periovulatory axilla and vulva scents accounted for a general increase of interest in sex. These odors were also rated as more pleasant and familiar, while luteal vulvar odors were perceived as intense and unpleasant.

  14. IUPAC critical evaluation of the rotational-vibrational spectra of water vapor, Part III: Energy levels and transition wavenumbers for H216O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennyson, Jonathan; Bernath, Peter F.; Brown, Linda R.; Campargue, Alain; Császár, Attila G.; Daumont, Ludovic; Gamache, Robert R.; Hodges, Joseph T.; Naumenko, Olga V.; Polyansky, Oleg L.; Rothman, Laurence S.; Vandaele, Ann Carine; Zobov, Nikolai F.; Al Derzi, Afaf R.; Fábri, Csaba; Fazliev, Alexander Z.; Furtenbacher, Tibor; Gordon, Iouli E.; Lodi, Lorenzo; Mizus, Irina I.

    2013-03-01

    This is the third of a series of articles reporting critically evaluated rotational-vibrational line positions, transition intensities, and energy levels, with associated critically reviewed labels and uncertainties, for all the main isotopologues of water. This paper presents experimental line positions, experimental-quality energy levels, and validated labels for rotational-vibrational transitions of the most abundant isotopologue of water, H216O. The latest version of the MARVEL (Measured Active Rotational-Vibrational Energy Levels) line-inversion procedure is used to determine the rovibrational energy levels of the electronic ground state of H216O from experimentally measured lines, together with their self-consistent uncertainties, for the spectral region up to the first dissociation limit. The spectroscopic network of H216O containstwo components, an ortho (o) and a para (p) one. For o-H216O and p-H216O, experimentally measured, assigned, and labeled transitions were analyzed from more than 100 sources. The measured lines come from one-photon spectra recorded at room temperature in absorption, from hot samples with temperatures up to 3000 K recorded in emission, and from multiresonance excitation spectra which sample levels up to dissociation. The total number of transitions considered is 184 667 of which 182 156 are validated: 68 027 between para states and 114 129 ortho ones. These transitions give rise to 18 486 validated energy levels, of which 10 446 and 8040 belong to o-H216O and p-H216O, respectively. The energy levels, including their labeling with approximate normal-mode and rigid-rotor quantum numbers, have been checked against ones determined from accurate variational nuclear motion computations employing exact kinetic energy operators as well as against previous compilations of energy levels. The extensive list of MARVEL lines and levels obtained are deposited in the supplementary data of this paper, as well as in a distributed information system

  15. Evidence for an Inducible Repair-Recombination System in the Female Germ Line of Drosophila Melanogaster. III. Correlation between Reactivity Levels, Crossover Frequency and Repair Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Laurencon, A.; Gay, F.; Ducau, J.; Bregliano, J. C.

    1997-01-01

    We previously reported evidence that the so-called reactivity level, a peculiar cellular state of oocytes that regulates the frequency of transposition of I factor, a LINE element-like retrotransposon, might be one manifestation of a DNA repair system. In this article, we report data showing that the reactivity level is correlated with the frequency of crossing over, at least on the X chromosome and on the pericentromeric region of the third chromosome. Moreover, a check for X-chromosome losses and recessive lethals produced after gamma irradiation in flies with different reactivity levels, but common genetic backgrounds, brings more precise evidence for the relationship between reactivity levels and DNA repair. Those results support the existence of a repair-recombination system whose efficiency is modulated by endogenous and environmental factors. The implications of this biological system in connecting genomic variability and environment may shed new lights on adaptative mechanisms. We propose to call it VAMOS for variability modulation system. PMID:9258678

  16. Children Who Desperately Want To Read, but Are Not Working at Grade Level: Use Movement Patterns as "Windows" To Discover Why. Part III: The Frontal Midline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corso, Marjorie

    A longitudinal research study observed 30 children between the ages of infancy and elementary age to determine if using large muscle motor patterns to master the three identified midlines that concur with the body planes used in anatomy is reflected in academic classroom learning levels. This third part of the study focused on the frontal midline.…

  17. Prevention Plus III: Assessing Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention Programs at the School and Community Level. A Four-Step Guide to Useful Program Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linney, Jean Ann; Wandersman, Abraham

    This workbook, the third in a series of "Prevention Plus" publications, provides a step-by-step approach to assessing alcohol and other drug prevention programs at the school and community level. Program assessment is presented according to a four-step model: (1) goal and desired outcome identification; (2) process assessment; (3) outcome…

  18. Impact of the 1980 BEIR-III report on low-level radiation risk assessment, radiation protection guides, and public health policy

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1981-06-01

    The author deals with the scientific basis for establishing appropriate radiation protection guides, and this effect on evaluation of societal activities concerned with the health effects in human populations exposed to low-level radiation. Methodology is discussed for estimating risks of radio-induced cancer and genetically related ill-health in man, the sources of data, the dose-response models used, and the precision ascribed to the process. (PSB)

  19. Association of 25-hydroxy Vitamin D levels with indexes of general and abdominal obesity in Iranian adolescents: The CASPIAN-III study

    PubMed Central

    Jari, Mohsen; Qorbani, Mostafa; Moafi, Mohammad; Motlagh, Mohammad Esmaeil; Keikha, Mojtaba; Ardalan, Gelayol; Kelishadi, Roya

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to determine the association of serum 25-hydroxy Vitamin D (25(OH)D) levels with measures of general and abdominal obesity in Iranian adolescents. Materials and Methods: This nationwide cross-sectional study was conducted among 1090 students, aged 10-18 years, living in 27 provinces in Iran. Serum concentration of 25(OH)D was analyzed quantitatively by direct competitive immunoassay chemiluminescence method. Body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) were considered as measures of generalized and abdominal obesity, respectively. Results: Study participants consisted of 1090 adolescents (51.9% boy and 67.1% urban residents) with mean age, BMI, and waist circumference of 14.7 (2.6) years, 19.3 (4.2) kg/m2, and 67.82 (12.23) cm, respectively. The median serum 25(OH)D was 13.0 ng/mL (interquartile range: 20.6). Overall, 40% of participants were Vitamin D deficient, and 39% were Vitamin D insufficient. Serum 25(OH)D level was not associated with BMI and WHtR. Conclusion: We did not document any significant association between serum 25(OH)D level and anthropometric measures in adolescents. This finding may be because of considerably high prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in the study population. PMID:25983762

  20. The role of the LRPPRC (leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat cassette) gene in cytochrome oxidase assembly: mutation causes lowered levels of COX (cytochrome c oxidase) I and COX III mRNA

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Leigh syndrome French Canadian (LSFC) is a variant of cytochrome oxidase deficiency found in Québec and caused by mutations in the LRPPRC (leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat cassette) gene. Northern blots showed that the LRPPRC mRNA levels seen in skeletal muscle>heart>placenta>kidney>liver>lung=brain were proportionally almost opposite in strength to the severity of the enzymic cytochrome oxidase defect. The levels of COX (cytochrome c oxidase) I and COX III mRNA visible on Northern blots were reduced in LSFC patients due to the common (A354V, Ala354→Val) founder mutation. The amount of LRPPRC protein found in both fibroblast and liver mitochondria from LSFC patients was consistently reduced to <30% of control levels. Import of [35S]methionine LRPPRC into rat liver mitochondria was slower for the mutant (A354V) protein. A titre of LRPPRC protein was also found in nuclear fractions that could not be easily accounted for by mitochondrial contamination. [35S]Methionine labelling of mitochondrial translation products showed that the translation of COX I, and perhaps COX III, was specifically reduced in the presence of the mutation. These results suggest that the gene product of LRPPRC, like PET 309p, has a role in the translation or stability of the mRNA for mitochondrially encoded COX subunits. A more diffuse distribution of LRPPRC in LSFC cells compared with controls was evident when viewed by immunofluorescence microscopy, with less LRPPRC present in peripheral mitochondria. PMID:15139850

  1. Geologic and hydrologic characterization and evaluation of the Basin and Range Province relative to the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Part III. Geologic and hydrologic evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Bedinger, M.S.; Sargent, K.A.; Brady, B.T.

    1985-12-31

    This report describes the first phase in evaluating the geology and hydrology of the Basin and Range Province for potential suitability of geohydrologic environments for isolation of high-level radioactive waste. The geologic and hydrologic factors considered in the Province evaluation include distribution of potential host rocks, tectonic conditions and data on ground-water hydrology. Potential host media considered include argillaceous rocks, tuff, basaltic rocks, granitic rocks, evaporites, and the unsaturated zone. The tectonic factors considered are Quaternary faults, late Cenozoic volcanics, seismic activity, heat flow, and late Cenozoic rates of vertical uplift. Hydrologic conditions considered include length of flow path from potential host rocks to discharge areas, interbasin and geothermal flow systems and thick unsaturated sections as potential host media. The Basin and Range Province was divided into 12 subprovinces; each subprovince is evaluated separately and prospective areas for further study are identified. About one-half of the Province appears to have combinations of potential host rocks, tectonic conditions, and ground-water hydrology that merit consideration for further study. The prospective areas for further study in each subprovince are summarized in a brief list of the potentially favorable factors and the issues of concern. Data compiled for the entire Province do not permit a complete evaluation of the favorability for high-level waste isolation. The evaluations here are intended to identify broad regions that contain potential geohydrologic environments containing multiple natural barriers to radionuclide migration. 13 refs., 14 figs.

  2. Determining the Probability of Violating Upper-Level Wind Constraints for the Launch of Minuteman III Ballistic Missiles at Vandenberg Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, Jaclyn A.; Brock, Tyler M.

    2012-01-01

    The 30th Operational Support Squadron Weather Flight (30 OSSWF) provides comprehensive weather services to the space program at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) in California. One of their responsibilities is to monitor upper-level winds to ensure safe launch operations of the Minuteman Ill ballistic missile. The 30 OSSWF tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to analyze VAFB sounding data with the goal of determining the probability of violating (PoV) their upper-level thresholds for wind speed and shear constraints specific to this launch vehicle, and to develop a tool that will calculate the PoV of each constraint on the day of launch. In order to calculate the probability of exceeding each constraint, the AMU collected and analyzed historical data from VAFB. The historical sounding data were retrieved from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Earth System Research Laboratory archive for the years 1994-2011 and then stratified into four sub-seasons: January-March, April-June, July-September, and October-December. The AMU determined the theoretical distributions that best fit the maximum wind speed and maximum wind shear datasets and applied this information when calculating the averages and standard deviations needed for the historical and real-time PoV calculations. In addition, the AMU included forecast sounding data from the Rapid Refresh model. This information provides further insight for the launch weather officers (LWOs) when determining if a wind constraint violation will occur over the next few hours on the day of launch. The AMU developed an interactive graphical user interface (GUI) in Microsoft Excel using Visual Basic for Applications. The GUI displays the critical sounding data easily and quickly for LWOs on day of launch. This tool will replace the existing one used by the 30 OSSWF, assist the LWOs in determining the probability of exceeding specific wind threshold values, and help to improve the overall upper winds forecast for

  3. High levels of the type III inorganic phosphate transporter PiT1 (SLC20A1) can confer faster cell adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Kongsfelt, Iben Boutrup; Byskov, Kristina; Pedersen, Lasse Ebdrup; Pedersen, Lene

    2014-08-01

    The inorganic phosphate transporter PiT1 (SLC20A1) is ubiquitously expressed in mammalian cells. We recently showed that overexpression of human PiT1 was sufficient to increase proliferation of two strict density-inhibited cell lines, murine fibroblastic NIH3T3 and pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells, and allowed the cultures to grow to higher cell densities. In addition, upon transformation NIH3T3 cells showed increased ability to form colonies in soft agar. The cellular regulation of PiT1 expression supports that cells utilize the PiT1 levels to control proliferation, with non-proliferating cells showing the lowest PiT1 mRNA levels. The mechanism behind the role of PiT1 in increased cell proliferation is not known. We, however, found that compared to control cells, cultures of NIH3T3 cells overexpressing PiT1 upon seeding showed increased cell number after 24 h and had shifted more cells from G0/G1 to S+G2/M within 12 h, suggesting that an early event may play a role. We here show that expression of human PiT1 in NIH3T3 cells led to faster cell adhesion; this effect was not cell type specific in that it was also observed when expressing human PiT1 in MC3T3-E1 cells. We also show for NIH3T3 that PiT1 overexpression led to faster cell spreading. The final total numbers of attached cells did, however, not differ between cultures of PiT1 overexpressing cells and control cells of neither cell type. We suggest that the PiT1-mediated fast adhesion potentials allow the cells to go faster out of G0/G1 and thereby contribute to their proliferative advantage within the first 24 h after seeding. - Highlights: • Effects of elevated levels of the inorganic phosphate transporter PiT1 were studied. • The density-inhibited murine cell lines NIH3T3 and MC3T3-E1 showed faster adhesion. • NIH3T3 cells showed faster spreading. • We suggest that the faster adhesion/spreading contributes to faster proliferation.

  4. Geologic and hydrologic characterization and evaluation of the Basin and Range Province relative to the disposal of high-level radioactive waste: Part III, Geologic and hydrologic evaluation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bedinger, M.S.; Sargent, Kenneth A.; Brady, Bruce T.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the first phase in evaluating the geology and hydrology of the Basin and Range Province for potential suitability of geohydrologic environments for isolation of high-level radioactive waste. The evaluation of the Province applies the guidelines, discussed in Part I (Bedinger, Sargent, and Reed, 1983) of this report to the geologic and hydrologic information compiled for the Province in Part II (Sargent and Bedinger, 1983).The geologic and hydrologic factors considered in the Province evaluation include distribution of potential host rocks, tectonic conditions and data on ground-water hydrology. Potential host media considered include argillaceous rocks, tuff, basaltic rocks, granitic rocks, evaporites, and the unsaturated zone. The tectonic factors considered are Quaternary faults, late Cenozoic volcanics, seismic activity, heat flow, and late Cenozoic rates of vertical uplift. Hydrologic conditions considered include length of flow path from potential host rocks to discharge areas, interbasin and geothermal flow systems and thick unsaturated sections as potential host media.The Basin and Range Province was divided into 12 subprovinces; each subprovince is evaluated separately and prospective areas for further study are identified. About onehalf of the Province appears to have combinations of potential host rocks, tectonic conditions, and ground-water hydrology that merit consideration for further study.The prospective areas for further study in each subprovince are summarized in a brief list of the potentially favorable factors and the issues of concern. Data compiled for the entire Province do not permit a complete evaluation of the favorability for high-level waste isolation. The evaluations here are intended to identify broad regions that contain potential geohydrologic environments containing multiple natural barriers to radionuclide migration.

  5. Changes in Men’s Salivary Testosterone and Cortisol Levels, and in Sexual Desire after Smelling Female Axillary and Vulvar Scents

    PubMed Central

    Cerda-Molina, Ana Lilia; Hernández-López, Leonor; de la O, Claudio E.; Chavira-Ramírez, Roberto; Mondragón-Ceballos, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have shown that a woman’s vaginal or axillary odors convey information on her attractivity. Yet, whether such scents induce psychoneuroendocrinological changes in perceivers is still controversial. We studied if smelling axillary and vulvar odors collected in the periovulatory and late luteal phases of young women modify salivary testosterone and cortisol levels, as well as sexual desire in men. Forty-five women and 115 men, all of them college students and unacquainted with each other, participated in the study. Female odors were collected on pads affixed to the axilla and on panty protectors both worn the entire night before experiments. Men provided five saliva samples, a basal one before the smelling procedure, and four more 15, 30, 60, and 75 min after exposure to odors. Immediately after smelling the odor source, men answered a questionnaire rating hedonic qualities of scents, and after providing the last saliva sample they answered questionnaire on sexual desire. We found that periovulatory axillary and vulvar odors increased testosterone and cortisol levels, with vulvar scents producing a more prolonged effect. Luteal axilla odors decreased testosterone and cortisol levels, while luteal vulva odors increased cortisol. Periovulatory axilla and vulva scents accounted for a general increase of interest in sex. These odors were also rated as more pleasant and familiar, while luteal vulvar odors were perceived as intense and unpleasant. PMID:24194730

  6. Optimisation of resistant starch II and III levels in durum wheat pasta to reduce in vitro digestibility while maintaining processing and sensory characteristics.

    PubMed

    Aravind, Nisha; Sissons, Mike; Fellows, Christopher M; Blazek, Jaroslav; Gilbert, Elliot P

    2013-01-15

    Foods with elevated levels of resistant starch (RS) may have beneficial effects on human health. Pasta was enriched with commercial resistant starches (RSII, Hi Maize™ 1043; RSIII, Novelose 330™) at 10%, 20% and 50% substitution of semolina for RSII and 10% and 20% for RSIII and compared with pasta made from 100% durum wheat semolina to investigate technological, sensory, in vitro starch digestibility and structural properties. The resultant RS content of pasta increased from 1.9% to ∼21% and was not reduced on cooking. Significantly, the results indicate that 10% and 20% RSII and RSIII substitution of semolina had no significant effects on pasta cooking loss, texture and sensory properties, with only a minimal reduction in pasta yellowness. Both RS types lowered the extent of in vitro starch hydrolysis compared to that of control pasta. X-ray diffraction and small-angle scattering verified the incorporation of RS and, compared to the control sample, identified enhanced crystallinity and a changed molecular arrangement following digestion. These results can be contrasted with the negative impact on pasta resulting from substitution with equivalent amounts of more traditional dietary fibre such as bran. The study suggests that these RS-containing formulations may be ideal sources for the preparation of pasta with reduced starch digestibility.

  7. Effect of low-level laser therapy on types I and III collagen and inflammatory cells in rats with induced third-degree burns.

    PubMed

    Fiório, Franciane B; Albertini, Regiane; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camillo

    2014-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been increasingly used to accelerate wound healing in third-degree burns. This study investigated the effects of lasers on the tissue repair process of third-degree burns. Burns were produced on the backs of male Wistar rats. The animals were divided into four groups (n = 12): control, injury, LLLT 3 J/cm(2), and LLLT 4 J/cm(2). Each group was further divided into two subgroups; the rats in one subgroup were killed on day 8 and those in the other, on day 16 after injury. The animals in LLLT 3 J/cm(2) and LLLT 4 J/cm(2) were irradiated 1 h after injury, and irradiation was repeated every 48 h. Laser (660 nm, 35 mW) treatment at fluences of 3 and 4 J/cm(2) were used. After killing the rats, tissue fragments from the burnt area were removed for histological analysis. The LLLT-treated groups showed a significant decrease (p <0.05) in the number of inflammatory cells and increased collagen deposition compared to the injury group. Laser irradiation (both 3 and 4 J/cm(2)) resulted in reduction in the inflammatory process and improved collagen deposition, thereby ameliorating the healing of third-degree burns.

  8. Energy levels of terbium(III) in the elpasolite Cs2NaTbBr6. II. A correlation crystal field analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaw, C. S.; Denning, R. G.

    A set of more than 100 electronic energy levels in Cs2NaTbBr6, extending from the ground state to 5H4, is used to test different models of the correlation crystal field (CCF). These are based on Judd's orthogonal g(k)iQ two-electron operators, and more specifically on contributions due to spin-correlation, or ligand polarization. Similar data from Cs2NaTbCl6 and Cs2NaTbF6 has also been analysed. Only fourth-rank operators make clear improvements to the quality of the fit in deviant multiplets. Empirically the g7(4) and g9(4) operators are found to be the most effective. Although fourth-rank operators achieve modest success in correcting the calculated spread of the multiplets, no single operator has a significant impact on the shortcomings of the one-body crystal field. This result is discussed in terms of the limitations of an effective-operator Hamiltonian.

  9. Interface simulation of strained and non-abrupt III-V quantum wells. Part 2: energy level calculation versus experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberti, C.

    1996-01-01

    This work describes a program able to compute the allowed energy levels and the respective wavefunctions of strained {In1 - xGaxAsyP1 - y}/{In1 - zGazAswP1 - w} for electrons, light and heavy holes in single- and multi-quantum wells and superlattices. Ground and excited states can be detected. The problem of non-abrupt interfaces has been taken into account. The computation on intentionally strained QW structures can be performed. The simulation of coupled wells may also be done, allowing theoretical prediction on the 4 K photoluminescence emission of superlattices. The adopted mathematical approach has been treated in details. The results of the presented simulations performed on heterostructures grown by low-pressure metallorganic vapor phase epitaxy and by chemical beam epitaxy heterostructures are compared with 4 K Fourier transform photoluminescence and with room temperature IR absorption data. The data used as input by this program are previously computed by the program BANDSTRAIN (described in a previous paper). In this work also the simulation of high resolution X-ray diffraction patterns is briefly presented and compared with the experimental curves; it is shown how the combined simulations of PL and X-ray data is a powerful tool in the interfaces characterization. Finally, qualitative information is extracted from high-resolution transmission electron microscopy micrographs.

  10. Viability testing of material derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis prior to removal from a Containment Level-III Laboratory as part of a Laboratory Risk Assessment Program

    PubMed Central

    Blackwood, Kym S; Burdz, Tamara V; Turenne, Christine Y; Sharma, Meenu K; Kabani, Amin M; Wolfe, Joyce N

    2005-01-01

    Background In the field of clinical mycobacteriology, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) can be a difficult organism to manipulate due to the restrictive environment of a containment level 3 (CL3) laboratory. Tests for rapid diagnostic work involving smears and molecular methods do not require CL3 practices after the organism has been rendered non-viable. While it has been assumed that after organism deactivation these techniques can be performed outside of a CL3, no conclusive study has consistently confirmed that the organisms are noninfectious after the theoretical 'deactivation' steps. Previous studies have shown that initial steps (such as heating /chemical fixation) may not consistently kill MTB organisms. Methods An inclusive viability study (n = 226) was undertaken to determine at which point handling of culture extraction materials does not necessitate a CL3 environment. Four different laboratory protocols tested for viability included: standard DNA extractions for IS6110 fingerprinting, crude DNA preparations for PCR by boiling and mechanical lysis, protein extractions, and smear preparations. For each protocol, laboratory staff planted a proportion of the resulting material to Bactec 12B medium that was observed for growth for 8 weeks. Results Of the 208 isolates initially tested, 21 samples grew within the 8-week period. Sixteen (7.7%) of these yielded positive results for MTB that included samples of: deactivated culture resuspensions exposed to 80°C for 20 minutes, smear preparations and protein extractions. Test procedures were consequently modified and tested again (n = 18), resulting in 0% viability. Conclusions This study demonstrates that it cannot be assumed that conventional practices (i.e. smear preparation) or extraction techniques render the organism non-viable. All methodologies, new and existing, should be examined by individual laboratories to validate the safe removal of material derived from MTB to the outside of a CL3 laboratory. This

  11. Evidence for a hyperglycaemia-dependent decrease of antithrombin III-thrombin complex formation in humans.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Giugliano, D; Quatraro, A; Marchi, E; Barbanti, M; Lefèbvre, P

    1990-03-01

    In the presence of increased levels of fibrinopeptide A, decreased antithrombin III biological activity, and thrombin-antithrombin III complex levels are seen in diabetic patients. Induced-hyperglycaemia in diabetic and normal subjects decreased antithrombin III activity and thrombin-antithrombin III levels, and increased fibrinopeptide A plasma levels, while antithrombin III concentration did not change; heparin was shown to reduced these phenomena. In diabetic patients, euglycaemia induced by insulin infusion restored antithrombin III activity, thrombin-antithrombin III complex and fibrinopeptide A concentrations; heparin administration had the same effects. These data stress the role of a hyperglycaemia-dependent decrease of antithrombin III activity in precipitating thrombin hyperactivity in diabetes mellitus.

  12. The START III bargaining space

    SciTech Connect

    Karas, T.H.

    1998-08-01

    The declining state of the Russian military and precarious Russian economic condition will give the US considerable advantages at the START III bargaining table. Taking the US-RF asymmetries into account, this paper discusses a menu of START III measures the US could ask for, and measures it could offer in return, in attempting to negotiate an equitable treaty. Measures the US might seek in a START III treaty include: further reductions in deployed strategic nuclear warheads, irreversibility of reductions through warhead dismantlement; beginning to bring theater nuclear weapons under mutual control, and increased transparency into the Russian nuclear weapons complex. The US may, however, wish to apply its bargaining advantages to attempting to achieve the first steps toward two long-range goals that would enhance US security: bringing theater nuclear weapons into the US-RF arms control arena, and increasing transparency into the Russian nuclear weapons complex. In exchange for measures relating to these objectives, the US might consider offering to Russia: Further strategic weapons reductions approaching levels at which the Russians believe they could maintain a degree of parity with the US; Measures to decrease the large disparities in potential deliver-system uploading capabilities that appear likely under current START II/START III scenarios; and Financial assistance in achieving START II/START III reductions as rapidly as is technically possible.

  13. Weighted f-values, A-values, and line strengths for the E1 transitions among 3d 6, 3d 54s, and 3d 54p levels of Fe III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Narayan C.; Hibbert, Alan

    2009-03-01

    Weighted oscillator strengths, weighted radiative rates, and line strengths for all the E1 transitions between 285 fine-structure levels belonging to the 3d 6, 3d 54s, and 3d 54p configurations of Fe III are presented, in ascending order of wavelength. Calculations have been undertaken using the general configuration interaction (CI) code CIV3. The large configuration set is constructed by allowing single and double replacements from any of 3d 6, 3d 54s, 3d 54p, and 3d 54d configurations to nl orbitals with n⩽5,l⩽3 as well as 6p. Additional selective promotions from 3s and 3p subshells are also included in the CI expansions to incorporate the important correlation effects in the n=3 shell. Results of some strong transitions between levels of 3d 6, 3d 54s, and 3d 54p configurations are also presented and compared with other available calculations. It is found that large disagreements occur in many transitions among the existing calculations.

  14. Global Positioning System III (GPS III)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    from the SV Bus, specifically the Scalable Power Regulation Unit and is being amplified by the solar arrays which act as highly efficient antennas. To...Military Operations in Urban Terrain; Defense-Wide Mission Support; Air Mobility; and Space Launch Orbital Support. For military users, the GPS III...Service: The GPS III program will provide O&S for on- orbit support through the Launch and On- Orbit Support contract. For Space Vehicle (SV)01 and

  15. Randomized Phase III Trial of Gemcitabine-Based Chemotherapy With In Situ RRM1 and ERCC1 Protein Levels for Response Prediction in Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Craig; Obasaju, Coleman; Schell, Michael J.; Li, Xueli; Zheng, Zhong; Boulware, David; Caton, John R.; DeMarco, Linda C.; O'Rourke, Mark A.; Shaw Wright, Gail; Boehm, Kristi A.; Asmar, Lina; Bromund, Jane; Peng, Guangbin; Monberg, Matthew J.; Bepler, Gerold

    2009-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the efficacy of gemcitabine versus gemcitabine and carboplatin in patients with advanced non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and a performance status (PS) of 2 and assessed if tumoral RRM1 and ERCC1 protein levels are predictive of response to therapy. Patients and Methods A randomized phase III trial was conducted in community-based oncology practices. Tumor specimens were collected a priori and shipped to a single laboratory for blinded determination of in situ RRM1 and ERCC1 protein expression levels by an automated quantitative immunofluorescent-based technology. Results One hundred seventy patients were randomly assigned. Overall median survival was 5.1 months for gemcitabine and 6.7 months for gemcitabine and carboplatin (P = .24). RRM1 (range, 5.3 to 105.6; median, 34.1) and ERCC1 (range, 5.2 to 131.3; median, 34.7) values were significantly and inversely correlated with disease response (r = −0.41; P = .001 for RRM1; r = −0.39; P = .003 for ERCC1; ie, response was better for patients with low levels of expression). A model for response prediction that included RRM1, ERCC1, and treatment arm, was highly predictive of the treatment response observed (P = .0005). We did not find statistically significant associations between survival and RRM1 or ERCC1 levels. Conclusion Single-agent chemotherapy remains the standard of care for patients with advanced NSCLC and poor PS. Quantitative analysis of RRM1 and ERCC1 protein expression in routinely collected tumor specimens in community oncology practices is predictive of response to gemcitabine and gemcitabine and carboplatin therapy. Oncologists should consider including in situ expression analysis for these proteins into their therapeutic decisions. PMID:19884554

  16. LEVEL III AND IV ECOREGIONS OF ILLINOIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ecoregions of Illinois have been identified, mapped, and described; they provide a geographic structure for environmental resources research, assessment, monitoring, and management. This project is part of a larger effort by the U.S. EPA to create a national, hierarchical ec...

  17. Child Care: A Level III Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Board of Community Colleges, Tallahassee.

    This report describes the state-mandated review of Florida's child care programs. Florida's community colleges offer a total of six different degree or certificate programs in child care: Child Development and Education; Child Care Center Management; Child Development Early Intervention; Child Care Provider (discontinued in 98-99); Early Childhood…

  18. Effect of low-level laser therapy on metalloproteinase MMP-2 and MMP-9 production and percentage of collagen types I and III in a papain cartilage injury model.

    PubMed

    Alves, Ana Carolina Araruna; Albertini, Regiane; dos Santos, Solange Almeida; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; Santana, Eduardo; Serra, Andrey Jorge; Silva, José Antonio; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camillo

    2014-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) resulting from injury or disease is associated with increased levels of several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which degrade all components of the complex extracellular matrix in the cartilage. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on papain-induced joint damage in rats by histopathology and analysis of metalloproteinase 2 and 9 production. Sixty male Wistar rats were randomly distributed into four groups of 15 animals: (1) non-injury negative control, (2) injury positive control, (3) treated with LLLT at 50 mW, and (4) treated with LLLT at 100 mW. OA was induced in animals using papain (4 % solution) followed by treatment with LLLT. After 7, 14, and 21 days, the animals were euthanized. The articular lavage was collected and centrifuged; then, the supernatant was stored prior to protein analysis by western blot. The material was stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histopathological analysis, and Picrosirius Red was used to estimate the percentage of collagen fibers. To determine normal distribution, ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test were used for comparison between and within each group at each time period. All data are expressed as mean and standard deviation values, with the null hypothesis considered as p < 0.05. Both laser groups (50 and 100 mW) were effective in tissue repair, decreasing collagen type III expression and increasing type I expression in all experimental periods; however, LLLT at 50 mW reduced metalloproteinase 9 more than at 100 mW in 21 days. LLLT at 50 mW was more efficient in the modulation of matrix MMPs and tissue repair.

  19. SUPERSTARS III: K-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Education, Raleigh.

    SUPERSTARS III is a K-8 program designed as an enrichment opportunity for self-directed learners in mathematics. The basic purpose of SUPERSTARS III is to provide the extra challenge that self-motivated students need in mathematics and to do so in a structured, long-term program that does not impinge on the normal classroom routine or the…

  20. Separation studies of As(III), Sb(III) and Bi(III) by reversed-phase paper chromatographic technique

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, B.; Shinde, V.M.

    1987-07-01

    Reversed-phase paper chromatographic separations of As(III), Sb(III) and Bi(III) have been carried out on Whatman No 1 filter paper impregnated with triphenylphosphine oxide as stationary phase and using organic complexing agents such as sodium acetate, sodium succinate and sodium malonate solutions as active mobile phases. Results for the separation of binary and ternary mixtures are reported and the method has been successfully applied to the separation and detection of these elements present in real samples and at ppm level concentration.

  1. Genes, genetics, and Class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Xue, F; Wong, R W K; Rabie, A B M

    2010-05-01

    To present current views that are pertinent to the investigation of the genetic etiology of Class III malocclusion. Class III malocclusion is thought to be a polygenic disorder that results from an interaction between susceptibility genes and environmental factors. However, research on family pedigrees has indicated that Class III malocclusion might also be a monogenic dominant phenotype. Recent studies have reported that genes that encode specific growth factors or other signaling molecules are involved in condylar growth under mechanical strain. These genes, which include Indian hedgehog homolog (IHH), parathyroid-hormone like hormone (PTHLH), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and variations in their levels of expression play an important role in the etiology of Class III malocclusion. In addition, genome-wide scans have revealed chromosomal loci that are associated with Class III malocclusion. It is likely that chromosomal loci 1p36, 12q23, and 12q13 harbor genes that confer susceptibility to Class III malocclusion. In a case-control association study, we identified erythrocyte membrane protein band 4.1 (EPB41) to be a new positional candidate gene that might be involved in susceptibility to mandibular prognathism. Most of the earlier studies on the genetic etiology of Class III malocclusion have focused on the patterns of inheritance of this phenotype. Recent investigations have focused on understanding the genetic variables that affect Class III malocclusion and might provide new approaches to uncovering the genetic etiology of this phenotype.

  2. Arsenic (III, V), indium (III), and gallium (III) toxicity to zebrafish embryos using a high-throughput multi-endpoint in vivo developmental and behavioral assay.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Christopher I; Field, Jim A; Simonich, Michael; Tanguay, Robert L; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2016-04-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) and other III/V materials are finding increasing application in microelectronic components. The rising demand for III/V-based products is leading to increasing generation of effluents containing ionic species of gallium, indium, and arsenic. The ecotoxicological hazard potential of these streams is unknown. While the toxicology of arsenic is comprehensive, much less is known about the effects of In(III) and Ga(III). The embryonic zebrafish was evaluated for mortality, developmental abnormalities, and photomotor response (PMR) behavior changes associated with exposure to As(III), As(V), Ga(III), and In(III). The As(III) lowest observable effect level (LOEL) for mortality was 500 μM at 24 and 120 h post fertilization (hpf). As(V) exposure was associated with significant mortality at 63 μM. The Ga(III)-citrate LOEL was 113 μM at 24 and 120 hpf. There was no association of significant mortality over the tested range of In(III)-citrate (56-900 μM) or sodium citrate (213-3400 μM) exposures. Only As(V) resulted in significant developmental abnormalities with LOEL of 500 μM. Removal of the chorion prior to As(III) and As(V) exposure was associated with increased incidence of mortality and developmental abnormality suggesting that the chorion may normally attenuate mass uptake of these metals by the embryo. Finally, As(III), As(V), and In(III) caused PMR hypoactivity (49-69% of control PMR) at 900-1000 μM. Overall, our results represent the first characterization of multidimensional toxicity effects of III/V ions in zebrafish embryos helping to fill a significant knowledge gap, particularly in Ga(III) and In(III) toxicology.

  3. Antithrombin III blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... AT III) is a protein that helps control blood clotting. A blood test can determine the amount of ... may mean you have an increased risk of blood clotting. This can occur when there is not enough ...

  4. Cloud point extraction of iron(III) and vanadium(V) using 8-quinolinol derivatives and Triton X-100 and determination of 10(-7)moldm(-3) level iron(III) in riverine water reference by a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Akira; Ito, Hiromi; Kanai, Chikako; Imura, Hisanori; Ohashi, Kousaburo

    2005-01-30

    The cloud point extraction behavior of iron(III) and vanadium(V) using 8-quinolinol derivatives (HA) such as 8-quinolinol (HQ), 2-methyl-8-quinolinol (HMQ), 5-butyloxymethyl-8-quinolinol (HO(4)Q), 5-hexyloxymethyl-8-quinolinol (HO(6)Q), and 2-methyl-5-octyloxymethyl-8-quinolinol (HMO(8)Q) and Triton X-100 solution was investigated. Iron(III) was extracted with HA and 4% (v/v) Triton X-100 in the pH range of 1.70-5.44. Above pH 4.0, more than 95% of iron(III) was extracted with HQ, HMQ, and HMO(8)Q. Vanadium(V) was also extracted with HA and 4% (v/v) Triton X-100 in the pH range of 2.07-5.00, and the extractability increased in the following order of HMQ < HQ < HO(4)Q < HO(6)Q. The cloud point extraction was applied to the determination of iron(III) in the riverine water reference by a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy. When 1.25 x 10(-3)M HMQ and 1% (v/v) Triton X-100 were used, the found values showed a good agreement with the certified ones within the 2% of the R.S.D. Moreover, the effect of an alkyl group on the solubility of 5-alkyloxymethyl-8-quinolinol and 2-methyl-5-alkyloxymethyl-8-quinolinol in 4% (v/v) Triton X-100 at 25 degrees C was also investigated.

  5. Information Consumption by Low Income Families to Reduce the Impact of Rural Poverty in Florida. Volume III, Knowledge Level, Need, and Use of Selective Anti-Poverty Programs by the Rural Poor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dhillon, Jogindar S.

    Presented as part of a 4-volume comprehensive report of a Florida project designed to understand rural poor and their information-seeking and information-utilization behavior patterns, Volume III reported data collected in a pre-test, used to determine the awareness and utilization of seven anti-poverty programs. Low income rural residents (N=840)…

  6. Type III burst pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Zongjun; Fu, Qijun; Lu, Quankang

    2000-05-01

    We present a special solar radio burst detected on 5 January 1994 using the multi-channel (50) spectrometer (1.0-2.0 GHz) of the Beijing Astronomical Observatory (BAO). Sadly, the whole event could not be recorded since it had a broader bandwidth than the limit range of the instrument. The important part was obtained, however. The event is composed of a normal drift type III burst on the lower frequency side and a reverse drift type III burst appearing almost simultaneously on the high side. We call the burst type III a burst pair. It is a typical characteristic of two type III bursts that they are morphologically symmetric about some frequency from 1.64 GHz to 1.78 GHz on the dynamic spectra records, which indicates that there are two different electron beams from the same acceleration region travelling simultaneously in opposite directions (upward and downward). A magnetic reconnection mode is a nice interpretation of type III burst pair since the plasma beta β~=0.01 is much less than 1 and the beams have velocity of about 1.07×10^8 cm s^-1 after leaving the reconnection region if we assume that the ambient magnetic field strength is about 100 G.

  7. Type III burst pair.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zongjun, Ning; Fu, Qijun; Quankang, Lu

    2000-05-01

    Presents a special solar radio burst detected on 5 January 1994 using the multi-channel (50) spectrometer (1.0 - 2.0 GHz) of the Beijing Astronomical Observatory. Sadly, the whole event could not be recorded since it had a broader bandwidth than the limit range of the instrument. The important part was obtained, however. The event is composed of a normal drift type III burst on the lower frequency side and a reverse drift type III burst appearing almost simultaneously on the high side. The authors call the burst type III a burst pair. It is a typical characteristic of two type III bursts that they are morphologically symmetric about some frequency from 1.64 GHz to 1.78 GHz on the dynamic spectra records, which indicates that there are two different electron beams from the same acceleration region travelling simultaneously in opposite directions (upward and downward). A magnetic reconnection mode is an interpretation of type III burst pair.

  8. Experimental and Theoretical Studies on Biologically Active Lanthanide (III) Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostova, I.; Trendafilova, N.; Georgieva, I.; Rastogi, V. K.; Kiefer, W.

    2008-11-01

    The complexation ability and the binding mode of the ligand coumarin-3-carboxylic acid (HCCA) to La(III), Ce(III), Nd(III), Sm(III), Gd(III) and Dy(III) lanthanide ions (Ln(III)) are elucidated at experimental and theoretical level. The complexes were characterized using elemental analysis, DTA and TGA data as well as 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra. FTIR and Raman spectroscopic techniques as well as DFT quantum chemical calculations were used for characterization of the binding mode and the structures of lanthanide(III) complexes of HCCA. The metal—ligand binding mode is predicted through molecular modeling and energy estimation of different Ln—CCA structures using B3LYP/6-31G(d) method combined with a large quasi-relativistic effective core potential for lanthanide ion. The energies obtained predict bidentate coordination of CCA- to Ln(III) ions through the carbonylic oxygen and the carboxylic oxygen. Detailed vibrational analysis of HCCA, CCA- and Ln(III) complexes based on both calculated and experimental frequencies confirms the suggested metal—ligand binding mode. The natural bonding analysis predicts strongly ionic character of the Ln(III)-CCA bonding in the- complexes studied. With the relatively resistant tumor cell line K-562 we obtained very interesting in-vitro results which are in accordance with our previously published data concerning the activity of lanthanide(III) complexes with other coumarin derivatives.

  9. Approaching actinide(+III) hydration from first principles.

    PubMed

    Wiebke, J; Moritz, A; Cao, X; Dolg, M

    2007-01-28

    A systematic computational approach to An(III) hydration on a density-functional level of theory, using quasi-relativistic 5f-in-core pseudopotentials and valence-only basis sets for the An(III) subsystems, is presented. Molecular structures, binding energies, hydration energies, and Gibbs free energies of hydration have been calculated for [An(III)(OH(2))(h)](3+) (h = 7, 8, 9) and [An(III)(OH(2))(h-1) * OH(2)](3+) (h = 8, 9), using large (7s6p5d2f1g)/[6s5p4d2f1g] An(III) and cc-pVQZ O and H basis sets within the COSMO implicit solvation model. An(III) preferred primary hydration numbers are found to be 8 for all An(III) at the gradient-corrected density-functional level of theory. Second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory predicts preferred primary hydration numbers of 9 and 8 for Ac(III)-Md(III) and No(III)-Lr(III), respectively.

  10. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.D.

    1985-07-01

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report.

  11. Sensitivity and specificity of WAIS-III/WMS-III demographically corrected factor scores in neuropsychological assessment.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M J; Heaton, R K

    2001-11-01

    This study explored the neurodiagnostic utility of 6 factor scores identified by recent exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of the WAIS-III and WMS-III: Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Organization, Processing Speed, Working Memory, Auditory Memory and Visual Memory. Factor scores were corrected for age. education, sex and ethnicity to minimize their influences on diagnostic accuracy. Cut-offs at 1, 1.5 and 2 standard deviations (SDs) below the standardization sample mean were applied to data from the overlapping test normative samples (N = 1073) and 6 clinical samples described in the WAIS-III/WMS-III Technical Manual (N = 126). The analyses suggest that a I SD cut-off yields the most balanced levels of sensitivity and specificity; more strict (1.5 or 2 SD) cut-offs generally result in trading modest gains in specificity for larger losses in sensitivity. Finally, using combinations of WAIS-III/WMS-III factors together as test batteries, we explored the sensitivity and specificity implications of varying diagnostic decision rules (e.g.,1 vs. 2 impaired factors = "impairment"). For most of the disorders considered here, even a small (e.g., 3 factor) WAIS-III/WMS-III battery provides quite good overall diagnostic accuracy.

  12. Summary of Session III

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    2002-06-19

    This is a summary of the talks presented in Session III ''Simulations of Electron-Cloud Build Up'' of the Mini-Workshop on Electron-Cloud Simulations for Proton and Positron Beams ECLOUD-02, held at CERN, 15-18 April 2002.

  13. The Apple III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditlea, Steve

    1982-01-01

    Describes and evaluates the features, performance, peripheral devices, available software, and capabilities of the Apple III microcomputer. The computer's operating system, its hardware, and the commercially produced software it accepts are discussed. Specific applications programs for financial planning, accounting, and word processing are…

  14. Pacific Barrier Radar III (PACBAR III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. D.; Sigler, J. D.

    1983-11-01

    The Pacific Barrier (PACBAR III) C-band radar is being installed at the Western Space and Missile Center to furnish Revolution 0 detection of foreign launches. Previously installed on a tracking ship, the upgraded system will also identify and target space objects, maintain a catalog, and cover maneuvers and decay of space objects. Nominal operation will comprise a search of a predesignated 15 deg azimuth with the capability of detecting a 6 sq m target in a 400 km orbit, track spacecraft in orbits up to 800 km altitude, have a range resolution of about 80 yd, provide realtime payload and rocket body discrimination, and transmit two-way digital message traffic between the Center and NORAD in Cheyenne Mt. Interlaced vertical and horizontal pulses will augment the search and acquisition capabilities, and the antenna will have a 140 deg plunge range. The transmitter will function at 5.4-5.65 GHz, 320 p/sec, with a peak power of 0.8 MW, and the system will have a nonambiguous range of 32,768 nmi.

  15. The Mark III VLBI System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, A. E. E.; Whitney, A. R.; Levine, J. I.; Nesman, E. F.; Webber, J. C.; Hinteregger, H. F.

    1988-01-01

    Geodetic measurements have errors in centimeter range. Collection of three reports describes both equipment and results of some measurements taken with Mark III very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) system. Has demonstrated high accuracy over short baselines, where phase-delay measurements used. Advanced hardware, called Mark III A, developed to improve system performance and efficiency. Original Mark III hardware and III A subsystem upgrades developed as part of NASA Crustal Dynamics Project at Haystack Observatory.

  16. The Distribution of Scaled Scores and Possible Floor Effects on the WISC-III and WAIS-III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Simon; Wood, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Objective: It has been suggested that, as the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) and the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition (WISC-III) give a scaled score of one even if a client scores a raw score of zero, these assessments may have a hidden floor effect at low IQ levels. The study looked for…

  17. Expression of anti-neuroexcitation peptide III of scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch BmK ANEP III in plants.

    PubMed

    Song, Y B; Huang, T T; Lai, L L; Zhou, J; Yang, W Y; Zhang, J H

    2011-01-01

    Anti-neuroexcitation peptide III of Buthus martensii Karsch (BmK ANEP III) has better anti-epileptic and anticonvulsive effects in the test animal models. The present study is aimed at developing transgenic tomato and tobacco lines overproducing the ANEP III protein. Using the molecular cloning technique, the plant expression vector pBI-ANEP III was constructed successfully. The ANEP III expression cassette included a double CaMV 35S promoter with omega enhancers, the ANEP III gene with the Kozak sequence, the ER retention signal and the NOS terminator. Recombinant plasmids were transferred into Agrobacterium tumefaciens EHA105 by freeze-thaw transformation methods. By the Agrobacterium-mediated leaf disc transformation method, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum) lines were transformed. Transformants were screened and confirmed by PCR, RT-PCR and western blotting analysis. It was demonstrated that the ANEP III gene was successfully expressed in the genomic DNA of transgenic plants. The ANEP III protein was detected by immunofluorescence analysis, and the results confirmed the high amount of ANEP III protein, being 0.81 and 1.08% of total soluble proteins in transgenic tobacco and tomato. The study of plants with high expression levels of ANEP III has an important theoretical and practical significance and provides valuable information for establishing a new, economical and effective system for industrial protein production.

  18. Type III Hyperlipoproteinaemia

    PubMed Central

    Borrie, Peter

    1969-01-01

    Eighteen patients with type III hyperlipoproteinaemia, diagnosed on the basis of skin lesions, serum lipids, and lipoprotein electrophoresis, have been fully investigated over a period of 15 years. The incidence of coronary artery disease was only slightly increased, and was not increased at all among first-degree relatives. Peripheral occlusive arterial disease was probably more common. An increased incidence of carbohydrate intolerance was found in neither the patients nor their relatives. The effects of treatment on the skin were uniformly good. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:5783124

  19. POPULATION III HYPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Smidt, Joseph; Whalen, Daniel J.; Wiggins, Brandon K.; Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L.; Johnson, Jarrett L.

    2014-12-20

    Population III supernovae have been of growing interest of late for their potential to directly probe the properties of the first stars, particularly the most energetic events that are visible near the edge of the observable universe. Until now, hypernovae, the unusually energetic Type Ib/c supernovae that are sometimes associated with gamma-ray bursts, have been overlooked as cosmic beacons at the highest redshifts. In this, the latest of a series of studies on Population III supernovae, we present numerical simulations of 25-50 M {sub ☉} hypernovae and their light curves done with the Los Alamos RAGE and SPECTRUM codes. We find that they will be visible at z = 10-15 to the James Webb Space Telescope and z = 4-5 to the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope, tracing star formation rates in the first galaxies and at the end of cosmological reionization. If, however, the hypernova crashes into a dense shell ejected by its progenitor, it is expected that a superluminous event will occur that may be seen at z ∼ 20 in the first generation of stars.

  20. Sample exchange/evaluation (SEE) report - Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.I.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the results from Phase III of the Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) program. The SEE program is used to compare analytical laboratory performance on samples from the Hanford Site`s high level waste tanks.

  1. Antisites in III-V semiconductors: Density functional theory calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Chroneos, A.; Tahini, H. A.; Schwingenschlögl, U.; Grimes, R. W.

    2014-07-14

    Density functional based simulation, corrected for finite size effects, is used to investigate systematically the formation of antisite defects in III-V semiconductors (III = Al, Ga, and In and V = P, As, and Sb). Different charge states are modelled as a function of the Fermi level and under different growth conditions. The formation energies of group III antisites (III{sub V}{sup q}) decrease with increasing covalent radius of the group V atom though not group III radius, whereas group V antisites (V{sub III}{sup q}) show a consistent decrease in formation energies with increase in group III and group V covalent radii. In general, III{sub V}{sup q} defects dominate under III-rich conditions and V{sub III}{sup q} under V-rich conditions. Comparison with equivalent vacancy formation energy simulations shows that while antisite concentrations are always dominant under stoichiometric conditions, modest variation in growth or doping conditions can lead to a significantly higher concentration of vacancies.

  2. Type III Radio Burst Duration and SEP Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Makela, P.; Xie, H.

    2010-01-01

    Long-duration (>15 min), low-frequency (<14 MHz) type III radio bursts have been reported to be indicative of solar energetic particle events. We measured the durations of type III bursts associated with large SEP events of solar cycle 23. The Type III durations are distributed symmetrically at 1 MHz yielding a mean value of approximately 33 min (median = 32 min) for the large SEP events. When the SEP events with ground level enhancement (GLE,) are considered, the distribution is essentially unchanged (mean = 32 min, median = 30 min). To test the importance of type III bursts in indicating SEP events, we considered a set of six type III bursts from the same active region (AR 10588) whose durations fit the "long duration" criterion. We analyzed the coronal mass ejections (CMEs), flares, and type II radio bursts associated with the type III bursts. The CMEs were of similar speeds and the flares are also of similar size and duration. All but one of the type III bursts was not associated with a type II burst in the metric or longer wavelength domains. The burst without type II burst also lacked a solar energetic particle (SEP) event at energies >25 MeV. The 1-MHz duration of the type III burst (28 rein) is near the median value of type III durations found for gradual SEP events and ground level enhancement (GLE) events. Yet, there was no sign of SEP events. On the other hand, two other type III bursts from the same active region had similar duration but accompanied by WAVES type 11 bursts; these bursts were also accompanied by SEP events detected by SOHO/ERNE. This study suggests that the type III burst duration may not be a good indicator of an SEP event, consistent with the statistical study of Cliver and Ling (2009, ApJ ).

  3. Pseudo Class III malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hummayani, Fadia M.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of deep anterior crossbite is technically challenging due to the difficulty of placing traditional brackets with fixed appliances. This case report represents a none traditional treatment modality to treat deep anterior crossbite in an adult pseudo class III malocclusion complicated by severely retruded, supraerupted upper and lower incisors. Treatment was carried out in 2 phases. Phase I treatment was performed by removable appliance “modified Hawley appliance with inverted labial bow,” some modifications were carried out to it to suit the presented case. Positive overbite and overjet was accomplished in one month, in this phase with minimal forces exerted on the lower incisors. Whereas, phase II treatment was performed with fixed appliances (braces) to align teeth and have proper over bite and overjet and to close posterior open bite, this phase was accomplished within 11 month. PMID:27052290

  4. Pseudo Class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Al-Hummayani, Fadia M

    2016-04-01

    The treatment of deep anterior crossbite is technically challenging due to the difficulty of placing traditional brackets with fixed appliances. This case report represents a none traditional treatment modality to treat deep anterior crossbite in an adult pseudo class III malocclusion complicated by severely retruded, supraerupted upper and lower incisors. Treatment was carried out in 2 phases. Phase I treatment was performed by removable appliance "modified Hawley appliance with inverted labial bow," some modifications were carried out to it to suit the presented case. Positive overbite and overjet was accomplished in one month, in this phase with minimal forces exerted on the lower incisors. Whereas, phase II treatment was performed with fixed appliances (braces) to align teeth and have proper over bite and overjet and to close posterior open bite, this phase was accomplished within 11 month.

  5. Free Trade and Tariffs: Level III, Unit 2, Lesson 1; Capitalism, Communism, Socialism: Lesson 2; Nationalism vs. Internationalism: Lesson 3. Advanced General Education Program. A High School Self-Study Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Job Corps.

    This self-study program for high-school level contains lessons on: Free Trade and Tariffs; Capitalism, Communism, Socialism; and Nationalism vs. Internationalism. Each of the lessons concludes with a Mastery Test to be completed by the student. (DB)

  6. The effects of graded levels of calorie restriction: III. Impact of short term calorie and protein restriction on mean daily body temperature and torpor use in the C57BL/6 mouse

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Sharon E.; Delville, Camille; Konstantopedos, Penelope; Derous, Davina; Green, Cara L.; Chen, Luonan; Han, Jing-Dong J.; Wang, Yingchun; Promislow, Daniel E.L.; Douglas, Alex; Lusseau, David; Speakman, John R.

    2015-01-01

    A commonly observed response in mammals to calorie restriction (CR) is reduced body temperature (Tb). We explored how the Tb of male C57BL/6 mice responded to graded CR (10 to 40%), compared to the response to equivalent levels of protein restriction (PR) over 3 months. Under CR there was a dynamic change in daily Tb over the first 30–35 days, which stabilized thereafter until day 70 after which a further decline was noted. The time to reach stability was dependent on restriction level. Body mass negatively correlated with Tb under ad libitum feeding and positively correlated under CR. The average Tb over the last 20 days was significantly related to the levels of body fat, structural tissue, leptin and insulin-like growth factor-1. Some mice, particularly those under higher levels of CR, showed periods of daily torpor later in the restriction period. None of the changes in Tb under CR were recapitulated by equivalent levels of PR. We conclude that changes in Tb under CR are a response only to the shortfall in calorie intake. The linear relationship between average Tb and the level of restriction supports the idea that Tb changes are an integral aspect of the lifespan effect. PMID:26286956

  7. The effects of graded levels of calorie restriction: III. Impact of short term calorie and protein restriction on mean daily body temperature and torpor use in the C57BL/6 mouse.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Sharon E; Delville, Camille; Konstantopedos, Penelope; Derous, Davina; Green, Cara L; Chen, Luonan; Han, Jing-Dong J; Wang, Yingchun; Promislow, Daniel E L; Douglas, Alex; Lusseau, David; Speakman, John R

    2015-07-30

    A commonly observed response in mammals to calorie restriction (CR) is reduced body temperature (Tb). We explored how the Tb of male C57BL/6 mice responded to graded CR (10 to 40%), compared to the response to equivalent levels of protein restriction (PR) over 3 months. Under CR there was a dynamic change in daily Tb over the first 30-35 days, which stabilized thereafter until day 70 after which a further decline was noted. The time to reach stability was dependent on restriction level. Body mass negatively correlated with Tb under ad libitum feeding and positively correlated under CR. The average Tb over the last 20 days was significantly related to the levels of body fat, structural tissue, leptin and insulin-like growth factor-1. Some mice, particularly those under higher levels of CR, showed periods of daily torpor later in the restriction period. None of the changes in Tb under CR were recapitulated by equivalent levels of PR. We conclude that changes in Tb under CR are a response only to the shortfall in calorie intake. The linear relationship between average Tb and the level of restriction supports the idea that Tb changes are an integral aspect of the lifespan effect.

  8. Occurrence and speciation of polymeric chromium(III), monomeric chromium(III) and chromium(VI) in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ligang; Cai, Yong; Jiang, Guibin

    2016-08-01

    Laboratory experiments suggest that polymeric Cr(III) could exist in aqueous solution for a relative long period of time. However, the occurrence of polymeric Cr(III) has not been reported in environmental media due partially to the lack of method for speciating polymeric Cr. We observed an unknown Cr species during the course of study on speciation of Cr in the leachates of chromated-copper-arsenate (CCA)-treated wood. Efforts were made to identify structure of the unknown Cr species. Considering the forms of Cr existed in the CCA-treated woods, we mainly focused our efforts to determine if the unknown species were polymeric Cr(III), complex of Cr/As or complex of Cr with dissolved organic matter (DOM). In order to evaluate whether polymeric Cr(III) largely exist in wood leachates, high performance liquid chromatography coupled with inductively coupled mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICPMS was used) for simultaneous speciation of monomeric Cr(III), polymeric Cr(III), and Cr(VI). In addition to wood leachates where polymeric Cr (III) ranged from 39.1 to 67.4%, occurrence of the unknown Cr species in other environmental matrices, including surface waters, tap and waste waters, was also investigated. It was found that polymeric Cr(III) could exist in environmental samples containing μg/L level of Cr, at a level up to 60% of total Cr, suggesting that polymeric Cr(III) could significantly exist in natural environments. Failure in quantifying polymeric Cr(III) would lead to the underestimation of total Cr and bias in Cr speciation. The environmental implication of the presence of polymeric Cr(III) species in the environment deserves further study.

  9. Aqueous Ln(III) Luminescence Agents Derived from a Tasty Precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Jocher, C.J.; Moore, E.G.; Pierce, J.D.; Raymond, K.N.

    2008-06-02

    The synthesis, aqueous stability and photophysical properties are reported for a novel tetradentate ligand derived from maltol, a commonly used flavor enhancer. In aqueous solution, this chelate forms stable complexes with Ln(III) cations, and sensitized emission was observed from Eu(III), Yb(III), and Nd(III). A comparison with recently reported and structurally analogous ligands reveals a slightly higher basicity but lower complex stability with Eu(III) [pEu = 14.7 (1)]. A very poor metal centered quantum yield with Eu(III) was observed ({Phi}{sub tot} = 0.04%), which can be rationalized by the similar energy of the ligand triplet state and the Eu(III) {sup 5}D{sub 0} emissive level. Instead, sensitized emission from the Yb(III) and Nd(III) cations was observed, which emit in the Near Infra-Red (NIR).

  10. Co-norming the WAIS-III and WMS-III: Is there a test-order effect on IQ and memory scores?

    PubMed

    Zhu, J; Tulsky, D S

    2000-11-01

    Test-order effect on the WAIS-III and WMS-III scores was evaluated using the WMS-III standardization sample. Participants completed the standardization editions of the WAIS-III and WMS-III in one session, with the tests administered in roughly counterbalanced order. Repeated measure MANOVA analyses were conducted to determine if there was an overall test-order effect for subtest, index, or IQ scores. No significant test-order effects were found for either the WAIS-III index or IQ scores or for the WMS-III index scores. At the subtest level, the majority of the WAIS-III and WMS-III subtests did not show a significant test-order effect. The exceptions were Digit Span and Digit Symbol-Coding on the WAIS-III and Faces II and Logical Memory II on the WMS-III. Although statistically significant test-order effects were found on these subtests, the effect sizes were small. This study indicates that the test-order effect is not a potential threat to the internal validity of the WAIS-III and WMS-III normative data. The practical implications of the current study are discussed.

  11. Interaction of alkylmercuric compounds with sodium selenite. III. Biotransformation, levels of metallothioneinlike proteins and endogenous copper in some tissues of rats exposed to methyl or ethylmercuric chloride with and without sodium selenite.

    PubMed Central

    Brzeźnicka, E A; Chmielnicka, J

    1985-01-01

    The biotransformation efficiency of alkylmercurial compounds was studied in rat liver, kidneys, blood, and brain after 2-week administration of methylmercuric chloride (MeHg) and ethylmercuric chloride (EtHg) at doses of 0.25 or 2.5 mg Hg/kg, alone or in combination with sodium selenite (Se) at a level of 0.5 mg Se/kg. Simultaneously, the level of metallothioneinlike proteins (MTP) and endogenous copper (Cu) was monitored in tissues of control rats and intoxicated rats. Regardless of the dose, the highest concentrations of inorganic mercury from both the alkylmercurials was found in the rat kidneys. Sodium selenite had a variable effect on the amount of inorganic mercury liberated, depending on the organ and the molar ratio of Hg:Se administered. A statistically significant increase in the levels of MTP and endogenous Cu, compared with control group, was found only in the kidneys of intoxicated rats. This increase was dependent on the concentration of inorganic mercury liberated by biotransformation of alkylmercurials. The observed changes appeared when the level of inorganic mercury exceeded 10 micrograms Hg/g tissue and reached a plateau at about 40 micrograms Hg/g tissue. In the presence of selenium the plateau of MTP and Cu levels were no observed in the kidneys, regardless of the amount of inorganic mercury liberated. PMID:3928366

  12. Interaction of alkylmercuric compounds with sodium selenite. III. Biotransformation, levels of metallothioneinlike proteins and endogenous copper in some tissues of rats exposed to methyl or ethylmercuric chloride with and without sodium selenite

    SciTech Connect

    Brzeznicka, E.A.; Chmielnicka, J.

    1985-05-01

    The biotransformation efficiency of alkylmercurial compounds was studied in rat liver, kidneys, blood, and brain after 2-week administration of methylmercuric chloride (MeHg) and ethylmercuric chloride (EtHg) at doses of 0.25 or 2.5 mg Hg/kg, alone or in combination with sodium selenite (Se) at a level of 0.5 mg Se/kg. Simultaneously, the level of metallothioneinlike proteins (MTP) and endogenous copper (Cu) was monitored in tissues of control rats and intoxicated rats. Regardless of the dose, the highest concentrations of inorganic mercury from both the alkylmercurials was found in the rat kidneys. Sodium selenite had a variable effect on the amount of inorganic mercury liberated, depending on the organ and the molar ratio of Hg:Se administered. A statistically significant increase in the levels of MTP and endogenous Cu, compared with control group, was found only in the kidneys of intoxicated rats. This increase was dependent on the concentration of inorganic mercury liberated by biotransformation of alkylmercurials. The observed changes appeared when the level of inorganic mercury exceeded 10 g Hg/g tissue and reached a plateau at about 40 g Hg/g tissue. In the presence of selenium the plateau of MTP and Cu levels were not observed in the kidneys, regardless of the amount of inorganic mercury liberated.

  13. [Role of antithrombin iii in cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Muedra, V; Barettino, D; D'Ocón, P

    2013-11-01

    Coagulation of blood is of multidisciplinary interest. Cardiac surgery produces major changes in the delicate balance between pro-and anti-coagulant serum factors. The role of antithrombin iii has been analysed after finding evidence that associated decreased levels of protein activity to postoperative morbidity and mortality. Supplementing exogenous antithrombin is considered with the aim of optimising outcomes. Its intrinsic anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties have stimulated a growing interest, and suggests new lines of research.

  14. Measuring the Level of Effectiveness of the High School Assistant Principal and the High School Instructional Leadership Team (ILT) in Preparing Their English I, II, and III Teachers and Students for End of Course/TN Ready Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Rhonda

    2016-01-01

    This research study addressed measuring the level of instructional leadership effectiveness of the high school assistant principal and the high school instructional leadership teams (ILT) at over forty (40) Shelby County Schools. More specifically, this research study examined their impact on teacher effectiveness and student achievement in their…

  15. An Exploratory Study of the Impact of Parent Advisory Councils on the Management and Administration of Title I Programs at the Local Level. Volume II Final Report and Volume III Appendices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CPI Associates, Inc., Dallas, TX.

    This report details the theoretical framework, methodology, and findings of research into the impact of Parent Advisory Councils (PACs) on the management and administration of Title I programs at the local level. The eight school districts studied were selected because they varied in their orientations toward PAC involvement in Title I, and in…

  16. An Unusual Origin of Fetal Lymphangioma Filling Right Axilla.

    PubMed

    Ersoy, Ali Ozgur; Oztas, Efser; Saridogan, Erdinc; Ozler, Sibel; Danisman, Nuri

    2016-03-01

    Fetal lymphangioma is a hamartomatous congenital anomaly of the lymphatic system, which is embracing the fetal skin (sometimes mucous membranes) and the subcutaneous tissue. The general consensus is that it occurs as a result of failure in lymphatic drainage. A 36-year-old pregnant woman was referred to our perinatology clinic at 22 weeks' gestation, because of a fetal right-sided axillary mass revealed by ultrasonography. The mass measuring 5x7x7cm in three dimensions had a multilocular structure without colour Doppler flow and well-circumscribed borders. Amniocentesis revealed a normal constitutional karyotyping. Lymphangioma was considered as prediagnosis. A healthy female baby weighing 3470 grams was delivered at term. Neonatal examination and the postnatal MRI confirmed the diagnosis. The baby is still on follow-up with the medical treatment of Sirolimus an anti-proliferative drug, and the mass got smaller significantly in 8 months after delivery.

  17. Title III and Cultural Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The Title III Quarterly, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Title III projects dealing with cultural diversity in the classroom are described in this issue of the Title III Quarterly. Major articles are devoted to the following projects: Two Arts Culture Three Project, developing the crafts and music of mountain whites, blacks, and Cherokees; the Rota Bilingual Project, the Marianas District, emphasizing…

  18. SUPERSTARS III: 6-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Education, Raleigh.

    SUPERSTARS III is a K-8 program designed as an enrichment opportunity for self-directed learners in mathematics. The basic purpose of SUPERSTARS III is to provide the extra challenge that self-motivated students need in mathematics and to do so in a structured, long-term program that does not impinge on the normal classroom routine or the…

  19. Using dBase III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Janet; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Four articles on dBASE III include three on library applications: a photocopy invoicing system for interlibrary loan, a vertical file subject headings list program, and a subject index to statistical resources. Another article explains the differences between interpreters and compilers and the advantages of the Clipper compiler for dBASE III. (EM)

  20. SUPERSTARS III: 3-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Education, Raleigh.

    SUPERSTARS III is a K-8 program designed as an enrichment opportunity for self-directed learners in mathematics. The basic purpose of SUPERSTARS III is to provide the extra challenge that self-motivated students need in mathematics and to do so in a structured, long-term program that does not impinge on the normal classroom routine or the…

  1. Biochemical and Structural Properties of Mouse Kynurenine Aminotransferase III

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Q.; Robinson, H; Cai, T; Tagle, D; Li, J

    2009-01-01

    Kynurenine aminotransferase III (KAT III) has been considered to be involved in the production of mammalian brain kynurenic acid (KYNA), which plays an important role in protecting neurons from overstimulation by excitatory neurotransmitters. The enzyme was identified based on its high sequence identity with mammalian KAT I, but its activity toward kynurenine and its structural characteristics have not been established. In this study, the biochemical and structural properties of mouse KAT III (mKAT III) were determined. Specifically, mKAT III cDNA was amplified from a mouse brain cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was expressed in an insect cell protein expression system. We established that mKAT III is able to efficiently catalyze the transamination of kynurenine to KYNA and has optimum activity at relatively basic conditions of around pH 9.0 and at relatively high temperatures of 50 to 60C. In addition, mKAT III is active toward a number of other amino acids. Its activity toward kynurenine is significantly decreased in the presence of methionine, histidine, glutamine, leucine, cysteine, and 3-hydroxykynurenine. Through macromolecular crystallography, we determined the mKAT III crystal structure and its structures in complex with kynurenine and glutamine. Structural analysis revealed the overall architecture of mKAT III and its cofactor binding site and active center residues. This is the first report concerning the biochemical characteristics and crystal structures of KAT III enzymes and provides a basis toward understanding the overall physiological role of mammalian KAT III in vivo and insight into regulating the levels of endogenous KYNA through modulation of the enzyme in the mouse brain.

  2. Biochemical and structural properties of mouse kynurenine aminotransferase III.

    PubMed

    Han, Qian; Robinson, Howard; Cai, Tao; Tagle, Danilo A; Li, Jianyong

    2009-02-01

    Kynurenine aminotransferase III (KAT III) has been considered to be involved in the production of mammalian brain kynurenic acid (KYNA), which plays an important role in protecting neurons from overstimulation by excitatory neurotransmitters. The enzyme was identified based on its high sequence identity with mammalian KAT I, but its activity toward kynurenine and its structural characteristics have not been established. In this study, the biochemical and structural properties of mouse KAT III (mKAT III) were determined. Specifically, mKAT III cDNA was amplified from a mouse brain cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was expressed in an insect cell protein expression system. We established that mKAT III is able to efficiently catalyze the transamination of kynurenine to KYNA and has optimum activity at relatively basic conditions of around pH 9.0 and at relatively high temperatures of 50 to 60 degrees C. In addition, mKAT III is active toward a number of other amino acids. Its activity toward kynurenine is significantly decreased in the presence of methionine, histidine, glutamine, leucine, cysteine, and 3-hydroxykynurenine. Through macromolecular crystallography, we determined the mKAT III crystal structure and its structures in complex with kynurenine and glutamine. Structural analysis revealed the overall architecture of mKAT III and its cofactor binding site and active center residues. This is the first report concerning the biochemical characteristics and crystal structures of KAT III enzymes and provides a basis toward understanding the overall physiological role of mammalian KAT III in vivo and insight into regulating the levels of endogenous KYNA through modulation of the enzyme in the mouse brain.

  3. Iron(III) hydroxide-loaded coral limestone as an adsorbent for arsenic(III) and arsenic (V)

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Shigeru; Ohki, Akira; Saikoji, Shunsuke; Naka, Kensuke )

    1992-04-01

    Trace levels of As(III) and As(V) in aqueous media were effectively adsorbed onto a coral limestone loaded by Fe(OH){sub 3}. The adsorption of As(III) was almost comparable to that of As(V). The adsorption of As(III) and As(V) was almost independent of the pH of the aqueous phase (pH range: 3-10) because of a self-buffering effect of the coral. The addition of such anions as chloride, nitrate, sulfate, and acetate in the aqueous phase did not significantly affect the adsorption of As(III), whereas the addition of phosphate brought about a great decrease in the adsorption. The arsenic adsorption was effectively applied to the column method. Unloaded coral itself was effective as an adsorbent for As(V) when Fe(III) coexisted in the aqueous solutions.

  4. WAIS-III and WMS-III performance in chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Keilp, John G; Corbera, Kathy; Slavov, Iordan; Taylor, Michael J; Sackeim, Harold A; Fallon, Brian A

    2006-01-01

    There is controversy regarding the nature and degree of intellectual and memory deficits in chronic Lyme disease. In this study, 81 participants with rigorously diagnosed chronic Lyme disease were administered the newest revisions of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III) and Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS-III), and compared to 39 nonpatients. On the WAIS-III, Lyme disease participants had poorer Full Scale and Performance IQ's. At the subtest level, differences were restricted to Information and the Processing Speed subtests. On the WMS-III, Lyme disease participants performed more poorly on Auditory Immediate, Immediate, Auditory Delayed, Auditory Recognition Delayed, and General Memory indices. Among WMS-III subtests, however, differences were restricted to Logical Memory (immediate and delayed) and Family Pictures (delayed only), a Visual Memory subtest. Discriminant analyses suggest deficits in chronic Lyme are best characterized as a combination of memory difficulty and diminished processing speed. Deficits were modest, between one-third and two-thirds of a standard deviation, consistent with earlier studies. Depression severity had a weak relationship to processing speed, but little other association to test performance. Deficits in chronic Lyme disease are consistent with a subtle neuropathological process affecting multiple performance tasks, although further work is needed to definitively rule out nonspecific illness effects.

  5. Recombinant lipidated dengue-3 envelope protein domain III stimulates broad immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chen-Yi; Liu, Shih-Jen; Hsieh, Chun-Hsiang; Chen, Mei-Yu; Tsai, Jy-Ping; Liu, Hsueh-Hung; Chen, I-Hua; Chong, Pele; Leng, Chih-Hsiang; Chen, Hsin-Wei

    2016-02-17

    The linkage of an immunogen with a toll-like receptor ligand has great potential to induce highly potent immune responses with the initial features of antigen-presenting cell activation. In the current study, we expressed recombinant dengue-3 envelope protein domain III (D3ED III) in lipidated form using an Escherichia coli-based system. The recombinant lipidated dengue-3 envelope protein domain III (LD3ED III) augments the expression levels of IL-12 family cytokines. LD3ED III-immunized mice enhance wide ranges of T cell responses as indicated by IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-21 production. Additionally, LD3ED III-immunized mice increase the frequencies of anti-D3ED III antibody producing cells. The boosted antibody titers cover various IgG isotypes, including IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG3. Importantly, LD3ED III-immunized mice induce neutralizing antibody capacity associated with a reduction of viremia levels after challenges. In contrast, mice that are immunized with D3ED III formulated with aluminum phosphate (D3ED III/Alum) only enhance Th2 responses and boost IgG1 antibody titers. Neither neutralizing antibody responses nor the inhibition of viremia levels after challenge is observed in mice that are immunized with D3ED III/Alum. These results suggest that LD3ED III can induce broad profiles of cellular and humoral immune responses.

  6. Design III with Marker Loci

    PubMed Central

    Cockerham, C. C.; Zeng, Z. B.

    1996-01-01

    Design III is an experimental design originally proposed by R. E. COMSTOCK and H. F. ROBINSON for estimating genetic variances and the average degree of dominance for quantitative trait loci (QTL) and has recently been extended for mapping QTL. In this paper, we first extend COMSTOCK and ROBINSON's analysis of variance to include linkage, two-locus epistasis and the use of F(3) parents. Then we develop the theory and statistical analysis of orthogonal contrasts and contrast X environment interaction for a single marker locus to characterize the effects of QTL. The methods are applied to the maize data of C. W. STUBER. The analyses strongly suggest that there are multiple linked QTL in many chromosomes for several traits examined. QTL effects are largely environment-independent for grain yield, ear height, plant height and ear leaf area and largely environment dependent for days to tassel, grain moisture and ear number. There is significant QTL epistasis. The results are generally in favor of the hypothesis of dominance of favorable genes to explain the observed heterosis in grain yield and other traits, although epistasis could also play an important role and overdominance at individual QTL level can not be ruled out. PMID:8807314

  7. Application for a Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada National Security Site Area 5 Asbestiform Low-Level Solid Waste Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-10-04

    The Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) is located approximately 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) is the federal lands management authority for the NNSS and National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NNSS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NNSS is posted with signs along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NNSS. The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) is the location of the permitted facility for the Solid Waste Disposal Site (SWDS). The Area 5 RWMS is located near the eastern edge of the NNSS (Figure 1), approximately 26 km (16 mi) north of Mercury, Nevada. The Area 5 RWMS is used for the disposal of low-level waste (LLW) and mixed low-level waste. Many areas surrounding the RWMS have been used in conducting nuclear tests. The site will be used for the disposal of regulated Asbestiform Low-Level Waste (ALLW), small quantities of low-level radioactive hydrocarbon-burdened (LLHB) media and debris, LLW, LLW that contains Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) Bulk Product Waste greater than 50 ppm that leaches at a rate of less than 10 micrograms of PCB per liter of water, and small quantities of LLHB demolition and construction waste (hereafter called permissible waste). Waste containing free liquids, or waste that is regulated as hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) or state-of-generation hazardous waste regulations, will not be accepted for disposal at the site. Waste regulated under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) that will be accepted at the disposal site is regulated asbestos-containing materials (RACM) and PCB Bulk Product Waste greater than 50 ppm that leaches at a rate of less than 10 micrograms of PCB per liter of water. The term asbestiform is

  8. In vivo erythrocyte micronucleus assay III. Validation and regulatory acceptance of automated scoring and the use of rat peripheral blood reticulocytes, with discussion of non-hematopoietic target cells and a single dose-level limit test.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Makoto; MacGregor, James T; Gatehouse, David G; Blakey, David H; Dertinger, Stephen D; Abramsson-Zetterberg, Lilianne; Krishna, Gopala; Morita, Takeshi; Russo, Antonella; Asano, Norihide; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Ohyama, Wakako; Gibson, Dave

    2007-02-03

    The in vivo micronucleus assay working group of the International Workshop on Genotoxicity Testing (IWGT) discussed new aspects in the in vivo micronucleus (MN) test, including the regulatory acceptance of data derived from automated scoring, especially with regard to the use of flow cytometry, the suitability of rat peripheral blood reticulocytes to serve as the principal cell population for analysis, the establishment of in vivo MN assays in tissues other than bone marrow and blood (for example liver, skin, colon, germ cells), and the biological relevance of the single-dose-level test. Our group members agreed that flow cytometric systems to detect induction of micronucleated immature erythrocytes have advantages based on the presented data, e.g., they give good reproducibility compared to manual scoring, are rapid, and require only small quantities of peripheral blood. Flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood reticulocytes has the potential to allow monitoring of chromosome damage in rodents and also other species as part of routine toxicology studies. It appears that it will be applicable to humans as well, although in this case the possible confounding effects of splenic activity will need to be considered closely. Also, the consensus of the group was that any system that meets the validation criteria recommended by the IWGT (2000) should be acceptable. A number of different flow cytometric-based micronucleus assays have been developed, but at the present time the validation data are most extensive for the flow cytometric method using anti-CD71 fluorescent staining especially in terms of inter-laboratory collaborative data. Whichever method is chosen, it is desirable that each laboratory should determine the minimum sample size required to ensure that scoring error is maintained below the level of animal-to-animal variation. In the second IWGT, the potential to use rat peripheral blood reticulocytes as target cells for the micronucleus assay was discussed

  9. PREFACE: Quantum Optics III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orszag, M.; Retamal, J. C.; Saavedra, C.; Wallentowitz, S.

    2007-06-01

    All the 50 years of conscious pondering did not bring me nearer to an answer to the question `what is light quanta?'. Nowadays, every rascal believes, he knows it, however, he is mistaken. (A Einstein, 1951 in a letter to M Besso) Quantum optics has played a key role in physics in the last several decades. On the other hand, in these early decades of the information age, the flow of information is becoming more and more central to our daily life. Thus, the related fields of quantum information theory as well as Bose-Einstein condensation have acquired tremendous importance in the last couple of decades. In Quantum Optics III, a fusion of these fields appears in a natural way. Quantum Optics III was held in Pucón, Chile, in 27-30 of November, 2006. This beautiful location in the south of Chile is near the lake Villarrica and below the snow covered volcano of the same name. This fantastic environment contributed to a relaxed atmosphere, suitable for informal discussion and for the students to have a chance to meet the key figures in the field. The previous Quantum Optics conferences took place in Santiago, Chile (Quantum Optics I, 2000) and Cozumel, Mexico (Quantum Optics II, 2004). About 115 participants from 19 countries attended and participated in the meeting to discuss a wide variety of topics such as quantum-information processing, experiments related to non-linear optics and squeezing, various aspects of entanglement including its sudden death, correlated twin-photon experiments, light storage, decoherence-free subspaces, Bose-Einstein condensation, discrete Wigner functions and many more. There was a strong Latin-American participation from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela and Mexico, as well as from Europe, USA, China, and Australia. New experimental and theoretical results were presented at the conference. In Latin-America a quiet revolution has taken place in the last twenty years. Several groups working in quantum optics and

  10. Comparative overview of RNA polymerase II and III transcription cycles, with focus on RNA polymerase III termination and reinitiation.

    PubMed

    Arimbasseri, Aneeshkumar G; Rijal, Keshab; Maraia, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotes, RNA polymerase (RNAP) III transcribes hundreds of genes for tRNAs and 5S rRNA, among others, which share similar promoters and stable transcription initiation complexes (TIC), which support rapid RNAP III recycling. In contrast, RNAP II transcribes a large number of genes with highly variable promoters and interacting factors, which exert fine regulatory control over TIC lability and modifications of RNAP II at different transitional points in the transcription cycle. We review data that illustrate a relatively smooth continuity of RNAP III initiation-elongation-termination and reinitiation toward its function to produce high levels of tRNAs and other RNAs that support growth and development.

  11. Viking Phase III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    VIKING PHASE III - With the incredible success of the Viking missions on Mars, mission operations have progressed though a series of phases - each being funded as mission success dictated its potential. The Viking Primary Mission phase was concluded in November, 1976, when the reins were passed on to the second phase - the Viking Extended Mission. The Extended Mission successfully carried spacecraft operations through the desired period of time needed to provided a profile of a full Martian year, but would have fallen a little short of connecting and overlapping a full Martian year of Viking operations which scientists desired as a means of determining the degree of duplicity in the red planet's seasons - at least for the summer period. Without this continuation of spacecraft data acquisitions to and beyond the seasonal points when the spacecraft actually began their Mars observations, there would be no way of knowing whether the changing environmental values - such as temperatures and winds atmospheric dynamics and water vapor, surface thermal dynamics, etc. - would match up with those acquired as the spacecraft began investigations during the summer and fall of 1976. This same broad interest can be specifically pursued at the surface - where hundreds of rocks, soil drifts and other features have become extremely familiar during long-term analysis. This picture was acquired on the 690th Martian day of Lander 1 operations - 4009th picture sequence commanded of the two Viking Landers. As such, it became the first picture acquired as the third phase of Viking operations got under way - the Viking Continuation Mission. Between the start of the Continuation Mission in April, 1978, until spacecraft operations are concluded in November, the landers will acquire an additional 200 pictures. These will be used to monitor the two landscaped for the surface changes. All four cameras, two on Lander 1 and two on Lander 2, continue to operate perfectly. Both landers will also

  12. Swahili: Book III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mwalozi, D. Chilyalya

    This text of instructional materials, designed for the third level of a course in Swahili, contains 12 lessons with exercises for the student. Topics of the chapters include: (1) "Utabibu Hospitalini," (2) "Waifunga Ndoa Kanisani," (3) "Kutambua Saa," (4) "Kupiga Kambi," (5) "Mgema," (6) "Maisha ya Rais Nasser," (7) "Uhuru na Kazi," (8) "Mkonge,…

  13. BEIR-III controverly

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1980-06-01

    How certain of the areas addressed by the Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) have attempted to deal with the scientific basis for establishing appropriate radiation protection guides is discussed, and what effect this may have on decision-making for the regulation of societal activities concerned with the health effects in human populations exposed to low-level radiation. (ACR)

  14. Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type

    MedlinePlus

    ... diabetic type of cranial mononeuropathy III is a complication of diabetes . It causes double vision and eyelid drooping . ... Cooper ME, Vinik AI, Plutzky J, Boulton AJM. Complications of diabetes mellitus. In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, Kronenberg ...

  15. Methods to increase the luminescence of lanthanide (III) macrocyclic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quagliano, John R.; Leif, Robert C.; Vallarino, Lidia M.; Williams, Steven A.

    2000-04-01

    Simultaneous detection of both a Eu(III) and a Sm(III) Quantum Dye is now possible because the enhanced luminescence of the Eu(III) and Sm(III) macrocycles occurs in the same solution and with excitation at the same wavelengths between 350 to 370 nm. Since DAPI is also excited between 350 to 370 nm, it is possible to use common excitation optics and a single dichroic mirror for measuring two molecular species and DNA. The narrow emissions of these macrocycles can be detected with negligible overlap between themselves or with DAPI-stained DNA. This will permit precise pixel by pixel ratio measurements of the Eu(III) macrocycle to Sm(III) macrocycle, and of each macrocycle to DNA> This technology should be applicable to antibodies, FISH, comparative genomic hybridization, and chromosome painting. Cofluorescence of the Tb(III)-macrocycle has also been obtained under different conditions. The luminescence of these lanthanide macrocycles can be observed with conventional fluorescence instrumentation previously unattainable low levels. Thus, it will be possible to employ narrow bandwidth lanthanide luminescent tags to identify three molecular species with a conventional microscope.

  16. Mitochondria are the main target organelle for trivalent monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III))-induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Naranmandura, Hua; Xu, Shi; Sawata, Takashi; Hao, Wen Hui; Liu, Huan; Bu, Na; Ogra, Yasumitsu; Lou, Yi Jia; Suzuki, Noriyuki

    2011-07-18

    Excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is considered to play an important role in arsenic-induced carcinogenicity in the liver, lungs, and urinary bladder. However, little is known about the mechanism of ROS-based carcinogenicity, including where the ROS are generated, and which arsenic species are the most effective ROS inducers. In order to better understand the mechanism of arsenic toxicity, rat liver RLC-16 cells were exposed to arsenite (iAs(III)) and its intermediate metabolites [i.e., monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III))]. MMA(III) (IC(50) = 1 μM) was found to be the most toxic form, followed by DMA(III) (IC(50) = 2 μM) and iAs(III) (IC(50) = 18 μM). Following exposure to MMA(III), ROS were found to be generated primarily in the mitochondria. DMA(III) exposure resulted in ROS generation in other organelles, while no ROS generation was seen following exposures to low levels of iAs(III). This suggests the mechanisms of induction of ROS are different among the three arsenicals. The effects of iAs(III), MMA(III), and DMA(III) on activities of complexes I-IV in the electron transport chain (ETC) of rat liver submitochondrial particles and on the stimulation of ROS production in intact mitochondria were also studied. Activities of complexes II and IV were significantly inhibited by MMA(III), but only the activity of complexes II was inhibited by DMA(III). Incubation with iAs(III) had no inhibitory effects on any of the four complexes. Generation of ROS in intact mitochondria was significantly increased following incubation with MMA(III), while low levels of ROS generation were observed following incubation with DMA(III). ROS was not produced in mitochondria following exposure to iAs(III). The mechanism underlying cell death is different among As(III), MMA(III), and DMA(III), with mitochondria being one of the primary target organelles for MMA(III)-induced cytotoxicity.

  17. III-nitride-based avalanche photo detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClintock, Ryan; Cicek, Erdem; Vashaei, Zahra; Bayram, Can; Razeghi, Manijeh; Ulmer, Melville P.

    2010-08-01

    Research into III-Nitride based avalanche photodiodes (APDs) is motivated by the need for high sensitivity ultraviolet (UV) detectors in numerous civilian and military applications. By designing III-Nitride photodetectors that utilize low-noise impact ionization high internal gain can be realized-GaN APDs operating in Geiger mode can achieve gains exceeding 1×107. Thus with careful design, it becomes possible to count photons at the single photon level. In this paper we review the current state of the art in III-Nitride visible-blind APDs and discuss the critical design choices necessary to achieve high performance Geiger mode devices. Other major technical issues associated with the realization of visible-blind Geiger mode APDs are also discussed in detail and future prospects for improving upon the performance of these devices are outlined. The photon detection efficiency, dark count rate, and spectral response of or most recent Geiger-mode GaN APDs on free-standing GaN substrates are studied under low photon fluxes, with single photon detection capabilities being demonstrated. We also present our latest results regarding linear mode gain uniformity: the study of gain uniformity helps reveal the spatial origins of gain so that we can better understand the role of defects.

  18. Impact analysis of Minuteman III Payload Transporter Type III

    SciTech Connect

    Stirbis, P.P.

    1993-12-01

    An analysis of the impact of the Minuteman III Payload Transporter Type III into a nonyielding target at 46 m.p.h. and 30 m.p.h., and into a yielding target at 46 m.p.h. is presented. The analysis considers the structural response of the tiedown system which secures the Minuteman III re-entry system to the floor of the payload transporter. A finite element model of the re-entry system, its tiedown system, which includes tie-rods and shear pins, and the pallet plate which is attached to the transporter floating plate, was constructed. Because accelerations of the payload transporter are not known, acceleration data from one-quarter scale testing of the Safe Secure Trailer was used to investigate the response of the tiedown system. These accelerations were applied to the pallet plate. The ABAQUS computer code was used to predict the forces in the members of the tiedown system.

  19. Dissociation of cerium(III) and neodymium(III) phthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomova, T. N.

    2015-07-01

    The kinetics of dissociation of phthalocyanine complexes with cerium(III) and neodymium(III) (X)LnPc (X = Cl-, Br-, AcO-) under the action of acetic acid in ethanol with isolation of the macrocyclic ligand depending on the temperature was studied. The kinetic equations with the numerical values of rate constants, activation parameters, and the stoichiometric mechanisms with the limiting simple reaction between the nonionized AcOH molecule and (phthalocyaninato)lanthanide(III) in the axially coordinated ((X)LnPc, cerium complexes) or axially ionized ([(AcOH)LnPc]+X-, neodymium complexes) state were derived by solving the direct and inverse problems. As shown by a comparative analysis of quantitative kinetic data, the state is determined by the electronic structure of the metal cation and the mutual effect of the axial and equatorial ligands in the first coordination sphere.

  20. Thermal and optical properties of Tb(III), Eu(III) and Tb(III)/Eu(III) co-complexed silicone fluorinated acrylate copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Yinfeng; Xie, Hongde; Cai, Haijun; Cai, Peiqing; Seo, Hyo Jin

    2015-07-01

    Tb(III), Eu(III) and Tb(III)/Eu(III) activated silicone fluorinated acrylate (SFA) have been successfully synthesized using the method of semi-continuous emulsion polymerization. The copolymers are characterized by flourier transform infrared (FT-IR), thermal gravity analysis (TGA), photoluminescence excitation (PLE) and emission (PL) spectroscopy. The copolymer containing Tb(III) and Eu(III) ions display green and red luminescent colors under UV light excitation, respectively. The TGA curves show the thermal decomposition temperatures of the copolymers are up to about 300 °C. The PL spectra show a strong green emission at 546 nm (5D4 → 7F5) of Tb(III) complexed copolymers, and show a prominent red emission at 615 nm (5D0 → 7F2) of Eu(III) complexed copolymers. Different concentrations of Eu(III) and Tb(III) ions are introduced into the copolymer and the energy transfer from Tb(III) to Eu(III) ions in the copolymer was found. Thus, based on the results it can be suggested that SFA:Eu(III), SFA:Tb(III) and SFA:Tb(III)/Eu(III) can be used potentially as luminescent materials.

  1. Sparkle/AM1 Parameters for the Modeling of Samarium(III) and Promethium(III) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Freire, Ricardo O; da Costa, Nivan B; Rocha, Gerd B; Simas, Alfredo M

    2006-01-01

    The Sparkle/AM1 model is extended to samarium(III) and promethium(III) complexes. A set of 15 structures of high crystallographic quality (R factor < 0.05 Å), with ligands chosen to be representative of all samarium complexes in the Cambridge Crystallographic Database 2004, CSD, with nitrogen or oxygen directly bonded to the samarium ion, was used as a training set. In the validation procedure, we used a set of 42 other complexes, also of high crystallographic quality. The results show that this parametrization for the Sm(III) ion is similar in accuracy to the previous parametrizations for Eu(III), Gd(III), and Tb(III). On the other hand, promethium is an artificial radioactive element with no stable isotope. So far, there are no promethium complex crystallographic structures in CSD. To circumvent this, we confirmed our previous result that RHF/STO-3G/ECP, with the MWB effective core potential (ECP), appears to be the most efficient ab initio model chemistry in terms of coordination polyhedron crystallographic geometry predictions from isolated lanthanide complex ion calculations. We thus generated a set of 15 RHF/STO-3G/ECP promethium complex structures with ligands chosen to be representative of complexes available in the CSD for all other trivalent lanthanide cations, with nitrogen or oxygen directly bonded to the lanthanide ion. For the 42 samarium(III) complexes and 15 promethium(III) complexes considered, the Sparkle/AM1 unsigned mean error, for all interatomic distances between the Ln(III) ion and the ligand atoms of the first sphere of coordination, is 0.07 and 0.06 Å, respectively, a level of accuracy comparable to present day ab initio/ECP geometries, while being hundreds of times faster.

  2. III-Nitride nanowire optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Songrui; Nguyen, Hieu P. T.; Kibria, Md. G.; Mi, Zetian

    2015-11-01

    Group-III nitride nanowire structures, including GaN, InN, AlN and their alloys, have been intensively studied in the past decade. Unique to this material system is that its energy bandgap can be tuned from the deep ultraviolet (~6.2 eV for AlN) to the near infrared (~0.65 eV for InN). In this article, we provide an overview on the recent progress made in III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices, including light emitting diodes, lasers, photodetectors, single photon sources, intraband devices, solar cells, and artificial photosynthesis. The present challenges and future prospects of III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices are also discussed.

  3. RAVEN. Dynamic Event Tree Approach Level III Milestone

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Mandelli, Diego; Cogliati, Joshua; Kinoshita, Robert

    2014-07-01

    Conventional Event-Tree (ET) based methodologies are extensively used as tools to perform reliability and safety assessment of complex and critical engineering systems. One of the disadvantages of these methods is that timing/sequencing of events and system dynamics are not explicitly accounted for in the analysis. In order to overcome these limitations several techniques, also know as Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (DPRA), have been developed. Monte-Carlo (MC) and Dynamic Event Tree (DET) are two of the most widely used D-PRA methodologies to perform safety assessment of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). In the past two years, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed its own tool to perform Dynamic PRA: RAVEN (Reactor Analysis and Virtual control ENvironment). RAVEN has been designed to perform two main tasks: 1) control logic driver for the new Thermo-Hydraulic code RELAP-7 and 2) post-processing tool. In the first task, RAVEN acts as a deterministic controller in which the set of control logic laws (user defined) monitors the RELAP-7 simulation and controls the activation of specific systems. Moreover, the control logic infrastructure is used to model stochastic events, such as components failures, and perform uncertainty propagation. Such stochastic modeling is deployed using both MC and DET algorithms. In the second task, RAVEN processes the large amount of data generated by RELAP-7 using data-mining based algorithms. This report focuses on the analysis of dynamic stochastic systems using the newly developed RAVEN DET capability. As an example, a DPRA analysis, using DET, of a simplified pressurized water reactor for a Station Black-Out (SBO) scenario is presented.

  4. RAVEN: Dynamic Event Tree Approach Level III Milestone

    SciTech Connect

    Andrea Alfonsi; Cristian Rabiti; Diego Mandelli; Joshua Cogliati; Robert Kinoshita

    2013-07-01

    Conventional Event-Tree (ET) based methodologies are extensively used as tools to perform reliability and safety assessment of complex and critical engineering systems. One of the disadvantages of these methods is that timing/sequencing of events and system dynamics are not explicitly accounted for in the analysis. In order to overcome these limitations several techniques, also know as Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (DPRA), have been developed. Monte-Carlo (MC) and Dynamic Event Tree (DET) are two of the most widely used D-PRA methodologies to perform safety assessment of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). In the past two years, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed its own tool to perform Dynamic PRA: RAVEN (Reactor Analysis and Virtual control ENvironment). RAVEN has been designed to perform two main tasks: 1) control logic driver for the new Thermo-Hydraulic code RELAP-7 and 2) post-processing tool. In the first task, RAVEN acts as a deterministic controller in which the set of control logic laws (user defined) monitors the RELAP-7 simulation and controls the activation of specific systems. Moreover, the control logic infrastructure is used to model stochastic events, such as components failures, and perform uncertainty propagation. Such stochastic modeling is deployed using both MC and DET algorithms. In the second task, RAVEN processes the large amount of data generated by RELAP-7 using data-mining based algorithms. This report focuses on the analysis of dynamic stochastic systems using the newly developed RAVEN DET capability. As an example, a DPRA analysis, using DET, of a simplified pressurized water reactor for a Station Black-Out (SBO) scenario is presented.

  5. Environmental Curriculum Materials, Level III (5,6).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware State Dept. of Public Instruction, Dover. Div. of Elementary Education.

    More than 50 outdoor activities and 60 follow-up activities for children in grades five and six are collected in this teacher's guide. They focus on the interdependence of life; the relationship of man, animals, and plants to each other and to the environment. Most are designed as field trips, utilizing a discovery and questioning approach to…

  6. Bicentennial Source Book, Level III, Grades 6-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burger, Robert; And Others

    This student activities source book is one of a series of four developed by the Carroll County Public School System, Maryland, for celebration of the Bicentennial. It is specifically designed to generate ideas integrating the Bicentennial celebration into various disciplines, classroom activities, and school-wide events at the sixth through eighth…

  7. First Stars III Conference Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shea, B. W.; McKee, C. F.; Heger, A.; Abel, T.

    2008-03-01

    The understanding of the formation, life, and death of Population III stars, as well as the impact that these objects had on later generations of structure formation, is one of the foremost issues in modern cosmological research and has been an active area of research during the past several years. We summarize the results presented at "First Stars III," a conference sponsored by Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics. This conference, the third in a series, took place in July 2007 at the La Fonda Hotel in Santa Fe, New Mexico, U.S.A.

  8. Clark Lake microbursts - On a lower limit to type III burst brightness temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, S. M.; Kundu, M. R.; Szabo, A.

    1987-01-01

    Further observations of solar microbursts by the Clark Lake radioheliograph are reported. The microbursts have properties consistent with weak type III bursts, with the implication that type III's can have brightness temperatures as low as 1 million K. The importance of this result is explored. A single model to explain the stronger type III bursts and the weaker microbursts is sought. It is shown that none of the models for stabilizing the strongest type III electron streams can explain the observed microbursts: these models have threshold levels of Langmuir waves which imply emission (due to spontaneous scattering off ions) with brightness temperatures in excess of those observed. It appears that either some vital physics is still missing from models for type III bursts, or that microbursts should have properties significantly different from those of type III bursts. In the latter case further observations should allow important tests of type III models.

  9. Mechanism of Ribonuclease III Catalytic Regulation by Serine Phosphorylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gone, Swapna; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes; Paudyal, Samridhdi; Nicholson, Allen W.

    2016-05-01

    Ribonuclease III (RNase III) is a conserved, gene-regulatory bacterial endonuclease that cleaves double-helical structures in diverse coding and noncoding RNAs. RNase III is subject to multiple levels of control, reflective of its global regulatory functions. Escherichia coli (Ec) RNase III catalytic activity is known to increase during bacteriophage T7 infection, reflecting the expression of the phage-encoded protein kinase, T7PK. However, the mechanism of catalytic enhancement is unknown. This study shows that Ec-RNase III is phosphorylated on serine in vitro by purified T7PK, and identifies the targets as Ser33 and Ser34 in the N-terminal catalytic domain. Kinetic experiments reveal a 5-fold increase in kcat and a 1.4-fold decrease in Km following phosphorylation, providing a 7.4–fold increase in catalytic efficiency. Phosphorylation does not change the rate of substrate cleavage under single-turnover conditions, indicating that phosphorylation enhances product release, which also is the rate-limiting step in the steady-state. Molecular dynamics simulations provide a mechanism for facilitated product release, in which the Ser33 phosphomonoester forms a salt bridge with the Arg95 guanidinium group, thereby weakening RNase III engagement of product. The simulations also show why glutamic acid substitution at either serine does not confer enhancement, thus underscoring the specific requirement for a phosphomonoester.

  10. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S; Farnaby, Joy H; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G; Love, Jason B; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal-ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on U(III) and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to Np(IV). Here we report the synthesis of three new Np(III) organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that Np(III) complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of Np(II) is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key Np(III) orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements.

  11. Title III hazardous air pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, R.

    1995-12-31

    The author presents an overview of the key provisions of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The key provisions include the following: 112(b) -- 189 Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP); 112(a) -- Major Source: 10 TPY/25 TPY; 112(d) -- Application of MACT; 112(g) -- Modifications; 112(I) -- State Program; 112(j) -- The Hammer; and 112(r) -- Accidental Release Provisions.

  12. RNase III Is Required for Actinomycin Production in Streptomyces antibioticus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Hoon; Gatewood, Marcha L.

    2013-01-01

    Using insertional mutagenesis, we have disrupted the RNase III gene, rnc, of the actinomycin-producing streptomycete, Streptomyces antibioticus. Disruption was verified by Southern blotting. The resulting strain grows more vigorously than its parent on actinomycin production medium but produces significantly lower levels of actinomycin. Complementation of the rnc disruption with the wild-type rnc gene from S. antibioticus restored actinomycin production to nearly wild-type levels. Western blotting experiments demonstrated that the disruptant did not produce full-length or truncated forms of RNase III. Thus, as is the case in Streptomyces coelicolor, RNase III is required for antibiotic production in S. antibioticus. No differences in the chemical half-lives of bulk mRNA were observed in a comparison of the S. antibioticus rnc mutant and its parental strain. PMID:23956389

  13. Low verbal assessment with the Bayley-III.

    PubMed

    Visser, Linda; Ruiter, Selma A J; Van der Meulen, Bieuwe F; Ruijssenaars, Wied A J J M; Timmerman, Marieke E

    2014-10-24

    Recently, the authors have developed the Bayley-III-NL Low Verbal for developmental assessment of children with language impairment. The Low Verbal version consists of an accommodated cognition scale, and non-accommodated communication and motor scales. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the validity and added value of the Bayley-III-NL Low Verbal for children with a language impairment, in relation to the standard Bayley-III-NL for children without impairment. We administered the Bayley-III Low Verbal to 69 children with language impairment, and the standard Bayley-III-NL to 1132 children without impairments. We used an evaluation form for test administrators and interviews with developmental psychologists to evaluate the suitability of the Low Verbal version for the target group. We analyzed the test results using nonparametric item response theory (IRT) to investigate whether test results can be reasonably compared across the two groups. The results of the IRT analyses support the validity of the Bayley-III-NL Low Verbal: the test items do not suffer from differential item functioning (DIF) across the two groups, and thus measure the ability levels of interest in the same way. The results of the evaluation form and interviews confirm that the Bayley-III-NL Low Verbal has added value for testing children with a language impairment, especially for children up to 36 months old. It is also suitable for children with general developmental delay. We conclude that the Bayley-III-NL Low Verbal can validly assess the cognitive, language, and motor development of young children with a language impairment and is the preferred instrument for this target group.

  14. X-ray twinkles and Population III stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricotti, Massimo

    2016-10-01

    Population III stars are typically massive stars of primordial composition forming at the centres of the first collapsed dark matter structures. Here we estimate the optimal X-ray emission in the early universe for promoting the formation of Population III stars. This is important in determining the number of dwarf galaxies formed before reionization and their fossils in the local universe, as well as the number of intermediate-mass seed black holes. A mean X-ray emission per source above the optimal level reduces the number of Population III stars because of the increased Jeans mass of the intergalactic medium, while a lower emission suppresses the formation rate of H2 preventing or delaying star formation in dark matter minihaloes above the Jeans mass. The build-up of the H2 dissociating background is slower than the X-ray background due to the shielding effect of resonant hydrogen Lyman lines. Hence, the nearly unavoidable X-ray emission from supernova remnants of Population III stars is sufficient to boost their number to few tens per comoving Mpc3 by redshift z ˜ 15. We find that there is a critical X-ray to ultraviolet energy ratio emitted per source that produces a universe where the number of Population III stars is largest: 400 per comoving Mpc3. This critical ratio is very close to the one provided by 20-40 M⊙ Population III stars exploding as hypernovae. High-mass X-ray binaries in dwarf galaxies are far less effective at increasing the number of Population III stars than normal supernova remnants, we thus conclude that supernovae drove the formation of Population III stars.

  15. Photoionization Models for the Semi-forbidden C III] 1909 Emission in Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaskot, A. E.; Ravindranath, S.

    2016-12-01

    The increasing neutrality of the intergalactic medium at z > 6 suppresses Lyα emission, and spectroscopic confirmation of galaxy redshifts requires the detection of alternative ultraviolet lines. The strong [C iii] λ1907+C iii] λ1909 doublet frequently observed in low-metallicity, actively star-forming galaxies is a promising emission feature. We present CLOUDY photoionization model predictions for C iii] equivalent widths (EWs) and line ratios as a function of starburst age, metallicity, and ionization parameter. Our models include a range of C/O abundances, dust content, and gas density. We also examine the effects of varying the nebular geometry and optical depth. Only the stellar models that incorporate binary interaction effects reproduce the highest observed C iii] EWs. The spectral energy distributions from the binary stellar population models also generate observable C iii] over a longer timescale relative to single-star models. We show that diagnostics using C iii] and nebular He ii λ1640 can separate star-forming regions from shock-ionized gas. We also find that density-bounded systems should exhibit weaker C iii] EWs at a given ionization parameter, and C iii] EWs could, therefore, select candidate Lyman continuum-leaking systems. In almost all models, C iii] is the next strongest line at <2700 Å after Lyα, and C iii] reaches detectable levels for a wide range of conditions at low metallicity. C iii] may therefore serve as an important diagnostic for characterizing galaxies at z > 6.

  16. Effect of praseodymium(III) on zinc(II) species in human interstitial fluid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiyuan; Wang, Jinping; Lu, Xin; Yang, Kuiyue; Niu, Chunji

    2005-11-01

    A multiphase model of metal ion species in human interstitial fluid was constructed under physiological conditions. The effect of Pr(III) on Zn(II) species was studied. At the normal conditions, Zn(II) species mainly distribute in [Zn(HSA)], [Zn(IgG)], and [Zn(Cys)(2)H](+). With the Pr(III) level increased, the apparent competition of Pr(III) for ligands lead to the redistribution of Zn(II) species.

  17. The addition of a second lanthanide ion to increase the luminescence of europium(III) macrocyclic complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bromm, A.J. Jr.; Vallarino, L.M.; Leif, R.C.; Quagliano, J.R.

    1998-12-29

    At present, the microscopic visualization of luminescent labels containing lanthanide(III) ions, primarily europium(III), as light-emitting centers is best performed with time-gated instrumentation, which by virtually eliminating the background fluorescence results in an improved signal to noise ratio. However, the use of the europium(III) macrocycle, Quantum Dye{trademark}, in conjunction with the strong luminescence enhancing effect (cofluorescence) of yttrium(III) or gadolinium(III), can eliminate the need for such specialized instrumentation. In the presence of Gd(III), the luminescence of the Eu(III)-macrocycles can be conveniently observed with conventional fluorescence instrumentation at previously unattainable low levels. The Eu(III) {sup 5}D{sub 0} {r_arrow} {sup 7}F{sub 2} emission of the Eu(III)-macrocycles was observed as an extremely sharp band with a maximum at 619 nm and a clearly resolved characteristic pattern. At very low Eu(III)-macrocycle concentrations, another sharp emission was detected at 614 nm, arising from traces of Eu(III) present in even the purest commercially available gadolinium products. Discrimination of the resolved emissions of the Eu(III)-macrocycle and Eu(III) contaminant should provide a means to further lower the limit of detection of the Eu(III)-macrocycle.

  18. Cognitive development in patients with Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (Sanfilippo syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (MPS III, Sanfilippo syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of one of the enzymes involved in the degradation of heparan sulfate. MPS III is characterized by progressive mental deterioration resulting in severe dementia. A number of potentially disease-modifying therapies are studied. As preservation of cognitive function is the ultimate goal of treatment, assessment of cognitive development will be essential in order to evaluate treatment efficacy. However, no large scale studies on cognitive levels in MPS III patients, using formal psychometric tests, have been reported. Methods We aimed to assess cognitive development in all 73 living patients with MPS III in the Netherlands. Results Cognitive development could be assessed in 69 patients. In 39 of them developmental level was estimated > 3 months and formal psychometric testing was attempted. A remarkable variation in the intellectual disability was detected. Conclusions Despite special challenges encountered, testing failed in only three patients. The observed broad variation in intellectual disability, should be taken into account when designing therapeutic trials. PMID:21689409

  19. Theory of gain in group-III nitride lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, W.W.; Wright, A.F.; Girndt, A.

    1997-06-01

    A microscopic theory of gain in a group-III nitride quantum well laser is presented. The approach, which treats carrier correlations at the level of quantum kinetic theory, gives a consistent account of plasma and excitonic effects in an inhomogeneously broadened system.

  20. Reservoir-induced seismicity in Karun III dam (Southwestern Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kangi, Abas; Heidari, Nematollah

    2008-10-01

    Statistical analyses of the Karun III reservoir seismicity reveal a remarkable correlation between seismicity rate and water-level harmonic changes. It seems that seismicity in this dam depends on rapid water-level changes. The three biggest earthquakes of Karun III, measuring 4, 4.1, and 4.3 on the Richter scale (ML), occurred after two stages of rapid filling of the dam on March 22, 2005 and May 12, 2006. These earthquakes happened when the water reached the maximum operational level. Since the beginning of filling the reservoir on November 8, 2004 until March, 2006, most reservoir-induced seismicity has been localized in three main clusters. The majority of the earthquakes occurred in the frontal anticline of Keyf Malek; the second and third clusters happened near Karun Blind Fault (KBF) and Mountain Front Fault (MFF), respectively. Filling Karun III reservoir immediately led to an increase in the occurrence of earthquakes. Further, following abrupt water-level changes, a considerable increase in the number of earthquakes is observed. Finally, in terms of seismicity rate, vertical and horizontal migration, magnitude, and distance, the earthquakes of Karun III behave differently.

  1. Jovian type III radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Scarf, F. L.

    1989-01-01

    Radio bursts have been observed in the Voyager plasma wave data from Jupiter that bear a striking resemblance to solar type III radio bursts. The emissions lie in the frequency range near 10 kHz, have durations of a minute or so, and occur in a set of periodically spaced bursts. The spacing between primary bursts is typically 15 min, but the bursts may have additional components which recur on time scales of about 3 min. The similarity with solar type III radio bursts suggests a source mechanism involving the movement of energetic electrons through a density gradient in the plasma surrounding Jupiter. The periodicity of bursts suggests Io may be involved in the generation of waves, since the timing is similar to the Alfven wave travel time from one hemisphere to the other through the Io torus.

  2. Transition probabilities in O III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froese Fischer, Charlotte

    1994-01-01

    Transition data has been computed in the MCHF + Breit-Pauli approximation for a number of the low lying triplets in O III. Special attention was given to the 2p3p 3P-2p3d 3P transition which is a primary cascade for the Bowen fluorescence mechanism in O III. The relativistic, largely spin-orbit, effect on the intensity ratio of primary decays was found to be as large as 50%, whereas the effect on secondary cascades was less than 30%. Agreement with astrophysically observed intensity ratios is excellent. There also is good agreement between the present liftimes and the beam-foil mean lifetimes obtained by Pinnington et al., though for 2p3p 3D and 3S the theoretical lifetimes are considerably shorter.

  3. NIF Title III engineering plan

    SciTech Connect

    Deis, G

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to define the work that must be accomplished by the NIF Project during Title III Engineering. This definition is intended to be sufficiently detailed to provide a framework for yearly planning, to clearly identify the specific deliverables so that the Project teams can focus on them, and to provide a common set of objectives and processes across the Project. This plan has been preceded by similar documents for Title I and Title II design and complements the Site Management Plan, the Project Control Manual, the Quality Assurance Program Plan, the RM Parsons NIF Title III Configuration Control Plan, the Integrated Project Schedule, the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report, the Configuration Management Plan, and the Transition Plan.

  4. Silver europium(III) polyphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Ayadi, Mounir; Férid, Mokhtar; Moine, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Europium(III) silver polyphosphate, AgEu(PO3)4, was prepared by the flux method. The atomic arrangement is built up by infinite (PO3)n chains (periodicity of 4) extending along the c axis. These chains are joined to each other by EuO8 dodeca­hedra. The Ag+ cations are located in the voids of this arrangement and are surrounded by five oxygen atoms in a distorted [4+1] coordination. PMID:21582031

  5. Organometallic neptunium(III) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutkiewicz, Michał S.; Farnaby, Joy H.; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Walter, Olaf; Magnani, Nicola; Gardiner, Michael G.; Love, Jason B.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Caciuffo, Roberto; Arnold, Polly L.

    2016-08-01

    Studies of transuranic organometallic complexes provide a particularly valuable insight into covalent contributions to the metal-ligand bonding, in which the subtle differences between the transuranium actinide ions and their lighter lanthanide counterparts are of fundamental importance for the effective remediation of nuclear waste. Unlike the organometallic chemistry of uranium, which has focused strongly on UIII and has seen some spectacular advances, that of the transuranics is significantly technically more challenging and has remained dormant. In the case of neptunium, it is limited mainly to NpIV. Here we report the synthesis of three new NpIII organometallic compounds and the characterization of their molecular and electronic structures. These studies suggest that NpIII complexes could act as single-molecule magnets, and that the lower oxidation state of NpII is chemically accessible. In comparison with lanthanide analogues, significant d- and f-electron contributions to key NpIII orbitals are observed, which shows that fundamental neptunium organometallic chemistry can provide new insights into the behaviour of f-elements.

  6. Association of europium(III), americium(III), and curium(III) with cellulose, chitin, and chitosan.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Takuo; Kimura, Takaumi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Kirishima, Akira; Yoshida, Takahiro; Isobe, Hiroshi; Francis, Arokiasamy J

    2006-08-01

    The association of trivalent f-elements-Eu(III), Am(III), and Cm(III)--with cellulose, chitin, and chitosan was determined by batch experiments and time-resolved, laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The properties of these biopolymers as an adsorbent were characterized based on speciation calculation of Eu(III). The adsorption study showed that an increase of the ionic strength by NaCl did not affect the adsorption kinetics of Eu(III), Am(III), and Cm(III) for all the biopolymers, but the addition of Na2CO3 significantly delayed the kinetics because of their trivalent f-element complexation with carbonate ions. It also was suggested from the speciation calculation study that all the biopolymers were degraded under alkaline conditions, leading to their masking of the adsorption of Eu(III), Am(III), and Cm(III) on the nondegraded biopolymers. The masking effect was higher for cellulose than for chitin and chitosan, indicating that of the three, cellulose was degraded most significantly in alkaline solutions. Desorption experiments suggested that some portion of the adsorbed Eu(III) penetrated deep into the matrix, being isolated in a cavity-like site. The TRLFS study showed that the coordination environment of Eu(III) is stabilized mainly by the inner spherical coordination in chitin and by the outer spherical coordination in chitosan, with less association in cellulose in comparison to chitin and chitosan. These results suggest that the association of these biopolymers with Eu(III), Am(III), and Cm(III) is governed not only by the affinity of the functional groups alone but also by other factors, such as the macromolecular steric effect. The association of degraded materials of the biopolymers also should be taken into consideration for an accurate prediction of the influence of biopolymers on the migration behavior of trivalent f-elements.

  7. The optically thin C III spectrum - Line and multiplet intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Kastner, S. O.

    1993-05-01

    C III line/multiplet intensities expected under optically thin conditions are presented over the density/ temperature ranges 4.0 - 12.0 and 4.6 - 5.0 (40,000 - l00,000 K). These improved values are obtained from a hybrid level/term calculation which makes use of the most recently available atomic data and extends the treatment down to lower densities than were achieved with our previous term representation. Some illustrative applications are given, including a brief description of the importance of the present data for interpretation of the strong C III line emission from carbon Wolf-Rayet stars.

  8. The optically thin C III spectrum - Line and multiplet intensities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Kastner, S. O.

    1993-01-01

    C III line/multiplet intensities expected under optically thin conditions are presented over the density/ temperature ranges 4.0 - 12.0 and 4.6 - 5.0 (40,000 - l00,000 K). These improved values are obtained from a hybrid level/term calculation which makes use of the most recently available atomic data and extends the treatment down to lower densities than were achieved with our previous term representation. Some illustrative applications are given, including a brief description of the importance of the present data for interpretation of the strong C III line emission from carbon Wolf-Rayet stars.

  9. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 265 - EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Pt. 265, App. III Appendix III to Part 265—EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards Parameter Maximum level (mg/l) Arsenic 0.05 Barium 1.0 Cadmium 0.01 Chromium...

  10. A Balancing Act: Division III Student-Athletes Time Demands and Life Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Daniel R., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    A majority of the research on student-athletes occurs at the Division I level, acid less is known about Division III student-athletes. The scant research addressing the experiences of Division III students-athletes focused on academics, campus involvement, development, and athletic identity (Griffith & Johnson, 2002; Heuser & Gray, 2009;…

  11. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 265 - EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards III Appendix III to Part 265 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Water Standards Parameter Maximum level (mg/l) Arsenic 0.05 Barium 1.0 Cadmium 0.01 Chromium...

  12. 21 CFR 1308.13 - Schedule III.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Schedule III. 1308.13 Section 1308.13 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Schedules § 1308.13 Schedule III. (a) Schedule III shall consist of the drugs and other substances,...

  13. 21 CFR 1308.13 - Schedule III.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Schedule III. 1308.13 Section 1308.13 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Schedules § 1308.13 Schedule III. (a) Schedule III shall consist of the drugs and other substances,...

  14. Transcriptional interference by RNA polymerase III affects expression of the Polr3e gene

    PubMed Central

    Yeganeh, Meghdad; Praz, Viviane; Cousin, Pascal; Hernandez, Nouria

    2017-01-01

    Overlapping gene arrangements can potentially contribute to gene expression regulation. A mammalian interspersed repeat (MIR) nested in antisense orientation within the first intron of the Polr3e gene, encoding an RNA polymerase III (Pol III) subunit, is conserved in mammals and highly occupied by Pol III. Using a fluorescence assay, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated deletion of the MIR in mouse embryonic stem cells, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we show that the MIR affects Polr3e expression through transcriptional interference. Our study reveals a mechanism by which a Pol II gene can be regulated at the transcription elongation level by transcription of an embedded antisense Pol III gene. PMID:28289142

  15. Transcriptional interference by RNA polymerase III affects expression of the Polr3e gene.

    PubMed

    Yeganeh, Meghdad; Praz, Viviane; Cousin, Pascal; Hernandez, Nouria

    2017-02-15

    Overlapping gene arrangements can potentially contribute to gene expression regulation. A mammalian interspersed repeat (MIR) nested in antisense orientation within the first intron of the Polr3e gene, encoding an RNA polymerase III (Pol III) subunit, is conserved in mammals and highly occupied by Pol III. Using a fluorescence assay, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated deletion of the MIR in mouse embryonic stem cells, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we show that the MIR affects Polr3e expression through transcriptional interference. Our study reveals a mechanism by which a Pol II gene can be regulated at the transcription elongation level by transcription of an embedded antisense Pol III gene.

  16. The ZEPLIN-III anti-coincidence veto detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimov, D. Yu.; Araújo, H. M.; Barnes, E. J.; Belov, V. A.; Burenkov, A. A.; Chepel, V.; Currie, A.; Edwards, B.; Francis, V.; Ghag, C.; Hollingsworth, A.; Horn, M.; Kalmus, G. E.; Kobyakin, A. S.; Kovalenko, A. G.; Lebedenko, V. N.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, M. I.; Lüscher, R.; Lyons, K.; Majewski, P.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Neves, F.; Paling, S. M.; Pinto da Cunha, J.; Preece, R.; Quenby, J. J.; Reichhart, L.; Scovell, P. R.; Solovov, V. N.; Smith, N. J. T.; Smith, P. F.; Stekhanov, V. N.; Sumner, T. J.; Taylor, R.; Thorne, C.; Walker, R. J.

    2010-10-01

    The design, optimisation and construction of an anti-coincidence veto detector to complement the ZEPLIN-III direct dark matter search instrument is described. One tonne of plastic scintillator is arranged into 52 bars individually read out by photomultipliers and coupled to a gadolinium-loaded passive polypropylene shield. Particular attention has been paid to radiological content. The overall aim has been to achieve a veto detector of low threshold and high efficiency without the creation of additional background in ZEPLIN-III, all at a reasonable cost. Extensive experimental measurements of the components have been made, including radioactivity levels and performance characteristics. These have been used to inform a complete end-to-end Monte Carlo simulation that has then been used to calculate the expected performance of the new instrument, both operating alone and as an anti-coincidence detector for ZEPLIN-III. The veto device will be capable of rejecting over 65% of coincident nuclear recoil events from neutron background in the energy range of interest in ZEPLIN-III. This will reduce the background in ZEPLIN-III from ≃0.4 to ≃0.14 events per year in the WIMP acceptance region, a significant factor in the event of a non-zero observation. Furthermore, in addition to providing valuable diagnostic capabilities, the veto is capable of tagging over 15% for γ-ray rejection, all whilst contributing no significant additional background. In conjunction with the replacement of the internal ZEPLIN-III photomultiplier array, the new veto is expected to improve significantly the sensitivity of the ZEPLIN-III instrument to dark matter, allowing spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross sections below 10 -8 pb to be probed.

  17. Antithrombin III Doses Rounded to Available Vial Sizes in Critically Ill Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stockton, Winifred M.; Padilla-Tolentino, Eimeira

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Children have decreased levels of antithrombin III (AT III) compared to adults. These levels may be further decreased during acute illness. Administration of exogenous AT III can increase anticoagulant efficacy. The objective of this study was to evaluate AT III doses rounded to available vial sizes compared to partial vial doses in critically ill pediatric patients, including patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). METHOD This retrospective review evaluated pediatric patients 0–18 years of age admitted to a 24-bed medical/surgical pediatric intensive care unit between June 1, 2012, and December 31, 2014, who received plasma-derived AT III. Patients received unfractionated heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin, or no anticoagulation. This review included patients who received ECMO and CRRT. RESULTS Eighty doses of AT III were administered to 24 patients (38 full vial size doses and 42 partial vial size doses). The AT III level following dose administration was ≥80% for 26 full vial doses (70%) and 16 partial vial doses (41%; p = 0.010). For patients who received multiple doses of AT III, the median time between doses was 45 hours following full vial doses, and 23 hours following partial vial doses (p = 0.011). Seven patients (29%) had documentation of new or increased bleeding. The median waste prevented from rounding doses to full vial sizes was 363 units. CONCLUSIONS After receiving AT III doses rounded to full vial sizes, patients were more likely to have a therapeutic AT III level and a longer interval between administrations. Rounding AT III doses to full vial sizes reduces waste and can result in cost savings.

  18. The oxidation of As(III) in groundwater using biological manganese removal filtration columns.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hong; Sun, Wenyong; Ge, Huoqing; Yao, Renda

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is known as a toxic element to humans, and has been reported to co-exist with iron and manganese in groundwater worldwide. The typical method for arsenic removal from groundwater is to oxidize trivalent (As(III)) to pentavalent (As(V)) followed by the As(V) removal. This study aims to evaluate the oxidization efficiency of As(III) in a mature biological manganese (Mn(2+)) removal filtration system with different elevated influent As(III) concentrations. The effects of influent Mn(2+) concentrations, influent As(III) concentrations, filtration rates and dissolved oxygen (DO) levels on the efficiency of As(III) oxidation were assessed. The results showed that As(III) oxidation can be simultaneously achieved with removing Mn(2+) in the filtration system. The oxidation efficiency was not impacted by increasing the influent As(III) concentration up to nearly 2500 µg L(-1), but the filtration rate was limited at 11 m h(-1) for maintaining the effluent As(III) concentration below 10 µg L(-1). The oxidation process followed first-order kinetics with the constant reaching 0.56-0.61 min(-1). The As(III) oxidation process was most likely to be mediated by the bacterial community initially developed for Mn(2+) removal in the filtration system, which performed the catalytic oxidation for As(III).

  19. Coordination of substrate binding and ATP hydrolysis in Vps4-mediated ESCRT-III disassembly.

    PubMed

    Davies, Brian A; Azmi, Ishara F; Payne, Johanna; Shestakova, Anna; Horazdovsky, Bruce F; Babst, Markus; Katzmann, David J

    2010-10-01

    ESCRT-III undergoes dynamic assembly and disassembly to facilitate membrane exvagination processes including multivesicular body (MVB) formation, enveloped virus budding, and membrane abscission during cytokinesis. The AAA-ATPase Vps4 is required for ESCRT-III disassembly, however the coordination of Vps4 ATP hydrolysis with ESCRT-III binding and disassembly is not understood. Vps4 ATP hydrolysis has been proposed to execute ESCRT-III disassembly as either a stable oligomer or an unstable oligomer whose dissociation drives ESCRT-III disassembly. An in vitro ESCRT-III disassembly assay was developed to analyze Vps4 function during this process. The studies presented here support a model in which Vps4 acts as a stable oligomer during ATP hydrolysis and ESCRT-III disassembly. Moreover, Vps4 oligomer binding to ESCRT-III induces coordination of ATP hydrolysis at the level of individual Vps4 subunits. These results suggest that Vps4 functions as a stable oligomer that acts upon individual ESCRT-III subunits to facilitate ESCRT-III disassembly.

  20. III-Nitride full-scale high-resolution microdisplays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Jacob; Li, J.; Lie, D. Y. C.; Bradford, Charles; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2011-07-01

    We report the realization and properties of a high-resolution solid-state self-emissive microdisplay based on III-nitride semiconductor micro-size light emitting diodes (µLEDs) capable of delivering video graphics images. The luminance level of III-nitride microdisplays is several orders of magnitude higher than those of liquid crystal and organic-LED displays. The pixel emission intensity was almost constant over an operational temperature range from 100 to -100 °C. The outstanding performance is a direct attribute of III-nitride semiconductors. An energy efficient active drive scheme is accomplished by hybrid integration between µLED arrays and Si CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) active matrix integrated circuits. These integrated devices could play important roles in emerging fields such as biophotonics and optogenetics, as well as ultra-portable products such as next generation pico-projectors.

  1. Modeling rare earth complexes: Sparkle/AM1 parameters for thulium (III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, Ricardo O.; Rocha, Gerd B.; Simas, Alfredo M.

    2005-08-01

    The Sparkle/AM1 model, recently defined for Eu(III), Gd(III) and Tb(III) [R.O. Freire, G.B. Rocha, A.M., Simas, Inorg. Chem. 44 (2005) 3299], is extended to Tm(III). A set of 15 structures of high crystallographic quality from the Cambridge Crystallographic Database, with ligands chosen to be representative of all complexes with nitrogen or oxygen directly bonded to the Tm(III) ion, was used as a training set. For the 15 complexes, the Sparkle/AM1 unsigned mean error, for all interatomic distances between the Tm(III) ion and the oxygen or nitrogen ligand atoms of the first sphere of coordination, is 0.07 Å, a level of accuracy useful for luminescent complex design.

  2. An immunohistochemical and serum ELISA study of type I and III procollagen aminopropeptides in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, B. H.; Madri, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    By means of ELISA methodology, the aminopropeptides of Type I and Type III procollagen were measured in the serum of a group of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. The corresponding liver biopsies were graded blindly for degrees of fibrosis and inflammation. When available, paraffin-embedded liver specimens underwent immunoperoxidase staining for mature Type I and III collagen as well as the aminopropeptides of Type I and III procollagen. Regardless of the degree of fibrosis or inflammation, serum levels of the aminopropeptide of Type I remained within normal limits. In contrast, serum levels of the aminopropeptide of Type III procollagen were elevated uniformly. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the aminopropeptide of Type III procollagen persists extracellularly. This finding may explain the previously reported relationship between levels of inflammation and serum levels of the Type III aminopropeptide. Images Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:3303951

  3. Development of Demographic Norms for Four New WAIS-III/WMS-III Indexes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, Rael T.; Chelune, Gordon J.; Taylor, Michael J.; Woodward, Todd S.; Heaton, Robert K.

    2006-01-01

    Following the publication of the third edition Wechsler scales (i.e., WAIS-III and WMS-III), demographically corrected norms were made available in the form of a computerized scoring program (i.e., WAIS-III/WMS-III/WIAT-II Scoring Assistant). These norms correct for age, gender, ethnicity, and education. Since then, four new indexes have been…

  4. Palladium(III) in Synthesis and Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Powers, David C.; Ritter, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    While the organometallic chemistry of Pd in its (0), (+II), and (+IV) oxidation states is well-established, organometallic Pd(III) chemistry remains widely unexplored. Few characterized Pd(III) complexes are known, which has inhibited detailed study of the organometallic chemistry of Pd(III). In this review, the potential roles of both mono- and dinuclear Pd(III) complexes in organometallic chemistry will be discussed. While not widely recognized, Pd in the (+III) oxidation state may play a significant role in a variety of known Pd-catalyzed reactions. PMID:21461129

  5. Development of demographic norms for four new WAIS-III/WMS-III indexes.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Chelune, Gordon J; Taylor, Michael J; Woodward, Todd S; Heaton, Robert K

    2006-06-01

    Following the publication of the third edition Wechsler scales (i.e., WAIS-III and WMS-III), demographically corrected norms were made available in the form of a computerized scoring program (i.e., WAIS-III/WMS-III/WIAT-II Scoring Assistant). These norms correct for age, gender, ethnicity, and education. Since then, four new indexes have been developed: the WAIS-III General Ability Index, the WMS-III Delayed Memory Index, and the two alternate Immediate and Delayed Memory Indexes. The purpose of this study was to develop demographically corrected norms for the four new indexes using the standardization sample and education oversample from the WAIS-III and WMS-III. These norms were developed using the same methodology as the demographically corrected norms made available in the WAIS-III/WMS-III/WIAT-II Scoring Assistant.

  6. The Nimbus III Michelson Interferometer.

    PubMed

    Hanel, R A; Schlachman, B; Clark, F D; Prokesh, C H; Taylor, J B; Wilson, W M; Chaney, L

    1970-08-01

    The Michelson interferometer flown on Nimbus III in April 1969 has obtained infrared emission spectra of the earth and its atmosphere within 400 cm(-1) and 2000 cm(-1) (5 micro and 25 micro). Spectra of good quality have been recorded with a spectral resolution corresponding to 5 cm(-1). This paper discusses the design of the instrument including the optical layout, the phase locked loop operation of the Michelson motor, and the functioning of the reference interferometer. The methods of data reduction and in-flight calibration are demonstrated on sample spectra recorded while in orbit around the earth.

  7. Inhibition of monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III))-induced cell malignant transformation through restoring dysregulated histone acetylation.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yichen; Gong, Zhihong; Olson, James R; Xu, Peilin; Buck, Michael J; Ren, Xuefeng

    2013-10-04

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) and its high toxic metabolite, monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)), are able to induce malignant transformation of human cells. Chronic exposure to these chemicals is associated with an increased risk of developing multiple cancers in human. However, the mechanisms contributing to iAs/MMA(III)-induced cell malignant transformation and carcinogenesis are not fully elucidated. We recently showed that iAs/MMA(III) exposure to human cells led to a decreased level of histone acetylation globally, which was associated with an increased sensitivity to arsenic cytotoxicity. In the current study, it demonstrated that prolonged exposure to low-level MMA(III) in human urothelial cells significantly increased the expression and activity of histone deacetylases (HDACs) with an associated reduction of histone acetylation levels both globally and lysine specifically. Administration of the HDAC inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), at 4 weeks after the initial MMA(III) treatment inhibited the MMA(III)-mediated up-regulation of the expression and activities of HDACs, leading to increase histone acetylation and prevention of MMA(III)-induced malignant transformation. These new findings suggest that histone acetylation dysregulation may be a key mechanism in MMA(III)-induced malignant transformation and carcinogenesis, and that HDAC inhibitors could be targeted to prevent or treat iAs-related cancers.

  8. ApoC-III inhibits clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins through LDL family receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gordts, Philip L.S.M.; Son, Ni-Huiping; Ramms, Bastian; Lew, Irene; Gonzales, Jon C.; Thacker, Bryan E.; Basu, Debapriya; Lee, Richard G.; Mullick, Adam E.; Graham, Mark J.; Goldberg, Ira J.; Crooke, Rosanne M.; Witztum, Joseph L.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and plasma triglycerides (TGs) correlate strongly with plasma apolipoprotein C-III (ApoC-III) levels. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) for ApoC-III reduce plasma TGs in primates and mice, but the underlying mechanism of action remains controversial. We determined that a murine-specific ApoC-III–targeting ASO reduces fasting TG levels through a mechanism that is dependent on low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLRs) and LDLR-related protein 1 (LRP1). ApoC-III ASO treatment lowered plasma TGs in mice lacking lipoprotein lipase (LPL), hepatic heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) receptors, LDLR, or LRP1 and in animals with combined deletion of the genes encoding HSPG receptors and LDLRs or LRP1. However, the ApoC-III ASO did not lower TG levels in mice lacking both LDLR and LRP1. LDLR and LRP1 were also required for ApoC-III ASO–induced reduction of plasma TGs in mice fed a high-fat diet, in postprandial clearance studies, and when ApoC-III–rich or ApoC-III–depleted lipoproteins were injected into mice. ASO reduction of ApoC-III had no effect on VLDL secretion, heparin-induced TG reduction, or uptake of lipids into heart and skeletal muscle. Our data indicate that ApoC-III inhibits turnover of TG-rich lipoproteins primarily through a hepatic clearance mechanism mediated by the LDLR/LRP1 axis. PMID:27400128

  9. Investigation of new semiinsulating behavior of III-V compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagowski, Jacek

    1990-01-01

    The investigation of defect interactions and properties related to semiinsulating behavior of III-V semiconductors resulted in about twenty original publications, six doctoral thesis, one masters thesis and numerous conference presentations. The studies of new compensation mechanisms involving transition metal impurities have defined direct effects associated with deep donor/acceptor levels acting as compensating centers. Electrical and optical properties of vanadium and titanium levels were determined in GaAs, InP and also in ternary compounds InGaAs. The experimental data provided basis for the verification of chemical trends and the VRBE method. They also defined compositional range for III-V mixed crystals whereby semiinsulating behavior can be achieved using transition elements deep levels and a suitable codoping with shallow donor/acceptor impurities.

  10. Questa Baseline and Pre-Mining Ground-Water Quality Investigation 15.-Methods of Phase II and III Well Installation and Development and Results of Well Logging, Hydraulic Testing, and Water-Level Measurements in the Red River Valley, New Mexico, 2002-04

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchard, Paul J.; Bartolino, James R.; Donohoe, Lisa C.; McAda, Douglas P.; Naus, Cheryl A.; Morin, Roger H.

    2007-01-01

    0.08 feet per day, respectively, and for mixed debris flow and Red River alluvium were 73-207 (estimated range) and 80 feet per day. In general, bedrock has the smallest hydraulic conductivity, debris-flow material has the next highest hydraulic conductivity, and mixed debris flow and Red River alluvium has the largest hydraulic conductivity. A pumping test conducted December 3-4, 2003, using well AWWT-1 as the pumped well, and wells AWWT-2, SC-5A, SC-5B, SC-7A, and SC-8A as observation wells, indicated estimated transmissivity of 12,000 to 34,000 feet squared per day and estimated hydraulic conductivity of 230 to 340 feet per day. Water-level measurements in wells SC-6A, SC-7A, SC-8A, and the Hottentot, Hansen, and La Bobita wells show that water levels typically rose rapidly during melting of the winter snowpack in the springtime and then generally declined during the rest of the year. The water-level rise in response to spring snowmelt occurred earlier and was smaller at larger distances from the Red River. Differences between the stage in the Red River and water levels in wells SC-8A and SC-9A, and the absence of water in well SC-9A at the time of well completion, indicate that the Red River has a poor hydraulic connection to the underlying ground-water system and the surface-water system is perched above the ground-water system at this site. Water levels in Phase III wells indicate that the Red River and the shallow ground-water system are connected hydraulically from near wells 4-1D and 4-1S downstream to near wells 2-1 and 2-2 but are poorly connected near the La Bobita well and well 1.

  11. Impact of the Addition of Carboplatin and/or Bevacizumab to Neoadjuvant Once-per-Week Paclitaxel Followed by Dose-Dense Doxorubicin and Cyclophosphamide on Pathologic Complete Response Rates in Stage II to III Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: CALGB 40603 (Alliance)

    PubMed Central

    Sikov, William M.; Berry, Donald A.; Perou, Charles M.; Singh, Baljit; Cirrincione, Constance T.; Tolaney, Sara M.; Kuzma, Charles S.; Pluard, Timothy J.; Somlo, George; Port, Elisa R.; Golshan, Mehra; Bellon, Jennifer R.; Collyar, Deborah; Hahn, Olwen M.; Carey, Lisa A.; Hudis, Clifford A.; Winer, Eric P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose One third of patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) achieve pathologic complete response (pCR) with standard neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT). CALGB 40603 (Alliance), a 2 × 2 factorial, open-label, randomized phase II trial, evaluated the impact of adding carboplatin and/or bevacizumab. Patients and Methods Patients (N = 443) with stage II to III TNBC received paclitaxel 80 mg/m2 once per week (wP) for 12 weeks, followed by doxorubicin plus cyclophosphamide once every 2 weeks (ddAC) for four cycles, and were randomly assigned to concurrent carboplatin (area under curve 6) once every 3 weeks for four cycles and/or bevacizumab 10 mg/kg once every 2 weeks for nine cycles. Effects of adding these agents on pCR breast (ypT0/is), pCR breast/axilla (ypT0/isN0), treatment delivery, and toxicities were analyzed. Results Patients assigned to either carboplatin or bevacizumab were less likely to complete wP and ddAC without skipped doses, dose modification, or early discontinuation resulting from toxicity. Grade ≥ 3 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia were more common with carboplatin, as were hypertension, infection, thromboembolic events, bleeding, and postoperative complications with bevacizumab. Employing one-sided P values, addition of either carboplatin (60% v 44%; P = .0018) or bevacizumab (59% v 48%; P = .0089) significantly increased pCR breast, whereas only carboplatin (54% v 41%; P = .0029) significantly raised pCR breast/axilla. More-than-additive interactions between the two agents could not be demonstrated. Conclusion In stage II to III TNBC, addition of either carboplatin or bevacizumab to NACT increased pCR rates, but whether this will improve relapse-free or overall survival is unknown. Given results from recently reported adjuvant trials, further investigation of bevacizumab in this setting is unlikely, but the role of carboplatin could be evaluated in definitive studies, ideally limited to biologically defined patient subsets most likely

  12. Addition of a second lanthanide ion to increase the luminescence of europium(III) macrocyclic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromm, Alfred J., Jr.; Leif, Robert C.; Quagliano, John R.; Vallarino, Lidia M.

    1999-06-01

    At present, the microscopic visualization of luminescent labels containing lanthanide(III) ions, primarily europium(III), as light-emitting centers is best performed with time-gated instrumentation, which by virtually eliminating the background fluorescence results in an improved signal to noise ratio. However, the use of the europium(III) macrocycle, Quantum DyeTM, in conjunction with the strong luminescence enhancing effect (cofluorescence) of yttrium(III) or gadolinium(III), can eliminate the need for such specialized instrumentation. In the presence of Gd(III), the luminescence of the Eu-macrocycles can be conveniently observed with conventional fluorescence instrumentation at previously unattainable low levels. The Eu(III) 5DO yields 7F2 emission of the Eu-macrocycles was observed as an extremely sharp band with a maximum at 619 nm and a clearly resolved characteristic pattern. At very low Eu- macrocycle concentrations, another sharp emission was detected at 614 nm, arising from traces of Eu(III) present in even the purest commercially available gadolinium products. Discrimination of the resolved emissions of the Eu-macrocycle and Eu(III) contaminant should provide a means to further lower the limit of detection of the Eu-macrocycle.

  13. III-Nitride Nanowire Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jeremy Benjamin

    2014-07-01

    In recent years there has been a tremendous interest in nanoscale optoelectronic devices. Among these devices are semiconductor nanowires whose diameters range from 10-100 nm. To date, nanowires have been grown using many semiconducting material systems and have been utilized as light emitting diodes, photodetectors, and solar cells. Nanowires possess a relatively large index contrast relative to their dielectric environment and can be used as lasers. A key gure of merit that allows for nanowire lasing is the relatively high optical con nement factor. In this work, I discuss the optical characterization of 3 types of III-nitride nanowire laser devices. Two devices were designed to reduce the number of lasing modes to achieve singlemode operation. The third device implements low-group velocity mode lasing with a photonic crystal constructed of an array of nanowires. Single-mode operation is necessary in any application where high beam quality and single frequency operation is required. III-Nitride nanowire lasers typically operate in a combined multi-longitudinal and multi-transverse mode state. Two schemes are introduced here for controlling the optical modes and achieving single-mode op eration. The rst method involves reducing the diameter of individual nanowires to the cut-o condition, where only one optical mode propagates in the wire. The second method employs distributed feedback (DFB) to achieve single-mode lasing by placing individual GaN nanowires onto substrates with etched gratings. The nanowire-grating substrate acted as a distributed feedback mirror producing single mode operation at 370 nm with a mode suppression ratio (MSR) of 17 dB. The usage of lasers for solid state lighting has the potential to further reduce U.S. lighting energy usage through an increase in emitter e ciency. Advances in nanowire fabrication, speci cally a two-step top-down approach, have allowed for the demonstration of a multi-color array of lasers on a single chip that emit

  14. III-nitride nanowire lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Jeremy Benjamin

    In recent years there has been a tremendous interest in nanoscale optoelectronic devices. Among these devices are semiconductor nanowires whose diameters range from 10-100 nm. To date, nanowires have been grown using many semiconducting material systems and have been utilized as light emitting diodes, photodetectors, and solar cells. Nanowires possess a relatively large index contrast relative to their dielectric environment and can be used as lasers. A key figure of merit that allows for nanowire lasing is the relatively high optical confinement factor. In this work, I discuss the optical characterization of 3 types of III-nitride nanowire laser devices. Two devices were designed to reduce the number of lasing modes to achieve single-mode operation. The third device implements low-group velocity mode lasing with a photonic crystal constructed of an array of nanowires. Single-mode operation is necessary in any application where high beam quality and single frequency operation is required. III-Nitride nanowire lasers typically operate in a combined multi-longitudinal and multi-transverse mode state. Two schemes are introduced here for controlling the optical modes and achieving single-mode operation. The first method involves reducing the diameter of individual nanowires to the cut-off condition, where only one optical mode propagates in the wire. The second method employs distributed feedback (DFB) to achieve single-mode lasing by placing individual GaN nanowires onto substrates with etched gratings. The nanowire-grating substrate acted as a distributed feedback mirror producing single mode operation at 370 nm with a mode suppression ratio (MSR) of 17 dB. The usage of lasers for solid state lighting has the potential to further reduce U.S. lighting energy usage through an increase in emitter efficiency. Advances in nanowire fabrication, specifically a two-step top-down approach, have allowed for the demonstration of a multi-color array of lasers on a single chip

  15. DECIMETRIC TYPE III BURSTS: GENERATION AND PROPAGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Li, B.; Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.; Yan, Y. H.

    2011-09-01

    Simulations are presented for decimetric type III radio bursts at 2f{sub p} , where f{sub p} is the local electron plasma frequency. The simulations show that 2f{sub p} radiation can be observed at Earth in two scenarios for the radiation's generation and propagation. In Scenario A, radiation is produced and propagates in warm plasmas in the lower corona that are caused by previous magnetic reconnection outflows and/or chromospheric evaporation. In Scenario B radiation is generated in normal plasmas, then due to its natural directivity pattern and refraction, radiation partly propagates into nearby regions, which are hot because of previous reconnection/evaporation. The profiles of plasma density n{sub e} (r) and electron temperature T{sub e} (r) in the lower corona (r - R{sub sun} {approx}< 100 Mm) are found to be crucial to whether radiation can be produced and escape at observable levels against the effects of free-free absorption, where r is the heliocentric distance. Significantly, the observed wide ranges of radiation properties (e.g., drift rates) require n{sub e} (r) with a large range of scale heights h{sub s} , consistent nonetheless for Scenario B with short observed EUV loops. This is relevant to problems with large h{sub s} inferred from tall EUV loops. The simulations suggest: (1) n{sub e} (r) with small h{sub s} , such as n{sub e} (r){proportional_to}(r - R{sub sun}){sup -2.38} for flaring regions, are unexpectedly common deep in the corona. This result is consistent with recent work on n{sub e} (r) for r {approx} (1.05-2)R{sub sun} extracted from observed metric type IIIs. (2) The dominance of reverse-slope bursts over normal bursts sometimes observed may originate from asymmetric reconnection/acceleration, which favors downgoing beams.

  16. Atomic Data and Spectral Line Intensities for Ne III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Thomas, R. J.; Landi, E.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Electron impact collision strengths, energy levels, oscillator strengths and spontaneous radiative decay rates are calculated for Ne III. The configurations used are 2s(sup 2) 2p(sup 4),2s2p(sup 5),2s(sup 2) 2p(sup 3)3s, and 2s(sup 2)3p(sup 3)3d giving rise to 57 fine-structure levels in intermediate coupling. Collision strengths are calculated at five incident energies, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 Ry. Excitation rate coefficients are calculated by assuming a Maxwellian electron velocity distribution at an electron temperature of logT,(K)=5.0, corresponding to maximum abundance of Ne III. Using the excitation rate coefficients and the radiative transition rates, statistical equilibrium equations for level populations are solved at electron densities covering the range of 10(exp 8)-10(exp 14) per cubic centimeter. Relative spectral line intensities are calculated. Proton excitation rates between the lowest three levels have been included in the statistical equilibrium equations. The predicted Ne III line intensities are compared with SERTS rocket measurements of a solar active region and of a laboratory EUV light source.

  17. DOE/NNSA perspective safeguard by design: GEN III/III+ light water reactors and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Paul Y

    2010-12-10

    An overview of key issues relevant to safeguards by design (SBD) for GEN III/IV nuclear reactors is provided. Lessons learned from construction of typical GEN III+ water reactors with respect to SBD are highlighted. Details of SBD for safeguards guidance development for GEN III/III+ light water reactors are developed and reported. This paper also identifies technical challenges to extend SBD including proliferation resistance methodologies to other GEN III/III+ reactors (except HWRs) and GEN IV reactors because of their immaturity in designs.

  18. Software architecture of the III/FBI segment of the FBI's integrated automated identification system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booker, Brian T.

    1997-02-01

    This paper will describe the software architecture of the Interstate Identification Index (III/FBI) Segment of the FBI's Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System (IAFIS). IAFIS is currently under development, with deployment to begin in 1998. III/FBI will provide the repository of criminal history and photographs for criminal subjects, as well as identification data for military and civilian federal employees. Services provided by III/FBI include maintenance of the criminal and civil data, subject search of the criminal and civil data, and response generation services for IAFIS. III/FBI software will be comprised of both COTS and an estimated 250,000 lines of developed C code. This paper will describe the following: (1) the high-level requirements of the III/FBI software; (2) the decomposition of the III/FBI software into Computer Software Configuration Items (CSCIs); (3) the top-level design of the III/FBI CSCIs; and (4) the relationships among the developed CSCIs and the COTS products that will comprise the III/FBI software.

  19. Altered Hypoxic-Adenosine Axis and Metabolism in Group III Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Morales, Luis J; Chen, Ning-Yuan; Weng, Tingting; Luo, Fayong; Davies, Jonathan; Philip, Kemly; Volcik, Kelly A; Melicoff, Ernestina; Amione-Guerra, Javier; Bunge, Raquel R; Bruckner, Brian A; Loebe, Matthias; Eltzschig, Holger K; Pandit, Lavannya M; Blackburn, Michael R; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry

    2016-04-01

    Group III pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a highly prevalent and deadly lung disorder with limited treatment options other than transplantation. Group III PH affects patients with ongoing chronic lung injury, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Between 30 and 40% of patients with IPF are diagnosed with PH. The diagnosis of PH has devastating consequences to these patients, leading to increased morbidity and mortality, yet the molecular mechanisms involved in the development of PH in patients with chronic lung disease remain elusive. Our hypothesis was that the hypoxic-adenosinergic system is enhanced in patients with group III PH compared with patients with IPF with no PH. Explanted lung tissue was analyzed for markers of the hypoxic-adenosine axis, including expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1A, adenosine A2B receptor, CD73, and equilibrative nucleotide transporter-1. In addition, we assessed whether altered mitochondrial metabolism was present in these samples. Increased expression of HIF-1A was observed in tissues from patients with group III PH. These changes were consistent with increased evidence of adenosine accumulation in group III PH. A novel observation of our study was of evidence suggesting altered mitochondrial metabolism in lung tissue from group III PH leading to increased succinate levels that are able to further stabilize HIF-1A. Our data demonstrate that the hypoxic-adenosine axis is up-regulated in group III PH and that subsequent succinate accumulation may play a part in the development of group III PH.

  20. Decameter Type III-Like Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, V. N.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Rutkevych, B. P.; Rucker, H. O.; Dorovskyy, V. V.; Abranin, E. P.; Lecacheux, A.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Stanislavskyy, A. A.

    2007-12-01

    Starting from 1960s Type III-like bursts (Type III bursts with high drift rates) in a wide frequency range from 300 to 950MHz have been observed. These new bursts observed at certain frequency being compared to the usual Type III bursts at the same frequency show similar behaviour but feature frequency drift 2-6 times higher than the normal bursts. In this paper we report the first observations of Type III-like bursts in decameter range, carried out during summer campaigns 2002 - 2004 at UTR-2 radio telescope. The circular polarization of the bursts was measured by the radio telescope URAN-2 in 2004. The observed bursts are analyzed and compared with usual Type III bursts in the decameter range. From the analysis of over 1100 Type III-like bursts, their main parameters have been found. Characteristic feature of the observed bursts is similar to Type III-like bursts at other frequencies, i.e. measured drift rates (5-10 MHz/s) of this bursts are few times larger than that for usual Type III bursts, and their durations (1-2 s) are few times smaller than that for usual Type III bursts in this frequency band.

  1. Characterization of ribonuclease III from Brucella.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chang-Xian; Xu, Xian-Jin; Zheng, Ke; Liu, Fang; Yang, Xu-Dong; Chen, Chuang-Fu; Chen, Huan-Chun; Liu, Zheng-Fei

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial ribonuclease III (RNase III) is a highly conserved endonuclease, which plays pivotal roles in RNA maturation and decay pathways by cleaving double-stranded structure of RNAs. Here we cloned rncS gene from the genomic DNA of Brucella melitensis, and analyzed the cleavage properties of RNase III from Brucella. We identified Brucella-encoding small RNA (sRNA) by high-throughput sequencing and northern blot, and found that sRNA of Brucella and Homo miRNA precursor (pre-miRNA) can be bound and cleaved by B.melitensis ribonuclease III (Bm-RNase III). Cleavage activity of Bm-RNase III is bivalent metal cations- and alkaline buffer-dependent. We constructed several point mutations in Bm-RNase III, whose cleavage activity indicated that the 133th Glutamic acid residue was required for catalytic activity. Western blot revealed that Bm-RNase III was differently expressed in Brucella virulence strain 027 and vaccine strain M5-90. Collectively, our data suggest that Brucella RNase III can efficiently bind and cleave stem-loop structure of small RNA, and might participate in regulation of virulence in Brucella.

  2. Comparative adsorption of Eu(III) and Am(III) on TPD.

    PubMed

    Fan, Q H; Zhao, X L; Ma, X X; Yang, Y B; Wu, W S; Zheng, G D; Wang, D L

    2015-09-01

    Comparative adsorption behaviors of Eu(III) and Am(III) on thorium phosphate diphosphate (TPD), i.e., Th4(PO4)4P2O7, have been studied using a batch approach and surface complexation model (SCM) in this study. The results showed that Eu(III) and Am(III) adsorption increased to a large extent with the increase in TPD dose. Strong pH-dependence was observed in both Eu(III) and Am(III) adsorption processes, suggesting that inner-sphere complexes (ISCs) were possibly responsible for the adsorption of Eu(III) and Am(III). Meanwhile, the adsorption of Eu(III) and Am(III) decreased to a different extent with the increase in ion strength, which was possibly related to outer-sphere complexes and/or ion exchange. In the presence of fulvic acid (FA), the adsorption of Eu(III) and Am(III) showed high enhancement mainly due to the ternary surface complexes of TPD-FA-Eu(3+) and TPD-FA-Am(3+). The SCM showed that one ion exchange (≡S3Am/Eu) and two ISCs (≡(XO)2Am/EuNO3 and ≡(YO)2Am/EuNO3) seemed more reasonable to quantitatively describe the adsorption edges of both Eu(III) and Am(III). Our findings obviously showed that Eu(III) could be a good analogue to study actinide behaviors in practical terms. However, it should be kept in mind that there are still obvious differences between the characteristics of Eu(III) and Am(III) in some special cases, for instance, the complex ability with organic matter and adsorption affinity to a solid surface.

  3. Collegiate Athletics: An Investigation into Athletic Persistence of Freshman Student-Athletes Participating in NCAA Division-III Varsity Athletic Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sombito, Lester Jamili

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of the persistence of student-athletes in athletics at the D-III level is complex. This research study investigated the issue of student-athlete retention by focusing on Division III (D-III) student-athlete persistence in athletics by asking the following research question, "To what extent do freshman student-athletes persist in…

  4. Mechanisms of Sb(III) Photooxidation by the Excitation of Organic Fe(III) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Kong, Linghao; He, Mengchang

    2016-07-05

    Organic Fe(III) complexes are widely distributed in the aqueous environment, which can efficiently generate free radicals under light illumination, playing a significant role in heavy metal speciation. However, the potential importance of the photooxidation of Sb(III) by organic Fe(III) complexes remains unclear. Therefore, the photooxidation mechanisms of Sb(III) were comprehensively investigated in Fe(III)-oxalate, Fe(III)-citrate and Fe(III)-fulvic acid (FA) solutions by kinetic measurements and modeling. Rapid photooxidation of Sb(III) was observed in an Fe(III)-oxalate solution over the pH range of 3 to 7. The addition of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) as an ·OH scavenger quenched the Sb(III) oxidation, suggesting that ·OH is an important oxidant for Sb(III). However, the incomplete quenching of Sb(III) oxidation indicated the existence of other oxidants, presumably an Fe(IV) species in irradiated Fe(III)-oxalate solution. In acidic solutions, ·OH may be formed by the reaction of Fe(II)(C2O4) with H2O2, but a hypothetical Fe(IV) species may be generated by the reaction of Fe(II)(C2O4)2(2-) with H2O2 at higher pH. Kinetic modeling provides a quantitative explanation of the results. Evidence for the existence of ·OH and hypothetical Fe(IV) was also observed in an irradiated Fe(III)-citrate and Fe(III)-FA system. This study demonstrated an important pathway of Sb(III) oxidation in surface waters.

  5. Human immune responsiveness to Lolium perenne pollen allergen Lol p III (rye III) is associated with HLA-DR3 and DR5.

    PubMed

    Ansari, A A; Freidhoff, L R; Meyers, D A; Bias, W B; Marsh, D G

    1989-05-01

    A well-characterized allergen of Lolium perenne (perennial rye grass) pollen, Lol p III, has been used as a model antigen to study the genetic control of the human immune response. Associations between HLA type and IgE or IgG antibody (Ab) responsiveness to Lol p III were studied in two groups of skin-test-positive Caucasoid adults (N = 135 and 67). We found by nonparametric and parametric analyses that immune responsiveness to Lol p III was significantly associated with HLA-DR3 and DR5. No association was found between any DQ type and immune responsiveness to Lol p III. Geometric mean IgE or IgG Ab levels to Lol p III were not different between B8+, DR3+ subjects and B8-, DR3+ subjects, showing that HLA-B8 had no influence on the association. Lol p III IgG Ab data obtained on subjects after grass antigen immunotherapy showed that 100% of DR3 subjects and 100% of DR5 subjects were Ab+. A comparison of all the available protein sequences of DRB gene products showed that the first hypervariable region of DR3 and DR5 (and DRw6), and no other region, contains the sequence Glu9-Tyr-Ser-Thr-Ser13. Our observations are consistent with the possibility that immune responsiveness to the allergen Lol p III is associated with this amino acid sequence in the first hypervariable region of the DR beta 1 polypeptide chain.

  6. Speciation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in geological and water samples by ytterbium(III) hydroxide coprecipitation system and atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Duran, Ali; Tuzen, Mustafa; Soylak, Mustafa

    2011-07-01

    A novel coprecipitation method with ytterbium(III) hydroxide has been established for speciation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in geological and water samples. At pH 10, while Cr(III) was quantitatively recovered, Cr(VI) was recovered under 10% levels. Total chromium was determined reducing of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) in acidic media with KI reagent. The concentration of Cr(VI) was calculated by the concentration difference between the total chromium and Cr(III). For the quantitative recovery of Cr(III), parameters such as pH, amount of ytterbium, centrifugation time and speed, matrix effect, KI amount, and sample volume were investigated. The preconcentration factor was 30. The limit of detection was obtained as 1.1 μg/L for Cr(III). The accuracy was checked by analyte addition and analyses of standard reference materials (TMDA-54.4 Certified Reference Water, NIST 2710 Montana Soil). Method has been successfully applied to the chromium speciation for industrial waste water of leather factories located in Bor-Nigde, and also for mine and soil samples.

  7. National Coastal Condition Report III (2008)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The National Coastal Condition Report III (NCCR III) is the third in a series of environmental assessments of U.S. coastal waters and the Great Lakes. The report includes assessments of the nation’s estuaries in the contiguous 48 states and Puerto Rico.

  8. Synthesis, spectroscopic and antimicrobial studies of La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) Metformin HCl chelates.

    PubMed

    Refat, Moamen S; Al-Azab, Fathi M; Al-Maydama, Hussein M A; Amin, Ragab R; Jamil, Yasmin M S; Kobeasy, Mohamed I

    2015-05-05

    Metal complexes of Metformin hydrochloride were prepared using La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III). The resulting complexes were discussed and synthesized to serve as potential insulin-mimetic. Some physical properties and analytical data of the four complexes were checked. The elemental analysis shows that La(III), Ce(III) Sm(III) and Y(III) formed complexes with Metformin in 1:3 (metal:MF) molar ratio. All the synthesized complexes are white and possess high melting points. These complexes are soluble in dimethylsulfoxide and dimethylformamide, partially soluble in hot methanol and insoluble in water and some other organic solvents. From the spectroscopic (infrared, UV-vis and florescence), effective magnetic moment and elemental analyses data, the formula structures are suggested. The results obtained suggested that Metformin reacted with metal ions as a bidentate ligand through its two imino groups. The molar conductance measurements proved that the Metformin complexes are slightly electrolytic in nature. The kinetic thermodynamic parameters such as: E(∗), ΔH(∗), ΔS(∗) and ΔG(∗) were estimated from the DTG curves. The antibacterial evaluations of the Metformin and their complexes were also performed against some gram positive, negative bacteria as well as fungi.

  9. JumpStart III Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arthur M.; Brawer, Florence B.; Kozeracki, Carol A.

    This final report for the JumpStart III program presents a summary of the entrepreneurship training programs developed by each of the four JumpStart III partners selected in March 1997. Grants for the colleges totaled $354,546 over 2 years. The Jumpstart funding has been only a starting point for these and the other 12 Jumpstart partners in…

  10. Grant Administration Manual for Title III Coordinators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathis, Emily Duncan; Ashmore, Frances W.

    Guidelines for coordinators of programs under Title III of the Higher Education Act of 1965 are presented, based on a national survey of Title III program coordinators. The responsibilities of the coordinator and information on administering the Strengthening Developing Institutions Program (SDIP) grant are covered. The program can either be a…

  11. Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Olshavsky, Michael A.

    1996-01-01

    Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed, They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline.

  12. Cyanoacrylate glue for type iii lad perforation.

    PubMed

    Trehan, V K; Nigam, Arima

    2008-01-01

    Coronary artery perforation especially type III is a rare and catastrophic complication of percutaneous coronary intervention. It mandates emergency open heart surgery if hemostasis is not achieved promptly. We report a case of type III left anterior descending artery (LAD) perforation which was managed successfully with cyanoacrylate glue.

  13. Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A.P.; Olshavsky, M.A.

    1996-04-09

    Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed. They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline. 4 figs.

  14. Synthesis and in vitro microbial evaluation of La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) metal complexes of vitamin B6 drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Al-Azab, Fathi M.; Al-Maydama, Hussein M. A.; Amin, Ragab R.; Jamil, Yasmin M. S.

    2014-06-01

    Metal complexes of pyridoxine mono hydrochloride (vitamin B6) are prepared using La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III). The resulting complexes are investigated. Some physical properties, conductivity, analytical data and the composition of the four pyridoxine complexes are discussed. The elemental analysis shows that the formed complexes of La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) with pyridoxine are of 1:2 (metal:PN) molar ratio. All the synthesized complexes are brown in color and possess high melting points. These complexes are partially soluble in hot methanol, dimethylsulfoxide and dimethylformamide and insoluble in water and some other organic solvents. Elemental analysis data, spectroscopic (IR, UV-vis. and florescence), effective magnetic moment in Bohr magnetons and the proton NMR suggest the structures. However, definite particle size is determined by invoking the X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy data. The results obtained suggested that pyridoxine reacted with metal ions as a bidentate ligand through its phenolate oxygen and the oxygen of the adjacent group at the 4‧-position. The molar conductance measurements proved that the pyridoxine complexes are electrolytic in nature. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters such as: Ea, ΔH*, ΔS* and ΔG* were estimated from the DTG curves. The antibacterial evaluation of the pyridoxine and their complexes were also performed against some gram positive, negative bacteria as well as fungi.

  15. Synthesis, spectroscopic and antimicrobial studies of La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) Metformin HCl chelates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Al-Azab, Fathi M.; Al-Maydama, Hussein M. A.; Amin, Ragab R.; Jamil, Yasmin M. S.; Kobeasy, Mohamed I.

    2015-05-01

    Metal complexes of Metformin hydrochloride were prepared using La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III). The resulting complexes were discussed and synthesized to serve as potential insulin-mimetic. Some physical properties and analytical data of the four complexes were checked. The elemental analysis shows that La(III), Ce(III) Sm(III) and Y(III) formed complexes with Metformin in 1:3 (metal:MF) molar ratio. All the synthesized complexes are white and possess high melting points. These complexes are soluble in dimethylsulfoxide and dimethylformamide, partially soluble in hot methanol and insoluble in water and some other organic solvents. From the spectroscopic (infrared, UV-vis and florescence), effective magnetic moment and elemental analyses data, the formula structures are suggested. The results obtained suggested that Metformin reacted with metal ions as a bidentate ligand through its two imino groups. The molar conductance measurements proved that the Metformin complexes are slightly electrolytic in nature. The kinetic thermodynamic parameters such as: E∗, ΔH∗, ΔS∗ and ΔG∗ were estimated from the DTG curves. The antibacterial evaluations of the Metformin and their complexes were also performed against some gram positive, negative bacteria as well as fungi.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: mucolipidosis III gamma

    MedlinePlus

    ... time. People with mucolipidosis III gamma often have heart valve abnormalities and mild clouding of the clear covering ... III Gamma MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Cloudy Cornea MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Heart Valves General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests ...

  17. Limits on Population III star formation with the most iron-poor stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bennassuti, M.; Salvadori, S.; Schneider, R.; Valiante, R.; Omukai, K.

    2017-02-01

    We study the impact of star-forming minihaloes, and the initial mass function (IMF) of Population III (Pop III) stars, on the Galactic halo metallicity distribution function (MDF) and on the properties of C-enhanced and C-normal stars at [Fe/H] < -3. For our investigation we use a data-constrained merger tree model for the Milky Way formation, which has been improved to self-consistently describe the physical processes regulating star formation in minihaloes, including the poor sampling of the Pop III IMF. We find that only when star-forming minihaloes are included the low-Fe tail of the MDF is correctly reproduced, showing a plateau that is built up by C-enhanced metal-poor stars imprinted by primordial faint supernovae. The incomplete sampling of the Pop III IMF in inefficiently star-forming minihaloes (<10-3 M⊙ yr-1) strongly limits the formation of pair-instability supernovae (PISNe), with progenitor masses mPopIII = [140-260] M⊙, even when a flat Pop III IMF is assumed. Second-generation stars formed in environments polluted at >50 per cent level by PISNe are thus extremely rare, corresponding to ≈0.25 per cent of the total stellar population at [Fe/H] < -2, which is consistent with recent observations. The low-Fe tail of the MDF strongly depends on the Pop III IMF shape and mass range. Given the current statistics, we find that a flat Pop III IMF model with mPopIII = [10-300] M⊙ is disfavoured by observations. We present testable predictions for Pop III stars extending down to lower masses, with mPopIII = [0.1-300] M⊙.

  18. Highly luminescent charge-neutral europium(iii) and terbium(iii) complexes with tridentate nitrogen ligands.

    PubMed

    Senthil Kumar, Kuppusamy; Schäfer, Bernhard; Lebedkin, Sergei; Karmazin, Lydia; Kappes, Manfred M; Ruben, Mario

    2015-09-21

    We report on the synthesis of tridentate-nitrogen pyrazole-pyridine-tetrazole (L(1)H) and pyrazole-pyridine-triazole (L(2)H) ligands and their complexation with lanthanides (Ln = Gd(iii), Eu(iii) and Tb(iii)) resulting in stable, charge-neutral complexes Ln(L(1))3 and Ln(L(2))3, respectively. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the complexes with L(1) ligands revealed tricapped trigonal coordination geometry around the lanthanide ions. All complexes show bright photoluminescence (PL) in the solid state, indicating efficient sensitization of the lanthanide emission via the triplet states of the ligands. In particular, the terbium complexes show high PL quantum yields of 65 and 59% for L(1) and L(2), respectively. Lower PL efficiencies of the europium complexes (7.5 and 9%, respectively) are attributed to large energy gaps between the triplet states of the ligands and accepting levels of Eu(iii). The triplet state energy can be reduced by introducing an electron withdrawing (EW) group at the 4 position of the pyridine ring. Such substitution of L(1)H with a carboxylic ester (COOMe) EW group leads to a europium complex with increased PL quantum yield of 31%. A comparatively efficient PL of the complexes dissolved in ethanol indicates that the lanthanide ions are shielded against nonradiative deactivation via solvent molecules.

  19. Scaled Vitrification System III (SVS III) Process Development and Laboratory Tests at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    V. Jain; S. M. Barnes; B. G. Bindi; R. A. Palmer

    2000-04-30

    At the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP),the Vitrification Facility (VF)is designed to convert the high-level radioactive waste (HLW)stored on the site to a stable glass for disposal at a Department of Energy (DOE)-specified federal repository. The Scaled Vitrification System III (SVS-III)verification tests were conducted between February 1995 and August 1995 as a supplemental means to support the vitrification process flowsheet, but at only one seventh the scale.During these tests,the process flowsheet was refined and optimized. The SVS-III test series was conducted with a focus on confirming the applicability of the Redox Forecasting Model, which was based on the Index of Feed Oxidation (IFO)developed during the Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS)and SVS-I tests. Additional goals were to investigate the prototypical feed preparation cycle and test the new target glass composition. Included in this report are the basis and current designs of the major components of the Scale Vitrification System and the results of the SVS-III tests.The major subsystems described are the feed preparation and delivery, melter, and off-gas treatment systems. In addition,the correlation between the melter's operation and its various parameters;which included feed rate,cold cap coverage,oxygen reduction (redox)state of the glass,melter power,plenum temperature,and airlift analysis;were developed.

  20. Cyanido Antimonate(III) and Bismuthate(III) Anions.

    PubMed

    Arlt, Sören; Harloff, Jörg; Schulz, Axel; Stoffers, Alrik; Villinger, Alexander

    2016-12-05

    The reaction of in situ generated E(CN)3 (E = Sb, Bi) with different amounts of [Ph4P]CN and [PPN]CN ([PPN](+) = [Ph3P-N-PPh3](+)) was studied, affording salts bearing the novel ions [E(CN)5](2-), [Bi2(CN)11](5-), and [Bi(CN)6](3-). The valence lone pair of electrons on the central atom of antimony and bismuth(III) compounds can be either sterically active in an unsymmetric fashion (three shorter bonds + x longer bonds) or symmetric (with rather long averaged bonds). In the presence of weakly coordinating cations (e.g., [Ph4P](+) and [PPN](+)), the solid-state structures of salts with [E(CN)5](2-) anions contain well-separated cations and monomeric anions, which display a sterically active lone pair and a monomeric square-based pyramidal (pseudo-octahedral) structure. The [Bi(CN)5·MeCN](2-) acetonitrile adduct ion exhibits a strongly distorted octahedral structure, which is better understood as a [5 + 1] coordination. The intriguing [Ph4P]6[Bi2(CN)11]CN salt consists of separated cations and anions as well as well-separated [Bi2(CN)11](5-) and CN(-) ions. The structure of the molecular [Bi2(CN)11](5-) ion can be described as two square-based-pyramidal [Bi(CN)5](2-) fragments connected by a disordered bridging CN(-) ion, thereby leading to a distorted-octahedral environment around the two Bi centers. Here the steric effect of the lone pair is much less pronounced but still present.

  1. Mark III results from SPEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Toki, W.

    1983-11-01

    First results from the MARK III detector at SPEAR are presented based on 2.7 million J/psi decays. The eta/sub c/ is observed in three modes, J/psi ..-->.. ..gamma..eta/sub c/, (eta/sub c/ ..-->.. rho anti rho, eta..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/, and phi phi). Using the phi phi mode, the eta/sub c/ spin-parity is determined to be 0/sup -/. The known radiative J/psi decays J/psi ..-->.. ..gamma..f(f ..-->.. ..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/), ..gamma..eta'(eta' ..-->.. ..gamma..rho/sup 0/, eta..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/), ..gamma..f'(f' ..-->.. kappa/sup +/kappa/sup -/), ..gamma..theta(theta ..-->.. kappa anti kappa), and ..gamma..iota(iota ..-->.. ..pi..kappa anti kappa) are observed and their branching ratios found to be in agreement with previous measurements. In the J/psi ..-->.. ..gamma..kappa/sup +/kappa/sup -/ mode a new state is observed at 2.22 GeV and in the J/psi ..-->.. ..gamma gamma..rho/sup 0/ and ..gamma..eta..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/ modes evidence for new structures near 1.4 GeV is presented. 29 references.

  2. III-V arsenide-nitride semiconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, Jo S. (Inventor); Welch, David F. (Inventor); Scifres, Donald R. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    III-V arsenide-nitride semiconductor are disclosed. Group III elements are combined with group V elements, including at least nitrogen and arsenic, in concentrations chosen to lattice match commercially available crystalline substrates. Epitaxial growth of these III-V crystals results in direct bandgap materials, which can be used in applications such as light emitting diodes and lasers. Varying the concentrations of the elements in the III-V materials varies the bandgaps, such that materials emitting light spanning the visible spectra, as well as mid-IR and near-UV emitters, can be created. Conversely, such material can be used to create devices that acquire light and convert the light to electricity, for applications such as full color photodetectors and solar energy collectors. The growth of the III-V material can be accomplished by growing thin layers of elements or compounds in sequences that result in the overall lattice match and bandgap desired.

  3. A flow-through fluorescent sensor to determine Fe(III) and total inorganic iron.

    PubMed

    Pulido-Tofiño, P; Moreno, J M; Pérez-Conde, M C

    2000-03-06

    A flow-through fluorescent sensor for the consecutive determination of Fe(III) and total iron is described. The reactive phase of the proposed sensor, which has a high affinity for complexed Fe(III), consists of pyoverdin immobilized on controlled pore glass (CPG) by covalent bonding. This pigment selectively reacts with Fe(III) decreasing its fluorescence emission. Total inorganic iron is determined as Fe(III) after on-line oxidation in a mini-column containing persulphate immobilized on an ion exchange resin. The developed method allows the determination of Fe(III) in the 3-200 (g l(-1) range. The relative standard deviations of 10 determinations of 60 (g l(-1) of Fe(III) and 20 (g l(-1) of Fe(III)+Fe(II) are 3 and 5%, respectively. The sensor has been satisfactorily applied to speciate iron in synthetic, tap and well waters and wines. There were no significant differences for total inorganic iron determination between this new method and the atomic absorption spectroscopy reference method at the 95% confidence level. The sensor allows the concentration of Fe(II) to be calculated as the difference between total inorganic iron and Fe(III). The lifetime of the sensor is at least 3 months in continuous use or the equivalent of 1000 determinations.

  4. Glycogen storage disease type III in the Irish population.

    PubMed

    Crushell, Ellen; Treacy, Eileen P; Dawe, J; Durkie, M; Beauchamp, Nicholas J

    2010-12-01

    Glycogen storage disease type III (GSD III) results from mutations of the AGL gene encoding the glycogen debrancher enzyme. The disease has clinical and biochemical heterogeneity reflecting the severity of the AGL mutations. We sought to characterise the molecular defects in our cohort of Irish patients with GSD III. Fifteen patients from eight unrelated Irish families were identified: six males and nine females. The age ranged from 2-39 years old, and all presented in the first 3 years of life. Four patients (of three families) had mild disease with hepatomegaly, mild hypoglycaemia and normal creatine kinase (CK) levels. Five families had more severe disease, with liver and skeletal muscle involvement and elevated CK. Eleven different mutations were identified amongst the eight families. Of the 11, six were novel: p.T512fs, p.S736fs, p.A1400fs, p.K1407fs, p.Y519X and p.D627Y. The family homozygous for p.A1400fs had the most severe phenotype (early-onset hypoglycaemia, massive hepatomegaly, myopathy and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy before age 2 years), which was not halted by aggressive carbohydrate and protein supplementation. Conversely, the only missense mutation identified in the cohort, p.D627Y, was associated with a mild phenotype. The phenotypic diversity in our GSD III cohort is mirrored by the allelic heterogeneity. We describe two novel null mutations in exon 32 in two families with severe GSD III resistant to current treatment modalities. Knowledge of the specific mutations segregating in this cohort may allow for the development of new therapeutic interventions.

  5. Photoreduction of iron(III) in marine mineral aerosol solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaorong; Prospero, Joseph M.; Savoie, Dennis L.; Millero, Frank J.; Zika, Rod G.; Saltzman, Eric S.

    1993-05-01

    Although there have been a number of studies of the solubility of Fe in marine mineral aerosols, there have been few studies of the oxidation states of the soluble iron fraction and of the factors that affect the solubility of iron in aerosol solutions. In this paper we present measurements of the concentrations of total Fe (including particulate), total soluble Fe and total soluble Fe(II) in marine aerosol particles. Only 1% of the total Fe and 7.5% of the soluble Fe was in the Fe(II) form. Photolysis experiments were performed with solutions extracted from aerosol filter samples and with solutions of Fe(III) in acidic sodium chloride. In both systems, Fe(II) concentrations increased rapidly when the solutions were exposed to sunlight and they attained steady state within an hour. However, in all cases Fe(II) is only a minor component even when conditions are favorable for photolysis. Fe(II) formation is hindered at the low pH that is believed to be characteristic of marine aerosol solutions. Solutions with added oxalate yielded greatly increased concentrations of Fe(II); this is probably related to the fact that Fe(III) oxalate complexes have strong ligand to metal charge transfer bands in the tropospheric solar UV-visible region. However, the presence of oxalate also leads to the formation of H2O2; when the radiation level decreased, the Fe(II) was partially or totally oxidized back to Fe(III) due to reactions with H2O2. The photoreduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II) did not appear to significantly increase the dissolution of Fe(III) from the dust mineral matrix.

  6. Neptunium Binding Kinetics with Arsenazo(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Leigh R.; Johnson, Aaron T.; Mezyk, Stephen P.

    2014-08-01

    This document has been prepared to meet FCR&D level 2 milestone M2FT-14IN0304021, “Report on the results of actinide binding kinetics with aqueous phase complexants” This work was carried out under the auspices of the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Advanced Separations Systems FCR&D work package. The report details kinetics experiments that were performed to measure rates of aqueous phase complexation for pentavalent neptunium with the chromotropic dye Arsenazo III (AAIII). The studies performed were designed to determine how pH, ionic strength and AAIII concentration may affect the rate of the reaction. A brief comparison with hexavalent neptunium is also made. It was identified that as pH was increased the rate of reaction also increased, however increasing the ionic strength and concentration of AAIII had the opposite effect. Interestingly, the rate of reaction of Np(VI) with AAIII was found to be slower than that of the Np(V) reaction.

  7. The luminosity of Population III star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSouza, Alexander L.; Basu, Shantanu

    2015-06-01

    We analyse the time evolution of the luminosity of a cluster of Population III protostars formed in the early Universe. We argue from the Jeans criterion that primordial gas can collapse to form a cluster of first stars that evolve relatively independently of one another (i.e. with negligible gravitational interaction). We model the collapse of individual protostellar clumps using non-axisymmetric numerical hydrodynamics simulations. Each collapse produces a protostar surrounded by a massive disc (i.e. Mdisc /M* ≳ 0.1), whose evolution we follow for a further 30-40 kyr. Gravitational instabilities result in the fragmentation and the formation of gravitationally bound clumps within the disc. The accretion of these fragments by the host protostar produces accretion and luminosity bursts on the order of 106 L⊙. Within the cluster, we show that a simultaneity of such events across several protostellar cluster members can elevate the cluster luminosity to 5-10 times greater than expected, and that the cluster spends ˜15 per cent of its star-forming history at these levels. This enhanced luminosity effect is particularly enabled in clusters of modest size with ≃10-20 members. In one such instance, we identify a confluence of burst events that raise the luminosity to nearly 1000 times greater than the cluster mean luminosity, resulting in L > 108 L⊙. This phenomenon arises solely through the gravitational-instability-driven episodic fragmentation and accretion that characterizes this early stage of protostellar evolution.

  8. Lanthanide(III) and Yttrium(III) Complexes of Benzimidazole-2-Acetic Acid: Synthesis, Characterisation and Effect of La(III) Complex on Germination of Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Gudasi, Kalagouda B.; Shenoy, Rashmi V.; Vadavi, Ramesh S.; Patil, Manjula S.; Patil, Siddappa A.; Hanchinal, Rayappa R.; Desai, Srinivas A.; Lohithaswa, H.

    2006-01-01

    The synthesis and characterisation of lanthanide(III) and yttrium(III) nitrate complexes of benzimidazole-2-acetic acid (HBIA) are reported. The complexes have been characterised by elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic studies, IR, 1H NMR, UV-visible, EPR, and TG/DTA studies. They have the stoichiometry [Ln3(BIA)2(NO3)7(H2O)4] · 3H2O where Ln=La(III), Pr(III), Nd(II), Sm(III), Eu(III), Gd(III), Tb(III), Dy(III), and Y(III). The effect of La(III) complex on germination, coleoptile, and root length of two local varieties of wheat DWR-195 and GW-349 for different treatment periods has been investigated. The complex was found to exhibit enhanced activity, compared to HBIA or metal salt alone at lower treatment periods. PMID:17497017

  9. Validity of demographically corrected norms for the WAIS-III.

    PubMed

    Strong, Carrie-Ann H; Donders, Jacobus; van Dyke, Sarah

    2005-08-01

    The diagnostic validity of new demographically corrected WAIS-III norms was investigated using a sample of 100 patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and a matched control group from the standardization sample. Demographically corrected norms were compared to traditional age-corrected norms. Although education accounted for incremental variance in WAIS-III factor scores in patients with TBI, above and beyond the effects of injury severity, the demographically corrected norms did not yield statistically different diagnostic classification of individuals with moderate-severe TBI than the traditional norms. In participants with relatively low levels of educational attainment, sensitivity to length of coma was less for demographically corrected norms then for traditional age-corrected norms. Nevertheless, when using a discrepancy between Verbal Comprehension and Processing speed, diagnostic accuracy rates were again similar for both sets of norms. It is concluded that the demographically corrected WAIS-III norms do not offer a clear advantage or disadvantage compared to traditional age-corrected norms in the assessment of patients with TBI who are Caucasian and who have at least a middle school level of education.

  10. Alglucosidase alfa enzyme replacement therapy as a therapeutic approach for glycogen storage disease type III.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Fredrickson, Keri; Austin, Stephanie; Tolun, Adviye A; Thurberg, Beth L; Kraus, William E; Bali, Deeksha; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Kishnani, Priya S

    2013-02-01

    We investigated the feasibility of using recombinant human acid-α glucosidase (rhGAA, Alglucosidase alfa), an FDA approved therapy for Pompe disease, as a treatment approach for glycogen storage disease type III (GSD III). An in vitro disease model was established by isolating primary myoblasts from skeletal muscle biopsies of patients with GSD IIIa. We demonstrated that rhGAA significantly reduced glycogen levels in the two GSD IIIa patients' muscle cells (by 17% and 48%, respectively) suggesting that rhGAA could be a novel therapy for GSD III. This conclusion needs to be confirmed in other in vivo models.

  11. CONVERSION EXTRACTION DESULFURIZATION (CED) PHASE III

    SciTech Connect

    James Boltz

    2005-03-01

    This project was undertaken to refine the Conversion Extraction Desulfurization (CED) technology to efficiently and economically remove sulfur from diesel fuel to levels below 15-ppm. CED is considered a generic term covering all desulfurization processes that involve oxidation and extraction. The CED process first extracts a fraction of the sulfur from the diesel, then selectively oxidizes the remaining sulfur compounds, and finally extracts these oxidized materials. The Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Petro Star Inc. a contract to fund Phase III of the CED process development. Phase III consisted of testing a continuous-flow process, optimization of the process steps, design of a pilot plant, and completion of a market study for licensing the process. Petro Star and the Degussa Corporation in coordination with Koch Modular Process Systems (KMPS) tested six key process steps in a 7.6-centimeter (cm) (3.0-inch) inside diameter (ID) column at gas oil feed rates of 7.8 to 93.3 liters per hour (l/h) (2.1 to 24.6 gallons per hour). The team verified the technical feasibility with respect to hydraulics for each unit operation tested and successfully demonstrated pre-extraction and solvent recovery distillation. Test operations conducted at KMPS demonstrated that the oxidation reaction converted a maximum of 97% of the thiophenes. The CED Process Development Team demonstrated that CED technology is capable of reducing the sulfur content of light atmospheric gas oil from 5,000-ppm to less than 15-ppm within the laboratory scale. In continuous flow trials, the CED process consistently produced fuel with approximately 20-ppm of sulfur. The process economics study calculated an estimated process cost of $5.70 per product barrel. The Kline Company performed a marketing study to evaluate the possibility of licensing the CED technology. Kline concluded that only 13 refineries harbored opportunity for the CED process. The Kline study and the research team's discussions with

  12. Neptunium(III) application in extraction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Guérin, Nicolas; Nadeau, Kenny; Larivière, Dominic

    2011-12-15

    This paper describes a novel strategy for actinide separation by extraction chromatography with Np(III) valence adjustment. Neptunium(IV) was reduced to Np(III) using Cr(II) and then selectively separated from uranium (IV) on a TEVA resin. After elution, Np(III) was retained on a DGA resin in order to remove any detrimental chromium impurities. Neptunium(III) formation was demonstrated by the complete and selective elution of Np from TEVA resin (99 ± 7%) in less than 12 mL of 9M HCl from U(IV) (0.7 ± 0.7%). It was determined by UV-visible and kinetic studies that Cr(II) was the only species responsible for the elution of Np(IV) as Np(III) and that the Cr(II) solution could be prepared from 2 to 30 min before its use without the need of complex degassing systems to prevent the oxidation of Np(III) by oxygen. The methodology proposed here with TEVA/DGA resins provides removal of Cr(III) impurities produced at high decontamination factors (2.8 × 10(3) and 7.3 × 10(4) respectively).

  13. Timely management of developing class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Yelampalli, M R; Rachala, M R

    2012-01-01

    Timing of orthodontic treatment, especially for children with developing class III malocclusions, has always been somewhat controversial, and definitive treatment tends to be delayed for severe class III cases. Developing class III patients with moderate to severe anterior crossbite and deep bite may need early intervention in some selected cases. Class III malocclusion may develop in children as a result of an inherent growth abnormality, i.e. true class III malocclusion, or as a result of premature occlusal contacts causing forward functional shift of the mandible, which is known as pseudo class III malocclusion. These cases, if not treated at the initial stage of development, interfere with normal growth of the jaw bases and may result in severe facial deformities. The treatment should be carried out as early as possible for permitting normal growth of the skeletal bases. This paper deals with the selection of an appropriate appliance from the various current options available for early intervention in developing class III malocclusion through two case reports.

  14. Is the Pharmacological Mode of Action of Chromium(III) as a Second Messenger?

    PubMed

    Vincent, John B

    2015-07-01

    Although recent studies have shown that chromium (as the trivalent ion) is not an essential trace element, it has been demonstrated to generate beneficial effects at pharmacologically relevant doses on insulin sensitivity and cholesterol levels of rodent models of insulin insensitivity, including models of type 2 diabetes. The mode of action of Cr(III) at a molecular level is still an area of active debate; however, the movement of Cr(III) in the body, particularly in response to changes in insulin concentration, suggests that Cr(III) could act as a second messenger, amplifying insulin signaling. The evidence for the pharmacological mechanism of Cr(III)'s ability to increase insulin sensitivity by acting as a second messenger is reviewed, and proposals for testing this hypothesis are described.

  15. [Napoleon III's urogenital disease (1808-1873)].

    PubMed

    Androutsos, G

    2000-02-01

    We tried through this paper to reconstitute the evolution of the urologic illness of Napoleon III, last emperor of France, the first symptoms of which appeared many years before the fatal war of 1870, which led to the dismembering of France. In this connection, we present Napoleon III's physicians and his cures, along with the diagnostic and therapeutic errors. The case of Napoleon III is a typical example of the influence the bad health of a sovereign can exercise on the destiny of his country.

  16. Transcription by RNA polymerases I and III

    PubMed Central

    Paule, Marvin R.; White, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    The task of transcribing nuclear genes is shared between three RNA polymerases in eukaryotes: RNA polymerase (pol) I synthesises the large rRNA, pol II synthesises mRNA and pol III synthesises tRNA and 5S rRNA. Although pol II has received most attention, pol I and pol III are together responsible for the bulk of transcriptional activity. This survey will summarise what is known about the process of transcription by pol I and pol III, how it happens and the proteins involved. Attention will be drawn to the similarities between the three nuclear RNA polymerase systems and also to their differences. PMID:10684922

  17. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, T.D.; Misra, M.

    1997-10-14

    A photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The photodetector includes a substrate with interdigitated electrodes formed on its surface. The substrate has a sapphire base layer, a buffer layer formed from a III-V nitride and a single crystal III-V nitride film. The three layers are formed by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (ECR-assisted MBE). Use of the ECR-assisted MBE process allows control and predetermination of the electrical properties of the photodetector. 24 figs.

  18. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D.; Misra, Mira

    1997-01-01

    A photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The photodetector includes a substrate with interdigitated electrodes formed on its surface. The substrate has a sapphire base layer, a buffer layer formed from a III-V nitride and a single crystal III-V nitride film. The three layers are formed by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (ECR-assisted MBE). Use of the ECR-assisted MBE process allows control and predetermination of the electrical properties of the photodetector.

  19. Complexation of N4-Tetradentate Ligands with Nd(III) and Am(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, Mark D.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Meier, G. Patrick; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Nash, Kenneth L.

    2012-12-06

    To improve understanding of aza-complexants in trivalent actinide–lanthanide separations, a series of tetradentate N-donor ligands have been synthesized and their complexation of americium(III) and neodymium(III) investigated by UV–visible spectrophotometry in methanolic solutions. The six pyridine/alkyl amine/imine ligands are N,N0-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,2-diaminoethane, N,N0-bis(2-methylpyridyl)-1,3-diaminopropane, trans-N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,2-diaminocyclohexane (BPMDAC), N,N’-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)piperazine, N,N’-bis-[pyridin-2-ylmethylene]ethane-1,2-diamine, and trans-N,Nbis-([pyridin-2-ylmethylene]-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine. Each ligand has two pyridine groups and two aliphatic amine/imine N-donor atoms arranged with different degrees of preorganization and structural backbone rigidity. Conditional stability constants for the complexes of Am(III) and Nd(III) by these ligands establish the selectivity patterns. The overall selectivity of Am(III) over Nd(III) is similar to that reported for the terdentate bis(dialkyltriazinyl)pyridine molecules. The cyclohexane amine derivative (BPMDAC) is the strongest complexant and shows the highest selectivity for Am(III) over Nd(III) while the imines appear to prefer a bridging arrangement between two cations. These results suggest that this series of ligands could be employed to develop an enhanced actinide(III)– lanthanide(III) separation system.

  20. Expression and Quorum Sensing Regulation of Type III Secretion System Genes of Vibrio harveyi during Infection of Gnotobiotic Brine Shrimp.

    PubMed

    Ruwandeepika, H A Darshanee; Karunasagar, Indrani; Bossier, Peter; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Type III secretion systems enable pathogens to inject their virulence factors directly into the cytoplasm of the host cells. The type III secretion system of Vibrio harveyi, a major pathogen of aquatic organisms and a model species in quorum sensing studies, is repressed by the quorum sensing master regulator LuxR. In this study, we found that during infection of gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae, the expression levels of three type III secretion operons in V. harveyi increased within the first 12h after challenge and decreased again thereafter. The in vivo expression levels were highest in a mutant with a quorum sensing system that is locked in low cell density configuration (minimal LuxR levels) and lowest in a mutant with a quorum sensing system that is locked in the high cell density configuration (maximal LuxR levels), which is consistent with repression of type III secretion by LuxR. Remarkably, in vivo expression levels of the type III secretion system genes were much (> 1000 fold) higher than the in vitro expression levels, indicating that (currently unknown) host factors significantly induce the type III secretion system. Given the fact that type III secretion is energy-consuming, repression by the quorum sensing master regulators might be a mechanism to save energy under conditions where it does not provide an advantage to the cells.

  1. Construction Cluster Volume III [Plumbing].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Justice, Harrisburg. Bureau of Correction.

    The document is the third of a series, to be integrated with a G.E.D. program, containing instructional materials at the basic skills level for the construction cluster. The volume focuses on plumbing and consists of 20 instructional units which require a month of study. The units include: (1) importance of plumbing; (2) pipe and tubing…

  2. Synthesis, thermal and spectroscopic behaviors of metal-drug complexes: La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) amoxicillin trihydrate antibiotic drug complexes.

    PubMed

    Refat, Moamen S; Al-Maydama, Hussein M A; Al-Azab, Fathi M; Amin, Ragab R; Jamil, Yasmin M S

    2014-07-15

    The metal complexes of Amoxicillin trihydrate with La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) are synthesized with 1:1 (metal:Amox) molar ratio. The suggested formula structures of the complexes are based on the results of the elemental analyses, molar conductivity, (infrared, UV-visible and fluorescence) spectra, effective magnetic moment in Bohr magnetons, as well as the thermal analysis (TG), and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results obtained suggested that Amoxicillin reacted with metal ions as tridentate ligands, coordinating the metal ion through its amino, imino, and β-lactamic carbonyl. The kinetic thermodynamic parameters such as: Ea, ΔH(*), ΔS(*) and ΔG(*) were estimated from the DTG curves.

  3. Sorption of indium (III) onto carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Alguacil, F J; Lopez, F A; Rodriguez, O; Martinez-Ramirez, S; Garcia-Diaz, I

    2016-08-01

    Indium has numerous applications in different industrial sectors and is not an abundant element. Therefore appropriate technology to recover this element from various process wastes is needed. This research reports high adsorption capacity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) for In(III). The effects of pH, kinetics, isotherms and adsorption mechanism of MWCNT on In(III) adsorption were investigated and discussed in detail. The pH increases improves the adsorption capacity for In(III). The Langmuir adsorption model is the best fit with the experimental data. For the kinetic study, the adsorption onto MWCNT could be fitted to pseudo second-order. The adsorption of indium(III) can be described to a mechanism which consists of a film diffusion controlled process. Metal desorption can be achieved with acidic solutions.

  4. SAGE III capabilities and global change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. Patrick

    1991-01-01

    The science objectives of the satellite-borne SAGE III are presented as they pertain to detecting global change. SAGE III is the proposed follow on and improved version of SAM II, SAGE I and SAGE II which have measured stratospheric and, in some cases, tropospheric species since late 1978. Specifically, SAGE III will measure profiles of aerosols, ozone, water vapor, nitrogen dioxide and trioxide, neutral density, temperature, clouds, and chlorine dioxide using the solar and lunar occultation techniques. These techniques are inherently self-calibrating, provide high vertical resolution, and use well-behaved data retrievals making them ideal for trend detection and global change studies. The potential capabilities of SAGE III are illustrated by using data and results from SAM II, SAGE I and SAGE II.

  5. Junto III: Collaboration Outreach by AAACE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasworm, Carol E.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses recommendations developed by Junto III of the American Association for Adult and Continuing Education concerning association responsibility, specific group action (full representation, socialization of new membership, generation of new research), and special needs. (CT)

  6. Genetics Home Reference: mucopolysaccharidosis type III

    MedlinePlus

    ... diagnosis of mucopolysaccharidosis III (Sanfilippo syndrome): A changing landscape. Mol Genet Metab. 2014 Sep-Oct;113(1- ... j.1651-2227.2010.01800.x. Epub 2010 Mar 14. Citation on PubMed Meyer A, Kossow K, ...

  7. Isolatable organophosphorus(III)-tellurium heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Nordheider, Andreas; Chivers, Tristram; Schön, Oliver; Karaghiosoff, Konstantin; Athukorala Arachchige, Kasun S; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Woollins, J Derek

    2014-01-13

    A new structural arrangement Te3 (RP(III) )3 and the first crystal structures of organophosphorus(III)-tellurium heterocycles are presented. The heterocycles can be stabilized and structurally characterized by the appropriate choice of substituents in Tem (P(III) R)n (m=1: n=2, R=OMes* (Mes*=supermesityl or 2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenyl); n=3, R=adamantyl (Ad); n=4, R=ferrocene (Fc); m=n=3: R=trityl (Trt), Mesor by the installation of a P(V) 2 N2 anchor in RP(III) [TeP(V) (tBuN)(μ-NtBu)]2 (R=Ad, tBu).

  8. Potentiometry: A Chromium (III) -- EDTA Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoppe, J. I.; Howell, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment that involves the preparation of a chromium (III)-EDTA compound, a study of its infrared spectrum, and the potentiometric determination of two successive acid dissociation constants. (Author/GS)

  9. SAGE III/Meteor - 3M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Back view of the SAGE III Bench Checkout Unit, Portable Image Generator (PIG) on tripod, and the Stratospheric Aerosol Gastropheric Experiment (SAGE)/Meteor - 3M flight instrument. Photographed in building 1250, 40 foot clean room.

  10. SAGE III/Meteor - 3M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Full view of the SAGE III Bench Checkout Unit, Collimated Source Bench (CSB), Portable Image Generator (PIG) on tripod, and Stratospheric Aerosol Gastropheric Experiment (SAGE)/Meteor - 3M flight instrument. Photographed in building 1250, 40 foot clean room.

  11. Population III Stars Around the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komiya, Yutaka; Suda, Takuma; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.

    2016-03-01

    We explore the possibility of observing Population III (Pop III) stars, born of primordial gas. Pop III stars with masses below 0.8 M⊙ should survive to date though are not yet observed, but the existence of stars with low metallicity as [{{Fe}}/{{H}}]\\lt -5 in the Milky Way halo suggests the surface pollution of Pop III stars with accreted metals from the interstellar gas after birth. In this paper, we investigate the runaway of Pop III stars from their host mini-halos, considering the ejection of secondary members from binary systems when their massive primaries explode as supernovae. These stars save them from surface pollution. By computing the star formation and chemical evolution along with the hierarchical structure formation based on the extended Press-Schechter merger trees, we demonstrate that several hundreds to tens of thousands of low-mass Pop III stars escape from the building blocks of the Milky Way. The second and later generations of extremely metal-poor stars also escaped from the mini-halos. We discuss the spatial distributions of these escaped stars by evaluating the distances between the mini-halos in the branches of merger trees under the spherical collapse model of dark matter halos. It is demonstrated that the escaped stars distribute beyond the stellar halo with a density profile close to the dark matter halo, while Pop III stars are slightly more centrally concentrated. 6%-30% of the escaped stars leave the Milky Way and go out into the intergalactic space. Based on the results, we discuss the feasibility of observing the Pop III stars with the pristine surface abundance.

  12. SAGE III solar ozone measurements: Initial results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hsiang-Jui; Cunnold, Derek M.; Trepte, Chip; Thomason, Larry W.; Zawodny, Joseph M.

    2006-01-01

    Results from two retrieval algorithms, o3-aer and o3-mlr , used for SAGE III solar occultation ozone measurements in the stratosphere and upper troposphere are compared. The main differences between these two retrieved (version 3.0) ozone are found at altitudes above 40 km and below 15 km. Compared to correlative measurements, the SAGE II type ozone retrievals (o3-aer) provide better precisions above 40 km and do not induce artificial hemispheric differences in upper stratospheric ozone. The multiple linear regression technique (o3_mlr), however, can yield slightly more accurate ozone (by a few percent) in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere. By using SAGE III (version 3.0) ozone from both algorithms and in their preferred regions, the agreement between SAGE III and correlative measurements is shown to be approx.5% down to 17 km. Below 17 km SAGE III ozone values are systematically higher, by 10% at 13 km, and a small hemispheric difference (a few percent) appears. Compared to SAGE III and HALOE, SAGE II ozone has the best accuracy in the lowest few kilometers of the stratosphere. Estimated precision in SAGE III ozone is about 5% or better between 20 and 40 km and approx.10% at 50 km. The precision below 20 km is difficult to evaluate because of limited coincidences between SAGE III and sondes. SAGE III ozone values are systematically slightly larger (2-3%) than those from SAGE II but the profile shapes are remarkably similar for altitudes above 15 km. There is no evidence of any relative drift or time dependent differences between these two instruments for altitudes above 15-20 km.

  13. Design of Training Systems Phase III Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-09-01

    as the reader is aware of this approach and relies on the T&E Report for a more detailed analysis , this summary should highlight the key T&E concerns... ANALYSIS AND EVALUATION GROUP LIBRARY TECHNICAL REPORT SECTION NAVAL POSTGRADUATE S^ MONTEREY CALliChMA TAEG REPORT NO. 28 DESIGN...EVALUATION SUMMARY I II-l IV PHASE III PRODUCTS CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS IV-1 PHASE III DOCUMENTATION IV-7 11 TAE6 REPORT NO. 28

  14. Development of WAIS-III General Ability Index Minus WMS-III memory discrepancy scores.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Chelune, Gordon J; Tulsky, David S

    2006-09-01

    Analysis of the discrepancy between intellectual functioning and memory ability has received some support as a useful means for evaluating memory impairment. In recent additions to Wechlser scale interpretation, the WAIS-III General Ability Index (GAI) and the WMS-III Delayed Memory Index (DMI) were developed. The purpose of this investigation is to develop base rate data for GAI-IMI, GAI-GMI, and GAI-DMI discrepancy scores using data from the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample (weighted N = 1250). Base rate tables were developed using the predicted-difference method and two simple-difference methods (i.e., stratified and non-stratified). These tables provide valuable data for clinical reference purposes to determine the frequency of GAI-IMI, GAI-GMI, and GAI-DMI discrepancy scores in the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample.

  15. Lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) derivatives with dithiocarbamates derived from alpha-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Rai, Anita; Sengupta, Soumitra K; Pandey, Om P

    2006-06-01

    Lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) complexes with dithiocarbamates have been synthesized by the reactions of lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) chloride with barium dithiocarbamate and complexes of type [LnCl(L)H2O]n have been obtained (where Ln=La(III) or Pr(III); L=barium salt of dithiocarbamate derived from glycine, L-leucine, L-valine, DL-alanine). The complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, electronic absorption and fluorescence, infrared, far infrared, 1H NMR spectral studies. The presence of coordinated water molecule is inferred from thermogravimetric analysis which indicates the loss of one water molecule at 150-170 degrees C. The oscillator strength, Judd-Ofelt intensity parameter, stimulated emission cross-section, etc. have been obtained for different transitions of Pr3+.

  16. Helical lanthanide(III) complexes with chiral nonaaza macrocycle.

    PubMed

    Gregoliński, Janusz; Starynowicz, Przemysław; Hua, KimNgan T; Lunkley, Jamie L; Muller, Gilles; Lisowski, Jerzy

    2008-12-31

    The chiral nonaazamacrocyclic amine L, which is a reduction product of the 3 + 3 Schiff base macrocycle, wraps around the lanthanide(III) ions to form enantiopure helical complexes. These Ce(III), Pr(III), Nd(III), Eu(III), Gd(III), Tb(III), Er(III), Yb(III) and Lu(III) complexes have been isolated in enantiopure form and have been characterized by spectroscopic methods. X-ray crystal structures of the Ln(III) complexes with L show that the thermodynamic product of the complexation of the RRRRRR-isomer of the macrocycle is the (M)-helical complex in the case of Ce(III), Pr(III), Nd(III) and Eu(III). In contrast, the (P)-helical complex is the thermodynamic product in the case of Yb(III) and Lu(III). The NMR and CD spectra show that the (M)-helicity for the kinetic complexation product of the RRRRRR-isomer of the macrocycle is preferred for all investigated lanthanide(III) ions, while the preferred helicity of the thermodynamic product is (M) for the early lanthanide(III) ions and (P) for the late lanthanide(III) ions. In the case of the late lanthanide(III) ions, a slow inversion of helicity between the kinetic (M)-helical product and the thermodynamic (P)-helical product is observed in solution. For Er(III), Yb(III) and Lu(III) both forms have been isolated in pure form and characterized by NMR and CD. The analysis of 2D NMR spectra of the Lu(III) complex reveals the NOE correlations that prove that the helical structure is retained in solution. The NMR spectra also reveal large isotopic effect on the 1H NMR shifts of paramagnetic Ln(III) complexes, related to NH/ND exchange. Photophysical measurements show that L(RRRRRR) appears to favor an efficient 3pipi*-to-Ln energy transfer process taking place for Eu(III) and Tb(III), but these Eu(III)- and Tb(III)-containing complexes with L(RRRRRR) lead to small luminescent quantum yields due to an incomplete intersystem crossing (isc) transfer, a weak efficiency of the luminescence sensitization by the ligand, and

  17. Extended Deterrence, Nuclear Proliferation, and START III

    SciTech Connect

    Speed, R.D.

    2000-06-20

    Early in the Cold War, the United States adopted a policy of ''extended nuclear deterrence'' to protect its allies by threatening a nuclear strike against any state that attacks these allies. This threat can (in principle) be used to try to deter an enemy attack using conventional weapons or one using nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons. The credibility of a nuclear threat has long been subject to debate and is dependent on many complex geopolitical factors, not the least of which is the military capabilities of the opposing sides. The ending of the Cold War has led to a significant decrease in the number of strategic nuclear weapons deployed by the United States and Russia. START II, which was recently ratified by the Russian Duma, will (if implemented) reduce the number deployed strategic nuclear weapons on each side to 3500, compared to a level of over 11,000 at the end of the Cold War in 1991. The tentative limit established by Presidents Clinton and Yeltsin for START III would reduce the strategic force level to 2000-2500. However, the Russians (along with a number of arms control advocates) now argue that the level should be reduced even further--to 1500 warheads or less. The conventional view is that ''deep cuts'' in nuclear weapons are necessary to discourage nuclear proliferation. Thus, as part of the bargain to get the non-nuclear states to agree to the renewal of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, the United States pledged to work towards greater reductions in strategic forces. Without movement in the direction of deep cuts, it is thought by many analysts that some countries may decide to build their own nuclear weapons. Indeed, this was part of the rationale India used to justify its own nuclear weapons program. However, there is also some concern that deep cuts (to 1500 or lower) in the U.S. strategic nuclear arsenal could have the opposite effect. The fear is that such cuts might undermine extended deterrence and cause a crisis in confidence

  18. A tiny event producing an interplanetary type III burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alissandrakis, C. E.; Nindos, A.; Patsourakos, S.; Kontogeorgos, A.; Tsitsipis, P.

    2015-10-01

    Aims: We investigate the conditions under which small-scale energy release events in the low corona gave rise to strong interplanetary (IP) type III bursts. Methods: We analyzed observations of three tiny events, detected by the Nançay Radio Heliograph (NRH), two of which produced IP type III bursts. We took advantage of the NRH positioning information and of the high cadence of AIA/SDO data to identify the associated extreme-UV (EUV) emissions. We measured positions and time profiles of the metric and EUV sources. Results: We found that the EUV events that produced IP type III bursts were located near a coronal hole boundary, while the one that did not was located in a closed magnetic field region. In all three cases tiny flaring loops were involved, without any associated mass eruption. In the best observed case, the radio emission at the highest frequency (435 MHz) was displaced by ~55'' with respect to the small flaring loop. The metric type III emission shows a complex structure in space and in time, indicative of multiple electron beams, despite the low intensity of the events. From the combined analysis of dynamic spectra and NRH images, we derived the electron beam velocity as well as the height, ambient plasma temperature, and density at the level of formation of the 160 MHz emission. From the analysis of the differential emission measure derived from the AIA images, we found that the first evidence of energy release was at the footpoints, and this was followed by the development of flaring loops and subsequent cooling. Conclusions: Even small energy release events can accelerate enough electrons to give rise to powerful IP type III bursts. The proximity of the electron acceleration site to open magnetic field lines facilitates the escape of the electrons into the interplanetary space. The offset between the site of energy release and the metric type III location warrants further investigation. The movie is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. WAIS-III and WMS-III profiles of mildly to severely brain-injured patients.

    PubMed

    Fisher, D C; Ledbetter, M F; Cohen, N J; Marmor, D; Tulsky, D S

    2000-01-01

    Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (WAIS-III) and Wechsler Memory Scale-III (WMS-III; The Psychological Corporation, 1997) scores of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI, n = 23) to moderate-severe traumatic brain injury (M-S TBI, n = 22) were compared to those of 45 matched normal control patients. WAIS-III results revealed that IQ and index scores of MTBI patients did not significantly differ from those of controls, whereas M-S TBI patients received significantly lower mean scores on all measures. All M-S TBI patients' WMS-III index scores also revealed significantly lower scores in comparison to those of control participants, with the exception of Delayed Auditory Recognition. MTBI patients showed significantly lower mean index scores compared to normal controls on measures of immediate and delayed auditory memory, immediate memory, visual delayed memory, and general memory. Eta-squared analyses revealed that WMS-III visual indexes and WAIS-III processing speed showed particularly large effect sizes. These results suggest that symptomatic MTBI patients obtain some low WMS-III test scores comparable to those of more severely injured patients.

  20. Design of Integrated III-Nitride/Non-III-Nitride Tandem Photovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Toledo, N. G.; Friedman, D..J.; Farrell, R. M.; Perl, E. E.; Lin, C. T.; Bowers, J. E.; Speck, J. S.; Mishra, U. K.

    2012-03-01

    The integration of III-nitride and non-III-nitride materials for tandem solar cell applications can improve the efficiency of the photovoltaic device due to the added power contributed by the III-nitride top cell to that of high-efficiency multi-junction non-III-nitride solar cells if the device components are properly designed and optimized. The proposed tandem solar cell is comprised of a III-nitride top cell bonded to a non-III-nitride, series-constrained, multi-junction subcell. The top cell is electrically isolated, but optically coupled to the underlying subcell. The use of a III-nitride top cell is potentially beneficial when the top junction of a stand-alone non-III-nitride subcell generates more photocurrent than the limiting current of the non-III-nitride subcell. Light producing this excess current can either be redirected to the III-nitride top cell through high energy photon absorption, redirected to the lower junctions through layer thickness optimization, or a combination of both, resulting in improved total efficiency. When the non-III-nitride cell's top junction is the limiting junction, the minimum power conversion efficiency that the III-nitride top cell must contribute should compensate for the spectrum filtered from the multi-junction subcell for this design to be useful. As the III-nitride absorption edge wavelength, {lambda}{sub N}, increases, the performance of the multi-junction subcell decreases due to spectral filtering. In the most common spectra of interest (AM1.5G, AM1.5 D, and AM0), the technology to grow InGaN cells with {lambda}{sub N}<520 nm is found to be sufficient for III-nitride top cell applications. The external quantum efficiency performance, however, of state-of-the-art InGaN solar cells still needs to be improved. The effects of surface/interface reflections are also presented. The management of these reflection issues determines the feasibility of the integrated III-nitride/non-III-nitride design to improve overall cell

  1. Comparative serum albumin interactions and antitumor effects of Au(III) and Ga(III) ions.

    PubMed

    Sarioglu, Omer Faruk; Ozdemir, Ayse; Karaboduk, Kuddusi; Tekinay, Turgay

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, interactions of Au(III) and Ga(III) ions on human serum albumin (HSA) were studied comparatively via spectroscopic and thermal analysis methods: UV-vis absorbance spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The potential antitumor effects of these ions were studied on MCF-7 cells via Alamar blue assay. It was found that both Au(III) and Ga(III) ions can interact with HSA, however; Au(III) ions interact with HSA more favorably and with a higher affinity. FT-IR second derivative analysis results demonstrated that, high concentrations of both metal ions led to a considerable decrease in the α-helix content of HSA; while Au(III) led to around 5% of decrease in the α-helix content at 200μM, it was around 1% for Ga(III) at the same concentration. Calorimetric analysis gave the binding kinetics of metal-HSA interactions; while the binding affinity (Ka) of Au(III)-HSA binding was around 3.87×10(5)M(-1), it was around 9.68×10(3)M(-1) for Ga(III)-HSA binding. Spectroscopy studies overall suggest that both metal ions have significant effects on the chemical structure of HSA, including the secondary structure alterations. Antitumor activity studies on MCF7 tumor cell line with both metal ions revealed that, Au(III) ions have a higher antiproliferative activity compared to Ga(III) ions.

  2. Sorption of phosphate and Cr(VI) by Fe(III) and Cr(III) hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Tzou, Y M; Wang, M K; Loeppert, R H

    2003-05-01

    Understanding the chemical behavior and interactions of Cr(VI) ( e.g., HCrO(4)(-)) and other anions, such as orthophosphate (P) with insoluble metal hydroxides ( i.e., Cr[III] and Fe[III]) in disposal landfills or in chromite ore processing residue (CORP)-enriched soil is very important in predicting the movement and the fate of Cr(VI). This study evaluates the sorption behavior of P and Cr(VI) by Fe(III) ( i.e., ferrihydrite), Cr(III) ( i.e., Cr[OH](3)), and coprecipitated Fe(III)/Cr(III) hydroxides. These metal hydroxide sorbents were synthesized, and sorption of P and Cr(VI) were conducted at different pH using a batch technology. Our results show that P and Cr(VI) sorption by metal hydroxides decreased with increasing suspension pH. Greater decrease in P sorption was observed when Cr(III) was present in the structures of hydroxides. Following the sorption of low concentration of P ( i.e., 0.5 mM), the sorption of subsequently added Cr(VI) by hydroxides was less influenced. However, Cr(VI) sorption was greatly inhibited when high concentration of P ( i.e., 10 mM) prereacted with hydroxides, particularly in Fe(III) hydroxide system. Results also indicated that high concentration of Cr(VI) (10 mM) could dissolve Cr(III) hydroxide at pH 3 and reprecipitate as an amorphous form of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) compound at pH about 6.5. Although coprecipitation of Cr(VI) with Cr(III) can inhibit Cr(VI) movement through soil profiles, the inhibition seems to be low due to the gradual release of Cr(VI) with increasing pH.

  3. Characterization of polymorphic forms of Fc receptor III on human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Ory, P A; Goldstein, I M; Kwoh, E E; Clarkson, S B

    1989-01-01

    We characterized Fc receptor III (FcR III) on human neutrophils and found it to be heavily glycosylated and polymorphic. In some individuals, FcR III that had been digested with N-glycanase appeared after SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions as two bands with apparent molecular masses of 33 and 29 kD. In other individuals, N-glycanase-treated FcR III appeared as a single band with an Mr of either 33 or 29 kD. After SDS-PAGE of N-glycanase-treated FcR III under nonreducing conditions, the apparent Mr of each structural type was decreased, suggesting the presence of intramolecular disulfide bonds. Digestion of the 33-kD band and the 29-kD band with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease yielded similar, but not identical, peptide maps. Thus, at least two polymorphic forms of FcR III are expressed on human neutrophils. The structural polymorphism of neutrophil FcR III correlated with previously described antigenic polymorphisms detected by monoclonal antibody Gran 11 and by alloantisera which recognize epitopes of the biallelic, neutrophil antigen (NA) system. Individuals whose neutrophils expressed the two-band structural type of FcR III were NA1NA2 heterozygotes. Individuals whose neutrophils expressed the single 33-kD band structural type were NA2NA2 homozygotes, and individuals whose neutrophils expressed the single 29-kD band structural type were NA1NA1 homozygotes. These findings indicate that antigenic and structural polymorphisms of human neutrophil FcR III are related and can be accounted for by differences at the level of primary protein structure. Images PMID:2523415

  4. Going wireless: Fe(III) oxide reduction without pili by Geobacter sulfurreducens strain JS-1.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jessica A; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Snoeyenbos-West, Oona L; Franks, Ashley E; Nevin, Kelly P; Lovley, Derek R

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the conductive pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens are essential for extracellular electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides and for optimal long-range electron transport through current-producing biofilms. The KN400 strain of G. sulfurreducens reduces poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide more rapidly than the more extensively studied DL-1 strain. Deletion of the gene encoding PilA, the structural pilin protein, in strain KN400 inhibited Fe(III) oxide reduction. However, low rates of Fe(III) reduction were detected after extended incubation (>30 days) in the presence of Fe(III) oxide. After seven consecutive transfers, the PilA-deficient strain adapted to reduce Fe(III) oxide as fast as the wild type. Microarray, whole-genome resequencing, proteomic, and gene deletion studies indicated that this adaptation was associated with the production of larger amounts of the c-type cytochrome PgcA, which was released into the culture medium. It is proposed that the extracellular cytochrome acts as an electron shuttle, promoting electron transfer from the outer cell surface to Fe(III) oxides. The adapted PilA-deficient strain competed well with the wild-type strain when both were grown together on Fe(III) oxide. However, when 50% of the culture medium was replaced with fresh medium every 3 days, the wild-type strain outcompeted the adapted strain. A possible explanation for this is that the necessity to produce additional PgcA, to replace the PgcA being continually removed, put the adapted strain at a competitive disadvantage, similar to the apparent selection against electron shuttle-producing Fe(III) reducers in many anaerobic soils and sediments. Despite increased extracellular cytochrome production, the adapted PilA-deficient strain produced low levels of current, consistent with the concept that long-range electron transport through G. sulfurreducens biofilms is more effective via pili.

  5. Going Wireless: Fe(III) Oxide Reduction without Pili by Geobacter sulfurreducens Strain JS-1

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Snoeyenbos-West, Oona L.; Franks, Ashley E.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the conductive pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens are essential for extracellular electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides and for optimal long-range electron transport through current-producing biofilms. The KN400 strain of G. sulfurreducens reduces poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide more rapidly than the more extensively studied DL-1 strain. Deletion of the gene encoding PilA, the structural pilin protein, in strain KN400 inhibited Fe(III) oxide reduction. However, low rates of Fe(III) reduction were detected after extended incubation (>30 days) in the presence of Fe(III) oxide. After seven consecutive transfers, the PilA-deficient strain adapted to reduce Fe(III) oxide as fast as the wild type. Microarray, whole-genome resequencing, proteomic, and gene deletion studies indicated that this adaptation was associated with the production of larger amounts of the c-type cytochrome PgcA, which was released into the culture medium. It is proposed that the extracellular cytochrome acts as an electron shuttle, promoting electron transfer from the outer cell surface to Fe(III) oxides. The adapted PilA-deficient strain competed well with the wild-type strain when both were grown together on Fe(III) oxide. However, when 50% of the culture medium was replaced with fresh medium every 3 days, the wild-type strain outcompeted the adapted strain. A possible explanation for this is that the necessity to produce additional PgcA, to replace the PgcA being continually removed, put the adapted strain at a competitive disadvantage, similar to the apparent selection against electron shuttle-producing Fe(III) reducers in many anaerobic soils and sediments. Despite increased extracellular cytochrome production, the adapted PilA-deficient strain produced low levels of current, consistent with the concept that long-range electron transport through G. sulfurreducens biofilms is more effective via pili. PMID:24814783

  6. 30 CFR 57.22207 - Booster fans (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22207 Booster fans... methane reaches the following levels: (i) 1.0 percent at the fan in Subcategory I-A, Category III,...

  7. 30 CFR 57.22207 - Booster fans (I-A, II-A, III, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22207 Booster fans... methane reaches the following levels: (i) 1.0 percent at the fan in Subcategory I-A, Category III,...

  8. Transcription by RNA polymerase III: insights into mechanism and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Turowski, Tomasz W.; Tollervey, David

    2016-01-01

    The highly abundant, small stable RNAs that are synthesized by RNA polymerase III (RNAPIII) have key functional roles, particularly in the protein synthesis apparatus. Their expression is metabolically demanding, and is therefore coupled to changing demands for protein synthesis during cell growth and division. Here, we review the regulatory mechanisms that control the levels of RNAPIII transcripts and discuss their potential physiological relevance. Recent analyses have revealed differential regulation of tRNA expression at all steps on its biogenesis, with significant deregulation of mature tRNAs in cancer cells. PMID:27911719

  9. Sparkle/PM3 Parameters for the Modeling of Neodymium(III), Promethium(III), and Samarium(III) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Freire, Ricardo O; da Costa, Nivan B; Rocha, Gerd B; Simas, Alfredo M

    2007-07-01

    The Sparkle/PM3 model is extended to neodymium(III), promethium(III), and samarium(III) complexes. The unsigned mean error, for all Sparkle/PM3 interatomic distances between the trivalent lanthanide ion and the ligand atoms of the first sphere of coordination, is 0.074 Å for Nd(III); 0.057 Å for Pm(III); and 0.075 Å for Sm(III). These figures are similar to the Sparkle/AM1 ones of 0.076 Å, 0.059 Å, and 0.075 Å, respectively, indicating they are all comparable models. Moreover, their accuracy is similar to what can be obtained by present-day ab initio effective potential calculations on such lanthanide complexes. Hence, the choice of which model to utilize will depend on the assessment of the effect of either AM1 or PM3 on the quantum chemical description of the organic ligands. Finally, we present a preliminary attempt to verify the geometry prediction consistency of Sparkle/PM3. Since lanthanide complexes are usually flexible, we randomly generated 200 different input geometries for the samarium complex QIPQOV which were then fully optimized by Sparkle/PM3. A trend appeared in that, on average, the lower the total energy of the local minima found, the lower the unsigned mean errors, and the higher the accuracy of the model. These preliminary results do indicate that attempting to find, with Sparkle/PM3, a global minimum for the geometry of a given complex, with the understanding that it will tend to be closer to the experimental geometry, appears to be warranted. Therefore, the sparkle model is seemingly a trustworthy semiempirical quantum chemical model for the prediction of lanthanide complexes geometries.

  10. Failures in Phase III: Causes and Consequences.

    PubMed

    Seruga, Bostjan; Ocana, Alberto; Amir, Eitan; Tannock, Ian F

    2015-10-15

    Phase III randomized controlled trials (RCT) in oncology fail to lead to registration of new therapies more often than RCTs in other medical disciplines. Most RCTs are sponsored by the pharmaceutical industry, which reflects industry's increasing responsibility in cancer drug development. Many preclinical models are unreliable for evaluation of new anticancer agents, and stronger evidence of biologic effect should be required before a new agent enters the clinical development pathway. Whenever possible, early-phase clinical trials should include pharmacodynamic studies to demonstrate that new agents inhibit their molecular targets and demonstrate substantial antitumor activity at tolerated doses in an enriched population of patients. Here, we review recent RCTs and found that these conditions were not met for most of the targeted anticancer agents, which failed in recent RCTs. Many recent phase III RCTs were initiated without sufficient evidence of activity from early-phase clinical trials. Because patients treated within such trials can be harmed, they should not be undertaken. The bar should also be raised when making decisions to proceed from phase II to III and from phase III to marketing approval. Many approved agents showed only better progression-free survival than standard treatment in phase III trials and were not shown to improve survival or its quality. Introduction of value-based pricing of new anticancer agents would dissuade the continued development of agents with borderline activity in early-phase clinical trials. When collaborating with industry, oncologists should be more critical and better advocates for cancer patients.

  11. Hybrid III-V/silicon lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspar, P.; Jany, C.; Le Liepvre, A.; Accard, A.; Lamponi, M.; Make, D.; Levaufre, G.; Girard, N.; Lelarge, F.; Shen, A.; Charbonnier, P.; Mallecot, F.; Duan, G.-H.; Gentner, J.-.; Fedeli, J.-M.; Olivier, S.; Descos, A.; Ben Bakir, B.; Messaoudene, S.; Bordel, D.; Malhouitre, S.; Kopp, C.; Menezo, S.

    2014-05-01

    The lack of potent integrated light emitters is one of the bottlenecks that have so far hindered the silicon photonics platform from revolutionizing the communication market. Photonic circuits with integrated light sources have the potential to address a wide range of applications from short-distance data communication to long-haul optical transmission. Notably, the integration of lasers would allow saving large assembly costs and reduce the footprint of optoelectronic products by combining photonic and microelectronic functionalities on a single chip. Since silicon and germanium-based sources are still in their infancy, hybrid approaches using III-V semiconductor materials are currently pursued by several research laboratories in academia as well as in industry. In this paper we review recent developments of hybrid III-V/silicon lasers and discuss the advantages and drawbacks of several integration schemes. The integration approach followed in our laboratory makes use of wafer-bonded III-V material on structured silicon-on-insulator substrates and is based on adiabatic mode transfers between silicon and III-V waveguides. We will highlight some of the most interesting results from devices such as wavelength-tunable lasers and AWG lasers. The good performance demonstrates that an efficient mode transfer can be achieved between III-V and silicon waveguides and encourages further research efforts in this direction.

  12. Incremental validity of the WJ III COG: Limited predictive effects beyond the GIA-E.

    PubMed

    McGill, Ryan J; Busse, R T

    2015-09-01

    This study is an examination of the incremental validity of Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) broad clusters from the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities (WJ III COG) for predicting scores on the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Achievement (WJ III ACH). The participants were children and adolescents, ages 6-18 (n = 4,722), drawn from the WJ III standardization sample. The sample was nationally stratified and proportional to U.S. census estimates for race/ethnicity, parent education level, and geographic region. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used to assess for cluster-level effects after controlling for the variance accounted for by the General Intellectual Ability-Extended (GIA-E) composite score. The results were interpreted using the R²/ΔR² statistic as the effect size indicator. Consistent with previous studies, the GIA-E accounted for statistically and clinically significant portions of WJ III ACH cluster score variance, with R2 values ranging from .29 to .56. WJ III COG CHC cluster scores collectively provided statistically significant incremental variance beyond the GIA-E in all of the regression models, although the effect sizes were consistently negligible to small (Average ΔR2(CHC) = .06), with significant effects observed only in the Oral Expression model (ΔR²(CHC) = .23). Individually, the WJ III COG cluster scores accounted for mostly small portions of achievement variance across the prediction models, with a large effect found for the Comprehension-Knowledge cluster in the Oral Expression model (ΔR²(Gc) = .23). The potential clinical and theoretical implications of these results are discussed.

  13. Luminescent xerogels obtained through embedding Tb(III) and Eu(III) complexes in silica matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, Corneliu S.; Marcotte, Nathalie; Secula, Marius S.; Popa, Marcel

    2013-07-01

    The paper reports the preparation of two luminescent xerogels through embedding in a silica matrix of Tb(III) and Eu(III) complexes using succinimide (SI) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHSI) as ligands. In the first stage, Tb(III) and Eu(III) complexes with N-hydroxysuccinimide and succinimide were prepared at 1:3 metal to ligand ratio. Strong luminescent emission was observed only in case of Eu(III)-SI and Tb(III)-NHSI complexes while the Eu(III)-NHSI and Tb(III)-SI complexes exhibited none or weak photoluminescent properties. In the second stage, the selected highly luminescent complexes were embedded in silica matrices via a sol-gel procedure leading to the formation of xerogels with transparent-glassy aspect which keep the remarkable photoluminescence properties of the free complexes. The selected, highly luminescent free complexes and their correspondent silica xerogels were investigated through thermal analysis, powder XRD, SEM, FT-IR and fluorescence spectroscopy. Their excellent photoluminescent properties and excitation spectra, conveniently located in UV-A region, might recommend these materials for applications in optoelectronic devices where photonic conversion layers are required.

  14. Novel, highly photoluminescent Eu(III) and Tb(III) tetrazolate-2-pyridine-1-oxide complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietraszkiewicz, Marek; Mal, Suraj; Pietraszkiewicz, Oksana

    2012-07-01

    Tetrazole-2-pyridine-1-oxide was prepared from 2-cyanopyridine and sodium azide, followed by oxidation with m-chloroperbenzoic acid. This ligand forms neutral 1:3 complexes with Eu(III) and Tb(III) cations. The complexes are photoluminescent in solution, with photoluminescence quantum yields 13% and 31%, respectively.

  15. Teachers' Guide to Music Appreciation III A and III B in the Senior High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, J. Mark; Dawkins, Barbara R.

    This guide to music appreciation courses was developed for use in senior high schools in Duval County, Jacksonville, Florida. Music Appreciation III A examines the development of music, from the Gothic period through the Classical period. Music Appreciation III B examines the development of music from the Romantic period through the 1970s.…

  16. Synthesis, crystal structure and magnetism of iron(III) and manganese(III) dipicolinates with pyridinemethanols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhrecký, Róbert; Pavlik, Ján; Růžičková, Zdeňka; Dlháň, Ľubor; Koman, Marian; Boča, Roman; Moncoľ, Ján

    2014-11-01

    Four ionic iron(III) and manganese(III) dipicolinato complexes of the formula (2-pymeH) [FeIII(dipic)2]ṡ[FeIII(H2O)2Cl(dipic)]ṡ2H2O, (3-pymeH)[MnIII(dipic)2]ṡ1.5H2O, (4-pymeH)[FeIII(dipic)2]ṡ2H2O and (4-pymeH)[MnIII(dipic)2]ṡ2H2O, where H2dipic = pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid, 2-pyme = 2-pyridinemethanol, 3-pyme = 3-pyridinemethanol, 4-pyme = 4-pyridinemethanol, have been prepared and characterized by the single-crystal X-ray structure analysis, infrared spectroscopy and magnetic measurements. The magnetic data were fitted to a zero-field splitting model revealing a slight magnetic anisotropy for Mn(III) systems. The molecular field correction was consistently formulated and included in the analysis for both, magnetic susceptibility and magnetization data.

  17. Hexaammine Complexes of Cr(III) and Co(III): A Spectral Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, D. R.; Pavlis, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    Procedures are provided for experiments containing complex ions with octahedral symmetry, hexaamminecobalt(III) chloride and hexaamminechromium(III) nitrate, so students can interpret fully the ultra violet/visible spectra of the complex cations in terms of the ligand field parameters, 10 "Dq," the Racah interelectron repulsion parameters, "B,"…

  18. Molten-Salt-Based Growth of Group III Nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Waldrip, Karen E.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Kerley, Thomas M.

    2008-10-14

    A method for growing Group III nitride materials using a molten halide salt as a solvent to solubilize the Group-III ions and nitride ions that react to form the Group III nitride material. The concentration of at least one of the nitride ion or Group III cation is determined by electrochemical generation of the ions.

  19. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  20. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  1. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  2. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  3. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  4. Psychometric Testing of the FACES III with Rural Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ide, Bette; Dingmann, Colleen; Cuevas, Elizabeth; Meehan, Maurita

    2010-01-01

    This study tests the validity and reliability of the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Scale III (FACES III) in two samples of rural adolescents. The underlying theory is the linear 3-D circumplex model. The FACES III was administered to 1,632 adolescents in Grades 7 through 12 in two counties in a rural western state. The FACES III Scale and the…

  5. Discrepancies between the [O iii] and [S iii] temperatures in H ii regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binette, L.; Matadamas, R.; Hägele, G. F.; Nicholls, D. C.; Magris C., G.; Peña-Guerrero, M. Á.; Morisset, C.; Rodríguez-González, A.

    2012-11-01

    Context. Analysis of published [O iii] and [S iii] temperatures measurements of emission line objects consisting of Hii galaxies, giant extragalactic Hii regions, Galactic Hii regions, and Hii regions from the Magellanic Clouds reveal that the [O iii] temperatures are higher than the corresponding values from [S iii] in most objects with gas metallicities in excess of 0.2 solar. For the coolest nebulae (the highest metallicities), the [O iii] temperature excess can reach ~3000 K. Aims: We look for an explanation for these temperature differences and explore the parameter space of models with the aim of reproducing the observed trend of TO iii > TS iii in Hii regions with temperatures below 14 000 K. Methods: Using standard photoionization models, we varied the ionization parameter, the hardness of the ionizing continuum, and the gas metallicities in order to characterize how models behave with respect to the observations. We introduced temperature inhomogeneities and varied their mean squared amplitude t2 . We explored the possibility of inhomogeneities in abundances by combining two models of widely different metallicity. We calculated models that consider the possibility of a non-Maxwell-Boltzmann energy distribution (a κ-distribution) for the electron energies. We also considered shock heating within the photoionized nebula. Results: Simple photoionization calculations yield nearly equal [O iii] and [S iii] temperatures in the domain of interest. Hence these models fail to reproduce the [O iii] temperature excess. Models that consider temperature inhomogeneities, as measured by the mean squared amplitude t2 , also fail in the regime where TO iii < 14 000 K. Three options remain that can reproduce the observed excess in TO iii temperatures: (1) large metallicity inhomogeneities in the nebula; a (2) κ-distribution for the electron energies; and (3) shock waves that propagate in the photoionized plasma at velocities ~60 km s-1. Conclusions: The observed nebular

  6. Solidity of Type III Bernoulli Crossed Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrakchi, Amine

    2017-03-01

    We generalize a theorem of Chifan and Ioana by proving that for any, possibly type III, amenable von Neumann algebra A 0, any faithful normal state φ_0 and any discrete group {Γ}, the associated Bernoulli crossed product von Neumann algebra {M=(A_0,φ_0)^{overline{⊗} Γ} rtimes Γ} is solid relatively to L(Γ). In particular, if L(Γ) is solid then M is solid and if {Γ} is non-amenable and {A_0 ≠ C then M is a full prime factor. This gives many new examples of solid or prime type III factors. Following Chifan and Ioana, we also obtain the first examples of solid non-amenable type III equivalence relations.

  7. Evolution of Class III treatment in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Ngan, Peter; Moon, Won

    2015-07-01

    Angle, Tweed, and Moyers classified Class III malocclusions into 3 types: pseudo, dentoalveolar, and skeletal. Clinicians have been trying to identify the best timing to intercept a Class III malocclusion that develops as early as the deciduous dentition. With microimplants as skeletal anchorage, orthopedic growth modification became more effective, and it also increased the scope of camouflage orthodontic treatment for patients who were not eligible for orthognathic surgery. However, orthodontic treatment combined with orthognathic surgery remains the only option for patients with a severe skeletal Class III malocclusion or a craniofacial anomaly. Distraction osteogenesis can now be performed intraorally at an earlier age. The surgery-first approach can minimize the length of time that the malocclusion needs to worsen before orthognathic surgery. Finally, the use of computed tomography scans for 3-dimensional diagnosis and treatment planning together with advances in imaging technology can improve the accuracy of surgical movements and the esthetic outcomes for these patients.

  8. BICEP2 III: Instrumental systematics

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, P. A. R.

    2015-11-23

    In a companion paper, we have reported a >5σ detection of degree scale B-mode polarization at 150 GHz by the Bicep2 experiment. Here we provide a detailed study of potential instrumental systematic contamination to that measurement. We focus extensively on spurious polarization that can potentially arise from beam imperfections. We present a heuristic classification of beam imperfections according to their symmetries and uniformities, and discuss how resulting contamination adds or cancels in maps that combine observations made at multiple orientations of the telescope about its boresight axis. We introduce a technique, which we call "deprojection," for filtering the leading order beam-induced contamination from time-ordered data, and show that it reduces power in Bicep2's actual and null-test BB spectra consistent with predictions using high signal-to-noise beam shape measurements. We detail the simulation pipeline that we use to directly simulate instrumental systematics and the calibration data used as input to that pipeline. Finally, we present the constraints on BB contamination from individual sources of potential systematics. We find that systematics contribute BB power that is a factor of ~10× below Bicep2's three-year statistical uncertainty, and negligible compared to the observed BB signal. Lastly, the contribution to the best-fit tensor/scalar ratio is at a level equivalent to r = (3–6) × 10–3.

  9. BICEP2 III: Instrumental systematics

    DOE PAGES

    Ade, P. A. R.

    2015-11-23

    In a companion paper, we have reported a >5σ detection of degree scale B-mode polarization at 150 GHz by the Bicep2 experiment. Here we provide a detailed study of potential instrumental systematic contamination to that measurement. We focus extensively on spurious polarization that can potentially arise from beam imperfections. We present a heuristic classification of beam imperfections according to their symmetries and uniformities, and discuss how resulting contamination adds or cancels in maps that combine observations made at multiple orientations of the telescope about its boresight axis. We introduce a technique, which we call "deprojection," for filtering the leading ordermore » beam-induced contamination from time-ordered data, and show that it reduces power in Bicep2's actual and null-test BB spectra consistent with predictions using high signal-to-noise beam shape measurements. We detail the simulation pipeline that we use to directly simulate instrumental systematics and the calibration data used as input to that pipeline. Finally, we present the constraints on BB contamination from individual sources of potential systematics. We find that systematics contribute BB power that is a factor of ~10× below Bicep2's three-year statistical uncertainty, and negligible compared to the observed BB signal. Lastly, the contribution to the best-fit tensor/scalar ratio is at a level equivalent to r = (3–6) × 10–3.« less

  10. Bicep2. III. INSTRUMENTAL SYSTEMATICS

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aikin, R. W.; Bock, J. J.; Brevik, J. A.; Filippini, J. P.; Golwala, S. R.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Barkats, D.; Benton, S. J.; Bischoff, C. A.; Buder, I.; Karkare, K. S.; Bullock, E.; Dowell, C. D.; Duband, L.; Fliescher, S.; Halpern, M.; Hasselfield, M.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D.; Collaboration: Bicep2 Collaboration; and others

    2015-12-01

    In a companion paper, we have reported a >5σ detection of degree scale B-mode polarization at 150 GHz by the Bicep2 experiment. Here we provide a detailed study of potential instrumental systematic contamination to that measurement. We focus extensively on spurious polarization that can potentially arise from beam imperfections. We present a heuristic classification of beam imperfections according to their symmetries and uniformities, and discuss how resulting contamination adds or cancels in maps that combine observations made at multiple orientations of the telescope about its boresight axis. We introduce a technique, which we call “deprojection,” for filtering the leading order beam-induced contamination from time-ordered data, and show that it reduces power in Bicep2's actual and null-test BB spectra consistent with predictions using high signal-to-noise beam shape measurements. We detail the simulation pipeline that we use to directly simulate instrumental systematics and the calibration data used as input to that pipeline. Finally, we present the constraints on BB contamination from individual sources of potential systematics. We find that systematics contribute BB power that is a factor of ∼10× below Bicep2's three-year statistical uncertainty, and negligible compared to the observed BB signal. The contribution to the best-fit tensor/scalar ratio is at a level equivalent to r = (3–6) × 10{sup −3}.

  11. SAGE III Aerosol Extinction Validation in the Arctic Winter: Comparisons with SAGE II and POAM III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, L. W.; Poole, L. R.; Randall, C. E.

    2007-01-01

    The use of SAGE III multiwavelength aerosol extinction coefficient measurements to infer PSC type is contingent on the robustness of both the extinction magnitude and its spectral variation. Past validation with SAGE II and other similar measurements has shown that the SAGE III extinction coefficient measurements are reliable though the comparisons have been greatly weighted toward measurements made at mid-latitudes. Some aerosol comparisons made in the Arctic winter as a part of SOLVE II suggested that SAGE III values, particularly at longer wavelengths, are too small with the implication that both the magnitude and the wavelength dependence are not reliable. Comparisons with POAM III have also suggested a similar discrepancy. Herein, we use SAGE II data as a common standard for comparison of SAGE III and POAM III measurements in the Arctic winters of 2002/2003 through 2004/2005. During the winter, SAGE II measurements are made infrequently at the same latitudes as these instruments. We have mitigated this problem through the use potential vorticity as a spatial coordinate and thus greatly increased the number of coincident events. We find that SAGE II and III extinction coefficient measurements show a high degree of compatibility at both 1020 nm and 450 nm except a 10-20% bias at both wavelengths. In addition, the 452 to 1020-nm extinction ratio shows a consistent bias of approx. 30% throughout the lower stratosphere. We also find that SAGE II and POAM III are on average consistent though the comparisons show a much higher variability and larger bias than SAGE II/III comparisons. In addition, we find that the two data sets are not well correlated below 18 km. Overall, we find both the extinction values and the spectral dependence from SAGE III are robust and we find no evidence of a significant defect within the Arctic vortex.

  12. Complexation of Cm(III)/Eu(III) with Silicate in Basic Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zheming; Felmy, Andrew R; Xia, Yuanxian; Qafoku, Odeta; Yantasee, Wassana; Cho, Herman M

    2005-12-01

    The complexation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) with dissolved silica was studied by time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) in basic solutions over a range of total silica concentrations and ionic strengths (NaNO3). In highly basic solutions, both the fluorescence spectra and lifetime data indicate the formation of Eu(III)/Cm(III) complexes with oligomeric silicates as well as hydroxide groups and/or nitrate in the presence of concentrated NaNO3. At high silica concentration the inner-sphere complexation caused the shift of the fluorescence spectral maximum for Cm(III)(aq) from 594 nm to up to 607 nm and a significant increase of the hypersensitive 5D0 → 7F2 band around 615 nm relative to the non-hypersensitive 5D0 → 7F1 band at 592 nm for Eu(III). At the same time, the fluorescence lifetime increased from 68 s to up to 202 s for Cm(III) in 0.1 M NaNO3 and from 115 s to 1.8 ms for Eu(III) in 3.0 M and 5.0 M NaNO3, consistent with the removal of 6 or more water molecules upon silicate complexation. Linear correlations between the spectral intensity of Cm(III) complexes and the concentrations of the dissolved silicates suggest that Cm(III) complexation with the silicate dimer, Si2O2(OH)22-, may play a role.

  13. Antithrombin III: biodistribution in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Knot, E A; de Jong, E; ten Cate, J W; Gie, L K; van Royen, E A

    1987-12-18

    Five healthy volunteers were injected intravenously with 73-90 uCi purified human 131I-Antithrombin III (AT III), specific biological activity 5.6 U/mg. The tracer data were analysed using a three compartment model. The plasma radioactivity half life was 66.2 +/- 1.2 (sem) h, the fractional catabolic rate constant of the plasma pool was 0.025 +/- 0.002 (sem) h-1. These data were comparable with those described in the literature. Because of the difficulty in translating the mathematical analysis of various compartments into the biological model, biodistribution was monitored by a gamma camera linked to a DEC PDP 11/34 computer system. Dynamic and static images were obtained at fixed time intervals following the injection of 131I-AT III. Whole body scanning at intervals between the time of injection (t = 0) and t = 24.5 h showed 131I-AT III distribution over the heart, lungs, liver, spleen and great vessels. Dynamic scanning was performed over the heart, spleen and liver. Overlayed frames in the first ten minutes after the 131I-AT III injection showed the following radioactivity expressed as percentage of the injected dose; 5.9% +/- 0.3 (sem) over the heart, 10.6% +/- 0.9 (sem) over the liver and 1.1% +/- 0.1 (sem) over the spleen. A slower decline of the radioactivity between t = 0 and t = 24 h; (19%) was measured over the liver compared with the radioactivity disappearance over the heart region. This shows, in combination with the fact that the radioactivity disappearance over the heart was identical with the radioactivity decline measured in the plasma samples that retention of 131I-AT III occurred in the liver.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Stellar populations of Shapley constellation III

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, N.; Mould, J.; Thompson, I.

    1987-12-01

    A V-I color-magnitude diagram is presented for a 0.6-sq deg field encompassing part of the LMC's Shapley III star-formation region. The pronounced luminosity function peak exhibited by the main-sequence stars is identified with the turnoff of the first star-forming burst, and then used as an age indicator with which to compare stellar evolutionary models with the dynamical age estimate determined by Dopita et al. (1985); the initial luminosity and mass functions are derived. The dynamical clock in Shapley III is in better agreement with the stellar evolutionary clock if models without convective overshoot are adopted. 42 references.

  15. Validation Test Report for WAVEWATCH III

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-30

    WAM and WAVEWATCH III. An experimental realtime system is now running on NAVOCEANO hardware and uses the “multi-grid” (two-way nesting) feature of...WW3, with a global grid and nine regional grids. The realtime system is validated in a limited sense using several coastal and deep- water NOAA NDBC...WAVEWATCH III Wave model Windsea Swell 73-5097-A3-5 Space & Naval Warfare Systems Command 2451 Crystal Drive Arlington, VA 22245-5200 0603207N SPAWAR ii

  16. Siderophores are not involved in Fe(III) solubilization during anaerobic Fe(III) respiration by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Fennessey, Christine M; Jones, Morris E; Taillefert, Martial; DiChristina, Thomas J

    2010-04-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 respires a wide range of anaerobic electron acceptors, including sparingly soluble Fe(III) oxides. In the present study, S. oneidensis was found to produce Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration, a respiratory strategy postulated to destabilize Fe(III) and produce more readily reducible soluble organic Fe(III). In-frame gene deletion mutagenesis, siderophore detection assays, and voltammetric techniques were combined to determine (i) if the Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands produced by S. oneidensis during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration were synthesized via siderophore biosynthesis systems and (ii) if the Fe(III)-siderophore reductase was required for respiration of soluble organic Fe(III) as an anaerobic electron acceptor. Genes predicted to encode the siderophore (hydroxamate) biosynthesis system (SO3030 to SO3032), the Fe(III)-hydroxamate receptor (SO3033), and the Fe(III)-hydroxamate reductase (SO3034) were identified in the S. oneidensis genome, and corresponding in-frame gene deletion mutants were constructed. DeltaSO3031 was unable to synthesize siderophores or produce soluble organic Fe(III) during aerobic respiration yet retained the ability to solubilize and respire Fe(III) at wild-type rates during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration. DeltaSO3034 retained the ability to synthesize siderophores during aerobic respiration and to solubilize and respire Fe(III) at wild-type rates during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration. These findings indicate that the Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands produced by S. oneidensis during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration are not synthesized via the hydroxamate biosynthesis system and that the Fe(III)-hydroxamate reductase is not essential for respiration of Fe(III)-citrate or Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) as an anaerobic electron acceptor.

  17. Shewanella putrefaciens produces an Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligand during anaerobic respiration on insoluble Fe(III) oxides.

    PubMed

    Taillefert, Martial; Beckler, Jordon S; Carey, Elizabeth; Burns, Justin L; Fennessey, Christine M; DiChristina, Thomas J

    2007-11-01

    The mechanism of Fe(III) reduction was investigated using voltammetric techniques in anaerobic incubations of Shewanella putrefaciens strain 200 supplemented with Fe(III) citrate or a suite of Fe(III) oxides as terminal electron acceptor. Results indicate that organic complexes of Fe(III) are produced during the reduction of Fe(III) at rates that correlate with the reactivity of the Fe(III) phase and bacterial cell density. Anaerobic Fe(III) solubilization activity is detected with either Fe(III) oxides or Fe(III) citrate, suggesting that the organic ligand produced is strong enough to destabilize Fe(III) from soluble or solid Fe(III) substrates. Results also demonstrate that Fe(III) oxide dissolution is not controlled by the intrinsic chemical reactivity of the Fe(III) oxides. Instead, the chemical reaction between the endogenous organic ligand is only affected by the number of reactive surface sites available to S. putrefaciens. This report describes the first application of voltammetric techniques to demonstrate production of soluble organic-Fe(III) complexes by any Fe(III)-reducing microorganism and is the first report of a Fe(III)-solubilizing ligand generated by a metal-reducing member of the genus Shewanella.

  18. Effects upon metabolic pathways and energy production by Sb(III) and As(III)/Sb(III)-oxidase gene aioA in Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingxin; Yang, Birong; Shi, Manman; Yuan, Kai; Guo, Wei; Li, Mingshun; Wang, Gejiao

    2017-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4 is a heterotrophic arsenite [As(III)]/antimonite [Sb(III)]-oxidizing strain. The As(III) oxidase AioAB is responsible for As(III) oxidation in the periplasm and it is also involved in Sb(III) oxidation in Agrobacterium tumefaciens 5A. In addition, Sb(III) oxidase AnoA and cellular H2O2 are also responsible for Sb(III) oxidation in strain GW4. However, the deletion of aioA increased the Sb(III) oxidation efficiency in strain GW4. In the present study, we found that the cell mobility to Sb(III), ATP and NADH contents and heat release were also increased by Sb(III) and more significantly in the aioA mutant. Proteomics and transcriptional analyses showed that proteins/genes involved in Sb(III) oxidation and resistance, stress responses, carbon metabolism, cell mobility, phosphonate and phosphinate metabolism, and amino acid and nucleotide metabolism were induced by Sb(III) and were more significantly induced in the aioA mutant. The results suggested that Sb(III) oxidation may produce energy. In addition, without periplasmic AioAB, more Sb(III) would enter bacterial cells, however, the cytoplasmic AnoA and the oxidative stress response proteins were significantly up-regulated, which may contribute to the increased Sb(III) oxidation efficiency. Moreover, the carbon metabolism was also activated to generate more energy against Sb(III) stress. The generated energy may be used in Sb transportation, DNA repair, amino acid synthesis, and cell mobility, and may be released in the form of heat.

  19. Effects upon metabolic pathways and energy production by Sb(III) and As(III)/Sb(III)-oxidase gene aioA in Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingxin; Yang, Birong; Shi, Manman; Yuan, Kai; Guo, Wei; Li, Mingshun

    2017-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4 is a heterotrophic arsenite [As(III)]/antimonite [Sb(III)]-oxidizing strain. The As(III) oxidase AioAB is responsible for As(III) oxidation in the periplasm and it is also involved in Sb(III) oxidation in Agrobacterium tumefaciens 5A. In addition, Sb(III) oxidase AnoA and cellular H2O2 are also responsible for Sb(III) oxidation in strain GW4. However, the deletion of aioA increased the Sb(III) oxidation efficiency in strain GW4. In the present study, we found that the cell mobility to Sb(III), ATP and NADH contents and heat release were also increased by Sb(III) and more significantly in the aioA mutant. Proteomics and transcriptional analyses showed that proteins/genes involved in Sb(III) oxidation and resistance, stress responses, carbon metabolism, cell mobility, phosphonate and phosphinate metabolism, and amino acid and nucleotide metabolism were induced by Sb(III) and were more significantly induced in the aioA mutant. The results suggested that Sb(III) oxidation may produce energy. In addition, without periplasmic AioAB, more Sb(III) would enter bacterial cells, however, the cytoplasmic AnoA and the oxidative stress response proteins were significantly up-regulated, which may contribute to the increased Sb(III) oxidation efficiency. Moreover, the carbon metabolism was also activated to generate more energy against Sb(III) stress. The generated energy may be used in Sb transportation, DNA repair, amino acid synthesis, and cell mobility, and may be released in the form of heat. PMID:28241045

  20. Modulation of active Cr(III) complexes by bath preparation to adjust Cr(III) electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Wang, Zhi; Wang, Ming-yong; Zhang, Yi

    2013-09-01

    The preparation process of the Cr(III) bath was studied based on a perspective of accelerating the formation of active Cr(III) complexes. The results of ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy (UV-Vis) and electrodeposition showed that active Cr(III) complexes in the bath prepared at room temperature in several days were rare for depositing chromium. The increase of heating temperature, time, and pH value during the bath preparation promoted the formation of active Cr(III) complexes. The chromium deposition rate increased with the concentration of active Cr(III) complexes increasing. Increasing the heating temperature from 60 to 96°C, the chromium deposition rate increased from 0.40 to 0.71 μm/min. When the concentration of active Cr(III) complexes increased, the grain size of Cr coatings increased, and the carbon content of the coating decreased. It is deduced that Cr(H2O)4(OH)L2+ (L is an organic ligand, and its valence is omitted) is a primary active Cr(III) complex.

  1. Interpreting change on the WAIS-III/WMS-III in clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Iverson, G L

    2001-02-01

    Clinicians should note that there is considerable variability in the reliabilities of the index and subtest scores derived from the third editions of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III) and the Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS-III). The purpose of this article is to review these reliabilities and to illustrate how they can be used to interpret change in patients' performances from test to retest. The WAIS-III IQ and Index scores are consistently the most reliable scores, in terms of both internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The most internally consistent WAIS-III subtests are Vocabulary, Information, Digit Span, Matrix Reasoning, and Arithmetic. Information and Vocabulary have the highest test-retest reliability. On the WMS-III, the Auditory Immediate Index, Immediate Memory Index, Auditory Delayed Index, and General Memory Index are the most reliable, in terms of both internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The Logical Memory I and Verbal Paired Associates I subtests are the most reliable. Data from three clinical groups (i.e., Alzheimer's disease, chronic alcohol abuse, and schizophrenia) were extracted from the Technical Manual [Psychological Corporation (1997). WAIS-III/WMS-III Technical Manual. San Antonio: Harcourt Brace] for the purpose of calculating reliable change estimates. A table of confidence intervals for test-retest measurement error is provided to help the clinician determine if patients have reliably improved or deteriorated on follow-up testing.

  2. DX centers in III-V semiconductors under hydrostatic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Wolk, J.A.

    1992-11-01

    DX centers are deep level defects found in some III-V semiconductors. They have persistent photoconductivity and large difference between thermal and optical ionization energies. Hydrostatic pressure was used to study microstructure of these defects. A new local vibrational mode (LVM) was observed in hydrostatically stressed, Si-doped GaAs. Corresponding infrared absorption peak is distinct from the Si{sub Ga} shallow donor LVM peak, which is the only other LVM peak observed in our samples, and is assigned to the Si DX center. Analysis of the relative intensities of the Si DX LVM and the Si shallow donor LVM peaks, combined with Hall effect and resistivity indicate that the Si DX center is negatively charged. Frequency of this new mode provides clues to the structure of this defect. A pressure induced deep donor level in S-doped InP was also discovered which has the properties of a DX center. Pressure at which the new defect becomes more stable than the shallow donor is 82 kbar. Optical ionization energy and energy dependence of the optical absorption cross section was measured for this new effect. Capture barrier from the conduction band into the DX state were also determined. That DX centers can be formed in InP by pressure suggests that DX states should be common in n-type III-V semiconductors. A method is suggested for predicting under what conditions these defects will be the most stable form of the donor impurity.

  3. Solvent extraction of Sc(III), Zr(IV), Th(IV), Fe(III), and Lu(III) with thiosubstituted organophosphinic acid extractants

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.; Li, D.

    1995-05-01

    The solvent extraction of Sc(III), Zr(IV), Th(IV), Fe(III) and Lu(III) with Cyanex 302 (bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)monothiphosphinic acid) and Cyanex 301 (bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)dithiophosphinic acid) in n-hexane from acidic aqueous solutions has been investigated systematically. The effect of equilibrium aqueous acidity on the extraction with these reagents was studied. The separation of Th(IV), Fe(III) and Lu(III) from Sc(III), or the separation of other metals from Lu(III) with Cyanex 302, can be achieved by controlling the aqueous acidity. However, Cyanex 301 exhibited a poor selectivity for the above metals, except for Lu(III). The extraction of these metals with Cyanex 272, Cyanex 302 and Cyanex 301 has been compared. The stripping percentages of Sc(III) for Cyanex 302 and Cyanex 301 in a single stage are near 78% and 75% with 3.5 mol/L and 5.8 mol/L sulphuric acid solutions, respectively. The effects of extractant concentration and temperature on the extraction of Sc(III) were investigated. The stoichiometry of the extraction of Sc(III) with Cyanex 302 was determined. The role of different components of Cyanex 302 in the extraction of Sc(III) was discussed. 18 refs., 10 figs.

  4. Me-3,2-HOPO Complexes of Near Infra-Red (NIR) Emitting Lanthanides: Efficient Sensitization of Yb(III) and Nd(III) in Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Evan G.; Xu, Jide; Dodani, Sheel; Jocher, Christoph; D'Aleo, Anthony; Seitz, Michael; Raymond, Kenneth

    2009-11-10

    The synthesis, X-ray structure, solution stability, and photophysical properties of several trivalent lanthanide complexes of Yb(III) and Nd(III) using both tetradentate and octadentate ligand design strategies and incorporating the 1-methyl-3-hydroxy-pyridin-2-one (Me-3,2-HOPO) chelate group are reported. Both the Yb(III) and Nd(III) complexes have emission bands in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) region, and this luminescence is retained in aqueous solution ({Phi}{sub tot}{sup Yb} {approx} 0.09-0.22%). Furthermore, the complexes demonstrate very high stability (pYb {approx} 18.8-21.9) in aqueous solution, making them good candidates for further development as probes for NIR imaging. Analysis of the low temperature (77 K) photophysical measurements for a model Gd(III) complex were used to gain an insight into the electronic structure, and were found to agree well with corresponding TD-DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-311G{sup ++}(d,p) level of theory for a simplified model monovalent sodium complex.

  5. Me-3,2-HOPO Complexes of Near Infra-Red (NIR) Emitting Lanthanides: Efficient Sensitization of Yb(III) and Nd(III) in Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Evan G.; Xu, Jide; Dodani, Sheel C.; Jocher, Christoph J.; D'Aléo, Anthony; Seitz, Michael; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2011-01-01

    The synthesis, X-ray structure, solution stability, and photophysical properties of several trivalent lanthanide complexes of Yb(III) and Nd(III) using both tetradentate and octadentate ligand design strategies and incorporating the 1-methyl-3-hydroxy-pyridin-2-one (Me-3,2-HOPO) chelate group are reported. Both the Yb(III) and Nd(III) complexes have emission bands in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) region, and this luminescence is retained in aqueous solution (ΦtotYb~0.09−0.22%). Furthermore, the complexes demonstrate very high stability (pYb ~ 18.8 – 21.9) in aqueous solution, making them good candidates for further development as probes for NIR imaging. Analysis of the low temperature (77 K) photophysical measurements for a model Gd(III) complex were used to gain an insight into the electronic structure, and were found to agree well with corresponding TD-DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-311G++(d,p) level of theory for a simplified model monovalent sodium complex. PMID:20364838

  6. Alterations in cytosol free calcium in horseradish roots simultaneously exposed to lanthanum(III) and acid rain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuanbo; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Anhua; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2016-04-01

    The extensive use of rare earth elements (REEs) has increased their environmental levels. REE pollution concomitant with acid rain in many agricultural regions can affect crop growth. Cytosol free calcium ions (Ca(2+)) play an important role in almost all cellular activities. However, no data have been reported regarding the role of cytosol free Ca(2+) in plant roots simultaneously exposed to REE and acid rain. In this study, the effects of exposures to lanthanum(III) and acid rain, independently and in combination, on cytosol free Ca(2+) levels, root activity, metal contents, biomass, cytosol pH and La contents in horseradish roots were investigated. The simultaneous exposures to La(III) and acid rain increased or decreased the cytosol free Ca(2+) levels, depending on the concentration of La(III), and these effects were more evident than independent exposure to La(III) or acid rain. In combined exposures, cytosol free Ca(2+) played an important role in the regulation of root activity, metal contents and biomass. These roles were closely related to La(III) dose, acid rain strength and treatment mode (independent exposure or simultaneous exposure). A low concentration of La(III) (20 mg L(-1)) could alleviate the adverse effects on the roots caused by acid rain, and the combined exposures at higher concentrations of La(III) and acid rain had synergic effects on the roots.

  7. Low-Frequency Type III Bursts and Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Makela, Pertti

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the coronal mass ejections (CMEs), flares, and type 11 radio bursts associated with a set of six low frequency (<14 MHz) extended type III bursts from active region 10588. The durations were measured at 1 and 14 MHz using high resolution data from Wind/WAVES and were within the range (>15 min) normally used to define these bursts. All but one of the type III bursts was not associated with a type 11 burst in the metric or longer wavelength domains. The burst without type 11 burst also lacked a solar energetic particle (SEP) event at energies >25 MeV. The 1-MHz duration of the type III burst (28 min) is near the median value of type III durations found for gradual SEP events and ground level enhancement (GLE) events. Yet, there was no sign of SEP events. On the other hand, two other type III bursts from the same active region had similar duration but accompanied by WAVES type 11 bursts; these bursts were also accompanied by SEP events detected by SOHO/ERNE. The CMEs were of similar speeds and the flares are also of similar size and duration. This study suggests that the type III burst duration may not be a good indicator of an SEP event.

  8. Prominent role of exopeptidase DPP III in estrogen-mediated protection against hyperoxia in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sobočanec, Sandra; Filić, Vedrana; Matovina, Mihaela; Majhen, Dragomira; Šafranko, Željka Mačak; Hadžija, Marijana Popović; Krsnik, Željka; Kurilj, Andrea Gudan; Šarić, Ana; Abramić, Marija; Balog, Tihomir

    2016-01-01

    A number of age-related diseases have a low incidence in females, which is attributed to a protective effect of sex hormones. For instance, the female sex hormone estrogen (E2) has a well established cytoprotective effect against oxidative stress, which strongly contributes to ageing. However, the mechanism by which E2 exerts its protective activity remains elusive. In this study we address the question whether the E2-induced protective effect against hyperoxia is mediated by the Nrf-2/Keap-1 signaling pathway. In particular, we investigate the E2-induced expression and cellular distribution of DPP III monozinc exopeptidase, a member of the Nrf-2/Keap-1 pathway, upon hyperoxia treatment. We find that DPP III accumulates in the nucleus in response to hyperoxia. Further, we show that combined induction of hyperoxia and E2 administration have an additive effect on the nuclear accumulation of DPP III. The level of nuclear accumulation of DPP III is comparable to nuclear accumulation of Nrf-2 in healthy female mice exposed to hyperoxia. In ovariectomized females exposed to hyperoxia, supplementation of E2 induced upregulation of DPP III, Ho-1, Sirt-1 and downregulation of Ppar-γ. While other cytoprotective mechanisms cannot be excluded, these findings demonstrate a prominent role of DPP III, along with Sirt-1, in the E2-mediated protection against hyperoxia. PMID:26774752

  9. Pregnancy Differentially Regulates the Collagens Types I and III in Left Ventricle from Rat Heart

    PubMed Central

    Limon-Miranda, Sarai; Salazar-Enriquez, Diana G.; Muñiz, Jesus; Ramirez-Archila, Mario V.; Sanchez-Pastor, Enrique A.; Andrade, Felipa; Soñanez-Organis, Jose G.; Moran-Palacio, Edgar F.; Virgen-Ortiz, Adolfo

    2014-01-01

    The pathologic cardiac remodeling has been widely documented; however, the physiological cardiac remodeling induced by pregnancy and its reversion in postpartum are poorly understood. In the present study we investigated the changes in collagen I (Col I) and collagen III (Col III) mRNA and protein levels in left ventricle from rat heart during pregnancy and postpartum. Col I and Col III mRNA expression in left ventricle samples during pregnancy and postpartum were analyzed by using quantitative PCR. Data obtained from gene expression show that Col I and Col III in left ventricle are upregulated during pregnancy with reversion in postpartum. In contrast to gene expression, the protein expression evaluated by western blot showed that Col I is downregulated and Col III is upregulated in left ventricle during pregnancy. In conclusion, the pregnancy differentially regulates collagens types I and III in heart; this finding could be an important molecular mechanism that regulates the ventricular stiffness in response to blood volume overload present during pregnancy which is reversed in postpartum. PMID:25147829

  10. Pregnancy differentially regulates the collagens types I and III in left ventricle from rat heart.

    PubMed

    Limon-Miranda, Sarai; Salazar-Enriquez, Diana G; Muñiz, Jesus; Ramirez-Archila, Mario V; Sanchez-Pastor, Enrique A; Andrade, Felipa; Soñanez-Organis, Jose G; Moran-Palacio, Edgar F; Virgen-Ortiz, Adolfo

    2014-01-01

    The pathologic cardiac remodeling has been widely documented; however, the physiological cardiac remodeling induced by pregnancy and its reversion in postpartum are poorly understood. In the present study we investigated the changes in collagen I (Col I) and collagen III (Col III) mRNA and protein levels in left ventricle from rat heart during pregnancy and postpartum. Col I and Col III mRNA expression in left ventricle samples during pregnancy and postpartum were analyzed by using quantitative PCR. Data obtained from gene expression show that Col I and Col III in left ventricle are upregulated during pregnancy with reversion in postpartum. In contrast to gene expression, the protein expression evaluated by western blot showed that Col I is downregulated and Col III is upregulated in left ventricle during pregnancy. In conclusion, the pregnancy differentially regulates collagens types I and III in heart; this finding could be an important molecular mechanism that regulates the ventricular stiffness in response to blood volume overload present during pregnancy which is reversed in postpartum.

  11. ESEA III Evaluation and Dissemination: An Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balyeat, Ralph R.; Norman, C. Douglas

    This study surveyed evaluation and dissemination/diffusion practices of ESEA III projects funded in the 1969 fiscal year, which projects are nearing the end of their operations as federally supported programs. The study attempted to discover if (1) the projects were evaluated in accordance with generally accepted procedures, (2) the project…

  12. Leveraging Information Technology. Track III: Organizational Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Seven papers from the 1987 CAUSE conference's Track III, Organizational Issues, are presented. They include: "Learning Resources and Technologies: A Unified Organizational Reorientation to Administering Educational Support Services" (Morrell D. Boone); "IRM: A Short-Lived Concept?" (James I. Penrod and Michael G. Dolence);…

  13. Sex Bias, Diagnosis, and DSM-III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Sandra; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Sixty-five clinical psycholgists independently diagnosed 18 written case histories on the basis of 110 DSM-III categories. Females were rated significantly more histrionic than males exhibiting identical histrionic symptoms, but males were not rated as more antisocial than females. The findings suggest that vague diagnostic descriptions promote…

  14. International Space Programs. Aerospace Education III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Air Univ., Maxwell AFB, AL. Junior Reserve Office Training Corps.

    This curriculum guide is prepared for the Aerospace Education III series publication entitled "International Space Programs." The guide is organized according to specific chapters in the textbook. It provides guidelines for teachers in terms of objectives, behavioral objectives, suggested outlines, orientation, suggested key points,…

  15. Constraining the Statistics of Population III Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacy, Athena; Bromm, Volker

    2012-01-01

    We perform a cosmological simulation in order to model the growth and evolution of Population III (Pop III) stellar systems in a range of host minihalo environments. A Pop III multiple system forms in each of the ten minihaloes, and the overall mass function is top-heavy compared to the currently observed initial mass function in the Milky Way. Using a sink particle to represent each growing protostar, we examine the binary characteristics of the multiple systems, resolving orbits on scales as small as 20 AU. We find a binary fraction of approx. 36, with semi-major axes as large as 3000 AU. The distribution of orbital periods is slightly peaked at approx. < 900 yr, while the distribution of mass ratios is relatively flat. Of all sink particles formed within the ten minihaloes, approx. 50 are lost to mergers with larger sinks, and 50 of the remaining sinks are ejected from their star-forming disks. The large binary fraction may have important implications for Pop III evolution and nucleosynthesis, as well as the final fate of the first stars.

  16. International Space Programs. Aerospace Education III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulmer, S. B.

    This book, one in the series on Aerospace Education III, is a collection of the diverse information available regarding the international space programs. The five goals listed for the book are: to examine the Soviet space program, to understand the future of Soviet space activity, to examine other national and international space programs, to…

  17. Academic Achievement of NCAA Division III Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, Kathy A.; Hickey, Ann

    2014-01-01

    A study of 215 athletes at a small private liberal arts Division III college revealed that athletes (a) begin their college experience with SATs no different from non-athletes; (b) attain GPAs that do not significantly differ from those of nonathletes; (c) achieve GPAs that do not significantly differ between their "in-season" semester…

  18. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, T.D.

    1998-12-08

    A bandpass photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The bandpass photodetector detects electromagnetic radiation between a lower transition wavelength and an upper transition wavelength. That detector comprises two low pass photodetectors. The response of the two low pass photodetectors is subtracted to yield a response signal. 24 figs.

  19. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D.

    1998-01-01

    A bandpass photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties. The bandpass photodetector detects electromagnetic radiation between a lower transition wavelength and an upper transition wavelength. That detector comprises two low pass photodetectors. The response of the two low pass photodetectors is subtracted to yield a response signal.

  20. The Zeplin-Iii Veto Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scovell, P. R.

    2010-12-01

    An active veto detector to complement the ZEPLIN-III two phase Xenon, direct dark matter device is described. The design consists of 52 plastic scintillator segments, individually read out by high efficiency photomultipliers, coupled to a Gd loaded passive polypropylene shield. Experimental work was performed to determine the plastic scintillator characteristics which were used to inform a complete end-to-end Monte Carlo simulation of the expected performance of the new instrument, both operating alone and as an active veto detector for ZEPLIN-III. The veto device will be capable of tagging over 65% of expected coincident nuclear recoil events in the energy range of interest in ZEPLIN-III, and over 14% for gamma ray rejection (gamma and neutron rate is predicted by simulation), while contributing no significant additional background. In addition it will also provide valuable diagnostic capabilities. The inclusion of the veto to ZEPLIN-III will aid to significantly improve the sensitivity to spin independent WIMP-nucleon cross sections 10-9 pb.

  1. Modelling the arsenic (V) and (III) adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, I.; Meghea, A.; Peleanu, I.; Gonzalo, A.; Valiente, M.; Zaharescu, M.

    2003-01-01

    Arsenic has gained great notoriety historically for its toxic properties. In aquatic environment, arsenic can exist in several oxidation states, as both inorganic and organometallic species. As (V) is less toxic than As (III). Most research has been directed to the control of arsenic pollution of potable water. Various techniques such as precipitation with iron and aluminium hydroxides, ion exchange, reverse osmosis, and adsorption are used for As (V) removal from surface and waste waters. Because of the easy handling of sludge, its free operation and regeneration capability, the adsorption technique has secured a place as one of the advanced methods of arsenic removal. A study of As (III) and As (V) sorption onto some different adsorbents (Fe (III) — iminodiacetate resin, nanocomposite materials, Fe(III) — forager sponge) referring to kinetic considerations and modelling of the process will be presented. All the systems studied are better described by Freundlich-Langmuir isotherm and the rate constant evaluation shows a sub-unitary order for the adsorption process.

  2. Kenston Aerospace: Title III ESEA Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenston Local School District, Chagrin Falls, OH.

    The objectives of a three-year comprehensive aerospace education program at Kenston High School, Chagrin Falls, Ohio, funded under Title III ESEA, were to provide marketable skills for non-College-bound students as well as counseling for the student planning on college or technical school education in the aviation field. Students also were taught…

  3. FutureTox III: Bridges for Translation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present document describes key discussion points and outcomes of a Society of Toxicology (SOT) Contemporary Concepts in Toxicology (CCT) Workshop, entitled FutureTox III1,2 that was held in Crystal City, Virginia, November 19-20, 2015. The workshop built on the many lessons l...

  4. Gold(III)-Catalyzed Hydration of Phenylacetylene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, J. Michelle; Tzeel, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    A guided inquiry-based experiment exploring the regioselectivity of the hydration of phenylacetylene is described. The experiment uses an acidic gold(III) catalyst in a benign methanol/water solvent system to introduce students to alkyne chemistry and key principles of green chemistry. The experiment can be easily completed in approximately 2 h,…

  5. Maggie III: The Prototypical Library System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowlin, Kenneth E.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes the Maggie III automated library system, which supports a public access catalog, cataloging interface, bibliographic maintenance, circulation, electronic mail, and community information databases, with acquisitions and serials modules planned. Sidebars describe the community information database's structure, planned use of software by…

  6. Exploring Flipped Classroom Instruction in Calculus III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Nicholas H.; Quint, Christa; Norris, Scott A.; Carr, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    In an undergraduate Calculus III class, we explore the effect of "flipping" the instructional delivery of content on both student performance and student perceptions. Two instructors collaborated to determine daily lecture notes, assigned the same homework problems, and gave identical exams; however, compared to a more traditional…

  7. The Changing Nature of Division III Athletics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, William

    2014-01-01

    Non-selective Division III institutions often face challenges in meeting their enrollment goals. To ensure their continued viability, these schools recruit large numbers of student athletes. As a result, when compared to FBS (Football Bowl Division) institutions these schools have a much higher percentage of student athletes on campus and a…

  8. The Operational Level of War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    Ramsay III, Dr. William G. Robertson, Major Claude R. Sasso, and Lieutenant Colonel Gary H. Wade. We owe special thanks to a few individuals who...initially assembled this bibliography in response to a requirement by Brigadier General William A. Stofft, then a colonel and director of CSI...and World War I. This battle analysis is accomplished largely at the operational level and is beneficial to the reader. Balck, Wilhelm ( William

  9. WAIS-III factor index score patterns after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Paul; Donders, Jacobus

    2003-06-01

    Profile subtypes, based on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) factor index scores, were examined in a sample of 166 patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) by means of a two-stage clustering procedure. Three reliable subtypes were found that were differentiated primarily by level of performance across all factor index scores, although each of them demonstrated a relative weakness on the Processing Speed index. These subtypes were then validated on the basis of demographic variables, injury parameters, and additional psychometric measures that had not been included in the clustering procedures. The results indicated that performance on the WAIS-III after TBI was affected by both injury severity and level of education. It is concluded that there is no unique "signature" profile on the WAIS-III after TBI, except that a relative strength on the Processing Speed index is uncommon with this condition.

  10. Satisfaction of skeletal class III patients treated with different types of orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Dantas, J F C; Neto, J N N; de Carvalho, S H G; Martins, I M C L deB; de Souza, R F; Sarmento, V A

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the satisfaction of skeletal class III patients following treatment with three different methods of orthognathic surgery. Eighty-two patients were divided into three groups according to the surgical procedure performed to correct their class III dentofacial deformity, and answered a questionnaire designed to determine the patient's opinion of the aesthetic and functional treatment outcomes. Differences in the patterns of responses to questions in the questionnaire related to satisfaction between the three clinical groups were evaluated by χ(2) and Fisher's exact tests (α=5%). Eighty patients (97.6%) reported being satisfied with the treatment received. There was no significant difference in response patterns among clinical groups when assessing the improvement in facial appearance, chewing, speech, and socialization. Maxillary advancement led to higher levels of improvement in breathing (P<0.0003). Class III patients treated by orthognathic surgery had high levels of satisfaction with the aesthetic and functional outcomes of their treatment.

  11. Binding study of lysozyme with Al(III) using chemiluminescence analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiangman; Luo, Kai; Song, Zhenghua

    2014-09-01

    The binding behavior of lysozyme with Al(III) is described using luminol as a luminescence probe by flow injection-chemiluminescence (FI-CL) analysis. It was found that the CL intensity of the luminol-lysozyme reaction could be markedly enhanced by Al(III), and the increase in CL intensity was linear with the Al(III) concentration over the range 0.3-30.0  pg  mL(-1) , with a detection limit of 0.1 pg  mL(-1) (3σ). Based on the interaction model of lysozyme with Al(III), lg[(I - I0 )/(2I0  - I)] = lgK + nlg[M], the binding constant K = 6.84 × 10(6)  L mol(-1) and the number of binding sites (n) = 0.76. The relative standard deviations were 3.2, 2.4 and 2.0% for 10.0, 20.0 and 30.0  pg  mL(-1) Al(III) (n = 7), respectively. This new method was successfully applied to continuous, quantitative monitoring of picogram level Al(III) in human saliva following oral intake of compound aluminum hydroxide tablets. It was found that Al(III) in saliva reached a maximum of 101.2  ng  mL(-1) at 3.0 h. The absorption rate constant ka , elimination rate constant k and half-life time t1/2 of Al(III) were 1.378  h(-1) , 0.264  h(-1) and 2.624  h, respectively.

  12. Cosmological Impact of Population III Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Bromm, Volker; Heger, Alexander; Jeon, Myoungwon; Woosley, Stan

    2015-03-01

    We present the results of the stellar feedback from Population III (Pop III) binaries by employing improved, more realistic Pop III evolutionary stellar models. To facilitate a meaningful comparison, we consider a fixed mass of 60 {{M}⊙ } incorporated in Pop III stars, either contained in a single star, or split up in binary stars of 30 {{M}⊙ } each or an asymmetric case of one 45 and one 15 {{M}⊙ } star. Whereas the sizes of the resulting H ii regions are comparable across all cases, the He iii regions around binary stars are significantly smaller than that of the single star. Consequently, the He+ 1640 \\overset{\\circ}A recombination line is expected to become much weaker. Supernova (SN) feedback exhibits great variety due to the uncertainty in possible explosion pathways. If at least one of the component stars dies as a hypernova about 10 times more energetic than conventional core-collapse SNe, the gas inside the host minihalo is effectively blown out, chemically enriching the intergalactic medium (IGM) to an average metallicity of {{10}-4}-{{10}-3} {{Z}⊙ }, out to ˜ 2 kpc. The single star, however, is more likely to collapse into a black hole, accompanied by at most very weak explosions. The effectiveness of early chemical enrichment would thus be significantly reduced, in contrast to the lower mass binary stars, where at least one component is likely to contribute to heavy element production and dispersal. Important new feedback physics is also introduced if close binaries can form high-mass X-ray binaries, leading to the pre-heating and -ionization of the IGM beyond the extent of the stellar H ii regions.

  13. Triglyceride level

    MedlinePlus

    ... levels may be due to: Low fat diet Hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid) Malabsorption syndrome (conditions in which the ... Familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency High blood cholesterol levels Hyperthyroidism Hypothyroidism Malabsorption Metabolism Nephrotic syndrome Protein in diet ...

  14. Inhibition of HTLV-III by exogenous oligonucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Goodchild, J.; Zamecnik, P.C.

    1989-02-21

    A method is described of detecting the presence of HTLV-III virus in a sample by demonstrating inhibition of replication of the virus in cells which are normally killed by the HTLV-III virus after the cells have been (a) combined with the sample and an oligonucleotide complementary to at least one highly conserved region of the HTLV-III genome necessary for HTLV-III replication and capable of hybridizing with at least the highly conserved region, the highly conserved region of the HTLV-III genome being a nucleotide sequence present in the genomes of HTLV-III isolates and the oligonucleotide complementary to at least one highly conserved region of the HTLV-III genome necessary for HTLV-III replication being complementary to a region of the HTLV-III genome.

  15. FMRI correlates of the WAIS-III symbol search subtest.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Lawrence H; Paskavitz, James F; O'Connor, Matthew J; Browndyke, Jeffrey N; Wellen, Jeremy W; Cohen, Ronald A

    2005-07-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) experiments frequently administer substantially adapted cognitive tests. This study was designed to identify FMRI correlates of a well-standardized clinical measure presented with minor adaptations. We administered the WAIS-III Symbol Search (SS) and a visuospatial control task to fifteen adults during FMRI. SS-related brain activity was identified, followed by analyses of activity related to performance level. Compared to the control task, SS was associated with greater activity in bilateral medial occipital, occipitoparietal, occipitotemporal, parietal, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices (DLPFC). Across both tasks, slower processing speed was also related to greater activity in these areas, except right DLPFC. Greater activity in left DLPFC was specifically related to slower processing speed during SS. Performance was consistent with education levels. Findings suggest that SS performance involves regions associated with executive and visual processing. Furthermore, slower SS performance was related to greater recruitment of left hemisphere regions associated with executive function in other studies.

  16. Effects of friction and high torque on fatigue crack propagation in mode III. [AISI 4140 and 4340

    SciTech Connect

    Nayeb-Hashemi, H.; McClintock, F.A.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1982-12-01

    Turbo-generator and automotive shafts are often subjected to complex histories of high torques. To provide a basis for fatigue life estimation in such components, a study of fatigue crack propagation in Mode III (anti-plane shear) for a mill-annealed AISI 4140 steel (R /SUB B/ 88, 590 MN/m/sup 2/ tensile strength) has been undertaken, using torsionally-loaded, circumferentially-notched cylindrical specimens. As demonstrated previously for higher strength AISI 4340 steel, Mode III cyclic crack growth rates (dc/dN) /SUB III/ can be related to the alternating stress intensity factor ..delta..K /SUB III/ for conditions of small-scale yielding. However, to describe crack propagation behavior over an extended range of crack growth rates (about 10/sup -6/ to 10/sup -2/ mm per cycle), where crack growth proceeds under elastic-plastic and full plastic conditions, no correlation between (dc/dN) /SUB III/ and ..delta..K /SUB III/ is possible. Accordingly, a new parameter for torsional crack growth, termed the plastic strain intensity GAMMA /SUB III/, is introduced and is shown to provide a unique description of Mode III crack growth behavior for a wide range of testing conditions, provided a mean load reduces friction, abrasion, and interlocking between mating fracture surfaces A micro-mechanical model for the main radial Mode III growth is extended to high nominal stress levels, and predicts that Mode III fatigue crack propagation rates should be proportional to the range of plastic strain intensity (..delta..GAMMA /SUB III/) if local Mode II growth rates are proportional to the displacements. Such predictions are shown to be in agreement with measured growth rates in AISI 4140 steel from 10/sup -6/ to 10/sup -2/ mm per cycle.

  17. LM1500 Engine Marinization Contract. Phase III. Materials and Processes Development for Phase III Engine Components.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The purpose of this report is to briefly document the principal difficulties encountered and the solutions which were effected in the course of manufacturing the modified Phase III test engine hardware. (Author)

  18. Cell line with endogenous EGFRvIII expression is a suitable model for research and drug development purposes.

    PubMed

    Stec, Wojciech J; Rosiak, Kamila; Siejka, Paulina; Peciak, Joanna; Popeda, Marta; Banaszczyk, Mateusz; Pawlowska, Roza; Treda, Cezary; Hulas-Bigoszewska, Krystyna; Piaskowski, Sylwester; Stoczynska-Fidelus, Ewelina; Rieske, Piotr

    2016-05-31

    Glioblastoma is the most common and malignant brain tumor, characterized by high cellular heterogeneity. About 50% of glioblastomas are positive for EGFR amplification, half of which express accompanying EGFR mutation, encoding truncated and constitutively active receptor termed EGFRvIII. Currently, no cell models suitable for development of EGFRvIII-targeting drugs exist, while the available ones lack the intratumoral heterogeneity or extrachromosomal nature of EGFRvIII.The reports regarding the biology of EGFRvIII expressed in the stable cell lines are often contradictory in observations and conclusions. In the present study, we use DK-MG cell line carrying endogenous non-modified EGFRvIII amplicons and derive a sub-line that is near depleted of amplicons, whilst remaining identical on the chromosomal level. By direct comparison of the two lines, we demonstrate positive effects of EGFRvIII on cell invasiveness and populational growth as a result of elevated cell survival but not proliferation rate. Investigation of the PI3K/Akt indicated no differences between the lines, whilst NFκB pathway was over-active in the line strongly expressing EGFRvIII, finding further supported by the effects of NFκB pathway specific inhibitors. Taken together, these results confirm the important role of EGFRvIII in intrinsic and extrinsic regulation of tumor behavior. Moreover, the proposed models are stable, making them suitable for research purposes as well as drug development process utilizing high throughput approach.

  19. Cell line with endogenous EGFRvIII expression is a suitable model for research and drug development purposes

    PubMed Central

    Stec, Wojciech J.; Rosiak, Kamila; Siejka, Paulina; Peciak, Joanna; Popeda, Marta; Banaszczyk, Mateusz; Pawlowska, Roza; Treda, Cezary; Hulas-Bigoszewska, Krystyna; Piaskowski, Sylwester; Stoczynska-Fidelus, Ewelina; Rieske, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common and malignant brain tumor, characterized by high cellular heterogeneity. About 50% of glioblastomas are positive for EGFR amplification, half of which express accompanying EGFR mutation, encoding truncated and constitutively active receptor termed EGFRvIII. Currently, no cell models suitable for development of EGFRvIII-targeting drugs exist, while the available ones lack the intratumoral heterogeneity or extrachromosomal nature of EGFRvIII. The reports regarding the biology of EGFRvIII expressed in the stable cell lines are often contradictory in observations and conclusions. In the present study, we use DK-MG cell line carrying endogenous non-modified EGFRvIII amplicons and derive a sub-line that is near depleted of amplicons, whilst remaining identical on the chromosomal level. By direct comparison of the two lines, we demonstrate positive effects of EGFRvIII on cell invasiveness and populational growth as a result of elevated cell survival but not proliferation rate. Investigation of the PI3K/Akt indicated no differences between the lines, whilst NFκB pathway was over-active in the line strongly expressing EGFRvIII, finding further supported by the effects of NFκB pathway specific inhibitors. Taken together, these results confirm the important role of EGFRvIII in intrinsic and extrinsic regulation of tumor behavior. Moreover, the proposed models are stable, making them suitable for research purposes as well as drug development process utilizing high throughput approach. PMID:27004406

  20. Theoretical insights into the separation of Am(III) over Eu(III) with PhenBHPPA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Han; Wu, Qun-Yan; Wang, Cong-Zhi; Lan, Jian-Hui; Liu, Zhi-Rong; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2015-10-14

    Due to the similar chemical properties of actinides An(iii) and lanthanides Ln(iii), their separation in spent nuclear fuel reprocessing is extremely challenging. A 1,10-phenanthroline dipicolinamide-based ligand (PhenBHPPA) has been identified to possess a selectivity for Am(iii) over Eu(iii) and could potentially be used for group actinide extraction. In this study, quasi-relativistic density functional theoretical calculations have been used to disclose the interaction mechanisms of Am(iii) and Eu(iii) complexes with PhenBHPPA. The electronic structures, bonding nature, QTAIM (Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules) analyses and thermodynamic behaviors of the Am(iii) and Eu(iii) complexes with PhenBHPPA have been explored in detail. According to the Wiberg bond indices (WBIs) and QTAIM analyses, interactions between the ligand and metal cations (Am(iii) and Eu(iii)) exhibit a weakly covalent character. Thermodynamic analyses show that the charged complexes [ML(NO3)2](+) appear to be the most stable species in the complexation processes. Moreover, it is more energetically favorable for PhenBHPPA to bind to Am(iii) compared to Eu(iii). Our study could render new insights into understanding the selectivity of the ligand towards minor actinides and the separation of An(iii) from Ln(iii) via liquid-liquid extraction.

  1. Enhanced thermaly managed packaging for III-nitride light emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudsieh, Nicolas

    In this Dissertation our work on `enhanced thermally managed packaging of high power semiconductor light sources for solid state lighting (SSL)' is presented. The motivation of this research and development is to design thermally high stable cost-efficient packaging of single and multi-chip arrays of III-nitrides wide bandgap semiconductor light sources through mathematical modeling and simulations. Major issues linked with this technology are device overheating which causes serious degradation in their illumination intensity and decrease in the lifetime. In the introduction the basics of III-nitrides WBG semiconductor light emitters are presented along with necessary thermal management of high power cingulated and multi-chip LEDs and laser diodes. This work starts at chip level followed by its extension to fully packaged lighting modules and devices. Different III-nitride structures of multi-quantum well InGaN/GaN and AlGaN/GaN based LEDs and LDs were analyzed using advanced modeling and simulation for different packaging designs and high thermal conductivity materials. Study started with basic surface mounted devices using conventional packaging strategies and was concluded with the latest thermal management of chip-on-plate (COP) method. Newly discovered high thermal conductivity materials have also been incorporated for this work. Our study also presents the new approach of 2D heat spreaders using such materials for SSL and micro LED array packaging. Most of the work has been presented in international conferences proceedings and peer review journals. Some of the latest work has also been submitted to well reputed international journals which are currently been reviewed for publication. .

  2. Hybrid III-V/silicon SOA for photonic integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspar, P.; Brenot, R.; Le Liepvre, A.; Accard, A.; Make, D.; Levaufre, G.; Girard, N.; Lelarge, F.; Duan, G.-H.; Olivier, S.; Jany, Christophe; Kopp, C.; Menezo, S.

    2014-11-01

    Silicon photonics has reached a considerable level of maturity, and the complexity of photonic integrated circuits (PIC) is steadily increasing. As the number of components in a PIC grows, loss management becomes more and more important. Integrated semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA) will be crucial components in future photonic systems for loss compensation. In addition, there are specific applications, where SOAs can play a key role beyond mere loss compensation, such as modulated reflective SOAs in carrier distributed passive optical networks or optical gates in packet switching. It is, therefore, highly desirable to find a generic integration platform that includes the possibility of integrating SOAs on silicon. Various methods are currently being developed to integrate light emitters on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguide circuits. Many of them use III-V materials for the hybrid integration on SOI. Various types of lasers have been demonstrated by several groups around the globe. In some of the integration approaches, SOAs can be implemented using essentially the same technology as for lasers. In this paper we will focus on SOA devices based on a hybrid integration approach where III-V material is bonded on SOI and a vertical optical mode transfer is used to couple light between SOI waveguides and guides formed in bonded III-V semiconductor layers. In contrast to evanescent coupling schemes, this mode transfer allows for a higher confinement factor in the gain material and thus for efficient light amplification over short propagation distances. We will outline the fabrication process of our hybrid components and present some of the most interesting results from a fabricated and packaged hybrid SOA.

  3. Let's Start Leveling about Leveling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasswell, Kath; Ford, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors propose a revised way of thinking about reading levels, one that promotes a wider and more flexible view of teacher decision making about the use of leveled texts in classrooms. They share five key principles to consider when looking at the use of instruction that involves matching leveled materials with readers.…

  4. IMPROVING INSTRUCTION IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS THROUGH TITLE III OF THE NDEA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GAARDER, A. BRUCE

    THIS REPORT COVERS THE ACTIVITIES WHICH OCCURRED DURING FISCAL YEAR 1964, UNDER THE AUTHORITY OF TITLE III OF THE NATIONAL DEFENSE EDUCATION ACT. IT REPORTS THE MAJOR FEDERAL-STATE-LOCAL JOINT EFFORTS TO IMPROVE INSTRUCTION IN THE PUBLIC ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS THROUGH THE DEVELOPMENT OF PROFESSIONAL LEADERSHIP AT THE STATE LEVEL AND THE…

  5. BEIR-III report and its implications for radiation protection and public health policy

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1980-03-01

    A general background is given of the implications the BEIR-III Report may have on societal decision-making in the regulation of activities concerned with the health effects of low-level radiation. The scientific basis for establishing appropriate radiation protection guides are discussed. (ACR)

  6. Risk estimation and decision-making: implications of the 1980 BEIR-III report

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1981-04-01

    The report gives a general background of the implications the current Report of the Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (The BEIR-III Report) may have on societal decision-making in the regulation of activities concerned with the health effects of low-level radiation. (ACR)

  7. The Use of WAIS-III in Adults with HFA and Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spek, Antoinette A.; Scholte, Evert M.; van Berckelaer-Onnes, Ina A.

    2008-01-01

    The WAIS III was administered to 16 adults with high functioning autism (HFA) and 27 adults with Asperger syndrome. Differences between Verbal Intelligence (VIQ) and Performance Intelligence (PIQ) were not found. Processing Speed problems in people with HFA appeared. At the subtest level, the Asperger syndrome group performed weak on Digit Span.…

  8. A neutral dinuclear Ir(iii) complex for anti-counterfeiting and data encryption.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yang; Li, Guangfu; Che, Weilong; Liu, Yingjie; Xu, Bin; Shan, Guogang; Zhu, Dongxia; Su, Zhongmin; Bryce, Martin R

    2017-03-09

    A neutral dinuclear Ir(iii) Schiff base complex PIBIP has been synthesized and shown to exhibit both piezochromic luminescence (PCL) and aggregation induced emission (AIE) behaviour. An efficient second-level anti-counterfeit trademark and a data encryption device were fabricated using PIBIP as the active material.

  9. Shells and Insects. Alaska Sea Week Curriculum Series III. Alaska Sea Grant Report 84-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelsey, Claudia; And Others

    This curriculum guide is the third (Series III) in a six-volume set that comprises the Sea Week Curriculum Series developed in Alaska. The book lends itself to the second-grade level but can be adapted to preschool, secondary, and adult education. Ten units contain 77 activities with worksheets that cover the following topics: (1) introduction to…

  10. Afro-American Curriculum Office and Resource Center. ESEA Title III, Toledo Public Schools, Toledo, Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meinke, Dean L.; Glick, I. David

    The Afro-American Curriculum Office and Resource Center, funded under Title III of the 1965 Elementary Secondary Education Act, had the general purpose of upgrading the instructional level and the material resources concerning the black American's contributions to this country's past and present life. Although the project was directly administered…

  11. Social Studies Course III. India: A Cultural Area. Teacher's Manual and Readings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leppert, Ella C.

    This secondary level instructional unit on India is the second of three cultural areas comprising Course III, "Cultural Areas of Today's World," and follows the first sequential social studies unit on Africa described in SO 003 516. A major objective is for the student to comprehend the characteristics and value structure of India and,…

  12. WAIS-III Percentile Scores by Education and Sex for U.S. and Canadian Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longman, R. Stewart; Saklofske, Donald H.; Fung, Tak S.

    2007-01-01

    Tables are presented for the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) IQ and index scores by education level for both the U.S. and Canadian normative samples. This allows clinicians to provide more accurate identification of relative strengths or weaknesses, compared to expectations from an individual's background, rather than…

  13. The Behavior of Thallium(III) During Jarosite Precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Dutrizac,J.; Chen, T.; Beauchemin, S.

    2005-01-01

    The behavior of thallium(III) under the general conditions employed for jarosite precipitation in the zinc industry was investigated in a series of laboratory experiments. Thallium(III) does not appear to form end-member jarosite-type compounds, MTl{sub 3}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){sub 6}, where M is Na, K, NH{sub 4}, etc. In acid solutions at pH > 0.7, the thallium(III) hydrolyzes to Tl{sub 2}O{sub 3}; in more strongly acid media, two K-Tl(III) sulphate phases crystallize at temperatures < 90 C. The K-Tl(III) sulphate phases were investigated by chemical and X-ray diffraction analyses and by thermogravimetry. Although end-member Tl(III) analogues of jarosite-type compounds could not be synthesized, it is possible to incorporate significant amounts of Tl(III) in potassium jarosite (KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6), and over 20 at.% substitution of Tl(III) for Fe(III) was achieved. The presence of Tl(III) in the potassium jarosite structure was confirmed by microscopic methods, electron microprobe analyses and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The Tl(III)-bearing species forms rapidly, and excess Fe(III) precipitates as nearly Tl-free potassium jarosite which envelops the initially formed Tl(III)-bearing potassium jarosite phase.

  14. Coronal type III radio bursts and their X-ray flare and interplanetary type III counterparts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Hamish A. S.; Vilmer, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    Context. Type III bursts and hard X-rays are both produced by flare energetic electron beams. The link between both emissions has been investigated in many previous studies, but no statistical studies have compared both coronal and interplanetary type III bursts with X-ray flares. Aims: Using events where the coronal radio emission above 100 MHz is exclusively from type III bursts, we revisited some long-standing questions regarding the relation between type III bursts and X-ray flares: Do all coronal type III bursts have X-ray counterparts? What correlation, if any, occurs between radio and X-ray intensities? What X-ray and radio signatures above 100 MHz occur in connection with interplanetary type III bursts below 14 MHz? Methods: We analysed ten years of data from 2002 to 2011 starting with a selection of coronal type III bursts above 100 MHz. We used X-ray flare information from RHESSI >6 keV to make a list of 321 events that have associated type III bursts and X-ray flares, encompassing at least 28% of the initial sample of type III events. We then examined the timings, intensities, associated GOES class, and whether there was an associated interplanetary radio signature in both radio and X-rays. Results: For our 321 events with radio and X-ray signatures, the X-ray emission at 6 keV usually lasted much longer than the groups of type III bursts at frequencies >100 MHz. The selected events were mostly associated with GOES B and C class flares. A weak correlation was found between the type III radio flux at frequencies below 327 MHz and the X-ray intensity at 25-50 keV, with an absence of events at high X-ray intensity and low type III radio flux. The weakness of the correlation is related to the coherent emission mechanism of radio type IIIs which can produce high radio fluxes by low density electron beams. Interplanetary type III bursts (<4 MHz) were observed for 54% of the events. The percentage of association increased when events were observed with 25-50 ke

  15. 43 CFR 3420.2 - Regional leasing levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Management data sources which may be available and pertinent to leasing level decision-making; (iii) address... additional alternative leasing levels. The regional coal team shall consider the State Director's review and shall transmit to the Secretary alternative leasing levels and a preferred leasing level presented...

  16. Luminescence of europium (III) complexes for visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolontaeva, Olga A.; Pozharov, Mikhail V.; Korolovich, Vladimir F.; Khokhlova, Anastasia R.; Kirdyanova, Anna N.; Burmistrova, Natalia A.; Zakharova, Tamara V.; Goryacheva, Irina Y.

    2016-04-01

    With the purpose to develop bright non-toxic luminescent label for theranostic application we have studied complexation of lanthanide dipicolinates (2,6-pyridinedicarboxylates) by sodium alginate and effect of thermal exposure of synthesized micro-capsules on their luminescent properties. Synthesized micro-capsules are stable in acidic medium but dissolve at pH ~ 4 due to transformation of cationic europium dipicolinate complex to anionic. Luminescence studies have shown that emission spectra of europium(III)-alginate complexes (both chloride and dipicolinate) contain two intensive bands characteristic to Eu3+ ion (5D0 --> 7F1 (590 nm) and 5D0 --> 7F1 (612 nm)). We have also found that at 160ºC europium(III)- alginate micro-capsules decompose to black, soot-like substance, therefore, their thermal treatment must be performed in closed environment (i.e., sealed ampoules).

  17. Flexor tendon repair in zone III.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, Mohammad M

    2011-01-01

    There is a paucity of the literature on the outcome of zone III flexor tendon injuries. In this paper, we report on the results of zone III flexor tendon repair in 35 consecutive adult patients with clean cut lacerations of both flexor tendons in 42 fingers. There were 25 men and 10 women with an average age of 32 years. Repair of both flexor tendons was performed using 'figure of eight' core sutures and a continuous epitendinous suture. Postoperatively, an immediate active range of motion protocol was applied to ensure full active extension of the interphalangeal joints. The results were assessed using the Strickland-Glogovac grading system. There were no ruptures. One patient with two injured fingers developed complex regional pain syndrome and the final outcome was fair in both fingers. In the remaining 34 patients (40 fingers), 33 patients (38 fingers) had an excellent outcome and the remaining patient (two fingers) had a good outcome.

  18. Iron (III) chloride doping of CVD graphene.

    PubMed

    Song, Yi; Fang, Wenjing; Hsu, Allen L; Kong, Jing

    2014-10-03

    Chemical doping has been shown as an effective method of reducing the sheet resistance of graphene. We present the results of our investigations into doping large area chemical vapor deposition graphene using Iron (III) Chloride (FeCl(3)). It is shown that evaporating FeCl(3) can increase the carrier concentration of monolayer graphene to greater than 10(14) cm(-2) and achieve resistances as low as 72 Ω sq(-1). We also evaluate other important properties of the doped graphene such as surface cleanliness, air stability, and solvent stability. Furthermore, we compare FeCl(3) to three other common dopants: Gold (III) Chloride (AuCl(3)), Nitric Acid (HNO(3)), and TFSA ((CF(3)SO(2))(2)NH). We show that compared to these dopants, FeCl(3) can not only achieve better sheet resistance but also has other key advantages including better solvent stability.

  19. LSPRAY-III: A Lagrangian Spray Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.

    2008-01-01

    LSPRAY-III is a Lagrangian spray solver developed for application with parallel computing and unstructured grids. It is designed to be massively parallel and could easily be coupled with any existing gas-phase flow and/or Monte Carlo Probability Density Function (PDF) solvers. The solver accommodates the use of an unstructured mesh with mixed elements of either triangular, quadrilateral, and/or tetrahedral type for the gas flow grid representation. It is mainly designed to predict the flow, thermal and transport properties of a rapidly vaporizing spray because of its importance in aerospace application. The manual provides the user with an understanding of various models involved in the spray formulation, its code structure and solution algorithm, and various other issues related to parallelization and its coupling with other solvers. With the development of LSPRAY-III, we have advanced the state-of-the-art in spray computations in several important ways.

  20. FutureTox III: Bridges for Translation.

    PubMed

    Juberg, Daland R; Knudsen, Thomas B; Sander, Miriam; Beck, Nancy B; Faustman, Elaine M; Mendrick, Donna L; Fowle, John R; Hartung, Thomas; Tice, Raymond R; Lemazurier, Emmanuel; Becker, Richard A; Fitzpatrick, Suzanne Compton; Daston, George P; Harrill, Alison; Hines, Ronald N; Keller, Douglas A; Lipscomb, John C; Watson, David; Bahadori, Tina; Crofton, Kevin M

    2017-01-01

    Future Tox III, a Society of Toxicology Contemporary Concepts in Toxicology workshop, was held in November 2015. Building upon Future Tox I and II, Future Tox III was focused on developing the high throughput risk assessment paradigm and taking the science of in vitro data and in silico models forward to explore the question-what progress is being made to address challenges in implementing the emerging big-data toolbox for risk assessment and regulatory decision-making. This article reports on the outcome of the workshop including 2 examples of where advancements in predictive toxicology approaches are being applied within Federal agencies, where opportunities remain within the exposome and AOP domains, and how collectively the toxicology community across multiple sectors can continue to bridge the translation from historical approaches to Tox21 implementation relative to risk assessment and regulatory decision-making.

  1. Background investigation in EDELWEISS-III

    SciTech Connect

    Scorza, Silvia

    2015-08-17

    Protection from and rejection of backgrounds is a key issue for the EDELWEISS-III direct dark matter detection experiment which aims at exploring the 10{sup −9} pb cross-section region for spin-independent WIMP-nucleon interaction. The detector is located in the low radioactivity environment of the Modane Underground Laboratory and consists of 36 advanced FID germanium detectors operating at 18 mK in a dilution refrigerator in order to identify eventual rare nuclear recoils induced by elastic scattering of WIMPs from our Galactic halo. I will discuss the background and the methods of rejecting it with the FID detectors. Detector performances and the first analysis of data acquired in a long-term campaign will be presented as well. The FID detector technology is not limited to EDELWEISS-III but can further be employed in the next generation of cryogenic detector experiments.

  2. BES-III distributed computing status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, S. D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Korenkov, V. V.; Li, W. D.; Lin, T.; Ma, Z. T.; Nicholson, C.; Pelevanyuk, I. S.; Suo, B.; Trofimov, V. V.; Tsaregorodtsev, A. U.; Uzhinskiy, A. V.; Yan, T.; Yan, X. F.; Zhang, X. M.; Zhemchugov, A. S.

    2016-09-01

    The BES-III experiment at the Institute of High Energy Physics (Beijing, China) is aimed at the precision measurements in e+e- annihilation in the energy range from 2.0 till 4.6 GeV. The world's largest samples of J/psi and psi' events and unique samples of XYZ data have been already collected. The expected increase of the data volume in the coming years required a significant evolution of the computing model, namely shift from a centralized data processing to a distributed one. This report summarizes a current design of the BES-III distributed computing system, some of key decisions and experience gained during 2 years of operations.

  3. Gold(III) complexes in medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Maia, Pedro Ivo da Silva; Deflon, Victor M; Abram, Ulrich

    2014-09-01

    A number of gold(III) compounds has been designed with the objective of overcoming the disadvantages associated with the platinum-based drugs for cancer treatment. Compounds of a remarkable structural manifold show significant antiproliferative effects in vitro against a number of cancer cells, including cisplatin resistant ones. The target of most of them is, unlike that of cisplatin, not the DNA. Although the mechanisms of action displayed by the gold compounds in biological media are still under investigation, many studies show evidence that the cellular targets are mitochondria-based. Recent advances in gold(III) medicinal chemistry also recommend such compounds for other pharmacological applications such as the treatment of viral or parasitic diseases. The radioactive isotopes (198)Au and (199)Au present potential in radiotherapy.

  4. Co(II)4, Co(II)7, and a Series of Co(II)2Ln(III) (Ln(III) = Nd(III), Sm(III), Gd(III), Tb(III), Dy(III)) Coordination Clusters: Search for Single Molecule Magnets.

    PubMed

    Modak, Ritwik; Sikdar, Yeasin; Thuijs, Annaliese E; Christou, George; Goswami, Sanchita

    2016-10-03

    We report herein the syntheses and investigation of the magnetic properties of a Co(II)4 compound, a series of trinuclear Co(II)2Ln(III) (Ln(III) = Nd(III), Sm(III), Gd(III), Tb(III), Dy(III)) complexes, and a Co(II)7 complex. The homometallic Co(II)4 core was obtained from the reaction of Ln(NO3)3·xH2O/Co(NO3)2·6H2O/H2vab/Et3N in a 0.5:0.5:1:2 ratio in methanol. Variation in synthetic conditions was necessary to get the desired Co(II)-Ln(III) complexes. The Co(II)-Ln(III) assembly was synthesized from Ln(NO3)3·xH2O/Co(OAc)2·4H2O/H2vab/NaOMe in a 0.4:0.5:1:1 ratio in methanol. The isostructural Co(II)2Ln(III) complexes have a core structure with the general formula [Co2Ln(Hvab)4(NO3)](NO3)2·MeOH·H2O, (where H2vab = 2-[(2-hydroxymethyl-phenylimino)-methyl]-6-methoxy-phenol) with simultaneous crystallization of Co(II)7 complex in each reaction. The magnetic investigation of these complexes reveals that both homometallic complexes and four Co(II)-Ln(III) complexes (except Co(II)-Nd(III)) display behavior characteristic of single molecule magnets.

  5. Type III-B rotaxane dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Ho, Watson K-W; Lee, Siu-Fung; Wong, Chi-Hin; Zhu, Xiao-Ming; Kwan, Chak-Shing; Chak, Chun-Pong; Mendes, Paula M; Cheng, Christopher H K; Leung, Ken Cham-Fai

    2013-11-28

    Type III-B first generation [3]rotaxane and second generation [4]rotaxane dendrimers have been synthesized via (1) a modified copper-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition (CuAAC), (2) Glaser-Hay's acetylenic oxidative homo-coupling, and (3) amide formation. The dendron does not reveal obvious cytotoxicities in L929 fibroblast cells. The rotaxane dendrimers can capture ammonia and are switchable both in solution and on surfaces.

  6. Doublet III: status and future plans

    SciTech Connect

    Rawls, J.M.

    1980-04-01

    A synopsis is presented of the experimental results from the ohmic heating phase of Doublet III, with emphasis on the production of good target plasmas for the upcoming neutral beam injection phase. The program plan for the device over the life of the US-Japan cooperative program is discussed, as is the status of the preliminary investigation into replacing the present vacuum vessel by one better suited for ETF simulation.

  7. Addendum I, BIOPLUME III Graphics Conversion to SURFER Format

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This procedure can be used to create a SURFER® compatible grid file from Bioplume III input and output graphics. The input data and results from Bioplume III can be contoured and printed directly from SURFER.

  8. The nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of bisphthalocyaninatolanthanide (III). Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Tsutsui, M.; Kasuga, K.

    1980-06-01

    The NMR spectra of bisphthalocyaninatolanthanide (III) complexes (La, Nd, Sm, and Eu) have been examined. An effect of a macrocyclic-ring current and induced shift caused by lanthanide (III) ions were discussed.

  9. Octachlorodibenzodioxin formation on Fe(III)-montmorillonite clay.

    PubMed

    Gu, Cheng; Li, Hui; Teppen, Brian J; Boyd, Stephen A

    2008-07-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) are ubiquitous and highly toxic environmental contaminants found in surface and subsurface soils and in clay deposits. Interestingly, the congener profiles of such PCDDs are inexplicably dissimilar to those of known anthropogenic (e.g., pesticide manufacture, waste incineration) or natural (e.g., forest fire) sources. Characteristic features of soil or clay-associated PCDDs are the dominance of octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (OCDD) as the most abundant congener and very low levels of polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs). These propensities led to the hypothesis of in situ PCDD formation in soils and geologic clay deposits. In this study, we demonstrate the formation of OCDD on the naturally occurring and widely distributed clay mineral montmorillonite under environmentally relevant conditions. When pentachlorophenol (PCP)was mixed with Fe(III)-montmorillonite, significant amounts of OCDD were rapidly (minutes to days) formed (approximately 5 mg OCDD/kg clay) at ambient temperature in the presence of water. This reaction is initiated by single electron transfer from PCP to Fe(III)-montmorillonite thereby forming the PCP radical cation. Subsequent dimerization, dechlorination, and ring closure reactions result in formation of OCDD. This study provides the first direct evidence for clay-catalyzed formation of OCDD supporting the plausibility of its in situ formation in soils.

  10. An octanuclear iron(III) isobutyrate wheel.

    PubMed

    Baca, Svetlana G; Breukers, Stefanie; Ellern, Arkady; Kögerler, Paul

    2011-12-01

    The reaction of the μ(3)-oxido-centred trinuclear isobutyrate cluster [Fe(3)O(O(2)CCHMe(2))(6)(H(2)O)(3)](+) with an excess of phenol (PhOH) in chloroform produces a novel octanuclear Fe(III) cluster, cyclo-tetra-μ(2)-hydroxido-dodeca-μ(2)-isobutyrato-κ(24)O:O'-octa-μ(2)-phenolato-κ(16)O:O'-octairon(III) phenol hexasolvate monohydrate, [Fe(8)(C(4)H(7)O(2))(12)(C(6)H(5)O)(8)(OH)(4)]·6C(6)H(5)OH·H(2)O. The neutral cluster is located about a centre of inversion and consists of a planar ring of eight Fe(III) centres with two types of bridges between adjacent Fe atoms: each Fe atom is bridged to one of its neighbours by a μ-hydroxide and two 1,3-bridging carboxylates, or by two phenolate and one 1,3-bridging isobutyrate ligand. The cavity within the {Fe(8)} wheel is occupied by a disordered water molecule. Intermolecular O-H···O hydrogen bonds and C-H···π interactions connect the clusters and the phenol solvent molecules to form a three-dimensional network.

  11. Validity of Impedance Predictions at Various Levels of Fatness,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    estimates of total body water and of fat-free mass. The validity of RES to predict percent body fat (%BF) was evaluated in a sample of 403 male (Mean...were collected on a sample of 403 male and 135 female military personnel. Characteristics of this population sample are provided in Table 1...inferior to the axilla and at the nipple line as described by Beckett and Hodgdon (1985) and Behnke and Wilmore (1974), respectively. Abdominal

  12. Level and Chemical Composition of Cryoglobulins in Schizophrenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoyetsyan, Aren; Boyajyan, Anna; Melkumova, Maya

    The blood samples of 40 schizophrenic patients were tested for the presence of cryoglobulins (Cgs) and composition of Cgs was examined. The elevated levels of type III Cgs, containing complement components, were detected in all study subjects.

  13. Atomic Data and Spectral Line Intensities for Ne III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Thomas, R. J.; Landi, E.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A number of satellites and rockets have been launched to observe radiation from the Sun and other astrophysical objects. Line radiation is emitted when the electron impact excited levels decay to the lower levels by photon emission. From this radiation, the physical parameters such as electron temperature and density of the astrophysical plasma, elemental abundance, and opacity can be inferred. Ne III lines have been observed in H II regions, Ne-rich filaments in supernovae, and planetary nebulae. The allowed line at 489.50 Angstroms due to the transition 2s(sup 2) 2p(sup 5) (sup 3) P2 (goes to) 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 4)(sup 3)P2 has been identified in the solar spectrum by Vernazza and Reeves using Skylab observations. Other Ne III lines in the solar EUV spectrum have been reported by Thomas and Neupert based on observations from the Solar EUV Rocket Telescope and Spectrograph (SERTS) instrument. Atomic data for Ne III have been calculated by using a set of programs developed at, University College, London. The Superstructure and Distorted Wave (DW) programs have been updated over the years. In the Superstructure program, configuration interaction can be taken into account and radial functions are calculated in a modified Thomas-Fermi-Amaldi potential. This is a statistical potential and depends on parameters lambda 1 which are determined by optimizing the weighted sum of term energies. They are found to be lambda(sub 0)=1.2467, lambda(sub 1)=1.1617, and lambda(sub 2)=1.0663. The relativistic corrections are included by using the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian as a perturbation to the nonrelativistic Hamiltonian. The same potential is used to calculate reactance matrices in the DW approximation in LS coupling. Collision strengths in intermediate coupling are obtained by using term coupling coefficients obtained from the Superstructure program. In this calculation, the configurations used are 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 4), 2s2p(sup 5), 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 3)3s, 2s(sup 2)p(sup 3)3d giving rise

  14. 1,2,4-Diazaphospholide complexes of lanthanum(iii), cerium(iii), neodymium(iii), praseodymium(iii), and samarium(iii): synthesis, X-ray structural characterization, and magnetic susceptibility studies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Minggang; Wang, Lixia; Li, Pangpang; Ma, Jianping; Zheng, Wenjun

    2016-07-05

    A few heteroleptic, charge-separated heterobimetallic, and polymeric alkali metalate complexes of 1,2,4-diazaphospholide lanthanum(iii), cerium(iii), neodymium(iii), praseodymium(iii), and samarium(iii) were simply prepared via the metathesis reaction of MCl3 (THF)m (m = 1-2) and K[3,5-R2dp] ([3,5-R2dp](-) = 3,5-di-substituent-1,2,4-diazaphospholide; R = tBu, Ph) in a varied ratio (1 : 3, 1 : 4, and 1 : 5, respectively) at room temperature in tetrahydrofuran. All the complexes were fully characterized by (1)H, (13)C{(1)H}, (31)P{(1)H}, IR, and X-ray single crystal diffraction analysis despite their paramagnetism (excluding La(iii) complexes). The structures of the complexes were found to feature varied coordination modes. The magnetic properties of several compounds were studied by magnetic susceptibility, and the complexes presented the magnetic moments close to or lower than the theoretical values for the free ions in the trivalent oxidation states (Pr(3+), Nd(3+)).

  15. A newly developed chromium(III) gel technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sydansk, R.D. . Research Div.)

    1990-08-01

    Laboratory testing of a recently developed chromium(III) (Cr(III)) gel technology is reported. The gels can be used in conjunction with a number of oilfield treatments. The single-fluid acrylamide-polymer/Cr(III)-carboxylate aqueous gels are formed by crosslinking acrylamide polymer with a Cr(III)-carboxylate-complex crosslinking agent. Representative gel compositions and associated gel properties are discussed.

  16. The Structure of Bis(phthalocyaninato)neodymium(III).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    synthesis of lanthanide (III) phthalocyanine complexes 1 was established by Kirin and Moskalev, many studies on their composi- 2 tions and properties have...been reported. For instance, intense attention has been directed toward electrochromism of bis(phthalocyaninato) lanthanide (III) complexes , Pc2Ln(III)H...The structural analysis of bis(phthalocyaninato) lanthanide (III) complexes would provide useful information to investigate their electo- chromuism, and

  17. Brief report: The use of WAIS-III in adults with HFA and Asperger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Spek, Antoinette A; Scholte, Evert M; van Berckelaer-Onnes, Ina A

    2008-04-01

    The WAIS III was administered to 16 adults with high functioning autism (HFA) and 27 adults with Asperger syndrome. Differences between Verbal Intelligence (VIQ) and Performance Intelligence (PIQ) were not found. Processing Speed problems in people with HFA appeared. At the subtest level, the Asperger syndrome group performed weak on Digit Span. Comprehension and Block Design were relative strengths. In the HFA group, performance on Digit-Symbol Coding and Symbol Search was relatively poor. Strengths were found on Information and Matrix Reasoning. The results suggest that the VIQ-PIQ difference cannot distinguish between HFA and Asperger syndrome. WAIS III Factor Scale and Subtest patterning provides a more valid indicator.

  18. Brief Report: The Use of WAIS-III in Adults with HFA and Asperger Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Scholte, Evert M.; van Berckelaer-Onnes, Ina A.

    2007-01-01

    The WAIS III was administered to 16 adults with high functioning autism (HFA) and 27 adults with Asperger syndrome. Differences between Verbal Intelligence (VIQ) and Performance Intelligence (PIQ) were not found. Processing Speed problems in people with HFA appeared. At the subtest level, the Asperger syndrome group performed weak on Digit Span. Comprehension and Block Design were relative strengths. In the HFA group, performance on Digit-Symbol Coding and Symbol Search was relatively poor. Strengths were found on Information and Matrix Reasoning. The results suggest that the VIQ-PIQ difference cannot distinguish between HFA and Asperger syndrome. WAIS III Factor Scale and Subtest patterning provides a more valid indicator. PMID:17879152

  19. Contribution of Type III Interferons to Antiviral Immunity; Location, Location, Location.

    PubMed

    Kotenko, Sergei V; Durbin, Joan E

    2017-03-13

    Type I interferons (IFN-α/β) and the more recently identified type III IFNs (IFN-λ) function as the first line of defense against virus infection, and regulate the development of both innate and adaptive immune responses. Type III IFNs were originally identified as a novel ligand-receptor system acting in parallel with type I IFNs, but subsequent studies have provided increasing evidence for distinct roles for each IFN family. In addition to their compartmentalized antiviral actions, these two systems appear to have multiple levels of cross-regulation, and act coordinately to achieve effective anti-microbial protection with minimal collateral damage to the host.

  20. Comparative Studies on Periodatocuprate(II, III) and Telluratocuprate(II, III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingmei, Wu; Qiang, Su; Gang, Hu; Yufang, Ren

    1995-02-01

    The crystal structures, electronic spectra, and Cu2 p XPS of Cu(III) complexes Na 4H[Cu(H 2TeO 6) 2] · 17H 2O and Na 4K[Cu (HIO 6) 2] · 12H2O have been described. The characterizations of a Cu(III) atom in a complex are as follows: (i) In a square-planar coordination, the average bond length of Cu-O is 0.183 nm, shorter than the 0.190-0.200 nm found for a Cu(II) complex. (2) The "blue shift" occurs for d-d transitions in the electronic spectrum of the Cu(III) complex compared to those of its related Cu(II) complex, resulting from the higher valence state. (3) Cu(III) compounds with CuO 4 square-planar coordination are expected to be diamagnetic whereas Cu(II) compounds to be paramagnetic. (4) Comprehensive investigations on Cu2 p XPS show that the binding energy of Cu2 p3/2 of a pure Cu(III) compound is about 2.0 eV higher than that of its corresponding Cu(II) compound: the shakeup satellites do not appear in the Cu2 p XPS for a pure diamagnetic Cu(III) compound, the same as found for a diamagnetic Ni(II) compound: the FWHM of the signal of Cu2 p XPS may become broader for Cu(III) compound because its core hole's lifetime shortens due to the higher valence state of copper.

  1. The installation and preliminary test programme of REMGUN III - A 6.7 MJ HPG driven railgun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reip, P. W.; Hinkin, C. R.; Mitcham, A.

    1986-11-01

    Features and expected performance levels of REMGUN III, a railgun at the Royal Armament R&D Establishment are summarized. REMGUN III is powered by an iron-cored 6.7 MJ homopolar generator (HPG). Details of the generator, inductor, breech/rail system and system installation and integration procedures are outlined. Plans for evaluating the HPG performance, continued development of railswitch, barrel design, and projectile/armature configurations, and for studying the internal, external and terminal ballistics of railguns are summarized.

  2. Brazilian Adaptation of the Woodcock-Johnson III Cognitive Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wechsler, Solange Muglia; Nunes, Carlos Sancineto; Schelini, Patricia Waltz; Pasian, Sonia Regina; Homsi, Silvia Vertoni; Moretti, Lucia; Anache, Alexandra Ayach

    2010-01-01

    An adaptation of the standard battery of Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities (WJ-III) for Brazilian children and youth was investigated. The sample was composed of 1094 students (54 percent girls), ages 7-17, living in Sao Paulo state (91 percent). Items from Brazilian school books as well as from the WJ-III Spanish version…

  3. 49 CFR 172.440 - RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. 172.440 Section 172... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.440 RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label must be as follows: EC02MR91.034 (b) In addition to complying...

  4. 49 CFR 172.440 - RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. 172.440 Section 172... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.440 RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label must be as follows: EC02MR91.034 (b) In addition to complying...

  5. 49 CFR 172.440 - RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. 172.440 Section 172... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.440 RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label must be as follows: EC02MR91.034 (b) In addition to complying...

  6. 49 CFR 172.440 - RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. 172.440 Section 172... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.440 RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label. (a) Except for size and color, the RADIOACTIVE YELLOW-III label must be as follows: EC02MR91.034 (b) In addition to complying...

  7. Teaching a Course on World War III: An Introductory Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussman, Glenn

    1987-01-01

    Provides a description of an upper division college course on nuclear war. The course, which used an interdisciplinary approach and many resource speakers, was divided into three components: the consequences of World War III, the causes of World War III, and the prevention of World War III. Includes a detailed course outline along with required…

  8. Microbial As(III) Oxidation in Water Treatment Plant Filters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic exists in two oxidation states in water - arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)]. As(III) is relatively mobile in water and difficult to remove by arsenic-removal treatment processes. Source waters that contain As(III) must add a strong oxidant such as free chlorine or p...

  9. 75 FR 14575 - Voting Equipment Evaluations Phase III

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-26

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Voting Equipment Evaluations Phase III AGENCY: National... Phase III of the benchmark research for voting equipment used in an election in 2008 or later and/ or... Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) will be conducting Phase III research on voting equipment...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 261 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false III Appendix III to Part 261 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Appendix III to Part 261...

  11. Photosynthetic activity and protein overexpression found in Cr(III)-tolerant cells of the green algae Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides.

    PubMed

    Pereira, M; Bartolomé, C M; Sánchez-Fortún, S

    2014-08-01

    Chromium is an important constituent in effluents obtained from chromium plating industries. Due to the highly toxic nature of Cr(VI), attention has been shifted to less hazardous Cr(III) electroplating processes. This study evaluated aquatic toxicity of Cr(III)-containing laboratory samples representative of effluents from chromium electroplating industries, on the photosynthetic activity exhibited by both Cr(III)-sensitive (Dc1M(wt)) and tolerant (Dc1M(Cr(III)R30)) Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides strains. Additionally, selected de novo-determined peptide sequences, obtained from Dc1M(Cr(III)R30), have been analyzed to evidence the possible Cr(III) toxic mechanism involved in the resistance of these cells to high Cr(III) levels in aquatic environments. Dc1M(Cr(III)R30) strain exhibited a gross photosynthetic balance of about five times lower than that exhibited by Dc1M(wt) strain, demonstrating that Dc1M(Cr(III)R30) has a photosynthetic yield significantly lower than Dc1M(wt). SDS-PAGE of Dc1M(Cr(III)R30) samples showed the presence of at least two protein bands (23.05 and 153.46 KDa, respectively) absent in wild-type strain samples. Although it has achieved a low coincidence between the lower molecular weight band and a GTPase identified from genome of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, none of de novo peptide sequences obtained showed a significant MS-BLAST score, so that further studies will be required.

  12. SAGE III Educational Outreach and Student's On-Line Atmospheric Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, D. C.; Moore, S. W.; Walters, S. C.

    2002-05-01

    Students On-Line Atmospheric Research (SOLAR) is a NASA-sponsored educational outreach program aimed at raising the level of interest in science among elementary, middle, and high school students. SOLAR is supported by, and closely linked to, NASA's Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III). SAGE III, launched on a Russian METEOR 3M spacecraft in December 2001, is a key component of NASA's Earth Observing System. It will monitor the quantity and distribution of aerosols, ozone, clouds, and other important trace gases in the upper atmosphere. Early data from SAGE III indicate that the instrument is performing as expected. SAGE III measurements will extend the long-term data record established by its predecessors, SAGE I and SAGE II, which spans from 1979 to the present. In addition, SAGE III's added measurement capabilities will provide more detailed data on certain atmospheric species. SOLAR selects interesting topics related to the science issues addressed by the SAGE III experiments, and develops educational materials and projects to enhance science teaching, and to help students realize the relevance of these issues to our lives on Earth. For example, SOLAR highlights some of the major questions regarding the health of the atmosphere such as possible influences of aerosols on global climate, and atmospheric processes related to ozone depletion. The program features projects to give students hands-on experience with scientific equipment and help develop skills in collecting, analyzing, and reporting science results. SOLAR focuses on helping teachers become familiar with current research in the atmospheric sciences, helping teachers integrate SOLAR developed educational materials into their curriculum. SOLAR gives special presentations at national and regional science teacher conferences and conducts a summer teacher workshop at the NASA Langley Research Center. This poster will highlight some of the key features of the SOLAR program and will present

  13. TYPE III RADIO BURSTS IN CORONAL PLASMAS WITH KAPPA PARTICLE DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, B.; Cairns, Iver H.

    2013-02-01

    We present the first simulations of type III bursts produced in the corona with suprathermal non-Maxwellian background particles, as inferred from solar wind data and proposed by theories for the corona and solar wind. The coronal background particles are assumed to follow kappa ({kappa}) distributions. The predicted f{sub p} emission of type III bursts is sensitive via the {kappa} index to the presence of suprathermal background particles, where f{sub p} is the local plasma frequency. The simulations show that (1) the speeds v{sub b} of type III beams are much larger (e.g., v{sub b} Almost-Equal-To 0.58c for {kappa} = 5) and so type III bursts drift much faster for low {kappa} ({<=}5) background plasmas than for Maxwellian backgrounds (producing v{sub b} < 0.3c), and (2) f{sub p} emission generated in a {kappa}-distributed background corona has a larger total bandwidth than in a Maxwellian background, for similar onset frequencies. Type III beams are thus more persistent, i.e., extending over larger distances, in {kappa}-distributed corona. Consequently, observations of fast-drifting coronal type III bursts and associated fast electron beams suggest that the ambient electrons in the corona are {kappa}-distributed, at least when such bursts are observed. These results support, from the new viewpoint of nonthermal radio emission, the occasional presence of suprathermal background electrons in the corona and the associated mechanisms (e.g., 'velocity filtration') for coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. The new results also help resolve longstanding issues regarding the speeds and persistence of type III beams, and the production of remotely observable levels of f{sub p} emission despite severe losses during propagation.

  14. The endoplasmic reticulum is a target organelle for trivalent dimethylarsinic acid (DMA{sup III})-induced cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Naranmandura, Hua; Xu, Shi; Koike, Shota; Pan, Li Qiang; Chen, Bin; Wang, Yan Wei; Rehman, Kanwal; Wu, Bin; Chen, Zhe; Suzuki, Noriyuki

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of present study was to characterize the endoplasmic reticulum stress and generation of ROS in rat liver RLC-16 cells by exposing to trivalent dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}) and compared with that of trivalent arsenite (iAs{sup III}) and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}). Protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) phosphorylation was significantly induced in cells exposed to DMA{sup III}, while there was no change in phosphorylated PERK (P-PERK) detected in cells after exposure to iAs{sup III} or MMA{sup III}. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) after DMA{sup III} exposure was found to take place specifically in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), while previous reports showed that ROS was generated in mitochondria following exposure to MMA{sup III}. Meanwhile, cycloheximide (CHX) which is an inhibitor of protein biosynthesis strongly inhibited the DMA{sup III}-induced intracellular ROS generation in the ER and the phosphorylation of PERK, suggesting the induction of ER stress probably occurs through the inhibition of the protein folding process. Activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) mRNA were induced by all three arsenic species, however, evidence suggested that they might be induced by different pathways in the case of iAs{sup III} and MMA{sup III}. In addition, ER resident molecular chaperone glucose-regulated protein78 (GRP78) was not affected by trivalent arsenicals, while it was induced in positive control only at high concentration (Thapsigargin;Tg), suggesting the GRP78 is less sensitive to low levels of ER stress. In summary, our findings demonstrate that the endoplasmic reticulum is a target organelle for DMA{sup III}-induced cytotoxicity. Highlights: ►ER is a target organelle for trivalent DMA{sup III}-induced cytotoxicity. ►Generation of ROS in ER can be induced specially by trivalent DMA{sup III}. ►ER-stress and generation of ROS are caused by the increase in

  15. Mechanisms for Fe(III) oxide reduction in sedimentary environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovely, Derek R.

    2002-01-01

    Although it was previously considered that Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms must come into direct contact with Fe(III) oxides in order to reduce them, recent studies have suggested that electron-shuttling compounds and/or Fe(III) chelators, either naturally present or produced by the Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms themselves, may alleviate the need for the Fe(III) reducers to establish direct contact with Fe(III) oxides. Studies with Shewanella alga strain BrY and Fe(III) oxides sequestered within microporous beads demonstrated for the first time that this organism releases a compound(s) that permits electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides which the organism cannot directly contact. Furthermore, as much as 450 w M dissolved Fe(III) was detected in cultures of S. alga growing in Fe(III) oxide medium, suggesting that this organism releases compounds that can solublize Fe(III) from Fe(III) oxide. These results contrast with previous studies, which demonstrated that Geobacter metallireducens does not produce electron-shuttles or Fe(III) chelators. Some freshwater aquatic sediments and groundwaters contained compounds, which could act as electron shuttles by accepting electrons from G. metallireducens and then transferring the electrons to Fe(III). However, other samples lacked significant electron-shuttling capacity. Spectroscopic studies indicated that the electron-shuttling capacity of the waters was not only associated with the presence of humic substances, but water extracts of walnut, oak, and maple leaves contained electron-shuttling compounds did not appear to be humic substances. Porewater from a freshwater aquatic sediment and groundwater from a petroleum-contaminated aquifer contained dissolved Fe(III) (4-16 w M), suggesting that soluble Fe(III) may be available as an electron acceptor in some sedimentary environments. These results demonstrate that in order to accurately model the mechanisms for Fe(III) reduction in sedimentary environments it will be necessary

  16. Interactions Between Fe(III)-oxides and Fe(III)-phyllosilicates During Microbial Reduction 2: Natural Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, T.; Griffin, A. M.; Gorski, C. A.; Shelobolina, E. S.; Xu, H.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Roden, E. E.

    2016-04-19

    Dissimilatory microbial reduction of solid-phase Fe(III)-oxides and Fe(III)-bearing phyllosilicates (Fe(III)-phyllosilicates) is an important process in anoxic soils, sediments, and subsurface materials. Although various studies have documented the relative extent of microbial reduction of single-phase Fe(III)-oxides and Fe(III)-phyllosilicates, detailed information is not available on interaction between these two processes in situations where both phases are available for microbial reduction. The goal of this research was to use the model dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium (DIRB) Geobacter sulfurreducens to study Fe(III)-oxide vs. Fe(III)-phyllosilicate reduction in a range of subsurface materials and Fe(III)-oxide stripped versions of the materials. Low temperature (12K) Mossbauer spectroscopy was used to infer changes in the relative abundances of Fe(III)-oxide, Fe(III)-phyllosilicate, and phyllosilicate-associated Fe(II) (Fe(II)-phyllosilicate). A Fe partitioning model was employed to analyze the fate of Fe(II) and assess the potential for abiotic Fe(II)-catalyzed reduction of Fe(III)-phyllosilicates. The results showed that in most cases Fe(III)- oxide utilization dominated (70-100 %) bulk Fe(III) reduction activity, and that electron transfer from oxide-derived Fe(II) played only a minor role (ca. 10-20 %) in Fe partitioning. In addition, the extent of Fe(III)-oxide reduction was positively correlated to surface area-normalized cation exchange capacity and the phyllosilicate-Fe(III)/total Fe(III) ratio, which suggests that the phyllosilicates in the natural sediments promoted Fe(III)-oxide reduction by binding of oxide-derived Fe(II), thereby enhancing Fe(III)-oxide reduction by reducing or delaying the inhibitory effect that Fe(II) accumulation on oxide and DIRB cell surfaces has on Fe(III)-oxide reduction. In general our results suggest that although Fe(III)-oxide reduction is likely to dominate bulk Fe(III) reduction in most subsurface sediments, Fe

  17. Applying the Fe(III) binding property of a chemical transferrin mimetic to Ti(IV) anticancer drug design.

    PubMed

    Parks, Timothy B; Cruz, Yahaira M; Tinoco, Arthur D

    2014-02-03

    As an endogenous serum protein binder of Ti(IV), transferrin (Tf) serves as an excellent vehicle to stabilize the hydrolysis prone metal ion and successfully transport it into cells. This transporting role is thought to be central to Ti(IV)'s anticancer function, but efforts to synthesize Ti(IV) compounds targeting transferrin have not produced a drug. Nonetheless, the Ti(IV) transferrin complex (Ti2Tf) greatly informs on a new Ti(IV)-based anticancer drug design strategy. Ti2Tf interferes with cellular uptake of Fe(III), which is particularly detrimental to cancer cells because of their higher requirement for iron. Ti(IV) compounds of chemical transferrin mimetic (cTfm) ligands were designed to facilitate Ti(IV) activity by attenuating Fe(III) intracellular levels. In having a higher affinity for Fe(III) than Ti(IV), these ligands feature the appropriate balance between stability and lability to effectively transport Ti(IV) into cancer cells, release Ti(IV) via displacement by Fe(III), and deplete the intracellular Fe(III) levels. The cTfm ligand N,N'-di(o-hydroxybenzyl)ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid (HBED) was selected to explore the feasibility of the design strategy. Kinetic studies on the Fe(III) displacement process revealed that Ti(IV) can be transported and released into cells by HBED on a physiologically relevant time scale. Cell viability studies using A549 cancerous and MRC5 normal human lung cells and testing the cytotoxicity of HBED and its Ti(IV), Fe(III), and Ga(III) compounds demonstrate the importance of Fe(III) depletion in the proposed drug design strategy and the specificity of the strategy for Ti(IV) activity. The readily derivatized cTfm ligands demonstrate great promise for improved Ti(IV) anticancer drugs.

  18. Management issues for women with epilepsy--focus on pregnancy (an evidence-based review): III. Vitamin K, folic acid, blood levels, and breast-feeding: Report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee and Therapeutics and Technology Assessment Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the American Epilepsy Society.

    PubMed

    Harden, Cynthia L; Pennell, Page B; Koppel, Barbara S; Hovinga, Collin A; Gidal, Barry; Meador, Kimford J; Hopp, Jennifer; Ting, Tricia Y; Hauser, W A; Thurman, David; Kaplan, Peter W; Robinson, Julian N; French, Jacqueline A; Wiebe, Samuel; Wilner, Andrew N; Vazquez, Blanca; Holmes, Lewis; Krumholz, Allan; Finnell, Richard; Shafer, Patricia O; Le Guen, Claire L

    2009-05-01

    A committee assembled by the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) reassessed the evidence related to the care of women with epilepsy (WWE) during pregnancy, including preconceptional folic acid and prenatal vitamin K use and the clinical implications of placental and breast-milk transfer of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). The committee evaluated the available evidence based on a structured literature review and classification of relevant articles. Preconceptional folic acid supplementation is possibly effective in preventing major congenital malformations in the newborns of WWE taking AEDs. There is inadequate evidence to determine if the newborns of WWE taking AEDs have a substantially increased risk of hemorrhagic complications. Primidone and levetiracetam probably transfer into breast milk in clinically important amounts. Valproate, phenobarbital, phenytoin, and carbamazepine probably are not transferred into breast milk in clinically important amounts. Pregnancy probably causes an increase in the clearance and a decrease in the concentrations of lamotrigine, phenytoin, and, to a lesser extent carbamazepine, and possibly decreases the level of levetiracetam and the active oxcarbazepine metabolite, the monohydroxy derivative (MHD). Supplementing WWE with at least 0.4 mg of folic acid before pregnancy may be considered. Monitoring of lamotrigine, carbamazepine, and phenytoin levels during pregnancy should be considered, and monitoring of levetiracetam and oxcarbazepine (as MHD) levels may be considered. A paucity of evidence limited the strength of many recommendations.

  19. A spectrophotometric study of Nd(III), Sm(III) and Er(III) complexation in sulfate-bearing solutions at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migdisov, Art. A.; Williams-Jones, A. E.

    2008-11-01

    The speciation of Nd(III), Sm(III), and Er(III) in sulfate-bearing solutions has been determined spectrophotometrically at temperatures from 25 to 250 °C and a pressure of 100 bars. The data obtained earlier on the speciation of Nd in sulfate-bearing solutions ( Migdisov et al., 2006) have been re-evaluated and corrected using a more appropriate activity model and are compared with the corresponding data for Sm(III) and Er(III) and new data for Nd(III). Based on this comparison, the dominant species in the solution are interpreted to be REESO4+ and REE(SO)2-, with the latter complex increasing in importance at higher temperature. Equilibrium constants were calculated for the following reactions:

  20. Solvent extraction behaviour of lanthanum(III), cerium(III), europium(III), thorium(IV) and uranium(VI) with 3-phenyl-4-benzoyl-5-isoxazolone.

    PubMed

    Jyothi, A; Rao, G N

    1990-04-01

    The extraction behaviour of La(III), Ce(III), Eu(III), Th(IV) and U(VI) with 3-phenyl-4- benzoyl-5-isoxazolone (HPBI) in chloroform has been studied. The mechanism of extraction and the species extracted have been identified. Extraction constants for each system have been calculated. The system has been used to separate Th(IV) from U(VI) and from La(III), Ce(III) and Eu(III). A comparison of the extraction constants with those for the 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-5-pyrazolone (HPMBP) and thenoyltrifluoroacetone (HTTA) systems indicates that HPBI extracts these metal species better than HPMBP and HTTA do.

  1. Effects of Al(III) and nano-Al13 species on malate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaodi; Cai, Ling; Peng, Yu; Li, Huihui; Chen, Rong Fu; Shen, Ren Fang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of different aluminum species on malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity were investigated by monitoring amperometric i-t curves for the oxidation of NADH at low overpotential using a functionalized multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) modified glass carbon electrode (GCE). The results showed that Al(III) and Al(13) can activate the enzymatic activity of MDH, and the activation reaches maximum levels as the Al(III) and Al(13) concentration increase. Our study also found that the effects of Al(III) and Al(13) on the activity of MDH depended on the pH value and aluminum speciation. Electrochemical and circular dichroism spectra methods were applied to study the effects of nano-sized aluminum compounds on biomolecules.

  2. Effects of Al(III) and Nano-Al13 Species on Malate Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaodi; Cai, Ling; Peng, Yu; Li, Huihui; Chen, Rong Fu; Shen, Ren Fang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of different aluminum species on malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity were investigated by monitoring amperometric i-t curves for the oxidation of NADH at low overpotential using a functionalized multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) modified glass carbon electrode (GCE). The results showed that Al(III) and Al13 can activate the enzymatic activity of MDH, and the activation reaches maximum levels as the Al(III) and Al13 concentration increase. Our study also found that the effects of Al(III) and Al13 on the activity of MDH depended on the pH value and aluminum speciation. Electrochemical and circular dichroism spectra methods were applied to study the effects of nano-sized aluminum compounds on biomolecules. PMID:22163924

  3. Modeling rare earth complexes: Sparkle/PM3 parameters for thulium(III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, Ricardo O.; Rocha, Gerd B.; Simas, Alfredo M.

    2006-07-01

    The Sparkle model, recently defined for Tm(III) within AM1 [R.O. Freire, G.B. Rocha, A.M. Simas, Chem. Phys. Lett. 411 (2005) 61], is now extended to PM3. For the same 15 complexes previously used, the Sparkle/PM3 unsigned mean error, for all interatomic distances between the Tm(III) ion and the directly coordinating oxygen or nitrogen atoms, is 0.08 Å, a level of accuracy equivalent to the Sparkle/AM1 figure of 0.07 Å, as well as to results from present day ab initio effective core potential calculations. The results thus indicate that both Sparkle/AM1 and Sparkle/PM3 models may prove useful for luminescent Tm(III) complex design.

  4. TRLFS characterization of Eu(III)-doped synthetic organo-hectorite.

    PubMed

    Finck, Nicolas; Stumpf, Thorsten; Walther, Clemens; Bosbach, Dirk

    2008-12-12

    Europium(III) was coprecipitated with the clay mineral hectorite, a magnesian smectite, following a multi-step synthesis procedure. Different Eu(III) species associated with the proceeding synthetic hectorite were characterized by selectively exciting the 5D0-->7F0 transition at low temperature (T < 20 K). Fluorescence decay times indicated that Eu(III) ions may be incorporated in the octahedral layer of the brucite precursor as well as in the octahedral sheet of the clay mineral. The excitation spectra indicated that the substitution of the divalent Mg by the trivalent Eu induced local structural deformation. This investigation implements the molecular-level understanding of the f element structural incorporation into the octahedral layer of sheet silicates by coprecipitation with clay minerals from salt solutions at 100 degrees C.

  5. Dislocation effects in FinFETs for different III-V compound semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, Ji-Hyun; Jeon, Sanghun

    2016-04-01

    While Si-based devices are facing the limits of scaling, III-V materials, having high mobility, have attracted more and more attention. However, their advantages are obtained by ignoring the drawbacks of inevitably present dislocations. In this paper, we present a theoretical model that describes the degradation in carrier mobility caused by these inevitable charged dislocations in nanometer-sized, quantum-confined III-V compound semiconductor fin-shaped field effect transistors. We conclude that the Fermi-level pinning effect needs to be resolved to give carriers high enough energy (Fermi energy in the channel) to effectively ignore Coulomb scattering of charges at dislocations in a channel made by III-V compound semiconductors.

  6. Development and Evaluation of Adeno-HTLV-III Hybrid Virus and Non- Cytopathic HTLV-III Mutant for Vaccine Use

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-28

    AD_______________ DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF ADENO- HTLV -III HYBRID VIRUS AND NON- (V) CYTOPATHIC HTLV -III MUTANT FOR VACCINE USE Lf In Annual...Development and Evaluation of Adeno- HTLV -III Hybrid Virus and Non-Cytopathic HTLV -III Mutant for Vaccine Use 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Lubet, Martha Turner...HIV virus. Assessment of vaccine efficacy against the virus challenge will include T4/T8 ratios, Interleukin-2 production, HTLV -IJT serology and ability

  7. Hormone levels

    MedlinePlus

    Blood or urine tests can determine the levels of various hormones in the body. This includes reproductive hormones, thyroid hormones, adrenal hormones, pituitary hormones, and many others. For more information, see: ...

  8. Performance Evaluation and Parameter Identification on DROID III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumb, Julianna J.

    2011-01-01

    The DROID III project consisted of two main parts. The former, performance evaluation, focused on the performance characteristics of the aircraft such as lift to drag ratio, thrust required for level flight, and rate of climb. The latter, parameter identification, focused on finding the aerodynamic coefficients for the aircraft using a system that creates a mathematical model to match the flight data of doublet maneuvers and the aircraft s response. Both portions of the project called for flight testing and that data is now available on account of this project. The conclusion of the project is that the performance evaluation data is well-within desired standards but could be improved with a thrust model, and that parameter identification is still in need of more data processing but seems to produce reasonable results thus far.

  9. TRYPTOPHANASE-TRYPTOPHAN SYNTHETASE SYSTEMS IN ESCHERICHIA COLI III.

    PubMed Central

    Freundlich, Martin; Lichstein, Herman C.

    1962-01-01

    Freundlich, Martin (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis) and Herman C. Lichstein. Tryptophanase-tryptophan synthetase systems in Escherichia coli. III. Requirements for enzyme synthesis. J. Bacteriol. 84:996–1006. 1962.—The requirements for the formation of tryptophanase and tryptophan synthetase in Escherichia coli during repression release were studied. The kinetics of the formation of tryptophan synthetase differed in the two strains examined; this was attributed to differences in the endogenous level of tryptophan in the bacterial cells. The formation of both enzymes was inhibited by chloramphenicol, and by the absence of arginine in an arginine-requiring mutant. These results are indicative of a requirement for protein synthesis for enzyme formation. Requirements for nucleic acid synthesis were examined by use of a uracil- and thymine-requiring mutant, and with purine and pyrimidine analogues. The results obtained suggest that some type of ribonucleic acid synthesis was necessary for the formation of tryptophanase and tryptophan synthetase. PMID:13959620

  10. Characterization of the Type III restriction endonuclease PstII from Providencia stuartii.

    PubMed

    Sears, Alice; Peakman, Luke J; Wilson, Geoffrey G; Szczelkun, Mark D

    2005-01-01

    A new Type III restriction endonuclease designated PstII has been purified from Providencia stuartii. PstII recognizes the hexanucleotide sequence 5'-CTGATG(N)(25-26/27-28)-3'. Endonuclease activity requires a substrate with two copies of the recognition site in head-to-head repeat and is dependent on a low level of ATP hydrolysis ( approximately 40 ATP/site/min). Cleavage occurs at just one of the two sites and results in a staggered cut 25-26 nt downstream of the top strand sequence to generate a two base 5'-protruding end. Methylation of the site occurs on one strand only at the first adenine of 5'-CATCAG-3'. Therefore, PstII has characteristic Type III restriction enzyme activity as exemplified by EcoPI or EcoP15I. Moreover, sequence asymmetry of the PstII recognition site in the T7 genome acts as an historical imprint of Type III restriction activity in vivo. In contrast to other Type I and III enzymes, PstII has a more relaxed nucleotide specificity and can cut DNA with GTP and CTP (but not UTP). We also demonstrate that PstII and EcoP15I cannot interact and cleave a DNA substrate suggesting that Type III enzymes must make specific protein-protein contacts to activate endonuclease activity.

  11. Evaluation of Oxygen Interactions with Materials III -- mission and induced environments

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, S.L.; Leger, L.J.; Rickman, S.L.; Cross, J.B.; Hakes, C.L.; Bui, D.T.

    1994-04-01

    The Evaluation of Oxygen Interactions with Materials III (EOIM-III) flight experiment was developed to obtain benchmark atomic oxygen/material reactivity data. The experiment was conducted during Space Shuttle mission 46 (STS-46), which flew July 31 to August 7, 1992. Quantitative interpretation of the materials reactivity measurements requires a complete and accurate definition of the space environment exposure, including the thermal history of the payload was measured using twelve thermocouple sensors placed behind selected samples and on the EOIM-III payload structure. The solar ultraviolet exposure history of the EOIM-III payload was determined by analysis of the as-flown orbit and vehicle attitude combined with daily average solar ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet (UV/VUV) fluxes. The atomic oxygen fluence was assessed in three different ways. First, the O-atom fluence was calculated using a program that incorporates the MSIS-86 atmospheric model, the as-flown Space Shuttle trajectory, and solar activity parameters. Second, the oxygen atom fluence was estimated directly from Kapton film erosion. Third, ambient oxygen atom measurements were made using the quadrupole mass spectrometer on the EOIM-III payload. The best estimate of the oxygen atom fluence as of this writing is 2.3 {+-} 0.3 {times} 10{sup 20} atoms per square centimeter. Finally, results of post-flight X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) surface analyses of selected samples indicate low levels of contamination on the payload surface.

  12. Does As(III) interact with Fe(II), Fe(III) and organic matter through ternary complexes?

    PubMed

    Catrouillet, Charlotte; Davranche, Mélanie; Dia, Aline; Bouhnik-Le Coz, Martine; Demangeat, Edwige; Gruau, Gérard

    2016-05-15

    Up until now, only a small number of studies have been dedicated to the binding processes of As(III) with organic matter (OM) via ionic Fe(III) bridges; none was interested in Fe (II). Complexation isotherms were carried out with As(III), Fe(II) or Fe(III) and Leonardite humic acid (HA). Although PHREEQC/Model VI, implemented with OM thiol groups, reproduced the experimental datasets with Fe(III), the poor fit between the experimental and modeled Fe(II) data suggested another binding mechanism for As(III) to OM. PHREEQC/Model VI was modified to take various possible As(III)-Fe(II)-OM ternary complex conformations into account. The complexation of As(III) as a mononuclear bidentate complex to a bidentate Fe(II)-HA complex was evidenced. However, the model needed to be improved since the distribution of the bidentate sites appeared to be unrealistic with regards to the published XAS data. In the presence of Fe(III), As(III) was bound to thiol groups which are more competitive with regards to the low density of formed Fe(III)-HA complexes. Based on the new data and previously published results, we propose a general scheme describing the various As(III)-Fe-MO complexes that are able to form in Fe and OM-rich waters.

  13. Production of fine structures in type III solar radio bursts due to turbulent density profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Loi, Shyeh Tjing; Cairns, Iver H.; Li, Bo

    2014-07-20

    Magnetic reconnection events in the corona release energetic electron beams along open field lines, and the beams generate radio emission at multiples of the electron plasma frequency f{sub p} to produce type III solar radio bursts. Type III bursts often exhibit irregularities in the form of flux modulations with frequency and/or local temporal advances and delays, and a type IIIb burst represents the extreme case where a type III burst is fragmented into a chain of narrowband features called striae. Remote and in situ spacecraft measurements have shown that density turbulence is ubiquitous in the corona and solar wind, and often exhibits a Kolmogorov power spectrum. In this work, we numerically investigate the effects of one-dimensional macroscopic density turbulence (along the beam direction) on the behavior of type III bursts, and find that this turbulence produces stria-like fine structures in the dynamic spectra of both f{sub p} and 2 f{sub p} radiation. Spectral and temporal fine structures in the predicted type III emission are produced by variations in the scattering path lengths and group speeds of radio emission, and in the locations and sizes of emitting volumes. Moderate turbulence levels yield flux enhancements with much broader half-power bandwidths in f{sub p} than 2 f{sub p} emission, possibly explaining the often observed type IIIb-III harmonic pairs as being where intensifications in 2 f{sub p} radiation are not resolved observationally. Larger turbulence levels producing trough-peak regions in the plasma density profile may lead to broader, resolvable intensifications in 2 f{sub p} radiation, which may account for the type IIIb-IIIb pairs that are sometimes observed.

  14. The role of Ce(III) in BZ oscillating reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, Paulo A.; Varela, Hamilton; Faria, Roberto B.

    2012-03-01

    Herein we present results on the oscillatory dynamics in the bromate-oxalic acid-acetone-Ce(III)/Ce(IV) system in batch and also in a CSTR. We show that Ce(III) is the necessary reactant to allow the emergence of oscillations. In batch, oscillations occur with Ce(III) and also with Ce(IV), but no induction period is observed with Ce(III). In a CSTR, no oscillations were found using a freshly prepared Ce(IV), but only when the cerium-containing solution was aged, allowing partial conversion of Ce(IV) to Ce(III) by reaction with acetone.

  15. Removal of arsenic(III) and arsenic(IV) ions from aqueous solutions with lanthanum(III) salt and comparison with aluminum(III), calcium(II), and iron(III) salts

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, S.; Yokoyama, S.; Wasay, S.A.

    1999-05-01

    Interactions of arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) ions with a lanthanum salt were studied with the aim of developing a new precipitation method for removal of arsenic from aqueous solutions. Performance was compared to those of aluminum, polyaluminum chloride (PAC), calcium, and iron(III) salts. Arsenic(III) was removed by iron(III) and lanthanum in a narrow pH range with less than 605 removal. Arsenic(V) was removed more efficiently by aluminum, PAC, iron(III), and lanthanum. Lanthanum was most effective, meeting Japanese effluent and drinking water standards by adding three times as much lanthanum as arsenic(V).

  16. Methods of Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis III (PIOPED III).

    PubMed

    Stein, Paul D; Gottschalk, Alexander; Sostman, H Dirk; Chenevert, Thomas L; Fowler, Sarah E; Goodman, Lawrence R; Hales, Charles A; Hull, Russell D; Kanal, Emanuel; Leeper, Kenneth V; Nadich, David P; Sak, Daniel J; Tapson, Victor F; Wakefield, Thomas W; Weg, John G; Woodard, Pamela K

    2008-11-01

    In this work, the methods of the Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis III (PIOPED III) are described in detail. PIOPED III is a multicenter collaborative investigation sponsored by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. The purpose is to determine the accuracy of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in combination with venous phase magnetic resonance venography for the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism (PE). A composite reference standard based on usual diagnostic methods for PE is used. All images will be read by 2 blinded and study-certified central readers. Patients with no PE according to the composite reference test will be randomized to undergo gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in combination with venous phase magnetic resonance venography. This procedure will reduce the proportion of patients with negative tests at no loss in evaluation of sensitivity and specificity.

  17. Methods of Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis III (PIOPED III)

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Paul D.; Gottschalk, Alexander; Sostman, H. Dirk; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Fowler, Sarah E.; Goodman, Lawrence R.; Hales, Charles A.; Hull, Russell D.; Kanal, Emanuel; Leeper, Kenneth V.; Nadich, David P.; Sak, Daniel J; Tapson, Victor F.; Wakefield, Thomas W.; Weg, John G.; Woodard, Pamela K.

    2008-01-01

    The methods of the Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis III (PIOPED III) are described in detail. PIOPED III is a multicenter collaborative investigation sponsored by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. The purpose is to determine the accuracy of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (Gd-MRA) in combination with venous phase magnetic resonance venography (Gd-MRV) for the diagnosis for acute pulmonary embolism (PE). A composite reference standard based on usual diagnostic methods for pulmonary embolism is used. All images will be read by two blinded and study-certified central readers. Patients with no PE according to the composite reference test will be randomized to undergo Gd-MRA/MRV. This will reduce the proportion of patients with negative tests at no loss in evaluation of sensitivity and specificity. PMID:19331840

  18. Decorating the lanthanide terminus of self-assembled heterodinuclear lanthanum(III)/gallium(III) helicates.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Markus; Latorre, Irene; Mehmeti, Gent; Hengst, Konstantin; Oppel, Iris M

    2011-12-07

    Arylacylhydrazones of 2,3-dihydroxybenzaldehyde are appropriate ligands for the preparation of heterodinuclear triple-stranded helicates involving high coordinated lanthanide(III) ions. In the present study, three different kinds of substituents are introduced at the ligands in order to modify the organic periphery of the coordination compounds: (1) alkoxy groups are attached to the terminal phenyl groups, (2) NH protons of the hydrazones are substituted by phenyl moieties and (3) amino acid bearing units are attached to the terminus of the ligand. The new ligands nicely form the desired triple-stranded gallium(III)-lanthanum(III) complexes [(5a-c,7,12,15)(3)GaLa] of which the highly phenylated derivative was crystallized and studied by X-ray diffraction.

  19. A binuclear Fe(III)Dy(III) single molecule magnet. Quantum effects and models.

    PubMed

    Ferbinteanu, Marilena; Kajiwara, Takashi; Choi, Kwang-Yong; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Nakamoto, Akio; Kojima, Norimichi; Cimpoesu, Fanica; Fujimura, Yuichi; Takaishi, Shinya; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2006-07-19

    The binuclear [FeIII(bpca)(mu-bpca)Dy(NO3)4], having Single Molecule Magnet (SMM) properties, belonging to a series of isostructural FeIIILnIII complexes (Ln = Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho) and closely related FeIILnIII chain structures, was characterized in concise experimental and theoretical respects. The low temperature magnetization data showed hysteresis and tunneling. The anomalous temperature dependence of Mössbauer spectra is related to the onset of magnetic order, consistent with the magnetization relaxation time scale resulting from AC susceptibility measurements. The advanced ab initio calculations (CASSCF and spin-orbit) revealed the interplay of ligand field, spin-orbit, and exchange effects and probed the effective Ising nature of the lowest states, involved in the SMM and tunneling effects.

  20. Solubility of Fe(III) in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millero, Frank J.

    1998-01-01

    Recently Kuma et al. [K. Kuma, J. Nishioka, K. Matsunaga, Controls on iron (III) hydroxide solubility in seawater: The influence of pH and natural organic chelators, Limnol. Oceanogr. 41 (1996) 396-407] made some careful measurements of the solubility of Fe(III) in UV and non-UV irradiated seawater as a function of pH (5-8). They showed that organic compounds can increase the solubility (32-65%) at pH=8.1, apparently due to the formation of Fe(III) organic complexes. In this paper I have examined how these results can be quantified using a speciation model for Fe(III). The results indicate that the effect of pH (2-9) on coastal and open ocean waters by Kuma et al. and the earlier filtration measurement of Byrne and Kester [R.H. Byrne, D.R. Kester, Solubility of hydrous ferric oxide and iron speciation in sea water, Mar. Chem. 4 (1976) 255-274] can be adequately represented by considering the formation of FeOH 2+ and Fe(OH) 2+ using the hydrolysis constants ( K ∗1=10 -2.62, K ∗2=10 -6.0) determined by Millero et al. [F.J. Millero, W. Yao, J. Aicher, The speciation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) in natural waters, Mar. Chem. 50 (1995) 21-39]. The solubility measurements [Kuma et al., 1996] on unaltered coastal and open ocean waters appear to require the consideration of the formation of Fe(OH) 30 ( K ∗3=10 -13.3-10 -14.3). A more careful look at these measurements indicates that the curvature between pH 7 and 8 can be attributed to the formation of complexes of Fe 3+ with organic ligands (FeL). Model speciation calculations (pH 6-8) yield total ligand concentrations of [L] T=1.2 nM and 0.17 nM for unaltered coastal and open ocean waters, respectively, assuming K' FeL=10 21. These estimates are in good agreement with the values found for ocean waters by voltammetric methods. The model calculations for the solubility of Fe(III) (0.2 nM at pH=8.1 and 0.6 nM at pH=7.65) are in good agreement with measured open ocean surface (0.2 nM) and deep waters (0.6 nM) determined by